Science.gov

Sample records for acoustic wave velocities

  1. Estimating propagation velocity through a surface acoustic wave sensor

    DOEpatents

    Xu, Wenyuan; Huizinga, John S.

    2010-03-16

    Techniques are described for estimating the propagation velocity through a surface acoustic wave sensor. In particular, techniques which measure and exploit a proper segment of phase frequency response of the surface acoustic wave sensor are described for use as a basis of bacterial detection by the sensor. As described, use of velocity estimation based on a proper segment of phase frequency response has advantages over conventional techniques that use phase shift as the basis for detection.

  2. Flow velocity measurement with the nonlinear acoustic wave scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Didenkulov, Igor; Pronchatov-Rubtsov, Nikolay

    2015-10-28

    A problem of noninvasive measurement of liquid flow velocity arises in many practical applications. To this end the most often approach is the use of the linear Doppler technique. The Doppler frequency shift of signal scattered from the inhomogeneities distributed in a liquid relatively to the emitted frequency is proportional to the sound frequency and velocities of inhomogeneities. In the case of very slow flow one needs to use very high frequency sound. This approach fails in media with strong sound attenuation because acoustic wave attenuation increases with frequency and there is limit in increasing sound intensity, i.e. the cavitation threshold. Another approach which is considered in this paper is based on the method using the difference frequency Doppler Effect for flows with bubbles. This method is based on simultaneous action of two high-frequency primary acoustic waves with closed frequencies on bubbles and registration of the scattered by bubbles acoustic field at the difference frequency. The use of this method is interesting since the scattered difference frequency wave has much lower attenuation in a liquid. The theoretical consideration of the method is given in the paper. The experimental examples confirming the theoretical equations, as well as the ability of the method to be applied in medical diagnostics and in technical applications on measurement of flow velocities in liquids with strong sound attenuation is described. It is shown that the Doppler spectrum form depends on bubble concentration velocity distribution in the primary acoustic beams crossing zone that allows one to measure the flow velocity distribution.

  3. Diffraction correction for precision surface acoustic wave velocity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz M., Alberto; Nagy, Peter B.

    2002-09-01

    Surface wave dispersion measurements can be used to nondestructively characterize shot-peened, laser shock-peened, burnished, and otherwise surface-treated specimens. In recent years, there have been numerous efforts to separate the contribution of surface roughness from those of near-surface material variations, such as residual stress, texture, and increased dislocation density. As the accuracy of the dispersion measurements was gradually increased using state-of-the-art laser-ultrasonic scanning and sophisticated digital signal processing methods, it was recognized that a perceivable dispersive effect, similar to the one found on rough shot-peened specimens, is exhibited by untreated smooth surfaces as well. This dispersion effect is on the order of 0.1%, that is significantly higher than the experimental error associated with the measurements and comparable to the expected velocity change produced by near-surface compressive residual stresses in metals below their yield point. This paper demonstrates that the cause of this apparent dispersion is the diffraction of the surface acoustic wave (SAW) as it travels over the surface of the specimen. The results suggest that a diffraction correction may be introduced to increase the accuracy of surface wave dispersion measurements. A simple diffraction correction model was developed for surface waves and this correction was subsequently validated by laser-interferometric velocity measurements on aluminum specimens. copyright 2002 Acoustical Society of America.

  4. Simultaneous realization of negative group velocity, fast and slow acoustic waves in a metamaterial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiao-juan; Xue, Cheng; Fan, Li; Zhang, Shu-yi; Chen, Zhe; Ding, Jin; Zhang, Hui

    2016-06-01

    An acoustic metamaterial is designed based on a simple and compact structure of one string of side pipes arranged along a waveguide, in which diverse group velocities are achieved. Owing to Fabry-Perot resonance of the side pipes, a negative phase time is achieved, and thus, acoustic waves transmitting with negative group velocities are produced near the resonant frequency. In addition, both fast and slow acoustic waves are also observed in the vicinity of the resonance frequency. The extraordinary group velocities can be explained based on spectral rephasing induced by anomalous dispersion on the analogy of Lorentz dispersion in electromagnetic waves.

  5. Acoustic wave velocity behavior for some Jurassic carbonate samples, north Sinai, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Sayed, Nahla A.; Abuseda, Hesham; Kassab, Mohamed A.

    2015-11-01

    Seismic data of reservoir rocks use for understand of risk reduction. Acoustic laboratory measurements have been carried out for 75 carbonate rock samples for both dry and fully saturated collected from Jurassic deposits exposed in the north Sinai at Gebel El-Maghara. This study has been carried out to know more about the behavior of compression wave velocity and shear wave velocity in carbonate rock samples for both dry and fully saturated conditions and to investigate the effect of porosity, permeability and density on both dry and fully saturated acoustic velocities. The compressional wave velocities at dry and fully saturated carbonate rock samples increased with increasing the bulk density and decreasing the porosity, while the porosity decreasing with increasing bulk density, the relationships between the porosity as well as shear wave velocity in dry and fully saturated are in cloud points, with no clear relationships. The relationships between the permeability and both the compressional wave and the shear wave velocities at dry and fully saturated cases could not be identified. The statistical analyses indicate that the compressional wave in the fully saturated is higher than the compressional wave in dry case. The compressional wave velocity of the fully saturated carbonate rock samples were strongly correlated with the compressional wave velocity of the dry rock samples and the derived equation can be used for prediction of the compressional wave velocity of fully saturated rock from the compressional wave velocity of dry rock. The shear wave of the fully saturated carbonate rock samples is a fair correlated with the shear wave of the dry rock samples.

  6. Reflection and transmission of acoustical waves from a layer with space-dependent velocity.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinmetz, G. G.; Singh, J. J.

    1972-01-01

    The refraction of acoustical waves by a moving medium layer is theoretically treated and the reflection and transmission coefficients are determined. The moving-medium-layer velocity is uniform but with a space dependence in one direction. A partitioning of the moving medium layer into constant-velocity sublayers is introduced and numerical results for a three-sublayer approximation of Poiseuille flow are presented. The degenerate case of a single constant-velocity layer is also treated theoretically and numerically. The numerical results show the reflection and transmission coefficients as functions of the peak moving-medium-layer normalized velocity for several angles of incidence.

  7. Laser photoacoustic technique for ultrasonic surface acoustic wave velocity evaluation on porcelain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, K.; Tu, S. J.; Gao, L.; Xu, J.; Li, S. D.; Yu, W. C.; Liao, H. H.

    2016-10-01

    A laser photoacoustic technique has been developed to evaluate the surface acoustic wave (SAW) velocity of porcelain. A Q-switched Nd:YAG laser at 1064 nm was focused by a cylindrical lens to initiate broadband SAW impulses, which were detected by an optical fiber interferometer with high spatial resolution. Multiple near-field surface acoustic waves were observed on the sample surface at various locations along the axis perpendicular to the laser line source as the detector moved away from the source in the same increments. The frequency spectrum and dispersion curves were obtained by operating on the recorded waveforms with cross-correlation and FFT. The SAW phase velocities of the porcelain of the same source are similar while they are different from those of different sources. The marked differences of Rayleigh phase velocities in our experiment suggest that this technique has the potential for porcelain identification.

  8. Texture in steel plates revealed by laser ultrasonic surface acoustic waves velocity dispersion analysis.

    PubMed

    Yin, Anmin; Wang, Xiaochen; Glorieux, Christ; Yang, Quan; Dong, Feng; He, Fei; Wang, Yanlong; Sermeus, Jan; Van der Donck, Tom; Shu, Xuedao

    2017-02-24

    A photoacoustic, laser ultrasonics based approach in an Impulsive Stimulated Scattering (ISS) implementation was used to investigate the texture in polycrystalline metal plates. The angular dependence of the 'polycrystalline' surface acoustic wave (SAW) velocity measured along regions containing many grains was experimentally determined and compared with simulated results that were based on the angular dependence of the 'single grain' SAW velocity within single grains and the grain orientation distribution. The polycrystalline SAW velocities turn out to vary with texture. The SAW velocities and their angular variations for {110} texture were found to be larger than that the ones for {111} texture or the strong γ fiber texture. The SAW velocities for {001} texture were larger than for {111} texture, but with almost the same angular dependence. The results infer the feasibility to apply angular SAW angular dispersion measurements by laser ultrasonics for on-line texture monitoring.

  9. Measurement of surface acoustic wave velocity using a variable-line-focus polyurea thin-film ultrasonic transducer.

    PubMed

    Aoyagi, Takahiro; Nakazawa, Marie; Tabaru, Masaya; Nakamura, Kentaro; Ueha, Sadayuki

    2009-08-01

    This paper presents the novel measurement method of the surface acoustic wave velocity by the variable-line- focus transducer using a polyurea piezoelectric ultrasonic transducer. First, a multiresonant polyurea thin-film ultrasonic transducer is fabricated by the vapor deposition polymerization process using 2 monomers. Second, the measurement system of surface acoustic wave velocity modified from the V(z) curve method is established. The system uses the fabricated polyurea thin film as a variable-line-focus transducer at the 30-MHz resonance frequency. The focal length is changed by varying the radius of curvature of the film transducer. To estimate the surface acoustic wave velocities from the measured data theoretically, the photographs of the transducer bent shapes are taken by using a digital microscope, and the bent transducer curvature is modeled by the 7th-order polynomial. To examine the performances of the variable-line-focus transducer, the surface acoustic wave velocities of an aluminum and a synthesized silica glass specimen have been measured. The measured surface acoustic velocities showed good agreement with the reference values.

  10. Surface acoustic wave velocity of gold films deposited on silicon substrates at different temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Salas, E.; Jimenez Rioboo, R. J.; Prieto, C.; Every, A. G.

    2011-07-15

    Au thin films have been deposited by DC magnetron sputtering on Si (001) substrates at different substrate temperatures, ranging from 200 K to 450 K. With increasing temperature, the expected crystallinity and morphology of the Au thin film are clearly improved, as shown by x ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy experiments. Parallel to this, the surface acoustic wave propagation velocity shows a clear enhancement toward the ideal values obtained from numerical simulations of a Au thin film on Si (001) substrate. Moreover, a very thin and slightly rough interlayer between the Si (001) substrate and the Au thin film is developed for temperatures above 350 K. The composition and nature of this interlayer is not known. This interlayer may be responsible for the steep change in the structural and elastic properties of the Au thin films at the higher temperatures and possibly also for an improvement of the adhesion properties of the Au on the Si (001) substrate.

  11. Measurements of acoustic particle velocity in a coaxial duct and its application to a traveling-wave thermoacoustic heat engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morii, Jun; Biwa, Tetsushi; Yazaki, Taichi

    2014-09-01

    We present theoretical solutions, based on linear acoustic theory, for axial acoustic particle velocity in an annular region of a coaxial duct. The solutions are expressed in terms of two non-dimensional parameters h/δν and R; h and δν, respectively, represent the half of the spacing between two concentric ducts and the characteristic length given by kinematic viscosity of the gas and angular frequency of acoustic oscillations, and R is the radius ratio of the ducts. The validity of the solutions was verified by direct measurements using a laser Doppler velocimeter. The present results are applied to measurements of the acoustic power distribution in a traveling wave thermoacoustic engine with a coaxial duct, which provides experimental evidence for acoustic power feedback in the coaxial duct.

  12. Measurements of acoustic particle velocity in a coaxial duct and its application to a traveling-wave thermoacoustic heat engine.

    PubMed

    Morii, Jun; Biwa, Tetsushi; Yazaki, Taichi

    2014-09-01

    We present theoretical solutions, based on linear acoustic theory, for axial acoustic particle velocity in an annular region of a coaxial duct. The solutions are expressed in terms of two non-dimensional parameters h/δ(ν) and R; h and δ(ν), respectively, represent the half of the spacing between two concentric ducts and the characteristic length given by kinematic viscosity of the gas and angular frequency of acoustic oscillations, and R is the radius ratio of the ducts. The validity of the solutions was verified by direct measurements using a laser Doppler velocimeter. The present results are applied to measurements of the acoustic power distribution in a traveling wave thermoacoustic engine with a coaxial duct, which provides experimental evidence for acoustic power feedback in the coaxial duct.

  13. Reliability of Phase Velocity Measurements of Flexural Acoustic Waves in the Human Tibia In-Vivo

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Axial-transmission acoustics have shown to be a promising technique to measure individual bone properties and detect bone pathologies. With the ultimate goal being the in-vivo application of such systems, quantification of the key aspects governing the reliability is crucial to bring this method towards clinical use. Materials and Methods This work presents a systematic reliability study quantifying the sources of variability and their magnitudes of in-vivo measurements using axial-transmission acoustics. 42 healthy subjects were measured by an experienced operator twice per week, over a four-month period, resulting in over 150000 wave measurements. In a complementary study to assess the influence of different operators performing the measurements, 10 novice operators were trained, and each measured 5 subjects on a single occasion, using the same measurement protocol as in the first part of the study. Results The estimated standard error for the measurement protocol used to collect the study data was ∼ 17 m/s (∼ 4% of the grand mean) and the index of dependability, as a measure of reliability, was Φ = 0.81. It was shown that the method is suitable for multi-operator use and that the reliability can be improved efficiently by additional measurements with device repositioning, while additional measurements without repositioning cannot improve the reliability substantially. Phase velocity values were found to be significantly higher in males than in females (p < 10−5) and an intra-class correlation coefficient of r = 0.70 was found between the legs of each subject. Conclusions The high reliability of this non-invasive approach and its intrinsic sensitivity to mechanical properties opens perspectives for the rapid and inexpensive clinical assessment of bone pathologies, as well as for monitoring programmes without any radiation exposure for the patient. PMID:27015093

  14. Shear wave velocity and attenuation in the upper layer of ocean bottoms from long-range acoustic field measurements.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ji-Xun; Zhang, Xue-Zhen

    2012-12-01

    Several physics-based seabed geoacoustic models (including the Biot theory) predict that compressional wave attenuation α(2) in sandy marine sediments approximately follows quadratic frequency dependence at low frequencies, i.e., α(2)≈kf(n) (dB/m), n=2. A recent paper on broadband geoacoustic inversions from low frequency (LF) field measurements, made at 20 locations around the world, has indicated that the frequency exponent of the effective sound attenuation n≈1.80 in a frequency band of 50-1000 Hz [Zhou et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 125, 2847-2866 (2009)]. Carey and Pierce hypothesize that the discrepancy is due to the inversion models' neglect of shear wave effects [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 124, EL271-EL277 (2008)]. The broadband geoacoustic inversions assume that the seabottom is an equivalent fluid and sound waves interact with the bottom at small grazing angles. The shear wave velocity and attenuation in the upper layer of ocean bottoms are estimated from the LF field-inverted effective bottom attenuations using a near-grazing bottom reflection expression for the equivalent fluid model, derived by Zhang and Tindle [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 98, 3391-3396 (1995)]. The resultant shear wave velocity and attenuation are consistent with the SAX99 measurement at 25 Hz and 1000 Hz. The results are helpful for the analysis of shear wave effects on long-range sound propagation in shallow water.

  15. The Velocity and Attenuation of Acoustic Emission Waves in SiC/SiC Composites Loaded in Tension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morscher, Gregory N.; Gyekenyesi, Andrew L.; Gray, Hugh R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The behavior of acoustic waves produced by microfracture events and from pencil lead breaks was studied for two different silicon carbide fiber-reinforced silicon carbide matrix composites. The two composite systems both consisted of Hi-Nicalon (trademark) fibers and carbon interfaces but had different matrix compositions that led to considerable differences in damage accumulation and acoustic response. This behavior was primarily due to an order of magnitude difference in the interfacial shear stress for the two composite systems. Load/unload/reload tensile tests were performed and measurements were made over the entire stress range in order to determine the stress-dependence of acoustic activity for increasing damage states. It was found that using the extensional wave velocities from acoustic emission (AE) events produced from pencil lead breaks performed outside of the transducers enabled accurate measurements of the stiffness of the composite. The extensional wave velocities changed as a function of the damage state and the stress where the measurement was taken. Attenuation for AE waveforms from the pencil lead breaks occurred only for the composite possessing the lower interfacial shear stress and only at significantly high stresses. At zero stress after unloading from a peak stress, no attenuation occurred for this composite because of crack closure. For the high interfacial stress composite no attenuation was discernable at peak or zero stress over the entire stress-range of the composite. From these observations, it is believed that attenuation of AE waveforms is dependent on the magnitude of matrix crack opening.

  16. AWESoMe: A code for the calculation of phase and group velocities of acoustic waves in homogeneous solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz-Santiburcio, Daniel; Hernández-Laguna, Alfonso; Soto, Juan I.

    2015-07-01

    We present AWESoMe, an implementation of a method for the evaluation of acoustic wave velocities in homogeneous solid media. The code computes the phase and group velocities for all the possible propagation directions, as well as some related parameters such as the polarization vectors, the power flow angle and the enhancement factor. The code is conveniently interfaced with GNUPLOT, thus offering immediate visualization of the results. AWESoMe is open-source software, available under the GNU General Public License v3.

  17. Acoustic wave velocities in two-dimensional composite structures based on acousto-optical crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mal'neva, P. V.; Trushin, A. S.

    2015-04-01

    Sound velocities in two-dimensional composite structures based on isotropic and anisotropic acousto-optical crystals have been determined by numerical simulations. The isotropic materials are represented by fused quartz (SiO2) and flint glass, while anisotropic materials include tetragonal crystals of paratellurite (TeO2) and rutile (TiO2) and a trigonal crystal of tellurium (Te). It is established that the acoustic anisotropy of periodic composite structures strongly depends on both the chemical composition and geometric parameters of components.

  18. Acoustic velocity meter systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Laenen, Antonius

    1985-01-01

    Acoustic velocity meter (AVM) systems operate on the principles that the point-to-point upstream traveltime of an acoustic pulse is longer than the downstream traveltime and that this difference in traveltime can be accurately measured by electronic devices. An AVM system is capable of recording water velocity (and discharge) under a wide range of conditions, but some constraints apply: 1. Accuracy is reduced and performance is degraded if the acoustic path is not a continuous straight line. The path can be bent by reflection if it is too close to a stream boundary or by refraction if it passes through density gradients resulting from variations in either water temperature or salinity. For paths of less than 100 m, a temperature gradient of 0.1' per meter causes signal bending less than 0.6 meter at midchannel, and satisfactory velocity results can be obtained. Reflection from stream boundaries can cause signal cancellation if boundaries are too close to signal path. 2. Signal strength is attenuated by particles or bubbles that absorb, spread, or scatter sound. The concentration of particles or bubbles that can be tolerated is a function of the path length and frequency of the acoustic signal. 3. Changes in streamline orientation can affect system accuracy if the variability is random. 4. Errors relating to signal resolution are much larger for a single threshold detection scheme than for multiple threshold schemes. This report provides methods for computing the effect of various conditions on the accuracy of a record obtained from an AVM. The equipment must be adapted to the site. Field reconnaissance and preinstallation analysis to detect possible problems are critical for proper installation and operation of an AVM system.

  19. Canonical Acoustics and Its Application to Surface Acoustic Wave on Acoustic Metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Jian Qi

    2016-08-01

    In a conventional formalism of acoustics, acoustic pressure p and velocity field u are used for characterizing acoustic waves propagating inside elastic/acoustic materials. We shall treat some fundamental problems relevant to acoustic wave propagation alternatively by using canonical acoustics (a more concise and compact formalism of acoustic dynamics), in which an acoustic scalar potential and an acoustic vector potential (Φ ,V), instead of the conventional acoustic field quantities such as acoustic pressure and velocity field (p,u) for characterizing acoustic waves, have been defined as the fundamental variables. The canonical formalism of the acoustic energy-momentum tensor is derived in terms of the acoustic potentials. Both the acoustic Hamiltonian density and the acoustic Lagrangian density have been defined, and based on this formulation, the acoustic wave quantization in a fluid is also developed. Such a formalism of acoustic potentials is employed to the problem of negative-mass-density assisted surface acoustic wave that is a highly localized surface bound state (an eigenstate of the acoustic wave equations). Since such a surface acoustic wave can be strongly confined to an interface between an acoustic metamaterial (e.g., fluid-solid composite structures with a negative dynamical mass density) and an ordinary material (with a positive mass density), it will give rise to an effect of acoustic field enhancement on the acoustic interface, and would have potential applications in acoustic device design for acoustic wave control.

  20. Stochastic simulation for the propagation of high-frequency acoustic waves through a random velocity field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, B.; Darmon, M.; Leymarie, N.; Chatillon, S.; Potel, C.

    2012-05-01

    In-service inspection of Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactors (SFR) requires the development of non-destructive techniques adapted to the harsh environment conditions and the examination complexity. From past experiences, ultrasonic techniques are considered as suitable candidates. The ultrasonic telemetry is a technique used to constantly insure the safe functioning of reactor inner components by determining their exact position: it consists in measuring the time of flight of the ultrasonic response obtained after propagation of a pulse emitted by a transducer and its interaction with the targets. While in-service the sodium flow creates turbulences that lead to temperature inhomogeneities, which translates into ultrasonic velocity inhomogeneities. These velocity variations could directly impact the accuracy of the target locating by introducing time of flight variations. A stochastic simulation model has been developed to calculate the propagation of ultrasonic waves in such an inhomogeneous medium. Using this approach, the travel time is randomly generated by a stochastic process whose inputs are the statistical moments of travel times known analytically. The stochastic model predicts beam deviations due to velocity inhomogeneities, which are similar to those provided by a determinist method, such as the ray method.

  1. Lift-off compensation for improved accuracy in ultrasonic lamb wave velocity measurements using electromagnetic acoustic transducers (EMATs).

    PubMed

    Morrison, J P; Dixon, S; Potter, M D G; Jian, X

    2006-12-22

    The crystalline texture of a sheet metal strongly affects its formability, so having knowledge of this texture is of great industrial relevance. The texture of rolled sheet metals, such as aluminium and steel, may be determined by ultrasonic measurement of the velocity of the zero order symmetric (S(0)) Lamb wave as a function of angle to the rolling direction. Electromagnetic acoustic transducers (EMATs) may perform this measurement without contacting the sample, therefore reducing perturbation to the plate wave system, as they are electromagnetically coupled to the sheet. The EMAT system measurements are non-destructive and may be made in real time, therefore offering advantages over the conventional techniques such as X-ray and neutron diffraction. It has been noticed that in the two EMAT pitch-catch system, the apparent arrival times of the ultrasonic waves change with variation in lift-off (distance between sample and transducer) due to impedance and aperture effects. For precise and accurate texture parameters to be obtained, accurate absolute ultrasonic velocity measurement is required and hence lift-off must be compensated for. This is of particular importance to online inspection systems where constant lift-off may be difficult to maintain. The impedance behaviour of various coil geometries has been investigated as a function of lift-off and frequency and compared to the received ultrasonic signal and the drive current pulse profile. Theoretical models have been used to explain the observed behaviour, and hence a scheme has been proposed for the compensation of lift-off effects in real time.

  2. Measuring sea ice permeability as a function of the attenuation and phase velocity shift of an acoustic wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudier, E. J.; Bahoura, M.

    2012-12-01

    Sea ice is a two-phase porous medium consisting of a solid matrix of pure ice and a salty liquid phase. At spring when ice permeability increases, it has been observed that pressure gradients induced at the ice-water interface upstream and downstream of pressure ridge keels can cause sea water and brine to be forced through the ice water boundary. It suggests that salt and heat fluxes through the bottom ice layers may be a major factor controlling the decay of an ice sheet. Knowing how water flows through the ice matrix is fundamental to a modeling of ocean-ice heat exchanges integrating the advective import/export of latent heat that result from melting/freezing within the ice. Permeability is the measurement of the ease with which fluids flow through a porous medium, however one of the most tricky to measure without altering the porosity of the sampled medium. To further complicate the challenge, horizontal and vertical permeability of the ice, referred as ice anisotropy, is significant. Acoustic wave propagation through porous media have been theorized to relate the acoustic velocity and attenuation to the physical properties of the tested material. It is a non-invasive technique, and as such could provide more reliable measurements of sea ice permeability than anything presently used. Simulations combining the Biot's and squirt flow mechanisms are performed to investigate the effect of permeability on the attenuation and phase velocity as a function of frequency. We first present the attenuation dispersion curves for an isotropic sea ice, then low-frequency and high-frequency limits are determined. Optimal frequency range and resolution requirements are evaluated for testing.

  3. Simultaneous estimation of cortical bone thickness and acoustic wave velocity using a multivariable optimization approach: Bone phantom and in-vitro study.

    PubMed

    Tasinkevych, Yuriy; Podhajecki, Jerzy; Falińska, Katarzyna; Litniewski, Jerzy

    2016-02-01

    The paper presents a method that allows the thickness of a compact bone layer and longitudinal wave velocity in the bone to be determined simultaneously with the use of reflected waves, with particular emphasis on the case of layers when the propagation time through the layer is shorter than the time duration of the interrogating pulse. The proposed method estimates simultaneously the thickness of the cortical bone layer and acoustic wave velocity by fitting the temporal spectrum of the simulated reflected wave to the spectrum of the reflected wave measured experimentally. For the purpose of echo-simulations the model of "soft tissue - compact bone layer - cancellous bone" was developed. Next, the cost function was defined as the least square error between the measured and simulated temporal spectra. Minimization of the cost function allowed us to determine the values of the parameters of the cortical bone layer which best fitted the measurements. To solve the optimization problem a simulated annealing algorithm was used. The method was tested using acoustic data obtained at the frequency of 0.6 MHz and 1 MHz respectively for a custom designed bone mimicking phantom and a calf femur. For the cortical shell of the calf femur whose thickness varies from 2.1 mm to 2.4 mm and velocity of 2910 m/s, the relative errors of the thickness estimation ranged from 0.4% to 5.5%. The corresponding error of the acoustic wave velocity estimation in the layer was 3.1%. In the case of artificial bone the thickness of the cortical layer was equal to 1.05 and 1.2 mm and acoustic wave velocity was 2900 m/s. These parameters were determined with the errors ranging from 1.9% to 10.8% and from 3.9% to 4.5% respectively.

  4. Determination of elastic properties of a MnO2 coating by surface acoustic wave velocity dispersion analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sermeus, J.; Sinha, R.; Vanstreels, K.; Vereecken, P. M.; Glorieux, C.

    2014-07-01

    MnO2 is a material of interest in the development of high energy-density batteries, specifically as a coating material for internal 3D structures, thus ensuring rapid energy deployment. Its electrochemical properties have been mapped extensively, but there are, to the best of the authors' knowledge, no records of the elastic properties of thin film MnO2. Impulsive stimulated thermal scattering (ISTS), also known as the heterodyne diffraction or transient grating technique, was used to determine the Young's modulus (E) and porosity (ψ) of a 500 nm thick MnO2 coating on a Si(001) substrate. ISTS is an all optical method that is able to excite and detect surface acoustic waves (SAWs) on opaque samples. From the measured SAW velocity dispersion, the Young's modulus and porosity were determined to be E = 25 ± 1 GPa and ψ = 42 ± 1 %, respectively. These values were confirmed by independent techniques and determined by a most-squares analysis of the carefully fitted SAW velocity dispersion. This study demonstrates the ability of the presented technique to determine the elastic parameters of a thin, porous film on an anisotropic substrate.

  5. Angular spectrum approach for the computation of group and phase velocity surfaces of acoustic waves in anisotropic materials

    PubMed

    Pluta; Schubert; Jahny; Grill

    2000-03-01

    The decomposition of an acoustic wave into its angular spectrum representation creates an effective base for the calculation of wave propagation effects in anisotropic media. In this method, the distribution of acoustic fields is calculated in arbitrary planes from the superposition of the planar components with proper phase shifts. These phase shifts depend on the ratio of the distance between the planes to the normal component of the phase slowness vector. In anisotropic media, the phase shifts depend additionally on the changes of the slowness with respect to the direction of the propagation vector and the polarization. Those relations are obtained from the Christoffel equation. The method employing the fast Fourier transformation algorithm is especially suited for volume imaging in anisotropic media, based on holographic detection in transmission of acoustic waves generated by a point source. This technique is compared with measurements on crystals performed by phase-sensitive scanning acoustic microscopy.

  6. Ultrahigh-pressure acoustic wave velocities of SiO2-Al2O3 glasses up to 200 GPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohira, Itaru; Murakami, Motohiko; Kohara, Shinji; Ohara, Koji; Ohtani, Eiji

    2016-12-01

    Extensive experimental studies on the structure and density of silicate glasses as laboratory analogs of natural silicate melts have attempted to address the nature of dense silicate melts that may be present at the base of the mantle. Previous ultrahigh-pressure experiments, however, have been performed on simple systems such as SiO2 or MgSiO3, and experiments in more complex system have been conducted under relatively low-pressure conditions below 60 GPa. The effect of other metal cations on structural changes that occur in dense silicate glasses under ultrahigh pressures has been poorly understood. Here, we used a Brillouin scattering spectroscopic method up to pressures of 196.9 GPa to conduct in situ high-pressure acoustic wave velocity measurements of SiO2-Al2O3 glasses in order to understand the effect of Al2O3 on pressure-induced structural changes in the glasses as analogs of aluminosilicate melts. From 10 to 40 GPa, the transverse acoustic wave velocity ( V S ) of Al2O3-rich glass (SiO2 + 20.5 mol% Al2O3) was greater than that of Al2O3-poor glass (SiO2 + 3.9 mol% Al2O3). This result suggests that SiO2-Al2O3 glasses with higher proportions of Al ions with large oxygen coordination numbers (5 and 6) become elastically stiffer up to 40 GPa, depending on the Al2O3 content, but then soften above 40 GPa. At pressures from 40 to ~100 GPa, the increase in V S with increasing pressure became less steep than below 40 GPa. Above ~100 GPa, there were abrupt increases in the P-V S gradients ( dV S /dP) at 130 GPa in Al2O3-poor glass and at 116 GPa in Al2O3-rich glass. These changes resemble previous experimental results on SiO2 glass and MgSiO3 glass. Given that changes of dV S / dP have commonly been related to changes in the Si-O coordination states in the glasses, our results, therefore, may indicate a drastic structural transformation in SiO2-Al2O3 glasses above 116 GPa, possibly associated with an average Si-O coordination number change to higher than 6. Compared

  7. Propagation of Electron Acoustic Soliton, Periodic and Shock Waves in Dissipative Plasma with a q-Nonextensive Electron Velocity Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Hanbaly, A. M.; El-Shewy, E. K.; Elgarayhi, A.; Kassem, A. I.

    2015-11-01

    The nonlinear properties of small amplitude electron-acoustic (EA) solitary and shock waves in a homogeneous system of unmagnetized collisionless plasma with nonextensive distribution for hot electrons have been investigated. A reductive perturbation method used to obtain the Kadomstev-Petviashvili-Burgers equation. Bifurcation analysis has been discussed for non-dissipative system in the absence of Burgers term and reveals different classes of the traveling wave solutions. The obtained solutions are related to periodic and soliton waves and their behavior are shown graphically. In the presence of the Burgers term, the EXP-function method is used to solve the Kadomstev-Petviashvili-Burgers equation and the obtained solution is related to shock wave. The obtained results may be helpful in better conception of waves propagation in various space plasma environments as well as in inertial confinement fusion laboratory plasmas.

  8. Acoustic waves in medical imaging and diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Sarvazyan, Armen P; Urban, Matthew W; Greenleaf, James F

    2013-07-01

    Up until about two decades ago acoustic imaging and ultrasound imaging were synonymous. The term ultrasonography, or its abbreviated version sonography, meant an imaging modality based on the use of ultrasonic compressional bulk waves. Beginning in the 1990s, there started to emerge numerous acoustic imaging modalities based on the use of a different mode of acoustic wave: shear waves. Imaging with these waves was shown to provide very useful and very different information about the biological tissue being examined. We discuss the physical basis for the differences between these two basic modes of acoustic waves used in medical imaging and analyze the advantages associated with shear acoustic imaging. A comprehensive analysis of the range of acoustic wavelengths, velocities and frequencies that have been used in different imaging applications is presented. We discuss the potential for future shear wave imaging applications.

  9. Coupling liquids acoustic velocity effects on elastic metallic bioglass properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metiri, W.; Hadjoub, F.; Doghmane, A.; Hadjoub, Z.

    2009-11-01

    The effect of surface acoustic wave, SAW, velocities of coupling liquids on acoustical properties of several bulk metallic glasses, BMG, has been investigated using simulation program based on acoustic microscopy. Thus, we determined variations of critical angles at which the excitation of longitudinal mode, θL and Rayleigh mode, θR occurs as a function of wave velocities in different coupling liquids, Vliq. Linear relations of the form θi =ai0 +βiVliq were deduced. The importance of such formula, used with Snell's law, lies in the direct determination of SAW velocities and consequently mechanical properties of BMGs.

  10. Shear waves in acoustic anisotropic media

    SciTech Connect

    Grechka, Vladimir; Zhang, Linbin; Rector, James W.

    2003-01-02

    Acoustic transversely isotropic (TI) media are defined by artificially setting the shear-wave velocity in the direction of symmetry axis, VS0, to zero. Contrary to conventional wisdom that equating VS0 = 0 eliminates shear waves, we demonstrate their presence and examine their properties. Specifically, we show that SV-waves generally have finite nonzero phase and group velocities in acoustic TI media. In fact, these waves have been observed in full waveform modeling, but apparently they were not understood and labeled as numerical artifacts. Acoustic TI media are characterized by extreme, in some sense infinite strength of anisotropy. It makes the following unusual wave phenomena possible: (1) there are propagation directions, where the SV-ray is orthogonal to the corresponding wavefront normal, (2) the SV-wave whose ray propagates along the symmetry axis is polarized parallel to the P-wave propagating in the same direction, (3) P-wave singularities, that is, directions where P- and SV -wave phase velocities coincide might exist in acoustic TI media. We also briefly discuss some aspects of wave propagation in low-symmetry acoustic anisotropic models. Extreme anisotropy in those media creates bizarre phase- and group-velocity surfaces that might bring intellectual delight to an anisotropic guru.

  11. Modulational instability of ion-acoustic waves in plasma with a q-nonextensive nonthermal electron velocity distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Bouzit, Omar Tribeche, Mouloud E-mail: mtribeche@usthb.dz; Bains, A. S.

    2015-08-15

    Modulation instability of ion-acoustic waves (IAWs) is investigated in a collisionless unmagnetized one dimensional plasma, containing positive ions and electrons following the mixed nonextensive nonthermal distribution [Tribeche et al., Phys. Rev. E 85, 037401 (2012)]. Using the reductive perturbation technique, a nonlinear Schrödinger equation which governs the modulation instability of the IAWs is obtained. Valid range of plasma parameters has been fixed and their effects on the modulational instability discussed in detail. We find that the plasma supports both bright and dark solutions. The valid domain for the wave number k where instabilities set in varies with both nonextensive parameter q as well as non thermal parameter α. Moreover, the analysis is extended for the rational solutions of IAWs in the instability regime. Present study is useful for the understanding of IAWs in the region where such mixed distribution may exist.

  12. Dust ion-acoustic shock waves in charge varying dusty plasmas with electrons having vortexlike velocity distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Alinejad, H.; Tribeche, M.

    2010-12-15

    A weakly nonlinear analysis is carried out to investigate the properties of dust ion-acoustic shock waves in a charge varying dusty plasma with vortexlike electron distribution. We use the ionization model, hot ions with equilibrium streaming speed and a trapped electron charging current derived from the well-known orbit limited motion theory. A new modified Burger equation is derived. Besides nonlinear trapping, this equation involves two kinds of dissipation (the anomalous one inherent to nonadiabatic dust charge fluctuation and the one due to the particle loss and ionization). These two kinds of dissipation can act concurrently. The traveling wave solution has been acquired by employing the modified extended tanh-function method. The shocklike solution is numerically analyzed based on the typical numerical data from laboratory dusty plasma devices. It is found that ion temperature, trapped particles, and weak dissipations significantly modify the shock structures.

  13. Comparison of ultrasound B-mode, strain imaging, acoustic radiation force impulse displacement and shear wave velocity imaging using real time clinical breast images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manickam, Kavitha; Machireddy, Ramasubba Reddy; Raghavan, Bagyam

    2016-04-01

    It has been observed that many pathological process increase the elastic modulus of soft tissue compared to normal. In order to image tissue stiffness using ultrasound, a mechanical compression is applied to tissues of interest and local tissue deformation is measured. Based on the mechanical excitation, ultrasound stiffness imaging methods are classified as compression or strain imaging which is based on external compression and Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse (ARFI) imaging which is based on force generated by focused ultrasound. When ultrasound is focused on tissue, shear wave is generated in lateral direction and shear wave velocity is proportional to stiffness of tissues. The work presented in this paper investigates strain elastography and ARFI imaging in clinical cancer diagnostics using real time patient data. Ultrasound B-mode imaging, strain imaging, ARFI displacement and ARFI shear wave velocity imaging were conducted on 50 patients (31 Benign and 23 malignant categories) using Siemens S2000 machine. True modulus contrast values were calculated from the measured shear wave velocities. For ultrasound B-mode, ARFI displacement imaging and strain imaging, observed image contrast and Contrast to Noise Ratio were calculated for benign and malignant cancers. Observed contrast values were compared based on the true modulus contrast values calculated from shear wave velocity imaging. In addition to that, student unpaired t-test was conducted for all the four techniques and box plots are presented. Results show that, strain imaging is better for malignant cancers whereas ARFI imaging is superior than strain imaging and B-mode for benign lesions representations.

  14. Acoustic and streaming velocity components in a resonant waveguide at high acoustic levels.

    PubMed

    Daru, Virginie; Reyt, Ida; Bailliet, Hélène; Weisman, Catherine; Baltean-Carlès, Diana

    2017-01-01

    Rayleigh streaming is a steady flow generated by the interaction between an acoustic wave and a solid wall, generally assumed to be second order in a Mach number expansion. Acoustic streaming is well known in the case of a stationary plane wave at low amplitude: it has a half-wavelength spatial periodicity and the maximum axial streaming velocity is a quadratic function of the acoustic velocity amplitude at antinode. For higher acoustic levels, additional streaming cells have been observed. Results of laser Doppler velocimetry measurements are here compared to direct numerical simulations. The evolution of axial and radial velocity components for both acoustic and streaming velocities is studied from low to high acoustic amplitudes. Two streaming flow regimes are pointed out, the axial streaming dependency on acoustics going from quadratic to linear. The evolution of streaming flow is different for outer cells and for inner cells. Also, the hypothesis of radial streaming velocity being of second order in a Mach number expansion, is not valid at high amplitudes. The change of regime occurs when the radial streaming velocity amplitude becomes larger than the radial acoustic velocity amplitude, high levels being therefore characterized by nonlinear interaction of the different velocity components.

  15. Quantum positron acoustic waves

    SciTech Connect

    Metref, Hassina; Tribeche, Mouloud

    2014-12-15

    Nonlinear quantum positron-acoustic (QPA) waves are investigated for the first time, within the theoretical framework of the quantum hydrodynamic model. In the small but finite amplitude limit, both deformed Korteweg-de Vries and generalized Korteweg-de Vries equations governing, respectively, the dynamics of QPA solitary waves and double-layers are derived. Moreover, a full finite amplitude analysis is undertaken, and a numerical integration of the obtained highly nonlinear equations is carried out. The results complement our previously published results on this problem.

  16. Hepatic and Splenic Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse Shear Wave Velocity Elastography in Children with Liver Disease Associated with Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Cañas, Teresa; Maciá, Araceli; Muñoz-Codoceo, Rosa Ana; Fontanilla, Teresa; González-Rios, Patricia; Miralles, María; Gómez-Mardones, Gloria

    2015-01-01

    Background. Liver disease associated with cystic fibrosis (CFLD) is the second cause of mortality in these patients. The diagnosis is difficult because none of the available tests are specific enough. Noninvasive elastographic techniques have been proven to be useful to diagnose hepatic fibrosis. Acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging is an elastography imaging system. The purpose of the work was to study the utility of liver and spleen ARFI Imaging in the detection of CFLD. Method. 72 patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) were studied and received ARFI imaging in the liver and in the spleen. SWV values were compared with the values of 60 healthy controls. Results. Comparing the SWV values of CFLD with the control healthy group, values in the right lobe were higher in patients with CFLD. We found a SWV RHL cut-off value to detect CFLD of 1.27 m/s with a sensitivity of 56.5% and a specificity of 90.5%. CF patients were found to have higher SWC spleen values than the control group. Conclusions. ARFI shear wave elastography in the right hepatic lobe is a noninvasive technique useful to detect CFLD in our sample of patients. Splenic SWV values are higher in CF patients, without any clinical consequence. PMID:26609528

  17. Guided acoustic wave inspection system

    SciTech Connect

    Chinn, Diane J.

    2004-10-05

    A system for inspecting a conduit for undesirable characteristics. A transducer system induces guided acoustic waves onto said conduit. The transducer system detects the undesirable characteristics of the conduit by receiving guided acoustic waves that contain information about the undesirable characteristics. The conduit has at least two sides and the transducer system utilizes flexural modes of propagation to provide inspection using access from only the one side of the conduit. Cracking is detected with pulse-echo testing using one transducer to both send and receive the guided acoustic waves. Thinning is detected in through-transmission testing where one transducer sends and another transducer receives the guided acoustic waves.

  18. Link Between Resistivity and Acoustic Velocity Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hacikoylu, P.; Dvorkin, J. P.

    2005-12-01

    Seismic modeling at a well is essential to many impedance inversion methods as well as quality control for real seismic data. The three main inputs for seismic modeling are the P- and S-wave velocity and density. A common problem is poor quality of sonic, dipole, and density logs, or an absence of these curves in parts of a well or in older well data sets. As a result, attempts have been made to reconstruct these curves from more reliable measurements, such as resistivity. The earliest attempt is by Faust (1953) where both the velocity and resistivity are empirically related to the geologic age, depth, and lithology. From these two relations an equation follows that links the sonic velocity to the depth and formation factor, where the formation factor is the ratio of the resistivity of water-saturated rock to the resistivity of water. This relation between the resistivity and velocity does not have any apparent physical basis simply because the velocity depends on the elasticity of a material while the resistivity describes its electrical charge transport capability. The observed link is most likely due to the dependence of both material properties on porosity. We analyze this link by using recent rock physics transforms between the velocity, porosity, and mineralogy together with existing empirical (e.g., Archie) and theoretical (Hashin-Shtrikman bounds) resistivity-porosity models. We also use a number of high-quality lab and well data sets to verify the results. We find that Faust's equation is applicable to consolidated cemented sandstones with low clay content with porosity between 5 and 20 percent. It should not be used in shale or unconsolidated and/or uncemented rock. By using rock physics theory we derive a family of new resistivity-velocity equations appropriate for various textures of clastic sediment. Specifically, an analytical solution applicable to unconsolidated shale is a combination of the lower Hashin-Strikman bound for resistivity and the soft

  19. Surface acoustic wave microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Ding, Xiaoyun; Li, Peng; Lin, Sz-Chin Steven; Stratton, Zackary S; Nama, Nitesh; Guo, Feng; Slotcavage, Daniel; Mao, Xiaole; Shi, Jinjie; Costanzo, Francesco; Huang, Tony Jun

    2013-09-21

    The recent introduction of surface acoustic wave (SAW) technology onto lab-on-a-chip platforms has opened a new frontier in microfluidics. The advantages provided by such SAW microfluidics are numerous: simple fabrication, high biocompatibility, fast fluid actuation, versatility, compact and inexpensive devices and accessories, contact-free particle manipulation, and compatibility with other microfluidic components. We believe that these advantages enable SAW microfluidics to play a significant role in a variety of applications in biology, chemistry, engineering and medicine. In this review article, we discuss the theory underpinning SAWs and their interactions with particles and the contacting fluids in which they are suspended. We then review the SAW-enabled microfluidic devices demonstrated to date, starting with devices that accomplish fluid mixing and transport through the use of travelling SAW; we follow that by reviewing the more recent innovations achieved with standing SAW that enable such actions as particle/cell focusing, sorting and patterning. Finally, we look forward and appraise where the discipline of SAW microfluidics could go next.

  20. Surface acoustic wave microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Xiaoyun; Li, Peng; Lin, Sz-Chin Steven; Stratton, Zackary S.; Nama, Nitesh; Guo, Feng; Slotcavage, Daniel; Mao, Xiaole; Shi, Jinjie; Costanzo, Francesco; Huang, Tony Jun

    2014-01-01

    The recent introduction of surface acoustic wave (SAW) technology onto lab-on-a-chip platforms has opened a new frontier in microfluidics. The advantages provided by such SAW microfluidics are numerous: simple fabrication, high biocompatibility, fast fluid actuation, versatility, compact and inexpensive devices and accessories, contact-free particle manipulation, and compatibility with other microfluidic components. We believe that these advantages enable SAW microfluidics to play a significant role in a variety of applications in biology, chemistry, engineering, and medicine. In this review article, we discuss the theory underpinning SAWs and their interactions with particles and the contacting fluids in which they are suspended. We then review the SAW-enabled microfluidic devices demonstrated to date, starting with devices that accomplish fluid mixing and transport through the use of travelling SAW; we follow that by reviewing the more recent innovations achieved with standing SAW that enable such actions as particle/cell focusing, sorting, and patterning. Finally, we look forward and appraise where the discipline of SAW microfluidics could go next. PMID:23900527

  1. Acoustic Measurement of Potato Cannon Velocity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Courtney, Michael; Courtney, Amy

    2007-01-01

    Potato cannon velocity can be measured with a digitized microphone signal. A microphone is attached to the potato cannon muzzle, and a potato is fired at an aluminum target about 10 m away. Flight time can be determined from the acoustic waveform by subtracting the time in the barrel and time for sound to return from the target. The potato…

  2. Creating and studying ion acoustic waves in ultracold neutral plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Killian, T. C.; Castro, J.; McQuillen, P.; O'Neil, T. M.

    2012-05-15

    We excite ion acoustic waves in ultracold neutral plasmas by imprinting density modulations during plasma creation. Laser-induced fluorescence is used to observe the density and velocity perturbations created by the waves. The effect of expansion of the plasma on the evolution of the wave amplitude is described by treating the wave action as an adiabatic invariant. After accounting for this effect, we determine that the waves are weakly damped, but the damping is significantly faster than expected for Landau damping.

  3. Nonlinear ion acoustic waves scattered by vortexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohno, Yuji; Yoshida, Zensho

    2016-09-01

    The Kadomtsev-Petviashvili (KP) hierarchy is the archetype of infinite-dimensional integrable systems, which describes nonlinear ion acoustic waves in two-dimensional space. This remarkably ordered system resides on a singular submanifold (leaf) embedded in a larger phase space of more general ion acoustic waves (low-frequency electrostatic perturbations). The KP hierarchy is characterized not only by small amplitudes but also by irrotational (zero-vorticity) velocity fields. In fact, the KP equation is derived by eliminating vorticity at every order of the reductive perturbation. Here, we modify the scaling of the velocity field so as to introduce a vortex term. The newly derived system of equations consists of a generalized three-dimensional KP equation and a two-dimensional vortex equation. The former describes 'scattering' of vortex-free waves by ambient vortexes that are determined by the latter. We say that the vortexes are 'ambient' because they do not receive reciprocal reactions from the waves (i.e., the vortex equation is independent of the wave fields). This model describes a minimal departure from the integrable KP system. By the Painlevé test, we delineate how the vorticity term violates integrability, bringing about an essential three-dimensionality to the solutions. By numerical simulation, we show how the solitons are scattered by vortexes and become chaotic.

  4. Multi-reflective acoustic wave device

    DOEpatents

    Andle, Jeffrey C.

    2006-02-21

    An acoustic wave device, which utilizes multiple localized reflections of acoustic wave for achieving an infinite impulse response while maintaining high tolerance for dampening effects, is disclosed. The device utilized a plurality of electromechanically significant electrodes disposed on most of the active surface. A plurality of sensors utilizing the disclosed acoustic wave mode device are also described.

  5. Acoustic wave based MEMS devices for biosensing applications.

    PubMed

    Voiculescu, Ioana; Nordin, Anis Nurashikin

    2012-03-15

    This paper presents a review of acoustic-wave based MEMS devices that offer a promising technology platform for the development of sensitive, portable, real-time biosensors. MEMS fabrication of acoustic wave based biosensors enables device miniaturization, power consumption reduction and integration with electronic circuits. For biological applications, the biosensors are integrated in a microfluidic system and the sensing area is coated with a biospecific layer. When a bioanalyte interacts with the sensing layer, mass and viscosity variations of the biospecific layer can be detected by monitoring changes in the acoustic wave properties such as velocity, attenuation, resonant frequency and delay time. Few types of acoustic wave devices could be integrated in microfluidic systems without significant degradation of the quality factor. The acoustic wave based MEMS devices reported in the literature as biosensors and presented in this review are film bulk acoustic wave resonators (FBAR), surface acoustic waves (SAW) resonators and SAW delay lines. Different approaches to the realization of FBARs, SAW resonators and SAW delay lines for various biochemical applications are presented. Methods of integration of the acoustic wave MEMS devices in the microfluidic systems and functionalization strategies will be also discussed.

  6. Relationship between dust acoustic waves in two and three dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Piel, A.; Goree, J.

    2006-10-15

    Low frequency electrostatic waves are investigated for a monolayer suspension of dust particles that are shielded by an ambient plasma of three-dimensional extension. The dispersion of the resulting dust acoustic surface waves is compared with dust acoustic waves in three dimensions and with lattice modes in two dimensions. It is found that the wave dispersion is determined by shielding of electric fields by electrons and ions on either side of the dust monolayer; this differs from previously studied cases of charged sheets in a vacuum. The phase velocity of these surface waves suggests the definition of a proper dust plasma frequency for monolayer systems.

  7. Millimeter Waves: Acoustic and Electromagnetic

    PubMed Central

    Ziskin, Marvin C.

    2012-01-01

    This article is the presentation I gave at the D'Arsonval Award Ceremony on June 14, 2011 at the Bioelectromagnetics Society Annual Meeting in Halifax, Nova Scotia. It summarizes my research activities in acoustic and electromagnetic millimeter waves over the past 47 years. My earliest research involved acoustic millimeter waves, with a special interest in diagnostic ultrasound imaging and its safety. For the last 21 years my research expanded to include electromagnetic millimeter waves, with a special interest in the mechanisms underlying millimeter wave therapy. Millimeter wave therapy has been widely used in the former Soviet Union with great reported success for many diseases, but is virtually unknown to Western physicians. I and the very capable members of my laboratory were able to demonstrate that the local exposure of skin to low intensity millimeter waves caused the release of endogenous opioids, and the transport of these agents by blood flow to all parts of the body resulted in pain relief and other beneficial effects. PMID:22926874

  8. Millimeter waves: acoustic and electromagnetic.

    PubMed

    Ziskin, Marvin C

    2013-01-01

    This article is the presentation I gave at the D'Arsonval Award Ceremony on June 14, 2011 at the Bioelectromagnetics Society Annual Meeting in Halifax, Nova Scotia. It summarizes my research activities in acoustic and electromagnetic millimeter waves over the past 47 years. My earliest research involved acoustic millimeter waves, with a special interest in diagnostic ultrasound imaging and its safety. For the last 21 years my research expanded to include electromagnetic millimeter waves, with a special interest in the mechanisms underlying millimeter wave therapy. Millimeter wave therapy has been widely used in the former Soviet Union with great reported success for many diseases, but is virtually unknown to Western physicians. I and the very capable members of my laboratory were able to demonstrate that the local exposure of skin to low intensity millimeter waves caused the release of endogenous opioids, and the transport of these agents by blood flow to all parts of the body resulted in pain relief and other beneficial effects.

  9. Surface acoustic wave frequency comb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsko, A. B.; Savchenkov, A. A.; Ilchenko, V. S.; Seidel, D.; Maleki, L.

    2012-02-01

    We investigate opto-mechanical oscillation (OMO) and subsequent generation of acoustic wave frequency combs in monolithic crystalline whispering gallery mode (WGM) resonators. The OMO is observed in resonators made of electro-optic (lithium tantalate), non-electro-optic birefringent (magnesium fluoride), and non-birefringent (calcium fluoride) materials. The phenomenon manifests itself as generation of optical harmonics separated by the eigenfrequency of a surface acoustic wave (SAW) mechanical mode of the same WGM resonator. We show that the light escaping the resonator and demodulated on a fast photodiode produces a spectrally pure radio frequency (RF) signal. For instance, we demonstrate generation of 200 MHz signals with instantaneous linewidth of 0.2 Hz.

  10. Surface acoustic wave oxygen sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collman, James P.; Oglesby, Donald M.; Upchurch, Billy T.; Leighty, Bradley D.; Zhang, Xumu; Herrmann, Paul C.

    1994-01-01

    A surface acoustic wave (SAW) device that responds to oxygen pressure was developed by coating a 158 MHz quartz surface acoustic wave (SAW) device with an oxygen binding agent. Two types of coatings were used. One type was prepared by dissolving an oxygen binding agent in a toluene solution of a copolymer containing the axial ligand. A second type was prepared with an oxygen binding porphyrin solution containing excess axial ligand without a polymer matrix. In the polymer based coatings, the copolymer served to provide the axial ligand to the oxygen binding agent and as a coating matrix on the surface of the SAW device. The oxygen sensing SAW device has been shown to bind oxygen following a Langmuir isotherm and may be used to measure the equilibrium constant of the oxygen binding compound in the coating matrix.

  11. Acoustic equations of state for simple lattice Boltzmann velocity sets.

    PubMed

    Viggen, Erlend Magnus

    2014-07-01

    The lattice Boltzmann (LB) method typically uses an isothermal equation of state. This is not sufficient to simulate a number of acoustic phenomena where the equation of state cannot be approximated as linear and constant. However, it is possible to implement variable equations of state by altering the LB equilibrium distribution. For simple velocity sets with velocity components ξ(iα)∈(-1,0,1) for all i, these equilibria necessarily cause error terms in the momentum equation. These error terms are shown to be either correctable or negligible at the cost of further weakening the compressibility. For the D1Q3 velocity set, such an equilibrium distribution is found and shown to be unique. Its sound propagation properties are found for both forced and free waves, with some generality beyond D1Q3. Finally, this equilibrium distribution is applied to a nonlinear acoustics simulation where both mechanisms of nonlinearity are simulated with good results. This represents an improvement on previous such simulations and proves that the compressibility of the method is still sufficiently strong even for nonlinear acoustics.

  12. Is dust acoustic wave a new plasma acoustic mode?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwivedi, C. B.

    1997-09-01

    In this Brief Communication, the claim of the novelty of the dust acoustic wave in a dusty plasma within the constant dust charge model is questioned. Conceptual lacunas behind the claim have been highlighted and appropriate physical arguments have been forwarded against the claim. It is demonstrated that the so-called dust acoustic wave could better be termed as a general acoustic fluctuation response with a dominant characteristic feature of the acoustic-like mode (ALM) fluctuation response reported by Dwivedi et al. [J. Plasma Phys. 41, 219 (1989)]. It is suggested that both correct and more usable nomenclature of the ALM should be the so-called acoustic mode.

  13. Acoustic waves in gases with strong pressure gradients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zorumski, William E.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of strong pressure gradients on the acoustic modes (standing waves) of a rectangular cavity is investigated analytically. When the cavity response is represented by a sum of modes, each mode is found to have two resonant frequencies. The lower frequency is near the Viaesaela-Brundt frequency, which characterizes the buoyant effect, and the higher frequency is above the ordinary acoustic resonance frequency. This finding shows that the propagation velocity of the acoustic waves is increased due to the pressure gradient effect.

  14. Coda wave interferometry for estimating nonlinear behavior in seismic velocity.

    PubMed

    Snieder, Roel; Grêt, Alexandre; Douma, Huub; Scales, John

    2002-03-22

    In coda wave interferometry, one records multiply scattered waves at a limited number of receivers to infer changes in the medium over time. With this technique, we have determined the nonlinear dependence of the seismic velocity in granite on temperature and the associated acoustic emissions. This technique can be used in warning mode, to detect the presence of temporal changes in the medium, or in diagnostic mode, where the temporal change in the medium is quantified.

  15. Manipulate acoustic waves by impedance matched acoustic metasurfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ying; Mei, Jun; Aljahdali, Rasha

    We design a type of acoustic metasurface, which is composed of carefully designed slits in a rigid thin plate. The effective refractive indices of different slits are different but the impedances are kept the same as that of the host medium. Numerical simulations show that such a metasurface can redirect or reflect a normally incident wave at different frequencies, even though it is impedance matched to the host medium. We show that the underlying mechanisms can be understood by using the generalized Snell's law, and a unified analytic model based on mode-coupling theory. We demonstrate some simple realization of such acoustic metasurface with real materials. The principle is also extended to the design of planar acoustic lens which can focus acoustic waves. Manipulate acoustic waves by impedance matched acoustic metasurfaces.

  16. Broadband Metamaterial for Nonresonant Matching of Acoustic Waves

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-28

    transmission (EOT)5–8. Lately, it has been extended to acoustic waves, as extraordinary acoustic transmission ( EAT )9–11. Usually these phenomena are achieved... EAT limitations. To this goal, we show a way to manipulate the effective constitutive properties (density reff and sound velocity ceff) of an...obtained. Most EAT phenomena rely on resonance effects that are inherently narrow-band, and for which large transmission is usually hindered by

  17. Reflection and transmission of acoustic waves from a moving layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinmetz, G. G.; Singh, J. J.

    1972-01-01

    The refraction of acoustic waves by a moving medium layer is theoretically treated and the expressions for reflection and transmission coefficients are determined. The moving medium layer velocity is assumed to have a space dependence in one direction. A partitioning of the moving medium layer into constant-velocity sublayers is introduced and the number of sublayers is allowed to increase until the reflection and transmission coefficients converage to their respective values. Numerical results for several sublayer approximations of Poiseuille's flow are presented as functions of the moving layer velocity for several angles of incidence of the acoustic wave. The degenerate case of single constant-velocity layer is also treated, both theoretically and by a numerical analysis.

  18. Probing Acoustic Nonlinearity by Mixing Surface Acoustic Waves

    SciTech Connect

    Hurley, David Howard; Telschow, Kenneth Louis

    2000-07-01

    Measurement methods aimed at determining material properties through nonlinear wave propagation are sensitive to artifacts caused by background nonlinearities inherent in the ultrasonic generation and detection methods. The focus of this paper is to describe our investigation of nonlinear mixing of surface acoustic waves (SAWs) as a means to decrease sensitivity to background nonlinearity and increase spatial sensitivity to acoustic nonlinearity induced by material microstructure.

  19. Acoustic wave science realized by metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dongwoo; Nguyen, Duc Minh; Rho, Junsuk

    2017-01-01

    Artificially structured materials with unit cells at sub-wavelength scale, known as metamaterials, have been widely used to precisely control and manipulate waves thanks to their unconventional properties which cannot be found in nature. In fact, the field of acoustic metamaterials has been much developed over the past 15 years and still keeps developing. Here, we present a topical review of metamaterials in acoustic wave science. Particular attention is given to fundamental principles of acoustic metamaterials for realizing the extraordinary acoustic properties such as negative, near-zero and approaching-infinity parameters. Realization of acoustic cloaking phenomenon which is invisible from incident sound waves is also introduced by various approaches. Finally, acoustic lenses are discussed not only for sub-diffraction imaging but also for applications based on gradient index (GRIN) lens.

  20. Surface acoustic wave stabilized oscillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, T. E.

    1978-01-01

    A number of 401.2 MHz surface acoustic wave (SAW) controlled oscillators were built and tested. The performance of these oscillators was evaluated for possible use as stable oscillators in communication systems. A short term frequency stability of better than 1 x 10 to the minus 9th power for one second was measured for the SAW oscillators. Long term frequency drift was measured and was found to be dependent on SAW design and packaging. Drift rates ranging from 15 ppm in twenty weeks to 2.5 ppm in twenty weeks were observed. Some further improvement was required. The temperature dependence of the saw oscillators was evaluated and it was concluded that some form of temperature compensation will be necessary to meet the requirements of some communication systems.

  1. Swimming Using Surface Acoustic Waves

    PubMed Central

    Bourquin, Yannyk; Cooper, Jonathan M.

    2013-01-01

    Microactuation of free standing objects in fluids is currently dominated by the rotary propeller, giving rise to a range of potential applications in the military, aeronautic and biomedical fields. Previously, surface acoustic waves (SAWs) have been shown to be of increasing interest in the field of microfluidics, where the refraction of a SAW into a drop of fluid creates a convective flow, a phenomenon generally known as SAW streaming. We now show how SAWs, generated at microelectronic devices, can be used as an efficient method of propulsion actuated by localised fluid streaming. The direction of the force arising from such streaming is optimal when the devices are maintained at the Rayleigh angle. The technique provides propulsion without any moving parts, and, due to the inherent design of the SAW transducer, enables simple control of the direction of travel. PMID:23431358

  2. Swimming using surface acoustic waves.

    PubMed

    Bourquin, Yannyk; Cooper, Jonathan M

    2013-01-01

    Microactuation of free standing objects in fluids is currently dominated by the rotary propeller, giving rise to a range of potential applications in the military, aeronautic and biomedical fields. Previously, surface acoustic waves (SAWs) have been shown to be of increasing interest in the field of microfluidics, where the refraction of a SAW into a drop of fluid creates a convective flow, a phenomenon generally known as SAW streaming. We now show how SAWs, generated at microelectronic devices, can be used as an efficient method of propulsion actuated by localised fluid streaming. The direction of the force arising from such streaming is optimal when the devices are maintained at the Rayleigh angle. The technique provides propulsion without any moving parts, and, due to the inherent design of the SAW transducer, enables simple control of the direction of travel.

  3. Wave-wave interactions and deep ocean acoustics.

    PubMed

    Guralnik, Z; Bourdelais, J; Zabalgogeazcoa, X; Farrell, W E

    2013-10-01

    Deep ocean acoustics, in the absence of shipping and wildlife, is driven by surface processes. Best understood is the signal generated by non-linear surface wave interactions, the Longuet-Higgins mechanism, which dominates from 0.1 to 10 Hz, and may be significant for another octave. For this source, the spectral matrix of pressure and vector velocity is derived for points near the bottom of a deep ocean resting on an elastic half-space. In the absence of a bottom, the ratios of matrix elements are universal constants. Bottom effects vitiate the usual "standing wave approximation," but a weaker form of the approximation is shown to hold, and this is used for numerical calculations. In the weak standing wave approximation, the ratios of matrix elements are independent of the surface wave spectrum, but depend on frequency and the propagation environment. Data from the Hawaii-2 Observatory are in excellent accord with the theory for frequencies between 0.1 and 1 Hz, less so at higher frequencies. Insensitivity of the spectral ratios to wind, and presumably waves, is indeed observed in the data.

