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Sample records for acoustic wave propagates

  1. Radio wave propagation and acoustic sounding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singal, S. P.

    Radio wave propagation of the decimetric and centimetric waves depends to a large extent on the boundary layer meteorological conditions which give rise to severe fadings, very often due to multipath propagation. Sodar is one of the inexpensive remote sensing techniques which can be employed to probe the boundary layer structure. In the paper a historical perspective has been given of the simultaneously conducted studies on radio waves and sodar at various places. The radio meteorological information needed for propagation studies has been clearly spelt out and conditions of a ray path especially in the presence of a ducting layer have been defined as giving rise to fading or signal enhancement conditions. Finally the potential of the sodar studies to obtain information about the boundary layer phenomena has been stressed, clearly spelling out the use of acoustic sounding in radio wave propagation studies.

  2. Propagation characteristics of acoustic waves in snow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capelli, Achille; Kapil, Jagdish Chandra; Reiweger, Ingrid; Schweizer, Jürg; Or, Dani

    2015-04-01

    Acoustic emission analysis is a promising technique for monitoring snow slope stability with potential for application in early warning systems for avalanches. Current research efforts focus on identification and localization of acoustic emission features preceding snow failure and avalanches. However, our knowledge of sound propagation characteristics in snow is still limited. A review of previous studies showed that significant gaps exist and that the results of the various studies are partly contradictory. Furthermore, sound velocity and attenuation have been determined for the frequency range below 10 kHz, while recent snow failure experiments suggest that the peak frequency is in the ultrasound range between 30 kHz to 500 kHz. We therefore studied the propagation of pencil lead fracture (PLF) signals through snow in the ultrasound frequency range. This was achieved by performing laboratory experiments with columns of artificially produced snow of varying density and temperature. The attenuation constant was obtained by varying the size of the columns to eliminate possible influences of the snow-sensor coupling. The attenuation constant was measured for the entire PLF burst signal and for single frequency components. The propagation velocity was calculated from the arrival time of the acoustic signal. We then modelled the sound propagation for our experimental setup using Biot's model for wave propagation in porous media. The Model results were in good agreement with our experimental results. For the studied samples, the acoustic signals propagated as fast and slow longitudinal waves, but the main part of the energy was carried by the slow waves. The Young's modulus of our snow samples was determined from the sound velocity. This is highly relevant, as the elastic properties of snow are not well known.

  3. Nonlinear acoustic wave propagation in atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hariharan, S. I.

    1985-01-01

    A model problem that simulates an atmospheric acoustic wave propagation situation that is nonlinear is considered. The model is derived from the basic Euler equations for the atmospheric flow and from the regular perturbations for the acoustic part. The nonlinear effects are studied by obtaining two successive linear problems in which the second one involves the solution of the first problem. Well posedness of these problems is discussed and approximations of the radiation boundary conditions that can be used in numerical simulations are presented.

  4. Nonlinear acoustic wave propagation in atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hariharan, S. I.

    1986-01-01

    In this paper a model problem is considered that simulates an atmospheric acoustic wave propagation situation that is nonlinear. The model is derived from the basic Euler equations for the atmospheric flow and from the regular perturbations for the acoustic part. The nonlinear effects are studied by obtaining two successive linear problems in which the second one involves the solution of the first problem. Well-posedness of these problems is discussed and approximations of the radiation boundary conditions that can be used in numerical simulations are presented.

  5. Surface acoustic wave propagation in graphene film

    SciTech Connect

    Roshchupkin, Dmitry Plotitcyna, Olga; Matveev, Viktor; Kononenko, Oleg; Emelin, Evgenii; Irzhak, Dmitry; Ortega, Luc; Zizak, Ivo; Erko, Alexei; Tynyshtykbayev, Kurbangali; Insepov, Zinetula

    2015-09-14

    Surface acoustic wave (SAW) propagation in a graphene film on the surface of piezoelectric crystals was studied at the BESSY II synchrotron radiation source. Talbot effect enabled the visualization of the SAW propagation on the crystal surface with the graphene film in a real time mode, and high-resolution x-ray diffraction permitted the determination of the SAW amplitude in the graphene/piezoelectric crystal system. The influence of the SAW on the electrical properties of the graphene film was examined. It was shown that the changing of the SAW amplitude enables controlling the magnitude and direction of current in graphene film on the surface of piezoelectric crystals.

  6. Linear and nonlinear acoustic wave propagation in the atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hariharan, S. I.; Yu, Ping

    1988-01-01

    The investigation of the acoustic wave propagation theory and numerical implementation for the situation of an isothermal atmosphere is described. A one-dimensional model to validate an asymptotic theory and a 3-D situation to relate to a realistic situation are considered. In addition, nonlinear wave propagation and the numerical treatment are included. It is known that the gravitational effects play a crucial role in the low frequency acoustic wave propagation. They propagate large distances and, as such, the numerical treatment of those problems become difficult in terms of posing boundary conditions which are valid for all frequencies.

  7. Spectral solution of acoustic wave-propagation problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopriva, David A.

    1990-01-01

    The Chebyshev spectral collocation solution of acoustic wave propagation problems is considered. It is shown that the phase errors decay exponentially fast and that the number of points per wavelength is not sufficient to estimate the phase accuracy. Applications include linear propagation of a sinusoidal acoustic wavetrain in two space dimensions, and the interaction of a sound wave with the bow shock formed by placing a cylinder in a uniform Mach 4 supersonic free stream.

  8. Wave envelopes method for description of nonlinear acoustic wave propagation.

    PubMed

    Wójcik, J; Nowicki, A; Lewin, P A; Bloomfield, P E; Kujawska, T; Filipczyński, L

    2006-07-01

    A novel, free from paraxial approximation and computationally efficient numerical algorithm capable of predicting 4D acoustic fields in lossy and nonlinear media from arbitrary shaped sources (relevant to probes used in medical ultrasonic imaging and therapeutic systems) is described. The new WE (wave envelopes) approach to nonlinear propagation modeling is based on the solution of the second order nonlinear differential wave equation reported in [J. Wójcik, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 104 (1998) 2654-2663; V.P. Kuznetsov, Akust. Zh. 16 (1970) 548-553]. An incremental stepping scheme allows for forward wave propagation. The operator-splitting method accounts independently for the effects of full diffraction, absorption and nonlinear interactions of harmonics. The WE method represents the propagating pulsed acoustic wave as a superposition of wavelet-like sinusoidal pulses with carrier frequencies being the harmonics of the boundary tone burst disturbance. The model is valid for lossy media, arbitrarily shaped plane and focused sources, accounts for the effects of diffraction and can be applied to continuous as well as to pulsed waves. Depending on the source geometry, level of nonlinearity and frequency bandwidth, in comparison with the conventional approach the Time-Averaged Wave Envelopes (TAWE) method shortens computational time of the full 4D nonlinear field calculation by at least an order of magnitude; thus, predictions of nonlinear beam propagation from complex sources (such as phased arrays) can be available within 30-60 min using only a standard PC. The approximate ratio between the computational time costs obtained by using the TAWE method and the conventional approach in calculations of the nonlinear interactions is proportional to 1/N2, and in memory consumption to 1/N where N is the average bandwidth of the individual wavelets. Numerical computations comparing the spatial field distributions obtained by using both the TAWE method and the conventional approach

  9. Nonlinear propagation and control of acoustic waves in phononic superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez, Noé; Mehrem, Ahmed; Picó, Rubén; García-Raffi, Lluís M.; Sánchez-Morcillo, Víctor J.

    2016-05-01

    The propagation of intense acoustic waves in a one-dimensional phononic crystal is studied. The medium consists in a structured fluid, formed by a periodic array of fluid layers with alternating linear acoustic properties and quadratic nonlinearity coefficient. The spacing between layers is of the order of the wavelength, therefore Bragg effects such as band gaps appear. We show that the interplay between strong dispersion and nonlinearity leads to new scenarios of wave propagation. The classical waveform distortion process typical of intense acoustic waves in homogeneous media can be strongly altered when nonlinearly generated harmonics lie inside or close to band gaps. This allows the possibility of engineer a medium in order to get a particular waveform. Examples of this include the design of media with effective (e.g., cubic) nonlinearities, or extremely linear media (where distortion can be canceled). The presented ideas open a way towards the control of acoustic wave propagation in nonlinear regime. xml:lang="fr"

  10. Estimating propagation velocity through a surface acoustic wave sensor

    DOEpatents

    Xu, Wenyuan; Huizinga, John S.

    2010-03-16

    Techniques are described for estimating the propagation velocity through a surface acoustic wave sensor. In particular, techniques which measure and exploit a proper segment of phase frequency response of the surface acoustic wave sensor are described for use as a basis of bacterial detection by the sensor. As described, use of velocity estimation based on a proper segment of phase frequency response has advantages over conventional techniques that use phase shift as the basis for detection.

  11. Propagation of plate acoustic waves in contact with fluid medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghatadi Suraji, Nagaraj

    The characteristics of acoustic waves propagating in thin piezoelectric plates in the presence of a fluid medium contacting one or both of the plate surfaces are investigated. If the velocity of plate wave in the substrate is greater than velocity of bulk wave in the fluid, then a plate acoustic wave (PAW) traveling in the substrate will radiate a bulk acoustic wave (BAW) in the fluid. It is found that, under proper conditions, efficient conversion of energy from plate acoustic waves to bulk acoustic waves and vice versa can be obtained. For example, using the fundamental anti symmetric plate wave mode (A0 mode) propagating in a lithium niobate substrate and water as the fluid, total mode conversion loss (PAW to BAW and back from BAW to PAW) of less than 3 dB has been obtained. This mode conversion principle can be used to realize miniature, high efficiency transducers for use in ultrasonic flow meters. Similar type of transducer based on conversion of energy from surface acoustic wave (SAW) to bulk acoustic wave (BAW) has been developed previously. The use of plate waves has several advantages. Since the energy of plate waves is present on both plate surfaces, the inter digital transducer (IDT) can be on the surface opposite from that which is in contact with the fluid. This protects the IDT from possible damage due to the fluid and also simplifies the job of making electrical connections to the IDT. Another advantage is that one has wider choice of substrate materials with plate waves than is the case with SAWs. Preliminary calculations indicate that the mode conversion principle can also be used to generate and detect ultrasonic waves in air. This has potential applications for realizing transducers for use in non-contact ultrasonic's. The design of an ASIC (Application Specific Integrated Circuit) chip containing an amplifier and frequency counter for use with ultrasonic transducers is also presented in this thesis.

  12. Backward propagating acoustic waves in single gold nanobeams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jean, Cyril; Belliard, Laurent; Becerra, Loïc; Perrin, Bernard

    2015-11-01

    Femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy has been carried out on suspended gold nanostructures with a rectangular cross section lithographed on a silicon substrate. With a thickness fixed to 110 nm and a width ranging from 200 nm to 800 nm , size dependent measurements are used to distinguish which confined acoustic modes are detected. Furthermore, in order to avoid any ambiguity due to the measurement uncertainties on both the frequency and size, pump and probe beams are also spatially shifted to detect guided acoustic phonons. This leads us to the observation of backward propagating acoustic phonons in the gigahertz range ( ˜3 GHz ) in such nanostructures. While backward wave propagation in elastic waveguides has been predicted and already observed at the macroscale, very few studies have been done at the nanoscale. Here, we show that these backward waves can be used as the unique signature of the width dilatational acoustic mode.

  13. Corrigendum and addendum. Modeling weakly nonlinear acoustic wave propagation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Christov, Ivan; Christov, C. I.; Jordan, P. M.

    2014-12-18

    This article presents errors, corrections, and additions to the research outlined in the following citation: Christov, I., Christov, C. I., & Jordan, P. M. (2007). Modeling weakly nonlinear acoustic wave propagation. The Quarterly Journal of Mechanics and Applied Mathematics, 60(4), 473-495.

  14. Numerical modelling of nonlinear full-wave acoustic propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velasco-Segura, Roberto; Rendón, Pablo L.

    2015-10-01

    The various model equations of nonlinear acoustics are arrived at by making assumptions which permit the observation of the interaction with propagation of either single or joint effects. We present here a form of the conservation equations of fluid dynamics which are deduced using slightly less restrictive hypothesis than those necessary to obtain the well known Westervelt equation. This formulation accounts for full wave diffraction, nonlinearity, and thermoviscous dissipative effects. A two-dimensional, finite-volume method using Roe's linearisation has been implemented to obtain numerically the solution of the proposed equations. This code, which has been written for parallel execution on a GPU, can be used to describe moderate nonlinear phenomena, at low Mach numbers, in domains as large as 100 wave lengths. Applications range from models of diagnostic and therapeutic HIFU, to parametric acoustic arrays and nonlinear propagation in acoustic waveguides. Examples related to these applications are shown and discussed.

  15. Numerical modelling of nonlinear full-wave acoustic propagation

    SciTech Connect

    Velasco-Segura, Roberto Rendón, Pablo L.

    2015-10-28

    The various model equations of nonlinear acoustics are arrived at by making assumptions which permit the observation of the interaction with propagation of either single or joint effects. We present here a form of the conservation equations of fluid dynamics which are deduced using slightly less restrictive hypothesis than those necessary to obtain the well known Westervelt equation. This formulation accounts for full wave diffraction, nonlinearity, and thermoviscous dissipative effects. A two-dimensional, finite-volume method using Roe’s linearisation has been implemented to obtain numerically the solution of the proposed equations. This code, which has been written for parallel execution on a GPU, can be used to describe moderate nonlinear phenomena, at low Mach numbers, in domains as large as 100 wave lengths. Applications range from models of diagnostic and therapeutic HIFU, to parametric acoustic arrays and nonlinear propagation in acoustic waveguides. Examples related to these applications are shown and discussed.

  16. Propagation of acoustic pulses in random gravity wave fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millet, Christophe; de La Camara, Alvaro; Lott, François

    2015-11-01

    A linear solution modeling the interaction between an incoming acoustic wave and a randomly perturbed atmosphere is developed, using the normal mode method. The wave mode structure is determined by a sound speed profile that is confining. The environmental uncertainty is described by a stochastic field obtained with a multiwave stochastic parameterization of gravity waves (GW). Using the propagating modes of the unperturbed atmosphere, the wave propagation problem is reduced to solving a system of ordinary differential equations. We focus on the asymptotic behavior of the transmitted waves in the weakly heterogeneous regime. In this regime, the coupling between the acoustic pulse and the randomly perturbed waveguides is weak and the propagation distance must be large enough for the wave to experience significant scattering. A general expression for the pressure far-field is derived in terms of saddle-point contributions. The saddle-points are obtained from a WKB approximation of the vertical eigenvalue problem. We present preliminary results that show how statistics of the transmitted signal are related to some eigenvalues and how an ``optimal'' GW field can trigger large deviations in the acoustic signals. The present model is used to explain the variability of infrasound signals.

  17. Observations of acoustic surface waves in outdoor sound propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert, Donald G.

    2003-05-01

    Acoustic surface waves have been detected propagating outdoors under natural conditions. Two critical experimental conditions were employed to ensure the conclusive detection of these waves. First, acoustic pulses rather than a continuous wave source allowed an examination of the waveform shape and avoided the masking of wave arrivals. Second, a snow cover provided favorable ground impedance conditions for surface waves to exist. The acoustic pulses were generated by blank pistol shots fired 1 m above the snow. The resultant waveforms were measured using a vertical array of six microphones located 60 m away from the source at heights between 0.1 and 4.75 m. A strong, low frequency ``tail'' following the initial arrival was recorded near the snow surface. This tail, and its exponential decay with height (z) above the surface (~e-αz), are diagnostic features of surface waves. The measured attenuation coefficient α was 0.28 m-1. The identification of the surface wave is confirmed by comparing the measured waveforms with waveforms predicted by the theoretical evaluation of the explicit surface wave pole term using residue theory.

  18. Propagation of three-dimensional electron-acoustic solitary waves

    SciTech Connect

    Shalaby, M.; El-Sherif, L. S.; El-Labany, S. K.; Sabry, R.

    2011-06-15

    Theoretical investigation is carried out for understanding the properties of three-dimensional electron-acoustic waves propagating in magnetized plasma whose constituents are cold magnetized electron fluid, hot electrons obeying nonthermal distribution, and stationary ions. For this purpose, the hydrodynamic equations for the cold magnetized electron fluid, nonthermal electron density distribution, and the Poisson equation are used to derive the corresponding nonlinear evolution equation, Zkharov-Kuznetsov (ZK) equation, in the small- but finite- amplitude regime. The ZK equation is solved analytically and it is found that it supports both solitary and blow-up solutions. It is found that rarefactive electron-acoustic solitary waves strongly depend on the density and temperature ratios of the hot-to-cold electron species as well as the nonthermal electron parameter. Furthermore, there is a critical value for the nonthermal electron parameter, which decides whether the electron-acoustic solitary wave's amplitude is decreased or increased by changing various plasma parameters. Importantly, the change of the propagation angles leads to miss the balance between the nonlinearity and dispersion; hence, the localized pulses convert to explosive/blow-up pulses. The relevance of this study to the nonlinear electron-acoustic structures in the dayside auroral zone in the light of Viking satellite observations is discussed.

  19. Longitudinal elastic wave propagation characteristics of inertant acoustic metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, Prateek P.; Manimala, James M.

    2016-06-01

    Longitudinal elastic wave propagation characteristics of acoustic metamaterials with various inerter configurations are investigated using their representative one-dimensional discrete element lattice models. Inerters are dynamic mass-amplifying mechanical elements that are activated by a difference in acceleration across them. They have a small device mass but can provide a relatively large dynamic mass presence depending on accelerations in systems that employ them. The effect of introducing inerters both in local attachments and in the lattice was examined vis-à-vis the propagation characteristics of locally resonant acoustic metamaterials. A simple effective model based on mass, stiffness, or their combined equivalent was used to establish dispersion behavior and quantify attenuation within bandgaps. Depending on inerter configurations in local attachments or in the lattice, both up-shift and down-shift in the bandgap frequency range and their extent are shown to be possible while retaining static mass addition to the host structure to a minimum. Further, frequency-dependent negative and even extreme effective-stiffness regimes are encountered. The feasibility of employing tuned combinations of such mass-delimited inertant configurations to engineer acoustic metamaterials that act as high-pass filters without the use of grounded elements or even as complete longitudinal wave inhibitors is shown. Potential device implications and strategies for practical applications are also discussed.

  20. Determination of particle size distributions from acoustic wave propagation measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Spelt, P.D.; Norato, M.A.; Sangani, A.S.; Tavlarides, L.L.

    1999-05-01

    The wave equations for the interior and exterior of the particles are ensemble averaged and combined with an analysis by Allegra and Hawley [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. {bold 51}, 1545 (1972)] for the interaction of a single particle with the incident wave to determine the phase speed and attenuation of sound waves propagating through dilute slurries. The theory is shown to compare very well with the measured attenuation. The inverse problem, i.e., the problem of determining the particle size distribution given the attenuation as a function of frequency, is examined using regularization techniques that have been successful for bubbly liquids. It is shown that, unlike the bubbly liquids, the success of solving the inverse problem is limited since it depends strongly on the nature of particles and the frequency range used in inverse calculations. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  1. A superconducting qubit coupled to propagating acoustic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gustafsson, Martin V.; Aref, Thomas; Frisk Kockum, Anton; Ekström, Maria K.; Johansson, Göran; Delsing, Per

    2015-03-01

    Mechanical devices in the quantum regime have so far consisted mainly of suspended resonators, where standing modes can be populated with quanta of vibrational energy. We present a fundamentally different system, where the mechanical excitation is not restricted to a specific mode and location. Instead, we demonstrate strong non-classical coupling between propagating phonons and a superconducting qubit. The qubit is fabricated on a piezoelectric substrate, and is designed to interact with Surface Acoustic Waves (SAWs) in the gigahertz frequency range. A separate on-chip transducer allows us to launch SAWs toward the qubit from a distance and pick up SAW phonons that the qubit reflects and emits. In a series of experiments where the qubit is addressed both electrically and acoustically, we show that the qubit couples much more strongly to SAWs than to any electrical modes. The low speed of sound sets phonons apart from photons as a medium for transporting quantum information, and should enable real-time manipulation of propagating quanta. The short acoustic wavelength and strong piezoelectric coupling should also allows regimes of interaction to be explored which cannot be reached in photonic systems.

  2. Sources and propagation of atmospherical acoustic shock waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coulouvrat, François

    2012-09-01

    Sources of aerial shock waves are numerous and produce acoustical signals that propagate in the atmosphere over long ranges, with a wide frequency spectrum ranging from infrasonic to audible, and with a complex human response. They can be of natural origin, like meteors, lightning or volcanoes, or human-made as for explosions, so-called "buzz-saw noise" (BSN) from aircraft engines or sonic booms. Their description, modeling and data analysis within the viewpoint of nonlinear acoustics will be the topic of the present lecture, with focus on two main points: the challenges of the source description, and the main features of nonlinear atmospheric propagation. Inter-disciplinary aspects, with links to atmospheric and geo-sciences will be outlined. Detailed description of the source is very dependent on its nature. Mobile supersonic sources can be rotating (fan blades of aircraft engines) or in translation (meteors, sonic boom). Mach numbers range from transonic to hypersonic. Detailed knowledge of geometry is critical for the processes of boom minimization and audible frequency spectrum of BSN. Sources of geophysical nature are poorly known, and various mechanisms for explaining infrasound recorded from meteors or thunderstorms have been proposed. Comparison between recorded data and modeling may be one way to discriminate between them. Moreover, the nearfield of these sources is frequently beyond the limits of acoustical approximation, or too complex for simple modeling. A proper numerical description hence requires specific matching procedures between nearfield behavior and farfield propagation. Nonlinear propagation in the atmosphere is dominated by temperature and wind stratification. Ray theory is an efficient way to analyze observations, but is invalid in various situations. Nonlinear effects are enhanced locally at caustics, or in case of grazing propagation over a rigid surface. Absorption, which controls mostly the high frequency part of the spectrum contained

  3. Controlling acoustic-wave propagation through material anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tehranian, Aref; Amirkhizi, Alireza V.; Irion, Jeffrey; Isaacs, Jon; Nemat-Nasser, Sia

    2009-03-01

    Acoustic-wave velocity is strongly direction dependent in an anisotropic medium. This can be used to design composites with preferred acoustic-energy transport characteristics. In a unidirectional fiber-glass composite, for example, the preferred direction corresponds to the fiber orientation which is associated with the highest stiffness and which can be used to guide the momentum and energy of the acoustic waves either away from or toward a region within the material, depending on whether one wishes to avoid or harvest the corresponding stress waves. The main focus of this work is to illustrate this phenomenon using numerical simulations and then check the results experimentally.

  4. Numerical and experimental study of Lamb wave propagation in a two-dimensional acoustic black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Shiling; Lomonosov, Alexey M.; Shen, Zhonghua

    2016-06-01

    The propagation of laser-generated Lamb waves in a two-dimensional acoustic black-hole structure was studied numerically and experimentally. The geometrical acoustic theory has been applied to calculate the beam trajectories in the region of the acoustic black hole. The finite element method was also used to study the time evolution of propagating waves. An optical system based on the laser-Doppler vibration method was assembled. The effect of the focusing wave and the reduction in wave speed of the acoustic black hole has been validated.

  5. Observations of vertically propagating driven dust acoustic waves: Finite temperature effects

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Jeremiah D.; Thomas, Edward Jr.; Marcus, Lydia

    2008-04-15

    In this study, the first measurement of the dispersion relationship for a vertically propagating (i.e., parallel to gravity), driven dust acoustic wave is reported. Finite dust temperature effects were observed in the dispersion relation of the dust acoustic wave.

  6. Effect of tidal internal wave fields on shallow water acoustic propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Ju; Wang, Huan; Sun, Junping

    2010-09-01

    Internal waves are one of the most pronounced oceanic phenomenons to the oceanographer. During past decades much effort has been made to investigate the effect of internal waves on shallow water acoustic propagation. Even though many field observations, such as SWARM '95, have provided fruitful information about the relation between internal waves and acoustic propagation, it is necessary to conduct more numerical simulations due to their extensive feasibility. In this study, the shallow water internal wave environment is constructed by using a non-hydrostatic ocean model, the open boundary forcing is set by considering single or several internal wave modes at the M2 tidal frequency. In order to show the mode coupling caused by the internal wave field more clearly, the acoustic starting field with different single normal modes is adopted. The acoustic simulation can be used to check whether a specific combination of internal wave modes is related to the mode coupling, and which mode pair will be affected. The combination of internal wave modes can be separated into several groups. Even though the internal wave fields are different among every case in each group, the acoustic field structure and the mode coupling are similar. Different acoustic normal mode coupling occurs due to the different combinations of internal wave mode forcing. When the parameters of internal wave mode are modified gently, the acoustic mode coupling becomes quite different. It is interesting and important to investigate the sensitivity of acoustic fields to the variability of the internal mode combination.

  7. Single crystal metal wedges for surface acoustic wave propagation

    DOEpatents

    Fisher, Edward S.

    1982-01-01

    An ultrasonic testing device has been developed to evaluate flaws and inhomogeneities in the near-surface region of a test material. A metal single crystal wedge is used to generate high frequency Rayleigh surface waves in the test material surface by conversion of a slow velocity, bulk acoustic mode in the wedge into a Rayleigh wave at the metal-wedge test material interface. Particular classes of metals have been found to provide the bulk acoustic modes necessary for production of a surface wave with extremely high frequency and angular collimation. The high frequency allows flaws and inhomogeneities to be examined with greater resolution. The high degree of angular collimation for the outgoing ultrasonic beam permits precision angular location of flaws and inhomogeneities in the test material surface.

  8. Single crystal metal wedges for surface acoustic wave propagation

    DOEpatents

    Fisher, E.S.

    1980-05-09

    An ultrasonic testing device has been developed to evaluate flaws and inhomogeneities in the near-surface region of a test material. A metal single crystal wedge is used to generate high frequency Rayleigh surface waves in the test material surface by conversion of a slow velocity, bulk acoustic mode in the wedge into a Rayleigh wave at the metal-wedge test material interface. Particular classes of metals have been found to provide the bulk acoustic modes necessary for production of a surface wave with extremely high frequency and angular collimation. The high frequency allows flaws and inhomogeneities to be examined with greater resolution. The high degree of angular collimation for the outgoing ultrasonic beam permits precision angular location of flaws and inhomogeneities in the test material surface.

  9. High-frequency surface acoustic wave propagation in nanaostructures characterized by coherent extreme ultraviolet beams

    SciTech Connect

    Siemens, M.; Li, Q.; Murnane, M.; Kapteyn, H.; Yang, R.; Anderson, E.; Nelson, K.

    2009-03-02

    We study ultrahigh frequency surface acoustic wave propagation in nickel-on-sapphire nanostructures. The use of ultrafast, coherent, extreme ultraviolet beams allows us to extend optical measurements of propagation dynamics of surface acoustic waves to frequencies of nearly 50 GHz, corresponding to wavelengths as short as 125 nm. We repeat the measurement on a sequence of nanostructured samples to observe surface acoustic wave dispersion in a nanostructure series for the first time. These measurements are critical for accurate characterization of thin films using this technique.

  10. Laser induced plane acoustic wave generation, propagation, and interaction with rigid structures in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Seung H.; Ryu, Sang G.; Misra, Nipun; Pan, Heng; Grigoropoulos, Costas P.; Kladias, Nick; Panides, Elias; Domoto, Gerald A.

    2008-10-01

    Short pulsed laser induced single acoustic wave generation, propagation, interaction with rigid structures, and focusing in water are experimentally and numerically studied. A large area short duration single plane acoustic wave was generated by the thermoelastic interaction of a homogenized nanosecond pulsed laser beam with a liquid-solid interface and propagated at the speed of sound in water. Laser flash schlieren photography was used to visualize the transient interaction of the plane acoustic wave with various submerged rigid structures [(a) a single block, (b) double blocks, (c) 33° tilted single block, and (d) concave cylindrical acoustic lens configurations]. Excellent agreement between the experimental results and numerical simulation is observed. Our simulation results demonstrate that the laser induced planar acoustic wave can be focused down to several tens of micron size and several bars in pressure.

  11. Numerical study of nonlinear full wave acoustic propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velasco-Segura, Roberto; Rendon, Pablo L.

    2013-11-01

    With the aim of describing nonlinear acoustic phenomena, a form of the conservation equations for fluid dynamics is presented, deduced using slightly less restrictive hypothesis than those necessary to obtain the well known Westervelt equation. This formulation accounts for full wave diffraction, nonlinearity, and thermoviscous dissipative effects. A CLAWPACK based, 2D finite-volume method using Roe's linearization has been implemented to obtain numerically the solution of the proposed equations. In order to validate the code, two different tests have been performed: one against a special Taylor shock-like analytic solution, the other against published results on a HIFU system, both with satisfactory results. The code is written for parallel execution on a GPU and improves performance by a factor of over 50 when compared to the standard CLAWPACK Fortran code. This code can be used to describe moderate nonlinear phenomena, at low Mach numbers, in domains as large as 100 wave lengths. Applications range from modest models of diagnostic and therapeutic HIFU, parametric acoustic arrays, to acoustic wave guides. A couple of examples will be presented showing shock formation and oblique interaction. DGAPA PAPIIT IN110411, PAEP UNAM 2013.

  12. Acoustic wave propagation in heterogeneous structures including experimental validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, Kenneth J.; Dahl, Milo D.

    1989-01-01

    A finite element model was developed to solve for the acoustic pressure and energy fields in a heterogeneous suppressor. The derivations from the governing equations assumed that the material properties could vary with position resulting in a heterogeneous variable property two-dimensional wave equation. This eliminated the necessity of finding the boundary conditions between different materials. For a two-media region consisting of part air and part bulk absorber, a model was used to describe the bulk absorber properties in two directions. Complex metallic structures inside the air duct are simulated by simply changing element properties from air to the structural material in a pattern to describe the desired shapes. To verify the numerical theory, experiments were conducted without flow in a rectangular duct with a single folded cavity mounted above the duct and absorbing material mounted inside a cavity. Changes in a nearly plane wave sound field were measured on the wall opposite the absorbing cavity. Fairly good agreement was found in the standing wave pattern upstream of the absorber and in the decay of pressure level opposite the absorber, as a function of distance along the duct. The finite element model provides a convenient method for evaluating the acoustic properties of bulk absorbers.

  13. Passive models of viscothermal wave propagation in acoustic tubes.

    PubMed

    Bilbao, Stefan; Harrison, Reginald; Kergomard, Jean; Lombard, Bruno; Vergez, Christophe

    2015-08-01

    A continued fraction expansion to the immittances defining viscothermal wave propagation in a cylindrical tube has been presented recently in this journal, intended as a starting point for time domain numerical method design. Though the approximation has the great benefit of passivity, or positive realness under truncation, its convergence is slow leading to approximations of high order in practice. Other passive structures, when combined with optimisation methods, can lead to good accuracy over a wide frequency range, and for relatively low order. PMID:26328672

  14. An Investigation of Acoustic Wave Propagation in Mach 2 Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieberding, Zachary J.

    Hypersonic technology is the next advancement to enter the aerospace community; it is defined as the study of flight at speeds Mach 5 and higher where intense aerodynamic heating is prevalent. Hypersonic flight is achieved through use of scramjet engines, which intake air and compress it by means of shock waves and geometry design. The airflow is then directed through an isolator where it is further compressed, it is then delivered to the combustor at supersonic speeds. The combusted airflow and fuel mixture is then accelerated through a nozzle to achieve the hypersonic speeds. Unfortunately, scramjet engines can experience a phenomenon known as an inlet unstart, where the combustor produces pressures large enough to force the incoming airflow out of the inlet of the engine, resulting in a loss of acceleration and power. There have been several government-funded programs that look to prove the concept of the scramjet engine and also tackle this inlet unstart issue. The research conducted in this thesis is a fundamental approach towards controlling the unstart problem: it looks at the basic concept of sending a signal upstream through the boundary layer of a supersonic flow and being able to detect a characterizeable signal. Since conditions within and near the combustor are very harsh, hardware is unable to be installed in that area, so this testing will determine if a signal can be sent and if so, how far upstream can the signal be detected. This experimental approach utilizes several acoustic and mass injection sources to be evaluated over three test series in a Mach 2 continuous flow wind tunnel that will determine the success of the objective. The test series vary in that the conditions of the flow and the test objectives change. The research shows that a characterizeable signal can be transmitted upstream roughly 12 inches through the subsonic boundary layer of a supersonic cross flow. It is also shown that the signal attenuates as the distance between the

  15. Numerical solutions of acoustic wave propagation problems using Euler computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hariharan, S. I.

    1984-01-01

    This paper reports solution procedures for problems arising from the study of engine inlet wave propagation. The first problem is the study of sound waves radiated from cylindrical inlets. The second one is a quasi-one-dimensional problem to study the effect of nonlinearities and the third one is the study of nonlinearities in two dimensions. In all three problems Euler computations are done with a fourth-order explicit scheme. For the first problem results are shown in agreement with experimental data and for the second problem comparisons are made with an existing asymptotic theory. The third problem is part of an ongoing work and preliminary results are presented for this case.

  16. Propagation of flexural waves in inhomogeneous plates exhibiting hysteretic nonlinearity: Nonlinear acoustic black holes.

    PubMed

    Gusev, Vitalyi E; Ni, Chenyin; Lomonosov, Alexey; Shen, Zhonghua

    2015-08-01

    Theory accounting for the influence of hysteretic nonlinearity of micro-inhomogeneous material on flexural wave in the plates of continuously varying thickness is developed. For the wedges with thickness increasing as a power law of distance from its edge strong modifications of the wave dynamics with propagation distance are predicted. It is found that nonlinear absorption progressively disappearing with diminishing wave amplitude leads to complete attenuation of acoustic waves in most of the wedges exhibiting black hole phenomenon. It is also demonstrated that black holes exist beyond the geometrical acoustic approximation. Applications include nondestructive evaluation of micro-inhomogeneous materials and vibrations damping. PMID:25937493

  17. Modeling of acoustic and gravity waves propagation through the atmosphere with spectral element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brissaud, Q.; Garcia, R.; Martin, R.; Komatitsch, D.

    2014-12-01

    Low-frequency events such as tsunamis generate acoustic and gravity waves which quickly propagate in the atmosphere. Since the atmospheric density decreases exponentially as the altitude increases and from the conservation of the kinetic energy, those waves see their amplitude raise (to the order of 105 at 200km of altitude), allowing their detection in the upper atmosphere. Various tools have been developed through years to model this propagation, such as normal modes modeling or to a greater extent time-reversal techniques, but none offer a low-frequency multi-dimensional atmospheric wave modelling.A modeling tool is worthy interest since there are many different phenomena, from quakes to atmospheric explosions, able to propagate acoustic and gravity waves. In order to provide a fine modeling of the precise observations of these waves by GOCE satellite data, we developed a new numerical modeling tool.Starting from the SPECFEM program that already propagate waves in solid, porous or fluid media using a spectral element method, this work offers a tool with the ability to model acoustic and gravity waves propagation in a stratified attenuating atmosphere with a bottom forcing or an atmospheric source.Atmospheric attenuation is required in a proper modeling framework since it has a crucial impact on acoustic wave propagation. Indeed, it plays the role of a frequency filter that damps high-frequency signals. The bottom forcing feature has been implemented due to its ability to easily model the coupling with the Earth's or ocean's surface (that vibrates when a surface wave go through it) but also huge atmospheric events.

  18. Vertically propagating acoustic waves launched by seismic waves visualized in ionograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruyama, Takashi; Shinagawa, Hiroyuki

    2013-04-01

    After the magnitude 9.0 earthquake off the Pacific coast of Tohoku (near the east coast of Honshu, Japan), which occurred on 11 March 2011, an unusual multiple-cusp signature (MCS) was observed in ionograms at three ionosonde stations across Japan. Similar MCSs in ionograms were identified in 8 of 43 earthquakes with a seismic magnitude of 8.0 or greater for the period from 1957 to 2011. The appearance of MCSs at different epicentral distances exhibited traveling characteristics at a velocity of ~4.0 km/s, which is in the range of Rayleigh waves. There was a ~7 min offset in delay time at each epicentral distance in the travel-time diagram. This offset is consistent with the propagation time of acoustic waves from the ground to the ionosphere. We analyzed vertical structure of electron density perturbation that caused MCSs. The ionosonde technique is essentially radar-based measurement of a reflection at a height where the plasma frequency is equal to the sounding radio frequency and it is possible to obtain an electron density profile by sweeping the frequency. However, this measured height is not a true height because radio waves do not propagate at the speed of light in the ionosphere. The group velocity of radio waves decreases just below the reflection height where the sounding frequency approaches the plasma frequency. The amount of delay is larger when this region is thicker. The vertically propagating acoustic waves modulate the electron density. The radio wave speed greatly delays and a cusp signature appears in the echo trace at a phase of the periodic perturbation of electron density where the density gradient is most gradual. Simulations were conducted how large amplitude of density perturbation produces cusp signatures as observed. First, the real height density profile was obtained by converting the ionogram trace just before the arrival of coseismic disturbances. The electron density profile was then modified by adding a periodic perturbation and the

  19. Evolution of nonlinear ion-acoustic solitary wave propagation in rotating plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Das, G. C.; Nag, Apratim

    2006-08-15

    A simple unmagnetized plasma rotating around an axis at an angle {theta} with the propagation direction of the acoustic mode has been taken. The nonlinear wave mode has been derived as an equivalent Sagdeev potential equation. A special procedure, known as the tanh method, has been developed to study the nonlinear wave propagation in plasma dynamics. Further, under small amplitude approximation, the nonlinear plasma acoustic mode has been exploited to study the evolution of soliton propagation in the plasma. The main emphasis has been given to the interaction of Coriolis force on the changes of coherent structure of the soliton. The solitary wave solution finds the different nature of solitons called compressive and rarefactive solitons as well as its explosions or collapses along with soliton dynamics and these have been showing exciting observations in exhibiting a narrow wave packet with the generation of high electric pressure and the growth of high energy which, in turn, yields the phenomena of radiating soliton in dynamics.

  20. Numerical modeling of acoustic and gravity waves propagation in the atmosphere using a spectral element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Roland; Brissaud, Quentin; Garcia, Raphael; Komatitsch, Dimitri

    2015-04-01

    During low-frequency events such as tsunamis, acoustic and gravity waves are generated and quickly propagate in the atmosphere. Due to the exponential decrease of the atmospheric density with the altitude, the conservation of the kinetic energy imposes that the amplitude of those waves increases (to the order of 105 at 200km of altitude), which allows their detection in the upper atmosphere. This propagation bas been modelled for years with different tools, such as normal modes modeling or to a greater extent time-reversal techniques, but a low-frequency multi-dimensional atmospheric wave modelling is still crucially needed. A modeling tool is worth of interest since there are many different sources, as earthquakes or atmospheric explosions, able to propagate acoustic and gravity waves. In order to provide a fine modeling of the precise observations of these waves by GOCE satellite data, we developed a new numerical modeling tool. By adding some developments to the SPECFEM package that already models wave propagation in solid, porous or fluid media using a spectral element method, we show here that acoustic and gravity waves propagation can now be modelled in a stratified attenuating atmosphere with a bottom forcing or an atmospheric source. The bottom forcing feature has been implemented to easily model the coupling with the Earth's or ocean's vibrating surfaces but also huge atmospheric events. Atmospheric attenuation is also introduced since it has a crucial impact on acoustic wave propagation. Indeed, it plays the role of a frequency filter that damps high-frequency signals.

  1. Acoustic propagation through anisotropic internal wave fields: transmission loss, cross-range coherence, and horizontal refraction.

    PubMed

    Oba, Roger; Finette, Steven

    2002-02-01

    Results of a computer simulation study are presented for acoustic propagation in a shallow water, anisotropic ocean environment. The water column is characterized by random volume fluctuations in the sound speed field that are induced by internal gravity waves, and this variability is superimposed on a dominant summer thermocline. Both the internal wave field and resulting sound speed perturbations are represented in three-dimensional (3D) space and evolve in time. The isopycnal displacements consist of two components: a spatially diffuse, horizontally isotropic component and a spatially localized contribution from an undular bore (i.e., a solitary wave packet or solibore) that exhibits horizontal (azimuthal) anisotropy. An acoustic field is propagated through this waveguide using a 3D parabolic equation code based on differential operators representing wide-angle coverage in elevation and narrow-angle coverage in azimuth. Transmission loss is evaluated both for fixed time snapshots of the environment and as a function of time over an ordered set of snapshots which represent the time-evolving sound speed distribution. Horizontal acoustic coherence, also known as transverse or cross-range coherence, is estimated for horizontally separated points in the direction normal to the source-receiver orientation. Both transmission loss and spatial coherence are computed at acoustic frequencies 200 and 400 Hz for ranges extending to 10 km, a cross-range of 1 km, and a water depth of 68 m. Azimuthal filtering of the propagated field occurs for this environment, with the strongest variations appearing when propagation is parallel to the solitary wave depressions of the thermocline. A large anisotropic degradation in horizontal coherence occurs under the same conditions. Horizontal refraction of the acoustic wave front is responsible for the degradation, as demonstrated by an energy gradient analysis of in-plane and out-of-plane energy transfer. The solitary wave packet is

  2. Acoustic propagation through anisotropic internal wave fields: Transmission loss, cross-range coherence, and horizontal refraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oba, Roger; Finette, Steven

    2002-02-01

    Results of a computer simulation study are presented for acoustic propagation in a shallow water, anisotropic ocean environment. The water column is characterized by random volume fluctuations in the sound speed field that are induced by internal gravity waves, and this variability is superimposed on a dominant summer thermocline. Both the internal wave field and resulting sound speed perturbations are represented in three-dimensional (3D) space and evolve in time. The isopycnal displacements consist of two components: a spatially diffuse, horizontally isotropic component and a spatially localized contribution from an undular bore (i.e., a solitary wave packet or solibore) that exhibits horizontal (azimuthal) anisotropy. An acoustic field is propagated through this waveguide using a 3D parabolic equation code based on differential operators representing wide-angle coverage in elevation and narrow-angle coverage in azimuth. Transmission loss is evaluated both for fixed time snapshots of the environment and as a function of time over an ordered set of snapshots which represent the time-evolving sound speed distribution. Horizontal acoustic coherence, also known as transverse or cross-range coherence, is estimated for horizontally separated points in the direction normal to the source-receiver orientation. Both transmission loss and spatial coherence are computed at acoustic frequencies 200 and 400 Hz for ranges extending to 10 km, a cross-range of 1 km, and a water depth of 68 m. Azimuthal filtering of the propagated field occurs for this environment, with the strongest variations appearing when propagation is parallel to the solitary wave depressions of the thermocline. A large anisotropic degradation in horizontal coherence occurs under the same conditions. Horizontal refraction of the acoustic wave front is responsible for the degradation, as demonstrated by an energy gradient analysis of in-plane and out-of-plane energy transfer. The solitary wave packet is

  3. Three-dimensional visualization of shear wave propagation generated by dual acoustic radiation pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mochizuki, Yuta; Taki, Hirofumi; Kanai, Hiroshi

    2016-07-01

    An elastic property of biological soft tissue is an important indicator of the tissue status. Therefore, quantitative and noninvasive methods for elasticity evaluation have been proposed. Our group previously proposed a method using acoustic radiation pressure irradiated from two directions for elastic property evaluation, in which by measuring the propagation velocity of the shear wave generated by the acoustic radiation pressure inside the object, the elastic properties of the object were successfully evaluated. In the present study, we visualized the propagation of the shear wave in a three-dimensional space by the synchronization of signals received at various probe positions. The proposed method succeeded in visualizing the shear wave propagation clearly in the three-dimensional space of 35 × 41 × 4 mm3. These results show the high potential of the proposed method to estimate the elastic properties of the object in the three-dimensional space.

  4. Propagation of acoustic shock waves between parallel rigid boundaries and into shadow zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desjouy, C.; Ollivier, S.; Marsden, O.; Dragna, D.; Blanc-Benon, P.

    2015-10-01

    The study of acoustic shock propagation in complex environments is of great interest for urban acoustics, but also for source localization, an underlying problematic in military applications. To give a better understanding of the phenomenon taking place during the propagation of acoustic shocks, laboratory-scale experiments and numerical simulations were performed to study the propagation of weak shock waves between parallel rigid boundaries, and into shadow zones created by corners. In particular, this work focuses on the study of the local interactions taking place between incident, reflected, and diffracted waves according to the geometry in both regular or irregular - also called Von Neumann - regimes of reflection. In this latter case, an irregular reflection can lead to the formation of a Mach stem that can modify the spatial distribution of the acoustic pressure. Short duration acoustic shock waves were produced by a 20 kilovolts electric spark source and a schlieren optical method was used to visualize the incident shockfront and the reflection/diffraction patterns. Experimental results are compared to numerical simulations based on the high-order finite difference solution of the two dimensional Navier-Stokes equations.

  5. Propagation of acoustic shock waves between parallel rigid boundaries and into shadow zones

    SciTech Connect

    Desjouy, C. Ollivier, S.; Dragna, D.; Blanc-Benon, P.; Marsden, O.

    2015-10-28

    The study of acoustic shock propagation in complex environments is of great interest for urban acoustics, but also for source localization, an underlying problematic in military applications. To give a better understanding of the phenomenon taking place during the propagation of acoustic shocks, laboratory-scale experiments and numerical simulations were performed to study the propagation of weak shock waves between parallel rigid boundaries, and into shadow zones created by corners. In particular, this work focuses on the study of the local interactions taking place between incident, reflected, and diffracted waves according to the geometry in both regular or irregular – also called Von Neumann – regimes of reflection. In this latter case, an irregular reflection can lead to the formation of a Mach stem that can modify the spatial distribution of the acoustic pressure. Short duration acoustic shock waves were produced by a 20 kilovolts electric spark source and a schlieren optical method was used to visualize the incident shockfront and the reflection/diffraction patterns. Experimental results are compared to numerical simulations based on the high-order finite difference solution of the two dimensional Navier-Stokes equations.

  6. Mesospheric airglow and ionospheric responses to upward-propagating acoustic and gravity waves above tropospheric sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snively, J. B.; Zettergren, M. D.

    2013-12-01

    The existence of acoustic waves (periods ~1-5 minutes) and gravity waves (periods >4 minutes) in the ionosphere above active tropospheric convection has been appreciated for more than forty years [e.g., Georges, Rev. Geophys. and Space Phys., 11(3), 1973]. Likewise, gravity waves exhibiting cylindrical symmetry and curvature of phase fronts have been observed via imaging of the mesospheric airglow layers [e.g., Yue et al., JGR, 118(8), 2013], clearly associated with tropospheric convection; gravity wave signatures have also recently been detected above convection in ionospheric total electron content (TEC) measurements [Lay et al., GRL, 40, 2013]. We here investigate the observable features of acoustic waves, and their relationship to upward-propagating gravity waves generated by the same sources, as they arrive in the mesosphere, lower-thermosphere, and ionosphere (MLTI). Numerical simulations using a nonlinear, cylindrically-axisymmetric, compressible atmospheric dynamics model confirm that acoustic waves generated by transient tropospheric sources may produce "concentric ring" signatures in the mesospheric hydroxyl airglow layer that precede the arrival of gravity waves. As amplitudes increase with altitude and decreasing neutral density, the modeled acoustic waves achieve temperature and vertical wind perturbations on the order of ~10s of Kelvin and m/s throughout the E- and F-region. Using a coupled multi-fluid ionospheric model [Zettergren and Semeter, JGR, 117(A6), 2012], extended for low-latitudes using a 2D dipole magnetic field coordinate system, we investigate acoustic wave perturbations to the ionosphere in the meridional direction. Resulting perturbations are predicted to be detectable by ground-based radar and GPS TEC measurements, or via in situ instrumentation. Although transient and short-lived, the acoustic waves' airglow and ionospheric signatures are likely to in some cases be observable, and may provide important insight into the regional

  7. Acoustic Wave Propagation in Snow Based on a Biot-Type Porous Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidler, R.

    2014-12-01

    Despite the fact that acoustic methods are inexpensive, robust and simple, the application of seismic waves to snow has been sparse. This might be due to the strong attenuation inherent to snow that prevents large scale seismic applications or due to the somewhat counterintuitive acoustic behavior of snow as a porous material. Such materials support a second kind of compressional wave that can be measured in fresh snow and which has a decreasing wave velocity with increasing density of snow. To investigate wave propagation in snow we construct a Biot-type porous model of snow as a function of porosity based on the assumptions that the solid frame is build of ice, the pore space is filled with a mix of air, or air and water, and empirical relationships for the tortuosity, the permeability, the bulk, and the shear modulus.We use this reduced model to investigate compressional and shear wave velocities of snow as a function of porosity and to asses the consequences of liquid water in the snowpack on acoustic wave propagation by solving Biot's differential equations with plain wave solutions. We find that the fast compressional wave velocity increases significantly with increasing density, but also that the fast compressional wave velocity might be even lower than the slow compressional wave velocity for very light snow. By using compressional and shear strength criteria and solving Biot's differential equations with a pseudo-spectral approach we evaluate snow failure due to acoustic waves in a heterogeneous snowpack, which we think is an important mechanism in triggering avalanches by explosives as well as by skiers. Finally, we developed a low cost seismic acquisition device to assess the theoretically obtained wave velocities in the field and to explore the possibility of an inexpensive tool to remotely gather snow water equivalent.

  8. A high-order discontinuous Galerkin method for wave propagation through coupled elastic-acoustic media

    SciTech Connect

    Wilcox, Lucas C.; Stadler, Georg; Burstedde, Carsten; Ghattas, Omar

    2010-12-10

    We introduce a high-order discontinuous Galerkin (dG) scheme for the numerical solution of three-dimensional (3D) wave propagation problems in coupled elastic-acoustic media. A velocity-strain formulation is used, which allows for the solution of the acoustic and elastic wave equations within the same unified framework. Careful attention is directed at the derivation of a numerical flux that preserves high-order accuracy in the presence of material discontinuities, including elastic-acoustic interfaces. Explicit expressions for the 3D upwind numerical flux, derived as an exact solution for the relevant Riemann problem, are provided. The method supports h-non-conforming meshes, which are particularly effective at allowing local adaptation of the mesh size to resolve strong contrasts in the local wavelength, as well as dynamic adaptivity to track solution features. The use of high-order elements controls numerical dispersion, enabling propagation over many wave periods. We prove consistency and stability of the proposed dG scheme. To study the numerical accuracy and convergence of the proposed method, we compare against analytical solutions for wave propagation problems with interfaces, including Rayleigh, Lamb, Scholte, and Stoneley waves as well as plane waves impinging on an elastic-acoustic interface. Spectral rates of convergence are demonstrated for these problems, which include a non-conforming mesh case. Finally, we present scalability results for a parallel implementation of the proposed high-order dG scheme for large-scale seismic wave propagation in a simplified earth model, demonstrating high parallel efficiency for strong scaling to the full size of the Jaguar Cray XT5 supercomputer.

  9. A high-order discontinuous Galerkin method for wave propagation through coupled elastic-acoustic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilcox, Lucas C.; Stadler, Georg; Burstedde, Carsten; Ghattas, Omar

    2010-12-01

    We introduce a high-order discontinuous Galerkin (dG) scheme for the numerical solution of three-dimensional (3D) wave propagation problems in coupled elastic-acoustic media. A velocity-strain formulation is used, which allows for the solution of the acoustic and elastic wave equations within the same unified framework. Careful attention is directed at the derivation of a numerical flux that preserves high-order accuracy in the presence of material discontinuities, including elastic-acoustic interfaces. Explicit expressions for the 3D upwind numerical flux, derived as an exact solution for the relevant Riemann problem, are provided. The method supports h-non-conforming meshes, which are particularly effective at allowing local adaptation of the mesh size to resolve strong contrasts in the local wavelength, as well as dynamic adaptivity to track solution features. The use of high-order elements controls numerical dispersion, enabling propagation over many wave periods. We prove consistency and stability of the proposed dG scheme. To study the numerical accuracy and convergence of the proposed method, we compare against analytical solutions for wave propagation problems with interfaces, including Rayleigh, Lamb, Scholte, and Stoneley waves as well as plane waves impinging on an elastic-acoustic interface. Spectral rates of convergence are demonstrated for these problems, which include a non-conforming mesh case. Finally, we present scalability results for a parallel implementation of the proposed high-order dG scheme for large-scale seismic wave propagation in a simplified earth model, demonstrating high parallel efficiency for strong scaling to the full size of the Jaguar Cray XT5 supercomputer.

  10. The effects of fracture permeability on acoustic wave propagation in the porous media: A microscopic perspective.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ding; Wang, Liji; Ding, Pinbo

    2016-08-01

    An illustrative theory is developed to analyze the acoustic wave propagation characteristics in the porous media with anisotropic permeability. We focus here on the role of fracture permeability in the unconsolidated porous media, looking in particular at the compressional P-wave phase velocity and attenuation. Two fluid pressure equilibration characteristic time factors are defined, which are corresponding to crack-pore system and crack-crack system, respectively. The theoretical results show that the dispersion and attenuation characteristics of acoustic wave are affected by porous matrix and fracture permeability simultaneously. Due to the fluid exchange that takes place between fractures and pores dominantly, the influence of the fracture connectivity on the wave propagation is very weak when the permeability of background medium is relatively high. However, correlation between wave propagation and fracture permeability is significant when the matrix permeability at a low level. A second attenuation peak occurs for the fluid flow within fractures in high-frequency region for more and more higher fracture permeability. The exact analytical solutions that are compared to numerical forward modeling of wave propagation in fractured media allow us to verify the correctness of the new model. If there exists another approach for obtaining the connectivity information of background media, we can use this model to analyze qualitatively the permeability of fractures or afford an indicator of in-situ permeability changes in a oil reservoir, for example, fracturing operations. PMID:27259119

  11. Characterization of acoustic wave propagation in a concrete member after fire exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, Chih-Hung; Huang, Chin-Ting

    2001-04-01

    The acoustic wave propagation in a concrete member with embedded reinforcing bars was analyzed. Fire exposure was applied to two batches of concrete specimens prior to acoustic wave characterization. The fire duration and maximum temperature were simulated for experimental studies using a custom-built electric oven. A standard ultrasonic pulse velocity testing system for concrete was used to provide the through-transmission wave propagation. Multiple peaks were found in the frequency domain based on the fast Fourier transform of the waveform. This could be due to cracks induced by the incompatibility of thermal deformation of the constituents of concrete. Further study showed bond deterioration between reinforcing bars and concrete would also contribute to the variation in frequency content of the recorded waveform.

  12. Temporal coherence of the acoustic field forward propagated through a continental shelf with random internal waves.

    PubMed

    Gong, Zheng; Chen, Tianrun; Ratilal, Purnima; Makris, Nicholas C

    2013-11-01

    An analytical model derived from normal mode theory for the accumulated effects of range-dependent multiple forward scattering is applied to estimate the temporal coherence of the acoustic field forward propagated through a continental-shelf waveguide containing random three-dimensional internal waves. The modeled coherence time scale of narrow band low-frequency acoustic field fluctuations after propagating through a continental-shelf waveguide is shown to decay with a power-law of range to the -1/2 beyond roughly 1 km, decrease with increasing internal wave energy, to be consistent with measured acoustic coherence time scales. The model should provide a useful prediction of the acoustic coherence time scale as a function of internal wave energy in continental-shelf environments. The acoustic coherence time scale is an important parameter in remote sensing applications because it determines (i) the time window within which standard coherent processing such as matched filtering may be conducted, and (ii) the number of statistically independent fluctuations in a given measurement period that determines the variance reduction possible by stationary averaging. PMID:24180758

  13. Local probing of propagating acoustic waves in a gigahertz echo chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gustafsson, Martin V.; Santos, Paulo V.; Johansson, Göran; Delsing, Per

    2012-04-01

    In the same way that micro-mechanical resonators resemble guitar strings and drums, surface acoustic waves resemble the sound these instruments produce, but moving over a solid surface rather than through air. In contrast with oscillations in suspended resonators, such propagating mechanical waves have not before been studied near the quantum mechanical limits. Here, we demonstrate local probing of surface acoustic waves with a displacement sensitivity of 30amRMSHz-1/2 and detection sensitivity on the single-phonon level after averaging, at a frequency of 932MHz. Our probe is a piezoelectrically coupled single-electron transistor, which is sufficiently fast, non-destructive and localized to enable us to track pulses echoing back and forth in a long acoustic cavity, self-interfering and ringing the cavity up and down. We project that strong coupling to quantum circuits will enable new experiments, and hybrids using the unique features of surface acoustic waves. Prospects include quantum investigations of phonon-phonon interactions, and acoustic coupling to superconducting qubits for which we present favourable estimates.

  14. Transformation of intense acoustic waves propagating vertically upward in an isothermally stratified atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gusev, V. A.; Zhostkov, R. A.

    2015-09-01

    The specific features in the propagation of acoustic waves with a finite amplitude in the model of an isothermally viscous stratified atmosphere have been studied based on the analytical solutions. The Khokhlov—Zabolotskaya and Burgers equations have been generalized for a stratified atmosphere. The selfsimilar solution for a generalized Burgers equation with variable viscosity has been found. The asymptotic solution for an initial sinusoidal disturbance has been obtained. The solutions can be used to seismically analyze induced acoustic fields in a wide frequency band.

  15. Study of low-frequency-acoustic- and seismic-wave energy propagation on the shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutenko, A. N.; Manul'chev, D. S.; Solov'ev, A. A.

    2013-05-01

    The paper presents the results of field and numerical studies on the features of low-frequency-acoustic- and seismic-wave energy propagation on the shelf of the Sea of Japan. Measurements were conducted with the Mollusk-07 autonomous vertical acousto-hydrophysical measurement system, an electromagnetic low-frequency resonance emitter, and a pulsed pneumoemitter lowered from the ship, as well as a shore-based resonance seismoemitter.

  16. Effects of dissipation on propagation of surface electromagnetic and acoustic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagaraj, Nagaraj

    With the recent emergence of the field of metamaterials, the study of subwavelength propagation of plane waves and the dissipation of their energy either in the form of Joule losses in the case of electomagnetic waves or in the form of viscous dissipation in the case of acoustic waves in different interfaced media assumes great importance. With this motivation, I have worked on problems in two different areas, viz., plasmonics and surface acoustics. The first part (chapters 2 & 3) of the dissertation deals with the emerging field of plasmonics. Researchers have come up with various designs in an effort to fabricate efficient plasmonic waveguides capable of guiding plasmonic signals. However, the inherent dissipation in the form of Joule losses limits efficient usage of surface plasmon signal. A dielectric-metal-dielectric planar structure is one of the most practical plasmonic structures that can serve as an efficient waveguide to guide electromagnetic waves along the metal-dielectric boundary. I present here a theoretical study of propagation of surface plasmons along a symmetric dielectric-metal-dielectric structure and show how proper orientation of the optical axis of the anisotropic substrate enhances the propagation length. An equation for propagation length is derived in a wide range of frequencies. I also show how the frequency of coupled surface plasmons can be modulated by changing the thickness of the metal film. I propose a Kronig-Penny model for the plasmonic crystal, which in the long wavelength limit, may serve as a homogeneous dielectric substrate with high anisotropy which do not exist for natural optical crystals. In the second part (chapters 4 & 5) of the dissertation, I discuss an interesting effect of extraordinary absorption of acoustic energy due to resonant excitation of Rayleigh waves in a narrow water channel clad between two metal plates. Starting from the elastic properties of the metal plates, I derive a dispersion equation that gives

  17. Effect of crystalline quality of diamond film to the propagation loss of surface acoustic wave devices.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Satoshi; Shikata, Shinichi; Uemura, Tomoki; Nakahata, Hideaki; Harima, Hiroshi

    2005-10-01

    Diamond films with various crystal qualities were grown by chemical vapor deposition on silicon wafers. Their crystallinity was characterized by Raman scattering and electron backscattering diffraction. By fabricating a device structure for surface acoustic wave (SAW) using these diamond films, the propagation loss was measured at 1.8 GHz and compared with the crystallinity. It was found that the propagation loss was lowered in relatively degraded films having small crystallites, a narrow distribution in the diamond crystallite size, and preferential grain orientation. This experiment clarifies diamond film characteristics required for high-frequency applications in SAW filters. PMID:16382634

  18. Finite Difference Numerical Modeling of Gravito-Acoustic Wave Propagation in a Windy and Attenuating Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brissaud, Q.; Garcia, R.; Martin, R.; Komatitsch, D.

    2015-12-01

    The acoustic and gravity waves propagating in the planetary atmospheres have been studied intensively as markers of specific phenomena (tectonic events, explosions) or as contributors to the atmosphere dynamics. To get a better understanding of the physic behind these dynamic processes, both acoustic and gravity waves propagation should be modeled in an attenuating and windy 3D atmosphere from the ground to the upper thermosphere. Thus, In order to provide an efficient numerical tool at the regional or the global scale a high order finite difference time domain (FDTD) approach is proposed that relies on the linearized compressible Navier-Stokes equations (Landau 1959) with non constant physical parameters (density, viscosities and speed of sound) and background velocities (wind). One significant benefit from this code is its versatility. Indeed, it handles both acoustic and gravity waves in the same simulation that enables one to observe correlations between the two. Simulations will also be performed on 2D/3D realistic cases such as tsunamis in a full MSISE-00 atmosphere and gravity-wave generation through atmospheric explosions. Computations are validated by comparison to well-known analytical solutions based on dispersion relations in specific benchmark cases (atmospheric explosion and bottom displacement forcing).

  19. A mesh-free method with arbitrary-order accuracy for acoustic wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takekawa, Junichi; Mikada, Hitoshi; Imamura, Naoto

    2015-05-01

    In the present study, we applied a novel mesh-free method to solve acoustic wave equation. Although the conventional finite difference methods determine the coefficients of its operator based on the regular grid alignment, the mesh-free method is not restricted to regular arrangements of calculation points. We derive the mesh-free approach using the multivariable Taylor expansion. The methodology can use arbitrary-order accuracy scheme in space by expanding the influence domain which controls the number of neighboring calculation points. The unique point of the method is that the approach calculates the approximation of derivatives using the differences of spatial variables without parameters as e.g. the weighting functions, basis functions. Dispersion analysis using a plane wave reveals that the choice of the higher-order scheme improves the dispersion property of the method although the scheme for the irregular distribution of the calculation points is more dispersive than that of the regular alignment. In numerical experiments, a model of irregular distribution of the calculation points reproduces acoustic wave propagation in a homogeneous medium same as that of a regular lattice. In an inhomogeneous model which includes low velocity anomalies, partially fine arrangement improves the effectiveness of computational cost without suffering from accuracy reduction. Our result indicates that the method would provide accurate and efficient solutions for acoustic wave propagation using adaptive distribution of the calculation points.

  20. A perturbative analysis of surface acoustic wave propagation and reflection in interdigital transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thoma, Carsten Hilmar

    1997-12-01

    The coupling of stress and strain fields to electric fields present in anisotropic piezoelectric crystals makes them ideal for use as electromechanical transducers in a wide variety of applications. In recent years such crystals have been utilized to produce surface acoustic wave devices for signal processing applications, in which an applied metallic grating both transmits and receives, through the piezoelectric effect, electromechanical surface waves. The design of such interdigital transducers requires an accurate knowledge of wave propagation and reflection. The presence of the metal grating in addition to its ideal transduction function, by means of electrical and mechanical loading, also introduces a velocity shift as well as reflection into substrate surface waves. We seek to obtain a consistent formulation of the wave behavior due to the electrical and mechanical loading of the substrate crystal by the metallic grating. A perturbative solution up to second order in h//lambda is developed, where h is the maximum grating height and λ the acoustic wavelength. For the operating frequencies and physical parameters of modern surface acoustic wave devices such an analysis will provide an adequate description of device behavior in many cases, thereby circumventing the need for more computationally laborious methods. Numerical calculations are presented and compared with available experimental data.

  1. Temperature dependence of acoustic harmonics generated by nonlinear ultrasound wave propagation in water at various frequencies.

