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Sample records for acousto-ultrasonic stress wave

  1. Local interaction modeling for acousto-ultrasonic wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, B. C.; Staszewski, Wieslaw J.

    2002-07-01

    Damage detection in metallic structures has been the subject of many investigations. Recent developments have shown applications of acousto-ultrasonic and Lamb wave testing. Lamb wave inspection is based on theory of longitudinal waves propagating in plates. In general, the principles of acousto-ultrasonic and Lamb wave inspection techniques are similar. Damage in a structure is identified by a change in the output signal. Previous studies show that even simple input signals can lead to complex output waves, which are difficult to interpret. It is clear that knowledge and understanding of wave propagation in analyzed structures can ease the interpretation of damage detection results. The paper reports an application of local interaction modeling of acousto-ultrasonic waves in metallic structures. The focus of the analysis is on one-dimensional interactions between different material boundaries. This includes modeling of acousto-ultrasonic waves in piezoceramic, adhesive glue and copper in an actuator/sensor configuration. The study also involves experimental validation of the simulation results. The method shows the potential for modeling of acousto-ultrasonic waves in complex media for damage detection applications.

  2. Acousto-ultrasonics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vary, Alex

    1990-01-01

    The theoretical development, methodology, and potential applications of acousto-ultrasonic nondestructive testing are set forth in an overview to assess the effectiveness of the technique. Stochastic wave propagation is utilized to isolate and describe defects in fiber-reinforced composites, particularly emphasizing the integrated effects of diffuse populations of subcritical flaws. The generation and nature of acousto-ultrasonic signals are described in detail, and stress-wave factor analysis of the signals is discussed. Applications of acousto-ultrasonics are listed including the prediction of failure sites, assessing fatique and impact damage, calculating ultimate tensile strength, and determining interlaminar bond strength. The method can identify subtle but important variations in fiber-reinforced composites, and development of the related instrumentation technology is emphasized.

  3. The acousto-ultrasonic approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vary, Alex

    1987-01-01

    The nature and underlying rationale of the acousto-ultrasonic approach is reviewed, needed advanced signal analysis and evaluation methods suggested, and application potentials discussed. Acousto-ultrasonics is an NDE technique combining aspects of acoustic emission methodology with ultrasonic simulation of stress waves. This approach uses analysis of simulated stress waves for detecting and mapping variations of mechanical properties. Unlike most NDE, acousto-ultrasonics is less concerned with flaw detection than with the assessment of the collective effects of various flaws and material anomalies. Acousto-ultrasonics has been applied chiefly to laminated and filament-wound fiber reinforced composites. It has been used to assess the significant strength and toughness reducing effects that can be wrought by combinations of essentially minor flaws and diffuse flaw populations. Acousto-ultrasonics assesses integrated defect states and the resultant variations in properties such as tensile, shear, and flexural strengths and fracture resistance. Matrix cure state, porosity, fiber orientation, fiber volume fraction, fiber-matrix bonding, and interlaminar bond quality are underlying factors.

  4. Review of acousto-ultrasonic NDE for composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vary, Alex; Kautz, Harold

    1990-01-01

    Acousto-ultrasonics utilizes simulated stress waves to detect and quantify defect states, damage conditions, and variations of mechanical properties in fiber reinforced composites. The term acousto-ultrasonics denotes a combination of aspects of acoustic emission methodology with ultrasonic materials characterization. The acousto-ultrasonic approach was developed to deal primarily with evaluation of the integrated effect of minor flaws and diffuse flaw populations of subcritical flaws in composite and bonded structures. These factors singly and collectively also influence acousto-ultrasonic measurements that, in turn, correlate with dynamic response and mechanical property variations. Since it was first introduced, the acousto-ultrasonic approach was successfully applied to a variety of materials, including polymeric, metallic, and ceramic matrix composites; adhesively bonded materials; paper and wood products; cable and rope; and also human bone. Examples of applications and limitations of the approach are reviewed. Basic methods and guidelines are discussed. The underlying hypothesis and theory development needs are indicated.

  5. Detecting Lamb waves with broad-band acousto-ultrasonic signals in composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kautz, Harold E.

    1992-01-01

    Lamb waves can be produced and detected in ceramic matrix composites (CMC) and metal matrix composites (MMC) plates using the acousto-ultrasonic configuration employing broadband transducers. Experimental dispersion curves of lowest symmetric and antisymmetric modes behave in a manner analogous to the graphite/polymer theoretical curves. In this study a basis has been established for analyzing Lamb wave velocities for characterizing composite plates. Lamb wave dispersion curves and group velocities were correlated with variations in axial stiffness and shear stiffness in MMC and CMC. For CMC, interfacial shear strength was also correlated with the first antisymmetric Lamb mode.

  6. Acousto-ultrasonic input-output characterization of unidirectional fiber composite plate by SH waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, James H., Jr.; Liao, Peter

    1987-01-01

    A unidirectional fiberglass epoxy composite plate specimen is modelled as a homogeneous transversely isotropic continuum plate medium. Acousto-ultrasonic non-contact input-output characterization by tracing SH waves in the continuum is studied theoretically with a transmitting and receiving transducer located on the same face of the plate. It is found that the directional dependence of the phase velocity of the SH waves travelling in the transversely isotropic medium has a significant effect on the delay time as opposed to the phase velocity of the SH wave travelling in an isotropic medium.

  7. Acousto-ultrasonic input-output characterization of unidirectional fiber composite plate by SV waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liao, Peter; Williams, James H., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    A unidirectional fiberglass epoxy compostie specimen is modelled as a homogeneous transversely isotropic continuum plate medium. Acousto-ultrasonic noncontact input-output characterization is studied theoretically with a transmitting and a receiving transducer located on the same face of the plate. The single reflection problem for an incident SV wave at a plane boundary in transversely isotropic medium is analyzed. An obliquely incident SV wave results in a reflected SV wave and a reflected P wave for an angle of incidence of the incident SV wave less than the critical angle. Otherwise, there exists only an SV wave in the medium as the reflected P wave degenerates into a surface wave travelling parallel to the plane boundary. The amplitude ratio of the reflected SV wave is -1 when the angle of incidence is greater than or = the critical angle. The directional dependence of the phase velocity of the SV wave propagating in the transversely isotropic medium has a significant effect on the delay time, as opposed to the directional independence of the phase velocity of a shear wave propagating in an isotropic medium. The displacements associated with the SV wave in the plate and which may be detected by the noncontact receiving transducer are approximated by an asymptotic solution for an infinite transversely isotropic medium subjected to a harmonic point load.

  8. Quality Evaluation By Acousto-Ultrasonic Testing Of Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vary, Alex

    1989-01-01

    Promising nondestructive-testing method based on ultrasonic simulation of stress waves. Report reviews acousto-ultrasonic technology for nondestructive testing. Discusses principles, suggests advanced signal-analysis schemes for development, and presents potential applications. Acousto-ultrasonics applied principally to assess defects in laminated and filament-wound fiber-reinforced composite materials. Technique used to determine variations in such properties as tensile, shear, and flexural strengths and reductions in strength and toughness caused by defects. Also used to evaluate states of cure, porosities, orientation of fibers, volume fractions of fibers, bonding between fibers and matrices, and qualities of interlaminar bonds.

  9. Classification of Low Velocity Impactors Using Spiral Sensing of Acousto-Ultrasonic Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agbasi, Chijioke Raphael

    The non-linear elastodynamics of a flat plate subjected to low velocity foreign body impacts is studied, resembling the space debris impacts on the space structure. The work is based on a central hypothesis that in addition to identifying the impact locations, the material properties of the foreign objects can also be classified using acousto-ultrasonic signals (AUS). Simultaneous localization of impact point and classification of impact object is quite challenging using existing state-of-the-art structural health monitoring (SHM) approaches. Available techniques seek to report the exact location of impact on the structure, however, the reported information is likely to have errors from nonlinearity and variability in the AUS signals due to materials, geometry, boundary conditions, wave dispersion, environmental conditions, sensor and hardware calibration etc. It is found that the frequency and speed of the guided wave generated in the plate can be quantized based on the impactor's relationship with the plate (i.e. the wave speed and the impactor's mechanical properties are coupled). In this work, in order to characterize the impact location and mechanical properties of imapctors, nonlinear transient phenomenon is empirically studied to decouple the understanding using the dominant frequency band (DFB) and Lag Index (LI) of the acousto-ultrasonic signals. Next the understanding was correlated with the elastic modulus of the impactor to predict transmitted force histories. The proposed method presented in this thesis is especially applicable for SHM where sensors cannot be widely or randomly distributed. Thus a strategic organization and localization of the sensors is achieved by implementing the geometric configuration of Theodorous Spiral Sensor Cluster (TSSC). The performance of TSSC in characterizing the impactor types are compared with other conventional sensor clusters (e.g. square, circular, random etc.) and it is shown that the TSSC is advantageous over

  10. Acousto-ultrasonic characterization of fiber reinforced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vary, A.

    1981-01-01

    The acousto-ultrasonic technique combines advantageous aspects of acoustic emission and ultrasonic methodologies. Acousto-ultrasonics operates by introducing a repeating series of ultrasonic pulses into a material. The waves introduced simulate the spontaneous stress waves that would arise if the material were put under stress as in the case of acoustic emission measurements. These benign stress waves are detected by an acoustic emission sensor. The physical arrangement of the ultrasonic (input) transducer and acoustic emission (output) sensor is such that the resultant waveform carries an imprint of morphological factors that govern or contribute to material performance. The output waveform is complex, but it can be quantitized in terms of a 'stress wave factor.' The stress wave factor, which can be defined in a number of ways, is a relative measure of the efficiency of energy dissipation in a material. If flaws or other material anomalies exist in the volume being examined, their combined effect appears in the stress wave factor.

  11. Transply crack density detection by acousto-ultrasonics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemann, John H.; Bowles, Kenneth J.; Kautz, Harold; Cavano, Paul

    1987-01-01

    The acousto-ultrasonic method was applied to a PMR-15 8-harness, satin Celion 3000 fabric composite to determine the extent of transply cracking. A six-ply 0/90 laminate was also subjected to mechanical loading, which induced transply cracking. The stress wave factor (SWF) is defined as the energy contained in the received signal from a 2.25-MHz center frequency transducer. The correlation of the SWF with transply crack density is shown.

  12. Acousto-ultrasonic evaluation of ceramic matrix composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dosreis, Henrique L. M.

    1991-01-01

    Acousto-ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation of ceramic composite specimens with a lithium-alumino-silicate glass matrix reinforced with unidirectional silicon carbide (NICALON) fibers was conducted to evaluate their reserve of strength. Ceramic composite specimens with different amount of damage were prepared by four-point cyclic fatigue loading of the specimens at 500 C for a different number of cycles. The reserve of strength of the specimens was measured as the maximum bending stress recorded during four-pointed bending test with the load monotonically increased until failure occurs. It was observed that the reserve of strength did not correlate with the number of fatigue cycles. However, it was also observed that higher values of the stress wave factor measurements correspond to higher values of the reserve of strength test data. Therefore, these results show that the acousto-ultrasonic approach has the potential of being used to monitor damage and to estimate the reserve of strength of ceramic composites.

  13. Acousto-ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation of materials using laser beam generation and detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, Robert D.; Green, Robert E., Jr.

    The acousto-ultrasonic method has proven to be a most interesting technique for nondestructive evaluation of the mechanical properties of a variety of materials. Use of the technique or a modification thereof, has led to correlation of the associated stress wave factor with mechanical properties of both metals and composite materials. The method is applied to the nondestructive evaluation of selected fiber reinforced structural composites. For the first time, conventional piezoelectric transducers were replaced with laser beam ultrasonic generators and detectors. This modification permitted true non-contact acousto-ultrasonic measurements to be made, which yielded new information about the basic mechanisms involved as well as proved the feasibility of making such non-contact measurements on terrestrial and space structures and heat engine components. A state-of-the-art laser based acousto-ultrasonic system, incorporating a compact pulsed laser and a fiber-optic heterodyne interferometer, was delivered to the NASA Lewis Research Center.

  14. Nondestructive evaluation by acousto-ultrasonics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kautz, Harold E.

    1988-01-01

    Acousto-ultrasonics is an ultrasonic technique that was originally devised to cope with the particular problems associated with nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of fiber/polymer composite structures. The fiber/polymer composites are more attenuating to ultrasound than any other material presently of interest. This limits the applicability of high-frequency ultrasonics. A common use of ultrasound is the imaging of flaws internal to a structure by scattering from the interface with the flaw. However, structural features of composites can scatter ultrasound internally, thus obscuring the flaws. A need relative to composites is to be able to nondestructively measure the strength of laminar boundaries in order to assess the integrity of a structure. Acousto-ultrasonics has exhibited the ability to use the internal scattering to provide information for determining the strength of laminar boundaries. Analysis of acousto-ultrasonic signals by the wave ray paths that compose it leads to waveform partitioning that enhances the sensitivity to mechanical strength parameters.

  15. Determination of plate wave velocities and diffuse field decay rates with braod-band acousto-ultrasonic signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kautz, Harold E.

    1993-01-01

    Lowest symmetric and lowest antisymmetric plate wave modes were excited and identified in broad-band acousto-ultrasonic (AU) signals collected from various high temperature composite materials. Group velocities have been determined for these nearly nondispersive modes. An algorithm has been developed and applied to determine phase velocities and hence dispersion curves for the frequency ranges of the broad-band pulses. It is demonstrated that these data are sensitive to changes in the various stiffness moduli of the materials, in agreement by analogy, with the theoretical and experimental results of Tang and Henneke on fiber reinforced polymers. Diffuse field decay rates have been determined in the same specimen geometries and AU configuration as for the plate wave measurements. These decay rates are of value in assessing degradation such as matrix cracking in ceramic matrix composites. In addition, we verify that diffuse field decay rates respond to fiber/matrix interfacial shear strength and density in ceramic matrix composites. This work shows that velocity/stiffness and decay rate measurements can be obtained in the same set of AU experiments for characterizing materials and in specimens with geometries useful for mechanical measurements.

  16. Acousto-ultrasonics - Retrospective exhortation with bibliography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vary, Alex

    1991-01-01

    Major research on the acousto-ultrasonic (AU) technique (also known as the stress-wave-factor technique) encompassing aspects of acoustic emission and ultrasonic materials characterization methodology is reviewed. AU deals primarily with such factors as the assessment of the integrated effects of diffuse defect states, thermomechanical degradation, and population of subcritical flaws that influence AU measurements correlating with mechanical property variations. AU is used to evaluate fiber-reinforced composites, adhesive bonds, lumber, paper and wood products, cable and rope, and human bone. The AU technique has been demonstrated to be sensitive to interlaminar and adhesive bond strength variations and has been shown to be useful in assessing microporosity and microcracking produced by fatigue cycling. An extensive bibliography ranging from 1985 to 1991 is presented.

  17. Acousto-ultrasonic input-output characterization of unidirectional fiber composite plate by P waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liao, Peter; Williams, James H., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The single reflection problem for an incident P wave at a stress free plane boundary in a semi-infinite transversely isotropic medium whose isotropic plane is parallel to the plane boundary is analyzed. It is found that an obliquely incident P wave results in a reflected P wave and a reflected SV wave. The delay time for propagation between the transmitting and the receiving transducers is computed as if the P waves were propagating in an infinite half space. The displacements associated with the P waves in the plate and which may be detected by a noncontact NDE receiving transducer are approximated by an asymptotic solution for an infinite transversely isotropic medium subjected to a harmonic point load.

  18. Acousto-ultrasonics - An update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vary, Alex

    1989-01-01

    The application possibilities and limitations of acoustoultrasonics are reviewed. One of the most useful aspects of acousto-ultrasonics is its ability to assess degradation and damage states in composites. The sensitivity of the acousto-ultrasonic approach for detecting and measuring subtle but significant material property variations in composites has been demonstrated.

  19. Acousto-ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation of materials using laser beam generation and detection. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huber, Robert D.; Green, Robert E., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    The acousto-ultrasonic method has proven to be a most interesting technique for nondestructive evaluation of the mechanical properties of a variety of materials. Use of the technique or a modification thereof, has led to correlation of the associated stress wave factor with mechanical properties of both metals and composite materials. The method is applied to the nondestructive evaluation of selected fiber reinforced structural composites. For the first time, conventional piezoelectric transducers were replaced with laser beam ultrasonic generators and detectors. This modification permitted true non-contact acousto-ultrasonic measurements to be made, which yielded new information about the basic mechanisms involved as well as proved the feasibility of making such non-contact measurements on terrestrial and space structures and heat engine components. A state-of-the-art laser based acousto-ultrasonic system, incorporating a compact pulsed laser and a fiber-optic heterodyne interferometer, was delivered to the NASA Lewis Research Center.

  20. High-Performance Scanning Acousto-Ultrasonic System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, Don; Martin, Richard; Kautz, Harold; Cosgriff, Laura; Gyekenyesi, Andrew

    2006-01-01

    A high-performance scanning acousto-ultrasonic system, now undergoing development, is designed to afford enhanced capabilities for imaging microstructural features, including flaws, inside plate specimens of materials. The system is expected to be especially helpful in analyzing defects that contribute to failures in polymer- and ceramic-matrix composite materials, which are difficult to characterize by conventional scanning ultrasonic techniques and other conventional nondestructive testing techniques. Selected aspects of the acousto-ultrasonic method have been described in several NASA Tech Briefs articles in recent years. Summarizing briefly: The acousto-ultrasonic method involves the use of an apparatus like the one depicted in the figure (or an apparatus of similar functionality). Pulses are excited at one location on a surface of a plate specimen by use of a broadband transmitting ultrasonic transducer. The stress waves associated with these pulses propagate along the specimen to a receiving transducer at a different location on the same surface. Along the way, the stress waves interact with the microstructure and flaws present between the transducers. The received signal is analyzed to evaluate the microstructure and flaws. The specific variant of the acousto-ultrasonic method implemented in the present developmental system goes beyond the basic principle described above to include the following major additional features: Computer-controlled motorized translation stages are used to automatically position the transducers at specified locations. Scanning is performed in the sense that the measurement, data-acquisition, and data-analysis processes are repeated at different specified transducer locations in an array that spans the specimen surface (or a specified portion of the surface). A pneumatic actuator with a load cell is used to apply a controlled contact force. In analyzing the measurement data for each pair of transducer locations in the scan, the total

  1. Acousto-ultrasonic verification of the strength of filament wound composite material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kautz, H. E.

    1986-01-01

    The concept of acousto-ultrasonic (AU) waveform partitioning was applied to nondestructive evaluation of mechanical properties in filament wound composites (FWC). A series of FWC test specimens were subjected to AU analysis and the results were compared with destructively measured interlaminar shear strengths (ISS). AU stress-wave factor (SWF) measurements gave greater than 90 percent correlation coefficient upon regression against the ISS. This high correlation was achieved by employing the appropriate time and frequency domain partitioning as dictated by wave propagation path analysis. There is indication that different SWF frequency partitions are sensitive to ISS at different depths below the surface.

  2. Noncontact Acousto-Ultrasonics for Material Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kautz, Harold E.

    1998-01-01

    A NdYAG 1064 nm, laser pulse was employed to produce ultrasonic waves in specimens of SiC/SiC and SiC/Ti 6-4 composites which are high temperature materials of interest for aerospace applications. Air coupled transducers were used to detect and collect the signals used for acousto-ultrasonic analysis. Conditions for detecting ultrasonic decay signals were examined. The results were compared to those determined on the same specimens with contact coupling. Some non-contact measurements were made employing conventional air focused detectors. Others were performed with a more novel micromachined capacitance transducer. Concerns of the laser-in technology include potential destructiveness of the laser pulse. Repeated laser pulsing at the same location does lead to deterioration of the ultrasonic signal in some materials, but seems to recover with time. Also, unlike contact AU, the frequency regime employed is a function of laser-material interaction rather than the choice of transducers. Concerns of the air coupled-out technology include the effect of air attenuation. This imposes a practical upper limit to frequency of detection. In the case of the experimental specimens studied ultrasonic decay signals could be imaged satisfactorily.

  3. An acoustic emission and acousto-ultrasonic analysis of impact damaged composite pressure vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, Gary L. (Principal Investigator); Walker, James L.

    1996-01-01

    The use of acoustic emission to characterize impact damage in composite structures is being performed on composite bottles wrapped with graphite epoxy and kevlar bottles. Further development of the acoustic emission methodology will include neural net analysis and/or other multivariate techniques to enhance the capability of the technique to identify dominant failure mechanisms during fracture. The acousto-ultrasonics technique will also continue to be investigated to determine its ability to predict regions prone to failure prior to the burst tests. Characterization of the stress wave factor before, and after impact damage will be useful for inspection purposes in manufacturing processes. The combination of the two methods will also allow for simple nondestructive tests capable of predicting the performance of a composite structure prior to its being placed in service and during service.

  4. Acousto-Ultrasonic analysis of failure in ceramic matrix composite tensile specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kautz, Harold E.; Chulya, Abhisak

    1993-01-01

    Three types of acousto-ultrasonic (AU) measurements, stress-wave factor (SWF), lowest antisymmetric plate mode group velocity (VS), and lowest symmetric plate mode group velocity (VL), were performed on specimens before and after tensile failure. Three different Nicalon fiber architectures with ceramic matrices were tested. These composites were categorized as 1D (unidirectional fiber orientation) SiC/CAS glass ceramic, and 2D and 3D woven SiC/SiC ceramic matrix materials. SWF was found to be degraded after tensile failure in all three material categories. VS was found to be degraded only in the 1D SiC/CAS. VL was difficult to determine on the irregular specimen surfaces but appeared unchanged on all failed specimens. 3D woven specimens with heat-treatment at high temperature exhibited degradation only in SWF.

  5. Acousto-ultrasonics-based fatigue damage characterization: Linear versus nonlinear signal features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Zhongqing; Zhou, Chao; Hong, Ming; Cheng, Li; Wang, Qiang; Qing, Xinlin

    2014-03-01

    Engineering structures are prone to fatigue damage over service lifespan, entailing early detection and continuous monitoring of the fatigue damage from its initiation through growth. A hybrid approach for characterizing fatigue damage was developed, using two genres of damage indices constructed based on the linear and the nonlinear features of acousto-ultrasonic waves. The feasibility, precision and practicability of using linear and nonlinear signal features, for quantitatively evaluating multiple barely visible fatigue cracks in a metallic structure, was compared. Miniaturized piezoelectric elements were networked to actively generate and acquire acousto-ultrasonic waves. The active sensing, in conjunction with a diagnostic imaging algorithm, enabled quantitative evaluation of fatigue damage and facilitated embeddable health monitoring. Results unveiled that the nonlinear features of acousto-ultrasonic waves outperform their linear counterparts in terms of the detectability. Despite the deficiency in perceiving small-scale damage and the possibility of conveying false alarms, linear features show advantages in noise tolerance and therefore superior practicability. The comparison has consequently motivated an amalgamation of linear and nonlinear features of acousto-ultrasonic waves, targeting the prediction of multi-scale damage ranging from microscopic fatigue cracks to macroscopic gross damage.

  6. A study of the stress wave factor technique for evaluation of composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duke, J. C., Jr.; Henneke, E. G., II; Kiernan, M. T.; Grosskopf, P. P.

    1989-01-01

    The acousto-ultrasonic approach for nondestructive evaluation provides a measurement procedure for quantifying the integrated effect of globally distributed damage characteristic of fiber reinforced composite materials. The evaluation procedure provides a stress wave factor that correlates closely with several material performance parameters. The procedure was investigated for a variety of materials including advanced composites, hybrid structure bonds, adhesive bonds, wood products, and wire rope. The research program focused primarily on development of fundamental understanding and applications advancements of acousto-ultrasonics for materials characterization. This involves characterization of materials for which detection, location, and identification of imperfections cannot at present be analyzed satisfactorily with mechanical performance prediction models. In addition to presenting definitive studies on application potentials, the understanding of the acousto-ultrasonic method as applied to advanced composites is reviewed.

  7. Damage detection by Acousto-Ultrasonic Location (AUL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marioli-Riga, Z. P.; Karanika, A. N.; Philippidis, T. P.; Paipetis, S. A.

    1992-12-01

    Damage detection in aircraft structures in-situ is important, especially with not visible defects in composite components for a variety of reasons. In the present paper a new technique based on the Acousto-Ultrasonic (AU) concept is introduced, but instead of extracting information from the externally generated pulsed wave, as with AU, the characteristics of waves reflected from defects are measured. In this way it was possible to identify and locate defected areas in honeycomb panels and thermoplastic carbon fiber laminates. The results were correlated with ultrasonic C-scans, and satisfactory agreement was obtained. The present is part of a major project aiming at the development of a fast inspection method for aircraft components during routine maintenance cycles.

  8. Acousto-ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation of materials using laser beam generation and detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huber, Robert D.; Green, Robert E., Jr.; Vary, Alex; Kautz, Harold

    1990-01-01

    Presented in viewgraph format, the possibility of using laser generation and detection of ultrasound to replace piezoelectric transducers for the acousto-ultrasonic technique is advanced. The advantages and disadvantages of laser acousto-ultrasonics are outlined. Laser acousto-ultrasonics complements standard piezoelectric acousto-ultrasonics and offers non-contact nondestructive evaluation.

  9. Acousto-ultrasonics to Assess Material and Structural Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kautz, Harold E.

    2002-01-01

    This report was created to serve as a manual for applying the Acousto-Ultrasonic NDE method, as practiced at NASA Glenn, to the study of materials and structures for a wide range of applications. Three state of the art acousto-ultrasonic (A-U) analysis parameters, ultrasonic decay (UD) rate, mean time (or skewing factor, "s"), and the centroid of the power spectrum, "f(sub c)," have been studied and applied at GRC for NDE interrogation of various materials and structures of aerospace interest. In addition to this, a unique application of Lamb wave analysis is shown. An appendix gives a brief overview of Lamb Wave analysis. This paper presents the analysis employed to calculate these parameters and the development and reasoning behind their use. It also discusses the planning of A-U measurements for materials and structures to be studied. Types of transducer coupling are discussed including contact and non-contact via laser and air. Experimental planning includes matching transducer frequency range to material and geometry of the specimen to be studied. The effect on results of initially zeroing the DC component of the ultrasonic waveform is compared with not doing so. A wide range of interrogation problems are addressed via the application of these analysis parameters to real specimens is shown for five cases: Case 1: Differences in density in [0] SiC/RBSN ceramic matrix composite. Case 2: Effect of tensile fatigue cycling in [+/-45] SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composite. Case 3: Detecting creep life, and failure, in Udimet 520 Nickel-Based Super Alloy. Case 4: Detecting Surface Layer Formation in T-650-35/PMR-15 Polymer Matrix Composites Panels due to Thermal Aging. Case 5: Detecting Spin Test Degradation in PMC Flywheels. Among these cases a wide range of materials and geometries are studied.

  10. Acousto-Ultrasonics to Assess Material and Structural Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kautz, Harold E.

    2002-10-01

    This report was created to serve as a manual for applying the Acousto-Ultrasonic NDE method, as practiced at NASA Glenn, to the study of materials and structures for a wide range of applications. Three state of the art acousto-ultrasonic (A-U) analysis parameters, ultrasonic decay (UD) rate, mean time (or skewing factor, "s"), and the centroid of the power spectrum, "fc," have been studied and applied at GRC for NDE interrogation of various materials and structures of aerospace interest. In addition to this, a unique application of Lamb wave analysis is shown. An appendix gives a brief overview of Lamb Wave analysis. This paper presents the analysis employed to calculate these parameters and the development and reasoning behind their use. It also discusses the planning of A-U measurements for materials and structures to be studied. Types of transducer coupling are discussed including contact and non-contact via laser and air. Experimental planning includes matching transducer frequency range to material and geometry of the specimen to be studied. The effect on results of initially zeroing the DC component of the ultrasonic waveform is compared with not doing so. A wide range of interrogation problems are addressed via the application of these analysis parameters to real specimens is shown for five cases: Case 1: Differences in density in 0 SiC/RBSN ceramic matrix composite. Case 2: Effect of tensile fatigue cycling in +/-45 SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composite. Case 3: Detecting creep life, and failure, in Udimet 520 Nickel-Based Super Alloy. Case 4: Detecting Surface Layer Formation in T-650-35/PMR-15 Polymer Matrix Composites Panels due to Thermal Aging. Case 5: Detecting Spin Test Degradation in PMC Flywheels. Among these cases a wide range of materials and geometries are studied.

  11. A theoretical basis for the acousto-ultrasonic evaluation of composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiernan, M. T.; Duke, J. C., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    The application of the acousto-ultrasonic (AU) technique to composite laminates involves imparting a mechanical excitation to the surface of a composite plate to create a mechanical disturbance within the material. At the same time, a transducer is used at another location on the same or another surface of the material to sense vibrations (ultrasonic waves) caused by the disturbance. Experimental results are presented and related to concepts of through-thickness-transverse resonance and plate wave theory.

  12. Advanced instrumentation for acousto-ultrasonic based structural health monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smithard, Joel; Galea, Steve; van der Velden, Stephen; Powlesland, Ian; Jung, George; Rajic, Nik

    2016-04-01

    Structural health monitoring (SHM) systems using structurally-integrated sensors potentially allow the ability to inspect for damage in aircraft structures on-demand and could provide a basis for the development of condition-based maintenance approaches for airframes. These systems potentially offer both substantial cost savings and performance improvements over conventional nondestructive inspection (NDI). Acousto-ultrasonics (AU), using structurallyintegrated piezoelectric transducers, offers a promising basis for broad-field damage detection in aircraft structures. For these systems to be successfully applied in the field the hardware for AU excitation and interrogation needs to be easy to use, compact, portable, light and, electrically and mechanically robust. Highly flexible and inexpensive instrumentation for basic background laboratory investigations is also required to allow researchers to tackle the numerous scientific and engineering issues associated with AU based SHM. The Australian Defence Science and Technology Group (DST Group) has developed the Acousto Ultrasonic Structural health monitoring Array Module (AUSAM+), a compact device for AU excitation and interrogation. The module, which has the footprint of a typical current generation smart phone, provides autonomous control of four send and receive piezoelectric elements, which can operate in pitch-catch or pulse-echo modes and can undertake electro-mechanical impedance measurements for transducer and structural diagnostics. Modules are designed to operate synchronously with other units, via an optical link, to accommodate larger transducer arrays. The module also caters for fibre optic sensing of acoustic waves with four intensity-based optical inputs. Temperature and electrical resistance strain gauge inputs as well as external triggering functionality are also provided. The development of a Matlab hardware object allows users to easily access the full hardware functionality of the device and

  13. Ultrasonic stress wave characterization of composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duke, J. C., Jr.; Henneke, E. G., II; Stinchcomb, W. W.

    1986-01-01

    The work reported covers three simultaneous projects. The first project was concerned with: (1) establishing the sensitivity of the acousto-ultrasonic method for evaluating subtle forms of damage development in cyclically loaded composite materials, (2) establishing the ability of the acousto-ultrasonic method for detecting initial material imperfections that lead to localized damage growth and final specimen failure, and (3) characteristics of the NBS/Proctor sensor/receiver for acousto-ultrasonic evaluation of laminated composite materials. The second project was concerned with examining the nature of the wave propagation that occurs during acoustic-ultrasonic evaluation of composite laminates and demonstrating the role of Lamb or plate wave modes and their utilization for characterizing composite laminates. The third project was concerned with the replacement of contact-type receiving piezotransducers with noncontacting laser-optical sensors for acousto-ultrasonic signal acquisition.

  14. An Acoustic Emission and Acousto-Ultrasonic Analysis of Impact Damaged Composite Pressure Vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, James L.; Workman, Gary L.; Workman, Gary L.

    1996-01-01

    high as 50% were produced. An acousto-ultrasonic robotic evaluation system (AURES) was developed for mapping the effects of damage on filament wound pressure vessels prior to hydroproof testing. The AURES injects a single broadband ultrasonic pulse into each vessel at preprogrammed positions and records the effects of the interaction of that pulse on the material volume with a broadband receiver. A stress wave factor in the form of the energy associated with the 750 to 1000 kHz and 1000 to 1250 kHz frequency bands were used to map the potential failure sites for each vessel. The energy map associated with the graphite/epoxy vessels was found to decrease in the region of the impact damage. The kevlar vessels showed the opposite trend, with the energy values increasing around the damage/failure sites.

  15. The Influence of Finite-size Sources in Acousto-ultrasonics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pavlakovic, Brian N.; Rose, Joseph L.

    1994-01-01

    This work explores the effects that the finite normal axisymmetric traction loading of an infinite isotropic plate has on wave propagation in acousto-ultrasonics (AU), in which guided waves are created using two normal incidence transducers. Although the work also addresses the effects of the transducer pressure distribution and pulse shape, this thesis concentrates on two main questions: how does the transducer's diameter control the phase velocity and frequency spectrum of the response, and how does the plate thickness relate to the plate's excitability? The mathematics of the time-harmonic solution and the physical principles and the practical considerations for AU wave generation are explained. Transient sources are modeled by the linear superposition of the time-harmonic solutions found using the Hankel transform and they are then compared to experimental data to provide insight into the relation between the size of the transducer and the preferred phase velocity.

  16. Acousto-ultrasonic decay in metal matrix composite panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kautz, Harold E.

    1995-01-01

    Acousto-ultrasonic (A-U) decay rates (UD) were measured in metal matrix composite (MMC) panels. The MMC panels had fiber architectures and cross-sectional thicknesses corresponding to those designed for aerospace turbine engine structures. The wavelength-to-thickness ratio produced by the combination of experimental frequency setting conditions and specimen geometry was found to be a key parameter for identifying optimum conditions for UD measurements. The ratio was shown to be a useful rule of thumb when applied to ceramic matrix composites (CMC)s and monolithic thermo-plastics.

  17. Nondestructive Evaluation of Adhesively Bonded Joints by Acousto-Ultrasonic Technique and Acoustic Emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nayeb-Hashemi, Hamid; Rossettos, J. N.

    1997-01-01

    Reliable applications of adhesively bonded joints require an effective nondestructive evaluation technique for their bond strength prediction. To properly evaluate factors affecting bond strength, effects of defects such as voids and disbonds on stress distribution in the overlap region must be understood. At the same time, in order to use acousto-ultrasonic (AU) technique to evaluate bond quality, the effect of these defects on dynamic response of single lap joints must be clear. The stress distribution in a single lap joint with and without defects (void or disbond) is analyzed. A bar-Theta parameter which contains adherend and adhesive thickness and properties is introduced. It is shown for bonded joints with bar-Theta greater than 10, that a symmetric void or disbond in the middle of overlap up to the 70 percent of overlap length has negligible effect on bond strength. In contrast frequency response analyses by a finite element technique showed that the dynamic response is affected significantly by the presence of voids or disbonds. These results have direct implication in the interpretations of AU results. Through transmission attenuation and a number of AU parameters for various specimens with and without defects are evaluated. It is found that although void and disbond have similar effects on bond strength (stress distribution), they have completely different effects on wave propagation characteristics. For steel-adhesive-steel specimens with voids, the attenuation changes are related to the bond strength. However, the attenuation changes for specimens with disbond are fairly constant over a disbond range. In order to incorporate the location of defects in AU parameters, a weighting function is introduced. Using an immersion system with focused transducers, a number of AU parameters are evaluated. It is found that by incorporating weighting functions in these parameters better sensitivities (AU parameters vs. bond strength) are achieved. Acoustic emission

  18. Multivariate data-driven modelling and pattern recognition for damage detection and identification for acoustic emission and acousto-ultrasonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres-Arredondo, M.-A.; Tibaduiza, D.-A.; McGugan, M.; Toftegaard, H.; Borum, K.-K.; Mujica, L. E.; Rodellar, J.; Fritzen, C.-P.

    2013-10-01

    Different methods are commonly used for non-destructive testing in structures; among others, acoustic emission and ultrasonic inspections are widely used to assess structures. The research presented in this paper is motivated by the need to improve the inspection capabilities and reliability of structural health monitoring (SHM) systems based on ultrasonic guided waves with focus on the acoustic emission and acousto-ultrasonics techniques. The use of a guided wave based approach is driven by the fact that these waves are able to propagate over relatively long distances, and interact sensitively and uniquely with different types of defect. Special attention is paid here to the development of efficient SHM methodologies. This requires robust signal processing techniques for the correct interpretation of the complex ultrasonic waves. Therefore, a variety of existing algorithms for signal processing and pattern recognition are evaluated and integrated into the different proposed methodologies. As a contribution to solve the problem, this paper presents results in damage detection and classification using a methodology based on hierarchical nonlinear principal component analysis, square prediction measurements and self-organizing maps, which are applied to data from acoustic emission tests and acousto-ultrasonic inspections. At the end, the efficiency of these methodologies is experimentally evaluated in diverse anisotropic composite structures.

  19. Acousto-ultrasonics as a monitor of material anisotropy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duke, J. C., Jr.; Kiernan, M. T.

