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Sample records for acoustics test asmat

  1. Verification of Ares I Liftoff Acoustic Environments via the Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Counter, Douglas; Houston, Janice

    2012-01-01

    The Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test (ASMAT) program was implemented to verify the predicted Ares I liftoff acoustic environments and to determine the acoustic reduction gained by using an above deck water sound suppression system. The test article included a 5% scale Ares I vehicle model and Mobile Launcher with tower. Acoustic and pressure data were measured by over 200 instruments. The ASMAT results are compared to Ares I-X flight data.

  2. Simulation of Acoustics for Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putnam, Gabriel; Strutzenberg, Louise L.

    2011-01-01

    The Ares I Scale Model Acoustics Test (ASMAT) is a series of live-fire tests of scaled rocket motors meant to simulate the conditions of the Ares I launch configuration. These tests have provided a well documented set of high fidelity acoustic measurements useful for validation including data taken over a range of test conditions and containing phenomena like Ignition Over-Pressure and water suppression of acoustics. To take advantage of this data, a digital representation of the ASMAT test setup has been constructed and test firings of the motor have been simulated using the Loci/CHEM computational fluid dynamics software. Results from ASMAT simulations with the rocket in both held down and elevated configurations, as well as with and without water suppression have been compared to acoustic data collected from similar live-fire tests. Results of acoustic comparisons have shown good correlation with the amplitude and temporal shape of pressure features and reasonable spectral accuracy up to approximately 1000 Hz. Major plume and acoustic features have been well captured including the plume shock structure, the igniter pulse transient, and the ignition overpressure.

  3. Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Tests Instrumentation for Acoustic and Pressure Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vargas, Magda B.; Counter, Douglas D.

    2011-01-01

    The Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test (ASMAT) was a development test performed at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) East Test Area (ETA) Test Stand 116. The test article included a 5% scale Ares I vehicle model and tower mounted on the Mobile Launcher. Acoustic and pressure data were measured by approximately 200 instruments located throughout the test article. There were four primary ASMAT instrument suites: ignition overpressure (IOP), lift-off acoustics (LOA), ground acoustics (GA), and spatial correlation (SC). Each instrumentation suite incorporated different sensor models which were selected based upon measurement requirements. These requirements included the type of measurement, exposure to the environment, instrumentation check-outs and data acquisition. The sensors were attached to the test article using different mounts and brackets dependent upon the location of the sensor. This presentation addresses the observed effect of the sensors and mounts on the acoustic and pressure measurements.

  4. Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test Above Deck Water Sound Suppression Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Counter, Douglas D.; Houston, Janice D.

    2011-01-01

    The Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test (ASMAT) program test matrix was designed to determine the acoustic reduction for the Liftoff acoustics (LOA) environment with an above deck water sound suppression system. The scale model test can be used to quantify the effectiveness of the water suppression system as well as optimize the systems necessary for the LOA noise reduction. Several water flow rates were tested to determine which rate provides the greatest acoustic reductions. Preliminary results are presented.

  5. Overview of the Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Counter, Douglas D.; Houston, Janice D.

    2011-01-01

    Launch environments, such as lift-off acoustic (LOA) and ignition overpressure (IOP), are important design factors for any vehicle and are dependent upon the design of both the vehicle and the ground systems. LOA environments are used directly in the development of vehicle vibro-acoustic environments and IOP is used in the loads assessment. The NASA Constellation Program had several risks to the development of the Ares I vehicle linked to LOA. The risks included cost, schedule and technical impacts for component qualification due to high predicted vibro-acoustic environments. One solution is to mitigate the environment at the component level. However, where the environment is too severe for component survivability, reduction of the environment itself is required. The Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test (ASMAT) program was implemented to verify the Ares I LOA and IOP environments for the vehicle and ground systems including the Mobile Launcher (ML) and tower. An additional objective was to determine the acoustic reduction for the LOA environment with an above deck water sound suppression system. ASMAT was a development test performed at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) East Test Area (ETA) Test Stand 116 (TS 116). The ASMAT program is described in this presentation.

  6. Validation and Simulation of ARES I Scale Model Acoustic Test -1- Pathfinder Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putnam, G. C.

    2011-01-01

    The Ares I Scale Model Acoustics Test (ASMAT) is a series of live-fire tests of scaled rocket motors meant to simulate the conditions of the Ares I launch configuration. These tests have provided a well documented set of high fidelity measurements useful for validation including data taken over a range of test conditions and containing phenomena like Ignition Over-Pressure and water suppression of acoustics. To take advantage of this data, a digital representation of the ASMAT test setup has been constructed and test firings of the motor have been simulated using the Loci/CHEM computational fluid dynamics software. Within this first of a series of papers, results from ASMAT simulations with the rocket in a held down configuration and without water suppression have then been compared to acoustic data collected from similar live-fire tests to assess the accuracy of the simulations. Detailed evaluations of the mesh features, mesh length scales relative to acoustic signals, Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy numbers, and spatial residual sources have been performed to support this assessment. Results of acoustic comparisons have shown good correlation with the amplitude and temporal shape of pressure features and reasonable spectral accuracy up to approximately 1000 Hz. Major plume and acoustic features have been well captured including the plume shock structure, the igniter pulse transient, and the ignition overpressure. Finally, acoustic propagation patterns illustrated a previously unconsidered issue of tower placement inline with the high intensity overpressure propagation path.

  7. Verification of Ares I Liftoff Acoustic Environments via the Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Counter, Douglas D.; Houston, Janice D.

    2012-01-01

    Launch environments, such as Liftoff Acoustic (LOA) and Ignition Overpressure (IOP), are important design factors for any vehicle and are dependent upon the design of both the vehicle and the ground systems. The NASA Constellation Program had several risks to the development of the Ares I vehicle linked to LOA which are used in the development of the vibro-acoustic environments. The risks included cost, schedule and technical impacts for component qualification due to high predicted vibro-acoustic environments. One solution is to mitigate the environment at the component level. However, where the environment is too severe to mitigate at the component level, reduction of the launch environments is required. The Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test (ASMAT) program was implemented to verify the predicted Ares I launch environments and to determine the acoustic reduction for the LOA environment with an above deck water sound suppression system. The test article included a 5% scale Ares I vehicle model, tower and Mobile Launcher. Acoustic and pressure data were measured by approximately 200 instruments. The ASMAT results are compared to the Ares I LOA predictions and water suppression effectiveness results are presented.

  8. Verification of Ares I Liftoff Acoustic Environments via the Ares Scale Model Acoustic Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Counter, Douglas D.; Houston, Janice D.

    2012-01-01

    Launch environments, such as Liftoff Acoustic (LOA) and Ignition Overpressure (IOP), are important design factors for any vehicle and are dependent upon the design of both the vehicle and the ground systems. The NASA Constellation Program had several risks to the development of the Ares I vehicle linked to LOA which are used in the development of the vibro-acoustic environments. The risks included cost, schedule and technical impacts for component qualification due to high predicted vibro-acoustic environments. One solution is to mitigate the environment at the component level. However, where the environment is too severe to mitigate at the component level, reduction of the launch environments is required. The Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test (ASMAT) program was implemented to verify the predicted Ares I launch environments and to determine the acoustic reduction for the LOA environment with an above deck water sound suppression system. The test article included a 5% scale Ares I vehicle model, tower and Mobile Launcher. Acoustic and pressure data were measured by approximately 200 instruments. The ASMAT results are compared to the Ares I LOA predictions and water suppression effectiveness results are presented.

  9. Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test Instrumentation for Acoustic and Pressure Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vargas, Magda B.; Counter, Douglas

    2011-01-01

    Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test (ASMAT) is a 5% scale model test of the Ares I vehicle, launch pad and support structures conducted at MSFC to verify acoustic and ignition environments and evaluate water suppression systems Test design considerations 5% measurements must be scaled to full scale requiring high frequency measurements Users had different frequencies of interest Acoustics: 200 - 2,000 Hz full scale equals 4,000 - 40,000 Hz model scale Ignition Transient: 0 - 100 Hz full scale equals 0 - 2,000 Hz model scale Environment exposure Weather exposure: heat, humidity, thunderstorms, rain, cold and snow Test environments: Plume impingement heat and pressure, and water deluge impingement Several types of sensors were used to measure the environments Different instrument mounts were used according to the location and exposure to the environment This presentation addresses the observed effects of the selected sensors and mount design on the acoustic and pressure measurements

  10. Validation and Simulation of Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test - 2 - Simulations at 5 Foot Elevation for Evaluation of Launch Mount Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strutzenberg, Louise L.; Putman, Gabriel C.

    2011-01-01

    The Ares I Scale Model Acoustics Test (ASMAT) is a series of live-fire tests of scaled rocket motors meant to simulate the conditions of the Ares I launch configuration. These tests have provided a well documented set of high fidelity measurements useful for validation including data taken over a range of test conditions and containing phenomena like Ignition Over-Pressure and water suppression of acoustics. Expanding from initial simulations of the ASMAT setup in a held down configuration, simulations have been performed using the Loci/CHEM computational fluid dynamics software for ASMAT tests of the vehicle at 5 ft. elevation (100 ft. real vehicle elevation) with worst case drift in the direction of the launch tower. These tests have been performed without water suppression and have compared the acoustic emissions for launch structures with and without launch mounts. In addition, simulation results have also been compared to acoustic and imagery data collected from similar live-fire tests to assess the accuracy of the simulations. Simulations have shown a marked change in the pattern of emissions after removal of the launch mount with a reduction in the overall acoustic environment experienced by the vehicle and the formation of highly directed acoustic waves moving across the platform deck. Comparisons of simulation results to live-fire test data showed good amplitude and temporal correlation and imagery comparisons over the visible and infrared wavelengths showed qualitative capture of all plume and pressure wave evolution features.

  11. Validation and Simulation of Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test - 3 - Modeling and Evaluating the Effect of Rainbird Water Deluge Inclusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strutzenberg, Louise L.; Putman, Gabriel C.

    2011-01-01

    The Ares I Scale Model Acoustics Test (ASMAT) is a series of live-fire tests of scaled rocket motors meant to simulate the conditions of the Ares I launch configuration. These tests have provided a well documented set of high fidelity measurements useful for validation including data taken over a range of test conditions and containing phenomena like Ignition Over-Pressure and water suppression of acoustics. Building on dry simulations of the ASMAT tests with the vehicle at 5 ft. elevation (100 ft. real vehicle elevation), wet simulations of the ASMAT test setup have been performed using the Loci/CHEM computational fluid dynamics software to explore the effect of rainbird water suppression inclusion on the launch platform deck. Two-phase water simulation has been performed using an energy and mass coupled lagrangian particle system module where liquid phase emissions are segregated into clouds of virtual particles and gas phase mass transfer is accomplished through simple Weber number controlled breakup and boiling models. Comparisons have been performed to the dry 5 ft. elevation cases, using configurations with and without launch mounts. These cases have been used to explore the interaction between rainbird spray patterns and launch mount geometry and evaluate the acoustic sound pressure level knockdown achieved through above-deck rainbird deluge inclusion. This comparison has been anchored with validation from live-fire test data which showed a reduction in rainbird effectiveness with the presence of a launch mount.

  12. Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test Overpressure Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casiano, M. J.; Alvord, D. A.; McDaniels, D. M.

    2011-01-01

    A summary of the overpressure environment from the 5% Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test (ASMAT) and the implications to the full-scale Ares I are presented in this Technical Memorandum. These include the scaled environment that would be used for assessing the full-scale Ares I configuration, observations, and team recommendations. The ignition transient is first characterized and described, the overpressure suppression system configuration is then examined, and the final environment characteristics are detailed. The recommendation for Ares I is to keep the space shuttle heritage ignition overpressure (IOP) suppression system (below-deck IOP water in the launch mount and mobile launcher and also the crest water on the main flame deflector) and the water bags.

  13. Acoustic Casing Treatment Test

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-02-14

    Acoustic Casing Treatment Testing Completed in the W-8 Single Stage Axial Compressor Facility at NASA Glenn. Four different over-the-rotor acoustic casing treatment concepts were tested along with two baseline configurations. Testing included steady-aerodynamic measurements of fan performance, hotfilm turbulence measurements, and inlet acoustic measurements with an in-duct array.

  14. Direct Field Acoustic Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larkin, Paul; Goldstein, Bob

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents an update to the methods and procedures used in Direct Field Acoustic Testing (DFAT). The paper will discuss some of the recent techniques and developments that are currently being used and the future publication of a reference standard. Acoustic testing using commercial sound system components is becoming a popular and cost effective way of generating a required acoustic test environment both in and out of a reverberant chamber. This paper will present the DFAT test method, the usual setup and procedure and the development and use of a closed-loop, narrow-band control system. Narrow-band control of the acoustic PSD allows all standard techniques and procedures currently used in random control to be applied to acoustics and some examples are given. The paper will conclude with a summary of the development of a standard practice guideline that is hoped to be available in the first quarter of next year.

  15. Direct Field Acoustic Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larkin, Paul; Goldstein, Bob

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents an update to the methods and procedures used in Direct Field Acoustic Testing (DFAT). The paper will discuss some of the recent techniques and developments that are currently being used and the future publication of a reference standard. Acoustic testing using commercial sound system components is becoming a popular and cost effective way of generating a required acoustic test environment both in and out of a reverberant chamber. This paper will present the DFAT test method, the usual setup and procedure and the development and use of a closed-loop, narrow-band control system. Narrow-band control of the acoustic PSD allows all standard techniques and procedures currently used in random control to be applied to acoustics and some examples are given. The paper will conclude with a summary of the development of a standard practice guideline that is hoped to be available in the first quarter of next year.

  16. Validation of High-Fidelity CFD/CAA Framework for Launch Vehicle Acoustic Environment Simulation against Scale Model Test Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liever, Peter A.; West, Jeffrey S.; Harris, Robert E.

    2016-01-01

    A hybrid Computational Fluid Dynamics and Computational Aero-Acoustics (CFD/CAA) modeling framework has been developed for launch vehicle liftoff acoustic environment predictions. The framework couples the existing highly-scalable NASA production CFD code, Loci/CHEM, with a high-order accurate Discontinuous Galerkin solver developed in the same production framework, Loci/THRUST, to accurately resolve and propagate acoustic physics across the entire launch environment. Time-accurate, Hybrid RANS/LES CFD modeling is applied for predicting the acoustic generation physics at the plume source, and a high-order accurate unstructured mesh Discontinuous Galerkin (DG) method is employed to propagate acoustic waves away from the source across large distances using high-order accurate schemes. The DG solver is capable of solving 2nd, 3rd, and 4th order Euler solutions for non-linear, conservative acoustic field propagation. Initial application testing and validation has been carried out against high resolution acoustic data from the Ares Scale Model Acoustic Test (ASMAT) series to evaluate the capabilities and production readiness of the CFD/CAA system to resolve the observed spectrum of acoustic frequency content. This paper presents results from this validation and outlines efforts to mature and improve the computational simulation framework.

  17. Validation of High-Fidelity CFD/CAA Framework for Launch Vehicle Acoustic Environment Simulation against Scale Model Test Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liever, Peter A.; West, Jeffrey S.

    2016-01-01

    A hybrid Computational Fluid Dynamics and Computational Aero-Acoustics (CFD/CAA) modeling framework has been developed for launch vehicle liftoff acoustic environment predictions. The framework couples the existing highly-scalable NASA production CFD code, Loci/CHEM, with a high-order accurate discontinuous Galerkin solver developed in the same production framework, Loci/THRUST, to accurately resolve and propagate acoustic physics across the entire launch environment. Time-accurate, Hybrid RANS/LES CFD modeling is applied for predicting the acoustic generation physics at the plume source, and a high-order accurate unstructured discontinuous Galerkin (DG) method is employed to propagate acoustic waves away from the source across large distances using high-order accurate schemes. The DG solver is capable of solving 2nd, 3rd, and 4th order Euler solutions for non-linear, conservative acoustic field propagation. Initial application testing and validation has been carried out against high resolution acoustic data from the Ares Scale Model Acoustic Test (ASMAT) series to evaluate the capabilities and production readiness of the CFD/CAA system to resolve the observed spectrum of acoustic frequency content. This paper presents results from this validation and outlines efforts to mature and improve the computational simulation framework.

  18. Acoustic Model Testing Chronology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nesman, Tom

    2017-01-01

    Scale models have been used for decades to replicate liftoff environments and in particular acoustics for launch vehicles. It is assumed, and analyses supports, that the key characteristics of noise generation, propagation, and measurement can be scaled. Over time significant insight was gained not just towards understanding the effects of thruster details, pad geometry, and sound mitigation but also to the physical processes involved. An overview of a selected set of scale model tests are compiled here to illustrate the variety of configurations that have been tested and the fundamental knowledge gained. The selected scale model tests are presented chronologically.

  19. AST Launch Vehicle Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houston, Janice; Counter, D.; Giacomoni, D.

    2015-01-01

    The liftoff phase induces acoustic loading over a broad frequency range for a launch vehicle. These external acoustic environments are then used in the prediction of internal vibration responses of the vehicle and components which result in the qualification levels. Thus, predicting these liftoff acoustic (LOA) environments is critical to the design requirements of any launch vehicle. If there is a significant amount of uncertainty in the predictions or if acoustic mitigation options must be implemented, a subscale acoustic test is a feasible pre-launch test option to verify the LOA environments. The NASA Space Launch System (SLS) program initiated the Scale Model Acoustic Test (SMAT) to verify the predicted SLS LOA environments and to determine the acoustic reduction with an above deck water sound suppression system. The SMAT was conducted at Marshall Space Flight Center and the test article included a 5% scale SLS vehicle model, tower and Mobile Launcher. Acoustic and pressure data were measured by approximately 250 instruments. The SMAT liftoff acoustic results are presented, findings are discussed and a comparison is shown to the Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test (ASMAT) results.

  20. Stennis conducts launch acoustics testing

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-04-26

    Operators at the E-3 Test Stand at NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center completed 32 acoustics tests April 16-28, designed to gather critical information for future space launches. Stennis operators investigated lift-off acoustics that can damage space vehicle components by testing the benefits of injecting water onto the upper surface of the launch pad to suppress sound. The Stennis tests provided critical data to determine what can be gained from this approach.

  1. Electronic dummy for acoustical testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, B. B.; Di Mattia, A. L.; Rosencheck, A. J.; Stern, M.; Torick, E. L.

    1967-01-01

    Electronic Dummy /ED/ used for acoustical testing represents the average male torso from the Xiphoid process upward and includes an acoustic replica of the human head. This head simulates natural flesh, and has an artificial voice and artificial ears that measure sound pressures at the eardrum or the entrance to the ear canal.

  2. Acoustic Climb to Cruise Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Flight test film footage of three different aircraft testing the acoustical noise levels during take-off, climb, maneuvers, and touch and go landings are described. These sound tests were conducted on two fighter aircraft and one cargo aircraft. Results from mobile test vehicle are shown.

  3. Acoustically Induced Vibration of Structures: Reverberant Vs. Direct Acoustic Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolaini, Ali R.; O'Connell, Michael R.; Tsoi, Wan B.

    2009-01-01

    Large reverberant chambers have been used for several decades in the aerospace industry to test larger structures such as solar arrays and reflectors to qualify and to detect faults in the design and fabrication of spacecraft and satellites. In the past decade some companies have begun using direct near field acoustic testing, employing speakers, for qualifying larger structures. A limited test data set obtained from recent acoustic tests of the same hardware exposed to both direct and reverberant acoustic field testing has indicated some differences in the resulting structural responses. In reverberant acoustic testing, higher vibration responses were observed at lower frequencies when compared with the direct acoustic testing. In the case of direct near field acoustic testing higher vibration responses appeared to occur at higher frequencies as well. In reverberant chamber testing and direct acoustic testing, standing acoustic modes of the reverberant chamber or the speakers and spacecraft parallel surfaces can strongly couple with the fundamental structural modes of the test hardware. In this paper data from recent acoustic testing of flight hardware, that yielded evidence of acoustic standing wave coupling with structural responses, are discussed in some detail. Convincing evidence of the acoustic standing wave/structural coupling phenomenon will be discussed, citing observations from acoustic testing of a simple aluminum plate. The implications of such acoustic coupling to testing of sensitive flight hardware will be discussed. The results discussed in this paper reveal issues with over or under testing of flight hardware that could pose unanticipated structural and flight qualification issues. Therefore, it is of paramount importance to understand the structural modal coupling with standing acoustic waves that has been observed in both methods of acoustic testing. This study will assist the community to choose an appropriate testing method and test setup in

  4. Acoustically Induced Vibration of Structures: Reverberant Vs. Direct Acoustic Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolaini, Ali R.; O'Connell, Michael R.; Tsoi, Wan B.

    2009-01-01

    Large reverberant chambers have been used for several decades in the aerospace industry to test larger structures such as solar arrays and reflectors to qualify and to detect faults in the design and fabrication of spacecraft and satellites. In the past decade some companies have begun using direct near field acoustic testing, employing speakers, for qualifying larger structures. A limited test data set obtained from recent acoustic tests of the same hardware exposed to both direct and reverberant acoustic field testing has indicated some differences in the resulting structural responses. In reverberant acoustic testing, higher vibration responses were observed at lower frequencies when compared with the direct acoustic testing. In the case of direct near field acoustic testing higher vibration responses appeared to occur at higher frequencies as well. In reverberant chamber testing and direct acoustic testing, standing acoustic modes of the reverberant chamber or the speakers and spacecraft parallel surfaces can strongly couple with the fundamental structural modes of the test hardware. In this paper data from recent acoustic testing of flight hardware, that yielded evidence of acoustic standing wave coupling with structural responses, are discussed in some detail. Convincing evidence of the acoustic standing wave/structural coupling phenomenon will be discussed, citing observations from acoustic testing of a simple aluminum plate. The implications of such acoustic coupling to testing of sensitive flight hardware will be discussed. The results discussed in this paper reveal issues with over or under testing of flight hardware that could pose unanticipated structural and flight qualification issues. Therefore, it is of paramount importance to understand the structural modal coupling with standing acoustic waves that has been observed in both methods of acoustic testing. This study will assist the community to choose an appropriate testing method and test setup in

  5. Scale Model Acoustic Test Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Counter, Douglas D.; Houston, Janice D.

    2012-01-01

    Launch environments, such as liftoff acoustic (LOA) and ignition overpressure (IOP), are important design factors for any vehicle and are dependent upon the design of both the vehicle and the ground systems. LOA environments are used directly in the development of vehicle vibro-acoustic environments and IOP is used in the loads assessment. The Scale Model Acoustic Test (SMAT) program was implemented to verify the Space Launch Systems LOA and IOP environments for the vehicle and ground systems including the Mobile Launcher (ML) and tower. The SMAT is currently in the design and fabrication phase. The SMAT program is described in this presentation.

  6. 5 Percent Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test: Overpressure Characterization and Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alvord, David; Casiano, Matthew; McDaniels, Dave

    2011-01-01

    During the ignition of a ducted solid rocket motor (SRM), rapid expansion of injected hot gases from the motor into a confined volume causes the development of a steep fronted wave. This low frequency transient wave propagates outward from the exhaust duct, impinging the vehicle and ground structures. An unsuppressed overpressure wave can potentially cause modal excitation in the structures and vehicle, subsequently leading to damage. This presentation details the ignition transient f indings from the 5% Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test (ASMAT). The primary events of the ignition transient environment induced by the SRM are the ignition overpressure (IOP), duct overpressure (DOP), and source overpressure (SOP). The resulting observations include successful knockdown of the IOP environment through use of a Space Shuttle derived IOP suppression system, a potential load applied to the vehicle stemming from instantaneous asymmetrical IOP and DOP wave impingement, and launch complex geometric influences on the environment. The results are scaled to a full-scale Ares I equivalent and compared with heritage data including Ares I-X and both suppressed and unsuppressed Space Shuttle IOP environments.

  7. Solid Rocket Motor Acoustic Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, J.D.

    1999-03-31

    Acoustic data are often required for the determination of launch and powered flight loads for rocket systems and payloads. Such data are usually acquired during test firings of the solid rocket motors. In the current work, these data were obtained for two tests at a remote test facility where we were visitors. This paper describes the data acquisition and the requirements for working at a remote site, interfacing with the test hosts.

  8. Acoustical Analysis of a Test Horn.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-01-20

    computer program COMIC (COMplex AcoustIC Pressure Analysis). The mode shapes are presented graphically and nodal -panes are identified. Placing a wall of...shapes of a small test horn using a computer program COMIC (fO.plex AcoustIC Pressure Analysis), which was developed by Battelle Columbus...written to convert the COMIC output data into the one which operates on CADS (Computer Aided Design System) using DI-3000 graphics package. Reference

  9. NASA Goddard's Acoustic Test Chamber

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-28

    At Goddard, the engineers use the Acoustic Test Chamber, a 42-foot-tall chamber, with 6-foot-diameter speaker horns to replicate the launch environment. The horns use an altering flow of gaseous nitrogen to produce a sound level as high as 150 decibels for two-minute tests. That’s about the level of sound heard standing next to a jet engine during takeoff. The 6-foot-wide horns in this 42-foot-tall chamber can produce noise at levels as high as 150 dB. During the acoustics test, the speakers can still be heard outside of its insulated massive metal doors. Credits: NASA/Goddard/Chris Gunn NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  10. W-8 Acoustic Casing Treatment Test Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozak, Rick; Podboy, Gary; Dougherty, Robert

    2017-01-01

    During February 2017, aerodynamic and acoustic testing was performed on a scale-model high bypass ratio turbofan rotor, R4, in an internal flow component test facility. An overview of the testing completed is presented.

  11. Direct Field and Reverberant Chamber Acoustic Test Comparisons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    OConnell, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Reverberant and direct acoustic test comparisons were analyzed in this viewgraph presentation. The acoustic test data set includes: 1) CloudSat antenna subjected to PF reverberant chamber acoustic test; 2) CloudSat subjected to a PF direct speaker acoustic test; and 3) DAWN flight spacecraft subjected to PF direct speaker and a workmanship reverberant chamber acoustic test.

  12. Direct Field and Reverberant Chamber Acoustic Test Comparisons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    OConnell, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Reverberant and direct acoustic test comparisons were analyzed in this viewgraph presentation. The acoustic test data set includes: 1) CloudSat antenna subjected to PF reverberant chamber acoustic test; 2) CloudSat subjected to a PF direct speaker acoustic test; and 3) DAWN flight spacecraft subjected to PF direct speaker and a workmanship reverberant chamber acoustic test.

  13. Reverberant Acoustic Testing and Direct Field Acoustic Testing Acoustic Standing Waves and their Impact on Structural Responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolaini, Ali R.; Doty, Benjamin; Chang, Zensheu

    2012-01-01

    The aerospace industry has been using two methods of acoustic testing to qualify flight hardware: (1) Reverberant Acoustic Test (RAT), (2) Direct Field Acoustic Test (DFAT). The acoustic field obtained by RAT is generally understood and assumed to be diffuse, expect below Schroeder cut-of frequencies. DFAT method of testing has some distinct advantages over RAT, however the acoustic field characteristics can be strongly affected by test setup such as the speaker layouts, number and location of control microphones and control schemes. In this paper the following are discussed based on DEMO tests performed at APL and JPL: (1) Acoustic wave interference patterns and acoustic standing waves, (2) The structural responses in RAT and DFAT.

  14. Reverberant Acoustic Testing and Direct Field Acoustic Testing Acoustic Standing Waves and their Impact on Structural Responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolaini, Ali R.; Doty, Benjamin; Chang, Zensheu

    2012-01-01

    The aerospace industry has been using two methods of acoustic testing to qualify flight hardware: (1) Reverberant Acoustic Test (RAT), (2) Direct Field Acoustic Test (DFAT). The acoustic field obtained by RAT is generally understood and assumed to be diffuse, expect below Schroeder cut-of frequencies. DFAT method of testing has some distinct advantages over RAT, however the acoustic field characteristics can be strongly affected by test setup such as the speaker layouts, number and location of control microphones and control schemes. In this paper the following are discussed based on DEMO tests performed at APL and JPL: (1) Acoustic wave interference patterns and acoustic standing waves, (2) The structural responses in RAT and DFAT.

  15. The Acoustic Test Environment for Hearing Testing.

    PubMed

    Margolis, Robert H; Madsen, Brandon

    2015-10-01

    Audiology clinics traditionally employ expensive, prefabricated sound rooms to create an environment that is sufficiently quiet for accurate hearing tests. There is seldom any analysis of the need for or benefit from such enclosures. There may be less expensive methods that would decrease the cost of and increase access to hearing testing. This report provides information concerning the need for and effectiveness of sound rooms and an analysis of the audiometric test ranges for various earphone/room combinations. Acoustic measurements made in four rooms were analyzed with the attenuation provided by various earphone designs to determine the maximum permissible ambient noise levels and the corresponding audiometric test ranges. The measurements and calculations were performed with four test rooms and five earphone designs. Ambient noise levels and earphone attenuation characteristics were used to calculate the noise levels that reach the ear. Those were compared to the maximum permissible ambient noise levels that are provided in ANSI S3.1-1999 or calculated from measured attenuation levels. These measurements were used to calculate testable ranges for each room/earphone combination. The various room/earphone combinations resulted in minimum test levels that ranged from -10 to 20 dB HL at various test frequencies. When the actual benefits of expensive prefabricated sound rooms are assessed based on the range of hearing levels that can be tested, the effectiveness of that approach becomes highly questionable. Less expensive methods based on planning the clinic space, use of inexpensive sound treatments, and selecting an appropriate earphone can be effective in almost any space that would be used for hearing testing. American Academy of Audiology.

  16. Voyager: Vibration Acoustics and Pyro Shock Testing

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-07-05

    An engineer works on vibration acoustics and pyro shock testing for one of NASA's Voyager spacecraft on November 18, 1976. Several of the spacecraft's science instruments are visible at left. https://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21733

  17. The South Pole Acoustic Test Setup (SPATS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laihem, Karim; IceCube Collaboration

    2012-11-01

    New detection techniques for (GZK) neutrinos are required for instrumenting a large detector volume needed to observe the low neutrino fluxes at the EeV energy range. Studies on a larger IceCube Neutrino Observatory at the South Pole have been intensively investigated in the last decade. A larger effective volume at a reasonable cost is possible if an acoustic array is a part of a large hybrid detector which includes radio and the existing optical array. The feasibility and the physics capabilities of an acoustic array at the South Pole depend on the knowledge of the acoustic properties of the ice such as the sound speed, the attenuation length, the background noise level and the transient rate. To investigate the ice properties, the first three acoustic strings of the South Pole Acoustic Test Setup (SPATS) have been deployed in the austral summer 2006/2007, then completed with an additional string in 2007/2008. With its four strings SPATS was able to evaluate in situ the acoustic properties of the South Pole ice in the 10-100 kHz frequency range. In this paper the performance of SPATS is described, results on the acoustic ice properties are presented and a new drilling method to deploy acoustic strings in ice is introduced.

  18. NuSTAR: Vibro-Acoustic Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Kasim, K.

    2004-09-03

    NuSTAR is a satellite that will be carrying X-ray optics that consist of many nested glass cylinders. Due to different acoustic environments, the glass may react such that cracks and/or fractures may form. Cracks and/or fractures in the glass would not allow the optic to work properly. Therefore, it is necessary to test the glass and optic prototypes to determine if they will be able to withhold when experiencing certain acoustic environments. The vibro-acoustic testing conducted at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena determined that under the minimum workmanship acoustic environments, the glass on the optics will not fail. Overall, the results of the test were successful which gives confidence that when the satellite is launched into the air and then dropped into space, the glass in the optics will not fail.

  19. Acoustic Test Characterization of Melamine Foam for Usage in NASA's Payload Fairing Acoustic Attenuation Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, William O.; McNelis, Anne M.; McNelis, Mark E.

    2014-01-01

    The external acoustic liftoff levels predicted for NASA's future heavy lift launch vehicles are expected to be significantly higher than the environment created by today's commercial launch vehicles. This creates a need to develop an improved acoustic attenuation system for future NASA payload fairings. NASA Glenn Research Center initiated an acoustic test series to characterize the acoustic performance of melamine foam, with and without various acoustic enhancements. This testing was denoted as NEMFAT, which stands for NESC Enhanced Melamine Foam Acoustic Test, and is the subject of this paper. Both absorption and transmission loss testing of numerous foam configurations were performed at the Riverbank Acoustical Laboratory in July 2013. The NEMFAT test data provides an initial acoustic characterization and database of melamine foam for NASA. Because of its acoustic performance and lighter mass relative to fiberglass blankets, melamine foam is being strongly considered for use in the acoustic attenuation systems of NASA's future launch vehicles.

  20. Acoustic impedance testing for aeroacoustic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Todd

    Accurate acoustic propagation models are required to characterize and subsequently reduce aircraft engine noise. These models ultimately rely on acoustic impedance measurements of candidate materials used in sound-absorbing liners. The standard two-microphone method (TMM) is widely used to estimate acoustic impedance but is limited in frequency range and does not provide uncertainty estimates, which are essential for data quality assessment and model validation. This dissertation presents a systematic framework to estimate uncertainty and extend the frequency range of acoustic impedance testing. Uncertainty estimation for acoustic impedance data using the TMM is made via two methods. The first employs a standard analytical technique based on linear perturbations and provides useful scaling information. The second uses a Monte Carlo technique that permits the propagation of arbitrarily large uncertainties. Both methods are applied to the TMM for simulated data representative of sound-hard and sound-soft acoustic materials. The results indicate that the analytical technique can lead to false conclusions about the magnitude and importance of specific error sources. Furthermore, the uncertainty in acoustic impedance is strongly dependent on the frequency and the uncertainty in the microphone locations. Next, an increased frequency range of acoustic impedance testing is investigated via two methods. The first method reduces the size of the test specimen (from 25.4 mm square to 8.5 mm square) and uses the standard TMM. This method has issues concerning specimen nonuniformity because the small specimens may not be representative of the material. The second method increases the duct cross section and, hence, the required complexity of the sound field propagation model. A comparison among all three methods is conducted for each of the three specimens: two different ceramic tubular specimens and a single degree-of-freedom liner. The results show good agreement between the

  1. Tuned Chamber Core Panel Acoustic Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schiller, Noah H.; Allen, Albert R.

    2016-01-01

    This report documents acoustic testing of tuned chamber core panels, which can be used to supplement the low-frequency performance of conventional acoustic treatment. The tuned chamber core concept incorporates low-frequency noise control directly within the primary structure and is applicable to sandwich constructions with a directional core, including corrugated-, truss-, and fluted-core designs. These types of sandwich structures have long, hollow channels (or chambers) in the core. By adding small holes through one of the facesheets, the hollow chambers can be utilized as an array of low-frequency acoustic resonators. These resonators can then be used to attenuate low-frequency noise (below 400 Hz) inside a vehicle compartment without increasing the weight or size of the structure. The results of this test program demonstrate that the tuned chamber core concept is effective when used in isolation or combined with acoustic foam treatments. Specifically, an array of acoustic resonators integrated within the core of the panels was shown to improve both the low-frequency absorption and transmission loss of the structure in targeted one-third octave bands.

  2. Impact of Acoustic Standing Waves on Structural Responses: Reverberant Acoustic Testing (RAT) vs. Direct Field Acoustic Testing (DFAT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolaini, Ali R.; Doty, Benjamin; Chang, Zensheu

    2012-01-01

    Loudspeakers have been used for acoustic qualification of spacecraft, reflectors, solar panels, and other acoustically responsive structures for more than a decade. Limited measurements from some of the recent speaker tests used to qualify flight hardware have indicated significant spatial variation of the acoustic field within the test volume. Also structural responses have been reported to differ when similar tests were performed using reverberant chambers. To address the impact of non-uniform acoustic field on structural responses, a series of acoustic tests were performed using a flat panel and a 3-ft cylinder exposed to the field controlled by speakers and repeated in a reverberant chamber. The speaker testing was performed using multi-input-single-output (MISO) and multi-input-multi-output (MIMO) control schemes with and without the test articles. In this paper the spatial variation of the acoustic field due to acoustic standing waves and their impacts on the structural responses in RAT and DFAT (both using MISO and MIMO controls for DFAT) are discussed in some detail.

  3. Impact of Acoustic Standing Waves on Structural Responses: Reverberant Acoustic Testing (RAT) vs. Direct Field Acoustic Testing (DFAT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolaini, Ali R.; Doty, Benjamin; Chang, Zensheu

    2012-01-01

    Loudspeakers have been used for acoustic qualification of spacecraft, reflectors, solar panels, and other acoustically responsive structures for more than a decade. Limited measurements from some of the recent speaker tests used to qualify flight hardware have indicated significant spatial variation of the acoustic field within the test volume. Also structural responses have been reported to differ when similar tests were performed using reverberant chambers. To address the impact of non-uniform acoustic field on structural responses, a series of acoustic tests were performed using a flat panel and a 3-ft cylinder exposed to the field controlled by speakers and repeated in a reverberant chamber. The speaker testing was performed using multi-input-single-output (MISO) and multi-input-multi-output (MIMO) control schemes with and without the test articles. In this paper the spatial variation of the acoustic field due to acoustic standing waves and their impacts on the structural responses in RAT and DFAT (both using MISO and MIMO controls for DFAT) are discussed in some detail.

  4. Simplified three microphone acoustic test method

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Accepted acoustic testing standards are available; however, they require specialized hardware and software that are typically out of reach economically to the occasional practitioner. What is needed is a simple and inexpensive screening method that could provide a quick comparison for rapid identifi...

  5. Post Test Evaluation of HSCT Nozzle Acoustic Liner Subcomponents Subjected to a Hot Acoustic Durability Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verrilli, Michael J.; Lee, Kuan

    2008-01-01

    The acoustic liner system designed for use in the High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) was tested in a thermal-acoustic environment. Five ceramic matrix composite (CMC) acoustic tile configurations, five bulk acoustic absorbers, and one thermal protection system design were tested. The CMC acoustic tiles were subjected to two 2 3/4 hr ambient temperature acoustic exposures to measure their dynamic response. One exposure was conducted on the tiles alone and the second exposure included the tiles and the T-foam bulk absorber. The measured tile RMS strains were small. With or without the T-foam absorber, the dynamic strains were below strain levels that would cause damage during fatigue loading. After the ambient exposure, a 75-hr durability test of the entire acoustic liner system was conducted using a thermal-acoustic cycle that approximated the anticipated service cycle. Acoustic loads up to 139 dB/Hz and temperatures up to 1670 F (910 C) were employed during this 60 cycle test. During the durability test, the CMC tiles were exposed to temperatures up to 1780 F and a transient through thickness gradient up to 490 F. The TPS peak temperatures on the hot side of the panels ranged from 750 to 1000 F during the 60 cycles. The through thickness delta T ranged from 450 to 650 F, varying with TPS location and cycle number. No damage, such as cracks or chipping, was observed in the CMC tiles after completion of the testing. However, on tile warped during the durability test and was replaced after 43 or 60 cycles. No externally observed damage was found in this tile. No failure of the CMC fasteners occurred, but damage was observed. Cracks and missing material occurred, only in the fastener head region. No indication of damage was observed in the T-foam acoustic absorbers. The SiC foam acoustic absorber experienced damage after about 43 cycles. Cracking in the TPS occurred around the attachment holes and under a vent. In spite of the development of damage, the TPS maintained

  6. Vibration and acoustic testing of spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scharton, T. D.

    2002-01-01

    Spacecraft are subjected to a variety of dynamics environments, which may include: quasi-static, vibration and acoustic loads at launch: pyrotechnic shocks generated by separation mechanisms; on orbit jitter; and sometimes, planetary landing loads. There is a trend in the aerospace industry to rely more on structural analyses and less on testing to simulate these environments, because dynamics testing of spacecraft is time consuming, risky and expensive.

  7. Acoustic testing of high temperature panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leatherwood, Jack D.; Clevenson, Sherman A.; Powell, Clemans A.; Daniels, Edward F.

    1990-01-01

    Results are presented of a series of thermal-acoustic tests conducted on the NASA Langley Research Center Thermal-Acoustic Test Apparatus to (1) investigate techniques for obtaining strain measurements on metallic and carbon-carbon materials at elevated temperature; (2) document the dynamic strain response characteristics of several superalloy honeycomb thermal protection system panels at elevated temperatures of up to 1200 F; and (3) determine the strain response and sonic fatigue behavior of four carbon-carbon panels at both ambient and elevated temperatures. A second study tested four carbon-carbon panels to document panel dynamic response characteristics at ambient and elevated temperature, determine time to failure and faliure modes, and collect continuous strain data up to panel failure. Strain data are presented from both types of panels, and problems encountered in obtaining reliable strain data on the carbon-carbon panels are described. The failure modes of the carbon-carbon panels are examined.

  8. SLS Scale Model Acoustic Test Liftoff Results and Comparisons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houston, Janice; Counter, Douglas; Giacomoni, Clothilde

    2015-01-01

    The liftoff phase induces acoustic loading over a broad frequency range for a launch vehicle. These external acoustic environments are then used in the prediction of internal vibration responses of the vehicle and components which result in the qualification levels. Thus, predicting these liftoff acoustic (LOA) environments is critical to the design requirements of any launch vehicle. If there is a significant amount of uncertainty in the predictions or if acoustic mitigation options must be implemented, a subscale acoustic test is a feasible design phase test option to verify the LOA environments. The NASA Space Launch System (SLS) program initiated the Scale Model Acoustic Test (SMAT) to verify the predicted SLS LOA environments.

  9. XV-15 Tiltrotor Aircraft: 1997 Acoustic Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, Bryan D.; Conner, David A.

    2003-01-01

    XV-15 acoustic test is discussed, and measured results are presented. The test was conducted by NASA Langley and Bell Helicopter Textron, Inc., during June - July 1997, at the BHTI test site near Waxahachie, Texas. This was the second in a series of three XV-15 tests to document the acoustic signature of the XV-15 tiltrotor aircraft for a variety of flight conditions and minimize the noise signature during approach. Tradeoffs between flight procedures and the measured noise are presented to illustrate the noise abatement flight procedures. The test objectives were to: (1) support operation of future tiltrotors by further developing and demonstrating low-noise flight profiles, while maintaining acceptable handling and ride qualities, and (2) refine approach profiles, selected from previous (1995) tiltrotor testing, to incorporate Instrument Flight Rules (IFR), handling qualities constraints, operations and tradeoffs with sound. Primary emphasis was given to the approach flight conditions where blade-vortex interaction (BVI) noise dominates, because this condition influences community noise impact more than any other. An understanding of this part of the noise generating process could guide the development of low noise flight operations and increase the tiltrotor's acceptance in the community.

  10. Affordable Acoustic Disdrometer: Design, Calibration, Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Giesen, N.; Degen, C.; Hut, R.

    2009-12-01

    It would be a hydrological understatement to say that measuring rainfall correctly is important. Recent years have seen important lowering of the costs of raingauges capable of measuring rainfall intensities. Such raingauges are typically tipping bucket raingauges, connected to an event logger. Costs for such a raingauge are about 100. Accuracy is not always very high, especially during high intensity storms. The moving parts make them vulnerable to slight disruptions such as insects. We set out to design a raingauge without moving parts and at a better price/quality ratio than existing raingauges. After testing several potential candidates, we settled on a very simple piezo ceramic element, which measures the impact of single drops. Such an element costs around 1. The impact of each drop causes an acoustic signal that is transformed into a voltage. A typical impact gives an upswing of up to 1 V and the ringing lasts about 50 ms. With a surface area of about 20 cm2, there is almost never overlap between the signals of different drops. The basic assumption is that each drop will have reached terminal velocity and that the total energy of the impact can, thereby, be related to drop size. We calibrated this acoustic disdrometer by letting drops of different size fall on the disdrometer. A very encouraging calibration curve was obtained in this way. Further testing consisted of comparisons during rainstorms between the acoustic disdrometer and standard tipping bucket raingauges. During intensive storms, the acoustic disdrometer gave results that were very close to those of a nearby totaling raingauge. The signal of the tipping bucket raingauges was clearly saturated as these were not capable of keeping up with the rain. During low intensity events, tipping bucket raingauges performed better as drops too small to detect by the acoustic disdrometer became a significant part of the total rainfall. In first instance, a simple MP3 player with recording functionality ($50

  11. The Development of the Acoustic Design of NASA Glenn Research Center's New Reverberant Acoustic Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, William O.; McNelis, Mark E.; Hozman, Aron D.; McNelis, Anne M.

    2011-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Glenn Research Center (GRC) is leading the design and build of the new world-class vibroacoustic test capabilities at the NASA GRC's Plum Brook Station in Sandusky, Ohio, USA. Benham Companies, LLC is currently constructing modal, base-shake sine and reverberant acoustic test facilities to support the future testing needs of NASA s space exploration program. The large Reverberant Acoustic Test Facility (RATF) will be approximately 101,000 ft3 in volume and capable of achieving an empty chamber acoustic overall sound pressure level (OASPL) of 163 dB. This combination of size and acoustic power is unprecedented amongst the world s known active reverberant acoustic test facilities. The key to achieving the expected acoustic test spectra for a range of many NASA space flight environments in the RATF is the knowledge gained from a series of ground acoustic tests. Data was obtained from several NASA-sponsored test programs, including testing performed at the National Research Council of Canada s acoustic test facility in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, and at the Redstone Technical Test Center acoustic test facility in Huntsville, Alabama, USA. The majority of these tests were performed to characterize the acoustic performance of the modulators (noise generators) and representative horns that would be required to meet the desired spectra, as well as to evaluate possible supplemental gas jet noise sources. The knowledge obtained in each of these test programs enabled the design of the RATF sound generation system to confidently advance to its final acoustic design and subsequent on-going construction.

  12. The Development of the Acoustic Design of NASA Glenn Research Center's New Reverberant Acoustic Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, William O.; McNelis, Mark E.; Hozman, Aron D.; McNelis, Anne M.

    2011-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Glenn Research Center (GRC) is leading the design and build of the new world-class vibroacoustic test capabilities at the NASA GRC s Plum Brook Station in Sandusky, Ohio. Benham Companies, LLC is currently constructing modal, base-shake sine and reverberant acoustic test facilities to support the future testing needs of NASA s space exploration program. The large Reverberant Acoustic Test Facility (RATF) will be approximately 101,000 ft3 in volume and capable of achieving an empty chamber acoustic overall sound pressure level (OASPL) of 163 dB. This combination of size and acoustic power is unprecedented amongst the world s known active reverberant acoustic test facilities. The key to achieving the expected acoustic test spectra for a range of many NASA space flight environments in the RATF is the knowledge gained from a series of ground acoustic tests. Data was obtained from several NASA-sponsored test programs, including testing performed at the National Research Council of Canada s acoustic test facility in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, and at the Redstone Technical Test Center acoustic test facility in Huntsville, Alabama. The majority of these tests were performed to characterize the acoustic performance of the modulators (noise generators) and representative horns that would be required to meet the desired spectra, as well as to evaluate possible supplemental gas jet noise sources. The knowledge obtained in each of these test programs enabled the design of the RATF sound generation system to confidently advance to its final acoustic design and subsequent on-going construction.

  13. XV-15 Tiltrotor Aircraft: 1999 Acoustic Testing - Test Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, Bryan D.; Conner, David A.

    2003-01-01

    An XV-15 acoustic test is discussed, and measured results are presented. The test was conducted by NASA Langley and Bell Helicopter Textron, Inc., during October 1999, at the BHTI test site near Waxahachie, Texas. As part of the NASA-sponsored Short Haul Civil Tiltrotor noise reduction initiative, this was the third in a series of three major XV-15 acoustic tests. Their purpose was to document the acoustic signature of the XV-15 tiltrotor aircraft for a variety of flight conditions and to minimize the noise signature during approach. Tradeoffs between flight procedures and the measured noise are presented to illustrate the noise abatement flight procedures. The test objectives were to support operation of future tiltrotors by further developing and demonstrating low-noise flight profiles, while maintaining acceptable handling and ride qualities, and refine approach profiles, selected from previous (1995 & 1997) tiltrotor testing, to incorporate Instrument Flight Rules (IFR), handling qualities constraints, operations and tradeoffs with sound. Primary emphasis was given to the approach flight conditions where blade-vortex interaction (BVI) noise dominates, because this condition influences community noise impact more than any other. An understanding of this part of the noise generating process could guide the development of low noise flight operations and increase the tiltrotor's acceptance in the community.

  14. Tests Of Shear-Flow Model For Acoustic Impedance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrot, Tony L.; Watson, Willie R.; Jones, Michael G.

    1992-01-01

    Tests described in report conducted to validate two-dimensional shear-flow analytical model for determination of acoustic impedance of acoustic liner in grazing-incidence, grazing-flow environment by use of infinite-waveguide method. Tests successful for both upstream and downstream propagations. Work has potential for utility in testing of engine ducts in commercial aircraft.

  15. Acoustic emission monitoring of HFIR vessel during hydrostatic testing

    SciTech Connect

    Friesel, M.A.; Dawson, J.F.

    1992-08-01

    This report discusses the results and conclusions reached from applying acoustic emission monitoring to surveillance of the High Flux Isotope Reactor vessel during pressure testing. The objective of the monitoring was to detect crack growth and/or fluid leakage should it occur during the pressure test. The report addresses the approach, acoustic emission instrumentation, installation, calibration, and test results.

  16. Magneto acoustic emission apparatus for testing materials for embrittlement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allison, Sidney G. (Inventor); Min, Namkung (Inventor); Yost, William T. (Inventor); Cantrell, John H. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A method and apparatus for testing steel components for temper embrittlement uses magneto-acoustic emission to nondestructively evaluate the component. Acoustic emission signals occur more frequently at higher levels in embrittled components. A pair of electromagnets are used to create magnetic induction in the test component. Magneto-acoustic emission signals may be generated by applying an ac current to the electromagnets. The acoustic emission signals are analyzed to provide a comparison between a component known to be unembrittled and a test component. Magnetic remanence is determined by applying a dc current to the electromagnets, then turning the magnets off and observing the residual magnetic induction.

  17. Acoustic Test Results of Melamine Foam with Application to Payload Fairing Acoustic Attenuation Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, William O.; McNelis, Anne M.

    2014-01-01

    A spacecraft at launch is subjected to a harsh acoustic and vibration environment resulting from the passage of acoustic energy, created during the liftoff of a launch vehicle, through the vehicle's payload fairing. In order to ensure the mission success of the spacecraft it is often necessary to reduce the resulting internal acoustic sound pressure levels through the usage of acoustic attenuation systems. Melamine foam, lining the interior walls of the payload fairing, is often utilized as the main component of such a system. In order to better understand the acoustic properties of melamine foam, with the goal of developing improved acoustic attenuation systems, NASA has recently performed panel level testing on numerous configurations of melamine foam acoustic treatments at the Riverbank Acoustical Laboratory. Parameters assessed included the foam's thickness and density, as well as the effects of a top outer cover sheet material and mass barriers embedded within the foam. This testing followed the ASTM C423 standard for absorption and the ASTM E90 standard for transmission loss. The acoustic test data obtained and subsequent conclusions are the subjects of this paper.

  18. A New Acoustic Test Facility at Alcatel Space Test Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meurat, A.; Jezequel, L.

    2004-08-01

    Due to the obsolescence of its acoustic test facility, Alcatel Space has initiated the investment of a large acoustic chamber on its test centre located in Cannes, south of France. This paper presents the main specification elaborated to design the facility, and the solution chosen : it will be located on a dedicated area of the existing test centre and will be based on technical solution already used in similar facilities over the world. The main structure consists in a chamber linked to an external envelope (concrete building) through suspension aiming at decoupling the vibration and preventing from seismic risks. The noise generation system is based on the use of Wyle modulators located on the chamber roof. Gaseous nitrogen is produced by a dedicated gas generator developed by Air-Liquide that could deliver high flow rate with accurate pressure and temperature controls. The control and acquisition system is based on existing solution implemented on the vibration facilities of the test centre. With the start of the construction in May 2004, the final acceptance tests are planned for April 2005, and the first satellites to be tested are planned for May 2005.

  19. LATTE Linking Acoustic Tests and Tagging Using Statistical Estimation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-30

    DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. FINAL REPORT LATTE – Linking Acoustic Tests and Tagging using...whales (some from animals exposed to acoustic stimuli); (2) medium-term satellite tagging studies of individual whales (some from data collected...during navy exercises); and (3) long-term passive acoustic monitoring from bottom-mounted hydrophones (much collected during exercises). All data came

  20. Digital control of high-intensity acoustic testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slusser, R. A.

    1975-01-01

    To eliminate previous system instabilities and control high-intensity acoustic tests, a digital control vibration test system is modified by a software change. Three systems for the control of acoustic testing are compared: a hybrid digital/analog system, a digital vibration system, and the same digital vibration system modified by a software change to allow acoustic testing. It is shown that the hybrid system and the modified vibration system exhibit almost equal performance, although the hybrid system performs testing twice as fast. The development of a specialized acoustic test control system is justified since it costs far less than the general-purpose vibration control system. However, the latter is much easier to set up for a test, which is important in preventing overtesting of valuable spacecraft components.

  1. Acoustic guide for noise-transmission testing of aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaicaitis, Rimas (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    Selective testing of aircraft or other vehicular components without requiring disassembly of the vehicle or components was accomplished by using a portable guide apparatus. The device consists of a broadband noise source, a guide to direct the acoustic energy, soft sealing insulation to seal the guide to the noise source and to the vehicle component, and noise measurement microphones, both outside the vehicle at the acoustic guide output and inside the vehicle to receive attenuated sound. By directing acoustic energy only to selected components of a vehicle via the acoustic guide, it is possible to test a specific component, such as a door or window, without picking up extraneous noise which may be transmitted to the vehicle interior through other components or structure. This effect is achieved because no acoustic energy strikes the vehicle exterior except at the selected component. Also, since the test component remains attached to the vehicle, component dynamics with vehicle frame are not altered.

  2. 21 CFR 874.1060 - Acoustic chamber for audiometric testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Acoustic chamber for audiometric testing. 874.1060 Section 874.1060 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 874.1060 Acoustic chamber...

  3. 21 CFR 874.1060 - Acoustic chamber for audiometric testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Acoustic chamber for audiometric testing. 874.1060 Section 874.1060 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 874.1060 Acoustic chamber...

  4. 21 CFR 874.1060 - Acoustic chamber for audiometric testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Acoustic chamber for audiometric testing. 874.1060 Section 874.1060 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 874.1060 Acoustic chamber...

  5. Acoustic emission from composite materials. [nondestructive tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Visconti, I. C.; Teti, R.

    1979-01-01

    The two basic areas where the acoustic emission (AE) technique can be applied are materials research and the evaluation of structural reliability. This experimental method leads to a better understanding of fracture mechanisms and is an NDT technique particularly well suited for the study of propagating cracks. Experiments are described in which acoustic emissions were unambiguously correlated with microstructural fracture mechanisms. The advantages and limitations of the AE technique are noted.

  6. Acoustic tests of augmentor wing model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodykoontz, J. H.

    1977-01-01

    Acoustic and aerodynamic data were obtained for a full-scale section of an augmentor wing. Features of the design included a single-row, multielement nozzle array and acoustically tuned panels placed on the interior surfaces of the augmentor. When the data were extrapolated to a 91,000-kilogram aircraft, the calculated sideline perceived noise levels were approximately the same for either the takeoff or approach condition.

  7. Drive Rig Mufflers for Model Scale Engine Acoustic Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, David

    2010-01-01

    Testing of air breathing propulsion systems in the 9x15 foot wind tunnel at NASA Glenn Research Center depends on compressed air turbines for power. The drive rig turbines exhaust directly to the wind tunnel test section, and have been found to produce significant unwanted noise that reduces the quality of the acoustic measurements of the model being tested. In order to mitigate this acoustic contamination, a muffler can be attached downstream of the drive rig turbine. The modern engine designs currently being tested produce much less noise than traditional engines, and consequently a lower noise floor is required of the facility. An acoustic test of a muffler designed to mitigate this extraneous noise is presented, and a noise reduction of 8 dB between 700 Hz and 20 kHz was documented, significantly improving the quality of acoustic measurements in the facility.

  8. Evaluation of acoustic testing techniques for spacecraft systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cockburn, J. A.

    1971-01-01

    External acoustic environments, structural responses, noise reductions, and the internal acoustic environments have been predicted for a typical shroud/spacecraft system during lift-off and various critical stages of flight. Spacecraft responses caused by energy transmission from the shroud via mechanical and acoustic paths have been compared and the importance of the mechanical path has been evaluated. Theoretical predictions have been compared extensively with available laboratory and in-flight measurements. Equivalent laboratory acoustic fields for simulation of shroud response during the various phases of flight have been derived and compared in detail. Techniques for varying the time-space correlations of laboratory acoustic fields have been examined, together with methods for varying the time and spatial distribution of acoustic amplitudes. Possible acoustic testing configurations for shroud/spacecraft systems have been suggested and trade-off considerations have been reviewed. The problem of simulating the acoustic environments versus simulating the structural responses has been considered and techniques for testing without the shroud installed have been discussed.

  9. High-temperature acoustic test facilities and methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, Jerome

    1994-09-01

    The Wright Laboratory is the Air Force center for air vehicles, responsible for developing advanced technology and incorporating it into new flight vehicles and for continuous technological improvement of operational air vehicles. Part of that responsibility is the problem of acoustic fatigue. With the advent of jet aircraft in the 1950's, acoustic fatigue of aircraft structure became a significant problem. In the 1960's the Wright Laboratory constructed the first large acoustic fatigue test facilities in the United States, and the laboratory has been a dominant factor in high-intensity acoustic testing since that time. This paper discusses some of the intense environments encountered by new and planned Air Force flight vehicles, and describes three new acoustic test facilities of the Wright Laboratory designed for testing structures in these dynamic environments. These new test facilities represent the state of the art in high-temperature, high-intensity acoustic testing and random fatigue testing. They will allow the laboratory scientists and engineers to test the new structures and materials required to withstand the severe environments of captive-carry missiles, augmented lift wings and flaps, exhaust structures of stealth aircraft, and hypersonic vehicle structures well into the twenty-first century.

  10. Issues Related to Large Flight Hardware Acoustic Qualification Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolaini, Ali R.; Perry, Douglas C.; Kern, Dennis L.

    2011-01-01

    The characteristics of acoustical testing volumes generated by reverberant chambers or a circle of loudspeakers with and without large flight hardware within the testing volume are significantly different. The parameters attributing to these differences are normally not accounted for through analysis or acoustic tests prior to the qualification testing without the test hardware present. In most cases the control microphones are kept at least 2-ft away from hardware surfaces, chamber walls, and speaker surfaces to minimize the impact of the hardware in controlling the sound field. However, the acoustic absorption and radiation of sound by hardware surfaces may significantly alter the sound pressure field controlled within the chamber/speaker volume to a given specification. These parameters often result in an acoustic field that may provide under/over testing scenarios for flight hardware. In this paper the acoustic absorption by hardware surfaces will be discussed in some detail. A simple model is provided to account for some of the observations made from Mars Science Laboratory spacecraft that recently underwent acoustic qualification tests in a reverberant chamber.

  11. Issues Related to Large Flight Hardware Acoustic Qualification Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolaini, Ali R.; Perry, Douglas C.; Kern, Dennis L.

    2011-01-01

    The characteristics of acoustical testing volumes generated by reverberant chambers or a circle of loudspeakers with and without large flight hardware within the testing volume are significantly different. The parameters attributing to these differences are normally not accounted for through analysis or acoustic tests prior to the qualification testing without the test hardware present. In most cases the control microphones are kept at least 2-ft away from hardware surfaces, chamber walls, and speaker surfaces to minimize the impact of the hardware in controlling the sound field. However, the acoustic absorption and radiation of sound by hardware surfaces may significantly alter the sound pressure field controlled within the chamber/speaker volume to a given specification. These parameters often result in an acoustic field that may provide under/over testing scenarios for flight hardware. In this paper the acoustic absorption by hardware surfaces will be discussed in some detail. A simple model is provided to account for some of the observations made from Mars Science Laboratory spacecraft that recently underwent acoustic qualification tests in a reverberant chamber.

  12. Acoustic emissions verification testing of International Space Station experiment racks at the NASA Glenn Research Center Acoustical Testing Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akers, James C.; Passe, Paul J.; Cooper, Beth A.

    2005-09-01

    The Acoustical Testing Laboratory (ATL) at the NASA John H. Glenn Research Center (GRC) in Cleveland, OH, provides acoustic emission testing and noise control engineering services for a variety of specialized customers, particularly developers of equipment and science experiments manifested for NASA's manned space missions. The ATL's primary customer has been the Fluids and Combustion Facility (FCF), a multirack microgravity research facility being developed at GRC for the USA Laboratory Module of the International Space Station (ISS). Since opening in September 2000, ATL has conducted acoustic emission testing of components, subassemblies, and partially populated FCF engineering model racks. The culmination of this effort has been the acoustic emission verification tests on the FCF Combustion Integrated Rack (CIR) and Fluids Integrated Rack (FIR), employing a procedure that incorporates ISO 11201 (``Acoustics-Noise emitted by machinery and equipment-Measurement of emission sound pressure levels at a work station and at other specified positions-Engineering method in an essentially free field over a reflecting plane''). This paper will provide an overview of the test methodology, software, and hardware developed to perform the acoustic emission verification tests on the CIR and FIR flight racks and lessons learned from these tests.

