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Sample records for acoustic waveguide remote

  1. Ocean Acoustic Waveguide Remote Sensing (OAWRS) of Marine Ecosystems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-12-03

    Supplement 1). Since krill are mainly found in the upper water column ( m) (Hamner et al. 1983, Brierley & Watkins 2000, Brierley et al. 2002), RSR...remotely assess populations and study the behavior of fish and other marine organisms, such as Antarctic krill , to help the study of marine ecology and...remotely assess populations and study the behavior of fish and other pelagic organisms, such as Antarctic krill , over broad temporal and spatial scales. A

  2. Remote Sensing of Marine Life and Submerged Target Motions with Ocean Waveguide Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Zheng

    Many species of fish that inhabit the continental shelf waters can cause significant acoustic scattering at low- to mid-frequencies due to the large impedance contrast between their air-filled swimbladders and the surrounding water. In this thesis, we investigate the acoustic resonance scattering response from distributed fish groups both experimentally and theoretically including the effects of multiple scattering, attenuation, and dispersion in a random range-dependent ocean waveguide using an instantaneous wide-area imaging system. In navy sonar operations, the biological organisms can cause high false alarm rates or missed target detections since the biological scattering can be confused with or camouflage the returns from other discrete and distributed objects, such as underwater vehicles and geologic features. From an ecological perspective, the ability to instantaneously survey fish populations distributed over wide areas is important for fisheries management. The low-frequency target strength of shoaling Atlantic herring ( Clupea harengus) in the Gulf of Maine during their Autumn 2006 spawning season is estimated from experimental data acquired simultaneously at multiple frequencies in the 300 to 1200 Hz range using (1) a low-frequency ocean acoustic waveguide remote sensing (OAWRS) system, (2) areal population density calibration with several conventional fish finding sonar (CFFS) systems, and (3) low-frequency transmission loss measurements. The OAWRS system's instantaneous imaging diameter of 100 km and regular updating enabled unaliased monitoring of fish populations over ecosystem scales including shoals of Atlantic herring containing as many as 200 million individuals, as estimated based on single scattering assumption and confirmed by concurrent trawl and CFFS sampling. The mean scattering cross-section of an individual shoaling herring is found to consistently exhibit a strong, roughly 20 dB/octave roll-off with decreasing frequency over all days of

  3. A Unified Approach to Passive and Active Ocean Acoustic Waveguide Remote Sensing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-30

    fish from man-made targets. Many species of animals including fish, birds , insects and other self-propelled particles (SPPs) are known to form...synchronous motion within the SPP group, and that disturbances can propagate as waves within a group at speeds much higher than that of any individual...noise sources, both natural and anthropogenic , on acoustic detection will be evaluated quantitatively. An analytic model that accounts for the

  4. Acoustic Remote Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowling, David R.; Sabra, Karim G.

    2015-01-01

    Acoustic waves carry information about their source and collect information about their environment as they propagate. This article reviews how these information-carrying and -collecting features of acoustic waves that travel through fluids can be exploited for remote sensing. In nearly all cases, modern acoustic remote sensing involves array-recorded sounds and array signal processing to recover multidimensional results. The application realm for acoustic remote sensing spans an impressive range of signal frequencies (10-2 to 107 Hz) and distances (10-2 to 107 m) and involves biomedical ultrasound imaging, nondestructive evaluation, oil and gas exploration, military systems, and Nuclear Test Ban Treaty monitoring. In the past two decades, approaches have been developed to robustly localize remote sources; remove noise and multipath distortion from recorded signals; and determine the acoustic characteristics of the environment through which the sound waves have traveled, even when the recorded sounds originate from uncooperative sources or are merely ambient noise.

  5. Low-frequency target strength and abundance of shoaling Atlantic herring (Clupea harengus) in the Gulf of Maine during the Ocean Acoustic Waveguide Remote Sensing 2006 Experiment.

    PubMed

    Gong, Zheng; Andrews, Mark; Jagannathan, Srinivasan; Patel, Ruben; Jech, J Michael; Makris, Nicholas C; Ratilal, Purnima

    2010-01-01

    The low-frequency target strength of shoaling Atlantic herring (Clupea harengus) in the Gulf of Maine during Autumn 2006 spawning season is estimated from experimental data acquired simultaneously at multiple frequencies in the 300-1200 Hz range using (1) a low-frequency ocean acoustic waveguide remote sensing (OAWRS) system, (2) areal population density calibration with several conventional fish finding sonar (CFFS) systems, and (3) low-frequency transmission loss measurements. The OAWRS system's instantaneous imaging diameter of 100 km and regular updating enabled unaliased monitoring of fish populations over ecosystem scales including shoals of Atlantic herring containing hundreds of millions of individuals, as confirmed by concurrent trawl and CFFS sampling. High spatial-temporal coregistration was found between herring shoals imaged by OAWRS and concurrent CFFS line-transects, which also provided fish depth distributions. The mean scattering cross-section of an individual shoaling herring is found to consistently exhibit a strong, roughly 20 dB/octave roll-off with decreasing frequency in the range of the OAWRS survey over all days of the roughly 2-week experiment, consistent with the steep roll-offs expected for sub-resonance scattering from fish with air-filled swimbladders.

  6. Reconfigurable origami-inspired acoustic waveguides.

    PubMed

    Babaee, Sahab; Overvelde, Johannes T B; Chen, Elizabeth R; Tournat, Vincent; Bertoldi, Katia

    2016-11-01

    We combine numerical simulations and experiments to design a new class of reconfigurable waveguides based on three-dimensional origami-inspired metamaterials. Our strategy builds on the fact that the rigid plates and hinges forming these structures define networks of tubes that can be easily reconfigured. As such, they provide an ideal platform to actively control and redirect the propagation of sound. We design reconfigurable systems that, depending on the externally applied deformation, can act as networks of waveguides oriented along one, two, or three preferential directions. Moreover, we demonstrate that the capability of the structure to guide and radiate acoustic energy along predefined directions can be easily switched on and off, as the networks of tubes are reversibly formed and disrupted. The proposed designs expand the ability of existing acoustic metamaterials and exploit complex waveguiding to enhance control over propagation and radiation of acoustic energy, opening avenues for the design of a new class of tunable acoustic functional systems.

  7. Reconfigurable origami-inspired acoustic waveguides

    PubMed Central

    Babaee, Sahab; Overvelde, Johannes T. B.; Chen, Elizabeth R.; Tournat, Vincent; Bertoldi, Katia

    2016-01-01

    We combine numerical simulations and experiments to design a new class of reconfigurable waveguides based on three-dimensional origami-inspired metamaterials. Our strategy builds on the fact that the rigid plates and hinges forming these structures define networks of tubes that can be easily reconfigured. As such, they provide an ideal platform to actively control and redirect the propagation of sound. We design reconfigurable systems that, depending on the externally applied deformation, can act as networks of waveguides oriented along one, two, or three preferential directions. Moreover, we demonstrate that the capability of the structure to guide and radiate acoustic energy along predefined directions can be easily switched on and off, as the networks of tubes are reversibly formed and disrupted. The proposed designs expand the ability of existing acoustic metamaterials and exploit complex waveguiding to enhance control over propagation and radiation of acoustic energy, opening avenues for the design of a new class of tunable acoustic functional systems. PMID:28138527

  8. Transition section for acoustic waveguides

    DOEpatents

    Karplus, H.H.B.

    1975-10-28

    A means of facilitating the transmission of acoustic waves with minimal reflection between two regions having different specific acoustic impedances is described comprising a region exhibiting a constant product of cross-sectional area and specific acoustic impedance at each cross-sectional plane along the axis of the transition region. A variety of structures that exhibit this feature is disclosed, the preferred embodiment comprising a nested structure of doubly reentrant cones. This structure is useful for monitoring the operation of nuclear reactors in which random acoustic signals are generated in the course of operation.

  9. Ring waveguide resonator on surface acoustic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biryukov, S. V.; Martin, G.; Weihnacht, M.

    2007-04-01

    A simple regular electrode structure for surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices is proposed. The structure consists of an interdigital transducer in the form of a ring placed on the Z cut of a hexagonal piezoelectric crystal. Finite thickness electrodes produce the known slowing effect for a SAW in comparison with this SAW on a free surface. The closed "slow" electrode region with the "fast" surrounding region forms an open waveguide resonator structure with the acoustic field concentrated in the electrode region. If the radius of the structure is large enough for a given wavelength, an acceptable level of radiation losses can be reached. The electrical admittance of such resonator does not have sidelobes.

  10. Transversal Anderson localization of sound in acoustic waveguide arrays.

    PubMed

    Ye, Yangtao; Ke, Manzhu; Feng, Junheng; Wang, Mudi; Qiu, Chunyin; Liu, Zhengyou

    2015-04-22

    We present designs of one-dimensional acoustic waveguide arrays and investigate wave propagation inside. Under the condition of single identical waveguide mode and weak coupling, the acoustic wave motion in waveguide arrays can be modeled with a discrete mode-coupling theory. The coupling constants can be retrieved from simulations or experiments as the function of neighboring waveguide separations. Sound injected into periodic arrays gives rise to the discrete diffraction, exhibiting ballistic or extended transport in transversal direction. But sound injected into randomized waveguide arrays readily leads to Anderson localization transversally. The experimental results show good agreement with simulations and theoretical predictions.

  11. Nonlinear ball chain waveguides for acoustic emission and ultrasound sensing of ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, Stephen H.

    Harsh environment acoustic emission and ultrasonic wave sensing applications often benefit from placing the sensor in a remote and more benign physical location by using waveguides to transmit elastic waves between the structural location under test and the transducer. Waveguides are normally designed to have high fidelity over broad frequency ranges to minimize distortion -- often difficult to achieve in practice. This thesis reports on an examination of using nonlinear ball chain waveguides for the transmission of acoustic emission and ultrasonic waves for the monitoring of thermal protection systems undergoing severe heat loading, leading to ablation and similar processes. Experiments test the nonlinear propagation of solitary, harmonic and mixed harmonic elastic waves through a copper tube filled with steel and elastomer balls and various other waveguides. Triangulation of pencil lead breaks occurs on a steel plate. Data are collected concerning the usage of linear waveguides and a water-cooled linear waveguide. Data are collected from a second water-cooled waveguide monitoring Atmospheric Reentry Materials in UVM's Inductively-Coupled Plasma Torch Facility. The motion of the particles in the dimer waveguides is linearly modeled with a three ball and spring chain model and the results are compared per particle. A theoretical nonlinear model is presented which is capable of exactly modeling the motion of the dimer chains. The shape of the waveform propagating through the dimer chain is modeled in a sonic vacuum. Mechanical pulses of varying time widths and amplitudes are launched into one end of the ball chain waveguide and observed at the other end in both time and frequency domains. Similarly, harmonic and mixed harmonic mechanical loads are applied to one end of the waveguide. Balls of different materials are analyzed and discriminated into categories. A copper tube packed with six steel particles, nine steel or marble particles and a longer copper tube

  12. Modeling of Acoustic Emission Signal Propagation in Waveguides

    PubMed Central

    Zelenyak, Andreea-Manuela; Hamstad, Marvin A.; Sause, Markus G. R.

    2015-01-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) testing is a widely used nondestructive testing (NDT) method to investigate material failure. When environmental conditions are harmful for the operation of the sensors, waveguides are typically mounted in between the inspected structure and the sensor. Such waveguides can be built from different materials or have different designs in accordance with the experimental needs. All these variations can cause changes in the acoustic emission signals in terms of modal conversion, additional attenuation or shift in frequency content. A finite element method (FEM) was used to model acoustic emission signal propagation in an aluminum plate with an attached waveguide and was validated against experimental data. The geometry of the waveguide is systematically changed by varying the radius and height to investigate the influence on the detected signals. Different waveguide materials were implemented and change of material properties as function of temperature were taken into account. Development of the option of modeling different waveguide options replaces the time consuming and expensive trial and error alternative of experiments. Thus, the aim of this research has important implications for those who use waveguides for AE testing. PMID:26007731

  13. Low-frequency Target Strength and Abundance of Shoaling Atlantic Herring (Clupea harengus) in the Gulf of Maine during the Ocean Acoustic Waveguide Remote Sensing 2006 Experiment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    populations over wide areas in complex continental-shelf environments with highly variable bathymetry and oceanography. Shoals imaged by OAWRS typically...behavior to be determined during the Autumn spawning sea - son on Georges Bank.3,4 The mean scattering cross-section of an individual shoaling herring is...waveguide transmission loss in the range-dependent Georges Bank environment with the hourly sound speed pro- file updates and known bathymetry .27 III. DATA

  14. Continuous Monitoring of Fish Population and Behavior by Instantaneous Continental-Shelf-Scale Imaging with Ocean-Waveguide Acoustics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    Nero, Mike Jech, Olav Rune Godø, Sunwoong Lee, Purnima Ratilal, and Nicholas Makris, “Ocean Acoustic Waveguide Remote Sensing (OAWRS) of Marine...Srinivasan Jagannathan, Deanelle Symonds, Ioannis Bertsatos, Tianrun Chen, Hector Pena, Ruben Patel, Olav Rune Godø, Redwood W. 6 7 Nero, J

  15. Tunable acoustic waveguide based on vibro-acoustic metamaterials with shunted piezoelectric unit cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Byung-Jin; Jung, Jin-Young; Lee, Dooho; Park, Kwang-Chun; Oh, Il-Kwon

    2015-10-01

    We propose a new class of acoustic waveguides with tunable bandgaps (TBs) by using vibro-acoustic metamaterials with shunted periodic piezoelectric unit cells. The unit metamaterial cells that consist of a single crystal piezoelectric transducer and an electrical shunt circuit are designed to induce a strong vibro-acousto-electrical coupling, resulting in a tunable acoustic bandgap as well as local structural resonance and Bragg scattering bandgaps. The present results show that the TB frequency can be actively controlled and the transmission loss of the acoustic wave can be greatly improved by simply changing the inductance values in the shunt circuit.

  16. On the Coriolis effect in acoustic waveguides.

    PubMed

    Wegert, Henry; Reindl, Leonard M; Ruile, Werner; Mayer, Andreas P

    2012-05-01

    Rotation of an elastic medium gives rise to a shift of frequency of its acoustic modes, i.e., the time-period vibrations that exist in it. This frequency shift is investigated by applying perturbation theory in the regime of small ratios of the rotation velocity and the frequency of the acoustic mode. In an expansion of the relative frequency shift in powers of this ratio, upper bounds are derived for the first-order and the second-order terms. The derivation of the theoretical upper bounds of the first-order term is presented for linear vibration modes as well as for stable nonlinear vibrations with periodic time dependence that can be represented by a Fourier series.

  17. Elliptical Acoustic Particle Motion in Underwater Waveguides

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-27

    approximation to the degree of circularity. This approximation, applied to acoustic pressure measurements from two closely spaced hydrophones made in...elliptical motion in the vertical plane can be approximated by vertical line array of closely spaced pressure sensors. We demonstrate in this paper how the...an approximate measure of circular- ity. Most importantly, Θ̃ can be formed from two closely spaced (< λ/4) hydrophones, extending this analysis of

  18. Comparison of Two Acoustic Waveguide Methods for Determining Liner Impedance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Michael G.; Watson, Willie R.; Tracy, Maureen B.; Parrott, Tony L.

    2001-01-01

    Acoustic measurements taken in a flow impedance tube are used to assess the relative accuracy of two waveguide methods for impedance eduction in the presence of grazing flow. The aeroacoustic environment is assumed to contain forward and backward-traveling acoustic waves, consisting of multiple modes, and uniform mean flow. Both methods require a measurement of the complex acoustic pressure profile over the length of the test liner. The Single Mode Method assumes that the sound pressure level and phase decay-rates of a single progressive mode can be extracted from this measured complex acoustic pressure profile. No a priori assumptions are made in the Finite Element. Method regarding the modal or reflection content in the measured acoustic pressure profile. The integrity of each method is initially demonstrated by how well their no-flow impedances match those acquired in a normal incidence impedance tube. These tests were conducted using ceramic tubular and conventional perforate liners. Ceramic tubular liners were included because of their impedance insensitivity to mean flow effects. Conversely, the conventional perforate liner was included because its impedance is known to be sensitive to mean flow velocity effects. Excellent comparisons between impedance values educed with the two waveguide methods in the absence of mean flow and the corresponding values educed with the normal incident impedance tube were observed. The two methods are then compared for mean flow Mach numbers up to 0.5, and are shown to give consistent results for both types of test liners. The quality of the results indicates that the Single Mode Method should be used when the measured acoustic pressure profile is clearly dominated by a single progressive mode, and the Finite Element Method should be used for all other cases.

  19. Acoustic Scattering in Flexible Waveguide Involving Step Discontinuity

    PubMed Central

    Afzal, Muhammad; Nawaz, Rab; Ayub, Muhammad; Wahab, Abdul

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, the propagation and scattering of acoustic waves in a flexible wave-guide involving step discontinuity at an interface is considered. The emerging boundary value problem is non-Sturm-Liouville and is solved by employing a hybrid mode-matching technique. The physical scattering process and attenuation of duct modes versus frequency regime and change of height is studied. Moreover, the mode-matching solution is validated through a series of numerical experiments by testifying the power conservation identity and matching interface conditions. PMID:25084019

  20. Invention of a tunable damper for use with an acoustic waveguide in hostile environments

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, S.C.

    1984-06-01

    A damper was invented to remove undesirable stress pulses from an acoustic waveguide. Designed to be tunable, the damper was constructed to withstand a corrosive or otherwise hostile environment. It serves to simplify the design and enhance the performance of a water-level measurement system, of which the damper and acoustic waveguide are integral parts. An experimental damper was constructed and applied to an existing level probe and measurement system. The resulting damper, properly tuned, causes acoustic stress pulses that pass into it along the waveguide to be attenuated.

  1. Invariant currents in lossy acoustic waveguides with complete local symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalozoumis, P. A.; Richoux, O.; Diakonos, F. K.; Theocharis, G.; Schmelcher, P.

    2015-07-01

    We implement the concept of complete local symmetry in lossy acoustic waveguides. Despite the presence of losses, the existence of a spatially invariant current is shown theoretically and observed experimentally. We demonstrate how this invariant current leads to the generalization of the Bloch and parity theorems for lossy systems defining a mapping of the pressure field between symmetry-related spatial domains. Using experimental data, we verify this mapping with remarkable accuracy. For the performed experiment, we employ a construction technique based on local symmetries that allows the design of setups with prescribed perfect transmission resonances in the lossless case. Our results reveal the fundamental role of symmetries in restricted spatial domains, and they clearly indicate that completely locally symmetric devices constitute a promising class of setups with regard to the manipulation of wave propagation.

  2. Acoustic solitons in waveguides with Helmholtz resonators: transmission line approach.

    PubMed

    Achilleos, V; Richoux, O; Theocharis, G; Frantzeskakis, D J

    2015-02-01

    We report experimental results and study theoretically soliton formation and propagation in an air-filled acoustic waveguide side loaded with Helmholtz resonators. We propose a theoretical modeling of the system, which relies on a transmission-line approach, leading to a nonlinear dynamical lattice model. The latter allows for an analytical description of the various soliton solutions for the pressure, which are found by means of dynamical systems and multiscale expansion techniques. These solutions include Boussinesq-like and Korteweg-de Vries pulse-shaped solitons that are observed in the experiment, as well as nonlinear Schrödinger envelope solitons, that are predicted theoretically. The analytical predictions are in excellent agreement with direct numerical simulations and in qualitative agreement with the experimental observations.

  3. Experimental demonstration of topologically protected efficient sound propagation in an acoustic waveguide network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Qi; Tian, Ye; Zuo, Shu-Yu; Cheng, Ying; Liu, Xiao-Jun

    2017-03-01

    Acoustic topological states support sound propagation along the boundary in a one-way direction with inherent robustness against defects and disorders, leading to the revolution of the manipulation on acoustic waves. A variety of acoustic topological states relying on circulating fluid, chiral coupling, or temporal modulation have been proposed theoretically. However, experimental demonstration has so far remained a significant challenge, due to the critical limitations such as structural complexity and high losses. Here, we experimentally demonstrate an acoustic anomalous Floquet topological insulator in a waveguide network. The acoustic gapless edge states can be found in the band gap when the waveguides are strongly coupled. The scheme features simple structure and high-energy throughput, leading to the experimental demonstration of efficient and robust topologically protected sound propagation along the boundary. The proposal may offer a unique, promising application for design of acoustic devices in acoustic guiding, switching, isolating, filtering, etc.

  4. Multi Reflection of Lamb Wave Emission in an Acoustic Waveguide Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Schmitt, Martin; Olfert, Sergei; Rautenberg, Jens; Lindner, Gerhard; Henning, Bernd; Reindl, Leonhard Michael

    2013-01-01

    Recently, an acoustic waveguide sensor based on multiple mode conversion of surface acoustic waves at the solid—liquid interfaces has been introduced for the concentration measurement of binary and ternary mixtures, liquid level sensing, investigation of spatial inhomogenities or bubble detection. In this contribution the sound wave propagation within this acoustic waveguide sensor is visualized by Schlieren imaging for continuous and burst operation the first time. In the acoustic waveguide the antisymmetrical zero order Lamb wave mode is excited by a single phase transducer of 1 MHz on thin glass plates of 1 mm thickness. By contact to the investigated liquid Lamb waves propagating on the first plate emit pressure waves into the adjacent liquid, which excites Lamb waves on the second plate, what again causes pressure waves traveling inside the liquid back to the first plate and so on. The Schlieren images prove this multi reflection within the acoustic waveguide, which confirms former considerations and calculations based on the receiver signal. With this knowledge the sensor concepts with the acoustic waveguide sensor can be interpreted in a better manner. PMID:23447010

  5. Multi reflection of Lamb wave emission in an acoustic waveguide sensor.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Martin; Olfert, Sergei; Rautenberg, Jens; Lindner, Gerhard; Henning, Bernd; Reindl, Leonhard Michael

    2013-02-27

    Recently, an acoustic waveguide sensor based on multiple mode conversion of surface acoustic waves at the solid-liquid interfaces has been introduced for the concentration measurement of binary and ternary mixtures, liquid level sensing, investigation of spatial inhomogenities or bubble detection. In this contribution the sound wave propagation within this acoustic waveguide sensor is visualized by Schlieren imaging for continuous and burst operation the first time. In the acoustic waveguide the antisymmetrical zero order Lamb wave mode is excited by a single phase transducer of 1 MHz on thin glass plates of 1 mm thickness. By contact to the investigated liquid Lamb waves propagating on the first plate emit pressure waves into the adjacent liquid, which excites Lamb waves on the second plate, what again causes pressure waves traveling inside the liquid back to the first plate and so on. The Schlieren images prove this multi reflection within the acoustic waveguide, which confirms former considerations and calculations based on the receiver signal. With this knowledge the sensor concepts with the acoustic waveguide sensor can be interpreted in a better manner.

  6. Observation of low-loss broadband supermode propagation in coupled acoustic waveguide complex

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Ya-Xi; Peng, Yu-Gui; Chen, Xin-Cheng; Zhao, De-Gang; Zhu, Xue-Feng

    2017-01-01

    We investigate analytically, numerically, and experimentally the low-loss supermode propagation in a coupled acoustic waveguide complex within a broadband. The waveguide complex is implemented with air channels coupled via an ultrathin metafluid layer. We analytically derive the field distribution of incident sound needed for producing acoustic supermodes, and verify the periodically revival propagation in coupled waveguide systems numerically and experimentally. We find out that the supermode wavelength becomes longer for higher mode order or lower frequency. We have also demonstrated the robust propagation of supermodes in broadband. Our scheme can in principle be extended to three dimensions and the ultrasound regime with simplicity and may promote applications of high-fidelity signal transfer in complicated acoustic networks. PMID:28349953

  7. Observation of low-loss broadband supermode propagation in coupled acoustic waveguide complex.

    PubMed

    Shen, Ya-Xi; Peng, Yu-Gui; Chen, Xin-Cheng; Zhao, De-Gang; Zhu, Xue-Feng

    2017-03-28

    We investigate analytically, numerically, and experimentally the low-loss supermode propagation in a coupled acoustic waveguide complex within a broadband. The waveguide complex is implemented with air channels coupled via an ultrathin metafluid layer. We analytically derive the field distribution of incident sound needed for producing acoustic supermodes, and verify the periodically revival propagation in coupled waveguide systems numerically and experimentally. We find out that the supermode wavelength becomes longer for higher mode order or lower frequency. We have also demonstrated the robust propagation of supermodes in broadband. Our scheme can in principle be extended to three dimensions and the ultrasound regime with simplicity and may promote applications of high-fidelity signal transfer in complicated acoustic networks.

  8. Fiber optic reference frequency distribution to remote beam waveguide antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calhoun, Malcolm; Kuhnle, Paul; Law, Julius

    1995-01-01

    In the NASA/JPL Deep Space Network (DSN), radio science experiments (probing outer planet atmospheres, rings, gravitational waves, etc.) and very long-base interferometry (VLBI) require ultra-stable, low phase noise reference frequency signals at the user locations. Typical locations for radio science/VLBI exciters and down-converters are the cone areas of the 34 m high efficiency antennas or the 70 m antennas, located several hundred meters from the reference frequency standards. Over the past three years, fiber optic distribution links have replaced coaxial cable distribution for reference frequencies to these antenna sites. Optical fibers are the preferred medium for distribution because of their low attenuation, immunity to EMI/IWI, and temperature stability. A new network of Beam Waveguide (BWG) antennas presently under construction in the DSN requires hydrogen maser stability at tens of kilometers distance from the frequency standards central location. The topic of this paper is the design and implementation of an optical fiber distribution link which provides ultra-stable reference frequencies to users at a remote BWG antenna. The temperature profile from the earth's surface to a depth of six feet over a time period of six months was used to optimize the placement of the fiber optic cables. In-situ evaluation of the fiber optic link performance indicates Allan deviation on the order of parts in 10(exp -15) at 1000 and 10,000 seconds averaging time; thus, the link stability degradation due to environmental conditions still preserves hydrogen maser stability at the user locations. This paper reports on the implementation of optical fibers and electro-optic devices for distributing very stable, low phase noise reference signals to remote BWG antenna locations. Allan deviation and phase noise test results for a 16 km fiber optic distribution link are presented in the paper.

  9. Multi-band asymmetric acoustic transmission in a bended waveguide with multiple mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yu-lei; Sun, Hong-xiang; Xia, Jian-ping; Yuan, Shou-qi; Ding, Xin-lei

    2016-07-01

    We report the realization of a multi-band device of the asymmetric acoustic transmission by placing a phononic crystal inside a bended waveguide immersed in water, as determined both experimentally and numerically. The asymmetric acoustic transmission exists in three frequency bands below 500 kHz induced by multiple mechanisms. Besides the band gap of the phononic crystal, we also introduce the deaf mode and interaction between the phononic crystal and waveguide. More importantly, this asymmetric transmission can be systematically controlled by mechanically rotating the square rods of the phononic crystal. The device has the advantages of multiple band, broader bandwidth, and adjustable property, showing promising applications in ultrasonic devices.

  10. Acoustic Remote Sensing of Rogue Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, Wade; Kadri, Usama

    2016-04-01

    We propose an early warning system for approaching rogue waves using the remote sensing of acoustic-gravity waves (AGWs) - progressive sound waves that propagate at the speed of sound in the ocean. It is believed that AGWs are generated during the formation of rogue waves, carrying information on the rogue waves at near the speed of sound, i.e. much faster than the rogue wave. The capability of identifying those special sound waves would enable detecting rogue waves most efficiently. A lot of promising work has been reported on AGWs in the last few years, part of which in the context of remote sensing as an early detection of tsunami. However, to our knowledge none of the work addresses the problem of rogue waves directly. Although there remains some uncertainty as to the proper definition of a rogue wave, there is little doubt that they exist and no one can dispute the potential destructive power of rogue waves. An early warning system for such extreme waves would become a demanding safety technology. A closed form expression was developed for the pressure induced by an impulsive source at the free surface (the Green's function) from which the solution for more general sources can be developed. In particular, we used the model of the Draupner Wave of January 1st, 1995 as a source and calculated the induced AGW signature. In particular we studied the AGW signature associated with a special feature of this wave, and characteristic of rogue waves, of the absence of any local set-down beneath the main crest and the presence of a large local set-up.

  11. Demonstration of acoustic waveguiding and tight bending in phononic crystals

    DOE PAGES

    Ghasemi Baboly, M.; Raza, A.; Brady, J.; ...

    2016-10-31

    The systematic design, fabrication, and characterization of an isolated, single-mode, 90° bend phononic crystal (PnC) waveguide are presented. A PnC consisting of a 2D square array of circular air holes in an aluminum substrate is used, and waveguides are created by introducing a line defect in the PnC lattice. A high transmission coefficient is observed (–1 dB) for the straight sections of the waveguide, and an overall 2.3 dB transmission loss is observed (a transmission coefficient of 76%) for the 90° bend. Further optimization of the structure may yield higher transmission efficiencies. Lastly, this manuscript shows the complete design processmore » for an engineered 90° bend PnC waveguide from inception to experimental demonstration.« less

  12. Demonstration of acoustic waveguiding and tight bending in phononic crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Ghasemi Baboly, M.; Raza, A.; Brady, J.; Reinke, C. M.; Leseman, Z. C.; El-Kady, I.

    2016-10-31

    The systematic design, fabrication, and characterization of an isolated, single-mode, 90° bend phononic crystal (PnC) waveguide are presented. A PnC consisting of a 2D square array of circular air holes in an aluminum substrate is used, and waveguides are created by introducing a line defect in the PnC lattice. A high transmission coefficient is observed (–1 dB) for the straight sections of the waveguide, and an overall 2.3 dB transmission loss is observed (a transmission coefficient of 76%) for the 90° bend. Further optimization of the structure may yield higher transmission efficiencies. Lastly, this manuscript shows the complete design process for an engineered 90° bend PnC waveguide from inception to experimental demonstration.

  13. Acoustic response of a rectangular waveguide with a strong transverse temperature gradient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zorumski, William E.

    1989-01-01

    An acoustic wave equation was developed for a perfect gas with spatially-variable temperature. The strong-gradient wave equation was used to analyze the response of a rectangular wave guide containing a thermally-stratified gas. It was assumed that the temperature gradient is constant, representing one-dimensional heat transfer with a constant coefficient of conductivity. The analysis of the waveguide shows that the resonant frequencies of the waveguide are shifted away from the values that would be expected from the average temperature of the waveguide. For small gradients, the frequency shift is proportional to the square of the gradient. The factor of proportionality is a quadratic function of the natural frequency of the waveguide with uniform temperature. An experiment is designed to verify the essential features of the strong-gradient theory.

  14. Decoupling of multiple coupled phononic crystal waveguides: application to acoustic demultiplexing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Qiushun; Liu, Wenxing; Yu, Tianbao; Liu, Nianhua; Wang, Tongbiao; Liao, Qinghua

    2017-03-01

    We show that the decoupling of two coupled phononic crystal waveguides (PnCWs) by a proper design can be achieved. And this decoupling property can be extended to the coupling of any number of parallel coupled PnCWs. The acoustic wavelength for decoupling is insensitive to the number of coupled PnCWs. Decoupling induces the extinction of neighbor PnCWs’ power transfer and makes the design of compact acoustic components easier. As a possible application of our work, a new kind of 1-to-2 acoustic demultiplexers are numerically demonstrated by employing the decoupling at the crossing-point frequency in two and three coupled PnCWs. This design concept provides a novel method and compact model for acoustic demultiplexing and can present practical applications in future acoustic wave circuits.

  15. Partial-aperture array imaging in acoustic waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsogka, Chrysoula; Mitsoudis, Dimitrios A.; Papadimitropoulos, Symeon

    2016-12-01

    We consider the problem of imaging extended reflectors in waveguides using partial-aperture array, i.e. an array that does not span the whole depth of the waveguide. For this imaging, we employ a method that back-propagates a weighted modal projection of the usual array response matrix. The challenge in this setup is to correctly define this projection matrix in order to maintain good energy concentration properties for the imaging method, which were obtained previously by Tsogka et al (2013 SIAM J. Imaging Sci. 6 2714-39) for the full-aperture case. In this paper we propose a way of achieving this and study the properties of the resulting imaging method.

  16. Acoustic Bloch Wave Propagation in a Periodic Waveguide

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-07-24

    electrical conductivity. In the quantum theory, the electron is represented by De Broglie/ Schr ~ dinger matter waves which propagate in an electrical conductor...waveguide loaded with a periodic array of rigid spheres. They based their approach on the Webster horn equation and compared the results of a strained...governing equations , we simply use the dissi- pative equations in the limit as the heat conductivity and viscosity approach zero. In such a limit the

  17. Application of acoustic feedback to target detection in a waveguide: experimental demonstration at the ultrasonic scale.

    PubMed

    Roux, Philippe; Marandet, Christian; La Rizza, Patrick; Kuperman, W A

    2011-07-01

    People are familiar with the acoustic feedback phenomenon, which results in a loud sound that is heard when a musician plays an electric instrument directly into a speaker. Acoustic feedback occurs when a source and a receiver are connected both acoustically through the propagation medium and electrically through an amplifier, such that the amplified received signal is continuously re-emitted by the source. The acoustic feedback can be initiated from a continuous sine wave. When the emitter and the receiver are in phase, resonance is obtained, which appears to be highly sensitive to any fluctuation of the propagation medium. Another procedure consists in initiating the acoustic feedback from a continuous loop of ambient noise. It then generates an unstable self-sustained feedback oscillator (SFO) that is tested here as a method for monitoring temperature fluctuations of a shallow-water oceanic environment. The goal of the present study is to reproduce and study the SFO at the laboratory scale in an ultrasonic waveguide. The experimental results demonstrate the potential applications of the SFO for the detection of a target in the framework of the acoustic-barrier problem in shallow-water acoustics.

  18. An acoustic bending waveguide designed by anisotropic density-near-zero metamaterial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yang-Yang; Ding, Er-Liang; Liu, Xiao-Zhou; Gong, Xiu-Fen

    2016-12-01

    Anisotropic metamaterial with only one component of the mass density tensor near zero (ADNZ) is proposed to control the sound wave propagation. We find that such an anisotropic metamaterial can be used to realize perfect bending waveguides. According to a coordinate transformation, the surface waves on the input and output interfaces of the ADNZ metamaterial induces the sound energy flow to be redistributed and match smoothly with the propagating modes inside the metamaterial waveguide. According to the theory of bending waveguide, we realize the “T”-type sound shunting and convergence, as well as acoustic channel selection by embedding small-sized defects. Numerical calculations are performed to confirm the above effects. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2012CB921504), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11474160), the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities, China (Grant No. 020414380001), the State Key Laboratory of Acoustics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (Grant No. SKLA201609), and the Priority Academic Program Development of Jiangsu Higher Education Institution, China.

  19. Tunability of acoustic phonon transmission and thermal conductance in three dimensional quasi-periodically stubbed waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Zhong-Xiang; Liu, Jing-Zhong; Yu, Xia; Wang, Hai-Bin; Deng, Yuan-Xiang; Li, Ke-Min; Zhang, Yong

    2015-03-01

    We investigate acoustic phonon transmission and thermal conductance in three dimensional (3D) quasi-periodically stubbed waveguides according to the Fibonacci sequence. Results show that the transmission coefficient exhibits the periodic oscillation upon varying the length of stub/waveguide at low frequency, and the period of such oscillation is tunably decreased with increasing the Fibonacci number N. Interestingly, there also exist some anti-resonant dips that gradually develop into wide stop-frequency gaps with increasing N. As the temperature goes up, a transition of the thermal conductance from the decrease to the increase occurs in these systems. When N is increased, the thermal conductance is approximately decreased with a linear trend. Moreover, the decreasing degree sensitively depends on the variation of temperature. A brief analysis of these results is given.

  20. waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauters, Jared F.; Adleman, James R.; Heck, Martijn J. R.; Bowers, John E.

    2014-08-01

    Planar waveguides with ultra-low propagation loss are necessary for integrating optoelectronic systems that require long optical time delay or narrowband optical filters. In this paper, we review an ultra-low loss planar waveguide platform that uses thin (<150 nm) Si3N4 cores and thick (>8 μm) SiO2 cladding layers. In particular, we discuss the performance of arrayed waveguide gratings (AWGs) fabricated with the platform. We propose the use of a practical design method that takes the statistical nature of worst-case crosstalk into account. We also demonstrate the measurement of amplitude and phase error distributions in an AWG using an optical backscatter reflectometer. We show that the waveguides have phase errors small enough to achieve AWG crosstalk below -30 dB, while crosstalk below -40 dB should also be possible with optimization of the component design.

  1. Acoustic and streaming velocity components in a resonant waveguide at high acoustic levels.

    PubMed

    Daru, Virginie; Reyt, Ida; Bailliet, Hélène; Weisman, Catherine; Baltean-Carlès, Diana

    2017-01-01

    Rayleigh streaming is a steady flow generated by the interaction between an acoustic wave and a solid wall, generally assumed to be second order in a Mach number expansion. Acoustic streaming is well known in the case of a stationary plane wave at low amplitude: it has a half-wavelength spatial periodicity and the maximum axial streaming velocity is a quadratic function of the acoustic velocity amplitude at antinode. For higher acoustic levels, additional streaming cells have been observed. Results of laser Doppler velocimetry measurements are here compared to direct numerical simulations. The evolution of axial and radial velocity components for both acoustic and streaming velocities is studied from low to high acoustic amplitudes. Two streaming flow regimes are pointed out, the axial streaming dependency on acoustics going from quadratic to linear. The evolution of streaming flow is different for outer cells and for inner cells. Also, the hypothesis of radial streaming velocity being of second order in a Mach number expansion, is not valid at high amplitudes. The change of regime occurs when the radial streaming velocity amplitude becomes larger than the radial acoustic velocity amplitude, high levels being therefore characterized by nonlinear interaction of the different velocity components.

  2. The use of waveguide acoustic probes for void fraction measurement in the evaporator of BN-350-Type reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Melnikov, V.I.; Nigmatulin, B.I.

    1995-09-01

    The present paper deals with some results of the experimental studies which have been carried out to investigate the steam generation dynamics in the Field tubes of sodium-water evaporators used in the BN-350 reactors. The void fraction measurements have been taken with the aid of waveguide acoustic transducers manufactured in accordance with a specially designed technology (waveguide acoustic transducers-WAT technology). Presented in this paper also the transducer design and calibration methods, as well as the diagram showing transducers arrengment in the evaporator. The transducers under test featured a waveguide of about 4 m in length and a 200-mm long sensitive element (probe). Besides, this paper specifies the void fraction data obtained through measurements in diverse points of the evaporator. The studies revealed that the period of observed fluctuations in the void fraction amounted to few seconds and was largely dependent on the level of water in the evaporator.

  3. Active structural acoustic control using the remote sensor method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheer, Jordan; Daley, Steve

    2016-09-01

    Active structural acoustic control (ASAC) is an effective method of reducing the sound radiation from vibrating structures. In order to implement ASAC systems using only structural actuators and sensors, it is necessary to employ a model of the sound radiation from the structure. Such models have been presented in the literature for simple structures, such as baffled rectangular plates, and methods of determining the radiation modes of more complex practical structures using experimental data have also been explored. A similar problem arises in the context of active noise control, where cancellation of a disturbance is required at positions in space where it is not possible to locate a physical error microphone. In this case the signals at the cancellation points can be estimated from the outputs of remotely located measurement sensors using the “remote microphone method”. This remote microphone method is extended here to the ASAC problem, in which the pressures at a number of microphone locations must be estimated from measurements on the structure of the radiating system. The control and estimation strategies are described and the performance is assessed for a typical structural radiation problem.

  4. Wave propagation in a 2D nonlinear structural acoustic waveguide using asymptotic expansions of wavenumbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijay Prakash, S.; Sonti, Venkata R.

    2016-02-01

    Nonlinear acoustic wave propagation in an infinite rectangular waveguide is investigated. The upper boundary of this waveguide is a nonlinear elastic plate, whereas the lower boundary is rigid. The fluid is assumed to be inviscid with zero mean flow. The focus is restricted to non-planar modes having finite amplitudes. The approximate solution to the acoustic velocity potential of an amplitude modulated pulse is found using the method of multiple scales (MMS) involving both space and time. The calculations are presented up to the third order of the small parameter. It is found that at some frequencies the amplitude modulation is governed by the Nonlinear Schrödinger equation (NLSE). The first objective here is to study the nonlinear term in the NLSE. The sign of the nonlinear term in the NLSE plays a role in determining the stability of the amplitude modulation. Secondly, at other frequencies, the primary pulse interacts with its higher harmonics, as do two or more primary pulses with their resultant higher harmonics. This happens when the phase speeds of the waves match and the objective is to identify the frequencies of such interactions. For both the objectives, asymptotic coupled wavenumber expansions for the linear dispersion relation are required for an intermediate fluid loading. The novelty of this work lies in obtaining the asymptotic expansions and using them for predicting the sign change of the nonlinear term at various frequencies. It is found that when the coupled wavenumbers approach the uncoupled pressure-release wavenumbers, the amplitude modulation is stable. On the other hand, near the rigid-duct wavenumbers, the amplitude modulation is unstable. Also, as a further contribution, these wavenumber expansions are used to identify the frequencies of the higher harmonic interactions. And lastly, the solution for the amplitude modulation derived through the MMS is validated using these asymptotic expansions.

  5. A wireless acoustic emission sensor remotely powered by light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahedi, F.; Huang, H.

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, wireless sensing of acoustic emission (AE) signals using a battery-free sensor node remotely powered by light is presented. The wireless sensor consists of a piezoelectric wafer active sensor (PWAS) for AE signal acquisition and a wireless transponder that performs signal conditioning, frequency conversion, and wireless transmission. For signal conditioning, a voltage follower that consumes less than 2 mW was introduced to buffer the high impedance of the PWAS from the low impedance of the wireless transponder. A photocell-based energy harvester with a stable voltage output was developed to power the voltage follower so that the wireless AE sensor can operate without an external power source. The principle of operation of the battery-free wireless AE sensor node and the sensor interrogation system is described, followed by a detailed description of the hardware implementation. The voltage follower and the wireless channel were characterized by ultrasound pitch-catch and pencil lead break experiments.

  6. Quasi-residual strain and moduli measurements in materials using embedded acoustic waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrold, Ronald T.; Sanjana, Zal N.; Raju, Basavaraju B.

    1996-11-01

    Following the processing and manufacture of resin and composite parts and during their lifetime, the distribution of internal residual strain and any variations in moduli are generally unknown. Real-time information on these parameters would be valuable for improving material performance and reliability. It is believed that measurements related to material residual stresses or strain and moduli can be obtained by measuring the longitudinal wave velocities within acoustic waveguides (AWG) embedded within a material. The concept is that the wave velocities within embedded AWG are related to the material bulk modulus, density and Poisson's Ratio which are all in some degree related to the material state of cure, and finally the internal residual stresses. Based on this concept it is shown that the AWG of different diameters embedded within the same resin part of uniform internal stress distribution, the AWG wave velocities should vary in relation to the square root of the AWG diameter. Experimental results using AWG of 5, 10, 16, 20, 40 and 62 mil diameter Nichrome embedded within Shell 815 clear resin with optically measured uniform strain, demonstrate a direct relationship between AWG velocities and the square root of the AWG diameter. Consequently, it is reasoned that for a part with several embedded AWG, each of the same diameter, then differences in the AWG velocities would yield information on differences in the residual strain and moduli within the part.

  7. Acoustic Clutter and Ocean Acoustic Waveguide Remote Sensing (OAWRS) in Continental Shelf Environments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-30

    Marina). Professor Makris worked for several years with various ONR Latin America Station Chiefs and Program Managers and the US Embassy in Mexico City...made targets [3]. In order to study the dynamics of clutter in OAWRS imagery, we have developed and applied a Minimum Energy Flow (MEF) method which...to establish relationships with Mexico and obtain support from the Admiral commanding the Directorate of Oceanography, Hydrology and Meteorology

  8. Nonlinear Acoustics: Long Range Underwater Propagation, Air-Filled Porous Materials, and Noncollinear Interaction in a Waveguide.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-10-28

    degree December 1985. 3. A. TenCate , Ph.D. student in Mechanical Engineering. " ’-. I. Sw J -- - . II. PROJECTS 1. Nonlinear effects in long range...interaction in a rectangular waveguide. (Hamilton and TenCate ). This work is an outgrowth of Hamilton’s Ph.D. research (84-6,7) and TenCate’s M.S...Ph.D. dissertation research topics. TenCate has begun work on an acoustical chaos experiment, intense standing waves in a closed tube. His initial

  9. Remote, Aerial, Trans-Layer, Linear and Non-Linear Downlink Underwater Acoustic Communication

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-09-01

    with the acousto-optic detection using the laser Doppler vibrometer has also been used to demonstrate the initial feasibility of a remote, aerial...rate, modulation parameters, and sound pressure level requirements. Figure 4 shows an acoustic shockwave , time waveform produced by a single...and picosecond regime exist that do not produce additional acoustic transients following the optical breakdown shockwave in water. It is possible

  10. Remote acoustic monitoring of North Atlantic right whales (Eubalaena glacialis) reveals seasonal and diel variations in acoustic behavior.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Leanna P; McCordic, Jessica A; Parks, Susan E

    2014-01-01

    Remote acoustic monitoring is a non-invasive tool that can be used to study the distribution, behavior, and habitat use of sound-producing species. The North Atlantic right whale (Eubalaena glacialis) is an endangered baleen whale species that produces a variety of stereotyped acoustic signals. One of these signals, the "gunshot" sound, has only been recorded from adult male North Atlantic right whales and is thought to function for reproduction, either as reproductive advertisement for females or as an agonistic signal toward other males. This study uses remote acoustic monitoring to analyze the presence of gunshots over a two-year period at two sites on the Scotian Shelf to determine if there is evidence that North Atlantic right whales may use these locations for breeding activities. Seasonal analyses at both locations indicate that gunshot sound production is highly seasonal, with an increase in the autumn. One site, Roseway West, had significantly more gunshot sounds overall and exhibited a clear diel trend in production of these signals at night. The other site, Emerald South, also showed a seasonal increase in gunshot production during the autumn, but did not show any significant diel trend. This difference in gunshot signal production at the two sites indicates variation either in the number or the behavior of whales at each location. The timing of the observed seasonal increase in gunshot sound production is consistent with the current understanding of the right whale breeding season, and our results demonstrate that detection of gunshots with remote acoustic monitoring can be a reliable way to track shifts in distribution and changes in acoustic behavior including possible mating activities.

  11. Emergence of the Green’s Functions from Noise and Passive Acoustic Remote Sensing of Ocean Dynamics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-30

    Acoustic Remote Sensing of Ocean Dynamics Oleg A. Godin CIRES/Univ. of Colorado and NOAA/OAR/Earth System Research Lab., R/PSD99, 325 Broadway...characterization of a time-varying ocean where ambient acoustic noise is utilized as a probing signal. • To develop a passive remote sensing technique for...inapplicable. 3. To quantify degradation of performance of passive remote sensing techniques due to ocean surface motion and other variations of underwater

  12. Analytical study of the propagation of fast longitudinal modes along wz-BN/AlN thin acoustic waveguides.

    PubMed

    Caliendo, Cinzia

    2015-01-23

    The propagation of the fundamental symmetric Lamb mode S0 along wz-BN/AlN thin composite plates suitable for telecommunication and sensing applications is studied. The investigation of the acoustic field profile across the plate thickness revealed the presence of modes having longitudinal polarization, the Anisimkin Jr. plate modes (AMs), travelling at a phase velocity close to that of the wz-BN longitudinal bulk acoustic wave propagating in the same direction. The study of the S0 mode phase velocity and coupling coefficient (K2) dispersion curves, for different electrical boundary conditions, has shown that eight different coupling configurations are allowable that exhibit a K2 as high as about 4% and very high phase velocity (up to about 16,700 m/s). The effect of the thickness and material type of the metal floating electrode on the K2 dispersion curves has also been investigated, specifically addressing the design of an enhanced coupling device. The gravimetric sensitivity of the BN/AlN-based acoustic waveguides was then calculated for both the AMs and elliptically polarized S0 modes; the AM-based sensor velocity and attenuation shifts due to the viscosity of a surrounding liquid was theoretically predicted. The performed investigation suggests that wz-BN/AlN is a very promising substrate material suitable for developing GHz band devices with enhanced electroacoustic coupling efficiency and suitable for application in telecommunications and sensing fields.

  13. Analytical Study of the Propagation of Fast Longitudinal Modes along wz-BN/AlN Thin Acoustic Waveguides

    PubMed Central

    Caliendo, Cinzia

    2015-01-01

    The propagation of the fundamental symmetric Lamb mode S0 along wz-BN/AlN thin composite plates suitable for telecommunication and sensing applications is studied. The investigation of the acoustic field profile across the plate thickness revealed the presence of modes having longitudinal polarization, the Anisimkin Jr. plate modes (AMs), travelling at a phase velocity close to that of the wz-BN longitudinal bulk acoustic wave propagating in the same direction. The study of the S0 mode phase velocity and coupling coefficient (K2) dispersion curves, for different electrical boundary conditions, has shown that eight different coupling configurations are allowable that exhibit a K2 as high as about 4% and very high phase velocity (up to about 16,700 m/s). The effect of the thickness and material type of the metal floating electrode on the K2 dispersion curves has also been investigated, specifically addressing the design of an enhanced coupling device. The gravimetric sensitivity of the BN/AlN-based acoustic waveguides was then calculated for both the AMs and elliptically polarized S0 modes; the AM-based sensor velocity and attenuation shifts due to the viscosity of a surrounding liquid was theoretically predicted. The performed investigation suggests that wz-BN/AlN is a very promising substrate material suitable for developing GHz band devices with enhanced electroacoustic coupling efficiency and suitable for application in telecommunications and sensing fields. PMID:25625904

  14. Development of a slab waveguide spatial heterodyne spectrometer for remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florjańczyk, Miroslaw; Cheben, Pavel; Janz, Siegfried; Lamontagne, Boris; Lapointe, Jean; Scott, Alan; Solheim, Brian; Xu, Dan-Xia

    2010-02-01

    We present development of a compact, robust, waveguide Fourier-transform microspectrometer for high-resolution and high-throughput spectroscopy in space-based applications. The prototype device is being developed to monitor water vapor in the atmosphere from a micro-satellite platform. The instrument is based on a unique slab waveguide spatial heterodyne spectrometer (SHS) chip fabricated at the National Research Council Canada in silicon-on-insulator (SOI) technology.

  15. Surface acoustic wave properties of proton-exchanged LiNbO3 waveguides with SiO2 film.

    PubMed

    Kao, Kuo-Sheng; Cheng, Chien-Chuan; Chung, Chung-Jen; Chen, Ying-Chung

    2005-03-01

    Surface acoustic wave (SAW) properties of proton-exchanged (PE) z-cut lithium niobate (LiNbO3) waveguides with silicon dioxide (SiO2) film layers were investigated using octanoic acid. The distribution of hydrogen measured by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) showed a step-like profile, which was assumed to be equal to the waveguide depth (d). The SiO2 film was deposited on z-cut LiNbO3 waveguide by radio frequency (rf) magnetron sputtering. We investigated the important parameters for the design of SAW devices such as phase velocity (Vp), insertion loss (IL) and temperature coefficient of frequency (TCF) by a network analyzer using thin-film aluminum interdigital transducer electrodes on the upper SiO2 film surface. The experimental results showed that the Vp of SAW decreased slightly with the increase of h/lambda, where h was the thickness of SiO2 films and lambda was the wavelength. The IL of SAW increased with increased h/lambda. The TCF of SAW calculated from the frequency change of the output of SAW delay line showed an evident decrease with the increase of h/lambda. The TCF for PE z-cut LiNbO3 was measured to be about -54.72 ppm/degreees C at h/lambda = 0.08. It revealed that the SiO2 films could compensate and improve the temperature stability as compared with the TCF of SAW on PE samples without SiO2 film.

  16. Control of deviations and prediction of surface roughness from micro machining of THz waveguides using acoustic emission signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, James M.; Diaz, Fernanda; Geerling, Edgar; Clasing, Matias; Ponce, Vicente; Taylor, Chris; Turner, Sam; Michael, Ernest A.; Patricio Mena, F.; Bronfman, Leonardo

    2017-02-01

    By using acoustic emission (AE) it is possible to control deviations and surface quality during micro milling operations. The method of micro milling is used to manufacture a submillimetre waveguide where micro machining is employed to achieve the required superior finish and geometrical tolerances. Submillimetre waveguide technology is used in deep space signal retrieval where highest detection efficiencies are needed and therefore every possible signal loss in the receiver has to be avoided and stringent tolerances achieved. With a sub-standard surface finish the signals travelling along the waveguides dissipate away faster than with perfect surfaces where the residual roughness becomes comparable with the electromagnetic skin depth. Therefore, the higher the radio frequency the more critical this becomes. The method of time-frequency analysis (STFT) is used to transfer raw AE into more meaningful salient signal features (SF). This information was then correlated against the measured geometrical deviations and, the onset of catastrophic tool wear. Such deviations can be offset from different AE signals (different deviations from subsequent tests) and feedback for a final spring cut ensuring the geometrical accuracies are met. Geometrical differences can impact on the required transfer of AE signals (change in cut off frequencies and diminished SNR at the interface) and therefore errors have to be minimised to within 1 μm. Rules based on both Classification and Regression Trees (CART) and Neural Networks (NN) were used to implement a simulation displaying how such a control regime could be used as a real time controller, be it corrective measures (via spring cuts) over several initial machining passes or, with a micron cut introducing a level plain measure for allowing setup corrective measures (similar to a spirit level).

  17. Characterization and Simulation of an Acoustic Source Moving through an Oceanic Waveguide

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-09-01

    algorithms, classical spectrum estimation methods are employed [1, 2] to estimate the auto- and cross-spectra of data received at the array of...Acoust. Soc. Am., 65(3):675-681 (March). [4] Rao, Kodali V., Thomas M. Michaud, and Henrik Schmidt. 1991. "Doppler shifts in underwater acoustics using

  18. Acoustic and satellite remote sensing of blue whale seasonality and habitat in the Northeast Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burtenshaw, Jessica C.; Oleson, Erin M.; Hildebrand, John A.; McDonald, Mark A.; Andrew, Rex K.; Howe, Bruce M.; Mercer, James A.

    2004-05-01

    Northeast Pacific blue whales seasonally migrate, ranging from the waters off Central America to the Gulf of Alaska. Using acoustic and satellite remote sensing, we have continuously monitored the acoustic activity and habitat of blue whales during 1994-2000. Calling blue whales primarily aggregate off the coast of southern and central California in the late summer, coinciding with the timing of the peak euphausiid biomass, their preferred prey. The northward bloom of primary production along the coast and subsequent northbound movements of the blue whales are apparent in the satellite and acoustic records, respectively, with the calling blue whales moving north along the Oregon and Washington coasts to a secondary foraging area with high primary productivity off Vancouver Island in the late fall. El Ni n˜o conditions, indicated by elevated sea-surface temperature and depressed regional chlorophyll- a concentrations, are apparent in the satellite records, particularly in the Southern California Bight during 1997/1998. These conditions disrupt biological production and alter the presence of calling blue whales in primary feeding locations. Remote sensing using acoustics is well suited to characterizing the seasonal movements and relative abundance of the northeast Pacific blue whales, and remote sensing using satellites allows for monitoring their habitat. These technologies are invaluable because of their ability to provide continuous large-scale spatial and temporal coverage of the blue whale migration.