    1988-01-01

    This paper discusses experimental results obtained by performing the acousto-ultrasonic (AU) method at various azimuthal angles on the surface of fiber-reinforced composite plates. The use of an IBM-PC/data-acquisition board to obtain a digitized AU signal to be analyzed by specially developed software is described. An introduction is given to the use of AU parameters to quantify information evidenced in amplitude/frequency plots. A description of how the parameters are obtained by calculating various spectral moments and the area under particular ranges of the spectral density curve is presented. Results are given from voltage/time plots, amplitude/frequency plots, and plots showing the variation of calculated AU parameters with azimuthal angle. Finally, how the variation of AU parameters with azimuthal angle may be related to variation in material properties with azimuthal angle is discussed.

  20. Development of a High Performance Acousto-ultrasonic Scan System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, D. J.; Martin, R. E.; Harmon, L. M.; Gyekenyesi, A. L.; Kautz, H. E.

    2002-01-01

    Acousto-ultrasonic (AU) interrogation is a single-sided nondestructive evaluation (NDE) technique employing separated sending and receiving transducers. It is used for assessing the microstructural condition/distributed damage state of the material between the transducers. AU is complementary to more traditional NDE methods such as ultrasonic c-scan, x-ray radiography, and thermographic inspection that tend to be used primarily for discrete flaw detection. Through its history, AU has been used to inspect polymer matrix composite, metal matrix composite, ceramic matrix composite, and even monolithic metallic materials. The development of a high-performance automated AU scan system for characterizing within-sample microstructural and property homogeneity is currently in a prototype stage at NASA. In this paper, a review of essential AU technology is given. Additionally, the basic hardware and software configuration, and preliminary results with the system, are described.

  1. Experimental Investigation on Acousto-Ultrasonic Sensing Using Polarization-Maintaining Fiber Bragg Gratings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Gang; Banks, Curtis E.

    2015-01-01

    This report discusses the guided Lamb wave sensing using polarization-maintaining (PM) fiber Bragg grating (PM-FBG) sensor. The goal is to apply the PM-FBG sensor system to composite structural health monitoring (SHM) applications in order to realize directivity and multi-axis strain sensing capabilities while using reduced number of sensors. Comprehensive experiments were conducted to evaluate the performance of the PM-FBG sensor in a composite panel structure under different actuation frequencies and locations. Three Macro-Fiber-Composite (MFC) piezoelectric actuators were used to generate guided Lamb waves and they are oriented at 0, 45, and 90 degrees with respect to PM-FBG axial direction, respectively. The actuation frequency was varied from 20kHz to 200kHz. It is shown that the PM-FBG sensor system is able to detect high-speed ultrasound waves and capture the characteristics under different actuation conditions. Both longitudinal and lateral strain components in the order of nano-strain were determined based on the reflective intensity measurement data from fast and slow axis of the PM fiber. It must be emphasized that this is the first attempt to investigate acousto-ultrasonic sensing using PM-FBG sensor. This could lead to a new sensing approach in the SHM applications.

  2. A physical model for the acousto-ultrasonic method. Ph.D. Thesis Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiernan, Michael T.; Duke, John C., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    A basic physical explanation, a model, and comments on NDE application of the acousto-ultrasonic (AU) method for composite materials are presented. The basis of this work is a set of experiments where a sending and a receiving piezoelectric transducer were both oriented normal to the surface, at different points, on aluminum plates, various composite plates, and a tapered aluminum plate. The purpose and basic idea is introduced. Also, general comments on the AU method are offered. A literature review is offered for areas pertinent, such as composite materials, wave propagation, ultrasonics, and the AU. Special emphasis is given to theory which is used later on and past experimental results that are important to the physical understanding of the AU method. The experimental set-up, procedure, and the ensuing analysis are described. The experimental results are presented in both a quantitative and qualitative manner. A physical understanding of experimental results based on elasticity solution is furnished. Modeling and applications of the AU method is discussed for composite material and general conclusions are stated. The physical model of the AU method for composite materials is offered, something which has been much needed and sorely lacking. This physical understanding is possible due to the extensive set of experimental measurements, also reported.

  3. Damage Assessment of Creep Tested and Thermally Aged Udimet 520 Using Acousto-Ultrasonics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gyekenyesi, Andrew L.; Kautz, Harold E.; Cao, Wei

    2001-01-01

    Due to elevated temperatures and excessive stresses, turbine components may experience creep behavior. As a result, it is desirable to monitor and assess the current condition of such components. This study employed the Acousto-Ultrasonics (AU) method in an effort to monitor the state of the material at various percentages of used up creep life in the nickel base alloy, Udimet 520. A stepped specimen (i.e., varying cross sectional area) was employed which allowed for a postmortem nondestructive evaluation (NDE) analysis of the various levels of used up life. The overall objectives here were two fold: First, a user friendly, graphical interface AU system was developed, and second the new AU system was applied as an NDE tool to assess distributed damage resulting from creep. The experimental results demonstrated that the AU method shows promise as an NDE tool capable of detecting material changes as a function of used up creep life. Furthermore, the changes in the AU parameters were mainly attributed to the case of combined load and elevated temperature (i.e., creep) and not simply because of a timed exposure at elevated temperature (i.e., heat treatment or thermal aging).

  4. Real time acousto-ultrasonic NDE technique for monitoring damage in ceramic composites under dynamic loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiwari, Anil

    1995-01-01

    Research effort was directed towards developing a near real-time, acousto-ultrasonic (AU), nondestructive evaluation (NDE) tool to study the failure mechanisms of ceramic composites. Progression of damage is monitored in real-time by observing the changes in the received AU signal during the actual test. During the real-time AU test, the AU signals are generated and received by the AU transducers attached to the specimen while it is being subjected to increasing quasi-static loads or cyclic loads (10 Hz, R = 1.0). The received AU signals for 64 successive pulses were gated in the time domain (T = 40.96 micro sec) and then averaged every second over ten load cycles and stored in a computer file during fatigue tests. These averaged gated signals are representative of the damage state of the specimen at that point of its fatigue life. This is also the first major attempt in the development and application of real-time AU for continuously monitoring damage accumulation during fatigue without interrupting the test. The present work has verified the capability of the AU technique to assess the damage state in silicon carbide/calcium aluminosilicate (SiC/CAS) and silicon carbide/ magnesium aluminosilicate (SiC/MAS) ceramic composites. Continuous monitoring of damage initiation and progression under quasi-static ramp loading in tension to failure of unidirectional and cross-ply SiC/CAS and quasi-isotropic SiC/MAS ceramic composite specimens at room temperature was accomplished using near real-time AU parameters. The AU technique was shown to be able to detect the stress levels for the onset and saturation of matrix cracks, respectively. The critical cracking stress level is used as a design stress for brittle matrix composites operating at elevated temperatures. The AU technique has found that the critical cracking stress level is 10-15% below the level presently obtained for design purposes from analytical models. An acousto-ultrasonic stress-strain response (AUSSR) model

  5. A preliminary investigation of acousto-ultrasonic NDE of metal matrix composite test specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kautz, Harold E.; Lerch, Brad A.

    1991-01-01

    Acousto-ultrasonic (AU) measurements were performed on a series of tensile specimens composed of 8 laminated layers of continuous, SiC fiber reinforced Ti-15-3 matrix. The following subject areas are covered: AU signal analysis; tensile behavior; AU and interrupted tensile tests; AU and thermally cycled specimens; AU and stiffness; and AU and specimen geometry.

  6. High-Performance Acousto-Ultrasonic Scan System Being Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, Don J.; Martin, Richard E.; Cosgriff, Laura M.; Gyekenyesi, Andrew L.; Kautz, Harold E.

    2003-01-01

    Acousto-ultrasonic (AU) interrogation is a single-sided nondestructive evaluation (NDE) technique employing separated sending and receiving transducers. It is used for assessing the microstructural condition and distributed damage state of the material between the transducers. AU is complementary to more traditional NDE methods, such as ultrasonic cscan, x-ray radiography, and thermographic inspection, which tend to be used primarily for discrete flaw detection. Throughout its history, AU has been used to inspect polymer matrix composites, metal matrix composites, ceramic matrix composites, and even monolithic metallic materials. The development of a high-performance automated AU scan system for characterizing within-sample microstructural and property homogeneity is currently in a prototype stage at NASA. This year, essential AU technology was reviewed. In addition, the basic hardware and software configuration for the scanner was developed, and preliminary results with the system were described. Mechanical and environmental loads applied to composite materials can cause distributed damage (as well as discrete defects) that plays a significant role in the degradation of physical properties. Such damage includes fiber/matrix debonding (interface failure), matrix microcracking, and fiber fracture and buckling. Investigations at the NASA Glenn Research Center have shown that traditional NDE scan inspection methods such as ultrasonic c-scan, x-ray imaging, and thermographic imaging tend to be more suited to discrete defect detection rather than the characterization of accumulated distributed microdamage in composites. Since AU is focused on assessing the distributed microdamage state of the material in between the sending and receiving transducers, it has proven to be quite suitable for assessing the relative composite material state. One major success story at Glenn with AU measurements has been the correlation between the ultrasonic decay rate obtained during AU

  7. High-Performance Acousto-Ultrasonic Scan System Being Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, Don J.; Martin, Richard E.; Cosgriff, Laura M.; Gyekenyesi, Andrew L.; Kautz, Harold E.

    2003-01-01

    Acousto-ultrasonic (AU) interrogation is a single-sided nondestructive evaluation (NDE) technique employing separated sending and receiving transducers. It is used for assessing the microstructural condition and distributed damage state of the material between the transducers. AU is complementary to more traditional NDE methods, such as ultrasonic cscan, x-ray radiography, and thermographic inspection, which tend to be used primarily for discrete flaw detection. Throughout its history, AU has been used to inspect polymer matrix composites, metal matrix composites, ceramic matrix composites, and even monolithic metallic materials. The development of a high-performance automated AU scan system for characterizing within-sample microstructural and property homogeneity is currently in a prototype stage at NASA. This year, essential AU technology was reviewed. In addition, the basic hardware and software configuration for the scanner was developed, and preliminary results with the system were described. Mechanical and environmental loads applied to composite materials can cause distributed damage (as well as discrete defects) that plays a significant role in the degradation of physical properties. Such damage includes fiber/matrix debonding (interface failure), matrix microcracking, and fiber fracture and buckling. Investigations at the NASA Glenn Research Center have shown that traditional NDE scan inspection methods such as ultrasonic c-scan, x-ray imaging, and thermographic imaging tend to be more suited to discrete defect detection rather than the characterization of accumulated distributed micro-damage in composites. Since AU is focused on assessing the distributed micro-damage state of the material in between the sending and receiving transducers, it has proven to be quite suitable for assessing the relative composite material state. One major success story at Glenn with AU measurements has been the correlation between the ultrasonic decay rate obtained during AU

  8. Piezoelectric phased array acousto-ultrasonic interrogation of damage in thin plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purekar, Ashish S.

    Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) and Condition Based Maintenance (CBM) systems can provide substantial benefits for aging aerospace systems as well as newer systems still in the design process. In aging aerospace systems, a retrofitted SHM system would alert users of incipient damage preventing catastrophic failure. For newer systems, incorporating a SHM approach and using CBM techniques can reduce life-cycle costs. Central to such SHM and CBM systems is the ability to detect damage in a structure. Traditional approaches to damage detection in structures involve one of two methods. In the modal dynamics approach, the natural frequencies and modeshapes of a structure shift when damage occurs. The location, type, and amount of damage is determined by the shifts in the modal properties due to damage. Alternately, in an Ultrasonics approach, the structure is scanned with a specialized transducer which induces high frequency vibrations in the structure. Damage in the structure is inferred when these vibrations are altered. In the same vein as Ultrasonics, Acoustic Emission based methods listen for energy release in the structure upon defect growth. All of these techniques have limitations which hinder their usage in a practical system. This thesis attempts to develop a methodology with the benefits of the modal approach as well as the Ultrasonics/Acoustic Emission approach. The methodology is commonly referred to as an Acousto-Ultrasonic technique for damage detection. The structural dynamics of plate structures is described as wavelike in nature where the plate is a medium for wave propagation. For thin plates, bulk wave propagation is described using Lamb wave modes. The two fundamental modes of wave propagation are the in-plane acoustic mode and the transverse bending mode. The interaction of these waves with a discontinuity or damaged region changes the way the waves propagate. Part of the incident wavefront is reflected back while the rest is transmitted through

  9. Damage Assessment of Creep Tested and Thermally Aged Metallic Alloys Using Acousto-Ultrasonics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gyekenyesi, Andrew L.; Kautz, Harold E.; Baaklini, George Y.

    2001-01-01

    In recent years emphasis has been placed on the early detection of material changes experienced in turbine powerplant components. During the scheduled overhaul of a turbine, the current techniques of examination of various hot section components aim to find flaws such as cracks, wear, and erosion, as well as excessive deformations. Thus far, these localized damage modes have been detected with satisfactory results. However, the techniques used to find these flaws provide no information on life until the flaws are actually detected. Major improvements in damage assessment, safety, as well as more accurate life prediction could be achieved if nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques could be utilized to sense material changes that occur prior to the localized defects mentioned. Because of elevated temperatures and excessive stresses, turbine components may experience creep behavior. As a result, it is desirable to monitor and access the current condition of such components. Research at the NASA Glenn Research Center involves developing and utilizing an NDE technique that discloses distributed material changes that occur prior to the localized damage detected by the current methods of inspection. In a recent study, creep processes in a nickel-base alloy were the life-limiting condition of interest, and the NDE technique was acousto-ultrasonics (AU). AU is an NDE technique that utilizes two ultrasonic transducers to interrogate the condition of a test specimen. The sending transducer introduces an ultrasonic pulse at a point on the surface of the specimen while a receiving transducer detects the signal after it has passed through the material. The goal of the method is to correlate certain parameters of the detected waveform to characteristics of the material between the two transducers. Here, the waveform parameter of interest is the attenuation due to internal damping for which information is being garnered from the frequency domain. The parameters utilized to

  10. An optimal baseline selection methodology for data-driven damage detection and temperature compensation in acousto-ultrasonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres-Arredondo, M.-A.; Sierra-Pérez, Julián; Cabanes, Guénaël

    2016-05-01

    The process of measuring and analysing the data from a distributed sensor network all over a structural system in order to quantify its condition is known as structural health monitoring (SHM). For the design of a trustworthy health monitoring system, a vast amount of information regarding the inherent physical characteristics of the sources and their propagation and interaction across the structure is crucial. Moreover, any SHM system which is expected to transition to field operation must take into account the influence of environmental and operational changes which cause modifications in the stiffness and damping of the structure and consequently modify its dynamic behaviour. On that account, special attention is paid in this paper to the development of an efficient SHM methodology where robust signal processing and pattern recognition techniques are integrated for the correct interpretation of complex ultrasonic waves within the context of damage detection and identification. The methodology is based on an acousto-ultrasonics technique where the discrete wavelet transform is evaluated for feature extraction and selection, linear principal component analysis for data-driven modelling and self-organising maps for a two-level clustering under the principle of local density. At the end, the methodology is experimentally demonstrated and results show that all the damages were detectable and identifiable.

  11. Real time acousto-ultrasonic NDE technique for monitoring damage in ceramic composites under dynamic loads. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Tiwari, ANIL

    1995-08-01

    Research effort was directed towards developing a near real-time, acousto-ultrasonic (AU), nondestructive evaluation (NDE) tool to study the failure mechanisms of ceramic composites. Progression of damage is monitored in real-time by observing the changes in the received AU signal during the actual test. During the real-time AU test, the AU signals are generated and received by the AU transducers attached to the specimen while it is being subjected to increasing quasi-static loads or cyclic loads (10 Hz, R = 1.0). The received AU signals for 64 successive pulses were gated in the time domain (T = 40.96 micro sec) and then averaged every second over ten load cycles and stored in a computer file during fatigue tests. These averaged gated signals are representative of the damage state of the specimen at that point of its fatigue life. This is also the first major attempt in the development and application of real-time AU for continuously monitoring damage accumulation during fatigue without interrupting the test. The present work has verified the capability of the AU technique to assess the damage state in silicon carbide/calcium aluminosilicate (SiC/CAS) and silicon carbide/ magnesium aluminosilicate (SiC/MAS) ceramic composites. Continuous monitoring of damage initiation and progression under quasi-static ramp loading in tension to failure of unidirectional and cross-ply SiC/CAS and quasi-isotropic SiC/MAS ceramic composite specimens at room temperature was accomplished using near real-time AU parameters. The AU technique was shown to be able to detect the stress levels for the onset and saturation of matrix cracks, respectively. The critical cracking stress level is used as a design stress for brittle matrix composites operating at elevated temperatures. The AU technique has found that the critical cracking stress level is 10-15% below the level presently obtained for design purposes from analytical models.

  12. New acousto-ultrasonic techniques applied to aerospace materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kautz, Harold E.

    1988-01-01

    The use of an NdYAG pulsed laser for generating ultrasonic waves for NDE in resin matrix composites was investigated. A study was conducted of the use of the 1.064 micron wavelength NdYAG pulsed laser with the neat, unreinforced resin as well as graphite fiber/polymer composite specimens. In the case of the neat resins it was found that, at normal incidence, about 25 percent of the laser pulse energy was reflected at the incident surface. An attenuation coefficient for the polyimide resin, PMR-15 was determined to be approximately 5.8 np/cm. It was found in energy balance studies that graphite fiber/polymer specimens attenuate the laser beam more than do neat resins. The increase absorption is in the graphite fibers. The occurrence of laser induced surface damage was also studied. For the polymer neat resin, damage appears as pit formation over a small fraction of the pulse impact area and discoloration over a larger part of the area. A damage threshold was inferred from observed damage as a function of pulse energy. The 600 F cured PMR-15 and PMR-11 exhibit about the same amount of damage for a given laser pulse energy. The damage threshold is between 0.06 and 0.07 J/sq cm.

  13. Application of neural networks in the acousto-ultrasonic evaluation of metal-matrix composite specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cios, Krzysztof J.; Tjia, Robert E.; Vary, Alex; Kautz, Harold E.

    1992-01-01

    Acousto-ultrasonics (AU) is a nondestructive evaluation (NDE) technique that was devised for the testing of various types of composite materials. A study has been done to determine how effectively the AU technique may be applied to metal-matrix composites (MMCs). The authors use the results and data obtained from that study and apply neural networks to them, particularly in the assessment of mechanical property variations of a specimen from AU measurements. It is assumed that there is no information concerning the important features of the AU signal which relate to the mechanical properties of the specimen. Minimally processed AU measurements are used while relying on the network's ability to extract the significant features of the signal.

  14. Noncontact acousto-ultrasonics using laser generation and laser interferometric detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Robert E., Jr.; Huber, Robert D.

    1991-01-01

    A compact, portable fiber-optic heterodyne interferometer designed to detect out-of-plane motion on surfaces is described. The interferometer provides a linear output for displacements over a broad frequency range and can be used for ultrasonic, acoustic emission, and acousto-ultrasonic (AU) testing. The interferometer in conjunction with a compact pulsed Nd:YAG laser represents a noncontact testing system. This system was tested to determine its usefulness for the AU technique. The results obtained show that replacement of conventional piezoelectric transducers (PZT) with a laser generation/detection system make it possible to carry out noncontact AU measurements. The waveforms recorded were 5 MHZ PZT-generated ultrasound propagating through an aluminum block, detection of the acoustic emission event, and laser AU waveforms from graphite-epoxy laminates and a filament-wound composite.

  15. Nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of composite-to-metal bond interface of a wind turbine blade using an acousto-ultrasonic technique

    SciTech Connect

    Gieske, J.H.; Rumsey, M.A.

    1996-12-31

    An acousto-ultrasonic inspection technique was developed to evaluate the structural integrity of the epoxy bond interface between a metal insert and the fiber glass epoxy composite of a wind turbine blade. Data was generated manually as well as with a PC based data acquisition and display system. C-scan imaging using a portable ultrasonic scanning system provided an area mapping of the delamination or disbond due to fatigue testing and normal field operation conditions of the turbine blade. Comparison of the inspection data with a destructive visual examination of the bond interface to determine the extent of the disbond showed good agreement between the acousto-ultrasonic inspection data and the visual data.

  16. Investigation of an expert health monitoring system for aeronautical structures based on pattern recognition and acousto-ultrasonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tibaduiza-Burgos, Diego Alexander; Torres-Arredondo, Miguel Angel

    2015-08-01

    Aeronautical structures are subjected to damage during their service raising the necessity for periodic inspection and maintenance of their components so that structural integrity and safe operation can be guaranteed. Cost reduction related to minimizing the out-of-service time of the aircraft, together with the advantages offered by real-time and safe-life service monitoring, have led to a boom in the design of inexpensive and structurally integrated transducer networks comprising actuators, sensors, signal processing units and controllers. These kinds of automated systems are normally referred to as smart structures and offer a multitude of new solutions to engineering problems and multi-functional capabilities. It is thus expected that structural health monitoring (SHM) systems will become one of the leading technologies for assessing and assuring the structural integrity of future aircraft. This study is devoted to the development and experimental investigation of an SHM methodology for the detection of damage in real scale complex aeronautical structures. The work focuses on each aspect of the SHM system and highlights the potentialities of the health monitoring technique based on acousto-ultrasonics and data-driven modelling within the concepts of sensor data fusion, feature extraction and pattern recognition. The methodology is experimentally demonstrated on an aircraft skin panel and fuselage panel for which several damage scenarios are analysed. The detection performance in both structures is quantified and presented.

  17. Experimental Investigation on Acousto-ultrasonic Sensing Using Polarization-Maintaining Fiber Bragg Gratings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Gag; Banks, Curtis E.

    2016-01-01

    This report discusses the guided Lamb wave sensing using polarization-maintaining (PM) fiber Bragg grating (PM-FBG) sensor. The goal is to apply the PM-FBG sensor system to composite structural health monitoring (SHM) applications in order to realize directivity and multi-axis strain sensing capabilities while reducing the number of sensors. Comprehensive experiments were conducted to evaluate the performance of the PM-FBG sensor attached to a composite panel structure under different actuation frequencies and locations. Three Macro-Fiber-Composite (MFC) piezoelectric actuators were used to generate guided Lamb waves that were oriented at 0, 45, and 90 degrees with respect to PM-FBG axial direction, respectively. The actuation frequency was varied from 20kHz to 200kHz. It was shown that the PM-FBG sensor system was able to detect high-speed ultrasound waves and capture the characteristics under different actuation conditions. Both longitudinal and lateral strain components in the order of nano-strain were determined based on the reflective intensity measurement data from fast and slow axis of the PM fiber. It must be emphasized that this is the first attempt to investigate acouto-ultrasonic sensing using PM-FBG sensor. This could lead to a new sensing approach in the SHM applications. Nomenclature.

  18. Experimental investigation on acousto-ultrasonic sensing using polarization-maintaining fiber Bragg gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banks, Curtis E.; Wang, Gang

    2016-04-01

    This report discusses the guided Lamb wave sensing using polarization-maintaining (PM) fiber Bragg grating (PM-FBG) sensor. The goal is to apply the PM-FBG sensor system to composite structural health monitoring (SHM) applications in order to realize directivity and multi-axis strain sensing capabilities while reducing the number of sensors. Comprehensive experiments were conducted to evaluate the performance of the PM-FBG sensor attached to a composite panel structure under different actuation frequencies and locations. Three Macro-Fiber-Composite (MFC) piezoelectric actuators were used to generate guided Lamb waves that were oriented at 0, 45, and 90 degrees with respect to PMFBG axial direction, respectively. The actuation frequency was varied from 20 kHz to 200 kHz. It was shown that the PM-FBG sensor system was able to detect high-speed ultrasound waves and capture the characteristics under different actuation conditions. Both longitudinal and lateral strain components in the order of nano-strain were determined based on the reflective intensity measurement data from fast and slow axis of the PM fiber. It must be emphasized that this is the first attempt to investigate acouto-ultrasonic sensing using PM-FBG sensor. This could lead to a new sensing approach in the SHM applications.

  19. Acoustic emission and acousto-ultrasonic signature analysis of failure mechanisms in carbon fiber reinforced polymer materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carey, Shawn Allen

    Fiber reinforced polymer composite materials, particularly carbon (CFRPs), are being used for primary structural applications, particularly in the aerospace and naval industries. Advantages of CFRP materials, compared to traditional materials such as steel and aluminum, include: light weight, high strength to weight ratio, corrosion resistance, and long life expectancy. A concern with CFRPs is that despite quality control during fabrication, the material can contain many hidden internal flaws. These flaws in combination with unseen damage due to fatigue and low velocity impact have led to catastrophic failure of structures and components. Therefore a large amount of research has been conducted regarding nondestructive testing (NDT) and structural health monitoring (SHM) of CFRP materials. The principal objective of this research program was to develop methods to characterize failure mechanisms in CFRP materials used by the U.S. Army using acoustic emission (AE) and/or acousto-ultrasonic (AU) data. Failure mechanisms addressed include fiber breakage, matrix cracking, and delamination due to shear between layers. CFRP specimens were fabricated and tested in uniaxial tension to obtain AE and AU data. The specimens were designed with carbon fibers in different orientations to produce the different failure mechanisms. Some specimens were impacted with a blunt indenter prior to testing to simulate low-velocity impact. A signature analysis program was developed to characterize the AE data based on data examination using visual pattern recognition techniques. It was determined that it was important to characterize the AE event , using the location of the event as a parameter, rather than just the AE hit (signal recorded by an AE sensor). A back propagation neural network was also trained based on the results of the signature analysis program. Damage observed on the specimens visually with the aid of a scanning electron microscope agreed with the damage type assigned by the

  20. An Integrated Acousto/Ultrasonic Structural Health Monitoring System for Composite Pressure Vessels.

    PubMed

    Bulletti, Andrea; Giannelli, Pietro; Calzolai, Marco; Capineri, Lorenzo

    2016-06-01

    This paper describes the implementation of a structural health monitoring (SHM) method for mechanical components and structures in composite materials with a focus on carbon-fiber-overwrapped pressure vessels (COPVs) used in the aerospace industry. Two flex arrays of polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) interdigital transducers have been designed, realized, and mounted on the COPV to generate guided Lamb waves (mode A0) for damage assessment. We developed a custom electronic instrument capable of performing two functions using the same transducers: passive-mode detection of impacts and active-mode damage assessment using Lamb waves. The impact detection is based on an accurate evaluation of the time of arrival and was successfully tested with low-velocity impacts (7 and 30 J). Damage detection and progression is based on the calculation of a damage index matrix which compares a set of signals acquired from the transducers with a baseline. This paper also investigates the advantage of tuning the active-mode frequency to obtain the maximum transducer response in the presence of structural variations of the specimen, and therefore, the highest sensitivity to damage. PMID:27019485

  1. Stress wave focusing transducers

    SciTech Connect

    Visuri, S.R., LLNL

    1998-05-15

    Conversion of laser radiation to mechanical energy is the fundamental process behind many medical laser procedures, particularly those involving tissue destruction and removal. Stress waves can be generated with laser radiation in several ways: creation of a plasma and subsequent launch of a shock wave, thermoelastic expansion of the target tissue, vapor bubble collapse, and ablation recoil. Thermoelastic generation of stress waves generally requires short laser pulse durations and high energy density. Thermoelastic stress waves can be formed when the laser pulse duration is shorter than the acoustic transit time of the material: {tau}{sub c} = d/c{sub s} where d = absorption depth or spot diameter, whichever is smaller, and c{sub s} = sound speed in the material. The stress wave due to thermoelastic expansion travels at the sound speed (approximately 1500 m/s in tissue) and leaves the site of irradiation well before subsequent thermal events can be initiated. These stress waves, often evolving into shock waves, can be used to disrupt tissue. Shock waves are used in ophthalmology to perform intraocular microsurgery and photodisruptive procedures as well as in lithotripsy to fragment stones. We have explored a variety of transducers that can efficiently convert optical to mechanical energy. One such class of transducers allows a shock wave to be focused within a material such that the stress magnitude can be greatly increased compared to conventional geometries. Some transducer tips could be made to operate regardless of the absorption properties of the ambient media. The size and nature of the devices enable easy delivery, potentially minimally-invasive procedures, and precise tissue- targeting while limiting thermal loading. The transducer tips may have applications in lithotripsy, ophthalmology, drug delivery, and cardiology.

  2. Effects of stress waves on cells

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, H L; Da Silva, L B; Visuri, S R

    1998-03-02

    Laser induced stress waves are being used in a variety of medical applications, including drug delivery and targeted tissue disruption. Stress waves can also be an undesirable side effect in laser procedures such as ophthalmology and angioplasty. Thus, a study of the effects of stress waves on a cellular level is useful. Thermoelastic stress waves were produced using a Q-switched frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser (@.=532nm) with a pulse duration of 4 ns. The laser radiation was delivered to an absorbing media. A thermoelastic stress wave was produced in the absorbing media and propagated into plated cells. The energy per pulse delivered to a sample and the spot size were varied. Stress waves were quantified. We assayed for cell viability and damage using two methods. The laser parameters within which cells maintain viability were investigated and thresholds for cell damage were defined. A comparison of cell damage thresholds for different cell lines was made.

  3. Energy in elastic fiber embedded in elastic matrix containing incident SH wave

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, James H., Jr.; Nagem, Raymond J.

    1989-01-01

    A single elastic fiber embedded in an infinite elastic matrix is considered. An incident plane SH wave is assumed in the infinite matrix, and an expression is derived for the total energy in the fiber due to the incident SH wave. A nondimensional form of the fiber energy is plotted as a function of the nondimensional wavenumber of the SH wave. It is shown that the fiber energy attains maximum values at specific values of the wavenumber of the incident wave. The results obtained here are interpreted in the context of phenomena observed in acousto-ultrasonic experiments on fiber reinforced composite materials.

  4. Strongly coupled stress waves in heterogeneous plates.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, A. S. D.; Chou, P. C.; Rose, J. L.

    1972-01-01

    Consideration of coupled stress waves generated by an impulsive load applied at one end of a semiinfinite plate. For the field equations governing the one-dimensional coupled waves a hyperbolic system of equations is obtained in which a strong coupling in the second derivatives exists. The method of characteristics described by Chou and Mortimer (1967) is extended to cover the case of strong coupling, and a study is made of the transient stress waves in a semiinfinite plate subjected to an initial step input. Coupled discontinuity fronts are found to propagate at different velocities. The normal plate stress and the bending moment at different time regimes are illustrated by graphs.

  5. A study of the stress wave factor technique for nondestructive evaluation of composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarrafzadeh-Khoee, A.; Kiernan, M. T.; Duke, J. C., Jr.; Henneke, E. G., II

    1986-01-01

    The acousto-ultrasonic method of nondestructive evaluation is an extremely sensitive means of assessing material response. Efforts continue to complete the understanding of this method. In order to achieve the full sensitivity of the technique, extreme care must be taken in its performance. This report provides an update of the efforts to advance the understanding of this method and to increase its application to the nondestructive evaluation of composite materials. Included are descriptions of a novel optical system that is capable of measuring in-plane and out-of-plane displacements, an IBM PC-based data acquisition system, an extensive data analysis software package, the azimuthal variation of acousto-ultrasonic behavior in graphite/epoxy laminates, and preliminary examination of processing variation in graphite-aluminum tubes.

  6. Geometric effects on stress wave propagation.

    PubMed

    Johnson, K L; Trim, M W; Horstemeyer, M F; Lee, N; Williams, L N; Liao, J; Rhee, H; Prabhu, R

    2014-02-01

    The present study, through finite element simulations, shows the geometric effects of a bioinspired solid on pressure and impulse mitigation for an elastic, plastic, and viscoelastic material. Because of the bioinspired geometries, stress wave mitigation became apparent in a nonintuitive manner such that potential real-world applications in human protective gear designs are realizable. In nature, there are several toroidal designs that are employed for mitigating stress waves; examples include the hyoid bone on the back of a woodpecker's jaw that extends around the skull to its nose and a ram's horn. This study evaluates four different geometries with the same length and same initial cross-sectional diameter at the impact location in three-dimensional finite element analyses. The geometries in increasing complexity were the following: (1) a round cylinder, (2) a round cylinder that was tapered to a point, (3) a round cylinder that was spiraled in a two dimensional plane, and (4) a round cylinder that was tapered and spiraled in a two-dimensional plane. The results show that the tapered spiral geometry mitigated the greatest amount of pressure and impulse (approximately 98% mitigation) when compared to the cylinder regardless of material type (elastic, plastic, and viscoelastic) and regardless of input pressure signature. The specimen taper effectively mitigated the stress wave as a result of uniaxial deformational processes and an induced shear that arose from its geometry. Due to the decreasing cross-sectional area arising from the taper, the local uniaxial and shear stresses increased along the specimen length. The spiral induced even greater shear stresses that help mitigate the stress wave and also induced transverse displacements at the tip such that minimal wave reflections occurred. This phenomenon arose although only longitudinal waves were introduced as the initial boundary condition (BC). In nature, when shearing occurs within or between materials

  7. Impact produced stress waves in composites

    SciTech Connect

    Clements, B.; Johnson, J.; Addessio, F.; Hixson, R.

    1997-05-01

    The Nonhomogenized Dynamic Method of Cells (NHDMOC) is used to study the propagation of stress waves through laminates. The accuracy of the theory is tested by applying it to a plate-impact experiment and checking its ability to resolve a propagation shock wave front. The theory is then compared to Lagrangian hydrodynamic calculations, where it is found that the NHDMOC consistently requires less fine spatial and temporal grids, and less artificial viscosity to control numerical noise. The theory is then used to treat the impact of an epoxy-graphite bilaminate. When the viscoelastic properties of the epoxy are accounted for, the theory agrees well with the experiment.

  8. Propagating Stress Waves During Epithelial Expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Shiladitya; Utuje, Kazage J. C.; Marchetti, M. Cristina

    2015-06-01

    Coordinated motion of cell monolayers during epithelial wound healing and tissue morphogenesis involves mechanical stress generation. Here we propose a model for the dynamics of epithelial expansion that couples mechanical deformations in the tissue to contractile activity and polarization in the cells. A new ingredient of our model is a feedback between local strain, polarization, and contractility that naturally yields a mechanism for viscoelasticity and effective inertia in the cell monolayer. Using a combination of analytical and numerical techniques, we demonstrate that our model quantitatively reproduces many experimental findings [Nat. Phys. 8, 628 (2012)], including the buildup of intercellular stresses, and the existence of traveling mechanical waves guiding the oscillatory monolayer expansion.

  9. Pressure measurements of nonplanar stress waves

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, G.H.; Charest, J.A.

    1981-01-01

    Measuring the pressure of non-planar stress waves using thin piezo-resistive gages requires correcting for induced strain parallel to the sensing elements. A technique has been developed that permits such measurements, making use of a dual element gage. One element, Manganin, is sensitive to stress both parallel and perpendicular to the sensing element; the other element, Constantan, is primarily sensitive to stress parallel to the sensing element. The change in resistance in the Constantan element is thereby used to correct for the strain effect parallel to the Manganin element axis. Individual and combined Manganin and Constantan elements were subjected to controlled gas gun impact tests in the pressure and strain ranges of 0 to 50 kbar and 0 to 7%, respectively. From planar wave tests, the piezoresistivity of Constantan was found to be positive but negligible in comparison with Manganin. From combined stress and strain environments, the compression and tension strain factors of Constantan were found to be constant and equal to 2.06. The strain factors of Manganin were found to increase from 1.2 to 2.0 asymptotically in the range of 0 to 3% strain. It was experimentally demonstrated that, because of the closeness of their strain factors, the Manganin-Constantan dual element gage could be used in the differential recording mode to yield pressure directly. In this mode the gage is a strain compensating gage. Analytical techniques have also been developed for more accurate strain compensation.

  10. Ultrasonic evaluation of mechanical properties of thick, multilayered, filament-wound composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kautz, H. E.

    1987-01-01

    A preliminary investigation is conducted to define capabilities and limitations of ultrasonic and acousto-ultrasonic measurements related to mechanical properties of filament wound graphite/epoxy composite structures. The structures studied are segments of filament wound cylinders formed of multiple layers of hoop and helical windings. The segments consist of 24 to 35 layers and range from 3.02 to 3.34 cm in wall thickness. The resultant structures are anisotropic, heterogeneous, porous, and highly attenuating to ultrasonic frequencies greater than 1 MHz. The segments represent structures to be used for Space Shuttle booster cases.Ultrasonic velocity and acousto-ultrasonic stress wave factor measurement approaches are discussed. Correlations among velocity, density, and porosity, and between the acousto-ultrasonic stress wave factor and interlaminar shear strength are presented.

  11. Ultrasonic evaluation of mechanical properties of thick, multilayered, filament wound composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kautz, H. E.

    1985-01-01

    A preliminary investigation is conducted to define capabilities and limitations of ultrasonic and acousto-ultrasonic measurements related to mechanical properties of filament wound graphite/epoxy composite structures. The structures studied are segments of filament wound cylinders formed of multiple layers of hoop and helical windings. The segments consist of 24 to 35 layers and range from 3.02 to 3.34 cm in wall thickness. The resultant structures are anisotropic, heterogeneous, porous, and highly attenuating to ultrasonic frequencies greater than 1 MHz. The segments represent structures to be used for space shuttle booster cases. Ultrasonic velocity and acousto-ultrasonic stress wave factor measurement approaches are discussed. Correlations among velocity, density, and porosity, and between the acousto-ultrasonic stress wave factor and interlaminar shear strength are presented.