  13. Space Launch System Scale Model Acoustic Test Ignition Overpressure Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nance, Donald K.; Liever, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    The overpressure phenomenon is a transient fluid dynamic event occurring during rocket propulsion system ignition. This phenomenon results from fluid compression of the accelerating plume gas, subsequent rarefaction, and subsequent propagation from the exhaust trench and duct holes. The high-amplitude unsteady fluid-dynamic perturbations can adversely affect the vehicle and surrounding structure. Commonly known as ignition overpressure (IOP), this is an important design-to environment for the Space Launch System (SLS) that NASA is currently developing. Subscale testing is useful in validating and verifying the IOP environment. This was one of the objectives of the Scale Model Acoustic Test (SMAT), conducted at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The test data quantifies the effectiveness of the SLS IOP suppression system and improves the analytical models used to predict the SLS IOP environments. The reduction and analysis of the data gathered during the SMAT IOP test series requires identification and characterization of multiple dynamic events and scaling of the event waveforms to provide the most accurate comparisons to determine the effectiveness of the IOP suppression systems. The identification and characterization of the overpressure events, the waveform scaling, the computation of the IOP suppression system knockdown factors, and preliminary comparisons to the analytical models are discussed.

  14. Space Launch System Scale Model Acoustic Test Ignition Overpressure Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nance, Donald; Liever, Peter; Nielsen, Tanner

    2015-01-01

    The overpressure phenomenon is a transient fluid dynamic event occurring during rocket propulsion system ignition. This phenomenon results from fluid compression of the accelerating plume gas, subsequent rarefaction, and subsequent propagation from the exhaust trench and duct holes. The high-amplitude unsteady fluid-dynamic perturbations can adversely affect the vehicle and surrounding structure. Commonly known as ignition overpressure (IOP), this is an important design-to environment for the Space Launch System (SLS) that NASA is currently developing. Subscale testing is useful in validating and verifying the IOP environment. This was one of the objectives of the Scale Model Acoustic Test, conducted at Marshall Space Flight Center. The test data quantifies the effectiveness of the SLS IOP suppression system and improves the analytical models used to predict the SLS IOP environments. The reduction and analysis of the data gathered during the SMAT IOP test series requires identification and characterization of multiple dynamic events and scaling of the event waveforms to provide the most accurate comparisons to determine the effectiveness of the IOP suppression systems. The identification and characterization of the overpressure events, the waveform scaling, the computation of the IOP suppression system knockdown factors, and preliminary comparisons to the analytical models are discussed.

  15. Cassini/Titan-4 Acoustic Blanket Development and Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, William O.; McNelis, Anne M.

    1996-01-01

    NASA Lewis Research Center recently led a multi-organizational effort to develop and test verify new acoustic blankets. These blankets support NASA's goal in reducing the Titan-4 payload fairing internal acoustic environment to allowable levels for the Cassini spacecraft. To accomplish this goal a two phase acoustic test program was utilized. Phase One consisted of testing numerous blanket designs in a flat panel configuration. Phase Two consisted of testing the most promising designs out of Phase One in a full scale cylindrical payload fairing. This paper will summarize this highly successful test program by providing the rationale and results for each test phase, the impacts of this testing on the Cassini mission, as well as providing some general information on blanket designs.

  16. Maneuver Acoustic Flight Test of the Bell 430 Helicopter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watts, Michael E.; Snider, Royce; Greenwood, Eric; Baden, Joel

    2012-01-01

    A cooperative flight test by NASA, Bell Helicopter and the U.S. Army to characterize the steady state acoustics and measure the maneuver noise of a Bell Helicopter 430 aircraft was accomplished. The test occurred during June/July, 2011 at Eglin Air Force Base, Florida. This test gathered a total of 410 data points over 10 test days and compiled an extensive data base of dynamic maneuver measurements. Three microphone configurations with up to 31 microphones in each configuration were used to acquire acoustic data. Aircraft data included DGPS, aircraft state and rotor state information. This paper provides an overview of the test.

  17. Acoustic test and analyses of three advanced turboprop models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, B. M.; Metzger, F. B.

    1980-01-01

    Results of acoustic tests of three 62.2 cm (24.5 inch) diameter models of the prop-fan (a small diameter, highly loaded. Multi-bladed variable pitch advanced turboprop) are presented. Results show that there is little difference in the noise produced by unswept and slightly swept designs. However, the model designed for noise reduction produces substantially less noise at test conditions simulating 0.8 Mach number cruise speed or at conditions simulating takeoff and landing. In the near field at cruise conditions the acoustically designed. In the far field at takeoff and landing conditions the acoustically designed model is 5 db quieter than unswept or slightly swept designs. Correlation between noise measurement and theoretical predictions as well as comparisons between measured and predicted acoustic pressure pulses generated by the prop-fan blades are discussed. The general characteristics of the pulses are predicted. Shadowgraph measurements were obtained which showed the location of bow and trailing waves.

  18. Tabulation of data from the tip aerodynamics and acoustics test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cross, Jeffrey L.; Tu, Wilson

    1990-01-01

    In a continuing effort to understand helicopter rotor tip aerodynamics and acoustics, researchers at Ames Research Center conducted a flight test. The test was performed using the NASA White Cobra and a set of highly instrumented blades. Tabular and graphic summaries of two data subsets from the Tip Aerodynamics and Acoustics Test are given. The data presented are for airloads, blade structural loads, blade vibrations, with summary tables of the aircraft states for each test point. The tabular data consist of the first 15 harmonics only, whereas the plots contain the entire measured frequency content.

  19. In-flight acoustic testing techniques using the YO-3A Acoustic Research Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cross, J. L.; Watts, M. E.

    1984-01-01

    This report discusses the flight testing techniques and equipment employed during air-to-air acoustic testing of helicopters at Ames Research Center. The in flight measurement technique used enables acoustic data to be obtained without the limitations of anechoic chambers or the multitude of variables encountered in ground based flyover testing. The air-to-air testing is made possible by the NASA YO-3A Acoustic Research Aircraft. This "Quiet Aircraft' is an acoustically instrumented version of a quiet observation aircraft manufactured for the military. To date, tests with the following aircraft have been conducted: YO-3A background noise; Hughes 500D; Hughes AH-64; Bell AH-1S; Bell AH-1G. Several system upgrades are being designed and implemented to improve the quality of data. This report will discuss not only the equipment involved and aircraft tested, but also the techniques used in these tests. In particular, formation flying position locations, and the test matrices will be discussed. Examples of data taken will also be presented.

  20. In-flight acoustic testing techniques using the YO-3A acoustic research aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cross, J. L.; Watts, M. E.

    1983-01-01

    This report discusses the flight testing techniques and equipment employed during air-to-air acoustic testing of helicopters at Ames Research Center. The in-flight measurement technique used enables acoustic data to be obtained without the limitations of anechoic chambers or the multitude of variables encountered in ground based flyover testing. The air-to-air testing is made possible by the NASA YO-3A Acoustic Research Aircraft. This 'Quiet Aircraft' is an acoustically instrumented version of a quiet observation aircraft manufactured for the military. To date, tests with the following aircraft have been conducted: YO-3A background noise; Hughes 500D; Hughes AH-64; Bell AH-1S; Bell AH-1G. Several system upgrades are being designed and implemented to improve the quality of data. This report will discuss not only the equipment involved and aircraft tested, but also the techniques used in these tests. In particular, formation flying, position locations, and the test matrices will be discussed. Examples of data taken will also be presented.

  1. In-flight acoustic testing techniques using the YO-3A acoustic research aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cross, J. L.; Watts, M. E.

    1983-01-01

    This report discusses the flight testing techniques and equipment employed during air-to-air acoustic testing of helicopters at Ames Research Center. The in-flight measurement technique used enables acoustic data to be obtained without the limitations of anechoic chambers or the multitude of variables encountered in ground based flyover testing. The air-to-air testing is made possible by the NASA YO-3A Acoustic Research Aircraft. This 'Quiet Aircraft' is an acoustically instrumented version of a quiet observation aircraft manufactured for the military. To date, tests with the following aircraft have been conducted: YO-3A background noise; Hughes 500D; Hughes AH-64; Bell AH-1S; Bell AH-1G. Several system upgrades are being designed and implemented to improve the quality of data. This report will discuss not only the equipment involved and aircraft tested, but also the techniques used in these tests. In particular, formation flying, position locations, and the test matrices will be discussed. Examples of data taken will also be presented.

  2. The Testing Behind The Test Facility: The Acoustic Design of the NASA Glenn Research Center's World-Class Reverberant Acoustic Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, William O.; McNelis, Mark E.; McNelis, Anne M.

    2011-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Glenn Research Center (GRC) is leading the design and build of the new world-class vibroacoustic test capabilities at the NASA GRC?s Plum Brook Station in Sandusky, Ohio, USA. Benham Companies, LLC is currently constructing modal, base-shake sine and reverberant acoustic test facilities to support the future testing needs of NASA?s space exploration program. T he large Reverberant Acoustic Test Facility (RATF) will be approximately 101,000 ft3 in volume and capable of achieving an empty chamber acoustic overall sound pressure level (OASPL) of 163 dB. This combination of size and acoustic power is unprecedented amongst the world?s known active reverberant acoustic test facilities. The key to achieving the expected acoustic test spectra for a range of many NASA space flight environments in the RATF is the knowledge gained from a series of ground acoustic tests. Data was obtained from several NASA-sponsored test programs, including testing performed at the National Research Council of Canada?s acoustic test facility in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, and at the Redstone Technical Test Center acoustic test facility in Huntsville, Alabama, USA. The majority of these tests were performed to characterize the acoustic performance of the modulators (noise generators) and representative horns that would be required to meet the desired spectra, as well as to evaluate possible supplemental gas jet noise sources. The knowledge obtained in each of these test programs enabled the design of the RATF sound generation system to confidently advance to its final acoustic de-sign and subsequent on-going construction.

  3. The Testing Behind the Test Facility: the Acoustic Design of the NASA Glenn Research Center's World-Class Reverberant Acoustic Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, William O.; McNelis, Mark E.; Hozman, Aron D.; McNelis, Anne M.

    2010-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Glenn Research Center (GRC) is leading the design and build of the new world-class vibroacoustic test capabilities at the NASA GRC s Plum Brook Station in Sandusky, Ohio, U.S.A. Benham Companies, LLC is currently constructing modal, base-shake sine and reverberant acoustic test facilities to support the future testing needs of NASA s space exploration program. The large Reverberant Acoustic Test Facility (RATF) will be approximately 101,000 ft3 in volume and capable of achieving an empty chamber acoustic overall sound pressure level (OASPL) of 163 dB. This combination of size and acoustic power is unprecedented amongst the world s known active reverberant acoustic test facilities. The key to achieving the expected acoustic test spectra for a range of many NASA space flight environments in the RATF is the knowledge gained from a series of ground acoustic tests. Data was obtained from several NASA-sponsored test programs, including testing performed at the National Research Council of Canada s acoustic test facility in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, and at the Redstone Technical Test Center acoustic test facility in Huntsville, Alabama, U.S.A. The majority of these tests were performed to characterize the acoustic performance of the modulators (noise generators) and representative horns that would be required to meet the desired spectra, as well as to evaluate possible supplemental gas jet noise sources. The knowledge obtained in each of these test programs enabled the design of the RATF sound generation system to confidently advance to its final acoustic design and subsequent ongoing construction.

  4. The Testing Behind The Test Facility: The Acoustic Design of the NASA Glenn Research Center's World-Class Reverberant Acoustic Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hozman, Aron D.; Hughes, William O.; McNelis, Mark E.; McNelis, Anne M.

    2011-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Glenn Research Center (GRC) is leading the design and build of the new world-class vibroacoustic test capabilities at the NASA GRC's Plum Brook Station in Sandusky, Ohio, USA. Benham Companies, LLC is currently constructing modal, base-shake sine and reverberant acoustic test facilities to support the future testing needs of NASA's space exploration program. The large Reverberant Acoustic Test Facility (RATF) will be approximately 101,000 cu ft in volume and capable of achieving an empty chamber acoustic overall sound pressure level (OASPL) of 163 dB. This combination of size and acoustic power is unprecedented amongst the world's known active reverberant acoustic test facilities. The key to achieving the expected acoustic test spectra for a range of many NASA space flight environments in the RATF is the knowledge gained from a series of ground acoustic tests. Data was obtained from several NASA-sponsored test programs, including testing performed at the National Research Council of Canada's acoustic test facility in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, and at the Redstone Technical Test Center acoustic test facility in Huntsville, Alabama, USA. The majority of these tests were performed to characterize the acoustic performance of the modulators (noise generators) and representative horns that would be required to meet the desired spectra, as well as to evaluate possible supplemental gas jet noise sources. The knowledge obtained in each of these test programs enabled the design of the RATF sound generation system to confidently advance to its final acoustic design and subsequent on-going construction.

  5. Sandia National Laboratories' new high level acoustic test facility

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, J. D.; Hendrick, D. M.

    1989-01-01

    A high intensity acoustic test facility has been designed and is under construction at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, NM. The chamber is designed to provide an acoustic environment of 154dB (re 20 {mu}Pa) overall sound pressure level over the bandwidth of 50 Hz to 10,000 Hz. The chamber has a volume of 16,000 cubic feet with interior dimensions of 21.6 ft {times} 24.6 ft {times} 30 ft. The construction of the chamber should be complete by the summer of 1990. This paper discusses the design goals and constraints of the facility. The construction characteristics are discussed in detail, as are the acoustic performance design characteristics. The authors hope that this work will help others in designing acoustic chambers. 12 refs., 6 figs.

  6. Digital control of high-intensity acoustic testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slusser, R. A.

    1975-01-01

    A high intensity acoustic test system is reported that consists of a reverberation room measuring 18 feet wide by 21 feet long by 26 feet high, with an internal volume of 10,900 cubic feet. The room is rectangular in shape. Acoustic energy is supplied through two 50-Hz cutoff exponential horns about 12 feet long. Each of the two horns has two transducers rated at 4000 acoustic watts each. A gaseous nitrogen supply is used to supply the energy. The equalized electrical signal is corrected by a circuit designed to compensate for the transducer nonlinearity, then fed into one channel of a phase linear power amplifier, then into the transducer. The amplifiers have been modified to increase their reliability. The acoustic energy in the room is monitored by six B and K 1/2-inch condenser microphones. The electrical signal from each microphone is fed into a six channel real time averager to give a spatial average of the signals.

  7. Comparison of Two High Intensity Acoustic Test Facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Launay, A.; Tadao Sakita, M.; Kim, Youngkey K.

    2004-08-01

    In two different countries, at the same period of time, the institutes in charge of the development of space activities have decided to extend their satellite integration and test center, and to implement a reverberant acoustic chamber. In Brazil the INPE laboratory (LIT : Laboratorio de Integracao e Testes) and in South Korea the KARI laboratory (SITC : Satellite Integration and Test Center) started their projects in July 2000 for the RATF (Reverberant Acoustic Test Facility) and in May 2001 for the HIAC (High Intensity Acoustic Chamber) respectively, writing the technical specifications. The kick-off meetings took place in December 2000 and in February 2002 and the opening ceremonies in December 19, 2002 in Brazil and in August 22, 2003 in Korea. This paper compares the two projects in terms of design choices, manufacturing processes, equipment installed and technical final characteristics.

  8. The Nozzle Acoustic Test Rig: an Acoustic and Aerodynamic Free-jet Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castner, Raymond S.

    1994-01-01

    The nozzle acoustic test rig (NATR) was built at NASA Lewis Research Center to support the High Speed Research Program. The facility is capable of measuring the acoustic and aerodynamic performance of aircraft engine nozzle concepts. Trade-off studies are conducted to compare performance and noise during simulated low-speed flight and takeoff. Located inside an acoustically treated dome with a 62-ft radius, the NATR is a free-jet that has a 53-in. diameter and is driven by an air ejector. This ejector is operated with 125 lb/s of compressed air, at 125 psig, to achieve 375 lb/s at Mach 0.3. Acoustic and aerodynamic data are collected from test nozzles mounted in the free-jet flow. The dome serves to protect the surrounding community from high noise levels generated by the nozzles, and to provide an anechoic environment for acoustic measurements. Information presented in this report summarizes free-jet performance, fluid support systems, and data acquisition capabilities of the NATR.

  9. Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, Jerry R.; Grosveld, Ferdinand

    2007-01-01

    The acoustics environment in space operations is important to maintain at manageable levels so that the crewperson can remain safe, functional, effective, and reasonably comfortable. High acoustic levels can produce temporary or permanent hearing loss, or cause other physiological symptoms such as auditory pain, headaches, discomfort, strain in the vocal cords, or fatigue. Noise is defined as undesirable sound. Excessive noise may result in psychological effects such as irritability, inability to concentrate, decrease in productivity, annoyance, errors in judgment, and distraction. A noisy environment can also result in the inability to sleep, or sleep well. Elevated noise levels can affect the ability to communicate, understand what is being said, hear what is going on in the environment, degrade crew performance and operations, and create habitability concerns. Superfluous noise emissions can also create the inability to hear alarms or other important auditory cues such as an equipment malfunctioning. Recent space flight experience, evaluations of the requirements in crew habitable areas, and lessons learned (Goodman 2003; Allen and Goodman 2003; Pilkinton 2003; Grosveld et al. 2003) show the importance of maintaining an acceptable acoustics environment. This is best accomplished by having a high-quality set of limits/requirements early in the program, the "designing in" of acoustics in the development of hardware and systems, and by monitoring, testing and verifying the levels to ensure that they are acceptable.

  10. Vibration and acoustic testing of TOPEX/Poseidon satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boatman, Dave; Scharton, Terry; Hershfeld, Donald; Larkin, Paul

    1992-01-01

    The satellite was subjected to a 1.5G swept sine vibration test and a 146 dB overall level acoustic test, in accordance with Ariane launch vehicle requirements, at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. Extensive pretest analysis of the sine test was conducted to plan the input notching and to justify vibration testing the satellite only in the longitudinal axis. A unique measurement system was utilized to determine the six components of interface force between the shaker and the satellite in the sine vibration test. The satellite was heavily instrumented in both the sine vibration and acoustic test in order to insure that the launch loads were enveloped with appropriate margin and that satellite responses did not exceed the compatibilities of the structure and equipment. The test specification, objectives, instrumentation, and test results are described herein.

  11. Vibration and acoustic testing of TOPEX/Poseidon satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boatman, Dave; Scharton, Terry; Hershfeld, Donald; Larkin, Paul

    1992-11-01

    The satellite was subjected to a 1.5G swept sine vibration test and a 146 dB overall level acoustic test, in accordance with Ariane launch vehicle requirements, at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. Extensive pretest analysis of the sine test was conducted to plan the input notching and to justify vibration testing the satellite only in the longitudinal axis. A unique measurement system was utilized to determine the six components of interface force between the shaker and the satellite in the sine vibration test. The satellite was heavily instrumented in both the sine vibration and acoustic test in order to insure that the launch loads were enveloped with appropriate margin and that satellite responses did not exceed the compatibilities of the structure and equipment. The test specification, objectives, instrumentation, and test results are described herein.

  12. Development of a MEMS device for acoustic emission testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozevin, Didem; Pessiki, Stephen P.; Jain, Akash; Greve, David W.; Oppenheim, Irving J.

    2003-08-01

    Acoustic emission testing is an important technology for evaluating structural materials, and especially for detecting damage in structural members. Significant new capabilities may be gained by developing MEMS transducers for acoustic emission testing, including permanent bonding or embedment for superior coupling, greater density of transducer placement, and a bundle of transducers on each device tuned to different frequencies. Additional advantages include capabilities for maintenance of signal histories and coordination between multiple transducers. We designed a MEMS device for acoustic emission testing that features two different mechanical types, a hexagonal plate design and a spring-mass design, with multiple detectors of each type at ten different frequencies in the range of 100 kHz to 1 MHz. The devices were fabricated in the multi-user polysilicon surface micromachining (MUMPs) process and we have conducted electrical characterization experiments and initial experiments on acoustic emission detection. We first report on C(V) measurements and perform a comparison between predicted (design) and measured response. We next report on admittance measurements conducted at pressures varying from vacuum to atmospheric, identifying the resonant frequencies and again providing a comparison with predicted performance. We then describe initial calibration experiments that compare the performance of the detectors to other acoustic emission transducers, and we discuss the overall performance of the device as a sensor suite, as contrasted to the single-channel performance of most commercial transducers.

  13. Computer-controlled noise adaption for acoustical test facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wedig, W. V.; Ams, A.

    1990-09-01

    For acoustical noise tests of elastic structures, statistically representative signals generated from white noise by means of spectrum shapers and band pass filters are needed. Subsequently, these signals are amplified and transformed into physical test noise by acoustical sirens. A mathematical model of the entire system based on measurements of frequency transfer functions in order to predict an optimal amplitude modulation of the spectrum shaper is presented. The prediction is performed by means of a nonlinear optimization procedure which iterates the tuning parameters of the shaper with respect to the stored frequency data of the entire system.

  14. The Dornier 328 Acoustic Test Cell (ATC) for interior noise tests and selected test results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hackstein, H. Josef; Borchers, Ingo U.; Renger, Klaus; Vogt, Konrad

    1992-01-01

    To perform acoustic studies for achieving low noise levels for the Dornier 328, an acoustic test cell (ATC) of the Dornier 328 has been built. The ATC consists of a fuselage section, a realistic fuselage suspension system, and three exterior noise simulation rings. A complex digital 60 channel computer/amplifier noise generation system as well as multichannel digital data acquisition and evaluation system have been used. The noise control tests started with vibration measurements for supporting acoustic data interpretation. In addition, experiments have been carried out on dynamic vibration absorbers, the most important passive noise reduction measure for low frequency propeller noise. The design and arrangement of the current ATC are presented. Furthermore, exterior noise simulation as well as data acquisition are explained. The most promising results show noise reduction due to synchrophasing and dynamic vibration absorbers.

  15. Vibro-Acoustics Modal Testing at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pappa, Richard S.; Pritchard, Jocelyn I.; Buehrle, Ralph D.

    1999-01-01

    This paper summarizes on-going modal testing activities at the NASA Langley Research Center for two aircraft fuselage structures: a generic "aluminum testbed cylinder" (ATC) and a Beechcraft Starship fuselage (BSF). Subsequent acoustic tests will measure the interior noise field created by exterior mechanical and acoustic sources. These test results will provide validation databases for interior noise prediction codes on realistic aircraft fuselage structures. The ATC is a 12-ft-long, all-aluminum, scale model assembly. The BSF is a 40-ft-long, all-composite, complete aircraft fuselage. To date, two of seven test configurations of the ATC and all three test configurations of the BSF have been completed. The paper briefly describes the various test configurations, testing procedure, and typical results for frequencies up to 250 Hz.

  16. Modal decomposition method for acoustic impedance testing in square ducts.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Todd; Cattafesta, Louis N; Sheplak, Mark

    2006-12-01

    Accurate duct acoustic propagation models are required to predict and reduce aircraft engine noise. These models ultimately rely on measurements of the acoustic impedance to characterize candidate engine nacelle liners. This research effort increases the frequency range of normal-incidence acoustic impedance testing in square ducts by extending the standard two-microphone method (TMM), which is limited to plane wave propagation, to include higher-order modes. The modal decomposition method (MDM) presented includes four normal modes in the model of the sound field, thus increasing the bandwidth from 6.7 to 13.5 kHz for a 25.4 mm square waveguide. The MDM characterizes the test specimen for normal- and oblique-incident acoustic impedance and mode scattering coefficients. The MDM is first formulated and then applied to the measurement of the reflection coefficient matrix for a ceramic tubular specimen. The experimental results are consistent with results from the TMM for the same specimen to within the 95% confidence intervals for the TMM. The MDM results show a series of resonances for the ceramic tubular material exhibiting a monotonic decrease in the resonant peaks of the acoustic resistance with increasing frequency, resembling a rigidly-terminated viscous tube, and also evidence of mode scattering is visible at the higher frequencies.

  17. Wake Shield Facility Modal Survey Test in Vibration Acoustic Test Facility

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1991-10-09

    Astronaut Ronald M. Sega stands beside the University of Houston's Wake Shield Facility before it undergoes a Modal Survey Test in the Vibration and Acoustic Test Facility Building 49, prior to being flown on space shuttle mission STS-60.

  18. Overview of the Acoustic Testing of the European Service Module Structural Test Article (E-STA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, William; Fogt, Vince; Le Plenier, Cyprien; Duval, Francois; Durand, Jean-Francois; Staab, Lucas D.; Hozman, Aron; Mcnelis, Anne; Bittinger, Samantha; Thirkettle, Anthony; hide

    2017-01-01

    The European Space Agency (ESA) and their prime contractor Airbus Defense Space (ADS) are developing the European Service Module (ESM) for integration and utilization with other modules of NASAs Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle. As part of this development, ESA, ADS, NASA and the Lockheed Martin Company performed a series of reverberant acoustic tests in April-May 2016 on the ESM Structural Test Article (E-STA), the mechanical mock-up of the ESM designated for mechanical tests. Testing the E-STA under acoustic qualification loads verifies whether it can successfully withstand the medium and high frequency mechanical environment occurring during the vehicles lift-off and atmospheric phases of flight. The testing occurred at the Reverberant Acoustic Test Facility (RATF) at the NASA Glenn Research Centers Plum Brook Station site in Sandusky, OH, USA. This highly successful acoustic test campaign excited the E-STA to acoustic test levels as high as 149.4 dB Overall Sound Pressure Level. This acoustic testing met all the ESA and ADSs test objectives, including establishingverifying the random vibration qualification test levels for numerous hardware components of the ESM, and qualifying the ESMs Solar Array Wing electrical power system. This paper will address the test objectives, the test articles configuration, the test instrumentation and excitation levels, the RATF site and capabilities, the series of acoustic tests performed, and the technical issues faced and overcome to result in a successful acoustic test campaign for the ESM. A discussion of several test results is also included.

  19. Overview of the Acoustic Testing of the European Service Module Structural Test Article (E-STA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, William; Le Plenier, Cyprien; Duval, Francois; Staab, Lucas; Hozman, Aron; Thirkettle, Anthony; Fogt, Vincent; Durand, Jean-Francois; McNelis, Anne; Bittinger, Samantha; hide

    2017-01-01

    The European Space Agency (ESA) and their prime contractor Airbus Defense Space (ADS) are developing the European Service Module (ESM) for integration and utilization with other modules of NASAs Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle. As part of this development, ESA, ADS, NASA and the Lockheed Martin Company performed a series of reverberant acoustic tests in April-May 2016 on the ESM Structural Test Article (E-STA), the mechanical mock-up of the ESM designated for mechanical tests. Testing the E-STA under acoustic qualification loads verifies whether it can successfully withstand the medium and high frequency mechanical environment occurring during the vehicles lift-off and atmospheric phases of flight. The testing occurred at the Reverberant Acoustic Test Facility (RATF) at the NASA Glenn Research Centers Plum Brook Station site in Sandusky, OH, USA. This highly successful acoustic test campaign excited the E-STA to acoustic test levels as high as 149.4 dB Overall Sound Pressure Level. This acoustic testing met all the ESA and ADSs test objectives, including establishing/verifying the random vibration qualification test levels for numerous hardware components of the ESM, and qualifying the ESMs Solar Array Wing electrical power system. This paper will address the test objectives, the test articles configuration, the test instrumentation and excitation levels, the RATF site and capabilities, the series of acoustic tests performed, and the technical issues faced and overcome to result in a successful acoustic test campaign for the ESM. A discussion of several test results is also included.

  20. Results of acoustic emission tests on Halon fire bottles

    SciTech Connect

    Beattie, A.G.; Shurtleff, W.W.

    1996-10-01

    An acoustic emission tester for aircraft Halon bottles has been developed. The necessary load is applied by heating the bottles. Acoustic emission is monitored during the heating by six sensors held in position by a special fixture. This fixture was designed to fit spheres with diameters between 5 and 16 inches. A prototype has been undergoing testing in two commercial Halon bottle repair and test facilities. Results to date indicate that about 97 percent of the bottles tested show no indications of any flaws. The other three percent have had indications of flaws in non-critical areas of the bottles. All bottles tested to date have passed the hydrostatic test required by the Department of Transportation (DOT).

  1. Digital control of high-intensity acoustic testing. [for spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slusser, R. A.

    1975-01-01

    Three systems for the control of acoustic testing are compared: a hybrid digital/analog system, a digital vibration system, and the same digital vibration system modified by a software change. The hybrid system was constructed to control the 1/3-octaves from 50 to 1000 Hz. The vibration system was equipped with programs for sine and random vibration tests, shock analysis and synthesis, and signal analysis. For the modified vibration system, the random-vibration control program of the unmodified unit was changed so that acoustic tests could be performed. The performance of the three systems is compared by conducting probability-density and time-history analyses of the proposed test spectrum for the Mariner Jupiter/Saturn 1977 program. The results of the analyses show that the hybrid and modified vibration systems perform almost equally, but the modified vibration system is easier to use and produces better test documentation.

  2. An Evaluation of the Additional Acoustic Power Needed to Overcome the Effects of a Test-Article's Absorption during Reverberant Chamber Acoustic Testing of Spaceflight Hardware

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hozman, Aron D.; Hughes, William O.

    2014-01-01

    The exposure of a customers aerospace test-article to a simulated acoustic launch environment is typically performed in a reverberant acoustic test chamber. The acoustic pre-test runs that will ensure that the sound pressure levels of this environment can indeed be met by a test facility are normally performed without a test-article dynamic simulator of representative acoustic absorption and size. If an acoustic test facilitys available acoustic power capability becomes maximized with the test-article installed during the actual test then the customers environment requirement may become compromised. In order to understand the risk of not achieving the customers in-tolerance spectrum requirement with the test-article installed, an acoustic power margin evaluation as a function of frequency may be performed by the test facility. The method for this evaluation of acoustic power will be discussed in this paper. This method was recently applied at the NASA Glenn Research Center Plum Brook Stations Reverberant Acoustic Test Facility for the SpaceX Falcon 9 Payload Fairing acoustic test program.

  3. An Evaluation of the Additional Acoustic Power Needed to Overcome the Effects of a Test-Article's Absorption During Reverberant Chamber Acoustic Testing of Spaceflight Hardware

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hozman, Aron D.; Hughes, William O.

    2014-01-01

    The exposure of a customer's aerospace test-article to a simulated acoustic launch environment is typically performed in a reverberant acoustic test chamber. The acoustic pre-test runs that will ensure that the sound pressure levels of this environment can indeed be met by a test facility are normally performed without a test-article dynamic simulator of representative acoustic absorption and size. If an acoustic test facility's available acoustic power capability becomes maximized with the test-article installed during the actual test then the customer's environment requirement may become compromised. In order to understand the risk of not achieving the customer's in-tolerance spectrum requirement with the test-article installed, an acoustic power margin evaluation as a function of frequency may be performed by the test facility. The method for this evaluation of acoustic power will be discussed in this paper. This method was recently applied at the NASA Glenn Research Center Plum Brook Station's Reverberant Acoustic Test Facility for the SpaceX Falcon 9 Payload Fairing acoustic test program.

  4. Acoustic results of the Boeing model 360 whirl tower test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watts, Michael E.; Jordan, David

    1990-01-01

    An evaluation is presented for whirl tower test results of the Model 360 helicopter's advanced, high-performance four-bladed composite rotor system intended to facilitate over-200-knot flight. During these performance measurements, acoustic data were acquired by seven microphones. A comparison of whirl-tower tests with theory indicate that theoretical prediction accuracies vary with both microphone position and the inclusion of ground reflection. Prediction errors varied from 0 to 40 percent of the measured signal-to-peak amplitude.

  5. Acoustic and Aerothermal Performance Test of the Axisymmetric Coannular Ejector Nozzle. Volume 2; Acoustic Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herkes, William

    2000-01-01

    Acoustic and propulsion performance testing of a model-scale Axisymmetric Coannular Ejector nozzle was conducted in the Boeing Low-speed Aeroacoustic Facility. This nozzle is a plug nozzle with an ejector design to provide aspiration of about 20% of the engine flow. A variety of mixing enhancers were designed to promote mixing of the engine and the aspirated flows. These included delta tabs, tone-injection rods, and wheeler ramps. This report addresses the acoustic aspects of the testing. The spectral characteristics of the various configurations of the nozzle are examined on a model-scale basis. This includes indentifying particular noise sources contributing to the spectra and the data are projected to full-scale flyover conditions to evaluate the effectiveness of the nozzle, and of the various mixing enhancers, on reducing the Effective Perceived Noise Levels.

  6. Structural tests using a MEMS acoustic emission sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oppenheim, Irving J.; Greve, David W.; Ozevin, Didem; Hay, D. Robert; Hay, Thomas R.; Pessiki, Stephen P.; Tyson, Nathan L.

    2006-03-01

    In a collaborative project at Lehigh and Carnegie Mellon, a MEMS acoustic emission sensor was designed and fabricated as a suite of six resonant-type capacitive transducers in the frequency range between 100 and 500 kHz. Characterization studies showed good comparisons between predicted and experimental electro-mechanical behavior. Acoustic emission events, simulated experimentally in steel ball impact and in pencil lead break tests, were detected and source localization was demonstrated. In this paper we describe the application of the MEMS device in structural testing, both in laboratory and in field applications. We discuss our findings regarding housing and mounting (acoustic coupling) of the MEMS device with its supporting electronics, and we then report the results of structural testing. In all tests, the MEMS transducers were used in parallel with commercial acoustic emission sensors, which thereby serve as a benchmark and permit a direct observation of MEMS device functionality. All tests involved steel structures, with particular interest in propagation of existing cracks or flaws. A series of four laboratory tests were performed on beam specimens fabricated from two segments (Grade 50 steel) with a full penetration weld (E70T-4 electrode material) at midspan. That weld region was notched, an initial fatigue crack was induced, and the specimens were then instrumented with one commercial transducer and with one MEMS device; data was recorded from five individual transducers on the MEMS device. Under a four-point bending test, the beam displayed both inelastic behavior and crack propagation, including load drops associated with crack instability. The MEMS transducers detected all instability events as well as many or most of the acoustic emissions occurring during plasticity and stable crack growth. The MEMS transducers were less sensitive than the commercial transducer, and did not detect as many events, but the normalized cumulative burst count obtained

  7. Seismic, Acoustic, and Magnetic Test Results from US/German Testing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-01-01

    SEISMIC, ACOUSTIC, AND MAGNETIC TEST RESULTS FROM US/GERMAN TESTING John Sledge CHICKEN LITTLE Program Office Eglin AFB Florida 32542 ABSTRACT...conducted at the Meppen Test Range during the period of October 1997. The CHICKEN LITTLE, Sensor/Seeker Seismic, Acoustic, and Magnetic (SAM) team...Number Performing Organization Name(s) and Address(es) CHICKEN LITTLE Program Office Eglin AFB Florida 32542 Performing Organization Number(s

  8. Tip aerodynamics and acoustics test: A report and data survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cross, Jeffrey L.; Watts, Michael E.

    1988-01-01

    In a continuing effort to understand helicopter rotor tip aerodynamics and acoustics, a flight test was conducted by NASA Ames Research Center. The test was performed using the NASA White Cobra and a set of highly instrumented blades. All aspects of the flight test instrumentation and test procedures are explained. Additionally, complete data sets for selected test points are presented and analyzed. Because of the high volume of data acquired, only selected data points are presented. However, access to the entire data set is available to the researcher on request.

  9. Could Acoustic Emission Testing Show a Pipe Failure in Advance?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soares, S. D.; Teixeira, J. C. G.

    2004-02-01

    During the last 20 years PETROBRAS has been attempting to use Acoustic Emission (AE) as an inspection tool. In this period the AE concept has changed from a revolutionary method to a way of finding areas to make a complete inspection. PETROBRAS has a lot of pressure vessels inspected by AE and with other NDTs techniques to establish their relationship. In other hand, PETROBRAS R&D Center has conducted destructive hydrostatic tests in pipelines samples with artificial defects made by milling. Those tests were monitored by acoustic emission and manual ultrasonic until the complete failure of pipe sample. This article shows the results obtained and a brief proposal of analysis criteria for this environment of test.

  10. Field tests of acoustic telemetry for a portable coastal observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Martini, M.; Butman, B.; Ware, J.; Frye, D.

    2006-01-01

    Long-term field tests of a low-cost acoustic telemetry system were carried out at two sites in Massachusetts Bay. At each site, an acoustic Doppler current profiler mounted on a bottom tripod was fitted with an acoustic modem to transmit data to a surface buoy; electronics mounted on the buoy relayed these data to shore via radio modem. The mooring at one site (24 m water depth) was custom-designed for the telemetry application, with a custom designed small buoy, a flexible electro-mechanical buoy to mooring joint using a molded chain connection to the buoy, quick-release electro-mechanical couplings, and dual hydrophones suspended 7 m above the bottom. The surface buoy at the second site (33 m water depth) was a U.S. Coast Guard (USCG) channel buoy fitted with telemetry electronics and clamps to hold the hydrophones. The telemetry was tested in several configurations for a period of about four years. The custom-designed buoy and mooring provided nearly error-free data transmission through the acoustic link under a variety of oceanographic conditions for 261 days at the 24 m site. The electro mechanical joint, cables and couplings required minimal servicing and were very reliable, lasting 862 days deployed before needing repairs. The acoustic communication results from the USCG buoy were poor, apparently due to the hard cobble bottom, noise from the all-steel buoy, and failure of the hydrophone assembly. Access to the USCG buoy at sea required ideal weather. ??2006 IEEE.

  11. Vibration and Acoustic Testing for Mars Micromission Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kern, Dennis L.; Scharton, Terry D.

    1999-01-01

    The objective of the Mars Micromission program being managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) for NASA is to develop a common spacecraft that can carry telecommunications equipment and a variety of science payloads for exploration of Mars. The spacecraft will be capable of carrying robot landers and rovers, cameras, probes, balloons, gliders or aircraft, and telecommunications equipment to Mars at much lower cost than recent NASA Mars missions. The lightweight spacecraft (about 220 Kg mass) will be launched in a cooperative venture with CNES as a TWIN auxiliary payload on the Ariane 5 launch vehicle. Two or more Mars Micromission launches are planned for each Mars launch opportunity, which occur every 26 months. The Mars launch window for the first mission is November 1, 2002 through April 2003, which is planned to be a Mars airplane technology demonstration mission to coincide with the 100 year anniversary of the Kittyhawk flight. Several subsequent launches will create a telecommunications network orbiting Mars, which will provide for continuous communication with lenders and rovers on the Martian surface. Dedicated science payload flights to Mars are slated to start in 2005. This new cheaper and faster approach to Mars exploration calls for innovative approaches to the qualification of the Mars Micromission spacecraft for the Ariane 5 launch vibration and acoustic environments. JPL has in recent years implemented new approaches to spacecraft testing that may be effectively applied to the Mars Micromission. These include 1) force limited vibration testing, 2) combined loads, vibration and modal testing, and 3) direct acoustic testing. JPL has performed nearly 200 force limited vibration tests in the past 9 years; several of the tests were on spacecraft and large instruments, including the Cassini and Deep Space One spacecraft. Force limiting, which measures and limits the spacecraft base reaction force using triaxial force gages sandwiched between the

  12. Vibration and Acoustic Testing for Mars Micromission Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kern, Dennis L.; Scharton, Terry D.

    1999-01-01

    The objective of the Mars Micromission program being managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) for NASA is to develop a common spacecraft that can carry telecommunications equipment and a variety of science payloads for exploration of Mars. The spacecraft will be capable of carrying robot landers and rovers, cameras, probes, balloons, gliders or aircraft, and telecommunications equipment to Mars at much lower cost than recent NASA Mars missions. The lightweight spacecraft (about 220 Kg mass) will be launched in a cooperative venture with CNES as a TWIN auxiliary payload on the Ariane 5 launch vehicle. Two or more Mars Micromission launches are planned for each Mars launch opportunity, which occur every 26 months. The Mars launch window for the first mission is November 1, 2002 through April 2003, which is planned to be a Mars airplane technology demonstration mission to coincide with the 100 year anniversary of the Kittyhawk flight. Several subsequent launches will create a telecommunications network orbiting Mars, which will provide for continuous communication with lenders and rovers on the Martian surface. Dedicated science payload flights to Mars are slated to start in 2005. This new cheaper and faster approach to Mars exploration calls for innovative approaches to the qualification of the Mars Micromission spacecraft for the Ariane 5 launch vibration and acoustic environments. JPL has in recent years implemented new approaches to spacecraft testing that may be effectively applied to the Mars Micromission. These include 1) force limited vibration testing, 2) combined loads, vibration and modal testing, and 3) direct acoustic testing. JPL has performed nearly 200 force limited vibration tests in the past 9 years; several of the tests were on spacecraft and large instruments, including the Cassini and Deep Space One spacecraft. Force limiting, which measures and limits the spacecraft base reaction force using triaxial force gages sandwiched between the

  13. Design and manufacturing of scanning probe acoustic microscope test phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiaohui; Fang, Xiaoyue; Song, Jitao; Ding, Mingyue

    2015-03-01

    Acquiring nondestructive internal structures acoustic image as well as the morphology images using scanning probe acoustic microscope (SPAM) is a challenge and no known metrology tools to identify the ultrasonic internal resolution and detectable depth of SPAM in a nondestructive way. Monitoring these defects necessitates the identification of their technical parameters of SPAM. In this paper, the specific materials (test phantoms) were designed and processed so that the ultrasound internal resolution of SPAM in nondestructive imaging of the embedded or buried substructures as well as the morphology images were measured. Experimental results demonstrated the successful identification of embedded or buried defects under the test phantom with the resolution of 50nm for SPAM as well as the detectable depth of more than 100μm.

  14. LATTE - Linking Acoustic Tests and Tagging Using Statistical Estimation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-30

    after C. Harris’ maternity leave. WORK COMPLETED The project started in April 2010. Task 3 (data processing) is now essentially over, and task 4...Marques et al. An overview of LATTE: Linking Acoustic Tests and Tagging using statistical Estimation: Modelling the Behaviour of Beaked Whales in...geometric (Figure 2). 5 Figure 2 – Conceptual description of the dive cycle of a beaked whale considering 7 behavioural states: 1. At the

  15. NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) Enhanced Melamine (ML) Foam Acoustic Test (NEMFAT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McNelis, Anne M.; Hughes, William O.; McNelis, Mark E.

    2014-01-01

    The NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) funded a proposal to achieve initial basic acoustic characterization of ML (melamine) foam, which could serve as a starting point for a future, more comprehensive acoustic test program for ML foam. A project plan was developed and implemented to obtain acoustic test data for both normal and enhanced ML foam. This project became known as the NESC Enhanced Melamine Foam Acoustic Test (NEMFAT). This document contains the outcome of the NEMFAT project.

  16. Hybrid Wing Body Aircraft Acoustic Test Preparations and Facility Upgrades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heath, Stephanie L.; Brooks, Thomas F.; Hutcheson, Florence V.; Doty, Michael J.; Haskin, Henry H.; Spalt, Taylor B.; Bahr, Christopher J.; Burley, Casey L.; Bartram, Scott M.; Humphreys, William M.; Lunsford, Charles B.; Popenack, Thomas G.; Colbert, Scott E.; Hoad, Danny; Becker, Lawrence; Stead, Dan; Kuchta, Dennis; Yeh, Les

    2013-01-01

    NASA is investigating the potential of acoustic shielding as a means to reduce the noise footprint at airport communities. A subsonic transport aircraft and Langley's 14- by 22-foot Subsonic Wind Tunnel were chosen to test the proposed "low noise" technology. The present experiment studies the basic components of propulsion-airframe shielding in a representative flow regime. To this end, a 5.8-percent scale hybrid wing body model was built with dual state-of-the-art engine noise simulators. The results will provide benchmark shielding data and key hybrid wing body aircraft noise data. The test matrix for the experiment contains both aerodynamic and acoustic test configurations, broadband turbomachinery and hot jet engine noise simulators, and various airframe configurations which include landing gear, cruise and drooped wing leading edges, trailing edge elevons and vertical tail options. To aid in this study, two major facility upgrades have occurred. First, a propane delivery system has been installed to provide the acoustic characteristics with realistic temperature conditions for a hot gas engine; and second, a traversing microphone array and side towers have been added to gain full spectral and directivity noise characteristics.

  17. Crack propagation testing using a YCOB acoustic emission sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Joseph A.; Kim, Kyungrim; Zhang, Shujun; Jiang, Xiaoning

    2014-03-01

    Piezoelectric crystals are popular for passive sensors, such as accelerometers and acoustic emission sensors, due to their robustness and high sensitivity. These sensors are widespread in structural health monitoring among civil and industrial structures, but there is little application in high temperature environments (e.g. > 1000°C) due to the few materials that are capable of operating at elevated temperatures. Most piezoelectric materials suffer from a loss of electric properties above temperatures in the 500-700°C range, but rare earth oxyborate crystals, such as Yttrium calcium oxyborate (YCOB), retain their piezoelectric properties above 1000 °C. Our previous research demonstrated that YCOB can be used to detect transient lamb waves via Hsu-Nielsen tests, which replicate acoustic emission waves, up to 1000°C. In this paper, YCOB piezoelectric acoustic emission sensors were tested for their ability to detect crack progression at elevated temperatures. The sensor was fabricated using a YCOB single crystal and Inconel electrodes and wires. The sensor was mounted onto a stainless steel bar substrate, which was machined to include a pre-crack notch. A dynamic load was induced on the bar with a shaker in order to force the crack to advance along the thickness of the substrate. The obtained raw data was processed and analyzed in the frequency domain and compared to the Lamb wave modes that were evaluated in previous Hsu-Nielsen testing for the substrate.

  18. Helicopter Acoustic Flight Test with Altitude Variation and Maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watts, Michael E.; Greenwood, Eric; Sim, Ben; Stephenson, James; Smith, Charles D.

    2016-01-01

    A cooperative flight test campaign between NASA and the U.S. Army was performed from September 2014 to February 2015. The purposes of the testing were to: investigate the effects of altitude variation on noise generation, investigate the effects of gross weight variation on noise generation, establish the statistical variability in acoustic flight testing of helicopters, and characterize the effects of transient maneuvers on radiated noise for a medium-lift utility helicopter. This test was performed at three test sites (0, 4000, and 7000 feet above mean sea level) with two aircraft (AS350 SD1 and EH-60L) tested at each site. This report provides an overview of the test, documents the data acquired and describes the formats of the stored data.

  19. NASA Glenn Research Center Acoustical Testing Laboratory: Five year retrospective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Beth A.; Akers, James C.; Passe, Paul J.

    2005-09-01

    In the five years since the NASA Glenn Research Center Acoustical Testing Laboratory (ATL) opened its doors in September, 2000, it has developed a comprehensive array of services and products that support hearing conservation goals within NASA and industry. The ATL provides acoustic emission testing and noise control engineering services for a variety of specialized customers, particularly developers of equipment and science experiments manifested for NASA's manned space missions. The ATL aggressively supports the vision of a low-noise on-orbit environment, which facilitates mission success as well as crew health, safety, and comfort. In concert with these goals, the ATL also produces and distributes free educational resources and low-noise advocacy tools for hearing conservation education and awareness. Among these are two compact discs of auditory demonstrations (of phenomena in acoustics, hearing conservation, and communication), and presentations, software packages, and other educational materials for use by engineers, audiologists, and other hearing conservation stakeholders. This presentation will highlight ATL's construction, history, technical capabilities, and current projects and will feature demonstrations of some of the unique educational resource materials that are distributed by the ATL.

  20. Acoustic emission testing of 12-nickel maraging steel pressure vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunegan, H. L.

    1973-01-01

    Acoustic emission data were obtained from three point bend fracture toughness specimens of 12-nickel maraging steel, and two pressure vessels of the same material. One of the pressure vessels contained a prefabricated flaw which was extended and sharpened by fatigue cycling. It is shown that the flawed vessel had similar characteristics to the fracture specimens, thereby allowing estimates to be made of its nearness to failure during a proof test. Both the flawed and unflawed pressure vessel survived the proof pressure and 5 cycles to the working pressure, but it was apparent from the acoustic emission response during the proof cycle and the 5 cycles to the working pressure that the flawed vessel was very near failure. The flawed vessel did not survive a second cycle to the proof pressure before failure due to flaw extension through the wall (causing a leak).

  1. Adaptation to Room Acoustics Using the Modified Rhyme Test

    PubMed Central

    Brandewie, Eugene; Zahorik, Pavel

    2012-01-01

    The negative effect of reverberant sound energy on speech intelligibility is well documented. Recently, however, prior exposure to room acoustics has been shown to increase intelligibility for a number of listeners in simulated room environments. This room adaptation effect, a possible extension of dynamic echo suppression, has been shown to be specific to reverberant rooms and requires binaural input. Because this effect has been demonstrated only using the Coordinated Response Measure (CRM) corpus it is important to determine whether the increase in intelligibility scores reported previously was due to the specific nature of the CRM task. Here we demonstrate a comparable room-acoustic effect using the Modified Rhyme Test (MRT) corpus in multiple room environments. The results are consistent with the idea that the room adaptation effect may be a natural phenomenon of listening in reverberant environments. PMID:23437415

  2. Engine exhaust characteristics evaluation in support of aircraft acoustic testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ennix, Kimberly A.

    1994-02-01

    NASA Dryden Flight Research Facility and NASA Langley Research Center completed a joint acoustic flight test program. Test objectives were (1) to quantify and evaluate subsonic climb-to-cruise noise and (2) to obtain a quality noise database for use in validating the Aircraft Noise Prediction Program. These tests were conducted using aircraft with engines that represent the high nozzle pressure ratio of future transport designs. Test flights were completed at subsonic speeds that exceeded Mach 0.3 using F-18 and F-16XL aircraft. This paper describes the efforts of NASA Dryden Flight Research Facility in this flight test program. Topics discussed include the test aircraft, setup, and matrix. In addition, the engine modeling codes and nozzle exhaust characteristics are described.

  3. Engine exhaust characteristics evaluation in support of aircraft acoustic testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ennix, Kimberly A.

    1994-01-01

    NASA Dryden Flight Research Facility and NASA Langley Research Center completed a joint acoustic flight test program. Test objectives were (1) to quantify and evaluate subsonic climb-to-cruise noise and (2) to obtain a quality noise database for use in validating the Aircraft Noise Prediction Program. These tests were conducted using aircraft with engines that represent the high nozzle pressure ratio of future transport designs. Test flights were completed at subsonic speeds that exceeded Mach 0.3 using F-18 and F-16XL aircraft. This paper describes the efforts of NASA Dryden Flight Research Facility in this flight test program. Topics discussed include the test aircraft, setup, and matrix. In addition, the engine modeling codes and nozzle exhaust characteristics are described.

  4. Engine exhaust characteristics evaluation in support of aircraft acoustic testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ennix, Kimberly A.

    1993-01-01

    NASA Dryden Flight Research Facility and NASA Langley Research Center completed a joint acoustic flight test program. Test objectives were (1) to quantify and evaluate subsonic climb-to-cruise noise and (2) to obtain a quality noise database for use in validating the Aircraft Noise Prediction Program. These tests were conducted using aircraft with engines that represent the high nozzle pressure ratio of future transport designs. Test flights were completed at subsonic speeds that exceeded Mach 0.3 using F-18 and F-16XL aircraft. This paper describes the efforts of NASA Dryden Flight Research Facility in this flight test program. Topics discussed include the test aircraft, setup, and matrix. In addition, the engine modeling codes and nozzle exhaust characteristics are described.

  5. Vibration and Acoustic Test Facility (VATF): User Test Planning Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fantasia, Peter M.

    2011-01-01

    Test process, milestones and inputs are unknowns to first-time users of the VATF. The User Test Planning Guide aids in establishing expectations for both NASA and non-NASA facility customers. The potential audience for this guide includes both internal and commercial spaceflight hardware/software developers. It is intended to assist their test engineering personnel in test planning and execution. Material covered includes a roadmap of the test process, roles and responsibilities of facility and user, major milestones, facility capabilities, and inputs required by the facility. Samples of deliverables, test article interfaces, and inputs necessary to define test scope, cost, and schedule are included as an appendix to the guide.

  6. Acoustic tests of duct-burning turbofan jet noise simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knott, P. R.; Stringas, E. J.; Brausch, J. F.; Staid, P. S.; Heck, P. H.; Latham, D.

    1978-01-01

    The results of a static acoustic and aerodynamic performance, model-scale test program on coannular unsuppressed and multielement fan suppressed nozzle configurations are summarized. The results of the static acoustic tests show a very beneficial interaction effect. When the measured noise levels were compared with the predicted noise levels of two independent but equivalent conical nozzle flow streams, noise reductions for the unsuppressed coannular nozzles were of the order of 10 PNdB; high levels of suppression (8 PNdB) were still maintained even when only a small amount of core stream flow was used. The multielement fan suppressed coannular nozzle tests showed 15 PNdB noise reductions and up to 18 PNdB noise reductions when a treated ejector was added. The static aerodynamic performance tests showed that the unsuppressed coannular plug nozzles obtained gross thrust coefficients of 0.972, with 1.2 to 1.7 percent lower levels for the multielement fan-suppressed coannular flow nozzles. For the first time anywhere, laser velocimeter velocity profile measurements were made on these types of nozzle configurations and with supersonic heated flow conditions. Measurements showed that a very rapid decay in the mean velocity occurs for the nozzle tested.

  7. Acoustic-Structure Interaction in Rocket Engines: Validation Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, R. Benjamin; Joji, Scott S.; Parks, Russel A.; Brown, Andrew M.

    2009-01-01

    While analyzing a rocket engine component, it is often necessary to account for any effects that adjacent fluids (e.g., liquid fuels or oxidizers) might have on the structural dynamics of the component. To better characterize the fully coupled fluid-structure system responses, an analytical approach that models the system as a coupled expansion of rigid wall acoustic modes and in vacuo structural modes has been proposed. The present work seeks to experimentally validate this approach. To experimentally observe well-coupled system modes, the test article and fluid cavities are designed such that the uncoupled structural frequencies are comparable to the uncoupled acoustic frequencies. The test measures the natural frequencies, mode shapes, and forced response of cylindrical test articles in contact with fluid-filled cylindrical and/or annular cavities. The test article is excited with a stinger and the fluid-loaded response is acquired using a laser-doppler vibrometer. The experimentally determined fluid-loaded natural frequencies are compared directly to the results of the analytical model. Due to the geometric configuration of the test article, the analytical model is found to be valid for natural modes with circumferential wave numbers greater than four. In the case of these modes, the natural frequencies predicted by the analytical model demonstrate excellent agreement with the experimentally determined natural frequencies.

  8. Design and performance of the South Pole Acoustic Test Setup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdou, Y.; Becker, K.-H.; Berdermann, J.; Bissok, M.; Bohm, C.; Böser, S.; Bothe, M.; Carson, M.; Descamps, F.; Fischer-Wolfarth, J.-H.; Gustafsson, L.; Hallgren, A.; Heinen, D.; Helbing, K.; Heller, R.; Hundertmark, S.; Karg, T.; Krieger, K.; Laihem, K.; Meures, T.; Nahnhauer, R.; Naumann, U.; Oberson, F.; Paul, L.; Pohl, M.; Price, B.; Ribordy, M.; Ryckbosch, D.; Schunck, M.; Semburg, B.; Stegmaier, J.; Sulanke, K.-H.; Tosi, D.; Vandenbroucke, J.; Wiebusch, C.

    2012-08-01

    The South Pole Acoustic Test Setup (SPATS) was built to evaluate the acoustic characteristics of the South Pole ice in the 10-100 kHz frequency range, for the purpose of assessing the feasibility of an acoustic neutrino detection array at the South Pole. The SPATS hardware consists of four vertical strings deployed in the upper 500 m of the South Pole ice cap. The strings form a trapezoidal array with a maximum baseline of 543 m. Each string has seven stages equipped with one transmitter and one sensor module (glaciophone). Sound is detected or generated by piezoelectric ceramic elements inside the modules. Analogue signals are sent to the surface on electric cables where they are digitized by a PC-based data acquisition system. The data from all strings are collected on a central computer in the IceCube Laboratory from where they are sent to a central data storage facility via a satellite link or stored locally on tape. A technical overview of SPATS and its performance is presented.

  9. Love wave acoustic sensor for testing in liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Haifeng; Zhu, Huizhong; Feng, Guanping

    2001-09-01

    Love wave is one type of the surface acoustic waves (SAWs). It is guided acoustic mode propagating in ta thin layer deposited on a substrate. Because of its advantages of high mass sensitivity, low noise level and being fit for operating in liquids, Love wave acoustic sensors have become one of the hot spots in the research of biosensor nowadays. In this paper the Love wave devices with the substrate of ST-cut quartz and the guiding layers of PMMA and fused quartz were fabricated successfully. By measuring the transfer function S21 and the insertion loss of the devices, the characteristics of the Rayleigh wave device and the Love wave devices with different guiding layers in gas phase and liquid phase were compared. It was validated that the Love wave sensor is suitable for testing in liquids but the Rayleigh wave sensor is not. What's more, SiO2 is the more proper material for the guiding layer of the Love wave device.

  10. An Evaluation of the Additional Acoustic Power Needed to Overcome the Effects of a Test-Articles Absorption During Reverberant Chamber Acoustic Testing of Spaceflight Hardware

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hozman, Aron D.; Hughes, William O.

    2014-01-01

    It is important to realize that some test-articles may have significant sound absorption that may challenge the acoustic power capabilities of a test facility. Therefore, to mitigate this risk of not being able to meet the customers target spectrum, it is prudent to demonstrate early-on an increased acoustic power capability which compensates for this test-article absorption. This paper describes a concise method to reduce this risk when testing aerospace test-articles which have significant absorption. This method was successfully applied during the SpaceX Falcon 9 Payload Fairing acoustic test program at the NASA Glenn Research Center Plum Brook Stations RATF.

  11. Acoustic Testing of Flight Hardware Using Loudspeakers: How Much do We Know About This Method of Testing?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolaini, Ali R.; Kern, Dennis L

    2011-01-01

    Loudspeakers have been used for acoustic qualification of spacecrafts, reflectors, solar panels, and other acoustically responsive structures for more than a decade. Even though a lot of hardware has been acoustic tested using this method, the nature of the acoustic field generated by controlling an ensemble of speakers with and without the hardware in the test volume has not been thoroughly investigated. Limited measurements from some of the recent speaker tests used to qualify flight hardware have indicated significant spatial variation of the acoustic field within the test volume. Also structural responses have been reported to differ when similar tests were performed using reverberant chambers. Unlike the reverberant chamber acoustic test, for which the acoustic field in most chambers is known to be diffuse except below several tens of Hz where acoustic standing waves and large spatial variations exist, the characteristics of the acoustic field within the speaker test volume has not been quantified. It has only been recently that a detailed acoustic field characterization of speaker testing has been made at Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) with involvement of various organizations. To address the impact of non-uniform acoustic field on structures, a series of acoustic tests were performed using a flat panel and a 3-ft cylinder exposed to the field controlled by speakers and repeated in a reverberant chamber. The analysis of the data from this exercise reveals that there are significant differences both in the acoustic field and in the structural responses. In this paper the differences between the two methods are reviewed in some detail and the over- or under-testing of articles that could pose un-anticipated structural and flight qualification issues are discussed. A framework for discussing the validity of the speaker acoustic testing method with the current control system and a path forward for improving it will be provided.

  12. Acoustic Testing of Flight Hardware Using Loudspeakers: How Much do We Know About This Method of Testing?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolaini, Ali R.; Kern, Dennis L

    2011-01-01

    Loudspeakers have been used for acoustic qualification of spacecrafts, reflectors, solar panels, and other acoustically responsive structures for more than a decade. Even though a lot of hardware has been acoustic tested using this method, the nature of the acoustic field generated by controlling an ensemble of speakers with and without the hardware in the test volume has not been thoroughly investigated. Limited measurements from some of the recent speaker tests used to qualify flight hardware have indicated significant spatial variation of the acoustic field within the test volume. Also structural responses have been reported to differ when similar tests were performed using reverberant chambers. Unlike the reverberant chamber acoustic test, for which the acoustic field in most chambers is known to be diffuse except below several tens of Hz where acoustic standing waves and large spatial variations exist, the characteristics of the acoustic field within the speaker test volume has not been quantified. It has only been recently that a detailed acoustic field characterization of speaker testing has been made at Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) with involvement of various organizations. To address the impact of non-uniform acoustic field on structures, a series of acoustic tests were performed using a flat panel and a 3-ft cylinder exposed to the field controlled by speakers and repeated in a reverberant chamber. The analysis of the data from this exercise reveals that there are significant differences both in the acoustic field and in the structural responses. In this paper the differences between the two methods are reviewed in some detail and the over- or under-testing of articles that could pose un-anticipated structural and flight qualification issues are discussed. A framework for discussing the validity of the speaker acoustic testing method with the current control system and a path forward for improving it will be provided.