    PubMed

    Maraghechi, Borna; Hasani, Mojtaba H; Kolios, Michael C; Tavakkoli, Jahan

    2016-05-01

    Ultrasound-based thermometry requires a temperature-sensitive acoustic parameter that can be used to estimate the temperature by tracking changes in that parameter during heating. The objective of this study is to investigate the temperature dependence of acoustic harmonics generated by nonlinear ultrasound wave propagation in water at various pulse transmit frequencies from 1 to 20 MHz. Simulations were conducted using an expanded form of the Khokhlov-Zabolotskaya-Kuznetsov nonlinear acoustic wave propagation model in which temperature dependence of the medium parameters was included. Measurements were performed using single-element transducers at two different transmit frequencies of 3.3 and 13 MHz which are within the range of frequencies simulated. The acoustic pressure signals were measured by a calibrated needle hydrophone along the axes of the transducers. The water temperature was uniformly increased from 26 °C to 46 °C in increments of 5 °C. The results show that the temperature dependence of the harmonic generation is different at various frequencies which is due to the interplay between the mechanisms of absorption, nonlinearity, and focusing gain. At the transmit frequencies of 1 and 3.3 MHz, the harmonic amplitudes decrease with increasing the temperature, while the opposite temperature dependence is observed at 13 and 20 MHz. PMID:27250143

  2. Acoustic wave propagation in heterogeneous two-dimensional fractured porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamzehpour, Hossein; Asgari, Mojgan; Sahimi, Muhammad

    2016-06-01

    This paper addresses an important fundamental question: the differences between wave propagation in fractured porous media with a uniform matrix (constant bulk modulus) and those in which the matrix is heterogeneous with its bulk modulus distributed spatially. The analysis of extensive experimental data [Phys. Rev. E 71, 046301 (2005), 10.1103/PhysRevE.71.046301] indicated that such distributions are self-affine and induce correlations at all the relevant length scales. The comparison is important from a practical view point because in many of the traditional models of fractured rock, particularly those that are used to study wave propagation or fit some data, the matrix is assumed to be uniform. Using extensive numerical simulation of propagation of acoustic waves, we present strong evidence indicating that the waves' amplitude in a fractured porous medium with a heterogeneous matrix decays exponentially with the distance from the source. This is in sharp contrast with a fractured porous medium with a uniform matrix in which not only the waves' amplitude decays with the distance as a stretched exponential function, but the exponent that characterizes the function is also dependent upon the fracture density. The localization length depends on the correlations in the spatial distribution of the bulk modulus, as well as the fracture density. The mean speed of the waves varies linearly with the fractures' mean orientation.

  3. Acoustic wave propagation in heterogeneous two-dimensional fractured porous media.

    PubMed

    Hamzehpour, Hossein; Asgari, Mojgan; Sahimi, Muhammad

    2016-06-01

    This paper addresses an important fundamental question: the differences between wave propagation in fractured porous media with a uniform matrix (constant bulk modulus) and those in which the matrix is heterogeneous with its bulk modulus distributed spatially. The analysis of extensive experimental data [Phys. Rev. E 71, 046301 (2005)PLEEE81539-375510.1103/PhysRevE.71.046301] indicated that such distributions are self-affine and induce correlations at all the relevant length scales. The comparison is important from a practical view point because in many of the traditional models of fractured rock, particularly those that are used to study wave propagation or fit some data, the matrix is assumed to be uniform. Using extensive numerical simulation of propagation of acoustic waves, we present strong evidence indicating that the waves' amplitude in a fractured porous medium with a heterogeneous matrix decays exponentially with the distance from the source. This is in sharp contrast with a fractured porous medium with a uniform matrix in which not only the waves' amplitude decays with the distance as a stretched exponential function, but the exponent that characterizes the function is also dependent upon the fracture density. The localization length depends on the correlations in the spatial distribution of the bulk modulus, as well as the fracture density. The mean speed of the waves varies linearly with the fractures' mean orientation. PMID:27415385

  4. TOPICAL REVIEW: Sensors and actuators based on surface acoustic waves propagating along solid liquid interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindner, Gerhard

    2008-06-01

    The propagation of surface acoustic waves (SAWs) along solid-liquid interfaces depends sensitively on the properties of the liquid covering the solid surface and may result in a momentum transfer into the liquid and thus a propulsion effect via acoustic streaming. This review gives an overview of the design of different SAW devices used for the sensing of liquids and the basic mechanisms of the interaction of SAWs with overlaying liquids. In addition, applications of devices based on these phenomena with respect to touch sensing and the measurement of liquid properties such as density, viscosity or the composition of mixed liquids are described, including microfabricated as well as macroscopic devices made from non-piezoelectric materials. With respect to the rapidly growing field of acoustic streaming applications, recent developments in the movement of nanolitre droplets on a single piezoelectric chip, the rather macroscopic approaches to the acoustic pumping of liquids in channels and recent attempts at numerical simulations of acoustic streaming are reported.

  5. Numerical modeling of nonlinear acoustic-gravity wave propagation in the whole atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavrilov, Nikolai M.; Kshevetskii, Sergey P.

    According to present knowledge, acoustic-gravity waves (AGWs) observed in the upper atmosphere may be generated near the Earth surface due to different sources and propagate upwards. Algorithms for two- and three-dimensional numerical simulation of vertical propagation and breaking of nonlinear AGWs from the Earth's surface to the upper atmosphere were developed recently. The algorithms of the solution of fluid dynamic equations use finite-difference analogues of basic conservation laws. This approach allows us to select physically correct generalized wave solutions of the nonlinear equations. Horizontally moving periodical horizontal sinusoidal structures of vertical velocity on the Earth’s surface serve as AGW sources in the model. Numerical simulation was made in a region of the Earth atmosphere with dimensions up to several thousand kilometers horizontally and 500 km vertically. Vertical profiles of the mean temperature, density, molecular viscosity and thermal conductivity are specified from standard models of the atmosphere. Calculations are made for different amplitudes, horizontal wavelengths and speeds of wave sources at the bottom boundary of the model. It is shown that after “switch on” tropospheric source atmospheric waves very quickly (for several minutes) may propagate to high altitudes (up to 100 km). When AGW amplitudes increase with height, waves may break down in the middle and upper atmosphere. Instability and dissipation of wave energy may lead to formations of wave accelerations of the mean winds and to creations of wave-induced jet flows in the middle and upper atmosphere. Nonlinear interactions may lead to instabilities of the initial wave and to the creation of smaller-scale structures. These smaller inhomogeneities may increase temperature and wind gradients and enhance the wave energy dissipation. Thus, the increase in AGW amplitudes in the upper atmosphere may occur at a much slower pace than the increase in amplitudes of

  6. Experimental study of outdoor propagation of spherically speading periodic acoustic waves of finite amplitude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Theobald, M. A.

    1977-01-01

    The outdoor propagation of spherically spreading sound waves of finite amplitude was investigated. The main purpose of the experiments was to determine the extent to which the outdoor environment, mainly random inhomogeneity of the medium, affects finite amplitude propagation. Periodic sources with fundamental frequencies in the range 6 to 8 kHz and source levels SPLlm from 140 to 149 dB were used. The sources were an array of 7 to 10 horn drivers and a siren. The propagation path was vertical and parallel to an 85 m tower, whose elevator carried the traveling microphone. The general conclusions drawn from the experimental results were as follows. The inhomogeneities caused significant fluctuations in the instantaneous acoustic signal, but with sufficient time averaging of the measured harmonic levels, the results were comparable to results expected for propagation in a quiet medium. Propagation data for the fundamental of the siren approached within 1 dB of the weak shock saturation levels. Extra attenuation on the order of 8 dB was observed. The measurements generally confirmed the predictions of several theoretical models. The maximum propagation distance was 36 m. The narrowbeam arrays were much weaker sources. Nonlinear propagation distortion was produced, but the maximum value of extra attenuation measured was 1.5 dB. The maximum propagation distance was 76 m. The behavior of the asymetric waveforms received in one experiment qualitatively suggested that beam type diffraction effects were present. The role of diffraction of high intensity sound waves in radiation from a single horn was briefly investigated.

  7. Measurement of the flow velocity in unmagnetized plasmas by counter propagating ion-acoustic waves

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, J.X.; Li Yangfang; Xiao Delong; Li Jingju; Li Yiren

    2005-06-15

    The diffusion velocity of an inhomogeneous unmagnetized plasma is measured by means of the phase velocities of ion-acoustic waves propagating along and against the direction of the plasma flow. Combined with the measurement of the plasma density distributions by usual Langmuir probes, the method is applied to measure the ambipolar diffusion coefficient and effective ion collision frequency in inhomogeneous plasmas formed in an asymmetrically discharged double-plasma device. Experimental results show that the measured flow velocities, diffusion coefficients, and effective collision frequencies are in agreement with ion-neutral collision dominated diffusion theory.

  8. Model parameter extraction for obliquely propagating surface acoustic waves in infinitely long grating structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Gongbin; Han, Tao; Chen, Jing; Zhang, Benfeng; Omori, Tatsuya; Hashimoto, Ken-ya

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we propose the use of the “longitudinal resonance condition” for the characterization of the two-dimensional propagation of surface acoustic waves (SAWs) in periodic grating structures, and also show a procedure for extracting parameters required in the behavior model from the full-wave analysis. The condition is given by β xp = π, where p is the grating period and β x is the wavenumber of the grating mode in the longitudinal direction (x). This is based on the fact that in conventional SAW resonators, acoustic resonances including transverse ones occur when β x is real but the longitudinal resonance condition is mostly satisfied. The longitudinal resonance condition is applied to a simple model, and the wavenumber β y in the lateral direction (y) is expressed as a simple function of the angular frequency ω. The full-wave analysis is applied for SAWs propagating in an infinite grating on a 128°YX-LiNbO3 substrate, and the anisotropy parameter γ is extracted by the fitting with the derived equation. The fitted result agrees well with the original numerical result. It is also indicated that γ estimated by this technique is significantly different from the value estimated without taking the effects of the grating structure into account.

  9. Propagation and oblique collision of ion-acoustic solitary waves in a magnetized dusty electronegative plasma

    SciTech Connect

    El-Labany, S. K.; Behery, E. E.; El-Shamy, E. F.

    2013-12-15

    The propagation and oblique collision of ion-acoustic (IA) solitary waves in a magnetized dusty electronegative plasma consisting of cold mobile positive ions, Boltzmann negative ions, Boltzmann electrons, and stationary positive/negative dust particles are studied. The extended Poincaré-Lighthill-Kuo perturbation method is employed to derive the Korteweg-de Vries equations and the corresponding expressions for the phase shifts after collision between two IA solitary waves. It turns out that the angle of collision, the temperature and density of negative ions, and the dust density of opposite polarity have reasonable effects on the phase shift. Clearly, the numerical results demonstrated that the IA solitary waves are delayed after the oblique collision. The current finding of this work is applicable in many plasma environments having negative ion species, such as D- and F-regions of the Earth's ionosphere and some laboratory plasma experiments.

  10. Features of Propagation of the Acoustic-Gravity Waves Generated by High-Power Periodic Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernogor, L. F.; Frolov, V. L.

    2013-09-01

    We present the results of the bandpass filtering of temporal variations of the Doppler frequency shift of radio signals from a vertical-sounding Doppler radar located near the city of Kharkov when the ionosphere was heated by high-power periodic (with 10 and 15-min periods) radiation from the Sura facility. The filtering was done in the ranges of periods that are close to the acoustic cutoff period and the Brunt—Väisälä period (4-6, 8-12, and 13-17 min). Oscillations with periods of 4-6 min and amplitudes of 50-100 mHz were not recorded in fact. Oscillations with periods of 8-12 and 13-17 min and amplitudes of 60-100 mHz were detected in almost all the sessions. In the former and the latter oscillations, the time of delay with respect to the heater switch-on was close to 100 min and about 40-50 min, respectively. These values correspond to group propagation velocities of about 160 and 320-400 m/s. The Doppler shift oscillations were caused by the acoustic-gravity waves which led to periodic variations in the electron number density with a relative amplitude of about 0.1-1.0%. It was demonstrated that the acoustic-gravity waves were not recorded when the effective power of the Sura facility was equal to 50 MW and they were confidently observed when the effective power was increased up to 130 MW. It is shown that the period of the wave processes was determined by the period of the heating-pause cycles, and the duration of the wave trains did not depend on the duration of the series of heating-pause cycles. The data suggest that the generation mechanism of recorded wave disturbances is different from the mechanism proposed in 1970-1990.

  11. Oblique propagation of ion-acoustic solitary waves in a magnetized electron-positron-ion plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Ferdousi, M.; Sultana, S.; Mamun, A. A.

    2015-03-15

    The properties of obliquely propagating ion-acoustic solitary waves in the presence of ambient magnetic field have been investigated theoretically in an electron-positron-ion nonthermal plasma. The plasma nonthermality is introduced via the q-nonextensive distribution of electrons and positrons. The Korteweg-de Vries (K-dV) and modified K-dV (mK-dV) equations are derived by adopting reductive perturbation method. The solution of K-dV and modified K-dV equation, which describes the solitary wave characteristics in the long wavelength limit, is obtained by steady state approach. It is seen that the electron and positron nonextensivity and external magnetic field (obliqueness) have significant effects on the characteristics of solitary waves. A critical value of nonextensivity is found for which solitary structures transit from positive to negative potential. The findings of this investigation may be used in understanding the wave propagation in laboratory and space plasmas where static external magnetic field is present.

  12. Frequency-dependent damping in propagating slow magneto-acoustic waves

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, S. Krishna; Banerjee, D.; Van Doorsselaere, T.

    2014-07-10

    Propagating slow magneto-acoustic waves are often observed in polar plumes and active region fan loops. The observed periodicities of these waves range from a few minutes to a few tens of minutes and their amplitudes were found to decay rapidly as they travel along the supporting structure. Previously, thermal conduction, compressive viscosity, radiation, density stratification, and area divergence were identified to be some of the causes for change in the slow wave amplitude. Our recent studies indicate that the observed damping in these waves is frequency-dependent. We used imaging data from the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly to study this dependence in detail and for the first time via observations we attempted to deduce a quantitative relation between the damping length and frequency of these oscillations. We developed a new analysis method to obtain this relation. The observed frequency dependence does not seem to agree with the current linear wave theory and it was found that the waves observed in the polar regions show a different dependence from those observed in the on-disk loop structures despite the similarity in their properties.

  13. Weakly nonlinear acoustic wave propagation in a nonlinear orthotropic circular cylindrical waveguide.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Vijay S; Sonti, Venkata R

    2015-11-01

    Nonlinear acoustic wave propagation is considered in an infinite orthotropic thin circular cylindrical waveguide. The modes are non-planar having small but finite amplitude. The fluid is assumed to be ideal and inviscid with no mean flow. The cylindrical waveguide is modeled using the Donnell's nonlinear theory for thin cylindrical shells. The approximate solutions for the acoustic velocity potential are found using the method of multiple scales (MMS) in space and time. The calculations are presented up to the third order of the small parameter. It is found that at some frequencies the amplitude modulation is governed by the Nonlinear Schrödinger Equation (NLSE). The first objective is to study the nonlinear term in the NLSE, as the sign of the nonlinear term determines the stability of the amplitude modulation. On the other hand, at other specific frequencies, interactions occur between the primary wave and its higher harmonics. Here, the objective is to identify the frequencies of the higher harmonic interactions. Lastly, the linear terms in the NLSE obtained using the MMS calculations are validated. All three objectives are met using an asymptotic analysis of the dispersion equation. PMID:26627797

  14. Finite element modeling of acoustic wave propagation and energy deposition in bone during extracorporeal shock wave treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaofeng; Matula, Thomas J.; Ma, Yong; Liu, Zheng; Tu, Juan; Guo, Xiasheng; Zhang, Dong

    2013-06-01

    It is well known that extracorporeal shock wave treatment is capable of providing a non-surgical and relatively pain free alternative treatment modality for patients suffering from musculoskeletal disorders but do not respond well to conservative treatments. The major objective of current work is to investigate how the shock wave (SW) field would change if a bony structure exists in the path of the acoustic wave. Here, a model of finite element method (FEM) was developed based on linear elasticity and acoustic propagation equations to examine SW propagation and deflection near a mimic musculoskeletal bone. High-speed photography experiments were performed to record cavitation bubbles generated in SW field with the presence of mimic bone. By comparing experimental and simulated results, the effectiveness of FEM model could be verified and strain energy distributions in the bone were also predicted according to numerical simulations. The results show that (1) the SW field will be deflected with the presence of bony structure and varying deflection angles can be observed as the bone shifted up in the z-direction relative to SW geometric focus (F2 focus); (2) SW deflection angels predicted by the FEM model agree well with experimental results obtained from high-speed photographs; and (3) temporal evolutions of strain energy distribution in the bone can also be evaluated based on FEM model, with varied vertical distance between F2 focus and intended target point on the bone surface. The present studies indicate that, by combining MRI/CT scans and FEM modeling work, it is possible to better understand SW propagation characteristics and energy deposition in musculoskeletal structure during extracorporeal shock wave treatment, which is important for standardizing the treatment dosage, optimizing treatment protocols, and even providing patient-specific treatment guidance in clinic.

  15. Wave Propagation Program

    2007-01-08

    WPP is a massively parallel, 3D, C++, finite-difference elastodynamic wave propagation code. Typical applications for wave propagation with WPP include: evaluation of seismic event scenarios and damage from earthquakes, non-destructive evaluation of materials, underground facility detection, oil and gas exploration, predicting the electro-magnetic fields in accelerators, and acoustic noise generation. For more information, see User’s Manual [1].

  16. Wave propagation in piezoelectric layered structures of film bulk acoustic resonators.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Feng; Qian, Zheng-hua; Wang, Bin

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we studied the wave propagation in a piezoelectric layered plate consisting of a piezoelectric thin film on an electroded elastic substrate with or without a driving electrode. Both plane-strain and anti-plane waves were taken into account for the sake of completeness. Numerical results on dispersion relations, cut-off frequencies and vibration distributions of selected modes were given. The effects of mass ratio of driving electrode layer to film layer on the dispersion curve patterns and cut-off frequencies of the plane-strain waves were discussed in detail. Results show that the mass ratio does not change the trend of dispersion curves but larger mass ratio lowers corresponding frequency at a fixed wave number and may extend the frequency range for energy trapping. Those results are of fundamental importance and can be used as a reference to develop effective two-dimensional plate equations for structural analysis and design of film bulk acoustic resonators. PMID:26812132

  17. On the Propagation of Plane Acoustic Waves in a Duct With Flexible and Impedance Walls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frendi, Abdelkader; Vu, Bruce

    2003-01-01

    This Technical Memorandum (TM) discusses the harmonic and random plane acoustic waves propagating from inside a duct to its surroundings. Various duct surfaces are considered, such as rigid, flexible, and impedance. In addition, the effects of a mean flow are studied when the duct alone is considered. Results show a significant reduction in overall sound pressure levels downstream of the impedance wall for both mean flow and no mean flow cases and for a narrow duct. When a wider duct is used, the overall sound pressure level (OSPL) reduction downstream of the impedance wall is much smaller. In the far field, the directivity is such that the overall sound pressure level is reduced by about 5 decibels (dB) on the side of the impedance wall. When a flexible surface is used, the far field directivity becomes asymmetric with an increase in the OSPL on the side of the flexible surface of about 7 dB.

  18. The stability of freely-propagating ion acoustic waves in 2D systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, Thomas; Berger, Richard; Banks, Jeffrey; Brunner, Stephan

    2014-10-01

    The stability of a freely-propagating ion acoustic wave (IAW) is a basic science problem that is made difficult by the need to resolve electron kinetic effects over a timescale that greatly exceeds the IAW period during numerical simulation. Recent results examining IAW stability using a 1D+1V Vlasov-Poisson solver indicate that instability is a fundamental property of IAWs that occurs over most if not all of the parameter space of relevance to ICF experiments. We present here new results addressing the fundamental question of IAW stability across a broad range of plasma conditions in a 2D+2V system using LOKI, ranging from a regime of relatively weak to a regime of relatively strong ion kinetic effects. Work performed under the auspices of the U.S. DOE by LLNL (DE-AC52-07NA27344) and funded by the LDRD Program at LLNL (12-ERD-061).

  19. FE simulation of laser generated surface acoustic wave propagation in skin.

    PubMed

    L'Etang, Adèle; Huang, Zhihong

    2006-12-22

    Advances in laser ultrasonics have opened new possibilities in medical applications, such as the characterization of skin properties. This paper describes the development of a multilayered finite element model (FEM) using ANSYS to simulate the propagation of laser generated thermoelastic surface acoustic waves (SAWs) through skin and to generate signals one would expect to observe without causing thermal damage to skin. A transient thermal analysis is developed to simulate the thermal effect of the laser source penetrating into the skin. The results from the thermal analysis are subsequently applied as a load to the structural analysis where the out-of-plane displacement responses are analysed in models with varying dermis layer thickness. PMID:16814352

  20. A finite element propagation model for extracting normal incidence impedance in nonprogressive acoustic wave fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Willie R.; Jones, Michael G.; Tanner, Sharon E.; Parrott, Tony L.

    1995-01-01

    A propagation model method for extracting the normal incidence impedance of an acoustic material installed as a finite length segment in a wall of a duct carrying a nonprogressive wave field is presented. The method recasts the determination of the unknown impedance as the minimization of the normalized wall pressure error function. A finite element propagation model is combined with a coarse/fine grid impedance plane search technique to extract the impedance of the material. Results are presented for three different materials for which the impedance is known. For each material, the input data required for the prediction scheme was computed from modal theory and then contaminated by random error. The finite element method reproduces the known impedance of each material almost exactly for random errors typical of those found in many measurement environments. Thus, the method developed here provides a means for determining the impedance of materials in a nonprogressirve wave environment such as that usually encountered in a commercial aircraft engine and most laboratory settings.

  1. Stability analysis for acoustic wave propagation in tilted TI media by finite differences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakker, Peter M.; Duveneck, Eric

    2011-05-01

    Several papers in recent years have reported instabilities in P-wave modelling, based on an acoustic approximation, for inhomogeneous transversely isotropic media with tilted symmetry axis (TTI media). In particular, instabilities tend to occur if the axis of symmetry varies rapidly in combination with strong contrasts of medium parameters, which is typically the case at the foot of a steeply dipping salt flank. In a recent paper, we have proposed and demonstrated a P-wave modelling approach for TTI media, based on rotated stress and strain tensors, in which the wave equations reduce to a coupled set of two second-order partial differential equations for two scalar stress components: a normal component along the variable axis of symmetry and a lateral component of stress in the plane perpendicular to that axis. Spatially constant density is assumed in this approach. A numerical discretization scheme was proposed which uses discrete second-derivative operators for the non-mixed second-order derivatives in the wave equations, and combined first-derivative operators for the mixed second-order derivatives. This paper provides a complete and rigorous stability analysis, assuming a uniformly sampled grid. Although the spatial discretization operator for the TTI acoustic wave equation is not self-adjoint, this operator still defines a complete basis of eigenfunctions of the solution space, provided that the solution space is somewhat restricted at locations where the medium is elliptically anisotropic. First, a stability analysis is given for a discretization scheme, which is purely based on first-derivative operators. It is shown that the coefficients of the central difference operators should satisfy certain conditions. In view of numerical artefacts, such a discretization scheme is not attractive, and the non-mixed second-order derivatives of the wave equation are discretized directly by second-derivative operators. It is shown that this modification preserves

  2. Oblique propagation of ion acoustic soliton-cnoidal waves in a magnetized electron-positron-ion plasma with superthermal electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jian-Yong; Cheng, Xue-Ping; Tang, Xiao-Yan; Yang, Jian-Rong; Ren, Bo

    2014-03-15

    The oblique propagation of ion-acoustic soliton-cnoidal waves in a magnetized electron-positron-ion plasma with superthermal electrons is studied. Linear dispersion relations of the fast and slow ion-acoustic modes are discussed under the weak and strong magnetic field situations. By means of the reductive perturbation approach, Korteweg-de Vries equations governing ion-acoustic waves of fast and slow modes are derived, respectively. Explicit interacting soliton-cnoidal wave solutions are obtained by the generalized truncated Painlevé expansion. It is found that every peak of a cnoidal wave elastically interacts with a usual soliton except for some phase shifts. The influence of the electron superthermality, positron concentration, and magnetic field obliqueness on the soliton-cnoidal wave are investigated in detail.

  3. Using the nonlinear geometrical acoustics method in the problem of moreton and EUV wave propagation in the solar corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afanasyev, An. N.; Uralov, A. M.; Grechnev, V. V.

    2011-12-01

    Propagation of shock related Moreton and EUV waves in the solar atmosphere is simulated by the nonlinear geometrical acoustics method. This method is based on the ray approximation and takes account of nonlinear wave features: dependence of the wave velocity on its amplitude, nonlinear dissipation of wave energy in the shock front, and the increase in its duration with time. The paper describes ways of applying this method to solve the propagation problem of a blast magnetohydrodynamic shock wave. Results of analytical modeling of EUV and Moreton waves in the spherically symmetric and isothermal solar corona are also presented. The calculations demonstrate deceleration of these waves and an increase in their duration. The calculation results of the kinematics of the EUV wave observed on the Sun on January 17, 2010 are presented as an example.

  4. Acoustic wave propagation in the solar atmosphere 1. Rediscussion of the linearized theory including nonstationary solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Zhengzhi; Ulrich, Roger K.; Coroniti, Ferdinand V.

    1995-01-01

    The normal dispersion analysis for linear adiabatic wave propagation in stratified atmospheres adopts a real frequency and solves for the complex vertical wavenumber. We show that an exponentially stratified atmosphere does not have any spatially bounded normal modes for real frequencies. The usual treatment involves a representation where the imaginary part of the vertical wavenumber yields a rho(sup -1/2) dependence of the velocity amplitude which diverges as the absolute value of z approaches infinity. This solution includes a cutoff frequency below which acoustic modes cannot propagate. The standard dispersion analysis is a local representation of the wave behavior in both space and time but which is assumed to represent the motion throughout - infinity is less than t is less than infinity and 0 is less than infinity. However, any solution which has a purely sinusoidal time dependence extends through this full domain and is divergent due to the rho(sup -1/2) dependence. We show that a proper description is in terms of a near field of a boundary piston which is driven arbitrarily as a function of space and time. The atmosphere which responds to this piston is a semi-infinite layer which has an initially constant sound speed but which has the usual gravitational stratification. In a restricted domain of space and time above this boundary, the wavelike behavior of the medium may be described by frequencies and vertical wavenumbers which are both complex. When both parameters are allowed to have imaginary components, a new range of solutions is found for which there is virtually no cutoff frequency. We show that vertical energy propagation can take place through the solar atmosphere as a result of oscillations below the nominal cutoff frequency. Previously, the largest amplitude oscillations which generally have low frequencies were dropped from the calculation of energy flux becuase their frequencies are below the cutoff frequency. This new family of near

  5. 3D frequency-domain finite-difference modeling of acoustic wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Operto, S.; Virieux, J.

    2006-12-01

    We present a 3D frequency-domain finite-difference method for acoustic wave propagation modeling. This method is developed as a tool to perform 3D frequency-domain full-waveform inversion of wide-angle seismic data. For wide-angle data, frequency-domain full-waveform inversion can be applied only to few discrete frequencies to develop reliable velocity model. Frequency-domain finite-difference (FD) modeling of wave propagation requires resolution of a huge sparse system of linear equations. If this system can be solved with a direct method, solutions for multiple sources can be computed efficiently once the underlying matrix has been factorized. The drawback of the direct method is the memory requirement resulting from the fill-in of the matrix during factorization. We assess in this study whether representative problems can be addressed in 3D geometry with such approach. We start from the velocity-stress formulation of the 3D acoustic wave equation. The spatial derivatives are discretized with second-order accurate staggered-grid stencil on different coordinate systems such that the axis span over as many directions as possible. Once the discrete equations were developed on each coordinate system, the particle velocity fields are eliminated from the first-order hyperbolic system (following the so-called parsimonious staggered-grid method) leading to second-order elliptic wave equations in pressure. The second-order wave equations discretized on each coordinate system are combined linearly to mitigate the numerical anisotropy. Secondly, grid dispersion is minimized by replacing the mass term at the collocation point by its weighted averaging over all the grid points of the stencil. Use of second-order accurate staggered- grid stencil allows to reduce the bandwidth of the matrix to be factorized. The final stencil incorporates 27 points. Absorbing conditions are PML. The system is solved using the parallel direct solver MUMPS developed for distributed

  6. On the role of ion-temperature anisotropy on the propagation of shear-modified ion-acoustic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koepke, M. E.; Teodorescu, C.; Reynolds, E. W.

    2002-11-01

    Oblique ion-acoustic waves, excited by the combination of magnetic-field-aligned (parallel) electron drift and sheared parallel ion flow, are investigated in magnetized laboratory plasma that is characterized by ion-temperature anisotropy. Direct measurements of the parallel and perpendicular ion temperatures, parallel and perpendicular ion drift velocities, electron temperature and parallel electron drift velocity, parallel and perpendicular wavevector components, and mode frequency and growth rate are used to document an observed correlation between ion-temperature anisotropy and wave-propagation angle. Experimental measurements show that anisotropy significantly influences the propagation angle. These results support the ion-acoustic wave interpretation of broadband waves in the auroral energization region where shear and anisotropy are known to exist and may have ramifications for many space plasmas in which anisotropy exists in the electron-temperature or ion-temperature.

  7. Turbofan Acoustic Propagation and Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eversman, Walter

    2000-01-01

    This document describes progress in the development of finite element codes for the prediction of near and far field acoustic radiation from the inlet and aft fan ducts of turbofan engines. The report consists of nine papers which have appeared in archival journals and conference proceedings, or are presently in review for publication. Topics included are: 1. Aft Fan Duct Acoustic Radiation; 2. Mapped Infinite Wave Envelope Elements for Acoustic Radiation in a Uniformly Moving Medium; 3. A Reflection Free Boundary Condition for Propagation in Uniform Flow Using Mapped Infinite Wave Envelope Elements; 4. A Numerical Comparison Between Multiple-Scales and FEM Solution for Sound Propagation in Lined Flow Ducts; 5. Acoustic Propagation at High Frequencies in Ducts; 6. The Boundary Condition at an Impedance Wall in a Nonuniform Duct with Potential Flow; 7. A Reverse Flow Theorem and Acoustic Reciprocity in Compressible Potential Flows; 8. Reciprocity and Acoustics Power in One Dimensional Compressible Potential Flows; and 9. Numerical Experiments on Acoustic Reciprocity in Compressible Potential Flows.

  8. Generation and Upper Atmospheric Propagation of Acoustic Gravity Waves according to Numerical Modeling and Radio Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorontsov, Artem; Andreeva, Elena; Nesterov, Ivan; Padokhin, Artem; Kurbatov, Grigory

    2016-04-01

    The acoustic-gravity waves (AGW) in the upper atmosphere and ionosphere can be generated by a variety of the phenomena in the near-Earth environment and atmosphere as well as by some perturbations of the Earth's ground or ocean surface. For instance, the role of the AGW sources can be played by the earthquakes, explosions, thermal heating, seisches, tsunami waves. We present the examples of AGWs excited by the tsunami waves traveling in the ocean, by seisches, and by ionospheric heating by the high-power radio wave. In the last case, the gravity waves are caused by the pulsed modulation of the heating wave. The AGW propagation in the upper atmosphere induces the variations and irregularities in the electron density distribution of the ionosphere, whose structure can be efficiently reconstructed by the method of the ionospheric radio tomography (RT) based on the data from the global navigational satellite systems (GNSS). The input data for RT diagnostics are composed of the 150/400 MHz radio signals from the low-orbiting (LO) satellites and 1.2-1.5 GHz radio signals from the high-orbiting (HO) satellites with their orbits at ~1000 and ~20000 km above the ground, respectively. These data enable ionospheric imaging on different spatiotemporal scales with different spatiotemporal resolution and coverage, which is suitable, inter alia, for tracking the waves and wave-like features in the ionosphere. In particular, we demonstrate the maps of the ionospheric responses to the tornado at Moore (Oklahoma, USA) of May 20, 2013, which are reconstructed from the HO data. We present the examples of LORT images containing the waves and wavelike disturbances associated with various sources (e.g., auroral precipitation and high-power heating of the ionosphere). We also discuss the results of modeling the AGW generation by the surface and volumetric sources. The millihertz AGW from these sources initiate the ionospheric perturbation with a typical scale of a few hundred km at the

  9. Wave propagation in a 2D nonlinear structural acoustic waveguide using asymptotic expansions of wavenumbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijay Prakash, S.; Sonti, Venkata R.

    2016-02-01

    Nonlinear acoustic wave propagation in an infinite rectangular waveguide is investigated. The upper boundary of this waveguide is a nonlinear elastic plate, whereas the lower boundary is rigid. The fluid is assumed to be inviscid with zero mean flow. The focus is restricted to non-planar modes having finite amplitudes. The approximate solution to the acoustic velocity potential of an amplitude modulated pulse is found using the method of multiple scales (MMS) involving both space and time. The calculations are presented up to the third order of the small parameter. It is found that at some frequencies the amplitude modulation is governed by the Nonlinear Schrödinger equation (NLSE). The first objective here is to study the nonlinear term in the NLSE. The sign of the nonlinear term in the NLSE plays a role in determining the stability of the amplitude modulation. Secondly, at other frequencies, the primary pulse interacts with its higher harmonics, as do two or more primary pulses with their resultant higher harmonics. This happens when the phase speeds of the waves match and the objective is to identify the frequencies of such interactions. For both the objectives, asymptotic coupled wavenumber expansions for the linear dispersion relation are required for an intermediate fluid loading. The novelty of this work lies in obtaining the asymptotic expansions and using them for predicting the sign change of the nonlinear term at various frequencies. It is found that when the coupled wavenumbers approach the uncoupled pressure-release wavenumbers, the amplitude modulation is stable. On the other hand, near the rigid-duct wavenumbers, the amplitude modulation is unstable. Also, as a further contribution, these wavenumber expansions are used to identify the frequencies of the higher harmonic interactions. And lastly, the solution for the amplitude modulation derived through the MMS is validated using these asymptotic expansions.

  10. Propagation characteristics of dust-acoustic waves in presence of a floating cylindrical object in the DC discharge plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhary, Mangilal; Mukherjee, S.; Bandyopadhyay, P.

    2016-08-01

    The experimental observation of the self-excited dust acoustic waves (DAWs) and its propagation characteristics in the absence and presence of a floating cylindrical object is investigated. The experiments are carried out in a direct current (DC) glow discharge dusty plasma in a background of argon gas. Dust particles are found levitated at the interface of plasma and cathode sheath region. The DAWs are spontaneously excited in the dust medium and found to propagate in the direction of ion drift (along the gravity) above a threshold discharge current at low pressure. Excitation of such a low frequency wave is a result of the ion-dust streaming instability in the dust cloud. Characteristics of the propagating dust acoustic wave get modified in the presence of a floating cylindrical object of radius larger than that of the dust Debye length. Instead of propagation in the vertical direction, the DAWs are found to propagate obliquely in the presence of the floating object (kept either vertically or horizontally). In addition, a horizontally aligned floating object forms a wave structure in the cone shaped dust cloud in the sheath region. Such changes in the propagation characteristics of DAWs are explained on the basis of modified potential (or electric field) distribution, which is a consequence of coupling of sheaths formed around the cylindrical object and the cathode.

  11. Wave propagation characteristics of helically orthotropic cylindrical shells and resonance emergence in scattered acoustic field. Part 1. Formulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajabi, Majid

    2016-05-01

    The method of wave function expansion is adopted to study the three dimensional scattering of a plane progressive harmonic acoustic wave incident upon an arbitrarily thick-walled helically filament-wound composite cylindrical shell submerged in and filled with compressible ideal fluids. An approximate laminate model in the context of the so-called state-space formulation is employed for the construction of T-matrix solution to solve for the unknown modal scattering coefficients. Considering the nonaxisymmetric wave propagation phenomenon in anisotropic cylindrical components and following the resonance scattering theory which determines the resonance and background scattering fields, the stimulated resonance frequencies of the shell are isolated and classified due to their fundamental mode of excitation, overtone and style of propagation along the cylindrical axis (i.e., clockwise or anticlockwise propagation around the shell) and are identified as the helically circumnavigating waves.

  12. Effect of gas adsorption on acoustic wave propagation in MFI zeolite membrane materials: experiment and molecular simulation.

    PubMed

    Manga, Etoungh D; Blasco, Hugues; Da-Costa, Philippe; Drobek, Martin; Ayral, André; Le Clezio, Emmanuel; Despaux, Gilles; Coasne, Benoit; Julbe, Anne

    2014-09-01

    The present study reports on the development of a characterization method of porous membrane materials which consists of considering their acoustic properties upon gas adsorption. Using acoustic microscopy experiments and atomistic molecular simulations for helium adsorbed in a silicalite-1 zeolite membrane layer, we showed that acoustic wave propagation could be used, in principle, for controlling the membranes operando. Molecular simulations, which were found to fit experimental data, showed that the compressional modulus of the composite system consisting of silicalite-1 with adsorbed He increases linearly with the He adsorbed amount while its shear modulus remains constant in a large range of applied pressures. These results suggest that the longitudinal and Rayleigh wave velocities (VL and VR) depend on the He adsorbed amount whereas the transverse wave velocity VT remains constant. PMID:25089584

  13. Modeling acoustic wave propagation in the Southern Ocean to estimate the acoustic impact of seismic surveys on marine mammals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breitzke, M.; Bohlen, T.

    2007-12-01

    According to the Protocol on Environmental Protection to the Antarctic Treaty, adopted 1991, seismic surveys in the Southern Ocean south of 60°S are exclusively dedicated to academic research. The seismic surveys conducted by the Alfred-Wegener-Institute for Polar and Marine Research, Bremerhaven, Germany during the last 20 years focussed on two areas: The Wedell Sea (60°W - 0°W) and the Amundsen/Bellinghausen Sea (120°W - 60°W). Histograms of the Julian days and water depths covered by these surveys indicate that maximum activities occurred in January and February, and most lines were collected either in shallow waters of 400 - 500 m depth or in deep waters of 2500 - 4500 m depth. To assess the potential risk of future seismic research on marine mammal populations an acoustic wave propagation modeling study is conducted for the Wedell and the Amundsen/ Bellinghausen Sea. A 2.5D finite-difference code is used. It allows to simulate the spherical amplitude decay of point sources correctly, considers P- and S-wave velocities at the sea floor and provides snapshots of the wavefield at any spatial and temporal resolution. As source signals notional signatures of GI-, G- and Bolt guns, computed by the NUCLEUS software (PGS) are used. Based on CTD measurements, sediment core samplings and sediment echosounder recordings two horizontally-layered, range-independent generic models are established for the Wedell and the Amundsen/Bellinghausen Sea, one for shallow (500 m) and one for deep water (3000 m). They indicate that the vertical structure of the water masses is characterized by a 100 m thick, cold, low sound velocity layer (~1440 - 1450 m/s), centered in 100 m depth. In the austral summer it is overlain by a warmer, 50 m thick surface layer with slightly higher sound velocities (~1447 - 1453 m/s). Beneath the low-velocity layer sound velocities increase rapidly to ~1450 - 1460 m/s in 200 m depth, and smoothly to ~1530 m/s in 4700 m depth. The sea floor is mainly

  14. Dynamical and thermal effects of nonsteady nonlinear acoustic-gravity waves propagating from tropospheric sources to the upper atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavrilov, Nikolai M.; Kshevetskii, Sergey P.

    2015-11-01

    We performed numerical simulations of nonlinear AGW propagation to the middle and upper atmosphere from a plane wave forcing at the Earth's surface with period τ = 2 × 103 s. After activating the surface wave forcing, initial pulse of acoustic and very long gravity modes in a few minutes can reach altitudes above 100 km. Dissipation of this initial pulse produces substantial mean heating and wave-induced mean winds at altitudes above 200 km. This may influence AGW propagation and produce enhanced vertical gradients of temperature, horizontal velocity and increased wave dissipation in the lower part of the wave-induced mean flows helping their downward expansions. Later, AGWs may produce layers of convective instability and peaks of the wave-induced jets at altitudes 100-120 km. Shorter AGWs with smaller horizontal wave speeds produce smaller mean heating and wave-induced mean velocities in the upper atmosphere at fixed amplitudes and periods of the surface wave excitation. Numerical simulation of nonlinear AGW propagation helps better understanding the details of dynamical and thermal influence of waves coming from the troposphere on the mean temperature and wind in the middle and upper atmosphere.

  15. Causality, Stokes' wave equation, and acoustic pulse propagation in a viscous fluid.

    PubMed

    Buckingham, Michael J

    2005-08-01

    Stokes' acoustic wave equation is solved for the impulse response of an isotropic viscous fluid. Two exact integral forms of solution are derived, both of which are causal, predicting a zero response before the source is activated at time t = 0. Moreover, both integral solutions satisfy a stronger causality condition: the pressure pulse is maximally flat, with all its time derivatives identically zero at t = 0, signifying that there is no instantaneous response to the source anywhere in the fluid. A closed-form approximation for each of the two integrals is derived, with distinctly different properties in the two cases, even though the original integrals are equivalent in that they predict identical pulse shapes. One of these approximations, reminiscent of transient solutions that have appeared previously in the literature, is noncausal due to the incorrect representation of high-frequency components in the propagating pulse. In the second approximation, all frequency components are treated correctly, leading to an impulse response that satisfies the strong causality condition, also satisfied by the original integrals, whereby the predicted pressure pulse is zero when t < 0 and maximally flat everywhere in the fluid immediately after t = 0. PMID:16196738

  16. Numerical analysis of wave generation and propagation in a focused surface acoustic wave device for potential microfluidics applications.

    PubMed

    Sankaranarayanan, Subramanian K R S; Bhethanabotla, Venkat R

    2009-03-01

    We develop a 3-D finite element model of a focused surface acoustic wave (F-SAW) device based on LiNbO(3) to analyze the wave generation and propagation characteristics for devices operating at MHz frequencies with varying applied input voltages. We compare the F-SAW device to a conventional SAW device with similar substrate dimensions and transducer finger periodicity. SAW devices with concentrically shaped focused interdigital transducer fingers (F-IDTs) are found to excite waves with high intensity and high beam-width compression ratio, confined to a small localized area. F-SAW devices are more sensitive to amplitude variations at regions close to the focal point than conventional SAW devices having uniform IDT configuration. We compute F-SAW induced streaming forces and velocity fields by applying a successive approximation technique to the Navier-Stokes equation (Nyborg's theory). The maximum streaming force obtained at the focal point varies as the square of the applied input voltage. Computed streaming velocities at the focal point in F-SAW devices are at least an order of magnitude higher than those in conventional SAW devices. Simulated frequency response indicates higher insertion losses in F-SAW devices than in conventional devices, reflecting their greater utility as actuators than as sensors. Our simulation findings suggest that F-SAW devices can be utilized effectively for actuation in microfluidic applications involving diffusion limited transport processes. PMID:19411221

  17. Propagation of dust-acoustic waves in weakly ionized plasmas with dust-charge fluctuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, K. K.

    2004-11-01

    For an unmagnetized partially ionized dusty plasma containing electrons, singly charged positive ions, micron-sized massive negatively charged dust grains and a fraction of neutral atoms, dispersion relations for both the dust-ion-acoustic and the dust- acoustic waves have been derived, incorporating dust charge fluctuation. The dispersion relations, under various conditions, have been exhaustively analysed. The explicit expres- sions for the growth rates have also been derived.

  18. Normal mode solutions for seismo-acoustic propagation resulting from shear and combined wave point sources.

    PubMed

    Nealy, Jennifer L; Collis, Jon M; Frank, Scott D

    2016-04-01

    Normal mode solutions to range-independent seismo-acoustic problems are benchmarked against elastic parabolic equation solutions and then used to benchmark the shear elastic parabolic equation self-starter [Frank, Odom, and Collis, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 133, 1358-1367 (2013)]. The Pekeris waveguide with an elastic seafloor is considered for a point source located in the ocean emitting compressional waves, or in the seafloor, emitting both compressional and shear waves. Accurate solutions are obtained when the source is in the seafloor, and when the source is at the interface between the fluid and elastic layers. PMID:27106346

  19. Nonlinear propagation of spark-generated N-waves in air: modeling and measurements using acoustical and optical methods.

    PubMed

    Yuldashev, Petr; Ollivier, Sébastien; Averiyanov, Mikhail; Sapozhnikov, Oleg; Khokhlova, Vera; Blanc-Benon, Philippe

    2010-12-01

    The propagation of nonlinear spherically diverging N-waves in homogeneous air is studied experimentally and theoretically. A spark source is used to generate high amplitude (1.4 kPa) short duration (40 μs) N-waves; acoustic measurements are performed using microphones (3 mm diameter, 150 kHz bandwidth). Numerical modeling with the generalized Burgers equation is used to reveal the relative effects of acoustic nonlinearity, thermoviscous absorption, and oxygen and nitrogen relaxation on the wave propagation. The results of modeling are in a good agreement with the measurements in respect to the wave amplitude and duration. However, the measured rise time of the front shock is ten times longer than the calculated one, which is attributed to the limited bandwidth of the microphone. To better resolve the shock thickness, a focused shadowgraphy technique is used. The recorded optical shadowgrams are compared with shadow patterns predicted by geometrical optics and scalar diffraction model of light propagation. It is shown that the geometrical optics approximation results in overestimation of the shock rise time, while the diffraction model allows to correctly resolve the shock width. A combination of microphone measurements and focused optical shadowgraphy is therefore a reliable way of studying evolution of spark-generated shock waves in air. PMID:21218866

  20. Acoustic and electromagnetic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Douglas Samuel

    Theoretical models of EM and acoustic wave propagation are presented in an introductory text intended for intermediate-level science and engineering students. Chapters are devoted to the mathematical representation of acoustic and EM fields, the special theory of relativity, radiation, resonators, waveguide theory, refraction, surface waves, scattering by smooth objects, diffraction by edges, and transient waves. The mathematical tools required for the analysis (Bessel, Legendre, Mathieu, parabolic-cylinder, and spheroidal functions; tensor calculus; and the asymptotic evaluation of integrals) are covered in appendices.

  1. Quasi-plane shear wave propagation induced by acoustic radiation force with a focal line region: a simulation study.

    PubMed

    Guo, Min; Abbott, Derek; Lu, Minhua; Liu, Huafeng

    2016-03-01

    Shear wave propagation speed has been regarded as an attractive indicator for quantitatively measuring the intrinsic mechanical properties of soft tissues. While most existing techniques use acoustic radiation force (ARF) excitation with focal spot region based on linear array transducers, we try to employ a special ARF with a focal line region and apply it to viscoelastic materials to create shear waves. First, a two-dimensional capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer with 64 × 128 fully controllable elements is realised and simulated to generate this special ARF. Then three-dimensional finite element models are developed to simulate the resulting shear wave propagation through tissue phantom materials. Three different phantoms are explored in our simulation study using: (a) an isotropic viscoelastic medium, (b) within a cylindrical inclusion, and (c) a transverse isotropic viscoelastic medium. For each phantom, the ARF creates a quasi-plane shear wave which has a preferential propagation direction perpendicular to the focal line excitation. The propagation of the quasi-plane shear wave is investigated and then used to reconstruct shear moduli sequentially after the estimation of shear wave speed. In the phantom with a transverse isotropic viscoelastic medium, the anisotropy results in maximum speed parallel to the fiber direction and minimum speed perpendicular to the fiber direction. The simulation results show that the line excitation extends the displacement field to obtain a large imaging field in comparison with spot excitation, and demonstrate its potential usage in measuring the mechanical properties of anisotropic tissues. PMID:26768475

  2. Spectroscopic observations of propagating disturbances in a polar coronal hole: evidence of slow magneto-acoustic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, G. R.; Teriaca, L.; Marsch, E.; Solanki, S. K.; Banerjee, D.

    2012-10-01

    Aims: We focus on detecting and studying quasi-periodic propagating features that have been interpreted in terms of both slow magneto-acoustic waves and of high-speed upflows. Methods: We analyzed long-duration spectroscopic observations of the on-disk part of the south polar coronal hole taken on 1997 February 25 by the SUMER spectrometer onboard SOHO. We calibrated the velocity with respect to the off-limb region and obtained time-distance maps in intensity, Doppler velocity, and line width. We also performed a cross-correlation analysis on different time series curves at different latitudes. We studied average spectral line profiles at the roots of propagating disturbances and along the propagating ridges, and performed a red-blue asymmetry analysis. Results: We clearly find propagating disturbances in intensity and Doppler velocity with a projected propagation speed of about 60 ± 4.8 km s-1 and a periodicity of ≈14.5 min. To our knowledge, this is the first simultaneous detection of propagating disturbances in intensity as well as in Doppler velocity in a coronal hole. During the propagation, an intensity enhancement is associated with a blueshifted Doppler velocity. These disturbances are clearly seen in intensity also at higher latitudes (i.e., closer to the limb), while disturbances in Doppler velocity become faint there. The spectral line profiles averaged along the propagating ridges are found to be symmetric, to be well fitted by a single Gaussian, and have no noticeable red-blue asymmetry. Conclusions: Based on our analysis, we interpret these disturbances in terms of propagating slow magneto-acoustic waves.

  3. Finite-difference numerical modelling of gravito-acoustic wave propagation in a windy and attenuating atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brissaud, Quentin; Martin, Roland; Garcia, Raphaël F.; Komatitsch, Dimitri

    2016-04-01

    Acoustic and gravity waves propagating in planetary atmospheres have been studied intensively as markers of specific phenomena such as tectonic events or explosions or as contributors to atmosphere dynamics. To get a better understanding of the physics behind these dynamic processes, both acoustic and gravity waves propagation should be modelled in a 3D attenuating and windy atmosphere extending from the ground to the upper thermosphere. Thus, in order to provide an efficient numerical tool at the regional or global scale we introduce a finite difference in the time domain (FDTD) approach that relies on the linearized compressible Navier-Stokes equations with a background flow (wind). One significant benefit of such a method is its versatility because it handles both acoustic and gravity waves in the same simulation, which enables one to observe interactions between them. Simulations can be performed for 2D or 3D realistic cases such as tsunamis in a full MSISE-00 atmosphere or gravity-wave generation by atmospheric explosions. We validate the computations by comparing them to analytical solutions based on dispersion relations in specific benchmark cases: an atmospheric explosion, and a ground displacement forcing.

  4. Transmission of wave energy in curved ducts. [acoustic propagation within rigid walls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rostafinski, W.

    1974-01-01

    Investigation of the ability of circular bends to transmit acoustic energy flux. A formulation of wave-energy flow is developed for motion in curved ducts. A parametric study over a range of frequencies shows the ability of circular bends to transmit energy in the case of perfectly rigid walls.

  5. The subgrid modeling of propagation of acoustic waves in heterogeneous media with multiscale isotropic random elastic stiffness and density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soboleva, O. N.; Kurochkina, E. P.

    2016-01-01

    The effective coefficients in the problem of the acoustic wave propagation have been calculated for a multiscale 3D isotropic medium using a subgrid modeling approach. The density and the elastic stiffness have been represented mathematically by the Kolmogorov multiplicative cascades, which, to date, appear to be the only mechanisms for generating a stationary multifractal fields with a log-stable probability distribution. The fields with the stable distribution are described with the help of linear combination random values ?, ? and weight coefficients ?, ?, which satisfy certain conditions in the nodes of spatial grid ?. The parameters of the stable distribution of the random values ?, ? are equal: ?, ?, ?, ?. The wavelength is assumed to be large as compared with the scale of heterogeneities of the medium. We consider the regime in which the waves propagate over a distance of the typical wave length in source. The theoretical results obtained in this paper are compared with the results of a direct 3D numerical simulation.

  6. Effects of obliqueness and strong electrostatic interaction on linear and nonlinear propagation of dust-acoustic waves in a magnetized strongly coupled dusty plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Shahmansouri, M.; Mamun, A. A.

    2014-03-15

    Linear and nonlinear propagation of dust-acoustic waves in a magnetized strongly coupled dusty plasma is theoretically investigated. The normal mode analysis (reductive perturbation method) is employed to investigate the role of ambient/external magnetic field, obliqueness, and effective electrostatic dust-temperature in modifying the properties of linear (nonlinear) dust-acoustic waves propagating in such a strongly coupled dusty plasma. The effective electrostatic dust-temperature, which arises from strong electrostatic interactions among highly charged dust, is considered as a dynamical variable. The linear dispersion relation (describing the linear propagation characteristics) for the obliquely propagating dust-acoustic waves is derived and analyzed. On the other hand, the Korteweg-de Vries equation describing the nonlinear propagation of the dust-acoustic waves (particularly, propagation of dust-acoustic solitary waves) is derived and solved. It is shown that the combined effects of obliqueness, magnitude of the ambient/external magnetic field, and effective electrostatic dust-temperature significantly modify the basic properties of linear and nonlinear dust-acoustic waves. The results of this work are compared with those observed by some laboratory experiments.

  7. Propagation of Electron Acoustic Soliton, Periodic and Shock Waves in Dissipative Plasma with a q-Nonextensive Electron Velocity Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    A. M., El-Hanbaly; E. K., El-Shewy; Elgarayhi, A.; A. I., Kassem

    2015-11-01

    The nonlinear properties of small amplitude electron-acoustic (EA) solitary and shock waves in a homogeneous system of unmagnetized collisionless plasma with nonextensive distribution for hot electrons have been investigated. A reductive perturbation method used to obtain the Kadomstev-Petviashvili-Burgers equation. Bifurcation analysis has been discussed for non-dissipative system in the absence of Burgers term and reveals different classes of the traveling wave solutions. The obtained solutions are related to periodic and soliton waves and their behavior are shown graphically. In the presence of the Burgers term, the EXP-function method is used to solve the Kadomstev-Petviashvili-Burgers equation and the obtained solution is related to shock wave. The obtained results may be helpful in better conception of waves propagation in various space plasma environments as well as in inertial confinement fusion laboratory plasmas.

  8. Current state of acoustic wave propagation modelling and its use in the estimation of impact on marine mammals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Racca, R.; Hannay, D.; Carr, S.

    2006-05-01

    Underwater acoustic wave propagation modelling has matured into a sophisticated and reliable forecasting tool for predicting the acoustic noise footprints of geophysical exploration activities. Computational methods such as Parabolic Equation solutions of the wave function can account for all aspects of acoustic propagation including diffraction, mode stripping, and compressional and shear wave transmission in the seabed substrate. Given sufficient knowledge of the acousto-physical properties of the water column and the seabed, it is possible to estimate the acoustic transmission loss for individual sound frequencies and hence the overall attenuation of a spectrally described source at any range. In combination with numerical models that provide reliable estimates of the acoustic pulse properties and spatial pattern of the sound emission from any design of airgun array, wave propagation modelling provides the means to fully characterize the ensonification of an area without need for experimental measurement, allowing the potential impact on the marine environment of a planned operation to be studied in advance of physical deployment of the equipment. In this presentation we provide an overview of the current state of acoustic propagation modelling methods with particular emphasis on full noise footprint estimation, whereby the acoustic propagation model is automatically run along multiple traverses to cover the region of interest to a desired spatial resolution. The prediction of sound level footprints, however, is only a step in the process of estimating the acoustic impact on sea life and especially marine mammals. The interaction between the sound and the subject is also influenced by the subject's frequency-dependent auditory sensitivity relative to the frequency content of the sounds to which it is exposed. Much experimental work has been performed recently to measure frequency- dependent auditory thresholds (audiograms) for many marine mammal species. The

  9. Acoustic-radiation-force-induced shear wave propagation in cardiac tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchard, Richard R.; Wolf, Patrick D.; Hsu, Stephen J.; Dumont, Douglas M.; Trahey, Gregg E.

    2009-02-01

    Shear wave elasticity imaging (SWEI) was employed to track acoustic radiation force (ARF)-induced shear waves in the myocardium of a beating heart. Shear waves were generated in and tracked through the myocardium of the left ventricular free wall (LVFW) in an in vivo heart that was exposed through a thoracotomy; matched studies were also preformed on an ex vivo myocardial specimen. Average shear wave velocities ranged from 2.22 to 2.53 m/s for the ex vivo specimen and 1.5 to 2.9 m/s (1.5-2.09 m/s during diastole; 2.9 m/s during systole) for in vivo specimens. Despite the known rotation of myocardial fiber orientation with tissue depth, there was no statistically significant shear wave velocity depth dependence observed in any of the experimental trials.

  10. Propagation of small-scale acoustic-gravity waves in the Venus atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubert, G.; Walterscheid, R. L.

    1984-04-01

    The amplification and attenuation of small-scale acoustic-gravity waves in Venus's atmosphere is studied with a plane-wave model that realistically simulates height variations in structure and zonal circulation. Forcing for these waves could be convective activity at cloud heights or close to the surface, or turbulence arising from small-scale shear instability of the zonal flow; the model treats both surface forcing and cloud-level forcing by diabatic heating variations in the low-stability layer near the base of the clouds. Waves are attenuated in this cloud-level, low-static-stability layer. Slowly moving waves with small vertical length scales are attenuated by eddy diffusivity. Westward moving waves can undergo critical level absorption. A net enhancement in wave amplitude is also possible because waves can be trapped between the surface and the base of the low stability layer at about 50 km. Observations of small-scale wave activity at the cloud tops and above can be used to explore uncertain aspects of atmospheric structure and circulation such as the persistence or decay of the atmospheric superrotation with height above the clouds.

  11. Asymmetric Acoustic Propagation of Wave Packets Via the Self-Demodulation Effect.

    PubMed

    Devaux, Thibaut; Tournat, Vincent; Richoux, Olivier; Pagneux, Vincent

    2015-12-01

    This Letter presents the experimental characterization of nonreciprocal elastic wave transmission in a single-mode elastic waveguide. This asymmetric system is obtained by coupling a selection layer with a conversion layer: the selection component is provided by a phononic crystal, while the conversion is achieved by a nonlinear self-demodulation effect in a 3D unconsolidated granular medium. A quantitative experimental study of this acoustic rectifier indicates a high rectifying ratio, up to 10^{6}, with wide band (10 kHz) and an audible effect. Moreover, this system allows for wave-packet rectification and extends the future applications of asymmetric systems. PMID:26684119

  12. Asymmetric Acoustic Propagation of Wave Packets Via the Self-Demodulation Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devaux, Thibaut; Tournat, Vincent; Richoux, Olivier; Pagneux, Vincent

    2015-12-01

    This Letter presents the experimental characterization of nonreciprocal elastic wave transmission in a single-mode elastic waveguide. This asymmetric system is obtained by coupling a selection layer with a conversion layer: the selection component is provided by a phononic crystal, while the conversion is achieved by a nonlinear self-demodulation effect in a 3D unconsolidated granular medium. A quantitative experimental study of this acoustic rectifier indicates a high rectifying ratio, up to 1 06, with wide band (10 kHz) and an audible effect. Moreover, this system allows for wave-packet rectification and extends the future applications of asymmetric systems.

  13. Acoustic wave propagation in air-bubble curtains in water. Part 1. History and theory

    SciTech Connect

    Domenico, S.N.

    1982-03-01

    Air bubbles in water increase the compressibility several orders of magnitude above that in bubble-free water, thereby greatly reducing the velocity and increasing attenuation of acoustic waves. Currently, air bubble curtains are used to prevent damage of submerged structures (e.g., dams) by shock waves from submarine explosives. Also, air-bubble curtains are used to reduce damage to water-filler tanks in which metals are formed by explosives. Published results of laboratory experiments confirm theoretic velocity and attenuation functions and demonstrate that these quantities are dependent principally upon frequency, bubble size, and fractional volume of air. 31 references.

  14. Passive time-domain numerical models of viscothermal wave propagation in acoustic tubes of variable cross section.

    PubMed

    Bilbao, Stefan; Harrison, Reginald

    2016-07-01

    Numerical modeling of wave propagation in acoustic tubes is a subject of longstanding interest, particularly for enclosures of varying cross section, and especially when viscothermal losses due to boundary layer effects are taken into consideration. Though steady-state, or frequency domain methods, are a common avenue of approach, recursive time domain methods are an alternative, allowing for the generation of wideband responses, and offer a point of departure for more general modeling of nonlinear wave propagation. The design of time-domain methods is complicated by numerical stability considerations, and to this end, a passive representation is a useful design principle leading to simple stable and explicit numerical schemes, particularly in the case of viscothermal loss modeling. Such schemes and the accompanying energy and stability analysis are presented here. Numerical examples are presented for a variety of duct profiles, illustrating strict energy dissipation, and for comparison of computed input impedances against frequency-domain results. PMID:27475194

  15. Multi-dimensional instability of obliquely propagating ion acoustic solitary waves in electron-positron-ion superthermal magnetoplasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    EL-Shamy, E. F.

    2014-08-01

    The solitary structures of multi-dimensional ion-acoustic solitary waves (IASWs) have been considered in magnetoplasmas consisting of electron-positron-ion with high-energy (superthermal) electrons and positrons are investigated. Using a reductive perturbation method, a nonlinear Zakharov-Kuznetsov equation is derived. The multi-dimensional instability of obliquely propagating (with respect to the external magnetic field) IASWs has been studied by the small-k (long wavelength plane wave) expansion perturbation method. The instability condition and the growth rate of the instability have been derived. It is shown that the instability criterion and their growth rate depend on the parameter measuring the superthermality, the ion gyrofrequency, the unperturbed positrons-to-ions density ratio, the direction cosine, and the ion-to-electron temperature ratio. Clearly, the study of our model under consideration is helpful for explaining the propagation and the instability of IASWs in space observations of magnetoplasmas with superthermal electrons and positrons.

  16. Multi-dimensional instability of obliquely propagating ion acoustic solitary waves in electron-positron-ion superthermal magnetoplasmas

    SciTech Connect

    EL-Shamy, E. F.

    2014-08-15

    The solitary structures of multi–dimensional ion-acoustic solitary waves (IASWs) have been considered in magnetoplasmas consisting of electron-positron-ion with high-energy (superthermal) electrons and positrons are investigated. Using a reductive perturbation method, a nonlinear Zakharov-Kuznetsov equation is derived. The multi-dimensional instability of obliquely propagating (with respect to the external magnetic field) IASWs has been studied by the small-k (long wavelength plane wave) expansion perturbation method. The instability condition and the growth rate of the instability have been derived. It is shown that the instability criterion and their growth rate depend on the parameter measuring the superthermality, the ion gyrofrequency, the unperturbed positrons-to-ions density ratio, the direction cosine, and the ion-to-electron temperature ratio. Clearly, the study of our model under consideration is helpful for explaining the propagation and the instability of IASWs in space observations of magnetoplasmas with superthermal electrons and positrons.

  17. Guided acoustic wave inspection system

    DOEpatents

    Chinn, Diane J.

    2004-10-05

    A system for inspecting a conduit for undesirable characteristics. A transducer system induces guided acoustic waves onto said conduit. The transducer system detects the undesirable characteristics of the conduit by receiving guided acoustic waves that contain information about the undesirable characteristics. The conduit has at least two sides and the transducer system utilizes flexural modes of propagation to provide inspection using access from only the one side of the conduit. Cracking is detected with pulse-echo testing using one transducer to both send and receive the guided acoustic waves. Thinning is detected in through-transmission testing where one transducer sends and another transducer receives the guided acoustic waves.

