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Sample records for acousto-ultrasonic scan system

  1. Development of a High Performance Acousto-ultrasonic Scan System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, D. J.; Martin, R. E.; Harmon, L. M.; Gyekenyesi, A. L.; Kautz, H. E.

    2002-01-01

    Acousto-ultrasonic (AU) interrogation is a single-sided nondestructive evaluation (NDE) technique employing separated sending and receiving transducers. It is used for assessing the microstructural condition/distributed damage state of the material between the transducers. AU is complementary to more traditional NDE methods such as ultrasonic c-scan, x-ray radiography, and thermographic inspection that tend to be used primarily for discrete flaw detection. Through its history, AU has been used to inspect polymer matrix composite, metal matrix composite, ceramic matrix composite, and even monolithic metallic materials. The development of a high-performance automated AU scan system for characterizing within-sample microstructural and property homogeneity is currently in a prototype stage at NASA. In this paper, a review of essential AU technology is given. Additionally, the basic hardware and software configuration, and preliminary results with the system, are described.

  2. Investigation of an expert health monitoring system for aeronautical structures based on pattern recognition and acousto-ultrasonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tibaduiza-Burgos, Diego Alexander; Torres-Arredondo, Miguel Angel

    2015-08-01

    Aeronautical structures are subjected to damage during their service raising the necessity for periodic inspection and maintenance of their components so that structural integrity and safe operation can be guaranteed. Cost reduction related to minimizing the out-of-service time of the aircraft, together with the advantages offered by real-time and safe-life service monitoring, have led to a boom in the design of inexpensive and structurally integrated transducer networks comprising actuators, sensors, signal processing units and controllers. These kinds of automated systems are normally referred to as smart structures and offer a multitude of new solutions to engineering problems and multi-functional capabilities. It is thus expected that structural health monitoring (SHM) systems will become one of the leading technologies for assessing and assuring the structural integrity of future aircraft. This study is devoted to the development and experimental investigation of an SHM methodology for the detection of damage in real scale complex aeronautical structures. The work focuses on each aspect of the SHM system and highlights the potentialities of the health monitoring technique based on acousto-ultrasonics and data-driven modelling within the concepts of sensor data fusion, feature extraction and pattern recognition. The methodology is experimentally demonstrated on an aircraft skin panel and fuselage panel for which several damage scenarios are analysed. The detection performance in both structures is quantified and presented.

  3. The acousto-ultrasonic approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vary, Alex

    1987-01-01

    The nature and underlying rationale of the acousto-ultrasonic approach is reviewed, needed advanced signal analysis and evaluation methods suggested, and application potentials discussed. Acousto-ultrasonics is an NDE technique combining aspects of acoustic emission methodology with ultrasonic simulation of stress waves. This approach uses analysis of simulated stress waves for detecting and mapping variations of mechanical properties. Unlike most NDE, acousto-ultrasonics is less concerned with flaw detection than with the assessment of the collective effects of various flaws and material anomalies. Acousto-ultrasonics has been applied chiefly to laminated and filament-wound fiber reinforced composites. It has been used to assess the significant strength and toughness reducing effects that can be wrought by combinations of essentially minor flaws and diffuse flaw populations. Acousto-ultrasonics assesses integrated defect states and the resultant variations in properties such as tensile, shear, and flexural strengths and fracture resistance. Matrix cure state, porosity, fiber orientation, fiber volume fraction, fiber-matrix bonding, and interlaminar bond quality are underlying factors.

  4. Review of acousto-ultrasonic NDE for composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vary, Alex; Kautz, Harold

    1990-01-01

    Acousto-ultrasonics utilizes simulated stress waves to detect and quantify defect states, damage conditions, and variations of mechanical properties in fiber reinforced composites. The term acousto-ultrasonics denotes a combination of aspects of acoustic emission methodology with ultrasonic materials characterization. The acousto-ultrasonic approach was developed to deal primarily with evaluation of the integrated effect of minor flaws and diffuse flaw populations of subcritical flaws in composite and bonded structures. These factors singly and collectively also influence acousto-ultrasonic measurements that, in turn, correlate with dynamic response and mechanical property variations. Since it was first introduced, the acousto-ultrasonic approach was successfully applied to a variety of materials, including polymeric, metallic, and ceramic matrix composites; adhesively bonded materials; paper and wood products; cable and rope; and also human bone. Examples of applications and limitations of the approach are reviewed. Basic methods and guidelines are discussed. The underlying hypothesis and theory development needs are indicated.

  5. Acousto-ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation of materials using laser beam generation and detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huber, Robert D.; Green, Robert E., Jr.; Vary, Alex; Kautz, Harold

    1990-01-01

    Presented in viewgraph format, the possibility of using laser generation and detection of ultrasound to replace piezoelectric transducers for the acousto-ultrasonic technique is advanced. The advantages and disadvantages of laser acousto-ultrasonics are outlined. Laser acousto-ultrasonics complements standard piezoelectric acousto-ultrasonics and offers non-contact nondestructive evaluation.

  6. Acousto-ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation of materials using laser beam generation and detection. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huber, Robert D.; Green, Robert E., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    The acousto-ultrasonic method has proven to be a most interesting technique for nondestructive evaluation of the mechanical properties of a variety of materials. Use of the technique or a modification thereof, has led to correlation of the associated stress wave factor with mechanical properties of both metals and composite materials. The method is applied to the nondestructive evaluation of selected fiber reinforced structural composites. For the first time, conventional piezoelectric transducers were replaced with laser beam ultrasonic generators and detectors. This modification permitted true non-contact acousto-ultrasonic measurements to be made, which yielded new information about the basic mechanisms involved as well as proved the feasibility of making such non-contact measurements on terrestrial and space structures and heat engine components. A state-of-the-art laser based acousto-ultrasonic system, incorporating a compact pulsed laser and a fiber-optic heterodyne interferometer, was delivered to the NASA Lewis Research Center.

  7. Advanced instrumentation for acousto-ultrasonic based structural health monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smithard, Joel; Galea, Steve; van der Velden, Stephen; Powlesland, Ian; Jung, George; Rajic, Nik

    2016-04-01

    Structural health monitoring (SHM) systems using structurally-integrated sensors potentially allow the ability to inspect for damage in aircraft structures on-demand and could provide a basis for the development of condition-based maintenance approaches for airframes. These systems potentially offer both substantial cost savings and performance improvements over conventional nondestructive inspection (NDI). Acousto-ultrasonics (AU), using structurallyintegrated piezoelectric transducers, offers a promising basis for broad-field damage detection in aircraft structures. For these systems to be successfully applied in the field the hardware for AU excitation and interrogation needs to be easy to use, compact, portable, light and, electrically and mechanically robust. Highly flexible and inexpensive instrumentation for basic background laboratory investigations is also required to allow researchers to tackle the numerous scientific and engineering issues associated with AU based SHM. The Australian Defence Science and Technology Group (DST Group) has developed the Acousto Ultrasonic Structural health monitoring Array Module (AUSAM+), a compact device for AU excitation and interrogation. The module, which has the footprint of a typical current generation smart phone, provides autonomous control of four send and receive piezoelectric elements, which can operate in pitch-catch or pulse-echo modes and can undertake electro-mechanical impedance measurements for transducer and structural diagnostics. Modules are designed to operate synchronously with other units, via an optical link, to accommodate larger transducer arrays. The module also caters for fibre optic sensing of acoustic waves with four intensity-based optical inputs. Temperature and electrical resistance strain gauge inputs as well as external triggering functionality are also provided. The development of a Matlab hardware object allows users to easily access the full hardware functionality of the device and

  8. Quality Evaluation By Acousto-Ultrasonic Testing Of Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vary, Alex

    1989-01-01

    Promising nondestructive-testing method based on ultrasonic simulation of stress waves. Report reviews acousto-ultrasonic technology for nondestructive testing. Discusses principles, suggests advanced signal-analysis schemes for development, and presents potential applications. Acousto-ultrasonics applied principally to assess defects in laminated and filament-wound fiber-reinforced composite materials. Technique used to determine variations in such properties as tensile, shear, and flexural strengths and reductions in strength and toughness caused by defects. Also used to evaluate states of cure, porosities, orientation of fibers, volume fractions of fibers, bonding between fibers and matrices, and qualities of interlaminar bonds.

  9. Acousto-ultrasonic characterization of fiber reinforced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vary, A.

    1981-01-01

    The acousto-ultrasonic technique combines advantageous aspects of acoustic emission and ultrasonic methodologies. Acousto-ultrasonics operates by introducing a repeating series of ultrasonic pulses into a material. The waves introduced simulate the spontaneous stress waves that would arise if the material were put under stress as in the case of acoustic emission measurements. These benign stress waves are detected by an acoustic emission sensor. The physical arrangement of the ultrasonic (input) transducer and acoustic emission (output) sensor is such that the resultant waveform carries an imprint of morphological factors that govern or contribute to material performance. The output waveform is complex, but it can be quantitized in terms of a 'stress wave factor.' The stress wave factor, which can be defined in a number of ways, is a relative measure of the efficiency of energy dissipation in a material. If flaws or other material anomalies exist in the volume being examined, their combined effect appears in the stress wave factor.

  10. Acousto-ultrasonic evaluation of ceramic matrix composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dosreis, Henrique L. M.

    1991-01-01

    Acousto-ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation of ceramic composite specimens with a lithium-alumino-silicate glass matrix reinforced with unidirectional silicon carbide (NICALON) fibers was conducted to evaluate their reserve of strength. Ceramic composite specimens with different amount of damage were prepared by four-point cyclic fatigue loading of the specimens at 500 C for a different number of cycles. The reserve of strength of the specimens was measured as the maximum bending stress recorded during four-pointed bending test with the load monotonically increased until failure occurs. It was observed that the reserve of strength did not correlate with the number of fatigue cycles. However, it was also observed that higher values of the stress wave factor measurements correspond to higher values of the reserve of strength test data. Therefore, these results show that the acousto-ultrasonic approach has the potential of being used to monitor damage and to estimate the reserve of strength of ceramic composites.

  11. Highly reproducible Bragg grating acousto-ultrasonic contact transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saxena, Indu Fiesler; Guzman, Narciso; Lieberman, Robert A.

    2014-09-01

    Fiber optic acousto-ultrasonic transducers offer numerous applications as embedded sensors for impact and damage detection in industrial and aerospace applications as well as non-destructive evaluation. Superficial contact transducers with a sheet of fiber optic Bragg gratings has been demonstrated for guided wave ultrasound based measurements. It is reported here that this method of measurement provides highly reproducible guided ultrasound data of the test composite component, despite the optical fiber transducers not being permanently embedded in it.

  12. Transply crack density detection by acousto-ultrasonics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemann, John H.; Bowles, Kenneth J.; Kautz, Harold; Cavano, Paul

    1987-01-01

    The acousto-ultrasonic method was applied to a PMR-15 8-harness, satin Celion 3000 fabric composite to determine the extent of transply cracking. A six-ply 0/90 laminate was also subjected to mechanical loading, which induced transply cracking. The stress wave factor (SWF) is defined as the energy contained in the received signal from a 2.25-MHz center frequency transducer. The correlation of the SWF with transply crack density is shown.

  13. Noncontact acousto-ultrasonics using laser generation and laser interferometric detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Robert E., Jr.; Huber, Robert D.

    1991-01-01

    A compact, portable fiber-optic heterodyne interferometer designed to detect out-of-plane motion on surfaces is described. The interferometer provides a linear output for displacements over a broad frequency range and can be used for ultrasonic, acoustic emission, and acousto-ultrasonic (AU) testing. The interferometer in conjunction with a compact pulsed Nd:YAG laser represents a noncontact testing system. This system was tested to determine its usefulness for the AU technique. The results obtained show that replacement of conventional piezoelectric transducers (PZT) with a laser generation/detection system make it possible to carry out noncontact AU measurements. The waveforms recorded were 5 MHZ PZT-generated ultrasound propagating through an aluminum block, detection of the acoustic emission event, and laser AU waveforms from graphite-epoxy laminates and a filament-wound composite.

  14. Acousto-Ultrasonics to Assess Material and Structural Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kautz, Harold E.

    2002-10-01

    This report was created to serve as a manual for applying the Acousto-Ultrasonic NDE method, as practiced at NASA Glenn, to the study of materials and structures for a wide range of applications. Three state of the art acousto-ultrasonic (A-U) analysis parameters, ultrasonic decay (UD) rate, mean time (or skewing factor, "s"), and the centroid of the power spectrum, "fc," have been studied and applied at GRC for NDE interrogation of various materials and structures of aerospace interest. In addition to this, a unique application of Lamb wave analysis is shown. An appendix gives a brief overview of Lamb Wave analysis. This paper presents the analysis employed to calculate these parameters and the development and reasoning behind their use. It also discusses the planning of A-U measurements for materials and structures to be studied. Types of transducer coupling are discussed including contact and non-contact via laser and air. Experimental planning includes matching transducer frequency range to material and geometry of the specimen to be studied. The effect on results of initially zeroing the DC component of the ultrasonic waveform is compared with not doing so. A wide range of interrogation problems are addressed via the application of these analysis parameters to real specimens is shown for five cases: Case 1: Differences in density in 0 SiC/RBSN ceramic matrix composite. Case 2: Effect of tensile fatigue cycling in +/-45 SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composite. Case 3: Detecting creep life, and failure, in Udimet 520 Nickel-Based Super Alloy. Case 4: Detecting Surface Layer Formation in T-650-35/PMR-15 Polymer Matrix Composites Panels due to Thermal Aging. Case 5: Detecting Spin Test Degradation in PMC Flywheels. Among these cases a wide range of materials and geometries are studied.

  15. Acousto-ultrasonics to Assess Material and Structural Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kautz, Harold E.

    2002-01-01

    This report was created to serve as a manual for applying the Acousto-Ultrasonic NDE method, as practiced at NASA Glenn, to the study of materials and structures for a wide range of applications. Three state of the art acousto-ultrasonic (A-U) analysis parameters, ultrasonic decay (UD) rate, mean time (or skewing factor, "s"), and the centroid of the power spectrum, "f(sub c)," have been studied and applied at GRC for NDE interrogation of various materials and structures of aerospace interest. In addition to this, a unique application of Lamb wave analysis is shown. An appendix gives a brief overview of Lamb Wave analysis. This paper presents the analysis employed to calculate these parameters and the development and reasoning behind their use. It also discusses the planning of A-U measurements for materials and structures to be studied. Types of transducer coupling are discussed including contact and non-contact via laser and air. Experimental planning includes matching transducer frequency range to material and geometry of the specimen to be studied. The effect on results of initially zeroing the DC component of the ultrasonic waveform is compared with not doing so. A wide range of interrogation problems are addressed via the application of these analysis parameters to real specimens is shown for five cases: Case 1: Differences in density in [0] SiC/RBSN ceramic matrix composite. Case 2: Effect of tensile fatigue cycling in [+/-45] SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composite. Case 3: Detecting creep life, and failure, in Udimet 520 Nickel-Based Super Alloy. Case 4: Detecting Surface Layer Formation in T-650-35/PMR-15 Polymer Matrix Composites Panels due to Thermal Aging. Case 5: Detecting Spin Test Degradation in PMC Flywheels. Among these cases a wide range of materials and geometries are studied.

  16. Experimental Investigation on Acousto-Ultrasonic Sensing Using Polarization-Maintaining Fiber Bragg Gratings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Gang; Banks, Curtis E.

    2015-01-01

    This report discusses the guided Lamb wave sensing using polarization-maintaining (PM) fiber Bragg grating (PM-FBG) sensor. The goal is to apply the PM-FBG sensor system to composite structural health monitoring (SHM) applications in order to realize directivity and multi-axis strain sensing capabilities while using reduced number of sensors. Comprehensive experiments were conducted to evaluate the performance of the PM-FBG sensor in a composite panel structure under different actuation frequencies and locations. Three Macro-Fiber-Composite (MFC) piezoelectric actuators were used to generate guided Lamb waves and they are oriented at 0, 45, and 90 degrees with respect to PM-FBG axial direction, respectively. The actuation frequency was varied from 20kHz to 200kHz. It is shown that the PM-FBG sensor system is able to detect high-speed ultrasound waves and capture the characteristics under different actuation conditions. Both longitudinal and lateral strain components in the order of nano-strain were determined based on the reflective intensity measurement data from fast and slow axis of the PM fiber. It must be emphasized that this is the first attempt to investigate acousto-ultrasonic sensing using PM-FBG sensor. This could lead to a new sensing approach in the SHM applications.

  17. Damage Assessment of Creep Tested and Thermally Aged Udimet 520 Using Acousto-Ultrasonics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gyekenyesi, Andrew L.; Kautz, Harold E.; Cao, Wei

    2001-01-01

    Due to elevated temperatures and excessive stresses, turbine components may experience creep behavior. As a result, it is desirable to monitor and assess the current condition of such components. This study employed the Acousto-Ultrasonics (AU) method in an effort to monitor the state of the material at various percentages of used up creep life in the nickel base alloy, Udimet 520. A stepped specimen (i.e., varying cross sectional area) was employed which allowed for a postmortem nondestructive evaluation (NDE) analysis of the various levels of used up life. The overall objectives here were two fold: First, a user friendly, graphical interface AU system was developed, and second the new AU system was applied as an NDE tool to assess distributed damage resulting from creep. The experimental results demonstrated that the AU method shows promise as an NDE tool capable of detecting material changes as a function of used up creep life. Furthermore, the changes in the AU parameters were mainly attributed to the case of combined load and elevated temperature (i.e., creep) and not simply because of a timed exposure at elevated temperature (i.e., heat treatment or thermal aging).

  18. Apodized fibre Bragg grating acousto-ultrasonic sensor under arbitrary strain using dual Fabry Perot filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jung-Ryul; Tsuda, Hiroshi; Akimune, Yoshio

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes a novel acousto-ultrasonic (AU) sensing system in which a fibre Bragg grating (FBG) is permanently built in a structure for in situ health monitoring. The AU wave detection using an FBG can be realized by a demodulation technique using an optical filter or light source narrower than the FBG spectrum. However, since the spectral wavelength shift induced from structural strain is much larger than the spectral oscillation induced from the AU wave, it is difficult for the demodulation wavelength to follow the spectral shift. For this work, we introduce a passive demodulation method regardless of the spectral shift based on an apodized FBG (AFBG) and dual fibre Fabry-Perot (FFP) filters. The free spectral range (FSR) of a high-finesse FFP filter is matched to the full-bandwidth of the AFBG without side lobes. Therefore, a part of the AFBG spectrum is always filtered by one of the multiple interferometric peaks. However, the wavelength regime near the maximum or minimum reflectivity of the AFBG provides insufficient sensitivity with respect to the wave. Therefore, another 1/4 FSR-biased FFP filter with the same FSR is simultaneously operated.

  19. A preliminary investigation of acousto-ultrasonic NDE of metal matrix composite test specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kautz, Harold E.; Lerch, Brad A.

    1991-01-01

    Acousto-ultrasonic (AU) measurements were performed on a series of tensile specimens composed of 8 laminated layers of continuous, SiC fiber reinforced Ti-15-3 matrix. The following subject areas are covered: AU signal analysis; tensile behavior; AU and interrupted tensile tests; AU and thermally cycled specimens; AU and stiffness; and AU and specimen geometry.

  20. A preliminary investigation of acousto-ultrasonic NDE of metal matrix composite test specimens

    SciTech Connect

    Kautz, H.E.; Lerch, B.A.

    1991-05-01

    Acousto-ultrasonic (AU) measurements were performed on a series of tensile specimens composed of 8 laminated layers of continuous, SiC fiber reinforced Ti{sup -15}- matrix. The following subject areas are covered: AU signal analysis; tensile behavior; AU and interrupted tensile tests; AU and thermally cycled specimens; AU and stiffness; and AU and specimen geometry.

  1. An Acoustic Emission and Acousto-Ultrasonic Analysis of Impact Damaged Composite Pressure Vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, James L.; Workman, Gary L.; Workman, Gary L.

    1996-01-01

    The research presented herein summarizes the development of acoustic emission (AE) and acousto-ultrasonic (AU) techniques for the nondestructive evaluation of filament wound composite pressure vessels. Vessels fabricated from both graphite and kevlar fibers with an epoxy matrix were examined prior to hydroburst using AU and during hydroburst using AE. A dead weight drop apparatus featuring both blunt and sharp impactor tips was utilized to produce a single known energy 'damage' level in each of the vessels so that the degree to which the effects of impact damage could be measured. The damage levels ranged from barely visible to obvious fiber breakage and delamination. Independent neural network burst pressure prediction models were developed from a sample of each fiber/resin material system. Here, the cumulative AE amplitude distribution data collected from low level proof test (25% of the expected burst for undamaged vessels) were used to measure the effects of the impact on the residual burst pressure of the vessels. The results of the AE/neural network model for the inert propellant filled graphite/epoxy vessels 'IM7/3501-6, IM7/977-2 and IM7/8553-45' demonstrated that burst pressures can be predicted from low level AE proof test data, yielding an average error of 5.0%. The trained network for the IM7/977-2 class vessels was also able to predict the expected burst pressure of taller vessels (three times longer hoop region length) constructed of the same material and using the same manufacturing technique, with an average error of 4.9%. To a lesser extent, the burst pressure prediction models could also measure the effects of impact damage to the kevlar/epoxy 'Kevlar 49/ DPL862' vessels. Here though, due to the higher attenuation of the material, an insufficient amount of AE amplitude information was collected to generate robust network models. Although, the worst case trial errors were less than 6%, when additional blind predictions were attempted, errors as

  2. Damage Assessment of Creep Tested and Thermally Aged Metallic Alloys Using Acousto-Ultrasonics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gyekenyesi, Andrew L.; Kautz, Harold E.; Baaklini, George Y.

    2001-01-01

    In recent years emphasis has been placed on the early detection of material changes experienced in turbine powerplant components. During the scheduled overhaul of a turbine, the current techniques of examination of various hot section components aim to find flaws such as cracks, wear, and erosion, as well as excessive deformations. Thus far, these localized damage modes have been detected with satisfactory results. However, the techniques used to find these flaws provide no information on life until the flaws are actually detected. Major improvements in damage assessment, safety, as well as more accurate life prediction could be achieved if nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques could be utilized to sense material changes that occur prior to the localized defects mentioned. Because of elevated temperatures and excessive stresses, turbine components may experience creep behavior. As a result, it is desirable to monitor and access the current condition of such components. Research at the NASA Glenn Research Center involves developing and utilizing an NDE technique that discloses distributed material changes that occur prior to the localized damage detected by the current methods of inspection. In a recent study, creep processes in a nickel-base alloy were the life-limiting condition of interest, and the NDE technique was acousto-ultrasonics (AU). AU is an NDE technique that utilizes two ultrasonic transducers to interrogate the condition of a test specimen. The sending transducer introduces an ultrasonic pulse at a point on the surface of the specimen while a receiving transducer detects the signal after it has passed through the material. The goal of the method is to correlate certain parameters of the detected waveform to characteristics of the material between the two transducers. Here, the waveform parameter of interest is the attenuation due to internal damping for which information is being garnered from the frequency domain. The parameters utilized to

  3. Acousto-ultrasonic verification of the strength of filament wound composite material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kautz, H. E.

    1986-01-01

    The concept of acousto-ultrasonic (AU) waveform partitioning was applied to nondestructive evaluation of mechanical properties in filament wound composites (FWC). A series of FWC test specimens were subjected to AU analysis and the results were compared with destructively measured interlaminar shear strengths (ISS). AU stress-wave factor (SWF) measurements gave greater than 90 percent correlation coefficient upon regression against the ISS. This high correlation was achieved by employing the appropriate time and frequency domain partitioning as dictated by wave propagation path analysis. There is indication that different SWF frequency partitions are sensitive to ISS at different depths below the surface.

  4. Detecting Lamb waves with broad-band acousto-ultrasonic signals in composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kautz, Harold E.

    1992-01-01

    Lamb waves can be produced and detected in ceramic matrix composites (CMC) and metal matrix composites (MMC) plates using the acousto-ultrasonic configuration employing broadband transducers. Experimental dispersion curves of lowest symmetric and antisymmetric modes behave in a manner analogous to the graphite/polymer theoretical curves. In this study a basis has been established for analyzing Lamb wave velocities for characterizing composite plates. Lamb wave dispersion curves and group velocities were correlated with variations in axial stiffness and shear stiffness in MMC and CMC. For CMC, interfacial shear strength was also correlated with the first antisymmetric Lamb mode.

  5. Acousto-ultrasonic input-output characterization of unidirectional fiber composite plate by SH waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, James H., Jr.; Liao, Peter

    1987-01-01

    A unidirectional fiberglass epoxy composite plate specimen is modelled as a homogeneous transversely isotropic continuum plate medium. Acousto-ultrasonic non-contact input-output characterization by tracing SH waves in the continuum is studied theoretically with a transmitting and receiving transducer located on the same face of the plate. It is found that the directional dependence of the phase velocity of the SH waves travelling in the transversely isotropic medium has a significant effect on the delay time as opposed to the phase velocity of the SH wave travelling in an isotropic medium.

  6. An optimal baseline selection methodology for data-driven damage detection and temperature compensation in acousto-ultrasonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres-Arredondo, M.-A.; Sierra-Pérez, Julián; Cabanes, Guénaël

    2016-05-01

    The process of measuring and analysing the data from a distributed sensor network all over a structural system in order to quantify its condition is known as structural health monitoring (SHM). For the design of a trustworthy health monitoring system, a vast amount of information regarding the inherent physical characteristics of the sources and their propagation and interaction across the structure is crucial. Moreover, any SHM system which is expected to transition to field operation must take into account the influence of environmental and operational changes which cause modifications in the stiffness and damping of the structure and consequently modify its dynamic behaviour. On that account, special attention is paid in this paper to the development of an efficient SHM methodology where robust signal processing and pattern recognition techniques are integrated for the correct interpretation of complex ultrasonic waves within the context of damage detection and identification. The methodology is based on an acousto-ultrasonics technique where the discrete wavelet transform is evaluated for feature extraction and selection, linear principal component analysis for data-driven modelling and self-organising maps for a two-level clustering under the principle of local density. At the end, the methodology is experimentally demonstrated and results show that all the damages were detectable and identifiable.

  7. PC analysis of an acousto-ultrasonic signal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiernan, M. T.; Duke, J. C., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    An introduction is given to PC software developed to analyze a digitized signal. The specific way in which the software was implemented and the relative ease with which the same software can be implemented in different systems for various applications are discussed. The basic equations and related theory used in the software are furnished. Specifically, mention is made of signal digitization, dc biasing, Fourier analysis, moment analysis, digital filtering, and transfer functions. Examples of calculations are given to indicate the physical significance of variables calculated from the frequency domain via moment equations.

  8. The Influence of Finite-size Sources in Acousto-ultrasonics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pavlakovic, Brian N.; Rose, Joseph L.

    1994-01-01

    This work explores the effects that the finite normal axisymmetric traction loading of an infinite isotropic plate has on wave propagation in acousto-ultrasonics (AU), in which guided waves are created using two normal incidence transducers. Although the work also addresses the effects of the transducer pressure distribution and pulse shape, this thesis concentrates on two main questions: how does the transducer's diameter control the phase velocity and frequency spectrum of the response, and how does the plate thickness relate to the plate's excitability? The mathematics of the time-harmonic solution and the physical principles and the practical considerations for AU wave generation are explained. Transient sources are modeled by the linear superposition of the time-harmonic solutions found using the Hankel transform and they are then compared to experimental data to provide insight into the relation between the size of the transducer and the preferred phase velocity.

  9. An acoustic emission and acousto-ultrasonic analysis of impact damaged composite pressure vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, Gary L. (Principal Investigator); Walker, James L.

    1996-01-01

    The use of acoustic emission to characterize impact damage in composite structures is being performed on composite bottles wrapped with graphite epoxy and kevlar bottles. Further development of the acoustic emission methodology will include neural net analysis and/or other multivariate techniques to enhance the capability of the technique to identify dominant failure mechanisms during fracture. The acousto-ultrasonics technique will also continue to be investigated to determine its ability to predict regions prone to failure prior to the burst tests. Characterization of the stress wave factor before, and after impact damage will be useful for inspection purposes in manufacturing processes. The combination of the two methods will also allow for simple nondestructive tests capable of predicting the performance of a composite structure prior to its being placed in service and during service.

  10. Acousto-Ultrasonic analysis of failure in ceramic matrix composite tensile specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kautz, Harold E.; Chulya, Abhisak

    1993-01-01

    Three types of acousto-ultrasonic (AU) measurements, stress-wave factor (SWF), lowest antisymmetric plate mode group velocity (VS), and lowest symmetric plate mode group velocity (VL), were performed on specimens before and after tensile failure. Three different Nicalon fiber architectures with ceramic matrices were tested. These composites were categorized as 1D (unidirectional fiber orientation) SiC/CAS glass ceramic, and 2D and 3D woven SiC/SiC ceramic matrix materials. SWF was found to be degraded after tensile failure in all three material categories. VS was found to be degraded only in the 1D SiC/CAS. VL was difficult to determine on the irregular specimen surfaces but appeared unchanged on all failed specimens. 3D woven specimens with heat-treatment at high temperature exhibited degradation only in SWF.

  11. Acousto-Ultrasonic analysis of failure in ceramic matrix composite tensile specimens

    SciTech Connect

    Kautz, H.E.; Chulya, A.

    1993-06-01

    Three types of acousto-ultrasonic (AU) measurements, stress-wave factor (SWF), lowest antisymmetric plate mode group velocity (VS), and lowest symmetric plate mode group velocity (VL), were performed on specimens before and after tensile failure. Three different Nicalon fiber architectures with ceramic matrices were tested. These composites were categorized as 1D (unidirectional fiber orientation) SiC/CAS glass ceramic, and 2D and 3D woven SiC/SiC ceramic matrix materials. SWF was found to be degraded after tensile failure in all three material categories. VS was found to be degraded only in the 1D SiC/CAS. VL was difficult to determine on the irregular specimen surfaces but appeared unchanged on all failed specimens. 3D woven specimens with heat-treatment at high temperature exhibited degradation only in SWF.

  12. Acoustic emission and acousto-ultrasonic signature analysis of failure mechanisms in carbon fiber reinforced polymer materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carey, Shawn Allen

    Fiber reinforced polymer composite materials, particularly carbon (CFRPs), are being used for primary structural applications, particularly in the aerospace and naval industries. Advantages of CFRP materials, compared to traditional materials such as steel and aluminum, include: light weight, high strength to weight ratio, corrosion resistance, and long life expectancy. A concern with CFRPs is that despite quality control during fabrication, the material can contain many hidden internal flaws. These flaws in combination with unseen damage due to fatigue and low velocity impact have led to catastrophic failure of structures and components. Therefore a large amount of research has been conducted regarding nondestructive testing (NDT) and structural health monitoring (SHM) of CFRP materials. The principal objective of this research program was to develop methods to characterize failure mechanisms in CFRP materials used by the U.S. Army using acoustic emission (AE) and/or acousto-ultrasonic (AU) data. Failure mechanisms addressed include fiber breakage, matrix cracking, and delamination due to shear between layers. CFRP specimens were fabricated and tested in uniaxial tension to obtain AE and AU data. The specimens were designed with carbon fibers in different orientations to produce the different failure mechanisms. Some specimens were impacted with a blunt indenter prior to testing to simulate low-velocity impact. A signature analysis program was developed to characterize the AE data based on data examination using visual pattern recognition techniques. It was determined that it was important to characterize the AE event , using the location of the event as a parameter, rather than just the AE hit (signal recorded by an AE sensor). A back propagation neural network was also trained based on the results of the signature analysis program. Damage observed on the specimens visually with the aid of a scanning electron microscope agreed with the damage type assigned by the

  13. A physical model for the acousto-ultrasonic method. Ph.D. Thesis Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiernan, Michael T.; Duke, John C., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    A basic physical explanation, a model, and comments on NDE application of the acousto-ultrasonic (AU) method for composite materials are presented. The basis of this work is a set of experiments where a sending and a receiving piezoelectric transducer were both oriented normal to the surface, at different points, on aluminum plates, various composite plates, and a tapered aluminum plate. The purpose and basic idea is introduced. Also, general comments on the AU method are offered. A literature review is offered for areas pertinent, such as composite materials, wave propagation, ultrasonics, and the AU. Special emphasis is given to theory which is used later on and past experimental results that are important to the physical understanding of the AU method. The experimental set-up, procedure, and the ensuing analysis are described. The experimental results are presented in both a quantitative and qualitative manner. A physical understanding of experimental results based on elasticity solution is furnished. Modeling and applications of the AU method is discussed for composite material and general conclusions are stated. The physical model of the AU method for composite materials is offered, something which has been much needed and sorely lacking. This physical understanding is possible due to the extensive set of experimental measurements, also reported.

  14. Acousto-ultrasonic input-output characterization of unidirectional fiber composite plate by SV waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liao, Peter; Williams, James H., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    A unidirectional fiberglass epoxy compostie specimen is modelled as a homogeneous transversely isotropic continuum plate medium. Acousto-ultrasonic noncontact input-output characterization is studied theoretically with a transmitting and a receiving transducer located on the same face of the plate. The single reflection problem for an incident SV wave at a plane boundary in transversely isotropic medium is analyzed. An obliquely incident SV wave results in a reflected SV wave and a reflected P wave for an angle of incidence of the incident SV wave less than the critical angle. Otherwise, there exists only an SV wave in the medium as the reflected P wave degenerates into a surface wave travelling parallel to the plane boundary. The amplitude ratio of the reflected SV wave is -1 when the angle of incidence is greater than or = the critical angle. The directional dependence of the phase velocity of the SV wave propagating in the transversely isotropic medium has a significant effect on the delay time, as opposed to the directional independence of the phase velocity of a shear wave propagating in an isotropic medium. The displacements associated with the SV wave in the plate and which may be detected by the noncontact receiving transducer are approximated by an asymptotic solution for an infinite transversely isotropic medium subjected to a harmonic point load.

  15. Classification of Low Velocity Impactors Using Spiral Sensing of Acousto-Ultrasonic Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agbasi, Chijioke Raphael

    The non-linear elastodynamics of a flat plate subjected to low velocity foreign body impacts is studied, resembling the space debris impacts on the space structure. The work is based on a central hypothesis that in addition to identifying the impact locations, the material properties of the foreign objects can also be classified using acousto-ultrasonic signals (AUS). Simultaneous localization of impact point and classification of impact object is quite challenging using existing state-of-the-art structural health monitoring (SHM) approaches. Available techniques seek to report the exact location of impact on the structure, however, the reported information is likely to have errors from nonlinearity and variability in the AUS signals due to materials, geometry, boundary conditions, wave dispersion, environmental conditions, sensor and hardware calibration etc. It is found that the frequency and speed of the guided wave generated in the plate can be quantized based on the impactor's relationship with the plate (i.e. the wave speed and the impactor's mechanical properties are coupled). In this work, in order to characterize the impact location and mechanical properties of imapctors, nonlinear transient phenomenon is empirically studied to decouple the understanding using the dominant frequency band (DFB) and Lag Index (LI) of the acousto-ultrasonic signals. Next the understanding was correlated with the elastic modulus of the impactor to predict transmitted force histories. The proposed method presented in this thesis is especially applicable for SHM where sensors cannot be widely or randomly distributed. Thus a strategic organization and localization of the sensors is achieved by implementing the geometric configuration of Theodorous Spiral Sensor Cluster (TSSC). The performance of TSSC in characterizing the impactor types are compared with other conventional sensor clusters (e.g. square, circular, random etc.) and it is shown that the TSSC is advantageous over

  16. Real time acousto-ultrasonic NDE technique for monitoring damage in ceramic composites under dynamic loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiwari, Anil

    1995-01-01

    Research effort was directed towards developing a near real-time, acousto-ultrasonic (AU), nondestructive evaluation (NDE) tool to study the failure mechanisms of ceramic composites. Progression of damage is monitored in real-time by observing the changes in the received AU signal during the actual test. During the real-time AU test, the AU signals are generated and received by the AU transducers attached to the specimen while it is being subjected to increasing quasi-static loads or cyclic loads (10 Hz, R = 1.0). The received AU signals for 64 successive pulses were gated in the time domain (T = 40.96 micro sec) and then averaged every second over ten load cycles and stored in a computer file during fatigue tests. These averaged gated signals are representative of the damage state of the specimen at that point of its fatigue life. This is also the first major attempt in the development and application of real-time AU for continuously monitoring damage accumulation during fatigue without interrupting the test. The present work has verified the capability of the AU technique to assess the damage state in silicon carbide/calcium aluminosilicate (SiC/CAS) and silicon carbide/ magnesium aluminosilicate (SiC/MAS) ceramic composites. Continuous monitoring of damage initiation and progression under quasi-static ramp loading in tension to failure of unidirectional and cross-ply SiC/CAS and quasi-isotropic SiC/MAS ceramic composite specimens at room temperature was accomplished using near real-time AU parameters. The AU technique was shown to be able to detect the stress levels for the onset and saturation of matrix cracks, respectively. The critical cracking stress level is used as a design stress for brittle matrix composites operating at elevated temperatures. The AU technique has found that the critical cracking stress level is 10-15% below the level presently obtained for design purposes from analytical models. An acousto-ultrasonic stress-strain response (AUSSR) model

  17. Determination of plate wave velocities and diffuse field decay rates with braod-band acousto-ultrasonic signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kautz, Harold E.

    1993-01-01

    Lowest symmetric and lowest antisymmetric plate wave modes were excited and identified in broad-band acousto-ultrasonic (AU) signals collected from various high temperature composite materials. Group velocities have been determined for these nearly nondispersive modes. An algorithm has been developed and applied to determine phase velocities and hence dispersion curves for the frequency ranges of the broad-band pulses. It is demonstrated that these data are sensitive to changes in the various stiffness moduli of the materials, in agreement by analogy, with the theoretical and experimental results of Tang and Henneke on fiber reinforced polymers. Diffuse field decay rates have been determined in the same specimen geometries and AU configuration as for the plate wave measurements. These decay rates are of value in assessing degradation such as matrix cracking in ceramic matrix composites. In addition, we verify that diffuse field decay rates respond to fiber/matrix interfacial shear strength and density in ceramic matrix composites. This work shows that velocity/stiffness and decay rate measurements can be obtained in the same set of AU experiments for characterizing materials and in specimens with geometries useful for mechanical measurements.

  18. Evaluation of fatigue cracks using nonlinearities of acousto-ultrasonic waves acquired by an active sensor network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chao; Hong, Ming; Su, Zhongqing; Wang, Qiang; Cheng, Li

    2013-01-01

    There has been increasing interest in using the nonlinear features of acousto-ultrasonic (AU) waves to detect damage onset (e.g., micro-fatigue cracks) due to their high sensitivity to damage with small dimensions. However, most existing approaches are able to infer the existence of fatigue damage qualitatively, but fail to further ascertain its location and severity. A damage characterization approach, in conjunction with the use of an active piezoelectric sensor network, was established, capable of evaluating fatigue cracks in a quantitative manner (including the co-presence of multiple fatigue cracks, and their individual locations and severities). Fundamental investigations, using both experiment and enhanced finite element analysis dedicated to the simulation of nonlinear AU waves, were carried out to link the accumulation of nonlinearities extracted from high-order AU waves to the characteristic parameters of a fatigue crack. A probability-based diagnostic imaging algorithm was developed, facilitating an intuitive presentation of identification results in images. The approach was verified experimentally by evaluating multi-fatigue cracks near rivet holes of a fatigued aluminum plate, showing satisfactory precision in characterizing real, barely visible fatigue cracks. Compared with existing methods, this approach innovatively (i) uses permanently integrated active sensor networks, conducive to automatic and online health monitoring; (ii) characterizes fatigue cracks at a quantitative level; (iii) allows detection of multiple fatigue cracks; and (iv) visualizes identification results in intuitive images.

  19. An Integrated Acousto/Ultrasonic Structural Health Monitoring System for Composite Pressure Vessels.

    PubMed

    Bulletti, Andrea; Giannelli, Pietro; Calzolai, Marco; Capineri, Lorenzo

    2016-06-01

    This paper describes the implementation of a structural health monitoring (SHM) method for mechanical components and structures in composite materials with a focus on carbon-fiber-overwrapped pressure vessels (COPVs) used in the aerospace industry. Two flex arrays of polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) interdigital transducers have been designed, realized, and mounted on the COPV to generate guided Lamb waves (mode A0) for damage assessment. We developed a custom electronic instrument capable of performing two functions using the same transducers: passive-mode detection of impacts and active-mode damage assessment using Lamb waves. The impact detection is based on an accurate evaluation of the time of arrival and was successfully tested with low-velocity impacts (7 and 30 J). Damage detection and progression is based on the calculation of a damage index matrix which compares a set of signals acquired from the transducers with a baseline. This paper also investigates the advantage of tuning the active-mode frequency to obtain the maximum transducer response in the presence of structural variations of the specimen, and therefore, the highest sensitivity to damage. PMID:27019485

  20. Experimental investigation on acousto-ultrasonic sensing using polarization-maintaining fiber Bragg gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banks, Curtis E.; Wang, Gang

    2016-04-01

    This report discusses the guided Lamb wave sensing using polarization-maintaining (PM) fiber Bragg grating (PM-FBG) sensor. The goal is to apply the PM-FBG sensor system to composite structural health monitoring (SHM) applications in order to realize directivity and multi-axis strain sensing capabilities while reducing the number of sensors. Comprehensive experiments were conducted to evaluate the performance of the PM-FBG sensor attached to a composite panel structure under different actuation frequencies and locations. Three Macro-Fiber-Composite (MFC) piezoelectric actuators were used to generate guided Lamb waves that were oriented at 0, 45, and 90 degrees with respect to PMFBG axial direction, respectively. The actuation frequency was varied from 20 kHz to 200 kHz. It was shown that the PM-FBG sensor system was able to detect high-speed ultrasound waves and capture the characteristics under different actuation conditions. Both longitudinal and lateral strain components in the order of nano-strain were determined based on the reflective intensity measurement data from fast and slow axis of the PM fiber. It must be emphasized that this is the first attempt to investigate acouto-ultrasonic sensing using PM-FBG sensor. This could lead to a new sensing approach in the SHM applications.

  1. Experimental Investigation on Acousto-ultrasonic Sensing Using Polarization-Maintaining Fiber Bragg Gratings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Gag; Banks, Curtis E.

    2016-01-01

    This report discusses the guided Lamb wave sensing using polarization-maintaining (PM) fiber Bragg grating (PM-FBG) sensor. The goal is to apply the PM-FBG sensor system to composite structural health monitoring (SHM) applications in order to realize directivity and multi-axis strain sensing capabilities while reducing the number of sensors. Comprehensive experiments were conducted to evaluate the performance of the PM-FBG sensor attached to a composite panel structure under different actuation frequencies and locations. Three Macro-Fiber-Composite (MFC) piezoelectric actuators were used to generate guided Lamb waves that were oriented at 0, 45, and 90 degrees with respect to PM-FBG axial direction, respectively. The actuation frequency was varied from 20kHz to 200kHz. It was shown that the PM-FBG sensor system was able to detect high-speed ultrasound waves and capture the characteristics under different actuation conditions. Both longitudinal and lateral strain components in the order of nano-strain were determined based on the reflective intensity measurement data from fast and slow axis of the PM fiber. It must be emphasized that this is the first attempt to investigate acouto-ultrasonic sensing using PM-FBG sensor. This could lead to a new sensing approach in the SHM applications. Nomenclature.

  2. Free motion scanning system

    DOEpatents

    Sword, Charles K.

    2000-01-01

    The present invention relates to an ultrasonic scanner system and method for the imaging of a part system, the scanner comprising: a probe assembly spaced apart from the surface of the part including at least two tracking signals for emitting radiation and a transmitter for emitting ultrasonic waves onto a surface in order to induce at least a portion of the waves to be reflected from the part, at least one detector for receiving the radiation wherein the detector is positioned to receive the radiation from the tracking signals, an analyzer for recognizing a three-dimensional location of the tracking signals based on the emitted radiation, a differential converter for generating an output signal representative of the waveform of the reflected waves, and a device such as a computer for relating said tracking signal location with the output signal and projecting an image of the resulting data. The scanner and method are particularly useful to acquire ultrasonic inspection data by scanning the probe over a complex part surface in an arbitrary scanning pattern.

  3. Transverse section radionuclide scanning system

    DOEpatents

    Kuhl, David E.; Edwards, Roy Q.

    1976-01-01

    This invention provides a transverse section radionuclide scanning system for high-sensitivity quantification of brain radioactivity in cross-section picture format in order to permit accurate assessment of regional brain function localized in three-dimensions. High sensitivity crucially depends on overcoming the heretofore known raster type scanning, which requires back and forth detector movement involving dead-time or partial enclosure of the scan field. Accordingly, this invention provides a detector array having no back and forth movement by interlaced detectors that enclose the scan field and rotate as an integral unit around one axis of rotation in a slip ring that continuously transmits the detector data by means of laser emitting diodes, with the advantages that increased amounts of data can be continuously collected, processed and displayed with increased sensitivity according to a suitable computer program.

  4. Scanning Terahertz Heterodyne Imaging Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, Peter; Dengler, Robert

    2007-01-01

    Scanning terahertz heterodyne imaging systems are now at an early stage of development. In a basic scanning terahertz heterodyne imaging system, (see Figure 1) two far-infrared lasers generate beams denoted the local-oscillator (LO) and signal that differ in frequency by an amount, denoted the intermediate frequency (IF), chosen to suit the application. The LO beam is sent directly to a mixer as one of two inputs. The signal beam is focused to a spot on or in the specimen. After transmission through or reflection from the specimen, the beams are focused to a spot on a terahertz mixer, which extracts the IF outputs. The specimen is mounted on a translation stage, by means of which the focal spot is scanned across the specimen to build up an image.

  5. Scan mirrors relay for high resolution laser scanning systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessler, David

    2014-09-01

    Two dimensional beam deflection is often required in medical laser scanning systems such as OCT or confocal microscopy. Commonly two linear galvo mirrors are used for performance in terms of their large apertures and scan angles. The galvo mirrors are placed at the vicinity of entrance pupil of the scan lens with a "displacement distance" separating them. This distance limits the scan fields and/or reduces the effective aperture of the scan lens. Another option is to use a beam or pupil relay, and image one galvo mirror onto the other. However, beam (or pupil) relays are notoriously complicated, expensive and can add significant aberrations. This paper discusses a simple, all reflective, diffraction limited, color corrected, beam relay, capable of large scan angles and large deflecting mirrors. The design is based on a unique combination of an Offner configuration with a Schmidt aspheric corrector. The design is highly corrected up to large scan mirrors and large scan angles down to milliwaves of aberrations. It allows significantly larger scan field and or scan lenses with higher numerical aperture as compared with scanners using galvos separated by the displacement distance. While this relay is of exceptionally high performance, it has one element located where the beam is focused which may present a problem for high power lasers. Thus modifications of the above design are introduced where the beam is focused in mid air thus making it usable for high power systems such including laser marking and fabrication systems.

  6. SCAN+

    SciTech Connect

    Kenneth Krebs, John Svoboda

    2009-11-01

    SCAN+ is a software application specifically designed to control the positioning of a gamma spectrometer by a two dimensional translation system above spent fuel bundles located in a sealed spent fuel cask. The gamma spectrometer collects gamma spectrum information for the purpose of spent fuel cask fuel loading verification. SCAN+ performs manual and automatic gamma spectrometer positioning functions as-well-as exercising control of the gamma spectrometer data acquisitioning functions. Cask configuration files are used to determine the positions of spent fuel bundles. Cask scanning files are used to determine the desired scan paths for scanning a spent fuel cask allowing for automatic unattended cask scanning that may take several hours.

  7. A microprocessor controlled pressure scanning system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, R. C.

    1976-01-01

    A microprocessor-based controller and data logger for pressure scanning systems is described. The microcomputer positions and manages data from as many as four 48-port electro-mechanical pressure scanners. The maximum scanning rate is 80 pressure measurements per second (20 ports per second on each of four scanners). The system features on-line calibration, position-directed data storage, and once-per-scan display in engineering units of data from a selected port. The system is designed to be interfaced to a facility computer through a shared memory. System hardware and software are described. Factors affecting measurement error in this type of system are also discussed.

  8. Camera Systems Rapidly Scan Large Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2013-01-01

    Needing a method to quickly scan large structures like an aircraft wing, Langley Research Center developed the line scanning thermography (LST) system. LST works in tandem with a moving infrared camera to capture how a material responds to changes in temperature. Princeton Junction, New Jersey-based MISTRAS Group Inc. now licenses the technology and uses it in power stations and industrial plants.

  9. SCAN+

    2009-11-01

    SCAN+ is a software application specifically designed to control the positioning of a gamma spectrometer by a two dimensional translation system above spent fuel bundles located in a sealed spent fuel cask. The gamma spectrometer collects gamma spectrum information for the purpose of spent fuel cask fuel loading verification. SCAN+ performs manual and automatic gamma spectrometer positioning functions as-well-as exercising control of the gamma spectrometer data acquisitioning functions. Cask configuration files are used to determinemore » the positions of spent fuel bundles. Cask scanning files are used to determine the desired scan paths for scanning a spent fuel cask allowing for automatic unattended cask scanning that may take several hours.« less

  10. The design of laser scanning galvanometer system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiaoling; Zhou, Bin; Xie, Weihao; Zhang, Yuangeng

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, we designed the laser scanning galvanometer system according to our requirements. Based on scanning range of our laser scanning galvanometer system, the design parameters of this system were optimized. During this work, we focused on the design of the f-θ field lens. An optical system of patent lens in the optical manual book, which had three glasses structure, was used in our designs. Combining the aberration theory, the aberration corrections and image quality evaluations were finished using Code V optical design software. An optimum f-θ field lens was designed, which had focal length of 434 mm, pupil diameter of 30 mm, scanning range of 160 mm × 160 mm, and half field angle of 18°×18°. At the last, we studied the influences of temperature changes on our system.

  11. Noncontact dimensional measurement system using holographic scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagan, Stephen F.; Rosso, Robert S.; Rowe, David M.

    1997-07-01

    Holographic scanning systems have been used for years in point-of-sale bar code scanners and other low resolution applications. These simple scanning systems could not successfully provide the accuracy and precision required to measure, inspect and control the production of today's high tech optical fibers, medical extrusions and electrical cables. A new class of instruments for the precision measurement of industrial processes has been created by the development of systems with a unique combination of holographic optical elements that can compensate for the wavelength drift in laser diodes, the application of proprietary post-processing algorithms, and the advancements in replication methods to fabricate low cost holographic scanning discs. These systems have improved upon the performance of traditional polygon mirror scanners. This paper presents the optical configuration and design features that have been incorporated into a holographic scanning inspection system that provides higher productivity, increased product quality and lower production costs for many manufacturers.

  12. Slow-scan television system.

    PubMed

    Hunten, D M; Nelson, B E; Stump, C J

    1976-09-01

    An unconventional, highly sensitive camera system is described, suitable for silicon or amplified silicon (SIT or EBS) vidicons. Features are a variable field size and sweep rate and a low-noise video amplifier. Used on a 91-cm telescope, it can detect 15th magnitude stars with the silicon vidicon. With an SIT tube, the limit is 17 on the 91-cm and 20.5 on the 4-m telescope. The system is briefly compared with an I-SIT camera.

  13. Slow-scan television system.

    PubMed

    Hunten, D M; Nelson, B E; Stump, C J

    1976-09-01

    An unconventional, highly sensitive camera system is described, suitable for silicon or amplified silicon (SIT or EBS) vidicons. Features are a variable field size and sweep rate and a low-noise video amplifier. Used on a 91-cm telescope, it can detect 15th magnitude stars with the silicon vidicon. With an SIT tube, the limit is 17 on the 91-cm and 20.5 on the 4-m telescope. The system is briefly compared with an I-SIT camera. PMID:20165372

  14. Scanning tunneling microscope assembly, reactor, and system

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, Feng; Salmeron, Miquel; Somorjai, Gabor A

    2014-11-18

    An embodiment of a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) reactor includes a pressure vessel, an STM assembly, and three spring coupling objects. The pressure vessel includes a sealable port, an interior, and an exterior. An embodiment of an STM system includes a vacuum chamber, an STM reactor, and three springs. The three springs couple the STM reactor to the vacuum chamber and are operable to suspend the scanning tunneling microscope reactor within the interior of the vacuum chamber during operation of the STM reactor. An embodiment of an STM assembly includes a coarse displacement arrangement, a piezoelectric fine displacement scanning tube coupled to the coarse displacement arrangement, and a receiver. The piezoelectric fine displacement scanning tube is coupled to the coarse displacement arrangement. The receiver is coupled to the piezoelectric scanning tube and is operable to receive a tip holder, and the tip holder is operable to receive a tip.

  15. Joule heating scanning structure system.

    PubMed

    Moya, J A

    2016-08-01

    A method and its system to study the structural evolution on soft magnetic amorphous and nanocrystalline ribbon shaped alloys are presented. With only one sample, a complete set of magnetic and electric data at room and at high temperature are obtained in a relatively short period of time, allowing us to elucidate the structural changes occurring in the alloy and to determine the optimal soft magnetic properties annealing conditions. PMID:27587169

  16. Joule heating scanning structure system.

    PubMed

    Moya, J A

    2016-08-01

    A method and its system to study the structural evolution on soft magnetic amorphous and nanocrystalline ribbon shaped alloys are presented. With only one sample, a complete set of magnetic and electric data at room and at high temperature are obtained in a relatively short period of time, allowing us to elucidate the structural changes occurring in the alloy and to determine the optimal soft magnetic properties annealing conditions.

  17. Joule heating scanning structure system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moya, J. A.

    2016-08-01

    A method and its system to study the structural evolution on soft magnetic amorphous and nanocrystalline ribbon shaped alloys are presented. With only one sample, a complete set of magnetic and electric data at room and at high temperature are obtained in a relatively short period of time, allowing us to elucidate the structural changes occurring in the alloy and to determine the optimal soft magnetic properties annealing conditions.

  18. Optical scanning system for laser velocimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhodes, D. B.

    1977-01-01

    An optical system was developed to provide fast incremental scanning of a backscattered laser velocimeter focus point over a 36-cm distance. The system is used to measure flow velocities at 16 positions along its optical axis and to scan these 16 positions up to 30 times a second. Dwell time at each location is approximately 2 milliseconds. Sample volumes typically are 0.2 mm in diameter by 1.4 cm in length. The optical scanning system consists of a wheel containing plane parallel quartz windows of various thicknesses. The laser velocimeter beams are imaged to a primary focus within the dead airspace of an optical cell. The beams emerging from the cell pass through the windows of the scanning wheel. The refraction of the beams passing through the windows causes an apparent shift of the focus within the optical cell and hence in the test zone. Light scattered from the secondary focus within the test zone is concurrently collected and reimaged through the same optical path which originally projected the primary focus. The reimaged backscattered light containing the velocity information is then collected and focused onto a photomultiplier detector system to complete the scanned laser velocimeter optical system.

  19. Simple Cassegrain scanning system for infrared astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Apt, J.; Goody, R.; Mertz, L.

    1980-01-01

    To meet the need for a reliable, fast imaging system capable of being taken rapidly on and off the telescope, a simple, inexpensive, and compact Cassegrain reimaging system for scanning IR images was constructed. Using commercially available components without requiring close mechanical tolerances, the design solves the problem of beam stability pointed out by Koornneef and van Overbeeke (1976). For the moving-iron galvanometer scanner, it is noted that at the imaging frequency of 0.5 Hz, hysteresis in image plane motion was found to be less than 0.2 arc sec for a 64-arc sec scan, and the deviation from linearity with a triangular wave input was found to be less than 0.3 arc sec. This system and a scanning secondary were used to image Venus at 11.5 microns, and compared with the scanning secondary, the reimaging system did not appear to contribute any additional noise, considerably improved mechanical reliability, and eliminated cross-scan motion

  20. CS-Studio Scan System Parallelization

    SciTech Connect

    Kasemir, Kay; Pearson, Matthew R

    2015-01-01

    For several years, the Control System Studio (CS-Studio) Scan System has successfully automated the operation of beam lines at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). As it is applied to additional beam lines, we need to support simultaneous adjustments of temperatures or motor positions. While this can be implemented via virtual motors or similar logic inside the Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS) Input/Output Controllers (IOCs), doing so requires a priori knowledge of experimenters requirements. By adding support for the parallel control of multiple process variables (PVs) to the Scan System, we can better support ad hoc automation of experiments that benefit from such simultaneous PV adjustments.

  1. Microprocessor-controlled scanning densitometer system

    SciTech Connect

    Shurtliff, R.W.

    1980-04-01

    An Automated Scanning Densitometer System has been developed by uniting a microprocessor with a low energy x-ray densitometer system. The microprocessor controls the detector movement, provides self-calibration, compensates raw readings to provide time-linear output, controls both data storage and the host computer interface, and provides measurement output in engineering units for immediate reading. The densitometer, when used in a scanning mode, is a precision reference instrument that provides chordal average density measurements over the cross section of a pipe under steady-state flow conditions. Results have shown an improvement over the original densitometer in reliability and repeatability of the system, an a factor-of-five improvement in accuracy.

  2. Compact high-speed scanning lidar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickinson, Cameron; Hussein, Marwan; Tripp, Jeff; Nimelman, Manny; Koujelev, Alexander

    2012-06-01

    The compact High Speed Scanning Lidar (HSSL) was designed to meet the requirements for a rover GN&C sensor. The eye-safe HSSL's fast scanning speed, low volume and low power, make it the ideal choice for a variety of real-time and non-real-time applications including: 3D Mapping; Vehicle guidance and Navigation; Obstacle Detection; Orbiter Rendezvous; Spacecraft Landing / Hazard Avoidance. The HSSL comprises two main hardware units: Sensor Head and Control Unit. In a rover application, the Sensor Head mounts on the top of the rover while the Control Unit can be mounted on the rover deck or within its avionics bay. An Operator Computer is used to command the lidar and immediately display the acquired scan data. The innovative lidar design concept was a result of an extensive trade study conducted during the initial phase of an exploration rover program. The lidar utilizes an innovative scanner coupled with a compact fiber laser and high-speed timing electronics. Compared to existing compact lidar systems, distinguishing features of the HSSL include its high accuracy, high resolution, high refresh rate and large field of view. Other benefits of this design include the capability to quickly configure scan settings to fit various operational modes.

  3. Influence of scanning strategies on the accuracy of digital intraoral scanning systems.

    PubMed

    Ender, A; Mehl, A

    2013-01-01

    The digital intraoral impression is a central part in today's CAD/CAM dentistry. With its possibilities, new treatment options for the patient is provided and the prosthetic workflow is accelerated. Nowadays, the major issue with intraoral scanning systems is to gain more accuracy especially for larger scan areas and to simplify clinical handling for the dentist. The aim of this study was to investigate different scanning strategies regardingtheir accuracy with full arch scans in an in-vitro study design. A reference master model was used for the digital impressions with the Lava COS, the Cerec Bluecam and a powderfree intraoral scanning system, Cadent iTero. The trueness and precision of each scanning protocol was measured. Lava COS provides the a trueness of 45.8 microm with the scanning protocol recommended from the manufacturer. A different scanning protocol shows significantly lower accuracy (trueness +/- 90.2 microm). Cerec Bluecam also benefits from an optimal scanning protocol with a trueness of +/- 23.3 microm compared to +/- 52.5 microm with a standard protocol. The powderfree impression system Cadent iTero shows also a high accurate full-arch scan with a trueness of +/- 35.0 microm and a precision of +/- 30.9 microm. With the current intraoral scanning systems, full arch dental impressions are possible with a high accuracy, if adequate scan strategies are used. The powderfree scanning system provides the same level of accuracy compared to scanning systems with surface pretreatment.

  4. Spaceborne scanning lidar system (SSLS) upgrade path

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nimelman, M.; Tripp, J.; Allen, A.; Hiemstra, D. M.; McDonald, S. A.

    2006-05-01

    The Spaceborne Scanning Lidar System (SSLS) system is a space-qualified scanning lidar system developed by MDA and Optech. It has been operating on orbit since April 2005 as part of the XSS-11 one-year demonstration of space technologies associated with spacecraft autonomous rendezvous and proximity operations. The SSLS has already successfully supported long and medium-range object acquisition and tracking. Short range acquisition, tracking, and imaging tasks are scheduled towards the end of its one-year mission. MDA and Optech view SSLS as the first 'smart' product in the RELAVIS line of scanning lidar products. An upgrade plan, addressing customer needs and lessons learned during SSLS build and operation on orbit, has been established and is currently being implemented. Next generation SSLS lidar will provide improved performance and real-time space object tracking solution based on point cloud data acquired by the lidar. Real-time pose (position and orientation) capability will be provided in addition to the currently provided range, bearing, and centroid telemetry data. The integrated pose solution will provide the user with tracking data while reducing spacecraft databus and processor utilization. This new functionality expands the SSLS role from a 'sensor only' ranging role to a robust long/medium and short range 'ranging and tracking solution' supporting rendezvous and close proximity missions. This paper describes the SSLS upgrade plan and provides information related to the implementation and progress of the upgrade via test results of the new SSLS capabilities.

  5. Scanning systems for particle cancer therapy

    DOEpatents

    Trbojevic, Dejan

    2015-08-04

    A particle beam to treat malignant tissue is delivered to a patient by a gantry. The gantry includes a plurality of small magnets sequentially arranged along a beam tube to transfer the particle beam with strong focusing and a small dispersion function, whereby a beam size is very small, allowing for the small magnet size. Magnets arranged along the beam tube uses combined function magnets where the magnetic field is a combination of a bending dipole field with a focusing or defocusing quadrupole field. A triplet set of combined function magnets defines the beam size at the patient. A scanning system of magnets arranged along the beam tube after the bending system delivers the particle beam in a direction normal to the patient, to minimize healthy skin and tissue exposure to the particle beam.

  6. Pointed science scan platforms. [for remote directional satellite instrumentation systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ward, R. S.

    1978-01-01

    Two examples of science scan platform mechanization concepts are presented to familiarize the reader with today's planetary scan platform technology. The first example is the Voyager scan platform, which will demonstrate the traditional approach to scan pointing from planetary vehicles. Although this conventional approach may be familiar to many, the control law implemented in the scan positioning loop is a new and interesting one. It is called 'Zero Crosser + Terminal Control'. The other example marks the beginning of a new generation of planetary scan pointing systems. It is the Galileo scan platform which will be inertially stabilized and decoupled from spacecraft motion.

  7. Millimeter Wave Synthetic Aperture Imaging System with a Unique Rotary Scanning System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghasr, M. T.; Case, J. T.; McClanahan, A. D.; Abou-Khousa, M.; Guinn, K.; Kharkovsky, S.; Zoughi, R.; Afaki-Beni, A.; DePaulis, F.; Pommerenke, D.

    2008-01-01

    This is the video that accompanies the "Millimeter Wave Synthetic Aperture Imaging System with a Unique Rotary Scanning System" presentation. It shows the operation of the scanning system, and reviews the results of the scanning of a sample.

  8. System and method for compressive scanning electron microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Reed, Bryan W

    2015-01-13

    A scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) system is disclosed. The system may make use of an electron beam scanning system configured to generate a plurality of electron beam scans over substantially an entire sample, with each scan varying in electron-illumination intensity over a course of the scan. A signal acquisition system may be used for obtaining at least one of an image, a diffraction pattern, or a spectrum from the scans, the image, diffraction pattern, or spectrum representing only information from at least one of a select subplurality or linear combination of all pixel locations comprising the image. A dataset may be produced from the information. A subsystem may be used for mathematically analyzing the dataset to predict actual information that would have been produced by each pixel location of the image.

  9. Laser scanning system for object monitoring

    DOEpatents

    McIntyre, Timothy James [Knoxville, TN; Maxey, Lonnie Curtis [Powell, TN; Chiaro, Jr; John, Peter [Clinton, TN

    2008-04-22

    A laser scanner is located in a fixed position to have line-of-sight access to key features of monitored objects. The scanner rapidly scans pre-programmed points corresponding to the positions of retroreflecting targets affixed to the key features of the objects. The scanner is capable of making highly detailed scans of any portion of the field of view, permitting the exact location and identity of targets to be confirmed. The security of an object is verified by determining that the cooperative target is still present and that its position has not changed. The retroreflecting targets also modulate the reflected light for purposes of returning additional information back to the location of the scanner.

  10. Further progress for a fast scanning of nuclear emulsions with Large Angle Scanning System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandrov, A.; Tioukov, V.; Vladymyrov, M.

    2014-02-01

    The LASSO (Large Angle Scanning System for OPERA) is a scanning system designed in the framework of the OPERA experiment as a result of several R&Ds aimed to improve the performance of the European Scanning System (ESS) by increasing the scanning speed, the angular acceptance and the efficiency in microtrack reconstruction. The novel Continuous Motion (CM) scanning approach allows to double the ESS nominal speed without any changes in the hardware set-up. The LASSO modular design makes the system easily adaptable to new hardware. The novel microtrack reconstruction algorithm has been developed to be efficient in both standard Stop&Go (SG) and CM modes, performing a number of corrections during the processing like corrections for vibrations, optical distortions, field of view curvature. As an intermediate step it reconstructs silver grains positions inside emulsion layer to make a transition from 2D images to real 3D traces of a charged particle. This allows the algorithm to have no internal limits on the slope of microtracks being equally efficient on all angles. The LASSO has been used for about one year for mass production scanning of emulsion films of OPERA, Muon Radiography and also of films employed to study nuclear fragmentation of ion beams used in medical physics. More than 50000 cm2 of the emulsion surface have been analyzed during this period.

  11. Speckle averaging system for laser raster-scan image projection

    DOEpatents

    Tiszauer, Detlev H.; Hackel, Lloyd A.

    1998-03-17

    The viewers' perception of laser speckle in a laser-scanned image projection system is modified or eliminated by the addition of an optical deflection system that effectively presents a new speckle realization at each point on the viewing screen to each viewer for every scan across the field. The speckle averaging is accomplished without introduction of spurious imaging artifacts.

  12. Speckle averaging system for laser raster-scan image projection

    DOEpatents

    Tiszauer, D.H.; Hackel, L.A.

    1998-03-17

    The viewers` perception of laser speckle in a laser-scanned image projection system is modified or eliminated by the addition of an optical deflection system that effectively presents a new speckle realization at each point on the viewing screen to each viewer for every scan across the field. The speckle averaging is accomplished without introduction of spurious imaging artifacts. 5 figs.