  19. Tunable broadband unidirectional acoustic transmission based on a waveguide with phononic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Ailing; Chen, Tianning; Wang, Xiaopeng; Wan, Lele

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, a tunable broadband unidirectional acoustic transmission (UAT) device composed of a bended tube and a superlattice with square columns is proposed and numerically investigated by using finite element method. The UAT is realized in the proposed UAT device within two wide frequency ranges. And the effectiveness of the UAT device is demonstrated by analyzing the sound pressure distributions when the acoustic waves are incident from different directions. The unidirectional band gaps can be effectively tuned by mechanically rotating the square columns, which is a highlight of this paper. Besides, a bidirectional acoustic isolation (BAI) device is obtained by placing two superlattices in the bended tube, in which the acoustic waves cannot propagate along any directions. The physical mechanisms of the proposed UAT device and BAI device are simply discussed. The proposed models show potential applications in some areas, such as unidirectional sonic barrier or noise insulation.

  20. Determination of cutoff frequencies of simple waveguides using finite difference method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolagani, Sridhar

    Waveguides are used to transfer electromagnetic energy from one location to another. Within many electronic circles, waveguides are commonly used for microwave RF signals; the same principle can be used for many forms of waves from sound to light. They have been used in many technologies like acoustic waveguide speaker technology, high-performance passive waveguide technologies for remote sensing and communication, optical computing, robotic-vision, biochemical sensing and many more. Modern waveguide technology employs a variety of waveguides with different cross sections and perturbations, the cutoff frequencies and mode shapes of many of these waveguides are ill-suited for determination by an analytical method. In this thesis, we solve this type of waveguides by employing the numerical procedure of finite difference method. By adopting finite difference approach with an application of eigenvalue method, we discuss about few different types of these waveguides in determining the cutoff frequencies of supported modes, and extracting the possible degenerate modes and their field distributions. To validate the method and its accuracy, it is applied to the two well known rectangular waveguides, viz. PEC Rectangular Waveguide and Artificial Rectangular Waveguide (consists of PEC and PMC walls) and compared with the analytical solutions.

  1. Transmitting Information by Propagation in an Ocean Waveguide: Computation of Acoustic Field Capacity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-17

    sound speeds and densities for both the water column and bottom, in conjunction with a correlated noise field. The acoustic source is described by a...determined here through singular value de- composition of matrices associated with the Green functions and noise distribution, in conjunction with a

  2. Observations of Brine Pool Surface Characteristics and Internal Structure Through Remote Acoustic and Structured Light Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smart, C.; Roman, C.; Michel, A.; Wankel, S. D.

    2015-12-01

    Observations and analysis of the surface characteristics and internal structure of deep-sea brine pools are currently limited to discrete in-situ observations. Complementary acoustic and structured light imaging sensors mounted on a remotely operated vehicle (ROV) have demonstrated the ability systematically detect variations in surface characteristics of a brine pool, reveal internal stratification and detect areas of active hydrocarbon activity. The presented visual and acoustic sensors combined with a stereo camera pair are mounted on the 4000m rated ROV Hercules (Ocean Exploration Trust). These three independent sensors operate simultaneously from a typical 3m altitude resulting in visual and bathymetric maps with sub-centimeter resolution. Applying this imaging technology to 2014 and 2015 brine pool surveys in the Gulf of Mexico revealed acoustic and visual anomalies due to the density changes inherent in the brine. Such distinct changes in acoustic impedance allowed the high frequency 1350KHz multibeam sonar to detect multiple interfaces. For instance, distinct acoustic reflections were observed at 3m and 5.5m below the vehicle. Subsequent verification using a CDT and lead line indicated the acoustic return from the brine surface was the signal at 3m, while a thicker muddy and more saline interface occurred at 5.5m, the bottom of the brine pool was not located but is assumed to be deeper than 15m. The multibeam is also capable of remotely detecting emitted gas bubbles within the brine pool, indicative of active hydrocarbon seeps. Bubbles associated with these seeps were not consistently visible above the brine while using the HD camera on the ROV. Additionally, while imaging the surface of brine pool the structured light sheet laser became diffuse, refracting across the main interface. Analysis of this refraction combined with varying acoustic returns allow for systematic and remote detection of the density, stratification and activity levels within and

  3. Opto-Acoustic Data Fusion for Supporting the Guidance of Remotely Operated Underwater Vehicles (ROVs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruno, F.; Lagudi, A.; Ritacco, G.; Muzzupappa, M.; Guida, R.

    2015-04-01

    Remotely Operated underwater Vehicles (ROVs) play an important role in a number of operations conducted in shallow and deep water (e.g.: exploration, survey, intervention, etc.), in several application fields like marine science, offshore construction, and underwater archeology. ROVs are usually equipped with different imaging devices, both optical and acoustic. Optical sensors are able to generate better images in close range and clear water conditions, while acoustic systems are usually employed in long range acquisitions and do not suffer from the presence of turbidity, a well-known cause of coarser resolution and harder data extraction. In this work we describe the preliminary steps in the development of an opto-acoustic camera able to provide an on-line 3D reconstruction of the acquired scene. Taking full advantage of the benefits arising from the opto-acoustic data fusion techniques, the system was conceived as a support tool for ROV operators during the navigation in turbid waters, or in operations conducted by means of mechanical manipulators. The paper presents an overview of the device, an ad-hoc methodology for the extrinsic calibration of the system and a custom software developed to control the opto-acoustic camera and supply the operator with visual information.

  4. Improved multimodal method for the acoustic propagation in waveguides with a wall impedance and a uniform flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercier, Jean-François; Maurel, Agnès

    2016-06-01

    We present an efficient multimodal method to describe the acoustic propagation in the presence of a uniform flow in a waveguide with locally a wall impedance treatment. The method relies on a variational formulation of the problem, which allows to derive a multimodal formulation within a rigorous mathematical framework, notably to properly account for the boundary conditions on the walls (being locally the Myers condition and the Neumann condition otherwise). Also, the method uses an enriched basis with respect to the usual cosine basis, able to absorb the less converging part of the modal series and thus, to improve the convergence of the method. Using the cosine basis, the modal method has a low convergence, 1/N, with N the order of truncation. Using the enriched basis, the improvement in the convergence is shown to depend on the Mach number, from 1/N5 to roughly 1/N1.5 for M=0 to M close to unity. The case of a continuously varying wall impedance is considered, and we discuss the limiting case of piecewise constant impedance, which defines pressure edge conditions at the impedance discontinuities.

  5. Maximum entropy approach to statistical inference for an ocean acoustic waveguide.

    PubMed

    Knobles, D P; Sagers, J D; Koch, R A

    2012-02-01

    A conditional probability distribution suitable for estimating the statistical properties of ocean seabed parameter values inferred from acoustic measurements is derived from a maximum entropy principle. The specification of the expectation value for an error function constrains the maximization of an entropy functional. This constraint determines the sensitivity factor (β) to the error function of the resulting probability distribution, which is a canonical form that provides a conservative estimate of the uncertainty of the parameter values. From the conditional distribution, marginal distributions for individual parameters can be determined from integration over the other parameters. The approach is an alternative to obtaining the posterior probability distribution without an intermediary determination of the likelihood function followed by an application of Bayes' rule. In this paper the expectation value that specifies the constraint is determined from the values of the error function for the model solutions obtained from a sparse number of data samples. The method is applied to ocean acoustic measurements taken on the New Jersey continental shelf. The marginal probability distribution for the values of the sound speed ratio at the surface of the seabed and the source levels of a towed source are examined for different geoacoustic model representations.

  6. Influence of electron-electron collisions on the propagation of ion-acoustic space-charge waves in a warm plasma waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Myoung-Jae; Jung, Young-Dae

    2017-04-01

    The influence of electron–electron collisions on the propagation of the ion-acoustic space-charge wave is investigated in a cylindrical waveguide filled with warm collisional plasma by employing the normal mode analysis and the method of separation of variables. It is shown that the frequency of the ion-acoustic space-charge wave with higher-harmonic modes is always smaller than that with lower-harmonic modes, especially in intermediate wave number domains. It is also shown that the collisional damping rate of the ion-acoustic space-charge wave due to the electron–electron collision effect with higher-harmonic modes is smaller than that with lower-harmonic modes. In addition, it is found that the maximum position of the collisional damping rate shifts to large wave numbers with an increase of the harmonic mode. The variation of the wave frequency and the collisional damping rate of the ion-acoustic space-charge wave is also discussed.

  7. Miniature, Low-Power, Waveguide Based Infrared Fourier Transform Spectrometer for Spacecraft Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hewagama, TIlak; Aslam, Shahid; Talabac, Stephen; Allen, John E., Jr.; Annen, John N.; Jennings, Donald E.

    2011-01-01

    Fourier transform spectrometers have a venerable heritage as flight instruments. However, obtaining an accurate spectrum exacts a penalty in instrument mass and power requirements. Recent advances in a broad class of non-scanning Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) devices, generally called spatial heterodyne spectrometers, offer distinct advantages as flight optimized systems. We are developing a miniaturized system that employs photonics lightwave circuit principles and functions as an FTS operating in the 7-14 micrometer spectral region. The inteferogram is constructed from an ensemble of Mach-Zehnder interferometers with path length differences calibrated to mimic scan mirror sample positions of a classic Michelson type FTS. One potential long-term application of this technology in low cost planetary missions is the concept of a self-contained sensor system. We are developing a systems architecture concept for wide area in situ and remote monitoring of characteristic properties that are of scientific interest. The system will be based on wavelength- and resolution-independent spectroscopic sensors for studying atmospheric and surface chemistry, physics, and mineralogy. The self-contained sensor network is based on our concept of an Addressable Photonics Cube (APC) which has real-time flexibility and broad science applications. It is envisaged that a spatially distributed autonomous sensor web concept that integrates multiple APCs will be reactive and dynamically driven. The network is designed to respond in an event- or model-driven manner or reconfigured as needed.

  8. Near-field acoustic microbead trapping as remote anchor for single particle manipulation

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Jae Youn; Cheon, Dong Young; Shin, Hyunjune; Kim, Hyun Bin; Lee, Jungwoo

    2015-05-04

    We recently proposed an analytical model of a two-dimensional acoustic trapping of polystyrene beads in the ray acoustics regime, where a bead diameter is larger than the wavelength used. As its experimental validation, this paper demonstrates the transverse (or lateral) trapping of individual polystyrene beads in the near field of focused ultrasound. A 100 μm bead is immobilized on the central beam axis by a focused sound beam from a 30 MHz single element lithium niobate transducer, after being laterally displaced through hundreds of micrometers. Maximum displacement, a longest lateral distance at which a trapped bead can be directed towards the central axis, is thus measured over a discrete frequency range from 24 MHz to 36 MHz. The displacement data are found to be between 323.7 μm and 470.2 μm, depending on the transducer's driving frequency and input voltage amplitude. The experimental results are compared with their corresponding model values, and their relative errors lie between 0.9% and 3.9%. The results suggest that this remote maneuvering technique may be employed to manipulate individual cells through solid microbeads, provoking certain cellular reactions to localized mechanical disturbance without direct contact.

  9. Ocean acoustic remote sensing using ambient noise: results from the Florida Straits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, M. G.; Godin, O. A.; Zang, X.; Ball, J. S.; Zabotin, N. A.; Zabotina, L. Y.; Williams, N. J.

    2016-07-01

    Noise interferometry is the process by which approximations to acoustic Green's functions, which describe sound propagation between two locations, are estimated by cross-correlating time series of ambient noise measured at those locations. Noise-interferometry-based approximations to Green's functions can be used as the basis for a variety of inversion algorithms, thereby providing a purely passive alternative to active-source ocean acoustic remote sensing. In this paper we give an overview of results from noise interferometry experiments conducted in the Florida Straits at 100 m depth in December 2012, and at 600 m depth in September/October 2013. Under good conditions for noise interferometry, estimates of cross-correlation functions are shown to allow one to perform advanced phase-coherent signal processing techniques to perform waveform inversions, estimate currents by exploiting non-reciprocity, perform time-reversal/back-propagation calculations and investigate modal dispersion using time-warping techniques. Conditions which are favourable for noise interferometry are identified and discussed.

  10. Use of acoustic velocity methodology and remote sensing techniques to measure unsteady flow on the lower Yazoo River in Mississippi

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Turnipseed, D. Phil; Cooper, Lance M.; Davis, Angela A.

    1998-01-01

    Methodologies have been developed for computing continuous discharge during varied, non-uniform low and medium flows on the Yazoo River at the U.S. Geological Survey streamgage below Steele Bayou near Long Lake, Mississippi, using acoustic signal processing and conventional streamgaging techniques. Procedures were also developed to compute locations of discharges during future high flow events when the stream reach is subject to hi-directional and reverse flow caused by rising stages on the Mississippi River using a combination of acoustic equipment and remote sensing technology. A description of the study area is presented. Selected results of these methods are presented for the period from March through September 1997.

  11. Remote listening and passive acoustic detection in a 3-D environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnhill, Colin

    Teleconferencing environments are a necessity in business, education and personal communication. They allow for the communication of information to remote locations without the need for travel and the necessary time and expense required for that travel. Visual information can be communicated using cameras and monitors. The advantage of visual communication is that an image can capture multiple objects and convey them, using a monitor, to a large group of people regardless of the receiver's location. This is not the case for audio. Currently, most experimental teleconferencing systems' audio is based on stereo recording and reproduction techniques. The problem with this solution is that it is only effective for one or two receivers. To accurately capture a sound environment consisting of multiple sources and to recreate that for a group of people is an unsolved problem. This work will focus on new methods of multiple source 3-D environment sound capture and applications using these captured environments. Using spherical microphone arrays, it is now possible to capture a true 3-D environment A spherical harmonic transform on the array's surface allows us to determine the basis functions (spherical harmonics) for all spherical wave solutions (up to a fixed order). This spherical harmonic decomposition (SHD) allows us to not only look at the time and frequency characteristics of an audio signal but also the spatial characteristics of an audio signal. In this way, a spherical harmonic transform is analogous to a Fourier transform in that a Fourier transform transforms a signal into the frequency domain and a spherical harmonic transform transforms a signal into the spatial domain. The SHD also decouples the input signals from the microphone locations. Using the SHD of a soundfield, new algorithms are available for remote listening, acoustic detection, and signal enhancement The new algorithms presented in this paper show distinct advantages over previous detection and

  12. Internal gravity-shear waves in the atmospheric boundary layer from acoustic remote sensing data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyulyukin, V. S.; Kallistratova, M. A.; Kouznetsov, R. D.; Kuznetsov, D. D.; Chunchuzov, I. P.; Chirokova, G. Yu.

    2015-03-01

    The year-round continuous remote sounding of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) by means of the Doppler acoustic radar (sodar) LATAN-3 has been performed at the Zvenigorod Scientific Station of the Obukhov Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, since 2008. A visual analysis of sodar echograms for four years revealed a large number of wavelike patterns in the intensity field of a scattered sound signal. Similar patterns were occasionally identified before in sodar, radar, and lidar sounding data. These patterns in the form of quasi-periodic inclined stripes, or cat's eyes, arise under stable stratification and significant vertical wind shears and result from the loss of the dynamic stability of the flow. In the foreign literature, these patterns, which we call internal gravity-shear waves, are often associated with Kelvin-Helmholtz waves. In the present paper, sodar echograms are classified according to the presence or absence of wavelike patterns, and a statistical analysis of the frequency of their occurrence by the year and season was performed. A relationship between the occurrence of the patterns and wind shear and between the wave length and amplitude was investigated. The criteria for the identification of gravity-shear waves, meteorological conditions of their excitation, and issues related to their observations were discussed.

  13. Remote full control, by an Internet link, of an underwater acoustics laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranz-Guerra, Carlos; Cobo-Parra, Pedro; Siguero-Guerra, Manuel; Fernandez-Fernandez, Alejandro

    2002-11-01

    The Underwater Tank Laboratory located at the Instituto de Acustica, CSIC, Madrid, has been fully reshaped. Now, the two bridges (emission and reception) have full automatic motion control by the operator. These capabilities were complemented by a new management of signal generation, signal acquisition, processing and storing of data. This new framework makes many of the tasks to be performed in this kind of facility easier by putting at the hands of the operator specific friendly software programs that attend to the main aspects of the ongoing experiment. In one step forward, the remote control of all the functionalities was considered feasible. The potentialities of the Internet were thought to provide a new dimension to the laboratory by lowering the difficulties of taking over the full control of the installation, by any user around the world. Here is one real example of how this achievement can be carried out. The Underwater Acoustics Laboratory at the Instituto de Acustica, CSIC, is now ready to be run by any one interested. The main lines, over which this problem has been considered, are described in this paper. [Work supported by PN on Science and Technology and CSIC, Spain.

  14. Remote ballistic emplacement of an electro-optical and acoustic target detection and localization system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, Aaron; Mellini, Mark

    2015-05-01

    Near real time situational awareness in uncontrolled non line of sight (NLOS) and beyond line of sight (BLOS) environments is critical in the asymmetric battlefield of future conflicts. The ability to detect and accurately locate hostile forces in difficult terrain or urban environments can dramatically increase the survivability and effectiveness of dismounted soldiers, especially when they are limited to the resources available only to the small unit. The Sensor Mortar Network (SMortarNet) is a 60mm Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance (ISR) mortar designed to give the Squad near real time situational awareness in uncontrolled NLOS environments. SMortarNet is designed to track targets both acoustically and electro optically and can fuse tracks between, the acoustic, EO, and magnetic modalities on board. The system is linked to other mortar nodes and the user via a masterless frequency hopping spread spectrum ad-hoc mesh radio network. This paper will discuss SMortarNet in the context of a squad level dismounted soldier, its technical capabilities, and its benefit to the small unit Warfighter. The challenges with ballistic remote emplacement of sensitive components and the on board signal processing capabilities of the system will also be covered. The paper will also address how the sensor network can be integrated with existing soldier infrastructure, such as the NettWarrior platform, for rapid transition to soldier systems. Networks of low power sensors can have many forms, but the more practical networks for warfighters are ad hoc radio-based systems that can be rapidly deployed and can leverage a range of assets available at a given time. The low power long life networks typically have limited bandwidth and may have unreliable communication depending on the network health, which makes autonomous sensors a critical component of the network. SMortarNet reduces data to key information features at the sensor itself. The smart sensing approach enables

  15. Characterizing Broadband Acoustic Propagation Scintillation and Modelling Scattering and Reverberation for Sensing in a Random Ocean Waveguide

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-30

    Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 2 annulus offset from the origin in the complex plane. The phase distributions are found to...Complex field, (b) amplitude and (c) phase distributions of ocean acoustic signal propagated over small source-receiver separations in the Gulf of

  16. Double-Capon and double-MUSICAL for arrival separation and observable estimation in an acoustic waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Touzé, Grégoire Le; Nicolas, Barbara; Mars, Jérôme I.; Roux, Philippe; Oudompheng, Benoit

    2012-12-01

    Recent developments in shallow water ocean acoustic tomography propose the use of an original configuration composed of two source-receiver vertical arrays and wideband sources. The recording space thus has three dimensions, with two spatial dimensions and the frequency dimension. Using this recording space, it is possible to build a three-dimensional (3D) estimation space that gives access to the three observables associated with the acoustic arrivals: the direction of departure, the direction of arrivals, and the time of arrival. The main interest of this 3D estimation space is its capability for the separation of acoustic arrivals that usually interfere in the recording space, due to multipath propagation. A 3D estimator called double beamforming has already been developed, although it has limited resolution. In this study, the new 3D high-resolution estimators of double Capon and double MUSICAL are proposed to achieve this task. The ocean acoustic tomography configuration allows a single recording realization to estimate the cross-spectral data matrix, which is necessary to build high-resolution estimators. 3D smoothing techniques are thus proposed to increase the rank of the matrix. The estimators developed are validated on real data recorded in an ultrasonic tank, and their detection performances are compared to existing 2D and 3D methods.

  17. Remote temperature profiling in the troposphere and stratosphere by the radio-acoustic sounding technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matuura, N.; Masuda, Y.; Inuki, H.

    1986-01-01

    Radar application of the radio-acoustic sounding technique uses the Doppler frequency shift of radar echoes returning from the atmospheric wave structure, in association with a traveling acoustic pulse transmitted from the ground, to determine the speed of sound, and hence the atmospheric temperature, as a function of altitude. Temperature measurement in the troposphere and stratosphere were determined using the radio-acoustic sounding technique with the Radio-Acoustic Sounding System (RASS). Successful experiments were performed in March 1985, and in August 1985.

  18. A re-expansion method for determining the acoustical impedance and the scattering matrix for the waveguide discontinuity problem

    PubMed Central

    Homentcovschi, Dorel; Miles, Ronald N.

    2010-01-01

    The paper gives a new method for analyzing planar discontinuities in rectangular waveguides. The method consists of a re-expansion of the normal modes in the two ducts at the junction plane into a system of functions accounting for the velocity singularities at the corner points. As the new expansion has an exponential convergence, only a few terms have to be considered for obtaining the solution of most practical problems. To see how the method works some closed form solutions, obtained by the conformal mapping method, are used to discuss the convergence of the re-expanded series when the number of retained terms increases. The equivalent impedance accounting for nonplanar waves into a plane-wave analysis is determined. Finally, the paper yields the scattering matrix which describes the coupling of arbitrary modes at each side of the discontinuity valid in the case of many propagating modes in both parts of the duct. PMID:20707432

  19. Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, Jerry R.; Grosveld, Ferdinand

    2007-01-01

    The acoustics environment in space operations is important to maintain at manageable levels so that the crewperson can remain safe, functional, effective, and reasonably comfortable. High acoustic levels can produce temporary or permanent hearing loss, or cause other physiological symptoms such as auditory pain, headaches, discomfort, strain in the vocal cords, or fatigue. Noise is defined as undesirable sound. Excessive noise may result in psychological effects such as irritability, inability to concentrate, decrease in productivity, annoyance, errors in judgment, and distraction. A noisy environment can also result in the inability to sleep, or sleep well. Elevated noise levels can affect the ability to communicate, understand what is being said, hear what is going on in the environment, degrade crew performance and operations, and create habitability concerns. Superfluous noise emissions can also create the inability to hear alarms or other important auditory cues such as an equipment malfunctioning. Recent space flight experience, evaluations of the requirements in crew habitable areas, and lessons learned (Goodman 2003; Allen and Goodman 2003; Pilkinton 2003; Grosveld et al. 2003) show the importance of maintaining an acceptable acoustics environment. This is best accomplished by having a high-quality set of limits/requirements early in the program, the "designing in" of acoustics in the development of hardware and systems, and by monitoring, testing and verifying the levels to ensure that they are acceptable.

  20. The derivative of a waveguide acoustic field with respect to a three-dimensional sound speed perturbation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thode, Aaron

    2004-06-01

    Semianalytic expressions are derived for the first-order derivative of a pressure field in a laterally homogeneous waveguide, with respect to an arbitrary three-dimensional refractive index perturbation in either the water column or ocean bottom. These expressions for the ``environmental derivative,'' derived using an adjoint method, require a three-dimensional spatial correlation between two Green's functions, weighted by an environmental parameter basis function, with the Green's functions expressed in terms of normal modes. When a particular set of orthogonal spatial basis functions is chosen, the three-dimensional spatial integral can be converted into a set of one-dimensional integrations over depth and azimuth. The use of the orthogonal basis permits environmental derivatives to be computed for an arbitrary sound-speed perturbation. To illustrate the formulas, a simple sensitivity study is presented that explores under what circumstances three-dimensional plane-wave and cylindrical perturbations produce non-negligible horizontal refraction effects, for a fixed source/receiver geometry. Other potential applications of these formulas include benchmarking three-dimensional propagation codes, and computing Cramer-Rao bounds for three-dimensional environmental parameter estimates, including internal wave components.

  1. Acoustic and microwave tests in a cylindrical cavity for acoustic gas thermometry at high temperature

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, K.; Feng, X.J.; Gillis, K.; Moldover, M.; Zhang, J.T.; Lin, H.; Qu, J.F.; Duan, Y.N.

    2016-01-01

    Relative primary acoustic gas thermometry determines the ratios of thermodynamic temperatures from measured ratios of acoustic and microwave resonance frequencies in a gas-filled metal cavity on isotherms of interest. When measured in a cavity with known dimensions, the frequencies of acoustic resonances in a gas determine the speed of sound, which is a known function of the thermodynamic temperature T. Changes in the dimensions of the cavity are measured using the frequencies of the cavity's microwave resonances. We explored techniques and materials for acoustic gas thermometry at high temperatures using a cylindrical cavity with remote acoustic transducers. We used gas-filled ducts as acoustic waveguides to transmit sound between the cavity at high temperatures and the acoustic transducers at room temperature. We measured non-degenerate acoustic modes in a cylindrical cavity in the range 295 K < T < 797 K. The fractional uncertainty of the measured acoustic frequencies increased from 2×10−6 at 295 K to 5×10−6 at 797 K. In addition, we measured the frequencies of several transverse magnetic (TM) microwave resonances up to 1000 K in order to track changes in the cavity's length L and radius R. The fractional standard deviation of the values of L deduced from three TM modes increased from 3×10−6 for T < 600 K to 57×10−6 at 1000 K. We observed similar inconsistencies in a previous study. PMID:26903106

  2. Remote opto-acoustic probing of single-cell adhesion on metallic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Abi Ghanem, Maroun; Dehoux, Thomas; Zouani, Omar F; Gadalla, Atef; Durrieu, Marie-Christine; Audoin, Bertrand

    2014-06-01

    The reflection of picosecond ultrasonic pulses from a cell-substrate interface is used to probe cell-biomaterial adhesion with a subcell resolution. We culture monocytes on top of a thin biocompatible Ti metal film, supported by a transparent sapphire substrate. Low-energy femtosecond pump laser pulses are focused at the bottom of the Ti film to a micron spot. The subsequent ultrafast thermal expansion launches a longitudinal acoustic pulse in Ti, with a broad spectrum extending up to 100 GHz. We measure the acoustic echoes reflected from the Ti-cell interface through the transient optical reflectance changes. The time-frequency analysis of the reflected acoustic pulses gives access to a map of the cell acoustic impedance Zc and to a map of the film-cell interfacial stiffness K simultaneously. Variations in Zc across the cell are attributed to rigidity and density fluctuations within the cell, whereas variations in K are related to interfacial intermolecular forces and to the nano-architecture of the transmembrane bonds.

  3. Enhancing active and passive remote sensing in the ocean using broadband acoustic transmissions and coherent hydrophone arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Duong Duy

    The statistics of broadband acoustic signal transmissions in a random continental shelf waveguide are characterized for the fully saturated regime. The probability distribution of broadband signal energies after saturated multi-path propagation is derived using coherence theory. The frequency components obtained from Fourier decomposition of a broadband signal are each assumed to be fully saturated, where the energy spectral density obeys the exponential distribution with 5.6 dB standard deviation and unity scintillation index. When the signal bandwidth and measurement time are respectively larger than the correlation bandwidth and correlation time of its energy spectral density components, the broadband signal energy obtained by integrating the energy spectral density across the signal bandwidth then follows the Gamma distribution with standard deviation smaller than 5.6 dB and scintillation index less than unity. The theory is verified with broadband transmissions in the Gulf of Maine shallow water waveguide in the 300-1200 Hz frequency range. The standard deviations of received broadband signal energies range from 2.7 to 4.6 dB for effective bandwidths up to 42 Hz, while the standard deviations of individual energy spectral density components are roughly 5.6 dB. The energy spectral density correlation bandwidths of the received broadband signals are found to be larger for signals with higher center frequency. Sperm whales in the New England continental shelf and slope were passively localized, in both range and bearing using a single low-frequency (< 2500 Hz), densely sampled, towed horizontal coherent hydrophone array system. Whale bearings were estimated using time-domain beamforming that provided high coherent array gain in sperm whale click signal-to-noise ratio. Whale ranges from the receiver array center were estimated using the moving array triangulation technique from a sequence of whale bearing measurements. The dive profile was estimated for a sperm

  4. Note: A frequency modulated wireless interrogation system exploiting narrowband acoustic resonator for remote physical quantity measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Droit, C.; Martin, G.; Ballandras, S.; Friedt, J.-M.

    2010-05-01

    We demonstrate the wireless conversion of frequency modulation to amplitude modulation by radio frequency resonators as means of accurately determining the resonance frequency of passive acoustoelectronic sensors. The emitted frequency modulated radio frequency pulses are generated by a pulsed radar for probing a surface acoustic wave based sensor. The sharp sign transition of the amplitude modulated received signal provides a signal on which a feedback loop is locked to monitor the resonance signal. The strategy is demonstrated using a full software implementation on a generic hardware, resulting in 2 Hz resolution at 1 s integration time limited by the proportional feedback loop.

  5. Note: A frequency modulated wireless interrogation system exploiting narrowband acoustic resonator for remote physical quantity measurement.

    PubMed

    Droit, C; Martin, G; Ballandras, S; Friedt, J-M

    2010-05-01

    We demonstrate the wireless conversion of frequency modulation to amplitude modulation by radio frequency resonators as means of accurately determining the resonance frequency of passive acoustoelectronic sensors. The emitted frequency modulated radio frequency pulses are generated by a pulsed radar for probing a surface acoustic wave based sensor. The sharp sign transition of the amplitude modulated received signal provides a signal on which a feedback loop is locked to monitor the resonance signal. The strategy is demonstrated using a full software implementation on a generic hardware, resulting in 2 Hz resolution at 1 s integration time limited by the proportional feedback loop.

  6. A wireless interrogation system exploiting narrowband acoustic resonator for remote physical quantity measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedt, J.-M.; Droit, C.; Martin, G.; Ballandras, S.

    2010-01-01

    Monitoring physical quantities using acoustic wave devices can be advantageously achieved using the wave characteristic dependence to various parametric perturbations (temperature, stress, and pressure). Surface acoustic wave (SAW) resonators are particularly well suited to such applications as their resonance frequency is directly influenced by these perturbations, modifying both the phase velocity and resonance conditions. Moreover, the intrinsic radio frequency (rf) nature of these devices makes them ideal for wireless applications, mainly exploiting antennas reciprocity and piezoelectric reversibility. In this paper, we present a wireless SAW sensor interrogation unit operating in the 434 MHz centered ISM band—selected as a tradeoff between antenna dimensions and electromagnetic wave penetration in dielectric media—based on the principles of a frequency sweep network analyzer. We particularly focus on the compliance with the ISM standard which reveals complicated by the need for switching from emission to reception modes similarly to radar operation. In this matter, we propose a fully digital rf synthesis chain to develop various interrogation strategies to overcome the corresponding difficulties and comply with the above-mentioned standard. We finally assess the reader interrogation range, accuracy, and dynamics.

  7. A wireless interrogation system exploiting narrowband acoustic resonator for remote physical quantity measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Friedt, J.-M; Droit, C.; Martin, G.; Ballandras, S.

    2010-01-15

    Monitoring physical quantities using acoustic wave devices can be advantageously achieved using the wave characteristic dependence to various parametric perturbations (temperature, stress, and pressure). Surface acoustic wave (SAW) resonators are particularly well suited to such applications as their resonance frequency is directly influenced by these perturbations, modifying both the phase velocity and resonance conditions. Moreover, the intrinsic radio frequency (rf) nature of these devices makes them ideal for wireless applications, mainly exploiting antennas reciprocity and piezoelectric reversibility. In this paper, we present a wireless SAW sensor interrogation unit operating in the 434 MHz centered ISM band--selected as a tradeoff between antenna dimensions and electromagnetic wave penetration in dielectric media--based on the principles of a frequency sweep network analyzer. We particularly focus on the compliance with the ISM standard which reveals complicated by the need for switching from emission to reception modes similarly to radar operation. In this matter, we propose a fully digital rf synthesis chain to develop various interrogation strategies to overcome the corresponding difficulties and comply with the above-mentioned standard. We finally assess the reader interrogation range, accuracy, and dynamics.

  8. Remote vibration measurement: A wireless passive surface acoustic wave resonator fast probing strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedt, J.-M.; Droit, C.; Ballandras, S.; Alzuaga, S.; Martin, G.; Sandoz, P.

    2012-05-01

    Surface acoustic wave (SAW) resonators can advantageously operate as passive sensors which can be interrogated through a wireless link. Amongst the practical applications of such devices, structural health monitoring through stress measurement and more generally vibration characteristics of mechanical structures benefit from the ability to bury such sensors within the considered structure (wireless and battery-less). However, measurement bandwidth becomes a significant challenge when measuring wideband vibration characteristics of mechanical structures. A fast SAW resonator measurement scheme is demonstrated here. The measurement bandwidth is limited by the physical settling time of the resonator (Q/π periods), requiring only two probe pulses through a monostatic RADAR-like electronic setup to identify the sensor resonance frequency and hence stress on a resonator acting as a strain gauge. A measurement update rate of 4800 Hz using a high quality factor SAW resonator operating in the 434 MHz Industrial, Scientific and Medical band is experimentally demonstrated.

  9. Remote vibration measurement: a wireless passive surface acoustic wave resonator fast probing strategy.

    PubMed

    Friedt, J-M; Droit, C; Ballandras, S; Alzuaga, S; Martin, G; Sandoz, P

    2012-05-01

    Surface acoustic wave (SAW) resonators can advantageously operate as passive sensors which can be interrogated through a wireless link. Amongst the practical applications of such devices, structural health monitoring through stress measurement and more generally vibration characteristics of mechanical structures benefit from the ability to bury such sensors within the considered structure (wireless and battery-less). However, measurement bandwidth becomes a significant challenge when measuring wideband vibration characteristics of mechanical structures. A fast SAW resonator measurement scheme is demonstrated here. The measurement bandwidth is limited by the physical settling time of the resonator (Q/π periods), requiring only two probe pulses through a monostatic RADAR-like electronic setup to identify the sensor resonance frequency and hence stress on a resonator acting as a strain gauge. A measurement update rate of 4800 Hz using a high quality factor SAW resonator operating in the 434 MHz Industrial, Scientific and Medical band is experimentally demonstrated.

  10. Acoustic Remote Sensing of Volcanic Eruptions in Washington, Ecuador, and Colombia: New Tools for Covering Observational Gaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garces, M.; Fee, D.; Steffke, A.; Matoza, R.; Hedlin, M.; Yepes, H.; McCormack, D.; Bass, H.; Hetzer, C.; Servranckx, R.

    2007-05-01

    Some volcanoes, particularly near population centers or in developed countries, have well developed ground- based monitoring systems. Yet there remain large portions of Earth's surface, particularly in remote areas or less-developed countries, where local ground-based surveillance systems are sparse, fragile, or non-existent. The Acoustic Surveillance for Hazardous Eruptions (ASHE) project aims to develop and evaluate the capability to use low frequency sound to provide robust, low-latency notifications of volcanic eruptions over large regions. We describe current field deployments of several small, autonomous infrasound arrays in Washington State (since October 2004) and Ecuador (since January 2006). The arrays in Washington have detected diverse eruption signals from Mount St. Helens, and the arrays in Ecuador have captured eruptions from Tungurahua and Sangay Volcanoes, as well as Galeras in Colombia. These stations send continuous real time data to a central facility where automatic analysis techniques for eruption detection are being prototyped. Plans are in place to send automated notification products on a test basis to a participating ICAO-designated Volcanic Ash Advisory Center for comparison and possible integration with their existing warning systems. These notifications would be coupled with more detailed real-time data products (presently provided in designated web pages), and could be used by responsible agencies to assess hazard and disseminate updated information.

  11. Acoustic monitoring of co-seismic changes in gas bubble rupture rate in a hydrothermal reservoir: field evaluation of a possible precursor and mechanism for remote seismic triggering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crews, J. B.

    2015-12-01

    Remotely triggered seismicity is a phenomenon in which an earthquake at one location triggers others over distances up to thousands of kilometers. The mechanism by which low-amplitude dynamic oscillations of the confining stress can produce such an effect, often after a time delay of minutes-to-days, is unclear, but a concentration of remotely triggered seismic events in carbon-dioxide-rich volcanic and geothermal regions suggests that an increase in pore fluid pressure associated with the nucleation and growth of carbon-dioxide gas bubbles may reduce the effective stress in critically loaded geologic faults. While this hypothesis has been tested in bench-scale laboratory experiments, field detection of seismically initiated gas bubble growth in groundwater may provide further evidence for this remote triggering mechanism. In the present study, a hydrophone continuously records the acoustic power spectrum in CH-10B, a hydrothermal well located in Long Valley Caldera, California - a site that is susceptible to remotely seismic triggering. This well exhibits co-seismic changes in water level in response to near and distant earthquakes, including every magnitude-six or greater at any location on Earth. Exploiting the inverse relationship between gas bubble radius and the peak acoustic frequency emitted when a gas bubble ruptures, this investigation seeks to detect changes in the acoustic power spectrum arising from a shift in the size-distribution or count rate of rupturing gas bubbles, coincident with a distant earthquake. By resolving the timing and intensity of the onset of a change in gas bubble rupture rate after the passage of seismic wave from a distant source, it may be possible to establish the extent to which seismically initiated gas bubble growth contributes to co-seismic borehole water level response, pore fluid pressure perturbations, and the onset of remotely triggered seismicity.

  12. Remote monitoring and prognosis of fatigue cracking in steel bridges with acoustic emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jianguo Peter; Ziehl, Paul; Pollock, Adrian

    2011-04-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) monitoring is desirable to nondestructively detect fatigue damage in steel bridges. Investigations of the relationship between AE signals and crack growth behavior are of paramount importance prior to the widespread application of passive piezoelectric sensing for monitoring of fatigue crack propagation in steel bridges. Tests have been performed to detect AE from fatigue cracks in A572G50 steel. Noise induced AE signals were filtered based on friction emission tests, loading pattern, and a combined approach involving Swansong II filters and investigation of waveforms. The filtering methods based on friction emission tests and load pattern are of interest to the field evaluation using sparse datasets. The combined approach is suitable for data filtering and interpretation of actual field tests. The pattern recognition program NOESIS (Envirocoustics) was utilized for the evaluation of AE data quality. AE parameters are associated with crack length, crack growth rate, maximum stress intensity and stress intensity range. It is shown that AE hits, counts, absolute energy, and signal strength are able to provide warnings at the critical cracking level where cracking progresses from stage II (stable propagation) to stage III (unstable propagation which may result in failure). Absolute energy rate and signal strength rate may be better than count rate to assess the remaining fatigue life of inservice steel bridges.

  13. Metallic waveguide mirrors in polymer film waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolff, S.; Giehl, A. R.; Renno, M.; Fouckhardt, H.

    2001-10-01

    A technology for the fabrication of metallic waveguide mirrors is developed. Plane and curved waveguide mirrors, the latter acting in the same way as cylindrical lenses, are realized in benzocyclobutene (BCB) film waveguides. The waveguide mirror structure is dry-etched into the BCB film waveguide. To enhance the reflectivity of the waveguide mirrors, the waveguide edge is metallized. The BCB film waveguide mirrors are characterized with respect to waveguide attenuation and mirror reflectivity. The waveguide attenuation of the processed BCB waveguide is 0.5 dB/cm. Ag-coated BCB waveguide mirrors show a reflectivity of 71%. The efficiency of total internal reflection (TIR, i.e. in the case without metallization) at the dry-etched waveguide edge is 74%. As an application of the BCB waveguide mirrors a hybrid integrated optical module for Fourier-optical transverse mode selection in broad area lasers (BAL) is proposed.

  14. Perturbations From Ducts on the Modes of Acoustic Thermometers

    PubMed Central

    Gillis, K. A.; Lin, H.; Moldover, M. R.

    2009-01-01

    We examine the perturbations of the modes of an acoustic thermometer caused by circular ducts used either for gas flow or as acoustic waveguides coupled to remote transducers. We calculate the acoustic admittance of circular ducts using a model based on transmission line theory. The admittance is used to calculate the perturbations to the resonance frequencies and half-widths of the modes of spherical and cylindrical acoustic resonators as functions of the duct’s radius, length, and the locations of the transducers along the duct's length. To verify the model, we measured the complex acoustic admittances of a series of circular tubes as a function of length between 200 Hz and 10 kHz using a three-port acoustic coupler. The absolute magnitude of the specific acoustic admittance is approximately one. For a 1.4 mm inside-diameter, 1.4 m long tube, the root mean square difference between the measured and modeled specific admittances (both real and imaginary parts) over this frequency range was 0.018. We conclude by presenting design considerations for ducts connected to acoustic thermometers. PMID:27504227

  15. Nonlinear Acoustics: Periodic Waveguide, Finite-Amplitude Propagation in a Medium Having a Distribution of Relaxation Processes, and Production of an Isolated Negative Pulse in Water

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-08-24

    TenCate , "Finite amplitude sound near cutoff in higher order modes of a rectangular duct," J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 84, 327-334 (1988). Gen§ 0 7. D. T...Acoust. Soc. Am. 90, 2339(A) (1991) 1109 0 7. James A. TenCate , "Measurements of nonlinear effects in the sound field radiated from a circular

  16. Seismic Waveguide of Metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sang-Hoon; Das, Mukunda P.

    We developed a new method of an earthquake-resistant design to support conventional aseismic system using acoustic metamaterials. The device is an attenuator of a seismic wave that reduces the amplitude of the wave exponentially. Constructing a cylindrical shell-type waveguide composed of many Helmholtz resonators that creates a stop-band for the seismic frequency range, we convert the seismic wave into an attenuated one without touching the building that we want to protect. It is a mechanical way to convert the seismic energy into sound and heat.

  17. LOADED WAVEGUIDES

    DOEpatents

    Mullett, L.B.; Loach, B.G.; Adams, G.L.

    1958-06-24

    >Loaded waveguides are described for the propagation of electromagnetic waves with reduced phase velocities. A rectangular waveguide is dimensioned so as to cut-off the simple H/sub 01/ mode at the operating frequency. The waveguide is capacitance loaded, so as to reduce the phase velocity of the transmitted wave, by connecting an electrical conductor between directly opposite points in the major median plane on the narrower pair of waveguide walls. This conductor may take a corrugated shape or be an aperature member, the important factor being that the electrical length of the conductor is greater than one-half wavelength at the operating frequency. Prepared for the Second U.N. International ConferThe importance of nuclear standards is duscussed. A brief review of the international callaboration in this field is given. The proposal is made to let the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) coordinate the efforts from other groups. (W.D.M.)

  18. Tunable sound transmission at an impedance-mismatched fluidic interface assisted by a composite waveguide

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hui; Wei, Zhi; Fan, Li; Qu, Jianmin; Zhang, Shu-yi

    2016-01-01

    We report a composite waveguide fabricated by attaching a coupling aperture to a waveguide. The acoustic impedance of the composite waveguide can be regulated by merely controlling its coupling vibrations, depending on its structure size. By changing the size to adjust the acoustic impedance of the composite waveguide at an impedance-mismatched fluidic interface, tunable sound transmission at the desired frequencies is achieved. The reported composite waveguide provides a new method for sound regulation at a mismatched fluidic interface and has extensive frequency hopping and frequency agility applications in air-water sound communication. PMID:27698379

  19. Tunable sound transmission at an impedance-mismatched fluidic interface assisted by a composite waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hui; Wei, Zhi; Fan, Li; Qu, Jianmin; Zhang, Shu-Yi

    2016-10-01

    We report a composite waveguide fabricated by attaching a coupling aperture to a waveguide. The acoustic impedance of the composite waveguide can be regulated by merely controlling its coupling vibrations, depending on its structure size. By changing the size to adjust the acoustic impedance of the composite waveguide at an impedance-mismatched fluidic interface, tunable sound transmission at the desired frequencies is achieved. The reported composite waveguide provides a new method for sound regulation at a mismatched fluidic interface and has extensive frequency hopping and frequency agility applications in air-water sound communication.

  20. Remote Sensing Wind and Wind Shear System.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Contents: Remote sensing of wind shear and the theory and development of acoustic doppler; Wind studies; A comparison of methods for the remote detection of winds in the airport environment; Acoustic doppler system development; System calibration; Airport operational tests.

  1. Towards new applications using capillary waveguides

    PubMed Central

    Stasio, Nicolino; Shibukawa, Atsushi; Papadopoulos, Ioannis N.; Farahi, Salma; Simandoux, Olivier; Huignard, Jean-Pierre; Bossy, Emmanuel; Moser, Christophe; Psaltis, Demetri

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we demonstrate the enhancement of the sensing capabilities of glass capillaries. We exploit their properties as optical and acoustic waveguides to transform them potentially into high resolution minimally invasive endoscopic devices. We show two possible applications of silica capillary waveguides demonstrating fluorescence and optical-resolution photoacoustic imaging using a single 330 μm-thick silica capillary. A nanosecond pulsed laser is focused and scanned in front of a capillary by digital phase conjugation through the silica annular ring of the capillary, used as an optical waveguide. We demonstrate optical-resolution photoacoustic images of a 30 μm-thick nylon thread using the water-filled core of the same capillary as an acoustic waveguide, resulting in a fully passive endoscopic device. Moreover, fluorescence images of 1.5 μm beads are obtained collecting the fluorescence signal through the optical waveguide. This kind of silica-capillary waveguide together with wavefront shaping techniques such as digital phase conjugation, paves the way to minimally invasive multi-modal endoscopy. PMID:26713182

  2. Temporal coherence of the acoustic field forward propagated through a continental shelf with random internal waves.

    PubMed

    Gong, Zheng; Chen, Tianrun; Ratilal, Purnima; Makris, Nicholas C

    2013-11-01

    An analytical model derived from normal mode theory for the accumulated effects of range-dependent multiple forward scattering is applied to estimate the temporal coherence of the acoustic field forward propagated through a continental-shelf waveguide containing random three-dimensional internal waves. The modeled coherence time scale of narrow band low-frequency acoustic field fluctuations after propagating through a continental-shelf waveguide is shown to decay with a power-law of range to the -1/2 beyond roughly 1 km, decrease with increasing internal wave energy, to be consistent with measured acoustic coherence time scales. The model should provide a useful prediction of the acoustic coherence time scale as a function of internal wave energy in continental-shelf environments. The acoustic coherence time scale is an important parameter in remote sensing applications because it determines (i) the time window within which standard coherent processing such as matched filtering may be conducted, and (ii) the number of statistically independent fluctuations in a given measurement period that determines the variance reduction possible by stationary averaging.

  3. Development of an Autonomous, Compact, Broadband Acoustic Backscattering System for Remote Characterization of Zooplankton Variability (PART II)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-30

    temporal scales (e.g. Holliday and Pieper , 1980, 1995; Pieper et al., 1990; Napp et al., 1993; Wiebe et al., 1996; Benfield et al., 1998; Brierley et...Holliday, D.V. and Pieper , R.E. (1980). “Volume scattering strengths and zooplankton distributions at acoustic frequencies between 0.5 and 3 MHz,” J...Acoust. Soc. Am. 67(1), 135-146. Holliday, V.D. and Pieper , R.E. (1995). “Bioacoustical oceanography at high frequencies,” ICES J. Mar. Sci. 52

  4. A reappraisal of the diversity of geomorphological and genetic processes of New Caledonian coral reefs: a synthesis from optical remote sensing, coring and acoustic multibeam observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andréfouët, S.; Cabioch, G.; Flamand, B.; Pelletier, B.

    2009-09-01

    The diversity of oceanic and continental reef structures of New Caledonia is reviewed, taking into account their geological history and in particular, that since the last interglacial period. To guide this review, a new path is provided by following the diversity of units that have been mapped and characterized using high spatial resolution optical remote sensing data for the main New Caledonian coral reef complexes (banks, atolls, uplifted reefs, drowned reefs, fringing reefs, barrier reefs, patch reefs) and their individual reef-forming units. This interpretation, based on geomorphology, depth, and exposure has provided 161 unit types distributed across 4,537 km2 of reef area and 31,336 km2 of non-reef area. In addition to shallow reefs (0-30 m) described by optical remote sensing, the bathymetry of deep slopes between -20 to -1,000 m were recently mapped using multibeam acoustic data providing additional data to explain the morphological diversity. With the detailed three-dimensional topographic information acquired, hitherto unrecognized marine terraces and faulting became visible, indicating different episodes of formation of the barrier reef and of sea level variations. Finally, dating and coring corals provided a more accurate understanding of the genesis of the present reef structures. In contrast with the synoptic remote sensing data, cores provided only point data, but allowed the addition of a precise temporal dimension to the description of New Caledonian reefs. Cores provided a significant body of the information necessary for the establishment of models of reef settlement and development during the last interglacial ages in the New Caledonian region. The combined examination of the different sources of data, and the exhaustive description of remotely sensed reef units, allow a qualitative synoptic parallel to be drawn between the morphology of modern reefs and the contrasting patterns of reef growth, subsidence, and uplift rates occurring around New

  5. Emergence of the Green’s Functions from Noise and Passive Acoustic Remote Sensing of Ocean Dynamics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-30

    environments, Acta Acustica united with Acustica , 95, no. 6, p. 963–974 (2009b) [published, refereed] O. A. Godin, Emergence of deterministic Green’s...Godin, Emergence of acoustic Green’s functions from time averages of ambient noise, Acta Acustica united with Acustica (2010) [in press, refereed

  6. Use of Acoustic Transmitter-Equipped Remote Sedation to Aid in Tracking and Capture of Entangled California Sea Lions (Zalophus californianus).

    PubMed

    Frankfurter, Greg; DeRango, Eugene; Johnson, Shawn

    2016-07-01

    Free-ranging California sea lions ( Zalophus californianus ) with marine debris entanglements were darted with a combination of medetomidine, butorphanol, and midazolam by using acoustic transmitter-equipped darts. Of the 15 animals sedated, 13 (87%) reentered the water and were tracked by using a unidirectional hydrophone. Sea lions that entered the water continued to surface and breathe postsedation. There were three mortalities (20%) during the course of this study due to the following: suspected drowning caused by entrapment under a dock, overdose due to inaccurate weight estimation, and trauma caused by a dart puncturing the animal's abdomen. The drug combination, new dart design, and tracking techniques allowed for successful remote sedation and capture of California sea lions in high-risk situations and improved our ability to determine the final outcome for all cases. These methods allow targeting and capture of individual animals, while minimizing disturbance to other animals.

  7. Stimulated Brillouin scattering enhancement in silicon inverse opal waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, M. J. A.; Wolff, C.; de Sterke, C. M.; Lapine, M.; Kuhlmey, B. T.; Poulton, C. G.

    2016-10-01

    Silicon is an ideal material for on-chip applications, however its poor acoustic properties limit its performance for important optoacoustic applications, particularly for Stimulated Brillouin Scattering (SBS). We theoretically show that silicon inverse opals exhibit a strongly improved acoustic performance that enhances the bulk SBS gain coefficient by more than two orders of magnitude. We also design a waveguide that incorporates silicon inverse opals and which has SBS gain values that are comparable with chalcogenide glass waveguides. This research opens new directions for opto-acoustic applications in on-chip material systems.

  8. Measurement of elastic nonlinearity using remote laser ultrasonics and CHeap Optical Transducers and dual frequency surface acoustic waves.

    PubMed

    Collison, I J; Stratoudaki, T; Clark, M; Somekh, M G

    2008-11-01

    A nonlinear ultrasonic technique for evaluating material elastic nonlinearity has been developed. It measures the phase modulation of a high frequency (82MHz) surface acoustic wave interacting with a low frequency (1MHz) high amplitude stress inducing surface acoustic wave. A new breed of optical transducers has been developed and used for the generation and detection of the high frequency wave. The CHeap Optical Transducer (CHOT) is an ultrasonic transducer system, optically activated and read by a laser. We show that CHOTs offer advantages over alternative transducers. CHOTs and nonlinear ultrasonics have great potential for aerospace applications. Results measuring changes in ultrasonic velocity corresponding to different stress states of the sample are presented on fused silica and aluminium.

  9. Environmental Acoustics and Intensity Vector Acoustics with Emphasis on Shallow Water Effects and the Sea Surface

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-30

    also advising PhD student Mr. Jeffrey Daniels, from the Acoustics Research Detachment (Bayview ID) Carderock Division, who has received an ILIR...2013. [2] D.R. Dall’Osto and P. H. Dahl, Elliptical acoustic particle motion in underwater waveguides , J. Acoust. Soc. Am., 134 (1), 109-118, July

  10. Changes in Humpback Whale Song Occurrence in Response to an Acoustic Source 200 km Away

    PubMed Central

    Risch, Denise; Corkeron, Peter J.; Ellison, William T.; Van Parijs, Sofie M.

    2012-01-01

    The effect of underwater anthropogenic sound on marine mammals is of increasing concern. Here we show that humpback whale (Megaptera novaeangliae) song in the Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary (SBNMS) was reduced, concurrent with transmissions of an Ocean Acoustic Waveguide Remote Sensing (OAWRS) experiment approximately 200 km away. We detected the OAWRS experiment in SBNMS during an 11 day period in autumn 2006. We compared the occurrence of song for 11 days before, during and after the experiment with song over the same 33 calendar days in two later years. Using a quasi-Poisson generalized linear model (GLM), we demonstrate a significant difference in the number of minutes with detected song between periods and years. The lack of humpback whale song during the OAWRS experiment was the most substantial signal in the data. Our findings demonstrate the greatest published distance over which anthropogenic sound has been shown to affect vocalizing baleen whales, and the first time that active acoustic fisheries technology has been shown to have this effect. The suitability of Ocean Acoustic Waveguide Remote Sensing technology for in-situ, long term monitoring of marine ecosystems should be considered, bearing in mind its possible effects on non-target species, in particular protected species. PMID:22253769

  11. A three-dimensional coupled-mode model for the acoustic field in a two-dimensional waveguide with perfectly reflecting boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Wen-Yu; Yu, Xiao-Lin; Yang, Xue-Feng; Zhang, Ze-Zhong; Zhang, Ren-He

    2016-12-01

    This paper presents a three-dimensional (3D) coupled-mode model using the direct-global-matrix technique as well as Fourier synthesis. This model is a full wave, two-way three-dimensional model, and is therefore capable of providing accurate acoustic field solutions. Because the problem of sound propagation excited by a point source in an ideal wedge with perfectly reflecting boundaries is one of a few three-dimensional problems with analytical solutions, the ideal wedge problem is chosen in this work to validate the presented three-dimensional model. Numerical results show that the field results by analytical solutions and those by the presented model are in excellent agreement, indicating that the presented model can serve as a benchmark model for three-dimensional sound propagation problems involving a planar two-dimensional geometry as well as a point source. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11125420, 11434012, and 41561144006) and the Knowledge Innovation Program of the Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  12. Tunable damper for an acoustic wave guide

    DOEpatents

    Rogers, Samuel C.