  18. Effect of soil texture and excitation frequency on the propagation and attenuation of acoustic waves at saturated conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, Wei-Cheng; Yeh, Chao-Lung; Jan, Chyan-Deng

    2008-08-01

    SummaryThe study of the propagation and dissipation of acoustic waves through a fluid-containing porous medium is crucial for the successful application of seismic methods to characterize subsurface hydrological properties. To gain a better understanding of changes in two important acoustic wave characteristics (speed and attenuation) due to the effect of soil texture and excitation frequency, a complex-valued dispersion relation obtained from the Biot theory of poroelasticity was solved numerically for eleven soil texture classes whose pore space is fully saturated by one of two very different fluids, air or water. Two modes of acoustic motion can be demonstrated to exist, known as the Biot fast and slow waves. Five lower excitation frequencies (100-500 Hz) were selected for numerical simulation, below which Darcy's law remains valid for describing porous media flow under wave perturbation. Numerical results show that in the frequency range we examined, the predicted phase speed of the Biot fast wave takes the same value as the Biot reference speed. The variation in speed is not obvious in a water-filled system, but becomes more significant in an air-filled system. When the pore fluid is water, an inverse linear relation exists between the phase speed of the Biot fast wave and porosity. An important physical parameter controlling its attenuation coefficient is intrinsic permeability, which renders a positive impact. A statistical analysis indicates that the attenuation coefficient of the Biot fast wave linearly increases with an increase in intrinsic permeability. In an air-saturated system, the phase speed of the Biot slow wave is found to be quadratically proportional to intrinsic permeability, whereas the attenuation coefficient of the Biot slow wave bears a quadratic relation with the inverse of intrinsic permeability. A study on the influence of pore fluid reveals that the Biot fast wave attenuates more in the water-saturated system than in the air

  19. Oblique propagation of ion acoustic shock waves in weakly and highly relativistic plasmas with nonthermal electrons and positrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafez, M. G.; Roy, N. C.; Talukder, M. R.; Hossain Ali, M.

    2016-09-01

    This work investigates the oblique nonlinear propagation of ion acoustic (IA) shock waves for both weakly and highly relativistic plasmas composed of nonthermal electrons and positrons with relativistic thermal ions. The KdVB-like equation, involving dispersive, weakly transverse dispersive, nonlinearity and dissipative coefficients, is derived employing the well known reductive perturbation method. The integration of this equation is carried out by the {tanh} method taking the stable shock formation condition into account. The effects of nonthermal electrons and positrons, nonthermal electrons with isothermal positrons, isothermal electrons with nonthermal positrons, and isothermal electrons and positrons on oblique propagation of IA shock waves in weakly relativistic regime are described. Furthermore, the effects of plasma parameters on oblique propagation of IA shock waves in highly relativistic regime are discussed and compared with weakly relativistic case. It is seen that the plasma parameters within certain limits significantly modify the structures of the IA shock waves in both cases. The results may be useful for better understanding of the interactions of charged particles with extra-galactic jets as well as astrophysical compact objects.

  20. On the propagation of long waves in acoustically treated, curved ducts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rostafinski, W.

    1981-01-01

    A two dimensional study is presented on the behavior of long waves in lined, curved ducts. The analysis includes a comparison between the propagation in curved and straight lined ducts. A parametric study was conducted over a range of wall admittance and duct wall separation. The complex eigenvalues of the characteristic equation, which in the case of a curved duct are also the angular wavenumbers, were obtained by successive approximations.

  1. Canonical Acoustics and Its Application to Surface Acoustic Wave on Acoustic Metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Jian Qi

    2016-08-01

    In a conventional formalism of acoustics, acoustic pressure p and velocity field u are used for characterizing acoustic waves propagating inside elastic/acoustic materials. We shall treat some fundamental problems relevant to acoustic wave propagation alternatively by using canonical acoustics (a more concise and compact formalism of acoustic dynamics), in which an acoustic scalar potential and an acoustic vector potential (Φ ,V), instead of the conventional acoustic field quantities such as acoustic pressure and velocity field (p,u) for characterizing acoustic waves, have been defined as the fundamental variables. The canonical formalism of the acoustic energy-momentum tensor is derived in terms of the acoustic potentials. Both the acoustic Hamiltonian density and the acoustic Lagrangian density have been defined, and based on this formulation, the acoustic wave quantization in a fluid is also developed. Such a formalism of acoustic potentials is employed to the problem of negative-mass-density assisted surface acoustic wave that is a highly localized surface bound state (an eigenstate of the acoustic wave equations). Since such a surface acoustic wave can be strongly confined to an interface between an acoustic metamaterial (e.g., fluid-solid composite structures with a negative dynamical mass density) and an ordinary material (with a positive mass density), it will give rise to an effect of acoustic field enhancement on the acoustic interface, and would have potential applications in acoustic device design for acoustic wave control.

  2. Effect of spatial dispersion on transient acoustic wave propagation in 3D.

    PubMed

    Every, A G

    2006-12-22

    Spatial dispersion is the variation of wave speed with wavelength. It sets in when the acoustic wavelength approaches the natural scale of length of the medium, which could, for example, be the lattice constant of a crystal, the repeat distance in a superlattice, or the grain size in a granular material. In centrosymmetric media, the first onset of dispersion is accommodated by the introduction of fourth order spatial derivatives into the wave equation. These lead to a correction to the phase velocity which is quadratic in the spatial frequency. This paper treats the effect of spatial dispersion on the point force elastodynamic Green's functions of solids. The effects of dispersion are shown to be most pronounced in the vicinity of wave arrivals. These lose their singular form, and are transformed into wave trains known as quasi-arrivals. The step and ramp function wave arrivals are treated, and it is shown that their unfolded quasi-arrival forms can be expressed in terms of integrals involving the Airy function. PMID:16828830

  3. Strong acoustic wave action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gokhberg, M. B.

    1983-07-01

    Experiments devoted to acoustic action on the atmosphere-magnetosphere-ionosphere system using ground based strong explosions are reviewed. The propagation of acoustic waves was observed by ground observations over 2000 km in horizontal direction and to an altitude of 200 km. Magnetic variations up to 100 nT were detected by ARIEL-3 satellite near the epicenter of the explosion connected with the formation of strong field aligned currents in the magnetosphere. The enhancement of VLF emission at 800 km altitude is observed.

  4. Nonlinear propagation of dust-acoustic waves in an unmagnetized dusty plasma with nonthermal electron and vortex-like ion distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, A.; Mandal, G.; Amin, M. R.; Mamun, A. A.

    2013-10-15

    The nonlinear propagation of dust-acoustic (DA) waves in an unmagnetized dusty plasma consisting of nonthermal electrons, vortex-like (trapped) distributed ions and mobile negative dust have been investigated by employing the reductive perturbation technique. The effects of nonthermal electrons and trapped ions are found to modify the properties of the DA solitary waves.

  5. Numerical study of wave propagation around an underground cavity: acoustic case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esterhazy, Sofi; Perugia, Ilaria; Schöberl, Joachim; Bokelmann, Götz

    2015-04-01

    Motivated by the need to detect an underground cavity within the procedure of an On-Site-Inspection (OSI) of the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO), which might be caused by a nuclear explosion/weapon testing, we aim to provide a basic numerical study of the wave propagation around and inside such an underground cavity. The aim of the CTBTO is to ban all nuclear explosions of any size anywhere, by anyone. Therefore, it is essential to build a powerful strategy to efficiently investigate and detect critical signatures such as gas filled cavities, rubble zones and fracture networks below the surface. One method to investigate the geophysical properties of an underground cavity allowed by the Comprehensive Nuclear-test Ban Treaty is referred to as 'resonance seismometry' - a resonance method that uses passive or active seismic techniques, relying on seismic cavity vibrations. This method is in fact not yet entirely determined by the Treaty and there are also only few experimental examples that have been suitably documented to build a proper scientific groundwork. This motivates to investigate this problem on a purely numerical level and to simulate these events based on recent advances in the mathematical understanding of the underlying physical phenomena. Here, we focus our numerical study on the propagation of P-waves in two dimensions. An extension to three dimensions as well as an inclusion of the full elastic wave field is planned in the following. For the numerical simulations of wave propagation we use a high order finite element discretization which has the significant advantage that it can be extended easily from simple toy designs to complex and irregularly shaped geometries without excessive effort. Our computations are done with the parallel Finite Element Library NGSOLVE ontop of the automatic 2D/3D tetrahedral mesh generator NETGEN (http://sourceforge.net/projects/ngsolve/). Using the basic mathematical understanding of the

  6. Dynamic adaptive finite element analysis of acoustic wave propagation due to underwater explosion for fluid-structure interaction problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emamzadeh, Seyed Shahab; Ahmadi, Mohammad Taghi; Mohammadi, Soheil; Biglarkhani, Masoud

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, an investigation into the propagation of far field explosion waves in water and their effects on nearby structures are carried out. For the far field structure, the motion of the fluid surrounding the structure may be assumed small, allowing linearization of the governing fluid equations. A complete analysis of the problem must involve simultaneous solution of the dynamic response of the structure and the propagation of explosion wave in the surrounding fluid. In this study, a dynamic adaptive finite element procedure is proposed. Its application to the solution of a 2D fluid-structure interaction is investigated in the time domain. The research includes: a) calculation of the far-field scatter wave due to underwater explosion including solution of the time-depended acoustic wave equation, b) fluid-structure interaction analysis using coupled Euler-Lagrangian approach, and c) adaptive finite element procedures employing error estimates, and re-meshing. The temporal mesh adaptation is achieved by local regeneration of the grid using a time-dependent error indicator based on curvature of pressure function. As a result, the overall response is better predicted by a moving mesh than an equivalent uniform mesh. In addition, the cost of computation for large problems is reduced while the accuracy is improved.

  7. Concurrent Visualization of Acoustic Radiation Force Displacement and Shear Wave Propagation with 7T MRI

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yu; Fite, Brett Z.; Mahakian, Lisa M.; Johnson, Sarah M.; Larrat, Benoit; Dumont, Erik; Ferrara, Katherine W.

    2015-01-01

    Manual palpation is a common and very informative diagnostic tool based on estimation of changes in the stiffness of tissues that result from pathology. In the case of a small lesion or a lesion that is located deep within the body, it is difficult for changes in mechanical properties of tissue to be detected or evaluated via palpation. Furthermore, palpation is non-quantitative and cannot be used to localize the lesion. Magnetic Resonance-guided Focused Ultrasound (MRgFUS) can also be used to evaluate the properties of biological tissues non-invasively. In this study, an MRgFUS system combines high field (7T) MR and 3 MHz focused ultrasound to provide high resolution MR imaging and a small ultrasonic interrogation region (~0.5 x 0.5 x 2 mm), as compared with current clinical systems. MR-Acoustic Radiation Force Imaging (MR-ARFI) provides a reliable and efficient method for beam localization by detecting micron-scale displacements induced by ultrasound mechanical forces. The first aim of this study is to develop a sequence that can concurrently quantify acoustic radiation force displacements and image the resulting transient shear wave. Our motivation in combining these two measurements is to develop a technique that can rapidly provide both ARFI and shear wave velocity estimation data, making it suitable for use in interventional radiology. Secondly, we validate this sequence in vivo by estimating the displacement before and after high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) ablation, and we validate the shear wave velocity in vitro using tissue-mimicking gelatin and tofu phantoms. Such rapid acquisitions are especially useful in interventional radiology applications where minimizing scan time is highly desirable. PMID:26439259

  8. Oblique propagation of dust ion-acoustic solitary waves in a magnetized dusty pair-ion plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Misra, A. P. E-mail: apmisra@gmail.com; Barman, Arnab

    2014-07-15

    We investigate the propagation characteristics of electrostatic waves in a magnetized pair-ion plasma with immobile charged dusts. It is shown that obliquely propagating (OP) low-frequency (in comparison with the negative-ion cyclotron frequency) long-wavelength “slow” and “fast” modes can propagate, respectively, as dust ion-acoustic (DIA) and dust ion-cyclotron (DIC)-like waves. The properties of these modes are studied with the effects of obliqueness of propagation (θ), the static magnetic field, the ratios of the negative to positive ion masses (m), and temperatures (T) as well as the dust to negative-ion number density ratio (δ). Using the standard reductive perturbation technique, we derive a Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation which governs the evolution of small-amplitude OP DIA waves. It is found that the KdV equation admits only rarefactive solitons in plasmas with m well below its critical value m{sub c} (≫ 1) which typically depends on T and δ. It is shown that the nonlinear coefficient of the KdV equation vanishes at m = m{sub c}, i.e., for plasmas with much heavier negative ions, and the evolution of the DIA waves is then described by a modified KdV (mKdV) equation. The latter is shown to have only compressive soliton solution. The properties of both the KdV and mKdV solitons are studied with the system parameters as above, and possible applications of our results to laboratory and space plasmas are briefly discussed.

  9. 3D numerical simulation of the long range propagation of acoustical shock waves through a heterogeneous and moving medium

    SciTech Connect

    Luquet, David; Marchiano, Régis; Coulouvrat, François

    2015-10-28

    Many situations involve the propagation of acoustical shock waves through flows. Natural sources such as lightning, volcano explosions, or meteoroid atmospheric entries, emit loud, low frequency, and impulsive sound that is influenced by atmospheric wind and turbulence. The sonic boom produced by a supersonic aircraft and explosion noises are examples of intense anthropogenic sources in the atmosphere. The Buzz-Saw-Noise produced by turbo-engine fan blades rotating at supersonic speed also propagates in a fast flow within the engine nacelle. Simulating these situations is challenging, given the 3D nature of the problem, the long range propagation distances relative to the central wavelength, the strongly nonlinear behavior of shocks associated to a wide-band spectrum, and finally the key role of the flow motion. With this in view, the so-called FLHOWARD (acronym for FLow and Heterogeneous One-Way Approximation for Resolution of Diffraction) method is presented with three-dimensional applications. A scalar nonlinear wave equation is established in the framework of atmospheric applications, assuming weak heterogeneities and a slow wind. It takes into account diffraction, absorption and relaxation properties of the atmosphere, quadratic nonlinearities including weak shock waves, heterogeneities of the medium in sound speed and density, and presence of a flow (assuming a mean stratified wind and 3D turbulent ? flow fluctuations of smaller amplitude). This equation is solved in the framework of the one-way method. A split-step technique allows the splitting of the non-linear wave equation into simpler equations, each corresponding to a physical effect. Each sub-equation is solved using an analytical method if possible, and finite-differences otherwise. Nonlinear effects are solved in the time domain, and others in the frequency domain. Homogeneous diffraction is handled by means of the angular spectrum method. Ground is assumed perfectly flat and rigid. Due to the 3D

  10. 3D numerical simulation of the long range propagation of acoustical shock waves through a heterogeneous and moving medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luquet, David; Marchiano, Régis; Coulouvrat, François

    2015-10-01

    Many situations involve the propagation of acoustical shock waves through flows. Natural sources such as lightning, volcano explosions, or meteoroid atmospheric entries, emit loud, low frequency, and impulsive sound that is influenced by atmospheric wind and turbulence. The sonic boom produced by a supersonic aircraft and explosion noises are examples of intense anthropogenic sources in the atmosphere. The Buzz-Saw-Noise produced by turbo-engine fan blades rotating at supersonic speed also propagates in a fast flow within the engine nacelle. Simulating these situations is challenging, given the 3D nature of the problem, the long range propagation distances relative to the central wavelength, the strongly nonlinear behavior of shocks associated to a wide-band spectrum, and finally the key role of the flow motion. With this in view, the so-called FLHOWARD (acronym for FLow and Heterogeneous One-Way Approximation for Resolution of Diffraction) method is presented with three-dimensional applications. A scalar nonlinear wave equation is established in the framework of atmospheric applications, assuming weak heterogeneities and a slow wind. It takes into account diffraction, absorption and relaxation properties of the atmosphere, quadratic nonlinearities including weak shock waves, heterogeneities of the medium in sound speed and density, and presence of a flow (assuming a mean stratified wind and 3D turbulent ? flow fluctuations of smaller amplitude). This equation is solved in the framework of the one-way method. A split-step technique allows the splitting of the non-linear wave equation into simpler equations, each corresponding to a physical effect. Each sub-equation is solved using an analytical method if possible, and finite-differences otherwise. Nonlinear effects are solved in the time domain, and others in the frequency domain. Homogeneous diffraction is handled by means of the angular spectrum method. Ground is assumed perfectly flat and rigid. Due to the 3D

  11. Theoretical analysis of surface acoustic wave propagating properties of Y-cut nano lithium niobate film on silicon dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jing; Zhang, Qiaozhen; Han, Tao; Zhou, Liu; Tang, Gongbin; Liu, Boquan; Ji, Xiaojun

    2015-08-01

    The surface acoustic wave (SAW) propagating characteristics of Y-cut nano LiNbO3 (LN) film on SiO2/LN substrate have been theoretically calculated. The simulated results showed a shear horizontal (SH) SAW with enhanced electromechanical coupling factor K2 owing to a dimensional effect of the nanoscale LN film. However, a Rayleigh SAW and two other resonances related to thickness vibrations caused spurious responses for wideband SAW devices. These spurious waves could be fully suppressed by properly controlling structural parameters including the electrode layer height, thickness, and the Euler angle (θ) of the LN thin film. Finally, a pure SH SAW was obtained with a wide θ range, from 0° to 5° and 165° to 180°. The largest K2 achieved for the pure SH SAW was about 35.1%. The calculated results demonstrate the promising application of nano LN film to the realization of ultra-wideband SAW devices.

  12. Thermal Acoustic Wave Propagation Within a Slightly Compressible Viscous Fluid-Filled Impermeable Cylindrical Elastic Tube.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Paul Nan-Jiune

    1990-01-01

    Three dimensional mode shapes for thermoelastic waves in a viscous, compressible, fluid-filled infinite annular elastic concentric cylinder are studied using the exact coupled three dimensional equations for the vibrations in the n = 0, 1 circumferential modes. These results are related to those which arise under circumstances where uncoupled shear modes in the wall and the fluid have similar axial phase velocities and therefore are in a state sometimes called "coincidence". Three dimensional dispersion curves and modal wave plots are presented for a range of parameters including a steel tube containing water, glycerin and air. The corresponding axial mode shapes and radial mode shapes and their three dimensional equivalents are plotted so that the types of wave motion can be identified. The thermal effect for wave propagation in a fluid -filled annular elastic steel tube is found to be very important. This effect can cause a 15% difference (the average for water and glycerin) with that neglecting the thermal effect with the system equations. However, for an elastic steel tube or a fluid line alone, the thermal effect is small (< 1%) under the conditions of room temperature and the radius ratio of inner to outer radii is 0.93. The mechanism for the importance of the thermal effect in the coupled fluid-solid problem is related to the relatively higher thermal conductivity at the solid wall which conducts away heat from the relatively insulated viscous liquid boundary layer.

  13. ZnO films on /001/-cut (110)-propagating GaAs substrates for surface acoustic wave device applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hickernell, Frederick S.; Higgins, Robert J.; Jen, Cheng-Kuei; Kim, Yoonkee; Hunt, William D.

    1995-01-01

    A potential application for piezoelectric films substrates is the monolithic integration of surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices with GaAs electronics. Knowledge of the SAW properties of the layered structure is critical for the optimum and accurate design of such devices. The acoustic properties of ZnO films sputtered on /001/-cut group of (110) zone axes-propagating GaAs substrates are investigated in this article, including SAW velocity, effective piezoelectric coupling constant, propagation loss, diffraction, velocity surface, and reflectivity of shorted and open metallic gratings. The measurements of these essential SAW properties for the frequency range between 180 and 360 MHz have been performed using a knife-edge laser probe for film thicknesses over the range of 1.6-4 micron and with films of different grain sizes. The high quality of dc triode sputtered films was observed as evidenced by high K(sup 2) and low attenuation. The measurements of the velocity surface, which directly affects the SAW diffraction, on the bare and metalized ZnO on SiO2 or Si3N4 on /001/-cut GaAs samples are reported using two different techniques: (1) knife-edge laser probe, (2) line-focus-beam scanning acoustic microscope. It was found that near the group of (110) zone axes propagation direction, the focusing SAW property of the bare GaAs changes into a nonfocusing one for the layered structure, but a reversed phenomenon exists near the (100) direction. Furthermore, to some extent the diffraction of the substrate can be controlled with the film thickness. The reflectivity of shorted and open gratings are also analyzed and measured. Zero reflectivity is observed for a shorted grating. There is good agreement between the measured data and theoretical values.

  14. ZnO Films on {001}-Cut <110>-Propagating GaAs Substrates for Surface Acoustic Wave Device Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Yoonkee; Hunt, William D.; Hickernell, Frederick S.; Higgins, Robert J.; Jen, Cheng-Kuei

    1995-01-01

    A potential application for piezoelectric films on GaAs substrates is the monolithic integration of surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices with GaAs electronics. Knowledge of the SAW properties of the layered structure is critical for the optimum and accurate design of such devices. The acoustic properties of ZnO films sputtered on {001}-cut <110> -propagating GaAs substrates are investigated in this article, including SAW Velocity effective piezoelectric coupling constant, propagation loss. diffraction, velocity surface, and reflectivity of shorted and open metallic gratings. The measurements of these essential SAW properties for the frequency range between 180 and 360 MHz have been performed using a knife-edge laser probe for film thicknesses over the range of 1.6-4 micron and with films or different grain sizes. The high quality of dc triode sputtered films was observed as evidenced by high K(exp 2) and low attenuation. The measurements of the velocity surface, which directly affects the SAW diffraction, on the bare and metalized ZnO on SiO2, or Si3N4 on {001}-cut GaAs samples are reported using two different techniques: 1) knife-edge laser probe, 2) line-focus-beam scanning acoustic microscope. It was found that near the <110> propagation direction, the focusing SAW property of the bare GaAs changes into a nonfocusing one for the layered structure, but a reversed phenomenon exists near the <100> direction. Furthermore, to some extent the diffraction of the substrate can be controlled with the film thickness. The reflectivity of shorted and open gratings are also analyzed and measured. Zero reflectivity is observed for a shorted grating. There is good agreement between the measured data and theoretical values.

  15. Propagation of ion acoustic shock waves in negative ion plasmas with nonextensive electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Hussain, S.; Akhtar, N.; Mahmood, S.

    2013-09-15

    Nonlinear ion acoustic shocks (monotonic as well as oscillatory) waves in negative ion plasmas are investigated. The inertialess electron species are assumed to be nonthermal and follow Tsallis distribution. The dissipation in the plasma is considered via kinematic viscosities of both positive and negative ion species. The Korteweg-de Vries Burgers (KdVB) equation is derived using small amplitude reductive perturbation technique and its analytical solution is presented. The effects of variation of density and temperature of negative ions and nonthermal parameter q of electrons on the strength of the shock structures are plotted for illustration. The numerical solutions of KdVB equation using Runge Kutta method are obtained, and transition from oscillatory to monotonic shock structures is also discussed in detail for negative ions nonthermal plasmas.

  16. Nonlinear propagation of Electron-acoustic waves in a nonextensive electron-positron-ion plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, M. M.; Rafat, A.; Alam, M. S.; Mamun, A. A.

    2015-03-01

    Electron-acoustic shock waves (EASWs) in an unmagnetized electron-positron-ion plasma system (consisting of a cold mobile viscous electron fluid, hot electrons and positrons following the q-nonextensive distribution, and immobile positive ions) are studied analytically. The Burgers equation is derived by using the well-known reductive perturbation method. The basic features (viz. polarity, amplitude, width, phase speed, etc.) of EASWs are briefly addressed. The basic features of EASWs are found to be significantly modified by the effects of nonextensivity of the hot electrons and positrons, the relative number density and temperature ratios, and the kinematic viscosity of the cold electrons. The present investigation can be useful in understanding the fundamental characteristics of EASWs in various space plasmas.

  17. Implementation of dispersion-free slow acoustic wave propagation and phase engineering with helical-structured metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xuefeng; Li, Kun; Zhang, Peng; Zhu, Jie; Zhang, Jintao; Tian, Chao; Liu, Shengchun

    2016-05-01

    The ability to slow down wave propagation in materials has attracted significant research interest. A successful solution will give rise to manageable enhanced wave-matter interaction, freewheeling phase engineering and spatial compression of wave signals. The existing methods are typically associated with constructing dispersive materials or structures with local resonators, thus resulting in unavoidable distortion of waveforms. Here we show that, with helical-structured acoustic metamaterials, it is now possible to implement dispersion-free sound deceleration. The helical-structured metamaterials present a non-dispersive high effective refractive index that is tunable through adjusting the helicity of structures, while the wavefront revolution plays a dominant role in reducing the group velocity. Finally, we numerically and experimentally demonstrate that the helical-structured metamaterials with designed inhomogeneous unit cells can turn a normally incident plane wave into a self-accelerating beam on the prescribed parabolic trajectory. The helical-structured metamaterials will have profound impact to applications in explorations of slow wave physics.

  18. Implementation of dispersion-free slow acoustic wave propagation and phase engineering with helical-structured metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xuefeng; Li, Kun; Zhang, Peng; Zhu, Jie; Zhang, Jintao; Tian, Chao; Liu, Shengchun

    2016-01-01

    The ability to slow down wave propagation in materials has attracted significant research interest. A successful solution will give rise to manageable enhanced wave-matter interaction, freewheeling phase engineering and spatial compression of wave signals. The existing methods are typically associated with constructing dispersive materials or structures with local resonators, thus resulting in unavoidable distortion of waveforms. Here we show that, with helical-structured acoustic metamaterials, it is now possible to implement dispersion-free sound deceleration. The helical-structured metamaterials present a non-dispersive high effective refractive index that is tunable through adjusting the helicity of structures, while the wavefront revolution plays a dominant role in reducing the group velocity. Finally, we numerically and experimentally demonstrate that the helical-structured metamaterials with designed inhomogeneous unit cells can turn a normally incident plane wave into a self-accelerating beam on the prescribed parabolic trajectory. The helical-structured metamaterials will have profound impact to applications in explorations of slow wave physics. PMID:27198887

  19. Propagation and stability of quantum dust-ion-acoustic shock waves in planar and nonplanar geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Masood, W.; Siddiq, M.; Nargis, Shahida; Mirza, Arshad M.

    2009-01-15

    Dust-ion-acoustic (DIA) shock waves are studied in an unmagnetized quantum plasma consisting of electrons, ions, and dust by employing the quantum hydrodynamic (QHD) model. In this context, a Korteweg-deVries-Burger (KdVB) equation is derived by employing the small amplitude perturbation expansion method. The dissipation is introduced by taking into account the kinematic viscosity among the plasma constituents. It is found that the strength of the quantum DIA shock wave is maximum for spherical, intermediate for cylindrical, and minimum for the planar geometry. The effects of quantum Bohm potential, dust concentration, and kinematic viscosity on the quantum DIA shock structure are also investigated. The temporal evolution of DIA KdV solitons and Burger shocks are also studied by putting the dissipative and dispersive coefficients equal to zero, respectively. The effects of the quantum Bohm potential on the stability of the DIA shock is also investigated. The present investigation may be beneficial to understand the dissipative and dispersive processes that may occur in the quantum dusty plasmas found in microelectronic devices as well as in astrophysical plasmas.

  20. Stochastic simulation for the propagation of high-frequency acoustic waves through a random velocity field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, B.; Darmon, M.; Leymarie, N.; Chatillon, S.; Potel, C.

    2012-05-01

    In-service inspection of Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactors (SFR) requires the development of non-destructive techniques adapted to the harsh environment conditions and the examination complexity. From past experiences, ultrasonic techniques are considered as suitable candidates. The ultrasonic telemetry is a technique used to constantly insure the safe functioning of reactor inner components by determining their exact position: it consists in measuring the time of flight of the ultrasonic response obtained after propagation of a pulse emitted by a transducer and its interaction with the targets. While in-service the sodium flow creates turbulences that lead to temperature inhomogeneities, which translates into ultrasonic velocity inhomogeneities. These velocity variations could directly impact the accuracy of the target locating by introducing time of flight variations. A stochastic simulation model has been developed to calculate the propagation of ultrasonic waves in such an inhomogeneous medium. Using this approach, the travel time is randomly generated by a stochastic process whose inputs are the statistical moments of travel times known analytically. The stochastic model predicts beam deviations due to velocity inhomogeneities, which are similar to those provided by a determinist method, such as the ray method.

  1. The numerical solution of the Helmholtz equation for wave propagation problems in underwater acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayliss, A.; Goldstein, C. I.; Turkel, E.

    1984-01-01

    The Helmholtz Equation (-delta-K(2)n(2))u=0 with a variable index of refraction, n, and a suitable radiation condition at infinity serves as a model for a wide variety of wave propagation problems. A numerical algorithm was developed and a computer code implemented that can effectively solve this equation in the intermediate frequency range. The equation is discretized using the finite element method, thus allowing for the modeling of complicated geometrices (including interfaces) and complicated boundary conditions. A global radiation boundary condition is imposed at the far field boundary that is exact for an arbitrary number of propagating modes. The resulting large, non-selfadjoint system of linear equations with indefinite symmetric part is solved using the preconditioned conjugate gradient method applied to the normal equations. A new preconditioner is developed based on the multigrid method. This preconditioner is vectorizable and is extremely effective over a wide range of frequencies provided the number of grid levels is reduced for large frequencies. A heuristic argument is given that indicates the superior convergence properties of this preconditioner.

  2. Stochastic simulation for the propagation of high-frequency acoustic waves through a random velocity field

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, B.; Darmon, M.; Leymarie, N.; Chatillon, S.; Potel, C.

    2012-05-17

    In-service inspection of Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactors (SFR) requires the development of non-destructive techniques adapted to the harsh environment conditions and the examination complexity. From past experiences, ultrasonic techniques are considered as suitable candidates. The ultrasonic telemetry is a technique used to constantly insure the safe functioning of reactor inner components by determining their exact position: it consists in measuring the time of flight of the ultrasonic response obtained after propagation of a pulse emitted by a transducer and its interaction with the targets. While in-service the sodium flow creates turbulences that lead to temperature inhomogeneities, which translates into ultrasonic velocity inhomogeneities. These velocity variations could directly impact the accuracy of the target locating by introducing time of flight variations. A stochastic simulation model has been developed to calculate the propagation of ultrasonic waves in such an inhomogeneous medium. Using this approach, the travel time is randomly generated by a stochastic process whose inputs are the statistical moments of travel times known analytically. The stochastic model predicts beam deviations due to velocity inhomogeneities, which are similar to those provided by a determinist method, such as the ray method.

  3. Implementation of dispersion-free slow acoustic wave propagation and phase engineering with helical-structured metamaterials

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xuefeng; Li, Kun; Zhang, Peng; Zhu, Jie; Zhang, Jintao; Tian, Chao; Liu, Shengchun

    2016-01-01

    The ability to slow down wave propagation in materials has attracted significant research interest. A successful solution will give rise to manageable enhanced wave–matter interaction, freewheeling phase engineering and spatial compression of wave signals. The existing methods are typically associated with constructing dispersive materials or structures with local resonators, thus resulting in unavoidable distortion of waveforms. Here we show that, with helical-structured acoustic metamaterials, it is now possible to implement dispersion-free sound deceleration. The helical-structured metamaterials present a non-dispersive high effective refractive index that is tunable through adjusting the helicity of structures, while the wavefront revolution plays a dominant role in reducing the group velocity. Finally, we numerically and experimentally demonstrate that the helical-structured metamaterials with designed inhomogeneous unit cells can turn a normally incident plane wave into a self-accelerating beam on the prescribed parabolic trajectory. The helical-structured metamaterials will have profound impact to applications in explorations of slow wave physics. PMID:27198887

  4. Nonlinear propagation of dust-ion-acoustic solitary waves in an unmagnetized dusty plasma with trapped particle distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, O.

    2015-12-01

    The nonlinear propagation of dust-ion-acoustic (DIA) solitary waves (SWs) in an unmagnetized four-component dusty plasma containing electrons and negative ions obeying vortex-like (trapped) velocity distribution, cold mobile positive ions and arbitrarily charged stationary dust has been theoretically investigated. The properties of small but finite amplitude DIASWs are studied by employing the reductive perturbation technique. It has been found that owing to the departure from the Maxwellian electron and Maxwellian negative ion distribution to a vortex-like one, the dynamics of such DIASWs is governed by a modified Korteweg-de Vries (mKdV) equation which admits SW solution under certain conditions. The basic properties (speed, amplitude, width, etc.) of such DIASWs are found to be significantly modified by the presence of trapped electron and trapped negative ions. The implications of our results to space and laboratory dusty electronegative plasmas (DENPs) are briefly discussed.

  5. Effect of flow on quasi-one-dimensional acoustic wave propagation in a variable area duct of finite length

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lumsdaine, E.; Ragab, S.

    1977-01-01

    The general equation for the velocity potential of quasi-one-dimensional acoustic wave motion in a variable area, finite duct with one-dimensional flow is derived by using a perturbation technique. The nonlinear second-order partial differential equation is linearized and then solved, by either a power series expansion method or the Runge-Kutta fourth-order method, for harmonic time dependence. The boundary condition taken at the duct mouth is that of matching the impedance of the duct sound field to that of the radiation field at the duct opening. Three axial Mach number variations along the duct axis are considered and the results obtained are compared with those for the case of constant Mach number, to determine the influence of the axial velocity gradient on sound propagation. The effect of flow on the radiation impedance is also considered.

  6. Multi-level Monte Carlo finite volume methods for uncertainty quantification of acoustic wave propagation in random heterogeneous layered medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, S.; Schwab, Ch.; Šukys, J.

    2016-05-01

    We consider the very challenging problem of efficient uncertainty quantification for acoustic wave propagation in a highly heterogeneous, possibly layered, random medium, characterized by possibly anisotropic, piecewise log-exponentially distributed Gaussian random fields. A multi-level Monte Carlo finite volume method is proposed, along with a novel, bias-free upscaling technique that allows to represent the input random fields, generated using spectral FFT methods, efficiently. Combined together with a recently developed dynamic load balancing algorithm that scales to massively parallel computing architectures, the proposed method is able to robustly compute uncertainty for highly realistic random subsurface formations that can contain a very high number (millions) of sources of uncertainty. Numerical experiments, in both two and three space dimensions, illustrating the efficiency of the method are presented.

  7. Stability of three-dimensional obliquely propagating dust acoustic waves in dusty plasma including the polarization force effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Labany, S. K.; El-Taibany, W. F.; Behery, E. E.; Zedan, N. A.

    2015-12-01

    Propagation of dust acoustic solitary waves (DASWs) in a magnetized dusty plasma consisting of extremely massive, negatively/positively charged dust fluid and Boltzmann distributed electrons and ions is studied. A nonlinear Zakharov-Kuznetsov (ZK) equation adequate for describing the solitary waves is derived by applying a reductive perturbation technique. Moreover, an extended Zakharov Kuznetsov (EZK) equation is derived at the vicinity of the critical phase velocity. The effects of the polarization force are explicitly discussed and the growth rate of the produced waves is calculated. It is found that the physical parameters have strong effects on the instability criterion as well as on the growth rate. It is noted that the phase velocity decreases as the polarization force, the effective-to-ion temperature ratio, and the ion-to-electron temperature ratio increase. Moreover, the nonlinearity coefficient and the critical phase velocity increase by increasing the polarization force. The relevance of these findings to a recent plasma experiment and astrophysical plasma observations is briefly discussed.

  8. Free films of a partially wetting liquid under the influence of a propagating MHz surface acoustic wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altshuler, Gennady; Manor, Ofer

    2016-07-01

    We use both theory and experiment to study the response of thin and free films of a partially wetting liquid to a MHz vibration, propagating in the solid substrate in the form of a Rayleigh surface acoustic wave (SAW). We generalise the previous theory for the response of a thin fully wetting liquid film to a SAW by including the presence of a small but finite three phase contact angle between the liquid and the solid. The SAW in the solid invokes a convective drift of mass in the liquid and leaks sound waves. The dynamics of a film that is too thin to support the accumulation of the sound wave leakage is governed by a balance between the drift and capillary stress alone. We use theory to demonstrate that a partially wetting liquid film, supporting a weak capillary stress, will spread along the path of the SAW. A partially wetting film, supporting an appreciable capillary stress, will however undergo a concurrent dynamic wetting and dewetting at the front and the rear, respectively, such that the film will displace, rather than spread, along the path of the SAW. The result of the theory for a weak capillary stress is in agreement with the previous experimental and theoretical studies on the response of thin silicon oil films to a propagating SAW. No corresponding previous results exist for the case of an appreciable capillary stress. We thus complement the large capillary limit of our theory by undertaking an experimental procedure where we explore the response of films of water and a surfactant solutions to a MHz SAW, which is found to be in qualitative agreement with the theory at this limit.

  9. Theoretical analysis of surface acoustic wave propagating properties of Y-cut nano lithium niobate film on silicon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jing Zhang, Qiaozhen; Han, Tao; Zhou, Liu; Tang, Gongbin; Liu, Boquan; Ji, Xiaojun

    2015-08-15

    The surface acoustic wave (SAW) propagating characteristics of Y-cut nano LiNbO{sub 3} (LN) film on SiO{sub 2}/LN substrate have been theoretically calculated. The simulated results showed a shear horizontal (SH) SAW with enhanced electromechanical coupling factor K{sup 2} owing to a dimensional effect of the nanoscale LN film. However, a Rayleigh SAW and two other resonances related to thickness vibrations caused spurious responses for wideband SAW devices. These spurious waves could be fully suppressed by properly controlling structural parameters including the electrode layer height, thickness, and the Euler angle (θ) of the LN thin film. Finally, a pure SH SAW was obtained with a wide θ range, from 0° to 5° and 165° to 180°. The largest K{sup 2} achieved for the pure SH SAW was about 35.1%. The calculated results demonstrate the promising application of nano LN film to the realization of ultra-wideband SAW devices.

  10. Nonlinear Zakharov-Kuznetsov equation for obliquely propagating two-dimensional ion-acoustic solitary waves in a relativistic, rotating magnetized electron-positron-ion plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Mushtaq, A.; Shah, H.A.

    2005-07-15

    The purpose of this work is to investigate the linear and nonlinear properties of the ion-acoustic waves (IAW), propagating obliquely to an external magnetic field in a weakly relativistic, rotating, and magnetized electron-positron-ion plasma. The Zakharov-Kuznetsov equation is derived by employing the reductive perturbation technique for this wave in the nonlinear regime. This equation admits the solitary wave solution. The amplitude and width of this solitary wave have been discussed with the effects of obliqueness, relativity, ion temperature, positron concentration, magnetic field, and rotation of the plasma and it is observed that for IAW these parameters affect the propagation properties of solitary waves and these plasmas behave differently from the simple electron-ion plasmas. Likewise, the current density and electric field of these waves are investigated for their dependence on the above-mentioned parameters.

  11. Evaluation of Wave Propagation Properties during a True-Triaxial Rock Fracture Experiment using Acoustic Emission Frequency Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodfellow, S. D.; Ghofrani Tabari, M.; Nasseri, M. B.; Young, R.

    2013-12-01

    A true-triaxial deformation experiment was conducted to study the evolution of wave propagation properties by using frequency characteristics of AE waveforms to diagnose the state of fracturing in a sample of sandstone. Changes in waveform frequency content has been interpreted as either the generation of progressively larger fractures or the relative attenuation of high-frequency wave components as a result of micro-crack formation. A cubic sample of Fontainebleau sandstone was initially loaded to a stress state of σ1 = σ2 = 35 MPa, σ3 = 5 MPa at which point σ1¬ was increased until failure. Acoustic emission (AE) activity was monitored by 18 PZT transducers, three embedded in each platen. The sensor amplitude response spectrum was determined by following an absolute source calibration procedure and showed a relatively constant sensitivity in the frequency range between 20 kHz and 1200 kHz. Amplified waveforms were continuously recorded at a sampling rate of 10 MHz and 12-bit resolution. Continuous acoustic emission waveforms were harvested to extract discrete events. Using a time-varying transverse isotropic velocity model, 48,502 events were locatable inside the sample volume. Prior to peak-stress, AE activity was associated with stable quasi-static growth of fractures coplanar with σ1 and σ2 located near the platen boundaries. In the post peak-stress regime, fracture growth displays unstable ¬dynamic propagation. Analysis of waveform frequency characteristics was limited to the pre peak-stress regime. Analysis of AE frequency characteristics was conducted on all 48,502 located AE events; each event file containing 18 waveforms of varied quality. If the signal to noise ratio was greater than 5, the waveforms power spectrum was estimated and the source-receiver raypath vector was calculated. The power spectrum of each waveform was divided into three frequency bands (Low: 100 - 300 kHz, Medium: 300 - 600 kHz and High: 600 - 1000 kHz) and the power in each

  12. Finite Difference Simulations of Acoustic and Gravity Wave Propagation in Mars Atmosphere: Applications to INSIGHT NASA Mission and Mars Microphone Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, R.; Brissaud, Q.; Martin, R.; Rolland, L. M.; Komatitsch, D.

    2015-12-01

    A simulation tool of acoustic and gravity wave propagation through finite differences is applied to the case of Mars atmosphere.The details of the code and its validation for Earth atmosphere are presented in session SA003.The simulations include the modeling of both acoustic and gravity waves in the same run, an effects of exponential density decrease, winds and attenuation.The application to Mars requires the inclusion of a specific attenuation effect related to the relaxation induced by vibrational modes of carbon dioxide molecules.Two different applications are presented demonstrating the ability of the simulation tool to work at very different scale length and frequencies.First the propagation of acoustic and gravity waves due to a bolide explosion in the atmosphere of Mars are simulated.This case has a direct application to the atmospheric pressure and seismic measurements that will be performed by INSIGHT NASA discovery mission next year.Then, we also present simulations of sound wave propagation on a scale of meters that can be used to infer the feasability microphone measurements for future Mars missions.

  13. Effect of dust charge fluctuation on the propagation of dust-ion acoustic waves in inhomogeneous mesospheric dusty plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Mowafy, A. E.; El-Shewy, E. K.; Zahran, M. A.; Moslem, W. M.

    2008-07-15

    Investigation of positive and negative dust charge fluctuations on the propagation of dust-ion acoustic waves (DIAWs) in a weakly inhomogeneous, collisionless, unmagnetized dusty plasmas consisting of cold positive ions, stationary positively and negatively charged dust particles and isothermal electrons. The reductive perturbation method is employed to reduce the basic set of fluid equations to the variable coefficients Korteweg-de Varies (KdV) equation. At the critical ion density, the KdV equation is not appropriate for describing the system. Hence, a new set of stretched coordinates is considered to derive the modified variable coefficients KdV equation. It is found that the presence of positively charged dust grains does not only significantly modify the basic properties of solitary structure, but also changes the polarity of the solitary profiles. In the vicinity of the critical ion density, neither KdV nor the modified KdV equation is appropriate for describing the DIAWs. Therefore, a further modified KdV equation is derived, which admits both soliton and double layer solutions.

  14. Theoretical investigation of surface acoustic wave propagation characteristics in periodic (AlN/ZnO)N /diamond multilayer structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Lirong; Li, Cuiping; Li, Mingji; Wang, Fang; Yang, Baohe

    2014-11-01

    Propagation characteristics of surface acoustic wave (SAW) in periodic (AlN/ZnO)N/diamond multilayer structures were theoretically investigated using effective permittivity method. The phase velocity Vp, electromechanical coupling coefficient K2, and temperature coefficient of frequency (TCF) of the Sezawa mode are analyzed for different thicknesses-to-wavelength H/λ, thickness ratios of AlN to ZnO Rh, and periods of alternating ZnO and AlN layers N. Results show that, comparing with AlN/ZnO/diamond multilayer structure, the periodic (AlN/ZnO)N/diamond multilayer structure (N ≥ 2) shows excellent electromechanical coupling and temperature stable characteristics with significantly improved K2 and TCF. The largest coupling coefficient of 3.0% associated with a phase velocity of 5726 m/s and a TCF of -29.2 ppm/°C can be reached for Rh = 0.2 and N = 2. For a low TCF of -24.4 ppm/°C, a large coupling coefficient of 2.0% associated with a phase velocity of 7058 m/s can be obtained for Rh = 1.0 and N = 5. The simulated results can be used to design the low loss and good temperature stability SAW devices of gigahertz-band application.

  15. Wave propagation phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groenenboom, P. H. L.

    The phenomenon of wave propagation is encountered frequently in a variety of engineering disciplines. It has been realized that for a growing number of problems the solution can only be obtained by discretization of the boundary. Advantages of the Boundary Element Method (BEM) over domain-type methods are related to the reduction of the number of space dimensions and of the modelling effort. It is demonstrated how the BEM can be applied to wave propagation phenomena by establishing the fundamental relationships. A numerical solution procedure is also suggested. In connection with a discussion of the retarded potential formulation, it is shown how the wave propagation problem can be cast into a Boundary Integral Formulation (BIF). The wave propagation problem in the BIF can be solved by time-successive evaluation of the boundary integrals. The example of pressure wave propagation following a sodium-water reaction in a Liquid Metal cooled Fast Breeder Reactor steam generator is discussed.

  16. Nonlinear acoustic wave propagation in atmosphere. Absorbing boundary conditions for exterior problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hariharan, S. I.

    1985-01-01

    Elliptic and hyperbolic problems in unbounded regions are considered. These problems, when one wants to solve them numerically, have the difficulty of prescribing boundary conditions at infinity. Computationally, one needs a finite region in which to solve these problems. The corresponding conditions at infinity imposed on the finite distance boundaries should dictate the boundary conditions at infinity and be accurate with respect to the interior numerical scheme. The treatment of these boundary conditions for wave-like equations is discussed.

  17. The effect of ocean fronts on acoustic wave propagation in the Celtic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapiro, G.; Chen, F.; Thain, R.

    2014-11-01

    Underwater noise is now classed as pollution in accordance with the Marine Strategy Framework Directive. Noise from shipping is a major contributor to the ambient noise levels in ocean, particularly at low (< 300 Hz) frequencies. This paper studies patterns and seasonal variations of underwater noise in the Celtic Sea by using a coupled ocean model (POLCOMS) and an acoustic model (HARCAM) in the year 2010. Two sources of sound are considered: (i) representing a typical large cargo ship and (ii) noise from pile-driving activity. In summer, when the source of sound is on the onshore side of the front, the sound energy is mostly concentrated in the near-bottom layer. In winter, the sound from the same source is distributed more evenly in the vertical. The difference between the sound level in summer and winter at 10 m depth is as high as 20 dB at a distance of 40 km. When the source of sound is on the seaward side of the front, the sound level is nearly uniform in the vertical. The transmission loss is also greater (~ 16 dB) in the summer than in the winter for shallow source while it is up to ~ 20 dB for deep source at 30 km.

  18. The leaking mode problem in atmospheric acoustic-gravity wave propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinney, W. A.; Pierce, A. D.

    1976-01-01

    The problem of predicting the transient acoustic pressure pulse at long horizontal distances from large explosions in the atmosphere is examined. Account is taken of poles off the real axis and of branch line integrals in the general integral governing the transient waveform. Perturbation techniques are described for the computation of the imaginary ordinate of the poles and numerical studies are described for a model atmosphere terminated by a halfspace with c = 478 m/sec above 125 km. For frequencies less than 0.0125 rad/sec, the GR sub 1 mode, for example, is found to have a frequency dependent amplitude decay of the order of 0.0001 nepers/km. Examples of numerically synthesized transient waveforms are exhibited with and without the inclusion of leaking modes. The inclusion of leaking modes results in waveforms with a more marked beginning rather than a low frequency oscillating precursor of gradually increasing amplitude. Also, the revised computations indicate that waveforms invariably begin with a pressure rise, a result supported by other theoretical considerations and by experimental data.

  19. Grain-based characterisation and acoustic wave propagation in a sand packing subject to triaxial compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saadatfar, Mohammad; Francois, Nicolas; Arad, Alon; Madadi, Mahyar; Sheppard, Adrian; Senden, Tim; Knackstedt, Mark

    2013-06-01

    This paper presents a study of 3D deformation process in a dry packing of Ottawa sand. X-ray microtomography is used to acquire scans of a triaxial test of the sample at five axial stress levels. Using 3D image analysis we are able to resolve particle scale features. Particle tracking combined with finite element simulations reveal that the rotational transformation of particles is one of the primary mechanisms of elastic energy dissipation at the grain scale. By analysing grain contact orientation, we show that stress induced anisotropy is spatially correlated to the compressional elastic wave.

  20. Nonlinear propagation of small-amplitude modified electron acoustic solitary waves and double layer in semirelativistic plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Sah, O.P.; Goswami, K.S. )

    1994-10-01

    Considering an unmagnetized plasma consisting of relativistic drifting electrons and nondrifting thermal ions and by using reductive perturbation method, a usual Korteweg--de Vries (KdV) equation and a generalized form of KdV equation are derived. It is found that while the former governs the dynamics of a small-amplitude rarefactive modified electron acoustic (MEA) soliton, the latter governs the dynamics of a weak compressive modified electron acoustic double layer. The influences of relativistic effect on the propagation of such a soliton and double layer are examined. The relevance of this investigation to space plasma is pointed out.

  1. Propagation of arbitrary amplitude dust-ion acoustic waves in the collisional magnetized dusty plasma in the presence of non-thermal electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayyar, M.; Zahed, H.; Pestehe, S. J.; Sobhanian, S.

    2016-07-01

    Using the Sagdeev pseudo-potential method, the oblique propagation of dust-ion acoustic solitary waves is studied in a magnetized dusty plasma. By considering non-thermal distribution of electrons, the related pseudo-potential is obtained using the Poisson equation. The behavior of the wave is investigated for some ranges of parameters. It is demonstrated that the increase in ion density, lz, β, and also δ1 can lead to the increases in the width and amplitude of the pseudo-potential, while any increase of a2, the coefficient that describes the first nonlinear term in the G ( ϕ ) , increases the amplitude of the V ( ϕ ) .

  2. The effect of non-thermal electrons on obliquely propagating electron acoustic waves in a magnetized plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Satyavir; Bharuthram, Ramashwar

    2016-07-01

    Small amplitude electron acoustic solitary waves are studied in a magnetized plasma consisting of hot electrons following Cairn's type non-thermal distribution function and fluid cool electrons, cool ions and an electron beam. Using reductive perturbation technique, the Korteweg-de-Vries-Zakharov-Kuznetsov (KdV-ZK) equation is derived to describe the nonlinear evolution of electron acoustic waves. It is observed that the presence of non-thermal electrons plays an important role in determining the existence region of solitary wave structures. Theoretical results of this work is used to model the electrostatic solitary structures observed by Viking satellite. Detailed investigation of physical parameters such as non-thermality of hot electrons, beam electron velocity and temperature, obliquity on the existence regime of solitons will be discussed.

  3. Acoustic propagation in a thermally stratified atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanmoorhem, W. K.

    1984-01-01

    This report describes the activities during the fourth six month period of the investigation of acoustic propagation in the atmosphere with a realistic lapse temperature profile. A significant error was detected since the previous semi-annual report and has been corrected in both the plane wave and point source solutions. This report then describes both of these problems in some detail along with presenting some numerical results from the model. Work will begin this summer on the model of propagation in an inversion.

  4. Acoustic propagation in a thermally stratified atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanmoorhem, W. K.

    1987-01-01

    Acoustic propagation in an atmosphere with a specific form of temperature profile has been investigated by analytical means. The temperature profile used is representative of an actual atmospheric profile and contains three free parameters. Both lapse and inversion cases have been considered. Although ray solution have been considered the primary emphasis has been on solutions of the acoustic wave equation with point force where the sound speed varies with height above the ground corresponding to the assumed temperature profile. The method used to obtain the solution of the wave equation is based on Hankel transformation of the wave equation, approximate solution of the transformed equation for wavelength small compared to the scale of the temperature (or sound speed) profile, and approximate or numerical inversion of the Hankel transformed solution. The solution displays the characteristics found in experimental data but extensive comparison between the models and experimental data has not been carried out.

  5. Propagation of spinning acoustic modes in partially choked converging ducts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayfeh, A. H.; Kelly, J. J.; Watson, L. T.

    1982-04-01

    A computer model based on the wave-envelope technique is used to study the propagation of spinning acoustic modes in converging hard-walled and lined circular ducts carrying near sonic mean flows. The results show that with increasing spinning mode number the intensification of the acoustic signal at the throat decreases for upstream propagation. The influence of the throat Mach number, frequency, boundary-layer thickness, and liner admittance on the propagation of spinning modes is considered.

  6. Effect of anisotropic dust pressure and superthermal electrons on propagation and stability of dust acoustic solitary waves

    SciTech Connect

    Bashir, M. F.; Behery, E. E.; El-Taibany, W. F.

    2015-06-15

    Employing the reductive perturbation technique, Zakharov–Kuznetzov (ZK) equation is derived for dust acoustic (DA) solitary waves in a magnetized plasma which consists the effects of dust anisotropic pressure, arbitrary charged dust particles, Boltzmann distributed ions, and Kappa distributed superthermal electrons. The ZK solitary wave solution is obtained. Using the small-k expansion method, the stability analysis for DA solitary waves is also discussed. The effects of the dust pressure anisotropy and the electron superthermality on the basic characteristics of DA waves as well as on the three-dimensional instability criterion are highlighted. It is found that the DA solitary wave is rarefactive (compressive) for negative (positive) dust. In addition, the growth rate of instability increases rapidly as the superthermal spectral index of electrons increases with either positive or negative dust grains. A brief discussion for possible applications is included.

  7. Study of the influence of semiconductor material parameters on acoustic wave propagation modes in GaSb/AlSb bi-layered structures by Legendre polynomial method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Othmani, Cherif; Takali, Farid; Njeh, Anouar; Ben Ghozlen, Mohamed Hédi

    2016-09-01

    The propagation of Rayleigh-Lamb waves in bi-layered structures is studied. For this purpose, an extension of the Legendre polynomial (LP) method is proposed to formulate the acoustic wave equation in the bi-layered structures induced by thin film Gallium Antimonide (GaSb) and with Aluminum Antimonide (AlSb) substrate in moderate thickness. Acoustic modes propagating along a bi-layer plate are shown to be quite different than classical Lamb modes, contrary to most of the multilayered structures. The validation of the LP method is illustrated by a comparison between the associated numerical results and those obtained using the ordinary differential equation (ODE) method. The convergency of the LP method is discussed through a numerical example. Moreover, the influences of thin film GaSb parameters on the characteristics Rayleigh-Lamb waves propagation has been studied in detail. Finally, the advantages of the Legendre polynomial (LP) method to analyze the multilayered structures are described. All the developments performed in this work were implemented in Matlab software.

  8. Study of obliquely propagating dust acoustic solitary waves in magnetized tropical mesospheric plasmas with effect of dust charge variations and rotation of the plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Mushtaq, A.; Shah, H.A.; Rubab, N.; Murtaza, G.

    2006-06-15

    The characteristics of obliquely propagating Dust Acoustic Waves (DAWs) in rotating and magnetized dusty plasma in the dayside tropical mesosphere are examined by incorporating adiabatic dust charge fluctuations. A Korteweg-de Vries equation is derived, which may support a nonlinear dust acoustic wave on a very slow time scale. The meteoritic dust in mesospheric plasmas on the dayside is charged positively due to photo- and thermionic emissions. The dynamics of the DAW with electronic, ionic, thermionic, and photoelectric currents along with obliqueness and effective gyrofrequency are studied. It is observed that the amplitude of the soliton depends directly on the obliqueness {theta} and dust charge variation, respectively, while the width is modified inversely with these parameters. It is also observed that the effective gyrofrequency modifies the width inversely.

  9. Robust acoustic wave manipulation of bubbly liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gumerov, N. A.; Akhatov, I. S.; Ohl, C.-D.; Sametov, S. P.; Khazimullin, M. V.; Gonzalez-Avila, S. R.

    2016-03-01

    Experiments with water-air bubbly liquids when exposed to acoustic fields of frequency ˜100 kHz and intensity below the cavitation threshold demonstrate that bubbles ˜30 μm in diameter can be "pushed" away from acoustic sources by acoustic radiation independently from the direction of gravity. This manifests formation and propagation of acoustically induced transparency waves (waves of the bubble volume fraction). In fact, this is a collective effect of bubbles, which can be described by a mathematical model of bubble self-organization in acoustic fields that matches well with our experiments.

  10. A stochastic response surface formulation for the description of acoustic propagation through an uncertain internal wave field.

    PubMed

    Gerdes, Frank; Finette, Steven

    2012-10-01

    A modeling and simulation study is performed in a littoral ocean waveguide subject to uncertainty in four quantities: source depth, tidal forcing, initial thermocline structure, and sediment sound speed. In this partially known shelf-break environment, tidal forcing over a density-stratified water column produces internal tides and solitary wave packets. The resulting uncertainty in the space-time oceanographic field is mapped into the sound speed distribution which, in turn, introduces uncertainty into the acoustic wave field. The latter is treated as a stochastic field whose intensity is described by a polynomial chaos expansion. The expansion coefficients are estimated through constrained multivariate linear regression, and an analysis of the chaos coefficients provides insight into the relative contribution of the uncertain acoustic and oceanographic quantities. Histograms of acoustic intensity are estimated and compared to a reference solution obtained through Latin Hypercube sampling. A sensitivity analysis is performed to illustrate the relative importance of the four contributions of incomplete information about the environment. The simulation methodology represents an end-to-end analysis approach including both oceanographic and acoustic field uncertainty where the latter is quantified using stochastic basis expansions in the form of a polynomial chaos representation. PMID:23039422

  11. Joint Acoustic Propagation Experiment (JAPE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carnes, Benny L.; Olsen, Robert O.; Kennedy, Bruce W.

    1993-01-01

    The Joint Acoustic Propagation Experiment (JAPE), performed under the auspices of NATO and the Acoustics Working Group, was conducted at White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico, USA, during the period 11-28 Jul. 1991. JAPE consisted of 220 trials using various acoustic sources including speakers, propane cannon, various types of military vehicles, helicopters, a 155mm howitzer, and static high explosives. Of primary importance to the performance of these tests was the intensive characterization of the atmosphere before and during the trials. Because of the wide range of interests on the part of the participants, JAPE was organized in such a manner to provide a broad cross section of test configurations. These included short and long range propagation from fixed and moving vehicles, terrain masking, and vehicle detection. A number of independent trials were also performed by individual participating agencies using the assets available during JAPE. These tests, while not documented in this report, provided substantial and important data to those groups. Perhaps the most significant feature of JAPE is the establishment of a permanent data base which can be used by not only the participants but by others interested in acoustics. A follow-on test was performed by NASA LaRC during the period 19-29 Aug. 1991 at the same location. These trials consisted of 59 overflights of supersonic aircraft in order to establish the relationship between atmospheric turbulence and the received sonic boom energy at the surface.

  12. Vlasov simulation of 2D Modulational Instability of Ion Acoustic Waves and Prospects for Modeling such instabilities in Laser Propagation Codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Richard; Chapman, T.; Banks, J. W.; Brunner, S.

    2015-11-01

    We present 2D+2V Vlasov simulations of Ion Acoustic waves (IAWs) driven by an external traveling-wave potential, ϕ0 (x , t) , with frequency, ω, and wavenumber, k, obeying the kinetic dispersion relation. Both electrons and ions are treated kinetically. Simulations with ϕ0 (x , t) , localized transverse to the propagation direction, model IAWs driven in a laser speckle. The waves bow with a positive or negative curvature of the wave fronts that depends on the sign of the nonlinear frequency shift ΔωNL , which is in turn determined by the magnitude of ZTe /Ti where Z is the charge state and Te , i is the electron, ion temperature. These kinetic effects result can cause modulational and self-focusing instabilities that transfer wave energy to kinetic energy. Linear dispersion properties of IAWs are used in laser propagation codes that predict the amount of light reflected by stimulated Brillouin scattering. At high enough amplitudes, the linear dispersion is invalid and these kinetic effects should be incorporated. Including the spatial and time scales of these instabilities is computationally prohibitive. We report progress including kinetic models in laser propagation codes. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344 and funded by the Laboratory Research and Development Program at LLNL under project tracking code 15.

  13. Reflection of Propagating Slow Magneto-acoustic Waves in Hot Coronal Loops: Multi-instrument Observations and Numerical Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, Sudip; Yuan, Ding; Fang, Xia; Banerjee, Dipankar; Pant, Vaibhav; Van Doorsselaere, Tom

    2016-09-01

    Slow MHD waves are important tools for understanding coronal structures and dynamics. In this paper, we report a number of observations from the X-Ray Telescope (XRT) on board HINODE and Solar Dynamic Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) of reflecting longitudinal waves in hot coronal loops. To our knowledge, this is the first report of this kind as seen from the XRT and simultaneously with the AIA. The wave appears after a micro-flare occurs at one of the footpoints. We estimate the density and temperature of the loop plasma by performing differential emission measure (DEM) analysis on the AIA image sequence. The estimated speed of propagation is comparable to or lower than the local sound speed, suggesting it to be a propagating slow wave. The intensity perturbation amplitude, in every case, falls very rapidly as the perturbation moves along the loop and eventually vanishes after one or more reflections. To check the consistency of such reflection signatures with the obtained loop parameters, we perform a 2.5D MHD simulation, which uses the parameters obtained from our observation as inputs, and perform forward modeling to synthesize AIA 94 Å images. Analyzing the synthesized images, we obtain the same properties of the observables as for the real observation. From the analysis we conclude that a footpoint heating can generate a slow wave which then reflects back and forth in the coronal loop before fading. Our analysis of the simulated data shows that the main agent for this damping is anisotropic thermal conduction.

  14. Time-resolved X-ray diffraction studies of laser-induced acoustic wave propagation in bilayer metallic thin crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Er, Ali Oguz; Tang, Jau E-mail: prentzepis@ece.tamu.edu; Chen, Jie; Rentzepis, Peter M. E-mail: prentzepis@ece.tamu.edu

    2014-09-07

    Phonon propagation across the interface of a Cu/Ag(111) bilayer and transient lattice disorder, induced by a femtosecond 267 nm pulse, in Ag(111) crystal have been measured by means of time resolved X-ray diffraction. A “blast” force due to thermal stress induced by suddenly heated electrons is formed within two picoseconds after excitation and its “blast wave” propagation through the interface and Ag (111) crystal was monitored by the shift and broadening of the rocking curve, I vs. ω, as a function of time after excitation. Lattice disorder, contraction and expansion as well as thermal strain formation and wave propagation have also been measured. The experimental data and mechanism proposed are supported by theoretical simulations.

  15. Chromospheric heating by acoustic shock waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, Stuart D.

    1993-01-01

    Work by Anderson & Athay (1989) suggests that the mechanical energy required to heat the quiet solar chromosphere might be due to the dissipation of weak acoustic shocks. The calculations reported here demonstrate that a simple picture of chromospheric shock heating by acoustic waves propagating upward through a model solar atmosphere, free of both magnetic fields and local inhomogeneities, cannot reproduce their chromospheric model. The primary reason is the tendency for vertically propagating acoustic waves in the range of allowed periods to dissipate too low in the atmosphere, providing insufficient residual energy for the middle chromosphere. The effect of diverging magnetic fields and the corresponding expanding acoustic wavefronts on the mechanical dissipation length is then discussed as a means of preserving a quasi-acoustic heating hypothesis. It is argued that this effect, in a canopy that overlies the low chromosphere, might preserve the acoustic shock hypothesis consistent with the chromospheric radiation losses computed by Anderson & Athay.

  16. Active Wave Propagation and Sensing in Plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghoshal, Anindya; Martin, William N.; Sundaresan, Mannur J.; Schulz, Mark J.; Ferguson, Frederick

    2001-01-01

    Health monitoring of aerospace structures can be done using an active interrogation approach with diagnostic Lamb waves. Piezoelectric patches are often used to generate the waves, and it is helpful to understand how these waves propagate through a structure. To give a basic understanding of the actual physical process of wave propagation, a model is developed to simulate asymmetric wave propagation in a panel and to produce a movie of the wave motion. The waves can be generated using piezoceramic patches of any size or shape. The propagation, reflection, and interference of the waves are represented in the model. Measuring the wave propagation is the second important aspect of damage detection. Continuous sensors are useful for measuring waves because of the distributed nature of the sensor and the wave. Two sensor designs are modeled, and their effectiveness in measuring acoustic waves is studied. The simulation model developed is useful to understand wave propagation and to optimize the type of sensors that might be used for health monitoring of plate-like structures.