  12. Biological effects of laser-induced stress waves

    SciTech Connect

    Doukas, A.; Lee, S.; McAuliffe, D.

    1995-12-31

    Laser-induced stress waves can be generated by one of the following mechanisms: Optical breakdown, ablation or rapid heating of an absorbing medium. These three modes of laser interaction with matter allow the investigation of cellular and tissue responses to stress waves with different characteristics and under different conditions. The most widely studied phenomena are those of the collateral damage seen in photodisruption in the eye and in 193 run ablation of cornea and skin. On the other hand, the therapeutic application of laser-induced stress waves has been limited to the disruption of noncellular material such as renal stones, atheromatous plaque and vitreous strands. The effects of stress waves to cells and tissues can be quite disparate. Stress waves can fracture tissue, damage cells, and increase the permeability of the plasma membrane. The viability of cell cultures exposed to stress waves increases with the peak stress and the number of pulses applied. The rise time of the stress wave also influences the degree of cell injury. In fact, cell viability, as measured by thymidine incorporation, correlates better with the stress gradient than peak stress. Recent studies have also established that stress waves induce a transient increase of the permeability of the plasma membrane in vitro. In addition, if the stress gradient is below the damage threshhold, the cells remain viable. Thus, stress waves can be useful as a means of drug delivery, increasing the intracellular drug concentration and allowing the use of drugs which are impermeable to the cell membrane. The present studies show that it is important to create controllable stress waves. The wavelength tunability and the micropulse structure of the free electron laser is ideal for generating stress waves with independently adjustable parameters, such as rise time, duration and peak stress.

  13. Stress Wave Interaction Between Two Adjacent Blast Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Changping; Johansson, Daniel; Nyberg, Ulf; Beyglou, Ali

    2016-05-01

    Rock fragmentation by blasting is determined by the level and state of stress in the rock mass subjected to blasting. With the application of electronic detonators, some researchers stated that it is possible to achieve improved fragmentation through stress wave superposition with very short delay times. This hypothesis was studied through theoretical analysis in the paper. First, the stress in rock mass induced by a single-hole shot was analyzed with the assumptions of infinite velocity of detonation and infinite charge length. Based on the stress analysis of a single-hole shot, the stress history and tensile stress distribution between two adjacent holes were presented for cases of simultaneous initiation and 1 ms delayed initiation via stress superposition. The results indicated that the stress wave interaction is local around the collision point. Then, the tensile stress distribution at the extended line of two adjacent blast holes was analyzed for a case of 2 ms delay. The analytical results showed that the tensile stress on the extended line increases due to the stress wave superposition under the assumption that the influence of neighboring blast hole on the stress wave propagation can be neglected. However, the numerical results indicated that this assumption is unreasonable and yields contrary results. The feasibility of improving fragmentation via stress wave interaction with precise initiation was also discussed. The analysis in this paper does not support that the interaction of stress waves improves the fragmentation.

  14. Spallation and fracture resulting from reflected and intersecting stress waves.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinslow, R.

    1973-01-01

    Discussion of the effects of stress waves produced in solid by explosions or high-velocity impacts. These waves rebound from free surfaces in the form of tensile waves that are capable of causing internal fractures or spallation of the material. The high-speed framing camera is shown to be an important tool for observing the stress waves and fracture in transparent targets, and its photographs provide valuable information on the mechanics of fracture.

  15. Investigation into stress wave propagation in metal foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lang; Xue, Pu; Chen, Yue

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate stress wave propagation in metal foams under high-speed impact loading. Three-dimensional Voronoi model is established to represent real closed-cell foam. Based on the one-dimensional stress wave theory and Voronoi model, a numerical model is developed to calculate the velocity of elastic wave and shock wave in metal foam. The effects of impact velocity and relative density of metal foam on the stress wave propagation in metal foams are explored respectively. The results show that both elastic wave and shock wave propagate faster in metal foams with larger relative density; with increasing the impact velocity, the shock wave propagation velocity increase, but the elastic wave propagation is not sensitive to the impact velocity.

  16. Stress wave transmission and reflection through auxetic solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Teik-Cheng

    2013-08-01

    This paper establishes the effect of auxeticity on stress wave transmission and reflection. Specifically, investigation was made on wave transmission across two perfectly bonded isotropic solids in which the Poisson’s ratios ranged between -1 and 0.5. The results show that the combined use of auxetic and conventional solids at extreme Poisson’s ratio is helpful to multiply or even to eliminate stress waves, under the prescribed density and modulus relations. These results suggest the usefulness of auxetic solids as smart materials and in smart structures for effective control of stress wave transmission.

  17. Stresses in a submarine topography under ocean waves

    SciTech Connect

    Mei, C.C.; McTigue, D.F.

    1984-09-01

    The problem of submarine slope stability is of interest to both offshore engineering and geology. In an uneven topography, the weight above a horizontal plane induces two-dimensional variation in the static stress field. The action of wave pressure, which changes with depth, further introduces excess pore pressure and dynamic stresses in the sea bottom. In the present paper, we combine a simple analytical theory for the static stress by the present authors, and the recent solution by Mei and Foda for wave-induced stresses in a plane poro-elastic sea bed to account for mild bottom slope and wave shoaling, and obtain the effective stress field in a submarine topography under sea waves. Sample results are given for a ridge and a canyon. In particular, the dynamic pore pressure and the combined static and dynamic effective stresses are presented.

  18. Stresses in a submarine topography under ocean waves

    SciTech Connect

    Mei, C.C.; McTigue, D.F.

    1984-01-01

    The problem of submarine slope stability is of interest to both offshore engineering and geology. In an uneven topography, the weight above a horizontal plane induces two-dimensional variation in the static stress field. The action of wave pressure, which changes with depth, further introduces excess pore pressure and dynamic stresses in the sea bottom. In the present paper, we combine a simple analytical theory for the static stress by the present authors, and the recent solution by Mei and Foda for wave-induced stresses in a plane poro-elastic sea bed to account for mild bottom slope and wave shoaling, to obtain the effective stress field in a submarine topography under sea waves. Sample results are given for a ridge and a canyon. In particular the dynamic pore pressure and the combined static and dynamic effective stresses are presented. 10 references, 11 figures.

  19. Nondestructive Testing Residual Stress Using Ultrasonic Critical Refracted Longitudinal Wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Chunguang; Song, Wentao; Pan, Qinxue; Li, Huanxin; Liu, Shuai

    Residual stress has significant impacts on the performance of the mechanical components, especially on its strength, fatigue life and corrosion resistance and dimensional stability. Based on theory of acoustoelasticity, the testing principle of ultrasonic LCR wave method is analyzed. The testing system of residual stress is build. The method of calibration of stress coefficient is proposed in order to improve the detection precision. At last, through experiments and applications on residual stress testing of oil pipeline weld joint, vehicle's torsion shaft, glass and ceramics, gear tooth root, and so on, the result show that it deserved to be studied deeply on application and popularization of ultrasonic LCR wave method.

  20. WAVE ACTION AND BOTTOM SHEAR STRESSES IN LAKE ERIE

    EPA Science Inventory

    For Lake Erie, the amplitudes and periods of wind-driven, surface gravity waves were calculated by means of the SMB hindcasting method. Bottom orbital velocities and bottom shear stresses were then calculated using linear wave theory and Kajiura's (1968) turbulent oscillating bou...

  1. Observations of wave shear stress on a steep beach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, G. W.; Hay, A. E.; Bowen, A. J.

    2014-11-01

    Observations are presented of the wave shear stress on a steeply sloping beach. Above the wave boundary layer (WBL), positive values of were observed and are attributed to a combination of both wave shoaling due to the large-scale bed slope, and dissipation due to wave breaking, in agreement with the wave theory of Zou et al. (2003). Within the WBL, observed vertical profiles of were also in good agreement with theory, in cases where the wave height was small. As wave heights increased, however, the WBL profile of generally did not agree with theory. Near-simultaneous rotary sonar observations of the bed suggest the disagreement with theory was due to the presence of orbital-scale ripples, which the present theory does not accommodate.

  2. Coherent phase transformation under nonhydrostatic stress-wave loading

    SciTech Connect

    Grady, D E

    1989-12-01

    Coherent phase transformation occurs under conditions of stress wave loading and there are indications that transformation is dependent on the nonhydrostatic state of stress in the body. Studies under static loading show transformation proceeds at lower confining pressure when combined with shearing stress and similar effects appear to occur under stress-wave loading. Nonlinearities in the stress-strain behavior due to the transformation strain lead to complicated wave propagation, including wave separation and rarefaction shock waves. In the present study a thermodynamic theory of the combined elastic and phase transformtion deformation is developed which incorporates the interrelation of pressure and shear effects. The theory is focused on wave propagation in solids and is compared with earlier experimental work on Oakhall limestone. A thermodynamic Gibbs potential is derived for the material and a phase equilibrium relation identified, which constrains the volume and shape change through the transformation. The theory is extended to account for the effect of microstructural heterogeneities on the transformation process which has been observed experimentally.

  3. Dependence of Body Wave Velocity on Borehole Stress Concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Jiayong; Man, Yuanpeng; Qi, Hui

    In order to develop ultrasonic method for the quantitative measurement of in-situ rock stresses, we investigate the influence of stress concentration on the body-wave velocities around a borehole. First, the acoustoelasticity theory of finite-deformation solids yields a direct and explicit quantitative borehole acoustoelasticity, which reveals that the orientations of the maximum and minimum wave-velocity shifts at the borehole surface coincide with the directions of the minimum and maximum far-field principal stresses, respectively. Second, pulse-echo measurement of wave-velocity variations at the borehole surface in the sandstone sample under the biaxial compressional loadings is performed to validate the quantitative borehole acoustoelasticity. The consistence of the experimental results with the theoretical prediction means that the ultrasonic method based on acoustoelasticity theory could be a promising noncontact and non-destructive method for the quantitative measurement of in-situ rock stresses.

  4. Stress Wave Source Characterization: Impact, Fracture, and Sliding Friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLaskey, Gregory Christofer

    Rapidly varying forces, such as those associated with impact, rapid crack propagation, and fault rupture, are sources of stress waves which propagate through a solid body. This dissertation investigates how properties of a stress wave source can be identified or constrained using measurements recorded at an array of sensor sites located far from the source. This methodology is often called the method of acoustic emission and is useful for structural health monitoring and the noninvasive study of material behavior such as friction and fracture. In this dissertation, laboratory measurements of 1--300 mm wavelength stress waves are obtained by means of piezoelectric sensors which detect high frequency (10 kHz--3MHz) motions of a specimen's surface, picometers to nanometers in amplitude. Then, stress wave source characterization techniques are used to study ball impact, drying shrinkage cracking in concrete, and the micromechanics of stick-slip friction of Poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) and rock/rock interfaces. In order to quantitatively relate recorded signals obtained with an array of sensors to a particular stress wave source, wave propagation effects and sensor distortions must be accounted for. This is achieved by modeling the physics of wave propagation and transduction as linear transfer functions. Wave propagation effects are precisely modeled by an elastodynamic Green's function, sensor distortion is characterized by an instrument response function, and the stress wave source is represented with a force moment tensor. These transfer function models are verified though calibration experiments which employ two different mechanical calibration sources: ball impact and glass capillary fracture. The suitability of the ball impact source model, based on Hertzian contact theory, is experimentally validated for small (˜1 mm) balls impacting massive plates composed of four different materials: aluminum, steel, glass, and PMMA. Using this transfer function approach

  5. Magnetically induced cylindrical stress waves in a thermoelastic conductor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chian, C. T.; Moon, F. C.

    1981-01-01

    The problem of stress wave generation in a linear thermoelastic solid by a pulsed magnetic field is investigated both analytically and experimentally for a cylindrically symmetric conducting solid. A dynamic response analysis is developed to correlate magnetic, thermal, and stress fields in the solid with the time history of the electric current. In the experiment, a transient magnetic field was applied normal to a large conducting plate with a circular hole. Initially the field was confined to the interior of the circular hole. The field was generated by discharging a large capacitor bank through a solenoidal coil. The plane-stress cylindrical stress waves are 1-D in nature. The relative effects of the magnetic body force and thermoelastic stresses, both generated by the electromagnetic field, are assessed.

  6. Determination of Residual Stress in Composite Materials Using Ultrasonic Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rokhlin, S. I.

    1997-01-01

    The performance of high temperature composites can be significantly affected by the presence of residual stresses. These stresses arise during cooling processes from fabrication to room temperature due to mismatch of thermal expansion coefficients between matrix and fiber materials. This effect is especially pronounced in metal matrix and intermetallic composites. It can lead to plastic deformations, matrix cracking and fiber/matrix interface debonding. In this work the feasibility of ultrasonic techniques for residual stress assessment in composites is addressed. A novel technique for absolute stress determination in orthotropic materials from angular dependencies of ultrasonic velocities is described. The technique is applicable for determination of both applied and residual stresses and does not require calibration measurements on a reference sample. The important advantage of this method is that stress is determined simultaneously with stress-dependent elastic constants and is thus decoupled from the material texture. It is demonstrated that when the principal plane stress directions coincide with acoustical axes, the angular velocity data in the plane perpendicular to the stress plane may be used to determine both stress components. When the stress is off the acoustical axes, the shear and the difference of the normal stress components may be determined from the angular dependence of group velocities in the plane of stresses. Synthetic sets of experimental data corresponding to materials with different anisotropy and stress levels are used to check the applicability of the technique. The method is also verified experimentally. A high precision ultrasonic wave transmission technique is developed to measure angular dependence of ultrasonic velocities. Examples of stress determination from experimental velocity data are given. A method is presented for determination of velocities of ultrasonic waves propagating through the composite material with residual

  7. Monitoring Stress Changes in a Concrete Bridge with Acoustic Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stähler, S.; Sens-Schönfelder, C.; Niederleithinger, E.; Pirskawetz, S.

    2009-12-01

    The sensitivity of coda waves for material changes has been demonstrated in various environments ranging form laboratory scale to regional seismology. Here we present a test for monitoring stress induced velocity variations in a concrete construction. The construction is a bridge made of reinforced concrete in Germany that is build in incremental launching method (Taktschiebe-Mode). This means that construction takes place at one end of the bridge from which the bridge is successively pushed over the pillars as the constructions continues. During the movement of the construction over the pillars the stress in the girder and the deck slab undergoes changes between 0 and 14 MPa in horizontal direction. We used seismic equipment to induce elastic waves in the deck slab of the bridge at different position of the array relative to the supporting pillars. Comparing reverberating waves in slab recorded at different stress states we can infer changes in the propagation velocity. The observed velocity change is compared to modeled stress variations in the slab. Comparison is difficult due to imprecise positioning of the array and the spatially periodic stress variations. But we can show that the observed velocity variation is in agreement with the predictions from the stress model. Samples of the concrete used in the bridge are tested under different loads in the laboratory to infer the stress-velocity relation. The experiments show that the acousto-elastic effect in the specific concrete can account for the observed velocity variations.

  8. Stress-Wave Probing of Electric Field Distributions in Dielectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alquie, C.; Dreyfus, G.; Lewiner, J.

    1981-11-01

    The spatial distribution of the electric field within a dielectric sample is shown to be obtainable unambiguously from the time dependence of the open-circuit voltage or short-circuit current during the propagation of a stress wave across the sample. Experiments in which the pressure wave is generated by the impact of a pulsed laser beam on a metal target bonded to the dielectric plate under investigation have led to the first straightforward visualization of electric field distributions in solid dielectrics.

  9. Characterization of concrete materials by using stress wave NDE techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadri, Afshin; deWalle, Brian

    1999-12-01

    A new instrument for monitoring the quality of concrete materials has been developed by Andec Mfg. Ltd. This new instrument, the AndeScope, can be used to evaluate concrete materials by measuring the stress wave velocity, dynamic elastic constant, quality factor (Q-factor), signal frequency, and decay coefficient. The AndeScope can be used to estimate the strength gain at the setting time, or it can be used to diagnose problems such as Alkali-Silica Reaction (ASR) or micro fracturing. The three stress wave propagation techniques are used in combination for this evaluation: ultrasonic through-transmission, pulse-echo and impact-echo. The ultrasonic through-transmission technique uses a direct arrangement between the transmitting and receiving transducers, while the pulse-echo and impact-echo technique are used to monitor concrete materials and structures from a single available face. The AndeScope's three stress wave modes can also be used to detect flaws, delamination, thickness, honeycombing, and crack depth measurements. In this paper, the principles of the three stress wave techniques and actual functions of the instrument are described. The advantages and disadvantages of each technique and new methodologies are discussed.

  10. Discrete Element Method Simulation of Nonlinear Viscoelastic Stress Wave Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Zhiping; Horie, Y.; Wang, Wenqiang

    2002-07-01

    A DEM(Discrete Element Method) simulation of nonlinear viscoelastic stress wave problems is carried out. The interaction forces among elements are described using a model in which neighbor elements are linked by a nonlinear spring and a certain number of Maxwell components in parallel. By making use of exponential relaxation moduli, it is shown that numerical computation of the convolution integral does not require storing and repeatedly calculating strain history, so that the computational cost is dramatically reduced. To validate the viscoelastic DM2 code1, stress wave propagation in a Maxwell rod with one end subjected to a constant stress loading is simulated. Results excellently fit those from the characteristics calculation. The code is then used to investigate the problem of meso-scale damage in a plastic-bonded explosive under shock loading. Results not only show "compression damage", but also reveal a complex damage evolution. They demonstrate a unique capability of DEM in modeling heterogeneous materials.

  11. Discrete Element Method Simulation of Nonlinear Viscoelastic Stress Wave Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wenqiang; Tang, Zhiping; Horie, Y.

    2002-07-01

    A DEM(Discrete Element Method) simulation of nonlinear viscoelastic stress wave problems is carried out. The interaction forces among elements are described using a model in which neighbor elements are linked by a nonlinear spring and a certain number of Maxwell components in parallel. By making use of exponential relaxation moduli, it is shown that numerical computation of the convolution integral does not require storing and repeatedly calculating strain history, so that the computational cost is dramatically reduced. To validate the viscoelastic DM2 code[1], stress wave propagation in a Maxwell rod with one end subjected to a constant stress loading is simulated. Results excellently fit those from the characteristics calculation. The code is then used to investigate the problem of meso-scale damage in a plastic-bonded explosive under shock loading. Results not only show "compression damage", but also reveal a complex damage evolution. They demonstrate a unique capability of DEM in modeling heterogeneous materials.

  12. Experimental investigation of the stress wave propagation inside a granular column impacted by a shock wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belov, E.; Blachman, M.; Britan, A.; Sadot, O.; Ben-Dor, G.

    2015-11-01

    A simple experimental technique, based on pressure transducers, capable of measuring the stress wave that propagates along the solid phase of a granular column after being hit head-on by a plane shock wave is presented. The technique is based on installing couples of gauges at different cross-sections along the granular column in such a way that one transducer measures the overall pressure acting on it while the other measures only the pressure exerted on it by the gaseous phase of the granular column. By means of the presented experimental technique the time histories of the stresses normal to the shock tube walls and data on the stress wave attenuation as it propagates downstream towards the shock tube end wall were obtained.

  13. Wave stress and coral community structure in Hawaii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dollar, S. J.

    1982-10-01

    The most significant factor determining the structure of Hawaiian reef coral communities is physical disturbance from waves. Sequential analysis of community structure off the west coast of the island of Hawaii shows that variation of wave energy and storm frequency clearly affects organization in time and space. Normal conditions of low wave stress maintain four well-defined reef zones; diversity is highest at intermediate depths and decreases in physically rigorous shallow areas and stable deep reef slopes. Intermediate level storm wave events cause variable effects within the reef zones, but the zonation pattern, as a whole, is maintained. Diversity increases in zones that are dominated by a single species largely through nonlethal fragmentation and transport, but decreases in the zone of most equitable species distribution. Conversely, severe infrequent storm disturbances that cause massive mortality to all coral species wipe out the pattern of community structure and return the entire community to a low diversity early successional stage.

  14. Stress waves in transversely isotropic media: The homogeneous problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marques, E. R. C.; Williams, J. H., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The homogeneous problem of stress wave propagation in unbounded transversely isotropic media is analyzed. By adopting plane wave solutions, the conditions for the existence of the solution are established in terms of phase velocities and directions of particle displacements. Dispersion relations and group velocities are derived from the phase velocity expressions. The deviation angles (e.g., angles between the normals to the adopted plane waves and the actual directions of their propagation) are numerically determined for a specific fiber-glass epoxy composite. A graphical method is introduced for the construction of the wave surfaces using magnitudes of phase velocities and deviation angles. The results for the case of isotropic media are shown to be contained in the solutions for the transversely isotropic media.

  15. Use Your Own Computer Timer: Velocity of Stress Waves in a Solid Rod.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, David

    1997-01-01

    Describes how to measure the penultimate laboratory speed, a stress wave velocity in a solid rod. Also includes background information on stress waves, apparatus, and procedures. Employs a homemade interface for the IBM platform. (DDR)

  16. Stress-induced chemical waves in sediment burial diagenesis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yifeng; Budd, David A

    2012-01-01

    Lateral metre-scale periodic variations in porosity and composition are found in many dolomite strata. Such variations may embed important information about dolomite formation and transformation. Here we show that these variations could be fossilized chemical waves emerging from stress-mediated mineral-water interaction during sediment burial diagenesis. Under the overlying loading, crystals in higher porosity domains are subjected to a higher effective stress, causing pressure solution. The dissolved species diffuse to and precipitate in neighbouring lower porosity domains, further reducing the porosity. This positive feedback leads to lateral porosity and compositional patterning in dolomite. The pattern geometry depends on fluid flow regimes. In a diffusion-dominated case, the low- and high-porosity domains alternate spatially with no directional preference, while, in the presence of an advective flow, this alternation occurs only along the flow direction, propagating like a chemical wave. Our work provides a new perspective for interpreting diagenetic signatures in sedimentary rocks. PMID:22353716

  17. DEM Modelling of Non-linear Viscoelastic Stress Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wenqiang; Tang, Zhiping; Horie, Yasuyuki

    2001-06-01

    A DEM(Discrete Element Method) simulation of nonlinear viscoelastic stress wave problems is carried out. The interaction forces among elements are described using a model in which neighbor elements are linked by a nonlinear spring and a certain number of Maxwell components in parallel. By making use of exponential relaxation moduli, it is shown that numerical computation of the convolution integral does not require storing and repeatedly calculating strain history, and can reduce the computational cost dramatically. To validate the viscoelastic DM2 code, stress wave propagation in a Maxwell rod with one end subjected to a constant stress loading is simulated. Results excellently fit those from the characteristics calculation. Satisfactory results are also obtained in the simulation of one-dimensional plane wave in a plastic bonded explosive. The code is then used to investigate the problem of meso-scale damage in this explosive under shock loading. Results not only show "compression damage", but also reveal a complex damage evolution. They demonstrate a unique capability of DEM in modeling heterogeneous materials.

  18. Application of homomorphic signal processing to stress wave factor analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karagulle, H.; Williams, J. H., Jr.; Lee, S. S.

    1985-01-01

    The stress wave factor (SWF) signal, which is the output of an ultrasonic testing system where the transmitting and receiving transducers are coupled to the same face of the test structure, is analyzed in the frequency domain. The SWF signal generated in an isotropic elastic plate is modelled as the superposition of successive reflections. The reflection which is generated by the stress waves which travel p times as a longitudinal (P) wave and s times as a shear (S) wave through the plate while reflecting back and forth between the bottom and top faces of the plate is designated as the reflection with p, s. Short-time portions of the SWF signal are considered for obtaining spectral information on individual reflections. If the significant reflections are not overlapped, the short-time Fourier analysis is used. A summary of the elevant points of homomorphic signal processing, which is also called cepstrum analysis, is given. Homomorphic signal processing is applied to short-time SWF signals to obtain estimates of the log spectra of individual reflections for cases in which the reflections are overlapped. Two typical SWF signals generated in aluminum plates (overlapping and non-overlapping reflections) are analyzed.

  19. Application of homomorphic signal processing to stress wave factor analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, J. H., Jr.; Lee, S. S.; Karaguelle, H.

    1985-01-01

    The stress wave factor (SWF) signal, which is the output of an ultrasonic testing system where the transmitting and receiving transducers are coupled to the same face of the test structure, is analyzed in the frequency domain. The SWF signal generated in an isotropic elastic plate is modelled as the superposition of successive reflections. The reflection which is generated by the stress waves which travel P times as a longitudinal (P) wave and s times as a shear (S) wave through the plate while reflecting back and forth between the bottom and top faces of the plate is designated as the reflection with P, s. Short-time portions of the SWF signal are considered for obtaining spectral information on individual reflections. If the significant reflections are not overlapped, the short-time Fourier analysis is used. A summary of the elevant points of homomorphic signal processing, which is also called cepstrum analysis, is given. Homomorphic signal processing is applied to short-time SWF signals to obtain estimates of the log spectra of individual reflections for cases in which the reflections are overlapped. Two typical SWF signals generated in aluminum plates (overlapping and non-overlapping reflections) are analyzed.

  20. Attenuation of stress waves in single and multi-layered structures. [mitigation of elastic and plastic stress waves during spacecraft landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, J. C. S.; Tsui, C. Y.

    1972-01-01

    Analytical and experimental studies were made of the attenuation of the stress waves during passage through single and multilayer structures. The investigation included studies on elastic and plastic stress wave propagation in the composites and those on shock mitigating material characteristics such as dynamic stress-strain relations and energy absorbing properties. The results of the studies are applied to methods for reducing the stresses imposed on a spacecraft during planetary or ocean landings.

  1. A Study on Propagation Characteristic of One-dimensional Stress Wave in Functionally Graded Armor Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, S. Y.; Liu, X.; Cao, D. F.; Mei, H.; Lei, Z. T.; Liu, L. S.

    2013-03-01

    The development of Functionally Graded Materials (FGM) for energy-absorbing applications requires understanding of stress wave propagation in these structures in order to optimize their resistance to failure. One-dimensional stress wave in FGM composites under elastic and plastic wave loading have been investigated. The stress distributions through the thickness and stress status have been analyzed and some comparisons have been done with the materials of sharp interfaces (two-layered material). The results demonstrate that the gradient structure design greatly decreases the severity of the stress concentrations at the interfaces and there are no clear differences in stress distribution in FGM composites under elastic and plastic wave loading.

  2. Dependence of Wave-Breaking Statistics on Wind Stress and Wave Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katsaros, Kristina B.; Atakturk, Serhad S.

    1992-01-01

    Incidence of wave breaking for pure wind driven waves has been studied on Lake Washington at wind speeds up to 8 m/s. Video recordings were employed to identify and categorize the breaking events in terms of micro-scale, spilling and plunging breakers. These events were correlated with the magnitude of the wave spectrum measured with a resistance wire wave gauge and band pass filtered between 6 and 10 Hz. An equivalent percentage of breaking crests were found for spilling and plunging events. Wave forcing as measured by wind stress (or friction velocity, u(sub *), squared) and by inverse wave age, u(sub *)/Cp where Cp is the phase velocity of the waves at the peak of the frequency spectrum, were found to be good prerictors of percentage of breaking crests. When combined in a two parameter regression, those two variables gave small standard deviation and had a high correlation coefficient (66 percent). The combination of u(sub *)(exp 2) and u(sub *)/Cp can be understood in physical terms. Furthermore, for the larger values of u(sub *)(exp 2) the dependence of wave braking and wave age was stronger than at the low end of the values u(sub *)(exp 2) and u(sub *)/Cp. Thus, both the level of wave development as determined by inverse wave age, which we may term relative wind effectiveness for wave forcing and the wind forcing on the water surface determine the incidence of wave breaking. Substituting U(sub 10)(sup 3.75) (which is the dependence of whitecap cover found by Monahan and coworkers) an equivalent correlation was found to the prediction by u(sub *)(exp 2). Slightly better standard deviation value and higher correlation coefficient were found by using a Reynolds number as predictor. A two-parameter regression involving u(sub *)(exp 2) and a Reynold's number proposed by Toba and his colleagues which relates u(sub *)(exp 2) and peak wave frequency, improves the correlation even more but is less easy to interpret in physical terms. The equivalent percentage of

  3. Stress Wave Isolation by Purely Mechanical Topological Phononic Crystals

    PubMed Central

    Chaunsali, Rajesh; Li, Feng; Yang, Jinkyu

    2016-01-01

    We present an active, purely mechanical stress wave isolator that consists of short cylindrical particles arranged in a helical architecture. This phononic structure allows us to change inter-particle stiffness dynamically by controlling the contact angles of the cylinders. We use torsional travelling waves to control the contact angles, thereby imposing a desired spatio-temporal stiffness variation to the phononic crystal along the longitudinal direction. Such torsional excitation is a form of parametric pumping in the system, which results in the breakage of the time-reversal symmetry. We report that, in quasi-static sense, the system shows topologically non-trivial band-gaps. However, in a dynamic regime where the pumping effect is significant, these band-gaps become asymmetric with respect to the frequency and wavenumber domains in the dispersion relationship. By using numerical simulations, we show that such asymmetry has a direct correspondence to the topological invariant, i.e., Chern number, of the system. We propose that this asymmetry, accompanied by selective inter-band transition, can be utilized for directional isolation of the stress wave propagating along the phononic crystal. PMID:27477236

  4. Stress Wave Isolation by Purely Mechanical Topological Phononic Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaunsali, Rajesh; Li, Feng; Yang, Jinkyu

    2016-08-01

    We present an active, purely mechanical stress wave isolator that consists of short cylindrical particles arranged in a helical architecture. This phononic structure allows us to change inter-particle stiffness dynamically by controlling the contact angles of the cylinders. We use torsional travelling waves to control the contact angles, thereby imposing a desired spatio-temporal stiffness variation to the phononic crystal along the longitudinal direction. Such torsional excitation is a form of parametric pumping in the system, which results in the breakage of the time-reversal symmetry. We report that, in quasi-static sense, the system shows topologically non-trivial band-gaps. However, in a dynamic regime where the pumping effect is significant, these band-gaps become asymmetric with respect to the frequency and wavenumber domains in the dispersion relationship. By using numerical simulations, we show that such asymmetry has a direct correspondence to the topological invariant, i.e., Chern number, of the system. We propose that this asymmetry, accompanied by selective inter-band transition, can be utilized for directional isolation of the stress wave propagating along the phononic crystal.

  5. Stress Wave Isolation by Purely Mechanical Topological Phononic Crystals.

    PubMed

    Chaunsali, Rajesh; Li, Feng; Yang, Jinkyu

    2016-01-01

    We present an active, purely mechanical stress wave isolator that consists of short cylindrical particles arranged in a helical architecture. This phononic structure allows us to change inter-particle stiffness dynamically by controlling the contact angles of the cylinders. We use torsional travelling waves to control the contact angles, thereby imposing a desired spatio-temporal stiffness variation to the phononic crystal along the longitudinal direction. Such torsional excitation is a form of parametric pumping in the system, which results in the breakage of the time-reversal symmetry. We report that, in quasi-static sense, the system shows topologically non-trivial band-gaps. However, in a dynamic regime where the pumping effect is significant, these band-gaps become asymmetric with respect to the frequency and wavenumber domains in the dispersion relationship. By using numerical simulations, we show that such asymmetry has a direct correspondence to the topological invariant, i.e., Chern number, of the system. We propose that this asymmetry, accompanied by selective inter-band transition, can be utilized for directional isolation of the stress wave propagating along the phononic crystal. PMID:27477236

  6. PC analysis of an acousto-ultrasonic signal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiernan, M. T.; Duke, J. C., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    An introduction is given to PC software developed to analyze a digitized signal. The specific way in which the software was implemented and the relative ease with which the same software can be implemented in different systems for various applications are discussed. The basic equations and related theory used in the software are furnished. Specifically, mention is made of signal digitization, dc biasing, Fourier analysis, moment analysis, digital filtering, and transfer functions. Examples of calculations are given to indicate the physical significance of variables calculated from the frequency domain via moment equations.

  7. Studies of the propagation of viscoelastic spherical divergent stress waves based on the generalized Maxwell model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Qiang; Wang, Zhan-jiang

    2016-06-01

    The governing equations for viscoelastic spherical divergent stress waves are formulated, and the solutions for spherical stress waves are analytically given in the Laplace domain. Based on the generalized Maxwell model, the propagation coefficient for viscoelastic spherical stress waves is obtained analytically and the characteristics of the attenuation coefficient and the phase velocity are discussed. Meanwhile, the solutions for viscoelastic spherical stress waves are calculated by using the numerical method of the inverse Laplace transform in the case of cavity explosion. The propagating characteristics for strong discontinuous visco-elastic spherical waves and steady-state values caused by the cavity pressure are discussed using theoretical and numerical methods.

  8. Detection of distributed damage in concrete using transient stress waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kesner, Keith; Sansalone, Mary; Poston, Randall W.

    1998-03-01

    Distributed damage mechanisms, such as delayed ettringite formation (DEF) and alkali-silica reactivity (ASR) can cause cracking and premature deterioration of concrete structures. The focus of the authors' research has been to determine whether transient stress waves can be used for assessing the amount of damage present in plate-like concrete sections. Results obtained from numerical, laboratory, and field studies are presented. Finite element analyses were performed to study the effects caused by distributed damage on propagation stress waves. Laboratory studies involved the use of accelerated damage specimens for performing tests for detecting changes in physical properties over time, impact-echo tests, and neutron radiography to quantify the amount of cracking present in a specimen. A correlation was made between damage predictions obtained from impact-echo signals and the actual amount of cracking as determined from radiographs. A field study on concrete box beams suffering deterioration caused by distributed damage mechanisms was performed to demonstrate the feasibility of the methods for quantifying damage in actual concrete members. These studies demonstrated that impact-echo signals can be used to detect and quantify the amount of distributed damage in concrete sections. Guidelines for determining the amount of damage using impact-echo signals are presented. For the first time, engineers have a tool for assessing the amount of damage in concrete structures with distributed cracking.

  9. Analysis of the Stress Wave Effect During Rock Breakage by Pulsating Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yong; Wei, Jianping; Ren, Ting

    2016-02-01

    Formation, propagation and attenuation of stress waves during rock breakage by pulsating jets are simulated by introducing the Johnson-Holmquist-Concrete nonlinear constitutive model, and using the smoothed particle hydrodynamics approach. The curve of stress over time at different locations of the rock surface under the action of high-velocity pulsating jets is obtained, as well as relationship curve between amplitude of stress wave and distance to jet action spot. Based on the computational results, breakage behavior of rocks under stress wave effect, and impacts of jet velocity and rock properties on stress wave effect are analyzed. The results show that the stress wave effect of pulsating jets is rather strongly localized, and the amplitude of stress wave decreases sharply with increasing distance to jet action spot. The intensity and effect range of stress wave are in direct proportion to jet velocity; besides, there is a threshold velocity regarding macroscopic failure of rocks. Rocks of different lithologies have somewhat different failure modes under stress wave action of pulsating jets; failure mode of low strength rocks like sandstone is mainly crack propagation under tensile stress during rock loading and unloading processes, whereas the failure mode of hard brittle rocks such as limestone and granite is mainly longitudinal failure caused by stress concentration.

  10. Monitoring in situ stress changes in a mining environment with coda wave interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grêt, Alexandre; Snieder, Roel; Özbay, Uḡur

    2006-11-01

    Coda waves are highly sensitive to changes in the subsurface; we use this sensitivity to monitor small stress changes in an underground mine. We apply coda wave interferometry to seismic data excited by a hammer source, collected at an experimental hard rock mine in Idaho Springs, CO. We carried out a controlled stress-change experiment in a mine pillar and we show how coda wave interferometry can be used to monitor the in situ stress change with modest hardware requirements.

  11. Generation of multiple stress waves in silica glass in high fluence femtosecond laser ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Hu Haofeng; Wang Xiaolei; Zhai Hongchen; Zhang Nan; Wang Pan

    2010-08-09

    Shadowgraphs of dynamic processes outside and inside transparent target during the intense femtosecond laser ablation of silica glass are recorded. Two material ejections outside the target and two corresponding stress waves inside the target are observed at different energy fluences. In particular, a third stress wave can be observed at energy fluence as high as 40 J/cm{sup 2}. The first wave is a thermoelastic wave, while the second and the third may be generated subsequently by the mechanical expansions. In addition, the magnitudes of the three stress waves decrease sequentially based on our analysis.

  12. Special purpose hybrid transfinite elements and unified computational methodology for accurately predicting thermoelastic stress waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tamma, Kumar K.; Railkar, Sudhir B.