  13. PSIDD: A Post-Scan Interactive Data Display system for ultrasonic scans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, Don J.; Szatmary, Steven A.

    1993-01-01

    An ultrasonic data display system was developed at NASA Lewis Research Center that allows the user to interactively examine digitized waveforms and processed information associated with any specific scan location of an ultrasonic contact scan. This information is displayed on a video display monitor and includes acquired time-domain waveforms, frequency-domain magnitude and phase spectra, and ultrasonic properties (pulse velocity, phase velocity, reflection coefficient, attenuation coefficient, attenuation coefficient error) as a function of frequency for a material. This report describes the system features and illustrates the system's usefulness for nondestructive materials characterization.

  14. Rapid scanning system for fuel drawers

    DOEpatents

    Caldwell, J.T.; Fehlau, P.E.; France, S.W.

    A nondestructive method for uniquely distinguishing among and quantifying the mass of individual fuel plates in situ in fuel drawers utilized in nuclear reactors is described. The method is both rapid and passive, eliminating the personnel hazard of the commonly used irradiation techniques which require that the analysis be performed in proximity to an intense neutron source such as a reactor. In the present technique, only normally decaying nuclei are observed. This allows the analysis to be performed anywhere. This feature, combined with rapid scanning of a given fuel drawer (in approximately 30 s), and the computer data analysis allows the processing of large numbers of fuel drawers efficiently in the event of a loss alert.

  15. Rapid scanning system for fuel drawers

    DOEpatents

    Caldwell, John T.; Fehlau, Paul E.; France, Stephen W.

    1981-01-01

    A nondestructive method for uniqely distinguishing among and quantifying the mass of individual fuel plates in situ in fuel drawers utilized in nuclear reactors is described. The method is both rapid and passive, eliminating the personnel hazard of the commonly used irradiation techniques which require that the analysis be performed in proximity to an intense neutron source such as a reactor. In the present technique, only normally decaying nuclei are observed. This allows the analysis to be performed anywhere. This feature, combined with rapid scanning of a given fuel drawer (in approximately 30 s), and the computer data analysis allows the processing of large numbers of fuel drawers efficiently in the event of a loss alert.

  16. Correcting scan-to-scan response variability for a radiochromic film-based reference dosimetry system

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, David; Devic, Slobodan

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: In radiochromic film dosimetry systems, measurements are usually obtained from film images acquired on a CCD-based flatbed scanner. The authors investigated factors affecting scan-to-scan response variability leading to increased dose measurement uncertainty. Methods: The authors used flatbed document scanners to repetitively scan EBT3 radiochromic films exposed to doses 0–1000 cGy, together with three neutral density filters and three blue optical filters. Scanning was performed under two conditions: scanner lid closed and scanner lid opened/closed between scans. The authors also placed a scanner in a cold room at 9 °C and later in a room at 22 °C and scanned EBT3 films to explore temperature effects. Finally, the authors investigated the effect of altering the distance between the film and the scanner’s light source. Results: Using a measurement protocol to isolate the contribution of the CCD and electronic circuitry of the scanners, the authors found that the standard deviation of response measurements for the EBT3 film model was about 0.17% for one scanner and 0.09% for the second. When the lid of the first scanner was opened and closed between scans, the average scan-to-scan difference of responses increased from 0.12% to 0.27%. Increasing the sample temperature during scanning changed the RGB response values by about −0.17, −0.14, and −0.05%/°C, respectively. Reducing the film-to-light source distance increased the RBG response values about 1.1, 1.3, and 1.4%/mm, respectively. The authors observed that films and film samples were often not flat with some areas up to 8 mm away from the scanner’s glass window. Conclusions: In the absence of measures to deal with the response irregularities, each factor the authors investigated could lead to dose uncertainty >2%. Those factors related to the film-to-light source distance could be particularly impactful since the authors observed many instances where the curl of film samples had the

  17. Stereo vision based hand-held laser scanning system design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Hanwei; Xu, Jun; Wang, Jinming

    2011-11-01

    Although 3D scanning system is used more and more broadly in many fields, such computer animate, computer aided design, digital museums, and so on, a convenient scanning device is expansive for most people to afford. In another hand, imaging devices are becoming cheaper, a stereo vision system with two video cameras cost little. In this paper, a hand held laser scanning system is design based on stereo vision principle. The two video cameras are fixed tighter, and are all calibrated in advance. The scanned object attached with some coded markers is in front of the stereo system, and can be changed its position and direction freely upon the need of scanning. When scanning, the operator swept a line laser source, and projected it on the object. At the same time, the stereo vision system captured the projected lines, and reconstructed their 3D shapes. The code markers are used to translate the coordinate system between scanned points under different view. Two methods are used to get more accurate results. One is to use NURBS curves to interpolate the sections of the laser lines to obtain accurate central points, and a thin plate spline is used to approximate the central points, and so, an exact laser central line is got, which guards an accurate correspondence between tow cameras. Another way is to incorporate the constraint of laser swept plane on the reconstructed 3D curves by a PCA (Principle Component Analysis) algorithm, and more accurate results are obtained. Some examples are given to verify the system.

  18. Aberration averaging using point spread function for scanning projection systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ooki, Hiroshi; Noda, Tomoya; Matsumoto, Koichi

    2000-07-01

    Scanning projection system plays a leading part in current DUV optical lithography. It is frequently pointed out that the mechanically induced distortion and field curvature degrade image quality after scanning. On the other hand, the aberration of the projection lens is averaged along the scanning direction. This averaging effect reduces the residual aberration significantly. The aberration averaging based on the point spread function and phase retrieval technique in order to estimate the effective wavefront aberration after scanning is described in this paper. Our averaging method is tested using specified wavefront aberration, and its accuracy is discussed based on the measured wavefront aberration of recent Nikon projection lens.

  19. Laser galvanometric scanning system for improved average power uniformity and larger scanning area.

    PubMed

    Yang, Pei-Ming; Lo, Yu-Lung; Chang, Yuan-Hao

    2016-07-01

    A new laser galvanometric scanning optical system incorporating a dynamic-tilt focusing lens is proposed to improve the laser spot performance in adaptive manufacturing applications. The simulations focus specifically on the laser spot size, the spot profile, the spot position, the spot energy distribution, and the size of the scanning working field. It is shown that for a designed spot size of 50 μm, the proposed system achieves an average spot size of 50.5 μm. Moreover, the maximum position deviation of the laser beam is reduced from (x=-3.02%, y=1.30%) in a traditional scanning system to (x=-0.055%, y=0.162%) in the proposed system. Finally, the maximum working field area is increased by around 240% compared to that of a traditional system. Overall, the results show that the proposed laser galvanometric scanning system achieves a small spot size, a symmetrical and round spot profile, a uniform spot energy distribution, and a large working area. As a result, it is ideally suited to rapid prototyping applications. PMID:27409183

  20. Ultrasonic scanning system for inspection of brazed tube joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haynes, J. L.; Maurer, N. A.

    1972-01-01

    An ultrasonic scanning system used to inspect and evaluate in-place brazed tube joints is considered. The system was designed, developed, and built especially for nondestructive testing and was selected because of its known response to brazing defects not associated with material density changes. The scan system is capable of scanning brazed joints in union, tee, elbow and cross configuration of 3/16-inch through 5/8-inch diameters. It is capable of detecting brazed defects as small as 0.008 by 0.010-inch, which exceeds the 0.015-inch diameter defect resolution required by specification.

  1. Tuning and scanning control system for high resolution alexandrite lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, James C.; Schwemmer, Geary K.

    1988-01-01

    An alexandrite laser is spectrally narrowed and tuned by the use of three optical elements. Each element provides a successively higher degree of spectral resolution. The digitally controlled tuning and scanning control servo system simultaneously positions all three optical elements to provide continuous high resolution laser spectral tuning. The user may select manual, single, or continuous modes of automated scanning of ranges up to 3.00/cm and at scan rates up to 3.85/cm/min. Scanning over an extended range of up to 9.999/cm may be achieved if the highest resolution optic is removed from the system. The control system is also capable of being remotely operated by another computer or controller via standard RS-232 serial data link.

  2. [SCAN system--semi-structured interview based on diagnostic criteria].

    PubMed

    Adamowski, Tomasz; Kiejna, Andrzej; Hadryś, Tomasz

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents the main features of contemporary diagnostic systems which are implemented into the SCAN--modern and semi-structured diagnostic interview. The concepts of further development of the classifications, rationale for operationalized diagnostic criteria and for the divisional approach to mental diagnoses will be in focus. The structure and components of SCAN ver. 2.1 (WHO), i.e. Present State Examination--10th edition, Item Group Checklist, Clinical History Schedule, Glossary of Definitions and computer software with the diagnostic algorithm: I-Shell, as well as rules for a reliable use of diagnostic rating scales, will be discussed within the scope of this paper. The materials and training sets necessary for the learning of proper use of the SCAN, especially training sets for SCAN Training Centers and the Reference Manual--a form of guidebook for SCAN shall be introduced. Finally the paper will present evidence that SCAN is an instrument feasible in different cultural settings. Reliability and validity data of SCAN will also be dealt with indicating that SCAN could be widely used in research studies as well as in everyday clinical practice facilitating more detailed diagnostic approach to a patient. PMID:17068947

  3. [SCAN system--semi-structured interview based on diagnostic criteria].

    PubMed

    Adamowski, Tomasz; Kiejna, Andrzej; Hadryś, Tomasz

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents the main features of contemporary diagnostic systems which are implemented into the SCAN--modern and semi-structured diagnostic interview. The concepts of further development of the classifications, rationale for operationalized diagnostic criteria and for the divisional approach to mental diagnoses will be in focus. The structure and components of SCAN ver. 2.1 (WHO), i.e. Present State Examination--10th edition, Item Group Checklist, Clinical History Schedule, Glossary of Definitions and computer software with the diagnostic algorithm: I-Shell, as well as rules for a reliable use of diagnostic rating scales, will be discussed within the scope of this paper. The materials and training sets necessary for the learning of proper use of the SCAN, especially training sets for SCAN Training Centers and the Reference Manual--a form of guidebook for SCAN shall be introduced. Finally the paper will present evidence that SCAN is an instrument feasible in different cultural settings. Reliability and validity data of SCAN will also be dealt with indicating that SCAN could be widely used in research studies as well as in everyday clinical practice facilitating more detailed diagnostic approach to a patient.

  4. Pencil Beam Scanning System Based On A Cyclotron

    SciTech Connect

    Tachikawa, Toshiki; Nonaka, Hideki; Kumata, Yukio; Nishio, Teiji; Ogino, Takashi

    2011-06-01

    Sumitomo Heavy Industries, Ltd. (SHI) has developed a new pencil beam scanning system (PBS) for proton therapy in collaboration with National Cancer Center Hospital East (NCCHE). Taking advantage of the continuous beam from the cyclotron P235, the line scanning method is employed in order to realize continuous irradiation with high dose rate. 3D uniform and sphere field was irradiated and compared with the simulation.

  5. New acousto-ultrasonic techniques applied to aerospace materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kautz, Harold E.

    1988-01-01

    The use of an NdYAG pulsed laser for generating ultrasonic waves for NDE in resin matrix composites was investigated. A study was conducted of the use of the 1.064 micron wavelength NdYAG pulsed laser with the neat, unreinforced resin as well as graphite fiber/polymer composite specimens. In the case of the neat resins it was found that, at normal incidence, about 25 percent of the laser pulse energy was reflected at the incident surface. An attenuation coefficient for the polyimide resin, PMR-15 was determined to be approximately 5.8 np/cm. It was found in energy balance studies that graphite fiber/polymer specimens attenuate the laser beam more than do neat resins. The increase absorption is in the graphite fibers. The occurrence of laser induced surface damage was also studied. For the polymer neat resin, damage appears as pit formation over a small fraction of the pulse impact area and discoloration over a larger part of the area. A damage threshold was inferred from observed damage as a function of pulse energy. The 600 F cured PMR-15 and PMR-11 exhibit about the same amount of damage for a given laser pulse energy. The damage threshold is between 0.06 and 0.07 J/sq cm.

  6. New acousto-ultrasonic techniques applied to aerospace materials

    SciTech Connect

    Kautz, H.E.

    1988-08-01

    The use of an NdYAG pulsed laser for generating ultrasonic waves for NDE in resin matrix composites was investigated. A study was conducted of the use of the 1.064 micron wavelength NdYAG pulsed laser with the neat, unreinforced resin as well as graphite fiber/polymer composite specimens. In the case of the neat resins it was found that, at normal incidence, about 25 percent of the laser pulse energy was reflected at the incident surface. An attenuation coefficient for the polyimide resin, PMR-15 was determined to be approximately 5.8 np/cm. It was found in energy balance studies that graphite fiber/polymer specimens attenuate the laser beam more than do neat resins. The increase absorption is in the graphite fibers. The occurrence of laser induced surface damage was also studied. For the polymer neat resin, damage appears as pit formation over a small fraction of the pulse impact area and discoloration over a larger part of the area. A damage threshold was inferred from observed damage as a function of pulse energy. The 600 F cured PMR-15 and PMR-11 exhibit about the same amount of damage for a given laser pulse energy. The damage threshold is between 0.06 and 0.07 J/sq cm.

  7. Comparative Geometrical Investigations of Hand-Held Scanning Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kersten, T. P.; Przybilla, H.-J.; Lindstaedt, M.; Tschirschwitz, F.; Misgaiski-Hass, M.

    2016-06-01

    An increasing number of hand-held scanning systems by different manufacturers are becoming available on the market. However, their geometrical performance is little-known to many users. Therefore the Laboratory for Photogrammetry & Laser Scanning of the HafenCity University Hamburg has carried out geometrical accuracy tests with the following systems in co-operation with the Bochum University of Applied Sciences (Laboratory for Photogrammetry) as well as the Humboldt University in Berlin (Institute for Computer Science): DOTProduct DPI-7, Artec Spider, Mantis Vision F5 SR, Kinect v1 + v2, Structure Sensor and Google's Project Tango. In the framework of these comparative investigations geometrically stable reference bodies were used. The appropriate reference data were acquired by measurement with two structured light projection systems (AICON smartSCAN and GOM ATOS I 2M). The comprehensive test results of the different test scenarios are presented and critically discussed in this contribution.

  8. Investigation of a scanned cylindrical ultrasound system for breast hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Ju, Kuen-Cheng; Tseng, Li-Te; Chen, Yung-Yaw; Lin, Win-Li

    2006-02-01

    This paper investigates the feasibility of a scanned cylindrical ultrasound system for producing uniform heating from the central to the superficial portions of the breast or localized heating within the breast at a specific location. The proposed system consists of plane ultrasound transducer(s) mounted on a scanned cylindrical support. The breast was immersed in water and surrounded by this system during the treatment. The control parameters considered are the size of the transducer, the ultrasound frequency, the scan angle and the shifting distance between the axes of the breast and the system. Three-dimensional acoustical and thermal models were used to calculate the temperature distribution. Non-perfused phantom experiments were performed to verify the simulation results. Simulation results indicate that high frequency ultrasound could be used for the superficial heating, and the scan angle of the transducer could be varied to obtain an appropriate high temperature region to cover the desired treatment region. Low frequency ultrasound could be used for deep heating and the high temperature region could be moved by shifting the system. In addition, a combination of low and high frequency ultrasound could result in a portion treatment from the central to the superficial breast or an entire breast treatment. Good agreement was obtained between non-perfused experiments and simulation results. The findings of this study can be used to determine the effects of the control parameters of this system, as well as to select the optimal parameters for a specific treatment.

  9. Digital adaptive optics line-scanning confocal imaging system.

    PubMed

    Liu, Changgeng; Kim, Myung K

    2015-01-01

    A digital adaptive optics line-scanning confocal imaging (DAOLCI) system is proposed by applying digital holographic adaptive optics to a digital form of line-scanning confocal imaging system. In DAOLCI, each line scan is recorded by a digital hologram, which allows access to the complex optical field from one slice of the sample through digital holography. This complex optical field contains both the information of one slice of the sample and the optical aberration of the system, thus allowing us to compensate for the effect of the optical aberration, which can be sensed by a complex guide star hologram. After numerical aberration compensation, the corrected optical fields of a sequence of line scans are stitched into the final corrected confocal image. In DAOLCI, a numerical slit is applied to realize the confocality at the sensor end. The width of this slit can be adjusted to control the image contrast and speckle noise for scattering samples. DAOLCI dispenses with the hardware pieces, such as Shack–Hartmann wavefront sensor and deformable mirror, and the closed-loop feedbacks adopted in the conventional adaptive optics confocal imaging system, thus reducing the optomechanical complexity and cost. Numerical simulations and proof-of-principle experiments are presented that demonstrate the feasibility of this idea.

  10. Digital adaptive optics line-scanning confocal imaging system

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Changgeng; Kim, Myung K.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. A digital adaptive optics line-scanning confocal imaging (DAOLCI) system is proposed by applying digital holographic adaptive optics to a digital form of line-scanning confocal imaging system. In DAOLCI, each line scan is recorded by a digital hologram, which allows access to the complex optical field from one slice of the sample through digital holography. This complex optical field contains both the information of one slice of the sample and the optical aberration of the system, thus allowing us to compensate for the effect of the optical aberration, which can be sensed by a complex guide star hologram. After numerical aberration compensation, the corrected optical fields of a sequence of line scans are stitched into the final corrected confocal image. In DAOLCI, a numerical slit is applied to realize the confocality at the sensor end. The width of this slit can be adjusted to control the image contrast and speckle noise for scattering samples. DAOLCI dispenses with the hardware pieces, such as Shack–Hartmann wavefront sensor and deformable mirror, and the closed-loop feedbacks adopted in the conventional adaptive optics confocal imaging system, thus reducing the optomechanical complexity and cost. Numerical simulations and proof-of-principle experiments are presented that demonstrate the feasibility of this idea. PMID:26140334

  11. Digital adaptive optics line-scanning confocal imaging system.

    PubMed

    Liu, Changgeng; Kim, Myung K

    2015-01-01

    A digital adaptive optics line-scanning confocal imaging (DAOLCI) system is proposed by applying digital holographic adaptive optics to a digital form of line-scanning confocal imaging system. In DAOLCI, each line scan is recorded by a digital hologram, which allows access to the complex optical field from one slice of the sample through digital holography. This complex optical field contains both the information of one slice of the sample and the optical aberration of the system, thus allowing us to compensate for the effect of the optical aberration, which can be sensed by a complex guide star hologram. After numerical aberration compensation, the corrected optical fields of a sequence of line scans are stitched into the final corrected confocal image. In DAOLCI, a numerical slit is applied to realize the confocality at the sensor end. The width of this slit can be adjusted to control the image contrast and speckle noise for scattering samples. DAOLCI dispenses with the hardware pieces, such as Shack–Hartmann wavefront sensor and deformable mirror, and the closed-loop feedbacks adopted in the conventional adaptive optics confocal imaging system, thus reducing the optomechanical complexity and cost. Numerical simulations and proof-of-principle experiments are presented that demonstrate the feasibility of this idea. PMID:26140334

  12. Digital adaptive optics line-scanning confocal imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Changgeng; Kim, Myung K.

    2015-11-01

    A digital adaptive optics line-scanning confocal imaging (DAOLCI) system is proposed by applying digital holographic adaptive optics to a digital form of line-scanning confocal imaging system. In DAOLCI, each line scan is recorded by a digital hologram, which allows access to the complex optical field from one slice of the sample through digital holography. This complex optical field contains both the information of one slice of the sample and the optical aberration of the system, thus allowing us to compensate for the effect of the optical aberration, which can be sensed by a complex guide star hologram. After numerical aberration compensation, the corrected optical fields of a sequence of line scans are stitched into the final corrected confocal image. In DAOLCI, a numerical slit is applied to realize the confocality at the sensor end. The width of this slit can be adjusted to control the image contrast and speckle noise for scattering samples. DAOLCI dispenses with the hardware pieces, such as Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor and deformable mirror, and the closed-loop feedbacks adopted in the conventional adaptive optics confocal imaging system, thus reducing the optomechanical complexity and cost. Numerical simulations and proof-of-principle experiments are presented that demonstrate the feasibility of this idea.

  13. Optical System Design For High Speed Bar Code Scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellekson, Ronald; Reddersen, Brad; Campbell, Scott

    1987-04-01

    Spectra-Physics recently introduced the Model 750 SL scanner for use in the European point-of-sale market, to meet the European requirement for a scanner of less than 13 cm height. The model 750 SL uses a higher density computer designed scan pattern with a retrodirective collection system to scan and detect UPC, EAN, and JAN bar codes. The scanner "reads" these bar codes in such a way that the user need not precisely align the bar code symbol with respect to the window in the scanner even at package speeds up to 100 inches per second. By using a unique geometrical arrangement of mirrors, a polygonal mirror assembly, and a custom-designed plastic bifocal lens, a design was developed to meet these requirements. This paper describes the design of this new low cost scanner, the use of computer-aided design in the development of this scanner, and some observations on the future of bar code scanning.

  14. A scanning defect mapping system for semiconductor characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sopori, Bushnan L.

    1994-01-01

    We have developed an optical scanning system that generates maps of the spatial distributions of defects in single and polycrystalline silicon wafers. This instrument, called Scanning Defect Mapping System, utilizes differences in the scattering characteristics of dislocation etch pits and grain boundaries from a defect-etched sample to identify and count them. This system simultaneously operates in the dislocation mode and the grain boundary (GB) mode. In the 'dislocation mode,' the optical scattering from the etch pits is used to statistically count dislocations, while ignoring the GB's. Likewise, in the 'grain boundary mode' the system only recognizes the local scattering from the GB's to generate grain boundary distributions. The information generated by this instrument is valuable for material quality control, identifying mechanisms of defect generation and the nature of thermal stresses during the crystal growth, and the solar cell process design.

  15. A scanning defect mapping system for semiconductor characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sopori, Bushnan L.

    1994-02-01

    We have developed an optical scanning system that generates maps of the spatial distributions of defects in single and polycrystalline silicon wafers. This instrument, called Scanning Defect Mapping System, utilizes differences in the scattering characteristics of dislocation etch pits and grain boundaries from a defect-etched sample to identify and count them. This system simultaneously operates in the dislocation mode and the grain boundary (GB) mode. In the 'dislocation mode,' the optical scattering from the etch pits is used to statistically count dislocations, while ignoring the GB's. Likewise, in the 'grain boundary mode' the system only recognizes the local scattering from the GB's to generate grain boundary distributions. The information generated by this instrument is valuable for material quality control, identifying mechanisms of defect generation and the nature of thermal stresses during the crystal growth, and the solar cell process design.

  16. Dual-Frequency Airborne Scanning Rain Radar Antenna System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hussein, Ziad A.; Green, Ken

    2004-01-01

    A compact, dual-frequency, dual-polarization, wide-angle-scanning antenna system has been developed as part of an airborne instrument for measuring rainfall. This system is an upgraded version of a prior single-frequency airborne rain radar antenna system and was designed to satisfy stringent requirements. One particularly stringent combination of requirements is to generate two dual-polarization (horizontal and vertical polarizations) beams at both frequencies (13.405 and 35.605 GHz) in such a way that the beams radiated from the antenna point in the same direction, have 3-dB angular widths that match within 25 percent, and have low sidelobe levels over a wide scan angle at each polarization-and-frequency combination. In addition, the system is required to exhibit low voltage standing-wave ratios at both frequencies. The system (see figure) includes a flat elliptical scanning reflector and a stationary offset paraboloidal reflector illuminated by a common-aperture feed system that comprises a corrugated horn with four input ports one port for each of the four frequency-and-polarization combinations. The feed horn is designed to simultaneously (1) under-illuminate the reflectors 35.605 GHz and (2) illuminate the reflectors with a 15-dB edge taper at 13.405 GHz. The scanning mirror is rotated in azimuth to scan the antenna beam over an angular range of 20 in the cross-track direction for wide swath coverage, and in elevation to compensate for the motion of the aircraft. The design of common-aperture feed horn makes it possible to obtain the required absolute gain and low side-lobe levels in wide-angle beam scanning. The combination of the common-aperture feed horn with the small (0.3) focal-length-to-diameter ratio of the paraboloidal reflector makes it possible for the overall system to be compact enough that it can be mounted on a DC-8 airplane.

  17. Ultrasonic scanning system for imaging flaw growth in composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiraly, L. J.; Meyn, E. H.

    1982-01-01

    A system for measuring and visually representing damage in composite specimens while they are being loaded was demonstrated. It uses a hobbiest grade microcomputer system to control data taking and image processing. The system scans operator selected regions of the specimen while it is under load in a tensile test machine and measures internal damage by the attenuation of a 2.5 MHz ultrasonic beam passed through the specimen. The microcomputer dynamically controls the position of ultrasonic transducers mounted on a two axis motor driven carriage. As many as 65,536 samples can be taken and filed on a floppy disk system in less than four minutes.

  18. Fast frame scanning camera system for light-sheet microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wu, Di; Zhou, Xing; Yao, Baoli; Li, Runze; Yang, Yanlong; Peng, Tong; Lei, Ming; Dan, Dan; Ye, Tong

    2015-10-10

    In the interest of improving the temporal resolution for light-sheet microscopy, we designed a fast frame scanning camera system that incorporated a galvanometer scanning mirror into the imaging path of a home-built light-sheet microscope. This system transformed a temporal image sequence to a spatial one so that multiple images could be acquired during one exposure period. The improvement factor of the frame rate was dependent on the number of sub-images that could be tiled on the sensor without overlapping each other and was therefore a trade-off with the image size. As a demonstration, we achieved 960 frames/s (fps) on a CCD camera that was originally capable of recording images at only 30 fps (full frame). This allowed us to observe millisecond or sub-millisecond events with ordinary CCD cameras.

  19. Fast frame scanning camera system for light-sheet microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wu, Di; Zhou, Xing; Yao, Baoli; Li, Runze; Yang, Yanlong; Peng, Tong; Lei, Ming; Dan, Dan; Ye, Tong

    2015-10-10

    In the interest of improving the temporal resolution for light-sheet microscopy, we designed a fast frame scanning camera system that incorporated a galvanometer scanning mirror into the imaging path of a home-built light-sheet microscope. This system transformed a temporal image sequence to a spatial one so that multiple images could be acquired during one exposure period. The improvement factor of the frame rate was dependent on the number of sub-images that could be tiled on the sensor without overlapping each other and was therefore a trade-off with the image size. As a demonstration, we achieved 960 frames/s (fps) on a CCD camera that was originally capable of recording images at only 30 fps (full frame). This allowed us to observe millisecond or sub-millisecond events with ordinary CCD cameras. PMID:26479797

  20. Raman mapping using advanced line-scanning systems: geological applications.

    PubMed

    Bernard, Sylvain; Beyssac, Olivier; Benzerara, Karim

    2008-11-01

    By allowing nondestructive chemical and structural imaging of heterogeneous samples with a micrometer spatial resolution, Raman mapping offers unique capabilities for assessing the spatial distribution of both mineral and organic phases within geological samples. Recently developed line-scanning Raman mapping techniques have made it possible to acquire Raman maps over large, millimeter-sized, zones of interest owing to a drastic decrease of the data acquisition time without losing spatial or spectral resolution. The synchronization of charge-coupled device (CCD) measurements with x,y motorized stage displacement has allowed dynamic line-scanning Raman mapping to be even more efficient: total acquisition time may be reduced by a factor higher than 100 compared to point-by-point mapping. Using two chemically and texturally complex geological samples, a fossil megaspore in a metamorphic rock and aragonite-garnet intergrowths in an Eclogitic marble, we compare here two recent versions of line-scanning Raman mapping systems and discuss their respective advantages and disadvantages in terms of acquisition time, image quality, spatial and imaging resolutions, and signal-to-noise ratio. We show that line-scanning Raman mapping techniques are particularly suitable for the characterization of such samples, which are representative of the general complexity of geological samples. PMID:19007458

  1. Miniature image guided three-axis scanning and positioning system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avirovik, Dragan; Dave, Digant; Priya, Shashank

    2012-04-01

    We have developed a high precision three axes scanning and positioning system for integration with Multifunctional Image Guided Surgical (MIGS) Platform. The stage integrates three main components: an optical coherence tomography (OCT) probe, laser scalpel and suction cup. The requirements for this stage were to provide scanning area of 400mm2, resolution of less than 10 microns and scanning velocity in the range of 10 - 40 mm/s. The stage was modeled using computer aided design software NX Unigraphics. In addition to the parameters mentioned above, additional boundary conditions for the stage were set as low volume and modularity. Optimized stage model was fabricated by using rapid prototyping technique that integrates low cost stepper motors, threaded rod drive train and a stepper motor controller. The EZ4axis stepper motor controller was able to provide 1/8th microstep resolution control over the motors, which met the criterion desired for the MIGS platform. Integration of computer controlled three-axis stage with MIGS platform provides the opportunity for conducting intricate surgical procedures using remote control or joystick. The device is image guided using the OCT probe and it is able to pin point any location requiring a laser scalpel incision. Due to the scanning capabilities, a high quality threedimensional image of the tissue topography is obtained which allows the surgeon to make a confident decision of where to apply the laser scalpel and make an incision.

  2. Raman mapping using advanced line-scanning systems: geological applications.

    PubMed

    Bernard, Sylvain; Beyssac, Olivier; Benzerara, Karim

    2008-11-01

    By allowing nondestructive chemical and structural imaging of heterogeneous samples with a micrometer spatial resolution, Raman mapping offers unique capabilities for assessing the spatial distribution of both mineral and organic phases within geological samples. Recently developed line-scanning Raman mapping techniques have made it possible to acquire Raman maps over large, millimeter-sized, zones of interest owing to a drastic decrease of the data acquisition time without losing spatial or spectral resolution. The synchronization of charge-coupled device (CCD) measurements with x,y motorized stage displacement has allowed dynamic line-scanning Raman mapping to be even more efficient: total acquisition time may be reduced by a factor higher than 100 compared to point-by-point mapping. Using two chemically and texturally complex geological samples, a fossil megaspore in a metamorphic rock and aragonite-garnet intergrowths in an Eclogitic marble, we compare here two recent versions of line-scanning Raman mapping systems and discuss their respective advantages and disadvantages in terms of acquisition time, image quality, spatial and imaging resolutions, and signal-to-noise ratio. We show that line-scanning Raman mapping techniques are particularly suitable for the characterization of such samples, which are representative of the general complexity of geological samples.

  3. Scanning lidar with a coupled radar safety system.

    PubMed

    Kent, G S; Hansen, G M

    1999-10-20

    A small scanning three-wavelength lidar system at NASA Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia, has been used since 1992 to make atmospheric measurements on stratospheric and upper tropospheric aerosols and on the evolution of aircraft exhaust plumes. Many of these measurements have been made away from the zenith, and, to reduce the hazard to air traffic produced by the laser beam, a radar safety device has been installed. The radar application is original in that the radar beam is made collinear with the laser beam by use of a dichroic mirror that transmits the laser radiation and reflects the microwaves. This mirror is inserted into the outgoing optical path prior to the radiation from both the radar and the laser passing through the independent scanning unit. Tests of the complete system show that the lidar and radar beams remain collocated as they are scanned and that the radar can be used to inhibit the laser prior to an aircraft passing through the beam. PMID:18324168

  4. Scanning thematic maps for input to geographic information systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wise, Steve

    1995-02-01

    The development of a simple algorithm for deriving raster data from scanned thematic maps is described. Such maps usually contain extra information in addition to the thematic information—identification symbols and cartographic details—which need to be removed before the information can be used in a Geographic Information System. The method described here requires the user to identify those pixel values which represent unwanted information. The program then attempts to replace these with the thematic data values in the neighboring pixels. The method has been implemented as a module for the IDRISI raster GIS which runs on IBM PCs. The FORTRAN source is included, together with an explanation of some of the design decisions taken in writing it. Initial results from the method seem promising, although further work is required to determine the optimum method of scanning to use, and the types of maps for which the method is most suited.

  5. Super-resolution for scanning light stimulation systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bitzer, L. A.; Neumann, K.; Benson, N.; Schmechel, R.

    2016-09-01

    Super-resolution (SR) is a technique used in digital image processing to overcome the resolution limitation of imaging systems. In this process, a single high resolution image is reconstructed from multiple low resolution images. SR is commonly used for CCD and CMOS (Complementary Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor) sensor images, as well as for medical applications, e.g., magnetic resonance imaging. Here, we demonstrate that super-resolution can be applied with scanning light stimulation (LS) systems, which are common to obtain space-resolved electro-optical parameters of a sample. For our purposes, the Projection Onto Convex Sets (POCS) was chosen and modified to suit the needs of LS systems. To demonstrate the SR adaption, an Optical Beam Induced Current (OBIC) LS system was used. The POCS algorithm was optimized by means of OBIC short circuit current measurements on a multicrystalline solar cell, resulting in a mean square error reduction of up to 61% and improved image quality.

  6. Minimum Detectable Activity for Tomographic Gamma Scanning System

    SciTech Connect

    Venkataraman, Ram; Smith, Susan; Kirkpatrick, J. M.; Croft, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    For any radiation measurement system, it is useful to explore and establish the detection limits and a minimum detectable activity (MDA) for the radionuclides of interest, even if the system is to be used at far higher values. The MDA serves as an important figure of merit, and often a system is optimized and configured so that it can meet the MDA requirements of a measurement campaign. The non-destructive assay (NDA) systems based on gamma ray analysis are no exception and well established conventions, such the Currie method, exist for estimating the detection limits and the MDA. However, the Tomographic Gamma Scanning (TGS) technique poses some challenges for the estimation of detection limits and MDAs. The TGS combines high resolution gamma ray spectrometry (HRGS) with low spatial resolution image reconstruction techniques. In non-imaging gamma ray based NDA techniques measured counts in a full energy peak can be used to estimate the activity of a radionuclide, independently of other counting trials. However, in the case of the TGS each “view” is a full spectral grab (each a counting trial), and each scan consists of 150 spectral grabs in the transmission and emission scans per vertical layer of the item. The set of views in a complete scan are then used to solve for the radionuclide activities on a voxel by voxel basis, over 16 layers of a 10x10 voxel grid. Thus, the raw count data are not independent trials any more, but rather constitute input to a matrix solution for the emission image values at the various locations inside the item volume used in the reconstruction. So, the validity of the methods used to estimate MDA for an imaging technique such as TGS warrant a close scrutiny, because the pair-counting concept of Currie is not directly applicable. One can also raise questions as to whether the TGS, along with other image reconstruction techniques which heavily intertwine data, is a suitable method if one expects to measure samples whose activities

  7. Image reconstruction and optimization using a terahertz scanned imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yıldırım, İhsan Ozan; Özkan, Vedat A.; Idikut, Fırat; Takan, Taylan; Şahin, Asaf B.; Altan, Hakan

    2014-10-01

    Due to the limited number of array detection architectures in the millimeter wave to terahertz region of the electromagnetic spectrum, imaging schemes with scan architectures are typically employed. In these configurations the interplay between the frequencies used to illuminate the scene and the optics used play an important role in the quality of the formed image. Using a multiplied Schottky-diode based terahertz transceiver operating at 340 GHz, in a stand-off detection scheme; the effect of image quality of a metal target was assessed based on the scanning speed of the galvanometer mirrors as well as the optical system that was constructed. Background effects such as leakage on the receiver were minimized by conditioning the signal at the output of the transceiver. Then, the image of the target was simulated based on known parameters of the optical system and the measured images were compared to the simulation. By using an image quality index based on χ2 algorithm the simulated and measured images were found to be in good agreement with a value of χ2 = 0 .14. The measurements as shown here will aid in the future development of larger stand-off imaging systems that work in the terahertz frequency range.

  8. An automated microfluidic sample preparation system for laser scanning cytometry.

    PubMed

    Wu, Eric; Menon, Vidya; Geddie, William; Sun, Yu

    2011-04-01

    Laser scanning cytometry (LSC) is emerging as a clinical tool. In one application a "Clatch" slide, named after the inventor, is used in conjunction with LSC for cell surface marker immunophenotyping of patient samples. The slide requires time consuming and laborious pipetting steps, making a test tedious and prone to handling errors. The Clatch slide also uses a significant number of cells, limiting the number of analyses on paucicellular samples. This paper presents an automated microfluidic system consisting of a control circuit, a microfluidic system, and an aluminum frame, capable of performing immunophenotyping procedures. This prototype system reduces 36 pipetting steps to 1, reduces the amount of cell sample from 180 μL to 56 μL, and shortens the time used by technicians.

  9. Sample heating system for spin-polarized scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kohashi, Teruo; Motai, Kumi

    2013-08-01

    A sample-heating system for spin-polarized scanning electron microscopy (spin SEM) has been developed and used for microscopic magnetization analysis at temperatures up to 500°C. In this system, a compact ceramic heater and a preheating operation keep the ultra-high vacuum conditions while the sample is heated during spin SEM measurement. Moreover, the secondary-electron collector, which is arranged close to the sample, was modified so that it is not damaged at high temperatures. The system was used to heat a Co(1000) single-crystal sample from room temperature up to 500°C, and the magnetic-domain structures were observed. Changes of the domain structures were observed around 220 and 400°C, and these changes are considered to be due to phase transitions of this sample.

  10. Monitoring system for windmill rotorblades based on optical connections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubert, L.; Schulze, E.; Frankenstein, B.; Fischer, D.; Weihnacht, B.; Rieske, R.

    2011-04-01

    To operate wind turbines safely and efficiently, condition monitoring for the main components are of increasing importance. Especially the lack of access to offshore installations increases inspection and maintenance costs. The current work at Fraunhofer IZFP Dresden in the field of monitoring of wind turbines is focused on the development of a condition monitoring system for rotor blades. A special focus lies on the application of optical technologies for communication and power supply. It is not possible to introduce electrical conductors into the rotor blade since it might cause tremendous damages by lightning. The monitoring concept is based on a combination of low frequency integral vibration monitoring and acoustic monitoring techniques in the frequency range between 10 and 100 kHz using guided waves. A joint application of acousto ultrasonics and acoustic emission techniques will be presented. Challenges and solutions of such a field test like sensor application, data handling and gathering as well as temperature variation are described.

  11. Cooperative Environment Scans Based on a Multi-Robot System

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Ji-Wook

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a cooperative environment scan system (CESS) using multiple robots, where each robot has low-cost range finders and low processing power. To organize and maintain the CESS, a base robot monitors the positions of the child robots, controls them, and builds a map of the unknown environment, while the child robots with low performance range finders provide obstacle information. Even though each child robot provides approximated and limited information of the obstacles, CESS replaces the single LRF, which has a high cost, because much of the information is acquired and accumulated by a number of the child robots. Moreover, the proposed CESS extends the measurement boundaries and detects obstacles hidden behind others. To show the performance of the proposed system and compare this with the numerical models of the commercialized 2D and 3D laser scanners, simulation results are included. PMID:25789491

  12. Hyperspectral imaging system for disease scanning on banana plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochoa, Daniel; Cevallos, Juan; Vargas, German; Criollo, Ronald; Romero, Dennis; Castro, Rodrigo; Bayona, Oswaldo

    2016-05-01

    Black Sigatoka (BS) is a banana plant disease caused by the fungus Mycosphaerella fijiensis. BS symptoms can be observed at late infection stages. By that time, BS has probably spread to other plants. In this paper, we present our current work on building an hyper-spectral (HS) imaging system aimed at in-vivo detection of BS pre-symptomatic responses in banana leaves. The proposed imaging system comprises a motorized stage, a high-sensitivity VIS-NIR camera and an optical spectrograph. To capture images of the banana leaf, the stage's speed and camera's frame rate must be computed to reduce motion blur and to obtain the same resolution along both spatial dimensions of the resulting HS cube. Our continuous leaf scanning approach allows imaging leaves of arbitrary length with minimum frame loss. Once the images are captured, a denoising step is performed to improve HS image quality and spectral profile extraction.

  13. Calibration technology in application of robot-laser scanning system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, YongJie; Yin, ShiBin; Zhu, JiGui

    2012-11-01

    A system composed of laser sensor and 6-DOF industrial robot is proposed to obtain complete three-dimensional (3-D) information of the object surface. Suitable for the different combining ways of laser sensor and robot, a new method to calibrate the position and pose between sensor and robot is presented. By using a standard sphere with known radius as a reference tool, the rotation and translation matrices between the laser sensor and robot are computed, respectively in two steps, so that many unstable factors introduced in conventional optimization methods can be avoided. The experimental results show that the accuracy of the proposed calibration method can be achieved up to 0.062 mm. The calibration method is also implemented into the automated robot scanning system to reconstruct a car door panel.

  14. Cooperative environment scans based on a multi-robot system.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Ji-Wook

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a cooperative environment scan system (CESS) using multiple robots, where each robot has low-cost range finders and low processing power. To organize and maintain the CESS, a base robot monitors the positions of the child robots, controls them, and builds a map of the unknown environment, while the child robots with low performance range finders provide obstacle information. Even though each child robot provides approximated and limited information of the obstacles, CESS replaces the single LRF, which has a high cost, because much of the information is acquired and accumulated by a number of the child robots. Moreover, the proposed CESS extends the measurement boundaries and detects obstacles hidden behind others. To show the performance of the proposed system and compare this with the numerical models of the commercialized 2D and 3D laser scanners, simulation results are included. PMID:25789491

  15. Active Spatial Perception in the Vibrissa Scanning Sensorimotor System

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Samar B; Whitmer, Diane; Figueroa, Rodolfo; Williams, Ben A; Kleinfeld, David

    2007-01-01

    Haptic perception is an active process that provides an awareness of objects that are encountered as an organism scans its environment. In contrast to the sensation of touch produced by contact with an object, the perception of object location arises from the interpretation of tactile signals in the context of the changing configuration of the body. A discrete sensory representation and a low number of degrees of freedom in the motor plant make the ethologically prominent rat vibrissa system an ideal model for the study of the neuronal computations that underlie this perception. We found that rats with only a single vibrissa can combine touch and movement to distinguish the location of objects that vary in angle along the sweep of vibrissa motion. The patterns of this motion and of the corresponding behavioral responses show that rats can scan potential locations and decide which location contains a stimulus within 150 ms. This interval is consistent with just one to two whisk cycles and provides constraints on the underlying perceptual computation. Our data argue against strategies that do not require the integration of sensory and motor modalities. The ability to judge angular position with a single vibrissa thus connects previously described, motion-sensitive neurophysiological signals to perception in the behaving animal. PMID:17227143

  16. Structural health monitoring system based on diffracted Lamb wave analysis by multiresolution processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemistre, Michel; Balageas, Daniel

    2001-06-01

    A health monitoring system is presented composed of integrated disc-shaped, 100 µm thick and 5 mm diameter piezoelectric transducers (PZTs) working sequentially as Lamb wave emitters and receivers. The diagnostic is based on the analysis of Lamb wave signals recorded before and after damage. In the composite, delaminations are discontinuities producing mode conversion processes generating various outgoing modes. The multiresolution processing allows the isolation of various propagation modes and their extraction in order to measure, for various propagation paths, the time delay between the arrivals of the main burst and of a specific outgoing mode. This process permits, with good accuracy, the localization of damage and the estimation of its extent. The robustness and portability of this technique is demonstrated by the fact that, after validation in our laboratory, it was successfully applied to data coming from an experiment conducted in another laboratory using its own acousto-ultrasonic health monitoring hardware system.

  17. Galvanometer beam-scanning system for laser fiber drawing.

    PubMed

    Oehrle, R C

    1979-02-15

    A major difficulty in using a laser to draw optical fibers from a glass preform has been uniformally distributing the laser's energy around the melt zone. Several systems have evolved in recent years, but to date the most successful technique has been the off-axis rotating lens system (RLS). The inability of this device to structure efficiently and dynamically the heat zone longitudinally along the preform has restricted its use to preform of less than 8-mm diameter. A new technique reported here employs two orthogonal mounted mirrors, driven by galvanometers to distribute the laser energy around the preform. This system can be retrofitted into the RLS to replace the rotating lens element. The new system, the galvanometer scanning system (GSS), operates at ten times the rotational speed of the RLS and can instantaneously modify the melt zone. The ability of the GSS to enlarge the melt zone reduces the vaporization rate at the surface of the preform permitting efficient use of higher laser power. Experiments i dicate that fibers can be drawn from significantly larger preforms by using the expanded heat zone provided by the GSS.

  18. Galvanometer beam-scanning system for laser fiber drawing.

    PubMed

    Oehrle, R C

    1979-02-15

    A major difficulty in using a laser to draw optical fibers from a glass preform has been uniformally distributing the laser's energy around the melt zone. Several systems have evolved in recent years, but to date the most successful technique has been the off-axis rotating lens system (RLS). The inability of this device to structure efficiently and dynamically the heat zone longitudinally along the preform has restricted its use to preform of less than 8-mm diameter. A new technique reported here employs two orthogonal mounted mirrors, driven by galvanometers to distribute the laser energy around the preform. This system can be retrofitted into the RLS to replace the rotating lens element. The new system, the galvanometer scanning system (GSS), operates at ten times the rotational speed of the RLS and can instantaneously modify the melt zone. The ability of the GSS to enlarge the melt zone reduces the vaporization rate at the surface of the preform permitting efficient use of higher laser power. Experiments i dicate that fibers can be drawn from significantly larger preforms by using the expanded heat zone provided by the GSS. PMID:20208750

  19. Mechatronic Scanning System with Integrated Micro Electro Mechanical System Position Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stavrov, Vladimir; Chakarov, Dimitar; Shulev, Assen; Tsveov, Mihail

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, a study of a mechatronic scanning system for application in the microbiology, microelectronics research, chemistry, etc. is presented. Integrated silicon micro electro mechanical system (MEMS) position sensor is used for monitoring the displacement of the scanning system. The utilized silicon MEMS sensors with sidewall embedded piezoresistors possess a number of key advantages such as high sensitivity, low noise and extremely low temperature dependence. Design of 2D scanning system with a travel range of 22 × 22 μm2 has been presented in present work. This system includes a Compliant Transmission Mechanism, (CTM) designed as a complex elastic mechanism, comprising four parallelograms. Computer aided desigh (CAD) model and finite element analysis (FEA) of the Compliant Transmission Mechanism mechanisms have been carried out. A prototype of the scanning system is fabricated, based on CAD model. An experimental set-up of an optical system and a correlation technique for digital image processing have been used for testing the scanning system prototype. Results of the experimental investigations of the prototyped scanning system are also presented.

  20. Scanned Image Projection System Employing Intermediate Image Plane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeJong, Christian Dean (Inventor); Hudman, Joshua M. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    In imaging system, a spatial light modulator is configured to produce images by scanning a plurality light beams. A first optical element is configured to cause the plurality of light beams to converge along an optical path defined between the first optical element and the spatial light modulator. A second optical element is disposed between the spatial light modulator and a waveguide. The first optical element and the spatial light modulator are arranged such that an image plane is created between the spatial light modulator and the second optical element. The second optical element is configured to collect the diverging light from the image plane and collimate it. The second optical element then delivers the collimated light to a pupil at an input of the waveguide.

  1. Electronically scanned multichannel pressure transducer system for cryogenic environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, John J.

    1990-01-01

    Research into the application of custom doped piezoresistive silicon pressure sensors has led to a multichannel pressure sensor design that will operate accurately and reliably at cryogenic temperatures. The thermal effects upon multichannel pressure sensors are mapped by thermal calibrations and are represented by sets of nth order coefficients specific to each sensor. The thermal offset and sensitivity variations are corrected by computer algorithms which scan the sensors, recall correction coefficients from thermally induced sensor variations, and apply these to correct the sensor's output measurement uncertainty to within 0.5 percent of full scale output for combined offset and sensitivity. A prototype sensor system has been fabricated, and performance test data are presented.

  2. A Mobile Automated Tomographic Gamma Scanning System - 13231

    SciTech Connect

    Kirkpatrick, J.M.; LeBlanc, P.J.; Nakazawa, D.; Petroka, D.L.; Kane Smith, S.; Venkataraman, R.; Villani, M.

    2013-07-01

    Canberra Industries have recently designed and built a new automated Tomographic Gamma Scanning (TGS) system for mobile deployment. The TGS technique combines high-resolution gamma spectroscopy with low spatial resolution 3-dimensional image reconstruction to provide increased accuracy over traditional approaches for the assay of non-uniform source distributions in low-to medium-density, non-heterogeneous matrices. Originally pioneered by R. Estep at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), the TGS method has been further developed and commercialized by Canberra Industries in recent years. The present system advances the state of the art on several fronts: it is designed to be housed in a standard cargo transport container for ease of transport, allowing waste characterization at multiple facilities under the purview of a single operator. Conveyor feed, drum rotator, and detector and collimator positioning mechanisms operated by programmable logic control (PLC) allow automated batch mode operation. The variable geometry settings can accommodate a wide range of waste packaging, including but not limited to standard 220 liter drums, 380 liter overpack drums, and smaller 20 liter cans. A 20 mCi Eu-152 transmission source provides attenuation corrections for drum matrices up to 1 g/cm{sup 3} in TGS mode; the system can be operated in Segmented Gamma Scanning (SGS) mode to measure higher density drums. To support TGS assays at higher densities, the source shield is sufficient to house an alternate Co-60 transmission source of higher activity, up to 250 mCi. An automated shutter and attenuator assembly is provided for operating the system with a dual intensity transmission source. The system's 1500 kg capacity rotator turntable can handle heavy containers such as concrete lined 380 liter overpack drums. Finally, data acquisition utilizes Canberra's Broad Energy Germanium (BEGE) detector and Lynx MCA, with 32 k channels, providing better than 0.1 keV/channel resolution to

  3. Virtual surgical operation system using volume scanning display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kameyama, Ken-ichi; Ohtomi, Koichi; Ohhashi, Akinami; Iseki, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Naotoshi; Takakura, Kintomo

    1994-05-01

    This paper describes an interactive 3-D display system for supporting image-guided surgery. Different from conventional CRT-based medical display systems, this one can provide true 3- D images of the patient's anatomical structures in a physical 3-D space. Furthermore, various tools for view control, target definition, and simple treatment simulation, have been developed and can be used for directly manipulating these images. This feature is very useful for a surgeon to intuitively recognize the precise position of a lesion and other structures and to plan a more accurate treatment. The hardware system is composed of a volume scanning 3-D display for 3-D real image presentation, a 3-D wireless mouse for direct manipulation in a 3-D space, and a workstation for the data control of these devices. The software is for analyzing X-CT, MRI, or SPECT images and for organizing the tools for treatment planning. The system is currently aimed at being used for stereotactic neurosurgical operations.

  4. A scanning system for intelligent imaging: I-ImaS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longo, R.; Asimidis, A.; Cavouras, D.; Esbrand, C.; Fant, A.; Gasiorek, P.; Georgiou, H.; Hall, G.; Jones, J.; Leaver, J.; Li, G.; Griffiths, J.; Machin, D.; Manthos, N.; Metaxas, M.; Noy, M.; Østby, J. M.; Psomadellis, F.; Rokvic, T.; Royle, G.; Schulerud, H.; Speller, R.; van der Stelt, PF.; Theodoridis, S.; Triantis, F.; Turchetta, R.; Venanzi, C.

    2007-03-01

    I-ImaS (Intelligent Imaging Sensors) is a European project aiming to produce adaptive x-ray imaging systems using Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS) to create optimal diagnostic images. Initial systems concentrate on mammography and cephalography. The on-chip intelligence available to MAPS technology will allow real-time analysis of data during image acquisition, giving the capability to build a truly adaptive imaging system with the potential to create images with maximum diagnostic information within given dose constraints. In our system, the exposure in each image region is optimized and the beam intensity is a function not only of tissue thickness and attenuation, but also of local physical and statistical parameters found in the image itself. Using a linear array of detectors with on-chip intelligence, the system will perform an on-line analysis of the image during the scan and then will optimize the X-ray intensity in order to obtain the maximum diagnostic information from the region of interest while minimizing exposure of less important, or simply less dense, regions. This paper summarizes the testing of the sensors and their electronics carried out using synchrotron radiation, x-ray sources and optical measurements. The sensors are tiled to form a 1.5D linear array. These have been characterised and appropriate correction techniques formulated to take into account misalignments between individual sensors. Full testing of the mammography and cephalography I-ImaS prototypes is now underway and the system intelligence is constantly being upgraded through iterative testing in order to obtain the optimal algorithms and settings.

  5. Nanosecond step-scan FTIR spectroscopy applied to photobiological systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rödig, C.; Weidlich, O.; Hackmann, C.; Siebert, F.

    1998-06-01

    Our improved step-scan FTIR instrument, capable of measuring spectra within 15 ns after the flash, is employed to measure flash-induced infrared difference spectra of bacteriorhodopsin, halorhodopsin and CO-myoglobin. For all three systems it is necessary to cover a large time range extending into several milliseconds. Therefore, the linear time base provided by the transient recorder board is converted to a quasi-logarithmic scale. Each of the three systems is characterized by several time constants extending over the large time range. For bacteriorhodopsin, it is shown that two spectral changes occur, one in the 20 and the other in the 100 ns time range. Furthermore, spectral differences between the two M states could be detected in the μs time range. For halorhodopsin, a clear batho intermediate with red-shifted ethylenic mode could be identified in the nanosecond time range. In addition, a transition corresponding to the N intermediate in bacteriorhodopsin was deduced. Further, it is shown that the millisecond time constant depends on Cl- concentration, enabling the detection of the O intermediate. In the case of CO-myoglobin, spectral differences could be identified caused by mutations of the distal histidine of the heme binding pocket.

  6. Shaping Corneal Transplants with a Scanning Laser System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homolka, Peter; Biowski, Robert; Gosch-Baumgartner, Isabella; Husinsky, Wolfgang; Grabner, Günter

    1997-03-01

    We present an improved commercially available Laser device for shaping corneal grafts with an ArF excimer laser. In this system the laser beam is steady and scanning is realized by moving the cornea under the beam using three stepper motors. The Excimer Laser Corneal Shaping System (ELCS-S2) is used to prepare donor buttons for penetrating keratoplasty as well as refractive lenticules of corneal tissue for correcting both hyperopia and myopia with epikeratophakia. Whereas the former is already a routinely used technique, the latter -- like lenticules used for correcting astigmatism -- is still a topic of research. We developed a new algorithm to calculate the ablation parameters based on more sophisticated optimizations of mechanical parameters like beam size and ablation radii and a more accurate mathematical model. Before implementation the algorithm was tested and optimized using a simulation on alpha-generation workstations. We could reduce surface roughness by a factor >10. This is of crucial importance if the optical center of the cornea is effected.

  7. Laser Scanning System for Pressure and Temperature Paints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, John

    1997-01-01

    Acquiring pressure maps of aerodynamic surfaces is very important for improving and validating the performance of aerospace vehicles. Traditional pressure measurements are taken with pressure taps embedded in the model surface that are connected to transducers. While pressure taps allow highly accurate measurements to be acquired, they do have several drawbacks. Pressure taps do not give good spatial resolution due to the need for individual pressure tubes, compounded by limited space available inside models. Also, building a model proves very costly if taps are needed because of the large amount of labor necessary to drill, connect and test each one. The typical cost to install one tap is about $200. Recently, a new method for measuring pressure on aerodynamic surfaces has been developed utilizing a technology known as pressure sensitive paints (PSP). Using PSP, pressure distributions can be acquired optically with high spatial resolution and simple model preparation. Flow structures can be easily visualized using PSP, but are missed using low spatial resolution arrays of pressure taps. PSP even allows pressure distributions to be found on rotating machinery where previously this has been extremely difficult or even impossible. The goal of this research is to develop a laser scanning system for use with pressure sensitive paints that allows accurate pressure measurements to be obtained on various aerodynamic surfaces ranging from wind tunnel models to high speed jet engine compressor blades.

  8. Distributing Functionality in the Drift Scan Camera System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicinski, T.; Constanta-Fanourakis, P.; MacKinnon, B.; Petravick, D.; Pluquet, C.; Rechenmacher, R.; Sergey, G.

    Although Fermilab is a High Energy Physics (HEP) laboratory, its experience in producing high speed data acquisition systems was essential in the development of the Drift Scan Camera System (DSC). It integrates high speed CCD (2048 2048 pixels) readout over fiber optics into an embedded VMEbus single board computer with a backend UNIX analysis system. Functionality is distributed across heterogeneous platforms through tight and loose coupling of machines client/server protocols a common interpretive command language Besides being a prototype for the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, the DSC System will be used for independent scientific objectives. It will be installed on the ARC 3.5m telescope at Apache Point Observatory, New Mexico in late 1993. The DSC core consists of two machines: the Instrument Control Computer (ICC) and the Online Analysis Computer (OAC). The ICC, a VMEbus-based Motorola MVME167b, and the OAC, a Silicon Graphics 4D/35, are tightly coupled through a VMEbus repeater. The ICC acquires image data from a 2048 2048 pixels CCD at rates up to 922 KBytes/second and stores this data, packaged into Frames up to 8 MBytes in size, in a local Frame Pool (on disk) in real-time. Frames in the Pool are served by the ICC to the Archiver (tape logger) and/or various OAC clients in near-real-time. As a Frame Pool client, the OAC requests Frames from the ICC via backplane-based RPCs (Remote Procedure Calls) and shared memory. Tight backplane coupling is necessary to provide the OAC with Frames as fast as they become available. This allows quick analysis, during the acquisition of the next Frame, to determine whether the current Frame should be retained, logged, etc. With observation time being precious, it also permits the observer to quickly discover problems (non-visually) and to correct them. The ICC is usually controlled by the OAC. But, as the ICC uses servers that interpret a common command language (Tcl), any machine (including the ICC) can issue commands to it

  9. A novel scanning system using an industrial robot and the workspace measurement and positioning system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Ziyue; Zhu, Jigui; Yang, Linghui; Lin, Jiarui

    2015-10-01

    The present scanning system consists of an industrial robot and a line-structured laser sensor which uses the industrial robot as a position instrument to guarantee the accuracy. However, the absolute accuracy of an industrial robot is relatively poor compared with the good repeatability in the manufacturing industry. This paper proposes a novel method using the workspace measurement and positioning system (wMPS) to remedy the lack of accuracy of the industrial robot. In order to guarantee the positioning accuracy of the system, the wMPS which is a laser-based measurement technology designed for large-volume metrology applications is brought in. Benefitting from the wMPS, this system can measure different cell-areas by the line-structured laser sensor and fuse the measurement data of different cell-areas by using the wMPS accurately. The system calibration which is the procedure to acquire and optimize the structure parameters of the scanning system is also stated in detail in this paper. In order to verify the feasibility of the system for scanning the large free-form surface, an experiment is designed to scan the internal surface of the door of a car-body in white. The final results show that the measurement data of the whole measuring areas have been jointed perfectly and there is no mismatch in the figure especially in the hole measuring areas. This experiment has verified the rationality of the system scheme, the correctness and effectiveness of the relevant methods.

  10. Miniaturized hand held microwave interference scanning system for NDE of dielectric armor and armor systems

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, Karl F.; Little, Jack R.; Ellingson, William A.; Meitzler, Thomas J.; Green, William

    2011-06-23

    Inspection of ceramic-based armor has advanced through development of a microwave-based, portable, non-contact NDE system. Recently, this system was miniaturized and made wireless for maximum utility in field applications. The electronic components and functionality of the laboratory system are retained, with alternative means of position input for creation of scan images. Validation of the detection capability was recently demonstrated using specially fabricated surrogates and ballistic impact-damaged specimens. The microwave data results have been compared to data from laboratory-based microwave interferometry systems and digital x-ray imaging. The microwave interference scanning has been shown to reliably detect cracks, laminar features and material property variations. The authors present details of the system operation, descriptions of the test samples used and recent results obtained.

  11. Scanning Tunneling Microscope Data Acquistion and Control System

    1995-02-01

    SHOESCAN is a PC based code that acquires and displays data for Scanning Tunneling Microscopes (STM). SHOESCAN interfaces with the STM through external electronic feedback and raster control circuits that are controlled by I/O boards on the PC bus. Data is displayed on a separate color monitor that is interfaced to the PC through an additional frame-grabber board. SHOESCAN can acquire a wide range of surface topographic information as well as surface electronic structure information.

  12. Millimeter Wave Synthetic Aperture Imaging System with a Unique Rotary Scanning System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghasr, M. T.; Pommerenke, D.; Case, J. T.; McClanahan, A. D.; Afaki-Beni, A.; Abou-Khousa, M.; Guinn, K.; DePaulis, F.; Kharkovsky, S.; Zoughi, R.

    2008-01-01

    In recent years, millimeter wave imaging techniques, using synthetic aperture focusing and holographical approaches, have shown tremendous potential for nondestructive testing applications, involving materials and structures used in space vehicles, including the space shuttle external fuel tank spray on foam insulation and its acreage heat tiles. The ability of signals at millimeter wave frequencies (30 - 300 GHz) to easily penetrate inside of low loss dielectric materials, their relatively small wavelengths, and the possibility of detecting coherent (magnitude and phase) reflections make them suitable for high resolution synthetic aperture focused imaging the interior of such materials and structures. To accommodate imaging requirements, commonly a scanning system is employed that provides for a raster scan of the desired structure. However, most such scanners, although simple in design and construction, are inherently slow primarily due to the need to stop and start at the beginning and end of each scan line. To this end, a millimeter wave synthetic aperture focusing system including a custom-designed transceiver operating at 35 - 45 GHz (Q-band) and unique and complex rotary scanner was designed and developed. The rotary scanner is capable of scanning an area with approximately 80 cm in diameter in less than 10 minutes at step sizes of 3 mm and smaller. The transceiver is capable of producing accurate magnitude and phase of reflected signal from the structure under test. Finally, a synthetic aperture focusing algorithm was developed that translates this rotary-obtained magnitude and phase into a synthetic aperture focusing image of inspected structures. This paper presents the design of the transceiver and the rotary scanning system along with showing several images obtained with this system from various complicated structures.

  13. Angle extended linear MEMS scanning system for 3D laser vision sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Yajun; Zhang, Yinxin; Yang, Huaidong; Zhu, Pan; Gai, Ye; Zhao, Jian; Huang, Zhanhua

    2016-09-01

    Scanning system is often considered as the most important part for 3D laser vision sensor. In this paper, we propose a method for the optical system design of angle extended linear MEMS scanning system, which has features of huge scanning degree, small beam divergence angle and small spot size for 3D laser vision sensor. The principle of design and theoretical formulas are derived strictly. With the help of software ZEMAX, a linear scanning optical system based on MEMS has been designed. Results show that the designed system can extend scanning angle from ±8° to ±26.5° with a divergence angle small than 3.5 mr, and the spot size is reduced for 4.545 times.

  14. Fast-scanning two-photon fluorescence imaging based on a microelectromechanical systems two- dimensional scanning mirror.

    PubMed

    Piyawattanametha, Wibool; Barretto, Robert P J; Ko, Tony H; Flusberg, Benjamin A; Cocker, Eric D; Ra, Hyejun; Lee, Daesung; Solgaard, Olav; Schnitzer, Mark J

    2006-07-01

    Towards overcoming the size limitations of conventional two-photon fluorescence microscopy, we introduce two-photon imaging based on microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) scanners. Single crystalline silicon scanning mirrors that are 0.75 mm x 0.75 mm in size and driven in two dimensions by microfabricated vertical comb electrostatic actuators can provide optical deflection angles through a range of approximately16 degrees . Using such scanners we demonstrated two-photon microscopy and microendoscopy with fast-axis acquisition rates up to 3.52 kHz.

  15. Reducing field distortion for galvanometer scanning system using a vision system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega Delgado, Moises Alberto; Lasagni, Andrés Fabián

    2016-11-01

    Laser galvanometer scanning systems are well-established devices for material processing, medical imaging and laser projection. Besides all the advantages of these devices like high resolution, repeatability and processing velocity, they are always affected by field distortions. Different pre-compensating techniques using iterative marking and measuring methods are applied in order to reduce such field distortions and increase in some extends the accuracy of the scanning systems. High-tech devices, temperature control systems and self-adjusting galvanometers are some expensive possibilities for reducing these deviations. This contribution presents a method for reducing field distortions using a coaxially coupled vision device and a self-designed calibration plate; this avoids, among others, the necessity of repetitive marking and measuring phases.

  16. Determining the flare dispensing program effectiveness against conical-scan and spin-scan reticle systems via Gaussian mixture models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Şahingil, Mehmet C.; Aslan, Murat Ş.

    2013-05-01

    The reticle systems which are considered as the classical approach for determining the angular position of radiating targets in infrared band are widely used in early generation surface-to-air and air-to-air infrared guided missile seekers. One of the cost-effective ways of protecting aircrafts against these missiles is to dispense flare decoys from the countermeasure dispensing system (CMDS) integrated into the aircraft platform. Although this counter-measuring technique seems very simple, if not optimized carefully, it may not be effective for protecting the aircraft. Flares should be dispensed in accordance with a specific dispensing program which determines the number of flares to be dispensed from each dispenser of the CMDS and timing sequence of dispensing. Optimizing the parameters of the dispensing program is not trivial. It requires a good understanding of the operating principle of the threat seeker, operational capabilities of own platform and engagement scenario between them. In the present paper, we propose a complete simulation-based procedure to form an effectiveness boundary of flare dispensing programs against the spin-scan and conical-scan reticle seekers. The region of effectiveness is determined via Gaussian mixture models. The raw data is collected via extensive number of simulations using a MATLAB-coded simulator which models reticle-based seeker, aircraft radiation, aircraft motion, aircraft CMDS system, flare motion and flare radiation.

  17. Control electronics for a multi-laser/multi-detector scanning system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, W.

    1980-01-01

    The Mars Rover Laser Scanning system uses a precision laser pointing mechanism, a photodetector array, and the concept of triangulation to perform three dimensional scene analysis. The system is used for real time terrain sensing and vision. The Multi-Laser/Multi-Detector laser scanning system is controlled by a digital device called the ML/MD controller. A next generation laser scanning system, based on the Level 2 controller, is microprocessor based. The new controller capabilities far exceed those of the ML/MD device. The first draft circuit details and general software structure are presented.

  18. Improved design of a laser scanning system for food analysis applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meulebroeck, W.; Berghmans, P.; Thienpont, H.