  13. Effects of specimen resonances on acoustic-ultrasonic testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, J. H., Jr.; Kahn, E. B.; Lee, S. S.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of specimen resonances on acoustic ultrasonic (AU) nondestructive testing were investigated. Selected resonant frequencies and the corresponding normal mode nodal patterns of the aluminum block are measured up to 75.64 kHz. Prominent peaks in the pencil lead fracture and sphere impact spectra from the two transducer locations corresponded exactly to resonant frequencies of the block. It is established that the resonant frequencies of the block dominated the spectral content of the output signal. The spectral content of the output signals is further influenced by the transducer location relative to the resonant frequency nodal lines. Implications of the results are discussed in relation to AU parameters and measurements.

  14. Acoustic Testing of the Cassini Spacecraft and Titan 4 Payload Fairing. Part 1; Introduction and Test Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, William O.; McNelis, Anne M.

    1997-01-01

    NASA Lewis Research Center recently led a multi-organizational acoustic test program. This testing consisted of acoustically exciting a Cassini spacecraft simulator in a full scale 60 foot high Titan 4 payload fairing with various acoustic blanket designs and configurations in a large reverberant acoustic chamber. The primary purpose of this test program was to measure the fairing's internal acoustics and spacecraft vibration, especially the Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTG) vibration, and to quantify the mitigation efforts in reducing these levels. Key to this reduction effort was the utilization of new acoustic blanket designs. This paper will provide the background and rationale for performing this test program, state the test program's primary and secondary objectives and describe the test matrix, hardware and instrumentation. A second part companion paper will provide the test results and data analysis.

  15. Acoustic emission testing of composite vessels under sustained loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lark, R. F.; Moorhead, P. E.

    1978-01-01

    Acoustic emissions (AE) generated from Kevlar 49/epoxy composite pressure vessels subjected to sustained load-to-failure tests were studied. Data from two different transducer locations on the vessels were compared. It was found that AE from vessel wall-mounted transducers showed a wide variance from those for identical vessels subjected to the same pressure loading. Emissions from boss-mounted transducers did, however, yield values that were relatively consistent. It appears that the signals from the boss-mounted transducers represent an integrated average of the emissions generated by fibers fracturing during the vessel tests. The AE from boss-mounted transducers were also independent of time for vessel failure. This suggests that a similar number of fiber fractures must occur prior to initiation of vessel failure. These studies indicate a potential for developing an AE test procedure for predicting the residual service life or integrity of composite vessels.

  16. Design and fabrication of an augmentor wing model for acoustic tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, J.; Schedin, R. W.; Campbell, J. M.

    1973-01-01

    The design and fabrication of a full-scale section of an augmentor wing to be used for acoustic testing at the Lewis Research Center are discussed. This hardware will be used primarily to investigate scaling effects of acoustic data obtained during the Boeing-run model tests. Typical model test data is shown in the report, together with predictions on both performance and acoustics that can be expected from the full-scale section to be built. Areas covered include: the aerodynamic and acoustic criteria of the flap system and nozzles, detailed discussion of the hardware, test system operation procedure, and stress analysis of the entire test system.

  17. Acoustic and Thermal Testing of an Integrated Multilayer Insulation and Broad Area Cooling Shield System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Jessica J.; Foster, Lee W.

    2013-01-01

    A Multilayer Insulation (MLI) and Broad Area Cooling (BAC) shield thermal control system shows promise for long-duration storage of cryogenic propellant. The NASA Cryogenic Propellant Storage and Transfer (CPST) project is investigating the thermal and structural performance of this tank-applied integrated system. The MLI/BAC Shield Acoustic and Thermal Test was performed to evaluate the MLI/BAC shield's structural performance by subjecting it to worst-case launch acoustic loads. Identical thermal tests using Liquid Nitrogen (LN2) were performed before and after the acoustic test. The data from these tests was compared to determine if any degradation occurred in the thermal performance of the system as a result of exposure to the acoustic loads. The thermal test series consisted of two primary components: a passive boil-off test to evaluate the MLI performance and an active cooling test to evaluate the integrated MLI/BAC shield system with chilled vapor circulating through the BAC shield tubes. The acoustic test used loads closely matching the worst-case envelope of all launch vehicles currently under consideration for CPST. Acoustic test results yielded reasonable responses for the given load. The thermal test matrix was completed prior to the acoustic test and successfully repeated after the acoustic test. Data was compared and yielded near identical results, indicating that the MLI/BAC shield configuration tested in this series is an option for structurally implementing this thermal control system concept.

  18. Acoustic and microwave tests in a cylindrical cavity for acoustic gas thermometry at high temperature

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, K.; Feng, X.J.; Gillis, K.; Moldover, M.; Zhang, J.T.; Lin, H.; Qu, J.F.; Duan, Y.N.

    2016-01-01

    Relative primary acoustic gas thermometry determines the ratios of thermodynamic temperatures from measured ratios of acoustic and microwave resonance frequencies in a gas-filled metal cavity on isotherms of interest. When measured in a cavity with known dimensions, the frequencies of acoustic resonances in a gas determine the speed of sound, which is a known function of the thermodynamic temperature T. Changes in the dimensions of the cavity are measured using the frequencies of the cavity's microwave resonances. We explored techniques and materials for acoustic gas thermometry at high temperatures using a cylindrical cavity with remote acoustic transducers. We used gas-filled ducts as acoustic waveguides to transmit sound between the cavity at high temperatures and the acoustic transducers at room temperature. We measured non-degenerate acoustic modes in a cylindrical cavity in the range 295 K < T < 797 K. The fractional uncertainty of the measured acoustic frequencies increased from 2×10−6 at 295 K to 5×10−6 at 797 K. In addition, we measured the frequencies of several transverse magnetic (TM) microwave resonances up to 1000 K in order to track changes in the cavity's length L and radius R. The fractional standard deviation of the values of L deduced from three TM modes increased from 3×10−6 for T < 600 K to 57×10−6 at 1000 K. We observed similar inconsistencies in a previous study. PMID:26903106

  19. Acoustic emission monitoring of HFIR vessel during hydrostatic testing. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Friesel, M.A.; Dawson, J.F.

    1992-08-01

    This report discusses the results and conclusions reached from applying acoustic emission monitoring to surveillance of the High Flux Isotope Reactor vessel during pressure testing. The objective of the monitoring was to detect crack growth and/or fluid leakage should it occur during the pressure test. The report addresses the approach, acoustic emission instrumentation, installation, calibration, and test results.

  20. Measurement of transmission loss characteristics using acoustic intensity techniques at the KU-FRL Acoustic Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roskam, J.

    1983-01-01

    The transmission loss characteristics of panels using the acoustic intensity technique is presented. The theoretical formulation, installation of hardware, modifications to the test facility, and development of computer programs and test procedures are described. A listing of all the programs is also provided. The initial test results indicate that the acoustic intensity technique is easily adapted to measure transmission loss characteristics of panels. Use of this method will give average transmission loss values. The fixtures developed to position the microphones along the grid points are very useful in plotting the intensity maps of vibrating panels.

  1. Identifying Otosclerosis with Aural Acoustical Tests of Absorbance, Group Delay, Acoustic Reflex Threshold, and Otoacoustic Emissions.

    PubMed

    Keefe, Douglas H; Archer, Kelly L; Schmid, Kendra K; Fitzpatrick, Denis F; Feeney, M Patrick; Hunter, Lisa L

    2017-10-01

    Otosclerosis is a progressive middle-ear disease that affects conductive transmission through the middle ear. Ear-canal acoustic tests may be useful in the diagnosis of conductive disorders. This study addressed the degree to which results from a battery of ear-canal tests, which include wideband reflectance, acoustic stapedius muscle reflex threshold (ASRT), and transient evoked otoacoustic emissions (TEOAEs), were effective in quantifying a risk of otosclerosis and in evaluating middle-ear function in ears after surgical intervention for otosclerosis. To evaluate the ability of the test battery to classify ears as normal or otosclerotic, measure the accuracy of reflectance in classifying ears as normal or otosclerotic, and evaluate the similarity of responses in normal ears compared with ears after surgical intervention for otosclerosis. A quasi-experimental cross-sectional study incorporating case control was used. Three groups were studied: one diagnosed with otosclerosis before corrective surgery, a group that received corrective surgery for otosclerosis, and a control group. The test groups included 23 ears (13 right and 10 left) with normal hearing from 16 participants (4 male and 12 female), 12 ears (7 right and 5 left) diagnosed with otosclerosis from 9 participants (3 male and 6 female), and 13 ears (4 right and 9 left) after surgical intervention from 10 participants (2 male and 8 female). Participants received audiometric evaluations and clinical immittance testing. Experimental tests performed included ASRT tests with wideband reference signal (0.25-8 kHz), reflectance tests (0.25-8 kHz), which were parameterized by absorbance and group delay at ambient pressure and at swept tympanometric pressures, and TEOAE tests using chirp stimuli (1-8 kHz). ASRTs were measured in ipsilateral and contralateral conditions using tonal and broadband noise activators. Experimental ASRT tests were based on the difference in wideband-absorbed sound power before and after

  2. The design and development of an acoustic test section for the ARA transonic wind tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, M. E.; Newman, D. A.

    1988-11-01

    The structural, aerodynamic and acoustic design of a lined test section necessary to produce a sufficiently reflection-free environment for noise tests in the Aircraft Research Association (ARA) tunnel at Mach numbers up to 0.85 are described. The aerodynamic design was aided by computational fluid dynamics methods and the acoustic design by a ray-theory model. Results of the aerodynamic calibration of the liner and preliminary acoustic and performance tests on two model propellers are presented. Development work carried out to improve the liner acoustically and aerodynamically is described.

  3. Acoustic Testing of the Cassini Spacecraft and Titan IV Payload Fairing. Part 2; Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, William O.; McNelis, Anne M.

    1997-01-01

    A Cassini spacecraft simulator in a full scale 60 foot high Titan 4 payload fairing with various acoustic blanket designs and configurations was recently tested in a large reverberant acoustic chamber. A first part companion paper provides the test configuration details and other background information. This paper addresses the results obtained from this test program. Emphasis will be on the effects of the new blanket designs on reducing the payload fairing's internal acoustics and the vibration response of the spacecraft's Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators. Other results discussed include: the effect of blankets on fairing vibration, the effect of partial blanket coverage on acoustics and vibration and the effect of tuned vibration absorbers.

  4. Fetal acoustic stimulation test for early intrapartum fetal monitoring.

    PubMed

    Goonewardene, M; Hanwellage, K

    2011-03-01

    The fetal acoustic stimulation test (FAST) is a simple cost effective screening test for antenatal fetal monitoring. The aim of the study was to evaluate the FAST as a screening test for early intrapartum fetal well being. An initial non stress test (NST) followed by a FAST using corometric model 146 was carried out in 486 participants in early labour with uncomplicated singleton pregnancies and > 32 weeks gestation. A repeat NST was recorded in the participants who had an initial non reactive NST. The results of the NST and FAST were compared with fetal outcome. Maternal perception of fetal movements after FAST, results of NST before and after FAST, and the babies' 5 minute APGAR scores were measured. Of the 486 participants 413 (85%) noticed fetal movements after FAST. Initial NST was non reactive in 203 (42%) but 149 (31%) became reactive after FAST. Compared to the NST, FAST had a better sensitivity (97% vs 62%, p < 0.001), specificity (100% vs 87%, p = 0.017), positive predictive value (100% vs 98%, p = 0.024), negative predictive value (79% vs 17%, p < 0.001) and accuracy (99%vs 64%, p < 0.001) in predicting 5 minute APGAR < 7 in the baby. FAST is a reliable screening test for assessing fetal well being in early labour. It complements the NST and is better than the NST alone.

  5. NASA Rat Acoustic Tolerance Test 1994-1995

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holley, Daniel C.; Mele, Gary D.; Naidu, Sujata

    1996-01-01

    The major objective of this Cooperative Agreement was to develop a noise level specification for laboratory rats in the Centrifuge Facility Specimen Chambers (Space Station Biological Research Project), and to validate the specification for 3 noise octave bands: center frequencies 8 kHz, 16, kHz, and 32 kHz. This has been accomplished. Objective measures were used to verify that the chronic noise exposure was not harmful to the animals from physiological and behavioral perspectives. These measures were defined in the Stress Assessment Battery Validation for the Rat Acoustic Tolerance Test. In addition, the effects of the chronic noise exposure on rat hearing was assessed by the Brainstem Auditory Evoked Potential Method (BAER).

  6. Direct-field acoustic testing of a flight system : logistics, challenges, and results.

    SciTech Connect

    Stasiunas, Eric Carl; Gurule, David Joseph; Babuska, Vit; Skousen, Troy J.

    2010-10-01

    Before a spacecraft can be considered for launch, it must first survive environmental testing that simulates the launch environment. Typically, these simulations include vibration testing performed using an electro-dynamic shaker. For some spacecraft however, acoustic excitation may provide a more severe loading environment than base shaker excitation. Because this was the case for a Sandia Flight System, it was necessary to perform an acoustic test prior to launch in order to verify survival due to an acoustic environment. Typically, acoustic tests are performed in acoustic chambers, but because of scheduling, transportation, and cleanliness concerns, this was not possible. Instead, the test was performed as a direct field acoustic test (DFAT). This type of test consists of surrounding a test article with a wall of speakers and controlling the acoustic input using control microphones placed around the test item, with a closed-loop control system. Obtaining the desired acoustic input environment - proto-flight random noise input with an overall sound pressure level (OASPL) of 146.7 dB-with this technique presented a challenge due to several factors. An acoustic profile with this high OASPL had not knowingly been obtained using the DFAT technique prior to this test. In addition, the test was performed in a high-bay, where floor space and existing equipment constrained the speaker circle diameter. And finally, the Flight System had to be tested without contamination of the unit, which required a contamination bag enclosure of the test unit. This paper describes in detail the logistics, challenges, and results encountered while performing a high-OASPL, direct-field acoustic test on a contamination-sensitive Flight System in a high-bay environment.

  7. Modified dynamic visual acuity tests after acoustic neuroma resection.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Helen S; Bloomberg, Jacob J

    2007-08-01

    These data suggest that visual acuity during quiet sitting is dynamic, requiring full body interaction of vestibulo-ocular and postural responses. These findings may have practical implications for seating design and design of tasks requiring good visual acuity while seated. Looking at something during quiet sitting is usually assumed to be a static activity. We tested the idea that visual acuity during quiet sitting is dynamic, requiring integration of whole body responses as well as intact vestibulo-ocular reflexes. Normal subjects and patients scheduled for acoustic neuroma resection were tested preoperatively. Patients were then tested during the four in-patient postoperative days. Testing was done while seated, with or without head and back support, while reading numbers from slides on a laptop computer at eye level, in font sizes from 20 pt to 12 pt. The dependent measure was percent correct per font size. In both groups scores while sitting unsupported were significantly higher than with full support or only back support. In patients, scores were significantly decreased on postoperative day 1 and gradually increased toward normal but maintained the pattern of better scores when sitting unsupported than with head or back support.

  8. Acoustic Performance of Drive Rig Mufflers for Model Scale Engine Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, David, B.

    2013-01-01

    Aircraft engine component testing at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) includes acoustic testing of scale model fans and propellers in the 9- by15-Foot Low Speed Wind Tunnel (LSWT). This testing utilizes air driven turbines to deliver power to the article being studied. These air turbines exhaust directly downstream of the model in the wind tunnel test section and have been found to produce significant unwanted noise that reduces the quality of the acoustic measurements of the engine model being tested. This report describes an acoustic test of a muffler designed to mitigate the extraneous turbine noise. The muffler was found to provide acoustic attenuation of at least 8 dB between 700 Hz and 20 kHz which significantly improves the quality of acoustic measurements in the facility.

  9. Numerical simulation of the tip aerodynamics and acoustics test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tejero E, F.; Doerffer, P.; Szulc, O.; Cross, J. L.

    2016-04-01

    The application of an efficient flow control system on helicopter rotor blades may lead to improved aerodynamic performance. Recently, our invention of Rod Vortex Generators (RVGs) has been analyzed for helicopter rotor blades in hover with success. As a step forward, the study has been extended to forward flight conditions. For this reason, a validation of the numerical modelling for a reference helicopter rotor (without flow control) is needed. The article presents a study of the flow-field of the AH-1G helicopter rotor in low-, medium- and high-speed forward flight. The CFD code FLOWer from DLR has proven to be a suitable tool for the aerodynamic analysis of the two-bladed rotor without any artificial wake modelling. It solves the URANS equations with LEA (Linear Explicit Algebraic stress) k-ω model using the chimera overlapping grids technique. Validation of the numerical model uses comparison with the detailed flight test data gathered by Cross J. L. and Watts M. E. during the Tip Aerodynamics and Acoustics Test (TAAT) conducted at NASA in 1981. Satisfactory agreements for all speed regimes and a presence of significant flow separation in high-speed forward flight suggest a possible benefit from the future implementation of RVGs. The numerical results based on the URANS approach are presented not only for a popular, low-speed case commonly used in rotorcraft community for CFD codes validation but preferably for medium- and high-speed test conditions that have not been published to date.

  10. Measurement resolution of noise directivity patterns from acoustic flight tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conner, David A.

    1989-01-01

    The measurement resolution of noise directivity patterns from acoustic flight tests was investigated. Directivity angle resolution is affected by the data reduction parameters, the aircraft velocity and flyover altitude, and by deviations of the aircraft from the desired flight path. Equations are developed which determine bounds for the lateral and longitudinal directivity angle resolution as a function of the nominal directivity angle. The equations are applied to a flight test data base and the effects of several flight conditions and data reduction parameters on the directivity angle resolution are presented. The maximum directivity angle resolution typically occurs when the aircraft is at or near the overhead position. In general, directivity angle resolution improves with decreasing velocity, increasing altitude, increasing sampling rate, decreasing block size, and decreasing block averages. Deviations from the desired ideal flight path will increase the resolution. For the flight experiment considered in this study, an average of two flyovers were required at each test condition to obtain an acceptable flight path. The ability of the pilot to maintain the flight track improved with decreasing altitude, decreasing velocity, and practice. Due to the prevailing wind conditions, yaw angles of as much as 20 deg were required to maintain the desired flight path.

  11. The Ability to Structure Acoustic Material as a Measure of Musical Aptitude. 4. Experiences with Modifications of the Acoustic Structuring Test. Research Bulletin. No. 51.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karma, Kai

    Four new versions of an acoustic structuring test were developed, administered, and analyzed in order to produce better tests and to contribute to better understanding of the abilities measured by these tests. The tests consist of tape recordings of patterns of musical notes played on an electric organ or an acoustic guitar. Item analyses and…

  12. Intermedius nerve involvement and testing in acoustic neuromas.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, J; Zilstorff, K

    1975-01-01

    The clinical findings in 125 patients with surgically confirmed acoustic neuromas are presented, with special regard to the involvement of the intermedius nerve in the diagnosis. In assessing the function of the intermedius nerve the examination of the nasolacrimal reflex and the sensation of taste on the anterior two-thirds of the tongue are used. The methods of investigation are described in detail. The material consisted of 20 medium-sized and 105 large tumours; no intracanalicular tumor was found. Hearing loss was the initial symptom in 85% of the patients, 10% had tinitus and 4% vertigo as the first symptom. Apart from the VIII cranial nerve symptoms, a defective nasolacrimal reflex was the most significant evidence of cerebellopontine angle pathology. The test was positive in 65% of the medium-sized tumours, in the entire material, 85%. The figures are higher than the incidence of trigeminal nerve symptoms. This in contrast to the reports of most authors. The tests described are simple and quick to perform, and it is emphasized that they should be applied to all patients with unilateral hearing loss of unknown origin.

  13. Acoustic Quality of the 40- by 80- Foot Wind Tunnel Test Section After Installation of a Deep Acoustic Lining

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soderman, Paul T.; Jaeger, Stephen M.; Hayes, Julie A.; Allen, Christopher S.

    2002-01-01

    A recessed, 42-inch deep acoustic lining has been designed and installed in the 40- by 80- Foot Wind Tunnel (40x80) test section to greatly improve the acoustic quality of the facility. This report describes the test section acoustic performance as determined by a detailed static calibration-all data were acquired without wind. Global measurements of sound decay from steady noise sources showed that the facility is suitable for acoustic studies of jet noise or similar randomly generated sound. The wall sound absorption, size of the facility, and averaging effects of wide band random noise all tend to minimize interference effects from wall reflections. The decay of white noise with distance was close to free field above 250 Hz. However, tonal sound data from propellers and fans, for example, will have an error band to be described that is caused by the sensitivity of tones to even weak interference. That error band could be minimized by use of directional instruments such as phased microphone arrays. Above 10 kHz, air absorption began to dominate the sound field in the large test section, reflections became weaker, and the test section tended toward an anechoic environment as frequency increased.

  14. Payload bay atmospheric vent airflow testing at the Vibration and Acoustic Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, James D., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Several concerns related to venting the Space Shuttle Orbiter payload bay during launch led to laboratory experiments with a flight-type vent box installed in the wall of a subsonic wind tunnel. This report describes the test setups and procedures used to acquire data for characterization of airflow through the vent box and acoustic tones radiated from the vent-box cavity. A flexible boundary-layer spoiler which reduced the vent-tone amplitude is described.

  15. NASA LeRC's Acoustic Fill Effect Test Program and Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, William O.; Mcnelis, Mark E.; Manning, Jerome E.

    1994-01-01

    NASA Lewis Research Center, in conjunction with General Dynamics Space Systems Division, has performed a test program to investigate the acoustic fill effect for an unblanketed payload fairing for a variety of payload simulators. This paper will discuss this test program and fill factor test data, and make comparisons with theoretical predictions. This paper will also address the NASA acoustic fill effect standard which was verified from the test data analysis.

  16. Gender difference in speech intelligibility using speech intelligibility tests and acoustic analyses

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE The purpose of this study was to compare men with women in terms of speech intelligibility, to investigate the validity of objective acoustic parameters related with speech intelligibility, and to try to set up the standard data for the future study in various field in prosthodontics. MATERIALS AND METHODS Twenty men and women were served as subjects in the present study. After recording of sample sounds, speech intelligibility tests by three speech pathologists and acoustic analyses were performed. Comparison of the speech intelligibility test scores and acoustic parameters such as fundamental frequency, fundamental frequency range, formant frequency, formant ranges, vowel working space area, and vowel dispersion were done between men and women. In addition, the correlations between the speech intelligibility values and acoustic variables were analyzed. RESULTS Women showed significantly higher speech intelligibility scores than men and there were significant difference between men and women in most of acoustic parameters used in the present study. However, the correlations between the speech intelligibility scores and acoustic parameters were low. CONCLUSION Speech intelligibility test and acoustic parameters used in the present study were effective in differentiating male voice from female voice and their values might be used in the future studies related patients involved with maxillofacial prosthodontics. However, further studies are needed on the correlation between speech intelligibility tests and objective acoustic parameters. PMID:21165272

  17. Gender difference in speech intelligibility using speech intelligibility tests and acoustic analyses.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Ho-Beom

    2010-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare men with women in terms of speech intelligibility, to investigate the validity of objective acoustic parameters related with speech intelligibility, and to try to set up the standard data for the future study in various field in prosthodontics. Twenty men and women were served as subjects in the present study. After recording of sample sounds, speech intelligibility tests by three speech pathologists and acoustic analyses were performed. Comparison of the speech intelligibility test scores and acoustic parameters such as fundamental frequency, fundamental frequency range, formant frequency, formant ranges, vowel working space area, and vowel dispersion were done between men and women. In addition, the correlations between the speech intelligibility values and acoustic variables were analyzed. Women showed significantly higher speech intelligibility scores than men and there were significant difference between men and women in most of acoustic parameters used in the present study. However, the correlations between the speech intelligibility scores and acoustic parameters were low. Speech intelligibility test and acoustic parameters used in the present study were effective in differentiating male voice from female voice and their values might be used in the future studies related patients involved with maxillofacial prosthodontics. However, further studies are needed on the correlation between speech intelligibility tests and objective acoustic parameters.

  18. S0 Truss moves into building 49 highbay for acoustic test

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1998-11-12

    The S0 Truss is moved into the highbay of bldg 49 for Space Station Module acoustic test. Views include: S0 Truss moved into bldg 49 highbay (17342-53, 17370-71); a measuring stick is held near Truss (17354); Truss in acoustic chamber (17355-61, 17367); Truss in air above cradle (17362, 17364-66, 17368); Truss in cradle (17363).

  19. Development of an Acoustic Impedance Tube Testbed for Material Sample Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doty, Benjamin J.; Kolaini, Ali R.

    2012-01-01

    Acoustic impedance tube method: uses Traveling wave amplitudes are measured on either side of a sample in a tube. Many acoustic properties of the sample can be calculated. It is Simple and inexpensive to set up, ideal for high volume optimization tests

  20. Development of an Acoustic Impedance Tube Testbed for Material Sample Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doty, Benjamin J.; Kolaini, Ali R.

    2012-01-01

    Acoustic impedance tube method: uses Traveling wave amplitudes are measured on either side of a sample in a tube. Many acoustic properties of the sample can be calculated. It is Simple and inexpensive to set up, ideal for high volume optimization tests

  1. Acoustic emission analysis as a non-destructive test procedure for fiber compound structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Block, J.

    1983-01-01

    The concept of acoustic emission analysis is explained in scientific terms. The detection of acoustic events, their localization, damage discrimination, and event summation curves are discussed. A block diagram of the concept of damage-free testing of fiber-reinforced synthetic materials is depicted. Prospects for application of the concept are assessed.

  2. A wireless data acquisition system for acoustic emission testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmerman, A. T.; Lynch, J. P.

    2013-01-01

    As structural health monitoring (SHM) systems have seen increased demand due to lower costs and greater capabilities, wireless technologies have emerged that enable the dense distribution of transducers and the distributed processing of sensor data. In parallel, ultrasonic techniques such as acoustic emission (AE) testing have become increasingly popular in the non-destructive evaluation of materials and structures. These techniques, which involve the analysis of frequency content between 1 kHz and 1 MHz, have proven effective in detecting the onset of cracking and other early-stage failure in active structures such as airplanes in flight. However, these techniques typically involve the use of expensive and bulky monitoring equipment capable of accurately sensing AE signals at sampling rates greater than 1 million samples per second. In this paper, a wireless data acquisition system is presented that is capable of collecting, storing, and processing AE data at rates of up to 20 MHz. Processed results can then be wirelessly transmitted in real-time, creating a system that enables the use of ultrasonic techniques in large-scale SHM systems.

  3. Titanium honeycomb acoustic lining structural and thermal test report. [for acoustic tailpipe for JT8D engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joynes, D.; Balut, J. P.

    1974-01-01

    The results are presented of static, fatigue and thermal testing of titanium honeycomb acoustic panels representing the acoustic tailpipe for the Pratt and Whitney Aircraft JT8D Refan engine which is being studied for use on the Boeing 727-200 airplane. Test specimens represented the engine and tailpipe flange joints, the rail to which the thrust reverser is attached and shear specimens of the tailpipe honeycomb. Specimens were made in four different batches with variations in configuration, materials and processes in each. Static strength of all test specimens exceeded the design ultimate load requirements. Fatigue test results confirmed that aluminum brazed titanium, as used in the Refan tailpipe design, meets the fatigue durability objectives. Quality of welding was found to be critical to life, with substandard welding failing prematurely, whereas welding within the process specification exceeded the panel skin life. Initial fatigue testing used short grip length bolts which failed prematurely. These were replaced with longer bolts and subsequent testing demonstrated the required life. Thermal tests indicate that perforated skin acoustic honeycomb has approximately twice the heat transfer of solid skin honeycomb.

  4. 21 CFR 874.1060 - Acoustic chamber for audiometric testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 874.1060 Acoustic chamber for... provides isolation from outside sounds. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device...

  5. 21 CFR 874.1060 - Acoustic chamber for audiometric testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 874.1060 Acoustic chamber for... provides isolation from outside sounds. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device...

  6. High-intensity acoustic tests of a thermally stressed plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ng, Chung Fai; Clevenson, Sherman A.

    1991-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in the Thermal Acoustic Fatigue Apparatus at the Langley Research Center to study the acoustically excited random motion of an aluminum plate which is buckled due to thermal stresses. The thermal buckling displacements were measured and compared with theory. The general trends of the changes in resonances frequencies and random responses of the plate agree with previous theoretical prediction and experimental results for a mechanically buckled plate.

  7. Aerodynamic and acoustic test of a United Technologies model scale rotor at DNW

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Yung H.; Liu, Sandy R.; Jordan, Dave E.; Landgrebe, Anton J.; Lorber, Peter F.; Pollack, Michael J.; Martin, Ruth M.

    1990-01-01

    The UTC model scale rotors, the DNW wind tunnel, the AFDD rotary wing test stand, the UTRC and AFDD aerodynamic and acoustic data acquisition systems, and the scope of test matrices are discussed and an introduction to the test results is provided. It is pointed out that a comprehensive aero/acoustic database of several configurations of the UTC scaled model rotor has been created. The data is expected to improve understanding of rotor aerodynamics, acoustics, and dynamics, and lead to enhanced analytical methodology and design capabilities for the next generation of rotorcraft.

  8. Space shuttle maneuvering engine reusable thrust chamber program. Task 11: Stability analyses and acoustic model testing data dump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oberg, C. L.

    1974-01-01

    The combustion stability characteristics of engines applicable to the Space Shuttle Orbit Maneuvering System and the adequacy of acoustic cavities as a means of assuring stability in these engines were investigated. The study comprised full-scale stability rating tests, bench-scale acoustic model tests and analysis. Two series of stability rating tests were made. Acoustic model tests were made to determine the resonance characteristics and effects of acoustic cavities. Analytical studies were done to aid design of the cavity configurations to be tested and, also, to aid evaluation of the effectiveness of acoustic cavities from available test results.

  9. A closed-loop automatic control system for high-intensity acoustic test systems.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slusser, R. A.

    1973-01-01

    Sound at sound pressure levels in the range from 130 to 160 dB is used in the investigation. Random noise is passed through a series of parallel filters, generally 1/3-octave wide. A basic automatic system is investigated because of preadjustment inaccuracies and high costs found in a study of a typical manually controlled acoustic testing system. The unit described has been successfully used in automatic acoustic tests in connection with the spacecraft tests for the Mariner 1971 program.

  10. Sea Test of a Parametric Acoustic Receiving Array at Stage I.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-11-07

    SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES It. KEY WORDS (CoathwRae on reverse side iI necessary and Identify by block inmber) PARRAY Nonlinear acoustics Sea test...Austin, has been engaged in a program to develop an experimental parametric acoustic receiving array ( PARRAY ). A sea test was performed in shallow...FIGURES v LIST OF TABLES vii 1. INTRODUCTION 1 II. SEA TEST OBJECTIVES 5 III. EXPERIMENTAL PARRAY DESCRIPTION AND INSTALLATION 7 A. System Hardware 7 B

  11. A closed-loop automatic control system for high-intensity acoustic test systems.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slusser, R. A.

    1973-01-01

    Sound at sound pressure levels in the range from 130 to 160 dB is used in the investigation. Random noise is passed through a series of parallel filters, generally 1/3-octave wide. A basic automatic system is investigated because of preadjustment inaccuracies and high costs found in a study of a typical manually controlled acoustic testing system. The unit described has been successfully used in automatic acoustic tests in connection with the spacecraft tests for the Mariner 1971 program.

  12. Inlet Acoustic Data from a High Bypass Ratio Turbofan Rotor in an Internal Flow Component Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozak, Richard F.

    2017-01-01

    In February 2017, aerodynamic and acoustic testing was completed on a scale-model high bypass ratio turbofan rotor, R4, in an internal flow component test facility. The objective of testing was to determine the aerodynamic and acoustic impact of fan casing treatments designed to reduce noise. The baseline configuration consisted of the R4 rotor with a hardwall fan case. Data are presented for a baseline acoustic run with fan exit instrumentation removed to give a clean acoustic configuration.

  13. Wind Turbine Generator System Acoustic Noise Test Report for the ARE 442 Wind Turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Huskey, A.; van Dam, J.

    2010-11-01

    This test was conducted on the ARE 442 as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Independent Testing project. This project was established to help reduce the barriers of wind energy expansion by providing independent testing results for small turbines. In total, five turbines are being tested at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) as a part of this project. Acoustic noise testing is one of up to five tests that may be performed on the turbines, including duration, safety and function, power performance, and power quality tests. The acoustic noise test was conducted to the IEC 61400-11 Edition 2.1.

  14. Laboratory test and acoustic analysis of cabin treatment for propfan test assessment aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuntz, H. L.; Gatineau, R. J.

    1991-01-01

    An aircraft cabin acoustic enclosure, built in support of the Propfan Test Assessment (PTA) program, is described. Helmholtz resonators were attached to the cabin trim panels to increase the sidewall transmission loss (TL). Resonators (448) were located between the trim panels and fuselage shell. In addition, 152 resonators were placed between the enclosure and aircraft floors. The 600 resonators were each tuned to a 235 Hz resonance frequency. After flight testing on the PTA aircraft, the enclosure was tested in the Kelly Johnson R and D Center Acoustics Lab. Laboratory noise reduction (NR) test results are discussed. The enclosure was placed in a Gulfstream 2 fuselage section. Broadband (138 dB overall SPL) and tonal (149 dB overall SPL) excitations were used in the lab. Tonal excitation simulated the propfan flight test excitation. The fundamental tone was stepped in 2 Hz intervals from 225 through 245 Hz. The resonators increase the NR of the cabin walls around the resonance frequency of the resonator array. The effects of flanking, sidewall absorption, cabin adsorption, resonator loading of trim panels, and panel vibrations are presented. Increases in NR of up to 11 dB were measured.

  15. NASA/GE quiet engine C acoustic test results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazin, S. B.; Pass, J. E.

    1974-01-01

    The acoustic investigation and evaluation of the C propulsion turbofan engine are discussed. The engine was built as a part of the Quiet Engine Program. The objectives of the program are as follows: (1) to determine the noise levels produced turbofan bypass engines, (2) to demonstrate the technology and innovations which will reduce the production and radiation of noise in turbofan engines, and (3) to acquire experimental acoustic and aerodynamic data for high bypass turbofan engines to provide a better understanding of noise production mechanisms. The goals of the program called for a turbofan engine 15 to 20 PNdB quieter than currently available engines in the same thrust class.

  16. A Correlated Study of the Response of a Satellite to Acoustic Radiation Using Statistical Energy Analysis and Acoustic Test Data

    SciTech Connect

    CAP,JEROME S.; TRACEY,BRIAN

    1999-11-15

    Aerospace payloads, such as satellites, are subjected to vibroacoustic excitation during launch. Sandia's MTI satellite has recently been certified to this environment using a combination of base input random vibration and reverberant acoustic noise. The initial choices for the acoustic and random vibration test specifications were obtained from the launch vehicle Interface Control Document (ICD). In order to tailor the random vibration levels for the laboratory certification testing, it was necessary to determine whether vibration energy was flowing across the launch vehicle interface from the satellite to the launch vehicle or the other direction. For frequencies below 120 Hz this issue was addressed using response limiting techniques based on results from the Coupled Loads Analysis (CLA). However, since the CLA Finite Element Analysis FEA model was only correlated for frequencies below 120 Hz, Statistical Energy Analysis (SEA) was considered to be a better choice for predicting the direction of the energy flow for frequencies above 120 Hz. The existing SEA model of the launch vehicle had been developed using the VibroAcoustic Payload Environment Prediction System (VAPEPS) computer code [1]. Therefore, the satellite would have to be modeled using VAPEPS as well. As is the case for any computational model, the confidence in its predictive capability increases if one can correlate a sample prediction against experimental data. Fortunately, Sandia had the ideal data set for correlating an SEA model of the MTI satellite--the measured response of a realistic assembly to a reverberant acoustic test that was performed during MTI's qualification test series. The first part of this paper will briefly describe the VAPEPS modeling effort and present the results of the correlation study for the VAPEPS model. The second part of this paper will present the results from a study that used a commercial SEA software package [2] to study the effects of in-plane modes and to

  17. On determining the acoustic properties of main helicopter rotor models on an open test bench

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kop'ev, V. F.; Zaitsev, M. Yu.; Ostrikov, N. N.; Denisov, S. L.; Makashov, S. Yu.; Anikin, V. A.; Gromov, V. V.

    2016-11-01

    The paper presents the results of experimental studies on developing a technique to determine the acoustic properties of models of main helicopter rotors on an open test bench. The method of maximum length sequences is used to choose the optimum arrangement of microphones for an open test bench that would minimize the influence of parasitic echo. The results of processing the data of an acoustic experiment with a model rotor are detailed.

  18. Acoustic modelling and testing of diesel particulate filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allam, Sabry; Åbom, Mats

    2005-11-01

    The use of Diesel Particulate Filters (DPFs) on automobiles to reduce the harmful effects of diesel exhaust gases is becoming a standard in many countries. Although the main purpose of a DPF is to reduce harmful emission of soot particles it also affects the acoustic emission. This paper presents a first attempt to describe the acoustic behavior of DPFs and to present models which allow the acoustic two-port to be calculated. The simplest model neglects wave propagation and treats the filter as an equivalent acoustic resistance modeled via a lumped impedance element. This simple model gives a constant frequency-independent transmission loss and agrees within 1 dB with measured data on a typical filter (length 250 mm) up to 200-300 Hz (at 20 °C). In the second model, the ceramic filter monolith is described as a system of coupled porous channels carrying plane waves. The coupling between the channels through the porous walls is described via Darcy's law. This model gives a frequency-dependent transmission loss and agrees well with measured data in the entire plane wave range.

  19. Maneuver Acoustic Flight Test of the Bell 430 Helicopter Data Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watts, Michael E.; Greenwood, Eric; Smith, Charles D.; Snider, Royce; Conner, David A.

    2014-01-01

    A cooperative ight test by NASA, Bell Helicopter and the U.S. Army to characterize the steady state acoustics and measure the maneuver noise of a Bell Helicopter 430 aircraft was accomplished. The test occurred during June/July 2011 at Eglin Air Force Base, Florida. This test gathered a total of 410 test points over 10 test days and compiled an extensive database of dynamic maneuver measurements. Three microphone arrays with up to 31 microphon. es in each were used to acquire acoustic data. Aircraft data included Differential Global Positioning System, aircraft state and rotor state information. This paper provides an overview of the test and documents the data acquired.

  20. The Hit & Turn Tennis Test: an acoustically controlled endurance test for tennis players.

    PubMed

    Ferrauti, Alexander; Kinner, Vanessa; Fernandez-Fernandez, Jaime

    2011-03-01

    This study was conducted to validate and evaluate the "Hit & Turn Tennis Test", an acoustically progressive on-court endurance test for tennis players. Ninety-eight competitive tennis players (53 males, 45 females) of different age groups participated in the study. For validation, the adult male players completed three Hit & Turn tests, one on a clay court and two on a carpet surface, a tennis-specific ball machine test and an incremental treadmill run in a randomized order. A stronger correlation between maximal performance (r = 0.81, P < 0.01) and maximal oxygen uptake (r = 0.96, P < 0.01) was observed between the Hit & Turn test and the ball machine test, than between the Hit & Turn test and the treadmill test. For test-retest, we found a significant correlation between maximal performance on the same (r = 0.83, P < 0.01) and on different surfaces (r = 0.74, P < 0.01). During test evaluation, maximal performance was higher in males than in females (P < 0.01) and increased by consecutive age group in boys (P < 0.01) but not in girls (P = 0.97). In conclusion, Hit & Turn maximum test performance can be recommended as a valid and reliable indicator for tennis-specific endurance.

  1. Developmental design, fabrication, and test of acoustic suppressors for fans of high bypass turbofan engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, R. H.; Nelsen, M. D.; Gregg, G. E.; Palmer, F. I.

    1974-01-01

    An analysis procedure was developed for design of acoustically treated nacelles for high bypass turbofan engines. The plan was applied to the conceptual design of a nacelle for the quiet engine typical of a 707/DC-8 airplane installation. The resultant design was modified to a test nacelle design for the NASA Lewis quiet fan. The acoustic design goal was a 10 db reduction in effective perceived fan noise levels during takoff and approach. Detailed nacelle designs were subsequently developed for both the quiet engine and the quiet fan. The acoustic design goal for each nacelle was 15 db reductions in perceived fan noise levels from the inlet and fan duct. Acoustically treated nacelles were fabricated for the quiet engine and quiet fan for testing. Performance of selected inlet and fan duct lining configurations was experimentally evaluated in a flow duct. Results of the tests show that the linings perform as designed.

  2. Acoustic Test Prediction and Correlation for the SGEO Satellite Platform STM Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruess, Florian; Segelke, Harald; Obst, Andreas; Rubio, Alberto

    2014-06-01

    Spacecraft structural designs have to be designed and verified for a number of mechanical environments, namely:- Quasi-static loads- Sinusoidal vibration- Acoustic Noise- ShockThe environments are present during launch or due to activation of spacecraft equipment.The paper presents the Structural Thermal Model (STM) acoustic test prediction vibration analysis performed in the frame of the SGEO satellite project and the analysis correlation to STM test results.For the analysis the same Finite Element Model (FEM) as for the sinusoidal vibration analysis has been used. Then the FEM has been exposed to an acoustic field using the boundary element method (BEM) based on the program code Rayon, which is included in the vibro- acoustic pre/post processor VA One.Analysis results have been compared with STM test results and a very good correlation as well as confirmation of the baseline assumptions has been found.

  3. A Brief Historical Survey of Rocket Testing Induced Acoustic Environments at NASA SSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allgood, Daniel C.

    2012-01-01

    A survey was conducted of all the various rocket test programs that have been performed since the establishment of NASA Stennis Space Center. The relevant information from each of these programs were compiled and used to quantify the theoretical noise source levels using the NASA approved methodology for computing "acoustic loads generated by a propulsion system" (NASA SP ]8072). This methodology, which is outlined in Reference 1, has been verified as a reliable means of determining the noise source characteristics of rocket engines. This information is being provided to establish reference environments for new government/business residents to ascertain whether or not their activities will generate acoustic environments that are more "encroaching" in the NASA Fee Area. In this report, the designation of sound power level refers to the acoustic power of the rocket engine at the engine itself. This is in contrast to the sound pressure level associated with the propagation of the acoustic energy in the surrounding air. The first part of the survey documents the "at source" sound power levels and their dominant frequency bands for the range of engines tested at Stennis. The second part of the survey discusses how the acoustic energy levels will propagate non ]uniformly from the test stands. To demonstrate this, representative acoustic sound pressure mappings in the NASA Stennis Fee Area were computed for typical engine tests on the B ]1 and E ]1 test stands.

  4. The effect of the wind tunnel wall boundary layer on the acoustic testing of propellers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eversman, Walter

    1989-01-01

    An approximation based on the representation of the boundary layer by lamina of uniform flow with suitable interlayer boundary conditions is shown to be accurate, efficient, and compatible with finite element formulations. The approximation has been implemented using existing codes to produce a model for assessing the suitability of the acoustic environment in a wind tunnel for the acoustic testing of propellers. It is found that, with suitable acoustic treatment and with measurements made near the propeller and well removed from the walls, the free field directivity and level can be reproduced with good fidelity.

  5. NEMO-SMO acoustic array: A deep-sea test of a novel acoustic positioning system for a km3-scale underwater neutrino telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viola, S.; Ardid, M.; Bertin, V.; Enzenhöfer, A.; Keller, P.; Lahmann, R.; Larosa, G.; Llorens, C. D.; NEMO Collaboration; SMO Collaboration

    2013-10-01

    Within the activities of the NEMO project, the installation of a 8-floors tower (NEMO-Phase II) at a depth of 3500 m is foreseen in 2012. The tower will be installed about 80 km off-shore Capo Passero, in Sicily. On board the NEMO tower, an array of 18 acoustic sensors will be installed, permitting acoustic detection of biological sources, studies for acoustic neutrino detection and primarily acoustic positioning of the underwater structures. For the latter purpose, the sensors register acoustic signals emitted by five acoustic beacons anchored on the sea-floor. The data acquisition system of the acoustic sensors is fully integrated with the detector data transport system and is based on an “all data to shore” philosophy. Signals coming from hydrophones are continuously sampled underwater at 192 kHz/24 bit and transmitted to shore through an electro-optical cable for real-time analysis. A novel technology for underwater GPS time-stamping of data has been implemented and tested. The operation of the acoustic array will permit long-term test of sensors and electronics technologies that are proposed for the acoustic positioning system of KM3NeT.

  6. Langasite Surface Acoustic Wave Sensors: Fabrication and Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Peng; Greve, David W.; Oppenheim, Irving J.; Chin, Tao-Lun; Malone, Vanessa

    2012-02-01

    We report on the development of harsh-environment surface acoustic wave sensors for wired and wireless operation. Surface acoustic wave devices with an interdigitated transducer emitter and multiple reflectors were fabricated on langasite substrates. Both wired and wireless temperature sensing was demonstrated using radar-mode (pulse) detection. Temperature resolution of better than ±0.5°C was achieved between 200°C and 600°C. Oxygen sensing was achieved by depositing a layer of ZnO on the propagation path. Although the ZnO layer caused additional attenuation of the surface wave, oxygen sensing was accomplished at temperatures up to 700°C. The results indicate that langasite SAW devices are a potential solution for harsh-environment gas and temperature sensing.

  7. Acoustical characteristics of the NASA Langley full scale wind tunnel test section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abrahamson, A. L.; Kasper, P. K.; Pappa, R. S.

    1975-01-01

    The full-scale wind tunnel at NASA-Langley Research Center was designed for low-speed aerodynamic testing of aircraft. Sound absorbing treatment has been added to the ceiling and walls of the tunnel test section to create a more anechoic condition for taking acoustical measurements during aerodynamic tests. The results of an experimental investigation of the present acoustical characteristics of the tunnel test section are presented. The experimental program included measurements of ambient nosie levels existing during various tunnel operating conditions, investigation of the sound field produced by an omnidirectional source, and determination of sound field decay rates for impulsive noise excitation. A comparison of the current results with previous measurements shows that the added sound treatment has improved the acoustical condition of the tunnel test section. An analysis of the data indicate that sound reflections from the tunnel ground-board platform could create difficulties in the interpretation of actual test results.

  8. Test of acoustic tone source and propulsion performance of C8A Buffalo suppressor nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marrs, C. C.; Harkonen, D. L.; Okeefe, J. V.

    1974-01-01

    Results are presented for a static acoustic and propulsion performance ground test conducted at the Boeing hot nozzle facility on the C8A Buffalo noise suppressor nozzle. Various methods to remove a nozzle-associated 2000-Hz tone are evaluated. Results of testing this rectangular-array lobed nozzle for propulsion performance and acoustic directivity are reported. Recommendations for future nozzle modifications and further testing are included. Appendix A contains the test plan. Appendix B presents the test log. Appendix C contains plots of the one-third octave sound pressure levels recorded during the test. Appendix D describes the acoustic data recording and reduction systems. The performance data is tabulated in Appendix E.

  9. Multiple Convergence Zone Acoustic Telemetry Feasibility Test Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-11-01

    oseq oseqr body Multiple Convergence Zone Acoustic Telemetry Feasibility Tesi ReportNovemrber 6. 199153 53 pack oseq=[ipfill([- 1 1 -1I1 -1 -111 -1 -1...Convergpnce Zonc Acoumtic Telcmetry Feasibdity Tesi Rertm.Nvcmbcr 6, 199180 80 oseq=oseq.*exp((sqrt(- I )*2*pi*(fO/fs))*(O: 1 :length(oseq)- I)); pnstrn...Stella Sanchez -Wade Pell Marine Science Library Documents Section University of Rhode Island Scripps Institution of Oceanography Narragansett Bay Campus

  10. Flight Acoustic Testing and Data Acquisition For the Rotor Noise Model (RNM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conner, David A.; Burley, Casey L.; Smith, Charles D.

    2006-01-01

    Two acoustic flight tests have been conducted on a remote test range at Eglin Air Force Base in the panhandle of Florida. The first was the Acoustics Week flight test conducted in September 2003. The second was the NASA Heavy Lift Rotorcraft Acoustics Flight Test conducted in October-November 2005. Benchmark acoustic databases were obtained for a number of rotorcraft and limited fixed wing vehicles for a variety of flight conditions. The databases are important for validation of acoustic prediction programs such as the Rotorcraft Noise Model (RNM), as well as for the development of low noise flight procedures and for environmental impact assessments. An overview of RNM capabilities and a detailed description of the RNM/ART (Acoustic Repropagation Technique) process are presented. The RNM/ART process is demonstrated using measured acoustic data for the MD600N. The RNM predictions for a level flyover speed sweep show the highest SEL noise levels on the flight track centerline occurred at the slowest vehicle speeds. At these slower speeds, broadband noise content is elevated compared to noise levels obtained at the higher speeds. A descent angle sweep shows that, in general, ground noise levels increased with increasing descent rates. Vehicle orientation in addition to vehicle position was found to significantly affect the RNM/ART creation of source noise semi-spheres for vehicles with highly directional noise characteristics and only mildly affect those with weak acoustic directionality. Based on these findings, modifications are proposed for RNM/ART to more accurately define vehicle and rotor orientation.

  11. Flight Acoustic Testing and For the Rotorcraft Noise Data Acquisition Model (RNM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burley, Casey L.; Smith, Charles D.; Conner, David A.

    2006-01-01

    Two acoustic flight tests have been conducted on a remote test range at Eglin Air Force Base in the panhandle of Florida. The first was the "Acoustics Week" flight test conducted in September 2003. The second was the NASA Heavy Lift Rotorcraft Acoustics Flight Test conducted in October-November 2005. Benchmark acoustic databases were obtained for a number of rotorcraft and limited fixed wing vehicles for a variety of flight conditions. The databases are important for validation of acoustic prediction programs such as the Rotorcraft Noise Model (RNM), as well as for the development of low noise flight procedures and for environmental impact assessments. An overview of RNM capabilities and a detailed description of the RNM/ART (Acoustic Repropagation Technique) process are presented. The RNM/ART process is demonstrated using measured acoustic data for the MD600N. The RNM predictions for a level flyover speed sweep show the highest SEL noise levels on the flight track centerline occurred at the slowest vehicle speeds. At these slower speeds, broadband noise content is elevated compared to noise levels obtained at the higher speeds. A descent angle sweep shows that, in general, ground noise levels increased with increasing descent rates. Vehicle orientation in addition to vehicle position was found to significantly affect the RNM/ART creation of source noise semi-spheres for vehicles with highly directional noise characteristics and only mildly affect those with weak acoustic directionality. Based on these findings, modifications are proposed for RNM/ART to more accurately define vehicle and rotor orientation.

  12. Feasibility of acoustic neutrino detection in ice: Design and performance of the South Pole Acoustic Test Setup (SPATS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böser, S.; Bohm, C.; Descamps, F.; Fischer, J.; Hallgren, A.; Heller, R.; Hundertmark, S.; Krieger, K.; Nahnhauer, R.; Pohl, M.; Price, P.B.; Sulanke, K.-H.; Tosi, D.; Vandenbroucke, J.

    The South Pole Acoustic Test Setup (SPATS) has been built to evaluate the acoustic characteristics of the Antarctic ice in the 10 to 100 kHz frequency range so that the feasibility and specific design of an acoustic neutrino detection array at South Pole can be evaluated. SPATS consists of three vertical strings that have been deployed in the upper 400 meter of the Antarctic ice cap in January 2007, using the upper part of IceCube holes. The strings form a triangular array with a longest baseline of 422 meters. Each of them has 7 stages with one transmitter and one sensor module. Both are equipped with piezoelectric ceramic elements in order to produce or detect sound. Analog signals are brought to the surface on electric cables where they are digitized by a PCbased data acquisition system. Connected through dedicated wire pairs in the IceCube surface cables, the data from all three strings is then collected on a MasterPC in a central facility, from which they are sent to the northern hemisphere via a satellite link or locally stored on tape. A full technical overview of the SPATS detector and its performance will be presented.

  13. Analysis of Measured and Predicted Acoustics from an XV-15 Flight Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, D. Douglas, Jr.; Burley, Casey L.

    2001-01-01

    Flight acoustic and vehicle state data from an XV-15 acoustic flight test are examined. Flight predictions using TRAC are performed for a level flight (repeated) and four descent conditions (including a BVI). The assumptions and procedures used for TRAC flight predictions as well as the variability in flight measurements, which are used for input and comparison to predictions, are investigated in detail. Differences were found in the measured vehicle airspeed, altitude, glideslope, and vehicle orientation (yaw, pitch and roll angle) between each of the repeat runs. These differences violate some of the prediction assumptions and significantly impacted the resulting acoustic predictions. Multiple acoustic pulses, with a variable time between the pulses, were found in the measured acoustic time histories for the repeat runs. These differences could be attributed in part to the variability in vehicle orientation. Acoustic predictions that used the measured vehicle orientation for the repeat runs captured this multiple pulse variability. Thickness noise was found to be dominant on approach for all the cases, except the BVI condition. After the aircraft passed overhead, broadband noise and low frequency loading noise were dominant. The predicted LowSPL time histories compared well with measurement on approach to the array for the non-BVI conditions and poorly for the BVI condition. Accurate prediction of the lift share between the rotor and fuselage must be known in order to improve predictions. At a minimum, measurements of the rotor thrust and tip-path-plane angle are critical to further develop accurate flight acoustic prediction capabilities.

  14. FJ44 Turbofan Engine Test at NASA Glenn Research Center's Aero-Acoustic Propulsion Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauer, Joel T.; McAllister, Joseph; Loew, Raymond A.; Sutliff, Daniel L.; Harley, Thomas C.

    2009-01-01

    A Williams International FJ44-3A 3000-lb thrust class turbofan engine was tested in the NASA Glenn Research Center s Aero-Acoustic Propulsion Laboratory. This report presents the test set-up and documents the test conditions. Farfield directivity, in-duct unsteady pressures, duct mode data, and phased-array data were taken and are reported separately.

  15. VCE early acoustic test results of General Electric's high-radius ratio coannular plug nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knott, P. R.; Brausch, J. F.; Bhutiani, P. K.; Majjigi, R. K.; Doyle, V. L.

    1980-01-01

    Results of variable cycle engine (VCE) early acoustic engine and model scale tests are presented. A summary of an extensive series of far field acoustic, advanced acoustic, and exhaust plume velocity measurements with a laser velocimeter of inverted velocity and temperature profile, high radius ratio coannular plug nozzles on a YJ101 VCE static engine test vehicle are reviewed. Select model scale simulated flight acoustic measurements for an unsuppressed and a mechanical suppressed coannular plug nozzle are also discussed. The engine acoustic nozzle tests verify previous model scale noise reduction measurements. The engine measurements show 4 to 6 PNdB aft quadrant jet noise reduction and up to 7 PNdB forward quadrant shock noise reduction relative to a fully mixed conical nozzle at the same specific thrust and mixed pressure ratio. The influences of outer nozzle radius ratio, inner stream velocity ratio, and area ratio are discussed. Also, laser velocimeter measurements of mean velocity and turbulent velocity of the YJ101 engine are illustrated. Select model scale static and simulated flight acoustic measurements are shown which corroborate that coannular suppression is maintained in forward speed.

  16. Acoustic emission non-destructive testing of structures using source location techniques.

    SciTech Connect

    Beattie, Alan G.

    2013-09-01

    The technology of acoustic emission (AE) testing has been advanced and used at Sandia for the past 40 years. AE has been used on structures including pressure vessels, fire bottles, wind turbines, gas wells, nuclear weapons, and solar collectors. This monograph begins with background topics in acoustics and instrumentation and then focuses on current acoustic emission technology. It covers the overall design and system setups for a test, with a wind turbine blade as the object. Test analysis is discussed with an emphasis on source location. Three test examples are presented, two on experimental wind turbine blades and one on aircraft fire extinguisher bottles. Finally, the code for a FORTRAN source location program is given as an example of a working analysis program. Throughout the document, the stress is on actual testing of real structures, not on laboratory experiments.

  17. Design, construction, activation, and operation of a high intensity acoustic test chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamel, L. T.

    1986-01-01

    The design philosophy, construction, integration, and activation of the high intensity acoustic test chamber for production acceptance testing of satellites are discussed. The 32,000 cubic-foot acoustic test cell consists of a steel reinforced concrete chamber with six electropneumatic noise generators. One of the innovative features of the chamber is a unique quarter horn assembly that acoustically couples the noise generators to the chamber. Design concepts, model testing, and evaluation results are presented. Considerations such as nitrogen versus compressed air source, digital closed loop spectrum control versus manual equalizers, and microprocessor based interlock systems are included. Construction difficulties, anomalies encountered, and their resolution are also discussed. Results of the readiness testing are highlighted.

  18. Design, construction, activation, and operation of a high intensity acoustic test chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamel, L. T.

    1986-01-01

    The design philosophy, construction, integration, and activation of the high intensity acoustic test chamber for production acceptance testing of satellites are discussed. The 32,000 cubic-foot acoustic test cell consists of a steel reinforced concrete chamber with six electropneumatic noise generators. One of the innovative features of the chamber is a unique quarter horn assembly that acoustically couples the noise generators to the chamber. Design concepts, model testing, and evaluation results are presented. Considerations such as nitrogen versus compressed air source, digital closed loop spectrum control versus manual equalizers, and microprocessor based interlock systems are included. Construction difficulties, anomalies encountered, and their resolution are also discussed. Results of the readiness testing are highlighted.

  19. Monitoring and Analysis of In-Pile Phenomena in Advanced Test Reactor using Acoustic Telemetry

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, Vivek; Smith, James A.; Jewell, James Keith

    2015-02-01

    The interior of a nuclear reactor presents a particularly harsh and challenging environment for both sensors and telemetry due to high temperatures and high fluxes of energetic and ionizing particles among the radioactive decay products. A number of research programs are developing acoustic-based sensing approach to take advantage of the acoustic transmission properties of reactor cores. Idaho National Laboratory has installed vibroacoustic receivers on and around the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) containment vessel to take advantage of acoustically telemetered sensors such as thermoacoustic (TAC) transducers. The installation represents the first step in developing an acoustic telemetry infrastructure. This paper presents the theory of TAC, application of installed vibroacoustic receivers in monitoring the in-pile phenomena inside the ATR, and preliminary data processing results.

  20. The experimental determination of atmospheric absorption from aircraft acoustic flight tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. L.; Oncley, P. B.

    1971-01-01

    A method for determining atmospheric absorption coefficients from acoustic flight test data is presented. Measurements from five series of acoustic flight tests were included in the study. The number of individual flights totaled 24: six Boeing 707 flights performed in May 1969 in connection with the turbofan nacelle modification program, eight flights from Boeing tests conducted during the same period, and 10 flights of the Boeing 747 airplane. The effects of errors in acoustic, meteorological, and aircraft performance and position measurements are discussed. Tabular data of the estimated sample variance of the data for each test are given for source directivity angles from 75 deg to 120 deg and each 1/3-octave frequency band. Graphic comparisons are made of absorption coefficients derived from ARP 866, using atmospheric profile data, with absorption coefficients determined by the experimental method described in the report.

  1. Study of acoustic emission during mechanical tests of large flight weight tank structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccauley, B. O.; Nakamura, Y.; Veach, C. L.

    1973-01-01

    A PPO-insulated, flight-weight, subscale, aluminum tank was monitored for acoustic emissions during a proof test and during 100 cycles of environmental test simulating space flights. The use of a combination of frequency filtering and appropriate spatial filtering to reduce background noise was found to be sufficient to detect acoustic emission signals of relatively small intensity expected from subcritical crack growth in the structure. Several emission source locations were identified, including the one where a flaw was detected by post-test x-ray inspections. For most source locations, however, post-test inspections did not detect flaws; this was partially attributed to the higher sensitivity of the acoustic emission technique than any other currently available NDT method for detecting flaws. For these non-verifiable emission sources, a problem still remains in correctly interpreting observed emission signals.

  2. Aerodynamic and Acoustic Flight Test Results and Results for the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cumming, Stephen B.; Smith, Mark S.; Cliatt, Larry J.; Frederick, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    As part of the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy program, a 747SP airplane was modified to carry a 2.5-m telescope in the aft section of the fuselage. The resulting airborne observatory allows for observations above 99 percent of the water vapor in the atmosphere. The open cavity created by the modifications had the potential to significantly affect the airplane in the areas of aerodynamics and acoustics. Several series of flight tests were conducted to clear the operating envelope of the airplane for astronomical observations, planned to be performed between the altitudes of 35,000 ft and 45,000 ft. The flight tests were successfully completed. Cavity acoustics were below design limits, and the overall acoustic characteristics of the cavity were better than expected. The modification did have some effects on the stability and control of the airplane, but these effects were not significant. Airplane air data systems were not affected by the modifications. This paper describes the methods used to examine the aerodynamics and acoustic data from the flight tests and provides a discussion of the flight-test results in the areas of cavity acoustics, stability and control, and air data.