    1984-01-01

    A damper for tunably damping acoustic waves in an ultrasonic waveguide is provided which may be used in a hostile environment such as a nuclear reactor. The area of the waveguide, which may be a selected size metal rod in which acoustic waves are to be damped, is wrapped, or surrounded, by a mass of stainless steel wool. The wool wrapped portion is then sandwiched between tuning plates, which may also be stainless steel, by means of clamping screws which may be adjusted to change the clamping force of the sandwiched assembly along the waveguide section. The plates are preformed along their length in a sinusoidally bent pattern with a period approximately equal to the acoustic wavelength which is to be damped. The bent pattern of the opposing plates are in phase along their length relative to their sinusoidal patterns so that as the clamping screws are tightened a bending stress is applied to the waveguide at 180.degree. intervals along the damping section to oppose the acoustic wave motions in the waveguide and provide good coupling of the wool to the guide. The damper is tuned by selectively tightening the clamping screws while monitoring the amplitude of the acoustic waves launched in the waveguide. It may be selectively tuned to damp particular acoustic wave modes (torsional or extensional, for example) and/or frequencies while allowing others to pass unattenuated.

  13. Tunable damper for an acoustic wave guide

    DOEpatents

    Rogers, S.C.

    1982-10-21

    A damper for tunably damping acoustic waves in an ultrasonic waveguide is provided which may be used in a hostile environment such as a nuclear reactor. The area of the waveguide, which may be a selected size metal rod in which acoustic waves are to be damped, is wrapped, or surrounded, by a mass of stainless steel wool. The wool wrapped portion is then sandwiched between tuning plates, which may also be stainless steel, by means of clamping screws which may be adjusted to change the clamping force of the sandwiched assembly along the waveguide section. The plates are preformed along their length in a sinusoidally bent pattern with a period approximately equal to the acoustic wavelength which is to be damped. The bent pattern of the opposing plates are in phase along their length relative to their sinusoidal patterns so that as the clamping screws are tightened a bending stress is applied to the waveguide at 180/sup 0/ intervals along the damping section to oppose the acoustic wave motions in the waveguide and provide good coupling of the wool to the guide. The damper is tuned by selectively tightening the clamping screws while monitoring the amplitude of the acoustic waves launched in the waveguide. It may be selectively tuned to damp particular acoustic wave modes (torsional or extensional, for example) and/or frequencies while allowing others to pass unattenuated.

  14. Compact waveguide circular polarizer

    SciTech Connect

    Tantawi, Sami G.

    2016-08-16

    A multi-port waveguide is provided having a rectangular waveguide that includes a Y-shape structure with first top arm having a first rectangular waveguide port, a second top arm with second rectangular waveguide port, and a base arm with a third rectangular waveguide port for supporting a TE.sub.10 mode and a TE.sub.20 mode, where the end of the third rectangular waveguide port includes rounded edges that are parallel to a z-axis of the waveguide, a circular waveguide having a circular waveguide port for supporting a left hand and a right hand circular polarization TE.sub.11 mode and is coupled to a base arm broad wall, and a matching feature disposed on the base arm broad wall opposite of the circular waveguide for terminating the third rectangular waveguide port, where the first rectangular waveguide port, the second rectangular waveguide port and the circular waveguide port are capable of supporting 4-modes of operation.

  15. The estimation of elasticity and viscosity of soft tissues in vitro using the data of remote acoustic palpation.

    PubMed

    Girnyk, S; Barannik, A; Barannik, E; Tovstiak, V; Marusenko, A; Volokhov, V

    2006-02-01

    The presented study revealed the significant dependence of displacement magnitude and strain relaxation on phantom elasticity and viscosity. It has been shown that simultaneous analysis of temporal behavior and magnitude of shear strain induced by the radiation force of focused ultrasonic beam gives the necessary data for quantitative estimation of tissue shear modulus because of the known functional dependencies of displacement on local viscosity and elasticity. As a result, the simplest calibration procedure of acoustic radiation force-based methods is performed and algorithm for separate reconstruction of tissue elasticity and viscosity is proposed. These findings were tested, in particular, using the data obtained for specially prepared phantoms containing calf liver and muscle tissue in vitro. The observed complex character of shear strain relaxation and noise in some tissue phantoms and tissues in vitro reduces the preciseness of viscoelastic properties estimation.

  16. Environmental Acoustics and Intensity Vector Acoustics with Emphasis on Shallow Water Effects and the Sea Surface

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-30

    scientists), and Kevin Williams, all of APL-UW, and William Hodgkiss of SIO-MPL. The PI is also advising PhD student Mr. Jeffrey Daniels, from the...the University of Washington. PUBLICATIONS [1] D.R. Dall’Osto and P. H. Dahl, Elliptical acoustic particle motion in underwater waveguides , J...published, refereed] [3] D. R. Dall’Osto, Properties of the Acoustic Vector Field in Underwater Waveguides , Ph.D. thesis, Dept. Mechanical Engineering

  17. Waveguide cooling system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, B. C. J.; Hartop, R. W. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    An improved system is described for cooling high power waveguides by the use of cooling ducts extending along the waveguide, which minimizes hot spots at the flanges where waveguide sections are connected together. The cooling duct extends along substantially the full length of the waveguide section, and each flange at the end of the section has a through hole with an inner end connected to the duct and an opposite end that can be aligned with a flange hole in another waveguide section. Earth flange is formed with a drainage groove in its face, between the through hole and the waveguide conduit to prevent leakage of cooling fluid into the waveguide. The ducts have narrowed sections immediately adjacent to the flanges to provide room for the installation of fasteners closely around the waveguide channel.

  18. Waveguide cooling system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, B. C. J.; Hartop, R. W.

    1981-04-01

    An improved system is described for cooling high power waveguides by the use of cooling ducts extending along the waveguide, which minimizes hot spots at the flanges where waveguide sections are connected together. The cooling duct extends along substantially the full length of the waveguide section, and each flange at the end of the section has a through hole with an inner end connected to the duct and an opposite end that can be aligned with a flange hole in another waveguide section. Earth flange is formed with a drainage groove in its face, between the through hole and the waveguide conduit to prevent leakage of cooling fluid into the waveguide. The ducts have narrowed sections immediately adjacent to the flanges to provide room for the installation of fasteners closely around the waveguide channel.

  19. System and method to create three-dimensional images of non-linear acoustic properties in a region remote from a borehole

    DOEpatents

    Vu, Cung; Nihei, Kurt T.; Schmitt, Denis P.; Skelt, Christopher; Johnson, Paul A.; Guyer, Robert; TenCate, James A.; Le Bas, Pierre-Yves

    2013-01-01

    In some aspects of the disclosure, a method for creating three-dimensional images of non-linear properties and the compressional to shear velocity ratio in a region remote from a borehole using a conveyed logging tool is disclosed. In some aspects, the method includes arranging a first source in the borehole and generating a steered beam of elastic energy at a first frequency; arranging a second source in the borehole and generating a steerable beam of elastic energy at a second frequency, such that the steerable beam at the first frequency and the steerable beam at the second frequency intercept at a location away from the borehole; receiving at the borehole by a sensor a third elastic wave, created by a three wave mixing process, with a frequency equal to a difference between the first and second frequencies and a direction of propagation towards the borehole; determining a location of a three wave mixing region based on the arrangement of the first and second sources and on properties of the third wave signal; and creating three-dimensional images of the non-linear properties using data recorded by repeating the generating, receiving and determining at a plurality of azimuths, inclinations and longitudinal locations within the borehole. The method is additionally used to generate three dimensional images of the ratio of compressional to shear acoustic velocity of the same volume surrounding the borehole.

  20. Presence and seasonal variation of deep diving foraging odontocetes around Kauai, Hawaii using remote autonomous acoustic recorders.

    PubMed

    Au, Whitlow W L; Giorli, Giacomo; Chen, Jessica; Copeland, Adrienne; Lammers, Marc O; Richlen, Michael; Jarvis, Susan; Morrissey, Ronald; Moretti, David

    2014-01-01

    Ecological acoustic recorders (EARs) were moored off the bottom in relatively deep depths (609-710 m) at five locations around the island of Kauai. Initially, the EARs had an analog-to-digital sample rate of 64 kHz with 30-s recordings every 5 min. After the second deployment the sampling rate was increased to 80 kHz in order to better record beaked whale biosonar signals. The results of the 80 kHz recording are discussed in this manuscript and are the results of three deployments over a year's period (January 2010 to January 2011). Five categories of the biosonar signal detection of deep diving odontocetes were created, short-finned pilot whales, sperm whales, beaked whales, Risso's dolphins, and unknown dolphins. During any given day, at least one species of these deep diving odontocetes were detected. On many days, several species were detected. The biosonar signals of short-finned pilot whales were detected the most often with approximately 30% of all the signals, followed by beaked and sperm whales approximately 22% and 21% of all clicks, respectively. The seasonal patterns were not very strong except in the SW location with distinct peak in detection during the months of April-June 2010 period.

  1. Multimode acoustic transparency and slow sound effects in hybrid subwavelength resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Yu-Qiang; Qi, Dong-Xiang; Tuo, Ming-Jun; Liu, Lian-Zi; Zhang, Rui-Li; Peng, Ru-Wen; Wang, Mu

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate that a series of hybrid Helmholtz resonators, which introduce “acoustic transparent atoms”, “acoustic nontransparent atoms”, and “acoustic quasitransparent atoms” simultaneously, can generate multimode acoustic transparency and the slow sound effect. Dual-mode acoustic transparency can be achieved by employing a waveguide incorporating three different Helmholtz resonators. Additional modes are introduced by adding further acoustic quasitransparent atoms. This can be explained by the destructive interference among different resonators. Furthermore, slow sound propagation is demonstrated in our multimode acoustic transparency systems by employing time-domain simulations. Our results may have potential applications for sound control in one-dimensional waveguides.

  2. Offset Waveguide Transmission Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cravey, Robin

    1997-01-01

    This report describes measurements to determine transmission losses in S-band (2.60-3.95 GHz) waveguide sections due to misalignment of the sections relative to each other. The experiments were performed in support of the Hydrostar program to determine the feasibility of using deployable waveguide sections in a large space radiometer. The waveguide sections would possibly be hinged and folded for launch, then deployed in space to form long sections of waveguide. Since very low losses are required for radiometer applications, the effects of potential misalignment after deployment of the waveguide sections may be significant. These measurements were performed in the Electromagnetic Properties Measurement Laboratory in the Electromagnetics Research Branch.

  3. Highly dispersive slot waveguides.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lin; Yue, Yang; Xiao-Li, Yinying; Beausoleil, Raymond G; Willner, Alan E

    2009-04-27

    We propose a slot-waveguide with high dispersion, in which a slot waveguide is coupled to a strip waveguide. A negative dispersion of up to -181520 ps/nm/km is obtained due to a strong interaction of the slot and strip modes. A flat and large dispersion is achievable by cascading the dispersive slot-waveguides with varied waveguide thickness or width for dispersion compensation and signal processing applications. We show - 31300 ps/nm/km dispersion over 147-nm bandwidth with <1% variance.

  4. Solid state laser media driven by remote nuclear powered fluorescence

    DOEpatents

    Prelas, Mark A.

    1992-01-01

    An apparatus is provided for driving a solid state laser by a nuclear powered fluorescence source which is located remote from the fluorescence source. A nuclear reaction produced in a reaction chamber generates fluorescence or photons. The photons are collected from the chamber into a waveguide, such as a fiber optic waveguide. The waveguide transports the photons to the remote laser for exciting the laser.

  5. Acoustic neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    Vestibular schwannoma; Tumor - acoustic; Cerebellopontine angle tumor; Angle tumor; Hearing loss - acoustic; Tinnitus - acoustic ... Acoustic neuromas have been linked with the genetic disorder neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2). Acoustic neuromas are uncommon.

  6. Interconnect Between a Waveguide and a Dielectric Waveguide Comprising an Impedance Matched Dielectric Lens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decrossas, Emmanuel (Inventor); Chattopadhyay, Goutam (Inventor); Chahat, Nacer (Inventor); Tang, Adrian J. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A lens for interconnecting a metallic waveguide with a dielectric waveguide is provided. The lens may be coupled a metallic waveguide and a dielectric waveguide, and minimize a signal loss between the metallic waveguide and the dielectric waveguide.

  7. On-chip optical mode conversion based on dynamic grating in photonic-phononic hybrid waveguide

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guodong; Zhang, Ruiwen; Sun, Junqiang

    2015-01-01

    We present a scheme for reversible and tunable on-chip optical mode conversion based on dynamic grating in a hybrid photonic-phononic waveguide. The dynamic grating is built up through the acousto-optic effect and the theoretical model of the optical mode conversion is developed by considering the geometrical deformation and refractive index change. Three kinds of mode conversions are able to be realized using the same hybrid waveguide structure in a large bandwidth by only changing the launched acoustic frequency. The complete mode conversion can be achieved by choosing a proper acoustic power under a given waveguide length. PMID:25996236

  8. Waveguide disturbance detection method

    DOEpatents

    Korneev, Valeri A.; Nihei, Kurt T.; Myer, Larry R.

    2000-01-01

    A method for detection of a disturbance in a waveguide comprising transmitting a wavefield having symmetric and antisymmetric components from a horizontally and/or vertically polarized source and/or pressure source disposed symmetrically with respect to the longitudinal central axis of the waveguide at one end of the waveguide, recording the horizontal and/or vertical component or a pressure of the wavefield with a vertical array of receivers disposed at the opposite end of the waveguide, separating the wavenumber transform of the wavefield into the symmetric and antisymmetric components, integrating the symmetric and antisymmetric components over a broad frequency range, and comparing the magnitude of the symmetric components and the antisymmetric components to an expected magnitude for the symmetric components and the antisymmetric components for a waveguide of uniform thickness and properties thereby determining whether or not a disturbance is present inside the waveguide.

  9. Broad band waveguide spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Goldman, Don S.

    1995-01-01

    A spectrometer for analyzing a sample of material utilizing a broad band source of electromagnetic radiation and a detector. The spectrometer employs a waveguide possessing an entry and an exit for the electromagnetic radiation emanating from the source. The waveguide further includes a surface between the entry and exit portions which permits interaction between the electromagnetic radiation passing through the wave guide and a sample material. A tapered portion forms a part of the entry of the wave guide and couples the electromagnetic radiation emanating from the source to the waveguide. The electromagnetic radiation passing from the exit of the waveguide is captured and directed to a detector for analysis.

  10. Fluorescence and optical-resolution photoacoustic imaging through capillary waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stasio, Nicolino; Shibukawa, Atsushi; Papadopoulos, Ioannis N.; Farahi, Salma; Simandoux, Olivier; Huignard, Jean-Pierre; Bossy, Emmanuel; Moser, Christophe; Psaltis, Demetri

    2016-03-01

    Endoscopy can be used to obtain high-resolution images at large depths in biological tissues. Usually endoscopic devices have a diameter ranging from 1 to few millimeters. Using digital phase conjugation, it is possible to adapt ultrathin multimode fibers to endoscopic purposes. Recently, we demonstrated that a 330 μm diameter, water-filled silica capillary waveguide can guide high frequency ultrasound waves through a 3 cm thick fat layer, allowing optical resolution photoacoustic imaging. Here we demonstrate that using digital phase conjugation, the same water-filled capillary waveguide (3 cm long) can be used as an endoscopic probe to obtain both fluorescence and optical resolution photoacoustic imaging, with no optical or acoustic elements at the tip of the waveguide. We study the consequences of using digital phase conjugation combined with a capillary waveguide and we conclude with possible future improvements of our endoscopic approach.

  11. Brillouin cooling in a linear waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yin-Chung; Kim, Seunghwi; Bahl, Gaurav

    2016-11-01

    Brillouin scattering is not usually considered as a mechanism that can cause cooling of a material due to the thermodynamic dominance of Stokes scattering in most practical systems. However, it has been shown in experiments on resonators that net phonon annihilation through anti-Stokes Brillouin scattering can be enabled by means of a suitable set of optical and acoustic states. The cooling of traveling phonons in a linear waveguide, on the other hand, could lead to the exciting future prospect of manipulating unidirectional phonon fluxes and even the nonreciprocal transport of quantum information via phonons. In this work, we present an analysis of the conditions under which Brillouin cooling of phonons of both low and high group velocities may be achieved in a linear waveguide. We analyze the three-wave mixing interaction between the optical and traveling acoustic modes that participate in forward Brillouin scattering, and reveal the key regimes of operation for the process. Our calculations indicate that measurable cooling may occur in a system having phonons with spatial loss rate that is of the same order as the spatial optical loss rate. If the Brillouin gain in such a waveguide reaches the order of 105 m-1 W-1, appreciable cooling of phonon modes may be observed with modest pump power of a few mW.

  12. Waveguide arrangements based on adiabatic elimination

    SciTech Connect

    Suchowski, Haim; Mrejen, Michael; Wu, Chihhui; Zhang, Xiang

    2016-09-13

    This disclosure provides systems, methods, and apparatus related to nanophotonics. In one aspect, an arrangement of waveguides includes a substrate and three waveguides. Each of the three waveguides may be a linear waveguide. A second waveguide is positioned between a first waveguide and a third waveguide. The dimensions and positions of the first, the second, and the third waveguides are specified to substantially eliminate coupling between the first waveguide and the third waveguide over a distance of about 1 millimeter to 2 millimeters along lengths of the first waveguide, the second waveguide, and the third waveguide.

  13. Birefringent corrugated waveguide

    DOEpatents

    Moeller, Charles P.

    1990-01-01

    A corrugated waveguide having a circular bore and noncircularly symmetric corrugations, and preferably elliptical corrugations, provides birefringence for rotation of polarization in the HE.sub.11 mode. The corrugated waveguide may be fabricated by cutting circular grooves on a lathe in a cylindrical tube or rod of aluminum of a diameter suitable for the bore of the waveguide, and then cutting an approximation to ellipses for the corrugations using a cutting radius R.sub.0 from the bore axis that is greater than the bore radius, and then making two circular cuts using a radius R.sub.1 less than R.sub.0 at centers +b and -b from the axis of the waveguide bore. Alternatively, stock for the mandrel may be formed with an elliptical transverse cross section, and then only the circular grooves need be cut on a lathe, leaving elliptical corrugations between the grooves. In either case, the mandrel is first electroplated and then dissolved leaving a corrugated waveguide with noncircularly symmetric corrugations. A transition waveguide is used that gradually varies from circular to elliptical corrugations to couple a circularly corrugated waveguide to an elliptically corrugated waveguide.

  14. Peptide Optical waveguides.

    PubMed

    Handelman, Amir; Apter, Boris; Shostak, Tamar; Rosenman, Gil

    2017-02-01

    Small-scale optical devices, designed and fabricated onto one dielectric substrate, create integrated optical chip like their microelectronic analogues. These photonic circuits, based on diverse physical phenomena such as light-matter interaction, propagation of electromagnetic waves in a thin dielectric material, nonlinear and electro-optical effects, allow transmission, distribution, modulation, and processing of optical signals in optical communication systems, chemical and biological sensors, and more. The key component of these optical circuits providing both optical processing and photonic interconnections is light waveguides. Optical confinement and transmitting of the optical waves inside the waveguide material are possible due to the higher refractive index of the waveguides in comparison with their surroundings. In this work, we propose a novel field of bionanophotonics based on a new concept of optical waveguiding in synthetic elongated peptide nanostructures composed of ordered peptide dipole biomolecules. New technology of controllable deposition of peptide optical waveguiding structures by nanofountain pen technique is developed. Experimental studies of refractive index, optical transparency, and linear and nonlinear waveguiding in out-of-plane and in-plane diphenylalanine peptide nanotubes have been conducted. Optical waveguiding phenomena in peptide structures are simulated by the finite difference time domain method. The advantages of this new class of bio-optical waveguides are high refractive index contrast, wide spectral range of optical transparency, large optical nonlinearity, and electro-optical effect, making them promising for new applications in integrated multifunctional photonic circuits. Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Nanocrystal waveguide (NOW) laser

    DOEpatents

    Simpson, John T.; Simpson, Marcus L.; Withrow, Stephen P.; White, Clark W.; Jaiswal, Supriya L.

    2005-02-08

    A solid state laser includes an optical waveguide and a laser cavity including at least one subwavelength mirror disposed in or on the optical waveguide. A plurality of photoluminescent nanocrystals are disposed in the laser cavity. The reflective subwavelength mirror can be a pair of subwavelength resonant gratings (SWG), a pair of photonic crystal structures (PC), or a distributed feedback structure. In the case of a pair of mirrors, a PC which is substantially transmissive at an operating wavelength of the laser can be disposed in the laser cavity between the subwavelength mirrors to improve the mode structure, coherence and overall efficiency of the laser. A method for forming a solid state laser includes the steps of providing an optical waveguide, creating a laser cavity in the optical waveguide by disposing at least one subwavelength mirror on or in the waveguide, and positioning a plurality of photoluminescent nanocrystals in the laser cavity.

  16. Zero-mode waveguides

    DOEpatents

    Levene, Michael J.; Korlach, Jonas; Turner, Stephen W.; Craighead, Harold G.; Webb, Watt W.

    2007-02-20

    The present invention is directed to a method and an apparatus for analysis of an analyte. The method involves providing a zero-mode waveguide which includes a cladding surrounding a core where the cladding is configured to preclude propagation of electromagnetic energy of a frequency less than a cutoff frequency longitudinally through the core of the zero-mode waveguide. The analyte is positioned in the core of the zero-mode waveguide and is then subjected, in the core of the zero-mode waveguide, to activating electromagnetic radiation of a frequency less than the cut-off frequency under conditions effective to permit analysis of the analyte in an effective observation volume which is more compact than if the analysis were carried out in the absence of the zero-mode waveguide.

  17. Mid-IR acoustooptic interaction in planar waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deriugin, L. N.; Anikin, V. I.; Gudzenko, A. I.; Dneprovskii, V. G.; Terichev, V. F.

    1980-04-01

    The interaction of surface acoustic waves (SAW) and surface optical waves in planar infrared waveguides has been studied experimentally at a wavelength of 10.6 microns, corresponding to the output wavelength of a CO2 laser. In the planar waveguide used, the supporting layer was a film of As-Se chalcogenide glass deposited by thermal evaporation on a substrate of a high-resistivity cadmium sulfide single crystal. Diffraction efficiency vs acoustic power and diffraction efficiency vs SAW frequency plots are presented. The maximum intensity of the diffracted light was observed when the infrared light was incident on the acoustic column at an angle of 1 deg 59 min, which is in good agreement with the calculated value.

  18. Acoustic actuation of bioinspired microswimmers.

    PubMed

    Kaynak, Murat; Ozcelik, Adem; Nourhani, Amir; Lammert, Paul E; Crespi, Vincent H; Huang, Tony Jun

    2017-01-31

    Acoustic actuation of bioinspired microswimmers is experimentally demonstrated. Microswimmers are fabricated in situ in a microchannel. Upon acoustic excitation, the flagellum of the microswimmer oscillates, which in turn generates linear or rotary movement depending on the swimmer design. The speed of these bioinspired microswimmers is tuned by adjusting the voltage amplitude applied to the acoustic transducer. Simple microfabrication and remote actuation are promising for biomedical applications.

  19. Compound semiconductor optical waveguide switch

    DOEpatents

    Spahn, Olga B.; Sullivan, Charles T.; Garcia, Ernest J.

    2003-06-10

    An optical waveguide switch is disclosed which is formed from III-V compound semiconductors and which has a moveable optical waveguide with a cantilevered portion that can be bent laterally by an integral electrostatic actuator to route an optical signal (i.e. light) between the moveable optical waveguide and one of a plurality of fixed optical waveguides. A plurality of optical waveguide switches can be formed on a common substrate and interconnected to form an optical switching network.

  20. Chalcogenide Glass Optical Waveguides for Infrared Biosensing

    PubMed Central

    Anne, Marie-Laure; Keirsse, Julie; Nazabal, Virginie; Hyodo, Koji; Inoue, Satoru; Boussard-Pledel, Catherine; Lhermite, Hervé; Charrier, Joël; Yanakata, Kiyoyuki; Loreal, Olivier; Le Person, Jenny; Colas, Florent; Compère, Chantal; Bureau, Bruno

    2009-01-01

    Due to the remarkable properties of chalcogenide (Chg) glasses, Chg optical waveguides should play a significant role in the development of optical biosensors. This paper describes the fabrication and properties of chalcogenide fibres and planar waveguides. Using optical fibre transparent in the mid-infrared spectral range we have developed a biosensor that can collect information on whole metabolism alterations, rapidly and in situ. Thanks to this sensor it is possible to collect infrared spectra by remote spectroscopy, by simple contact with the sample. In this way, we tried to determine spectral modifications due, on the one hand, to cerebral metabolism alterations caused by a transient focal ischemia in the rat brain and, in the other hand, starvation in the mouse liver. We also applied a microdialysis method, a well known technique for in vivo brain metabolism studies, as reference. In the field of integrated microsensors, reactive ion etching was used to pattern rib waveguides between 2 and 300 μm wide. This technique was used to fabricate Y optical junctions for optical interconnections on chalcogenide amorphous films, which can potentially increase the sensitivity and stability of an optical micro-sensor. The first tests were also carried out to functionalise the Chg planar waveguides with the aim of using them as (bio)sensors. PMID:22423209

  1. Environmental Acoustics and Intensity Vector Acoustics with Emphasis on Shallow Water Effects and the Sea Surface

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-30

    interference; for example how it relates directly the angles of interfering wavefronts and therefore reflection and refraction processes in a waveguide . We...intensity fields in an underwater waveguide through modification of the RAM parabolic wave equation (PE) code [3]. The vector products of the PE are used...advising PhD student Mr. Jeffrey Daniels, from the Acoustics Research Detachment (Bayview ID) Carderock Division, who has received an ILIR grant from

  2. Autonomous Adaptive Acoustic Relay Positioning

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    species as well as uncover underwater archaeological sites [21]. Remotely-operated vehicles (ROVs) are designed for remote human control and use with a...distribution unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT We consider the problem of maximizing underwater acoustic data transmission by...practical method of underwater wireless communication and improving channel throughput and reliability is key to improving the capabilities of underwater

  3. Fiber waveguide sensors for intelligent materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flax, A. R.; Claus, R. O.

    1988-01-01

    This report, an addendum to the six month report submitted to NASA Langley Research Center in December 1987, covers research performed by the Fiber and Electro-Optics Research Center (FEORC) at Virginia Tech for the NASA Langley Research Center, Grant NAG1-780, for the period from December 1987 to June 1988. This final report discusses the research performed in the following four areas as described in the proposal: Fabrication of Sensor Fibers Optimized for Embedding in Advanced Composites; Fabrication of Sensor Fiber with In-Line Splices and Evaluation via OTR methods; Modal Domain Optical Fiber Sensor Analysis; and Acoustic Fiber Waveguide Implementation.

  4. Tests Of Shear-Flow Model For Acoustic Impedance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrot, Tony L.; Watson, Willie R.; Jones, Michael G.

    1992-01-01

    Tests described in report conducted to validate two-dimensional shear-flow analytical model for determination of acoustic impedance of acoustic liner in grazing-incidence, grazing-flow environment by use of infinite-waveguide method. Tests successful for both upstream and downstream propagations. Work has potential for utility in testing of engine ducts in commercial aircraft.

  5. Sparsity-driven Passive Tracking of Underwater Acoustic Sources

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-01

    bend ✴ Temperature , pressure and salinity D epth Range Source localization map (SLM) 2 Shallow water sound -speed profile Modeling...Difficult due to complexities of the propagation environment • Ocean behaves as an acoustic waveguide • Varying sound -speed causes acoustic signals to

  6. Microfabricated bragg waveguide

    DOEpatents

    Fleming, James G.; Lin, Shawn-Yu; Hadley, G. Ronald

    2004-10-19

    A microfabricated Bragg waveguide of semiconductor-compatible material having a hollow core and a multilayer dielectric cladding can be fabricated by integrated circuit technologies. The microfabricated Bragg waveguide can comprise a hollow channel waveguide or a hollow fiber. The Bragg fiber can be fabricated by coating a sacrificial mandrel or mold with alternating layers of high- and low-refractive-index dielectric materials and then removing the mandrel or mold to leave a hollow tube with a multilayer dielectric cladding. The Bragg channel waveguide can be fabricated by forming a trench embedded in a substrate and coating the inner wall of the trench with a multilayer dielectric cladding. The thicknesses of the alternating layers can be selected to satisfy the condition for minimum radiation loss of the guided wave.

  7. Omnidirectional optical waveguide

    DOEpatents

    Bora, Mihail; Bond, Tiziana C.

    2016-08-02

    In one embodiment, a system includes a scintillator material; a detector coupled to the scintillator material; and an omnidirectional waveguide coupled to the scintillator material, the omnidirectional waveguide comprising: a plurality of first layers comprising one or more materials having a refractive index in a first range; and a plurality of second layers comprising one or more materials having a refractive index in a second range, the second range being lower than the first range, a plurality of interfaces being defined between alternating ones of the first and second layers. In another embodiment, a method includes depositing alternating layers of a material having a relatively high refractive index and a material having a relatively low refractive index on a substrate to form an omnidirectional waveguide; and coupling the omnidirectional waveguide to at least one surface of a scintillator material.

  8. Calculate waveguide aperture susceptance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, J.-K.; Ishii, T. K.

    1982-12-01

    A method is developed for calculating aperture susceptance which makes use of the distribution of an aperture's local fields. This method can be applied to the computation of the aperture susceptance of irises, as well as the calculation of the susceptances of waveguide filters, aperture antennas, waveguide cavity coupling, waveguide junctions, and heterogeneous boundaries such as inputs to ferrite or dielectric loaded waveguides. This method assumes a local field determined by transverse components of the incident wave in the local surface of the cross section in the discontinuity plane which lies at the aperture. The aperture susceptance is calculated by the use of the local fields, the law of energy conservation, and the principles of continuity of the fields. This method requires that the thickness of the aperture structure be zero, but this does not limit the practical usefulness of this local-field method.

  9. Axially Modulated Plasma Waveguides

    SciTech Connect

    Layer, B. D.; York, A. G.; Varma, S.; Chen, Y.-H.; Milchberg, H. M.

    2009-01-22

    We demonstrate two techniques for making periodically modulated plasma waveguides-one with sharp, stable voids as short as 50 {mu}m with a period as small as 200 {mu}m, and another which modulates the waveguide diameter with a corrugation period as short as 35 {mu}m[1]. These features persist as the plasma expands for the full lifetime of the waveguide (>6 ns). The waveguides were made using the hydrodynamic shock method in a cluster jet using hydrogen, nitrogen, and argon. We demonstrate guided propagation at intensities up to 2x10{sup 17} W/cm{sup 2}, limited by our laser energy currently available. This technique is useful for quasi-phase matching to allow efficient coupling of laser energy to acceleration of relativistic electrons or generation of coherent electromagnetic radiation at selected frequencies.

  10. Surface modification to waveguides

    DOEpatents

    Timberlake, J.R.; Ruzic, D.N.; Moore, R.L.; Cohen, S.A.; Manos, D.M.

    1982-06-16

    A method is described for treating the interior surfaces of a waveguide to improve power transmission comprising the steps of mechanically polishing to remove surface protrusions; electropolishing to remove embedded particles; ultrasonically cleaning to remove any residue; coating the interior waveguide surfaces with an alkyd resin solution or electrophoretically depositing carbon lamp black suspended in an alkyd resin solution to form a 1..mu.. to 5..mu.. thick film; vacuum pyrolyzing the film to form a uniform adherent carbon coating.

  11. Surface modification to waveguides

    DOEpatents

    Timberlake, John R.; Ruzic, David N.; Moore, Richard L.; Cohen, Samuel A.; Manos, Dennis M.

    1983-01-01

    A method of treating the interior surfaces of a waveguide to improve power transmission comprising the steps of mechanically polishing to remove surface protrusions; electropolishing to remove embedded particles; ultrasonically cleaning to remove any residue; coating the interior waveguide surfaces with an alkyd resin solution or electrophoretically depositing carbon lamp black suspended in an alkyd resin solution to form a 1.mu. to 5.mu. thick film; vacuum pyrolyzing the film to form a uniform adherent carbon coating.

  12. GOATS 2008: Autonomous, Adaptive Multistatic Acoustic Sensing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-30

    develop the OASES -3d modeling framework for target scattering and reverberation in shallow ocean waveguides. As has been the case for the autonomous...using Green’s functions using legacy environmental acoustic models such as OASES , CSNAP, and RAM. This new unique simulation environment allows for...MIT are being maintained and dissiminated under the GOATS grant. The OASES and CSNAP environmental acoustic modeling codes are used extensively in

  13. Mode Profiles in Waveguide-Coupled Resonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, William D.; Cameron, Tom; Saw, John C. B.; Kim, Yoonkee

    1993-01-01

    Surface acoustic wave (SAW) waveguide-coupled resonators are of considerable interest for narrow-band filter applications, though to date there has been very little published on the acoustic details of their operation. As in any resonator, one must fully understand its mode structure and herein we study the SAW mode profiles in these devices. Transverse mode profiles in the resonant cavity of the device were measured at various frequencies of interest using a knife-edge laser probe. In addition we predict the mode profiles for the device structure by two independent methods. One is a stack-matrix approach adapted from integrated optics and the other is a conventional analytical eigenmode analysis of the Helmholtz equation. Both modeling techniques are in good agreement with the measured results.

  14. Problems in Nonlinear Acoustics: Pulsed Finite Amplitude Sound Beams, Nonlinear Propagation of Sound in Layered Media, Time Domain Solutions for Focused Sound Beams, Focusing of Sound with an Ellipsoidal Mirror, and Modeling Finite Amplitude Propagation in Waveguides.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-08-01

    Introduction of an article by Hamilton and TenCate . 5 In a real ocean environment, however, not only does sound penetrate the ocean bottom, but the...F. Hamilton and J. A. TenCate , "Finite amplitude sound near cutoff in higher-order modes of a rectangular duct," J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 84, 327-334

  15. Acoustic Neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    ... search IRSA's site Unique Hits since January 2003 Acoustic Neuroma Click Here for Acoustic Neuroma Practice Guideline ... to microsurgery. One doctor's story of having an acoustic neuroma In August 1991, Dr. Thomas F. Morgan ...

  16. A Simple Optical Waveguide Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phelps, J.; Sambles, J. R.

    1989-01-01

    Describes a thin film rectangular dielectric waveguide and its laboratory use. Discusses the theory of uniaxial thin film waveguides with mathematical expressions and the laboratory procedures for a classroom experiment with diagrams. (Author/YP)

  17. Waveguide effect under 'antiguiding' conditions in graded anisotropic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlov, A. V.; Mozhaev, V. G.; Zyryanova, A. V.

    2010-02-01

    A new wave confinement effect is predicted in graded crystals with a concave slowness surface under conditions of growth of the phase velocity with decreasing distance from the waveguide axis. This finding overturns the common notion about the guiding and 'antiguiding' profiles of wave velocity in inhomogeneous media. The waveguide effect found is elucidated by means of ray analysis and particular exact wave solutions. The exact solution obtained for localized flexural waves in thin plates of graded cubic and tetragonal crystals confirms the predicted effect. Since this solution is substantially different with respect to the existence conditions from all others yet reported, and it cannot be deduced from the previously known results, the predicted waves can be classified as a new type of waveguide mode in graded anisotropic media. Although the concrete calculations are given in the article for acoustic waves, its general predictions are expected to be valid for waves of various natures, including spin, plasma, and optical waves.

  18. Novel mid-IR quantum cascade laser waveguide coupling techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shyu, David; Choa, Fow-Sen; Chen, Xing; Trivedi, Sudhir

    2011-02-01

    Signal modulations and coherent signal detections are important for both communications and remote sensing applications. Photonic integration reduces size, weight, cost, and improves the performance of these systems as demonstrated by integrated DFB-laser modulators, receivers and transceivers at near-IR wavelength regions. However, due to the difficulties of waveguide coupling, photonic integration in the mid-IR wavelength range is under-developed. We developed a technique that can monitor mid-IR coupling based on the negative photoconductivity in quantum cascaded (QC) materials that can simplify and optimize laser waveguide coupling in the mid-IR wavelength range.

  19. Remote Diagnosis of Dug-in Areas and Bottom Pipe by Main Acoustic Emission Method Using a Self-organizing Wireless Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kravtsova, Ye; Shram, V.; Lysyannikova, N.; Bezborodov, Yu; Selsky, A.; Lysyannikov, A.

    2016-06-01

    This paper discusses methods of nondestructive testing, the main method is method of acoustic flue gas emission. It was found that the use of this method in the diagnosis of bottom pipe and dug-in areas allows to reduce time, does not require surface dressing to a certain value, provides almost instant information about the defect at a great distance to the nearest gas-pumping station and is not inferior to the reliability of the control other existing methods.

  20. Sound propagation in a flat-oval waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cummings, A.; Chang, I.-J.

    1986-04-01

    A numerical method, for finding the eigenvalues and eigenfunctions associated with acoustic propagation in a uniform waveguide of flat-oval cross-section, is described. Comparison is made between the numerical results and experimental data, and the agreement is generally satisfactory. The method described should be of use in calculating the sound transmission loss of the walls of flat-oval air conditioning ductwork.

  1. Actively coupled optical waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexeeva, N. V.; Barashenkov, I. V.; Rayanov, K.; Flach, S.

    2014-01-01

    We consider light propagation through a pair of nonlinear optical waveguides with absorption, placed in a medium with power gain. The active medium boosts the in-phase component of the overlapping evanescent fields of the guides, while the nonlinearity of the guides couples it to the damped out-of-phase component creating a feedback loop. As a result, the structure exhibits stable stationary and oscillatory regimes in a wide range of gain-loss ratios. We show that the pair of actively coupled (AC) waveguides can act as a stationary or integrate-and-fire comparator sensitive to tiny differences in their input powers.

  2. Passive acoustic observations of tide height in the Iroise Sea using ambient noise.

    PubMed

    Kinda, G Bazile; Bonnel, Julien

    2015-09-01

    Considering a broadband motionless source in a waveguide with a depth that varies with time, the time-frequency representation of the acoustic intensity shows a striation pattern than can be explained using the depth-frequency waveguide invariant. This phenomenon is used here to describe acoustic data recorded in the Iroise Sea, where intense tides occur. The originality of this study is that the acoustic data consist of only ambient noise. The best hypothesis is that these striations are created by distant marine traffic in the Bay of Brest, and the results suggest that tide height can be monitored using long-term passive acoustics.

  3. Periodically structured plasmonic waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saj, W. M.; Foteinopoulou, S.; Kafesaki, M.; Soukoulis, C. M.; Economou, E. N.

    2008-04-01

    We study surface plasmon polariton (SPP) guiding structures, which are a modification of the Metal-Insulator-Metal (MIM) waveguide. The designs are constructed by introducing a periodic modulation in a MIM waveguide, with a glass core and silver claddings. This periodic modulation is created either by causing periodic indentations in the silver slabs encompassing the glass core, or by increasing the glass spacer material in certain periodic locations. Our objective is to achieve long range sub-wavelength waveguiding with vast dispersion engineering capabilities. We employ the Finite Difference Time Domain Method (FDTD) with the Auxiliary Differential Equation method (ADE) for the calculation of the dispersion relation of the guided modes, as well as the real time propagation suggests that the guiding mechnism in the examined structures is based on the electromagnetic (EM) couping between the slit plasmon modes. These - depending on the design - exist in the grooves between the silver plates or in the larger areas of the glass core spacer. Put it different, the guiding mechanism in the examined SPP waveguide designs is analogous to the EM energy transfer along metallic nanoparticle chains.

  4. Gratings in polymeric waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishakov, G.; Sokolov, V.; Kocabas, A.; Aydinli, A.

    2007-04-01

    Laser-induced formation of polymer Bragg grating filters for Dense Wavelength Division Multiplexing (DWDM) applications is discussed. Acrylate monomers halogenated with both fluorine and chlorine, which possess absorption losses less than 0.25 dB/cm and wide choice of refractive indices (from 1.3 to 1.5) in the 1.5 μm telecom wavelength region were used. The monomers are highly intermixable thus permitting to adjust the refractive index of the composition within +/-0.0001. Moreover they are photocurable under UV exposure and exhibit high contrast in polymerization. These properties make halogenated acrylates very promising for fabricating polymeric waveguides and photonic circuits. Single-mode polymer waveguides were fabricated on silicon wafers using resistless contact lithography. Submicron index gratings have been written in polymer waveguides using holographic exposure with He-Cd laser beam (325 nm) through a phase mask. Both uniform and apodized gratings have been fabricated. The gratings are stable and are not erased by uniform UV exposure. The waveguide gratings possess narrowband reflection spectra in the 1.5 μm wavelength region of 0.4 nm width, nearly rectangular shape of the stopband and reflectivity R > 99%. The fabricated Bragg grating filters can be used for multiplexing/demultiplexing optical signals in high-speed DWDM optical fiber networks.

  5. A Hamiltonian treatment of stimulated Brillouin scattering in nanoscale integrated waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sipe, J. E.; Steel, M. J.

    2016-04-01

    We present a multimode Hamiltonian formulation for the problem of opto-acoustic interactions in optical waveguides. We develop a quantised Hamiltonian representation of the acoustic field and then introduce a full system with a simple opto-acoustic coupling that includes both photoelastic/electrostrictive and radiation pressure/moving boundary effects in a particularly transparent manner. The interaction is applied to a Fermi's golden rule calculation of spontaneous Brillouin scattering in uniform waveguides. The Heisenberg equations of motion are then used to obtain coupled mode equations for quantised envelope operators for the optical and acoustic fields. We show that the coupling coefficients obtained coincide with those established earlier. Our formalism provides a new basis for future work involving quantum photon and phonon noise in the low intensity limit, phonon-phonon scattering and anharmonicity effects.

  6. Acoustic rainbow trapping by coiling up space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Xu; Wu, Ying; Chen, Ze-Guo; Zheng, Li-Yang; Xu, Ye-Long; Nayar, Priyanka; Liu, Xiao-Ping; Lu, Ming-Hui; Chen, Yan-Feng

    2014-11-01

    We numerically realize the acoustic rainbow trapping effect by tapping an air waveguide with space-coiling metamaterials. Due to the high refractive-index of the space-coiling metamaterials, our device is more compact compared to the reported trapped-rainbow devices. A numerical model utilizing effective parameters is also calculated, whose results are consistent well with the direct numerical simulation of space-coiling structure. Moreover, such device with the capability of dropping different frequency components of a broadband incident temporal acoustic signal into different channels can function as an acoustic wavelength division de-multiplexer. These results may have potential applications in acoustic device design such as an acoustic filter and an artificial cochlea.

  7. Experimental investigation of plasmofluidic waveguides

    SciTech Connect

    Ku, Bonwoo; Kwon, Min-Suk; Shin, Jin-Soo

    2015-11-16

    Plasmofluidic waveguides are based on guiding light which is strongly confined in fluid with the assistance of a surface plasmon polariton. To realize plasmofluidic waveguides, metal-insulator-silicon-insulator-metal (MISIM) waveguides, which are hybrid plasmonic waveguides fabricated using standard complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor technology, are employed. The insulator of the MISIM waveguide is removed to form 30-nm-wide channels, and they are filled with fluid. The plasmofluidic waveguide has a subwavelength-scale mode area since its mode is strongly confined in the fluid. The waveguides are experimentally characterized for different fluids. When the refractive index of the fluid is 1.440, the plasmofluidic waveguide with 190-nm-wide silicon has propagation loss of 0.46 dB/μm; the coupling loss between it and an ordinary silicon photonic waveguide is 1.79 dB. The propagation and coupling losses may be reduced if a few fabrication-induced imperfections are removed. The plasmofluidic waveguide may pave the way to a dynamically phase-tunable ultracompact device.

  8. Gap plasmon excitation in plasmonic waveguide using Si waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okuda, Koji; Kamada, Shun; Okamoto, Toshihiro; Haraguchi, Masanobu

    2016-08-01

    Plasmonic waveguides have attracted considerable attention for application in highly integrated optical circuits since they can confine light to areas smaller than the diffraction limit. In this context, in order to realize a highly integrated optical circuit, we fabricate and evaluate the optical characteristics of a poly(methyl methacrylate) junction positioned between Si and plasmonic waveguides. For the plasmonic waveguide, we employ a gap plasmonic waveguide in which the energy of the plasmonic wave can be confined in order to reduce the scattering loss at the junction. By experimental measurement, we determine the coupling efficiency between the Si and gap plasmonic waveguides and the propagation length at the gap plasmonic waveguide to be 52.4% and 11.1 µm, respectively. These values agree with those obtained by the three-dimensional finite-difference time-domain simulation. We believe that our findings can significantly contribute to the development of highly integrated optical circuits.

  9. Amplifier Module for 260-GHz Band Using Quartz Waveguide Transitions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padmanabhan, Sharmila; Fung, King Man; Kangaslahti, Pekka P.; Peralta, Alejandro; Soria, Mary M.; Pukala, David M.; Sin, Seth; Samoska, Lorene A.; Sarkozy, Stephen; Lai, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Packaging of MMIC LNA (monolithic microwave integrated circuit low-noise amplifier) chips at frequencies over 200 GHz has always been problematic due to the high loss in the transition between the MMIC chip and the waveguide medium in which the chip will typically be used. In addition, above 200 GHz, wire-bond inductance between the LNA and the waveguide can severely limit the RF matching and bandwidth of the final waveguide amplifier module. This work resulted in the development of a low-loss quartz waveguide transition that includes a capacitive transmission line between the MMIC and the waveguide probe element. This capacitive transmission line tunes out the wirebond inductance (where the wire-bond is required to bond between the MMIC and the probe element). This inductance can severely limit the RF matching and bandwidth of the final waveguide amplifier module. The amplifier module consists of a quartz E-plane waveguide probe transition, a short capacitive tuning element, a short wire-bond to the MMIC, and the MMIC LNA. The output structure is similar, with a short wire-bond at the output of the MMIC, a quartz E-plane waveguide probe transition, and the output waveguide. The quartz probe element is made of 3-mil quartz, which is the thinnest commercially available material. The waveguide band used is WR4, from 170 to 260 GHz. This new transition and block design is an improvement over prior art because it provides for better RF matching, and will likely yield lower loss and better noise figure. The development of high-performance, low-noise amplifiers in the 180-to- 700-GHz range has applications for future earth science and planetary instruments with low power and volume, and astrophysics array instruments for molecular spectroscopy. This frequency band, while suitable for homeland security and commercial applications (such as millimeter-wave imaging, hidden weapons detection, crowd scanning, airport security, and communications), also has applications to

  10. Solid Rocket Motor Acoustic Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, J.D.

    1999-03-31

    Acoustic data are often required for the determination of launch and powered flight loads for rocket systems and payloads. Such data are usually acquired during test firings of the solid rocket motors. In the current work, these data were obtained for two tests at a remote test facility where we were visitors. This paper describes the data acquisition and the requirements for working at a remote site, interfacing with the test hosts.

  11. Phonon waveguides for electromechanical circuits.

    PubMed

    Hatanaka, D; Mahboob, I; Onomitsu, K; Yamaguchi, H

    2014-07-01

    Nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS), utilizing localized mechanical vibrations, have found application in sensors, signal processors and in the study of macroscopic quantum mechanics. The integration of multiple mechanical elements via electrical or optical means remains a challenge in the realization of NEMS circuits. Here, we develop a phonon waveguide using a one-dimensional array of suspended membranes that offers purely mechanical means to integrate isolated NEMS resonators. We demonstrate that the phonon waveguide can support and guide mechanical vibrations and that the periodic membrane arrangement also creates a phonon bandgap that enables control of the phonon propagation velocity. Furthermore, embedding a phonon cavity into the phonon waveguide allows mobile mechanical vibrations to be dynamically switched or transferred from the waveguide to the cavity, thereby illustrating the viability of waveguide-resonator coupling. These highly functional traits of the phonon waveguide architecture exhibit all the components necessary to permit the realization of all-phononic NEMS circuits.

  12. Guided acoustic and optical waves in silicon-on-insulator for Brillouin scattering and optomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarabalis, Christopher J.; Hill, Jeff T.; Safavi-Naeini, Amir H.

    2016-10-01

    We numerically study silicon waveguides on silica showing that it is possible to simultaneously guide optical and acoustic waves in the technologically important silicon on insulator (SOI) material system. Thin waveguides, or fins, exhibit geometrically softened mechanical modes at gigahertz frequencies with phase velocities below the Rayleigh velocity in glass, eliminating acoustic radiation losses. We propose slot waveguides on glass with telecom optical frequencies and strong radiation pressure forces resulting in Brillouin gains on the order of 500 and 50 000 W-1m-1 for backward and forward Brillouin scattering, respectively.

  13. Microwave waveguide manifold and method

    DOEpatents

    Staehlin, John H.

    1987-12-01

    A controllably electrically coupled, physically intersecting plural waveguide manifold assembly wherein the intersecting waveguide elements are fabricated in integral unitary relationship from a single piece of metal in order to avoid the inaccuracies and difficult-to-control fabrication steps associated with uniting separate waveguide elements into a unitary structure. An X-band aluminum airborne radar manifold example is disclosed, along with a fabrication sequence for the manifold and the electrical energy communicating apertures joining the manifold elements.

  14. Microwave waveguide manifold and method

    DOEpatents

    Staehlin, John H.

    1987-01-01

    A controllably electrically coupled, physically intersecting plural waveguide manifold assembly wherein the intersecting waveguide elements are fabricated in integral unitary relationship from a single piece of metal in order to avoid the inaccuracies and difficult-to-control fabrication steps associated with uniting separate waveguide elements into a unitary structure. An X-band aluminum airborne radar manifold example is disclosed, along with a fabrication sequence for the manifold and the electrical energy communicating apertures joining the manifold elements.

  15. Analysis of Helical Waveguide.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-12-23

    tube Efficiency Helix structure Backward wave oscillation Gain 19. ABSTRACT (Continue on reverse if necessary and identofy by block number) The...4,vailabilitY CCdes -vai aidIorDist spec a ." iii "- -. .5- S.. . ANALYSIS OF HELICAL WAVEGUIDE I. INTRODUCTION High power (- 10 kW) and broadband ...sys- tems. The frequency range of interest is 60-100 GHz. In this frequency range, the conventional slow wave circuits such as klystrons and TWTs have

  16. Investigation of Truncated Waveguides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lourie, Nathan P.; Chuss, David T.; Henry, Ross M.; Wollack, Edward J.

    2013-01-01

    The design, fabrication, and performance of truncated circular and square waveguide cross-sections are presented. An emphasis is placed upon numerical and experimental validation of simple analytical formulae that describe the propagation properties of these structures. A test component, a 90-degree phase shifter, was fabricated and tested at 30 GHz. The concepts explored can be directly applied in the design, synthesis and optimization of components in the microwave to sub-millimeter wavebands.

  17. Acoustic Neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    An acoustic neuroma is a benign tumor that develops on the nerve that connects the ear to the brain. ... can press against the brain, becoming life-threatening. Acoustic neuroma can be difficult to diagnose, because the ...

  18. Design for broadband on-chip isolator using Stimulated Brillouin Scattering in dispersion-engineered chalcogenide waveguides.

    PubMed

    Poulton, Christopher G; Pant, Ravi; Byrnes, Adam; Fan, Shanhui; Steel, M J; Eggleton, Benjamin J

    2012-09-10

    We propose a scheme for on-chip isolation in chalcogenide (As₂S₃) rib waveguides, in which Stimulated Brillouin Scattering is used to induce non-reciprocal mode conversion within a multi-moded waveguide. The design exploits the idea that a chalcogenide rib buried in a silica matrix acts as waveguide for both light and sound, and can also be designed to be multi-moded for both optical and acoustic waves. The enhanced opto-acoustic coupling allows significant isolation (> 20 dB) within a chip-scale (cm-long) device (< 10 cm). We also show that the bandwidth of this device can be dramatically increased by tuning the dispersion of the waveguide to match the group velocity between optical modes: we find that 20 dB isolation can be extended over a bandwidth of 25 nm.

  19. Photonic Waveguide Choke Joint with Absorptive Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wollack, Edward J. (Inventor); U-Yen, Kongpop (Inventor); Chuss, David T. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A photonic waveguide choke includes a first waveguide flange member having periodic metal tiling pillars, a dissipative dielectric material positioned within an area between the periodic metal tiling pillars and a second waveguide flange member disposed to be coupled with the first waveguide flange member and in spaced-apart relationship separated by a gap. The first waveguide flange member has a substantially smooth surface, and the second waveguide flange member has an array of two-dimensional pillar structures formed therein.

  20. Folded waveguide coupler

    DOEpatents

    Owens, Thomas L.

    1988-03-01

    A resonant cavity waveguide coupler for ICRH of a magnetically confined plasma. The coupler consists of a series of inter-leaved metallic vanes disposed withn an enclosure analogous to a very wide, simple rectangular waveguide that has been "folded" several times. At the mouth of the coupler, a polarizing plate is provided which has coupling apertures aligned with selected folds of the waveguide through which rf waves are launched with magnetic fields of the waves aligned in parallel with the magnetic fields confining the plasma being heated to provide coupling to the fast magnetosonic wave within the plasma in the frequency usage of from about 50-200 mHz. A shorting plate terminates the back of the cavity at a distance approximately equal to one-half the guide wavelength from the mouth of the coupler to ensure that the electric field of the waves launched through the polarizing plate apertures are small while the magnetic field is near a maximum. Power is fed into the coupler folded cavity by means of an input coaxial line feed arrangement at a point which provides an impedance match between the cavity and the coaxial input line.

  1. Cup Cylindrical Waveguide Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acosta, Roberto J.; Darby, William G.; Kory, Carol L.; Lambert, Kevin M.; Breen, Daniel P.

    2008-01-01

    The cup cylindrical waveguide antenna (CCWA) is a short backfire microwave antenna capable of simultaneously supporting the transmission or reception of two distinct signals having opposite circular polarizations. Short backfire antennas are widely used in mobile/satellite communications, tracking, telemetry, and wireless local area networks because of their compactness and excellent radiation characteristics. A typical prior short backfire antenna contains a half-wavelength dipole excitation element for linear polarization or crossed half-wavelength dipole elements for circular polarization. In order to achieve simultaneous dual circular polarization, it would be necessary to integrate, into the antenna feed structure, a network of hybrid components, which would introduce significant losses. The CCWA embodies an alternate approach that entails relatively low losses and affords the additional advantage of compactness. The CCWA includes a circular cylindrical cup, a circular disk subreflector, and a circular waveguide that serves as the excitation element. The components that make it possible to obtain simultaneous dual circular polarization are integrated into the circular waveguide. These components are a sixpost polarizer and an orthomode transducer (OMT) with two orthogonal coaxial ports. The overall length of the OMT and polarizer (for the nominal middle design frequency of 2.25 GHz) is about 11 in. (approximately equal to 28 cm), whereas the length of a commercially available OMT and polarizer for the same frequency is about 32 in. (approximately equal to 81 cm).

  2. Waveguide mutually pumped phase conjugators.

    PubMed

    James, S W; Youden, K E; Jeffrey, P M; Eason, R W; Chandler, P J; Zhang, L; Townsend, P D

    1993-09-20

    The operation of the bridge mutually pumped phase conjugator is reported in a planar waveguide structure in photorefractive BaTiO(3). The waveguide was fabricated by the technique of ion implantation, using 1.5-MeVH(+) ions at a dose of 10(16) ions/cm(2). An order of magnitude decrease in response time is observed in the waveguide as compared with typical values obtained in bulk crystals, probably as a result of a combination of the optical confinement within the waveguide and possible modification of the charge-transport properties induced by the implantation process.