    2008-04-01

    Scanning systems are used in many applications where on-line, high-speed analysis of products is needed. Because of the growing demand for healthy and high quality food products, these systems found their way in several food sensing applications. We will focus on an optical scanning system used for the identification and quality control of vegetables and fruits. It should be able to detect defects as small as 1.5 millimeter and should have a uniform sorting contrast over the entire length of the scanning line. Depending on the application, the analysis process is based on different interaction phenomena such as selective absorption or fluorescence. In this work we first analyzed which parts of the scanning system influence the size of the smallest detectable defect and how the system should be designed in order to fulfill a predefined size. This was done by experimentally analyzing a standard optical scanning system. The major part of our work concentrates on the uniformity of the sorting contrast which depends on the amount of light captured by the detector. We learned that for the standard scanning system this contrast strongly depends on the position of the product in the scanning line. In this paper we highlight the factors which are responsible for this effect and describe a new system characterized by a uniform sorting contrast. The simulations related to this last part were performed with the aid of the optical analysis software ASAP.

  19. A line-scan hyperspectral system for high-throughput Raman chemical imaging

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A line-scan hyperspectral system was developed to enable Raman chemical imaging for large sample areas. A custom-designed 785 nm line-laser, based on a scanning mirror, serves as an excitation source. A 45° dichroic beamsplitter reflects the laser light to form a 24 cm × 1 mm excitation line normall...

  20. Scanning image detection (SID) system for conventional transmission electron microscope (CTEM) images.

    PubMed

    Tanji, T; Tomita, M; Kobayashi, H

    1990-08-01

    A new image detection system has been developed to display transmission electron microscope (TEM) images on a CRT without a video camera system. Deflection coils placed in both the upper space of an objective lens and in the lower space of the first intermediate lens scan a small electron probe simultaneously. The electrical signal acquired through an improved scintillator and a photomultiplier is synchronized with the scanning signal and displayed in a similar fashion to a conventional scanning TEM (STEM) instrument. A preliminary system using a 100 kV conventional TEM (CTEM) equipped with a hairpin-type electron gun, produced an image with a spatial resolution of 1 nm.

  1. Performance of the NIRS fast scanning system for heavy-ion radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Furukawa, Takuji; Inaniwa, Taku; Sato, Shinji; Shirai, Toshiyuki; Takei, Yuka; Takeshita, Eri; Mizushima, Kota; Iwata, Yoshiyuki; Himukai, Takeshi; Mori, Shinichiro; Fukuda, Shigekazu; Minohara, Shinichi; Takada, Eiichi; Murakami, Takeshi; Noda, Koji

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: A project to construct a new treatment facility, as an extension of the existing HIMAC facility, has been initiated for the further development of carbon-ion therapy at NIRS. This new treatment facility is equipped with a 3D irradiation system with pencil-beam scanning. The challenge of this project is to realize treatment of a moving target by scanning irradiation. To achieve fast rescanning within an acceptable irradiation time, the authors developed a fast scanning system. Methods: In order to verify the validity of the design and to demonstrate the performance of the fast scanning prior to use in the new treatment facility, a new scanning-irradiation system was developed and installed into the existing HIMAC physics-experiment course. The authors made strong efforts to develop (1) the fast scanning magnet and its power supply, (2) the high-speed control system, and (3) the beam monitoring. The performance of the system including 3D dose conformation was tested by using the carbon beam from the HIMAC accelerator. Results: The performance of the fast scanning system was verified by beam tests. Precision of the scanned beam position was less than {+-}0.5 mm. By cooperating with the planning software, the authors verified the homogeneity of the delivered field within {+-}3% for the 3D delivery. This system took only 20 s to deliver the physical dose of 1 Gy to a spherical target having a diameter of 60 mm with eight rescans. In this test, the average of the spot-staying time was considerably reduced to 154 {mu}s, while the minimum staying time was 30 {mu}s. Conclusions: As a result of this study, the authors verified that the new scanning delivery system can produce an accurate 3D dose distribution for the target volume in combination with the planning software.

  2. Microstructural and Defect Characterization in Ceramic Composites Using an Ultrasonic Guided Wave Scan System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, D. J.; Cosgriff, L. M.; Martin, R. E.; Verrilli, M. J.; Bhatt, R. T.

    2003-01-01

    In this study, an ultrasonic guided wave scan system was used to characterize various microstructural and flaw conditions in two types of ceramic matrix composites, SiC/SiC and C/SiC. Rather than attempting to isolate specific lamb wave modes to use for characterization (as is desired for many types of guided wave inspection problems), the guided wave scan system utilizes the total (multi-mode) ultrasonic response in its inspection analysis. Several time and frequency-domain parameters are calculated from the ultrasonic guided wave signal at each scan location to form images. Microstructural and defect conditions examined include delamination, density variation, cracking, and pre/ post-infiltration. Results are compared with thermographic imaging methods. Although the guided wave technique is commonly used so scanning can be eliminated, applying the technique in the scanning mode allows a more precise characterization of defect conditions.

  3. Scanning in biomedical imaging: from classical devices to handheld heads and micro-systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duma, Virgil-Florin

    2014-01-01

    We review some of the most important scanning systems that are competitive in high-end biomedical imaging applications such as Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT), but also Confocal Microscopy (CM) or multiphoton microscopy. Both 1-D (uni-dimensional) and 2-D (bi-dimensional) scanning systems are considered. The paper discusses different scanners, including polygon mirror, galvanometer-based and Risley prisms. Their configurations and characteristics, as well some of our contributions in the domain are presented. The tendency of applying them into special designs such as handheld scanning probes and endoscopes - the latter with MEMS (Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems) and micro-systems is pointed out. A discussion on further advancements of scanning technology in biomedical applications in general and in OCT in particular concludes the study.

  4. Development of a 3D laser scanning system for the cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Kai; Zhang, Da; Zhang, Yuan Sheng

    2013-06-01

    Serious geological hazard such as the roof fall-rib spalling-closure deformation of the cavity can exert bad influence to mine, even threaten human life. The traditional monitoring ways have some disadvantages, which are difficulties in obtaining data of the cavity, monitoring the unmanned cavity and calculating volume of the cavity accurately. To solve these problems, this paper describes how to develop a high precision 3D laser scanning system, which enables scanning the cavity rapidly, obtaining the same resolution point cloud, calculating volume of the cavity, marking the deformation area correctly and providing visualized environment. At the same time, this device has realized remote control functionality to avoid people to work on the underground. The measurement accuracy of the 3D laser scanning system is +/-2cm. The 3D laser scanning system can be combined with the mine microseism monitoring system to help with the estimation the cavity's stability and improve the effect of cavity monitoring.

  5. A new generation scanning system for the high-speed analysis of nuclear emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandrov, A.; Buonaura, A.; Consiglio, L.; D'Ambrosio, N.; De Lellis, G.; Di Crescenzo, A.; Galati, G.; Lauria, A.; Montesi, M. C.; Tioukov, V.; Vladymyrov, M.

    2016-06-01

    The development of automatic scanning systems was a fundamental issue for large scale neutrino detectors exploiting nuclear emulsions as particle trackers. Such systems speed up significantly the event analysis in emulsion, allowing the feasibility of experiments with unprecedented statistics. In the early 1990s, R&D programs were carried out by Japanese and European laboratories leading to automatic scanning systems more and more efficient. The recent progress in the technology of digital signal processing and of image acquisition allows the fulfillment of new systems with higher performances. In this paper we report the description and the performance of a new generation scanning system able to operate at the record speed of 84 cm2/hour and based on the Large Angle Scanning System for OPERA (LASSO) software infrastructure developed by the Naples scanning group. Such improvement, reduces the scanning time by a factor 4 with respect to the available systems, allowing the readout of huge amount of nuclear emulsions in reasonable time. This opens new perspectives for the employment of such detectors in a wider variety of applications.

  6. Human abdomen recognition using camera and force sensor in medical robot system for automatic ultrasound scan.

    PubMed

    Bin Mustafa, Ammar Safwan; Ishii, Takashi; Matsunaga, Yoshiki; Nakadate, Ryu; Ishii, Hiroyuki; Ogawa, Kouji; Saito, Akiko; Sugawara, Motoaki; Niki, Kiyomi; Takanishi, Atsuo

    2013-01-01

    Physicians use ultrasound scans to obtain real-time images of internal organs, because such scans are safe and inexpensive. However, people in remote areas face difficulties to be scanned due to aging society and physician's shortage. Hence, it is important to develop an autonomous robotic system to perform remote ultrasound scans. Previously, we developed a robotic system for automatic ultrasound scan focusing on human's liver. In order to make it a completely autonomous system, we present in this paper a way to autonomously localize the epigastric region as the starting position for the automatic ultrasound scan. An image processing algorithm marks the umbilicus and mammary papillae on a digital photograph of the patient's abdomen. Then, we made estimation for the location of the epigastric region using the distances between these landmarks. A supporting algorithm distinguishes rib position from epigastrium using the relationship between force and displacement. We implemented these algorithms with the automatic scanning system into an apparatus: a Mitsubishi Electric's MELFA RV-1 six axis manipulator. Tests on 14 healthy male subjects showed the apparatus located the epigastric region with a success rate of 94%. The results suggest that image recognition was effective in localizing a human body part. PMID:24110822

  7. An Automated Medical Information Management System (OpScan-MIMS) in a Clinical Setting

    PubMed Central

    Margolis, S.; Baker, T.G.; Ritchey, M.G.; Alterescu, S.; Friedman, C.

    1981-01-01

    This paper describes an automated medical information management system within a clinic setting. The system includes an optically scanned data entry system (OpScan), a generalized, interactive retrieval and storage software system(Medical Information Management System, MIMS) and the use of time-sharing. The system has the advantages of minimal hardware purchase and maintenance, rapid data entry and retrieval, user-created programs, no need for user knowledge of computer language or technology and is cost effective. The OpScan-MIMS system has been operational for approximately 16 months in a sexually transmitted disease clinic. The system's application to medical audit, quality assurance, clinic management and clinical training are demonstrated.

  8. Current Status Of The NAVSEA Synchronous Scanning Laser Imaging System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulp, Thomas J.; Garvis, Darrel; Kennedy, Randall; McRae, Thomas G.

    1988-12-01

    This paper constitutes an update on our efforts to develop an underwater laser-based imaging system (UWLIS). The work is being performed under contract from the Naval Sea Systems Command Office of Salvage and Diving (NAUSEA/00C) in order to provide instrumentation that will improve the visibility range available to deep-ocean (1500-6000 m) submersible vehicles during ocean-floor search-and-salvage operations. In general, these submersibles are remotely operated vehicles (ROV) that currently employ high-intensity floodlights and low-light-level TV cameras to produce video images of the seafloor, which are relayed to the mother ship to allow target identification. Often, these floodlight-based systems require that the ROV come within 6 to 10 m of the target in order to positively identify it. This poses both a risk of damaging the vehicle on outcropping seafloor terrain features and an increase in mission cost due to the time lost on maneuvering to identify false targets. Given that salvage-operation costs typically range from 1000 to 3000 per hour, a system that would improve the visibility range from 10 to 100 m would save thousands of dollars and greatly increase the probability of success of these missions.

  9. Low-power portable scanning imaging ladar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyburn, Dana; Leon, Roberto; Haji-Saeed, B.; Sengupta, Sandip K.; Testorf, Markus; Kierstead, John; Khoury, Jehad; Woods, Charles L.; Lorenzo, Joseph

    2003-08-01

    We propose and are in the process of progressively implementing an improved architecture for a laser based system to acquire intensity and range images of hard targets in real-time. The system design emphasizes the use of low power laser sources in conjunction with optical preamplification of target return signals to maintain eye safety without incurring the associated performance penalty. The design leverages advanced fiber optic component technology developed for the commercial market to achieve compactness and low power consumption without the high costs and long lead times associated with custom military devices. All important system parameters are designed to be configured in the field, by the user, in software, allowing for adaptive reconfiguration for different missions and targets. Recently we have started our transition from the initial test bed, using a laser in the visible wavelength, into the final system with a 1550nm diode laser. Currently we are able to acquire and display 3-D false-color and gray-scale images, in the laboratory, at moderate frame rates in real-time. Commercial off-the-shelf data acquisition and signal processing software on a desktop computer equipped with commercial acquisition hardware is utilized. Significant improvements in both range and spatial resolution are expected in the near future.

  10. Image reconstruction for single detector rosette scanning systems based on compressive sensing theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uzeler, Hande; Cakir, Serdar; Aytaç, Tayfun

    2016-02-01

    Compressive sensing (CS) is a signal processing technique that enables a signal that has a sparse representation in a known basis to be reconstructed using measurements obtained below the Nyquist rate. Single detector image reconstruction applications using CS have been shown to give promising results. In this study, we investigate the application of CS theory to single detector infrared (IR) rosette scanning systems which suffer from low performance compared to costly focal plane array (FPA) detectors. The single detector pseudoimaging rosette scanning system scans the scene with a specific pattern and performs processing to estimate the target location without forming an image. In this context, this generation of scanning systems may be improved by utilizing the samples obtained by the rosette scanning pattern in conjunction with the CS framework. For this purpose, we consider surface-to-air engagement scenarios using IR images containing aerial targets and flares. The IR images have been reconstructed from samples obtained with the rosette scanning pattern and other baseline sampling strategies. It has been shown that the proposed scheme exhibits good reconstruction performance and a large size FPA imaging performance can be achieved using a single IR detector with a rosette scanning pattern.

  11. Spacelab data analysis using the space plasma computer analysis network (SCAN) system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, J. L.

    1984-01-01

    The Space-plasma Computer Analysis Network (SCAN) currently connects a large number of U.S. Spacelab investigators into a common computer network. Used primarily by plasma physics researchers at present, SCAN provides access to Spacelab investigators in other areas of space science, to Spacelab and non-Spacelab correlative data bases, and to large Class VI computational facilities for modeling. SCAN links computers together at remote institutions used by space researchers, utilizing commercially available software for computer-to-computer communications. Started by the NASA's Office of Space Science in mid 1980, SCAN presently contains ten system nodes located at major universities and space research laboratories, with fourteen new nodes projected for the near future. The Stanford University computer gateways allow SCAN users to connect onto the ARPANET and TELENET overseas networks.

  12. Developing and improving a scanning system for dosimetric applications

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, P.; Galvan, V.; Castellanoa, G.; Valente, M.

    2010-08-04

    Radiotherapy is nowadays one of the most used techniques for the treatment of different pathologies, particularly cancer diseases. The accuracy regarding the application of these treatments, which are planned according to patient information, depends mainly on the dosimetric measurements of absorbed dose within irradiated tissues. The present work is devoted to the study, design and construction of an original device capable of performing visible light transmission measurements in order to analyze Fricke gel dosimeters. Furthermore, a suitable bi-dimensional positioning system along with a dedicated control system and image processing software has been adapted to the dosimetric device in order to perform 2D dose mapping. The obtained results confirm the feasibility of the proposed method, therefore suggesting its potentiality for clinical applications.

  13. Performances of the scanning system for the CNAO center of oncological hadron therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giordanengo, S.; Donetti, M.; Marchetto, F.; Ansarinejad, A.; Attili, A.; Bourhaleb, F.; Burini, F.; Cirio, R.; Fabbricatore, P.; Voelker, F.; Garella, M. A.; Incurvati, M.; Monaco, V.; Pardo, J.; Peroni, C.; Russo, G.; Sacchi, R.; Taddia, G.; Zampieri, A.

    2010-02-01

    In hadron therapy one of the most advanced methods for beam delivery is the active scanning technique which uses fast scanning magnets to drive a narrow particle beam across the target. The Centro Nazionale di Adroterapia Oncologica (CNAO) will treat tumours with this technique. The CNAO scanning system includes two identical dipole magnets for horizontal and vertical beam deflection, each one connected to a fast power supply. The dose delivery system exploits a set of monitor chambers to measure the fluence and position of the beam and drives the beam during the treatment by controlling the sequence of currents set by the power supplies. A test of the dynamic performance of the scanning system has been performed using a Hall probe to measure the field inside the magnet and the results are presented in this paper.

  14. Development of online lines-scan imaging system for chicken inspection and differentiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chun-Chieh; Chan, Diane E.; Chao, Kuanglin; Chen, Yud-Ren; Kim, Moon S.

    2006-10-01

    An online line-scan imaging system was developed for differentiation of wholesome and systemically diseased chickens. The hyperspectral imaging system used in this research can be directly converted to multispectral operation and would provide the ideal implementation of essential features for data-efficient high-speed multispectral classification algorithms. The imaging system consisted of an electron-multiplying charge-coupled-device (EMCCD) camera and an imaging spectrograph for line-scan images. The system scanned the surfaces of chicken carcasses on an eviscerating line at a poultry processing plant in December 2005. A method was created to recognize birds entering and exiting the field of view, and to locate a Region of Interest on the chicken images from which useful spectra were extracted for analysis. From analysis of the difference spectra between wholesome and systemically diseased chickens, four wavelengths of 468 nm, 501 nm, 582 nm and 629 nm were selected as key wavelengths for differentiation. The method of locating the Region of Interest will also have practical application in multispectral operation of the line-scan imaging system for online chicken inspection. This line-scan imaging system makes possible the implementation of multispectral inspection using the key wavelengths determined in this study with minimal software adaptations and without the need for cross-system calibration.

  15. The remote measurement of tornado-like flows employing a scanning laser Doppler system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeffreys, H. B.; Bilbro, J. W.; Dimarzio, C.; Sonnenschein, C.; Toomey, D.

    1977-01-01

    The paper deals with a scanning laser Doppler velocimeter system employed in a test program for measuring naturally occurring tornado-like phenomena, known as dust devils. A description of the system and the test program is followed by a discussion of the data processing techniques and data analysis. The system uses a stable 15-W CO2 laser with the beam expanded and focused by a 12-inch telescope. Range resolution is obtained by focusing the optical system. The velocity of each volume of air (scanned in a horizontal plane) is determined from spectral analysis of the heterodyne signal. Results derived from the measurement program and data/system analyses are examined.

  16. Remote Gamma Scanning System for Characterization of BWR and PWR Fuel Rod Sections

    SciTech Connect

    Crowell, Shannon L.; Alzheimer, James M.

    2011-08-08

    Sometimes challenges with the design and deployment of automated equipment in remote environments deals more with the constraints imposed by the remote environment than it does with the details of the automation. This paper discusses the development of a scanning system used to provide gamma radiation profiles of irradiated fuel rod segments. The system needed the capability to provide axial scans of cut segments of BWR and PWR fuel rods. The scanning location is A-Cell at the Radiochemical Processing Laboratory (RPL) at the Hanford site in Washington State. The criteria for the scanning equipment included axial scanning increments of a tenth of an inch or less, ability to scan fuel rods with diameters ranging from 3/8 inch to 5/8 inch in diameter, and fuel rod segments up to seven feet in length. Constraints imposed by the environment included having the gamma detector and operator controls on the outside of the hot cell and the scanning hardware on the inside of the hot cell. This entailed getting a narrow, collimated beam of radiation from the fuel rod to the detector on the outside of the hot cell while minimizing the radiation exposure caused by openings for the wires and cables traversing the hot cell walls. Setup and operation of all of the in-cell hardware needed to accommodate limited access ports and use of hot cell manipulators. The radiation levels inside the cell also imposed constraints on the materials used.

  17. Handheld Thermoacoustic Scanning System Based on a Linear-array Transducer.

    PubMed

    Ji, Zhong; Ding, Wenzheng; Ye, Fanghao; Lou, Cunguang

    2016-07-01

    To receive the information necessary for imaging, traditional microwave-induced thermoacoustic imaging systems (MITISs) use a type of circular-scanning mode using single or arc detectors. However, the use of MITISs for body scanning is complicated by restrictions in space and imaging time. A linear-array detector, the most widely used transducer in medical ultrasound imaging systems for body scanning, is a possible alternative to MITISs for scanning biological tissues, such as from the breast or limbs. In this paper, a handheld MITIS, based on a linear-array detector and a multiple data acquisition system, is described, and the capacity of the system is explored experimentally. First, the vertical and lateral resolution of the system is discussed. Next, real-time imaging of a moving object, obtained with an image capture rate of 20 frame/s, is described. Finally, a phantom experiment is detailed, investigating the overall imaging capability. The results show that this system achieves rapid scanning with a large field of view. The system has the obvious advantages of being handheld, not using coupled fluids, and achieving real-time imaging with a large field of view, which make this MITIS more suitable for clinical applications.

  18. Handheld Thermoacoustic Scanning System Based on a Linear-array Transducer.

    PubMed

    Ji, Zhong; Ding, Wenzheng; Ye, Fanghao; Lou, Cunguang

    2016-07-01

    To receive the information necessary for imaging, traditional microwave-induced thermoacoustic imaging systems (MITISs) use a type of circular-scanning mode using single or arc detectors. However, the use of MITISs for body scanning is complicated by restrictions in space and imaging time. A linear-array detector, the most widely used transducer in medical ultrasound imaging systems for body scanning, is a possible alternative to MITISs for scanning biological tissues, such as from the breast or limbs. In this paper, a handheld MITIS, based on a linear-array detector and a multiple data acquisition system, is described, and the capacity of the system is explored experimentally. First, the vertical and lateral resolution of the system is discussed. Next, real-time imaging of a moving object, obtained with an image capture rate of 20 frame/s, is described. Finally, a phantom experiment is detailed, investigating the overall imaging capability. The results show that this system achieves rapid scanning with a large field of view. The system has the obvious advantages of being handheld, not using coupled fluids, and achieving real-time imaging with a large field of view, which make this MITIS more suitable for clinical applications. PMID:26294659

  19. Review of P-scan computer-based ultrasonic inservice inspection system. Supplement 1

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, R.V. Jr.; Angel, L.J.

    1995-12-01

    This Supplement reviews the P-scan system, a computer-based ultrasonic system used for inservice inspection of piping and other components in nuclear power plants. The Supplement was prepared using the methodology described in detail in Appendix A of NUREG/CR-5985, and is based on one month of using the system in a laboratory. This Supplement describes and characterizes: computer system, ultrasonic components, and mechanical components; scanning, detection, digitizing, imaging, data interpretation, operator interaction, data handling, and record-keeping. It includes a general description, a review checklist, and detailed results of all tests performed.

  20. Digital processing of side-scan sonar data with the Woods Hole image processing system software

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paskevich, Valerie F.

    1992-01-01

    Since 1985, the Branch of Atlantic Marine Geology has been involved in collecting, processing and digitally mosaicking high and low-resolution side-scan sonar data. Recent development of a UNIX-based image-processing software system includes a series of task specific programs for processing side-scan sonar data. This report describes the steps required to process the collected data and to produce an image that has equal along- and across-track resol

  1. Development of a hybrid atomic force microscopic measurement system combined with white light scanning interferometry.

    PubMed

    Guo, Tong; Wang, Siming; Dorantes-Gonzalez, Dante J; Chen, Jinping; Fu, Xing; Hu, Xiaotang

    2012-01-01

    A hybrid atomic force microscopic (AFM) measurement system combined with white light scanning interferometry for micro/nanometer dimensional measurement is developed. The system is based on a high precision large-range positioning platform with nanometer accuracy on which a white light scanning interferometric module and an AFM head are built. A compact AFM head is developed using a self-sensing tuning fork probe. The head need no external optical sensors to detect the deflection of the cantilever, which saves room on the head, and it can be directly fixed under an optical microscopic interferometric system. To enhance the system's dynamic response, the frequency modulation (FM) mode is adopted for the AFM head. The measuring data can be traceable through three laser interferometers in the system. The lateral scanning range can reach 25 mm × 25 mm by using a large-range positioning platform. A hybrid method combining AFM and white light scanning interferometry is proposed to improve the AFM measurement efficiency. In this method, the sample is measured firstly by white light scanning interferometry to get an overall coarse morphology, and then, further measured with higher resolution by AFM. Several measuring experiments on standard samples demonstrate the system's good measurement performance and feasibility of the hybrid measurement method.

  2. Comparison of slot scanning digital mammography system with full-field digital mammography system

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, C.-J.; Shaw, Chris C.; Geiser, William; Chen, Lingyun; Arribas, Elsa; Stephens, Tanya; Davis, Paul L.; Ayyar, Geetha P.; Dogan, Basak E.; Nguyen, Victoria A.; Whitman, Gary J.; Yang, Wei T.

    2008-06-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare microcalcification detectability of two commercial full-field digital mammography (DM) systems. The first unit was a flat panel based DM system (FFDM) which employed an anti-scatter grid method to reject scatter, and the second unit was a charge-coupled device-based DM system (SSDM) which used scanning slot imaging geometry to reduce scatter radiation. Both systems have comparable scatter-to-primary ratios. In this study, 125-160 and 200-250 {mu}m calcium carbonate grains were used to simulate microcalcifications and imaged by both DM systems. The calcium carbonate grains were overlapped with a 5-cm-thick 50% adipose/50% glandular simulated breast tissue slab and an anthropomorphic breast phantom (RMI 165, Gammex) for imaging at two different mean glandular dose levels: 0.87 and 1.74 mGy. A reading study was conducted with seven board certified mammographers with images displayed on review workstations. A five-point confidence level rating was used to score each detection task. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was performed and the area under the ROC curve (A{sub z}) was used to quantify and compare the performances of these two systems. The results showed that with the simulated breast tissue slab (uniform background), the SSDM system resulted in higher A{sub z}'s than the FFDM system at both MGD levels with the difference statistically significant at 0.87 mGy only. With the anthropomorphic breast phantom (tissue structure background), the SSDM system performed better than the FFDM system at 0.87 mGy but worse at 1.74 mGy. However, the differences were not found to be statistically significant.

  3. Optical tomographic scanning target-tracking system based on single pixel sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Baosheng; Wang, Yicheng; Yang, Jiuchun

    2015-11-01

    Optical tomography imaging had the characteristics of high resolution. The rotating periscope system and modulating plate with 65 slits were designed. Filter back projection (FBP) algorithm was applied to the one-dimensional signals, which were obtained by multi-angle scanning in modulating plate, to reconstruct two-dimensional image. Single pixel photoelectric sensor has high frequency response and can acquire high speed real-time signal. This work had carried on the simulation and experiment about scanning system based on the analysis and determination about the modulating plate's parameters, and verify the feasibility of scanning system. In this paper, the method plays an important role in developing novel target tracking system and provides deep foundation for deeper experimental research.

  4. Georeferenced Scanning System to Estimate the Leaf Wall Area in Tree Crops

    PubMed Central

    del-Moral-Martínez, Ignacio; Arnó, Jaume; Escolà, Alexandre; Sanz, Ricardo; Masip-Vilalta, Joan; Company-Messa, Joaquim; Rosell-Polo, Joan R.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the use of a terrestrial light detection and ranging (LiDAR) system to scan the vegetation of tree crops to estimate the so-called pixelated leaf wall area (PLWA). Scanning rows laterally and considering only the half-canopy vegetation to the line of the trunks, PLWA refers to the vertical projected area without gaps detected by LiDAR. As defined, PLWA may be different depending on the side from which the LiDAR is applied. The system is completed by a real-time kinematic global positioning system (RTK-GPS) sensor and an inertial measurement unit (IMU) sensor for positioning. At the end, a total leaf wall area (LWA) is computed and assigned to the X, Y position of each vertical scan. The final value of the area depends on the distance between two consecutive scans (or horizontal resolution), as well as the number of intercepted points within each scan, since PLWA is only computed when the laser beam detects vegetation. To verify system performance, tests were conducted related to the georeferencing task and synchronization problems between GPS time and central processing unit (CPU) time. Despite this, the overall accuracy of the system is generally acceptable. The Leaf Area Index (LAI) can then be estimated using PLWA as an explanatory variable in appropriate linear regression models. PMID:25868079

  5. Georeferenced scanning system to estimate the leaf wall area in tree crops.

    PubMed

    del-Moral-Martínez, Ignacio; Arnó, Jaume; Escolà, Alexandre; Sanz, Ricardo; Masip-Vilalta, Joan; Company-Messa, Joaquim; Rosell-Polo, Joan R

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the use of a terrestrial light detection and ranging (LiDAR) system to scan the vegetation of tree crops to estimate the so-called pixelated leaf wall area (PLWA). Scanning rows laterally and considering only the half-canopy vegetation to the line of the trunks, PLWA refers to the vertical projected area without gaps detected by LiDAR. As defined, PLWA may be different depending on the side from which the LiDAR is applied. The system is completed by a real-time kinematic global positioning system (RTK-GPS) sensor and an inertial measurement unit (IMU) sensor for positioning. At the end, a total leaf wall area (LWA) is computed and assigned to the X, Y position of each vertical scan. The final value of the area depends on the distance between two consecutive scans (or horizontal resolution), as well as the number of intercepted points within each scan, since PLWA is only computed when the laser beam detects vegetation. To verify system performance, tests were conducted related to the georeferencing task and synchronization problems between GPS time and central processing unit (CPU) time. Despite this, the overall accuracy of the system is generally acceptable. The Leaf Area Index (LAI) can then be estimated using PLWA as an explanatory variable in appropriate linear regression models. PMID:25868079

  6. Autoblocker: a system for detecting and blocking of network scanning based on analysis of netflow data

    SciTech Connect

    Bobyshev, A.; Lamore, D.; Demar, P.; /Fermilab

    2004-12-01

    In a large campus network, such at Fermilab, with tens of thousands of nodes, scanning initiated from either outside of or within the campus network raises security concerns. This scanning may have very serious impact on network performance, and even disrupt normal operation of many services. In this paper we introduce a system for detecting and automatic blocking excessive traffic of different kinds of scanning, DoS attacks, virus infected computers. The system, called AutoBlocker, is a distributed computing system based on quasi-real time analysis of network flow data collected from the border router and core switches. AutoBlocker also has an interface to accept alerts from IDS systems (e.g. BRO, SNORT) that are based on other technologies. The system has multiple configurable alert levels for the detection of anomalous behavior and configurable trigger criteria for automated blocking of scans at the core or border routers. It has been in use at Fermilab for about 2 years, and has become a very valuable tool to curtail scan activity within the Fermilab campus network.

  7. Nondestructive x-ray microanalysis bidirectional scanning and data acquisition system

    SciTech Connect

    Lawson, R.L.

    1989-09-12

    A system for making fast scans of specimens and acquiring data was developed at the oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. An LSI 11/23 computer using the RT11 operating system controls the scan and data acquisition. Scan software was written which would program a Unidex III stepping motor controller to make the scan motions while the position was monitored and the data acquired through the computer`s timer/counter boards from the multichannel analyzer`s four region of interest (ROI) outputs. Small areas of a part or specimen are scanned by moving the part back and forth in the x-ray beam using stepping motor actuated tables. A detector receives the scattered x-rays from the part and sends a signal to the multichannel analyzer which digitizes it. After the data has been acquired using the scan computer, the data is then transferred to a PC to where it is processed and an image is generated and displayed for analysis.

  8. Concepts and Analyses in the CT Scanning of Root Systems and Leaf Canopies: A Timely Summary.

    PubMed

    Lafond, Jonathan A; Han, Liwen; Dutilleul, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Non-medical applications of computed tomography (CT) scanning have flourished in recent years, including in Plant Science. This Perspective article on CT scanning of root systems and leaf canopies is intended to be of interest to three categories of readers: those who have not yet tried plant CT scanning, and should find inspiration for new research objectives; readers who are on the learning curve with applications-here is helpful advice for them; and researchers with greater experience-the field is evolving quickly and it is easy to miss aspects. Our conclusion is that CT scanning of roots and canopies is highly demanding in terms of technology, multidisciplinarity and big-data analysis, to name a few areas of expertise, but eventually, the reward for researchers is directly proportional! PMID:26734022

  9. Concepts and Analyses in the CT Scanning of Root Systems and Leaf Canopies: A Timely Summary

    PubMed Central

    Lafond, Jonathan A.; Han, Liwen; Dutilleul, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Non-medical applications of computed tomography (CT) scanning have flourished in recent years, including in Plant Science. This Perspective article on CT scanning of root systems and leaf canopies is intended to be of interest to three categories of readers: those who have not yet tried plant CT scanning, and should find inspiration for new research objectives; readers who are on the learning curve with applications—here is helpful advice for them; and researchers with greater experience—the field is evolving quickly and it is easy to miss aspects. Our conclusion is that CT scanning of roots and canopies is highly demanding in terms of technology, multidisciplinarity and big-data analysis, to name a few areas of expertise, but eventually, the reward for researchers is directly proportional! PMID:26734022

  10. Concepts and Analyses in the CT Scanning of Root Systems and Leaf Canopies: A Timely Summary.

    PubMed

    Lafond, Jonathan A; Han, Liwen; Dutilleul, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Non-medical applications of computed tomography (CT) scanning have flourished in recent years, including in Plant Science. This Perspective article on CT scanning of root systems and leaf canopies is intended to be of interest to three categories of readers: those who have not yet tried plant CT scanning, and should find inspiration for new research objectives; readers who are on the learning curve with applications-here is helpful advice for them; and researchers with greater experience-the field is evolving quickly and it is easy to miss aspects. Our conclusion is that CT scanning of roots and canopies is highly demanding in terms of technology, multidisciplinarity and big-data analysis, to name a few areas of expertise, but eventually, the reward for researchers is directly proportional!

  11. Spectral line-scan imaging system for high-speed nondestructive wholesomeness inspection of broilers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A spectral line-scan imaging system was developed for automated online wholesomeness inspection of broilers and evaluated in a commercial chicken processing plant. Real-time online hyperspectral images acquired by the system on a 140 bird-per-minute processing line were analyzed to optimize Region o...

  12. Recommendations for the design and the installation of large laser scanning microscopy systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helm, P. Johannes

    2012-03-01

    Laser Scanning Microscopy (LSM) has since the inventions of the Confocal Scanning Laser Microscope (CLSM) and the Multi Photon Laser Scanning Microscope (MPLSM) developed into an essential tool in contemporary life science and material science. The market provides an increasing number of turn-key and hands-off commercial LSM systems, un-problematic to purchase, set up and integrate even into minor research groups. However, the successful definition, financing, acquisition, installation and effective use of one or more large laser scanning microscopy systems, possibly of core facility character, often requires major efforts by senior staff members of large academic or industrial units. Here, a set of recommendations is presented, which are helpful during the process of establishing large systems for confocal or non-linear laser scanning microscopy as an effective operational resource in the scientific or industrial production process. Besides the description of technical difficulties and possible pitfalls, the article also illuminates some seemingly "less scientific" processes, i.e. the definition of specific laboratory demands, advertisement of the intention to purchase one or more large systems, evaluation of quotations, establishment of contracts and preparation of the local environment and laboratory infrastructure.

  13. Development of a Hybrid Atomic Force Microscopic Measurement System Combined with White Light Scanning Interferometry

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Tong; Wang, Siming; Dorantes-Gonzalez, Dante J.; Chen, Jinping; Fu, Xing; Hu, Xiaotang

    2012-01-01

    A hybrid atomic force microscopic (AFM) measurement system combined with white light scanning interferometry for micro/nanometer dimensional measurement is developed. The system is based on a high precision large-range positioning platform with nanometer accuracy on which a white light scanning interferometric module and an AFM head are built. A compact AFM head is developed using a self-sensing tuning fork probe. The head need no external optical sensors to detect the deflection of the cantilever, which saves room on the head, and it can be directly fixed under an optical microscopic interferometric system. To enhance the system’s dynamic response, the frequency modulation (FM) mode is adopted for the AFM head. The measuring data can be traceable through three laser interferometers in the system. The lateral scanning range can reach 25 mm × 25 mm by using a large-range positioning platform. A hybrid method combining AFM and white light scanning interferometry is proposed to improve the AFM measurement efficiency. In this method, the sample is measured firstly by white light scanning interferometry to get an overall coarse morphology, and then, further measured with higher resolution by AFM. Several measuring experiments on standard samples demonstrate the system’s good measurement performance and feasibility of the hybrid measurement method. PMID:22368463

  14. Multi-frequency AOM for multi-beam laser scanning exposure system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinada, Hidetoshi

    2016-10-01

    Digital printing systems recorded on films or computer to plates (CTPs) have been required to improve their productivity and image quality. Under the circumstance, a printing technology of the multi-beam laser scanning for the drum capstan system, which is almost the same as optics configuration as the flat bed system, was developed using a newly developed multi-frequency acousto-optic modulator (AOM) as a key device instead of ultra-fast scanning devices toward a main scan direction. The multi-frequency AOM was developed with phased array-type transducers, achieving a wider bandwidth of over 160 MHz. The design consisted of a simultaneous three beams generation with interlace scan to avoid the beat effect by adjacent Doppler-shifted beams, which consequently attained the fastest recording speed of 5.0 mm/s compared with 2.0-3.0 mm/s of existing systems in those days. Furthermore, a couple of critical parameters of the multi-frequency AOM are studied, for example, a treatment of third-order intermodulation and also beat effect in connection with photosensitive media. As a result, the necessity of interlaces scanning to obtain good image quality without beat effect and also to allow a lower laser power to apply is proposed.

  15. Multi-frequency AOM for multi-beam laser scanning exposure system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinada, Hidetoshi

    2016-08-01

    Digital printing systems recorded on films or computer to plates (CTPs) have been required to improve their productivity and image quality. Under the circumstance, a printing technology of the multi-beam laser scanning for the drum capstan system, which is almost the same as optics configuration as the flat bed system, was developed using a newly developed multi-frequency acousto-optic modulator (AOM) as a key device instead of ultra-fast scanning devices toward a main scan direction. The multi-frequency AOM was developed with phased array-type transducers, achieving a wider bandwidth of over 160 MHz. The design consisted of a simultaneous three beams generation with interlace scan to avoid the beat effect by adjacent Doppler-shifted beams, which consequently attained the fastest recording speed of 5.0 mm/s compared with 2.0-3.0 mm/s of existing systems in those days. Furthermore, a couple of critical parameters of the multi-frequency AOM are studied, for example, a treatment of third-order intermodulation and also beat effect in connection with photosensitive media. As a result, the necessity of interlaces scanning to obtain good image quality without beat effect and also to allow a lower laser power to apply is proposed.

  16. A voice coil motor based measuring force control system for tactile scanning profiler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Shengdong; Liu, Xiaojun; Chen, Liangzhou; Zhou, Liping; Lu, Wenlong

    2015-02-01

    In tactile scanning profiler, the measuring force would change in a wide range when it was used for profile measurement in a large range, which could possibly destroy the measured surface. To solve the problem, measuring force control system for tactile scanning profiler was needed. In the paper, a voice coil motor-based measuring force control system for tactile scanning profiler was designed. In the design, a low stiffness coefficient spring was used to provide contact force, while a voice coil motor (VCM) to balance the spring force so that the contact force could be kept for constant measuring force. A VCM was designed specially, and for active measuring force control, a precision current source circuit under the control of a DSP unit was designed to drive the VCM. The performance of voice coil motor based measuring force control system had been tested, and its good characteristics were verified.

  17. The correction of vibration in frequency scanning interferometry based absolute distance measurement system for dynamic measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Cheng; Liu, Guodong; Liu, Bingguo; Chen, Fengdong; Zhuang, Zhitao; Xu, Xinke; Gan, Yu

    2015-10-01

    Absolute distance measurement systems are of significant interest in the field of metrology, which could improve the manufacturing efficiency and accuracy of large assemblies in fields such as aircraft construction, automotive engineering, and the production of modern windmill blades. Frequency scanning interferometry demonstrates noticeable advantages as an absolute distance measurement system which has a high precision and doesn't depend on a cooperative target. In this paper , the influence of inevitable vibration in the frequency scanning interferometry based absolute distance measurement system is analyzed. The distance spectrum is broadened as the existence of Doppler effect caused by vibration, which will bring in a measurement error more than 103 times bigger than the changes of optical path difference. In order to decrease the influence of vibration, the changes of the optical path difference are monitored by a frequency stabilized laser, which runs parallel to the frequency scanning interferometry. The experiment has verified the effectiveness of this method.

  18. [Passive remote measurement of flame infrared image by a FTIR scanning imaging system].

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhi-Ming; Gao, Min-Guang; Liu, Wen-Qing; Lu, Yi-Huai; Zhang, Tian-Shu; Xu, Liang; Wei, Xiu-Li

    2008-11-01

    The present paper introduced a FTIR scanning imaging system. This system is based on the combination of a FTIR spectrometer and a scanning mirror. So it has the advantage of FTIR spectrometer: non-contact, real-time, celerity, nicety and high sensitivity. Through scanning mirror, the authors can obtain the space information of targets. The authors used this system to measure the flames infrared emission spectra of three alcohol burners at a flat roof in our laboratory. According to Planck's law, the authors calculated the relative temperature of from each spectrum. These temperature data formed an array. The authors used matlab software to plot the infrared images of target and contrasted them with video image. They were consistent with each other very well. This experiment allowed us to obtain the temperature distribution of three alcohol burners' flames, and provide identification, visualization, and quantification of pollutant clouds.

  19. Innovative Gamma Ray Spectrometer Detection Systems for Conducting Scanning Surveys on Challenging Terrain - 13583

    SciTech Connect

    Palladino, Carl; Mason, Bryan; Engle, Matt; LeVangie, James; Dempsey, Gregg; Klemovich, Ron

    2013-07-01

    The Santa Susana Field Laboratory located near Simi Valley, California was investigated to determine the nature and extent of gamma radiation anomalies. The primary objective was to conduct gamma scanning surveys over 100 percent of the approximately 1,906,000 square meters (471 acre) project site with the most sensitive detection system possible. The site had challenging topography that was not conducive to traditional gamma scanning detection systems. Terrain slope varied from horizontal to 48 degrees and the ground surface ranged from flat, grassy meadows to steep, rocky hillsides. In addition, the site was home to many protected endangered plant and animal species, and archaeologically significant sites that required minimal to no disturbance of the ground surface. Therefore, four innovative and unique gamma ray spectrometer detection systems were designed and constructed to successfully conduct gamma scanning surveys of approximately 1,076,000 square meters (266 acres) of the site. (authors)

  20. 3D scanning characteristics of an amorphous silicon position sensitive detector array system.

    PubMed

    Contreras, Javier; Gomes, Luis; Filonovich, Sergej; Correia, Nuno; Fortunato, Elvira; Martins, Rodrigo; Ferreira, Isabel

    2012-02-13

    The 3D scanning electro-optical characteristics of a data acquisition prototype system integrating a 32 linear array of 1D amorphous silicon position sensitive detectors (PSD) were analyzed. The system was mounted on a platform for imaging 3D objects using the triangulation principle with a sheet-of-light laser. New obtained results reveal a minimum possible gap or simulated defect detection of approximately 350 μm. Furthermore, a first study of the angle for 3D scanning was also performed, allowing for a broad range of angles to be used in the process. The relationship between the scanning angle of the incident light onto the object and the image displacement distance on the sensor was determined for the first time in this system setup. Rendering of 3D object profiles was performed at a significantly higher number of frames than in the past and was possible for an incident light angle range of 15 ° to 85 °.

  1. Scanning Ultrasonic Spectroscopy System Developed for the Inspection of Composite Flywheels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Richard E.; Baaklini, George Y.

    2002-01-01

    Composite flywheels are being considered as replacements for chemical batteries aboard the International Space Station. A flywheel stores energy in a spinning mass that can turn a generator to meet power demands. Because of the high rotational speeds of the spinning mass, extensive testing of the flywheel system must be performed prior to flight certification. With this goal in mind, a new scanning system has been developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center for the nondestructive inspection of composite flywheels and flywheel subcomponents. The system uses ultrasonic waves to excite a material and examines the response to detect and locate flaws and material variations. The ultrasonic spectroscopy system uses a transducer to send swept-frequency ultrasonic waves into a test material and then receives the returning signal with a second transducer. The received signal is then analyzed in the frequency domain using a fast Fourier transform. A second fast Fourier transform is performed to examine the spacing of the peaks in the frequency domain. The spacing of the peaks is related to the standing wave resonances that are present in the material because of the constructive and destructive interferences of the waves in the full material thickness as well as in individual layers within the material. Material variations and flaws are then identified by changes in the amplitudes and positions of the peaks in both the frequency and resonance spacing domains. This work, conducted under a grant through the Cleveland State University, extends the capabilities of an existing point-by-point ultrasonic spectroscopy system, thus allowing full-field automated inspection. Results of an ultrasonic spectroscopy scan of a plastic cylinder with intentionally seeded flaws. The result of an ultrasonic spectroscopy scan of a plastic cylinder used as a proof-of-concept specimen is shown. The cylinder contains a number of flat bottomed holes of various sizes and shapes. The scanning system

  2. A PORTABLE MICROWAVE INTERFERENCE SCANNING SYSTEM FOR NONDESTRUCTIVE TESTING OF MULTI-LAYERED DIELECTRIC MATERIALS

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, K. F.; Little, J. R.; Ellingson, W. A.; Green, W.

    2009-03-03

    A portable, microwave interference scanning system, that can be used in situ, with one-sided, non-contact access, has been developed. It has demonstrated capability of damage detection on composite ceramic armor. Specimens used for validation included specially fabricated surrogates, and non-ballistic impact-damaged specimens. Microwave data results were corroborated with high resolution direct-digital x-ray imaging. Microwave interference scanning detects cracks, laminar features and material properties variations. This paper will present details of the system and discuss results obtained.

  3. A 3D acquisition system combination of structured-light scanning and shape from silhouette

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Changku; Tao, Li; Wang, Peng; He, Li

    2006-05-01

    A robust and accurate three dimensional (3D) acquisition system is presented, which is a combination of structured-light scanning and shape from silhouette. Using common world coordinate system, two groups of point data can be integrated into the final complete 3D model without any integration and registration algorithm. The mathematics model of structured-light scanning is described in detail, and the shape from silhouette algorithm is introduced as well. The complete 3D model of a cup with a handle is obtained successfully by the proposed technique. At last the measurement on a ball bearing is performed, with the measurement precision better than 0.15 mm.

  4. Flat Gauss illumination for the step-and-scan lithographic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ming; Wang, Ying; Zeng, Aijun; Zhu, Jing; Yang, Baoxi; Huang, Huijie

    2016-08-01

    To meet the uniform dose exposure in optical lithography, it is desirable to get uniform illumination in the scanning direction on wafer for the step-and-scan lithographic system. We present a flat Gauss illumination for the step-and-scan lithographic system in this paper. Through flat Gauss illumination in scanning direction, pulse quantization effect could be reduced effectively. Correspondingly, the uniformity of the reticle and wafer is improved. Compared with the trapezoid illumination, flat Gauss illumination could keep the slit edge fixed, and pulse quantization effect will not be enhanced. Moreover flat Gauss illumination could be obtained directly without defocusing and blocking, which results in high energy efficiency and high throughput of the lithography. A design strategy for flat Gauss illumination is also proposed which offers high uniformity illumination, fixed slope and integral energy of flat Gauss illumination in different coherence factors. The strategy describes a light uniform device which contains first microlens array, second microlens array, one-dimensional Gauss diffuser and a Fourier lens. The device produces flat Gauss illumination directly at the scanning slit. The design and simulation results show that the uniformity of flat Gauss illumination in two directions satisfy the requirements of lithographic illumination system and the slope. In addition, slit edge of flat Gauss illumination does not change.

  5. A new fast scanning system for the measurement of large angle tracks in nuclear emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandrov, A.; Buonaura, A.; Consiglio, L.; D'Ambrosio, N.; De Lellis, G.; Di Crescenzo, A.; Di Marco, N.; Galati, G.; Lauria, A.; Montesi, M. C.; Pupilli, F.; Shchedrina, T.; Tioukov, V.; Vladymyrov, M.

    2015-11-01

    Nuclear emulsions have been widely used in particle physics to identify new particles through the observation of their decays thanks to their unique spatial resolution. Nevertheless, before the advent of automatic scanning systems, the emulsion analysis was very demanding in terms of well trained manpower. Due to this reason, they were gradually replaced by electronic detectors, until the '90s, when automatic microscopes started to be developed in Japan and in Europe. Automatic scanning was essential to conceive large scale emulsion-based neutrino experiments like CHORUS, DONUT and OPERA. Standard scanning systems have been initially designed to recognize tracks within a limited angular acceptance (θ lesssim 30°) where θ is the track angle with respect to a line perpendicular to the emulsion plane. In this paper we describe the implementation of a novel fast automatic scanning system aimed at extending the track recognition to the full angular range and improving the present scanning speed. Indeed, nuclear emulsions do not have any intrinsic limit to detect particle direction. Such improvement opens new perspectives to use nuclear emulsions in several fields in addition to large scale neutrino experiments, like muon radiography, medical applications and dark matter directional detection.

  6. Low-temperature scanning system for near- and far-field optical investigations.

    PubMed

    Kazantsev, D V; Dal Savio, C; Pierz, K; Güttler, B; Danzebrink, H-U

    2003-03-01

    A combined system for far- and near-field optical spectroscopy consisting of a compact scanning near-field optical microscope and a dedicated spectrometer was realized. The set-up allows the optical investigation of samples at temperatures from 10 to 300 K. The sample positioning range is as large as 5 x 5 x 5 mm3 and the spatial resolution is in the range of 1.5 micro m in the far-field optical microscopy mode at low temperatures. In the scanning near-field optical microscope mode the resolution is defined by the microfabricated cantilever probe, which is placed in the focus of a double-mirror objective. The tip-to-sample distance in the scanning near-field optical microscope is controlled by a beam deflection system in dynamic scanning force microscopy mode. After a description of the apparatus, scanning force topography images of self-assembled InAs quantum dots on a GaAs substrate with a density of less than one dot per square micrometre are shown, followed by the first spectroscopic investigations of such a sample. The presented results demonstrate the potential of the system.

  7. Initial Tests and Accuracy Assesment of a Compact Mobile Laser Scanning System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Julge, K.; Ellmann, A.; Vajakas, T.; Kolka, R.

    2016-06-01

    Mobile laser scanning (MLS) is a faster and cost-effective alternative to static laser scanning, even though there is a slight trade-off in accuracy. This contribution describes a compact mobile laser scanning system mounted on a vehicle. The technical parameters of the used system components, i.e. a small LIDAR sensor Velodyne VLP-16 and a dual antenna GNSS/INS system Advanced Navigation Spatial Dual, are reviewed, along with the integration of these components for spatial data acquisition. Calculation principles of 3D coordinates from the real-time data of all the involved sensors are discussed. The field tests were carried out in a controlled environment of a parking lot and at different velocities. Experiments were carried out to test the ability of the GNSS/INS system to cope with difficult conditions, e.g. sudden movements due to cornering or swerving. The accuracy of the resulting MLS point cloud is evaluated with respect to high-accuracy static terrestrial laser scanning data. Problems regarding combining LIDAR, GNSS and INS sensors are outlined, as well as the initial accuracy assessments. Initial tests revealed errors related to insufficient quality of inertial data and a need for the trajectory post-processing calculations. Although this study was carried out while the system was mounted on a car, there is potential for operating the system on an unmanned aerial vehicle, all-terrain vehicle or in a backpack mode due to its relatively compact size.

  8. Experimental underwater scanning imaging system using pulsed blue-green lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lei; Xu, Zhi-yong; Zhang, Qi-heng; Wang, Hua-chuang; Yu, Xue-gang; Nie, Rui-jie

    2011-06-01

    A new, simple and compact experimental laser scanning imaging system is introduced for underwater imaging, and the characteristics of the system are analyzed in this paper. The system consists of the illuminator, optical scanning system, optical receiving system, narrow band filters, high-sensitivity gated image sensor, synchronous control and data acquisition system and power supply and cooling system. The illuminator is a lump-pumped, Q-switched, frequency doubled Nd:YAG pulsed laser operating at 532 nm with a frequency of 50 Hz. The receiver is a self-made gated intensified charge coupled device (ICCD). As a result, gated super Gen-II image intensifier and PAL format charge-coupled device (CCD) camera are assembled to meet the requirements. The coupling gated ICCD has a sensitivity of approximated 10-5lx, and the minimum gate width can reach to 40 ns. And a set of scanning structure which only uses one mirror is used in the experimental system. In addition, the performance parameters are listed. Finally, the detection capabilities of the imaging system are theoretically analyzed in typical seawater. The analysis indicates that the detection depth of the system can reach to 16 m in the clear seawater.

  9. Design and performance of a practical variable-temperature scanning tunneling potentiometry system.

    PubMed

    Rozler, M; Beasley, M R

    2008-07-01

    We have constructed a scanning tunneling potentiometry system capable of simultaneously mapping the transport-related electrochemical potential of a biased sample along with its surface topography. Combining a novel sample biasing technique with a continuous current-nulling feedback scheme pushes the noise performance of the measurement to its fundamental limit--the Johnson noise of the scanning tunneling microscope (STM) tunnel junction. The resulting 130 nV voltage sensitivity allows us to spatially resolve local potentials at scales down to 2 nm, while maintaining angstrom scale STM imaging, all at scan sizes of up to 15 microm. A millimeter-range two-dimensional coarse positioning stage and the ability to operate from liquid helium to room temperature with a fast turn-around time greatly expand the versatility of the instrument. By performing studies of several model systems, we discuss the implications of various types of surface morphology for potentiometric measurements.

  10. Intra- and intervariability in beam data commissioning among water phantom scanning systems.

    PubMed

    Akino, Yuichi; Gibbons, John P; Neck, Daniel W; Chu, Connel; Das, Indra J

    2014-07-08

    Accurate beam data acquisition during commissioning is essential for modeling the treatment planning system and dose calculation in radiotherapy. Although currently several commercial scanning systems are available, there is no report that compared the differences among the systems because most institutions do not acquire several scanning systems due to the high cost, storage space, and infrequent usage. In this report, we demonstrate the intra- and intervariability of beam profiles measured with four commercial scanning systems. During a recent educational and training workshop, four different vendors of beam scanning water phantoms were invited to demonstrate the operation and data collection of their systems. Systems were set up utilizing vendor-recommended protocols and were operated with a senior physicist, who was assigned as an instructor along with vendor. During the training sessions, each group was asked to measure beam parameters, and the intravariability in percent depth dose (PDD). At the end of the day, the profile of one linear accelerator was measured with each system to evaluate intervariability. Relatively very small (SD < 0.12%) intervariability in PDD was observed among four systems at a region deeper than peak (1.5 cm). All systems showed almost identical profiles. At the area within 80% of radiation field, the average, and maximum differences were within ± 0.35% and 0.80%, respectively, compared to arbitrarily chosen IBA system as reference. In the penumbrae region, the distance to agreement (DTA) of the region where dose difference exceed ± 1% was less than 1 mm. Repeated PDD measurement showed small intravariability with SD < 0.5%, although large SD was observed in the buildup region. All four water phantom scanning systems demonstrated adequate accuracy for beam data collection (i.e., within 1% of dose difference or 1 mm of DTA among each other). It is concluded that every system is capable of acquiring accurate beam. Thus the selection

  11. Influence of scanning system and dentist's level of training in the accuracy of digital impressions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hategan, Simona; Gabor, Alin; Zaharia, Cristian; Sinescu, Cosmin; Negrutiu, Meda Lavinia; Jivanescu, Anca

    2016-03-01

    Background: The principal aim of our study was to evaluate digital impressions, taken with spray powder and powderfree scan systems, in order to determine the influence of the dentist's commitment to training as a critical factor regarding quality. Material and method: Two digital intraoral impression systems from the same manufacture (Sirona) : Apollo DI and CEREC Omnicam, were used to scan 16 crown preparations on teeth on a typodont maxillary model. Because an Apollo Di intraoral camera is a powder system, an adhesive was applied before using the powder spray. Three groups were used to scan the crown preparations in order to determine coating thickness homogeneity. One group consisted of senior year dental students, a second consisted of prosthodontics residents, and the third consisted of prosthodontics specialists. The same procedure was applied with a CEREC Omnicam intraoral camera, which is a powder-free system. By using the two systems software parameters we were able to determine the scanning precision. Results: Homogeneity scores for Apollo Di regarding the spray layer was significantly thinner for all dental surfaces in the first group, while the second group had thinner coatings for buccal and distal surfaces. For the third group, the crown preparations were coated more homogeneously than the first two groups. The powder-free system CEREC Omnicam can, to a degree, mask the lack of experience in direct optical impressions by avoiding the poor quality coating, which can lead to defective marginal adaptation of definitive restoration. Conclusions: The dentist's lack of experience can be mitigated, and partially avoided, by using powder-free systems. At the same time, the dentist can give more time towards learning how to integrate computerized fabricated restoration into the practice. The commitment to training is a critical factor in the successful integration of the technology. In

  12. Local imaging of high mobility two-dimensional electron systems with virtual scanning tunneling microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Pelliccione, M.; Bartel, J.; Goldhaber-Gordon, D.; Sciambi, A.; Pfeiffer, L. N.; West, K. W.

    2014-11-03

    Correlated electron states in high mobility two-dimensional electron systems (2DESs), including charge density waves and microemulsion phases intermediate between a Fermi liquid and Wigner crystal, are predicted to exhibit complex local charge order. Existing experimental studies, however, have mainly probed these systems at micron to millimeter scales rather than directly mapping spatial organization. Scanning probes should be well-suited to study the spatial structure of these states, but high mobility 2DESs are found at buried semiconductor interfaces, beyond the reach of conventional scanning tunneling microscopy. Scanning techniques based on electrostatic coupling to the 2DES deliver important insights, but generally with resolution limited by the depth of the 2DES. In this letter, we present our progress in developing a technique called “virtual scanning tunneling microscopy” that allows local tunneling into a high mobility 2DES. Using a specially designed bilayer GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure where the tunnel coupling between two separate 2DESs is tunable via electrostatic gating, combined with a scanning gate, we show that the local tunneling can be controlled with sub-250 nm resolution.

  13. Local imaging of high mobility two-dimensional electron systems with virtual scanning tunneling microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelliccione, M.; Bartel, J.; Sciambi, A.; Pfeiffer, L. N.; West, K. W.; Goldhaber-Gordon, D.

    2014-11-01

    Correlated electron states in high mobility two-dimensional electron systems (2DESs), including charge density waves and microemulsion phases intermediate between a Fermi liquid and Wigner crystal, are predicted to exhibit complex local charge order. Existing experimental studies, however, have mainly probed these systems at micron to millimeter scales rather than directly mapping spatial organization. Scanning probes should be well-suited to study the spatial structure of these states, but high mobility 2DESs are found at buried semiconductor interfaces, beyond the reach of conventional scanning tunneling microscopy. Scanning techniques based on electrostatic coupling to the 2DES deliver important insights, but generally with resolution limited by the depth of the 2DES. In this letter, we present our progress in developing a technique called "virtual scanning tunneling microscopy" that allows local tunneling into a high mobility 2DES. Using a specially designed bilayer GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure where the tunnel coupling between two separate 2DESs is tunable via electrostatic gating, combined with a scanning gate, we show that the local tunneling can be controlled with sub-250 nm resolution.

  14. In vivo mouse brain tomography by fast dual-scanning photoacoustic imaging system based on array transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Sihua; Xing, Da

    2008-12-01

    A full-view photoacoustic tomography system with dual-scanning using a linear transducer array for fast imaging of complicated blood network was developed. In this system, a 128-element linear transducer array was used to detect photoacoustic signals by combined scanning of electronic scan and mechanical scan. An improved limited-field filtered back projection algorithm with directivity factors was applied to reconstruct the distribution of the absorbed optical energy deposit. An in vivo experiment on a mouse brain was performed to evaluate the ability of this composite system. A clear view of the cerebrovascular network on the brain cortex was acquired successfully. Furthermore, the reconstruct images with different number of scanning positions were also investigated and analyzed to induce a compromised proposal between scanning time and scanning number. The experimental results demonstrate the multi-element photoacoustic imaging system has the potential to acquire the time-resolved functional information for fundamental research of small animal brain imaging.

  15. Biological sample evaluation using a line-scan based SWIR hyperspectral imaging system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A new line-scan hyperspectral imaging system was developed to enable short wavelength infrared (SWIR) imagery for biological sample evaluation. Critical sensing components include a SWIR imaging spectrograph and an HgCdTe (MCT) focal plane array detector. To date, agricultural applications of infra...

  16. An Investigation of the Feasibility of a Video Game System for Developing Scanning and Selection Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horn, Eva; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Three nonvocal students (ages 5-8) with severe physical handicaps were trained in scan and selection responses (similar to responses needed for operating augmentative communication systems) using a microcomputer-operated video-game format. Results indicated that all three children showed substantial increases in the number of correct responses and…

  17. Development of an angular scanning system for sensing vertical profiles of soil electrical conductivity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Apparent soil electrical conductivity (EC**a**) is typically mapped to define soil spatial variability within an agricultural field. Knowledge of the vertical variability of EC**a** is desired to define site-specific behavior of the soil profile. A Pneumatic Angular Scanning System (PASS) was develo...

  18. Developing an Environmental Scanning System in an Educational Organization: Lessons Learned. AIR 1990 Annual Forum Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrison, James L.; Ptaszynski, James G.

    An environmental scanning system was developed by the admissions office of a graduate school of management in a small southeastern university. The school's strategic planning committee felt that it would be beneficial to acquire information concerning issues, trends, and possible events that might impact upon the school in the future and to…

  19. Functions and Requirements for the DST Knuckle Region Ultrasonic Scanning System

    SciTech Connect

    Pardini, Allan F.; Samuel, Todd J.

    2001-01-29

    This document defines the functions and requirements for a ultrasonic scanning system to provide an examination of the knuckle region of Hanford's double shell waste tanks, This document provides the basis for the ultrasonic concept selection, design, fabrication, and deployment methodology.

  20. Inspection of float glass using a novel retroreflective laser scanning system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, Jonathan D.

    1997-07-01

    Since 1988, Image Automation has marketed a float glass inspection system using a novel retro-reflective laser scanning system. The (patented) instrument scans a laser beam by use of a polygon through the glass onto a retro-reflective screen, and collects the retro-reflected light off the polygon, such that a stationary image of the moving spot on the screen is produced. The spot image is then analyzed for optical effects introduced by defects within the glass, which typically distort and attenuate the scanned laser beam, by use of suitable detectors. The inspection system processing provides output of defect size, shape and severity, to the factory network for use in rejection or sorting of glass plates to the end customer. This paper briefly describes the principles of operation, the system architecture, and limitations to sensitivity and measurement repeatability. New instruments based on the retro-reflective scanning method have recently been developed. The principles and implementation are described. They include: (1) Simultaneous detection of defects within the glass and defects in a mirror coating on the glass surface using polarized light. (2) A novel distortion detector for very dark glass. (3) Measurement of optical quality (flatness/refractive homogeneity) of the glass using a position sensitive detector.

  1. Exposure uniformity analysis and optimization for scanning mirror system in Hefei lithography beam line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Congliang; Yin, Chuanshi; Liu, Tonghui; Zhong, Aijuan; Qian, Shinan

    2001-10-01

    It is a new technology to use synchrotron radiation lithography for making large scale integral circuit. Synchrotron radiation lithography System is composed of lithography beam line and exposure chamber. A scanning mirror system is making the largest linear exposure area for integrate circuit. By means of increasing control fineness and optimizing scanning frequency in on-line control system, the uniformity of exposure grating is improved quite well. It is opening good idea for every scientist and technician to continue study. It is shown that inspect and control system is still reliable, noise reduced and very convenient after several years operation. It shows operating status of each equipment and vacuum figures on beam line and station, mirror scanning linearity, exposure time, beam current, and so on. Some successful soft X-ray lithography sub-micrometer results are achieved by different users in this system, they are showing very good resolution, more clear leakage and enough depth for example. A convenient and smart optimum analysis system will be developed soon. It is easy to find very good oscillation frequency for mirror vibrating, and the strong interference from current monitor in synchrotron radiation storage ring is reduced very well. Convenient, compact, reliability and safety are the basic but important idea of system design, and what is higher level consideration for getting fine result of micro lithography. There will have enough database space for a different kind user to storage on- line test datum in system.

  2. Differential scanning calorimetry and a thermogravimetric analysis of nanozirconia-based powder systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanaki, A. V.; Buyakova, S. P.; Volkov, S. A.; Kulkov, S. N.

    2011-05-01

    Results obtained from differential scanning calorimetry and a thermogravimetric analysis of zirconia-based nanocrystalline powder systems are presented. Heating is found to cause intense mass loss that increases with increase in the MgO content. Differential scanning calorimetry has revealed that the total energy expended for reactions involved in the powder heating process increases with increase in the MgO content. The heated powders are characterized by desorption of water. For 10 wt. % MgO, residual nitrates are seen to decompose into NO2, N2O, or NO.

  3. A versatile fluorescence lifetime imaging system for scanning large areas with high time and spatial resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernardo, César; Belsley, Michael; de Matos Gomes, Etelvina; Gonçalves, Hugo; Isakov, Dmitry; Liebold, Falk; Pereira, Eduardo; Pires, Vladimiro; Samantilleke, Anura; Vasilevskiy, Mikhail; Schellenberg, Peter

    2014-08-01

    We present a flexible fluorescence lifetime imaging device which can be employed to scan large sample areas with a spatial resolution adjustable from many micrometers down to sub-micrometers and a temporal resolution of 20 picoseconds. Several different applications of the system will be presented including protein microarrays analysis, the scanning of historical samples, evaluation of solar cell surfaces and nanocrystalline organic crystals embedded in electrospun polymeric nanofibers. Energy transfer processes within semiconductor quantum dot superstructures as well as between dye probes and graphene layers were also investigated.

  4. Analysis of a head-mounted display-type multifocus display system using a laser scanning method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dong-Wook; Kwon, Yong-Moo; Park, Q.-Han; Kim, Sung-Kyu

    2011-03-01

    We developed a head-mounted display (HMD)-type multifocus display system using a laser-scanning method to provide an accommodation effect for viewers. This accomplishment indicates that providing a monocular depth cue is possible through this multifocus system. In the system, the optical path is changed by a scanning action. To provide an accurate accommodation effect for the viewer, the multifocus display system is designed and manufactured in accordance with the geometric analysis of the system's scanning action. Using a video camera as a substitute for the viewer, correct focus adjustment without the scanning action problem is demonstrated. By analyzing the scanning action and experimental results, we are able to illustrate the formation of a viewpoint in an HMD-type multifocus display system using a laser-scanning method. In addition, we demonstrate that the accommodation effect could be provided independent of the viewing condition of the viewer.