  17. Surface Acoustic Wave Microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeo, Leslie Y.; Friend, James R.

    2014-01-01

    Fluid manipulations at the microscale and beyond are powerfully enabled through the use of 10-1,000-MHz acoustic waves. A superior alternative in many cases to other microfluidic actuation techniques, such high-frequency acoustics is almost universally produced by surface acoustic wave devices that employ electromechanical transduction in wafer-scale or thin-film piezoelectric media to generate the kinetic energy needed to transport and manipulate fluids placed in adjacent microfluidic structures. These waves are responsible for a diverse range of complex fluid transport phenomena - from interfacial fluid vibration and drop and confined fluid transport to jetting and atomization - underlying a flourishing research literature spanning fundamental fluid physics to chip-scale engineering applications. We highlight some of this literature to provide the reader with a historical basis, routes for more detailed study, and an impression of the field's future directions.

  18. Saddle-node bifurcation and modulational instability associated with the pulse propagation of dust ion-acoustic waves in a viscous dusty plasma: A complex nonlinear Schroedinger equation

    SciTech Connect

    Misra, Amar P.; Roy Chowdhury, K.; Roy Chowdhury, A.

    2007-01-15

    Using the standard reductive perturbation technique, a nonlinear Schroedinger equation (NLSE) with complex coefficients is derived in a dusty plasma consisting of positive ions, nonthermal electrons, and charged dust grains. The effect of ion kinematic viscosity is taken into consideration, which makes the coefficients of NLSE complex. By means of a matching approach, the appearance mechanism of static pulses through a saddle-node bifurcation in the complex nonlinear Schroedinger equation is studied analytically. The analytical results are in good agreement with the direct numerical simulation. The modulational instability analysis is carried out for the dust ion-acoustic envelope solitary waves. The important role of the real part of the complex group velocity in the propagation of the one-dimensional wave packets in homogeneous active medium is predicted.

  19. Quantum positron acoustic waves

    SciTech Connect

    Metref, Hassina; Tribeche, Mouloud

    2014-12-15

    Nonlinear quantum positron-acoustic (QPA) waves are investigated for the first time, within the theoretical framework of the quantum hydrodynamic model. In the small but finite amplitude limit, both deformed Korteweg-de Vries and generalized Korteweg-de Vries equations governing, respectively, the dynamics of QPA solitary waves and double-layers are derived. Moreover, a full finite amplitude analysis is undertaken, and a numerical integration of the obtained highly nonlinear equations is carried out. The results complement our previously published results on this problem.

  20. An automated code generator for three-dimensional acoustic wave propagation with geometrically complex solid-wall boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyson, Rodger William, Jr.

    1999-10-01

    Finding the sources of noise generation in a turbofan propulsion system requires a computational tool that has sufficient fidelity to simulate steep gradients in the flow field and sufficient efficiency to run on today's computer systems. The goal of this dissertation was to develop an automated code generator for the creation of software that numerically solves the linearized Euler equations on Cartesian grids in three dimensional spatial domains containing bodies with complex shapes. It is based upon the recently developed Modified Expansion Solution Approximation (MESA) series of explicit finite-difference schemes that provide spectral-like resolution with extraordinary efficiency. The accuracy of these methods can, in theory, be arbritarily high in both space and time, without the significant inefficiences of Runge- Kutta based schemes. The complexity of coding these schemes was, however, very high, resulting in code that could not compile or took so long to write in FORTRAN that they were rendered impractical. Therefore, a tool in Mathematica was developed that could automatically code the MESA schemes into FORTRAN and the MESA schemes themselves were reformulated into a very simple form-making them practical to use without automation or very powerful with it. A method for automatically creating the MESA propagation schemes and their FORTRAN code in two and three spatial dimensions is shown with up to 29th order accuracy in space and time. Also, a method for treating solid wall boundaries in two dimensions is shown with up to 11th order accuracy on grid aligned boundaries and with up to 2nd order accuracy on generalized boundaries. Finally, an automated method for parallelizing these approaches on large scale parallel computers with near perfect scalability is presented. All these methods are combined to form a turnkey code generation tool in Mathematica that once provided the CAD geometry file can automatically simulate the acoustical physics by replacing the

  1. High-order Hybridized Discontinuous Galerkin (HDG) method for wave propagation simulation in complex geophysical media (elastic, acoustic and hydro-acoustic); an unifying framework to couple continuous Spectral Element and Discontinuous Galerkin Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terrana, Sebastien; Vilotte, Jean-Pierre; Guillot, Laurent; Mariotti, Christian

    2015-04-01

    Today seismological observation systems combine broadband seismic receivers, hydrophones and micro-barometers antenna that provide complementary observations of source-radiated waves in heterogeneous and complex geophysical media. Exploiting these observations requires accurate and multi-physics - elastic, hydro-acoustic, infrasonic - wave simulation methods. A popular approach is the Spectral Element Method (SEM) (Chaljub et al, 2006) which is high-order accurate (low dispersion error), very flexible to parallelization and computationally attractive due to efficient sum factorization technique and diagonal mass matrix. However SEMs suffer from lack of flexibility in handling complex geometry and multi-physics wave propagation. High-order Discontinuous Galerkin Methods (DGMs), i.e. Dumbser et al (2006), Etienne et al. (2010), Wilcox et al (2010), are recent alternatives that can handle complex geometry, space-and-time adaptativity, and allow efficient multi-physics wave coupling at interfaces. However, DGMs are more memory demanding and less computationally attractive than SEMs, especially when explicit time stepping is used. We propose a new class of higher-order Hybridized Discontinuous Galerkin Spectral Elements (HDGSEM) methods for spatial discretization of wave equations, following the unifying framework for hybridization of Cockburn et al (2009) and Nguyen et al (2011), which allows for a single implementation of conforming and non-conforming SEMs. When used with energy conserving explicit time integration schemes, HDGSEM is flexible to handle complex geometry, computationally attractive and has significantly less degrees of freedom than classical DGMs, i.e., the only coupled unknowns are the single-valued numerical traces of the velocity field on the element's faces. The formulation can be extended to model fractional energy loss at interfaces between elastic, acoustic and hydro-acoustic media. Accuracy and performance of the HDGSEM are illustrated and

  2. Confined aquifer as wave-guide and its responses to geo-acoustic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jian, Wen-Bin; Chen, Bao-Ren; Lu, Hua-Fu

    1997-05-01

    On the basis of the hydro-geological model of a confined aquifer, the propagation mechanism of geo-acoustic waves along the confined aquifer outlined as a plate wave-guide is proposed. The harmonic frequency equation for geo-acoustic propagation along confined aquifer as waveguide is derived from Biot theory. The basic frequency of the confined aquifer with a deep well for geo-acoustic observation, located at Juxian county, Shandong province, China, is 35.0 Hz. By Wigner distribution of geo-acoustic signals observed at Juxian geo-acoustic well, the frequencies of geo-acoustics are basically the integral multiple of the basic frequency. The results show that the responses of the confined aquifer to geo-acoustic waves are characterized by frequency selection and frequency dependence. Only the waves whose frequency f is the integral multiple of basic frequency can propagate as guide waves in the aquifer, that is, the aquifer responds to the waves.

  3. High-Order Hybridized Discontinuous Galerkin (HDG) Method for Wave Propagation Simulation in Complex Geophysical Media - Elastic, Acoustic and Hydro-Acoustic - an Unifying Framework to Couple Continuous Spectral Element and Discontinuous Galerkin Methods.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sébastien, T.; Vilotte, J. P.; Guillot, L.; Mariotti, C.

    2014-12-01

    Today seismological observation systems combine broadband seismic receivers, hydrophones and micro-barometers antenna that provide complementary observations of source-radiated waves in heterogeneous and complex geophysical media. Exploiting these observations requires accurate and multi-physics - elastic, hydro-acoustic, infrasonic - wave simulation methods. A popular approach is the Spectral Element Method (SEM) (Chaljub et al, 2006) which is high-order accurate (low dispersion error), very flexible to parallelization and computationally attractive due to efficient sum factorization technique and diagonal mass matrix. However SEMs suffer from lack of flexibility in handling complex geometry and multi-physics wave propagation. High-order Discontinuous Galerkin Methods (DGMs), i.e. Dumbser et al (2006), Etienne et al. (2010), Wilcox et al (2010), are recent alternatives that can handle complex geometry, space-and-time adaptativity, and allow efficient multi-physics wave coupling at interfaces. However, DGMs are more memory demanding and less computationally attractive than SEMs, especially when explicit time stepping is used. We propose a new class of higher-order Hybridized Discontinuous Galerkin Spectral Elements (HDGSEM) methods for spatial discretization of wave equations, following the unifying framework for hybridization of Cockburn et al (2009) and Nguyen et al (2011), which allows for a single implementation of conforming and non-conforming SEMs. When used with energy conserving explicit time integration schemes, HDGSEM is flexible to handle complex geometry, computationally attractive and has significantly less degrees of freedom than classical DGMs, i.e., the only coupled unknowns are the single-valued numerical traces of the velocity field on the element's faces. The formulation can be extended to model fractional energy loss at interfaces between elastic, acoustic and hydro-acoustic media. Accuracy and performance of the HDGSEM are illustrated and

  4. Analyzing Acoustic Propagation In A Pump Diffuser And Volute

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chon, Juliet T.; Szabo, Roland J.

    1994-01-01

    Theory and computer codes developed for use in analyzing propagation of sinusoidal components of fluctuations of pressure (acoustic waves) through fluid in diffuser and in volute or discharge duct of centrifugal pump. Reflections from impedance mismatches taken into account. Such analysis of propagation and resultant fluctuations of pressure important part of analysis of fluid-borne contributions to stresses on volute housing, volute liner, and/or discharge duct.

  5. An acoustic metasurface design for wave motion conversion of longitudinal waves to transverse waves using topology optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noguchi, Y.; Yamada, T.; Otomori, M.; Izui, K.; Nishiwaki, S.

    2015-11-01

    This letter presents an acoustic metasurface that converts longitudinal acoustic waves into transverse elastic waves in an acoustic-elastic coupled system. Metasurface configurations are obtained by a level set-based topology optimization method, and we describe the mechanism that changes the direction of the wave motion. Numerical examples of 2D problems with prescribed frequencies of incident acoustic waves are provided, and transverse elastic wave amplitudes are maximized by manipulating the propagation of the acoustic waves. Frequency analysis reveals that each of the different metasurface designs obtained for different wavelengths of incident waves provides peak response at the target frequency.

  6. Acoustic field distribution of sawtooth wave with nonlinear SBE model

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xiaozhou Zhang, Lue; Wang, Xiangda; Gong, Xiufen

    2015-10-28

    For precise prediction of the acoustic field distribution of extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy with an ellipsoid transducer, the nonlinear spheroidal beam equations (SBE) are employed to model acoustic wave propagation in medium. To solve the SBE model with frequency domain algorithm, boundary conditions are obtained for monochromatic and sawtooth waves based on the phase compensation. In numerical analysis, the influence of sinusoidal wave and sawtooth wave on axial pressure distributions are investigated.

  7. Dust-Acoustic Waves: Visible Sound Waves

    SciTech Connect

    Merlino, Robert L.

    2009-11-10

    A historical overview of some of the early theoretical and experimental work on dust acoustic waves is given. The basic physics of the dust acoustic wave and some of the theoretical refinements that have been made, including the effects of collisions, plasma absorption, dust charge fluctuations, particle drifts and strong coupling effects are discussed. Some recent experimental findings and outstanding problems are also presented.

  8. Vehicular sources in acoustic propagation experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prado, Gervasio; Fitzgerald, James; Arruda, Anthony; Parides, George

    1990-01-01

    One of the most important uses of acoustic propagation models lies in the area of detection and tracking of vehicles. Propagation models are used to compute transmission losses in performance prediction models and to analyze the results of past experiments. Vehicles can also provide the means for cost effective experiments to measure acoustic propagation conditions over significant ranges. In order to properly correlate the information provided by the experimental data and the propagation models, the following issues must be taken into consideration: the phenomenology of the vehicle noise sources must be understood and characterized; the vehicle's location or 'ground truth' must be accurately reproduced and synchronized with the acoustic data; and sufficient meteorological data must be collected to support the requirements of the propagation models. The experimental procedures and instrumentation needed to carry out propagation experiments are discussed. Illustrative results are presented for two cases. First, a helicopter was used to measure propagation losses at a range of 1 to 10 Km. Second, a heavy diesel-powered vehicle was used to measure propagation losses in the 300 to 2200 m range.

  9. Active micromixer using surface acoustic wave streaming

    DOEpatents

    Branch; Darren W. , Meyer; Grant D. , Craighead; Harold G.

    2011-05-17

    An active micromixer uses a surface acoustic wave, preferably a Rayleigh wave, propagating on a piezoelectric substrate to induce acoustic streaming in a fluid in a microfluidic channel. The surface acoustic wave can be generated by applying an RF excitation signal to at least one interdigital transducer on the piezoelectric substrate. The active micromixer can rapidly mix quiescent fluids or laminar streams in low Reynolds number flows. The active micromixer has no moving parts (other than the SAW transducer) and is, therefore, more reliable, less damaging to sensitive fluids, and less susceptible to fouling and channel clogging than other types of active and passive micromixers. The active micromixer is adaptable to a wide range of geometries, can be easily fabricated, and can be integrated in a microfluidic system, reducing dead volume. Finally, the active micromixer has on-demand on/off mixing capability and can be operated at low power.

  10. Torsional waves excited by electromagnetic-acoustic transducers during guided-wave acoustic inspection of pipelines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murav'eva, O. V.; Len'kov, S. V.; Murashov, S. A.

    2016-01-01

    A theory of propagation of torsional waves excited by an electromagnetic-acoustic transducer in a pipe is proposed. This theory takes into account the excitation parameters, geometry, viscosity, and the elastic characteristics of an object. The main testing parameters (the frequency and geometry of the transducer) that determine the possibilities of guided-wave testing of pipelines of various dimensions using torsional waves are theoretically substantiated.

  11. Acoustic-Gravity Waves from Bolide Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revelle, Douglas O.

    2008-06-01

    We have developed a new approach to modeling the acoustic-gravity wave (AGW) radiation from bolide sources. This first effort involves entry modeling of bolide sources that have available satellite data through procedures developed in ReVelle (Earth Moon Planets 95, 441-476, 2004a; in: A. Milani, G. Valsecchi, D. Vokrouhlicky (eds) NEO Fireball Diversity: Energetics-based Entry Modeling and Analysis Techniques, Near-earth Objects: Our Celestial Neighbors (IAU S236), 2007b). Results from the entry modeling are directly coupled to AGW production through line source blast wave theory for the initial wave amplitude and period at x=10 (at 10 blast wave radii and perpendicular to the trajectory). The second effort involves the prediction of the formation and or dominance of the propagation of the atmospheric Lamb, edge-wave composite mode in a viscous fluid (Pierce, J. Acoust. Soc. Amer. 35, 1798-1807, 1963) as a function of the source energy, horizontal range and source altitude using the Lamb wave frequency that was deduced directly during the entry modeling and that is used as a surrogate for the source energy. We have also determined that Lamb wave production by bolides at close range decreases dramatically as either the source energy decreases or the source altitude increases. Finally using procedures in Gill ( Atmospheric-Ocean Dynamics, 1982) and in Tolstoy ( Wave Propagation, 1973), we have analyzed two simple dispersion relationships and have calculated the expected dispersion for the Lamb edge-wave mode and for the excited, propagating internal acoustic waves. Finally, we have used the above formalism to fully evaluate these techniques for four large bolides, namely: the Tunguska bolide of June 30, 1908; the Revelstoke bolide of March 31, 1965; the Crete bolide of June 6, 2002 and the Antarctic bolide of September 3, 2004. Due to page limitations, we will only present results in detail for the Revelstoke bolide.

  12. Wave propagation in isogrid structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, Whitney D.; Doyle, Derek; Arritt, Brandon

    2011-04-01

    This work focuses on an analysis of wave propagation in isogrid structures as it relates to Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) methods. Assembly, integration, and testing (AI&T) of satellite structures in preparation for launch includes significant time for testing and reworking any issues that may arise. SHM methods are being investigated as a means to validate the structure during assembly and truncate the number of tests needed to qualify the structure for the launch environment. The most promising of these SHM methods uses an active wave-based method in which an actuator propagates a Lamb wave through the structure; the Lamb wave is then received by a sensor and evaluated over time to detect structural changes. To date this method has proven effective in locating structural defects in a complex satellite panel; however, the attributes associated with the first wave arrival change significantly as the wave travels through ribs and joining features. Previous studies have been conducted in simplified ribbed structures, giving initial insight into the complex wave propagation phenomena. In this work, the study has been extended numerically to the isogrid plate case. Wave propagation was modeled using commercial finite element analysis software. The results of the analyses offer further insight into the complexities of wave propagation in isogrid structures.

  13. Isomorphic surface acoustic waves on multilayer structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, William D.

    2001-03-01

    There has been growing interest in recent years over the investigation of bulk acoustic waves (BAWs) which propagate along certain directions in anisotropic crystals with a minimum of diffraction. One application of these BAWs is for multichannel acousto-optic devices. The fact that the beams propagate with the minimum diffraction implies that the channels in such a device can be closely packed. Since surface acoustic waves (SAWs) are constrained to be within roughly one acoustic wavelength from the surface, the possibility exists to deposit thin films of isotropic or anisotropic material on the substrate and embue the aggregate multilayer structure with properties not present in the beginning substrate material. The characteristic investigated in this article is the velocity anisotropy which, as is known, predominates SAW diffraction. Specifically, we present a method whereby self-collimating SAWs can be generated on surfaces even though the substrate material itself does not exhibit this behavior. We discuss the particular case of a ZnO layer on (001)-cut <110>-propagating GaAs for which a fair amount of slowness surface data exists. Finally, using angular spectrum of plane waves diffraction theory, we present data which substantiate the claim that self-collimating can more accurately be viewed as isomorphic because the SAW beam profile can propagate without changing its shape.

  14. New high-order, semi-implicit Hybridized Discontinuous Galerkin - Spectral Element Method (HDG-SEM) for simulation of complex wave propagation involving coupling between seismic, hydro-acoustic and infrasonic waves: numerical analysis and case studies.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terrana, S.; Vilotte, J. P.; Guillot, L.

    2015-12-01

    New seismological monitoring networks combine broadband seismic receivers, hydrophones and micro-barometers antenna, providing complementary observation of source-radiated waves. Exploiting these observations requires accurate and multi-media - elastic, hydro-acoustic, infrasound - wave simulation methods, in order to improve our physical understanding of energy exchanges at material interfaces.We present here a new development of a high-order Hybridized Discontinuous Galerkin (HDG) method, for the simulation of coupled seismic and acoustic wave propagation, within a unified framework ([1],[2]) allowing for continuous and discontinuous Spectral Element Methods (SEM) to be used in the same simulation, with conforming and non-conforming meshes. The HDG-SEM approximation leads to differential - algebraic equations, which can be solved implicitly using energy-preserving time-schemes.The proposed HDG-SEM is computationally attractive, when compared with classical Discontinuous Galerkin methods, involving only the approximation of the single-valued traces of the velocity field along the element interfaces as globally coupled unknowns. The formulation is based on a variational approximation of the physical fluxes, which are shown to be the explicit solution of an exact Riemann problem at each element boundaries. This leads to a highly parallel and efficient unstructured and high-order accurate method, which can be space-and-time adaptive.A numerical study of the accuracy and convergence of the HDG-SEM is performed through a number of case studies involving elastic-acoustic (infrasound) coupling with geometries of increasing complexity. Finally, the performance of the method is illustrated through realistic case studies involving ground wave propagation associated to topography effects.In conclusion, we outline some on-going extensions of the method.References:[1] Cockburn, B., Gopalakrishnan, J., Lazarov, R., Unified hybridization of discontinuous Galerkin, mixed and

  15. The North Pacific Acoustic Laboratory deep-water acoustic propagation experiments in the Philippine Sea.

    PubMed

    Worcester, Peter F; Dzieciuch, Matthew A; Mercer, James A; Andrew, Rex K; Dushaw, Brian D; Baggeroer, Arthur B; Heaney, Kevin D; D'Spain, Gerald L; Colosi, John A; Stephen, Ralph A; Kemp, John N; Howe, Bruce M; Van Uffelen, Lora J; Wage, Kathleen E

    2013-10-01

    A series of experiments conducted in the Philippine Sea during 2009-2011 investigated deep-water acoustic propagation and ambient noise in this oceanographically and geologically complex region: (i) the 2009 North Pacific Acoustic Laboratory (NPAL) Pilot Study/Engineering Test, (ii) the 2010-2011 NPAL Philippine Sea Experiment, and (iii) the Ocean Bottom Seismometer Augmentation of the 2010-2011 NPAL Philippine Sea Experiment. The experimental goals included (a) understanding the impacts of fronts, eddies, and internal tides on acoustic propagation, (b) determining whether acoustic methods, together with other measurements and ocean modeling, can yield estimates of the time-evolving ocean state useful for making improved acoustic predictions, (c) improving our understanding of the physics of scattering by internal waves and spice, (d) characterizing the depth dependence and temporal variability of ambient noise, and (e) understanding the relationship between the acoustic field in the water column and the seismic field in the seafloor. In these experiments, moored and ship-suspended low-frequency acoustic sources transmitted to a newly developed distributed vertical line array receiver capable of spanning the water column in the deep ocean. The acoustic transmissions and ambient noise were also recorded by a towed hydrophone array, by acoustic Seagliders, and by ocean bottom seismometers. PMID:24116529

  16. Wave propagation in metamaterial lattice sandwich plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Xin; Wen, Jihong; Yin, Jianfei; Yu, Dianlong

    2016-04-01

    This paper designed a special acoustic metamaterial 3D Kagome lattice sandwich plate. Dispersion properties and vibration responses of both traditional plate and metamaterial plate are investigated based on FEA methods. The traditional plate does not have low-frequency complete bandgaps, but the metamaterial plate has low-frequency complete bandgap (at 620Hz) coming from the symmetrical local cantilever resonators. The bandgap frequency is approximate to the first-order natural frequency of the oscillator. Complex wave modes are analyzed. The dispersion curves of longitudinal waves exist in the flexural bandgap. The dispersion properties demonstrate the metamaterial design is advantageous to suppress the low-frequency flexural wave propagation in lattice sandwich plate. The flexural vibrations near the bandgap are also suppressed efficiently. The longitudinal excitation stimulates mainly longitudinal waves and lots of low-frequency flexural vibration modes are avoided. Furthermore, the free edge effects in metamaterial plate provide new method for damping optimizations. The influences of damping on vibrations of the metamaterial sandwich plate are studied. Damping has global influence on the wave propagation; stronger damping will induce more vibration attenuation. The results enlighten us damping and metamaterial design approaches can be unite in the sandwich plates to suppress the wave propagations.

  17. Quasinormal modes and classical wave propagation in analogue black holes

    SciTech Connect

    Berti, Emanuele; Cardoso, Vitor; Lemos, Jose P.S.

    2004-12-15

    Many properties of black holes can be studied using acoustic analogues in the laboratory through the propagation of sound waves. We investigate in detail sound wave propagation in a rotating acoustic (2+1)-dimensional black hole, which corresponds to the 'draining bathtub' fluid flow. We compute the quasinormal mode frequencies of this system and discuss late-time power-law tails. Because of the presence of an ergoregion, waves in a rotating acoustic black hole can be superradiantly amplified. We also compute superradiant reflection coefficients and instability time scales for the acoustic black hole bomb, the equivalent of the Press-Teukolsky black hole bomb. Finally we discuss quasinormal modes and late-time tails in a nonrotating canonical acoustic black hole, corresponding to an incompressible, spherically symmetric (3+1)-dimensional fluid flow.

  18. Surface acoustic wave microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Xiaoyun; Li, Peng; Lin, Sz-Chin Steven; Stratton, Zackary S.; Nama, Nitesh; Guo, Feng; Slotcavage, Daniel; Mao, Xiaole; Shi, Jinjie; Costanzo, Francesco; Huang, Tony Jun

    2014-01-01

    The recent introduction of surface acoustic wave (SAW) technology onto lab-on-a-chip platforms has opened a new frontier in microfluidics. The advantages provided by such SAW microfluidics are numerous: simple fabrication, high biocompatibility, fast fluid actuation, versatility, compact and inexpensive devices and accessories, contact-free particle manipulation, and compatibility with other microfluidic components. We believe that these advantages enable SAW microfluidics to play a significant role in a variety of applications in biology, chemistry, engineering, and medicine. In this review article, we discuss the theory underpinning SAWs and their interactions with particles and the contacting fluids in which they are suspended. We then review the SAW-enabled microfluidic devices demonstrated to date, starting with devices that accomplish fluid mixing and transport through the use of travelling SAW; we follow that by reviewing the more recent innovations achieved with standing SAW that enable such actions as particle/cell focusing, sorting, and patterning. Finally, we look forward and appraise where the discipline of SAW microfluidics could go next. PMID:23900527

  19. Acoustic propagation in partially choked converging-diverging ducts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, J. J.; Nayfeh, A. H.; Watson, L. T.

    1982-04-01

    A computer model based on the wave-envelope technique is used to study acoustic propagation in converging-diverging hard walled and lined circular ducts carrying near sonic mean flows. The influences of the liner admittance, boundary layer thickness, spinning mode number, and mean Mach number are considered. The numerical results indicate that the diverging portion of the duct can have a strong reflective effect for partially choked flows.

  20. Radiation and propagation of short acoustical pulses from underground explosions

    SciTech Connect

    Banister, J.R.

    1982-06-01

    Radiation and propagation of short acoustical pulses from underground nuclear explosions were analyzed. The cone of more intense radiation is defined by the ratio of sound speeds in the ground and air. The pressure history of the radiated pulse is a function of the vertical ground-motion history, the range, the burial depth, and the velocity of longitudinal seismic waves. The analysis of short-pulse propagation employed an N-wave model with and without enegy conservation. Short pulses with initial wave lengths less than 100 m are severely attenuated by the energy loss in shocks and viscous losses in the wave interior. The methods developed in this study should be useful for system analysis.

  1. Reconstruction of nonlinear wave propagation

    DOEpatents

    Fleischer, Jason W; Barsi, Christopher; Wan, Wenjie

    2013-04-23

    Disclosed are systems and methods for characterizing a nonlinear propagation environment by numerically propagating a measured output waveform resulting from a known input waveform. The numerical propagation reconstructs the input waveform, and in the process, the nonlinear environment is characterized. In certain embodiments, knowledge of the characterized nonlinear environment facilitates determination of an unknown input based on a measured output. Similarly, knowledge of the characterized nonlinear environment also facilitates formation of a desired output based on a configurable input. In both situations, the input thus characterized and the output thus obtained include features that would normally be lost in linear propagations. Such features can include evanescent waves and peripheral waves, such that an image thus obtained are inherently wide-angle, farfield form of microscopy.

  2. Impact of mountain gravity waves on infrasound propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damiens, Florentin; Lott, François; Millet, Christophe

    2016-04-01

    Linear theory of acoustic propagation is used to analyze how mountain waves can change the characteristics of infrasound signals. The mountain wave model is based on the integration of the linear inviscid Taylor-Goldstein equation forced by a nonlinear surface boundary condition. For the acoustic propagation we solve the wave equation using the normal mode method together with the effective sound speed approximation. For large-amplitude mountain waves we use direct numerical simulations to compute the interactions between the mountain waves and the infrasound component. It is shown that the mountain waves perturb the low level waveguide, which leads to significant acoustic dispersion. The mountain waves also impact the arrival time and spread of the signals substantially and can produce a strong absorption of the wave signal. To interpret our results we follow each acoustic mode separately and show which mode is impacted and how. We also show that the phase shift between the acoustic modes over the horizontal length of the mountain wave field may yield to destructive interferences in the lee side of the mountain, resulting in a new form of infrasound absorption. The statistical relevance of those results is tested using a stochastic version of the mountain wave model and large enough sample sizes.

  3. Impact of gravity waves on long-range infrasound propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millet, Christophe; Lott, François; De La Camara, Alvaro

    2016-04-01

    In this work we study infrasound propagation in acoustic waveguides that support a finite number of propagating modes. We analyze the effects of gravity waves on these acoustic waveguides. Testing sound propagation in such perturbed fields can potentially be used to improve the gravity wave models. A linear solution modeling the interaction between an incoming acoustic wave and a randomly perturbed atmosphere is developed, using the forward-scattering approximation. The wave mode structure is determined by the effective sound speed profile which is strongly affected by gravity wave breaking. The random perturbations are described by a stochastic field predicted by a multiwave stochastic parameterization of gravity waves, which is operational in the LMDz climate model. The justification for this approach is two fold. On the one hand, the use of a few monochromatic waves mimics the observations of rather narrow-banded gravity wave packets in the lower stratosphere. On the other hand, the stochastic sampling of the gravity wave field and the random choice of wave properties deals with the inherent unpredictability of mesoscale dynamics from large scale conditions provided by the meteorological reanalysis. The transmitted acoustic signals contain a stable front and a small-amplitude incoherent coda. A general expression for the stable front is derived in terms of saddle-point contributions. The saddle-points are obtained from a WKB approximation of the vertical eigenvalue problem. This approach extract the dominant effects in the acoustic - gravity wave interaction. We present results that show how statistics of the transmitted signal are related to a few saddle-points and how the GW field can trigger large deviations in the acoustic signals. While some of the characteristics of the stable front can be directly related to that of a few individual gravity waves, it is shown that the amount of the launched gravity waves included in climate models can be estimated using

  4. Joint Acoustic Propagation Experiment (JAPE-91) Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willshire, William L., Jr. (Compiler); Chestnutt, David (Compiler)

    1993-01-01

    The Joint Acoustic Propagation Experiment (JAPE), was conducted at the White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico, USA, during the period 11-28 Jul. 1991. JAPE consisted of various short and long range propagation experiments using various acoustic sources including speakers, propane cannons, helicopters, a 155 mm howitzer, and static high explosives. Of primary importance to the performance of theses tests was the extensive characterization of the atmosphere during these tests. This atmospheric characterization included turbulence measurements. A workshop to disseminate the results of JAPE-91 was held in Hampton, VA, on 28 Apr. 1993. This report is a compilation of the presentations made at the workshop along with a list of attendees and the agenda.

  5. Propagation of acoustic perturbations in a gas flow with dissipation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavershinskii, I. P.; Molevich, N. E.

    1992-10-01

    In an earlier study (Ingard and Singhal, 1973), it has been found that, in a nondissipating moving medium, an acoustic wave propagating from a source in the flow direction has a smaller amplitude than a wave moving against the flow. Here, it is demonstrated that consideration of dissipation phenomena, which are related to the shear and bulk viscosities and heat conductivity of a medium, leads to an additional anisotropy of the sound amplitude, whose sign is opposite to that obtained in the above mentioned study.

  6. Seismic wave propagation modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, E.M.; Olsen, K.B.

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). A hybrid, finite-difference technique was developed for modeling nonlinear soil amplification from three-dimensional, finite-fault radiation patters for earthquakes in arbitrary earth models. The method was applied to the 17 January 1994 Northridge earthquake. Particle velocities were computed on a plane at 5-km depth, immediately above the causative fault. Time-series of the strike-perpendicular, lateral velocities then were propagated vertically in a soil column typical of the San Fernando Valley. Suitable material models were adapted from a suite used to model ground motions at the US Nevada Test Site. The effects of nonlinearity reduced relative spectral amplitudes by about 40% at frequencies above 1.5 Hz but only by 10% at lower frequencies. Runs made with source-depth amplitudes increased by a factor of two showed relative amplitudes above 1.5 Hz reduced by a total of 70% above 1.5 Hz and 20% at lower frequencies. Runs made with elastic-plastic material models showed similar behavior to runs made with Masing-Rule models.

  7. Acoustic pulse propagation near a right-angle wall.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lanbo; Albert, Donald G

    2006-04-01

    Experimental measurements were conducted around a right-angle wall to investigate the effect of this obstacle on sound propagation outdoors. Using small explosions as the source of the acoustic waves allowed reflected and diffracted arrivals to be discerned and investigated in detail. The measurements confirm that diffraction acts as a low-pass filter on acoustic waveforms in agreement with simple diffraction theory, reducing the peak pressure and broadening the waveform shape received by a sensor in the shadow zone. In addition, sensors mounted directly on the wall registered pressure doubling for nongrazing angles of incidence in line-of-sight conditions. A fast two-dimensional finite difference time domain (FDTD) model was developed and provided additional insight into the propagation around the wall. Calculated waveforms show good agreement with the measured waveforms. PMID:16642821

  8. Application of a finite difference technique to thermal wave propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, K. J.

    1975-01-01

    A finite difference formulation is presented for thermal wave propagation resulting from periodic heat sources. The numerical technique can handle complex problems that might result from variable thermal diffusivity, such as heat flow in the earth with ice and snow layers. In the numerical analysis, the continuous temperature field is represented by a series of grid points at which the temperature is separated into real and imaginary terms. Next, computer routines previously developed for acoustic wave propagation are utilized in the solution for the temperatures. The calculation procedure is illustrated for the case of thermal wave propagation in a uniform property semi-infinite medium.

  9. Application of a finite difference technique to thermal wave propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, K. J.

    1975-01-01

    A finite difference formulation is presented for thermal wave propagation resulting from periodic heat sources. The numerical technique can handle complex problems that might result from variable thermal diffusivity, such as heat flow in the earth with ice and snow layers. In the numerical analysis, the continuous temperature field is represented by a series of grid points at which the temperature is separated into real and imaginary terms. Computer routines previously developed for acoustic wave propagation are utilized in the solution for the temperatures. The calculation procedure is illustrated for the case of thermal wave propagation in a uniform property semi-infinite medium.

  10. Wave propagation in solids and fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, J. L.

    1988-01-01

    The fundamental principles of mathematical analysis for wave phenomena in gases, solids, and liquids are presented in an introduction for scientists and engineers. Chapters are devoted to oscillatory phenomena, the physics of wave propagation, partial differential equations for wave propagation, transverse vibration of strings, water waves, and sound waves. Consideration is given to the dynamics of viscous and inviscid fluids, wave propagation in elastic media, and variational methods in wave phenomena. 41 refs.

  11. WAVE: Interactive Wave-based Sound Propagation for Virtual Environments.

    PubMed

    Mehra, Ravish; Rungta, Atul; Golas, Abhinav; Ming Lin; Manocha, Dinesh

    2015-04-01

    We present an interactive wave-based sound propagation system that generates accurate, realistic sound in virtual environments for dynamic (moving) sources and listeners. We propose a novel algorithm to accurately solve the wave equation for dynamic sources and listeners using a combination of precomputation techniques and GPU-based runtime evaluation. Our system can handle large environments typically used in VR applications, compute spatial sound corresponding to listener's motion (including head tracking) and handle both omnidirectional and directional sources, all at interactive rates. As compared to prior wave-based techniques applied to large scenes with moving sources, we observe significant improvement in runtime memory. The overall sound-propagation and rendering system has been integrated with the Half-Life 2 game engine, Oculus-Rift head-mounted display, and the Xbox game controller to enable users to experience high-quality acoustic effects (e.g., amplification, diffraction low-passing, high-order scattering) and spatial audio, based on their interactions in the VR application. We provide the results of preliminary user evaluations, conducted to study the impact of wave-based acoustic effects and spatial audio on users' navigation performance in virtual environments. PMID:26357093

  12. Thermo-acoustic engineering of silicon microresonators via evanescent waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabrizian, R.; Ayazi, F.

    2015-06-01

    A temperature-compensated silicon micromechanical resonator with a quadratic temperature characteristic is realized by acoustic engineering. Energy-trapped resonance modes are synthesized by acoustic coupling of propagating and evanescent extensional waves in waveguides with rectangular cross section. Highly different temperature sensitivity of propagating and evanescent waves is used to engineer the linear temperature coefficient of frequency. The resulted quadratic temperature characteristic has a well-defined turn-over temperature that can be tailored by relative energy distribution between propagating and evanescent acoustic fields. A 76 MHz prototype is implemented in single crystal silicon. Two high quality factor and closely spaced resonance modes, created from efficient energy trapping of extensional waves, are excited through thin aluminum nitride film. Having different evanescent wave constituents and energy distribution across the device, these modes show different turn over points of 67 °C and 87 °C for their quadratic temperature characteristic.

  13. Thermo-acoustic engineering of silicon microresonators via evanescent waves

    SciTech Connect

    Tabrizian, R.; Ayazi, F.

    2015-06-29

    A temperature-compensated silicon micromechanical resonator with a quadratic temperature characteristic is realized by acoustic engineering. Energy-trapped resonance modes are synthesized by acoustic coupling of propagating and evanescent extensional waves in waveguides with rectangular cross section. Highly different temperature sensitivity of propagating and evanescent waves is used to engineer the linear temperature coefficient of frequency. The resulted quadratic temperature characteristic has a well-defined turn-over temperature that can be tailored by relative energy distribution between propagating and evanescent acoustic fields. A 76 MHz prototype is implemented in single crystal silicon. Two high quality factor and closely spaced resonance modes, created from efficient energy trapping of extensional waves, are excited through thin aluminum nitride film. Having different evanescent wave constituents and energy distribution across the device, these modes show different turn over points of 67 °C and 87 °C for their quadratic temperature characteristic.

  14. Ray dynamics in a long-range acoustic propagation experiment.

    PubMed

    Beron-Vera, Francisco J; Brown, Michael G; Colosi, John A; Tomsovic, Steven; Virovlyansky, Anatoly L; Wolfson, Michael A; Zaslavsky, George M

    2003-09-01

    A ray-based wave-field description is employed in the interpretation of broadband basin-scale acoustic propagation measurements obtained during the Acoustic Thermometry of Ocean Climate program's 1994 Acoustic Engineering Test. Acoustic observables of interest are wavefront time spread, probability density function (PDF) of intensity, vertical extension of acoustic energy in the reception finale, and the transition region between temporally resolved and unresolved wavefronts. Ray-based numerical simulation results that include both mesoscale and internal-wave-induced sound-speed perturbations are shown to be consistent with measurements of all the aforementioned observables, even though the underlying ray trajectories are predominantly chaotic, that is, exponentially sensitive to initial and environmental conditions. Much of the analysis exploits results that relate to the subject of ray chaos; these results follow from the Hamiltonian structure of the ray equations. Further, it is shown that the collection of the many eigenrays that form one of the resolved arrivals is nonlocal, both spatially and as a function of launch angle, which places severe restrictions on theories that are based on a perturbation expansion about a background ray. PMID:14514177

  15. Acoustic-gravity waves, theory and application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadri, Usama; Farrell, William E.; Munk, Walter

    2015-04-01

    Acoustic-gravity waves (AGW) propagate in the ocean under the influence of both the compressibility of sea water and the restoring force of gravity. The gravity dependence vanishes if the wave vector is normal to the ocean surface, but becomes increasingly important as the wave vector acquires a horizontal tilt. They are excited by many sources, including non-linear surface wave interactions, disturbances of the ocean bottom (submarine earthquakes and landslides) and underwater explosions. In this introductory lecture on acoustic-gravity waves, we describe their properties, and their relation to organ pipe modes, to microseisms, and to deep ocean signatures by short surface waves. We discuss the generation of AGW by underwater earthquakes; knowledge of their behaviour with water depth can be applied for the early detection of tsunamis. We also discuss their generation by the non-linear interaction of surface gravity waves, which explains the major role they play in transforming energy from the ocean surface to the crust, as part of the microseisms phenomenon. Finally, they contribute to horizontal water transport at depth, which might affect benthic life.

  16. On the Synchronization of Acoustic Gravity Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lonngren, Karl E.; Bai, Er-Wei

    Using the model proposed by Stenflo, we demonstrate that acoustic gravity waves found in one region of space can be synchronized with acoustic gravity waves found in another region of space using techniques from modern control theory.

  17. Effect of nonadiabaticity of dust charge variation on dust acoustic waves: generation of dust acoustic shock waves.

    PubMed

    Gupta, M R; Sarkar, S; Ghosh, S; Debnath, M; Khan, M

    2001-04-01

    The effect of nonadiabaticity of dust charge variation arising due to small nonzero values of tau(ch)/tau(d) has been studied where tau(ch) and tau(d) are the dust charging and dust hydrodynamical time scales on the nonlinear propagation of dust acoustic waves. Analytical investigation shows that the propagation of a small amplitude wave is governed by a Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) Burger equation. Notwithstanding the soliton decay, the "soliton mass" is conserved, but the dissipative term leads to the development of a noise tail. Nonadiabaticity generated dissipative effect causes the generation of a dust acoustic shock wave having oscillatory behavior on the downstream side. Numerical investigations reveal that the propagation of a large amplitude dust acoustic shock wave with dust density enhancement may occur only for Mach numbers lying between a minimum and a maximum value whose dependence on the dusty plasma parameters is presented. PMID:11308955

  18. Multi-reflective acoustic wave device

    DOEpatents

    Andle, Jeffrey C.

    2006-02-21

    An acoustic wave device, which utilizes multiple localized reflections of acoustic wave for achieving an infinite impulse response while maintaining high tolerance for dampening effects, is disclosed. The device utilized a plurality of electromechanically significant electrodes disposed on most of the active surface. A plurality of sensors utilizing the disclosed acoustic wave mode device are also described.

  19. Acoustic Remote Sensing of Rogue Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, Wade; Kadri, Usama

    2016-04-01

    We propose an early warning system for approaching rogue waves using the remote sensing of acoustic-gravity waves (AGWs) - progressive sound waves that propagate at the speed of sound in the ocean. It is believed that AGWs are generated during the formation of rogue waves, carrying information on the rogue waves at near the speed of sound, i.e. much faster than the rogue wave. The capability of identifying those special sound waves would enable detecting rogue waves most efficiently. A lot of promising work has been reported on AGWs in the last few years, part of which in the context of remote sensing as an early detection of tsunami. However, to our knowledge none of the work addresses the problem of rogue waves directly. Although there remains some uncertainty as to the proper definition of a rogue wave, there is little doubt that they exist and no one can dispute the potential destructive power of rogue waves. An early warning system for such extreme waves would become a demanding safety technology. A closed form expression was developed for the pressure induced by an impulsive source at the free surface (the Green's function) from which the solution for more general sources can be developed. In particular, we used the model of the Draupner Wave of January 1st, 1995 as a source and calculated the induced AGW signature. In particular we studied the AGW signature associated with a special feature of this wave, and characteristic of rogue waves, of the absence of any local set-down beneath the main crest and the presence of a large local set-up.

  20. Monograph on propagation of sound waves in curved ducts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rostafinski, Wojciech

    1991-01-01

    After reviewing and evaluating the existing material on sound propagation in curved ducts without flow, it seems strange that, except for Lord Rayleigh in 1878, no book on acoustics has treated the case of wave motion in bends. This monograph reviews the available analytical and experimental material, nearly 30 papers published on this subject so far, and concisely summarizes what has been learned about the motion of sound in hard-wall and acoustically lined cylindrical bends.

  1. Acoustic Propagation Modeling for Marine Hydro-Kinetic Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, C. N.; Johnson, E.

    2014-12-01

    The combination of riverine, tidal, and wave energy have the potential to supply over one third of the United States' annual electricity demand. However, in order to deploy and test prototypes, and commercial installations, marine hydrokinetic (MHK) devices must meet strict regulatory guidelines that determine the maximum amount of noise that can be generated and sets particular thresholds for determining disturbance and injury caused by noise. An accurate model for predicting the propagation of a MHK source in a real-life hydro-acoustic environment has been established. This model will help promote the growth and viability of marine, water, and hydrokinetic energy by confidently assuring federal regulations are meet and harmful impacts to marine fish and wildlife are minimal. Paracousti, a finite difference solution to the acoustic equations, was originally developed for sound propagation in atmospheric environments and has been successfully validated for a number of different geophysical activities. The three-dimensional numerical implementation is advantageous over other acoustic propagation techniques for a MHK application where the domains of interest have complex 3D interactions from the seabed, banks, and other shallow water effects. A number of different cases for hydro-acoustic environments have been validated by both analytical and numerical results from canonical and benchmark problems. This includes a variety of hydrodynamic and physical environments that may be present in a potential MHK application including shallow and deep water, sloping, and canyon type bottoms, with varying sound speed and density profiles. With the model successfully validated for hydro-acoustic environments more complex and realistic MHK sources from turbines and/or arrays can be modeled.

  2. Producing undistorted acoustic sine waves.

    PubMed

    Boutin, Henri; Smith, John; Wolfe, Joe

    2014-04-01

    A simple digital method is described that can produce an undistorted acoustic sine wave using an amplifier and loudspeaker having considerable intrinsic distortion, a common situation at low frequencies and high power. The method involves, first, using a pure sine wave as the input and measuring the distortion products. An iterative procedure then progressively adds harmonics with appropriate amplitude and phase to cancel any distortion products. The method is illustrated by producing a pure 52 Hz sine wave at 107 dB sound pressure level with harmonic distortion reduced over the audible range to >65 dB below the fundamental. PMID:25234964

  3. Acoustic gravity waves: A computational approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hariharan, S. I.; Dutt, P. K.

    1987-01-01

    This paper discusses numerical solutions of a hyperbolic initial boundary value problem that arises from acoustic wave propagation in the atmosphere. Field equations are derived from the atmospheric fluid flow governed by the Euler equations. The resulting original problem is nonlinear. A first order linearized version of the problem is used for computational purposes. The main difficulty in the problem as with any open boundary problem is in obtaining stable boundary conditions. Approximate boundary conditions are derived and shown to be stable. Numerical results are presented to verify the effectiveness of these boundary conditions.

  4. Influence of a forest edge on acoustical propagation: experimental results.

    PubMed

    Swearingen, Michelle E; White, Michael J; Guertin, Patrick J; Albert, Donald G; Tunick, Arnold

    2013-05-01

    Acoustic propagation through a forest edge can produce complicated pressure time histories because of scattering from the trees and changes in the microclimate and ground parameters of the two regions. To better understand these effects, a field experiment was conducted to measure low-frequency acoustic pulses propagating in an open field, a forest, and passing through a forest edge in both directions. Waveforms measured in the open field were simple impulses with very low scattering, whereas waveforms at the edge and within the forest had stronger reverberations after the direct arrival. The direct wave pulse shapes increased in duration in accordance with the path length in the forest, which had an effective flow resistivity 12 to 13 that of the grassy open field. The measurements exhibit different rates of attenuation in the two regions, with relatively lower attenuation in the open field than higher rates in the forest. Decay of SEL transmitted into the forest was 4 dB more per tenfold distance than for outbound transmission. Stronger attenuation in the 1-2 kHz range occurs when propagating into the forest. While the measured meteorological profiles revealed three distinct microclimates, meteorological effects are not sufficient to explain the apparent non-reciprocal propagation. PMID:23654365

  5. On fast radial propagation of parametrically excited geodesic acoustic mode

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu, Z.; Chen, L.; Zonca, F.

    2015-04-15

    The spatial and temporal evolution of parametrically excited geodesic acoustic mode (GAM) initial pulse is investigated both analytically and numerically. Our results show that the nonlinearly excited GAM propagates at a group velocity which is, typically, much larger than that due to finite ion Larmor radius as predicted by the linear theory. The nonlinear dispersion relation of GAM driven by a finite amplitude drift wave pump is also derived, showing a nonlinear frequency increment of GAM. Further implications of these findings for interpreting experimental observations are also discussed.

  6. Shock wave propagation in glow discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganguly, B. N.

    1998-10-01

    The modification of acoustic shock wave propagation characteristics in a 25 cm long positive column low pressure (10 to 50 Torr), low current density (2 to 10 mA/cm^2) argon and N2 dc discharges have been measured by laser beam deflection technique. The simultaneous multi point shock velocity, dispersion and damping have been measured both inside and outside the glow discharge region. The local shock velocity is found to increase with the increased propagation path length through the discharge; for Mach number greater than 1.7 the upstream velocity exceeded the downstream velocity in contrast to the opposite behavior in neutral gas. The damping and dispersion are also dependent on the propagation distance. The recovery of the shock dispersion and damping in the post discharge region, for a given discharge condition, are functions of the initial Mach number. The optical measurement of the wall and the gas (rotational) temperatures suggest the observed shock features can not be solely explained by the gas heating in a self sustained discharge. The results are similar for both Ar and N2 discharges showing that vibrational excitation and relaxation are not essential^1. The explanation of the observed weak shock propagation properties in a glow discharge appears to require long range cooperative interactions that enhance heavy particle collisional energy transfer rates for the measured discharge conditions. Unlike collisional shock wave propagation in highly ionized plasmas^2,3, the exact energy coupling mechanism between the nonequilibrium weakly ionized plasma and shock is not understood. 1. A.I. Osipov and A.V. Uvarov, Sov. Phys. Usp. 35, 903 (1992) and other references there in. 2. M. Casanova, O. Larroche and J-P Matte, Phys. Rev. Lett. 67, 2143 (1991). 3. M.C.M. van de Sanden, R. van den Bercken and D.C. Schram, Plasma Sources Sci.Technol. 3, 511 (1994).

  7. Waveform inversion of acoustic waves for explosion yield estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, K.; Rodgers, A.

    2016-07-01

    We present a new waveform inversion technique to estimate the energy of near-surface explosions using atmospheric acoustic waves. Conventional methods often employ air blast models based on a homogeneous atmosphere, where the acoustic wave propagation effects (e.g., refraction and diffraction) are not taken into account, and therefore, their accuracy decreases with increasing source-receiver distance. In this study, three-dimensional acoustic simulations are performed with a finite difference method in realistic atmospheres and topography, and the modeled acoustic Green's functions are incorporated into the waveform inversion for the acoustic source time functions. The strength of the acoustic source is related to explosion yield based on a standard air blast model. The technique was applied to local explosions (<10 km) and provided reasonable yield estimates (<˜30% error) in the presence of realistic topography and atmospheric structure. The presented method can be extended to explosions recorded at far distance provided proper meteorological specifications.

  8. Wave Propagation in Bimodular Geomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsova, Maria; Pasternak, Elena; Dyskin, Arcady; Pelinovsky, Efim

    2016-04-01

    Observations and laboratory experiments show that fragmented or layered geomaterials have the mechanical response dependent on the sign of the load. The most adequate model accounting for this effect is the theory of bimodular (bilinear) elasticity - a hyperelastic model with different elastic moduli for tension and compression. For most of geo- and structural materials (cohesionless soils, rocks, concrete, etc.) the difference between elastic moduli is such that their modulus in compression is considerably higher than that in tension. This feature has a profound effect on oscillations [1]; however, its effect on wave propagation has not been comprehensively investigated. It is believed that incorporation of bilinear elastic constitutive equations within theory of wave dynamics will bring a deeper insight to the study of mechanical behaviour of many geomaterials. The aim of this paper is to construct a mathematical model and develop analytical methods and numerical algorithms for analysing wave propagation in bimodular materials. Geophysical and exploration applications and applications in structural engineering are envisaged. The FEM modelling of wave propagation in a 1D semi-infinite bimodular material has been performed with the use of Marlow potential [2]. In the case of the initial load expressed by a harmonic pulse loading strong dependence on the pulse sign is observed: when tension is applied before compression, the phenomenon of disappearance of negative (compressive) strains takes place. References 1. Dyskin, A., Pasternak, E., & Pelinovsky, E. (2012). Periodic motions and resonances of impact oscillators. Journal of Sound and Vibration, 331(12), 2856-2873. 2. Marlow, R. S. (2008). A Second-Invariant Extension of the Marlow Model: Representing Tension and Compression Data Exactly. In ABAQUS Users' Conference.

  9. Acoustic propagation in rigid ducts with blockage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Raheb, M.; Wagner, P.

    1982-01-01

    Acoustic levitation has been suggested for moving nonmagnetic material in furnaces for heat processing in space experiments. Basically, acoustic standing waves under resonant conditions are excited in the cavity of the furnace while the material blockage is located at a pressure node and thus at a maximum gradient. The position of the blockage is controlled by displacing the node as a result of frequency change. The present investigation is concerned with the effect of blockage on the longitudinal and transverse resonances of a cylindrical cavity, taking into account the results of a one-dimensional and three-dimensional (3-D) analysis. Based on a Green's function surface element method, 3-D analysis is tested experimentally and proved to be accurate over a wide range of geometric parameters and boundary shapes. The shift in resonance depends on the change in pressure gradient and duct shortening caused by the blockage.

  10. Acoustic waves in gases with strong pressure gradients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zorumski, William E.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of strong pressure gradients on the acoustic modes (standing waves) of a rectangular cavity is investigated analytically. When the cavity response is represented by a sum of modes, each mode is found to have two resonant frequencies. The lower frequency is near the Viaesaela-Brundt frequency, which characterizes the buoyant effect, and the higher frequency is above the ordinary acoustic resonance frequency. This finding shows that the propagation velocity of the acoustic waves is increased due to the pressure gradient effect.

  11. Wave propagation in modified gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindroos, Jan Ø.; Llinares, Claudio; Mota, David F.

    2016-02-01

    We investigate the propagation of scalar waves induced by matter sources in the context of scalar-tensor theories of gravity which include screening mechanisms for the scalar degree of freedom. The usual approach when studying these theories in the nonlinear regime of cosmological perturbations is based on the assumption that scalar waves travel at the speed of light. Within general relativity this approximation is valid and leads to no loss of accuracy in the estimation of observables. We find, however, that mass terms and nonlinearities in the equations of motion lead to propagation and dispersion velocities significantly different from the speed of light. As the group velocity is the one associated with the propagation of signals, a reduction of its value has direct impact on the behavior and dynamics of nonlinear structures within modified gravity theories with screening. For instance, the internal dynamics of galaxies and satellites submerged in large dark matter halos could be affected by the fact that the group velocity is smaller than the speed of light. It is therefore important, within such a framework, to take into account the fact that different parts of a galaxy will see changes in the environment at different times. A full nonstatic analysis may be necessary under those conditions.

  12. Separation of acoustic waves in isentropic flow perturbations

    SciTech Connect

    Henke, Christian

    2015-04-15

    The present contribution investigates the mechanisms of sound generation and propagation in the case of highly-unsteady flows. Based on the linearisation of the isentropic Navier–Stokes equation around a new pathline-averaged base flow, it is demonstrated for the first time that flow perturbations of a non-uniform flow can be split into acoustic and vorticity modes, with the acoustic modes being independent of the vorticity modes. Therefore, we can propose this acoustic perturbation as a general definition of sound. As a consequence of the splitting result, we conclude that the present acoustic perturbation is propagated by the convective wave equation and fulfils Lighthill’s acoustic analogy. Moreover, we can define the deviations of the Navier–Stokes equation from the convective wave equation as “true” sound sources. In contrast to other authors, no assumptions on a slowly varying or irrotational flow are necessary. Using a symmetry argument for the conservation laws, an energy conservation result and a generalisation of the sound intensity are provided. - Highlights: • First splitting of non-uniform flows in acoustic and non-acoustic components. • These result leads to a generalisation of sound which is compatible with Lighthill’s acoustic analogy. • A closed equation for the generation and propagation of sound is given.

  13. Surface acoustic wave oxygen sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collman, James P.; Oglesby, Donald M.; Upchurch, Billy T.; Leighty, Bradley D.; Zhang, Xumu; Herrmann, Paul C.

    1994-01-01

    A surface acoustic wave (SAW) device that responds to oxygen pressure was developed by coating a 158 MHz quartz surface acoustic wave (SAW) device with an oxygen binding agent. Two types of coatings were used. One type was prepared by dissolving an oxygen binding agent in a toluene solution of a copolymer containing the axial ligand. A second type was prepared with an oxygen binding porphyrin solution containing excess axial ligand without a polymer matrix. In the polymer based coatings, the copolymer served to provide the axial ligand to the oxygen binding agent and as a coating matrix on the surface of the SAW device. The oxygen sensing SAW device has been shown to bind oxygen following a Langmuir isotherm and may be used to measure the equilibrium constant of the oxygen binding compound in the coating matrix.

  14. Nonlinear positron acoustic solitary waves

    SciTech Connect

    Tribeche, Mouloud; Aoutou, Kamel; Younsi, Smain; Amour, Rabia

    2009-07-15

    The problem of nonlinear positron acoustic solitary waves involving the dynamics of mobile cold positrons is addressed. A theoretical work is presented to show their existence and possible realization in a simple four-component plasma model. The results should be useful for the understanding of the localized structures that may occur in space and laboratory plasmas as new sources of cold positrons are now well developed.

  15. Wind, waves, and acoustic background levels at Station ALOHA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duennebier, Fred K.; Lukas, Roger; Nosal, Eva-Marie; Aucan, JéRome; Weller, Robert A.

    2012-03-01

    Frequency spectra from deep-ocean near-bottom acoustic measurements obtained contemporaneously with wind, wave, and seismic data are described and used to determine the correlations among these data and to discuss possible causal relationships. Microseism energy appears to originate in four distinct regions relative to the hydrophone: wind waves above the sensors contribute microseism energy observed on the ocean floor; a fraction of this local wave energy propagates as seismic waves laterally, and provides a spatially integrated contribution to microseisms observed both in the ocean and on land; waves in storms generate microseism energy in deep water that travels as seismic waves to the sensor; and waves reflected from shorelines provide opposing waves that add to the microseism energy. Correlations of local wind speed with acoustic and seismic spectral time series suggest that the local Longuet-Higgins mechanism is visible in the acoustic spectrum from about 0.4 Hz to 80 Hz. Wind speed and acoustic levels at the hydrophone are poorly correlated below 0.4 Hz, implying that the microseism energy below 0.4 Hz is not typically generated by local winds. Correlation of ocean floor acoustic energy with seismic spectra from Oahu and with wave spectra near Oahu imply that wave reflections from Hawaiian coasts, wave interactions in the deep ocean near Hawaii, and storms far from Hawaii contribute energy to the seismic and acoustic spectra below 0.4 Hz. Wavefield directionality strongly influences the acoustic spectrum at frequencies below about 2 Hz, above which the acoustic levels imply near-isotropic surface wave directionality.

  16. Acoustic signal propagation characterization of conduit networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Muhammad Safeer

    Analysis of acoustic signal propagation in conduit networks has been an important area of research in acoustics. One major aspect of analyzing conduit networks as acoustic channels is that a propagating signal suffers frequency dependent attenuation due to thermo-viscous boundary layer effects and the presence of impedance mismatches such as side branches. The signal attenuation due to side branches is strongly influenced by their numbers and dimensions such as diameter and length. Newly developed applications for condition based monitoring of underground conduit networks involve measurement of acoustic signal attenuation through tests in the field. In many cases the exact installation layout of the field measurement location may not be accessible or actual installation may differ from the documented layout. The lack of exact knowledge of numbers and lengths of side branches, therefore, introduces uncertainty in the measurements of attenuation and contributes to the random variable error between measured results and those predicted from theoretical models. There are other random processes in and around conduit networks in the field that also affect the propagation of an acoustic signal. These random processes include but are not limited to the presence of strong temperature and humidity gradients within the conduits, blockages of variable sizes and types, effects of aging such as cracks, bends, sags and holes, ambient noise variations and presence of variable layer of water. It is reasonable to consider that the random processes contributing to the error in the measured attenuation are independent and arbitrarily distributed. The error, contributed by a large number of independent sources of arbitrary probability distributions, is best described by an approximately normal probability distribution in accordance with the central limit theorem. Using an analytical approach to model the attenuating effect of each of the random variable sources can be very complex and

  17. Wave propagation in sandwich panels with a poroelastic core.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hao; Finnveden, Svante; Barbagallo, Mathias; Arteaga, Ines Lopez

    2014-05-01

    Wave propagation in sandwich panels with a poroelastic core, which is modeled by Biot's theory, is investigated using the waveguide finite element method. A waveguide poroelastic element is developed based on a displacement-pressure weak form. The dispersion curves of the sandwich panel are first identified as propagating or evanescent waves by varying the damping in the panel, and wave characteristics are analyzed by examining their motions. The energy distributions are calculated to identify the dominant motions. Simplified analytical models are also devised to show the main physics of the corresponding waves. This wave propagation analysis provides insight into the vibro-acoustic behavior of sandwich panels lined with elastic porous materials. PMID:24815252

  18. Propagation through a stratified ocean wave guide with random volume and surface inhomogeneities, Part I. Theory: Attenuation, dispersion, and acoustic mirages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratilal, Purnima; Makris, Nicholas C.

    2002-11-01

    Analytic expressions for the mean field propagated through a stratified ocean with random volume or sufrace inhomogeneities of arbitrary size compared to the wavelength are derived from a wave guide scattering model stemming from Green's theorem. It is found that multiple scattering through inhomogeneities in the forward direction can be succinctly expressed in terms of modal attenuation and dispersion coefficients under widely satisfied conditions. The inhomogeneities can have an arbitrary distribution in depth so that the model can realistically apply to scattering from internal waves, bubbles, fish, seafloor and seasurface roughness as well as sub-bottom anomalies. An understanding of the coherence of the forward scattered field can be gained by analogy with the formation of optical mirages in low-grazing angle forward scatter from random surfaces.

  19. Electron-acoustic solitary waves in a nonextensive plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Tribeche, Mouloud; Djebarni, Lyes

    2010-12-15

    The problem of arbitrary amplitude electron-acoustic solitary waves (EASWs) in a plasma having cold fluid electrons, hot nonextensive electrons, and stationary ions is addressed. It is found that the 'Maxwellianization' process of the hot nonextensive component does not favor the propagation of the EASWs. In contrast to superthermality, nonextensivity makes the electron-acoustic solitary structure less spiky. Our theoretical analysis brings a possibility to develop more refined theories of nonlinear solitary structures in astrophysical plasmas.

  20. Toward a Nonlinear Acoustic Analogy: Turbulence as a Source of Sound and Nonlinear Propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Steven A. E.

    2015-01-01

    An acoustic analogy is proposed that directly includes nonlinear propagation effects. We examine the Lighthill acoustic analogy and replace the Green's function of the wave equation with numerical solutions of the generalized Burgers' equation. This is justified mathematically by using similar arguments that are the basis of the solution of the Lighthill acoustic analogy. This approach is superior to alternatives because propagation is accounted for directly from the source to the far-field observer instead of from an arbitrary intermediate point. Validation of a numerical solver for the generalized Burgers' equation is performed by comparing solutions with the Blackstock bridging function and measurement data. Most importantly, the mathematical relationship between the Navier-Stokes equations, the acoustic analogy that describes the source, and canonical nonlinear propagation equations is shown. Example predictions are presented for nonlinear propagation of jet mixing noise at the sideline angle.

  1. Toward a Nonlinear Acoustic Analogy: Turbulence as a Source of Sound and Nonlinear Propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Steven A. E.

    2015-01-01

    An acoustic analogy is proposed that directly includes nonlinear propagation effects. We examine the Lighthill acoustic analogy and replace the Green's function of the wave equation with numerical solutions of the generalized Burgers' equation. This is justified mathematically by using similar arguments that are the basis of the solution of the Lighthill acoustic analogy. This approach is superior to alternatives because propagation is accounted for directly from the source to the far-field observer instead of from an arbitrary intermediate point. Validation of a numerical solver for the generalized Burgers' equation is performed by comparing solutions with the Blackstock bridging function and measurement data. Most importantly, the mathematical relationship between the Navier- Stokes equations, the acoustic analogy that describes the source, and canonical nonlinear propagation equations is shown. Example predictions are presented for nonlinear propagation of jet mixing noise at the sideline angle

  2. 3D Elastic Seismic Wave Propagation Code

    1998-09-23

    E3D is capable of simulating seismic wave propagation in a 3D heterogeneous earth. Seismic waves are initiated by earthquake, explosive, and/or other sources. These waves propagate through a 3D geologic model, and are simulated as synthetic seismograms or other graphical output.

  3. Acoustic Waves in Medical Imaging and Diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Sarvazyan, Armen P.; Urban, Matthew W.; Greenleaf, James F.