  3. Acoustic Seaglider

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-07

    a national naval responsibility. Acoustic sensors on mobile, autonomous platforms will enable basic research topics on temporal and spatial...problem and acoustic navigation and communications within the context of distributed autonomous persistent undersea surveillance sensor networks...Acoustic sensors on mobile, autonomous platforms will enable basic research topics on temporal and spatial coherence and the description of ambient

  4. Acoustic seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    The invention relates to a sealing device having an acoustic resonator. The acoustic resonator is adapted to create acoustic waveforms to generate a sealing pressure barrier blocking fluid flow from a high pressure area to a lower pressure area. The sealing device permits noncontacting sealing operation. The sealing device may include a resonant-macrosonic-synthesis (RMS) resonator.

  5. Acoustic Seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    The invention relates to a sealing device having an acoustic resonator. The acoustic resonator is adapted to create acoustic waveforms to generate a sealing pressure barrier blocking fluid flow from a high pressure area to a lower pressure area. The sealing device permits noncontacting sealing operation. The sealing device may include a resonant-macrosonic-synthesis (RMS) resonator.

  6. Broadband source localization using horizontal-beam acoustic intensity striations.

    PubMed

    Turgut, Altan; Orr, Marshall; Rouseff, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Waveguide invariant theory is applied to horizontal line array (HLA) beamformer output to localize moving broadband noise sources from measured acoustic intensity striation patterns. Acoustic signals emitted by ships of opportunity (merchant ships) were simultaneously recorded on a HLA and three hydrophones separated by 10 km during the RAGS03 (relationship between array gain and shelf-break fluid processes) experiment. Hough transforms are used to estimate both the waveguide invariant parameter "beta" and the ratio of source range at the closest point of approach to source speed from the observed striation patterns. Broadband (50-150-Hz) acoustic data-sets are used to demonstrate source localization capability as well as inversion capability of waveguide invariant parameter beta. Special attention is paid to bathymetric variability since the acoustic intensity striation patterns seem to be influenced by range-dependent bathymetry of the experimental area. The Hough transform method is also applied to the HLA beam-time record data and to the acoustic intensity data from three distant receivers to validate the estimation results from HLA beamformer output. Good agreement of the results from all three approaches suggests the feasibility of locating broadband noise sources and estimating waveguide invariant parameter beta in shallow waters.

  7. Shear Bloch waves and coupled phonon-polariton in periodic piezoelectric waveguides.

    PubMed

    Piliposyan, D G; Ghazaryan, K B; Piliposian, G T

    2014-02-01

    Coupled electro-elastic SH waves propagating in a periodic piezoelectric finite-width waveguide are considered in the framework of the full system of Maxwell's electrodynamic equations. We investigate Bloch-Floquet waves under homogeneous or alternating boundary conditions for the elastic and electromagnetic fields along the guide walls. Zero frequency stop bands, trapped modes as well as some anomalous features due to piezoelectricity are identified. For mixed boundary conditions, by modulating the ratio of the length of the unit cell to the width of the waveguide, the minimum widths of the stop bands can be moved to the middle of the Brillouin zone. The dispersion equation has been investigated also for phonon-polariton band gaps. It is shown that for waveguides at acoustic frequencies, acousto-optic coupling gives rise to polariton behavior at wavelengths much larger than the length of the unit cell but at optical frequencies polariton resonance occurs at wavelengths comparable with the period of the waveguide.

  8. Generation of very high pressure pulses with 1-bit time reversal in a solid waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montaldo, Gabriel; Roux, Phillippe; Derode, Arnaud; Negreira, Carlos; Fink, Mathias

    2001-12-01

    The use of piezoelectric transducer arrays has opened up the possibility of electronic steering and focusing of acoustic beams to track kidney stones. However, owing to the limited pressure delivered by each transducer (typically 10 bar), the number of transducers needed to reach an amplitude at the focus on the order of 1000 bars is typically of some hundreds of elements. We present here a new solution based on 1-bit time reversal in a solid waveguide to obtain, with a small number of transducers, a very high amplitude pulse in tissues located in front of the waveguide. The idea is to take advantage of the temporal dispersion in the waveguide to create, after time reversal, a temporally recompressed pulse with a stronger amplitude. The aim of this work is threefold: first, we experimentally demonstrate 1-bit time reversal between a point source in water and several transducers fastened to one section of a finite-length cylindrical waveguide. Second, we numerically and experimentally study the temporal and spatial focusing at the source as a function of the characteristics of the ``solid waveguide-time reversal mirror (TRM)'' system: length and diameter of the guide, number of transducers of the TRM. Last, we show that the instantaneous power delivered in water at the focus of the solid waveguide is much higher than the power directly transmitted into water from a classically focused transducer. The combination of 1-bit time reversal and a solid waveguide leads to shock wave lithotripsy with low-power electronics.

  9. Design of single-mode waveguides for enhanced light-sound interaction in honeycomb-lattice silicon slabs

    SciTech Connect

    Escalante, Jose M. Martínez, Alejandro; Laude, Vincent

    2014-02-14

    We present the design of two waveguides (ladder and slot-ladder waveguides) implemented in a silicon honeycomb photonic-phononic crystal slab, which can support slow electromagnetic and elastic guided modes simultaneously. Interestingly, the photonic bandgap extends along the first Brillouin zone; so with an appropriate design, we can suppress propagation losses that arise coupling to radiative modes. From the phononic point of view, we explain the slow elastic wave effect by considering the waveguide as a chain of coupled acoustic resonators (coupled resonant acoustic waveguide), which provides the mechanism for slow elastic wave propagation. The ladder waveguide moreover supports guided phononic modes outside the phononic bandgap, similar to photonic slab modes, resulting in highly confined phononic modes propagating with low losses. Such waveguides could find important applications to the observation of optomechanical and electrostriction effects, as well as to enhanced stimulated Brillouin scattering and other opto-acoustical effects in nanoscale silicon structures. We also suggest that they can be the basis for a “perfect” photonic-phononic cavity in which damping by coupling to the surroundings is completely forbidden.

  10. Ocean acoustic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornuelle, Bruce D.; Worcester, Peter F.; Dzieciuch, Matthew A.

    2008-10-01

    Ocean acoustic tomography (OAT) was proposed in 1979 by Walter Munk and Carl Wunsch as an analogue to x-ray computed axial tomography for the oceans. The oceans are opaque to most electromagnetic radiation, but there is a strong acoustic waveguide, and sound can propagate for 10 Mm and more with distinct multiply-refracted ray paths. Transmitting broadband pulses in the ocean leads to a set of impulsive arrivals at the receiver which characterize the impulse response of the sound channel. The peaks observed at the receiver are assumed to represent the arrival of energy traveling along geometric ray paths. These paths can be distinguished by arrival time, and by arrival angle when a vertical array of receivers is available. Changes in ray arrival time can be used to infer changes in ocean structure. Ray travel time measurements have been a mainstay of long-range acoustic measurements, but the strong sensitivity of ray paths to range-dependent sound speed perturbations makes the ray sampling functions uncertain in real cases. In the ray approximation travel times are sensitive to medium changes only along the corresponding eigenrays. Ray theory is an infinite-frequency approximation, and its eikonal equation has nonlinearities not found in the acoustic wave equation. We build on recent seismology results (kernels for body wave arrivals in the earth) to characterize the kernel for converting sound speed change in the ocean to travel time changes using more complete propagation physics. Wave-theoretic finite frequency kernels may show less sensitivity to small-scale sound speed structure.

  11. Demonstration of a directional sonic prism in two dimensions using an air-acoustic leaky wave antenna

    SciTech Connect

    Naify, Christina J. Rohde, Charles A.; Calvo, David C.; Orris, Gregory J.; Guild, Matthew D.

    2015-09-28

    Analysis and experimental demonstration of a two-dimensional acoustic leaky wave antenna is presented for use in air. The antenna is comprised of a two-dimensional waveguide patterned with radiating acoustic shunts. When excited using a single acoustic source within the waveguide, the antenna acts as a sonic prism that exhibits frequency steering. This design allows for control of acoustic steering angle using only a single source transducer and a patterned aperture. Aperture design was determined using transmission line analysis and finite element methods. The designed antenna was fabricated and the steering angle measured. The performance of the measured aperture was within 9% of predicted angle magnitudes over all examined frequencies.

  12. Hollow waveguide cavity ringdown spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dreyer, Chris (Inventor); Mungas, Greg S. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Laser light is confined in a hollow waveguide between two highly reflective mirrors. This waveguide cavity is used to conduct Cavity Ringdown Absorption Spectroscopy of loss mechanisms in the cavity including absorption or scattering by gases, liquid, solids, and/or optical elements.

  13. Acoustic and visual remote sensing of barrels of radioactive waste: Application of civilian and military technology to environmental management of the oceans

    SciTech Connect

    Karl, H.A.; Chin, J.L.; Maher, N.M.; Chavez, P.S. Jr.; Ueber, E.; Van Peeters, W.; Curl, H.

    1995-04-01

    As part of an ongoing strategic research project to find barrels of radioactive waste off San Francisco, the U.S. Navy (USN), the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), and the Gulf of the Farallones National Marine Sanctuary (GFNMS) pooled their expertise, resources, and technology to form a partnership to verify new computer enhancement techniques developed for detecting targets the size of 55 gallon barrels on sidescan sonar images. Between 1946 and 1970, approximately 47,800 large barrels and other containers of radioactive waste were dumped in the ocean west of San Francisco; the containers litter an area of the sea floor of at least 1400 km {sup 2} knows as the Farallon Island Radioactive Waste Dump. The exact location of the containers and the potential hazard the containers pose to the environment is unknown. The USGS developed computer techniques and contracted with private industry to enhance sidescan data, collected in cooperation with the GFNMS, to detect objects as small as 55 gallon steel barrels while conducting regional scale sidescan sonar surveys. Using a subset of the regional sonar survey, images were plotted over a 125 km {sub 2} area. The acoustic interpretations were verified visually using the USN DSV Sea Cliff and the unmanned Advanced Tethered Vehicle (ATV). Barrels and other physical features were found where image enhancement had indicated they would be found. The interagency cooperation among the USN, USGS, and GFNMS has led to develop a cost effective and time efficient method to locate the barrels of radioactive waste. This method has universal application for locating containers of hazardous waste over a regional scale in other ocean areas such as Boston Harbor and the Kara Sea in the Arctic. This successful application of military and civilian expertise and technology has provided scientific information to help formulate policy decisions that affect the environmental management and quality of the ocean.

  14. Waveguide Metacouplers for In-Plane Polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pors, Anders; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.

    2016-06-01

    The state of polarization (SOP) is an inherent property of the vectorial nature of light and a crucial parameter in a wide range of remote sensing applications. Nevertheless, the SOP is rather cumbersome to probe experimentally, as conventional detectors respond only to the intensity of the light, hence losing the phase information between orthogonal vector components. In this work, we propose a type of polarimeter that is compact and well suited for in-plane optical circuitry while allowing for immediate determination of the SOP through simultaneous retrieval of the associated Stokes parameters. The polarimeter is based on plasmonic phase-gradient birefringent metasurfaces that facilitate normal incident light to launch in-plane photonic-waveguide modes propagating in six predefined directions with the coupling efficiencies providing a direct measure of the incident SOP. The functionality and accuracy of the polarimeter, which essentially is an all-polarization-sensitive waveguide metacoupler, is confirmed through full-wave simulations at the operation wavelength of 1.55 μ m .

  15. Acoustic transducer for nuclear reactor monitoring

    DOEpatents

    Ahlgren, Frederic F.; Scott, Paul F.

    1977-01-01

    A transducer to monitor a parameter and produce an acoustic signal from which the monitored parameter can be recovered. The transducer comprises a modified Galton whistle which emits a narrow band acoustic signal having a frequency dependent upon the parameter being monitored, such as the temperature of the cooling media of a nuclear reactor. Multiple locations within a reactor are monitored simultaneously by a remote acoustic receiver by providing a plurality of transducers each designed so that the acoustic signal it emits has a frequency distinct from the frequencies of signals emitted by the other transducers, whereby each signal can be unambiguously related to a particular transducer.

  16. Brillouin resonance broadening due to structural variations in nanoscale waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolff, C.; Van Laer, R.; Steel, M. J.; Eggleton, B. J.; Poulton, C. G.

    2016-02-01

    We study the impact of structural variations (that is slowly varying geometry aberrations and internal strain fields) on the width and shape of the stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) resonance in nanoscale waveguides. We find that they lead to an inhomogeneous resonance broadening through two distinct mechanisms: firstly, the acoustic frequency is directly influenced via mechanical nonlinearities; secondly, the optical wave numbers are influenced via the opto-mechanical nonlinearity leading to an additional acoustic frequency shift via the phase-matching condition. We find that this second mechanism is proportional to the opto-mechanical coupling and, hence, related to the SBS-gain itself. It is absent in intra-mode forward SBS, while it plays a significant role in backward scattering. In backward SBS increasing the opto-acoustic overlap beyond a threshold defined by the fabrication tolerances will therefore no longer yield the expected quadratic increase in overall Stokes amplification. Finally, we illustrate in a numerical example that in backward SBS and inter-mode forward SBS the existence of two broadening mechanisms with opposite sign also opens the possibility to compensate the effect of geometry-induced broadening. Our results can be transferred to other micro- and nano-structured waveguide geometries such as photonic crystal fibres.

  17. Integrated optic waveguide devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramer, O. G.

    1980-01-01

    Integrated optic waveguide circuits with a phase bias and modulator on the same chip were designed, fabricated, and tested for use in a fiber-optic rotation sensor (gyro) under development. Single mode fiber-optic pigtails were permanently coupled to the four ports of the chip. The switch format was based on coherent coupling between waveguides formed in Z-cut LiNbO3. The control of the coupling was achieved by electro-optically varying the phase propagation constants of each guide. Fiber-to-chip interfacing required the development of appropriate fixturing and manipulation techniques to achieve the close tolerance needed for high coupling efficiency between a fiber with an approximately 5 micron m core and a channel guide with a roughly 2 micron m by 5 micron m cross section. Switch and chip performance at 0.85 micron m is discussed as well as potential improvements related to insertion loss reduction, switching voltages, and suppression of Li2O out-diffusion.

  18. Dielectric THz waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupuis, Alexandre

    In this thesis we have explored a wide variety of dielectric waveguides that rely on many different waveguiding mechanisms to guide THz (far-infrared) radiation. We have explored both theoretically and experimentally a large number of waveguide designs with the aim of reducing propagation and bending losses. The different waveguides can be classified into two fundamentally different strategies for reducing the propagation loss: small-core single-mode evanescent-field fibers or large hollow-core multi-mode tubes. Our focus was first set on exploring the small-core evanescent-field fiber strategy for reducing propagation losses. Following initial theoretical work in our group, much effort was spent on the fabrication and measurement of evanescent porous subwavelength diameter plastic fibers, in an attempt to further reduce the propagation losses. The fabrication of such fibers is a challenge and many novel techniques were devised to enable fiber drawing without hole collapse. The first method sealed the holes of an assembly of polymer tubes and lead to fibers of relatively low porosity (˜25% air within the core) due to reduction in hole size during fiber drawing. The second method was a novel sacrificial polymer technique whereby drawing a completely solid fiber prevented any hole collapse and the subsequent dissolution of the sacrificial polymer revealed the holes in the fiber. The third method was a combination of preform casting using glass molds and drawing with pressurized air within the holes. This led to fibers of record porosity (86% air). The measurement of these porous fibers began with a collaboration with a group from the university of Sherbrooke. At the time, the only available detector was a frequency integrating liquid-helium-cooled bolometer (powermeter). A novel directional coupler method for measuring the losses of subwavelength fibers was developed whereby an evanescent coupler is formed by bringing a probe fiber in proximity to the sample fiber

  19. Acoustic Reflection from a Plane Boundary having Variable Surface Parameters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-03-01

    1960). Mechanical waveguides. Pergamon Press . 10. Oppenheim, A.V. and Schafer, R.W. (1989). Discrete-time signal processing. Prentice Hall Signal...public release ANNOUNCEMENT Anouncement of this report is unlimited KEYWORDS Anechoic Coatings Surface Admittance Acoustic Reflectance ABSTRACT A

  20. Scintillator Waveguide For Sensing Radiation

    DOEpatents

    Bliss, Mary; Craig, Richard A.; Reeder; Paul L.

    2003-04-22

    The present invention is an apparatus for detecting ionizing radiation, having: a waveguide having a first end and a second end, the waveguide formed of a scintillator material wherein the therapeutic ionizing radiation isotropically generates scintillation light signals within the waveguide. This apparatus provides a measure of radiation dose. The apparatus may be modified to permit making a measure of location of radiation dose. Specifically, the scintillation material is segmented into a plurality of segments; and a connecting cable for each of the plurality of segments is used for conducting scintillation signals to a scintillation detector.

  1. Configurable silicon photonic crystal waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prorok, Stefan; Petrov, Alexander; Eich, Manfred; Luo, Jingdong; Jen, Alex K.-Y.

    2013-12-01

    In this Letter, we demonstrate that the mode cut off of a photonic crystal waveguide can be trimmed with high accuracy by electron beam bleaching of a chromophore doped polymer cladding. Using this method, configurable waveguides are realized, which allow for spatially resolved changes of the photonic crystal's effective lattice constant as small as 7.6 pm. We show three different examples how to take advantage of configurable photonic crystal waveguides: Shifting of the complete transmission spectrum, definition of cavities with high quality factor, and tuning of existing cavities.

  2. Configurable silicon photonic crystal waveguides

    SciTech Connect

    Prorok, Stefan; Petrov, Alexander; Eich, Manfred; Luo, Jingdong; Jen, Alex K.-Y.

    2013-12-23

    In this Letter, we demonstrate that the mode cut off of a photonic crystal waveguide can be trimmed with high accuracy by electron beam bleaching of a chromophore doped polymer cladding. Using this method, configurable waveguides are realized, which allow for spatially resolved changes of the photonic crystal's effective lattice constant as small as 7.6 pm. We show three different examples how to take advantage of configurable photonic crystal waveguides: Shifting of the complete transmission spectrum, definition of cavities with high quality factor, and tuning of existing cavities.

  3. Particle Movements in a Rotating Ultrasonic Waveguide.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitworth, Glenn

    An apparatus was designed to allow a suspension of biological cells to be subjected to a well-defined, 160 kHz standing ultrasonic field while being viewed through a stereo microscope. Cell positions were recorded either photographically or by means of a video camera. The chamber cavity, which has a square cross-section and pressure-release walls, acts as a single-mode acoustic waveguide. The well -defined, single-mode field is achieved through use of a special design involving air-filled chamber windows. Aqueous metrizamide solution is used to fill the ultrasonic chamber because it has a unique combination of properties including low viscosity, low osmolarity, and high density. The chamber rotates about its axis (whose inclination can be varied) producing the centripetal force necessary to contain the buoyant cells in the axial region. Observations were made on stroboscopically illuminated suspensions both of latex microspheres and of red blood cells (RBC's). Small (6-14 μm) latex microspheres or RBC's formed aggregates at half-wavelength intervals along the rotation axis near positions of acoustic pressure-amplitude (PA) minima. In addition, near the positions of PA maxima the particles would typically arrange themselves into axially symmetric distributions with evidence of flow. Larger (273 μm) latex microspheres also formed aggregates near the axial positions of PA minima. If these aggregates were sufficiently large, then much smaller aggregates would often form near positions of PA maxima. (This is in contrast with the flowing distributions seen near these positions when smaller particles were used.). The presence and shape of aggregates near positions of PA minima are explained by a scalar-potential theory for non-interacting particles that considers gravitational, rotational, and acoustic radiation forces on the particles. Theory was developed to describe acoustic streaming in a rotating fluid. This theory was then generalized to treat flow generated by a

  4. Elastic Pekeris waveguide normal mode solution comparisons against laboratory data.

    PubMed

    Schneiderwind, Joseph D; Collis, Jon M; Simpson, Harry J

    2012-09-01

    Following the derivation presented by Press and Ewing [Geophysics 15, 426-446 (1950)], a normal mode solution for the Pekeris waveguide problem with an elastic bottom is outlined. The analytic solution is benchmarked against data collected in an experiment performed at the Naval Research Laboratory [Collis et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 122, 1987-1993 (2007)]. Comparisons reveal a close match between the analytic solution and experimental data. Results are strongly dependent on the accuracy of the horizontal wavenumbers for the modes, and horizontal wavenumber spectra are compared against those from the experimental data.

  5. Crossing of manifolds leads to flat dispersion: Blazed Littrow waveguides

    SciTech Connect

    Benisty, H.; Khayam, O.; Piskunov, N.; Kashkarov, P. K.

    2011-12-15

    We display a photonic embodiment of the Demkov-Ostrovsky solution to the crossing of two manifolds made of equidistant modes thanks to broad periodic waveguides. We find clearly narrowing resonances that signal the singular, flat dispersion case that we had termed ''critical coupling.'' The reconciliation of band-edge confinement and cavity confinement, two pillars of photonics, appear from the guide length dependence of spectra. We suggest the generality of the Demkov-Ostrovsky or critical coupling flat dispersion across all kinds of waves, e.g., electronic and acoustic.

  6. Complete power concentration into a single waveguide in large-scale waveguide array lenses

    PubMed Central

    Catrysse, Peter B.; Liu, Victor; Fan, Shanhui

    2014-01-01

    Waveguide array lenses are waveguide arrays that focus light incident on all waveguides at the input side into a small number of waveguides at the output side. Ideal waveguide array lenses provide complete (100%) power concentration of incident light into a single waveguide. While of great interest for several applications, ideal waveguide array lenses have not been demonstrated for practical arrays with large numbers of waveguides. The only waveguide arrays that have sufficient degrees of freedom to allow for the design of an ideal waveguide array lens are those where both the propagation constants of the individual waveguides and the coupling constants between the waveguides vary as a function of space. Here, we use state-of-the-art numerical methods to demonstrate complete power transfer into a single waveguide for waveguide array lenses with large numbers of waveguides. We verify this capability for more than a thousand waveguides using a spatial coupled mode theory. We hereby extend the state-of-art by more than two orders of magnitude. We also demonstrate for the first time a physical design for an ideal waveguide array lens. The design is based on an aperiodic metallic waveguide array and focuses ~100% of the incident light into a deep-subwavelength focal spot. PMID:25319203

  7. Musical Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gough, Colin

    This chapter provides an introduction to the physical and psycho-acoustic principles underlying the production and perception of the sounds of musical instruments. The first section introduces generic aspects of musical acoustics and the perception of musical sounds, followed by separate sections on string, wind and percussion instruments.

  8. Coplanar waveguide supercomponents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeo, Mike

    The application of coplanar-waveguide (CPWG) technology to develop rugged compact high-performance electronic components for use in military receivers and similar equipment is described and illustrated with diagrams and photographs of typical CPWG implementations. The operating principles and characteristics of CPWGs are reviewed; the advantages and limitations of stripline, microstrip, and CPWG technologies are listed in a table and compared; and the inherently good isolation, the ease of making series and shunt connections, and the flexibility of ground-plane spacing of CPWGs are emphasized. The CPWG-based components shown include a Ku-band dual downconverter with 17 different functional circuits, an antenna switching unit with switches, driver, couplers, and ferrite devices; and two mixed-media multifunction hybrid components.

  9. Whispering-mode waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurnit, N. A.

    Properties of a relatively new type of waveguide structure of potential use of confining infrared radiation to a small mode volume over long path lengths are reviewed. A single guiding surface with curvature radius rho and band radius R allows propagation of a near-grazing incidence whispering mode of transverse width approximately (lambda square root of rho R/pi) sup 1/2 and radial width approximately 1/2 (sq lambda R)/sup 1/3. For sufficiently large rho, the loss per revolution for TE mode propagation is approximately pi A/sub N/, where A/sub N/ is the normal-incidence reflection loss. Results on a number of prototype structures in general agreement with these considerations are described.

  10. Nonlinear Waves in Waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leble, Sergei B.

    S.B. Leble's book deals with nonlinear waves and their propagation in metallic and dielectric waveguides and media with stratification. The underlying nonlinear evolution equations (NEEs) are derived giving also their solutions for specific situations. The reader will find new elements to the traditional approach. Various dispersion and relaxation laws for different guides are considered as well as the explicit form of projection operators, NEEs, quasi-solitons and of Darboux transforms. Special points relate to: 1. the development of a universal asymptotic method of deriving NEEs for guide propagation; 2. applications to the cases of stratified liquids, gases, solids and plasmas with various nonlinearities and dispersion laws; 3. connections between the basic problem and soliton- like solutions of the corresponding NEEs; 4. discussion of details of simple solutions in higher- order nonsingular perturbation theory.

  11. Strong acoustic coupling to a superconducting qubit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gustafsson, Martin; Aref, Thomas; Frisk Kockum, Anton; Ekström, Maria; Johansson, Göran; Delsing, Per

    2014-03-01

    Micromechanical resonators can be used to store quantum information, as shown in several recent experiments. These resonators typically have the form of membranes or beams, and phonons are localized to their vibrational eigenmodes. We present a different kind of mechanical quantum device, where propagating phonons serve as carriers for quantum information. At the core of our device is a superconducting qubit, designed to couple to Surface Acoustic Waves (SAW) in the underlying substrate through the piezoelectric effect. This type of coupling can be very strong, and in our case exceeds the coupling to any external electromagnetic modes. The acoustic waves propagate freely on the surface of the substrate, and we use a remote electro-acoustic transducer to address the qubit acoustically and listen to its emission of phonons. This presentation focuses on the basic properties of our acoustic quantum system, and we include experimental data that demonstrate the quantized coupling between the qubit and the propagating acoustic waves.

  12. Waveguides for performing enzymatic reactions

    DOEpatents

    Levene; Michael J. , Korlach; Jonas , Turner; Stephen W. , Craighead; Harold G. , Webb; Watt W.

    2007-11-06

    The present invention is directed to a method and an apparatus for analysis of an analyte. The method involves providing a zero-mode waveguide which includes a cladding surrounding a core where the cladding is configured to preclude propagation of electromagnetic energy of a frequency less than a cutoff frequency longitudinally through the core of the zero-mode waveguide. The analyte is positioned in the core of the zero-mode waveguide and is then subjected, in the core of the zero-mode wave guide, to activating electromagnetic radiation of a frequency less than the cut-off frequency under conditions effective to permit analysis of the analyte in an effective observation volume which is more compact than if the analysis were carried out in the absence of the zero-mode waveguide.

  13. Temporal waveguides for optical pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Plansinis, Brent W.; Donaldson, William R.; Agrawal, Govind P.

    2016-05-12

    Here we discuss, temporal total internal reflection (TIR), in analogy to the conventional TIR of an optical beam at a dielectric interface, is the total reflection of an optical pulse inside a dispersive medium at a temporal boundary across which the refractive index changes. A pair of such boundaries separated in time acts as the temporal analog of planar dielectric waveguides. We study the propagation of optical pulses inside such temporal waveguides, both analytically and numerically, and show that the waveguide supports a finite number of temporal modes. We also discuss how a single-mode temporal waveguide can be created in practice. In contrast with the spatial case, the confinement can occur even when the central region has a lower refractive index.

  14. Temporal waveguides for optical pulses

    DOE PAGES

    Plansinis, Brent W.; Donaldson, William R.; Agrawal, Govind P.

    2016-05-12

    Here we discuss, temporal total internal reflection (TIR), in analogy to the conventional TIR of an optical beam at a dielectric interface, is the total reflection of an optical pulse inside a dispersive medium at a temporal boundary across which the refractive index changes. A pair of such boundaries separated in time acts as the temporal analog of planar dielectric waveguides. We study the propagation of optical pulses inside such temporal waveguides, both analytically and numerically, and show that the waveguide supports a finite number of temporal modes. We also discuss how a single-mode temporal waveguide can be created inmore » practice. In contrast with the spatial case, the confinement can occur even when the central region has a lower refractive index.« less

  15. Multiscaffold DNA Origami Nanoparticle Waveguides

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    DNA origami templated self-assembly has shown its potential in creating rationally designed nanophotonic devices in a parallel and repeatable manner. In this investigation, we employ a multiscaffold DNA origami approach to fabricate linear waveguides of 10 nm diameter gold nanoparticles. This approach provides independent control over nanoparticle separation and spatial arrangement. The waveguides were characterized using atomic force microscopy and far-field polarization spectroscopy. This work provides a path toward large-scale plasmonic circuitry. PMID:23841957

  16. Optical Waveguide Scattering Reduction. II.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-12-01

    FAD-AOAR 815 BATTELLEWCOLUMBUS LABS ON F/S 20/6 OPTICAL WAVEGUIDE SCATTER ING REDUC TION. II.(U) 7 DEC 80 0 W VAHEY, N F HARTMAN, R C SHERMAN F3361... OPTICAL WAVEGUIDE SCATTERING REDUCTION II M BATTELLE COLUMBUS LABORATORIES 505 KING AVENUE COLUMBUS, OHIO 43201 DTIC ELECTEf MAY 12 198111 December...reviewed and is approved for publication. DOUGLAS AWIWILLE, Project Engineer KENNETH R. HUTCHINSON, Chief Electro- Optics Techniques and Electro- Optics

  17. MHD waveguides in space plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Mazur, N. G.; Fedorov, E. N.; Pilipenko, V. A.

    2010-07-15

    The waveguide properties of two characteristic formations in the Earth's magnetotail-the plasma sheet and the current (neutral) sheet-are considered. The question of how the domains of existence of different types of MHD waveguide modes (fast and slow, body and surface) in the (k, {omega}) plane and their dispersion properties depend on the waveguide parameters is studied. Investigation of the dispersion relation in a number of particular (limiting) cases makes it possible to obtain a fairly complete qualitative pattern of all the branches of the dispersion curve. Accounting for the finite size of perturbations across the wave propagation direction reveals new additional effects such as a change in the critical waveguide frequencies, the excitation of longitudinal current at the boundaries of the sheets, and a change in the symmetry of the fundamental mode. Knowledge of the waveguide properties of the plasma and current sheets can explain the occurrence of preferred frequencies in the low-frequency fluctuation spectra in the magnetotail. In satellite observations, the type of waveguide mode can be determined from the spectral properties, as well as from the phase relationships between plasma oscillations and magnetic field oscillations that are presented in this paper.

  18. Biocompatible silk step-index optical waveguides

    PubMed Central

    Applegate, Matthew B.; Perotto, Giovanni; Kaplan, David L.; Omenetto, Fiorenzo G.

    2015-01-01

    Biocompatible optical waveguides were constructed entirely of silk fibroin. A silk film (n=1.54) was encapsulated within a silk hydrogel (n=1.34) to form a robust and biocompatible waveguide. Such waveguides were made using only biologically and environmentally friendly materials without the use of harsh solvents. Light was coupled into the silk waveguides by direct incorporation of a glass optical fiber. These waveguides are extremely flexible, and strong enough to survive handling and manipulation. Cutback measurements showed propagation losses of approximately 2 dB/cm. The silk waveguides were found to be capable of guiding light through biological tissue. PMID:26600988

  19. Waveguide harmonic damper for klystron amplifier.

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Y.

    1998-10-27

    A waveguide harmonic damper was designed for removing the harmonic frequency power from the klystron amplifiers of the APS linac. Straight coaxial probe antennas are used in a rectangular waveguide to form a damper. A linear array of the probe antennas is used on a narrow wall of the rectangular waveguide for damping klystron harmonics while decoupling the fundamental frequency in dominent TE{sub 01} mode. The klystron harmonics can exist in the waveguide as waveguide higher-order modes above cutoff. Computer simulations are made to investigate the waveguide harmonic damping characteristics of the damper.

  20. Simplified flangeless unisex waveguide coupler assembly

    DOEpatents

    Michelangelo, Dimartino; Moeller, Charles P.

    1993-01-01

    A unisex coupler assembly is disclosed capable of providing a leak tight coupling for waveguides with axial alignment of the waveguides and rotational capability. The sealing means of the coupler assembly are not exposed to RF energy, and the coupler assembly does not require the provision of external flanges on the waveguides. In a preferred embodiment, O ring seals are not used and the coupler assembly is, therefore, bakeable at a temperature up to about 150.degree. C. The coupler assembly comprises a split collar which clamps around the waveguides and a second collar which fastens to the split collar. The split collar contains an inner annular groove. Each of the waveguides is provided with an external annular groove which receives a retaining ring. The split collar is clamped around one of the waveguides with the inner annular groove of the split collar engaging the retaining ring carried in the external annular groove in the waveguide. The second collar is then slipped over the second waveguide behind the annular groove and retaining ring therein and the second collar is coaxially secured by fastening means to the split collar to draw the respective waveguides together by coaxial force exerted by the second collar against the retaining ring on the second waveguide. A sealing ring is placed against an external sealing surface at a reduced external diameter end formed on one waveguide to sealingly engage a corresponding sealing surface on the other waveguide as the waveguides are urged toward each other.

  1. Simplified flangeless unisex waveguide coupler assembly

    DOEpatents

    Michelangelo, D.; Moeller, C.P.

    1993-05-04

    A unisex coupler assembly is disclosed capable of providing a leak tight coupling for waveguides with axial alignment of the waveguides and rotational capability. The sealing means of the coupler assembly are not exposed to RF energy, and the coupler assembly does not require the provision of external flanges on the waveguides. In a preferred embodiment, O ring seals are not used and the coupler assembly is, therefore, bakeable at a temperature up to about 150 C. The coupler assembly comprises a split collar which clamps around the waveguides and a second collar which fastens to the split collar. The split collar contains an inner annular groove. Each of the waveguides is provided with an external annular groove which receives a retaining ring. The split collar is clamped around one of the waveguides with the inner annular groove of the split collar engaging the retaining ring carried in the external annular groove in the waveguide. The second collar is then slipped over the second waveguide behind the annular groove and retaining ring therein and the second collar is coaxially secured by fastening means to the split collar to draw the respective waveguides together by coaxial force exerted by the second collar against the retaining ring on the second waveguide. A sealing ring is placed against an external sealing surface at a reduced external diameter end formed on one waveguide to sealingly engage a corresponding sealing surface on the other waveguide as the waveguides are urged toward each other.

  2. Room Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuttruff, Heinrich; Mommertz, Eckard

    The traditional task of room acoustics is to create or formulate conditions which ensure the best possible propagation of sound in a room from a sound source to a listener. Thus, objects of room acoustics are in particular assembly halls of all kinds, such as auditoria and lecture halls, conference rooms, theaters, concert halls or churches. Already at this point, it has to be pointed out that these conditions essentially depend on the question if speech or music should be transmitted; in the first case, the criterion for transmission quality is good speech intelligibility, in the other case, however, the success of room-acoustical efforts depends on other factors that cannot be quantified that easily, not least it also depends on the hearing habits of the listeners. In any case, absolutely "good acoustics" of a room do not exist.

  3. Integration of a waveguide self-electrooptic effect device and a vertically coupled interconnect waveguide

    DOEpatents

    Vawter, G. Allen

    2008-02-26

    A self-electrooptic effect device ("SEED") is integrated with waveguide interconnects through the use of vertical directional couplers. Light initially propagating in the interconnect waveguide is vertically coupled to the active waveguide layer of the SEED and, if the SEED is in the transparent state, the light is coupled back to the interconnect waveguide.

  4. Phased waveguide array with fixed tuning elements

    SciTech Connect

    Motley, R.W.; Bernabei, S.; Hooke, W.M.; Paoloni, F.J.

    1980-04-01

    The waveguide grill excites both penetrating lower hybrid waves and surface plasma waves. Quarter wavelength tuning elements attached to the sides of a twin waveguide are shown to reduce the surface wave component by a factor of approx. 3..

  5. Slotted Polyimide-Aerogel-Filled-Waveguide Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez-Solis, Rafael A.; Pacheco, Hector L.; Miranda, Felix A.; Meador, Mary Ann B.

    2013-01-01

    Polyimide aerogels were considered to serve as a filling for millimeter-wave waveguides. While these waveguides present a slightly higher loss than hollow waveguides, they have less losses than Duroid substrate integrated waveguides (less than 0.15 dB at Ka-band, in a 20 mm section), and exhibit an order of magnitude of mass reduction when compared to commercial waveguides. A Ka-band slotted aerogel-filled-waveguide array was designed, which provided the same gain (9 dBi) as its standard waveguide counterpart, and a slotted aerogel-filled-waveguide array using folded-slots was designed for comparison, obtaining a gain of 9 dB and a bandwidth of 590 MHz.

  6. Optical panel system including stackable waveguides

    DOEpatents

    DeSanto, Leonard; Veligdan, James T.

    2007-11-20

    An optical panel system including stackable waveguides is provided. The optical panel system displays a projected light image and comprises a plurality of planar optical waveguides in a stacked state. The optical panel system further comprises a support system that aligns and supports the waveguides in the stacked state. In one embodiment, the support system comprises at least one rod, wherein each waveguide contains at least one hole, and wherein each rod is positioned through a corresponding hole in each waveguide. In another embodiment, the support system comprises at least two opposing edge structures having the waveguides positioned therebetween, wherein each opposing edge structure contains a mating surface, wherein opposite edges of each waveguide contain mating surfaces which are complementary to the mating surfaces of the opposing edge structures, and wherein each mating surface of the opposing edge structures engages a corresponding complementary mating surface of the opposite edges of each waveguide.

  7. Optical panel system including stackable waveguides

    DOEpatents

    DeSanto, Leonard; Veligdan, James T.

    2007-03-06

    An optical panel system including stackable waveguides is provided. The optical panel system displays a projected light image and comprises a plurality of planar optical waveguides in a stacked state. The optical panel system further comprises a support system that aligns and supports the waveguides in the stacked state. In one embodiment, the support system comprises at least one rod, wherein each waveguide contains at least one hole, and wherein each rod is positioned through a corresponding hole in each waveguide. In another embodiment, the support system comprises at least two opposing edge structures having the waveguides positioned therebetween, wherein each opposing edge structure contains a mating surface, wherein opposite edges of each waveguide contain mating surfaces which are complementary to the mating surfaces of the opposing edge structures, and wherein each mating surface of the opposing edge structures engages a corresponding complementary mating surface of the opposite edges of each waveguide.

  8. Acousto-optic Bragg diffraction in a LiNbO3 channel-planar composite waveguide with application to optical computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, C. S.; Zang, D. Y.; Le, P.

    1985-09-01

    Successful experimentation on acousto-optic Bragg diffraction in a LiNbO3 composite waveguide that consists of an array of parallel but uncoupled channel waveguides directly extended to a single-mode planar waveguide and a titanium-indiffused proton-exchanged (TIPE) microlens array is reported for the first time. A channel-waveguide array, a planar waveguide, a linear TIPE microlens array, a 500-MHz surface acoustic wave transducer, and an integrating lens have all been integrated in a substrate size of 0.2 x 1.0 x 2.0 cm to form an integrated acousto-optic Bragg modulator that should find a variety of applications in optical computing, signal processing, and communications. The resulting modulator module has been utilized to perform matrix-vector multiplication.

  9. Planar waveguide sensor of ammonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogoziński, Roman; Tyszkiewicz, Cuma; Karasiński, Paweł; Izydorczyk, Weronika

    2015-12-01

    The paper presents the concept of forming ammonia sensor based on a planar waveguide structure. It is an amplitude sensor produced on the basis of the multimode waveguide. The technological base for this kind of structure is the ion exchange method and the sol-gel method. The planar multimode waveguide of channel type is produced in glass substrate (soda-lime glass of Menzel-Glaser company) by the selective Ag+↔Na+ ion exchange. On the surface of the glass substrate a porous (~40%) silica layer is produced by the sol-gel method. This layer is sensitized to the presence of ammonia in the surrounding atmosphere by impregnation with Bromocresol Purple (BCP) dye. Therefore it constitutes a sensor layer. Spectrophotometric tests carried out showed about 50% reduction of cross-transmission changes of such sensor layer for a wave λ=593 nm caused by the presence of 25% ammonia water vapor in its ambience. The radiation source used in this type of sensor structure is a light emitting diode LED. The gradient channel waveguide is designed for frontal connection (optical glue) with a standard multimode telecommunications waveguide 62.5/125μm.

  10. Loop coupled resonator optical waveguides.

    PubMed

    Song, Junfeng; Luo, Lian-Wee; Luo, Xianshu; Zhou, Haifeng; Tu, Xiaoguang; Jia, Lianxi; Fang, Qing; Lo, Guo-Qiang

    2014-10-06

    We propose a novel coupled resonator optical waveguide (CROW) structure that is made up of a waveguide loop. We theoretically investigate the forbidden band and conduction band conditions in an infinite periodic lattice. We also discuss the reflection- and transmission- spectra, group delay in finite periodic structures. Light has a larger group delay at the band edge in a periodic structure. The flat band pass filter and flat-top group delay can be realized in a non-periodic structure. Scattering matrix method is used to calculate the effects of waveguide loss on the optical characteristics of these structures. We also introduce a tunable coupling loop waveguide to compensate for the fabrication variations since the coupling coefficient of the directional coupler in the loop waveguide is a critical factor in determining the characteristics of a loop CROW. The loop CROW structure is suitable for a wide range of applications such as band pass filters, high Q microcavity, and optical buffers and so on.

  11. Slotted Polyimide-Aerogel-Filled-Waveguide Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez-Solis, Rafael A.; Pacheco, Hector L.; Miranda, Felix A.; Meador, Mary Ann B.

    2013-01-01

    This presentation discussed the potential advantages of developing Slotted Waveguide Arrays using polyimide aerogels. Polyimide (PI) aerogels offer great promise as an enabling technology for lightweight aerospace antenna systems. PI aerogels are highly porous solids possessing low density and low dielectric permittivity combined with good mechanical properties. For slotted waveguide array applications, there are significant advantages in mass that more than compensate for the slightly higher loss of the aerogel filled waveguide when compared to state of practice commercial waveguide.

  12. Bending loss of terahertz pipe waveguides.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jen-Tang; Hsueh, Yu-Chun; Huang, Yu-Ru; Hwang, Yuh-Jing; Sun, Chi-Kuang

    2010-12-06

    We present an experimental study on the bending loss of terahertz (THz) pipe waveguide. Bending loss of pipe waveguides is investigated for various frequencies, polarizations, core diameters, cladding thicknesses, and cladding materials. Our results indicate that the pipe waveguides with lower guiding loss suffer lower bending loss due to stronger mode confinement. The unexpected low bending loss in the investigated simple leaky waveguide structure promises variety of flexible applications.

  13. Investigation of semiconductor clad optical waveguides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batchman, T. E.; Carson, R. F.

    1985-01-01

    A variety of techniques have been proposed for fabricating integrated optical devices using semiconductors, lithium niobate, and glasses as waveguides and substrates. The use of glass waveguides and their interaction with thin semiconductor cladding layers was studied. Though the interactions of these multilayer waveguide structures have been analyzed here using glass, they may be applicable to other types of materials as well. The primary reason for using glass is that it provides a simple, inexpensive way to construct waveguides and devices.

  14. Dispersion compensation in slot photonic crystal waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plastun, Alexander; Konyukhov, Andrey

    2015-03-01

    Dispersion tailoring using photonic crystal cladding for slot waveguide is proposed. Numerical modeling based on the Maxwell equation for Te and TM modes of the photonic crystal is performed. Slot waveguide provide high intencity at the central area. Photonic crystal cladding of the slot waveguide allow us to compensate high values of the host glass dispersion.

  15. Acoustic tweezers via sub–time-of-flight regime surface acoustic waves

    PubMed Central

    Collins, David J.; Devendran, Citsabehsan; Ma, Zhichao; Ng, Jia Wei; Neild, Adrian; Ai, Ye

    2016-01-01

    Micrometer-scale acoustic waves are highly useful for refined optomechanical and acoustofluidic manipulation, where these fields are spatially localized along the transducer aperture but not along the acoustic propagation direction. In the case of acoustic tweezers, such a conventional acoustic standing wave results in particle and cell patterning across the entire width of a microfluidic channel, preventing selective trapping. We demonstrate the use of nanosecond-scale pulsed surface acoustic waves (SAWs) with a pulse period that is less than the time of flight between opposing transducers to generate localized time-averaged patterning regions while using conventional electrode structures. These nodal positions can be readily and arbitrarily positioned in two dimensions and within the patterning region itself through the imposition of pulse delays, frequency modulation, and phase shifts. This straightforward concept adds new spatial dimensions to which acoustic fields can be localized in SAW applications in a manner analogous to optical tweezers, including spatially selective acoustic tweezers and optical waveguides. PMID:27453940

  16. A general waveguide circuit theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marks, Roger B.; Williams, Dylan F.

    1992-10-01

    This work generalizes and extends the classical circuit theory of electromagnetic waveguides. Unlike the conventional theory, the present formulation applies to all waveguides composed of linear, isotropic material, even those involving lossy conductors and hybrid mode fields, in a fully rigorous way. Special attention is given to distinguishing the traveling waves, constructed with respect to a well-defined characteristic impedance, from a set of pseudo-waves, defined with respect to an arbitrary reference impedance. Matrices characterizing a linear circuit are defined, and relationships among them, some newly discovered, are derived. New ramifications of reciprocity are developed. Measurement of various network parameters is given extensive treatment.

  17. Hollow glass waveguides: New variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, Daniel Joseph

    This study is an effort to develop new variations on the infrared silver-silver iodide hollow glass waveguide (HGW) with application specific properties. Four variations are presented: a HGW with a long, gradual taper, a HGW with a rectangular cross-section, curved HGW tips and a new all-dielectric hollow waveguide based on photonic bandgap guidance principles. A hollow glass waveguide tapered over its entire length offers ease of coupling at the proximal end and excellent flexibility at the distal end. Waveguides tapered from 1000 to 500 mum and 700 to 500 mum over 1.5 m were fabricated in this study. Compared to similarly sized non-tapered waveguides, laser losses for the tapered guides were high but decreased when bent. This behavior is contrary to that of non-tapered guides and an iterative ray tracing model was also developed to explain the observed loss characteristics of tapered hollow waveguides. Hollow glass waveguides with round profiles do not maintain the polarization state of the delivered radiation to any appreciable degree. HGWs with large- and small-aspect ratio rectangular cross sections were developed and shown to preserve polarization up to 96%, even when bent. The large aspect ratio guide was able to effectively rotate the transmitted polarization when twisted along its axis. Curved distal tips for medical and dental laser applications were developed by removing the low-OH silica fiber from commercially available stainless steel dental tips, and inserting HGWs of various sizes. The optical performances and heating profiles of the various configurations indicate the tips are suitable for certain medical applications, but the minimum bending radius is limited by the mechanical properties of the glass substrate. A small radii bending loss study confirms that propagating modes periodically couple as the radius of curvature is reduced. Through the application of the photonic bandgap (PBG) guidance, hollow waveguides can be made entirely from

  18. Waveguide Four-Wave Mixing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-10-01

    PL-TR--91-1045 /’--"PL-TR-- AD-A243 555 91-1045 WAVEGUIDE FOUR -WAVE MIXING Thomas B. Simpson Jia-ming Liu JAYCOR San Diego, CA 92186-5154 October...Final Report; May 88 - Mar 91 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5. FUNDING NUMBERS WAVEGUIDE FOUR -WAVE MIXING C: F29601-88-C-0023 PE: 62601F PR: 3326 6. AUTHOR(S...for public release; distribution unlimited. 13. ABSTRACT (Maximum 200 words) This program has investigated four -wave mixing (4-win) in non- linear

  19. Acoustic biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Fogel, Ronen; Seshia, Ashwin A.

    2016-01-01

    Resonant and acoustic wave devices have been researched for several decades for application in the gravimetric sensing of a variety of biological and chemical analytes. These devices operate by coupling the measurand (e.g. analyte adsorption) as a modulation in the physical properties of the acoustic wave (e.g. resonant frequency, acoustic velocity, dissipation) that can then be correlated with the amount of adsorbed analyte. These devices can also be miniaturized with advantages in terms of cost, size and scalability, as well as potential additional features including integration with microfluidics and electronics, scaled sensitivities associated with smaller dimensions and higher operational frequencies, the ability to multiplex detection across arrays of hundreds of devices embedded in a single chip, increased throughput and the ability to interrogate a wider range of modes including within the same device. Additionally, device fabrication is often compatible with semiconductor volume batch manufacturing techniques enabling cost scalability and a high degree of precision and reproducibility in the manufacturing process. Integration with microfluidics handling also enables suitable sample pre-processing/separation/purification/amplification steps that could improve selectivity and the overall signal-to-noise ratio. Three device types are reviewed here: (i) bulk acoustic wave sensors, (ii) surface acoustic wave sensors, and (iii) micro/nano-electromechanical system (MEMS/NEMS) sensors. PMID:27365040

  20. Acoustic biosensors.

    PubMed

    Fogel, Ronen; Limson, Janice; Seshia, Ashwin A

    2016-06-30

    Resonant and acoustic wave devices have been researched for several decades for application in the gravimetric sensing of a variety of biological and chemical analytes. These devices operate by coupling the measurand (e.g. analyte adsorption) as a modulation in the physical properties of the acoustic wave (e.g. resonant frequency, acoustic velocity, dissipation) that can then be correlated with the amount of adsorbed analyte. These devices can also be miniaturized with advantages in terms of cost, size and scalability, as well as potential additional features including integration with microfluidics and electronics, scaled sensitivities associated with smaller dimensions and higher operational frequencies, the ability to multiplex detection across arrays of hundreds of devices embedded in a single chip, increased throughput and the ability to interrogate a wider range of modes including within the same device. Additionally, device fabrication is often compatible with semiconductor volume batch manufacturing techniques enabling cost scalability and a high degree of precision and reproducibility in the manufacturing process. Integration with microfluidics handling also enables suitable sample pre-processing/separation/purification/amplification steps that could improve selectivity and the overall signal-to-noise ratio. Three device types are reviewed here: (i) bulk acoustic wave sensors, (ii) surface acoustic wave sensors, and (iii) micro/nano-electromechanical system (MEMS/NEMS) sensors.

  1. Understanding and Utilizing Waveguide Invariant Range-frequency Striations in Ocean Acoustic Waveguides

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-02-01

    slope of the line connecting non-SRBR modes is sig- nif cantly different than the slope of the line connecting the SRBR modes. Thus, the non-SRBR modes...maximum range that one expects to see the source. All results presented in this chapter used Eqs. (3.8) and (3.9) with r = 5000 m, c1 = 1500 m/s, and c2...present work, ∆f was determined by using Eqs. (3.21) and (3.18) with c1 = 1500 m/s, c2 = 1800 m/s, r = 1000 meters, resulting in ∆f ≈ 81 Hz. ∆r was

  2. Acoustics of the Intonarumori

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serafin, Stefania

    2005-04-01

    The Intonarumori were a family of musical instruments invented by the Italian futurist composer and painter Luigi Russolo. Each Intonarumori was made of a wooden parallelepiped sound box, inside which a wheel of different sizes and materials was setting into vibration a catgut or metal string. The pitch of the string was varied by using a lever, while the speed of the wheel was controlled by the performer using a crank. At one end of the string there was a drumhead that transmitted vibrations to the speaker. Unfortunately, all the original Intonarumori were destroyed after a fire during World War II. Since then, researchers have tried to understand the sound production mechanism of such instruments, especially by consulting the patents compiled by Russolo or by reading his book ``The art of noise.'' In this paper we describe the acoustics of the Intonarumori. Based on such description, we propose physical models that simulate such instruments. The intonarumori's string is modeled using a one dimensional waveguide, which is excited either by an impact or a friction model. The body of the instrument is modeled using a 3-D rectangular mesh, while the horn is considered as an omnidirectional radiator.

  3. Stimulated Brillouin scattering in integrated photonic waveguides: Forces, scattering mechanisms, and coupled-mode analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolff, C.; Steel, M. J.; Eggleton, B. J.; Poulton, C. G.

    2015-07-01

    Recent theoretical studies of stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) in nanoscale devices have led to intense research effort dedicated to the demonstration and application of this nonlinearity in on-chip systems. The key feature of SBS in integrated photonic waveguides is that small, high-contrast waveguides are predicted to experience powerful optical forces on the waveguide boundaries, which are predicted to further boost the SBS gain that is already expected to grow dramatically in such structures because of the higher mode confinement alone. In all recent treatments, the effect of radiation pressure is included separately from the scattering action that the acoustic field exerts on the optical field. In contrast to this, we show here that the effects of radiation pressure and motion of the waveguide boundaries are inextricably linked. Central to this insight is a new formulation of the SBS interaction that unifies the treatment of light and sound, incorporating all relevant interaction mechanisms—radiation pressure, waveguide boundary motion, electrostriction, and photoelasticity—from a rigorous thermodynamic perspective. Our approach also clarifies important points of ambiguity in the literature, such as the nature of edge effects with regard to electrostriction and of body forces with respect to radiation pressure. This new perspective on Brillouin processes leads to physical insight with implications for the design and fabrication of SBS-based nanoscale devices.

  4. Effects of beryllium coating layer on performance of the ultrasonic waveguide sensor.

    PubMed

    Joo, Young-Sang; Bae, Jin-Ho; Kim, Jong-Bum; Kim, Jin-Yeon

    2013-02-01

    Under-sodium viewing is one of the critical technical issues and requirements for the in-service inspection of the sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) that is currently under development. The waveguide sensor that uses leaky A(0) mode Lamb waves has shown its potential for high-resolution viewing/scanning of the reactor core and in-vessel structures. However, a few problems arise under a liquid sodium environment due to high sound speed in liquid sodium and dispersion in the long waveguide plate, which simultaneously deteriorate the reconstructed C-scan images. This paper proposes coating the surface of the waveguide sensor plate with a thin layer of material that has a very high ultrasonic wave velocity. It is shown that this coating layer can largely reduce the size (width) and radiation angle of the acoustic beam from the waveguide sensor. This paper precisely analyzes the effects of coating parameters on the beam quality. The proposed idea is validated through ultrasonic experiments in which the radiation beam profiles and group velocities in waveguide sensors with different surface treatments are measured and compared.