  5. A novel sensor system for 3D face scanning based on infrared coded light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modrow, Daniel; Laloni, Claudio; Doemens, Guenter; Rigoll, Gerhard

    2008-02-01

    In this paper we present a novel sensor system for three-dimensional face scanning applications. Its operating principle is based on active triangulation with a color coded light approach. As it is implemented in the near infrared band, the used light is invisible for human perception. Though the proposed sensor is primarily designed for face scanning and biometric applications, its performance characteristics are beneficial for technical applications as well. The acquisition of 3d data is real-time capable, provides accurate and high resolution depthmaps and shows high robustness against ambient light. Hence most of the limiting factors of other sensors for 3d and face scanning applications are eliminated, such as blinding and annoying light patterns, motion constraints and highly restricted scenarios due to ambient light constraints.

  6. NMR scanning of the pelvis: initial experience with a 0. 3 T system

    SciTech Connect

    Bryan, P.J.; Butler, H.E.; LiPuma, J.P.; Haaga, J.R.; El Yousef, S.J.; Resnick, M.I.; Cohen, A.M.; Malviya, V.K.; Nelson, A.D.; Clampitt, M.

    1983-12-01

    Pelvic NMR scans were obtained on 29 patients using a 0.3 T superconducting magnet system. Pathologies studied included four bladder carcinomas, four prostatic carcinomas, four ovarian dermoid cysts, three ovarian cysts, three endometrial carcinomas, two endometriomas, and one each of serous cystadenoma of the ovary, benign prostatic hypertrophy, pelvic hematoma, and undifferentiated sarcoma. NMR is a very promising method for characterizing pelvic masses and in staging pelvic malignancies. It can show primary tumors of the prostate, bladder, and uterus and reveals tumor extension into pelvic fat. The pelvis is particularly well suited to NMR scanning because of the abundant natural contrast provided by pelvic fat and by urine in the bladder and gas in the bowel. There is also less motion blurring than in the upper abdomen and chest because there is relatively little respiratory motion of pelvic organs. Various pulse sequences were used in scanning the pelvis; their relative merits are discussed.

  7. A Laser Line Auto-Scanning System for Underwater 3D Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Chi, Shukai; Xie, Zexiao; Chen, Wenzhu

    2016-01-01

    In this study, a laser line auto-scanning system was designed to perform underwater close-range 3D reconstructions with high accuracy and resolution. The system changes the laser plane direction with a galvanometer to perform automatic scanning and obtain continuous laser strips for underwater 3D reconstruction. The system parameters were calibrated with the homography constraints between the target plane and image plane. A cost function was defined to optimize the galvanometer’s rotating axis equation. Compensation was carried out for the refraction of the incident and emitted light at the interface. The accuracy and the spatial measurement capability of the system were tested and analyzed with standard balls under laboratory underwater conditions, and the 3D surface reconstruction for a sealing cover of an underwater instrument was proved to be satisfactory. PMID:27657074

  8. System and method for chromatography and electrophoresis using circular optical scanning

    DOEpatents

    Balch, Joseph W.; Brewer, Laurence R.; Davidson, James C.; Kimbrough, Joseph R.

    2001-01-01

    A system and method is disclosed for chromatography and electrophoresis using circular optical scanning. One or more rectangular microchannel plates or radial microchannel plates has a set of analysis channels for insertion of molecular samples. One or more scanning devices repeatedly pass over the analysis channels in one direction at a predetermined rotational velocity and with a predetermined rotational radius. The rotational radius may be dynamically varied so as to monitor the molecular sample at various positions along a analysis channel. Sample loading robots may also be used to input molecular samples into the analysis channels. Radial microchannel plates are built from a substrate whose analysis channels are disposed at a non-parallel angle with respect to each other. A first step in the method accesses either a rectangular or radial microchannel plate, having a set of analysis channels, and second step passes a scanning device repeatedly in one direction over the analysis channels. As a third step, the scanning device is passed over the analysis channels at dynamically varying distances from a centerpoint of the scanning device. As a fourth step, molecular samples are loaded into the analysis channels with a robot.

  9. Verifying Data Integrity of Electronically Scanned Pressure Systems at the NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panek, Joseph W.

    2001-01-01

    The proper operation of the Electronically Scanned Pressure (ESP) System critical to accomplish the following goals: acquisition of highly accurate pressure data for the development of aerospace and commercial aviation systems and continuous confirmation of data quality to avoid costly, unplanned, repeat wind tunnel or turbine testing. Standard automated setup and checkout routines are necessary to accomplish these goals. Data verification and integrity checks occur at three distinct stages, pretest pressure tubing and system checkouts, daily system validation and in-test confirmation of critical system parameters. This paper will give an overview of the existing hardware, software and methods used to validate data integrity.

  10. A non-contact time-domain scanning brain imaging system: first in-vivo results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazurenka, M.; Di Sieno, L.; Boso, G.; Contini, D.; Pifferi, A.; Dalla Mora, A.; Tosi, A.; Wabnitz, H.; Macdonald, R.

    2013-06-01

    We present results of first in-vivo tests of an optical non-contact scanning imaging system, intended to study oxidative metabolism related processes in biological tissue by means of time-resolved near-infrared spectroscopy. Our method is a novel realization of the short source-detector separation approach and based on a fast-gated single-photon avalanche diode to detect late photons only. The scanning system is built in quasi-confocal configuration and utilizes polarizationsensitive detection. It scans an area of 4×4 cm2, recording images with 32×32 pixels, thus creating a high density of source-detector pairs. To test the system we performed a range of in vivo measurements of hemodynamic changes in several types of biological tissues, i.e. skin (Valsalva maneuver), muscle (venous and arterial occlusions) and brain (motor and cognitive tasks). Task-related changes in hemoglobin concentrations were clearly detected in skin and muscle. The brain activation shows weaker, but yet detectable changes. These changes were localized in pixels near the motor cortex area (C3). However, it was found that even very short hair substantially impairs the measurement. Thus the applicability of the scanner is limited to hairless parts of body. The results of our first in-vivo tests prove the feasibility of non-contact scanning imaging as a first step towards development of a prototype for biological tissue imaging for various medical applications.

  11. A PIXE system for routine longitudinal scanning of single hair strands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hong-Kou; Malmqvist, K. G.; Carlsson, L.-E.; Akselsson, K. Roland

    1984-04-01

    This article describes a PIXE system designed and constructed for routine longitudinal scanning of single hair strands. In constructing a PIXE system for trace elemental scans of single hair strands on a routine basis, a fairly intense beam has to be used but the heating damage must be kept to a minimum. The experimental conditions (charge integration, beam homogeneity etc.) have to be carefully controlled in order to give accurate PIXE results. The geometrical thickness of the hair at each point of the scan has to be determined and a qualitative knowledge of the elemental distribution over the cross section of the hair has to be provided for a proper interpretation of the PIXE results. In the present PIXE system the geometrical thickness of a hair strand at each point along the scan is determined by counting the number of backscattered protons simultaneously with the PIXE analysis, and a qualitative knowledge of the elemental distribution over the cross section of the hair is obtained through bombarding the hair at particular points with different proton energies.

  12. Toward a Continental-Scale Mesonet: USDA National Resources Conservation Service SCAN and SNOTEL System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaffer, G.; Marks, D.

    2004-12-01

    Since 1978 snow deposition and SWE in the inter-mountain western US have been monitored by the NRCS SNOTEL (SNOwpack TELemetry) system. This revolutionary network utilizes Meteorburst technology to telemeter data back to a central location in near real-time. With a pilot program starting in 1991, NRCS introduced SCAN (Soil Climate and Analysis Network) adding a focus on soil moisture and climate in regions outside the intermountain west. In the mid-1990's SNOTEL sites began to be augmented to match the full climate instrumentation (air temperature, humidity, solar radiation, wind, and soil moisture and temperature in addition to precipitation, snow depth and SWE) of the SCAN system. At present there are nearly 700 SNOTEL sites in 12 states in the western US and Alaska, and over 100 SCAN sites in 40 states, Puerto Rico, and several foreign countries. Though SNOTEL was originally a western snow-monitoring network, differences between SCAN and SNOTEL have largely disappeared. The combined SNOTEL/SCAN system provides a continental-scale mesonet to support river basin to continental scale hydro-climatic analysis. The system is flexible and based on off-the-shelf data recording technology, allowing instrumentation, sampling and averaging intervals to be specified by site conditions, issues, or scientific questions. Because of the NRCS data management structure, all sites have active telemetery and provide near real-time access to data through the internet. An ongoing research program is directed to improved instrumentation for measuring precipitation, snow depth and SWE, and soil moisture and temperature. Future directions include expansion of the network to be more comprehensive, and to develop focused monitoring efforts to more effectively observe elevational and regional gradients, and to capture high intensity hydro-climatic events such as potential flooding from convective storms and rain-on-snow.

  13. MULTISPECTRAL LINE-SCAN IMAGING SYSTEM FOR SIMULTANEOUS FLUORESCENCE AND REFLECTANCE MEASUREMENTS OF APPLES: MULTITASK APPLE INSPECTION SYSTEM

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this methodology paper, a recently developed line-scan imaging system, capable of simultaneously acquiring a combination of multispectral reflectance and fluorescence from fast moving objects, is presented. The system can potentially provide multitask inspections for quality and safety attribute...

  14. Image accumulation, storage, and display system for a scanning transmission electron microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zubin, J. A.; Wiggins, J. W.

    1980-01-01

    This paper describes a high resolution scanning transmission electron microscope data collection, storage, and display system. Included are a novel analog-to-digital converter, a digital hardware divider, a direct memory access interface to a PDP 11/20, a flicker-free gray scale TV display, two new gray scale hardcopy devices, and a software description of the system. The system described here accepts three 8-bit channels of image data from a single picture element every 30 μs. Each picture element intensity is measured simultaneously by three detectors. Scans of 64, 128, 256, or 512 lines of picture elements are provided. All the data are stored on one of eight disk files, and one of the three simultaneous data channels is displayed on a digitally refreshed TV screen in real time. Production of hard-copy images and magnetic tape images, and other manipulations of the data are provided after data accumulation is terminated.

  15. Automatic tool alignment in a backscatter x-ray scanning system

    SciTech Connect

    Garretson, Justin; Hobart, Clinton G.; Gladwell, Thomas S.; Monda, Mark J.

    2015-06-16

    Technologies pertaining to backscatter x-ray scanning systems are described herein. The backscatter x-ray scanning system includes an x-ray source, which directs collimated x-rays along a plurality of output vectors towards a target. A detector detects diffusely reflected x-rays subsequent to respective collimated x-rays impacting the target, and outputs signals indicative of parameters of the detected x-rays. An image processing system generates an x-ray image based upon parameters of the detected x-rays, wherein each pixel in the image corresponds to a respective output vector. A user selects a particular portion of the image, and a tool is positioned such that its directional axis is coincident with the output vector corresponding to at least one pixel in the portion of the image.

  16. Automatic tool alignment in a backscatter X-ray scanning system

    SciTech Connect

    Garretson, Justin; Hobart, Clinton G.; Gladwell, Thomas S.; Monda, Mark J.

    2015-11-17

    Technologies pertaining to backscatter x-ray scanning systems are described herein. The backscatter x-ray scanning system includes an x-ray source, which directs collimated x-rays along a plurality of output vectors towards a target. A detector detects diffusely reflected x-rays subsequent to respective collimated x-rays impacting the target, and outputs signals indicative of parameters of the detected x-rays. An image processing system generates an x-ray image based upon parameters of the detected x-rays, wherein each pixel in the image corresponds to a respective output vector. A user selects a particular portion of the image, and a medical device is positioned such that its directional axis is coincident with the output vector corresponding to at least one pixel in the portion of the image.

  17. Volumetric display system based on three-dimensional scanning of inclined optical image.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Daisuke; Shiba, Kensuke; Sotsuka, Koji; Matsushita, Kenji

    2006-12-25

    A volumetric display system based on three-dimensional (3D) scanning of an inclined image is reported. An optical image of a two-dimensional (2D) display, which is a vector-scan display monitor placed obliquely in an optical imaging system, is moved laterally by a galvanometric mirror scanner. Inclined cross-sectional images of a 3D object are displayed on the 2D display in accordance with the position of the image plane to form a 3D image. Three-dimensional images formed by this display system satisfy all the criteria for stereoscopic vision because they are real images formed in a 3D space. Experimental results of volumetric imaging from computed-tomography images and 3D animated images are presented.

  18. OPTIMIZING A PORTABLE MICROWAVE INTERFERENCE SCANNING SYSTEM FOR NONDESTRUCTIVE TESTING OF MULTI-LAYERED DIELECTRIC MATERIALS

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, K. F. Jr.; Little, J. R. Jr.; Ellingson, W. A.; Green, W.

    2010-02-22

    The projected microwave energy pattern, wave guide geometry, positioning methods and process variables have been optimized for use of a portable, non-contact, lap-top computer-controlled microwave interference scanning system on multi-layered dielectric materials. The system can be used in situ with one-sided access and has demonstrated capability of damage detection on composite ceramic armor. Specimens used for validation included specially fabricated surrogates, and ballistic impact-damaged specimens. Microwave data results were corroborated with high resolution direct-digital x-ray imaging. Microwave interference scanning detects cracks, laminar features and material properties variations. This paper presents the details of the system, the optimization steps and discusses results obtained.

  19. Beam characteristics in two different proton uniform scanning systems: A side-by-side comparison

    PubMed Central

    Nichiporov, Dmitri; Hsi, Wen; Farr, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To compare clinically relevant dosimetric characteristics of proton therapy fields produced by two uniform scanning systems that have a number of similar hardware components but employ different techniques of beam spreading. Methods: This work compares two technologically distinct systems implementing a method of uniform scanning and layer stacking that has been developed independently at Indiana University (IU) and by Ion Beam Applications, S. A. (IBA). Clinically relevant dosimetric characteristics of fields produced by these systems are studied, such as beam range control, peak-to-entrance ratio (PER), lateral penumbra, field flatness, effective source position, precision of dose delivery at different gantry angles, etc. Results: Under comparable conditions, both systems controlled beam range with an accuracy of 0.5 mm and a precision of 0.1 mm. Compared to IBA, the IU system produced pristine peaks with a slightly higher PER (3.23 and 3.45, respectively) and smaller, symmetrical, lateral in-air penumbra of 1 mm compared to about 1.9/2.4 mm in the inplane/crossplane (IP/CP) directions for IBA. Large field flatness results in the IP/CP directions were similar: 3.0/2.4% for IU and 2.9/2.4% for IBA. The IU system featured a longer virtual source-to-isocenter position, which was the same for the IP and CP directions (237 cm), as opposed to 212/192 cm (IP/CP) for IBA. Dose delivery precision at different gantry angles was higher in the IBA system (0.5%) than in the IU system (1%). Conclusions: Each of the two uniform scanning systems considered in this work shows some attractive performance characteristics while having other features that can be further improved. Overall, radiation field characteristics of both systems meet their clinical specifications and show comparable results. Most of the differences observed between the two systems are clinically insignificant. PMID:22559626

  20. Beam characteristics in two different proton uniform scanning systems: A side-by-side comparison

    SciTech Connect

    Nichiporov, Dmitri; Hsi Wen; Farr, Jonathan

    2012-05-15

    Purpose: To compare clinically relevant dosimetric characteristics of proton therapy fields produced by two uniform scanning systems that have a number of similar hardware components but employ different techniques of beam spreading. Methods: This work compares two technologically distinct systems implementing a method of uniform scanning and layer stacking that has been developed independently at Indiana University (IU) and by Ion Beam Applications, S. A. (IBA). Clinically relevant dosimetric characteristics of fields produced by these systems are studied, such as beam range control, peak-to-entrance ratio (PER), lateral penumbra, field flatness, effective source position, precision of dose delivery at different gantry angles, etc. Results: Under comparable conditions, both systems controlled beam range with an accuracy of 0.5 mm and a precision of 0.1 mm. Compared to IBA, the IU system produced pristine peaks with a slightly higher PER (3.23 and 3.45, respectively) and smaller, symmetrical, lateral in-air penumbra of 1 mm compared to about 1.9/2.4 mm in the inplane/crossplane (IP/CP) directions for IBA. Large field flatness results in the IP/CP directions were similar: 3.0/2.4% for IU and 2.9/2.4% for IBA. The IU system featured a longer virtual source-to-isocenter position, which was the same for the IP and CP directions (237 cm), as opposed to 212/192 cm (IP/CP) for IBA. Dose delivery precision at different gantry angles was higher in the IBA system (0.5%) than in the IU system (1%). Conclusions: Each of the two uniform scanning systems considered in this work shows some attractive performance characteristics while having other features that can be further improved. Overall, radiation field characteristics of both systems meet their clinical specifications and show comparable results. Most of the differences observed between the two systems are clinically insignificant.

  1. Multibeam field emission x-ray system with half-scan reconstruction algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Lu Yang; Yu Hengyong; Cao Guohua; Zhao Jun; Wang Ge; Zhou, Otto

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: In this article, the authors propose a multibeam field emission x-ray (MBFEX) system along with a half-scan fan-beam reconstruction algorithm. Methods: The proposed system consists of a linear CNT-based MBFEX source array, a single large area detector that is divided into same number of segments as the number of x-ray beams, a multihole collimator that aligns each beam with a corresponding detector segment, and a sample rotation stage. The collimator is placed between the source and the object to restrict the x-ray radiations through the target object only. In this design, all the x-ray beams are activated simultaneously to provide multiple projection views of the object. The detector is virtually segmented and synchronized with the x-ray exposure and the physiological signals when gating is involved. The transmitted x-ray intensity from each beam is collected by the corresponding segment on the detector. After each exposure, the object is rotated by a step angle until sufficient data set is collected. The half-scan reconstruction formula for MBFEX system is derived from the conventional filtered backprojection algorithm. To demonstrate the advantages of the system and method in reducing motion artifacts, the authors performed simulations with both standard and dynamic Shepp-Logan phantoms. Results: The numerical results indicate that the proposed multibeam system and the associated half-scan algorithm can effectively reduce the scanning time and improve the image quality for a time-varying object. Conclusions: The MBFEX technique offers an opportunity for the innovation of multisource imaging system.

  2. Development and demonstration of table-top synchronized fast-scan femtosecond time-resolved spectroscopy system by single-shot scan photo detector array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yabushita, Atsushi; Kao, Chih-Hsien; Lee, Yu-Hsien; Kobayashi, Takayoshi

    2015-07-01

    Ultrafast dynamics is generally studied by pump-probe method with laser pulse, which scans optical delay by motorized stage step by step. Using ultrashort laser pulse shorter than typical molecular vibration periods, the pump-probe measurement can study both of electronic dynamics and vibration dynamics simultaneously. The probe wavelength dependence of the ultrafast electronic and vibration dynamics (UEVD) helps us to distinguish the signal contributions from the dynamics of the electronic ground state and that of the electronic excited states, which elucidates primary reaction mechanism after photoexcitation. Meanwhile, the measurement time of UEVD spectroscopy takes too long time to be used in realistic application. In our previous work, we have developed multi-channel lock-in amplifying (MLA) detectors to study UEVD at all probe wavelengths simultaneously, and synchronized it with laser and fast-scan delay stage to scan the data in five seconds. It enabled us to study UEVD spectroscopy even for photo-fragile materials. However, the home-made MLA detectors required for the measurement is expensive and massive in size and weight, thus not suitable for general researchers in the field of ultrafast time-resolved spectroscopy. In the present work, we have developed a table-top synchronized fast-scan femtosecond time-resolved spectroscopy system using single shot scan line CCD. This system measures time-resolved trace at all probe wavelengths simultaneously in five seconds. The CCD-based fast-scan time-resolved spectroscopy system enables us to study ultrafast dynamics of various materials even biomaterials, which have been thought to be hard or even impossible to be studied in previous methods.

  3. Acousto-ultrasonic input-output characterization of unidirectional fiber composite plate by P waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liao, Peter; Williams, James H., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The single reflection problem for an incident P wave at a stress free plane boundary in a semi-infinite transversely isotropic medium whose isotropic plane is parallel to the plane boundary is analyzed. It is found that an obliquely incident P wave results in a reflected P wave and a reflected SV wave. The delay time for propagation between the transmitting and the receiving transducers is computed as if the P waves were propagating in an infinite half space. The displacements associated with the P waves in the plate and which may be detected by a noncontact NDE receiving transducer are approximated by an asymptotic solution for an infinite transversely isotropic medium subjected to a harmonic point load.

  4. An experimental evaluation method for the performance of a laser line scanning system with multiple sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Qingguo; Yang, Yujie; Zhang, Xiangyu; Ge, Baozhen

    2014-01-01

    Laser line scanning 3D digitising systems have a wide range of applications. Their working performance is mainly determined by the system calibration procedure and is also affected by the working conditions, CCD camera imperfections, and object surface optical characteristics. Therefore, a comprehensive evaluation of working performance is necessary before and during use. This study proposes an experimental method for the performance evaluation of a laser line scanner (LLS) with 8 scanning sensors developed in our laboratory. This method first obtains the dense point clouds of standard parts composed of disks, cylinders, and squares. Next, the single-layer point clouds located in horizontal planes of different heights are fitted using the least squares method to obtain the enclosed contours S. Three parameters, namely, the standard deviation of the distance distribution between points and S, the mean distance of the distance distribution, and the shape feature sizes, are used to evaluate the performance. The proposed method evaluates both the scanner as a whole and each scanning sensor. Using this method, more comprehensive information can be acquired to evaluate the scanner performance. The experimental results show that the absolute dimension size error and relative error are less than 5 mm and 3%, respectively, and the relative shape error is less than 2%; therefore, the evaluated LLS system can meet the requirements for human anthropometry applications. Although each scanning sensor has different random and systematic error, these errors are the function of measurement depth. These conclusions are helpful for the further use of this scanner system and can be utilised to optimise this LLS system further.

  5. Four-point probe electrical resistivity scanning system for large area conductivity and activation energy mapping.

    PubMed

    Shimanovich, Klimentiy; Bouhadana, Yaniv; Keller, David A; Rühle, Sven; Anderson, Assaf Y; Zaban, Arie

    2014-05-01

    The electrical properties of metal oxides play a crucial role in the development of new photovoltaic (PV) systems. Here we demonstrate a general approach for the determination and analysis of these properties in thin films of new metal oxide based PV materials. A high throughput electrical scanning system, which facilitates temperature dependent measurements at different atmospheres for highly resistive samples, was designed and constructed. The instrument is capable of determining conductivity and activation energy values for relatively large sample areas, of about 72 × 72 mm(2), with the implementation of geometrical correction factors. The efficiency of our scanning system was tested using two different samples of CuO and commercially available Fluorine doped tin oxide coated glass substrates. Our high throughput tool was able to identify the electrical properties of both resistive metal oxide thin film samples with high precision and accuracy. The scanning system enabled us to gain insight into transport mechanisms with novel compositions and to use those insights to make smart choices when choosing materials for our multilayer thin film all oxide photovoltaic cells. PMID:24880411

  6. Laser cutting of irregular shape object based on stereo vision laser galvanometric scanning system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Li; Zhang, Yixin; Wang, Shun; Tang, Zhiqiang; Yang, Huan; Zhang, Xuping

    2015-05-01

    Irregular shape objects with different 3-dimensional (3D) appearances are difficult to be shaped into customized uniform pattern by current laser machining approaches. A laser galvanometric scanning system (LGS) could be a potential candidate since it can easily achieve path-adjustable laser shaping. However, without knowing the actual 3D topography of the object, the processing result may still suffer from 3D shape distortion. It is desirable to have a versatile auxiliary tool that is capable of generating 3D-adjusted laser processing path by measuring the 3D geometry of those irregular shape objects. This paper proposed the stereo vision laser galvanometric scanning system (SLGS), which takes the advantages of both the stereo vision solution and conventional LGS system. The 3D geometry of the object obtained by the stereo cameras is used to guide the scanning galvanometers for 3D-shape-adjusted laser processing. In order to achieve precise visual-servoed laser fabrication, these two independent components are integrated through a system calibration method using plastic thin film target. The flexibility of SLGS has been experimentally demonstrated by cutting duck feathers for badminton shuttle manufacture.

  7. Bore-Sight Calibration of Multiple Laser Range Finders for Kinematic 3D Laser Scanning Systems.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jaehoon; Kim, Jeonghyun; Yoon, Sanghyun; Kim, Sangmin; Cho, Hyoungsig; Kim, Changjae; Heo, Joon

    2015-01-01

    The Simultaneous Localization and Mapping (SLAM) technique has been used for autonomous navigation of mobile systems; now, its applications have been extended to 3D data acquisition of indoor environments. In order to reconstruct 3D scenes of indoor space, the kinematic 3D laser scanning system, developed herein, carries three laser range finders (LRFs): one is mounted horizontally for system-position correction and the other two are mounted vertically to collect 3D point-cloud data of the surrounding environment along the system's trajectory. However, the kinematic laser scanning results can be impaired by errors resulting from sensor misalignment. In the present study, the bore-sight calibration of multiple LRF sensors was performed using a specially designed double-deck calibration facility, which is composed of two half-circle-shaped aluminum frames. Moreover, in order to automatically achieve point-to-point correspondences between a scan point and the target center, a V-shaped target was designed as well. The bore-sight calibration parameters were estimated by a constrained least squares method, which iteratively minimizes the weighted sum of squares of residuals while constraining some highly-correlated parameters. The calibration performance was analyzed by means of a correlation matrix. After calibration, the visual inspection of mapped data and residual calculation confirmed the effectiveness of the proposed calibration approach. PMID:25946627

  8. Benchmarking the Performance of Mobile Laser Scanning Systems Using a Permanent Test Field

    PubMed Central

    Kaartinen, Harri; Hyyppä, Juha; Kukko, Antero; Jaakkola, Anttoni; Hyyppä, Hannu

    2012-01-01

    The performance of various mobile laser scanning systems was tested on an established urban test field. The test was connected to the European Spatial Data Research (EuroSDR) project “Mobile Mapping—Road Environment Mapping Using Mobile Laser Scanning”. Several commercial and research systems collected laser point cloud data on the same test field. The system comparisons focused on planimetric and elevation errors using a filtered digital elevation model, poles, and building corners as the reference objects. The results revealed the high quality of the point clouds generated by all of the tested systems under good GNSS conditions. With all professional systems properly calibrated, the elevation accuracy was better than 3.5 cm up to a range of 35 m. The best system achieved a planimetric accuracy of 2.5 cm over a range of 45 m. The planimetric errors increased as a function of range, but moderately so if the system was properly calibrated. The main focus on mobile laser scanning development in the near future should be on the improvement of the trajectory solution, especially under non-ideal conditions, using both improvements in hardware and software. Test fields are relatively easy to implement in built environments and they are feasible for verifying and comparing the performance of different systems and also for improving system calibration to achieve optimum quality.

  9. Temporal subtraction system on torso FDG-PET scans based on statistical image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Yusuke; Hara, Takeshi; Fukuoka, Daisuke; Zhou, Xiangrong; Muramatsu, Chisako; Ito, Satoshi; Hakozaki, Kenta; Kumita, Shin-ichiro; Ishihara, Kei-ichi; Katafuchi, Tetsuro; Fujita, Hiroshi

    2013-02-01

    Diagnostic imaging on FDG-PET scans was often used to evaluate chemotherapy results of cancer patients. Radiologists compare the changes of lesions' activities between previous and current examinations for the evaluation. The purpose of this study was to develop a new computer-aided detection (CAD) system with temporal subtraction technique for FDGPET scans and to show the fundamental usefulness based on an observer performance study. Z-score mapping based on statistical image analysis was newly applied to the temporal subtraction technique. The subtraction images can be obtained based on the anatomical standardization results because all of the patients' scans were deformed into standard body shape. An observer study was performed without and with computer outputs to evaluate the usefulness of the scheme by ROC (receiver operating characteristics) analysis. Readers responded as confidence levels on a continuous scale from absolutely no change to definitely change between two examinations. The recognition performance of the computer outputs for the 43 pairs was 96% sensitivity with 31.1 false-positive marks per scan. The average of area-under-the-ROC-curve (AUC) from 4 readers in the observer performance study was increased from 0.85 without computer outputs to 0.90 with computer outputs (p=0.0389, DBM-MRMC). The average of interpretation time was slightly decreased from 42.11 to 40.04 seconds per case (p=0.625, Wilcoxon test). We concluded that the CAD system for torso FDG-PET scans with temporal subtraction technique might improve the diagnostic accuracy of radiologist in cancer therapy evaluation.

  10. Development of a multifunctional surface analysis system based on a nanometer scale scanning electron beam: Combination of ultrahigh vacuum-scanning electron microscopy, scanning reflection electron microscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Heiji; Ichikawa, Masakazu

    1996-12-01

    We have developed a multifunctional surface analysis system based on a scanning electron beam for nanofabrication and characterization of surface reactions for fabrication processes. The system performs scanning electron microscopy (SEM), scanning reflection electron microscopy (SREM), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Nanometer scale resolution is obtained for ultrahigh vacuum (UHV)-SEM while the mechanical pumping instruments are operated. Single atomic steps on Si(111) surfaces are observed through SREM. Surface sensitive AES measurement is achieved with SREM geometry; this has a great advantage for investigating atomic step related surface reactions. High spatial resolution AES analysis is also achieved by using a nanometer scale probe beam. Auger electron signals from a hundred Ag atoms on a Si(111) surface are successfully detected with high sensitivity.

  11. Study of 3D remote sensing system based on optical scanning holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Shihu; Yan, Lei

    2009-06-01

    High-precision and real-time remote sensing imaging system is an important part of remote sensing development. Holography is a method of wave front record and recovery which was presented by Dennis Gabor. As a new kind of holography techniques, Optical scanning holography (OSH) and remote sensing imaging are intended to be combined together and applied in acquisition and interference measurement of remote sensing. The key principles and applicability of OSH are studied and the mathematic relation between Fresnel Zone Plate number, numerical aperture and object distance was deduced, which are proved to be feasible for OSH to apply in large scale remote sensing. At last, a new three-dimensional reflected OSH remote sensing imaging system is designed with the combination of scanning technique to record hologram patterns of large scale remote sensing scenes. This scheme is helpful for expanding OSH technique to remote sensing in future.

  12. Reduction of signal modulation caused by polarization in visible optical scanning systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comer, M. R.

    1984-10-01

    A method and an apparatus for minimizing the polarization modulation effect of an optical scanner system which is in Earth orbit and is scanning the Earth are described. The optical train of the scanner includes a plurality of optically aligned, rotatable, flat folding mirrors having incident angle normals in the same plane, with the mirrors serially reflecting an image acquired by the scanning of the system in orbit. The method includes the steps of rotating the most rearwardly disposed of the mirrors around its vertical geometric axis such that the reflecting surface of the mirror is perpendicular to the impinging image beam, and then rotating the mirror around its horizontal geometric axis such that the angle of incidence of the impinging image beam is of a preselected magnitude. This change in positioned relationship results in a novel apparatus which minimizes the aforesaid polarization modulation effect.

  13. Scanning, non-contact, hybrid broadband diffuse optical spectroscopy and diffuse correlation spectroscopy system

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, Johannes D.; Mireles, Miguel; Morales-Dalmau, Jordi; Farzam, Parisa; Martínez-Lozano, Mar; Casanovas, Oriol; Durduran, Turgut

    2016-01-01

    A scanning system for small animal imaging using non-contact, hybrid broadband diffuse optical spectroscopy (ncDOS) and diffuse correlation spectroscopy (ncDCS) is presented. The ncDOS uses a two-dimensional spectrophotometer retrieving broadband (610-900 nm) spectral information from up to fifty-seven source-detector distances between 2 and 5 mm. The ncDCS data is simultaneously acquired from four source-detector pairs. The sample is scanned in two dimensions while tracking variations in height. The system has been validated with liquid phantoms, demonstrated in vivo on a human fingertip during an arm cuff occlusion and on a group of mice with xenoimplanted renal cell carcinoma. PMID:26977357

  14. Performance of a new high-NA scanned-laser mask lithography system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamaker, Henry Chris; Buck, Peter D.

    1997-02-01

    To meet the challenges of peak production of 0.25-micrometer design rule photomasks, a new generation of scanned-laser reticle writers has been developed. Based on the architecture of the ALTA 3000, the resolution and critical dimension (CD) control have been improved by integrating a new 33X, 0.8- NA reduction lens. The spot size of 0.27-micrometer FWHM represents a reduction by a factor of 0.6 relative to preceding scanned-laser products, thereby providing excellent CD linearity down to 0.5 micrometer. High throughput is maintained by reducing the number of averaging passes from eight to four. The sharper aerial image produced by the system limits the CD biasing which may be obtained using dose adjustment, so a dry etch process with zero etch bias must be used for optimal performance. Early characterization of the system indicates performance consistent with that required for 0.25 micrometer integrated circuits.

  15. Design of a VLSI scan conversion processor for high-performance 3-D graphics systems

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, H.U.

    1988-01-01

    Scan-conversion processing is the bottleneck in the image generation process. To solve the problem of smooth shading and hidden surface elimination, a new processor architecture was invented which has been labeled as a scan-conversion processor architecture (SCP). The SCP is designed to perform hidden surface elimination and scan conversion for 64 pixels. The color intensities are dual-buffered so that when one buffer is being updated the other can be scanned out. Z-depth is used to perform the hidden surface elimination. The key operation performed by the SCP is the evaluation of linear functions of a form like F(X,Y) = A X + B Y + C. The computation is further simplified by using incremental addition. The z-depth buffer and the color buffers are incorporated onto the same chip. The SCP receives from its preprocessor the information for the definition of polygons and the computation of z-depth and RGB color intensities. Many copies of this processor will be used in a high-performance graphics system.

  16. [Hyperspectral acquisition system for tongue inspection based on X-Y scanning galvanometer].

    PubMed

    Li, Gang; Zhao, Jing; Lin, Ling; Zhang, Bao-ju

    2011-12-01

    Hyperspectral was used for tongue inspection in the present work to resolve the problem that information of current research for tongue inspection was inadequate. A hyperspectral acquisition system based on X-Y scanning galvanometer was also proposed due to the high cost of the current hyperspectral apparatus. An experiment was made to test the ability of this system. By collecting the hyperspectral information of color pictures with size similar to the tongue, the results of experiment showed that this system can acquire more information of tongue than other methods, and this method can provide a new way for tongue inspection.

  17. Analysis of a scanning pentaprism system for measurements of large flat mirrors.

    PubMed

    Yellowhair, Julius; Burge, James H

    2007-12-10

    The optical surface of a large optical flat can be measured using an autocollimator and scanning pentaprism system. The autocollimator measures the slope difference between a point on the mirror and a reference point. Such a system was built and previously operated at the University of Arizona. We discuss refinements that were made to the hardware, the alignment procedure, and the error analysis. The improved system was demonstrated with a 1.6 m flat mirror, which was measured to be flat to 12 nm rms. The uncertainty in the measurement is only 9 nm rms.

  18. Analysis of a scanning pentaprism system for measurements of large flat mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Yellowhair, Julius; Burge, James H

    2007-12-10

    The optical surface of a large optical flat can be measured using an autocollimator and scanning pentaprism system. The autocollimator measures the slope difference between a point on the mirror and a reference point. Such a system was built and previously operated at the University of Arizona. We discuss refinements that were made to the hardware, the alignment procedure, and the error analysis.The improved system was demonstrated with a 1.6 m flat mirror, which was measured to be flat to 12 nm rms. The uncertainty in the measurement is only 9 nm rms.

  19. [Hyperspectral acquisition system for tongue inspection based on X-Y scanning galvanometer].

    PubMed

    Li, Gang; Zhao, Jing; Lin, Ling; Zhang, Bao-ju

    2011-12-01

    Hyperspectral was used for tongue inspection in the present work to resolve the problem that information of current research for tongue inspection was inadequate. A hyperspectral acquisition system based on X-Y scanning galvanometer was also proposed due to the high cost of the current hyperspectral apparatus. An experiment was made to test the ability of this system. By collecting the hyperspectral information of color pictures with size similar to the tongue, the results of experiment showed that this system can acquire more information of tongue than other methods, and this method can provide a new way for tongue inspection. PMID:22295792

  20. Acquisition of quantitative physiological data and computerized image reconstruction using a single scan TV system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baily, N. A.

    1975-01-01

    Single scan operation of television X-ray fluoroscopic systems allow both analog and digital reconstruction of tomographic sections from single plan images. This type of system combined with a minimum of statistical processing showed excellent capabilities for delineating small changes in differential X-ray attenuation. Patient dose reduction is significant when compared to normal operation or film recording. Flat screen, low light level systems were both rugged and light in weight, making them applicable for a variety of special purposes. Three dimensional information was available from the tomographic methods and the recorded data was sufficient when used with appropriate computer display devices to give representative 3D images.

  1. Capabilities of a single scan TV-radiographic system for digital data acquisition.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baily, N. A.; Crepeau, R. L.

    1971-01-01

    A single scan TV-radiography system capable of providing analogue signals ready for A-D conversion for input to a computer has been investigated. Modulation transfer functions of both horizontal and vertical resolution have been obtained. The capability for gray scale reproduction was also investigated. The output data rate of the system is 16 KHz thereby providing compatibility to A-D converters generally available for most computers. In general, the capability of the system was found to exceed the input capabilities of available image-amplifiers and is therefore acceptable for quantitative fluoroscopic applications.

  2. Implementation and characterization of a DUV raster-scanned mask pattern generation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohan, Michael J.; Hamaker, Henry Chris; Montgomery, Warren

    2002-03-01

    Etec Systems, Inc., an Applied Materials company, has completed the implementation and characterization of a deep ultraviolet (DUV), multibeam, raster-scanned mask patterning and integrated process solution. The ALTA® 4000 mask pattern generation system integrates a new data path, environmental control system, DUV optics, a 257nm DUV continuous-wave laser source, and an environmentally stable chemically amplified resist (CAR) process to deliver superior productivity, improved resolution, and critical dimension (CD) control required for volume 130nm mask production. Additionally, to obtain the maximum benefit of this mask pattern generation system, Etec has completed development of an environmentally stable CAR process, which has been tailored to allow the maskmaking industry to continue to receive pre-coated mask blanks from commercial suppliers. This paper details the system architecture and presents system performance and characterization data. The characterization results of the integrated system and process solution are also presented. This integrated pattern generation and process solution continues the tradition of the production workhorse ALTA product line with the introduction of the ALTA 4000 scanned-laser mask pattern generation system.

  3. Full-color holographic 3D imaging system using color optical scanning holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hayan; Kim, You Seok; Kim, Taegeun

    2016-06-01

    We propose a full-color holographic three-dimensional imaging system that composes a recording stage, a transmission and processing stage and reconstruction stage. In recording stage, color optical scanning holography (OSH) records the complex RGB holograms of an object. In transmission and processing stage, the recorded complex RGB holograms are transmitted to the reconstruction stage after conversion to off-axis RGB holograms. In reconstruction stage, the off-axis RGB holograms are reconstructed optically.

  4. Note: Automated optical focusing on encapsulated devices for scanning light stimulation systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bitzer, L. A.; Benson, N. Schmechel, R.

    2014-08-15

    Recently, a scanning light stimulation system with an automated, adaptive focus correction during the measurement was introduced. Here, its application on encapsulated devices is discussed. This includes the changes an encapsulating optical medium introduces to the focusing process as well as to the subsequent light stimulation measurement. Further, the focusing method is modified to compensate for the influence of refraction and to maintain a minimum beam diameter on the sample surface.

  5. Design of a robust SHM system for composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beard, Shawn; Liu, Ching-Chao; Chang, Fu-Kuo

    2007-04-01

    Composites are becoming increasingly popular materials used in a wide range of applications on large-scale structures such as windmill blades, rocket motor cases, and aircraft fuselage and wings. For these large structures, using composites greatly enhances the operation and performance of the application, but also introduces extraordinary inspection challenges that push the limits of traditional NDE in terms of time and cost. Recent advances in Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) technologies offer a promising solution to these inspection challenges. But efficient design methodologies and implementation procedures are needed to ensure the reliability and robustness of SHM technologies for use in real-world applications. This paper introduces the essential elements of the design and implementation process by way of example. State-of-the-art techniques to optimize sensor placement, perform self-diagnostics, compensate for environmental conditions, and generate probability of detection (POD) curves for any application are discussed. The techniques are presented in relation to Acellent's recently developed SmartComposite System that is used to monitor the integrity of large composite structures. The system builds on the active sensor network technology of Acellent that is analogous to a built-in acousto-ultrasonic NDE system. Key features of the system include new miniaturized lightweight hardware, self-diagnostics and adaptive algorithm to automatically compensate for damaged sensors, reliable damage detection under different environmental conditions, and generation of POD curves. This paper will provide an overview of the system and demonstrate its key features.

  6. Design of a MEMS-based retina scanning system for biometric authentication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woittennek, Franziska; Knobbe, Jens; Pügner, Tino; Schelinski, Uwe; Grüger, Heinrich

    2014-05-01

    There is an increasing need for reliable authentication for a number of applications such as e commerce. Common authentication methods based on ownership (ID card) or knowledge factors (password, PIN) are often prone to manipulations and may therefore be not safe enough. Various inherence factor based methods like fingerprint, retinal pattern or voice identifications are considered more secure. Retina scanning in particular offers both low false rejection rate (FRR) and low false acceptance rate (FAR) with about one in a million. Images of the retina with its characteristic pattern of blood vessels can be made with either a fundus camera or laser scanning methods. The present work describes the optical design of a new compact retina laser scanner which is based on MEMS (Micro Electric Mechanical System) technology. The use of a dual axis micro scanning mirror for laser beam deflection enables a more compact and robust design compared to classical systems. The scanner exhibits a full field of view of 10° which corresponds to an area of 4 mm2 on the retinal surface surrounding the optical disc. The system works in the near infrared and is designed for use under ambient light conditions, which implies a pupil diameter of 1.5 mm. Furthermore it features a long eye relief of 30 mm so that it can be conveniently used by persons wearing glasses. The optical design requirements and the optical performance are discussed in terms of spot diagrams and ray fan plots.

  7. Bore-Sight Calibration of Multiple Laser Range Finders for Kinematic 3D Laser Scanning Systems

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Jaehoon; Kim, Jeonghyun; Yoon, Sanghyun; Kim, Sangmin; Cho, Hyoungsig; Kim, Changjae; Heo, Joon

    2015-01-01

    The Simultaneous Localization and Mapping (SLAM) technique has been used for autonomous navigation of mobile systems; now, its applications have been extended to 3D data acquisition of indoor environments. In order to reconstruct 3D scenes of indoor space, the kinematic 3D laser scanning system, developed herein, carries three laser range finders (LRFs): one is mounted horizontally for system-position correction and the other two are mounted vertically to collect 3D point-cloud data of the surrounding environment along the system’s trajectory. However, the kinematic laser scanning results can be impaired by errors resulting from sensor misalignment. In the present study, the bore-sight calibration of multiple LRF sensors was performed using a specially designed double-deck calibration facility, which is composed of two half-circle-shaped aluminum frames. Moreover, in order to automatically achieve point-to-point correspondences between a scan point and the target center, a V-shaped target was designed as well. The bore-sight calibration parameters were estimated by a constrained least squares method, which iteratively minimizes the weighted sum of squares of residuals while constraining some highly-correlated parameters. The calibration performance was analyzed by means of a correlation matrix. After calibration, the visual inspection of mapped data and residual calculation confirmed the effectiveness of the proposed calibration approach. PMID:25946627

  8. Detection Of Multilayer Cavities By Employing RC-DTH Air Hammer System And Cavity Auto Scanning Laser System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Yongjiang; Li, Lijia; Peng, Jianming; Yin, Kun; Li, Peng; Gan, Xin; Zhao, Letao; Su, Wei

    2015-12-01

    The subterranean cavities are seriously threatened to construction and mining safety, and it's important to obtain the exact localization and dimensions of subterranean cavities for the planning of geotechnical and mining activities. Geophysical investigation is an alternative method for cavity detection, but it usually failed for the uncertainly solution of information and data obtained by Geophysical methods. Drilling is considered as the most accurate method for cavity detection. However, the conventional drilling methods can only be used for single cavity detection, and there is no effective solution for multilayer cavities detection have been reported. In this paper, a reverse circulation (RC) down-the-hole (DTH) air hammer system with a special structured drill bit is built and a cavity auto scanning laser system based on laser range finding technique was employed to confirm the localization and dimensions of the cavities. This RC-DTH air hammer system allows drilling through the upper cavities and putting the cavity auto scanning laser system into the cavity area through the central passage of the drill tools to protect the detection system from collapsing of borehole wall. The RC-DTH air hammer system was built, and field tests were conducted in Lanxian County Iron Ore District, which is located in Lv Liang city of Shan Xi province, the northwest of china. Field tests show that employing the RC-DTH air hammer system assisted by the cavity auto scanning laser system is an efficiency method to detect multilayer cavities.

  9. The CNAO dose delivery system for modulated scanning ion beam radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Giordanengo, S.; Marchetto, F.; Garella, M. A.; Donetti, M.; Bourhaleb, F.; Monaco, V.; Hosseini, M. A.; Peroni, C.; Sacchi, R.; Cirio, R.; Ciocca, M.; Mirandola, A.

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: This paper describes the system for the dose delivery currently used at the Centro Nazionale di Adroterapia Oncologica (CNAO) for ion beam modulated scanning radiotherapy. Methods: CNAO Foundation, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare and University of Torino have designed, built, and commissioned a dose delivery system (DDS) to monitor and guide ion beams accelerated by a dedicated synchrotron and to distribute the dose with a full 3D scanning technique. Protons and carbon ions are provided for a wide range of energies in order to cover a sizable span of treatment depths. The target volume, segmented in several layers orthogonally to the beam direction, is irradiated by thousands of pencil beams which must be steered and held to the prescribed positions until the prescribed number of particles has been delivered. For the CNAO beam lines, these operations are performed by the DDS. The main components of this system are two independent beam monitoring detectors, called BOX1 and BOX2, interfaced with two control systems performing the tasks of real-time fast and slow control, and connected to the scanning magnets and the beam chopper. As a reaction to any condition leading to a potential hazard, a DDS interlock signal is sent to the patient interlock system which immediately stops the irradiation. The essential tasks and operations performed by the DDS are described following the data flow from the treatment planning system through the end of the treatment delivery. Results: The ability of the DDS to guarantee a safe and accurate treatment was validated during the commissioning phase by means of checks of the charge collection efficiency, gain uniformity of the chambers, and 2D dose distribution homogeneity and stability. A high level of reliability and robustness has been proven by three years of system activity needing rarely more than regular maintenance and working with 100% uptime. Four identical and independent DDS devices have been tested showing

  10. Clinical characterization of a proton beam continuous uniform scanning system with dose layer stacking

    PubMed Central

    Farr, J. B.; Mascia, A. E.; Hsi, W.-C.; Allgower, C. E.; Jesseph, F.; Schreuder, A. N.; Wolanski, M.; Nichiporov, D. F.; Anferov, V.

    2008-01-01

    A proton beam delivery system on a gantry with continuous uniform scanning and dose layer stacking at the Midwest Proton Radiotherapy Institute has been commissioned and accepted for clinical use. This paper was motivated by a lack of guidance on the testing and characterization for clinical uniform scanning systems. As such, it describes how these tasks were performed with a uniform scanning beam delivery system. This paper reports the methods used and important dosimetric characteristics of radiation fields produced by the system. The commissioning data include the transverse and longitudinal dose distributions, penumbra, and absolute dose values. Using a 208 MeV cyclotron’s proton beam, the system provides field sizes up to 20 and 30 cm in diameter for proton ranges in water up to 27 and 20 cm, respectively. The dose layer stacking method allows for the flexible construction of spread-out Bragg peaks with uniform modulation of up to 15 cm in water, at typical dose rates of 1–3 Gy∕min. For measuring relative dose distributions, multielement ion chamber arrays, small-volume ion chambers, and radiographic films were employed. Measurements during the clinical commissioning of the system have shown that the lateral and longitudinal dose uniformity of 2.5% or better can be achieved for all clinically important field sizes and ranges. The measured transverse penumbra widths offer a slight improvement in comparison to those achieved with a double scattering beam spreading technique at the facility. Absolute dose measurements were done using calibrated ion chambers, thermoluminescent and alanine detectors. Dose intercomparisons conducted using various types of detectors traceable to a national standards laboratory indicate that the measured dosimetry data agree with each other within 5%. PMID:19070228

  11. Design and Development of a Scanning Airborne Direct Detection Doppler Lidar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gentry, Bruce; McGill, Matthew; Schwemmer, Geary; Hardesty, Michael; Brewer, Alan; Wilkerson, Thomas; Atlas, Robert; Sirota, Marcos; Lindemann, Scott

    2006-01-01

    In the fall of 2005 we began developing an airborne scanning direct detection molecular Doppler lidar. The instrument is being built as part of the Tropospheric Wind Lidar Technology Experiment (TWiLiTE), a three year project selected by the NASA Earth Sun Technology Office under the Instrument Incubator Program. The TWiLiTE project is a collaboration involving scientists and engineers from NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, NOAA ESRL, Utah State University Space Dynamics Lab, Michigan Aerospace Corporation and Sigma Space Corporation. The TWiLiTE instrument will leverage significant research and development investments made by NASA Goddard and it's partners in the past several years in key lidar technologies and sub-systems (lasers, telescopes, scanning systems, detectors and receivers) required to enable spaceborne global wind lidar measurement. These sub-systems will be integrated into a complete molecular direct detection Doppler wind lidar system designed for autonomous operation on a high altitude aircraft, such as the NASA WB57. The WB57 flies at an altitude of 18 km and from this vantage point the nadir viewing Doppler lidar will be able to profile winds through the full troposphere. The TWiLiTE integrated airborne Doppler lidar instrument will be the first demonstration of a airborne scanning direct detection Doppler lidar and will serve as a critical milestone on the path to a future spaceborne tropospheric wind system. In addition to being a technology testbed for space based tropospheric wind lidar, when completed the TWiLiTE high altitude airborne lidar will be used for studying mesoscale dynamics and storm research (e.g. winter storms, hurricanes) and could be used for calibration and validation of satellite based wind systems such as ESA's Aeolus Atmospheric Dynamics Mission. The TWiLiTE Doppler lidar will have the capability to profile winds in clear air from the aircraft altitude of 18 km to the surface with 250 m vertical resolution and < 2mls

  12. Probe Scanning Support System by a Parallel Mechanism for Robotic Echography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, Yusuke; Kaneko, Kenta; Oyamada, Masami; Takachi, Yuuki; Masuda, Kohji

    We propose a probe scanning support system based on force/visual servoing control for robotic echography. First, we have designed and formulated its inverse kinematics the construction of mechanism. Next, we have developed a scanning method of the ultrasound probe on body surface to construct visual servo system based on acquired echogram by the standalone medical robot to move the ultrasound probe on patient abdomen in three-dimension. The visual servo system detects local change of brightness in time series echogram, which is stabilized the position of the probe by conventional force servo system in the robot, to compensate not only periodical respiration motion but also body motion. Then we integrated control method of the visual servo with the force servo as a hybrid control in both of position and force. To confirm the ability to apply for actual abdomen, we experimented the total system to follow the gallbladder as a moving target to keep its position in the echogram by minimizing variation of reaction force on abdomen. As the result, the system has a potential to be applied to automatic detection of human internal organ.

  13. Portable automated imaging in complex ceramics with a microwave interference scanning system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goitia, Ryan M.; Schmidt, Karl F.; Little, Jack R.; Ellingson, William A.; Green, William; Franks, Lisa P.

    2013-01-01

    An improved portable microwave interferometry system has been automated to permit rapid examination of components with minimal operator attendance. Functionalities include stereo and multiplexed, frequency-modulated at multiple frequencies, producing layered volumetric images of complex ceramic structures. The technique has been used to image composite ceramic armor and ceramic matrix composite components, as well as other complex dielectric materials. The system utilizes Evisive Scan microwave interference scanning technique. Validation tests include artificial and in-service damage of ceramic armor, surrogates and ceramic matrix composite samples. Validation techniques include micro-focus x-ray and computed tomography imaging. The microwave interference scanning technique has demonstrated detection of cracks, interior laminar features and variations in material properties such as density. The image yields depth information through phase angle manipulation, and shows extent of feature and relative dielectric property information. It requires access to only one surface, and no coupling medium. Data are not affected by separation of layers of dielectric material, such as outer over-wrap. Test panels were provided by the US Army Research Laboratory, and the US Army Tank Automotive Research, Development and Engineering Center (TARDEC), who with the US Air Force Research Laboratory have supported this work.

  14. Validation of a three-dimensional facial scanning system based on structured light techniques.

    PubMed

    Ma, Lili; Xu, Tianmin; Lin, Jiuxiang

    2009-06-01

    The aim of this study was to validate a newly developed three-dimensional (3D) structured light scanning system in recording the facial morphology. The validation was performed in three aspects including accuracy, precision and reliability. The accuracy and precision were investigated using a plaster model with 19 marked landmarks. The accuracy was determined by comparing the coordinates from the 3D images and from the coordinates measure machine (CMM). The precision was quantified through the repeated landmarks location on 3D images. The reliability was investigated in 10 adult volunteers. Each was scanned five times in 3 weeks. The 3D images acquired at different times were compared with each other to measure the reliability. We found that the accuracy was 0.93 mm, the precision was 0.79 mm, the reliability was 0.2mm. These findings suggested that the structured light scanning system was accurate, precise and reliable to record the facial morphology for both clinic and research purposes. PMID:19303659

  15. Application of information theory to the design of line-scan imaging systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huck, F. O.; Park, S. K.; Halyo, N.; Stallman, S.

    1981-01-01

    Information theory is used to formulate a single figure of merit for assessing the performance of line scan imaging systems as a function of their spatial response (point spread function or modulation transfer function), sensitivity, sampling and quantization intervals, and the statistical properties of a random radiance field. Computational results for the information density and efficiency (i.e., the ratio of information density to data density) are intuitively satisfying and compare well with experimental and theoretical results obtained by earlier investigators concerned with the performance of TV systems.

  16. Automatic exposure control for a slot scanning full field digital mammography system

    SciTech Connect

    Elbakri, Idris A.; Lakshminarayanan, A.V.; Tesic, Mike M.

    2005-09-15

    Automatic exposure control (AEC) is an important feature in mammography. It enables consistently optimal image exposure despite variations in tissue density and thickness, and user skill level. Full field digital mammography systems cannot employ conventional AEC methods because digital receptors fully absorb the x-ray beam. In this paper we describe an AEC procedure for slot scanning mammography. With slot scanning detectors, our approach uses a fast low-resolution and low-exposure prescan to acquire an image of the breast. Tube potential depends on breast thickness, and the prescan histogram provides the necessary information to calculate the required tube current. We validate our approach with simulated prescan images and phantom measurements. We achieve accurate exposure tracking with thickness and density, and expect this method of AEC to reduce retakes and improve workflow.

  17. Thermal characterization of starch-water system by photopyroelectric technique and adiabatic scanning calorimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruz-Orea, A.; Bentefour, E. H.; Jamée, P.; Chirtoc, M.; Glorieux, C.; Pitsi, G.; Thoen, J.

    2003-01-01

    Starch is one of the most important carbohydrate sources in human nutrition. For the thermal analysis of starch, techniques such as differential scanning calorimetry have been extensively used. As an alternative, we have applied a photopyroelectric (PPE) configuration and adiabatic scanning calorimetry (ASC) to study the thermal properties of starch-water systems. For this study we used nixtamalized corn flour and potato starch with different quantities of distilled water, in order to obtain samples with different moisture content. By using PPE and ASC methods we have measured, for each technique separately, the heat capacity by unit volume (ρcp) at room temperature for a corn flour sample at 90% moisture. The obtained values agree within experimental uncertainty. By using these techniques we also studied the thermal behavior of potato starch, at 80% moisture, in the temperature range where phase transitions occur. In this case the PPE signal phase could be used as a sensitive and versatile monitor for phase transitions.

  18. Foveated scanning: dynamic monodimensional enlargement of resolved field of view in lenses of scanner systems.

    PubMed

    Javaherian, Farhang; Rashidian, Bizhan

    2016-09-10

    An inconsistency between the circular symmetric geometry of conventional optical imagers and the geometry of long linear sensors used in today's line-scan cameras results in suboptimal separate design of optics and electronics of scanner systems. Based on the method of foveated optical imaging, a technique named foveated scanning (FS) is proposed in this paper. The FS technique is employed to enlarge the one-dimensional resolved field of view (RFOV) of conventional lenses and permits optimized performance on a line-of-interest in the image plane where the optoelectronic sensor is located. The achieved enlargement of RFOV is verified on a proof-of-concept basic telephoto lens. Both modulation transfer function analysis and the imaging simulation of a standard target have been performed. Results show a twofold increase in RFOV by this technique. PMID:27661368

  19. Optimizing scan parameters for antibody microarray experiments: accelerating robust systems diagnostics for life sciences.

    PubMed

    Gu, Qiang; Sivanandam, Thamil Mani

    2014-06-01

    Microarray experiments are a centerpiece of postgenomics life sciences and the current efforts to develop systems diagnostics for personalized medicine. The majority of antibody microarray experiments are fluorescence-based, which utilizes a scanner to convert target signals into image files for subsequent quantification. Certain scan parameters such as the laser power and photomultiplier tube gain (PMT) can influence the readout of fluorescent intensities and thus may affect data quantitation. To date, however, there is no consensus of how to determine the optimal settings of microarray scanners. Here we show that different settings of the laser power and PMT not only affect the signal intensities but also the accuracy of antibody microarray experiments. More importantly, we demonstrate an experimental approach using two fluorescent dyes to determine optimal settings of scan parameters for microarray experiments. These measures provide added quality control of microarray experiments, and thus help to improve the accuracy of quantitative outcome in microarray experiments in the above contexts.

  20. Antenna-based ultrahigh vacuum microwave frequency scanning tunneling microscopy system.

    PubMed

    Giridharagopal, Rajiv; Zhang, Jun; Kelly, Kevin F

    2011-05-01

    The instrumental synthesis of high resolution scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) with the ability to measure differential capacitance with atomic scale resolution is highly desirable for fundamental metrology and for the study of novel physical characteristics. Microwave frequency radiation directed at the tip-sample junction in an STM system allows for such high-resolution differential capacitance information. This ability is particularly critical in ultrahigh vacuum environments, where the additional parameter space afforded by including a capacitance measurement would prove powerful. Here we describe the modifications made to a commercial scanning tunneling microscope to allow for broad microwave frequency alternating current scanning tunneling microscopy (ACSTM) in ultrahigh vacuum conditions using a relatively simple loop antenna and microwave difference frequency detection. The advantages of our system are twofold. First, the use of a removable antenna on a commercial STM prevents interference with other UHV processes while providing a simple method to retrofit any commercial UHV-STM with UHV-ACSTM capability. Second, mounting the microwave antenna on a translator allows for specific tuning of the system to replicate experimental conditions between samples, which is particularly critical in sensitive systems like organic thin films or single molecules where small changes in incident power can affect the results. Our innovation therefore provides a valuable approach to give nearly any commercial STM, be it an ambient or UHV system, the capability to measure atomic-scale microwave studies such as differential capacitance or even single molecule microwave response, and it ensures that experimental ACSTM conditions can be held constant between different samples. PMID:21639510

  1. Acquisition of quantitative physiological data and computerized image reconstruction using a single scan TV system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baily, N. A.

    1976-01-01

    A single-scan radiography system has been interfaced to a minicomputer, and the combined system has been used with a variety of fluoroscopic systems and image intensifiers available in clinical facilities. The system's response range is analyzed, and several applications are described. These include determination of the gray scale for typical X-ray-fluoroscopic-television chains, measurement of gallstone volume in patients, localization of markers or other small anatomical features, determinations of organ areas and volumes, computer reconstruction of tomographic sections of organs in motion, and computer reconstruction of transverse axial body sections from fluoroscopic images. It is concluded that this type of system combined with a minimum of statistical processing shows excellent capabilities for delineating small changes in differential X-ray attenuation.

  2. Design and implementation of an inexpensive LIDAR scanning system with applications in archaeology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willis, Andrew; Sui, Yunfeng; Ringle, William; Galor, Katherina

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a system and associated software capable of capturing 3D LIDAR data from surfaces up to 20m from the sensor. The chief concern of this initial system is to minimize cost which, for this initial system, is approximately $10.5k (USD). Secondary considerations for the system include portability, robustness, and size. The system hardware consists of two motors and a single-point sensor, capable of measuring the range of a single surface point location. The motors redirect the emitted laser along lines nearly equivalent to that specified by a spherical coordinate system generating a spherical range image, r = f ( φ, θ). This article describes the technical aspects of the scanner design which include a bill-of-materials for the scanner components and the mathematical model for the measured 3D point data. The designed system was built in 2007 and has since been used in the field twice: (1) for scanning ruins and underground cisterns within Mayan cities near Merida, Mexico and (2) for scanning the ruins of a Crusader castle at Apollonia-Arsuf, located on the Mediterranean shore near Herzliya, Israel. Using this system in these vastly different environments has provided a number of useful insights or "best practices" on the use of inexpensive LIDAR sensors which are discussed in this paper. We also discuss a measurement model for the generated data and an efficient and easy-to-implement algorithm for polygonizing the measured 3D (x,y, z) data. Specific applications of the developed system to archaeological and anthropological problems are discussed.

  3. Scanning all-fiber-optic endomicroscopy system for 3D nonlinear optical imaging of biological tissues

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yicong; Leng, Yuxin; Xi, Jiefeng; Li, Xingde

    2009-01-01

    An extremely compact all-fiber-optic scanning endomicroscopy system was developed for two-photon fluorescence (TPF) and second harmonic generation (SHG) imaging of biological samples. A conventional double-clad fiber (DCF) was employed in the endomicroscope for single-mode femtosecond pulse delivery, multimode nonlinear optical signals collection and fast two-dimensional scanning. A single photonic bandgap fiber (PBF) with negative group velocity dispersion at two-photon excitation wavelength (i.e. ~810 nm) was used for pulse prechirping in replacement of a bulky grating/lens-based pulse stretcher. The combined use of DCF and PBF in the endomicroscopy system made the endomicroscope basically a plug-and-play unit. The excellent imaging ability of the extremely compact all-fiber-optic nonlinear optical endomicroscopy system was demonstrated by SHG imaging of rat tail tendon and depth-resolved TPF imaging of epithelial tissues stained with acridine orange. The preliminary results suggested the promising potential of this extremely compact all-fiber-optic endomicroscopy system for real-time assessment of both epithelial and stromal structures in luminal organs. PMID:19434122

  4. MEMS scanner mirror based system for retina scanning and in eye projection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woittennek, Franziska; Knobbe, Jens; Pügner, Tino; Dallmann, Hans-Georg; Schelinski, Uwe; Grüger, Heinrich

    2015-02-01

    Many applications could benefit from miniaturized systems to scan blood vessels behind the retina in the human eye, so called "retina scanning". This reaches from access control to sophisticated security applications and medical devices. High volume systems for consumer applications require low cost and a user friendly operation. For example this includes no need for removal of glasses and self-adjustment, in turn guidance of focus and point of attraction by simultaneous projection for the user. A new system has been designed based on the well-known resonantly driven 2-d scanner mirror of Fraunhofer IPMS. A combined NIR and VIS laser system illuminates the eye through an eye piece designed for an operating distance allowing the use of glasses and granting sufficient field of view. This usability feature was considered to be more important than highest miniaturization. The modulated VIS laser facilitates the projection of an image directly onto the retina. The backscattered light from the continuous NIR laser contains the information of the blood vessels and is detected by a highly sensitive photo diode. A demonstrational setup has been realized including readout and driving electronics. The laser power was adjusted to an eye-secure level. Additional security features were integrated. Test measurements revealed promising results. In a first demonstration application the detection of biometric pattern of the blood vessels was evaluated for issues authentication in.

  5. Excitation-scanning hyperspectral imaging system for microscopic and endoscopic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayes, Sam A.; Leavesley, Silas J.; Rich, Thomas C.

    2016-04-01

    Current microscopic and endoscopic technologies for cancer screening utilize white-light illumination sources. Hyper-spectral imaging has been shown to improve sensitivity while retaining specificity when compared to white-light imaging in both microscopy and in vivo imaging. However, hyperspectral imaging methods have historically suffered from slow acquisition times due to the narrow bandwidth of spectral filters. Often minutes are required to gather a full image stack. We have developed a novel approach called excitation-scanning hyperspectral imaging that provides 2-3 orders of magnitude increased signal strength. This reduces acquisition times significantly, allowing for live video acquisition. Here, we describe a preliminary prototype excitation-scanning hyperspectral imaging system that can be coupled with endoscopes or microscopes for hyperspectral imaging of tissues and cells. Our system is comprised of three subsystems: illumination, transmission, and imaging. The illumination subsystem employs light-emitting diode arrays to illuminate at different wavelengths. The transmission subsystem utilizes a unique geometry of optics and a liquid light guide. Software controls allow us to interface with and control the subsystems and components. Digital and analog signals are used to coordinate wavelength intensity, cycling and camera triggering. Testing of the system shows it can cycle 16 wavelengths at as fast as 1 ms per cycle. Additionally, more than 18% of the light transmits through the system. Our setup should allow for hyperspectral imaging of tissue and cells in real time.

  6. Feasibility study of scanning celestial Attitude System (SCADS) for Earth Resources Technology Satellite (ERTS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    The feasibility of using the Scanning Celestial Attitude Determination System (SCADS) during Earth Resources Technology Satellite (ERTS) missions to compute an accurate spacecraft attitude by use of stellar measurements is considered. The spacecraft is local-vertical-stabilized. A heuristic discussion of the SCADS concept is first given. Two concepts are introduced: a passive system which contains no moving parts, and an active system in which the reticle is caused to rotate about the sensor's axis. A quite complete development of the equations of attitude motions is then given. These equations are used to generate the true attitude which in turn is used to compute the transit times of detectable stars and to determine the errors associated with the SCADS attitude. A more complete discussion of the analytical foundation of SCADS concept and its use for the geometries particular to this study, as well as salient design parameters for the passive and active systems are included.

  7. An automatic method for determining the centre of rotation of a mechanically scanned reflection UCT system.

    PubMed

    Jago, J R

    1994-12-01

    A method will be described for determining the centre of rotation of a mechanically scanned reflection ultrasound computed tomography system. It is based on the principle of obtaining opposing images of a test object containing many point targets. The method is automatic in the sense that the centre of rotation is calculated by a computer without the need for an operator to make direct measurements on the mechanical system. For the particular reflection UCT system described here, the centre of rotation is obtained in 3-5 min with a repeatability (+/-2 SD) of +/-0.3 mm. Ways in which even higher accuracy can be obtained are discussed. The basic principle of the method is applicable to any concentric imaging system for which a good approximation to an ideal point target can be produced.