    1988-01-01

    This paper represents an attempt to apply extensions of a hybrid transfinite element computational approach for accurately predicting thermoelastic stress waves. The applicability of the present formulations for capturing the thermal stress waves induced by boundary heating for the well known Danilovskaya problems is demonstrated. A unique feature of the proposed formulations for applicability to the Danilovskaya problem of thermal stress waves in elastic solids lies in the hybrid nature of the unified formulations and the development of special purpose transfinite elements in conjunction with the classical Galerkin techniques and transformation concepts. Numerical test cases validate the applicability and superior capability to capture the thermal stress waves induced due to boundary heating.

  13. Large-amplitude internal waves benefit corals during thermal stress

    PubMed Central

    Wall, M.; Putchim, L.; Schmidt, G. M.; Jantzen, C.; Khokiattiwong, S.; Richter, C.

    2015-01-01

    Tropical scleractinian corals are particularly vulnerable to global warming as elevated sea surface temperatures (SSTs) disrupt the delicate balance between the coral host and their algal endosymbionts, leading to symbiont expulsion, mass bleaching and mortality. While satellite sensing of SST has proved a reliable predictor of coral bleaching at the regional scale, there are large deviations in bleaching severity and mortality on the local scale that are poorly understood. Here, we show that internal waves play a major role in explaining local coral bleaching and mortality patterns in the Andaman Sea. Despite a severe region-wide SST anomaly in May 2010, frequent upslope intrusions of cold sub-pycnocline waters due to breaking large-amplitude internal waves (LAIW) mitigated coral bleaching and mortality in shallow waters. In LAIW-sheltered waters, by contrast, bleaching-susceptible species suffered severe bleaching and total mortality. These findings suggest that LAIW benefit coral reefs during thermal stress and provide local refugia for bleaching-susceptible corals. LAIW are ubiquitous in tropical stratified waters and their swash zones may thus be important conservation areas for the maintenance of coral diversity in a warming climate. Taking LAIW into account can significantly improve coral bleaching predictions and provide a valuable tool for coral reef conservation and management. PMID:25473004

  14. Large-amplitude internal waves benefit corals during thermal stress.

    PubMed

    Wall, M; Putchim, L; Schmidt, G M; Jantzen, C; Khokiattiwong, S; Richter, C

    2015-01-22

    Tropical scleractinian corals are particularly vulnerable to global warming as elevated sea surface temperatures (SSTs) disrupt the delicate balance between the coral host and their algal endosymbionts, leading to symbiont expulsion, mass bleaching and mortality. While satellite sensing of SST has proved a reliable predictor of coral bleaching at the regional scale, there are large deviations in bleaching severity and mortality on the local scale that are poorly understood. Here, we show that internal waves play a major role in explaining local coral bleaching and mortality patterns in the Andaman Sea. Despite a severe region-wide SST anomaly in May 2010, frequent upslope intrusions of cold sub-pycnocline waters due to breaking large-amplitude internal waves (LAIW) mitigated coral bleaching and mortality in shallow waters. In LAIW-sheltered waters, by contrast, bleaching-susceptible species suffered severe bleaching and total mortality. These findings suggest that LAIW benefit coral reefs during thermal stress and provide local refugia for bleaching-susceptible corals. LAIW are ubiquitous in tropical stratified waters and their swash zones may thus be important conservation areas for the maintenance of coral diversity in a warming climate. Taking LAIW into account can significantly improve coral bleaching predictions and provide a valuable tool for coral reef conservation and management. PMID:25473004

  15. Numerical modeling investigation of radiation stress in coastal wave-current coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Changlong; Li, Rui

    2014-05-01

    It is believed that the radiation stress is the main driving force for nearshore wave-induced currents. So far several theoretical formulas of radiation stress have been proposed, among which the vertical structures differ considerably. A numerical wave flume (NWF) have been established on the basis of the CFD software, and applied to simulate the wave motion in various shallow water topography with different incident waves. The results from the NWF is used to analyze the features of radiation stress. It is found, that the vertical integral of the radiation stress is agreeably consistent with the well-known classical result by Longuet-Higgins and Stewart (1964), while the vertical structure of the radiation stress is discontinuous at the surface where the maximum exists, which can be better characterized with the formula by Mellor (2008). The effects of radiation stress and wave roller are implemented in a coupled SWAN-POM model, so that the coupled model is able to simulate the wave setup and wave-induced current. The numerical modeling results have been verified by the field measurements. It is shown that the modelled wave setup corresponding to various radiation stress formulas is well in agreement with the field observation. This means the modeled wave setup is dependent on the vertical integral of radiation stress rather than the vertical structure of that. In comparison with the observed current velocity and direction data, it is shown that the modeled results with Mellor's radiation stress formula plus wave roller is able to be consistent with the filed measurement well. This indicates that the modeled wave-induced current is dependent on the vertical structure of radiation stress rather than the vertical integral of that.

  16. Wall stress and deformation analysis in a numerical model of pulse wave propagation.

    PubMed

    He, Fan; Hua, Lu; Gao, Lijian

    2015-01-01

    To simulate pulse wave propagation, we set up a wave propagation model using blood-wall interaction in previous work. In this paper, our purpose is to investigate wall stress and deformation of the wave propagation model. The finite element method is employed for solving the governing equations of blood and wall. Our results suggest that there are two peaks in the circumferential stress and strain distributions of the normal model. The stress and strain values change with the varieties of different factors, such as wall thickness and vessel diameter. The results indicate that different parameters of fluid and tube wall have remarked impact on wall stress and deformation. PMID:26406044

  17. Effect of Stress on Energy Flux Deviation of Ultrasonic Waves in Ultrasonic Waves in GR/EP Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prosser, William H.; Kriz, R. D.; Fitting, Dale W.

    1990-01-01

    Ultrasonic waves suffer energy flux deviation in graphite/epoxy because of the large anisotropy. The angle of deviation is a function of the elastic coefficients. For nonlinear solids, these coefficients and thus the angle of deviation is a function of stress. Acoustoelastic theory was used to model the effect of stress on flux deviation for unidirectional T300/5208 using previously measured elastic coefficients. Computations were made for uniaxial stress along the x3 axis fiber axis) and the x1 axis for waves propagating in the x1x3 plane. These results predict a shift as large as three degrees for the quasi-transverse wave. The shift in energy flux offers new nondestructive technique of evaluating stress in composites.

  18. Effect of Stress and Saturation on Shear Wave Anisotropy: Laboratory Observations Using Laser Doppler Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedev, M.; Collet, O.; Bona, A.; Gurevich, B.

    2015-12-01

    Estimations of hydrocarbon and water resources as well as reservoir management during production are the main challenges facing the resource recovery industry nowadays. The recently discovered reservoirs are not only deep but they are also located in complicated geological formations. Hence, the effect of anisotropy on reservoir imaging becomes significant. Shear wave (S-wave) splitting has been observed in the field and laboratory experiments for decades. Despite the fact that S-wave splitting is widely used for evaluation of subsurface anisotropy, the effects of stresses as well fluid saturation on anisotropy have not been understood in detail. In this paper we present the laboratory study of the effect of stress and saturation on S-wave splitting for a Bentheim sandstone sample. The cubic sample (50mm3), porosity 22%, density 1890kg/m3) was placed into a true-triaxial cell. The sample was subjected to several combinations of stresses varying from 0 to 10MPa and applied to the sample in two directions (X and Y), while no stress was applied to the sample in the Z-direction. The sample's bedding was nearly oriented parallel to Y-Z plane. The ultrasonic S-waves were exited at a frequency of 0.5MHz by a piezoelectric transducer and were propagating in the Z-direction. Upon wave arrival onto the free surface the displacement of the surface was monitored by a Laser Doppler interferometer. Hodograms of the central point of the dry sample (Fig. 1) demonstrate how S-wave polarizations for both "fast" and "slow" S-waves change when increasing the stress in the X direction, while the stress in direction Y is kept constant at 3 MPa. Polarization of the fast S wave is shifted towards the X-axis (axis of the maximum stress). While both S-wave velocities increase with stress, the anisotropy level remains the same. No shift of polarization of fast wave was observed when the stress along the Y-axis was kept at 3 MPa, while the stress along the X-axis was increasing. However, in

  19. Calculation of Surface Waves and Body Waves from an Explosion in a Three-Dimensional Stress Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, J. L.; Thompson, T. W.

    2013-12-01

    Although the effect of tectonic prestress on explosion-generated surface waves has been discussed since the 1960's, until recently it has not been possible to directly calculate the seismic waves from an explosion in a three-dimensional stress field. We developed a 3D nonlinear finite element code designed for calculation of explosions in 3D heterogeneous media and incorporated the capability to perform explosion calculations in a prestressed medium. During the calculations we save displacements and stresses on a monitoring surface in the elastic region outside the nonlinear region, and then use the representation theorem to propagate the solution to regional and teleseismic distances. We have run calculations with and without tectonic release so that we can compare them and isolate the effects of tectonic release. We model the explosion Shoal, a 12.5 kiloton explosion detonated at 390 meters depth near Fallon, Nevada. This event had strong heterogeneity in near-field waveforms and is in a region under primarily extensional tectonic stress. There were three near-field shot level recording stations located in three directions each at about 590 meters from the shot. Including prestress consistent with the regional stress field causes variations in the calculated near-field waveforms similar to those observed in the Shoal data. The calculation with tectonic release also generates Love waves and a Rayleigh wave radiation pattern similar to those observed. We calculate both far-field and regional body waves and find very little difference between the P-waves for the cases with and without tectonic release. The effect of tectonic release on the SV-waves from the explosion is also small. However the calculation with tectonic release does generate SH-waves not present in the calculation without tectonic release. An important conclusion from these calculations relevant to nuclear monitoring is that while tectonic release can be expected to substantially change surface wave

  20. Characterization of composite materials by means of the ultrasonic stress wave factor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duke, J. C., Jr.; Henneke, E. G.; Stinchcomb, W. W.; Reifsnider, K. L.

    1983-01-01

    The usual approach to nondestructively evaluating a composite structure involves inspection and mechanical analysis of the inspection results. Such an approach has met with only limited success. On the other hand, the ultrasonic stress wave factor technique directly evaluates the material. Despite requiring access to only one surface of the material, the technique interrogates the material in the directions of applied load. Using the stress wave factor technique it is possible to determine the failure location in the material. The correlation of the stress wave factor with stiffness is shown. In addition, the use of the technique for determining the strength or life of composite material structures is discussed.

  1. Characterizing wave- and current- induced bottom shear stress: U.S. middle Atlantic continental shelf

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dalyander, P. Soupy; Butman, Bradford; Sherwood, Christopher R.; Signell, Richard P.; Wilkin, John L.

    2013-01-01

    Waves and currents create bottom shear stress, a force at the seabed that influences sediment texture distribution, micro-topography, habitat, and anthropogenic use. This paper presents a methodology for assessing the magnitude, variability, and driving mechanisms of bottom stress and resultant sediment mobility on regional scales using numerical model output. The analysis was applied to the Middle Atlantic Bight (MAB), off the U.S. East Coast, and identified a tidally-dominated shallow region with relatively high stress southeast of Massachusetts over Nantucket Shoals, where sediment mobility thresholds are exceeded over 50% of the time; a coastal band extending offshore to about 30 m water depth dominated by waves, where mobility occurs more than 20% of the time; and a quiescent low stress region southeast of Long Island, approximately coincident with an area of fine-grained sediments called the “Mud Patch”. The regional high in stress and mobility over Nantucket Shoals supports the hypothesis that fine grain sediment winnowed away in this region maintains the Mud Patch to the southwest. The analysis identified waves as the driving mechanism for stress throughout most of the MAB, excluding Nantucket Shoals and sheltered coastal bays where tides dominate; however, the relative dominance of low-frequency events varied regionally, and increased southward toward Cape Hatteras. The correlation between wave stress and local wind stress was lowest in the central MAB, indicating a relatively high contribution of swell to bottom stress in this area, rather than locally generated waves. Accurate prediction of the wave energy spectrum was critical to produce good estimates of bottom shear stress, which was sensitive to energy in the long period waves.

  2. Significance of T-wave changes during early dobutamine stress echocardiography in patients with Q-wave acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    De Felice, F; Gostoli, E; Russo, M; Bonzano, A; Recanzone, P; Moretti, C; Pinneri, F; Borello, G

    1999-09-01

    The relation between T-wave changes and regional contraction during dobutamine stress echocardiography at low (5 to 10 microg/kg/min) and high (20 to 40 microg/kg/min) doses in 43 consecutive patients, early (7+/-2 days) after first recent Q-wave acute myocardial infarction has been evaluated. T-wave changes detected in > or =2 infarct-related electrocardiographic leads during dobutamine infusion were defined as follow: (1) negative T waves becoming positive, (2) positive T waves becoming upright > or =2 mm, and (3) negative T waves becoming upright > or =2 mm from baseline. Wall motion score index (WMSI) was defined as the sum of the echocardiographic scores of 16 segments divided by total segments considered at baseline, and at low and peak doses of dobutamine. Patients were classified according to the absence or presence of dobutamine T-wave changes. Those without T-wave changes had a significantly higher WMSI at rest (1.68+/-0.23 vs 1.50+/-0.21; p <0.05) and at peak (1.77+/-0.34 vs 1.51+/-.30 p <0.05) of dobutamine stress testing, without higher incidence of viability, homozonal, and heterozonal ischemia and chest pain. The angiographic patterns were similar between groups. Regression analysis showed a significant correlation between WMSI and T-wave amplitude at baseline (R = 0.38, p = 0.01) and at peak dobutamine stress testing (R = 0.50, p = 0.0006). The sensitivity sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of T-wave changes to detect myocardial viability were 0.27, 0.84, and 0.70, respectively. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of T-wave changes to detect homozonal ischemia were 0.76, 0.27, and 0.46, respectively. In conclusion, dobutamine-induced T-wave changes are associated with a greater extent of wall motion abnormalities both at rest and at peak stress echocardiography, but they are of little value in predicting myocardial viability when analyzed early after myocardial infarction. PMID:10482151

  3. Stress waves in an isotropic elastic plate excited by a circular transducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karagulle, H.; Williams, J. H., Jr.; Lee, S. S.

    1985-01-01

    Steady state harmonic stress waves in an isotropic elastic plate excited on one face by a circular transducer are analyzed theoretically. The transmitting transducer transforms an electrical voltage into a uniform normal stress at the top of the plate. To solve the boundary value problem, the radiation into a half-space is considered. The receiving transducer produces an electrical voltage proportional to the average spatially integrated normal stress over its face due to an incident wave. A numerical procedure is given to evaluate the frequency response at a receiving point due to a multiply reflected wave in the near field. Its stability and convergence are discussed. Parameterization plots which determine the particular wave whose frequency response has maximum magnitude compared with other multiple reflected waves are given for a range of values of dimensionless parameters. The effects of changes in the values of the parameters are discussed.

  4. Shear wave transducer for stress measurements in boreholes

    DOEpatents

    Mao, Nai-Hsien

    1987-01-01

    A technique and apparatus for estimating in situ stresses by measuring stress-induced velocity anisotropy around a borehole. Two sets each of radially and tangentially polarized transducers are placed inside the hole with displacement directions either parallel or perpendicular to the principal stress directions. With this configuration, relative travel times are measured by both a pulsed phase-locked loop technique and a cross correlation of digitized waveforms. The biaxial velocity data is used to back-calculate the applied stress.

  5. Research on measurement of bed shear stress under wave-current interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Hua; Xia, Yun-feng; Ma, Bing-he; Hao, Si-yu; Zhang, Shi-zhao; Du, De-jun

    2015-06-01

    The movement of sediment in estuary and on coast is directly restricted by the bed shear stress. Therefore, the research on the basic problem of sediment movement by the bed shear stress is an important way to research the theory of sediment movement. However, there is not a measuring and computing method to measure the bed shear stress under a complicated dynamic effect like wave and current. This paper describes the measurement and test research on the bed shear stress in a long launder of direct current by the new instrument named thermal shearometer based on micro-nanotechnology. As shown by the research results, the thermal shearometer has a high response frequency and strong stability. The measured results can reflect the basic change of the bed shear stress under wave and wave-current effect, and confirm that the method of measuring bed shear stress under wave-current effect with thermal shearometer is feasible. Meanwhile, a preliminary method to compute the shear stress compounded by wave-current is put forward according to the tested and measured results, and then a reference for further study on the basic theory of sediment movement under a complicated dynamic effect is provided.

  6. Seismic wave propagation through an in-situ stressed rock mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, L. F.; Sun, H. Y.

    2015-10-01

    This paper presents an analytical study of seismic wave propagation through an in-situ stressed rock mass. The joint deformation is assumed to satisfy the nonlinear Bandis-Barton (B-B) deformational model. The displacement discontinuity method (DDM) is introduced to take account of the effect of in-situ stress. The amplitude- and frequency-dependence of seismic wave propagation through an in-situ stressed rock mass are analyzed. The effects of in-situ stress on seismic attenuation, energy transmission and effective seismic velocity are discussed. The results show that seismic attenuation, energy transmission and effective seismic velocity are influenced by seismic wave amplitude and frequency, and in-situ stress. Moreover, the amplitude- and frequency-dependence of a seismic wave obtained by conventional DDM are special cases when in-situ stress is not considered. The effect of in-situ stress on seismic attenuation, energy transmission and effective seismic velocity can be neglected when either the amplitude or the frequency is sufficiently large. When the frequency is sufficiently small, the effect of in-situ stress on seismic attenuation and energy transmission can also be neglected, but its effect on the effective seismic velocity cannot be ignored.

  7. Internal stress determination in a polymer composite by Coda wave interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Q.; Binetruy, C.; Burtin, C.

    2016-07-01

    Coda wave interferometry (CWI) is largely employed in geotechnical applications to monitor changes due to cracks in materials but it is still not used for composite materials. In this paper, the technique is proposed to study internal stresses in a composite laminate [0°/90°]63 and was compared with the traditional acoustic technique. It is shown that the Coda wave interferometry has better precision and sensibility than the method based on the first arriving time of flight (TOF) measurement, especially when the fiber orientation is normal to the wave propagation. This method is found to be promising for residual stress evaluation in composite materials.

  8. Stress wave emission and cavitation bubble dynamics by nanosecond optical breakdown in a tissue phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brujan, Emil-Alexandru; Vogel, Alfred

    2006-07-01

    Stress wave emission and cavitation bubble dynamics after optical breakdown in water and a tissue phantom with Nd: YAG laser pulses of 6 ns duration were investigated both experimentally and numerically to obtain a better understanding of the physical mechanisms involved in plasma-mediated laser surgery. Experimental tools were high-speed photography with 50000 frames s(-1) , and acoustic measurements. The tissue phantom consisted of a transparent polyacrylamide (PAA) gel, the elastic properties of which can be controlled by modifying the water content. Breakdown in water produced a purely compressive stress wave. By contrast, in stiff PAA samples and for sufficiently large pulse energies, the compression wave was followed by an intense tensile wave, similar to the behaviour previously observed in cornea. The elastic/plastic response of the medium led to a significant decrease of the maximum size of the cavitation bubble and to a shortening of its oscillation period which was found to be related to the generation of the tensile stress wave upon breakdown. For increasing elastic modulus of the PAA, both the amplitudes of the bubble oscillation and of the stress wave emitted during bubble collapse decreased until the bubble oscillation was so strongly damped that no collapse stress wave was emitted. Numerical simulations were performed using a spherical model of bubble dynamics which includes the compressibility and elastic/plastic behaviour of the medium, viscosity, density and surface tension. The calculations revealed that consideration of the elastic/plastic behaviour of the medium surrounding the bubble is essential to describe the experimentally observed bipolar shape of the stress wave emitted upon optical breakdown. Water is a poor tissue model because the shape of the emitted stress waves and the bubble dynamics differ strongly for both materials. The mechanical properties of PAA were also found to be quite different from those of tissues. Experimental and

  9. Anisotropic stress as a signature of nonstandard propagation of gravitational waves.

    PubMed

    Saltas, Ippocratis D; Sawicki, Ignacy; Amendola, Luca; Kunz, Martin

    2014-11-01

    We make precise the heretofore ambiguous statement that anisotropic stress is a sign of a modification of gravity. We show that in cosmological solutions of very general classes of models extending gravity-all scalar-tensor theories (Horndeski), Einstein-aether models, and bimetric massive gravity-a direct correspondence exists between perfect fluids apparently carrying anisotropic stress and a modification in the propagation of gravitational waves. Since the anisotropic stress can be measured in a model-independent manner, a comparison of the behavior of gravitational waves from cosmological sources with large-scale-structure formation could, in principle, lead to new constraints on the theory of gravity. PMID:25415893

  10. Helical guided waves in liquid-filled cylindrical shells subjected to static pressurization stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubuc, Brennan; Ebrahimkhanlou, Arvin; Salamone, Salvatore

    2016-04-01

    Helical guided waves in pipelines are studied under the effects of pressurization stresses from a contained liquid. The pipeline is approximated by an "unwrapped" plate waveguide, and a transfer matrix method is used to solve for guided wave velocity and attenuation dispersion curves in a multilayered plate waveguide subject to an arbitrary triaxial state of initial stress. The matrix-based model is able to incorporate both elastic and viscoelastic solid materials, as well as approximate non-uniform distributions in initial stress through the thickness of a waveguide. Experiments on a steel pipe filled with pressurized water are carried out to validate the modeling approach.

  11. Finite element simulation of cell-substrate decohesion by laser-induced stress waves.

    PubMed

    Miller, Phillip; Hu, Lili; Wang, Junlan

    2010-04-01

    Fundamental to the development and application of biomedical devices is an understanding of the adhesion of cells to substrates. There are many experimental techniques and papers dedicated to the study of cell adhesion. This work aims to elucidate on the cell detachment mechanism in a recently reported cell adhesion measurement experiment by laser-induced stress wave technique. In the experiment the absorption of an Nd:YAG laser pulse generates a stress wave of nanoseconds duration that interacts with and detaches the cell adhered to a Si substrate. Due to the ultra-short timescale involved in the experiment, details of the detachment process were not readily observable. In this work, dynamic finite element method is used to simulate the cell-substrate decohesion process under the laser-induced stress wave loading. The results show that the combined effect of nanosecond stress wave pulse and the specific cell geometry results in a complex stress-strain state along the cell-substrate interface. The principal failure mechanism is large interfacial strains realized from the cell's tendency to spread and elongate on the substrate as a result of substrate acceleration. The cells behave like a soft elastic solid during the detachment process due to the large difference between their characteristic response time and the ultra-short duration of the applied stress wave. Evolution of the cell geometry from hydrophobic to hydrophilic contact results in the same detachment process. PMID:20142111

  12. Effect of stress on energy flux deviation of ultrasonic waves in GR/EP composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prosser, William H.; Kriz, R. D.; Fitting, Dale W.

    1990-01-01

    Ultrasonic waves suffer energy flux deviation in graphite/epoxy because of the large anisotropy. The angle of deviation is a function of the elastic coefficients. For nonlinear solids, these coefficients and thus the angle of deviation is a function of stress. Acoustoelastic theory was used to model the effect of stress on flux deviation for unidirectional T300/5208 using previously measured elastic coefficients. Computations were made for uniaxial stress along the x3 axis (fiber axis) and the x1 for waves propagating in the x1x3 plane. These results predict a shift as large as three degrees for the quasi-transverse wave. The shift in energy flux offers a new nondestructive technique of evaluating stress in composites.

  13. Thermoelastic Stress in a Functionally Graded Infinite Plate with Electromagnetic Wave Absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Hong-Yan; Wang, Xing-Zhe; Zhou, You-He

    2012-11-01

    We present an analysis of thermal and thermoelastic behaviors of a functionally graded infinite plate taking into account electromagnetic wave absorption. To treat with the inhomogeneity of functionally graded wave-absorbing (FGWA) materials, the plate is approximated by subdividing it into thin homogeneous layers to solve the governing equations together with proper boundary and connecting conditions. The results illustrate that the FGWA plate is a broadband type absorber with electromagnetic wave absorption. By choosing proper material gradation character and the thickness of the FGWA plate, it is possible to obtain a good performance of electromagnetic wave absorption and thermoelastic stress characteristics.

  14. Experimental study of the stress effect on attenuation of normally incident P-wave through coal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Junjun; Wang, Enyuan; Chen, Liang; Li, Xuelong; Xu, Zhaoyong; Li, Guoai

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to experimentally investigate the stress effect on normally incident P-wave attenuation through coal specimens. Laboratory tests were carried out using a Split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) system, and a modified method was proposed to determine the quality factor (Q) of P-waves through coal specimens. Larger quality factor denotes less energy attenuated during P-wave propagating through coal. Experimental results indicate that the quality factor and stress (σ) within coal specimens are positively correlated. The P-wave propagation through coal specimens causes crack closure at the beginning of the coal fracture process in SHPB tests, an innovative model was thus proposed to describe the relationship between the crack closure length and the dynamic stress induced by P-wave. Finally, the stress effect on P-wave attenuation through coal was quantitatively represented by a power function Q = a(c-bσ)- 6, and the material constants a, b, and c were determined as 1.227, 1.314, and 0.005, respectively. The results obtained in this study would be helpful for engineers to estimate seismic energy attenuation and coal mass instability in coal mines.

  15. Analytical Study for Stress Wave Interaction with Rock Joints Having Unequally Close-Open Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J. C.; Zhao, X. B.; Li, H. B.; Chai, S. B.; Zhao, Q. H.

    2016-08-01

    Stress wave interaction with rock joints during wave propagation is usually dependent on the dynamic response of the joints. During wave propagation, joints may be closed and open under the effects of the stress wave and the in situ stress. A joint in nature can only resist load during close process. In this paper, the close and open behaviors of rock joints are considered to be different. The joints are assumed to be linearly elastic in close status but turn into free surfaces in open status. Wave propagation equation across joints with unequally close-open behavior is first derived and expressed as a time-differential form based on the displacement discontinuity method. SHPB test recording is then adopted to verify the present approach, which is also compared with the results from existing methods for joints with equally close-open behavior. Next, analysis is conduced for wave propagation across a single joint and a set of parallel joints with unequally close-open behavior, respectively. From the analysis, effects of unequally close-open behavior of a joint on wave propagation and the dynamic response of the joint are studied finally.

  16. Isolated True Surface Wave in a Radiative Band on a Surface of a Stressed Auxetic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trzupek, D.; Zieliński, P.

    2009-08-01

    We demonstrate that a surface resonance (pseudosurface wave) may transform into a true surface wave, i.e., acquire an infinite lifetime, at a single isolated point within a bulk band (radiative region) in a model of a stressed auxetic material. In contrast with the secluded supersonic elastic surface waves, the one found here does not belong to a dispersion line of true surface waves. Therefore we propose to call it an isolated true surface wave (ITSW). The ITSW manifests itself by a deltalike peak in the local density of states and by anomalies in reflection coefficients. The phenomenon may be useful in redirecting energy and/or information from the bulk to the surface in devices supporting guided acoustic waves.

  17. Residual-stress characterization by use of elastic-wave-scattering measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Domany, E.; Gubernatis, J.E.

    1982-01-01

    The presence of a state of residual stress in a material can impair its structural quality by adversely affecting its elastic limit, yield point, etc. In this paper we derive the appropriate equations for the use of elastic waves to probe an inhomogeneous state of residual stress. As in other treatments of ultrasonic residual stress measurement, we start with nonlinear effects and require knowledge of third order elastic constants. Unlike other treatments, which relate these nonlinear effects to small relative changes in propagation speed of an incident wave, we identify these effects as a source of scattering of the incident wave. Like other treatments, one difficulty with ultrasonic residual stress measurements is separating small residual stress effects from other effects. However, we will give an example of at least one class of problems where this separation appears possible using our approach. It is demonstrated that elastic wave propagation in the presence of non-uniform residual stress can be viewed as a scattering problem. One should note that in various limits, such as that of short wavelength, this scattering problem (as well as any other) can be treated by optical methods (ray bendings, diffraction, etc.). The special features of a scattering situation are expected to be important for smaller wavelengths, and therefore their experimental observability is questionable, and can be resolved only by careful and thorough measurements.

  18. Softening of stressed granular packings with resonant sound waves.

    PubMed

    Reichhardt, C J Olson; Lopatina, L M; Jia, X; Johnson, P A

    2015-08-01

    We perform numerical simulations of a two-dimensional bidisperse granular packing subjected to both a static confining pressure and a sinusoidal dynamic forcing applied by a wall on one edge of the packing. We measure the response experienced by a wall on the opposite edge of the packing and obtain the resonant frequency of the packing as the static or dynamic pressures are varied. Under increasing static pressure, the resonant frequency increases, indicating a velocity increase of elastic waves propagating through the packing. In contrast, when the dynamic amplitude is increased for fixed static pressure, the resonant frequency decreases, indicating a decrease in the wave velocity. This occurs both for compressional and for shear dynamic forcing and is in agreement with experimental results. We find that the average contact number Zc at the resonant frequency decreases with increasing dynamic amplitude, indicating that the elastic softening of the packing is associated with a reduced number of grain-grain contacts through which the elastic waves can travel. We image the excitations created in the packing and show that there are localized disturbances or soft spots that become more prevalent with increasing dynamic amplitude. Our results are in agreement with experiments on glass bead packings and earth materials such as sandstone and granite and may be relevant to the decrease in elastic wave velocities that has been observed to occur near fault zones after strong earthquakes, in surficial sediments during strong ground motion, and in structures during earthquake excitation. PMID:26382390

  19. Correlation of fiber composite tensile strength with the ultrasonic stress wave factor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vary, A.; Lark, R. F.

    1978-01-01

    An ultrasonic-acoustic technique was used to indicate the strength variations of tensile specimens of a graphite-epoxy composite. A 'stress wave factor' was determined and its value was found to depend on variations of the fiber-resin bonding as well as fiber orientation. The fiber orientations studied were 0 deg (longitudinal), 10 deg (off-axis), 90 deg (transverse), (0 deg/+ or - 45 deg/0) symmetrical, and (+ or - 45 deg) symmetrical. The stress wave factor can indicate variations of the tensile and shear strengths of composite materials. The stress wave factor was also found to be sensitive to strength variations associated with microporosity and differences in fiber-resin ratio.

  20. Correlation of Fiber Composite Tensile Strength with the Ultrasonic Stress Wave Factor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vary, A.; Lark, R. F.

    1978-01-01

    An ultrasonic-acoustic technique was used to indicate the strength variations of tensile specimens of a graphite-epoxy composite. A stress wave factor was determined and its value was found to depend on variations of the fiber-resin bonding as well as fiber orientation. The fiber orientations studied were 0 deg (longitudinal), 10 deg (off-axis), 90 deg (transverse), 0 deg + or - 45 deg/0 deg symmetrical, and + or - 45 deg] symmetrical. The stress wave factor can indicate variations of the tensile and shear strengths of composite materials. The stress wave factor was also found to be sensitive to strength variations associated with microporosity and differences in fiber-resin ratio.

  1. Stress wave communication in concrete: I. Characterization of a smart aggregate based concrete channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siu, Sam; Ji, Qing; Wu, Wenhao; Song, Gangbing; Ding, Zhi

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, we explore the characteristics of a concrete block as a communication medium with piezoelectric transducers. Lead zirconate titanate (PZT) is a piezoceramic material used in smart materials intended for structural health monitoring (SHM). Additionally, a PZT based smart aggregate (SA) is capable of implementing stress wave communications which is utilized for investigating the properties of an SA based concrete channel. Our experiments characterize single-input single-output and multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) concrete channels in order to determine the potential capacity limits of SAs for stress wave communication. We first provide estimates and validate the concrete channel response. Followed by a theoretical upper bound for data rate capacity of our two channels, demonstrating a near-twofold increase in channel capacity by utilizing multiple transceivers to form an MIMO system. Our channel modeling techniques and results are also helpful to researchers using SAs with regards to SHM, energy harvesting and stress wave communications.

  2. Correlation of stress-wave-emission characteristics with fracture aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartbower, C. E.; Reuter, W. G.; Morais, C. F.; Crimmins, P. P.

    1972-01-01

    A study to correlate stress wave emission characteristics with fracture in welded and unwelded aluminum alloys tested at room and cryogenic temperature is reported. The stress wave emission characteristics investigated were those which serve to presage crack instability; viz., a marked increase in:(1) signal amplitude; (2) signal repetition rate; and (3) the slope of cumulative count plotted versus load. The alloys were 7075-T73, 2219-T87 and 2014-T651, welded with MIG and TIG using 2319 and 4043 filler wire. The testing was done with both unnotched and part-through-crack (PTC) tension specimens and with 18-in.-dia subscale pressure vessels. In the latter testing, a real time, acoustic emission, triangulation system was used to locate the source of each stress wave emission. With such a system, multiple emissions from a given location were correlated with defects found by conventional nondestructive inspection.

  3. Evaluation of stress wave propagation through rock mass using a modified dominate frequency method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, L. F.; Wu, Z. J.

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents an evaluation of stress wave propagation through rock mass using a modified dominate frequency method. The effective velocity and transmission coefficient of stress wave propagation through rock mass with different joint stiffnesses are investigated. The results are validated by the theoretical method and the effects of incident frequency on the calculation accuracy are discussed. The results show that the modified dominate frequency method can be used to predict the effective velocity when the frequency of stress waves is within the low frequency range or high frequency range. However, the error cannot be ignored when the frequency is in the transitional frequency range. On the other hand, the modified dominate frequency method can be used to predict the transmission coefficient when the frequency of stress wave is within the low frequency range or optimal frequency range. However, the error cannot be ignored when the wave is within the high frequency range, which approaches 40% when the frequency is sufficiently large. Finally, the optimal stiffness-frequency relationship for the maximum calculation errors of effective velocity and the minimum calculation errors of transmission coefficient are proposed.

  4. Propagation of Nonlinear Waves in Waveguides and Application to Nondestructive Stress Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nucera, Claudio

    Propagation of nonlinear waves in waveguides is a field that has received an ever increasing interest in the last few decades. Nonlinear guided waves are excellent candidates for interrogating long waveguide like structures because they combine high sensitivity to structural conditions, typical of nonlinear parameters, with large inspection ranges, characteristic of wave propagation in bounded media. The primary topic of this dissertation is the analysis of ultrasonic waves, including ultrasonic guided waves, propagating in their nonlinear regime and their application to structural health monitoring problems, particularly the measurement of thermal stress in Continuous Welded Rail (CWR). Following an overview of basic physical principles generating nonlinearities in ultrasonic wave propagation, the case of higher-harmonic generation in multi-mode and dispersive guided waves is examined in more detail. A numerical framework is developed in order to predict favorable higher-order generation conditions (i.e. specific guided modes and frequencies) for waveguides of arbitrary cross-sections. This model is applied to various benchmark cases of complex structures. The nonlinear wave propagation model is then applied to the case of a constrained railroad track (CWR) subjected to thermal variations. This study is a direct response to the key need within the railroad transportation community to develop a technique able to measure thermal stresses in CWR, or determine the rail temperature corresponding to a null thermal stress (Neutral Temperature -- NT). The numerical simulation phase concludes with a numerical study performed using ABAQUS commercial finite element package. These analyses were crucial in predicting the evolution of the nonlinear parameter beta with thermal stress level acting in the rail. A novel physical model, based on interatomic potential, was developed to explain the origin of nonlinear wave propagation under constrained thermal expansion. In fact

  5. Nonlinear Rayleigh waves to detect initial damage leading to stress corrosion cracking in carbon steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matlack, K. H.; Kim, J.-Y..; Jacobs, L. J.; Qu, J.; Singh, P. M.

    2012-05-01

    This research experimentally investigates second harmonic generation of Rayleigh waves propagating through carbon steel samples damaged in a stress corrosion environment. Damage from stress corrosion cracking is of major concern in nuclear reactor tubes and in gas and fuel transport pipelines. For example, certain types of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) account for more failures in steam generator tubes than most other damage mechanisms, yet these cracks do not initiate until late in the structure's life. Thus, there is a need to be able to measure the damage state prior to crack initiation, and it has been shown that the acoustic nonlinearity parameter - the parameter associated with second harmonic generation - is sensitive to microstructural evolution. In this work, samples are immersed in a sodium carbonate-bicarbonate solution, which typically forms in the soil surrounding buried pipelines affected by SCC, and held at yield stress for 5-15 days to the onset of stress corrosion cracking. Measurements of second harmonic generation with Rayleigh waves are taken intermittently to relate cumulative damage prior to macroscopic cracking to nonlinear wave propagation. Experimental results showing changes in second harmonic generation due to stress corrosion damage are presented.

  6. Reynolds stress closure in jet flows using wave models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, P. J.

    1986-01-01

    A wave model was developed for the two dimensional shear layer. This configuration is being used as a test case for the closure schemes. Numerical methods are under development to solve the nonseparable Rayleigh equation. A model problem is being used to assist in the algorithm development. An analytic solution of the Rayleigh equation for a basic elliptic flow was obtained. This will be used to verify the stability codes developed for arbitrary geometries. Other numerical methods for solving the Rayleigh equation based on the boundary element technique are being examined.