    2013-01-01

    Up until about two decades ago acoustic imaging and ultrasound imaging were synonymous. The term “ultrasonography,” or its abbreviated version “sonography” meant an imaging modality based on the use of ultrasonic compressional bulk waves. Since the 1990s numerous acoustic imaging modalities started to emerge based on the use of a different mode of acoustic wave: shear waves. It was demonstrated that imaging with these waves can provide very useful and very different information about the biological tissue being examined. We will discuss physical basis for the differences between these two basic modes of acoustic waves used in medical imaging and analyze the advantages associated with shear acoustic imaging. A comprehensive analysis of the range of acoustic wavelengths, velocities, and frequencies that have been used in different imaging applications will be presented. We will discuss the potential for future shear wave imaging applications. PMID:23643056

  4. Reflection properties of gravito-acoustic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jovanović, Gordana

    2016-03-01

    We derive the dispersion equation for gravito-acoustic waves in an isothermal gravitationally stratified nonmagnetized atmosphere. In this model, with constant sound speed, it is possible to derive analytically the equations for gravito-acoustic waves. The large value of the viscous Reynolds number in the solar atmosphere imply that the dissipative terms in HD (hydrodynamics) equations are negligible. We consider the plane boundary z = 0 between two isothermal atmosphere regions and using the boundary conditions we derive the equation for the reflection coeffcient of gravito-acoustic waves. For the frequencies much greater than acoustic cutoff frequency, the reflection coefficient of the acoustic waves modified by gravity is the same as in the case of the pure acoustic waves. Reflection coefficient for the gravity waves is very high, R ≈ 1.

  5. Surface wave acoustics of granular packing under gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clement, Eric; Bonneau, Lenaic; Andreotti, Bruno

    2009-06-01

    Due to the non-linearity of Hertzian contacts, the speed of sound in granular matter increases with pressure. For a packing under gravity and in the presence of a free surface, bulk acoustic waves cannot propagate due to the inherent refraction toward the surface (the mirage effect). Thus, only modes corresponding to surface waves (Raleigh-Hertz modes) are able to propagate the acoustic signal. First, based on a non-linear elasticity model, we describe the main features associated to these surface waves. We show that under gravity, a granular packing is from the acoustic propagation point of view an index gradient waveguide that selects modes of two distinct families i.e. the sagittal and transverse waves localized in the vicinity of the free surface. A striking feature of these surface waves is the multi-modal propagation: for both transverse and sagittal waves, we show the existence of a infinite but discrete series of propagating modes. In each case, we determine the mode shape and and the corresponding dispersion relation. In the case of a finite size system, a geometric waveguide is superimposed to the index gradient wave guide. In this later case, the dispersion relations are modified by the appearance of a cut-off frequency that scales with depth. The second part is devoted to an experimental study of surface waves propagating in a granular packing confined in a long channel. This set-up allows to tune a monomodal emission by taking advantage of the geometric waveguide features combined with properly designed emitters. For both sagittal and transverses waves, we were able to isolate a single mode (the fundamental one) and to plot the dispersion relation. This measurements agree well with the Hertzian scaling law as predicted by meanfield models. Furthermore, it allows us to determine quantitatively relations on the elastic moduli. However, we observe that our data yield a shear modulus abnormally weak when compared to several meanfield predictions.

  6. Surface wave acoustics of granular packing under gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Clement, Eric; Andreotti, Bruno; Bonneau, Lenaic

    2009-06-18

    Due to the non-linearity of Hertzian contacts, the speed of sound in granular matter increases with pressure. For a packing under gravity and in the presence of a free surface, bulk acoustic waves cannot propagate due to the inherent refraction toward the surface (the mirage effect). Thus, only modes corresponding to surface waves (Raleigh-Hertz modes) are able to propagate the acoustic signal. First, based on a non-linear elasticity model, we describe the main features associated to these surface waves. We show that under gravity, a granular packing is from the acoustic propagation point of view an index gradient waveguide that selects modes of two distinct families i.e. the sagittal and transverse waves localized in the vicinity of the free surface. A striking feature of these surface waves is the multi-modal propagation: for both transverse and sagittal waves, we show the existence of a infinite but discrete series of propagating modes. In each case, we determine the mode shape and and the corresponding dispersion relation. In the case of a finite size system, a geometric waveguide is superimposed to the index gradient wave guide. In this later case, the dispersion relations are modified by the appearance of a cut-off frequency that scales with depth. The second part is devoted to an experimental study of surface waves propagating in a granular packing confined in a long channel. This set-up allows to tune a monomodal emission by taking advantage of the geometric waveguide features combined with properly designed emitters. For both sagittal and transverses waves, we were able to isolate a single mode (the fundamental one) and to plot the dispersion relation. This measurements agree well with the Hertzian scaling law as predicted by meanfield models. Furthermore, it allows us to determine quantitatively relations on the elastic moduli. However, we observe that our data yield a shear modulus abnormally weak when compared to several meanfield predictions.

  7. Acoustic propagation in a thermally stratified atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanmoorhem, W. K.

    1985-01-01

    This report describes the activities during the fifth six month period of the investigation of acoustic propagation in the atmosphere with a realistic temperature profile. Progress has been achieved in two major directions: comparisons between the lapse model and experimental data taken by NASA during the second tower experiment, and development of a model propagation in an inversion. Data from the second tower experiment became available near the end of 1984 and some comparisons have been carried out, but this work is not complete. Problems with the temperature profiler during the experiment have produced temperature profiles that are difficult to fit the assumed variation of temperature with height, but in cases where reasonable fits have been obtained agreement between the model and the experiments are close. The major weaknesses in the model appear to be the presence of discontinuities in some regions, the low sound levels predicted near the source height, and difficulties with the argument of the Hankel function being outside the allowable range. Work on the inversion model has progressed slowly, and the rays for that case are discussed along with a simple energy conservation model of sound level enhancement in the inversion case.

  8. Particle-Wave Micro-Dynamics in Nonlinear Self-Excited Dust Acoustic Waves

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, C.-Y.; Teng, L.-W.; Liao, C.-T.; I Lin

    2008-09-07

    The large amplitude dust acoustic wave can be self-excited in a low-pressure dusty plasma. In the wave, the nonlinear wave-particle interaction determines particle motion, which in turn determines the waveform and wave propagation. In this work, the above behaviors are investigated by directly tracking particle motion through video-microscopy. A Lagrangian picture for the wave dynamics is constructed. The wave particle interaction associated with the transition from ordered to disordered particle oscillation, the wave crest trapping and wave heating are demonstrated and discussed.

  9. Three-dimensional to two-dimensional data conversion for electromagnetic wave propagation using an acoustic transfer function: application to cross-hole GPR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Vorst, Daryl G.; Yedlin, Matthew J.; Virieux, Jean; Krebes, Edward S.

    2014-07-01

    We show analytically that a well-known transfer function previously derived for the scalar acoustic problem that converts measurements from a 3-D (real-world) setting to a 2-D equivalent is directly applicable to the vector electromagnetic borehole ground penetrating radar problem. We also show that the transfer function's precision is improved for the low-loss case through the use of complex velocity. The transfer function has a strong effect on amplitude, and is therefore a critical preprocessing step for 2-D full-wave inversion when finding conductivity is of concern. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the transfer function through various numerical experiments and a synthetic frequency-domain full-wave inversion. We also compare the effectiveness of this curved-ray transfer function to a quasi-straight-ray transfer function. The inversion demonstrates the positive effect the transfer functions have on recovering conductivity and also that they are effective even when there are sharp velocity contrasts.

  10. Gasoline identifier based on SH0 plate acoustic waves.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsova, Iren E; Zaitsev, Boris D; Seleznev, Eugenii P; Verona, Enrico

    2016-08-01

    The present paper is devoted to the development of gasoline identifier based on zero order shear-horizontal (SH0) acoustic wave propagating in piezoelectric plate. It has been found that the permittivity of gasoline is increased when its octane number rises. The development of such identifier is experimentally demonstrated to be possible. PMID:27125559

  11. Dissipation of acoustic-gravity waves: an asymptotic approach.

    PubMed

    Godin, Oleg A

    2014-12-01

    Acoustic-gravity waves in the middle and upper atmosphere and long-range propagation of infrasound are strongly affected by air viscosity and thermal conductivity. To characterize the wave dissipation, it is typical to consider idealized environments, which admit plane-wave solutions. Here, an asymptotic approach is developed that relies instead on the assumption that spatial variations of environmental parameters are gradual. It is found that realistic assumptions about the atmosphere lead to rather different predictions for wave damping than do the plane-wave solutions. A modification to the Sutherland-Bass model of infrasound absorption is proposed. PMID:25480091

  12. Interaction of electromagnetic and acoustic waves in a stochastic atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatnagar, N.; Frankel, M. S.; Peterson, A. M.

    1977-01-01

    This paper considers the interaction of electromagnetic and acoustic waves where a Radio Acoustic Sounding System (RASS) is operated in a stochastic environment characterized by turbulence, winds and mean-temperature gradients. It has been shown that for a RASS operating at acoustic frequencies below a few kilohertz propagating under typical atmospheric conditions, turbulence has little effect on the strength of the received radio signal scattered from the pulse at heights up to a few kilometers. This result implies that the received RF signal level (power) is primarily a function of sound intensity which decreases as x exp minus 2 where x is the altitude.

  13. Shear horizontal acoustic waves propagating along two isotropic solid plates bonded with a non-dissipative adhesive layer: Effects of the rough interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potel, Catherine; Bruneau, Michel; Foze N'Djomo, Ludovic C.; Leduc, Damien; Echcherif Elkettani, Mounsif; Izbicki, Jean-Louis

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this paper is to provide an analytical contribution which presents the application of shear-horizontal (SH)-guided waves for the characterisation of a bi-layered structure which consists of two isotropic plates adhesively bonded using a non-dissipative thin layer of glue. The thickness of the layer of glue is assumed to be non-negligible, and the interfaces between this layer of glue and the plates are both assumed to be roughened (parallel ridges with complex shape and depth profiles). The basis of the theoretical approach is an extension of the integral formulation, in the frame of SH modal couplings due to the roughness, which has been developed previously for SH-wave propagation over a single plate with a rough surface. This approach assumes that the average roughness height is a small fraction of the thicknesses of the waveguides (the plates) everywhere. The changes, due to the roughness, in the characteristics of the fields created by a harmonic source set at the entrance edge of the structure are expressed through the mapping of the displacement and stress perturbations. Preliminary tests of the effectiveness of the model are given; they rely on the phase-matching effects of periodic profiles and pseudo-random experimental profile.

  14. Finite element analysis and experimental study of surface acoustic wave propagation through two-dimensional pillar-based surface phononic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yankin, S.; Talbi, A.; Du, Y.; Gerbedoen, J.-C.; Preobrazhensky, V.; Pernod, P.; Bou Matar, O.

    2014-06-01

    We study both theoretically and experimentally the interaction of surface elastic waves with 2D surface phononic crystal (PnC) on a piezoelectric substrate. A rigorous analysis based on 3D finite element method is conducted to calculate the band structure of the PnC and to analyze the transmission spectrum (module and phase). Interdigital transducers (IDTs) are considered for electrical excitation and detection, and absorbing boundary conditions are used to suppress wave's reflection from the edges. The PnCs are composed of an array of 20 Nickel cylindrical pillars arranged in a square lattice symmetry, and deposited on a LiNbO3 substrate (128°Y cut-X propagating) between two dispersive IDTs. We investigate by means of band diagrams and transmission spectrum the opening band-gaps originating from pillars resonant modes and from Bragg band-gap. The physical parameters that influence and determine their appearance are also discussed. Experimental validation is achieved through electrical measurement of the transmission characteristics, including amplitude and phase.

  15. Defect states of acoustic waves in a two-dimensional lattice of solid cylinders

    SciTech Connect

    Sigalas, M.M.

    1998-09-01

    Using the plane-wave expansion method, we study the propagation of acoustic waves through two-dimensional (2D) periodic composites consisting of solid cylinders in air. Defect in those structures create localized states inside the band gaps. We study both single and line defects. Line defects can act as a waveguide for acoustic waves while single defects can be used as acoustical filters. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  16. Deep ocean circulation by acoustic-gravity waves: from snowball to greenhouse earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadri, Usama

    2015-04-01

    Acoustic-gravity waves are compression-type waves propagating with amplitudes governed by the restoring force of gravity. They are generated, among others, by wind-wave interactions, surface waves interactions, submarine earthquakes, and movements of ice-blocks. We show that acoustic-gravity waves contribute to deep ocean water transport through different climate timelines: from snowball to greenhouse earth; they cause chaotic flow trajectories of individual water parcels, which can be transported up to a few centimetres per second.

  17. Temperature Dependence of Surface Acoustic Wave Propagation Velocity in InxGa1-xN Films Obtained by High-Resolution Brillouin Spectroscopy: Determination of Temperature Coefficient of Frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riobóo, Rafael J. Jiménez; Prieto, Carlos; Cuscó, Ramón; Artús, Lluís; Boney, Chris; Bensaoula, Abdelhak; Yamaguchi, Tomohiro; Nanishi, Yasushi

    2013-05-01

    Temperature-dependent surface acoustic wave (SAW) propagation velocity and temperature coefficient of frequency (TCF) have been determined for the first time in InxGa1-xN alloys by means of high-resolution Brillouin spectroscopy (HRBS). HRBS offers an alternative way of determining TCF. The obtained TCF values present a non-linear behavior with the In concentration. TCF of pure InN (-13.75 ppm/K) is similar to those of AlN and GaN (-19 and -17.7 ppm/K, respectively). InxGa1-xN samples exhibit frequency values that are very stable against temperature changes, which makes InxGa1-xN a good candidate for current SAW-based technological applications.

  18. Adiabatic trapping in coupled kinetic Alfven-acoustic waves

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, H. A.; Ali, Z.; Masood, W.

    2013-03-15

    In the present work, we have discussed the effects of adiabatic trapping of electrons on obliquely propagating Alfven waves in a low {beta} plasma. Using the two potential theory and employing the Sagdeev potential approach, we have investigated the existence of arbitrary amplitude coupled kinetic Alfven-acoustic solitary waves in both the sub and super Alfvenic cases. The results obtained have been analyzed and presented graphically and can be applied to regions of space where the low {beta} assumption holds true.

  19. Ion-Acoustic Waves in Self-Gravitaing Dusty Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Nagendra; Kumar, Vinod; Kumar, Anil

    2008-09-07

    The propagation and damping of low frequency ion-acoustic waves in steady state, unmagnetised, self-gravitating dusty plasma are studied taking into account two important damping mechanisms creation damping and Tromso damping. It is found that imaginary part of wave number is independent of frequency in case of creation damping. But when we consider the case of creation and Tromso damping together, an additional contribution to damping appears with the increase in frequency attributed to Tromso effect.

  20. Determination of hydrocarbon levels in water via laser-induced acoustics wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bidin, Noriah; Hossenian, Raheleh; Duralim, Maisarah; Krishnan, Ganesan; Marsin, Faridah Mohd; Nughro, Waskito; Zainal, Jasman

    2016-04-01

    Hydrocarbon contamination in water is a major environmental concern in terms of foreseen collapse of the natural ecosystem. Hydrocarbon level in water was determined by generating acoustic wave via an innovative laser-induced breakdown in conjunction with high-speed photographic coupling with piezoelectric transducer to trace acoustic wave propagation. A Q-switched Nd:YAG (40 mJ) was focused in cuvette-filled hydrocarbon solution at various concentrations (0-2000 ppm) to induce optical breakdown, shock wave generation and later acoustic wave propagation. A nitro-dye (ND) laser (10 mJ) was used as a flash to illuminate and frozen the acoustic wave propagation. Lasers were synchronised using a digital delay generator. The image of acoustic waves was grabbed and recorded via charged couple device (CCD) video camera at the speed of 30 frames/second with the aid of Matrox software version 9. The optical delay (0.8-10.0 μs) between the acoustic wave formation and its frozen time is recorded through photodetectors. A piezo-electric transducer (PZT) was used to trace the acoustic wave (sound signal), which cascades to a digital oscilloscope. The acoustic speed is calculated from the ratio of acoustic wave radius (1-8 mm) and optical time delay. Acoustic wave speed is found to linearly increase with hydrocarbon concentrations. The acoustic signal generation at higher hydrocarbon levels in water is attributed to supplementary mass transfer and impact on the probe. Integrated high-speed photography with transducer detection system authenticated that the signals indeed emerged from the laser-induced acoustic wave instead of photothermal processes. It is established that the acoustic wave speed in water is used as a fingerprint to detect the hydrocarbon levels.

  1. WAVE PROPAGATION AND JET FORMATION IN THE CHROMOSPHERE

    SciTech Connect

    Heggland, L.; Hansteen, V. H.; Carlsson, M.; De Pontieu, B.

    2011-12-20

    We present the results of numerical simulations of wave propagation and jet formation in solar atmosphere models with different magnetic field configurations. The presence in the chromosphere of waves with periods longer than the acoustic cutoff period has been ascribed to either strong inclined magnetic fields, or changes in the radiative relaxation time. Our simulations include a sophisticated treatment of radiative losses, as well as fields with different strengths and inclinations. Using Fourier and wavelet analysis techniques, we investigate the periodicity of the waves that travel through the chromosphere. We find that the velocity signal is dominated by waves with periods around 5 minutes in regions of strong, inclined field, including at the edges of strong flux tubes where the field expands, whereas 3 minute waves dominate in regions of weak or vertically oriented fields. Our results show that the field inclination is very important for long-period wave propagation, whereas variations in the radiative relaxation time have little effect. Furthermore, we find that atmospheric conditions can vary significantly on timescales of a few minutes, meaning that a Fourier analysis of wave propagation can be misleading. Wavelet techniques take variations with time into account and are more suitable analysis tools. Finally, we investigate the properties of jets formed by the propagating waves once they reach the transition region, and find systematic differences between the jets in inclined-field regions and those in vertical field regions, in agreement with observations of dynamic fibrils.

  2. A Statistical Study of Mid-latitude Thunderstorm Characteristics associated with Acoustic and Gravity Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lay, E. H.; Shao, X. M.; Kendrick, A.

    2014-12-01

    Gravity waves with periods greater than 5 minutes and acoustic waves with periods between 3 and 5 minutes have been detected at ionospheric heights (250-350 km) and associated with severe thunderstorms. Modeling results support these findings, indicating that acoustic waves should be able to reach 250-350 km within ~250 km horizontally of the source, and gravity waves should be able to propagate significantly further. However, the mechanism by which the acoustic waves are generated and the ubiquity of occurrence of both types of wave is unknown. We use GPS total electron content measurements to detect gravity and acoustic waves in the ionosphere. We perform a statistical study from 2005 May - July to compare the occurrence rate and horizontal extent of the waves to storm size and convective height from NEXRAD radar measurements. It is found that both gravity waves and acoustic wave horizontal extent is primarily associated with storm size and not convective height.

  3. Propagation of a fluidization - combustion wave

    SciTech Connect

    Pron, G.P.; Gusachenko, L.K.; Zarko, V.E.

    1994-05-01

    A fluidization-combustion wave propagating through a fixed and initially cool bed was created by igniting coal at the top surface of the bed. The proposed physical interpretation of the phenomenon is in qualitative agreement with the experimental dependences of the characteristics of the process on determining parameters. A kindling regime with forced wave propagation is suggested.

  4. Simulation of the elastic wave propagation in anisotropic microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryner, Juerg; Vollmann, Jacqueline; Profunser, Dieter M.; Dual, Jurg

    2007-06-01

    For the interpretation of optical Pump-Probe Measurements on microstructures the wave propagation in anisotropic 3-D structures with arbitrary geometries is numerically calculated. The laser acoustic Pump-Probe technique generates bulk waves in structures in a thermo-elastic way. This method is well established for non-destructive measurements of thin films with an indepth resolution in the order of 10 nm. The Pump-Probe technique can also be used for measurements, e.g. for quality inspection of three-dimensional structures with arbitrary geometries, like MEMS components. For the interpretation of the measurements it is necessary that the wave propagation in the specimen to be inspected can be calculated. Here, the wave propagation for various geometries and materials is investigated. In the first part, the wave propagation in isotropic axisymmetric structures is simulated with a 2-D finite difference formulation. The numerical results are verified with measurements of macroscopic specimens. In a second step, the simulations are extended to 3-D structures with orthotopic material properties. The implemented code allows the calculation of the wave propagation for different orientations of the material axes (orientation of the orthotropic axes relative to the geometry of the structure). Limits of the presented algorithm are discussed and future directions of the on-going research project are presented.

  5. Detection of in-plane displacements of acoustic wave fields using extrinsic Fizeau fiber interferometric sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dhawan, R.; Gunther, M. F.; Claus, R. O.

    1991-01-01

    Quantitative measurements of the in-plane particle displacement components of ultrasonic surface acoustic wave fields using extrinsic Fizeau fiber interferometric (EFFI) sensors are reported. Wave propagation in materials and the fiber sensor elements are briefly discussed. Calibrated experimental results obtained for simulated acoustic emission events on homogeneous metal test specimens are reported and compared to previous results obtained using piezoelectric transducers.

  6. Underwater acoustic wave generation by filamentation of terawatt ultrashort laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jukna, Vytautas; Jarnac, Amélie; Milián, Carles; Brelet, Yohann; Carbonnel, Jérôme; André, Yves-Bernard; Guillermin, Régine; Sessarego, Jean-Pierre; Fattaccioli, Dominique; Mysyrowicz, André; Couairon, Arnaud; Houard, Aurélien

    2016-06-01

    Acoustic signals generated by filamentation of ultrashort terawatt laser pulses in water are characterized experimentally. Measurements reveal a strong influence of input pulse duration on the shape and intensity of the acoustic wave. Numerical simulations of the laser pulse nonlinear propagation and the subsequent water hydrodynamics and acoustic wave generation show that the strong acoustic emission is related to the mechanism of superfilamention in water. The elongated shape of the plasma volume where energy is deposited drives the far-field profile of the acoustic signal, which takes the form of a radially directed pressure wave with a single oscillation and a very broad spectrum.

  7. Underwater acoustic wave generation by filamentation of terawatt ultrashort laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Jukna, Vytautas; Jarnac, Amélie; Milián, Carles; Brelet, Yohann; Carbonnel, Jérôme; André, Yves-Bernard; Guillermin, Régine; Sessarego, Jean-Pierre; Fattaccioli, Dominique; Mysyrowicz, André; Couairon, Arnaud; Houard, Aurélien

    2016-06-01

    Acoustic signals generated by filamentation of ultrashort terawatt laser pulses in water are characterized experimentally. Measurements reveal a strong influence of input pulse duration on the shape and intensity of the acoustic wave. Numerical simulations of the laser pulse nonlinear propagation and the subsequent water hydrodynamics and acoustic wave generation show that the strong acoustic emission is related to the mechanism of superfilamention in water. The elongated shape of the plasma volume where energy is deposited drives the far-field profile of the acoustic signal, which takes the form of a radially directed pressure wave with a single oscillation and a very broad spectrum. PMID:27415357

  8. Swimming using surface acoustic waves.

    PubMed

    Bourquin, Yannyk; Cooper, Jonathan M

    2013-01-01

    Microactuation of free standing objects in fluids is currently dominated by the rotary propeller, giving rise to a range of potential applications in the military, aeronautic and biomedical fields. Previously, surface acoustic waves (SAWs) have been shown to be of increasing interest in the field of microfluidics, where the refraction of a SAW into a drop of fluid creates a convective flow, a phenomenon generally known as SAW streaming. We now show how SAWs, generated at microelectronic devices, can be used as an efficient method of propulsion actuated by localised fluid streaming. The direction of the force arising from such streaming is optimal when the devices are maintained at the Rayleigh angle. The technique provides propulsion without any moving parts, and, due to the inherent design of the SAW transducer, enables simple control of the direction of travel. PMID:23431358

  9. Acoustic wave coupled magnetoelectric effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, J. S.; Zhang, N.

    2016-07-01

    Magnetoelectric (ME) coupling by acoustic waveguide was developed. Longitudinal and transversal ME effects of larger than 44 and 6 (V cm-1 Oe-1) were obtained with the waveguide-coupled ME device, respectively. Several resonant points were observed in the range of frequency lower than 47 kHz. Analysis showed that the standing waves in the waveguide were responsible for those resonances. The frequency and size dependence of the ME effects were investigated. A resonant condition about the geometrical size of the waveguide was obtained. Theory and experiments showed the resonant frequencies were closely influenced by the diameter and length of the waveguide. A series of double-peak curves of longitudinal magnetoelectric response were obtained, and their significance was discussed initially.

  10. Surface acoustic wave stabilized oscillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, T. E.

    1978-01-01

    A number of 401.2 MHz surface acoustic wave (SAW) controlled oscillators were built and tested. The performance of these oscillators was evaluated for possible use as stable oscillators in communication systems. A short term frequency stability of better than 1 x 10 to the minus 9th power for one second was measured for the SAW oscillators. Long term frequency drift was measured and was found to be dependent on SAW design and packaging. Drift rates ranging from 15 ppm in twenty weeks to 2.5 ppm in twenty weeks were observed. Some further improvement was required. The temperature dependence of the saw oscillators was evaluated and it was concluded that some form of temperature compensation will be necessary to meet the requirements of some communication systems.

  11. Surface acoustic wave stabilized oscillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, T. E.; Lee, D. L.; Leja, I.

    1979-01-01

    Four areas of surface acoustic wave (SAW) controlled oscillators were investigated and a number of 401.2 MHz oscillators were constructed that showed improved performance. Aging studies on SAW devices packaged in HC36/U cold weld enclosures produced frequency drifts as low as 0.4 ppm in 35 weeks and drift rates well under 0.5 ppm/year. Temperature compensation circuits have substantially improved oscillator temperature stability, with a deviation of + or - 4 ppm observed over the range -45 C to + 40 C. High efficiency amplifiers were constructed for SAW oscillators and a dc to RF efficiency of 44 percent was obtained for an RF output of 25 mW. Shock and vibration tests were made on four oscillators and all survived 500 G shock pulses unchanged. Only when white noise vibration (20 Hz to 2000 Hz) levels of 20 G's rms were applied did some of the devices fail.

  12. Swimming Using Surface Acoustic Waves

    PubMed Central

    Bourquin, Yannyk; Cooper, Jonathan M.

    2013-01-01

    Microactuation of free standing objects in fluids is currently dominated by the rotary propeller, giving rise to a range of potential applications in the military, aeronautic and biomedical fields. Previously, surface acoustic waves (SAWs) have been shown to be of increasing interest in the field of microfluidics, where the refraction of a SAW into a drop of fluid creates a convective flow, a phenomenon generally known as SAW streaming. We now show how SAWs, generated at microelectronic devices, can be used as an efficient method of propulsion actuated by localised fluid streaming. The direction of the force arising from such streaming is optimal when the devices are maintained at the Rayleigh angle. The technique provides propulsion without any moving parts, and, due to the inherent design of the SAW transducer, enables simple control of the direction of travel. PMID:23431358

  13. Volumetric measurements of a spatially growing dust acoustic wave

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Jeremiah D.

    2012-11-15

    In this study, tomographic particle image velocimetry (tomo-PIV) techniques are used to make volumetric measurements of the dust acoustic wave (DAW) in a weakly coupled dusty plasma system in an argon, dc glow discharge plasma. These tomo-PIV measurements provide the first instantaneous volumetric measurement of a naturally occurring propagating DAW. These measurements reveal over the measured volume that the measured wave mode propagates in all three spatial dimensional and exhibits the same spatial growth rate and wavelength in each spatial direction.

  14. Frequency Domain Calculations Of Acoustic Propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lockard, David P.

    2004-01-01

    Two complex geometry problems are solved using the linearized Euler equations. The impedance mismatch method1 is used to impose the solid surfaces without the need to use a body-fitted grid. The problem is solved in the frequency domain to avoid long run times. Although the harmonic assumption eliminates all time dependence, a pseudo-time term is added to allow conventional iterative methods to be employed. A Jameson type, Runge-Kutta scheme is used to advance the solution in pseudo time. The spatial operator is based on a seven-point, sixth-order finite difference. Constant coefficient, sixth-derivative artificial dissipation is used throughout the domain. A buffer zone technique employing a complex frequency to damp all waves near the boundaries is used to minimize reflections. The results show that the method is capable of capturing the salient features of the scattering, but an excessive number of grid points are required to resolve the phenomena in the vicinity of the solid bodies because the wavelength of the acoustics is relatively short compared with the size of the bodies. Smoothly transitioning into the immersed boundary condition alleviates the difficulties, but a fine mesh is still required.

  15. High-frequency shear-horizontal surface acoustic wave sensor

    DOEpatents

    Branch, Darren W

    2013-05-07

    A Love wave sensor uses a single-phase unidirectional interdigital transducer (IDT) on a piezoelectric substrate for leaky surface acoustic wave generation. The IDT design minimizes propagation losses, bulk wave interferences, provides a highly linear phase response, and eliminates the need for impedance matching. As an example, a high frequency (.about.300-400 MHz) surface acoustic wave (SAW) transducer enables efficient excitation of shear-horizontal waves on 36.degree. Y-cut lithium tantalate (LTO) giving a highly linear phase response (2.8.degree. P-P). The sensor has the ability to detect at the pg/mm.sup.2 level and can perform multi-analyte detection in real-time. The sensor can be used for rapid autonomous detection of pathogenic microorganisms and bioagents by field deployable platforms.

  16. High-frequency shear-horizontal surface acoustic wave sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Branch, Darren W

    2014-03-11

    A Love wave sensor uses a single-phase unidirectional interdigital transducer (IDT) on a piezoelectric substrate for leaky surface acoustic wave generation. The IDT design minimizes propagation losses, bulk wave interferences, provides a highly linear phase response, and eliminates the need for impedance matching. As an example, a high frequency (.about.300-400 MHz) surface acoustic wave (SAW) transducer enables efficient excitation of shear-horizontal waves on 36.degree. Y-cut lithium tantalate (LTO) giving a highly linear phase response (2.8.degree. P-P). The sensor has the ability to detect at the pg/mm.sup.2 level and can perform multi-analyte detection in real-time. The sensor can be used for rapid autonomous detection of pathogenic microorganisms and bioagents by field deployable platforms.

  17. Oxygen acoustic solitary waves in a magnetized plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Qian, S.; Lotko, W.; Hudson, M. K.

    1989-01-01

    Ion-acoustic solitary waves in a magnetized plasma containing an arbitrary mixture of H(+) and O(+) ions are studied. A nonlinear wave equation has been derived from the Poisson-Vlasov equations, including a uniform magnetic field and dissipation due to reflected electrons. When dissipation is ignored, the equation has soliton solutions associated with both oxygen and hydrogen acoustic modes, which can be either rarefactive or compressive depending on the ion concentrations and the electron/ion temperature ratio and, more weakly, on the bulk drifts of the species. If electron reflection is included, the solitary wave can be intensified. Under somewhat restrictive conditions the oxygen solitary wave is rarefactive and propagates with a velocity comparable to that observed by the Viking satellite. The three-dimensional solitons obey a relation of scales parallel to the magnetic field and in the transverse direction. Computer simulations of one-dimensional versions of the nonlinear wave equation are presented.

  18. Experimental and theoretical study of Rayleigh-Lamb wave propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Wayne P.; Datta, Subhendu K.; Ju, T. H.

    1990-01-01

    Many space structures, such as the Space Station Freedom, contain critical thin-walled components. The structural integrity of thin-walled plates and shells can be monitored effectively using acoustic emission and ultrasonic testing in the Rayleigh-Lamb wave frequency range. A new PVDF piezoelectric sensor has been developed that is well suited to remote, inservice nondestructive evaluation of space structures. In the present study the new sensor was used to investigate Rayleigh-Lamb wave propagation in a plate. The experimental apparatus consisted of a glass plate (2.3 m x 25.4 mm x 5.6 mm) with PVDF sensor (3 mm diam.) mounted at various positions along its length. A steel ball impact served as a simulated acoustic emission source, producing surface waves, shear waves and longitudinal waves with dominant frequencies between 1 kHz and 200 kHz. The experimental time domain wave-forms were compared with theoretical predictions of the wave propagation in the plate. The model uses an analytical solution for the Green's function and the measured response at a single position to predict response at any other position in the plate. Close agreement was found between the experimental and theoretical results.

  19. Propagation of extensional waves in a piezoelectric semiconductor rod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, C. L.; Wang, X. Y.; Chen, W. Q.; Yang, J. S.

    2016-04-01

    We studied the propagation of extensional waves in a thin piezoelectric semiconductor rod of ZnO whose c-axis is along the axis of the rod. The macroscopic theory of piezoelectric semiconductors was used which consists of the coupled equations of piezoelectricity and the conservation of charge. The problem is nonlinear because the drift current is the product of the unknown electric field and the unknown carrier density. A perturbation procedure was used which resulted in two one-way coupled linear problems of piezoelectricity and the conservation of charge, respectively. The acoustic wave and the accompanying electric field were obtained from the equations of piezoelectricity. The motion of carriers was then determined from the conservation of charge using a trigonometric series. It was found that while the acoustic wave was approximated by a sinusoidal wave, the motion of carriers deviates from a sinusoidal wave qualitatively because of the contributions of higher harmonics arising from the originally nonlinear terms. The wave crests become higher and sharper while the troughs are shallower and wider. This deviation is more pronounced for acoustic waves with larger amplitudes.

  20. Acoustic tweezers via sub–time-of-flight regime surface acoustic waves

    PubMed Central

    Collins, David J.; Devendran, Citsabehsan; Ma, Zhichao; Ng, Jia Wei; Neild, Adrian; Ai, Ye

    2016-01-01

    Micrometer-scale acoustic waves are highly useful for refined optomechanical and acoustofluidic manipulation, where these fields are spatially localized along the transducer aperture but not along the acoustic propagation direction. In the case of acoustic tweezers, such a conventional acoustic standing wave results in particle and cell patterning across the entire width of a microfluidic channel, preventing selective trapping. We demonstrate the use of nanosecond-scale pulsed surface acoustic waves (SAWs) with a pulse period that is less than the time of flight between opposing transducers to generate localized time-averaged patterning regions while using conventional electrode structures. These nodal positions can be readily and arbitrarily positioned in two dimensions and within the patterning region itself through the imposition of pulse delays, frequency modulation, and phase shifts. This straightforward concept adds new spatial dimensions to which acoustic fields can be localized in SAW applications in a manner analogous to optical tweezers, including spatially selective acoustic tweezers and optical waveguides. PMID:27453940

  1. Acoustic tweezers via sub-time-of-flight regime surface acoustic waves.

    PubMed

    Collins, David J; Devendran, Citsabehsan; Ma, Zhichao; Ng, Jia Wei; Neild, Adrian; Ai, Ye

    2016-07-01

    Micrometer-scale acoustic waves are highly useful for refined optomechanical and acoustofluidic manipulation, where these fields are spatially localized along the transducer aperture but not along the acoustic propagation direction. In the case of acoustic tweezers, such a conventional acoustic standing wave results in particle and cell patterning across the entire width of a microfluidic channel, preventing selective trapping. We demonstrate the use of nanosecond-scale pulsed surface acoustic waves (SAWs) with a pulse period that is less than the time of flight between opposing transducers to generate localized time-averaged patterning regions while using conventional electrode structures. These nodal positions can be readily and arbitrarily positioned in two dimensions and within the patterning region itself through the imposition of pulse delays, frequency modulation, and phase shifts. This straightforward concept adds new spatial dimensions to which acoustic fields can be localized in SAW applications in a manner analogous to optical tweezers, including spatially selective acoustic tweezers and optical waveguides. PMID:27453940

  2. Pulse Wave Propagation in the Arterial Tree

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Vosse, Frans N.; Stergiopulos, Nikos

    2011-01-01

    The beating heart creates blood pressure and flow pulsations that propagate as waves through the arterial tree that are reflected at transitions in arterial geometry and elasticity. Waves carry information about the matter in which they propagate. Therefore, modeling of arterial wave propagation extends our knowledge about the functioning of the cardiovascular system and provides a means to diagnose disorders and predict the outcome of medical interventions. In this review we focus on the physical and mathematical modeling of pulse wave propagation, based on general fluid dynamical principles. In addition we present potential applications in cardiovascular research and clinical practice. Models of short- and long-term adaptation of the arterial system and methods that deal with uncertainties in personalized model parameters and boundary conditions are briefly discussed, as they are believed to be major topics for further study and will boost the significance of arterial pulse wave modeling even more.

  3. Propagation and generation of waves in solar atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Routh, Swati

    The fact that the temperature increases with height in the solar atmosphere has been known for many years. To maintain this temperature increase, sources of heating must be present in the atmosphere. One of the most important, and still unsolved, problems in solar physics is to identify the basic physical processes that are responsible for this heating, and explain solar activities caused by the heating. It is also observationally well-established that the solar atmosphere shows a broad range of oscillations that are different in magnetic and non-magnetic regions of the atmosphere. The oscillations are driven by propagating waves, which cause the atmosphere to oscillate at its natural (cutoff) frequency. Since different waves have different cutoff frequencies, it is important to have a method that would allow determining such cutoffs for the solar atmosphere. In this PhD dissertation, the concept of cutoff frequency is extended to inhomogeneous atmospheres, and a general method to determine the cutoff frequency is presented. The method leads to new forms of wave equations obtained for all wave variables, and allows deriving the cutoff frequency without formally solving the wave equations. The main result is that the derived cutoff frequency is a local quantity and that its value at a given atmospheric height determines the frequency that waves must have in order to be propagating at this height. The developed method is general enough, so that it can be used to establish theoretical bases for studying the propagation and generation of different waves in the solar atmosphere. Acoustic waves play an important role in the heating of magnetic-free regions of the solar atmosphere. To determine the propagation conditions for these waves in the non-isothermal solar atmosphere, the method is used to obtain the resulting acoustic cutoff frequency. This new cutoff frequency is a local quantity and it generalizes Lamb's acoustic cutoff frequency that was obtained for an

  4. Numerical Study of Wave Propagation in a Non-Uniform Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Povitsky, Alex; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The propagation of acoustic waves originating from cylindrical and spherical pulses, in a non-uniform mean flow, and in the presence of a reflecting wall is investigated by Hardin and Pope approach using compact approximation of spatial derivatives. The 2-D and 3-D stagnation flows and a flow around a cylinder are taken as prototypes of real world flows with strong gradients of mean pressure and velocity. The intensity and directivity of acoustic wave patterns appear to be quite different from the benchmark solutions obtained in a static environment for the same geometry. The physical reasons for amplification and weakening of sound are discussed in terms of dynamics of wave profile and redistribution of acoustic energy and its potential and kinetic components. For an acoustic wave in the flow around a cylinder, the observed mean acoustic pressure is approximately doubled (upstream pulse position) and halved (downstream pulse position) in comparison with the sound propagation in static ambient conditions.

  5. Surface acoustic wave dust deposition monitor

    DOEpatents

    Fasching, G.E.; Smith, N.S. Jr.

    1988-02-12

    A system is disclosed for using the attenuation of surface acoustic waves to monitor real time dust deposition rates on surfaces. The system includes a signal generator, a tone-burst generator/amplifier connected to a transmitting transducer for converting electrical signals into acoustic waves. These waves are transmitted through a path defining means adjacent to a layer of dust and then, in turn, transmitted to a receiving transducer for changing the attenuated acoustic wave to electrical signals. The signals representing the attenuated acoustic waves may be amplified and used in a means for analyzing the output signals to produce an output indicative of the dust deposition rates and/or values of dust in the layer. 8 figs.

  6. An experimental investigation of acoustic propagation in saturated sands with variable fluid properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costley, R. D., Jr.

    1985-05-01

    The Biot-Stoll theory describes the propagation of acoustic waves in a saturated, unconsolidated porous medium. The expressions for the attenuation and phase velocity derived from this theory depend explicitly on the viscosity, density, and bulk modulus of the pore fluid. An experiment has been designed to determine the dependence of attenuation and phase velocity on these properties of the pore fluid. The phase velocity and attenuation of compressional waves were measured using a mixture of water and glycerine as the interstitial fluid. The theoretical background is reviewed and the experimental procedure is discussed in detail. The results, along with comparisons with the Biot-Stoll theory, are then presented. The choices of the theoretical parameters are discussed and their relation to the fit of the theory to the data. The Biot-Stoll theory is shown to adequately describe the effects of the fluid properties on acoustic wave propagation in saturated sediments, at least for compressional waves of the first type.

  7. Double aperture focusing transducer for controlling microparticle motions in trapezoidal microchannels with surface acoustic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Ming K.; Tjeung, Ricky; Ervin, Hannah; Yeo, Leslie Y.; Friend, James

    2009-09-01

    We present a method for controlling the motion of microparticles suspended in an aqueous solution, which fills in a microchannel fabricated into a piezoelectric substrate, using propagating surface acoustic waves. The cross-sectional shape of this microchannel is trapezoidal, preventing the formation of acoustic standing waves across the channel width and therefore allowing the steering of microparticles. The induced acoustic streaming transports these particles to eliminate the use of external pumps for fluid actuation.

  8. Making and Propagating Elastic Waves: Overview of the new wave propagation code WPP

    SciTech Connect

    McCandless, K P; Petersson, N A; Nilsson, S; Rodgers, A; Sjogreen, B; Blair, S C

    2006-05-09

    We are developing a new parallel 3D wave propagation code at LLNL called WPP (Wave Propagation Program). WPP is being designed to incorporate the latest developments in embedded boundary and mesh refinement technology for finite difference methods, as well as having an efficient portable implementation to run on the latest supercomputers at LLNL. We are currently exploring seismic wave applications, including a recent effort to compute ground motions for the 1906 Great San Francisco Earthquake. This paper will briefly describe the wave propagation problem, features of our numerical method to model it, implementation of the wave propagation code, and results from the 1906 Great San Francisco Earthquake simulation.

  9. Propagation of shock waves through petroleum suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukuk, K. V.; Makhkamov, S. M.; Azizov, K. K.

    1986-01-01

    Anomalous shock wave propagation through petroleum with a high paraffin content was studied in an attempt to confirm the theoretically predicted breakdown of a forward shock wave into oscillating waves and wave packets as well as individual solitons. Tests were performed in a shock tube at 10, 20, and 50 to 60 C, with pure kerosene as reference and with kerosene + 5, 10, 15, and 20% paraffin. The addition of paraffin was found to radically alter the rheodynamic characteristics of the medium and, along with it, the pattern of shock wave propagation. The integro-differential equation describing a one dimensional hydraulic shock process in viscoelastic fluids is reduced to the Burgers-Korteweg-deVries equation, which is solved numerically for given values of the system parameters. The results indicate that the theory of shock wave propagation through such an anomalous suspension must be modified.

  10. A New Wave of Acoustics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beyer, Robert

    1981-01-01

    Surveys 50 years of acoustical studies by discussing selected topics including the ear, nonlinear representations, underwater sound, acoustical diagnostics, absorption, electrolytes, phonons, magnetic interaction, and superfluidity and the five sounds. (JN)

  11. Microfabricated bulk wave acoustic bandgap device

    DOEpatents

    Olsson, Roy H.; El-Kady, Ihab F.; McCormick, Frederick; Fleming, James G.; Fleming, Carol

    2010-06-08

    A microfabricated bulk wave acoustic bandgap device comprises a periodic two-dimensional array of scatterers embedded within the matrix material membrane, wherein the scatterer material has a density and/or elastic constant that is different than the matrix material and wherein the periodicity of the array causes destructive interference of the acoustic wave within an acoustic bandgap. The membrane can be suspended above a substrate by an air or vacuum gap to provide acoustic isolation from the substrate. The device can be fabricated using microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) technologies. Such microfabricated bulk wave phononic bandgap devices are useful for acoustic isolation in the ultrasonic, VHF, or UHF regime (i.e., frequencies of order 1 MHz to 10 GHz and higher, and lattice constants of order 100 .mu.m or less).

  12. Microfabricated bulk wave acoustic bandgap device

    DOEpatents

    Olsson, Roy H.; El-Kady, Ihab F.; McCormick, Frederick; Fleming, James G.; Fleming, legal representative, Carol

    2010-11-23

    A microfabricated bulk wave acoustic bandgap device comprises a periodic two-dimensional array of scatterers embedded within the matrix material membrane, wherein the scatterer material has a density and/or elastic constant that is different than the matrix material and wherein the periodicity of the array causes destructive interference of the acoustic wave within an acoustic bandgap. The membrane can be suspended above a substrate by an air or vacuum gap to provide acoustic isolation from the substrate. The device can be fabricated using microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) technologies. Such microfabricated bulk wave phononic bandgap devices are useful for acoustic isolation in the ultrasonic, VHF, or UHF regime (i.e., frequencies of order 1 MHz to 10 GHz and higher, and lattice constants of order 100 .mu.m or less).

  13. Chromospheric extents predicted by time-dependent acoustic wave models

    SciTech Connect

    Cuntz, M. Heidelberg Universitaet )

    1990-01-01

    Theoretical models for chromospheric structures of late-type giant stars are computed, including the time-dependent propagation of acoustic waves. Models with short-period monochromatic shock waves as well as a spectrum of acoustic waves are discussed, and the method is applied to the stars Arcturus, Aldebaran, and Betelgeuse. Chromospheric extent, defined as the monotonic decrease with height of the time-averaged electron densities, are found to be 1.12, 1.13, and 1.22 stellar radii for the three stars, respectively; this corresponds to a time-averaged electron density of 10 to the 7th/cu cm. Predictions of the extended chromospheric obtained using a simple scaling law agree well with those obtained by the time-dependent wave models; thus, the chromospheres of all stars for which the scaling law is valid consist of the same number of pressure scale heights. 74 refs.

  14. Chromospheric extents predicted by time-dependent acoustic wave models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuntz, Manfred

    1990-01-01

    Theoretical models for chromospheric structures of late-type giant stars are computed, including the time-dependent propagation of acoustic waves. Models with short-period monochromatic shock waves as well as a spectrum of acoustic waves are discussed, and the method is applied to the stars Arcturus, Aldebaran, and Betelgeuse. Chromospheric extent, defined as the monotonic decrease with height of the time-averaged electron densities, are found to be 1.12, 1.13, and 1.22 stellar radii for the three stars, respectively; this corresponds to a time-averaged electron density of 10 to the 7th/cu cm. Predictions of the extended chromospheric obtained using a simple scaling law agree well with those obtained by the time-dependent wave models; thus, the chromospheres of all stars for which the scaling law is valid consist of the same number of pressure scale heights.

  15. Propagation of waves in a medium with high radiation pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bisnovatyy-Kogan, G. S.; Blinnikov, S. I.

    1979-01-01

    The propagation and mutual transformation of acoustic and thermal waves are investigated in media with a high radiative pressure. The equations of hydrodynamics for matter and the radiative transfer equations in a moving medium in the Eddington approximation are used in the investigation. Model problems of waves in a homogeneous medium with an abrupt jump in opacity and in a medium of variable opacity are presented. The characteristic and the times of variability are discussed. Amplitude for the brightness fluctuations for very massive stars are discussed.

  16. Controls on flood and sediment wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakker, Maarten; Lane, Stuart N.; Costa, Anna; Molnar, Peter

    2015-04-01

    The understanding of flood wave propagation - celerity and transformation - through a fluvial system is of generic importance for flood forecasting/mitigation. In association with flood wave propagation, sediment wave propagation may induce local erosion and sedimentation, which will affect infrastructure and riparian natural habitats. Through analysing flood and sediment wave propagation, we gain insight in temporal changes in transport capacity (the flood wave) and sediment availability and transport (the sediment wave) along the river channel. Heidel (1956) was amongst the first to discuss the progressive lag of sediment concentration behind the corresponding flood wave based on field measurements. Since then this type of hysteresis has been characterized in a number of studies, but these were often based on limited amount of floods and measurement sites, giving insufficient insight into associated forcing mechanisms. Here, as part of a project concerned with the hydrological and geomorphic forcing of sediment transfer processes in alpine environments, we model the downstream propagation of short duration, high frequency releases of water and sediment (purges) from a flow intake in the Borgne d'Arolla River in south-west Switzerland. A total of >50 events were measured at 1 minute time intervals using pressure transducers and turbidity probes at a number of sites along the river. We show that flood and sediment wave propagation can be well represented through simple convection diffusion models. The models are calibrated/validated to describe the set of measured waves and used to explain the observed variation in wave celerity and diffusion. In addition we explore the effects of controlling factors including initial flow depth, flood height, flood duration, bed roughness, bed slope and initial sediment concentration, on the wave propagation processes. We show that the effects of forcing mechanisms on flood and sediment wave propagation will lead to different

  17. Nonlinear wave propagation in strongly coupled dusty plasmas.

    PubMed

    Veeresha, B M; Tiwari, S K; Sen, A; Kaw, P K; Das, A

    2010-03-01

    The nonlinear propagation of low-frequency waves in a strongly coupled dusty plasma medium is studied theoretically in the framework of the phenomenological generalized hydrodynamic (GH) model. A set of simplified model nonlinear equations are derived from the original nonlinear integrodifferential form of the GH model by employing an appropriate physical ansatz. Using standard perturbation techniques characteristic evolution equations for finite small amplitude waves are then obtained in various propagation regimes. The influence of viscoelastic properties arising from dust correlation contributions on the nature of nonlinear solutions is discussed. The modulational stability of dust acoustic waves to parallel perturbation is also examined and it is shown that dust compressibility contributions influenced by the Coulomb coupling effects introduce significant modification in the threshold and range of the instability domain. PMID:20365882

  18. Nonlinear wave propagation in strongly coupled dusty plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Veeresha, B. M.; Tiwari, S. K.; Sen, A.; Kaw, P. K.; Das, A.

    2010-03-15

    The nonlinear propagation of low-frequency waves in a strongly coupled dusty plasma medium is studied theoretically in the framework of the phenomenological generalized hydrodynamic (GH) model. A set of simplified model nonlinear equations are derived from the original nonlinear integrodifferential form of the GH model by employing an appropriate physical ansatz. Using standard perturbation techniques characteristic evolution equations for finite small amplitude waves are then obtained in various propagation regimes. The influence of viscoelastic properties arising from dust correlation contributions on the nature of nonlinear solutions is discussed. The modulational stability of dust acoustic waves to parallel perturbation is also examined and it is shown that dust compressibility contributions influenced by the Coulomb coupling effects introduce significant modification in the threshold and range of the instability domain.

  19. S-Wave Normal Mode Propagation in Aluminum Cylinders

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, Myung W.; Waite, William F.

    2010-01-01

    Large amplitude waveform features have been identified in pulse-transmission shear-wave measurements through cylinders that are long relative to the acoustic wavelength. The arrival times and amplitudes of these features do not follow the predicted behavior of well-known bar waves, but instead they appear to propagate with group velocities that increase as the waveform feature's dominant frequency increases. To identify these anomalous features, the wave equation is solved in a cylindrical coordinate system using an infinitely long cylinder with a free surface boundary condition. The solution indicates that large amplitude normal-mode propagations exist. Using the high-frequency approximation of the Bessel function, an approximate dispersion relation is derived. The predicted amplitude and group velocities using the approximate dispersion relation qualitatively agree with measured values at high frequencies, but the exact dispersion relation should be used to analyze normal modes for full ranges of frequency of interest, particularly at lower frequencies.

  20. Overview of near millimeter wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flood, W. A.

    1981-02-01

    Near millimeter wave (NMMW) propagation problems are divided into three classes: propagation through homogeneous, turbid, and turbulent atmospheres. These classical forms include anomalous water vapor absorption in a homogeneous atmosphere as well as scintillation phenomena associated with propagation through severe weather and 'dirty battlefield' environments. Examples of the existing, inadequate, scintillation data base are given and the lack of supporting meteorological data noted. Carefully designed NMMW scintillation experiments with equally carefully designed micro-meteorological support are needed.

  1. Formation of ion acoustic solitary waves upstream of the earth's bow shock. [in solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pangia, M. J.; Lee, N. C.; Parks, G. K.

    1985-01-01

    The turbulent plasma development of Lee and Parks is applied to the solar wind approaching the earth's bow shock region. The ponderomotive force contribution is due to ion acoustic waves propagating in the direction of the ambient magnetic field. In this case, the envelope of the ion acoustic wave is shown to satisfy the cubic Schroedinger equation. Modulational instabilities exist for waves in the solar wind, thereby predicting the generation of solitary waves. This analysis further identifies that the ion acoustic waves which exhibit this instability have short wavelengths.

  2. Propagation of sound waves in tubes of noncircular cross section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richards, W. B.

    1986-01-01

    Plane-acoustic-wave propagation in small tubes with a cross section in the shape of a flattened oval is described. Theoretical descriptions of a plane wave propagating in a tube with circular cross section and between a pair of infinite parallel plates, including viscous and thermal damping, are expressed in similar form. For a wide range of useful duct sizes, the propagation constant (whose real and imaginary parts are the amplitude attenuation rate and the wave number, respectively) is very nearly the same function of frequency for both cases if the radius of the circular tube is the same as the distance between the parallel plates. This suggests that either a circular-cross-section model or a flat-plate model can be used to calculate wave propagation in flat-oval tubing, or any other shape tubing, if its size is expressed in terms of an equivalent radius, given by g = 2 x (cross-sectional area)/(length of perimeter). Measurements of the frequency response of two sections of flat-oval tubing agree with calculations based on this idea. Flat-plate formulas are derived, the use of transmission-line matrices for calculations of plane waves in compound systems of ducts is described, and examples of computer programs written to carry out the calculations are shown.

  3. HF Doppler observations of acoustic waves excited by the earthquake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ichinose, T.; Takagi, K.; Tanaka, T.; Okuzawa, T.; Shibata, T.; Sato, Y.; Nagasawa, C.; Ogawa, T.

    1985-01-01

    Ionospheric disturbances caused by the earthquake of a relatively small and large epicentral distance have been detected by a network of HF-Doppler sounders in central Japan and Kyoto station, respectively. The HF-Doppler data of a small epicentral distance, together with the seismic data, have been used to formulate a mechanism whereby ionospheric disturbances are produced by the Urakawa-Oki earthquake in Japan. Comparison of the dynamic spectra of these data has revealed experimentally that the atmosphere acts as a low-pass filter for upward-propagating acoustic waves. By surveying the earthquakes for which the magnitude M is larger than 6.0, researchers found the ionospheric effect in 16 cases of 82 seismic events. As almost all these effects have occurred in the daytime, it is considered that it may result from the filtering effect of the upward-propagating acoustic waves.

  4. Propagation of waves along an impedance boundary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wenzel, A. R.

    1974-01-01

    A theoretical analysis of the scalar wave field due to a point source above a plane impedance boundary is presented. A surface wave is found to be an essential component of the total wave field. It is shown that, as a result of ducting of energy by the surface wave, the amplitude of the total wave near the boundary can be greater than it would be if the boundary were perfectly reflecting. Asymptotic results, valid near the boundary, are obtained both for the case of finite impedance (the soft-boundary case) and for the limiting case in which the impedance becomes infinite (the hard-boundary case). In the latter, the wave amplitude in the farfield decreases essentially inversely as the horizontal propagation distance; in the former (if the surface-wave term is neglected), it decreases inversely as the square of the horizontal propagation distance.

  5. Longitudinal nonlinear wave propagation through soft tissue.

    PubMed

    Valdez, M; Balachandran, B

    2013-04-01

    In this paper, wave propagation through soft tissue is investigated. A primary aim of this investigation is to gain a fundamental understanding of the influence of soft tissue nonlinear material properties on the propagation characteristics of stress waves generated by transient loadings. Here, for computational modeling purposes, the soft tissue is modeled as a nonlinear visco-hyperelastic material, the geometry is assumed to be one-dimensional rod geometry, and uniaxial propagation of longitudinal waves is considered. By using the linearized model, a basic understanding of the characteristics of wave propagation is developed through the dispersion relation and in terms of the propagation speed and attenuation. In addition, it is illustrated as to how the linear system can be used to predict brain tissue material parameters through the use of available experimental ultrasonic attenuation curves. Furthermore, frequency thresholds for wave propagation along internal structures, such as axons in the white matter of the brain, are obtained through the linear analysis. With the nonlinear material model, the authors analyze cases in which one of the ends of the rods is fixed and the other end is subjected to a loading. Two variants of the nonlinear model are analyzed and the associated predictions are compared with the predictions of the corresponding linear model. The numerical results illustrate that one of the imprints of the nonlinearity on the wave propagation phenomenon is the steepening of the wave front, leading to jump-like variations in the stress wave profiles. This phenomenon is a consequence of the dependence of the local wave speed on the local deformation of the material. As per the predictions of the nonlinear material model, compressive waves in the structure travel faster than tensile waves. Furthermore, it is found that wave pulses with large amplitudes and small elapsed times are attenuated over shorter spans. This feature is due to the elevated

  6. Application of guided acoustic waves to delamination detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, Keun J.

    1992-01-01

    Guided plate waves are able to interact with structural flaws such as delaminations and cracks due to their propagation properties highly sensitive to the thickness change in materials. A technique which employs an acoustic damper to probe the results of this interaction and then to locate flaws in a relatively short period of time is developed. With its technical advantages, this technique shows its potential application to large area structural integrity assessment.

  7. Ultrafast microfluidics using surface acoustic waves

    PubMed Central

    Yeo, Leslie Y.; Friend, James R.

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate that surface acoustic waves (SAWs), nanometer amplitude Rayleigh waves driven at megahertz order frequencies propagating on the surface of a piezoelectric substrate, offer a powerful method for driving a host of extremely fast microfluidic actuation and micro∕bioparticle manipulation schemes. We show that sessile drops can be translated rapidly on planar substrates or fluid can be pumped through microchannels at 1–10 cm∕s velocities, which are typically one to two orders quicker than that afforded by current microfluidic technologies. Through symmetry-breaking, azimuthal recirculation can be induced within the drop to drive strong inertial microcentrifugation for micromixing and particle concentration or separation. Similar micromixing strategies can be induced in the same microchannel in which fluid is pumped with the SAW by merely changing the SAW frequency to rapidly switch the uniform through-flow into a chaotic oscillatory flow by exploiting superpositioning of the irradiated sound waves from the sidewalls of the microchannel. If the flow is sufficiently quiescent, the nodes of the transverse standing wave that arises across the microchannel also allow for particle aggregation, and hence, sorting on nodal lines. In addition, the SAW also facilitates other microfluidic capabilities. For example, capillary waves excited at the free surface of a sessile drop by the SAW underneath it can be exploited for micro∕nanoparticle collection and sorting at nodal points or lines at low powers. At higher powers, the large accelerations off the substrate surface as the SAW propagates across drives rapid destabilization of the drop free surface giving rise to inertial liquid jets that persist over 1–2 cm in length or atomization of the entire drop to produce 1–10 μm monodispersed aerosol droplets, which can be exploited for ink-jet printing, mass spectrometry interfacing, or pulmonary drug delivery. The atomization of polymer∕protein solutions

  8. The role of gravity in ocean acoustics propagation and its implication to early tsunami detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Tiago; Lin, Ying-Tsong; Kadri, Usama

    2016-04-01

    Oceanic low frequency sound generated by submarine earthquake travels much faster than tsunamis and leaves pressure signatures that can act as tsunami precursors. In this regard, it is anticipated that the correct measurement and analysis of low frequency acoustics would enhance current early tsunami detection systems. In this work we model the low frequency acoustics generated by the 2004 Indian Ocean earthquake using the "Method of Normal Modes" and the "Acoustics-Gravity Wave" theory. Ocean acoustic theories usually neglect the effect of gravity. However, we show for rigid and elastic bottom conditions how gravity influences the acoustic normal mode propagation speed. Practically, our results can help in the real time characterization of low frequency sources in the ocean. This will enhance the robustness of early tsunami detection systems.

  9. Nonlinear waves and shocks in a rigid acoustical guide.

    PubMed

    Fernando, Rasika; Druon, Yann; Coulouvrat, François; Marchiano, Régis

    2011-02-01

    A model is developed for the propagation of finite amplitude acoustical waves and weak shocks in a straight duct of arbitrary cross section. It generalizes the linear modal solution, assuming mode amplitudes slowly vary along the guide axis under the influence of nonlinearities. Using orthogonality properties, the model finally reduces to a set of ordinary differential equations for each mode at each of the harmonics of the input frequency. The theory is then applied to a two-dimensional waveguide. Dispersion relations indicate that there can be two types of nonlinear interactions either called "resonant" or "non-resonant." Resonant interactions occur dominantly for modes propagating at a rather large angle with respect to the axis and involve mostly modes propagating with the same phase velocity. In this case, guided propagation is similar to nonlinear plane wave propagation, with the progressive steepening up to shock formation of the two waves that constitute the mode and reflect onto the guide walls. Non-resonant interactions can be observed as the input modes propagate at a small angle, in which case, nonlinear interactions involve many adjacent modes having close phase velocities. Grazing propagation can also lead to more complex phenomena such as wavefront curvature and irregular reflection. PMID:21361419

  10. Writing magnetic patterns with surface acoustic waves

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Weiyang; Buford, Benjamin; Jander, Albrecht; Dhagat, Pallavi

    2014-05-07

    A novel patterning technique that creates magnetization patterns in a continuous magnetostrictive film with surface acoustic waves is demonstrated. Patterns of 10 μm wide stripes of alternating magnetization and a 3 μm dot of reversed magnetization are written using standing and focusing acoustic waves, respectively. The magnetization pattern is size-tunable, erasable, and rewritable by changing the magnetic field and acoustic power. This versatility, along with its solid-state implementation (no moving parts) and electronic control, renders it as a promising technique for application in magnetic recording, magnonic signal processing, magnetic particle manipulation, and spatial magneto-optical modulation.

  11. Electromagnetic wave propagation characteristics in unimolecular reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xingpeng; Huang, Kama

    2016-01-01

    Microwave-assisted chemical reactions have attracted interests because of their benefits for enhancement of reaction rates. However, the problems, such as hot spots and thermal runaway, limit the application of microwaves in the chemical industry. To study the characteristics of electromagnetic wave propagation in a chemical reaction is critical to solve the problems. The research on the characteristics of electromagnetic wave propagation in the unimolecular reaction that is a simple model reaction, can be generalized to the research in a chemical reaction. The approximate expressions of the attenuation and dispersion characteristics of electromagnetic wave propagation in the unimolecular reaction are derived by the nonlinear propagation theory. Specially, when the reaction rate is zero, the derived approximate expressions can be reduced to the formulas in low-loss dispersive media. Moreover, a 1D mold is used to validate the feasibility of the approximate expressions. The influences of the reaction rate and initial reactant concentration on the characteristics are obtained.

  12. Amplitude-Preserving Propagator and its Applications in Computational Wave Propagation and Seismic Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eslaminia, Mehran

    A novel method is developed to approximately solve acoustic wave equation in the frequency domain. The key idea of the method is to partition the domain into smaller subdomains and solve for the wavefield in each subdomain sequentially, which is facilitated by special interface (continuity) conditions. The sequential solution is performed in two steps: First the downward propagating wavefield is computed considering only downward propagation and transmission at the interfaces. The wavefield is then corrected by adding the upward propagating wavefield resulting from reflections and body forces. It is shown that the proposed method results in accurate amplitudes for downward propagation and primary reflections and is hence called the Amplitude-Preserving Propagator. This novel wave propagator leads to three disparate contributions in large scale computational wave modeling and seismic imaging: forward modeling, migration imaging and full waveform inversion. Forward Modeling: The amplitude-preserving propagator is implemented as a preconditioner to iteratively solve the Helmholtz equation. The effectiveness of the proposed preconditioner is studied using various numerical experiments. We show three significant properties of the proposed preconditioner. First, number of iterations grows very slowly with increasing frequency which is a significant advantage compared to other methods, e.g. sweeping preconditioner. Second, the mesh size (i.e. number of elements per wavelength) does not change number of iterations. Third, and the most important one, the computational time is much less than many other preconditioners. Migration Imaging: In the context of migration imaging, the amplitude-preserving propagator is implemented as an efficient forward solver to perform wave propagation simulation in the frequency domain. We show that the propagator results in a new migration algorithm that is almost as accurate as full-wave migration, while being significantly more efficient

  13. Tunable damper for an acoustic wave guide

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, S.C.