  8. Pharmaceutical applications of confocal laser scanning microscopy: the physical characterisation of pharmaceutical systems.

    PubMed

    Pygall, Samuel R; Whetstone, Joanne; Timmins, Peter; Melia, Colin D

    2007-12-10

    The application of confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) to the physicochemical characterisation of pharmaceutical systems is not as widespread as its application within the field of cell biology. However, methods have been developed to exploit the imaging capabilities of CLSM to study a wide range of pharmaceutical systems, including phase-separated polymers, colloidal systems, microspheres, pellets, tablets, film coatings, hydrophilic matrices, and chromatographic stationary phases. Additionally, methods to measure diffusion in gels, bioadhesives, and for monitoring microenvironmental pH change within dosage forms have been utilised. CLSM has also been used in the study of the physical interaction of dosage forms with biological barriers such as the eye, skin and intestinal epithelia, and in particular, to determine the effectiveness of a plethora of pharmaceutical systems to deliver drugs through these barriers. In the future, there is continuing scope for wider exploitation of existing techniques, and continuing advancements in instrumentation.

  9. Total Measurement Uncertainty for the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) Segmented Gamma Scan Assay System

    SciTech Connect

    WESTSIK, G.A.

    2001-06-06

    This report presents the results of an evaluation of the Total Measurement Uncertainty (TMU) for the Canberra manufactured Segmented Gamma Scanner Assay System (SGSAS) as employed at the Hanford Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP). In this document, TMU embodies the combined uncertainties due to all of the individual random and systematic sources of measurement uncertainty. It includes uncertainties arising from corrections and factors applied to the analysis of transuranic waste to compensate for inhomogeneities and interferences from the waste matrix and radioactive components. These include uncertainty components for any assumptions contained in the calibration of the system or computation of the data. Uncertainties are propagated at 1 sigma. The final total measurement uncertainty value is reported at the 95% confidence level. The SGSAS is a gamma assay system that is used to assay plutonium and uranium waste. The SGSAS system can be used in a stand-alone mode to perform the NDA characterization of a container, particularly for low to medium density (0-2.5 g/cc) container matrices. The SGSAS system provides a full gamma characterization of the container content. This document is an edited version of the Rocky Flats TMU Report for the Can Scan Segment Gamma Scanners, which are in use for the plutonium residues projects at the Rocky Flats plant. The can scan segmented gamma scanners at Rocky Flats are the same design as the PFP SGSAS system and use the same software (with the exception of the plutonium isotopics software). Therefore, all performance characteristics are expected to be similar. Modifications in this document reflect minor differences in the system configuration, container packaging, calibration technique, etc. These results are supported by the Quality Assurance Objective (QAO) counts, safeguards test data, calibration data, etc. for the PFP SGSAS system. Other parts of the TMU analysis utilize various modeling techniques such as Monte Carlo N

  10. SU-E-T-595: Output Factor Calculation for a Uniform Scanning Proton Therapy System

    SciTech Connect

    Hecksel, D; Stauffer, N; DeFillippo, G; Edwards, J; Pankuch, M

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To develop an analytical model that predicts dose output factors for patient treatment fields in a uniform scanning proton therapy system. Methods: A model to predict output factors for patient specific treatment fields was produced based on the methods developed by Kooy et al. (2003). The Kooy model predicts the output factor based on the ratio of the entrance dose under calibration conditions to that for a given range and modulation corrected for the inverse square effect. Field specific output factors were plotted as a function of a single parameter r, where r = (Range-Modulation)/Modulation. The model targeted user range 1 sub-span 3 through user range 2 sup-span 2 of the IBA uniform scanning proton therapy system. The data set included points measured using the 10 cm and 18 cm snout sizes to eliminate stem effects on the monitor unit chambers. The data was fit using equation 15 from Kooy et al. (2003), and the resulting model was tested against measurements that were not included in the original data set. Results: For the range and sub span investigated, 120 data points were tested against the model prediction. The model predicted the output factor within 2% for 96% of the points tested and within 2.5% for 99% of the points tested. All points were within 3% of the predicted values. Conclusion: Monitor units for patient treatment fields with proton ranges that fall within the tested interval can be predicted using a model based on the methods developed at MGH. With further evaluation, it will be possible to model all user ranges and sub-spans of the IBA system. Further testing is also needed to predict output factors using a 25 cm snout which introduces variable scanning pattern sizes and stem effects on the monitor unit chambers.

  11. Optical-mechanical line-scan imaging process - Its information capacity and efficiency. [satellite multispectral sensing systems application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huck, F. O.; Park, S. K.

    1975-01-01

    Optical-mechanical line-scan techniques have been applied to earth satellite multispectral imaging systems. The capability of the imaging system is generally assessed by its information capacity. An approach based on information theory is developed to formulate the capacity of the line-scan process. Included are the effects of blurring of spatial detail, photosensor noise, aliasing, and quantization. The information efficiency is shown to be dependent on sampling rate, system frequency response shape, SNR, and quantization interval.

  12. Operational results for the raster scanning power supply system constructed at the Bevalac Biomedical Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Stover, G.; Halliwell, J.; Nyman, M.; Dwinell, R.

    1989-03-01

    A raster scanning power supply for controlling an 8.0 Tesla-meter relativistic heavy-ion beam at the Biomedical Facility has been recently completed and is undergoing electrical testing before on- line operation in 1989. The scanner system will provide tightly controlled beam uniformity and off-axis treatment profiles with large aspect ratios and unusual dimensions. This article will discuss original specifications, agreement with measured results and special device performance (i.e. GTOs, FET actuator assembly, etc.). 5 refs., 4 figs.

  13. Adsorbate-induced quantum Hall system probed by scanning tunneling spectroscopy combined with transport measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Masutomi, Ryuichi Okamoto, Tohru

    2015-06-22

    An adsorbate-induced quantum Hall system at the cleaved InSb surfaces is investigated in magnetic fields up to 14 T using low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy combined with transport measurements. We show that an enhanced Zeeman splitting in the Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations is explained by an exchange enhancement of spin splitting and potential disorder, both of which are obtained from the spatially averaged density of states (DOS). Moreover, the Altshuler–Aronov correlation gap is observed in the spatially averaged DOS at 0 T.

  14. The effectiveness of the jammer signal characteristics on conical-scan systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Şahingil, Mehmet C.; Aslan, Murat Ş.

    2015-05-01

    Being passive systems and due to their proliferation to many regions in the world, the infrared (IR) guided missiles constitute probably the most dangerous threats for the aircraft platforms. Early generation surface-to-air and air-to-air IRguided missiles use reticle-based seekers. One of the IR countermeasure (IRCM) techniques for protecting aircraft platforms against these type of threats is to use a modulated jamming signal. Optimizing the parameters of the modulation is the most important issue for an effective protection. If the required characteristic is not satisfied, jamming may not be successful for protecting the aircraft. There are several parameters to define the jammer signal (modulation) characteristic. Optimizing them requires a good understanding of threat seekers' operating principles. In the present paper, we consider protection of a helicopter platform against conical-scan reticle based seeker systems and investigate the effect of the jammer signal modulation parameters on jamming performance via extensive batch simulations. The simulations are performed in a MATLAB-coded simulator which models reticle-based conical-scan seeker, aircraft radiation, aircraft motion and jammer system on the aircraft. The results show that if the properties of the jammer signal are similar to those of the reticle-modulated signal in the missile, the jamming can be successful. Otherwise, applied jamming may not deceive the threat seeker.

  15. Influence of both angle and position error of pentaprism on accuracy of pentaprism scanning system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Kun; Han, Sen; Zhang, Qiyuan; Wu, Quanying

    2014-11-01

    Pentaprism scanning system has been widely used in the measurement of large flat and wavefront, based on its property that the deviated beam will have no motion in the pitch direction. But the manufacturing and position errors of pentaprisms will bring error to the measurement and so a good error analysis method is indispensable. In this paper, we propose a new method of building mathematic models of pentaprism and through which the size and angle errors of a pentaprism can be put into the model as parameters. 4 size parameters are selected to determine the size and 11 angle parameters are selected to determine the angles of a pentaprism. Yaw, Roll and Pitch are used to describe the position error of a pentaprism and an autocollimator. A pentaprism scanning system of wavefront test is simulated by ray tracing using matlab. We design a method of separating the constant from the measurement results which will improve the measurement accuracy and analyze the system error by Monte Carlo method. This method is simple, rapid, accurate and convenient for computer programming.

  16. Bilateral control-based compensation for rotation in imaging in scan imaging systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Dapeng; Wang, Yutang; Wang, Fuchao; Zhang, Yupeng

    2015-12-01

    Scan imaging systems rely on the rotation of a mirror to scan an image. The rotation in the resulting image must be compensated to prevent information loss. Satisfactory performance of an imaging system is difficult to achieve when employing the methods of mechanical transmission and unilateral tracking control, especially when the system suffers from nonlinear factors, disturbances, and dynamic uncertainties. This paper proposes a compensation method based on bilateral control derived from the field of haptic robots. A two-loop disturbance observer was designed to guarantee that the dynamic characteristics of the motor are close to those of the nominal model. The controllers were designed on the basis of the small gain theorem. Experiments were conducted for a comparison with the traditional unilateral control-based compensation. The comparison showed a reduction of 99.83% in the L2 norm of error, which validates the method. The proposed method improves the accuracy of compensation for rotation in imaging, and demonstrates that bilateral control has feasibility for application in various fields, including photogrammetry.

  17. A new adaptive light beam focusing principle for scanning light stimulation systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bitzer, L. A.; Meseth, M.; Benson, N.; Schmechel, R.

    2013-02-15

    In this article a novel principle to achieve optimal focusing conditions or rather the smallest possible beam diameter for scanning light stimulation systems is presented. It is based on the following methodology: First, a reference point on a camera sensor is introduced where optimal focusing conditions are adjusted and the distance between the light focusing optic and the reference point is determined using a laser displacement sensor. In a second step, this displacement sensor is used to map the topography of the sample under investigation. Finally, the actual measurement is conducted, using optimal focusing conditions in each measurement point at the sample surface, that are determined by the height difference between camera sensor and the sample topography. This principle is independent of the measurement values, the optical or electrical properties of the sample, the used light source, or the selected wavelength. Furthermore, the samples can be tilted, rough, bent, or of different surface materials. In the following the principle is implemented using an optical beam induced current system, but basically it can be applied to any other scanning light stimulation system. Measurements to demonstrate its operation are shown, using a polycrystalline silicon solar cell.

  18. Fluorescence molecular imaging system with a novel mouse surface extraction method and a rotary scanning scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yue; Zhu, Dianwen; Baikejiang, Reheman; Li, Changqing

    2015-03-01

    We have developed a new fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT) imaging system, in which we utilized a phase shifting method to extract the mouse surface geometry optically and a rotary laser scanning approach to excite fluorescence molecules and acquire fluorescent measurements on the whole mouse body. Nine fringe patterns with a phase shifting of 2π/9 are projected onto the mouse surface by a projector. The fringe patterns are captured using a webcam to calculate a phase map that is converted to the geometry of the mouse surface with our algorithms. We used a DigiWarp approach to warp a finite element mesh of a standard digital mouse to the measured mouse surface thus the tedious and time-consuming procedure from a point cloud to mesh is avoided. Experimental results indicated that the proposed method is accurate with errors less than 0.5 mm. In the FMT imaging system, the mouse is placed inside a conical mirror and scanned with a line pattern laser that is mounted on a rotation stage. After being reflected by the conical mirror, the emitted fluorescence photons travel through central hole of the rotation stage and the band pass filters in a motorized filter wheel, and are collected by a CCD camera. Phantom experimental results of the proposed new FMT imaging system can reconstruct the target accurately.

  19. EEZ-SCAN: A U. S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY SEA-FLOOR IMAGING PROGRAM USING THE GLORIA SIDE-SCAN SONAR SYSTEM.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hill, Gary W.

    1985-01-01

    The U. S. Geological Survey initiated Program EEZ-SCAN in April 1984 in cooperation with the Institute of Oceanographic Sciences (IOS) of the United Kingdom to map the U. S. Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) at reconnaissance scale as a first effort to develop a geologic understanding of the new national territory. GLORIA*, a unique side-scan sonar system capable of mapping over 27,000 sq. km per day, is the principal tool being used in the mapping surveys. In 1984, GLORIA surveys were conducted in the EEZ off California, Oregon, and Washington covering an area of approximately 250,000 sq. nautical miles. These surveys were highlighted by discoveries of major geologic features.

  20. Integral three-dimensional television using a 2000-scanning-line video system.

    PubMed

    Arai, Jun; Okui, Makoto; Yamashita, Takayuki; Okano, Fumio

    2006-03-10

    We have developed an integral three-dimensional (3-D) television that uses a 2000-scanning-line video system that can shoot and display 3-D color moving images in real time. We had previously developed an integral 3-D television that used a high-definition television system. The new system uses -6 times as many elemental images [160 (horizontal) x 118 (vertical) elemental images] arranged at -1.5 times the density to improve further the picture quality of the reconstructed image. Through comparison an image near the lens array can be reconstructed at -1.9 times the spatial frequency, and the viewing angle is -1.5 times as wide. PMID:16572684

  1. Scanning Electron Microscope Mapping System Developed for Detecting Surface Defects in Fatigue Specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonacuse, Peter J.; Kantzos, Peter T.

    2002-01-01

    An automated two-degree-of-freedom specimen positioning stage has been developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center to map and monitor defects in fatigue specimens. This system expedites the examination of the entire gauge section of fatigue specimens so that defects can be found using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Translation and rotation stages are driven by microprocessor-based controllers that are, in turn, interfaced to a computer running custom-designed software. This system is currently being used to find and record the location of ceramic inclusions in powder metallurgy materials. The mapped inclusions are periodically examined during interrupted fatigue experiments. The number of cycles to initiate cracks from these inclusions and the rate of growth of initiated cracks can then be quantified. This information is necessary to quantify the effect of this type of defect on the durability of powder metallurgy materials. This system was developed with support of the Ultra Safe program.

  2. Calibration of the Space Shuttle Microwave Scanning Beam Landing System using a laser tracker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ford, K.

    1979-01-01

    Verification tests of the Space Shuttle Microwave Scanning Beam Landing System (MSBLS) performed with respect to the Precision Laser Tracking System are reported. MSBLS ground station measurements of the azimuth, elevation and range of a NASA Jetstar aircraft equipped with a laser retroreflector, a MSBLS antenna and commissioning instruments including a MSBLS navigation set of the type installed in the Orbiter, during the performance of radial, orbital and glideslope runs with respect to the ground station were compared with laser ground station measurements of aircraft position. Data obtained from flight testing at Shuttle landing sites reveal MSBLS distance measuring equipment performance to be very good, with elevation errors found at very low elevation angles and azimuth errors as a function of aircraft attitude. The Precision Laser Tracking System has thus proven to be a satisfactory instrument for determining MSBLS performance, and an ideal instrument for its calibration.

  3. Nanoscale Electromechanics of Ferroelectric and Biological Systems: A New Dimension in Scanning Probe Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Kalinin, Sergei V; Rodriguez, Brian J; Jesse, Stephen; Karapetian, Edgar; Mirman, B; Eliseev, E. A.; Morozovska, A. N.

    2007-01-01

    Functionality of biological and inorganic systems ranging from nonvolatile computer memories and microelectromechanical systems to electromotor proteins and cellular membranes is ultimately based on the intricate coupling between electrical and mechanical phenomena. In the past decade, piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) has been established as a powerful tool for nanoscale imaging, spectroscopy, and manipulation of ferroelectric and piezoelectric materials. Here, we give an overview of the fundamental image formation mechanism in PFM and summarize recent theoretical and technological advances. In particular, we show that the signal formation in PFM is complementary to that in the scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques, and we discuss the implications. We also consider the prospect of extending PFM beyond ferroelectric characterization for quantitative probing of electromechanical behavior in molecular and biological systems and high-resolution probing of static and dynamic polarization switching processes in low-dimensional ferroelectric materials and heterostructures.

  4. Development of a scanning tunneling potentiometry system for measurement of electronic transport at short length scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozler, Michael

    It is clear that complete understanding of macroscopic properties of materials is impossible without a thorough knowledge of behavior at the smallest length scales. While the past 25 years have witnessed major advances in a variety of techniques that probe the nanoscale properties of matter, electrical transport measurements -- the heart of condensed matter research -- have lagged behind, never progressing beyond bulk measurements. This thesis describes a scanning tunneling potentiometry (STP) system developed to simultaneously map the transport-related electrochemical potential distribution of a biased sample along with its surface topography, extending electronic transport measurements to the nanoscale. Combining a novel sample biasing technique with a continuous current-nulling feedback scheme pushes the noise performance of the measurement to its fundamental limit - the Johnson noise of the STM tunnel junction. The resulting 130 nV voltage sensitivity allows us to spatially resolve local potentials at scales down to 2 nm, while maintaining atomic scale STM imaging, all at scan sizes of up to 15 microns. A mm-range two-dimensional coarse positioning stage and the ability to operate from liquid helium to room temperature with a fast turn-around time greatly expand the versatility of the instrument. Use of carefully selected model materials, combined with excellent topographic and voltage resolution has allowed us to distinguish measurement artifacts caused by surface roughness from true potentiometric features, a major problem in previous STP measurements. The measurements demonstrate that STP can produce physically meaningful results for homogeneous transport as well as non-uniform conduction dominated by material microstructures. Measurements of several physically interesting materials systems are presented as well, revealing new behaviors at the smallest length sales. The results establish scanning tunneling potentiometry as a useful tool for physics and

  5. Semi-empirical inversion technique for retrieval of quantitative attenuation profiles with underwater scanning lidar systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vuorenkoski, Anni K.; Dalgleish, Fraser R.; Twardowski, Michael S.; Ouyang, Bing; Trees, Charles C.

    2015-05-01

    A fine structure underwater imaging LiDAR (FSUIL) has recently been developed and initial field trials have been conducted. The instrument, which rapidly scans an array of closely spaced, narrow, collimated laser pulses into the water column produces two-dimensional arrays of backscatter profiles, with fine spatial and temporal resolution. In this paper a novel method to derive attenuation profiles is introduced. This approach is particularly attractive in applications where primary on-board processing is required, and other applications where conventional model-based approaches are not feasible due to a limited computational capacity or lack of a priori knowledge of model input parameters. The paper also includes design details regarding the new FSUIL instrument are given, with field results taken in clear to moderately turbid water being presented to illustrate the various effects and considerations in the analysis of the system data. LiDAR waveforms and LiDAR derived attenuation coefficients are analyzed and compared to calibrated beam attenuation, particulate scattering and absorption coefficients. The system was field tested during the NATO Ligurian Sea LIDAR & Optical Measurements Experiment (LLOMEx) cruise in March 2013, during the spring bloom conditions. Throughout a wide range of environmental conditions, the FSUIL was deployed on an in situ profiler obtaining thousands of three-dimensional LiDAR scans from the near surface down to the lower thermocline. Deployed concurrent to the FSUIL was a range of commercially available off-the-shelf instruments providing side-by-side in-situ attenuation measurement.

  6. Design and experimental results for a compact laser printer optical system with MEMS scanning mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Takatoshi; Seki, Daisuke; Fujii, Shuichi; Mukai, Yukihiro

    2010-02-01

    There are many features expected by printer users, which include high resolution, low price, compact size, color, high speed printing and so on. Laser printers generally utilize a polygon mirror as a reflector in their optical configurations, but the usual size of the polygon mirror prevents laser scanning unit from being made much smaller. We have been conducting research on techniques which can contribute to reducing the optical unit size. Although oscillating mirror made with MEMS technology enables the system to be compact, it requires a sophisticated optical design having an increased number of constraints due to the change in angular velocity which varies depending on the orientation of the mirror, while the polygon mirror allows the scanning with constant speed. Using a small MEMS mirror is one of the critical issues concerning the reduction of cost. We have successfully resolved all the challenges listed above by using high-precision free-form optical surfaces and an optical layout making efficient use of 3D space. Our techniques can make the unit size much smaller and reduce the price. The optical path is designed to have a ray passing through a lens twice. We report both theoretical and experimental results for this system.

  7. Evaluation of three different rotary systems during endodontic retreatment - Analysis by scanning electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Vidal, Flávia-Teixeira; Nunes, Eduardo; Horta, Martinho-Campolina-Rebello; Freitas, Maria-Rita-Lopes-da Silva

    2016-01-01

    Background Endodontic therapy is considered a series of important and interdependent steps, and failure of any of these steps may compromise the treatment outcome. This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of three different rotary systems in removing obturation materials during endodontic retreatment using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis. Material and Methods Thirty-six endodontically treated teeth were selected and divided into 3 groups of 10 and 1 control group with 6 dental elements. The groups were divided according to the rotary system used for removing gutta-percha, as follows: G1: ProTaper system; G2: K3 system; G3: Mtwo system; and G4: Control group. Thereafter, the roots were split and the sections were observed under SEM, for analysis and counting of clear dentinal tubules, creating the variable “degree of dentinal tubule patency” (0: intensely clear; 1: moderately clear; 2: slightly clear; 3: completely blocked). The data were subjected to the Friedman and Kruskal-Wallis statistical tests. Results No differences were observed in the “degree of dentinal tubule patency” neither between the root thirds (to each evaluated group) nor between the groups (to each evaluated third). Nevertheless, when the three root thirds were grouped (providing evaluation of all root extension), the “degree of dentinal tubule patency” was lower in G1 than in G3 (p<0.05), but showed no differences neither between G1 and G2 nor G2 and G3. Conclusions No technique was able to completely remove the canal obturation material, despite G1 having shown better results, although without significant difference to G2 Key words:Scanning electron microscopy, NiTi, retreatment. PMID:27034750

  8. Scanning infrared remote sensing system for identification, visualization, and quantification of airborne pollutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harig, Roland; Matz, Gerhard; Rusch, Peter

    2002-02-01

    Remote sensing by Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometry allows detection, identification, and quantification of airborne pollutants. In the case of leaks in pipelines or leaks in chemical plants, chemical accidents, terrorism, or war, hazardous compounds are often released into the atmosphere. Various Fourier-transform infrared spectrometers have been developed for the remote detection and identification of hazardous clouds. However, for the localization of a leak and a complete assessment of the situation in the case of the release of a hazardous cloud, information about the position and the size of a cloud is essential. Therefore, an imaging passive remote sensing system comprised of an interferometer (Bruker OPAG 22), a data acquisition, processing, and control system with a digital signal processor (FTIR DSP), an azimuth-elevation-scanning mirror, a video system with a DSP, and a personal computer has been developed. The FTIR DSP system controls the scanning mirror, collects the interferograms, and performs the Fourier transformation. The spectra are transferred to a personal computer and analyzed by a real-time identification algorithm that does not require background spectra for the analysis. The results are visualized by a video image, overlaid by false color images. For each target compound of a spectral library, images of the coefficient of correlation, the signal to noise ratio, the brightness temperature of the background, the difference between the temperature of the ambient air and the brightness temperature of the background, and the noise equivalent column density are produced. The column densities of all directions in which a target compound has been identified may be retrieved by a nonlinear least squares fitting algorithm and an additional false color image is displayed. The system has a high selectivity, low noise equivalent spectral radiance, and it allows identification, visualization, and quantification of pollutant clouds.

  9. INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION REPORT "FIELD MEASUREMENT TECHNOLOGIES FOR TOTAL PETROLEUM HYDROCARBONS IN SOIL" ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS CORPORATION SYNCHRONOUS SCANNING LUMINOSCOPE

    EPA Science Inventory


    The Synchronous Scanning Luminoscope (Luminoscope) developed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in collaboration with Environmental Systems Corporation (ESC) was demonstrated under the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation Program i...

  10. Naeglaeria infection of the central nervous system, CT scan findings: a case series.

    PubMed

    Naqi, Rohana; Azeemuddin, Muhammad

    2013-03-01

    The imaging findings in four cases of a rare infection of the central nervous system caused by amoebae, Naeglaeria fowleri are presented. Naeglaeria fowleri are pathogenic free-living amoebae. They cause primary amoebic meningoencephalitis (PAM), a rapidly fatal disease of the central nervous system. The computed tomography brain findings in 3 (75%) of our cases of pan amoebic meningoencephalitis showed non-specific brain oedema; 2 (66%) of these cases also had moderate hydrocephalus and among that 1 (50%) case showed an old lacunar infarction in peri-ventricular region. In the remaining 1 (25%) case the scan was normal with no evidence of oedema or abnormal lesion. Out of three cases with diffuse brain oedema, postcontrast images showed abnormal meningeal enhancement throughout the brain parenchyma in 1 (33%) case. However, no definite focal enhancing lesion was noted. In the rest of the cases, no abnormal parenchymal or meningeal enhancement was seen on post-contrast images. PMID:23914650

  11. Ultra-high vacuum compatible optical chopper system for synchrotron x-ray scanning tunneling microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Hao; Cummings, Marvin; Shirato, Nozomi; Stripe, Benjamin; Rosenmann, Daniel; Preissner, Curt; Freeland, John W.; Kersell, Heath; Hla, Saw-Wai; Rose, Volker

    2016-01-01

    High-speed beam choppers are a crucial part of time-resolved x-ray studies as well as a necessary component to enable elemental contrast in synchrotron x-ray scanning tunneling microscopy (SX-STM). However, many chopper systems are not capable of operation in vacuum, which restricts their application to x-ray studies with high photon energies, where air absorption does not present a significant problem. To overcome this limitation, we present a fully ultra-high vacuum (UHV) compatible chopper system capable of operating at variable chopping frequencies up to 4 kHz. The lightweight aluminum chopper disk is coated with Ti and Au films to provide the required beam attenuation for soft and hard x-rays with photon energies up to about 12 keV. The chopper is used for lock-in detection of x-ray enhanced signals in SX-STM.

  12. Development of Novel System Combining Scanning Tunneling Microscope-Based Cathodoluminescence and Electroluminescence Nanospectroscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Kentaro; Nakamura, Yoshiaki; Kuboya, Shigeyuki; Katayama, Ryuji; Onabe, Kentaro; Ichikawa, Masakazu

    2011-08-01

    Novel system equipped with conductive optical fiber probe scanning tunneling microscope (STM) and bipolar sample holder is a powerful tool to characterize light-emitting devices by several STM-based techniques at the same sample position, which can realize photoluminescence (PL), cathodoluminescence (CL), electroluminescence (EL), and electron beam induced current (EBIC) measurements with higher spatial resolutions than conventional techniques. In this study, we developed a STM-CL/EL system which combines STM-CL technique for high CL excitation power and high spatial resolution and STM-EL technique for local EL collection. We demonstrated spatially resolved STM-CL/EL spectroscopy of GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure (110) cross-sections.

  13. An efficient solid modeling system based on a hand-held 3D laser scan device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Hanwei; Xu, Jun; Xu, Chenxi; Pan, Ming

    2014-12-01

    The hand-held 3D laser scanner sold in the market is appealing for its port and convenient to use, but price is expensive. To develop such a system based cheap devices using the same principles as the commercial systems is impossible. In this paper, a simple hand-held 3D laser scanner is developed based on a volume reconstruction method using cheap devices. Unlike convenient laser scanner to collect point cloud of an object surface, the proposed method only scan few key profile curves on the surface. Planar section curve network can be generated from these profile curves to construct a volume model of the object. The details of design are presented, and illustrated by the example of a complex shaped object.

  14. Development of a three-dimensional scanning microparticle image velocimetry system using a piezo actuator

    SciTech Connect

    Shinohara, Kyosuke; Sugii, Yasuhiko; Jeong, Jae Hong; Okamoto, Koji

    2005-10-15

    A technique for measuring the full field (x,y,z,u,v,w) velocity distribution of fluid flow at a micrometer scale spatial resolution has been developed. To investigate three-dimensional (3D) flow structures on a microscopic scale, a 3D scanning microparticle image velocimetry system was developed by combining a high-speed camera, an epifluorescent microscope, a cw laser, and a piezo actuator. Both numerical simulations and an experiment were carried out in order to validate the measurement accuracy of the system. Optimum measurement conditions were determined by numerical simulations using synthetic images under epifluorescent microscope observation. As a demonstration, the three-dimensional velocity distribution of water flow inside a microround tube having a diameter of 95 {mu}m was measured at a spatial resolution of 5.4x2.7x4.2 {mu}m.

  15. Upgrade and benchmarking of a 4D treatment planning system for scanned ion beam therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Richter, D.; Schwarzkopf, A.; Trautmann, J.; Durante, M.; Kraemer, M.; Jaekel, O.; Bert, C.

    2013-05-15

    Purpose: Upgrade and benchmarking of a research 4D treatment planning system (4DTPS) suitable for realistic patient treatment planning and treatment simulations taking into account specific requirements for scanned ion beam therapy, i.e., modeling of dose heterogeneities due to interplay effects and range changes caused by patient motion and dynamic beam delivery. Methods: The 4DTPS integrates data interfaces to 4D computed tomography (4DCT), deformable image registration and clinically used motion monitoring devices. The authors implemented a novel data model for 4D image segmentation using Boolean mask volume datasets and developed an algorithm propagating a manually contoured reference contour dataset to all 4DCT phases. They further included detailed treatment simulation and dose reconstruction functionality, based on the irregular patient motion and the temporal structure of the beam delivery. The treatment simulation functionality was validated against experimental data from irradiation of moving radiographic films in air, 3D moving ionization chambers in a water phantom, and moving cells in a biological phantom with a scanned carbon ion beam. The performance of the program was compared to results obtained with predecessor programs. Results: The measured optical density distributions of the radiographic films were reproduced by the simulations to (-2 {+-} 12)%. Compared to earlier versions of the 4DTPS, the mean agreement improved by 2%, standard deviations were reduced by 7%. The simulated dose to the moving ionization chambers in water showed an agreement with the measured dose of (-1 {+-} 4)% for the typical beam configuration. The mean deviation of the simulated from the measured biologically effective dose determined via cell survival was (617 {+-} 538) mGy relative biological effectiveness corresponding to (10 {+-} 9)%. Conclusions: The authors developed a research 4DTPS suitable for realistic treatment planning on patient data and capable of simulating

  16. Investigation of tomosynthetic perfusion measurements using the scanning-beam digital x-ray (SBDX) system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nett, Brian E.; Chen, Guang-Hong; Van Lysel, Michael S.; Betts, Timothy; Speidel, Michael; Rowley, Howard A.; Aagaard Kienitz, Beverly D.; Mistretta, Charles A.

    2004-10-01

    The feasibility of making regional perfusion measurements using a tomosynthetic digital subtraction angiography (TDSA) acquisition has been demonstrated. The study of tomosynthetic perfusion measurements was motivated by the clinical desire for perfusion measurements in an interventional angiography suite. These pilot studies were performed using the scanning-beam digital x-ray (SBDX) system which is an inverse-geometry imaging device which utilizes an electromagnetically-scanned x-ray source, and a small CdTe direct conversion photon counting detector. The scanning electron source was used to acquire planar-tomographic images of a 12.5 x 12.5 cm field of view at a frame rate of 15 frames/sec during dynamic contrast injection. A beagle animal model was used to evaluate the tomosynthetic perfusion measurements. A manual bolus injection of iodinated contrast solution was used in order to resolve the parameters of the contrast pass curve. The acquired planar tomosynthetic dataset was reconstructed with a simple back-projection algorithm. Digital subtraction techniques were used to visualize the change in contrast agent intensity in each reconstructed plane. Given the TDSA images, region of interest based analysis was used in the selection of the image pixels corresponding to the artery and tissue bed. The mean transit time (MTT), regional cerebral blood volume (rCBV) and regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) were extracted from the tomosynthetic data for selected regions in each of the desired reconstructed planes. For the purpose of this study, the arterial contrast enhancement curve was fit with a combination of gamma variate terms, and the MTT was calculated using a deconvolution based on the singular value decomposition (SVD). The results of the contrast pass curves derived with TDSA were consistent with the results from perfusion measurements as implemented with CT acquisition.

  17. An Automated and Intelligent Medical Decision Support System for Brain MRI Scans Classification.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Muhammad Faisal; Reza, Ahmed Wasif; Kanesan, Jeevan

    2015-01-01

    A wide interest has been observed in the medical health care applications that interpret neuroimaging scans by machine learning systems. This research proposes an intelligent, automatic, accurate, and robust classification technique to classify the human brain magnetic resonance image (MRI) as normal or abnormal, to cater down the human error during identifying the diseases in brain MRIs. In this study, fast discrete wavelet transform (DWT), principal component analysis (PCA), and least squares support vector machine (LS-SVM) are used as basic components. Firstly, fast DWT is employed to extract the salient features of brain MRI, followed by PCA, which reduces the dimensions of the features. These reduced feature vectors also shrink the memory storage consumption by 99.5%. At last, an advanced classification technique based on LS-SVM is applied to brain MR image classification using reduced features. For improving the efficiency, LS-SVM is used with non-linear radial basis function (RBF) kernel. The proposed algorithm intelligently determines the optimized values of the hyper-parameters of the RBF kernel and also applied k-fold stratified cross validation to enhance the generalization of the system. The method was tested by 340 patients' benchmark datasets of T1-weighted and T2-weighted scans. From the analysis of experimental results and performance comparisons, it is observed that the proposed medical decision support system outperformed all other modern classifiers and achieves 100% accuracy rate (specificity/sensitivity 100%/100%). Furthermore, in terms of computation time, the proposed technique is significantly faster than the recent well-known methods, and it improves the efficiency by 71%, 3%, and 4% on feature extraction stage, feature reduction stage, and classification stage, respectively. These results indicate that the proposed well-trained machine learning system has the potential to make accurate predictions about brain abnormalities from the

  18. Development of teaching modules for geology and engineering coursework using terrestrial LiDAR scanning systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yarbrough, L. D.; Katzenstein, K.

    2012-12-01

    Exposing students to active and local examples of physical geologic processes is beneficial to the learning process. Students typically respond with interest to examples that use state-of-the-art technologies to investigate local or regional phenomena. For lower cognitive level of learning (e.g. knowledge, comprehension, and application), the use of "close-to-home" examples ensures that students better understand concepts. By providing these examples, the students may already have a familiarity or can easily visit the location. Furthermore, these local and regional examples help students to offer quickly other examples of similar phenomena. Investigation of these examples using normal photographic techniques, as well as a more sophisticated 3-D Light Detection And Ranging (LiDAR) (AKA Terrestrial Laser Scanning or TLS) system, allows students to gain a better understanding of the scale and the mechanics of the geologic processes and hazards. The systems are used for research, teaching and outreach efforts and depending on departmental policies can be accessible to students are various learning levels. TLS systems can yield scans at sub-centimeter resolution and contain surface reflectance of targets. These systems can serve a number of learning goals that are essential for training geoscientists and engineers. While querying the data to answer geotechnical or geomorphologic related questions, students will develop skills using large, spatial databases. The upper cognitive level of learning (e.g. analysis, synthesis, and evaluation) is also promoted by using a subset of the data and correlating the physical geologic process of stream bank erosion and rock slope failures with mathematical and computer models using the scanned data. Students use the examples and laboratory exercises to help build their engineering judgment skills with Earth materials. The students learn not only applications of math and engineering science but also the economic and social implication

  19. Permanent 3D laser scanning system for an active landslide in Gresten (Austria)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canli, Ekrem; Höfle, Bernhard; Hämmerle, Martin; Benni, Thiebes; Glade, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Terrestrial laser scanners (TLS) have widely been used for high spatial resolution data acquisition of topographic features and geomorphic analyses. Existing applications encompass different landslides including rockfall, translational or rotational landslides, debris flow, but also coastal cliff erosion, braided river evolution or river bank erosion. The main advantages of TLS are (a) the high spatial sampling density of XYZ-measurements (e.g. 1 point every 2-3 mm at 10 m distance), particularly in comparison with the low data density monitoring techniques such as GNSS or total stations, (b) the millimeter accuracy and precision of the range measurement to centimeter accuracy of the final DEM, and (c) the highly dense area-wide scanning that enables to look through vegetation and to measure bare ground. One of its main constraints is the temporal resolution of acquired data due to labor costs and time requirements for field campaigns. Thus, repetition measurements are generally performed only episodically. However, for an increased scientific understanding of the processes as well as for early warning purposes, we present a novel permanent 3D monitoring setup to increase the temporal resolution of TLS measurements. This accounts for different potential monitoring deliverables such as volumetric calculations, spatio-temporal movement patterns, predictions and even alerting. This system was installed at the active Salcher landslide in Gresten (Austria) that is situated in the transition zone of the Gresten Klippenbelt (Helvetic) and the Flyschzone (Penninic). The characteristic lithofacies are the Gresten Beds of Early Jurassic age that are covered by a sequence of marly and silty beds with intercalated sandy limestones. Permanent data acquisition can be implemented into our workflow with any long-range TLS system offering fully automated capturing. We utilize an Optech ILRIS-3D scanner. The time interval between two scans is currently set to 24 hours, but can be

  20. Calibration improvements to electronically scanned pressure systems and preliminary statistical assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Everhart, Joel L.

    1996-01-01

    Orifice-to-orifice inconsistencies in data acquired with an electronically-scanned pressure system at the beginning of a wind tunnel experiment forced modifications to the standard, instrument calibration procedures. These modifications included a large increase in the number of calibration points which would allow a critical examination of the calibration curve-fit process, and a subsequent post-test reduction of the pressure data. Evaluation of these data has resulted in an improved functional representation of the pressure-voltage signature for electronically-scanned pressures sensors, which can reduce the errors due to calibration curve fit to under 0.10 percent of reading compared to the manufacturer specified 0.10 percent of full scale. Application of the improved calibration function allows a more rational selection of the calibration set-point pressures. These pressures should be adjusted to achieve a voltage output which matches the physical shape of the pressure-voltage signature of the sensor. This process is conducted in lieu of the more traditional approach where a calibration pressure is specified and the resulting sensor voltage is recorded. The fifteen calibrations acquired over the two-week duration of the wind tunnel test were further used to perform a preliminary, statistical assessment of the variation in the calibration process. The results allowed the estimation of the bias uncertainty for a single instrument calibration; and, they form the precursor for more extensive and more controlled studies in the laboratory.

  1. Microwave bone imaging: a preliminary scanning system for proof-of-concept

    PubMed Central

    Cuccaro, Antonio; Solimene, Raffaele; Brancaccio, Adriana; Basile, Bruno; Ammann, Max J.

    2016-01-01

    This Letter introduces a feasibility study of a scanning system for applications in biomedical bone imaging operating in the microwave range 0.5–4 GHz. Mechanical uncertainties and data acquisition time are minimised by using a fully automated scanner that controls two antipodal Vivaldi antennas. Accurate antenna positioning and synchronisation with data acquisition enables a rigorous proof-of-concept for the microwave imaging procedure of a multi-layer phantom including skin, fat, muscle and bone tissues. The presence of a suitable coupling medium enables antenna miniaturisation and mitigates the impedance mismatch between antennas and phantom. The three-dimensional image of tibia and fibula is successfully reconstructed by scanning the multi-layer phantom due to the distinctive dielectric contrast between target and surrounding tissues. These results show the viability of a microwave bone imaging technology which is low cost, portable, non-ionising, and does not require specially trained personnel. In fact, as no a-priori characterisation of the antenna is required, the image formation procedure is very conveniently simplified. PMID:27733930

  2. Design and Implementation of a Mechanical Control System for the Scanning Microwave Limb Sounder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowden, William

    2011-01-01

    The Scanning Microwave Limb Sounder (SMLS) will use technological improvements in low noise mixers to provide precise data on the Earth's atmospheric composition with high spatial resolution. This project focuses on the design and implementation of a real time control system needed for airborne engineering tests of the SMLS. The system must coordinate the actuation of optical components using four motors with encoder readback, while collecting synchronized telemetric data from a GPS receiver and 3-axis gyrometric system. A graphical user interface for testing the control system was also designed using Python. Although the system could have been implemented with a FPGA-based setup, we chose to use a low cost processor development kit manufactured by XMOS. The XMOS architecture allows parallel execution of multiple tasks on separate threads-making it ideal for this application and is easily programmed using XC (a subset of C). The necessary communication interfaces were implemented in software, including Ethernet, with significant cost and time reduction compared to an FPGA-based approach. For these reasons, the XMOS technology is an attractive, cost effective, alternative to FPGA-based technologies for this design and similar rapid prototyping projects.

  3. Possibilities of a Personal Laser Scanning System for Forest Mapping and Ecosystem Services

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Xinlian; Kukko, Antero; Kaartinen, Harri; Hyyppä, Juha; Yu, Xiaowei; Jaakkola, Anttoni; Wang, Yunsheng

    2014-01-01

    A professional-quality, personal laser scanning (PLS) system for collecting tree attributes was demonstrated in this paper. The applied system, which is wearable by human operators, consists of a multi-constellation navigation system and an ultra-high-speed phase-shift laser scanner mounted on a rigid baseplate and consisting of a single sensor block. A multipass-corridor-mapping method was developed to process PLS data and a 2,000 m2 forest plot was utilized in the test. The tree stem detection accuracy was 82.6%; the root mean square error (RMSE) of the estimates of tree diameter at breast height (DBH) was 5.06 cm; the RMSE of the estimates of tree location was 0.38 m. The relative RMSE of the DBH estimates was 14.63%. The results showed, for the first time, the potential of the PLS system in mapping large forest plots. Further research on mapping accuracy in various forest conditions, data correction methods and multi-sensoral positioning techniques is needed. The utilization of this system in different applications, such as harvester operations, should also be explored. In addition to collecting tree-level and plot-level data for forest inventory, other possible applications of PLS for forest ecosystem services include mapping of canopy gaps, measuring leaf area index of large areas, documenting and visualizing forest routes feasible for recreation, hiking and berry and mushroom picking. PMID:24434879

  4. Science Data Processing for the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer: Earth Observing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, H. Michael; Regner, Kathryn; Conover, Helen; Ashcroft, Peter; Wentz, Frank; Conway, Dawn; Lobl, Elena; Beaumont, Bruce; Hawkins, Lamar; Jones, Steve

    2004-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration established the framework for the Science Investigator-led Processing Systems (SIPS) to enable the Earth science data products to be produced by personnel directly associated with the instrument science team and knowledgeable of the science algorithms. One of the first instantiations implemented for NASA was the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer - Earth Observing System (AMSR-E) SIPS. The AMSR-E SIPS is a decentralized, geographically distributed ground data processing system composed of two primary components located in California and Alabama. Initial science data processing is conducted at Remote Sensing Systems (RSS) in Santa Rosa, California. RSS ingests antenna temperature orbit data sets from JAXA and converts them to calibrated, resampled, geolocated brightness temperatures. The brightness temperatures are sent to the Global Hydrology and Climate Center in Huntsville, Alabama, which generates the geophysical science data products (e.g., water vapor, sea surface temperature, sea ice extent, etc.) suitable for climate research and applications usage. These science products are subsequently sent to the National Snow and Ice Data Center Distributed Active Archive Center in Boulder, Colorado for archival and dissemination to the at-large science community. This paper describes the organization, coordination, and production techniques employed by the AMSR-E SIPS in implementing, automating and operating the distributed data processing system.

  5. Research on high precision equal-angle scanning method in rotary kiln temperature measurement system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Shaosheng; Guo, Zhongyuan; You, Changhui; Liu, Jinsong; Cheng, Yang; Tang, Huaming

    2016-05-01

    Aiming at traditional horizontal equal-angle scanning method's disadvantage of measurement error, a high precision equal-angle scanning method is proposed, the proposed method establishes a tilt scanning model by the following steps: introducing height variable, precisely calculating the viewing angle, building scanning model. The model is used to calculate scanning position on rotary kiln's surface, which helps to locate and track temperature variation. The experiment shows that the proposed method can effectively improve the precision of temperature spots' location on the rotary kiln surface.

  6. SAPling: a Scan-Add-Print barcoding database system to label and track asexual organisms

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Michael A.; Schötz, Eva-Maria

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY We have developed a ‘Scan-Add-Print’ database system, SAPling, to track and monitor asexually reproducing organisms. Using barcodes to uniquely identify each animal, we can record information on the life of the individual in a computerized database containing its entire family tree. SAPling has enabled us to carry out large-scale population dynamics experiments with thousands of planarians and keep track of each individual. The database stores information such as family connections, birth date, division date and generation. We show that SAPling can be easily adapted to other asexually reproducing organisms and has a strong potential for use in large-scale and/or long-term population and senescence studies as well as studies of clonal diversity. The software is platform-independent, designed for reliability and ease of use, and provided open source from our webpage to allow project-specific customization. PMID:21993779

  7. Ultrasonic Guided-Wave Scan System Used to Characterize Microstructure and Defects in Ceramic Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, Don J.; Cosgriff, Laura M.; Martin, Richard E.; Verrilli, Michael J.; Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.

    2004-01-01

    Ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) are being developed for advanced aerospace propulsion applications to save weight, improve reuse capability, and increase performance. However, mechanical and environmental loads applied to CMCs can cause discrete flaws and distributed microdamage, significantly reducing desirable physical properties. Such microdamage includes fiber/matrix debonding (interface failure), matrix microcracking, fiber fracture and buckling, oxidation, and second phase formation. A recent study (ref. 1) of the durability of a C/SiC CMC discussed the requirement for improved nondestructive evaluation (NDE) methods for monitoring degradation in these materials. Distributed microdamage in CMCs has proven difficult to characterize nondestructively because of the complex microstructure and macrostructure of these materials. This year, an ultrasonic guided-wave scan system developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center was used to characterize various microstructural and flaw conditions in SiC/SiC (silicon carbide fiber in silicon carbide matrix) and C/SiC (carbon fiber in silicon carbide matrix) CMC samples.

  8. Development of a Mechanical Scanning-type Intravascular Ultrasound System Using a Miniature Ultrasound Motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanabe, Masayuki; Xie, Shangping; Tagawa, Norio; Moriya, Tadashi; Furukawa, Yuji

    2007-07-01

    Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) plays an important role for the detection of arteriosclerosis, which causes the ischemic heart disease. In mechanical scanning-type IVUS, it is necessary to rotate a transducer or a reflecting mirror. A method that involves rotating the transducer using a torque wire causes image distortion (NURD: non uniform rotation distortion). For a method that involves placing an electromagnetic motor on the tip of an IVUS probe is difficult to miniaturize the probe. Our objectives are to miniaturize the probe (1 mm in diameter, 5 mm in length) and to remove NURD. Therefore, we conducted a study to assess the feasibility of attaining these objectives by constructing a prototype IVUS system, in which an ultrasound motor using a stator in the form of a helical coil (abbreviated as CS-USM: coiled stator-ultrasonic motor) is incorporated, and to clarify problems that need to be solved in constructing the probe.

  9. Tip alignment system in a sextupole-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruan, Shengyang; Kapp, Oscar H.

    1993-03-01

    Tip alignment and replacement in ultrahigh vacuum field-emission electron microscopes is traditionally a time-consuming endeavor. A convenient autodrive system for the 200 kV scanning transmission electron microscope was developed to facilitate the alignment of field-emission tips, thus saving a great deal of experimenter time. Under computer control, a series of automatic electrical and mechanical processes are initiated to systematically adjust various parameters to effect passage of the electron beam through the various apertures of the microscope column. The task of ``finding the beam'' is thus performed automatically. In this process the tip holder is moved in a raster parallel to the first anode. Feedback from various detectors placed throughout the column direct the positioning of the tip for optimal alignment. This process is routinely performed in about 45 min.

  10. Scanning multiple samples simultaneously in tube-based microCT systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stock, S. R.; Rajamannan, N. M.; Spelsberg, T. C.; Malayannan, S.; Riaz, R.; Polavarapu, M.; Hsu, E. L.; Hsu, W., K.; Chen, Yan; Zhang, Ming

    2010-09-01

    The world-wide explosion of commercial microComputed Tomography (microCT) system emplacement has led to dayin, day-out access to laboratory scanners. Most biologically-oriented microCT facilities must characterize large numbers of samples rapidly at moderate spatial resolution (e.g., 10-20 μm isotropic volume elements, voxels). Scanning multiple specimens simultaneously is one efficient solution. Sample positioning is critical if the region of interest of each specimen is to be imaged without increasing the number of slices recorded (i.e., data acquisition and reconstruction times). Three very different, multiple sample data acquisitions are reported: mouse heart tissue calcification, rat spinal fusion and mouse tibial bone cancer models

  11. Geometric validation of a mobile laser scanning system for urban applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Haiyan; Li, Jonathan; Yu, Yongtao; Liu, Yan

    2016-03-01

    Mobile laser scanning (MLS) technologies have been actively studied and implemented over the past decade, as their application fields are rapidly expanding and extending beyond conventional topographic mapping. Trimble's MX-8, as one of the MLS systems in the current market, generates rich survey-grade laser and image data for urban surveying. The objective of this study is to evaluate whether Trimble MX-8 MLS data satisfies the accuracy requirements of urban surveying. According to the formula of geo-referencing, accuracies of navigation solution and laser scanner determines the accuracy of the collected LiDAR point clouds. Two test sites were selected to test the performance of Trimble MX-8. Those extensive tests confirm that Trimble MX-8 offers a very promising tool to survey complex urban areas.

  12. An Airborne Scanning LiDAR System for Ocean and Coastal Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reineman, B. D.; Lenain, L.; Castel, D.; Melville, W. K.

    2008-12-01

    We have developed an airborne scanning LiDAR (Light Detection And Ranging) system and demonstrated its functionality for terrestrial and oceanographic measurements. Differential GPS (DGPS) and an Inertial Navigation System (INS) are synchronized with the LiDAR, providing end result vertical rms errors of approximately 6~cm. Flying 170~m above the surface, we achieve a point density of ~ 0.7 m-2 and a swath width of 90 to 120~m over ocean and 200~m over land. Georeferencing algorithms were developed in-house and earth-referenced data are available several hours after acquisition. Surveys from the system are compared with ground DGPS surveys and existing airborne surveys of fixed targets. Twelve research flights in a Piper Twin Comanche from August 2007 to July 2008 have provided topography of the Southern California coastline and sea surface wave fields in the nearshore ocean environment. Two of the flights also documented the results of the October 2007 landslide on Mt.~Soledad in La Jolla, California. Eight research flights aboard a Cessna Caravan surveyed the topography, lagoon, reef, and surrounding seas of Lady Elliot Island (LEI) in Australia's Great Barrier Reef in April 2008. We describe applications for the system, including coastal topographic surveys, wave measurements, reef research, and ship wake studies.

  13. Single-chip microcontroller system for CCD driving scan in LLMC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Binhua; Yang, Lei; Mao, Wei; Tie, Qiongxian

    2000-10-01

    According to the requirement of the Lower Latitude Meridian Circle (LLMC) that the instrument can still determine absolutely the position of a celestial body after a scientific CCD is attached to it, a new control plan is presented in this paper. The plan includes two parts. One is that the CCD camera is driven to track the stellar image in the horizontal direction when observed in the meridian direction. The other is that the CCD camera still moves in the horizontal, while the tube of the instrument moves in the vertical direction when observed in the prime vertical direction. In order to accomplish the plan we have developed a control system that includes three main parts: a personal computer (PC), a single chip microcontroller system for CCD driving scan and a vertical angle control system. The first to parts are described in the paper. The PC sends all kinds of instructions and data to the microcontroller via an output interface board. The control software in the PC is written in C++, and the one in the microcontroller is written in ASM. Two simplified program flow charts are presented. We also discuss the CCD tracking error caused by the control system, and propose a corresponding way to solve the problem.

  14. CHARACTERISING THE EOS SLOT-SCANNING SYSTEM WITH THE EFFECTIVE DETECTIVE QUANTUM EFFICIENCY.

    PubMed

    Clavel, A H; Monnin, P; Létang, J M; Verdun, F R; Darbon, A

    2016-06-01

    As opposed to the standard detective quantum efficiency (DQE), effective DQE (eDQE) is a figure of merit that allows comparing the performances of imaging systems in the presence of scatter rejection devices. The geometry of the EOS™ slot-scanning system is such that the detector is self-collimated and rejects scattered radiation. In this study, the EOS system was characterised using the eDQE in imaging conditions similar to those used in clinical practice: with phantoms of different widths placed in the X-ray beam, for various incident air kerma and tube voltages corresponding to the phantom thickness. Scatter fractions in EOS images were extremely low, around 2 % for all configurations. Maximum eDQE values spanned 9-14.8 % for a large range of air kerma at the detector plane from 0.01 to 1.34 µGy. These figures were obtained with non-optimised EOS setting but still over-performed most of the maximum eDQEs recently assessed for various computed radiology and digital radiology systems with antiscatter grids. PMID:26538617

  15. LiDAR Scan Matching Aided Inertial Navigation System in GNSS-Denied Environments.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jian; Chen, Yuwei; Niu, Xiaoji; Wang, Li; Chen, Liang; Liu, Jingbin; Shi, Chuang; Hyyppä, Juha

    2015-07-10

    A new scan that matches an aided Inertial Navigation System (INS) with a low-cost LiDAR is proposed as an alternative to GNSS-based navigation systems in GNSS-degraded or -denied environments such as indoor areas, dense forests, or urban canyons. In these areas, INS-based Dead Reckoning (DR) and Simultaneous Localization and Mapping (SLAM) technologies are normally used to estimate positions as separate tools. However, there are critical implementation problems with each standalone system. The drift errors of velocity, position, and heading angles in an INS will accumulate over time, and on-line calibration is a must for sustaining positioning accuracy. SLAM performance is poor in featureless environments where the matching errors can significantly increase. Each standalone positioning method cannot offer a sustainable navigation solution with acceptable accuracy. This paper integrates two complementary technologies-INS and LiDAR SLAM-into one navigation frame with a loosely coupled Extended Kalman Filter (EKF) to use the advantages and overcome the drawbacks of each system to establish a stable long-term navigation process. Static and dynamic field tests were carried out with a self-developed Unmanned Ground Vehicle (UGV) platform-NAVIS. The results prove that the proposed approach can provide positioning accuracy at the centimetre level for long-term operations, even in a featureless indoor environment.

  16. LiDAR Scan Matching Aided Inertial Navigation System in GNSS-Denied Environments

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Jian; Chen, Yuwei; Niu, Xiaoji; Wang, Li; Chen, Liang; Liu, Jingbin; Shi, Chuang; Hyyppä, Juha

    2015-01-01

    A new scan that matches an aided Inertial Navigation System (INS) with a low-cost LiDAR is proposed as an alternative to GNSS-based navigation systems in GNSS-degraded or -denied environments such as indoor areas, dense forests, or urban canyons. In these areas, INS-based Dead Reckoning (DR) and Simultaneous Localization and Mapping (SLAM) technologies are normally used to estimate positions as separate tools. However, there are critical implementation problems with each standalone system. The drift errors of velocity, position, and heading angles in an INS will accumulate over time, and on-line calibration is a must for sustaining positioning accuracy. SLAM performance is poor in featureless environments where the matching errors can significantly increase. Each standalone positioning method cannot offer a sustainable navigation solution with acceptable accuracy. This paper integrates two complementary technologies—INS and LiDAR SLAM—into one navigation frame with a loosely coupled Extended Kalman Filter (EKF) to use the advantages and overcome the drawbacks of each system to establish a stable long-term navigation process. Static and dynamic field tests were carried out with a self-developed Unmanned Ground Vehicle (UGV) platform—NAVIS. The results prove that the proposed approach can provide positioning accuracy at the centimetre level for long-term operations, even in a featureless indoor environment. PMID:26184206

  17. LiDAR Scan Matching Aided Inertial Navigation System in GNSS-Denied Environments.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jian; Chen, Yuwei; Niu, Xiaoji; Wang, Li; Chen, Liang; Liu, Jingbin; Shi, Chuang; Hyyppä, Juha

    2015-01-01

    A new scan that matches an aided Inertial Navigation System (INS) with a low-cost LiDAR is proposed as an alternative to GNSS-based navigation systems in GNSS-degraded or -denied environments such as indoor areas, dense forests, or urban canyons. In these areas, INS-based Dead Reckoning (DR) and Simultaneous Localization and Mapping (SLAM) technologies are normally used to estimate positions as separate tools. However, there are critical implementation problems with each standalone system. The drift errors of velocity, position, and heading angles in an INS will accumulate over time, and on-line calibration is a must for sustaining positioning accuracy. SLAM performance is poor in featureless environments where the matching errors can significantly increase. Each standalone positioning method cannot offer a sustainable navigation solution with acceptable accuracy. This paper integrates two complementary technologies-INS and LiDAR SLAM-into one navigation frame with a loosely coupled Extended Kalman Filter (EKF) to use the advantages and overcome the drawbacks of each system to establish a stable long-term navigation process. Static and dynamic field tests were carried out with a self-developed Unmanned Ground Vehicle (UGV) platform-NAVIS. The results prove that the proposed approach can provide positioning accuracy at the centimetre level for long-term operations, even in a featureless indoor environment. PMID:26184206

  18. Anatomy of the Intracortical Canal System: Scanning Electron Microscopy Study in Rabbit Femur

    PubMed Central

    Congiu, Terenzio; Raspanti, Mario; Ranchetti, Federico; Quacci, Daniela

    2009-01-01

    The current model of compact bone is that of a system of longitudinal (Haversian) canals connected by transverse (Volkmann’s) canals. Models based on histology or microcomputed tomography lack the morphologic detail and sense of temporal development provided by direct observation. Using direct scanning electron microscopy observation, we studied the bone surface and structure of the intracortical canal system in paired fractured surfaces in rabbit femurs, examining density of canal openings on periosteal and endosteal surfaces, internal network nodes and canal sizes, and collagen lining of the inner canal system. The blood supply of the diaphyseal compact bone entered the cortex through the canal openings on the endosteal and periosteal surfaces, with different morphologic features in the midshaft and distal shaft; their density was higher on endosteal than on periosteal surfaces in the midshaft but with no major differences among subregions. The circumference measurements along Haversian canals documented a steady reduction behind the head of the cutting cone but rather random variations as the distance from the head increased. These observations suggested discontinuous development and variable lamellar apposition rate of osteons in different segments of their trajectory. The frequent branching and types of network nodes suggested substantial osteonal plasticity and supported the model of a network organization. The collagen fibers of the canal wall were organized in intertwined, longitudinally oriented bundles with 0.1- to 0.5-μm holes connecting the canal lumen with the osteocyte canalicular system. PMID:19330389

  19. Atmospheric scanning electron microscope system with an open sample chamber: configuration and applications.

    PubMed

    Nishiyama, Hidetoshi; Koizumi, Mitsuru; Ogawa, Koji; Kitamura, Shinich; Konyuba, Yuji; Watanabe, Yoshiyuki; Ohbayashi, Norihiko; Fukuda, Mitsunori; Suga, Mitsuo; Sato, Chikara

    2014-12-01

    An atmospheric scanning electron microscope (ASEM) with an open sample chamber and optical microscope (OM) is described and recent developments are reported. In this ClairScope system, the base of the open sample dish is sealed to the top of the inverted SEM column, allowing the liquid-immersed sample to be observed by OM from above and by SEM from below. The optical axes of the two microscopes are aligned, ensuring that the same sample areas are imaged to realize quasi-simultaneous correlative microscopy in solution. For example, the cathodoluminescence of ZnO particles was directly demonstrated. The improved system has (i) a fully motorized sample stage, (ii) a column protection system in the case of accidental window breakage, and (iii) an OM/SEM operation system controlled by a graphical user interface. The open sample chamber allows the external administration of reagents during sample observation. We monitored the influence of added NaCl on the random motion of silica particles in liquid. Further, using fluorescence as a transfection marker, the effect of small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of endogenous Varp on Tyrp1 trafficking in melanocytes was examined. A temperature-regulated titanium ASEM dish allowed the dynamic observation of colloidal silver nanoparticles as they were heated to 240°C and sintered. PMID:25062041

  20. Image-guided intervention in the human bile duct using scanning fiber endoscope system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seibel, Eric J.; Jo, Javier A.; Melville, C. David; Johnston, Richard S.; Naumann, Christopher R.; Saunders, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    Bile duct cancers are increasing in frequency while being difficult to diagnose. Currently available endoscopic imaging devices used in the biliary tree are low resolution with poor image quality, leading to inadequate evaluation of indeterminate biliary strictures. However, a new ultrathin and flexible cholangioscope system has been successfully demonstrated in a human subject. This mini-cholangioscope system uses a scanning fiber endoscope (SFE) as a forward-imaging guidewire, dimensions of 1.2-mm diameter and 3-m length. Full color video (500-line resolution at 30Hz) is the standard SFE imaging mode using spiral scanning of red, green, and blue laser light at low power. Image-guided operation of the biopsy forceps was demonstrated in healthy human bile ducts with and without saline flushing. The laser-based video imaging can be switched to various modes to enhance tissue markers of disease, such as widefield fluorescence and enhanced spectral imaging. In parallel work, biochemical discrimination of tissue health in pig bile duct has been accomplished using fiberoptic delivery of pulsed UV illumination and time-resolved autofluorescence spectroscopic measurements. Implementation of time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy for biochemical assessment of the bile duct wall is being done through a secondary endoscopic channel. Preliminary results indicate that adequate SNR levels (> 30 dB) can be achieved through a 50 micron fiber, which could serve as an optical biopsy probe. The SFE is an ideal mini-cholangioscope for integration of both tissue and molecular specific image contrast in the future. This will provide the physician with unprecedented abilities to target biopsy locations and perform endoscopically-guided therapies.

  1. 3-D ultrasonic strain imaging based on a linear scanning system.

    PubMed

    Huang, Qinghua; Xie, Bo; Ye, Pengfei; Chen, Zhaohong

    2015-02-01

    This paper introduces a 3-D strain imaging method based on a freehand linear scanning mode. We designed a linear sliding track with a position sensor and a height-adjustable holder to constrain the movement of an ultrasound probe in a freehand manner. When moving the probe along the sliding track, the corresponding positional measures for the probe are transmitted via a wireless communication module based on Bluetooth in real time. In a single examination, the probe is scanned in two sweeps in which the height of the probe is adjusted by the holder to collect the pre- and postcompression radio-frequency echoes, respectively. To generate a 3-D strain image, a volume cubic in which the voxels denote relative strains for tissues is defined according to the range of the two sweeps. With respect to the post-compression frames, several slices in the volume are determined and the pre-compression frames are re-sampled to precisely correspond to the post-compression frames. Thereby, a strain estimation method based on minimizing a cost function using dynamic programming is used to obtain the 2-D strain image for each pair of frames from the re-sampled pre-compression sweep and the post-compression sweep, respectively. A software system is developed for volume reconstruction, visualization, and measurement of the 3-D strain images. The experimental results show that high-quality 3-D strain images of phantom and human tissues can be generated by the proposed method, indicating that the proposed system can be applied for real clinical applications (e.g., musculoskeletal assessments).

  2. Scanning Seismic Intrusion Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, R. D.

    1982-01-01

    Scanning seismic intrusion detector employs array of automatically or manually scanned sensors to determine approximate location of intruder. Automatic-scanning feature enables one operator to tend system of many sensors. Typical sensors used with new system are moving-coil seismic pickups. Detector finds uses in industrial security systems.

  3. Development of the compact proton beam therapy system dedicated to spot scanning with real-time tumor-tracking technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umezawa, Masumi; Fujimoto, Rintaro; Umekawa, Tooru; Fujii, Yuusuke; Takayanagi, Taisuke; Ebina, Futaro; Aoki, Takamichi; Nagamine, Yoshihiko; Matsuda, Koji; Hiramoto, Kazuo; Matsuura, Taeko; Miyamoto, Naoki; Nihongi, Hideaki; Umegaki, Kikuo; Shirato, Hiroki

    2013-04-01

    Hokkaido University and Hitachi Ltd. have started joint development of the Gated Spot Scanning Proton Therapy with Real-Time Tumor-Tracking System by integrating real-time tumor tracking technology (RTRT) and the proton therapy system dedicated to discrete spot scanning techniques under the "Funding Program for World-Leading Innovative R&D on Science and Technology (FIRST Program)". In this development, we have designed the synchrotron-based accelerator system by using the advantages of the spot scanning technique in order to realize a more compact and lower cost proton therapy system than the conventional system. In the gated irradiation, we have focused on the issues to maximize irradiation efficiency and minimize the dose errors caused by organ motion. In order to understand the interplay effect between scanning beam delivery and target motion, we conducted a simulation study. The newly designed system consists of the synchrotron, beam transport system, one compact rotating gantry treatment room with robotic couch, and one experimental room for future research. To improve the irradiation efficiency, the new control function which enables multiple gated irradiations per synchrotron cycle has been applied and its efficacy was confirmed by the irradiation time estimation. As for the interplay effect, we confirmed that the selection of a strict gating width and scan direction enables formation of the uniform dose distribution.

  4. A system architecture for sharing de-identified, research-ready brain scans and health information across clinical imaging centers.

    PubMed

    Chervenak, Ann L; van Erp, Theo G M; Kesselman, Carl; D'Arcy, Mike; Sobell, Janet; Keator, David; Dahm, Lisa; Murry, Jim; Law, Meng; Hasso, Anton; Ames, Joseph; Macciardi, Fabio; Potkin, Steven G

    2012-01-01

    Progress in our understanding of brain disorders increasingly relies on the costly collection of large standardized brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data sets. Moreover, the clinical interpretation of brain scans benefits from compare and contrast analyses of scans from patients with similar, and sometimes rare, demographic, diagnostic, and treatment status. A solution to both needs is to acquire standardized, research-ready clinical brain scans and to build the information technology infrastructure to share such scans, along with other pertinent information, across hospitals. This paper describes the design, deployment, and operation of a federated imaging system that captures and shares standardized, de-identified clinical brain images in a federation across multiple institutions. In addition to describing innovative aspects of the system architecture and our initial testing of the deployed infrastructure, we also describe the Standardized Imaging Protocol (SIP) developed for the project and our interactions with the Institutional Review Board (IRB) regarding handling patient data in the federated environment. PMID:22941984

  5. Evaluation of the propulsion control system of a planetary rover and design of a mast for an elevation scanning laser/multi-detector system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knaub, D.; Yerazunis, S. W.