  7. Gene transfer into mammalian cells by use of a nanosecond pulsed laser-induced stress wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terakawa, Mitsuhiro; Ogura, Makoto; Sato, Shunichi; Wakisaka, Hitoshi; Ashida, Hiroshi; Uenoyama, Maki; Masaki, Yoshinori; Obara, Minoru

    2004-06-01

    Plasmid DNA has been successfully delivered to mammalian cells by applying a nanosecond pulsed laser-induced stress wave (LISW). Cells exposed to a LISW were selectively transfected with plasmids coding for green fluorescent protein. It was also shown that transient, mild cellular heating (~43 °C) was effective in improving the transfection efficiency.

  8. Study of heat-stress levels in naturally ventilated sheep barns during heat waves: development and assessment of regression models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papanastasiou, D. K.; Bartzanas, T.; Panagakis, P.; Zhang, G.; Kittas, C.

    2016-03-01

    It is well documented that heat-stress burdens sheep welfare and productivity. Peak heat-stress levels are observed when high temperatures prevail, i.e. during heat waves; however, continuous measurements inside livestock buildings are not usually available for long periods so as to study the variation of summer heat-stress levels for several years, especially during extreme hot weather. Α methodology to develop a long time series of summer temperature and relative humidity inside naturally ventilated sheep barns is proposed. The accuracy and the transferability of the developed linear regression models were verified. Temperature Humidity Index (THI) was used to assess sheep's potential heat-stress. Τhe variation of THI inside a barn during heat wave and non-heat wave days was examined, and the results were comparatively assessed. The analysis showed that sheep were exposed to moderate, severe, and extreme severe heat-stress in 10, 21 and 66 % of hours, respectively, during heat wave days, while the corresponding values during non-heat wave days were 14, 33 and 43 %, respectively. The heat load on sheep was much higher during heat wave events than during non-heat wave periods. Additionally, based on the averaged diurnal variation of THI, it was concluded that extreme severe heat-stress conditions were prevailing between 1000 and 2400 hours local time during heat wave days. Cool off night periods were never and extremely rarely detected during heat wave and non-heat wave days, respectively.

  9. Reynolds stress closure in jet flows using wave models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, P. J.

    1988-01-01

    Ways of implementing the turbulence closure scheme based on modeling the large scale coherent structures as instability waves were sought. The computational tools necessary to apply this scheme to jets of arbitrary geometry were developed. The model, developed earlier, was extended to the shock structure of supersonic jets of arbitrary geometry and multiple jets. It was found that though the qualititate features of the unsteady flow field could be predicted there were always difficulties with some of the quantitative features. This led to the new formation of the closure scheme. The schemes for computations tools which were developed are efficient and represent the application of the very powerful mathematical tools to the problems of practical significance.

  10. Reynold stress closure in jet flows using wave models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, P. J.

    1988-01-01

    Research program efforts have continued to concentrate on the development of the numerical methods that will form the computational part of the turbulence closure scheme. Studies have continued on the wave model for the two dimensional shear layer. This configuration is being used as a test case for the closure schemes. Several numerical schemes for the solution of the non-separable Rayleigh equation were developed. This solution is required for the closure scheme in more complex geometries. The most efficient method found is a Hybrid scheme that combines both pseudospectral and finite difference techniques. In addition, conformal transformation techniques were developed to transform the arbitrary geometry of the jet to a simple computational domain. The study of the shock structure in arbitrary geometry jets and multiple jets. These developments are described briefly.

  11. Propagation of high amplitude stress waves through a filled artificial joint: An experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xiaolin; Qi, Shengwen; Xia, Kaiwen; Zheng, Hong; Zheng, Bowen

    2016-07-01

    This paper investigates the propagation of high amplitude stress waves through a filled joint using a modified steel split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) system. Quartz sand fillings with various thickness are placed in a steel tube and then sandwiched between the incident and transmitted bars to simulate the filled rock joints. Using SHPB, the incident stress waves with similar frequency spectrum but varying amplitude are induced to load the artificial filled joints. The particle size distributions of the fillings after tests are analyzed. It is discovered that as the amplitude of the incident wave increases, the fillings experience three stages of deformation: initial compaction, crushing and crushing and compaction. In the initial compaction stage and the crushing and compaction stage, the fillings are mainly compacted, and thus the transmission coefficient increases with the amplitude of the incident wave. However in the crushing stage, the transmission coefficient decreases with the increase of the amplitude of the incident wave. This is a result of energy consumption due to particle crushing. The observed dependence of the transmission coefficient on the wave amplitude is consistent with the particle size distribution of recovered fillings.

  12. Effective gravitational wave stress-energy tensor in alternative theories of gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Stein, Leo C.; Yunes, Nicolas

    2011-03-15

    The inspiral of binary systems in vacuum is controlled by the stress-energy of gravitational radiation and any other propagating degrees of freedom. For gravitational waves, the dominant contribution is characterized by an effective stress-energy tensor at future null infinity. We employ perturbation theory and the short-wavelength approximation to compute this stress-energy tensor in a wide class of alternative theories. We find that this tensor is generally a modification of that first computed by Isaacson, where the corrections can dominate over the general relativistic term. In a wide class of theories, however, these corrections identically vanish at asymptotically flat, future, null infinity, reducing the stress-energy tensor to Isaacson's. We exemplify this phenomenon by first considering dynamical Chern-Simons modified gravity, which corrects the action via a scalar field and the contraction of the Riemann tensor and its dual. We then consider a wide class of theories with dynamical scalar fields coupled to higher-order curvature invariants and show that the gravitational wave stress-energy tensor still reduces to Isaacson's. The calculations presented in this paper are crucial to perform systematic tests of such modified gravity theories through the orbital decay of binary pulsars or through gravitational wave observations.

  13. Ultrasonic evaluation of residual stresses in aero engine materials using bulk and Rayleigh surface waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubel, Sebastian; Dillhöfer, Alexander; Rieder, Hans; Spies, Martin; Bamberg, Joachim; Götz, Joshua; Hessert, Roland; Preikszas, Christina

    2014-02-01

    The evaluation of residual stresses using ultrasound can be a very complex issue, because different material properties may effect the propagation of ultrasonic waves. Nevertheless, in the manufacturing of modern aero engines it is essential to benefit from the full potential of the employed materials. In this context, it is indispensable to test whether ultrasonic stress measurement is applicable for the highly developed nickel- and titanium-based alloys. This contribution contains basic investigations on the achievable measurement effect in samples made of Inconel IN718 and the Titanium alloy Ti 6-2-4-6. Furthermore, we give an overview over the principles of ultrasonic stress measurement using bulk and Rayleigh waves and present first results which are discussed with respect to texture effects and future work.

  14. A focused electric spark source for non-contact stress wave excitation in solids.

    PubMed

    Dai, Xiaowei; Zhu, Jinying; Haberman, Michael R

    2013-12-01

    A focused electric spark is used as a non-contact acoustic source to excite stress waves in solids. The source consists of an electric spark source located at the near focus of an ellipsoidal reflector that focuses the acoustic disturbance generated by the spark source to the far focal point. Experimental studies using both contact and non-contact sensors indicate that the source has the capability to excite the Rayleigh surface wave and impact-echo mode (S1-zero-group-velocity Lamb mode) in a 250 mm thick concrete slab and to enable fully air-coupled testing of concrete specimens. PMID:25669297

  15. DERIVATIONS FOR HOOP STRESSES DUE TO SHOCK WAVES IN A TUBE

    SciTech Connect

    Leishear, R

    2007-04-30

    Equations describing the hoop stresses in a pipe due to water hammer have been presented in the literature in a series of papers, and this paper discusses the complete derivation of the pertinent equation. The derivation considers the pipe wall response to a water hammer induced shock wave moving along the inner wall of the pipe. Factors such as fluid properties, pipe wall materials, pipe dimensions, and damping are considered. These factors are combined to present a single, albeit rather complicated, equation to describe the pipe wall vibrations and hoop stresses as a function of time. This equation is also compared to another theoretical prediction for hoop stresses, which is also derived herein. Specifically, the two theories predict different maximum stresses, and the differences between these predictions are graphically displayed.

  16. An investigation of stress wave propagation in a shear deformable nanobeam based on modified couple stress theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbarzadeh Khorshidi, Majid; Shariati, Mahmoud

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents a new investigation for propagation of stress wave in a nanobeam based on modified couple stress theory. Using Euler-Bernoulli beam theory, Timoshenko beam theory, and Reddy beam theory, the effect of shear deformation is investigated. This nonclassical model contains a material length scale parameter to capture the size effect and the Poisson effect is incorporated in the current model. Governing equations of motion are obtained by Hamilton's principle and solved explicitly. This solution leads to obtain two phase velocities for shear deformable beams in different directions. Effects of shear deformation, material length scale parameter, and Poisson's ratio on the behavior of these phase velocities are investigated and discussed. The results also show a dual behavior for phase velocities against Poisson's ratio.

  17. Ultrafast Kikuchi diffraction: nanoscale stress-strain dynamics of wave-guiding structures.

    PubMed

    Yurtsever, Aycan; Schaefer, Sascha; Zewail, Ahmed H

    2012-07-11

    Complex structural dynamics at the nanoscale requires sufficiently small probes to be visualized. In conventional imaging using electron microscopy, the dimension of the probe is large enough to cause averaging over the structures present. However, by converging ultrafast electron bunches, it is possible to select a single nanoscale structure and study the dynamics, either in the image or using electron diffraction. Moreover, the span of incident wave vectors in a convergent beam enables sensitivity levels and information contents beyond those of parallel-beam illumination with a single wave vector Bragg diffraction. Here, we report the observation of propagating strain waves using ultrafast Kikuchi diffraction from nanoscale volumes within a wedge-shaped silicon single crystal. It is found that the heterogeneity of the strain in the lateral direction is only 100 nm. The transient elastic wave gives rise to a coherent oscillation with a period of 30 ps and with an envelope that has a width of 140 ps. The origin of this elastic deformation is theoretically examined using finite element analysis; it is identified as propagating shear waves. The wedge-shaped structure, unlike parallel-plate structure, is the key behind the traveling nature of the waves as its angle permits "transverse" propagation; the parallel-plate structure only exhibits the "longitudinal" motion. The studies reported suggest extension to a range of applications for nanostructures of different shapes and for exploring their ultrafast eigen-modes of stress-strain profiles. PMID:22667321

  18. A study of the stress wave factor technique for the characterization of composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Govada, A. K.; Duke, J. C., Jr.; Henneke, E. G., II; Stinchcomb, W. W.

    1985-01-01

    This study has investigated the potential of the Stress Wave Factor as an NDT technique for thin composite laminates. The conventional SWF and an alternate method for quantifying the SWF were investigated. Agreement between the initial SWF number, ultrasonic C-scan, inplane displacements as obtained by full field moire interferometry, and the failure location have been observed. The SWF number was observed to be the highest when measured along the fiber direction and the lowest when measured across the fibers. The alternate method for quantifying the SWF used square root of the zeroth moment (square root of M sub o) of the frequency spectrum of the received signal as a quantitative parameter. From this study it therefore appears that the stress wave factor has an excellent potential to monitor damage development in thin composite laminates.

  19. New calibration technique for multiple-component stress wave force balances

    SciTech Connect

    Abdel-jawad, Madhat M.; Mee, David J.; Morgan, Richard G.

    2007-06-15

    The measurement of forces in hypervelocity expansion tubes is not possible using conventional techniques. The stress wave force balance technique can be applied in expansion tubes to measure forces despite the short test times involved. This article presents a new calibration technique for multiple-component stress wave force balances where an impulse response created using a load distribution is required and no orthogonal surfaces on the model exist. This new technique relies on the tensorial superposition of single-component impulse responses analogous to the vectorial superposition of the calibration loads. The example presented here is that of a scale model of the Mars Pathfinder, but the technique is applicable to any geometry and may be useful for cases where orthogonal loads cannot be applied.

  20. New calibration technique for multiple-component stress wave force balances.

    PubMed

    Abdel-jawad, Madhat M; Mee, David J; Morgan, Richard G

    2007-06-01

    The measurement of forces in hypervelocity expansion tubes is not possible using conventional techniques. The stress wave force balance technique can be applied in expansion tubes to measure forces despite the short test times involved. This article presents a new calibration technique for multiple-component stress wave force balances where an impulse response created using a load distribution is required and no orthogonal surfaces on the model exist. This new technique relies on the tensorial superposition of single-component impulse responses analogous to the vectorial superposition of the calibration loads. The example presented here is that of a scale model of the Mars Pathfinder, but the technique is applicable to any geometry and may be useful for cases where orthogonal loads cannot be applied. PMID:17614632

  1. New calibration technique for multiple-component stress wave force balances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-jawad, Madhat M.; Mee, David J.; Morgan, Richard G.

    2007-06-01

    The measurement of forces in hypervelocity expansion tubes is not possible using conventional techniques. The stress wave force balance technique can be applied in expansion tubes to measure forces despite the short test times involved. This article presents a new calibration technique for multiple-component stress wave force balances where an impulse response created using a load distribution is required and no orthogonal surfaces on the model exist. This new technique relies on the tensorial superposition of single-component impulse responses analogous to the vectorial superposition of the calibration loads. The example presented here is that of a scale model of the Mars Pathfinder, but the technique is applicable to any geometry and may be useful for cases where orthogonal loads cannot be applied.

  2. Monitoring stress changes in a concrete bridge with coda wave interferometry.

    PubMed

    Stähler, Simon Christian; Sens-Schönfelder, Christoph; Niederleithinger, Ernst

    2011-04-01

    Coda wave interferometry is a recent analysis method now widely used in seismology. It uses the increased sensitivity of multiply scattered elastic waves with long travel-times for monitoring weak changes in a medium. While its application for structural monitoring has been shown to work under laboratory conditions, the usability on a real structure with known material changes had yet to be proven. This article presents experiments on a concrete bridge during construction. The results show that small velocity perturbations induced by a changing stress state in the structure can be determined even under adverse conditions. Theoretical estimations based on the stress calculations by the structural engineers are in good agreement with the measured velocity variations. PMID:21476650

  3. Free-slit shielding of stress waves by the photoelasticity method

    SciTech Connect

    Freishist, N.A.; Dmitrienko, O.L.

    1986-05-01

    This paper is devoted to the study of an experimental model investigation of the distribution of dynamic stresses beyond a free shielding slit as a longitudinal wave from a blast source strikes the shield. The studies were conducted by the method of photoelasticity on a dynamic polarization apparatus in the stress-study laboratory at the Moscow V.V. Kuibyshev Civil Engineering Institute. The problem was solved in the plane elastic statement on models in the form of plates made of an optically sensitive epoxy-resin-base material. The pulse effect was created by the detonation of a cylindrical lead azide microcharge. The dynamic stressed state at internal points of the model was evaluated from the magnitudes and distribution of maximum tangential stresses, and on the free perimeter of the model from the magnitudes and distribution of the normal stress parallel to the perimeter. The experimental studies indicated that a zone in which the stress amplitude is reduced as compared with the nominal stresses exists beyond the slit in all cases examined. The investigations made it possible to evaluate these relationships within the range of parameters under consideration.

  4. Effect of initial stress on propagation behaviors of shear horizontal waves in piezoelectric/piezomagnetic layered cylinders.

    PubMed

    Zhao, X; Qian, Z H; Zhang, S; Liu, J X

    2015-12-01

    An analytical approach is taken to investigate shear horizontal wave (SH wave) propagation in layered cylinder with initial stress, where a piezomagnetic (PM) material thin layer is bonded to a piezoelectric (PE) cylinder. Two different material combinations are taken into account, and the phase velocities of the SH waves are numerically calculated for the magnetically open and short cases, respectively. It is found that the initial stress, the thickness ratio and the material performance have a great influence on the phase velocity. The results obtained in this paper can offer fundamental significance to the application of PE/PM composite media or structure for the acoustic wave and microwave technologies. PMID:26138596

  5. Bottom shear stress and pressure perturbations under an internal solitary wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivera, Gustavo; Diamessis, Peter

    2014-11-01

    The bottom boundary layer (BBL) under a mode-1 internal solitary wave (ISW) of depression propagating against an oncoming model barotropic current is examined using 2-D direct numerical simulation based on a spectral multidomain penalty method model. Use of a postprocessing projection onto a modified set of divergence-free basis functions enables investigation of wave-based Reynolds numbers within the range [105 ,106 ] . At sufficiently high ISW amplitude, the BBL undergoes a global instability which produces intermittent vortex shedding from within the separation bubble in the lee of the wave. The interplay between the bottom shear stress field and pressure perturbations during vortex ejection events and the subsequent evolution of the vortices is the focus of this presentation. Implications for resuspension of bottom particulate matter are discussed in the context of specific sediment transport models. Support from the Cornell Sloan Diversity Fellowship program is gratefully acknowledged.

  6. Characterization of damage due to stress corrosion cracking in carbon steel using nonlinear surface acoustic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeitvogel, D. T.; Matlack, K. H.; Kim, J.-Y.; Jacobs, L. J.; Singh, P. M.; Qu, J.

    2013-01-01

    Cold rolled carbon steel 1018C is widely used in pressurized fuel pipelines. In these structures, stress corrosion cracking (SCC) can pose a significant problem because cracks initiate late in the lifetime and often unexpectedly, but grow fast once they get started. To ensure a safe operation it is crucial that any damage can be detected before the structural stability is reduced by large cracks. In the early stages of SCC, microstructural changes occur which in many cases increase the acoustic nonlinearity of the material. Therefore, an initially monochromatic Rayleigh wave is distorted and measurable higher harmonics are generated. Different levels of stress corrosion cracking is induced in five specimens. For each specimen, nonlinear ultrasonic measurements are performed before and after inducing the damage. For the measurements, oil coupled wedge transducers are used to generate and detect tone burst Rayleigh wave signals. The amplitudes of the received fundamental and second harmonic waves are measured at varying propagation distances to obtain a measure for the acoustic nonlinearity of the specimens. The results show a damage-dependent increase in nonlinearity for early stages of damage, indicating the feasibility of this nonlinear ultrasonic method to detect the initiation of stress corrosion cracking.

  7. Reflection and transmission of plane SH-waves in an initially stressed inhomogeneous anisotropic magnetoelastic medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majhi, S.; Pal, P. C.; Kumar, S.

    2016-06-01

    This study investigates the reflection and transmission of plane SH-waves in two semi-infinite anisotropic magnetoelastic media. The lower half-space is considered as initially stressed and inhomogeneous. The density of lower half-space is taken exponentially varying with depth. The solutions for half-spaces are obtained analytically. The expressions for reflection and transmission coefficient are obtained in the closed form subject to continuity conditions at the interfaces of anisotropic magnetoelastic half-spaces and the Snell's law. It is found that these coefficients depend on the initial stress, inhomogeneity parameter, the magnetoelastic coupling parameter, and the angle at which wave crosses the magnetic field of the half-spaces. Numerical computations are performed for these coefficients for a specific model of two different anisotropic magnetoelastic half-spaces. The numerical results are illustrated by the graph of reflection and transmission coefficient versus the angle of incidence. In general, as the initial stress increases the reflection and transmission coefficient increases, the affect is more prominent for more than 10 GPa. Inhomogeneity in the density of the material also increases the reflection and transmission coefficient. The anisotropic magnetoelastic parameter and the angle at which the wave crosses the magnetic field for both the half-spaces have a quite significant effect on the reflection and transmission coefficient.

  8. Radiation stress gradients across the surf zone for hurricane wave forcing: theory and observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulligan, R. P.; Bowen, A. J.; Hanson, J. L.; Hathaway, K. K.

    2012-12-01

    Wave breaking is a non-linear, turbulent and chaotic phenomenon that is the overwhelmingly dominant physical process acting along beaches and coasts exposed to surface waves during storms. The breaking process causes large rates of wave energy dissipation over short distances and the momentum that is exchanged with the mean flow is the dominant forcing for currents and water level changes across nearshore region. Inside the surf zone, this can outweigh other flow forcing mechanisms such as winds and tides by several orders of magnitude. We examine Eulerian observations from six sensor sites the USACE FRF cross-shore array for several large hurricane wave events with wide surf zones, to elucidate the nearshore balance of momentum under storm conditions. Under such strong wave forcing, observations of longshore currents up to 2 m/s and mean cross-shore flows up to 0.3 m/s near the 5 m isobath are presented for wave events that impacted the U.S. Atlantic coast in 2009-2011 including Hurricanes Bill, Earl and Irene. An investigation of the mass flux and momentum terms across the surf zone indicates that the radiation stress gradient in the cross-shore direction can exceed the momentum that can be balanced by the pressure gradient and results in significant bottom stress term and thus an offshore directed cross-shore flow. The mean cross-shore flow contributes to advection of alongshore momentum and although small when integrated across the whole surf zone, is locally important especially near the outer edge of the surf zone.

  9. Dynamic Modelling of Fault Slip Induced by Stress Waves due to Stope Production Blasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sainoki, Atsushi; Mitri, Hani S.

    2016-01-01

    Seismic events can take place due to the interaction of stress waves induced by stope production blasts with faults located in close proximity to stopes. The occurrence of such seismic events needs to be controlled to ensure the safety of the mine operators and the underground mine workings. This paper presents the results of a dynamic numerical modelling study of fault slip induced by stress waves resulting from stope production blasts. First, the calibration of a numerical model having a single blast hole is performed using a charge weight scaling law to determine blast pressure and damping coefficient of the rockmass. Subsequently, a numerical model of a typical Canadian metal mine encompassing a fault parallel to a tabular ore deposit is constructed, and the simulation of stope extraction sequence is carried out with static analyses until the fault exhibits slip burst conditions. At that point, the dynamic analysis begins by applying the calibrated blast pressure to the stope wall in the form of velocities generated by the blast holes. It is shown from the results obtained from the dynamic analysis that the stress waves reflected on the fault create a drop of normal stresses acting on the fault, which produces a reduction in shear stresses while resulting in fault slip. The influence of blast sequences on the behaviour of the fault is also examined assuming several types of blast sequences. Comparison of the blast sequence simulation results indicates that performing simultaneous blasts symmetrically induces the same level of seismic events as separate blasts, although seismic energy is more rapidly released when blasts are performed symmetrically. On the other hand when nine blast holes are blasted simultaneously, a large seismic event is induced, compared to the other two blasts. It is concluded that the separate blasts might be employed under the adopted geological conditions. The developed methodology and procedure to arrive at an ideal blast sequence can

  10. Coating thickness affects surface stress measurement of brush electro-plating nickel coating using Rayleigh wave approach.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bin; Dong, Shiyun; Xu, Binshi; He, Peng

    2012-09-01

    A surface ultrasonic wave approach was presented for measuring surface stress of brush electro-plating nickel coating specimen, and the influence of coating thickness on surface stress measurement was discussed. In this research, two Rayleigh wave transducers with 5MHz frequency were employed to collect Rayleigh wave signals of coating specimen with different static tensile stresses and different coating thickness. The difference in time of flight between two Rayleigh wave signals was determined based on normalized cross correlation function. The influence of stress on propagation velocity of Rayleigh wave and the relationship between the difference in time of flight and tensile stress that corresponded to different coating thickness were discussed. Results indicate that inhomogeneous deformation of coating affects the relationship between the difference in time of flight and tensile stress, velocity of Rayleigh wave propagating in coating specimen increases with coating thickness increasing, and the variation rate reduces of difference in time of flight with tensile stress increasing as coating thickness increases. PMID:22534060

  11. Reversible T-wave inversions and neurogenic myocardial stunning in a patient with recurrent stress-induced cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Akutsu, Yasushi; Kaneko, Kyouichi; Kodama, Yusuke; Li, Hui-Ling; Suyama, Jumpei; Toshida, Tsutomu; Kayano, Hiroyuki; Shinozuka, Akira; Gokan, Takehiko; Kobayashi, Youichi

    2014-05-01

    A 72-year-old female was diagnosed as a stress-induced cardiomyopathy from apical ballooning pattern of left ventricular dysfunction without coronary artery stenosis after the mental stress. ECG showed the transient T-wave inversions after the ST-segment elevations. By the mental stress after 1 year, she showed a transient dysfunction with similar ECG changes again. T-wave inversions recovered earlier, and cardiac sympathetic dysfunction showed a lighter response corresponding to the less severe dysfunction than those after the first onset. Wellens' ECG pattern was associated with the degree of neurogenic myocardial stunning with sympathetic hyperinnervation caused by mental stress. PMID:24147830

  12. Surface stress, initial stress and Knudsen-dependent flow velocity effects on the electro-thermo nonlocal wave propagation of SWBNNTs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghorbanpour Arani, A.; Roudbari, M. A.

    2014-11-01

    This paper investigates the electro-thermal nonlocal wave propagation of fluid-conveying single-walled Boron Nitride nanotubes (SWBNNTs) using nonlocal piezoelasticity with surface stress, initial stress and Knudsen-dependent flow velocity effect. SWBNNT is embedded in a vicsoelastic medium which is simulated as visco-Pasternak foundation. Using Euler-Bernoulli beam (EBB) model, Hamilton's principle and nonlocal piezoelasticity theory, the higher order governing equation is derived. A detailed parametric study is conducted, focusing on the combined effects of the electric parameters, viscoelastic medium, initial stress, surface stress, Knudsen number (Kn) and small scale on the wave propagation behaviour of the fluid-conveying SWBNNT. The results show that for smaller values of wave number the dispersion relation for different fluid viscosities seems to be similar. At the higher values of wave numbers, increase in the wave frequency values is remarkable due to increase in fluid viscosity. The electric field as a smart controller, surface effect, initial stress, temperature change and slip velocity effect have significant role on the wave frequency. The results of this work is hoped to be of use in design and manufacturing of smart MEMS/NEMS in advanced medical applications such as drug delivery systems with great applications in biomechanics.

  13. The fatigue problems of cracks subjected to obliquely incident stress waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weng, I.-Chung

    Catastrophic failure of aircraft and other structures are often caused by undetected cracks. Fracture mechanics has been developed to augment traditional static and fatigue design. In the static theory of fracture mechanics, extensive treatment has been given to the stress distribution around sharp cracks and notches under various loading conditions. Previous works on the problems of dynamic loadings are not accurate in dealing with singularities at high frequencies. The numerical solutions become unrealistic at high frequencies in many practical applications. To address the need to obtain the stress intensity factor in high frequency dynamic loading situations, we studied the use of dislocation to represent a crack by a continuous distribution of dislocation singularities. This study focused on the configuration of finite crack located in an infinite isotropic elastic solid which is subjected to harmonic shear waves. The most important contribution of this thesis is a new approach which is based on the development of dynamic dislocation model to investigate the dynamic problems of cracks, particularly the dynamic interaction between a surface crack and screw dislocations; dynamic interaction between a free surface and an internal crack; crack propagation under dynamic loadings. With this approach, we are able to derive the exact analytical expression for stress intensity factor at any given frequencies. Results of the present investigation show the dynamic stress intensity factors will increase as the wave number (a measure of frequency of loadings) increases and the maximum value is about 25% more than the static stress intensity factor. At relatively high frequencies, the stress intensity factor drops rapidly beyond the first maximum value and exhibits oscillations of approximately constant period as wave number increases. This conclusion can be used to predict the useful life of a component at which consists of the crack propagation phase. The stress intensity

  14. Study of stress waves in geomedia and effect of a soil cover layer on wave attenuation using a 1-D finite-difference method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhi-liang; Li, Yong-chi; Wang, J. G.

    2006-12-01

    The propagation and attenuation of blast-induced stress waves differs between geomedia such as rock or soil mass. This paper numerically studies the propagation and attenuation of blast-induced elastoplastic waves in deep geomedia by using a one-dimensional (1-D) finite-difference code. Firstly, the elastoplastic Cap models for rock and soil masses are introduced into the governing equations of spherical wave motion and a FORTRAN code based on the finite difference method is developed. Secondly, an underground spherical blast is simulated with this code and verified by software, RENEWTO. The propagation of stress-waves in rock and soil masses is numerically investigated, respectively. Finally, the effect of a soil cover layer on the attenuation of stress waves in the rear rock mass is studied. It is determined that large plastic deformation of geomedia can effectively dissipate the energy of stress-waves inward and the developed 1-D finite difference code coupled with elastoplastic Cap models is convenient and effective in the numerical simulations for underground spherical explosion.

  15. A theoretical analysis of stress wave propagation in the head under primary blast loading.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Feng; Chou, Clifford C; Yang, King H; King, Albert I

    2014-04-01

    Traumatic brain injury due to primary blast loading has become a signature injury in recent military conflicts. Efforts have been made to study the stress wave propagation in the head. However, the relationship of incident pressure, reflected pressure and intracranial pressure is still not clear, and the experimental findings reported in the literature are contradictory. In this article, an analytical model is developed to calculate the stress wave transfer through a multiple-layered structure which is used to mimic the head. The model predicts stress at the scalp-skull and skull-brain interfaces as the functions of reflected pressure, which is further dependent on incident pressure. A numerical model is used to corroborate the theoretical predictions. It is concluded that scalp has an amplification effect on intracranial pressure. If scalp is absent, there exists a critical incident pressure, defined as P cr at approximately 16 kPa. When peak incident pressure σ in is higher than 16 kPa, the pressure at the skull-brain interface is greater than σ in; otherwise, it is lower than σ in. PMID:24718865

  16. Estimation of Electro-Magnetic Signals Generated by Stress Changes before the Arrival of Seismic Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, K.

    2014-12-01

    This work aims to increase the efficiency of earthquake early warning (EEW) systems. Conventional EEW systems detect occurrence of earthquakes by means of detecting seismic P-waves; thus, they cannot make alert before P-waves reach the ground surface in principle. If we desires to break this limitation, we must observe other physical quantities including the electromagnetic (EM) and gravitational fields, variations of which propagate faster than elastic waves. The present study focuses on changes in the magnetic field generated by co-seismic stress changes in the Earth's crust. When magnetic minerals in the Earth's crust are subjected to mechanical forces, increments or decrements of magnetization appear. This is called the piezomagnetic effect. Significant changes in values of the geomagnetic field has frequently observed between before and after major earthquakes or volcanic ground deformation, which is considered to be generated by the piezomagnetic effect. The problem is, however, whether or not co-seismic changes in the stress field generates earlier signals, that is, changes in the magnetic field at observation sites which occur before arrival of seismic waves. To answer the question, a set of equations governing elastodynamics, electromagnetics, and the piezomagnetic effect, are solved for a whole space stuffed with a uniform physical properties. An impulsive double couple is assumed to represent the earthquake source mechanism. A set of solutions is derived in time-domain, and its features are investigated for several sets of parameters including electrical conductivity and seismic velocities. We can confirm that there are certain amount of changes in the EM field, even before arrival of seismic waves. EM signals before arrival of seismic waves (i.e. earlier EM signals) are relatively large in the case that the Earth's crust is conductive (> 0.01 S/m). However, the appearance of relatively large EM signal is not simultaneous to the rupture; instead, it is

  17. Influence of initial stress, irregularity and heterogeneity on Love-type wave propagation in double pre-stressed irregular layers lying over a pre-stressed half-space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Abhishek Kumar; Das, Amrita; Parween, Zeenat; Chattopadhyay, Amares

    2015-10-01

    The present paper deals with the propagation of Love-type wave in an initially stressed irregular vertically heterogeneous layer lying over an initially stressed isotropic layer and an initially stressed isotropic half-space. Two different types of irregularities, viz., rectangular and parabolic, are considered at the interface of uppermost initially stressed heterogeneous layer and intermediate initially stressed isotropic layer. Dispersion equations are obtained in closed form for both cases of irregularities, distinctly. The effect of size and shape of irregularity, horizontal compressive initial stress, horizontal tensile initial stress, heterogeneity of the uppermost layer and width ratio of the layers on phase velocity of Love-type wave are the major highlights of the study. Comparative study has been made to identify the effects of different shapes of irregularity, presence of heterogeneity and initial stresses. Numerical computations have been carried out and depicted by means of graphs for the present study.

  18. Unsteady stress partitioning and momentum transfer in the wave bottom boundary layer over movable rippled beds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Abudo, S.; Foster, D. L.

    2014-12-01

    Observations of the nearbed velocity field over a rippled sediment bed under asymmetric wave forcing conditions were collected using a submersible particle image velocimetry (PIV) system. To examine the role of bed form-induced dynamics in the total momentum transfer, a double-averaging technique was implemented on the two-dimensional time-dependent velocity field by means of the full momentum equation. This approach allows for direct determination of the bed form-induced stresses, i.e., stresses that arise due to the presence of bed forms, which are zero in flat bed conditions. This analysis suggests that bed form-induced stresses are closely related to the presence of coherent motions and may be partitioned from the turbulent stresses. Inferences of stress provided by a bed load transport model suggest that total momentum transfer obtained from the double-averaging technique is capable of reproducing bed form mobilization. Comparisons between the total momentum transfer and stress estimates obtained from local velocity profiles show significant variability across the ripple and suggest that an array of sensors is necessary to reproduce bed form evolution. The imbalance of momentum obtained by resolving the different terms constituting the near-bed momentum balance (i.e., acceleration deficit, stress gradient, and bed form-induced skin friction) provides an estimate of the bed form-induced pressure that is consistent with flow separation. This analysis reveals three regions in the flow: the free-stream, where all terms are relatively balanced; the near-bed, where momentum imbalance is significant during flow weakening; and below ripple crests, where bed form-induced pressure is the leading order mechanism.

  19. Dispersion of Rayleigh waves in titanium alloy resulting from inhomogeneous residual stress induced by low plasticity burnishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Man, C.-S.; Koo, L.; Shepard, M. J.

    2002-05-01

    We explore the possibility of using the dispersion of Rayleigh waves for nondestructive inspection of the layer of inhomogeneous residual stress induced by low plasticity burnishing (LPB) on Ti-6Al-4V samples, which inherit mirror-smooth surfaces from the LPB treatment. Our findings suggest that, while the acoustoelastic effect is very small in Ti-6Al-4V, the magnitude of the stress gradient involved still leads to a measurable Rayleigh-wave dispersion, from which information on the stress present could be inferred.

  20. Fabrication and simulation of random and periodic composites for reduced stress wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCuiston, Ryan Charles

    During a ballistic impact event between a monolithic ceramic target and a projectile, a shock wave precedes the projectile penetration and propagates through the target. Shock wave induced damage, fundamentally caused by the creation of tensile stress, can reduce the, expected performance of the target material. If the shock wave could be prevented from propagating it would be possible to improve ballistic performance of the target material. Recent research on phononic band gap structures has shown that it is possible to design and fabricate biphasic structures that forbid propagation of low amplitude acoustic waves. The goal of this dissertation was to determine the feasibility of creating a structure that is capable of limiting and or defeating large amplitude shock wave propagation by applying the concepts of phononic band gap research. A model system of Al2O3 and WC-Co was selected based on processing, acoustic and ballistic criteria. Al2O 3/WC-Co composites were fabricated by die pressing and vacuum sintering. The WC-Co was added as discrete inclusions 0.5 to 1.5 mm in diameter up to 50 vol. %. The interfacial bonding between Al2O3 and WC-Co was characterized by indentation and microscopy to determine optimal sintering conditions. A tape casting and lamination technique was developed to fabricate large dimension Al2O3 samples with periodically placed WC-Co inclusions. Through transmission acoustic characterization of green tape cast and laminated samples showed acoustic velocity could be reduced significantly by proper WC-Co inclusion arrangement. Two dimensional finite element simulations were performed on a series of designed Al2O3 structures containing both random and periodically arrayed WC-Co inclusions. For a fixed loading scheme, the effects of WC-Co inclusion diameter, area fraction and stacking arrangement were studied. Structures were found to respond either homogenously, heterogeneously or in a mixed mode fashion to the propagating stress wave. The

  1. Uncertainty quantification of relative acoustic nonlinearity parameter of guided waves for damage detection in composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Ming; Mao, Zhu; Todd, Michael D.; Su, Zhongqing; Qing, Xinlin

    2015-03-01

    Nonlinear guided waves have been studied extensively for the characterization of micro-damage in plate-like structures, such as early-stage fatigue and thermal degradation in metals. Meanwhile, an increasing number of studies have reported the use of nonlinear acoustic techniques for detection of impact damage, fatigue, and thermal fatigue in composite structures. Among these techniques, the (relative) acoustic nonlinearity parameter, extracted from acousto-ultrasonic waves based on second-harmonic generation, has been considered one of the most popular tools for quantifying the detection of nonlinearity in inspected structures. Considering the complex nature of nonlinearities involved in composite materials (even under healthy conditions), and operational/environmental variability and measurement noise, the calculation of the relative acoustic nonlinearity parameter (RANP) from experimental data may suffer from considerable uncertainties, which may impair the quality of damage detection. In this study, we aim to quantify the uncertainty of the magnitude of the RANP estimator in the context of impact damage identification in unidirectional carbon fiber laminates. First, the principles of nonlinear ultrasonics are revisited briefly. A general probability density function of the RANP is then obtained through numerical evaluation in a theoretical setting. Using piezoelectric wavers, continuous sine waves are generated in the sample. Steady-state responses are acquired and processed to produce histograms of the RANP estimates before and after the impact damage. These observed histograms are consistent with the predicted distributions, and examination of the distributions demonstrates the significance of uncertainty quantification when using the RANP for damage detection in composite structures.