    1984-06-05

    A damper for tunably damping acoustic waves in an ultrasonic waveguide is provided which may be used in a hostile environment such as a nuclear reactor. The area of the waveguide, which may be a selected size metal rod in which acoustic waves are to be damped, is wrapped, or surrounded, by a mass of stainless steel wool. The wool wrapped portion is then sandwiched between tuning plates, which may also be stainless steel, by means of clamping screws which may be adjusted to change the clamping force of the sandwiched assembly along the waveguide section. The plates are preformed along their length in a sinusoidally bent pattern with a period approximately equal to the acoustic wavelength which is to be damped. The bent pattern of the opposing plates are in phase along their length relative to their sinusoidal patterns so that as the clamping screws are tightened a bending stress is applied to the waveguide at 180/sup 0/ intervals along the damping section to oppose the acoustic wave motions in the waveguide and provide good coupling of the wool to the guide. The damper is tuned by selectively tightening the clamping screws while monitoring the amplitude of the acoustic waves launched in the waveguide. It may be selectively tuned to damp particular acoustic wave modes (torsional or extensional, for example) and/or frequencies while allowing others to pass unattenuated.

  14. Tunable damper for an acoustic wave guide

    DOEpatents

    Rogers, Samuel C.

    1984-01-01

    A damper for tunably damping acoustic waves in an ultrasonic waveguide is provided which may be used in a hostile environment such as a nuclear reactor. The area of the waveguide, which may be a selected size metal rod in which acoustic waves are to be damped, is wrapped, or surrounded, by a mass of stainless steel wool. The wool wrapped portion is then sandwiched between tuning plates, which may also be stainless steel, by means of clamping screws which may be adjusted to change the clamping force of the sandwiched assembly along the waveguide section. The plates are preformed along their length in a sinusoidally bent pattern with a period approximately equal to the acoustic wavelength which is to be damped. The bent pattern of the opposing plates are in phase along their length relative to their sinusoidal patterns so that as the clamping screws are tightened a bending stress is applied to the waveguide at 180.degree. intervals along the damping section to oppose the acoustic wave motions in the waveguide and provide good coupling of the wool to the guide. The damper is tuned by selectively tightening the clamping screws while monitoring the amplitude of the acoustic waves launched in the waveguide. It may be selectively tuned to damp particular acoustic wave modes (torsional or extensional, for example) and/or frequencies while allowing others to pass unattenuated.

  15. Tunable damper for an acoustic wave guide

    DOEpatents

    Rogers, S.C.

    1982-10-21

    A damper for tunably damping acoustic waves in an ultrasonic waveguide is provided which may be used in a hostile environment such as a nuclear reactor. The area of the waveguide, which may be a selected size metal rod in which acoustic waves are to be damped, is wrapped, or surrounded, by a mass of stainless steel wool. The wool wrapped portion is then sandwiched between tuning plates, which may also be stainless steel, by means of clamping screws which may be adjusted to change the clamping force of the sandwiched assembly along the waveguide section. The plates are preformed along their length in a sinusoidally bent pattern with a period approximately equal to the acoustic wavelength which is to be damped. The bent pattern of the opposing plates are in phase along their length relative to their sinusoidal patterns so that as the clamping screws are tightened a bending stress is applied to the waveguide at 180/sup 0/ intervals along the damping section to oppose the acoustic wave motions in the waveguide and provide good coupling of the wool to the guide. The damper is tuned by selectively tightening the clamping screws while monitoring the amplitude of the acoustic waves launched in the waveguide. It may be selectively tuned to damp particular acoustic wave modes (torsional or extensional, for example) and/or frequencies while allowing others to pass unattenuated.

  16. Wave propagation into the middle atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirota, I.

    1989-01-01

    Recent observations of various types of waves propagating into the middle atmosphere are reviewed. Emphasis is made on the excitation processes in the lower atmosphere and their vertical propagation through the background flow as a function of the latitude, height and season. The following subjects are discussed: (1) Vertical propagation of quasi-stationary forced Rossby waves into the winter stratosphere in connection with the sudden warming; (2) Spectral distribution and seasonal characteristics of normal mode (free) Rossby waves and the asymmetry of the Northern and Southern Hemispheres; and (3) Seasonal variation of internal gravity waves in the middle atmosphere. Further discussions are presented for future studies based on accumulated observational data during the MAP period.

  17. Faraday Pilot-Waves: Generation and Propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galeano-Rios, Carlos; Milewski, Paul; Nachbin, André; Bush, John

    2015-11-01

    We examine the dynamics of drops bouncing on a fluid bath subjected to vertical vibration. We solve a system of linear PDEs to compute the surface wave generation and propagation. Waves are triggered at each bounce, giving rise to the Faraday pilot-wave field. The model captures several of the behaviors observed in the laboratory, including transitions between a variety of bouncing and walking states, the Doppler effect, and droplet-droplet interactions. Thanks to the NSF.

  18. Waveform inversion of acoustic waves for explosion yield estimation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kim, K.; Rodgers, A. J.

    2016-07-08

    We present a new waveform inversion technique to estimate the energy of near-surface explosions using atmospheric acoustic waves. Conventional methods often employ air blast models based on a homogeneous atmosphere, where the acoustic wave propagation effects (e.g., refraction and diffraction) are not taken into account, and therefore, their accuracy decreases with increasing source-receiver distance. In this study, three-dimensional acoustic simulations are performed with a finite difference method in realistic atmospheres and topography, and the modeled acoustic Green's functions are incorporated into the waveform inversion for the acoustic source time functions. The strength of the acoustic source is related to explosionmore » yield based on a standard air blast model. The technique was applied to local explosions (<10 km) and provided reasonable yield estimates (<~30% error) in the presence of realistic topography and atmospheric structure. In conclusion, the presented method can be extended to explosions recorded at far distance provided proper meteorological specifications.« less

  19. Langasite Surface Acoustic Wave Sensors: Fabrication and Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Peng; Greve, David W.; Oppenheim, Irving J.; Chin, Tao-Lun; Malone, Vanessa

    2012-02-01

    We report on the development of harsh-environment surface acoustic wave sensors for wired and wireless operation. Surface acoustic wave devices with an interdigitated transducer emitter and multiple reflectors were fabricated on langasite substrates. Both wired and wireless temperature sensing was demonstrated using radar-mode (pulse) detection. Temperature resolution of better than ±0.5°C was achieved between 200°C and 600°C. Oxygen sensing was achieved by depositing a layer of ZnO on the propagation path. Although the ZnO layer caused additional attenuation of the surface wave, oxygen sensing was accomplished at temperatures up to 700°C. The results indicate that langasite SAW devices are a potential solution for harsh-environment gas and temperature sensing.

  20. Optimization of surface acoustic wave-based rate sensors.

    PubMed

    Xu, Fangqian; Wang, Wen; Shao, Xiuting; Liu, Xinlu; Liang, Yong

    2015-01-01

    The optimization of an surface acoustic wave (SAW)-based rate sensor incorporating metallic dot arrays was performed by using the approach of partial-wave analysis in layered media. The optimal sensor chip designs, including the material choice of piezoelectric crystals and metallic dots, dot thickness, and sensor operation frequency were determined theoretically. The theoretical predictions were confirmed experimentally by using the developed SAW sensor composed of differential delay line-oscillators and a metallic dot array deposited along the acoustic wave propagation path of the SAW delay lines. A significant improvement in sensor sensitivity was achieved in the case of 128° YX LiNbO₃, and a thicker Au dot array, and low operation frequency were used to structure the sensor. PMID:26473865

  1. Optimization of Surface Acoustic Wave-Based Rate Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Fangqian; Wang, Wen; Shao, Xiuting; Liu, Xinlu; Liang, Yong

    2015-01-01

    The optimization of an surface acoustic wave (SAW)-based rate sensor incorporating metallic dot arrays was performed by using the approach of partial-wave analysis in layered media. The optimal sensor chip designs, including the material choice of piezoelectric crystals and metallic dots, dot thickness, and sensor operation frequency were determined theoretically. The theoretical predictions were confirmed experimentally by using the developed SAW sensor composed of differential delay line-oscillators and a metallic dot array deposited along the acoustic wave propagation path of the SAW delay lines. A significant improvement in sensor sensitivity was achieved in the case of 128° YX LiNbO3, and a thicker Au dot array, and low operation frequency were used to structure the sensor. PMID:26473865

  2. The Propagation of Radio Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budden, K. G.

    1988-08-01

    Preface; 1. The ionosphere and magnetosphere; 2. The basic equations; 3. The constitutive relations; 4. Magnetoionic theory I. Polarisation and refractive index; 5. Magnetoionic theory II. Rays and group velocity; 6. Stratified media. The booker quartic; 7. Slowly varying medium. The W.K.B. solution; 8. The Airy integral function and the Stokes phenomenon; 9. Integration by steepest descents; 10. Ray tracing in a loss-free stratified medium; 11. Reflection and transmission coefficients; 12. Ray theory results for isotropic ionosphere; 13. Ray theory results for anisotropic plasmas; 14. General ray tracing; 15. Full wave solutions for isotropic ionosphere; 16. Coupled wave eqations; 17. Coalescence of couling points; 18. Full wave methods for anisotropic stratified media; 19. Applications of full wave methods; Answers to problems; Bibliography; Index of definitions of the more important symbols; Subject and name index.

  3. Ion Acoustic Waves in Ultracold Neutral Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, J.; McQuillen, P.; Killian, T. C.

    2010-08-06

    We photoionize laser-cooled atoms with a laser beam possessing spatially periodic intensity modulations to create ultracold neutral plasmas with controlled density perturbations. Laser-induced fluorescence imaging reveals that the density perturbations oscillate in space and time, and the dispersion relation of the oscillations matches that of ion acoustic waves, which are long-wavelength, electrostatic, density waves.

  4. Obliquely propagating ion acoustic waves in the auroral E region: Further evidence of irregularity production by field-aligned electron streaming

    SciTech Connect

    Villain, J.P. ); Hanuise, C. ); Greenwald, R.A.; Baker, K.B.; Ruohoniemi, J.M. )

    1990-06-01

    Common volume observations of E region high-latitude irregularities at decameter wavelengths have been obtained with the JHU/APL HF radar located at Goose Bay, Labrador, and the SHERPA HF radar located at Schefferville, Quebec. In this paper, the authors analyze an event with characteristics similar to those of a distinctive type of event described by Villain et al. (1987). The experimental configuration, which combines the azimuthal-scanning capability of the Goose Bay radar with the frequency-scanning operation of the Schefferville radar, has provided unambiguous evidence of the existence of two irregularity layers at different altitudes within the E region. The layers, which exhibit different characteristics, can be related to the action of the gradient drift and ion acoustic instability mechanisms. It is shown that the ion acoustic modes have phase velocities in the range of 400 to 550 m/s and are produced in regions of subcritical perpendicular electron Hall drift. They infer that the observed irregularities are produced through a combination of perpendicular and field-aligned relative electron-ion drifts. Features previously observed but no t satisfactorily explained by perpendicular drift excitation alone can be understood in terms of field-aligned drift excitation. They conclude that the role of electron-ion field-aligned drift may be much more important than previously realized.

  5. Ion acoustic shock waves in degenerate plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Akhtar, N.; Hussain, S.

    2011-07-15

    Korteweg de Vries Burgers equation for negative ion degenerate dissipative plasma has been derived using reductive perturbation technique. The quantum hydrodynamic model is used to study the quantum ion acoustic shock waves. The effects of different parameters on quantum ion acoustic shock waves are studied. It is found that quantum parameter, electrons Fermi temperature, temperature of positive and negative ions, mass ratio of positive to negative ions, viscosity, and density ratio have significant impact on the shock wave structure in negative ion degenerate plasma.

  6. Seismic Wave Propagation Simulation using Circular Hough Transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miah, K.; Potter, D. K.

    2012-12-01

    Synthetic data generation by numerically solving a two-way wave equation is an essential part of seismic tomography, especially in full-waveform inversion. Finite-difference and finite-element are the two common methods of seismic wave propagation modeling in heterogeneous media. Either time or frequency domain representation of wave equation is used for these simulations. Hanahara and Hiyane [1] proposed and implemented a circle-detection algorithm based on the Circular Hough transform (CHT) to numerically solve a two-dimensional wave equation. The Hough transform is generally used in image processing applications to identify objects of various shapes in an image [2]. In this abstract, we use the Circular Hough transform to numerically solve an acoustic wave equation, with the purpose to identify and locate primaries and multiples in the transform domain. Relationships between different seismic events and the CHT parameter are also investigated. [1] Hanahara, K. and Hiyane, M., A Circle-Detection Algorithm Simulating Wave Propagation, Machine Vision and Applications, vol. 3, pp. 97-111, 1990. [2 ] Petcher, P. A. and Dixon, S., A modified Hough transform for removal of direct and reflected surface waves from B-scans, NDT & E International, vol. 44, no. 2, pp. 139-144, 2011.

  7. Measurement of Bubble Size Distribution Based on Acoustic Propagation in Bubbly Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiongjun; Hsiao, Chao-Tsung; Choi, Jin-Keun; Chahine, Georges

    2013-03-01

    Acoustic properties are strongly affected by bubble size distribution in a bubbly medium. Measurement of the acoustic transmission becomes increasingly difficulty as the void fraction of the bubbly medium increases due to strong attenuation, while acoustic reflection can be measured more easily with increasing void fraction. The ABS ACOUSTIC BUBBLE SPECTROMETER®\\copyright, an instrument for bubble size measurement that is under development tries to take full advantage of the properties of acoustic propagation in bubbly media to extract bubble size distribution. Properties of both acoustic transmission and reflection in the bubbly medium from a range of short single-frequency bursts of acoustic waves at different frequencies are measured in an effort to deduce the bubble size distribution. With the combination of both acoustic transmission and reflection, assisted with validations from photography, the ABS ACOUSTIC BUBBLE SPECTROMETER®\\copyright has the potential to measure bubble size distributions in a wider void fraction range. This work was sponsored by Department of Energy SBIR program

  8. Applications of velocity potential function to acoustic duct propagation and radiation from inlets using finite element theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, K. J.; Majjigi, R. K.

    1979-01-01

    A finite element velocity potential program was developed to study acoustic wave propagation in complex geometries. For irrotational flows, relatively low sound frequencies, and plane wave input, the finite element solutions showed significant effects of inlet curvature and flow gradients on the attenuation of a given acoustic liner in a realistic variable area turbofan inlet. The velocity potential approach can not be used to estimate the effects of rotational flow on acoustic propagation, since the potential acoustic disturbances propagate at the speed of the media in sheared flow. Approaches are discussed that are being considered for extending the finite element solution to include the far field, as well as the internal portion of the duct. A new matrix partitioning approach is presented that can be incorporated in previously developed programs to allow the finite element calculation to be marched into the far field. The partitioning approach provided a large reduction in computer storage and running times.

  9. Interaction of surface acoustic waves with moving vortex structures in superconducting films

    SciTech Connect

    Gutlyansky, E. D.

    2007-07-15

    A method is proposed for describing a moving film vortex structure and its interaction with surface acoustic waves. It is shown that the moving vortex structure can amplify (generate) surface acoustic waves. In contrast to a similar effect in semiconductor films, this effect can appear when the velocity of the vortex structure is much lower than the velocity of the surface acoustic waves. A unidirectional collective mode is shown to exist in the moving vortex structure. This mode gives rise to an acoustic analogue of the diode effect that is resonant in the velocity of the vortex structure. This acoustic effect is manifested as an anomalous attenuation of the surface acoustic waves in the direction of the vortex-structure motion and as the absence of this attenuation for the propagation in the opposite direction.

  10. Rich eight-branch spectrum of the oblique propagating longitudinal waves in partially spin-polarized electron-positron-ion plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreev, Pavel A.; Iqbal, Z.

    2016-03-01

    We consider the separate spin evolution of electrons and positrons in electron-positron and electron-positron-ion plasmas. We consider the oblique propagating longitudinal waves in these systems. Working in a regime of high-density n0˜1027cm-3 and high-magnetic-field B0=1010 G, we report the presence of the spin-electron acoustic waves and their dispersion dependencies. In electron-positron plasmas, similarly to the electron-ion plasmas, we find one spin-electron acoustic wave (SEAW) at the propagation parallel or perpendicular to the external field and two spin-electron acoustic waves at the oblique propagation. At the parallel or perpendicular propagation of the longitudinal waves in electron-positron-ion plasmas, we find four branches: the Langmuir wave, the positron-acoustic wave, and a pair of waves having spin nature, they are the SEAW and the wave discovered in this paper, called the spin-electron-positron acoustic wave (SEPAW). At the oblique propagation we find eight longitudinal waves: the Langmuir wave, the Trivelpiece--Gould wave, a pair of positron-acoustic waves, a pair of SEAWs, and a pair of SEPAWs. Thus, for the first time, we report the existence of the second positron-acoustic wave existing at the oblique propagation and the existence of SEPAWs.

  11. Propagation of polarized waves in inhomogeneous media.

    PubMed

    Charnotskii, Mikhail

    2016-07-01

    A parabolic equation for electromagnetic wave propagation in a random medium is extended to include the depolarization effects in the narrow-angle, forward-scattering setting. Closed-form parabolic equations for propagation of the coherence tensor are derived under a Markov approximation model. For a general partially coherent and partially polarized beam wave, this equation can be reduced to a system of ordinary differential equations, allowing a simple numeric solution. An analytical solution exists for statistically homogeneous waves. Estimates based on the perturbation solution support the common knowledge that the depolarization at the optical frequencies is negligible for atmospheric turbulence propagation. These results indicate that the recently published theory [Opt. Lett.40, 3077 (2015)10.1364/OL.40.003077] is not valid for atmospheric turbulence. PMID:27409697

  12. Propagating precipitation waves: experiments and modeling.

    PubMed

    Tinsley, Mark R; Collison, Darrell; Showalter, Kenneth

    2013-12-01

    Traveling precipitation waves, including counterrotating spiral waves, are observed in the precipitation reaction of AlCl3 with NaOH [Volford, A.; et al. Langmuir 2007, 23, 961 - 964]. Experimental and computational studies are carried out to characterize the wave behavior in cross-section configurations. A modified sol-coagulation model is developed that is based on models of Liesegang band and redissolution systems. The dynamics of the propagating waves is characterized in terms of growth and redissolution of a precipitation feature that travels through a migrating band of colloidal precipitate. PMID:24191642

  13. Exciton transport by surface acoustic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudolph, J.; Hey, R.; Santos, P. V.

    2007-05-01

    Long-range acoustic transport of excitons in GaAs quantum wells (QWs) is demonstrated. The mobile strain field of a surface acoustic wave creates a dynamic lateral type I modulation of the conduction and valence bands in a double-quantum-well (DQW) structure. This mobile potential modulation transports long-living indirect excitons in the DQW over several hundreds of μm.

  14. SH wave propagation in piezoelectric coupled plates.

    PubMed

    Wang, Quan

    2002-05-01

    The propagation of shear horizontal (SH) wave in a piezoelectric coupled plate is investigated in this paper. Full account is taken of the piezoelectric coupling effect to the isotropic metal core in the mathematical model. One of the applications of this research is in the damage detection of the host metal structure from the wave propagation signal excited by the piezoelectric layer which is surface bonded on the surface of a metal core. This research is distinct from the previous works on SH propagation in piezoelectric structures because the piezoelectric materials were used as the core structure in the previous studies, and the potential of the studies was mainly on time-delay devices. The dispersive characteristics and the mode shapes of the transverse displacement and the electric potential of the piezoelectric layer are theoretically derived. The results from numerical simulations show that the phase velocity of the plate structure tends to the bulk shear wave velocity of the host metal core at high wavenumber when the shear wave velocity of host plate is larger than that of PZT bonded on it. Furthermore, there are three asymptotic solutions of wave propagation when the shear wave velocity of the host plate is smaller than that of PZT. The mode shape of the electric potential of the piezoelectric layer changes from the quadratic shape at lower wavenumber and with thinner piezoelectric layer to the shape with more zero nodes at higher wavenumber and with thicker piezoelectric layer. These findings are significant in the application of wave propagation in piezoelectric coupled structures. PMID:12046935

  15. Acoustic propagation in rigid three-dimensional waveguides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Raheb, M.

    1980-01-01

    The linear acoustic propagation in finite rigid three-dimensional waveguides is determined analytically using an eigenfunction expansion of the Helmholtz equation. The geometry considered consists of straight and circular bends of rectangular cross section with continuous interfaces (branches and sharp corners are excluded). The phenomena of resonance shift and relocation are explained for a bend-straight duct combination.

  16. TeO2 slow surface acoustic wave Bragg cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Shi-Kay

    1991-08-01

    A newly discovered slow acoustic surface wave (SAW) on a (-110) cut TeO2 surface is reported focusing on its properties studied using a PC based numerical method. It is concluded that the slow SAW is rather tolerant to crystal surface orientation errors and has unusually deep penetration of its shear component into the thickness of substrate, about 47 wavelengths for a half amplitude point. The deep shear field is considered to be beneficial for surface acoustooptic interaction with free propagating focused laser beams. Rotation of the substrate about the z-axis makes it possible to adjust a slow SAW velocity with the potential advantage of trading acoustic velocity for less acoustic attenuation. Wider-bandwidth long signal processing time Bragg cells may be feasible utilizing this trade-off. The slow SAW device is characterized by an extremely low power consumption which might be useful for compact portable or avionics signal processing equipment applications.

  17. Propagating waves can explain irregular neural dynamics.

    PubMed

    Keane, Adam; Gong, Pulin

    2015-01-28

    Cortical neurons in vivo fire quite irregularly. Previous studies about the origin of such irregular neural dynamics have given rise to two major models: a balanced excitation and inhibition model, and a model of highly synchronized synaptic inputs. To elucidate the network mechanisms underlying synchronized synaptic inputs and account for irregular neural dynamics, we investigate a spatially extended, conductance-based spiking neural network model. We show that propagating wave patterns with complex dynamics emerge from the network model. These waves sweep past neurons, to which they provide highly synchronized synaptic inputs. On the other hand, these patterns only emerge from the network with balanced excitation and inhibition; our model therefore reconciles the two major models of irregular neural dynamics. We further demonstrate that the collective dynamics of propagating wave patterns provides a mechanistic explanation for a range of irregular neural dynamics, including the variability of spike timing, slow firing rate fluctuations, and correlated membrane potential fluctuations. In addition, in our model, the distributions of synaptic conductance and membrane potential are non-Gaussian, consistent with recent experimental data obtained using whole-cell recordings. Our work therefore relates the propagating waves that have been widely observed in the brain to irregular neural dynamics. These results demonstrate that neural firing activity, although appearing highly disordered at the single-neuron level, can form dynamical coherent structures, such as propagating waves at the population level. PMID:25632135

  18. Characteristics of acoustic gravity waves obtained from Dynasonde data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negrea, Cǎtǎlin; Zabotin, Nikolay; Bullett, Terrence; Fuller-Rowell, Tim; Fang, Tzu-Wei; Codrescu, Mihail

    2016-04-01

    Traveling ionospheric disturbances (TIDs) are ubiquitous in the thermosphere-ionosphere and are often assumed to be caused by acoustic gravity waves (AGWs). This study performs an analysis of the TID and AGW activity above Wallops Island, VA, during October 2013. The variations in electron density and ionospheric tilts obtained with the Dynasonde technique are used as primary indicators of wave activity. The temporal and spectral characteristics of the data are discussed in detail, using also results of the Whole Atmosphere Model (WAM) and the Global Ionosphere Plasmasphere Model (GIP). The full set of propagation parameters (frequency, and the vertical, zonal and meridional wave vector components) of the TIDs is determined over the 160-220 km height range. A test of the self-consistency of these results within the confines of the theoretical AGW dispersion relation is devised. This is applied to a sample data set of 24 October 2013. A remarkable agreement has been achieved for wave periods between 52 and 21 min, for which we can rigorously claim the TIDs are caused by underlying acoustic gravity waves. The Wallops Island Dynasonde can operate for extended periods at a 2 min cadence, allowing determination of the statistical distributions of propagation parameters. A dominant population of TIDs is identified in the frequency band below 1 mHz, and for it, the distributions of the horizontal wavelengths, vertical wavelengths, and horizontal phase speeds are obtained.

  19. Imaging of Acoustic Waves in Sand

    SciTech Connect

    Deason, Vance Albert; Telschow, Kenneth Louis; Watson, Scott Marshall

    2003-08-01

    There is considerable interest in detecting objects such as landmines shallowly buried in loose earth or sand. Various techniques involving microwave, acoustic, thermal and magnetic sensors have been used to detect such objects. Acoustic and microwave sensors have shown promise, especially if used together. In most cases, the sensor package is scanned over an area to eventually build up an image or map of anomalies. We are proposing an alternate, acoustic method that directly provides an image of acoustic waves in sand or soil, and their interaction with buried objects. The INEEL Laser Ultrasonic Camera utilizes dynamic holography within photorefractive recording materials. This permits one to image and demodulate acoustic waves on surfaces in real time, without scanning. A video image is produced where intensity is directly and linearly proportional to surface motion. Both specular and diffusely reflecting surfaces can be accomodated and surface motion as small as 0.1 nm can be quantitatively detected. This system was used to directly image acoustic surface waves in sand as well as in solid objects. Waves as frequencies of 16 kHz were generated using modified acoustic speakers. These waves were directed through sand toward partially buried objects. The sand container was not on a vibration isolation table, but sat on the lab floor. Interaction of wavefronts with buried objects showed reflection, diffraction and interference effects that could provide clues to location and characteristics of buried objects. Although results are preliminary, success in this effort suggests that this method could be applied to detection of buried landmines or other near-surface items such as pipes and tanks.

  20. LOCA simulation: analysis of rarefaction waves propagating through geometric singularities

    SciTech Connect

    Crouzet, Fabien; Faucher, Vincent; Galon, Pascal; Piteau, Philippe; Izquierdo, Patrick

    2012-07-01

    The propagation of a transient wave through an orifice is investigated for applications to Loss Of Coolant Accident in nuclear plants. An analytical model is proposed for the response of an orifice plate and implemented in the EUROPLEXUS fast transient dynamics software. It includes an acoustic inertial effect in addition to a quasi-steady dissipation term. The model is experimentally validated on a test rig consisting in a single pipe filled with pressurized water. The test rig is designed to generate a rapid depressurization of the pipe, by means of a bursting disk. The proposed model gives results which compare favourably with experimental data. (authors)

  1. Topological charge pump by surface acoustic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Zheng; Shi-Ping, Feng; Shi-Jie, Yang

    2016-06-01

    Quantized electron pumping by the surface acoustic wave across barriers created by a sequence of split metal gates is interpreted from the viewpoint of topology. The surface acoustic wave serves as a one-dimensional periodical potential whose energy spectrum possesses the Bloch band structure. The time-dependent phase plays the role of an adiabatic parameter of the Hamiltonian which induces a geometrical phase. The pumping currents are related to the Chern numbers of the filled bands below the Fermi energy. Based on this understanding, we predict a novel effect of quantized but non-monotonous current plateaus simultaneously pumped by two homodromous surface acoustic waves. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11374036) and the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2012CB821403).

  2. Potential wells for classical acoustic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shi; Lin, ShuYu; Mo, RunYang; Fu, ZhiQiang

    2014-01-01

    The acceleration theorem of Bloch waves is utilized to construct random potential wells for classical acoustic waves in systems composed of alternating `cavities' and `couplers'. One prominent advantage of this method is these `cavities' and `couplers' are all monolayer structures. It allows forming more compact classical potential wells, which leads to the miniaturization of acoustic devices. We systematically investigate properties of harmonic, tangent, hyperbolic function, and square classical potential wells in quasi-periodic superlattices. Results show these classical potential wells are analogues of quantum potential wells. Thus some technologies and concepts in quantum potential well fields may be generalized to classical acoustic wave fields. In addition, some abnormal cases regarding forming classical potential wells are also found.

  3. Simulation of blast wave propagation from source to long distance with topography and atmospheric effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen-Dinh, Maxime; Gainville, Olaf; Lardjane, Nicolas

    2015-10-01

    We present new results for the blast wave propagation from strong shock regime to the weak shock limit. For this purpose, we analyse the blast wave propagation using both Direct Numerical Simulation and an acoustic asymptotic model. This approach allows a full numerical study of a realistic pyrotechnic site taking into account for the main physical effects. We also compare simulation results with first measurements. This study is a part of the french ANR-Prolonge project (ANR-12-ASTR-0026).

  4. An experimental study on the ultrasonic wave propagation in cancellous bone: waveform changes during propagation.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Fuminori; Mizuno, Katsunori; Matsukawa, Mami

    2013-12-01

    Wave propagation in a trabecular bone was experimentally investigated using an acoustic tube. For the purposes of this study, a cubic sample was gradually filed so the waveform change due to the sample thickness could be observed. The initial sample showed clear two-wave separation. As the sample became thinner, the fast and slow waves gradually overlapped. The apparent frequencies and amplitudes of the fast waves obtained from the time domain data decreased significantly for the smaller thicknesses. This indicates an increase in the apparent attenuation at the initial stage of the propagation. Next the authors investigated the distribution of the ultrasonic field after the transmission through the cancellous bone sample. In addition to a large aperture receiver, a needle-type ultrasonic transducer was used to observe the ultrasonic field. Within an area of the same size of the large transducer, the waveforms retrieved with the needle sensor exhibited high spatial variations; however, the averaged waveform in the plane was similar to the waveform obtained with the large aperture receiver. This indicates that the phase cancellation effect on the surface of the large aperture receiver can be one of the reasons for the strong apparent attenuation observed at the initial stages of the propagation. PMID:25669289

  5. Bifurcations of nonlinear ion-acoustic travelling waves in a multicomponent magnetoplasma with superthermal electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selim, M. M.; El-Depsy, A.; El-Shamy, E. F.

    2015-12-01

    Properties of nonlinear ion-acoustic travelling waves propagating in a three-dimensional multicomponent magnetoplasma system composed of positive ions, negative ions and superthermal electrons are considered. Using the reductive perturbation technique (RPT), the Zkharov-Kuznetsov (ZK) equation is derived. The bifurcation theory of planar dynamical systems is applied to investigate the existence of the solitary wave solutions and the periodic travelling wave solutions of the resulting ZK equation. It is found that both compressive and rarefactive nonlinear ion-acoustic travelling waves strongly depend on the external magnetic field, the unperturbed positive-to-negative ions density ratio, the direction cosine of the wave propagation vector with the Cartesian coordinates, as well as the superthermal electron parameter. The present model may be useful for describing the formation of nonlinear ion-acoustic travelling wave in certain astrophysical scenarios, such as the D and F-regions of the Earth's ionosphere.

  6. Prospects for coupling Surface Acoustic Waves to superconducting qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gustafsson, Martin

    2013-03-01

    Recent years have seen great development in the quantum control of mechanical resonators. These usually consist of membranes, cantilevers or suspended beams, whose vibrational modes can be cooled to the quantum ground state. This presentation will focus on a different kind of micromechanical system, where the motion is not confined to a mode with fixed boundaries, but propagates along the surface of a microchip. These modes are known as Surface Acoustic Waves (SAWs), and superficially resemble ripples on water, moving with low loss along the surfaces of solids. On a piezoelectric substrate, electrode gratings known as Interdigital Transducers (IDTs) can be used to convert power between the electric and acoustic domains. Devices based on this effect are of profound technological importance as filters and analog signal processors in the RF domain. In the realm of quantum information processing, SAWs have primarily been used to transport carriers and excitons through piezoelectric semiconductors, in the electric potential wells propagating along with the mechanical wave. Our approach, however, is different in that we aim to explore the mechanical wave itself as a carrier of quantum information. We have previously shown that a single-electron transistor can be used as a local probe for SAWs, with encouraging sensitivity levels. Building on this, we now investigate the prospects for coupling a SAW beam directly to a superconducting qubit. By merging a circuit model for an IDT with a quasi-classical description of a transmon qubit, we estimate that the qubit can couple to an acoustic transmission line with approximately the same strength as to an electrical one. This type of coupling opens for acoustic analogs of recent experiments in microwave quantum optics, including the generation of non-classical acoustic states.

  7. Oblique Propagation of Ion Acoustic Solitons in Magnetized Superthermal Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devanandhan, S.; Sreeraj, T.; Singh, S.; Lakhina, G. S.

    2015-12-01

    Small amplitude ion-acoustic solitons are studied in a magnetized plasma consisting of protons, doubly charged helium ions and superthermal electrons. The Korteweg-de-Vries-Zakharov-Kuznetsov (KdV-ZK) is derived to examine the properties of ion acoustic solitary structures observed in space plasmas. Our model is applicable for weakly magnetized plasmas. The results will be applied to the satellite observations in the solar wind at 1 AU where magnetized ion acoustic waves with superthermal electrons can exist. The effects of superthermality, temperature and densities on these solitary structures will be discussed.

  8. Globally propagating waves in the solar corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warmuth, Alexander

    2011-12-01

    High-cadence space-based observations, available for over a decade now, have revealed globally propagating wave-like disturbances in the solar corona. These coronal waves have now been imaged in a wide range of spectral channels, yielding a wealth of information. Still, no consensus on their physical nature has been reached yet. While many findings are consistent with fast-mode MHD waves and/or shocks, other characteristics have given rise to alternative models which involve magnetic reconfiguration in the framework of an erupting coronal mass ejection. In this paper, the observational signatures of coronal waves will be reviewed, and the different physical interpretations of coronal waves and how they are motivated by observations will be discussed. Finally, the potential of using coronal waves as a diagnostic tool for the corona will be shown.

  9. A Fusion Model of Seismic and Hydro-Acoustic Propagation for Treaty Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arora, Nimar; Prior, Mark

    2014-05-01

    We present an extension to NET-VISA (Network Processing Vertically Integrated Seismic Analysis), which is a probabilistic generative model of the propagation of seismic waves and their detection on a global scale, to incorporate hydro-acoustic data from the IMS (International Monitoring System) network. The new model includes the coupling of seismic waves into the ocean's SOFAR channel, as well as the propagation of hydro-acoustic waves from underwater explosions. The generative model is described in terms of multiple possible hypotheses -- seismic-to-hydro-acoustic, under-water explosion, other noise sources such as whales singing or icebergs breaking up -- that could lead to signal detections. We decompose each hypothesis into conditional probability distributions that are carefully analyzed and calibrated. These distributions include ones for detection probabilities, blockage in the SOFAR channel (including diffraction, refraction, and reflection around obstacles), energy attenuation, and other features of the resulting waveforms. We present a study of the various features that are extracted from the hydro-acoustic waveforms, and their correlations with each other as well the source of the energy. Additionally, an inference algorithm is presented that concurrently infers the seismic and under-water events, and associates all arrivals (aka triggers), both from seismic and hydro-acoustic stations, to the appropriate event, and labels the path taken by the wave. Finally, our results demonstrate that this fusion of seismic and hydro-acoustic data leads to very good performance. A majority of the under-water events that IDC (International Data Center) analysts built in 2010 are correctly located, and the arrivals that correspond to seismic-to-hydroacoustic coupling, the T phases, are mostly correctly identified. There is no loss in the accuracy of seismic events, in fact, there is a slight overall improvement.

  10. Alfven Wave Propagation in Inhomogeneous Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sears, Stephanie

    Damping of Alfven waves is one of the most likely mechanisms for ion heating in the solar corona. Density gradients have significant but poorly-understood effects on energy transfer and Alfven wave propagation in partially ionized plasmas, such as those found in the solar chromosphere. Reflection of Alfven waves at density and magnetic field gradients can give rise to turbulence which sustains particle heating. The density profile in the Hot hELIcon eXperiment (HELIX) varies strongly with radius, giving access to a wide range of Alfven dynamics across the plasma column and providing an ideal environment to observe Alfven wave-driven particle heating. A new internal wave-launching antenna, situated at the edge of the high-density core and the density-gradient region of HELIX has been used to excite low-frequency waves in argon plasma. The propagation behavior of the launched waves was measured with a small-scale (smaller than the ion gyroradius) magnetic sense coil at multiple radial locations across the plasma column (from the high-density core through the density gradient region). Time-resolved laser induced fluorescence (LIF) and Langmuir probe measurements also yield insight into the plasma response to the perturbation. This dissertation presents cross-spectral and wavelet analysis of low-frequency waves in a helicon plasma with a strong density gradient. Building on the work of Houshmandyar, shear Alfven waves were launched in a helicon plasma source with a strong density gradient. Alfven wave turbulence is suggested from phase angle and wavelet analysis of magnetic sense coil probe measurements. The perturbation wavelength derived from phase angle measurements is consistent with predictions from the full Alfven wave dispersion relation (taking electron Landua damping, electron-ion collisions, and finite frequency effects into account). Time-resolved LIF measurements across the plasma column suggest ion heating where the turbulence is strongest. Time

  11. Wave propagation in complex coordinates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horsley, S. A. R.; King, C. G.; Philbin, T. G.

    2016-04-01

    We give an interpretation for the use of complex spatial coordinates in electromagnetism, in terms of a family of closely related inhomogeneous media. Using this understanding we find that the phenomenon of reflection can be related to branch cuts in the wave that originate from poles of ε (z) at complex positions. Demanding that these branch cuts disappear, we derive a new large family of inhomogeneous media that are reflectionless for a single angle of incidence. Extending this property to all angles of incidence leads us to a generalized form of the Pöschl Teller potentials that in general include regions of loss and gain. We conclude by analyzing our findings within the phase integral (WKB) method, and find another very large family of isotropic planar media that from one side have a transmission of unity and reflection of zero, for all angles of incidence.

  12. Antenna Construction and Propagation of Radio Waves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marine Corps Inst., Washington, DC.

    Developed as part of the Marine Corps Institute (MCI) correspondence training program, this course on antenna construction and propagation of radio waves is designed to provide communicators with instructions in the selection and/or construction of the proper antenna(s) for use with current field radio equipment. Introductory materials include…

  13. Wave propagation analysis using the variance matrix.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Richa; Ivan, J Solomon; Narayanamurthy, C S

    2014-10-01

    The propagation of a coherent laser wave-field through a pseudo-random phase plate is studied using the variance matrix estimated from Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor data. The uncertainty principle is used as a tool in discriminating the data obtained from the Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor. Quantities of physical interest such as the twist parameter, and the symplectic eigenvalues, are estimated from the wavefront sensor measurements. A distance measure between two variance matrices is introduced and used to estimate the spatial asymmetry of a wave-field in the experiment. The estimated quantities are then used to compare a distorted wave-field with its undistorted counterpart. PMID:25401243

  14. Experiments on the acoustic solitary wave generated thermoacoustically in a looped tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Dai; Sugimoto, Nobumasa

    2015-10-01

    Emergence of an acoustic solitary wave is demonstrated in a gas-filled, looped tube with an array of Helmholtz resonators connected. The solitary wave is generated thermoacoustically and spontaneously by a pair of stacks positioned diametrically on exactly the opposite side of the loop. The temperature gradient is imposed on both stacks in the same sense along the tube. The stacks made of ceramics and of many square pores are sandwiched by hot and cold heat exchangers. The pressure profile measured and the propagation speed show good agreements with the theoretical ones of the acoustic solitary wave obtained by Sugimoto (J. Acoust. Soc. Am., 99, 1971-1976 (1996)).

  15. Low frequency acoustic pulse propagation in temperate forests.

    PubMed

    Albert, Donald G; Swearingen, Michelle E; Perron, Frank E; Carbee, David L

    2015-08-01

    Measurements of acoustic pulse propagation for a 30-m path were conducted in an open field and in seven different forest stands in the northeastern United States consisting of deciduous, evergreen, or mixed tree species. The waveforms recorded in forest generally show the pulse elongation characteristic of propagation over a highly porous ground surface, with high frequency scattered arrivals superimposed on the basic waveform shape. Waveform analysis conducted to determine ground properties resulted in acoustically determined layer thicknesses of 4-8 cm in summer, within 2 cm of the directly measured thickness of the litter layers. In winter the acoustic thicknesses correlated with the site-specific snow cover depths. Effective flow resistivity values of 50-88 kN s m(-4) were derived for the forest sites in summer, while lower values typical for snow were found in winter. Reverberation times (T60) were typically around 2 s, but two stands (deciduous and pruned spruce planted on a square grid) had lower values of about 1.2 s. One site with a very rough ground surface had very low summer flow resistivity value and also had the longest reverberation time of about 3 s. These measurements can provide parameters useful for theoretical predictions of acoustic propagation within forests. PMID:26328690

  16. Large-scale Globally Propagating Coronal Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warmuth, Alexander

    2015-09-01

    Large-scale, globally propagating wave-like disturbances have been observed in the solar chromosphere and by inference in the corona since the 1960s. However, detailed analysis of these phenomena has only been conducted since the late 1990s. This was prompted by the availability of high-cadence coronal imaging data from numerous spaced-based instruments, which routinely show spectacular globally propagating bright fronts. Coronal waves, as these perturbations are usually referred to, have now been observed in a wide range of spectral channels, yielding a wealth of information. Many findings have supported the "classical" interpretation of the disturbances: fast-mode MHD waves or shocks that are propagating in the solar corona. However, observations that seemed inconsistent with this picture have stimulated the development of alternative models in which "pseudo waves" are generated by magnetic reconfiguration in the framework of an expanding coronal mass ejection. This has resulted in a vigorous debate on the physical nature of these disturbances. This review focuses on demonstrating how the numerous observational findings of the last one and a half decades can be used to constrain our models of large-scale coronal waves, and how a coherent physical understanding of these disturbances is finally emerging.

  17. Propagation of seismic waves in tall buildings

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Safak, E.

    1998-01-01

    A discrete-time wave propagation formulation of the seismic response of tall buildings is introduced. The building is modeled as a layered medium, similar to a layered soil medium, and is subjected to vertically propagating seismic shear waves. Soil layers and the bedrock under the foundation are incorporated in the formulation as additional layers. Seismic response is expressed in terms of the wave travel times between the layers, and the wave reflection and transmission coefficients at the layer interfaces. The equations account for the frequency-dependent filtering effects of the foundation and floor masses. The calculation of seismic response is reduced to a pair of simple finite-difference equations for each layer, which can be solved recursively starting from the bedrock. Compared to the commonly used vibration formulation, the wave propagation formulation provides several advantages, including simplified calculations, better representation of damping, ability to account for the effects of the soil layers under the foundation, and better tools for identification and damage detection from seismic records. Examples presented show the versatility of the method. ?? 1998 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Solitary wave propagation influenced by submerged breakwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jin; Zuo, Qi-hua; Wang, Deng-ting; Shukrieva, Shirin

    2013-10-01

    The form of Boussinesq equation derived by Nwogu (1993) using velocity at an arbitrary distance and surface elevation as variables is used to simulate wave surface elevation changes. In the numerical experiment, water depth was divided into five layers with six layer interfaces to simulate velocity at each layer interface. Besides, a physical experiment was carried out to validate numerical model and study solitary wave propagation. "Water column collapsing" method (WCCM) was used to generate solitary wave. A series of wave gauges around an impervious breakwater were set-up in the flume to measure the solitary wave shoaling, run-up, and breaking processes. The results show that the measured data and simulated data are in good agreement. Moreover, simulated and measured surface elevations were analyzed by the wavelet transform method. It shows that different wave frequencies stratified in the wavelet amplitude spectrum. Finally, horizontal and vertical velocities of each layer interface were analyzed in the process of solitary wave propagation through submerged breakwater.

  19. Propagation characteristics of magnetostatic waves: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parekh, J. P.

    1983-01-01

    This paper reviews the propagation characteristics of guided magnetostatic waves (MSW's) in a YIG film magnetized beyond saturation. There exist three guided magnetostatic wave-types, viz., magnetostatic surface waves (MSSW's) and magnetostatic forward and backward volume waves (MSFVW's and MSBVW's). The orientation of the internal bias field determines the particular wave-type that can be supported by the YIG film. The frequency spectrum of the volume waves coincides with that over which magnetostatic plane waves are of the homogeneous variety. The frequency spectrum of the MSSW's is located immediately above the MSVW spectrum. MSW's are dispersive, with the dispersion properties alterable through modification in boundary conditions. The most explored dispersion control technique employs the placement of a ground plane somewhat above the YIG film surface. This dispersion control technique, which provides one method of realizing nondispersive MSW propagation, raises the upper bound of the MSSW spectrum but does not affect the bounds of the MSVW spectrum. Numerical computations illustrating the dispersion and polarization characteristics of MSW's are presented.

  20. Acoustic-wave sensor for ambient monitoring of a photoresist-stripping agent

    DOEpatents

    Pfeifer, Kent B.; Hoyt, Andrea E.; Frye, Gregory C.

    1998-01-01

    The acoustic-wave sensor. The acoustic-wave sensor is designed for ambient or vapor-phase monitoring of a photoresist-stripping agent such as N-methylpyrrolidinone (NMP), ethoxyethylpropionate (EEP) or the like. The acoustic-wave sensor comprises an acoustic-wave device such as a surface-acoustic-wave (SAW) device, a flexural-plate-wave (FPW) device, an acoustic-plate-mode (APM) device, or a thickness-shear-mode (TSM) device (also termed a quartz crystal microbalance or QCM) having a sensing region on a surface thereof. The sensing region includes a sensing film for sorbing a quantity of the photoresist-stripping agent, thereby altering or shifting a frequency of oscillation of an acoustic wave propagating through the sensing region for indicating an ambient concentration of the agent. According to preferred embodiments of the invention, the acoustic-wave device is a SAW device; and the sensing film comprises poly(vinylacetate), poly(N-vinylpyrrolidinone), or poly(vinylphenol).

  1. Acoustic-wave sensor for ambient monitoring of a photoresist-stripping agent

    DOEpatents

    Pfeifer, K.B.; Hoyt, A.E.; Frye, G.C.

    1998-08-18

    The acoustic-wave sensor is disclosed. The acoustic-wave sensor is designed for ambient or vapor-phase monitoring of a photoresist-stripping agent such as N-methylpyrrolidinone (NMP), ethoxyethylpropionate (EEP) or the like. The acoustic-wave sensor comprises an acoustic-wave device such as a surface-acoustic-wave (SAW) device, a flexural-plate-wave (FPW) device, an acoustic-plate-mode (APM) device, or a thickness-shear-mode (TSM) device (also termed a quartz crystal microbalance or QCM) having a sensing region on a surface thereof. The sensing region includes a sensing film for sorbing a quantity of the photoresist-stripping agent, thereby altering or shifting a frequency of oscillation of an acoustic wave propagating through the sensing region for indicating an ambient concentration of the agent. According to preferred embodiments of the invention, the acoustic-wave device is a SAW device; and the sensing film comprises poly(vinylacetate), poly(N-vinylpyrrolidinone), or poly(vinylphenol). 3 figs.

  2. Ionic wave propagation along actin filaments.

    PubMed

    Tuszyński, J A; Portet, S; Dixon, J M; Luxford, C; Cantiello, H F

    2004-04-01

    We investigate the conditions enabling actin filaments to act as electrical transmission lines for ion flows along their lengths. We propose a model in which each actin monomer is an electric element with a capacitive, inductive, and resistive property due to the molecular structure of the actin filament and viscosity of the solution. Based on Kirchhoff's laws taken in the continuum limit, a nonlinear partial differential equation is derived for the propagation of ionic waves. We solve this equation in two different regimes. In the first, the maximum propagation velocity wave is found in terms of Jacobi elliptic functions. In the general case, we analyze the equation in terms of Fisher-Kolmogoroff modes with both localized and extended wave characteristics. We propose a new signaling mechanism in the cell, especially in neurons. PMID:15041636

  3. Speeding up tsunami wave propagation modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavrentyev, Mikhail; Romanenko, Alexey

    2014-05-01

    Trans-oceanic wave propagation is one of the most time/CPU consuming parts of the tsunami modeling process. The so-called Method Of Splitting Tsunami (MOST) software package, developed at PMEL NOAA USA (Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, USA), is widely used to evaluate the tsunami parameters. However, it takes time to simulate trans-ocean wave propagation, that is up to 5 hours CPU time to "drive" the wave from Chili (epicenter) to the coast of Japan (even using a rather coarse computational mesh). Accurate wave height prediction requires fine meshes which leads to dramatic increase in time for simulation. Computation time is among the critical parameter as it takes only about 20 minutes for tsunami wave to approach the coast of Japan after earthquake at Japan trench or Sagami trench (as it was after the Great East Japan Earthquake on March 11, 2011). MOST solves numerically the hyperbolic system for three unknown functions, namely velocity vector and wave height (shallow water approximation). The system could be split into two independent systems by orthogonal directions (splitting method). Each system can be treated independently. This calculation scheme is well suited for SIMD architecture and GPUs as well. We performed adaptation of MOST package to GPU. Several numerical tests showed 40x performance gain for NVIDIA Tesla C2050 GPU vs. single core of Intel i7 processor. Results of numerical experiments were compared with other available simulation data. Calculation results, obtained at GPU, differ from the reference ones by 10^-3 cm of the wave height simulating 24 hours wave propagation. This allows us to speak about possibility to develop real-time system for evaluating tsunami danger.

  4. Acoustic waves superimposed on incompressible flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodge, Steve

    1990-01-01

    The use of incompressible approximations in deriving solutions to the Lighthill wave equation was investigated for problems where an analytical solution could be found. A particular model problem involves the determination of the sound field of a spherical oscillating bubble in an ideal fluid. It is found that use of incompressible boundary conditions leads to good approximations in the important region of high acoustic wave number.

  5. Radial propagation of geodesic acoustic modes

    SciTech Connect

    Hager, Robert; Hallatschek, Klaus

    2009-07-15

    The GAM group velocity is estimated from the ratio of the radial free energy flux to the total free energy applying gyrokinetic and two-fluid theory. This method is much more robust than approaches that calculate the group velocity directly and can be generalized to include additional physics, e.g., magnetic geometry. The results are verified with the gyrokinetic code GYRO[J. Candy and R. E. Waltz, J. Comput. Phys. 186, 545 (2003)], the two-fluid code NLET[K. Hallatschek and A. Zeiler, Phys. Plasmas 7, 2554 (2000)], and analytical calculations. GAM propagation must be kept in mind when discussing the windows of GAM activity observed experimentally and the match between linear theory and experimental GAM frequencies.

  6. On an Acoustic Wave Equation Arising in Non-Equilibrium Gasdynamics. Classroom Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chandran, Pallath

    2004-01-01

    The sixth-order wave equation governing the propagation of one-dimensional acoustic waves in a viscous, heat conducting gaseous medium subject to relaxation effects has been considered. It has been reduced to a system of lower order equations corresponding to the finite speeds occurring in the equation, following a method due to Whitham. The lower…

  7. Mechanical surface waves accompany action potential propagation.

    PubMed

    El Hady, Ahmed; Machta, Benjamin B

    2015-01-01

    Many diverse studies have shown that a mechanical displacement of the axonal membrane accompanies the electrical pulse defining the action potential (AP). We present a model for these mechanical displacements as arising from the driving of surface wave modes in which potential energy is stored in elastic properties of the neuronal membrane and cytoskeleton while kinetic energy is carried by the axoplasmic fluid. In our model, these surface waves are driven by the travelling wave of electrical depolarization characterizing the AP, altering compressive electrostatic forces across the membrane. This driving leads to co-propagating mechanical displacements, which we term Action Waves (AWs). Our model allows us to estimate the shape of the AW that accompanies any travelling wave of voltage, making predictions that are in agreement with results from several experimental systems. Our model can serve as a framework for understanding the physical origins and possible functional roles of these AWs. PMID:25819404

  8. Mechanical surface waves accompany action potential propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Hady, Ahmed; Machta, Benjamin B.

    2015-03-01

    Many diverse studies have shown that a mechanical displacement of the axonal membrane accompanies the electrical pulse defining the action potential (AP). We present a model for these mechanical displacements as arising from the driving of surface wave modes in which potential energy is stored in elastic properties of the neuronal membrane and cytoskeleton while kinetic energy is carried by the axoplasmic fluid. In our model, these surface waves are driven by the travelling wave of electrical depolarization characterizing the AP, altering compressive electrostatic forces across the membrane. This driving leads to co-propagating mechanical displacements, which we term Action Waves (AWs). Our model allows us to estimate the shape of the AW that accompanies any travelling wave of voltage, making predictions that are in agreement with results from several experimental systems. Our model can serve as a framework for understanding the physical origins and possible functional roles of these AWs.

  9. Nonlinear positron-acoustic waves in fully relativistic degenerate plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossen, M. A.; Mamun, A. A.

    2016-03-01

    The nonlinear positron-acoustic (PA) waves propagating in a fully relativistic electron-positron-ion (EPI) plasma (containing degenerate electrons and positrons, and immobile heavy ions) have been theoretically investigated. A fully relativistic hydrodynamic model, which is consistent with the relativistic principle has been used, and the reductive perturbation method is employed to derive the dynamical Korteweg-de Vries equation. The dynamics of electrons as well as positrons, and the presence of immobile heavy ions are taken into account. It is found that the effects of relativistic degeneracy of electrons and positrons, static heavy ions, plasma particles velocity, enthalpy, etc have significantly modified the basic properties of the PA solitary waves propagating in the fully relativistic EPI plasmas. The application of the results of our present work in astrophysical compact objects such as white dwarfs and neutron stars, etc are briefly discussed.

  10. Instability and Wave Propagation in Structured 3D Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaynia, Narges; Fang, Nicholas X.; Boyce, Mary C.

    2014-03-01

    Many structured composites found in nature possess undulating and wrinkled interfacial layers that regulate mechanical, chemical, acoustic, adhesive, thermal, electrical and optical functions of the material. This research focused on the complex instability and wrinkling pattern arising in 3D structured composites and the effect of the buckling pattern on the overall structural response. The 3D structured composites consisted of stiffer plates supported by soft matrix on both sides. Compression beyond the critical strain led to complex buckling patterns in the initially straight plates. The motivation of our work is to elaborate the formation of a system of prescribed periodic scatterers (metamaterials) due to buckling, and their effect to interfere wave propagation through the metamaterial structures. Such metamaterials made from elastomers enable large reversible deformation and, as a result, significant changes of the wave propagation properties. We developed analytical and finite element models to capture various aspects of the instability mechanism. Mechanical experiments were designed to further explore the modeling results. The ability to actively alter the 3D composite structure can enable on-demand tunability of many different functions, such as active control of wave propagation to create band-gaps and waveguides.

  11. Acoustic wave levitation: Handling of components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandaele, Vincent; Delchambre, Alain; Lambert, Pierre

    2011-06-01

    Apart from contact micromanipulation, there exists a large variety of levitation techniques among which standing wave levitation will be proposed as a way to handle (sub)millimetric components. This paper will compare analytical formulas to calculate the order of magnitude of the levitation force. It will then describe digital simulation and experimental levitation setup. Stable levitation of various components (cardboard, steel washer, ball, ceramic capacity, water droplet) was shown along 5 degrees of freedom: The only degree of freedom that could not be mastered was the rotation about the symmetry axis of the acoustic field. More importantly, the present work will show the modification of the orientation of the radial force component in the presence of an object disturbing the acoustic field. This property can be used as a new feeding strategy as it means that levitating components are spontaneously pushed toward grippers in an acoustic plane standing wave.

  12. Air-ground interface: Surface waves, surface impedance and acoustic-to-seismic coupling coefficient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daigle, Gilles; Embleton, Tony

    1990-01-01

    In atmospheric acoustics, the subject of surface waves has been an area of discussion for many years. The existence of an acoustic surface wave is now well established theoretically. The mathematical solution for spherical wave propagation above an impedance boundary includes the possibility of a contribution that possesses all the standard properties for a surface wave. Surface waves exist when the surface is sufficiently porous, relative to its acoustical resistance, that it can influence the airborne particle velocity near the surface and reduce the phase velocity of sound waves in air at the surface. This traps some of the sound energy in the air to remain near the surface as it propagates. Above porous grounds, the existence of surface waves has eluded direct experimental confirmation (pulse experiments have failed to show a separate arrival expected from the reduced phase speed) and indirect evidence for its existence has appeared contradictory. The experimental evidence for the existence of an acoustical surface wave above porous boundaries is reviewed. Recent measurements including pulse experiments are also described. A few years ago the acoustic impedance of a grass-covered surface was measured in the frequency range 30 to 300 Hz. Here, further measurements on the same site are discussed. These measurements include core samples, a shallow refractive survey to determine the seismic velocities, and measurements of the acoustic-to-seismic coupling coefficient.

  13. Wave Phenomena in an Acoustic Resonant Chamber

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Mary E.; And Others

    1974-01-01

    Discusses the design and operation of a high Q acoustical resonant chamber which can be used to demonstrate wave phenomena such as three-dimensional normal modes, Q values, densities of states, changes in the speed of sound, Fourier decomposition, damped harmonic oscillations, sound-absorbing properties, and perturbation and scattering problems.…

  14. Surface Acoustic Waves on Piezoelectrics: The KGBS Connection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickernell, Fred S.

    2003-10-01

    In December of 1968 Jeffrey Bleustein of Yale University published an article in Applied Physics Letters predicting the existence of a new type of transverse surface acoustic wave that could propagate on the surface of a piezoelectric crystal. This was followed within 20 days by an article published in Soviet Physics JETP Letters by Yuri Gulyaev in January of 1969 predicting the same basic property. The wave took on the name Bleustein-Gulyaev or BG-wave, joining the names of Rayleigh, Love, Sezawa, and Stonely for distinct types of surface acoustic waves. But is there more to the story than this? Did Kagonov and Sklovskaya anticipate this development in a publication as early as 1966? Also, what about the work of Shimizu, Nakamura, and Ohta, who in April of 1969 published both theoretical and experimental verification of the existence of such a wave independent of the knowledge of the Bleustein and Gulyaev papers? This presentation explores the early roots and characteristics of what could be called the KGBS wave.

  15. Absence of localized acoustic waves in a scale-free correlated random system.

    PubMed

    Costa, A E B; de Moura, F A B F

    2011-02-16

    We numerically study the propagation of acoustic waves in a one-dimensional medium with a scale-free long-range correlated elasticity distribution. The random elasticity distribution is assumed to have a power spectrum S(k) ∼ 1/k(α). By using a transfer-matrix method we solve the discrete version of the scalar wave equation and compute the localization length. In addition, we apply a second-order finite-difference method for both the time and spatial variables and study the nature of the waves that propagate in the chain. Our numerical data indicate the presence of extended acoustic waves for a high degree of correlations. In contrast with local correlations, we numerically demonstrate that scale-free correlations promote a stable phase of free acoustic waves in the thermodynamic limit. PMID:21406919

  16. Marble Ageing Characterization by Acoustic Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudani, Mohamed El; Wilkie-Chancellier, Nicolas; Martinez, Loïc; Hébert, Ronan; Rolland, Olivier; Forst, Sébastien; Vergès-Belmin, Véronique; Serfaty, Stéphane

    In cultural heritage, statue marble characterization by acoustic waves is a well-known non-destructive method. Such investigations through the statues by time of flight method (TOF) point out sound speeds decrease with ageing. However for outdoor stored statues as the ones in the gardens of Chateau de Versailles, ageing affects mainly the surface of the Carrara marble. The present paper proposes an experimental study of the marble acoustic properties variations during accelerated laboratory ageing. The surface degradation of the marble is reproduced in laboratory for 29 mm thick marble samples by using heating/cooling thermal cycles on one face of a marble plate. Acoustic waves are generated by 1 MHz central frequency contact transducers excited by a voltage pulse placed on both sides of the plate. During the ageing and by using ad hoc transducers, the marble samples are characterized in transmission, along their volume by shear, compressional TOF measurements and along their surface by Rayleigh waves measurements. For Rayleigh waves, both TOF by transducers and laser vibrometry methods are used to detect the Rayleigh wave. The transmission measurements point out a deep decrease of the waves speeds in conjunction with a dramatic decrease of the maximum frequency transmitted. The marble acts as a low pass filter whose characteristic frequency cut decreases with ageing. This pattern occurs also for the Rayleigh wave surface measurements. The speed change in conjunction with the bandwidth translation is shown to be correlated to the material de-structuration during ageing. With a similar behavior but reversed in time, the same king of phenomena have been observed trough sol-gel materials during their structuration from liquid to solid state (Martinez, L. et all (2004). "Chirp-Z analysis for sol-gel transition monitoring". Ultrasonics, 42(1), 507-510.). A model is proposed to interpret the acoustical measurements

  17. Nonlinear guided wave propagation in prestressed plates.

    PubMed

    Pau, Annamaria; Lanza di Scalea, Francesco

    2015-03-01

    The measurement of stress in a structure presents considerable interest in many fields of engineering. In this paper, the diagnostic potential of nonlinear elastic guided waves in a prestressed plate is investigated. To do so, an analytical model is formulated accounting for different aspects involved in the phenomenon. The fact that the initial strains can be finite is considered using the Green Lagrange strain tensor, and initial and final configurations are not merged, as it would be assumed in the infinitesimal strain theory. Moreover, an appropriate third-order expression of the strain energy of the hyperelastic body is adopted to account for the material nonlinearities. The model obtained enables to investigate both the linearized case, which gives the variation of phase and group velocity as a function of the initial stress, and the nonlinear case, involving second-harmonic generation as a function of the initial state of stress. The analysis is limited to Rayleigh-Lamb waves propagating in a plate. Three cases of initial prestress are considered, including prestress in the direction of the wave propagation, prestress orthogonal to the direction of wave propagation, and plane isotropic stress. PMID:25786963

  18. Wave propagation in spatially modulated tubes.

    PubMed

    Ziepke, A; Martens, S; Engel, H

    2016-09-01

    We investigate wave propagation in rotationally symmetric tubes with a periodic spatial modulation of cross section. Using an asymptotic perturbation analysis, the governing quasi-two-dimensional reaction-diffusion equation can be reduced into a one-dimensional reaction-diffusion-advection equation. Assuming a weak perturbation by the advection term and using projection method, in a second step, an equation of motion for traveling waves within such tubes can be derived. Both methods predict properly the nonlinear dependence of the propagation velocity on the ratio of the modulation period of the geometry to the intrinsic width of the front, or pulse. As a main feature, we observe finite intervals of propagation failure of waves induced by the tube's modulation and derive an analytically tractable condition for their occurrence. For the highly diffusive limit, using the Fick-Jacobs approach, we show that wave velocities within modulated tubes are governed by an effective diffusion coefficient. Furthermore, we discuss the effects of a single bottleneck on the period of pulse trains. We observe period changes by integer fractions dependent on the bottleneck width and the period of the entering pulse train. PMID:27608990

  19. Numerical simulation of shock wave propagation in flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rénier, Mathieu; Marchiano, Régis; Gaudard, Eric; Gallin, Louis-Jonardan; Coulouvrat, François

    2012-09-01

    Acoustical shock waves propagate through flows in many situations. The sonic boom produced by a supersonic aircraft influenced by winds, or the so-called Buzz-Saw-Noise produced by turbo-engine fan blades when rotating at supersonic speeds, are two examples of such a phenomenon. In this work, an original method called FLHOWARD, acronym for FLow and Heterogeneous One-Way Approximation for Resolution of Diffraction, is presented. It relies on a scalar nonlinear wave equation, which takes into account propagation in a privileged direction (one-way approach), with diffraction, flow, heterogeneous and nonlinear effects. Theoretical comparison of the dispersion relations between that equation and parabolic equations (standard or wide angle) shows that this approach is more precise than the parabolic approach because there are no restrictions about the angle of propagation. A numerical procedure based on the standard split-step technique is used. It consists in splitting the nonlinear wave equation into simpler equations. Each of these equations is solved thanks to an analytical solution when it is possible, and a finite differences scheme in other cases. The advancement along the propagation direction is done with an implicit scheme. The validity of that numerical procedure is assessed by comparisons with analytical solutions of the Lilley's equation in waveguides for uniform or shear flows in linear regime. Attention is paid to the advantages and drawbacks of that method. Finally, the numerical code is used to simulate the propagation of sonic boom through a piece of atmosphere with flows and heterogeneities. The effects of the various parameters are analysed.

  20. Investigation of guided waves propagation in pipe buried in sand

    SciTech Connect

    Leinov, Eli; Cawley, Peter; Lowe, Michael J.S.