    1978-01-01

    Vertical wheel loads, wheel speeds, and torque relationships are considered in the design of a propulsion system capable of responding to steering, slope climbing, and irregular local terrains. The system developed is applied to the RPI Mars roving vehicle. The mechanical system required to implement the elevation laser scanning/multidetector principle was the design and construction of a mechanical system for implementing the elevation scanning/multidetector principle is also discussed.

  6. Vibration Pattern Imager (VPI): A control and data acquisition system for scanning laser vibrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzi, Stephen A.; Brown, Donald E.; Shaffer, Thomas A.

    1993-01-01

    The Vibration Pattern Imager (VPI) system was designed to control and acquire data from scanning laser vibrometer sensors. The PC computer based system uses a digital signal processing (DSP) board and an analog I/O board to control the sensor and to process the data. The VPI system was originally developed for use with the Ometron VPI Sensor, but can be readily adapted to any commercially available sensor which provides an analog output signal and requires analog inputs for control of mirror positioning. The sensor itself is not part of the VPI system. A graphical interface program, which runs on a PC under the MS-DOS operating system, functions in an interactive mode and communicates with the DSP and I/O boards in a user-friendly fashion through the aid of pop-up menus. Two types of data may be acquired with the VPI system: single point or 'full field.' In the single point mode, time series data is sampled by the A/D converter on the I/O board (at a user-defined sampling rate for a selectable number of samples) and is stored by the PC. The position of the measuring point (adjusted by mirrors in the sensor) is controlled via a mouse input. The mouse input is translated to output voltages by the D/A converter on the I/O board to control the mirror servos. In the 'full field' mode, the measurement point is moved over a user-selectable rectangular area. The time series data is sampled by the A/D converter on the I/O board (at a user-defined sampling rate for a selectable number of samples) and converted to a root-mean-square (rms) value by the DSP board. The rms 'full field' velocity distribution is then uploaded for display and storage on the PC.

  7. Optimization of an adaptive SPECT system with the scanning linear estimator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanbari, Nasrin; Clarkson, Eric; Kupinski, Matthew A.; Li, Xin

    2015-08-01

    The adaptive single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) system studied here acquires an initial scout image to obtain preliminary information about the object. Then the configuration is adjusted by selecting the size of the pinhole and the magnification that optimize system performance on an ensemble of virtual objects generated to be consistent with the scout data. In this study the object is a lumpy background that contains a Gaussian signal with a variable width and amplitude. The virtual objects in the ensemble are imaged by all of the available configurations and the subsequent images are evaluated with the scanning linear estimator to obtain an estimate of the signal width and amplitude. The ensemble mean squared error (EMSE) on the virtual ensemble between the estimated and the true parameters serves as the performance figure of merit for selecting the optimum configuration. The results indicate that variability in the original object background, noise and signal parameters leads to a specific optimum configuration in each case. A statistical study carried out for a number of objects show that the adaptive system on average performs better than its nonadaptive counterpart.

  8. Imaging of aphakic intraocular lens with a slit-scanning tomography system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Cristina M.; Almeida, J. B.; Franco, S.

    2011-05-01

    Nowadays, cataract extraction with IOL implantation aims not only to restore the crystalline lens' transparency, but also to improve patients' retinal image quality. The refractive outcome and visual quality in pseudophakic eyes is mainly determined by the combination of corneal and internal optics resulting from the implanted IOLs. The optical function of the IOLs depends on its position in the eye. The IOL distance to the corneal apex determines the optical power needed for optical correction. In this paper it is described the usage of a slit-scanning imaging system to determine IOL positioning. Through the projection of the light from a slit onto the eye, this tomography system allows to acquire multiple sections of the anterior eye segment, at different meridians. The developed system's software corrects geometric and optical distortion of the images and provides 3-dimentional models of the eye's structures from the 2-dimensional sections. With this noninvasive technique, cross-sectional images of an eye with an aphakic IOL were obtained in order to reconstruct its 3- dimensional model of the lens and assess its position in the anterior segment camera.

  9. Development of Parallel Image Detection System Using Annular Pupils for Scanning Transmission Electron Microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Matsutani, Takaomi; Taya, Masaki; Ikuta, Takashi; Tanaka, Takeo; Kimura, Yoshihide; Takai, Yoshizo; Kawasaki, Tadahiro; Ichihashi, Mikio

    2010-10-13

    A parallel image detection system using an annular pupil for electron optics were developed to realize an increase in the depth of focus, aberration-free imaging and separation of amplitude and phase images under scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). Apertures for annular pupils able to suppress high-energy electron scattering were developed using a focused ion beam (FIB) technique. The annular apertures were designed with outer diameter of oe 40 {mu}m and inner diameter of oe32 {mu}m. A taper angle varying from 20 deg. to 1 deg. was applied to the slits of the annular apertures to suppress the influence of high-energy electron scattering. Each azimuth angle image on scintillator was detected by a multi-anode photomultiplier tube assembly through 40 optical fibers bundled in a ring shape. To focus the image appearing on the scintillator on optical fibers, an optical lens relay system attached with CCD camera was developed. The system enables the taking of 40 images simultaneously from different scattered directions.

  10. Surgical navigation display system using volume rendering of intraoperatively scanned CT images.

    PubMed

    Hayashibe, Mitsuhiro; Suzuki, Naoki; Hattori, Asaki; Otake, Yoshito; Suzuki, Shigeyuki; Nakata, Norio

    2006-09-01

    As operative procedures become more complicated, simply increasing the number of devices will not facilitate such operations. It is necessary to consider the ergonomics of the operating environment, especially with regard to the provision of navigation data, the prevention of technical difficulties, and the comfort of the operating room staff. We have designed and created a data-fusion interface that enables volumetric Maximum Intensity Projection (MIP) image navigation using intra-operative mobile 3D-CT data in the OR. The 3D volumetric data reflecting a patient's inner structure is directly displayed on the monitor through video images of the surgical field using a 3D optical tracking system, a ceiling-mounted articulating monitor, and a small-size video camera mounted at the back of the monitor. The system performance and accuracy was validated experimentally. This system provides a novel interface for a surgeon with volume rendering of intra-operatively scanned CT images, as opposed to preoperative images.

  11. Ag/ZnO hybrid systems studied with scanning tunnelling microscopy-based luminescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascua, Leandro; Stavale, Fernando; Nilius, Niklas; Freund, Hans-Joachim

    2016-03-01

    Coupled metal/oxide systems are prepared by depositing and embedding Ag nanoparticles into crystalline ZnO films grown on Au(111) supports. The morphology and optical properties of the compounds are investigated by topographic imaging and luminescence spectroscopy performed in a scanning tunnelling microscope (STM). The luminescence of bare ZnO is governed by the band-recombination and a Zn-vacancy related peak. After Ag deposition, two additional maxima are detected that are assigned to the in-plane and out-of-plane plasmon in Ag nanoparticles and have energies below and slightly above the oxide band-gap, respectively. Upon coating the particles with additional ZnO, the out-of-plane plasmon redshifts and loses intensity, indicating strong coupling to the oxide electronic system, while the in-plane mode broadens but remains detectable. The original situation can be restored by gently heating the sample, which drives the silver back to the surface. However, the optical response of pristine ZnO is not recovered even after silver evaporation at high temperature. Small discrepancies are explained with changes in the ZnO defect landscape, e.g., due to silver incorporation. Our experiments demonstrate how energy-transfer processes can be investigated in well-defined metal/oxide systems by means of STM-based spectroscopic techniques.

  12. A simple and accurate grading system for orthoiodohippurate renal scans in the assessment of post-transplant renal function

    SciTech Connect

    Zaki, S.K.; Bretan, P.N.; Go, R.T.; Rehm, P.K.; Streem, S.B.; Novick, A.C. )

    1990-06-01

    Orthoiodohippurate renal scanning has proved to be a reliable, noninvasive method for the evaluation and followup of renal allograft function. However, a standardized system for grading renal function with this test is not available. We propose a simple grading system to distinguish the different functional phases of hippurate scanning in renal transplant recipients. This grading system was studied in 138 patients who were evaluated 1 week after renal transplantation. There was a significant correlation between the isotope renographic functional grade and clinical correlates of allograft function such as the serum creatinine level (p = 0.0001), blood urea nitrogen level (p = 0.0001), urine output (p = 0.005) and need for hemodialysis (p = 0.007). We recommend this grading system as a simple and accurate method to interpret orthoiodohippurate renal scans in the evaluation and followup of renal allograft recipients.

  13. A New High Channel-Count, High Scan-Rate, Data Acquisition System for the NASA Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivanco, Thomas G.; Sekula, Martin K.; Piatak, David J.; Simmons, Scott A.; Babel, Walter C.; Collins, Jesse G.; Ramey, James M.; Heald, Dean M.

    2016-01-01

    A data acquisition system upgrade project, known as AB-DAS, is underway at the NASA Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel. AB-DAS will soon serve as the primary data system and will substantially increase the scan-rate capabilities and analog channel count while maintaining other unique aeroelastic and dynamic test capabilities required of the facility. AB-DAS is configurable, adaptable, and enables buffet and aeroacoustic tests by synchronously scanning all analog channels and recording the high scan-rate time history values for each data quantity. AB-DAS is currently available for use as a stand-alone data system with limited capabilities while development continues. This paper describes AB-DAS, the design methodology, and the current features and capabilities. It also outlines the future work and projected capabilities following completion of the data system upgrade project.

  14. PSIDD3: Post-Scan Ultrasonic Data Display System for the Windows-Based PC Including Fuzzy Logic Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovelace, Jeffrey J.; Cios, Krzysztof J.; Roth, Don J.; Cao, Wei

    2000-01-01

    Post-Scan Interactive Data Display (PSIDD) III is a user-oriented Windows-based system that facilitates the display and comparison of ultrasonic contact data. The system is optimized to compare ultrasonic measurements made at different locations within a material or at different stages of material degradation. PSIDD III provides complete analysis of the primary wave forms in the time and frequency domains along with the calculation of several frequency dependent properties including Phase Velocity and Attenuation Coefficient and several frequency independent properties, like the Cross Correlation Velocity. The system allows image generation on all of the frequency dependent properties at any available frequency (limited by the bandwidth used in the scans) and on any of the frequency independent properties. From ultrasonic contact scans, areas of interest on an image can be studied with regard to underlying raw waveforms and derived ultrasonic properties by simply selecting the point on the image. The system offers various modes of in-depth comparison between scan points. Up to five scan points can be selected for comparative analysis at once. The system was developed with Borland Delphi software (Visual Pascal) and is based on a SQL database. It is ideal for classification of material properties, or location of microstructure variations in materials.

  15. A new generation of detectors for scanning x-ray beam imaging systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rommel, J. Martin

    2016-01-01

    Scanning x-ray beam imaging systems were first developed by American Science and Engineering, Inc. (AS&E) in the early 1970s [1]. Since then, these systems have found a wide range of applications in security inspection and non-destructive testing. Large-area detectors are most frequently used to collect backscattered radiation but smaller transmission detectors are also employed for selected applications. Until recently, only two basic detector designs have been used: large scintillator blocks with attached photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) or large-volume light-sealed boxes, lined with scintillating screens and port windows for PMTs. In both cases, the detectors have required considerable depth to provide acceptable light collection efficiency. A new design recently developed by AS&E relies on wavelength shifting fibres (WSF) for light collection. For the first time, this approach enables the construction of thin large-area detectors. Stacking layers of WSF ribbons and scintillating screens in varying combinations enables optimization of the detection efficiency for different applications. Taking separate readings from different layers provides an energy-sensitive signal combination. Energy sensitivity can be improved further by adding filtration between the signal channels. Several prototype configurations have been built and characterized for both backscatter and transmission imaging. A WSF-based detector has been commercialized for a transmission x-ray imaging application.

  16. Design of high precision motor driving system for circular scanning ultrasonic endoscopic imaging equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Haoran; Bai, Baoping; Chen, Xiaodong; Zhao, Qiang; Li, Yanan; Wang, Yi; Yu, Daoyin

    2013-12-01

    This paper describes the development of a motor driving system for circular scanning ultrasonic endoscopic imaging equipment. It was designed to guarantee the motor rotating at a relatively constant speed in load fluctuation conditions, which result from the bending and twisting of the flexible shaft which connects the probe to the motor. A hardware feedback circuit based on Frequency-To-Voltage Converter LM331 and Step-Down Voltage Regulator LM2576-ADJ was designed to ensure steady rotation of motor in load fluctuation conditions, and a D/A module offered by MCU was used to regulate the real-time rotary speed. The feedback response cycle is about 20 μs according to theoretical analysis. Experimental results show that the maximum error is +/-1 r/min under the normal running environment (300 ~1500 r/min) and load fluctuation conditions, which means the average instability is reduced to 0.11% as compared with that of the motor drive simply based on MCU which is 0.94%. Both theoretical analysis and experimental results indicate that the motor driving system has high accuracy, fast response, excellent reliability and good versatility and portability, and can precisely guarantee the smooth movement of load-changing PMW (Pulse Width Modulation) motor, so as to ensure the imaging quality, and can effectively improve the efficiency and accuracy of the diagnosis.

  17. Scanning laser edema index: a reliable tool to correlate with diabetic retinopathy and systemic risk factors?

    PubMed

    Peyman, Mohammadreza; Tajunisah, Iqbal; Loo, Angela; Chuah, Khai Choon; Subrayan, Visvaraja

    2012-01-01

    To correlate Heidelberg Retina Tomograph (HRT) derived macular edema (DME) index with severity of diabetic retinopathy and systemic factors. A total of 300 diabetic patients were recruited for the study for each of them a value for the macular edema index was obtained using the HRT II. Patients' age, gender, duration and type of diabetes mellitus, latest HbA1c result and presence or absence of co-morbid factors (hypertension, ischemic heart disease, nephropathy) were recorded together with the stage of diabetic retinopathy. These were correlated with DME. Out of 300 patients, HRT defined macula edema was seen in 68 patients (22.6%). There is a wider and higher range (95% percentile) of macula edema index in the severe non proliferative diabetic retinopathy (NPDR) group. Independent samples t test showed significant difference between the severe NPDR group and no DR group (p<0.001), mild NPDR group (p<0.05) and moderate NPDR group (p<0.05). A higher macula edema index was also found to have a low degree of correlation with more advanced stages of retinopathy (r=0.310; p<0.001). Also nephropathy showed a strong and significant correlation with DME. Hypertension had moderately significant correlation with DME. This study found no correlation between ischemic heart disease and DME. HRT derived scanning laser edema index is a reliable objective tool to evaluate diabetic retinopathy and systemic risk factors. PMID:22520399

  18. Three-photon fluorescence imaging of melanin with a dual-wedge confocal scanning system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mega, Yair; Kerimo, Joseph; Robinson, Joseph; Vakili, Ali; Johnson, Nicolette; DiMarzio, Charles

    2012-03-01

    Confocal microscopy can be used as a practical tool in non-invasive applications in medical diagnostics and evaluation. In particular, it is being used for the early detection of skin cancer to identify pathological cellular components and, potentially, replace conventional biopsies. The detection of melanin and its spatial location and distribution plays a crucial role in the detection and evaluation of skin cancer. Our previous work has shown that the visible emission from melanin is strong and can be easily observed with a near-infrared CW laser using low power. This is due to a unique step-wise, (SW) three-photon excitation of melanin. This paper shows that the same SW, 3-photon fluorescence can also be achieved with an inexpensive, continuous-wave laser using a dual-prism scanning system. This demonstrates that the technology could be integrated into a portable confocal microscope for clinical applications. The results presented here are in agreement with images obtained with the larger and more expensive femtosecond laser system used earlier.

  19. Laser-assisted scanning probe alloying nanolithography (LASPAN) and its application in gold-silicon system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Luohan

    Nanoscale science and technology demand novel approaches and new knowledge to further advance. Nanoscale fabrication has been widely employed in both modern science and engineering. Micro/nano lithography is the most common technique to deposit nanostructures. Fundamental research is also being conducted to investigate structural, physical and chemical properties of the nanostructures. This research contributes fundamental understanding in surface science through development of a new methodology. Doing so, experimental approaches combined with energy analysis were carried out. A delicate hardware system was designed and constructed to realize the nanometer scale lithography. We developed a complete process, namely laser-assisted scanning probe alloying nanolithography (LASPAN), to fabricate well-defined nanostructures in gold-silicon (Au-Si) system. As a result, four aspects of nanostructures were made through different experimental trials. A non-equilibrium phase (AuSi3) was discovered, along with a non-equilibrium phase diagram. Energy dissipation and mechanism of nanocrystalization in the process have been extensively discussed. The mechanical energy input and laser radiation induced thermal energy input were estimated. An energy model was derived to represent the whole process of LASPAN.

  20. Design and implementation of fiber-based multiphoton endoscopy with microelectromechanical systems scanning

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Shuo; Jung, Woonggyu; McCormick, Daniel; Xie, Tuqiang; Su, Jiangping; Ahn, Yeh-Chan; Tromberg, Bruce J.; Chen, Zhongping

    2010-01-01

    A multiphoton endoscopy system has been developed using a two-axis microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) mirror and double-cladding photonic crystal fiber (DCPCF). The MEMS mirror has a 2-mm-diam, 20-deg optical scanning angle, and 1.26-kHz and 780-Hz resonance frequencies on the x and y axes. The maximum number of resolvable focal spots of the MEMS scanner is 720×720 on the x and y axes, which indicates that the MEMS scanner can potentially support high-resolution multiphoton imaging. The DCPCF is compared with standard single-mode fiber and hollow-core photonic bandgap fiber on the basis of dispersion, attenuation, and coupling efficiency properties. The DCPCF has high collection efficiency, and its dispersion can be compensated by grating pairs. Three configurations of probe design are investigated, and their imaging quality and field of view are compared. A two-lens configuration with a collimation and a focusing lens provides the optimum imaging performance and packaging flexibility. The endoscope is applied to image fluorescent microspheres and bovine knee joint cartilage. PMID:19566298

  1. POULTRY CARCASS INSPECTION BY A FAST LINE-SCAN IMAGING SYSTEM: RESULTS FROM IN-PLANT TESTING

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    During in-plant testing of a hyperspectral line-scan imaging system, images were acquired of wholesome and systemically diseased chickens on a commercial processing line moving at a speed 70 birds per minute. A fuzzy logic based algorithm using four key wavelengths, 468 nm, 501 nm, 582 nm, 629 nm, ...

  2. Surface scanning inspection system particle detection dependence on aluminum film morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prater, Walter; Tran, Natalie; McGarvey, Steve

    2012-03-01

    Physical vapor deposition (PVD) aluminum films present unique challenges when detecting particulate defects with a Surface Scanning Inspection System (SSIS). Aluminum (Al) films 4500Å thick were deposited on 300mm particle grade bare Si wafers at two temperatures using a Novellus Systems INOVA® NExT,.. Film surface roughness and morphology measurements were performed using a Veeco Vx310® atomic force microscope (AFM). AFM characterization found the high deposition temperature (TD) Al roughness (Root Mean Square 16.5 nm) to be five-times rougher than the low-TD Al roughness (rms 3.7 nm). High-TD Al had grooves at the grain boundaries that were measured to be 20 to 80 nm deep. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) examination, with a Hitachi RS6000 defect review SEM, confirmed the presence of pronounced grain grooves. SEM images established that the low-TD filmed wafers have fine grains (0.1 to 0.3 um diameter) and the high-TD film wafers have fifty-times larger equiaxed plateletshape grains (5 to 15 um diameter). Calibrated Poly-Styrene Latex (PSL) spheres ranging in size from 90 nm to 1 μm were deposited in circular patterns on the wafers using an aerosol deposition chamber. PSL sphere depositions at each spot were controlled to yield 2000 to 5000 counts. A Hitachi LS9100® dark field full wafer SSIS was used to experimentally determine the relationship of the PSL sphere scattered light intensity with S-polarized light, a measure of scattering cross-section, with respect to the calibrated PSL sphere diameter. Comparison of the SSIS scattered light versus PSL spot size calibration curves shows two distinct differences. Scattering cross-section (intensity) of the PSL spheres increased on the low-TD Al film with smooth surface roughness and the low-TD Al film defect detection sensitivity was 126 nm compared to 200 nm for the rougher high- TD Al film. This can be explained by the higher signal to noise attributed to the smooth low-TD Al. Dark field defect detection on

  3. Development, Calibration and Evaluation of a Portable and Direct Georeferenced Laser Scanning System for Kinematic 3D Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinz, Erik; Eling, Christian; Wieland, Markus; Klingbeil, Lasse; Kuhlmann, Heiner

    2015-12-01

    In recent years, kinematic laser scanning has become increasingly popular because it offers many benefits compared to static laser scanning. The advantages include both saving of time in the georeferencing and a more favorable scanning geometry. Often mobile laser scanning systems are installed on wheeled platforms, which may not reach all parts of the object. Hence, there is an interest in the development of portable systems, which remain operational even in inaccessible areas. The development of such a portable laser scanning system is presented in this paper. It consists of a lightweight direct georeferencing unit for the position and attitude determination and a small low-cost 2D laser scanner. This setup provides advantages over existing portable systems that employ heavy and expensive 3D laser scanners in a profiling mode. A special emphasis is placed on the system calibration, i. e. the determination of the transformation between the coordinate frames of the direct georeferencing unit and the 2D laser scanner. To this end, a calibration field is used, which consists of differently orientated georeferenced planar surfaces, leading to estimates for the lever arms and boresight angles with an accuracy of mm and one-tenth of a degree. Finally, point clouds of the mobile laser scanning system are compared with georeferenced point clouds of a high-precision 3D laser scanner. Accordingly, the accuracy of the system is in the order of cm to dm. This is in good agreement with the expected accuracy, which has been derived from the error propagation of previously estimated variance components.

  4. Thyroid scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... thyroid; Radioactive iodine uptake and scan test - thyroid; Nuclear scan - thyroid ... the test. Ask your provider or the radiology/nuclear medicine team performing the scan about taking precautions.

  5. Nuclear Scans

    MedlinePlus

    Nuclear scans use radioactive substances to see structures and functions inside your body. They use a special ... images. Most scans take 20 to 45 minutes. Nuclear scans can help doctors diagnose many conditions, including ...

  6. A raster scanning power supply system for controlling relativistic heavy ion beams at the Bevalac Biomedical Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Stover, G.; Nyman, M.; Halliwell, J.; Lutz, I.; Dwinell, R.

    1987-03-01

    A power supply system is currently being designed and constructed to sweep an 8.0 Tesla-meter relativistic heavy ion beam in a raster scanning mode for radiotherapy use. Two colinear dipole magnets with orthogonally oriented magnetic fields are driven by the system to produce a rectangular field (40 x 40 cm max.) with a uniform dose (+-2.5%) to a target volume 6 meters away. The ''fast'' horizontal scanning magnet is driven by a single power supply which in conjunction with a triac bridge network and a current regulated linear actuator will produce a 1200 cm/sec max. sweep rate. The ''slow'' (40 cm/sec) vertical scanning magnet will be controlled by dual current regulated linear actuators in a push-pull configuration. The scanner system can provide off-axis treatment profiles with large aspect ratios and unusual dimensions.

  7. SU-E-T-73: Commissioning of a Treatment Planning System for Proton Spot Scanning

    SciTech Connect

    Saini, J; Kang, Y; Schultz, L; Nicewonger, D; Herrera, M; Wong, T; Bowen, S; Bloch, C

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: A treatment planning system (TPS) was commissioned for clinical use with a fixed beam line proton delivery system. An outline of the data collection, modeling, and verification is provided. Methods: Beam data modeling for proton spot scanning in CMS Xio TPS requires the following measurements: (i) integral depth dose curves (IDDCs); (ii) absolute dose calibration; and (iii) beam spot characteristics. The IDDCs for 18 proton energies were measured using an integrating detector in a single spot field in a water phantom. Absolute scaling of the IDDCs were performed based on ion chamber measurements in mono-energetic 10×10 cm{sup 2} fields in water. Beam spot shapes were measured in air using a flat panel scintillator detector at multiple planes. For beam model verification, more than 45 uniform dose phantom and patient plans were generated. These plans were used to measure range, point dose, and longitudinal and lateral profiles. Tolerances employed for verification are: point dose and longitudinal profiles, ±2%; range, ±1 mm; FWHM for lateral profiles, ±2 mm; and patient plan dose distribution, gamma index of >90% at 3%/3 mm criteria. Results: More than 97% of the point dose measurements out of 115 were within +/-2% with maximum deviation of 3%. 98% of the ranges measured were within 1 mm with maximum deviation of 1.4mm. The normalized depth doses were within 2% at all depths. The maximum error in FWHM of lateral profiles was found to be less than 2mm. For 5 patient plans representing different anatomic sites, a total of 38 planes for 12 beams were analyzed for gamma index with average value of 99% and minimum of 94%. Conclusions: The planning system is successfully commissioned and can be safely deployed for clinical use. Measurements of IDDCs on user beam are highly recommended instead of using standard beam IDDCs.

  8. Preliminary results, obtained by using a proton beam, for an active scanning system to installed on the KHIMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chang Hyeuk; Lee, Hwa-Ryun; Jang, Sea Duk; Kim, Hyunyong; Hahn, Garam; Kim, Jeong Hwan; Jang, Hong Suk; Park, Dong Wook; Hwang, Won Taek; Yang, Tae-Keun

    2015-08-01

    The active scanning technique is a pencil beam delivery method in particle therapy. The active scanning beam delivery system consists of a beam scanner, beam monitor, energy modulator, and related programs, such as the irradiation control and planning programs. A proposed prototype active scanning system was designed and installed on MC-50 at the Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Science (KIRAMS) with a 45-MeV proton beam. The laminated magnetic yoke of the scanning magnet supported fast ramping. The beam intensity and the beam profile monitors were designed for measuring the beam's properties. Both the range shifter and the ridge filter modulate the incoming beam energy. The LabVIEW®-based beam-irradiation-control program operates the system in a sequential operation manner for use with the MC-50 cyclotron. In addition, an in-housecoded irradiation-planning program generates an optimal irradiation path. A scanning experiment was successfully completed to print the logo of the Korea Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator (KHIMA) on GaF film. Moreover, the beam's position accuracy was measured as 0.62 mm in the x-direction and as 0.83 mm in the y-direction.

  9. INS/GPS/LiDAR Integrated Navigation System for Urban and Indoor Environments Using Hybrid Scan Matching Algorithm.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yanbin; Liu, Shifei; Atia, Mohamed M; Noureldin, Aboelmagd

    2015-01-01

    This paper takes advantage of the complementary characteristics of Global Positioning System (GPS) and Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) to provide periodic corrections to Inertial Navigation System (INS) alternatively in different environmental conditions. In open sky, where GPS signals are available and LiDAR measurements are sparse, GPS is integrated with INS. Meanwhile, in confined outdoor environments and indoors, where GPS is unreliable or unavailable and LiDAR measurements are rich, LiDAR replaces GPS to integrate with INS. This paper also proposes an innovative hybrid scan matching algorithm that combines the feature-based scan matching method and Iterative Closest Point (ICP) based scan matching method. The algorithm can work and transit between two modes depending on the number of matched line features over two scans, thus achieving efficiency and robustness concurrently. Two integration schemes of INS and LiDAR with hybrid scan matching algorithm are implemented and compared. Real experiments are performed on an Unmanned Ground Vehicle (UGV) for both outdoor and indoor environments. Experimental results show that the multi-sensor integrated system can remain sub-meter navigation accuracy during the whole trajectory. PMID:26389906

  10. INS/GPS/LiDAR Integrated Navigation System for Urban and Indoor Environments Using Hybrid Scan Matching Algorithm.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yanbin; Liu, Shifei; Atia, Mohamed M; Noureldin, Aboelmagd

    2015-09-15

    This paper takes advantage of the complementary characteristics of Global Positioning System (GPS) and Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) to provide periodic corrections to Inertial Navigation System (INS) alternatively in different environmental conditions. In open sky, where GPS signals are available and LiDAR measurements are sparse, GPS is integrated with INS. Meanwhile, in confined outdoor environments and indoors, where GPS is unreliable or unavailable and LiDAR measurements are rich, LiDAR replaces GPS to integrate with INS. This paper also proposes an innovative hybrid scan matching algorithm that combines the feature-based scan matching method and Iterative Closest Point (ICP) based scan matching method. The algorithm can work and transit between two modes depending on the number of matched line features over two scans, thus achieving efficiency and robustness concurrently. Two integration schemes of INS and LiDAR with hybrid scan matching algorithm are implemented and compared. Real experiments are performed on an Unmanned Ground Vehicle (UGV) for both outdoor and indoor environments. Experimental results show that the multi-sensor integrated system can remain sub-meter navigation accuracy during the whole trajectory.

  11. INS/GPS/LiDAR Integrated Navigation System for Urban and Indoor Environments Using Hybrid Scan Matching Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yanbin; Liu, Shifei; Atia, Mohamed M.; Noureldin, Aboelmagd

    2015-01-01

    This paper takes advantage of the complementary characteristics of Global Positioning System (GPS) and Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) to provide periodic corrections to Inertial Navigation System (INS) alternatively in different environmental conditions. In open sky, where GPS signals are available and LiDAR measurements are sparse, GPS is integrated with INS. Meanwhile, in confined outdoor environments and indoors, where GPS is unreliable or unavailable and LiDAR measurements are rich, LiDAR replaces GPS to integrate with INS. This paper also proposes an innovative hybrid scan matching algorithm that combines the feature-based scan matching method and Iterative Closest Point (ICP) based scan matching method. The algorithm can work and transit between two modes depending on the number of matched line features over two scans, thus achieving efficiency and robustness concurrently. Two integration schemes of INS and LiDAR with hybrid scan matching algorithm are implemented and compared. Real experiments are performed on an Unmanned Ground Vehicle (UGV) for both outdoor and indoor environments. Experimental results show that the multi-sensor integrated system can remain sub-meter navigation accuracy during the whole trajectory. PMID:26389906

  12. Monte-Carlo simulation of a slot-scanning X-ray imaging system.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Mayuresh; Dendere, Ronald; Nicolls, Fred; Steiner, Stef; Douglas, Tania S

    2016-01-01

    We present a method for simulating slot-scanning X-ray imaging using the general-purpose Monte Carlo simulation package PENELOPE and penEasy Imaging. Different phantoms can be defined with the PENGEOM package, which defines bodies as combinations of volumes limited by quadric surfaces. The source-detector geometry, the position of the object, the collimator, the X-ray tube properties, the detector material and the pixel dimensions are defined. The output of the time-delay integration detector is simulated using sequential slot outputs derived from penEasy Imaging. The simulations are validated using tungsten and aluminium test objects, which are both simulated and imaged. The simulations are compared to the X-ray images using standard image quality metrics. The MTF, NPS and DQE curves show that the real and simulated X-ray images are comparable in terms of spatial resolution, noise and frequency information. The implementation can be modified to suit alterations in the system being simulated. PMID:26725256

  13. a Feasibility Study on Use of Generic Mobile Laser Scanning System for Detecting Asphalt Pavement Cracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xinqu; Li, Jonathan

    2016-06-01

    This study aims to automatically detect pavement cracks on urban roads by employing the 3D point clouds acquired by a mobile laser scanning (MLS) system. Our method consists of four steps: ground point filtering, high-pass convolution, matched filtering, and noise removal. First, a voxel-based upward growing method is applied to construct Digital Terrain Model (DTM) of the road surface. Then, a high-pass filter convolutes the DTM to detect local elevation changes that may embed cracking information. Next, a two-step matched filter is applied to extract crack features. Lastly, a noise removal process is conducted to refine the results. Instead of using MLS intensity, this study takes advantages of the MLS elevation information to perform automated crack detection from large-volume, mixed-density, unstructured MLS point clouds. Four types of cracks including longitudinal, transvers, random, and alligator cracks are detected. Our results demonstrated that the proposed method works well with the RIEGL VMX-450 point clouds and can detect cracks in moderate-to-severe severity (13 - 25 mm) within a 200 m by 30 m urban road segment located in Kingston, Ontario, at one time. Due to the resolution capability, small cracks with slight severity remain unclear in the MLS point cloud.

  14. Application of chemometric methods to differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) to estimate nimodipine polymorphs from cosolvent system.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Akhtar; Rahman, Ziyaur; Khan, Mansoor A

    2015-06-01

    The focus of this study was to evaluate the applicability of chemometrics to differential scanning calorimetry data (DSC) to evaluate nimodipine polymorphs. Multivariate calibration models were built using DSC data from known mixtures of the nimodipine modification. The linear baseline correction treatment of data was used to reduce dispersion in thermograms. Principal component analysis of the treated and untreated data explained 96% and 89% of the data variability, respectively. Score and loading plots correlated variability between samples with change in proportion of nimodipine modifications. The R(2) for principal component regression (PCR) and partial lease square regression (PLS) were found to be 0.91 and 0.92. The root mean square of standard error of the treated samples for calibration and validation in PCR and PLS was found to be lower than the untreated sample. These models were applied to samples recrystallized from a cosolvent system, which indicated different proportion of modifications in the mixtures than those obtained by placing samples under different storage conditions. The model was able to predict the nimodipine modifications with known margin of error. Therefore, these models can be used as a quality control tool to expediently determine the nimodipine modification in an unknown mixture. PMID:24856323

  15. A-scan ultrasound system for real-time puncture safety assessment during percutaneous nephrolithotomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Pedro L.; Rodrigues, Nuno F.; Fonseca, Jaime C.; von Krüger, M. A.; Pereira, W. C. A.; Vilaça, João. L.

    2015-03-01

    Background: Kidney stone is a major universal health problem, affecting 10% of the population worldwide. Percutaneous nephrolithotomy is a first-line and established procedure for disintegration and removal of renal stones. Its surgical success depends on the precise needle puncture of renal calyces, which remains the most challenging task for surgeons. This work describes and tests a new ultrasound based system to alert the surgeon when undesirable anatomical structures are in between the puncture path defined through a tracked needle. Methods: Two circular ultrasound transducers were built with a single 3.3-MHz piezoelectric ceramic PZT SN8, 25.4 mm of radius and resin-epoxy matching and backing layers. One matching layer was designed with a concave curvature to work as an acoustic lens with long focusing. The A-scan signals were filtered and processed to automatically detect reflected echoes. Results: The transducers were mapped in water tank and tested in a study involving 45 phantoms. Each phantom mimics different needle insertion trajectories with a percutaneous path length between 80 and 150 mm. Results showed that the beam cross-sectional area oscillates around the ceramics radius and it was possible to automatically detect echo signals in phantoms with length higher than 80 mm. Conclusions: This new solution may alert the surgeon about anatomical tissues changes during needle insertion, which may decrease the need of X-Ray radiation exposure and ultrasound image evaluation during percutaneous puncture.

  16. Feasibility of fiber optic displacement sensor scanning system for imaging of dental cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Husna Abdul; Che Ani, Adi Izhar; Harun, Sulaiman Wadi; Yasin, Moh.; Apsari, Retna; Ahmad, Harith

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the potential of intensity modulated fiber optic displacement sensor scanning system for the imaging of dental cavity. Here, we discuss our preliminary results in the imaging of cavities on various teeth surfaces, as well as measurement of the diameter of the cavities which are represented by drilled holes on the teeth surfaces. Based on the analysis of displacement measurement, the sensitivities and linear range for the molar, canine, hybrid composite resin, and acrylic surfaces are obtained at 0.09667 mV/mm and 0.45 mm 0.775 mV/mm and 0.4 mm 0.5109 mV/mm and 0.5 mm and 0.25 mV/mm and 0.5 mm, respectively, with a good linearity of more than 99%. The results also show a clear distinction between the cavity and surrounding tooth region. The stability, simplicity of design, and low cost of fabrication make it suitable for restorative dentistry.

  17. State of the art of 3D scanning systems and inspection of textile surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montilla, M.; Orjuela-Vargas, S. A.; Philips, W.

    2014-02-01

    The rapid development of hardware and software in the digital image processing field has boosted research in computer vision for applications in industry. The development of new electronic devices and the tendency to decrease their prices makes possible new developments that few decades ago were possible only in the imagination. This is the case of 3D imaging technology which permits to detect failures in industrial products by inspecting aspects on their 3D surface. In search of an optimal solution for scanning textiles we present in this paper a review of existing techniques for digitizing 3D surfaces. Topographic details of textiles can be obtained by digitizing surfaces using laser line triangulation, phase shifting optical triangulation, projected-light, stereo-vision systems and silhouette analysis. Although we are focused on methods that have been used in the textile industry, we also consider potential mechanisms used for other applications. We discuss the advantages and disadvantages of the evaluated methods and state a summary of potential implementations for the textile industry.

  18. Robust Dead Reckoning System for Mobile Robots Based on Particle Filter and Raw Range Scan

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Zhuohua; Cai, Zixing; Min, Huaqing

    2014-01-01

    Robust dead reckoning is a complicated problem for wheeled mobile robots (WMRs), where the robots are faulty, such as the sticking of sensors or the slippage of wheels, for the discrete fault models and the continuous states have to be estimated simultaneously to reach a reliable fault diagnosis and accurate dead reckoning. Particle filters are one of the most promising approaches to handle hybrid system estimation problems, and they have also been widely used in many WMRs applications, such as pose tracking, SLAM, video tracking, fault identification, etc. In this paper, the readings of a laser range finder, which may be also interfered with by noises, are used to reach accurate dead reckoning. The main contribution is that a systematic method to implement fault diagnosis and dead reckoning in a particle filter framework concurrently is proposed. Firstly, the perception model of a laser range finder is given, where the raw scan may be faulty. Secondly, the kinematics of the normal model and different fault models for WMRs are given. Thirdly, the particle filter for fault diagnosis and dead reckoning is discussed. At last, experiments and analyses are reported to show the accuracy and efficiency of the presented method. PMID:25192318

  19. Robust dead reckoning system for mobile robots based on particle filter and raw range scan.

    PubMed

    Duan, Zhuohua; Cai, Zixing; Min, Huaqing

    2014-09-04

    Robust dead reckoning is a complicated problem for wheeled mobile robots (WMRs), where the robots are faulty, such as the sticking of sensors or the slippage of wheels, for the discrete fault models and the continuous states have to be estimated simultaneously to reach a reliable fault diagnosis and accurate dead reckoning. Particle filters are one of the most promising approaches to handle hybrid system estimation problems, and they have also been widely used in many WMRs applications, such as pose tracking, SLAM, video tracking, fault identification, etc. In this paper, the readings of a laser range finder, which may be also interfered with by noises, are used to reach accurate dead reckoning. The main contribution is that a systematic method to implement fault diagnosis and dead reckoning in a particle filter framework concurrently is proposed. Firstly, the perception model of a laser range finder is given, where the raw scan may be faulty. Secondly, the kinematics of the normal model and different fault models for WMRs are given. Thirdly, the particle filter for fault diagnosis and dead reckoning is discussed. At last, experiments and analyses are reported to show the accuracy and efficiency of the presented method.

  20. Application of chemometric methods to differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) to estimate nimodipine polymorphs from cosolvent system.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Akhtar; Rahman, Ziyaur; Khan, Mansoor A

    2015-06-01

    The focus of this study was to evaluate the applicability of chemometrics to differential scanning calorimetry data (DSC) to evaluate nimodipine polymorphs. Multivariate calibration models were built using DSC data from known mixtures of the nimodipine modification. The linear baseline correction treatment of data was used to reduce dispersion in thermograms. Principal component analysis of the treated and untreated data explained 96% and 89% of the data variability, respectively. Score and loading plots correlated variability between samples with change in proportion of nimodipine modifications. The R(2) for principal component regression (PCR) and partial lease square regression (PLS) were found to be 0.91 and 0.92. The root mean square of standard error of the treated samples for calibration and validation in PCR and PLS was found to be lower than the untreated sample. These models were applied to samples recrystallized from a cosolvent system, which indicated different proportion of modifications in the mixtures than those obtained by placing samples under different storage conditions. The model was able to predict the nimodipine modifications with known margin of error. Therefore, these models can be used as a quality control tool to expediently determine the nimodipine modification in an unknown mixture.

  1. A new total body scanning system for automatic change detection in multiple pigmented skin lesions.

    PubMed

    Korotkov, Konstantin; Quintana, Josep; Puig, Susana; Malvehy, Josep; Garcia, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    The detection of newly appearing and changing pigmented skin lesions (PSLs) is essential for timely diagnosis of cutaneous melanoma. Total body skin examination (TBSE) procedures, currently practiced for this purpose, can be extremely time-consuming for patients with numerous lesions. In addition, these procedures are prone to subjectivity when selecting PSLs for baseline image comparison, increasing the risk of missing a developing cancer. To address this issue, we propose a new photogrammetry-based total body scanning system allowing for skin surface image acquisition using cross-polarized light. Equipped with 21 high-resolution cameras and a turntable, this scanner automatically acquires a set of overlapping images, covering 85%-90% of the patient's skin surface. These images are used for the automated mapping of PSLs and their change estimation between explorations. The maps produced relate images of individual lesions with their locations on the patient's body, solving the body-to-image and image-to-image correspondence problem in TBSEs. Currently, the scanner is limited to patients with sparse body hair and, for a complete skin examination, the scalp, palms, soles and inner arms should be photographed manually. The initial tests of the scanner showed that it can be successfully applied for automated mapping and temporal monitoring of multiple lesions: PSLs relevant for follow-up were repeatedly mapped in several explorations. Moreover, during the baseline image comparison, all lesions with artificially induced changes were correctly identified as "evolved." PMID:25222947

  2. Optical detection of metastatic cancer cells using a scanned laser pico-projection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chih-Ling; Chiu, Wen-Tai; Lo, Yu-Lung; Chuang, Chin-Ho; Chen, Yu-Bin; Chang, Shu-Jing; Ke, Tung-Ting; Cheng, Hung-Chi; Wu, Hua-Lin

    2015-03-01

    Metastasis is responsible for 90% of all cancer-related deaths in humans. As a result, reliable techniques for detecting metastatic cells are urgently required. Although various techniques have been proposed for metastasis detection, they are generally capable of detecting metastatic cells only once migration has already occurred. Accordingly, the present study proposes an optical method for physical characterization of metastatic cancer cells using a scanned laser pico-projection system (SLPP). The validity of the proposed method is demonstrated using five pairs of cancer cell lines and two pairs of non-cancer cell lines treated by IPTG induction in order to mimic normal cells with an overexpression of oncogene. The results show that for all of the considered cell lines, the SLPP speckle contrast of the high-metastatic cells is significantly higher than that of the low-metastatic cells. As a result, the speckle contrast measurement provides a reliable means of distinguishing quantitatively between low- and high-metastatic cells of the same origin. Compared to existing metastasis detection methods, the proposed SLPP approach has many advantages, including a higher throughput, a lower cost, a larger sample size and a more reliable diagnostic performance. As a result, it provides a highly promising solution for physical characterization of metastatic cancer cells in vitro.

  3. Cosmetic and aesthetic skin photosurgery using a computer-assisted CO2 laser-scanning system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutu, Doru C. A.; Dumitras, Dan C.; Nedelcu, Ioan; Ghetie, Sergiu D.

    1997-12-01

    Since the first application of CO2 laser in skin photosurgery, various techniques such as laser pulsing, beam scanning and computer-assisted laser pulse generator have been introduced for the purpose of reducing tissue carbonization and thermal necrosis. Using a quite simple XY optical scanner equipped with two galvanometric driven mirrors and an appropriate software to process the scanning data and control the interaction time and energy density in the scanned area, we have obtained a device which can improve CO2 laser application in cosmetic and aesthetic surgery. The opto-mechanical CO2 laser scanner based on two total reflecting flat mirrors placed at 90 degree(s) in respect to the XY scanning directions and independently driven through a magnetic field provides a linear movement of the incident laser beam in the operating field. A DA converter supplied with scanning data by the software enables a scanning with linearity better than 1% for a maximum angular deviation of 20 degree(s). Because the scanning quality of the laser beam in the operating field is given not only by the displacement function of the two mirrors, but also by the beam characteristics in the focal plane and the cross distribution in the laser beam, the surgeon can control through software either the scanning field dimensions or the distance between two consecutive points of the vertically and/or horizontally sweep line. The development of computer-assisted surgical scanning techniques will help control the surgical laser, to create either a reproducible incision with a controlled depth or a controlled incision pattern with minimal incision width, a long desired facility for plastic surgery, neurosurgery, ENT and dentistry.

  4. A dynamic collimation system for penumbra reduction in spot-scanning proton therapy: Proof of concept

    SciTech Connect

    Hyer, Daniel E. Hill, Patrick M.; Wang, Dongxu; Smith, Blake R.; Flynn, Ryan T.

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: In the absence of a collimation system the lateral penumbra of spot scanning (SS) dose distributions delivered by low energy proton beams is highly dependent on the spot size. For current commercial equipment, spot size increases with decreasing proton energy thereby reducing the benefit of the SS technique. This paper presents a dynamic collimation system (DCS) for sharpening the lateral penumbra of proton therapy dose distributions delivered by SS. Methods: The collimation system presented here exploits the property that a proton pencil beam used for SS requires collimation only when it is near the target edge, enabling the use of trimmers that are in motion at times when the pencil beam is away from the target edge. The device consists of two pairs of parallel nickel trimmer blades of 2 cm thickness and dimensions of 2 cm × 18 cm in the beam's eye view. The two pairs of trimmer blades are rotated 90° relative to each other to form a rectangular shape. Each trimmer blade is capable of rapid motion in the direction perpendicular to the central beam axis by means of a linear motor, with maximum velocity and acceleration of 2.5 m/s and 19.6 m/s{sup 2}, respectively. The blades travel on curved tracks to match the divergence of the proton source. An algorithm for selecting blade positions is developed to minimize the dose delivered outside of the target, and treatment plans are created both with and without the DCS. Results: The snout of the DCS has outer dimensions of 22.6 × 22.6 cm{sup 2} and is capable of delivering a minimum treatment field size of 15 × 15 cm{sup 2}. Using currently available components, the constructed system would weigh less than 20 kg. For irregularly shaped fields, the use of the DCS reduces the mean dose outside of a 2D target of 46.6 cm{sup 2} by approximately 40% as compared to an identical plan without collimation. The use of the DCS increased treatment time by 1–3 s per energy layer. Conclusions: The spread of the

  5. Design and operation of gamma scan and fission gas sampling systems for characterization of irradiated commercial nuclear fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Knox, C.A.; Thornhill, R.E.; Mellinger, G.B.

    1989-09-01

    One of the primary objectives of the Materials Characterization Center (MCC) is to acquire and characterize spent fuels used in waste form testing related to nuclear waste disposal. The initial steps in the characterization of a fuel rod consist of gamma scanning the rod and sampling the gas contained in the fuel rod (referred to as fission gas sampling). The gamma scan and fission gas sampling systems used by the MCC are adaptable to a wide range of fuel types and have been successfully used to characterize both boiling water reactor (BWR) and pressurized water reactor (PWR) fuel rods. This report describes the design and operation of systems used to gamma scan and fission gas sample full-length PWR and BWR fuel rods. 1 ref., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Review: two-photon scanning systems for clinical high resolution in vivo tissue imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    König, K.; Müller, J.; Höfer, M.; Müller, C.; Weinigel, M.; Bückle, R.; Elsner, P.; Kaatz, M.; Messerschmidt, B.

    2008-02-01

    The femtosecond laser multiphoton tomograph DermaInspect as well as high NA two-photon GRIN microendoscopes for in vivo tomography of human skin have been used to detect malignant melanoma as well as to study the diffusion and intradermal accumulation of topically applied cosmetical and pharmaceutical components. So far, more than 500 patients and volunteers in Europe, Australia, and Asia have been investigated with this unique tomograph. Near infrared 80 MHz picojoule femtosecond laser pulses were employed to excite endogenous fluorophores such as NAD(P)H, flavoproteins, melanin, and elastin as well as fluorescent components of a variety of ointments via a twophoton excitation process. In addition, collagen has been imaged by second harmonic generation. Using a two-PMT detection system, the ratio of elastin to collagen was determined during optical sectioning. A high submicron spatial resolution and 50 picosecond temporal resolution was achieved using galvoscan mirrors and piezodriven focusing optics as well as a time-correlated single photon counting module with a fast microchannel plate detector and fast photomultipliers. Individual intratissue cells, mitochondria, melanosomes, and the morphology of the nuclei as well as extracellular matrix elements could be clearly visualized due to molecular imaging and the calculation of fluorescence lifetime images. Nanoparticles and intratissue drugs have been detected non-invasively, in situ and over a period of up to 3 months. In addition, hydration effects and UV effects were studied by monitoring modifications of cellular morphology and autofluorescence. The system was used to observe the diffusion through the stratum corneum and the accumulation and release of functionalized nanoparticles along hair shafts and epidermal ridges. The DermaInspect been also employed to gain information on skin age and wound healing in patients with ulcers. Novel developments include a galvo/piezo-scan driven flexible articulated arm as

  7. Characterizing a proton beam scanning system for Monte Carlo dose calculation in patients.

    PubMed

    Grassberger, C; Lomax, Anthony; Paganetti, H

    2015-01-21

    The presented work has two goals. First, to demonstrate the feasibility of accurately characterizing a proton radiation field at treatment head exit for Monte Carlo dose calculation of active scanning patient treatments. Second, to show that this characterization can be done based on measured depth dose curves and spot size alone, without consideration of the exact treatment head delivery system. This is demonstrated through calibration of a Monte Carlo code to the specific beam lines of two institutions, Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) and Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI). Comparison of simulations modeling the full treatment head at MGH to ones employing a parameterized phase space of protons at treatment head exit reveals the adequacy of the method for patient simulations. The secondary particle production in the treatment head is typically below 0.2% of primary fluence, except for low-energy electrons (<0.6 MeV for 230 MeV protons), whose contribution to skin dose is negligible. However, there is significant difference between the two methods in the low-dose penumbra, making full treatment head simulations necessary to study out-of-field effects such as secondary cancer induction. To calibrate the Monte Carlo code to measurements in a water phantom, we use an analytical Bragg peak model to extract the range-dependent energy spread at the two institutions, as this quantity is usually not available through measurements. Comparison of the measured with the simulated depth dose curves demonstrates agreement within 0.5 mm over the entire energy range. Subsequently, we simulate three patient treatments with varying anatomical complexity (liver, head and neck and lung) to give an example how this approach can be employed to investigate site-specific discrepancies between treatment planning system and Monte Carlo simulations.

  8. Characterizing a proton beam scanning system for Monte Carlo dose calculation in patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grassberger, C.; Lomax, Anthony; Paganetti, H.

    2015-01-01

    The presented work has two goals. First, to demonstrate the feasibility of accurately characterizing a proton radiation field at treatment head exit for Monte Carlo dose calculation of active scanning patient treatments. Second, to show that this characterization can be done based on measured depth dose curves and spot size alone, without consideration of the exact treatment head delivery system. This is demonstrated through calibration of a Monte Carlo code to the specific beam lines of two institutions, Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) and Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI). Comparison of simulations modeling the full treatment head at MGH to ones employing a parameterized phase space of protons at treatment head exit reveals the adequacy of the method for patient simulations. The secondary particle production in the treatment head is typically below 0.2% of primary fluence, except for low-energy electrons (<0.6 MeV for 230 MeV protons), whose contribution to skin dose is negligible. However, there is significant difference between the two methods in the low-dose penumbra, making full treatment head simulations necessary to study out-of-field effects such as secondary cancer induction. To calibrate the Monte Carlo code to measurements in a water phantom, we use an analytical Bragg peak model to extract the range-dependent energy spread at the two institutions, as this quantity is usually not available through measurements. Comparison of the measured with the simulated depth dose curves demonstrates agreement within 0.5 mm over the entire energy range. Subsequently, we simulate three patient treatments with varying anatomical complexity (liver, head and neck and lung) to give an example how this approach can be employed to investigate site-specific discrepancies between treatment planning system and Monte Carlo simulations.

  9. Characterizing a Proton Beam Scanning System for Monte Carlo Dose Calculation in Patients

    PubMed Central

    Grassberger, C; Lomax, Tony; Paganetti, H

    2015-01-01

    The presented work has two goals. First, to demonstrate the feasibility of accurately characterizing a proton radiation field at treatment head exit for Monte Carlo dose calculation of active scanning patient treatments. Second, to show that this characterization can be done based on measured depth dose curves and spot size alone, without consideration of the exact treatment head delivery system. This is demonstrated through calibration of a Monte Carlo code to the specific beam lines of two institutions, Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) and Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI). Comparison of simulations modeling the full treatment head at MGH to ones employing a parameterized phase space of protons at treatment head exit reveals the adequacy of the method for patient simulations. The secondary particle production in the treatment head is typically below 0.2% of primary fluence, except for low–energy electrons (<0.6MeV for 230MeV protons), whose contribution to skin dose is negligible. However, there is significant difference between the two methods in the low-dose penumbra, making full treatment head simulations necessary to study out-of field effects such as secondary cancer induction. To calibrate the Monte Carlo code to measurements in a water phantom, we use an analytical Bragg peak model to extract the range-dependent energy spread at the two institutions, as this quantity is usually not available through measurements. Comparison of the measured with the simulated depth dose curves demonstrates agreement within 0.5mm over the entire energy range. Subsequently, we simulate three patient treatments with varying anatomical complexity (liver, head and neck and lung) to give an example how this approach can be employed to investigate site-specific discrepancies between treatment planning system and Monte Carlo simulations. PMID:25549079

  10. Photosensor aperture shaping to reduce aliasing in optical-mechanical line-scan imaging systems.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katzberg, S. J.; Huck, F. O.; Wall, S. D.

    1973-01-01

    Review of optical-mechanical scanning techniques that are generally employed in instruments specifically designed to characterize variations in scene brightness spectrally or radiometrically. Special attention is given to the effect of aliasing on the spatial detail of the reconstructed image. Aliasing may be caused by linescan sampling and can, in turn, severely degrade images that emphasize the spatial characterization of a scene. Photosensor aperture shaping and line-scan spacing are investigated as means for reducing this degradation.

  11. An automatic scanning method for high throughput microscopic system to facilitate medical genetic diagnosis: an initial study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Yuchen; Chen, Xiaodong; Li, Zheng; Li, Yuhua; Chen, Wei R.; Zheng, Bin; Li, Shibo; Liu, Hong

    2012-03-01

    The purpose of this paper is to report a new automatic scanning scheme for high throughput microscopic systems aiming to facilitate disease diagnosis in genetic laboratories. To minimize the impact of the random vibration and mechanical drifting of the scanning stage in microscopic image acquisition, auto-focusing operations are usually applied repeatedly during the scanning process. Such methods ensure the acquisition of well focused images for clinical diagnosis, but are time consuming. The technique investigated in this preliminary study applies the auto-focusing operations at a limited number of locations on the slide. For the rest of the imaging field, the focusing position is quickly adjusted through linear interpolation. In this initial validation study, blood pathological slides containing both metaphase and interphase cells are scanned. For a selected area of 6.9mm×6.9mm, a number of 2×2, 3×2, 3×3, and 4×4 positions are evenly sampled for auto-focusing operations. Respectively, 25, 29, 40, and 41 clinically meaningful cells are identified for each sampling scheme. For the specific case investigated, the results demonstrate that the 4 position auto-focusing scheme could obtain the adequate number of clinically meaningful cells for the diagnosis. The schemes with more auto-focusing operations provide an option for high reliability diagnosis when clinically necessary. More comprehensive research is planned, and that may lead to optimal design of trade-off for developing the scanning scheme of the high throughput microscopic systems.

  12. Clinical assessment of a commercial aerosol delivery system for ventilation scanning by comparison with KR-81m

    SciTech Connect

    Wollmer, P.; Eriksson, L.; Andersson, A.C.

    1984-01-01

    Radioactive aerosols offer a means for steady state ventilation scanning in multiple views. The clinical use of radioaerosol techniques has been hampered by the lack of delivery systems producing sufficiently small particles. If the aerosol contains large particles, heavy deposition occurs in major airways, especially in patients with airways disease. The authors have assessed a new, commercial aerosol delivery system (Syntevent) by comparison with Kr-81m ventilation scanning in 23 patients with airways obstruction. An indirect comparison was also made with a settling bad technique. Ventilation scans in four projections were obtained during continuous inhalation of Kr-81m. Subsequently, the patient inhaled an aerosol labelled with In-113m from the Syntevent system, and aerosol ventilation scans were obtained in the same projections. Spirometry was performed to establish the degree of airways obstruction. The aerosol delineated the ventilated regions of the lungs adequately in all the patients. Deposition of aerosol in larger airways was seen in a few patients only, and this did not impede the interpretation of the scintigram. A quantitative analysis of the penetration of the aerosol to the periphery of the lung failed to demonstrate any significant correlation between particle penetration and airways obstruction. Aerosol penetration was significantly greater (p<0.001) with the Syntevent system than with a settling bag technique.

  13. Geomorphic features off southern California as seen by GLORIA side-scan sonar system

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, B.D.; Field, M.E.; Carlson, P.R.; Kenyon, N.H.

    1985-02-01

    Approximately 165,000 km/sup 2/ of the sea floor off southern California was mapped during May 1984, as part of a USGS/IOS cooperative program to study the newly proclaimed Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) of the US Pacific margin. The area was insonified using the Geological Long-Range Inclined Asdic (GLORIA), a long-range side-scan sonar system. Images were corrected for water-column velocity anomalies, for along-track distortions caused by acoustic ray travel paths. A photomosaic of the overlapping sonographs has been compiled at a scale of 1:375,000. The basins of the inner California continental borderland are characterized by both sinuous channel and fan complexes and by feathery acoustic patterns indicating active sediment transport. In contrast, outer borderland basins appear to be more sediment starved, exhibit large areas of sediment failure, and show significant structural influence. West of Patton Escarpment, the sonographs are dominated by acoustic patterns showing volcanic ridges and seamounts and by deposits of the Monterey and Arguello fans. Arguello fan, for example, exhibits multiple sinuous channels that have transported sediment 60 km south from the canyon mouth. These channels coalesce into a single 100-km long, westward-meandering channel that terminates in a 600-m deep box canyon. A zone of sediment failure is identifiable on the north levee of an upper fan channel. Tectonic trends associated with oceanic basement are highlighted by the terminus of the west-trending Murray Fracture Zone and by the prevailing northeast trend of volcanic ridge and seamount chains.

  14. Electro-optical system for scanning microscopy of extreme ultraviolet masks with a high harmonic generation source.

    PubMed

    Naulleau, Patrick P; Anderson, Christopher N; Anderson, Erik H; Andreson, Nord; Chao, Weilun; Choi, Changhoon; Goldberg, Kenneth A; Gullikson, Eric M; Kim, Seong-Sue; Lee, Donggun; Miyakawa, Ryan; Park, Jongju; Rekawa, Seno; Salmassi, Farhad

    2014-08-25

    A self-contained electro-optical module for scanning extreme ultraviolet (EUV) reflection microscopy at 13.5 nm wavelength has been developed. The system has been designed to work with stand-alone commercially available EUV high harmonic generation (HHG) sources through the implementation of narrowband harmonic selecting multilayers and off-axis elliptical short focal length zoneplates. The module has been successfully integrated into an EUV mask scanning microscope achieving diffraction limited imaging performance (84 nm point spread function). PMID:25321224

  15. Design of a scanning gate microscope for mesoscopic electron systems in a cryogen-free dilution refrigerator.

    PubMed

    Pelliccione, M; Sciambi, A; Bartel, J; Keller, A J; Goldhaber-Gordon, D

    2013-03-01

    We report on our design of a scanning gate microscope housed in a cryogen-free dilution refrigerator with a base temperature of 15 mK. The recent increase in efficiency of pulse tube cryocoolers has made cryogen-free systems popular in recent years. However, this new style of cryostat presents challenges for performing scanning probe measurements, mainly as a result of the vibrations introduced by the cryocooler. We demonstrate scanning with root-mean-square vibrations of 0.8 nm at 3 K and 2.1 nm at 15 mK in a 1 kHz bandwidth with our design. Using Coulomb blockade thermometry on a GaAs/AlGaAs gate-defined quantum dot, we demonstrate an electron temperature of 45 mK.

  16. SU-E-I-56: Scan Angle Reduction for a Limited-Angle Intrafraction Verification (LIVE) System

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, L; Zhang, Y; Yin, F

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To develop a novel adaptive reconstruction strategy to further reduce the scanning angle required by the limited-angle intrafraction verification (LIVE) system for intrafraction verification. Methods: LIVE acquires limited angle MV projections from the exit fluence of the arc treatment beam or during gantry rotation between static beams. Orthogonal limited-angle kV projections are also acquired simultaneously to provide additional information. LIVE considers the on-board 4D-CBCT images as a deformation of the prior 4D-CT images, and solves the deformation field based on deformation models and data fidelity constraint. LIVE reaches a checkpoint after a limited-angle scan, and reconstructs 4D-CBCT for intrafraction verification at the checkpoint. In adaptive reconstruction strategy, a larger scanning angle of 30° is used for the first checkpoint, and smaller scanning angles of 15° are used for subsequent checkpoints. The onboard images reconstructed at the previous adjacent checkpoint are used as the prior images for reconstruction at the current checkpoint. As the algorithm only needs to reconstruct the small deformation occurred between adjacent checkpoints, projections from a smaller scan angle provide enough information for the reconstruction. XCAT was used to simulate tumor motion baseline drift of 2mm along sup-inf direction at every subsequent checkpoint, which are 15° apart. Adaptive reconstruction strategy was used to reconstruct the images at each checkpoint using orthogonal 15° kV and MV projections. Results: Results showed that LIVE reconstructed the tumor volumes accurately using orthogonal 15° kV-MV projections. Volume percentage differences (VPDs) were within 5% and center of mass shifts (COMS) were within 1mm for reconstruction at all checkpoints. Conclusion: It's feasible to use an adaptive reconstruction strategy to further reduce the scan angle needed by LIVE to allow faster and more frequent intrafraction verification to minimize the

  17. Gallium scan

    MedlinePlus

    Liver gallium scan; Bony gallium scan ... You will get a radioactive material called gallium injected into your vein. The gallium travels through the bloodstream and collects in the bones and certain organs. Your health care provider will ...

  18. Field Demonstration of Electro-Scan Defect Location Technology for Condition Assessment of Wastewater Collection Systems

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of the field demonstration program is to gather technically reliable cost and performance information on selected condition assessment technologies under defined field conditions. The selected technologies include zoom camera, electro-scan (FELL-41), and a multi-sens...

  19. Surface and subsurface inspection of food safety and quality using a line-scan Raman system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper presents a line-scan Raman platform for food safety and quality research, which can be configured for Raman chemical imaging (RCI) mode for surface inspection and spatially offset Raman spectroscopy (SORS) mode for subsurface inspection. In the RCI mode, macro-scale imaging was achieved u...

  20. Use of Slow-Scan Television Systems in Telemedicine, Distance Education, Government, and Industrial Applications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southworth, Glen

    Reducing the costs of teaching by television through slow-scan methods is discussed. Conventional television is costly to use, largely because the wide-band communications circuits required are in limited supply. One technical answer is bandwidth compression to fit an image into less spectrum space. A simpler and far less costly answer is to…

  1. Development of an efficient scanning and purging magnet system for IMRT with narrow high energy photon beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreassen, Björn; Svensson, Roger; Holmberg, Rickard; Danared, Håkan; Brahme, Anders

    2009-12-01

    Due to the clinical advantages of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) high flexibility and accuracy in intensity modulated dose delivery is desirable to really maximize treatment outcome. Although it is possible to deliver IMRT by using broad beams in combination with dynamic multileaf collimation the process is rather time consuming and inefficient. By using narrow scanned high energy photon beams the treatment outcome can be improved, the treatment time reduced and accurate 3D in vivo dose delivery monitoring is possible by PET-CT based dose delivery imaging of photo nuclear reactions in human tissues. Narrow photon beams can be produced by directing a low emittance high energy electron beam on a thin target, and then cleaning the therapeutic photon beam from transmitted high energy electrons, and photon generated charged leptons, with a dedicated purging magnet placed directly downstream of the target. To have an effective scanning and purging magnet system the purging magnet should be placed immediately after the bremsstrahlung target to deflect the transmitted electrons to an efficient electron stopper. In the static electron stopper the electrons should be safely collected independent of the desired direction of the therapeutic scanned photon beam. The SID (Source to Isocenter Distance) should preferably be short while retaining the ability to scan over a large area on the patient and consequently there are severe requirements both on the strength and the geometry of the scanning and purging magnets. In the present study an efficient magnet configuration with a purging and scanning magnet assembly is developed for electron energies in the 50-75 MeV range and a SID of 75 cm. For a bremsstrahlung target of 3 mm Be these electron energies produce a photon beam of 25-17 mm FWHM (Full Width Half Maximum) at a SID of 75 cm. The magnet system was examined both in terms of the efficiency in scanning the narrow bremsstrahlung beam and the deflection of

  2. Bone scanning.

    PubMed

    Greenfield, L D; Bennett, L R

    1975-03-01

    Scanning is based on the uptake of a nuclide by the crystal lattice of bone and is related to bone blood flow. Cancer cells do not take up the tracer. Normally, the scan visualizes the highly vascular bones. Scans are useful and are indicated in metastatic bone disease, primary bone tumors, hematologic malignancies and some non-neoplastic diseases. The scan is more sensitive than x-ray in the detection of malignant diseases of the skeleton. PMID:1054210

  3. Range 7 Scanner Integration with PaR Robot Scanning System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuler, Jason; Burns, Bradley; Carlson, Jeffrey; Minich, Mark

    2011-01-01

    An interface bracket and coordinate transformation matrices were designed to allow the Range 7 scanner to be mounted on the PaR Robot detector arm for scanning the heat shield or other object placed in the test cell. A process was designed for using Rapid Form XOR to stitch data from multiple scans together to provide an accurate 3D model of the object scanned. An accurate model was required for the design and verification of an existing heat shield. The large physical size and complex shape of the heat shield does not allow for direct measurement of certain features in relation to other features. Any imaging devices capable of imaging the entire heat shield in its entirety suffers a reduced resolution and cannot image sections that are blocked from view. Prior methods involved tools such as commercial measurement arms, taking images with cameras, then performing manual measurements. These prior methods were tedious and could not provide a 3D model of the object being scanned, and were typically limited to a few tens of measurement points at prominent locations. Integration of the scanner with the robot allows for large complex objects to be scanned at high resolution, and for 3D Computer Aided Design (CAD) models to be generated for verification of items to the original design, and to generate models of previously undocumented items. The main components are the mounting bracket for the scanner to the robot and the coordinate transformation matrices used for stitching the scanner data into a 3D model. The steps involve mounting the interface bracket to the robot's detector arm, mounting the scanner to the bracket, and then scanning sections of the object and recording the location of the tool tip (in this case the center of the scanner's focal point). A novel feature is the ability to stitch images together by coordinates instead of requiring each scan data set to have overlapping identifiable features. This setup allows models of complex objects to be developed

  4. Analysis of the Possibilities of Using Low-Cost Scanning System in 3d Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kedzierski, M.; Wierzbickia, D.; Fryskowska, A.; Chlebowska, B.