  2. Spatial parallelism of a 3D finite difference, velocity-stress elastic wave propagation code

    SciTech Connect

    Minkoff, S.E.

    1999-12-01

    Finite difference methods for solving the wave equation more accurately capture the physics of waves propagating through the earth than asymptotic solution methods. Unfortunately, finite difference simulations for 3D elastic wave propagation are expensive. The authors model waves in a 3D isotropic elastic earth. The wave equation solution consists of three velocity components and six stresses. The partial derivatives are discretized using 2nd-order in time and 4th-order in space staggered finite difference operators. Staggered schemes allow one to obtain additional accuracy (via centered finite differences) without requiring additional storage. The serial code is most unique in its ability to model a number of different types of seismic sources. The parallel implementation uses the MPI library, thus allowing for portability between platforms. Spatial parallelism provides a highly efficient strategy for parallelizing finite difference simulations. In this implementation, one can decompose the global problem domain into one-, two-, and three-dimensional processor decompositions with 3D decompositions generally producing the best parallel speedup. Because I/O is handled largely outside of the time-step loop (the most expensive part of the simulation) the authors have opted for straight-forward broadcast and reduce operations to handle I/O. The majority of the communication in the code consists of passing subdomain face information to neighboring processors for use as ghost cells. When this communication is balanced against computation by allocating subdomains of reasonable size, they observe excellent scaled speedup. Allocating subdomains of size 25 x 25 x 25 on each node, they achieve efficiencies of 94% on 128 processors. Numerical examples for both a layered earth model and a homogeneous medium with a high-velocity blocky inclusion illustrate the accuracy of the parallel code.

  3. Spatial Parallelism of a 3D Finite Difference, Velocity-Stress Elastic Wave Propagation Code

    SciTech Connect

    MINKOFF,SUSAN E.

    1999-12-09

    Finite difference methods for solving the wave equation more accurately capture the physics of waves propagating through the earth than asymptotic solution methods. Unfortunately. finite difference simulations for 3D elastic wave propagation are expensive. We model waves in a 3D isotropic elastic earth. The wave equation solution consists of three velocity components and six stresses. The partial derivatives are discretized using 2nd-order in time and 4th-order in space staggered finite difference operators. Staggered schemes allow one to obtain additional accuracy (via centered finite differences) without requiring additional storage. The serial code is most unique in its ability to model a number of different types of seismic sources. The parallel implementation uses the MP1 library, thus allowing for portability between platforms. Spatial parallelism provides a highly efficient strategy for parallelizing finite difference simulations. In this implementation, one can decompose the global problem domain into one-, two-, and three-dimensional processor decompositions with 3D decompositions generally producing the best parallel speed up. Because i/o is handled largely outside of the time-step loop (the most expensive part of the simulation) we have opted for straight-forward broadcast and reduce operations to handle i/o. The majority of the communication in the code consists of passing subdomain face information to neighboring processors for use as ''ghost cells''. When this communication is balanced against computation by allocating subdomains of reasonable size, we observe excellent scaled speed up. Allocating subdomains of size 25 x 25 x 25 on each node, we achieve efficiencies of 94% on 128 processors. Numerical examples for both a layered earth model and a homogeneous medium with a high-velocity blocky inclusion illustrate the accuracy of the parallel code.

  4. Guided ultrasonic waves for non-destructive monitoring of the stress levels in prestressed steel strands.

    PubMed

    Chaki, S; Bourse, G

    2009-02-01

    The safety of prestressed civil structures such as bridges, dams, nuclear power plants, etc. directly involves the security of both environment and users. Health monitoring of the tensioning components, such as strands, tendons, bars, anchorage bolts, etc. is an important research topic and a challenging task bringing together the non-destructive evaluation (NDE) and civil engineering communities. This paper deals with a guided ultrasonic wave procedure for monitoring the stress levels in seven-wire steel strands (15.7 mm in diameter). The mechanical and geometrical characteristics of the prestressed strands were taken into account for optimizing the measurement configuration and then the choice of the guided ultrasonic mode at a suitable frequency. Simplified acoustoelastic formulations were derived from the acoustoelasticity theory according to either calibration test or in situ measurement. The results from acoustoelastic measurements on the seven-wire steel strands are presented and discussed in the case of calibration tests and industrially prestressed strands. They show the potential and the suitability of the proposed guided wave method for evaluating the stress levels in the tested seven-wire steel strands. PMID:18804832

  5. Love-type wave propagation in a pre-stressed viscoelastic medium influenced by smooth moving punch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, A. K.; Parween, Z.; Chatterjee, M.; Chattopadhyay, A.

    2015-04-01

    In the present paper, a mathematical model studying the effect of smooth moving semi-infinite punch on the propagation of Love-type wave in an initially stressed viscoelastic strip is developed. The dynamic stress concentration due to the punch for the force of a constant intensity has been obtained in the closed form. Method based on Weiner-hopf technique which is indicated by Matczynski has been employed. The study manifests the significant effect of various affecting parameters viz. speed of moving punch associated with Love-type wave speed, horizontal compressive/tensile initial stress, vertical compressive/tensile initial stress, frequency parameter, and viscoelastic parameter on dynamic stress concentration due to semi-infinite punch. Moreover, some important peculiarities have been traced out and depicted by means of graphs.

  6. Controlling elastic wave propagation in a soft bilayer system via wrinkling-induced stress patterns.

    PubMed

    Li, Guo-Yang; Zheng, Yang; Cao, Yanping; Feng, Xi-Qiao; Zhang, Wanyu

    2016-05-14

    Compression of a film/substrate bilayer system with different surface/interfacial structures can lead to diverse buckling patterns including sinusoidal wrinkles, ridges, folds, creases and tilted sawteeth wrinkles. In this paper, we show that elastic wave band gaps in the film/substrate bilayer system largely depend on the wrinkling patterns. More interestingly, we find that different wrinkling patterns investigated here can coexist and evolve in one bilayer system and the elastic wave propagation behaviors can be controlled by manipulating the hybrid wrinkling patterns. Our analysis also reveals that the periodic stress pattern plays a dominant role in tuning the bandgap structures in comparison to geometrical patterns caused by surface instability. A careful investigation of the transmission spectra of the composite systems has validated the main findings given by the analysis based on the Bloch wave theory. Potential use of the method and materials reported here to gain wide attenuation frequency ranges and the design of nesting Fibonacci superlattices have been demonstrated. PMID:27074161

  7. Plant salt stress status is transmitted systemically via propagating calcium waves

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Stephan, Aaron B.; Schroeder, Julian I.

    2014-04-29

    The existence and relevance of rapid long distance signaling in plants is evident to any observer of the nastic movements of the Venus flytrap (Dionaea muscipula) or the sensitive plant (Mimosa pudica). However, all plants require the transmission of sensory information from the site of perception to other tissues to adjust their physiological states according to their environment. It is becoming increasingly apparent that rapid long-distance signals exist throughout the plant kingdom and may be responsible for initiating a multitude of physiological responses: electrical “action potentials” have been shown to convey wounding and saltstress information from leaf-to-leaf (1, 2); amore » “hydraulic signal” transmitted by the direction of water movement within the xylem can mediate long-distance signaling of water stress experienced by the roots to the leaves in Arabidopsis (3); and reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been shown to propagate across a plant and carry stimulus-specific information to a variety of stresses (4). In PNAS, Choi et al. (5) use elegant approaches and present advances demonstrating that calcium can function as a long-distance signaling messenger, propagating in waves from roots and carrying salt-stress signals to induce expression of salt tolerance genes in leaves.« less

  8. Plant salt stress status is transmitted systemically via propagating calcium waves

    SciTech Connect

    Stephan, Aaron B.; Schroeder, Julian I.

    2014-04-29

    The existence and relevance of rapid long distance signaling in plants is evident to any observer of the nastic movements of the Venus flytrap (Dionaea muscipula) or the sensitive plant (Mimosa pudica). However, all plants require the transmission of sensory information from the site of perception to other tissues to adjust their physiological states according to their environment. It is becoming increasingly apparent that rapid long-distance signals exist throughout the plant kingdom and may be responsible for initiating a multitude of physiological responses: electrical “action potentials” have been shown to convey wounding and saltstress information from leaf-to-leaf (1, 2); a “hydraulic signal” transmitted by the direction of water movement within the xylem can mediate long-distance signaling of water stress experienced by the roots to the leaves in Arabidopsis (3); and reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been shown to propagate across a plant and carry stimulus-specific information to a variety of stresses (4). In PNAS, Choi et al. (5) use elegant approaches and present advances demonstrating that calcium can function as a long-distance signaling messenger, propagating in waves from roots and carrying salt-stress signals to induce expression of salt tolerance genes in leaves.

  9. Thin film interface stresses produced by high amplitude laser generated surface acoustic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, Bradley; Liou, Hong-Cin; Balogun, Oluwaseyi

    2015-10-01

    Surface acoustic waves (SAWs) have been explored for nondestructive metrology of thin film elastic properties and thickness due to confinement of their energy within a shallow depth from a material surface. In this paper, we study the dynamic interfacial stresses produced by high amplitude SAWs generated by a strongly ablative source in a thin film-substrate system, with the goal of investigating the possibility of inducing thin film delamination at high loading rates. For modeling purposes, we represent the mechanical loading resulting from the pulsed laser-sample interaction in the ablative regime by an equivalent compressive surface load, and the resulting stresses and particle velocities induced by the generated SAWs are calculated using a linear finite element model. We explore the numerical model to study the dependence of the film-substrate interface tractions on the ratio of the film thickness and SAW wavelength for a soft film on a stiff substrate. Furthermore, by matching the numerical results obtained from the finite element model with experimental results, we are able to predict the dynamic interfacial stresses for a copper film on a fused silica substrate produced by SAWs excited by a high power pulsed laser line source. This study has implications for exploring SAWs in the characterization of interfacial failure in thin-film substrate systems.

  10. Elastic wave velocity and acoustic emission monitoring during Gypsum dehydration under triaxial stress conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brantut, N.; David, E. C.; Héripré, E.; Schubnel, A. J.; Zimmerman, R. W.; Gueguen, Y.

    2010-12-01

    Dehydration experiments were performed on natural Gypsum polycrystal samples coming from Volterra, Italy in order to study contemporaneously the evolution of P and S elastic wave velocities and acoustic emission (AE) triggering. During these experiments, temperature was slowly raised at 0.15 degrees C per minute under constant stress conditions. Two experiments were realized under quasi-hydrostatic stress (15 and 55 MPa respectively). The third experiment was realized under constant triaxial stress (σ3=45MPa, σ1=75MPa). All three were drained (10MPa constant pore pressure). In each experiments, both P and S wave velocities reduced drastically (as much as approx. 50% in the low confining pressure case) at the onset of dehydration. Importantly, the Vp/Vs ratio also decreased. Shortly after the onset of decrease in P and S wave velocities, the dehydration reaction was also accompanied by bursts of AEs. Time serie locations of the AEs show that they initiated from the pore pressure port, ie from where the pore fluid could easily be drained, and then slowly migrated within the sample. In each experiments, the AE rate could be positively correlated to the reaction rate, inferred from pore volumetry. In such a way, the AE rate reached a peak when the reaction was the fastest. Focal mechanism analysis of the largest AEs showed they had a large volumetric component in compaction, confirming that AEs were indeed related to pore closure and/or collapse. In addition, the AE rate also increased with confinement, ie when a larger amount of compaction was observed. Interestingly, when under differential stress conditions, AE focal mechanisms were mainly in shear. Additional dehydration experiments performed within an environmental scanning electron microscope under low vacuum highlight that, in drained conditions at least, the reaction seems to take place in two phases. First, cracks are being opened along cleavage planes within a single gypsum crystal, which allows for the

  11. Virial theorem for an inhomogeneous medium, boundary conditions for the wave functions, and stress tensor in quantum statistics.

    PubMed

    Bobrov, V B; Trigger, S A; van Heijst, G J F; Schram, P P J M

    2010-07-01

    On the basis of the stationary Schrödinger equation, the virial theorem in an inhomogeneous external field for the canonical ensemble is proved. It is shown that the difference in the form of virial theorem is conditioned by the value of the wave-function derivative on the surface of the volume, surrounding the system under consideration. The stress tensor in such a system is determined by the average values of the wave-function space derivatives. PMID:20866550

  12. Protein viscosity, mineral fraction and staggered architecture cooperatively enable the fastest stress wave decay in load-bearing biological materials.

    PubMed

    Qwamizadeh, Mahan; Zhang, Zuoqi; Zhou, Kun; Zhang, Yong Wei

    2016-07-01

    One of the key functions of load-bearing biological materials, such as bone, dentin and sea shell, is to protect their inside fragile organs by effectively damping dynamic impact. How those materials achieve this remarkable function remains largely unknown. Using systematic finite element analyses, we study the stress wave propagation and attenuation in cortical bone at the nanoscale as a model material to examine the effects of protein viscosity, mineral fraction and staggered architecture on the elastic wave decay. It is found that the staggered arrangement, protein viscosity and mineral fraction work cooperatively to effectively attenuate the stress wave. For a typical mineral volume fraction and protein viscosity, an optimal staggered nanostructure with specific feature sizes and layouts is able to give rise to the fastest stress wave decay, and the optimal aspect ratio and thickness of mineral platelets are in excellent agreement with experimental measurements. In contrary, as the mineral volume fraction or the protein viscosity goes much higher, the structural arrangement is seen having trivial effect on the stress wave decay, suggesting that the damping properties of the composites go into the structure-insensitive regime from the structure-sensitive regime. These findings not only significantly add to our understanding of the structure-function relationship of load-bearing biological materials, and but also provide useful guidelines for the design of bio-inspired materials with superior resistance to impact loading. PMID:26925698

  13. Interaction between a normal shock wave and a turbulent boundary layer at high transonic speeds. II - Wall shear stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, M. S.; Adamson, T. C., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Asymptotic methods are used to calculate the shear stress at the wall for the interaction between a normal shock wave and a turbulent boundary layer on a flat plate. A mixing length model is used for the eddy viscosity. The shock wave is taken to be strong enough that the sonic line is deep in the boundary layer and the upstream influence is thus very small. It is shown that unlike the result found for laminar flow an asymptotic criterion for separation is not found; however, conditions for incipient separation are computed numerically using the derived solution for the shear stress at the wall. Results are compared with available experimental measurements.

  14. Nanosecond laser pulse induced stress waves enhanced magnetofection of human carcinoma cells in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durdík, Š.; Babincová, M.; Bergemann, C.; Babinec, P.

    2012-09-01

    We have developed a novel platform for efficient gene delivery into cells using magnetic force for pre-concentration of gene-magnetic nanoparticle complex on the surface of cells with subsequent nanosecond laser pulse for generation of stress waves in transfection chamber which is able to permeabilize cell membrane for the facilitated delivery of gene into the cell interior. Combination of these two physical factors increased the efficiency of three different human carcinoma cells transfection with plasmid coding green fluorescence protein from 43% to 67%, from 35% to 54%, and from 23% to 39%, for HeLa (cervical carcinoma), MCF-7 (breast carcinoma), and UCI-107 (ovarian carcinoma) cells, respectively, as compared with using only magnetofection. Proposed fast, simple, and efficient method may have far reaching applications for cancer gene therapy.

  15. Stress wave attenuation in thin structures by ultrasonic through-transmission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, S. S.; Williams, J. H., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    The steady state amplitude of the output of an ultrasonic through transmission measurement is analyzed and the result is given in closed form. Provided that the product of the input and output transduction ratios; the specimen-transducer reflection coefficient; the specimen-transducer phase shift parameter; and the material phase velocity are known, this analysis gives a means for determining the through-thickness attenuation of an individual thin sample. Multiple stress wave reflections are taken into account and so signal echoes do not represent a difficulty. An example is presented for a graphite fiber epoxy composite (Hercules AS/3501-6). A direct method for continuous or intermittent monitoring of through thickness attenuation of plate structures which may be subject to service structural degradation is provided.

  16. Stress-wave attenuation in thin structures by ultrasonic through-transmission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, S. S.; Williams, J. H., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    The steady-state amplitude of the output of an ultrasonic through-transmission measurement is analyzed and the result is given in closed form. Provided that the product of the input and output transduction ratios, the specimen-transducer reflection coefficient, the specimen-transducer phase-shift parameter, and the material phase velocity are known, this analysis gives a means for determining the through-thickness attenuation of an individual thin sample. Multiple stress-wave reflections are taken into account, and so signal echoes do not represent a difficulty. An example is presented for a graphite fiber epoxy composite (Hercules AS/3501-6). Thus, the technique provides a direct method for continuous or intermittent monitoring of through-thickness attenuation of plate structures which may be subject to service structural degradation.

  17. A study of the stress wave factor technique for the characterization of composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henneke, E. G., II; Duke, J. C., Jr.; Stinchcomb, W. W.; Govada, A.; Lemascon, A.

    1983-01-01

    A testing program was undertaken to provide an independent investigation and evaluation of the stress wave factor for characterizing the mechanical behavior of composite laminates. Some of the data which was obtained after performing a very large number of tests to determine the reproducibility of the SWF measurement is presented. It was determined that, with some optimizing of experimental parameters, the SWF value can be reproduced to within + or - 10%. Results are also given which show that, after careful calibration procedures, the lowest SWF value along the length of a specimen will correlate very closely to the site of final failure when the specimen is loaded in tension. Finally, using a moire interferometry technique, it was found that local regions having the highest in plane strains under tensile loading also had the lowest SWF values.

  18. A three-phase soil model for simulating stress wave propagation due to blast loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhongqi; Hao, Hong; Lu, Yong

    2004-01-01

    A three-phase soil model is proposed to simulate stress wave propagation in soil mass to blast loading. The soil is modelled as a three-phase mass that includes the solid particles, water and air. It is considered as a structure that the solid particles form a skeleton and their voids are filled with water and air. The equation of state (EOS) of the soil is derived. The elastic-plastic theory is adopted to model the constitutive relation of the soil skeleton. The damage of the soil skeleton is also modelled. The Drucker-Prager strength model including the strain rate effect is used to describe the strength of the soil skeleton. The model is implemented into a hydrocode Autodyn. The recorded results obtained by explosion tests in soil are used to validate the proposed model. Copyright

  19. Effects of laser parameters on propagation characteristics of laser-induced stress wave for gene transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, Takahiro; Sato, Shunichi; Terakawa, Mitsuhiro; Ashida, Hiroshi; Obara, Minoru

    2010-02-01

    Laser-based gene delivery is attractive as a new method for topical gene therapy because of the high spatial controllability of laser energy. Previously, we demonstrated that an exogenous gene can be transferred to cells both in vitro and in vivo by applying nanosecond pulsed laser-induced stress waves (LISWs) or photomechanical waves (PMWs). In this study, we investigated effects of laser parameters on the propagation characteristics of LISWs in soft tissue phantoms and depth-dependent properties of gene transfection. Temporal pressure profiles of LISWs were measured with a hydrophone, showing that with a larger laser spot diameter, LISWs can be propagated more efficiently in phantoms with keeping flat wavefront. Phantoms with various thicknesses were placed on the rat dorsal skin that had been injected with plasmid DNA coding for reporter gene, and LISWs were applied from the top of the phantom. Efficient gene expression was observed in the rat skin that had interacted with LISWs propagating through a 15-mm-thick phantom. These results would be useful to determine appropriate laser parameters for gene delivery to deep-located tissue by transcutaneous application of LISWs.

  20. Antiplane wave scattering from a cylindrical cavity in pre-stressed nonlinear elastic media

    PubMed Central

    Shearer, Tom; Parnell, William J.; Abrahams, I. David

    2015-01-01

    The effect of a longitudinal stretch and a pressure-induced inhomogeneous radial deformation on the scattering of antiplane elastic waves from a cylindrical cavity is determined. Three popular nonlinear strain energy functions are considered: the neo-Hookean, the Mooney–Rivlin and a two-term Arruda–Boyce model. A new method is developed to analyse and solve the governing wave equations. It exploits their properties to determine an asymptotic solution in the far-field, which is then used to derive a boundary condition to numerically evaluate the equations local to the cavity. This method could be applied to any linear ordinary differential equation whose inhomogeneous coefficients tend to a constant as its independent variable tends to infinity. The effect of the pre-stress is evaluated by considering the scattering cross section. A longitudinal stretch is found to decrease the scattered power emanating from the cavity, whereas a compression increases it. The effect of the pressure difference depends on the strain energy function employed. For a Mooney–Rivlin material, a cavity inflation increases the scattered power and a deflation decreases it; for a neo-Hookean material, the scattering cross section is unaffected by the radial deformation; and for a two-term Arruda–Boyce material, both inflation and deflation are found to decrease the scattered power. PMID:26543398

  1. Impact of anisotropic stress of free-streaming particles on gravitational waves induced by cosmological density perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saga, Shohei; Ichiki, Kiyotomo; Sugiyama, Naoshi

    2015-01-01

    Gravitational waves (GWs) are inevitably induced at second order in cosmological perturbations through nonlinear couplings with first-order scalar perturbations, the existence of which is well established by recent cosmological observations. So far, the evolution and the spectrum of the secondary induced GWs have been derived by taking into account the sources of GWs only from the product of first-order scalar perturbations. Here we newly investigate the effects of purely second-order anisotropic stresses of photons and neutrinos on the evolution of GWs, which have been omitted in the literature. We present a full treatment of the Einstein-Boltzmann system to calculate the spectrum of GWs with anisotropic stress based on the formalism of the cosmological perturbation theory. We find that photon anisotropic stress amplifies the amplitude of GWs by about 150%, whereas neutrino anisotropic stress suppresses that of GWs by about 30% on small scales k ≳1.0 h Mpc-1 compared to the case without anisotropic stress. The second-order anisotropic stress does not affect GWs with wave numbers k ≲1.0 h Mpc-1 . The result is in marked contrast with the case at linear order, where the effect of anisotropic stress is damping in the amplitude of GWs.

  2. Contribution of stress wave and cavitation bubble in evaluation of cell-cell adhesion by femtosecond laser-induced impulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iino, Takanori; Li, Po-Lin; Wang, Wen-Zhe; Deng, Jia-Huei; Lu, Yun-Chang; Kao, Fu-Jen; Hosokawa, Yoichiroh

    2014-10-01

    When an intense femtosecond laser is focused in a cell culture medium, shock wave, stress wave, and cavitation bubble are generated at the laser focal point. Cell-cell adhesion can be broken at the cellular level by the impacts of these factors. We have applied this breaking of the adhesion to an estimation of the cell-cell adhesion strength. In this application, it is important to identify which of these factors is the dominant factor that breaks the adhesion. Here we investigated this issue using streptavidin-coated microbeads adhering to a biotin-coated substrate as a mimic of the cell-cell adhesion. The results indicated that the break was induced mainly by the stress wave, not by the impact of the cavitation bubble.

  3. Moderate Childhood Stress Buffers Against Depressive Response to Proximal Stressors: A Multi-Wave Prospective Study of Early Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Shapero, Benjamin G; Hamilton, Jessica L; Stange, Jonathan P; Liu, Richard T; Abramson, Lyn Y; Alloy, Lauren B

    2015-11-01

    Although the majority of research in the field has focused on childhood stressors as a risk factor for psychopathology, a burgeoning body of literature has focused on the possible steeling effect of moderate types of stressful events. The current study investigated the effects of proximal life stressors on prospective changes in depressive symptoms, and whether a history of moderate childhood adversity would moderate this relationship in a multi-wave study of a diverse community sample of early adolescents (N = 163, 52 % female, 51 % Caucasian). Hierarchical linear modeling was run with four waves of data. Adolescents with greater moderately severe early life events evinced a blunted depressive symptom response to changes in proximal stressful events in the previous 9 months, compared to those with fewer early moderately severe experiences of adversity. These results held after controlling for between-subject factors such as race, gender, severe early life stress, and average stress over the four waves of data. Findings indicate that greater exposure to moderate childhood stressors may buffer against the negative effects of subsequent stressors, suggesting the importance of a nuanced developmental approach to studying the effects of early life stress. PMID:25911194

  4. [Thermal stress of the inner ear during laser stapedotomy. I: Continuous-wave laser].

    PubMed

    Jovanovic, S; Schönfeld, U; Fischer, R; Döring, M; Prapavat, V; Müller, G; Scherer, H

    1995-12-01

    As a consequence of perforating the footplate during laser stapedotomy, direct radiation to the inner ear will warm perilymph and adjacent structures. To determine the possible thermal dangers to cochlear structures from different laser parameters, heat transport mechanisms, temperature increases and temperature fields were investigated in a model system approximating caloric and physiologic changes in the inner ear. The temperature-time course of local cochlear warming showed a rapid convection-dependent increase that reached a peak at about the end of the laser impulse. An increase in power density caused an elevation of the temperature in all laser systems used. Maximum temperatures varied widely for CO2 lasers at the same wave-length, but a different beam-time behavior was found at a distance of 2 mm behind the perforation by using low-power densities. Heat values were lowest at a pulse duration of 50 ms in the superpulse (< 5 degrees C) and continuous wave (cw) modes (< 9 degrees C), while the highest value was found in the pulser mode (to 21 degrees C). After argon laser irradiation at high-power densities, temperatures were nearly independent of location (5.5-13 degrees C). When considering risks of possible inner ear damage from thermal stress during laser stapedotomy, application of the CO2 superpulse and cw laser appears to be safe over a large power-density range. Low energies using a small-beam diameter and short pulse durations (50-100 ms) are recommended. In contrast, use of the CO2 laser in a pulser mode may result in inner-ear damage because of the high temperatures produced. Structures located at a greater distance can be endangered by direct irradiation with the argon laser. PMID:8582829

  5. Multi-component elastic reverse time migration based on the P- and S-wave separated velocity-stress equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Bingluo; Li, Zhiyuan; Ma, Xiaona; Liang, Guanghe

    2015-01-01

    The vector P- and S-seismograms in an elastic common-shot gather generated with a P-wave source in a two-dimensional model using a finite difference solution of the P- and S-wave separated velocity-stress equations can be imaged by two independent ERTMs based on the same equations. The inputs as boundary conditions for reverse-time extrapolation are the pure vector P- and S-waves, respectively. The vector P-wave image components can be obtained by the normalized correlation operation between the vector P-source wavefields and receiver wavefields, which are obtained by extrapolating the vector P-seismograms in reverse-time using the same equations as the forward modeling. The vector S-wave image components can be obtained by a similar method. Compared with the conventional ERTM, this method can minimize the artifacts caused by the crosstalk between different wave modes and can preserve the phase and amplitude attributes of migration images very well. Furthermore, the polarity-reversal of the vector S-wave data can be corrected automatically during the imaging process, so destructive interferences between data from adjacent sources do not exist. Numerical examples with synthetic data have demonstrated the feasibility and effectiveness of this method for complex structures.

  6. Love-type waves in functionally graded piezoelectric material (FGPM) sandwiched between initially stressed layer and elastic substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saroj, Pradeep K.; Sahu, S. A.; Chaudhary, S.; Chattopadhyay, A.

    2015-10-01

    This paper investigates the propagation behavior of Love-type surface waves in three-layered composite structure with initial stress. The composite structure has been taken in such a way that a functionally graded piezoelectric material (FGPM) layer is bonded between initially stressed piezoelectric upper layer and an elastic substrate. Using the method of separation of variables, frequency equation for the considered wave has been established in the form of determinant for electrical open and short cases on free surface. The bisection method iteration technique has been used to find the roots of the dispersion relations which give the modes for electrical open and short cases. The effects of gradient variation of material constant and initial stress on the phase velocity of surface waves are discussed. Dependence of thickness on each parameter of the study has been shown explicitly. Study has been also done to show the existence of cut-off frequency. Graphical representation has been done to exhibit the findings. The obtained results are significant for the investigation and characterization of Love-type waves in FGPM-layered media.

  7. Rate and temperature dependences of the yield stress of commercial titanium under conditions of shock-wave loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanel, G. I.; Razorenov, S. V.; Garkushin, G. V.

    2016-05-01

    The evolution of elastic-plastic shock waves with the propagation distance has been studied in annealed titanium of commercial purity at temperatures 20 °C and 600 °C. The free surface velocity histories of the shock-loaded samples 0.25-4.0 mm in thickness have been recorded using the Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector. The measured decays of the elastic precursor waves have been converted into relationships between the shear stress and the initial plastic strain rate at the Hugoniot elastic limit. It has been found that the temperature practically does not influence on the resistance to high-rate plastic deformation: the plastic strain rate varies with the shear stress as γ ˙ = 2.5 × 10 6 ( τ / τ 0 ) 4.8 s-1 at 20 °C and γ ˙ = 2.9 × 10 6 ( τ / τ 0 ) 4.9 s-1 at 600 °C. An analysis of the rise times of the plastic shock waves has shown that for the same level of shear stress, the plastic strain rate after small compressive strain is more than by order of magnitude higher than the initial plastic strain rate at the wave's foot. Such acceleration of the plastic deformation seems to be a result of an intense multiplication of the mobile dislocations or twins.

  8. Sensitivity of near-inertial internal waves to spatial interpolations of wind stress in ocean generation circulation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Zhao; Wu, Lixin; Ma, Xiaohui

    2016-03-01

    The oceanic near-inertial internal waves (NIWs) have been extensively studied using ocean general circulation models (OGCMs). Currently most OGCMs use the bilinear or bicubic interpolation to interpolate wind stress onto models' surface grids. In this study, we examine the influences of bilinear and bicubic interpolations on the wavenumber and frequency spectra of wind stress and on the simulated NIWs in the ocean. It is demonstrated that both the bilinear and bicubic interpolations are equivalent to spatial low-pass filters with the former leading to more significant loss of wind stress variance at high wavenumbers. When coarse (e.g., 2°) wind stress is used to force OGCMs, the bilinear and bicubic interpolations significantly damp the wavenumber spectrum of wind stress at mesoscales, leading to decreased near-inertial wind stress variance. Using the bilinear (bicubic) interpolation could weaken the near-inertial wind work by ∼43% (22%) in the subtropical region (10°N-30°N) and by ∼16% (4%) at the midlatitudes (30°N-50°N). We propose a new interpolation method, i.e., the bi-sinc-function interpolation, which is able to retain all the wind stress variance within the Nyquist wavenumber. Compared to the bilinear and bicubic interpolations, the bi-sinc-function interpolation improves the simulations of NIWs and should be incorporated into OGCMs especially when coarse wind stress is used.

  9. Propagation characteristics of laser-induced stress wave in deep tissue for gene transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, Takahiro; Sato, Shunichi; Takano, Shinta; Ashida, Hiroshi; Obara, Minoru

    2009-09-01

    Propagation characteristics of laser-induced stress waves (LISWs) in tissue and their correlation with properties of gene transfection were investigated for targeted deep-tissue gene therapy. LISWs were generated by irradiating a laser-absorbing material with 532-nm Q-switched Nd:YAG laser pulses; a transparent plastic sheet was attached on the absorbing material for plasma confinement. Temporal pressure profiles of LISWs that were propagated through different thickness tissues were measured with a needle-type hydrophone and propagation of LISWs in water was visualized by shadowgraph technique. The measurements showed that at a laser fluence of 1.2 J/cm 2 with a laser spot diameter of 3 mm, flat wavefront was maintained for up to 5 mm in depth and peak pressure P decreased with increasing tissue thickness d; P was proportional to d-0.54. Rat dorsal skin was injected with plasmid DNA coding for reporter gene, on which different numbers of excised skin(s) was/were placed, and LISWs were applied from the top of the skins. Efficient gene expression was observed in the skin under the 3 mm thick stacked skins, suggesting that deep-located tissue such as muscle can be transfected by transcutaneous application of LISWs.

  10. Targeted gene transfer into rat facial muscles by nanosecond pulsed laser-induced stress waves.

    PubMed

    Kurita, Akihiro; Matsunobu, Takeshi; Satoh, Yasushi; Ando, Takahiro; Sato, Shunichi; Obara, Minoru; Shiotani, Akihiro

    2011-09-01

    We investigate the feasibility of using nanosecond pulsed laser-induced stress waves (LISWs) for gene transfer into rat facial muscles. LISWs are generated by irradiating a black natural rubber disk placed on the target tissue with nanosecond pulsed laser light from the second harmonics (532 nm) of a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser, which is widely used in head and neck surgery and proven to be safe. After injection of plasmid deoxyribose nucleic acid (DNA) coding for Lac Z into rat facial muscles, pulsed laser is used to irradiate the laser target on the skin surface without incision or exposure of muscles. Lac Z expression is detected by X-gal staining of excised rat facial skin and muscles. Strong Lac Z expression is observed seven days after gene transfer, and sustained for up to 14 days. Gene transfer is achieved in facial muscles several millimeters deep from the surface. Gene expression is localized to the tissue exposed to LISWs. No tissue damage from LISWs is observed. LISW is a promising nonviral target gene transfer method because of its high spatial controllability, easy applicability, and minimal invasiveness. Gene transfer using LISW to produce therapeutic proteins such as growth factors could be used to treat nerve injury and paralysis. PMID:21950944

  11. Measurements of Wall Shear Stress and Aortic Pulse Wave Velocity in Swine with Familial Hypercholesterolemia

    PubMed Central

    Wentland, Andrew L.; Wieben, Oliver; Shanmuganayagam, Dhanansayan; Krueger, Christian G.; Meudt, Jennifer J.; Consigny, Daniel; Rivera, Leonardo; McBride, Patrick E.; Reed, Jess D.; Grist, Thomas M.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE To assess measurements of pulse wave velocity (PWV) and wall shear stress (WSS) in a swine model of atherosclerosis. MATERIALS AND METHODS Nine familial hypercholesterolemic (FH) swine with angioplasty balloon catheter-induced atherosclerotic lesions to the abdominal aorta (injured group) and ten uninjured FH swine were evaluated with a 4D phase contrast (PC) MRI acquisition, as well as with radial and Cartesian 2D PC acquisitions, on a 3T MR scanner. PWV values were computed from the 2D and 4D PC techniques, compared between the injured and uninjured swine, and were validated against reference standard pressure probe-based PWV measurements. WSS values were also computed from the 4D PC MRI technique and compared between injured and uninjured groups. RESULTS PWV values were significantly greater in the injured than in the uninjured groups with the 4D PC MRI technique (p=0.03) and pressure probes (p=0.02). No significant differences were found in PWV between groups using the 2D PC techniques (p=0.75–0.83). No significant differences were found for WSS values between the injured and uninjured groups. CONCLUSION The 4D PC MRI technique provides a promising means of evaluating PWV and WSS in a swine model of atherosclerosis, providing a potential platform for developing the technique for the early detection of atherosclerosis. PMID:24964097

  12. Numerical prediction of blast-induced stress wave from large-scale underground explosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chengqing; Lu, Yong; Hao, Hong

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents a numerical model for predicting the dynamic response of rock mass subjected to large-scale underground explosion. The model is calibrated against data obtained from large-scale field tests. The Hugoniot equation of state for rock mass is adopted to calculate the pressure as a function of mass density. A piecewise linear Drucker-Prager strength criterion including the strain rate effect is employed to model the rock mass behaviour subjected to blast loading. A double scalar damage model accounting for both the compression and tension damage is introduced to simulate the damage zone around the charge chamber caused by blast loading. The model is incorporated into Autodyn3D through its user subroutines. The numerical model is then used to predict the dynamic response of rock mass, in terms of the peak particle velocity (PPV) and peak particle acceleration (PPA) attenuation laws, the damage zone, the particle velocity time histories and their frequency contents for large-scale underground explosion tests. The computed results are found in good agreement with the field measured data; hence, the proposed model is proven to be adequate for simulating the dynamic response of rock mass subjected to large-scale underground explosion. Extended numerical analyses indicate that, apart from the charge loading density, the stress wave intensity is also affected, but to a lesser extent, by the charge weight and the charge chamber geometry for large-scale underground explosions. Copyright

  13. Targeted gene transfer into rat facial muscles by nanosecond pulsed laser-induced stress waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurita, Akihiro; Matsunobu, Takeshi; Satoh, Yasushi; Ando, Takahiro; Sato, Shunichi; Obara, Minoru; Shiotani, Akihiro

    2011-09-01

    We investigate the feasibility of using nanosecond pulsed laser-induced stress waves (LISWs) for gene transfer into rat facial muscles. LISWs are generated by irradiating a black natural rubber disk placed on the target tissue with nanosecond pulsed laser light from the second harmonics (532 nm) of a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser, which is widely used in head and neck surgery and proven to be safe. After injection of plasmid deoxyribose nucleic acid (DNA) coding for Lac Z into rat facial muscles, pulsed laser is used to irradiate the laser target on the skin surface without incision or exposure of muscles. Lac Z expression is detected by X-gal staining of excised rat facial skin and muscles. Strong Lac Z expression is observed seven days after gene transfer, and sustained for up to 14 days. Gene transfer is achieved in facial muscles several millimeters deep from the surface. Gene expression is localized to the tissue exposed to LISWs. No tissue damage from LISWs is observed. LISW is a promising nonviral target gene transfer method because of its high spatial controllability, easy applicability, and minimal invasiveness. Gene transfer using LISW to produce therapeutic proteins such as growth factors could be used to treat nerve injury and paralysis.