  3. Aerodynamic and Acoustic Flight Test Results for the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cumming, Stephen B.; Cliatt, Larry James; Frederick, Michael A.; Smith, Mark S.

    2013-01-01

    As part of the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) program, a 747SP airplane was modified to carry a 2.5 meter telescope in the aft section of the fuselage. The resulting airborne observatory allows for observations above 99 percent of the water vapor in the atmosphere. The open cavity created by the modifications had the potential to significantly affect the airplane in the areas of aerodynamics and acoustics. Several series of flight tests were conducted to clear the airplanes operating envelope for astronomical observations, planned to be performed between the altitudes of 39,000 feet and 45,000 feet. The flight tests were successfully completed. Cavity acoustics were below design limits, and the overall acoustic characteristics of the cavity were better than expected. The modification did have some effects on the stability and control of the airplane, but these effects were not significant. Airplane air data systems were not affected by the modifications. This paper describes the methods used to examine the aerodynamics and acoustic data from the flight tests and provides a discussion of the flight test results in the areas of cavity acoustics, stability and control, and air data.

  4. Closed-Loop Acoustic Control of Reverberant Room for Satellite Environmental Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janssens, Karl; Bianciardi, Fabio; Sabbatini, Danilo; Debille, Jan; Carrella, Alex

    2012-07-01

    The full satellite acoustic test is an important milestone in a satellite launch survivability verification campaign. This test is required to verify the satellite’s mechanical design against the high-level acoustic loads induced by the launch vehicle during the atmospheric flight. During the test, the satellite is subjected to a broadband diffuse acoustic field, reproducing the pressure levels observed during launch. The excitation is in most cases provided by a combination of horns for the low frequencies and noise generators for the higher frequencies. Acoustic control tests are commonly performed in reverberant rooms, controlling the sound pressure levels in third octave bands over the specified target spectrum. This paper discusses an automatic feedback control system for acoustic control of large reverberation rooms for satellite environmental testing. The acoustic control system consists of parallel third octave PI (Proportional Integral) feedback controllers that take the reverberation characteristics of the room into consideration. The drive output of the control system is shaped at every control step based on the comparison of the average third octave noise spectrum, measured from a number of microphones in the test room, with the target spectrum. Cross-over filters split the output drive into band- limited signals to feed each of the horns. The control system is realized in several steps. In the first phase, a dynamic process model is developed, including the non-linear characteristics of the horns and the reverberant properties of the room. The model is identified from dynamic experiments using system identification techniques. In the next phase, an adequate control strategy is designed which is capable of reaching the target spectrum in the required time period without overshoots. This control strategy is obtained from model-in-the-loop (MIL) simulations, evaluating the performance of various potential strategies. Finally, the proposed strategy is

  5. Characterization of acoustic lenses with the Foucault test by confocal laser scanning microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed Mohamed, E. T.; Abdelrahman, A.; Pluta, M.; Grill, W.

    2010-03-01

    In this work, the Foucault knife-edge test, which has traditionally been known as the classic test for optical imaging devices, is used to characterize an acoustic lens for operation at 1.2 GHz. A confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM) was used as the illumination and detection device utilizing its pinhole instead of the classical knife edge that is normally employed in the Foucault test. Information about the geometrical characteristics, such as the half opening angle of the acoustic lens, were determined as well as the quality of the calotte of the lens used for focusing. The smallest focal spot size that could be achieved with the examined lens employed as a spherical reflector was found to be about 1 μm. By comparison to the idealized resolution a degradation of about a factor of 2 can be deduced. This limits the actual quality of the acoustic focus.

  6. Effects of specimen resonances on acoustic-ultrasonic testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, J. H., Jr.; Lee, S. S.; Kahn, E. B.

    1983-01-01

    Frequency response is studied at two different transducer locations in the 10-280 kHz range, for the case of the response of a solid 6061-T6 aluminum alloy block to the fracture of an 0.5 mm-diameter pencil lead, as well as to the impact of 0.159 and 0.318 cm-diameter stainless steel spheres. Prominent peaks in the pencil lead fracture and sphere impact spectra from the two transducer locations are found to exactly correspond to the alloy block's resonant frequencies, indicating that these have dominated the spectral content of the output signal. The spectral content is further influenced by the transducer location, relative to the resonant frequency nodal lines. The implications of these results for acoustic-ultrasonic parameters and measurements are discussed.

  7. Clinical significance of SNAP somnography test acoustic recording.

    PubMed

    Galer, Chad; Yonkers, Anthony; Duff, Wallace; Heywood, Barbara

    2007-02-01

    To examine the clinical significance of acoustic data recorded by the SNAP home polysomnography system (SNAP Laboratories, Glenview, IL). Retrospective analysis of SNAP data from 59 patients undergoing evaluation for sleep apnea at the University of Nebraska Medical Center and an associated private practice in Omaha, NE. Snoring did not correlate with anthropometric variables such as body mass index and neck circumference. Statistical analysis showed no correlation between respiratory disturbance index and the maximum or average loudness of snoring. Average loudness was predictive of the presence of sleep apnea. Spectral analysis of snoring sonography found that the proportion of snoring events associated with a palatal source correlated strongly with the loudness of snoring. These data suggest that analysis of snoring has limited utility in the evaluation of the patient with sleep apnea but may be able to select patients who would benefit from palatal procedures to reduce snoring.

  8. Comparative evaluation of test methods to simulate acoustic response of shroud-enclosed spacecraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    On, F. J.

    1975-01-01

    Test methods were evaluated to ascertain whether a spacecraft, properly tested within its shroud, could be vibroacoustic tested without the shroud, with adjustments made in the acoustic input spectra to simulate the acoustic response of the missing shroud. The evaluation was based on vibroacoustic test results obtained from a baseline model composed (1) of a spacecraft with adapter, lower support structure, and shroud; (2) of the spacecraft, adapter, and lower structure, but without the shroud; and (3) of the spacecraft and adapter only. Emphasis was placed on the magnitude of the acoustic input changes required to substitute for the shroud and the difficulty of making such input changes, and the degree of missimulation which can result from the performance of a particular, less-than optimum test. Conclusions are drawn on the advantages and disadvantages derived from the use of input spectra adjustment methods and lower support structure simulations. Test guidelines were also developed for planning and performing a launch acoustic-environmental test.

  9. NASA Glenn's Acoustical Testing Laboratory Awarded Accreditation by the National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akers, James C.; Cooper, Beth A.

    2004-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center's Acoustical Testing Laboratory (ATL) provides a comprehensive array of acoustical testing services, including sound pressure level, sound intensity level, and sound-power-level testing per International Standards Organization (ISO)1 3744. Since its establishment in September 2000, the ATL has provided acoustic emission testing and noise control services for a variety of customers, particularly microgravity space flight hardware that must meet International Space Station acoustic emission requirements. The ATL consists of a 23- by 27- by 20-ft (height) convertible hemi/anechoic test chamber and a separate sound-attenuating test support enclosure. The ATL employs a personal-computer-based data acquisition system that provides up to 26 channels of simultaneous data acquisition with real-time analysis (ref. 4). Specialized diagnostic tools, including a scanning sound-intensity system, allow the ATL's technical staff to support its clients' aggressive low-noise design efforts to meet the space station's acoustic emission requirement. From its inception, the ATL has pursued the goal of developing a comprehensive ISO 17025-compliant quality program that would incorporate Glenn's existing ISO 9000 quality system policies as well as ATL-specific technical policies and procedures. In March 2003, the ATL quality program was awarded accreditation by the National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program (NVLAP) for sound-power-level testing in accordance with ISO 3744. The NVLAP program is administered by the National Institutes of Standards and Technology (NIST) of the U.S. Department of Commerce and provides third-party accreditation for testing and calibration laboratories. There are currently 24 NVLAP-accredited acoustical testing laboratories in the United States. NVLAP accreditation covering one or more specific testing procedures conducted in accordance with established test standards is awarded upon successful completion of an intensive

  10. Design and construction of a reverberation chamber for high-intensity acoustic testing.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slusser, R. A.

    1973-01-01

    A high-intensity acoustic test facility was constructed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) to support the Mariner Mars 1971 project. For ease of construction, the reverberation chamber itself is rectangular, which resulted in very little sacrifice in acoustic performance. Levels as high as 156 dB can be achieved with the chamber empty and test levels of 150 dB have been used with a Mariner Mars spacecraft model (full size) in the chamber. Levels as high as this must be generated using electropneumatic transducers, which modulate gaseous nitrogen to this facility.

  11. Acoustic Noise Test Report for the SWIFT Wind Turbine in Boulder, CO

    SciTech Connect

    Roadman, J.; Huskey, A.

    2013-04-01

    This report summarizes the results of an acoustic noise test that the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) conducted on the SWIFT wind turbine. This test was conducted in accordance with the International Electrotechnical Commission's (IEC) standard, Wind Turbine Generator Systems Part 11: Acoustic Noise Measurement Techniques, IEC 61400-11 Ed.2.1, 2006-11. However, because the SWIFT is a small turbine, as defined by IEC, NREL used 10-second averages instead of 60-second averages and utilized binning by wind speed instead of regression analysis.

  12. Acoustic Noise Test Report for the Viryd CS8 Wind Turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Roadman, J.; Huskey, A.

    2013-07-01

    This report summarizes the results of an acoustic noise test that the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) conducted on the Viryd CS8 wind turbine. This test was conducted in accordance with the International Electrotechnical Commission's (IEC) standard, Wind Turbine Generator Systems Part 11: Acoustic Noise Measurement Techniques, IEC 61400-11 Ed.2.1, 2006-11. However, because the Viryd CS8 is a small turbine, as defined by IEC, NREL used 10-second averages instead of 60-second averages and binning by wind speed instead of regression analysis.

  13. Multivariate acoustic detection of small explosions using Fisher's combined probability test.

    PubMed

    Arrowsmith, Stephen J; Taylor, Steven R

    2013-03-01

    A methodology for the combined acoustic detection and discrimination of explosions, which uses three discriminants, is developed for the purpose of identifying weak explosion signals embedded in complex background noise. By utilizing physical models for simple explosions that are formulated as statistical hypothesis tests, the detection/discrimination approach does not require a model for the background noise, which can be highly complex and variable in practice. Fisher's Combined Probability Test is used to combine the p-values from all multivariate discriminants. This framework is applied to acoustic data from a 400 g explosion conducted at Los Alamos National Laboratory.

  14. Initial Evaluation of Acoustic Emission SHM of PRSEUS Multi-bay Box Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horne, Michael R.; Madaras, Eric I.

    2016-01-01

    A series of tests of the Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure (PRSEUS) HWB Multi-Bay Test Article were conducted during the second quarter of 2015 at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) in the Combined Loads Test facility (COLTS). This report documents the Acoustic Emission (AE) data collected during those tests along with an initial analysis of the data. A more detailed analysis will be presented in future publications.

  15. Acoustic Treatment Design Scaling Methods. Volume 3; Test Plans, Hardware, Results, and Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, J.; Kwan, H. W.; Echternach, D. K.; Kraft, R. E.; Syed, A. A.

    1999-01-01

    The ability to design, build, and test miniaturized acoustic treatment panels on scale-model fan rigs representative of the full-scale engine provides not only a cost-savings, but an opportunity to optimize the treatment by allowing tests of different designs. To be able to use scale model treatment as a full-scale design tool, it is necessary that the designer be able to reliably translate the scale model design and performance to an equivalent full-scale design. The primary objective of the study presented in this volume of the final report was to conduct laboratory tests to evaluate liner acoustic properties and validate advanced treatment impedance models. These laboratory tests include DC flow resistance measurements, normal incidence impedance measurements, DC flow and impedance measurements in the presence of grazing flow, and in-duct liner attenuation as well as modal measurements. Test panels were fabricated at three different scale factors (i.e., full-scale, half-scale, and one-fifth scale) to support laboratory acoustic testing. The panel configurations include single-degree-of-freedom (SDOF) perforated sandwich panels, SDOF linear (wire mesh) liners, and double-degree-of-freedom (DDOF) linear acoustic panels.

  16. A Screening Approach for Classroom Acoustics Using Web-Based Listening Tests and Subjective Ratings

    PubMed Central

    Persson Waye, Kerstin; Magnusson, Lennart; Fredriksson, Sofie; Croy, Ilona

    2015-01-01

    Background Perception of speech is crucial in school where speech is the main mode of communication. The aim of the study was to evaluate whether a web based approach including listening tests and questionnaires could be used as a screening tool for poor classroom acoustics. The prime focus was the relation between pupils’ comprehension of speech, the classroom acoustics and their description of the acoustic qualities of the classroom. Methodology/Principal Findings In total, 1106 pupils aged 13-19, from 59 classes and 38 schools in Sweden participated in a listening study using Hagerman’s sentences administered via Internet. Four listening conditions were applied: high and low background noise level and positions close and far away from the loudspeaker. The pupils described the acoustic quality of the classroom and teachers provided information on the physical features of the classroom using questionnaires. Conclusions/Significance In 69% of the classes, at least three pupils described the sound environment as adverse and in 88% of the classes one or more pupil reported often having difficulties concentrating due to noise. The pupils’ comprehension of speech was strongly influenced by the background noise level (p<0.001) and distance to the loudspeakers (p<0.001). Of the physical classroom features, presence of suspended acoustic panels (p<0.05) and length of the classroom (p<0.01) predicted speech comprehension. Of the pupils’ descriptions of acoustic qualities, clattery significantly (p<0.05) predicted speech comprehension. Clattery was furthermore associated to difficulties understanding each other, while the description noisy was associated to concentration difficulties. The majority of classrooms do not seem to have an optimal sound environment. The pupil’s descriptions of acoustic qualities and listening tests can be one way of predicting sound conditions in the classroom. PMID:25615692

  17. Experimental aerodynamic and acoustic model testing of the Variable Cycle Engine (VCE) testbed coannular exhaust nozzle system: Comprehensive data report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, D. P.; Morris, P. M.

    1980-01-01

    The component detail design drawings of the one sixth scale model of the variable cycle engine testbed demonstrator exhaust syatem tested are presented. Also provided are the basic acoustic and aerodynamic data acquired during the experimental model tests. The model drawings, an index to the acoustic data, an index to the aerodynamic data, tabulated and graphical acoustic data, and the tabulated aerodynamic data and graphs are discussed.

  18. Passive Acoustic Tomography Tested for Measuring Gas Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fralick, Gustave C.; Kleppe, John

    2004-01-01

    tomography by sound waves. Active acoustic tomography, in which a sound pulse is injected into the flow and the time delays between members of an array of microphones are used to construct the temperature field has been used successfully in the stacks of power plants. However, the flow field inside a jet engine is much too noisy for it to be possible to detect an externally injected sound pulse. Instead we are developing passive acoustic tomography, which uses the sound already present in the flow.

  19. F-16XL and F-18 High Speed Acoustic Flight Test Databases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, J. J.; Wilson, M. R.; Rawls, J., Jr.; Norum, T. D.; Golub, R. A.

    1999-01-01

    This report presents the recorded acoustic data and the computed narrow-band and 1/3-octave band spectra produced by F-18 and F-16XL aircraft in subsonic flight over an acoustic array. Both broadband-shock noise and turbulent mixing noise are observed in the spectra. Radar and c-band tracking systems provided the aircraft position which enabled directivity and smear angles from the aircraft to each microphone to be computed. These angles are based on source emission time and thus give some idea about the directivity of the radiated sound field due to jet noise. A follow-on static test was also conducted where acoustic and engine data were obtained. The acoustic data described in the report has application to community noise analysis, noise source characterization and validation of prediction models. A detailed description of the signal processing procedures is provided. Follow-on static tests of each aircraft were also conducted for which engine data and far-field acoustic data are presented.

  20. Acoustic-Modal Testing of the Ares I Launch Abort System Attitude Control Motor Valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, R. Benjamin; Fischbach, Sean R.

    2010-01-01

    The Attitude Control Motor (ACM) is being developed for use in the Launch Abort System (LAS) of NASA's Ares I launch vehicle. The ACM consists of a small solid rocket motor and eight actuated pintle valves that directionally allocate.thrust_- 1t.has-been- predicted-that significant unsteady. pressure.fluctuations.will.exist. inside the-valves during operation. The dominant frequencies of these oscillations correspond to the lowest several acoustic natural frequencies of the individual valves. An acoustic finite element model of the fluid volume inside the valve has been critical to the prediction of these frequencies and their associated mode shapes. This work describes an effort to experimentally validate the acoustic finite model of the valve with an acoustic modal test. The modal test involved instrumenting a flight-like valve with six microphones and then exciting the enclosed air with a loudspeaker. The loudspeaker was configured to deliver broadband noise at relatively high sound pressure levels. The aquired microphone signals were post-processed and compared to results generated from the acoustic finite element model. Initial comparisons between the test data and the model results revealed that additional model refinement was necessary. Specifically, the model was updated to implement a complex impedance boundary condition at the entrance to the valve supply tube. This boundary condition models the frequency-dependent impedance that an acoustic wave will encounter as it reaches the end of the supply tube. Upon invoking this boundary condition, significantly improved agreement between the test data and the model was realized.

  1. Acoustic-Modal Testing of the Ares I Launch Abort System Attitude Control Motor Valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, R. Benjamin; Fischbach, Sean R.

    2010-01-01

    The Attitude Control Motor (ACM) is being developed for use in the Launch Abort System (LAS) of NASA's Ares I launch vehicle. The ACM consists of a small solid rocket motor and eight actuated pintle valves that directionally allocate.thrust_- 1t.has-been- predicted-that significant unsteady. pressure.fluctuations.will.exist. inside the-valves during operation. The dominant frequencies of these oscillations correspond to the lowest several acoustic natural frequencies of the individual valves. An acoustic finite element model of the fluid volume inside the valve has been critical to the prediction of these frequencies and their associated mode shapes. This work describes an effort to experimentally validate the acoustic finite model of the valve with an acoustic modal test. The modal test involved instrumenting a flight-like valve with six microphones and then exciting the enclosed air with a loudspeaker. The loudspeaker was configured to deliver broadband noise at relatively high sound pressure levels. The aquired microphone signals were post-processed and compared to results generated from the acoustic finite element model. Initial comparisons between the test data and the model results revealed that additional model refinement was necessary. Specifically, the model was updated to implement a complex impedance boundary condition at the entrance to the valve supply tube. This boundary condition models the frequency-dependent impedance that an acoustic wave will encounter as it reaches the end of the supply tube. Upon invoking this boundary condition, significantly improved agreement between the test data and the model was realized.

  2. Testing the odontocete acoustic prey debilitation hypothesis: no stunning results.

    PubMed

    Benoit-Bird, Kelly J; Au, Whitlow W L; Kastelein, Ronald

    2006-08-01

    The hypothesis that sounds produced by odontocetes can debilitate fish was examined. The effects of simulated odontocete pulsed signals on three species of fish commonly preyed on by odontocetes were examined, exposing three individuals of each species as well as groups of four fish to a high-frequency click of a bottlenose dolphin [peak frequency (PF) 120 kHz, 213-dB peak-to-peak exposure level (EL)], a midfrequency click modeled after a killer whale's signal (PF 55 kHz, 208-dB EL), and a low-frequency click (PF 18 kHz, 193-dB EL). Fish were held in a 50-cm diameter net enclosure immediately in front of a transducer where their swimming behavior, orientation, and balance were observed with two video cameras. Clicks were presented at constant rates and in graded sweeps simulating a foraging dolphin's "terminal buzz." No measurable change in behavior was observed in any of the fish for any signal type or pulse modulation rate, despite the fact that clicks were at or near the maximum source levels recorded for odontocetes. Based on the results, the hypothesis that acoustic signals of odontocetes alone can disorient or "stun" prey cannot be supported.

  3. Acoustical Testing Laboratory Developed to Support the Low-Noise Design of Microgravity Space Flight Hardware

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, Beth A.

    2001-01-01

    The NASA John H. Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field has designed and constructed an Acoustical Testing Laboratory to support the low-noise design of microgravity space flight hardware. This new laboratory will provide acoustic emissions testing and noise control services for a variety of customers, particularly for microgravity space flight hardware that must meet International Space Station limits on noise emissions. These limits have been imposed by the space station to support hearing conservation, speech communication, and safety goals as well as to prevent noise-induced vibrations that could impact microgravity research data. The Acoustical Testing Laboratory consists of a 23 by 27 by 20 ft (height) convertible hemi/anechoic chamber and separate sound-attenuating test support enclosure. Absorptive 34-in. fiberglass wedges in the test chamber provide an anechoic environment down to 100 Hz. A spring-isolated floor system affords vibration isolation above 3 Hz. These criteria, along with very low design background levels, will enable the acquisition of accurate and repeatable acoustical measurements on test articles, up to a full space station rack in size, that produce very little noise. Removable floor wedges will allow the test chamber to operate in either a hemi/anechoic or anechoic configuration, depending on the size of the test article and the specific test being conducted. The test support enclosure functions as a control room during normal operations but, alternatively, may be used as a noise-control enclosure for test articles that require the operation of noise-generating test support equipment.

  4. Design and Integration of a Rotor Alone Nacelle for Acoustic Fan Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shook, Tony D.; Hughes, Christoper E.; Thompson, William K.; Tavernelli, Paul F.; Cunningham, Cameron C.; Shah, Ashwin

    2001-01-01

    A brief summary of the design, integration and testing of a rotor alone nacelle (RAN) in NASA Glenn's 9'x 15' Low Speed Wind Tunnel (LSWT) is presented. The purpose of the RAN system was to provide an "acoustically clean" flow path within the nacelle to isolate that portion of the total engine system acoustic signature attributed to fan noise. The RAN design accomplished this by removing the stators that provided internal support to the nacelle. In its place, two external struts mounted to a two-axis positioning table located behind the tunnel wall provided the support. Nacelle-mounted lasers and a closed-loop control system provided the input to the table to maintain nacelle to fan concentricity as thermal and thrust loads displaced the strut-mounted fan. This unique design required extensive analysis and verification testing to ensure the safety of the fan model, propulsion simulator drive rig, and facility, along with experimental consistency of acoustic data obtained while using the RAN system. Initial testing was used to optimize the positioning system and resulted in concentricity errors of +/- 0.0031 in. in the horizontal direction and +0.0035/-0.0013 in, in the vertical direction. As a result of successful testing, the RAN system will be transitioned into other acoustic research programs at NASA Glenn Research Center.

  5. Characterization Test Report for the Mnemonics-UCS Wireless Surface Acoustic Wave Sensor System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, Joshua J.; Youngquist, Robert C.

    2013-01-01

    The scope of this testing includes the Surface Acoustic Wave Sensor System delivered to KSC: two interrogator (transceiver) systems, four temperature sensors, with wooden mounting blocks, two antennas, two power supplies, network cables, and analysis software. Also included are a number of additional temperature sensors and newly-developed hydrogen sensors

  6. Simplified through-transmission test method for determination of a material's acoustic properties

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Accepted acoustic testing standards are available; however, they require specialized hardware and software that are typically out of reach economically to the occasional practitioner. What is needed is a simple and inexpensive screening method that can provide a quick comparison for rapid identifica...

  7. Methodical principles of recognition different source types in an acoustic-emission testing of metal objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobrov, A. L.

    2017-08-01

    This paper presents issues of identification of various AE sources in order to increase the information value of AE method. This task is especially relevant for complex objects, when factors that affect an acoustic path on an object of testing significantly affect parameters of signals recorded by sensor. Correlation criteria, sensitive to type of AE source in metal objects is determined in the article.

  8. Recent Improvements to the Acoustical Testing Laboratory at the NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podboy, Devin M.; Mirecki, Julius H.; Walker, Bruce E.; Sutliff, Daniel L.

    2014-01-01

    The Acoustical Testing Laboratory (ATL) consists of a 27- by 23- by 20-ft (height) convertible hemi/anechoic chamber and separate sound-attenuating test support enclosure. Absorptive fiberglass wedges in the test chamber provide an anechoic environment down to 100 Hz. A spring-isolated floor system affords vibration isolation above 3 Hz. These specifications, along with very low design background levels, enable the acquisition of accurate and repeatable acoustical measurements on test articles that produce very low sound pressures. Removable floor wedges allow the test chamber to operate in either a hemi-anechoic or anechoic configuration, depending on the size of the test article and the specific test being conducted. The test support enclosure functions as a control room during normal operations. Recently improvements were accomplished in support of continued usage of the ATL by NASA programs including an analysis of the ultra-sonic characteristics. A 3-D traverse system inside the chamber was utilized for acquiring acoustic data for these tests. The traverse system drives a linear array of 13, 1/4 in.-microphones spaced 3 in. apart (36 in. span). An updated data acquisition system was also incorporated into the facility.

  9. Recent Improvements to the Acoustical Testing Laboratory at the NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podboy, Devin M.; Mirecki, Julius H.; Walker, Bruce E.; Sutliff, Daniel L.

    2014-01-01

    The Acoustical Testing Laboratory (ATL) consists of a 27 by 23 by 20 ft (height) convertible hemi/anechoic chamber and separate sound-attenuating test support enclosure. Absorptive fiberglass wedges in the test chamber provide an anechoic environment down to 100 Hz. A spring-isolated floor system affords vibration isolation above 3 Hz. These specifications, along with very low design background levels, enable the acquisition of accurate and repeatable acoustical measurements on test articles that produce very low sound pressures. Removable floor wedges allow the test chamber to operate in either a hemi-anechoic or anechoic configuration, depending on the size of the test article and the specific test being conducted. The test support enclosure functions as a control room during normal operations. Recently improvements were accomplished in support of continued usage of the ATL by NASA programs including an analysis of the ultra-sonic characteristics. A 3 dimensional traverse system inside the chamber was utilized for acquiring acoustic data for these tests. The traverse system drives a linear array of 13, 1/4"-microphones spaced 3" apart (36" span). An updated data acquisition system was also incorporated into the facility.

  10. Results of acoustic testing of the JT8D-109 refan engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burdsall, E. A.; Brochu, F. P.; Scaramella, V. M.

    1975-01-01

    A JT8D engine was modified to reduce jet noise levels by 6-8 PNdB at takeoff power without increasing fan generated noise levels. Designated the JT8D-109, the modified engines featured a larger single stage fan, and acoustic treatment in the fan discharge ducts. Noise levels were measured on an outdoor test facility for eight engine/acoustic treatment configurations. Compared to the baseline JT8D, the fully treated JT8D-109 showed reductions of 6 PNdB at takeoff, and 11 PNdB at a typical approach power setting.

  11. Characteristics of acoustic wave from atmospheric nuclear explosions conducted at the USSR Test Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolova, Inna

    2015-04-01

    Availability of the acoustic wave on the record of microbarograph is one of discriminate signs of atmospheric (surface layer of atmosphere) and contact explosions. Nowadays there is large number of air wave records from chemical explosions recorded by the IMS infrasound stations installed during recent decade. But there is small number of air wave records from nuclear explosions as air and contact nuclear explosions had been conducted since 1945 to 1962, before the Limited Test Ban Treaty was signed in 1963 (the treaty banning nuclear weapon tests in the atmosphere, in outer space and under water) by the Great Britain, USSR and USA. That time there was small number of installed microbarographs. First infrasound stations in the USSR appeared in 1954, and by the moment of the USSR collapse the network consisted of 25 infrasound stations, 3 of which were located on Kazakhstan territory - in Kurchatov (East Kazakhstan), in Borovoye Observatory (North Kazakhstan) and Talgar Observatory (Northern Tien Shan). The microbarograph of Talgar Observatory was installed in 1962 and recorded large number of air nuclear explosions conducted at Semipalatinsk Test Site and Novaya Zemlya Test Site. The epicentral distance to the STS was ~700 km, and to Novaya Zemlya Test Site ~3500 km. The historical analog records of the microbarograph were analyzed on the availability of the acoustic wave. The selected records were digitized, the database of acoustic signals from nuclear explosions was created. In addition, acoustic signals from atmospheric nuclear explosions conducted at the USSR Test Sites were recorded by analogue broadband seismic stations at wide range of epicentral distances, 300-3600 km. These signals coincide well by its form and spectral content with records of microbarographs and can be used for monitoring tasks and discrimination in places where infrasound observations are absent. Nuclear explosions which records contained acoustic wave were from 0.03 to 30 kt yield for

  12. Thick Films acoustic sensors devoted to MTR environment measurements. Thick Films acoustic sensors devoted to Material Testing Reactor environment measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Very, F.; Rosenkrantz, E.; Combette, P.; Ferrandis, J.Y.; Fourmentel, D.; Destouches, C.; Villard, J.F.

    2015-07-01

    The development of advanced instrumentation for in-pile experiments in Material Testing Reactor constitutes a main goal for the improvement of the nuclear fuel behavior knowledge. An acoustic method for fission gas release detection was tested with success during a first experiment called REMORA 3 in 2010 and 2011, and the results were used to differentiate helium and fission gas release kinetics under transient operating conditions. This experiment was lead at OSIRIS reactor (CEA Saclay, France). The maximal temperature on the sensor during the irradiation was about 150 deg. C. In this paper we present a thick film transducer produce by screen printing process. The screen printing of piezoelectric offers a wide range of possible applications for the development of acoustic sensors and piezoelectric structure for measurements in high temperature environment. We firstly produced a Lead Zirconate Titanate (PZT) based paste composed of Pz27 powder from Ferroperm, CF7575 glass, and organic solvent ESL 400. Likewise a Bismuth Titanate based paste synthesized in our laboratory was produced. With these inks we produced thick film up to 130 μm by screen printing process. Material properties characterizations of these thick-film resonators are essential for device design and applications. The piezoelectric coefficients d33 and pyro-electric P(T) coefficient are investigated. The highest P(T) and d33 are respectively 80 μC.m{sup -2}.K{sup -1} and 130 μC.N{sup -1} for the PZT transducer -which validates the fabrication process-. In view of the development of this transducer oriented for high temperature and irradiation environment, we investigated the electrical properties of the transducers for different ranges of frequencies and temperature - from 20 Hz up to 40 MHz between 30 and 400 deg. C. We highlight the evolution of the impedance response and piezoelectric parameters of screen printed piezoelectric structures on alumina. Shortly an irradiation will be realized in

  13. Evaluation of Acoustic Emission SHM of PRSEUS Composite Pressure Cube Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horne, Michael R.; Madaras, Eric I.

    2013-01-01

    A series of tests of the Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure (PRSEUS) pressure cube were conducted during third quarter 2011 at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) in the Combined Loads Test facility (COLTS). This is a report of the analysis of the Acoustic Emission (AE) data collected during those tests. The AE signals of the later tests are consistent with the final failure progression through two of the pressure cube panels. Calibration tests and damage precursor AE indications, from preliminary checkout pressurizations, indicated areas of concern that eventually failed. Hence those tests have potential for vehicle health monitoring.

  14. A modal test method using sound pressure transducers based on vibro-acoustic reciprocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, W. D.; Liu, J. M.; Xu, Y. F.; Ying, H. Q.

    2014-06-01

    A modal test method that uses sound pressure transducers at fixed locations and an impact hammer roving over a test structure is developed in this work. Since sound pressure transducers are used, the current method deals with a coupled structural-acoustic system. Based on the vibro-acoustic reciprocity, the method is equivalent to one, where acoustic excitations at fixed locations are given and the resulting acceleration of the test structure is measured. The current method can eliminate mass loading due to use of accelerometers, which can destroy existence of repeated or close natural frequencies of a symmetric structure. It can also avoid effects of a nodal line of a mode and an inactive area of a local mode, and measure all the out-of-plane modes within a frequency range of interest, including global and local ones. The coupling between the structure and the acoustic field in a structural-acoustic system introduces asymmetry in the model formulation. An equivalent state space formulation is used for a damped structural-acoustic system and the associated eigenvalue problem is derived. The biorthonormality relations between the left and right eigenvectors and the relations between the structural and acoustic components in the left and right eigenvectors are proved. The frequency response functions associated with the current method are derived and their physical meanings are explained. The guidelines for using the current method, including the types of structures that are suitable for the method, the positions of the sound pressure transducers, and the orientation of the test structure relative to the transducers, are provided. Modal tests were carried out on an automotive disk brake using the traditional and current methods, where multiple accelerometers and microphones were used to measure its dynamic responses induced by impacts, respectively. The differences between the measured natural frequencies using the current method and those from the finite element

  15. J-FLiC UAS Flights for Acoustic Testing Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Motter, Mark A.; High, James W.

    2016-01-01

    The jet-powered flying testbed (J-FLiC) unmanned aircraft system (UAS) successfully completed twenty-six flights at Fort AP Hill, VA, from 27 August until September 3 2015, supporting tests of a microphone array system for aircraft noise measurement. The test vehicles, J-FLiC NAVY2 (N508NU), and J-FLiC 4 (N509NU), were flown under manual and autopiloted control in a variety of test conditions: clean at speeds ranging from 80 to 150 knots; and full landing configuration at speeds ranging from 50 to 95 knots. During the test campaign, autopilot capability was incrementally improved to ultimately provide a high degree of accuracy and repeatability of the critical test requirements for airspeed, altitude, runway alignment and position over the microphone array. Manual flights were performed for test conditions at the both ends of the speed envelope where autopiloted flight would have required flight beyond visual range and more extensive developmental work. The research objectives of the campaign were fully achieved. The ARMD Integrated Systems Research Program (ISRP) Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) Project aims to develop the enabling capabilities/technologies that will allow prediction/reduction of aircraft noise. A primary measurement tool for ascertaining and characterizing empirically the effectiveness of various noise reduction technologies is a microphone phased array system. Such array systems need to be vetted and certified for operational use via field deployments and overflights of the array with test aircraft, in this case with sUAS aircraft such as J-FLiC.

  16. Noise testing of an advanced design propeller in the Boeing transonic wind tunnel with and without test section acoustic treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glover, B. M., Jr.; Plunkett, E. I.; Simcox, C. D.

    1984-10-01

    Noise tests using the NASA SR-6 advanced design propeller in the Boeing Transonic Wind Tunnel have recently been completed. Measurements were taken both with and without an acoustically treated test section. A wide range of helical tip speeds and power loadings were explored. Noise test techniques, previously not applied to advanced design propeller testing, have shown results indicating an increased level of confidence in the measured signatures. Typical results are presented along with recommendations for future noise tests and elementary empirical prediction methods for the SR-6.

  17. Aural Acoustic Stapedius-Muscle Reflex Threshold Procedures to Test Human Infants and Adults.

    PubMed

    Keefe, Douglas H; Feeney, M Patrick; Hunter, Lisa L; Fitzpatrick, Denis F

    2017-02-01

    Power-based procedures are described to measure acoustic stapedius-muscle reflex threshold and supra-threshold responses in human adult and infant ears at frequencies from 0.2 to 8 kHz. The stimulus set included five clicks in which four pulsed activators were placed between each pair of clicks, with each stimulus set separated from the next by 0.79 s to allow for reflex decay. Each click response was used to detect the presence of reflex effects across frequency that were elicited by a pulsed broadband-noise or tonal activator in the ipsilateral or contralateral test ear. Acoustic reflex shifts were quantified in terms of the difference in absorbed sound power between the initial baseline click and the later four clicks in each set. Acoustic reflex shifts were measured over a 40-dB range of pulsed activators, and the acoustic reflex threshold was objectively calculated using a maximum 10 likelihood procedure. To illustrate the principles underlying these new reflex tests, reflex shifts in absorbed sound power and absorbance are presented for data acquired in an adult ear with normal hearing and in two infant ears in the initial and follow-up newborn hearing screening exams, one with normal hearing and the other with a conductive hearing loss. The use of absorbed sound power was helpful in classifying an acoustic reflex shift as present or absent. The resulting reflex tests are in use in a large study of wideband clinical diagnosis and monitoring of middle-ear and cochlear function in infant and adult ears.

  18. Wind Turbine Generator System Acoustic Noise Test Report for the Gaia Wind 11-kW Wind Turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Huskey, A.

    2011-11-01

    This report details the acoustic noise test conducted on the Gaia-Wind 11-kW wind turbine at the National Wind Technology Center. The test turbine is a two- bladed, downwind wind turbine with a rated power of 11 kW. The test turbine was tested in accordance with the International Electrotechnical Commission standard, IEC 61400-11 Ed 2.1 2006-11 Wind Turbine Generator Systems -- Part 11 Acoustic Noise Measurement Techniques.

  19. Free jet feasibility study of a thermal acoustic shield concept for AST/VCE application-dual flow. Comprehensive data report. Volume 1: Test nozzles and acoustic data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janardan, B. A.; Brausch, J. F.; Price, A. O.

    1984-01-01

    Acoustic and diagnostic data that were obtained to determine the influence of selected geometric and aerodynamic flow variables of coannular nozzles with thermal acoustic shields are summarized in this comprehensive data report. A total of 136 static and simulated flight acoustic test points were conducted with 9 scale-model nozzles The tested nozzles included baseline (unshielded), 180 deg shielded, and 360 deg shielded dual flow coannular plug configurations. The baseline configurations include a high radius ratio unsuppressed coannular plug nozzle and a coanuular plug nozzle and a coannular plug nozzle with a 20-chute outer stream suppressor. The tests were conducted at nozzle temperatures and pressure typical of operating conditions of variable cycle engine.

  20. A closed-loop automatic control system for high-intensity acoustic test systems.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slusser, R. A.

    1973-01-01

    Description of an automatic control system for high-intensity acoustic tests in reverberation chambers. Working in 14 one-third-octave bands from 50 to 1000 Hz, the desired sound pressure levels are set into the memory in the control system before the test. The control system then increases the sound pressure level in the reverberation chamber gradually in each of the one-third-octave bands until the level set in the memory is reached. This level is then maintained for the duration of the test. Additional features of the system are overtest protection, the capability of 'holding' the spectrum at any time, and the presence of a total test timer.

  1. A closed-loop automatic control system for high-intensity acoustic test systems.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slusser, R. A.

    1973-01-01

    Description of an automatic control system for high-intensity acoustic tests in reverberation chambers. Working in 14 one-third-octave bands from 50 to 1000 Hz, the desired sound pressure levels are set into the memory in the control system before the test. The control system then increases the sound pressure level in the reverberation chamber gradually in each of the one-third-octave bands until the level set in the memory is reached. This level is then maintained for the duration of the test. Additional features of the system are overtest protection, the capability of 'holding' the spectrum at any time, and the presence of a total test timer.

  2. Towards an ecological audiology: stereophonic listening chamber and acoustic environmental tests.

    PubMed

    Borg, E; Wilson, M; Samuelsson, E

    1998-01-01

    An acoustic laboratory for reproduction of speech and acoustic environments is presented along with two sound field tests. Its design has been inspired by the LEDE (Living End Dead End) principle for construction of radio and music control rooms. The equipment and the 12 loudspeakers can simultaneously reproduce several stereophonic and monophonic recordings. The interesting feature is that the delayed first reflex in the LEDE room allows for a realistic perception of the recording room. A preliminary presentation of two newly developed tests for sound field listening is given. In DSIN. Directional Speech In Noise, the JFC (just follow conversation) threshold for continuous discourse is determined in 12 directions in quiet and in noise from +/- 60 degrees azimuth. In SEIT (Sound Environmental Identification Test), stereophonic acoustic environments are presented and the subject is asked to identify specific components and to characterize each environment as closely as possible. Results from tests with normal hearing subjects and examples of results with hearing impaired subjects are presented. The potential of the technique for use in aural rehabilitation, functional definition of auditory communication and quality assessment of hearing aids is discussed. It is pointed out that the term ecological audiology is suitable for describing the interaction between the communicating individual and the environment in a broad sense.

  3. Long-range propagation effects observed during acoustic counter battery system tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velea, Doru; Cardinale, Michael; Torvik, Kevin; LaRow, Andy; Chang, Jay

    2006-05-01

    In March 2005, Planning Systems, Inc. (PSI), Advanced Acoustic Concepts (AAC) and the U.S. Army Research Development and Engineering Center (ARDEC) tested the PSI Acoustic Counter Battery System (ACBS) at the Yuma Proving Ground (YPG). ACBS was designed to acoustically detect and locate mortar fire, and to detect and locate heavy artillery fire out to ranges beyond 12 km. During analysis of the test data, we discovered that long-range sensors were receiving multiple pulses in doublets and triplets from a single shot. Additionally, we observed that the leading pulses were arriving earlier than anticipated by surface speed of sound calculations. The analysis team modeled the atmosphere recorded during the test and identified the possible causes of multiple arrivals by modeling the supersonic projectile trajectory and by using Green's Function Parabolic Equation numerical techniques to propagate recorded pulses from the source to receivers. The lessons learned will be applied to adjust the signal processing algorithms in the ACBS. This paper describes the test setup and reports the results of the analysis.

  4. Acoustic Performance of an Advanced Model Turbofan in Three Aeroacoustic Test Facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodward, Richard P.; Hughes, Christopher E.

    2012-01-01

    A model advanced turbofan was acoustically tested in the NASA Glenn 9- by 15-Foot-Low-Speed Wind Tunnel (LSWT), and in two other aeroacoustic facilities. The Universal Propulsion Simulator (UPS) fan was designed and manufactured by the General Electric Aircraft Engines (GEAE) Company, and featured active core, as well as bypass, flow paths. The reference test configurations were with the metal, M4, rotor with hardwall and treated bypass flow ducts. The UPS fan was tested within an airflow at a Mach number of 0.20 (limited flow data were also acquired at a Mach number of 0.25) which is representative of aircraft takeoff and approach conditions. Comparisons were made between data acquired within the airflow (9x15 LSWT and German-Dutch Wind Tunnel (DNW)) and outside of a free jet (Boeing Low Speed Aero acoustic Facility (LSAF) and DNW). Sideline data were acquired on an 89-in. (nominal 4 fan diameters) sideline using the same microphone assembly and holder in the 9x15 LSWT and DNW facilities. These data showed good agreement for similar UPS operating conditions and configurations. Distortion of fan spectra tonal content through a free jet shear layer was documented, suggesting that in-flow acoustic measurements are required for comprehensive fan noise diagnostics. However, there was good agreement for overall sound power level (PWL) fan noise measurements made both within and outside of the test facility airflow.

  5. Acoustic detection and localization from a tethered aerostat during the NATO TG-53 test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiff, C.; Scanlon, M.; Noble, J.

    2006-05-01

    Acoustic sensors mounted to a tethered aerostat detect and localize transient signals from mortars, artillery, C-4, propane cannon, and small arms fire. Significant enhancements to soldier lethality and survivability can be gained when using the aerostat array to detect, localize, and cue an aerial imager to a weapon's launch site, or use the aerostat's instantaneous position and orientation to calculate a vector solution to the ground coordinates of the launch site for threat neutralization. The prototype aerostat-mounted array was tested at Yuma Proving Grounds (YPG) as part of the NATO TG-53 signature collection exercise. Acoustic wave form data was collected simultaneously with aerostat and ground-based sensor arrays for comparing wind noise, signal to noise related parameters, and atmospheric effects on propagation to an elevated array. A test description and summary of localization accuracy will be presented for various altitudes, ranges to target, and under differing meteorological conditions.

  6. Acoustic testing of a supersonic tip speed fan with acoustic treatment and rotor casting slots. Quiet engine program scale model fan C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazin, S. B.

    1973-01-01

    Acoustic tests were conducted on a high tip speed (1550 ft/sec, 472.44 m/sec) single stage fan with varying amounts of wall acoustic treatment and with circumferential slots over the rotor blade tips. The slots were also tested with acoustic treatment placed behind the slots. The wall treatment results show that the inlet treatment is more effective at high fan speeds and aft duct treatment is more effective at low fan speeds. Maximum PNL's on a 200-foot (60.96 m) sideline show the untreated slots to have increased the rear radiated noise at approach. However, when the treatment was added to the slots inlet radiated noise was decreased, resulting in little change relative to the solid casing on an EPNL basis.

  7. Acoustic Emission Monitoring of the DC-XA Composite Liquid Hydrogen Tank During Structural Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkerson, C.

    1996-01-01

    The results of acoustic emission (AE) monitoring of the DC-XA composite liquid hydrogen tank are presented in this report. The tank was subjected to pressurization, tensile, and compressive loads at ambient temperatures and also while full of liquid nitrogen. The tank was also pressurized with liquid hydrogen. AE was used to monitor the tank for signs of structural defects developing during the test.

  8. In situ Probe Microphone Measurement for Testing the Direct Acoustical Cochlear Stimulator.

    PubMed

    Stieger, Christof; Alnufaily, Yasser H; Candreia, Claudia; Caversaccio, Marco D; Arnold, Andreas M

    2017-01-01

    Hypothesis: Acoustical measurements can be used for functional control of a direct acoustic cochlear stimulator (DACS). Background: The DACS is a recently released active hearing implant that works on the principle of a conventional piston prosthesis driven by the rod of an electromagnetic actuator. An inherent part of the DACS actuator is a thin titanium diaphragm that allows for movement of the stimulation rod while hermetically sealing the housing. In addition to mechanical stimulation, the actuator emits sound into the mastoid cavity because of the motion of the diaphragm. Methods: We investigated the use of the sound emission of a DACS for intra-operative testing. We measured sound emission in the external auditory canal (PEAC) and velocity of the actuators stimulation rod (Vact) in five implanted ears of whole-head specimens. We tested the influence various positions of the loudspeaker and a probe microphone on PEAC and simulated implant malfunction in one example. Results: Sound emission of the DACS with a signal-to-noise ratio >10 dB was observed between 0.5 and 5 kHz. Simulated implant misplacement or malfunction could be detected by the absence or shift in the characteristic resonance frequency of the actuator. PEAC changed by <6 dB for variations of the microphone and loudspeaker position. Conclusion: Our data support the feasibility of acoustical measurements for in situ testing of the DACS implant in the mastoid cavity as well as for post-operative monitoring of actuator function.

  9. In situ Probe Microphone Measurement for Testing the Direct Acoustical Cochlear Stimulator

    PubMed Central

    Stieger, Christof; Alnufaily, Yasser H.; Candreia, Claudia; Caversaccio, Marco D.; Arnold, Andreas M.

    2017-01-01

    Hypothesis: Acoustical measurements can be used for functional control of a direct acoustic cochlear stimulator (DACS). Background: The DACS is a recently released active hearing implant that works on the principle of a conventional piston prosthesis driven by the rod of an electromagnetic actuator. An inherent part of the DACS actuator is a thin titanium diaphragm that allows for movement of the stimulation rod while hermetically sealing the housing. In addition to mechanical stimulation, the actuator emits sound into the mastoid cavity because of the motion of the diaphragm. Methods: We investigated the use of the sound emission of a DACS for intra-operative testing. We measured sound emission in the external auditory canal (PEAC) and velocity of the actuators stimulation rod (Vact) in five implanted ears of whole-head specimens. We tested the influence various positions of the loudspeaker and a probe microphone on PEAC and simulated implant malfunction in one example. Results: Sound emission of the DACS with a signal-to-noise ratio >10 dB was observed between 0.5 and 5 kHz. Simulated implant misplacement or malfunction could be detected by the absence or shift in the characteristic resonance frequency of the actuator. PEAC changed by <6 dB for variations of the microphone and loudspeaker position. Conclusion: Our data support the feasibility of acoustical measurements for in situ testing of the DACS implant in the mastoid cavity as well as for post-operative monitoring of actuator function. PMID:28860963

  10. Structural Dynamic Assessment of the GN2 Piping System for NASA's New and Powerful Reverberant Acoustic Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McNelis, Mark E.; Staab, Lucas D.; Akers, James C.; Hughes, William O.; Chang, Li C.; Hozman, Aron D.; Henry, Michael W.

    2012-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Glenn Research Center (GRC) has led the design and build of the new world-class vibroacoustic test capabilities at the NASA GRC's Plum Brook Station in Sandusky, Ohio, USA from 2007 to 2011. SAIC-Benham has completed construction of a new reverberant acoustic test facility to support the future testing needs of NASA's space exploration program and commercial customers. The large Reverberant Acoustic Test Facility (RATF) is approximately 101,000 cubic feet in volume and was designed to operate at a maximum empty chamber acoustic overall sound pressure level (OASPL) of 163 dB. This combination of size and acoustic power is unprecedented amongst the world s known active reverberant acoustic test facilities. Initial checkout acoustic testing was performed on March 2011 by SAIC-Benham at test levels up to 161 dB OASPL. During testing, several branches of the gaseous nitrogen (GN2) piping system, which supply the fluid to the noise generating acoustic modulators, failed at their T-junctions connecting the 12 in. supply line to their respective 4 in. branch lines. The problem was initially detected when the oxygen sensors in the horn room indicated a lower than expected oxygen level from which was inferred GN2 leaks in the piping system. In subsequent follow up inspections, cracks were identified in the failed T-junction connections through non-destructive evaluation testing. Through structural dynamic modeling of the piping system, the root cause of the T-junction connection failures was determined. The structural dynamic assessment identified several possible corrective design improvements to the horn room piping system. The effectiveness of the chosen design repairs were subsequently evaluated in September 2011 during acoustic verification testing to 161 dB OASPL.

  11. Structural Dynamic Assessment of the GN2 Piping System for NASA's New and Powerful Reverberant Acoustic Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McNelis, Mark E.; Staab, Lucas D.; Akers, James C.; Hughes, WIlliam O.; Chang, Li, C.; Hozman, Aron D.; Henry, Michael W.

    2012-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Glenn Research Center (GRC) has led the design and build of the new world-class vibroacoustic test capabilities at the NASA GRC's Plum Brook Station in Sandusky, Ohio, USA from 2007-2011. SAIC-Benham has completed construction of a new reverberant acoustic test facility to support the future testing needs of NASA's space exploration program and commercial customers. The large Reverberant Acoustic Test Facility (RATF) is approximately 101,000 cu ft in volume and was designed to operate at a maximum empty chamber acoustic overall sound pressure level (OASPL) of 163 dB. This combination of size and acoustic power is unprecedented amongst the world's known active reverberant acoustic test facilities. Initial checkout acoustic testing was performed on March 2011 by SAIC-Benham at test levels up to 161 dB OASPL. During testing, several branches of the gaseous nitrogen (GN2) piping system, which supply the fluid to the noise generating acoustic modulators, failed at their "t-junctions" connecting the 12 inch supply line to their respective 4 inch branch lines. The problem was initially detected when the oxygen sensors in the horn room indicated a lower than expected oxygen level from which was inferred GN2 leaks in the piping system. In subsequent follow up inspections, cracks were identified in the failed "t-junction" connections through non-destructive evaluation testing . Through structural dynamic modeling of the piping system, the root cause of the "t-junction" connection failures was determined. The structural dynamic assessment identified several possible corrective design improvements to the horn room piping system. The effectiveness of the chosen design repairs were subsequently evaluated in September 2011 during acoustic verification testing to 161 dB OASPL.

  12. A comparison of the acoustic and aerodynamic measurements of a model rotor tested in two anechoic wind tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boxwell, D. A.; Schmitz, F. H.; Splettstoesser, W. R.; Schultz, K. J.; Lewy, S.; Caplot, M.

    1986-01-01

    Two aeroacoustic facilities--the CEPRA 19 in France and the DNW in the Netherlands--are compared. The two facilities have unique acoustic characteristics that make them appropriate for acoustic testing of model-scale helicopter rotors. An identical pressure-instrumented model-scale rotor was tested in each facility and acoustic test results are compared with full-scale-rotor test results. Blade surface pressures measured in both tunnels were used to correlated nominal rotor operating conditions in each tunnel, and also used to assess the steadiness of the rotor in each tunnel's flow. In-the-flow rotor acoustic signatures at moderate forward speeds (35-50 m/sec) are presented for each facility and discussed in relation to the differences in tunnel geometries and aeroacoustic characteristics. Both reports are presented in appendices to this paper. ;.);

  13. Evaluation of the NASA Ames no. 1 7 by 10 foot wind tunnel as an acoustic test facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilby, J. F.; Scharton, T. D.

    1975-01-01

    Measurements were made in the no. 1 7'x10' wind tunnel at NASA Ames Research Center, with the objectives of defining the acoustic characteristics and recommending minimum cost treatments so that the tunnel can be converted into an acoustic research facility. The results indicate that the noise levels in the test section are due to (a) noise generation in the test section, associated with the presence of solid bodies such as the pitot tube, and (b) propagation of acoustic energy from the fan. A criterion for noise levels in the test section is recommended, based on low-noise microphone support systems. Noise control methods required to meet the criterion include removal of hardware items for the test section and diffuser, improved design of microphone supports, and installation of acoustic treatment in the settling chamber and diffuser.

  14. Vibro-Acoustic Response of Buildings Due to Sonic Boom Exposure: July 2007 Field Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klos, Jacob

    2008-01-01

    During the month of July 2007, a series of structural response measurements were made on a house on Edwards Air Force Base (EAFB) property that was exposed to sonic booms of various amplitudes. The purpose of this report is to document the measurements that were made, the structure on which they were made, the conditions under which they were made, the sensors and other hardware that were used, and the data that were collected. To that end, Chapter 2 documents the house, its location, the physical layout of the house, the surrounding area, and summarizes the transducers placed in and around the house. Chapter 3 details the sensors and other hardware that were placed in the house during the experiment. In addition, day-to-day variations of hardware configurations and transducer calibrations are documented in Chapter 3. Chapter 4 documents the boom generation process, flight conditions, and ambient weather conditions during the test days. Chapter 5 includes information about sub-experiments that were performed to characterize the vibro-acoustic response of the structure, the acoustic environment inside the house, and the acoustic environment outside the house. Chapter 6 documents the data format and presents examples of reduced data that were collected during the test days.

  15. Aerodynamic and acoustic tests of duct-burning turbofan exhaust nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozlowski, H.; Packman, A. B.

    1976-01-01

    The static aerodynamic and acoustic characteristics of duct-burning turbofan (DBTF) exhaust nozzles are established. Scale models, having a total area equivalent to a 0.127 m diameter convergent nozzle, simulating unsuppressed coannular nozzles and mechanically suppressed nozzles with and without ejectors (hardwall and acoustically treated) were tested in a quiescent environment. The ratio of fan to primary area was varied from 0.75 to 1.2. Far field acoustic data, perceived noise levels, and thrust measurements were obtained for 417 test conditions. Pressure ratios were varied from 1.3 to 4.1 in the fan stream and from 1.53 to 2.5 in the primary stream. Total temperature varied from 395 to 1090 K in both streams. Jet noise reductions relative to synthesized prediction from 8 PNdB (with the unsuppressed coannular nozzle) to 15 PNdB (with a mechanically suppressed configuration) were observed at conditions typical of engines being considered under the Advanced Supersonic Technology program. The inherent suppression characteristic of the unsuppressed coannular nozzle is related to the rapid mixing in the jet wake caused by the velocity profiles associated with the DBTF. Since this can be achieved without a mechanical suppressor, significant reductions in aircraft weight or noise footprint can be realized.

  16. Flight test of a pure-tone acoustic source. [aircraft noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, A. W.; Preisser, J. S.

    1981-01-01

    Static and flight testing of a pure-tone acoustic source were conducted in order to: (1) determine if a 4-KHz tone radiated by a source in flight and mixed with broadband aircraft flyover noise could be measured on the ground with a high degree of statistical confidence; (2) determine how well a comparison could be made of flight-to-static tone radiation pattern and a static radiation pattern; and (3) determine if there were any installation effects on the radiation pattern due to the flight vehicle. Narrow-band acoustic data were measured and averaged over eight microphones to obtain a high statistical confidence. The flight data were adjusted to an equivalent static condition by applying corrections for retarded time, spherical spreading, atmospheric absorption, ground impedance, instrumentation constraints, convective amplification, and the Doppler shift. The flight-to-static results are in excellent agreement with the measured static data. No installation effects were observed on the radiation pattern.

  17. Force Limiting Vibration Tests Evaluated from both Ground Acoustic Tests and FEM Simulations of a Flight Like Vehicle System Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Andrew; LaVerde, Bruce; Waldon, James; Hunt, Ron

    2014-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center has conducted a series of ground acoustic tests with the dual goals of informing analytical judgment, and validating analytical methods when estimating vibroacoustic responses of launch vehicle subsystems. The process of repeatedly correlating finite element-simulated responses with test-measured responses has assisted in the development of best practices for modeling and post-processing. In recent work, force transducers were integrated to measure interface forces at the base of avionics box equipment. Other force data was indirectly measured using strain gauges. The combination of these direct and indirect force measurements has been used to support and illustrate the advantages of implementing the Force Limiting approach for equipment qualification tests. The comparison of force response from integrated system level tests to measurements at the same locations during component level vibration tests provides an excellent illustration. A second comparison of the measured response cases from the system level acoustic tests to finite element simulations has also produced some principles for assessing the suitability of Finite Element Models (FEMs) for making vibroacoustics estimates. The results indicate that when FEM models are employed to guide force limiting choices, they should include sufficient detail to represent the apparent mass of the system in the frequency range of interest.

  18. Recognition test for an open set of talkers represented by their acoustic parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Federico, A.; Ibba, G.; Paoloni, A.; Ragona, R.

    1981-03-01

    A method based on a precise statistical formulation is presented which allows the use of a limited set of acoustic parameters for the recognition of the speaker in an open test. A number of speech realizations are collected for a group of different speakers. A second collection is made of utterances to be compared with the known speakers. In the general case a new utterance may not belong to any of the talkers referred to the test. Error of false identification and rejection is estimated as a measure of procedure effectiveness. Some considerations are made about the feasibility of the proposed method in the field practice of speaker recognition.

  19. Acoustic emission on flexural fracture test of SiC/Al composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sofue, Yasushi; Ogawa, Akinori

    1990-11-01

    Fracture behavior of SiC/Al composites was investigated using three point flexural tests with Acoustic Emission (AE) measurement. Flexural tests were conducted for four different types of ply specimens (0 deg unidirectional, 0 deg unidirectional, 0 deg/90 deg ply, and +/- 45 deg ply) of each of the composite materials and the specimen of 6061 aluminum alloy. The AE amplitude was above 8 dB for the fiber breakage of the 0 deg unidirectional ply and 0 deg/90 deg ply specimen, while the 0 deg unidirectional ply and the +/- 45 deg ply specimen produced an AE amplitude below 72 dB for the interlaminar and interface fracture mode.

  20. Measurement of impulse peak insertion loss from two acoustic test fixtures and four hearing protector conditions with an acoustic shock tube.

    PubMed

    Murphy, William J; Fackler, Cameron J; Berger, Elliott H; Shaw, Peter B; Stergar, Mike

    2015-01-01

    Impulse peak insertion loss (IPIL) was studied with two acoustic test fixtures and four hearing protector conditions at the E-A-RCAL Laboratory. IPIL is the difference between the maximum estimated pressure for the open-ear condition and the maximum pressure measured when a hearing protector is placed on an acoustic test fixture (ATF). Two models of an ATF manufactured by the French-German Research Institute of Saint-Louis (ISL) were evaluated with high-level acoustic impulses created by an acoustic shock tube at levels of 134 decibels (dB), 150 dB, and 168 dB. The fixtures were identical except that the E-A-RCAL ISL fixture had ear canals that were 3 mm longer than the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) ISL fixture. Four hearing protection conditions were tested: Combat Arms earplug with the valve open, ETYPlugs ® earplug, TacticalPro headset, and a dual-protector ETYPlugs earplug with TacticalPro earmuff. The IPILs measured for the E-A-RCAL fixture were 1.4 dB greater than the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) ISL ATF. For the E-A-RCAL ISL ATF, the left ear IPIL was 2.0 dB greater than the right ear IPIL. For the NIOSH ATF, the right ear IPIL was 0.3 dB greater than the left ear IPIL.

  1. Measurement of impulse peak insertion loss from two acoustic test fixtures and four hearing protector conditions with an acoustic shock tube

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, William J.; Fackler, Cameron J.; Berger, Elliott H.; Shaw, Peter B.; Stergar, Mike

    2015-01-01

    Impulse peak insertion loss (IPIL) was studied with two acoustic test fixtures and four hearing protector conditions at the E-A-RCAL Laboratory. IPIL is the difference between the maximum estimated pressure for the open-ear condition and the maximum pressure measured when a hearing protector is placed on an acoustic test fixture (ATF). Two models of an ATF manufactured by the French-German Research Institute of Saint-Louis (ISL) were evaluated with high-level acoustic impulses created by an acoustic shock tube at levels of 134 decibels (dB), 150 dB, and 168 dB. The fixtures were identical except that the E-A-RCAL ISL fixture had ear canals that were 3 mm longer than the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) ISL fixture. Four hearing protection conditions were tested: Combat Arms earplug with the valve open, ETYPlugs® earplug, TacticalPro headset, and a dual-protector ETYPlugs earplug with TacticalPro earmuff. The IPILs measured for the E-A-RCAL fixture were 1.4 dB greater than the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) ISL ATF. For the E-A-RCAL ISL ATF, the left ear IPIL was 2.0 dB greater than the right ear IPIL. For the NIOSH ATF, the right ear IPIL was 0.3 dB greater than the left ear IPIL. PMID:26356380

  2. Comments on the origin of acoustic emission in fatigue testing of aluminum alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heiple, C. R.; Carpenter, S. H.; Armentrout, D. L.