  5. Mode Conversion Behavior of Guided Wave in a Pipe Inspection System Based on a Long Waveguide

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Feiran; Sun, Zhenguo; Chen, Qiang; Murayama, Riichi; Nishino, Hideo

    2016-01-01

    To make clear the mode conversion behavior of S0-mode lamb wave and SH0-plate wave converting to the longitudinal mode guided wave and torsional mode guided wave in a pipe, respectively, the experiments were performed based on a previous built pipe inspection system. The pipe was wound with an L-shaped plate or a T-shaped plate as the waveguide, and the S0-wave and SH0-wave were excited separately in the waveguide. To carry out the objective, a meander-line coil electromagnetic acoustic transducer (EMAT) for S0-wave and a periodic permanent magnet (PPM) EMAT for SH0-wave were developed and optimized. Then, several comparison experiments were conducted to compare the efficiency of mode conversion. Experimental results showed that the T(0,1) mode, L(0,1) mode, and L(0,2) mode guided waves can be successfully detected when converted from the S0-wave or SH0-wave with different shaped waveguides. It can also be inferred that the S0-wave has a better ability to convert to the T(0,1) mode, while the SH0-wave is easier to convert to the L(0,1) mode and L(0,2) mode, and the L-shaped waveguide has a better efficiency than T-shaped waveguide. PMID:27775580

  6. Longitudinal modes along thin piezoelectric waveguides for liquid sensing applications.

    PubMed

    Caliendo, Cinzia

    2015-06-02

    The propagation of longitudinally polarized acoustic modes along thin piezoelectric plates (BN, ZnO, InN, AlN and GaN) is theoretically studied, aiming at the design of high frequency electroacoustic devices suitable for work in liquid environments. The investigation of the acoustic field profile across the plate revealed the presence of longitudinally polarized Lamb modes, travelling at velocities close to that of the longitudinal bulk acoustic wave propagating in the same direction. Such waves are suitable for the implementation of high-frequency, low-loss electroacoustic devices operating in liquid environments. The time-averaged power flow density, the phase velocity and the electroacoustic coupling coefficient K2 dispersion curves were studied, for the first (S0) and four higher order (S1, S2, S3, S4) symmetrical modes for different electrical boundary conditions. Two electroacoustic coupling configurations were investigated, based on interdigitated transducers, with or without a metal floating electrode at the opposite plate surface. Enhanced performances, such as a K2 as high as 8.5% and a phase velocity as high as 16,700 m/s, were demostrated for the ZnO- and BN-based waveguides, as an example. The relative velocity changes, and the inertial and viscous sensitivities of the first symmetric and anti-symmetric mode, S0 and A0, propagating along thin plates bordered by a viscous liquid were derived using the perturbation approach. The present study highlights the feasibility of the piezoelectric waveguides to the development of high-frequency, integrated-circuits compatible electroacoustic devices suitable for working in liquid environment.

  7. Longitudinal Modes along Thin Piezoelectric Waveguides for Liquid Sensing Applications

    PubMed Central

    Caliendo, Cinzia

    2015-01-01

    The propagation of longitudinally polarized acoustic modes along thin piezoelectric plates (BN, ZnO, InN, AlN and GaN) is theoretically studied, aiming at the design of high frequency electroacoustic devices suitable for work in liquid environments. The investigation of the acoustic field profile across the plate revealed the presence of longitudinally polarized Lamb modes, travelling at velocities close to that of the longitudinal bulk acoustic wave propagating in the same direction. Such waves are suitable for the implementation of high-frequency, low-loss electroacoustic devices operating in liquid environments. The time-averaged power flow density, the phase velocity and the electroacoustic coupling coefficient K2 dispersion curves were studied, for the first (S0) and four higher order (S1, S2, S3, S4) symmetrical modes for different electrical boundary conditions. Two electroacoustic coupling configurations were investigated, based on interdigitated transducers, with or without a metal floating electrode at the opposite plate surface. Enhanced performances, such as a K2 as high as 8.5% and a phase velocity as high as 16,700 m/s, were demostrated for the ZnO- and BN-based waveguides, as an example. The relative velocity changes, and the inertial and viscous sensitivities of the first symmetric and anti-symmetric mode, S0 and A0, propagating along thin plates bordered by a viscous liquid were derived using the perturbation approach. The present study highlights the feasibility of the piezoelectric waveguides to the development of high-frequency, integrated-circuits compatible electroacoustic devices suitable for working in liquid environment. PMID:26043174

  8. Characterization of wave physics in acoustic metamaterials using a fiber optic point detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganye, Randy; Chen, Yongyao; Liu, Haijun; Bae, Hyungdae; Wen, Zhongshan; Yu, Miao

    2016-06-01

    Due to limitations of conventional acoustic probes, full spatial field mapping (both internal and external wave amplitude and phase measurements) in acoustic metamaterials with deep subwavelength structures has not yet been demonstrated. Therefore, many fundamental wave propagation phenomena in acoustic metamaterials remain experimentally unexplored. In this work, we realized a miniature fiber optic acoustic point detector that is capable of omnidirectional detection of complex spatial acoustic fields in various metamaterial structures over a broadband spectrum. By using this probe, we experimentally characterized the wave-structure interactions in an anisotropic metamaterial waveguide. We further demonstrated that the spatial mapping of both internal and external acoustic fields of metamaterial structures can help obtain important wave propagation properties associated with material dispersion and field confinement, and develop an in-depth understanding of the waveguiding physics in metamaterials. The insights and inspirations gained from our experimental studies are valuable not only for the advancement of fundamental metamaterial wave physics but also for the development of functional metamaterial devices such as acoustic lenses, waveguides, and sensors.

  9. Polymeric slot waveguide for photonics sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chovan, J.; Uherek, F.

    2016-12-01

    Polymeric slot waveguide for photonics sensing was designed, simulated and studied in this work. The polymeric slot waveguide was designed on commercial Ormocer polymer platform and operates at visible 632.8 nm wavelength. Designed polymeric slot waveguide detects the refractive index change of the ambient material by evanescent field label-free techniques. The motivation for the reported work was to design a low-cost polymeric slot waveguide for sensing arms of integrated Mach-Zehnder interferometer optical sensor with reduced temperature dependency. The minimal dimensions of advanced sensing slot waveguide structure were designed for researcher direct laser writing fabrication by nonlinear two-photon polymerization. The normalized effective refractive index changes of TE and TM fundamental modes in polymeric slot waveguide and slab waveguides were compared. The sensitivity of the normalized effective refractive index changes of TE and TM fundamental modes on refractive index changes of the ambient material was investigated by glucose-water solutions.

  10. Optofluidic waveguides: II. Fabrication and structures

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Holger

    2011-01-01

    We review fabrication methods and common structures for optofluidic waveguides, defined as structures capable of optical confinement and transmission through fluid filled cores. Cited structures include those based on total internal reflection, metallic coatings, and interference based confinement. Configurations include optical fibers and waveguides fabricated on flat substrates (integrated waveguides). Some examples of optofluidic waveguides that are included in this review are Photonic Crystal Fibers (PCFs) and two-dimensional photonic crystal arrays, Bragg fibers and waveguides, and Anti Resonant Reflecting Optical Waveguides (ARROWs). An emphasis is placed on integrated ARROWs fabricated using a thin-film deposition process, which illustrates how optofluidic waveguides can be combined with other microfluidic elements in the creation of lab-on-a-chip devices. PMID:21603122

  11. Acoustic bandpass filters employing shaped resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Červenka, M.; Bednařík, M.

    2016-11-01

    This work deals with acoustic bandpass filters realized by shaped waveguide-elements inserted between two parts of an acoustic transmission line with generally different characteristic impedance. It is shown that the formation of a wide passband is connected with the eigenfrequency spectrum of the filter element which acts as an acoustic resonator and that the required filter shape substantially depends on whether the filter characteristic impedance is higher or lower than the characteristic impedance of the waveguide. It is further shown that this class of filters can be realized even without the need of different characteristic impedance. A heuristic technique is proposed to design filter shapes with required transmission properties; it is employed for optimization of low-frequency bandpass filters as well as for design of bandpass filters with wide passband surrounded by wide stopbands as it is typical for phononic crystals, however, in this case the arrangement is much simpler as it consists of only one simple-shaped homogeneous element.

  12. Optical waveguides for chemical sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgess, Lloyd W.

    1992-07-01

    Possibilities of employing thin film optical waveguides for chemical analysis are reviewed. Particular attention is given to the use of integrated or planar optical elements in sensors which may be applied to continuous or in situ monitoring in biomedical, environmental, and chemical processes.

  13. Birefringence compensated arrayed waveguide grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Jun; Xia, Xiang; Lang, Tingting; He, Jian-Jun

    2014-10-01

    In this paper we review our work on birefringence compensated arrayed waveguide grating. We elaborate on a birefringence compensation technique based on angled star couplers in arrayed waveguide grating (AWG) and discuss several demonstrations both in low-index-contrast and high-index-contrast material systems. A 16-channel AWG with 100GHz channel spacing for DWDM application is designed and fabricated in silica-based low-index-contrast waveguide. The experimental results confirm that the polarization-dependent wavelength shift (PDλ) can be tuned by varying the incident/diffraction angle at the star couplers and a birefringence-free property can be achieved without additional fabrication process as compared to conventional AWG. A further validation of this technique is demonstrated in high-index-contrast silicon-on-insulator waveguide, in combination with different diffraction orders for TE and TM polarizations. A birefringence compensated silicon nanowire AWG for CWDM optical interconnects is designed and fabricated. The theoretical and experimental results show that the PDλ can be reduced from 380-420nm to 0.5-3.5 nm, below 25% of the 3 dB bandwidth of the channel response in the wavelength range of 1500 to 1600nm.

  14. Polymer Waveguides for Quantum Information

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    design, fabrication and testing of slab waveguides made of EO polymer and covers the initial phase of installation, testing and use of the spin ... coating system to make a few simple slabs with the anticipation of testing those for coupling and other processes.

  15. Nonlinear Acoustics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-02-14

    Wester- velt. [60] Streaming. In 1831, Michael Faraday [61] noted that currents of air were set up in the neighborhood of vibrating plates-the first... ducei in the case of a paramettc amy (from Berktay an Leahy 141). C’ "". k•, SEC 10.1 NONLINEAR ACOUSTICS 345 The principal results of their analysis

  16. Waveguiding Actuators Based on Photothermally Responsive Hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ying; Hauser, Adam; Bende, Nakul; Kuzyk, Mark; Hayward, Ryan

    A simple means to achieve rapid and highly reversible photo-responsiveness in a hydrogel is to combine a thermally-responsive gel such as poly(N-isopropyl acrylamide) (PNIPAM), with the photothermal effect of gold nanoparticles. Relying on such composite gels, we fabricate micro-scale bilayer photoactuators by photolithographic patterning, and demonstrate their controlled bending/unbending behavior in response to visible light. In addition to actuation by flood exposure, 532 nm laser light can be waveguided through a plastic optical fiber to direct it into the photoactuator, providing the possibility for remotely controllable actuators that do not require line-of-sight access. The actuators show large magnitude responses within time-scales of ~1 s, consistent with the small dimensions of the actuators, but also exhibit smaller-scale responses over much longer times, suggesting the possibility of slow internal relaxations within the network. Based on our study on this bilayer system, we further explore fabrication methods for cylindrical actuators that are able to bend in arbitrary directions.

  17. Waveguide ring coupling design of MOG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Xiang; Li, Zi-li; Chen, Yuan-you; Qin, Xiao-hu; Lv, Xin

    2010-10-01

    The key technology of micro optic gyroscopes (MOGs) is to fabricate low-loss waveguide and use coupling technology to form reciprocal structure. The main topic in this paper is to study the coupling structure of MOG's spiral-ring waveguide. Using for the reference of fiber's low-loss character, the fiber-preform project is chosen as optimization means. According to the singlemode conditions, the width and thickness of rectangle waveguide can be calculated. The bend loss waveguide can decrease by means of introducing an offset at the junction of two waveguides and etching groove at the outside of bend waveguide. In this article intersection waveguide is designed to reduce the difficulty of coupling processing. Light in-and-out port coupled at opposite side is choosen for machining easiness in experiment.What's more, the edge-coupling technology being put forward to keep light transmit along the same rotary direction. An efficient means is introduced, which uses angle 45°to reflect the light to couple two waveguide at inside-end or outside-end, and outside-end coupling is chosen for processing convenience in the design. In experiment, the waveguide be fabricated by thick photoresist AZ4620, etched by RIE, When the angle of wafer and ion is set 85°, the angle of one sidewall can be etched almost 45°. It's benefit to design the coupling structure of MOG's spiral-ring waveguide.

  18. Love-Wave Biosensors Using Cross-Linked Polymer Waveguides on LiTaO{sub 3} Substrates

    SciTech Connect

    BENDER,FLORIAN; CERNOSEK,RICHARD W.; JOSSE,F.

    2000-07-13

    The design and performance of Love-wave sensors using cross-linked poly-(methyl methacrylate) waveguides of thickness of 0.3--3.2 {micro}m on LiTaO{sub 3} substrates are described. It is found that this layer-substrate combination provides sufficient waveguidance, and electrical isolation of the IDTs from the liquid environment to achieve low acoustic loss and distortion. In bio-sensing experiments, mass sensitivity up to 1,420 Hz/(ng/mm{sup 2}) is demonstrated.

  19. A Concept for the Development of Spatially Resolved Measurements for Soil Moisture with TEM Waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapteva, Yulia; Schmidt, Felix; Bumberger, Jan

    2014-05-01

    Soil water content plays a leading role in delimitating water and energy fluxes at the land surface and controlling groundwater recharging. The information about water content in the soil would be very useful in overcoming the challenge of managing water resources under conditions of increasing scarcity in Southern Europe and the Mediterranean region.For collecting data about the water content in soil, it is possible to use remote sensing and groundwater monitoring, built wireless sensor networks for water monitoring. Remote sensing provides a unique capability to get the information of soil moisture at global and regional scales. Wireless environmental sensor networks enable to connect local and regional-scale soil water content observations. There exist different ground based soil moisture measurement methods such as TDR, FDR, electromagnetic waves (EW), electrical and acoustic methods. Among these methods, the time domain reflectometry (TDR) is considered to be the most important and widely used electromagnetic approach. The special techniques for the reconstruction of the layered soil with TDR are based on differential equations in the time domain and numerical optimization algorithms. However, these techniques are time- consuming and suffering from some problems, like multiple reflections at the boundary surfaces. To overcome these limitations, frequency domain measurement (FDM) techniques could be used. With devices like vector network analyzers (VNA) the accuracy of the measurement itself and of the calibration can be improved. For field applicable methods the reflection coefficient is mathematically transformed in the time domain, which can be treated like TDR-data and the same information can be obtained. There are already existed some experiments using the frequency domain data directly as an input for inversion algorithms to find the spatial distribution of the soil parameters. The model that is used represents an exact solution of the Maxwell

  20. Acoustic transducer for acoustic microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T.; Chou, Ching H.

    1990-01-01

    A shear acoustic transducer-lens system in which a shear polarized piezoelectric material excites shear polarized waves at one end of a buffer rod having a lens at the other end which excites longitudinal waves in a coupling medium by mode conversion at selected locations on the lens.

  1. Acoustic transducer for acoustic microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Khuri-Yakub, B.T.; Chou, C.H.

    1990-03-20

    A shear acoustic transducer-lens system is described in which a shear polarized piezoelectric material excites shear polarized waves at one end of a buffer rod having a lens at the other end which excites longitudinal waves in a coupling medium by mode conversion at selected locations on the lens. 9 figs.

  2. Acoustic beam splitting at low GHz frequencies in a defect-free phononic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yuning; Brick, Delia; Großmann, Martin; Hettich, Mike; Dekorsy, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    The directional waveguiding in a 2D phononic crystal is simulated based on the analysis of equifrequency contours. This approach is utilized to investigate acoustic beam splitting in a defect-free nanostructure in the low GHz range. We find relaxed limitations regarding the source parameters compared to similar approaches in the sonic regime. Finally, we discuss the possibility to design an acoustic interferometer device at the nanoscale at GHz frequencies.

  3. A passively tunable acoustic metamaterial lens for selective ultrasonic excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, H.; Semperlotti, F.

    2014-09-07

    In this paper, we present an approach to ultrasonic beam-forming and beam-steering in structures based on the concept of embedded acoustic metamaterial lenses. The lens design exploits the principle of acoustic drop-channel that enables the dynamic coupling of multiple ultrasonic waveguides at selected frequencies. In contrast with currently available technology, the embedded lens allows exploiting the host structure as a key component of the transducer system therefore enabling directional excitation by means of a single ultrasonic transducer. The design and the performance of the lens are numerically investigated by using Plane Wave Expansion and Finite Difference Time Domain techniques applied to bulk structures. Then, the design is experimentally validated on a thin aluminum plate waveguide where the lens is implemented by through-holes. The dynamic response of the embedded lens is estimated by reconstructing, via Laser Vibrometry, the velocity field induced by a single source located at the center of the lens.

  4. Remote Sensing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Richard S., Jr.; Southworth, C. Scott

    1983-01-01

    The Landsat Program became the major event of 1982 in geological remote sensing with the successful launch of Landsat 4. Other 1982 remote sensing accomplishments, research, publications, (including a set of Landsat worldwide reference system index maps), and conferences are highlighted. (JN)

  5. Broadband evolution of phononic-crystal-waveguide eigenstates in real- and k-spaces.

    PubMed

    Otsuka, P H; Nanri, K; Matsuda, O; Tomoda, M; Profunser, D M; Veres, I A; Danworaphong, S; Khelif, A; Benchabane, S; Laude, V; Wright, O B

    2013-11-27

    Control of sound in phononic band-gap structures promises novel control and guiding mechanisms. Designs in photonic systems were quickly matched in phononics, and rows of defects in phononic crystals were shown to guide sound waves effectively. The vast majority of work in such phononic guiding has been in the frequency domain, because of the importance of the phononic dispersion relation in governing acoustic confinement in waveguides. However, frequency-domain studies miss vital information concerning the phase of the acoustic field and eigenstate coupling. Using a wide range of wavevectors k, we implement an ultrafast technique to probe the wave field evolution in straight and L-shaped phononic crystal surface-phonon waveguides in real- and k-space in two spatial dimensions, thus revealing the eigenstate-energy redistribution processes and the coupling between different frequency-degenerate eigenstates. Such use of k-t space is a first in acoustics, and should have other interesting applications such as acoustic-metamaterial characterization.

  6. Wideband unbalanced waveguide power dividers and combiners

    SciTech Connect

    Halligan, Matthew; McDonald, Jacob Jeremiah; Strassner, II, Bernd H.

    2016-05-17

    The various technologies presented herein relate to waveguide dividers and waveguide combiners for application in radar systems, wireless communications, etc. Waveguide dividers-combiners can be manufactured in accordance with custom dimensions, as well as in accordance with waveguide standards such that the input and output ports are of a defined dimension and have a common impedance. Various embodiments are presented which can incorporate one or more septum(s), one or more pairs of septums, an iris, an input matching region, a notch located on the input waveguide arm, waveguide arms having stepped transformer regions, etc. The various divider configurations presented herein can be utilized in high fractional bandwidth applications, e.g., a fractional bandwidth of about 30%, and RF applications in the Ka frequency band (e.g., 26.5-40 GHz).

  7. Flattened dispersion in silicon slot waveguides.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lin; Yue, Yang; Beausoleil, Raymond G; Willner, Alan E

    2010-09-13

    We propose a silicon strip/slot hybrid waveguide that produces flattened dispersion of 0 ± 16 ps/(nm∙km), over a 553-nm wavelength range, which is 20 times flatter than previous results. Different from previously reported slot waveguides, the strip/slot hybrid waveguide employs the mode transition from a strip mode to a slot mode to introduce unique waveguide dispersion. The flat dispersion profile is featured by three zero-dispersion wavelengths, which is obtained for the first time in on-chip silicon waveguides, to the best of our knowledge. The waveguide exhibits flattened dispersion from 1562-nm to 2115-nm wavelength, which is potentially useful for both telecom and mid-infrared applications.

  8. Plasmonic coaxial waveguide-cavity devices.

    PubMed

    Mahigir, Amirreza; Dastmalchi, Pouya; Shin, Wonseok; Fan, Shanhui; Veronis, Georgios

    2015-08-10

    We theoretically investigate three-dimensional plasmonic waveguide-cavity structures, built by side-coupling stub resonators that consist of plasmonic coaxial waveguides of finite length, to a plasmonic coaxial waveguide. The resonators are terminated either in a short or an open circuit. We show that the properties of these waveguide-cavity systems can be accurately described using a single-mode scattering matrix theory. We also show that, with proper choice of their design parameters, three-dimensional plasmonic coaxial waveguide-cavity devices and two-dimensional metal-dielectric-metal devices can have nearly identical transmission spectra. Thus, three-dimensional plasmonic coaxial waveguides offer a platform for practical implementation of two-dimensional metal-dielectric-metal device designs.

  9. Synchronized photonic modulators driven by surface acoustic waves.

    PubMed

    Crespo-Poveda, A; Hey, R; Biermann, K; Tahraoui, A; Santos, P V; Gargallo, B; Muñoz, P; Cantarero, A; de Lima, M M

    2013-09-09

    Photonic modulators are one of the most important elements of integrated photonics. We have designed, fabricated, and characterized a tunable photonic modulator consisting of two 180°-dephased output waveguide channels, driven by a surface acoustic wave in the GHz frequency range built on (Al,Ga)As. Odd multiples of the fundamental driven frequency are enabled by adjusting the applied acoustic power. A good agreement between theory and experimental results is achieved. The device can be used as a building block for more complex integrated functionalities and can be implemented in several material platforms.

  10. Acoustic response of a rectangular levitator with orifices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Raheb, Michael; Wagner, Paul

    1990-01-01

    The acoustic response of a rectangular cavity to speaker-generated excitation through waveguides terminating at orifices in the cavity walls is analyzed. To find the effects of orifices, acoustic pressure is expressed by eigenfunctions satisfying Neumann boundary conditions as well as by those satisfying Dirichlet ones. Some of the excess unknowns can be eliminated by point constraints set over the boundary, by appeal to Lagrange undetermined multipliers. The resulting transfer matrix must be further reduced by partial condensation to the order of a matrix describing unmixed boundary conditions. If the cavity is subjected to an axial temperature dependence, the transfer matrix is determined numerically.

  11. Dynamic Weakening by Acoustic Fluidization during Stick-Slip Motion.

    PubMed

    Giacco, F; Saggese, L; de Arcangelis, L; Lippiello, E; Pica Ciamarra, M

    2015-09-18

    The unexpected weakness of some faults has been attributed to the emergence of acoustic waves that promote failure by reducing the confining pressure through a mechanism known as acoustic fluidization, also proposed to explain earthquake remote triggering. Here we validate this mechanism via the numerical investigation of a granular fault model system. We find that the stick-slip dynamics is affected only by perturbations applied at a characteristic frequency corresponding to oscillations normal to the fault, leading to gradual dynamical weakening as failure is approaching. Acoustic waves at the same frequency spontaneously emerge at the onset of failure in the absence of perturbations, supporting the relevance of acoustic fluidization in earthquake triggering.

  12. Acoustic chaos

    SciTech Connect

    Lauterborn, W.; Parlitz, U.; Holzfuss, J.; Billo, A.; Akhatov, I.

    1996-06-01

    Acoustic cavitation, a complex, spatio-temporal dynamical system, is investigated with respect to its chaotic properties. The sound output, the {open_quote}{open_quote}noise{close_quote}{close_quote}, is subjected to time series analysis. The spatial dynamics of the bubble filaments is captured by high speed holographic cinematography and subsequent digital picture processing from the holograms. Theoretical models are put forward for describing the pattern formation. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  13. Medical Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beach, Kirk W.; Dunmire, Barbrina

    Medical acoustics can be subdivided into diagnostics and therapy. Diagnostics are further separated into auditory and ultrasonic methods, and both employ low amplitudes. Therapy (excluding medical advice) uses ultrasound for heating, cooking, permeablizing, activating and fracturing tissues and structures within the body, usually at much higher amplitudes than in diagnostics. Because ultrasound is a wave, linear wave physics are generally applicable, but recently nonlinear effects have become more important, even in low-intensity diagnostic applications.

  14. High Frequency Acoustic Reflection and Transmission in Ocean Sediments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    scattering in ocean environments with special emphasis on propagation in shallow water waveguides and scattering from ocean sediments. 3 ) Development of...TYPE 3 . DATES COVERED 00-00-2011 to 00-00-2011 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE High Frequency Acoustic Reflection and Transmission in Ocean Sediments...REPORT unclassified b. ABSTRACT unclassified c. THIS PAGE unclassified Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 2 3

  15. Sonobuoy-Based Acoustic Characterization of Shallow-Water Environments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-30

    obtaining the laterally varying, acoustic properties of the waveguide [2-7]. The experimental configuration consists of a moored, drifting , or towed...source, with GPS navigation, transmitting signals to a field of several freely drifting buoys, each containing a hydrophone, GPS navigation, and radio...buoy, thereby enabling the determination of the positions of the buoys relative to the ship with submeter accuracy [8,9]. In this manner, the drifting

  16. Acoustic temperature profile measurement technique for large combustion chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkateshan, S. P.; Shakkottai, P.; Kwack, E. Y.; Back, L. H.

    1989-01-01

    Measurement of times of flight of sound waves can be used to determine temperatures in a gas. This paper describes a system, based on this principle, that is capable of giving the temperature profile in a nonisothermal gas volume, for example, prevalent in a large furnace. The apparatus is simple, rugged, accurate, and capable of being automated for process control applications. It is basically an acoustic waveguide where the outside temperature profile is transferred to a chosen gas contained inside the guide.

  17. Digital waveguide adiabatic passage part 1: theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaitkus, Jesse A.; Steel, M. J.; Greentree, Andrew D.

    2017-03-01

    Spatial adiabatic passage represents a new way to design integrated photonic devices. In conventional adiabatic passage designs require smoothly varying waveguide separations. Here we show modelling of adiabatic passage devices where the waveguide separation is varied digitally. Despite digitisation, our designs show robustness against variations in the input wavelength and refractive index contrast of the waveguides relative to the cladding. This approach to spatial adiabatic passage opens new design strategies and hence the potential for new photonics devices.

  18. Shift multiplexing by planar waveguide referencing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Tao; Zhang, Jiasen; Yan, Lifen; Gong, Qihuang

    2005-09-01

    We present a new method with which to implement shift multiplexing by planar waveguide referencing. In this method, a planar waveguide is used to steer the reference beam, and we implement shift multiplexing by shifting the recording medium. A spatial selectivity as high as 1.1 μm is obtained. By using waveguide referencing we can make a compact and simple holographic system.

  19. Dispersion Characteristics of a Dielectric Loaded Waveguide,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-07-30

    NATIONAL BUREAU OF STANOAODS-1963-A ., ’I A NSWC TR 84-338 00 In ’DISPERSION CHARACTERISTICS OF A SDIELECTRIC LOADED WAVEGUIDE By H. CROSBY J. CHOE Y...4. TITLE (and Subtitle) S. TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVERED DISPERSION CHARACTERISTICS OF A DIELECTRIC LOADED WAVEGUIDE S. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES S. KEY WORDS (Continue on reverse aide it necessary and Identify by block number) Dielectric Loaded Waveguide ) " Resonant Cavity) a

  20. Optical fiber having wave-guiding rings

    DOEpatents

    Messerly, Michael J.; Dawson, Jay W.; Beach, Raymond J.; Barty, Christopher P. J.

    2011-03-15

    A waveguide includes a cladding region that has a refractive index that is substantially uniform and surrounds a wave-guiding region that has an average index that is close to the index of the cladding. The wave-guiding region also contains a thin ring or series of rings that have an index or indices that differ significantly from the index of the cladding. The ring or rings enable the structure to guide light.

  1. Constitutive Parameter Measurement Using Double Ridge Waveguide

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    CONSTITUTIVE PARAMETER MEASUREMENT USING DOUBLE RIDGE WAVEGUIDE THESIS Nathan J. Lehman, Captain, USAF AFIT-ENG-13-M-30 DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE...copyright protection in the United States. AFIT-ENG-13-M-30 CONSTITUTIVE PARAMETER MEASUREMENT USING DOUBLE RIDGE WAVEGUIDE THESIS Presented to the Faculty...PARAMETER MEASUREMENT USING DOUBLE RIDGE WAVEGUIDE Nathan J. Lehman, B.S.E.E. Captain, USAF Approved: Michael Havrilla, PhD (Chairman) Maj Milo Hyde, PhD

  2. Analysis of piezoelectric ultrasonic transducers attached to waveguides using waveguide finite elements.

    PubMed

    Loveday, Philip W

    2007-10-01

    A finite-element modeling procedure for computing the frequency response of piezoelectric transducers attached to infinite constant cross-section waveguides, as encountered in guided wave ultrasonic inspection, is presented. Two-dimensional waveguide finite elements are used to model the waveguide. Conventional three-dimensional finite elements are used to model the piezoelectric transducer. The harmonic forced response of the waveguide is used to obtain a dynamic stiffness matrix (complex and frequency dependent), which represents the waveguide in the transducer model. The electrical and mechanical frequency response of the transducer, attached to the waveguide, can then be computed. The forces applied to the waveguide are calculated and are used to determine the amplitude of each mode excited in the waveguide. The method is highly efficient compared to time integration of a conventional finite-element model of a length of waveguide. In addition, the method provides information about each mode that is excited in the waveguide. The method is demonstrated by modeling a sandwich piezoelectric transducer exciting a waveguide of rectangular cross section, although it could be applied to more complex situations. It is expected that the modeling method will be useful during the optimization of piezoelectric transducers for exciting specific wave propagation modes in waveguides.

  3. Ground-slot waveguide laser

    SciTech Connect

    Chenausky, P.; Drinkwater, E.H.; Laughman, L.M.

    1985-03-18

    A method of fabricating CO/sub 2/ waveguide-type lasers of the type comprising a slot formed in a broad surface of a hard ceramic material, comprising grinding the slot in a conventional surface grinding machine in two steps. The first step utilizes a coarse grinding wheel and the second a finer grinding wheel. The resultant laser cavity can produce high optical-power output when provided with RF excitation.

  4. Fluorescent immunosensors using planar waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herron, James N.; Caldwell, Karin D.; Christensen, Douglas A.; Dyer, Shellee; Hlady, Vladimir; Huang, P.; Janatova, V.; Wang, Hiabo K.; Wei, A. P.

    1993-05-01

    The goal of our research program is to develop competitive and sandwich fluoroimmunoassays with high sensitivity and fast response time, that do not require external reagents. Our approach to this problem is to employ an optical immunoassay based on total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF). Specifically, monoclonal antibodies are immobilized on a planar waveguide. Total internal reflection of light in the planar waveguide sets up an evanescent field which extends about 2000 angstroms from the interface. In the competitive immunoassay, a fluorescent label is coupled to a small synthetic antigen which is packaged with the antibody. In the absence of analyte, the fluorescently labeled antigen binds to the antibody and is excited by the evanescent field. Upon the addition of analyte, the fluorescently labeled antigen molecules are displaced by unlabeled antigen molecules and diffuse out of the evanescent field. In the sandwich assay, a primary or `capture' antibody is immobilized on the planar waveguide, and a secondary or `tracer' antibody (which is labeled with a fluorescent dye) is added to the bulk solution. In the absence of analyte, the tracer antibody remains in solution and very little fluorescence is observed. However, upon addition of analyte, a `molecular sandwich' is formed on the waveguide, composed of: (1) the capture antibody; (2) the analyte; and (3) the tracer antibody. Once this sandwich forms, the tracer antibody is within the evanescent field and fluoresces. Fluorescence emission is detected by a charged- coupled device (CCD). Using this approach, we have developed a prototype immunosensor for the detection of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG). This device meets our design goals and exhibits a sensitivity of 0.1 - 1 pmolar.

  5. RF window assembly comprising a ceramic disk disposed within a cylindrical waveguide which is connected to rectangular waveguides through elliptical joints

    SciTech Connect

    Tantawi, Sami G.; Dolgashev, Valery A.; Yeremian, Anahid D.

    2016-03-15

    A high-power microwave RF window is provided that includes a cylindrical waveguide, where the cylindrical waveguide includes a ceramic disk concentrically housed in a central region of the cylindrical waveguide, a first rectangular waveguide, where the first rectangular waveguide is connected by a first elliptical joint to a proximal end of the cylindrical waveguide, and a second rectangular waveguide, where the second rectangular waveguide is connected by a second elliptical joint to a distal end of the cylindrical waveguide.

  6. Acoustic dose and acoustic dose-rate.

    PubMed

    Duck, Francis

    2009-10-01

    Acoustic dose is defined as the energy deposited by absorption of an acoustic wave per unit mass of the medium supporting the wave. Expressions for acoustic dose and acoustic dose-rate are given for plane-wave conditions, including temporal and frequency dependencies of energy deposition. The relationship between the acoustic dose-rate and the resulting temperature increase is explored, as is the relationship between acoustic dose-rate and radiation force. Energy transfer from the wave to the medium by means of acoustic cavitation is considered, and an approach is proposed in principle that could allow cavitation to be included within the proposed definitions of acoustic dose and acoustic dose-rate.

  7. Acoustic energy transmission in cast iron pipelines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiziroglou, Michail E.; Boyle, David E.; Wright, Steven W.; Yeatman, Eric M.

    2015-12-01

    In this paper we propose acoustic power transfer as a method for the remote powering of pipeline sensor nodes. A theoretical framework of acoustic power propagation in the ceramic transducers and the metal structures is drawn, based on the Mason equivalent circuit. The effect of mounting on the electrical response of piezoelectric transducers is studied experimentally. Using two identical transducer structures, power transmission of 0.33 mW through a 1 m long, 118 mm diameter cast iron pipe, with 8 mm wall thickness is demonstrated, at 1 V received voltage amplitude. A near-linear relationship between input and output voltage is observed. These results show that it is possible to deliver significant power to sensor nodes through acoustic waves in solid structures. The proposed method may enable the implementation of acoustic - powered wireless sensor nodes for structural and operation monitoring of pipeline infrastructure.

  8. Acoustic Tooth Cleaner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyman, J. S.

    1984-01-01

    Acoustically-energized water jet aids in plaque breakdown. Acoustic Wand includes acoustic transducer 1/4 wave plate, and tapered cone. Together elements energize solution of water containing mild abrasive injected into mouth to help prevent calculous buildup.

  9. Arrays of Carbon Nanotubes as RF Filters in Waveguides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoppe, Daniel; Hunt, Brian; Hoenk, Michael; Noca, Flavio; Xu, Jimmy

    2003-01-01

    Brushlike arrays of carbon nanotubes embedded in microstrip waveguides provide highly efficient (high-Q) mechanical resonators that will enable ultraminiature radio-frequency (RF) integrated circuits. In its basic form, this invention is an RF filter based on a carbon nanotube array embedded in a microstrip (or coplanar) waveguide, as shown in Figure 1. In addition, arrays of these nanotube-based RF filters can be used as an RF filter bank. Applications of this new nanotube array device include a variety of communications and signal-processing technologies. High-Q resonators are essential for stable, low-noise communications, and radar applications. Mechanical oscillators can exhibit orders of magnitude higher Qs than electronic resonant circuits, which are limited by resistive losses. This has motivated the development of a variety of mechanical resonators, including bulk acoustic wave (BAW) resonators, surface acoustic wave (SAW) resonators, and Si and SiC micromachined resonators (known as microelectromechanical systems or MEMS). There is also a strong push to extend the resonant frequencies of these oscillators into the GHz regime of state-of-the-art electronics. Unfortunately, the BAW and SAW devices tend to be large and are not easily integrated into electronic circuits. MEMS structures have been integrated into circuits, but efforts to extend MEMS resonant frequencies into the GHz regime have been difficult because of scaling problems with the capacitively-coupled drive and readout. In contrast, the proposed devices would be much smaller and hence could be more readily incorporated into advanced RF (more specifically, microwave) integrated circuits.

  10. Single-mode interface states in heterostructure waveguides with Bragg and non-Bragg gaps

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Ya-Xian; Sang, Tang-Qing; Liu, Ting; Xu, Lan-Lan; Tao, Zhi-Yong

    2017-01-01

    Interface states can always arise in heterostructures that consist of two or more (artificial) materials with topologically different energy bands. The gapped band structure can be classified by the Chern number (a topological invariant) generally or the Zak phase in one-dimensional periodic systems. Recently, topological properties have been employed to investigate the interface states occurring at the connecting regions of the heterostructures of mechanical isostatic lattices and acoustical waveguides. Here, we study this heterostructure phenomenon by carefully connecting two corrugated stainless steel waveguides with Bragg and non-Bragg gaps at approximately the same frequency. These two waveguide structures can be achieved by continuously varying their geometry parameters when a topological transition exists in the forbidden bands, in which the reflection impedance changes the sign. Furthermore, a localized single high-order mode has been observed at the interface because of the transverse mode interactions, which relate to the non-Bragg gaps created by the different transverse mode resonances. Such a localized acoustic single mode with very large enhanced intensity could find its applications in sound detection, biomedical imaging, and underwater sound control, and could also enrich our means of wave front manipulations in various engineering fields. PMID:28287173

  11. Single-mode interface states in heterostructure waveguides with Bragg and non-Bragg gaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Ya-Xian; Sang, Tang-Qing; Liu, Ting; Xu, Lan-Lan; Tao, Zhi-Yong

    2017-03-01

    Interface states can always arise in heterostructures that consist of two or more (artificial) materials with topologically different energy bands. The gapped band structure can be classified by the Chern number (a topological invariant) generally or the Zak phase in one-dimensional periodic systems. Recently, topological properties have been employed to investigate the interface states occurring at the connecting regions of the heterostructures of mechanical isostatic lattices and acoustical waveguides. Here, we study this heterostructure phenomenon by carefully connecting two corrugated stainless steel waveguides with Bragg and non-Bragg gaps at approximately the same frequency. These two waveguide structures can be achieved by continuously varying their geometry parameters when a topological transition exists in the forbidden bands, in which the reflection impedance changes the sign. Furthermore, a localized single high-order mode has been observed at the interface because of the transverse mode interactions, which relate to the non-Bragg gaps created by the different transverse mode resonances. Such a localized acoustic single mode with very large enhanced intensity could find its applications in sound detection, biomedical imaging, and underwater sound control, and could also enrich our means of wave front manipulations in various engineering fields.

  12. Scalar Product in the Space of Waveguide Modes of an Open Planar Waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sevastianov, A. L.; Sevastianov, L. A.; Tiutiunnik, A. A.; Nikolaev, N. E.

    2016-02-01

    To implement the method of adiabatic waveguide modes for modeling the propagation of polarized monochromatic electromagnetic radiation in irregular integrated optics structures it is necessary to expand the desired solution in basic adiabatic waveguide modes. This expansion requires the use of the scalar product in the space of waveguide vector fields of integrated optics waveguide. This work solves the first stage of this problem - the construction of the scalar product in the space of vector solutions of the eigenmode problem (classical and generalized) waveguide modes of an open planar waveguide. In constructing the mentioned sesquilinear form, we used the Lorentz reciprocity principle of waveguide modes and tensor form of the Ostrogradsky-Gauss theorem.

  13. An overview of acoustic telemetry

    SciTech Connect

    Drumheller, D.S.

    1992-01-01

    Acoustic telemetry has been a dream of the drilling industry for the past 50 years. It offers the promise of data rates which are one-hundred times greater than existing technology. Such a system would open the door to true logging-while-drilling technology and bring enormous profits to its developers. The basic idea is to produce an encoded sound wave at the bottom of the well, let it propagate up the steel drillpipe, and extract the data from the signal at the surface. Unfortunately, substantial difficulties arise. The first difficult problem is to produce the sound wave. Since the most promising transmission wavelengths are about 20 feet, normal transducer efficiencies are quire low. Compounding this problem is the structural complexity of the bottomhole assembly and drillstring. For example, the acoustic impedance of the drillstring changes every 30 feet and produces an unusual scattering pattern in the acoustic transmission. This scattering pattern causes distortion of the signal and is often confused with signal attenuation. These problems are not intractable. Recent work has demonstrated that broad frequency bands exist which are capable of transmitting data at rates up to 100 bits per second. Our work has also identified the mechanism which is responsible for the observed anomalies in the patterns of signal attenuation. Furthermore in the past few years a body of experience has been developed in designing more efficient transducers for application to metal waveguides. The direction of future work is clear. New transducer designs which are more efficient and compatible with existing downhole power supplies need to be built and tested; existing field test data need to be analyzed for transmission bandwidth and attenuation; and the new and less expensive methods of collecting data on transmission path quality need to be incorporated into this effort. 11 refs.

  14. Waveguide tapering for beam-width control in a waveguide transducer.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Young Eui; Jeon, Hyun Joong; Kim, Hoe Woong; Kim, Yoon Young

    2014-03-01

    In a waveguide transducer that transmits an ultrasonic wave through a waveguide unit to a test structure, it is most preferred to send a non-dispersive ultrasonic wave of a narrow beam width. However, there is an unresolved conflict between the generation of the non- or less-dispersive wave and the transmission of a narrow-beam wave into a test structure. Among others, the thickness of the waveguide unit in a waveguide transducer is the key variable determining these two conflicting criteria, but the use of a uniformly-thick waveguide of any thickness cannot fulfill the two conflicting criteria simultaneously. In this study, we propose a specially-engineered tapered waveguide unit for the simultaneous satisfaction. An excitation unit is installed at the end of the thin region of the tapered waveguide and generates only the lowest non-dispersive shear-horizontal wave. Then the generated wave propagates through the tapered region of the waveguide unit and reaches the thick region of the waveguide with insignificant mode conversion to higher modes. If the tapered waveguide is used, the surviving lowest mode in the thick region of the waveguide is shown to carry most of the transmitted power and is finally propagated into a test structure. Because the beam size of the propagated wave and the thickness of the contacting waveguide region are inversely related, the thick contacting region of the tapered waveguide ensures narrow beam width. Numerical and experimental investigations were performed to check the effectiveness of the proposed waveguide-tapering approach.

  15. Cooling Waveguide Flanges in Microwave Transmitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, B. C.; Hartop, R. W.

    1984-01-01

    Flang appendage circulates coolant for conductive heat removal. Flange appendage bore accomodates coolant tube. O-ring surrounds bore; when adjacent waveguide sections are bolted together, continuous conduit is formed for coolant. Pressure release groove in modified flange prevents coolant from entering waveguide should O'ring seal fail.

  16. Planar fluoride waveguides for amplifiers and lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Grishutkina, T E; Doroshenko, M E; Karasik, A Ya; Konyushkin, V A; Konyushkin, D V; Nakladov, A N; Osiko, V V; Tsvetkov, V B

    2015-08-31

    We have produced planar optical waveguides having a crystalline CaF{sub 2} – YF{sub 3} – NdF{sub 3} mixed yttrofluorite core and two reflective claddings in order to improve waveguide excitation efficiency. Under diode pumping, lasing has been achieved at a wavelength of 1064 nm with a slope efficiency near 15%. (lasers)

  17. Waveguide Transition for Submillimeter-Wave MMICs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leong, Kevin M.; Deal, William R.; Radisic, Vesna; Mei, Xiaobing; Uyeda, Jansen; Lai, Richard; Fung, King Man; Gaier, Todd C.

    2009-01-01

    An integrated waveguide-to-MMIC (monolithic microwave integrated circuit) chip operating in the 300-GHz range is designed to operate well on high-permittivity semiconductor substrates typical for an MMIC amplifier, and allows a wider MMIC substrate to be used, enabling integration with larger MMICs (power amplifiers). The waveguide-to- CBCPW (conductor-backed coplanar waveguide) transition topology is based on an integrated dipole placed in the E-plane of the waveguide module. It demonstrates low loss and good impedance matching. Measurement and simulation demonstrate that the loss of the transition and waveguide loss is less than 1-dB over a 340-to-380-GHz bandwidth. A transition is inserted along the propagation direction of the waveguide. This transition uses a planar dipole aligned with the maximum E-field of the TE10 waveguide mode as an inter face between the waveguide and the MMIC. Mode conversion between the coplanar striplines (CPS) that feed the dipole and the CBCPW transmission line is accomplished using a simple air-bridge structure. The bottom side ground plane is truncated at the same reference as the top-side ground plane, leaving the end of the MMIC suspended in air.

  18. High temperature pressure coupled ultrasonic waveguide

    DOEpatents

    Caines, Michael J.

    1983-01-01

    A pressure coupled ultrasonic waveguide is provided to which one end may be attached a transducer and at the other end a high temperature material for continuous ultrasonic testing of the material. The ultrasonic signal is coupled from the waveguide into the material through a thin, dry copper foil.

  19. Capillary waveguide optrodes for Medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kieslinger, Dietmar; Weigl, Bernhard H.; Draxler, Sonja; Lippitsch, Max E.

    1997-01-01

    Glass capillaries with a chemically sensitive coating on the inner surface are used as optical sensors for medical diagnostics. The capillary simultaneously serves as a sample compartment, a sensor element, and an inhomogeneous optical waveguide. Different optical setups have been investigated and compared regarding its waveguiding properties.

  20. Acoustic iridescence.

    PubMed

    Cox, Trevor J

    2011-03-01

    An investigation has been undertaken into acoustic iridescence, exploring how a device can be constructed which alter sound waves, in a similar way to structures in nature that act on light to produce optical iridescence. The main construction had many thin perforated sheets spaced half a wavelength apart for a specified design frequency. The sheets create the necessary impedance discontinuities to create backscattered waves, which then interfere to create strongly reflected sound at certain frequencies. Predictions and measurements show a set of harmonics, evenly spaced in frequency, for which sound is reflected strongly. And the frequency of these harmonics increases as the angle of observation gets larger, mimicking the iridescence seen in natural optical systems. Similar to optical systems, the reflections become weaker for oblique angles of reflection. A second construction was briefly examined which exploited a metamaterial made from elements and inclusions which were much smaller than the wavelength. Boundary element method predictions confirmed the potential for creating acoustic iridescence from layers of such a material.

  1. Acoustic transducer

    DOEpatents

    Drumheller, D.S.

    1997-12-30

    An acoustic transducer is described comprising a one-piece hollow mandrel into the outer surface of which is formed a recess with sides perpendicular to the central axis of the mandrel and separated by a first distance and with a bottom parallel to the central axis and within which recess are a plurality of washer-shaped discs of a piezoelectric material and at least one disc of a temperature-compensating material with the discs being captured between the sides of the recess in a pre-stressed interference fit, typically at 2,000 psi of compressive stress. The transducer also includes a power supply and means to connect to a measurement device. The transducer is intended to be used for telemetry between a measurement device located downhole in an oil or gas well and the surface. The transducer is of an construction that is stronger with fewer joints that could leak fluids into the recess holding the piezoelectric elements than is found in previous acoustic transducers. 4 figs.

  2. Acoustic transducer

    DOEpatents

    Drumheller, Douglas S.

    1997-01-01

    An acoustic transducer comprising a one-piece hollow mandrel into the outer surface of which is formed a recess with sides perpendicular to the central axis of the mandrel and separated by a first distance and with a bottom parallel to the central axis and within which recess are a plurality of washer-shaped discs of a piezoelectric material and at least one disc of a temperature-compensating material with the discs being captured between the sides of the recess in a pre-stressed interference fit, typically at 2000 psi of compressive stress. The transducer also includes a power supply and means to connect to a measurement device. The transducer is intended to be used for telemetry between a measurement device located downhole in an oil or gas well and the surface. The transducer is of an construction that is stronger with fewer joints that could leak fluids into the recess holding the piezoelectric elements than is found in previous acoustic transducers.

  3. Waveguide Calibrator for Multi-Element Probe Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sommerfeldt, Scott D.; Blotter, Jonathan D.

    2007-01-01

    A calibrator, referred to as the spider design, can be used to calibrate probes incorporating multiple acoustic sensing elements. The application is an acoustic energy density probe, although the calibrator can be used for other types of acoustic probes. The calibrator relies on the use of acoustic waveguide technology to produce the same acoustic field at each of the sensing elements. As a result, the sensing elements can be separated from each other, but still calibrated through use of the acoustic waveguides. Standard calibration techniques involve placement of an individual microphone into a small cavity with a known, uniform pressure to perform the calibration. If a cavity is manufactured with sufficient size to insert the energy density probe, it has been found that a uniform pressure field can only be created at very low frequencies, due to the size of the probe. The size of the energy density probe prevents one from having the same pressure at each microphone in a cavity, due to the wave effects. The "spider" design probe is effective in calibrating multiple microphones separated from each other. The spider design ensures that the same wave effects exist for each microphone, each with an indivdual sound path. The calibrator s speaker is mounted at one end of a 14-cm-long and 4.1-cm diameter small plane-wave tube. This length was chosen so that the first evanescent cross mode of the plane-wave tube would be attenuated by about 90 dB, thus leaving just the plane wave at the termination plane of the tube. The tube terminates with a small, acrylic plate with five holes placed symmetrically about the axis of the speaker. Four ports are included for the four microphones on the probe. The fifth port is included for the pre-calibrated reference microphone. The ports in the acrylic plate are in turn connected to the probe sensing elements via flexible PVC tubes. These five tubes are the same length, so the acoustic wave effects are the same in each tube. The

  4. On-chip plasmonic waveguide optical waveplate

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Linfei; Huo, Yijie; Zang, Kai; Paik, Seonghyun; Chen, Yusi; Harris, James S.; Zhou, Zhiping

    2015-01-01

    Polarization manipulation is essential in almost every photonic system ranging from telecommunications to bio-sensing to quantum information. This is traditionally achieved using bulk waveplates. With the developing trend of photonic systems towards integration and miniaturization, the need for an on-chip waveguide type waveplate becomes extremely urgent. However, this is very challenging using conventional dielectric waveguides, which usually require complex 3D geometries to alter the waveguide symmetry and are also difficult to create an arbitrary optical axis. Recently, a waveguide waveplate was realized using femtosecond laser writing, but the device length is in millimeter range. Here, for the first time we propose and experimentally demonstrate an ultracompact, on-chip waveplate using an asymmetric hybrid plasmonic waveguide to create an arbitrary optical axis. The device is only in several microns length and produced in a flexible integratable IC compatible format, thus opening up the potential for integration into a broad range of systems. PMID:26507563

  5. Light propagation in periodically modulated complex waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nixon, Sean; Yang, Jianke

    2015-03-01

    Light propagation in optical waveguides with periodically modulated index of refraction and alternating gain and loss are investigated for linear and nonlinear systems. Based on a multiscale perturbation analysis, it is shown that for many non-parity-time- (PT -) symmetric waveguides, their linear spectrum is partially complex; thus light exponentially grows or decays upon propagation, and this growth or decay is not altered by nonlinearity. However, several classes of non-PT -symmetric waveguides are also identified to possess all-real linear spectrum. For PT -symmetric waveguides, phase transition is predicted analytically. In the nonlinear regime longitudinally periodic and transversely quasilocalized modes are found for PT -symmetric waveguides both above and below phase transition. These nonlinear modes are stable under evolution and can develop from initially weak initial conditions.

  6. Waveguide infrared spectrometer platform for point and standoff chemical sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chadha, Suneet; Henning, Pat; Landers, Frank; Weling, Ani

    2004-03-01

    Advanced autonomous detection of chemical warfare agents and toxic industrial chemicals has long been a major military concern. At present, our capability to rapidly assess the immediate environment is severely limited and our domestic infrastructure is burdened by the meticulous procedures required to rule out false threats. While significant advances have recently been accomplished in remote spectral sensing using rugged FTIRs and point detectors, efforts towards low cost chemical discrimination have been lacking. Foster-Miller has developed a unique waveguide spectrometer which is a paradigm shift from the conventional FTIR approach. The spectrometer provides spectral discrimination over the 3-14 μm range and will be the spectrometer platform for both active and passive detection. Foster-Miller has leveraged its innovations in infrared fiber-optic probes and the recent development of a waveguide spectrometer to build a novel infrared sensor platform for both point and stand-off chemical sensing. A monolithic wedge-grating optic provides the spectral dispersion with low cost thermopile point or array detectors picking off the diffracted wavelengths from the optic. The integrated optic provides spectral discrimination between 3-12 μm with resolution at 16 cm-1 or better and overall optical throughput approaching 35%. The device has a fixed cylindrical grating bonded to the edge of a ZnSe conditioning "wedge". The conditioning optic overcomes limitations of concave gratings as it accepts high angle (large FOV) light at the narrow end of the wedge and progressively conditions it to be near normal to the grating. On return, the diffracted wavelengths are concentrated on the discrete or array detector (pixel) elements by the wedge, providing throughput comparable to that of an FTIR. The waveguide spectrometer coupled to ATR probes, flow through liquid cells or multipass gas cells provides significant cost advantage over conventional sampling methodologies. We will

  7. Simultaneous realization of negative group velocity, fast and slow acoustic waves in a metamaterial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiao-juan; Xue, Cheng; Fan, Li; Zhang, Shu-yi; Chen, Zhe; Ding, Jin; Zhang, Hui

    2016-06-01

    An acoustic metamaterial is designed based on a simple and compact structure of one string of side pipes arranged along a waveguide, in which diverse group velocities are achieved. Owing to Fabry-Perot resonance of the side pipes, a negative phase time is achieved, and thus, acoustic waves transmitting with negative group velocities are produced near the resonant frequency. In addition, both fast and slow acoustic waves are also observed in the vicinity of the resonance frequency. The extraordinary group velocities can be explained based on spectral rephasing induced by anomalous dispersion on the analogy of Lorentz dispersion in electromagnetic waves.

  8. Hybrid grapheme plasmonic waveguide modulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansell, D.; Thackray, B. D.; Aznakayeva, D. E.; Thomas, P.; Auton, G. H.; Marshall, O. P.; Rodriguez, F. J.; Radko, I. P.; Han, Z.; Bozhevolnyi, S. I.; Grigorenko, A. N.

    2016-03-01

    The unique optical and electronic properties of graphene allow one to realize active optical devices. While several types of graphene-based photonic modulators have already been demonstrated, the potential of combining the versatility of graphene with sub-wavelength field confinement of plasmonic/metallic structures is not fully realized. Here we report fabrication and study of hybrid graphene-plasmonic modulators. We consider several types of modulators and identify the most promising one for light modulation at telecom and near-infrared. Our proof-of-concept results pave the way towards on-chip realization of efficient graphene-based active plasmonic waveguide devices for optical communications.