  14. Rheological controls on upper edifice stress-strain relationships from low frequency seismicity swarms and seismic wave scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bean, C. J.; Lokmer, I.; De Barros, L.

    2011-12-01

    A primary goal in the application of emerging methods for tracking surface deformation and seismic velocity changes on volcanoes is to determine the nature of stress changes within the edifice. This requires an understanding of both the rheological properties of in situ edifice materials and, as fractures strongly influence seismic wave velocities, the scaling of fracture stiffness in those materials. Although there is an absence of fracture stiffness scaling measurements on volcanoes, a limited amount of other studies demonstrate that fracture stiffness is a function of fracture size, which implies that stress related seismic velocity changes can depend on fracture population scaling statistics. On the other hand, newly identified swarms of shallow low frequency low stress drop short duration earthquakes at several volcanoes indicate that near surface volcanic material sometimes behaves in a quasi-ductile manner, which has significant implications for stress transfer to the surface. In this presentation both these aspects of material properties will be address through a combination of seismic data analysis and numerical simulations of both wave propagation and material deformation. The implications for tracking stress changes on volcanoes will also be explored.

  15. Heat waves imposed during early pod development in soybean (Glycine max) cause significant yield loss despite a rapid recovery from oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Siebers, Matthew H; Yendrek, Craig R; Drag, David; Locke, Anna M; Rios Acosta, Lorena; Leakey, Andrew D B; Ainsworth, Elizabeth A; Bernacchi, Carl J; Ort, Donald R

    2015-08-01

    Heat waves already have a large impact on crops and are predicted to become more intense and more frequent in the future. In this study, heat waves were imposed on soybean using infrared heating technology in a fully open-air field experiment. Five separate heat waves were applied to field-grown soybean (Glycine max) in central Illinois, three in 2010 and two in 2011. Thirty years of historical weather data from Illinois were analyzed to determine the length and intensity of a regionally realistic heat wave resulting in experimental heat wave treatments during which day and night canopy temperatures were elevated 6 °C above ambient for 3 days. Heat waves were applied during early or late reproductive stages to determine whether and when heat waves had an impact on carbon metabolism and seed yield. By the third day of each heat wave, net photosynthesis (A), specific leaf weight (SLW), and leaf total nonstructural carbohydrate concentration (TNC) were decreased, while leaf oxidative stress was increased. However, A, SLW, TNC, and measures of oxidative stress were no different than the control ca. 12 h after the heat waves ended, indicating rapid physiological recovery from the high-temperature stress. That end of season seed yield was reduced (~10%) only when heat waves were applied during early pod developmental stages indicates the yield loss had more to do with direct impacts of the heat waves on reproductive process than on photosynthesis. Soybean was unable to mitigate yield loss after heat waves given during late reproductive stages. This study shows that short high-temperature stress events that reduce photosynthesis and increase oxidative stress resulted in significant losses to soybean production in the Midwest, U.S. The study also suggests that to mitigate heat wave-induced yield loss, soybean needs improved reproductive and photosynthetic tolerance to high but increasingly common temperatures. PMID:25845935

  16. Stress wave propagation through viscous-elastic jointed rock masses using propagator matrix method (PMM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xiaolin; Qi, Shengwen; Liu, Youshan; Zhan, Zhifa

    2014-01-01

    The reflection-transmission coefficients of the stress wave propagating through a jointed rock mass are of great concern in many fields, for example seismology, exploration geophysics and geotechnical engineering. For a natural jointed rock mass, both the rock material and the joints should be treated to be viscous-elastic in the practical dynamic analysis. In this paper, Kelvin viscous-elastic model is adopted to describe the rock deformation behaviour; the viscous-elastic behaviour of the unfilled wet joints is reproduced by the displacement and velocity discontinuity model, which also behaves as Kelvin viscous-elastic deformation behaviour. Based on the propagator matrix method (PMM), the reflection-transmission coefficients after P-wave propagating through the rock masses with a single joint and multiple parallel joints are studied, respectively, taking account for the normalized joint elastic stiffness (K), normalized joint viscous stiffness (η'), the rock quality factor (Q), the incident angle (α), the dimensionless joint spacing (ξ) and the joint number. The results show that the increment of η' has double effect. That is not only can it increase the effective joint stiffness (positive effect), but also can cause energy loss (negative effect). For a certain K, the transmission coefficients first decrease to a minimum, then increase with increase of η', while the reflection coefficients always decrease. There exists a critical value of η' which makes energy loss achieve a maximum value. The change trend of the reflection-transmission coefficients that varies with α is similar to that of pure elastic joints except that the value of η' has an effect on the magnitude of these coefficients. In the case of the multiple parallel joints, only transmission coefficients are studied. Both η' and Q has an important effect on the interlayer multiple reflections, which makes the variation of transmission coefficients very different from the purely elastic results

  17. Wave simulation in biologic media based on the Kelvin-Voigt fractional-derivative stress-strain relation.

    PubMed

    Caputo, Michele; Carcione, José M; Cavallini, Fabio

    2011-06-01

    The acoustic behavior of biologic media can be described more realistically using a stress-strain relation based on fractional time derivatives of the strain, since the fractional exponent is an additional fitting parameter. We consider a generalization of the Kelvin-Voigt rheology to the case of rational orders of differentiation, the so-called Kelvin-Voigt fractional-derivative (KVFD) constitutive equation, and introduce a novel modeling method to solve the wave equation by means of the Grünwald-Letnikov approximation and the staggered Fourier pseudospectral method to compute the spatial derivatives. The algorithm can handle complex geometries and general material-property variability. We verify the results by comparison with the analytical solution obtained for wave propagation in homogeneous media. Moreover, we illustrate the use of the algorithm by simulation of wave propagation in normal and cancerous breast tissue. PMID:21601139

  18. The Change in Force Chains Inside a Gouge Layer Under Stresses Inferred From Transmission Waves and a Numerical Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshioka, N.; Sakaguchi, H.

    2005-12-01

    A laboratory experiment was performed to detect nucleation processes by transmission elastic waves across a fault with a gouge layer. The apparatus consists of an upper block, a lower block and a gouge layer between the two blocks. The gouge layer is formed with quartz sand with a given particle size distribution and a given thickness. Normal force is the constant self-weight of the upper block and shear force is applied to the upper block by a linear motor through a leaf spring. Elastic waves are continuously transmitted across the fault throughout the shear stress application up to a final stick-slip event. It is observed that a precursory slip and a dilatancy always precede a stick-slip event. The waveform of the transmitted waves significantly changes as the shear stress is increased even when the horizontal displacement is negligibly small. In particular, the amplitude becomes dramatically small with the onset of precursory slip. These facts suggest that the stress chain inside the gouge layer is changed with the application of shear stress. In order to elucidate the mechanism of the observation, a numerical simulation was performed for the gouge layer using the discrete element method (DEM). The loading procedure in the numerical simulation exactly follows the way of the laboratory experiment. The results show that the precursory slip and vertical movements of the upper block are well reproduced by the simulation. The initial stress chains which are homogeneously distributed in the gouge later are drastically changed by shear stress application. With the increment of shear force, some selected force chains become thicker forming columnar structures in the major principal stress direction (direction of the superimposed force of the shear force and the self-weight of the upper block). Dilation due to rotation of the thick column induces volume expansion and it reduces the number of passes to transmit wave from the lower block to the upper block as a result. The

  19. Shear stress induces a longitudinal Ca(2+) wave via autocrine activation of P2Y1 purinergic signalling in rat atrial myocytes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joon-Chul; Woo, Sun-Hee

    2015-12-01

    Atrial myocytes are exposed to shear stress during the cardiac cycle and haemodynamic disturbance. In response, they generate a longitudinally propagating global Ca(2+) wave. Here, we investigated the cellular mechanisms underlying the shear stress-mediated Ca(2+) wave, using two-dimensional confocal Ca(2+) imaging combined with a pressurized microflow system in single rat atrial myocytes. Shear stress of ∼16 dyn cm(-2) for 8 s induced ∼1.2 aperiodic longitudinal Ca(2+) waves (∼79 μm s(-1)) with a delay of 0.2-3 s. Pharmacological blockade of ryanodine receptors (RyRs) or inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors (IP3 Rs) abolished shear stress-induced Ca(2+) wave generation. Furthermore, in atrial myocytes from type 2 IP3R (IP3R2) knock-out mice, shear stress failed to induce longitudinal Ca(2+) waves. The phospholipase C (PLC) inhibitor U73122, but not its inactive analogue U73343, abolished the shear-induced longitudinal Ca(2+) wave. However, pretreating atrial cells with blockers for stretch-activated channels, Na(+)-Ca(2+) exchanger, transient receptor potential melastatin subfamily 4, or nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase did not suppress wave generation under shear stress. The P2 purinoceptor inhibitor suramin, and the potent P2Y1 receptor antagonist MRS 2179, both suppressed the Ca(2+) wave, whereas the P2X receptor antagonist, iso-PPADS, did not alter it. Suppression of gap junction hemichannels permeable to ATP or extracellular application of ATP-metabolizing apyrase inhibited the wave. Removal of external Ca(2+) to enhance hemichannel opening facilitated the wave generation. Our data suggest that longitudinally propagating, regenerative Ca(2+) release through RyRs is triggered by P2Y1-PLC-IP3R2 signalling that is activated by gap junction hemichannel-mediated ATP release in atrial myocytes under shear stress. PMID:26377030

  20. Stress Dependence of Ultrasonic Velocity in Unidirectional Graphite/Epoxy Composites for Longitudinal Waves Propagating Along the Direction of Stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prosser, William H.

    1990-01-01

    The first measurements of the stress induced velocity changes for propagation directions along the direction of applied stress in gr/ep composites have been presented. For propagation and stress direction perpendicular to the fiber direction, the data demonstrated a linear relation between normalized velocity shift and stress. After corrections for the delay line were made, the slope or SAC was determined and compared favorably with the expected value calculated from the previously determined nonlinear coefficients of this material. The ratio of the SAC to the elastic compliance for this direction of loading was evaluated and found to have a value similar to numerous other materials which have very different linear elastic properties. Measurements with stress and propagation along the fibers yielded unusual behavior. The curves were very nonlinear and even shifted direction at higher loads. The large scatter in the data due to bond variations made separation of material effects from bond induced artifacts impossible. Thus the SAC, R, and the remaining two unknown TOEC's could not be determined for this direction of propagation. These measurements further expand the basis of determining nonlinear elastic properties of composite materials. These properties may be useful in developing much needed NDE techniques to determine such important parameters as residual stress after cure and residual strength after impact damage. Additional study is needed to measure the nonlinear behavior in other composite materials including angle ply laminates. Also, other techniques to measure elastic nonlinearity such as harmonic generation should be applied to composites to improve the understanding of these properties and their importance.

  1. Shock wave development in couple stress fluid-filled thin elastic tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adesanya, Samuel O.; Eslami, Mostafa; Mirzazadeh, Mohammad; Biswas, Anjan

    2015-06-01

    This paper looks at the propagation of nonlinear waves through a fluid-filled elastic tube. Viscosity of fluid is taken into account. Using the reductive perturbation method, a nonlinear evolution equation (NLEE) is obtained and the exact travelling wave solution of the equation is obtained using the tanh method. The result shows that blood hyper-viscosity has a significant effect on the propagation of flow and pressure pulse waves.

  2. Multi-Wave Prospective Examination of the Stress-Reactivity Extension of Response Styles Theory of Depression in High-Risk Children and Early Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abela, John R. Z.; Hankin, Benjamin L.; Sheshko, Dana M.; Fishman, Michael B.; Stolow, Darren

    2012-01-01

    The current study tested the stress-reactivity extension of response styles theory of depression (Nolen-Hoeksema "Journal of Abnormal Psychology" 100:569-582, 1991) in a sample of high-risk children and early adolescents from a vulnerability-stress perspective using a multi-wave longitudinal design. In addition, we examined whether obtained…

  3. The contribution of activated processes to Q. [stress corrosion cracking in seismic wave attenuation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spetzler, H. A.; Getting, I. C.; Swanson, P. L.

    1980-01-01

    The possible role of activated processes in seismic attenuation is investigated. In this study, a solid is modeled by a parallel and series configuration of dashpots and springs. The contribution of stress and temperature activated processes to the long term dissipative behavior of this system is analyzed. Data from brittle rock deformation experiments suggest that one such process, stress corrosion cracking, may make a significant contribution to the attenuation factor, Q, especially for long period oscillations under significant tectonic stress.

  4. Significance of T wave normalization in the electrocardiogram during exercise stress test

    SciTech Connect

    Marin, J.J.; Heng, M.K.; Sevrin, R.; Udhoji, V.N.

    1987-12-01

    Although normalization of previously inverted T waves in the ECG is not uncommon during exercise treadmill testing, the clinical significance of this finding is still unclear. This was investigated in 45 patients during thallium-201 exercise testing. Patients with secondary T wave abnormalities on the resting ECG and ischemic exercise ST segment depression were excluded. On the thallium-201 scans, the left ventricle was divided into anterior-septal and inferior-posterior segments; these were considered equivalent to T wave changes in leads V1 and V5, and aVF, respectively. A positive thallium-201 scan was found in 43 of 45 (95%) patients and in 49 of 52 (94%) cardiac segments that showed T wave normalization. When thallium scans and T wave changes were matched to sites of involvement, 76% of T wave normalization in lead aV, was associated with positive thallium scans in the inferior-posterior segments, and 77% of T wave normalization in V1 and V5 was associated with positive thallium scans in the anterior-septal segments. These site correlations were similar for reversible and fixed thallium defects, and for patients not on digoxin therapy. Similar correlations were noted for the sites of T wave changes and coronary artery lesions in 12 patients who had angiography. In patients with a high prevalence for coronary artery disease, exercise T wave normalization is highly specific for the presence of the disease. In addition, it represents predominantly either previous injury or exercise-induced ischemic changes over the site of ECG involvement, rather than reciprocal changes of the opposite ventricular wall.

  5. Frequency- and stress-dependent changes in shear-wave velocity dispersion in water-saturated, unconsolidated sand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghose, R.

    2009-04-01

    Anelastic processes in the earth causes dissipation of seismic energy. Because of the fundamental laws of causality, the dissipation effects demand a frequency-dependent change of elastic moduli, and therefore, dispersion in elastic wave velocities. Assessing the dispersion of seismic shear waves in the unconsolidated subsoil is important for at least 3 reasons: 1) shear-wave velocity (Vs) is a key parameter in all dynamic loading problems; the frequency of the observed shear waves in field, downhole and laboratory measurements varies widely (20 Hz - 10 kHz), and consequently an uncertainty resulting from an unknown or poorly known estimate of dispersion may translate into erroneous evaluation and potential risks, 2) generally Vs-dispersion is considered negligible for the frequency range of practical interest; it is important to check this assumption and modify the site evaluation results, if necessary, and 3) the underlying soil-physics of any observed dispersion can be useful in estimating an unknown soil physical parameter. In the present research, we have concentrated on Vs dispersion in saturated sand in laboratory, under varying vertical and horizontal stress levels that are realistic in the context of shallow subsoil investigations. We explored theoretical models to obtain insight from our experimental findings. Laboratory experiments involving array seismic measurements and accurate stress control present clear evidence of dispersive shear-wave velocity in saturated sand in the frequency range 2-16 kHz. The change of Vs as a function of frequency is clearly nonlinear. For low frequencies, as observed in the field data, our result indicates significant dispersion and, therefore, nonlinear variation of attenuation. This has important implication on site evaluation using Vs. Significantly, the data allows us to distinguish a frequency-dependence of the velocity dispersion. The relative importance of fluid motion relative to the skeleton frame (Biot theory

  6. Potential applicability of stress wave velocity method on pavement base materials as a non-destructive testing technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahedi, Masrur

    Aggregates derived from natural sources have been used traditionally as the pavement base materials. But in recent times, the extraction of these natural aggregates has become more labor intensive and costly due to resource depletion and environmental concerns. Thus, the uses of recycled aggregates as the supplementary of natural aggregates are increasing considerably in pavement construction. Use of recycled aggregates such as recycled crushed concrete (RCA) and recycled asphalt pavement (RAP) reduces the rate of natural resource depletion, construction debris and cost. Although recycled aggregates could be used as a viable alternative of conventional base materials, strength characteristics and product variability limit their utility to a great extent. Hence, their applicability is needed to be evaluated extensively based on strength, stiffness and cost factors. But for extensive evaluation, traditionally practiced test methods are proven to be unreasonable in terms of time, cost, reliability and applicability. On the other hand, rapid non-destructive methods have the potential to be less time consuming and inexpensive along with the low variability of test results; therefore improving the reliability of estimated performance of the pavement. In this research work, the experimental program was designed to assess the potential application of stress wave velocity method as a non-destructive test in evaluating recycled base materials. Different combinations of cement treated recycled concrete aggregate (RAP) and recycled crushed concrete (RCA) were used to evaluate the applicability of stress wave velocity method. It was found that, stress wave velocity method is excellent in characterizing the strength and stiffness properties of cement treated base materials. Statistical models, based on P-wave velocity were derived for predicting the modulus of elasticity and compressive strength of different combinations of cement treated RAP, Grade-1 and Grade-2 materials. Two

  7. Experimental investigation of the dependence of radar backscattering on wind speed, wind stress and wave height

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gogineni, S. P.; Katsaros, K. B.

    1989-01-01

    During summer 1988, radar measurements were performed in conjunction with detailed environmental observations on Lake Washington at the University of Washington Sand Point field station. Radar data were collected at 5.3 and 10 GHz for incidence angles between 30 and 60 deg with VV-polarization. The environmental measurements included wind speed and direction, large-wave heights, the high-frequency portion of the wave spectrum, humidity, and air and water temperatures. The small-scale wave spectrum was measured using a resistance wire gauge. The results show that backscatter increased with wind speed as expected. However, little difference was observed in the scattering coefficient for upwind and crosswind directions. The results also indicated an increase in the amplitude of small waves with friction velocity.

  8. Complexity of cardiac signals for predicting changes in alpha-waves after stress in patients undergoing cardiac catheterization

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Hung-Chih; Lin, Yen-Hung; Lo, Men-Tzung; Tang, Sung-Chun; Wang, Tzung-Dau; Lu, Hung-Chun; Ho, Yi-Lwun; Ma, Hsi-Pin; Peng, Chung-Kang

    2015-01-01

    The hierarchical interaction between electrical signals of the brain and heart is not fully understood. We hypothesized that the complexity of cardiac electrical activity can be used to predict changes in encephalic electricity after stress. Most methods for analyzing the interaction between the heart rate variability (HRV) and electroencephalography (EEG) require a computation-intensive mathematical model. To overcome these limitations and increase the predictive accuracy of human relaxing states, we developed a method to test our hypothesis. In addition to routine linear analysis, multiscale entropy and detrended fluctuation analysis of the HRV were used to quantify nonstationary and nonlinear dynamic changes in the heart rate time series. Short-time Fourier transform was applied to quantify the power of EEG. The clinical, HRV, and EEG parameters of postcatheterization EEG alpha waves were analyzed using change-score analysis and generalized additive models. In conclusion, the complexity of cardiac electrical signals can be used to predict EEG changes after stress. PMID:26286628

  9. Complexity of cardiac signals for predicting changes in alpha-waves after stress in patients undergoing cardiac catheterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Hung-Chih; Lin, Yen-Hung; Lo, Men-Tzung; Tang, Sung-Chun; Wang, Tzung-Dau; Lu, Hung-Chun; Ho, Yi-Lwun; Ma, Hsi-Pin; Peng, Chung-Kang

    2015-08-01

    The hierarchical interaction between electrical signals of the brain and heart is not fully understood. We hypothesized that the complexity of cardiac electrical activity can be used to predict changes in encephalic electricity after stress. Most methods for analyzing the interaction between the heart rate variability (HRV) and electroencephalography (EEG) require a computation-intensive mathematical model. To overcome these limitations and increase the predictive accuracy of human relaxing states, we developed a method to test our hypothesis. In addition to routine linear analysis, multiscale entropy and detrended fluctuation analysis of the HRV were used to quantify nonstationary and nonlinear dynamic changes in the heart rate time series. Short-time Fourier transform was applied to quantify the power of EEG. The clinical, HRV, and EEG parameters of postcatheterization EEG alpha waves were analyzed using change-score analysis and generalized additive models. In conclusion, the complexity of cardiac electrical signals can be used to predict EEG changes after stress.

  10. Complexity of cardiac signals for predicting changes in alpha-waves after stress in patients undergoing cardiac catheterization.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Hung-Chih; Lin, Yen-Hung; Lo, Men-Tzung; Tang, Sung-Chun; Wang, Tzung-Dau; Lu, Hung-Chun; Ho, Yi-Lwun; Ma, Hsi-Pin; Peng, Chung-Kang

    2015-01-01

    The hierarchical interaction between electrical signals of the brain and heart is not fully understood. We hypothesized that the complexity of cardiac electrical activity can be used to predict changes in encephalic electricity after stress. Most methods for analyzing the interaction between the heart rate variability (HRV) and electroencephalography (EEG) require a computation-intensive mathematical model. To overcome these limitations and increase the predictive accuracy of human relaxing states, we developed a method to test our hypothesis. In addition to routine linear analysis, multiscale entropy and detrended fluctuation analysis of the HRV were used to quantify nonstationary and nonlinear dynamic changes in the heart rate time series. Short-time Fourier transform was applied to quantify the power of EEG. The clinical, HRV, and EEG parameters of postcatheterization EEG alpha waves were analyzed using change-score analysis and generalized additive models. In conclusion, the complexity of cardiac electrical signals can be used to predict EEG changes after stress. PMID:26286628

  11. A study of the use of vibration and stress wave sensing for the detection of bearing failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ensor, L. C.; Feng, C. C.

    1975-01-01

    Results from an experimental study of vibrations and stress waves emitted from ball bearings are presented. Fatique tests were run with both high quality bearings and man faulted bearings, all of one size. Tests were instrumented with different sensors to detect the noises from 10 Hz to 1 MHz. Frequency spectrum plots are presented. The modulation characteristics of the ultrasonic noises were analyzed, and acoustic emission type measurements were conducted. Results are presented which show that there are usable acoustic signal levels even beyond 500 KHz. These signal levels are modulated by a low frequency carrier which is a function of the stress loading and acoustic transmissibility. The results were correlated to fault size in the bearings. The correlation shows that the sensor used for signals from 100 KHz to 1 MHz gave the best sensitivity and detected the generation of very small spalls or pits.

  12. Observations of whitecap coverage and the relation to wind stress, wave slope, and turbulent dissipation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwendeman, Michael; Thomson, Jim

    2015-12-01

    Shipboard measurements of whitecap coverage are presented from two cruises in the North Pacific, and compared with in situ measurements of wind speed and friction velocity, average wave steepness, and near-surface turbulent dissipation. A threshold power law fit is proposed for all variables, which incorporates the flexibility of a power law with the threshold behavior commonly seen in whitecapping. The fit of whitecap coverage to wind speed, U10, closely matches similar relations from three recent studies, particularly in the range of 6-14 m/s. At higher wind speeds, the whitecap coverage data level off relative to the fits, and an analysis of the residuals shows some evidence of reduced whitecapping in rapidly developing waves. Wave slope variables are examined for potential improvement over wind speed parameterizations. Of these variables, the mean square slope of the equilibrium range waves has the best statistics, which are further improved after normalizing by the directional spread and frequency bandwidth. Finally, the whitecap coverage is compared to measurements of turbulent dissipation. Though still statistically significant, the correlation is worse than the wind or wave relations, and residuals show a strong negative trend with wave age. This may be due to an increased influence of microbreaking in older wind seas.

  13. Modeling wave-induced pore pressure and effective stress in a granular seabed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholtès, Luc; Chareyre, Bruno; Michallet, Hervé; Catalano, Emanuele; Marzougui, Donia

    2014-08-01

    The response of a sandy seabed under wave loading is investigated on the basis of numerical modeling using a multi-scale approach. To that aim, the discrete element method is coupled to a finite volume method specially enhanced to describe compressible fluid flow. Both solid and fluid phase mechanics are upscaled from considerations established at the pore level. Model's predictions are validated against poroelasticity theory and discussed in comparison with experiments where a sediment analog is subjected to wave action in a flume. Special emphasis is put on the mechanisms leading the seabed to liquefy under wave-induced pressure variation on its surface. Liquefaction is observed in both dilative and compactive regimes. It is shown that the instability can be triggered for a well-identified range of hydraulic conditions. Particularly, the results confirm that the gas content, together with the permeability of the medium are key parameters affecting the transmission of pressure inside the soil.

  14. Modeling wave-induced pore pressure and effective stress in a granular seabed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholtès, Luc; Chareyre, Bruno; Michallet, Hervé; Catalano, Emanuele; Marzougui, Donia

    2015-01-01

    The response of a sandy seabed under wave loading is investigated on the basis of numerical modeling using a multi-scale approach. To that aim, the discrete element method is coupled to a finite volume method specially enhanced to describe compressible fluid flow. Both solid and fluid phase mechanics are upscaled from considerations established at the pore level. Model's predictions are validated against poroelasticity theory and discussed in comparison with experiments where a sediment analog is subjected to wave action in a flume. Special emphasis is put on the mechanisms leading the seabed to liquefy under wave-induced pressure variation on its surface. Liquefaction is observed in both dilative and compactive regimes. It is shown that the instability can be triggered for a well-identified range of hydraulic conditions. Particularly, the results confirm that the gas content, together with the permeability of the medium are key parameters affecting the transmission of pressure inside the soil.

  15. Stress

    MedlinePlus

    ... sudden negative change, such as losing a job, divorce, or illness Traumatic stress, which happens when you ... stress, so you can avoid more serious health effects. NIH: National Institute of Mental Health

  16. Impact of 60-GHz millimeter waves and corresponding heat effect on endoplasmic reticulum stress sensor gene expression.

    PubMed

    Le Quément, Catherine; Nicolaz, Christophe Nicolas; Habauzit, Denis; Zhadobov, Maxim; Sauleau, Ronan; Le Dréan, Yves

    2014-09-01

    Emerging high data rate wireless communication systems, currently under development, will operate at millimeter waves (MMW) and specifically in the 60 GHz band for broadband short-range communications. The aim of this study was to investigate potential effects of MMW radiation on the cellular endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Human skin cell lines were exposed at 60.4 GHz, with incident power densities (IPD) ranging between 1 and 20 mW/cm(2) . The upper IPD limits correspond to the ICNIRP local exposure limit for the general public. The expression of ER-stress sensors, namely BIP and ORP150, was then examined by real-time RT-PCR. Our experimental data demonstrated that MMW radiations do not change BIP or ORP150 mRNA basal levels, whatever the cell line, the exposure duration or the IPD level. Co-exposure to the well-known ER-stress inducer thapsigargin (TG) and MMW were then assessed. Our results show that MMW exposure at 20 mW/cm(2) inhibits TG-induced BIP and ORP150 over expression. Experimental controls showed that this inhibition is linked to the thermal effect resulting from the MMW exposure. PMID:25099539

  17. Propagation of Surface Waves in a Homogeneous Layer of Finite Thickness over an Initially Stressed Functionally Graded Magnetic-Electric-Elastic Half-Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Li; Wei, P. J.

    2015-03-01

    The propagation behaviour of Love wave in an initially stressed functionally graded magnetic-electric-elastic half-space carrying a homogeneous layer is investigated. The material parameters in the substrate are assumed to vary exponentially along the thickness direction only. The velocity equations of Love wave are derived on the electrically or magnetically open circuit and short circuit boundary conditions, based on the equations of motion of the graded magnetic-electric-elastic mate- rial with the initial stresses and the free traction boundary conditions of surface and the continuous boundary conditions of interface. The dispersive curves are obtained numerically and the influences of the initial stresses and the material gradient index on the dispersive curves are dis- cussed. The investigation provides a basis for the development of new functionally graded magneto-electro-elastic surface wave devices.

  18. Effect of irregularity on torsional surface waves in an initially stressed anisotropic porous layer sandwiched between homogeneous and non-homogeneous half-space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Anup; Kundu, Santimoy; Gupta, Shishir; Vaishnav, Pramod Kumar

    2016-06-01

    The present paper is concerned with the propagation of torsional surface waves in an initially stressed anisotropic porous layer sandwiched between homogeneous and non-homogeneous half-space. We assume the quadratic inhomogeneity in rigidity and density in the lower half-space and irregularity is taken in the form of rectangle at the interface separating the layer from the lower half-space. The dispersion equation for torsional waves has been obtained in a closed form. Velocity equation is also obtained in the absence of irregularity. The study reveals that the presence of irregularity, initial stress, porosity, inhomogeneity and anisotropy factor in the dispersion equation approves the significant effect of these parameters in the propagation of torsional waves in porous medium. It has also been observed that for a uniform media, the velocity equation reduces to the classical result of Love wave.

  19. Gravity Probe-B Spacecraft attitude control based on the dynamics of slosh wave-induced fluid stress distribution on rotating dewar container of cryogenic propellant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.; Lee, C. C.; Leslie, F. W.

    1991-01-01

    The dynamical behavior of fluids, in particular the effect of surface tension on partially-filled rotating fluids, in a full-scale Gravity Probe-B Spacecraft propellant dewar tank imposed by various frequencies of gravity jitters have been investigated. Results show that fluid stress distribution exerted on the outer and inner walls of rotating dewar are closely related to the characteristics of slosh waves excited on the liquid-vapor interface in the rotating dewar tank. This can provide a set of tool for the spacecraft dynamic control leading toward the control of spacecraft unbalance caused by the uneven fluid stress distribution due to slosh wave excitations.

  20. Silencing by blasting: combination of laser pulse induced stress waves and magnetophoresis for siRNA delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babincová, M.; Babincová, N.; Durdík, S.; Bergemann, C.; Sourivong, P.

    2016-06-01

    A new method is developed for efficient delivery of short interference RNA into cells using combination of magnetophoresis for pre-concentration of siRNA-magnetic nanoparticle complex on the surface of cells with subsequent nanosecond laser pulse generating stress waves in transfection chamber, which is able to permeabilize cell membrane for the facilitated delivery of siRNA into the cell interior. As has been shown using siRNA inducing cell apoptosis, combination of these two physical factors increased the efficiency of three different human carcinoma cells transfection to 93%, 89%, and 84%, for HeLa (cervical carcinoma), MCF-7 (breast carcinoma), and UCI-107 (ovarian carcinoma) cells, respectively. This new physical method of siRNA delivery may have therefore far reaching applications in biotechnology and functional genomics.

  1. Noncontact Determination of Antisymmetric Plate Wave Velocity in Ceramic Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kautz, Harold E.

    1998-01-01

    High-temperature materials are of increasing importance in the development of more efficient engines and components for the aeronautics industry. In particular, ceramic matrix composite (CMC) and metal matrix composite (MMC) structures are under active development for these applications. The acousto-ultrasonic (AU) method has been shown to be useful for assessing mechanical properties in composite structures. In particular, plate wave analysis can characterize composites in terms of their stiffness moduli. It is desirable to monitor changes in mechanical properties that occur during thermomechanical testing and to monitor the health of components whose geometry or position make them hard to reach with conventional ultrasonic probes. In such applications, it would be useful to apply AU without coupling directly to the test surface. For a number of years, lasers have been under investigation as remote ultrasonic input sources and ultrasound detectors. The use of an ultrasonic transducer coupled through an air gap has also been under study. So far at the NASA Lewis Research Center, we have been more successful in using lasers as ultrasonic sources than as output devices. On the other hand, we have been more successful in using an air-coupled piezoelectric transducer as an output device than as an input device. For this reason, we studied the laser in/air-coupled-transducer out combination-using a pulsed NdYAG laser as the ultrasonic source and an air-coupled-transducer as the detector. The present work is focused on one of the AU parameters of interest, the ultrasonic velocity of the antisymmetric plate-wave mode. This easily identified antisymmetric pulse can be used to determine shear and flexure modulus. It was chosen for this initial work because the pulse arrival times are likely to be the most precise. The following schematic illustrates our experimental arrangement for using laser in/air-transducer out on SiC/SiC composite tensile specimens. The NdYAG pulse was

  2. Laboratory and field observations of stress-wave induced changes in oil flow behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, P. M.; Majer, Ernest Luther; Wooden, W.; Daley, T. M.

    2001-01-01

    We present recent results of laboratory and field experiments designed to validate and quantify the phenomenon of seismically enhanced oil production in marginal reservoirs. Controlled laboratory experiments were performed where mechanical stress oscillations at 100 Hz or less were applied to sandstone cores while flowing oil and/or brine at constant flow rates. Steady-state flow and simulated flooding experiments indicated that stress stimulation causes significant changes in the ability of one fluid to displace the other and on the preference that the rock has for trapping one fluid over the other. For Berea sandstone, which is highly water wet, stress stimulation caused oil production to be impeded during water floods and caused the bulk fluid pressure drop across the core to increase during steady-state simultaneous flow of oil and brine. A possible explanation of these observations is that stimulation caused the core to become more oil wet. Field stimulation tests on producing reservoirs at Lost Hills, California were performed using a downhole fluid pressure pulsation device. Stimulation was applied in one well for 50 days total during July - November 2000. Two groups of producing wells were monitored for changes in oil cut and oil production during the test. A control group of 26 wells displayed an oil-cut increase of 29% and an oil production increase of 26% which are clearly correlated with the stimulation treatment. A larger group of 60 wells showed 11% oil-cut and 17v0 production increases. Similar increases were observed during the October 1999 Hector Mine earthquake, magnitude 7.1, in the Mojave Desert about 230 miles from Lost Hills. Downhole seismic monitoring of the stimulation wavefield is being used to help quantify the frequency range and energy threshold required for effective production enhancement.

  3. A Comparison of Brain Wave Patterns of High and Low Grade Point Average Students During Rest, Problem Solving, and Stress Situations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montor, Karel

    The purpose of this study was to compare brain wave patterns produced by high and low grade point average students, while they were resting, solving problems, and subjected to stress situations. The study involved senior midshipmen at the United States Naval Academy. The high group was comprised of those whose cumulative grade point average was…

  4. Floc variability under changing turbulent stresses and sediment availability on a wave energetic muddy shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safak, I.; Allison, M. A.; Sheremet, A.

    2013-02-01

    The interplay between cohesive sediment flocculation, turbulence, and sediment availability is studied using field observations collected on the muddy Atchafalaya inner shelf, Louisiana, USA. Observations were made at two sites, characterized by surficial sediments of different grain size. At the coarse-sediment site, a negative correlation between floc size and suspended sediment concentration was observed for the first time in a field experiment under energetic wave conditions. This agrees with previous laboratory studies and field observations, and suggests that strong near-bed turbulence associated with significant sediment resuspension also results in the breaking of macro-flocs (230-μm mode). At the fine-sediment site, the relative abundance of clay and fine silt available for flocculation appears to promote persistent macro-flocs of approximately 300-μm. The observations support the assumption that sediment supply and surficial sediment properties, in addition to turbulence and suspended sediment concentration, play an important role in flocculation.

  5. Effect of postural stress on left ventricular performance using the continuous-wave Doppler technique.

    PubMed

    Brown, R A; McCormick, K A; Vaitkevicius, P V; Fleg, J L

    1991-09-01

    To evaluate the effect of postural shifts on continuous-wave Doppler indices of left ventricular performance in normal man, we recorded Doppler signals suprasternally in 69 healthy volunteers, ranging in age from 20 to 86 years, in the supine position and 2 min after assumption of sitting and standing postures. All indices decreased progressively with increasing orthostasis: peak acceleration (PKA): 15.6 +/- 4.5 m/s2 to 14.0 +/- 4.0 m/s2 to 13.6 +/- 4.6 m/s2; peak velocity (PKV): 0.64 +/- 0.18 m/s to 0.58 +/- 0.17 m/s to 0.56 +/- 0.17 m/s; stroke distance (SD): 11.4 +/- 3.7 cm to 9.8 +/- 3.4 cm to 8.0 +/- 2.8 cm; SD x heart rate (VIH): 717 +/- 272 cm to 655 +/- 268 cm to 572 +/- 217 cm, from supine to sitting to standing, respectively (p less than 0.001). In contrast heart rate increased modestly from 62.4 +/- 10.0 bpm supine, to 66.9 +/- 12.4 bpm sitting, to 71.3 +/- 9.9 bpm standing (p less than .001). Similar postural changes in Doppler variables were seen in all three age groups (20 to 44 years; 45 to 64 years; and 65 to 86 years). Thus, orthostasis in normal subjects is accompanied by a reduction in all continuous-wave Doppler indices of left ventricular performance, regardless of age. PMID:1889267

  6. Stress wave propagationin the site 12 hydraulic/explosive fracturing experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Boade, R. R.; Reed, R. P.