    The size of acoustic emission (AE) signals expected from inclusion fracture during fatigue testing of 7075 aluminum has been estimated on the basis of previous measurements of AE produced by the fracture of boron particles incorporated into 2219 aluminum. The AF signal size expected from deformation in the plastic zone ahead of the fatigue crack was estimated from the results of tensile tests on 7075 aluminum. The signals predicted from both processes are near or below the noise level in the fatigue experiments and are therefore far too small to account for the signals actually observed. Nearly simultaneous fracture of multiple inclusions could produce signals as large as those observed in fatigue tests of 7075 aluminum, however, fatigue tests of 7050 aluminum produced signals as large or larger than in 7075. Since 7050 has substantially fewer inclusions than 7075, the simultaneous failure of multiple inclusions is unlikely to be a major AE source in fatigue testing of either aluminum alloy. Thus, the most probable source of acoustic emission during fatigue testing of 7075 and 7050 aluminum is the crack advance itself. The measured crack advance per cycle is large enough to release sufficient elastic energy to account for the AE signals observed.

  3. Preliminary Analysis of Acoustic Measurements from the NASA-Gulfstream Airframe Noise Flight Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khorrami, Mehdi R.; Lockhard, David D.; Humphreys, Willliam M.; Choudhari, Meelan M.; Van De Ven, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    The NASA-Gulfstream joint Airframe Noise Flight Test program was conducted at the NASA Wallops Flight Facility during October, 2006. The primary objective of the AFN flight test was to acquire baseline airframe noise data on a regional jet class of transport in order to determine noise source strengths and distributions for model validation. To accomplish this task, two measuring systems were used: a ground-based microphone array and individual microphones. Acoustic data for a Gulfstream G550 aircraft were acquired over the course of ten days. Over twenty-four test conditions were flown. The test matrix was designed to provide an acoustic characterization of both the full aircraft and individual airframe components and included cruise to landing configurations. Noise sources were isolated by selectively deploying individual components (flaps, main landing gear, nose gear, spoilers, etc.) and altering the airspeed, glide path, and engine settings. The AFN flight test program confirmed that the airframe is a major contributor to the noise from regional jets during landing operations. Sound pressure levels from the individual microphones on the ground revealed the flap system to be the dominant airframe noise source for the G550 aircraft. The corresponding array beamform maps showed that most of the radiated sound from the flaps originates from the side edges. Using velocity to the sixth power and Strouhal scaling of the sound pressure spectra obtained at different speeds failed to collapse the data into a single spectrum. The best data collapse was obtained when the frequencies were left unscaled.

  4. Acoustic emission monitoring of a wind turbine blade during a fatigue test

    SciTech Connect

    Beattie, A.G.

    1997-01-01

    A fatigue test of a wind turbine blade was conducted at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in the fall of 1994. Acoustic emission monitoring of the test was performed, starting with the second loading level. The acoustic emission data indicated that this load exceeded the strength of the blade. From the first cycle at the new load, an oil can type of deformation occurred in two areas of the upper skin of the blade. One of these was near the blade root and the other was about the middle of the tested portion of the blade. The emission monitoring indicated that no damage was taking place in the area near the root, but in the deforming area near the middle of the blade, damage occurred from the first cycles at the higher load. The test was stopped after approximately one day and the blade was declared destroyed, although no gross damage had occurred. Several weeks later the test was resumed, to be continued until gross damage occurred. The upper skin tore approximately one half hour after the cycling was restarted.

  5. Acoustic Performance Of New Designs Of Traffic Noise Barriers: Full Scale Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watts, G. R.; Crombie, D. H.; Hothersall, D. C.

    1994-10-01

    Full scale tests of acoustical performance are reported on a range of promising traffic noise barrier shapes which had previously been identified by mathematical and scale modelling work. The designs chosen for testing were T-shaped, multiple edge barriers and double barriers. A test facility was established at the Transport Research Laboratory (TRL) in order to examine effectiveness under full scale conditions. This consisted of a 20 m length of noise barrier with interchangeable barrier panels, a large flat asphalt surface and a transportable speaker system capable of sufficient output to represent typical traffic noise. Screening performance was measured up to 80 m behind the barriers over a flat grassland area and at heights above the ground of 1·5 and 4·5 m. It was concluded that the average increase in acoustic screening of 2 m high T-shaped, multiple edge and double barriers compared with a simple plane reflecting barrier of identical overall height ranged from 1·4 to 3·6dB(A) depending on detailed design. It was suggested that a full scale test of a promising design should be carried out at a suitable highway location in order to validate fully these test results.

  6. Source localization results for airborne acoustic platforms in the 2010 Yuma Proving Ground test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostashev, Vladimir E.; Collier, Sandra L.; Reiff, Christian G.; Cheinet, Sylvain; Ligon, David A.; Wilson, D. Keith; Noble, John M.; Alberts, William C.

    2013-05-01

    Acoustic sensors are being employed on airborne platforms, such as Persistent Threat Detection System (PTDS) and Persistent Ground Surveillance System (PGSS), for source localization. Under certain atmospheric conditions, airborne sensors offer a distinct advantage over ground sensors. Among other factors, the performance of airborne sensors is affected by refraction of sound signals due to vertical gradients in temperature and wind velocity. A comprehensive experiment in source localization with an aerostat-mounted acoustic system was conducted in summer of 2010 at Yuma Proving Ground (YPG). Acoustic sources on the ground consisted of one-pound TNT denotations and small arms firings. The height of the aerostat was approximately 1 km above the ground. In this paper, horizontal, azimuthal, and elevation errors in source localization and their statistics are studied in detail. Initially, straight-line propagation is assumed; then refraction corrections are introduced to improve source localization and decrease the errors. The corrections are based on a recently developed theory [Ostashev, et. al, JASA 2008] which accounts for sound refraction due to vertical profiles of temperature and wind velocity. During the 2010 YPG field test, the vertical profiles were measured only up to a height of approximately 100 m. Therefore, the European Center for Medium-range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) is used to generate the profiles for July of 2010.

  7. ACOUSTICALLY ACTIVE INJECTION CATHETER GUIDED BY ULTRASOUND: NAVIGATION TESTS IN ACUTELY ISCHEMIC PORCINE HEARTS

    PubMed Central

    Belohlavek, Marek; Katayama, Minako; Zarbatany, David; Fortuin, F. David; Fatemi, Mostafa; Nenadic, Ivan Z.; McMahon, Eileen M.

    2014-01-01

    Catheters are increasingly used therapeutically and investigatively. With complex usage comes a need for more accurate intracardiac localization than traditional guidance can provide. An injection catheter navigated by ultrasound was designed and then tested in an open-chest model of acute ischemia in eight pigs. The catheter is made “acoustically active” by a piezoelectric crystal near its tip, electronically controlled, vibrating in the acoustic frequency range, and uniquely identifiable using pulsed-wave (PW) Doppler. Another “target” crystal was sutured to the epicardium within the ischemic region. Sonomicrometry was used to measure distances between the two crystals and then compared to measurements from 2D echocardiographic images. Complete data were obtained from 7 pigs, and the correlation between sonomicrometry and ultrasound measurements was excellent (p < 0.0001, ρ = 0.9820), as was the intraclass correlation coefficient (0.96) between 2 observers. These initial experimental results suggest high accuracy of ultrasound navigation of the acoustically active catheter prototype located inside the beating left ventricle. PMID:24785441

  8. Comparison of Modal Analysis Methods Applied to a Vibro-Acoustic Test Article

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pritchard, Jocelyn; Pappa, Richard; Buehrle, Ralph; Grosveld, Ferdinand

    2001-01-01

    Modal testing of a vibro-acoustic test article referred to as the Aluminum Testbed Cylinder (ATC) has provided frequency response data for the development of validated numerical models of complex structures for interior noise prediction and control. The ATC is an all aluminum, ring and stringer stiffened cylinder, 12 feet in length and 4 feet in diameter. The cylinder was designed to represent typical aircraft construction. Modal tests were conducted for several different configurations of the cylinder assembly under ambient and pressurized conditions. The purpose of this paper is to present results from dynamic testing of different ATC configurations using two modal analysis software methods: Eigensystem Realization Algorithm (ERA) and MTS IDEAS Polyreference method. The paper compares results from the two analysis methods as well as the results from various test configurations. The effects of pressurization on the modal characteristics are discussed.

  9. Mechanical design and vibro-acoustic testing of ultrathin carbon foils for a spacecraft instrument

    SciTech Connect

    Bernardin, John D; Baca, Allen G

    2009-01-01

    IBEX-Hi is an electrostatic analyzer spacecraft instrument designed to measure the energy and flux distribution of energetic neutral atoms (ENAs) emanating from the interaction zone between the Earth's solar system and the Milky Way galaxy. A key element to this electro-optic instrument is an array of fourteen carbon foils that are used to ionize the ENAs. The foils are comprised of an ultrathin (50-100 {angstrom} thick) layer of carbon suspended across the surface of an electroformed Nickel wire screen, which in turn is held taught by a metal frame holder. The electro formed orthogonal screen has square wire elements, 12.7 {micro}m thick, with a pitch of 131.1 wires/cm. Each foil holder has an open aperture approximately 5 cm by 2.5 cm. Designing and implementing foil holders with such a large surface area has not been attempted for spaceflight in the past and has proven to be extremely challenging. The delicate carbon foils are subject to fatigue failure from the large acoustic and vibration loads that they will be exposed to during launch of the spacecraft. This paper describes the evolution of the foil holder design from previous space instrument applications to a flight-like IBEX-Hi prototype. Vibro-acoustic qualification tests of the IBEX-Hi prototype instrument and the resulting failure of several foils are summarized. This is followed by a discussion of iterative foil holder design modifications and laser vibrometer modal testing to support future fatigue failure analyses, along with additional acoustic testing of the IBEX-Hi prototype instrument. The results of these design and testing activities are merged and the resulting flight-like foil holder assembly is proposed.

  10. Acoustic-hydrophysical testing of a shallow site in coastal waters of the Korean Strait

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgunov, Yu. N.; Golov, A. A.; Strobykin, D. S.; Kim, Kiseon; Kim, Chansan; Ro, Shinrae

    2012-05-01

    The paper describes the results of testing experiments for solving problems of thermometry and positioning of an autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) in the Korean Strait in a shallow sea with less than 10 m of water. The studies were conducted on acoustic tracks up to 615 m long, sensed with complex phase-shift keyed signals with a centeral frequency of 2500 Hz. Under field experiment conditions, it was shown that the resolution of the structure of pulse responses makes it possible to sense temperature changes less than one degree and to secure positioning of the AUV with an accuracy better than 1 m when operating in the near-bottom layer.

  11. Digital servo control of random sound test excitation. [in reverberant acoustic chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakich, R. B. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A digital servocontrol system for random noise excitation of a test object in a reverberant acoustic chamber employs a plurality of sensors spaced in the sound field to produce signals in separate channels which are decorrelated and averaged. The average signal is divided into a plurality of adjacent frequency bands cyclically sampled by a time division multiplex system, converted into digital form, and compared to a predetermined spectrum value stored in digital form. The results of the comparisons are used to control a time-shared up-down counter to develop gain control signals for the respective frequency bands in the spectrum of random sound energy picked up by the microphones.

  12. Characterisation and testing of the KM3NeT acoustic positioning system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viola, S.; Simeone, F.; Saldaña, M.

    2016-04-01

    In underwater neutrino telescopes, the search of point-like sources through the Cherenkov detection technique requires a precise knowledge of the positions of thousands of optical sensors, spread in a volume of a few cubic kilometres. In KM3NeT the optical sensors are hosted in 700 m high semi-rigid structures, called detection units, which move under the effects of underwater currents. These movements are continuously monitored through an underwater positioning system based on acoustic emitters and receivers. In this work, the tests performed on the key elements of the positioning system are presented.

  13. Acoustic emission monitoring of hot functional testing: Watts Bar Unit 1 Nuclear Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Hutton, P.H.; Dawson, J.F.; Friesel, M.A.; Harris, J.C.; Pappas, R.A.

    1984-06-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) monitoring of selected pressure boundary areas at TVA's Watts Bar, Unit 1 Nuclear Power Plant during hot functional preservice testing is described in this report. The report deals with background, methodology, and results. The work discussed here is a major milestone in a program supported by NRC to develop and demonstrate application of AE monitoring for continuous surveillance of reactor pressure boundaries to detect and evaluate growing flaws. The subject work demonstrated that anticipated problem areas can be overcome. Work is continuing toward AE monitoring during reactor operation.

  14. Acoustic flight tests of rotorcraft noise-abatement approaches using local differential GPS guidance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Robert T. N.; Hindson, William S.; Mueller, Arnold W.

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents the test design, instrumentation set-up, data acquisition, and the results of an acoustic flight experiment to study how noise due to blade-vortex interaction (BVI) may be alleviated. The flight experiment was conducted using the NASA/Army Rotorcraft Aircrew Systems Concepts Airborne Laboratory (RASCAL) research helicopter. A Local Differential Global Positioning System (LDGPS) was used for precision navigation and cockpit display guidance. A laser-based rotor state measurement system on board the aircraft was used to measure the main rotor tip-path-plane angle-of-attack. Tests were performed at Crows Landing Airfield in northern California with an array of microphones similar to that used in the standard ICAO/FAA noise certification test. The methodology used in the design of a RASCAL-specific, multi-segment, decelerating approach profile for BVI noise abatement is described, and the flight data pertaining to the flight technical errors and the acoustic data for assessing the noise reduction effectiveness are reported.

  15. Estimation of respiratory rate and heart rate during treadmill tests using acoustic sensor.

    PubMed

    Popov, B; Sierra, G; Telfort, V; Agarwal, R; Lanzo, V

    2005-01-01

    The objective was to test the robustness of an acoustic method to estimate respiratory rates (RR) during treadmill test. The accuracy was assessed by the comparison with simultaneous estimates from a capnograph, using as a common reference a pneumotachometer. Eight subjects without any pulmonary disease were enrolled. Tracheal sounds were acquired using a contact piezoelectric sensor placed on the subject's throat and analyzed using a combined investigation of the sound envelope and frequency content. The capnograph and pneumotachometer were coupled to a face mask worn by the subjects. There was a strong linear correlation between all three methods (r2ranged from 0.8 to 0.87), and the SEE ranged from 1.97 to 2.36. As a conclusion, the accuracy of the respiratory rate estimated from tracheal sounds on adult subjects during treadmill stress test was comparable to the accuracy of a commercial capnograph. The heart rate (HR) estimates can also be derived from carotid pulse using the same single sensor placed on the subject's throat. Compared to the pulse oximeter the results show an agreement of acoustic method with r2=0.76 and SEE = 3.51.

  16. Acoustic Modifications of the Ames 40x80 Foot Wind Tunnel and Test Techniques for High-Speed Research Model Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soderman, Paul T.; Olson, Larry (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    The NFAC 40- by 80- Foot Wind Tunnel at Ames is being refurbished with a new, deep acoustic lining in the test section which will make the facility nearly anechoic over a large frequency range. The modification history, key elements, and schedule will be discussed. Design features and expected performance gains will be described. Background noise reductions will be summarized. Improvements in aeroacoustic research techniques have been developed and used recently at NFAC on several wind tunnel tests of High Speed Research models. Research on quiet inflow microphones and struts will be described. The Acoustic Survey Apparatus in the 40x80 will be illustrated. A special intensity probe was tested for source localization. Multi-channel, high speed digital data acquisition is now used for acoustics. And most important, phased microphone arrays have been developed and tested which have proven to be very powerful for source identification and increased signal-to-noise ratio. Use of these tools for the HEAT model will be illustrated. In addition, an acoustically absorbent symmetry plane was built to satisfy the HEAT semispan aerodynamic and acoustic requirements. Acoustic performance of that symmetry plane will be shown.

  17. Acoustic Modifications of the Ames 40x80 Foot Wind Tunnel and Test Techniques for High-Speed Research Model Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soderman, Paul T.; Olson, Larry (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    The NFAC 40- by 80- Foot Wind Tunnel at Ames is being refurbished with a new, deep acoustic lining in the test section which will make the facility nearly anechoic over a large frequency range. The modification history, key elements, and schedule will be discussed. Design features and expected performance gains will be described. Background noise reductions will be summarized. Improvements in aeroacoustic research techniques have been developed and used recently at NFAC on several wind tunnel tests of High Speed Research models. Research on quiet inflow microphones and struts will be described. The Acoustic Survey Apparatus in the 40x80 will be illustrated. A special intensity probe was tested for source localization. Multi-channel, high speed digital data acquisition is now used for acoustics. And most important, phased microphone arrays have been developed and tested which have proven to be very powerful for source identification and increased signal-to-noise ratio. Use of these tools for the HEAT model will be illustrated. In addition, an acoustically absorbent symmetry plane was built to satisfy the HEAT semispan aerodynamic and acoustic requirements. Acoustic performance of that symmetry plane will be shown.

  18. Design, fabrication and acoustic tests of a 36 inch (0.914 meter) statorless turbotip fan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, E. G.; Stempert, D. L.; Uhl, W. R.

    1975-01-01

    The LF336/E is a 36 inch (0.914 meter) diameter fan designed to operate in a rotor-alone configuration. Design features required for modification of the existing LF336/A rotor-stator fan into the LF336/E statorless fan configuration are discussed. Tests of the statorless fan identified an aerodynamic performance deficiency due to inaccurate accounting of the fan exit swirl during the aerodynamic design. This performance deficiency, related to fan exit static pressure levels, produced about a 20 percent thrust loss. A study was then conducted for further evaluation of the fan exit flow fields typical of statorless fan systems. This study showed that through proper selection of fan design variables such as pressure ratio, radius ratio, and swirl distributions, performance of a statorless fan configuration could be improved with levels of thrust approaching the conventional rotor-stator fan system. Acoustic measurements were taken for the statorless fan system at both GE and NASA, and when compared to other lift fan systems, showed noise levels comparable to the quietest lift fan configuration which included rotor-stator spacing and acoustic treatment. The statorless fan system was also used to determine effects of rotor leading edge serrations on noise generations. A cascade test program identified the serration geometry based on minimum pressure losses, wake turbulence levels and noise generations.

  19. Acoustic interactions between an altitude test facility and jet engine plumes: Theory and experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahuja, K. K.; Jones, R. R., III; Tam, C. K.; Massey, K. C.; Fleming, A. J.

    1992-01-01

    The overall objective of the described effort was to develop an understanding of the physical mechanisms involved in the flow/acoustic interactions experienced in full-scale altitude engine test facilities. This is done by conducting subscale experiments and through development of a theoretical model. Model cold jet experiments with an axisymmetric convergent nozzle are performed in a test setup that stimulates a supersonic jet exhausting into a cylindrical diffuser. The measured data consist of detailed flow visualization data and acoustic spectra for a free and a ducted plume. It is shown that duct resonance is most likely responsible by theoretical calculations. Theoretical calculations also indicate that the higher discrete tones observed in the measurements are related to the screech phenomena. Limited experiments on the sensitivity of a free 2-D, C-D nozzle to externally imposed sound are also presented. It is shown that a 2-D, C-D nozzle with a cutback is less excitable than a 2-D C-D nozzle with no cutback. At a pressure ratio of 1.5 unsteady separation from the diverging walls of the nozzle is noticed. This separation switches from one wall to the opposite wall thus providing an unsteady deflection of the plume. It is shown that this phenomenon is related to the venting provided by the cutback section.

  20. Acoustic specifications for the design of jet engine test facilities on an airbase

    SciTech Connect

    Strumpf, F.M.

    1982-01-01

    The use of engine run up test arrangements was common in Israeli air-bases since the forties, when engines for the Mustang, Mosquito, Harward and other propellor powered planes were used. The era of jet engine propulsion boosted the noise levels, and the use of fighters with afterburners in the new engines of the 80's brought it up to unbearable levels. Thus, the growth of the Israeli Air Force demanded the use of efficient noise suppression devices. These were divided into engine run-up noise suppressors, and aircraft noise suppessors (Hush Houses). For both of the bove ground arrangements, acoustic specifications had to be given. They were, as well as design goals for the manufacturers, also needed to restrict noise levels on the air-base as well as its surroundings. The acoustic specifications discussed are based on measured data, and permitted noise levels in the homes on the base being as far as 2500 meters from the engine exhaust silencer. For the special air-base discussed, various criteria were tested, including US Military Specifications, none of which were acceptable, and a special specification was therefore prepared.

  1. Test-Anchored Vibration Response Predictions for an Acoustically Energized Curved Orthogrid Panel with Mounted Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frady, Gregory P.; Duvall, Lowery D.; Fulcher, Clay W. G.; Laverde, Bruce T.; Hunt, Ronald A.

    2011-01-01

    A rich body of vibroacoustic test data was recently generated at Marshall Space Flight Center for a curved orthogrid panel typical of launch vehicle skin structures. Several test article configurations were produced by adding component equipment of differing weights to the flight-like vehicle panel. The test data were used to anchor computational predictions of a variety of spatially distributed responses including acceleration, strain and component interface force. Transfer functions relating the responses to the input pressure field were generated from finite element based modal solutions and test-derived damping estimates. A diffuse acoustic field model was employed to describe the assumed correlation of phased input sound pressures across the energized panel. This application demonstrates the ability to quickly and accurately predict a variety of responses to acoustically energized skin panels with mounted components. Favorable comparisons between the measured and predicted responses were established. The validated models were used to examine vibration response sensitivities to relevant modeling parameters such as pressure patch density, mesh density, weight of the mounted component and model form. Convergence metrics include spectral densities and cumulative root-mean squared (RMS) functions for acceleration, velocity, displacement, strain and interface force. Minimum frequencies for response convergence were established as well as recommendations for modeling techniques, particularly in the early stages of a component design when accurate structural vibration requirements are needed relatively quickly. The results were compared with long-established guidelines for modeling accuracy of component-loaded panels. A theoretical basis for the Response/Pressure Transfer Function (RPTF) approach provides insight into trends observed in the response predictions and confirmed in the test data. The software modules developed for the RPTF method can be easily adapted for

  2. Laboratory Testing of Acoustic Tomography in Rock Samples Using Regularization of Incomplete Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, C.; Nowack, R. L.; Pyrak-Nolte, L. J.

    2002-12-01

    Seismic tomography is an important exploration method because it has been shown that it can determine subsurface structures from surface measurements. In the field, it is often difficult to design a dense tomographic coverage. However, for rock samples in the laboratory, it is possible to design tomographic experiments that are repeatable and have uniform ray coverage. In this study, we performed a series of tomographic experiments in the laboratory on synthetic sediments with known structures. In these tomographic experiments, glass beads saturated with de-ionized water were used as the water-saturated unconsolidated synthetic background sediments. The synthetic sediments were packed in a plastic cylindrical container with a diameter of 220 mm. Tomographic experiments were set up to measure transmitted acoustic waves through the sediment samples from multiple directions. The acoustic tomographic imaging system we used is composed of an oscilloscope, two computer-controlled rotary stages, and two water-coupled point wave transducers with a central frequency of 1 MHz. One transducer is used as a source to send out acoustic signals, the other is used to receive the acoustic signals after the signals have passed through the sample. At each source-receiver location, a waveform is recorded. The recorded data can then be used to develop useful protocols for the field seismic tomographic design, acquisition and interpretation. We recorded datasets with varying locations for the sources and receivers, and used this to tomographically reconstruct the laboratory geometries. We simulated variable non-uniform ray geometries using partial data reconstructions. The partial data can then be used to test different techniques for dealing with ill-posed problems. Because the incomplete datasets alone cannot completely resolve the model, a priori information and an appropriate regularization are necessary to obtain stable solutions. With the datasets recorded in the laboratory we can

  3. Testing the effectiveness of an acoustic deterrent for gray whales along the Oregon coast

    SciTech Connect

    Lagerquist, Barbara; Winsor, Martha; Mate, Bruce

    2012-12-31

    This study was conducted to determine whether a low-powered sound source could be effective at deterring gray whales from areas that may prove harmful to them. With increased interest in the development of marine renewal energy along the Oregon coast the concern that such development may pose a collision or entanglement risk for gray whales. A successful acoustic deterrent could act as a mitigation tool to prevent harm to whales from such risks. In this study, an acoustic device was moored on the seafloor in the pathway of migrating gray whales off Yaquina Head on the central Oregon coast. Shore-based observers tracked whales with a theodolite (surveyor’s tool) to accurately locate whales as they passed the headland. Individual locations of different whales/whale groups as well as tracklines of the same whale/whale groups were obtained and compared between times with the acoustic device was transmitting and when it was off. Observations were conducted on 51 d between January 1 and April 15, 2012. A total of 143 individual whale locations were collected for a total of 243 whales, as well as 57 tracklines for a total of 142 whales. Inclement weather and equipment problems resulted in very small sample sizes, especially during experimental periods, when the device was transmitting. Because of this, the results of this study were inconclusive. We feel that another season of field testing is warranted to successfully test the effectiveness of the deterrent, but recommend increasing the zone of influence to 3 km to ensure the collection of adequate sample sizes. Steps have been taken to acquire the necessary federal research permit modification to authorize the increased zone of influence and to modify the acoustic device for the increased power. With these changes we are confident we will be able to determine whether the deterrent is effective at deflecting gray whales. A successful deterrent device may serve as a valuable mitigation tool to protect gray whales, and

  4. Computational Fluid Dynamics Study on the Effects of RATO Timing on the Scale Model Acoustic Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nielsen, Tanner; Williams, B.; West, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    The Scale Model Acoustic Test (SMAT) is a 5% scale test of the Space Launch System (SLS), which is currently being designed at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The purpose of this test is to characterize and understand a variety of acoustic phenomena that occur during the early portions of lift off, one being the overpressure environment that develops shortly after booster ignition. The SLS lift off configuration consists of four RS-25 liquid thrusters on the core stage, with two solid boosters connected to each side. Past experience with scale model testing at MSFC (in ER42), has shown that there is a delay in the ignition of the Rocket Assisted Take Off (RATO) motor, which is used as the 5% scale analog of the solid boosters, after the signal to ignite is given. This delay can range from 0 to 16.5ms. While this small of a delay maybe insignificant in the case of the full scale SLS, it can significantly alter the data obtained during the SMAT due to the much smaller geometry. The speed of sound of the air and combustion gas constituents is not scaled, and therefore the SMAT pressure waves propagate at approximately the same speed as occurs during full scale. However, the SMAT geometry is much smaller allowing the pressure waves to move down the exhaust duct, through the trench, and impact the vehicle model much faster than occurs at full scale. To better understand the effect of the RATO timing simultaneity on the SMAT IOP test data, a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis was performed using the Loci/CHEM CFD software program. Five different timing offsets, based on RATO ignition delay statistics, were simulated. A variety of results and comparisons will be given, assessing the overall effect of RATO timing simultaneity on the SMAT overpressure environment.

  5. Test-Anchored Vibration Response Predictions for an Acoustically Energized Curved Orthogrid Panel with Mounted Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frady, Gregory P.; Duvall, Lowery D.; Fulcher, Clay W. G.; Laverde, Bruce T.; Hunt, Ronald A.

    2011-01-01

    rich body of vibroacoustic test data was recently generated at Marshall Space Flight Center for component-loaded curved orthogrid panels typical of launch vehicle skin structures. The test data were used to anchor computational predictions of a variety of spatially distributed responses including acceleration, strain and component interface force. Transfer functions relating the responses to the input pressure field were generated from finite element based modal solutions and test-derived damping estimates. A diffuse acoustic field model was applied to correlate the measured input sound pressures across the energized panel. This application quantifies the ability to quickly and accurately predict a variety of responses to acoustically energized skin panels with mounted components. Favorable comparisons between the measured and predicted responses were established. The validated models were used to examine vibration response sensitivities to relevant modeling parameters such as pressure patch density, mesh density, weight of the mounted component and model form. Convergence metrics include spectral densities and cumulative root-mean squared (RMS) functions for acceleration, velocity, displacement, strain and interface force. Minimum frequencies for response convergence were established as well as recommendations for modeling techniques, particularly in the early stages of a component design when accurate structural vibration requirements are needed relatively quickly. The results were compared with long-established guidelines for modeling accuracy of component-loaded panels. A theoretical basis for the Response/Pressure Transfer Function (RPTF) approach provides insight into trends observed in the response predictions and confirmed in the test data. The software developed for the RPTF method allows easy replacement of the diffuse acoustic field with other pressure fields such as a turbulent boundary layer (TBL) model suitable for vehicle ascent. Structural responses

  6. Cosmic distance-duality relation test using type Ia supernovae and the baryon acoustic oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Puxun; Li, Zhengxiang; Liu, Xiaoliang; Yu, Hongwei

    2015-07-01

    A check of the validity of the distance-duality relation (DDR) is necessary since a violation of one of the assumptions underlying this relation might be possible. In this paper, we test the DDR by combining the Union2.1 type Ia supernovae (SNIa) and five angular diameter distance data from the baryonic acoustic oscillation (BAO) measurements. We find that the DDR is consistent with the observations at the 2 σ confidence level (CL) for the case of the Hubble constant h =0.7 , and the consistency is improved to be 1 σ CL when h =0.7 is replaced by the latest constraint from the Planck satellite, i.e., h =0.678 , or h is marginalized. Our results show that the BAO measurement is a very powerful tool to test the DDR. With more and more BAO data being released in the future, we are expecting a better validity check of the DDR.

  7. Methods of testing for endurance of structural elements using simulated acoustic loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1993-10-01

    ESDU 93027 discusses methods of testing structural elements, designed to represent features of the full-size structure, using random-amplitude narrowband loading to simulate response to acoustic loading. A wide range of element geometries is included with information on probable failure locations, typical sizes, and any inherent limitations. Mounting methods are considered with examples of multiple specimen tests to allow the scatter in fatigue life to be determined in minimum elapsed time. Guidance is provided on excitation requirements, the measurement and monitoring instrumentation, specimen tuning, and the assessment of structural damping and response linearity. The means of defining a failure are considered, with particular reference to composite structures, and the use of residual strength assessment is discussed. The application of the techniques to obtain endurance data at elevated temperature is addressed. Finally, guidance is included on the interpretation of the results.

  8. Implementing and testing a panel-based method for modeling acoustic scattering from CFD input

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swift, S. Hales

    Exposure of sailors to high levels of noise in the aircraft carrier deck environment is a problem that has serious human and economic consequences. A variety of approaches to quieting exhausting jets from high-performance aircraft are undergoing development. However, testing of noise abatement solutions at full-scale may be prohibitively costly when many possible nozzle treatments are under consideration. A relatively efficient and accurate means of predicting the noise levels resulting from engine-quieting technologies at personnel locations is needed. This is complicated by the need to model both the direct and the scattered sound field in order to determine the resultant spectrum and levels. While the direct sound field may be obtained using CFD plus surface integral methods such as the Ffowcs-Williams Hawkings method, the scattered sound field is complicated by its dependence on the geometry of the scattering surface--the aircraft carrier deck, aircraft control surfaces and other nearby structures. In this work, a time-domain boundary element method, or TD-BEM, (sometimes referred to in terms of source panels) is proposed and developed that takes advantage of and offers beneficial effects for the substantial planar components of the aircraft carrier deck environment and uses pressure gradients as its input. This method is applied to and compared with analytical results for planar surfaces, corners and spherical surfaces using an analytic point source as input. The method can also accept input from CFD data on an acoustic data surface by using the G1A pressure gradient formulation to obtain pressure gradients on the surface from the flow variables contained on the acoustic data surface. The method is also applied to a planar scattering surface characteristic of an aircraft carrier flight deck with an acoustic data surface from a supersonic jet large eddy simulation, or LES, as input to the scattering model. In this way, the process for modeling the complete

  9. Characterization of the Scale Model Acoustic Test Overpressure Environment using Computational Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nielsen, Tanner; West, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    The Scale Model Acoustic Test (SMAT) is a 5% scale test of the Space Launch System (SLS), which is currently being designed at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The purpose of this test is to characterize and understand a variety of acoustic phenomena that occur during the early portions of lift off, one being the overpressure environment that develops shortly after booster ignition. The pressure waves that propagate from the mobile launcher (ML) exhaust hole are defined as the ignition overpressure (IOP), while the portion of the pressure waves that exit the duct or trench are the duct overpressure (DOP). Distinguishing the IOP and DOP in scale model test data has been difficult in past experiences and in early SMAT results, due to the effects of scaling the geometry. The speed of sound of the air and combustion gas constituents is not scaled, and therefore the SMAT pressure waves propagate at approximately the same speed as occurs in full scale. However, the SMAT geometry is twenty times smaller, allowing the pressure waves to move down the exhaust hole, through the trench and duct, and impact the vehicle model much faster than occurs at full scale. The DOP waves impact portions of the vehicle at the same time as the IOP waves, making it difficult to distinguish the different waves and fully understand the data. To better understand the SMAT data, a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis was performed with a fictitious geometry that isolates the IOP and DOP. The upper and lower portions of the domain were segregated to accomplish the isolation in such a way that the flow physics were not significantly altered. The Loci/CHEM CFD software program was used to perform this analysis.

  10. Improved tests for global warming trend extraction in ocean acoustic travel-time data. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Bottone, S.; Gray, H.L.; Woodward, W.A.

    1996-04-01

    A possible indication of the existence of global climate warming is the presence of a trend in the travel time of an acoustic signal along several ocean paths over a period of many years. This report describes new, improved tests for testing for linear trend in time series data with correlated residuals. We introduce a bootstrap based procedure to test for trend in this setting which is better adapted to controlling the significance levels. The procedure is applied to acoustic travel time data generated by the MASIG ocean model. It is shown how to generalize the improved method to multivariate, or vector, time series, which, in the ocean acoustics setting, corresponds to travel time data on many ocean paths. An appendix describes the TRENDS software, which enables the user to perform these calculations using a graphical user interface (GUI).

  11. A finite element model to predict the sound attenuation of earplugs in an acoustical test fixture.

    PubMed

    Viallet, Guilhem; Sgard, Franck; Laville, Frédéric; Boutin, Jérôme

    2014-09-01

    Acoustical test fixtures (ATFs) are currently used to measure the attenuation of the earplugs. Several authors pointed out that the presence of an artificial skin layer inside the cylindrical ear canal of the ATFs strongly influenced the attenuation measurements. In this paper, this role is investigated via a 2D axisymmetric finite element model of a silicon earplug coupled to an artificial skin. The model is solved using COMSOL Multiphysics (COMSOL(®), Sweden) and validated experimentally. The model is exploited thereafter to better understand the role of each part of the earplug/ear canal system and how the energy circulates within the domains. This is investigated by calculating power balances and by representing the mechanical and acoustical fluxes in the system. The important dissipative role of the artificial skin is underlined and its contribution as a sound transmission pathway is quantified. In addition, the influence of both the earplug and the artificial skin parameters is assessed via sensitivities analyses performed on the model.

  12. Performance Optimization of a Rotor Alone Nacelle for Acoustic Fan Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunningham, C. C.; Thompson, W. K.; Hughes, C. E.

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes the techniques, equipment, and results from the optimization of a two-axis traverse actuation system used to maintain concentricity between a sting-mounted fan and a wall-mounted nacelle in the 9 x 15 (9 Foot by 15 Foot Test Section) Low Speed Wind Tunnel (LSWT) at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC). The Rotor Alone Nacelle (RAN) system, developed at GRC by the Engineering Design and Analysis Division (EDAD) and the Acoustics Branch, used nacelle-mounted lasers and an automated control system to maintain concentricity as thermal and thrust operating loads displace the fan relative to the nacelle. This effort was critical to ensuring rig/facility safety and experimental consistency of the acoustic data from a statorless, externally supported nacelle configuration. Although the tip clearances were originally predicted to be about 0.020 in. at maximum rotor (fan) operating speed, proximity probe measurements showed that the nominal clearance was less than 0.004 in. As a result, the system was optimized through control-loop modifications, active laser cooling, data filtering and averaging, and the development of strict operational procedures. The resultant concentricity error of RAN was reduced to +/- 0.0031 in. in the Y-direction (horizontal) and +0.0035 in./-0.001 3 in. in the Z-direction (vertical), as determined by error analysis and experimental results. Based on the success of this project, the RAN system will be transitioned to other wind tunnel research programs at NASA GRC.

  13. Monitoring accelerated carbonation on standard Portland cement mortar by nonlinear resonance acoustic test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eiras, J. N.; Kundu, T.; Popovics, J. S.; Monzó, J.; Borrachero, M. V.; Payá, J.

    2015-03-01

    Carbonation is an important deleterious process for concrete structures. Carbonation begins when carbon dioxide (CO2) present in the atmosphere reacts with portlandite producing calcium carbonate (CaCO3). In severe carbonation conditions, C-S-H gel is decomposed into silica gel (SiO2.nH2O) and CaCO3. As a result, concrete pore water pH decreases (usually below 10) and eventually steel reinforcing bars become unprotected from corrosion agents. Usually, the carbonation of the cementing matrix reduces the porosity, because CaCO3 crystals (calcite and vaterite) occupy more volume than portlandite. In this study, an accelerated carbonation-ageing process is conducted on Portland cement mortar samples with water to cement ratio of 0.5. The evolution of the carbonation process on mortar is monitored at different levels of ageing until the mortar is almost fully carbonated. A nondestructive technique based on nonlinear acoustic resonance is used to monitor the variation of the constitutive properties upon carbonation. At selected levels of ageing, the compressive strength is obtained. From fractured surfaces the depth of carbonation is determined with phenolphthalein solution. An image analysis of the fractured surfaces is used to quantify the depth of carbonation. The results from resonant acoustic tests revealed a progressive increase of stiffness and a decrease of material nonlinearity.

  14. Development and Testing of a Dual Accelerometer Vector Sensor for AUV Acoustic Surveys †

    PubMed Central

    Mantouka, Agni; Felisberto, Paulo; Santos, Paulo; Zabel, Friedrich; Saleiro, Mário; Jesus, Sérgio M.; Sebastião, Luís

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents the design, manufacturing and testing of a Dual Accelerometer Vector Sensor (DAVS). The device was built within the activities of the WiMUST project, supported under the Horizon 2020 Framework Programme, which aims to improve the efficiency of the methodologies used to perform geophysical acoustic surveys at sea by the use of Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (AUVs). The DAVS has the potential to contribute to this aim in various ways, for example, owing to its spatial filtering capability, it may reduce the amount of post processing by discriminating the bottom from the surface reflections. Additionally, its compact size allows easier integration with AUVs and hence facilitates the vehicle manoeuvrability compared to the classical towed arrays. The present paper is focused on results related to acoustic wave azimuth estimation as an example of its spatial filtering capabilities. The DAVS device consists of two tri-axial accelerometers and one hydrophone moulded in one unit. Sensitivity and directionality of these three sensors were measured in a tank, whilst the direction estimation capabilities of the accelerometers paired with the hydrophone, forming a vector sensor, were evaluated on a Medusa Class AUV, which was sailing around a deployed sound source. Results of these measurements are presented in this paper. PMID:28594342

  15. Design considerations for the acoustic emission testing of large composite specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholey, Jonathan J.; Wilcox, Paul D.; Wisnom, Michael R.; Friswell, Mike I.

    2009-03-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) testing is a sensitive technique capable of detecting many types of defect with a sparse sensor array making it an attractive structural health monitoring technology. The widespread application of the technology is limited by a lack of predictive modelling and in part, the lack of quantitative source characteristics. The vast majority of current laboratory AE testing is conducted on small coupons which cannot be used to generate quantitative source characteristics since reflected wave energy from the specimen edges influences the received waveforms. An alternative approach is to test on large specimens where the modal properties of propagating waves can be examined with no influence from reflected wave energy. However, the design and testing of large specimens is not trivial. The work in this paper discusses the design of large fibre reinforced composite (FRC) specimens which are suitable for making quantitative source measurements. The design considerations include the minimum plate dimensions and placement of sensors. A novel technique, referred to as the location-time plot technique, is described which links propagation characteristics, specimen dimensions and sensor locations to map the dispersion of elastic waves in plates. The technique is demonstrated in the design of a simple AE experiment on a highly anisotropic plate. The technique is then used in the design of a practical AE testing arrangement for monitoring delamination from artificial defects in a large FRC plate. Experimental waveforms, recorded using this AE testing arrangement, are presented and are shown to be in agreement with the location-time plot technique.

  16. Acoustic Emission and Ultrasonic Characterization of Jurassic Navajo Formation Deformation During Axisymmetric Compression Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinehart, A. J.; Dewers, T. A.; Holcomb, D. J.; Broome, S. T.

    2011-12-01

    Linking continuum-scale and microscale brittle damage in rock remains a challenge impacting CO2 sequestration, secondary recovery, structural monitoring, and other geotechnical engineering applications. We examine if the mode of micromechanical failure scales directly up to continuum-scale damage-induced velocity anisotropy. Axisymmetric drained lab-dry compression experiments are performed on facies of moderately cemented finely laminated quartz arenite from the Jurassic Navajo Formation, a target reservoir rock for CO2 sequestration in Utah. The tests are 1 unconfined uniaxial compression test, 1 hydrostatic compression test, and 3 triaxial compression tests. Microscale damage is monitored using acoustic emissions (AE) and continuum scale damage is monitored with ultrasonic velocity scans. During the non-hydrostatic tests, three to five unload loops are performed pre-failure, with one unload loop performed post-failure. While stresses are increasing, AEs are monitored continuously using 1.6-mm diameter, 0.5-mm thick PZT-5A pins attached circumferentially around the cylindrical sample, and with 6-mm diameter, 2-mm thick PZT-5A discs at the ends of the sample. Before and after each unload loop, the test is paused and the AE transducers sequentially emit an ultrasonic pulse to measure wave speeds. The resulting elastic wave is detected by the other AE transducers. Post-test, the changing anisotropic velocity structure of the rock during compression and failure is compared to the locations, frequency, and relative moment tensors of the AEs measured between ultrasonic scans. Pre- and post-test visual and x-ray CT scan observations of the sample are compared to the acoustic metrics. These tiered observations of rock damage will further elucidate the scaling of microscale brittle failure to the continuum-scale This work was supported as part of the Center for Frontiers of Subsurface Energy Security, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of

  17. Performance, Thermal, and Vibration Qualification Testing of Zetec Acoustic Transducers, Model Z0002659-2, Sondicator Probes

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobson, G; Gemberling, S; Lavietes, A

    2006-03-10

    This report is a result of Qualification Test Plan No.001 prepared by Anthony Lavietes. The Qualification Test Plan outlines a list of requirements for thermal and vibrational testing of Zetac's Z0002659-2 Sondicator Probe acoustic transducers (hereafter called ''transducers''). The Zetec transducers are used in a system that employs an array of 7 acoustic transducers. Qualification testing of these transducers was required since they are a modified version of a standard catalog item from the manufacturer. This report documents the thermal, vibrational, and performance testing that was performed on a sampling of these transducers in order to qualify them for flight. A total of 14 transducers were tested. All 14 passed qualification testing with no failures.

  18. Evaluation of shrinkage and cracking in concrete of ring test by acoustic emission method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Takeshi; Hashimoto, Chikanori

    2015-03-01

    Drying shrinkage of concrete is one of the typical problems related to reduce durability and defilation of concrete structures. Lime stone, expansive additive and low-heat Portland cement are used to reduce drying shrinkage in Japan. Drying shrinkage is commonly evaluated by methods of measurement for length change of mortar and concrete. In these methods, there is detected strain due to drying shrinkage of free body, although visible cracking does not occur. In this study, the ring test was employed to detect strain and age cracking of concrete. The acoustic emission (AE) method was adopted to detect micro cracking due to shrinkage. It was recognized that in concrete using lime stone, expansive additive and low-heat Portland cement are effective to decrease drying shrinkage and visible cracking. Micro cracking due to shrinkage of this concrete was detected and evaluated by the AE method.

  19. Test-bench system for a borehole azimuthal acoustic reflection imaging logging tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xianping; Ju, Xiaodong; Qiao, Wenxiao; Lu, Junqiang; Men, Baiyong; Liu, Dong

    2016-06-01

    The borehole azimuthal acoustic reflection imaging logging tool (BAAR) is a new generation of imaging logging tool, which is able to investigate stratums in a relatively larger range of space around the borehole. The BAAR is designed based on the idea of modularization with a very complex structure, so it has become urgent for us to develop a dedicated test-bench system to debug each module of the BAAR. With the help of a test-bench system introduced in this paper, test and calibration of BAAR can be easily achieved. The test-bench system is designed based on the client/server model. The hardware system mainly consists of a host computer, an embedded controlling board, a bus interface board, a data acquisition board and a telemetry communication board. The host computer serves as the human machine interface and processes the uploaded data. The software running on the host computer is designed based on VC++. The embedded controlling board uses Advanced Reduced Instruction Set Machines 7 (ARM7) as the micro controller and communicates with the host computer via Ethernet. The software for the embedded controlling board is developed based on the operating system uClinux. The bus interface board, data acquisition board and telemetry communication board are designed based on a field programmable gate array (FPGA) and provide test interfaces for the logging tool. To examine the feasibility of the test-bench system, it was set up to perform a test on BAAR. By analyzing the test results, an unqualified channel of the electronic receiving cabin was discovered. It is suggested that the test-bench system can be used to quickly determine the working condition of sub modules of BAAR and it is of great significance in improving production efficiency and accelerating industrial production of the logging tool.

  20. Evaluation of Acoustic Emission NDE of Composite Crew Module Service Module/Alternate Launch Abort System (CCM SM/ALAS) Test Article Failure Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horne, Michael R.; Madaras, Eric I.

    2010-01-01

    Failure tests of CCM SM/ALAS (Composite Crew Module Service Module / Alternate Launch Abort System) composite panels were conducted during July 10, 2008 and July 24, 2008 at Langley Research Center. This is a report of the analysis of the Acoustic Emission (AE) data collected during those tests.

  1. Resolution of Forces and Strain Measurements from an Acoustic Ground Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Andrew M.; LaVerde, Bruce T.; Hunt, Ronald; Waldon, James M.

    2013-01-01

    The Conservatism in Typical Vibration Tests was Demonstrated: Vibration test at component level produced conservative force reactions by approximately a factor of 4 (approx.12 dB) as compared to the integrated acoustic test in 2 out of 3 axes. Reaction Forces Estimated at the Base of Equipment Using a Finite Element Based Method were Validated: FEM based estimate of interface forces may be adequate to guide development of vibration test criteria with less conservatism. Element Forces Estimated in Secondary Structure Struts were Validated: Finite element approach provided best estimate of axial strut forces in frequency range below 200 Hz where a rigid lumped mass assumption for the entire electronics box was valid. Models with enough fidelity to represent diminishing apparent mass of equipment are better suited for estimating force reactions across the frequency range. Forward Work: Demonstrate the reduction in conservatism provided by; Current force limited approach and an FEM guided approach. Validate proposed CMS approach to estimate coupled response from uncoupled system characteristics for vibroacoustics.

  2. The Alcock Paczy'nski test with Baryon Acoustic Oscillations: systematic effects for future surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lepori, Francesca; Di Dio, Enea; Viel, Matteo; Baccigalupi, Carlo; Durrer, Ruth

    2017-02-01

    We investigate the Alcock Paczy'nski (AP) test applied to the Baryon Acoustic Oscillation (BAO) feature in the galaxy correlation function. By using a general formalism that includes relativistic effects, we quantify the importance of the linear redshift space distortions and gravitational lensing corrections to the galaxy number density fluctuation. We show that redshift space distortions significantly affect the shape of the correlation function, both in radial and transverse directions, causing different values of galaxy bias to induce offsets up to 1% in the AP test. On the other hand, we find that the lensing correction around the BAO scale modifies the amplitude but not the shape of the correlation function and therefore does not introduce any systematic effect. Furthermore, we investigate in details how the AP test is sensitive to redshift binning: a window function in transverse direction suppresses correlations and shifts the peak position toward smaller angular scales. We determine the correction that should be applied in order to account for this effect, when performing the test with data from three future planned galaxy redshift surveys: Euclid, the Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument (DESI) and the Square Kilometer Array (SKA).

  3. A research program to reduce interior noise in general aviation airplanes. Design of an acoustic panel test facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roskam, J.; Muirhead, V. U.; Smith, H. W.; Henderson, T. D.

    1977-01-01

    The design, construction, and costs of a test facility for determining the sound transmission loss characteristics of various panels and panel treatments are described. The pressurization system and electronic equipment used in experimental testing are discussed as well as the reliability of the facility and the data gathered. Tests results are compared to pertinent acoustical theories for panel behavior and minor anomalies in the data are examined. A method for predicting panel behavior in the stiffness region is also presented.

  4. Can you hear me now? Range-testing a submerged passive acoustic receiver array in a Caribbean coral reef habitat

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Selby, Thomas H.; Hart, Kristen M.; Fujisaki, Ikuko; Smith, Brian J.; Pollock, Clayton J; Hillis-Star, Zandy M; Lundgren, Ian; Oli, Madan K.

    2016-01-01

    Submerged passive acoustic technology allows researchers to investigate spatial and temporal movement patterns of many marine and freshwater species. The technology uses receivers to detect and record acoustic transmissions emitted from tags attached to an individual. Acoustic signal strength naturally attenuates over distance, but numerous environmental variables also affect the probability a tag is detected. Knowledge of receiver range is crucial for designing acoustic arrays and analyzing telemetry data. Here, we present a method for testing a relatively large-scale receiver array in a dynamic Caribbean coastal environment intended for long-term monitoring of multiple species. The U.S. Geological Survey and several academic institutions in collaboration with resource management at Buck Island Reef National Monument (BIRNM), off the coast of St. Croix, recently deployed a 52 passive acoustic receiver array. We targeted 19 array-representative receivers for range-testing by submersing fixed delay interval range-testing tags at various distance intervals in each cardinal direction from a receiver for a minimum of an hour. Using a generalized linear mixed model (GLMM), we estimated the probability of detection across the array and assessed the effect of water depth, habitat, wind, temperature, and time of day on the probability of detection. The predicted probability of detection across the entire array at 100 m distance from a receiver was 58.2% (95% CI: 44.0–73.0%) and dropped to 26.0% (95% CI: 11.4–39.3%) 200 m from a receiver indicating a somewhat constrained effective detection range. Detection probability varied across habitat classes with the greatest effective detection range occurring in homogenous sand substrate and the smallest in high rugosity reef. Predicted probability of detection across BIRNM highlights potential gaps in coverage using the current array as well as limitations of passive acoustic technology within a complex coral reef

  5. Can you hear me now? Range-testing a submerged passive acoustic receiver array in a Caribbean coral reef habitat.

    PubMed

    Selby, Thomas H; Hart, Kristen M; Fujisaki, Ikuko; Smith, Brian J; Pollock, Clayton J; Hillis-Starr, Zandy; Lundgren, Ian; Oli, Madan K

    2016-07-01

    Submerged passive acoustic technology allows researchers to investigate spatial and temporal movement patterns of many marine and freshwater species. The technology uses receivers to detect and record acoustic transmissions emitted from tags attached to an individual. Acoustic signal strength naturally attenuates over distance, but numerous environmental variables also affect the probability a tag is detected. Knowledge of receiver range is crucial for designing acoustic arrays and analyzing telemetry data. Here, we present a method for testing a relatively large-scale receiver array in a dynamic Caribbean coastal environment intended for long-term monitoring of multiple species. The U.S. Geological Survey and several academic institutions in collaboration with resource management at Buck Island Reef National Monument (BIRNM), off the coast of St. Croix, recently deployed a 52 passive acoustic receiver array. We targeted 19 array-representative receivers for range-testing by submersing fixed delay interval range-testing tags at various distance intervals in each cardinal direction from a receiver for a minimum of an hour. Using a generalized linear mixed model (GLMM), we estimated the probability of detection across the array and assessed the effect of water depth, habitat, wind, temperature, and time of day on the probability of detection. The predicted probability of detection across the entire array at 100 m distance from a receiver was 58.2% (95% CI: 44.0-73.0%) and dropped to 26.0% (95% CI: 11.4-39.3%) 200 m from a receiver indicating a somewhat constrained effective detection range. Detection probability varied across habitat classes with the greatest effective detection range occurring in homogenous sand substrate and the smallest in high rugosity reef. Predicted probability of detection across BIRNM highlights potential gaps in coverage using the current array as well as limitations of passive acoustic technology within a complex coral reef environment.

  6. Evaluation of the Acoustic Measurement Capability of the NASA Langley V/STOL Wind Tunnel Open Test Section with Acoustically Absorbent Ceiling and Floor Treatments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Theobald, M. A.

    1978-01-01

    The single source location used for helicopter model studies was utilized in a study to determine the distances and directions upstream of the model accurate at which measurements of the direct acoustic field could be obtained. The method used was to measure the decrease of sound pressure levels with distance from a noise source and thereby determine the Hall radius as a function of frequency and direction. Test arrangements and procedures are described. Graphs show the normalized sound pressure level versus distance curves for the glass fiber floor treatment and for the foam floor treatment.

  7. Decay detection in red oak trees using a combination of visual inspection, acoustic testing, and resistance microdrilling

    Treesearch

    Xiping Wang; R. Bruce Allison

    2008-01-01

    Arborists are often challenged to identify internal structural defects hidden from view within tree trunks. This article reports the results of a study using a trunk inspection protocol combining visual observation, single-path stress wave testing, acoustic tomography, and resistance microdrilling to detect internal defects. Two century-old red oak (Quercus rubra)...

  8. Comparative evaluation of Space Transportation System (STS)-3 flight and acoustic test random vibration response of the OSS-1 payload

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    On, F. J.

    1983-01-01

    A comparative evaluation of the Space Transportation System (STS)-3 flight and acoustic test random vibration response of the Office of Space Science-1 (OSS-1) payload is presented. The results provide insight into the characteristics of vibroacoustic response of pallet payload components in the payload bay during STS flights.

  9. Preliminary vibration, acoustic, and shock design and test criteria for components on the Lightweight External Tank (LWT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The Space Shuttle LWT is divided into zones and subzones. Zones are designated primarily to assist in determining the applicable specifications. A subzone (general Specification) is available for use when the location of the component is known but component design and weight are not well defined. When the location, weight, and mounting configuration of the component are known, specifications for appropriate subzone weight ranges are available. Along with the specifications are vibration, acoustic, shock, transportation, handling, and acceptance test requirements and procedures. A method of selecting applicable vibration, acoustic, and shock specifications is presented.

  10. Acoustic communication in territorial butterflyfish: test of the sound production hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Tricas, Timothy C; Kajiura, Stephen M; Kosaki, Randall K

    2006-12-01

    Butterflyfishes are conspicuous members of coral reefs and well known for their visual displays during social interactions. Members of the genus Chaetodon have a unique peripheral arrangement of the anterior swim bladder that connects with the lateral line (the laterophysic connection) and in many species projects towards the inner ear. This morphology has lead to the proposal that the laterophysic connection and swim bladder system may be a specialized structure for the detection of sound. However, the relevant stimuli, receiver mechanisms and functions for these putative hearing structures were unknown because butterflyfishes were previously not recognized to produce sounds during natural behavior. We performed field experiments to test the hypothesis that Chaetodon produces sounds in natural social contexts. Acoustic and motor behaviors of the monogamous multiband butterflyfish, C. multicinctus, were evoked and recorded by placement of bottled fish into feeding territories of conspecific pairs. We demonstrate that territory defense includes the production of agonistic sounds and hydrodynamic stimuli that are associated with tail slap, jump, pelvic fin flick and dorsal-anal fin erection behaviors. In addition, grunt pulse trains were produced by bottled intruders and are tentatively interpreted to function as an alert call among pair mates. Acoustic behaviors include low frequency hydrodynamic pulses <100 Hz, sounds with peak energy from 100 Hz to 500 Hz, and a broadband high frequency click (peak frequency=3.6 kHz), which is produced only during the tail slap behavior. These results provide a biological framework for future studies to interpret the proximate function of the acoustico-lateralis sensory system, the evolution of the laterophysic mechanism and their relevance to butterflyfish social behavior.

  11. Field testing of a convergent array of acoustic Doppler profilers for high-resolution velocimetry in energetic tidal currents

    SciTech Connect

    Harding, Samuel F.; Sellar, Brian; Richmond, Marshall C.

    2016-04-25

    An array of single-beam acoustic Doppler profilers has been developed for the high resolution measurement of three-dimensional tidal flow velocities and subsequently tested in an energetic tidal site. This configuration has been developed to increase spatial resolution of velocity measurements in comparison to conventional acoustic Doppler profilers (ADPs) which characteristically use divergent acoustic beams emanating from a single instrument. This is achieved using geometrically convergent acoustic beams creating a sample volume at the focal point of 0.03 m3. Away from the focal point, the array is also able to simultaneously reconstruct three-dimensional velocity components in a profile throughout the water column, and is referred to herein as a convergent-beam acoustic Doppler profiler (C-ADP). Mid-depth profiling is achieved through integration of the sensor platform with the operational commercial-scale Alstom 1MW DeepGen-IV Tidal Turbine deployed at the European Marine Energy Center, Orkney Isles, UK. This proof-of-concept paper outlines the C-ADP system configuration and comparison to measurements provided by co-installed reference instrumentation.

  12. Gender differences in children's singing voices: acoustic analyses and results of a listening test.

    PubMed

    Mecke, Ann-Christine; Sundberg, Johan

    2010-05-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that acoustic parameters exist which are specific to gender in children's singing voices, and that these parameters are relevant to listeners' identification of gender of children's singing voices. A listening test was run with examples of singing produced by children belonging to different singing cultures, six boys and six girls from a Swedish music school and six boys from an elite German boys' choir. Sustained vowels were analyzed with regard to formants and voice source properties (jitter, shimmer and glottal-to-noise-excitation rate, closed quotient, and normalized amplitude quotient). Most of the measured parameters differed significantly between the boys belonging to the two different singing cultures. Regarding boys and girls from the same choir, only the closed quotient and the fourth formant frequency differed significantly. The listening test was carried out by an expert panel. The listeners correctly identified the gender of the singer in 66.0% of the cases, i.e., far better than chance. A multiple linear regression analysis revealed that the listener's answers correlated well with the formant frequencies, with the fourth formant showing the highest correlation.

  13. Acoustic test and analysis of a counterrotating prop-fan model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Magliozzi, Bernard; Brown, Paul; Parzych, David

    1987-01-01

    Results of acoustic tests of a 62.2 cm (24.5 in) diameter model counterrotating Prop-Fan are presented. The model was tested as a tractor and a pusher downstream of a pylon, both at 0 degrees and at 4 degrees angle-of-attack. The effects on noise of spacing between rotors and between the pylons and the rotors were also measured. Effects of rotor spacing were found to cause small changes in noise over the range of spacings tested. The presence of the pylon resulted in a 2 to 3 EPNdB increase in noise. Angle-of-attack effects showed an increase of 3 to 4 EPNdB for the tractor and only about 1 EPNdB for the pusher configuration. Speed was found to be the strongest parameter in minimizing noise. However, the decrease in noise with tip speeds below 200 m/sec (650 ft/sec) became significantly smaller than at higher tip speeds. Comparison of noise spectra between single rotation and counterrotating Prop-Fans showed that the counterrotating Prop-Fan has significantly higher levels of higher frequency noise which radiates in the forward direction. Correlations between measurement and prediction are discussed. Predictions are made of far-field noise during takeoff and near-field noise during cruise.

  14. Investigation of fuselage acoustic treatment for a twin-engine turboprop aircraft in flight and laboratory tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mixson, J. S.; Oneal, R. L.; Grosveld, F. W.

    1984-01-01

    A flight and laboratory study of sidewall acoustic treatment for cabin noise control is described. In flight, cabin noise levels were measured at six locations with three treatment configurations. Noise levels from narrow-band analysis are reduced to one-third octave format and used to calculate insertion loss, IL, defined as the reduction of interior noise associated with the addition of a treatment. Laboratory tests used a specially constructed structural panel modeled after the propeller plane section of the aircraft sidewall, and acoustic treatments representing those used in flight. Lab measured transmission loss and absorption values were combined using classical acoustic procedures to obtain a prediction of IL. Comparison with IL values measured in flight for the boundary layer component of the noise indicated general agreement.

  15. Testing of containers made of glass-fiber reinforced plastic with the aid of acoustic emission analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolitz, K.; Brockmann, W.; Fischer, T.