  9. Blue and Fin Whale Habitat Modeling from Long-Term Year-Round Passive Acoustic Data from the Southern California Bight

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-30

    Round Passive Acoustic Data from the Southern California Bight Ana Širović and John A. Hildebrand Scripps Institution of Oceanography UCSD 9500...passive acoustic and remotely sensed data available for the SCB. APPROACH Passive acoustic data have been collected using High-frequency Acoustic ...whale calls in the area of the SCB between 32° and 34° 20’ N from passive acoustic recordings collected year-round between 2006 and 2012 (Širović et

  10. Acoustic Propagation Modeling in Shallow Water Using Ray Theory.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westwood, Evan Kruse

    A ray method is developed for modeling acoustic propagation in low-frequency, shallow water ocean environments. The theoretical foundation is laid by studying the reflected and transmitted fields due to a point source in the presence of a plane, penetrable interface. Each field is expressed as a plane wave integral. The approach for solving the integral is based on the classical method of steepest descent, but the plane wave reflection and transmission coefficients are allowed to influence the location of the saddle points and their steepest descent paths. As a consequence, saddle points are, in general, complex, and complicated processes such as the reflected lateral wave field and the transmitted evanescent field are incorporated in the saddle point formulation. The saddle point criterion may be expressed in terms of eigenrays and their characteristics, providing physical insight into the paths and mechanisms of propagation. The method developed for solving the single interface problem is then applied to two simple models for shallow water ocean environments: the flat, isovelocity waveguide (the Pekeris model) and the sloping-bottom, isovelocity waveguide (the penetrable wedge). For the flat waveguide, near perfect agreement is found between the ray model and a model whose algorithm solves the wave equation numerically (the SAFARI fast field model). The ray method proves to be accurate even when the water depth is only half of the acoustic wavelength. For the sloping-bottom waveguide, ray model solutions to benchmark problems proposed by the Acoustical Society of America are compared to solutions from a model based on two-way coupled mode theory. For cases of upslope propagation in shallow-water penetrable wedges, agreement between the two independent models is excellent, both in the water and in the bottom. The ray method for the three-dimensional wedge problem is discussed, and the method is also extended to model directional sources by placing a point source

  11. Observation of acoustic Dirac-like cone and double zero refractive index

    PubMed Central

    Dubois, Marc; Shi, Chengzhi; Zhu, Xuefeng; Wang, Yuan; Zhang, Xiang

    2017-01-01

    Zero index materials where sound propagates without phase variation, holds a great potential for wavefront and dispersion engineering. Recently explored electromagnetic double zero index metamaterials consist of periodic scatterers whose refractive index is significantly larger than that of the surrounding medium. This requirement is fundamentally challenging for airborne acoustics because the sound speed (inversely proportional to the refractive index) in air is among the slowest. Here, we report the first experimental realization of an impedance matched acoustic double zero refractive index metamaterial induced by a Dirac-like cone at the Brillouin zone centre. This is achieved in a two-dimensional waveguide with periodically varying air channel that modulates the effective phase velocity of a high-order waveguide mode. Using such a zero-index medium, we demonstrated acoustic wave collimation emitted from a point source. For the first time, we experimentally confirm the existence of the Dirac-like cone at the Brillouin zone centre. PMID:28317927

  12. Observation of acoustic Dirac-like cone and double zero refractive index.

    PubMed

    Dubois, Marc; Shi, Chengzhi; Zhu, Xuefeng; Wang, Yuan; Zhang, Xiang

    2017-03-20

    Zero index materials where sound propagates without phase variation, holds a great potential for wavefront and dispersion engineering. Recently explored electromagnetic double zero index metamaterials consist of periodic scatterers whose refractive index is significantly larger than that of the surrounding medium. This requirement is fundamentally challenging for airborne acoustics because the sound speed (inversely proportional to the refractive index) in air is among the slowest. Here, we report the first experimental realization of an impedance matched acoustic double zero refractive index metamaterial induced by a Dirac-like cone at the Brillouin zone centre. This is achieved in a two-dimensional waveguide with periodically varying air channel that modulates the effective phase velocity of a high-order waveguide mode. Using such a zero-index medium, we demonstrated acoustic wave collimation emitted from a point source. For the first time, we experimentally confirm the existence of the Dirac-like cone at the Brillouin zone centre.

  13. Observation of acoustic Dirac-like cone and double zero refractive index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubois, Marc; Shi, Chengzhi; Zhu, Xuefeng; Wang, Yuan; Zhang, Xiang

    2017-03-01

    Zero index materials where sound propagates without phase variation, holds a great potential for wavefront and dispersion engineering. Recently explored electromagnetic double zero index metamaterials consist of periodic scatterers whose refractive index is significantly larger than that of the surrounding medium. This requirement is fundamentally challenging for airborne acoustics because the sound speed (inversely proportional to the refractive index) in air is among the slowest. Here, we report the first experimental realization of an impedance matched acoustic double zero refractive index metamaterial induced by a Dirac-like cone at the Brillouin zone centre. This is achieved in a two-dimensional waveguide with periodically varying air channel that modulates the effective phase velocity of a high-order waveguide mode. Using such a zero-index medium, we demonstrated acoustic wave collimation emitted from a point source. For the first time, we experimentally confirm the existence of the Dirac-like cone at the Brillouin zone centre.

  14. Subwavelength-Sized Narrow-Band Anechoic Waveguide Terminations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santillán, Arturo; Ćrenlund, Emil; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.

    2016-11-01

    We propose and demonstrate the use of a pair of detuned acoustic resonators to efficiently absorb narrow-band sound waves in a terminated waveguide. The suggested configuration is relatively simple and advantageous for usage at low frequencies, since the dimensions of the resonators are very small compared to the wavelength. We present a theoretical description based on lumped parameters to calculate the absorption coefficient, which agrees very well with experimental data. The experimental results verify that the anechoic (reflection approximately -38 dB ) narrow-band (Δ f /f ˜0.1 ) termination with deeply subwavelength (<λ /10 ) sizes can be realized at a target frequency, suggesting thereby applications for noise control and sensing. As an illustration of possible applications for sound absorption in a room, we demonstrate by use of numerical simulations that a given axial resonant excitation in a room can be practically eliminated. Thus, a reduction of approximately 24 dB in the average acoustic energy is achieved in the room when using only four Helmholtz resonators. We also discuss various scenarios of noise control in rooms.

  15. Ultralow loss cavities and waveguides scattering loss cancellation

    DOEpatents

    Rakich, Peter T

    2014-01-07

    A waveguide system includes a first waveguide having surface roughness along at least one surface and a second waveguide substantially identical to the first waveguide and having substantially identical surface roughness along a corresponding side. The first and second waveguides are separated from each other by a predermined distance and are configured to receive respective first and second light signals having antisymmetric modes. The predetermined distance between the first and second waveguide tends to cause cancellation of at least far-field polarization radiation emanating from the first and second waveguides and resulting from surface roughness.

  16. Acoustic cryocooler

    DOEpatents

    Swift, Gregory W.; Martin, Richard A.; Radenbaugh, Ray

    1990-01-01

    An acoustic cryocooler with no moving parts is formed from a thermoacoustic driver (TAD) driving a pulse tube refrigerator (PTR) through a standing wave tube. Thermoacoustic elements in the TAD are spaced apart a distance effective to accommodate the increased thermal penetration length arising from the relatively low TAD operating frequency in the range of 15-60 Hz. At these low operating frequencies, a long tube is required to support the standing wave. The tube may be coiled to reduce the overall length of the cryocooler. One or two PTR's are located on the standing wave tube adjacent antinodes in the standing wave to be driven by the standing wave pressure oscillations. It is predicted that a heat input of 1000 W at 1000 K will maintian a cooling load of 5 W at 80 K.

  17. Acoustic transducer

    DOEpatents

    Drumheller, Douglas S.

    2000-01-01

    An active acoustic transducer tool for use down-hole applications. The tool includes a single cylindrical mandrel including a shoulder defining the boundary of a narrowed portion over which is placed a sandwich-style piezoelectric tranducer assembly. The piezoelectric transducer assembly is prestressed by being placed in a thermal interference fit between the shoulder of the mandrel and the base of an anvil which is likewise positioned over the narrower portion of the mandrel. In the preferred embodiment, assembly of the tool is accomplished using a hydraulic jack to stretch the mandrel prior to emplacement of the cylindrical sandwich-style piezoelectric transducer assembly and anvil. After those elements are positioned and secured, the stretched mandrel is allowed to return substantially to its original (pre-stretch) dimensions with the result that the piezoelectric transducer elements are compressed between the anvil and the shoulder of the mandrel.

  18. Nondestructive Acoustic Imaging Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitz, Volker

    Acoustic imaging techniques are used in the field of nondestructive testing of technical components to measure defects such as lack of side wall fusion or cracks in welded joints. Data acquisition is performed by a remote-controlled manipulator and a PC for the mass storage of the high-frequency time-of-flight data at each probe position. The quality of the acoustic images and the interpretation relies on the proper understanding of the transmitted wave fronts and the arrangement of the probes in pulse-echo mode or in pitch-and-catch arrangement. The use of the Synthetic Aperture Focusing Technique allows the depth-dependent resolution to be replaced by a depth-independent resolution and the signal-to-noise ratio to be improved. Examples with surface-connected cracks are shown to demonstrate the improved features. The localization accuracy could be improved by entering 2-dimensional or 3-dimensional reconstructed data into the environment of a 3-dimensional CAD drawing. The propagation of ultrasonic waves through austenitic welds is disturbed by the anisotropic and inhomogeneous structure of the material. The effect is more or less severe depending upon the longitudinal or shear wave modes. To optimize the performance of an inspection software tool, a 3-dimensional CAD-Ray program has been implemented, where the shape of the inhomogeneous part of a weld can be simulated together with the grain structure based on the elastic constants. Ray-tracing results are depicted for embedded and for surface-connected defects.

  19. Acoustic telemetry.

    SciTech Connect

    Drumheller, Douglas Schaeffer; Kuszmaul, Scott S.

    2003-08-01

    Broadcasting messages through the earth is a daunting task. Indeed, broadcasting a normal telephone conversion through the earth by wireless means is impossible with todays technology. Most of us don't care, but some do. Industries that drill into the earth need wireless communication to broadcast navigation parameters. This allows them to steer their drill bits. They also need information about the natural formation that they are drilling. Measurements of parameters such as pressure, temperature, and gamma radiation levels can tell them if they have found a valuable resource such as a geothermal reservoir or a stratum bearing natural gas. Wireless communication methods are available to the drilling industry. Information is broadcast via either pressure waves in the drilling fluid or electromagnetic waves in the earth and well tubing. Data transmission can only travel one way at rates around a few baud. Given that normal Internet telephone modems operate near 20,000 baud, these data rates are truly very slow. Moreover, communication is often interrupted or permanently blocked by drilling conditions or natural formation properties. Here we describe a tool that communicates with stress waves traveling through the steel drill pipe and production tubing in the well. It's based on an old idea called Acoustic Telemetry. But what we present here is more than an idea. This tool exists, it's drilled several wells, and it works. Currently, it's the first and only acoustic telemetry tool that can withstand the drilling environment. It broadcasts one way over a limited range at much faster rates than existing methods, but we also know how build a system that can communicate both up and down wells of indefinite length.

  20. Waveguide-Based Biosensors for Pathogen Detection

    PubMed Central

    Mukundan, Harshini; Anderson, Aaron S.; Grace, W. Kevin; Grace, Karen M.; Hartman, Nile; Martinez, Jennifer S.; Swanson, Basil I.

    2009-01-01

    Optical phenomena such as fluorescence, phosphorescence, polarization, interference and non-linearity have been extensively used for biosensing applications. Optical waveguides (both planar and fiber-optic) are comprised of a material with high permittivity/high refractive index surrounded on all sides by materials with lower refractive indices, such as a substrate and the media to be sensed. This arrangement allows coupled light to propagate through the high refractive index waveguide by total internal reflection and generates an electromagnetic wave—the evanescent field—whose amplitude decreases exponentially as the distance from the surface increases. Excitation of fluorophores within the evanescent wave allows for sensitive detection while minimizing background fluorescence from complex, “dirty” biological samples. In this review, we will describe the basic principles, advantages and disadvantages of planar optical waveguide-based biodetection technologies. This discussion will include already commercialized technologies (e.g., Corning’s EPIC® Ô, SRU Biosystems’ BIND™, Zeptosense®, etc.) and new technologies that are under research and development. We will also review differing assay approaches for the detection of various biomolecules, as well as the thin-film coatings that are often required for waveguide functionalization and effective detection. Finally, we will discuss reverse-symmetry waveguides, resonant waveguide grating sensors and metal-clad leaky waveguides as alternative signal transducers in optical biosensing. PMID:22346727

  1. Plasmonic antennas hybridized with dielectric waveguides.

    PubMed

    Bernal Arango, Felipe; Kwadrin, Andrej; Koenderink, A Femius

    2012-11-27

    For the purpose of using plasmonics in an integrated scheme where single emitters can be probed efficiently, we experimentally and theoretically study the scattering properties of single nanorod gold antennas as well as antenna arrays placed on one-dimensional dielectric silicon nitride waveguides. Using real space and Fourier microscopy correlated with waveguide transmission measurements, we quantify the spectral properties, absolute strength, and directivity of scattering. The scattering processes can be well understood in the framework of the physics of dipolar objects placed on a planar layered environment with a waveguiding layer. We use the single plasmonic structures on top of the waveguide as dipolar building blocks for new types of antennas where the waveguide enhances the coupling between antenna elements. We report on waveguide hybridized Yagi-Uda antennas which show directionality in out-coupling of guided modes as well as directionality for in-coupling into the waveguide of localized excitations positioned at the feed element. These measurements together with simulations demonstrate that this system is ideal as a platform for plasmon quantum optics schemes as well as for fluorescence lab-on-chip applications.

  2. Optofluidic waveguides: I. Concepts and implementations

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Holger; Hawkins, Aaron R.

    2011-01-01

    We review recent developments and current status of liquid-core optical waveguides in optofluidics with emphasis on suitability for creating fully planar optofluidic labs-on-a-chip. In this first of two contributions, we give an overview of the different waveguide types that are being considered for effectively combining micro and nanofluidics with integrated optics. The large number of approaches is separated into conventional index-guided waveguides and more recent implementations using wave interference. The underlying principle for waveguiding and the current status are described for each type. We then focus on reviewing recent work on microfabricated liquid-core antiresonant reflecting optical (ARROW) waveguides, including the development of intersecting 2D waveguide networks and optical fluorescence and Raman detection with planar beam geometry. Single molecule detection capability and addition of electrical control for electrokinetic manipulation and analysis of single bioparticles are demonstrated. The demonstrated performance of liquid-core ARROWs is representative of the potential of integrated waveguides for on-chip detection with ultrahigh sensitivity, and points the way towards the next generation of high-performance, low-cost and portable biomedical instruments. PMID:21442048

  3. The phononic crystals: An unending quest for tailoring acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushwaha, Manvir S.

    2016-07-01

    Periodicity (in time or space) is a part and parcel of every living being: one can see, hear and feel it. Everyday examples are locomotion, respiration and heart beat. The reinforced N-dimensional periodicity over two or more crystalline solids results in the so-called phononic band gap crystals. These can have dramatic consequences on the propagation of phonons, vibrations and sound. The fundamental physics of cleverly fabricated phononic crystals can offer a systematic route to realize the Anderson localization of sound and vibrations. As to the applications, the phononic crystals are envisaged to find ways in the architecture, acoustic waveguides, designing transducers, elastic/acoustic filters, noise control, ultrasonics, medical imaging and acoustic cloaking, to mention a few. This review focuses on the brief sketch of the progress made in the field that seems to have prospered even more than was originally imagined in the early nineties.

  4. Thermo-acoustic engineering of silicon microresonators via evanescent waves

    SciTech Connect

    Tabrizian, R.; Ayazi, F.

    2015-06-29

    A temperature-compensated silicon micromechanical resonator with a quadratic temperature characteristic is realized by acoustic engineering. Energy-trapped resonance modes are synthesized by acoustic coupling of propagating and evanescent extensional waves in waveguides with rectangular cross section. Highly different temperature sensitivity of propagating and evanescent waves is used to engineer the linear temperature coefficient of frequency. The resulted quadratic temperature characteristic has a well-defined turn-over temperature that can be tailored by relative energy distribution between propagating and evanescent acoustic fields. A 76 MHz prototype is implemented in single crystal silicon. Two high quality factor and closely spaced resonance modes, created from efficient energy trapping of extensional waves, are excited through thin aluminum nitride film. Having different evanescent wave constituents and energy distribution across the device, these modes show different turn over points of 67 °C and 87 °C for their quadratic temperature characteristic.

  5. Toward efficient light diffraction and intensity variations by using wide bandwidth surface acoustic wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Young Ok; Chen, Fu; Lee, Kee Keun

    2016-06-01

    We have developed acoustic-optic (AO) based display units for implementing a handheld hologram display by modulating light deflection through wide bandwidth surface acoustic wave (SAW). The developed AO device consists of a metal layer, a ZnS waveguide layer, SAW inter digital transducers (IDTs), and a screen for display. When RF power with a particular resonant frequency was applied to IDTs, SAW was radiated and interfered with confined beam propagating along ZnS waveguide layer. The AO interacted beam was deflected laterally toward a certain direction depending on Bragg diffraction condition, exited out of the waveguide layer and then directed to the viewing screen placed at a certain distance from the device to form a single pixel. The deflected angles was adjusted by modulating the center frequency of the SAW IDT (SAW grating), the RF power of SAW, and the angles between propagating light beam path along waveguide and radiating SAW. The diffraction efficiency was also characterized in terms of waveguide thickness, SAW RF input power, and aperture length. Coupling of mode (COM) modeling was fulfilled to find optimal device parameters prior to fabrication. All the parameters affecting the deflection angle and efficiency to form a pixel for a three-dimensional (3D) hologram image were characterized and then discussed.

  6. Optical waveguide materials, structures, and dispersion modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hao; Liu, Jiaming; Lin, Jian; Li, Wenxiu; Xue, Xia; Huang, Anping; Xiao, Zhisong

    2016-11-01

    Optical waveguide is used in most integrated optic devices to confine and guide light in higher refractive index channels. The structures and materials of slot waveguides are reviewed in this paper. Coupled resonator optical waveguides (CROWs) can be used for a rotation sensor with compact size, low power consumption and low cost. The loss determines the ultimate sensitivity of CROW gyros. Resonator-based optical gyroscope's sensitivity for measuring rotation is enhanced via using the anomalous dispersion characteristic of superluminal light propagation, which can be also generated by using passive optical resonators.

  7. Waveguide optical isolator: a new design.

    PubMed

    Ando, K

    1991-03-20

    A new design of a thin film waveguide optical isolator is described. It is composed of a nonreciprocal mode converter by the Faraday effect, a reciprocal mode converter by the Cotton-Mouton effect, an integrated mirror, and TE-mode selectors. Its mode transfer matrices are derived. Numerical calculations show that wider tolerances of the film parameters and smaller dimensions are obtained compared with the ordinary tandem type waveguide isolators without the integrated mirror. This structure is free of the problem of the localized control of the directions of the magnetization, which has been required for the ordinary tandem type waveguide isolator.

  8. Waveguide grating mirror for laser resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabady, Rabi Ibrahim

    Improved beam quality for semiconductor lasers has been a challenging problem since laser invention. The approach proposed in this thesis for beam improvement is based on zero-order anomalies in the reflectance spectra of periodically corrugated waveguides, which is the waveguide analogy of the well-known Wood anomalies in diffraction spectra of metallic gratings. The proposed investigation include developing a high-quality and reliable technologies for optical waveguides, holographic-grating, and optical resonant filters. Applications of this research include high-power and high-brightness vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs), large area lasers, and laser arrays for optical communications, lidars, and industrial material processing.

  9. Waveguide-based optical chemical sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Grace, Karen M.; Swanson, Basil I.; Honkanen, Seppo

    2007-03-13

    The invention provides an apparatus and method for highly selective and sensitive chemical sensing. Two modes of laser light are transmitted through a waveguide, refracted by a thin film host reagent coating on the waveguide, and analyzed in a phase sensitive detector for changes in effective refractive index. Sensor specificity is based on the particular species selective thin films of host reagents which are attached to the surface of the planar optical waveguide. The thin film of host reagents refracts laser light at different refractive indices according to what species are forming inclusion complexes with the host reagents.

  10. Optical planar waveguide for cell counting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LeBlanc, John; Mueller, Andrew J.; Prinz, Adrian; Butte, Manish J.

    2012-01-01

    Low cost counting of cells has medical applications in screening, military medicine, disaster medicine, and rural healthcare. In this report, we present a shallow, buried, planar waveguide fabricated by potassium ion exchange in glass that enables low-cost and rapid counting of metal-tagged objects that lie in the evanescent field of the waveguide. Laser light transmitted through the waveguide was attenuated proportionately to the presence of metal-coated microstructures fabricated from photoresist. This technology enables the low-cost enumeration of cells from blood, urine, or other biofluids.

  11. Guided modes of elliptical metamaterial waveguides

    SciTech Connect

    Halterman, Klaus; Feng, Simin; Overfelt, P. L.

    2007-07-15

    The propagation of guided electromagnetic waves in open elliptical metamaterial waveguide structures is investigated. The waveguide contains a negative-index media core, where the permittivity {epsilon} and permeability {mu} are negative over a given bandwidth. The allowed mode spectrum for these structures is numerically calculated by solving a dispersion relation that is expressed in terms of Mathieu functions. By probing certain regions of parameter space, we find the possibility exists to have extremely localized waves that transmit along the surface of the waveguide.

  12. The structure of raylike arrivals in a shallow-water waveguide.

    PubMed

    Roux, Philippe; Cornuelle, Bruce D; Kuperman, W A; Hodgkiss, W S

    2008-12-01

    Acoustic remote sensing of the oceans requires a detailed understanding of the acoustic forward problem. The results of a shallow-water transmission experiment between a vertical array of sources and a vertical array of receivers are reported. The source array is used to provide additional degrees of freedom to isolate and track raylike arrivals by beamforming over both source and receiver arrays. The coordinated source-receiver array processing procedure is presented and its effectiveness in an example of tracking raylike arrivals in a fluctuating ocean environment is shown. Many of these arrivals can be tracked over an hour or more and show slowly varying amplitude and phase. The use of a double-beamforming algorithm lays the foundation for shallow-water acoustic remote sensing using travel time and source and receive angles of selected eigenrays.

  13. Topological Creation of Acoustic Pseudospin Multipoles in a Flow-Free Symmetry-Broken Metamaterial Lattice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhiwang; Wei, Qi; Cheng, Ying; Zhang, Ting; Wu, Dajian; Liu, Xiaojun

    2017-02-24

    The discovery of topological acoustics has revolutionized fundamental concepts of sound propagation, giving rise to strikingly unconventional acoustic edge modes immune to scattering. Because of the spinless nature of sound, the "spinlike" degree of freedom crucial to topological states in acoustic systems is commonly realized with circulating background flow or preset coupled resonator ring waveguides, which drastically increases the engineering complexity. Here we realize the acoustic pseudospin multipolar states in a simple flow-free symmetry-broken metamaterial lattice, where the clockwise (anticlockwise) sound propagation within each metamolecule emulates pseudospin down (pseudospin up). We demonstrate that tuning the strength of intermolecular coupling by simply contracting or expanding the metamolecule can induce the band inversion effect between the pseudospin dipole and quadrupole, which leads to a topological phase transition. Topologically protected edge states and reconfigurable topological one-way transmission for sound are further demonstrated. These results provide diverse routes to construct novel acoustic topological insulators with versatile applications.

  14. Topological Creation of Acoustic Pseudospin Multipoles in a Flow-Free Symmetry-Broken Metamaterial Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhiwang; Wei, Qi; Cheng, Ying; Zhang, Ting; Wu, Dajian; Liu, Xiaojun

    2017-02-01

    The discovery of topological acoustics has revolutionized fundamental concepts of sound propagation, giving rise to strikingly unconventional acoustic edge modes immune to scattering. Because of the spinless nature of sound, the "spinlike" degree of freedom crucial to topological states in acoustic systems is commonly realized with circulating background flow or preset coupled resonator ring waveguides, which drastically increases the engineering complexity. Here we realize the acoustic pseudospin multipolar states in a simple flow-free symmetry-broken metamaterial lattice, where the clockwise (anticlockwise) sound propagation within each metamolecule emulates pseudospin down (pseudospin up). We demonstrate that tuning the strength of intermolecular coupling by simply contracting or expanding the metamolecule can induce the band inversion effect between the pseudospin dipole and quadrupole, which leads to a topological phase transition. Topologically protected edge states and reconfigurable topological one-way transmission for sound are further demonstrated. These results provide diverse routes to construct novel acoustic topological insulators with versatile applications.

  15. Extension of Coupled-Modes Method to Waveguides with Elastic Bottom

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Ning; Wang Haozhong; Gao Dazhi

    2010-09-06

    In this paper, the coupled-modes method of acoustic propagation is extended to waveguides with smoothly varying fluid-elastic interfaces. To formulate the problem without recourse to the SH wave component from the ground up, we employ the {l_brace}u{sub z},u{sub v{r_brace}}-formulation developed in seismology. The result is remarkably different from that for fluid-fluid interfaces; the boundary conditions imposed at fluid-elastic interfaces give rise to terms including unknown boundary values so that the differential system obtained is not closed. To make the system closed, additional compatibility and constraining conditions have to be imposed.

  16. Waveguide silicon nitride grating coupler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litvik, Jan; Dolnak, Ivan; Dado, Milan

    2016-12-01

    Grating couplers are one of the most used elements for coupling of light between optical fibers and photonic integrated components. Silicon-on-insulator platform provides strong confinement of light and allows high integration. In this work, using simulations we have designed a broadband silicon nitride surface grating coupler. The Fourier-eigenmode expansion and finite difference time domain methods are utilized in design optimization of grating coupler structure. The fully, single etch step grating coupler is based on a standard silicon-on-insulator wafer with 0.55 μm waveguide Si3N4 layer. The optimized structure at 1550 nm wavelength yields a peak coupling efficiency -2.6635 dB (54.16%) with a 1-dB bandwidth up to 80 nm. It is promising way for low-cost fabrication using complementary metal-oxide- semiconductor fabrication process.

  17. Color sorting by retinal waveguides.

    PubMed

    Labin, Amichai M; Ribak, Erez N

    2014-12-29

    Light is being detected by the two distinct types of photoreceptors in the human retina: cones and rods. Before light arrives at the photoreceptors, it must traverse the whole retina, along its array of higher-index Müller cells serving as natural waveguides. Here we analyze this optical process of light propagation through Müller cells by two independent optical methods: numerical beam propagation and analytical modal analysis. We show that the structure and refractive index profile of the Müller cells create a unique spatio-spectral distribution of light. This distribution corresponds to the positions and spectral sensitivities of both cones and rods to improve their light absorption.

  18. Slotted antenna waveguide plasma source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, John (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A high density plasma generated by microwave injection using a windowless electrodeless rectangular slotted antenna waveguide plasma source has been demonstrated. Plasma probe measurements indicate that the source could be applicable for low power ion thruster applications, ion implantation, and related applications. This slotted antenna plasma source invention operates on the principle of electron cyclotron resonance (ECR). It employs no window and it is completely electrodeless and therefore its operation lifetime is long, being limited only by either the microwave generator itself or charged particle extraction grids if used. The high density plasma source can also be used to extract an electron beam that can be used as a plasma cathode neutralizer for ion source beam neutralization applications.

  19. Waveguides having patterned, flattened modes

    SciTech Connect

    Messerly, Michael J.; Pax, Paul H.; Dawson, Jay W.

    2015-10-27

    Field-flattening strands may be added to and arbitrarily positioned within a field-flattening shell to create a waveguide that supports a patterned, flattened mode. Patterning does not alter the effective index or flattened nature of the mode, but does alter the characteristics of other modes. Compared to a telecom fiber, a hexagonal pattern of strands allows for a three-fold increase in the flattened mode's area without reducing the separation between its effective index and that of its bend-coupled mode. Hexagonal strand and shell elements prove to be a reasonable approximation, and, thus, to be of practical benefit vis-a-vis fabrication, to those of circular cross section. Patterned flattened modes offer a new and valuable path to power scaling.

  20. Multimode waveguide based directional coupler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Rajib; Rifat, Ahmmed A.; Sabouri, Aydin; Al-Qattan, Bader; Essa, Khamis; Butt, Haider

    2016-07-01

    The Silicon-on-Insulator (SOI) based platform overcomes limitations of the previous copper and fiber based technologies. Due to its high index difference, SOI waveguide (WG) and directional couplers (DC) are widely used for high speed optical networks and hybrid Electro-Optical inter-connections; TE00-TE01, TE00-TE00 and TM00-TM00 SOI direction couplers are designed with symmetrical and asymmetrical configurations to couple with TE00, TE01 and TM00 in a multi-mode semi-triangular ring-resonator configuration which will be applicable for multi-analyte sensing. Couplers are designed with effective index method and their structural parameters are optimized with consideration to coupler length, wavelength and polarization dependence. Lastly, performance of the couplers are analyzed in terms of cross-talk, mode overlap factor, coupling length and coupling efficiency.

  1. Polymer and composite polymer slot waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiltunen, Marianne; Fegadolli, William S.; Lira, Hugo L. R.; Vahimaa, Pasi; Hiltunen, Jussi; Aikio, Sanna; Almeida, Vilson R.; Karioja, Pentti

    2014-05-01

    A fully polymer slot Young interferometer operating at 633 nm wavelength was fabricated by using nanoimprint molding method. The phase response of the interference pattern was measured with several concentrations of glucose-water solutions, utilizing both TE and TM polarization states. The sensor was experimentally found to detect a bulk refractive index change of 6.4×10-6 RIU. Temperature dependency of silicon slot waveguide has been demonstrated to be reduced with composite slot waveguide structure. The slot filled with thermally stable polymer having negative thermo-optic coefficient showed nearly an athermal operation of silicon slot waveguide. Experimental results show that the slot waveguide geometry covered with Ormocomp has thermo-optical coefficient of 6 pm/K.

  2. Electro-optic Waveguide Beam Deflector.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    beam deflection by variation in the electro - optic effect produced within the waveguide region in response to known or determinable magnitude variations in the electrical potential of an applied signal source.

  3. Multistaged stokes injected Raman capillary waveguide amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Kurnit, Norman A.

    1980-01-01

    A multistaged Stokes injected Raman capillary waveguide amplifier for providing a high gain Stokes output signal. The amplifier uses a plurality of optically coupled capillary waveguide amplifiers and one or more regenerative amplifiers to increase Stokes gain to a level sufficient for power amplification. Power amplification is provided by a multifocused Raman gain cell or a large diameter capillary waveguide. An external source of CO.sub.2 laser radiation can be injected into each of the capillary waveguide amplifier stages to increase Raman gain. Devices for injecting external sources of CO.sub.2 radiation include: dichroic mirrors, prisms, gratings and Ge Brewster plates. Alternatively, the CO.sub.2 input radiation to the first stage can be coupled and amplified between successive stages.

  4. Photoreceptor waveguides and effective retinal image quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vohnsen, Brian

    2007-03-01

    Individual photoreceptor waveguiding suggests that the entire retina can be considered as a composite fiber-optic element relating a retinal image to a corresponding waveguided image. In such a scheme, a visual sensation is produced only when the latter interacts with the pigments of the outer photoreceptor segments. Here the possible consequences of photoreceptor waveguiding on vision are studied with important implications for the pupil-apodization method commonly used to incorporate directional effects of the retina. In the absence of aberrations, it is found that the two approaches give identical predictions for an effective retinal image only when the pupil apodization is chosen twice as narrow as suggested by the traditional Stiles-Crawford effect. In addition, phase variations in the retinal field due to ocular aberrations can delicately alter a waveguided image, and this may provide plausible justification for an improved visual sensation as compared with what should be expected on the grounds of a retinal image only.

  5. Wideband waveguide polarizer development for SETI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, P.; Stanton, P.

    1991-01-01

    A wideband polarizer for the Deep Space Network (DSN) 34 meter beam waveguide antenna is needed for the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI) project. The results of a computer analysis of a wideband polarizer are presented.

  6. Radiation from Axisymmetric Waveguide Fed Horns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chinn, G. C.; Hoppe, D. J.; Epp, L. W.

    1995-01-01

    Return losses and radiation patterns for axisymmetric waveguide fed horns are calculated with the finite element method (FEM) in conjunction with the method of moments (MoM) and the mode matching technique (MM).

  7. Flexible parylene-film optical waveguide arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamagiwa, S.; Ishida, M.; Kawano, T.

    2015-08-01

    Modulation of neuronal activities by light [e.g., laser or light-emitting diode] using optogenetics is a powerful tool for studies on neuronal functions in a brain. Herein, flexible thin-film optical waveguide arrays based on a highly biocompatible material of parylene are reported. Parylene-C and -N thin layers with the different refractive indices form the clad and the core of the waveguide, respectively, and neural recording microelectrodes are integrated to record optical stimuli and electrical recordings simultaneously using the same alignment. Both theoretical and experimental investigations confirm that light intensities of more than 90% can propagate in a bent waveguide with a curvature radius of >5 mm. The proposed flexible thin-film waveguide arrays with microelectrodes can be used for numerous spherical bio-tissues, including brain and spinal cord samples.

  8. Low-index discontinuity terahertz waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagel, Michael; Marchewka, Astrid; Kurz, Heinrich

    2006-10-01

    A new type of dielectric THz waveguide based on recent approaches in the field of integrated optics is presented with theoretical and experimental results. Although the guiding mechanism of the low-index discontinuity (LID) THz waveguide is total internal reflection, the THz wave is predominantly confined in the virtually lossless low-index air gap within a high-index dielectric waveguide due to the continuity of electric flux density at the dielectric interface. Attenuation, dispersion and single-mode confinement properties of two LID structures are discussed and compared with other THz waveguide solutions. The new approach provides an outstanding combination of high mode confinement and low transmission losses currently not realizable with any other metal-based or photonic crystal approach. These exceptional properties might enable the breakthrough of novel integrated THz systems or endoscopy applications with sub-wavelength resolution.

  9. Optical Waveguide Output Couplers Fabricated in Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Michael D.; Abushagur, Mustafa A. G.; Ashley, Paul R.; Johnson-Cole, Helen

    1998-01-01

    Waveguide output couplers fabricated in Norland Optical Adhesive (NOA) #81 and AMOCO Ultradel 9020D polyimide are investigated. The output couplers are implemented using periodic relief gratings on a planar waveguide. Design theory of the couplers is based on the perturbation approach. Coupling of light from waveguide propagation modes to output radiation modes is described by coupled mode theory and the transmission line approximation of the perturbed area (grating structure). Using these concepts, gratings can be accurately designed to output a minimum number of modes at desired output angles. Waveguide couplers were designed using these concepts. These couplers were fabricated and analyzed for structural accuracy, output beam accuracy, and output efficiency. The results for the two different materials are compared.

  10. Acoustic source for generating an acoustic beam

    DOEpatents

    Vu, Cung Khac; Sinha, Dipen N.; Pantea, Cristian

    2016-05-31

    An acoustic source for generating an acoustic beam includes a housing; a plurality of spaced apart piezo-electric layers disposed within the housing; and a non-linear medium filling between the plurality of layers. Each of the plurality of piezoelectric layers is configured to generate an acoustic wave. The non-linear medium and the plurality of piezo-electric material layers have a matching impedance so as to enhance a transmission of the acoustic wave generated by each of plurality of layers through the remaining plurality of layers.

  11. Canonical Acoustics and Its Application to Surface Acoustic Wave on Acoustic Metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Jian Qi

    2016-08-01

    In a conventional formalism of acoustics, acoustic pressure p and velocity field u are used for characterizing acoustic waves propagating inside elastic/acoustic materials. We shall treat some fundamental problems relevant to acoustic wave propagation alternatively by using canonical acoustics (a more concise and compact formalism of acoustic dynamics), in which an acoustic scalar potential and an acoustic vector potential (Φ ,V), instead of the conventional acoustic field quantities such as acoustic pressure and velocity field (p,u) for characterizing acoustic waves, have been defined as the fundamental variables. The canonical formalism of the acoustic energy-momentum tensor is derived in terms of the acoustic potentials. Both the acoustic Hamiltonian density and the acoustic Lagrangian density have been defined, and based on this formulation, the acoustic wave quantization in a fluid is also developed. Such a formalism of acoustic potentials is employed to the problem of negative-mass-density assisted surface acoustic wave that is a highly localized surface bound state (an eigenstate of the acoustic wave equations). Since such a surface acoustic wave can be strongly confined to an interface between an acoustic metamaterial (e.g., fluid-solid composite structures with a negative dynamical mass density) and an ordinary material (with a positive mass density), it will give rise to an effect of acoustic field enhancement on the acoustic interface, and would have potential applications in acoustic device design for acoustic wave control.

  12. What Is an Acoustic Neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    ... ANAUSA.org Connect with us! What is an Acoustic Neuroma? Each heading slides to reveal information. Important ... Acoustic Neuroma Important Points To Know About an Acoustic Neuroma An acoustic neuroma, also called a vestibular ...

  13. Optical waveguide device with an adiabatically-varying width

    DOEpatents

    Watts; Michael R. , Nielson; Gregory N.

    2011-05-10

    Optical waveguide devices are disclosed which utilize an optical waveguide having a waveguide bend therein with a width that varies adiabatically between a minimum value and a maximum value of the width. One or more connecting members can be attached to the waveguide bend near the maximum value of the width thereof to support the waveguide bend or to supply electrical power to an impurity-doped region located within the waveguide bend near the maximum value of the width. The impurity-doped region can form an electrical heater or a semiconductor junction which can be activated with a voltage to provide a variable optical path length in the optical waveguide. The optical waveguide devices can be used to form a tunable interferometer (e.g. a Mach-Zehnder interferometer) which can be used for optical modulation or switching. The optical waveguide devices can also be used to form an optical delay line.

  14. An Investigation of Dielectric Loaded Ridged Waveguide.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-03-31

    propagation in any waveguide may be characterized by its field distribution. For homogeneous waveguides, modes are usually classified as TE (transverse...modes other than TE,,,.0 are characterized as LSE or LSM. Introduction of the ridge will cause distortion of the fields from true LSE or LSM nature...specify each of the LSE and LSM modes with any given mode characterized as the LSEm, mode or the LSM ,, mode. The first index m refers to the

  15. Broadband waveguide QED system on a chip

    SciTech Connect

    Quan Qimin; Bulu, Irfan; Loncar, Marko

    2009-07-15

    We demonstrate that a slot waveguide provides a broadband loss-free platform suitable for applications in quantum optics. We find that strong coupling between light quanta and a single quantum emitter placed in the waveguide slot can be achieved with efficiency higher than 96% and Purcell factor (spontaneous emission factor) larger than 200. The proposed system is a promising platform for quantum information processing and can be used to realize an efficient single photon source and optically addressable photon register.

  16. Target detection and localization in shallow water: an experimental demonstration of the acoustic barrier problem at the laboratory scale.

    PubMed

    Marandet, Christian; Roux, Philippe; Nicolas, Barbara; Mars, Jérôme

    2011-01-01

    This study demonstrates experimentally at the laboratory scale the detection and localization of a wavelength-sized target in a shallow ultrasonic waveguide between two source-receiver arrays at 3 MHz. In the framework of the acoustic barrier problem, at the 1/1000 scale, the waveguide represents a 1.1-km-long, 52-m-deep ocean acoustic channel in the kilohertz frequency range. The two coplanar arrays record in the time-domain the transfer matrix of the waveguide between each pair of source-receiver transducers. Invoking the reciprocity principle, a time-domain double-beamforming algorithm is simultaneously performed on the source and receiver arrays. This array processing projects the multireverberated acoustic echoes into an equivalent set of eigenrays, which are defined by their launch and arrival angles. Comparison is made between the intensity of each eigenray without and with a target for detection in the waveguide. Localization is performed through tomography inversion of the acoustic impedance of the target, using all of the eigenrays extracted from double beamforming. The use of the diffraction-based sensitivity kernel for each eigenray provides both the localization and the signature of the target. Experimental results are shown in the presence of surface waves, and methodological issues are discussed for detection and localization.

  17. Constructing acoustic timefronts using random matrix theory.

    PubMed

    Hegewisch, Katherine C; Tomsovic, Steven

    2013-10-01

    In a recent letter [Hegewisch and Tomsovic, Europhys. Lett. 97, 34002 (2012)], random matrix theory is introduced for long-range acoustic propagation in the ocean. The theory is expressed in terms of unitary propagation matrices that represent the scattering between acoustic modes due to sound speed fluctuations induced by the ocean's internal waves. The scattering exhibits a power-law decay as a function of the differences in mode numbers thereby generating a power-law, banded, random unitary matrix ensemble. This work gives a more complete account of that approach and extends the methods to the construction of an ensemble of acoustic timefronts. The result is a very efficient method for studying the statistical properties of timefronts at various propagation ranges that agrees well with propagation based on the parabolic equation. It helps identify which information about the ocean environment can be deduced from the timefronts and how to connect features of the data to that environmental information. It also makes direct connections to methods used in other disordered waveguide contexts where the use of random matrix theory has a multi-decade history.

  18. Light transmission loss in liquid crystal waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowinowski-Kruszelnicki, Edward; Walczak, Andrzej; Kiezun, Aleksander; Jaroszewicz, Leszek R.

    1998-02-01

    The investigation results of the propagation loss due to light scattering in electrically induced channel in planar waveguides are presented. The channel structure was obtained by means of electric driven stripe electrode made by photolithographic process. Planar waveguiding cell has been fabricated using ITO/SiO2/polyimide-coated glass plates and LC film 20 micrometers thick. A nematic liquid crystal layer with 90 degrees-twisted nematic orientation was studied. The He-Ne light beam was endfire coupled into an input edge of a waveguide using an objective lens. The propagation loss have been evaluated from the spatial variation intensity of light scattered out perpendicularly to the waveguide surface along the light propagation direction measured with CCD camera. Loss measurements have been made in room temperature. Waveguiding channel effect has been observed above 2.5 Vrms of applied voltage with the loss of about 17 +/- 1 dB. Increased driving voltage up to 100 Vrms reduces the loss to minimum value of 12 +/- 1 dB/cm. As a result of the experiments one may conclude that transmission loss in thick nematic waveguide have bulk character caused by imperfection of molecular alignment.

  19. Perfectly matched layer for an elastic parabolic equation model in ocean acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Chuanxiu; Zhang, Haigang; Piao, Shengchun; Yang, Shi'e.; Sun, Sipeng; Tang, Jun

    2017-02-01

    The perfectly matched layer (PML) is an effective technique for truncating unbounded domains with minimal spurious reflections. A fluid parabolic equation (PE) model applying PML technique was previously used to analyze the sound propagation problem in a range-dependent waveguide (Lu and Zhu, 2007). However, Lu and Zhu only considered a standard fluid PE to demonstrate the capability of the PML and did not take improved one-way models into consideration. They applied a [1/1] Padé approximant to the parabolic equation. The higher-order PEs are more accurate than standard ones when a very large angle propagation is considered. As for range-dependent problems, the techniques to handle the vertical interface between adjacent regions are mainly energy conserving and single-scattering. In this paper, the PML technique is generalized to the higher order elastic PE, as is to the higher order fluid PE. The correction of energy conserving is used in range-dependent waveguides. Simulation is made in both acoustic cases and seismo-acoustic cases. Range-independent and range-dependent waveguides are both adopted to test the accuracy and efficiency of this method. The numerical results illustrate that a PML is much more effective than an artificial absorbing layer (ABL) both in acoustic and seismo-acoustic sound propagation modeling.

  20. Light wheel confined in a purely dielectric composite waveguide.

    PubMed

    Ye, Yu Qian; Jin, Yi; He, Sailing

    2009-03-16

    A properly designed composite waveguide consisting of a one-dimensional photonic crystal waveguide and a conventional dielectric waveguide is proposed for the realization of a localized "light wheel". Light confinedly rotating between the two waveguides is numerically demonstrated and explained physically in detail. A delocalized "light wheel" is found at the band gap edge caused by contra-directional coupling between the two waveguides. Because of this delocalized "light wheel" , the composite waveguide can be used to trap light as a cavity, and a quality factor of 9 x 10(3) is achieved as an example. The present structure is completely dielectric and thus easy to realize with a low loss.

  1. Ion-exchanged glass waveguide technology: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tervonen, Ari; West, Brian R.; Honkanen, Seppo

    2011-07-01

    We review the history and current status of ion exchanged glass waveguide technology. The background of ion exchange in glass and key developments in the first years of research are briefly described. An overview of fabrication, characterization and modeling of waveguides is given and the most important waveguide devices and their applications are discussed. Ion exchanged waveguide technology has served as an available platform for studies of general waveguide properties, integrated optics structures and devices, as well as applications. It is also a commercial fabrication technology for both passive and active wave-guide components.

  2. Symptoms of Acoustic Neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Watch and Wait Radiation Microsurgery Acoustic Neuroma Decision Tree Questions for Your Physician Questions to Ask Yourself ... Watch and Wait Radiation Microsurgery Acoustic Neuroma Decision Tree Questions for Your Physician Questions to Ask Yourself ...

  3. NPL closes acoustics department

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Extance, Andy

    2016-11-01

    The UK's National Physical Laboratory (NPL) has withdrawn funding for its acoustics, polymer and thermoelectrics groups, triggering concern among airborne acoustics specialists that the move could undermine the country's noise-management policies.

  4. Identifying the Acoustic Neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Watch and Wait Radiation Microsurgery Acoustic Neuroma Decision Tree Questions for Your Physician Questions to Ask Yourself ... Watch and Wait Radiation Microsurgery Acoustic Neuroma Decision Tree Questions for Your Physician Questions to Ask Yourself ...

  5. Acoustic emission frequency discrimination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sugg, Frank E. (Inventor); Graham, Lloyd J. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    In acoustic emission nondestructive testing, broadband frequency noise is distinguished from narrow banded acoustic emission signals, since the latter are valid events indicative of structural flaws in the material being examined. This is accomplished by separating out those signals which contain frequency components both within and beyond (either above or below) the range of valid acoustic emission events. Application to acoustic emission monitoring during nondestructive bond verification and proof loading of undensified tiles on the Space Shuttle Orbiter is considered.

  6. Deep Water Ocean Acoustics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-17

    under-ice scattering , bathymetric diffraction and the application of the ocean acoustic Parabolic Equation to infrasound. 2. Tasks a. Task 1...QSR-14C0172-Ocean Acoustics -063015 Figure 10. Estimated reflection coefficient as a function of frequency by taking the difference of downgoing and...OASIS, INC. 1 Report No. QSR-14C0172-Ocean Acoustics -063015 Quarterly Progress Report Technical and Financial Deep Water Ocean Acoustics

  7. Deep Water Ocean Acoustics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-19

    OASIS, INC. 1 Report No. QSR-14C0172-Ocean Acoustics-093015 Quarterly Progress Report Technical and Financial Deep Water Ocean Acoustics...number. 1. REPORT DATE OCT 2015 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 01-07-2015 to 30-09-2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Deep Water Ocean Acoustics...understanding of the impact of the ocean and seafloor environmental variability on deep- water (long-range) ocean acoustic propagation and to develop

  8. Shallow Water Acoustics Studies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-30

    1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Shallow Water Acoustics Studies James F. Lynch MS #12...N00014-14-1-0040 http://acoustics.whoi.edu/sw06/ LONG TERM GOALS The long term goals of our shallow water acoustics work are to: 1) understand the...nature of low frequency (10-1500 Hz) acoustic propagation, scattering and noise in shallow water when strong oceanic variability is present in the

  9. On the use of waveform images to describe the initial response of finite-length waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginsberg, Jerry H.

    2005-09-01

    The d'Alembert solution of the wave equation can be adapted to describe reflection from planar boundaries. One technique for doing so images the incident wave on the opposite side of the boundary. This concept has been introduced in a few texts, most extensively by Morse and Ingard [Theoretical Acoustics, McGraw-Hill, New York (1964), pp. 106-115], but only for nondissipative ends (infinite or zero impedance.) This paper formalizes the procedure for the case where the boundary has a resistive impedance that is independent of frequency, and then extends it to treat waveguides of finite length. It is shown that the field that results from arbitrary initial conditions can be represented by an infinite number of images. This leads to a representation of the acoustic field as oppositely propagating wave in an unbounded waveguide, with only a limited number of images overlapping at any instant. Both mathematical and graphical descriptions of these waves are derived. In addition to assisting the student to understand the evolution of the field, mathematical analysis of the image construction leads to a number of physical and mathematical insights to fundamental acoustic phenomena. These include the fact that the field in the dissipationless case can be represented as a modal series with associated natural frequencies, and a quantitative understanding of the manner in which the field decays when either end is dissipative. A corollary of the latter analysis is an expression for reverberation time that is remarkably similar to the Norris-Eyring formula. From an instructional viewpoint, the fact that all results are derived without recourse to solving differential equations makes the image waveform concept especially useful as a way of introducing new students to fundamental acoustic phenomena.

  10. Coding Acoustic Metasurfaces.

    PubMed

    Xie, Boyang; Tang, Kun; Cheng, Hua; Liu, Zhengyou; Chen, Shuqi; Tian, Jianguo

    2017-02-01

    Coding acoustic metasurfaces can combine simple logical bits to acquire sophisticated functions in wave control. The acoustic logical bits can achieve a phase difference of exactly π and a perfect match of the amplitudes for the transmitted waves. By programming the coding sequences, acoustic metasurfaces with various functions, including creating peculiar antenna patterns and waves focusing, have been demonstrated.

  11. Tutorial on architectural acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, Neil; Talaske, Rick; Bistafa, Sylvio

    2002-11-01

    This tutorial is intended to provide an overview of current knowledge and practice in architectural acoustics. Topics covered will include basic concepts and history, acoustics of small rooms (small rooms for speech such as classrooms and meeting rooms, music studios, small critical listening spaces such as home theatres) and the acoustics of large rooms (larger assembly halls, auditoria, and performance halls).

  12. Joint Eglin Acoustic Week III Data Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watts, Michael E.; Conner, David A.; Smith, Charles D.

    2010-01-01

    A series of three flight tests have been conducted at an Eglin Air Force Base remote test range located in the Florida panhandle. The first was the "Acoustics Week" flight test conducted in September 2003. The second was the NASA Heavy Lift Rotorcraft Acoustic Flight Test conducted in October-November 2005. The most recent was the Eglin Acoustic Week III test conducted in August-September 2007. This series of tests acquired acoustic data for a number of rotary and fixed wing aircraft and are used to generate noise semi-spheres used in predicting the acoustic footprint for prescribed flight operations. This extensive database can be used to determine the impact of flight operations on communities around a terminal area as well as for prediction code validations. Another valuable use of the semi-spheres is determining the long-range propagation of noise for civilian and military purposes. This paper describes the third test in this series. Data described in this report were acquired during testing of the MD-902 and Mi-8M aircraft. In addition, data acquired during a set of atmospheric propagation tests is also described.

  13. Ultralow-loss waveguide crossings for the integration of microfluidics and optical waveguide sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zheng; Yan, Hai; Wang, Zongxing; Zou, Yi; Yang, Chun-Ju; Chakravarty, Swapnajit; Subbaraman, Harish; Tang, Naimei; Xu, Xiaochuan; Fan, D. L.; Wang, Alan X.; Chen, Ray T.

    2015-03-01

    Integrating photonic waveguide sensors with microfluidics is promising in achieving high-sensitivity and cost-effective biological and chemical sensing applications. One challenge in the integration is that an air gap would exist between the microfluidic channel and the photonic waveguide when the micro-channel and the waveguide intersect. The air gap creates a path for the fluid to leak out of the micro-channel. Potential solutions, such as oxide deposition followed by surface planarization, would introduce additional fabrication steps and thus are ineffective in cost. Here we propose a reliable and efficient approach for achieving closed microfluidic channels on a waveguide sensing chip. The core of the employed technique is to add waveguide crossings, i.e., perpendicularly intersecting waveguides, to block the etched trenches and prevent the fluid from leaking through the air gap. The waveguide crossings offer a smooth interface for microfluidic channel bonding while bring negligible additional propagation loss (0.024 dB/crossing based on simulation). They are also efficient in fabrication, which are patterned and fabricated in the same step with waveguides. We experimentally integrated microfluidic channels with photonic crystal (PC) microcavity sensor chips on silicon-on-insulator substrate and demonstrated leak-free sensing measurement with waveguide crossings. The microfluidic channel was made from polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and pressure bonded to the silicon chip. The tested flow rates can be varied from 0.2 μL/min to 200 μL/min. Strong resonances from the PC cavity were observed from the transmission spectra. The spectra also show that the waveguide crossings did not induce any significant additional loss or alter the resonances.

  14. Lagrangian description of Brillouin scattering and electrostriction in nanoscale optical waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laude, Vincent; Beugnot, Jean-Charles

    2015-12-01

    The diffraction of light by sound waves is known as Brillouin scattering. In optical waveguides, Brillouin scattering can arise from both bulk contributions, modelled by photoelasticity, and surface contributions, which are due to the waveguide boundaries being shaken by propagating sound. The reciprocal effect, electrostriction, governs the coherent generation of sound by light. The bulk photoelastic contribution to Brillouin scattering is generally nonlinear but can be limited to a first-order expansion for small strain. We investigate the moving-interface contribution to Brillouin scattering in optical waveguides and show that it is also inherently nonlinear, leading to multi-phonon processes for large deformations. Limiting the perturbation to first order, we form a Lagrangian describing the interaction of sound and light. The Lagrangian contains both surface and bulk contributions to Brillouin scattering and electrostriction, and allows the derivation of optical and acoustic equations in a single variational formula. A full electrostriction equation is then derived for the phonon distribution, with both bulk and surface effects included. Numerical simulations in the case of a silicon nanowire illustrate the different effects and their respective contributions.

  15. An Overview of Acoustic Telemetry

    SciTech Connect

    Drumheller, D.S.

    1992-03-24

    Acoustic telemetry has been a dream of the drilling industry for the past 50 years. It offers the promise of data rates which are one-hundred times greater than existing technology. Such a system would open the door to true logging-while-drilling technology and bring enormous profits to its developers. The oil and gas industry has led in most of the attempts to develop this type of telemetry system; however, very substantial efforts have also been made through government sponsored work in the geothermal industry. None of these previous attempts have lead to a commercial telemetry system. Conceptually, the problem looks easy. The basic idea is to produce an encoded sound wave at the bottom of the well, let it propagate up the steel drillpipe, and extract the data from the signal at the surface. Unfortunately, substantial difficulties arise. The first difficult problem is to produce the sound wave. Since the most promising transmission wavelengths are about 20 feet, normal transducer efficiencies are quite low. Compounding this problem is the structural complexity of the bottomhole assembly and drillstring. For example, the acoustic impedance of the drillstring changes every 30 feet and produces an unusual scattering pattern in the acoustic transmission. This scattering pattern causes distortion of the signal and is often confused with signal attenuation. These problems are not intractable. Recent work has demonstrated that broad frequency bands exist which are capable of transmitting data at rates up to 100 bits per second. Our work has also identified the mechanism which is responsible for the observed anomalies in the patterns of signal attenuation. Furthermore in the past few years a body of experience has been developed in designing more efficient transducers for application to metal Waveguides. The direction of future work is clear. New transducer designs which are more efficient and compatible with existing downhole power supplies need to be built and tested

  16. Remote control for anode-cathode adjustment

    DOEpatents

    Roose, Lars D.

    1991-01-01

    An apparatus for remotely adjusting the anode-cathode gap in a pulse power machine has an electric motor located within a hollow cathode inside the vacuum chamber of the pulse power machine. Input information for controlling the motor for adjusting the anode-cathode gap is fed into the apparatus using optical waveguides. The motor, controlled by the input information, drives a worm gear that moves a cathode tip. When the motor drives in one rotational direction, the cathode is moved toward the anode and the size of the anode-cathode gap is diminished. When the motor drives in the other direction, the cathode is moved away from the anode and the size of the anode-cathode gap is increased. The motor is powered by batteries housed in the hollow cathode. The batteries may be rechargeable, and they may be recharged by a photovoltaic cell in combination with an optical waveguide that receives recharging energy from outside the hollow cathode. Alternatively, the anode-cathode gap can be remotely adjusted by a manually-turned handle connected to mechanical linkage which is connected to a jack assembly. The jack assembly converts rotational motion of the handle and mechanical linkage to linear motion of the cathode moving toward or away from the anode.

  17. Indoor acoustic gain design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Concha-Abarca, Justo Andres

    2002-11-01

    The design of sound reinforcement systems includes many variables and usually some of these variables are discussed. There are criteria to optimize the performance of the sound reinforcement systems under indoor conditions. The equivalent acoustic distance, the necessary acoustic gain, and the potential acoustic gain are parameters which must be adjusted with respect to the loudspeaker array, electric power and directionality of loudspeakers, the room acoustics conditions, the distance and distribution of the audience, and the type of the original sources. The design and installation of front of the house and monitoring systems have individual criteria. This article is about this criteria and it proposes general considerations for the indoor acoustic gain design.