  4. Is dust acoustic wave a new plasma acoustic mode?

    SciTech Connect

    Dwivedi, C.B.

    1997-09-01

    In this Brief Communication, the claim of the novelty of the dust acoustic wave in a dusty plasma within the constant dust charge model is questioned. Conceptual lacunas behind the claim have been highlighted and appropriate physical arguments have been forwarded against the claim. It is demonstrated that the so-called dust acoustic wave could better be termed as a general acoustic fluctuation response with a dominant characteristic feature of the acoustic-like mode (ALM) fluctuation response reported by Dwivedi {ital et al.} [J. Plasma Phys. {bold 41}, 219 (1989)]. It is suggested that both correct and more usable nomenclature of the ALM should be the so-called acoustic mode. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  5. Applications of surface acoustic and shallow bulk acoustic wave devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Colin K.

    1989-10-01

    Surface acoustic wave (SAW) device coverage includes delay lines and filters operating at selected frequencies in the range from about 10 MHz to 11 GHz; modeling with single-crystal piezoelectrics and layered structures; resonators and low-loss filters; comb filters and multiplexers; antenna duplexers; harmonic devices; chirp filters for pulse compression; coding with fixed and programmable transversal filters; Barker and quadraphase coding; adaptive filters; acoustic and acoustoelectric convolvers and correlators for radar, spread spectrum, and packet radio; acoustooptic processors for Bragg modulation and spectrum analysis; real-time Fourier-transform and cepstrum processors for radar and sonar; compressive receivers; Nyquist filters for microwave digital radio; clock-recovery filters for fiber communications; fixed-, tunable-, and multimode oscillators and frequency synthesizers; acoustic charge transport; and other SAW devices for signal processing on gallium arsenide. Shallow bulk acoustic wave device applications include gigahertz delay lines, surface-transverse-wave resonators employing energy-trapping gratings, and oscillators with enhanced performance and capability.

  6. Surface acoustic wave dust deposition monitor

    DOEpatents

    Fasching, G.E.; Smith, N.S. Jr.

    1988-02-12

    A system is disclosed for using the attenuation of surface acoustic waves to monitor real time dust deposition rates on surfaces. The system includes a signal generator, a tone-burst generator/amplifier connected to a transmitting transducer for converting electrical signals into acoustic waves. These waves are transmitted through a path defining means adjacent to a layer of dust and then, in turn, transmitted to a receiving transducer for changing the attenuated acoustic wave to electrical signals. The signals representing the attenuated acoustic waves may be amplified and used in a means for analyzing the output signals to produce an output indicative of the dust deposition rates and/or values of dust in the layer. 8 figs.

  7. Linear coupling of acoustic and cyclotron waves in plasma flows

    SciTech Connect

    Rogava, Andria; Gogoberidze, Grigol

    2005-05-15

    It is found that in magnetized electrostatic plasma flows the velocity shear couples ion-acoustic waves with ion-cyclotron waves and leads, under favorable conditions, to their efficient reciprocal transformations. It is shown that in a two-dimensional setup this coupling has a remarkable feature: it is governed by equations that are mathematically equal to the ones describing coupling of sound waves with internal gravity waves [Rogava and Mahajan, Phys. Rev. E 55, 1185 (1997)] in neutral fluids. For flows with low shearing rates a fully analytic, quantitative description of the coupling efficiency, based on a noteworthy quantum-mechanical analogy, is given and transformation coefficients are calculated.

  8. An inexpensive instrument for measuring wave exposure and water velocity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Figurski, J.D.; Malone, D.; Lacy, J.R.; Denny, M.

    2011-01-01

    Ocean waves drive a wide variety of nearshore physical processes, structuring entire ecosystems through their direct and indirect effects on the settlement, behavior, and survivorship of marine organisms. However, wave exposure remains difficult and expensive to measure. Here, we report on an inexpensive and easily constructed instrument for measuring wave-induced water velocities. The underwater relative swell kinetics instrument (URSKI) is a subsurface float tethered by a short (<1 m) line to the seafloor. Contained within the float is an accelerometer that records the tilt of the float in response to passing waves. During two field trials totaling 358 h, we confirmed the accuracy and precision of URSKI measurements through comparison to velocities measured by an in situ acoustic Doppler velocimeter and those predicted by a standard swell model, and we evaluated how the dimensions of the devices, its buoyancy, and sampling frequency can be modified for use in a variety of environments.

  9. Generalized collar waves in acoustic logging while drilling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiu-Ming; He, Xiao; Zhang, Xiu-Mei

    2016-12-01

    Tool waves, also named collar waves, propagating along the drill collars in acoustic logging while drilling (ALWD), strongly interfere with the needed P- and S-waves of a penetrated formation, which is a key issue in picking up formation P- and S-wave velocities. Previous studies on physical insulation for the collar waves designed on the collar between the source and the receiver sections did not bring to a satisfactory solution. In this paper, we investigate the propagation features of collar waves in different models. It is confirmed that there exists an indirect collar wave in the synthetic full waves due to the coupling between the drill collar and the borehole, even there is a perfect isolator between the source and the receiver. The direct collar waves propagating all along the tool and the indirect ones produced by echoes from the borehole wall are summarized as the generalized collar waves. Further analyses show that the indirect collar waves could be relatively strong in the full wave data. This is why the collar waves cannot be eliminated with satisfactory effect in many cases by designing the physical isolators carved on the tool. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11134011 and 11374322) and the Foresight Research Project, Institute of Acoustics, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  10. Microfabricated bulk wave acoustic bandgap device

    DOEpatents

    Olsson, Roy H.; El-Kady, Ihab F.; McCormick, Frederick; Fleming, James G.; Fleming, Carol

    2010-06-08

    A microfabricated bulk wave acoustic bandgap device comprises a periodic two-dimensional array of scatterers embedded within the matrix material membrane, wherein the scatterer material has a density and/or elastic constant that is different than the matrix material and wherein the periodicity of the array causes destructive interference of the acoustic wave within an acoustic bandgap. The membrane can be suspended above a substrate by an air or vacuum gap to provide acoustic isolation from the substrate. The device can be fabricated using microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) technologies. Such microfabricated bulk wave phononic bandgap devices are useful for acoustic isolation in the ultrasonic, VHF, or UHF regime (i.e., frequencies of order 1 MHz to 10 GHz and higher, and lattice constants of order 100 .mu.m or less).

  11. Microfabricated bulk wave acoustic bandgap device

    DOEpatents

    Olsson, Roy H.; El-Kady, Ihab F.; McCormick, Frederick; Fleming, James G.; Fleming, legal representative, Carol

    2010-11-23

    A microfabricated bulk wave acoustic bandgap device comprises a periodic two-dimensional array of scatterers embedded within the matrix material membrane, wherein the scatterer material has a density and/or elastic constant that is different than the matrix material and wherein the periodicity of the array causes destructive interference of the acoustic wave within an acoustic bandgap. The membrane can be suspended above a substrate by an air or vacuum gap to provide acoustic isolation from the substrate. The device can be fabricated using microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) technologies. Such microfabricated bulk wave phononic bandgap devices are useful for acoustic isolation in the ultrasonic, VHF, or UHF regime (i.e., frequencies of order 1 MHz to 10 GHz and higher, and lattice constants of order 100 .mu.m or less).

  12. A New Wave of Acoustics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beyer, Robert

    1981-01-01

    Surveys 50 years of acoustical studies by discussing selected topics including the ear, nonlinear representations, underwater sound, acoustical diagnostics, absorption, electrolytes, phonons, magnetic interaction, and superfluidity and the five sounds. (JN)

  13. Estimation of spatiotemporal variation of acoustic velocity in ocean and its modeling for GPS/Acoustic seafloor positioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugimoto, S.; Tadokoro, K.; Ikuta, R.; Watanabe, T.; Okuda, T.; Sayanagi, K.; Miyata, K.; Nagao, T.

    2009-12-01

    We have been developing an observation system with the GPS/Acoustic combination technique for monitoring of seafloor crustal deformation. We installed two sets of triangular array of acoustic transponders as geodetic reference sites on the Suruga trough, central Japan, where the Philippine Sea plate is subducting beneath the Eurasian plate at a rate of 2 cm/yr. In our campaign observation, we measured ranges to acoustic transponders from an on-board acoustic transducer whose position was determined by kinematic GPS. Repeated our campaign observations can reveal directly seafloor crustal deformation in focal area of subduction zone. Present analysis method simultaneously estimates temporal variation of acoustic velocity and positions of acoustic transponders assuming the horizontally-layered structure of acoustic velocity. However, actual structure might have stable spatial variation due to oceanic current and internal wave. The stable spatial variation causes bias error on the positioning. For reduction of the bias error and shortening observation time, we should measure and/or estimate the spatial variation of acoustic velocity. In this presentation, for an investigation of horizontal scales of the spatial variation of acoustic velocity, we estimated spectrum of oceanic internal wave using by continuous measurements of temperature and pressure in ocean. In addition, we evaluate a new seafloor positioning method which simultaneously estimates spatiotemporal variation of acoustic velocity through numerical experiments. The continuous measurements in parallel with acoustic ranging were conducted by mooring temperature and pressure sensors attached rope with an interval of 50 m. The continuous measurements were made for five hours with a sampling interval of three seconds in each day in August and October 2008. For reduction of measurement noise, we carried out two-dimensional B-spline fitting of temperature and pressure with ABIC minimization. By the fitting, we

  14. Writing magnetic patterns with surface acoustic waves

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Weiyang; Buford, Benjamin; Jander, Albrecht; Dhagat, Pallavi

    2014-05-07

    A novel patterning technique that creates magnetization patterns in a continuous magnetostrictive film with surface acoustic waves is demonstrated. Patterns of 10 μm wide stripes of alternating magnetization and a 3 μm dot of reversed magnetization are written using standing and focusing acoustic waves, respectively. The magnetization pattern is size-tunable, erasable, and rewritable by changing the magnetic field and acoustic power. This versatility, along with its solid-state implementation (no moving parts) and electronic control, renders it as a promising technique for application in magnetic recording, magnonic signal processing, magnetic particle manipulation, and spatial magneto-optical modulation.

  15. Elastic Wave Propagation Mechanisms in Underwater Acoustic Environments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-30

    Elastic wave propagation mechanisms in underwater acoustic environments Scott D. Frank Marist College Department of Mathematics Poughkeepsie...conversion from elastic propagation to acoustic propagation, and intense interface waves on underwater acoustic environments with elastic bottoms... acoustic energy in the water column. Elastic material parameters will be varied for analysis of the dissipation of water column acoustic energy

  16. Tunable damper for an acoustic wave guide

    DOEpatents

    Rogers, Samuel C.

    1984-01-01

    A damper for tunably damping acoustic waves in an ultrasonic waveguide is provided which may be used in a hostile environment such as a nuclear reactor. The area of the waveguide, which may be a selected size metal rod in which acoustic waves are to be damped, is wrapped, or surrounded, by a mass of stainless steel wool. The wool wrapped portion is then sandwiched between tuning plates, which may also be stainless steel, by means of clamping screws which may be adjusted to change the clamping force of the sandwiched assembly along the waveguide section. The plates are preformed along their length in a sinusoidally bent pattern with a period approximately equal to the acoustic wavelength which is to be damped. The bent pattern of the opposing plates are in phase along their length relative to their sinusoidal patterns so that as the clamping screws are tightened a bending stress is applied to the waveguide at 180.degree. intervals along the damping section to oppose the acoustic wave motions in the waveguide and provide good coupling of the wool to the guide. The damper is tuned by selectively tightening the clamping screws while monitoring the amplitude of the acoustic waves launched in the waveguide. It may be selectively tuned to damp particular acoustic wave modes (torsional or extensional, for example) and/or frequencies while allowing others to pass unattenuated.

  17. Tunable damper for an acoustic wave guide

    DOEpatents

    Rogers, S.C.

    1982-10-21

    A damper for tunably damping acoustic waves in an ultrasonic waveguide is provided which may be used in a hostile environment such as a nuclear reactor. The area of the waveguide, which may be a selected size metal rod in which acoustic waves are to be damped, is wrapped, or surrounded, by a mass of stainless steel wool. The wool wrapped portion is then sandwiched between tuning plates, which may also be stainless steel, by means of clamping screws which may be adjusted to change the clamping force of the sandwiched assembly along the waveguide section. The plates are preformed along their length in a sinusoidally bent pattern with a period approximately equal to the acoustic wavelength which is to be damped. The bent pattern of the opposing plates are in phase along their length relative to their sinusoidal patterns so that as the clamping screws are tightened a bending stress is applied to the waveguide at 180/sup 0/ intervals along the damping section to oppose the acoustic wave motions in the waveguide and provide good coupling of the wool to the guide. The damper is tuned by selectively tightening the clamping screws while monitoring the amplitude of the acoustic waves launched in the waveguide. It may be selectively tuned to damp particular acoustic wave modes (torsional or extensional, for example) and/or frequencies while allowing others to pass unattenuated.

  18. Dust-acoustic solitary waves in dusty plasmas with non-thermal ions

    SciTech Connect

    Asgari, H.; Muniandy, S. V.; Wong, C. S.

    2013-02-15

    Most studies on dusty plasmas have assumed that electrons and ions follow Maxwellian distributions. However, in the presence of energetic ions, the distribution of ions tends to be non-Maxwellian. It is shown here that the existence of non-thermal ions would increase the phase velocity of a dust-acoustic wave. It is also found that the change in the phase velocity profoundly affects the characteristics of a dust-acoustic solitary wave.

  19. Reflection and Refraction of Acoustic Waves by a Shock Wave

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brillouin, J.

    1957-01-01

    The presence of sound waves in one or the other of the fluid regions on either side of a shock wave is made apparent, in the region under superpressure, by acoustic waves (reflected or refracted according to whether the incident waves lie in the region of superpressure or of subpressure) and by thermal waves. The characteristics of these waves are calculated for a plane, progressive, and uniform incident wave. In the case of refraction, the refracted acoustic wave can, according to the incidence, be plane, progressive, and uniform or take the form of an 'accompanying wave' which remains attached to the front of the shock while sliding parallel to it. In all cases, geometrical constructions permit determination of the kinematic characteristics of the reflected or refractive acoustic waves. The dynamic relationships show that the amplitude of the reflected wave is always less than that of the incident wave. The amplitude of the refracted wave, whatever its type, may in certain cases be greater than that of the incident wave.

  20. Bleustein-Gulyaev-Shimizu surface acoustic waves in two-dimensional piezoelectric phononic crystals.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Jin-Chen; Wu, Tsung-Tsong

    2006-06-01

    In this paper, we present a study on the existence of Bleustein-Gulyaev-Shimizu piezoelectric surface acoustic waves in a two-dimensional piezoelectric phononic crystal (zinc oxide, ZnO, and cadmium-sulfide, CdS) using the plane wave expansion method. In the configuration of ZnO (100)/CdS(100) phononic crystal, the calculated results show that this type of surface waves has higher acoustic wave velocities, high electromechanical coupling coefficients, and larger band gap width than those of the Rayleigh surface waves and pseudosurface waves. In addition, we find that the folded modes of the Bleustein-Gulyaev-Shimizu surface waves have higher coupling coefficients.

  1. Investigation of Shallow Bulk Acoustic Waves

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-11-12

    with the theoretical calculation using equivalent circuit model. How- ever, the spurious bulk wave level at high frequencies is much lower than that of...effect of a metallic grating on SBAW devices on quartz. 7 A periodic metallic structure will support horizontal shear surface waves if the finger...We have extensively investigated shallow bulk acoustic waves in. terms of material aspects, transducer equivalent circuits and device dev-.iopment

  2. Single crystal metal wedges for surface acoustic wave propagation

    DOEpatents

    Fisher, E.S.

    1980-05-09

    An ultrasonic testing device has been developed to evaluate flaws and inhomogeneities in the near-surface region of a test material. A metal single crystal wedge is used to generate high frequency Rayleigh surface waves in the test material surface by conversion of a slow velocity, bulk acoustic mode in the wedge into a Rayleigh wave at the metal-wedge test material interface. Particular classes of metals have been found to provide the bulk acoustic modes necessary for production of a surface wave with extremely high frequency and angular collimation. The high frequency allows flaws and inhomogeneities to be examined with greater resolution. The high degree of angular collimation for the outgoing ultrasonic beam permits precision angular location of flaws and inhomogeneities in the test material surface.

  3. Analytical description of nonlinear acoustic waves in the solar chromosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litvinenko, Yuri E.; Chae, Jongchul

    2017-02-01

    Aims: Vertical propagation of acoustic waves of finite amplitude in an isothermal, gravitationally stratified atmosphere is considered. Methods: Methods of nonlinear acoustics are used to derive a dispersive solution, which is valid in a long-wavelength limit, and a non-dispersive solution, which is valid in a short-wavelength limit. The influence of the gravitational field on wave-front breaking and shock formation is described. The generation of a second harmonic at twice the driving wave frequency, previously detected in numerical simulations, is demonstrated analytically. Results: Application of the results to three-minute chromospheric oscillations, driven by velocity perturbations at the base of the solar atmosphere, is discussed. Numerical estimates suggest that the second harmonic signal should be detectable in an upper chromosphere by an instrument such as the Fast Imaging Solar Spectrograph installed at the 1.6-m New Solar Telescope of the Big Bear Observatory.

  4. Single crystal metal wedges for surface acoustic wave propagation

    DOEpatents

    Fisher, Edward S.

    1982-01-01

    An ultrasonic testing device has been developed to evaluate flaws and inhomogeneities in the near-surface region of a test material. A metal single crystal wedge is used to generate high frequency Rayleigh surface waves in the test material surface by conversion of a slow velocity, bulk acoustic mode in the wedge into a Rayleigh wave at the metal-wedge test material interface. Particular classes of metals have been found to provide the bulk acoustic modes necessary for production of a surface wave with extremely high frequency and angular collimation. The high frequency allows flaws and inhomogeneities to be examined with greater resolution. The high degree of angular collimation for the outgoing ultrasonic beam permits precision angular location of flaws and inhomogeneities in the test material surface.

  5. Improved equivalent circuits for acoustic plate wave devices.

    PubMed

    Zaitsev, B D; Kuznetsova, I E; Joshi, S G

    2002-05-01

    This paper presents improved equivalent circuits for the analysis and design of acoustic plate wave devices. The method uses a mixed equivalent circuit for the interdigital transducer consisting of both active and passive sections placed on the surface of a piezoelectric plate. The values of the various circuit elements are obtained by carrying out a best fit between theoretical and experimental frequency dependence of the real and imaginary parts of transducer input impedance. Knowledge of the equivalent circuit parameters allows one to optimize design of the devices. The method has been successfully employed for the design of one-port shear-horizontal wave resonators on Y-X lithium niobate plates. The proposed method can also be utilized for determining acoustic wave velocity with high accuracy.

  6. Multiple-frequency surface acoustic wave devices as sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricco, Antonio J.; Martin, Stephen J.

    We have designed, fabricated, and tested a multiple-frequency acoustic wave (MUFAW) device on ST-cut quartz with nominal surface acoustic wave (SAW) center frequencies of 16, 40, 100, and 250 MHz. The four frequencies are obtained by patterning four sets of input and output interdigital transducers of differing periodicities on a single substrate. Such a device allows the frequency dependence of AW sensor perturbations to be examined, aiding in the elucidation of the operative interaction mechanism(s). Initial measurements of the SAW response to the vacuum deposition of a thin nickel film show the expected frequency dependence of mass sensitivity in addition to the expected frequency independence of the magnitude of the acoustoelectric effect. By measuring changes in both wave velocity and attenuation at multiple frequencies, extrinsic perturbations such as temperature and pressure changes are readily differentiated from one another and from changes in surface mass.

  7. Acoustic-velocity measurements in materials using a regenerative method

    DOEpatents

    Laine, E.F.

    1982-09-30

    Acoustic energy is propatated through earth material between an electro-acoustic generator and a receiver which converts the received acoustic energy into electrical signals. A closed loop is formed by a variable gain amplifier system connected between the receiver and the generator. The gain of the amplifier system is increased until sustained oscillations are produced in the closed loop. The frequency of the oscillations is measured as an indication of the acoustic propagation velocity through the earth material. The amplifier gain is measured as an indication of the acoustic attenuation through the earth materials. The method is also applicable to the non-destructive testing of structural materials, such as steel, aluminum and concrete.

  8. Acoustic velocity measurements in materials using a regenerative method

    DOEpatents

    Laine, Edwin F.

    1986-01-01

    Acoustic energy is propagated through earth material between an electro-acoustic generator and a receiver which converts the received acoustic energy into electrical signals. A closed loop is formed by a variable gain amplifier system connected between the receiver and the generator. The gain of the amplifier system is increased until sustained oscillations are produced in the closed loop. The frequency of the oscillations is measured as an indication of the acoustic propagation velocity through the earth material. The amplifier gain is measured as an indication of the acoustic attenuation through the earth materials. The method is also applicable to the non-destructive testing of structural materials, such as steel, aluminum and concrete.

  9. Imaging of Acoustic Waves in Sand

    SciTech Connect

    Deason, Vance Albert; Telschow, Kenneth Louis; Watson, Scott Marshall

    2003-08-01

    There is considerable interest in detecting objects such as landmines shallowly buried in loose earth or sand. Various techniques involving microwave, acoustic, thermal and magnetic sensors have been used to detect such objects. Acoustic and microwave sensors have shown promise, especially if used together. In most cases, the sensor package is scanned over an area to eventually build up an image or map of anomalies. We are proposing an alternate, acoustic method that directly provides an image of acoustic waves in sand or soil, and their interaction with buried objects. The INEEL Laser Ultrasonic Camera utilizes dynamic holography within photorefractive recording materials. This permits one to image and demodulate acoustic waves on surfaces in real time, without scanning. A video image is produced where intensity is directly and linearly proportional to surface motion. Both specular and diffusely reflecting surfaces can be accomodated and surface motion as small as 0.1 nm can be quantitatively detected. This system was used to directly image acoustic surface waves in sand as well as in solid objects. Waves as frequencies of 16 kHz were generated using modified acoustic speakers. These waves were directed through sand toward partially buried objects. The sand container was not on a vibration isolation table, but sat on the lab floor. Interaction of wavefronts with buried objects showed reflection, diffraction and interference effects that could provide clues to location and characteristics of buried objects. Although results are preliminary, success in this effort suggests that this method could be applied to detection of buried landmines or other near-surface items such as pipes and tanks.

  10. Wave measurements using GPS velocity signals.

    PubMed

    Doong, Dong-Jiing; Lee, Beng-Chun; Kao, Chia Chuen

    2011-01-01

    This study presents the idea of using GPS-output velocity signals to obtain wave measurement data. The application of the transformation from a velocity spectrum to a displacement spectrum in conjunction with the directional wave spectral theory are the core concepts in this study. Laboratory experiments were conducted to verify the accuracy of the inversed displacement of the surface of the sea. A GPS device was installed on a moored accelerometer buoy to verify the GPS-derived wave parameters. It was determined that loss or drifting of the GPS signal, as well as energy spikes occurring in the low frequency band led to erroneous measurements. Through the application of moving average skill and a process of frequency cut-off to the GPS output velocity, correlations between GPS-derived, and accelerometer buoy-measured significant wave heights and periods were both improved to 0.95. The GPS-derived one-dimensional and directional wave spectra were in agreement with the measurements. Despite the direction verification showing a 10° bias, this exercise still provided useful information with sufficient accuracy for a number of specific purposes. The results presented in this study indicate that using GPS output velocity is a reasonable alternative for the measurement of ocean waves.

  11. Active micromixer using surface acoustic wave streaming

    SciTech Connect

    Branch; Darren W. , Meyer; Grant D. , Craighead; Harold G.

    2011-05-17

    An active micromixer uses a surface acoustic wave, preferably a Rayleigh wave, propagating on a piezoelectric substrate to induce acoustic streaming in a fluid in a microfluidic channel. The surface acoustic wave can be generated by applying an RF excitation signal to at least one interdigital transducer on the piezoelectric substrate. The active micromixer can rapidly mix quiescent fluids or laminar streams in low Reynolds number flows. The active micromixer has no moving parts (other than the SAW transducer) and is, therefore, more reliable, less damaging to sensitive fluids, and less susceptible to fouling and channel clogging than other types of active and passive micromixers. The active micromixer is adaptable to a wide range of geometries, can be easily fabricated, and can be integrated in a microfluidic system, reducing dead volume. Finally, the active micromixer has on-demand on/off mixing capability and can be operated at low power.

  12. Topological charge pump by surface acoustic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Zheng; Shi-Ping, Feng; Shi-Jie, Yang

    2016-06-01

    Quantized electron pumping by the surface acoustic wave across barriers created by a sequence of split metal gates is interpreted from the viewpoint of topology. The surface acoustic wave serves as a one-dimensional periodical potential whose energy spectrum possesses the Bloch band structure. The time-dependent phase plays the role of an adiabatic parameter of the Hamiltonian which induces a geometrical phase. The pumping currents are related to the Chern numbers of the filled bands below the Fermi energy. Based on this understanding, we predict a novel effect of quantized but non-monotonous current plateaus simultaneously pumped by two homodromous surface acoustic waves. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11374036) and the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2012CB821403).

  13. Group velocity of neutrino waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Indumathi, D.; Kaul, Romesh K.; Murthy, M. V. N.; Rajasekaran, G.

    2012-03-01

    We follow up on the analysis of Mecozzi and Bellini (arxiv:arXiv:1110.1253v1) where they showed, in principle, the possibility of superluminal propagation of neutrinos, as indicated by the recent OPERA result. We refine the analysis by introducing wave packets for the superposition of energy eigenstates and discuss the implications of their results with realistic values for the mixing and mass parameters in a full three neutrino mixing scenario. Our analysis shows the possibility of superluminal propagation of neutrino flavour in a very narrow range of neutrino parameter space. Simultaneously this reduces the number of observable events drastically. Therefore, the OPERA result cannot be explained in this frame-work.

  14. Ultrafast microfluidics using surface acoustic waves

    PubMed Central

    Yeo, Leslie Y.; Friend, James R.

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate that surface acoustic waves (SAWs), nanometer amplitude Rayleigh waves driven at megahertz order frequencies propagating on the surface of a piezoelectric substrate, offer a powerful method for driving a host of extremely fast microfluidic actuation and micro∕bioparticle manipulation schemes. We show that sessile drops can be translated rapidly on planar substrates or fluid can be pumped through microchannels at 1–10 cm∕s velocities, which are typically one to two orders quicker than that afforded by current microfluidic technologies. Through symmetry-breaking, azimuthal recirculation can be induced within the drop to drive strong inertial microcentrifugation for micromixing and particle concentration or separation. Similar micromixing strategies can be induced in the same microchannel in which fluid is pumped with the SAW by merely changing the SAW frequency to rapidly switch the uniform through-flow into a chaotic oscillatory flow by exploiting superpositioning of the irradiated sound waves from the sidewalls of the microchannel. If the flow is sufficiently quiescent, the nodes of the transverse standing wave that arises across the microchannel also allow for particle aggregation, and hence, sorting on nodal lines. In addition, the SAW also facilitates other microfluidic capabilities. For example, capillary waves excited at the free surface of a sessile drop by the SAW underneath it can be exploited for micro∕nanoparticle collection and sorting at nodal points or lines at low powers. At higher powers, the large accelerations off the substrate surface as the SAW propagates across drives rapid destabilization of the drop free surface giving rise to inertial liquid jets that persist over 1–2 cm in length or atomization of the entire drop to produce 1–10 μm monodispersed aerosol droplets, which can be exploited for ink-jet printing, mass spectrometry interfacing, or pulmonary drug delivery. The atomization of polymer∕protein solutions

  15. Acoustic velocities of two-phase mixtures of cryogenic fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griggs, E. I.; Winter, E. R. F.; Schoenhals, R. J.; Hendricks, R. C.

    1982-01-01

    Calculated values of the acoustic velocity are presented for single-component and two-component, two-phase mixtures. Three different analytic models were employed. For purposes of comparison, all three models were used in making acoustic-velocity calculations for single-component, equivalent bubbly two-phase mixtures (with insoluble gas) of oxygen and helium and hydrogen and helium. In all cases the results are shown graphically so that the effects of variation in quality or void fraction, temperature and pressure are illustrated.

  16. Finite Difference Modeling of Wave Progpagation in Acoustic TiltedTI Media

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Linbin; Rector III, James W.; Hoversten, G. Michael

    2005-03-21

    Based on an acoustic assumption (shear wave velocity is zero) and a dispersion relation, we derive an acoustic wave equation for P-waves in tilted transversely isotropic (TTI) media (transversely isotropic media with a tilted symmetry axis). This equation has fewer parameters than an elastic wave equation in TTI media and yields an accurate description of P-wave traveltimes and spreading-related attenuation. Our TTI acoustic wave equation is a fourth-order equation in time and space. We demonstrate that the acoustic approximation allows the presence of shear waves in the solution. The substantial differences in traveltime and amplitude between data created using VTI and TTI assumptions is illustrated in examples.

  17. Shear wave velocity measurements in marine sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, J. E.

    1982-09-01

    Pulsed ultrasonic techniques for the measurement of sound speed are reliable and well documented. Extension of these techniques to the measurement of shear wave velocities in marine sediments, generally was unsuccessful. Recently developed shear wave transducers, based upon piezoelectric benders operated at sonic frequencies, provide significantly improved transducer-sample mechanical coupling. This improved coupling allows the application of pulsed techniques to the measurement of shear wave velocities in marine sediments, and the rapid determination of sediment dynamic elastic properties. Two types of bender-based shear wave transducer and preliminary data are described: 1) a probe configuration for box core samples, and 2) a modification to the Hamilton Frame Velocimeter for cut samples.

  18. Air-ground interface: Surface waves, surface impedance and acoustic-to-seismic coupling coefficient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daigle, Gilles; Embleton, Tony

    1990-01-01

    In atmospheric acoustics, the subject of surface waves has been an area of discussion for many years. The existence of an acoustic surface wave is now well established theoretically. The mathematical solution for spherical wave propagation above an impedance boundary includes the possibility of a contribution that possesses all the standard properties for a surface wave. Surface waves exist when the surface is sufficiently porous, relative to its acoustical resistance, that it can influence the airborne particle velocity near the surface and reduce the phase velocity of sound waves in air at the surface. This traps some of the sound energy in the air to remain near the surface as it propagates. Above porous grounds, the existence of surface waves has eluded direct experimental confirmation (pulse experiments have failed to show a separate arrival expected from the reduced phase speed) and indirect evidence for its existence has appeared contradictory. The experimental evidence for the existence of an acoustical surface wave above porous boundaries is reviewed. Recent measurements including pulse experiments are also described. A few years ago the acoustic impedance of a grass-covered surface was measured in the frequency range 30 to 300 Hz. Here, further measurements on the same site are discussed. These measurements include core samples, a shallow refractive survey to determine the seismic velocities, and measurements of the acoustic-to-seismic coupling coefficient.

  19. Envelope solitons of acoustic plate modes and surface waves.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Andreas P; Kovalev, Alexander S

    2003-06-01

    The problem of the existence of evelope solitons in elastic plates and at solid surfaces covered by an elastic film is revisited with special attention paid to nonlinear long-wave short-wave interactions. Using asymptotic expansions and multiple scales, conditions for the existence of envelope solitons are established and it is shown how their parameters can be expressed in terms of the elastic moduli and mass densities of the materials involved. In addition to homogeneous plates, weak periodic modulation of the plate's material parameters are also considered. In the case of wave propagation in an elastic plate, modulations of weakly nonlinear carrier waves are governed by a coupled system of partial differential equations consisting of evolution equations for the complex amplitude of the carrier wave (the nonlinear Schrödinger equation for envelope solitons and the Mills-Trullinger equations for gap solitons), and the wave equation for long-wavelength acoustic plate modes. In contrast to this situation, envelope solitons of surface acoustic waves in a layered structure are normally described by the nonlinear Schrödinger equation alone. However, at higher orders of the carrier wave amplitude, the envelope soliton is found to be accompanied by a quasistatic long-wavelength strain field, which may be localized at the surface with penetration depth into the substrate of the order of the inverse amplitude or which may radiate energy into the bulk. A new set of modulation equations is derived for the resonant case of the carrier wave's group velocity being equal to the phase velocity of long-wavelength Rayleigh waves of the uncoated substrate.

  20. 25 years of dust acoustic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merlino, Robert L.; Merlino

    2014-12-01

    The dust acoustic wave (DAW) was first discussed by P. K. Shukla in May of 1989 at the First Capri Workshop on Dusty Plasmas. In the past 25 years, the subsequent publication of the linear and nonlinear properties of the DAW (Rao, N. N., Shukla, P. K. and Yu, M. Y. 1990 Planet. Space Sci. 38, 543) has generated and sustained a large body of theoretical and experimental research that has clarified the physics of collective effects in dusty plasmas. A unique feature of the DAW is that it can be observed (literally) using laser illumination and high-speed videography, revealing details of wave-particle interactions at an unprecedented single particle level. This paper attempts to review some of the contributions and extensions of dust acoustic wave physics, as well as identify recent findings that illustrate the potential importance of this dust wave in the agglomeration of dust particles.

  1. Acoustic waves superimposed on incompressible flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodge, Steve

    1990-01-01

    The use of incompressible approximations in deriving solutions to the Lighthill wave equation was investigated for problems where an analytical solution could be found. A particular model problem involves the determination of the sound field of a spherical oscillating bubble in an ideal fluid. It is found that use of incompressible boundary conditions leads to good approximations in the important region of high acoustic wave number.

  2. Broadband acoustic cloak for ultrasound waves.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shu; Xia, Chunguang; Fang, Nicholas

    2011-01-14

    Invisibility devices based on coordinate transformation have opened up a new field of considerable interest. We present here the first practical realization of a low-loss and broadband acoustic cloak for underwater ultrasound. This metamaterial cloak is constructed with a network of acoustic circuit elements, namely, serial inductors and shunt capacitors. Our experiment clearly shows that the acoustic cloak can effectively bend the ultrasound waves around the hidden object, with reduced scattering and shadow. Because of the nonresonant nature of the building elements, this low-loss (∼6  dB/m) cylindrical cloak exhibits invisibility over a broad frequency range from 52 to 64 kHz. Furthermore, our experimental study indicates that this design approach should be scalable to different acoustic frequencies and offers the possibility for a variety of devices based on coordinate transformation.

  3. Gas sensing with surface acoustic wave devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, S. J.; Schweizer, K. S.; Ricco, A. J.; Zipperian, T. E.

    1985-03-01

    The use of a ZnO-on-Si surface acoustic wave (SAW) resonator as a gas sensor is discussed. In particular, the sensitivity of the device to organic vapors is examined. The planar nature of the SAW device, in which the acoustic energy is confined to within roughly one acoustic wavelength of the surface, makes the device extremely sensitive to surface perturbations. This characteristic has been exploited in the construction of SAW gas sensors in which the surface wave propagation characteristics are altered by species adsorbed from the ambient gas. The porous nature of the sputtered ZnO film, in conjunction with the microbalance capability of the SAW device, gives the sensor the ability to distinguish molecules on the basis of both size and mass.

  4. Wave Phenomena in an Acoustic Resonant Chamber

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Mary E.; And Others

    1974-01-01

    Discusses the design and operation of a high Q acoustical resonant chamber which can be used to demonstrate wave phenomena such as three-dimensional normal modes, Q values, densities of states, changes in the speed of sound, Fourier decomposition, damped harmonic oscillations, sound-absorbing properties, and perturbation and scattering problems.…

  5. Acoustic solitons: A robust tool to investigate the generation and detection of ultrafast acoustic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Péronne, Emmanuel; Chuecos, Nicolas; Thevenard, Laura; Perrin, Bernard

    2017-02-01

    Solitons are self-preserving traveling waves of great interest in nonlinear physics but hard to observe experimentally. In this report an experimental setup is designed to observe and characterize acoustic solitons in a GaAs(001) substrate. It is based on careful temperature control of the sample and an interferometric detection scheme. Ultrashort acoustic solitons, such as the one predicted by the Korteweg-de Vries equation, are observed and fully characterized. Their particlelike nature is clearly evidenced and their unique properties are thoroughly checked. The spatial averaging of the soliton wave front is shown to account for the differences between the theoretical and experimental soliton profile. It appears that ultrafast acoustic experiments provide a precise measurement of the soliton velocity. It allows for absolute calibration of the setup as well as the response function analysis of the detection layer. Moreover, the temporal distribution of the solitons is also analyzed with the help of the inverse scattering method. It shows how the initial acoustic pulse profile which gives birth to solitons after nonlinear propagation can be retrieved. Such investigations provide a new tool to probe transient properties of highly excited matter through the study of the emitted acoustic pulse after laser excitation.

  6. Marble Ageing Characterization by Acoustic Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudani, Mohamed El; Wilkie-Chancellier, Nicolas; Martinez, Loïc; Hébert, Ronan; Rolland, Olivier; Forst, Sébastien; Vergès-Belmin, Véronique; Serfaty, Stéphane

    In cultural heritage, statue marble characterization by acoustic waves is a well-known non-destructive method. Such investigations through the statues by time of flight method (TOF) point out sound speeds decrease with ageing. However for outdoor stored statues as the ones in the gardens of Chateau de Versailles, ageing affects mainly the surface of the Carrara marble. The present paper proposes an experimental study of the marble acoustic properties variations during accelerated laboratory ageing. The surface degradation of the marble is reproduced in laboratory for 29 mm thick marble samples by using heating/cooling thermal cycles on one face of a marble plate. Acoustic waves are generated by 1 MHz central frequency contact transducers excited by a voltage pulse placed on both sides of the plate. During the ageing and by using ad hoc transducers, the marble samples are characterized in transmission, along their volume by shear, compressional TOF measurements and along their surface by Rayleigh waves measurements. For Rayleigh waves, both TOF by transducers and laser vibrometry methods are used to detect the Rayleigh wave. The transmission measurements point out a deep decrease of the waves speeds in conjunction with a dramatic decrease of the maximum frequency transmitted. The marble acts as a low pass filter whose characteristic frequency cut decreases with ageing. This pattern occurs also for the Rayleigh wave surface measurements. The speed change in conjunction with the bandwidth translation is shown to be correlated to the material de-structuration during ageing. With a similar behavior but reversed in time, the same king of phenomena have been observed trough sol-gel materials during their structuration from liquid to solid state (Martinez, L. et all (2004). "Chirp-Z analysis for sol-gel transition monitoring". Ultrasonics, 42(1), 507-510.). A model is proposed to interpret the acoustical measurements

  7. Measuring Acoustic Nonlinearity by Collinear Mixing Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, M.; Tang, G.; Jacobs, L. J.; Qu, J.

    2011-06-01

    It is well known that the acoustic nonlinearity parameter β is correlated to fatigue damage in metallic materials. Various methods have been developed to measure β. One of the most often used methods is the harmonic generation technique, in which β is obtained by measuring the magnitude of the second order harmonic waves. An inherent weakness of this method is the difficulty in distinguishing material nonlinearity from the nonlinearity of the measurement system. In this paper, we demonstrate the possibility of using collinear mixing waves to measure β. The wave mixing method is based on the interaction between two incident waves in a nonlinear medium. Under certain conditions, such interactions generate a third wave of different frequency. This generated third wave is also called resonant wave, because its amplitude is unbounded if the medium has no attenuation. Such resonant waves are less sensitive to the nonlinearity of the measurement system, and have the potential to identify the source location of the nonlinearity. In this work, we used a longitudinal wave and a shear wave as the incident waves. The resonant shear wave is measured experimentally on samples made of aluminum and steel, respectively. Numerical simulations of the tests were also performed using a finite difference method.

  8. Observation of stimulated electron acoustic wave scattering: the case for nonlinear kinetic effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montgomery, D. S.; Cobble, J. A.; Fernandez, J. C.; Rose, H. A.; Focia, R. J.; Russell, D. A.

    2001-10-01

    Electrostatic waves with a frequency and phase velocity between an ion acoustic wave (IAW) and an electron plasma wave (EPW) have been observed with Thomson scattering in inhomogeneous plasmas, and in the backscattered spectrum for homogeneous single hot spot laser plasmas. We show that these waves are consistent with an electron-acoustic wave (EAW) that is a BGK-like mode due to electron trapping. The nonlinear dispersion relation for BGK-like EPW and EAW is discussed, and previous inhomogeneous Trident and Nova data are re-examined in this context. The possible implications of these results for backscattered SRS on the NIF are discussed.

  9. Cloaking of the momentum in acoustic waves.

    PubMed

    Sklan, Sophia

    2010-01-01

    Through an appropriate change in variables, we find that the three-dimensional acoustic wave equation is subject to the transformation media interpretation. In particular, we determine that this interpretation can be extended beyond the pressure difference to also account for the momentum transported by the wave. The suitability of momentum transport is especially interesting as it is an example where the field of interest is not governed by a wave equation. We examine how both fields behave in the case of cloaking. Explicit consideration of the boundary conditions shows that perfect cloaking is preserved, even when the incoming momentum is nonzero at the surface of the cloak.

  10. Surface acoustic wave propagation in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thalmeier, Peter; Dóra, Balázs; Ziegler, Klaus

    2010-01-01

    Surface acoustic wave (SAW) propagation is a powerful method to investigate two-dimensional (2D) electron systems. We show how SAW observables are influenced by coupling to the 2D massless Dirac electrons of graphene and argue that Landau oscillations in SAW propagation can be observed as function of gate voltage for constant field. Contrary to other transport measurements, the zero-field SAW propagation gives the wave-vector dependence of graphene conductivity for small wave numbers. We predict a crossover from Schrödinger to Dirac-like behavior as a function of gate voltage, with no attenuation in the latter for clean samples.

  11. Overstability of acoustic waves in strongly magnetized anisotropic magnetohydrodynamic shear flows

    SciTech Connect

    Uchava, E. S.; Shergelashvili, B. M.; Tevzadze, A. G.; Poedts, S.

    2014-08-15

    We present a linear stability analysis of the perturbation modes in anisotropic magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) flows with velocity shear and strong magnetic field. Collisionless or weakly collisional plasma is described within the 16-momentum MHD fluid closure model that takes into account not only the effect of pressure anisotropy but also the effect of anisotropic heat fluxes. In this model, the low frequency acoustic wave is revealed into a standard acoustic mode and higher frequency fast thermo-acoustic and lower frequency slow thermo-acoustic waves. It is shown that thermo-acoustic waves become unstable and grow exponentially when the heat flux parameter exceeds some critical value. It seems that velocity shear makes thermo-acoustic waves overstable even at subcritical heat flux parameters. Thus, when the effect of heat fluxes is not profound acoustic waves will grow due to the velocity shear, while at supercritical heat fluxes the flow reveals compressible thermal instability. Anisotropic thermal instability should be also important in astrophysical environments, where it will limit the maximal value of magnetic field that a low density ionized anisotropic flow can sustain.

  12. Acoustic Wave Filter Technology - A Review.

    PubMed

    Ruppel, Clemens

    2017-04-04

    Today, acoustic filters are the filter technology to meet the requirements with respect to performance dictated by the cellular phone standards and their form factor. Around 2 billion cellular phones are sold every year, and smart phones are of a very high percentage of approximately two thirds. Smart phones require a very high number of filter functions ranging from the low double-digit range up to almost triple digit numbers in the near future. In the frequency range up to 1 GHz surface acoustic wave (SAW) filters are almost exclusively employed, while in the higher frequency range bulk acoustic wave (BAW) and SAW filters are competing for their shares. Prerequisites for the success of acoustic filters were the availability of high quality substrates, advanced and highly reproducible fabrication technologies, optimum filter techniques, precise simulation software, and advanced design tools that allow the fast and efficient design according to customer specifications. The paper will try to focus on innovations leading to high volume applications of intermediate frequency (IF) and radio frequency (RF) acoustic filters, e.g., TV IF filters, IF filters for cellular phones, and SAW/BAW RF filters for the RF front-end of cellular phones.

  13. Millimeter-Wave Acoustic Transducers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-04-01

    Phys . Rev. Lett . 54, 1810 ( 1985 ). 28. S.A. Akhmanov, V.V. Fadeev, R.V. Khokhlov, and O.N. Chunaev, Sov . Phys . JETP Lett . 6, 85...Acoust. Soc. Am. 66, 1801 (1979). 41 . F.P. Milliken, K.W. Schwartz and C.W. Smith, Phys . Rev. Lett . 48, 1204 (1982). 42 . T.E. Huber and H.J. Maris... Phys . Lett . 7, 264 (1965). 7. K.H. Yang, P.L. Richards, and Y.R. Shen, J. Appl. Phys . 44, 1417 (1973). 8. H.K. Wong, G.K. Wong and J.B.

  14. High frequency acoustic wave scattering from turbulent premixed flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narra, Venkateswarlu

    This thesis describes an experimental investigation of high frequency acoustic wave scattering from turbulent premixed flames. The objective of this work was to characterize the scattered incoherent acoustic field and determine its parametric dependence on frequency, flame brush thickness, incident and measurement angles, mean velocity and flame speed. The experimental facility consists of a slot burner with a flat flame sheet that is approximately 15 cm wide and 12 cm tall. The baseline cold flow characteristics and flame sheet statistics were extensively characterized. Studies were performed over a wide range of frequencies (1-24 kHz) in order to characterize the role of the incident acoustic wave length. The spectrum of the scattered acoustic field showed distinct incoherent spectral sidebands on either side of the driving frequency. The scattered incoherent field was characterized in terms of the incoherent field strength and spectral bandwidth and related to the theoretical predictions. The role of the flame front wrinkling scale, i.e., flame brush thickness, was also studied. Flame brush thickness was varied independent of the mean velocity and flame speed by using a variable turbulence generator. Results are reported for five flame brush thickness cases, ranging from 1.2 mm to 5.2 mm. Some dependence of scattered field characteristics on flame brush thickness was observed, but the magnitude of the effect was much smaller than expected from theoretical considerations. The spatial dependence of the scattered field was investigated by measuring the scattered field at four measurement angles and exciting the flame at four incident angles. Theory predicts that these variations influence the spatial scale of the acoustic wave normal to the flame, a result confirmed by the measurements. Measurements were performed for multiple combinations of mean velocities and flame speeds. The scattered field was observed to depend strongly on the flame speed. Further analysis

  15. Extraordinary transmission of gigahertz surface acoustic waves

    PubMed Central

    Mezil, Sylvain; Chonan, Kazuki; Otsuka, Paul H.; Tomoda, Motonobu; Matsuda, Osamu; Lee, Sam H.; Wright, Oliver B.

    2016-01-01

    Extraordinary transmission of waves, i.e. a transmission superior to the amount predicted by geometrical considerations of the aperture alone, has to date only been studied in the bulk. Here we present a new class of extraordinary transmission for waves confined in two dimensions to a flat surface. By means of acoustic numerical simulations in the gigahertz range, corresponding to acoustic wavelengths λ ~ 3–50 μm, we track the transmission of plane surface acoustic wave fronts between two silicon blocks joined by a deeply subwavelength bridge of variable length with or without an attached cavity. Several resonant modes of the structure, both one- and two-dimensional in nature, lead to extraordinary acoustic transmission, in this case with transmission efficiencies, i.e. intensity enhancements, up to ~23 and ~8 in the two respective cases. We show how the cavity shape and bridge size influence the extraordinary transmission efficiency. Applications include new metamaterials and subwavelength imaging. PMID:27640998

  16. Acoustic-gravity waves, theory and application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadri, Usama; Farrell, William E.; Munk, Walter

    2015-04-01

    Acoustic-gravity waves (AGW) propagate in the ocean under the influence of both the compressibility of sea water and the restoring force of gravity. The gravity dependence vanishes if the wave vector is normal to the ocean surface, but becomes increasingly important as the wave vector acquires a horizontal tilt. They are excited by many sources, including non-linear surface wave interactions, disturbances of the ocean bottom (submarine earthquakes and landslides) and underwater explosions. In this introductory lecture on acoustic-gravity waves, we describe their properties, and their relation to organ pipe modes, to microseisms, and to deep ocean signatures by short surface waves. We discuss the generation of AGW by underwater earthquakes; knowledge of their behaviour with water depth can be applied for the early detection of tsunamis. We also discuss their generation by the non-linear interaction of surface gravity waves, which explains the major role they play in transforming energy from the ocean surface to the crust, as part of the microseisms phenomenon. Finally, they contribute to horizontal water transport at depth, which might affect benthic life.

  17. Full bandwidth calibration procedure for acoustic probes containing a pressure and particle velocity sensor.

    PubMed

    Basten, Tom G H; de Bree, Hans-Elias

    2010-01-01

    Calibration of acoustic particle velocity sensors is still difficult due to the lack of standardized sensors to compare with. Recently it is shown by Jacobsen and Jaud [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 120, 830-837 (2006)] that it is possible to calibrate a sound pressure and particle velocity sensor in free field conditions at higher frequencies. This is done by using the known acoustic impedance at a certain distance of a spherical loudspeaker. When the sound pressure is measured with a calibrated reference microphone, the particle velocity can be calculated from the known impedance and the measured pressure. At lower frequencies, this approach gives unreliable results. The method is now extended to lower frequencies by measuring the acoustic pressure inside the spherical source. At lower frequencies, the sound pressure inside the sphere is proportional to the movement of the loudspeaker membrane. If the movement is known, the particle velocity in front of the loudspeaker can be derived. This low frequency approach is combined with the high frequency approach giving a full bandwidth calibration procedure which can be used in free field conditions using a single calibration setup. The calibration results are compared with results obtained with a standing wave tube.

  18. The determination of the acoustic parameters of volcanic rocks from compressional velocity measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carroll, R.D.

    1969-01-01

    A statistical analysis was made of the relationship of various acoustic parameters of volcanic rocks to compressional wave velocities for data obtained in a volcanic region in Nevada. Some additional samples, chiefly granitic rocks, were also included in the study to extend the range of parameters and the variety of siliceous rock types sampled. Laboratory acoustic measurements obtained on 62 dry core samples were grouped with similar measurements obtained from geophysical logging devices at several depth intervals in a hole from which 15 of the core samples had been obtained. The effects of lithostatic and hydrostatic load on changing the rock acoustic parameters measured in the hole were noticeable when compared with the laboratory measurements on the same core. The results of the analyses determined by grouping all of the data, however, indicate that dynamic Young's, shear and bulk modulus, shear velocity, shear and compressional characteristic impedance, as well as amplitude and energy reflection coefficients may be reliably estimated on the basis of the compressional wave velocities of the rocks investigated. Less precise estimates can be made of density based on the rock compressional velocity. The possible extension of these relationships to include many siliceous rocks is suggested. ?? 1969.

  19. Ring waveguide resonator on surface acoustic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biryukov, S. V.; Martin, G.; Weihnacht, M.

    2007-04-01

    A simple regular electrode structure for surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices is proposed. The structure consists of an interdigital transducer in the form of a ring placed on the Z cut of a hexagonal piezoelectric crystal. Finite thickness electrodes produce the known slowing effect for a SAW in comparison with this SAW on a free surface. The closed "slow" electrode region with the "fast" surrounding region forms an open waveguide resonator structure with the acoustic field concentrated in the electrode region. If the radius of the structure is large enough for a given wavelength, an acceptable level of radiation losses can be reached. The electrical admittance of such resonator does not have sidelobes.

  20. Absorption of surface acoustic waves by graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, S. H.; Xu, W.

    2011-06-01

    We present a theoretical study on interactions of electrons in graphene with surface acoustic waves (SAWs). We find that owing to momentum and energy conservation laws, the electronic transition accompanied by the SAW absorption cannot be achieved via inter-band transition channels in graphene. For graphene, strong absorption of SAWs can be observed in a wide frequency range up to terahertz at room temperature. The intensity of SAW absorption by graphene depends strongly on temperature and can be adjusted by changing the carrier density. This study is relevant to the exploration of the acoustic properties of graphene and to the application of graphene as frequency-tunable SAW devices.

  1. Nonlinear standing waves in 2-D acoustic resonators.

    PubMed

    Cervenka, Milan; Bednarik, Michal

    2006-12-22

    This paper deals with 2-D simulation of finite-amplitude standing waves behavior in rectangular acoustic resonators. Set of three partial differential equations in third approximation formulated in conservative form is derived from fundamental equations of gas dynamics. These equations form a closed set for two components of acoustic velocity vector and density, the equations account for external driving force, gas dynamic nonlinearities and thermoviscous dissipation. Pressure is obtained from solution of the set by means of an analytical formula. The equations are formulated in the Cartesian coordinate system. The model equations set is solved numerically in time domain using a central semi-discrete difference scheme developed for integration of sets of convection-diffusion equations with two or more spatial coordinates. Numerical results show various patterns of acoustic field in resonators driven using vibrating piston with spatial distribution of velocity. Excitation of lateral shock-wave mode is observed when resonant conditions are fulfilled for longitudinal as well as for transversal direction along the resonator cavity.

  2. Elastic wave invariants for acoustic emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pardee, W. J.

    1981-07-01

    It is shown that there are four conserved properties of an elastic wave in an infinite isotropic plate: the energy, the two components of wave momentum parallel to the surface, and wave angular momentum normal to the surface. All four invariants are volume integrals of quadratic functions of the spatial (Eulerian) coordinates. The canonical energy-momentum density tensor and the orbital, spin, and total angular momentum density tensors are constructed and sufficient conditions for their conservation are demonstrated. A procedure for measuring the wave momentum of a surface wave is proposed. It is argued that these invariants are likely to be particularly useful characterizations of acoustic emission, e.g., from a growing crack. Experimental tests are proposed, and possible applications to practical monitoring problems described.

  3. Acoustic Remote Sensing of Rogue Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, Wade; Kadri, Usama

    2016-04-01

    We propose an early warning system for approaching rogue waves using the remote sensing of acoustic-gravity waves (AGWs) - progressive sound waves that propagate at the speed of sound in the ocean. It is believed that AGWs are generated during the formation of rogue waves, carrying information on the rogue waves at near the speed of sound, i.e. much faster than the rogue wave. The capability of identifying those special sound waves would enable detecting rogue waves most efficiently. A lot of promising work has been reported on AGWs in the last few years, part of which in the context of remote sensing as an early detection of tsunami. However, to our knowledge none of the work addresses the problem of rogue waves directly. Although there remains some uncertainty as to the proper definition of a rogue wave, there is little doubt that they exist and no one can dispute the potential destructive power of rogue waves. An early warning system for such extreme waves would become a demanding safety technology. A closed form expression was developed for the pressure induced by an impulsive source at the free surface (the Green's function) from which the solution for more general sources can be developed. In particular, we used the model of the Draupner Wave of January 1st, 1995 as a source and calculated the induced AGW signature. In particular we studied the AGW signature associated with a special feature of this wave, and characteristic of rogue waves, of the absence of any local set-down beneath the main crest and the presence of a large local set-up.

  4. The velocity field under breaking waves: coherent structures and turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melville, W. Kendall; Veron, Fabrice; White, Christopher J.

    2002-03-01

    Digital particle image velocimetry (DPIV) measurements of the velocity field under breaking waves in the laboratory are presented. The region of turbulent fluid directly generated by breaking is too large to be imaged in one video frame and so an ensemble-averaged representation of the flow is built up from a mosaic of image frames. It is found that breaking generates at least one coherent vortex that slowly propagates downstream at a speed consistent with the velocity induced by its image in the free surface. Both the kinetic energy of the flow and the vorticity decay approximately as t[minus sign]1. The Reynolds stress of the turbulence also decays as t[minus sign]1 and is, within the accuracy of the measurements, everywhere negative, consistent with downward transport of streamwise momentum. Estimates of the mometum flux from waves to currents based on the measurements of the Reynolds stress are consistent with earlier estimates. The implications of the measurements for breaking in the field are discussed. Based on geometrical optics and wave action conservation, we suggest that the presence of the breaking-induced vortex provides an explanation for the suppression of short waves by breaking. Finally, in Appendices, estimates of the majority of the terms in the turbulent kinetic energy budget are presented at an early stage in the evolution of the turbulence, and comparisons with independent acoustical measurements of breaking are presented.

  5. Modulation of a quantum positron acoustic wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amin, M. R.

    2015-09-01

    Amplitude modulation of a positron acoustic wave is considered in a four-component electron-positron plasma in the quantum magnetohydrodynamic regime. The important ingredients of this study are the inclusion of the particle exchange-correlation potential, quantum diffraction effects via the Bohm potential, and dissipative effect due to viscosity in the momentum balance equation of the charged carriers. A modified nonlinear Schrödinger equation is derived for the evolution of the slowly varying amplitude of the quantum positron acoustic wave by employing the standard reductive perturbation technique. Detailed analysis of the linear and nonlinear dispersions of the quantum positron acoustic wave is presented. For a typical parameter range, relevant to some dense astrophysical objects, it is found that the quantum positron acoustic wave is modulationally unstable above a certain critical wavenumber. Effects of the exchange-correlation potential and the Bohm potential in the wave dynamics are also studied. It is found that the quantum effect due to the particle exchange-correlation potential is significant in comparison to the effect due to the Bohm potential for smaller values of the carrier wavenumber. However, for comparatively larger values of the carrier wavenumber, the Bohm potential effect overtakes the effect of the exchange-correlation potential. It is found that the critical wavenumber for the modulation instability depends on the ratio of the equilibrium hot electron number density and the cold positron number density and on the ratio of the equilibrium hot positron number density and the cold positron number density. A numerical result on the growth rate of the modulation instability is also presented.

  6. Shear wave velocities of unconsolidated shallow sediments in the Gulf of Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, Myung W.

    2013-01-01

    Accurate shear-wave velocities for shallow sediments are important for a variety of seismic applications such as inver-sion and amplitude versus offset analysis. During the U.S. Department of Energy-sponsored Gas Hydrate Joint Industry Project Leg II, shear-wave velocities were measured at six wells in the Gulf of Mexico using the logging-while-drilling SonicScope acoustic tool. Because the tool measurement point was only 35 feet from the drill bit, the adverse effect of the borehole condition, which is severe for the shallow unconsolidated sediments in the Gulf of Mexico, was mini-mized and accurate shear-wave velocities of unconsolidated sediments were measured. Measured shear-wave velocities were compared with the shear-wave velocities predicted from the compressional-wave velocities using empirical formulas and the rock physics models based on the Biot-Gassmann theory, and the effectiveness of the two prediction methods was evaluated. Although the empirical equation derived from measured shear-wave data is accurate for predicting shear-wave velocities for depths greater than 500 feet in these wells, the three-phase Biot-Gassmann-theory -based theory appears to be optimum for predicting shear-wave velocities for shallow unconsolidated sediments in the Gulf of Mexico.

  7. Applications of velocity potential function to acoustic duct propagation and radiation from inlets using finite element theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, K. J.; Majjigi, R. K.

    1979-01-01

    A finite element velocity potential program was developed to study acoustic wave propagation in complex geometries. For irrotational flows, relatively low sound frequencies, and plane wave input, the finite element solutions showed significant effects of inlet curvature and flow gradients on the attenuation of a given acoustic liner in a realistic variable area turbofan inlet. The velocity potential approach can not be used to estimate the effects of rotational flow on acoustic propagation, since the potential acoustic disturbances propagate at the speed of the media in sheared flow. Approaches are discussed that are being considered for extending the finite element solution to include the far field, as well as the internal portion of the duct. A new matrix partitioning approach is presented that can be incorporated in previously developed programs to allow the finite element calculation to be marched into the far field. The partitioning approach provided a large reduction in computer storage and running times.

  8. Surface acoustic wave gas sensor based on film conductivity changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricco, A. J.; Martin, S. J.; Zipperian, T. E.

    1985-12-01

    The first surfce acoustic wave (SAW) sensor that functions via changes in conductivity of a thin surface film is reported. A lead phthalocyanine (PbPc) thin film is deposted on the acoustic progagation path of a LiNbO3 SAW delay line, which serves as the feedback element of an oscillator circuit. Reaction with strongly oxidizing gases, in particular NO2, increases the conductivity of the PbPc film. Acoustoelectric coupling of the traveling electric potential wave associated with the SAW-to-charge carriers in the PbPc film slows the acoustic wave velocity, altering the oscillation frequency of the circuit. This sensor is about 1000 times more sensitive, in terms of the number of NO2 molecules that can be detected (10 to the 16th molecules/cu cm of PbPc film), than an identical SAW sensor functioning via mass loading would be. Sensitivity to a few ppm of NO2 in N2 has been demonstrated.

  9. Surface acoustic wave gas sensor based on film conductivity changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricco, A. J.; Martin, S. J.; Zipperian, T. E.

    The first surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensor that functions via changes in conductivity of a thin surface film is reported. A lead phthalocyanine (PbPc) thin film is deposited on the acoustic propagation path of a LiNbO3 SAW delay line, which serves as the feedback element of an oscillator circuit. Reaction with strongly oxidizing gases, in particular NO2, increases the conductivity of the PbPc film. Acoustoelectic coupling of the traveling electric potential wave associated with the SAW-to-charge carriers in the PbPc film slows the acoustic wave velocity, altering the oscillation frequency of the circuit. This sensor is about 1000 times more sensitive, in terms of the number of NO2 molecules that can be detected (10 to the 16th molecules/cu cm of PbPc film), than an identical SAW sensor functioning via mass loading would be. Sensitivity to a few ppm of NO2 in Ne was demonstrated.

  10. Wireless Multiplexed Surface Acoustic Wave Sensors Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Youngquist, Robert C.

    2014-01-01

    Wireless Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) Sensor is a new technology for obtaining multiple, real-time measurements under extreme environmental conditions. This project plans to develop a wireless multiplexed sensor system that uses SAW sensors, with no batteries or semiconductors, that are passive and rugged, can operate down to cryogenic temperatures and up to hundreds of degrees C, and can be used to sense a wide variety of parameters over reasonable distances (meters).

  11. Dual output acoustic wave sensor for molecular identification

    DOEpatents

    Frye, Gregory C.; Martin, Stephen J.

    1991-01-01

    A method of identification and quantification of absorbed chemical species by measuring changes in both the velocity and the attenuation of an acoustic wave traveling through a thin film into which the chemical species is sorbed. The dual output response provides two independent sensor responses from a single sensing device thereby providing twice as much information as a single output sensor. This dual output technique and analysis allows a single sensor to provide both the concentration and the identity of a chemical species or permits the number of sensors required for mixtures to be reduced by a factor of two.