    1979-01-01

    Acoustic emission analysis as a quasi-nondestructive test method makes it possible to differentiate clearly, in judging the total behavior of fiber-reinforced plastic composites, between critical failure modes (in the case of unidirectional composites fiber fractures) and non-critical failure modes (delamination processes or matrix fractures). A particular advantage is that, for varying pressure demands on the composites, the emitted acoustic pulses can be analyzed with regard to their amplitude distribution. In addition, definite indications as to how the damages occurred can be obtained from the time curves of the emitted acoustic pulses as well as from the particular frequency spectrum. Distinct analogies can be drawn between the various analytical methods with respect to whether the failure modes can be classified as critical or non-critical.

  16. Acoustic Nondestructive Testing and Measurement of Tension for Steel Reinforcing Members: Part 2 - Field Testing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    BACKGROUND: Many reinforced concrete structures contain embedded pre- and post- tensioned steel members that are subject to corrosion and fracturing...Tension for Steel Reinforcing Members Part 2 – Field Testing by Michael K. McInerney PURPOSE: This Coastal and Hydraulics Engineering Technical...Specifically, the technology application addresses the problem of determining tension in concrete -embedded pre- and post-tensioned reinforcement rods

  17. Teaching Acoustic Properties of Materials in Secondary School: Testing Sound Insulators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hernandez, M. I.; Couso, D.; Pinto, R.

    2011-01-01

    Teaching the acoustic properties of materials is a good way to teach physics concepts, extending them into the technological arena related to materials science. This article describes an innovative approach for teaching sound and acoustics in combination with sound insulating materials in secondary school (15-16-year-old students). Concerning the…

  18. Aero-acoustic tests of duct-burning turbofan exhaust nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozlowski, H.; Packman, A. B.

    1976-01-01

    The acoustic and aerodynamic characteristics of several exhaust systems suitable for duct burning turbofan engines are evaluated. Scale models representing unsuppressed coannular exhaust systems are examined statically under varying exhaust conditions. Ejectors with both hardwall and acoustically treated inserts are investigated.

  19. Teaching Acoustic Properties of Materials in Secondary School: Testing Sound Insulators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hernandez, M. I.; Couso, D.; Pinto, R.

    2011-01-01

    Teaching the acoustic properties of materials is a good way to teach physics concepts, extending them into the technological arena related to materials science. This article describes an innovative approach for teaching sound and acoustics in combination with sound insulating materials in secondary school (15-16-year-old students). Concerning the…

  20. Acoustic impact testing and waveform analysis for damage detection in glued laminated timber

    Treesearch

    Feng Xu; Xiping Wang; Marko Teder; Yunfei Liu

    2017-01-01

    Delamination and decay are common structural defects in old glued laminated timber (glulam) buildings, which, if left undetected, could cause severe structural damage. This paper presents a new damage detection method for glulam inspection based on moment analysis and wavelet transform (WT) of impact acoustic signals. Acoustic signals were collected from a glulam arch...

  1. Design and Development of a Deep Acoustic Lining for the 40-by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel Test Section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soderman, Paul T.; Schmitz, Fredric H.; Allen, Christopher S.; Jaeger, Stephen M.; Sacco, Joe N.; Mosher, Marianne; Hayes, Julie A.

    2002-01-01

    The work described in this report has made effective use of design teams to build a state-of-the-art anechoic wind-tunnel facility. Many potential design solutions were evaluated using engineering analysis, and computational tools. Design alternatives were then evaluated using specially developed testing techniques, Large-scale coupon testing was then performed to develop confidence that the preferred design would meet the acoustic, aerodynamic, and structural objectives of the project. Finally, designs were frozen and the final product was installed in the wind tunnel. The result of this technically ambitious project has been the creation of a unique acoustic wind tunnel. Its large test section (39 ft x 79 ft x SO ft), potentially near-anechoic environment, and medium subsonic speed capability (M = 0.45) will support a full range of aeroacoustic testing-from rotorcraft and other vertical takeoff and landing aircraft to the take-off/landing configurations of both subsonic and supersonic transports.

  2. Acoustical modeling study of the open test section of the NASA Langley V/STOL wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ver, I. L.; Andersen, D. W.; Bliss, D. B.

    1975-01-01

    An acoustic model study was carried out to identify effective sound absorbing treatment of strategically located surfaces in an open wind tunnel test section. Also an aerodynamic study done concurrently, sought to find measures to control low frequency jet pulsations which occur when the tunnel is operated in its open test section configuration. The acoustical modeling study indicated that lining of the raised ceiling and the test section floor immediately below it, results in a substantial improvement. The aerodynamic model study indicated that: (1) the low frequency jet pulsations are most likely caused or maintained by coupling of aerodynamic and aeroacoustic phenomena in the closed tunnel circuit, (2) replacing the hard collector cowl with a geometrically identical but porous fiber metal surface of 100 mks rayls flow resistance does not result in any noticable reduction of the test section noise caused by the impingement of the turbulent flow on the cowl.

  3. Acoustic and aerodynamic testing of a scale model variable pitch fan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jutras, R. R.; Kazin, S. B.

    1974-01-01

    A fully reversible pitch scale model fan with variable pitch rotor blades was tested to determine its aerodynamic and acoustic characteristics. The single-stage fan has a design tip speed of 1160 ft/sec (353.568 m/sec) at a bypass pressure ratio of 1.5. Three operating lines were investigated. Test results show that the blade pitch for minimum noise also resulted in the highest efficiency for all three operating lines at all thrust levels. The minimum perceived noise on a 200-ft (60.96 m) sideline was obtained with the nominal nozzle. At 44% of takeoff thrust, the PNL reduction between blade pitch and minimum noise blade pitch is 1.8 PNdB for the nominal nozzle and decreases with increasing thrust. The small nozzle (6% undersized) has the highest efficiency at all part thrust conditions for the minimum noise blade pitch setting; although, the noise is about 1.0 PNdB higher for the small nozzle at the minimum noise blade pitch position.

  4. Evaluating damage potential of cryogenic concrete using acoustic emission sensors and permeability testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kogbara, Reginald B.; Parsaei, Boback; Iyengar, Srinath R.; Grasley, Zachary C.; Masad, Eyad A.; Zollinger, Dan G.

    2014-04-01

    This study evaluates the damage potential of concrete of different mix designs subjected to cryogenic temperatures, using acoustic emission (AE) and permeability testing. The aim is to investigate design methodologies that might be employed to produce concrete that resists damage when cooled to cryogenic temperatures. Such concrete would be suitable for primary containment of liquefied natural gas (LNG) and could replace currently used 9% Ni steel, thereby leading to huge cost savings. In the experiments described, concrete cubes, 150 mm x 150 mm x 150 mm, were cast using four different mix designs. The four mixes employed siliceous river sand as fine aggregate. Moreover, limestone, sandstone, trap rock and lightweight aggregate were individually used as coarse aggregates in the mixes. The concrete samples were then cooled from room temperature (20°C) to cryogenic temperature (-165°C) in a temperature chamber. AE sensors were placed on the concrete cubes during the cryogenic freezing process. The damage potential was evaluated in terms of the growth of damage as determined from AE, as a function of temperature and concrete mixture design. The damage potential observed was validated with water permeability testing. Initial results demonstrate the effects of the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of the aggregates on damage growth. Concrete damage (cracking) resistance generally decreased with increasing coarse aggregate CTE, and was in the order, limestone ≥ trap rock << lightweight aggregate ≥ sandstone. Work is in progress to fully understand thermal dilation and damage growth in concrete due to differential CTE of its components.

  5. Air-coupled acoustic method for testing and evaluation of microscale structures.

    PubMed

    Ricci, Justin; Cetinkaya, Cetin

    2007-05-01

    A noncontact testing and characterization approach for microscale structures based on air-coupled acoustic excitation and optical sensing is proposed and demonstrated. Using an air-coupled transducer to externally excite and a laser Doppler vibrometer/interferometer to capture transient displacement wave forms, the experimental approach results in a technique to determine mechanical properties of microscale structural elements. The effectiveness of this method has been demonstrated on commercially available microcantilever beams and microscale rotational oscillators fabricated for this study. The resonance frequencies and mechanical properties (Young's modulus and stiffness) extracted from the transient displacement wave forms have been compared, with good agreement, to computational and simplified analytical models for each case. It is also shown that the technique could serve to diagnose stiction problems of microscale structures. Some potential advantages of the approach described include the simplicity of the test setup, functionality at room conditions, noncontact and nondestructive operations, and repeatability and rapid turn-around time for the evaluation of modal parameters and mechanical properties of microscale structures.

  6. Correlation of FEM/BEM Vibroacoustic Prediction to System-Level Acoustic Test Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, G.; Ngan, I.; Santiago-Prowald, J.

    2014-06-01

    Coupled FEM/BEM vibroacoustic analyses are employed for deriving spacecraft random vibration environments and supporting the design of low aerial density structures. They offer deterministic predictions which are very accurate at low-frequency and meaningful across all the spectrum of interest for vibroacoustic response.An assessment of the standard procedure of FEM/BEM vibroacoustic analyses was carried out by correlation to measurements from system-level tests of several spacecraft. This allowed a quantification of the typical errors committed, and concluded on the adequacy of applying the standard factor of safety +4dB to the predictions. It was observed that a major source of error is the lack of representativeness of the models of the spacecraft, which adds to the diffuse field idealization made on the acoustic environment inside the fairing and the test chambers. In particular, it was observed a clear impact from a lack of detail of the damping of the structure, and an often crude lumped representation of units and equipment as well as tanks and fixations.

  7. Azimuthal cement evaluation with an acoustic phased-arc array transmitter: numerical simulations and field tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Che, Xiao-Hua; Qiao, Wen-Xiao; Ju, Xiao-Dong; Wang, Rui-Jia

    2016-03-01

    We developed a novel cement evaluation logging tool, named the azimuthally acoustic bond tool (AABT), which uses a phased-arc array transmitter with azimuthal detection capability. We combined numerical simulations and field tests to verify the AABT tool. The numerical simulation results showed that the radiation direction of the subarray corresponding to the maximum amplitude of the first arrival matches the azimuth of the channeling when it is behind the casing. With larger channeling size in the circumferential direction, the amplitude difference of the casing wave at different azimuths becomes more evident. The test results showed that the AABT can accurately locate the casing collars and evaluate the cement bond quality with azimuthal resolution at the casing—cement interface, and can visualize the size, depth, and azimuth of channeling. In the case of good casing—cement bonding, the AABT can further evaluate the cement bond quality at the cement—formation interface with azimuthal resolution by using the amplitude map and the velocity of the formation wave.

  8. Flight effects on the aerodynamic and acoustic characteristics of inverted profile coannular nozzles, volume 3. [supersonic cruise aircraft research wind tunnel tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozlowski, H.; Packman, A. B.

    1978-01-01

    Acoustic data from tests of the 0.75 area ratio coannular nozzle with ejector and the 1.2 area ratio coannular are presented in tables. Aerodynamic data acquired for the four test configurations are included.

  9. Vibration, acoustic, and shock design and test criteria for components on the Solid Rocket Boosters (SRB), Lightweight External Tank (LWT), and Space Shuttle Main Engines (SSME)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The vibration, acoustics, and shock design and test criteria for components and subassemblies on the space shuttle solid rocket booster (SRB), lightweight tank (LWT), and main engines (SSME) are presented. Specifications for transportation, handling, and acceptance testing are also provided.

  10. Study and Application of Acoustic Emission Testing in Fault Diagnosis of Low-Speed Heavy-Duty Gears

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Lixin; Zai, Fenlou; Su, Shanbin; Wang, Huaqing; Chen, Peng; Liu, Limei

    2011-01-01

    Most present studies on the acoustic emission signals of rotating machinery are experiment-oriented, while few of them involve on-spot applications. In this study, a method of redundant second generation wavelet transform based on the principle of interpolated subdivision was developed. With this method, subdivision was not needed during the decomposition. The lengths of approximation signals and detail signals were the same as those of original ones, so the data volume was twice that of original signals; besides, the data redundancy characteristic also guaranteed the excellent analysis effect of the method. The analysis of the acoustic emission data from the faults of on-spot low-speed heavy-duty gears validated the redundant second generation wavelet transform in the processing and denoising of acoustic emission signals. Furthermore, the analysis illustrated that the acoustic emission testing could be used in the fault diagnosis of on-spot low-speed heavy-duty gears and could be a significant supplement to vibration testing diagnosis. PMID:22346592

  11. Study and application of acoustic emission testing in fault diagnosis of low-speed heavy-duty gears.

    PubMed

    Gao, Lixin; Zai, Fenlou; Su, Shanbin; Wang, Huaqing; Chen, Peng; Liu, Limei

    2011-01-01

    Most present studies on the acoustic emission signals of rotating machinery are experiment-oriented, while few of them involve on-spot applications. In this study, a method of redundant second generation wavelet transform based on the principle of interpolated subdivision was developed. With this method, subdivision was not needed during the decomposition. The lengths of approximation signals and detail signals were the same as those of original ones, so the data volume was twice that of original signals; besides, the data redundancy characteristic also guaranteed the excellent analysis effect of the method. The analysis of the acoustic emission data from the faults of on-spot low-speed heavy-duty gears validated the redundant second generation wavelet transform in the processing and denoising of acoustic emission signals. Furthermore, the analysis illustrated that the acoustic emission testing could be used in the fault diagnosis of on-spot low-speed heavy-duty gears and could be a significant supplement to vibration testing diagnosis.

  12. Characterization of Pump-Induced Acoustics in Space Launch System Main Propulsion System Liquid Hydrogen Feedline Using Airflow Test Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eberhart, C. J.; Snellgrove, L. M.; Zoladz, T. F.

    2015-01-01

    High intensity acoustic edgetones located upstream of the RS-25 Low Pressure Fuel Turbo Pump (LPFTP) were previously observed during Space Launch System (STS) airflow testing of a model Main Propulsion System (MPS) liquid hydrogen (LH2) feedline mated to a modified LPFTP. MPS hardware has been adapted to mitigate the problematic edgetones as part of the Space Launch System (SLS) program. A follow-on airflow test campaign has subjected the adapted hardware to tests mimicking STS-era airflow conditions, and this manuscript describes acoustic environment identification and characterization born from the latest test results. Fluid dynamics responsible for driving discrete excitations were well reproduced using legacy hardware. The modified design was found insensitive to high intensity edgetone-like discretes over the bandwidth of interest to SLS MPS unsteady environments. Rather, the natural acoustics of the test article were observed to respond in a narrowband-random/mixed discrete manner to broadband noise thought generated by the flow field. The intensity of these responses were several orders of magnitude reduced from those driven by edgetones.

  13. Temperature effects on acoustic interactions between altitude test facilities and jet engine plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahuja, K. K.; Massey, K. C.; Tan, C. K.; Jones, R. R.

    1994-10-01

    The overall objective of the present investigation was to determine the mechanisms responsible for engine/test cell resonance observed at the AEDC facility. The specific objective was to determine the effect of heating the jet on its coupling with the diffuser used in a typical engine/test cell facility. This objective was to be accomplished through systematic measurements of cold and heated free and ducted jets using a subscale facility. An additional objective was to analytically examine the behavior of jet instability waves as a function of temperature, and to identify any potential of strong coupling between the jet instabilities and diffuser duct resonance modes directly attributable to heating of the jet. Model cold and heated jet experiments are performed with an axisymmetric convergent nozzle in a test setup that simulates a supersonic jet exhausting into a cylindrical diffuser. The measured data consist of a free and ducted plume for a range of jet exit Mach numbers and four reservoir temperatures: ambient, 400 F, 750 F, and 1,000 F. Analytical results on the growth of instability waves and the duct resonance have been introduced. It is shown that the screech frequency increases with increasing operating temperature ratio. The measured in-duct microphone signatures contain a number of discrete tones, and almost all of them can be associated with duct resonances. The amplitudes increase with increasing Mach number and operating temperature ratios. At certain operating conditions, the acoustic fluctuations associated with these ejector duct modes excite the most amplified wave of the jet.

  14. Flight effects on the aerodynamic and acoustic characteristics of inverted profile coannular nozzles, volume 2. [supersonic cruise aircraft research wind tunnel tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozlowski, H.; Packman, A. B.

    1978-01-01

    Data from the acoustic tests of the convergent reference nozzle and the 0.75 area ratio coannular nozzle are presented in tables. Data processing routines used to scale the acoustic data and to correct the data for atmospheric attenuation are included.

  15. Lobed Mixer Design for Noise Suppression Acoustic and Aerodynamic Test Data Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mengle, Vinod G.; Dalton, William N.; Boyd, Kathleen (Technical Monitor); Bridges, James (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A comprehensive database for the acoustic and aerodynamic characteristics of several model-scale lobe mixers of bypass ratio 5 to 6 has been created for mixed jet speeds up to 1080 ft/s at typical take-off (TO) conditions of small-to-medium turbofan engines. The flight effect was simulated for Mach numbers up to 0.3. The static thrust performance and plume data were also obtained at typical TO and cruise conditions. The tests were done at NASA Lewis anechoic dome and ASK's FluiDyne Laboratories. The effect of several lobe mixer and nozzle parameters, such as, lobe scalloping, lobe count, lobe penetration and nozzle length was examined in terms of flyover noise at constant altitude. Sound in the nozzle reference frame was analyzed to understand the source characteristics. Several new concepts, mechanisms and methods are reported for such lobed mixers, such as, "boomerang" scallops, "tongue" mixer, detection of "excess" internal noise sources, and extrapolation of flyover noise data from one flight speed to different flight speeds. Noise reduction of as much as 3 EPNdB was found with a deeply scalloped mixer compared to annular nozzle at net thrust levels of 9500 lb for a 29 in. diameter nozzle after optimizing the nozzle length.

  16. Acoustical and Intelligibility Test of the Vocera(Copyright) B3000 Communication Badge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Archer, Ronald; Litaker, Harry; Chu, Shao-Sheng R.; Simon, Cory; Romero, Andy; Moses, Haifa

    2012-01-01

    To communicate with each other or ground support, crew members on board the International Space Station (ISS) currently use the Audio Terminal Units (ATU), which are located in each ISS module. However, to use the ATU, crew members must stop their current activity, travel to a panel, and speak into a wall-mounted microphone, or use either a handheld microphone or a Crew Communication Headset that is connected to a panel. These actions unnecessarily may increase task times, lower productivity, create cable management issues, and thus increase crew frustration. Therefore, the Habitability and Human Factors and Human Interface Branches at the NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) are currently investigating a commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) wireless communication system, Vocera(C), as a near-term solution for ISS communication. The objectives of the acoustics and intelligibility testing of this system were to answer the following questions: 1. How intelligibly can a human hear the transmitted message from a Vocera(c) badge in three different noise environments (Baseline = 20 dB, US Lab Module = 58 dB, Russian Module = 70.6 dB)? 2. How accurate is the Vocera(C) badge at recognizing voice commands in three different noise environments? 3. What body location (chest, upper arm, or shoulder) is optimal for speech intelligibility and voice recognition accuracy of the Vocera(C) badge on a human in three different noise environments?

  17. Reproducibility experiments on measuring acoustical properties of rigid-frame porous media (round-robin tests).

    PubMed

    Horoshenkov, Kirill V; Khan, Amir; Bécot, François-Xavier; Jaouen, Luc; Sgard, Franck; Renault, Amélie; Amirouche, Nesrine; Pompoli, Francesco; Prodi, Nicola; Bonfiglio, Paolo; Pispola, Giulio; Asdrubali, Francesco; Hübelt, Jörn; Atalla, Noureddine; Amédin, Celse K; Lauriks, Walter; Boeckx, Laurens

    2007-07-01

    This paper reports the results of reproducibility experiments on the interlaboratory characterization of the acoustical properties of three types of consolidated porous media: granulated porous rubber, reticulated foam, and fiberglass. The measurements are conducted in several independent laboratories in Europe and North America. The studied acoustical characteristics are the surface complex acoustic impedance at normal incidence and plane wave absorption coefficient which are determined using the standard impedance tube method. The paper provides detailed procedures related to sample preparation and installation and it discusses the dispersion in the acoustical material property observed between individual material samples and laboratories. The importance of the boundary conditions, homogeneity of the porous material structure, and stability of the adopted signal processing method are highlighted.

  18. Acoustic neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    Vestibular schwannoma; Tumor - acoustic; Cerebellopontine angle tumor; Angle tumor; Hearing loss - acoustic; Tinnitus - acoustic ... Acoustic neuromas have been linked with the genetic disorder neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2). Acoustic neuromas are uncommon.

  19. Aerodynamic and Acoustic Tests of a 1/15 Scale Model Dry Cooled Jet Aircraft Runup Noise Suppression System,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-10-01

    Temperature Contours for the Obround Augmenter with the Jet Centered (Position a, yp = 1.0) and Deflected Downward 3.60 165 Figure 7.3- 16 . Maximum Mixed...Acoustic Tests -8- r7 FLUIDYNE ENGINEERING CORPORATION I 2.0.3 Aero-Thermal Testing (Test Series 13 through 16 ) I The aero-thermal testing, Figure...Excessive Augmenter Exit Flow Noise Noise One Engine at Two Engines at Criteria Max. RPM Max. RPM at 250 ft. AA/ANT a AA/A NT 95 dBA 18 16 85 dBA 24

  20. Acoustic flight test experience with the XV-15 Tiltrotor aircraft with the Advanced Technology Blade (ATB)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoad, Danny R.; Conner, David A.; Rutledge, Charles K.

    1992-01-01

    An acoustic model that predicts the discrete frequency noise characteristics of helicopter rotors has been utilized in an analysis to help identify source characteristics. This technique incorporated a NASA Langley developed acoustic prediction technique, and a simplified flow field model to account for rotor wake reingestion in hover. The vehicle rotor system was modified to include the ATBs that were designed to provide for higher operating weights and improved maneuver load factor in helicopter and transition modes of operation.

  1. Acoustic flight test experience with the XV-15 Tiltrotor aircraft with the Advanced Technology Blade (ATB)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoad, Danny R.; Conner, David A.; Rutledge, Charles K.

    1992-01-01

    An acoustic model that predicts the discrete frequency noise characteristics of helicopter rotors has been utilized in an analysis to help identify source characteristics. This technique incorporated a NASA Langley developed acoustic prediction technique, and a simplified flow field model to account for rotor wake reingestion in hover. The vehicle rotor system was modified to include the ATBs that were designed to provide for higher operating weights and improved maneuver load factor in helicopter and transition modes of operation.

  2. High intensity acoustic tests of a thermally stressed aluminum plate in TAFA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ng, Chung Fai; Clevenson, Sherman A.

    1989-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in the Thermal Acoustic Fatigue Apparatus at the Langley Research Center to study the acoustically excited random motion of an aluminum plate which is buckled due to thermal stresses. The thermal buckling displacements were measured and compared with theory. The general trends of the changes in resonances frequencies and random responses of the plate agree with previous theoretical prediction and experimental results for a mechanically buckled plate.

  3. AMADEUS—The acoustic neutrino detection test system of the ANTARES deep-sea neutrino telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilar, J. A.; Al Samarai, I.; Albert, A.; Anghinolfi, M.; Anton, G.; Anvar, S.; Ardid, M.; Assis Jesus, A. C.; Astraatmadja, T.; Aubert, J.-J.; Auer, R.; Barbarito, E.; Baret, B.; Basa, S.; Bazzotti, M.; Bertin, V.; Biagi, S.; Bigongiari, C.; Bou-Cabo, M.; Bouwhuis, M. C.; Brown, A.; Brunner, J.; Busto, J.; Camarena, F.; Capone, A.; Cârloganu, C.; Carminati, G.; Carr, J.; Cassano, B.; Castorina, E.; Cavasinni, V.; Cecchini, S.; Ceres, A.; Charvis, Ph.; Chiarusi, T.; Chon Sen, N.; Circella, M.; Coniglione, R.; Costantini, H.; Cottini, N.; Coyle, P.; Curtil, C.; de Bonis, G.; Decowski, M. P.; Dekeyser, I.; Deschamps, A.; Distefano, C.; Donzaud, C.; Dornic, D.; Drouhin, D.; Eberl, T.; Emanuele, U.; Ernenwein, J.-P.; Escoffier, S.; Fehr, F.; Fiorello, C.; Flaminio, V.; Fritsch, U.; Fuda, J.-L.; Gay, P.; Giacomelli, G.; Gómez-González, J. P.; Graf, K.; Guillard, G.; Halladjian, G.; Hallewell, G.; van Haren, H.; Heijboer, A. J.; Heine, E.; Hello, Y.; Hernández-Rey, J. J.; Herold, B.; Hößl, J.; de Jong, M.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kalekin, O.; Kappes, A.; Katz, U.; Keller, P.; Kooijman, P.; Kopper, C.; Kouchner, A.; Kretschmer, W.; Lahmann, R.; Lamare, P.; Lambard, G.; Larosa, G.; Laschinsky, H.; Le Provost, H.; Lefèvre, D.; Lelaizant, G.; Lim, G.; Lo Presti, D.; Loehner, H.; Loucatos, S.; Louis, F.; Lucarelli, F.; Mangano, S.; Marcelin, M.; Margiotta, A.; Martinez-Mora, J. A.; Mazure, A.; Mongelli, M.; Montaruli, T.; Morganti, M.; Moscoso, L.; Motz, H.; Naumann, C.; Neff, M.; Ostasch, R.; Palioselitis, D.; Păvălaş, G. E.; Payre, P.; Petrovic, J.; Picot-Clemente, N.; Picq, C.; Popa, V.; Pradier, T.; Presani, E.; Racca, C.; Radu, A.; Reed, C.; Riccobene, G.; Richardt, C.; Rujoiu, M.; Ruppi, M.; Russo, G. V.; Salesa, F.; Sapienza, P.; Schöck, F.; Schuller, J.-P.; Shanidze, R.; Simeone, F.; Spurio, M.; Steijger, J. J. M.; Stolarczyk, Th.; Taiuti, M.; Tamburini, C.; Tasca, L.; Toscano, S.; Vallage, B.; van Elewyck, V.; Vannoni, G.; Vecchi, M.; Vernin, P.; Wijnker, G.; de Wolf, E.; Yepes, H.; Zaborov, D.; Zornoza, J. D.; Zúñiga, J.

    2011-01-01

    The AMADEUS (ANTARES Modules for the Acoustic Detection Under the Sea) system which is described in this article aims at the investigation of techniques for acoustic detection of neutrinos in the deep sea. It is integrated into the ANTARES neutrino telescope in the Mediterranean Sea. Its acoustic sensors, installed at water depths between 2050 and 2300 m, employ piezo-electric elements for the broad-band recording of signals with frequencies ranging up to 125 kHz. The typical sensitivity of the sensors is around -145 dB re 1 V/μPa (including preamplifier). Completed in May 2008, AMADEUS consists of six “acoustic clusters”, each comprising six acoustic sensors that are arranged at distances of roughly 1 m from each other. Two vertical mechanical structures (so-called lines) of the ANTARES detector host three acoustic clusters each. Spacings between the clusters range from 14.5 to 340 m. Each cluster contains custom-designed electronics boards to amplify and digitise the acoustic signals from the sensors. An on-shore computer cluster is used to process and filter the data stream and store the selected events. The daily volume of recorded data is about 10 GB. The system is operating continuously and automatically, requiring only little human intervention. AMADEUS allows for extensive studies of both transient signals and ambient noise in the deep sea, as well as signal correlations on several length scales and localisation of acoustic point sources. Thus the system is excellently suited to assess the background conditions for the measurement of the bipolar pulses expected to originate from neutrino interactions.

  4. Test of an Acoustic Mechanism for Atmospheric Heating in Dynamo-Deficient F Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullan, D. J.

    1996-01-01

    In a qualitative sense, the heating of chromospheres and coronae has long been ascribed to either acoustic or magnetic heating. However, quantitative discussions of the energy balance with detailed comparison to the fluxes of chromospheric emission lines have begun to appear only recently. The aim of this work is to observe F stars where magnetic effects might be expected to be rather small, thereby allowing us hopefully to access acoustically heated atmospheres.

  5. A methodology to condition distorted acoustic emission signals to identify fracture timing from human cadaver spine impact tests.

    PubMed

    Arun, Mike W J; Yoganandan, Narayan; Stemper, Brian D; Pintar, Frank A

    2014-12-01

    While studies have used acoustic sensors to determine fracture initiation time in biomechanical studies, a systematic procedure is not established to process acoustic signals. The objective of the study was to develop a methodology to condition distorted acoustic emission data using signal processing techniques to identify fracture initiation time. The methodology was developed from testing a human cadaver lumbar spine column. Acoustic sensors were glued to all vertebrae, high-rate impact loading was applied, load-time histories were recorded (load cell), and fracture was documented using CT. Compression fracture occurred to L1 while other vertebrae were intact. FFT of raw voltage-time traces were used to determine an optimum frequency range associated with high decibel levels. Signals were bandpass filtered in this range. Bursting pattern was found in the fractured vertebra while signals from other vertebrae were silent. Bursting time was associated with time of fracture initiation. Force at fracture was determined using this time and force-time data. The methodology is independent of selecting parameters a priori such as fixing a voltage level(s), bandpass frequency and/or using force-time signal, and allows determination of force based on time identified during signal processing. The methodology can be used for different body regions in cadaver experiments.

  6. Nondestructive testing: use of IR and acoustics methods in buildings pathology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposti, Walter; Meroni, Italo

    1995-03-01

    In the paper the authors present some experiences made using IR and acoustics methods in a non destructive way for the evaluation of situations of degradation in building materials and components. Two studies are presented: (1) detection of the delamination of wall renderings, especially those supporting frescos, by means of IR and sonic investigation; (2) use of infrared thermography for the visualization of fracture zones of walls and steel components under cyclic loads. The possibility of detecting rendering delaminations is based on the different path of the heat diffusion in part of the wall affected by the delamination, compared to the rest of the wall. The difference is caused by the presence of small pockets containing still air. The case study showed makes reference to the analysis of adhesion conditions of a rendering dating back to the IV century, applied on the bell towers of the ancient basilica dedicated to S. Lorenzo in Milan, Italy. The use of infrared thermography for detecting the strength status of materials and components is based on the fact that the strength status of parts of building components can become evident because of heat losses which appear where the component is weaker. The IR observation was made on steel bars subject to traction testing and on lightweight concrete prismatic samples subject to compression testing. The experiences indicate that there is room for this NdT technique to provide some useful answers. Nevertheless it is sure that more experimental work is needed in order to increase the full comprehension of the phenomena which are the basis of their applications for alternative uses.

  7. Acoustic tests on a new motor generator system for the Minuteman launch control centers at Alpha 01 and Sierra 00, Malmstrom AFB, Montana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fairman, Terry M.

    1991-05-01

    Field tests of the acoustic performance of a new motor generator system (MGS) were performed at Minuteman Launch Control Centers (LCC) Alpha 01 and Sierra 00, Malmstrom AFB, MT. This same MGS unit was accepted for use after the Hill Engineering Test Facilities (HETF) acoustic performance studies conducted in 1988. Rivet Mile from the Ogden ALC began installation of the new MGS at Malmstrom in the spring of 1990. Performance tests were requested by 00-ALC/MMGRMM, and SAC, to compare with the HETF data and document the LCC acoustic environment with the new MGS operating in a field setting. This report presents our findings.

  8. Quantitative ultrasonic testing of acoustically anisotropic materials with verification on austenitic and dissimilar weld joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boller, C.; Pudovikov, S.; Bulavinov, A.

    2012-05-01

    Austenitic stainless steel materials are widely used in a variety of industry sectors. In particular, the material is qualified to meet the design criteria of high quality in safety related applications. For example, the primary loop of the most of the nuclear power plants in the world, due to high durability and corrosion resistance, is made of this material. Certain operating conditions may cause a range of changes in the integrity of the component, and therefore require nondestructive testing at reasonable intervals. These in-service inspections are often performed using ultrasonic techniques, in particular when cracking is of specific concern. However, the coarse, dendritic grain structure of the weld material, formed during the welding process, is extreme and unpredictably anisotropic. Such structure is no longer direction-independent to the ultrasonic wave propagation; therefore, the ultrasonic beam deflects and redirects and the wave front becomes distorted. Thus, the use of conventional ultrasonic testing techniques using fixed beam angles is very limited and the application of ultrasonic Phased Array techniques becomes desirable. The "Sampling Phased Array" technique, invented and developed by Fraunhofer IZFP, allows the acquisition of time signals (A-scans) for each individual transducer element of the array along with fast image reconstruction techniques based on synthetic focusing algorithms. The reconstruction considers the sound propagation from each image pixel to the individual sensor element. For anisotropic media, where the sound beam is deflected and the sound path is not known a-priori, a novel phase adjustment technique called "Reverse Phase Matching" is implemented. By taking into account the anisotropy and inhomogeneity of the weld structure, a ray tracing algorithm for modeling the acoustic wave propagation and calculating the sound propagation time is applied. This technique can be utilized for 2D and 3D real time image reconstruction. The

  9. Computational Analyses in Support of Sub-scale Diffuser Testing for the A-3 Facility. Part 3; Aero-Acoustic Analyses and Experimental Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allgood, Daniel C.; Graham, Jason S.; McVay, Greg P.; Langford, Lester L.

    2008-01-01

    A unique assessment of acoustic similarity scaling laws and acoustic analogy methodologies in predicting the far-field acoustic signature from a sub-scale altitude rocket test facility at the NASA Stennis Space Center was performed. A directional, point-source similarity analysis was implemented for predicting the acoustic far-field. In this approach, experimental acoustic data obtained from "similar" rocket engine tests were appropriately scaled using key geometric and dynamic parameters. The accuracy of this engineering-level method is discussed by comparing the predictions with acoustic far-field measurements obtained. In addition, a CFD solver was coupled with a Lilley's acoustic analogy formulation to determine the improvement of using a physics-based methodology over an experimental correlation approach. In the current work, steady-state Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes calculations were used to model the internal flow of the rocket engine and altitude diffuser. These internal flow simulations provided the necessary realistic input conditions for external plume simulations. The CFD plume simulations were then used to provide the spatial turbulent noise source distributions in the acoustic analogy calculations. Preliminary findings of these studies will be discussed.

  10. Durability assessments of concrete using electrical properties and acoustic emission testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todak, Heather N.

    Premature damage deterioration has been observed in pavement joints throughout the Midwestern region of the United States. Over time, severe joint damage creates a transportation safety concern and the necessary repairs can be an extreme economic burden. The deterioration is due in part to freeze-thaw damage associated with fluid accumulation at the pavement joints. This very preventable problem is an indication that current specifications and construction practices for freeze-thaw durability of concrete are inadequate. This thesis serves to create a better understanding of moisture ingress, freeze-thaw damage mechanisms, and the effect of variations in mixture properties on freeze-thaw behavior of concrete. The concepts of the nick point degree of saturation, sorptivity rates, and critical degree of saturation are discussed. These factors contribute to service life, defined in this study as the duration of time a concrete element remains below levels of critical saturation which are required for damage development to initiate. A theoretical model and a simple experimental procedure are introduced which help determine the nick point for a series of 32 concrete mixtures with unique mixture proportions and air entrainment properties. This simple experimental procedure is also presented as a method to measure important electrical properties in order to establish the formation factor, a valuable measure of concrete transport properties. The results of freeze-thaw testing with acoustic emission monitoring are presented to help understand and quantify damage development in concrete specimens when conditioned to various degrees of saturation. This procedure was used to study the relationship between air entrainment properties and the critical degree of saturation. Applying the concepts of degree of saturation and sorptivity, a performance-based model is proposed as a new approach to specifications for freeze-thaw durability. Finally, a conceptual model is presented to

  11. Acoustic emission analysis: A test method for metal joints bonded by adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brockmann, W.; Fischer, T.

    1978-01-01

    Acoustic emission analysis is applied to study adhesive joints which had been subjected to mechanical and climatic stresses, taking into account conditions which make results applicable to adhesive joints used in aerospace technology. Specimens consisting of the alloy AlMgSi0.5 were used together with a phenolic resin adhesive, an epoxy resin modified with a polyamide, and an epoxy resin modified with a nitrile. Results show that the acoustic emission analysis provides valuable information concerning the behavior of adhesive joints under load and climatic stresses.

  12. Quantitative Measures of Anthropogenic Noise on Harbor Porpoises: Testing the Reliability of Acoustic Tag Recordings.

    PubMed

    Wisniewska, Danuta M; Teilmann, Jonas; Hermannsen, Line; Johnson, Mark; Miller, Lee A; Siebert, Ursula; Madsen, Peter Teglberg

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, several sound and movement recording tags have been developed to sample the acoustic field experienced by cetaceans and their reactions to it. However, little is known about how tag placement and an animal's orientation in the sound field affect the reliability of on-animal recordings as proxies for actual exposure. Here, we quantify sound exposure levels recorded with a DTAG-3 tag on a captive harbor porpoise exposed to vessel noise in a controlled acoustic environment. Results show that flow noise is limiting onboard noise recordings, whereas no evidence of body shading has been found for frequencies of 2-20 kHz.

  13. Development and testing of cabin sidewall acoustic resonators for the reduction of cabin tone levels in propfan-powered aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuntz, H. L.; Gatineau, R. J.; Prydz, R. A.; Balena, F. J.

    1991-01-01

    The use of Helmholtz resonators to increase the sidewall transmission loss (TL) in aircraft cabin sidewalls is evaluated. Development, construction, and test of an aircraft cabin acoustic enclosure, built in support of the Propfan Test Assessment (PTA) program, is described. Laboratory and flight test results are discussed. Resonators (448) were located between the enclosure trim panels and the fuselage shell. In addition, 152 resonators were placed between the enclosure and aircraft floors. The 600 resonators were each tuned to a propfan fundamental blade passage frequency (235 Hz). After flight testing on the PTA aircraft, noise reduction (NR) tests were performed with the enclosure in the Kelly Johnson Research and Development Center Acoustics Laboratory. Broadband and tonal excitations were used in the laboratory. Tonal excitation simulated the propfan flight test excitation. The resonators increase the NR of the cabin walls around the resonance frequency of the resonator array. Increases in NR of up to 11 dB were measured. The effects of flanking, sidewall absorption, cabin absorption, resonator loading of trim panels, and panel vibrations are presented. Resonator and sidewall panel design and test are discussed.

  14. Acoustic Data Processing and Transient Signal Analysis for the Hybrid Wing Body 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Wind Tunnel Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahr, Christopher J.; Brooks, Thomas F.; Humphreys, William M.; Spalt, Taylor B.; Stead, Daniel J.

    2014-01-01

    An advanced vehicle concept, the HWB N2A-EXTE aircraft design, was tested in NASA Langley's 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Wind Tunnel to study its acoustic characteristics for var- ious propulsion system installation and airframe con gurations. A signi cant upgrade to existing data processing systems was implemented, with a focus on portability and a re- duction in turnaround time. These requirements were met by updating codes originally written for a cluster environment and transferring them to a local workstation while en- abling GPU computing. Post-test, additional processing of the time series was required to remove transient hydrodynamic gusts from some of the microphone time series. A novel automated procedure was developed to analyze and reject contaminated blocks of data, under the assumption that the desired acoustic signal of interest was a band-limited sta- tionary random process, and of lower variance than the hydrodynamic contamination. The procedure is shown to successfully identify and remove contaminated blocks of data and retain the desired acoustic signal. Additional corrections to the data, mainly background subtraction, shear layer refraction calculations, atmospheric attenuation and microphone directivity corrections, were all necessary for initial analysis and noise assessments. These were implemented for the post-processing of spectral data, and are shown to behave as expected.

  15. Towards Truly Quiet MRI: animal MRI magnetic field gradients as a test platform for acoustic noise reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edelstein, William; El-Sharkawy, Abdel-Monem

    2013-03-01

    Clinical MRI acoustic noise, often substantially exceeding 100 dB, causes patient anxiety and discomfort and interferes with functional MRI (fMRI) and interventional MRI. MRI acoustic noise reduction is a long-standing and difficult technical challenge. The noise is basically caused by large Lorentz forces on gradient windings--surrounding the patient bore--situated in strong magnetic fields (1.5 T, 3 T or higher). Pulsed currents of 300 A or more are switched through the gradient windings in sub-milliseconds. Experimenting with hardware noise reduction on clinical scanners is difficult and expensive because of the large scale and weight of clinical scanner components (gradient windings ~ 1000 kg) that require special handling equipment in large engineering test facilities. Our approach is to produce a Truly Quiet (<70 dB) small-scale animal imager. Results serve as a test platform for acoustic noise reduction measures that can be implemented in clinical scanners. We have so far decreased noise in an animal scale imager from 108 dB to 71 dB, a 37 dB reduction. Our noise reduction measures include: a gradient container that can be evacuated; inflatable antivibration mounts to prevent transmission of vibrations from gradient winding to gradient container; vibration damping of wires going from gradient to the outside world via the gradient container; and a copper passive shield to prevent the generation of eddy currents in the metal cryostat inner bore, which in turn can vibrate and produce noise.

  16. Preliminary vibration, acoustic, and shock design and test criteria for components on the SRB, ET, and SSME

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Specifications for vibration, acoustic and shock design for components and subassemblies on the External Tank (ET), Solid Rocket Booster (SRB), and Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME). Included are vibration, acoustic, shock, transportation, handling, and acceptance test requirements and procedures. The space shuttle ET, SRB, and SSME have been divided into zones and subzones. Zones are designated primarily to assist in determining the applicable specifications. A subzone (General Specification) is available for use when the location of the component is known but component design and weight are not well defined. When the location, weight, and mounting configuration of the component are known, specifications for appropriate subzone weight ranges are available. Criteria for some specific components are also presented.

  17. Acoustic emission frequency discrimination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sugg, Frank E. (Inventor); Graham, Lloyd J. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    In acoustic emission nondestructive testing, broadband frequency noise is distinguished from narrow banded acoustic emission signals, since the latter are valid events indicative of structural flaws in the material being examined. This is accomplished by separating out those signals which contain frequency components both within and beyond (either above or below) the range of valid acoustic emission events. Application to acoustic emission monitoring during nondestructive bond verification and proof loading of undensified tiles on the Space Shuttle Orbiter is considered.

  18. Wideband Acoustic Immittance: Normative Study and Test-Retest Reliability of Tympanometric Measurements in Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sun, Xiao-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to present normative data of tympanometric measurements of wideband acoustic immittance and to characterize wideband tympanograms. Method: Data were collected in 84 young adults with strictly defined normal hearing and middle ear status. Energy absorbance (EA) was measured using clicks for 1/12-octave…

  19. Navy vehicles: acoustic emission related to nondestructive testing. Final report, 1980-1987

    SciTech Connect

    Ono, K.

    1988-04-12

    This investigation was aimed at studying acoustic emission for applications to residual stress measurements and for the evaluation of structural integrity of engineering structures. Effects of microstructure, composition and prior cold working on magnetomechanical acoustic emission(MAE) have been studied. Magnetization behavior, magnetostriction and Barkhausen noise are affected by stress as well as other parameters. These responses have been measured simultaneously in order to identify the stress level uniquely. Combinations of advanced signal analysis methods and MAE measurements have been studied to identify the optimum parameters for applications. This work has established mechanisms of MAE signal generation, effects of various parameters that influence the MAE behavior of materials and signal processing techniques that allow materials characterization via MAE. Included are neutron-irradiated reactor-vessel steels, large-size steel plates as well as single crystals of various ferromagnetic metals and alloys. In the second part of this study, acoustic emission from materials undergoing plastic deformation and fracture were examined in an attempt to improve detection capability of the impending structural failure. Acoustic emission characteristics of reactor-vessel steels, advanced aluminum alloys and metal and ceramic-matrix composite materials have been evaluated in detail.

  20. Wideband Acoustic Immittance: Normative Study and Test-Retest Reliability of Tympanometric Measurements in Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sun, Xiao-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to present normative data of tympanometric measurements of wideband acoustic immittance and to characterize wideband tympanograms. Method: Data were collected in 84 young adults with strictly defined normal hearing and middle ear status. Energy absorbance (EA) was measured using clicks for 1/12-octave…

  1. Experimental investigation of shock-cell noise reduction for dual-stream nozzles in simulated flight comprehensive data report. Volume 1: Test nozzles and acoustic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, K.; Janardan, B. A.; Brausch, J. F.; Hoerst, D. J.; Price, A. O.

    1984-02-01

    Parameters which contribute to supersonic jet shock noise were investigated for the purpose of determining means to reduce such noise generation to acceptable levels. Six dual-stream test nozzles with varying flow passage and plug closure designs were evaluated under simulated flight conditions in an anechoic chamber. All nozzles had combined convergent-divergent or convergent flow passages. Acoustic behavior as a function of nozzle flow passage geometry was measured. The acoustic data consist primarily of 1/3 octave band sound pressure levels and overall sound pressure levels. Detailed schematics and geometric characteristics of the six scale model nozzle configurations and acoustic test point definitions are presented. Tabulation of aerodynamic test conditions and a computer listing of the measured acoustic data are displayed.

  2. Experimental investigation of shock-cell noise reduction for dual-stream nozzles in simulated flight comprehensive data report. Volume 1: Test nozzles and acoustic data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamamoto, K.; Janardan, B. A.; Brausch, J. F.; Hoerst, D. J.; Price, A. O.

    1984-01-01

    Parameters which contribute to supersonic jet shock noise were investigated for the purpose of determining means to reduce such noise generation to acceptable levels. Six dual-stream test nozzles with varying flow passage and plug closure designs were evaluated under simulated flight conditions in an anechoic chamber. All nozzles had combined convergent-divergent or convergent flow passages. Acoustic behavior as a function of nozzle flow passage geometry was measured. The acoustic data consist primarily of 1/3 octave band sound pressure levels and overall sound pressure levels. Detailed schematics and geometric characteristics of the six scale model nozzle configurations and acoustic test point definitions are presented. Tabulation of aerodynamic test conditions and a computer listing of the measured acoustic data are displayed.

  3. AMELIA CESTOL Test: Acoustic Characteristics of Circulation Control Wing with Leading- and Trailing-Edge Slot Blowing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horne, William C.; Burnside, Nathan J.

    2013-01-01

    The AMELIA Cruise-Efficient Short Take-off and Landing (CESTOL) configuration concept was developed to meet future requirements of reduced field length, noise, and fuel burn by researchers at Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo and Georgia Tech Research Institute under sponsorship by the NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Program (FAP), Subsonic Fixed Wing Project. The novel configuration includes leading- and trailing-edge circulation control wing (CCW), over-wing podded turbine propulsion simulation (TPS). Extensive aerodynamic measurements of forces, surfaces pressures, and wing surface skin friction measurements were recently measured over a wide range of test conditions in the Arnold Engineering Development Center(AEDC) National Full-Scale Aerodynamics Complex (NFAC) 40- by 80-Ft Wind Tunnel. Acoustic measurements of the model were also acquired for each configuration with 7 fixed microphones on a line under the left wing, and with a 48-element, 40-inch diameter phased microphone array under the right wing. This presentation will discuss acoustic characteristics of the CCW system for a variety of tunnel speeds (0 to 120 kts), model configurations (leading edge(LE) and/or trailing-edge(TE) slot blowing, and orientations (incidence and yaw) based on acoustic measurements acquired concurrently with the aerodynamic measurements. The flow coefficient, Cmu= mVSLOT/qSW varied from 0 to 0.88 at 40 kts, and from 0 to 0.15 at 120 kts. Here m is the slot mass flow rate, VSLOT is the slot exit velocity, q is dynamic pressure, and SW is wing surface area. Directivities at selected 1/3 octave bands will be compared with comparable measurements of a 2-D wing at GTRI, as will as microphone array near-field measurements of the right wing at maximum flow rate. The presentation will include discussion of acoustic sensor calibrations as well as characterization of the wind tunnel background noise environment.

  4. Acoustic tests on a new motor generator system for the minuteman launch control centers in Hill engineering test facilities 1 and 2, Hill AFB, Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fairman, Terry M.

    1989-04-01

    Post critical design review acoustic tests were performed in Hill Engineering Test Facilities 1 and 2 (HETF) on a proposed new motor generator system for the Minuteman Launch Control Centers (LCC). A performance noise criteria equivalent to a preferred noise criterion (PNC-50) curve was established as the standard by which to judge the effectiveness of the new motor generator. Measurements were obtained at both the commander's console and the deputy commander's console. Results indicated the noise from the motor generator as configured in HETF 1 (the small LCC) exceeded the PNC-50 criteria primarily in the 63 hertz (Hz) octave band by 10 decibels (dB) when operated in both the ac and dc modes. The motor generator as configured in HETF 2 (the large LCC) exceeded the PNC-50 criteria by 3 dB in the 125 Hz octave band only at the deputy commander's console when operated in the ac mode. Acoustic intensity measurements were obtained to isolate specific noise sources and determine the transmission loss of the floor panels. Vibration measurements were also made on and near the motor generator to determine paths of structure-borne vibration energy. Specific recommendations for improving the acoustic environment in the LCC's are presented.

  5. The sensitivity of acoustic cough recording relative to intraesophageal pressure recording and patient report during reflux testing.

    PubMed

    Rosen, R; Amirault, J; Heinz, N; Litman, H; Khatwa, U

    2014-11-01

    One of the primary indications for reflux testing with multichannel intraluminal impedance with pH (pH-MII) is to correlate reflux events with symptoms such as cough. Adult and pediatric studies have shown, using cough as a model, that patient report of symptoms is inaccurate. Unfortunately, intraesophageal pressure recording (IEPR) to record coughs is more invasive which limits its utility in children. The primary aim of this study was to validate the use of acoustic cough recording (ACR) during pH-MII testing. We recruited children undergoing pH-MII testing for the evaluation of cough. We simultaneously placed IEPR and pH-MII catheters and an ACR device in each patient. Each 24 h ACR, pH-MII, and IEPR tracing was scored by blinded investigators. Sensitivities for each method of symptom recording were calculated. A total of 2698 coughs were detected; 1140 were patient reported PR, 2425 were IEPR detected, and 2400 were ACR detected. The sensitivity of PR relative to ACR was 45.9% and the sensitivity of IEPR relative to ACR was 93.6%. There was strong inter-rater reliability (κ = 0.78) for the identification of cough by ACR. Acoustic recording is a non-invasive, sensitive method of recording cough during pH-MII testing that is well suited for the pediatric population. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. The use of extra-terrestrial oceans to test ocean acoustics students.

    PubMed

    Leighton, T G

    2012-03-01

    The existence of extra-terrestrial oceans offers the opportunities to set examination questions for which students in underwater acoustics do not already know the answers. The limited set of scenarios in Earth's oceans that can be presented to students as tractable examination questions means that, rather than properly assessing the individual scenario, students can rely on knowledge from previous examples in assessing, for example, which terms in equations are large and small, and what numerical values the answers are likely to take. The habit of adapting previous solutions with which the student is comfortable, to new scenarios, is not a safe approach to learn, as it ill equips the future scientist or engineer to identify and tackle problems which contain serious departures from their experience. © 2012 Acoustical Society of America

  7. An impulse test technique with application to acoustic measurements. [for engine noise absorbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salikuddin, M.; Dean, P. D.; Plumblee, H. E., Jr.; Ahuja, K. K.

    1979-01-01

    A method has been presented for measuring the acoustic properties of an absorbent material and a duct/nozzle system (with or without airflow) using a high voltage spark discharge as an impulse source of sound. The cross-spectra of the incident, reflected and transmitted acoustic pressure transients are analyzed by way of a FFT digital processor in the form of complex transfer functions. These transfer functions have a direct relationship to the termination impedance and radiation directivity. The impulse method has been justified by comparisons, with data obtained from existing methods (both experimental and theoretical), that show excellent agreement. Reflection coefficients and radiation impedances of various duct-nozzle systems and their associated far-field directivities are also presented as some of the applications of the impulse technique.

  8. Discrete-Mode Source Development and Testing for New Seismo-Acoustic Sonar

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-03-01

    the English scientist, Lord Rayleigh (J.W. Strutt ) [Ref. 6] demonstrated theoretically that there exist waves that can propagate over the planar...and T.G. Muir, Aug. 1994. 6. Rayleigh , Lord (J.W. Strutt ), "On Waves Propagated along the Plane Surface of an Elastic Solid," Proceedings London...13. ABSTRACT (maximum 200 words) A seismo-acoustic sonar concept that uses guided interface waves ( Rayleigh or Schölte) is being developed to

  9. A Register of Underwater Acoustic Test Facilities in the United States, Canada, and the United Kingdom

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-04-01

    requirements. Mailing Address: Naval Surface Warfare Center Acoustic Research Detachment P.O. Box 129 Bayview, ID 83803-0129 Contact Person: George Guedel...needs. Mailing Address: Naval Surface Warfare Center , Crane Division Bldg 41NE Crane, IN 47522-5070 Contact Person: George T. Moody Tel (812) 854-4270...requirements. Mailing Address: Naval Undersea Warfare Center Detachment New London, CT 06320 Contact Person: Lynn Carlton Tel (203) 440-5811 Narrative

  10. Testing and verification of a scale-model acoustic propagation system.

    PubMed

    Sagers, Jason D; Ballard, Megan S

    2015-12-01

    This paper discusses the design and operation of a measurement apparatus used to conduct scale-model underwater acoustic propagation experiments, presents experimental results for an idealized waveguide, and compares the measured results to data generated by two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) numerical models. The main objective of this paper is to demonstrate the capability of the apparatus for a simple waveguide that primarily exhibits 2D acoustic propagation. The apparatus contains a computer-controlled positioning system that accurately moves a receiving transducer in the water layer above a scale-model bathymetry while a stationary source transducer emits broadband pulsed waveforms. Experimental results are shown for a 2.133 m × 1.219 m bathymetric part possessing a flat-bottom bathymetry with a translationally invariant wedge of 10° slope along one edge. Beamformed results from a synthetic horizontal line array indicate the presence of strong in-plane arrivals along with weaker diffracted and horizontally refracted arrivals. A simulated annealing inversion method is applied to infer values for five waveguide parameters with the largest measurement uncertainty. The inferred values are then used in a 2D method of images model and a 3D adiabatic normal-mode model to simulate the measured acoustic data.

  11. Scale Model Acoustic Test Validation of IOP-SS Water Prediction using Loci-STREAM-VoF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nielsen, Tanner; West, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    The Scale Model Acoustic Test (SMAT) is a 5% scale test of the Space Launch System (SLS), which is currently being designed at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). SMAT consists of a 5% scale representation of the ignition overpressure sound-suppression system (IOP-SS) that is being tested to quantify the water flow and induced air entrainment in and around the mobile launcher exhaust hole. This data will be compared with computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations using the newly developed Loci-STREAM Volume of Fluid (VoF) methods. Compressible and incompressible VoF methods have been formulated, and are currently being used to simulate the water flow of SMAT IOP-SS. The test data will be used to qualitatively and quantitatively assess and validate the VoF methods.

  12. Acoustic Noise Test Report for the U.S. Department of Energy 1.5-Megawatt Wind Turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Roadman, Jason; Huskey, Arlinda

    2015-07-01

    A series of tests were conducted to characterize the baseline properties and performance of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) 1.5-megawatt wind turbine (DOE 1.5) to enable research model development and quantify the effects of future turbine research modifications. The DOE 1.5 is built on the platform of GE's 1.5-MW SLE commercial wind turbine model. It was installed in a nonstandard configuration at the NWTC with the objective of supporting DOE Wind Program research initiatives such as A2e. Therefore, the test results may not represent the performance capabilities of other GE 1.5-MW SLE turbines. The acoustic noise test documented in this report is one of a series of tests carried out to establish a performance baseline for the DOE 1.5 in the NWTC inflow environment.

  13. Preliminary vibration, acoustic, and shock design and test criteria for components on the HEAO-A spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    These vibration, acoustic, and shock specifications provide the qualification test criteria for spacecraft components and subassemblies and for the High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO-A) experiments. The HEAO-A was divided into zones and subzones to obtain simple component groupings. Zones are designated primarily to assist in determining the applicable specification. A Subzone is available for use when the location of the component is known but component design and weight are not well defined. When the location, weight, and mounting configuration of the component are known, the appropriate Subzone weight ranges are available. Experiment and specific component specifications are available.

  14. Preliminary vibration, acoustic, and shock design and test criteria for components on the HEAO-C spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The vibration, acoustic, and shock specification test criteria for spacecraft components and subassemblies and for the high Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO-C) experiments are presented. The HEAO-C was divided into zones and subzones to obtain simple component groupings. Zones are designated primarily to assist in determining the applicable specification. A subzone (general specification) is available for use when the location of the component is known but component design and weight are not well defined. When the location, weight, and mounting configuration of the component are known, the appropriate subzone weight ranges (-A, -B, etc. ) are available. Experiment and specific component specifications are available.

  15. A seismic field test with a Low-level Acoustic Combustion Source and Pseudo-Noise codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Askeland, Bjørn; Ruud, Bent Ole; Hobæk, Halvor; Mjelde, Rolf

    2009-01-01

    The Low-level Acoustic Combustion Source (LACS) which can fire its pulses at a high rate, has been tested successfully as a seismic marine source on shallow ice-age sediments in Byfjorden at Bergen, Norway. Pseudo-Noise pulsed signals with spiky autocorrelation functions were used to detect the sediments. Each transmitted sequence lasted 10 s and contained 43 pulses. While correlation gave a blurry result, deconvolution between the near-field recordings and the streamer recordings gave a clear seismic section. Compared to the section acquired with single air-gun shots along the same profile, the LACS gave a more clear presentation of the sediments and basement.

  16. A Synthetic Test of Precision in GPS/Acoustic Measurements of Seafloor Positioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kido, M.; Sweeney, A. D.; Osada, Y.; Fujimoto, H.; Miura, S.

    2004-12-01

    In this decade, much efforts have been made in detecting seafloor movement using GPS/Acoustic ranging method. GPS/Acoustic measurement consists of two parts, one is the positioning of a transducer at sea surface using K-GPS and the other is measuring travel-time or slant-range between the transducer and transponders put on ocean bottom using acoustic ranging. Currently precision of the seafloor positioning reaches less than 10cm. Several possible factors arise, which still decrease the precision, such as GPS positioning itself in 1 Hz, interpolating of exact position of the transducer at an arbitrary timing of acoustic measurement, uncertainty of the sound velocity variation both in time and space as well as depth variation due mainly to ocean tide. A linear or spline interpolation can be applied to undulation of the transducer position when GPS antennas and the transducer are equipped on a ship. On the contrary when using a buoy system, one need additional physical sensors to detect flutter of the buoy in higher frequency. For the sound velocity, one can estimate it based on CTD or XCTD/XBT data. However, such data cannot cover entire period and space of observation. In general, sound velocity thought to varies smaller in lateral than in time. Accounting for this nature, Scripps group developed a strategy that set transponders like triangle and make acoustic measurement with the transducer kept laterally equidistant to the transponders. In this method most of laterally stratified component of sound velocity variation in time will be cancelled to determine the center of the triangle. Prior to this measurement, position of individual transponder must be estimated. Error in this estimation will biases the ``absolute'' final position of the center, which is not important to detect the crustal ``relative'' movement, as long as one take the same estimations in the next survey. However this error increase the misfit of travel-time, which results in the final position to

  17. Challenging Pneumatic Requirements for Acoustic Testing of the Cryogenic Second Stage for the New Delta 3 Rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, Andrew T.

    1998-01-01

    The paper describes the unique pneumatic test requirements for the acoustic and shock separation testing of the Second Stage for the new Delta III Rocket at the Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. The testing was conducted in the 45,000 cu ft (25-feet wide by 30-feet deep by 50-foot high) Acoustic Facility. The acoustic testing required that the liquid oxygen (LOX) and liquid hydrogen (LH2) tanks be filled with enough liquid nitrogen (LN2) to simulate launch fuel masses during testing. The challenge for this test dealt with designing, procuring, and fabricating the pneumatic supply systems for quick assembly while maintaining the purity requirements and minimizing costs. The pneumatic systems were designed to fill and drain the both LOX and LH2 tanks as well as to operate the fill/drain and vent valves for each of the tanks. The test criteria for the pneumatic sub-systems consisted of function, cleanliness, availability, and cost. The first criteria, function, required the tanks to be filled and drained in an efficient manner while preventing them from seeing pressures greater than 9 psig which would add a pressure cycle to the tank. An LN2 tanker, borrowed from another NASA facility, served as the pre-cool and drain tanker. Pre-cooling the tanks allowed for more efficient and cost effective transfer from the LN2 delivery tankers. Helium gas, supplied from a high purity tube trailer, was used to pressurize the vapor space above the LN2 pushing it into the drain tanker. The tube trailer also supplied high pressure helium to the vehicle for valve control and component purges. Cleanliness was maintained by proper component selection, end-use particle filtration, and any on-site cleaning determined necessary by testing. In order to meet the availability/cost juggling act, products designed for LOX delivery systems were procured to ensure system compatibility while off the shelf valves and tubing designed for the semiconductor industry were procured for

  18. Use of Strain Measurements from Acoustic Bench Tests of the Battleship Flowliner Test Articles To Link Analytical Model Results to In-Service Resonant Response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frady, Greg; Smaolloey, Kurt; LaVerde, Bruce; Bishop, Jim

    2004-01-01

    The paper will discuss practical and analytical findings of a test program conducted to assist engineers in determining which analytical strain fields are most appropriate to describe the crack initiating and crack propagating stresses in thin walled cylindrical hardware that serves as part of the Space Shuttle Main Engine's fuel system. In service the hardware is excited by fluctuating dynamic pressures in a cryogenic fuel that arise from turbulent flow/pump cavitation. A bench test using a simplified system was conducted using acoustic energy in air to excite the test articles. Strain measurements were used to reveal response characteristics of two Flowliner test articles that are assembled as a pair when installed in the engine feed system.