    2016-06-01

    The laser scanning technique is still a very popular and fast growing method of obtaining information on modeling 3D objects. The use of low-cost miniature scanners creates new opportunities for small objects of 3D modeling based on point clouds acquired from the scan. The same, the development of accuracy and methods of automatic processing of this data type is noticeable. The article presents methods of collecting raw datasets in the form of a point-cloud using a low-cost ground-based laser scanner FabScan. As part of the research work 3D scanner from an open source FabLab project was constructed. In addition, the results for the analysis of the geometry of the point clouds obtained by using a low-cost laser scanner were presented. Also, some analysis of collecting data of different structures (made of various materials such as: glass, wood, paper, gum, plastic, plaster, ceramics, stoneware clay etc. and of different shapes: oval and similar to oval and prism shaped) have been done. The article presents two methods used for analysis: the first one - visual (general comparison between the 3D model and the real object) and the second one - comparative method (comparison between measurements on models and scanned objects using the mean error of a single sample of observations). The analysis showed, that the low-budget ground-based laser scanner FabScan has difficulties with collecting data of non-oval objects. Items built of glass painted black also caused problems for the scanner. In addition, the more details scanned object contains, the lower the accuracy of the collected point-cloud is. Nevertheless, the accuracy of collected data (using oval-straight shaped objects) is satisfactory. The accuracy, in this case, fluctuates between ± 0,4 mm and ± 1,0 mm whereas when using more detailed objects or a rectangular shaped prism the accuracy is much more lower, between 2,9 mm and ± 9,0 mm. Finally, the publication presents the possibility (for the future expansion of

  5. SCANS (Shipping Cask ANalysis System) a microcomputer-based analysis system for shipping cask design review: User`s manual to Version 3a. Volume 1, Revision 2

    SciTech Connect

    Mok, G.C.; Thomas, G.R.; Gerhard, M.A.; Trummer, D.J.; Johnson, G.L.

    1998-03-01

    SCANS (Shipping Cask ANalysis System) is a microcomputer-based system of computer programs and databases developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) for evaluating safety analysis reports on spent fuel shipping casks. SCANS is an easy-to-use system that calculates the global response to impact loads, pressure loads and thermal conditions, providing reviewers with an independent check on analyses submitted by licensees. SCANS is based on microcomputers compatible with the IBM-PC family of computers. The system is composed of a series of menus, input programs, cask analysis programs, and output display programs. All data is entered through fill-in-the-blank input screens that contain descriptive data requests. Analysis options are based on regulatory cases described in the Code of Federal Regulations 10 CFR 71 and Regulatory Guides published by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission in 1977 and 1978.

  6. Hyperspectral-multispectral line-scan imaging system for automated poultry carcass inspection applications for food safety.

    PubMed

    Chao, K; Yang, C C; Chen, Y R; Kim, M S; Chan, D E

    2007-11-01

    A hyperspectral-multispectral line-scan imaging system was developed for differentiation of wholesome and systemically diseased chickens. In-plant testing was conducted for chickens on a commercial evisceration line moving at a speed of 70 birds per minute. Hyperspectral image data was acquired for a calibration data set of 543 wholesome and 64 systemically diseased birds and for a testing data set of 381 wholesome and 100 systemically diseased birds. The calibration data set was used to develop the parameters of the imaging system for conducting multispectral inspection based on fuzzy logic detection algorithms using selected key wavelengths. Using a threshold of 0.4 for fuzzy output decision values, multispectral classification was able to achieve 90.6% accuracy for wholesome birds and 93.8% accuracy for systemically diseased birds in the calibration data set and 97.6% accuracy for wholesome birds and 96.0% accuracy for systemically diseased birds in the testing data set. By adjusting the classification threshold, 100% accuracy was achieved for systemically diseased birds with a decrease in accuracy for wholesome birds to 88.7%. This adjustment shows that the system can be feasibly adapted as needed for implementation for specific purposes, such as paw harvesting operations or prescreening for food safety inspection. This line-scan imaging system is ideal for directly implementing multispectral classification methods developed from hyperspectral image analysis.

  7. N-SCAN: new vibromodulation system for detection and monitoring of cracks and other contact-type defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donskoy, Dmitri; Ekimov, Alexander; Luzzato, Emile; Lottiaux, Jean-Louis; Stoupin, Stanislav; Zagrai, Andrei

    2003-08-01

    In recent years, innovative vibro-modulation technique has been introduced for detection of contact-type interfaces such as cracks, debondings, and delaminations. The technique utilizes the effect of nonlinear interaction of ultrasound and vibrations at the interface of the defect. Vibration varies on the contact area of the interface modulating passing through ultrasonic wave. The modulation manifests itself as additional side-band spectral components with the combination frequencies in the spectrum of the received signal. The presence of these components allows for detection and differentiation of the contact-type defects from other structural and material inhomogeneities. Vibro-modulation technique has been implemented in N-SCAN damage detection system. The system consists of a digital synthesizer, high and low frequency amplifiers, a magnetostrictive shaker, ultrasonic transducers and a PC-based data acquisition/processing station with N-SCAN software. The ability of the system to detect contact-type defects was experimentally verified using specimens of simple and complex geometries made of steel, aluminum, composites and other structural materials. N-SCAN proved to be very effective for nondestructive testing of full-scale structures ranging from 24 foot-long gun barrels to stainless steel pipes used in nuclear power plants. Among advantages of the system are applicability for the wide range of structural materials and for structures with complex geometries, real time data processing, convenient interface for system operation, simplicity of interpretation of results, no need for sensor scanning along structure, onsite inspection of large structures at a fraction of time as compared with conventional techniques. This paper describes the basic principles of nonlinear vibro-modulation NDE technique, some theoretical background for nonlinear interaction and justification of signal processing algorithm. It is also presents examples of practical implementation and

  8. Development of kinematic 3D laser scanning system for indoor mapping and as-built BIM using constrained SLAM.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jaehoon; Yoon, Sanghyun; Ju, Sungha; Heo, Joon

    2015-01-01

    The growing interest and use of indoor mapping is driving a demand for improved data-acquisition facility, efficiency and productivity in the era of the Building Information Model (BIM). The conventional static laser scanning method suffers from some limitations on its operability in complex indoor environments, due to the presence of occlusions. Full scanning of indoor spaces without loss of information requires that surveyors change the scanner position many times, which incurs extra work for registration of each scanned point cloud. Alternatively, a kinematic 3D laser scanning system, proposed herein, uses line-feature-based Simultaneous Localization and Mapping (SLAM) technique for continuous mapping. Moreover, to reduce the uncertainty of line-feature extraction, we incorporated constrained adjustment based on an assumption made with respect to typical indoor environments: that the main structures are formed of parallel or orthogonal line features. The superiority of the proposed constrained adjustment is its reduction for uncertainties of the adjusted lines, leading to successful data association process. In the present study, kinematic scanning with and without constrained adjustment were comparatively evaluated in two test sites, and the results confirmed the effectiveness of the proposed system. The accuracy of the 3D mapping result was additionally evaluated by comparison with the reference points acquired by a total station: the Euclidean average distance error was 0.034 m for the seminar room and 0.043 m for the corridor, which satisfied the error tolerance for point cloud acquisition (0.051 m) according to the guidelines of the General Services Administration for BIM accuracy.

  9. Development of Kinematic 3D Laser Scanning System for Indoor Mapping and As-Built BIM Using Constrained SLAM

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Jaehoon; Yoon, Sanghyun; Ju, Sungha; Heo, Joon

    2015-01-01

    The growing interest and use of indoor mapping is driving a demand for improved data-acquisition facility, efficiency and productivity in the era of the Building Information Model (BIM). The conventional static laser scanning method suffers from some limitations on its operability in complex indoor environments, due to the presence of occlusions. Full scanning of indoor spaces without loss of information requires that surveyors change the scanner position many times, which incurs extra work for registration of each scanned point cloud. Alternatively, a kinematic 3D laser scanning system, proposed herein, uses line-feature-based Simultaneous Localization and Mapping (SLAM) technique for continuous mapping. Moreover, to reduce the uncertainty of line-feature extraction, we incorporated constrained adjustment based on an assumption made with respect to typical indoor environments: that the main structures are formed of parallel or orthogonal line features. The superiority of the proposed constrained adjustment is its reduction for uncertainties of the adjusted lines, leading to successful data association process. In the present study, kinematic scanning with and without constrained adjustment were comparatively evaluated in two test sites, and the results confirmed the effectiveness of the proposed system. The accuracy of the 3D mapping result was additionally evaluated by comparison with the reference points acquired by a total station: the Euclidean average distance error was 0.034 m for the seminar room and 0.043 m for the corridor, which satisfied the error tolerance for point cloud acquisition (0.051 m) according to the guidelines of the General Services Administration for BIM accuracy. PMID:26501292

  10. Development of kinematic 3D laser scanning system for indoor mapping and as-built BIM using constrained SLAM.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jaehoon; Yoon, Sanghyun; Ju, Sungha; Heo, Joon

    2015-01-01

    The growing interest and use of indoor mapping is driving a demand for improved data-acquisition facility, efficiency and productivity in the era of the Building Information Model (BIM). The conventional static laser scanning method suffers from some limitations on its operability in complex indoor environments, due to the presence of occlusions. Full scanning of indoor spaces without loss of information requires that surveyors change the scanner position many times, which incurs extra work for registration of each scanned point cloud. Alternatively, a kinematic 3D laser scanning system, proposed herein, uses line-feature-based Simultaneous Localization and Mapping (SLAM) technique for continuous mapping. Moreover, to reduce the uncertainty of line-feature extraction, we incorporated constrained adjustment based on an assumption made with respect to typical indoor environments: that the main structures are formed of parallel or orthogonal line features. The superiority of the proposed constrained adjustment is its reduction for uncertainties of the adjusted lines, leading to successful data association process. In the present study, kinematic scanning with and without constrained adjustment were comparatively evaluated in two test sites, and the results confirmed the effectiveness of the proposed system. The accuracy of the 3D mapping result was additionally evaluated by comparison with the reference points acquired by a total station: the Euclidean average distance error was 0.034 m for the seminar room and 0.043 m for the corridor, which satisfied the error tolerance for point cloud acquisition (0.051 m) according to the guidelines of the General Services Administration for BIM accuracy. PMID:26501292

  11. HIGH RESOLUTION AND FAST SCANNING SQUID BASED NON-DESTRUCTIVE INSPECTION SYSTEM OF NIOBIUM SHEETS FOR SRF CAVITIES

    SciTech Connect

    SHU, QUAN-SHENG

    2008-06-08

    Applications in high energy physics accelerators and other fields require the use of thousands of superconducting RF (SRF) cavities that are made of high purity Nb material and the purity of niobium is critical for these cavities to reach the highest accelerating fields. Tantalum is the most prolific of metal inclusions, which can cause thermal breakdown and prevent the cavities from reaching their theoretical performance limits of 45-50 MV/m, and DOE Labs are searching for a technology that could detect small impurities in superconducting Nb sheets reaching the highest possible accelerating fields. The proposed innovative SQUID-based Nondestructive system can scan Niobium sheets used in the manufacturing of SRF cavities with both high speed and high resolution. A highly sensitive SQUID system with a gradiometer probe, non-magnetic dewar, data acquisition system, and a scanning system will be developed for fast detection of impurities in planar Nb sheets. In phase I, we will modify our existing SQUID-based eddy current system to detect 100 micron size Ta defects and a great effort will focus on achieving fast scanning of a large number of niobium sheets in a shorter time and with reasonable resolution. An older system operated by moving the sample 1 mm, stopping and waiting for 1-2 seconds, then activating a measurement by the SQUID after the short settle time is modified. A preliminary designed and implemented a SQUID scanning system that is fast and is capable of scanning a 30 cm x 30 cm Nb sheet in 15 minutes by continuously moving the table at speeds up to 10 mm/s while activating the SQUID at 1mm interval is modified and reached the Phase I goal of 100mm resolution. We have successfully demonstrated the feasibility that a fast speed SQUID scanner without sacrificing the resolution of detection can be done, and a data acquisition and analysis system is also preliminary developed. The SQUID based scanner will help reach the highest accelerating field in SRF

  12. Scanning Seebeck Coefficient Measurement System for Homogeneity Characterization of Bulk and Thin-Film Thermoelectric Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Iwanaga, S; Snyder, GJ

    2012-04-03

    Larger-scale production of thermoelectric materials is necessary when mass-producing thermoelectric devices at industrial level. Certain fabrication techniques can create inhomogeneity in the material through composition and doping fluctuations throughout the sample, causing local variations in thermoelectric properties. Some variations are in the range of sub-millimeter scale or larger but may be difficult to detect by traditional materials characterization techniques such as x-ray diffraction or scanning electron microscopy when the chemical variation is small but the doping variation, which strongly affects thermoelectric performance, is large. In this paper, a scanning apparatus to directly detect local variations of Seebeck coefficient on both bulk and thin-film samples is used. Results have shown that this technique can be utilized for detection of defective regions, as well as phase separation in the 100-m range or larger.

  13. A handheld laser scanning confocal reflectance imaging–confocal Raman microspectroscopy system

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Chetan A.; Arrasmith, Christopher L.; Mackanos, Mark A.; Dickensheets, David L.; Mahadevan-Jansen, Anita

    2012-01-01

    Confocal reflectance microscopy and confocal Raman spectroscopy have shown potential for non-destructive analysis of samples at micron-scale resolutions. Current studies utilizing these techniques often employ large bench-top microscopes, and are not suited for use outside of laboratory settings. We have developed a microscope which combines laser scanning confocal reflectance imaging and confocal Raman spectroscopy into a compact handheld probe that is capable of high-resolution imaging and spectroscopy in a variety of settings. The compact size of the probe is largely due to the use of a MEMS mirror for beam scanning. The probe is capable of axial resolutions of up to 4 μm for the confocal imaging channel and 10 μm for the confocal Raman spectroscopy channel. Here, we report instrument design, characterize optical performance, and provide images and spectra from normal skin to demonstrate the instrument’s capabilities for clinical diagnostics. PMID:22435097

  14. Feasibility of Concurrent Treatment with the Scanning Ultrasound Reflector Linear Array System (SURLAS) and the Helical Tomotherapy System

    PubMed Central

    Peñagarícano, José A.; Moros, Eduardo; Novák, Petr; Yan, Yulong; Corry, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the feasibility of concurrent treatment with the Scanning Ultrasound Reflector Linear Array System (SURLAS) and helical tomotherapy (HT) intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Methods The SURLAS was placed on a RANDO phantom simulating a patient with superficial or deep recurrent breast cancer. A Megavoltage CT (MVCT) of the phantom with and without the SURLAS was obtained in the HT system. MVCT images with the SURLAS were obtained for two configurations: i) with the SURLAS' long axis parallel and ii) perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of the phantom. The MVCT simulation data set was then transferred to a radiation therapy planning station. Organs at risk (OAR) were contoured including the lungs, heart, abdomen and spinal cord. The metallic parts of the SURLAS were contoured as well and constraints were assigned to completely or directionally block radiation through them. The MVCT-simulation data set and regions of interest (ROI) files were subsequently transferred to the HT planning station. Several HT plans were obtained with optimization parameters that are usually used in the clinic. For comparison purposes, planning was also performed without the SURLAS on the phantom. Results All plans with the SURLAS on the phantom showed adequate dose covering 95% of the planning target volume (PTV D95%), average dose and coefficient of variation of the planning target volume (PTV) dose distribution regardless of the SURLAS' orientation with respect to the RANDO phantom. Likewise, all OAR showed clinically acceptable dose values. Spatial dose distributions and dose-volume histogram (DVH) evaluation showed negligible plan degradation due to the presence of the SURLAS. Beam-on time varied depending on the selected optimization parameters. Conclusion From the perspective of the radiation dosage, concurrent treatment with the SURLAS and HT IMRT is feasible as demonstrated by the obtained clinically acceptable treatment plans. In addition, proper

  15. Wide area scanning system and carbon microbeams at the external microbeam facility of the INFN LABEC laboratory in Florence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giuntini, L.; Massi, M.; Calusi, S.; Castelli, L.; Carraresi, L.; Fedi, M. E.; Gelli, N.; Liccioli, L.; Mandò, P. A.; Mazzinghi, A.; Palla, L.; Romano, F. P.; Ruberto, C.; Taccetti, F.

    2015-04-01

    Recently, developments have been made to the external scanning microbeam of INFN-LABEC laboratory in Florence. A new system for mechanical sample scanning was implemented. This system allows us to acquire large maps (up to 20 × 20 cm2), of great interest in the Cultural Heritage field. In parallel, the possibility of using carbon microbeams for experiments, such as, for example, ion beam modification of materials and MeV Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry, has been investigated. As a test application, Particle Induced X-ray Emission with carbon microbeams has been performed on a lapis lazuli stone. First results for both wide area imaging and external carbon microbeams are briefly reported.

  16. Closed-loop control of a 2-D mems micromirror with sidewall electrodes for a laser scanning microscope system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hui; Chen, Albert; Jie Sun, Wei; Sun, Zhen Dong; Yeow, John TW

    2016-01-01

    This article presents the development and implementation of a robust nonlinear control scheme for a 2-D micromirror-based laser scanning microscope system. The presented control scheme, built around sliding mode control approach and augmented an adaptive algorithm, is proposed to improve the tracking accuracy in presence of cross-axis effect. The closed-loop controlled imaging system is developed through integrating a 2-D micromirror with sidewall electrodes (SW), a laser source, NI field-programmable gate array (FPGA) hardware, the optics, position sensing detector (PSD) and photo detector (PD). The experimental results demonstrated that the proposed scheme is able to achieve accurate tracking of a reference triangular signal. Compared with open-loop control, the scanning performance is significantly improved, and a better 2-D image is obtained using the micromirror with the proposed scheme.

  17. Dynamic secondary electron contrast effects in liquid systems studied by environmental scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Stokes, D J; Thiel, B L; Donald, A M

    2000-01-01

    We report an investigation into a dynamic contrast phenomenon in water-oil emulsions imaged in the environmental scanning electron microscope. Secondary electron contrast between oil and water phases is shown to change with scan rate, even inverting in extreme cases. This effect is attributed to the fact that charge carriers in liquids have intermediate mobilities compared with those in metallic conductors and solid insulators. Thus, increasing the electron energy flux density (via slower scan rates) results in the temporary accumulation of excess charge, which in turn gives rise to increased secondary electron emission. Excess charge dissipates between frames, however, such that classical charging of the specimen is not observed. The oils used here have conductivities lower than that of water, making them more susceptible to the effect. However, the material within the primary electron interaction volume is a conductive medium. We demonstrate that charging effects are not seen in regions of the oil where the interaction volume is in contact with the more conductive continuous water phase. Secondary electron emission from these regions therefore approximates to the intrinsic yield.

  18. Continuous wave synthetic low-coherence wind sensing Lidar: motionless measurement system with subsequent numerical range scanning.

    PubMed

    Brinkmeyer, Ernst; Waterholter, Thomas

    2013-01-28

    A continuous wave (CW) Lidar system for detection of scattering from atmospheric aerosol particles is presented which is useful in particular for remote sensing of wind velocities. It is based on a low-coherence interferometric setup powered by a synthetic broadband laser source with Gaussian power density spectrum. The laser bandwidth is electronically adjustable and determines the spatial resolution which is independent of range. The Lidar system has no moving parts. The location to be resolved can be shifted numerically after the measurement meaning that a single measurement already contains the full range information. The features of constant resolution and numerical range scanning are in sharp contrast to ordinary CW Lidar systems.

  19. Inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy: a computer controlled, scanning monochromator system for the rapid determination of the elements

    SciTech Connect

    Floyd, M.A.

    1980-03-01

    A computer controlled, scanning monochromator system specifically designed for the rapid, sequential determination of the elements is described. The monochromator is combined with an inductively coupled plasma excitation source so that elements at major, minor, trace, and ultratrace levels may be determined, in sequence, without changing experimental parameters other than the spectral line observed. A number of distinctive features not found in previously described versions are incorporated into the system here described. Performance characteristics of the entire system and several analytical applications are discussed.

  20. A study program on large aperture electronic scanning phased array antennas for the shuttle imaging microwave system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Fundamental phased array theory and performance parameters are discussed in terms of their application to microwave radiometry, and four scanning phased arrays representing current examples of state-of-the-art phased array technology are evaluated for potential use as components of the multispectral antenna system for the space shuttle imaging microwave system (SIMS). A discussion of problem areas, both in performance and fabrication is included, with extrapolations of performance characteristics for phased array antennas of increased sizes up to 20 m by 20 m. The possibility of interlacing two or more phased arrays to achieve a multifrequency aperture is considered, and, finally, a specific antenna system is recommended for use with SIMS.

  1. Navigation for space shuttle approach and landing using an inertial navigation system augmented by data from a precision ranging system or a microwave scan beam landing guidance system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgee, L. A.; Smith, G. L.; Hegarty, D. M.; Merrick, R. B.; Carson, T. M.; Schmidt, S. F.

    1970-01-01

    A preliminary study has been made of the navigation performance which might be achieved for the high cross-range space shuttle orbiter during final approach and landing by using an optimally augmented inertial navigation system. Computed navigation accuracies are presented for an on-board inertial navigation system augmented (by means of an optimal filter algorithm) with data from two different ground navigation aids; a precision ranging system and a microwave scanning beam landing guidance system. These results show that augmentation with either type of ground navigation aid is capable of providing a navigation performance at touchdown which should be adequate for the space shuttle. In addition, adequate navigation performance for space shuttle landing is obtainable from the precision ranging system even with a complete dropout of precision range measurements as much as 100 seconds before touchdown.

  2. Mobile gamma-ray scanning system for detecting radiation anomalies associated with /sup 226/Ra-bearing materials

    SciTech Connect

    Myrick, T.E.; Blair, M.S.; Doane, R.W.; Goldsmith, W.A.

    1982-11-01

    A mobile gamma-ray scanning system has been developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory for use in the Department of Energy's remedial action survey programs. The unit consists of a NaI(T1) detection system housed in a specially-equipped van. The system is operator controlled through an on-board mini-computer, with data output provided on the computer video screen, strip chart recorders, and an on-line printer. Data storage is provided by a floppy disk system. Multichannel analysis capabilities are included for qualitative radionuclide identification. A /sup 226/Ra-specific algorithm is employed to identify locations containing residual radium-bearing materials. This report presents the details of the system description, software development, and scanning methods utilized with the ORNL system. Laboratory calibration and field testing have established the system sensitivity, field of view, and other performance characteristics, the results of which are also presented. Documentation of the instrumentation and computer programs are included.

  3. Multiline radar scan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levinson, S.

    1977-01-01

    Scanning scheme is more efficient than conventional scanning. Originally designed for optical radar in space vehicles, scheme may also find uses in site-surveillance security systems and in other industrial applications. It should be particularly useful when system must run on battery energy, as would be case in power outages.

  4. Development of lightweight structural health monitoring systems for aerospace applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, Matthew

    This thesis investigates the development of structural health monitoring systems (SHM) for aerospace applications. The work focuses on each aspect of a SHM system covering novel transducer technologies and damage detection techniques to detect and locate damage in metallic and composite structures. Secondly the potential of energy harvesting and power arrangement methodologies to provide a stable power source is assessed. Finally culminating in the realisation of smart SHM structures. 1. Transducer Technology A thorough experimental study of low profile, low weight novel transducers not normally used for acoustic emission (AE) and acousto-ultrasonics (AU) damage detection was conducted. This included assessment of their performance when exposed to aircraft environments and feasibility of embedding these transducers in composites specimens in order to realise smart structures. 2. Damage Detection An extensive experimental programme into damage detection utilising AE and AU were conducted in both composites and metallic structures. These techniques were used to assess different damage mechanism within these materials. The same transducers were used for novel AE location techniques coupled with AU similarity assessment to successfully detect and locate damage in a variety of structures. 3. Energy Harvesting and Power Management Experimental investigations and numerical simulations were undertaken to assess the power generation levels of piezoelectric and thermoelectric generators for typical vibration and temperature differentials which exist in the aerospace environment. Furthermore a power management system was assessed to demonstrate the ability of the system to take the varying nature of the input power and condition it to a stable power source for a system. 4. Smart Structures The research conducted is brought together into a smart carbon fibre wing showcasing the novel embedded transducers for AE and AU damage detection and location, as well as vibration energy

  5. Towards a deep characterization of a 64-fold-pixelated position sensitive detector for a new {gamma}-scanning system of HPGe segmented detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez-Prieto, A.; Quintana, B.

    2011-07-01

    Characterization of the electrical response of the HPGe segmented detectors is one of the current goals for the Nuclear Physics community in order to perform {gamma}-ray tracking or even imaging with these detectors. For this purpose, scanning devices have to be developed to achieve the signal-position association with the highest precision. In this laboratory, a new scanning system, SALSA (Salamanca Lyso-based Scanning Array), consisting on a high spatial resolution {gamma} camera, is a under development. In this work the whole scanning system is presented and first results for the characterization of the {gamma} camera are shown. (authors)

  6. An excitation wavelength-scanning spectral imaging system for preclinical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leavesley, Silas; Jiang, Yanan; Patsekin, Valery; Rajwa, Bartek; Robinson, J. Paul

    2008-02-01

    Small-animal fluorescence imaging is a rapidly growing field, driven by applications in cancer detection and pharmaceutical therapies. However, the practical use of this imaging technology is limited by image-quality issues related to autofluorescence background from animal tissues, as well as attenuation of the fluorescence signal due to scatter and absorption. To combat these problems, spectral imaging and analysis techniques are being employed to separate the fluorescence signal from background autofluorescence. To date, these technologies have focused on detecting the fluorescence emission spectrum at a fixed excitation wavelength. We present an alternative to this technique, an imaging spectrometer that detects the fluorescence excitation spectrum at a fixed emission wavelength. The advantages of this approach include increased available information for discrimination of fluorescent dyes, decreased optical radiation dose to the animal, and ability to scan a continuous wavelength range instead of discrete wavelength sampling. This excitation-scanning imager utilizes an acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF), with supporting optics, to scan the excitation spectrum. Advanced image acquisition and analysis software has also been developed for classification and unmixing of the spectral image sets. Filtering has been implemented in a single-pass configuration with a bandwidth (full width at half maximum) of 16nm at 550nm central diffracted wavelength. We have characterized AOTF filtering over a wide range of incident light angles, much wider than has been previously reported in the literature, and we show how changes in incident light angle can be used to attenuate AOTF side lobes and alter bandwidth. A new parameter, in-band to out-of-band ratio, was defined to assess the quality of the filtered excitation light. Additional parameters were measured to allow objective characterization of the AOTF and the imager as a whole. This is necessary for comparing the

  7. Study of the KNO3-Al2O3 system by differential scanning calorimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amirov, A. M.; Gafurov, M. M.; Rabadanov, K. Sh.

    2016-09-01

    The structural and the thermodynamic properties of potassium nitrate KNO3 and its composites with nanosized aluminum oxide Al2O3 have been studied by differential scanning calorimetry. It has been found that an amorphous phase forms in composites (1- x)KNO3- x Al2O3. The thermal effect corresponding to this phase has been observed at 316°C. It has been found that the phase transition heats of potassium nitrate decreased as the aluminum oxide fraction increased.

  8. Serial block face scanning electron microscopy and the reconstruction of plant cell membrane systems.

    PubMed

    Kittelmann, M; Hawes, C; Hughes, L

    2016-08-01

    Serial block face imaging with the scanning electron microscope has been developed as an alternative to serial sectioning and transmission electron microscopy for the ultrastructural analysis of the three-dimensional organization of cells and tissues. An ultramicrotome within the microscope specimen chamber permits sectioning and imaging to a depth of many microns within resin-embedded specimens. The technology has only recently been adopted by plant microscopists and here we describe some specimen preparation procedures suitable for plant tissue, suggested microscope imaging parameters and discuss the software required for image reconstruction and analysis. PMID:27197647

  9. Serial block face scanning electron microscopy and the reconstruction of plant cell membrane systems.

    PubMed

    Kittelmann, M; Hawes, C; Hughes, L

    2016-08-01

    Serial block face imaging with the scanning electron microscope has been developed as an alternative to serial sectioning and transmission electron microscopy for the ultrastructural analysis of the three-dimensional organization of cells and tissues. An ultramicrotome within the microscope specimen chamber permits sectioning and imaging to a depth of many microns within resin-embedded specimens. The technology has only recently been adopted by plant microscopists and here we describe some specimen preparation procedures suitable for plant tissue, suggested microscope imaging parameters and discuss the software required for image reconstruction and analysis.

  10. A system for high resolution 3D mapping using laser radar and requiring no beam scanning mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rademacher, Paul

    1988-06-01

    The inherently high angular and range resolution capabilities associated with radar systems operating at optical frequencies are at once a blessing and a curse. Standard implementations consist of very narrow field of view optical receivers operating in conjunction with laser transmitters or even narrower illumination beamwidth. While high angular resolution is thus achieved, mechanical scanning is required to gather data over extended fields of view. The many laser pulse transmissions necessary to cover the entire field of view increase the detectability of the system by enemy sensors. A system concept is proposed which, through the use of a single laser transmitter and multiple optical receivers, largely eliminate these deficiencies. Complete 3D data over a broad angular field of view and depth of field can be gathered based upon the reflections from a single transmitted laser pulse. Covert operation is enhanced as a result of the sparse laser transmissions required. The eye safety characteristics of the system are also enhanced. Proprietary coding of optical shutters in each of the multiple optical receivers permits the number of such receivers to be reduced to a very practical few. An alternative configuration of the system reduces the number of receivers required to one, at the expense of increased data acquisition time. The multiple receiver configuration is simply a parallel processing implementation of the single receiver approach. While data rate is reduced by the single receiver configuration, it still greatly exceeds that of scanning systems, and hardware complexity is also reduced significantly.

  11. Effect of scatter and an antiscatter grid on the performance of a slot-scanning digital mammography system

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Sam Z.; Bloomquist, Aili K.; Mawdsley, Gord E.; Yaffe, Martin J.; Elbakri, Idris

    2006-04-15

    The use of a grid increases perceptibility of low contrast objects in mammography. Slot-scan mammography provides a more dose efficient reduction of the scattered radiation reaching the detector than obtained with an antiscatter grid in screen-film or flat-panel digital mammography. In this paper, the potential of using a grid in a slot-scan system to provide a further reduction of scattered radiation is investigated. The components of the digital signal: primary radiation, off-focus radiation, scattered radiation, and optical fluorescence glare in a CsI(Tl) detector were quantified. Based on these measurements, the primary and scatter transmission factors (T{sub p},T{sub s}), scatter-to-primary ratio (SPR), signal-difference-to-noise ratio (SDNR), and the SDNR improvement factor (K{sub SDNR}) were obtained. Our results showed that the SPR ranged from 0.05 to 0.19 for breast thicknesses between 2 and 8 cm, respectively. The values of K{sub SDNR} ranged from 0.85 to 0.94. Because the slot-scanning system has an inherently low SPR, the increase in dose required when the grid is used outweighs the benefit of the small increase in SDNR. It is possible that greater benefit could be achieved by using a grid with a higher T{sub p}, such as obtained using air-core technology.

  12. 77 FR 59941 - Prospective Grant of Exclusive License: Terahertz Scanning Systems for Cancer Pathology

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-01

    ... Systems for Cancer Pathology AGENCY: National Institutes of Health, Public Health Service, HHS. ACTION... systems for cancer pathology. Upon the expiration or termination of the exclusive evaluation...

  13. a Real-Time Earthquake Moment Tensor Scanning Code for the Antelope System (brtt, Inc)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macpherson, K. A.; Ruppert, N. A.; Freymueller, J. T.; Lindquist, K.; Harvey, D.; Dreger, D. S.; Lombard, P. N.; Guilhem, A.

    2015-12-01

    While all seismic observatories routinely determine hypocentral location and local magnitude within a few minutes of an earthquake's occurrence, the ability to estimate seismic moment and sense of slip in a similar time frame is less widespread. This is unfortunate, because moment and mechanism are critical parameters for rapid hazard assessment; for larger events, moment magnitude is more reliable due to the tendency of local magnitude to saturate, and certain mechanisms such as off-shore thrust events might indicate earthquakes with tsunamigenic potential. In order to increase access to this capability, we have developed a continuous moment tensor scanning code for Antelope, the ubiquitous open-architecture seismic acquisition and processing software in use around the world. The scanning code, which uses an algorithm that has previously been employed for real-time monitoring at the University of California, Berkeley, is able to produce full moment tensor solutions for moderate events from regional seismic data. The algorithm monitors a grid of potential sources by continuously cross-correlating pre-computed synthetic seismograms with long-period recordings from a sparse network of broad-band stations. The code package consists of 3 modules. One module is used to create a monitoring grid by constructing source-receiver geometry, calling a frequency-wavenumber code to produce synthetics, and computing the generalized linear inverse of the array of synthetics. There is a real-time scanning module that correlates streaming data with pre-inverted synthetics, monitors the variance reduction, and writes the moment tensor solution to a database if an earthquake detection occurs. Finally, there is an 'off-line' module that is very similar to the real-time scanner, with the exception that it utilizes pre-recorded data stored in Antelope databases and is useful for testing purposes or for quickly producing moment tensor catalogs for long time series. The code is open source

  14. [Atmospheric HCHO gradient monitoring and analysis in Beijing City with a scanning DOAS system].

    PubMed

    Wang, Man-hua; Xie, Pin-hua; Qin, Min; Dou, Ke; Wang, Jie; Li, Ang; Xu, Jin; Shi, Peng; Wu, Feng-cheng

    2011-03-01

    Scanning differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) technique combined with meteorological tower was used for monitoring vertical profiles of SO2, NO2, O3, HCHO and HONO along three light paths in Beijing City during July 28, 2009 to August 13, 2009. As a result, the time series of concentrations and vertical gradient of HCHO as well as other gases were acquired. By analyzing the vertical distribution frequency characteristics of HCHO, data of other gases and meteorological data, it was concluded that the main source of HCHO is vehicles emissions around the measurement site. The photochemical reaction as the secondary source accounts for a significant proportion of the source of HCHO at certain times of day (around noon, for a few hours). PMID:21595241

  15. Annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy (ADF-STEM) tomography of polymer systems.

    PubMed

    Lu, Kangbo; Sourty, Erwan; Loos, Joachim

    2010-08-01

    We have utilized bright-field conventional transmission electron microscopy tomography and annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy (ADF-STEM) tomography to characterize a well-defined carbon black (CB)-filled polymer nanocomposite with known CB volume concentration. For both imaging methods, contrast can be generated between the CB and the surrounding polymer matrix. The involved contrast mechanisms, in particular for ADF-STEM, will be discussed in detail. The obtained volume reconstructions were analysed and the CB volume concentrations were carefully determined from the reconstructed data. For both imaging modes, the measured CB volume concentrations are substantially different and only quantification based on the ADF-STEM data revealed about the same value as the known CB loading. Moreover, when applying low-convergence angles for imaging ADF-STEM tomography, data can be obtained of micrometre-thick samples.

  16. Assessment of DNA replication in central nervous system by Laser Scanning Cytometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenz, Dominik; Mosch, Birgit; Bocsi, Jozsef; Arendt, Thomas; Tárnok, Attila

    2004-07-01

    μIn neurons of patients with Alzheimers's disease (AD) signs of cell cycle re-entry as well as polyploidy have been reported1, 2, indicating that the entire or a part of the genome of the neurons is duplicated before its death but mitosis is not initiated so that the cellular DNA content remains tetraploid. It was concluded, that this imbalance is the direct cause of the neuronal loss in AD3. Manual counting of polyploidal cells is possible but time consuming and possibly statistically insufficient. The aim of this study was to develop an automated method that detects the neuronal DNA content abnormalities with Laser Scanning Cytometry (LSC).Frozen sections of formalin-fixed brain tissue of AD patients and control subjects were labelled with anti-cyclin B and anti-NeuN antibodies. Immunolabelling was performed using Cy5- and Cy2-conjugated secondary antibodies and biotin streptavidin or tyramid signal amplification. In the end sections of 20m thickness were incubated with propidium iodide (PI) (50μg/ml) and covered on slides. For analysis by the LSC PI was used as trigger. Cells identified as neurons by NeuN expression were analyzed for cyclin B expression. Per specimen data of at least 10,000 neurons were acquired. In the frozen brain sections an automated quantification of the amount of nuclear DNA is possible with LSC. The DNA ploidy as well as the cell cycle distribution can be analyzed. A high number of neurons can be scanned and the duration of measuring is shorter than a manual examination. The amount of DNA is sufficiently represented by the PI fluorescence to be able to distinguish between eu- and polyploid neurons.

  17. Machining accuracy of crowns by CAD/CAM system using TCP/IP: influence of restorative material and scanning condition.

    PubMed

    Tomita, Sachiko; Shin-ya, Akiyoshi; Gomi, Harunori; Shin-ya, Akikazu; Yokoyama, Daiichiro

    2007-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the optimal condition for fabricating accurate crowns efficiently using an internet-based CAD/CAM system. The influences of three different CAD/CAM restorative materials (titanium, porcelain, and composite resin) and three different step-over scanning distances (0.01 mm, 0.11 mm, and 0.21 mm) were evaluated, and their interactive effects were carefully examined. Several points on the inner and outer surfaces of machined crowns - as well as height - were measured. These measurements were then compared with the original models, from which machining accuracy was obtained. At all measuring points, the inner surface of all crowns was machined larger than the die model, whereas the cervical area of porcelain crown was machined smaller than the crown model. Results of this study revealed that a step-over distance of 0.11 mm was an optimal scanning condition, taking into consideration the interactive effects of scanning time required, data volume, and machining accuracy.

  18. Serial cranial computed-tomography scans in children with leukemia given two different forms of central nervous system therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Ochs, J.J.; Parvey, L.S.; Whitaker, J.N.; Bowman, W.P.; Ch'ien, L.; Campbell, M.; Coburn, T.

    1983-12-01

    Cranial computed tomography (CT) was used to estimate the frequency and permanence of brain abnormalities in 108 consecutive children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Fifty-five patients received cranial irradiation (1,800 rad) with intrathecal methotrexate (RT group) and 53 patients received intravenous and intrathecal methotrexate without irradiation (IVIT group). Continuation treatment included sequential drug pairs for the RT group and periodic IVIT methotrexate for the other group. After 12 to 24 months of serial evaluation, five (9%) of the 55 patients in the RT group have had CT scan abnormalities, compared to 10 (19%) of 52 in the IVIT group (p . 0.171). Fourteen of the 15 patients with CT scan abnormalities had focal or diffuse white-matter hypodensity; these have reverted to normal in most cases, reflecting a dynamic process. While such CT findings are of concern and may be an early indicator of central nervous system toxicity, this remains to be proven. Therapy should not be altered on the basis of abnormal CT scans alone but in the context of the entire clinical situation.

  19. Speed and accuracy of a beam tracking system for treatment of moving targets with scanned ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Nami; Bert, Christoph; Chaudhri, Naved; Gemmel, Alexander; Schardt, Dieter; Durante, Marco; Rietzel, Eike

    2009-08-01

    The technical performance of an integrated three-dimensional carbon ion pencil beam tracking system that was developed at GSI was investigated in phantom studies. Aim of the beam tracking system is to accurately treat tumours that are subject to respiratory motion with scanned ion beams. The current system provides real-time control of ion pencil beams to track a moving target laterally using the scanning magnets and longitudinally with a dedicated range shifter. The system response time was deduced to be approximately 1 ms for lateral beam tracking. The range shifter response time has been measured for various range shift amounts. A value of 16 ± 2 ms was achieved for a water equivalent shift of 5 mm. An additional communication delay of 11 ± 2 ms was taken into account in the beam tracking process via motion prediction. Accuracy of the lateral beam tracking was measured with a multi-wire position detector to <=0.16 mm standard deviation. Longitudinal beam tracking accuracy was parameterized based on measured responses of the range shifter and required time durations to maintain a specific particle range. For example, 5 mm water equivalence (WE) longitudinal beam tracking results in accuracy of 1.08 and 0.48 mm WE in root mean square for time windows of 10 and 50 ms, respectively.

  20. Speed and accuracy of a beam tracking system for treatment of moving targets with scanned ion beams.

    PubMed

    Saito, Nami; Bert, Christoph; Chaudhri, Naved; Gemmel, Alexander; Schardt, Dieter; Durante, Marco; Rietzel, Eike

    2009-08-21

    The technical performance of an integrated three-dimensional carbon ion pencil beam tracking system that was developed at GSI was investigated in phantom studies. Aim of the beam tracking system is to accurately treat tumours that are subject to respiratory motion with scanned ion beams. The current system provides real-time control of ion pencil beams to track a moving target laterally using the scanning magnets and longitudinally with a dedicated range shifter. The system response time was deduced to be approximately 1 ms for lateral beam tracking. The range shifter response time has been measured for various range shift amounts. A value of 16 +/- 2 ms was achieved for a water equivalent shift of 5 mm. An additional communication delay of 11 +/- 2 ms was taken into account in the beam tracking process via motion prediction. Accuracy of the lateral beam tracking was measured with a multi-wire position detector to < or =0.16 mm standard deviation. Longitudinal beam tracking accuracy was parameterized based on measured responses of the range shifter and required time durations to maintain a specific particle range. For example, 5 mm water equivalence (WE) longitudinal beam tracking results in accuracy of 1.08 and 0.48 mm WE in root mean square for time windows of 10 and 50 ms, respectively.

  1. The research on calibration methods of dual-CCD laser three-dimensional human face scanning system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jinjiang; Chang, Tianyu; Ge, Baozhen; Tian, Qingguo; Yang, Fengting; Shi, Shendong

    2013-09-01

    In this paper, on the basis of considering the performance advantages of two-step method, we combines the stereo matching of binocular stereo vision with active laser scanning to calibrate the system. Above all, we select a reference camera coordinate system as the world coordinate system and unity the coordinates of two CCD cameras. And then obtain the new perspective projection matrix (PPM) of each camera after the epipolar rectification. By those, the corresponding epipolar equation of two cameras can be defined. So by utilizing the trigonometric parallax method, we can measure the space point position after distortion correction and achieve stereo matching calibration between two image points. Experiments verify that this method can improve accuracy and system stability is guaranteed. The stereo matching calibration has a simple process with low-cost, and simplifies regular maintenance work. It can acquire 3D coordinates only by planar checkerboard calibration without the need of designing specific standard target or using electronic theodolite. It is found that during the experiment two-step calibration error and lens distortion lead to the stratification of point cloud data. The proposed calibration method which combining active line laser scanning and binocular stereo vision has the both advantages of them. It has more flexible applicability. Theory analysis and experiment shows the method is reasonable.

  2. Micrometric precision of prosthetic dental crowns obtained by optical scanning and computer-aided designing/computer-aided manufacturing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    das Neves, Flávio Domingues; de Almeida Prado Naves Carneiro, Thiago; do Prado, Célio Jesus; Prudente, Marcel Santana; Zancopé, Karla; Davi, Letícia Resende; Mendonça, Gustavo; Soares, Carlos José

    2014-08-01

    The current study evaluated prosthetic dental crowns obtained by optical scanning and a computer-aided designing/computer-aided manufacturing system using micro-computed tomography to compare the marginal fit. The virtual models were obtained with four different scanning surfaces: typodont (T), regular impressions (RI), master casts (MC), and powdered master casts (PMC). Five virtual models were obtained for each group. For each model, a crown was designed on the software and milled from feldspathic ceramic blocks. Micro-CT images were obtained for marginal gap measurements and the data were statistically analyzed by one-way analysis of variance followed by Tukey's test. The mean vertical misfit was T=62.6±65.2 μm; MC=60.4±38.4 μm; PMC=58.1±38.0 μm, and RI=89.8±62.8 μm. Considering a percentage of vertical marginal gap of up to 75 μm, the results were T=71.5%, RI=49.2%, MC=69.6%, and PMC=71.2%. The percentages of horizontal overextension were T=8.5%, RI=0%, MC=0.8%, and PMC=3.8%. Based on the results, virtual model acquisition by scanning the typodont (simulated mouth) or MC, with or without powder, showed acceptable values for the marginal gap. The higher result of marginal gap of the RI group suggests that it is preferable to scan this directly from the mouth or from MC.

  3. Detection of single gold nanoparticles using spatial modulation spectroscopy implemented with a galvo-scanning mirror system.

    PubMed

    Devadas, Mary Sajini; Li, Zhongming; Major, Todd A; Lo, Shun Shang; Havard, Nicolas; Yu, Kuai; Johns, Paul; Hartland, Gregory V

    2013-11-10

    The optical extinction of single nanoparticles can be sensitively detected by spatial modulation spectroscopy (SMS), where the particle is moved in and out of a tightly focused laser beam with a piezo-device. Here we show that high sensitivity can be obtained by modulating the beam with a galvo-mirror system, rather than by moving the sample. This work demonstrates an inexpensive method for making a SMS microscope, and shows how an existing laser scanning microscope can be adapted for SMS measurements. The galvo-mirror technique also allows SMS measurements to be performed in a liquid, which is difficult to do with piezo-modulation.

  4. Mobile Laser Scanning Systems for Measuring the Clearance Gauge of Railways: State of Play, Testing and Outlook

    PubMed Central

    Mikrut, Sławomir; Kohut, Piotr; Pyka, Krystian; Tokarczyk, Regina; Barszcz, Tomasz; Uhl, Tadeusz

    2016-01-01

    The paper contains a survey of mobile scanning systems for measuring the railway clearance gauge. The research was completed as part of the project carried out for the PKP (PKP Polish Railway Lines S.A., Warsaw, Poland) in 2011–2013. The authors conducted experiments, including a search for the latest solutions relating to mobile measurement systems that meet the basic requirement. At the very least, these solutions needed to be accurate and have the ability for quick retrieval of data. In the paper, specifications and the characteristics of the component devices of the scanning systems are described. Based on experiments, the authors did some examination of the selected mobile systems to be applied for measuring the clearance gauge. The Riegl (VMX-250) and Z+F (Zoller + Fröhlich) Solution were tested. Additional test measurements were carried out within a 30-kilometer section of the Warsaw-Kraków route. These measurements were designed so as to provide various elements of the railway infrastructure, the track geometry and the installed geodetic control network. This ultimately made it possible to reduce the time for the preparation of geodetic reference measurements for the testing of the accuracy of the selected systems. Reference measurements included the use of the polar method to select profiles perpendicular to the axis of the track. In addition, the coordinates selected were well defined as measuring points of the objects of the infrastructure of the clearance gauge. All of the tested systems meet the accuracy requirements initially established (within the range of 2 cm as required by the PKP). The tested systems have shown their advantages and disadvantages. PMID:27187400

  5. Mobile Laser Scanning Systems for Measuring the Clearance Gauge of Railways: State of Play, Testing and Outlook.

    PubMed

    Mikrut, Sławomir; Kohut, Piotr; Pyka, Krystian; Tokarczyk, Regina; Barszcz, Tomasz; Uhl, Tadeusz

    2016-01-01

    The paper contains a survey of mobile scanning systems for measuring the railway clearance gauge. The research was completed as part of the project carried out for the PKP (PKP Polish Railway Lines S.A., Warsaw, Poland) in 2011-2013. The authors conducted experiments, including a search for the latest solutions relating to mobile measurement systems that meet the basic requirement. At the very least, these solutions needed to be accurate and have the ability for quick retrieval of data. In the paper, specifications and the characteristics of the component devices of the scanning systems are described. Based on experiments, the authors did some examination of the selected mobile systems to be applied for measuring the clearance gauge. The Riegl (VMX-250) and Z+F (Zoller + Fröhlich) Solution were tested. Additional test measurements were carried out within a 30-kilometer section of the Warsaw-Kraków route. These measurements were designed so as to provide various elements of the railway infrastructure, the track geometry and the installed geodetic control network. This ultimately made it possible to reduce the time for the preparation of geodetic reference measurements for the testing of the accuracy of the selected systems. Reference measurements included the use of the polar method to select profiles perpendicular to the axis of the track. In addition, the coordinates selected were well defined as measuring points of the objects of the infrastructure of the clearance gauge. All of the tested systems meet the accuracy requirements initially established (within the range of 2 cm as required by the PKP). The tested systems have shown their advantages and disadvantages. PMID:27187400

  6. Co-Registration of DSMs Generated by Uav and Terrestrial Laser Scanning Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ancil Persad, Ravi; Armenakis, Costas

    2016-06-01

    An approach for the co-registration of Digital Surface Models (DSMs) derived from Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) and Terrestrial Laser Scanners (TLS) is proposed. Specifically, a wavelet-based feature descriptor for matching surface keypoints on the 2.5D DSMs is developed. DSMs are useful in wide-scope of various applications such as 3D building modelling and reconstruction, cultural heritage, urban and environmental planning, aircraft navigation/path routing, accident and crime scene reconstruction, mining as well as, topographic map revision and change detection. For these listed applications, it is not uncommon that there will be a need for automatically aligning multi-temporal DSMs which may have been acquired from multiple sensors, with different specifications over a period of time, and may have various overlaps. Terrestrial laser scanners usually capture urban facades in an accurate manner; however this is not the case for building roof structures. On the other hand, vertical photography from UAVs can capture the roofs. Therefore, the automatic fusion of UAV and laser-scanning based DSMs is addressed here as it serves various geospatial applications.

  7. Expected Characteristics of Global Wind Profile Measurements with a Scanning, Hybrid, Doppler Lidar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kavaya, Michael J.

    2008-01-01

    Over 20 years of investigation by NASA and NOAA scientists and Doppler lidar technologists into a global wind profiling mission from earth orbit have led to the current favored concept of an instrument with both coherent- and direct-detection pulsed Doppler lidars (i.e., a hybrid Doppler lidar) and a stepstare beam scanning approach covering several azimuth angles with a fixed nadir angle. The nominal lidar wavelengths are 2 microns for coherent detection, and 0.355 microns for direct detection. The two agencies have also generated two sets of sophisticated wind measurement requirements for a space mission: science demonstration requirements and operational requirements. The requirements contain the necessary details to permit mission design and optimization by lidar technologists. Simulations have been developed that connect the science requirements to the wind measurement requirements, and that connect the wind measurement requirements to the Doppler lidar parameters. The simulations also permit trade studies within the multi-parameter space. These tools, combined with knowledge of the state of the Doppler lidar technology, have been used to conduct space instrument and mission design activities to validate the feasibility of the chosen mission and lidar parameters. Recently, the NRC Earth Science Decadal Survey recommended the wind mission to NASA as one of 15 recommended missions. A full description of the wind measurement product from these notional missions and the possible trades available are presented in this paper.

  8. Modeling of Electronic Transport in Scanning Tunneling Microscope Tip-Carbon Nanotube Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamada, Toshishige; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A model is proposed for two observed current-voltage (I-V) patterns in a recent experiment with a scanning tunneling microscope tip and a carbon nanotube. We claim that there are two mechanical contact modes for a tip (metal) -nanotube (semiconductor) junction (1) with or (2) without a tiny vacuum gap (0.1 - 0.2 nm). With the tip grounded, the tunneling case in (1) would produce large dI/dV with V > 0, small dI/dV with V < 0, and I = 0 near V = 0 for an either n- or p-nanotube; the Schottky mechanism in (2) would result in I does not equal 0 only with V < 0 for an n-nanotube, and the bias polarities would be reversed for a p-nanotube. The two observed I-V patterns are thus entirely explained by a tip-nanotube contact of the two types, where the nanotube must be n-type.

  9. MRI Scans

    MedlinePlus

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) uses a large magnet and radio waves to look at organs and structures inside your body. Health care professionals use MRI scans to diagnose a variety of conditions, from torn ...

  10. WBC scan

    MedlinePlus

    Leukocyte scan ... will be taken from one of your veins. White blood cells are separated from the rest of the blood ... 111. These cells are considered tagged. The tagged white blood cells are injected back into your body through a ...

  11. The evaluation of unmanned aerial system-based photogrammetry and terrestrial laser scanning to generate DEMs of agricultural watersheds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouédraogo, Mohamar Moussa; Degré, Aurore; Debouche, Charles; Lisein, Jonathan

    2014-06-01

    Agricultural watersheds tend to be places of intensive farming activities that permanently modify their microtopography. The surface characteristics of the soil vary depending on the crops that are cultivated in these areas. Agricultural soil microtopography plays an important role in the quantification of runoff and sediment transport because the presence of crops, crop residues, furrows and ridges may impact the direction of water flow. To better assess such phenomena, 3-D reconstructions of high-resolution agricultural watershed topography are essential. Fine-resolution topographic data collection technologies can be used to discern highly detailed elevation variability in these areas. Knowledge of the strengths and weaknesses of existing technologies used for data collection on agricultural watersheds may be helpful in choosing an appropriate technology. This study assesses the suitability of terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) and unmanned aerial system (UAS) photogrammetry for collecting the fine-resolution topographic data required to generate accurate, high-resolution digital elevation models (DEMs) in a small watershed area (12 ha). Because of farming activity, 14 TLS scans (≈ 25 points m- 2) were collected without using high-definition surveying (HDS) targets, which are generally used to mesh adjacent scans. To evaluate the accuracy of the DEMs created from the TLS scan data, 1098 ground control points (GCPs) were surveyed using a real time kinematic global positioning system (RTK-GPS). Linear regressions were then applied to each DEM to remove vertical errors from the TLS point elevations, errors caused by the non-perpendicularity of the scanner's vertical axis to the local horizontal plane, and errors correlated with the distance to the scanner's position. The scans were then meshed to generate a DEMTLS with a 1 × 1 m spatial resolution. The Agisoft PhotoScan and MicMac software packages were used to process the aerial photographs and generate a DEMPSC

  12. High-angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy on carbon-based functional polymer systems.

    PubMed

    Sourty, Erwan; van Bavel, Svetlana; Lu, Kangbo; Guerra, Ralph; Bar, Georg; Loos, Joachim

    2009-06-01

    Two purely carbon-based functional polymer systems were investigated by bright-field conventional transmission electron microscopy (CTEM) and high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy (HAADF-STEM). For a carbon black (CB) filled polymer system, HAADF-STEM provides high contrast between the CB agglomerates and the polymer matrix so that details of the interface organization easily can be revealed and assignment of the CB phase is straightforward. For a second system, the functional polymer blend representing the photoactive layer of a polymer solar cell, details of its nanoscale organization could be observed that were not accessible with CTEM. By varying the camera length in HAADF-STEM imaging, the contrast can be enhanced between crystalline and amorphous compounds due to diffraction contrast so that nanoscale interconnections between domains are identified. In general, due to its incoherent imaging characteristics HAADF-STEM allows for reliable interpretation of the data obtained.

  13. Continuous wave synthetic low-coherence wind sensing Lidar: motionless measurement system with subsequent numerical range scanning.

    PubMed

    Brinkmeyer, Ernst; Waterholter, Thomas

    2013-01-28

    A continuous wave (CW) Lidar system for detection of scattering from atmospheric aerosol particles is presented which is useful in particular for remote sensing of wind velocities. It is based on a low-coherence interferometric setup powered by a synthetic broadband laser source with Gaussian power density spectrum. The laser bandwidth is electronically adjustable and determines the spatial resolution which is independent of range. The Lidar system has no moving parts. The location to be resolved can be shifted numerically after the measurement meaning that a single measurement already contains the full range information. The features of constant resolution and numerical range scanning are in sharp contrast to ordinary CW Lidar systems. PMID:23389172

  14. NAVIS-An UGV indoor positioning system using laser scan matching for large-area real-time applications.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jian; Chen, Yuwei; Jaakkola, Anttoni; Liu, Jinbing; Hyyppä, Juha; Hyyppä, Hannu

    2014-01-01

    Laser scan matching with grid-based maps is a promising tool for real-time indoor positioning of mobile Unmanned Ground Vehicles (UGVs). While there are critical implementation problems, such as the ability to estimate the position by sensing the unknown indoor environment with sufficient accuracy and low enough latency for stable vehicle control, further development work is necessary. Unfortunately, most of the existing methods employ heuristics for quick positioning in which numerous accumulated errors easily lead to loss of positioning accuracy. This severely restricts its applications in large areas and over lengthy periods of time. This paper introduces an efficient real-time mobile UGV indoor positioning system for large-area applications using laser scan matching with an improved probabilistically-motivated Maximum Likelihood Estimation (IMLE) algorithm, which is based on a multi-resolution patch-divided grid likelihood map. Compared with traditional methods, the improvements embodied in IMLE include: (a) Iterative Closed Point (ICP) preprocessing, which adaptively decreases the search scope; (b) a totally brute search matching method on multi-resolution map layers, based on the likelihood value between current laser scan and the grid map within refined search scope, adopted to obtain the global optimum position at each scan matching; and (c) a patch-divided likelihood map supporting a large indoor area. A UGV platform called NAVIS was designed, manufactured, and tested based on a low-cost robot integrating a LiDAR and an odometer sensor to verify the IMLE algorithm. A series of experiments based on simulated data and field tests with NAVIS proved that the proposed IMEL algorithm is a better way to perform local scan matching that can offer a quick and stable positioning solution with high accuracy so it can be part of a large area localization/mapping, application. The NAVIS platform can reach an updating rate of 12 Hz in a feature-rich environment and 2 Hz

  15. NAVIS-An UGV Indoor Positioning System Using Laser Scan Matching for Large-Area Real-Time Applications

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Jian.; Chen, Yuwei.; Jaakkola, Anttoni.; Liu, Jinbing.; Hyyppä, Juha.; Hyyppä, Hannu.

    2014-01-01

    Laser scan matching with grid-based maps is a promising tool for real-time indoor positioning of mobile Unmanned Ground Vehicles (UGVs). While there are critical implementation problems, such as the ability to estimate the position by sensing the unknown indoor environment with sufficient accuracy and low enough latency for stable vehicle control, further development work is necessary. Unfortunately, most of the existing methods employ heuristics for quick positioning in which numerous accumulated errors easily lead to loss of positioning accuracy. This severely restricts its applications in large areas and over lengthy periods of time. This paper introduces an efficient real-time mobile UGV indoor positioning system for large-area applications using laser scan matching with an improved probabilistically-motivated Maximum Likelihood Estimation (IMLE) algorithm, which is based on a multi-resolution patch-divided grid likelihood map. Compared with traditional methods, the improvements embodied in IMLE include: (a) Iterative Closed Point (ICP) preprocessing, which adaptively decreases the search scope; (b) a totally brute search matching method on multi-resolution map layers, based on the likelihood value between current laser scan and the grid map within refined search scope, adopted to obtain the global optimum position at each scan matching; and (c) a patch-divided likelihood map supporting a large indoor area. A UGV platform called NAVIS was designed, manufactured, and tested based on a low-cost robot integrating a LiDAR and an odometer sensor to verify the IMLE algorithm. A series of experiments based on simulated data and field tests with NAVIS proved that the proposed IMEL algorithm is a better way to perform local scan matching that can offer a quick and stable positioning solution with high accuracy so it can be part of a large area localization/mapping, application. The NAVIS platform can reach an updating rate of 12 Hz in a feature-rich environment and 2 Hz

  16. NAVIS-An UGV indoor positioning system using laser scan matching for large-area real-time applications.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jian; Chen, Yuwei; Jaakkola, Anttoni; Liu, Jinbing; Hyyppä, Juha; Hyyppä, Hannu

    2014-07-04

    Laser scan matching with grid-based maps is a promising tool for real-time indoor positioning of mobile Unmanned Ground Vehicles (UGVs). While there are critical implementation problems, such as the ability to estimate the position by sensing the unknown indoor environment with sufficient accuracy and low enough latency for stable vehicle control, further development work is necessary. Unfortunately, most of the existing methods employ heuristics for quick positioning in which numerous accumulated errors easily lead to loss of positioning accuracy. This severely restricts its applications in large areas and over lengthy periods of time. This paper introduces an efficient real-time mobile UGV indoor positioning system for large-area applications using laser scan matching with an improved probabilistically-motivated Maximum Likelihood Estimation (IMLE) algorithm, which is based on a multi-resolution patch-divided grid likelihood map. Compared with traditional methods, the improvements embodied in IMLE include: (a) Iterative Closed Point (ICP) preprocessing, which adaptively decreases the search scope; (b) a totally brute search matching method on multi-resolution map layers, based on the likelihood value between current laser scan and the grid map within refined search scope, adopted to obtain the global optimum position at each scan matching; and (c) a patch-divided likelihood map supporting a large indoor area. A UGV platform called NAVIS was designed, manufactured, and tested based on a low-cost robot integrating a LiDAR and an odometer sensor to verify the IMLE algorithm. A series of experiments based on simulated data and field tests with NAVIS proved that the proposed IMEL algorithm is a better way to perform local scan matching that can offer a quick and stable positioning solution with high accuracy so it can be part of a large area localization/mapping, application. The NAVIS platform can reach an updating rate of 12 Hz in a feature-rich environment and 2 Hz

  17. System and Campus Level Enrollment Projections and Environmental Scan, 1988-1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaylord, Thomas A.; And Others

    Alaska's first long-range, system-wide enrollment projection study since the inception of the higher education system's restructuring plan is reported. The study was undertaken in response to statewide economic distress, a decline in state funding of higher education, and a pattern of out-migration by the college-age population, particularly in…

  18. Simulations to design an online motion compensation system for scanned particle beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grözinger, Sven Oliver; Rietzel, Eike; Li, Qiang; Bert, Christoph; Haberer, Thomas; Kraft, Gerhard

    2006-07-01

    Respiration-induced target motion is a major problem in intensity-modulated radiation therapy. Beam segments are delivered serially to form the total dose distribution. In the presence of motion, the spatial relation between dose deposition from different segments will be lost. Usually, this results in over- and underdosage. Besides such interplay effects between target motion and dynamic beam delivery as known from photon therapy, changes in internal density have an impact on delivered dose for intensity-modulated charged particle therapy. In this study, we have analysed interplay effects between raster scanned carbon ion beams and target motion. Furthermore, the potential of an online motion strategy was assessed in several simulations. An extended version of the clinical treatment planning software was used to calculate dose distributions to moving targets with and without motion compensation. For motion compensation, each individual ion pencil beam tracked the planned target position in the lateral as well as longitudinal direction. Target translations and rotations, including changes in internal density, were simulated. Target motion simulating breathing resulted in severe degradation of delivered dose distributions. For example, for motion amplitudes of ±15 mm, only 47% of the target volume received 80% of the planned dose. Unpredictability of resulting dose distributions was demonstrated by varying motion parameters. On the other hand, motion compensation allowed for dose distributions for moving targets comparable to those for static targets. Even limited compensation precision (standard deviation ~2 mm), introduced to simulate possible limitations of real-time target tracking, resulted in less than 3% loss in dose homogeneity.

  19. Laser-ranging scanning system to observe topographical deformations of volcanoes.

    PubMed

    Aoki, T; Takabe, M; Mizutani, K; Itabe, T

    1997-02-20

    We have developed a laser-ranging system to observe the topographical structure of volcanoes. This system can be used to measure the distance to a target by a laser and shows the three-dimensional topographical structure of a volcano with an accuracy of 30 cm. This accuracy is greater than that of a typical laser-ranging system that uses a corner-cube reflector as a target because the reflected light jitters as a result of inclination and unevenness of the target ground surface. However, this laser-ranging system is useful for detecting deformations of topographical features in which placement of a reflector is difficult, such as in volcanic regions.

  20. Poultry carcass inspection by a fast line-scan imaging system: results from in-plant testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Kuanglin; Yang, Chun-Chieh; Chen, Yud-Ren; Chan, Diane E.; Kim, Moon S.

    2006-10-01

    During in-plant testing of a hyperspectral line-scan imaging system, images were acquired of wholesome and systemically diseased chickens on a commercial processing line moving at a speed 70 birds per minute. A fuzzy logic based algorithm using four key wavelengths, 468 nm, 501 nm, 582 nm, 629 nm, was developed using image data from the validation set of images of 543 wholesome and 66 systemically diseased chickens. A classification method using the fuzzy logic based algorithm was then tested on the testing set of images of 457 wholesome and 37 systemically diseased chickens, as well as 80 systemically diseased chickens that were imaged off-shift during breaks between normal processing shifts of the chicken plant. The classification method correctly identified 89.7% of wholesome chicken images and 98.5% of systemically diseased chicken images in the validation set. For the testing data set, the method correctly classified 96.7 % of 457 wholesome chicken images and 100% of 37 systemically diseased chicken images. The 80 images acquired off-shift were also 100% correctly identified.

  1. Fiber-Scanned Microdisplays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crossman-Bosworth, Janet; Seibel, Eric

    2010-01-01

    Helmet- and head-mounted display systems, denoted fiber-scanned microdisplays, have been proposed to provide information in an "augmented reality" format (meaning that the information would be optically overlaid on the user's field of view).

  2. A Feasibility and Optimization Study to Design a Nondestructive ATR Fuel Permanent Scanning System to Determine Fuel Burnup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navarro, J.; Ring, T. A.; Nigg, D. W.

    2014-04-01

    The goal of this project was to develop the best available non-destructive technique to determine burnup of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) fuels at Idaho National Laboratory, as well as to make a recommendation regarding the feasibility of implementing a permanent fuel scanning system at the ATR canal. The study determined that useful spectra for validation and fuel burnup predictions can be obtained in-situ at the ATR canal using three different detectors. In addition, the study established that calibration curves can be created to predict ATR fuel burnup onsite. The study also established that in order to design a rugged system that can stand the daily operations at the ATR canal a LaBr3 scintillator can be used effectively if deconvolution process is applied to increase the spectra resolution.

  3. Remote measurement utilizing NASA's scanning laser Doppler systems. Volume 1. Laser Doppler wake vortex tracking at Kennedy Airport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krause, M. C.; Wilson, D. J.; Howle, R. E.; Edwards, B. B.; Craven, C. E.; Jetton, J. L.