  12. Computation of acoustic waves in a jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayliss, A.; Turkel, E.

    1978-01-01

    A numerical treatment of acoustic waves in a jet is described. The full time dependent Euler equations are used in both linear and nonlinear formulations. The computational region of integration is artificially bounded and boundary conditions are developed to simulate outgoing waves and to enable the computational domain to be substantially restricted. Higher order methods and coordinate transformations are introduced to further reduce the number of grid points as well as to increase the efficiency of the program. Numerical results are presented for time harmonic sources as well as for sources with more complicated time dependence.

  13. A fractional calculus model of anomalous dispersion of acoustic waves.

    PubMed

    Wharmby, Andrew W

    2016-09-01

    An empirical formula based on viscoelastic analysis techniques that employs concepts from the fractional calculus that was used to model the dielectric behavior of materials exposed to oscillating electromagnetic fields in the radiofrequency, terahertz, and infrared bands. This work adapts and applies the formula to model viscoelastic behavior of materials that show an apparent increase of phase velocity of vibration with an increase in frequency, otherwise known as anomalous dispersion. A fractional order wave equation is derived through the application of the classic elastic-viscoelastic correspondence principle whose analytical solution is used to describe absorption and dispersion of acoustic waves in the viscoelastic material displaying anomalous dispersion in a specific frequency range. A brief discussion and comparison of an alternative fractional order wave equation recently formulated is also included.

  14. Langasite surface acoustic wave gas sensors: modeling and verification

    SciTech Connect

    Peng Zheng,; Greve, D. W.; Oppenheim, I. J.

    2013-03-01

    We report finite element simulations of the effect of conductive sensing layers on the surface wave velocity of langasite substrates. The simulations include both the mechanical and electrical influences of the conducting sensing layer. We show that three-dimensional simulations are necessary because of the out-of-plane displacements of the commonly used (0, 138.5, 26.7) Euler angle. Measurements of the transducer input admittance in reflective delay-line devices yield a value for the electromechanical coupling coefficient that is in good agreement with the three-dimensional simulations on bare langasite substrate. The input admittance measurements also show evidence of excitation of an additional wave mode and excess loss due to the finger resistance. The results of these simulations and measurements will be useful in the design of surface acoustic wave gas sensors.

  15. Radio wave propagation and acoustic sounding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singal, S. P.

    Radio wave propagation of the decimetric and centimetric waves depends to a large extent on the boundary layer meteorological conditions which give rise to severe fadings, very often due to multipath propagation. Sodar is one of the inexpensive remote sensing techniques which can be employed to probe the boundary layer structure. In the paper a historical perspective has been given of the simultaneously conducted studies on radio waves and sodar at various places. The radio meteorological information needed for propagation studies has been clearly spelt out and conditions of a ray path especially in the presence of a ducting layer have been defined as giving rise to fading or signal enhancement conditions. Finally the potential of the sodar studies to obtain information about the boundary layer phenomena has been stressed, clearly spelling out the use of acoustic sounding in radio wave propagation studies.

  16. Laboratory observations of self-excited dust acoustic shock waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merlino, Robert L.; Heinrich, Jonathon R.; Kim, Su-Hyun

    2009-11-01

    Dust acoustic waves have been discussed in connection with dust density structures in Saturn's rings and the Earth's mesosphere, and as a possible mechanism for triggering condensation of small grains in dust molecular clouds. Dust acoustic waves are a ubiquitous occurrence in laboratory dusty plasmas formed in glow discharges. We report observations of repeated, self-excited dust acoustic shock waves in a dc glow discharge dusty plasma using high-speed video imaging. Two major observations will be presented: (1) The self-steepening of a nonlinear dust acoustic wave into a saw-tooth wave with sharp gradient in dust density, very similar to those found in numerical solutions [1] of the fully nonlinear fluid equations for nondispersive dust acoustic waves, and (2) the collision and confluence of two dust acoustic shock waves. [4pt] [1] B. Eliasson and P. K. Shukla, Phys. Rev. E 69, 067401 (2004).

  17. Streaming Velocities and the Baryon Acoustic Oscillation Scale.

    PubMed

    Blazek, Jonathan A; McEwen, Joseph E; Hirata, Christopher M

    2016-03-25

    At the epoch of decoupling, cosmic baryons had supersonic velocities relative to the dark matter that were coherent on large scales. These velocities subsequently slow the growth of small-scale structure and, via feedback processes, can influence the formation of larger galaxies. We examine the effect of streaming velocities on the galaxy correlation function, including all leading-order contributions for the first time. We find that the impact on the baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) peak is dramatically enhanced (by a factor of ∼5) over the results of previous investigations, with the primary new effect due to advection: if a galaxy retains memory of the primordial streaming velocity, it does so at its Lagrangian, rather than Eulerian, position. Since correlations in the streaming velocity change rapidly at the BAO scale, this advection term can cause a significant shift in the observed BAO position. If streaming velocities impact tracer density at the 1% level, compared to the linear bias, the recovered BAO scale is shifted by approximately 0.5%. This new effect, which is required to preserve Galilean invariance, greatly increases the importance of including streaming velocities in the analysis of upcoming BAO measurements and opens a new window to the astrophysics of galaxy formation.

  18. Twisted electron-acoustic waves in plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aman-ur-Rehman, Ali, S.; Khan, S. A.; Shahzad, K.

    2016-08-01

    In the paraxial limit, a twisted electron-acoustic (EA) wave is studied in a collisionless unmagnetized plasma, whose constituents are the dynamical cold electrons and Boltzmannian hot electrons in the background of static positive ions. The analytical and numerical solutions of the plasma kinetic equation suggest that EA waves with finite amount of orbital angular momentum exhibit a twist in its behavior. The twisted wave particle resonance is also taken into consideration that has been appeared through the effective wave number qeff accounting for Laguerre-Gaussian mode profiles attributed to helical phase structures. Consequently, the dispersion relation and the damping rate of the EA waves are significantly modified with the twisted parameter η, and for η → ∞, the results coincide with the straight propagating plane EA waves. Numerically, new features of twisted EA waves are identified by considering various regimes of wavelength and the results might be useful for transport and trapping of plasma particles in a two-electron component plasma.

  19. Emergence of acoustic waves from vorticity fluctuations: impact of non-normality.

    PubMed

    George, Joseph; Sujith, R I

    2009-10-01

    Chagelishvili et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 79, 3178 (1997)] discovered a linear mechanism of acoustic wave emergence from vorticity fluctuations in shear flows. This paper illustrates how this "nonresonant" phenomenon is related to the non-normality of the operator governing the linear dynamics of disturbances in shear flows. The non-self-adjoint nature of the governing operator causes the emergent acoustic wave to interact strongly with the vorticity disturbance. Analytical expressions are obtained for the nondivergent vorticity perturbation. A discontinuity in the x component of the velocity field corresponding to the vorticity disturbance was originally identified to be the cause of acoustic wave emergence. However, a different mechanism is proposed in this paper. The correct "acoustic source" is identified and the reason for the abrupt nature of wave emergence is explained. The impact of viscous damping is also discussed.

  20. Acceleration of solitary ion-acoustic surface waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenflo, L.; Gradov, O. M.

    1991-10-01

    We consider the interaction between long-wavelength ion-acoustic and electron-plasma surface waves on a semi-infinite plasma. It then turns out that an ion-acoustic solitary wave can be accelerated when the amplitude of the electron-plasma surface wave varies in time.

  1. Monitoring seismic wave velocities in situ

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McEvilly, T.V.; Clymer, R.

    1979-01-01

    Beginning in the early 1960's, reports from the Soviet Union described travel-time anomalies of 5 to 20 percent preceding large earthquakes. In the early 970's, similar observations began to be reported outside the U.S.S.R. The most convincing were anomalously low values of the velocity ration, Vp/Vs, before four earthquakes of magnitudes 2.5 to 3.3 at Blue Mountain Lake, N.Y.; the anomalies were based on large amounts of high-quality data. In Japan, significant decreases were observed in the travel-time ratio, ts/tp, before two thrust-type earthquakes of magnitudes 6. and 5.3. Finally, there is the much discussed report of an anomaly before the magnitude 6.4 San Fernando, Calif., earthquake of 1971 and the implication that the change was caused principally by a decrease in the velocity of the primary (P) wave.

  2. Identification of rocket-induced acoustic waves in the ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mabie, Justin; Bullett, Terence; Moore, Prentiss; Vieira, Gerald

    2016-10-01

    Acoustic waves can create plasma disturbances in the ionosphere, but the number of observations is limited. Large-amplitude acoustic waves generated by energetic sources like large earthquakes and tsunamis are more readily observed than acoustic waves generated by weaker sources. New observations of plasma displacements caused by rocket-generated acoustic waves were made using the Vertically Incident Pulsed Ionospheric Radar (VIPIR), an advanced high-frequency radar. Rocket-induced acoustic waves which are characterized by low amplitudes relative to those induced by more energetic sources can be detected in the ionosphere using the phase data from fixed frequency radar observations of a plasma layer. This work is important for increasing the number and quality of observations of acoustic waves in the ionosphere and could help improve the understanding of energy transport from the lower atmosphere to the thermosphere.

  3. Helioseismology and asteroseismology: looking for gravitational waves in acoustic oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Lopes, Ilídio; Silk, Joseph E-mail: ilopes@uevora.pt

    2014-10-10

    Current helioseismology observations allow the determination of the frequencies and surface velocity amplitudes of solar acoustic modes with exceptionally high precision. In some cases, the frequency accuracy is better than one part in a million. We show that there is a distinct possibility that quadrupole acoustic modes of low order could be excited by gravitational waves (GWs), if the GWs have a strain amplitude in the range 10{sup –20} h {sub –20} with h {sub –20} ∼ 1 or h {sub –20} ∼ 10{sup 3}, as predicted by several types of GW sources, such as galactic ultracompact binaries or extreme mass ratio inspirals and coalescence of black holes. If the damping rate at low order is 10{sup –3}η {sub N} μHz, with η {sub N} ∼ 10{sup –3}-1, as inferred from the theory of stellar pulsations, then GW radiation will lead to a maximum rms surface velocity amplitude of quadrupole modes of the order of h{sub −20}η{sub N}{sup −1}∼ 10{sup –9}-10{sup –3} cm s{sup –1}, on the verge of what is currently detectable via helioseismology. The frequency and sensitivity range probed by helioseismological acoustic modes overlap with, and complement, the capabilities of eLISA for the brightest resolved ultracompact galactic binaries.

  4. Ultrasound acoustic wave energy transfer and harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahab, Shima; Leadenham, Stephen; Guillot, François; Sabra, Karim; Erturk, Alper

    2014-04-01

    This paper investigates low-power electricity generation from ultrasound acoustic wave energy transfer combined with piezoelectric energy harvesting for wireless applications ranging from medical implants to naval sensor systems. The focus is placed on an underwater system that consists of a pulsating source for spherical wave generation and a harvester connected to an external resistive load for quantifying the electrical power output. An analytical electro-acoustic model is developed to relate the source strength to the electrical power output of the harvester located at a specific distance from the source. The model couples the energy harvester dynamics (piezoelectric device and electrical load) with the source strength through the acoustic-structure interaction at the harvester-fluid interface. Case studies are given for a detailed understanding of the coupled system dynamics under various conditions. Specifically the relationship between the electrical power output and system parameters, such as the distance of the harvester from the source, dimensions of the harvester, level of source strength, and electrical load resistance are explored. Sensitivity of the electrical power output to the excitation frequency in the neighborhood of the harvester's underwater resonance frequency is also reported.

  5. Acoustic velocity and attenuation of unconsolidated sands: An experimental and modeling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhuping

    I have developed a sonic frequency apparatus (1--10 kHz) that utilizes resonance to measure the acoustic velocities and attenuation of both extensional and torsional waves in unconsolidated materials (e.g., sands, clays and sediments) under hydrostatic confinement. The basic equations and methodology for correcting these effects are given and applied to a dry Monterey sand to determine the shear and Young's moduli and attenuation over an effective pressure range of 0--9 MPa. Comparison of my measured data with theoretical granular contact models gives insight into the seismic wave propagation in unconsolidated sands. The effects of water saturation and pressure on the velocity and attenuation of seismic waves in unconsolidated sands are investigated using the newly-designed apparatus and methodology in the laboratory. Two kinds of pore fluid distribution are achieved with water injection and de-gassing methods, and an X-ray CT scanner is used to obtain the images of pore fluid distribution. There is not significant difference in velocities for the different pore fluid distributions. Measured velocities are in favorable agreement with theoretical predictions based on Gassmann's equations. At all effective pressures, V P of the fully-water-saturated sand is larger than that of the dry sand, implying that water in pore space stiffens the rock, causing an increase in the rock's bulk modulus. For the partially-saturated sand, the attenuation of compressional wave is larger than that of torsional wave, and both of them increase with water saturation. The effects of pore fluid saturation and distribution on seismic velocities are further studied based on numerical simulations of seismic wave propagation in fluid-saturated porous media. The calculated results indicate that numerical modeling based on Biot theory gives the same compressional velocity VP as Gassmann's equations if the pore fluids are mixed in such a fine scale that the induced pore pressure increments can

  6. Structural configuration study for an acoustic wave sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Biaobiao

    A continuous structure has several response characteristics that make it a candidate for a sensor used to locate an acoustic source. Primary goals in developing such a sensor structure are to ensure that the response is rich enough to provide information about the impinging acoustic wave and to detect the direction of travel without being too sensitive to background noise. As such, there are several factors that must be examined with regard to sensor configuration and measurement requirements. This dissertation describes a set of studies that examine various configuration requirements for such a sensor. Some of the parameters of interest include the size, or aperture of the structure, boundary conditions, material properties, and thickness. The response of the structure to transient sinusoidal wave excitations will be examined analytically. The time-domain response of an Euler-Bernoulli beam excited by a traveling sinusoidal excitation is obtained based on modal superposition and verified by using a finite element method. Then, an approach using simple basis functions will be applied to achieve the goal of more efficient response and force identification. The moving force is identified in the time domain by extending previous inverse approaches. The Tikhonov regularization technique provides bounds to the ill-conditioned results in the identification problem. Both simulated displacement and velocity are considered for use in the inverse. To evaluate the method and examine various configurations, simulations with different numbers of sinusoidal half-cycles exciting the sensor structure are studied. Various levels of random noise are also added to the simulated displacements and velocities responses in order to study the effect of noise in moving wave load identification. Such a new approach in acoustic sensing has applications in the areas of security and disaster recovery.

  7. Wave velocity dispersion and attenuation in media exhibiting internal oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frehner, Marcel; Steeb, Holger; Schmalholz, Stefan M.

    2010-05-01

    Understanding the dynamical and acoustical behavior of porous and heterogeneous rocks is of great importance in geophysics, e.g. earthquakes, and for various seismic engineering applications, e.g. hydrocarbon exploration. Within a heterogeneous medium oscillations with a characteristic resonance frequency, depending on the mass and internal length of the heterogeneity, can occur. When excited, heterogeneities can self-oscillate with their natural frequency. Another example of internal oscillations is the dynamical behavior of non-wetting fluid blobs or fluid patches in residually saturated pore spaces. Surface tension forces or capillary forces act as the restoring force that drives the oscillation. Whatever mechanism is involved, an oscillatory phenomena within a heterogeneous medium will have an effect on acoustic or seismic waves propagating through such a medium, i.e. wave velocity dispersion and frequency-dependent attenuation. We present two models for media exhibiting internal oscillations and discuss the frequency-dependent wave propagation mechanism. Both models give similar results: (1) The low-frequency (i.e. quasi-static) limit for the phase velocity is identical with the Gassmann-Wood limit and the high-frequency limit is larger than this value and (2) Around the resonance frequency a very strong phase velocity change and the largest attenuation occurs. (1) Model for a homogeneous medium exhibiting internal oscillations We present a continuum model for an acoustic medium exhibiting internal damped oscillations. The obvious application of this model is water containing oscillating gas bubbles, providing the material and model parameters for this study. Two physically based momentum interaction terms between the two inherent constituents are used: (1) A purely elastic term of oscillatory nature that scales with the volume of the bubbles and (2) A viscous term that scales with the specific surface of the bubble. The model is capable of taking into account

  8. Acoustic field distribution of sawtooth wave with nonlinear SBE model

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xiaozhou Zhang, Lue; Wang, Xiangda; Gong, Xiufen

    2015-10-28

    For precise prediction of the acoustic field distribution of extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy with an ellipsoid transducer, the nonlinear spheroidal beam equations (SBE) are employed to model acoustic wave propagation in medium. To solve the SBE model with frequency domain algorithm, boundary conditions are obtained for monochromatic and sawtooth waves based on the phase compensation. In numerical analysis, the influence of sinusoidal wave and sawtooth wave on axial pressure distributions are investigated.

  9. Experimental Acoustic Velocity Measurements in a Tidally Affected Stream

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Storm, J.B.; ,

    2002-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) constructed a continuous steamgaging station on the tidally affected Escatawpa River at Interstate 10 near Orange Grove, Mississippi, in August 2001. The gage collects water quantity parameters of stage and stream velocity, and water quality parameters of water temperature, specific conductance, and salinity. Data are transmitted to the local USGS office via the GOES satellite and are presented on a near real-time web page. Due to tidal effects, the stream has multiple flow regimes which include downstream, bi-directional, and reverse flows. Advances in acoustic technology have made it possible to gage streams of this nature where conventional methods have been unsuccessful. An experimental mount was designed in an attempt to recognize, describe, and quantify these flow regimes by using acoustic Doppler equipment.

  10. Dust kinetic Alfven and acoustic waves in a Lorentzian plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Rubab, N.; Biernat, H. K.; Erkaev, N. V.

    2009-10-15

    Dust kinetic Alfven waves (DKAWs) with finite Larmor radius effects have been examined rigorously in a uniform dusty plasma in the presence of an external magnetic field. A dispersion relation of low-frequency DKAW on the dust acoustic velocity branch is obtained in a low-{beta} Lorentzian plasma. It is found that the influence of the Lorentzian distribution function is more effective for perpendicular component of group velocity as compared with parallel one. Lorentzian-type charging currents are obtained with the aid of Vlasov theory. Damping/instability due to dust charge fluctuation is found to be insensitive with the form of distribution function for DKAW. The possible applications to dusty space plasmas are pointed out.

  11. Dual-mode acoustic wave biosensors microarrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auner, Gregory W.; Shreve, Gina; Ying, Hao; Newaz, Golam; Hughes, Chantelle; Xu, Jianzeng

    2003-04-01

    We have develop highly sensitive and selective acoustic wave biosensor arrays with signal analysis systems to provide a fingerprint for the real-time identification and quantification of a wide array of bacterial pathogens and environmental health hazards. We have developed an unique highly sensitive dual mode acoustic wave platform prototype that, when combined with phage based selective detection elements, form a durable bacteria sensor. Arrays of these new real-time biosensors are integrated to form a biosensor array on a chip. This research and development program optimizes advanced piezoelectric aluminum nitride wide bandgap semiconductors, novel micromachining processes, advanced device structures, selective phage displays development and immobilization techniques, and system integration and signal analysis technology to develop the biosensor arrays. The dual sensor platform can be programmed to sense in a gas, vapor or liquid environment by switching between acoustic wave resonate modes. Such a dual mode sensor has tremendous implications for applications involving monitoring of pathogenic microorganisms in the clinical setting due to their ability to detect airborne pathogens. This provides a number of applications including hospital settings such as intensive care or other in-patient wards for the reduction of nosocomial infections and maintenance of sterile environments in surgical suites. Monitoring for airborn pathogen transmission in public transportation areas such as airplanes may be useful for implementation of strategies for redution of airborn transmission routes. The ability to use the same sensor in the liquid sensing mode is important for tracing the source of airborn pathogens to local liquid sources. Sensing of pathogens in saliva will be useful for sensing oral pathogens and support of decision-making strategies regarding prevention of transmission and support of treatment strategies.

  12. Sensitivity comparisons of layered Rayleigh wave and Love wave acoustic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedrick, Michael K.; Tittmann, Bernhard R.

    2007-04-01

    Due to their high sensitivity, layered Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) devices are ideal for various film characterization and sensor applications. Two prominent wave types realized in these devices are Rayleigh waves consisting of coupled Shear Vertical and Longitudinal displacements and Love waves consisting of Shear Horizontal displacements. Theoretical calculations of sensitivity of SAW devices to pertubations in wave propagation are limited to idealized scenarios. Derivations of sensitivity to mass change in an overlayer are often based on the effect of rigid body motion of the overlayer on the propagation of one of the aforementioned wave types. These devices often utilize polymer overlayers for enhanced sensitivity. The low moduli of such overlayers are not sufficiently stiff to accommodate the rigid body motion assumption. This work presents device modeling based on the Finite Element Method. A coupled-field model allows for a complete description of device operation including displacement profiles, frequency, wave velocity, and insertion loss through the inclusion of transmitting and receiving IDTs. Geometric rotations and coordinate transformations allow for the modeling of different crystal orientations in piezoelectric substrates. The generation of Rayleigh and Love Wave propagation was realized with this model by examining propagation in ST Quartz both normal to and in the direction of the X axis known to support Love Waves and Rayleigh Waves, respectively. Sensitivities of layered SAW devices to pertubations in mass, layer thickness, and mechanical property changes of a Polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) and SU-8 overlayers were characterized and compared. Experimental validation of these models is presented.

  13. Nonreciprocal propagation of surface acoustic wave in Ni/LiNbO 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, R.; Nii, Y.; Iguchi, Y.; Onose, Y.

    2017-01-01

    We investigated surface acoustic wave propagation in a Ni/LiNbO3 hybrid device. We found that the absorption and phase velocity are dependent on the sign of the wave vector, which indicates that the surface acoustic wave propagation has nonreciprocal characteristics induced by simultaneous breaking of time-reversal and spatial inversion symmetries. The nonreciprocity was reversed by 180∘ rotation of the magnetic field. The origin of the nonreciprocity is ascribed to interference of shear-type and longitudinal-type magnetoelastic couplings.

  14. Surface-Acoustic-Wave Piezoelectric Microbalance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chuan, Raymond L.; Bowers, William D.

    1992-01-01

    Improved piezoelectric microbalances developed for use in measuring masses of volcanic, aerosol, and other small particles suspended in air. Sensitive microbalance used to analyze airborne particles in real time in environments as diverse as clean rooms or upper atmosphere. Surface-acoustic-wave resonator includes input and output sets of interdigitated electrodes and two passive conductive patterns acting as reflectors. Mechanical energy travels both ways out from middle and reflected back toward middle. Microbalance and associated circuitry fit in small package. Circuit draws only 80 mA at 5 V. Sensitivity more than 400 times that of bulk piezoelectric microbalance.

  15. Surface acoustic wave propagation in graphene film

    SciTech Connect

    Roshchupkin, Dmitry Plotitcyna, Olga; Matveev, Viktor; Kononenko, Oleg; Emelin, Evgenii; Irzhak, Dmitry; Ortega, Luc; Zizak, Ivo; Erko, Alexei; Tynyshtykbayev, Kurbangali; Insepov, Zinetula

    2015-09-14

    Surface acoustic wave (SAW) propagation in a graphene film on the surface of piezoelectric crystals was studied at the BESSY II synchrotron radiation source. Talbot effect enabled the visualization of the SAW propagation on the crystal surface with the graphene film in a real time mode, and high-resolution x-ray diffraction permitted the determination of the SAW amplitude in the graphene/piezoelectric crystal system. The influence of the SAW on the electrical properties of the graphene film was examined. It was shown that the changing of the SAW amplitude enables controlling the magnitude and direction of current in graphene film on the surface of piezoelectric crystals.

  16. Surface acoustic wave propagation in graphene film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roshchupkin, Dmitry; Ortega, Luc; Zizak, Ivo; Plotitcyna, Olga; Matveev, Viktor; Kononenko, Oleg; Emelin, Evgenii; Erko, Alexei; Tynyshtykbayev, Kurbangali; Irzhak, Dmitry; Insepov, Zinetula

    2015-09-01

    Surface acoustic wave (SAW) propagation in a graphene film on the surface of piezoelectric crystals was studied at the BESSY II synchrotron radiation source. Talbot effect enabled the visualization of the SAW propagation on the crystal surface with the graphene film in a real time mode, and high-resolution x-ray diffraction permitted the determination of the SAW amplitude in the graphene/piezoelectric crystal system. The influence of the SAW on the electrical properties of the graphene film was examined. It was shown that the changing of the SAW amplitude enables controlling the magnitude and direction of current in graphene film on the surface of piezoelectric crystals.

  17. Surface Acoustic Wave Atomizer and Electrostatic Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamagata, Yutaka

    A new methodology for fabricating thin film or micro patters of organic/bio material using surface acoustic wave (SAW) atomizer and electrostatic deposition is proposed and characteristics of atomization techniques are discussed in terms of drop size and atomization speed. Various types of SAW atomizer are compared with electrospray and conventional ultrasonic atomizers. It has been proved that SAW atomizers generate drops as small as electrospray and have very fast atomization speed. This technique is applied to fabrication of micro patterns of proteins. According to the result of immunoassay, the specific activity of immunoglobulin was preserved after deposition process.

  18. Surface acoustic wave atomizer and electrostatic deposition.

    PubMed

    Yamagata, Yutaka

    2010-01-01

    A new methodology for fabricating thin film or micro patters of organic/bio material using surface acoustic wave (SAW) atomizer and electrostatic deposition is proposed and characteristics of atomization techniques are discussed in terms of drop size and atomization speed. Various types of SAW atomizer are compared with electrospray and conventional ultrasonic atomizers. It has been proved that SAW atomizers generate drops as small as electrospray and have very fast atomization speed. This technique is applied to fabrication of micro patterns of proteins. According to the result of immunoassay, the specific activity of immunoglobulin was preserved after deposition process.

  19. Multiple-frequency acoustic wave devices for chemical sensing and materials characterization in both gas and liquid phase

    DOEpatents

    Martin, S.J.; Ricco, A.J.

    1993-08-10

    A chemical or intrinsic physical property sensor is described comprising: (a) a substrate; (b) an interaction region of said substrate where the presence of a chemical or physical stimulus causes a detectable change in the velocity and/or an attenuation of an acoustic wave traversing said region; and (c) a plurality of paired input and output interdigitated electrodes patterned on the surface of said substrate where each of said paired electrodes has a distinct periodicity, where each of said paired electrodes is comprised of an input and an output electrode; (d) an input signal generation means for transmitting an input signal having a distinct frequency to a specified input interdigitated electrode of said plurality so that each input electrode receives a unique input signal, whereby said electrode responds to said input signal by generating an acoustic wave of a specified frequency, thus, said plurality responds by generating a plurality of acoustic waves of different frequencies; (e) an output signal receiving means for determining an acoustic wave velocity and an amplitude of said acoustic waves at several frequencies after said waves transverses said interaction region and comparing these values to an input acoustic wave velocity and an input acoustic wave amplitude to produce values for perturbations in acoustic wave velocities and for acoustic wave attenuation as a function of frequency, where said output receiving means is individually coupled to each of said output interdigitated electrode; (f) a computer means for analyzing a data stream comprising information from said output receiving means and from said input signal generation means to differentiate a specified response due to a perturbation from a subsequent specified response due to a subsequent perturbation to determine the chemical or intrinsic physical properties desired.

  20. Focused acoustic beam imaging of grain structure and local Young's modulus with Rayleigh and surface skimming longitudinal waves

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, R. W.; Sathish, S.; Blodgett, M. P.

    2013-01-25

    The interaction of a focused acoustic beam with materials generates Rayleigh surface waves (RSW) and surface skimming longitudinal waves (SSLW). Acoustic microscopic investigations have used the RSW amplitude and the velocity measurements, extensively for grain structure analysis. Although, the presence of SSLW has been recognized, it is rarely used in acoustic imaging. This paper presents an approach to perform microstructure imaging and local elastic modulus measurements by combining both RSW and SSLW. The acoustic imaging of grain structure was performed by measuring the amplitude of RSW and SSLW signal. The microstructure images obtained on the same region of the samples with RSW and SSLW are compared and the difference in the contrast observed is discussed based on the propagation characteristics of the individual surface waves. The velocity measurements are determined by two point defocus method. The surface wave velocities of RSW and SSLW of the same regions of the sample are combined and presented as average Young's modulus image.

  1. Porous silicon bulk acoustic wave resonator with integrated transducer

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    We report that porous silicon acoustic Bragg reflectors and AlN-based transducers can be successfully combined and processed in a commercial solidly mounted resonator production line. The resulting device takes advantage of the unique acoustic properties of porous silicon in order to form a monolithically integrated bulk acoustic wave resonator. PMID:22776697

  2. Surface Acoustic Waves to Drive Plant Transpiration

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Eliot F.; Berggren, Magnus; Simon, Daniel T.

    2017-01-01

    Emerging fields of research in electronic plants (e-plants) and agro-nanotechnology seek to create more advanced control of plants and their products. Electronic/nanotechnology plant systems strive to seamlessly monitor, harvest, or deliver chemical signals to sense or regulate plant physiology in a controlled manner. Since the plant vascular system (xylem/phloem) is the primary pathway used to transport water, nutrients, and chemical signals—as well as the primary vehicle for current e-plant and phtyo-nanotechnology work—we seek to directly control fluid transport in plants using external energy. Surface acoustic waves generated from piezoelectric substrates were directly coupled into rose leaves, thereby causing water to rapidly evaporate in a highly localized manner only at the site in contact with the actuator. From fluorescent imaging, we find that the technique reliably delivers up to 6x more water/solute to the site actuated by acoustic energy as compared to normal plant transpiration rates and 2x more than heat-assisted evaporation. The technique of increasing natural plant transpiration through acoustic energy could be used to deliver biomolecules, agrochemicals, or future electronic materials at high spatiotemporal resolution to targeted areas in the plant; providing better interaction with plant physiology or to realize more sophisticated cyborg systems. PMID:28361922

  3. Surface Acoustic Waves to Drive Plant Transpiration.

    PubMed

    Gomez, Eliot F; Berggren, Magnus; Simon, Daniel T

    2017-03-31

    Emerging fields of research in electronic plants (e-plants) and agro-nanotechnology seek to create more advanced control of plants and their products. Electronic/nanotechnology plant systems strive to seamlessly monitor, harvest, or deliver chemical signals to sense or regulate plant physiology in a controlled manner. Since the plant vascular system (xylem/phloem) is the primary pathway used to transport water, nutrients, and chemical signals-as well as the primary vehicle for current e-plant and phtyo-nanotechnology work-we seek to directly control fluid transport in plants using external energy. Surface acoustic waves generated from piezoelectric substrates were directly coupled into rose leaves, thereby causing water to rapidly evaporate in a highly localized manner only at the site in contact with the actuator. From fluorescent imaging, we find that the technique reliably delivers up to 6x more water/solute to the site actuated by acoustic energy as compared to normal plant transpiration rates and 2x more than heat-assisted evaporation. The technique of increasing natural plant transpiration through acoustic energy could be used to deliver biomolecules, agrochemicals, or future electronic materials at high spatiotemporal resolution to targeted areas in the plant; providing better interaction with plant physiology or to realize more sophisticated cyborg systems.

  4. Random coupling of acoustic-gravity waves in the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millet, Christophe; Lott, Francois; Haynes, Christophe

    2016-11-01

    In numerical modeling of long-range acoustic propagation in the atmosphere, the effect of gravity waves on low-frequency acoustic waves is often ignored. As the sound speed far exceeds the gravity wave phase speed, these two types of waves present different spatial scales and their linear coupling is weak. It is possible, however, to obtain relatively strong couplings via sound speed profile changes with altitude. In the present study, this scenario is analyzed for realistic gravity wave fields and the incident acoustic wave is modeled as a narrow-banded acoustic pulse. The gravity waves are represented as a random field using a stochastic multiwave parameterization of non-orographic gravity waves. The parameterization provides independent monochromatic gravity waves, and the gravity wave field is obtained as the linear superposition of the waves produced. When the random terms are retained, a more generalized wave equation is obtained that both qualitatively and quantitatively agrees with the observations of several highly dispersed stratospheric wavetrains. Here, we show that the cumulative effect of gravity wave breakings makes the sensitivity of ground-based acoustic signals large, in that small changes in the parameterization can create or destroy an acoustic wavetrain.

  5. Surface acoustic wave biosensors: a review.

    PubMed

    Länge, Kerstin; Rapp, Bastian E; Rapp, Michael

    2008-07-01

    This review presents an overview of 20 years of worldwide development in the field of biosensors based on special types of surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices that permit the highly sensitive detection of biorelevant molecules in liquid media (such as water or aqueous buffer solutions). 1987 saw the first approaches, which used either horizontally polarized shear waves (HPSW) in a delay line configuration on lithium tantalate (LiTaO(3)) substrates or SAW resonator structures on quartz or LiTaO(3) with periodic mass gratings. The latter are termed "surface transverse waves" (STW), and they have comparatively low attenuation values when operated in liquids. Later Love wave devices were developed, which used a film resonance effect to significantly reduce attenuation. All of these sensor approaches were accompanied by the development of appropriate sensing films. First attempts used simple layers of adsorbed antibodies. Later approaches used various types of covalently bound layers, for example those utilizing intermediate hydrogel layers. Recent approaches involve SAW biosensor devices inserted into compact systems with integrated fluidics for sample handling. To achieve this, the SAW biosensors can be embedded into micromachined polymer housings. Combining these two features will extend the system to create versatile biosensor arrays for generic lab use or for diagnostic purposes.

  6. Acoustic microscope based on magneto-elastic wave phase conjugator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brysev, A.; Krutyansky, L.; Pernod, P.; Preobrazhensky, V.

    2000-05-01

    Acoustic C-scan imaging (acoustic microscopy) by means of supercritical parametric wave phase conjugation (WPC) is studied experimentally. A phase conjugator based on a magneto-acoustic active material is used for compensating phase distortions introduced by solid and polymer aberration layers covering objects (electronic integrated circuits as examples). Improvement of images is demonstrated on an acoustic microscope, operating at a frequency of 10 MHz.

  7. Ionospheric response to infrasonic-acoustic waves generated by natural hazard events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zettergren, M. D.; Snively, J. B.

    2015-09-01

    Recent measurements of GPS-derived total electron content (TEC) reveal acoustic wave periods of ˜1-4 min in the F region ionosphere following natural hazard events, such as earthquakes, severe weather, and volcanoes. Here we simulate the ionospheric responses to infrasonic-acoustic waves, generated by vertical accelerations at the Earth's surface or within the lower atmosphere, using a compressible atmospheric dynamics model to perturb a multifluid ionospheric model. Response dependencies on wave source geometry and spectrum are investigated at middle, low, and equatorial latitudes. Results suggest constraints on wave amplitudes that are consistent with observations and that provide insight on the geographical variability of TEC signatures and their dependence on the geometry of wave velocity field perturbations relative to the ambient geomagnetic field. Asymmetries of responses poleward and equatorward from the wave sources indicate that electron perturbations are enhanced on the equatorward side while field aligned currents are driven principally on the poleward side, due to alignments of acoustic wave velocities parallel and perpendicular to field lines, respectively. Acoustic-wave-driven TEC perturbations are shown to have periods of ˜3-4 min, which are consistent with the fraction of the spectrum that remains following strong dissipation throughout the thermosphere. Furthermore, thermospheric acoustic waves couple with ion sound waves throughout the F region and topside ionosphere, driving plasma disturbances with similar periods and faster phase speeds. The associated magnetic perturbations of the simulated waves are calculated to be observable and may provide new observational insight in addition to that provided by GPS TEC measurements.

  8. Nonlinear waves and shocks in a rigid acoustical guide.

    PubMed

    Fernando, Rasika; Druon, Yann; Coulouvrat, François; Marchiano, Régis

    2011-02-01

    A model is developed for the propagation of finite amplitude acoustical waves and weak shocks in a straight duct of arbitrary cross section. It generalizes the linear modal solution, assuming mode amplitudes slowly vary along the guide axis under the influence of nonlinearities. Using orthogonality properties, the model finally reduces to a set of ordinary differential equations for each mode at each of the harmonics of the input frequency. The theory is then applied to a two-dimensional waveguide. Dispersion relations indicate that there can be two types of nonlinear interactions either called "resonant" or "non-resonant." Resonant interactions occur dominantly for modes propagating at a rather large angle with respect to the axis and involve mostly modes propagating with the same phase velocity. In this case, guided propagation is similar to nonlinear plane wave propagation, with the progressive steepening up to shock formation of the two waves that constitute the mode and reflect onto the guide walls. Non-resonant interactions can be observed as the input modes propagate at a small angle, in which case, nonlinear interactions involve many adjacent modes having close phase velocities. Grazing propagation can also lead to more complex phenomena such as wavefront curvature and irregular reflection.

  9. Acoustic wave filter based on periodically poled lithium niobate.

    PubMed

    Courjon, Emilie; Bassignot, Florent; Ulliac, Gwenn; Benchabane, Sarah; Ballandras, Sylvain

    2012-09-01

    Solutions for the development of compact RF passive transducers as an alternative to standard surface or bulk acoustic wave devices are receiving increasing interest. This article presents results on the development of an acoustic band-pass filter based on periodically poled ferroelectric domains in lithium niobate. The fabrication of periodically poled transducers (PPTs) operating in the range of 20 to 650 MHz has been achieved on 3-in (76.2-mm) 500-μm-thick wafers. This kind of transducer is able to excite elliptical as well as longitudinal modes, yielding phase velocities of about 3800 and 6500 ms(-1), respectively. A new type of acoustic band-pass filter is proposed, based on the use of PPTs instead of the SAWs excited by classical interdigital transducers. The design and the fabrication of such a filter are presented, as well as experimental measurements of its electrical response and transfer function. The feasibility of such a PPT-based filter is thereby demonstrated and the limitations of this method are discussed.

  10. a Rayleigh Wave Technique to Measure the Acoustic Nonlinearity Parameter of Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shui, G.; Jacobs, L. J.; Qu, J.; Wang, Y. S.; Kim, J.-Y.

    2008-02-01

    Nonlinear ultrasonic techniques have shown great potential for evaluating accumulated damage early in the fatigue life, and ultimately for predicting remaining lifetime of a structural component. The acoustic nonlinearity parameter, a direct measure of the accumulated fatigue damage, is determined from the second harmonic amplitude in finite amplitude sinusoidal ultrasonic waves transmitted through the material. An absolute determination of the acoustic nonlinear parameter is notoriously difficult for several reasons. In this paper, a new experimental technique based on Rayleigh surface waves is presented for determining the absolute acoustic nonlinearity parameter of a relatively thin material specimen. Rayleigh waves are efficiently generated in a specimen by exciting at its edge, and the surface normal velocity of the propagating Rayleigh waves is measured with a laser interferometer system. The high efficiency of the excitation method allows us to drive the transmitting piezoelectric transducer as low as 60 Vpp, and thus to avoid the inherent harmonic distortion from the transducer. The absolute acoustic nonlinearity parameter is then determined from the measured magnitudes of the fundamental and second harmonic surface normal velocities. This technique is applied to determining the acoustic nonlinearity parameters of aluminum alloys 2024 and 6061; the results are compared with those available in the literature. The present technique is especially well-suited for relatively thin components, and much simpler and efficient than the traditional longitudinal wave technique.

  11. Guiding and confinement of interface acoustic waves in solid-fluid pillar-based phononic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razip Wee, M. F. Mohd; Addouche, Mahmoud; Siow, Kim S.; Zain, A. R. Md; Elayouch, Aliyasin; Chollet, Franck; Khelif, Abdelkrim

    2016-12-01

    Pillar-based phononic crystals exhibit some unique wave phenomena due to the interaction between surface acoustic modes of the substrate and local resonances supported by pillars. In this paper, we extend the investigations by taking into account the presence of a liquid medium. We particularly demonstrate that local resonances dramatically decrease the phase velocity of Scholte-Stoneley wave, which leads to a slow wave at the solid/fluid interface. Moreover, we show that increasing the height of pillars introduces a new set of branches of interface modes and drastically affects the acoustic energy localization. Indeed, while some modes display a highly confined pressure between pillars, others exponentially decay in the fluid or only propagate in the solid without disturbing the fluid pressure. These theoretical results, performed by finite element method, highlight a new acoustic wave confinement suitable in various applications such as acoustophoresis, lab on chip and microfluidics.

  12. Ion acoustic solitary waves in plasmas with nonextensive electrons, Boltzmann positrons and relativistic thermal ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafez, M. G.; Talukder, M. R.

    2015-09-01

    This work investigates the theoretical and numerical studies on nonlinear propagation of ion acoustic solitary waves (IASWs) in an unmagnetized plasma consisting of nonextensive electrons, Boltzmann positrons and relativistic thermal ions. The Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation is derived by using the well known reductive perturbation method. This equation admits the soliton like solitary wave solution. The effects of phase velocity, amplitude of soliton, width of soliton and electrostatic nonlinear propagation of weakly relativistic ion-acoustic solitary waves have been discussed with graphical representation found in the variation of the plasma parameters. The obtained results can be helpful in understanding the features of small but finite amplitude localized relativistic ion-acoustic waves for an unmagnetized three component plasma system in astrophysical compact objects.

  13. Characteristics of group velocities of backward waves in a hollow cylinder.

    PubMed

    Cui, Hanyin; Lin, Weijun; Zhang, Hailan; Wang, Xiuming; Trevelyan, Jon

    2014-06-01

    It is known that modes in axially uniform waveguides exhibit backward-propagation characteristics for which group and phase velocities have opposite signs. For elastic plates, group velocities of backward Lamb waves depend only on Poisson's ratio. This paper explores ways to achieve a large group velocity of a backward mode in hollow cylinders by changing the outer to inner radius ratio, in order that such a mode with strong backward-propagation characteristics may be used in acoustic logging tools. Dispersion spectra of guided waves in hollow cylinders of varying radii are numerically simulated to explore the existence of backward modes and to choose the clearly visible backward modes with high group velocities. Analyses of group velocity characteristics show that only a small number of low order backward modes are suitable for practical use, and the radius ratio to reach the highest group velocity corresponds to the accidental degeneracy of neighboring pure transverse and compressional modes at the wavenumber k = 0. It is also shown that large group velocities of backward waves are achievable in hollow cylinders made of commonly encountered materials, which may bring cost benefits when using acoustic devices which take advantage of backward-propagation effects.

  14. Observation of self-excited acoustic vortices in defect-mediated dust acoustic wave turbulence.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Ya-Yi; I, Lin

    2014-07-01

    Using the self-excited dust acoustic wave as a platform, we demonstrate experimental observation of self-excited fluctuating acoustic vortex pairs with ± 1 topological charges through spontaneous waveform undulation in defect-mediated turbulence for three-dimensional traveling nonlinear longitudinal waves. The acoustic vortex pair has helical waveforms with opposite chirality around the low-density hole filament pair in xyt space (the xy plane is the plane normal to the wave propagation direction). It is generated through ruptures of sequential crest surfaces and reconnections with their trailing ruptured crest surfaces. The initial rupture is originated from the amplitude reduction induced by the formation of the kinked wave crest strip with strong stretching through the undulation instability. Increasing rupture causes the separation of the acoustic vortex pair after generation. A similar reverse process is followed for the acoustic vortex annihilating with the opposite-charged acoustic vortex from the same or another pair generation.

  15. A special relation between Young's modulus, Rayleigh-wave velocity, and Poisson's ratio.

    PubMed

    Malischewsky, Peter G; Tuan, Tran Thanh

    2009-12-01

    Bayon et al. [(2005). J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 117, 3469-3477] described a method for the determination of Young's modulus by measuring the Rayleigh-wave velocity and the ellipticity of Rayleigh waves, and found a peculiar almost linear relation between a non-dimensional quantity connecting Young's modulus, Rayleigh-wave velocity and density, and Poisson's ratio. The analytical reason for this special behavior remained unclear. It is demonstrated here that this behavior is a simple consequence of the mathematical form of the Rayleigh-wave velocity as a function of Poisson's ratio. The consequences for auxetic materials (those materials for which Poisson's ratio is negative) are discussed, as well as the determination of the shear and bulk moduli.

  16. Comment on "Anomalous wave propagation in a one-dimensional acoustic metamaterial having simultaneously negative mass density and Young's modulus" [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 132, 2887-2895 (2012)].

    PubMed

    Marston, Philip L

    2014-03-01

    The phase and group velocities of elastic guided waves are important in the physical interpretation of high frequency scattering by fluid-loaded elastic shells. Outside the context of scattering, those properties are also important for understanding the energy flow in acoustic metamaterials. In a recent investigation of acoustic metamaterials exhibiting anomalous wave propagation [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 132, 2887-2895 (2012)] criticism of negative group velocity terminology was generalized to elastic waves guided on ordinary materials. Some context and justification for retaining the identification of negative group velocities associated with a type of backscattering enhancement for shells are explained here. The phase evolution direction is determined by the boundary conditions.

  17. Far-field image magnification for acoustic waves using anisotropic acoustic metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Ao, Xianyu; Chan, C T

    2008-02-01

    A kind of two-dimensional acoustic metamaterial is designed so that it exhibits strong anisotropy along two orthogonal directions. Based on the rectangular equal frequency contour of this metamaterial, magnifying lenses for acoustic waves, analogous to electromagnetic hyperlenses demonstrated recently in the optical regime, can be realized. Such metamaterial may offer applications in imaging for systems that obey scalar wave equations.

  18. A simple method of predicting S-wave velocity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, M.W.

    2006-01-01

    Prediction of shear-wave velocity plays an important role in seismic modeling, amplitude analysis with offset, and other exploration applications. This paper presents a method for predicting S-wave velocity from the P-wave velocity on the basis of the moduli of dry rock. Elastic velocities of water-saturated sediments at low frequencies can be predicted from the moduli of dry rock by using Gassmann's equation; hence, if the moduli of dry rock can be estimated from P-wave velocities, then S-wave velocities easily can be predicted from the moduli. Dry rock bulk modulus can be related to the shear modulus through a compaction constant. The numerical results indicate that the predicted S-wave velocities for consolidated and unconsolidated sediments agree well with measured velocities if differential pressure is greater than approximately 5 MPa. An advantage of this method is that there are no adjustable parameters to be chosen, such as the pore-aspect ratios required in some other methods. The predicted S-wave velocity depends only on the measured P-wave velocity and porosity. ?? 2006 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  19. Effect of Forcing Function on Nonlinear Acoustic Standing Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finkheiner, Joshua R.; Li, Xiao-Fan; Raman, Ganesh; Daniels, Chris; Steinetz, Bruce

    2003-01-01

    Nonlinear acoustic standing waves of high amplitude have been demonstrated by utilizing the effects of resonator shape to prevent the pressure waves from entering saturation. Experimentally, nonlinear acoustic standing waves have been generated by shaking an entire resonating cavity. While this promotes more efficient energy transfer than a piston-driven resonator, it also introduces complicated structural dynamics into the system. Experiments have shown that these dynamics result in resonator forcing functions comprised of a sum of several Fourier modes. However, previous numerical studies of the acoustics generated within the resonator assumed simple sinusoidal waves as the driving force. Using a previously developed numerical code, this paper demonstrates the effects of using a forcing function constructed with a series of harmonic sinusoidal waves on resonating cavities. From these results, a method will be demonstrated which allows the direct numerical analysis of experimentally generated nonlinear acoustic waves in resonators driven by harmonic forcing functions.

  20. Ion-acoustic cnoidal waves in a quantum plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Mahmood, S.; Haas, F.

    2014-10-15

    Nonlinear ion-acoustic cnoidal wave structures are studied in an unmagnetized quantum plasma. Using the reductive perturbation method, a Korteweg-de Vries equation is derived for appropriate boundary conditions and nonlinear periodic wave solutions are obtained. The corresponding analytical solution and numerical plots of the ion-acoustic cnoidal waves and solitons in the phase plane are presented using the Sagdeev pseudo-potential approach. The variations in the nonlinear potential of the ion-acoustic cnoidal waves are studied at different values of quantum parameter H{sub e} which is the ratio of electron plasmon energy to electron Fermi energy defined for degenerate electrons. It is found that both compressive and rarefactive ion-acoustic cnoidal wave structures are formed depending on the value of the quantum parameter. The dependence of the wavelength and frequency on nonlinear wave amplitude is also presented.

  1. Nonlinear ionospheric responses to large-amplitude infrasonic-acoustic waves generated by undersea earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zettergren, M. D.; Snively, J. B.; Komjathy, A.; Verkhoglyadova, O. P.

    2017-02-01

    Numerical models of ionospheric coupling with the neutral atmosphere are used to investigate perturbations of plasma density, vertically integrated total electron content (TEC), neutral velocity, and neutral temperature associated with large-amplitude acoustic waves generated by the initial ocean surface displacements from strong undersea earthquakes. A simplified source model for the 2011 Tohoku earthquake is constructed from estimates of initial ocean surface responses to approximate the vertical motions over realistic spatial and temporal scales. Resulting TEC perturbations from modeling case studies appear consistent with observational data, reproducing pronounced TEC depletions which are shown to be a consequence of the impacts of nonlinear, dissipating acoustic waves. Thermospheric acoustic compressional velocities are ˜±250-300 m/s, superposed with downward flows of similar amplitudes, and temperature perturbations are ˜300 K, while the dominant wave periodicity in the thermosphere is ˜3-4 min. Results capture acoustic wave processes including reflection, onset of resonance, and nonlinear steepening and dissipation—ultimately leading to the formation of ionospheric TEC depletions "holes"—that are consistent with reported observations. Three additional simulations illustrate the dependence of atmospheric acoustic wave and subsequent ionospheric responses on the surface displacement amplitude, which is varied from the Tohoku case study by factors of 1/100, 1/10, and 2. Collectively, results suggest that TEC depletions may only accompany very-large amplitude thermospheric acoustic waves necessary to induce a nonlinear response, here with saturated compressional velocities ˜200-250 m/s generated by sea surface displacements exceeding ˜1 m occurring over a 3 min time period.

  2. Guided acoustic and optical waves in silicon-on-insulator for Brillouin scattering and optomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarabalis, Christopher J.; Hill, Jeff T.; Safavi-Naeini, Amir H.

    2016-10-01

    We numerically study silicon waveguides on silica showing that it is possible to simultaneously guide optical and acoustic waves in the technologically important silicon on insulator (SOI) material system. Thin waveguides, or fins, exhibit geometrically softened mechanical modes at gigahertz frequencies with phase velocities below the Rayleigh velocity in glass, eliminating acoustic radiation losses. We propose slot waveguides on glass with telecom optical frequencies and strong radiation pressure forces resulting in Brillouin gains on the order of 500 and 50 000 W-1m-1 for backward and forward Brillouin scattering, respectively.

  3. Standing surface acoustic wave based cell coculture.

    PubMed

    Li, Sixing; Guo, Feng; Chen, Yuchao; Ding, Xiaoyun; Li, Peng; Wang, Lin; Cameron, Craig E; Huang, Tony Jun

    2014-10-07

    Precise reconstruction of heterotypic cell-cell interactions in vitro requires the coculture of different cell types in a highly controlled manner. In this article, we report a standing surface acoustic wave (SSAW)-based cell coculture platform. In our approach, different types of cells are patterned sequentially in the SSAW field to form an organized cell coculture. To validate our platform, we demonstrate a coculture of epithelial cancer cells and endothelial cells. Real-time monitoring of cell migration dynamics reveals increased cancer cell mobility when cancer cells are cocultured with endothelial cells. Our SSAW-based cell coculture platform has the advantages of contactless cell manipulation, high biocompatibility, high controllability, simplicity, and minimal interference of the cellular microenvironment. The SSAW technique demonstrated here can be a valuable analytical tool for various biological studies involving heterotypic cell-cell interactions.

  4. Standing Surface Acoustic Wave Based Cell Coculture

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Precise reconstruction of heterotypic cell–cell interactions in vitro requires the coculture of different cell types in a highly controlled manner. In this article, we report a standing surface acoustic wave (SSAW)-based cell coculture platform. In our approach, different types of cells are patterned sequentially in the SSAW field to form an organized cell coculture. To validate our platform, we demonstrate a coculture of epithelial cancer cells and endothelial cells. Real-time monitoring of cell migration dynamics reveals increased cancer cell mobility when cancer cells are cocultured with endothelial cells. Our SSAW-based cell coculture platform has the advantages of contactless cell manipulation, high biocompatibility, high controllability, simplicity, and minimal interference of the cellular microenvironment. The SSAW technique demonstrated here can be a valuable analytical tool for various biological studies involving heterotypic cell–cell interactions. PMID:25232648

  5. Surface acoustic wave microsensors and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galipeau, David W.; Story, Patrick R.; Vetelino, Kevin A.; Mileham, Russell D.

    1997-12-01

    Surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices have been studied for the last twenty years as highly sensitive yet relatively inexpensive microsensors for applications ranging from temperature and stress to gas and biological sensing. This wide range of applications is due to the SAW microsensors' high sensitivity to several physical parameters including mass, temperature, stress, and conductivity. Their low cost results from the use of standard batch microelectronic fabrication techniques for their manufacture. In this paper several chemical sensing applications for SAW devices are described. These include: gas detection; thin-film polymer characterization; dew-point measurements; surface energy measurements; and as a method to measure surface cleanliness. Experimental results are presented along with comparisons to other measurement techniques.

  6. Surface acoustic wave microsensors and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galipeau, David W.; Story, Patrick R.; Vetelino, Kevin A.; Mileham, R. D.

    1997-06-01

    Surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices have been studied for the last twenty years as highly sensitive yet relatively inexpensive microsensors for applications ranging from gas and biological sensing to thin film and surface characterization. This wide range of applications is due to SAW microsensors high sensitivity to several physical parameters including mass, conductivity, permittivity, stress, temperature and electric fields. Their low cost results from the use of standard batch microelectronic fabrication techniques for their manufacture. In this work several SAW sensing applications are described. These include: gas detection; thin film polymer characterization; dew-point measurements; surface energy measurements; and as a method to measure surface cleanliness. Experimental results are presented along with comparisons to other measurement techniques.

  7. Ionospheric acoustic and gravity waves associated with midlatitude thunderstorms

    SciTech Connect

    Lay, Erin H.; Shao, Xuan -Min; Kendrick, Alexander K.; Carrano, Charles S.

    2015-07-30

    Acoustic waves with periods of 2–4 min and gravity waves with periods of 6–16 min have been detected at ionospheric heights (25–350 km) using GPS total electron content measurements. The area disturbed by these waves and the wave amplitudes have been associated with underlying thunderstorm activity. A statistical study comparing Next Generation Weather Radar thunderstorm measurements with ionospheric acoustic and gravity waves in the midlatitude U.S. Great Plains region was performed for the time period of May–July 2005. An increase of ionospheric acoustic wave disturbed area and amplitude is primarily associated with large thunderstorms (mesoscale convective systems). Ionospheric gravity wave disturbed area and amplitude scale with thunderstorm activity, with even small storms (i.e., individual storm cells) producing an increase of gravity waves.

  8. Ionospheric acoustic and gravity waves associated with midlatitude thunderstorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lay, Erin H.; Shao, Xuan-Min; Kendrick, Alexander K.; Carrano, Charles S.

    2015-07-01

    Acoustic waves with periods of 2-4 min and gravity waves with periods of 6-16 min have been detected at ionospheric heights (250-350 km) using GPS total electron content measurements. The area disturbed by these waves and the wave amplitudes have been associated with underlying thunderstorm activity. A statistical study comparing Next Generation Weather Radar thunderstorm measurements with ionospheric acoustic and gravity waves in the midlatitude U.S. Great Plains region was performed for the time period of May-July 2005. An increase of ionospheric acoustic wave disturbed area and amplitude is primarily associated with large thunderstorms (mesoscale convective systems). Ionospheric gravity wave disturbed area and amplitude scale with thunderstorm activity, with even small storms (i.e., individual storm cells) producing an increase of gravity waves.

  9. Surface-acoustic-wave device incorporating conducting Langmuir-Blodgett films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holcroft, B.; Roberts, G. G.; Barraud, A.; Richard, J.

    1987-04-01

    Surface-acoustic-wave devices incorporating conducting Langmuir-Blodgett films are reported for the first time. Excellent characteristics have been obtained using a mixed valence charge transfer salt of a substituted pyridinium tetracyanoquinodimethane. The control afforded by the deposition technique has enabled the fractional change in surface wave velocity due to the electrical effects to be distinguished from those due to mass loading. The resistivity of the organic surface layer is measured to be 2 ohm-cm.

  10. Strongly driven ion acoustic waves in laser produced plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Baldis, H.A.; Labaune, C.; Renard, N.

    1994-09-20

    This paper present an experimental study of ion acoustic waves with wavenumbers corresponding to stimulated Brillouin scattering. Time resolved Thomson scattering in frequency and wavenumber space, has permitted to observe the dispersion relation of the waves as a function of the laser intensity. Apart from observing ion acoustic waves associated with a strong second component is observed at laser intensities above 10{sup 13}Wcm{sup {minus}2}.

  11. Velocity measurements in whole blood using acoustic resolution photoacoustic Doppler

    PubMed Central

    Brunker, Joanna; Beard, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Acoustic resolution photoacoustic Doppler velocimetry promises to overcome the spatial resolution and depth penetration limitations of current blood flow measuring methods. Despite successful implementation using blood-mimicking fluids, measurements in blood have proved challenging, thus preventing in vivo application. A common explanation for this difficulty is that whole blood is insufficiently heterogeneous relative to detector frequencies of tens of MHz compatible with deep tissue photoacoustic measurements. Through rigorous experimental measurements we provide new insight that refutes this assertion. We show for the first time that, by careful choice of the detector frequency and field-of-view, and by employing novel signal processing methods, it is possible to make velocity measurements in whole blood using transducers with frequencies in the tens of MHz range. These findings have important implications for the prospects of making deep tissue measurements of blood flow relevant to the study of microcirculatory abnormalities associated with cancer, diabetes, atherosclerosis and other conditions. PMID:27446707

  12. Wave velocity characteristic for Kenaf natural fibre under impact damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaleha, M.; Mahzan, S.; Fitri, Muhamad; Kamarudin, K. A.; Eliza, Y.; Tobi, A. L. Mohd

    2017-01-01

    This paper aims to determining the wave velocity characteristics for kenaf fibre reinforced composite (KFC) and it includes both experimental and simulation results. Lead zirconate titanate (PZT) sensor were proposed to be positioned to corresponding locations on the panel. In order to demonstrate the wave velocity, an impacts was introduced onto the panel. It is based on a classical sensor triangulation methodology, combines with experimental strain wave velocity analysis. Then the simulation was designed to replicate panel used in the experimental impacts test. This simulation was carried out using ABAQUS. It was shown that the wave velocity propagates faster in the finite element simulation. Although the experimental strain wave velocity and finite element simulation results do not match exactly, the shape of both waves is similar.

  13. Theoretical relationship between elastic wave velocity and electrical resistivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jong-Sub; Yoon, Hyung-Koo

    2015-05-01

    Elastic wave velocity and electrical resistivity have been commonly applied to estimate stratum structures and obtain subsurface soil design parameters. Both elastic wave velocity and electrical resistivity are related to the void ratio; the objective of this study is therefore to suggest a theoretical relationship between the two physical parameters. Gassmann theory and Archie's equation are applied to propose a new theoretical equation, which relates the compressional wave velocity to shear wave velocity and electrical resistivity. The piezo disk element (PDE) and bender element (BE) are used to measure the compressional and shear wave velocities, respectively. In addition, the electrical resistivity is obtained by using the electrical resistivity probe (ERP). The elastic wave velocity and electrical resistivity are recorded in several types of soils including sand, silty sand, silty clay, silt, and clay-sand mixture. The appropriate input parameters are determined based on the error norm in order to increase the reliability of the proposed relationship. The predicted compressional wave velocities from the shear wave velocity and electrical resistivity are similar to the measured compressional velocities. This study demonstrates that the new theoretical relationship may be effectively used to predict the unknown geophysical property from the measured values.

  14. Reverberant Acoustic Testing and Direct Field Acoustic Testing Acoustic Standing Waves and their Impact on Structural Responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolaini, Ali R.; Doty, Benjamin; Chang, Zensheu

    2012-01-01

    The aerospace industry has been using two methods of acoustic testing to qualify flight hardware: (1) Reverberant Acoustic Test (RAT), (2) Direct Field Acoustic Test (DFAT). The acoustic field obtained by RAT is generally understood and assumed to be diffuse, expect below Schroeder cut-of frequencies. DFAT method of testing has some distinct advantages over RAT, however the acoustic field characteristics can be strongly affected by test setup such as the speaker layouts, number and location of control microphones and control schemes. In this paper the following are discussed based on DEMO tests performed at APL and JPL: (1) Acoustic wave interference patterns and acoustic standing waves, (2) The structural responses in RAT and DFAT.

  15. Multilayer-graphene-based amplifier of surface acoustic waves

    SciTech Connect

    Yurchenko, Stanislav O. Komarov, Kirill A.; Pustovoit, Vladislav I.

    2015-05-15

    The amplification of surface acoustic waves (SAWs) by a multilayer graphene (MLG)-based amplifier is studied. The conductivity of massless carriers (electrons or holes) in graphene in an external drift electric field is calculated using Boltzmann’s equation. At some carrier drift velocities, the real part of the variable conductivity becomes negative and MLG can be employed in SAW amplifiers. Amplification of Blustein’s and Rayleigh’s SAWs in CdS, a piezoelectric hexagonal crystal of the symmetry group C{sub 6v}, is considered. The corresponding equations for SAW propagation in the device are derived and can be applied to other substrate crystals of the same symmetry. The results of the paper indicate that MLG can be considered as a perspective material for SAW amplification and related applications.

  16. Multilayer-graphene-based amplifier of surface acoustic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurchenko, Stanislav O.; Komarov, Kirill A.; Pustovoit, Vladislav I.

    2015-05-01

    The amplification of surface acoustic waves (SAWs) by a multilayer graphene (MLG)-based amplifier is studied. The conductivity of massless carriers (electrons or holes) in graphene in an external drift electric field is calculated using Boltzmann's equation. At some carrier drift velocities, the real part of the variable conductivity becomes negative and MLG can be employed in SAW amplifiers. Amplification of Blustein's and Rayleigh's SAWs in CdS, a piezoelectric hexagonal crystal of the symmetry group C6v, is considered. The corresponding equations for SAW propagation in the device are derived and can be applied to other substrate crystals of the same symmetry. The results of the paper indicate that MLG can be considered as a perspective material for SAW amplification and related applications.