  19. Use of Strain Measurements from Acoustic Bench Tests of the Battleship Flowliner Test Articles To Link Analytical Model Results to In-Service Resonant Response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frady, Greg; Smaolloey, Kurt; LaVerde, Bruce; Bishop, Jim

    2004-01-01

    The paper will discuss practical and analytical findings of a test program conducted to assist engineers in determining which analytical strain fields are most appropriate to describe the crack initiating and crack propagating stresses in thin walled cylindrical hardware that serves as part of the Space Shuttle Main Engine's fuel system. In service the hardware is excited by fluctuating dynamic pressures in a cryogenic fuel that arise from turbulent flow/pump cavitation. A bench test using a simplified system was conducted using acoustic energy in air to excite the test articles. Strain measurements were used to reveal response characteristics of two Flowliner test articles that are assembled as a pair when installed in the engine feed system.

  20. Effects of Different Local Anaesthetics on Oto-acoustic Emission Tests after Spinal Anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Sitilci, T; Akyol, O; Alka, Z; Ozyuvaci, E; Yigit, O

    2015-05-07

    To evaluate whether there is any effect of different local anaesthetic agents on hearing loss after spinal anaesthesia. Thirty American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) I patients without a hearing problem were included in the study. Transient evoked oto-acoustic emissions (TEOAE) were examined. Patients were randomly separated into two groups: Group L, 15 mg isobaric levobupivacaine application and Group B, 15 mg isobaric bupivacaine application, for spinal anaesthesia. Oto-acoustic emission measurements were repeated on patients at the 24(th) hour after spinal anaesthesia application. No significant difference was found in the output values of the right and left ears according to the input values in group L at no kHz (p > 0.05). No significant difference was found in the output values of the right and left ears according to the input values in any kHz of Group B (p > 0.05). Fifteen milligrammes of isobaric bupivacaine and levobupivacaine had no significant difference on the effect of hearing loss after spinal anaesthesia. Hearing loss after spinal anaesthesia has many unknown issues, and deserves to be explored by performing many studies.

  1. Subpilot-scale testing of acoustically enhanced cyclone collectors. Final report, September 1988--September 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Galica, M.A.; Campbell, A.H.; Rawlins, D.C.

    1994-08-01

    Gas turbines are used to recover energy from high temperature exhaust gases in coal-fired pressurized-fluidized bed, combined-cycle power generation systems. However, prior to entering the turbine hot-section, the majority of the fly ash must be removed in order to protect the turbine components from erosion, corrosion, and deposition of the ash. The U.S. Department of Energy under the direction of the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) sponsored the development of an acoustically enhanced cyclone collector which offers the potential of achieving environmental control standards under Pressurized Fluid Bed Combustors (PFBC) conditions without the need for post-turbine particulate control. Pulse combustors developed by Manufacturing and Technology Conversation International, Inc. (MTCI) produced the acoustic power necessary to agglomerate ash particles into sizes large enough to be collected in a conventional cyclone system. A hot gas cleanup system that meets both turbine protection and emissions requirements without post-turbine particulate controls would also have improved overall system economics.

  2. Development of modified vibration test criteria for qualifying space vehicle components. [subjected to broadband random acoustic excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, K. Y.; Kao, G. C.

    1974-01-01

    Simplified methods are described to estimate the test criteria of primary structures at component attachment points subjected to broadband random acoustic excitations. The current method utilizes a constant smeared component mass attenuation factor across the frequency range of interest. The developed method indicates that the attenuation factor is based on a frequency dependent ratio of the mechanical impedances of both the component and primary structures. The procedures used to predict the structural responses are considered as the present state-of-the-art and provide satisfactory prediction results. Example problems are used to illustrate the application procedures of the two methods and to compare the significant difference. It was found that the lower test criteria obtained by the impedance ratio method is due to the results of considering the effects of component/primary structure interaction.

  3. Acoustic Emission and Damage Accumulation for Various Woven C/SiC Composites Tested in Tension at Room Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morscher, Gregory; Petko, Jeanne; Kiser, James D.

    2002-01-01

    Modal acoustic emission (AE) has proven to be an excellent technique to monitor damage accumulation in ceramic matrix composites. In this study, AE was used to monitor tensile load-unload-reload hysteresis tests for a variety of C fiber reinforced, Sic matrix composites. C/SiC composites were reinforced with T-300 and IM7 fibers, had C, multilayer, or pseudo-porous C interphases, and had chemical vapor infiltrated Sic or melt-infiltrated SiC matrices. All of the composites exhibited considerable AE during testing. The extent and nature of the AE activity will be analyzed and discussed in light of matrix cracking and the variety of composite constituents. It is hoped that understanding the nature of stress-dependent damage accumulation in these materials can be of use in life-modeling for these types of composites.

  4. Acoustic Emission and Damage Accumulation for Various Woven C/SiC Composites Tested in Tension at Room Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morscher, Gregory N.; Petko, Jeanne; Kiser, James D.; Gray, Hugh R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Modal acoustic emission (AE) has proven to be an excellent technique to monitor damage accumulation in ceramic matrix composites. In this study, AE was used to monitor tensile load-unload-reload hysteresis tests for a variety of C fiber reinforced, SiC matrix composites. C/SiC composites were reinforced with T300 and IM7 fibers, had C, multilayer, or pseudo-porous C interphases, and had chemical vapor infiltrated SiC or melt-infiltrated SiC matrices. All of the composites exhibited considerable AE during testing. The extent and nature of the AE activity will be analyzed and discussed in light of matrix cracking and the variety of composite constituents. It is hoped that understanding the nature of stress dependent damage accumulation in these materials can be of use in life modeling for these types of composites.

  5. Advantages of laser-acoustical leak testing for construction and operation of low-temperature installations and superconducting experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herz, W.

    2002-09-01

    At the Institute of Technical Physics of the Research Center Karlsruhe, superconducting magnets for nuclear fusion applications have been tested in the vacuum tank TOSKA for more than 20 years. A crucial test parameter of the magnet coils (mass up to 120 metric tons) as well as of the peripheral components, such as current leads (up to 80 kA), helium refrigerators (2 kW), and low-temperature transfer lines (length approx200 m), is their vacuum tightness at operating conditions (minimum temperature approx2 K, maximum refrigerant pressure 25 bar). Because the final tests at cryotemperature are costly and time consuming, intermediate tests at room temperature have already been performed at the stages of manufacturing, certification, and assembling, and prior to cooldown. So far, these tightness tests have been performed with probe gas helium employing a conventional mass spectrometer leak detector, whereby the smallest detectable leakage is limited by the He partial pressure in the surrounding air. Therefore, a new technique of leak measurement was investigated using the probe gas sulfur hexafluoride SF6, which does not occur in natural air, and which can be sensitively detected by a laser-acoustical leak detector. The obtained experimental results reveal the substantial advantages of the new method with respect to detection sensitivity, testing expenditure, and costs. The results can be transferred to tightness tests in other fields of technology. copyright 2002 American Vacuum Society.

  6. Flight and Static Exhaust Flow Properties of an F110-GE-129 Engine in an F-16XL Airplane During Acoustic Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holzman, Jon K.; Webb, Lannie D.; Burcham, Frank W., Jr.

    1996-01-01

    The exhaust flow properties (mass flow, pressure, temperature, velocity, and Mach number) of the F110-GE-129 engine in an F-16XL airplane were determined from a series of flight tests flown at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. These tests were performed in conjunction with NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia (LARC) as part of a study to investigate the acoustic characteristics of jet engines operating at high nozzle pressure conditions. The range of interest for both objectives was from Mach 0.3 to Mach 0.9. NASA Dryden flew the airplane and acquired and analyzed the engine data to determine the exhaust characteristics. NASA Langley collected the flyover acoustic measurements and correlated these results with their current predictive codes. This paper describes the airplane, tests, and methods used to determine the exhaust flow properties and presents the exhaust flow properties. No acoustics results are presented.

  7. Numerical inverse method predicting acoustic spinning modes radiated by a ducted fan from free-field test data.

    PubMed

    Lewy, Serge

    2008-07-01

    Spinning modes generated by a ducted turbofan at a given frequency determine the acoustic free-field directivity. An inverse method starting from measured directivity patterns is interesting in providing information on the noise sources without requiring tedious spinning-mode experimental analyses. According to a previous article, equations are based on analytical modal splitting inside a cylindrical duct and on a Rayleigh or a Kirchhoff integral on the duct exit cross section to get far-field directivity. Equations are equal in number to free-field measurement locations and the unknowns are the propagating mode amplitudes (there are generally more unknowns than equations). A MATLAB procedure has been implemented by using either the pseudoinverse function or the backslash operator. A constraint comes from the fact that squared modal amplitudes must be positive which involves an iterative least squares fitting. Numerical simulations are discussed along with several examples based on tests performed by Rolls-Royce in the framework of a European project. It is assessed that computation is very fast and it well fits the measured directivities, but the solution depends on the method and is not unique. This means that the initial set of modes should be chosen according to any known physical property of the acoustic sources.

  8. Methodological considerations of acoustic playbacks to test the behavioral significance of call directionality in male northern elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holt, Marla M.; Insley, Stephen J.; Southall, Brandon L.; Schusterman, Ronald J.

    2005-09-01

    While attempting to gain access to receptive females, male northern elephant seals form dominance hierarchies through multiple dyadic interactions involving visual and acoustic signals. These signals are both highly stereotyped and directional. Previous behavioral observations suggested that males attend to the directional cues of these signals. We used in situ vocal playbacks to test whether males attend to directional cues of the acoustic components of a competitors calls (i.e., variation in call spectra and source levels). Here, we will focus on playback methodology. Playback calls were multiple exemplars of a marked dominant male from an isolated area, recorded with a directional microphone and DAT recorder and edited into a natural sequence that controlled call amplitude. Control calls were recordings of ambient rookery sounds with the male calls removed. Subjects were 20 marked males (10 adults and 10 subadults) all located at An~o Nuevo, CA. Playback presentations, calibrated for sound-pressure level, were broadcast at a distance of 7 m from each subject. Most responses were classified into the following categories: visual orientation, postural change, calling, movement toward or away from the loudspeaker, and re-directed aggression. We also investigated developmental, hierarchical, and ambient noise variables that were thought to influence male behavior.

  9. The design and flight test of an engine inlet bulk acoustic liner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lester, H. C.; Preisser, J. S.; Parrott, T. L.

    1983-01-01

    This paper summarizes the design, fabrication and flight evaluation of a Kevlar acoustic liner configuration for a JT15D turbofan engine. The liner was designed to suppress, by a measurable amount, a dominant (13,0) BPF tone. This tone or spinning mode was produced for research purposes by installing 41 circumferentially distributed small diameter rods upstream of the 28 fan blades. Duct liner attenuations calculated by a finite element procedure were compared to far field power (insertion) losses deduced from flight data. The finite element program modeled the variable geometry of the JT15D inlet and used a uniform flow with a boundary layer roll-off to model the inlet flow field. Calculated liner losses were generally conservative. That is, measured far field power losses were generally greater than attenuations calculated by the finite element computer program.

  10. Induction of enhanced acoustic startle response by noise exposure: dependence on exposure conditions and testing parameters and possible relevance to hyperacusis.

    PubMed

    Salloum, Rony H; Yurosko, Christopher; Santiago, Lia; Sandridge, Sharon A; Kaltenbach, James A

    2014-01-01

    There has been a recent surge of interest in the development of animal models of hyperacusis, a condition in which tolerance to sounds of moderate and high intensities is diminished. The reasons for this decreased tolerance are likely multifactorial, but some major factors that contribute to hyperacusis are increased loudness perception and heightened sensitivity and/or responsiveness to sound. Increased sound sensitivity is a symptom that sometimes develops in human subjects after acoustic insult and has recently been demonstrated in animals as evidenced by enhancement of the acoustic startle reflex following acoustic over-exposure. However, different laboratories have obtained conflicting results in this regard, with some studies reporting enhanced startle, others reporting weakened startle, and still others reporting little, if any, change in the amplitude of the acoustic startle reflex following noise exposure. In an effort to gain insight into these discrepancies, we conducted measures of acoustic startle responses (ASR) in animals exposed to different levels of sound, and repeated such measures on consecutive days using a range of different startle stimuli. Since many studies combine measures of acoustic startle with measures of gap detection, we also tested ASR in two different acoustic contexts, one in which the startle amplitudes were tested in isolation, the other in which startle amplitudes were measured in the context of the gap detection test. The results reveal that the emergence of chronic hyperacusis-like enhancements of startle following noise exposure is highly reproducible but is dependent on the post-exposure thresholds, the time when the measures are performed and the context in which the ASR measures are obtained. These findings could explain many of the discrepancies that exist across studies and suggest guidelines for inducing in animals enhancements of the startle reflex that may be related to hyperacusis.

  11. Acoustic Neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    ... search IRSA's site Unique Hits since January 2003 Acoustic Neuroma Click Here for Acoustic Neuroma Practice Guideline ... to microsurgery. One doctor's story of having an acoustic neuroma In August 1991, Dr. Thomas F. Morgan ...

  12. Damage Characterization of Bio and Green Polyethylene-Birch Composites under Creep and Cyclic Testing with Multivariable Acoustic Emissions.

    PubMed

    Bravo, Alencar; Toubal, Lotfi; Koffi, Demagna; Erchiqui, Fouad

    2015-11-02

    Despite the knowledge gained in recent years regarding the use of acoustic emissions (AEs) in ecologically friendly, natural fiber-reinforced composites (including certain composites with bio-sourced matrices), there is still a knowledge gap in the understanding of the difference in damage behavior between green and biocomposites. Thus, this article investigates the behavior of two comparable green and biocomposites with tests that better reflect real-life applications, i.e., load-unloading and creep testing, to determine the evolution of the damage process. Comparing the mechanical results with the AE, it can be concluded that the addition of a coupling agent (CA) markedly reduced the ratio of AE damage to mechanical damage. CA had an extremely beneficial effect on green composites because the Kaiser effect was dominant during cyclic testing. During the creep tests, the use of a CA also avoided the transition to new damaging phases in both composites. The long-term applications of PE green material must be chosen carefully because bio and green composites with similar properties exhibited different damage processes in tests such as cycling and creep that could not be previously understood using only monotonic testing.

  13. Damage Characterization of Bio and Green Polyethylene–Birch Composites under Creep and Cyclic Testing with Multivariable Acoustic Emissions

    PubMed Central

    Bravo, Alencar; Toubal, Lotfi; Koffi, Demagna; Erchiqui, Fouad

    2015-01-01

    Despite the knowledge gained in recent years regarding the use of acoustic emissions (AEs) in ecologically friendly, natural fiber-reinforced composites (including certain composites with bio-sourced matrices), there is still a knowledge gap in the understanding of the difference in damage behavior between green and biocomposites. Thus, this article investigates the behavior of two comparable green and biocomposites with tests that better reflect real-life applications, i.e., load-unloading and creep testing, to determine the evolution of the damage process. Comparing the mechanical results with the AE, it can be concluded that the addition of a coupling agent (CA) markedly reduced the ratio of AE damage to mechanical damage. CA had an extremely beneficial effect on green composites because the Kaiser effect was dominant during cyclic testing. During the creep tests, the use of a CA also avoided the transition to new damaging phases in both composites. The long-term applications of PE green material must be chosen carefully because bio and green composites with similar properties exhibited different damage processes in tests such as cycling and creep that could not be previously understood using only monotonic testing. PMID:28793640

  14. Results of Aero/Acoustic Tests and Analytical Studies of a Two-Dimensional Eight-Lobe Mixer-Ejector Exhaust Nozzle at Takeoff Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrington, Douglas (Technical Monitor); Schweiger, P.; Stern, A.; Gamble, E.; Barber, T.; Chiappetta, L.; LaBarre, R.; Salikuddin, M.; Shin, H.; Majjigi, R.

    2005-01-01

    Hot flow aero-acoustic tests were conducted with Pratt & Whitney's High-Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) Mixer-Ejector Exhaust Nozzles by General Electric Aircraft Engines (GEAE) in the GEAE Anechoic Freejet Noise Facility (Cell 41) located in Evendale, Ohio. The tests evaluated the impact of various geometric and design parameters on the noise generated by a two-dimensional (2-D) shrouded, 8-lobed, mixer-ejector exhaust nozzle. The shrouded mixer-ejector provides noise suppression by mixing relatively low energy ambient air with the hot, high-speed primary exhaust jet. Additional attenuation was obtained by lining the shroud internal walls with acoustic panels, which absorb acoustic energy generated during the mixing process. Two mixer designs were investigated, the high mixing "vortical" and aligned flow "axial", along with variations in the shroud internal mixing area ratios and shroud length. The shrouds were tested as hardwall or lined with acoustic panels packed with a bulk absorber. A total of 21 model configurations at 1:11.47 scale were tested. The models were tested over a range of primary nozzle pressure ratios and primary exhaust temperatures representative of typical HSCT aero thermodynamic cycles. Static as well as flight simulated data were acquired during testing. A round convergent unshrouded nozzle was tested to provide an acoustic baseline for comparison to the test configurations. Comparisons were made to previous test results obtained with this hardware at NASA Glenn's 9- by 15-foot low-speed wind tunnel (LSWT). Laser velocimetry was used to investigate external as well as ejector internal velocity profiles for comparison to computational predictions. Ejector interior wall static pressure data were also obtained. A significant reduction in exhaust system noise was demonstrated with the 2-D shrouded nozzle designs.

  15. Target spectrum matrix definition for multiple-input- multiple-output control strategies applied on direct-field- acoustic-excitation tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez Blanco, M.; Janssens, K.; Bianciardi, F.

    2016-09-01

    During the last two decades there have been several improvements on environmental acoustic qualification testing for launch and space vehicles. Direct field excitation (DFAX) tests using Multiple-Input-Multiple-Output (MIMO) control strategies seems to become the most cost-efficient way for component and subsystem acoustic testing. However there are still some concerns about the uniformity and diffusivity of the acoustic field produced by direct field testing. Lately, much of the documented progresses aimed to solve the non-uniformity of the field by altering the sound pressure level requirement, limiting responses and adding or modifying control microphones positions. However, the first two solutions imply modifying the qualification criteria, which could lead to under-testing, potentially risking the mission. Furthermore, adding or moving control microphones prematurely changes the system configuration, even if it is an optimal geometric layout in terms of wave interference patterns control. This research investigates the target definition as an initial condition for the acoustic MIMO control. Through experiments it is shown that for a given system configuration the performance of a DFAX test strongly depends on the target definition procedure. As output of this research a set of descriptors are presented describing a phenomenon defined as “Energy- sink”.

  16. Crack classification and evolution in anisotropic shale during cyclic loading tests by acoustic emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Miaomiao; Tan, Chengxuan; Meng, Jing; Yang, Baicun; Li, Yuan

    2017-08-01

    Characterization and evolution of the cracking mode in shale formation is significant, as fracture networks are an important element in shale gas exploitation. In this study we determine the crack modes and evolution in anisotropic shale under cyclic loading using the acoustic emission (AE) parameter-analysis method based on the average frequency and RA (rise-time/amplitude) value. Shale specimens with bedding-plane orientations parallel and perpendicular to the axial loading direction were subjected to loading cycles with increasing peak values until failure occurred. When the loading was parallel to the bedding plane, most of the cracks at failure were shear cracks, while tensile cracks were dominant in the specimens that were loaded normal to the bedding direction. The evolution of the crack mode in the shale specimens observed in the loading-unloading sequence except for the first cycle can be divided into three stages: (I) no or several cracks (AE events) form as a result of the Kaiser effect, (II) tensile and shear cracks increase steadily at nearly equal proportions, (III) tensile cracks and shear cracks increase abruptly, with more cracks forming in one mode than in the other. As the dominant crack motion is influenced by the bedding, the failure mechanism is discussed based on the evolution of the different crack modes. Our conclusions can increase our understanding of the formation mechanism of fracture networks in the field.

  17. Modification of the Ames 40- by 80-foot wind tunnel for component acoustic testing for the second generation supersonic transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitz, F. H.; Allmen, J. R.; Soderman, P. T.

    1994-01-01

    The development of a large-scale anechoic test facility where large models of engine/airframe/high-lift systems can be tested for both improved noise reduction and minimum performance degradation is described. The facility development is part of the effort to investigate economically viable methods of reducing second generation high speed civil transport noise during takeoff and climb-out that is now under way in the United States. This new capability will be achieved through acoustic modifications of NASA's second largest subsonic wind tunnel: the 40-by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel at the NASA Ames Research Center. Three major items are addressed in the design of this large anechoic and quiet wind tunnel: a new deep (42 inch (107 cm)) test section liner, expansion of the wind tunnel drive operating envelope at low rpm to reduce background noise, and other promising methods of improving signal-to-noise levels of inflow microphones. Current testing plans supporting the U.S. high speed civil transport program are also outlined.

  18. Virtual Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lokki, Tapio; Savioja, Lauri

    The term virtual acoustics is often applied when sound signal is processed to contain features of a simulated acoustical space and sound is spatially reproduced either with binaural or with multichannel techniques. Therefore, virtual acoustics consists of spatial sound reproduction and room acoustics modeling.

  19. Determination of Acoustic Effects on Marine Mammals and Sea Turtles for the Northwest Training and Testing Environmental Impact Statement/Overseas Environmental Impact Statement

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-11-01

    the Marine Mammal Protection Act, and the Endangered Species Act. The acoustic effects assessment for Phase II of the Tactical Training Theater...mitigation strategies, and documentation associated with Endangered Species Act Biological Evaluations and Marine Mammal Protection Act permit applications...and Testing Environmental Impact Statement/Overseas Environmental Impact Statement Marine Species Modeling Team Ranges, Engineering, and

  20. Acoustic testing to enhance western forest values and meet customer wood quality needs

    Treesearch

    Peter Carter; David Briggs; Robert J. Ross; Xiping Wang

    2005-01-01

    Nondestructive testing (NDT) of wood products, such as lumber and veneer, for stiffness and strength evaluation has been proven and commercialized for many years. The NDT concept has been extended and commercialized in the Director HM-200™ tool for testing logs in advance of processing so manufacturers can make more informed log purchases and better match logs to...

  1. Acoustic sensor engineering evaluation test report. [microphones for monitoring inside the space shuttle orbiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, E. L., Jr.; Bronson, R. D.

    1976-01-01

    Two types of one-inch diameter sound pressure level sensors, which are candidates for monitoring ambient noise in the shuttle orbiter crew compartment during rest periods, were exposed to temperature, passive humidity, and vibration. One unexposed sensor of each type served as a reference unit. Except for the humidity exposures, each of the three capacitive microphones was individually tested in sequence with the essential voltage power supply and preamplifier. One unit exibited anomalous characteristics after the humidity exposure but returned to normal after being dried in an oven at 115 deg for two hours. Except for the humidity exposures, each of the three piezoelectric microphones was individually tested with a laboratory type amplifier. Two apparent failures occurred during these tests. The diaphragm on one was found ruptured after the fourth cycle of the humidity test. A second sensor showed an anomaly after the random vibration tests at which time its sensitivity was consistent at about one-half its former value.

  2. Split Hopkinson Resonant Bar Test for Sonic-Frequency Acoustic Velocity and Attenuation Measurements of Small, Isotropic Geologic Samples

    SciTech Connect

    Nakagawa, S.

    2011-04-01

    Mechanical properties (seismic velocities and attenuation) of geological materials are often frequency dependent, which necessitates measurements of the properties at frequencies relevant to a problem at hand. Conventional acoustic resonant bar tests allow measuring seismic properties of rocks and sediments at sonic frequencies (several kilohertz) that are close to the frequencies employed for geophysical exploration of oil and gas resources. However, the tests require a long, slender sample, which is often difficult to obtain from the deep subsurface or from weak and fractured geological formations. In this paper, an alternative measurement technique to conventional resonant bar tests is presented. This technique uses only a small, jacketed rock or sediment core sample mediating a pair of long, metal extension bars with attached seismic source and receiver - the same geometry as the split Hopkinson pressure bar test for large-strain, dynamic impact experiments. Because of the length and mass added to the sample, the resonance frequency of the entire system can be lowered significantly, compared to the sample alone. The experiment can be conducted under elevated confining pressures up to tens of MPa and temperatures above 100 C, and concurrently with x-ray CT imaging. The described Split Hopkinson Resonant Bar (SHRB) test is applied in two steps. First, extension and torsion-mode resonance frequencies and attenuation of the entire system are measured. Next, numerical inversions for the complex Young's and shear moduli of the sample are performed. One particularly important step is the correction of the inverted Young's moduli for the effect of sample-rod interfaces. Examples of the application are given for homogeneous, isotropic polymer samples and a natural rock sample.

  3. Split Hopkinson resonant bar test for sonic-frequency acoustic velocity and attenuation measurements of small, isotropic geological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakagawa, Seiji

    2011-04-01

    Mechanical properties (seismic velocities and attenuation) of geological materials are often frequency dependent, which necessitates measurements of the properties at frequencies relevant to a problem at hand. Conventional acoustic resonant bar tests allow measuring seismic properties of rocks and sediments at sonic frequencies (several kilohertz) that are close to the frequencies employed for geophysical exploration of oil and gas resources. However, the tests require a long, slender sample, which is often difficult to obtain from the deep subsurface or from weak and fractured geological formations. In this paper, an alternative measurement technique to conventional resonant bar tests is presented. This technique uses only a small, jacketed rock or sediment core sample mediating a pair of long, metal extension bars with attached seismic source and receiver—the same geometry as the split Hopkinson pressure bar test for large-strain, dynamic impact experiments. Because of the length and mass added to the sample, the resonance frequency of the entire system can be lowered significantly, compared to the sample alone. The experiment can be conducted under elevated confining pressures up to tens of MPa and temperatures above 100 °C, and concurrently with x-ray CT imaging. The described split Hopkinson resonant bar test is applied in two steps. First, extension and torsion-mode resonance frequencies and attenuation of the entire system are measured. Next, numerical inversions for the complex Young's and shear moduli of the sample are performed. One particularly important step is the correction of the inverted Young's moduli for the effect of sample-rod interfaces. Examples of the application are given for homogeneous, isotropic polymer samples, and a natural rock sample.

  4. Aerodynamic flow quality and acoustic characteristics of the 40- by 80-foot test section circuit of the National Full-Scale Aerodynamic Complex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, Lawrence E.; Zell, Peter T.; Soderman, Paul T.; Falarski, Michael D.; Corsiglia, Victor R.; Edenborough, H. Kipling

    1988-01-01

    The 40- by 80-foot wind tunnel circuit of the National Full-Scale Aerodynamic Complex (NFAC) has recently undergone major modifications and subsequently completed final acceptance testing. The initial testing and calibration of the wind tunnel are described and in many cases these results are compared with predictions derived from model tests and theoretical analyses. The wind tunnel meets or exceeds essentially all performance objectives. The facility runs smoothly and routinely at its maximum test-section velocity of 300 knots (Mach number = 0.45). An effective cooling air exchange system enables the wind tunnel to operate indefinitely at this maximum power condition. Throughout the operating envelope of the wind tunnel the test-section dynamic pressure is uniform to within + or - 0.5 deg, and the axial component of turbulence is generally less than 0.5 percent. Acoustic measurements indicate that, due to the low noise fans and acoustic treatment in the wind-tunnel circuit and test section, the background noise level in the test section is comparable to other large-scale acoustic wind tunnels in the United States and abroad.

  5. In-flight near- and far-field acoustic data measured on the Propfan Test Assessment (PTA) testbed and with an adjacent aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodward, Richard P.; Loeffler, Irvin J.

    1993-01-01

    Flight tests to define the far-field tone source at cruise conditions were completed on the full-scale SR-7L advanced turboprop that was installed on the left wing of a Gulfstream 2 aircraft. This program, designated Propfan Test Assessment (PTA), involved aeroacoustic testing of the propeller over a range of test conditions. These measurements defined source levels for input into long-distance propagation models to predict en route noise. In-flight data were taken for seven test cases. Near-field acoustic data were taken on the Gulfstream fuselage and on a microphone boom that was mounted on the Gulfstream wing outboard of the propeller. Far-field acoustic data were taken by an acoustically instrumented Learjet that flew in formation with the Gulfstream. These flight tests were flown from El Paso, Texas, and from the NASA Lewis Research Center. A comprehensive listing of the aeroacoustic results from these flight tests which may be used for future analysis are presented.

  6. Scale Model Thruster Acoustic Measurement Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenny, R. Jeremy; Vargas, Magda B.

    2013-01-01

    Subscale rocket acoustic data is used to predict acoustic environments for full scale rockets. Over the last several years acoustic data has been collected during horizontal tests of solid rocket motors. Space Launch System (SLS) Scale Model Acoustic Test (SMAT) was designed to evaluate the acoustics of the SLS vehicle including the liquid engines and solid rocket boosters. SMAT is comprised of liquid thrusters scalable to the Space Shuttle Main engines (SSME) and Rocket Assisted Take Off (RATO) motors scalable to the 5-segment Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSTMV). Horizontal testing of the liquid thrusters provided an opportunity to collect acoustic data from liquid thrusters to characterize the acoustic environments. Acoustic data was collected during the horizontal firings of a single thruster and a 4-thruster (Quad) configuration. Presentation scope. Discuss the results of the single and 4-thruster acoustic measurements. Compare the measured acoustic levels of the liquid thrusters to the Solid Rocket Test Motor V - Nozzle 2 (SRTMV-N2).

  7. Advanced Jet Noise Exhaust Concepts in NASA's N+2 Supersonics Validation Study and the Environmentally Responsible Aviation Project's Upcoming Hybrid Wing Body Acoustics Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, Brenda S.; Doty, Mike

    2012-01-01

    Acoustic and flow-field experiments were conducted on exhaust concepts for the next generation supersonic, commercial aircraft. The concepts were developed by Lockheed Martin (LM), Rolls-Royce Liberty Works (RRLW), and General Electric Global Research (GEGR) as part of an N+2 (next generation forward) aircraft system study initiated by the Supersonics Project in NASA s Fundamental Aeronautics Program. The experiments were conducted in the Aero-Acoustic Propulsion Laboratory at the NASA Glenn Research Center. The exhaust concepts presented here utilized lobed-mixers and ejectors. A powered third-stream was implemented to improve ejector acoustic performance. One concept was found to produce stagnant flow within the ejector and the other produced discrete-frequency tones (due to flow separations within the model) that degraded the acoustic performance of the exhaust concept. NASA's Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) Project has been investigating a Hybrid Wing Body (HWB) aircraft as a possible configuration for meeting N+2 system level goals for noise, emissions, and fuel burn. A recently completed NRA led by Boeing Research and Technology resulted in a full-scale aircraft design and wind tunnel model. This model will be tested acoustically in NASA Langley's 14-by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel and will include dual jet engine simulators and broadband engine noise simulators as part of the test campaign. The objectives of the test are to characterize the system level noise, quantify the effects of shielding, and generate a valuable database for prediction method development. Further details of the test and various component preparations are described.

  8. Assessment of impact damage in Kevlar{reg_sign}-epoxy, filament-wound spherical test specimens by acoustic emission techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Whittaker, J.W.; Brosey, W.D.; Hamstad, M.A.

    1996-09-26

    The results of a study of the acoustic emission (AE) behavior of impact-damaged, spherical, composite test specimens subjected to thermal cycling and biaxial mechanical loading are presented. Seven Kevlar{reg_sign}-epoxy, filament-wound, spherical composite test specimens were subjected to different levels of impact damage. The seven specimens were a subset of a group of 77 specimens made with simulated fabrication-induced flaws. The specimens were subjected to two or three cycles of elevated temperature and then hydraulically pressurized to failure. The pressurization regime consisted of two cycles to different intermediate levels with a hold at each peak pressure level; a final pressurization to failure followed. The thermal and pressurization cycles were carefully designed to stimulate AE production under defined conditions. Both impacted and nonimpacted specimens produced thermo-AE (the term given to emission stimulated by thermal loading), but impacted specimens produced significantly more. Thermo-AE was produced primarily by damaged composite material. Damaged material produced emission as a function of both rising and falling temperature, but the effect was not repeatable. More seriously damaged specimens produced very large quantities of emission. Emission recorded during the static portion of the hydraulic loading cycles varied with load, time, and degree of damage. Static load AE behavior was quantified using a newly developed concept, the event-rate moment, and various correlations with residual strength were attempted. Correlations between residual strength, long-duration events, and even-rate moments were developed with varying degrees of success.

  9. A centrifugally actuated point-of-care testing system for the surface acoustic wave immunosensing of cardiac troponin I.

    PubMed

    Lee, Woochang; Jung, Jaeyeon; Hahn, Young Ki; Kim, Sang Kyu; Lee, Yeolho; Lee, Joonhyung; Lee, Tae-Han; Park, Jin-Young; Seo, Hyejung; Lee, Jung Nam; Oh, Jin Ho; Choi, Youn-Suk; Lee, Soo Suk

    2013-05-07

    A fully automated point-of-care testing (POCT) system with a surface acoustic wave (SAW) immunosensor was developed for rapid and sensitive detection of cardiac troponin I (cTnI) in body fluid (plasma and whole blood). The assay, based on gold nanoparticle sandwich immunoassay and subsequent gold staining, was performed on the SAW immunosensor packaged inside a disposable microfluidic cartridge. The entire fluidic process, including plasma separation, reagent transport, metering, and mixing, was carried out by controlling the centrifugal force acting on the rotating cartridge and laser-irradiated ferrowax microvalves. On investigation of sensor response to various cTnI concentrations, the system exhibited a high performance with a detection limit of 6.7 pg mL(-1), and the coefficient of variation was less than 10% over the entire test range (10 pg mL(-1) to 25 ng mL(-1)). On comparing this POCT system with a clinically utilized system in a physical laboratory (Centaur® XP; Siemens), a correlation coefficient of 0.998 was found, validating the diagnostic capability of the SAW immunosensor.

  10. Experimental aerodynamic and acoustic model testing of the Variable Cycle Engine (VCE) testbed coannular exhaust nozzle system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, D. P.; Morris, P. M.

    1980-01-01

    Aerodynamic performance and jet noise characteristics of a one sixth scale model of the variable cycle engine testbed exhaust system were obtained in a series of static tests over a range of simulated engine operating conditions. Model acoustic data were acquired. Data were compared to predictions of coannular model nozzle performance. The model, tested with an without a hardwall ejector, had a total flow area equivalent to a 0.127 meter (5 inch) diameter conical nozzle with a 0.65 fan to primary nozzle area ratio and a 0.82 fan nozzle radius ratio. Fan stream temperatures and velocities were varied from 422 K to 1089 K (760 R to 1960 R) and 434 to 755 meters per second (1423 to 2477 feet per second). Primary stream properties were varied from 589 to 1089 K (1060 R to 1960 R) and 353 to 600 meters per second (1158 to 1968 feet per second). Exhaust plume velocity surveys were conducted at one operating condition with and without the ejector installed. Thirty aerodynamic performance data points were obtained with an unheated air supply. Fan nozzle pressure ratio was varied from 1.8 to 3.2 at a constant primary pressure ratio of 1.6; primary pressure ratio was varied from 1.4 to 2.4 while holding fan pressure ratio constant at 2.4. Operation with the ejector increased nozzle thrust coefficient 0.2 to 0.4 percent.

  11. Results of Tests Performed on the Acoustic Quiet Flow Facility Three-Dimensional Model Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barna, P. S.

    1995-01-01

    The test results briefly described in this report were obtained on the three-dimensional 1:48 scale tunnel modeled on the design proposed by Messrs. D.S.M.A. Corporation. More particularly, while the test chamber dimensions were indeed scaled down in the ration of 1:48, including the contraction and the collector as well, the duct system itself leading to and from the chamber was adapted to suit laboratory conditions and space limitations. Earlier tests with the two-dimensional model showed that blowing mode was preferred as against the suction mode, hence all tests were performed with blowing only. At the exit of the contraction the maximum airspeed attained with the 1 HP blower unit was about 200 ft/sec. This airspeed may be increased in future if desired. The test results show that pressure recovery in the diffuser was about 34 percent due to the large blockage at its entrance. Velocity traverses taken across the diffuser entrance explain the reason for this blockage. Recirculation, studied with both, hot-wire anemometry and flow-visualization techniques, was largely affected by the design of the test chamber itself and the amount of vent-air admitted to the chamber. Vent-air helped to decrease the level of turbulence.

  12. Probability of acoustic transmitter detections by receiver lines in Lake Huron: results of multi-year field tests and simulations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hayden, Todd A.; Holbrook, Christopher M.; Binder, Thomas; Dettmers, John M.; Cooke, Steven J.; Vandergoot, Christopher S.; Krueger, Charles C.

    2016-01-01

    BackgroundAdvances in acoustic telemetry technology have led to an improved understanding of the spatial ecology of many freshwater and marine fish species. Understanding the performance of acoustic receivers is necessary to distinguish between tagged fish that may have been present but not detected and from those fish that were absent from the area. In this study, two stationary acoustic transmitters were deployed 250 m apart within each of four acoustic receiver lines each containing at least 10 receivers (i.e., eight acoustic transmitters) located in Saginaw Bay and central Lake Huron for nearly 2 years to determine whether the probability of detecting an acoustic transmission varied as a function of time (i.e., season), location, and distance between acoustic transmitter and receiver. Distances between acoustic transmitters and receivers ranged from 200 m to >10 km in each line. The daily observed probability of detecting an acoustic transmission was used in simulation models to estimate the probability of detecting a moving acoustic transmitter on a line of receivers.ResultsThe probability of detecting an acoustic transmitter on a receiver 1000 m away differed by month for different receiver lines in Lake Huron and Saginaw Bay but was similar for paired acoustic transmitters deployed 250 m apart within the same line. Mean probability of detecting an acoustic transmitter at 1000 m calculated over the study period varied among acoustic transmitters 250 m apart within a line and differed among receiver lines in Lake Huron and Saginaw Bay. The simulated probability of detecting a moving acoustic transmitter on a receiver line was characterized by short periods of time with decreased detection. Although increased receiver spacing and higher fish movement rates decreased simulated detection probability, the location of the simulated receiver line in Lake Huron had the strongest effect on simulated detection probability.ConclusionsPerformance of receiver

  13. Technical Note: Compact three-tesla magnetic resonance imager with high-performance gradients passes ACR image quality and acoustic noise tests.

    PubMed

    Weavers, Paul T; Shu, Yunhong; Tao, Shengzhen; Huston, John; Lee, Seung-Kyun; Graziani, Dominic; Mathieu, Jean-Baptiste; Trzasko, Joshua D; Foo, Thomas K-F; Bernstein, Matt A

    2016-03-01

    A compact, three-tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system has been developed. It features a 37 cm patient aperture, allowing the use of commercial receiver coils. Its design allows simultaneously for gradient amplitudes of 85 millitesla per meter (mT/m) sustained and 700 tesla per meter per second (T/m/s) slew rates. The size of the gradient system allows for these simultaneous performance targets to be achieved with little or no peripheral nerve stimulation, but also raises a concern about the geometric distortion as much of the imaging will be done near the system's maximum 26 cm field-of-view. Additionally, the fast switching capability raises acoustic noise concerns. This work evaluates the system for both the American College of Radiology's (ACR) MRI image quality protocol and the Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) nonsignificant risk (NSR) acoustic noise limits for MR. Passing these two tests is critical for clinical acceptance. In this work, the gradient system was operated at the maximum amplitude and slew rate of 80 mT/m and 500 T/m/s, respectively. The geometric distortion correction was accomplished by iteratively determining up to the tenth order spherical harmonic coefficients using a fiducial phantom and position-tracking software, with seventh order correction utilized in the ACR test. Acoustic noise was measured with several standard clinical pulse sequences. The system passes all the ACR image quality tests. The acoustic noise as measured when the gradient coil was inserted into a whole-body MRI system conforms to the FDA NSR limits. The compact system simultaneously allows for high gradient amplitude and high slew rate. Geometric distortion concerns have been mitigated by extending the spherical harmonic correction to higher orders. Acoustic noise is within the FDA limits.

  14. Technical Note: Compact three-tesla magnetic resonance imager with high-performance gradients passes ACR image quality and acoustic noise tests

    PubMed Central

    Weavers, Paul T.; Shu, Yunhong; Tao, Shengzhen; Huston, John; Lee, Seung-Kyun; Graziani, Dominic; Mathieu, Jean-Baptiste; Trzasko, Joshua D.; Foo, Thomas K.-F.; Bernstein, Matt A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: A compact, three-tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system has been developed. It features a 37 cm patient aperture, allowing the use of commercial receiver coils. Its design allows simultaneously for gradient amplitudes of 85 millitesla per meter (mT/m) sustained and 700 tesla per meter per second (T/m/s) slew rates. The size of the gradient system allows for these simultaneous performance targets to be achieved with little or no peripheral nerve stimulation, but also raises a concern about the geometric distortion as much of the imaging will be done near the system’s maximum 26 cm field-of-view. Additionally, the fast switching capability raises acoustic noise concerns. This work evaluates the system for both the American College of Radiology’s (ACR) MRI image quality protocol and the Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) nonsignificant risk (NSR) acoustic noise limits for MR. Passing these two tests is critical for clinical acceptance. Methods: In this work, the gradient system was operated at the maximum amplitude and slew rate of 80 mT/m and 500 T/m/s, respectively. The geometric distortion correction was accomplished by iteratively determining up to the tenth order spherical harmonic coefficients using a fiducial phantom and position-tracking software, with seventh order correction utilized in the ACR test. Acoustic noise was measured with several standard clinical pulse sequences. Results: The system passes all the ACR image quality tests. The acoustic noise as measured when the gradient coil was inserted into a whole-body MRI system conforms to the FDA NSR limits. Conclusions: The compact system simultaneously allows for high gradient amplitude and high slew rate. Geometric distortion concerns have been mitigated by extending the spherical harmonic correction to higher orders. Acoustic noise is within the FDA limits. PMID:26936710

  15. Presentation of the acoustic and aerodynamic results of the Aladin 2 concept qualification testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collard, M.; Doyotte, C.; Sagner, M.

    1985-01-01

    Wind tunnel tests were conducted of a scale model of the Aladin 2 aircraft. The propulsion system configuration is described and the air flow caused by jet ejection is analyzed. Three dimensional flow studies in the vicinity of the engine installation were made. Diagrams of the leading and trailing edge flaps are provided. Graphs are developed to show the aerodynamic performance under conditions of various airspeed and flap deflection.

  16. Biomechanical interactions of endodontically treated tooth implant-supported prosthesis under fatigue test with acoustic emission monitoring.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shao-Fu; Chen, Wan-Rung; Lin, Chun-Li

    2016-02-24

    This study investigated the biomechanical interactions in endodontically treated tooth implant-supported prosthesis (TISP) with implant system variations under dynamic cyclic loads monitored using the acoustic emission (AE) technique. Macrostructure implants using a taper integrated screw-in (TIS; 2-piece implant) and a retaining-screw (RS; 3-piece implant) connected to an abutment were used for this investigation and their corresponding mechanical resistances in conformity with the ISO 14801 standard were evaluated. The endodontically treated TISP samples were constructed containing TIS and RS implants splinted to the second premolar with fatigue tests performed by applying occlusal force onto the premolar simulating the bending moment effect. The numbers of accumulated AE signals in the fatigue tests and failure modes for the sample were recorded to evaluate the mechanical resistance. The maximum load in the static test for RS (3-piece) implant (797N) was significantly higher than that for the TIS (2-piece) implant (559N). Large deformations were found at abutment screws in both RS and TIS implants. Although the numbers of accumulated AE signals for the TIS implant (72511) were higher than those for the RS implant (437), statistical non-significant differences were found between TIS and RS implants. No obvious damage was noted in endodontically treated TISP samples using RS implants but two of the corresponding TIS implants fractured in the abutment screws. Splints with RS (3-piece) implant prosthesis produce better mechanical responses than the TIS (2-piece) implant when connected to an endodontically treated tooth restored with a post core and crown.

  17. Prefrontal oxygenation and the acoustic startle eyeblink response during exercise: A test of the dual-mode model.

    PubMed

    Tempest, Gavin D; Parfitt, Gaynor

    2017-03-30

    The interplay between the prefrontal cortex and amygdala is proposed to explain the regulation of affective responses (pleasure/displeasure) during exercise as outlined in the dual-mode model. However, due to methodological limitations the dual-mode model has not been fully tested. In this study, prefrontal oxygenation (using near-infrared spectroscopy) and amygdala activity (reflected by eyeblink amplitude using acoustic startle methodology) were recorded during exercise standardized to metabolic processes: 80% of ventilatory threshold (below VT), at the VT, and at the respiratory compensation point (RCP). Self-reported tolerance of the intensity of exercise was assessed prior to, and affective responses recorded during exercise. The results revealed that, as the intensity of exercise became more challenging (from below VT to RCP), prefrontal oxygenation was larger and eyeblink amplitude and affective responses were reduced. Below VT and at VT, larger prefrontal oxygenation was associated with larger eyeblink amplitude. At the RCP, prefrontal oxygenation was greater in the left than right hemisphere, and eyeblink amplitude explained significant variance in affective responses (with prefrontal oxygenation) and self-reported tolerance. These findings highlight the role of the prefrontal cortex and potentially the amygdala in the regulation of affective (particularly negative) responses during exercise at physiologically challenging intensities (above VT). In addition, a psychophysiological basis of self-reported tolerance is indicated. This study provides some support of the dual-mode model and insight into the neural basis of affective responses during exercise.

  18. The evaluation of ordinary Portland cement concrete subject to elevated temperatures in conjunction with acoustic emission and splitting tensile test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Yu-Min; Hou, Tsung-Chin; Chen, Guan-Ying; Hou, Ping-Ni

    2017-04-01

    The research objective was to evaluate Ordinary Portland Cement concrete subject to various elevated temperatures. Single OPC concrete mixture with water to cementitious (w/c) equal to 0.45 was proportioned. Concrete specimens were cast and placed in the curing tank in which water was saturated with calcium hydroxide. After ninety days of moist-cure, three elevated temperatures, namely 300, 600, and 900-°C, were carried out upon hardened concrete specimens. Furthermore, two post-damaged curing conditions were executed to recover damaged concrete specimens: one was to recure under 23°C with 50% humidity in a controlled environmental chamber and the other was to recure in the same curing tank. Acoustic emission apparatus coupled with the splitting tensile test was utilized and found able to assess damaged concrete. Before concrete subject to elevated temperatures, the development of indirect tensile strength versus displacement diagram fit well with the tendency of AE energy release. It was found there was a large amount of AE energy released when stress and displacement diagram developed about 40-50%. As such could be identified as the onset of first fracture and the plain concrete generally exhibited a quasi-brittle fracture with two major series of AE energy dissipations; however when concrete specimens were subject to elevated temperatures, the damaged concrete specimens displayed neither fracture pattern nor the "double-hump" AE energy dissipation in comparison with those of plain concrete.

  19. Does size matter? A test of size-specific mortality in Atlantic salmon Salmo salar smolts tagged with acoustic transmitters.

    PubMed

    Newton, M; Barry, J; Dodd, J A; Lucas, M C; Boylan, P; Adams, C E

    2016-09-01

    Mortality rates of wild Atlantic salmon Salmo salar smolts implanted with acoustic transmitters were assessed to determine if mortality was size dependent. The routinely accepted, but widely debated, '2% transmitter mass: body mass' rule in biotelemetry was tested by extending the transmitter burden up to 12·7% of body mass in small [mean fork length (LF ) 138·3 mm, range 115-168 mm] downstream migrating S. salar smolts. Over the short timescale of emigration (range 11·9-44·5 days) through the lower river and estuary, mortality was not related to S. salar size, nor was a relationship found between mortality probability and transmitter mass: body mass or transmitter length: LF ratios. This study provides further evidence that smolt migration studies can deviate from the '2% rule' of thumb, to more appropriate study-specific measures, which enables the use of fishes representative of the body size in natural populations without undue effects. © 2016 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  20. Acoustic Neuroma

    MedlinePlus

    An acoustic neuroma is a benign tumor that develops on the nerve that connects the ear to the brain. ... can press against the brain, becoming life-threatening. Acoustic neuroma can be difficult to diagnose, because the ...

  1. Acoustic Remote Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowling, David R.; Sabra, Karim G.

    2015-01-01

    Acoustic waves carry information about their source and collect information about their environment as they propagate. This article reviews how these information-carrying and -collecting features of acoustic waves that travel through fluids can be exploited for remote sensing. In nearly all cases, modern acoustic remote sensing involves array-recorded sounds and array signal processing to recover multidimensional results. The application realm for acoustic remote sensing spans an impressive range of signal frequencies (10-2 to 107 Hz) and distances (10-2 to 107 m) and involves biomedical ultrasound imaging, nondestructive evaluation, oil and gas exploration, military systems, and Nuclear Test Ban Treaty monitoring. In the past two decades, approaches have been developed to robustly localize remote sources; remove noise and multipath distortion from recorded signals; and determine the acoustic characteristics of the environment through which the sound waves have traveled, even when the recorded sounds originate from uncooperative sources or are merely ambient noise.

  2. Verification of nonlinear dynamic structural test results by combined image processing and acoustic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tene, Yair; Tene, Noam; Tene, G.

    1993-08-01

    An interactive data fusion methodology of video, audio, and nonlinear structural dynamic analysis for potential application in forensic engineering is presented. The methodology was developed and successfully demonstrated in the analysis of heavy transportable bridge collapse during preparation for testing. Multiple bridge elements failures were identified after the collapse, including fracture, cracks and rupture of high performance structural materials. Videotape recording by hand held camcorder was the only source of information about the collapse sequence. The interactive data fusion methodology resulted in extracting relevant information form the videotape and from dynamic nonlinear structural analysis, leading to full account of the sequence of events during the bridge collapse.

  3. Background Acoustics Levels in the 9x15 Wind Tunnel and Linear Array Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, David

    2011-01-01

    The background noise level in the 9x15 foot wind tunnel at NASA Glenn has been documented, and the results compare favorably with historical measurements. A study of recessed microphone mounting techniques was also conducted, and a recessed cavity with a micronic wire mesh screen reduces hydrodynamic noise by around 10 dB. A three-microphone signal processing technique can provide additional benefit, rejecting up to 15 dB of noise contamination at some frequencies. The screen and cavity system offers considerable benefit to test efficiency, although there are additional calibration requirements.

  4. Acoustic Seaglider

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-07

    a national naval responsibility. Acoustic sensors on mobile, autonomous platforms will enable basic research topics on temporal and spatial...problem and acoustic navigation and communications within the context of distributed autonomous persistent undersea surveillance sensor networks...Acoustic sensors on mobile, autonomous platforms will enable basic research topics on temporal and spatial coherence and the description of ambient

  5. Acoustic seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    The invention relates to a sealing device having an acoustic resonator. The acoustic resonator is adapted to create acoustic waveforms to generate a sealing pressure barrier blocking fluid flow from a high pressure area to a lower pressure area. The sealing device permits noncontacting sealing operation. The sealing device may include a resonant-macrosonic-synthesis (RMS) resonator.

  6. Acoustic Seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    The invention relates to a sealing device having an acoustic resonator. The acoustic resonator is adapted to create acoustic waveforms to generate a sealing pressure barrier blocking fluid flow from a high pressure area to a lower pressure area. The sealing device permits noncontacting sealing operation. The sealing device may include a resonant-macrosonic-synthesis (RMS) resonator.

  7. Audience effects, but not environmental influences, explain variation in gorilla close distance vocalizations-A test of the acoustic adaptation hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Hedwig, Daniela; Mundry, Roger; Robbins, Martha M; Boesch, Christophe

    2015-12-01

    Close distance vocalizations are an integral part of primate vocal communication. They exhibit large acoustic variation which has been suggested to constitute flexible responses to the highly variable social setting of group living animals. However, a recent study suggested that acoustic variation in close distance calls of baboons may also arise from acoustic adaptations to environmental factors in order to counteract sound degradation. We tested whether the variation in calling rate and acoustic structure of gorilla close distance vocalizations may serve to counteract distorting effects of vegetation during sound propagation. Using focal animal sampling we recorded the vocal behavior of 15 adult individuals living in two groups: one group of western lowland gorillas Gorilla gorilla gorilla and one group of mountain gorillas Gorilla beringei beringei. We considered the distance between the caller and its nearest neighbor as the minimum transmission distance of calls; while vegetation density was quantified through measures of visibility. Our analysis revealed vocal plasticity in gorilla close calls in relation to changes in visibility and nearest neighbor distance. However, the observed changes in fundamental frequency and calling rate are unlikely to counteract degrading effects of vegetation, but rather seem to reflect reactions to variation in spatial and visual separation from other group members, similar to the audience effects demonstrated in a range of other species. We propose that vocal plasticity to counteract distorting environmental effects may not be prevalent across taxa and perhaps confined to species living in heterogeneous habitats with highly variable transmission conditions. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Development of acoustically lined ejector technology for multitube jet noise suppressor nozzles by model and engine tests over a wide range of jet pressure ratios and temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atvars, J.; Paynter, G. C.; Walker, D. Q.; Wintermeyer, C. F.

    1974-01-01

    An experimental program comprising model nozzle and full-scale engine tests was undertaken to acquire parametric data for acoustically lined ejectors applied to primary jet noise suppression. Ejector lining design technology and acoustical scaling of lined ejector configurations were the major objectives. Ground static tests were run with a J-75 turbojet engine fitted with a 37-tube, area ratio 3.3 suppressor nozzle and two lengths of ejector shroud (L/D = 1 and 2). Seven ejector lining configurations were tested over the engine pressure ratio range of 1.40 to 2.40 with corresponding jet velocities between 305 and 610 M/sec. One-fourth scale model nozzles were tested over a pressure ratio range of 1.40 to 4.0 with jet total temperatures between ambient and 1088 K. Scaling of multielement nozzle ejector configurations was also studied using a single element of the nozzle array with identical ejector lengths and lining materials. Acoustic far field and near field data together with nozzle thrust performance and jet aerodynamic flow profiles are presented.

  9. Fatigue-crack monitoring in-flight using acoustic emission - hardware, technique, and testing

    SciTech Connect

    Hutton, P.H.; Skorpik, J.R.; Lemon, D.K.

    1981-07-01

    The three programs described represent a logical evolutionary process toward effective flaw surveillance in aircraft using AE. The Macchi tests showed that an AE system can withstand extended in-flight service and collect meaningful information relative to fatigue crack growth at a single specific location. The MIrage aircraft work seeks to extend the methods demonstrated on the Macchi into a more complex circumstance. We are now attempting to detect and locate crack growth at any of twenty fastener locations in a relatively complex geometry. The DARPA pattern recognition program seeks to develop signal identification capability that would pave the way for general monitoring of aircraft structures using AE to detect fatigue crack growth. It appears that AE technology may be capable of enhancing aircraft safety assurance while reducing inspection requirements with the associated costs.

  10. Resizing buffer rods for ultrasound testing of food products with acoustic noise considerations.

    PubMed

    García-Álvarez, Javier; García-Hernández, Miguel J; Novoa-Díaz, Daniel F; Turó Peroy, Antoni; Chávez Domínguez, Juan Antonio; Salazar Soler, Jordi

    2013-01-01

    Buffer rods can be used to perform non-destructive and on-line analysis of food and beverage products. These rods, usually solid cylinders, can be long and heavy for certain applications. In this paper, a resizing analytic procedure is described. Buffer rods designed following this new procedure can be several times shorter than the conventionally designed ones, optimising thus their weight and cost. The signal to noise ratio (SNR) of the resized buffers is also studied in order to determine their practical usability. To this effect, simulations and experiments are conducted using metal and plastic buffer rod materials appropriate for food and beverage testing such as aluminium and polyethylene. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Localization of multiple acoustic sources with small arrays using a coherence test

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, Satish; Lockwood, Michael E.; Kramer, Michael L.; Jones, Douglas L.

    2008-01-01

    Direction finding of more sources than sensors is appealing in situations with small sensor arrays. Potential applications include surveillance, teleconferencing, and auditory scene analysis for hearing aids. A new technique for time-frequency-sparse sources, such as speech and vehicle sounds, uses a coherence test to identify low-rank time-frequency bins. These low-rank bins are processed in one of two ways: (1) narrowband spatial spectrum estimation at each bin followed by summation of directional spectra across time and frequency or (2) clustering low-rank covariance matrices, averaging covariance matrices within clusters, and narrowband spatial spectrum estimation of each cluster. Experimental results with omnidirectional microphones and colocated directional microphones demonstrate the algorithm’s ability to localize 3–5 simultaneous speech sources over 4 s with 2–3 microphones to less than 1 degree of error, and the ability to localize simultaneously two moving military vehicles and small arms gunfire. PMID:18397021

  12. Localization of multiple acoustic sources with small arrays using a coherence test.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Satish; Lockwood, Michael E; Kramer, Michael L; Jones, Douglas L

    2008-04-01

    Direction finding of more sources than sensors is appealing in situations with small sensor arrays. Potential applications include surveillance, teleconferencing, and auditory scene analysis for hearing aids. A new technique for time-frequency-sparse sources, such as speech and vehicle sounds, uses a coherence test to identify low-rank time-frequency bins. These low-rank bins are processed in one of two ways: (1) narrowband spatial spectrum estimation at each bin followed by summation of directional spectra across time and frequency or (2) clustering low-rank covariance matrices, averaging covariance matrices within clusters, and narrowband spatial spectrum estimation of each cluster. Experimental results with omnidirectional microphones and colocated directional microphones demonstrate the algorithm's ability to localize 3-5 simultaneous speech sources over 4 s with 2-3 microphones to less than 1 degree of error, and the ability to localize simultaneously two moving military vehicles and small arms gunfire.

  13. Finite element analysis for the inhibition of electromagnetic acoustic testing (EMAT) Lamb waves multi-modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Suzhen; Zhang, Yanwei; Zhang, Chuang; Yang, Qingxin

    2017-02-01

    Lamb waves are widely used in nondestructive testing (NDT) and structural health monitoring (SHM) for its obvious advantages, such as good directionality, longer-range propagation and lower loss etc. However, it is difficult to analysis and to interpret the echo signals because of its multi-modes and dispersion. In this paper, the properties of single-mode Lamb waves which were excited by double EMAT were studied based on the principles of multi-modes and the characteristics of wave structure. Simulation results show that the double transducer excitation structure can stimulate single-mode Lamb waves and eliminate the extra modes, which are produced by modal conversion at ends of the specimen. The single-mode excitation of Lamb waves is beneficial to reduce the difficulty of signal processing and provide reliable information to locate the defect. The researches in this paper can be used as a theoretical basis to design double transducer excitation system.

  14. Antipsychoticlike effects of amoxapine, without catalepsy, using the prepulse inhibition of the acoustic startle reflex test in rats.

    PubMed

    Wadenberg, M G; Sills, T L; Fletcher, P J; Kapur, S

    2000-04-01

    The dibenzoxazepine amoxapine was introduced as an antidepressant but has shown antipsychoticlike activity in a number of animal screening tests. A recent positron emission tomography study showed a 5-HT(2)/D(2) receptor occupancy profile of amoxapine that is very similar to that of established atypical antipsychotics. Schizophrenics display deficits in sensory gating mechanisms, such as prepulse inhibition (PPI) of the acoustic startle reflex. A similar deficit can be produced by dopamine (DA) and by 5-HT(2A/C) receptor agonists in rats. Antipsychotic compounds reverse this effect. Effects of amoxapine on apomorphine- or 1-(2, 5-dimethoxy-4-iodophenyl)-2-aminopropane (DOI)-induced disruption of PPI were studied in adult male Sprague-Dawley rats. The extrapyramidal side effect (EPS) liability of amoxapine was assessed using the inclined grid catalepsy (CAT) test. Statistical analyses were performed by analysis of variance (ANOVA) for fully repeated measures (PPI) and by the Kruskal-Wallis one-way ANOVA by ranks (CAT). Apomorphine (0.5 mg/kg) produced a significant reduction in PPI compared with the case of rats in the saline control group. Pretreatment with amoxapine (10 mg/kg) significantly attenuated the apomorphine-induced disruption of PPI. DOI (0.5 mg/kg) significantly reduced PPI compared with saline controls. Pretreatment with amoxapine (5 or 10 mg/kg) produced a significant attenuation of the DOI-induced disruption of PPI. Amoxapine by itself did not alter PPI. Amoxapine (5 or 10 mg/kg) did not produce CAT. The DA D(2)/5-HT(2) receptor antagonist amoxapine produced an antipsychoticlike reversal of both apomorphine- and DOI-induced disruption of PPI. Furthermore, the same doses of amoxapine that reversed disruption of PPI did not produce CAT. The results confirm and lend further support to the results of previous studies on amoxapine, suggesting that amoxapine might possess antipsychotic activity with little propensity for producing EPS.