    2014-02-18

    The inspection of pipelines by guided wave testing is a well-established method for the detection of corrosion defects in pipelines, and is currently used routinely in a variety of industries, e.g. petrochemical and energy. When the method is applied to pipes buried in soil, test ranges tend to be significantly compromised because of attenuation of the waves caused by energy radiating into the soil. Moreover, the variability of soil conditions dictates different attenuation characteristics, which in-turn results in different, unpredictable, test ranges. We investigate experimentally the propagation and attenuation characteristics of guided waves in pipes buried in fine sand using a well characterized full scale experimental apparatus. The apparatus consists of an 8 inch-diameter, 5.6-meters long steel pipe embedded over 3 meters of its length in a rectangular container filled with fine sand, and an air-bladder for the application of overburden pressure. Longitudinal and torsional guided waves are excited in the pipe and recorded using a transducer ring (Guided Ultrasonics Ltd). Acoustic properties of the sand are measured independently in-situ and used to make model predictions of wave behavior in the buried pipe. We present the methodology and the systematic measurements of the guided waves under a range of conditions, including loose and compacted sand. It is found that the application of overburden pressure modifies the compaction of the sand and increases the attenuation, and that the measurement of the acoustic properties of sand allows model prediction of the attenuation of guided waves in buried pipes with a high level of confidence.

  1. Acoustic wave-equation-based earthquake location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Ping; Yang, Dinghui; Liu, Qinya; Yang, Xu; Harris, Jerry

    2016-04-01

    We present a novel earthquake location method using acoustic wave-equation-based traveltime inversion. The linear relationship between the location perturbation (δt0, δxs) and the resulting traveltime residual δt of a particular seismic phase, represented by the traveltime sensitivity kernel K(t0, xs) with respect to the earthquake location (t0, xs), is theoretically derived based on the adjoint method. Traveltime sensitivity kernel K(t0, xs) is formulated as a convolution between the forward and adjoint wavefields, which are calculated by numerically solving two acoustic wave equations. The advantage of this newly derived traveltime kernel is that it not only takes into account the earthquake-receiver geometry but also accurately honours the complexity of the velocity model. The earthquake location is obtained by solving a regularized least-squares problem. In 3-D realistic applications, it is computationally expensive to conduct full wave simulations. Therefore, we propose a 2.5-D approach which assumes the forward and adjoint wave simulations within a 2-D vertical plane passing through the earthquake and receiver. Various synthetic examples show the accuracy of this acoustic wave-equation-based earthquake location method. The accuracy and efficiency of the 2.5-D approach for 3-D earthquake location are further verified by its application to the 2004 Big Bear earthquake in Southern California.

  2. Properties of materials using acoustic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apfel, R. E.

    1984-10-01

    Our goal of characterizing materials using acoustic waves was forwarded through a number of projects: (1) We have refined our modulated radiation pressure technique for characterizing the interfaces between liquids so that we can automatically track changes in interfacial tension over time due to contaminants, surfactants, etc. (2) We have improved and simplified our acoustic scattering apparatus for measuring distributions of the properties of microparticle samples, which will allow us to distinguish particulates in liquids by size, compressibility, and density. (3) We are continuing work on theoretical approaches to nonlinear acoustics which should permit us to cast problems with geometric and other complexities into a manageable form. (4) Our studies of cavitation have enabled us to derive an analytic expression which predicts the acoustic pressure threshold for cavitation at the micrometer scale - where surface tension effects are important. This work has relevance to the consideration of possible bioeffects from diagnostic ultrasound. (5) Other projects include the calibration of hydrophones using acoustically levitated samples, and the investigation of solitary waves of the sort discovered by Wu, Keolian and Rudnick.

  3. Interaction of electromagnetic and acoustic waves in a stochastic atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatnagar, N.; Peterson, A. M.

    1979-01-01

    In the Stanford radio acoustic sounding system (RASS) an electromagnetic signal is made to scatter from a moving acoustic pulse train. Under a Bragg-scatter condition maximum electromagnetic scattering occurs. The scattered radio signal contains temperature and wind information as a function of the acoustic-pulse position. In this investigation RASS performance is assessed in an atmosphere characterized by the presence of turbulence and mean atmospheric parameters. The only assumption made is that the electromagnetic wave is not affected by stochastic perturbations in the atmosphere. It is concluded that the received radio signal depends strongly on the intensity of turbulence for altitudes of the acoustic pulse greater than the coherence length of propagation. The effect of mean vertical wind and mean temperature on the strength of the received signal is also demonstrated to be insignificant. Mean horizontal winds, however, shift the focus of the reflected electromagnetic energy from its origin, resulting in a decrease in received signal level when a monostatic radio-frequency (RF) system is used. For a bistatic radar configuration with space diversified receiving antennas, the shifting of the acoustic pulse makes possible the remote measurement of the horizontal wind component.

  4. Surface waves propagating on a turbulent flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutiérrez, Pablo; Aumaître, Sébastien

    2016-02-01

    We study the propagation of monochromatic surface waves on a turbulent flow of liquid metal, when the waves are much less energetic than the background flow. Electromagnetic forcing drives quasi-two-dimensional turbulence with strong vertical vorticity. To isolate the surface-wave field, we remove the surface deformation induced by the background turbulent flow using coherent-phase averaging at the wave frequency. We observe a significant increase in wavelength, when the latter is smaller than the forcing length scale. This phenomenon has not been reported before and can be explained by multiple random wave deflections induced by the turbulent velocity gradients. The shift in wavelength thus provides an estimate of the fluctuations in deflection angle. Local measurements of the wave frequency far from the wavemaker do not reveal such systematic behavior, although a small shift is visible. Finally, we quantify the damping enhancement induced by the turbulent flow and compare it to the existing theoretical predictions. Most of them suggest that the damping increases as the square of the Froude number, whereas our experimental data show a linear increase with the Froude number. We interpret this linear relationship as a balance between the time for a wave to cross a turbulent structure and the turbulent mixing time. The larger the ratio of these two times, the more energy is extracted from the wave. We conclude with possible mechanisms for energy exchange.

  5. Lattice Boltzmann model for wave propagation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianying; Yan, Guangwu; Shi, Xiubo

    2009-08-01

    A lattice Boltzmann model for two-dimensional wave equation is proposed by using the higher-order moment method. The higher-order moment method is based on the solution of a series of partial differential equations obtained by using multiscale technique and Chapman-Enskog expansion. In order to obtain the lattice Boltzmann model for the wave equation with higher-order accuracy of truncation errors, we removed the second-order dissipation term and the third-order dispersion term by employing the moments up to fourth order. The reversibility in time appears owing to the absence of the second-order dissipation term and the third-order dispersion term. As numerical examples, some classical examples, such as interference, diffraction, and wave passing through a convex lens, are simulated. The numerical results show that this model can be used to simulate wave propagation. PMID:19792280

  6. Acoustic spin pumping in magnetoelectric bulk acoustic wave resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polzikova, N. I.; Alekseev, S. G.; Pyataikin, I. I.; Kotelyanskii, I. M.; Luzanov, V. A.; Orlov, A. P.

    2016-05-01

    We present the generation and detection of spin currents by using magnetoelastic resonance excitation in a magnetoelectric composite high overtone bulk acoustic wave (BAW) resonator (HBAR) formed by a Al-ZnO-Al-GGG-YIG-Pt structure. Transversal BAW drives magnetization oscillations in YIG film at a given resonant magnetic field, and the resonant magneto-elastic coupling establishes the spin-current generation at the Pt/YIG interface. Due to the inverse spin Hall effect (ISHE) this BAW-driven spin current is converted to a dc voltage in the Pt layer. The dependence of the measured voltage both on magnetic field and frequency has a resonant character. The voltage is determined by the acoustic power in HBAR and changes its sign upon magnetic field reversal. We compare the experimentally observed amplitudes of the ISHE electrical field achieved by our method and other approaches to spin current generation that use surface acoustic waves and microwave resonators for ferromagnetic resonance excitation, with the theoretically expected values.

  7. Multi Reflection of Lamb Wave Emission in an Acoustic Waveguide Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Schmitt, Martin; Olfert, Sergei; Rautenberg, Jens; Lindner, Gerhard; Henning, Bernd; Reindl, Leonhard Michael

    2013-01-01

    Recently, an acoustic waveguide sensor based on multiple mode conversion of surface acoustic waves at the solid—liquid interfaces has been introduced for the concentration measurement of binary and ternary mixtures, liquid level sensing, investigation of spatial inhomogenities or bubble detection. In this contribution the sound wave propagation within this acoustic waveguide sensor is visualized by Schlieren imaging for continuous and burst operation the first time. In the acoustic waveguide the antisymmetrical zero order Lamb wave mode is excited by a single phase transducer of 1 MHz on thin glass plates of 1 mm thickness. By contact to the investigated liquid Lamb waves propagating on the first plate emit pressure waves into the adjacent liquid, which excites Lamb waves on the second plate, what again causes pressure waves traveling inside the liquid back to the first plate and so on. The Schlieren images prove this multi reflection within the acoustic waveguide, which confirms former considerations and calculations based on the receiver signal. With this knowledge the sensor concepts with the acoustic waveguide sensor can be interpreted in a better manner. PMID:23447010

  8. Elastic parabolic equation solutions for oceanic T-wave generation and propagation from deep seismic sources.

    PubMed

    Frank, Scott D; Collis, Jon M; Odom, Robert I

    2015-06-01

    Oceanic T-waves are earthquake signals that originate when elastic waves interact with the fluid-elastic interface at the ocean bottom and are converted to acoustic waves in the ocean. These waves propagate long distances in the Sound Fixing and Ranging (SOFAR) channel and tend to be the largest observed arrivals from seismic events. Thus, an understanding of their generation is important for event detection, localization, and source-type discrimination. Recently benchmarked seismic self-starting fields are used to generate elastic parabolic equation solutions that demonstrate generation and propagation of oceanic T-waves in range-dependent underwater acoustic environments. Both downward sloping and abyssal ocean range-dependent environments are considered, and results demonstrate conversion of elastic waves into water-borne oceanic T-waves. Examples demonstrating long-range broadband T-wave propagation in range-dependent environments are shown. These results confirm that elastic parabolic equation solutions are valuable for characterization of the relationships between T-wave propagation and variations in range-dependent bathymetry or elastic material parameters, as well as for modeling T-wave receptions at hydrophone arrays or coastal receiving stations. PMID:26093440

  9. Mechanical Surface Waves Accompany Action Potential Propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machta, Benjamin; El Hady, Ahmed

    2015-03-01

    The action potential (AP) is the basic mechanism by which information is transmitted along neuronal axons. Although the excitable nature of axons is understood to be primarily electrical, many experimental studies have shown that a mechanical displacement of the axonal membrane co-propagates with the electrical signal. While the experimental evidence for co-propagating mechanical waves is diverse and compelling, there is no consensus for their physical underpinnings. We present a model in which these mechanical displacements arise from the driving of mechanical surface waves, in which potential energy is stored in elastic deformations of the neuronal membrane and cytoskeleton while kinetic energy is stored in the movement of the axoplasmic fluid. In our model these surface waves are driven by the traveling wave of electrical depolarization that characterizes the AP, altering the electrostatic forces across the membrane as it passes. Our model allows us to predict the shape of the displacement that should accompany any traveling wave of voltage, including the well-characterized AP. We expect our model to serve as a framework for understanding the physical origins and possible functional roles of these AWs in neurobiology. See Arxiv/1407.7600

  10. Seismic Wave Propagation Along Fracture Intersections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abell, B.; Pyrak-Nolte, L. J.; Knobloch, J.

    2012-12-01

    Past research has shown that fractures support guided-modes such as coupled Rayleigh waves as well as confined modes such as Love waves and leaky-mode compressional waves. We demonstrated experimentally that fracture intersections support a mode that is similar to interface waves but propagates at speeds below the Rayleigh wave for low applied load. In this experimental study, we demonstrated that at low stress, fracture intersections support highly-localized wedge waves whose existence depends on stress and source-receiver polarization. Wedge waves (W.W.) were propagated along the orthogonal edge of aluminum samples. The sample measured 100 x 150 x 150 mm and was machined with two orthogonal fractures, intersecting at the center, such that four independent pieces of aluminum could be measured independently or pieced together. Seismic measurements were performed for two cases: (1) two right angle blocks in contact to examine the stress dependence of two corners in contact and (2) four right angle blocks in contact to study the behavior of four intersecting corners in contact. Seismic transducers with a central frequency of 1MHz were used to propagate shear (S) waves along the corners of the blocks that form an intersection, along the fractures and through the bulk. Measurements were made with the shear transducers polarized at 0, 45, 90 and 135 deg. to the direction of loading for a range (0 to 66 kN) of applied normal loads. When only two blocks were in contact, a W.W. was observed traveling at speeds between 2650 m/s and 3000 m/s. This is below the Rayleigh speed (2830 m/s) for low stress. As the applied load was increased, the wave speed increased, indicating a change in the local stiffness. Although an increase in speed was observed for both polarizations, the measured speed was lower for 135 deg. polarization indicating that the local stiffness of the top wedge was dramatically different than the bottom aluminum block. All four blocks were also examined under

  11. Obliquely propagating dust-density waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piel, A.; Arp, O.; Klindworth, M.; Melzer, A.

    2008-02-01

    Self-excited dust-density waves are experimentally studied in a dusty plasma under microgravity. Two types of waves are observed: a mode inside the dust volume propagating in the direction of the ion flow and another mode propagating obliquely at the boundary between the dusty plasma and the space charge sheath. The dominance of oblique modes can be described in the frame of a fluid model. It is shown that the results fom the fluid model agree remarkably well with a kinetic electrostatic model of Rosenberg [J. Vac. Sci. Technol. A 14, 631 (1996)]. In the experiment, the instability is quenched by increasing the gas pressure or decreasing the dust density. The critical pressure and dust density are well described by the models.

  12. Solitons in wave propagation and spin systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loutsenko, Igor

    1999-10-01

    This thesis consists of three parts: In the first part, a solution of the restricted Hadamard problem is presented. The classical Hadamard problem consists in determining (up to equivalence) all the second order differential operators which satisfy Huygens' Principle in the narrow sense. Physically, such operators describe systems where the diffusion of waves is absent and where signals propagate with maximal velocity. Unlike the original principle of superposition of secondary waves, which holds for all wave propagation phenomena, Huygens' principle in the narrow sense of Hadamard applies only to a very restricted range of wave processes, with sharp signals. We present a new class of Huygens' operators on Minkowski space-time and establish a new link between Huygens' principle and the solitons of the Korteveg-de Vries equation. In the second part, a new class of exactly solvable models in statistical mechanics is presented. We study the connections between the soliton solutions of certain integrable nonlinear equations (hierarchies of equations) and the thermodynamic quantities of one-dimensional Ising models with different types of interactions between spins. The exact solvability of these models can be traced back to this connection. We consider a model linked to soliton solutions of the Korteveg de Vries and of the B-type Kadomtsev-Petiashvili hierarchies. A connection between these Ising chains and random matrix models is considered as well. In the third part, we study solitonic mechanisms of exciton superfluidity. We provide a theoretical explanation of recent experiments on the propagation of excitons in semiconductors. In these experiments, the excitonic transport under the action of a laser pulse has been studied. It turned out that under certain conditions this transport becomes anomalous and the excitons propagate through the crystal in a wave packet without diffusion. We propose a model for this phenomenon which relies on the presence of an exciton

  13. Nonlinear holography for acoustic wave detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bortolozzo, U.; Dolfi, D.; Huignard, J. P.; Molin, S.; Peigné, A.; Residori, S.

    2015-03-01

    A liquid crystal medium is used to perform nonlinear dynamic holography and is coupled with multimode optical fibers for optical sensing applications. Thanks to the adaptive character of the nonlinear holography, and to the sensitivity of the multimode fibers, we demonstrate that the system is able to perform efficient acoustic wave detection even with noisy signals. The detection limit is estimated and multimode versus monomode optical fiber are compared. Finally, a wavelength multiplexing protocol is implemented for the spatial localization of the acoustic disturbances.

  14. Influence of surface acoustic waves induced acoustic streaming on the kinetics of electrochemical reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tietze, Sabrina; Schlemmer, Josefine; Lindner, Gerhard

    2013-12-01

    The kinetics of electrochemical reactions is controlled by diffusion processes of charge carriers across a boundary layer between the electrode and the electrolyte, which result in a shielding of the electric field inside the electrolyte and a concentration gradient across this boundary layer. In accumulators the diffusion rate determines the rather long time needed for charging, which is a major drawback for electric mobility. This diffusion boundary can be removed by acoustic streaming in the electrolyte induced by surface acoustic waves propagating of the electrode, which results in an increase of the charging current and thus in a reduction of the time needed for charging. For a quantitative study of the influence of acoustic streaming on the charge transport an electropolishing cell with vertically oriented copper electrodes and diluted H3PO4-Propanol electrolytes were used. Lamb waves with various excitation frequencies were exited on the anode with different piezoelectric transducers, which induced acoustic streaming in the overlaying electrolytic liquid. An increase of the polishing current of up to approximately 100 % has been obtained with such a set-up.

  15. Peculiarities of the Propagation of Supersonic Seismic Waves to the Upper Atmosphere.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavrilov, Nikolai M.; Kshevetskii, Sergey P.

    2016-04-01

    Seismic waves generated before and after earthquakes produce vertical and horizontal motion of the Earth's surface. The perturbations can propagate upwards and produce variations and oscillations of atmospheric characteristics at different altitudes. One of the mechanisms of such ionospheric perturbations is propagation of acoustic-gravity waves (AGWs) in the atmosphere caused by seismic excitations at the ground surface. The main difficulties in such explanation are high phase speeds of surface seismic waves, much exceeding the sound speed in the atmosphere near the ground. The strongest ground seismic waves are the surface Rayleigh waves, having phase speeds 3 - 4 km/s (sometimes up to 10 km/s). Traditional theory of atmospheric AGWs predicts that such supersonic excitation should produce not propagating, but trapped (or evanescent) gravity wave modes with amplitudes exponentially decaying with altitude. This can raise questions about the importance of seismic-excited supersonic waves in the formation of ionospheric disturbances. In the present study, we use the recently developed nonlinear numerical Whole-altitude Acoustic-Gravity Wave Model (WAGWM) to simulate propagation of supersonic wave modes from the ground to the upper atmosphere. The WAGWM is a three-dimensional model and uses the plain geometry. It calculates atmospheric velocity components and deviations of temperature, pressure, and density from their background values. Gavrilov and Kshevetskii (2014) described the set of used nonlinear three-dimensional equations of continuity, motion and heat balance. At the upper boundary z = 500 km we assume zero vertical velocity and zero vertical gradients of the other wave parameters. In the present research, we made calculations in rectangle region of the atmosphere and assume horizontal periodicity of wave solutions. Variations of vertical velocity produced by propagating seismic waves at the Earth's surface serve to force the waves in the model. Calculations

  16. EXCITATION OF ACOUSTIC WAVES BY VORTICES IN THE QUIET SUN

    SciTech Connect

    Kitiashvili, I. N.; Kosovichev, A. G.; Mansour, N. N.; Wray, A. A.

    2011-02-01

    The five-minute oscillations are one of the basic properties of solar convection. Observations show a mixture of a large number of acoustic wave fronts propagating from their sources. We investigate the process of acoustic waves excitation from the point of view of individual events, by using a realistic three-dimensional radiative hydrodynamic simulation of the quiet Sun. The results show that the excitation events are related to the dynamics of vortex tubes (or swirls) in intergranular lanes of solar convection. These whirlpool-like flows are characterized by very strong horizontal velocities (7-11 km s{sup -1}) and downflows ({approx}7 km s{sup -1}), and are accompanied by strong decreases of temperature, density, and pressure at the surface and 0.5-1 Mm below the surface. High-speed whirlpool flows can attract and capture other vortices. According to our simulation results the processes of vortex interaction, such as vortex annihilation, can cause excitation of acoustic waves on the Sun.

  17. Acoustic Wave Propagation in Pressure Sense Lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vitarius, Patrick; Gregory, Don A.; Wiley, John; Korman, Valentin

    2003-01-01

    Sense lines are used in pressure measurements to passively transmit information from hostile environments to areas where transducers can be used. The transfer function of a sense line can be used to obtain information about the measured environment from the protected sensor. Several properties of this transfer function are examined, including frequency dependence, Helmholtz resonance, and time of flight delay.

  18. RADIATIVE HYDRODYNAMIC SIMULATIONS OF ACOUSTIC WAVES IN SUNSPOTS

    SciTech Connect

    Bard, S.; Carlsson, M.

    2010-10-10

    We investigate the formation and evolution of the Ca II H line in a sunspot. The aim of our study is to establish the mechanisms underlying the formation of the frequently observed brightenings of small regions of sunspot umbrae known as 'umbral flashes'. We perform fully consistent NLTE radiation hydrodynamic simulations of the propagation of acoustic waves in sunspot umbrae and conclude that umbral flashes result from increased emission of the local solar material during the passage of acoustic waves originating in the photosphere and steepening to shock in the chromosphere. To quantify the significance of possible physical mechanisms that contribute to the formation of umbral flashes, we perform a set of simulations on a grid formed by different wave power spectra, different inbound coronal radiation, and different parameterized chromospheric heating. Our simulations show that the waves with frequencies in the range 4.5-7.0 mHz are critical to the formation of the observed blueshifts of umbral flashes while waves with frequencies below 4.5 mHz do not play a role despite their dominance in the photosphere. The observed emission in the Ca II H core between flashes only occurs in the simulations that include significant inbound coronal radiation and/or extra non-radiative chromospheric heating in addition to shock dissipation.

  19. Multilayer magnetostrictive structure based surface acoustic wave devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, H.; Talbi, A.; Tiercelin, N.; Bou Matar, O.

    2014-03-01

    This study addresses the experimental and theoretical investigations of guided elastic waves propagation in piezo-magnetic multi-layered structure. The structure is composed of a 20×TbCo2(5nm)/FeCo(5nm) nanostructured multi-layer deposited between two Aluminum (Al) Inter-Digitals Transducers forming a surface acoustic wave delay line, on a Y-cut LiNbO3 substrate. We compare the calculated and measured phase velocity variation under the action of the external magnetic field orientation and magnitude. We find quantitative agreement between the measured and modeled phase velocity shift for all external magnetic field configurations (hard axis and easy axis) and for different shape modes of elastic waves at their first and third harmonic operation frequencies. The shear horizontal mode exhibits a maximum phase velocity shift close to 20% for a ratio close to 1 between magneto-elastic film thickness and wavelength.

  20. Piezoelectric tube rotation effect owing to surface acoustic wave excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biryukov, Sergey V.; Sotnikov, Andrei; Schmidt, Hagen

    2016-03-01

    It is shown experimentally that a macroscopic cylindrical solid shaped like a piezoelectric tube can be rotated due to the excitation of surface acoustic waves (SAWs) with different amplitudes propagating in opposite directions along the solid's surface. A unidirectional SAW transducer covering the whole cylindrical surface has been used for ac voltage excitation of waves with unequal amplitudes in both directions. The pattern of such a transducer consists of a periodic comb structure with two electrodes of different width per period. An external torque is not applied to the tube and, from the outside, its movement looks like a motion under the action of an internal force. The observed mechanical response of the piezoelectric cylindrical tube to excitation of waves is due to an angular momentum of SAWs, the value of which has been directly calculated from experimental results.

  1. Dust ion acoustic solitary waves in a collisional dusty plasma with dust grains having Gaussian distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Maitra, Sarit; Banerjee, Gadadhar

    2014-11-15

    The influence of dust size distribution on the dust ion acoustic solitary waves in a collisional dusty plasma is investigated. It is found that dust size distribution changes the amplitude and width of a solitary wave. A critical wave number is derived for the existence of purely damping mode. A deformed Korteweg-de Vries (dKdV) equation is obtained for the propagation of weakly nonlinear dust ion acoustic solitary waves and the effect of different plasma parameters on the solution of this equation is also presented.

  2. Wave Propagation in Jointed Geologic Media

    SciTech Connect

    Antoun, T

    2009-12-17

    Predictive modeling capabilities for wave propagation in a jointed geologic media remain a modern day scientific frontier. In part this is due to a lack of comprehensive understanding of the complex physical processes associated with the transient response of geologic material, and in part it is due to numerical challenges that prohibit accurate representation of the heterogeneities that influence the material response. Constitutive models whose properties are determined from laboratory experiments on intact samples have been shown to over-predict the free field environment in large scale field experiments. Current methodologies for deriving in situ properties from laboratory measured properties are based on empirical equations derived for static geomechanical applications involving loads of lower intensity and much longer durations than those encountered in applications of interest involving wave propagation. These methodologies are not validated for dynamic applications, and they do not account for anisotropic behavior stemming from direcitonal effects associated with the orientation of joint sets in realistic geologies. Recent advances in modeling capabilities coupled with modern high performance computing platforms enable physics-based simulations of jointed geologic media with unprecedented details, offering a prospect for significant advances in the state of the art. This report provides a brief overview of these modern computational approaches, discusses their advantages and limitations, and attempts to formulate an integrated framework leading to the development of predictive modeling capabilities for wave propagation in jointed and fractured geologic materials.

  3. Characterization of wave physics in acoustic metamaterials using a fiber optic point detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganye, Randy; Chen, Yongyao; Liu, Haijun; Bae, Hyungdae; Wen, Zhongshan; Yu, Miao

    2016-06-01

    Due to limitations of conventional acoustic probes, full spatial field mapping (both internal and external wave amplitude and phase measurements) in acoustic metamaterials with deep subwavelength structures has not yet been demonstrated. Therefore, many fundamental wave propagation phenomena in acoustic metamaterials remain experimentally unexplored. In this work, we realized a miniature fiber optic acoustic point detector that is capable of omnidirectional detection of complex spatial acoustic fields in various metamaterial structures over a broadband spectrum. By using this probe, we experimentally characterized the wave-structure interactions in an anisotropic metamaterial waveguide. We further demonstrated that the spatial mapping of both internal and external acoustic fields of metamaterial structures can help obtain important wave propagation properties associated with material dispersion and field confinement, and develop an in-depth understanding of the waveguiding physics in metamaterials. The insights and inspirations gained from our experimental studies are valuable not only for the advancement of fundamental metamaterial wave physics but also for the development of functional metamaterial devices such as acoustic lenses, waveguides, and sensors.

  4. Acoustic waves in a stratified atmosphere. IV. Three-dimensional nonlinear hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalkofen, W.; Rossi, P.; Bodo, G.; Massaglia, S.

    2010-09-01

    Context. The quiet solar chromosphere in the interior of supergranulation cells is believed to be heated by the dissipation of acoustic waves that originate with a typical period of 3 min in the photosphere. Aims: We investigate how the horizontal expansion with height of acoustic waves traveling upward into an isothermal, gravitationally stratified atmosphere depends on the size of the source region. Methods: We have solved the three-dimensional, nonlinear, time-dependent hydrodynamic equations for impulsively-generated, upward-propagating acoustic waves, assuming cylindrical symmetry. Results: When the diameter of the source of acoustic waves is small, the pattern of the upward-propagating waves is that of a point source, for which the energy travels upward in a vertical cone, qualitatively matching the observed pattern of bright-point expansion with height. For the largest plausible size of a source region, i.e., with granular size of 1 Mm, wave propagation in the low chromosphere is approximately that of plane waves, but in the middle and upper chromosphere it is also that of a point source. The assumption of plane-wave propagation is not a good approximation in the solar chromosphere. The upward-directed energy flux is larger than that of the solar chromosphere, at least in the middle and upper chromosphere, and probably throughout. Conclusions: Simulations of impulsively generated acoustic waves emitted from source regions with diameters that are small compared to the pressure scale height of the atmosphere qualitatively reproduce the upward expansion observed in chromospheric bright points. The emission features in the cores of the H and K lines are predicted to be blueshifted for a pulse and redshifted for the waves in its wake. The contribution of internal gravity waves to the upward energy flux is small and decreases with increasing size of the source region.

  5. Numerical simulation of the nonlinear ultrasonic pressure wave propagation in a cavitating bubbly liquid inside a sonochemical reactor.

    PubMed

    Dogan, Hakan; Popov, Viktor

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the acoustic wave propagation in bubbly liquid inside a pilot sonochemical reactor which aims to produce antibacterial medical textile fabrics by coating the textile with ZnO or CuO nanoparticles. Computational models on acoustic propagation are developed in order to aid the design procedures. The acoustic pressure wave propagation in the sonoreactor is simulated by solving the Helmholtz equation using a meshless numerical method. The paper implements both the state-of-the-art linear model and a nonlinear wave propagation model recently introduced by Louisnard (2012), and presents a novel iterative solution procedure for the nonlinear propagation model which can be implemented using any numerical method and/or programming tool. Comparative results regarding both the linear and the nonlinear wave propagation are shown. Effects of bubble size distribution and bubble volume fraction on the acoustic wave propagation are discussed in detail. The simulations demonstrate that the nonlinear model successfully captures the realistic spatial distribution of the cavitation zones and the associated acoustic pressure amplitudes. PMID:26611813

  6. Visualization of Surface Acoustic Waves in Thin Liquid Films

    PubMed Central

    Rambach, R. W.; Taiber, J.; Scheck, C. M. L.; Meyer, C.; Reboud, J.; Cooper, J. M.; Franke, T.

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate that the propagation path of a surface acoustic wave (SAW), excited with an interdigitated transducer (IDT), can be visualized using a thin liquid film dispensed onto a lithium niobate (LiNbO3) substrate. The practical advantages of this visualization method are its rapid and simple implementation, with many potential applications including in characterising acoustic pumping within microfluidic channels. It also enables low-cost characterisation of IDT designs thereby allowing the determination of anisotropy and orientation of the piezoelectric substrate without the requirement for sophisticated and expensive equipment. Here, we show that the optical visibility of the sound path critically depends on the physical properties of the liquid film and identify heptane and methanol as most contrast rich solvents for visualization of SAW. We also provide a detailed theoretical description of this effect. PMID:26917490

  7. Visualization of Surface Acoustic Waves in Thin Liquid Films.

    PubMed

    Rambach, R W; Taiber, J; Scheck, C M L; Meyer, C; Reboud, J; Cooper, J M; Franke, T

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate that the propagation path of a surface acoustic wave (SAW), excited with an interdigitated transducer (IDT), can be visualized using a thin liquid film dispensed onto a lithium niobate (LiNbO3) substrate. The practical advantages of this visualization method are its rapid and simple implementation, with many potential applications including in characterising acoustic pumping within microfluidic channels. It also enables low-cost characterisation of IDT designs thereby allowing the determination of anisotropy and orientation of the piezoelectric substrate without the requirement for sophisticated and expensive equipment. Here, we show that the optical visibility of the sound path critically depends on the physical properties of the liquid film and identify heptane and methanol as most contrast rich solvents for visualization of SAW. We also provide a detailed theoretical description of this effect. PMID:26917490

  8. Visualization of Surface Acoustic Waves in Thin Liquid Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rambach, R. W.; Taiber, J.; Scheck, C. M. L.; Meyer, C.; Reboud, J.; Cooper, J. M.; Franke, T.

    2016-02-01

    We demonstrate that the propagation path of a surface acoustic wave (SAW), excited with an interdigitated transducer (IDT), can be visualized using a thin liquid film dispensed onto a lithium niobate (LiNbO3) substrate. The practical advantages of this visualization method are its rapid and simple implementation, with many potential applications including in characterising acoustic pumping within microfluidic channels. It also enables low-cost characterisation of IDT designs thereby allowing the determination of anisotropy and orientation of the piezoelectric substrate without the requirement for sophisticated and expensive equipment. Here, we show that the optical visibility of the sound path critically depends on the physical properties of the liquid film and identify heptane and methanol as most contrast rich solvents for visualization of SAW. We also provide a detailed theoretical description of this effect.

  9. Ion acoustic solitary waves in plasmas with nonextensive electrons, Boltzmann positrons and relativistic thermal ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafez, M. G.; Talukder, M. R.

    2015-09-01

    This work investigates the theoretical and numerical studies on nonlinear propagation of ion acoustic solitary waves (IASWs) in an unmagnetized plasma consisting of nonextensive electrons, Boltzmann positrons and relativistic thermal ions. The Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation is derived by using the well known reductive perturbation method. This equation admits the soliton like solitary wave solution. The effects of phase velocity, amplitude of soliton, width of soliton and electrostatic nonlinear propagation of weakly relativistic ion-acoustic solitary waves have been discussed with graphical representation found in the variation of the plasma parameters. The obtained results can be helpful in understanding the features of small but finite amplitude localized relativistic ion-acoustic waves for an unmagnetized three component plasma system in astrophysical compact objects.

  10. Properties of materials using acoustic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apfel, R. E.

    1985-10-01

    Our goal of characterizing materials using acoustic waves was forwarded through a number of projects: (1) We have derived a theory, and tested it on tissues, for predicting the composition of composite materials using mixture rules, such as the one we derived for the nonlinear parameter two years ago; (2) We have published one article and another is in review on our use of modulated acoustic radiation pressure on levitated drops to characterize interfaces with and without surfactants. We have begun to study in a systematic way the nonlinear dynamics of drops, including drop fission: (3) we have improved apparatus for 30 MHz ultrasonic scattering from microparticles (approx. micron size), which should allow us to discriminate between different microparticles in a liquid; (4) We have begun to study the nonlinear mechanics of hydrodynamic solitons in cylindrical (2-d) geometry; and (5) We have been studying the use of acoustic levitation for transducer calibration.

  11. Feasibility of optical coherence elastography measurements of shear wave propagation in homogeneous tissue equivalent phantoms

    PubMed Central

    Razani, Marjan; Mariampillai, Adrian; Sun, Cuiru; Luk, Timothy W. H.; Yang, Victor X. D.; Kolios, Michael C.

    2012-01-01

    In this work, we explored the potential of measuring shear wave propagation using optical coherence elastography (OCE) based on a swept-source optical coherence tomography (OCT) system. Shear waves were generated using a 20 MHz piezoelectric transducer (circular element 8.5 mm diameter) transmitting sine-wave bursts of 400 μs, synchronized with the OCT swept source wavelength sweep. The acoustic radiation force (ARF) was applied to two gelatin phantoms (differing in gelatin concentration by weight, 8% vs. 14%). Differential OCT phase maps, measured with and without the ARF, demonstrate microscopic displacement generated by shear wave propagation in these phantoms of different stiffness. We present preliminary results of OCT derived shear wave propagation velocity and modulus, and compare these results to rheometer measurements. The results demonstrate the feasibility of shear wave OCE (SW-OCE) for high-resolution microscopic homogeneous tissue mechanical property characterization. PMID:22567590

  12. Feasibility of optical coherence elastography measurements of shear wave propagation in homogeneous tissue equivalent phantoms.

    PubMed

    Razani, Marjan; Mariampillai, Adrian; Sun, Cuiru; Luk, Timothy W H; Yang, Victor X D; Kolios, Michael C

    2012-05-01

    In this work, we explored the potential of measuring shear wave propagation using optical coherence elastography (OCE) based on a swept-source optical coherence tomography (OCT) system. Shear waves were generated using a 20 MHz piezoelectric transducer (circular element 8.5 mm diameter) transmitting sine-wave bursts of 400 μs, synchronized with the OCT swept source wavelength sweep. The acoustic radiation force (ARF) was applied to two gelatin phantoms (differing in gelatin concentration by weight, 8% vs. 14%). Differential OCT phase maps, measured with and without the ARF, demonstrate microscopic displacement generated by shear wave propagation in these phantoms of different stiffness. We present preliminary results of OCT derived shear wave propagation velocity and modulus, and compare these results to rheometer measurements. The results demonstrate the feasibility of shear wave OCE (SW-OCE) for high-resolution microscopic homogeneous tissue mechanical property characterization. PMID:22567590

  13. On the Role of Ion-Temperature Anisotropy in the Growth and Propagation of the Shear-Modified Ion-Acoustic Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teodorescu, C.; Koepke, M. E.; Reynolds, E. W.

    2002-05-01

    Broadband ion-acoustic waves have been observed in the Earth's ionosphere, where the electron and ion temperatures are equal, propagating obliquely to the magnetic field lines. Explaining these waves with the current-driven ion-acoustic instability in homogeneous plasma requires an unusually large ratio of electron to ion temperature. We investigate in a Q machine oblique ion-acoustic waves, excited by the combination of magnetic-field-aligned (parallel) current and sheared parallel ion flow, at almost equal ion and electron temperatures. Direct measurements of the parallel and perpendicular ion temperatures, parallel and perpendicular ion drift velocities, electron temperature and parallel electron drift velocity, parallel and perpendicular wavevector components, and mode frequency and growth rate are used to elucidate the shear-modified ion-acoustic instability mechanism and document an observed correlation between ion-temperature anisotropy and wave-propagation angle. Experimental measurements show how anisotropy significantly influences this propagation angle. These results may support the ion-acoustic wave interpretation of broadband waves in the auroral energization region where shear and anisotropy are known to exist. Although the results were obtained from an investigation of shear-modified ion-acoustic waves, our conclusions pertain to the general subject of oblique ion-acoustic waves and thus have ramifications for many space plasmas. * Work supported by NSF and NASA.

  14. Seismic Wave Propagation on the Tablet Computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emoto, K.

    2015-12-01

    Tablet computers widely used in recent years. The performance of the tablet computer is improving year by year. Some of them have performance comparable to the personal computer of a few years ago with respect to the calculation speed and the memory size. The convenience and the intuitive operation are the advantage of the tablet computer compared to the desktop PC. I developed the iPad application of the numerical simulation of the seismic wave propagation. The numerical simulation is based on the 2D finite difference method with the staggered-grid scheme. The number of the grid points is 512 x 384 = 196,608. The grid space is 200m in both horizontal and vertical directions. That is the calculation area is 102km x 77km. The time step is 0.01s. In order to reduce the user waiting time, the image of the wave field is drawn simultaneously with the calculation rather than playing the movie after the whole calculation. P and S wave energies are plotted on the screen every 20 steps (0.2s). There is the trade-off between the smooth simulation and the resolution of the wave field image. In the current setting, it takes about 30s to calculate the 10s wave propagation (50 times image updates). The seismogram at the receiver is displayed below of the wave field updated in real time. The default medium structure consists of 3 layers. The layer boundary is defined by 10 movable points with linear interpolation. Users can intuitively change to the arbitrary boundary shape by moving the point. Also users can easily change the source and the receiver positions. The favorite structure can be saved and loaded. For the advance simulation, users can introduce the random velocity fluctuation whose spectrum can be changed to the arbitrary shape. By using this application, everyone can simulate the seismic wave propagation without the special knowledge of the elastic wave equation. So far, the Japanese version of the application is released on the App Store. Now I am preparing the

  15. A Theoretical and Experimental Study of Acoustic Propagation in Multisectioned Circular Ducts. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wyerman, B. R.

    1976-01-01

    The propagation of plane waves and higher order acoustic modes in a circular multisectioned duct was studied. A unique source array consisting of two concentric rings of sources, providing phase and amplitude control in the radial, as well as circumferential direction, was developed to generate plane waves and both spinning and nonspinning higher order modes. Measurements of attenuation and radial mode shapes were taken with finite length liners inserted between the hard wall sections of an anechoically terminated duct. Materials tested as liners included a glass fiber material and both sintered fiber metals and perforated sheet metals with a honeycomb backing. The fundamental acoustic properties of these materials were studied with emphasis on the attenuation of sound by the liners and the determination of local versus extended reaction behavior for the boundary condition. A search technique was developed to find the complex eigenvalues for a liner under the assumption of a locally reacting boundary condition.

  16. Shock wave propagation along constant sloped ocean bottoms.

    PubMed

    Maestas, Joseph T; Taylor, Larissa F; Collis, Jon M

    2014-12-01

    The nonlinear progressive wave equation (NPE) is a time-domain model used to calculate long-range shock propagation using a wave-following computational domain. Current models are capable of treating smoothly spatially varying medium properties, and fluid-fluid interfaces that align horizontally with a computational grid that can be handled by enforcing appropriate interface conditions. However, sloping interfaces that do not align with a horizontal grid present a computational challenge as application of interface conditions to vertical contacts is non-trivial. In this work, range-dependent environments, characterized by sloping bathymetry, are treated using a rotated coordinate system approach where the irregular interface is aligned with the coordinate axes. The coordinate rotation does not change the governing equation due to the narrow-angle assumption adopted in its derivation, but care is taken with applying initial, interface, and boundary conditions. Additionally, sound pressure level influences on nonlinear steepening for range-independent and range-dependent domains are used to quantify the pressures for which linear acoustic models suffice. A study is also performed to investigate the effects of thin sediment layers on the propagation of blast waves generated by explosives buried beneath mud line. PMID:25480048

  17. Propagation of finite amplitude sound through turbulence: modeling with geometrical acoustics and the parabolic approximation.

    PubMed

    Blanc-Benon, Philippe; Lipkens, Bart; Dallois, Laurent; Hamilton, Mark F; Blackstock, David T

    2002-01-01

    Sonic boom propagation can be affected by atmospheric turbulence. It has been shown that turbulence affects the perceived loudness of sonic booms, mainly by changing its peak pressure and rise time. The models reported here describe the nonlinear propagation of sound through turbulence. Turbulence is modeled as a set of individual realizations of a random temperature or velocity field. In the first model, linear geometrical acoustics is used to trace rays through each realization of the turbulent field. A nonlinear transport equation is then derived along each eigenray connecting the source and receiver. The transport equation is solved by a Pestorius algorithm. In the second model, the KZK equation is modified to account for the effect of a random temperature field and it is then solved numerically. Results from numerical experiments that simulate the propagation of spark-produced N waves through turbulence are presented. It is observed that turbulence decreases, on average, the peak pressure of the N waves and increases the rise time. Nonlinear distortion is less when turbulence is present than without it. The effects of random vector fields are stronger than those of random temperature fields. The location of the caustics and the deformation of the wave front are also presented. These observations confirm the results from the model experiment in which spark-produced N waves are used to simulate sonic boom propagation through a turbulent atmosphere. PMID:11837954

  18. Wireless Multiplexed Surface Acoustic Wave Sensors Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Youngquist, Robert C.

    2014-01-01

    Wireless Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) Sensor is a new technology for obtaining multiple, real-time measurements under extreme environmental conditions. This project plans to develop a wireless multiplexed sensor system that uses SAW sensors, with no batteries or semiconductors, that are passive and rugged, can operate down to cryogenic temperatures and up to hundreds of degrees C, and can be used to sense a wide variety of parameters over reasonable distances (meters).

  19. Support minimized inversion of acoustic and elastic wave scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Safaeinili, A.

    1994-04-24

    This report discusses the following topics on support minimized inversion of acoustic and elastic wave scattering: Minimum support inversion; forward modelling of elastodynamic wave scattering; minimum support linearized acoustic inversion; support minimized nonlinear acoustic inversion without absolute phase; and support minimized nonlinear elastic inversion.

  20. Three-dimensional coupled mode analysis of internal-wave acoustic ducts.

    PubMed

    Shmelev, Alexey A; Lynch, James F; Lin, Ying-Tsong; Schmidt, Henrik

    2014-05-01

    A fully three-dimensional coupled mode approach is used in this paper to describe the physics of low frequency acoustic signals propagating through a train of internal waves at an arbitrary azimuth. A three layer model of the shallow water waveguide is employed for studying the properties of normal modes and their coupled interaction due to the presence of nonlinear internal waves. Using a robust wave number integration technique for Fourier transform computation and a direct global matrix approach, an accurate three-dimensional coupled mode full field solution is obtained for the tonal signal propagation through straight and parallel internal waves. This approach provides accurate results for arbitrary azimuth and includes the effects of backscattering. This enables one to provide an azimuthal analysis of acoustic propagation and separate the effects of mode coupled transparent resonance, horizontal reflection and refraction, the horizontal Lloyd's mirror, horizontal ducting and anti-ducting, and horizontal tunneling and secondary ducting. PMID:24815234

  1. Spherical ion acoustic waves in pair ion plasmas with nonthermal electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selim, M. M.

    2016-04-01

    Propagation of nonplanar ion acoustic waves in a plasma composed of negative and positive ions and nonthermally distributed electrons is investigated using reductive perturbation theory. The spherical Kadomtsev-Petviashvili (SKP) equation which describes the dynamics of the nonlinear spherical ion acoustic waves is derived. It is found that compressive and rarefactive ion-acoustic solitary wave characteristics significantly depend on the density and mass ratios of the positive to negative ions, the nonthermal electron parameter, and the geometry factor. The possible regions for the existence of spherical ion acoustic waves are defined precisely for typical parameters of (H+, O2 -) and (H+, H-) plasmas in the D and F-regions of the Earth's ionosphere, as well as for laboratory plasma (Ar+, F-).

  2. Counter-propagating wave interaction for contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renaud, G.; Bosch, J. G.; ten Kate, G. L.; Shamdasani, V.; Entrekin, R.; de Jong, N.; van der Steen, A. F. W.

    2012-11-01

    Most techniques for contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging require linear propagation to detect nonlinear scattering of contrast agent microbubbles. Waveform distortion due to nonlinear propagation impairs their ability to distinguish microbubbles from tissue. As a result, tissue can be misclassified as microbubbles, and contrast agent concentration can be overestimated; therefore, these artifacts can significantly impair the quality of medical diagnoses. Contrary to biological tissue, lipid-coated gas microbubbles used as a contrast agent allow the interaction of two acoustic waves propagating in opposite directions (counter-propagation). Based on that principle, we describe a strategy to detect microbubbles that is free from nonlinear propagation artifacts. In vitro images were acquired with an ultrasound scanner in a phantom of tissue-mimicking material with a cavity containing a contrast agent. Unlike the default mode of the scanner using amplitude modulation to detect microbubbles, the pulse sequence exploiting counter-propagating wave interaction creates no pseudoenhancement behind the cavity in the contrast image.

  3. Modeling Propagation of Shock Waves in Metals

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, W M; Molitoris, J D

    2005-08-19

    We present modeling results for the propagation of strong shock waves in metals. In particular, we use an arbitrary Lagrange Eulerian (ALE3D) code to model the propagation of strong pressure waves (P {approx} 300 to 400 kbars) generated with high explosives in contact with aluminum cylinders. The aluminum cylinders are assumed to be both flat-topped and have large-amplitude curved surfaces. We use 3D Lagrange mechanics. For the aluminum we use a rate-independent Steinberg-Guinan model, where the yield strength and shear modulus depend on pressure, density and temperature. The calculation of the melt temperature is based on the Lindermann law. At melt the yield strength and shear modulus is set to zero. The pressure is represented as a seven-term polynomial as a function of density. For the HMX-based high explosive, we use a JWL, with a program burn model that give the correct detonation velocity and C-J pressure (P {approx} 390 kbars). For the case of the large-amplitude curved surface, we discuss the evolving shock structure in terms of the early shock propagation experiments by Sakharov.

  4. Nonlinear ion acoustic waves scattered by vortexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohno, Yuji; Yoshida, Zensho

    2016-09-01

    The Kadomtsev-Petviashvili (KP) hierarchy is the archetype of infinite-dimensional integrable systems, which describes nonlinear ion acoustic waves in two-dimensional space. This remarkably ordered system resides on a singular submanifold (leaf) embedded in a larger phase space of more general ion acoustic waves (low-frequency electrostatic perturbations). The KP hierarchy is characterized not only by small amplitudes but also by irrotational (zero-vorticity) velocity fields. In fact, the KP equation is derived by eliminating vorticity at every order of the reductive perturbation. Here, we modify the scaling of the velocity field so as to introduce a vortex term. The newly derived system of equations consists of a generalized three-dimensional KP equation and a two-dimensional vortex equation. The former describes 'scattering' of vortex-free waves by ambient vortexes that are determined by the latter. We say that the vortexes are 'ambient' because they do not receive reciprocal reactions from the waves (i.e., the vortex equation is independent of the wave fields). This model describes a minimal departure from the integrable KP system. By the Painlevé test, we delineate how the vorticity term violates integrability, bringing about an essential three-dimensionality to the solutions. By numerical simulation, we show how the solitons are scattered by vortexes and become chaotic.

  5. Acoustic Shielding by Cavitation Bubbles in Shock Wave Lithotripsy (SWL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pishchalnikov, Yuri A.; McAteer, James A.; Bailey, Michael R.; Pishchalnikova, Irina V.; Williams, James C.; Evan, Andrew P.

    2006-05-01

    Lithotripter pulses (˜7-10 μs) initiate the growth of cavitation bubbles, which collapse hundreds of microseconds later. Since the bubble growth-collapse cycle trails passage of the pulse, and is ˜1000 times shorter than the pulse interval at clinically relevant firing rates, it is not expected that cavitation will affect pulse propagation. However, pressure measurements with a fiber-optic hydrophone (FOPH-500) indicate that bubbles generated by a pulse can, indeed, shield the propagation of the negative tail. Shielding was detected within 1 μs of arrival of the negative wave, contemporaneous with the first observation of expanding bubbles by high-speed camera. Reduced negative pressure was observed at 2 Hz compared to 0.5 Hz firing rate, and in water with a higher content of dissolved gas. We propose that shielding of the negative tail can be attributed to loss of acoustic energy into the expansion of cavitation bubbles.

  6. On Dirac equations for linear magnetoacoustic waves propagating in an isothermal atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alicki, R.; Musielak, E. Z.; Sikorski, J.; Makowiec, D.

    1994-01-01

    A new analytical approach to study linear magnetoacoustic waves propagating in an isothermal, stratified, and uniformly magnetized atmosphere is presented. The approach is based on Dirac equations, and the theory of Sturm-Liouville operators is used to investigate spectral properties of the obtained Dirac Hamiltonians. Two cases are considered: (1) the background magnetic field is vertical, and the waves are separated into purely magnetic (transverse) and purely acoustic (longitudinal) modes; and (2) the field is tilted with respect to the vertical direction and the magnetic and acoustic modes become coupled giving magnetoacoustic waves. For the first case, the Dirac Hamiltonian possesses either a discrete spectrum, which corresponds to standing magnetic waves, or a continuous spectrum, which can be clearly identified with freely propagating acoustic waves. For the second case, the quantum mechanical perturbation calculus is used to study coupling and energy exchange between the magnetic and acoustic components of magnetoacoustic waves. It is shown that this coupling may efficiently prevent trapping of magnetoacoustic waves instellar atmospheres.

  7. Ultrasonic wave propagation in cortical bone mimics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodd, Simon P.; Cunningham, James L.; Miles, Anthony W.; Humphrey, Victor F.; Gheduzzi, Sabina

    2004-10-01

    Understanding the velocity and attenuation of ultrasonic waves in cortical bone is important for studies of osteoporosis and fractures. In particular, propagation in free- and water-loaded acrylic plates, with a thickness range of around 1-6 mm, has been widely used to mimic cortical bone behavior. A theoretical investigation of Lamb mode propagation at 200 kHz in free- and water-loaded acrylic plates revealed a marked difference in the form of their velocity and attenuation dispersion curves as a function of frequency thickness product. In experimental studies, this difference between free and loaded plates is not seen. Over short measurement distances, the results for both free and loaded plates are consistent with previous modeling and experimental studies: for thicker plates (above 3-4 mm), the velocity calculated using the first arrival signal is a lateral wave comparable with the longitudinal velocity. As the plate thickness decreases, the velocity approaches the S0 Lamb mode value. WAVE2000 modeling of the experimental setup agrees with experimental data. The data are also used to test a hypothesis that for thin plates the velocity approaches the corresponding S0 Lamb mode velocity at large measurement distances or when different arrival time criteria are used. [Work supported by Action Medical Research.

  8. Theoretical models for duct acoustic propagation and radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eversman, Walter

    1991-01-01

    The development of computational methods in acoustics has led to the introduction of analysis and design procedures which model the turbofan inlet as a coupled system, simultaneously modeling propagation and radiation in the presence of realistic internal and external flows. Such models are generally large, require substantial computer speed and capacity, and can be expected to be used in the final design stages, with the simpler models being used in the early design iterations. Emphasis is given to practical modeling methods that have been applied to the acoustical design problem in turbofan engines. The mathematical model is established and the simplest case of propagation in a duct with hard walls is solved to introduce concepts and terminologies. An extensive overview is given of methods for the calculation of attenuation in uniform ducts with uniform flow and with shear flow. Subsequent sections deal with numerical techniques which provide an integrated representation of duct propagation and near- and far-field radiation for realistic geometries and flight conditions.

  9. Nonlinear progressive acoustic-gravity waves: Exact solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godin, Oleg

    2013-04-01

    We consider finite-amplitude mechanical waves in an inhomogeneous, compressible fluid in a uniform gravity field. The fluid is assumed to be inviscid, and wave motion is considered as an adiabatic thermodynamic process. The fluid either occupies an unbounded domain or has free and/or rigid boundaries. Wave motion is described by the momentum, continuity, and state equations in Lagrangian coordinates. We consider generic inhomogeneous fluids; no specific assumptions are made regarding the equation of state or spatial variations of the mass density or the sound speed in the absence of waves. The density and the sound speed are piece-wise continuous functions of position. The discontinuities represent fluid-fluid interfaces, such as the air-sea interface. Following a recent work on linear acoustic-gravity waves [O. A. Godin, Incompressible wave motion of compressible fluids, Phys. Rev. Lett., 108, 194501 (2012)], here we investigate a particular class of non-linear wave motions in fluids, in which pressure remains constant in each moving fluid parcel. Exact, analytic solutions of the non-linear hydrodynamics equations are obtained for two distinct scenarios. In the first scenario, the fluid is either unbounded or has a free surface. In the latter case, the exact analytic solution can be interpreted as a progressive surface wave. In the second scenario, the fluid has a free surface and a sloping, plane rigid boundary. Then the exact analytic solution represents an edge wave propagating horizontally along the rigid boundary. In both scenarios, the flow field associated with the finite-amplitude waves is rotational. When the sound speed tends to infinity, our results reduce to well-known finite-amplitude waves in incompressible fluids. In another limit, when the wave amplitude tends to zero, the exact solutions reduce to known results for linear waves in compressible fluids. The possibility of extending the theory to rotating fluids and fluids with a shearing background

  10. Radio wave propagation in pulsar magnetospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrova, S. A.; Lyubarskii, Yu. E.

    Pulsar magnetospheres are known to contain an ultrarelativistic highly magnetized plasma which streams along the open magnetic lines. The radio emission observed from pulsars is believed to originate sufficiently deep in the open field line tube, so that the characteristics of outgoing waves can be influenced by propagation in the magnetospheric plasma. Refraction of radio waves in pulsar magnetospheres appears to be efficient. The effect not only influences the observed pulse width and its frequency dependency. It can alter the apparent spatial structure of pulsar emission region which can be derived from the observations of pulsar interstellar scintillations. Transverse ray separation versus pulse longitude calculated allowing for magnetospheric refraction appears to be in qualitative agreement with that observed. In particular, the nonmonotonic character of the curve can be attributed to nonmonotonic distribution of the plasma number density across the open field line tube which makes the rays emitted at different spatial locations deviate in the opposite directions. Proceeding from the frequency dependence of refraction some predictions are made about the frequency evolution of the apparent spatial structure of pulsar emission region. Magnetospheric refraction can also determine the profile shape giving rise to ray grouping into separate components. It will be demonstrated that the salient features of profile morphology can be explained within the frame of a primordial hollow-cone emission model taking into account refraction of rays in pulsar plasma. Then the frequency evolution of profile structure is naturally interpreted as a consequence of frequency dependence of refraction. As the waves propagate in the magnetospheric plasma their polarization also evolves essentially. In the vicinity of the emission region normal waves are linearly polarized and propagate independently, with the polarization plane following the orientation of the local magnetic field. As

  11. Surface wave propagation across the USArray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, A. E.; Ekstrom, G.; Hjorleifsdottir, V.

    2010-12-01

    We present Love and Rayleigh wave phase-velocity models at discrete periods between 25 and 100 s from the inversion of phase measurements. Phase measurements are made on an updated set of USArray TA data using a two-station method that has been corrected for the estimated wavefront arrival angle. Arrival angles are estimated using a “mini-array” method, which additionally calculates the local phase velocity for each event recorded in a mini array. By minimizing the misfit between observed and predicted phase within the mini array, we find the best-fit local phase velocity, which is then used to predict the phase in a grid search for apparent source locations. The trial sources have fixed epicentral distance but varied arrival angles with respect to the mini array, and the optimal apparent source corresponds to the arrival angle. Correcting the two-station method for the arrival angle produces small (around 1%) changes in phase velocity. In the inversion results, these changes are most significant along the Pacific coast at shorter periods, as a result of refraction at the ocean-continent transition. The local phase-velocity estimates are combined to make independent phase-velocity models for comparison with the inversion results. For Rayleigh waves at all periods, the two models have similar size, location, and strength of anomalies. Higher noise levels in Love wave data are apparent in both models; they show similar velocities and large anomalies, but smaller anomalies are below the noise levels at short periods. Still, the overall quality and quantity of data available allow us to investigate the errors associated with the two-station method, and the effect the duration and complexity of wave propagation has on these errors. We examine the consistency of wave propagation using the estimated arrival angles for multiple events recorded at the same stations. This is repeated with synthetic events, calculated using the spectral element method of Komatitsch and

  12. Observations of clustering inside oceanic bubble clouds and the effect on short-range acoustic propagation.

    PubMed

    Weber, Thomas C

    2008-11-01

    It has recently been shown [Weber, T. C. et al. (2007). "Acoustic propagation through clustered bubble clouds," IEEE J. Ocean. Eng. 32, 513-523] that gas bubble clustering plays a role in determining the acoustic field characteristics of bubbly fluids. In particular, it has been shown that clustering changes the bubble-induced attenuation as well as the ping-to-ping variability in the acoustic field. The degree to which bubble clustering exists in nature, however, is unknown. This paper describes a method for quantifying bubble clustering using a high frequency (400 kHz) multibeam sonar, and reports on observations of near-surface bubble clustering during a storm (14.6 m/s wind speed) in the Gulf of Maine. The multibeam sonar data are analyzed to estimate the pair correlation function, a measure of bubble clustering. In order to account for clustering in the mean acoustic field, a modification to the effective medium wave number is made. With this modification, the multibeam sonar observations are used to predict the effect of clustering on the attenuation of the mean field for short-range propagation (1 m) at frequencies between 10 and 350 kHz. Results for this specific case show that clustering can cause the attenuation to change by 20%-80% over this frequency range. PMID:19045766

  13. Acoustic Switches: Harnessing Deformation to Switch On and Off the Propagation of Sound (Adv. Mater. 8/2016).

    PubMed

    Babaee, Sahab; Viard, Nicolas; Wang, Pai; Fang, Nicholas X; Bertoldi, Katia

    2016-02-01

    Isosurfaces of sound waves traveling through an architected material proposed by K. Bertoldi and co-workers on page 1631 are depicted. The material comprises a square array of elastomeric helices in background air and acts as an on/off acoustic switch. It is characterized by frequency ranges of strong wave attenuation (bandgaps) in the undeformed configuration. Upon deformation, the initial bandgap is suppressed, enabling the propagation of sound over all frequencies. PMID:26891043

  14. A Variational Formulation for the Finite Element Analysis of Sound Wave Propagation in a Spherical Shell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lebiedzik, Catherine

    1995-01-01

    Development of design tools to furnish optimal acoustic environments for lightweight aircraft demands the ability to simulate the acoustic system on a workstation. In order to form an effective mathematical model of the phenomena at hand, we have begun by studying the propagation of acoustic waves inside closed spherical shells. Using a fully-coupled fluid-structure interaction model based upon variational principles, we have written a finite element analysis program and are in the process of examining several test cases. Future investigations are planned to increase model accuracy by incorporating non-linear and viscous effects.

  15. Elastic Wave Propagation and Generation in Seismology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lees, Jonathan M.

    The majority of mature seismologists of my generation were introduced to theoretical seismology via classic textbooks written in the early 1980s. Since this generation has matured and taken the mantle of teaching seismology to a new generation, several new books have been put forward as replacements, or alternatives, to the original classical texts. The target readers of the new texts range from beginner through intermediate to more advanced, although all have been attempts to improve upon what is now considered standard convention in quantitative seismology. To this plethora of choices we now have a new addition by Jose Pujol, titledElastic Wave Propagation and Generation in Seismology.

  16. Acoustic and Cavitation Fields of Shock Wave Therapy Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chitnis, Parag V.; Cleveland, Robin O.

    2006-05-01

    Extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) is considered a viable treatment modality for orthopedic ailments. Despite increasing clinical use, the mechanisms by which ESWT devices generate a therapeutic effect are not yet understood. The mechanistic differences in various devices and their efficacies might be dependent on their acoustic and cavitation outputs. We report acoustic and cavitation measurements of a number of different shock wave therapy devices. Two devices were electrohydraulic: one had a large reflector (HMT Ossatron) and the other was a hand-held source (HMT Evotron); the other device was a pneumatically driven device (EMS Swiss DolorClast Vet). Acoustic measurements were made using a fiber-optic probe hydrophone and a PVDF hydrophone. A dual passive cavitation detection system was used to monitor cavitation activity. Qualitative differences between these devices were also highlighted using a high-speed camera. We found that the Ossatron generated focused shock waves with a peak positive pressure around 40 MPa. The Evotron produced peak positive pressure around 20 MPa, however, its acoustic output appeared to be independent of the power setting of the device. The peak positive pressure from the DolorClast was about 5 MPa without a clear shock front. The DolorClast did not generate a focused acoustic field. Shadowgraph images show that the wave propagating from the DolorClast is planar and not focused in the vicinity of the hand-piece. All three devices produced measurable cavitation with a characteristic time (cavitation inception to bubble collapse) that varied between 95 and 209 μs for the Ossatron, between 59 and 283 μs for the Evotron, and between 195 and 431 μs for the DolorClast. The high-speed camera images show that the cavitation activity for the DolorClast is primarily restricted to the contact surface of the hand-piece. These data indicate that the devices studied here vary in acoustic and cavitation output, which may imply that the

  17. Model of propagation of acoustic pulses caused by underground nuclear explosion and theirs influence on the ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasnov, V.; Drobzheva, Y.

    2003-04-01

    To describe the propagation of an acoustic pulse through the inhomogeneity atmosphere we developed new equation and correspondent computer simulation code. The equation takes into account nonlinear effects, inhomogeneities of the atmosphere, absorption, expansion of a wave acoustic front, etc. The model includes subroutine of vertical movement of earth surface during an underground nuclear explosion (we use an empirical model), subroutine of acoustic pulse generation by a spall zone, subroutine of propagation of acoustic pulse up to the ionospheric height, subroutine of acoustic wave influence on the ionospheric plasma, subroutine of ionospheric perturbation influence on Doppler frequency of a radio wave. All calculations take into account geomagnetic field and neutral wind. The data measurement of acoustic pulses at heights of the ionosphere with helping Doppler radio sounding were used to test the model. We used data of Doppler shift records which were obtained during 9 underground nuclear explosion for 16 traces of radio sounding of the ionoshphere. Coefficients correlation between calculated and experimental forms is 0.7-0.94.

  18. Mesospheric hydroxyl airglow signatures of acoustic and gravity waves generated by transient tropospheric forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snively, J. B.

    2013-09-01

    Numerical model results demonstrate that acoustic waves generated by tropospheric sources may produce cylindrical "concentric ring" signatures in the mesospheric hydroxyl airglow layer. They may arrive as precursors to upward propagating gravity waves, generated simultaneously by the same sources, and produce strong temperature perturbations in the thermosphere above. Transient and short-lived, the acoustic wave airglow intensity and temperature signatures are predicted to be detectable by ground-based airglow imaging systems and may provide new insight into the forcing of the upper atmosphere from below.

  19. Investigation into stress wave propagation in metal foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lang; Xue, Pu; Chen, Yue

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate stress wave propagation in metal foams under high-speed impact loading. Three-dimensional Voronoi model is established to represent real closed-cell foam. Based on the one-dimensional stress wave theory and Voronoi model, a numerical model is developed to calculate the velocity of elastic wave and shock wave in metal foam. The effects of impact velocity and relative density of metal foam on the stress wave propagation in metal foams are explored respectively. The results show that both elastic wave and shock wave propagate faster in metal foams with larger relative density; with increasing the impact velocity, the shock wave propagation velocity increase, but the elastic wave propagation is not sensitive to the impact velocity.