  17. Acoustic resolution photoacoustic Doppler velocity measurements in fluids using time-domain cross-correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunker, J.; Beard, P.

    2013-03-01

    Blood flow measurements have been demonstrated using the acoustic resolution mode of photoacoustic sensing. This is unlike previous flowmetry methods using the optical resolution mode, which limits the maximum penetration depth to approximately 1mm. Here we describe a pulsed time correlation photoacoustic Doppler technique that is inherently flexible, lending itself to both resolution modes. Doppler time shifts are quantified via cross-correlation of pairs of photoacoustic waveforms generated in moving absorbers using pairs of laser light pulses, and the photoacoustic waves detected using an ultrasound transducer. The acoustic resolution mode is employed by using the transducer focal width, rather than the large illuminated volume, to define the lateral spatial resolution. The use of short laser pulses allows depth-resolved measurements to be obtained with high spatial resolution, offering the prospect of mapping flow within microcirculation. Whilst our previous work has been limited to a non-fluid phantom, we now demonstrate measurements in more realistic blood-mimicking phantoms incorporating fluid suspensions of microspheres flowing along an optically transparent tube. Velocities up to 110 mm/s were measured with accuracies approaching 1% of the known velocities, and resolutions of a few mm/s. The velocity range and resolution are scalable with excitation pulse separation, but the maximum measurable velocity was considerably smaller than the value expected from the detector focal beam width. Measurements were also made for blood flowing at velocities up to 13.5 mm/s. This was for a sample reduced to 5% of the normal haematocrit; increasing the red blood cell concentration limited the maximum measurable velocity so that no results were obtained for concentrations greater than 20% of a physiologically realistic haematocrit. There are several possible causes for this limitation; these include the detector bandwidth and irregularities in the flow pattern. Better

  18. Theoretical and experimental study on the acoustic wave energy after the nonlinear interaction of acoustic waves in aqueous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Chao-feng; Li, Feng-chen; Chen, Huan; Lu, Di; Yang, De-sen; Zhang, Meng

    2015-06-01

    Based on the Burgers equation and Manley-Rowe equation, the derivation about nonlinear interaction of the acoustic waves has been done in this paper. After nonlinear interaction among the low-frequency weak waves and the pump wave, the analytical solutions of acoustic waves' amplitude in the field are deduced. The relationship between normalized energy of high-frequency and the change of acoustic energy before and after the nonlinear interaction of the acoustic waves is analyzed. The experimental results about the changes of the acoustic energy are presented. The study shows that new frequencies are generated and the energies of the low-frequency are modulated in a long term by the pump waves, which leads the energies of the low-frequency acoustic waves to change in the pulse trend in the process of the nonlinear interaction of the acoustic waves. The increase and decrease of the energies of the low-frequency are observed under certain typical conditions, which lays a foundation for practical engineering applications.

  19. Accuracy of a pulse-coherent acoustic Doppler profiler in a wave-dominated flow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lacy, J.R.; Sherwood, C.R.

    2004-01-01

    The accuracy of velocities measured by a pulse-coherent acoustic Doppler profiler (PCADP) in the bottom boundary layer of a wave-dominated inner-shelf environment is evaluated. The downward-looking PCADP measured velocities in eight 10-cm cells at 1 Hz. Velocities measured by the PCADP are compared to those measured by an acoustic Doppler velocimeter for wave orbital velocities up to 95 cm s-1 and currents up to 40 cm s-1. An algorithm for correcting ambiguity errors using the resolution velocities was developed. Instrument bias, measured as the average error in burst mean speed, is -0.4 cm s-1 (standard deviation = 0.8). The accuracy (root-mean-square error) of instantaneous velocities has a mean of 8.6 cm s-1 (standard deviation = 6.5) for eastward velocities (the predominant direction of waves), 6.5 cm s-1 (standard deviation = 4.4) for northward velocities, and 2.4 cm s-1 (standard deviation = 1.6) for vertical velocities. Both burst mean and root-mean-square errors are greater for bursts with ub ??? 50 cm s-1. Profiles of burst mean speeds from the bottom five cells were fit to logarithmic curves: 92% of bursts with mean speed ??? 5 cm s-1 have a correlation coefficient R2 > 0.96. In cells close to the transducer, instantaneous velocities are noisy, burst mean velocities are biased low, and bottom orbital velocities are biased high. With adequate blanking distances for both the profile and resolution velocities, the PCADP provides sufficient accuracy to measure velocities in the bottom boundary layer under moderately energetic inner-shelf conditions.

  20. On the fully nonlinear acoustic waves in a plasma with positrons beam impact and superthermal electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Ali Shan, S.; El-Tantawy, S. A.; Moslem, W. M.

    2013-08-15

    Arbitrary amplitude ion-acoustic waves in an unmagnetized plasma consisting of cold positive ions, superthermal electrons, and positrons beam are reported. The basic set of fluid equations is reduced to an energy-balance like equation. The latter is numerically analyzed to examine the existence regions for solitary and shock waves. It is found that only solitary waves can propagate, however, the model cannot support shocks. The effects of superthermality and beam parameters (via, positrons concentration and streaming velocity) on the existence region, as well as solitary wave profile have been discussed.

  1. Surface-acoustic-wave (SAW) flow sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Shrinivas G.

    1991-03-01

    The use of a surface-acoustic-wave (SAW) device to measure the rate of gas flow is described. A SAW oscillator heated to a suitable temperature above ambient is placed in the path of a flowing gas. Convective cooling caused by the gas flow results in a change in the oscillator frequency. A 73-MHz oscillator fabricated on 128 deg rotated Y-cut lithium niobate substrate and heated to 55 C above ambient shows a frequency variation greater than 142 kHz for flow-rate variation from 0 to 1000 cu cm/min. The output of the sensor can be calibrated to provide a measurement of volume flow rate, pressure differential across channel ports, or mass flow rate. High sensitivity, wide dynamic range, and direct digital output are among the attractive features of this sensor. Theoretical expressions for the sensitivity and response time of the sensor are derived. It is shown that by using ultrasonic Lamb waves propagating in thin membranes, a flow sensor with faster response than a SAW sensor can be realized.

  2. Ionospheric acoustic and gravity waves associated with midlatitude thunderstorms

    DOE PAGES

    Lay, Erin H.; Shao, Xuan -Min; Kendrick, Alexander K.; ...

    2015-07-30

    Acoustic waves with periods of 2–4 min and gravity waves with periods of 6–16 min have been detected at ionospheric heights (25–350 km) using GPS total electron content measurements. The area disturbed by these waves and the wave amplitudes have been associated with underlying thunderstorm activity. A statistical study comparing Next Generation Weather Radar thunderstorm measurements with ionospheric acoustic and gravity waves in the midlatitude U.S. Great Plains region was performed for the time period of May–July 2005. An increase of ionospheric acoustic wave disturbed area and amplitude is primarily associated with large thunderstorms (mesoscale convective systems). Ionospheric gravity wavemore » disturbed area and amplitude scale with thunderstorm activity, with even small storms (i.e., individual storm cells) producing an increase of gravity waves.« less

  3. Continuous micro-vortex-based nanoparticle manipulation via focused surface acoustic waves.

    PubMed

    Collins, David J; Ma, Zhichao; Han, Jongyoon; Ai, Ye

    2016-12-20

    Despite increasing demand in the manipulation of nanoscale objects for next generation biological and industrial processes, there is a lack of methods for reliable separation, concentration and purification of nanoscale objects. Acoustic methods have proven their utility in contactless manipulation of microscale objects mainly relying on the acoustic radiation effect, though the influence of acoustic streaming has typically prevented manipulation at smaller length scales. In this work, however, we explicitly take advantage of the strong acoustic streaming in the vicinity of a highly focused, high frequency surface acoustic wave (SAW) beam emanating from a series of focused 6 μm substrate wavelength interdigital transducers patterned on a piezoelectric lithium niobate substrate and actuated with a 633 MHz sinusoidal signal. This streaming field serves to focus fluid streamlines such that incoming particles interact with the acoustic field similarly regardless of their initial starting positions, and results in particle displacements that would not be possible with a travelling acoustic wave force alone. This streaming-induced manipulation of nanoscale particles is maximized with the formation of micro-vortices that extend the width of the microfluidic channel even with the imposition of a lateral flow, occurring when the streaming-induced flow velocities are an order of magnitude larger than the lateral one. We make use of this acoustic streaming to demonstrate the continuous and differential focusing of 100 nm, 300 nm and 500 nm particles.

  4. Propagation of waves of acoustic frequencies in curved ducts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rostafinski, W.

    1973-01-01

    The propagation of waves of acoustic frequencies in curved ducts is studied for the first four modes. The analysis makes use of Bessel functions to construct curves of wave number in the duct versus imposed wave number. The results apply to ducts of arbitrary width and arbitrary radii of curvature. The characteristics of motion in a bend are compared with propagation of waves in a straight duct, and important differences in the behavior of waves are noted.

  5. An Analysis of Consolidation Grouting Effect of Bedrock Based on its Acoustic Velocity Increase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ming; Lu, Wen-bo; Zhang, Wen-ju; Yan, Peng; Zhou, Chuang-bing

    2015-05-01

    Acoustic velocity is an important parameter to evaluate the mechanical properties of fractured rock masses. Based on the in situ acoustic velocity measurement data of ~20 hydropower stations in China, we assessed the acoustic velocity increase of rock masses as a result of consolidation grouting in different geological conditions, such as fault sites, weathered areas and excavation-induced damage zones. We established an empirical relationship between the acoustic velocity of rock masses before and after consolidation grouting, and examined the correlation between acoustic velocity and deformation modulus. A case study is presented about a foundation consolidation grouting project for an intake tower of Pubugou Hydropower Station. The results show that different types of rock masses possess distinct ranges for resultant acoustic velocity increase by consolidation grouting. Under a confidence interval of 95 %, the ranges of the increasing rate of acoustic velocity in a faulted zone, weathered zone, and excavation-induced damage zone are observed to be 12.7-43.1, 12.3-31.2, and 6.9-14.5 %, respectively. The acoustic velocity before grouting and its increasing rate can be used to predict the effectiveness of consolidation grouting.

  6. Frequency Scaling for Evaluation of Shale and Mudstone Properties from Acoustic Velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suarez-Rivera, R.; Willson, S. M.; Nakagawa, S.; Magnar-Ness, O.

    2001-12-01

    In subsurface oil and gas exploration, seismic wave (stress wave) measurement is one of the most important tools for determining the properties of overburden and predicting reservoir conditions such as pore pressure, fracture gradient, and stress distribution. To achieve detailed and reliable knowledge of the reservoir, an integrated analysis can be performed on the seismic properties of rocks measured at different scales ranging from laboratory core, boreholes (well logging) and reservoir itself (surface seismic). However, particularly for sedimentary rocks containing a large amount of clay minerals, such integration is not a straightforward task because of velocity dispersion that makes waves of different frequencies travel at different velocities. The ultimate goal of this study is to devise a methodology for frequency scaling based on laboratory measurements of wave propagation at different frequency ranges. To this end, we have examined the mechanical and acoustic (seismic) properties of strongly dispersive sedimentary rocks. Shales were selected as principal rocks of interest for their predominance in the overburden and the direct impact on the well construction cost. Two types of shales were cored from outcrops(Pierre I and Mancos) and tested under varying conditions of loading (hydrostatic versus uniaxial-strain), orientation to bedding (parallel, perpendicular and oblique). Wave measurements were conducted under four ranges of frequency: Static and quasi-static (seismic frequency, approximately 7 Hz) data was obtained from high-accuracy, low-speed stress-strain measurements, and sonic data (0.4 kHz-9 kHz) was obtained from gas-confined resonant bar tests. For ultrasonic data (150 kHz-1 MHz), a frequency-domain phase analysis was applied to compute frequency-dependent phase and group velocities. Over these ranges, both Pierre and Mancos shales showed a smooth and monotonic increase in compressional and shear wave velocities with frequency. Strong velocity

  7. Acoustic Velocity Of The Sediments Offshore Southwestern Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, C.; Liu, C.; Huang, P.

    2004-12-01

    Along the Manila Trench south of 21øXN, deep-sea sediments are being underthrusted beneath the Taiwan accretionary prism which is composed of the Kaoping Slope and Hengchun Ridge. Offshore southwestern Taiwan, foreland sediments and Late Miocene strata of the Tainan Basin are being accreted onto the fold-and thrust belt of the syn-collision accretionary wedge of the Kaoping Slope. The Kaoping Slope consists of thick Neogene to Recent siliciclastics deformed by fold-and-thrust structures and mud diapers. These Pliocene-Quaternary sediments deposited in the Kaoping Shelf and upper slope area are considered to be paleo-channel deposits confined by NNE-SSW trend mud diapiric structure. Seismic P-wave velocities of the sediment deposited in the Kaoping Shelf and Kaoping Slope area are derived from mutichannel seismic reflection data and wide-angle reflection and refraction profiles collected by sonobuoys. Sediment velocity structures constrained from mutichannel seismic reflection data using velocity spectrum analysis method and that derived from sonobuoy data using tau-sum inversion method are compared, and they both provide consistent velocity structures. Seismic velocities were analyzed along the seismic profile from the surface to maximum depths of about 2.0 km below the seafloor. Our model features a sediment layer1 with 400 ms in thickness and a sediment layer2 with 600 ms in thickness. For the shelf sediments, we observe a linear interval velocity trend of V=1.53+1.91T in layer1, and V=1.86+0.87T in layer2, where T is the one way travel time within the layer. For the slop sediment, the trend of V=1.47+1.93T in layer1, and V=1.70+1.55T in layer2. The layer1¡¦s velocities gradients are similar between the shelf (1.91 km/sec2) and the slope(1.93 km/sec2). It means layer1 distributes over the slope and shelf widely. The result of the sediment velocity gradients in this area are in good agreement with that reported for the south Atlantic continental margins.

  8. False Paradoxes of Superposition in Electric and Acoustic Waves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Richard C.

    1980-01-01

    Corrected are several misconceptions concerning the apparently "missing" energy that results when acoustic or electromagnetic waves cancel by destructive interference and the wave impedance reflected to the sources of the wave energy changes so that the input power is reduced. (Author/CS)

  9. Self-focusing of ion-acoustic surface waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenflo, L.; Gradov, O. M.

    1996-06-01

    An electrostatic ion-acoustic surface wave propagating along the boundary of a semi-infinite plasma is considered. It is shown that a nonlinear Schrödinger equation can describe the development of the wave amplitude. The self-focusing length of a wave beam is estimated.

  10. Waveform inversion of acoustic waves for explosion yield estimation

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.; Rodgers, A. J.

    2016-07-08

    We present a new waveform inversion technique to estimate the energy of near-surface explosions using atmospheric acoustic waves. Conventional methods often employ air blast models based on a homogeneous atmosphere, where the acoustic wave propagation effects (e.g., refraction and diffraction) are not taken into account, and therefore, their accuracy decreases with increasing source-receiver distance. In this study, three-dimensional acoustic simulations are performed with a finite difference method in realistic atmospheres and topography, and the modeled acoustic Green's functions are incorporated into the waveform inversion for the acoustic source time functions. The strength of the acoustic source is related to explosion yield based on a standard air blast model. The technique was applied to local explosions (<10 km) and provided reasonable yield estimates (<~30% error) in the presence of realistic topography and atmospheric structure. In conclusion, the presented method can be extended to explosions recorded at far distance provided proper meteorological specifications.

  11. Velocities of guided ultrasonic waves in heterogeneous medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Touratier, M.

    1984-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical examinations were performed of the longitudinal velocity characteristics of waves in trilaminar and encapsulated waveguides. The study was confined to waveguides with core material that featured transverse wave velocities much worse than the longitudinal wave velocities. The velocities were obtained using a dispersion equation, with consideration given to both the core and encapsulant. Asymptotic velocities were also calculated for bending and twisting in trilaminar waveguides. Trials were run with bimetallic waveguides for comparison with the theoretical predictions. Good agreement was found between the predicted velocity of the propagation of the fundamental mode and the measured velocities. The method was calculated valid for modes above four, confirming that the data were contained in either the core or outer layer, and were unsensitive to the encapsulant.

  12. Shear wave velocity structures of the Arabian Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokhtar, Talal A.; Al-Saeed, Mohammed M.

    1994-02-01

    The shear velocity structures of the different tectonic provinces of the Arabian Peninsula has been studied using surface wave data recorded by the RYD (Riyadh) station. The inversion of Rayleigh wave group velocities indicates that the Arabian shield can be modeled by two layers, each of which is 20 km thick with a shear velocity of 3.61 km/s in the upper crust and 3.88 km/s in the lower crust. The underlying upper mantle velocity is 4.61 km/s. Inversion of both Love and Rayleigh waves group velocities shows that the Arabian platform upper and lower crusts are comparable in their thicknesses to those of the shield, but with shear velocities of 3.4 and 4 km/s, respectively. The upper mantle velocity beneath the platform is 4.4 km/s and the average total thickness of the crust is 45 km.

  13. Effect of acoustic field parameters on arc acoustic binding during ultrasonic wave-assisted arc welding.

    PubMed

    Xie, Weifeng; Fan, Chenglei; Yang, Chunli; Lin, Sanbao

    2016-03-01

    As a newly developed arc welding method, power ultrasound has been successfully introduced into arc and weld pool during ultrasonic wave-assisted arc welding process. The advanced process for molten metals can be realized by utilizing additional ultrasonic field. Under the action of the acoustic wave, the plasma arc as weld heat source is regulated and its characteristics make an obvious change. Compared with the conventional arc, the ultrasonic wave-assisted arc plasma is bound significantly and becomes brighter. To reveal the dependence of the acoustic binding force on acoustic field parameters, a two-dimensional acoustic field model for ultrasonic wave-assisted arc welding device is established. The influences of the radiator height, the central pore radius, the radiator radius, and curvature radius or depth of concave radiator surface are discussed using the boundary element method. Then the authors analyze the resonant mode by this relationship curve between acoustic radiation power and radiator height. Furthermore, the best acoustic binding ability is obtained by optimizing the geometric parameters of acoustic radiator. In addition, three concave radiator surfaces including spherical cap surface, paraboloid of revolution, and rotating single curved surface are investigated systematically. Finally, both the calculation and experiment suggest that, to obtain the best acoustic binding ability, the ultrasonic wave-assisted arc welding setup should be operated under the first resonant mode using a radiator with a spherical cap surface, a small central pore, a large section radius and an appropriate curvature radius.

  14. Anisotropic Swirling Surface Acoustic Waves from Inverse Filtering for On-Chip Generation of Acoustic Vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riaud, Antoine; Thomas, Jean-Louis; Charron, Eric; Bussonnière, Adrien; Bou Matar, Olivier; Baudoin, Michael

    2015-09-01

    From radio-electronics signal analysis to biological sample actuation, surface acoustic waves (SAWs) are involved in a multitude of modern devices. However, only the most simple standing or progressive waves such as plane and focused waves have been explored so far. In this paper, we expand the SAW toolbox with a wave family named "swirling surface acoustic waves" which are the 2D anisotropic analogue of bulk acoustic vortices. Similarly to their 3D counterpart, they appear as concentric structures of bright rings with a phase singularity in their center resulting in a central dark spot. After the rigorous mathematical definition of these waves, we synthesize them experimentally through the inverse filtering technique revisited for surface waves. For this purpose, we design a setup combining arrays of interdigitated transducers and a multichannel electronic that enables one to synthesize any prescribed wave field compatible with the anisotropy of the substrate in a region called the "acoustic scene." This work opens prospects for the design of integrated acoustic vortex generators for on-chip selective acoustic tweezing.

  15. Broadband enhanced transmission of acoustic waves through serrated metal gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Dong-Xiang; Deng, Yu-Qiang; Xu, Di-Hu; Fan, Ren-Hao; Peng, Ru-Wen; Chen, Ze-Guo; Lu, Ming-Hui; Huang, X. R.; Wang, Mu

    2015-01-01

    In this letter, we have demonstrated that serrated metal gratings, which introduce gradient coatings, can give rise to broadband transmission enhancement of acoustic waves. Here, we have experimentally and theoretically studied the acoustic transmission properties of metal gratings with or without serrated boundaries. The average transmission is obviously enhanced for serrated metal gratings within a wide frequency range, while the Fabry-Perot resonance is significantly suppressed. An effective medium hypothesis with varying acoustic impedance is proposed to analyze the mechanism, which was verified through comparison with finite-element simulation. The serrated boundary supplies gradient mass distribution and gradient normal acoustic impedance, which could efficiently reduce the boundary reflection. Further, by increasing the region of the serrated boundary, we present a broadband high-transmission grating for wide range of incident angle. Our results may have potential applications to broadband acoustic imaging, acoustic sensing, and acoustic devices.

  16. Scattering of Acoustic Waves from Ocean Boundaries

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-30

    derived reflection coefficients as a function of range along the reverberation track (right). RESULTS Analysis of Acoustic Scattering for Layered and... acoustic interaction with the ocean floor, including penetration through and reflection from smooth and rough water/sediment interfaces, scattering ...can account for the all of the physical processes and variability of acoustic propagation and scattering in ocean environments with special emphasis

  17. Flow induced dust acoustic shock waves in a complex plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaiswal, Surabhi; Bandyopadhyay, Pintu; Sen, Abhijit

    2015-11-01

    We report on experimental observations of particle flow induced large amplitude shock waves in a dusty plasma. These dust acoustic shocks (DAS) are observed for strongly supersonic flows and have been studied in a U-shaped Dusty Plasma Experimental (DPEx) device for charged kaolin dust in a background of Argon plasma. The strong flow of the dust fluid is induced by adjusting the pumping speed and neutral gas flow into the device. An isolated copper wire mounted on the cathode acts as a potential barrier to the flow of dust particles. A sudden change of the dust density near the potential hill is used to trigger the onset of high velocity dust acoustic shocks. The dynamics of the shocks are captured by fast video pictures of the structures that are illuminated by a laser sheet beam. The physical characteristics of the shock are delineated from a parametric scan of their dynamical properties over a range of plasma parameters and flow speeds. Details of these observations and a physical explanation based on model calculations will be presented.

  18. Interaction of High Frequency Acoustic Waves and Optical Waves Propagating in Single Mode Fibers.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Paula, Ramon Perez

    This paper develops a frequency dependent model for the acousto-optic interaction with a single mode fiber of acoustic waves having wavelengths comparable to the fiber diameter. This paper also presents optical techniques for experimental observation and measurement of such effects. The acoustic waves are both normally and obliquelly incident on the fiber. The solutions to the elastic problem studied here are constructed using scalar and vector potentials. The principal strains induced by a plane wave propagating in a fluid is calculated through the solution of the wave equation and the associated boundary condition. The optical beam propagation is analyzed starting with Maxwell's, equations and the required solution for single mode (degenerate double mode) propagation is presented. For the perturbed fiber the anisotropic solution is discussed. The optical indicatrix is derived from the electric energy density, with the major axis parallel to the induced principal strains obtained from the solution of the elastic problem. The solution of the optical indicatrix equation (index ellipsoid) yields two independent propagation modes that are linear polarized plane waves with two different propagation velocities. The induced phase shift and birefringence are calculated from the index ellipsoid. The birefringence and phase shift are also measured experimentally using a fiber optic interferometer and a fiber optic polariscope. The experimental apparatus is discussed in detail and the techniques used to make the measurements are presented. The results are separated into two parts: first, the results for ultrasonic waves of normal incidence are presented, theoretical and experimental results are discussed, and the two compared; second, the results for angular incidence are presented in the same format as above, and compared with the results for perpendicular incidence.

  19. Wave-particle dynamics of wave breaking in the self-excited dust acoustic wave.

    PubMed

    Teng, Lee-Wen; Chang, Mei-Chu; Tseng, Yu-Ping; I, Lin

    2009-12-11

    The wave-particle microdynamics in the breaking of the self-excited dust acoustic wave growing in a dusty plasma liquid is investigated through directly tracking dust micromotion. It is found that the nonlinear wave growth and steepening stop as the mean oscillating amplitude of dust displacement reaches about 1/k (k is the wave number), where the vertical neighboring dust trajectories start to crossover and the resonant wave heating with uncertain crest trapping onsets. The dephased dust oscillations cause the abrupt dropping and broadening of the wave crest after breaking, accompanied by the transition from the liquid phase with coherent dust oscillation to the gas phase with chaotic dust oscillation. Corkscrew-shaped phase-space distributions measured at the fixed phases of the wave oscillation cycle clearly indicate how dusts move in and constitute the evolving waveform through dust-wave interaction.

  20. Droplet actuation by surface acoustic waves: an interplay between acoustic streaming and radiation pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunet, Philippe; Baudoin, Michael; Matar, Olivier Bou; Zoueshtiagh, Farzam

    2010-11-01

    Surface acoustic waves (SAW) are known to be a versatile technique for the actuation of sessile drops. Droplet displacement, internal mixing or drop splitting, are amongst the elementary operations that SAW can achieve, which are useful on lab-on-chip microfluidics benches. On the purpose to understand the underlying physical mechanisms involved during these operations, we study experimentally the droplet dynamics varying different physical parameters. Here in particular, the influence of liquid viscosity and acoustic frequency is investigated: it is indeed predicted that both quantities should play a role in the acoustic-hydrodynamic coupling involved in the dynamics. The key point is to compare the relative magnitude of the attenuation length, i.e. the scale within which the acoustic wave decays in the fluid, and the size of the drop. This relative magnitude governs the relative importance of acoustic streaming and acoustic radiation pressure, which are both involved in the droplet dynamics.

  1. Spectral solution of acoustic wave-propagation problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopriva, David A.

    1990-01-01

    The Chebyshev spectral collocation solution of acoustic wave propagation problems is considered. It is shown that the phase errors decay exponentially fast and that the number of points per wavelength is not sufficient to estimate the phase accuracy. Applications include linear propagation of a sinusoidal acoustic wavetrain in two space dimensions, and the interaction of a sound wave with the bow shock formed by placing a cylinder in a uniform Mach 4 supersonic free stream.

  2. Nonlinear Scattering of Acoustic Waves by Vibrating Obstacles.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-06-01

    AD-A129 282 NONLINEAR SCATTERING OF ACOUSTIC WAVES BY VIBRATING OBSTACLES (U) NAVAL RESEARCH LAR WASHINOTON DC d C PIQUETTE 01 JUN 83 NRL-MR-5077...MICROCOPY RESOLUTION TEST CHART NAIOAL IBtJ[IAU Of S1ANDARD~If A3 NRL Memorandum Report 5077 Nonlinear Scattering of Acoustic Waves by Vibrating Obstacles ... Obstacles continuing problem. S. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUMMER 7. AUTHOR(s) 6. CONTRACT OR GRANT NUMIISER( ) Jean C. Piquette* S. PERFORMING

  3. Thin Superconducting Film Characterization by Surface Acoustic Waves.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-26

    NUMBER 2. GOVT ACCESSION NO. 3 RECIPIENT’S CA ALOG NUMBER ~~AFOSR TR -0 8 4. TITLE (and Subtitle) 5 TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVERED Thin Superconducting ...thin film superconductor surface acoustic waves I SAW electron phonon interaction superconducting energy gap electron mean free path vortex...electrical resistivity and the attenuation of surface ,e J -acoustic waves (SAW) were measured in the superconducting state of a L granular lead film

  4. Wave-equation velocity replacement of the low-velocity layer for overthrust-belt data

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, W.A. Jr.; Phillip, L.D.; Paal, E.F.

    1995-03-01

    Seismic land data are commonly plagued by nonhyperbolic distortions induced by a variable near-surface, low-velocity layer (LVL). First-arrival refraction analysis is conventionally employed to estimate the LVL geometry and velocities. Then vertical static time shifts are used to replace the LVL velocities with the more uniform, faster velocities that characterize the underlying refracting layer. This methodology has earned a good reputation as a geophysical data processing tool; however, velocity replacement with static shifts assumes that no ray bending occurred at the LVL base and that waves propagated vertically through the LVL. Wave-equation datuming may be used to perform LVL velocity replacement when statics are inadequately. This method extrapolates the seismic data from the surface to the LVL base with the LVL velocities. Then it extrapolates the data from the LVL base to an arbitrary datum, with the replacement velocity field. Application of wave-equation datuming to land data is difficult because of certain common characteristics of land data and because the LVL estimation procedure is considerably more difficult. The authors demonstrate wave-equation velocity replacement on land data from a western US overthrust belt. The LVL in this region was particularly thick and complicated and ideal for a wave-theoretical velocity-replacement procedure. Standard refraction analysis techniques were employed to estimate the LVL, then wave-equation datuming was used to perform the velocity replacement. Their derived LVL model was not perfect, so some imaging errors were expected because wave-equation datuming is highly dependent upon the LVL model. Nevertheless, their results show that wave-equation datuming generally allowed better shallow reflector imaging than could be achieved with conventional statics processing.

  5. Acoustic wave and eikonal equations in a transformed metric space for various types of anisotropy.

    PubMed

    Noack, Marcus M; Clark, Stuart

    2017-03-01

    Acoustic waves propagating in anisotropic media are important for various applications. Even though these wave phenomena do not generally occur in nature, they can be used to approximate wave motion in various physical settings. We propose a method to derive wave equations for anisotropic wave propagation by adjusting the dispersion relation according to a selected type of anisotropy and transforming it into another metric space. The proposed method allows for the derivation of acoustic wave and eikonal equations for various types of anisotropy, and generalizes anisotropy by interpreting it as a change of the metric instead of a change of velocity with direction. The presented method reduces the scope of acoustic anisotropy to a selection of a velocity or slowness surface and a tensor that describes the transformation into a new metric space. Experiments are shown for spatially dependent ellipsoidal anisotropy in homogeneous and inhomogeneous media and sandstone, which shows vertical transverse isotropy. The results demonstrate the stability and simplicity of the solution process for certain types of anisotropy and the equivalency of the solutions.

  6. MEASUREMENTS OF ABSORPTION, EMISSIVITY REDUCTION, AND LOCAL SUPPRESSION OF SOLAR ACOUSTIC WAVES IN SUNSPOTS

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, D.-Y.; Liang, Z.-C.; Yang, M.-H.; Zhao Hui; Sun, M.-T.

    2009-05-01

    The power of solar acoustic waves in magnetic regions is lower relative to the quiet Sun. Absorption, emissivity reduction, and local suppression of acoustic waves contribute to the observed power reduction in magnetic regions. We propose a model for the energy budget of acoustic waves propagating through a sunspot in terms of the coefficients of absorption, emissivity reduction, and local suppression of the sunspot. Using the property that the waves emitted along the wave path between two points have no correlation with the signal at the starting point, we can separate the effects of these three mechanisms. Applying this method to helioseismic data filtered with direction and phase-velocity filters, we measure the fraction of the contribution of each mechanism to the power deficit in the umbra of the leading sunspot of NOAA 9057. The contribution from absorption is 23.3 {+-} 1.3%, emissivity reduction 8.2 {+-} 1.4%, and local suppression 68.5 {+-} 1.5%, for a wave packet corresponding to a phase velocity of 6.98 x 10{sup -5} rad s{sup -1}.

  7. Nozzleless Spray Cooling Using Surface Acoustic Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ang, Kar Man; Yeo, Leslie; Friend, James; Hung, Yew Mun; Tan, Ming Kwang

    2015-11-01

    Due to its reliability and portability, surface acoustic wave (SAW) atomization is an attractive approach for the generation of monodispersed microdroplets in microfluidics devices. Here, we present a nozzleless spray cooling technique via SAW atomization with key advantage of downward scalability by simply increasing the excitation frequency. With generation of micron size droplets through surface destabilization using SAW, the clogging issues commonly encountered by spraying nozzle can be neutralized. Using deionised water, cooling is improved when the atomization rate is increased and the position of the device is optimized such that the atomized droplets can be easily seeded into the upstream of the flow circulation. Cooling is further improved with the use of nanofluids; a suspension of nanoparticles in water. By increasing nanoparticle mass concentration from 1% to 3%, cooling is enhanced due to the deposition and formation of nanoparticle clusters on heated surface and eventually increase the surface area. However, further increase the concentration to 10% reduces the cooling efficiency due to drastic increase in viscosity μ that leads to lower atomization rate which scales as ṁ ~μ - 1 / 2 .

  8. Surface acoustic wave devices for sensor applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bo, Liu; Xiao, Chen; Hualin, Cai; Mohammad, Mohammad Ali; Xiangguang, Tian; Luqi, Tao; Yi, Yang; Tianling, Ren

    2016-02-01

    Surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices have been widely used in different fields and will continue to be of great importance in the foreseeable future. These devices are compact, cost efficient, easy to fabricate, and have a high performance, among other advantages. SAW devices can work as filters, signal processing units, sensors and actuators. They can even work without batteries and operate under harsh environments. In this review, the operating principles of SAW sensors, including temperature sensors, pressure sensors, humidity sensors and biosensors, will be discussed. Several examples and related issues will be presented. Technological trends and future developments will also be discussed. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 60936002, 61025021, 61434001, 61574083), the State Key Development Program for Basic Research of China (No. 2015CB352100), the National Key Project of Science and Technology (No. 2011ZX02403-002) and the Special Fund for Agroscientific Research in the Public Interest of China (No. 201303107). M.A.M is additionally supported by the Postdoctoral Fellowship (PDF) program of the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC) of Canada and the China Postdoctoral Science Foundation (CPSF).

  9. Surface acoustic wave (SAW) vibration sensors.

    PubMed

    Filipiak, Jerzy; Solarz, Lech; Steczko, Grzegorz

    2011-01-01

    In the paper a feasibility study on the use of surface acoustic wave (SAW) vibration sensors for electronic warning systems is presented. The system is assembled from concatenated SAW vibration sensors based on a SAW delay line manufactured on a surface of a piezoelectric plate. Vibrations of the plate are transformed into electric signals that allow identification of the sensor and localization of a threat. The theoretical study of sensor vibrations leads us to the simple isotropic model with one degree of freedom. This model allowed an explicit description of the sensor plate movement and identification of the vibrating sensor. Analysis of frequency response of the ST-cut quartz sensor plate and a damping speed of its impulse response has been conducted. The analysis above was the basis to determine the ranges of parameters for vibrating plates to be useful in electronic warning systems. Generally, operation of electronic warning systems with SAW vibration sensors is based on the analysis of signal phase changes at the working frequency of delay line after being transmitted via two circuits of concatenated four-terminal networks. Frequencies of phase changes are equal to resonance frequencies of vibrating plates of sensors. The amplitude of these phase changes is proportional to the amplitude of vibrations of a sensor plate. Both pieces of information may be sent and recorded jointly by a simple electrical unit.

  10. Nanoliter-droplet acoustic streaming via ultra high frequency surface acoustic waves.

    PubMed

    Shilton, Richie J; Travagliati, Marco; Beltram, Fabio; Cecchini, Marco

    2014-08-06

    The relevant length scales in sub-nanometer amplitude surface acoustic wave-driven acoustic streaming are demonstrated. We demonstrate the absence of any physical limitations preventing the downscaling of SAW-driven internal streaming to nanoliter microreactors and beyond by extending SAW microfluidics up to operating frequencies in the GHz range. This method is applied to nanoliter scale fluid mixing.

  11. Diffraction of three-colour radiation on an acoustic wave

    SciTech Connect

    Kotov, V M

    2015-07-31

    We study acousto-optic Bragg diffraction of three-colour radiation having wavelengths of 488, 514 and 633 nm on a single acoustic wave propagating in a TeO{sub 2} crystal. A technique is developed that allows one to find diffraction regimes with a proportional change in the intensity of all radiations by varying the acoustic power. According to the technique, radiation with a maximum wavelength has to be in strict Bragg synchronism with the acoustic wave, while other radiations diffract during the synchronism detuning. The results obtained using this technique are experimentally confirmed. (diffraction of light)

  12. Analysis of an existing experiment on the interaction of acoustic waves with a laminar boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schopper, M. R.

    1982-01-01

    The hot-wire anemometer amplitude data contained in the 1977 report of P. J. Shapiro entitled, ""The Influence of Sound Upon Laminar Boundary'' were reevaluated. Because the low-Reynolds number boundary layer disturbance data were misinterpreted, an effort was made to improve the corresponding disturbance growth rate curves. The data are modeled as the sum of upstream and downstream propagating acoustic waves and a wave representing the Tollmien-Schlichting (TS) wave. The amplitude and phase velocity of the latter wave were then adjusted so that the total signal reasonably matched the amplitude and phase angle hot-wire data along the plate laminar boundary layer. The revised rates show growth occurring further upstream than Shapiro found. It appears that the premature growth is due to the adverse pressure gradient created by the shape of the plate. Basic elements of sound propagation in ducts and the experimental and theoretical acoustic-stability literature are reviewed.

  13. Incident Wave Removal for Defect Enhancement in Acoustic Wavefield Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Master, Zubin M.; Michaels, Thomas E.; Michaels, Jennifer E.

    2007-03-01

    The method of Acoustic Wavefield Imaging (AWI) offers many advantages over conventional ultrasonic techniques for nondestructive evaluation, and also provides a means of incorporating fixed ultrasonic sensors used for structural health monitoring into subsequent inspections. AWI utilizes these fixed sensors as wave sources and an externally scanned ultrasonic transducer (or laser interferometer) as a receiver to acquire complete waveform data over the surface. When displayed as time-dependent images, these signals show the propagation of acoustic waves through a structure and subsequent interactions of these waves with both defects and structural geometry. Defect areas appear as stationary scattering sources on these images, but such scattered wave energy is often obscured by the stronger incident acoustic wavefield. The objective of the work presented here is to develop multidimensional signal processing algorithms to enhance the appearance of structural defects on wavefield images via removal of the incident wave. Results are presented for analysis of images from aluminum plate and solid laminate composite specimens.

  14. Nonlinear acoustic waves in the viscous thermosphere and ionosphere above earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chum, J.; Cabrera, M. A.; Mošna, Z.; Fagre, M.; Baše, J.; Fišer, J.

    2016-12-01

    The nonlinear behavior of acoustic waves and their dissipation in the upper atmosphere is studied on the example of infrasound waves generated by vertical motion of the ground surface during the Mw 8.3 earthquake that occurred about 46 km from Illapel, Chile on 16 September 2015. To conserve energy, the amplitude of infrasound waves initially increased as the waves propagated upward to the rarefied air. When the velocities of air particles became comparable with the local sound speed, the nonlinear effects started to play an important role. Consequently, the shape of waveform changed significantly with increasing height, and the original wave packet transformed to the "N-shaped" pulse resembling a shock wave. A unique observation by the continuous Doppler sounder at the altitude of about 195 km is in good agreement with full wave numerical simulation that uses as boundary condition the measured vertical motion of the ground surface.

  15. Implications of elastic wave velocities for Apollo 17 rock powders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Talwani, P.; Nur, A.; Kovach, R. L.

    1974-01-01

    Ultrasonic P- and S-wave velocities of lunar rock powders 172701, 172161, 170051, and 175081 were measured at room temperature and to 2.5 kb confining pressure. The results compare well with those of terrestrial volcanic ash and powdered basalt. P-wave velocity values up to pressures corresponding to a lunar depth of 1.4 km preclude cold compaction alone as an explanation for the observed seismic velocity structure at the Apollo 17 site. Application of small amounts of heat with simultaneous application of pressure causes rock powders to achieve equivalence of seismic velocities for competent rocks.

  16. Propagation and localization of acoustic waves in Fibonacci phononic circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aynaou, H.; El Boudouti, E. H.; Djafari-Rouhani, B.; Akjouj, A.; Velasco, V. R.

    2005-07-01

    A theoretical investigation is made of acoustic wave propagation in one-dimensional phononic bandgap structures made of slender tube loops pasted together with slender tubes of finite length according to a Fibonacci sequence. The band structure and transmission spectrum is studied for two particular cases. (i) Symmetric loop structures, which are shown to be equivalent to diameter-modulated slender tubes. In this case, it is found that besides the existence of extended and forbidden modes, some narrow frequency bands appear in the transmission spectra inside the gaps as defect modes. The spatial localization of the modes lying in the middle of the bands and at their edges is examined by means of the local density of states. The dependence of the bandgap structure on the slender tube diameters is presented. An analysis of the transmission phase time enables us to derive the group velocity as well as the density of states in these structures. In particular, the stop bands (localized modes) may give rise to unusual (strong normal) dispersion in the gaps, yielding fast (slow) group velocities above (below) the speed of sound. (ii) Asymmetric tube loop structures, where the loops play the role of resonators that may introduce transmission zeros and hence new gaps unnoticed in the case of simple diameter-modulated slender tubes. The Fibonacci scaling property has been checked for both cases (i) and (ii), and it holds for a periodicity of three or six depending on the nature of the substrates surrounding the structure.

  17. Calculating wave-generated bottom orbital velocities from surface-wave parameters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wiberg, P.L.; Sherwood, C.R.

    2008-01-01

    Near-bed wave orbital velocities and shear stresses are important parameters in many sediment-transport and hydrodynamic models of the coastal ocean, estuaries, and lakes. Simple methods for estimating bottom orbital velocities from surface-wave statistics such as significant wave height and peak period often are inaccurate except in very shallow water. This paper briefly reviews approaches for estimating wave-generated bottom orbital velocities from near-bed velocity data, surface-wave spectra, and surface-wave parameters; MATLAB code for each approach is provided. Aspects of this problem have been discussed elsewhere. We add to this work by providing a method for using a general form of the parametric surface-wave spectrum to estimate bottom orbital velocity from significant wave height and peak period, investigating effects of spectral shape on bottom orbital velocity, comparing methods for calculating bottom orbital velocity against values determined from near-bed velocity measurements at two sites on the US east and west coasts, and considering the optimal representation of bottom orbital velocity for calculations of near-bed processes. Bottom orbital velocities calculated using near-bed velocity data, measured wave spectra, and parametric spectra for a site on the northern California shelf and one in the mid-Atlantic Bight compare quite well and are relatively insensitive to spectral shape except when bimodal waves are present with maximum energy at the higher-frequency peak. These conditions, which are most likely to occur at times when bottom orbital velocities are small, can be identified with our method as cases where the measured wave statistics are inconsistent with Donelan's modified form of the Joint North Sea Wave Project (JONSWAP) spectrum. We define the 'effective' forcing for wave-driven, near-bed processes as the product of the magnitude of forcing times its probability of occurrence, and conclude that different bottom orbital velocity statistics

  18. Nonlinear behavior of acoustic waves in combustion chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Culick, F. E. C.

    1975-01-01

    The nonlinear growth and limiting amplitude of acoustic waves in a combustion chamber are considered. A formal framework is provided within which practical problems can be treated with a minimum of effort and expense. The general conservation equations were expanded in two small parameters, one characterizing the mean flow field and one measuring the amplitude of oscillations, and then combined to yield a nonlinear inhomogeneous wave equation. The unsteady pressure and velocity fields were expressed as syntheses of the normal modes of the chamber, but with unknown time-varying amplitudes. This procedure yielded a representation of a general unsteady field as a system of coupled nonlinear oscillators. The system of nonlinear equations was treated by the method of averaging to produce a set of coupled nonlinear first order differential equations for the amplitudes and phases of the modes. The analysis is applicable to any combustion chamber. The most interesting applications are probably to solid rockets, liquid rockets, or thrust augmentors on jet engines.

  19. Generalized concept of shear horizontal acoustic plate mode and Love wave sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McHale, Glen

    2003-11-01

    An approach to mass and liquid sensitivity for both the phase velocity and insertion loss of shear mode acoustic wave sensors based on the dispersion equations for layered systems is outlined. The approach is sufficiently general to allow for viscoelastic guiding layers. An equation for the phase velocity and insertion loss sensitivities is given which depends on the slope of the complex phase velocity dispersion curves. This equation contains the equivalent of the Sauerbrey and Kanazawa equations for loading of a quartz crystal microbalance by rigid mass and Newtonian liquids, respectively, and also describes surface loading by viscoelastic layers. The theoretical approach can be applied to a four-layer system, with any of the four layers being viscoelastic, so that mass deposition from a liquid can also be modelled. The theoretical dispersion equation based approach to layer-guided shear horizontal acoustic wave modes on finite substrates presented in this work provides a unified view of Love wave and shear horizontal acoustic plate mode (SH-APM) devices, which have been generally regarded as distinct in sensor research. It is argued that SH-APMs with guiding layers possessing shear acoustic speeds lower than that of the substrate and Love waves are two branches of solution of the same dispersion equation. The layer guided SH-APMs have a phase velocity higher than that of the substrate and the Love waves a phase velocity lower than that of the substrate. Higher-order Love wave modes are continuations of the layer-guided SH-APMs. The generalized concept of SH-APMs and Love waves provides a basis for understanding the change in sensitivity with higher-frequency operation and the relationship between multiple modes in Love wave sensors. It also explains why a relatively thick layer of a high-loss polymer can be used as a waveguide layer and so extends the range of materials that can be considered experimentally. Moreover, it is predicted that a new type of sensor, a

  20. Cardiac Shear Wave Velocity Detection in the Porcine Heart.

    PubMed

    Vos, Hendrik J; van Dalen, Bas M; Heinonen, Ilkka; Bosch, Johan G; Sorop, Oana; Duncker, Dirk J; van der Steen, Antonius F W; de Jong, Nico

    2017-04-01

    Cardiac muscle stiffness can potentially be estimated non-invasively with shear wave elastography. Shear waves are present on the septal wall after mitral and aortic valve closure, thus providing an opportunity to assess stiffness in early systole and early diastole. We report on the shear wave recordings of 22 minipigs with high-frame-rate echocardiography. The waves were captured with 4000 frames/s using a programmable commercial ultrasound machine. The wave pattern was extracted from the data through a local tissue velocity estimator based on one-lag autocorrelation. The wave propagation velocity was determined with a normalized Radon transform, resulting in median wave propagation velocities of 2.2 m/s after mitral valve closure and 4.2 m/s after aortic valve closure. Overall the velocities ranged between 0.8 and 6.3 m/s in a 95% confidence interval. By dispersion analysis we found that the propagation velocity only mildly increased with shear wave frequency.

  1. Wavemaker theories for acoustic-gravity waves over a finite depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Miao; Kadri, Usama

    2016-04-01

    Acoustic-gravity waves (hereafter AGWs) in ocean have received much interest recently, mainly with respect to early detection of tsunamis as they travel at near the speed of sound in water which makes them ideal candidates for early detection of tsunamis. While the generation mechanisms of AGWs have been studied from the perspective of vertical oscillations of seafloor (Yamamoto, 1982; Stiassnie, 2010) and triad wave-wave interaction (Longuet-Higgins 1950; Kadri and Stiassnie 2013; Kadri and Akylas 2016), in the current study we are interested in their generation by wave-structure interaction with possible application to the energy sector. Here, we develop two wavemaker theories to analyze different wave modes generated by impermeable (the classic Havelock's theory) and porous (porous wavemaker theory) plates in weakly compressible fluids. Slight modification has been made to the porous theory so that, unlike the previous theory (Chwang, 1983), the new solution depends on the geometry of the plate. The expressions for three different types of plates (piston, flap, delta-function) are introduced. Analytical solutions are also derived for the potential amplitude of the gravity, evanescent, and acoustic-gravity waves, as well as the surface elevation, velocity distribution, and pressure for AGWs. Both theories reduce to previous results for incompressible flow when the compressibility is negligible. We also show numerical examples for AGW generated in a wave flume as well as in deep ocean. Our current study sets the theoretical background towards remote sensing by AGWs, for optimized deep ocean wave-power harnessing, among others. References Chwang, A.T. 1983 A porous-wavemaker theory. Journal of Fluid Mechanics, 132, 395- 406. Kadri, U., Stiassnie, M. 2013 Generation of an acoustic-gravity wave by two gravity waves, and their subsequent mutual interaction. J. Fluid Mech. 735, R6. Kadri U., Akylas T.R. 2016 On resonant triad interactions of acoustic-gravity waves. J

  2. Two true surface acoustic waves and other acoustic modes in (110) plane of Li2B4O7 substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Victor Y.; Lefebvre, J. E.; Gryba, T.

    1999-09-01

    The surface acoustic waves (SAWs) and other acoustic modes propagating in the (110) plane of Li2B4O7 are investigated by means of the effective surface permittivity (ESP). It is demonstrated that the velocity of all piezoactive SAWs, both true and pseudo, as well as surface skimming bulk waves (SSBWs) can be numerically determined by computing the ESP as a function of acoustic trace slowness. A physical phenomenon not reported has been found for certain propagation directions, namely, simultaneous existence of two true SAWs, both being of the generalized Rayleigh type, together with a pseudo SAW of similar polarization. Propagation velocity, electromechanical coupling coefficient, and decay factor have been verified and confirmed by using two different sets of material constants and two numerical methods. The obtained values and accuracy of SAWs parameters are compared, and the validity conditions discussed. The generalized slowness diagram, plotted for the sagittal plane, enables to determine the total number of SSBW and to interpret the depth penetration properties of SAW. The Nyquist diagram of the ESP is shown to be a more helpful form for identifying a pseudo SAW and for distinguishing it from a SSBW.

  3. Ocean-Acoustic Solitary Wave Studies and Predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warn-Varnas, A. C.; Chin-Bing, S. A.; King, D. B.; Hallock, Z.; Hawkins, J. A.

    Shallow water internal solitary waves have become a major topic of interest to oceanographers and acousticians. In this paper we review the cross-disciplinary status of joint ocean-acoustic solitary wave studies and predictions. We consider the process of acoustical mode coupling in the presence of solitary waves and the corresponding acoustical intensity loss due to increased coupling with the bottom. A study of the interaction of an acoustical field with a train of solitary waves is undertaken at a range of frequencies. At a resonant frequency the acoustic field can interact with the solitary wave packet which results in mode conversions (acoustic energy is redistributed among the modes, often from lower-order to higher-order modes). Higher signal losses can occur in the higher order modes through increased bottom attenuation and result in an anomalous acoustical intensity loss at the resonant frequency. We present some new results of joint ocean-acoustic research, from a dedicated study in the Strait of Messina, where solitary waves are generated by semidiurnal tidal flow over topographic variations. The University of Hamburg weakly nonhydrostatic two layer model is used for simulating the generation and propagation of solitary waves. In particular, the physical states encountered during an October 1995 cruise in the Strait of Messina (between Italy and Sicily) are simulated. Various parameter space sensitivity studies, about the existing cruise conditions, are performed. The modelled solitary wave trains are compared against conductivity-temperature-depth (CTD) chain measurements in terms of amplitudes, wavelengths, phase speeds and correlations with data. Predicted and observed sound speeds are used in acoustical intensity calculations that are conducted with a parabolic equation (PE) model. The differences in the resultant acoustical intensity fields provide a guide for the tuning of the oceanographic model parameters. The tuned oceanographic model shows

  4. Quantum ion-acoustic wave oscillations in metallic nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Moradi, Afshin

    2015-05-15

    The low-frequency electrostatic waves in metallic nanowires are studied using the quantum hydrodynamic model, in which the electron and ion components of the system are regarded as a two-species quantum plasma system. The Poisson equation as well as appropriate quantum boundary conditions give the analytical expressions of dispersion relations of the surface and bulk quantum ion-acoustic wave oscillations.

  5. Application of surface acoustic wave devices to radio telemetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strasilla, U.

    1983-01-01

    Three experimental Surface Acoustic Wave Resonators (SAWR) are developed and evaluated. A desired center frequency is obtained by correct spacing of the Inter-Digital Transducers (IDT). Transmitting and receiving IDT's must be close for adequate coupling and a sufficient number of reflectors are required to create a high quality standing wave. A review of oscillator theory is given and current technology evaluated.

  6. Propagation of acoustic waves in multifractional polydisperse gas suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gubaidullin, D. A.; Teregulova, E. A.

    2017-01-01

    The propagation of acoustic waves in multifractional polydisperse gas suspension is studied. A mathematical model is presented, the dispersion equation is obtained, dispersion curves are calculated. The influence of the particle size and the parameters of the dispersed phase for multifractional gas mixture with ice particles, aluminum and sand on dissipation and dispersion of sound waves is analyzed.

  7. Gas hydrate concentration estimated from P- and S-wave velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carcione, J. M.; Gei, D.

    2003-04-01

    .M. and Gei, D., Gas hydrate concentration estimated from P- and S-wave velocities at the Mallik 2L-38 research well, Mackenzie Delta, Canada, submitted to Geophysics. Gei, D. and Carcione, J.M., Acoustic properties of sediments saturated with gas hydrate, free gas and water, Geophysical Prospecting, in press. Leclarie, Ph., Cohen-Tenoudji, F., and Aguirre-Puente, J., 1994, Extension of Biot's theory of wave propagation to frozen porous media, J. Acoust. Soc. Am., 96, 6, 3753-3768.

  8. Vertical structure of fluid velocity for flow through vegetation under waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, H.; Cox, D.; Albert, D.; Mori, N.; Smith, H. D.

    2010-12-01

    Interaction between hydrodynamics (e.g., wave attenuation, fluid flow characteristics) and vegetation in coastal area is very important to develop strategies for maintenance of sustainable ecological systems. However, there are several difficulties in collecting and analyzing field data of wave attenuation and fluid flow characteristics in coastal vegetation owing to complexity of the various physical processes, such as changes in wind speed and direction, tides, wave refraction and shoaling. Furthermore, without understanding the impact of waves on real vegetation, it is difficult to develop scale-model tests. Therefore, a controlled laboratory environment at prototype scale with live plants is recommended to quantify the hydrodynamics and responses of vegetation. To account for this, a large-scale laboratory experiment was conducted during the summer of 2010 at the Large Wave Flume (104m long, 3.6m wide, and 4.6m deep) at O.H. Hinsdale Wave Research Laboratory (HWRL) at Oregon State University. Live plants (Schoenoplectus pungens or threesquare bulrush) were collected from the field (Tillamook, Oregon), and transplanted to twelve 8-ft long planters. The planters were placed into 4 channels with different plant densities. To our knowledge, this is the first test using live plants in a controlled, high energy wave environment. Observations of hydrodynamics under regular waves will be presented with an emphasis on the vertical structures of fluid velocity with different plant densities. The velocity data were measured using Acoustic Doppler Velocimeters (ADVs) and decomposed into mean current, wave-induced velocity and turbulence. Finally, the effect of the vegetation on the vertical structures of fluid velocity will be discussed. It is acknowledged that this work was conducted as part of Ecological modeling of emergent vegetation for sustaining wetlands in high wave energy coastal environments (NSF 0828549).

  9. Analysis of non linear partially standing waves from 3D velocity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drevard, D.; Rey, V.; Svendsen, Ib; Fraunie, P.

    2003-04-01

    Surface gravity waves in the ocean exhibit an energy spectrum distributed in both frequency and direction of propagation. Wave data collection is of great importance in coastal zones for engineering and scientific studies. In particular, partially standing waves measurements near coastal structures and steep or barred beaches may be a requirement, for instance for morphodynamic studies. The aim of the present study is the analysis of partially standing surface waves icluding non-linear effects. According to 1st order Stokes theory, synchronous measurements of horizontal and vertical velocity components allow calculation of rate of standing waves (Drevard et al, 2003). In the present study, it is demonstrated that for deep water conditions, partially standing 2nd order Stokes waves induced velocity field is still represented by the 1st order solution for the velocity potential contrary to the surface elevation which exhibits harmonic components. For intermediate water depth, harmonic components appear not only in the surface elevation but also in the velocity fields, but their weight remains much smaller, because of the vertical decreasing wave induced motion. For irregular waves, the influence of the spectrum width on the non-linear effects in the analysis is discussed. Keywords: Wave measurements ; reflection ; non-linear effects Acknowledgements: This work was initiated during the stay of Prof. Ib Svendsen, as invited Professor, at LSEET in autumn 2002. This study is carried out in the framework of the Scientific French National Programmes PNEC ART7 and PATOM. Their financial supports are acknowledged References: Drevard, D., Meuret, A., Rey, V. Piazzola, J. And Dolle, A.. (2002). "Partially reflected waves measurements using Acoustic Doppler Velocimeter (ADV)", Submitted to ISOPE 03, Honolulu, Hawaii, May 2003.

  10. A Study in Wedge Waves with Applications in Acoustic Delay- line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tung, Po-Hsien; Wang, Wen-Chi; Yang, Che-Hua

    The acoustic delay line is usually used to supply protection from dangerous environment, to enhance signal intensity by fit geometry of analyte, or to achieve specific angle/focusing by Snell's law, but rarely to avoid noise from coupling agent and to raise spatial resolution by reducing contact area. This study is focused on wedge waves with applications in delay-line to solve the knot of traditionally transducer measurement. Wedge waves are guided acoustic waves propagating along the tip of a wedge. The advantages of wedge being used in acoustic delay line are wedge waves has large motion amplitude of anti-symmetric flexural (ASF) mode, low energy attenuation and the velocity of ASF more is regular weather frequency varied or not. According the characteristic of wedge wave and vibration direction of particle, the acoustical wedge delay line with high signal- noise-ratio, approximate point-like contact area, without coupling agent and in/out vibration measurement by specific experimental setup is developed.

  11. INTERFERENCE FRINGES OF SOLAR ACOUSTIC WAVES AROUND SUNSPOTS

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, Dean-Yi; Zhao Hui; Yang, Ming-Hsu; Liang, Zhi-Chao

    2012-10-20

    Solar acoustic waves are scattered by a sunspot due to the interaction between the acoustic waves and the sunspot. The sunspot, excited by the incident wave, generates the scattered wave. The scattered wave is added to the incident wave to form the total wave around the sunspot. The interference fringes between the scattered wave and the incident wave are visible in the intensity of the total wave because the coherent time of the incident wave is of the order of a wave period. The strength of the interference fringes anti-correlates with the width of temporal spectra of the incident wave. The separation between neighboring fringes increases with the incident wavelength and the sunspot size. The strength of the fringes increases with the radial order n of the incident wave from n = 0 to n = 2, and then decreases from n = 2 to n = 5. The interference fringes play a role analogous to holograms in optics. This study suggests the feasibility of using the interference fringes to reconstruct the scattered wavefields of the sunspot, although the quality of the reconstructed wavefields is sensitive to the noise and errors in the interference fringes.

  12. Transmission of acoustic waves through mixing layers and 2D isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juve, D.; Blanc-Benon, P.; Comte-Bellot, G.

    Ray tracing and parabolic equation methods have been used to study the properties of acoustic waves transmitted through turbulent velocity fields. A numerical simulation permits individual realizations of the turbulent field, which then allow, if desired, an ensemble averaging of the fields. Two flows have been considered, 2D isotropic turbulence and a 2D mixing layer. The following complementary aspects are developed: the occurrence of caustics, the reinforced or weakened zones of the acoustic field, the eigenrays between a source and a receiver, and the associated travel times, variances, and scintillation index.

  13. Acoustic Gravity Wave Chemistry Model for the RAYTRACE Code.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-26

    AU)-AI56 850 ACOlUSTIC GRAVITY WAVE CHEMISTRY MODEL FOR THE IAYTRACE I/~ CODE(U) MISSION RESEARCH CORP SANTA BARBIARA CA T E OLD Of MAN 84 MC-N-SlS...DNA-TN-S4-127 ONAOOI-BO-C-0022 UNLSSIFIlED F/O 20/14 NL 1-0 2-8 1111 po 312.2 1--I 11111* i •. AD-A 156 850 DNA-TR-84-127 ACOUSTIC GRAVITY WAVE...Hicih Frequency Radio Propaoation Acoustic Gravity Waves 20. ABSTRACT (Continue en reveree mide if tteceeemr and Identify by block number) This

  14. Thermo-acoustic engineering of silicon microresonators via evanescent waves

    SciTech Connect

    Tabrizian, R.; Ayazi, F.

    2015-06-29

    A temperature-compensated silicon micromechanical resonator with a quadratic temperature characteristic is realized by acoustic engineering. Energy-trapped resonance modes are synthesized by acoustic coupling of propagating and evanescent extensional waves in waveguides with rectangular cross section. Highly different temperature sensitivity of propagating and evanescent waves is used to engineer the linear temperature coefficient of frequency. The resulted quadratic temperature characteristic has a well-defined turn-over temperature that can be tailored by relative energy distribution between propagating and evanescent acoustic fields. A 76 MHz prototype is implemented in single crystal silicon. Two high quality factor and closely spaced resonance modes, created from efficient energy trapping of extensional waves, are excited through thin aluminum nitride film. Having different evanescent wave constituents and energy distribution across the device, these modes show different turn over points of 67 °C and 87 °C for their quadratic temperature characteristic.

  15. Ultrasonic wave velocities, gas permeability and porosity in natural and granular rock salt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popp, T.; Kern, H.

    Gas-permeability and P- and S-wave velocities were measured simultaneously as a function of pressure in core samples of rock salt from the Gorleben borehole Go 1002. In addition, compaction experiments were carried out on granular salt in order to establish velocity-porosity systematics. The initial permeabilities of the Gorleben rock salt vary between 10 -16 and 2∗10 -20 m 2 and are found to be controlled by the grain size of the halite matrix minerals and the amount and distribution of “impurities” (anhydrite, polyhalite) on grain boundaries. Increase of effective pressure to 30 MPa gives rise to a marked decrease of permeability and a significant increase of P- and S-wave velocities due to the closure of grain boundary cracks. Our results are in agreement with literature data reported for in situ permeability and acoustic properties of single crystals, respectively. Compaction of granular rock salt gives rise to a reduction of porosity from about 40% to 2% exhibiting linear relationships between porosity and P- and S-wave velocities for porosities <25%. The combined measurements of gas permeability and ultrasonic wave velocities are found to provide powerful tools for the investigation of dilatancy in rock salt.

  16. Iron sound velocities in shock wave experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, N C; Nguyen, J H

    1999-08-20

    We have performed a series of sound velocity measurements in iron at earth's core pressures. Experiments were carried out at shock pressures as high as 400 GPa, with particular emphasis on the pressure range between 175 GPa and 275 GPa. The measured sound velocities of iron at elevated pressures exhibit a single discontinuity near 250 GPa, corresponding to the vanishing of shear strength as the iron melts. A second discontinuity reported by Brown and McQueen in their previous iron sound velocity studies was not observed in our study. Our results are consistent with their data otherwise. Experimental details and error propagation techniques essential to determining the melting point will also be discussed.

  17. Nonlinear shock acceleration. III - Finite wave velocity, wave pressure, and entropy generation via wave damping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eichler, D.