  18. Untangled modes in multimode waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plöschner, Martin; Tyc, TomáÅ.¡; Čižmár, TomáÅ.¡

    2016-03-01

    Small, fibre-based endoscopes have already improved our ability to image deep within the human body. A novel approach introduced recently utilised disordered light within a standard multimode optical fibre for lensless imaging. Importantly, this approach brought very significant reduction of the instruments footprint to dimensions below 100 μm. The most important limitations of this exciting technology is the lack of bending flexibility - imaging is only possible as long as the fibre remains stationary. The only route to allow flexibility of such endoscopes is in trading-in all the knowledge about the optical system we have, particularly the cylindrical symmetry of refractive index distribution. In perfect straight step-index cylindrical waveguides we can find optical modes that do not change their spatial distribution as they propagate through. In this paper we present a theoretical background that provides description of such modes in more realistic model of real-life step-index multimode fibre taking into account common deviations in distribution of the refractive index from its ideal step-index profile. Separately, we discuss how to include the influence of fibre bending.

  19. Gigahertz Guided-Wave Acoustooptic Bragg Diffraction in Zinc-Oxide Arsenide Composite Waveguides and Integrated Optic RF Spectrum Analyzers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelrazek, Yasser Abdelaziz

    In this dissertation, a rigorous theoretical analysis of the optical guided-wave (OGW), surface acoustic wave (SAW), and AO Bragg interaction between the OGW and SAW in the ZnO/GaAs/AlGaAs composite waveguide is presented. High performance guided-wave AO Bragg cells operating at acoustic center frequencies of 800 MHz, 950 MHz, and most recently 1.1 GHz have been realized for the first time in ZnO/GaAs/AlGaAs composite waveguides. The emphasis of this dissertation is placed on the 1.1 GHz AO Bragg cells. The design and fabrication processes of the Bragg cells including the growth of GaAs/AlGaAs optical waveguides by liquid phase epitaxy and deposition of ZnO layers by rf sputtering technique are presented. The characterization of the AO Bragg cells consists of two parts. The first part concerns the characterization of the SAW, and includes the measurement of the SAW phase velocity, insertion loss, transducer conversion efficiency, -3 dB bandwidth, and propagation loss. The second part concerns the AO Bragg diffraction and includes the measurement of the AO -3 dB bandwidth, Bragg diffraction efficiency as a function of the rf power level, and incident light polarization. In addition, the design, fabrication, and measurement of integrated optic rf spectrum analyzers (IOSA) in ZnO/GaAs/AlGaAs composite waveguide are presented. The IOSA represents the first module that incorporates AO Bragg cell and a waveguide lens pair on a common GaAs substrate. The module consists of an input coupling waveguide lens, an AO Bragg cell, and a waveguide Fourier transform lens all integrated on a sample size of 23 mm x 7 mm. Both narrow and wide band IOSAs were realized using the double-electrode tilted -chirp transducers. Therefore, this wide band IOSA module provided 36 resolvable light spots or frequency channels. The results of this first IOSA on GaAs are respectable even when compared with the best IOSA fabricated on LiNbO _3. (Abstract shortened with permission of author.).

  20. Improved cooling design for high power waveguide system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, W. C. J.; Hartop, R.

    1981-06-01

    Testing of X band high power components in a traveling wave resonator indicates that this improved cooling design reduces temperature in the waveguide and flange. The waveguide power handling capability and power transmission reliability is increased substantially.

  1. Improved cooling design for high power waveguide system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, W. C. J.; Hartop, R.

    1981-01-01

    Testing of X band high power components in a traveling wave resonator indicates that this improved cooling design reduces temperature in the waveguide and flange. The waveguide power handling capability and power transmission reliability is increased substantially.

  2. Surface wave acoustics of granular packing under gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Clement, Eric; Andreotti, Bruno; Bonneau, Lenaic

    2009-06-18

    Due to the non-linearity of Hertzian contacts, the speed of sound in granular matter increases with pressure. For a packing under gravity and in the presence of a free surface, bulk acoustic waves cannot propagate due to the inherent refraction toward the surface (the mirage effect). Thus, only modes corresponding to surface waves (Raleigh-Hertz modes) are able to propagate the acoustic signal. First, based on a non-linear elasticity model, we describe the main features associated to these surface waves. We show that under gravity, a granular packing is from the acoustic propagation point of view an index gradient waveguide that selects modes of two distinct families i.e. the sagittal and transverse waves localized in the vicinity of the free surface. A striking feature of these surface waves is the multi-modal propagation: for both transverse and sagittal waves, we show the existence of a infinite but discrete series of propagating modes. In each case, we determine the mode shape and and the corresponding dispersion relation. In the case of a finite size system, a geometric waveguide is superimposed to the index gradient wave guide. In this later case, the dispersion relations are modified by the appearance of a cut-off frequency that scales with depth. The second part is devoted to an experimental study of surface waves propagating in a granular packing confined in a long channel. This set-up allows to tune a monomodal emission by taking advantage of the geometric waveguide features combined with properly designed emitters. For both sagittal and transverses waves, we were able to isolate a single mode (the fundamental one) and to plot the dispersion relation. This measurements agree well with the Hertzian scaling law as predicted by meanfield models. Furthermore, it allows us to determine quantitatively relations on the elastic moduli. However, we observe that our data yield a shear modulus abnormally weak when compared to several meanfield predictions.

  3. Electro-optic switching based on a waveguide-ring resonator made of dielectric-loaded graphene plasmon waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Zhe; Zhu, Zhi Hong; Xu, Wei; Zhang, Jian Fa; Cai Guo, Chu; Liu, Ken; Yuan, Xiao Dong; Qiao Qin, Shi

    2016-09-01

    We numerically demonstrate that electro-optic switching in the mid-infrared range can be realized using a waveguide-ring resonator made of dielectric-loaded graphene plasmon waveguides (DLGPWs). The numerical results are in good agreement with the results of physical analysis. The switching mechanism is based on dynamic modification of the resonant wavelengths of the ring resonator, achieved by varying the Fermi energy of a graphene sheet. The results reveal that a switching ratio of ∼24 dB can be achieved with only a 0.01 eV change in the Fermi energy. Such electrically controlled switching operation may find use in actively tunable integrated photonic circuits.

  4. Waveguides in Thin Film Polymeric Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakisov, Sergey; Abdeldayem, Hossin; Venkateswarlu, Putcha; Teague, Zedric

    1996-01-01

    Results on the fabrication of integrated optical components in polymeric materials using photo printing methods will be presented. Optical waveguides were fabricated by spin coating preoxidized silicon wafers with organic dye/polymer solution followed by soft baking. The waveguide modes were studied using prism coupling technique. Propagation losses were measured by collecting light scattered from the trace of a propagation mode by either scanning photodetector or CCD camera. We observed the formation of graded index waveguides in photosensitive polyimides after exposure of UV light from a mercury arc lamp. By using a theoretical model, an index profile was reconstructed which is in agreement with the profile reconstructed by the Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin calculation technique using a modal spectrum of the waveguides. Proposed mechanism for the formation of the graded index includes photocrosslinking followed by UV curing accompanied with optical absorption increase. We also developed the prototype of a novel single-arm double-mode interferometric sensor based on our waveguides. It demonstrates high sensitivity to the chance of ambient temperature. The device can find possible applications in aeropropulsion control systems.

  5. Simple Broadband Circular Polarizer in Oversized Waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stange, Torsten

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, a possibility is shown to realize a simple waveguide polarizer producing nearly the same circular polarization over a broad frequency range up to an octave. It is based upon the combination of two smoothly squeezed oversized waveguides with different diameters. The principle is similar to an achromatic lens in optics, where two counteracting lenses with differently sloped wavelength dependencies of the refractive index are combined to compensate the dispersion in the desired wavelength range. Consequently, two different wavelengths of light are brought into focus at the same plane. A waveguide for the transmission of microwaves has a similar frequency dependence of the refractive index resulting in a frequency-dependent phase shift between two propagating waves polarized along the symmetry axes of a waveguide with an elliptical cross section. For this reason, an incident wave with a linear polarization between the axes of symmetry can be only converted into a circularly polarized wave over a limited frequency range. However, the diameter and the shape along two counteracting squeezed waveguides can be adjusted in such a way that the frequency dependence of the resultant phase shift is finally canceled out.

  6. MMICs with Radial Probe Transitions to Waveguides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samoska, Lorene; Chattopadhyay, Goutam; Pukala, David; Soria, Mary; Fung, King Man; Gaier, Todd; Radisic, Vesna; Lai, Richard

    2009-01-01

    A document presents an update on the innovation reported in Integrated Radial Probe Transition From MMIC to Waveguide (NPO-43957), NASA Tech Briefs Vol. 31, No. 5 (May 2007), page 38. To recapitulate: To enable operation or testing of a monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC), it is necessary to mount the MMIC in a waveguide package that typically has cross-sectional waveguide dimensions of the order of a few hundred microns. A radial probe transition between an MMIC operating at 340 GHz and a waveguide had been designed (but not yet built and tested) to be fabricated as part of a monolithic unit that would include the MMIC. The radial probe could readily be integrated with an MMIC amplifier because the design provided for fabrication of the transition on a substrate of the same material (InP) and thickness (50 m) typical of substrates of MMICs that can operate above 300 GHz. As illustrated in the updated document by drawings, photographs, and plots of test data, the concept has now been realized by designing, fabricating, and testing several MMIC/radial- probe integrated-circuit chips and designing and fabricating a waveguide package to contain each chip.

  7. Laser chemical etching of waveguides and quasi-optical devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drouet D'Aubigny, Christian Yann Pierre

    2003-11-01

    The terahertz (THz) frequency domain, located at the frontier of radio and light, is the last unexplored region of the electromagnetic spectrum. As technology becomes available, THz systems are finding applications to fields ranging all the way from astronomical and atmospheric remote sensing to space telecommunications, medical imaging, and security. In Astronomy the THz and far infrared (IR) portion of the electromagnetic spectrum (λ = 300 to 10 μm) may hold the answers to countless questions regarding the origin and evolution of the Universe, galaxy, star and planet formation. Over the past decade, advances in telescope and detector technology have for the first time made this regime available to astronomers. Near THz frequencies, metallic hollow waveguide structures become so small, (typically much less than a millimeter), that conventional machining becomes extremely difficult, and in many cases, nearly impossible. Laser induced, micro-chemical etching is a promising new technology that can be used to fabricate three dimensional structures many millimeters across with micrometer accuracy. Laser micromachining of silicon possesses a significant edge over more conventional techniques. It does not require the use of masks and is not confined to crystal planes. A non-contact process, it eliminates tool wear and vibration problems associated with classical milling machines. At the University of Arizona we have constructed the first such laser micromachining system optimized for the fabrication of THz and far IR waveguide and quasi-optical components. The system can machine structures up to 50 mm in diameter, down to a few microns accuracy in a few minutes and with a remarkable surface finish. A variety of THz devices have been fabricated using this technique, their design, fabrication, assembly and theoretical performance is described in the chapters that follow.

  8. Stopping light by an air waveguide with anisotropic metamaterial cladding.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Tian; Zhao, Junming; Feng, Yijun

    2009-01-05

    We present a detailed study of oscillating modes in a slab waveguide with air core and anisotropic metamaterial cladding. It is shown that, under specific dielectric configurations, slow and even stopped electromagnetic wave can be supported by such an air waveguide. We propose a linearly tapped waveguide structure that could lead the propagating light to a complete standstill. Both the theoretical analysis and the proposed waveguide have been validated by full-wave simulation based on finite-difference time-domain method.

  9. Coupling characteristics between slot plasmonic mode and dielectric waveguide mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Shuai; Liu, Fang; Wan, Ruiyuan; Huang, Yidong

    2010-12-01

    A hybrid coupler composed of a slot plasmonic waveguide and a dielectric waveguide is proposed and its coupling characteristics are analyzed. The simulation results show that the ultra-small mode of the slot plasmonic waveguide can be excited efficiently by the dielectric waveguide mode within the coupling length of just several microns, which provides an interface between the slot plasmonic devices and dielectric devices. Meanwhile, based on this hybrid the coupler, a highly integrated refractive index sensor could be realized.

  10. Capabilities of DLW for fabrication of planar waveguides in PDMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jandura, D.; Pudiš, D.; Gašo, P.

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, capabilities of the fabrication technology for planar waveguide structures and devices in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) are presented. Direct laser writing in combination with imprinting technique was used to pattern photoresist layer as a master for imprinting process. In the next step, PDMS waveguide structures as channel waveguide, Y-branch waveguide splitter and ring resonator were imprinted. Finally, optical and morphological properties of prepared devices were investigated by confocal microscopy and atomic force microscopy.

  11. Leak detection by acoustic emission monitoring. Phase 1: Feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lichtenstein, Bernard; Winder, A. A.

    1994-05-01

    This investigation was conducted to determine the feasibility of detecting leaks from underground storage tanks or pipelines using acoustic emissions. An extensive technical literature review established that distinguishable acoustic emission signals will be generated when a storage tank is subjected to deformation stresses. A parametric analysis was performed which indicated that leak rates less than 0.1 gallons per hour can be detected for leak sizes less than 1/32 inch with 99% probability if the transient signals were sensed with an array of accelerometers (cemented to the tank or via acoustic waveguides), each having a sensitivity greater than 250 mv/g over a frequency range of 0.1 to 4000 Hz, and processed in a multi-channel Fourier spectrum analyzer with automatic threshold detection. An acoustic transient or energy release processor could conceivably detect the onset of the leak at the moment of fracture of the tank wall. The primary limitations to realizing reliable and robust acoustic emission monitoring of underground fluid leaks are the various masking noise sources prevalent at Air Force bases, which are attributed to aircraft, motor traffic, pump station operation, and ground tremors.

  12. Research on micro-sized acoustic bandgap structures.

    SciTech Connect

    Fleming, James Grant; McCormick, Frederick Bossert; Su, Mehmet F.; El-Kady, Ihab Fathy; Olsson, Roy H., III; Tuck, Melanie R.

    2010-01-01

    Phononic crystals (or acoustic crystals) are the acoustic wave analogue of photonic crystals. Here a periodic array of scattering inclusions located in a homogeneous host material forbids certain ranges of acoustic frequencies from existence within the crystal, thus creating what are known as acoustic (or phononic) bandgaps. The vast majority of phononic crystal devices reported prior to this LDRD were constructed by hand assembling scattering inclusions in a lossy viscoelastic medium, predominantly air, water or epoxy, resulting in large structures limited to frequencies below 1 MHz. Under this LDRD, phononic crystals and devices were scaled to very (VHF: 30-300 MHz) and ultra (UHF: 300-3000 MHz) high frequencies utilizing finite difference time domain (FDTD) modeling, microfabrication and micromachining technologies. This LDRD developed key breakthroughs in the areas of micro-phononic crystals including physical origins of phononic crystals, advanced FDTD modeling and design techniques, material considerations, microfabrication processes, characterization methods and device structures. Micro-phononic crystal devices realized in low-loss solid materials were emphasized in this work due to their potential applications in radio frequency communications and acoustic imaging for medical ultrasound and nondestructive testing. The results of the advanced modeling, fabrication and integrated transducer designs were that this LDRD produced the 1st measured phononic crystals and phononic crystal devices (waveguides) operating in the VHF (67 MHz) and UHF (937 MHz) frequency bands and established Sandia as a world leader in the area of micro-phononic crystals.

  13. EEsoF MICAD and ACADEMY macro files for coplanar waveguide and finite ground plan coplanar waveguide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponchak, George E.

    1995-01-01

    A collection of macro files is presented which when appended to either the EEsoF MICAD.ELE or EEsoF ACADEMY.ELE file permits the layout of coplanar waveguide and finite ground plane coplanar waveguide circuits.

  14. Photolithography fabrication of sol-gel ridge waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sara, Rahmani; Touam, Tahar; Blanchetiere, Chantal; Saddiki, Z.; Saravanamuttu, Kalaichelvi; Du, Xin M.; Chrostowski, Jacek; Andrews, Mark P.; Najafi, S. Iraj

    1998-07-01

    We report on fabrication of ridge waveguides in UV-light sensitive glass sol-gel thin films, deposited on silicon substrate, using a simple photolithography process. The single-layer films are prepared at low temperature and deep UV-light (DUV) is employed to make the waveguides. The effect of fabrication parameters on waveguide shape is investigated.

  15. Microminiature optical waveguide structure and method for fabrication

    DOEpatents

    Strand, O.T.; Deri, R.J.; Pocha, M.D.

    1998-12-08

    A method for manufacturing low-cost, nearly circular cross section waveguides comprises starting with a substrate material that a molten waveguide material can not wet or coat. A thin layer is deposited of an opposite material that the molten waveguide material will wet and is patterned to describe the desired surface-contact path pedestals for a waveguide. A waveguide material, e.g., polymer or doped silica, is deposited. A resist material is deposited and unwanted excess is removed to form pattern masks. The waveguide material is etched away to form waveguide precursors and the masks are removed. Heat is applied to reflow the waveguide precursors into near-circular cross-section waveguides that sit atop the pedestals. The waveguide material naturally forms nearly circular cross sections due to the surface tension effects. After cooling, the waveguides will maintain the round shape. If the width and length are the same, then spherical ball lenses are formed. Alternatively, the pedestals can be patterned to taper along their lengths on the surface of the substrate. This will cause the waveguides to assume a conical taper after reflowing by heat. 32 figs.

  16. Microminiature optical waveguide structure and method for fabrication

    DOEpatents

    Strand, Oliver T.; Deri, Robert J.; Pocha, Michael D.

    1998-01-01

    A method for manufacturing low-cost, nearly circular cross section waveguides comprises starting with a substrate material that a molten waveguide material can not wet or coat. A thin layer is deposited of an opposite material that the molten waveguide material will wet and is patterned to describe the desired surface-contact path pedestals for a waveguide. A waveguide material, e.g., polymer or doped silica, is deposited. A resist material is deposited and unwanted excess is removed to form pattern masks. The waveguide material is etched away to form waveguide precursors and the masks are removed. Heat is applied to reflow the waveguide precursors into near-circular cross-section waveguides that sit atop the pedestals. The waveguide material naturally forms nearly circular cross sections due to the surface tension effects. After cooling, the waveguides will maintain the round shape. If the width and length are the same, then spherical ball lenses are formed. Alternatively, the pedestals can be patterned to taper along their lengths on the surface of the substrate. This will cause the waveguides to assume a conical taper after reflowing by heat.

  17. Particle filtering for dispersion curve tracking in ocean acoustics.

    PubMed

    Zorych, Ivan; Michalopoulou, Zoi-Heleni

    2008-08-01

    A particle filtering method is developed for dispersion curve extraction from spectrograms of broadband acoustic signals propagating in underwater media. The goal is to obtain accurate representation of modal dispersion which can be employed for source localization and geoacoustic inversion. Results are presented from the application of the method to synthetic data, demonstrating the potential of the approach for accurate estimation of waveguide dispersion characteristics. The method outperforms simple time-frequency analysis providing estimates that are very close to numerically calculated dispersion curves. The method also provides uncertainty information on modal arrival time estimates, typically unavailable when traditional methods are used.

  18. Excitation of a Parallel Plate Waveguide by an Array of Rectangular Waveguides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rengarajan, Sembiam

    2011-01-01

    This work addresses the problem of excitation of a parallel plate waveguide by an array of rectangular waveguides that arises in applications such as the continuous transverse stub (CTS) antenna and dual-polarized parabolic cylindrical reflector antennas excited by a scanning line source. In order to design the junction region between the parallel plate waveguide and the linear array of rectangular waveguides, waveguide sizes have to be chosen so that the input match is adequate for the range of scan angles for both polarizations. Electromagnetic wave scattered by the junction of a parallel plate waveguide by an array of rectangular waveguides is analyzed by formulating coupled integral equations for the aperture electric field at the junction. The integral equations are solved by the method of moments. In order to make the computational process efficient and accurate, the method of weighted averaging was used to evaluate rapidly oscillating integrals encountered in the moment matrix. In addition, the real axis spectral integral is evaluated in a deformed contour for speed and accuracy. The MoM results for a large finite array have been validated by comparing its reflection coefficients with corresponding results for an infinite array generated by the commercial finite element code, HFSS. Once the aperture electric field is determined by MoM, the input reflection coefficients at each waveguide port, and coupling for each polarization over the range of useful scan angles, are easily obtained. Results for the input impedance and coupling characteristics for both the vertical and horizontal polarizations are presented over a range of scan angles. It is shown that the scan range is limited to about 35 for both polarizations and therefore the optimum waveguide is a square of size equal to about 0.62 free space wavelength.

  19. Virtual acoustic displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wenzel, Elizabeth M.

    1991-01-01

    A 3D auditory display can potentially enhance information transfer by combining directional and iconic information in a quite naturalistic representation of dynamic objects in the interface. Another aspect of auditory spatial clues is that, in conjunction with other modalities, it can act as a potentiator of information in the display. For example, visual and auditory cues together can reinforce the information content of the display and provide a greater sense of presence or realism in a manner not readily achievable by either modality alone. This phenomenon will be particularly useful in telepresence applications, such as advanced teleconferencing environments, shared electronic workspaces, and monitoring telerobotic activities in remote or hazardous situations. Thus, the combination of direct spatial cues with good principles of iconic design could provide an extremely powerful and information-rich display which is also quite easy to use. An alternative approach, recently developed at ARC, generates externalized, 3D sound cues over headphones in realtime using digital signal processing. Here, the synthesis technique involves the digital generation of stimuli using Head-Related Transfer Functions (HRTF's) measured in the two ear-canals of individual subjects. Other similar approaches include an analog system developed by Loomis, et. al., (1990) and digital systems which make use of transforms derived from normative mannikins and simulations of room acoustics. Such an interface also requires the careful psychophysical evaluation of listener's ability to accurately localize the virtual or synthetic sound sources. From an applied standpoint, measurement of each potential listener's HRTF's may not be possible in practice. For experienced listeners, localization performance was only slightly degraded compared to a subject's inherent ability. Alternatively, even inexperienced listeners may be able to adapt to a particular set of HRTF's as long as they provide adequate

  20. Wave chaos in a randomly inhomogeneous waveguide: Spectral analysis of the finite-range evolution operator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarov, D. V.; Kon'kov, L. E.; Uleysky, M. Yu.; Petrov, P. S.

    2013-01-01

    The problem of sound propagation in a randomly inhomogeneous oceanic waveguide is considered. An underwater sound channel in the Sea of Japan is taken as an example. Our attention is concentrated on the domains of finite-range ray stability in phase space and their influence on wave dynamics. These domains can be found by means of the one-step Poincare map. To study manifestations of finite-range ray stability, we introduce the finite-range evolution operator (FREO) describing transformation of a wave field in the course of propagation along a finite segment of a waveguide. Carrying out statistical analysis of the FREO spectrum, we estimate the contribution of regular domains and explore their evanescence with increasing length of the segment. We utilize several methods of spectral analysis: analysis of eigenfunctions by expanding them over modes of the unperturbed waveguide, approximation of level-spacing statistics by means of the Berry-Robnik distribution, and the procedure used by A. Relano and coworkers [Relano , Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.89.244102 89, 244102 (2002); Relano, Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.100.224101 100, 224101 (2008)]. Comparing the results obtained with different methods, we find that the method based on the statistical analysis of FREO eigenfunctions is the most favorable for estimating the contribution of regular domains. It allows one to find directly the waveguide modes whose refraction is regular despite the random inhomogeneity. For example, it is found that near-axial sound propagation in the Sea of Japan preserves stability even over distances of hundreds of kilometers due to the presence of a shearless torus in the classical phase space. Increasing the acoustic wavelength degrades scattering, resulting in recovery of eigenfunction localization near periodic orbits of the one-step Poincaré map.

  1. Silicon nitride grating waveguide based directional coupler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Jijun; Li, Anyuan; Akimoto, Ryoichi; Zeng, Heping

    2016-10-01

    Silicon nitride is a promising wave-guiding material for integrated photonics applications with a wide transparency bandwidth from visible to mid-infrared, with a superior performance in fiber-coupling and propagation losses, more tolerant fabrication process to the structure parameters variation and compatible with the CMOS technology. Directional coupler (DC) is very popular for realizing beam splitter because of its structural simplicity and no excess loss intrinsically. Here, a conventional silicon nitride directional coupler, three-dimensional vertical coupler, and grating waveguide assisted coupler are designed and fabricated, and compared with each other. A grating waveguide based coupler with a period of 300 nm and coupling length of 26 um, can realize a wideband 3-dB splitter for the wavelength in the range from 1540 to 1620 nm, for a transverse electric (TE) polarized wave. With further optimization of the grating period and duty cycle, the device performance can be further improved with a wider bandwidth.

  2. Photonic hybrid assembly through flexible waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wörhoff, K.; Prak, A.; Postma, F.; Leinse, A.; Wu, K.; Peters, T. J.; Tichem, M.; Amaning-Appiah, B.; Renukappa, V.; Vollrath, G.; Balcells-Ventura, J.; Uhlig, P.; Seyfried, M.; Rose, D.; Santos, R.; Leijtens, X. J. M.; Flintham, B.; Wale, M.; Robbins, D.

    2016-05-01

    Fully automated, high precision, cost-effective assembly technology for photonic packages remains one of the main challenges in photonic component manufacturing. Next to the cost aspect the most demanding assembly task for multiport photonic integrated circuits (PICs) is the high-precision (±0.1 μm) alignment and fixing required for optical I/O in InP PICs, even with waveguide spot size conversion. In a European research initiative - PHASTFlex - we develop and investigate an innovative, novel assembly concept, in which the waveguides in a matching TriPleX interposer PIC are released during fabrication to make them movable. After assembly of both chips by flip-chip bonding on a common carrier, TriPleX based actuators and clamping functions position and fix the flexible waveguides with the required accuracy.

  3. Quantum interference between transverse spatial waveguide modes

    PubMed Central

    Mohanty, Aseema; Zhang, Mian; Dutt, Avik; Ramelow, Sven; Nussenzveig, Paulo; Lipson, Michal

    2017-01-01

    Integrated quantum optics has the potential to markedly reduce the footprint and resource requirements of quantum information processing systems, but its practical implementation demands broader utilization of the available degrees of freedom within the optical field. To date, integrated photonic quantum systems have primarily relied on path encoding. However, in the classical regime, the transverse spatial modes of a multi-mode waveguide have been easily manipulated using the waveguide geometry to densely encode information. Here, we demonstrate quantum interference between the transverse spatial modes within a single multi-mode waveguide using quantum circuit-building blocks. This work shows that spatial modes can be controlled to an unprecedented level and have the potential to enable practical and robust quantum information processing. PMID:28106036

  4. Alpha Radiation Effects on Silicon Oxynitride Waveguides

    SciTech Connect

    Morichetti, Francesco; Grillanda, Stefano; Manandhar, Sandeep; Shutthanandan, Vaithiyalingam; Kimerling, Lionel; Melloni, Andrea; Agarwal, Anuradha M.

    2016-09-21

    Photonic technologies are today of great interest for use in harsh environments, such as outer space, where they can potentially replace current communication systems based on radiofrequency components. However, very much alike to electronic devices, the behavior of optical materials and circuits can be strongly altered by high-energy and high-dose ionizing radiations. Here, we investigate the effects of alpha () radiation with MeV-range energy on silicon oxynitride (SiON) optical waveguides. Irradiation with a dose of 5×1015 cm-2 increases the refractive index of the SiON core by nearly 10-2, twice as much that of the surrounding silica cladding, leading to a significant increase of the refractive index contrast of the waveguide. The higher mode confinement induced by -radiation reduces the loss of tightly bent waveguides. We show that this increases the quality factor of microring resonators by 20%, with values larger than 105 after irradiation.

  5. High-Performance Flexible Waveguiding Photovoltaics

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Chun-Hsien; Chuang, Jui-Kang; Chen, Fang-Chung

    2013-01-01

    The use of flat-plane solar concentrators is an effective approach toward collecting sunlight economically and without sun trackers. The optical concentrators are, however, usually made of rigid glass or plastics having limited flexibility, potentially restricting their applicability. In this communication, we describe flexible waveguiding photovoltaics (FWPVs) that exhibit high optical efficiencies and great mechanical flexibility. We constructed these FWPVs by integrating poly-Si solar cells, a soft polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) waveguide, and a TiO2-doped backside reflector. Optical microstructures that increase the light harvesting ability of the FWPVs can be fabricated readily, through soft lithography, on the top surface of the PDMS waveguide. Our optimized structure displayed an optical efficiency of greater than 42% and a certified power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 5.57%, with a projected PCE as high as approximately 18%. This approach might open new avenues for the harvesting of solar energy at low cost with efficient, mechanically flexible photovoltaics. PMID:23873225

  6. Waveguide finite elements for curved structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finnveden, Svante; Fraggstedt, Martin

    2008-05-01

    A waveguide finite element formulation for the analysis of curved structures is introduced. The formulation is valid for structures that along one axis have constant properties. It is based on a modified Hamilton's principle valid for general linear viscoelastic motion, which is derived here. Using this principle, material properties such as losses may be distributed in the system and may vary with frequency. Element formulations for isoparametric solid elements and deep shell elements are presented for curved waveguides as well as for straight waveguides. In earlier works, the curved elements have successfully been used to model a passenger car tyre. Here a simple validation example and convergence study is presented, which considers a finite length circular cylinder and all four elements presented are used, in turn, to model this structure. Calculated results compare favourably to those in the literature.

  7. Quantum interference between transverse spatial waveguide modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohanty, Aseema; Zhang, Mian; Dutt, Avik; Ramelow, Sven; Nussenzveig, Paulo; Lipson, Michal

    2017-01-01

    Integrated quantum optics has the potential to markedly reduce the footprint and resource requirements of quantum information processing systems, but its practical implementation demands broader utilization of the available degrees of freedom within the optical field. To date, integrated photonic quantum systems have primarily relied on path encoding. However, in the classical regime, the transverse spatial modes of a multi-mode waveguide have been easily manipulated using the waveguide geometry to densely encode information. Here, we demonstrate quantum interference between the transverse spatial modes within a single multi-mode waveguide using quantum circuit-building blocks. This work shows that spatial modes can be controlled to an unprecedented level and have the potential to enable practical and robust quantum information processing.

  8. Modal characteristics of crossed rectangular waveguides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, F.-L. C.

    1977-01-01

    An integral-eigenvalue problem is formulated for a crossed rectangular waveguide and solved numerically by applying the Ritz-Galerkin method. Theoretical formulas for determining cutoff frequencies and modal-field expressions are obtained for the specific case of a symmetrical rectangular waveguide, cutoff frequencies are calculated numerically, and the results are verified by comparison with available experimental data. The modal fields are expressed in terms of Fourier series for both TE and TM modes. It is found that the bandwidth can be increased to a maximum of 38% when the waveguide dimensions are properly selected and that the numerical results are in agreement with those computed by the method of partial regions. Some practical applications of the modal-field equations are briefly noted.

  9. Assembly and performance of silicone polymer waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lostutter, Calob K.; Hodge, Malcolm H.; Marrapode, Thomas R.; Swatowski, Brandon W.; Weidner, W. Ken

    2016-03-01

    We report on the functionality and key performance properties of 50 μm x 50 μm flexible graded index silicone polymer waveguides. The materials show low optical propagation losses of < 0.04 dB/cm @ 850 nm over 1 m lengths as well as stability to 2000 hours 85°C/85% relative humidity and 5 cycles of 260°C solder wave reflow testing. Methods to fabricate large area panels are demonstrated for scaled manufacturing of polymer based optical printed wiring boards. The polymer waveguides are terminated with a passive direct fiber attach method. Fully MPO connectorized waveguide panels are realized and their optical performance properties assessed.

  10. Beam waveguides in the Deep Space Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clauss, R. C.; Smith, J. G.

    1987-01-01

    A beam waveguide is a mechanism for guiding electromagnetic radiation from one part of an antenna to another through a series of reflectors. Appropriate placement of reflectors on an antenna allows a beam to be guided around the elevation axis and/or below the alidade. The beam waveguide permits placement of all electronics in a room on the alidade below the elevation axis, or below the alidade; feed horn covers to be protected from the weather; and feed electronics to be in spacious rooms rather than in crowded cones, and always level rather than tipping with change in elevation angle. These factors can lead to lower costs in implementation such as Ka-band, better antenna performance at X-band, more efficient and stable performance of transmitters and receivers, and lower maintenance and operating costs. Studies are underway to determine methods for converting the major antennas of the Deep Space Network (DSN) to beam waveguide operations by 1995.

  11. Artificial cochlea and acoustic black hole travelling waves observation: Model and experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foucaud, Simon; Michon, Guilhem; Gourinat, Yves; Pelat, Adrien; Gautier, François

    2014-07-01

    An inhomogeneous fluid structure waveguide reproducing passive behaviour of the inner ear is modelled with the help of the Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin method. A physical setup is designed and built. Experimental results are compared with a good correlation to theoretical ones. The experimental setup is a varying width plate immersed in fluid and terminated with an acoustic black hole. The varying width plate provides a spatial repartition of the vibration depending on the excitation frequency. The acoustic black hole is made by decreasing the plate's thickness with a quadratic profile and by covering this region with a thin film of viscoelastic material. Such a termination attenuates the flexural wave reflection at the end of the waveguide, turning standing waves into travelling waves.

  12. Coherent coupling between radio frequency, optical, and acoustic waves in piezo-optomechanical circuits.

    PubMed

    Balram, Krishna C; Davanço, Marcelo I; Song, Jin Dong; Srinivasan, Kartik

    2016-05-01

    Optomechanical cavities have been studied for applications ranging from sensing to quantum information science. Here, we develop a platform for nanoscale cavity optomechanical circuits in which optomechanical cavities supporting co-localized 1550 nm photons and 2.4 GHz phonons are combined with photonic and phononic waveguides. Working in GaAs facilitates manipulation of the localized mechanical mode either with a radio frequency (RF) field through the piezo-electric effect, which produces acoustic waves that are routed and coupled to the optomechanical cavity by phononic crystal waveguides, or optically through the strong photoelastic effect. Along with mechanical state preparation and sensitive readout, we use this to demonstrate an acoustic wave interference effect, similar to atomic coherent population trapping, in which RF-driven coherent mechanical motion is cancelled by optically-driven motion. Manipulating cavity optomechanical systems with equal facility through both photonic and phononic channels enables new architectures for signal transduction between the optical, electrical, and mechanical domains.

  13. Model-based passive acoustic tracking of sperm whale foraging behavior in the Gulf of Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiemann, Christopher; Thode, Aaron; Straley, Jan; Folkert, Kendall; O'Connell, Victoria

    2005-09-01

    In 2004, the Southeast Alaska Sperm Whale Avoidance Project (SEASWAP) introduced the use of passive acoustics to help monitor the behavior of sperm whales depredating longline fishing operations. Acoustic data from autonomous recorders mounted on longlines provide the opportunity to demonstrate a tracking algorithm based on acoustic propagation modeling while providing insight into whales' foraging behavior. With knowledge of azimuthally dependent bathymetry, a 3D track of whale motion can be obtained using data from just one hydrophone by exploiting multipath arrival information from recorded sperm whale clicks. The evolution of multipath arrival patterns is matched to range-, depth-, and azimuth-dependent modeled arrival patterns to generate an estimate of whale motion. This technique does not require acoustic ray identification (i.e., direct path, surface reflected, etc.) while still utilizing individual ray arrival information, and it can also account for all waveguide propagation physics such as interaction with range-dependent bathymetry and ray refraction.

  14. Acoustic gain in piezoelectric semiconductors at ɛ-near-zero response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willatzen, M.; Christensen, J.

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate strong acoustic gain in electric-field biased piezoelectric semiconductors at frequencies near the plasmon frequency in the terahertz range. When the electron drift velocity produced by an external electric field is higher than the speed of sound, Cherenkov radiation of phonons generates amplification of sound. It is demonstrated that this effect is particularly effective at ɛ-near-zero response, leading to giant levels of acoustic gain. Operating at conditions with strong acoustic amplification, we predict unprecedented enhancement of the scattered sound field radiated from an electrically controlled piezoelectric slab waveguide. This extreme sound field enhancement in an active piezo material shows potential for acoustic sensing and loss compensation in metamaterials and nonlinear devices.

  15. Numerical investigation of amplitude-dependent dynamic response in acoustic metamaterials with nonlinear oscillators.

    PubMed

    Manimala, James M; Sun, C T

    2016-06-01

    The amplitude-dependent dynamic response in acoustic metamaterials having nonlinear local oscillator microstructures is studied using numerical simulations on representative discrete mass-spring models. Both cubically nonlinear hardening and softening local oscillator cases are considered. Single frequency, bi-frequency, and wave packet excitations at low and high amplitude levels were used to interrogate the models. The propagation and attenuation characteristics of harmonic waves in a tunable frequency range is found to correspond to the amplitude and nonlinearity-dependent shifts in the local resonance bandgap for such nonlinear acoustic metamaterials. A predominant shift in the propagated wave spectrum towards lower frequencies is observed. Moreover, the feasibility of amplitude and frequency-dependent selective filtering of composite signals consisting of individual frequency components which fall within propagating or attenuating regimes is demonstrated. Further enrichment of these wave manipulation mechanisms in acoustic metamaterials using different combinations of nonlinear microstructures presents device implications for acoustic filters and waveguides.

  16. Guided plasmon polaritons for triangular metallic waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yuntian; Xiao, Sanshui; Nielsen, Torben Roland

    2008-11-01

    The properties of guided plasmon polaritons supported by a triangular metallic waveguide are presented. The waveguide examined is a metal core with equilateral triangular cross section embedded in an infinite lossless dielectric media. Based on the rotation symmetry of the waveguide, the sketch of the supported fundament modes is given. The fundamental modes can be constructed by a proper combination of the corner modes and surface modes, which can be supported by isolated metal corners and metallic-dielectric interface respectively. The mode properties of the metallic waveguide, e.g., the dispersion and propagation length with the size of the metal core, mode field orientation and field distribution profiles are addressed by using a finite element method. The numerical singularities of the optical field are removed by smoothing the corners with an appropriate arc at the nano meter scale. The guided modes supported by the structure are determined and characterized for both subwavelength and suprawavelength. We find that the corner modes exist in both regimes, while the surface modes only appear in the suprawavelenth. Our results also show that the mode properties preserve a certain kind of symmetry of the waveguides. The degenerate modes exist both for the corner guided modes and for surface guided modes. The first fundamental corner modes is a polarization-independent mode without the cut-off size of the waveguides. Calculations also show how sensitively the mode changes with the corner sharpness. The propagation constant of the corner modes is sensitive to the corner sharpness, while the side modes are unaffected.

  17. AST Launch Vehicle Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houston, Janice; Counter, D.; Giacomoni, D.

    2015-01-01

    The liftoff phase induces acoustic loading over a broad frequency range for a launch vehicle. These external acoustic environments are then used in the prediction of internal vibration responses of the vehicle and components which result in the qualification levels. Thus, predicting these liftoff acoustic (LOA) environments is critical to the design requirements of any launch vehicle. If there is a significant amount of uncertainty in the predictions or if acoustic mitigation options must be implemented, a subscale acoustic test is a feasible pre-launch test option to verify the LOA environments. The NASA Space Launch System (SLS) program initiated the Scale Model Acoustic Test (SMAT) to verify the predicted SLS LOA environments and to determine the acoustic reduction with an above deck water sound suppression system. The SMAT was conducted at Marshall Space Flight Center and the test article included a 5% scale SLS vehicle model, tower and Mobile Launcher. Acoustic and pressure data were measured by approximately 250 instruments. The SMAT liftoff acoustic results are presented, findings are discussed and a comparison is shown to the Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test (ASMAT) results.

  18. Airborne chemistry: acoustic levitation in chemical analysis.

    PubMed

    Santesson, Sabina; Nilsson, Staffan

    2004-04-01

    This review with 60 references describes a unique path to miniaturisation, that is, the use of acoustic levitation in analytical and bioanalytical chemistry applications. Levitation of small volumes of sample by means of a levitation technique can be used as a way to avoid solid walls around the sample, thus circumventing the main problem of miniaturisation, the unfavourable surface-to-volume ratio. Different techniques for sample levitation have been developed and improved. Of the levitation techniques described, acoustic or ultrasonic levitation fulfils all requirements for analytical chemistry applications. This technique has previously been used to study properties of molten materials and the equilibrium shape()and stability of liquid drops. Temperature and mass transfer in levitated drops have also been described, as have crystallisation and microgravity applications. The airborne analytical system described here is equipped with different and exchangeable remote detection systems. The levitated drops are normally in the 100 nL-2 microL volume range and additions to the levitated drop can be made in the pL-volume range. The use of levitated drops in analytical and bioanalytical chemistry offers several benefits. Several remote detection systems are compatible with acoustic levitation, including fluorescence imaging detection, right angle light scattering, Raman spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction. Applications include liquid/liquid extractions, solvent exchange, analyte enrichment, single-cell analysis, cell-cell communication studies, precipitation screening of proteins to establish nucleation conditions, and crystallisation of proteins and pharmaceuticals.

  19. Forecast analysis of optical waveguide bus performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ledesma, R.; Rourke, M. D.

    1979-01-01

    Elements to be considered in the design of a data bus include: architecture; data rate; modulation, encoding, detection; power distribution requirements; protocol, work structure; bus reliability, maintainability; interterminal transmission medium; cost; and others specific to application. Fiber- optic data bus considerations for a 32 port transmissive star architecture, are discussed in a tutorial format. General optical-waveguide bus concepts, are reviewed. The electrical and optical performance of a 32 port transmissive star bus, and the effects of temperature on the performance of optical-waveguide buses are examined. A bibliography of pertinent references and the bus receiver test results are included.

  20. Single Mode Optical Waveguide Design Investigation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-07-10

    AD-AI04 584 CORNING GLASS WORKS NY F/G 20/6 SINGLE MODE OPTICAL WAVEGUIDE DESIGN INVESTIGATION. (7 N JUL 81 V A BHAGAVATJLA, R A WESTWIG. D B KECK...Contract N00173-8O-C-0563 / V. A./Bhagavatula R. A..Westwig D. B.!Keck Corning Glass Works Corning, New York H> July 1,0, 1981 CL 8m NA Single Mode Optical...Waveguide Design Inve-tigation Progress Report 3 1. Sumpry 1.1 ,A total of six fibers have been fabricated with parameters fitting the design matrix

  1. Silica waveguide devices and their applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, C. J.; Schmidt, Kevin M.; Lin, Wenhua

    2005-03-01

    Silica waveguide technology transitioned from laboratories to commercial use in early 1990. Since then, various applications have been exploited based on this technology. Tens of thousands of array waveguide grating (AWG) devices have been installed worldwide for DWDM Mux and Demux. The recent FTTH push in Japan has renewed the significance of this technology for passive optical network (PON) application. This paper reviews the past development of this technology, compare it with competing technologies, and outline the future role of this technology in the evolving optical communications.

  2. Integrated optical tamper sensor with planar waveguide

    DOEpatents

    Carson, R.F.; Casalnuovo, S.A.

    1993-01-05

    A monolithic optical tamper sensor, comprising an optical emitter and detector, connected by an optical waveguide and placed into the critical entry plane of an enclosed sensitive region, the tamper sensor having a myriad of scraps of a material optically absorbent at the wavelength of interest, such that when the absorbent material is in place on the waveguide, an unique optical signature can be recorded, but when entry is attempted into the enclosed sensitive region, the scraps of absorbent material will be displaced and the optical/electrical signature of the tamper sensor will change and that change can be recorded.

  3. Integrated optical tamper sensor with planar waveguide

    DOEpatents

    Carson, Richard F.; Casalnuovo, Stephen A.

    1993-01-01

    A monolithic optical tamper sensor, comprising an optical emitter and detector, connected by an optical waveguide and placed into the critical entry plane of an enclosed sensitive region, the tamper sensor having a myriad of scraps of a material optically absorbent at the wavelength of interest, such that when the absorbent material is in place on the waveguide, an unique optical signature can be recorded, but when entry is attempted into the enclosed sensitive region, the scraps of absorbent material will be displaced and the optical/electrical signature of the tamper sensor will change and that change can be recorded.

  4. Soft tissue cutting with ultrasonic mechanical waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wylie, Mark. P.; McGuinness, Garrett; Gavin, Graham P.

    2012-05-01

    The use of ultrasonic vibrations transmitted via small diameter wire waveguides represents a technology that has potential for minimally invasive procedures in surgery. This form of energy delivery results in distal tip mechanical vibrations with amplitudes of vibration of up to 50 μm and at frequencies between 20-50 kHz commonly reported. This energy can then be used by micro-cutting surgical tools and end effectors for a range of applications such as bone cutting, cement removal in joint revision surgery and soft tissue cutting. One particular application which has gained regulatory approval in recent years is in the area of cardiovascular surgery in the removal of calcified atherosclerotic plaques and chronic total occlusions. This paper builds on previous work that was focused on the ultrasonic perforation of soft vascular tissue using ultrasonically activated mechanical waveguides and the applied force required to initiate failure in soft tissue when compared with non-ultrasonic waveguides. An ultrasonic device and experimental rig was developed that can deliver ultrasonic vibrations to the distal tip of 1.0 mm diameter nickel-titanium waveguides. The operation of the ultrasonic device has been characterized at 22.5 kHz with achievable amplitudes of vibration in the range of 16 - 40μm. The experimental rig allows the ultrasonically activated waveguide to be advanced through a tissue sample over a range of feedrates and the waveguide-tissue interaction force can be measured during perforation into the tissue. Preliminary studies into the effects of feedrate on porcine aortic arterial tissue perforation forces are presented as part of this work. A range of amplitudes of vibration at the wire waveguide distal tip were examined. The resulting temperature increase when perforating artery wall when using the energized wire waveguides is also examined. Results show a clear multistage failure of the tissue. The first stage involves a rise in force up to some

  5. Gamma-ray irradiated polymer optical waveguides

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, C.-C.; Wei, T.-Y.; Chang, C.-Y.; Wang, W.-S.; Wei, Y.-Y.

    2008-01-14

    Optical waveguides fabricated by gamma-ray irradiation on polymer through a gold mask are presented. The gamma-ray induced index change is found almost linearly dependent on the dose of the irradiation. And the measured propagation losses are low enough for practical application. Due to the high penetrability of gamma ray, uniform refractive index change in depth can be easily achieved. Moreover, due to large-area printing, the uniformity of waveguide made by gamma-ray irradiation is much better than that by e-beam direct writing.

  6. Bidirectional waveguide coupling with plasmonic Fano nanoantennas

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Rui; Decker, Manuel Staude, Isabelle; Neshev, Dragomir N.; Kivshar, Yuri S.

    2014-08-04

    We introduce the concept of a bidirectional, compact single-element Fano nanoantenna that allows for directional coupling of light in opposite directions of a high-index dielectric waveguide for two different operation wavelengths. We utilize a Fano resonance to tailor the radiation phases of a gold nanodisk and a nanoslit that is inscribed into the nanodisk to realize bidirectional scattering. We show that this Fano nanoantenna operates as a bidirectional waveguide coupler at telecommunication wavelengths and, thus, is ideally suitable for integrated wavelength-selective light demultiplexing.

  7. DIELECTRIC-LOADED WAVE-GUIDES

    DOEpatents

    Robertson-Shersby-Harvie, R.B.; Mullett, L.B.

    1957-04-23

    This patent presents a particular arrangement for delectric loading of a wave-guide carrying an electromagnetic wave in the E or TM mode of at least the second order, to reduce the power dissipated as the result of conduction loss in the wave-guide walls. To achieve this desirabie result, the effective dielectric constants in the radial direction of adjacent coaxial tubular regions bounded approximateiy by successive nodai surfaces within the electromagnetic field are of two different values alternating in the radial direction, the intermost and outermost regions being of the lower value, and the dielectric constants between nodes are uniform.

  8. Waveguide-QED-based photonic quantum computation.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Huaixiu; Gauthier, Daniel J; Baranger, Harold U

    2013-08-30

    We propose a new scheme for quantum computation using flying qubits--propagating photons in a one-dimensional waveguide interacting with matter qubits. Photon-photon interactions are mediated by the coupling to a four-level system, based on which photon-photon π-phase gates (CONTROLLED-NOT) can be implemented for universal quantum computation. We show that high gate fidelity is possible, given recent dramatic experimental progress in superconducting circuits and photonic-crystal waveguides. The proposed system can be an important building block for future on-chip quantum networks.

  9. Acoustic Translation of an Acoustically Levitated Sample

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmatz, M. B.; Allen, J. L.

    1986-01-01

    Acoustic-levitation apparatus uses only one acoustic mode to move sample from one region of chamber to another. Sample heated and cooled quickly by translation between hot and cold regions of levitation chamber. Levitated sample is raised into furnace region by raising plunger. Frequency of sound produced by transducers adjusted by feedback system to maintain (102) resonant mode, which levitates sample midway between transducers and plunger regardless of plunger position.

  10. Normal mode solutions for seismo-acoustic propagation resulting from shear and combined wave point sources.

    PubMed

    Nealy, Jennifer L; Collis, Jon M; Frank, Scott D

    2016-04-01

    Normal mode solutions to range-independent seismo-acoustic problems are benchmarked against elastic parabolic equation solutions and then used to benchmark the shear elastic parabolic equation self-starter [Frank, Odom, and Collis, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 133, 1358-1367 (2013)]. The Pekeris waveguide with an elastic seafloor is considered for a point source located in the ocean emitting compressional waves, or in the seafloor, emitting both compressional and shear waves. Accurate solutions are obtained when the source is in the seafloor, and when the source is at the interface between the fluid and elastic layers.

  11. Counting cells with a low-cost integrated microfluidics-waveguide sensor.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Daniel; Ghansah, Isaac; Leblanc, John; Butte, Manish J

    2012-03-01

    The capability to count cells from biofluids at low cost has important diagnostic implications in resource-poor settings. Many approaches have been developed to address this important need, and while most envision a low per-test cost, the detector instrument can be quite expensive. In this report, we present a novel device that enables low-cost and rapid counting of cells from a drop of blood. We demonstrate a shallow, buried, planar waveguide fabricated by ion exchange in glass that underlies a microfluidic structure for capturing cells. Laser light transmitted through the waveguide was attenuated by the number of metal nanoparticles tagged to the cells because of the interaction of the metal particles with the evanescent field of the waveguide. Calibration of the sensor using bead-tagged lymphocytes captured from human blood showed that the sensor could semi-quantitatively count as few as 100 cells/µL of blood. This technology enables the enumeration of specifically captured cells, allowing for a point-of-care, hand-held device for fast and affordable cell counting in screening, remote, or resource-poor settings.

  12. GOATS 2011 Adaptive and Collaborative Exploitation of 3-Dimensional Environmental Acoustics in Distributed Undersea Networks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-30

    MIT continues to develop the OASES -3d modeling framework for target scattering and reverberation in shallow ocean waveguides. As was previously the...element-level timeseries using Green’s functions using legacy environmental acoustic models such as OASES , KRAKEN and BELLHOP. WORK COMPLETED...derive a confidence model and critical regions for the AUV to sample. The full field scattered field may be simulated using the SCATT- OASES

  13. A nonlinear acoustic metamaterial: Realization of a backwards-traveling second-harmonic sound wave.

    PubMed

    Quan, Li; Qian, Feng; Liu, Xiaozhou; Gong, Xiufen

    2016-06-01

    An ordinary waveguide with periodic vibration plates and side holes can realize an acoustic metamaterial that simultaneously possesses a negative bulk modulus and a negative mass density. The study is further extended to a nonlinear case and it is predicted that a backwards-traveling second-harmonic sound wave can be obtained through the nonlinear propagation of a sound wave in such a metamaterial.

  14. Mode imaging and loss evaluation of semiconductor waveguides

    SciTech Connect

    Mochizuki, Toshimitsu; Kim, Changsu; Yoshita, Masahiro; Nakamura, Takahiro; Akiyama, Hidefumi; Pfeiffer, Loren N.; West, Ken W.

    2014-05-15

    An imaging and loss evaluation method for semiconductor waveguides coupled with non-doped quantum wells is presented. Using the internal emission of the wells as a probe light source, the numbers and widths of the modes of waveguides with various ridge sizes were evaluated by CCD imaging, and the obtained values were consistent with effective index method calculation. Waveguide internal losses were obtained from analyses of the Fabry-Pérot fringes of waveguide emission spectra. We quantified the quality of 29 single-mode waveguide samples as an internal loss and variation of 10.2 ± 0.6  cm{sup −1}.

  15. Linear-array ultrasonic waveguide transducer for under sodium viewing.

    SciTech Connect

    Sheen, S. H.; Chien, H. T.; Wang, K.; Lawrence, W. P.; Engel, D.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2010-09-01

    In this report, we first present the basic design of a low-noise waveguide and its performance followed by a review of the array transducer technology. The report then presents the concept and basic designs of arrayed waveguide transducers that can apply to under-sodium viewing for in-service inspection of fast reactors. Depending on applications, the basic waveguide arrays consist of designs for sideway and downward viewing. For each viewing application, two array geometries, linear and circular, are included in design analysis. Methods to scan a 2-D target using a linear array waveguide transducer are discussed. Future plan to develop a laboratory array waveguide prototype is also presented.

  16. Seismo-acoustic ray model benchmarking against experimental tank data.

    PubMed

    Camargo Rodríguez, Orlando; Collis, Jon M; Simpson, Harry J; Ey, Emanuel; Schneiderwind, Joseph; Felisberto, Paulo

    2012-08-01

    Acoustic predictions of the recently developed traceo ray model, which accounts for bottom shear properties, are benchmarked against tank experimental data from the EPEE-1 and EPEE-2 (Elastic Parabolic Equation Experiment) experiments. Both experiments are representative of signal propagation in a Pekeris-like shallow-water waveguide over a non-flat isotropic elastic bottom, where significant interaction of the signal with the bottom can be expected. The benchmarks show, in particular, that the ray model can be as accurate as a parabolic approximation model benchmarked in similar conditions. The results of benchmarking are important, on one side, as a preliminary experimental validation of the model and, on the other side, demonstrates the reliability of the ray approach for seismo-acoustic applications.

  17. Polarization rotation and coupling between silicon waveguide and hybrid plasmonic waveguide

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sangsik; Qi, Minghao

    2015-01-01

    We present a polarization rotation and coupling scheme that rotates a TE0 mode in a silicon waveguide and simultaneously couples the rotated mode to a hybrid plasmonic (HP0) waveguide mode. Such a polarization rotation can be realized with a partially etched asymmetric hybrid plasmonic waveguide consisting of a silicon strip waveguide, a thin oxide spacer, and a metal cap made from copper, gold, silver or aluminum. Two implementations, one with and one without the tapering of the metal cap are presented, and different taper shapes (linear and exponential) are also analyzed. The devices have large 3 dB conversion bandwidths (over 200 nm at near infrared) and short length (< 5 μm), and achieve a maximum coupling factor of ∼ 78% with a linearly tapered silver metal cap. PMID:25969038

  18. Research in Nonlinear Acoustics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-07-02

    waveguide was used in an experi- ment done by J. A. TenCate to study the interaction of two noncollinear wave fields. The first field was that of an...Rectan- gular Waveguide TenCate (82-2, 83-7) used the suppression of sound by sound as a means of measuring eff (Eq. 15a). Consider, for example, Eq. 10...suppression in a noncollinear interaction experiment is generally limited 26 to a few dB; complete nulls are not a viable option. TenCate therefore

  19. Multiple node remote messaging

    DOEpatents

    Blumrich, Matthias A.; Chen, Dong; Gara, Alan G.; Giampapa, Mark E.; Heidelberger, Philip; Ohmacht, Martin; Salapura, Valentina; Steinmacher-Burow, Burkhard; Vranas, Pavlos

    2010-08-31

    A method for passing remote messages in a parallel computer system formed as a network of interconnected compute nodes includes that a first compute node (A) sends a single remote message to a remote second compute node (B) in order to control the remote second compute node (B) to send at least one remote message. The method includes various steps including controlling a DMA engine at first compute node (A) to prepare the single remote message to include a first message descriptor and at least one remote message descriptor for controlling the remote second compute node (B) to send at least one remote message, including putting the first message descriptor into an injection FIFO at the first compute node (A) and sending the single remote message and the at least one remote message descriptor to the second compute node (B).