    1976-01-01

    Test operations of the Scanning Laser Doppler System (SLDS) at Kennedy International Airport (KIA) during August 1974 through June 1975 are reported. A total of 1,619 data runs was recorded with a totally operational system during normal landing operations at KIA. In addition, 53 data runs were made during cooperative flybys with the C880 for a grand total of 1672 recorded vortex tracks. Test crews were in attendance at KIA for 31 weeks, of which 25 weeks were considered operational and the other six were packing, unpacking, setup and check out. Although average activity equates to 67 recorded landing operations per week, two periods of complete runway inactivity spanned 20 days and 13 days, respectively. The operation frequency therefore averaged about 88 operations per week.

  4. Polymorphic transition of solid-fats dispersed systems — its characterization by a novel method and scanning electron microscopy observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirokawa, Norio; Ueda, Masahiro; Harano, Yoshio

    1994-08-01

    Solid-fats dispersed systems, such as margarine, butter and cacao-butter, were characterized by a novel method based on liquid permeation under pressure, for the simultaneous measurement of a solid-content ɛ p and an average diameter dp of solid particles (fats crystals) in them. Further, micro-structures of these systems were observed by a scanning electron microscope (SEM). As the result, it has been clarified that the spherical fats crystals of several μm in size appeared in the initial solid-fats products are agglomerates of fine particles of ca. 0.1 μm and that these fine particles are uniformly redispersed during an annealing treatment accompanying the reduction of ɛ p and dp. It is strongly suggested that this phenomenon is caused by a transition of fat crystals into a more stable polymorph.

  5. Hyperspectral reflectance and fluorescence line-scan imaging system for online detection of fecal contamination on apples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Moon S.; Cho, Byoung-Kwan; Yang, Chun-Chieh; Chao, Kaunglin; Lefcourt, Alan M.; Chen, Yud-Ren

    2006-10-01

    We have developed nondestructive opto-electronic imaging techniques for rapid assessment of safety and wholesomeness of foods. A recently developed fast hyperspectral line-scan imaging system integrated with a commercial apple-sorting machine was evaluated for rapid detection of animal feces matter on apples. Apples obtained from a local orchard were artificially contaminated with cow feces. For the online trial, hyperspectral images with 60 spectral channels, reflectance in the visible to near infrared regions and fluorescence emissions with UV-A excitation, were acquired from apples moving at a processing sorting-line speed of three apples per second. Reflectance and fluorescence imaging required a passive light source, and each method used independent continuous wave (CW) light sources. In this paper, integration of the hyperspectral imaging system with the commercial applesorting machine and preliminary results for detection of fecal contamination on apples, mainly based on the fluorescence method, are presented.

  6. Digital mapping of side-scan sonar data with the Woods Hole Image Processing System software

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paskevich, Valerie F.

    1992-01-01

    Since 1985, the Branch of Atlantic Marine Geology has been involved in collecting, processing and digitally mosaicking high and low resolution sidescan sonar data. In the past, processing and digital mosaicking has been accomplished with a dedicated, shore-based computer system. Recent development of a UNIX-based image-processing software system includes a series of task specific programs for pre-processing sidescan sonar data. To extend the capabilities of the UNIX-based programs, development of digital mapping techniques have been developed. This report describes the initial development of an automated digital mapping procedure. Included is a description of the programs and steps required to complete the digital mosaicking on a UNIXbased computer system, and a comparison of techniques that the user may wish to select.

  7. Feasibility for detection of autofluorescent signatures in rat organs using a novel excitation-scanning hyperspectral imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favreau, Peter F.; Deal, Joshua A.; Weber, David S.; Rich, Thomas C.; Leavesley, Silas J.

    2016-04-01

    The natural fluorescence (autofluorescence) of tissues has been noted as a biomarker for cancer for several decades. Autofluorescence contrast between tumors and healthy tissues has been of significant interest in endoscopy, leading to development of autofluorescence endoscopes capable of visualizing 2-3 fluorescence emission wavelengths to achieve maximal contrast. However, tumor detection with autofluorescence endoscopes is hindered by low fluorescence signal and limited quantitative information, resulting in prolonged endoscopic procedures, prohibitive acquisition times, and reduced specificity of detection. Our lab has designed a novel excitation-scanning hyperspectral imaging system with high fluorescence signal detection, low acquisition time, and enhanced spectral discrimination. In this study, we surveyed a comprehensive set of excised tissues to assess the feasibility of detecting tissue-specific pathologies using excitation-scanning. Fresh, untreated tissue specimens were imaged from 360 to 550 nm on an inverted fluorescence microscope equipped with a set of thin-film tunable filters (Semrock, A Unit of IDEX). Images were subdivided into training and test sets. Automated endmember extraction (ENVI 5.1, Exelis) with PCA identified endmembers within training images of autofluorescence. A spectral library was created from 9 endmembers. The library was used for identification of endmembers in test images. Our results suggest (1) spectral differentiation of multiple tissue types is possible using excitation scanning; (2) shared spectra between tissue types; and (3) the ability to identify unique morphological features in disparate tissues from shared autofluorescent components. Future work will focus on isolating specific molecular signatures present in tissue spectra, and elucidating the contribution of these signatures in pathologies.

  8. Data-fusion display system with volume rendering of intraoperatively scanned CT images.

    PubMed

    Hayashibe, Mitsuhiro; Suzuki, Naoki; Hattori, Asaki; Otake, Yoshito; Suzuki, Shigeyuki; Nakata, Norio

    2005-01-01

    In this study we have designed and created a data-fusion display that has enabled volumetric MIP image navigation using intraoperative C-arm CT data in the operating room. The 3D volumetric data reflecting a patient's inner structure is directly displayed on the monitor through video images of the surgical field using a 3D optical tracking system, a ceiling-mounted articulating monitor, and a small size video camera mounted at the back of the monitor. The system performance was validated in an experiment carried out in the operating room.

  9. A Case Study Correlating Innovative Gamma Ray Scanning Detection Systems Data to Surface Soil Gamma Spectrometry Results - 13580

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Shannon; Rodriguez, Rene; Billock, Paul; Lit, Peter

    2013-07-01

    HydroGeoLogic (HGL), Inc. completed a United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) study to characterize radiological contamination at a site near Canoga Park, California. The characterized area contained 470 acres including the site of a prototype commercial nuclear reactor and other nuclear design, testing, and support operations from the 1950's until 1988 [1]. The site history included radiological releases during operation followed by D and D activities. The characterization was conducted under an accelerated schedule and the results will support the project remediation. The project has a rigorous cleanup to background agenda and does not allow for comparison to risk-based guidelines. To target soil sample locations, multiple lines of evidence were evaluated including a gamma radiation survey, geophysical surveys, historical site assessment, aerial photographs, and former worker interviews. Due to the time since production and decay, the primary gamma emitting radionuclide remaining is cesium-137 (Cs-137). The gamma ray survey covered diverse, rugged terrain using custom designed sodium iodide thallium-activated (NaI(Tl)) scintillation detection systems. The survey goals included attaining 100% ground surface coverage and detecting gamma radiation as sensitively as possible. The effectiveness of innovative gamma ray detection systems was tested by correlating field Cs-137 static count ratios to Cs-137 laboratory gamma spectrometry results. As a case study, the area encompassing the former location of the first nuclear power station in the U. S. was scanned, and second by second global positioning system (GPS)-linked gamma spectral data were evaluated by examining total count rate and nuclide-specific regions of interest. To compensate for Compton scattering from higher energy naturally occurring radionuclides (U-238, Th-232 and their progeny, and K-40), count rate ratios of anthropogenic nuclide-specific regions of interest to the total count rate were

  10. Pulse compression techniques to improve modulated pulsed laser line scan systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Robert W.; Nash, Justin K.; Cochenour, Brandon M.; Mullen, Linda J.

    2015-05-01

    A modulated pulse laser imaging system has been developed which utilizes coded/chirped RF modulation to mitigate the adverse effects of optical scattering in degraded visual underwater environments. Current laser imaging techniques employ either short pulses or single frequency modulated pulses to obtain both intensity and range images. Systems using short pulses have high range resolution but are susceptible to scattering due to the wide bandwidth nature of the pulse. Range gating can be used to limit the effects of backscatter, but this can lead to blind spots in the range image. Modulated pulse systems can help suppress the contribution from scattered light in generated imagery without gating the receiver. However, the use of narrowband, single tone modulation results in limited range resolution where small targets are camouflaged within the background. This drives the need for systems which have high range resolution while still suppressing the effects of scattering caused by the environment. Coded/chirped modulated pulses enable the use of radar pulse compression techniques to substantially increase range resolution while also providing a way to discriminate the object of interest from the light scattered from the environment. Linearly frequency chirped waveforms and phase shift keyed barker codes were experimentally investigated to determine the effects that pulse compression would have on intensity/range data. The effect of modulation frequency on the data produced with both wideband and narrowband modulation was also investigated. The results from laboratory experiments will be presented and compared to model predictions.

  11. Current status of the NAVSEA synchronous scanning laser-imaging system

    SciTech Connect

    Kulp, T.J.; Garvis, D.; Kennedy, R.; McRae, T.G.

    1988-08-01

    This paper constitutes an update on our efforts to develop an underwater laser-based imaging system (UWLIS). The work is being performed under contract from the Naval Sea Systems Command Office of Salvage and Diving (NAVSEA/OOC) in order to provide instrumentation that will improve the visibility range available to deep-ocean (1500--6000 m) submersible vehicles during ocean-floor search-and-salvage operations. In general, these submersibles are remotely operated vehicles (ROV) that currently employ high-intensity floodlights and low-light-level TV cameras to produce video images of the seafloor, which are relayed to the mother ship to allow target identification. Often, these floodlight based systems require that the ROV come within 6 to 10 m of the target in order to positively identify it. This poses both a risk of damaging the vehicle on outcropping seafloor terrain features and an increase in mission cost due to the time lost on maneuvering to identify false targets. Given that salvage-operation costs typically range from $1000 to $3000 per hour, a system that would improve the visibility range from 10 to 100 m would save thousands of dollars and greatly increase the probability of success of these missions. 7 refs., 9 figs.

  12. Understanding Ionic Bonding--A Scan across the Croatian Education System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vladušic, R.; Bucat, R. B.; Ožic, M.

    2016-01-01

    A study was conducted on the understandings of the accepted model of ionic substances that are held by participants at all levels of the chemical education system in Croatia, including secondary school students, university students, and chemistry teachers. We follow the research of Taber who found that a diagram of a layer of a sodium chloride…

  13. Feasibility test of a solid state spin-scan photo-imaging system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laverty, N. P.

    1973-01-01

    The feasibility of using a solid-state photo-imaging system to obtain resolution imagery from a Pioneer-type spinning spacecraft in future exploratory missions to the outer planets is discussed. Evaluation of the photo-imaging system performance, based on electrical video signal analysis recorded on magnetic tape, shows that the signal-to-noise (S/N) ratios obtained at low spatial frequencies exceed the anticipated performance and that measured modulation transfer functions exhibited some degradation in comparison with the estimated values, primarily owing to the difficulty in obtaining a precise focus of the optical system in the laboratory with the test patterns in close proximity to the objective lens. A preliminary flight model design of the photo-imaging system is developed based on the use of currently available phototransistor arrays. Image quality estimates that will be obtained are presented in terms of S/N ratios and spatial resolution for the various planets and satellites. Parametric design tradeoffs are also defined.

  14. SCANS (Shipping Cask ANalysis System) a microcomputer based analysis system for shipping cask design review: Volume 4--Theory manual: Thermal analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, G.L.; Shapiro, A.B.

    1989-02-01

    TOPAZ is the two-dimensional, implicit, finite-element computer code included in the SCANS cask analysis system for heat conduction calculations. TOPAZ, a code developed on LLNL mainframes, has been implemented on IBM PC computers. This report provides documentation of TOPAZ controls and variables and a description of the numerical algorithms used. Sample problems with analytical solutions are presented. 10 refs., 32 figs., 11 tabs.

  15. Research on high precision timing system based on FPGA non scanning imaging laser radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Yanbo; Han, Shaokun; Wang, Liang; Ma, Yayun

    2015-08-01

    The article introduced the system structure and imaging principle of no three-dimensional imaging laser radar. This paper used the XC7K325T XILINX chip of KINTEX 7 series and used temporal interpolation method to measure distance. Rough side used PLL multiplier 400MHZ, which reached 2.5ns time accuracy. This method used a thin chip delay chains carry resources to reach 50ps accuracy and greatly improved the accuracy of the timing of imaging. Application technique used a delay line in APD array imaging system, such that each channel distance accuracy greatly improved. Echo signal by photoelectric conversion is completed by APD array detector, and designed by the impedance amplifier and other analog signal processing circuit. FPGA signal processing circuit is to complete the back-end processing, which is the timing function. FPGA array timer clock is to achieve coarse portion through timing, and delay line technique for measuring the length of time a non-integer multiple of the period of the laser pulse emission and the moment of reception, each stage of the delay units delay accuracy of sub ns magnitude, so as to achieve precision measuring part timers. With the above device was close imaging experiments, obtaining the 5 × 5 pixel imaging test results, presented to further improve system accuracy improved method.

  16. A Novel Concept for Observing Land-Surface-Atmosphere Feedback Based on a Synergy of Scanning Lidar Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wulfmeyer, V.; Turner, D. D.; Mauder, M.; Behrendt, A.; Ingwersen, J.; Streck, T.

    2015-12-01

    Improved simulations of land-surface-atmosphere interaction are fundamental for improving weather forecast and climate models. This requires observations of 2D fields of surface fluxes and the 3D structure of the atmospheric boundary layer simultaneously. A novel strategy is introduced for studying land-surface exchange and entrainment processes in the convective boundary layer (CBL) over complex terrain by means of a new generation of remote sensing systems. The sensor synergy consists of scanning Doppler lidar (DL), water-vapor differential absorption lidar (WVDIAL), and temperature rotational Raman lidar (TRRL) systems supported by surface in-situ measurements. The 2D measurements of surface fluxes are realized by the operation of a DL, a WVDIAL, and a TRRL along the same line-of-sight (LOS) in a range-height-indicator (RHI) mode whereas the other DL is performing a series of cross track RHI scans along this LOS. This new setup enables us to determine the friction velocity as well as surface sensible and latent heat fluxes by closing the complete set of Monin-Obukhov similarity relationships under a variety of surface layer stability conditions and different land cover and soil properties. As this closure is performed at all DL crossing points along the LOS, this is a strategy towards a 2D mapping of surface fluxes entirely based on remote sensing systems. Further details are presented at the conference. The second configuration is the simultaneous vertical profiling of vertical wind, humidity and temperature by DL, WVDIAL and TRRL so that latent heat and sensible heat flux profiles as well as a variety of different turbulent moments can be measured in the CBL. Consequently, by alternating of RHI scanning and vertical pointing modes, entrainment fluxes and surface fluxes can be measured almost simultaneously. This novel strategy has been realized for the first time during the Surface Atmospheric Boundary Layer Exchange (SABLE) campaign in the Kraichgau region

  17. Laser scanning thermoreflectance imaging system using galvanometric mirrors for temperature measurements of microelectronic devices.

    PubMed

    Grauby, S; Salhi, A; Rampnoux, J-M; Michel, H; Claeys, W; Dilhaire, S

    2007-07-01

    We present a thermoreflectance imaging system using a focused laser sweeping the device under test with a scanner made of galvanometric mirrors. We first show that the spatial resolution of this setup is submicrometric, which makes it adapted to microelectronic thermal measurements. Then, we studied qualitative temperature variations on two dissipative structures constituted of thin (0.35 microm) dissipative resistors, the distance between two resistors being equal to 0.8 or 10 microm. This technique combines sensitivity and speed: it is faster than a point classical thermoreflectance technique and, in addition, more sensitive than a charge-coupled device thermoreflectance imaging technique.

  18. Data processing and quality evaluation of a boat-based mobile laser scanning system.

    PubMed

    Vaaja, Matti; Kukko, Antero; Kaartinen, Harri; Kurkela, Matti; Kasvi, Elina; Flener, Claude; Hyyppä, Hannu; Hyyppä, Juha; Järvelä, Juha; Alho, Petteri

    2013-01-01

    Mobile mapping systems (MMSs) are used for mapping topographic and urban features which are difficult and time consuming to measure with other instruments. The benefits of MMSs include efficient data collection and versatile usability. This paper investigates the data processing steps and quality of a boat-based mobile mapping system (BoMMS) data for generating terrain and vegetation points in a river environment. Our aim in data processing was to filter noise points, detect shorelines as well as points below water surface and conduct ground point classification. Previous studies of BoMMS have investigated elevation accuracies and usability in detection of fluvial erosion and deposition areas. The new findings concerning BoMMS data are that the improved data processing approach allows for identification of multipath reflections and shoreline delineation. We demonstrate the possibility to measure bathymetry data in shallow (0-1 m) and clear water. Furthermore, we evaluate for the first time the accuracy of the BoMMS ground points classification compared to manually classified data. We also demonstrate the spatial variations of the ground point density and assess elevation and vertical accuracies of the BoMMS data. PMID:24048340

  19. Data processing and quality evaluation of a boat-based mobile laser scanning system.

    PubMed

    Vaaja, Matti; Kukko, Antero; Kaartinen, Harri; Kurkela, Matti; Kasvi, Elina; Flener, Claude; Hyyppä, Hannu; Hyyppä, Juha; Järvelä, Juha; Alho, Petteri

    2013-09-17

    Mobile mapping systems (MMSs) are used for mapping topographic and urban features which are difficult and time consuming to measure with other instruments. The benefits of MMSs include efficient data collection and versatile usability. This paper investigates the data processing steps and quality of a boat-based mobile mapping system (BoMMS) data for generating terrain and vegetation points in a river environment. Our aim in data processing was to filter noise points, detect shorelines as well as points below water surface and conduct ground point classification. Previous studies of BoMMS have investigated elevation accuracies and usability in detection of fluvial erosion and deposition areas. The new findings concerning BoMMS data are that the improved data processing approach allows for identification of multipath reflections and shoreline delineation. We demonstrate the possibility to measure bathymetry data in shallow (0-1 m) and clear water. Furthermore, we evaluate for the first time the accuracy of the BoMMS ground points classification compared to manually classified data. We also demonstrate the spatial variations of the ground point density and assess elevation and vertical accuracies of the BoMMS data.

  20. Data Processing and Quality Evaluation of a Boat-Based Mobile Laser Scanning System

    PubMed Central

    Vaaja, Matti; Kukko, Antero; Kaartinen, Harri; Kurkela, Matti; Kasvi, Elina; Flener, Claude; Hyyppä, Hannu; Hyyppä, Juha; Järvelä, Juha; Alho, Petteri

    2013-01-01

    Mobile mapping systems (MMSs) are used for mapping topographic and urban features which are difficult and time consuming to measure with other instruments. The benefits of MMSs include efficient data collection and versatile usability. This paper investigates the data processing steps and quality of a boat-based mobile mapping system (BoMMS) data for generating terrain and vegetation points in a river environment. Our aim in data processing was to filter noise points, detect shorelines as well as points below water surface and conduct ground point classification. Previous studies of BoMMS have investigated elevation accuracies and usability in detection of fluvial erosion and deposition areas. The new findings concerning BoMMS data are that the improved data processing approach allows for identification of multipath reflections and shoreline delineation. We demonstrate the possibility to measure bathymetry data in shallow (0–1 m) and clear water. Furthermore, we evaluate for the first time the accuracy of the BoMMS ground points classification compared to manually classified data. We also demonstrate the spatial variations of the ground point density and assess elevation and vertical accuracies of the BoMMS data. PMID:24048340

  1. A Virtual Microscopy System to Scan, Evaluate and Archive Biomarker Enhanced Cervical Cytology Slides

    PubMed Central

    Grabe, Niels; Lahrmann, Bernd; Pommerencke, Thora; von Knebel Doeberitz, Magnus; Reuschenbach, Miriam; Wentzensen, Nicolas

    2010-01-01

    Background: Although cytological screening for cervical precancers has led to a reduction of cervical cancer incidence worldwide it is a subjective and variable method with low single-test sensitivity. New biomarkers like p16 that specifically highlight abnormal cervical cells can improve cytology performance. Virtual microscopy offers an ideal platform for assisted evaluation and archiving of biomarker-stained slides. Methods: We first performed a quantitative analysis of p16-stained slides digitized with the Hamamatsu NDP slide scanner. From the results an automated algorithm was created to reliably detect cells, nuclei and p16-stained cells. The algorithm's performance was evaluated on two complete slides and tiles from 52 independent slides (11,628, 4094 and 25,619 cells/clusters, respectively). Results: We achieved excellent performance to discriminate unstained cells from nuclei and biomarker-stained cells. The automated algorithm showed a high overall and positive agreement (99.0–99.7% and 70.9–83.4%, respectively) with the gold standard and had a very high sensitivity (89.1–100.0%) and specificity (98.9–100.0%) to detect biomarker-stained cells. Conclusions: We implemented a virtual microscopy system allowing highly efficient automated prescreening and archiving of biomarker-stained slides. Based on the initial results, we will evaluate the performance of our system in large epidemiologic studies against disease endpoints. PMID:20208139

  2. VPI - VIBRATION PATTERN IMAGER: A CONTROL AND DATA ACQUISITION SYSTEM FOR SCANNING LASER VIBROMETERS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rizzi, S. A.

    1994-01-01

    The Vibration Pattern Imager (VPI) system was designed to control and acquire data from laser vibrometer sensors. The PC computer based system uses a digital signal processing (DSP) board and an analog I/O board to control the sensor and to process the data. The VPI system was originally developed for use with the Ometron VPI Sensor (Ometron Limited, Kelvin House, Worsley Bridge Road, London, SE26 5BX, England), but can be readily adapted to any commercially available sensor which provides an analog output signal and requires analog inputs for control of mirror positioning. VPI's graphical user interface allows the operation of the program to be controlled interactively through keyboard and mouse-selected menu options. The main menu controls all functions for setup, data acquisition, display, file operations, and exiting the program. Two types of data may be acquired with the VPI system: single point or "full field". In the single point mode, time series data is sampled by the A/D converter on the I/O board at a user-defined rate for the selected number of samples. The position of the measuring point, adjusted by mirrors in the sensor, is controlled via a mouse input. In the "full field" mode, the measurement point is moved over a user-selected rectangular area with up to 256 positions in both x and y directions. The time series data is sampled by the A/D converter on the I/O board and converted to a root-mean-square (rms) value by the DSP board. The rms "full field" velocity distribution is then uploaded for display and storage. VPI is written in C language and Texas Instruments' TMS320C30 assembly language for IBM PC series and compatible computers running MS-DOS. The program requires 640K of RAM for execution, and a hard disk with 10Mb or more of disk space is recommended. The program also requires a mouse, a VGA graphics display, a Four Channel analog I/O board (Spectrum Signal Processing, Inc.; Westborough, MA), a break-out box and a Spirit-30 board (Sonitech

  3. High Pressure Scanning Tunneling Microscopy Studies of AdsorbateStructure and Mobility during Catalytic Reactions: Novel Design of anUltra High Pressure, High Temperature Scanning Tunneling MicroscopeSystem for Probing Catalytic Conversions

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, David Chi-Wai

    2005-05-16

    The aim of the work presented therein is to take advantage of scanning tunneling microscope’s (STM) capability for operation under a variety of environments under real time and at atomic resolution to monitor adsorbate structures and mobility under high pressures, as well as to design a new generation of STM systems that allow imaging in situ at both higher pressures (35 atm) and temperatures (350 °C).

  4. Investigation of biological cell-protein interactions using SPR sensor through laser scanning confocal imaging-surface plasmon resonance system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hongyan; Yang, Liquan; Zhou, Bingjiang; Wang, Xueliang; Liu, Guiying; Liu, Weimin; Wang, Pengfei

    2014-03-01

    A new method for investigating biological cell-protein interactions was developed by using a laser scanning confocal imaging-surface plasmon resonance (LSCI-SPR) system. Mouse normal IgG was modified on the SPR chip. The suspension mouse lymphocyte cancer cells (L5178Y cells) labeled by Hoechst33342 freely flowed into the surface of the SPR sensor chip. By changing the concentration of the cells, the fluorescence images and the SPR signal were synchronously recorded in real time. The red fluorescence points in the imaging region increased with increase in the concentration of the mouse lymphocyte cancer cells and fit well with the change in the SPR signal. Different suspending cells were chosen to investigate cell-protein interactions through antigen-antibody reactions on the biological cell surfaces through binding detection. This method has potential application in cell biology and pharmacology.

  5. Solitary pulmonary amyloidoma mimicking lung cancer on 18F-FDG PET-CT scan in systemic lupus erythematosus patient.

    PubMed

    Barešić, M; Sreter, K B; Brčić, L; Hećimović, A; Janevski, Z; Anić, B

    2015-12-01

    Localized amyloid deposits (tumoral amyloidosis or amyloidoma) are uncommon form of amyloidosis and nodular pulmonary amyloidomas are rarely found. This incidental finding can mimic a bronchopulmonary neoplasm and may occur secondarily to an infectious, inflammatory or lymphoproliferative disease. We report a case of a 62-year-old female with long-standing systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) with low compliance who presented with radiologically-verified solitary pulmonary nodule. Work-up included positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) scan, which revealed hypermetabolic uptake of (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose, and lobectomy was performed. Staining of the tissue was positive for Congo red and was green birefringent under polarized light. Immunohistochemical methods excluded lymphoproliferative disease and confirmed amyloidoma. SLE was controlled with antimalarials and glucocorticoids. Pulmonary amyloidoma should be considered in the differential diagnosis of solitary lung nodules.

  6. Low-cost virtual instrumentation system of an energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometer for a scanning electron microscope

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Junfeng; Zeng, Libo; Liu, Ronggui; Liu, Juntang; Zhang, Zelan

    2002-01-01

    The paper describes an energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometer for a scanning electron microscope (SEM-EDXS). It was constructed using the new architecture of a virtual instrument (VI), which is low-cost, space-saving, fast and flexible way to develop the instrument. Computer-aided teaching (CAT) was used to develop the instrument and operation rather than a traditional instrument technique. The VI was designed using the object-oriented program language C++ and compact programmable logical devices (CPLD). These include spectra collection and processing, quantitative analysis and X-ray-intensity distribution analysis. The procedure is described in detail. The VI system gives an e¡ective and user-friendly human interface for the whole analytical task. Some examples are described. PMID:18924732

  7. Observations of the Au/Si(111) System with a High-Resolution Ultrahigh-Vacuum Scanning Electron Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endo, Akira; Ino, Shozo

    1993-10-01

    Secondary electron (SE) imaging with a high-resolution ultrahigh-vacuum scanning electron microscope (UHV-SEM) has been applied to the observation of the Au/Si(111) system. Domains of the 5× 2-Au or \\sqrt{3}×\\sqrt{3}-Au structure partially covering a Si(111)-7× 7 surface are clearly observed. Domains of 5× 2-Au formed by Au deposition onto a substrate held at ˜870 K show threefold elongation corresponding to three equivalent kinds of domains rotated 120° to each other. On the other hand, 5× 2-Au regions formed by partial Au desorption by heating at ˜1270 K from an entirely covered surface display larger size without such elongation. Granular clusters, a few nm in size, of Au formed by deposition approximately at room temperature, and large three-dimensional islands formed in the Stranski-Krastanov growth mode are also clearly imaged.

  8. Volumetric rendering and metrology of spherical gradient refractive index lens imaged by angular scan optical coherence tomography system.

    PubMed

    Yao, Jianing; Thompson, Kevin P; Ma, Bin; Ponting, Michael; Rolland, Jannick P

    2016-08-22

    In this paper, we develop the methodology, including the refraction correction, geometrical thickness correction, coordinate transformation, and layer segmentation algorithms, for 3D rendering and metrology of a layered spherical gradient refractive index (S-GRIN) lens based on the imaging data collected by an angular scan optical coherence tomography (OCT) system. The 3D mapping and rendering enables direct 3D visualization and internal defect inspection of the lens. The metrology provides assessment of the surface geometry, the lens thickness, the radii of curvature of the internal layer interfaces, and the misalignment of the internal S-GRIN distribution with respect to the lens surface. The OCT metrology results identify the manufacturing defects, and enable targeted process development for optimizing the manufacturing parameters. The newly fabricated S-GRIN lenses show up to a 7x spherical aberration reduction that allows a significantly increased utilizable effective aperture. PMID:27557217

  9. Microwave scanning beam landing system compatibility and performance: Engineering analyses 75-1 and 75-2. [space shuttle orbiter landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The microwave scanning beam landing system (MSBLS) is the primary position sensor of the Orbiter's navigation subsystem during the autoland phase of the flight. Portions of the system are discussed with special emphasis placed on potential problem areas as referenced to the Orbiter's mission. Topics discussed include system compatability, system accuracy, and expected RF signal levels. A block and flow diagram of MSBLS system operation is included with a list of special tests required to determine system performance.

  10. Evaluation of Fracture Resistance of Various Restorative Systems for Posterior Full Contour Restorations by Means of Scanning Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhima, Matilda

    Aims: The goals of this study were to: 1.) assess a range of the performance of four restorative systems for posterior single tooth crowns under single load to fracture submerged in an aqueous environment, 2.) identify restorative system(s) of interest to be examined under sliding contact step-stress fatigue as full contour anatomically appropriate single posterior tooth restoration(s) of various thicknesses submerged in water, 3.) assess a range of the performance of various thicknesses of restorative system(s) of interest. Material and Methods: A total of forty samples (n=10 each group) 2 mm uniform thickness were tested. Group 1. monolithic lithium disilicate IPS e.max Press; group 2. IPS e.max ZirPress, 0.8mm zirconia core with 1.2mm pressed veneering porcelain, group 3. IPS e.max ZirPress, 0.4mm zirconia core with 1.6mm pressed veneering porcelain, group 4. IPS InLine PoM. Samples were bonded to a block of polycast acrylic resin on a 30 degree sloped surface with resin cement. Samples were axially single loaded to failure while submerged under water. Findings from the testing were statistically analyzed and used to establish parameters for the material of interest to test submerged in aqueous environment under sliding contact step-stress fatigue as full contour single posterior restoration. This second phase assessed the performance of four groups (n=10 each group) of 0.5mm, 1.0mm, 1.5mm and 2.0mm of lithium disilicate restorations were tested. The tooth preparation for each sample was uniformly reduced, scanned digitally and milled for each group. The restorations were fabricated by scanning and milling technology. Results: There was a statistically significant difference (p< 0.001) in single failure load among the four restorative systems. Lithium disilicate showed a mean failure load similar to mean maximum posterior bite forces (743.1N +/- 114.3 N). This material was identified of interest to test submerged in aqueous environment under peak value force and

  11. Development of real-time line-scan hyperspectral imaging system for online agricultural and food product inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Seung Chul; Park, Bosoon; Lawrence, Kurt C.; Windham, William R.; Heitschmidt, Gerald W.

    2010-04-01

    This paper reports a recent development of a line-scan hyperspectral imaging system for real-time multispectral imaging applications in agricultural and food industries. The hyperspectral imaging system consisted of a spectrograph, an EMCCD camera, and application software. The real-time multispectral imaging with the developed system was possible due to (1) data binning, especially a unique feature of the EMCCD sensor allowing the access to non-contiguous multispectral bands, (2) an image processing algorithm designed for real-time multispectral imaging, and (3) the design and implementation of the real-time application software. The imaging system was developed as a poultry inspection instrument determining the presence of surface feces on poultry carcasses moving at commercial poultry processing line speeds up to 180 birds per minute. The imaging system can be easily modifiable to solve other real-time inspection/sorting problems. Three wavelengths at 517 nm, 565 nm and 802 nm were selected for real-time fecal detection imaging. The fecal detection algorithm was based on dual band ratios of 565nm/517nm and 802nm/517nm followed by thresholding. The software architecture was based on a ping pong memory and a circular buffer for the multitasking of image grabbing and processing. The software was written in Microsoft Visual C++. An image-based internal triggering (i.e. polling) algorithm was developed to determine the start and end positions of birds. Twelve chickens were used for testing the imaging system at two different speeds (140 birds per minute and 180 bird per minute) in a pilot-scale processing line. Four types of fecal materials (duodenum, ceca, colon and ingesta) were used for the evaluation of the detection algorithm. The software grabbed and processed multispectral images of the dimension 118 (line scans) x 512 (height) x 3 (bands) pixels obtained from chicken carcasses moving at the speed up to 180 birds per minute (a frame rate 286 Hz). Intensity

  12. Scanning fluorescence correlation spectroscopy as a versatile tool to measure static and dynamic properties of soft matter systems.

    PubMed

    Nepal, Manish; Oyler-Yaniv, Alon; Krichevsky, Oleg

    2015-12-14

    We present the formalism and experimental implementation of scanning fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (SFCS) for the measurements of soft matter system structure and dynamics. We relate the SFCS function Fourier transform to the system intermediate scattering function and demonstrate how SFCS can be combined with specific labelling to measure the desired statistical and kinetic features of the system. Using DNA as a model polymer, we demonstrate the application of SFCS to measure (1) the static structure factor of the system, (2) polymer end-to-end distance distribution, and (3) polymer segmental dynamics in dilute and in dense solutions. The measured DNA end-to-end distance distributions are close to Gaussian. Implementing SFCS we obtain reliable data on segmental mean-square displacement kinetics in dense solutions, where the static FCS approach fails because of dye photobleaching. For moderate concentrations in the semidilute regime (at ∼7 overlap concentrations) segmental dynamics exhibit only weak entanglements. Both of these experimental findings are consistent with theoretical predictions of the weakness of excluded interactions in semiflexible polymers.

  13. Scanning fluorescence correlation spectroscopy as a versatile tool to measure static and dynamic properties of soft matter systems.

    PubMed

    Nepal, Manish; Oyler-Yaniv, Alon; Krichevsky, Oleg

    2015-12-14

    We present the formalism and experimental implementation of scanning fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (SFCS) for the measurements of soft matter system structure and dynamics. We relate the SFCS function Fourier transform to the system intermediate scattering function and demonstrate how SFCS can be combined with specific labelling to measure the desired statistical and kinetic features of the system. Using DNA as a model polymer, we demonstrate the application of SFCS to measure (1) the static structure factor of the system, (2) polymer end-to-end distance distribution, and (3) polymer segmental dynamics in dilute and in dense solutions. The measured DNA end-to-end distance distributions are close to Gaussian. Implementing SFCS we obtain reliable data on segmental mean-square displacement kinetics in dense solutions, where the static FCS approach fails because of dye photobleaching. For moderate concentrations in the semidilute regime (at ∼7 overlap concentrations) segmental dynamics exhibit only weak entanglements. Both of these experimental findings are consistent with theoretical predictions of the weakness of excluded interactions in semiflexible polymers. PMID:26406382

  14. Advanced compact laser scanning system enhancements for gear and thread measurements. Final CRADA report

    SciTech Connect

    McKeethan, W.M.; Maxey, L.C.; Bernacki, B.E.; Castore, G.

    1997-04-04

    The measurement, or metrology, of physical objects is a fundamental requirement for industrial progress. Dimensional measurement capability lies at the heart of ones ability to produce objects within the required technical specifications. Dimensional metrology systems are presently dominated by touch-probe technologies, which are mature and reliable. Due to the intricate geometries required in certain fields of manufacturing, these contract probes cannot be physically brought in proximity to the measurement surface, or lack sufficient lateral resolution to satisfactorily determine the surface profile, which can occur in the measurement of gears, splines and thread. Optical probes are viable candidates to supplement the contact probes, since light can be focused to less than one micron (40 microinches), no contact occurs that can mar highly finished surfaces, and no probes must be replaced due to wear. However, optical probes typically excel only on one type of surface: mirror-like or diffuse, and the optical stylus itself is oftentimes not as compact as its contact probe counterpart. Apeiron, Inc. has pioneered the use of optical non-contact sensors to measure machined parts, especially threads, gears and splines. The Oak Ridge Metrology Center at Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant are world-class experts in dimensional metrology. The goal of this CRADA is to tap the expertise in Oak Ridge to evaluate Apeiron`s platform, and to suggest new or novel methods of optical surface sensing, if appropriate.

  15. Increasing inspection equipment productivity by utilizing factory automation SW on TeraScan 5XX systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakubski, Thomas; Piechoncinski, Michal; Moses, Raphael; Bugata, Bharathi; Schmalfuss, Heiko; Köhler, Ines; Lisowski, Jan; Klobes, Jens; Fenske, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Especially for advanced masks the reticle inspection operation is a very significant cost factor, since it is a time consuming process and inspection tools are becoming disproportionately expensive. Analyzing and categorizing historical equipment utilization times of the reticle inspection tools however showed a significant amount of time which can be classified as non productive. In order to reduce the inspection costs the equipment utilization needed to be improved. The main contributors to non productive time were analyzed and several use cases identified, where automation utilizing a SECS1 equipment interface was expected to help to reduce these non productive times. The paper demonstrates how real time access to equipment utilization data can be applied to better control manufacturing resources. Scenarios are presented where remote monitoring and control of the inspection equipment can be used to avoid setup errors or save inspection time by faster response to problem situations. Additionally a solution to the second important need, the maximization of tool utilization in cases where not all of the intended functions are available, is explained. Both the models and the software implementation are briefly explained. For automation of the so called inspection strategy a new approach which allows separation of the business rules from the automation infrastructure was chosen. Initial results of inspection equipment performance data tracked through the SECS interface are shown. Furthermore a system integration overview is presented and examples of how the inspection strategy rules are implemented and managed are given.

  16. N-Scan®: New Vibro-Modulation System for Crack Detection, Monitoring and Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zagrai, Andrei; Donskoy, Dimitri; Lottiaux, Jean-Louis

    2004-02-01

    In recent years, an innovative vibro-modulation technique has been introduced for the detection of contact-type interfaces such as cracks, debondings, and delaminations. The technique utilizes the effect of nonlinear interaction of ultrasound and vibrations at the interface of the defect. Vibration varies the contact area of the interface, modulating a passing ultrasonic wave. The modulation manifests itself as additional side-band spectral components with the combination frequencies in the spectrum of the received signal. The presence of these components allows for the detection and differentiation of the contact-type defects from other structural and material inhomogeneities. The vibro-modulation technique has been implemented in the N-SCAN® damage detection system providing a cost effective solution for the complex NDT problems. N-SCAN® proved to be very effective for damage detection and characterization in structures and structural components of simple and complex geometries made of steel, aluminum, composites, and other materials. Examples include 24 foot-long gun barrels, stainless steel pipes used in nuclear power plants, aluminum automotive parts, steel train couplers, etc. This paper describes the basic principles of the nonlinear vibro-modulation NDE technique, some theoretical background for nonlinear interaction, and justification of signal processing algorithms. The laboratory experiment is presented for a set of specimens with the calibrated cracks and the quantitative characterization of fatigue damage is given in terms of a modulation index. The paper also discusses examples of practical implementation and application of the technique.

  17. Virtual slit scanning microscopy.

    PubMed

    Fiolka, Reto; Stemmer, Andreas; Belyaev, Yury

    2007-12-01

    We present a novel slit scanning confocal microscope with a CCD camera image sensor and a virtual slit aperture for descanning that can be adjusted during post-processing. A very efficient data structure and mathematical criteria for aligning the virtual aperture guarantee the ease of use. We further introduce a method to reduce the anisotropic lateral resolution of slit scanning microscopes. System performance is evaluated against a spinning disk confocal microscope on identical specimens. The virtual slit scanning microscope works as the spinning disk type and outperforms on thick specimens. PMID:17891411

  18. Perineal scanning.

    PubMed

    Jeanty, P; d'Alton, M; Romero, R; Hobbins, J C

    1986-10-01

    Although various techniques have been described to aid in the ultrasound diagnosis of placenta previa and incompetent cervix, these maneuvers depend on the precise identification of the internal cervical os, a feat which is notoriously difficult to accomplish consistently. In an attempt to get a closer view of the cervix we tried another approach. This simple technique of perineal scanning has the potential to help considerably with these problems. PMID:3530265

  19. A Transition Edge Sensor Microcalorimeter System for the Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy Performed on a Scanning-Transmission Electron Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maehata, K.; Hara, T.; Mitsuda, K.; Hidaka, M.; Tanaka, K.; Yamanaka, Y.

    2016-07-01

    We are conducting the development of a transition edge sensor (TES) microcalorimeter system for energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), performed using a scanning-transmission electron microscope (STEM). The operating temperature of the TES microcalorimeter was maintained using a compact dry 3He-4He dilution refrigerator. This was pre-cooled by a remote helium cooling loop system and a Gifford-McMahon cooler. These conditions allowed for high-resolution STEM imaging to be achieved. A single-pixel TES microcalorimeter with a polycapillary optic was selected to demonstrate the analytical operation of the EDS system in the STEM. For a Ti-It-Pt sample, an X-ray energy resolution of 8.6 eV full-width at half maximum (FWHM) was obtained at Ir M_{α 1}, Pt M_{α 1}, and Ir M_{β }. Using an electron device sample, element distribution maps of Si, Ti, and W were obtained using a Si K_{α 1} X-ray energy resolution of 9.7 eV FWHM.

  20. A Scanning electron microscopic evaluation of intracanal smear layer removal by two different final irrigation activation systems

    PubMed Central

    Dua, Deepti; Dua, Ankur; Uppin, Veerendra M.

    2014-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to compare smear layer removal at apical 1 mm level after final irrigation activation with an EndoVac system and Max-I probe. Materials and Methods: Fifty freshly extracted maxillary central incisors were randomly divided into two groups after completing cleaning and shaping with ProTaper rotary files. In one group, final irrigation was performed with an EndoVac system while in the other group final irrigation was performed with a 30 gauge Max-I probe. 3% sodium hypochlorite and 17% ethylenediaminetetracetic acid were used as final irrigants in all teeth. After instrumentation and irrigation, the teeth were sectioned longitudinally into buccal and palatal halves and viewed under a scanning electron microscope for evaluation of the smear layer. Statistical analysis was performed using the Kruskal Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests. Results: The EndoVac group showed significantly better smear layer removal compared with the Max-I probe at the apical 1 mm level. Conclusion: An apical negative pressure system (EndoVac) results in better debridement at apical 1 mm when compared with side-vented closed ended needle irrigation (Max-I probe). PMID:24808693

  1. Commissioning dose computation models for spot scanning proton beams in water for a commercially available treatment planning system

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, X. R.; Poenisch, F.; Lii, M.; Sawakuchi, G. O.; Titt, U.; Bues, M.; Song, X.; Zhang, X.; Li, Y.; Ciangaru, G.; Li, H.; Taylor, M. B.; Suzuki, K.; Mohan, R.; Gillin, M. T.; Sahoo, N.

    2013-04-15

    Purpose: To present our method and experience in commissioning dose models in water for spot scanning proton therapy in a commercial treatment planning system (TPS). Methods: The input data required by the TPS included in-air transverse profiles and integral depth doses (IDDs). All input data were obtained from Monte Carlo (MC) simulations that had been validated by measurements. MC-generated IDDs were converted to units of Gy mm{sup 2}/MU using the measured IDDs at a depth of 2 cm employing the largest commercially available parallel-plate ionization chamber. The sensitive area of the chamber was insufficient to fully encompass the entire lateral dose deposited at depth by a pencil beam (spot). To correct for the detector size, correction factors as a function of proton energy were defined and determined using MC. The fluence of individual spots was initially modeled as a single Gaussian (SG) function and later as a double Gaussian (DG) function. The DG fluence model was introduced to account for the spot fluence due to contributions of large angle scattering from the devices within the scanning nozzle, especially from the spot profile monitor. To validate the DG fluence model, we compared calculations and measurements, including doses at the center of spread out Bragg peaks (SOBPs) as a function of nominal field size, range, and SOBP width, lateral dose profiles, and depth doses for different widths of SOBP. Dose models were validated extensively with patient treatment field-specific measurements. Results: We demonstrated that the DG fluence model is necessary for predicting the field size dependence of dose distributions. With this model, the calculated doses at the center of SOBPs as a function of nominal field size, range, and SOBP width, lateral dose profiles and depth doses for rectangular target volumes agreed well with respective measured values. With the DG fluence model for our scanning proton beam line, we successfully treated more than 500 patients

  2. Commissioning dose computation models for spot scanning proton beams in water for a commercially available treatment planning system

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, X. R.; Poenisch, F.; Lii, M.; Sawakuchi, G. O.; Titt, U.; Bues, M.; Song, X.; Zhang, X.; Li, Y.; Ciangaru, G.; Li, H.; Taylor, M. B.; Suzuki, K.; Mohan, R.; Gillin, M. T.; Sahoo, N.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To present our method and experience in commissioning dose models in water for spot scanning proton therapy in a commercial treatment planning system (TPS). Methods: The input data required by the TPS included in-air transverse profiles and integral depth doses (IDDs). All input data were obtained from Monte Carlo (MC) simulations that had been validated by measurements. MC-generated IDDs were converted to units of Gy mm2/MU using the measured IDDs at a depth of 2 cm employing the largest commercially available parallel-plate ionization chamber. The sensitive area of the chamber was insufficient to fully encompass the entire lateral dose deposited at depth by a pencil beam (spot). To correct for the detector size, correction factors as a function of proton energy were defined and determined using MC. The fluence of individual spots was initially modeled as a single Gaussian (SG) function and later as a double Gaussian (DG) function. The DG fluence model was introduced to account for the spot fluence due to contributions of large angle scattering from the devices within the scanning nozzle, especially from the spot profile monitor. To validate the DG fluence model, we compared calculations and measurements, including doses at the center of spread out Bragg peaks (SOBPs) as a function of nominal field size, range, and SOBP width, lateral dose profiles, and depth doses for different widths of SOBP. Dose models were validated extensively with patient treatment field-specific measurements. Results: We demonstrated that the DG fluence model is necessary for predicting the field size dependence of dose distributions. With this model, the calculated doses at the center of SOBPs as a function of nominal field size, range, and SOBP width, lateral dose profiles and depth doses for rectangular target volumes agreed well with respective measured values. With the DG fluence model for our scanning proton beam line, we successfully treated more than 500 patients from

  3. Feasibility of CT-based 3D anatomic mapping with a scanning-beam digital x-ray (SBDX) system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slagowski, Jordan M.; Tomkowiak, Michael T.; Dunkerley, David A. P.; Speidel, Michael A.

    2015-03-01

    This study investigates the feasibility of obtaining CT-derived 3D surfaces from data provided by the scanning-beam digital x-ray (SBDX) system. Simulated SBDX short-scan acquisitions of a Shepp-Logan and a thorax phantom containing a high contrast spherical volume were generated. 3D reconstructions were performed using a penalized weighted least squares method with total variation regularization (PWLS-TV), as well as a more efficient variant employing gridding of projection data to parallel rays (gPWLS-TV). Voxel noise, edge blurring, and surface accuracy were compared to gridded filtered back projection (gFBP). PWLS reconstruction of a noise-free reduced-size Shepp-Logan phantom had 1.4% rRMSE. In noisy gPWLS-TV reconstructions of a reduced-size thorax phantom, 99% of points on the segmented sphere perimeter were within 0.33, 0.47, and 0.70 mm of the ground truth, respectively, for fluences comparable to imaging through 18.0, 27.2, and 34.6 cm acrylic. Surface accuracies of gFBP and gPWLS-TV were similar at high fluences, while gPWLS-TV offered improvement at the lowest fluence. The gPWLS-TV voxel noise was reduced by 60% relative to gFBP, on average. High-contrast linespread functions measured 1.25 mm and 0.96 mm (FWHM) for gPWLS-TV and gFBP. In a simulation of gated and truncated projection data from a full-sized thorax, gPWLS-TV reconstruction yielded segmented surface points which were within 1.41 mm of ground truth. Results support the feasibility of 3D surface segmentation with SBDX. Further investigation of artifacts caused by data truncation and patient motion is warranted.

  4. Compact antenna for two-dimensional beam scan in the JT-60U electron cyclotron heating/current drive system

    SciTech Connect

    Moriyama, S.; Kajiwara, K.; Takahashi, K.; Kasugai, A.; Seki, M.; Ikeda, Y.; Fujii, T.

    2005-11-15

    A compact antenna system was designed and fabricated to enable millimeter-wave beam scanning in the toroidal and poloidal directions of the JT-60U tokamak for electron cyclotron heating (ECH) and electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) experiments. The antenna consists of a fast movable flat mirror mounted on the tokamak vacuum vessel and a rotary focusing mirror attached at the end of the waveguide that is supported from outside the vacuum vessel. This separate support concept enables a compact structure inside a shallow port (0.68x0.54x0.2 m) that is shared with a subport for an independent diagnostic system. During a plasma shot, the flat mirror is driven by a servomotor with a 3-m-long drive shaft to reduce the influence of the high magnetic field on the motor. The focusing mirror is rotated by a simple mechanism utilizing a push rod and an air cylinder. The antenna has been operated reliably for 3 years after a small improvement to the rotary drive mechanism. It has made significant contributions to ECH and ECCD experiments, especially the current profile control in JT-60U.

  5. Efficacy of Two Irrigants Used with Self-Adjusting File System on Smear Layer: A Scanning Electron Microscopy Study

    PubMed Central

    Kaya, Sadullah; Er, Özgür; Alaçam, Tayfun

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical instrumentation of root canals produces a smear layer that adversely affects the root canal seal. The aim of this study was to evaluate efficacy of MTAD and citric acid solutions used with self-adjusting file (SAF) system on smear layer. Twenty-three single-rooted human teeth were used for the study. Canals were instrumented manually up to a number 20 K file size. SAF was used to prepare the root canals. The following groups were studied: Group 1: MTAD + 5.25% NaOCl, Group 2: 20% citric acid + 5.25% NaOCl, and Group 3: Control (5.25% NaOCl). All roots were split longitudinally and subjected to scanning electron microscopy. The presence of smear layer in the coronal, middle, and apical thirds was evaluated using a five-score evaluation system. Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests were used for statistical analysis. In the coronal third, Group 2 exhibited the best results and was statistically different froms the other groups (P < 0.05). There was not a significant difference among the three thirds of groups according to in-group comparisons (P > 0.05). The solutions used in Group 1 and 2 could effectively remove smear layer in most of the specimens. However, citric acid was more effective than MTAD in the three thirds of the canal. PMID:27355025

  6. Evaluating the design of satellite scanning radiometers for earth radiation budget measurements with system simulations. Part 1: Instantaneous estimates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stowe, Larry; Ardanuy, Philip; Hucek, Richard; Abel, Peter; Jacobowitz, Herbert

    1991-01-01

    A set of system simulations was performed to evaluate candidate scanner configurations to fly as a part of the Earth Radiation Budget Instrument (ERBI) on the polar platforms during the 1990's. The simulation is considered of instantaneous sampling (without diurnal averaging) of the longwave and shortwave fluxes at the top of the atmosphere (TOA). After measurement and subsequent inversion to the TOA, the measured fluxes were compared to the reference fluxes for 2.5 deg lat/long resolution targets. The reference fluxes at this resolution are obtained by integrating over the 25 x 25 = 625 grid elements in each target. The differences between each of these two resultant spatially averaged sets of target measurements (errors) are taken and then statistically summarized. Five instruments are considered: (1) the Conically Scanning Radiometer (CSR); (2) the ERBE Cross Track Scanner; (3) the Nimbus-7 Biaxial Scanner; (4) the Clouds and Earth's Radiant Energy System Instrument (CERES-1); and (5) the Active Cavity Array (ACA). Identical studies of instantaneous error were completed for many days, two seasons, and several satellite equator crossing longitudes. The longwave flux errors were found to have the same space and time characteristics as for the shortwave fluxes, but the errors are only about 25 pct. of the shortwave errors.

  7. Efficacy of Two Irrigants Used with Self-Adjusting File System on Smear Layer: A Scanning Electron Microscopy Study.

    PubMed

    Genç Şen, Özgür; Kaya, Sadullah; Er, Özgür; Alaçam, Tayfun

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical instrumentation of root canals produces a smear layer that adversely affects the root canal seal. The aim of this study was to evaluate efficacy of MTAD and citric acid solutions used with self-adjusting file (SAF) system on smear layer. Twenty-three single-rooted human teeth were used for the study. Canals were instrumented manually up to a number 20 K file size. SAF was used to prepare the root canals. The following groups were studied: Group 1: MTAD + 5.25% NaOCl, Group 2: 20% citric acid + 5.25% NaOCl, and Group 3: Control (5.25% NaOCl). All roots were split longitudinally and subjected to scanning electron microscopy. The presence of smear layer in the coronal, middle, and apical thirds was evaluated using a five-score evaluation system. Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests were used for statistical analysis. In the coronal third, Group 2 exhibited the best results and was statistically different froms the other groups (P < 0.05). There was not a significant difference among the three thirds of groups according to in-group comparisons (P > 0.05). The solutions used in Group 1 and 2 could effectively remove smear layer in most of the specimens. However, citric acid was more effective than MTAD in the three thirds of the canal.

  8. Evaluating the design of satellite scanning radiometers for earth radiation budget measurements with system simulations. Part 1: Instantaneous estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stowe, Larry; Ardanuy, Philip; Hucek, Richard; Abel, Peter; Jacobowitz, Herbert

    1991-10-01

    A set of system simulations was performed to evaluate candidate scanner configurations to fly as a part of the Earth Radiation Budget Instrument (ERBI) on the polar platforms during the 1990's. The simulation is considered of instantaneous sampling (without diurnal averaging) of the longwave and shortwave fluxes at the top of the atmosphere (TOA). After measurement and subsequent inversion to the TOA, the measured fluxes were compared to the reference fluxes for 2.5 deg lat/long resolution targets. The reference fluxes at this resolution are obtained by integrating over the 25 x 25 = 625 grid elements in each target. The differences between each of these two resultant spatially averaged sets of target measurements (errors) are taken and then statistically summarized. Five instruments are considered: (1) the Conically Scanning Radiometer (CSR); (2) the ERBE Cross Track Scanner; (3) the Nimbus-7 Biaxial Scanner; (4) the Clouds and Earth's Radiant Energy System Instrument (CERES-1); and (5) the Active Cavity Array (ACA). Identical studies of instantaneous error were completed for many days, two seasons, and several satellite equator crossing longitudes. The longwave flux errors were found to have the same space and time characteristics as for the shortwave fluxes, but the errors are only about 25 pct. of the shortwave errors.

  9. Using a geographic information system and scanning technology to create high-resolution land-use data sets

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harvey, Craig A.; Kolpin, Dana W.; Battaglin, William A.

    1996-01-01

    A geographic information system (GIS) procedure was developed to compile low-altitude aerial photography, digitized data, and land-use data from U.S. Department of Agriculture Consolidated Farm Service Agency (CFSA) offices into a high-resolution (approximately 5 meters) land-use GIS data set. The aerial photography consisted of 35-mm slides which were scanned into tagged information file format (TIFF) images. These TIFF images were then imported into the GIS where they were registered into a geographically referenced coordinate system. Boundaries between land use were delineated from these GIS data sets using on-screen digitizing techniques. Crop types were determined using information obtained from the U.S. Department of Agriculture CFSA offices. Crop information not supplied by the CFSA was attributed by manual classification procedures. Automated methods to provide delineation of the field boundaries and land-use classification were investigated. It was determined that using these data sources, automated methods were less efficient and accurate than manual methods of delineating field boundaries and classifying land use.

  10. Failure of the MicroScan WalkAway system to detect heteroresistance to carbapenems in a patient with Enterobacter aerogenes bacteremia.

    PubMed

    Gordon, N C; Wareham, D W

    2009-09-01

    We report the failure of the automated MicroScan WalkAway system to detect carbapenem heteroresistance in Enterobacter aerogenes. Carbapenem resistance has become an increasing concern in recent years, and robust surveillance is required to prevent dissemination of resistant strains. Reliance on automated systems may delay the detection of emerging resistance.

  11. Slow Scan Telemedicine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Originally developed under contract for NASA by Ball Bros. Research Corporation for acquiring visual information from lunar and planetary spacecraft, system uses standard closed circuit camera connected to a device called a scan converter, which slows the stream of images to match an audio circuit, such as a telephone line. Transmitted to its destination, the image is reconverted by another scan converter and displayed on a monitor. In addition to assist scans, technique allows transmission of x-rays, nuclear scans, ultrasonic imagery, thermograms, electrocardiograms or live views of patient. Also allows conferencing and consultation among medical centers, general practitioners, specialists and disease control centers. Commercialized by Colorado Video, Inc., major employment is in business and industry for teleconferencing, cable TV news, transmission of scientific/engineering data, security, information retrieval, insurance claim adjustment, instructional programs, and remote viewing of advertising layouts, real estate, construction sites or products.

  12. Field Demonstration of Electro-Scan Defect Location Technology for Condition Assessment of Wastewater Collection Systems - Paper

    EPA Science Inventory

    A USEPA-sponsored field demonstration program was conducted to gather technically reliable cost and performance information on the electro-scan (FELL -41) pipeline condition assessment technology. Electro-scan technology can be used to estimate the magnitude and location of pote...

  13. A 1 kHz A-scan rate pump-probe laser-ultrasound system for robust inspection of composites.

    PubMed

    Pelivanov, Ivan; Shtokolov, Alex; Wei, Chen-Wei; O'Donnell, Matthew

    2015-09-01

    We recently built a fiber-optic laser-ultrasound (LU) scanner for nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of aircraft composites and demonstrated its greatly improved sensitivity and stability compared with current noncontact systems. It is also very attractive in terms of cost, stability to environmental noise and surface roughness, simplicity in adjustment, footprint, and flexibility. A new type of a balanced fiber-optic Sagnac interferometer is a key component of this all-optical LU pump-probe system. Very high A-scan rates can be achieved because no reference arm or stabilization feedback are needed. Here, we demonstrate LU system performance at 1000 A-scans/s combined with a fast 2-D translator operating at a scanning speed of 100 mm/s with a peak acceleration of 10 m/s(2) in both lateral directions to produce parallel B-scans at high rates. The fast scanning strategy is described in detail. The sensitivity of this system, in terms of noise equivalent pressure, was further improved to be only 8.3 dB above the Nyquist thermal noise limit. To our knowledge, this is the best reported sensitivity for a noncontact ultrasonic detector of this dimension used to inspect aircraft composites. PMID:26415130

  14. A 1 kHz A-scan rate pump-probe laser-ultrasound system for robust inspection of composites.

    PubMed

    Pelivanov, Ivan; Shtokolov, Alex; Wei, Chen-Wei; O'Donnell, Matthew

    2015-09-01

    We recently built a fiber-optic laser-ultrasound (LU) scanner for nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of aircraft composites and demonstrated its greatly improved sensitivity and stability compared with current noncontact systems. It is also very attractive in terms of cost, stability to environmental noise and surface roughness, simplicity in adjustment, footprint, and flexibility. A new type of a balanced fiber-optic Sagnac interferometer is a key component of this all-optical LU pump-probe system. Very high A-scan rates can be achieved because no reference arm or stabilization feedback are needed. Here, we demonstrate LU system performance at 1000 A-scans/s combined with a fast 2-D translator operating at a scanning speed of 100 mm/s with a peak acceleration of 10 m/s(2) in both lateral directions to produce parallel B-scans at high rates. The fast scanning strategy is described in detail. The sensitivity of this system, in terms of noise equivalent pressure, was further improved to be only 8.3 dB above the Nyquist thermal noise limit. To our knowledge, this is the best reported sensitivity for a noncontact ultrasonic detector of this dimension used to inspect aircraft composites.

  15. WE-D-17A-01: A Dynamic Collimation System for Spot Scanned Proton Therapy: Conceptual Overview

    SciTech Connect

    Hyer, D; Hill, P; Wang, D; Smith, B; Flynn, R

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: In the absence of a collimation system, the lateral penumbra in pencil beam scanning (PBS) proton therapy delivered at low energies is highly dependent on the spot size. This dependence, coupled with the fact that spot sizes increase with decreasing energy, reduces the benefit of the PBS technique for treating shallow tumors such as those found in the head and neck region. In order to overcome this limitation, a dynamic collimation system (DCS) was developed for sharpening the lateral penumbra of low energy proton therapy dose distributions delivered by PBS. Methods: The proposed DCS consists of two pairs of orthogonal trimmer blades which intercept the edges of the proton beam near the target edge in the beam's eye view. Each trimmer blade is capable of rapid motion in the direction perpendicular to the central beam axis by means of a linear motor, with maximum velocity and acceleration of 2.5 m/s and 19.6 m/s{sup 2}, respectively. Two-dimensional treatment plans were created both with and without the DCS for in-air spot sizes (σ-air) of 3, 5, 7, and 9 mm, representing a wide array of clinically available equipment. Results: In its current configuration, the snout of the DCS has outer dimensions of 22.6 × 22.6 cm{sup 2} and is capable of delivering a minimum treatment field size of 15 × 15 cm{sup 2}. Using off the shelf components, the constructed system would weigh less than 20 kg. The treatment plans created with the DCS yielded a reduction in the mean dose to normal tissue surrounding the target of 26.2–40.6% for spot sizes of 3–9 mm, respectively. Conclusion: The DCS can be integrated with current or future proton therapy equipment and we believe it will serve as a useful tool to further improve the next generation of proton therapy delivery.

  16. [Evaluation of resolving power property to the position and direction of in-plane in CT-scan system].

    PubMed

    Hara, Takanori; Ichikawa, Katsuhiro; Niwa, Shinji

    2008-01-20

    Analysis of the detailed physical property in CT system is important in an understanding of a clinical image. In this study, we evaluated resolution power property about the positions and direction for in-plane in CT system. The indexes of the resolving power property of CT images were measured by MTFs using the thin metal wire (diameter of 0.2 mm). We measured the positions of the iso-center and the off-center (32 mm, 64 mm, 96 mm, 128 mm) in in-plane. One-dimensional MTFs for the X-direction and Y-direction were calculated by the numerical slit scanning method. Then, MTF was calculated from the corresponding direction. As a result, when a filter kernel of high resolutions (B70) is used in the position of 128 mm, the resolution of X-direction was inferior to the Y-direction about 30% (at the MTF-value of 0.5 cycles/mm). Moreover, the resolution of X-direction at the position of 128 mm was inferior to the center about 33% (at the MTF-value of 0.5 cycles/mm). The resolving power property of in-plane in CT system was decreased in the calculation from the numerical slit that becomes perpendicular to the direction of centrifugal and, decreased proportionately with the distance from the center. Also, the resolutions along the centrifugal direction fell off remarkably at the peripheral area. And also, it turned out that the declining trend becomes larger, when the filter function for high-resolving power that is adapted for lungs is used.

  17. Characterization of C/Enhanced SiC Composite During Creep-Rupture Tests Using an Ultrasonic Guided Wave Scan System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, Don J.; Verrilli, Michael J.; Martin, Richard E.; Cosgriff, Laura M.

    2004-01-01

    An ultrasonic guided wave scan system was used to nondestructively monitor damage over time and position in a C/enhanced SiC sample that was creep tested to failure at 1200 C in air at a stress of 69 MPa (10 ksi). The use of the guided wave scan system for mapping evolving oxidation profiles (via porosity gradients resulting from oxidation) along the sample length and predicting failure location was explored. The creep-rupture tests were interrupted for ultrasonic evaluation every two hours until failure at approx. 17.5 cumulative hours.

  18. Evaluation of polymyxin susceptibility profile among KPC-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae using Etest and MicroScan WalkAway automated system.

    PubMed

    Perez, Leandro Reus Rodrigues

    2015-11-01

    Determination of polymyxin susceptibility profile is important to monitor resistance rates and for implementing control measures for polymyxin-resistant carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae. Some laboratorial methods have been used to determine the polymyxin susceptibility profile. However, the performance of MicroScan WalkAway has been poorly reported for KPC-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae, so far. To evaluate two different methods, Etest and the MicroScan automated system, in determining minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of polymyxin among KPC-producing K. pneumoniae isolated from patients in two care units (ICUs) of a tertiary hospital in Porto Alegre, Southern Brazil. A total of 101 KPC-Kb isolates were obtained from rectal swabs and clinical specimens (urine, blood, and endotracheal aspirate). Colistin and polymyxin B MICs were determined using MicroScan WalkAway automated system and Etest, respectively. Discrepant results were resolved by broth microdilution (BMD). MicroScan showed 88.1% of sensitivity for predicting polymyxin B resistance in KPC-producing K. pneumoniae compared to the results obtained by Etest. All discrepant results were tested by BMD and these were concordant with results obtained by Etest. The MicroScan automated system does not seem to be very efficient for the screening of polymyxin-resistant isolates once an inappropriate sensitivity is achieved. The results presented here show the need for confirmation of the susceptibility profile by use of a dilution method (Etest or BMD).

  19. A 3D Freehand Ultrasound System for Multi-view Reconstructions from Sparse 2D Scanning Planes

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background A significant limitation of existing 3D ultrasound systems comes from the fact that the majority of them work with fixed acquisition geometries. As a result, the users have very limited control over the geometry of the 2D scanning planes. Methods We present a low-cost and flexible ultrasound imaging system that integrates several image processing components to allow for 3D reconstructions from limited numbers of 2D image planes and multiple acoustic views. Our approach is based on a 3D freehand ultrasound system that allows users to control the 2D acquisition imaging using conventional 2D probes. For reliable performance, we develop new methods for image segmentation and robust multi-view registration. We first present a new hybrid geometric level-set approach that provides reliable segmentation performance with relatively simple initializations and minimum edge leakage. Optimization of the segmentation model parameters and its effect on performance is carefully discussed. Second, using the segmented images, a new coarse to fine automatic multi-view registration method is introduced. The approach uses a 3D Hotelling transform to initialize an optimization search. Then, the fine scale feature-based registration is performed using a robust, non-linear least squares algorithm. The robustness of the multi-view registration system allows for accurate 3D reconstructions from sparse 2D image planes. Results Volume measurements from multi-view 3D reconstructions are found to be consistently and significantly more accurate than measurements from single view reconstructions. The volume error of multi-view reconstruction is measured to be less than 5% of the true volume. We show that volume reconstruction accuracy is a function of the total number of 2D image planes and the number of views for calibrated phantom. In clinical in-vivo cardiac experiments, we show that volume estimates of the left ventricle from multi-view reconstructions are found to be in better

  20. Head CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    Brain CT; Cranial CT; CT scan - skull; CT scan - head; CT scan - orbits; CT scan - sinuses; Computed tomography - cranial; CAT scan - brain ... conditions: Birth (congenital) defect of the head or brain Brain infection Brain tumor Buildup of fluid inside ...