    1985-01-01

    The nonlinear theory of shock acceleration developed in earlier papers, which treated the waves as being completely frozen into the fluid, is generalized to include wave dynamics. In the limit where damping keeps the wave amplitude small, it is found that a finite phase velocity (V sub ph) of the scattering waves through the background fluid, tempers the acceleration generated by high Mach number shocks. Asymptotic spectra proportional to 1/E sq are possible only when the ratio of wave velocity to shock velocity is less than 0.13. For a given asymptotic spectrum, the efficiency of relativistic particle production is found to be practically independent of the value of V sub ph, so that earlier results concerning its value remain valid for finite V sub ph. In the limit where there is no wave damping, it is shown that for modest Alfven Mach numbers, approximately greater than 4 and less than 6, the magnetic field is amplified by the energetic particles to the point of being in rough equipartition with them, as models of synchrotron emission frequently take the field to be. In this case, the disordering and amplification of field energy may play a major role in the shock transition.

  18. Broadband enhanced transmission of acoustic waves through serrated metal gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Dong-Xiang; Fan, Ren-Hao; Deng, Yu-Qiang; Peng, Ru-Wen; Wang, Mu; Jiangnan University Collaboration

    In this talk, we present our studies on broadband properties of acoustic waves through metal gratings. We have demonstrated that serrated metal gratings, which introduce gradient coatings, can give rise to broadband transmission enhancement of acoustic waves. Here, we have experimentally and theoretically studied the acoustic transmission properties of metal gratings with or without serrated boundaries. The average transmission is obviously enhanced for serrated metal gratings within a wide frequency range, while the Fabry-Perot resonance is significantly suppressed. An effective medium hypothesis with varying acoustic impedance is proposed to analyze the mechanism, which was verified through comparison with finite-element simulation. The serrated boundary supplies gradient mass distribution and gradient normal acoustic impedance, which could efficiently reduce the boundary reflection. Further, by increasing the region of the serrated boundary, we present a broadband high-transmission grating for wide range of incident angle. Our results may have potential applications to broadband acoustic imaging, acoustic sensing and new acoustic devices. References: [1] Dong-Xiang Qi, Yu-Qiang Deng, Di-Hu Xu, Ren-Hao Fan, Ru-Wen Peng, Ze-Guo Chen, Ming-Hui Lu, X. R. Huang and Mu Wang, Appl. Phys. Lett. 106, 011906 (2015); [2] Dong-Xiang Qi, Ren-Hao Fan, Ru-Wen Peng, Xian-Rong Huang, Ming-Hui Lu, Xu Ni, Qing Hu, and Mu Wang, Applied Physics Letters 101, 061912 (2012).

  19. Separation of acoustic waves in isentropic flow perturbations

    SciTech Connect

    Henke, Christian

    2015-04-15

    The present contribution investigates the mechanisms of sound generation and propagation in the case of highly-unsteady flows. Based on the linearisation of the isentropic Navier–Stokes equation around a new pathline-averaged base flow, it is demonstrated for the first time that flow perturbations of a non-uniform flow can be split into acoustic and vorticity modes, with the acoustic modes being independent of the vorticity modes. Therefore, we can propose this acoustic perturbation as a general definition of sound. As a consequence of the splitting result, we conclude that the present acoustic perturbation is propagated by the convective wave equation and fulfils Lighthill’s acoustic analogy. Moreover, we can define the deviations of the Navier–Stokes equation from the convective wave equation as “true” sound sources. In contrast to other authors, no assumptions on a slowly varying or irrotational flow are necessary. Using a symmetry argument for the conservation laws, an energy conservation result and a generalisation of the sound intensity are provided. - Highlights: • First splitting of non-uniform flows in acoustic and non-acoustic components. • These result leads to a generalisation of sound which is compatible with Lighthill’s acoustic analogy. • A closed equation for the generation and propagation of sound is given.

  20. Anomalous wave propagation in a one-dimensional acoustic metamaterial having simultaneously negative mass density and Young's modulus.

    PubMed

    Huang, H H; Sun, C T

    2012-10-01

    A mechanical model representing an acoustic metamaterial that exhibits simultaneously negative mass density and negative Young's modulus was proposed. Wave propagation was studied in the frequency range of double negativity. In view of positive energy flow, it was found that the phase velocity in this range is negative. This phenomenon was also observed using transient wave propagation finite-element analyses of a transient sinusoidal wave and a transient wave packet. In contrast to wave propagation in the region of positive mass and modulus, the peculiar backward wave motion in the region of double negativity was clearly displayed.

  1. Finite element approach analysis for characteristics of electromagnetic acoustic Lamb wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiaoming; Li, Songsong

    2016-04-01

    The electromagnetic acoustic Lamb wave, with the advantages of quickly detecting the defect and sensitivity to the defects, is widely used in non-destructive testing of thin sheet. In this paper, the directivity of sound field, Phase velocity, group velocity and particle displacement amplitude of Lamb wave are study based on finite element analysis method. The results show that, for 1mm aluminum, when the excitation frequency 0.64MHz, the displacement amplitude of A0 mode is minimum, and the displacement amplitude S0 mode is largest. Appropriate to increase the displacement amplitude of a mode, while reducing displacement amplitude of another mode, to achieve the excitation of a single mode Lamb wave. It is helpful to the Optimization of transducer parameters, the choice of Lamb wave modes and providing optimal excitation frequency.

  2. Sensitivity of surface acoustic wave devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filipiak, Jerzy; Zubko, Konrad

    2001-08-01

    The SAW devices are widely used as filters, delay lines, resonators and gas sensors. It is possible to use it as mechanical force. The paper describes sensitivity of acceleration sensor based on SAW using the Rayleigh wave propagation. Since characteristic of acceleration SAW sensors are largely determined by piezoelectric materials, it is very important to select substrate with required characteristics. Researches and numerical modeling based on simply sensor model include piezoelectric beam with unilateral free end. An aggregated mass is connected to the one. The dimension and aggregated mass are various. In this case a buckling stress and sensitivity are changed. Sensitivity in main and perpendicular axis are compare for three sensor based on SiO2, LiNbO3, Li2B4O7. Influences of phase velocity, electro-mechanical coupling constant and density on sensitivity are investigated. Some mechanical parameters of the substrates in dynamic work mode are researched using sensor model and Rayleigh model of vibrations without vibration damping. The model is useful because it simply determines dependencies between sensor parameters and substrate parameters. Differences between measured and evaluated quantities are less than 5 percent. Researches based on sensor modes, which fulfilled mechanical specifications similarly to aircraft navigation.

  3. The ''phase velocity'' of nonlinear plasma waves in the laser beat-wave accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Spence, W.L.

    1985-04-01

    A calculational scheme for beat-wave accelerators is introduced that includes all orders in velocity and in plasma density, and additionally accounts for the influence of plasma nonlinearities on the wave's phase velocity. The main assumption is that the laser frequencies are very large compared to the plasma frequency - under which it is possible to sum up all orders of forward Raman scattering. It is found that the nonlinear plasma wave does not have simply a single phase velocity, but that the beat-wave which drives it is usefully described by a non-local ''effective phase velocity'' function. A time-space domain approach is followed. (LEW)

  4. Estimation of near-surface shear-wave velocity by inversion of Rayleigh waves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Xia, J.; Miller, R.D.; Park, C.B.

    1999-01-01

    The shear-wave (S-wave) velocity of near-surface materials (soil, rocks, pavement) and its effect on seismic-wave propagation are of fundamental interest in many groundwater, engineering, and environmental studies. Rayleigh-wave phase velocity of a layered-earth model is a function of frequency and four groups of earth properties: P-wave velocity, S-wave velocity, density, and thickness of layers. Analysis of the Jacobian matrix provides a measure of dispersion-curve sensitivity to earth properties. S-wave velocities are the dominant influence on a dispersion curve in a high-frequency range (>5 Hz) followed by layer thickness. An iterative solution technique to the weighted equation proved very effective in the high-frequency range when using the Levenberg-Marquardt and singular-value decomposition techniques. Convergence of the weighted solution is guaranteed through selection of the damping factor using the Levenberg-Marquardt method. Synthetic examples demonstrated calculation efficiency and stability of inverse procedures. We verify our method using borehole S-wave velocity measurements.Iterative solutions to the weighted equation by the Levenberg-Marquardt and singular-value decomposition techniques are derived to estimate near-surface shear-wave velocity. Synthetic and real examples demonstrate the calculation efficiency and stability of the inverse procedure. The inverse results of the real example are verified by borehole S-wave velocity measurements.

  5. Small amplitude electron acoustic solitary waves in a magnetized superthermal plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devanandhan, S.; Singh, S. V.; Lakhina, G. S.; Bharuthram, R.

    2015-05-01

    The propagation of electron acoustic solitary waves in a magnetized plasma consisting of fluid cold electrons, electron beam and superthermal hot electrons (obeying kappa velocity distribution function) and ion is investigated in a small amplitude limit using reductive perturbation theory. The Korteweg-de-Vries-Zakharov-Kuznetsov (KdV-ZK) equation governing the dynamics of electron acoustic solitary waves is derived. The solution of the KdV-ZK equation predicts the existence of negative potential solitary structures. The new results are: (1) increase of either the beam speed or temperature of beam electrons tends to reduce both the amplitude and width of the electron acoustic solitons, (2) the inclusion of beam speed and temperature pushes the allowed Mach number regime upwards and (3) the soliton width maximizes at certain angle of propagation (αm) and then decreases for α >αm . In addition, increasing the superthermality of the hot electrons also results in reduction of soliton amplitude and width. For auroral plasma parameters observed by Viking, the obliquely propagating electron-acoustic solitary waves have electric field amplitudes in the range (7.8-45) mV/m and pulse widths (0.29-0.44) ms. The Fourier transform of these electron acoustic solitons would result in a broadband frequency spectra with peaks near 2.3-3.5 kHz, thus providing a possible explanation of the broadband electrostatic noise observed during the Burst a.

  6. Magneto-acoustic imaging by continuous-wave excitation.

    PubMed

    Shunqi, Zhang; Zhou, Xiaoqing; Tao, Yin; Zhipeng, Liu

    2017-04-01

    The electrical characteristics of tissue yield valuable information for early diagnosis of pathological changes. Magneto-acoustic imaging is a functional approach for imaging of electrical conductivity. This study proposes a continuous-wave magneto-acoustic imaging method. A kHz-range continuous signal with an amplitude range of several volts is used to excite the magneto-acoustic signal and improve the signal-to-noise ratio. The magneto-acoustic signal amplitude and phase are measured to locate the acoustic source via lock-in technology. An optimisation algorithm incorporating nonlinear equations is used to reconstruct the magneto-acoustic source distribution based on the measured amplitude and phase at various frequencies. Validation simulations and experiments were performed in pork samples. The experimental and simulation results agreed well. While the excitation current was reduced to 10 mA, the acoustic signal magnitude increased up to 10(-7) Pa. Experimental reconstruction of the pork tissue showed that the image resolution reached mm levels when the excitation signal was in the kHz range. The signal-to-noise ratio of the detected magneto-acoustic signal was improved by more than 25 dB at 5 kHz when compared to classical 1 MHz pulse excitation. The results reported here will aid further research into magneto-acoustic generation mechanisms and internal tissue conductivity imaging.

  7. Love wave acoustic sensor for testing in liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Haifeng; Zhu, Huizhong; Feng, Guanping

    2001-09-01

    Love wave is one type of the surface acoustic waves (SAWs). It is guided acoustic mode propagating in ta thin layer deposited on a substrate. Because of its advantages of high mass sensitivity, low noise level and being fit for operating in liquids, Love wave acoustic sensors have become one of the hot spots in the research of biosensor nowadays. In this paper the Love wave devices with the substrate of ST-cut quartz and the guiding layers of PMMA and fused quartz were fabricated successfully. By measuring the transfer function S21 and the insertion loss of the devices, the characteristics of the Rayleigh wave device and the Love wave devices with different guiding layers in gas phase and liquid phase were compared. It was validated that the Love wave sensor is suitable for testing in liquids but the Rayleigh wave sensor is not. What's more, SiO2 is the more proper material for the guiding layer of the Love wave device.

  8. Acoustic tweezers via sub–time-of-flight regime surface acoustic waves

    PubMed Central

    Collins, David J.; Devendran, Citsabehsan; Ma, Zhichao; Ng, Jia Wei; Neild, Adrian; Ai, Ye

    2016-01-01

    Micrometer-scale acoustic waves are highly useful for refined optomechanical and acoustofluidic manipulation, where these fields are spatially localized along the transducer aperture but not along the acoustic propagation direction. In the case of acoustic tweezers, such a conventional acoustic standing wave results in particle and cell patterning across the entire width of a microfluidic channel, preventing selective trapping. We demonstrate the use of nanosecond-scale pulsed surface acoustic waves (SAWs) with a pulse period that is less than the time of flight between opposing transducers to generate localized time-averaged patterning regions while using conventional electrode structures. These nodal positions can be readily and arbitrarily positioned in two dimensions and within the patterning region itself through the imposition of pulse delays, frequency modulation, and phase shifts. This straightforward concept adds new spatial dimensions to which acoustic fields can be localized in SAW applications in a manner analogous to optical tweezers, including spatially selective acoustic tweezers and optical waveguides. PMID:27453940

  9. Three-dimensional visualization of shear wave propagation generated by dual acoustic radiation pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mochizuki, Yuta; Taki, Hirofumi; Kanai, Hiroshi

    2016-07-01

    An elastic property of biological soft tissue is an important indicator of the tissue status. Therefore, quantitative and noninvasive methods for elasticity evaluation have been proposed. Our group previously proposed a method using acoustic radiation pressure irradiated from two directions for elastic property evaluation, in which by measuring the propagation velocity of the shear wave generated by the acoustic radiation pressure inside the object, the elastic properties of the object were successfully evaluated. In the present study, we visualized the propagation of the shear wave in a three-dimensional space by the synchronization of signals received at various probe positions. The proposed method succeeded in visualizing the shear wave propagation clearly in the three-dimensional space of 35 × 41 × 4 mm3. These results show the high potential of the proposed method to estimate the elastic properties of the object in the three-dimensional space.

  10. Finite difference solutions to shocked acoustic waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walkington, N. J.; Eversman, W.

    1983-01-01

    The MacCormack, Lambda and split flux finite differencing schemes are used to solve a one dimensional acoustics problem. Two duct configurations were considered, a uniform duct and a converging-diverging nozzle. Asymptotic solutions for these two ducts are compared with the numerical solutions. When the acoustic amplitude and frequency are sufficiently high the acoustic signal shocks. This condition leads to a deterioration of the numerical solutions since viscous terms may be required if the shock is to be resolved. A continuous uniform duct solution is considered to demonstrate how the viscous terms modify the solution. These results are then compared with a shocked solution with and without viscous terms. Generally it is found that the most accurate solutions are those obtained using the minimum possible viscosity coefficients. All of the schemes considered give results accurate enough for acoustic power calculations with no one scheme performing significantly better than the others.

  11. Elastic wave velocities of Apollo 14, 15, and 16 rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mizutani, H.; Newbigging, D. F.

    1973-01-01

    Elastic wave velocities of two Apollo 14 rocks, 14053 and 14321, three Apollo 15 rocks, 15058, 15415, and 15545, and one Apollo 16 rock 60315 have been determined at pressures up to 10 kb. For sample 14321, the variation of the compressional wave velocities with temperature has been measured over the temperature range from 27 to 200 C. Overall elastic properties of these samples except sample 15415 are very similar to those of Apollo 11, 12, and 14 rocks and are concordant with Toksoz et al.'s (1972) interpretation that lunar upper crust is of basaltic composition. Temperature derivative of the P wave velocity for sample 14321 is a half to one order of magnitude larger than that for single crystalline minerals. This suggests that the seismic velocity in the lunar crust may be affected significantly by the temperature distribution.

  12. Lithology and shear-wave velocity in Memphis, Tennessee

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gomberg, J.; Waldron, B.; Schweig, E.; Hwang, H.; Webbers, A.; Van Arsdale, R.; Tucker, K.; Williams, R.; Street, R.; Mayne, P.; Stephenson, W.; Odum, J.; Cramer, C.; Updike, R.; Hutson, S.; Bradley, M.

    2003-01-01

    We have derived a new three-dimensional model of the lithologic structure beneath the city of Memphis, Tennessee, and examined its correlation with measured shear-wave velocity profiles. The correlation is sufficiently high that the better-constrained lithologic model may be used as a proxy for shear-wave velocities, which are required to calculate site-amplification for new seismic hazard maps for Memphis. The lithologic model and its uncertainties are derived from over 1200 newly compiled well and boring logs, some sampling to 500 m depth, and a moving-least-squares algorithm. Seventy-six new shear-wave velocity profiles have been measured and used for this study, most sampling to 30 m depth or less. All log and velocity observations are publicly available via new web sites.

  13. Modeling Nonlinear Acoustical Blast Waves Outdoors: A Research Summary

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-09-01

    Porous Surfaces. 5 David Gottlieb and Eli Turkel, "Dissipative Two-Four Methods for Time Dependent Problems," Mathematical Comnputation, No. 30 (1976...or structure factor, which Attenborough relates to the tortuosity. The local reaction assumption is inhereptly built into this model of the porous...k Waves in the Atmosphere," Journal of the Acoustical Socidy of America, No. 74 (1983). pp 1514-1517. David T. Blackstone., "Nonlinear Acoustics

  14. Nonlinear hydrodynamic effects induced by Rayleigh surface acoustic wave in sessile droplets.

    PubMed

    Alghane, M; Chen, B X; Fu, Y Q; Li, Y; Desmulliez, M P Y; Mohammed, M I; Walton, A J

    2012-11-01

    We report an experimental and numerical characterization of three-dimensional acoustic streaming behavior in small droplets of volumes (1-30 μl) induced by surface acoustic wave (SAW). We provide a quantitative evidence of the existence of strong nonlinear nature of the flow inertia in this SAW-driven flow over a range of the newly defined acoustic parameter F{NA}=Fλ/(σ/R_{d})≥0.01, which is a measure of the strength of the acoustic force to surface tension, where F is the acoustic body force, λ is the SAW wavelength, σ is the surface tension, and R{d} is the droplet radius. In contrast to the widely used Stokes model of acoustic streaming, which generally ignores such a nonlinearity, we identify that the full Navier-Stokes equation must be applied to avoid errors up to 93% between the computed streaming velocities and those from experiments as in the nonlinear case. We suggest that the Stokes model is valid only for very small acoustic power of ≤1 μW (F{NA}<0.002). Furthermore, we demonstrate that the increase of F{NA} above 0.45 induces not only internal streaming, but also the deformation of droplets.

  15. Lightning location with variable radio wave propagation velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhongjian; Koh, Kuang Liang; Mezentsev, Andrew; Sugier, Jacqueline; Fullekrug, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Lightning discharges can be located by triangulation of their broadband electromagnetic pulses in long-baseline (~500 km) radio receiver networks. Here we apply the time of arrival difference (TOA) method to electric field recordings with a low frequency radio receiver array consisting of four stations in western Europe. The electromagnetic wave propagation velocity at low radio frequencies is an important input parameter for the TOA calculation and it is normally assumed to be equal to the speed of light. However, the radio wave propagation depends for example on the frequency, ground conductivity and the ionospheric height and small variations can cause location differences from hundreds to thousands of meters, as demonstrated in this study. The radio wave propagation from two VLF transmissions at 20.9 kHz and 23.4 kHz are compared. The results show that the apparent phase velocities are 0.6% slower and 0.5% faster than the speed of light respectively. As a result, a variable velocity is implemented in the TOA method using continuously recorded data on the 8th August 2014, when a mesoscale convective system developed over central France. The lightning locations inferred with a variable wave propagation velocity are more clustered than those using a fixed velocity. The distribution of the lightning velocities in a given geographic area fits a normal distribution that is not centred at the speed of light. As a result, representative velocities can be calculated for smaller regions to generate a velocity map over a larger area of enhanced lightning activity. These results suggest a connection with the ground elevation and/or surface conductivity that might have an impact on the observed wave propagation velocities.

  16. Microfluidic particle manipulation using high frequency surface acoustic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ai, Ye; Collins, David J.

    2016-11-01

    Precise manipulation of particles and biological cells remains a very active research area in microfluidics. Among various force fields applied for microfluidic manipulations, acoustic waves have superior propagating properties in solids and fluids, which can readily enable non-contact cell manipulation in long operating distances. Exploiting acoustic waves for fluid and cell manipulation in microfluidics has led to a newly emerging research area, acoustofluidics. In this work, I will present particle and cell manipulation in microfluidics using high frequency surface acoustic waves (SAW). In particular, I will discuss a unique design of a focused IDT (FIDT) structure, which is able to generate a highly localized SAW field on the order of 20 µm wide. This highly focused acoustic beam has an effective manipulation area size that is comparable to individual micron-sized particles. Here, I demonstrate the use of this highly localized SAW field for single particle level sorting with sub-millisecond pulses and selective capture of particles. Based on the presented studies on acoustic particle manipulation, I envision that the merging of acoustics and microfluidics could enable various particle and cell manipulations needed in microfluidic applications. We acknowledge the support received from Singapore University of Technology and Design (SUTD)-Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) International Design Center (IDG11300101) and SUTD Startup Research Grant (SREP13053) awarded to Y.A.

  17. Surface acoustic wave devices for harsh environment wireless sensing

    DOE PAGES

    Greve, David W.; Chin, Tao -Lun; Zheng, Peng; ...

    2013-05-24

    In this study, langasite surface acoustic wave devices can be used to implement harsh environment wireless sensing of gas concentration and temperature. This paper reviews prior work on the development of langasite surface acoustic wave devices, followed by a report of recent progress toward the implementation of oxygen gas sensors. Resistive metal oxide films can be used as the oxygen sensing film, although development of an adherent barrier layer will be necessary with the sensing layers studied here to prevent interaction with the langasite substrate. Experimental results are presented for the performance of a langasite surface acoustic wave oxygen sensormore » with tin oxide sensing layer, and these experimental results are correlated with direct measurements of the sensing layer resistivity.« less

  18. Surface acoustic wave devices for harsh environment wireless sensing

    SciTech Connect

    Greve, David W.; Chin, Tao -Lun; Zheng, Peng; Ohodnicki, Paul; Baltrus, John; Oppenheim, Irving J.

    2013-05-24

    In this study, langasite surface acoustic wave devices can be used to implement harsh environment wireless sensing of gas concentration and temperature. This paper reviews prior work on the development of langasite surface acoustic wave devices, followed by a report of recent progress toward the implementation of oxygen gas sensors. Resistive metal oxide films can be used as the oxygen sensing film, although development of an adherent barrier layer will be necessary with the sensing layers studied here to prevent interaction with the langasite substrate. Experimental results are presented for the performance of a langasite surface acoustic wave oxygen sensor with tin oxide sensing layer, and these experimental results are correlated with direct measurements of the sensing layer resistivity.

  19. Broadband metamaterial for nonresonant matching of acoustic waves.

    PubMed

    D'Aguanno, G; Le, K Q; Trimm, R; Alù, A; Mattiucci, N; Mathias, A D; Aközbek, N; Bloemer, M J

    2012-01-01

    Unity transmittance at an interface between bulk media is quite common for polarized electromagnetic waves incident at the Brewster angle, but it is rarely observed for sound waves at any angle of incidence. In the following, we theoretically and experimentally demonstrate an acoustic metamaterial possessing a Brewster-like angle that is completely transparent to sound waves over an ultra-broadband frequency range with >100% bandwidth. The metamaterial, consisting of a hard metal with subwavelength apertures, provides a surface impedance matching mechanism that can be arbitrarily tailored to specific media. The nonresonant nature of the impedance matching effectively decouples the front and back surfaces of the metamaterial allowing one to independently tailor the acoustic impedance at each interface. On the contrary, traditional methods for acoustic impedance matching, for example in medical imaging, rely on resonant tunneling through a thin antireflection layer, which is inherently narrowband and angle specific.

  20. Acoustic waves switch based on meta-fluid phononic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xue-Feng

    2012-08-01

    The acoustic waves switch based on meta-fluid phononic crystals (MEFL PCs) is theoretically investigated. The MEFL PCs consist of fluid matrix and fluid-like inclusions with extremely anisotropic-density. The dispersion relations are calculated via the plane wave expansion method, which are in good agreement with the transmitted sound pressure level spectra obtained by the finite element method. The results show that the width of absolute band gap in MEFL PCs depends sensitively upon the orientation of the extremely anisotropic-density inclusions and reaches maximum at the rotating angle of 45°, with the gap position nearly unchanged. Also, the inter-mode conversion inside anisotropic-density inclusions can be ignored due to large acoustic mismatch. The study gives a possibility to realize greater flexibility and stronger effects in tuning the acoustic band gaps, which is very significant in the enhanced control over sound waves and has potential applications in ultrasonic imaging and therapy.

  1. Individually Identifiable Surface Acoustic Wave Sensors, Tags and Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hines, Jacqueline H. (Inventor); Solie, Leland P. (Inventor); Tucker, Dana Y. G. (Inventor); Hines, Andrew T. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    A surface-launched acoustic wave sensor tag system for remotely sensing and/or providing identification information using sets of surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensor tag devices is characterized by acoustic wave device embodiments that include coding and other diversity techniques to produce groups of sensors that interact minimally, reducing or alleviating code collision problems typical of prior art coded SAW sensors and tags, and specific device embodiments of said coded SAW sensor tags and systems. These sensor/tag devices operate in a system which consists of one or more uniquely identifiable sensor/tag devices and a wireless interrogator. The sensor device incorporates an antenna for receiving incident RF energy and re-radiating the tag identification information and the sensor measured parameter(s). Since there is no power source in or connected to the sensor, it is a passive sensor. The device is wirelessly interrogated by the interrogator.

  2. Surface Acoustic Wave Devices for Harsh Environment Wireless Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Greve, David W.; Chin, Tao-Lun; Zheng, Peng; Ohodnicki, Paul; Baltrus, John; Oppenheim, Irving J.

    2013-01-01

    Langasite surface acoustic wave devices can be used to implement harsh-environment wireless sensing of gas concentration and temperature. This paper reviews prior work on the development of langasite surface acoustic wave devices, followed by a report of recent progress toward the implementation of oxygen gas sensors. Resistive metal oxide films can be used as the oxygen sensing film, although development of an adherent barrier layer will be necessary with the sensing layers studied here to prevent interaction with the langasite substrate. Experimental results are presented for the performance of a langasite surface acoustic wave oxygen sensor with tin oxide sensing layer, and these experimental results are correlated with direct measurements of the sensing layer resistivity. PMID:23708273

  3. Drops subjected to surface acoustic waves: flow dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunet, Philippe; Baudoin, Michael; Bou Matar, Olivier; Dynamique Des Systèmes Hors Equilibre Team; Aiman-Films Team

    2012-11-01

    Ultrasonic acoustic waves of frequency beyond the MHz are known to induce streaming flow in fluids that can be suitable to perform elementary operations in microfluidics systems. One of the currently appealing geometry is that of a sessile drop subjected to surface acoustic waves (SAW). Such Rayleigh waves produce non-trival actuation in the drop leading to internal flow, drop displacement, free-surface oscillations and atomization. We recently carried out experiments and numerical simulations that allowed to better understand the underlying physical mechanisms that couple acoustic propagation and fluid actuation. We varied the frequency and amplitude of actuation, as well as the properties of the fluid, and we measured the effects of these parameters on the dynamics of the flow. We compared these results to finite-elements numerical simulations.

  4. High-frequency shear-horizontal surface acoustic wave sensor

    DOEpatents

    Branch, Darren W

    2013-05-07

    A Love wave sensor uses a single-phase unidirectional interdigital transducer (IDT) on a piezoelectric substrate for leaky surface acoustic wave generation. The IDT design minimizes propagation losses, bulk wave interferences, provides a highly linear phase response, and eliminates the need for impedance matching. As an example, a high frequency (.about.300-400 MHz) surface acoustic wave (SAW) transducer enables efficient excitation of shear-horizontal waves on 36.degree. Y-cut lithium tantalate (LTO) giving a highly linear phase response (2.8.degree. P-P). The sensor has the ability to detect at the pg/mm.sup.2 level and can perform multi-analyte detection in real-time. The sensor can be used for rapid autonomous detection of pathogenic microorganisms and bioagents by field deployable platforms.

  5. High-frequency shear-horizontal surface acoustic wave sensor

    DOEpatents

    Branch, Darren W

    2014-03-11

    A Love wave sensor uses a single-phase unidirectional interdigital transducer (IDT) on a piezoelectric substrate for leaky surface acoustic wave generation. The IDT design minimizes propagation losses, bulk wave interferences, provides a highly linear phase response, and eliminates the need for impedance matching. As an example, a high frequency (.about.300-400 MHz) surface acoustic wave (SAW) transducer enables efficient excitation of shear-horizontal waves on 36.degree. Y-cut lithium tantalate (LTO) giving a highly linear phase response (2.8.degree. P-P). The sensor has the ability to detect at the pg/mm.sup.2 level and can perform multi-analyte detection in real-time. The sensor can be used for rapid autonomous detection of pathogenic microorganisms and bioagents by field deployable platforms.

  6. Feasibility of using acoustic velocity meters for estimating highly organic suspended-solids concentrations in streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Patino, Eduardo

    1996-01-01

    A field experiment was conducted at the Levee 4 canal site below control structure G-88 in the Everglades agricultural area in northwestern Broward County, Florida, to study the relation of acoustic attenuation to suspended-solids concentrations. Acoustic velocity meter and temperature data were obtained with concurrent water samples analyzed for suspended-solids concentrations. Two separate acoustic velocity meter frequencies were used, 200 and 500 kilohertz, to determine the sensitivity of acoustic attenuation to frequency for the measured suspended-solids concentration range. Suspended-solids concentrations for water samples collected at the Levee 4 canal site from July 1993 to September 1994 ranged from 22 to 1,058 milligrams per liter, and organic content ranged from about 30 to 93 percent. Regression analyses showed that attenuation data from the acoustic velocity meter (automatic gain control) and temperature data alone do not provide enough information to adequately describe the concentrations of suspended solids. However, if velocity is also included as one of the independent variables in the regression model, a satisfactory correlation can be obtained. Thus, it is feasible to use acoustic velocity meter instrumentation to estimate suspended-solids concentrations in streams, even when suspended solids are primarily composed of organic material. Using the most comprehensive data set available for the study (500 kiloherz data), the best fit regression model produces a standard error of 69.7 milligrams per liter, with actual errors ranging from 2 to 128 milligrams per liter. Both acoustic velocity meter transmission frequencies of 200 and 500 hilohertz produced similar results, suggesting that transducers of either frequency could be used to collect attenuation data at the study site. Results indicate that calibration will be required for each acoustic velocity meter system to the unique suspended-solids regime existing at each site. More robust solutions may

  7. An ultrasonic air pump using an acoustic traveling wave along a small air gap.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Daisuke; Wada, Yuji; Nakamura, Kentaro; Nishikawa, Masato; Nakagawa, Tatsuyuki; Kihara, Hitoshi

    2010-01-01

    An ultrasonic air pump that uses a traveling wave along a small air gap between a bending vibrator and a reflector is discussed. The authors investigate ultrasonic air pumps that make use of bending vibrators and reflectors and confirm that air can be induced to flow by generating an asymmetric acoustic standing wave along an air gap. In this paper, we proposed a novel ultrasonic air pump in which a traveling wave along an air gap induces acoustic streaming and achieves one-way airflow. Two new reflector configurations, stepped and tapered, were designed and used to generate traveling waves. To predict airflow generation, sound pressure distribution in the air gap was calculated by means of finite element analysis (FEA). As a preliminary step, 2 FEA models were compared: one piezoelectric-structure-acoustic model and one piezoelectric- structure-fluid model, which included the viscosity effect of the fluid. The sound pressure distribution in the air gap, including fluid viscosity, was calculated by the FEA because it is expected to be dominant and thus have a strong effect on the sound pressure field in such a thin fluid layer. Based on the FEA results of the stepped and the tapered reflectors, it was determined that acoustic traveling waves could propagate along the gaps. Experiments were carried out with the designed bending vibrator and the reflectors. The acoustic fields in the air gap were measured via a fiber optic probe, and it was determined that the sound pressure and the phase distribution tendencies corresponded well with the results computed by FEA. Through our experiments, one-way airflow generation, in the same direction of the traveling wave and with the maximum flow velocity of 5.6 cm/s, was achieved.

  8. Particle-Wave Micro-Dynamics in Nonlinear Self-Excited Dust Acoustic Waves

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, C.-Y.; Teng, L.-W.; Liao, C.-T.; I Lin

    2008-09-07

    The large amplitude dust acoustic wave can be self-excited in a low-pressure dusty plasma. In the wave, the nonlinear wave-particle interaction determines particle motion, which in turn determines the waveform and wave propagation. In this work, the above behaviors are investigated by directly tracking particle motion through video-microscopy. A Lagrangian picture for the wave dynamics is constructed. The wave particle interaction associated with the transition from ordered to disordered particle oscillation, the wave crest trapping and wave heating are demonstrated and discussed.

  9. Lagrangian-Eulerian micromotion and wave heating in nonlinear self-excited dust-acoustic waves.

    PubMed

    Liao, Chen-Ting; Teng, Lee-Wen; Tsai, Chen-Yu; Io, Chong-Wai; I, Lin

    2008-05-09

    We investigate particle-wave microdynamics in the large amplitude self-excited dust acoustic wave at the discrete level through direct visualization. The wave field induces dust oscillations which in turn sustain wave propagation. In the regular wave with increasing wave amplitude, dust-wave interaction with uncertain temporary crest trapping and dust-dust interaction lead to the transition from cyclic to disordered dust motion associated with the liquid to the gas transition, and anisotropic non-Gaussian heating. In the irregular wave, particle trough-trapping is also observed, and the heating is nearly Gaussian and less anisotropic.

  10. A metasurface carpet cloak for electromagnetic, acoustic and water waves.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yihao; Wang, Huaping; Yu, Faxin; Xu, Zhiwei; Chen, Hongsheng

    2016-01-29

    We propose a single low-profile skin metasurface carpet cloak to hide objects with arbitrary shape and size under three different waves, i.e., electromagnetic (EM) waves, acoustic waves and water waves. We first present a metasurface which can control the local reflection phase of these three waves. By taking advantage of this metasurface, we then design a metasurface carpet cloak which provides an additional phase to compensate the phase distortion introduced by a bump, thus restoring the reflection waves as if the incident waves impinge onto a flat mirror. The finite element simulation results demonstrate that an object can be hidden under these three kinds of waves with a single metasurface cloak.

  11. Simulation of surface acoustic wave motor with spherical slider.

    PubMed

    Morita, T; Kurosawa, M K; Higuchi, T

    1999-01-01

    The operation of a surface acoustic wave (SAW) motor using spherical-shaped sliders was demonstrated by Kurosawa et al. (1994). It was necessary to modify the previous simulation models for usual ultrasonic motors because of this slider shape and the high frequency vibration. A conventional ultrasonic motor has a flat contact surface slider and a hundredth driving frequency; so, the tangential motion caused by the elasticity of the slider and stator with regard to the spherical slider of the SAW motor requires further investigation. In this paper, a dynamic simulation model for the SAW motor is proposed. From the simulation result, the mechanism of the SAW motor was clarified (i.e., levitation and contact conditions were repeated during the operation). The transient response of the motor speed was simulated. The relationships between frictional factor and time constant and vibration velocity of the stator and the slider speed were understood. The detailed research regarding the elastic deformation caused by preload would be helpful to construct an exact simulation model for the next work.

  12. Uppermost mantle P wave velocities beneath Turkey and Iran

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C.; Chen, W.; Molnar, P.

    1980-01-01

    The uppermost mantle P wave velocities beneath Turkey and Iran were estimated by applying the conventional travel time-distance relation method to arrival times of well located earthquakes recorded at a few stations. The average uppermost mantle P wave velocity under Turkey is estimated from two stations of the World Wide Standardized Seismograph Network (WWSSN), Istanbul and Tabriz. The data are consistent with a crust of uniform, but poorly determined, thickness and an uppermost mantle P wave velocity of 7.73 +- 0.08 km/s. This velocity is very similar to that for the Aegean Sea and suggests that its structure could be closely related to that beneath Turkey. For Iran, the results calculated from travel times to three WWSSN stations, Meshed, Shiraz, and Tabriz, can be explained by a crust dipping toward the south-southeast at about 1/sup 0/ with an uppermost mantle P wave velocity of 8.0 +- 0.1 km/s. If the crustal thickness were 34 km in the north it would reach about 49 km in the south. Based on these uppermost mantle velocities, the temperature at Moho beneath Turkey is probably close to the melting temperature of peridotite but that beneath Iran is probably lower.

  13. Amplification of acoustic evanescent waves using metamaterial slabs.

    PubMed

    Park, Choon Mahn; Park, Jong Jin; Lee, Seung Hwan; Seo, Yong Mun; Kim, Chul Koo; Lee, Sam H

    2011-11-04

    We amplified acoustic evanescent waves using metamaterial slabs with a negative effective density. For the amplifying effect of the slab to overcome the dissipation, it is necessary that the imaginary part of the effective density is much smaller than the real part, a condition not satisfied so far. We report the construction of membrane-based two-dimensional negative-density metamaterials which exhibited remarkably small dissipation. Using a slab of this metamaterial we realized a 17-fold net amplitude gain at a remote distance from the evanescent wave source. Potential applications include acoustic superlensing.

  14. Anisotropic diffraction of bulk acoustic wave beams in lithium niobate.

    PubMed

    Naumenko, Natalya F; Chizhikov, Sergey I; Molchanov, Vladimir Ya; Yushkov, Konstantin B

    2015-12-01

    The formalism of planar diffraction tensor was applied to the analysis of anisotropy of bulk acoustic wave diffraction and to build a full map of anisotropic diffractional coefficients for three bulk acoustic wave modes propagating in lithium niobate. For arbitrary propagation direction the diffractional coefficients derived allow estimation of ultrasonic beam divergence in far-field. Analysis of obtained data revealed that the maxima of acousto-optic figure of merit for anisotropic diffraction in the YZ plane correspond to moderate diffractional spreading of the beams exceeding isotropic diffraction 2-3 times.

  15. Surface acoustic wave/silicon monolithic sensor/processor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kowel, S. T.; Kornreich, P. G.; Nouhi, A.; Kilmer, R.; Fathimulla, M. A.; Mehter, E.

    1983-01-01

    A new technique for sputter deposition of piezoelectric zinc oxide (ZnO) is described. An argon-ion milling system was converted to sputter zinc oxide films in an oxygen atmosphere using a pure zinc oxide target. Piezoelectric films were grown on silicon dioxide and silicon dioxide overlayed with gold. The sputtered films were evaluated using surface acoustic wave measurements, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy, and resistivity measurements. The effect of the sputtering conditions on the film quality and the result of post-deposition annealing are discussed. The application of these films to the generation of surface acoustic waves is also discussed.

  16. Soliton generation via continuous stokes acoustic self-scattering of hypersonic waves in a paramagnetic crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Bugay, A. N.; Sazonov, S. V.

    2008-08-15

    A new mechanism is proposed for continuous frequency down-conversion of acoustic waves propagating in a paramagnetic crystal at a low temperature in an applied magnetic field. A transverse hypersonic pulse generating a carrier-free longitudinal strain pulse via nonlinear effects is scattered by the generated pulse. This leads to a Stokes shift in the transverse hypersonic wave proportional to its intensity, and both pulses continue to propagate in the form of a mode-locked soliton. As the transverse-pulse frequency is Stokes shifted, its spectrum becomes narrower. This process can be effectively implemented only if the linear group velocity of the transverse hypersonic pulse equals the phase velocity of the longitudinal strain wave. These velocities are renormalized by spin-phonon coupling and can be made equal by adjusting the magnitude of the applied magnetic field. The transverse structure of the soliton depends on the sign of the group velocity dispersion of the transverse component. When the dispersion is positive, planar solitons can develop whose transverse component has a topological defect of dark vortex type and longitudinal component has a hole. In the opposite case, the formation of two-component acoustic 'bullets' or vortices localized in all directions is possible.

  17. Lithosphere-Atmosphere coupling: Spectral element modeling of the evolution of acoustic waves in the atmosphere from an underground source.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Averbuch, Gil; Price, Colin

    2015-04-01

    Lithosphere-Atmosphere coupling: Spectral element modeling of the evolution of acoustic waves in the atmosphere from an underground source. G. Averbuch, C. Price Department of Geosciences, Tel Aviv University, Israel Infrasound is one of the four Comprehensive Nuclear-Test Ban Treaty technologies for monitoring nuclear explosions. This technology measures the acoustic waves generated by the explosions followed by their propagation through the atmosphere. There are also natural phenomena that can act as an infrasound sources like sprites, volcanic eruptions and earthquakes. The infrasound waves generated from theses phenomena can also be detected by the infrasound arrays. In order to study the behavior of these waves, i.e. the physics of wave propagation in the atmosphere, their evolution and their trajectories, numerical methods are required. This presentation will deal with the evolution of acoustic waves generated by underground sources (earthquakes and underground explosions). A 2D Spectral elements formulation for lithosphere-atmosphere coupling will be presented. The formulation includes the elastic wave equation for the seismic waves and the momentum, mass and state equations for the acoustic waves in a moving stratified atmosphere. The coupling of the two media is made by boundary conditions that ensures the continuity of traction and velocity (displacement) in the normal component to the interface. This work has several objectives. The first is to study the evolution of acoustic waves in the atmosphere from an underground source. The second is to derive transmission coefficients for the energy flux with respect to the seismic magnitude and earth density. The third will be the generation of seismic waves from acoustic waves in the atmosphere. Is it possible?

  18. Acoustic carrier transportation induced by surface acoustic waves in graphene in solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okuda, Satoshi; Ikuta, Takashi; Kanai, Yasushi; Ono, Takao; Ogawa, Shinpei; Fujisawa, Daisuke; Shimatani, Masaaki; Inoue, Koichi; Maehashi, Kenzo; Matsumoto, Kazuhiko

    2016-04-01

    The acoustic charge transportation induced by surface acoustic wave (SAW) propagation in graphene in solution was investigated. The sign of acoustic current (I A) was found to switch when crossing the Dirac point because the major carrier was transitioned from holes to electrons by the change in electrolyte-gate voltage. I A also exhibited a peak value under conditions of both hole and electron conduction. These results can be explained on the basis of a change in the type of major carrier in graphene, as well as a change in the carrier mobility of graphene.

  19. Evaluation of an acoustic black hole’s structural characteristics using laser-generated Lamb waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Shi-Ling; Lomonosov, A. M.; Shen, Zhong-Hua

    2016-02-01

    The interaction of laser-generated Lamb waves propagating in a thin aluminum plate with a two-dimensional (2D) acoustic black hole was studied experimentally and theoretically. The decrease in phase velocity due to the gradual decrease in thickness was validated. The focusing function of the structure was also studied in this work. Experiments were performed using a vibrometer. A scanning laser line source technique was used to generate a series of Lamb wave waveforms to obtain the dispersion spectrum through the 2D fast Fourier transform method. Using this method, the effect of structure on Lamb modes was studied.

  20. Surface acoustic wave response to optical absorption by graphene composite film.

    PubMed

    Chivukula, Venkata S; Ciplys, Daumantas; Kim, Jin Ho; Rimeika, Romualdas; Xu, Jimmy M; Shur, Michael S

    2012-02-01

    Propagation of surface acoustic waves in YZ LiNbO3 overlaid with graphene flakes has been investigated and its optical response to illumination by 633-nm light from a He-Ne laser was studied. The heating of the sample surface caused by optical absorption by the graphene led to a downshift in the transmitted SAW phase caused by the wave velocity's dependence on temperature. The proposed simple model based on optothermal SAW phase modulation was found to be in good agreement with the experimental results.

  1. Acoustic waves generated from seismic surface waves: propagation properties determined from Doppler sounding observations and normal-mode modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artru, Juliette; Farges, Thomas; Lognonné, Philippe

    2004-09-01

    Since 1960, experiments have shown that perturbations of the ionosphere can occur after earthquakes, by way of dynamic coupling between seismic surface waves and the atmosphere. The atmospheric wave is amplified exponentially while propagating upwards due to the decrease of density, and interaction with the ionospheric plasma leads to clearly identified signals on both ground-based or satellite ionospheric measurements. In 1999 and 2000, after an upgrade of the HF Doppler sounder, the Commisariat à l'Énergie Atomique systematically recorded these effects in the ionosphere with the Francourville (France) network, by measuring vertical oscillations of ionospheric layers with the Doppler technique. Normal-mode theory extended to a solid Earth with an atmosphere allows successful modelling of such signals, even if this 1-D approach is probably too crude, especially in the solid Earth, where 20 s surface waves see large lateral variations in the crust. The combination of observations and simulations provides a new tool to determine acoustic gravity wave propagation characteristics from the ground to ionospheric height. Observed velocity and amplification of the atmospheric waves show good agreement from the ground up to moderate sounding altitudes (140-150 km); however, at higher altitudes the propagation speed is found to be much smaller than predicted and attenuation is underestimated. This shows that the standard formalism of acoustic gravity waves in the atmosphere cannot efficiently describe propagation in the ionized atmosphere. Further work is needed to characterize the propagation of acoustic waves in this altitude range: we believe that seismic waves can provide a well-constrained source for such study.

  2. Properties of Materials Using Acoustic Waves.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-10-01

    CLASSiFICATIOO OF THIS PAGIR elM. DMe Eatae" to nonlinear acoustics which should permit us to cast problems with geometric and other complexities into a...on the kinetics of chemical reactions . 5. New theoretical approaches in nonlinear acoustics (R.M. McGowan and Professor B.-T. Chu) We are working to...of water and methanol was compared with the theoretical predictions given by Marston’s theory and the simplified model (Hsu 1983). This set of data

  3. Rayleigh-wave group velocity distribution in the Antarctic region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Reiji; Zhao, Dapeng

    2004-03-01

    We determined 2D group velocity distribution of Rayleigh waves at periods of 20-150 s in the Antarctic region using a tomographic inversion technique. The data are recorded by both permanent networks and temporary arrays. In East Antarctica the velocities are high at periods of 90-150 s, suggesting that the root of East Antarctica is very deep. The velocities in West Antarctica are low at all periods, which may be related to the volcanic activity and the West Antarctic Rift System. Low velocity anomalies appear at periods of 40-140 s along the Southeastern Indian Ridge and the western part of the Pacific Antarctic Ridge. The velocities are only slightly low around the Atlantic Indian Ridge, Southwestern Indian Ridge, and the eastern part of the Pacific Antarctic Ridge, where the spreading rates are small. Around two hotspots, the Mount Erebus and Balleny Islands, the velocity is low at periods of 50-150 s.

  4. Acoustic measurements of air entrainment by breaking waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terrill, Eric James

    1998-11-01

    Wave breaking at the surface of the ocean plays an important role in air-sea interaction processes. Bubbles entrained by breaking waves not only enhance the transfer of atmospheric gases to the ocean, but also modify the phase speed and attenuation of acoustic waves propagating through the bubbly medium. The development of acoustic instruments to measure bubbles and the results obtained from a number of field and laboratory experiments are presented. The first part of this dissertation addresses sound speed measurements made in the North Atlantic as part of the Acoustic Surface Reverberation Experiment (ASREX). An autonomous buoy system that directly measures the sound speed in the surface wave layer was developed. Data obtained with the instrument spanned several storm cycles with wind speeds and significant wave heights reaching 20 m/s and 8 m, respectively. The use of Wood's relation (1946) allows the calculation of the void fraction of air based on the low-frequency sound speed measurements. The highly variable near-surface sound speed/void fraction field is analyzed with respect to wind and surface wave- breaking parameters. The second part of this dissertation presents the development of a broadband acoustic technique which simultaneously measures the phase speed and attenuation at acoustic frequencies ranging from 4-100 kHz. The acoustic data is inverted for the size distribution of bubbles using algorithms that are based upon the physics of sound propagation through a bubbly mixture. This acoustic technique was evaluated in the large wave channel at the Hydraulics Laboratory, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, using mechanically generated breaking waves in seawater. Field measurements of bubble concentrations that result from wave breaking were made in both shallow water off Scripps Pier, California and in deep water near Point Conception, California using the broadband technique. Significant variability is observed in the bubble field, characterized by

  5. Monitoring polymer properties using shear horizontal surface acoustic waves.

    PubMed

    Gallimore, Dana Y; Millard, Paul J; Pereira da Cunha, Mauricio

    2009-10-01

    Real-time, nondestructive methods for monitoring polymer film properties are increasingly important in the development and fabrication of modern polymer-containing products. Online testing of industrial polymer films during preparation and conditioning is required to minimize material and energy consumption, improve the product quality, increase the production rate, and reduce the number of product rejects. It is well-known that shear horizontal surface acoustic wave (SH-SAW) propagation is sensitive to mass changes as well as to the mechanical properties of attached materials. In this work, the SH-SAW was used to monitor polymer property changes primarily dictated by variations in the viscoelasticity. The viscoelastic properties of a negative photoresist film were monitored throughout the ultraviolet (UV) light-induced polymer cross-linking process using SH-SAW delay line devices. Changes in the polymer film mass and viscoelasticity caused by UV exposure produced variations in the phase velocity and attenuation of the SH-SAW propagating in the structure. Based on measured polymer-coated delay line scattering transmission responses (S(21)) and the measured polymer layer thickness and density, the viscoelastic constants c(44) and eta(44) were extracted. The polymer thickness was found to decrease 0.6% during UV curing, while variations in the polymer density were determined to be insignificant. Changes of 6% in c(44) and 22% in eta(44) during the cross-linking process were observed, showing the sensitivity of the SH-SAW phase velocity and attenuation to changes in the polymer film viscoelasticity. These results indicate the potential for SH-SAW devices as online monitoring sensors for polymer film processing.

  6. Comparison of parallel group velocity of ECH waves with electron resonant velocity: Implication for electron diffusion by ECH waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, A. K.; Singhal, R. P.

    2009-10-01

    We have investigated the role of group velocity in the calculation of pitch-angle diffusion coefficients by electron cyclotron harmonic (ECH) waves in planetary magnetospheres. The assumption which is generally made that the parallel group velocity can be neglected in comparison with particle parallel velocity is examined in detail. It is found that for lowest harmonic band this assumption is quite good. It is found that in general it is not possible to ignore the parallel group velocity. However, for lowest harmonic band this assumption is quite good at low electron temperatures.

  7. Efficient counter-propagating wave acoustic micro-particle manipulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grinenko, A.; Ong, C. K.; Courtney, C. R. P.; Wilcox, P. D.; Drinkwater, B. W.

    2012-12-01

    A simple acoustic system consisting of a pair of parallel singe layered piezoelectric transducers submerged in a fluid used to form standing waves by a superposition of two counter-propagating waves is reported. The nodal positions of the standing wave are controlled by applying a variable phase difference to the transducers. This system was used to manipulate polystyrene micro-beads trapped at the nodal positions of the standing wave. The demonstrated good manipulation capability of the system is based on a lowering of the reflection coefficient in a narrow frequency band near the through-thickness resonance of the transducer plates.

  8. Measuring acoustic nonlinearity parameter using collinear wave mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Minghe; Tang, Guangxin; Jacobs, Laurence J.; Qu, Jianmin

    2012-07-01

    This study introduces a new acoustic nonlinearity parameter βT. It is shown that βT is associated with the interaction between a longitudinal wave and a shear wave in isotropic elastic solids with quadratic nonlinearity. Experimental measurements are conducted to demonstrate that the collinear wave mixing technique is capable of measuring βT nondestructively. Further, it is shown that βT is well-correlated with the plastic deformation in Al-6061 alloys. These results indicate that collinear wave mixing is a promising method for nondestructive assessment of plastic deformation, and possibly, fatigue damage in metallic materials.

  9. Virtual membrane for filtration of particles using surface acoustic waves (SAW).

    PubMed

    Fakhfouri, Armaghan; Devendran, Citsabehsan; Collins, David J; Ai, Ye; Neild, Adrian

    2016-09-21

    Surface acoustic wave (SAW) based particle manipulation is contactless, versatile, non-invasive and biocompatible making it useful for biological studies and diagnostic technologies. In this work, we present a sensitive particle sorting system, termed the virtual membrane, in which a periodic acoustic field with a wavelength on the order of particle dimensions permits size-selective filtration. Polystyrene particles that are larger than approximately 0.3 times the acoustic half-wavelength experience a force repelling them from the acoustic field. If the particle size is such that, at a given acoustic power and flow velocity, this repulsive force is dominant over the drag force, these particles will be prohibited from progressing further downstream (i.e. filtered), while smaller particles will be able to pass through the force field along the pressure nodes (akin to a filter's pores). Using this mechanism, we demonstrate high size selectivity using a standing SAW generated by opposing sets of focused interdigital transducers (FIDTs). The use of FIDTs permits the generation of a highly localized standing wave field, here used for filtration in μl min(-1) order flow rates at 10s of mW of applied power. Specifically, we demonstrate the filtration of 8 μm particles from 5 μm particles and 10.36 μm particles from 7.0 μm and 5.0 μm particles, using high frequency SAW at 258 MHz, 192.5 MHz, and 129.5 MHz, respectively.

  10. Teleseismic P-wave Velocity Tomography Beneath The Arabian Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Y.; Nyblade, A. A.; Rodgers, A.; Al-Amri, A.

    2004-12-01

    We have imaged tomographically the three-dimensional velocity structure of the upper mantle beneath the Arabian Peninsula using teleseismic P-waves. The data came from the Saudi Arabian National Digital Seismic Network (SANDSN) operated by King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology (KACST) and three permanent stations (RAYN, EIL and MRNI). The KACST network consists of 38 stations (27 broadband and 11 short-period) spread throughout most of western Saudi Arabia. P wave travel time residuals were obtained for 131 earthquakes in the distance range from 30\\deg to 90\\deg, resulting in 1716 rays paths. We find a pronounced low velocity anomaly beneath the southeastern Arabian Shield and southern Red Sea that likely represents a northward continuation of the Afar hotspot. We also image smaller low velocity anomalies beneath the Dead Sea Transform, the Gulf of Aqaba, and the northeastern corner of the Arabian Shield. The origin of these low velocity anomalies is uncertain.

  11. A high-order discontinuous Galerkin method for wave propagation through coupled elastic-acoustic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilcox, Lucas C.; Stadler, Georg; Burstedde, Carsten; Ghattas, Omar

    2010-12-01

    We introduce a high-order discontinuous Galerkin (dG) scheme for the numerical solution of three-dimensional (3D) wave propagation problems in coupled elastic-acoustic media. A velocity-strain formulation is used, which allows for the solution of the acoustic and elastic wave equations within the same unified framework. Careful attention is directed at the derivation of a numerical flux that preserves high-order accuracy in the presence of material discontinuities, including elastic-acoustic interfaces. Explicit expressions for the 3D upwind numerical flux, derived as an exact solution for the relevant Riemann problem, are provided. The method supports h-non-conforming meshes, which are particularly effective at allowing local adaptation of the mesh size to resolve strong contrasts in the local wavelength, as well as dynamic adaptivity to track solution features. The use of high-order elements controls numerical dispersion, enabling propagation over many wave periods. We prove consistency and stability of the proposed dG scheme. To study the numerical accuracy and convergence of the proposed method, we compare against analytical solutions for wave propagation problems with interfaces, including Rayleigh, Lamb, Scholte, and Stoneley waves as well as plane waves impinging on an elastic-acoustic interface. Spectral rates of convergence are demonstrated for these problems, which include a non-conforming mesh case. Finally, we present scalability results for a parallel implementation of the proposed high-order dG scheme for large-scale seismic wave propagation in a simplified earth model, demonstrating high parallel efficiency for strong scaling to the full size of the Jaguar Cray XT5 supercomputer.

  12. A high-order discontinuous Galerkin method for wave propagation through coupled elastic-acoustic media

    SciTech Connect

    Wilcox, Lucas C.; Stadler, Georg; Burstedde, Carsten; Ghattas, Omar

    2010-12-10

    We introduce a high-order discontinuous Galerkin (dG) scheme for the numerical solution of three-dimensional (3D) wave propagation problems in coupled elastic-acoustic media. A velocity-strain formulation is used, which allows for the solution of the acoustic and elastic wave equations within the same unified framework. Careful attention is directed at the derivation of a numerical flux that preserves high-order accuracy in the presence of material discontinuities, including elastic-acoustic interfaces. Explicit expressions for the 3D upwind numerical flux, derived as an exact solution for the relevant Riemann problem, are provided. The method supports h-non-conforming meshes, which are particularly effective at allowing local adaptation of the mesh size to resolve strong contrasts in the local wavelength, as well as dynamic adaptivity to track solution features. The use of high-order elements controls numerical dispersion, enabling propagation over many wave periods. We prove consistency and stability of the proposed dG scheme. To study the numerical accuracy and convergence of the proposed method, we compare against analytical solutions for wave propagation problems with interfaces, including Rayleigh, Lamb, Scholte, and Stoneley waves as well as plane waves impinging on an elastic-acoustic interface. Spectral rates of convergence are demonstrated for these problems, which include a non-conforming mesh case. Finally, we present scalability results for a parallel implementation of the proposed high-order dG scheme for large-scale seismic wave propagation in a simplified earth model, demonstrating high parallel efficiency for strong scaling to the full size of the Jaguar Cray XT5 supercomputer.

  13. Chromospheric extents predicted by time-dependent acoustic wave models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuntz, Manfred

    1990-01-01

    Theoretical models for chromospheric structures of late-type giant stars are computed, including the time-dependent propagation of acoustic waves. Models with short-period monochromatic shock waves as well as a spectrum of acoustic waves are discussed, and the method is applied to the stars Arcturus, Aldebaran, and Betelgeuse. Chromospheric extent, defined as the monotonic decrease with height of the time-averaged electron densities, are found to be 1.12, 1.13, and 1.22 stellar radii for the three stars, respectively; this corresponds to a time-averaged electron density of 10 to the 7th/cu cm. Predictions of the extended chromospheric obtained using a simple scaling law agree well with those obtained by the time-dependent wave models; thus, the chromospheres of all stars for which the scaling law is valid consist of the same number of pressure scale heights.

  14. Chromospheric extents predicted by time-dependent acoustic wave models

    SciTech Connect

    Cuntz, M. Heidelberg Universitaet )

    1990-01-01

    Theoretical models for chromospheric structures of late-type giant stars are computed, including the time-dependent propagation of acoustic waves. Models with short-period monochromatic shock waves as well as a spectrum of acoustic waves are discussed, and the method is applied to the stars Arcturus, Aldebaran, and Betelgeuse. Chromospheric extent, defined as the monotonic decrease with height of the time-averaged electron densities, are found to be 1.12, 1.13, and 1.22 stellar radii for the three stars, respectively; this corresponds to a time-averaged electron density of 10 to the 7th/cu cm. Predictions of the extended chromospheric obtained using a simple scaling law agree well with those obtained by the time-dependent wave models; thus, the chromospheres of all stars for which the scaling law is valid consist of the same number of pressure scale heights. 74 refs.

  15. Measuring Ultrasonic Acoustic Velocity in a Thin Sheet of Graphite Epoxy Composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    A method for measuring the acoustic velocity in a thin sheet of a graphite epoxy composite (GEC) material was investigated. This method uses two identical acoustic-emission (AE) sensors, one to transmit and one to receive. The delay time as a function of distance between sensors determines a bulk velocity. A lightweight fixture (balsa wood in the current implementation) provides a consistent method of positioning the sensors, thus providing multiple measurements of the time delay between sensors at different known distances. A linear fit to separation, x, versus delay time, t, will yield an estimate of the velocity from the slope of the line.

  16. Waveform inversion of acoustic waves for explosion yield estimation

    DOE PAGES

    Kim, K.; Rodgers, A. J.

    2016-07-08

    We present a new waveform inversion technique to estimate the energy of near-surface explosions using atmospheric acoustic waves. Conventional methods often employ air blast models based on a homogeneous atmosphere, where the acoustic wave propagation effects (e.g., refraction and diffraction) are not taken into account, and therefore, their accuracy decreases with increasing source-receiver distance. In this study, three-dimensional acoustic simulations are performed with a finite difference method in realistic atmospheres and topography, and the modeled acoustic Green's functions are incorporated into the waveform inversion for the acoustic source time functions. The strength of the acoustic source is related to explosionmore » yield based on a standard air blast model. The technique was applied to local explosions (<10 km) and provided reasonable yield estimates (<~30% error) in the presence of realistic topography and atmospheric structure. In conclusion, the presented method can be extended to explosions recorded at far distance provided proper meteorological specifications.« less

  17. Acoustic and elastic waves in metamaterials for underwater applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titovich, Alexey S.

    Elastic effects in acoustic metamaterials are investigated. Water-based periodic arrays of elastic scatterers, sonic crystals, suffer from low transmission due to the impedance and index mismatch of typical engineering materials with water. A new type of acoustic metamaterial element is proposed that can be tuned to match the acoustic properties of water in the quasi-static regime. The element comprises a hollow elastic cylindrical shell fitted with an optimized internal substructure consisting of a central mass supported by an axisymmetric distribution of elastic stiffeners, which dictate the shell's effective bulk modulus and density. The derived closed form scattering solution for this system shows that the subsonic flexural waves excited in the shell by the attachment of stiffeners are suppressed by including a sufficiently large number of such stiffeners. As an example of refraction-based wave steering, a cylindrical-to-plane wave lens is designed by varying the bulk modulus in the array according to the conformal mapping of a unit circle to a square. Elastic shells provide rich scattering properties, mainly due to their ability to support highly dispersive flexural waves. Analysis of flexural-borne waves on a pair of shells yields an analytical expression for the width of a flexural resonance, which is then used with the theory of multiple scattering to accurately predict the splitting of the resonance frequency. This analysis leads to the discovery of the acoustic Poisson-like effect in a periodic wave medium. This effect redirects an incident acoustic wave by 90° in an otherwise acoustically transparent sonic crystal. An unresponsive "deaf" antisymmetric mode locked to band gap boundaries is unlocked by matching Bragg scattering with a quadrupole flexural resonance of the shell. The dynamic effect causes normal unidirectional wave motion to strongly couple to perpendicular motion, analogous to the quasi-static Poisson effect in solids. The Poisson

  18. Complete velocity distribution in river cross-sections measured by acoustic instruments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cheng, R.T.; Gartner, J.W.; ,

    2003-01-01

    To fully understand the hydraulic properties of natural rivers, velocity distribution in the river cross-section should be studied in detail. The measurement task is not straightforward because there is not an instrument that can measure the velocity distribution covering the entire cross-section. Particularly, the velocities in regions near the free surface and in the bottom boundary layer are difficult to measure, and yet the velocity properties in these regions play the most significant role in characterizing the hydraulic properties. To further characterize river hydraulics, two acoustic instruments, namely, an acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP), and a "BoogieDopp" (BD) were used on fixed platforms to measure the detailed velocity profiles across the river. Typically, 20 to 25 stations were used to represent a river cross-section. At each station, water velocity profiles were measured independently and/or concurrently by an ADCP and a BD. The measured velocity properties were compared and used in computation of river discharge. In a tow-tank evaluation of a BD, it has been confirmed that BD is capable of measuring water velocity at about 11 cm below the free-surface. Therefore, the surface velocity distribution across the river was extracted from the BD velocity measurements and used to compute the river discharge. These detailed velocity profiles and the composite velocity distribution were used to assess the validity of the classic theories of velocity distributions, conventional river discharge measurement methods, and for estimates of channel bottom roughness.