  20. Nearfield Acoustical Holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayek, Sabih I.

    Nearfield acoustical holography (NAH) is a method by which a set of acoustic pressure measurements at points located on a specific surface (called a hologram) can be used to image sources on vibrating surfaces on the acoustic field in three-dimensional space. NAH data are processed to take advantage of the evanescent wavefield to image sources that are separated less that one-eighth of a wavelength.

  1. Deep Water Acoustics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-28

    Estimates of basin-wide sound speed ( temperature ) fields obtained by the combination of acoustic, altimetry, and other data types with ocean...of acoustic coherence at long ranges in the ocean. Estimates of basin-wide sound speed ( temperature ) fields obtained by the combination of acoustic...index.html Award Number N00014-13-1-0053 LONG-TERM GOALS The ultimate limitations to the performance of long-range sonar are due to ocean sound speed

  2. Acoustic Communications (ACOMMS) ATD

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-14

    Acoustic Communications (ACOMMS) ATD Tam Nguyen 2531 Jefferson Davis Hwy Arlington, VA 22242 phone: (703) 604-6013 ext 520 fax: (703) 604-6056...email: NguyenTL@navsea.navy.mil Award # N0001499PD30007 LONG-TERM GOALS The goal of the recently completed Acoustic Communications Advanced...Technology Demonstration program (ACOMMS ATD) was to demonstrate long range and moderate data rate underwater acoustic communications between a submarine

  3. Deep Water Ocean Acoustics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-04-30

    OASIS, INC. 1 Report No. QSR-14C0172-Ocean Acoustics-043016 Quarterly Progress Report Technical and Financial Deep Water Ocean Acoustics...understanding of the impact of the ocean and seafloor environmental variability on deep- water (long-range) ocean acoustic propagation and to...improve our understanding. During the past few years, the physics effects studied have been three-dimensional propagation on global scales, deep water

  4. Ultrasonic transmission measurements in the characterization of viscoelasticity utilizing polymeric waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bause, Fabian; Rautenberg, Jens; Feldmann, Nadine; Webersen, Manuel; Claes, Leander; Gravenkamp, Hauke; Henning, Bernd

    2016-10-01

    For the numerical simulation of acoustic wave propagation in (measurement) systems and their design, the use of reliable material models and material parameters is a central issue. Especially in polymers, acoustic material parameters cannot be evaluated based on quasistatically measured parameters, as are specified in data sheets by the manufacturers. In this work, a measurement method is presented which quantifies, for a given polymeric material sample, a complex-valued and frequency-dependent material model. A novel three-dimensional approach for modeling viscoelasticity is introduced. The material samples are designed as hollow cylindrical waveguides to account for the high damping characteristics of the polymers under test and to provide an axisymmetric structure for good performance of waveguide modeling and reproducible coupling conditions arising from the smaller coupling area in the experiment. Ultrasonic transmission measurements are carried out between the parallel faces of the sample. To account for the frequency dependency of the material properties, five different transducer pairs with ascending central frequency from 750~\\text{kHz} to 2.5~\\text{MHz} are used. After passing through the sample, each of the five received signals contains information on the material parameters which are determined in an inverse procedure. The solution of the inverse problem is carried out by iterative comparison of an innovative forward SBFEM-based simulations of the entire measurement system with the experimentally determined measurement data. For a given solution of the inverse problem, an estimate of the measurement uncertainty of each identified material parameter is calculated. Moreover, a second measurement setup, based on laser-acoustic excitation of Lamb modes in plate-shaped specimens, is presented. Using this setup, the identified material properties can be verified on samples with a varied geometry, but made from the same material.

  5. Silicone polymer waveguide bridge for Si to glass optical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruse, Kevin L.; Riegel, Nicholas J.; Middlebrook, Christopher T.

    2015-03-01

    Multimode step index polymer waveguides achieve high-speed, (<10 Gb/s) low bit-error-rates for onboard and embedded circuit applications. Using several multimode waveguides in parallel enables overall capacity to reach beyond 100 Gb/s, but the intrinsic bandwidth limitations due to intermodal dispersion limit the data transmission rates within multimode waveguides. Single mode waveguides, where intermodal dispersion is not present, have the potential to further improve data transmission rates. Single mode waveguide size is significantly less than their multimode counterparts allowing for greater density of channels leading to higher bandwidth capacity per layer. Challenges in implementation of embedded single mode waveguides within printed circuit boards involves mass production fabrication techniques to create precision dimensional waveguides, precision alignment tolerances necessary to launch a mode, and effective coupling between adjoining waveguides and devices. An emerging need in which single mode waveguides can be utilized is providing low loss fan out techniques and coupling between on-chip transceiver devices containing Si waveguide structures to traditional single mode optical fiber. A polymer waveguide bridge for Si to glass optical fibers can be implemented using silicone polymers at 1310 nm. Fabricated and measured prototype devices with modeling and simulation analysis are reported for a 12 member 1-D tapered PWG. Recommendations and designs are generated with performance factors such as numerical aperture and alignment tolerances.

  6. Analysis of the Suspended H-Waveguide and Other Related Dielectric Waveguide Structures.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-01-01

    propagation constants of a slot leaky-wave antenna array constructed from a sus- pended H- waveguide is presented. A technique for improving the radiation...spectral domain approach for determining the complex propagation constants of a slot leaky-wave antenna array constructed from a suspended H-vaveguide... analysis for the suspended H- waveguide could also be used for other planar dielectric structures of rectangular cross-section. Information in Figs. 7 and

  7. Electrically Tunable Nd:YAG waveguide laser based on Graphene

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Linan; Tan, Yang; Akhmadaliev, Shavkat; Zhou, Shengqiang; Chen, Feng

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a tunable hybrid Graphene-Nd:YAG cladding waveguide laser exploiting the electro-optic and the Joule heating effects of Graphene. A cladding Nd:YAG waveguide was fabricated by the ion irradiation. The multi-layer graphene were transferred onto the waveguide surface as the saturable absorber to get the Q-switched pulsed laser oscillation in the waveguide. Composing with appropriate electrodes, graphene based capacitance and heater were formed on the surface of the Nd:YAG waveguide. Through electrical control of graphene, the state of the hybrid waveguide laser was turned on or off. And the laser operation of the hybrid waveguide was electrically tuned between the continuous wave laser and the nanosecond pulsed laser. PMID:27833114

  8. Electrically Tunable Nd:YAG waveguide laser based on Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Linan; Tan, Yang; Akhmadaliev, Shavkat; Zhou, Shengqiang; Chen, Feng

    2016-11-01

    We demonstrate a tunable hybrid Graphene-Nd:YAG cladding waveguide laser exploiting the electro-optic and the Joule heating effects of Graphene. A cladding Nd:YAG waveguide was fabricated by the ion irradiation. The multi-layer graphene were transferred onto the waveguide surface as the saturable absorber to get the Q-switched pulsed laser oscillation in the waveguide. Composing with appropriate electrodes, graphene based capacitance and heater were formed on the surface of the Nd:YAG waveguide. Through electrical control of graphene, the state of the hybrid waveguide laser was turned on or off. And the laser operation of the hybrid waveguide was electrically tuned between the continuous wave laser and the nanosecond pulsed laser.

  9. Surface plasmon mode analysis of nanoscale metallic rectangular waveguide.

    PubMed

    Kong, Fanmin; Wu, Bae-Ian; Chen, Hongsheng; Kong, Jin Au

    2007-09-17

    A detailed study of guided modes in a nanoscale metallic rectangular waveguide is presented by using the effective dielectric constant approach. The guided modes, including both traditional waveguide mode and surface plasmon mode, are investigated for the silver rectangular waveguide. The mode evolution in narrow waveguide is also discussed with the emphasis on the dependence of mode dispersion with waveguide height. Finally, the red-shift of the cutoff wavelength of the fundamental mode is observed when the waveguide height decreases, contrary to the behavior of regular metallic waveguide with PEC boundary. The comprehensive analysis can provide some guideline in the design of subwavelength optical devices based on the dispersion characteristics of metallic rectangular bore.

  10. Testing and verification of a scale-model acoustic propagation system.

    PubMed

    Sagers, Jason D; Ballard, Megan S

    2015-12-01

    This paper discusses the design and operation of a measurement apparatus used to conduct scale-model underwater acoustic propagation experiments, presents experimental results for an idealized waveguide, and compares the measured results to data generated by two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) numerical models. The main objective of this paper is to demonstrate the capability of the apparatus for a simple waveguide that primarily exhibits 2D acoustic propagation. The apparatus contains a computer-controlled positioning system that accurately moves a receiving transducer in the water layer above a scale-model bathymetry while a stationary source transducer emits broadband pulsed waveforms. Experimental results are shown for a 2.133 m × 1.219 m bathymetric part possessing a flat-bottom bathymetry with a translationally invariant wedge of 10° slope along one edge. Beamformed results from a synthetic horizontal line array indicate the presence of strong in-plane arrivals along with weaker diffracted and horizontally refracted arrivals. A simulated annealing inversion method is applied to infer values for five waveguide parameters with the largest measurement uncertainty. The inferred values are then used in a 2D method of images model and a 3D adiabatic normal-mode model to simulate the measured acoustic data.

  11. Acoustic dispersive prism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esfahlani, Hussein; Karkar, Sami; Lissek, Herve; Mosig, Juan R.

    2016-01-01

    The optical dispersive prism is a well-studied element, which allows separating white light into its constituent spectral colors, and stands in nature as water droplets. In analogy to this definition, the acoustic dispersive prism should be an acoustic device with capability of splitting a broadband acoustic wave into its constituent Fourier components. However, due to the acoustical nature of materials as well as the design and fabrication difficulties, there is neither any natural acoustic counterpart of the optical prism, nor any artificial design reported so far exhibiting an equivalent acoustic behaviour. Here, based on exotic properties of the acoustic transmission-line metamaterials and exploiting unique physical behaviour of acoustic leaky-wave radiation, we report the first acoustic dispersive prism, effective within the audible frequency range 800 Hz–1300 Hz. The dispersive nature, and consequently the frequency-dependent refractive index of the metamaterial are exploited to split the sound waves towards different and frequency-dependent directions. Meanwhile, the leaky-wave nature of the structure facilitates the sound wave radiation into the ambient medium.

  12. Acoustic dispersive prism.

    PubMed

    Esfahlani, Hussein; Karkar, Sami; Lissek, Herve; Mosig, Juan R

    2016-01-07

    The optical dispersive prism is a well-studied element, which allows separating white light into its constituent spectral colors, and stands in nature as water droplets. In analogy to this definition, the acoustic dispersive prism should be an acoustic device with capability of splitting a broadband acoustic wave into its constituent Fourier components. However, due to the acoustical nature of materials as well as the design and fabrication difficulties, there is neither any natural acoustic counterpart of the optical prism, nor any artificial design reported so far exhibiting an equivalent acoustic behaviour. Here, based on exotic properties of the acoustic transmission-line metamaterials and exploiting unique physical behaviour of acoustic leaky-wave radiation, we report the first acoustic dispersive prism, effective within the audible frequency range 800 Hz-1300 Hz. The dispersive nature, and consequently the frequency-dependent refractive index of the metamaterial are exploited to split the sound waves towards different and frequency-dependent directions. Meanwhile, the leaky-wave nature of the structure facilitates the sound wave radiation into the ambient medium.

  13. Low frequency acoustic microscope

    DOEpatents

    Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T.

    1986-11-04

    A scanning acoustic microscope is disclosed for the detection and location of near surface flaws, inclusions or voids in a solid sample material. A focused beam of acoustic energy is directed at the sample with its focal plane at the subsurface flaw, inclusion or void location. The sample is scanned with the beam. Detected acoustic energy specularly reflected and mode converted at the surface of the sample and acoustic energy reflected by subsurface flaws, inclusions or voids at the focal plane are used for generating an interference signal which is processed and forms a signal indicative of the subsurface flaws, inclusions or voids.

  14. Acoustic dispersive prism

    PubMed Central

    Esfahlani, Hussein; Karkar, Sami; Lissek, Herve; Mosig, Juan R.

    2016-01-01

    The optical dispersive prism is a well-studied element, which allows separating white light into its constituent spectral colors, and stands in nature as water droplets. In analogy to this definition, the acoustic dispersive prism should be an acoustic device with capability of splitting a broadband acoustic wave into its constituent Fourier components. However, due to the acoustical nature of materials as well as the design and fabrication difficulties, there is neither any natural acoustic counterpart of the optical prism, nor any artificial design reported so far exhibiting an equivalent acoustic behaviour. Here, based on exotic properties of the acoustic transmission-line metamaterials and exploiting unique physical behaviour of acoustic leaky-wave radiation, we report the first acoustic dispersive prism, effective within the audible frequency range 800 Hz–1300 Hz. The dispersive nature, and consequently the frequency-dependent refractive index of the metamaterial are exploited to split the sound waves towards different and frequency-dependent directions. Meanwhile, the leaky-wave nature of the structure facilitates the sound wave radiation into the ambient medium. PMID:26739504

  15. Wireless remote liquid level detector and indicator for well testing

    DOEpatents

    Fasching, George E.; Evans, Donald M.; Ernest, John H.

    1985-01-01

    An acoustic system is provided for measuring the fluid level in oil, gas or water wells under pressure conditions that does not require an electrical link to the surface for level detection. A battery powered sound transmitter is integrated with a liquid sensor in the form of a conductivity probe, enclosed in a sealed housing which is lowered into a well by means of a wire line reel assembly. The sound transmitter generates an intense identifiable acoustic emission when the sensor contacts liquid in the well. The acoustic emissions propagate up the well which functions as a waveguide and are detected by an acoustic transducer. The output signal from the transducer is filtered to provide noise rejection outside of the acoustic signal spectrum. The filtered signal is used to indicate to an operator the liquid level in the well has been reached and the depth is read from a footage counter coupled with the wire line reel assembly at the instant the sound signal is received.

  16. Supermode dispersion and waveguide-to-slot mode transition in arrays of silicon-on-insulator waveguides.

    PubMed

    de Nobriga, Charles E; Hobbs, Gareth D; Wadsworth, William J; Knight, Jonathan C; Skryabin, Dmitry V; Samarelli, Antonio; Sorel, Marc; De La Rue, Richard M

    2010-12-01

    In this Letter, we report group index measurements of the supermodes of an array of two strongly coupled silicon-on-insulator waveguides. We observe coupling-induced dispersion that is greater than the material and waveguide dispersion of the individual waveguides. We demonstrate that the system transforms from supporting the two supermodes associated with two coupled waveguides to the single mode of a slot waveguide within the investigated spectral range. During the cutoff of the antisymmetric supermode, an anti-crossing between the symmetric TM and antisymmetric TE supermodes has been observed.

  17. Extraordinary acoustic transmission mediated by Helmholtz resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koju, Vijay; Rowe, Ebony; Robertson, William M.

    2014-07-01

    We demonstrate perfect transmission of sound through a rigid barrier embedded with Helmholtz resonators. The resonators are confined within a waveguide and they are oriented such that one neck protrudes onto each side of the barrier. Perfect sound transmission occurs even though the open area of the necks is less than 3% of the barrier area. Maximum transmission occurs at the resonant frequency of the Helmholtz resonator. Because the dimensions of the Helmholtz resonators are much smaller than the resonant wavelength, the transmission is independent of the direction of sound on the barrier and of the relative placement of the necks. Further, we show that the transmitted sound experiences a continuous phase transition of π radians as a function of frequency through resonance. In simulations of adjacent resonators with slightly offset resonance frequencies, the phase difference leads to destructive interference. By expanding the simulation to a linear array of tuned Helmholtz resonators we show that it is possible to create an acoustic lens. The ability of Helmholtz resonator arrays to manipulate the phase of a plane acoustic wave enables a new class of sonic beam-forming devices analogous to diffractive optics.

  18. Extraordinary acoustic transmission mediated by Helmholtz resonators

    SciTech Connect

    Koju, Vijay; Rowe, Ebony; Robertson, William M.

    2014-07-15

    We demonstrate perfect transmission of sound through a rigid barrier embedded with Helmholtz resonators. The resonators are confined within a waveguide and they are oriented such that one neck protrudes onto each side of the barrier. Perfect sound transmission occurs even though the open area of the necks is less than 3% of the barrier area. Maximum transmission occurs at the resonant frequency of the Helmholtz resonator. Because the dimensions of the Helmholtz resonators are much smaller than the resonant wavelength, the transmission is independent of the direction of sound on the barrier and of the relative placement of the necks. Further, we show that the transmitted sound experiences a continuous phase transition of π radians as a function of frequency through resonance. In simulations of adjacent resonators with slightly offset resonance frequencies, the phase difference leads to destructive interference. By expanding the simulation to a linear array of tuned Helmholtz resonators we show that it is possible to create an acoustic lens. The ability of Helmholtz resonator arrays to manipulate the phase of a plane acoustic wave enables a new class of sonic beam-forming devices analogous to diffractive optics.

  19. Evaluation of specialty fibers and waveguides for ultrashort laser pulse propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Michael N.

    Ultrashort pulse lasers have become invaluable tools in many areas of science and technology. Optical waveguide or fiber delivery of ultrashort pulses would benefit numerous applications that require remote location of the laser or for addressing areas of low accessibility such as minimally invasive surgical procedures, multiphoton excitation microscopy, laser micromachining and high bandwidth telecommunications. However, the extremely high peak power and bandwidth associated with ultrashort pulses are prohibitive for most conventional waveguides that guide light in solid dielectric cores, the main drawbacks being dispersion, nonlinear effects, and damage via optical breakdown. The purpose of this study is to investigate the significant obstacles involved with implementing optical waveguides or fibers capable of delivering ultrashort pulses. In recent years, specialty fibers such as large mode-area (LMA) photonic crystal and photonic bandgap fibers have been developed, which exhibit remarkable properties such as single-mode guidance that is independent of core size and guidance in an air core respectively. In this thesis, two early prototypes of each of these fibers are investigated for their ability to deliver ultrashort pulses. Another specialty fiber, silver coated hollow silica waveguide, which was originally developed for delivery of infrared light from CO2 and Er:YAG lasers is shown to be a good candidate for single-mode delivery of gigawatt peak power pulses with minimal pulse distortion. Another potential fiber is comprised of multiple evanescently-coupled single-mode cores. This so-called multi-core fiber has demonstrated increased power handling in fiber lasers and amplifiers and was selected as a candidate for delivery of ultrashort pulses due to its scalable large mode-area and increased nonlinear threshold. A design for multi-core fibers is proposed that allows tailoring of the supermode distribution to obtain equal power distribution among all cores

  20. Strongly Confined Spoof Surface Plasmon Polaritons Waveguiding Enabled by Planar Staggered Plasmonic Waveguides

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Longfang; Xiao, Yifan; Liu, Yanhui; Zhang, Liang; Cai, Guoxiong; Liu, Qing Huo

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a novel route to achieving highly efficient and strongly confined spoof surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) waveguides at subwavelength scale enabled by planar staggered plasmonic waveguides (PSPWs). The structure of these new waveguides consists of an ultrathin metallic strip with periodic subwavelength staggered double groove arrays supported by a flexible dielectric substrate, leading to unique staggered EM coupling and waveguiding phenomenon. The spoof SPP propagation properties, including dispersion relations and near field distributions, are numerically investigated. Furthermore, broadband coplanar waveguide (CPW) to planar staggered plasmonic waveguide (PSPW) transitions are designed to achieve smooth momentum matching and highly efficient spoof SPP mode conversion. By applying these transitions, a CPW-PSPW-CPW structure is designed, fabricated and measured to verify the PSPW’s propagation performance at microwave frequencies. The investigation results show the proposed PSPWs have excellent performance of deep subwavelength spoof SPPs confinement, long propagation length and low bend loss, as well as great design flexibility to engineer the propagation properties by adjusting their geometry dimensions and material parameters. Our work opens up a new avenue for development of various advanced planar integrated plasmonic devices and circuits in microwave and terahertz regimes. PMID:27917930

  1. Strongly Confined Spoof Surface Plasmon Polaritons Waveguiding Enabled by Planar Staggered Plasmonic Waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Longfang; Xiao, Yifan; Liu, Yanhui; Zhang, Liang; Cai, Guoxiong; Liu, Qing Huo

    2016-12-01

    We demonstrate a novel route to achieving highly efficient and strongly confined spoof surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) waveguides at subwavelength scale enabled by planar staggered plasmonic waveguides (PSPWs). The structure of these new waveguides consists of an ultrathin metallic strip with periodic subwavelength staggered double groove arrays supported by a flexible dielectric substrate, leading to unique staggered EM coupling and waveguiding phenomenon. The spoof SPP propagation properties, including dispersion relations and near field distributions, are numerically investigated. Furthermore, broadband coplanar waveguide (CPW) to planar staggered plasmonic waveguide (PSPW) transitions are designed to achieve smooth momentum matching and highly efficient spoof SPP mode conversion. By applying these transitions, a CPW-PSPW-CPW structure is designed, fabricated and measured to verify the PSPW’s propagation performance at microwave frequencies. The investigation results show the proposed PSPWs have excellent performance of deep subwavelength spoof SPPs confinement, long propagation length and low bend loss, as well as great design flexibility to engineer the propagation properties by adjusting their geometry dimensions and material parameters. Our work opens up a new avenue for development of various advanced planar integrated plasmonic devices and circuits in microwave and terahertz regimes.

  2. Acoustic tomography in the atmospheric surface layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziemann, A.; Arnold, K.; Raabe, A.

    1999-01-01

    Acoustic tomography is presented as a technique for remote monitoring of meteorological quantities. This method and a special algorithm of analysis can directly produce area-averaged values of meteorological parameters. As a result consistent data will be obtained for validation of numerical atmospheric micro-scale models. Such a measuring system can complement conventional point measurements over different surfaces. The procedure of acoustic tomography uses the horizontal propagation of sound waves in the atmospheric surface layer. Therefore, to provide a general overview of sound propagation under various atmospheric conditions a two-dimensional ray-tracing model according to a modified version of Snell's law is used. The state of the crossed atmosphere can be estimated from measurements of acoustic travel time between sources and receivers at different points. Derivation of area-averaged values of the sound speed and furthermore of air temperature results from the inversion of travel time values for all acoustic paths. Thereby, the applied straight ray two-dimensional tomographic model using SIRT (simultaneous iterative reconstruction technique) is characterised as a method with small computational requirements, satisfactory convergence and stability properties as well as simple handling, especially, during online evaluation.

  3. Wireless actuation with functional acoustic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, T.; Palagi, S.; Mark, A. G.; Melde, K.; Adams, F.; Fischer, P.

    2016-11-01

    Miniaturization calls for micro-actuators that can be powered wirelessly and addressed individually. Here, we develop functional surfaces consisting of arrays of acoustically resonant micro-cavities, and we demonstrate their application as two-dimensional wireless actuators. When remotely powered by an acoustic field, the surfaces provide highly directional propulsive forces in fluids through acoustic streaming. A maximal force of ˜0.45 mN is measured on a 4 × 4 mm2 functional surface. The response of the surfaces with bubbles of different sizes is characterized experimentally. This shows a marked peak around the micro-bubbles' resonance frequency, as estimated by both an analytical model and numerical simulations. The strong frequency dependence can be exploited to address different surfaces with different acoustic frequencies, thus achieving wireless actuation with multiple degrees of freedom. The use of the functional surfaces as wireless ready-to-attach actuators is demonstrated by implementing a wireless and bidirectional miniaturized rotary motor, which is 2.6 × 2.6 × 5 mm3 in size and generates a stall torque of ˜0.5 mN.mm. The adoption of micro-structured surfaces as wireless actuators opens new possibilities in the development of miniaturized devices and tools for fluidic environments that are accessible by low intensity ultrasound fields.

  4. Multistatic scattering of targets and rough interfaces in ocean waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jaiyong

    1999-11-01

    The diffusive nature of shallow water environment limits the fidelity of high performance target sonar systems. The multi-layered ocean waveguide increases the reverberation and the stochastic nature of interface inhomogeneities distorts the target signal. In order to improve the performance in such an environment, an accurate description and a better understanding of background reverberant field are essential. As a theoretical approach, two numerical models have been developed in a consistent framework to simulate multi- static scattered fields produced by rough interfaces and targets in ocean waveguides. The first model describes a scattered field generated by interface roughness in a multi-layered medium. The strong interaction between seismo-acoustic waves and rough interfaces causes a significant amount of surface reverberation. A perturbational approach has been developed for the rough interface scattering. It was combined with 3-D OASES-a seismo-acoustic wave propagation model for a horizontally stratified medium, in order to express multi-layered media efficiently. The model is capable of producing random realizations and spatial statistics of scattered fields in a 3-D space with arbitrary horizontal stratification. Its deterministic scattering formulation for random roughness enables the use of a wide range of roughness types as well as experimental roughness data directly. The second model describes deterministic target scattering. It is based on the plane wave scattering functions of various targets in a free space and the single scattering approximation. As the target models, a rigid sphere, a pressure-release sphere, and a finite cylindrical elastic shell have been used. A scattering theory of finite cylindrical elastic shells has been chosen to investigate the 3-D effects caused by an aspect-dependent object. The plane wave scattering functions are incorporated with 3-D OASES to produce a unified target scattering model within multi-layered media

  5. Radar Remote Sensing of Waves and Currents in the Nearshore Zone

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    and application of novel microwave, acoustic, and optical remote sensing techniques. The objectives of this effort are to determine the extent to which...Doppler radar techniques are useful for nearshore remote sensing applications. Of particular interest are estimates of surf zone location and extent...surface currents, waves, and bathymetry. To date, optical (video) techniques have been the primary remote sensing technology used for these applications. A key advantage of the radar is its all weather day-night operability.

  6. Wideband Waveguide Acousto-Optic Bragg Cell.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The results of an effort to improve the performance specifications of acousto - optic Bragg cells are reported. Various configurations of multiple...would provide a 700 MHz acousto - optic bandwidth. Investigated were Bragg cells fabricated on Ti diffused LiNb03 waveguides as well as Ti diffused LiNb03

  7. Nonlinear optical beam interactions in waveguide arrays.

    PubMed

    Meier, Joachim; Stegeman, George I; Silberberg, Y; Morandotti, R; Aitchison, J S

    2004-08-27

    We report our investigation of Kerr nonlinear beam interactions in discrete systems. The influence of power and the relative phase between two Gaussian shaped beams was investigated in detail by performing numerical simulations of the discrete nonlinear Schrödinger equation and comparing the results with experiments done in AlGaAs waveguide arrays. Good agreement between theory and experiment was obtained.

  8. Transmission characteristics of finite periodic dielectric waveguides.

    PubMed

    Luan, Pi-Gang; Chang, Kao-Der

    2006-04-17

    Transmission properties of the periodic dielectric waveguide (PDWG) formed by aligning a sequence of dielectric cylinders in air are investigated theoretically. Unlike photonic crystal waveguides (PCWs), light confinement in a PDWG is due to total internal reflection. Besides, the dispersion relation of the guided modes is strongly influenced by the dielectric periodicity along the waveguide. The band structure for the guided modes is calculated using a finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. The first band is used for guiding light, which makes PDWG single mode. Transmission is calculated using the multiple scattering method for various S shaped PDWGs, each containing two opposite bends. When PDWG operates in appropriate frequency ranges, high transmission (above 90%) is observed, even if the radius of curvature of the bends is reduced to three wavelengths. This feature indicates that the guiding ability of PDWG can be made better than the conventional waveguide when used in an optical circuit. In addition, PDWG has the advantage that it can be bent to any arbitrary shape while still preserves the high transmission, avoiding the geometric restriction that PCWs are subject to.

  9. Optimization of Aperiodic Waveguide Mode Converters

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, G J; White, D A; Thompson, C A

    2004-12-09

    Previous studies by Haq, Webb and others have demonstrated the design of aperiodic waveguide structures to act as filters and mode converters. These aperiodic structures have been shown to yield high efficiency mode conversion or filtering in lengths considerably shorter than structures using gradual transitions and periodic perturbations. The design method developed by Haq and others has used mode-matching models for the irregular, stepped waveguides coupled with computer optimization to achieve the design goal using a Matlab optimization routine. Similar designs are described here, using a mode matching code written in Fortran and with optimization accomplished with the downhill simplex method with simulated annealing using an algorithm from the book Numerical Recipes in Fortran. Where Haq et al. looked mainly for waveguide shapes with relatively wide cavities, we have sought lower profile designs. It is found that lower profiles can meet the design goals and result in a structure with lower Q. In any case, there appear to be very many possible configurations for a given mode conversion goal, to the point that it is unlikely to find the same design twice. Tolerance analysis was carried out for the designs to show edge sensitivity and Monte Carlo degradation rate. The mode matching code and mode conversion designs were validated by comparison with FDTD solutions for the discontinuous waveguides.

  10. Planned waveguide electric field breakdown studies

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Faya; Li Zenghai

    2012-12-21

    This paper presents an experimental setup for X-band rf breakdown studies. The setup is composed of a section of WR90 waveguide with a tapered pin located at the middle of the waveguide E-plane. Another pin is used to rf match the waveguide so it operates in a travelling wave mode. By adjusting the penetration depth of the tapered pin, different surface electric field enhancements can be obtained. The setup will be used to study the rf breakdown rate dependence on power flow in the waveguide for a constant maximum surface electric field on the pin. Two groups of pins have been designed. The Q of one group is different and very low. The other has a similar Q. With the test of the two groups of pins, we should be able to discern how the net power flow and Q affect the breakdown. Furthermore, we will apply an electron beam treatment to the pins to study its effect on breakdown. Overall, these experiments should be very helpful in understanding rf breakdown phenomena and could significantly benefit the design of high gradient accelerator structures.

  11. Transforming guided waves with metamaterial waveguide cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viaene, S.; Ginis, V.; Danckaert, J.; Tassin, P.

    2016-04-01

    Metamaterials make use of subwavelength building blocks to enhance our control on the propagation of light. To determine the required material properties for a given functionality, i.e., a set of desired light flows inside a metamaterial device, metamaterial designs often rely on a geometrical design tool known as transformation optics. In recent years, applications in integrated photonics motivated several research groups to develop two-dimensional versions of transformation optics capable of routing surface waves along graphene-dielectric and metal-dielectric interfaces. Although guided electromagnetic waves are highly relevant to applications in integrated optics, no consistent transformation-optical framework has so far been developed for slab waveguides. Indeed, the conventional application of transformation optics to dielectric slab waveguides leads to bulky three-dimensional devices with metamaterial implementations both inside and outside of the waveguide's core. In this contribution, we develop a transformationoptical framework that still results in thin metamaterial waveguide devices consisting of a nonmagnetic metamaterial core of varying thickness [Phys. Rev. B 93.8, 085429 (2016)]. We numerically demonstrate the effectiveness and versatility of our equivalence relations with three crucial functionalities: a beam bender, a beam splitter and a conformal lens. Our devices perform well on a qualitative (comparison of fields) and quantitative (comparison of transmitted power) level compared to their bulky counterparts. As a result, the geometrical toolbox of transformation optics may lead to a plethora of integrated metamaterial devices to route guided waves along optical chips.

  12. LF Daytime Earth Ionosphere Waveguide Calculations.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-01-01

    this sort could be responsible for the slight discrep- ancies between the waveguide and wave hop calculations. In view of the differ- ence in methods...205.45 ANALYTICAL SYSTEMS ENGINEERING CORP DOC CON FOR DONALD I GALE OLD CCCORD RD BURLINGTON. ’A 01803 LAWRENCE LIVERMORE LABORATORY RADIO SCIE NCES Po

  13. Coplanar waveguide feed for microstrip patch antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, R. L.; Williams, J. T.

    1992-01-01

    A coplanar waveguide (CPW) loop is shown to be an effective low VSWR feed for microstrip antennas. The low VSWR transition between the CPW and the antenna is obtained without the use of a matching circuit, and it is relatively insensitive to the position of the antenna and the feed.

  14. Dispersive solitons in magneto-optic waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vega-Guzman, Jose; Ullah, Malik Zaka; Asma, Mir; Zhou, Qin; Biswas, Anjan

    2017-03-01

    This paper obtains bright, dark and singular dispersive optical soliton solutions with magneto-optic waveguides. The governing equation is the coupled Schrödinger-Hirota equation. The existence criteria of these solitons are also presented. Both Kerr law and power law of nonlinearity are considered.

  15. Investigation of semiconductor clad optical waveguides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batchman, T. E.; Mcwright, G. M.

    1982-01-01

    Glass waveguides are studied because of the ease and economy of fabricating devices in glass. All calculations are based on the assumption of a glass guide and substrate, but the effects being studied will occur on other materials if the proper refractive indices are used in the calculations.

  16. Vector Reflectometry in a Beam Waveguide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eimer, J. R.; Bennett, C. L.; Chuss, D. T.; Wollack, E. J.

    2011-01-01

    We present a one-port calibration technique for characterization of beam waveguide components with a vector network analyzer. This technique involves using a set of known delays to separate the responses of the instrument and the device under test. We demonstrate this technique by measuring the reflected performance of a millimeter-wave variable-delay polarization modulator.

  17. Propagation Limitations in Remote Sensing.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Contents: Multi-sensors and systems in remote sensing ; Radar sensing systems over land; Remote sensing techniques in oceanography; Influence of...propagation media and background; Infrared techniques in remote sensing ; Photography in remote sensing ; Analytical studies in remote sensing .

  18. RWGSCAT - RECTANGULAR WAVEGUIDE JUNCTION SCATTERING PROGRAM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoppe, D. J.

    1994-01-01

    In order to optimize frequency response and determine the tolerances required to meet RF specifications, accurate computer modeling of passive rectangular waveguide components is often required. Many rectangular waveguide components may be represented either exactly or approximately as a number of different size rectangular waveguides which are connected in series. RWGSCAT, Rectangular WaveGuide junction SCATtering program, solves for the scattering properties of a waveguide device. This device must consist of a number of rectangular waveguide sections of different cross sectional area which are connected in series. Devices which fall into this category include step transformers, filters, and smooth or corrugated rectangular horns. RWGSCAT will model such devices and accurately predict the reflection and transmission characteristics, taking into account higher order (other than dominant TE 10) mode excitation if it occurs, as well as multiple reflections and stored energy at each discontinuity. For devices which are large with respect to the wavelength of operation, the characteristics of the device may be required for computing a higher order mode or a number of higher order modes exciting the device. Such interactions can be represented by defining a scattering matrix for each discontinuity in the device, and then cascading the individual scattering matrices in order to determine the scattering matrix for the overall device. The individual matrices are obtained using the mode matching method. RWGSCAT is written in FORTRAN 77 for IBM PC series and compatible computers running MS-DOS. It has been successfully compiled and implemented using Lahey FORTRAN 77 under MS-DOS. A sample MS-DOS executable is provided on the distribution medium. It requires 377K of RAM for execution. Sample input data is also provided on the distribution medium. The standard distribution medium for this program is one 5.25 inch 360K MS-DOS format diskette. The contents of the diskette are

  19. [Thematic Issue: Remote Sensing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howkins, John, Ed.

    1978-01-01

    Four of the articles in this publication discuss the remote sensing of the Earth and its resources by satellites. Among the topics dealt with are the development and management of remote sensing systems, types of satellites used for remote sensing, the uses of remote sensing, and issues involved in using information obtained through remote…

  20. Cascaded Second-Order Nonlinearities in Waveguides.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundheimer, Michael Lee

    The cascaded second-order nonlinearity arising from the second-harmonic generation process in noncentrosymmetric media is a novel approach to achieving the nonlinear phase shifts required for all-optical signal processing. The research presented in this dissertation demonstrated and measured the cascaded second-order nonlinearity for the first time in viable integrated optical waveguide formats. Cascaded self-phase modulation was measured in potassium titanyl phosphate (KTiOPO_4 or KTP) segmented quasi-phasematched waveguides at wavelengths near 855 nm and in the optical fiber telecommunications window near 1.585 μm using picosecond and femtosecond pulses, respectively. Spectral modulation and broadening were observed on the output fundamental spectrum and compared to predictions from pulsed second -harmonic generation theory under conditions of group-velocity mismatch (temporal walk-off) and group-velocity dispersion. Peak cascaded phase shifts of the fundamental of approximately pi at 855 nm were inferred with 690 W of peak guided power. Peak cascaded phase shifts of approximately pi/2 were inferred at 1.585 μm with 760 W of peak power in the guide. Direct interferometric measurements of the magnitude and sign of the cascaded nonlinear phase shift of the fundamental were performed in temperature-tuned lithium niobate (LiNbO _3) channel waveguides at 1.32 mum. The cascaded phase shift was shown to change sign upon passing through the phasematching condition, as required by theory. Peak cascaded phase shifts of +0.53 pi and -0.13 pi were measured for 86 W peak power in these waveguides. A non-uniform temperature profile along the waveguide led to a non-uniform wavevector-mismatch along the guide, resulting in an enhanced positive phase shift and an increased temperature bandwidth for the phase shift. The phase shifts achieved in this research are large enough to be suitable for some all-optical signal processing functions.

  1. Efficient waveguide coupler based on metal materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Wenjun; Yang, Junbo; Chang, Shengli; Zhang, Jingjing; Lu, Huanyu

    2015-10-01

    Because of the diffraction limit of light, the scale of optical element stays in the order of wavelength, which makes the interface optics and nano-electronic components cannot be directly matched, thus the development of photonics technology encounters a bottleneck. In order to solve the problem that coupling of light into the subwavelength waveguide, this paper proposes a model of coupler based on metal materials. By using Surface Plasmon Polaritons (SPPs) wave, incident light can be efficiently coupled into waveguide of diameter less than 100 nm. This paper mainly aims at near infrared wave band, and tests a variety of the combination of metal materials, and by changing the structural parameters to get the maximum coupling efficiency. This structure splits the plane incident light with wavelength of 864 nm, the width of 600 nm into two uniform beams, and separately coupled into the waveguide layer whose width is only about 80 nm, and the highest coupling efficiency can reach above 95%. Using SPPs structure will be an effective method to break through the diffraction limit and implement photonics device high-performance miniaturization. We can further compress the light into small scale fiber or waveguide by using the metal coupler, and to save the space to hold more fiber or waveguide layer, so that we can greatly improve the capacity of optical communication. In addition, high-performance miniaturization of the optical transmission medium can improve the integration of optical devices, also provide a feasible solution for the photon computer research and development in the future.

  2. [Research on symmetrical optical waveguide based surface plasmon resonance sensing with spectral interrogation].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi-long; Liu, Le; Guo, Jun; Zhang, Peng-fei; Guo, Ji-hua; Ma, Hui; He, Yong-hong

    2015-02-01

    Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensors with spectral interrogation can adopt fiber to transmit light signals, thus leaving the sensing part separated, which is very convenient for miniaturization, remote-sensing and on-site analysis. Symmetrical optical waveguide (SOW) SPR has the same refractive index of the-two buffer media layers adjacent to the metal film, resulting in longer propagation distance, deeper penetration depth and better performance compared to conventional SPR In the present paper, we developed a symmetrical optical, waveguide (SOW) SPR sensor with wavelength interrogation. In the system, MgF2-Au-MgF2 film was used as SOW module for glucose sensing, and a fiber based light source and detection was used in the spectral interrogation. In the experiment, a refractive index resolution of 2.8 x 10(-7) RIU in fluid protocol was acquired. This technique provides advantages of high resolution and could have potential use in compact design, on-site analysis and remote sensing.

  3. The Acoustical Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Melissa

    Asserting that without an adequate acoustical environment, learning activities can be hindered, this paper reviews the literature on classroom acoustics, particularly noise, reverberation, signal-to-noise ratio, task performance, and recommendations for improvement. Through this review, the paper seeks to determine whether portable classrooms…

  4. Cystic acoustic schwannomas.

    PubMed

    Lunardi, P; Missori, P; Mastronardi, L; Fortuna, A

    1991-01-01

    Three cases with large space-occupying cysts in the cerebellopontine angle are reported. CT and MRI findings were not typical for acoustic schwannomas but at operation, besides the large cysts, small acoustic schwannomas could be detected and removed. The clinical and neuroradiological features of this unusual variety and the CT and MRI differential diagnosis of cerebellopontine angle lesions are discussed.

  5. Lake bed classification using acoustic data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yin, Karen K.; Li, Xing; Bonde, John; Richards, Carl; Cholwek, Gary

    1998-01-01

    As part of our effort to identify the lake bed surficial substrates using remote sensing data, this work designs pattern classifiers by multivariate statistical methods. Probability distribution of the preprocessed acoustic signal is analyzed first. A confidence region approach is then adopted to improve the design of the existing classifier. A technique for further isolation is proposed which minimizes the expected loss from misclassification. The devices constructed are applicable for real-time lake bed categorization. A mimimax approach is suggested to treat more general cases where the a priori probability distribution of the substrate types is unknown. Comparison of the suggested methods with the traditional likelihood ratio tests is discussed.

  6. Light propagation in strip and slot waveguide arrays for sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Qingyan; Qi, Fan; Wang, Yufei; Liu, Zhishuang; Zheng, Wanhua

    2016-11-01

    Light propagation in strip and slot waveguide arrays for sensing are proposed and analyzed with a new theory of quantum walk. The waveguide arrays are designed on silicon-on-insulator and can be fabricated with mature and cost-efficient complementary metal-oxide semiconductor technology. A new slot waveguide array modified by conventional strip waveguide array with electric field mainly confined in the cladding region is investigated. Quantum walks have an exact mapping to classical phenomena as verified by experiments using bright laser light, so that they are introduced in our work as theoretical foundation. We take the width of waveguide of 450 nm and the coupling distance of 200 nm for strip waveguide array, and 420 nm and 180 nm for slot waveguide array, but with a 100nm slot in the center of waveguide. At last the waveguide array covered by a thin layer of graphene is investigated, which brings higher sensing property as well as a much better biocompatibility. With the monochrome light injection the intensity distribution at the end of the arrays changes with the refractive index of the sensing area (cladding region) and it can be explained by quantum walks theory. The designed waveguide arrays can possess compact footprint and high refractive index resolution, reaching 1E-11 RIU theoretically.

  7. Phononic crystal structures for acoustically driven microfluidic manipulations.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Rab; Reboud, Julien; Bourquin, Yannyk; Neale, Steven L; Zhang, Yi; Cooper, Jonathan M

    2011-01-21

    The development of microfluidic systems is often constrained both by difficulties associated with the chip interconnection to other instruments and by limitations imposed by the mechanisms that can enable fluid movement and processing. Surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices have shown promise in allowing samples to be manipulated, although designing complex fluid operations involves using multiple electrode transducers. We now demonstrate a simple interface between a piezoelectric SAW device and a disposable microfluidic chip, patterned with phononic structures to control the acoustic wave propagation. The surface wave is coupled from the piezoelectric substrate into the disposable chip where it interacts with the phononic lattice. By implementing both a phononic filter and an acoustic waveguide, we illustrate the potential of the technique by demonstrating microcentrifugation for particle and cell concentration in microlitre droplets. We show for the first time that the interaction of the fluid within this metamaterial phononic lattice is dependent upon the frequency of the acoustic wave, providing a route to programme complex fluidic functions into a microchip (in much the same way, by analogy, that a holographic element would change the phase of a light wave in optical tweezers). A practical realisation of this involves the centrifugation of blood on the chip.

  8. Travel-time sensitivity kernels in ocean acoustic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skarsoulis, E. K.; Cornuelle, B. D.

    2004-07-01

    Wave-theoretic ocean acoustic propagation modeling is combined with the peak arrival approach for tomographic travel-time observables to derive the sensitivity kernel of travel times with respect to sound-speed variations. This is the Born-Fréchet kernel relating the three-dimensional spatial distribution of sound-speed variations with the induced travel-time variations. The derivation is based on the first Born approximation of the Green's function. The application of the travel-time sensitivity kernel to an ocean acoustic waveguide gives a picture close to the ray-theoretic one in the case of high frequencies. However, in the low-frequency case, of interest in ocean acoustic tomography, for example, there are significant deviations. Low-frequency travel times are sensitive to sound-speed changes in Fresnel-zone-scale areas surrounding the eigenrays, but not on the eigenrays themselves, where the sensitivity is zero. Further, there are areas of positive sensitivity, where, e.g., a sound-speed increase results in an increase of arrival times, i.e., a further delay of arrivals, in contrast with the common expectation. These findings are confirmed by forward acoustic predictions from a coupled-mode code.

  9. Acoustic suspension system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, M. C.; Wang, T. G. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    An acoustic levitation system is described, with single acoustic source and a small reflector to stably levitate a small object while the object is processed as by coating or heating it. The system includes a concave acoustic source which has locations on opposite sides of its axis that vibrate towards and away from a focal point to generate a converging acoustic field. A small reflector is located near the focal point, and preferably slightly beyond it, to create an intense acoustic field that stably supports a small object near the reflector. The reflector is located about one-half wavelength from the focal point and is concavely curved to a radius of curvature (L) of about one-half the wavelength, to stably support an object one-quarter wavelength (N) from the reflector.

  10. Virtual acoustics displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wenzel, Elizabeth M.; Fisher, Scott S.; Stone, Philip K.; Foster, Scott H.

    1991-01-01

    The real time acoustic display capabilities are described which were developed for the Virtual Environment Workstation (VIEW) Project at NASA-Ames. The acoustic display is capable of generating localized acoustic cues in real time over headphones. An auditory symbology, a related collection of representational auditory 'objects' or 'icons', can be designed using ACE (Auditory Cue Editor), which links both discrete and continuously varying acoustic parameters with information or events in the display. During a given display scenario, the symbology can be dynamically coordinated in real time with 3-D visual objects, speech, and gestural displays. The types of displays feasible with the system range from simple warnings and alarms to the acoustic representation of multidimensional data or events.

  11. Cochlear bionic acoustic metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Fuyin; Wu, Jiu Hui; Huang, Meng; Fu, Gang; Bai, Changan

    2014-11-01

    A design of bionic acoustic metamaterial and acoustic functional devices was proposed by employing the mammalian cochlear as a prototype. First, combined with the experimental data in previous literatures, it is pointed out that the cochlear hair cells and stereocilia cluster are a kind of natural biological acoustic metamaterials with the negative stiffness characteristics. Then, to design the acoustic functional devices conveniently in engineering application, a simplified parametric helical structure was proposed to replace actual irregular cochlea for bionic design, and based on the computational results of such a bionic parametric helical structure, it is suggested that the overall cochlear is a local resonant system with the negative dynamic effective mass characteristics. There are many potential applications in the bandboard energy recovery device, cochlear implant, and acoustic black hole.

  12. Acoustic integrated extinction

    PubMed Central

    Norris, Andrew N.

    2015-01-01

    The integrated extinction (IE) is defined as the integral of the scattering cross section as a function of wavelength. Sohl et al. (2007 J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 122, 3206–3210. (doi:10.1121/1.2801546)) derived an IE expression for acoustic scattering that is causal, i.e. the scattered wavefront in the forward direction arrives later than the incident plane wave in the background medium. The IE formula was based on electromagnetic results, for which scattering is causal by default. Here, we derive a formula for the acoustic IE that is valid for causal and non-causal scattering. The general result is expressed as an integral of the time-dependent forward scattering function. The IE reduces to a finite integral for scatterers with zero long-wavelength monopole and dipole amplitudes. Implications for acoustic cloaking are discussed and a new metric is proposed for broadband acoustic transparency. PMID:27547100

  13. Direct Field Acoustic Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larkin, Paul; Goldstein, Bob

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents an update to the methods and procedures used in Direct Field Acoustic Testing (DFAT). The paper will discuss some of the recent techniques and developments that are currently being used and the future publication of a reference standard. Acoustic testing using commercial sound system components is becoming a popular and cost effective way of generating a required acoustic test environment both in and out of a reverberant chamber. This paper will present the DFAT test method, the usual setup and procedure and the development and use of a closed-loop, narrow-band control system. Narrow-band control of the acoustic PSD allows all standard techniques and procedures currently used in random control to be applied to acoustics and some examples are given. The paper will conclude with a summary of the development of a standard practice guideline that is hoped to be available in the first quarter of next year.

  14. Virtual acoustics displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenzel, Elizabeth M.; Fisher, Scott S.; Stone, Philip K.; Foster, Scott H.

    1991-03-01

    The real time acoustic display capabilities are described which were developed for the Virtual Environment Workstation (VIEW) Project at NASA-Ames. The acoustic display is capable of generating localized acoustic cues in real time over headphones. An auditory symbology, a related collection of representational auditory 'objects' or 'icons', can be designed using ACE (Auditory Cue Editor), which links both discrete and continuously varying acoustic parameters with information or events in the display. During a given display scenario, the symbology can be dynamically coordinated in real time with 3-D visual objects, speech, and gestural displays. The types of displays feasible with the system range from simple warnings and alarms to the acoustic representation of multidimensional data or events.

  15. Amplification of acoustic evanescent waves using metamaterial slabs.

    PubMed

    Park, Choon Mahn; Park, Jong Jin; Lee, Seung Hwan; Seo, Yong Mun; Kim, Chul Koo; Lee, Sam H

    2011-11-04

    We amplified acoustic evanescent waves using metamaterial slabs with a negative effective density. For the amplifying effect of the slab to overcome the dissipation, it is necessary that the imaginary part of the effective density is much smaller than the real part, a condition not satisfied so far. We report the construction of membrane-based two-dimensional negative-density metamaterials which exhibited remarkably small dissipation. Using a slab of this metamaterial we realized a 17-fold net amplitude gain at a remote distance from the evanescent wave source. Potential applications include acoustic superlensing.

  16. Optical properties of V-groove silicon nitride trench waveguides.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qiancheng; Huang, Yuewang; Boyraz, Ozdal

    2016-09-01

    We numerically investigate the mode properties of the V-groove silicon nitride trench waveguides based on the experimental results. The trench waveguides are suitable for nonlinear applications. By manipulating the waveguide thicknesses, the waveguides can achieve zero dispersion or a maximized nonlinear parameter of 0.219  W-1·m-1 at 1550 nm. Broadband four-wave mixing with a gain of 5.545  m-1 is presented as an example. The waveguides can also be applied in sensing applications with an optimized evanescent intensity ratio. By etching away the top flat slabs, wider trapezoidal trench waveguides can be utilized for plasmonic sensing thanks to their TE fundamental modes.

  17. Characterization of bending loss in hollow flexible terahertz waveguides.

    PubMed

    Doradla, Pallavi; Joseph, Cecil S; Kumar, Jayant; Giles, Robert H

    2012-08-13

    Attenuation characteristics of hollow, flexible, metal and metal/dielectric coated polycarbonate waveguides were investigated using an optically pumped far infrared (FIR) laser at 215 µm. The bending loss of silver coated polycarbonate waveguides were measured as a function of various bending angles, bending radii, and bore diameters. Minimal propagation losses of 1.77, 0.96 dB/m were achieved by coupling the lowest loss TE11 mode into the silver or gold coated waveguide, and HE11 mode into the silver/polystyrene coated waveguides respectively. The maximal bending loss was found to be less than 1 dB/m for waveguides of 2 to 4.1 mm bore diameters, with a 6.4 cm bend radius, and up to 150° bending angle. The investigation shows the preservation of single laser mode in smaller bore waveguides even at greater bending angles.

  18. Fluoride waveguide lasers grown by liquid phase epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starecki, Florent; Bolaños, Western; Brasse, Gurvan; Benayad, Abdelmjid; Doualan, Jean-Louis; Braud, Alain; Moncorgé, Richard; Camy, Patrice

    2013-03-01

    High optical quality rare-earth-doped LiYF4 (YLF) epitaxial layers were grown on pure YLF substrates by liquid phase epitaxy (LPE). Thulium, praseodymium and ytterbium YLF crystalline waveguides co-doped with gadolinium and/or lutetium were obtained. Spectroscopic and optical characterization of these rare-earth doped waveguides are reported. Internal propagation losses as low as 0.11 dB/cm were measured on the Tm:YLF waveguide and the overall spectroscopic characteristics of the epitaxial layers were found to be comparable to bulk crystals. Laser operation was achieved at 1.87 μm in the Tm3+ doped YLF planar waveguide with a very good efficiency of 76% with respect to the pump power. Lasing was also demonstrated in a Pr3+ doped YLF waveguide in the red and orange regions and in a Yb3+:YLF planar waveguide at 1020 nm and 994 nm.

  19. Degenerate four-wave mixing in silicon hybrid plasmonic waveguides.

    PubMed

    Duffin, Thorin J; Nielsen, Michael P; Diaz, Fernando; Palomba, Stefano; Maier, Stefan A; Oulton, Rupert F

    2016-01-01

    Silicon-based plasmonic waveguides show high confinement well beyond the diffraction limit. Various devices have been demonstrated to outperform their dielectric counterparts at micrometer scales, such as linear modulators, capable of generating high field confinement and improving device efficiency by increasing access to nonlinear processes, limited by ohmic losses. By using hybridized plasmonic waveguide architectures and nonlinear materials, silicon-based plasmonic waveguides can generate strong nonlinear effects over just a few wavelengths. We have theoretically investigated the nonlinear optical performance of two hybrid plasmonic waveguides (HPWG) with three different nonlinear materials. Based on this analysis, the hybrid gap plasmon waveguide (HGPW), combined with the DDMEBT nonlinear polymer, shows a four-wave mixing (FWM) conversion efficiency of -16.4  dB over a 1 μm propagation length, demonstrating that plasmonic waveguides can be competitive with standard silicon photonics structures over distances three orders of magnitude shorter.

  20. Nonlinear optical localization in embedded chalcogenide waveguide arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Mingshan; Huang, Sheng; Wang, Qingqing; Chen, Kevin P.; Petek, Hrvoje

    2014-05-15

    We report the nonlinear optical localization in an embedded waveguide array fabricated in chalcogenide glass. The array, which consists of seven waveguides with circularly symmetric cross sections, is realized by ultrafast laser writing. Light propagation in the chalcogenide waveguide array is studied with near infrared laser pulses centered at 1040 nm. The peak intensity required for nonlinear localization for the 1-cm long waveguide array was 35.1 GW/cm{sup 2}, using 10-nJ pulses with 300-fs pulse width, which is 70 times lower than that reported in fused silica waveguide arrays and with over 7 times shorter interaction distance. Results reported in this paper demonstrated that ultrafast laser writing is a viable tool to produce 3D all-optical switching waveguide circuits in chalcogenide glass.