  15. Investigations of detail design issues for the high speed acoustic wind tunnel using a 60th scale model tunnel. Part 1: Tests with open circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barna, P. Stephen

    1991-01-01

    This report summarizes the tests on the 1:60 scale model of the High Speed Acoustic Wind Tunnel (HSAWT) performed during the period of November 1989 to December 1990. Throughout the testing the tunnel was operated in the 'open circuit mode', that is when the airflow was induced by a powerful exhaust fan located outside the tunnel circuit. The tests were first performed with the closed test section and were subsequently repeated with the open test section. While operating with the open test section, a novel device, called the 'nozzle-diffuser,' was also tested in order to establish its usefulness of increasing pressure recovery in the first diffuser. The tests established the viability of the tunnel design. The flow distribution in each tunnel component was found acceptable and pressure recovery in the diffusers were found satisfactory. The diffusers appeared to operate without flow separation. All tests were performed at NASA LaRC.

  16. Using a fibre-optic cable as Distributed Acoustic Sensor for Vertical Seismic Profiling - Overview of various field tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Götz, Julia; Lüth, Stefan; Henninges, Jan; Reinsch, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Fibre-optic Distributed Acoustic Sensing (DAS) or Distributed Vibration Sensing (DVS) is a technology, where an optical fibre cable is used as a sensor for acoustic signals. An ambient seismic wavefield, which is coupled by friction or pressure to the optical fibre, induces dynamic strain changes along the cable. The DAS/DVS technology offers the possibility to record an optoelectronic signal which is linearly related to the time dependent local strain. The DAS/DVS technology is based on the established technique of phase-sensitive optical time-domain reflectometry (phi-OTDR). Coherent laser pulses are launched into the fibre to monitor changes in the resulting elastic Rayleigh backscatter with time. Dynamic strain changes lead to small displacements of the scattering elements (non-uniformities within the glass structure of the optical fibre), and therefore to variations of the relative phases of the backscattered photons. The fibre behaves as a series of interferometers whose output is sensitive to small changes of the strain at any point along its length. To record the ground motion not only in space but also in time, snapshots of the wavefield are created by repeatedly firing laser pulses into the fibre at sampling frequencies much higher than seismic frequencies. DAS/DVS is used e.g. for continuous monitoring of pipelines, roads or borders and for production monitoring from within the wellbore. Within the last years, the DAS/DVS technology was further developed to record seismic data. We focus on the recording of Vertical Seismic Profiling (VSP) data with DAS/DVS and present an overview of various field tests published between 2011 and 2014. Here, especially CO2 storage pilot sites provided the opportunity to test this new technology for geophysical reservoir monitoring. DAS/DVS-VSP time-lapse measurements have been published for the Quest CO2 storage site in Canada. The DAS/DVS technology was also tested at the CO2 storage sites in Rousse (France), Citronelle

  17. Development and Testing of an Ultra Low Power System-On-Chip (SOC) Platform for Marine Mammal Tags and Passive Acoustic Signal Processing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-30

    tag, called Nano -power Electronics MOdule (NEMO). The NEMO tag has the specific application goal of determining the response of deep diving whales to...flowchart. IMPACT/ APPLICATIONS The goal of this project is to develop a marine mammal tag to last for several weeks. This tag will allow data...Development and Testing of an Ultra Low Power System-On-Chip (SOC) Platform for Marine Mammal Tags and Passive Acoustic Signal Processing Benton H

  18. PRSEUS Acoustic Panel Fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicolette, Velicki; Yovanof, Nicolette P.; Baraja, Jaime; Mathur, Gopal; Thrash, Patrick; Pickell, Robert

    2011-01-01

    This report describes the development of a novel structural concept, Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure (PRSEUS), that addresses the demanding fuselage loading requirements for the Hybrid Wing or Blended Wing Body (BWB) airplane configuration with regards to acoustic response. A PRSEUS panel was designed and fabricated and provided to NASA-LaRC for acoustic response testing in the Structural Acoustics Loads and Transmission (SALT) facility). Preliminary assessments of the sound transmission characteristics of a PRSEUS panel subjected to a representative Hybrid Wing Body (HWB) operating environment were completed for the NASA Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) Program.

  19. Network of acoustic sensors for the detection of weapons firing: tests for the choice of individual sensing elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naz, P.; Marty, Ch.; Hengy, S.; Hamery, P.

    2010-04-01

    The detection and localization of weapon firing on the battlefield is envisaged by means of acoustic waves. The main objective of this work is to compare various sensing elements that can be integrated in acoustic arrays. Experimental measurements of sound waves obtained by using some of these elements in Unattended Ground Sensors are presented for snipers, mortars or artillery guns. The emphasis will be put on the characteristics of the sensing elements needed to detect and classify the Mach wave generated by a supersonic projectile and the muzzle wave generated by the combustion of the propulsion powder. Examples of preliminary prototypes are presented to illustrate our topic. We will concentrate on a wearable system considered to improve the soldier's awareness of the surrounding threats: this realization consists of a network of three helmets integrating an acoustic array for the detection and localization of snipers.

  20. Developments and field tests of low-frequency portable acoustic transducers for a mobile exploration and time lapse experiment of a sea-bottom reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuruga, K.; Kasahara, J.; Hasada, Y.; Kondo, H.

    2013-12-01

    Depth, scale and resolutions of geophysical explorations for mineral resources are controlled by transmitted seismic energy and wavelength (frequency range). Most explorations in marine have been conducted by survey ship system with arrayed acoustic sources whose dominant frequency range is about 10 to 500 Hz. On the other hand, for shallow parts of sea bottom structure survey, some sub-bottom profilers with frequency range around 3.5kHz are used. To monitor a time lapse of a sea bottom reservoir such as an oil, gas, or methane hydrate reservoir as well as to exploit a mobile survey near a sea bottom by AUVs, it is necessary to use a broadband portable acoustic transducer with a dominant frequency range of 500 Hz to 5 kHz. We have been developing several types of portable acoustic transducers and a transmitting and recording system which is accurately controlled by a GPS clock (Tsuruga et al., 2012). In this pater, we report the new broadband acoustic portable transducers which have larger power than the original cylindrical acoustic transducers in a low frequency range (<5 kHz), partly funded by JOGMEC, and show the preliminary results of field tests at the shallow sea bottom around 32 m deep by means of the transducers and hydrophone receivers array. Each transducer repeatedly transmitted Chirp signals with a unit period of 500 msec in two frequency ranges of 0.5k-4.5kHz and 4k-16kHz . We stacked 500-ms data by 28 times to obtain a transfer function of each source-receiver pair in the time and frequency domains. The preliminary results suggest as the follows: (i) it is successful to broaden the frequency bandwidth (i.e., 2k-10kHz) by extending a geometrical resonance length of a cylindrical acoustic transducers, and (ii) the observation at the sea bottom with accurately controlled timing systems of transmitter and data-logger is very useful to identify the stable and/or unstable seismic phases, that is, waves propagating in a underground and/or in a sea water as

  1. Acoustic evaluation of wood quality in standing trees. Part I, Acoustic wave behavior

    Treesearch

    Xiping Wang; Robert J. Ross; Peter Carter

    2007-01-01

    Acoustic wave velocities in standing trees or live softwood species were measured by the time-of-flight (TOF) method. Tree velocities were compared with acoustic velocities measured in corresponding butt logs through a resonance acoustic method. The experimental data showed a skewed relationship between tree and log acoustic measurements. For most trees tested,...

  2. The neonatal acoustic reflex.

    PubMed

    Weatherby, L A; Bennett, M J

    1980-01-01

    Probe tones from 220 Hz to 2 000 Hz were used to measure the static and dynamic acoustic impedance of 44 neonates. Acoustic reflex thresholds to broad band noise were obtained from every neonate tested when employing the higher frequency probe tones. The reflex threshold levels measured are similar to those of adults. The static impedance values are discussed to give a possible explanation of why reflex thresholds cannot be detected using conventional 220 Hz impedance bridges.

  3. Evaluation of the effects of acoustic stimulation and feeding mother stimulation on non-reactive non-stress test: a randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Hasanpour, Shirin; Raouf, Shiva; Shamsalizadeh, Neda; Bani, Soheila; Ghojazadeh, Morteza; Sheikhan, Fatemeh

    2013-06-01

    Non-stress test (NST) is known as one of the most common assessments for evaluation of fetus well being. Since the prevalence of its false positive results is high and majority of fetuses with non-reactive results are not at risk, it is important to find out effective approaches to identify such results to avoid unnecessary interventions. So this survey was conducted with the aim of comparing the effects of acoustic stimulation with feeding mothers stimulation on non-reactive NST results. This study preformed on 104 healthy pregnant women with non-reactive NST results and gestational ages between 32 and 42 weeks in Tabriz Alzahra hospital. Subjects were divided into two groups for acoustic stimulation and feeding mother stimulation. Half an hour later NST repeated for participants of each group in the same environmental condition and again the results evaluated. According to our findings, 75 % of subjects with non-reactive NST results changed to reactive after acoustic stimulation group. However, 80 % of participants with non-reactive NST results changed into reactive after feeding stimulation. No significant differences found while comparing test results. Both stimulating approaches were effective in the identification of false positive NSTs and might be useful in preventing the unnecessary interventions.

  4. Transmission Acoustic Vibration Testing.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-07-01

    DRVENO Fiue6 xeimna eroCosScin HOUIN The baeiehuig(iue7 sasn odZ4Amgei umalycsigwihn 5 pud ro omciig h hosn isteoiihmcie.ndwih 0 ons h mahie catnosfte...tooth load, P is power, and the suL- scripts indicate reference level. These relationships reflect that doubling the speed, load or power increases...USAAVRACON-TR-83-D-34 UNCLASSIFIED D AAK5I92- - 82-CSSF/61/3 NL I0013EI sonl*.lf.~fmommmmoii-m NNNNNEl 1.8. 1111L2 111. NATION -W EUO TNAOS-16 *~)fl 11111

  5. Acoustic mapping velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muste, M.; Baranya, S.; Tsubaki, R.; Kim, D.; Ho, H.; Tsai, H.; Law, D.

    2016-05-01

    Knowledge of sediment dynamics in rivers is of great importance for various practical purposes. Despite its high relevance in riverine environment processes, the monitoring of sediment rates remains a major and challenging task for both suspended and bed load estimation. While the measurement of suspended load is currently an active area of testing with nonintrusive technologies (optical and acoustic), bed load measurement does not mark a similar progress. This paper describes an innovative combination of measurement techniques and analysis protocols that establishes the proof-of-concept for a promising technique, labeled herein Acoustic Mapping Velocimetry (AMV). The technique estimates bed load rates in rivers developing bed forms using a nonintrusive measurements approach. The raw information for AMV is collected with acoustic multibeam technology that in turn provides maps of the bathymetry over longitudinal swaths. As long as the acoustic maps can be acquired relatively quickly and the repetition rate for the mapping is commensurate with the movement of the bed forms, successive acoustic maps capture the progression of the bed form movement. Two-dimensional velocity maps associated with the bed form migration are obtained by implementing algorithms typically used in particle image velocimetry to acoustic maps converted in gray-level images. Furthermore, use of the obtained acoustic and velocity maps in conjunction with analytical formulations (e.g., Exner equation) enables estimation of multidirectional bed load rates over the whole imaged area. This paper presents a validation study of the AMV technique using a set of laboratory experiments.

  6. Guided acoustic wave inspection system

    SciTech Connect

    Chinn, Diane J.

    2004-10-05

    A system for inspecting a conduit for undesirable characteristics. A transducer system induces guided acoustic waves onto said conduit. The transducer system detects the undesirable characteristics of the conduit by receiving guided acoustic waves that contain information about the undesirable characteristics. The conduit has at least two sides and the transducer system utilizes flexural modes of propagation to provide inspection using access from only the one side of the conduit. Cracking is detected with pulse-echo testing using one transducer to both send and receive the guided acoustic waves. Thinning is detected in through-transmission testing where one transducer sends and another transducer receives the guided acoustic waves.

  7. Special Award in Ocean Acoustics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-05-21

    project to acoustically detect, simultaneously with the Cerenkov light detection, very high-energy cosmic ray neutrinos at the deep underwater laboratory in...to Professor Uscinski and the Cambridge Ocean Acoustics Group in devising the Acoustic Shadowgraph Method . Initial trials of the method were reported...to test the high and low tails of these intensity pdfs. The second research area is to work with Bradley Bell to complete the MDMF for complex

  8. Results of tests performed on the Acoustic Quiet Flow Facility Three-Dimensional Model Tunnel: Report on the Modified D.S.M.A. Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barna, P. S.

    1996-01-01

    Numerous tests were performed on the original Acoustic Quiet Flow Facility Three-Dimensional Model Tunnel, scaled down from the full-scale plans. Results of tests performed on the original scale model tunnel were reported in April 1995, which clearly showed that this model was lacking in performance. Subsequently this scale model was modified to attempt to possibly improve the tunnel performance. The modifications included: (a) redesigned diffuser; (b) addition of a collector; (c) addition of a Nozzle-Diffuser; (d) changes in location of vent-air. Tests performed on the modified tunnel showed a marked improvement in performance amounting to a nominal increase of pressure recovery in the diffuser from 34 percent to 54 percent. Results obtained in the tests have wider application. They may also be applied to other tunnels operating with an open test section not necessarily having similar geometry as the model under consideration.

  9. Musical Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gough, Colin

    This chapter provides an introduction to the physical and psycho-acoustic principles underlying the production and perception of the sounds of musical instruments. The first section introduces generic aspects of musical acoustics and the perception of musical sounds, followed by separate sections on string, wind and percussion instruments.

  10. Acoustical oceanography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The Acoustical Society of America has formed a Technical Specialty Group on Acoustical Oceanography. At ASA meetings the new group will have special sessions where they will give invited and contributed papers and have panel discussions about ocean parameters that are measured effectively by acoustical techniques.The first special sessions will be May 22-23, 1990, at the ASA meeting at Pennsylvania State University, University Park. The focus on May 22 will be acoustical techniques for detection and measurement of internal waves and turbulence; conveners are Robert Pinkel of Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, Calif., and Herman Medwin of the Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, Calif. Acoustical studies of the physical and biological characteristics of ocean mass boundaries are the discussion topic on May 23. The convener is C. S. Clay, University of Wisconsin, Madison.

  11. Joint Aircraft Survivability Program Final Test Report for the Acoustic Fire Suppression Project JASP-TR-14-05

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-01

    speakers were capable of producing over 100-dB sound pressure level below 100 Hz and could not extinguish the flame. Additional research and...The root-mean-square (rms) acoustic pressure and air speed were measured during each trial and, along with frequency, these measurements were used to...were capable of producing over 100-dB sound pressure level (SPL) below 100 Hz. As a result none of the CNT thermoacoustic speakers were sufficient for

  12. Advanced Distributed Measurements and Data Processing at the Vibro-Acoustic Test Facility, GRC Space Power Facility, Sandusky, Ohio - an Architecture and an Example

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Gerald M.; Evans, Richard K.

    2009-01-01

    A large-scale, distributed, high-speed data acquisition system (HSDAS) is currently being installed at the Space Power Facility (SPF) at NASA Glenn Research Center s Plum Brook Station in Sandusky, OH. This installation is being done as part of a facility construction project to add Vibro-acoustic Test Capabilities (VTC) to the current thermal-vacuum testing capability of SPF in support of the Orion Project s requirement for Space Environments Testing (SET). The HSDAS architecture is a modular design, which utilizes fully-remotely managed components, enables the system to support multiple test locations with a wide-range of measurement types and a very large system channel count. The architecture of the system is presented along with details on system scalability and measurement verification. In addition, the ability of the system to automate many of its processes such as measurement verification and measurement system analysis is also discussed.

  13. Acoustic Source Bearing Estimation (ASBE) computer program development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiese, Michael R.

    1987-01-01

    A new bearing estimation algorithm (Acoustic Source Analysis Technique - ASAT) and an acoustic analysis computer program (Acoustic Source Bearing Estimation - ASBE) are described, which were developed by Computer Sciences Corporation for NASA Langley Research Center. The ASBE program is used by the Acoustics Division/Applied Acoustics Branch and the Instrument Research Division/Electro-Mechanical Instrumentation Branch to analyze acoustic data and estimate the azimuths from which the source signals radiated. Included are the input and output from a benchmark test case.

  14. Acoustic Ground-Impedance Meter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuckerwar, A. J.

    1983-01-01

    Helmoltz resonator used in compact, portable meter measures acoustic impedance of ground or other surfaces. Earth's surface is subject of increasing acoustical investigations because of its importance in aircraft noise prediction and measurment. Meter offers several advantages. Is compact and portable and set up at any test site, irrespective of landscape features, weather or other environmental condition.

  15. Digital Controller For Acoustic Levitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tarver, D. Kent

    1989-01-01

    Acoustic driver digitally controls sound fields along three axes. Allows computerized acoustic levitation and manipulation of small objects for such purposes as containerless processing and nuclear-fusion power experiments. Also used for controlling motion of vibration-testing tables in three dimensions.

  16. Cyclic Crack Growth Testing of an A.O. Smith Multilayer Pressure Vessel with Modal Acoustic Emission Monitoring and Data Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ziola, Steven M.

    2014-01-01

    Digital Wave Corp. (DWC) was retained by Jacobs ATOM at NASA Ames Research Center to perform cyclic pressure crack growth sensitivity testing on a multilayer pressure vessel instrumented with DWC's Modal Acoustic Emission (MAE) system, with captured wave analysis to be performed using DWCs WaveExplorerTM software, which has been used at Ames since 2001. The objectives were to document the ability to detect and characterize a known growing crack in such a vessel using only MAE, to establish the sensitivity of the equipment vs. crack size and / or relevance in a realistic field environment, and to obtain fracture toughness materials properties in follow up testing to enable accurate crack growth analysis. This report contains the results of the testing.

  17. The WiggleZ Dark Energy Survey: testing the cosmological model with baryon acoustic oscillations at z= 0.6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blake, Chris; Davis, Tamara; Poole, Gregory B.; Parkinson, David; Brough, Sarah; Colless, Matthew; Contreras, Carlos; Couch, Warrick; Croom, Scott; Drinkwater, Michael J.; Forster, Karl; Gilbank, David; Gladders, Mike; Glazebrook, Karl; Jelliffe, Ben; Jurek, Russell J.; Li, I.-Hui; Madore, Barry; Martin, D. Christopher; Pimbblet, Kevin; Pracy, Michael; Sharp, Rob; Wisnioski, Emily; Woods, David; Wyder, Ted K.; Yee, H. K. C.

    2011-08-01

    We measure the imprint of baryon acoustic oscillations (BAOs) in the galaxy clustering pattern at the highest redshift achieved to date, z= 0.6, using the distribution of N= 132 509 emission-line galaxies in the WiggleZ Dark Energy Survey. We quantify BAOs using three statistics: the galaxy correlation function, power spectrum and the band-filtered estimator introduced by Xu et al. The results are mutually consistent, corresponding to a 4.0 per cent measurement of the cosmic distance-redshift relation at z= 0.6 [in terms of the acoustic parameter 'A(z)' introduced by Eisenstein et al., we find A(z= 0.6) = 0.452 ± 0.018]. Both BAOs and power spectrum shape information contribute towards these constraints. The statistical significance of the detection of the acoustic peak in the correlation function, relative to a wiggle-free model, is 3.2σ. The ratios of our distance measurements to those obtained using BAOs in the distribution of luminous red galaxies at redshifts z= 0.2 and 0.35 are consistent with a flat Λ cold dark matter model that also provides a good fit to the pattern of observed fluctuations in the cosmic microwave background radiation. The addition of the current WiggleZ data results in a ≈30 per cent improvement in the measurement accuracy of a constant equation of state, w, using BAO data alone. Based solely on geometric BAO distance ratios, accelerating expansion (w < -1/3) is required with a probability of 99.8 per cent, providing a consistency check of conclusions based on supernovae observations. Further improvements in cosmological constraints will result when the WiggleZ survey data set is complete.

  18. Room Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuttruff, Heinrich; Mommertz, Eckard

    The traditional task of room acoustics is to create or formulate conditions which ensure the best possible propagation of sound in a room from a sound source to a listener. Thus, objects of room acoustics are in particular assembly halls of all kinds, such as auditoria and lecture halls, conference rooms, theaters, concert halls or churches. Already at this point, it has to be pointed out that these conditions essentially depend on the question if speech or music should be transmitted; in the first case, the criterion for transmission quality is good speech intelligibility, in the other case, however, the success of room-acoustical efforts depends on other factors that cannot be quantified that easily, not least it also depends on the hearing habits of the listeners. In any case, absolutely "good acoustics" of a room do not exist.

  19. Sound-conduction effects on distortion-product otoacoustic emission screening outcomes in newborn infants: test performance of wideband acoustic transfer functions and 1-kHz tympanometry.

    PubMed

    Sanford, Chris A; Keefe, Douglas H; Liu, Yi-Wen; Fitzpatrick, Denis; McCreery, Ryan W; Lewis, Dawna E; Gorga, Michael P

    2009-12-01

    Universal newborn hearing screening (UNHS) test outcomes can be influenced by conditions affecting the sound conduction pathway, including ear canal and/or middle ear function. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the test performance of wideband (WB) acoustic transfer functions and 1-kHz tympanometry in terms of their ability to predict the status of the sound conduction pathway for ears that passed or were referred in a UNHS program. A distortion-product otoacoustic emission (DPOAE) test was used to determine the UNHS status of 455 infant ears (375 passed and 80 referred). WB and 1-kHz tests were performed immediately after the infant's first DPOAE test (day 1). Of the 80 infants referred on day 1, 67 infants were evaluated again after a second UNHS DPOAE test the next day (day 2). WB data were acquired under ambient and tympanometric (pressurized) ear canal conditions. Clinical decision theory analysis was used to assess the test performance of WB and 1-kHz tests in terms of their ability to classify ears that passed or were referred, using DPOAE UNHS test outcomes as the "gold standard." Specifically, performance was assessed using previously published measurement criteria and a maximum-likelihood procedure for 1-kHz tympanometry and WB measurements, respectively. For measurements from day 1, the highest area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.87 for an ambient WB test predictor. The highest area under the receiver operating characteristic curve among several variables derived from 1-kHz tympanometry was 0.75. In general, ears that passed the DPOAE UNHS test had higher energy absorbance compared with those that were referred, indicating that infants who passed the DPOAE UNHS had a more acoustically efficient conductive pathway. Results showed that (1) WB tests had better performance in classifying UNHS DPOAE outcomes than 1-kHz tympanometry; (2) WB tests provide data to suggest that many UNHS referrals are a consequence of transient

  20. Acoustic fault injection tool (AFIT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoess, Jeffrey N.

    1999-05-01

    On September 18, 1997, Honeywell Technology Center (HTC) successfully completed a three-week flight test of its rotor acoustic monitoring system (RAMS) at Patuxent River Flight Test Center. This flight test was the culmination of an ambitious 38-month proof-of-concept effort directed at demonstrating the feasibility of detecting crack propagation in helicopter rotor components. The program was funded as part of the U.S. Navy's Air Vehicle Diagnostic Systems (AVDS) program. Reductions in Navy maintenance budgets and available personnel have dictated the need to transition from time-based to 'condition-based' maintenance. Achieving this will require new enabling diagnostic technologies. The application of acoustic emission for the early detection of helicopter rotor head dynamic component faults has proven the feasibility of the technology. The flight-test results demonstrated that stress-wave acoustic emission technology can detect signals equivalent to small fatigue cracks in rotor head components and can do so across the rotating articulated rotor head joints and in the presence of other background acoustic noise generated during flight operation. During the RAMS flight test, 12 test flights were flown from which 25 Gbyte of digital acoustic data and about 15 hours of analog flight data recorder (FDR) data were collected from the eight on-rotor acoustic sensors. The focus of this paper is to describe the CH-46 flight-test configuration and present design details about a new innovative machinery diagnostic technology called acoustic fault injection. This technology involves the injection of acoustic sound into machinery to assess health and characterize operational status. The paper will also address the development of the Acoustic Fault Injection Tool (AFIT), which was successfully demonstrated during the CH-46 flight tests.

  1. Acoustic Detection of Faults and Degradation in a High-Bypass Turbofan Engine during VIPR Phase III Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyle, Devin K.

    2017-01-01

    The Vehicle Integrated Propulsion Research (VIPR) Phase III project was executed at Edwards Air Force Base, California, by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and several industry, academic, and government partners in the summer of 2015. One of the research objectives was to use external radial acoustic microphone arrays to detect changes in the noise characteristics produced by the research engine during volcanic ash ingestion and seeded fault insertion scenarios involving bleed air valves. Preliminary results indicate the successful acoustic detection of suspected degradation as a result of cumulative exposure to volcanic ash. This detection is shown through progressive changes, particularly in the high-frequency content, as a function of exposure to greater cumulative quantities of ash. Additionally, detection of the simulated failure of the 14th stage stability bleed valve and, to a lesser extent, the station 2.5 stability bleed valve, to their fully-open fail-safe positions was achieved by means of spectral comparisons between nominal (normal valve operation) and seeded fault scenarios.

  2. Embedded Acoustic Sensor Array for Engine Fan Noise Source Diagnostic Test: Feasibility of Noise Telemetry via Wireless Smart Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaman, Afroz; Bauch, Matthew; Raible, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Aircraft engines have evolved into a highly complex system to meet ever-increasing demands. The evolution of engine technologies has primarily been driven by fuel efficiency, reliability, as well as engine noise concerns. One of the sources of engine noise is pressure fluctuations that are induced on the stator vanes. These local pressure fluctuations, once produced, propagate and coalesce with the pressure waves originating elsewhere on the stator to form a spinning pressure pattern. Depending on the duct geometry, air flow, and frequency of fluctuations, these spinning pressure patterns are self-sustaining and result in noise which eventually radiate to the far-field from engine. To investigate the nature of vane pressure fluctuations and the resulting engine noise, unsteady pressure signatures from an array of embedded acoustic sensors are recorded as a part of vane noise source diagnostics. Output time signatures from these sensors are routed to a control and data processing station adding complexity to the system and cable loss to the measured signal. "Smart" wireless sensors have data processing capability at the sensor locations which further increases the potential of wireless sensors. Smart sensors can process measured data locally and transmit only the important information through wireless communication. The aim of this wireless noise telemetry task was to demonstrate a single acoustic sensor wireless link for unsteady pressure measurement, and thus, establish the feasibility of distributed smart sensors scheme for aircraft engine vane surface unsteady pressure data transmission and characterization.

  3. Procedures for ambient-pressure and tympanometric tests of aural acoustic reflectance and admittance in human infants and adults

    PubMed Central

    Keefe, Douglas H.; Hunter, Lisa L.; Feeney, M. Patrick; Fitzpatrick, Denis F.

    2015-01-01

    Procedures are described to measure acoustic reflectance and admittance in human adult and infant ears at frequencies from 0.2 to 8 kHz. Transfer functions were measured at ambient pressure in the ear canal, and as down- or up-swept tympanograms. Acoustically estimated ear-canal area was used to calculate ear reflectance, which was parameterized by absorbance and group delay over all frequencies (and pressures), with substantial data reduction for tympanograms. Admittance measured at the probe tip in adults was transformed into an equivalent admittance at the eardrum using a transmission-line model for an ear canal with specified area and ear-canal length. Ear-canal length was estimated from group delay around the frequency above 2 kHz of minimum absorbance. Illustrative measurements in ears with normal function are described for an adult, and two infants at 1 month of age with normal hearing and a conductive hearing loss. The sensitivity of this equivalent eardrum admittance was calculated for varying estimates of area and length. Infant-ear patterns of absorbance peaks aligned in frequency with dips in group delay were explained by a model of resonant canal-wall mobility. Procedures will be applied in a large study of wideband clinical diagnosis and monitoring of middle-ear and cochlear function. PMID:26723319

  4. Quiet Clean Short-haul Experimental Engine (QCSEE) Over-The-Wing (OTW) propulsion systems test report. Volume 4: Acoustic performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stimpert, D. L.

    1979-01-01

    A series of acoustic tests were conducted on the over the wing engine. These tests evaluated the fully suppressed noise levels in forward and reverse thrust operation and provided insight into the component noise sources of the engine plus the suppression achieved by various components. System noise levels using the contract specified calculation procedure indicate that the in-flight noise level on a 152 m sideline at takeoff and approach are 97.2 and 94.6 EPNdB, respectively, compared to a goal of 95.0 EPNdB. In reverse thrust, the system noise level was 106.1 PNdB compared to a goal of 100 PNdB. Baseline source noise levels agreed very well with pretest predictions. Inlet-radiated noise suppression of 14 PNdB was demonstrated with the high throat Mach number inlet at 0.79 throat Mach number.

  5. Concert hall acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroeder, Manfred

    2004-05-01

    I will review some work at Bell Laboratories on artificial reverberation and concert hall acoustics including Philharmonic Hall (Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts, New York). I will also touch on sound diffusion by number-theoretic surfaces and the measurement of reverberation time using the music as played in the hall as a ``test'' signal.

  6. Investigations of detail design issues for the high speed acoustic wind tunnel using a 60th scale model tunnel. Part 2: Tests with the closed circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barna, P. Stephen

    1991-01-01

    This report summarizes the tests on the 1:60 scale model of the High Speed Acoustic Wind Tunnel (HSAWT) performed during the period June - August 1991. Throughout the testing the tunnel was operated in the 'closed circuit mode,' that is when the airflow was set up by an axial flow fan, which was located inside the tunnel circuit and was directly driven by a motor. The tests were first performed with the closed test section and were subsequently repeated with the open test section, the latter operating with the nozzle-diffuser at its optimum setting. On this subject, reference is made to the report (1) issued January 1991, under contract 17-GFY900125, which summarizes the result obtained with the tunnel operating in the 'open circuit mode.' The tests confirmed the viability of the tunnel design, and the flow distributions in most of the tunnel components were considered acceptable. There were found, however, some locations where the flow distribution requires improvement. This applies to the flow upstream of the fan where the flow was found skewed, thus affecting the flow downstream. As a result of this, the flow appeared separated at the end of the large diffuser at the outer side. All tests were performed at NASA LaRC.

  7. Broadband Acoustic Hyperbolic Metamaterial.

    PubMed

    Shen, Chen; Xie, Yangbo; Sui, Ni; Wang, Wenqi; Cummer, Steven A; Jing, Yun

    2015-12-18

    In this Letter, we report on the design and experimental characterization of a broadband acoustic hyperbolic metamaterial. The proposed metamaterial consists of multiple arrays of clamped thin plates facing the y direction and is shown to yield opposite signs of effective density in the x and y directions below a certain cutoff frequency, therefore, yielding a hyperbolic dispersion. Partial focusing and subwavelength imaging are experimentally demonstrated at frequencies between 1.0 and 2.5 kHz. The proposed metamaterial could open up new possibilities for acoustic wave manipulation and may find usage in medical imaging and nondestructive testing.

  8. Undersea Acoustic Research.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-01-01

    field test of ocean tomography in 1981. S.; Bibliography W. Munk, B. Zetler, J. Clark, S. Gill, D. Porter, J. Spiesberger , and R. Spindel, "Tidal effects...on long-range sound transmission," JGR (Green) 86, 6399-6410, 1981. J. Spiesberger , R. Spindel and K. Metzger, "Stability and identification of ocean...Acoustics, T =+viv, Israel, 1981. R.C. Spindel and J. Spiesberger , "Multipath variability du, the Gulf Stream," J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 69, 982-988, 1981. R.C

  9. Geographic Variation in the Acoustic Traits of Greater Horseshoe Bats: Testing the Importance of Drift and Ecological Selection in Evolutionary Processes

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Keping; Luo, Li; Kimball, Rebecca T.; Wei, Xuewen; Jin, Longru; Jiang, Tinglei; Li, Guohong; Feng, Jiang

    2013-01-01

    Patterns of intraspecific geographic variation of signaling systems provide insight into the microevolutionary processes driving phenotypic divergence. The acoustic calls of bats are sensitive to diverse evolutionary forces, but processes that shape call variation are largely unexplored. In China, Rhinolophus ferrumequinum displays a diverse call frequency and inhabits a heterogeneous landscape, presenting an excellent opportunity for this kind of research. We quantified geographic variation in resting frequency (RF) of echolocation calls, estimated genetic structure and phylogeny of R. ferrumequinum populations, and combined this with climatic factors to test three hypotheses to explain acoustic variation: genetic drift, cultural drift, and local adaptation. Our results demonstrated significant regional divergence in frequency and phylogeny among the bat populations in China's northeast (NE), central-east (CE) and southwest (SW) regions. The CE region had higher frequencies than the NE and SW regions. Drivers of RF divergence were estimated in the entire range and just the CE/NE region (since these two regions form a clade). In both cases, RF divergence was not correlated with mtDNA or nDNA genetic distance, but was significantly correlated with geographic distance and mean annual temperature, indicating cultural drift and ecological selection pressures are likely important in shaping RF divergence among different regions in China. PMID:23950926

  10. Laboratory tests on an aircraft fuselage to determine the insertion loss of various acoustic add-on treatments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heitman, K. E.; Mixson, J. S.

    1984-01-01

    This paper describes a laboratory study of add-on acoustic treatments for a propeller-driven light aircraft fuselage. The treatments included: no treatment (i.e., baseline fuselage); a production-type double-wall interior; and various amounts of high density fiberglass added to the baseline fuselage. The sound source was a pneumatic-driver with attached exponential horn, supplied with a broadband signal. Data were acquired at the approximate head positions of the six passenger seats. The results were analyzed on space-averaged narrowband, one-third octave band and overall insertion loss basis. In addition, insertion loss results for the different configurations at specific frequencies representing propeller tone spectra are presented. The propeller tone data includes not only the space-averaged insertion loss, but also the variation of insertion loss at these particular frequencies across the six microphone positions.

  11. Acoustic test of a model rotor and tail rotor: Results for the isolated rotors and combined configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, R. M.; Burley, C. L.; Elliott, J. W.

    1989-01-01

    Acoustic data from a model scale main rotor and tail rotor experiment in the NASA Langley 14 by 22 Foot Subsonic Tunnel are presented for the main rotor and trail rotor in isolation and for the two rotors operating together. Results for the isolated main rotor show the importance of the rotor flapping conditions on mid-frequency noise content. High levels of main rotor retreating side blade-vortex interaction noise are shown to radiate downstream of the model. The isolated tail rotor noise results show the dominance of harmonic noise in the thrusting direction. The occurrence of tail rotor broadband noise is seen by the broadening of the tail rotor harmonics and is attributed to fuselage wake turbulence. The combined main and tail rotor data are presented to show the dominance of each rotor's different noise sources at different directivity locations.

  12. Acoustic analysis of warp potential of green ponderosa pine lumber

    Treesearch

    Xiping Wang; William T. Simpson

    2005-01-01

    This study evaluated the potential of acoustic analysis as presorting criteria to identify warp-prone boards before kiln drying. Dimension lumber, 38 by 89 mm (nominal 2 by 4 in.) and 2.44 m (8 ft) long, sawn from open-grown small-diameter ponderosa pine trees, was acoustically tested lengthwise at green condition. Three acoustic properties (acoustic speed, rate of...

  13. Acoustic biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Fogel, Ronen; Seshia, Ashwin A.

    2016-01-01

    Resonant and acoustic wave devices have been researched for several decades for application in the gravimetric sensing of a variety of biological and chemical analytes. These devices operate by coupling the measurand (e.g. analyte adsorption) as a modulation in the physical properties of the acoustic wave (e.g. resonant frequency, acoustic velocity, dissipation) that can then be correlated with the amount of adsorbed analyte. These devices can also be miniaturized with advantages in terms of cost, size and scalability, as well as potential additional features including integration with microfluidics and electronics, scaled sensitivities associated with smaller dimensions and higher operational frequencies, the ability to multiplex detection across arrays of hundreds of devices embedded in a single chip, increased throughput and the ability to interrogate a wider range of modes including within the same device. Additionally, device fabrication is often compatible with semiconductor volume batch manufacturing techniques enabling cost scalability and a high degree of precision and reproducibility in the manufacturing process. Integration with microfluidics handling also enables suitable sample pre-processing/separation/purification/amplification steps that could improve selectivity and the overall signal-to-noise ratio. Three device types are reviewed here: (i) bulk acoustic wave sensors, (ii) surface acoustic wave sensors, and (iii) micro/nano-electromechanical system (MEMS/NEMS) sensors. PMID:27365040

  14. Acoustic biosensors.

    PubMed

    Fogel, Ronen; Limson, Janice; Seshia, Ashwin A

    2016-06-30

    Resonant and acoustic wave devices have been researched for several decades for application in the gravimetric sensing of a variety of biological and chemical analytes. These devices operate by coupling the measurand (e.g. analyte adsorption) as a modulation in the physical properties of the acoustic wave (e.g. resonant frequency, acoustic velocity, dissipation) that can then be correlated with the amount of adsorbed analyte. These devices can also be miniaturized with advantages in terms of cost, size and scalability, as well as potential additional features including integration with microfluidics and electronics, scaled sensitivities associated with smaller dimensions and higher operational frequencies, the ability to multiplex detection across arrays of hundreds of devices embedded in a single chip, increased throughput and the ability to interrogate a wider range of modes including within the same device. Additionally, device fabrication is often compatible with semiconductor volume batch manufacturing techniques enabling cost scalability and a high degree of precision and reproducibility in the manufacturing process. Integration with microfluidics handling also enables suitable sample pre-processing/separation/purification/amplification steps that could improve selectivity and the overall signal-to-noise ratio. Three device types are reviewed here: (i) bulk acoustic wave sensors, (ii) surface acoustic wave sensors, and (iii) micro/nano-electromechanical system (MEMS/NEMS) sensors.

  15. Acoustic Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyman, Joseph S.

    1993-01-01

    Pump uses acoustic-radiation forces. Momentum transferred from sound waves to sound-propagating material in way resulting in net pumping action on material. Acoustic pump is solid-state pump. Requires no moving parts, entirely miniaturized, and does not invade pumped environment. Silent, with no conventional vibration. Used as pump for liquid, suspension, gas, or any other medium interacting with radiation pressure. Also used where solid-state pump needed for reliability and controllability. In microgravity environment, device offers unusual control for low flow rates. For medical or other applications in which contamination cannot be allowed, offers noninvasive pumping force.

  16. Integrating fluorescent dye flow-curve testing and acoustic Doppler velocimetry profiling for in situ hydraulic evaluation and improvement of clarifier performance.

    PubMed

    Tarud, F; Aybar, M; Pizarro, G; Cienfuegos, R; Pastén, P

    2010-08-01

    Enhancing the performance of clarifiers requires a thorough understanding of their hydraulics. Fluorescence spectroscopy and acoustic doppler velocimeter (ADV) profiling generally have been used separately to evaluate secondary settlers. We propose that simultaneous use of these techniques is needed to obtain a more reliable and useful evaluation. Experiments were performed on laboratory- and full-scale clarifiers. Factors affecting Fluorescein and Rhodamine 6G properties were identified. Underestimations up to 500% in fluorescence intensities may be derived from differential fluorescence quenching by oxygen. A careful control and interpretation of fluorescent dye experiments is needed to minimize artifacts in real settings. While flow-curve tests constructed under controlled conditions provided a more accurate overall quantitative estimation of the hydraulic performance, ADV velocity and turbulence profiling provided a detailed spatial understanding of flow patterns that was used to troubleshoot and fix the causes of hydraulic short-circuits.

  17. Mars Acoustic Anemometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banfield, D.; Gierasch, P. J.; Toigo, A.; Dissly, R.; Dagle, W. R.; Schindel, D.; Hutchins, D.; Khuri-Yakub, B. T.

    2004-05-01

    . The Martian atmosphere has an acoustic impedance of about 1% that of the Earth. The commonly used (on Earth) piezo transducers lose about 110dB coupling with Mars air. Matching plates are unsuitable due to bandwidth limitations. Acoustic horns may aid in matching impedances. Capacitive transducers have an inherently low acoustic impedance, and are now becoming available in the frequency ranges needed for Mars. We have secured 3 sources of cutting-edge capacitive transducers that are being tested in a simulated martian atmosphere anechoic chamber. Our testing and redesign is resulting in an optimized transducer for use on Mars. The goal of this project is to produce a proof-of-concept and functional design of an accurate, robust, versatile Martian anemometer with significantly greater capabilities than its predecessors.

  18. Practical Acoustic Thermometry with Acoustic Waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Podesta, M.; Sutton, G.; Underwood, R.; Legg, S.; Steinitz, A.

    2010-09-01

    Acoustic thermometry is capable of phenomenal accuracy, but is a difficult technique to apply in many practical situations. Here, we describe a modification of the technique, which permits robust temperature measurements to be made, potentially with millikelvin resolution, over a temperature range extending from cryogenic temperatures to over 1000 °C. The technique uses measurements of the time of flight of acoustic pulses in tubes, usually filled with an inert gas such as argon. The tubes—typically made of stainless steel with an outer diameter of 6mm—act as acoustic waveguides and can be several meters long and bent into complex shapes. The time of flight is determined by the average temperature along the entire length of the tube. Local temperature information can be inferred in several ways. Typically a second shorter tube is used and the difference in time of flight reflects the temperature in the region at the end of the first tube. If the measurement length is sufficiently long—typically 1m of tube—then a measurement resolution of less than 1mK is achievable. The technique is well suited to measurements in harsh environments in which conventional sensors degrade. Results from early tests are shown, which highlight the strengths and weaknesses of the technique.

  19. Acoustic/Magnetic Stress Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyman, J. S.; Namkung, M.

    1986-01-01

    High-resolution sensor fast, portable, does not require permanent bonding to structure. Sensor measures nondestructively type (compressive or tensile) and magnitude of stresses and stress gradients present in class of materials. Includes precise high-resolution acoustic interferometer, sending acoustic transducer, receiving acoustic transducer, electromagnet coil and core, power supply, and magnetic-field-measuring device such as Hall probe. This measurement especially important for construction and applications where steel is widely used. Sensor useful especially for nondestructive evaluation of stress in steel members because of portability, rapid testing, and nonpermanent installation.

  20. 50 years of nonlinear acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naugolnykh, K.

    2008-06-01

    Episodes of nonlinear acoustics history related to several topics are discussed. Nonlinear evolution of finite amplitude wave, its distortion and weak shock wave formation, nonlinear absorption of the high intensity wave. Nonlinear wave propagation in a randomly inhomogeneous media, interaction of noises and regular signals. Nonlinear sound wave interactions. Parametric transmitting and receiving array theoretical models, experimental test and applications in ocean and atmospheric sounding. Parametric acoustic array in oceanic waveguids. High-intensity focused ultrasound propagation in a inhomogeneous fluid and tissue, nonlinear mechanism of heating by high-intensity focused ultrasound, which is important for ultrasound thermal therapy. Intense acoustic pulses generation, cavitation, laser generated nonlinear pulses.

  1. Acoustic transducer for acoustic microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Khuri-Yakub, B.T.; Chou, C.H.

    1990-03-20

    A shear acoustic transducer-lens system is described in which a shear polarized piezoelectric material excites shear polarized waves at one end of a buffer rod having a lens at the other end which excites longitudinal waves in a coupling medium by mode conversion at selected locations on the lens. 9 figs.

  2. Acoustic transducer for acoustic microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T.; Chou, Ching H.

    1990-01-01

    A shear acoustic transducer-lens system in which a shear polarized piezoelectric material excites shear polarized waves at one end of a buffer rod having a lens at the other end which excites longitudinal waves in a coupling medium by mode conversion at selected locations on the lens.

  3. Failure Behavior of Plasma-Sprayed Yttria-Stabilized Zirconia Thermal Barrier Coatings Under Three-Point Bending Test via Acoustic Emission Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L.; Ni, J. X.; Shao, F.; Yang, J. S.; Zhong, X. H.; Zhao, H. Y.; Liu, C. G.; Tao, S. Y.; Wang, Y.; Li, D. Y.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, the failure behavior of plasma-sprayed yttria-stabilized zirconia thermal barrier coatings fabricated by atmospheric plasma spraying (APS-TBCs) under three-point bending (3PB) test has been characterized via acoustic emission (AE) technique. Linear positioning method has been adopted to monitor dynamic failure process of the APS-TBCs under 3PB test. The investigation results indicate that the variation of AE parameters (AE event counts, amplitudes and AE energy) corresponds well with the change of stress-strain curve of the loading processes. The failure mechanism was analyzed based on the characteristics of AE parameters. The distribution of frequency of crack propagation has been obtained. The AE signals came from two aspects: i.e., plastic deformation of substrates, initiation and propagation of the cracks in the coatings. The AE analysis combined with cross-sectional observation has indicated that many critical cracks initiate at the surface of the top-coat. And some main cracks tend to propagate toward the substrate/bond-coat interface. The actual failure mechanism of the APS-TBCs under 3PB test is attributed to the debonding of metallic coating from the substrates and the propagation of the horizontal crack along the substrate/bond-coat interface under the action of flexural moment.

  4. Field Testing and Performance Evaluation of the Long-Range Acoustic Real-Time Sensor for Polar Areas (LARA)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-30

    1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Field Testing and Performance Evaluation of the Long...cover expenses for field testing and performance evaluation. This new ONR award will allow us to conduct initial short-term deployments of LARA of the...more effective, and provides maximum flexibility allowing for a wide range of applications even in ice-covered areas. APPROACH We will test

  5. Intelligent Engine Systems: Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wojno, John; Martens, Steve; Simpson, Benjamin

    2008-01-01

    An extensive study of new fan exhaust nozzle technologies was performed. Three new uniform chevron nozzles were designed, based on extensive CFD analysis. Two new azimuthally varying variants were defined. All five were tested, along with two existing nozzles, on a representative model-scale, medium BPR exhaust nozzle. Substantial acoustic benefits were obtained from the uniform chevron nozzle designs, the best benefit being provided by an existing design. However, one of the azimuthally varying nozzle designs exhibited even better performance than any of the uniform chevron nozzles. In addition to the fan chevron nozzles, a new technology was demonstrated, using devices that enhance mixing when applied to an exhaust nozzle. The acoustic benefits from these devices applied to medium BPR nozzles were similar, and in some cases superior to, those obtained from conventional uniform chevron nozzles. However, none of the low noise technologies provided equivalent acoustic benefits on a model-scale high BPR exhaust nozzle, similar to current large commercial applications. New technologies must be identified to improve the acoustics of state-of-the-art high BPR jet engines.

  6. Acoustic chaos

    SciTech Connect

    Lauterborn, W.; Parlitz, U.; Holzfuss, J.; Billo, A.; Akhatov, I.

    1996-06-01

    Acoustic cavitation, a complex, spatio-temporal dynamical system, is investigated with respect to its chaotic properties. The sound output, the {open_quote}{open_quote}noise{close_quote}{close_quote}, is subjected to time series analysis. The spatial dynamics of the bubble filaments is captured by high speed holographic cinematography and subsequent digital picture processing from the holograms. Theoretical models are put forward for describing the pattern formation. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  7. Medical Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beach, Kirk W.; Dunmire, Barbrina

    Medical acoustics can be subdivided into diagnostics and therapy. Diagnostics are further separated into auditory and ultrasonic methods, and both employ low amplitudes. Therapy (excluding medical advice) uses ultrasound for heating, cooking, permeablizing, activating and fracturing tissues and structures within the body, usually at much higher amplitudes than in diagnostics. Because ultrasound is a wave, linear wave physics are generally applicable, but recently nonlinear effects have become more important, even in low-intensity diagnostic applications.

  8. PORTABLE ACOUSTIC MONITORING PACKAGE (PAMP)

    SciTech Connect

    John L. Loth; Gary J. Morris; George M. Palmer; Richard Guiler; Patrick Browning

    2004-07-20

    The Portable Acoustic Monitoring Package (PAMP) has been designed to record and monitor the acoustic signal in natural gas transmission lines. In particular the three acoustic signals associated with a line leak. The system is portable ({approx}30 lbs) and is designed for line pressures up to 1000 psi. It has become apparent that cataloging of the various background acoustic signals in natural gas transmission line is very important if a system to identify leak signals is to be developed. The low-pressure (0-200 psig) laboratory test phase has been completed and a number of field trials have been conducted. Before the cataloging phase could begin, a few problems identified in field trials identified had to be corrected such as: (1) Decreased microphone sensitivity at line pressures above 250 psig. (2) The inability to deal with large data sets collected when cataloging the variety of signals in a transmission line. (3) The lack of an available online acoustic calibration system. These problems have been solved and the WVU PAMP is now fully functional over the entire pressure range found in the Natural Gas transmission lines in this region. Field portability and reliability have been greatly improved. Data collection and storage have also improved to the point were the full acoustic spectrum of acoustic signals can be accurately cataloged, recorded and described.

  9. A novel anatomical short glass fiber reinforced post in an endodontically treated premolar mechanical resistance evaluation using acoustic emission under fatigue testing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hsuan-Wen; Chang, Yen-Hsiang; Lin, Chun-Li

    2017-01-01

    This study evaluates the fracture resistance in an endodontically treated tooth using circular fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) and innovated anatomical short glass fiber reinforced (SGFR) posts under fatigue testing, monitored using the acoustic emission (AE) technique. An anatomical SGFR fiber post with an oval shape and slot/notch design was manufactured using an injection-molding machine. Crown/core maxillary second premolar restorations were executed using the anatomical SGFR and commercial cylindrical fiber posts under fatigue test to understand the mechanical resistances. The load versus AE signals in the fracture and fatigue tests were recorded to evaluate the restored tooth failure resistance. The static fracture resistance results showed that teeth restored using the anatomical SGFR post presented higher resistance than teeth restored using the commercial FRC post. The fatigue test endurance limitation (1.2×10(6) cycles) was 207.1N for the anatomical SGFR fiber post, higher than the 185.3N found with the commercial FRC post. The average accumulated number of AE signals and corresponding micro cracks for the anatomical SGFR fiber post (153.0 hits and 2.44 cracks) were significantly lower than those for the commercial FRC post (194.7 hits and 4.78 cracks) under 40% of the static maximum resistance fatigue test load (pass 1.2×10(6) cycles). This study concluded that the anatomical SGFR fiber post with surface slot/notch design made using precise injection molding presented superior static fracture resistance and fatigue endurance limitation than those for the commercial FRC post in an endodontically treated premolar.

  10. Acoustic dose and acoustic dose-rate.

    PubMed

    Duck, Francis

    2009-10-01

    Acoustic dose is defined as the energy deposited by absorption of an acoustic wave per unit mass of the medium supporting the wave. Expressions for acoustic dose and acoustic dose-rate are given for plane-wave conditions, including temporal and frequency dependencies of energy deposition. The relationship between the acoustic dose-rate and the resulting temperature increase is explored, as is the relationship between acoustic dose-rate and radiation force. Energy transfer from the wave to the medium by means of acoustic cavitation is considered, and an approach is proposed in principle that could allow cavitation to be included within the proposed definitions of acoustic dose and acoustic dose-rate.

  11. Acoustic Tooth Cleaner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyman, J. S.

    1984-01-01

    Acoustically-energized water jet aids in plaque breakdown. Acoustic Wand includes acoustic transducer 1/4 wave plate, and tapered cone. Together elements energize solution of water containing mild abrasive injected into mouth to help prevent calculous buildup.

  12. High-acoustic-impedance tantalum oxide layers for insulating acoustic reflectors.

    PubMed

    Capilla, Jose; Olivares, Jimena; Clement, Marta; Sangrador, Jesús; Iborra, Enrique; Devos, Arnaud

    2012-03-01

    This work describes the assessment of the acoustic properties of sputtered tantalum oxide films intended for use as high-impedance films of acoustic reflectors for solidly mounted resonators operating in the gigahertz frequency range. The films are grown by sputtering a metallic tantalum target under different oxygen and argon gas mixtures, total pressures, pulsed dc powers, and substrate biases. The structural properties of the films are assessed through infrared absorption spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction measurements. Their acoustic impedance is assessed by deriving the mass density from X-ray reflectometry measurements and the acoustic velocity from picosecond acoustic spectroscopy and the analysis of the frequency response of the test resonators.

  13. Acoustics Research of Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, Ximing; Houston, Janice

    2014-01-01

    The liftoff phase induces high acoustic loading over a broad frequency range for a launch vehicle. These external acoustic environments are used in the prediction of the internal vibration responses of the vehicle and components. Present liftoff vehicle acoustic environment prediction methods utilize stationary data from previously conducted hold-down tests to generate 1/3 octave band Sound Pressure Level (SPL) spectra. In an effort to update the accuracy and quality of liftoff acoustic loading predictions, non-stationary flight data from the Ares I-X were processed in PC-Signal in two flight phases: simulated hold-down and liftoff. In conjunction, the Prediction of Acoustic Vehicle Environments (PAVE) program was developed in MATLAB to allow for efficient predictions of sound pressure levels (SPLs) as a function of station number along the vehicle using semi-empirical methods. This consisted of generating the Dimensionless Spectrum Function (DSF) and Dimensionless Source Location (DSL) curves from the Ares I-X flight data. These are then used in the MATLAB program to generate the 1/3 octave band SPL spectra. Concluding results show major differences in SPLs between the hold-down test data and the processed Ares I-X flight data making the Ares I-X flight data more practical for future vehicle acoustic environment predictions.

  14. Acoustics Research of Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, Ximing; Houston, Janice D.

    2014-01-01

    The liftoff phase induces some of the highest acoustic loading over a broad frequency for a launch vehicle. These external acoustic environments are used in the prediction of the internal vibration responses of the vehicle and components. Thus, predicting these liftoff acoustic environments is critical to the design requirements of any launch vehicle but there are challenges. Present liftoff vehicle acoustic environment prediction methods utilize stationary data from previously conducted hold-down tests; i.e. static firings conducted in the 1960's, to generate 1/3 octave band Sound Pressure Level (SPL) spectra. These data sets are used to predict the liftoff acoustic environments for launch vehicles. To facilitate the accuracy and quality of acoustic loading, predictions at liftoff for future launch vehicles such as the Space Launch System (SLS), non-stationary flight data from the Ares I-X were processed in PC-Signal in two forms which included a simulated hold-down phase and the entire launch phase. In conjunction, the Prediction of Acoustic Vehicle Environments (PAVE) program was developed in MATLAB to allow for efficient predictions of sound pressure levels (SPLs) as a function of station number along the vehicle using semiempirical methods. This consisted, initially, of generating the Dimensionless Spectrum Function (DSF) and Dimensionless Source Location (DSL) curves from the Ares I-X flight data. These are then used in the MATLAB program to generate the 1/3 octave band SPL spectra. Concluding results show major differences in SPLs between the hold-down test data and the processed Ares IX flight data making the Ares I-X flight data more practical for future vehicle acoustic environment predictions.

  15. Suppression through acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Kevin D.; Short, Kenneth R.; VanMeenen, Kirsten M.; Servatius, Richard J.

    2006-05-01

    This paper reviews research conducted by our laboratory exploring the possible use of acoustical stimuli as a tool for influencing behavior. Over the course of several programs, different types of acoustic stimuli have been evaluated for their effectiveness in disrupting targeting, balance, and high-order cognitive processes in both humans and animals. Escape responses are of particular use in this regard. An escape response serves not only as an objective measure of aversion, but as a potential substitute for ongoing behavior. We have also assessed whether the level of performance changes if the individual does not perform an escape response. In general these studies have both suggested certain types of sounds are more aversive or distracting than others. Although the laboratory development of additional stimuli needs to continue, we are taking the next step by testing some of the more effective stimuli in more applied experimental scenarios including those involving group dynamics.

  16. Acoustic testing of a 1.5 pressure ratio low tip speed fan with casing tip bleed (QEP Fan B scale model)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazin, S. B.; Minzner, W. R.; Paas, J. E.

    1971-01-01

    A scale model of the bypass flow region of a 1.5 pressure ratio, single stage, low tip speed fan was tested with a rotor tip casing bleed slot to determine its effects on noise generation. The bleed slot was located 1/2 inch (1.3 cm) upstream of the rotor leading edge and was configured to be a continuous opening around the circumference. The bleed manifold system was operated over a range of bleed rates corresponding to as much as 6% of the fan flow at approach thrust and 4.25% of the fan flow at takeoff thrust. Acoustic results indicate that a bleed rate of 4% of the fan flow reduces the fan maximum approach 200 foot (61.0 m) sideline PNL 0.5 PNdB and the corresponding takeoff thrust noise 1.1 PNdB below the level with zero bleed. However, comparison of the standard casing (no bleed slot) and the slotted bleed casing with zero bleed shows that the bleed slot itself caused a noise increase.

  17. Acoustic testing of a 1.5 pressure ratio low tip speed fan with a serrated rotor (QEP fan B scale model). [reduction of engine noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazin, S. B.; Paas, J. E.; Minzner, W. R.

    1973-01-01

    A scale model of the bypass flow region of a 1.5 pressure ratio, single stage, low tip speed fan was tested with a serrated rotor leading edge to determine its effects on noise generation. The serrated rotor was produced by cutting teeth into the leading edge of the nominal rotor blades. The effects of speed and exhaust nozzle area on the scale models noise characteristics were investigated with both the nominal rotor and serrated rotor. Acoustic results indicate the serrations reduced front quadrant PNL's at takeoff power. In particular, the 200 foot (61.0 m) sideline noise was reduced from 3 to 4 PNdb at 40 deg for nominal and large nozzle operation. However, the rear quadrant maximum sideline PNL's were increased 1.5 to 3 PNdb at approach thust and up to 2 PNdb at takeoff thust with these serrated rotor blades. The configuration with the serrated rotor produced the lowest maximum 200 foot (61.0 m) sideline PNL for any given thust when the large nozzle (116% of design area) was employed.

  18. An experimental study of the structure and acoustic field of a jet in a cross stream. [Ames 7-ft by 10-ft wind tunnel tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Camelier, I.; Karamcheti, K.

    1976-01-01

    The plane of symmetry of a high speed circular jet was surveyed to measure the mean and turbulent velocity fields by using constant temperature hot wire anemometry. The intensity of the noise radiated from the jet was determined in the tunnel test section by utilizing the cross-correlation at a particular time delay between the signals of two microphones suitably located along a given direction. Experimental results indicate that the turbulent intensity inside the crossflow jet increases by a factor of (1 + 1/2) as compared to the turbulent intensity of the same jet under free conditions, with r indicating the ratio of the jet velocity by the cross stream velocity. The peak observed in the turbulence spectra obtained inside the potential core of the jet has a frequency that increases by the same factor with respect to the corresponding frequency measured in the case of the free jet. The noise radiated by the jet becomes more intense as the crossflow velocity increases. The measured acoustic intensity of the crossflow jet is higher than the value which would be expected from the increase of the turbulent intensity only.

  19. YO-3A acoustics research aircraft systems manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cross, J. L.

    1984-01-01

    The flight testing techniques, equipment, and procedures employed during air-to-air acoustic testing of helicopters using the NASA YO-3A Acoustic Research Aircraft are discussed. The research aircraft instrumentation system is described as well as hardware installation on the test aircraft and techniques used during the tests. Emphasis is placed on formation flying, position locations, test matrices, and test procedures.

  20. Wireless Acoustic Measurement System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Paul D.; Dorland, Wade D.

    2005-01-01

    A prototype wireless acoustic measurement system (WAMS) is one of two main subsystems of the Acoustic Prediction/Measurement Tool, which comprises software, acoustic instrumentation, and electronic hardware combined to afford integrated capabilities for predicting and measuring noise emitted by rocket and jet engines. The other main subsystem is described in "Predicting Rocket or Jet Noise in Real Time" (SSC-00215-1), which appears elsewhere in this issue of NASA Tech Briefs. The WAMS includes analog acoustic measurement instrumentation and analog and digital electronic circuitry combined with computer wireless local-area networking to enable (1) measurement of sound-pressure levels at multiple locations in the sound field of an engine under test and (2) recording and processing of the measurement data. At each field location, the measurements are taken by a portable unit, denoted a field station. There are ten field stations, each of which can take two channels of measurements. Each field station is equipped with two instrumentation microphones, a micro-ATX computer, a wireless network adapter, an environmental enclosure, a directional radio antenna, and a battery power supply. The environmental enclosure shields the computer from weather and from extreme acoustically induced vibrations. The power supply is based on a marine-service lead-acid storage battery that has enough capacity to support operation for as long as 10 hours. A desktop computer serves as a control server for the WAMS. The server is connected to a wireless router for communication with the field stations via a wireless local-area network that complies with wireless-network standard 802.11b of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. The router and the wireless network adapters are controlled by use of Linux-compatible driver software. The server runs custom Linux software for synchronizing the recording of measurement data in the field stations. The software includes a module that