  19. Asymptotic permanent profile of the ion acoustic wave driven by the Langmuir wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaup, D. J.; Latifi, A.; Leon, J.

    1992-08-01

    We study the evolution of Langmuir waves coupled to the ion acoustic wave by means of the ponderomotive force in the Karpman limit (caviton equation). Using the spectral transform with singular dispersion relation, it is shown that the background noise (fluctuations in the ion density) is amplified and its time asymptotic behavior will be a static solution which is totally reflective for the Langmuir wave. Moreover, if the initial ion density contains a local depression, the asymptotic profile will contain a number of permanent localized density depressions (cavitons), static in the rest frame of the acoustic wave and entrained in its wake.

  20. Argon–oxygen dc magnetron discharge plasma probed with ion acoustic waves

    SciTech Connect

    Saikia, Partha Saikia, Bipul Kumar; Goswami, Kalyan Sindhu; Phukan, Arindam

    2014-05-15

    The precise determination of the relative concentration of negative ions is very important for the optimization of magnetron sputtering processes, especially for those undertaken in a multicomponent background produced by adding electronegative gases, such as oxygen, to the discharge. The temporal behavior of an ion acoustic wave excited from a stainless steel grid inside the plasma chamber is used to determine the relative negative ion concentration in the magnetron discharge plasma. The phase velocity of the ion acoustic wave in the presence of negative ions is found to be faster than in a pure argon plasma, and the phase velocity increases with the oxygen partial pressure. Optical emission spectroscopy further confirms the increase in the oxygen negative ion density, along with a decrease in the argon positive ion density under the same discharge conditions. The relative negative ion concentration values measured by ion acoustic waves are compared with those measured by a single Langmuir probe, and a similarity in the results obtained by both techniques is observed.

  1. Vapor sensing by means of a ZnO-on-Si surface acoustic wave resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, S. J.; Schweizer, K. S.; Schwartz, S. S.; Gunshor, R. L.

    Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) devices can function as sensitive detectors of vapors. The high surface acoustic energy density of the device makes it extremely sensitive to the presence of molecules adsorbed from the gas phase. Mass loading by the adsorbate is the primary mechanism for the surface wave velocity perturbation. If the device is used as the frequency control element of an oscillator, perturbations in wave velocity on the order of 10 parts per billion may be resolved by means of a frequency counter. Zno-on-Si SAW resonators have been examined as vapor sensors. The piezoelectric ZnO layer permits transduction between electrical and acoustic energies, as well as endowing the surface with particular adsorptive properties. These devices exhibit C-values up to 12,000 at a resonant frequency of 109 MHZ. The resonant frequency of the device shifts upon exposure to a vapor-air mixture, with a transient response which is distinct for each of the organic vapors tested. Due to the permeability of the polycrystalline ZnO layer, the instantaneous reversibility of the resonant frequency shift is found to depend on the type of adsorbed molecule.

  2. Regionalized Rayleigh wave group velocities in southeastern Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souza, J. L.; Dos Santos, N. P.; Pacheco, R. P.

    2003-04-01

    Damped least-square inversion was used to regionalize a large quantity of source-station Rayleigh wave dispersion curves obtained from digital seismograms, which were recorded at twenty-three IRIS seismological stations located either in or around South America continent. The region including all source-station Rayleigh wave paths (defined by geographical coordinates : -125,45 and 25,-75) was divided into cells of 2 by 2 degrees, and a group velocity for each cell (visited by at least one Rayleigh wave path) of the grid was computed. The estimated group velocities were then related to the Preliminary Reference Earth Model (PREM) and their percentual deviation from PREM were used to construct velocity maps at different periods (from 10 to 102 sec). The group velocity anomalies maps show a strong correlation with the superficial limits of the main geologic provinces in the region. Both Tocantis and Sao Francisco cratonic nuclei were clearly identified and they have deep roots. Several group velocity anomalies in the maps also have a direct correlation with recent studies about geoid anomalies in the southeastern Brazil and adjacent regions. The high density of Rayleigh wave paths across southeastern Brazil has provided high resolutions throughout the region under investigation. In general, the spatial resolution in the grid is of two degrees or 200km.

  3. Spin-Orbit Twisted Spin Waves: Group Velocity Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, F.; Baboux, F.; Ullrich, C. A.; D'Amico, I.; Vignale, G.; Karczewski, G.; Wojtowicz, T.

    2016-09-01

    We present a theoretical and experimental study of the interplay between spin-orbit coupling (SOC), Coulomb interaction, and motion of conduction electrons in a magnetized two-dimensional electron gas. Via a transformation of the many-body Hamiltonian we introduce the concept of spin-orbit twisted spin waves, whose energy dispersions and damping rates are obtained by a simple wave-vector shift of the spin waves without SOC. These theoretical predictions are validated by Raman scattering measurements. With optical gating of the density, we vary the strength of the SOC to alter the group velocity of the spin wave. The findings presented here differ from that of spin systems subject to the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction. Our results pave the way for novel applications in spin-wave routing devices and for the realization of lenses for spin waves.

  4. Reconfigurable Wave Velocity Transmission Lines for Phased Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Host, Nick; Chen, Chi-Chih; Volakis, John L.; Miranda, Felix

    2013-01-01

    Phased array antennas showcase many advantages over mechanically steered systems. However, they are also more complex, heavy and most importantly costly. This presentation paper presents a concept which overcomes these detrimental attributes by eliminating all of the phase array backend (including phase shifters). Instead, a wave velocity reconfigurable transmission line is used in a series fed array arrangement to allow phase shifting with one small (100mil) mechanical motion. Different configurations of the reconfigurable wave velocity transmission line are discussed and simulated and experimental results are presented.

  5. Excitation of Electron Acoustic Waves in Plasmas of the SINP-MaPLE Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, Satyajit; Biswas, Subir; Chakrabrati, Nikhil; Pal, Rabindranath

    2016-10-01

    Electron acoustic wave (EAW) is the low frequency branch of the undamped electrostatic plasma wave and has low phase velocity. In order to overcome Landau damping the EAW needs a non-Maxwellian electron velocity distribution with a flat region near the phase velocity, or equivalently, a plasma with two temperature electron species with a relative velocity between them. The ECR produced plasmas of the MaPLE device at Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics provide such characteristics as observed by retarded field energy analyzer and single Langmuir probe. Experiments are carried out to exploit this feature by putting a negatively biased mesh launcher inside the plasma and energizing it with sinusoidal voltages from a function generator with frequencies varying near the ion plasma frequency. Circular mesh probes along the axis of the device serve as detectors for wave propagation. Experimental results show EAWs are indeed launched and propagate along the magnetic field direction. The dispersion curve experimentally obtained shows the phase velocity matching satisfactorily with the estimated theoretical values. Changing the bias on the launcher the electron distribution function is varied, which, in turn, controls the wave amplitude. Detailed experimental results will be presented. Department of Atomic Energy, Govt. of India.

  6. Ion-Acoustic Waves in Self-Gravitaing Dusty Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Nagendra; Kumar, Vinod; Kumar, Anil

    2008-09-07

    The propagation and damping of low frequency ion-acoustic waves in steady state, unmagnetised, self-gravitating dusty plasma are studied taking into account two important damping mechanisms creation damping and Tromso damping. It is found that imaginary part of wave number is independent of frequency in case of creation damping. But when we consider the case of creation and Tromso damping together, an additional contribution to damping appears with the increase in frequency attributed to Tromso effect.

  7. Estimation of Sea Surface Wave Spectra Using Acoustic Tomography.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-09-01

    develops a new technique for estimating quasi- homogeneous and quasi-stationary sea surface wave frequency-direction spectra using acoustic tomog...problems for the homogeneous and quasi- homogeneous frequency-direction spectrum are introduced. The theory is ap- plied tosynthetic data which simulate...thesis introduces a technique that estimates the quasi-stationary and quasi- homogeneous sea surface wave frequency-direction spectrum from the spectra of

  8. S-Band Shallow Bulk Acoustic Wave (SBAW) microwave source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Techniques necessary to fabricate a high performance S-band microwave single source using state-of-the-art shallow bulk acoustic wave (SBAW) were explored. The bulk wave structures of the AlN/Al 2O3 were investigated for both the R plane and basal plane of sapphire. A 1.072 GHz SBAW delay line and oscillators were developed. A method of selecting and setting oscillator output frequency by selecting substrate orientation angle was also established.

  9. Dust acoustic shock waves in two temperatures charged dusty grains

    SciTech Connect

    El-Shewy, E. K.; Abdelwahed, H. G.; Elmessary, M. A.

    2011-11-15

    The reductive perturbation method has been used to derive the Korteweg-de Vries-Burger equation and modified Korteweg-de Vries-Burger for dust acoustic shock waves in a homogeneous unmagnetized plasma having electrons, singly charged ions, hot and cold dust species with Boltzmann distributions for electrons and ions in the presence of the cold (hot) dust viscosity coefficients. The behavior of the shock waves in the dusty plasma has been investigated.

  10. Interaction of acoustic waves generated by coupled plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuschieri, J. M.

    1990-01-01

    When two substructures are coupled, the acoustic field generated by the motion of each of the substructures will interact with the motion of the other substructure. This would be the case of a structure enclosing an acoustic cavity. A technique to model the interaction of the generated sound fields from the two components of a coupled structure, and the influence of this interaction on the vibration of the structural components is presented. Using a mobility power flow approach, each element of the substructure is treated independently both when developing the structural response and when determining the acoustic field generated by this component. The presence of the other substructural components is introduced by assuming these components to be rigid baffles. The excitation of one of the substructures is assumed to be by an incident acoustic wave which is dependent of the motion of the substructure. The sound field generated by the motion of the substructure is included in the solution of the response.

  11. Measurement of velocity variations along a wave path in the through-thickness direction in a plate.

    PubMed

    Kawashima, Katsuhiro

    2005-01-01

    In this paper there is given a method to predict ultrasonic wave velocity variations along a wave path in the through-thickness direction in a plate from thickness resonance spectra. Thickness resonance spectra are numerically calculated and two simple rules used to predict the entire ultrasonic wave velocity variation are derived. In the calculation, the wave path is assumed to be straight along the thickness direction and the velocity variation is assumed to be either as a parabolic curve dependence or a linear dependence with respect to the distance from the surface and to be symmetric with respect to the plate center. To see if the numerical calculation method is reliable, thickness resonance frequencies of a sample with three-layers were measured by EMAT (electromagnetic acoustic transducer) with a good agreement between the measured and the calculated frequencies. This method can be applied to the ultrasonic measurement of material characteristics, internal stress or various other properties of plate materials.

  12. Standing surface acoustic wave (SSAW)-based cell washing

    PubMed Central

    Li, Sixing; Ding, Xiaoyun; Mao, Zhangming; Chen, Yuchao; Nama, Nitesh; Guo, Feng; Li, Peng; Wang, Lin; Cameron, Craig E.; Huang, Tony Jun

    2014-01-01

    Cell/bead washing is an indispensable sample preparation procedure used in various cell studies and analytical processes. In this article, we report a standing surface acoustic wave (SSAW)-based microfluidic device for cell and bead washing in a continuous flow. In our approach, the acoustic radiation force generated in a SSAW field is utilized to actively extract cells or beads from their original medium. A unique configuration of tilted-angle standing surface acoustic wave (taSSAW) is employed in our device, enabling us to wash beads with >98% recovery rate and >97% washing efficiency. We also demonstrate the functionality of our device by preparing high-purity (>97%) white blood cells from lysed blood samples through cell washing. Our SSAW-based cell/bead washing device has the advantages of label-free manipulation, simplicity, high biocompatibility, high recovery rate, and high washing efficiency. It can be useful for many lab-on-a-chip applications. PMID:25372273

  13. Acoustic reconstruction of the velocity field in a furnace using a characteristic flow model.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanqin; Zhou, Huaichun; Chen, Shiying; Zhang, Yindi; Wei, Xinli; Zhao, Jinhui

    2012-06-01

    An acoustic method can provide a noninvasive, efficient and full-field reconstruction of aerodynamic fields in a furnace. A simple yet reasonable model is devised for reconstruction of a velocity field in a cross section of a tangential furnace from acoustic measurements based on typical physical characteristics of the field. The solenoidal component of the velocity field is modeled by a curved surface, derived by rotating a curve of Gaussian distribution, determined by six characteristic parameters, while the nonrotational component is governed by a priori knowledge. Thus the inverse problem is translated into determination of the characteristic parameters using a set of acoustic projection data. First numerical experiments were undertaken to simulate the acoustic measurement, so as to preliminarily validate the effectiveness of the model. Based on this, physical experiments under different operating conditions were performed in a pilot-scale setup to provide a further test. Hot-wire anemometry and strip floating were applied to compare with acoustic measurements. The acoustic measurements provided satisfactory consistency with both of these approaches. Nevertheless, for a field with a relatively large magnitude of air velocities, the acoustic measurement can give more reliable reconstructions. Extension of the model to measurements of hot tangential furnaces is also discussed.

  14. Blood characteristics effect on pulse wave velocity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong Youn; Yoon, Jihyun; Cho, Minhee; Lee, Byoung-Kwon; Karimi, Ali; Shin, Sehyun

    2013-01-01

    PWV, a surrogate marker for vascular stiffness, can be also expressed by the Bramwell-Hill equation. The effect of blood density to PWV has been ignored, because variation of blood density is assumed to be negligible. In some clinical situation, blood density could be changed, and blood density as a mechanical property of blood flow might affect to PWV. While the elastic property plays an important role in determining the wave propagation in an elastic tube, our assumption is that there might be some relation between blood flow and vascular wall, and that the characteristics of blood flow might influence PWV. This study was objected to investigate the role of mechanical and hemorheologic parameters on PWV in subjects with cardiovascular disease. We have measured and analyzed the PWV, hemorheologic parameters, and other clinical parameters in 814 patients with coronary arterial disease scheduled for coronary angiography. There is no commercial method for measuring whole blood density. So, we defined the density score, which is sum of hemoglobin and total protein. And the hemorheologic parameters were measured within 4 hours after sampling by automated microfluidic hemorheometer. And the effect of all the clinical and hemorheologic parameter on PWV was analyzed by multiple linear regression analysis. Many clinical parameters including age and blood pressure, high shear WBV and ESR as hemorheologic parameters, and density score were correlated well with ba-PWV. However, many clinical variables, high shear WBV and ESR lost the independent significance on multivariable regression analysis. Only age, SBP, and density score were independent variables (p < 0.001). In conclusion, density score as a mechanical property of blood might be suggested as an independent variable influencing PWV in addition to age and blood pressure, but hemorheologic parameters, such as RBC deformability, aggregation, and whole blood viscosity do not affect PWV independently.

  15. Electron acoustic wave driven vortices with non-Maxwellian hot electrons in magnetoplasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Haque, Q.; Mirza, Arshad M.; Zakir, U.

    2014-07-15

    Linear dispersion characteristics of the Electron Acoustic Wave (EAW) and the corresponding vortex structures are investigated in a magnetoplasma in the presence of non-Maxwellian hot electrons. In this regard, kappa and Cairns distributed hot electrons are considered. It is noticed that the nonthermal distributions affect the phase velocity of the EAW. Further, it is found that the phase velocity of EAW increases for Cairns and decreases for kappa distributed hot electrons. Nonlinear solutions in the form of dipolar vortices are also obtained for both stationary and non-stationary ions in the presence of kappa distributed hot electrons and dynamic cold electrons. It is found that the amplitude of the nonlinear vortex structures also reduces with kappa factor like the electron acoustic solitons.

  16. Velocity and attenuation of ultrasound waves under cyclic loading of low-carbon steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lunev, Alexey; Nadezhkin, Mikhail; Zuev, Lev

    2016-11-01

    The results of the research of ultrasound wave velocity and attenuation in low-carbon steel during low-cycle fatigue tests have been presented in this work. It has been found that the dependencies of acoustic parameters on the number of cycles have three stages. The first stage is connected with dislocation density growth in a specimen. The transition from the second stage to the third one can be used as a criterion of fatigue wear of metalworks and implemented for nondestructive ultrasound lifetime estimation.

  17. Gasoline identifier based on SH0 plate acoustic waves.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsova, Iren E; Zaitsev, Boris D; Seleznev, Eugenii P; Verona, Enrico

    2016-08-01

    The present paper is devoted to the development of gasoline identifier based on zero order shear-horizontal (SH0) acoustic wave propagating in piezoelectric plate. It has been found that the permittivity of gasoline is increased when its octane number rises. The development of such identifier is experimentally demonstrated to be possible.

  18. Corrigendum and addendum. Modeling weakly nonlinear acoustic wave propagation

    DOE PAGES

    Christov, Ivan; Christov, C. I.; Jordan, P. M.

    2014-12-18

    This article presents errors, corrections, and additions to the research outlined in the following citation: Christov, I., Christov, C. I., & Jordan, P. M. (2007). Modeling weakly nonlinear acoustic wave propagation. The Quarterly Journal of Mechanics and Applied Mathematics, 60(4), 473-495.

  19. The variation with T(e) and T(i) of the velocity of unstable ionospheric two-stream waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farley, Donald; Providakes, Jason

    1989-11-01

    In order to test the validity of the existing expressions for the ion-acoustic velocity, simultaneous measurements were made of the electron and ion temperatures together with full spectral measurements of the phase velocity of type 4 waves in the auroral zone. Details of the European Incoherent Scatter experiment using the Cornell University Portable Radar Interferometer are described, and a linear theory is developed for two-stream waves, with a fluid model used for the electrons and a kinetic model for the ions. The linear theory is found to be in satisfactory agreeement with the experimental results.

  20. Complex Shear Wave Velocity Structure Imaged Beneath Africa and Iceland.

    PubMed

    Ritsema; van Heijst HJ; Woodhouse

    1999-12-03

    A model of three-dimensional shear wave velocity variations in the mantle reveals a tilted low velocity anomaly extending from the core-mantle boundary (CMB) region beneath the southeastern Atlantic Ocean into the upper mantle beneath eastern Africa. This anomaly suggests that Cenozoic flood basalt volcanism in the Afar region and active rifting beneath the East African Rift is linked to an extensive thermal anomaly at the CMB more than 45 degrees away. In contrast, a low velocity anomaly beneath Iceland is confined to the upper mantle.

  1. Acoustic wave propagation in high-pressure system.

    PubMed

    Foldyna, Josef; Sitek, Libor; Habán, Vladimír

    2006-12-22

    Recently, substantial attention is paid to the development of methods of generation of pulsations in high-pressure systems to produce pulsating high-speed water jets. The reason is that the introduction of pulsations into the water jets enables to increase their cutting efficiency due to the fact that the impact pressure (so-called water-hammer pressure) generated by an impact of slug of water on the target material is considerably higher than the stagnation pressure generated by corresponding continuous jet. Special method of pulsating jet generation was developed and tested extensively under the laboratory conditions at the Institute of Geonics in Ostrava. The method is based on the action of acoustic transducer on the pressure liquid and transmission of generated acoustic waves via pressure system to the nozzle. The purpose of the paper is to present results obtained during the research oriented at the determination of acoustic wave propagation in high-pressure system. The final objective of the research is to solve the problem of transmission of acoustic waves through high-pressure water to generate pulsating jet effectively even at larger distances from the acoustic source. In order to be able to simulate numerically acoustic wave propagation in the system, it is necessary among others to determine dependence of the sound speed and second kinematical viscosity on operating pressure. Method of determination of the second kinematical viscosity and speed of sound in liquid using modal analysis of response of the tube filled with liquid to the impact was developed. The response was measured by pressure sensors placed at both ends of the tube. Results obtained and presented in the paper indicate good agreement between experimental data and values of speed of sound calculated from so-called "UNESCO equation". They also show that the value of the second kinematical viscosity of water depends on the pressure.

  2. Scattering of Acoustic Waves from Ocean Boundaries

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-30

    of buried mines and improve SONAR performance in shallow water. OBJECTIVES 1) Determination of the correct physical model of acoustic propagation...Measurements for Range Dependent Geoacoustic Parameters: Bottom loss data from 5 – 30 kHz were collected as part of the Target and Reverberation Experiment...2013 (TREX13). These data were analyzed and range dependent geoacoustic parameters were derived for the TREX reverberation site including bottom loss

  3. Hydrocarbon saturation determination using acoustic velocities obtained through casing

    DOEpatents

    Moos, Daniel

    2010-03-09

    Compressional and shear velocities of earth formations are measured through casing. The determined compressional and shear velocities are used in a two component mixing model to provides improved quantitative values for the solid, the dry frame, and the pore compressibility. These are used in determination of hydrocarbon saturation.

  4. Subwavelength acoustic focusing by surface-wave-resonance enhanced transmission in doubly negative acoustic metamaterials

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Xiaoming; Badreddine Assouar, M. Oudich, Mourad

    2014-11-21

    We present analytical and numerical analyses of a yet unseen lensing paradigm that is based on a solid metamaterial slab in which the wave excitation source is attached. We propose and demonstrate sub-diffraction-limited acoustic focusing induced by surface resonant states in doubly negative metamaterials. The enhancement of evanescent waves across the metamaterial slab produced by their resonant coupling to surface waves is evidenced and quantitatively determined. The effect of metamaterial parameters on surface states, transmission, and wavenumber bandwidth is clearly identified. Based on this concept consisting of a wave source attached on the metamaterial, a high resolution of λ/28.4 is obtained with the optimum effective physical parameters, opening then an exciting way to design acoustic metamaterials for ultrasonic focused imaging.

  5. Wave equation based microseismic source location and velocity inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yikang; Wang, Yibo; Chang, Xu

    2016-12-01

    The microseismic event locations and velocity information can be used to infer the stress field and guide hydraulic fracturing process, as well as to image the subsurface structures. How to get accurate microseismic event locations and velocity model is the principal problem in reservoir monitoring. For most location methods, the velocity model has significant relation with the accuracy of the location results. The velocity obtained from log data is usually too rough to be used for location directly. It is necessary to discuss how to combine the location and velocity inversion. Among the main techniques for locating microseismic events, time reversal imaging (TRI) based on wave equation avoids traveltime picking and offers high-resolution locations. Frequency dependent wave equation traveltime inversion (FWT) is an inversion method that can invert velocity model with source uncertainty at certain frequency band. Thus we combine TRI with FWT to produce improved event locations and velocity model. In the proposed approach, the location and model information are interactively used and updated. Through the proposed workflow, the inverted model is better resolved and the event locations are more accurate. We test this method on synthetic borehole data and filed data of a hydraulic fracturing experiment. The results verify the effectiveness of the method and prove it has potential for real-time microseismic monitoring.

  6. DIASCoPE: Directly integrated acoustic system combined with pressure experiments—A new method for fast acoustic velocity measurements at high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitaker, Matthew L.; Baldwin, Kenneth J.; Huebsch, William R.

    2017-03-01

    A new experimental system to measure elastic wave velocities in samples in situ under extreme conditions of pressure and temperature in a multi-anvil apparatus has been installed at Beamline 6-BM-B of the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory. This system allows for measurement of acoustic velocities via ultrasonic interferometry, and makes use of the synchrotron beam to measure sample densities via X-ray diffraction and sample lengths using X-radiographic imaging. This system is fully integrated into the automated software controls of the beamline and is capable of collecting robust data on elastic wave travel times in less than 1 s, which is an improvement of more than one to two orders of magnitude over existing systems. Moreover, this fast data collection time has been shown to have no effect on the obtained travel time results. This allows for more careful study of time-dependent phenomena with tighter snapshots in time of processes that would otherwise be lost or averaged out in other acoustic measurement systems.

  7. Drift-wave transport in the velocity shear layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosalem, K. C.; Roberto, M.; Caldas, I. L.

    2016-07-01

    Particle drift driven by electrostatic wave fluctuations is numerically computed to describe the transport in a gradient velocity layer at the tokamak plasma edge. We consider an equilibrium plasma in large aspect ratio approximation with E × B flow and specified toroidal plasma velocity, electric field, and magnetic field profiles. A symplectic map, previously derived for infinite coherent time modes, is used to describe the transport dependence on the electric, magnetic, and plasma velocity shears. We also show that resonant perturbations and their correspondent islands in the Poincaré maps are much affected by the toroidal velocity profiles. Moreover, shearless transport barriers, identified by extremum values of the perturbed rotation number profiles of the invariant curves, allow chaotic trajectories trapped into the plasma. We investigate the influence of the toroidal plasma velocity profile on these shearless transport barriers.

  8. An acoustic travel time method for continuous velocity monitoring in shallow tidal streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razaz, Mahdi; Kawanisi, Kiyosi; Nistor, Ioan; Sharifi, Soroosh

    2013-08-01

    Long-term variations of streamflow in a tidal channel were measured using a Fluvial Acoustic Tomography (FAT) system through one transmission path. FAT is an innovative acoustic technology that utilizes the time-of-travel method to determine velocity between two points from multiple ray paths that traverse the entire cross-section of stream. Due to high spatial variability of flow distribution stationary ADCP measurements were not likely to yield true section-averaged flow velocity and moving-boat ADCP method was therefore used to provide reference data. As such, two short-term moving boat ADCP campaigns were carried out by the authors. In the first campaign, a couple of acoustic stations were added to the FAT system in order to resolve flow angularity in addition to the mean velocity. Comparing the FAT results with corresponding ADCP section-averaged flow direction and velocity indicated remarkable consistency. Second campaign was designed to capture the influence of salt wedge intrusion on the sound propagation pattern. It was found that FAT velocity measurements bias high if acoustic stations lay inside the cooler freshwater layer. Ray-tracing hindcasts suggest that installing acoustic stations inside the salt wedge may significantly improve function of output of the system. Comparing salinities evaluated from long-term FAT travel time records with nodal salinity measurements provided by conductivity-temperature sensors reveals the potential ability of FAT in measuring salt flux.

  9. Impact of Acoustic Standing Waves on Structural Responses: Reverberant Acoustic Testing (RAT) vs. Direct Field Acoustic Testing (DFAT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolaini, Ali R.; Doty, Benjamin; Chang, Zensheu

    2012-01-01

    Loudspeakers have been used for acoustic qualification of spacecraft, reflectors, solar panels, and other acoustically responsive structures for more than a decade. Limited measurements from some of the recent speaker tests used to qualify flight hardware have indicated significant spatial variation of the acoustic field within the test volume. Also structural responses have been reported to differ when similar tests were performed using reverberant chambers. To address the impact of non-uniform acoustic field on structural responses, a series of acoustic tests were performed using a flat panel and a 3-ft cylinder exposed to the field controlled by speakers and repeated in a reverberant chamber. The speaker testing was performed using multi-input-single-output (MISO) and multi-input-multi-output (MIMO) control schemes with and without the test articles. In this paper the spatial variation of the acoustic field due to acoustic standing waves and their impacts on the structural responses in RAT and DFAT (both using MISO and MIMO controls for DFAT) are discussed in some detail.

  10. Multiple-frequency acoustic wave devices for chemical sensing and materials characterization in both gas and liquid phase

    DOEpatents

    Martin, Stephen J.; Ricco, Antonio J.

    1993-01-01

    A chemical sensor (1) includes two or more pairs of interdigital electrodes (10) having different periodicities. Each pair is comprised of a first electrode (10a) and a second electrode (10b). The electrodes are patterned on a surface of a piezoelectric substrate (12). Each pair of electrodes may launch and receive various acoustic waves (AW), including a surface acoustic wave (SAW), and may also launch and receive several acoustic plate modes (APMs). The frequencies associated with each are functions of the transducer periodicity as well as the velocity of the particular AW in the chosen substrate material. An AW interaction region (13) exists between each pair of electrodes. Circuitry (20, 40) is used to launch, receive, and monitor the propagation characteristics of the AWs and may be configured in an intermittent measurement fashion or in a continuous measurement fashion. Perturbations to the AW velocity and attenuation are recorded at several frequencies and provide the sensor response.

  11. Opportunities for shear energy scaling in bulk acoustic wave resonators.

    PubMed

    Jose, Sumy; Hueting, Raymond J E

    2014-10-01

    An important energy loss contribution in bulk acoustic wave resonators is formed by so-called shear waves, which are transversal waves that propagate vertically through the devices with a horizontal motion. In this work, we report for the first time scaling of the shear-confined spots, i.e., spots containing a high concentration of shear wave displacement, controlled by the frame region width at the edge of the resonator. We also demonstrate a novel methodology to arrive at an optimum frame region width for spurious mode suppression and shear wave confinement. This methodology makes use of dispersion curves obtained from finite-element method (FEM) eigenfrequency simulations for arriving at an optimum frame region width. The frame region optimization is demonstrated for solidly mounted resonators employing several shear wave optimized reflector stacks. Finally, the FEM simulation results are compared with measurements for resonators with Ta2O5/ SiO2 stacks showing suppression of the spurious modes.

  12. Frequency effect on streaming phenomenon induced by Rayleigh surface acoustic wave in microdroplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alghane, M.; Fu, Y. Q.; Chen, B. X.; Li, Y.; Desmulliez, M. P. Y.; Walton, A. J.

    2012-10-01

    Acoustic streaming of ink particles inside a water microdroplet generated by a surface acoustic wave (SAW) has been studied numerically using a finite volume numerical method and these results have been verified using experimental measurements. Effects of SAW excitation frequency, droplet volume, and radio-frequency (RF) power are investigated, and it has been shown that SAW excitation frequency influences the SAW attenuation length, lSAW, and hence the acoustic energy absorbed by liquid. It has also been observed that an increase of excitation frequency generally enhances the SAW streaming behavior. However, when the frequency exceeds a critical value that depends on the RF power applied to the SAW device, weaker acoustic streaming is observed resulting in less effective acoustic mixing inside the droplet. This critical value is characterised by a dimensionless ratio of droplet radius to SAW attenuation length, i.e., Rd/lSAW. With a mean value of Rd/lSAW ≈ 1, a fast and efficient mixing can be induced, even at the lowest RF power of 0.05 mW studied in this paper. On the other hand, for the Rd/lSAW ratios much larger than ˜1, significant decreases in streaming velocities were observed, resulting in a transition from regular (strong) to irregular (weak) mixing/flow. This is attributed to an increased absorption rate of acoustic wave energy that leaks into the liquid, resulting in a reduction of the acoustic energy radiated away from the SAW interaction region towards the droplet free surface. It has been demonstrated in this study that a fast and efficient mixing process with a smaller RF power could be achieved if the ratio of Rd/lSAW ≤ 1 in the SAW-droplet based microfluidics.

  13. Fabrication, Operation and Flow Visualization in Surface-acoustic-wave-driven Acoustic-counterflow Microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Travagliati, Marco; Shilton, Richie; Beltram, Fabio; Cecchini, Marco

    2013-01-01

    Surface acoustic waves (SAWs) can be used to drive liquids in portable microfluidic chips via the acoustic counterflow phenomenon. In this video we present the fabrication protocol for a multilayered SAW acoustic counterflow device. The device is fabricated starting from a lithium niobate (LN) substrate onto which two interdigital transducers (IDTs) and appropriate markers are patterned. A polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) channel cast on an SU8 master mold is finally bonded on the patterned substrate. Following the fabrication procedure, we show the techniques that allow the characterization and operation of the acoustic counterflow device in order to pump fluids through the PDMS channel grid. We finally present the procedure to visualize liquid flow in the channels. The protocol is used to show on-chip fluid pumping under different flow regimes such as laminar flow and more complicated dynamics characterized by vortices and particle accumulation domains. PMID:24022515

  14. Surface wave acoustics of granular packing under gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Clement, Eric; Andreotti, Bruno; Bonneau, Lenaic

    2009-06-18

    Due to the non-linearity of Hertzian contacts, the speed of sound in granular matter increases with pressure. For a packing under gravity and in the presence of a free surface, bulk acoustic waves cannot propagate due to the inherent refraction toward the surface (the mirage effect). Thus, only modes corresponding to surface waves (Raleigh-Hertz modes) are able to propagate the acoustic signal. First, based on a non-linear elasticity model, we describe the main features associated to these surface waves. We show that under gravity, a granular packing is from the acoustic propagation point of view an index gradient waveguide that selects modes of two distinct families i.e. the sagittal and transverse waves localized in the vicinity of the free surface. A striking feature of these surface waves is the multi-modal propagation: for both transverse and sagittal waves, we show the existence of a infinite but discrete series of propagating modes. In each case, we determine the mode shape and and the corresponding dispersion relation. In the case of a finite size system, a geometric waveguide is superimposed to the index gradient wave guide. In this later case, the dispersion relations are modified by the appearance of a cut-off frequency that scales with depth. The second part is devoted to an experimental study of surface waves propagating in a granular packing confined in a long channel. This set-up allows to tune a monomodal emission by taking advantage of the geometric waveguide features combined with properly designed emitters. For both sagittal and transverses waves, we were able to isolate a single mode (the fundamental one) and to plot the dispersion relation. This measurements agree well with the Hertzian scaling law as predicted by meanfield models. Furthermore, it allows us to determine quantitatively relations on the elastic moduli. However, we observe that our data yield a shear modulus abnormally weak when compared to several meanfield predictions.

  15. Development of Surface Acoustic Wave-Based Microgyroscope Utilizing Progressive Wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Haekwan; Yang, Sangsik; Lee, Keekeun

    2010-06-01

    An 80 MHz surface acoustic wave (SAW)-based gyroscope utilizing a progressive wave was developed on a 128° YX LiNbO3 piezoelectric substrate. The sensor developed consists of two SAW oscillators in which one is used as the sensing element and has metallic dots in the cavity between input and output interdigital transducers (IDTs). The other is used as the reference element. Coupling of modes (COM) modeling was conducted to determine the optimal device parameters prior to fabrication. On the basis of the simulation results, the device was fabricated and then measured on a rate table. When the device was subjected to an angular rotation, oscillation frequency differences between the two oscillators were observed because of the Coriolis force acting on the metallic dots. Depending on the angular velocity, the difference in oscillation frequency was modulated. The obtained sensitivity was approximately 52.35 Hz deg-1 s-1 at an angular rate range of 0-1000 deg/s. Device performances at different mass weights, mass positions, and temperatures were characterized. Good thermal stability was also observed during the evaluation process.

  16. On the correlation of plume centerline velocity decay of turbulent acoustically excited jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonglahn, Uwe H.

    1987-01-01

    Acoustic excitation was shown to alter the velocity decay and spreading characteristics of jet plumes by modifying the large-scale structures in the plume shear layer. The present work consists of reviewing and analyzing available published and unpublished experimental data in order to determine the importance and magnitude of the several variables that contribute to plume modification by acoustic excitation. Included in the study were consideration of the effects of internal and external acoustic excitation, excitation Strouhal number, acoustic excitation level, nozzle size, and flow conditions. The last include jet Mach number and jet temperature. The effects of these factors on the plume centerline velocity decay are then summarized in an overall empirical correlation.

  17. Limit velocities of lamb waves: Analytic and numerical studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avershieva, A. V.; Goldstein, R. V.; Kuznetsov, S. V.

    2016-09-01

    The Lamb wave propagation in elastic isotropic and orthotropic layers is studied by numerical and analytic methods. An analytic solution is obtained by using the Cauchy formalism for the entire frequency range. Numerical solutions are obtained in a neighborhood of the second limit velocity corresponding to very small frequencies. The influence of variations in the layer geometry on the dispersion curves is studied.

  18. Normal Wave Propagation Velocity in a Static Web.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-12-01

    34 " " ’ . " . " . " " . " , " " . " -" " " " . " " . " " " " . " * . - " " " , 4 . " . " . " " " . " " "." "-" "." " . . . . . " " " " -w A- INah . . . . . . - - 1 NORMAL WAVE PROPAGATION VELOCITY IN A STATIC WEB By

  19. The stress-induced surface wave velocity variations in concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spalvier, Agustin; Bittner, James; Evani, Sai Kalyan; Popovics, John S.

    2017-02-01

    This investigation studies the behavior of surface wave velocity in concrete specimens subjected to low levels of compressive and tensile stress in beams from applied flexural loads. Beam specimen is loaded in a 4-point-load bending configuration, generating uniaxial compression and tension stress fields at the top and bottom surfaces of the beam, respectively. Surface waves are generated through contactless air-coupled transducers and received through contact accelerometers. Results show a clear distinction in responses from compression and tension zones, where velocity increases in the former and decreases in the latter, with increasing load levels. These trends agree with existing acoustoelastic literature. Surface wave velocity tends to decrease more under tension than it tends to increase under compression, for equal load levels. It is observed that even at low stress levels, surface wave velocity is affected by acoustoelastic effects, coupled with plastic effects (stress-induced damage). The acoustoelastic effect is isolated by means of considering the Kaiser effect and by experimentally mitigating the viscoelastic effects of concrete. Results of this ongoing investigation contribute to the overall knowledge of the acoustoelastic behavior of concrete. Applications of this knowledge may include structural health monitoring of members under flexural loads, improved high order modelling of materials, and validation of results seen in dynamic acoustoelasticity testing.

  20. Finite Difference Numerical Modeling of Gravito-Acoustic Wave Propagation in a Windy and Attenuating Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brissaud, Q.; Garcia, R.; Martin, R.; Komatitsch, D.

    2015-12-01

    The acoustic and gravity waves propagating in the planetary atmospheres have been studied intensively as markers of specific phenomena (tectonic events, explosions) or as contributors to the atmosphere dynamics. To get a better understanding of the physic behind these dynamic processes, both acoustic and gravity waves propagation should be modeled in an attenuating and windy 3D atmosphere from the ground to the upper thermosphere. Thus, In order to provide an efficient numerical tool at the regional or the global scale a high order finite difference time domain (FDTD) approach is proposed that relies on the linearized compressible Navier-Stokes equations (Landau 1959) with non constant physical parameters (density, viscosities and speed of sound) and background velocities (wind). One significant benefit from this code is its versatility. Indeed, it handles both acoustic and gravity waves in the same simulation that enables one to observe correlations between the two. Simulations will also be performed on 2D/3D realistic cases such as tsunamis in a full MSISE-00 atmosphere and gravity-wave generation through atmospheric explosions. Computations are validated by comparison to well-known analytical solutions based on dispersion relations in specific benchmark cases (atmospheric explosion and bottom displacement forcing).

  1. ML shear wave velocity tomography for the Iranian Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maheri-Peyrov, Mehdi; Ghods, Abdolreza; Abbasi, Madjid; Bergman, Eric; Sobouti, Farhad

    2016-04-01

    Iranian Plateau reflects several different tectonic styles of collision, and large-scale strike-slip faults. We calculate a high-resolution 2-D ML shear velocity map for the Iranian Plateau to detect lateral crustal thickness changes associated with different tectonic boundaries. The ML velocity is very sensitive to strong lateral variations of crustal thickness and varies between the velocity of Lg and Sn phases. Our data set consists of 65 795 ML amplitude velocity measurements from 2531 precisely relocated events recorded by Iranian networks in the period 1996-2014. Using a constrained least-squares inversion scheme, we inverted the ML velocities for a 2-D shear velocity map of Iran. Our results show that the Zagros and South Caspian Basin (SCB) have shear wave velocities close to the Sn phase, and are thus Lg-blocking regions. High velocities in the High Zagros and the Simply Folded Belt imply significant crustal undulations within these zones. We note that in the central and south Zagros, the velocity border between the Zagros and central Iran is not coincident with the Zagros suture line that marks underthrusting of the Arabian plate beneath central Iran. The low plains of Gilan and Gorgan to the south of the Caspian Sea show high shear velocities similar to the SCB, implying that they are either underlain by an oceanic type crust or a transitional crust with a strong lateral crustal thickness gradient. The Lut block is an Lg-passing block implying that it is not surrounded by any sudden crustal thickness changes along its borders with central Iran. In the Alborz, NW Iran, Kopeh-Dagh, Binalud and most of the central Iran, low shear velocity near the Lg velocity is attributed to smooth or minor Moho undulations within these regions.

  2. Synchronization of self-excited dust acoustic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suranga Ruhunusiri, W. D.; Goree, John

    2012-10-01

    Synchronization is a nonlinear phenomenon where a self-excited oscillation, like a wave in a plasma, interacts with an external driving, resulting in an adjustment of the oscillation frequency. Dust acoustic wave synchronization has been experimentally studied previously in laboratory and in microgravity conditions, e.g. [Pilch PoP 2009] and [Menzel PRL 2010]. We perform a laboratory experiment to study synchronization of self-excited dust acoustic waves. An rf glow discharge argon plasma is formed by applying a low power radio frequency voltage to a lower electrode. A 3D dust cloud is formed by levitating 4.83 micron microspheres inside a glass box placed on the lower electrode. Dust acoustic waves are self-excited with a natural frequency of 22 Hz due to an ion streaming instability. A cross section of the dust cloud is illuminated by a vertical laser sheet and imaged from the side with a digital camera. To synchronize the waves, we sinusoidally modulate the overall ion density. Differently from previous experiments, we use a driving electrode that is separate from the electrode that sustains the plasma, and we characterize synchronization by varying both driving amplitude and frequency.

  3. Langasite Surface Acoustic Wave Sensors: Fabrication and Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Peng; Greve, David W.; Oppenheim, Irving J.; Chin, Tao-Lun; Malone, Vanessa

    2012-02-01

    We report on the development of harsh-environment surface acoustic wave sensors for wired and wireless operation. Surface acoustic wave devices with an interdigitated transducer emitter and multiple reflectors were fabricated on langasite substrates. Both wired and wireless temperature sensing was demonstrated using radar-mode (pulse) detection. Temperature resolution of better than ±0.5°C was achieved between 200°C and 600°C. Oxygen sensing was achieved by depositing a layer of ZnO on the propagation path. Although the ZnO layer caused additional attenuation of the surface wave, oxygen sensing was accomplished at temperatures up to 700°C. The results indicate that langasite SAW devices are a potential solution for harsh-environment gas and temperature sensing.

  4. Image reconstruction with acoustic radiation force induced shear waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAleavey, Stephen A.; Nightingale, Kathryn R.; Stutz, Deborah L.; Hsu, Stephen J.; Trahey, Gregg E.

    2003-05-01

    Acoustic radiation force may be used to induce localized displacements within tissue. This phenomenon is used in Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse Imaging (ARFI), where short bursts of ultrasound deliver an impulsive force to a small region. The application of this transient force launches shear waves which propagate normally to the ultrasound beam axis. Measurements of the displacements induced by the propagating shear wave allow reconstruction of the local shear modulus, by wave tracking and inversion techniques. Here we present in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo measurements and images of shear modulus. Data were obtained with a single transducer, a conventional ultrasound scanner and specialized pulse sequences. Young's modulus values of 4 kPa, 13 kPa and 14 kPa were observed for fat, breast fibroadenoma, and skin. Shear modulus anisotropy in beef muscle was observed.

  5. Homomorphic processing of the tube wave generated during acoustic logging

    SciTech Connect

    Ellefsen, K.J. ); Cheng, C.H. . Dept. of Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences); Burns, D.R.

    1993-10-01

    The authors have developed a new method to process the tube wave, which is generated during acoustic logging, to obtain estimates for its wavenumber, attenuation coefficient, amplitude, and phase at every frequency. To improve the accuracy of the estimates, the method can use data from multiple sources and data collected at successive depths in the borehole. This new method has several advantages over other methods that are currently used to process acoustic logging data: the new method can obtain accurate estimates of the wavenumber and amplitude from only a few receivers; the receivers can be irregularly spaced; and no spurious estimates are generated. Nonetheless, this new method has one disadvantage compared to others: it can only estimate the parameters for one, high-amplitude wave like the tube wave. Also, like all other existing methods, the new method obtains only reasonable estimates for the attenuation coefficient when data from many receivers are processed.

  6. Ultrasonic wave velocity in the restructuring of disperse media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koltsova, I. S.; Khomutova, A. S.; Deinega, M. A.

    2016-03-01

    The ultrasonic wave velocities in the restructuring of disperse media were measured using interference and pulsed techniques and the coefficient of reflection in suspensions of starch, Al2O3, and SiO2 particles, glass bulbs, their porous sediments, and composites of Fe3O4 particles in 10% gelatin aqueous solution at a frequency of 3 MHz. The experiments showed alternating variation in the concentration velocity coefficient during the transition of the dispersed phase concentration from the subpercolation to percolation region. The minimum ultrasonic wave velocity in the region of discrete clusters correlates with the ratio between the particle and matrix densities. The results obtained are explained using the Isakovich, Chaban, Rytov, Biot, Hausdorff, and other theories.

  7. Propagation velocity of Alfven wave packets in a dissipative plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Amagishi, Y.; Nakagawa, H. ); Tanaka, M. )

    1994-09-01

    We have experimentally studied the behavior of Alfven wave packets in a dissipative plasma due to ion--neutral-atom collisions. It is urged that the central frequency of the packet is observed to gradually decrease with traveling distance in the absorption range of frequencies because of a differential damping among the Fourier components, and that the measured average velocity of its peak amplitude is not accounted for by the conventional group velocity, but by the prediction derived by Tanaka, Fujiwara, and Ikegami [Phys. Rev. A 34, 4851 (1986)]. Furthermore, when the initial central frequency is close to the critical frequency in the anomalous dispersion, the wave packet apparently collapses when traveling along the magnetic field; however, we have found that it is decomposed into another two wave packets with the central frequencies being higher or lower than the critical frequency.

  8. Precise tailoring of acoustic velocity in optical fibers by hydrogenation and UV exposure.

    PubMed

    Kong, Fanting; Dong, Liang

    2012-12-03

    Tailoring of acoustic properties in solids has many potential applications in both acoustics, i.e. acoustic gratings and waveguides, and photon-phonon interactions, i.e. stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS). One immediate application is in the area of SBS suppression in optical fibers. We demonstrate, for the first time, a post-processing technique where hydrogen is diffused in to a fiber core and then locally and permanently bonded to core glass by a subsequent UV exposure. It is discovered that local acoustic velocity can be altered by as much as ~2% this way, with strong potential for much further improvements with an increased hydrogen pressure. It is also found that the large change in acoustic velocity is primarily due to a reduction in bulk modulus, possibly as a result of network bonds being broken up by the addition of OH bonds. It is possible to use this technique to precisely tailor acoustic velocity along a fiber for more optimized SBS suppression in a fiber amplifier. Change in Brillouin Stokes frequency of ~320MHz at 1.064μm was observed.

  9. Excitation of Ion Acoustic Waves by Electron Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sydorenko, Dmytro; Tokluoglu, Erinc; Kaganovich, Igor; Startsev, Edward; Davidson, Ronald

    2012-10-01

    The interaction of electron beams with plasmas is of considerable importance particularly for hybrid DC/RF coupled plasma sources used in plasma processing [1]. An electron beam is formed by emission from one surface, is accelerated through a dc bias electric field and enters the bulk plasma. Emitted electrons excite electron plasma (Langmuir) waves through the two-stream instability. Due to the high localized plasmon pressure, ion acoustic waves are excited parametrically. The plasma waves saturate by non-linear wave trapping. Eventually coupling between electron plasma waves and ion acoustic waves deteriorates the Langmuir waves, which leads to a bursting behavior. The two-stream instability and the consequent ion fluctuations are studied over a wide range of system parameters using the particle-in-cell codes EDIPIC and LSP. The influenceof these instabilities on collisionless electron heating are presented for a hybrid RF-DC plasma source.[4pt] [1] Lin Xu, et al, Appl. Phys. Lett., 93, 261502 (2008).

  10. Comparing shear-wave velocity profiles inverted from multichannel surface wave with borehole measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Xia, J.; Miller, R.D.; Park, C.B.; Hunter, J.A.; Harris, J.B.; Ivanov, J.

    2002-01-01

    Recent field tests illustrate the accuracy and consistency of calculating near-surface shear (S)-wave velocities using multichannel analysis of surface waves (MASW). S-wave velocity profiles (S-wave velocity vs. depth) derived from MASW compared favorably to direct borehole measurements at sites in Kansas, British Columbia, and Wyoming. Effects of changing the total number of recording channels, sampling interval, source offset, and receiver spacing on the inverted S-wave velocity were studied at a test site in Lawrence, Kansas. On the average, the difference between MASW calculated Vs and borehole measured Vs in eight wells along the Fraser River in Vancouver, Canada was less than 15%. One of the eight wells was a blind test well with the calculated overall difference between MASW and borehole measurements less than 9%. No systematic differences were observed in derived Vs values from any of the eight test sites. Surface wave analysis performed on surface data from Wyoming provided S-wave velocities in near-surface materials. Velocity profiles from MASW were confirmed by measurements based on suspension log analysis. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. A surface-acoustic-wave-based cantilever bio-sensor.

    PubMed

    De Simoni, Giorgio; Signore, Giovanni; Agostini, Matteo; Beltram, Fabio; Piazza, Vincenzo

    2015-06-15

    A scalable surface-acoustic-wave- (SAW-) based cantilevered device for portable bio-chemical sensing applications is presented. Even in the current, proof-of-principle implementation this architecture is shown to outperform commercial quartz-crystal microbalances in terms of sensitivity. Adhesion of analytes on a functionalized surface of the cantilever shifts the resonant frequency of a SAW-generating transducer due to the stress-induced variation of the speed of surface acoustic modes. We discuss the relevance of this approach for diagnostics applications based on miniaturized devices.

  12. Synchronized photonic modulators driven by surface acoustic waves.

    PubMed

    Crespo-Poveda, A; Hey, R; Biermann, K; Tahraoui, A; Santos, P V; Gargallo, B; Muñoz, P; Cantarero, A; de Lima, M M

    2013-09-09

    Photonic modulators are one of the most important elements of integrated photonics. We have designed, fabricated, and characterized a tunable photonic modulator consisting of two 180°-dephased output waveguide channels, driven by a surface acoustic wave in the GHz frequency range built on (Al,Ga)As. Odd multiples of the fundamental driven frequency are enabled by adjusting the applied acoustic power. A good agreement between theory and experimental results is achieved. The device can be used as a building block for more complex integrated functionalities and can be implemented in several material platforms.

  13. Coupling between ion-acoustic waves and neutrino oscillations.

    PubMed

    Haas, Fernando; Pascoal, Kellen Alves; Mendonça, José Tito

    2017-01-01

    The work investigates the coupling between ion-acoustic waves and neutrino flavor oscillations in a nonrelativistic electron-ion plasma under the influence of a mixed neutrino beam. Neutrino oscillations are mediated by the flavor polarization vector dynamics in a material medium. The linear dispersion relation around homogeneous static equilibria is developed. When resonant with the ion-acoustic mode, the neutrino flavor oscillations can transfer energy to the plasma exciting a new fast unstable mode in extreme astrophysical scenarios. The growth rate and the unstable wavelengths are determined in typical type II supernova parameters. The predictions can be useful for a new indirect probe on neutrino oscillations in nature.

  14. Coupling between ion-acoustic waves and neutrino oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haas, Fernando; Pascoal, Kellen Alves; Mendonça, José Tito

    2017-01-01

    The work investigates the coupling between ion-acoustic waves and neutrino flavor oscillations in a nonrelativistic electron-ion plasma under the influence of a mixed neutrino beam. Neutrino oscillations are mediated by the flavor polarization vector dynamics in a material medium. The linear dispersion relation around homogeneous static equilibria is developed. When resonant with the ion-acoustic mode, the neutrino flavor oscillations can transfer energy to the plasma exciting a new fast unstable mode in extreme astrophysical scenarios. The growth rate and the unstable wavelengths are determined in typical type II supernova parameters. The predictions can be useful for a new indirect probe on neutrino oscillations in nature.

  15. Full-circular surface acoustic wave excitation for high resolution acoustic microscopy using spherical lens and time gate technology.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, I; Katakura, K; Ogura, Y

    1999-01-01

    With a fixed gate width under the condition where the focus of an acoustic lens was set inside the sample, we varied signal taking-in time. Discrimination was made between differences in time required for an ultrasonic signal reflected from the sample to reach the acoustic lens. This process also enabled three types of images to be obtained separately: the surface reflection wave image, a combination of images based on the interference of the surface reflection wave with surface acoustic waves, and the surface acoustic wave image. Thus it was presumed that this process also would reveal the causes of image contrast and allow an easy interpretation of images. Furthermore, the image resolution was improved, because the surface acoustic wave image was drawn by an ultrasonic beam produced by full-circular surface acoustic wave excitation propagating toward the center converging concentrically; the theoretical resolution was 0.4 times the value of the surface acoustic wave wavelength lambda(R) and independent of the defocus value of the acoustic lens. Several kinds of samples were observed with this method. The results showed that the new method permitted observation of the internal structures of samples while offering new knowledge through the data reflecting the ultrasonic wave damping and scatter drawn on the display.

  16. Making structured metals transparent for ultrabroadband electromagnetic waves and acoustic waves

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Ren-Hao; Peng, Ru-Wen; Huang, Xian-Rong; Wang, Mu

    2015-07-15

    In this review, we present our recent work on making structured metals transparent for broadband electromagnetic waves and acoustic waves via excitation of surface waves. First, we theoretically show that one-dimensional metallic gratings can become transparent and completely antireflective for extremely broadband electromagnetic waves by relying on surface plasmons or spoof surface plasmons. Second, we experimentally demonstrate that metallic gratings with narrow slits are highly transparent for broadband terahertz waves at oblique incidence and high transmission efficiency is insensitive to the metal thickness. Further, we significantly develop oblique metal gratings transparent for broadband electromagnetic waves (including optical waves and terahertz ones) under normal incidence. In the third, we find the principles of broadband transparency for structured metals can be extended from one-dimensional metallic gratings to two-dimensional cases. Moreover, similar phenomena are found in sonic artificially metallic structures, which present the transparency for broadband acoustic waves. These investigations provide guidelines to develop many novel materials and devices, such as transparent conducting panels, antireflective solar cells, and other broadband metamaterials and stealth technologies. - Highlights: • Making structured metals transparent for ultrabroadband electromagnetic waves. • Non-resonant excitation of surface plasmons or spoof surface plasmons. • Sonic artificially metallic structures transparent for broadband acoustic waves.

  17. AlScN thin film based surface acoustic wave devices with enhanced microfluidic performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, W. B.; Fu, Y. Q.; Chen, J. J.; Xuan, W. P.; Chen, J. K.; Wang, X. Z.; Mayrhofer, P.; Duan, P. F.; Bittner, A.; Schmid, U.; Luo, J. K.

    2016-07-01

    This paper reports the characterization of scandium aluminum nitride (Al1-x Sc x N, x  =  27%) films and discusses surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices based on them. Both AlScN and AlN films were deposited on silicon by sputtering and possessed columnar microstructures with (0 0 0 2) crystal orientation. The AlScN/Si SAW devices showed improved electromechanical coupling coefficients (K 2, ~2%) compared with pure AlN films (<0.5%). The performance of the two types of devices was also investigated and compared, using acoustofluidics as an example. The AlScN/Si SAW devices achieved much lower threshold powers for the acoustic streaming and pumping of liquid droplets, and the acoustic streaming and pumping velocities were 2  ×  and 3  ×  those of the AlN/Si SAW devices, respectively. Mechanical characterization showed that the Young’s modulus and hardness of the AlN film decreased significantly when Sc was doped, and this was responsible for the decreased acoustic velocity and resonant frequency, and the increased temperature coefficient of frequency, of the AlScN SAW devices.

  18. A three-microphone acoustic reflection technique using transmitted acoustic waves in the airway.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Yuki; Huang, Jyongsu; Fukunaga, Toshiharu; Kato, Ryo; Higashino, Mari; Shinomiya, Shohei; Kitadate, Shoko; Takahara, Yutaka; Yamaya, Atsuyo; Saito, Masatoshi; Kobayashi, Makoto; Kojima, Koji; Oikawa, Taku; Nakagawa, Ken; Tsuchihara, Katsuma; Iguchi, Masaharu; Takahashi, Masakatsu; Mizuno, Shiro; Osanai, Kazuhiro; Toga, Hirohisa

    2013-10-15

    The acoustic reflection technique noninvasively measures airway cross-sectional area vs. distance functions and uses a wave tube with a constant cross-sectional area to separate incidental and reflected waves introduced into the mouth or nostril. The accuracy of estimated cross-sectional areas gets worse in the deeper distances due to the nature of marching algorithms, i.e., errors of the estimated areas in the closer distances accumulate to those in the further distances. Here we present a new technique of acoustic reflection from measuring transmitted acoustic waves in the airway with three microphones and without employing a wave tube. Using miniaturized microphones mounted on a catheter, we estimated reflection coefficients among the microphones and separated incidental and reflected waves. A model study showed that the estimated cross-sectional area vs. distance function was coincident with the conventional two-microphone method, and it did not change with altered cross-sectional areas at the microphone position, although the estimated cross-sectional areas are relative values to that at the microphone position. The pharyngeal cross-sectional areas including retropalatal and retroglossal regions and the closing site during sleep was visualized in patients with obstructive sleep apnea. The method can be applicable to larger or smaller bronchi to evaluate the airspace and function in these localized airways.

  19. A Void Fraction Characterisation by Low Frequency Acoustic Velocity Measurements in Microbubble Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavaro, Matthieu

    Low frequency acoustic velocity measurements have been applied for the characterization of microbubble clouds generated in water. This method, based on the Wood's model (1941) links the acoustic velocity throughout a two-phase medium to its void fraction value. Low frequency means below resonance frequencies of the bubbles inside the cloud. An original bench was developed to allow the qualification of this method. The experiments conducted allowed us to characterize void fraction values between 10-3 and 10-7. The radii of the studied microbubbles are between a few micrometers and a hundred micrometers.

  20. Non-linear wave propagation in acoustically lined circular ducts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nayfeh, A. H.; Tsai, M.-S.

    1974-01-01

    An analysis is presented of the nonlinear effects of the gas motion as well as of the acoustic lining material on the transmission and attenuation of sound in a circular duct with a uniform cross-section and no mean flow. The acoustic material is characterized by an empirical, nonlinear impedance in which the instantaneous resistance is a nonlinear function of both the frequency and the acoustic velocity. The results show that there exist frequency bandwidths around the resonant frequencies in which the nonlinearity decreases the attenuation rate, and outside which the nonlinearity increases the attenuation rate, in qualitative agreement with experimental observations. Moreover, the effect of the gas nonlinearity increases with increasing sound frequency, whereas the effect of the material nonlinearity decreases with increasing sound frequency.

  1. Diffraction of dust acoustic waves by a circular cylinder

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.-H.; Heinrich, J. R.; Merlino, R. L.

    2008-09-15

    The diffraction of dust acoustic (DA) waves around a long dielectric rod is observed using video imaging methods. The DA waves are spontaneously excited in a dusty plasma produced in a direct current glow discharge plasma. The rod acquires a negative charge that produces a coaxial dust void around it. The diameter of the void is the effective size of the 'obstacle' encountered by the waves. The wavelength of the DA waves is approximately the size of the void. The observations are considered in relation to the classical problem of the diffraction of sound waves from a circular cylinder, a problem first analyzed by Lord Rayleigh [Theory of Sound, 2nd ed. (MacMillan, London, 1896)].

  2. Nonlinear electron acoustic waves in presence of shear magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Dutta, Manjistha; Khan, Manoranjan; Ghosh, Samiran; Chakrabarti, Nikhil

    2013-12-15

    Nonlinear electron acoustic waves are studied in a quasineutral plasma in the presence of a variable magnetic field. The fluid model is used to describe the dynamics of two temperature electron species in a stationary positively charged ion background. Linear analysis of the governing equations manifests dispersion relation of electron magneto sonic wave. Whereas, nonlinear wave dynamics is being investigated by introducing Lagrangian variable method in long wavelength limit. It is shown from finite amplitude analysis that the nonlinear wave characteristics are well depicted by KdV equation. The wave dispersion arising in quasineutral plasma is induced by transverse magnetic field component. The results are discussed in the context of plasma of Earth's magnetosphere.

  3. Inverse Scattering Problems for Acoustic Waves in AN Inhomogeneous Medium.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kedzierawski, Andrzej Wladyslaw

    1990-01-01

    This dissertation considers the inverse scattering problem of determining either the absorption of sound in an inhomogeneous medium or the surface impedance of an obstacle from a knowledge of the far-field patterns of the scattered fields corresponding to many incident time -harmonic plane waves. First, we consider the inverse problem in the case when the scattering object is an inhomogeneous medium with complex refraction index having compact support. Our approach to this problem is the orthogonal projection method of Colton-Monk (cf. The inverse scattering problem for time acoustic waves in an inhomogeneous medium, Quart. J. Mech. Appl. Math. 41 (1988), 97-125). After that, we prove the analogue of Karp's Theorem for the scattering of acoustic waves through an inhomogeneous medium with compact support. We then generalize some of these results to the case when the inhomogeneous medium is no longer of compact support. If the acoustic wave penetrates the inhomogeneous medium by only a small amount then the inverse medium problem leads to the inverse obstacle problem with an impedance boundary condition. We solve the inverse impedance problem of determining the surface impedance of an obstacle of known shape by using both the methods of Kirsch-Kress and Colton-Monk (cf. R. Kress, Linear Integral Equations, Springer-Verlag, New York, 1989).

  4. A frequency selective acoustic transducer for directional Lamb wave sensing.

    PubMed

    Senesi, Matteo; Ruzzene, Massimo

    2011-10-01

    A frequency selective acoustic transducer (FSAT) is proposed for directional sensing of guided waves. The considered FSAT design is characterized by a spiral configuration in wavenumber domain, which leads to a spatial arrangement of the sensing material producing output signals whose dominant frequency component is uniquely associated with the direction of incoming waves. The resulting spiral FSAT can be employed both for directional sensing and generation of guided waves, without relying on phasing and control of a large number of channels. The analytical expression of the shape of the spiral FSAT is obtained through the theoretical formulation for continuously distributed active material as part of a shaped piezoelectric device. Testing is performed by forming a discrete array through the points of the measurement grid of a scanning laser Doppler vibrometer. The discrete array approximates the continuous spiral FSAT geometry, and provides the flexibility to test several configurations. The experimental results demonstrate the strong frequency dependent directionality of the spiral FSAT and suggest its application for frequency selective acoustic sensors, to be employed for the localization of broadband acoustic events, or for the directional generation of Lamb waves for active interrogation of structural health.