  20. Planar and nonplanar ion acoustic shock waves in relativistic degenerate astrophysical electron-positron-ion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Ata-ur-Rahman,; Qamar, A.; Ali, S.; Mirza, Arshad M.

    2013-04-15

    We have studied the propagation of ion acoustic shock waves involving planar and non-planar geometries in an unmagnetized plasma, whose constituents are non-degenerate ultra-cold ions, relativistically degenerate electrons, and positrons. By using the reductive perturbation technique, Korteweg-deVries Burger and modified Korteweg-deVries Burger equations are derived. It is shown that only compressive shock waves can propagate in such a plasma system. The effects of geometry, the ion kinematic viscosity, and the positron concentration are examined on the ion acoustic shock potential and electric field profiles. It is found that the properties of ion acoustic shock waves in a non-planar geometry significantly differ from those in planar geometry. The present study has relevance to the dense plasmas, produced in laboratory (e.g., super-intense laser-dense matter experiments) and in dense astrophysical objects.

  1. Wave propagation in granular chains with local resonances.

    PubMed

    Bonanomi, Luca; Theocharis, Georgios; Daraio, Chiara

    2015-03-01

    We study wave propagation in a chain of spherical particles containing a local resonator. The resonant particles are made of an aluminum outer spherical shell and a steel inner mass connected by a polymeric plastic structure acting as a spring. We characterize the dynamic response of individual particles and the transmitted linear spectra of a chain of particles in contact. A wide band gap is observed both in theoretical and experimental results. We show the ability to tune the acoustic transmission by varying the contact interaction between particles. Higher driving amplitude leads to the generation of nonlinearities both in the response of a single particle and that of the whole chain. For a single resonant particle, we observe experimentally a resonant frequency downshift, which follows a complex nonlinear behavior. In the chain of particles, nonlinearity leads to the generation of nonlinear harmonics and the presence of localized modes inside the band gap. PMID:25871239

  2. Wave propagation in poroelastic hollow cylinder immersed in fluid with seismoelectric effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Wenyang; Cui, Zhiwen; Wang, Kexie

    2013-09-01

    Based on Pride theory, we studied the propagation of seismoelectric waves in a fluid-filled poroelastic hollow cylinder. We presented the expressions of seismoelectric waves in the poroelastic hollow cylinder, acoustic and electromagnetic field in inner and outer of the hollow cylinder, and we used the boundary condition to determine acoustic and electromagnetic field. Also this problem is accomplished by using the quasi-static method. The numerical simulation is operated on acoustic field and electromagnetic field in inner fluid of hollow poroelastic cylinder, and the transient waveform is obtained. It shows that there is no difference on the graph between the electric field obtained from Pride equations and that obtained from quasi-static method. The influence of hollow cylinder thickness, molarity and permeability on wave amplitude are discussed. The results show that for the acoustic field the amplitude of longitudinal mode and Stoneley wave will increase with hollow cylinder thickness increasing, and for the converted axial electric field the amplitude of Stoneley wave increases with hollow cylinder thickness increasing, while the amplitude of longitudinal mode will decrease. The amplitude of electric field in inner fluid will decrease with the molarity of fluid increasing. The amplitude of the fluid acoustic and electric field will decrease with the permeability increasing. The influence of impermeable outer surface on the amplitude of longitudinal wave is obviously much larger than that of Stoneley wave in the electric field.

  3. Wave propagation in a solar quiet region and the influence of the magnetic canopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kontogiannis, I.; Tsiropoula, G.; Tziotziou, K.

    2016-01-01

    Aims: We seek indications or evidence of transmission/conversion of magnetoacoustic waves at the magnetic canopy, as a result of its impact on the properties of the wave field of the photosphere and chromosphere. Methods: We use cross-wavelet analysis to measure phase differences between intensity and Doppler signal oscillations in the Hα, Ca ii h, and G-band. We use the height of the magnetic canopy to create appropriate masks to separate internetwork (IN) and magnetic canopy regions. We study wave propagation and differences between these two regions. Results: The magnetic canopy affects wave propagation by lowering the phase differences of progressive waves and allowing the propagation of waves with frequencies lower than the acoustic cut-off. We also find indications in the Doppler signals of Hα of a response to the acoustic waves at the IN, observed in the Ca ii h line. This response is affected by the presence of the magnetic canopy. Conclusions: Phase difference analysis indicates the existence of a complicated wave field in the quiet Sun, which is composed of a mixture of progressive and standing waves. There are clear imprints of mode conversion and transmission due to the interaction between the p-modes and small-scale magnetic fields of the network and internetwork.

  4. Coupling of an acoustic wave to shear motion due to viscous heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bin; Goree, J.

    2016-07-01

    Viscous heating due to shear motion in a plasma can result in the excitation of a longitudinal acoustic wave, if the shear motion is modulated in time. The coupling mechanism is a thermal effect: time-dependent shear motion causes viscous heating, which leads to a rarefaction that can couple into a longitudinal wave, such as an acoustic wave. This coupling mechanism is demonstrated in an electrostatic three-dimensional (3D) simulation of a dusty plasma, in which a localized shear flow is initiated as a pulse, resulting in a delayed outward propagation of a longitudinal acoustic wave. This coupling effect can be profound in plasmas that exhibit localized viscous heating, such as the dusty plasma we simulated using parameters typical of the PK-4 experiment. We expect that a similar phenomenon can occur with other kinds of plasma waves.

  5. Eulerian Simulation of Acoustic Waves Over Long Range in Realistic Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chitta, Subhashini; Steinhoff, John

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, we describe a new method for computation of long-range acoustics. The approach is a hybrid of near and far-field methods, and is unique in its Eulerian treatment of the far-field propagation. The near-field generated by any existing method to project an acoustic solution onto a spherical surface that surrounds a source. The acoustic field on this source surface is then extended to an arbitrarily large distance in an inhomogeneous far-field. This would normally require an Eulerian solution of the wave equation. However, conventional Eulerian methods have prohibitive grid requirements. This problem is overcome by using a new method, ``Wave Confinement'' (WC) that propagates wave-identifying phase fronts as nonlinear solitary waves that live on grid indefinitely. This involves modification of wave equation by the addition of a nonlinear term without changing the basic conservation properties of the equation. These solitary waves can then be used to ``carry'' the essential integrals of the acoustic wave. For example, arrival time, centroid position and other properties that are invariant as the wave passes a grid point. Because of this property the grid can be made as coarse as necessary, consistent with overall accuracy to resolve atmospheric/ground variations. This work is being funded by the U.S. Army under a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program (contract number: # W911W6-12-C-0036). The authors would like to thank Dr. Frank Caradonna and Dr. Ben W. Sim for this support.

  6. Propagation of gravity waves across the tropopause

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bense, Vera; Spichtinger, Peter

    2015-04-01

    The tropopause region is characterised by strong gradients in various atmospheric quantities that exhibit different properties in the troposphere compared to the stratosphere. The temperature lapse rate typically changes from negative to near-zero values resulting in a strong increase in stability. Accordingly, the buoyancy frequency often undergoes a jump at the tropopause. Analysis of radiosounding data also shows the existence of a strong inversion layer (tropopause inversion layer, TIL) characterised by a strong maximum in buoyancy frequency just above the tropopause, see e.g. Birner et al. (2002). Additionally, the magnitude of the vertical wind shear of the horizontal wind maximizes at the tropopause and the region also exhibits characteristical gradients of trace gases. Vertically propagating gravity waves can be excited in the troposphere by several mechanisms, e.g. by flow over topography (e.g. Durran, 1990), by jets and fronts (for a recent review: Plougonven and Zhang, 1990) or by convection (e.g. Clark et al., 1986). When these waves enter the tropopause region, their properties can be changed drastically by the changing stratification and strong wind shear. Within this work, the EULAG (Eulerian/semi-Lagrangian fluid solver, see e.g. Smolarkiewicz and Margolin, 1997) model is used to investigate the impact of the tropopause on vertically propagating gravity waves excited by flows over topography. The choice of topography (sine-shaped mountains, bell-shaped mountain) along with horizontal wind speed and tropospheric value of buoyancy frequency determine the spectrum of waves (horizontal and vertical wavelengths) that is excited in the tropsphere. In order to analyse how these spectra change for several topographies when a tropopause is present, we investigate different idealized cases in a two-dimensional domain. By varying the vertical profiles of buoyancy frequency (step-wise vs. continuos change, including TIL) and wind shear, the tropopause

  7. Optical coherence tomography detection of shear wave propagation in MCF7 cell modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razani, Marjan; Mariampillai, Adrian; Berndl, Elizabeth S. L.; Kiehl, Tim-Rasmus; Yang, Victor X. D.; Kolios, Michael C.

    2014-02-01

    In this work, we explored the potential of measuring shear wave propagation using Optical Coherence Elastography (OCE) in MCF7 cell modules (comprised of MCF7 cells and collagen) and based on a swept-source optical coherence tomography (OCT) system. Shear waves were generated using a piezoelectric transducer transmitting sine-wave bursts of 400 μs, synchronized with an OCT swept source wavelength sweep imaging system. Acoustic radiation force was applied to the MCF7 cell constructs. Differential OCT phase maps, measured with and without the acoustic radiation force, demonstrate microscopic displacement generated by shear wave propagation in these modules. The OCT phase maps are acquired with a swept-source OCT (SS-OCT) system. We also calculated the tissue mechanical properties based on the propagating shear waves in the MCF7 + collagen phantoms using the Acoustic Radiation Force (ARF) of an ultrasound transducer, and measured the shear wave speed with the OCT phase maps. This method lays the foundation for future studies of mechanical property measurements of breast cancer structures, with applications in the study of breast cancer pathologies.

  8. T-wave generation and propagation: a comparison between data and spectral element modeling.

    PubMed

    Jamet, Guillaume; Guennou, Claude; Guillon, Laurent; Mazoyer, Camille; Royer, Jean-Yves

    2013-10-01

    T-waves are underwater acoustic waves generated by earthquakes. Modeling of their generation and propagation is a challenging problem. Using a spectral element code-SPECFEM2D, this paper presents the first realistic simulations of T-waves taking into account major aspects of this phenomenon: The radiation pattern of the source, the propagation of seismic waves in the crust, the seismic to acoustic conversion on a non-planar seafloor, and the propagation of acoustic waves in the water column. The simulated signals are compared with data from the mid-Atlantic Ridge recorded by an array of hydrophones. The crust/water interface is defined by the seafloor bathymetry. Different combinations of water sound-speed profiles and sub-seafloor seismic velocities, and frequency content of the source are tested. The relative amplitudes, main arrival-times, and durations of simulated T-phases are in good agreement with the observed data; differences in the spectrograms and early arrivals are likely due to too simplistic source signals and environmental model. These examples demonstrate the abilities of the SPECFEM2D code for modeling earthquake generated T-waves. PMID:24116530

  9. Calibration of seismic wave propagation in Kuwait

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Awadhi, J; Endo, E; Fryall, F; Harris, D; Mayeda, K; Rodgers, A; Ruppert, S; Sweeney, J

    1999-07-23

    The Kuwait Institute of Scientific Research (KISR), the USGS and LLNL are collaborating to calibrate seismic wave propagation in Kuwait and surrounding regions of the northwest Arabian Gulf using data from the Kuwait National Seismic Network (KNSN). Our goals are to develop local and regional propagation models for locating and characterizing seismic events in Kuwait and portions of the Zagros mountains close to Kuwait. The KNSN consists of 7 short-period stations and one broadband (STS-2) station. Constraints on the local velocity structure may be derived from joint inversions for hypocenters of local events and the local velocity model, receiver functions from three-component observations of teleseisms, and surface wave phase velocity estimated from differential dispersion measurements made across the network aperture. Data are being collected to calibrate travel-time curves for the principal regional phases for events in the Zagros mountains. The available event observations span the distance range from approximately 2.5 degrees to almost 9 degrees. Additional constraints on structure across the deep sediments of the Arabian Gulf will be obtained from long-period waveform modeling.

  10. Wave propagation in random granular chains.

    PubMed

    Manjunath, Mohith; Awasthi, Amnaya P; Geubelle, Philippe H

    2012-03-01

    The influence of randomness on wave propagation in one-dimensional chains of spherical granular media is investigated. The interaction between the elastic spheres is modeled using the classical Hertzian contact law. Randomness is introduced in the discrete model using random distributions of particle mass, Young's modulus, or radius. Of particular interest in this study is the quantification of the attenuation in the amplitude of the impulse associated with various levels of randomness: two distinct regimes of decay are observed, characterized by an exponential or a power law, respectively. The responses are normalized to represent a vast array of material parameters and impact conditions. The virial theorem is applied to investigate the transfer from potential to kinetic energy components in the system for different levels of randomness. The level of attenuation in the two decay regimes is compared for the three different sources of randomness and it is found that randomness in radius leads to the maximum rate of decay in the exponential regime of wave propagation. PMID:22587093

  11. Mid-frequency acoustic propagation in shallow water on the New Jersey shelf: mean intensity.

    PubMed

    Tang, Dajun; Henyey, Frank S; Wang, Zhongkang; Williams, Kevin L; Rouseff, Daniel; Dahl, Peter H; Quijano, Jorge; Choi, Jee Woong

    2008-09-01

    Mid-frequency (1-10 kHz) sound propagation was measured at ranges 1-9 km in shallow water in order to investigate intensity statistics. Warm water near the bottom results in a sound speed minimum. Environmental measurements include sediment sound speed and water sound speed and density from a towed conductivity-temperature-depth chain. Ambient internal waves contribute to acoustic fluctuations. A simple model involving modes with random phases predicts the mean transmission loss to within a few dB. Quantitative ray theory fails due to near axial focusing. Fluctuations of the intensity field are dominated by water column variability. PMID:19045567

  12. Calibration of seismic wave propagation in Jordan

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Husien, A; Amrat, A; Harris, D; Mayeda, K; Nakanishi, K; Rodgers, A; Ruppert, S; Ryall, F; Skinnell, K; Yazjeen, T

    1999-07-23

    The Natural Resources Authority of Jordan (NRA), the USGS and LLNL have a collaborative project to improve the calibration of seismic propagation in Jordan and surrounding regions. This project serves common goals of CTBT calibration and earthquake hazard assessment in the region. These objectives include accurate location of local and regional earthquakes, calibration of magnitude scales, and the development of local and regional propagation models. In the CTBT context, better propagation models and more accurately located events in the Dead Sea rift region can serve as (potentially GT5) calibration events for generating IMS location corrections. The detection and collection of mining explosions underpins discrimination research. The principal activity of this project is the deployment of two broadband stations at Hittiyah (south Jordan) and Ruweishid (east Jordan). These stations provide additional paths in the region to constrain structure with surface wave and body wave tomography. The Ruweishid station is favorably placed to provide constraints on Arabian platform structure. Waveform modeling with long-period observations of larger earthquakes will provide constraints on 1-D velocity models of the crust and upper mantle. Data from these stations combined with phase observations from the 26 short-period stations of the Jordan National Seismic Network (JNSN) may allow the construction of a more detailed velocity model of Jordan. The Hittiyah station is an excellent source of ground truth information for the six phosphate mines of southern Jordan and Israel. Observations of mining explosions collected by this station have numerous uses: for definition of templates for screening mining explosions, as ground truth events for calibrating travel-time models, and as explosion populations in development and testing discriminants. Following previously established procedures for identifying explosions, we have identified more than 200 explosions from the first 85 days of

  13. Electron Acoustic Waves in Pure Ion Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderegg, F.; Affolter, M.; Driscoll, C. F.; O'Neil, T. M.; Valentini, F.

    2012-10-01

    Electron Acoustic Waves (EAWs) are the low-frequency branch of near-linear Langmuir (plasma) waves: the frequency is such that the complex dielectric function (Dr, Di) has Dr= 0; and ``flattening'' of f(v) near the wave phase velocity vph gives Di=0 and eliminates Landau damping. Here, we observe standing axisymmetric EAWs in a pure ion column.footnotetextF. Anderegg, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 095001 (2009). At low excitation amplitudes, the EAWs have vph˜1.4 v, in close agreement with near-linear theory. At moderate excitation strengths, EAW waves are observed over a range of frequencies, with 1.3 v < vph< 2.1 v. Here, the final wave frequency may differ from the excitation frequency since the excitation modifies f (v); and recent theory analyzes frequency shifts from ``corners'' of a plateau at vph.footnotetextF. Valentini et al., arXiv:1206.3500v1. Large amplitude EAWs have strong phase-locked harmonic content, and experiments will be compared to same-geometry simulations, and to simulations of KEENfootnotetextB. Afeyan et al., Proc. Inertial Fusion Sci. and Applications 2003, A.N.S. Monterey (2004), p. 213. waves in HEDLP geometries.

  14. Acoustic microfluidics: Capillary waves and vortex currents in a spherical fluid drop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedev-Stepanov, P. V.; Rudenko, O. V.

    2016-07-01

    We calculate the radiation forces in a spherical drop lying on a solid substrate. The forces form as a result of the action of a capillary wave on a fluid as it propagates along the free spherical surface. We study the structure of acoustic currents excited by the radiation forces.

  15. Observations of dust acoustic waves driven at high frequencies: Finite dust temperature effects and wave interference

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Edward Jr.; Fisher, Ross; Merlino, Robert L.

    2007-12-15

    An experiment has been performed to study the behavior of dust acoustic waves driven at high frequencies (f>100 Hz), extending the range of previous work. In this study, two previously unreported phenomena are observed--interference effects between naturally excited dust acoustic waves and driven dust acoustic waves, and the observation of finite dust temperature effects on the dispersion relation.

  16. Ultrafast high strain rate acoustic wave measurements at high static pressure in a diamond anvil cell

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, M; Crowhurst, J; Reed, E; Zaug, J

    2008-02-04

    We have used sub-picosecond laser pulses to launch ultra-high strain rate ({approx} 10{sup 9} s{sup -1}) nonlinear acoustic waves into a 4:1 methanol-ethanol pressure medium which has been precompressed in a standard diamond anvil cell. Using ultrafast interferometry, we have characterized acoustic wave propagation into the pressure medium at static compression up to 24 GPa. We find that the velocity is dependent on the incident laser fluence, demonstrating a nonlinear acoustic response which may result in shock wave behavior. We compare our results with low strain, low strain-rate acoustic data. This technique provides controlled access to regions of thermodynamic phase space that are otherwise difficult to obtain.

  17. Kink Wave Propagation in Thin Isothermal Magnetic Flux Tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopin, I. P.; Nagorny, I. G.; Nippolainen, E.

    2014-08-01

    We investigated the propagation of kink waves in thin and isothermal expanding flux tubes in cylindrical geometry. By using the method of radial expansion for fluctuating variables we obtained a new kink wave equation. We show that including the radial component of the tube magnetic field leads to cutoff-free propagation of kink waves along thin flux tubes.

  18. Propagation of high frequency jet noise using geometric acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khavaran, A.; Krejsa, E. A.

    1993-01-01

    Spherical directivity of noise radiated from a convecting quadrupole source embedded in an arbitrary spreading jet is obtained by ray-tracing methods of geometrical acoustics. The six propagation equations are solved in their general form in a rectangular coordinate system. The noise directivity in the far field is calculated by applying an iteration scheme that finds the required radiation angles at the source resulting in propagation through a given observer point. Factors influencing the zone of silence are investigated. The caustics of geometrical acoustics and the exact locations where it forms is demonstrated by studying the variation in ray tube area obtained from transport equation. For a ring source convecting along the center-axis of an axisymmetric jet, the polar directivity of the radiated noise is obtained by an integration with respect to azimuthal directivity of compact quadrupole sources distributed on the ring. The Doppler factor is shown to vary slightly from point to point on the ring. Finally the scaling of the directivity pattern with power -3 of Doppler factor is investigated and compared with experimental data.

  19. Propagation of Buoyancy Waves Through the Magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, R.; Schutza, A. M.; Toffoletto, F. R.

    2015-12-01

    THEMIS observations analyzed by E. V. Panov and collaborators have shown that, when an earthward-moving plasma-sheet flow burst encounters the quasi-dipolar region of the magnetosphere, the plasma that formed the burst often oscillates a few times before coming to rest. The observed oscillation periods seem in good agreement with the frequency calculated theoretically for a thin filament oscillating in the same region. However, since a thin filament is an extreme idealization of a real flow burst, we have investigated the relationship between thin-filament oscillations and the normal modes of a 2D plasma system that is analogous to the magnetosphere. We have developed an analytic model of the normal modes of an idealized plasma configuration that consists of a wedge with circular field lines. For that system, the low-frequency wave obeys a one-dimensional differential equation that is essentially the same as the equation describing buoyancy oscillations in the neutral atmosphere. An important term in the neutral-atmosphere equation is proportional to the square of ωb, which is called the "buoyancy frequency" or "Brunt-Väisälä frequency", and the corresponding quantity in the plasma equation is exactly the square of the fundamental oscillation frequency of a thin filament. In both cases, a buoyancy wave of frequency ω propagates in the region where ωb>ω, but is evanescent in the region where ωb<ω. A thin-filament code has been used to calculate the buoyancy frequency in different regions of the magnetosphere, as represented by a force-balanced configuration based on a Tsyganenko model. The results suggest that, if the braking of a bursty bulk flow produces an oscillation at the buoyancy frequency at about 10 RE, it may generate a buoyancy wave that can propagate earthward to the plasmapause.

  20. Superlensing effect for surface acoustic waves in a pillar-based phononic crystal with negative refractive index

    SciTech Connect

    Addouche, Mahmoud Al-Lethawe, Mohammed A. Choujaa, Abdelkrim Khelif, Abdelkrim

    2014-07-14

    We demonstrate super resolution imaging for surface acoustic waves using a phononic structure displaying negative refractive index. This phononic structure is made of a monolithic square lattice of cylindrical pillars standing on a semi-infinite medium. The pillars act as acoustic resonator and induce a surface propagating wave with unusual dispersion. We found, under specific geometrical parameters, one propagating mode that exhibits negative refraction effect with negative effective index close to −1. Furthermore, a flat lens with finite number of pillars is designed to allow the focusing of an acoustic point source into an image with a resolution of (λ)/3 , overcoming the Rayleigh diffraction limit.

  1. Modeling of acoustic emission signal propagation in waveguides.

    PubMed

    Zelenyak, Andreea-Manuela; Hamstad, Marvin A; Sause, Markus G R

    2015-01-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) testing is a widely used nondestructive testing (NDT) method to investigate material failure. When environmental conditions are harmful for the operation of the sensors, waveguides are typically mounted in between the inspected structure and the sensor. Such waveguides can be built from different materials or have different designs in accordance with the experimental needs. All these variations can cause changes in the acoustic emission signals in terms of modal conversion, additional attenuation or shift in frequency content. A finite element method (FEM) was used to model acoustic emission signal propagation in an aluminum plate with an attached waveguide and was validated against experimental data. The geometry of the waveguide is systematically changed by varying the radius and height to investigate the influence on the detected signals. Different waveguide materials were implemented and change of material properties as function of temperature were taken into account. Development of the option of modeling different waveguide options replaces the time consuming and expensive trial and error alternative of experiments. Thus, the aim of this research has important implications for those who use waveguides for AE testing. PMID:26007731

  2. Modeling of Acoustic Emission Signal Propagation in Waveguides

    PubMed Central

    Zelenyak, Andreea-Manuela; Hamstad, Marvin A.; Sause, Markus G. R.

    2015-01-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) testing is a widely used nondestructive testing (NDT) method to investigate material failure. When environmental conditions are harmful for the operation of the sensors, waveguides are typically mounted in between the inspected structure and the sensor. Such waveguides can be built from different materials or have different designs in accordance with the experimental needs. All these variations can cause changes in the acoustic emission signals in terms of modal conversion, additional attenuation or shift in frequency content. A finite element method (FEM) was used to model acoustic emission signal propagation in an aluminum plate with an attached waveguide and was validated against experimental data. The geometry of the waveguide is systematically changed by varying the radius and height to investigate the influence on the detected signals. Different waveguide materials were implemented and change of material properties as function of temperature were taken into account. Development of the option of modeling different waveguide options replaces the time consuming and expensive trial and error alternative of experiments. Thus, the aim of this research has important implications for those who use waveguides for AE testing. PMID:26007731

  3. Dual-mode acoustic wave biosensors microarrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auner, Gregory W.; Shreve, Gina; Ying, Hao; Newaz, Golam; Hughes, Chantelle; Xu, Jianzeng

    2003-04-01

    We have develop highly sensitive and selective acoustic wave biosensor arrays with signal analysis systems to provide a fingerprint for the real-time identification and quantification of a wide array of bacterial pathogens and environmental health hazards. We have developed an unique highly sensitive dual mode acoustic wave platform prototype that, when combined with phage based selective detection elements, form a durable bacteria sensor. Arrays of these new real-time biosensors are integrated to form a biosensor array on a chip. This research and development program optimizes advanced piezoelectric aluminum nitride wide bandgap semiconductors, novel micromachining processes, advanced device structures, selective phage displays development and immobilization techniques, and system integration and signal analysis technology to develop the biosensor arrays. The dual sensor platform can be programmed to sense in a gas, vapor or liquid environment by switching between acoustic wave resonate modes. Such a dual mode sensor has tremendous implications for applications involving monitoring of pathogenic microorganisms in the clinical setting due to their ability to detect airborne pathogens. This provides a number of applications including hospital settings such as intensive care or other in-patient wards for the reduction of nosocomial infections and maintenance of sterile environments in surgical suites. Monitoring for airborn pathogen transmission in public transportation areas such as airplanes may be useful for implementation of strategies for redution of airborn transmission routes. The ability to use the same sensor in the liquid sensing mode is important for tracing the source of airborn pathogens to local liquid sources. Sensing of pathogens in saliva will be useful for sensing oral pathogens and support of decision-making strategies regarding prevention of transmission and support of treatment strategies.

  4. Wave propagation in predator-prey systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Sheng-Chen; Tsai, Je-Chiang

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we study a class of predator-prey systems of reaction-diffusion type. Specifically, we are interested in the dynamical behaviour for the solution with the initial distribution where the prey species is at the level of the carrying capacity, and the density of the predator species has compact support, or exponentially small tails near x=+/- ∞ . Numerical evidence suggests that this will lead to the formation of a pair of diverging waves propagating outwards from the initial zone. Motivated by this phenomenon, we establish the existence of a family of travelling waves with the minimum speed. Unlike the previous studies, we do not use the shooting argument to show this. Instead, we apply an iteration process based on Berestycki et al 2005 (Math Comput. Modelling 50 1385-93) to construct a set of super/sub-solutions. Since the underlying system does not enjoy the comparison principle, such a set of super/sub-solutions is not based on travelling waves, and in fact the super/sub-solutions depend on each other. With the aid of the set of super/sub-solutions, we can construct the solution of the truncated problem on the finite interval, which, via the limiting argument, can in turn generate the wave solution. There are several advantages to this approach. First, it can remove the technical assumptions on the diffusivities of the species in the existing literature. Second, this approach is of PDE type, and hence it can shed some light on the spreading phenomenon indicated by numerical simulation. In fact, we can compute the spreading speed of the predator species for a class of biologically acceptable initial distributions. Third, this approach might be applied to the study of waves in non-cooperative systems (i.e. a system without a comparison principle).

  5. A particle-in-cell approach to obliquely propagating electrostatic waves

    SciTech Connect

    Koen, Etienne J.; Collier, Andrew B.; Maharaj, Shimul K.

    2014-09-15

    The electron-acoustic and beam-driven modes associated with electron beams have previously been identified and studied numerically. These modes are associated with Broadband Electrostatic Noise found in the Earth's auroral and polar cusp regions. Using a 1-D spatial Particle-in-Cell simulation, the electron-acoustic instability is studied for a magnetized plasma, which includes cool ions, cool electrons and a hot, drifting electron beam. Both the weakly and strongly magnetized regimes with varying wave propagation angle, θ, with respect to the magnetic field are studied. The amplitude and frequency of the electron-acoustic mode are found to decrease with increasing θ. The amplitude of the electron-acoustic mode is found to significantly grow at intermediate wavenumber ranges. It reaches a saturation level at the point, where a plateau forms in the hot electron velocity distribution after which the amplitude of the electron-acoustic mode decays.

  6. Interactions between two propagating waves in rat visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Gao, X; Xu, W; Wang, Z; Takagaki, K; Li, B; Wu, J-Y

    2012-08-01

    Sensory-evoked propagating waves are frequently observed in sensory cortex. However, it is largely unknown how an evoked propagating wave affects the activity evoked by subsequent sensory inputs, or how two propagating waves interact when evoked by simultaneous sensory inputs. Using voltage-sensitive dye imaging, we investigated the interactions between two evoked waves in rat visual cortex, and the spatiotemporal patterns of depolarization in the neuronal population due to wave-to-wave interactions. We have found that visually-evoked propagating waves have a refractory period of about 300 ms, within which the response to a subsequent visual stimulus is suppressed. Simultaneous presentation of two visual stimuli at different locations can evoke two waves propagating toward each other, and these two waves fuse. Fusion significantly shortens the latency and half-width of the response, leading to changes in the spatial profile of evoked population activity. The visually-evoked propagating wave may also be suppressed by a preceding spontaneous wave. The refractory period following a propagating wave and the fusion between two waves may contribute to visual sensory processing by modifying the spatiotemporal profile of population neuronal activity evoked by sensory events. PMID:22561730

  7. Nonextensive dust-acoustic solitary waves

    SciTech Connect

    Tribeche, M.; Merriche, A.

    2011-03-15

    The seminal paper of Mamun et al. [Phys. Plasmas 3, 702 (1996)] is revisited within the theoretical framework of the Tsallis statistical mechanics. The nonextensivity may originate from the correlation or long-range interactions in the dusty plasma. It is found that depending on whether the nonextensive parameter q is positive or negative, the dust-acoustic (DA) soliton exhibits compression for q<0 and rarefaction for q>0. The lower limit of the Mach number for the existence of DA solitary waves is greater (smaller) than its Maxwellian counterpart in the case of superextensivity (subextensivity).

  8. Simulation of dust-acoustic waves

    SciTech Connect

    Winske, D.; Murillo, M.S.; Rosenberg, M.

    1998-12-01

    The authors use molecular dynamics (MD) and particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation methods to investigate the dispersion relation of dust-acoustic waves in a one-dimensional, strongly coupled (Coulomb coupling parameter = {Lambda} = ratio of the Coulomb energy to the thermal energy = 120) dusty plasma. They study both cases where the dust is represented by a small number of simulation particles that form into a regular array structure (crystal limit) as well as where the dust is represented by a much larger number of particles (fluid limit).

  9. Propagation of sound waves in drill strings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drumheller, D. S.; Knudsen, S. D.

    1995-04-01

    Deep wells are commonly drilled while steering the drill bit. The steering process is completely controlled by the drilling-rig operator. A key element of this procedure is the measurement and communication of navigation information from the bottom of the well to the operator. Pressure pulses modulated onto the flow of the drill fluid are now employed in some cases to communicate this information. However, data rates are only a few binary bits per second with this method. This drastically limits the quantity of data available to the operator. As an alternative method, elastic waves generated within the steel drill string can be used as a carrier signal to transmit data. The drill string is commonly assembled from 10-m segments of threaded pipe and forms a periodic structure. The elastic wavelengths of interest are shorter than this periodic length. Consequently, these waves undergo significant dispersion. This paper presents new data for the propagation of elastic waves in a 2-km drill string. The influence of aperiodicity in the drill string, rotation of the drill string, and noise levels are studied in detail. The data verify a method for reducing the attenuation of a carrier signal by a factor of 2.

  10. One-way approximation for the simulation of weak shock wave propagation in atmospheric flows.

    PubMed

    Gallin, Louis-Jonardan; Rénier, Mathieu; Gaudard, Eric; Farges, Thomas; Marchiano, Régis; Coulouvrat, François

    2014-05-01

    A numerical scheme is developed to simulate the propagation of weak acoustic shock waves in the atmosphere with no absorption. It generalizes the method previously developed for a heterogeneous medium [Dagrau, Rénier, Marchiano, and Coulouvrat, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 130, 20-32 (2011)] to the case of a moving medium. It is based on an approximate scalar wave equation for potential, rewritten in a moving time frame, and separated into three parts: (i) the linear wave equation in a homogeneous and quiescent medium, (ii) the effects of atmospheric winds and of density and speed of sound heterogeneities, and (iii) nonlinearities. Each effect is then solved separately by an adapted method: angular spectrum for the wave equation, finite differences for the flow and heterogeneity corrections, and analytical method in time domain for nonlinearities. To keep a one-way formulation, only forward propagating waves are kept in the angular spectrum part, while a wide-angle parabolic approximation is performed on the correction terms. The numerical process is validated in the case of guided modal propagation with a shear flow. It is then applied to the case of blast wave propagation within a boundary layer flow over a flat and rigid ground. PMID:24815240

  11. Spin-electron acoustic waves: Linear and nonlinear regimes, and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreev, Pavel

    2015-11-01

    Considering the spin-up and spin-down electrons as two different fluids we find corresponding hydrodynamic and kinetic equations from the Pauli equation. We find different pressure the spin-up and spin-down electrons due to different concentrations of electrons in the magnetized electron gas. This difference leads to existence of new branches of linear longitudinal waves propagating with small damping. These waves are called the spin-electron acoustic waves (SEAWs) due to linear dispersion dependence at small wave vectors. We obtain two waves at oblique propagation and one wave at propagation parallel or perpendicular to the external magnetic field. Dispersion dependences of these waves are calculated. Contribution of the Coulomb exchange interaction is included in the model and spectrums. Area of existence of nonlinear SEAWs appearing as a spin-electron acoustic soliton is found for the regime of wave propagation parallel to the external magnetic field. It is obtained that the SEAWs lead to formation of the Cooper pairs. This application of our results to the superconductivity phenomenon reveals in a model of the high-temperature superconductivity with the transition temperatures up to 300 K.

  12. Modeling of Conversion of Seismic to Acoustic Waves at the Seafloor Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balanche, A.; Guennou, C.; Goslin, J.; Dziak, R.

    2007-12-01

    Hydroacoustic waves are generated at the seafloor interface, by conversion of seismic waves and travel in the water column within the SOFAR channel with little attenuation. Recording T-waves with widespread arrays of autonomous hydrophones moored in the SOFAR channel allows to detect and localize many small-magnitude earthquakes in oceanic areas. However, hydroacoustic data cannot be used straightforwardly in seismic interpretations. In particular, because the physics of the seismic to acoustic conversion and the acoustic propagation is not completely understood, no direct information on the event magnitudes, focal mechanisms and focal depths can be directly derived from the hydroacoustic signals. In order to overcome some of these limitations, we have developed a mechanical model of the conversion from seismic to acoustic waves at the seafloor interface. The modelling is achieved through major adaptations of the 2D- finite element code "FLUSOL", which was originally developed to model fluid to solid energy conversion. Velocity displacement module within fluids and solids are derived from the stress and pressure computed for each grid element. We are able to model successfully, over a 10 x 10 km-grid, the seismic to acoustic conversion of waves generated by a source in the crust. Our model shows that a source with a high S-wave content appear to be more efficient in producing T-waves than a simple explosive source that only generates P-waves. Future work include the modelling of the conversion by more realistic seafloor topographies. Finally, we will use the output of SOLFLU as input to standard long-range acoustic propagation codes made available by the marine acoustics community. The modelled T-waves generated by various source mechanisms (tectonic or magmatic) will then be compared with real data to validate our conversion model.

  13. Wave propagation in a dynamic system of soft granular materials.

    PubMed

    Harada, Shusaku; Takagi, Shu; Matsumoto, Yoichiro

    2003-06-01

    The wave propagation in a dynamic system of soft elastic granules is investigated theoretically and numerically. The perturbation theory for simple fluids is applied to the elastic granular system in order to relate the elastic properties of individual particles with the "thermodynamic" quantities of the system. The properties of a piston-driven shock are derived from the obtained thermodynamic relations and the Rankine-Hugoniot relations. The discrete particle simulation of a piston-driven shock wave in a granular system is performed by the discrete element method. From theoretical and numerical results, the effect of the elastic properties of a particle on shock properties is shown quantitatively. Owing to the finite duration of the interparticle contact, the compressibility factor of the elastic granular system decreases in comparison with that of the hard-sphere system. In addition, the relation between the internal energy and the granular temperature changes due to the energy preserved with the elastic deformation of the particle. Consequently, the shock properties in soft particles are considerably different from those in the hard-sphere system. We also show the theoretical prediction of the speed of sound in soft particles and discuss the effect of the elasticity on an acoustic wave. PMID:16241219

  14. Effect of direct bubble-bubble interactions on linear-wave propagation in bubbly liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuster, D.; Conoir, J. M.; Colonius, T.

    2014-12-01

    We study the influence of bubble-bubble interactions on the propagation of linear acoustic waves in bubbly liquids. Using the full model proposed by Fuster and Colonius [J. Fluid Mech. 688, 253 (2011), 10.1017/jfm.2011.380], numerical simulations reveal that direct bubble-bubble interactions have an appreciable effect for frequencies above the natural resonance frequency of the average size bubble. Based on the new results, a modification of the classical wave propagation theory is proposed. The results obtained are in good agreement with previously reported experimental data where the classical linear theory systematically overpredicts the effective attenuation and phase velocity.

  15. Oblique modulation of ion-acoustic waves and envelope solitons in electron-positron-ion plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Jehan, Nusrat; Salahuddin, M.; Mirza, Arshad M.

    2009-06-15

    The effect of oblique modulation on the amplitude dynamics of ion-acoustic wave propagating in a collisionless electron-positron-ion plasma is investigated. Using Krylov-Bogoliubov-Mitropolsky (KBM) perturbation method, a nonlinear Schroedinger (NLS) equation is derived which governs the evolution of obliquely modulated ion-acoustic envelope excitations. It is found that the presence of positron component significantly modifies the stability domains for small angles of propagation with the direction of modulation. The stationary solutions of NLS equation, i.e., bright and dark envelope solitons, become narrower as the concentration of positron component increases.

  16. An investigation into Voigt wave propagation for optical sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackay, Tom G.

    2013-09-01

    In the nonsingular case of optical propagation in a linear, homogeneous, anisotropic, dielectric material, two independent plane waves, with orthogonal polarizations and different phase speeds, can propagate in a given direction. However, in certain dissipative biaxial materials there are particular directions along which these two waves coalesce to form a single plane wave. This coalescent Voigt wave represents the singular case. Most conspicuously, the amplitude of Voigt waves are linearly dependent upon propagation direction. A porous nanostructured thin film which supports Voigt wave propagation was investigated, with a view to possible optical sensing applications. The directions along which Voigt waves propagate can be highly sensitive to the refractive index of a fluid which infiltrates this porous material. Indeed, in our theoretical studies sensitivities which compare favourably to those of surface-plasmon-polariton-based optical sensors were found.

  17. Analysis of an existing experiment on the interaction of acoustic waves with a laminar boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schopper, M. R.

    1982-01-01

    The hot-wire anemometer amplitude data contained in the 1977 report of P. J. Shapiro entitled, ""The Influence of Sound Upon Laminar Boundary'' were reevaluated. Because the low-Reynolds number boundary layer disturbance data were misinterpreted, an effort was made to improve the corresponding disturbance growth rate curves. The data are modeled as the sum of upstream and downstream propagating acoustic waves and a wave representing the Tollmien-Schlichting (TS) wave. The amplitude and phase velocity of the latter wave were then adjusted so that the total signal reasonably matched the amplitude and phase angle hot-wire data along the plate laminar boundary layer. The revised rates show growth occurring further upstream than Shapiro found. It appears that the premature growth is due to the adverse pressure gradient created by the shape of the plate. Basic elements of sound propagation in ducts and the experimental and theoretical acoustic-stability literature are reviewed.

  18. Mesospheric, Thermospheric, and Ionospheric Responses to Acoustic and Gravity Waves Generated by Transient Forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snively, J. B.; Zettergren, M. D.

    2014-12-01

    Strong acoustic waves with periods ~1-4 minutes have been confirmed to perturb the ionosphere following their generation by earthquakes [e.g., Garcia et al., GRL, 40(5), 2013] and volcanic eruption events [e.g., Heki, GRL, 33, L14303, 2006]. Clear acoustic and gravity wave signatures have also been reported in ionospheric data above strong tropospheric convection [Nishioka, GRL, 40(21), 2013], and prior modeling results suggest that convectively-generated acoustic waves with ~3-4 minute periods are readily detectable above their sources in TEC [Zettergren and Snively, GRL, 40(20), 2013]. These observations have provided quantitative insight into the coupling of processes occurring near Earth's surface with the upper atmosphere and ionosphere over short time-scales. Here, we investigate acoustic waves and short-period gravity waves generated by sources near ground level, and the observable responses of the mesosphere, lower-thermosphere, and ionosphere (MLTI) systems. Numerical simulations are performed using a nonlinear, compressible, atmospheric dynamics model, in cylindrically-axisymmetric coordinates, to investigate wave generation, upward propagation, steepening, and dissipation. Acoustic waves may produce observable signatures in the mesospheric hydroxyl airglow layer [e.g., Snively, GRL, 40(17), 2013], and can strongly perturb the lower-thermosphere and E- and F-region ionosphere, prior to the arrival of simultaneously-generated gravity waves. Using a coupled multi-fluid ionospheric model [Zettergren and Semeter, JGR, 117(A6), 2012], extended for mid and low latitudes using a 2D dipole magnetic field coordinate system [Zettergren and Snively, GRL, 40(20), 2013], we investigate its response to realistic acoustic wave perturbations. In particular, we demonstrate that the MLT and ionospheric responses are significantly and nonlinearly determined by the acoustic wave source geometry, spectrum, and amplitude, in addition to the local ambient state of the

  19. Dust-acoustic solitary waves in a magnetized opposite polarity dust-plasma medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamun, A. A.; Ferdousi, M.; Sultana, S.

    2015-08-01

    The basic features of obliquely propagating dust-acoustic (DA) solitary waves (SWs) in a three-component magnetized dusty plasma (containing inertial negatively as well as positively charged dust grains, and nonextensive ions) have been theoretically investigated. The reductive perturbation technique is employed in order to derive the Korteweg-de Vries (K-dV) equation. The stationary solitary wave solution of the K-dV equation, which describes the characteristics of SWs associated with ultra-low-frequency, long wavelength DA waves, is obtained and numerically analyzed. It is observed that the basic characteristics (polarity, amplitude, width, speed, etc) of the DA SWs are significantly modified by the effects of ion nonextensivity, external magnetic field, and angle between the directions of external magnetic field and wave propagation. The findings of this investigation may be used in understanding the wave propagation in space and laboratory plasmas in which dust of opposite polarity coexists.

  20. Wave theory of turbulence in compressible media (acoustic theory of turbulence)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kentzer, C. P.

    1975-01-01

    The generation and the transmission of sound in turbulent flows are treated as one of the several aspects of wave propagation in turbulence. Fluid fluctuations are decomposed into orthogonal Fourier components, with five interacting modes of wave propagation: two vorticity modes, one entropy mode, and two acoustic modes. Wave interactions, governed by the inhomogeneous and nonlinear terms of the perturbed Navier-Stokes equations, are modeled by random functions which give the rates of change of wave amplitudes equal to the averaged interaction terms. The statistical framework adopted is a quantum-like formulation in terms of complex distribution functions. The spatial probability distributions are given by the squares of the absolute values of the complex characteristic functions. This formulation results in nonlinear diffusion-type transport equations for the probability densities of the five modes of wave propagation.

  1. Regional Wave Propagation in Southeastern United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jemberie, A. L.; Langston, C. A.

    2003-12-01

    Broad band seismograms from the April 29, 2003, M4.6 Fort Payne, Alabama earthquake are analyzed to infer mechanisms of crustal wave propagation, crust and upper mantle velocity structure in southeastern United States, and source parameters of the event. In particular, we are interested in producing deterministic models of the distance attenuation of earthquake ground motions through computation of synthetic seismograms. The method first requires constraining the source parameters of an earthquake and then modeling the amplitude and times of broadband arrivals within the waveforms to infer appropriate layered earth models. A first look at seismograms recorded by stations outside the Mississippi Embayment (ME) show clear body phases such P, sP, Pnl, Sn and Lg. The ME signals are qualitatively different from others because they have longer durations and large surface waves. A straightforward interpretation of P wave arrival times shows a typical upper mantle velocity of 8.18 km/s. However, there is evidence of significantly higher P phase velocities at epicentral distances between 400 and 600km, that may be caused by a high velocity upper mantle anomaly; triplication of P-waves is seen in these seismograms. The arrival time differences between regional P and the depth phase sP at different stations are used to constrain the depth of the earthquake. The source depth lies between 9.5 km and 13km which is somewhat more shallow than the network location that was constrained to 15km depth. The Fort Payne earthquake is the largest earthquake to have occurred within the Eastern Tennessee Seismic Zone.

  2. Mode tomography using signals from the Long Range Ocean Acoustic Propagation EXperiment (LOAPEX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandrayadula, Tarun K.

    Ocean acoustic tomography uses acoustic signals to infer the environmental properties of the ocean. The procedure for tomography consists of low frequency acoustic transmissions at mid-water depths to receivers located at hundreds of kilometer ranges. The arrival times of the signal at the receiver are then inverted for the sound speed of the background environment. Using this principle, experiments such as the 2004 Long Range Ocean Acoustic Propagation EXperiment have used acoustic signals recorded across Vertical Line Arrays (VLAs) to infer the Sound Speed Profile (SSP) across depth. The acoustic signals across the VLAs can be represented in terms of orthonormal basis functions called modes. The lower modes of the basis set concentrated around mid-water propagate longer distances and can be inverted for mesoscale effects such as currents and eddies. In spite of these advantages, mode tomography has received less attention. One of the important reasons for this is that internal waves in the ocean cause significant amplitude and travel time fluctuations in the modes. The amplitude and travel time fluctuations cause errors in travel time estimates. The absence of a statistical model and the lack of signal processing techniques for internal wave effects have precluded the modes from being used in tomographic inversions. This thesis estimates a statistical model for modes affected by internal waves and then uses the estimated model to design appropriate signal processing methods to obtain tomographic observables for the low modes. In order to estimate a statistical model, this thesis uses both the LOAPEX signals and also numerical simulations. The statistical model describes the amplitude and phase coherence across different frequencies for modes at different ranges. The model suggests that Matched Subspace Detectors (MSDs) based on the amplitude statistics of the modes are the optimum detectors to make travel time estimates for modes up to 250 km. The mean of the

  3. Wave propagation in a random medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, R. W.; Harp, J. C.

    1969-01-01

    A simple technique is used to derive statistical characterizations of the perturbations imposed upon a wave (plane, spherical or beamed) propagating through a random medium. The method is essentially physical rather than mathematical, and is probably equivalent to the Rytov method. The limitations of the method are discussed in some detail; in general they are restrictive only for optical paths longer than a few hundred meters, and for paths at the lower microwave frequencies. Situations treated include arbitrary path geometries, finite transmitting and receiving apertures, and anisotropic media. Results include, in addition to the usual statistical quantities, time-lagged functions, mixed functions involving amplitude and phase fluctuations, angle-of-arrival covariances, frequency covariances, and other higher-order quantities.

  4. Wave Propagation in Expanding Cell Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utuje, Kazage J. Christophe; Banerjee, Shiladitya; Marchetti, M. Cristina

    2014-03-01

    The coordinated migration of groups of cells drives important biological processes, such as wound healing and morphogenesis. In this talk we present a minimal continuum model of an expanding cell monolayer coupling elastic deformations to myosin-based activity in the cells. The myosin-driven contractile activity is quantified by the chemical potential difference for the process of ATP hydrolysis by myosin motors. A new ingredient of the model is a feedback of the local strain rate of the monolayer on contractility that naturally yields a mechanism for viscoelasticity of the cellular medium. By combining analytics and numerics we show that this simple model reproduces qualitatively many experimental findings, including the build-up of contractile stresses at the center of the cell monolayer, and the existence of traveling mechanical waves that control spreading dynamics and stress propagation in the cell monolayer. KJCU and MCM were supported by the NSF through grants DMR-1004789 and DGE-1068780.

  5. Porous silicon bulk acoustic wave resonator with integrated transducer

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    We report that porous silicon acoustic Bragg reflectors and AlN-based transducers can be successfully combined and processed in a commercial solidly mounted resonator production line. The resulting device takes advantage of the unique acoustic properties of porous silicon in order to form a monolithically integrated bulk acoustic wave resonator. PMID:22776697

  6. The multipath propagation effect in gunshot acoustics and its impact on the design of sniper positioning systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, António L. L.; Holm, Sverre; Gudvangen, Sigmund; Otterlei, Ragnvald

    2013-06-01

    Counter sniper systems rely on the detection and parameter estimation of the shockwave and the muzzle blast in order to determine the sniper location. In real-world situations, these acoustical signals can be disturbed by natural phenomena like weather and climate conditions, multipath propagation effect, and background noise. While some of these issues have received some attention in recent publications with application to gunshot acoustics, the multipath propagation phenomenon whose effect can not be neglected, specially in urban environments, has not yet been discussed in details in the technical literature in the same context. Propagating sound waves can be reflected at the boundaries in the vicinity of sound sources or receivers, whenever there is a difference in acoustical impedance between the reflective material and the air. Therefore, the received signal can be composed of a direct-path signal plus N scaled delayed copies of that signal. This paper presents a discussion on the multipath propagation effect and its impact on the performance and reliability of sniper positioning systems. In our formulation, propagation models for both the shockwave and the muzzle blast are considered and analyzed. Conclusions following the theoretical analysis of the problem are fully supported by actual gunshots acoustical signatures.

  7. Small amplitude electron acoustic solitary waves in a magnetized superthermal plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devanandhan, S.; Singh, S. V.; Lakhina, G. S.; Bharuthram, R.

    2015-05-01

    The propagation of electron acoustic solitary waves in a magnetized plasma consisting of fluid cold electrons, electron beam and superthermal hot electrons (obeying kappa velocity distribution function) and ion is investigated in a small amplitude limit using reductive perturbation theory. The Korteweg-de-Vries-Zakharov-Kuznetsov (KdV-ZK) equation governing the dynamics of electron acoustic solitary waves is derived. The solution of the KdV-ZK equation predicts the existence of negative potential solitary structures. The new results are: (1) increase of either the beam speed or temperature of beam electrons tends to reduce both the amplitude and width of the electron acoustic solitons, (2) the inclusion of beam speed and temperature pushes the allowed Mach number regime upwards and (3) the soliton width maximizes at certain angle of propagation (αm) and then decreases for α >αm . In addition, increasing the superthermality of the hot electrons also results in reduction of soliton amplitude and width. For auroral plasma parameters observed by Viking, the obliquely propagating electron-acoustic solitary waves have electric field amplitudes in the range (7.8-45) mV/m and pulse widths (0.29-0.44) ms. The Fourier transform of these electron acoustic solitons would result in a broadband frequency spectra with peaks near 2.3-3.5 kHz, thus providing a possible explanation of the broadband electrostatic noise observed during the Burst a.

  8. Electron Acoustic Solitary Waves in Magnetized Quantum Plasma with Relativistic Degenerated Electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zhenni; Wu, Zhengwei; Li, Chunhua; Yang, Weihong

    2014-11-01

    A model for the nonlinear properties of obliquely propagating electron acoustic solitary waves in a two-electron populated relativistically quantum magnetized plasma is presented. By using the standard reductive perturbation technique, the Zakharov-Kuznetsov (ZK) equation is derived and this equation gives the solitary wave solution. It is observed that the relativistic effects, the ratio of the cold to hot electron unperturbed number density and the magnetic field normalized by electron cyclotron frequency significantly influence the solitary structures.

  9. A nonlinear acoustic metamaterial: Realization of a backwards-traveling second-harmonic sound wave.

    PubMed

    Quan, Li; Qian, Feng; Liu, Xiaozhou; Gong, Xiufen

    2016-06-01

    An ordinary waveguide with periodic vibration plates and side holes can realize an acoustic metamaterial that simultaneously possesses a negative bulk modulus and a negative mass density. The study is further extended to a nonlinear case and it is predicted that a backwards-traveling second-harmonic sound wave can be obtained through the nonlinear propagation of a sound wave in such a metamaterial. PMID:27369164

  10. A micromachined surface acoustic wave sensor for detecting inert gases

    SciTech Connect

    Ahuja, S.; Hersam, M.; Ross, C.; Chien, H.T.; Raptis, A.C.

    1996-12-31

    Surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensors must be specifically designed for each application because many variables directly affect the acoustic wave velocity. In the present work, the authors have designed, fabricated, and tested an SAW sensor for detection of metastable states of He. The sensor consists of two sets of micromachined interdigitated transducers (IDTs) and delay lines fabricated by photolithography on a single Y-cut LiNbO{sub 3} substrate oriented for Z-propagation of the SAWs. One set is used as a reference and the other set employs a delay line coated with a titanium-based thin film sensitive to electrical conductivity changes when exposed to metastable states of He. The reference sensor is used to obtain a true frequency translation in relation to a voltage controlled oscillator. An operating frequency of 109 MHz has been used, and the IDT finger width is 8 {micro}m. Variation in electrical conductivity of the thin film at the delay line due to exposure to He is detected as a frequency shift in the assembly, which is then used as a measure of the amount of metastable He exposed to the sensing film on the SAW delay line. A variation in the He pressure versus frequency shifts indicates the extent of the metastable He interaction.

  11. Experimental and numerical studies on standing surface acoustic wave microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Mao, Zhangming; Xie, Yuliang; Guo, Feng; Ren, Liqiang; Huang, Po-Hsun; Chen, Yuchao; Rufo, Joseph; Costanzo, Francesco; Huang, Tony Jun

    2016-02-01

    Standing surface acoustic waves (SSAW) are commonly used in microfluidics to manipulate cells and other micro/nano particles. However, except for a simple one-dimensional (1D) harmonic standing waves (HSW) model, a practical model that can predict particle behaviour in SSAW microfluidics is still lacking. Herein, we established a two-dimensional (2D) SSAW microfluidic model based on the basic theory in acoustophoresis and our previous modelling strategy to predict the acoustophoresis of microparticles in SSAW microfluidics. This 2D SSAW microfluidic model considers the effects of boundary vibrations, channel materials, and channel dimensions on the acoustic propagation; as an experimental validation, the acoustophoresis of microparticles under continuous flow through narrow channels made of PDMS and silicon was studied. The experimentally observed motion of the microparticles matched well with the numerical predictions, while the 1D HSW model failed to predict many of the experimental observations. Particularly, the 1D HSW model cannot account for particle aggregation on the sidewall in PDMS channels, which is well explained by our 2D SSAW microfluidic model. Our model can be used for device design and optimization in SSAW microfluidics. PMID:26698361

  12. Nonlinear ion-acoustic cnoidal waves in a dense relativistic degenerate magnetoplasma.

    PubMed

    El-Shamy, E F

    2015-03-01

    The complex pattern and propagation characteristics of nonlinear periodic ion-acoustic waves, namely, ion-acoustic cnoidal waves, in a dense relativistic degenerate magnetoplasma consisting of relativistic degenerate electrons and nondegenerate cold ions are investigated. By means of the reductive perturbation method and appropriate boundary conditions for nonlinear periodic waves, a nonlinear modified Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation is derived and its cnoidal wave is analyzed. The various solutions of nonlinear ion-acoustic cnoidal and solitary waves are presented numerically with the Sagdeev potential approach. The analytical solution and numerical simulation of nonlinear ion-acoustic cnoidal waves of the nonlinear modified KdV equation are studied. Clearly, it is found that the features (amplitude and width) of nonlinear ion-acoustic cnoidal waves are proportional to plasma number density, ion cyclotron frequency, and direction cosines. The numerical results are applied to high density astrophysical situations, such as in superdense white dwarfs. This research will be helpful in understanding the properties of compact astrophysical objects containing cold ions with relativistic degenerate electrons. PMID:25871222

  13. Obliquely propagating cnoidal waves in a magnetized dusty plasma with variable dust charge

    SciTech Connect

    Yadav, L. L.; Sayal, V. K.

    2009-11-15

    We have studied obliquely propagating dust-acoustic nonlinear periodic waves, namely, dust-acoustic cnoidal waves, in a magnetized dusty plasma consisting of electrons, ions, and dust grains with variable dust charge. Using reductive perturbation method and appropriate boundary conditions for nonlinear periodic waves, we have derived Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation for the plasma. It is found that the contribution to the dispersion due to the deviation from plasma approximation is dominant for small angles of obliqueness, while for large angles of obliqueness, the dispersion due to magnetic force becomes important. The cnoidal wave solution of the KdV equation is obtained. It is found that the frequency of the cnoidal wave depends on its amplitude. The effects of the magnetic field, the angle of obliqueness, the density of electrons, the dust-charge variation and the ion-temperature on the characteristics of the dust-acoustic cnoidal wave are also discussed. It is found that in the limiting case the cnoidal wave solution reduces to dust-acoustic soliton solution.

  14. Nonlinear interaction of kinetic Alfvén waves and ion acoustic waves in coronal loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Prachi; Yadav, Nitin; Sharma, R. P.

    2016-05-01

    Over the years, coronal heating has been the most fascinating question among the scientific community. In the present article, a heating mechanism has been proposed based on the wave-wave interaction. Under this wave-wave interaction, the high frequency kinetic Alfvén wave interacts with the low frequency ion acoustic wave. These waves are three dimensionally propagating and nonlinearly coupled through ponderomotive nonlinearity. A numerical code based on pseudo-spectral technique has been developed for solving these normalized dynamical equations. Localization of kinetic Alfvén wave field has been examined, and magnetic power spectrum has also been analyzed which shows the cascading of energy to higher wavenumbers, and this cascading has been found to have Kolmogorov scaling, i.e., k-5 /3 . A breakpoint appears after Kolmogorov scaling and next to this spectral break; a steeper scaling has been obtained. The presented nonlinear interaction for coronal loops plasmas is suggested to generate turbulent spectrum having Kolmogorov scaling in the inertial range and steepened scaling in the dissipation range. Since Kolmogorov turbulence is considered as the main source for coronal heating; therefore, the suggested mechanism will be a useful tool to understand the mystery of coronal loop heating through Kolmogorov turbulence and dissipation.

  15. Spin-wave propagation and transformation in a thermal gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obry, Björn; Vasyuchka, Vitaliy I.; Chumak, Andrii V.; Serga, Alexander A.; Hillebrands, Burkard

    2012-11-01

    The influence of a thermal gradient on the propagation properties of externally excited dipolar spin waves in a magnetic insulator waveguide is investigated. It is shown that spin waves propagating towards a colder region along the magnetization direction continuously reduce their wavelength. The wavelength increase of a wave propagating into a hotter region was utilized to realize its decomposition in the partial waveguide modes which are reflected at different locations. This influence of temperature on spin-wave properties is mainly caused by a change in the saturation magnetization and yields promising opportunities for the manipulation of spin waves in spin-caloritronic applications.

  16. Effect of Resolution on Propagating Detonation Wave

    SciTech Connect

    Menikoff, Ralph

    2014-07-10

    Simulations of the cylinder test are used to illustrate the effect of mesh resolution on a propagating detonation wave. For this study we use the xRage code with the SURF burn model for PBX 9501. The adaptive mesh capability of xRage is used to vary the resolution of the reaction zone. We focus on two key properties: the detonation speed and the cylinder wall velocity. The latter is related to the release isentrope behind the detonation wave. As the reaction zone is refined (2 to 15 cells for cell size of 62 to 8μm), both the detonation speed and final wall velocity change by a small amount; less than 1 per cent. The detonation speed decreases with coarser resolution. Even when the reaction zone is grossly under-resolved (cell size twice the reaction-zone width of the burn model) the wall velocity is within a per cent and the detonation speed is low by only 2 per cent.

  17. The effect of buildings on acoustic pulse propagation in an urban environment.

    PubMed

    Albert, Donald G; Liu, Lanbo

    2010-03-01

    Experimental measurements were conducted using acoustic pulse sources in a full-scale artificial village to investigate the reverberation, scattering, and diffraction produced as acoustic waves interact with buildings. These measurements show that a simple acoustic source pulse is transformed into a complex signature when propagating through this environment, and that diffraction acts as a low-pass filter on the acoustic pulse. Sensors located in non-line-of-sight (NLOS) positions usually recorded lower positive pressure maxima than sensors in line-of-sight positions. Often, the first arrival on a NLOS sensor located around a corner was not the largest arrival, as later reflection arrivals that traveled longer distances without diffraction had higher amplitudes. The waveforms are of such complexity that human listeners have difficulty identifying replays of the signatures generated by a single pulse, and the usual methods of source location based on the direction of arrivals may fail in many cases. Theoretical calculations were performed using a two-dimensional finite difference time domain (FDTD) method and compared to the measurements. The predicted peak positive pressure agreed well with the measured amplitudes for all but two sensor locations directly behind buildings, where the omission of rooftop ray paths caused the discrepancy. The FDTD method also produced good agreement with many of the measured waveform characteristics. PMID:20329833

  18. ANALYTICAL SOLUTION FOR WAVES IN PLANETS WITH ATMOSPHERIC SUPERROTATION. I. ACOUSTIC AND INERTIA-GRAVITY WAVES

    SciTech Connect

    Peralta, J.; López-Valverde, M. A.; Imamura, T.; Read, P. L.; Luz, D.; Piccialli, A.

    2014-07-01

    This paper is the first of a two-part study devoted to developing tools for a systematic classification of the wide variety of atmospheric waves expected on slowly rotating planets with atmospheric superrotation. Starting with the primitive equations for a cyclostrophic regime, we have deduced the analytical solution for the possible waves, simultaneously including the effect of the metric terms for the centrifugal force and the meridional shear of the background wind. In those cases when the conditions for the method of the multiple scales in height are met, these wave solutions are also valid when vertical shear of the background wind is present. A total of six types of waves have been found and their properties were characterized in terms of the corresponding dispersion relations and wave structures. In this first part, only waves that are direct solutions of the generic dispersion relation are studied—acoustic and inertia-gravity waves. Concerning inertia-gravity waves, we found that in the cases of short horizontal wavelengths, null background wind, or propagation in the equatorial region, only pure gravity waves are possible, while for the limit of large horizontal wavelengths and/or null static stability, the waves are inertial. The correspondence between classical atmospheric approximations and wave filtering has been examined too, and we carried out a classification of the mesoscale waves found in the clouds of Venus at different vertical levels of its atmosphere. Finally, the classification of waves in exoplanets is discussed and we provide a list of possible candidates with cyclostrophic regimes.

  19. Acoustic waves generated by a laser point source in an isotropic cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Yongdong; Rossignol, Clément; Audoin, Bertrand

    2004-08-01

    The acoustic field of a homogeneous and isotropic cylinder generated by a laser point source in either ablation or thermoelastic regime is obtained theoretically. A three-dimensional Fourier transform is used to calculate the acoustic displacement at the cylinder surface. Experimental waveforms were measured and analyzed for both regimes. Theoretical normal displacements under either regime are calculated and compared to the experimental signals for aluminum cylinders. Very good agreements are observed in the arrival time, shape, and relative amplitude (i) of the cylindrical Rayleigh waves with different round trips, and (ii) of the various longitudinal and transverse bulk waves propagating through the cylinder or reflected at the free circular surface.

  20. Coherent reflection from surface gravity water waves during reciprocal acoustic transmissions.

    PubMed

    Badiey, Mohsen; Song, Aijun; Smith, Kevin B

    2012-10-01

    During a recent experiment in Kauai, Hawaii, reciprocal transmissions were conducted between two acoustic transceivers mounted on the seafloor at a depth of 100 m. The passage of moving surface wave crests was shown to generate focused and intense coherent acoustic returns, which had increasing or decreasing delay depending on the direction of propagation relative to the direction of surface wave crests. It is shown that a rough surface two-dimensional parabolic equation model with an evolving sea surface can produce qualitative agreement with data for the dynamic surface returns. PMID:23039567