  5. Hammering Yucca Flat, Part Two: Shear-Wave Velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finlay, T. S.; Abbott, R. E.; Knox, H. A.; Tang, D. G.; James, S. R.; Haney, M. M.; Hampshire, J. B., II

    2015-12-01

    In preparation for the next phase of the Source Physics Experiment (SPE), we conducted an active-source seismic survey of Yucca Flat, Nevada, on the Nevada National Security Site. Results from this survey will be used to inform the geologic models associated with the SPE project. For this study, we used a novel 13,000 kilogram weight-drop seismic source to interrogate an 18-km North-South transect of Yucca Flat. Source points were spaced every 200 meters and were recorded by 350 to 380 3-component 2-Hz geophones with variable spacings of 10, 20, and 100 meters. We utilized the Refraction-Microtremor (ReMi) technique to create multiple 1D dispersion curves, which were then inverted for shear-wave velocity profiles using the Dix inversion method (Tsai and Haney, 2015). Each of these 1D velocity models was subsequently stitched together to create a 2D profile over the survey area. The dispersion results indicate a general decrease in surface-wave phase velocity to the south. This result is supported by slower shear-wave velocity sediments and increasing basin depth towards the survey's southern extent. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  6. Noninvasive determination of pulse-wave velocity in mice.

    PubMed

    Hartley, C J; Taffet, G E; Michael, L H; Pham, T T; Entman, M L

    1997-07-01

    Some transgenic mice have abnormal vascular function, but arterial geometry and dynamics are difficult to evaluate. To examine whether ultrasonic velocimetry could be used to determine arterial pulse-wave velocity (PWV) in mice, a custom-made 20-MHz pulsed Doppler instrument was used to obtain blood flow velocity signals from the aortic arch and the abdominal aorta 4 cm downstream. The upstroke (foot) of the velocity wave was timed at each site with respect to the R wave of the electrocardiogram, and PWV was calculated by dividing the separation distance by the difference in R-foot times. Doppler determinations were compared with invasive tonometry, and PWV was altered pharmacologically. It was found that the upstrokes of pressure (by tonometry) and velocity were coincident (+/-1 ms) and that PWV could be calculated by either method on exposed vessels. With the use of Doppler methods, pulse transit time was determined noninvasively with +/-1-ms resolution in 140 of 142 attempts in 82 mice. The calculated PWV in mice ranged from 220 to 850 cm/s with vasodilating anesthetics producing the low values and vasoconstricting agents producing the higher values. Thus PWV can be determined noninvasively in mice, is similar to that in other mammals, and responds as expected to vasoactive agents.

  7. Wave-equation migration velocity inversion using passive seismic sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witten, B.; Shragge, J. C.

    2015-12-01

    Seismic monitoring at injection sites (e.g., CO2 sequestration, waste water disposal, hydraulic fracturing) has become an increasingly important tool for hazard identification and avoidance. The information obtained from this data is often limited to seismic event properties (e.g., location, approximate time, moment tensor), the accuracy of which greatly depends on the estimated elastic velocity models. However, creating accurate velocity models from passive array data remains a challenging problem. Common techniques rely on picking arrivals or matching waveforms requiring high signal-to-noise data that is often not available for the magnitude earthquakes observed over injection sites. We present a new method for obtaining elastic velocity information from earthquakes though full-wavefield wave-equation imaging and adjoint-state tomography. The technique exploits the fact that the P- and S-wave arrivals originate at the same time and location in the subsurface. We generate image volumes by back-propagating P- and S-wave data through initial Earth models and then applying a correlation-based extended-imaging condition. Energy focusing away from zero lag in the extended image volume is used as a (penalized) residual in an adjoint-state tomography scheme to update the P- and S-wave velocity models. We use an acousto-elastic approximation to greatly reduce the computational cost. Because the method requires neither an initial source location or origin time estimate nor picking of arrivals, it is suitable for low signal-to-noise datasets, such as microseismic data. Synthetic results show that with a realistic distribution of microseismic sources, P- and S-velocity perturbations can be recovered. Although demonstrated at an oil and gas reservoir scale, the technique can be applied to problems of all scales from geologic core samples to global seismology.

  8. Standing wave acoustic levitation on an annular plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandemir, Mehmet Hakan; Çalışkan, Mehmet

    2016-11-01

    In standing wave acoustic levitation technique, a standing wave is formed between a source and a reflector. Particles can be attracted towards pressure nodes in standing waves owing to a spring action through which particles can be suspended in air. This operation can be performed on continuous structures as well as in several numbers of axes. In this study an annular acoustic levitation arrangement is introduced. Design features of the arrangement are discussed in detail. Bending modes of the annular plate, known as the most efficient sound generation mechanism in such structures, are focused on. Several types of bending modes of the plate are simulated and evaluated by computer simulations. Waveguides are designed to amplify waves coming from sources of excitation, that are, transducers. With the right positioning of the reflector plate, standing waves are formed in the space between the annular vibrating plate and the reflector plate. Radiation forces are also predicted. It is demonstrated that small particles can be suspended in air at pressure nodes of the standing wave corresponding to a particular bending mode.

  9. Mechanical back-action of a spin-wave resonance in a magnetoelastic thin film on a surface acoustic wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gowtham, P. G.; Labanowski, D.; Salahuddin, S.

    2016-07-01

    Surface acoustic waves (SAWs) traveling on the surface of a piezoelectric crystal can, through the magnetoelastic interaction, excite traveling spin-wave resonance in a magnetic film deposited on the substrate. This spin-wave resonance in the magnetic film creates a time-ynamic surface stress of magnetoelastic origin that acts back on the surface of the piezoelectric and modifies the SAW propagation. Unlike previous analyses that treat the excitation as a magnon-phonon polariton, here the magnetoelastic film is treated as a perturbation modifying boundary conditions on the SAW. We use acoustical perturbation theory to find closed-form expressions for the back-action surface stress and strain fields and the resultant SAW velocity shifts and attenuation. We demonstrate that the shear stres fields associated with this spin-wave back-action also generate effective surface currents on the piezoelectric both in phase and out of phase with the driving SAW potential. Characterization of these surface currents and their applications in determination of the magnetoelastic coupling are discussed. The perturbative calculation is carried out explicitly to first order (a regime corresponding to many experimental situations of current interest) and we provide a sketch of the implications of the theory at higher order.

  10. Concepts and Tradeoffs in Velocity Estimation With Plane-Wave Contrast-Enhanced Doppler.

    PubMed

    Tremblay-Darveau, Charles; Williams, Ross; Sheeran, Paul S; Milot, Laurent; Bruce, Matthew; Burns, Peter N

    2016-11-01

    While long Doppler ensembles are, in principle, beneficial for velocity estimates, short acoustic pulses must be used in microbubble contrast-enhanced (CE) Doppler to mitigate microbubble destruction. This introduces inherent tradeoffs in velocity estimates with autocorrelators, which are studied here. A model of the autocorrelation function adapted to the microbubble Doppler signal accounting for transit time, the echo frequency uncertainty, and contrast-agent destruction is derived and validated in vitro. It is further demonstrated that a local measurement of the center frequency of the microbubble echo is essential in order to avoid significant bias in velocity estimates arising from the linear and nonlinear frequency-dependent scattering of microbubbles and compensate for the inherent speckle nature of the received echo frequency. For these reasons, broadband Doppler estimators (2-D autocorrelator and Radon projection) are better suited than simpler narrow-band estimators (1-D autocorrelator and 1-D Fourier transform) for CE flow assessment. A case study of perfusion in a VX-2 carcinoma using CE plane-wave Doppler is also shown. We demonstrate that even when considering all uncertainties associated with microbubble-related decorrelation (destruction, pulse bandwidth, transit time, and flow gradient) and the need for real-time imaging, a coefficient of variation of 4% on the axial velocity is achievable with plane-wave imaging.

  11. Effects of dissipation on propagation of surface electromagnetic and acoustic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagaraj, Nagaraj

    resonant frequencies, which coincide with those observed in the experiment that was performed by Wave Phenomena Group at Polytechnic University of Valencia, Spain. Two eigenmodes with different polarizations and phase velocities are obtained from the dispersion equation. At certain critical aperture of the channel, an interesting cutoff effect, which is unusual for an acoustic wave, is observed for one of the eigenmodes with symmetric distribution of the pressure field. The theoretical prediction of the coupling and synchronization of Rayleigh waves strongly supports the experimentally measured shift of the resonant frequencies in the transmission spectra with channel aperture. The observed high level of absorption may find applications in designing metamaterial acoustic absorbers.

  12. Acoustic and vibration performance evaluations of a velocity sensing hull array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cray, Benjamin A.; Christman, Russell A.

    1996-04-01

    Acoustic and vibration measurements were conducted at the Naval Undersea Warfare Center's Seneca Lake Facility to investigate the in situ signal response of a linear array of velocity sensors (sensors that measure either acoustic particle acceleration, velocity, or displacement have generically been denoted as velocity sensors) on a coating. The coating used at Seneca Lake consisted of air-voided elastomeric tiles with an overall coating thickness of approximately 3 inches. The accelerometer array and coating were mounted on the Seneca Lake Hull Fixture, which measures 33 feet lengthwise with an arc length of 20 feet. The fixture weighs approximately 30 tons. Specifically, measurements of in situ sensitivity, velocity reduction, reflection gain, array beam response, and equivalent planewave self-noise levels are presented.

  13. Accurate group velocity estimation for unmanned aerial vehicle-based acoustic atmospheric tomography.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Kevin J; Finn, Anthony

    2017-02-01

    Acoustic atmospheric tomography calculates temperature and wind velocity fields in a slice or volume of atmosphere based on travel time estimates between strategically located sources and receivers. The technique discussed in this paper uses the natural acoustic signature of an unmanned aerial vehicle as it overflies an array of microphones on the ground. The sound emitted by the aircraft is recorded on-board and by the ground microphones. The group velocities of the intersecting sound rays are then derived by comparing these measurements. Tomographic inversion is used to estimate the temperature and wind fields from the group velocity measurements. This paper describes a technique for deriving travel time (and hence group velocity) with an accuracy of 0.1% using these assets. This is shown to be sufficient to obtain highly plausible tomographic inversion results that correlate well with independent SODAR measurements.

  14. Particle velocity non-uniformity and steady-wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meshcheryakov, Yu. I.

    2017-03-01

    A constitutive equation grounded in dislocation dynamics is shown to be incapable of describing the propagation of shock fronts in solids. Shock wave experiments and theoretical investigations motivate an additional collective mechanism of stress relaxation that should be incorporated into the model through the standard deviation of the particle velocity, which is found to be proportional to the strain rate. In this case, the governing equation system results in a second-order differential equation of square non-linearity. Solution to this equation and calculations for D16 aluminum alloy show a more precise coincidence of the theoretical and experimental velocity profiles.

  15. Zero-group-velocity propagation of electromagnetic wave through nanomaterial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Taian

    This research will investigate the problem on the propagation of electromagnetic wave through a specific nanomaterial. The nanomaterial analyzed is a material consisting of a field of Pt nanorods. This field of Pt nanorods are deposited on a substrate which consists of a RuO2 nano structure. When the nanorod is exposed to an electron beam emitted by a TEM (Transmission electron microscopy). A wave disturbance has been observed. A video taken within the chamber shows a wave with a speed in the scale of um/s (10-6 m/s), which is 14 orders of magnitude lower than speed of light in free space (approximate 3x108 m/s ). A physical and mathematical model is developed to explain this phenomenon. Due to the process of fabrication, the geometry of the decorated Pt nanorod field is assumed to be approximately periodic. The nanomaterials possess properties similar to a photonic crystal. Pt, as a noble metal, shows dispersive behaviours that is different from those ones of a perfect or good conductors. A FDTD algorithm is implemented to calculate the band diagram of the nanomaterials. To explore the dispersive properties of the Pt nanorod field, the FDTD algorithm is corrected with a Drude Model. The analysis of the corrected band diagram illustrates that the group velocity of the wave packet propagating through the nanomaterial can be positive, negative or zero. The possible zero-group velocity is therefore used to explain the extremely low velocity of wave (wave envelope) detected in the TEM.

  16. Measurements of parallel electron velocity distributions using whistler wave absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Thuecks, D. J.; Skiff, F.; Kletzing, C. A.

    2012-08-15

    We describe a diagnostic to measure the parallel electron velocity distribution in a magnetized plasma that is overdense ({omega}{sub pe} > {omega}{sub ce}). This technique utilizes resonant absorption of whistler waves by electrons with velocities parallel to a background magnetic field. The whistler waves were launched and received by a pair of dipole antennas immersed in a cylindrical discharge plasma at two positions along an axial background magnetic field. The whistler wave frequency was swept from somewhat below and up to the electron cyclotron frequency {omega}{sub ce}. As the frequency was swept, the wave was resonantly absorbed by the part of the electron phase space density which was Doppler shifted into resonance according to the relation {omega}-k{sub ||v||} = {omega}{sub ce}. The measured absorption is directly related to the reduced parallel electron distribution function integrated along the wave trajectory. The background theory and initial results from this diagnostic are presented here. Though this diagnostic is best suited to detect tail populations of the parallel electron distribution function, these first results show that this diagnostic is also rather successful in measuring the bulk plasma density and temperature both during the plasma discharge and into the afterglow.

  17. Ultrasonic wave velocity measurement in small polymeric and cortical bone specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohles, S. S.; Bowers, J. R.; Vailas, A. C.; Vanderby, R. Jr

    1997-01-01

    A system was refined for the determination of the bulk ultrasonic wave propagation velocity in small cortical bone specimens. Longitudinal and shear wave propagations were measured using ceramic, piezoelectric 20 and 5 MHz transducers, respectively. Results of the pulse transmission technique were refined via the measurement of the system delay time. The precision and accuracy of the system were quantified using small specimens of polyoxymethylene, polystyrene-butadiene, and high-density polyethylene. These polymeric materials had known acoustic properties, similarity of propagation velocities to cortical bone, and minimal sample inhomogeneity. Dependence of longitudinal and transverse specimen dimensions upon propagation times was quantified. To confirm the consistency of longitudinal wave propagation in small cortical bone specimens (< 1.0 mm), cut-down specimens were prepared from a normal rat femur. Finally, cortical samples were prepared from each of ten normal rat femora, and Young's moduli (Eii), shear moduli (Gij), and Poisson ratios (Vij) were measured. For all specimens (bone, polyoxymethylene, polystyrene-butadiene, and high-density polyethylene), strong linear correlations (R2 > 0.997) were maintained between propagation time and distance throughout the size ranges down to less than 0.4 mm. Results for polyoxymethylene, polystyrene-butadiene, and high-density polyethylene were accurate to within 5 percent of reported literature values. Measurement repeatability (precision) improved with an increase in the wave transmission distance (propagating dimension). No statistically significant effect due to the transverse dimension was detected.

  18. Ultrasonic wave velocity measurement in small polymeric and cortical bone specimens.

    PubMed

    Kohles, S S; Bowers, J R; Vailas, A C; Vanderby, R

    1997-08-01

    A system was refined for the determination of the bulk ultrasonic wave propagation velocity in small cortical bone specimens. Longitudinal and shear wave propagations were measured using ceramic, piezoelectric 20 and 5 MHz transducers, respectively. Results of the pulse transmission technique were refined via the measurement of the system delay time. The precision and accuracy of the system were quantified using small specimens of polyoxymethylene, polystyrene-butadiene, and high-density polyethylene. These polymeric materials had known acoustic properties, similarity of propagation velocities to cortical bone, and minimal sample inhomogeneity. Dependence of longitudinal and transverse specimen dimensions upon propagation times was quantified. To confirm the consistency of longitudinal wave propagation in small cortical bone specimens (< 1.0 mm), cut-down specimens were prepared from a normal rat femur. Finally, cortical samples were prepared from each of ten normal rat femora, and Young's moduli (Eii), shear moduli (Gij), and Poisson ratios (Vij) were measured. For all specimens (bone, polyoxymethylene, polystyrene-butadiene, and high-density polyethylene), strong linear correlations (R2 > 0.997) were maintained between propagation time and distance throughout the size ranges down to less than 0.4 mm. Results for polyoxymethylene, polystyrene-butadiene, and high-density polyethylene were accurate to within 5 percent of reported literature values. Measurement repeatability (precision) improved with an increase in the wave transmission distance (propagating dimension). No statistically significant effect due to the transverse dimension was detected.

  19. Detection of Volatile Organics Using a Surface Acoustic Wave Array System

    SciTech Connect

    ANDERSON, LAWRENCE F.; BARTHOLOMEW, JOHN W.; CERNOSEK, RICHARD W.; COLBURN, CHRISTOPHER W.; CROOKS, R.M.; MARTINEZ, R.F.; OSBOURN, GORDON C.; RICCO, A.J.; STATON, ALAN W.; YELTON, WILLIAM G.

    1999-10-14

    A chemical sensing system based on arrays of surface acoustic wave (SAW) delay lines has been developed for identification and quantification of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The individual SAW chemical sensors consist of interdigital transducers patterned on the surface of an ST-cut quartz substrate to launch and detect the acoustic waves and a thin film coating in the SAW propagation path to perturb the acoustic wave velocity and attenuation during analyte sorption. A diverse set of material coatings gives the sensor arrays a degree of chemical sensitivity and selectivity. Materials examined for sensor application include the alkanethiol-based self-assembled monolayer, plasma-processed films, custom-synthesized conventional polymers, dendrimeric polymers, molecular recognition materials, electroplated metal thin films, and porous metal oxides. All of these materials target a specific chemical fi.mctionality and the enhancement of accessible film surface area. Since no one coating provides absolute analyte specificity, the array responses are further analyzed using a visual-empirical region-of-influence (VERI) pattern recognition algorithm. The chemical sensing system consists of a seven-element SAW array with accompanying drive and control electronics, sensor signal acquisition electronics, environmental vapor sampling hardware, and a notebook computer. Based on data gathered for individual sensor responses, greater than 93%-accurate identification can be achieved for any single analyte from a group of 17 VOCs and water.

  20. A linear acoustic model for intake wave dynamics in IC engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, M. F.; Stanev, P. T.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, a linear acoustic model is described that has proven useful in obtaining a better understanding of the nature of acoustic wave dynamics in the intake system of an internal combustion (IC) engine. The model described has been developed alongside a set of measurements made on a Ricardo E6 single cylinder research engine. The simplified linear acoustic model reported here produces a calculation of the pressure time-history in the port of an IC engine that agrees fairly well with measured data obtained on the engine fitted with a simple intake system. The model has proved useful in identifying the role of pipe resonance in the intake process and has led to the development of a simple hypothesis to explain the structure of the intake pressure time history: the early stages of the intake process are governed by the instantaneous values of the piston velocity and the open area under the valve. Thereafter, resonant wave action dominates the process. The depth of the early depression caused by the moving piston governs the intensity of the wave action that follows. A pressure ratio across the valve that is favourable to inflow is maintained and maximized when the open period of the valve is such to allow at least, but no more than, one complete oscillation of the pressure at its resonant frequency to occur while the valve is open.

  1. Phase Velocity Method for Guided Wave Measurements in Composite Plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, E.; Galarza, N.; Rubio, B.; Otero, J. A.

    Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer is a well-recognized material for aeronautic applications. Its plane structure has been widely used where anisotropic characteristics should be evaluated with flaw detection. A phase velocity method of ultrasonic guided waves based on a pitch-catch configuration is presented for this purpose. Both shear vertical (SV) and shear horizontal (SH) have been studied. For SV (Lamb waves) the measurements were done at different frequencies in order to evaluate the geometrical dispersion and elastic constants. The results for SV are discussed with an orthotropic elastic model. Finally experiments with lamination flaws are presented.

  2. Laser and acoustic Doppler techniques for the measurement of fluid velocities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cliff, W. C.

    1975-01-01

    An overview of current laser and acoustic Doppler techniques is presented. Results obtained by Doppler anemometry and conventional sensors are compared. Comparisons include simultaneous velocity measurements by hot wire and a three-dimensional laser anemometer made in a gaseous pipe flow as well as direct comparisons of atmospheric velocities measured with propeller and cup anemometry. Scanning techniques are also discussed. Conclusions and recommendations for future work are presented.

  3. Dust acoustic waves in strongly coupled dissipative plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, B. S.; Yu, M. Y.

    2000-12-01

    The theory of dust acoustic waves is revisited in the frame of the generalized viscoelastic hydrodynamic theory for highly correlated dusts. Physical processes relevant to many experiments on dusts in plasmas, such as ionization and recombination, dust-charge variation, elastic electron and ion collisions with neutral and charged dust particles, as well as relaxation due to strong dust coupling, are taken into account. These processes can be on similar time scales and are thus important for the conservation of particles and momenta in a self-consistent description of the system. It is shown that the dispersion properties of the dust acoustic waves are determined by a sensitive balance of the effects of strong dust coupling and collisional relaxation. The predictions of the present theory applicable to typical parameters in laboratory strongly coupled dusty plasmas are given and compared with the experiment results. Some possible implications and discrepanies between theory and experiment are also discussed.

  4. High-Temperature Piezoelectric Crystals for Acoustic Wave Sensor Applications.

    PubMed

    Zu, Hongfei; Wu, Huiyan; Wang, Qing-Ming

    2016-03-01

    In this review paper, nine different types of high-temperature piezoelectric crystals and their sensor applications are overviewed. The important materials' properties of these piezoelectric crystals including dielectric constant, elastic coefficients, piezoelectric coefficients, electromechanical coupling coefficients, and mechanical quality factor are discussed in detail. The determination methods of these physical properties are also presented. Moreover, the growth methods, structures, and properties of these piezoelectric crystals are summarized and compared. Of particular interest are langasite and oxyborate crystals, which exhibit no phase transitions prior to their melting points ∼ 1500 °C and possess high electrical resistivity, piezoelectric coefficients, and mechanical quality factor at ultrahigh temperature ( ∼ 1000 °C). Finally, some research results on surface acoustic wave (SAW) and bulk acoustic wave (BAW) sensors developed using this high-temperature piezoelectric crystals are discussed.

  5. HF Doppler observations of acoustic waves excited by the earthquake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ichinose, T.; Takagi, K.; Tanaka, T.; Okuzawa, T.; Shibata, T.; Sato, Y.; Nagasawa, C.; Ogawa, T.

    1985-01-01

    Ionospheric disturbances caused by the earthquake of a relatively small and large epicentral distance have been detected by a network of HF-Doppler sounders in central Japan and Kyoto station, respectively. The HF-Doppler data of a small epicentral distance, together with the seismic data, have been used to formulate a mechanism whereby ionospheric disturbances are produced by the Urakawa-Oki earthquake in Japan. Comparison of the dynamic spectra of these data has revealed experimentally that the atmosphere acts as a low-pass filter for upward-propagating acoustic waves. By surveying the earthquakes for which the magnitude M is larger than 6.0, researchers found the ionospheric effect in 16 cases of 82 seismic events. As almost all these effects have occurred in the daytime, it is considered that it may result from the filtering effect of the upward-propagating acoustic waves.

  6. Scanning Michelson interferometer for imaging surface acoustic wave fields.

    PubMed

    Knuuttila, J V; Tikka, P T; Salomaa, M M

    2000-05-01

    A scanning homodyne Michelson interferometer is constructed for two-dimensional imaging of high-frequency surface acoustic wave (SAW) fields in SAW devices. The interferometer possesses a sensitivity of ~10(-5)nm/ radicalHz , and it is capable of directly measuring SAW's with frequencies ranging from 0.5 MHz up to 1 GHz. The fast scheme used for locating the optimum operation point of the interferometer facilitates high measuring speeds, up to 50,000 points/h. The measured field image has a lateral resolution of better than 1 mu;m . The fully optical noninvasive scanning system can be applied to SAW device development and research, providing information on acoustic wave distribution that cannot be obtained by merely electrical measurements.

  7. Laser-generated acoustic wave studies on tattoo pigment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paterson, Lorna M.; Dickinson, Mark R.; King, Terence A.

    1996-01-01

    A Q-switched alexandrite laser (180 ns at 755 nm) was used to irradiate samples of agar embedded with red, black and green tattoo dyes. The acoustic waves generated in the samples were detected using a PVDF membrane hydrophone and compared to theoretical expectations. The laser pulses were found to generate acoustic waves in the black and green samples but not in the red pigment. Pressures of up to 1.4 MPa were produced with irradiances of up to 96 MWcm-2 which is comparable to the irradiances used to clear pigment embedded in skin. The pressure gradient generated across pigment particles was approximately 1.09 X 1010 Pam-1 giving a pressure difference of 1.09 +/- 0.17 MPa over a particle with mean diameter 100 micrometers . This is not sufficient to permanently damage skin which has a tensile strength of 7.4 MPa.

  8. Comparison of Transmission Line Methods for Surface Acoustic Wave Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, William; Atkinson, Gary

    2009-01-01

    Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) technology is low cost, rugged, lightweight, extremely low power and can be used to develop passive wireless sensors. For these reasons, NASA is investigating the use of SAW technology for Integrated Vehicle Health Monitoring (IVHM) of aerospace structures. To facilitate rapid prototyping of passive SAW sensors for aerospace applications, SAW models have been developed. This paper reports on the comparison of three methods of modeling SAWs. The three models are the Impulse Response Method (a first order model), and two second order matrix methods; the conventional matrix approach, and a modified matrix approach that is extended to include internal finger reflections. The second order models are based upon matrices that were originally developed for analyzing microwave circuits using transmission line theory. Results from the models are presented with measured data from devices. Keywords: Surface Acoustic Wave, SAW, transmission line models, Impulse Response Method.

  9. On-line surveillance of lubricants in bearings by means of surface acoustic waves.

    PubMed

    Lindner, Gerhard; Schmitt, Martin; Schubert, Josephine; Krempel, Sandro; Faustmann, Hendrik

    2010-01-01

    The acoustic wave propagation in bearings filled with lubricants and driven by pulsed excitation of surface acoustic waves has been investigated with respect to the presence and the distribution of different lubricants. Experimental setups, which are based on the mode conversion between surface acoustic waves and compression waves at the interface between a solid substrate of the bearing and a lubricant are described. The results of preliminary measurements at linear friction bearings, rotation ball bearings and axial cylinder roller bearings are presented.

  10. Acoustic field of a ballistic shock wave therapy device.

    PubMed

    Cleveland, Robin O; Chitnis, Parag V; McClure, Scott R

    2007-08-01

    Shock wave therapy (SWT) refers to the use of focused shock waves for treatment of musculoskeletal indications including plantar fascitis and dystrophic mineralization of tendons and joint capsules. Measurements were made of a SWT device that uses a ballistic source. The ballistic source consists of a handpiece within which compressed air (1-4 bar) is used to fire a projectile that strikes a metal applicator placed on the skin. The projectile generates stress waves in the applicator that transmit as pressure waves into tissue. The acoustic fields from two applicators were measured: one applicator was 15 mm in diameter and the surface slightly convex and the second was 12 mm in diameter the surface was concave. Measurements were made in a water tank and both applicators generated a similar pressure pulse consisting of a rectangular positive phase (4 micros duration and up to 8 MPa peak pressure) followed by a predominantly negative tail (duration of 20 micros and peak negative pressure of -6 MPa), with many oscillations. The rise times of the waveforms were around 1 micros and were shown to be too long for the pulses to be considered shock waves. Measurements of the field indicated that region of high pressure was restricted to the near-field (20-40 mm) of the source and was consistent with the Rayleigh distance. The measured acoustic field did not display focusing supported by calculations, which demonstrated that the radius of curvature of the concave surface was too large to effect a focusing gain. Other SWT devices use electrohydraulic, electromagnetic and piezoelectric sources that do result in focused shock waves. This difference in the acoustic fields means there is potentially a significant mechanistic difference between a ballistic source and other SWT devices.

  11. High-Temperature Surface-Acoustic-Wave Transducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhao, Xiaoliang; Tittmann, Bernhard R.

    2010-01-01

    Aircraft-engine rotating equipment usually operates at high temperature and stress. Non-invasive inspection of microcracks in those components poses a challenge for the non-destructive evaluation community. A low-profile ultrasonic guided wave sensor can detect cracks in situ. The key feature of the sensor is that it should withstand high temperatures and excite strong surface wave energy to inspect surface/subsurface cracks. As far as the innovators know at the time of this reporting, there is no existing sensor that is mounted to the rotor disks for crack inspection; the most often used technology includes fluorescent penetrant inspection or eddy-current probes for disassembled part inspection. An efficient, high-temperature, low-profile surface acoustic wave transducer design has been identified and tested for nondestructive evaluation of structures or materials. The development is a Sol-Gel bismuth titanate-based surface-acoustic-wave (SAW) sensor that can generate efficient surface acoustic waves for crack inspection. The produced sensor is very thin (submillimeter), and can generate surface waves up to 540 C. Finite element analysis of the SAW transducer design was performed to predict the sensor behavior, and experimental studies confirmed the results. One major uniqueness of the Sol-Gel bismuth titanate SAW sensor is that it is easy to implement to structures of various shapes. With a spray coating process, the sensor can be applied to surfaces of large curvatures. Second, the sensor is very thin (as a coating) and has very minimal effect on airflow or rotating equipment imbalance. Third, it can withstand temperatures up to 530 C, which is very useful for engine applications where high temperature is an issue.

  12. Microfluidic integrated acoustic waving for manipulation of cells and molecules.

    PubMed

    Barani, Alireza; Paktinat, Hossein; Janmaleki, Mohsen; Mohammadi, Aminollah; Mosaddegh, Peiman; Fadaei-Tehrani, Alireza; Sanati-Nezhad, Amir

    2016-11-15

    Acoustophoresis with its simple and low-cost fabrication, rapid and localized fluid actuation, compatibility with microfluidic components, and biocompatibility for cellular studies, has been extensively integrated into microfluidics to provide on-chip microdevices for a variety of applications in biology, bioengineering and chemistry. Among different applications, noninvasive manipulation of cells and biomolecules are significantly important, which are addressed by acoustic-based microfluidics. Here in this paper, we briefly explain the principles and different configurations of acoustic wave and acoustic streaming for the manipulation of cells and molecules and overview its applications for single cell isolation, cell focusing and sorting, cell washing and patterning, cell-cell fusion and communication, and tissue engineering. We further discuss the application of acoustic-based microfluidic systems for the mixing and transport of liquids, manipulation of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and ribonucleic acid (RNA) molecules, followed by explanation on the present challenges of acoustic-based microfluidics for the handling of cells and molecules, and highlighting the future directions.

  13. Impact of Acoustic Standing Waves on Structural Responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolaini, Ali R.

    2014-01-01

    For several decades large reverberant chambers and most recently direct field acoustic testing have been used in the aerospace industry to test larger structures with low surface densities such as solar arrays and reflectors to qualify them and to detect faults in the design and fabrication. It has been reported that in reverberant chamber and direct acoustic testing, standing acoustic modes may strongly couple with the fundamental structural modes of the test hardware (Reference 1). In this paper results from a recent reverberant chamber acoustic test of a composite reflector are discussed. These results provide further convincing evidence of the acoustic standing wave and structural modes coupling phenomenon. The purpose of this paper is to alert test organizations to this phenomenon so that they can account for the potential increase in structural responses and ensure that flight hardware undergoes safe testing. An understanding of the coupling phenomenon may also help minimize the over and/or under testing that could pose un-anticipated structural and flight qualification issues.

  14. Surface acoustic wave probe implant for predicting epileptic seizures

    DOEpatents

    Gopalsami, Nachappa [Naperville, IL; Kulikov, Stanislav [Sarov, RU; Osorio, Ivan [Leawood, KS; Raptis, Apostolos C [Downers Grove, IL

    2012-04-24

    A system and method for predicting and avoiding a seizure in a patient. The system and method includes use of an implanted surface acoustic wave probe and coupled RF antenna to monitor temperature of the patient's brain, critical changes in the temperature characteristic of a precursor to the seizure. The system can activate an implanted cooling unit which can avoid or minimize a seizure in the patient.

  15. Monolithic GaAs surface acoustic wave chemical microsensor array

    SciTech Connect

    HIETALA,VINCENT M.; CASALNUOVO,STEPHEN A.; HELLER,EDWIN J.; WENDT,JOEL R.; FRYE-MASON,GREGORY CHARLES; BACA,ALBERT G.

    2000-03-09

    A four-channel surface acoustic wave (SAW) chemical sensor array with associated RF electronics is monolithically integrated onto one GaAs IC. The sensor operates at 690 MHz from an on-chip SAW based oscillator and provides simple DC voltage outputs by using integrated phase detectors. This sensor array represents a significant advance in microsensor technology offering miniaturization, increased chemical selectivity, simplified system assembly, improved sensitivity, and inherent temperature compensation.

  16. Optimum contact conditions for miniaturized surface acoustic wave linear motor

    PubMed

    Takasaki; Kurosawa; Higuchi

    2000-03-01

    This paper reports the successful operation of a 70 MHz driving surface acoustic wave (SAW) linear motor with a miniaturized stator transducer. This paper also deals with an investigation into an optimized slider design for the miniaturized SAW linear motor. The performance of three silicon type sliders, with different projection size, was compared. Output forces of the three sliders were measured with change of pre-load. It was found that the slider with smaller projection tended to produce greater output force.

  17. Optimizing surface acoustic wave sensors for trace chemical detection

    SciTech Connect

    Frye, G.C.; Kottenstette, R.J.; Heller, E.J.

    1997-06-01

    This paper describes several recent advances for fabricating coated surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensors for applications requiring trace chemical detection. Specifically, we have demonstrated that high surface area microporous oxides can provide 100-fold improvements in SAW sensor responses compared with more typical polymeric coatings. In addition, we fabricated GaAs SAW devices with frequencies up to 500 MHz to provide greater sensitivity and an ideal substrate for integration with high-frequency electronics.

  18. Application of guided acoustic waves to delamination detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, Keun J.

    1992-01-01

    Guided plate waves are able to interact with structural flaws such as delaminations and cracks due to their propagation properties highly sensitive to the thickness change in materials. A technique which employs an acoustic damper to probe the results of this interaction and then to locate flaws in a relatively short period of time is developed. With its technical advantages, this technique shows its potential application to large area structural integrity assessment.

  19. Space manufacturing of surface acoustic wave devices, appendix D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sardella, G.

    1973-01-01

    Space manufacturing of transducers in a vibration free environment is discussed. Fabrication of the masks, and possible manufacturing of the surface acoustic wave components aboard a space laboratory would avoid the inherent ground vibrations and the frequency limitation imposed by a seismic isolator pad. The manufacturing vibration requirements are identified. The concepts of space manufacturing are analyzed. A development program for manufacturing transducers is recommended.

  20. R&D 100 Winner 2010: Acoustic Wave Biosensors

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, Richard; Branch, Darren; Edwards, Thayne

    2016-06-07

    The acoustic wave biosensor is innovative device that is a handheld, battery-powered, portable detection system capable of multiplex identification of a wide range of medically relevant pathogens and their biomolecular signatures — viruses, bacteria, proteins, and DNA — at clinically relevant levels. This detection occurs within minutes — not hours — at the point of care, whether that care is in a physician's office, a hospital bed, or at the scene of a biodefense or biomedical emergency.

  1. Inter-laboratory comparison of wave velocity measures.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waite, William F.; Santamarina, J.C.; Rydzy, M.; Chong, S.H.; Grozic, J.L.H.; Hester, K.; Howard, J.; Kneafsey, T.J.; Lee, J.Y.; Nakagawa, S.; Priest, J.; Reese, E.; Koh, H.; Sloan, E.D.; Sultaniya, A.

    2011-01-01

     This paper presents an eight-laboratory comparison of compressional and shear wave velocities measured in F110 Ottawa sand. The study was run to quantify the physical property variations one should expect in heterogeneous, multiphase porous materials by separately quantifying the variability inherent in the measurement techniques themselves. Comparative tests were run in which the sand was dry, water-saturated, partially water-saturated, partially ice-saturated and partially hydrate-saturated. Each test illustrates a collection of effects that can be classified as inducing either specimen-based or measurement-based variability. The most significant variability is due to void ratio variations between samples. Heterogeneous pore-fill distributions and differences in measurement techniques also contribute to the observed variability, underscoring the need to provide detailed sample preparation and system calibration information when reporting wave velocities in porous media. 

  2. Whistler Waves Driven by Anisotropic Strahl Velocity Distributions: Cluster Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vinas, A.F.; Gurgiolo, C.; Nieves-Chinchilla, T.; Gary, S. P.; Goldstein, M. L.

    2010-01-01

    Observed properties of the strahl using high resolution 3D electron velocity distribution data obtained from the Cluster/PEACE experiment are used to investigate its linear stability. An automated method to isolate the strahl is used to allow its moments to be computed independent of the solar wind core+halo. Results show that the strahl can have a high temperature anisotropy (T(perpindicular)/T(parallell) approximately > 2). This anisotropy is shown to be an important free energy source for the excitation of high frequency whistler waves. The analysis suggests that the resultant whistler waves are strong enough to regulate the electron velocity distributions in the solar wind through pitch-angle scattering

  3. Damping of dust-acoustic waves due to dust-dust interactions in dusty plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Angelis, U.; Shukla, P. K.

    1998-08-01

    The results of a kinetic model are presented which includes dust-dust collisions as a damping mechanism for the low-phase velocity dust-acoustic waves which have been observed [Pieper and Goree, Phys. Rev. Lett. 77 (1976) 3137] in a dusty plasma device. A comparison of our theoretical results with those of observations exhibits a good agreement, and it also leads to quantitative estimates that are close to the predictions of the modified fluid theory, which has introduced a damping rate in an ad hoc manner.

  4. Determination of Surface Stress Distributions in Steel Using Laser-Generated Surface Acoustic Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi; Yifei; Ni; Chenyin; Shen; Zhonghua; Ni; Xiaowu; Lu; Jian

    2008-05-01

    High frequency surface acoustic waves (SAWs) are excited by a pulsed laser and detected by a specially designed poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) transducer to investigate surface stress distribution. Two kinds of stressed surfaces are examined experimentally. One is a steel plate elastically deformed under simple bending forces, where the surface stress varies slowly. The other is a welded steel plate for which the surface stress varies very rapidly within a small area near the welding seam. Applying a new signal processing method developed from correlation technique, the velocity distribution of the SAWs, which reflects the stress distribution, is obtained in these two samples with high resolution.

  5. Oblique ion acoustic shock waves in a magnetized plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Shahmansouri, M.; Mamun, A. A.

    2013-08-15

    Ion acoustic (IA) shock waves are studied in a magnetized plasma consisting of a cold viscous ion fluid and Maxwellian electrons. The Korteweg–de Vries–Burgers equation is derived by using the reductive perturbation method. It is shown that the combined effects of external magnetic field and obliqueness significantly modify the basic properties (viz., amplitude, width, speed, etc.) of the IA shock waves. It is observed that the ion-viscosity is a source of dissipation, and is responsible for the formation of IA shock structures. The implications of our results in some space and laboratory plasma situations are discussed.

  6. Acoustic charge transport induced by the surface acoustic wave in chemical doped graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Shijun; Zhang, Hao; Feng, Zhihong; Yu, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Rui; Sun, Chongling; Liu, Jing; Duan, Xuexin; Pang, Wei; Zhang, Daihua

    2016-10-01

    A graphene/LiNbO3 hybrid device is used to investigate the acoustic induced charge transport in chemical doped graphene. The chemical doping of graphene via its physisorption of gas molecules affects the surface acoustic wave (SAW) charge carrier transport in a manner different from electric field drift. That transport induces doping dependent macroscopic acoustoelectric current. The chemical doping can manipulate majority carriers and induces unique acoustoelectric features. The observation is explained by a classical relaxation model. Eventually the device based on acoustoelectric current is proved to outperform the common chemiresistor for chemicals. Our finding provides insight into acoustic charge carrier transport during chemical doping. The doping affects interaction of carriers with SAW phonon and facilitates the understanding of nanoscale acoustoelectric effect. The exploration inspires potential acoustoelectric application for chemical detection involving emerging 2D nanomaterials.

  7. Effect of orbital angular momentum on electron acoustic waves in double-Kappa plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehman, Aman-ur; Shan, S. Ali; Hamza, M. Yousaf; Lee, J. K.

    2017-02-01

    Kinetic theory of electron acoustic waves (EAWs) in the presence of wave angular momentum has been derived to study the effect of wave angular momentum on the propagation of EAWs in a non-Maxwellian plasma. Both types of electrons (hot and cool) are modeled as Kappa-distributed velocity distribution functions. The theory is also applied to Saturn's magnetosphere where these kinds of distribution functions are commonly found. It is seen that the presence of wave angular momentum in the model has a significant effect on the existence of the regions where EAWs are weakly damped. The effect of wave angular momentum on EAWs is studied by defining a parameter η = k/(lqθ), which is the ratio of the planar wave number to the azimuthal wave number. The wave is purely planar if η→∞. The weakly damped region of EAWs depends strongly on this parameter in addition to other parameters such as hot electron spectral index κh, cool electron spectral index κc, the fraction of hot electrons, and hot to cool electrons temperature ratio. The results also show the effect of η on the propagation of EAWs in various regions of Saturn's magnetosphere.

  8. Surface Acoustic Waves Enhance Neutrophil Killing of Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Loike, John D.; Plitt, Anna; Kothari, Komal; Zumeris, Jona; Budhu, Sadna; Kavalus, Kaitlyn; Ray, Yonatan; Jacob, Harold

    2013-01-01

    Biofilms are structured communities of bacteria that play a major role in the pathogenicity of bacteria and are the leading cause of antibiotic resistant bacterial infections on indwelling catheters and medical prosthetic devices. Failure to resolve these biofilm infections may necessitate the surgical removal of the prosthetic device which can be debilitating and costly. Recent studies have shown that application of surface acoustic waves to catheter surfaces can reduce the incidence of infections by a mechanism that has not yet been clarified. We report here the effects of surface acoustic waves (SAW) on the capacity of human neutrophils to eradicate S. epidermidis bacteria in a planktonic state and within biofilms. Utilizing a novel fibrin gel system that mimics a tissue-like environment, we show that SAW, at an intensity of 0.3 mW/cm2, significantly enhances human neutrophil killing of S. epidermidis in a planktonic state and within biofilms by enhancing human neutrophil chemotaxis in response to chemoattractants. In addition, we show that the integrin CD18 plays a significant role in the killing enhancement observed in applying SAW. We propose from out data that this integrin may serve as mechanoreceptor for surface acoustic waves enhancing neutrophil chemotaxis and killing of bacteria. PMID:23936303

  9. Dual mode acoustic wave sensor for precise pressure reading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Xiaojing; Kropelnicki, Piotr; Wang, Yong; Randles, Andrew Benson; Chuan Chai, Kevin Tshun; Cai, Hong; Gu, Yuan Dong

    2014-09-01

    In this letter, a Microelectromechanical system acoustic wave sensor, which has a dual mode (lateral field exited Lamb wave mode and surface acoustic wave (SAW) mode) behavior, is presented for precious pressure change read out. Comb-like interdigital structured electrodes on top of piezoelectric material aluminium nitride (AlN) are used to generate the wave modes. The sensor membrane consists of single crystalline silicon formed by backside-etching of the bulk material of a silicon on insulator wafer having variable device thickness layer (5 μm-50 μm). With this principle, a pressure sensor has been fabricated and mounted on a pressure test package with pressure applied to the backside of the membrane within a range of 0 psi to 300 psi. The temperature coefficient of frequency was experimentally measured in the temperature range of -50 °C to 300 °C. This idea demonstrates a piezoelectric based sensor having two modes SAW/Lamb wave for direct physical parameter—pressure readout and temperature cancellation which can operate in harsh environment such as oil and gas exploration, automobile and aeronautic applications using the dual mode behavior of the sensor and differential readout at the same time.

  10. Ion acoustic shock wave in collisional equal mass plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Adak, Ashish; Ghosh, Samiran; Chakrabarti, Nikhil

    2015-10-15

    The effect of ion-ion collision on the dynamics of nonlinear ion acoustic wave in an unmagnetized pair-ion plasma has been investigated. The two-fluid model has been used to describe the dynamics of both positive and negative ions with equal masses. It is well known that in the dynamics of the weakly nonlinear wave, the viscosity mediates wave dissipation in presence of weak nonlinearity and dispersion. This dissipation is responsible for the shock structures in pair-ion plasma. Here, it has been shown that the ion-ion collision in presence of collective phenomena mediated by the plasma current is the source of dissipation that causes the Burgers' term which is responsible for the shock structures in equal mass pair-ion plasma. The dynamics of the weakly nonlinear wave is governed by the Korteweg-de Vries Burgers equation. The analytical and numerical investigations revealed that the ion acoustic wave exhibits both oscillatory and monotonic shock structures depending on the frequency of ion-ion collision parameter. The results have been discussed in the context of the fullerene pair-ion plasma experiments.

  11. Dust-acoustic rogue waves in a nonextensive plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Moslem, W. M.; Shukla, P. K.; Sabry, R.; El-Labany, S. K.

    2011-12-15

    We present an investigation for the generation of a dust-acoustic rogue wave in a dusty plasma composed of negatively charged dust grains, as well as nonextensive electrons and ions. For this purpose, the reductive perturbation technique is used to obtain a nonlinear Schroedinger equation. The critical wave-number threshold k{sub c}, which indicates where the modulational instability sets in, has been determined precisely for various regimes. Two different behaviors of k{sub c} against the nonextensive parameter q are found. For small k{sub c}, it is found that increasing q would lead to an increase of k{sub c} until q approaches a certain value q{sub c}, then further increase of q beyond q{sub c} decreases the value of k{sub c}. For large k{sub c}, the critical wave-number threshold k{sub c} is always increasing with q. Within the modulational instability region, a random perturbation of the amplitude grows and thus creates dust-acoustic rogue waves. In order to show that the characteristics of the rogue waves are influenced by the plasma parameters, the relevant numerical analysis of the appropriate nonlinear solution is presented. The nonlinear structure, as reported here, could be useful for controlling and maximizing highly energetic pulses in dusty plasmas.

  12. Dust-acoustic rogue waves in a nonextensive plasma.

    PubMed

    Moslem, W M; Sabry, R; El-Labany, S K; Shukla, P K

    2011-12-01

    We present an investigation for the generation of a dust-acoustic rogue wave in a dusty plasma composed of negatively charged dust grains, as well as nonextensive electrons and ions. For this purpose, the reductive perturbation technique is used to obtain a nonlinear Schrödinger equation. The critical wave-number threshold k(c), which indicates where the modulational instability sets in, has been determined precisely for various regimes. Two different behaviors of k(c) against the nonextensive parameter q are found. For small k(c), it is found that increasing q would lead to an increase of k(c) until q approaches a certain value q(c), then further increase of q beyond q(c) decreases the value of k(c). For large k(c), the critical wave-number threshold k(c) is always increasing with q. Within the modulational instability region, a random perturbation of the amplitude grows and thus creates dust-acoustic rogue waves. In order to show that the characteristics of the rogue waves are influenced by the plasma parameters, the relevant numerical analysis of the appropriate nonlinear solution is presented. The nonlinear structure, as reported here, could be useful for controlling and maximizing highly energetic pulses in dusty plasmas.

  13. Characteristics of acoustic gravity waves obtained from Dynasonde data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negrea, Cǎtǎlin; Zabotin, Nikolay; Bullett, Terrence; Fuller-Rowell, Tim; Fang, Tzu-Wei; Codrescu, Mihail

    2016-04-01

    Traveling ionospheric disturbances (TIDs) are ubiquitous in the thermosphere-ionosphere and are often assumed to be caused by acoustic gravity waves (AGWs). This study performs an analysis of the TID and AGW activity above Wallops Island, VA, during October 2013. The variations in electron density and ionospheric tilts obtained with the Dynasonde technique are used as primary indicators of wave activity. The temporal and spectral characteristics of the data are discussed in detail, using also results of the Whole Atmosphere Model (WAM) and the Global Ionosphere Plasmasphere Model (GIP). The full set of propagation parameters (frequency, and the vertical, zonal and meridional wave vector components) of the TIDs is determined over the 160-220 km height range. A test of the self-consistency of these results within the confines of the theoretical AGW dispersion relation is devised. This is applied to a sample data set of 24 October 2013. A remarkable agreement has been achieved for wave periods between 52 and 21 min, for which we can rigorously claim the TIDs are caused by underlying acoustic gravity waves. The Wallops Island Dynasonde can operate for extended periods at a 2 min cadence, allowing determination of the statistical distributions of propagation parameters. A dominant population of TIDs is identified in the frequency band below 1 mHz, and for it, the distributions of the horizontal wavelengths, vertical wavelengths, and horizontal phase speeds are obtained.

  14. P wave velocity structure beneath Greenland using teleseismic events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Y.; Lee, W.; Yoo, H.

    2013-12-01

    A three-dimensional P-wave velocity model was inverted with 3032 ray paths from 416 events observed on the GLISN network from 2009 to 2013. The relative travel times were computed with respect to the IASP91 global reference model using the multi-channel cross correlation method (MCCC) by VanDecar and Crosson {, 1990 #1}. Our model space was parameterized laterally with 1°×1° from 55°N to 85°N in latitude and from 20°W to 80°W in longitude. This high latitude model space causes spatial distortion in the model parameters on the spherical coordinate for the teleseismic body wave tomography. To minimize a distortion in the model parameters the spherical coordinate system was rotated as the referent stations SUMG and SCO, located on the middle of Greenland, to equator, and all stations and seismic events were converted to this new coordinate system. All ray paths were computed by a three dimensional ray tracing algorithm developed with pseudobending technique and Snell's law {Zhao, 1992 #1}, and travel times were corrected by ice and crustal thicknesses for each observed station as well. Our inverted model shows a broad low velocity anomaly ( -1.5%) in the mid-eastern parts of Greenland, which is connected to the low velocity anomaly beneath Iceland. Another low velocity anomaly was observed below 300km in the middle of Greenland where the Icelandic mantle plume was located in 60Ma. P wave velocity anomaly depth slices from 150 km to 400 km on the rotated coordinate from the center of Green land to the equator.

  15. The thin section rock physics: Modeling and measurement of seismic wave velocity on the slice of carbonates

    SciTech Connect

    Wardaya, P. D. Noh, K. A. B. M. Yusoff, W. I. B. W.; Ridha, S.; Nurhandoko, B. E. B.

    2014-09-25

    This paper discusses a new approach for investigating the seismic wave velocity of rock, specifically carbonates, as affected by their pore structures. While the conventional routine of seismic velocity measurement highly depends on the extensive laboratory experiment, the proposed approach utilizes the digital rock physics view which lies on the numerical experiment. Thus, instead of using core sample, we use the thin section image of carbonate rock to measure the effective seismic wave velocity when travelling on it. In the numerical experiment, thin section images act as the medium on which wave propagation will be simulated. For the modeling, an advanced technique based on artificial neural network was employed for building the velocity and density profile, replacing image's RGB pixel value with the seismic velocity and density of each rock constituent. Then, ultrasonic wave was simulated to propagate in the thin section image by using finite difference time domain method, based on assumption of an acoustic-isotropic medium. Effective velocities were drawn from the recorded signal and being compared to the velocity modeling from Wyllie time average model and Kuster-Toksoz rock physics model. To perform the modeling, image analysis routines were undertaken for quantifying the pore aspect ratio that is assumed to represent the rocks pore structure. In addition, porosity and mineral fraction required for velocity modeling were also quantified by using integrated neural network and image analysis technique. It was found that the Kuster-Toksoz gives the closer prediction to the measured velocity as compared to the Wyllie time average model. We also conclude that Wyllie time average that does not incorporate the pore structure parameter deviates significantly for samples having more than 40% porosity. Utilizing this approach we found a good agreement between numerical experiment and theoretically derived rock physics model for estimating the effective seismic wave

  16. The Evolution of P-wave Velocity in Fault Gouge: Initial Results for Samples from the SAFOD Volume.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knuth, M. W.; Tobin, H. J.; Marone, C.

    2008-12-01

    We present initial results from a new technique for observing the evolution of elastic properties in sheared fault zone materials via acoustic wave velocity. The relationship between the mechanical strength of fault gouge and acoustic velocity during active deformation has important implications not only for a physical understanding of elasticity in deforming granular media, but also for the interpretation of the seismic velocity at the field scale. Experiments are conducted at atmospheric temperature and saturation state in a double-direct-shear testing apparatus, with normal stress stepped from 1 to 19 MPa to interrogate behavior during compaction, and sheared at a rate of 10 microns/second to observe changes in velocity with increasing strain. Tests are divided between those involving continuous shear to a displacement of 22.5 mm, and those with intervals of 3.75 mm shear separated by unloading and reloading sequences in normal stress. Velocity is measured by time-of-flight between two piezoelectric P-wave transducers set into the sample configuration on either side of the shearing layers. Samples tested include common laboratory standards for simulated fault gouge and field samples taken from representative localities in the 3D rock volume containing the San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth experiment in Parkfield, California. The velocities of sand and clay end-member gouges are observed to behave differently under shear, and mixtures of quartz sand and montmorillonite behave differently from both end-member materials. Initial results suggest that particle sorting exerts a strong influence on both the absolute velocity and the evolution of velocity in response to increasing shear strain where the elastic properties of the grains are similar. We also observe a first-order relationship between the coefficient of friction and P-wave velocity that appears to be related to grain reorganization at the onset of shear following initial compaction.

  17. Phase Velocity and Full-Waveform Analysis of Co-located Distributed Acoustic Sensing (DAS) Channels and Geophone Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, L.; Mellors, R. J.; Thurber, C. H.; Wang, H. F.; Zeng, X.

    2015-12-01

    A 762-meter Distributed Acoustic Sensing (DAS) array with a channel spacing of one meter was deployed at the Garner Valley Downhole Array in Southern California. The array was approximately rectangular with dimensions of 180 meters by 80 meters. The array also included two subdiagonals within the rectangle along which three-component geophones were co-located. Several active sources were deployed, including a 45-kN, swept-frequency, shear-mass shaker, which produced strong Rayleigh waves across the array. Both DAS and geophone traces were filtered in 2-Hz steps between 4 and 20 Hz to obtain phase velocities as a function of frequency from fitting the moveout of travel times over distances of 35 meters or longer. As an alternative to this traditional means of finding phase velocity, it is theoretically possible to find the Rayleigh-wave phase velocity at each point of co-location as the ratio of DAS and geophone responses, because DAS is sensitive to ground strain and geophones are sensitive to ground velocity, after suitable corrections for instrument response (Mikumo & Aki, 1964). The concept was tested in WPP, a seismic wave propagation program, by first validating and then using a 3D synthetic, full-waveform seismic model to simulate the effect of increased levels of noise and uncertainty as data go from ideal to more realistic. The results obtained from this study provide a better understanding of the DAS response and its potential for being combined with traditional seismometers for obtaining phase velocity at a single location. This analysis is part of the PoroTomo project (Poroelastic Tomography by Adjoint Inverse Modeling of Data from Seismology, Geodesy, and Hydrology, http://geoscience.wisc.edu/feigl/porotomo).

  18. Acoustic and Cavitation Fields of Shock Wave Therapy Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chitnis, Parag V.; Cleveland, Robin O.

    2006-05-01

    Extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) is considered a viable treatment modality for orthopedic ailments. Despite increasing clinical use, the mechanisms by which ESWT devices generate a therapeutic effect are not yet understood. The mechanistic differences in various devices and their efficacies might be dependent on their acoustic and cavitation outputs. We report acoustic and cavitation measurements of a number of different shock wave therapy devices. Two devices were electrohydraulic: one had a large reflector (HMT Ossatron) and the other was a hand-held source (HMT Evotron); the other device was a pneumatically driven device (EMS Swiss DolorClast Vet). Acoustic measurements were made using a fiber-optic probe hydrophone and a PVDF hydrophone. A dual passive cavitation detection system was used to monitor cavitation activity. Qualitative differences between these devices were also highlighted using a high-speed camera. We found that the Ossatron generated focused shock waves with a peak positive pressure around 40 MPa. The Evotron produced peak positive pressure around 20 MPa, however, its acoustic output appeared to be independent of the power setting of the device. The peak positive pressure from the DolorClast was about 5 MPa without a clear shock front. The DolorClast did not generate a focused acoustic field. Shadowgraph images show that the wave propagating from the DolorClast is planar and not focused in the vicinity of the hand-piece. All three devices produced measurable cavitation with a characteristic time (cavitation inception to bubble collapse) that varied between 95 and 209 μs for the Ossatron, between 59 and 283 μs for the Evotron, and between 195 and 431 μs for the DolorClast. The high-speed camera images show that the cavitation activity for the DolorClast is primarily restricted to the contact surface of the hand-piece. These data indicate that the devices studied here vary in acoustic and cavitation output, which may imply that the

  19. Attenuation of acoustic waves in glacial ice and salt domes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, P. B.

    2006-02-01

    Two classes of natural solid media, glacial ice and salt domes, are under consideration as media in which to deploy instruments for detection of neutrinos with energy ≥1018 eV. Though insensitive to 1011 to 1016 eV neutrinos for which observatories (e.g., AMANDA and IceCube) that utilize optical Cherenkov radiation detectors are designed, radio and acoustic methods are suited for searches for the very low fluxes of neutrinos with energies >1017 eV. This is because owing to the very long attenuation lengths of radio and acoustic waves produced by interactions of such neutrinos in ice and salt, detection modules can be spaced at horizontal distances ˜1 km, in contrast to the 0.12 km distances between strings of IceCube modules. In this paper, I calculate the absorption and scattering coefficients as a function of frequency and grain size for acoustic waves in glacial ice and salt domes and show that experimental measurements on laboratory samples and in glacial ice and salt domes are consistent with theory. For South Pole ice with grain size ˜0.2 cm at depths ≤600 m, scattering lengths are calculated to be 2000 and 25 km at frequencies 10 and 30 kHz, respectively; for grain size ˜0.4 cm at 1500 m (the maximum depth to be instrumented acoustically), scattering lengths are calculated to be 250 and 3 km. These are within the range of frequencies where most of the energy of the acoustic wave is concentrated. The absorption length is calculated to be 9 ± 3 km at all frequencies above ˜100 Hz. For NaCl (rock salt) with grain size 0.75 cm, scattering lengths are calculated to be 120 and 1.4 km at 10 and 30 kHz, and absorption lengths are calculated to be 3 × 104 and 3300 km at 10 and 30 kHz. Existing measurements are consistent with theory. For ice, absorption is the limiting factor; for salt, scattering is the limiting factor. Both media would be suitable for detection of acoustic waves from ultrahigh-energy neutrino interactions.

  20. Acoustic beam control in biomimetic projector via velocity gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xiaowei; Zhang, Yu; Cao, Wenwu; Dong, Erqian; Song, Zhongchang; Li, Songhai; Tang, Liguo; Zhang, Sai

    2016-07-01

    A biomimetic projector (BioP) based on computerized tomography of pygmy sperm whale's biosonar system has been designed using gradient-index (GRIN) material. The directivity of this BioP device was investigated as function of frequency and the velocity gradient of the GRIN material. A strong beam control over a broad bandwidth at the subwavelength scale has been achieved. Compared with a bare subwavelength source, the main lobe pressure of the BioP is about five times as high and the angular resolution is one order of magnitude better. Our results indicate that this BioP has excellent application potential in miniaturized underwater sonars.

  1. Acoustic Wave Stimulated Enhanced Oil Recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichmann, Sven; Giese, Rüdiger; Amro, Mohammed

    2013-04-01

    High demand and the finite oil deposits will be a problem in the future. To temper the impact of a shortage in crude oil, a lot of research in the field of enhanced oil recovery (EOR) is worldwide ongoing. Using seismic waves to stimulate recovery of oil is known as seismic-EOR. The development of a stimulation procedure using seismic sources and the evaluation of the obtained data in a real oil field is the aim of the project WAVE.O.R. The project is funded by the German scientific society for oil, gas and coal (DGMK). The Technical University of Freiberg (TUBAF) and the German Research Center for Geosciences (GFZ) in Potsdam developed a flooding cell connected with magnetostrictive actuators as sources for seismic energy. This device is eligible to survey the impact of different seismic stimulation parameter like frequency, alignment, amplitude and rock characteristics on oil recovery. The obtained laboratory data of flooding experiments using seismic waves were analyzed for key features like water breakthrough point, oil recovery and oil fraction. New approach has been developed, which consists of the connection of a principal component analysis with a clustering algorithm. This new technique allows us a better understanding and thus prediction of the recovery behavior of oil bearing sediments. The experiments show promising possibilities to enhance oil recovery with seismic stimulation. Especially the combination of different frequencies between 100 Hz and 4000 Hz had a positive impact on oil recovery. The responsible mechanisms were identified and discussed. Data obtained with the laboratory device will be applied in a field test using a borehole device developed by the GFZ in the project "Seismic Prediction While Drilling" (SPWD). For this purpose experiments are conducted to obtain the radiation pattern of the seismic sources used by the SPWD device in a borehole. In addition, the development of a control setup for the 1-D actuator array is an aim of the

  2. Accurate thermoelastic tensor and acoustic velocities of NaCl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcondes, Michel L.; Shukla, Gaurav; da Silveira, Pedro; Wentzcovitch, Renata M.

    2015-12-01

    Despite the importance of thermoelastic properties of minerals in geology and geophysics, their measurement at high pressures and temperatures are still challenging. Thus, ab initio calculations are an essential tool for predicting these properties at extreme conditions. Owing to the approximate description of the exchange-correlation energy, approximations used in calculations of vibrational effects, and numerical/methodological approximations, these methods produce systematic deviations. Hybrid schemes combining experimental data and theoretical results have emerged as a way to reconcile available information and offer more reliable predictions at experimentally inaccessible thermodynamics conditions. Here we introduce a method to improve the calculated thermoelastic tensor by using highly accurate thermal equation of state (EoS). The corrective scheme is general, applicable to crystalline solids with any symmetry, and can produce accurate results at conditions where experimental data may not exist. We apply it to rock-salt-type NaCl, a material whose structural properties have been challenging to describe accurately by standard ab initio methods and whose acoustic/seismic properties are important for the gas and oil industry.

  3. Accurate thermoelastic tensor and acoustic velocities of NaCl

    SciTech Connect

    Marcondes, Michel L.; Shukla, Gaurav; Silveira, Pedro da; Wentzcovitch, Renata M.

    2015-12-15

    Despite the importance of thermoelastic properties of minerals in geology and geophysics, their measurement at high pressures and temperatures are still challenging. Thus, ab initio calculations are an essential tool for predicting these properties at extreme conditions. Owing to the approximate description of the exchange-correlation energy, approximations used in calculations of vibrational effects, and numerical/methodological approximations, these methods produce systematic deviations. Hybrid schemes combining experimental data and theoretical results have emerged as a way to reconcile available information and offer more reliable predictions at experimentally inaccessible thermodynamics conditions. Here we introduce a method to improve the calculated thermoelastic tensor by using highly accurate thermal equation of state (EoS). The corrective scheme is general, applicable to crystalline solids with any symmetry, and can produce accurate results at conditions where experimental data may not exist. We apply it to rock-salt-type NaCl, a material whose structural properties have been challenging to describe accurately by standard ab initio methods and whose acoustic/seismic properties are important for the gas and oil industry.

  4. Ion acoustic and dust acoustic waves at finite size of plasma particles

    SciTech Connect

    Andreev, Pavel A. Kuz'menkov, L. S.

    2015-03-15

    We consider the influence of the finite size of ions on the properties of classic plasmas. We focus our attention at the ion acoustic waves for electron-ion plasmas. We also consider the dusty plasmas where we account the finite size of ions and particles of dust and consider the dispersion of dust acoustic waves. The finite size of particles is a classical effect as well as the Coulomb interaction. The finite size of particles considerably contributes to the properties of the dense plasmas in the small wavelength limit. Low temperature dense plasmas, revealing the quantum effects, are also affected by the finite size of plasma particles. Consequently, it is important to consider the finite size of ions in the quantum plasmas as well.

  5. Guided wave opto-acoustic device

    DOEpatents

    Jarecki, Jr., Robert L.; Rakich, Peter Thomas; Camacho, Ryan; Shin, Heedeuk; Cox, Jonathan Albert; Qiu, Wenjun; Wang, Zheng

    2016-02-23

    The various technologies presented herein relate to various hybrid phononic-photonic waveguide structures that can exhibit nonlinear behavior associated with traveling-wave forward stimulated Brillouin scattering (forward-SBS). The various structures can simultaneously guide photons and phonons in a suspended membrane. By utilizing a suspended membrane, a substrate pathway can be eliminated for loss of phonons that suppresses SBS in conventional silicon-on-insulator (SOI) waveguides. Consequently, forward-SBS nonlinear susceptibilities are achievable at about 3000 times greater than achievable with a conventional waveguide system. Owing to the strong phonon-photon coupling achievable with the various embodiments, potential application for the various embodiments presented herein cover a range of radiofrequency (RF) and photonic signal processing applications. Further, the various embodiments presented herein are applicable to applications operating over a wide bandwidth, e.g. 100 MHz to 50 GHz or more.

  6. Particle-in-cell simulations of ion-acoustic waves with application to Saturn's magnetosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Koen, Etienne J.; Collier, Andrew B.; Hellberg, Manfred A.; Maharaj, Shimul K.

    2014-07-15

    Using a particle-in-cell simulation, the dispersion and growth rate of the ion-acoustic mode are investigated for a plasma containing two ion and two electron components. The electron velocities are modelled by a combination of two kappa distributions, as found in Saturn's magnetosphere. The ion components consist of adiabatic ions and an ultra-low density ion beam to drive a very weak instability, thereby ensuring observable waves. The ion-acoustic mode is explored for a range of parameter values such as κ, temperature ratio, and density ratio of the two electron components. The phase speed, frequency range, and growth rate of the mode are investigated. Simulations of double-kappa two-temperature plasmas typical of the three regions of Saturn's magnetosphere are also presented and analysed.

  7. FROM THE CURRENT LITERATURE: Laser excitation of surface acoustic waves: a new direction in opto-acoustic spectroscopy of a solid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karabutov, Aleksander A.

    1985-11-01

    Studies in thermo-optic excitation of surface acoustic waves are reviewed. The excitation of periodic and pulse signals is discussed, using nonmoving and moving beams. Most attention is paid to application of this effect for purposes of opto-acoustic spectroscopy of a solid. The possibilities and promises of using opto-acoustic spectroscopy (OAS) employing surface acoustic waves (SAW) are analyzed

  8. Acoustic systems containing curved duct sections. [numerical analysis of wave propagation in acoustic ducts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rostafinski, W.

    1975-01-01

    The analysis of waves in bends in acoustical ducting of rectangular cross section was extended to the study of motion near discontinuities. This included determination of the characteristics of the tangential and radial components of the nonpropagating modes. It is established that attenuation of the nonpropagating modes strongly depends on frequency and that, in general, the sharper the bend, the less attenuation may be expected. Evaluation of a bend's impedance and of impedance-generated reflections is also presented in detail.

  9. Switchable and Tunable Ferroelectric Bulk Acoustic Wave Resonators and Filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saddik, George Nabih

    Ferroelectric materials such as barium titanate (BaTiO 3 or BTO), strontium titanate (SrTiO3 or STO), and their solid solution barium strontium titanate (BaxSr1-xTiO 3 or BST) have been under investigation for over 50 years. BTO, STO, and BST are high-k dielectric materials, with a field dependent permittivity and a perovskite crystal structure. At room temperature BTO is a ferroelectric with a ferroelectric to paraelectric transition temperature of about 116°C (Curie temperature), while STO has no ferroelectric phase. The formation of a solid solution between BTO and STO allows for the engineering of the Curie temperature; the Curie temperature decreses as the mole ratio of barium decreases. Extensive research went into understanding the properties of BST and developing RF circuits such as tunable capacitors, tunable matching networks, tunable filters, phase shifters and harmonic generators. BST tunable capacitors have always had anomalous resonances in the one port scattering parameter measurements, although they are very small they degrade the quality factor of the device, and research went into reducing these resonances as much as possible. The goal of this thesis is to investigate these anomalous resonances and exploit them into RF devices and circuits. Careful investigation showed that these resonances were field induced piezoelectric resonance. Piezoelectric materials such as AlN, ZnO, and PZT are used in many applications, such as resonators, and filters. Thin film bulk acoustic wave resonators (FBAR) have been in use by research and industry since the early 1980s, and in high volume production for cell phone duplexers since early 2000s. FBAR filters and duplexers have several advantages over surface acoustic wave (SAW) and ceramic devices such as high quality factors necessary for sharp filter skirts, small size, high performance, and ease of integration. There are two approaches to designing bulk acoustic wave resonators. The first is an FBAR where a

  10. The electron drift velocity, ion acoustic speed and irregularity drifts in high-latitude E-region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uspensky, M. V.; Pellinen, R. J.; Janhunen, P.

    2008-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the STARE irregularity drift velocity dependence on the EISCAT line-of-sight (los or l-o-s) electron drift velocity magnitude, VE×Blos, and the flow angle ΘN,F (superscript N and/or F refer to the STARE Norway and Finland radar). In the noon-evening sector the flow angle dependence of Doppler velocities, VirrN,F, inside and outside the Farley-Buneman (FB) instability cone (|VE×Blos|>Cs and |VE×Blos|acoustic speed), is found to be similar and much weaker than suggested earlier. In a band of flow angles 45°<ΘN,F<85° it can be reasonably described by |VirrN,F|∝AN,FCscosnΘN,F, where AN,F≍1.2 1.3 are monotonically increasing functions of VE×B and the index n is ~0.2 or even smaller. This study (a) does not support the conclusion by Nielsen and Schlegel (1985), Nielsen et al. (2002, their #[18]) that at flow angles larger than ~60° (or |VirrN,F|≤300 m/s) the STARE Doppler velocities are equal to the component of the electron drift velocity. We found (b) that if the data points are averages over 100 m/s intervals (bins) of l-o-s electron velocities and 10 deg intervals (bins) of flow angles, then the largest STARE Doppler velocities always reside inside the bin with the largest flow angle. In the flow angle bin 80° the STARE Doppler velocity is larger than its driver term, i.e. the EISCAT l-o-s electron drift velocity component, |VirrN,F|>|VE×Blos|. Both features (a and b) as well as the weak flow angle velocity dependence indicate that the l-o-s electron drift velocity cannot be the sole factor which controls the motion of the backscatter ~1-m irregularities at large flow angles. Importantly, the backscatter was collected at aspect angle ~1° and flow angle Θ>60°, where linear fluid and kinetic theories invariably predict negative growth rates. At least qualitatively, all the facts can be reasonably explained by nonlinear wave-wave coupling found and

  11. Comment on 'Nonplanar dust-ion acoustic Gardner solitons in a dusty plasma with q-nonextensive electron velocity distribution' [Phys. Plasmas 19, 033703 (2012)

    SciTech Connect

    Mannan, A.; Tanjia, F.; Yasmin, S.

    2013-04-15

    The basic characteristics of cylindrical and spherical dust-ion acoustic Gardner solitary waves in a dusty plasma with q-nonextensive electron velocity distribution have been represented by Ghosh et al.[Phys. Plasmas 19, 033703 (2012)]. In this manuscript, they use the double layer stationary solution of the standard Gardner equation but they explain the whole article in terms of Gardner solitons which is completely incorrect.

  12. Determination of hydrocarbon levels in water via laser-induced acoustics wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bidin, Noriah; Hossenian, Raheleh; Duralim, Maisarah; Krishnan, Ganesan; Marsin, Faridah Mohd; Nughro, Waskito; Zainal, Jasman

    2016-04-01

    Hydrocarbon contamination in water is a major environmental concern in terms of foreseen collapse of the natural ecosystem. Hydrocarbon level in water was determined by generating acoustic wave via an innovative laser-induced breakdown in conjunction with high-speed photographic coupling with piezoelectric transducer to trace acoustic wave propagation. A Q-switched Nd:YAG (40 mJ) was focused in cuvette-filled hydrocarbon solution at various concentrations (0-2000 ppm) to induce optical breakdown, shock wave generation and later acoustic wave propagation. A nitro-dye (ND) laser (10 mJ) was used as a flash to illuminate and frozen the acoustic wave propagation. Lasers were synchronised using a digital delay generator. The image of acoustic waves was grabbed and recorded via charged couple device (CCD) video camera at the speed of 30 frames/second with the aid of Matrox software version 9. The optical delay (0.8-10.0 μs) between the acoustic wave formation and its frozen time is recorded through photodetectors. A piezo-electric transducer (PZT) was used to trace the acoustic wave (sound signal), which cascades to a digital oscilloscope. The acoustic speed is calculated from the ratio of acoustic wave radius (1-8 mm) and optical time delay. Acoustic wave speed is found to linearly increase with hydrocarbon concentrations. The acoustic signal generation at higher hydrocarbon levels in water is attributed to supplementary mass transfer and impact on the probe. Integrated high-speed photography with transducer detection system authenticated that the signals indeed emerged from the laser-induced acoustic wave instead of photothermal processes. It is established that the acoustic wave speed in water is used as a fingerprint to detect the hydrocarbon levels.

  13. Synchronization of the dust acoustic wave under microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruhunusiri, W. D. Suranga; Goree, J.

    2013-10-01

    Synchronization is a nonlinear phenomenon where a self-excited oscillation, like a wave in a plasma, interacts with an external driving, resulting in an adjustment of the oscillation frequency. To prepare for experiments under microgravity conditions using the PK-4 facility on the International Space Station, we perform a laboratory experiment to observe synchronization of the self-excited dust acoustic wave. An rf glow discharge argon plasma is formed by applying a low power radio frequency voltage to a lower electrode. A 3D dust cloud is formed by levitating 4.83 micron microspheres inside a glass box placed on the lower electrode. The dust acoustic wave is self-excited with a natural frequency of 22 Hz due to an ion streaming instability. A cross section of the dust cloud is illuminated by a vertical laser sheet and imaged from the side with a digital camera. To synchronize the wave, we sinusoidally modulate the overall ion density. Differently from previous experiments, we use a driving electrode that is separate from the electrode that sustains the plasma, and we characterize synchronization by varying both driving amplitude and frequency. Supported by NASA's Physical Science Research Program.

  14. Vlasov Simulations of Electron Plasma and Ion Acoustic Waves: self-focusing and harmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banks, Jeffrey; Berger, R.; Cohen, B.; Hittinger, J.; Brunner, S.

    2011-10-01

    Vlasov simulations of nonlinear electron plasma (EPW) and ion acoustic waves (IAW) are presented in one and two dimensions. In 2D simulations with LOKI (Banks et al., 18, 052102 (2011)) the waves are created with an external traveling wave potential with a transverse envelope of width Δy such that thermal electrons transit the wave in a ``sideloss'' time, tsl ~ Δ y/ve where ve is the electron thermal velocity. The quasi-steady distribution of trapped electrons and its self-consistent plasma wave are studied after the external field is turned off. For sufficiently short times and large enough wave amplitudes, the magnitude of the negative frequency shift from trapped electrons is a local function of electrostatic potential. Analysis and simulations are presented of the damping and trapped-electron-induced self-focusing (H. Rose PoP 12, 012318 (2005)) of the finite-amplitude EPW. In 1D simulations with SAPRISTI (Brunner and Valeo, PRL 93, 145003 (2004)), IAWs are created with an external traveling wave potential with full electron dynamics. For large IAW amplitudes, the contribution from IAW harmonics to the frequency shift is significant and larger than fluid theory predicts. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  15. Effects of acoustic-gravity waves on the K I 7699 line

    SciTech Connect

    Severino, G.; Roberti, G.; Marmolino, C.; Gomez, M.T.

    1986-01-01

    The effects are examined of acoustic gravity waves with long and short periods on the solar profile of the Potassium 1 7699 line using a dynamic model of line formation. First we studied the kinetic equilibrium of the K 1 atoms in a static atmosphere confirming with up to date atomic data and atmosphere model that a good fit of the resonance line 7699 is possible only when non-LTE effects are accounted for. Then the static non-LTE line source function and lower level population are used as input data for calculating the line formation in the presence of waves. The time behavior of the synthetic profiles corresponding to 300 s and 30 s waves is extensively discussed. The characteristic redshift induced by the 30 s wave is explained within the framework of the S-S line formation model. Long-period waves yield an anticorrelation between the asymmetry at different residual intensities and the line core shift, as observed. The short-period waves with velocity amplitude of about 100 m/s (as the base of the photosphere) produce a mean bisector whose lower part has a slope in agreement with the observed one. The efficiency of waves to produce macro and microturbulence is also discussed.

  16. Features of Propagation of the Acoustic-Gravity Waves Generated by High-Power Periodic Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernogor, L. F.; Frolov, V. L.

    2013-09-01

    We present the results of the bandpass filtering of temporal variations of the Doppler frequency shift of radio signals from a vertical-sounding Doppler radar located near the city of Kharkov when the ionosphere was heated by high-power periodic (with 10 and 15-min periods) radiation from the Sura facility. The filtering was done in the ranges of periods that are close to the acoustic cutoff period and the Brunt—Väisälä period (4-6, 8-12, and 13-17 min). Oscillations with periods of 4-6 min and amplitudes of 50-100 mHz were not recorded in fact. Oscillations with periods of 8-12 and 13-17 min and amplitudes of 60-100 mHz were detected in almost all the sessions. In the former and the latter oscillations, the time of delay with respect to the heater switch-on was close to 100 min and about 40-50 min, respectively. These values correspond to group propagation velocities of about 160 and 320-400 m/s. The Doppler shift oscillations were caused by the acoustic-gravity waves which led to periodic variations in the electron number density with a relative amplitude of about 0.1-1.0%. It was demonstrated that the acoustic-gravity waves were not recorded when the effective power of the Sura facility was equal to 50 MW and they were confidently observed when the effective power was increased up to 130 MW. It is shown that the period of the wave processes was determined by the period of the heating-pause cycles, and the duration of the wave trains did not depend on the duration of the series of heating-pause cycles. The data suggest that the generation mechanism of recorded wave disturbances is different from the mechanism proposed in 1970-1990.

  17. Underwater acoustic wave generation by filamentation of terawatt ultrashort laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Jukna, Vytautas; Jarnac, Amélie; Milián, Carles; Brelet, Yohann; Carbonnel, Jérôme; André, Yves-Bernard; Guillermin, Régine; Sessarego, Jean-Pierre; Fattaccioli, Dominique; Mysyrowicz, André; Couairon, Arnaud; Houard, Aurélien

    2016-06-01

    Acoustic signals generated by filamentation of ultrashort terawatt laser pulses in water are characterized experimentally. Measurements reveal a strong influence of input pulse duration on the shape and intensity of the acoustic wave. Numerical simulations of the laser pulse nonlinear propagation and the subsequent water hydrodynamics and acoustic wave generation show that the strong acoustic emission is related to the mechanism of superfilamention in water. The elongated shape of the plasma volume where energy is deposited drives the far-field profile of the acoustic signal, which takes the form of a radially directed pressure wave with a single oscillation and a very broad spectrum.

  18. Modeling acoustic wave propagation in the Southern Ocean to estimate the acoustic impact of seismic surveys on marine mammals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breitzke, M.; Bohlen, T.

    2007-12-01

    According to the Protocol on Environmental Protection to the Antarctic Treaty, adopted 1991, seismic surveys in the Southern Ocean south of 60°S are exclusively dedicated to academic research. The seismic surveys conducted by the Alfred-Wegener-Institute for Polar and Marine Research, Bremerhaven, Germany during the last 20 years focussed on two areas: The Wedell Sea (60°W - 0°W) and the Amundsen/Bellinghausen Sea (120°W - 60°W). Histograms of the Julian days and water depths covered by these surveys indicate that maximum activities occurred in January and February, and most lines were collected either in shallow waters of 400 - 500 m depth or in deep waters of 2500 - 4500 m depth. To assess the potential risk of future seismic research on marine mammal populations an acoustic wave propagation modeling study is conducted for the Wedell and the Amundsen/ Bellinghausen Sea. A 2.5D finite-difference code is used. It allows to simulate the spherical amplitude decay of point sources correctly, considers P- and S-wave velocities at the sea floor and provides snapshots of the wavefield at any spatial and temporal resolution. As source signals notional signatures of GI-, G- and Bolt guns, computed by the NUCLEUS software (PGS) are used. Based on CTD measurements, sediment core samplings and sediment echosounder recordings two horizontally-layered, range-independent generic models are established for the Wedell and the Amundsen/Bellinghausen Sea, one for shallow (500 m) and one for deep water (3000 m). They indicate that the vertical structure of the water masses is characterized by a 100 m thick, cold, low sound velocity layer (~1440 - 1450 m/s), centered in 100 m depth. In the austral summer it is overlain by a warmer, 50 m thick surface layer with slightly higher sound velocities (~1447 - 1453 m/s). Beneath the low-velocity layer sound velocities increase rapidly to ~1450 - 1460 m/s in 200 m depth, and smoothly to ~1530 m/s in 4700 m depth. The sea floor is mainly

  19. Potential Misidentification of Love-Wave Phase Velocity Based on Three-Component Ambient Seismic Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zongbo; Xia, Jianghai; Luo, Yinhe; Cheng, Feng; Pan, Yudi

    2016-04-01

    People have calculated Rayleigh-wave phase velocities from vertical component of ambient seismic noise for several years. Recently, researchers started to extract Love waves from transverse component recordings of ambient noise, where "transverse" is defined as the direction perpendicular to a great-circle path or a line in small scale through observation sensors. Most researches assumed Rayleigh waves could be negligible, but Rayleigh waves can exist in the transverse component when Rayleigh waves propagate in other directions besides radial direction. In study of data acquired in western Junggar Basin near Karamay city, China, after processing the transverse component recordings of ambient noise, we obtain two energy trends, which are distinguished with Rayleigh-wave and Love-wave phase velocities, in the frequency-velocity domain using multichannel analysis of surface waves (MASW). Rayleigh waves could be also extracted from the transverse component data. Because Rayleigh-wave and Love-wave phase velocities are close in high frequencies (>0.1 Hz), two kinds of surface waves might be merged in the frequency-velocity domain. Rayleigh-wave phase velocities may be misidentified as Love-wave phase velocities. To get accurate surface-wave phase velocities from the transverse component data using seismic interferometry in investigating the shallow geology, our results suggest using MASW to calculate real Love-wave phase velocities.

  20. Longitudinal elastic wave propagation characteristics of inertant acoustic metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, Prateek P.; Manimala, James M.

    2016-06-01

    Longitudinal elastic wave propagation characteristics of acoustic metamaterials with various inerter configurations are investigated using their representative one-dimensional discrete element lattice models. Inerters are dynamic mass-amplifying mechanical elements that are activated by a difference in acceleration across them. They have a small device mass but can provide a relatively large dynamic mass presence depending on accelerations in systems that employ them. The effect of introducing inerters both in local attachments and in the lattice was examined vis-à-vis the propagation characteristics of locally resonant acoustic metamaterials. A simple effective model based on mass, stiffness, or their combined equivalent was used to establish dispersion behavior and quantify attenuation within bandgaps. Depending on inerter configurations in local attachments or in the lattice, both up-shift and down-shift in the bandgap frequency range and their extent are shown to be possible while retaining static mass addition to the host structure to a minimum. Further, frequency-dependent negative and even extreme effective-stiffness regimes are encountered. The feasibility of employing tuned combinations of such mass-delimited inertant configurations to engineer acoustic metamaterials that act as high-pass filters without the use of grounded elements or even as complete longitudinal wave inhibitors is shown. Potential device implications and strategies for practical applications are also discussed.

  1. Extraction of Stoneley and acoustic Rayleigh waves from ambient noise on ocean bottom observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonegawa, T.; Fukao, Y.; Takahashi, T.; Obana, K.; Kodaira, S.; Kaneda, Y.

    2013-12-01

    the separation distance of ~5 km, the peak emerged in the CCFs clearly shows a travel time variation as a function of water depth. The group velocity of the signal gradually changes from 1.2 km/s to 0.7 km/s at water depths from 2000 to 4000 m. In addition to the wave, a relatively weak signal can be seen, which shows a group velocity of 1.4-1.5 km/s with no depth dependency. This would correspond to the ocean acoustic wave. For the case of the analysis for seismometer, similar patterns could be seen in the CCFs, but the signal with a velocity of 1.4-1.5 km/s emerged clearly compared to those using records of hydrophone. We investigated by using a numerical simulation with finite difference technique and normal mode approach in order to confirm what the signals are. As a result, the signal with a group velocities of 1.2 km/s at shallower water depths can be explained by acoustic Rayleigh wave, which has the energy within not only the ocean but also sediment, whereas the other signal with a group velocity of 0.7 km/s at deeper water depths corresponds to the Stoneley wave whose energy is concentrated on the seafloor. The generation of the acoustic Rayleigh wave would be caused by water depth, wavelength, and thickness and velocity of sediment layer.

  2. Asymmetric wave transmission in a diatomic acoustic/elastic metamaterial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bing; Tan, K. T.

    2016-08-01

    Asymmetric acoustic/elastic wave transmission has recently been realized using nonlinearity, wave diffraction, or bias effects, but always at the cost of frequency distortion, direction shift, large volumes, or external energy. Based on the self-coupling of dual resonators, we propose a linear diatomic metamaterial, consisting of several small-sized unit cells, to realize large asymmetric wave transmission in low frequency domain (below 1 kHz). The asymmetric transmission mechanism is theoretically investigated, and numerically verified by both mass-spring and continuum models. This passive system does not require any frequency conversion or external energy, and the asymmetric transmission band can be theoretically predicted and mathematically controlled, which extends the design concept of unidirectional transmission devices.

  3. New Biosensor Using Shear Horizontal Surface Acoustic Wave Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondoh, Jun; Matsui, Yoshikazu; Shiokawa, Showko

    1993-05-01

    This paper describes a new biosensor to detect an enzyme reaction in liquid using surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices fabricated on 36°-rotated Y-cut, X-propagating LiTaO3. The sensing wave on the substrate is a predominantly shear-horizontal-mode SAW (SH-SAW) and is affected by a strong acoustoelectric interaction between the piezoelectric potential and electrical properties of the materials in the adjacent liquid. As an example of an electrical property, pH change associated with an enzyme reaction leads to measurable perturbation in the wave-propagation characteristic. Taking advantage of this phenomenon we realized a SAW biosensor which consists of an immobilized urease membrane on the surface. Also, highly sensitive detection for the urea solution was obtained in our preliminary experiments.

  4. Determination of particle size distributions from acoustic wave propagation measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Spelt, P.D.; Norato, M.A.; Sangani, A.S.; Tavlarides, L.L.

    1999-05-01

    The wave equations for the interior and exterior of the particles are ensemble averaged and combined with an analysis by Allegra and Hawley [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. {bold 51}, 1545 (1972)] for the interaction of a single particle with the incident wave to determine the phase speed and attenuation of sound waves propagating through dilute slurries. The theory is shown to compare very well with the measured attenuation. The inverse problem, i.e., the problem of determining the particle size distribution given the attenuation as a function of frequency, is examined using regularization techniques that have been successful for bubbly liquids. It is shown that, unlike the bubbly liquids, the success of solving the inverse problem is limited since it depends strongly on the nature of particles and the frequency range used in inverse calculations. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  5. Attenuation of 7 GHz surface acoustic waves on silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dongyao; Cahill, David G.

    2016-09-01

    We measured the attenuation of GHz frequency surface acoustic waves (SAWs) on the Si (001) surface using an optical pump-probe technique at temperatures between 300 and 600 K. SAWs are generated and detected by a 700 nm Al grating fabricated by nanoimprint lithography. The grating for SAW generation is separated from the grating for SAW detection by ≈150 μ m . The amplitude of SAWs is attenuated by coupling to bulk waves created by the Al grating, diffraction due to the finite size of the source, and the intrinsic relaxational Akhiezer damping of elastic waves in Si. Thermal phonon relaxation time and Grüneisen parameters are fitted using temperature-dependent measurement. The f Q product of a hypothetical micromechanical oscillator limited by Akhiezer damping at this frequency is ˜3 ×1013 Hz.

  6. Nonextensive dust acoustic waves in a charge varying dusty plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacha, Mustapha; Tribeche, Mouloud

    2012-01-01

    Our recent analysis on nonlinear nonextensive dust-acoustic waves (DA) [Amour and Tribeche in Phys. Plasmas 17:063702, 2010] is extended to include self-consistent nonadiabatic grain charge fluctuation. The appropriate nonextensive electron charging current is rederived based on the orbit-limited motion theory. Our results reveal that the amplitude, strength and nature of the nonlinear DA waves (solitons and shocks) are extremely sensitive to the degree of ion nonextensivity. Stronger is the electron correlation, more important is the charge variation induced nonlinear wave damping. The anomalous dissipation effects may prevail over that dispersion as the electrons evolve far away from their Maxwellian equilibrium. Our investigation may be of wide relevance to astronomers and space scientists working on interstellar dusty plasmas where nonthermal distributions are turning out to be a very common and characteristic feature.

  7. Poisson's ratio from polarization of acoustic zero-group velocity Lamb mode.

    PubMed

    Baggens, Oskar; Ryden, Nils

    2015-07-01

    Poisson's ratio of an isotropic and free elastic plate is estimated from the polarization of the first symmetric acoustic zero-group velocity Lamb mode. This polarization is interpreted as the ratio of the absolute amplitudes of the surface normal and surface in-plane components of the acoustic mode. Results from the evaluation of simulated datasets indicate that the presented relation, which links the polarization and Poisson's ratio, can be extended to incorporate plates with material damping. Furthermore, the proposed application of the polarization is demonstrated in a practical field case, where an increased accuracy of estimated nominal thickness is obtained.

  8. Acoustic waves in the solar atmosphere at high spatial resolution. II. Measurement in the Fe I 5434 Å line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bello González, N.; Flores Soriano, M.; Kneer, F.; Okunev, O.; Shchukina, N.

    2010-11-01

    Aims: We investigate the energy supply of the solar chromosphere by acoustic waves. Methods: A time sequence with high spatial and temporal resolution from the quiet Sun disc centre in Fe i 5434 Å (Landé factor g = 0) is analysed. We used models from a numerical simulation of granular convection and apply NLTE spectral line transfer to determine the height of formation. For estimates of acoustic energy flux, we adopted wave propagation with inclinations of the wave vector with respect to the vertical of 0°, 30°, and 45°. For a granular and an intergranular model, the transmissions of the atmosphere to high-frequency waves were determined for the three inclination angles. Wavelet and Fourier analyses were performed and the resulting power spectra were corrected for atmospheric transmission. Results: We find waves with periods down to ~40 s. They occur intermittently in space and time. The velocity signal is formed at a height of 500 km in the granular model and at 620 km in the intergranule. At periods shorter than the acoustic cutoff (~190 s), ~40% of the waves occur above granules and ~60% above intergranules. By adopting vertical propagation, we estimate total fluxes above granules of 2750-3360 W m-2, and of 910-1 000 W m-2 above intergranules. The weighted average is 1730-2 060 W m-2. The estimates of the total fluxes increase by 15% when inclined wave propagation of 45° is assumed.

  9. Tuning of acoustic wave dispersion in ferroelectrics—A theoretical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Wontae

    2017-02-01

    Tuning of acoustic wave dispersion in ferroelectrics due to its electrostrictive effect is theoretically investigated. As the acoustic wave is excited electrically in ferroelectrics, the elastic stiffness tensor can be modified by both the linear piezoelectric and nonlinear electrostrictive electromechanical couplings depending on the wave excitation direction of the crystal, where the linear piezoelectric modification has been well characterized and extensively used for the application of piezoelectric-based acoustic wave devices over the past 50 years, but the nonlinear electrostrictive modification, determining the tuning of acoustic wave dispersion in the medium, is still too premature to use the properties in application. For the tuning application, it is essential to know how the electrostrictive strain actually tunes the propagation and displacement of the ferroelectrically active acoustic waves, and this information is currently unavailable. In this paper, the ferroelectrically active acoustic wave propagation and displacement in conjunction with the nonlinear electrostrictive modification are calculated using the plane wave expansion method, and the tunable wave properties associated with the propagation and displacement, are discussed. The electrically excited acoustic wave properties in ferroelectrics are largely modified from the electrostrictive effect, e.g., tuned, excited, vanished, coupled, decoupled, etc., and this should be taken into account in the development of ferroelectric-based acoustic wave devices.

  10. Surface acoustic wave unidirectional transducers for quantum applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekström, Maria K.; Aref, Thomas; Runeson, Johan; Björck, Johan; Boström, Isac; Delsing, Per

    2017-02-01

    The conversion efficiency of electric microwave signals into surface acoustic waves in different types of superconducting transducers is studied with the aim of quantum applications. We compare delay lines containing either conventional symmetric transducers (IDTs) or unidirectional transducers (UDTs) at 2.3 GHz and 10 mK. The UDT delay lines improve the insertion loss with 4.7 dB and a directivity of 22 dB is found for each UDT, indicating that 99.4% of the acoustic power goes in the desired direction. The power lost in the undesired direction accounts for more than 90% of the total loss in IDT delay lines, but only ˜3% of the total loss in the floating electrode unidirectional transducer delay lines.

  11. Absorption of surface acoustic waves by topological insulator thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Li, L. L.; Xu, W.

    2014-08-11

    We present a theoretical study on the absorption of the surface acoustic waves (SAWs) by Dirac electrons in topological insulator (TI) thin films (TITFs). We find that due to momentum and energy conservation laws, the absorption of the SAWs in TITFs can only be achieved via intra-band electronic transitions. The strong absorption can be observed up to sub-terahertz frequencies. With increasing temperature, the absorption intensity increases significantly and the cut-off frequency is blue-shifted. More interestingly, we find that the absorption of the SAWs by the TITFs can be markedly enhanced by the tunable subgap in the Dirac energy spectrum of the TI surface states. Such a subgap is absent in conventional two-dimensional electron gases (2DEGs) and in the gapless Dirac 2DEG such as graphene. This study is pertinent to the exploration of the acoustic properties of TIs and to potential application of TIs as tunable SAW devices working at hypersonic frequencies.

  12. Visualization of Surface Acoustic Waves in Thin Liquid Films

    PubMed Central

    Rambach, R. W.; Taiber, J.; Scheck, C. M. L.; Meyer, C.; Reboud, J.; Cooper, J. M.; Franke, T.

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate that the propagation path of a surface acoustic wave (SAW), excited with an interdigitated transducer (IDT), can be visualized using a thin liquid film dispensed onto a lithium niobate (LiNbO3) substrate. The practical advantages of this visualization method are its rapid and simple implementation, with many potential applications including in characterising acoustic pumping within microfluidic channels. It also enables low-cost characterisation of IDT designs thereby allowing the determination of anisotropy and orientation of the piezoelectric substrate without the requirement for sophisticated and expensive equipment. Here, we show that the optical visibility of the sound path critically depends on the physical properties of the liquid film and identify heptane and methanol as most contrast rich solvents for visualization of SAW. We also provide a detailed theoretical description of this effect. PMID:26917490

  13. Absorption of surface acoustic waves by topological insulator thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, L. L.; Xu, W.

    2014-08-01

    We present a theoretical study on the absorption of the surface acoustic waves (SAWs) by Dirac electrons in topological insulator (TI) thin films (TITFs). We find that due to momentum and energy conservation laws, the absorption of the SAWs in TITFs can only be achieved via intra-band electronic transitions. The strong absorption can be observed up to sub-terahertz frequencies. With increasing temperature, the absorption intensity increases significantly and the cut-off frequency is blue-shifted. More interestingly, we find that the absorption of the SAWs by the TITFs can be markedly enhanced by the tunable subgap in the Dirac energy spectrum of the TI surface states. Such a subgap is absent in conventional two-dimensional electron gases (2DEGs) and in the gapless Dirac 2DEG such as graphene. This study is pertinent to the exploration of the acoustic properties of TIs and to potential application of TIs as tunable SAW devices working at hypersonic frequencies.

  14. System and method for sonic wave measurements using an acoustic beam source

    DOEpatents

    Vu, Cung Khac; Sinha, Dipen N.; Pantea, Cristian

    2015-08-11

    A method and system for investigating structure near a borehole are described herein. The method includes generating an acoustic beam by an acoustic source; directing at one or more azimuthal angles the acoustic beam towards a selected location in a vicinity of a borehole; receiving at one or more receivers an acoustic signal, the acoustic signal originating from a reflection or a refraction of the acoustic wave by a material at the selected location; and analyzing the received acoustic signal to characterize features of the material around the borehole.

  15. Molding acoustic, electromagnetic and water waves with a single cloak

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jun; Jiang, Xu; Fang, Nicholas; Georget, Elodie; Abdeddaim, Redha; Geffrin, Jean-Michel; Farhat, Mohamed; Sabouroux, Pierre; Enoch, Stefan; Guenneau, Sébastien

    2015-01-01

    We describe two experiments demonstrating that a cylindrical cloak formerly introduced for linear surface liquid waves works equally well for sound and electromagnetic waves. This structured cloak behaves like an acoustic cloak with an effective anisotropic density and an electromagnetic cloak with an effective anisotropic permittivity, respectively. Measured forward scattering for pressure and magnetic fields are in good agreement and provide first evidence of broadband cloaking. Microwave experiments and 3D electromagnetic wave simulations further confirm reduced forward and backscattering when a rectangular metallic obstacle is surrounded by the structured cloak for cloaking frequencies between 2.6 and 7.0 GHz. This suggests, as supported by 2D finite element simulations, sound waves are cloaked between 3 and 8 KHz and linear surface liquid waves between 5 and 16 Hz. Moreover, microwave experiments show the field is reduced by 10 to 30 dB inside the invisibility region, which suggests the multi-wave cloak could be used as a protection against water, sonic or microwaves. PMID:26057934

  16. Use of multiple acoustic wave modes for assessment of long bones: Model study

    PubMed Central

    Tatarinov, Alexey; Sarvazyan, Noune; Sarvazyan, Armen

    2010-01-01

    Multiple acoustic wave mode method has been proposed as a new modality in axial bone QUS. The new method is based on measurement of ultrasound velocity at different ratio of wavelength to the bone thickness, and taking into account both bulk and guided waves. It allows assessment of changes in both the material properties related to porosity and mineralization as well as the cortical thickness influenced by resorption from inner layers, which are equally important in diagnostics of osteoporosis and other bone osteopenia. Developed method was validated in model studies using a dual-frequency (100 and 500 kHz) ultrasound device. Three types of bone phantoms for long bones were developed and tested: (1) tubular specimens from polymer materials to model combined changes of material stiffness and cortical wall thickness; (2) layered specimens to model porosity in compact bone progressing from endosteum towards periosteum; (3) animal bone specimens with both cortical and trabecular components. Observed changes of the ultrasound velocity of guided waves at 100 kHz followed gradual changes in the thickness of the intact cortical layer. On the other hand, the bulk velocity at 500 kHz remained nearly constant at the different cortical layer thickness but was affected by the material stiffness. Similar trends were observed in phantoms and in fragments of animal bones. PMID:15982472

  17. Evaluation of the resolution of a metamaterial acoustic leaky wave antenna.

    PubMed

    Naify, Christina J; Rogers, Jeffery S; Guild, Matthew D; Rohde, Charles A; Orris, Gregory J

    2016-06-01

    Acoustic antennas have long been utilized to directionally steer acoustic waves in both air and water. Typically, these antennas are comprised of arrays of active acoustic elements, which are electronically phased to steer the acoustic profile in the desired direction. A new technology, known as an acoustic leaky wave antenna (LWA), has recently been shown to achieve directional steering of acoustic waves using a single active transducer coupled to a transmission line passive aperture. The LWA steers acoustic energy by preferential coupling to an input frequency and can be designed to steer from backfire to endfire, including broadside. This paper provides an analysis of resolution as a function of both input frequency and antenna length. Additionally, the resolution is compared to that achieved using an array of active acoustic elements.

  18. Numerical and experimental study of Lamb wave propagation in a two-dimensional acoustic black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Shiling; Lomonosov, Alexey M.; Shen, Zhonghua

    2016-06-01

    The propagation of laser-generated Lamb waves in a two-dimensional acoustic black-hole structure was studied numerically and experimentally. The geometrical acoustic theory has been applied to calculate the beam trajectories in the region of the acoustic black hole. The finite element method was also used to study the time evolution of propagating waves. An optical system based on the laser-Doppler vibration method was assembled. The effect of the focusing wave and the reduction in wave speed of the acoustic black hole has been validated.

  19. Mass sensitivity of layered shear-horizontal surface acoustic wave devices for sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalantar-Zadeh, Kourosh; Trinchi, Adrian; Wlodarski, Wojtek; Holland, Anthony; Galatsis, Kosmas

    2001-11-01

    Layered Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) devices that allow the propagation of Love mode acoustic waves will be studied in this paper. In these devices, the substrate allows the propagation of Surface Skimming Bulks Waves (SSBWs). By depositing layers, that the speed of Shear Horizontal (SH) acoustic wave propagation is less than that of the substrate, the propagation mode transforms to Love mode. Love mode devices which will be studied in this paper, have SiO2 and ZnO acoustic guiding layers. As Love mode of propagation has no movement of particles component normal to the active sensor surface, they can be employed for the sensing applications in the liquid media.

  20. Acoustic scattering from a finite plate: generation of guided Lamb waves S(0), A(0) and A.

    PubMed

    Cité, N; Chati, F; Décultot, D; Léon, F; Maze, G

    2012-06-01

    In the domain of renewable energies, marine current turbines constitute one of the possibilities of producing electrical energy. Naked-eye inspection, or with the aid of video monitoring systems of these machines to ensure their perfect working order, can be difficult in a turbid environment. Acoustic methods are conceivable. The study focuses on the blades of these machines, by considering rectangular plates. The propagation of Lamb waves in a plate is studied by analyzing experimental time signals obtained from acoustic scattering. These signals are analyzed employing the ray theory. In vacuum, the flexural wave is the A(0) Lamb wave, whilst in water this wave splits in a bifurcation: the A wave with a phase velocity always smaller than the sound speed in water, and the A(0) wave with a phase velocity always higher than the sound speed in water. In the central bandpass of the transducers used in the experiments, mainly the A and S(0) waves exist. However, signals observed in the third harmonic bandpass of the transducers are also analyzed. In order to complement these results, resonance frequencies of the plate studied are calculated taking into account the boundary conditions and compared with the resonance frequencies of the experimental spectra.

  1. Effect of secondary electron emission on nonlinear dust acoustic wave propagation in a complex plasma with negative equilibrium dust charge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhakta, Subrata; Ghosh, Uttam; Sarkar, Susmita

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, we have investigated the effect of secondary electron emission on nonlinear propagation of dust acoustic waves in a complex plasma where equilibrium dust charge is negative. The primary electrons, secondary electrons, and ions are Boltzmann distributed, and only dust grains are inertial. Electron-neutral and ion-neutral collisions have been neglected with the assumption that electron and ion mean free paths are very large compared to the plasma Debye length. Both adiabatic and nonadiabatic dust charge variations have been separately taken into account. In the case of adiabatic dust charge variation, nonlinear propagation of dust acoustic waves is governed by the KdV (Korteweg-de Vries) equation, whereas for nonadiabatic dust charge variation, it is governed by the KdV-Burger equation. The solution of the KdV equation gives a dust acoustic soliton, whose amplitude and width depend on the secondary electron yield. Similarly, the KdV-Burger equation provides a dust acoustic shock wave. This dust acoustic shock wave may be monotonic or oscillatory in nature depending on the fact that whether it is dissipation dominated or dispersion dominated. Our analysis shows that secondary electron emission increases nonadiabaticity induced dissipation and consequently increases the monotonicity of the dust acoustic shock wave. Such a dust acoustic shock wave may accelerate charge particles and cause bremsstrahlung radiation in space plasmas whose physical process may be affected by secondary electron emission from dust grains. The effect of the secondary electron emission on the stability of the equilibrium points of the KdV-Burger equation has also been investigated. This equation has two equilibrium points. The trivial equilibrium point with zero potential is a saddle and hence unstable in nature. The nontrivial equilibrium point with constant nonzero potential is a stable node up to a critical value of the wave velocity and a stable focus above it. This critical

  2. Experimental quiescent drifting dusty plasmas and temporal dust acoustic wave growth

    SciTech Connect

    Heinrich, J. R.; Kim, S.-H.; Meyer, J. K.; Merlino, R. L.

    2011-11-15

    We report on dust acoustic wave growth rate measurements taken in a dc (anode glow) discharge plasma device. By introducing a mesh with a variable bias 12-17 cm from the anode, we developed a technique to produce a drifting dusty plasma. A secondary dust cloud, free of dust acoustic waves, was trapped adjacent to the anode side of the mesh. When the mesh was returned to its floating potential, the secondary cloud was released and streamed towards the anode and primary dust cloud, spontaneously exciting dust acoustic waves. The amplitude growth of the excited dust acoustic waves was measured directly along with the wavelength and Doppler shifted frequency. These measurements were compared to fluid and kinetic dust acoustic wave theories. As the wave growth saturated a transition from linear to nonlinear waves was observed. The merging of the secondary and primary dust clouds was also observed.

  3. Inverse scattering problems for acoustic waves in an inhomogeneous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kedzierawski, Andrzej Wladyslaw

    The inverse scattering problem is considered of determining either the absorption of sound in an inhomogeneous medium or the surface impedance of an obstacle from a knowledge of the far field patterns of the scattered field corresponding to many incident time-harmonic plane waves. First, the inverse problem is studied in the case when the scattering object is an inhomogeneous medium with complex refractive index having compact support. The approach to this problem is the orthogonal projection method of Colton-Monk (1988). After that, the analogue is proven of Karp's Theorem for the scattering of acoustic waves through an inhomogeneous medium with compact support. Some of these results are then generalized to the case when the inhomogeneous medium is no longer of compact support. If the acoustic wave penetrates the inhomogeneous medium by only a small amount then the inverse medium problem leads to the inverse obstacle problem with an impedance boundary condition. The inverse impedance problem is solved of determining the surface impedance of an obstacle of known shape by using both the methods of Kirsch-Kress and Colton-Monk (1989).

  4. Acoustic wave propagation in heterogeneous structures including experimental validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, Kenneth J.; Dahl, Milo D.

    1989-01-01

    A finite element model was developed to solve for the acoustic pressure and energy fields in a heterogeneous suppressor. The derivations from the governing equations assumed that the material properties could vary with position resulting in a heterogeneous variable property two-dimensional wave equation. This eliminated the necessity of finding the boundary conditions between different materials. For a two media region consisting of part air and part bulk absorber, a model was used to describe the bulk absorber properties in two directions. Complex metallic structures inside the air duct are simulated by simply changing element properties from air to the structural material in a pattern to describe the desired shapes. To verify the numerical theory, experiments were conducted without flow in a rectangular duct with a single folded cavity mounted above the duct and absorbing material mounted inside a cavity. Changes in a nearly plane wave sound field were measured on the wall opposite the absorbing cavity. Fairly good agreement was found in the standing wave pattern upstream of the absorber and in the decay of pressure level opposite the absorber, as a function of distance along the duct. The finite element model provides a convenient method for evaluating the acoustic properties of bulk absorbers.

  5. The evaluation and control of acoustical standing waves1

    PubMed Central

    Krasnegor, Norman A.; Hodos, William

    1974-01-01

    Calibration of a standard pigeon box subsequently modified for use as an acoustical chamber in a frequency discrimination experiment revealed that the enclosure was not acoustically “flat”. Standing waves were detected at each of the six frequencies measured. To ascertain whether the maximum standing waves recorded (3.0 dB) could serve as an added or alternative cue for pigeons tested in the chamber on a frequency discrimination problem, pure-tone intensity difference thresholds were determined for two pigeons at 1.0, 2.0, and 3.0 KHz. The results of the experiment indicated that the smallest intensity difference detectable was 10.0 dB, a value that was 7.0 dB above the maximum standing wave measured in the box. These data suggest that the modified pigeon chamber is suitable to test pure-tone frequency discriminations in pigeons in the range of 1.0 to 3.0 KHz. PMID:16811783

  6. Acoustic wave propagation in heterogeneous structures including experimental validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, Kenneth J.; Dahl, Milo D.

    1989-01-01

    A finite element model was developed to solve for the acoustic pressure and energy fields in a heterogeneous suppressor. The derivations from the governing equations assumed that the material properties could vary with position resulting in a heterogeneous variable property two-dimensional wave equation. This eliminated the necessity of finding the boundary conditions between different materials. For a two-media region consisting of part air and part bulk absorber, a model was used to describe the bulk absorber properties in two directions. Complex metallic structures inside the air duct are simulated by simply changing element properties from air to the structural material in a pattern to describe the desired shapes. To verify the numerical theory, experiments were conducted without flow in a rectangular duct with a single folded cavity mounted above the duct and absorbing material mounted inside a cavity. Changes in a nearly plane wave sound field were measured on the wall opposite the absorbing cavity. Fairly good agreement was found in the standing wave pattern upstream of the absorber and in the decay of pressure level opposite the absorber, as a function of distance along the duct. The finite element model provides a convenient method for evaluating the acoustic properties of bulk absorbers.

  7. Blood pulse wave velocity measured by photoacoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Chenghung; Hu, Song; Maslov, Konstantin; Wang, Lihong V.

    2013-03-01

    Blood pulse wave velocity (PWV) is an important indicator for vascular stiffness. In this letter, we present electrocardiogram-synchronized photoacoustic microscopy for in vivo noninvasive quantification of the PWV in the peripheral vessels of mice. Interestingly, strong correlation between blood flow speed and ECG were clearly observed in arteries but not in veins. PWV is measured by the pulse travel time and the distance between two spot of a chose vessel, where simultaneously recorded electrocardiograms served as references. Statistical analysis shows a linear correlation between the PWV and the vessel diameter, which agrees with known physiology. Keywords: photoacoustic microscopy, photoacoustic spectroscopy, bilirubin, scattering medium.

  8. Characterization of Surface Acoustic Wave Nebulization: Atomization dynamics and resulting droplet size distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Alicia; Aliseda, Alberto; Heron, Scott; Huang, Yue; Goodlett, David

    2012-11-01

    High-speed imaging and Phase Doppler Particle Analyzer (PDPA) measurements are used to characterize the size and velocity distributions of micron-sized droplets produced by a surface acoustic wave (SAW) microelectronic nebulizer. The effects of drop composition, electric field amplitude and pulsation frequency, and initial drop volume have been experimentally studied. We observe that the droplets created in pure water are smaller, ~2 μm, and the plume more concentrated near the nebulizer, with small second probability peak for large diameters, ~100 μm. Pure methanol droplets have larger diameters, ~ 5 μm, and lower volume concentration in the nebulizer plume, as corresponds to less efficient atomization process. The influence of fluid viscosity and surface tension will be discussed. Measurements of the velocity distribution show a strong dependency with excitation amplitude and duty factor.

  9. Acoustic wavefield and Mach wave radiation of flashing arcs in strombolian explosion measured by image luminance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genco, Riccardo; Ripepe, Maurizio; Marchetti, Emanuele; Bonadonna, Costanza; Biass, Sebastien

    2014-10-01

    Explosive activity often generates visible flashing arcs in the volcanic plume considered as the evidence of the shock-front propagation induced by supersonic dynamics. High-speed image processing is used to visualize the pressure wavefield associated with flashing arcs observed in strombolian explosions. Image luminance is converted in virtual acoustic signal compatible with the signal recorded by pressure transducer. Luminance variations are moving with a spherical front at a 344.7 m/s velocity. Flashing arcs travel at the sound speed already 14 m above the vent and are not necessarily the evidence of a supersonic explosive dynamics. However, seconds later, the velocity of small fragments increases, and the spherical acousto-luminance wavefront becomes planar recalling the Mach wave radiation generated by large scale turbulence in high-speed jet. This planar wavefront forms a Mach angle of 55° with the explosive jet axis, suggesting an explosive dynamics moving at Mo = 1.22 Mach number.

  10. Effect of viscoelastic film for shear horizontal surface acoustic wave on quartz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, Mikihiro; Yatsuda, Hiromi; Kondoh, Jun

    2015-07-01

    A numerical analysis for the mass loading sensitivity of shear horizontal surface acoustic wave (SH-SAW) immunoassay biosensors on quartz has already been studied. However, the mass loading analysis is insufficient to explain the actual biosensor performance. To understand the SH-SAW biosensor performance, we analyze the effect of a viscoelastic film on SH-SAW biosensors. In this paper, a numerical analysis using a simple viscoelastic model for the SH-SAW biosensors is presented. In the theoretical model, the bioreaction layer on the SH-SAW biosensors can be treated as a viscoelastic film. The velocity changes of the 250 MHz SH-SAWs on quartz substrates, which are covered with bovine serum albumin (BSA) layers of different thicknesses, were measured and compared with the theoretical results obtained using the proposed viscoelastic model. Good agreement of the velocity changes of SH-SAWs versus changes in the viscoelastic film thickness between theoretical and experimental results was obtained.

  11. Errors in acoustic doppler profiler velocity measurements caused by flow disturbance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mueller, D.S.; Abad, J.D.; Garcia, C.M.; Gartner, J.W.; Garcia, M.H.; Oberg, K.A.

    2007-01-01

    Acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs) are commonly used to measure streamflow and water velocities in rivers and streams. This paper presents laboratory, field, and numerical model evidence of errors in ADCP measurements caused by flow disturbance. A state-of-the-art three-dimensional computational fluid dynamic model is validated with and used to complement field and laboratory observations of flow disturbance and its effect on measured velocities. Results show that near the instrument, flow velocities measured by the ADCP are neither the undisturbed stream velocity nor the velocity of the flow field around the ADCP. The velocities measured by the ADCP are biased low due to the downward flow near the upstream face of the ADCP and upward recovering flow in the path of downstream transducer, which violate the flow homogeneity assumption used to transform beam velocities into Cartesian velocity components. The magnitude of the bias is dependent on the deployment configuration, the diameter of the instrument, and the approach velocity, and was observed to range from more than 25% at 5cm from the transducers to less than 1% at about 50cm from the transducers for the scenarios simulated. ?? 2007 ASCE.

  12. Dust-acoustic waves modulational instability and rogue waves in a polarized dusty plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouzit, Omar; Tribeche, Mouloud

    2015-10-01

    The polarization force-induced changes in the dust-acoustic waves (DAWs) modulational instability (MI) are examined. Using the reductive perturbation method, the nonlinear Schrödinger equation that governs the MI of the DAWs is obtained. It is found that the effect of the polarization term R is to narrow the wave number domain for the onset of instability. The amplitude of the wave envelope decreases as R increases, meaning that the polarization force effects render weaker the associated DA rogue waves. The latter may therefore completely damp in the vicinity of R ˜ 1, i.e., as the polarization force becomes close to the electrostatic one (the net force acting on the dust particles becomes vanishingly small). The DA rogue wave profile is very sensitive to any change in the restoring force acting on the dust particles. It turns out that the polarization effects may completely smear out the DA rogue waves.

  13. Dust-acoustic waves modulational instability and rogue waves in a polarized dusty plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Bouzit, Omar; Tribeche, Mouloud

    2015-10-15

    The polarization force-induced changes in the dust-acoustic waves (DAWs) modulational instability (MI) are examined. Using the reductive perturbation method, the nonlinear Schrödinger equation that governs the MI of the DAWs is obtained. It is found that the effect of the polarization term R is to narrow the wave number domain for the onset of instability. The amplitude of the wave envelope decreases as R increases, meaning that the polarization force effects render weaker the associated DA rogue waves. The latter may therefore completely damp in the vicinity of R ∼ 1, i.e., as the polarization force becomes close to the electrostatic one (the net force acting on the dust particles becomes vanishingly small). The DA rogue wave profile is very sensitive to any change in the restoring force acting on the dust particles. It turns out that the polarization effects may completely smear out the DA rogue waves.

  14. The nonlinear evolution of driven nonlinear ion acoustic waves with kinetic electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Richard; Brunner, Stephan; Valeo, Ernest; Divol, Laurent; Still, Charles

    2006-10-01

    The stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) of laser light from hot plasma drives ion acoustic waves to large amplitudes particularly if the phase velocity is much greater than the ion thermal velocity for all ion species, that is, ZTe/Ti >>1 where Z is the charge state of the ion, and Te and Ti are the electron and ion temperatures. In fluid simulations of the SBS from CO2 and Krypton plasmas, ad hoc limits on the amplitude of the driven ion waves were required to match the measured reflectivity. Because ZTe/Ti >>1, ion kinetics are unlikely to play a role in the saturation of ion waves. Here, we study the effect of electron trapping which produces a positive frequency shift in quantitative agreement with theory (see abstract by S. Brunner et al., this meeting) and the role of electron kinetics on the decay instability of the driven ion wave. Further, we apply these results to modeling of experiments where ZTe/Ti >>1 [e.g., Glenzer et al., PRL 86, 2565 (2001), L. Divol, et al., Physics of Plasmas 10, 1822 (2003)].

  15. Acoustic emisson and ultrasonic wave characteristics in TIG-welded 316 stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jin Kyung; Lee, Joon Hyun; Lee, Sang Pill; Son, In Su; Bae, Dong Su

    2014-05-01

    A TIG welded 316 stainless steel materials will have a large impact on the design and the maintenance of invessel components including pipes used in a nuclear power plant, and it is important to clear the dynamic behavior in the weld part of stainless steel. Therefore, nondestructive techniques of acoustic emission (AE) and ultrasonic wave were applied to investigate the damage behavior of welded stainless steel. The velocity and attenuation ratio of the ultrasonic wave at each zone were measured, and a 10 MHz sensor was used. We investigated the relationship between dynamic behavior and AE parameters analysis and derived the optimum parameters to evaluate the damage degree of the specimen. By measuring the velocity and the attenuation of an ultrasonic wave propagating each zone of the welded stainless steel, the relation of the ultrasonic wave and metal structure at the base metal, heat affected zone (HAZ) metal and weld metal is also discussed. The generating tendency of cumulated counts is similar to that of the load curve. The attenuation ratios from the ultrasonic test results were 0.2 dB/mm at the base zone, and 0.52 dB/mm and 0.61 dB/mm at the HAZ zone and weld zone, respectively.

  16. Semiconductor Characterization with Acoustic and Thermal waves on Picosecond Timescales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Oliver B.

    1997-03-01

    Ultrafast optical techniques for semiconductor characterization can probe the dynamics of photoexcited carriers, leading to applications in, for example, in-line monitoring of semiconductor processing and optimization of materials for sub-picosecond electronic switches or for nanoscale electronic devices.(Semiconductors Probed by Ultrafast Laser Spectroscopy, edited by R. R. Alfano (Academic, New York, 1984).) Picosecond or femtosecond optical pulses excite electrons to higher electronic bands, producing a nonequilibrium electron-hole distribution. Various physical effects result from the relaxation of this distribution. Luminescence or photoelectron emission are examples. In the present study the focus is on acoustic and thermal effects. The change in electron and hole occupation probabilities induces an electronic stress distributed throughout the carrier penetration depth. A temperature change of the lattice and an associated thermal stress are also produced. The combined stress distribution launches a strain pulse that propagates into the sample as a longitudinally polarized acoustic wave in the present experiments. Its reflection from sub-surface boundaries, interfaces or defects can be detected at the surface by another, weaker optical probe pulse. During this time the temperature distribution in the semiconductor also changes due to thermal wave propagation,(Photoacoustic and Thermal Wave Phenomena in Semiconductors, edited by Andreas Mandelis (North Holland, New York, 1987).) and this simultaneously influences the optical probe pulse. Both reflectance modulation and beam deflection methods for probing were used to investigate crystalline and amorphous silicon samples.(O. B. Wright, U. Zammit, M. Marinelli, and V. Gusev, Appl. Phys. Lett. 69, 553 (1996).) (O. B. Wright and V. E. Gusev, Appl. Phys. Lett. 66, 1190 (1995).) (O. B. Wright and K. Kawashima, Phonon Scattering in Condensed Matter VII, edited by R. O. Pohl and M. Meissner, Springer Verlag, Berlin

  17. An analysis of beam parameters on proton-acoustic waves through an analytic approach.

    PubMed

    Aytac Kipergil, Esra; Erkol, Hakan; Kaya, Serhat; Gulsen, Gultekin; Unlu, Mehmet

    2017-03-02

    It has been reported that acoustic waves are generated when a high energy pulsed proton beam is deposited in a small volume within tissue. One possible application of the proton induced acoustics is to get a real-time feedback for intratreatment adjustments by monitoring such acoustic waves. High spatial resolution in ultrasound imaging may reduce proton range uncertainty. Thus, it is crucial to understand the dependence of the acoustic waves on the proton beam characteristics. In this manuscript, firstly, an analytic solution to the proton induced acoustic wave is presented to reveal the dependence of signal on beam parameters, and then combined with an analytic approximation of the Bragg curve. The influence of the beam energy, pulse duration, and beam diameter variation on the acoustic waveform are investigated. Further analysis is performed regarding the Fourier decomposition of proton-acoustic signals. Our results show that smaller spill time of proton beam upsurges the amplitude of acoustic wave for constant number of protons, and hence beneficial for dose monitoring. The increase in the energy of each individual proton in the beam leads to spatial broadening of the Bragg curve, which also yields acoustic waves of greater amplitude. The pulse duration and the beam width of the proton beam do not affect the central frequency of the acoustic wave, but they change the amplitude of the spectral components.

  18. Multi-resonance tunneling of acoustic waves in two-dimensional locally-resonant phononic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Aichao; He, Wei; Zhang, Jitao; Zhu, Liang; Yu, Lingang; Ma, Jian; Zou, Yang; Li, Min; Wu, Yu

    2017-03-01

    Multi-resonance tunneling of acoustic waves through a two-dimensional phononic crystal (PC) is demonstrated by substituting dual Helmholtz resonators (DHRs) for acoustically-rigid scatterers in the PC. Due to the coupling of the incident waves with the acoustic multi-resonance modes of the DHRs, acoustic waves can tunnel through the PC at specific frequencies which lie inside the band gaps of the PC. This wave tunneling transmission can be further broadened by using the multilayer Helmholtz resonators. Thus, a PC consisting of an array of dual/multilayer Helmholtz resonators can serve as an acoustic band-pass filter, used to pick out acoustic waves with certain frequencies from noise.

  19. GPS-Acoustic Seafloor Geodesy using a Wave Glider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chadwell, C. D.

    2013-12-01

    The conventional approach to implement the GPS-Acoustic technique uses a ship or buoy for the interface between GPS and Acoustics. The high cost and limited availability of ships restricts occupations to infrequent campaign-style measurements. A new approach to address this problem uses a remote controlled, wave-powered sea surface vehicle, the Wave Glider. The Wave Glider uses sea-surface wave action for forward propulsion with both upward and downward motions producing forward thrust. It uses solar energy for power with solar panels charging the onboard 660 W-h battery for near continuous operation. It uses Iridium for communication providing command and control from shore plus status and user data via the satellite link. Given both the sea-surface wave action and solar energy are renewable, the vehicle can operate for extended periods (months) remotely. The vehicle can be launched from a small boat and can travel at ~ 1 kt to locations offshore. We have adapted a Wave Glider for seafloor geodesy by adding a dual frequency GPS receiver embedded in an Inertial Navigation Unit, a second GPS antenna/receiver to align the INU, and a high precision acoustic ranging system. We will report results of initial testing of the system conducted at SIO. In 2014, the new approach will be used for seafloor geodetic measurements of plate motion in the Cascadia Subduction Zone. The project is for a three-year effort to measure plate motion at three sites along an East-West profile at latitude 44.6 N, offshore Newport Oregon. One site will be located on the incoming plate to measure the present day convergence between the Juan de Fuca and North American plates and two additional sites will be located on the continental slope of NA to measure the elastic deformation due to stick-slip behavior on the mega-thrust fault. These new seafloor data will constrain existing models of slip behavior that presently are poorly constrained by land geodetic data 100 km from the deformation front.

  20. Modeling of a Surface Acoustic Wave Strain Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, W. C.; Atkinson, Gary M.

    2010-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center is investigating Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) sensor technology for harsh environments aimed at aerospace applications. To aid in development of sensors a model of a SAW strain sensor has been developed. The new model extends the modified matrix method to include the response of Orthogonal Frequency Coded (OFC) reflectors and the response of SAW devices to strain. These results show that the model accurately captures the strain response of a SAW sensor on a Langasite substrate. The results of the model of a SAW Strain Sensor on Langasite are presented