    1980-05-01

    The Site 12 experiment was a heavily instrumented field event performed to examine the hydraulic/explosive fracturing concept for preparing an underground oil shale bed for true in situ processing. One of the key phases of this fracturing concept is the blasting operation which involves the insertion and detonation of slurry explosive in a pre-formed system of hydrofractures. To obtain a sound understanding of the nature of the blasting operations, a rather extensive array of stress gages, accelerometers, and time-of-arrival gages was installed in the rock mass in the vacinity of the explosive to monitor the dynamic events initiated by the detonation. These gages provided considerable amounts of information which were useful in evaluating overall results of the experiment. Details of the gage array, of the data, of analysis methods, and of the results and conclusions are considered in the report.

  7. Stress wave-induced damage of sandstone for dry and wet conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Swift, R.

    2000-05-01

    The authors present meso-scale modeling of impact recovery experiments on sandstone using a hybrid Smooth Particle Hydrodynamic (SPH) and Discrete Element Method (DEM) approach. Each grain is represented with clusters of particles providing explicit representation of the graidpore structure. obtained from scanning electron microscope (SEM) or synthetic images. Modeling accounts for the influence of pore fluid and illustrates how graidpore heterogeneity under dry and saturated states affects the evolution of grain damage. Results exhibit characteristics that are observed in impact recovery experiments. An increase in grain damage is associated with an increase in stress level. Grains in dry samples are extremely and irregularly fragmented and show extensively reduced porosity, while less grain damage and higher porosity are observed in saturated samples. Pore fluid mitigates the interaction between grains, thus reducing fragmentation damage. This modeling approach in concert with experiments offers a unique way to understand dynamic compaction of brittle porous materials.

  8. NDE of titanium alloy MMC rings for gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baaklini, George Y.; Percival, Larry D.; Yancey, Robert N.; Kautz, Harold E.

    1993-01-01

    Progress in the processing and fabrication of metal matrix composites (MMC's) requires appropriate mechanical and nondestructive testing methods. These methods are needed to characterize properties, assess integrity, and predict the life of engine components such as compressor rotors, blades, and vanes. Capabilities and limitations of several state-of-the-art nondestructive evaluation (NDE) technologies are investigated for characterizing titanium MMC rings for gas turbine engines. The use of NDE technologies such as x-ray computed tomography, radiography, and ultrasonics in identifying fabrication-related problems that caused defects in components is examined. Acousto-ultrasonics was explored to assess degradation of material mechanical properties by using stress wave factor and ultrasonic velocity measurements before and after the burst testing of the rings.

  9. Stress dependent dispersion relations of acoustic waves travelling on a chain of point masses connected by anharmonic linear and torsional springs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pluta, Mieczysław; Amjad, Umar; Klinghammer, Hermann; Jha, Diwaker; Tarar, Khurram; Grill, Wolfgang

    2012-05-01

    The propagation of a deformation along a flexural beam or plate depends on material properties, geometrical conditions like the beam cross-section, effects of stiffening or softening due to external stress, and last but not least the mode of the wave including its polarization. The time-of-flight (TOF) of acoustic waves is influenced by any of the above listed parameters. This effect is utilized in ultrasonic NDE and structural health monitoring applications. It was shown in earlier publications that the solutions of wave equations for a linear chain model consisting of identical mass points, subject to a direction and distance dependent potential, show the dispersion properties and dependencies on externally applied stress of the lowest longitudinal and transversal plate modes. In the model presented here anharmonic potentials are introduced. The potentials are represented by torsional springs at each mass point and linear springs between them. Dynamic equations are derived, based on interactions with next and second next neighbors. The results obtained with the developed model are compared with experimental observations concerning the reaction of the TOF for the lowest Lamb modes in an aluminum plate under variable in plane stress. The developed models are capable to demonstrate general aspects of the mode and frequency dependence of the acousto-elastic coefficients for the lowest symmetric and antisymmetric Lamb waves. The introduced anharmonicities allow furthermore for a close approximation of the experimental findings.

  10. Accelerated adhesion of grafted skins by laser-induced stress wave-based gene transfer of hepatocyte growth factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aizawa, Kazuya; Sato, Shunichi; Saitoh, Daizoh; Tsuda, Hitoshi; Ashida, Hiroshi; Obara, Minoru

    2009-02-01

    In our previous study, we delivered plasmid DNA coding for human hepatocyto growth factor (hHGF) to rat skin grafts based on laser-induced stress wave (LISW), by which production of CD31-positive cells in the grafted skins was found to be enhanced, suggesting improved angiogenesis. In this study, we validated the efficacy of this method to accelerate adhesion of grafted skins; reperfusion and reepithelialization in the grafted skins were examined. As a graft, dorsal skin of a rat was exsected and its subcutaneous fat was removed. Plasmid DNA expression vector for hHGF was injected into the graft; on its back surface a laser target with a transparent sheet for plasma confinement was placed, and irradiated with three nanosecond laser pulses at a laser fluence of 1.2 J/cm2 (532 nm; spot diameter, 3 mm) to generate LISWs. After the application of LISWs, the graft was transplanted onto its donor site. We evaluated blood flow by laser Doppler imaging and analyzed reepithelialization based on immunohistochemistry as a function of postgrafting time. It was found that both reperfusion and reepithelialization were significantly enhanced for the grafts with gene transfection than for normal grafts; reepithelialization was completed within 7 days after transplantation with the transfected grafts. These findings demonstrate that adhesion of grafted skins can be accelerated by delivering HGF gene to the grafts based on LISWs.

  11. Accelerated adhesion of grafted skin by laser-induced stress wave-based gene transfer of hepatocyte growth factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aizawa, Kazuya; Sato, Shunichi; Terakawa, Mitsuhiro; Saitoh, Daizoh; Tsuda, Hitoshi; Ashida, Hiroshi; Obara, Minoru

    2009-11-01

    Gene therapy using wound healing-associated growth factor gene has received much attention as a new strategy for improving the outcome of tissue transplantation. We delivered plasmid DNA coding for human hepatocyte growth factor (hHGF) to rat free skin grafts by the use of laser-induced stress waves (LISWs); autografting was performed with the grafts. Systematic analysis was conducted to evaluate the adhesion properties of the grafted tissue; angiogenesis, cell proliferation, and reepithelialization were assessed by immunohistochemistry, and reperfusion was measured by laser Doppler imaging as a function of time after grafting. Both the level of angiogenesis on day 3 after grafting and the increased ratio of blood flow on day 4 to that on day 3 were significantly higher than those in five control groups: grafting with hHGF gene injection alone, grafting with control plasmid vector injection alone, grafting with LISW application alone, grafting with LISW application after control plasmid vector injection, and normal grafting. Reepithelialization was almost completed on day 7 even at the center of the graft with LISW application after hHGF gene injection, while it was not for the grafts of the five control groups. These findings demonstrate the validity of our LISW-based HGF gene transfection to accelerate the adhesion of grafted skins.

  12. Effects of pressure characteristics on transfection efficiency in laser-induced stress wave-mediated gene delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, Takahiro; Sato, Shunichi; Ashida, Hiroshi; Obara, Minoru

    2013-07-01

    Laser-induced stress waves (LISWs) generated by irradiating a light-absorbing medium with a pulsed laser can transiently increase the permeability of cell membranes for gene delivery. In this study, we investigated the effects of pressure characteristics of LISWs upon gene transfection efficiency using lasers with different pulse durations: a 6-ns pulsed Nd:YAG laser and 20-ns and 200-µs pulsed ruby lasers. LISWs were generated by irradiating a black rubber disk, on which a transparent plastic sheet was adhered for confinement of the laser-produced plasma. Rat dorsal skin was injected with plasmid DNA coding for luciferase, to which LISWs were applied. With nanosecond laser pulses, transfection efficiency increased linearly with increasing positive peak pressure in the range of 35 to 145 MPa, the corresponding impulse ranging from 10 to 40 Paṡs. With 200-µs laser pulses, on the other hand, efficient gene expression was observed by the application of LISWs even with a 10-fold-lower peak pressure (˜5 MPa), the corresponding impulse being as large as 430 Paṡs. These results indicate that even at low peak pressures, efficient transfection can be achieved by extending the pressure duration and hence by increasing the impulse of LISWs, while the averaged expression efficiencies were relatively low.

  13. Gate-to-drain capacitance verifying the continuous-wave green laser crystallization n-TFT trapped charges distribution under dc voltage stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Zhen-Ying; Wang, Mu-Chun; Chen, Shuang-Yuan; Chen, Chih; Huang, Heng-Sheng

    2009-12-01

    In this work, a metrology was proposed to realize the distribution of fixed oxide trapped charges and grain boundary trapped states. The (continuous-wave green laser crystallization) n-channel thin-film transistors (TFTs) were forced by dc voltage stress, VG=VD. The gate-to-drain capacitance, CGD-VG, with varying frequency of applied small signal was developed. To probe the distribution of these defects, the difference (initial capacitance values minus stressed capacitance values) of CGD-VG with different frequencies was precisely studied.

  14. Generation of SH-type waves due to shearing stress discontinuity in a sandy layer overlying an isotropic and inhomogeneous elastic half-space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Prakash; Mandal, Dinbandhu

    2014-02-01

    The generation of SH-type waves due to sudden application of a stress discontinuity which moves after creation at the sandy layer of finite thickness overlying an isotropic and inhomogeneous elastic half-space is considered. The displacements are obtained in exact form by the method due to Cagniard modified by De Hoop. The numerical calculations are obtained. Two cases of shearing stress discontinuities are considered for different sandiness parameters. The graphs are drawn to show the effect of sandiness in the displacement components.

  15. Salt stress-induced Ca2+ waves are associated with rapid, long-distance root-to-shoot signaling in plants

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Won-Gyu; Toyota, Masatsugu; Kim, Su-Hwa; Hilleary, Richard; Gilroy, Simon

    2014-01-01

    Their sessile lifestyle means that plants have to be exquisitely sensitive to their environment, integrating many signals to appropriate developmental and physiological responses. Stimuli ranging from wounding and pathogen attack to the distribution of water and nutrients in the soil are frequently presented in a localized manner but responses are often elicited throughout the plant. Such systemic signaling is thought to operate through the redistribution of a host of chemical regulators including peptides, RNAs, ions, metabolites, and hormones. However, there are hints of a much more rapid communication network that has been proposed to involve signals ranging from action and system potentials to reactive oxygen species. We now show that plants also possess a rapid stress signaling system based on Ca2+ waves that propagate through the plant at rates of up to ∼400 µm/s. In the case of local salt stress to the Arabidopsis thaliana root, Ca2+ wave propagation is channeled through the cortex and endodermal cell layers and this movement is dependent on the vacuolar ion channel TPC1. We also provide evidence that the Ca2+ wave/TPC1 system likely elicits systemic molecular responses in target organs and may contribute to whole-plant stress tolerance. These results suggest that, although plants do not have a nervous system, they do possess a sensory network that uses ion fluxes moving through defined cell types to rapidly transmit information between distant sites within the organism. PMID:24706854

  16. Salt stress-induced Ca2+ waves are associated with rapid, long-distance root-to-shoot signaling in plants.

    PubMed

    Choi, Won-Gyu; Toyota, Masatsugu; Kim, Su-Hwa; Hilleary, Richard; Gilroy, Simon

    2014-04-29

    Their sessile lifestyle means that plants have to be exquisitely sensitive to their environment, integrating many signals to appropriate developmental and physiological responses. Stimuli ranging from wounding and pathogen attack to the distribution of water and nutrients in the soil are frequently presented in a localized manner but responses are often elicited throughout the plant. Such systemic signaling is thought to operate through the redistribution of a host of chemical regulators including peptides, RNAs, ions, metabolites, and hormones. However, there are hints of a much more rapid communication network that has been proposed to involve signals ranging from action and system potentials to reactive oxygen species. We now show that plants also possess a rapid stress signaling system based on Ca(2+) waves that propagate through the plant at rates of up to ∼ 400 µm/s. In the case of local salt stress to the Arabidopsis thaliana root, Ca(2+) wave propagation is channeled through the cortex and endodermal cell layers and this movement is dependent on the vacuolar ion channel TPC1. We also provide evidence that the Ca(2+) wave/TPC1 system likely elicits systemic molecular responses in target organs and may contribute to whole-plant stress tolerance. These results suggest that, although plants do not have a nervous system, they do possess a sensory network that uses ion fluxes moving through defined cell types to rapidly transmit information between distant sites within the organism. PMID:24706854

  17. The influence of laser-induced nanosecond rise-time stress waves on the microstructure and surface chemical activity of single crystal Cu nanopillars

    SciTech Connect

    Youssef, G.; Crum, R.; Seif, D.; Po, G.; Prikhodko, S. V.; Kodambaka, S.; Ghoniem, N.; Gupta, V.

    2013-02-28

    An apparatus and test procedure for fabrication and loading of single crystal metal nanopillars under extremely high pressures (>1 GPa) and strain rates (>10{sup 7} s{sup -1}), using laser-generated stress waves, are presented. Single-crystalline Cu pillars ({approx}1.20 {mu}m in tall and {approx}0.45 {mu}m in diameter) prepared via focused ion beam milling of Cu(001) substrates are shock-loaded using this approach with the dilatational stress waves propagating along the [001] axis of the pillars. Transmission electron microscopy observations of shock-loaded pillars show that dislocation density decreases and that their orientation changes with increasing stress wave amplitude, indicative of dislocation motion. The shock-loaded pillars exhibit enhanced chemical reactivity when submerged in oil and isopropyl alcohol solutions, due likely to the exposure of clean surfaces via surface spallation and formation of surface steps and nanoscale facets through dislocation motion to the surface of the pillars, resulting in growth of thin oxide films on the surfaces of the pillars.

  18. The influence of laser-induced nanosecond rise-time stress waves on the microstructure and surface chemical activity of single crystal Cu nanopillars

    PubMed Central

    Youssef, G.; Crum, R.; Prikhodko, S. V.; Seif, D.; Po, G.; Ghoniem, N.; Kodambaka, S.; Gupta, V.

    2013-01-01

    An apparatus and test procedure for fabrication and loading of single crystal metal nanopillars under extremely high pressures (>1 GPa) and strain rates (>107 s−1), using laser-generated stress waves, are presented. Single-crystalline Cu pillars (∼1.20 μm in tall and ∼0.45 μm in diameter) prepared via focused ion beam milling of Cu(001) substrates are shock-loaded using this approach with the dilatational stress waves propagating along the [001] axis of the pillars. Transmission electron microscopy observations of shock-loaded pillars show that dislocation density decreases and that their orientation changes with increasing stress wave amplitude, indicative of dislocation motion. The shock-loaded pillars exhibit enhanced chemical reactivity when submerged in oil and isopropyl alcohol solutions, due likely to the exposure of clean surfaces via surface spallation and formation of surface steps and nanoscale facets through dislocation motion to the surface of the pillars, resulting in growth of thin oxide films on the surfaces of the pillars. PMID:23526837

  19. Sediment movement along the U.S. east coast continental shelf-I. Estimates of bottom stress using the Grant-Madsen model and near-bottom wave and current measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lyne, V.D.; Butman, B.; Grant, W.D.

    1990-01-01

    Bottom stress is calculated for several long-term time-series observations, made on the U.S. east coast continental shelf during winter, using the wave-current interaction and moveable bed models of Grant and Madsen (1979, Journal of Geophysical Research, 84, 1797-1808; 1982, Journal of Geophysical Research, 87, 469-482). The wave and current measurements were obtained by means of a bottom tripod system which measured current using a Savonius rotor and vane and waves by means of a pressure sensor. The variables were burst sampled about 10% of the time. Wave energy was reasonably resolved, although aliased by wave groupiness, and wave period was accurate to 1-2 s during large storms. Errors in current speed and direction depend on the speed of the mean current relative to the wave current. In general, errors in bottom stress caused by uncertainties in measured current speed and wave characteristics were 10-20%. During storms, the bottom stress calculated using the Grant-Madsen models exceeded stress computed from conventional drag laws by a factor of about 1.5 on average and 3 or more during storm peaks. Thus, even in water as deep as 80 m, oscillatory near-bottom currents associated with surface gravity waves of period 12 s or longer will contribute substantially to bottom stress. Given that the Grant-Madsen model is correct, parameterizations of bottom stress that do not incorporate wave effects will substantially underestimate stress and sediment transport in this region of the continental shelf. ?? 1990.

  20. Sediment movement along the U.S. east coast continental shelf—I. Estimates of bottom stress using the Grant-Madsen model and near-bottom wave and current measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyne, Vincent D.; Butman, Bradford; Grant, William D.

    1990-05-01

    Bottom stress is calculated for several long-term time-series observations, made on the U.S. east coast continental shelf during winter, using the wave-current interaction and moveable bed models of GRANT and MADSEN (1979, Journal of Geophysical Research, 84, 1797-1808; 1982, Journal of Geophysical Research, 87, 469-482). The wave and current measurements were obtained by means of a bottom tripod system which measured current using a Savonius rotor and vane and waves by means of a pressure sensor. The variables were burst sampled about 10% of the time. Wave energy was reasonably resolved, although aliased by wave groupiness, and wave period was accurate to 1-2 s during large storms. Errors in current speed and direction depend on the speed of the mean current relative to the wave current. In general, errors in bottom stress caused by uncertainties in measured current speed and wave characteristics were 10-20%. During storms, the bottom stress calculated using the Grant-Madsen models exceeded stress computed from conventional drag laws by a factor of about 1.5 on average and 3 or more during storm peaks. Thus, even in water as deep as 80 m, oscillatory near-bottom currents associated with surface gravity waves of period 12 s or longer will contribute substantially to bottom stress. Given that the Grant-Madsen model is correct, parameterizations of bottom stress that do not incorporate wave effects will substantially underestimate stress and sediment transport in this region of the continental shelf.

  1. Stress.

    PubMed

    Chambers, David W

    2008-01-01

    We all experience stress as a regular, and sometimes damaging and sometimes useful, part of our daily lives. In our normal ups and downs, we have our share of exhaustion, despondency, and outrage--matched with their corresponding positive moods. But burnout and workaholism are different. They are chronic, dysfunctional, self-reinforcing, life-shortening habits. Dentists, nurses, teachers, ministers, social workers, and entertainers are especially susceptible to burnout; not because they are hard-working professionals (they tend to be), but because they are caring perfectionists who share control for the success of what they do with others and perform under the scrutiny of their colleagues (they tend to). Workaholics are also trapped in self-sealing cycles, but the elements are ever-receding visions of control and using constant activity as a barrier against facing reality. This essay explores the symptoms, mechanisms, causes, and successful coping strategies for burnout and workaholism. It also takes a look at the general stress response on the physiological level and at some of the damage American society inflicts on itself. PMID:18846841

  2. Impact of 60-GHz millimeter waves on stress and pain-related protein expression in differentiating neuron-like cells.

    PubMed

    Haas, Alexis J; Le Page, Yann; Zhadobov, Maxim; Boriskin, Artem; Sauleau, Ronan; Le Dréan, Yves

    2016-10-01

    Millimeter waves (MMW) will be increasingly used for future wireless telecommunications. Previous studies on skin keratinocytes showed that MMW could impact the mRNA expression of Transient Receptor Potential cation channel subfamily Vanilloid, member 2 (TRPV2). Here, we investigated the effect of MMW exposure on this marker, as well as on other membrane receptors such as Transient Receptor Potential cation channel subfamily Vanilloid, member 1 (TRPV1) and purinergic receptor P2X, ligand-gated ion channel, 3 (P2 × 3). We exposed the Neuroscreen-1 cell line (a PC12 subclone), in order to evaluate if acute MMW exposures could impact expression of these membrane receptors at the protein level. Proteotoxic stress-related chaperone protein Heat Shock Protein 70 (HSP70) expression level was also assessed. We used an original high-content screening approach, based on fluorescence microscopy, to allow cell-by-cell analysis and to detect any cell sub-population responding to exposure. Immunocytochemistry was done after 24 h MMW exposure of cells at 60.4 GHz, with an incident power density of 10 mW/cm(2) . Our results showed no impact of MMW exposure on protein expressions of HSP70, TRPV1, TRPV2, and P2 × 3. Moreover, no specific cell sub-populations were found to express one of the studied markers at a different level, compared to the rest of the cell populations. However, a slight insignificant increase in HSP70 expression and an increase in protein expression variability within cell population were observed in exposed cells, but controls showed that this was related to thermal effect. Bioelectromagnetics. 37:444-454, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27483046

  3. A ROS-Assisted Calcium Wave Dependent on the AtRBOHD NADPH Oxidase and TPC1 Cation Channel Propagates the Systemic Response to Salt Stress1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Matthew J.; Choi, Won-Gyu

    2016-01-01

    Plants exhibit rapid, systemic signaling systems that allow them to coordinate physiological and developmental responses throughout the plant body, even to highly localized and quickly changing environmental stresses. The propagation of these signals is thought to include processes ranging from electrical and hydraulic networks to waves of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and cytoplasmic Ca2+ traveling throughout the plant. For the Ca2+ wave system, the involvement of the vacuolar ion channel TWO PORE CHANNEL1 (TPC1) has been reported. However, the precise role of this channel and the mechanism of cell-to-cell propagation of the wave have remained largely undefined. Here, we use the fire-diffuse-fire model to analyze the behavior of a Ca2+ wave originating from Ca2+ release involving the TPC1 channel in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). We conclude that a Ca2+ diffusion-dominated calcium-induced calcium-release mechanism is insufficient to explain the observed wave transmission speeds. The addition of a ROS-triggered element, however, is able to quantitatively reproduce the observed transmission characteristics. The treatment of roots with the ROS scavenger ascorbate and the NADPH oxidase inhibitor diphenyliodonium and analysis of Ca2+ wave propagation in the Arabidopsis respiratory burst oxidase homolog D (AtrbohD) knockout background all led to reductions in Ca2+ wave transmission speeds consistent with this model. Furthermore, imaging of extracellular ROS production revealed a systemic spread of ROS release that is dependent on both AtRBOHD and TPC1. These results suggest that, in the root, plant systemic signaling is supported by a ROS-assisted calcium-induced calcium-release mechanism intimately involving ROS production by AtRBOHD and Ca2+ release dependent on the vacuolar channel TPC1. PMID:27261066

  4. A ROS-Assisted Calcium Wave Dependent on the AtRBOHD NADPH Oxidase and TPC1 Cation Channel Propagates the Systemic Response to Salt Stress.

    PubMed

    Evans, Matthew J; Choi, Won-Gyu; Gilroy, Simon; Morris, Richard J

    2016-07-01

    Plants exhibit rapid, systemic signaling systems that allow them to coordinate physiological and developmental responses throughout the plant body, even to highly localized and quickly changing environmental stresses. The propagation of these signals is thought to include processes ranging from electrical and hydraulic networks to waves of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and cytoplasmic Ca(2+) traveling throughout the plant. For the Ca(2+) wave system, the involvement of the vacuolar ion channel TWO PORE CHANNEL1 (TPC1) has been reported. However, the precise role of this channel and the mechanism of cell-to-cell propagation of the wave have remained largely undefined. Here, we use the fire-diffuse-fire model to analyze the behavior of a Ca(2+) wave originating from Ca(2+) release involving the TPC1 channel in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). We conclude that a Ca(2+) diffusion-dominated calcium-induced calcium-release mechanism is insufficient to explain the observed wave transmission speeds. The addition of a ROS-triggered element, however, is able to quantitatively reproduce the observed transmission characteristics. The treatment of roots with the ROS scavenger ascorbate and the NADPH oxidase inhibitor diphenyliodonium and analysis of Ca(2+) wave propagation in the Arabidopsis respiratory burst oxidase homolog D (AtrbohD) knockout background all led to reductions in Ca(2+) wave transmission speeds consistent with this model. Furthermore, imaging of extracellular ROS production revealed a systemic spread of ROS release that is dependent on both AtRBOHD and TPC1 These results suggest that, in the root, plant systemic signaling is supported by a ROS-assisted calcium-induced calcium-release mechanism intimately involving ROS production by AtRBOHD and Ca(2+) release dependent on the vacuolar channel TPC1. PMID:27261066

  5. Heat transfer, velocity-temperature correlation, and turbulent shear stress from Navier-Stokes computations of shock wave/turbulent boundary layer interaction flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, C. R.; Hingst, W. R.; Porro, A. R.

    1991-01-01

    The properties of 2-D shock wave/turbulent boundary layer interaction flows were calculated by using a compressible turbulent Navier-Stokes numerical computational code. Interaction flows caused by oblique shock wave impingement on the turbulent boundary layer flow were considered. The oblique shock waves were induced with shock generators at angles of attack less than 10 degs in supersonic flows. The surface temperatures were kept at near-adiabatic (ratio of wall static temperature to free stream total temperature) and cold wall (ratio of wall static temperature to free stream total temperature) conditions. The computational results were studied for the surface heat transfer, velocity temperature correlation, and turbulent shear stress in the interaction flow fields. Comparisons of the computational results with existing measurements indicated that (1) the surface heat transfer rates and surface pressures could be correlated with Holden's relationship, (2) the mean flow streamwise velocity components and static temperatures could be correlated with Crocco's relationship if flow separation did not occur, and (3) the Baldwin-Lomax turbulence model should be modified for turbulent shear stress computations in the interaction flows.

  6. Constructing 3D isotropic and azimuthally anisotropic crustal models across USArray using Rayleigh wave phase velocity and ellipticity: inferring continental stress field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, F. C.; Schmandt, B.; Tsai, V. C.

    2014-12-01

    The EarthScope USArray Transportable Array (TA) has provided a great opportunity for imaging the detailed lithospheric structure beneath the continental US. In this presentation, we will report our recent progress on constructing detailed 3D isotropic and anisotropic crustal models of the contiguous US using Rayleigh wave phase velocity and ellipticity measurements across TA. In particular, we will discuss our recent methodology development of extracting short period Rayleigh wave ellipticity, or Rayleigh-wave H/V (horizontal to vertical) amplitude ratios, using multicomponent noise cross-correlations. To retain the amplitude ratio information between vertical and horizontal components, for each station, we perform daily noise pre-processing (temporal normalization and spectrum whitening) simultaneously for all three components. For each station pair, amplitude measurements between cross-correlations of different components (radial-radial, radial-vertical, vertical-radial and vertical-vertical) are then used to determine the Rayleigh-wave H/V ratios at the two station locations. Measurements from all available station pairs are used to determine isotropic and directionally dependent Rayleigh-wave H/V ratios at each location between 8- and 24-second period. The isotropic H/V ratio maps, combined with previous longer period Rayleigh-wave H/V ratio maps from earthquakes and Rayleigh-wave phase velocity maps from both ambient noise and earthquakes, are used to invert for a new 3-D isotropic crustal and upper-mantle model in the western United States. The new model has an outstanding vertical resolution in the upper crust and tradeoffs between different parameters are mitigated. A clear 180-degree periodicity is observed in the directionally dependent H/V ratio measurements for many locations where upper crustal anisotropy is likely strong. Across the US, good correlation is observed between the inferred fast directions in the upper crust and documented maximum

  7. Study of stress-induced velocity variation in concrete under direct tensile force and monitoring of the damage level by using thermally-compensated Coda Wave Interferometry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuxiang; Abraham, Odile; Grondin, Frédéric; Loukili, Ahmed; Tournat, Vincent; Le Duff, Alain; Lascoup, Bertrand; Durand, Olivier

    2012-12-01

    In this paper, we describe an experimental study of concrete behavior under a uniaxial tensile load by use of the thermally-compensated Coda Wave Interferometry (CWI) analysis. Under laboratory conditions, uniaxial tensile load cycles are imposed on a cylindrical concrete specimen, with continuous ultrasonic measurements being recorded within the scope of bias control protocols. A thermally-compensated CWI analysis of multiple scattering waves is performed in order to evaluate the stress-induced velocity variation. Concrete behavior under a tensile load can then be studied, along with CWI results from both its elastic performance (acoustoelasticity) and plastic performance (microcracking corresponding to the Kaiser effect). This work program includes a creep test with a sustained, high tensile load; the acoustoelastic coefficients are estimated before and after conducting the creep test and then used to demonstrate the effect of creep load. PMID:22989948

  8. Erratum to Dynamic stresses, Coulomb failure, and remote triggering and to Surface wave potential for triggering tectonic (nonvolcanic) tremor

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hill, David P.

    2012-01-01

    Hill (2008) and Hill (2010) contain two technical errors: (1) a missing factor of 2 for computed Love‐wave amplitudes, and (2) a sign error in the off‐diagonal elements in the Euler rotation matrix.

  9. Enhanced Transfection Efficiency in Laser-Induced Stress Wave-Assisted Gene Transfer at Low Laser Fluence by Increasing Pressure Impulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takano, Shinta; Sato, Shunichi; Terakawa, Mitsuhiro; Asida, Hiroshi; Okano, Hideyuki; Obara, Minoru

    2008-03-01

    To improve transfection efficiency in gene delivery based on nanosecond pulsed laser-induced stress waves, we examined different types of transparent materials, a poly(ethylene terephthalate) sheet, poly(vinyl alcohol) gel, and water, which were placed on a laser target for plasma confinement. We found that the use of water was most effective for maintaining a large pressure impulse during multipulse laser irradiation and, as a result, high transfection efficiency was demonstrated in rat skin in vivo at a relatively low laser fluence of 0.7 J/cm2. At this fluence, steady laser transmission through quartz fibers was confirmed, allowing endoscopic application of our gene delivery technique.

  10. Interaction between a normal shock wave and a turbulent boundary layer at high transonic speeds. Part 2: Wall shear stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, M. S.; Adamson, T. C., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    An analysis is presented of the flow in the two inner layers, the Reynolds stress sublayer and the wall layer. Included is the calculation of the shear stress at the wall in the interaction region. The limit processes considered are those used for an inviscid flow.

  11. Negative Attachment Cognitions and Emotional Distress in mainland Chinese Adolescents: A Prospective Multi-Wave Test of Vulnerability-Stress and Stress Generation Models

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Joseph R.; Hankin, Benjamin L.; Gibb, Brandon E.; Hammen, Constance; Hazel, Nicholas A.; Ma, Denise; Yao, Shuqiao; Zhu, Xiong Zhao; Abela, John R.Z.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The present study examined the relation between attachment cognitions, stressors, and emotional distress in a sample of Chinese adolescents. Specifically, it was examined whether negative attachment cognitions predicted depression and anxiety symptoms, and if a vulnerability-stress or stress generation model best explained the relation between negative attachment cognitions and internalizing symptoms. Method Participants included 558 adolescents (310 females and 248 males) from an urban school in Changsha, and 592 adolescents (287 females and 305 males) from a rural school in Liuyang, both in Hunan province located in mainland China. Participants completed self-report measures of negative attachment cognitions at baseline, and self-report measures of negative events, depression symptoms, and anxiety symptoms at baseline and at regular one month intervals for an overall 6-month follow-up (i.e., six follow-up assessments). Results Higher levels of negative attachment cognitions predicted prospective depression and anxiety symptoms. Furthermore, support was found for a stress generation model that partially mediated this longitudinal association. No support was found for a vulnerability-stress model. Conclusion Overall, these findings highlight new developmental pathways for development of depression and anxiety symptoms in mainland Chinese adolescents. PMID:23237030

  12. Source duration of stress and water-pressure induced seismicity derived from experimental analysis of P wave pulse width in granite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuda, K.

    2013-12-01

    Pulse widths of P waves in granite, measured in the laboratory, were analyzed to investigate source durations of rupture processes for water-pressure induced and stress-induced microseismicity. Much evidence suggests that fluids in the subsurface are intimately linked to faulting processes. Studies of seismicity induced by water injection are thus important for understanding the trigger mechanisms of earthquakes as well as for engineering applications such as hydraulic fracturing of rocks at depth for petroleum extraction. Determining the cause of seismic events is very important in seismology and engineering; however, water-pressure induced seismic events are difficult to distinguish from those induced by purely tectonic stress. To investigate this problem, we analyzed the waveforms of acoustic emissions (AEs) produced in the laboratory by both water-pressure induced and stress-induced microseismicity. We used a cylinder (50 mm in diameter and 100 mm in length) of medium-grained granite. We applied a differential stress of about 70% of fracture strength, to the rock sample under 40 MPa confining pressure and held it constant throughout the experiment. When the primary creep stage and acoustic emissions (AEs) caused by the initial loading had ceased, we injected distilled water into the bottom end of the sample at a constant pressure of 17 MPa until macroscopic fracture occurred. We analysed AE waveforms produced by stress-induced AEs which occurred before the water-injection and by water-pressure induced AEs which occurred after the water-injection. Pulse widths were measured from the waveform traces plotted from the digital data. To investigate the source duration of the rupture process, we estimated the pulse width at the source and normalized by event magnitude to obtain a scaled pulse width at the source. After the effects of event size and hypocentral distance were removed from observed pulse widths, the ratio of the scaled source durations of water

  13. Alteration in Memory and Electroencephalogram Waves with Sub-acute Noise Stress in Albino Rats and Safeguarded by Scoparia dulcis

    PubMed Central

    Loganathan, Sundareswaran; Rathinasamy, Sheeladevi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Noise stress has different effects on memory and novelty and the link between them with an electroencephalogram (EEG) has not yet been reported. Objective: To find the effect of sub-acute noise stress on the memory and novelty along with EEG and neurotransmitter changes. Materials and Methods: Eight-arm maze (EAM) and Y-maze to analyze the memory and novelty by novel object test. Four groups of rats were used: Control, control treated with Scoparia dulcis extract, noise exposed, and noise exposed which received Scoparia extract. Results: The results showed no marked difference observed between control and control treated with Scoparia extract on EAM, Y-maze, novel object test, and EEG in both prefrontal and occipital region, however, noise stress exposed rats showed significant increase in the reference memory and working memory error in EAM and latency delay, triad errors in Y-maze, and prefrontal and occipital EEG frequency rate with the corresponding increase in plasma corticosterone and epinephrine, and significant reduction in the novelty test, and significant reduction in the novelty test, amplitude of prefrontal, occipital EEG, and acetylcholine. Conclusion: These noise stress induced changes in EAM, Y-maze, novel object test, and neurotransmitters were significantly prevented when treated with Scoparia extract and these changes may be due to the normalizing action of Scoparia extract on the brain, which altered due to noise stress. SUMMARY Noise stress exposure causes EEG, behavior, and neurotransmitter alteration in the frontoparietal and occipital regions mainly involved in planning and recognition memoryOnly the noise stress exposed animals showed the significant alteration in the EEG, behavior, and neurotransmittersHowever, these noise stress induced changes in EEG behavior and neurotransmitters were significantly prevented when treated with Scoparia extractThese changes may be due to the normalizing action of Scoparia dulcis (adoptogen) on

  14. Study on the anisotropic response of condensed-phase RDX under repeated stress wave loading via ReaxFF molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ning; Peng, Jinhua; Pang, Aimin; Hu, Jianjiang; He, Tieshan

    2016-09-01

    Anisotropic mechanical response and chemical reaction process of cyclotrimethylene trinitramine (RDX) along crystal orientations were studied with molecular dynamics simulations using ReaxFF potential under repeated stress wave loading. In the simulations, shocks were propagated along the [010], [001], [210], [100], [111], and [102] orientations of crystal RDX at initial particle velocity Up in the range of 1∼4 km/s. For shocks at Up ≤ 2 km/s, local stacking fault and molecular conformational change can only cause marginal temperature and pressure increase without molecular decomposition. As shocks increase to Up ≥ 2.5 km/s, rupture of N-NO2 bond accompanied by partial HONO elimination dominates the main chemical reactions at the initial stage. The ordering of the follow-up consumption of NO2 and ring-breaking rate is directly consistent with that of increasing rate in temperature and pressure. The (210) and (100) planes are more sensitive to shocks in temperature and pressure profiles than the (111) plane, which agrees well with experimental observations and theoretical results in the literature. Therefore, the repeated dynamic loading model in conjunction with MD simulation using ReaxFF potential for crystal RDX indicates that these methods can be applied to study the mechanical response and chemical reaction process of polymer bonded explosives that are commonly subjected to compressive and tensile stress waves observed in practice. PMID:27568527

  15. Non-β-blocking R-carvedilol enantiomer suppresses Ca2+ waves and stress-induced ventricular tachyarrhythmia without lowering heart rate or blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingqun; Zhou, Qiang; Smith, Chris D; Chen, Haiyan; Tan, Zhen; Chen, Biyi; Nani, Alma; Wu, Guogen; Song, Long-Sheng; Fill, Michael; Back, Thomas G; Chen, S R Wayne

    2015-09-01

    Carvedilol is the current β-blocker of choice for suppressing ventricular tachyarrhythmia (VT). However, carvedilol's benefits are dose-limited, attributable to its potent β-blocking activity that can lead to bradycardia and hypotension. The clinically used carvedilol is a racemic mixture of β-blocking S-carvedilol and non-β-blocking R-carvedilol. We recently reported that novel non-β-blocking carvedilol analogues are effective in suppressing arrhythmogenic Ca(2+) waves and stress-induced VT without causing bradycardia. Thus, the non-β-blocking R-carvedilol enantiomer may also possess this favourable anti-arrhythmic property. To test this possibility, we synthesized R-carvedilol and assessed its effect on Ca(2+) release and VT. Like racemic carvedilol, R-carvedilol directly reduces the open duration of the cardiac ryanodine receptor (RyR2), suppresses spontaneous Ca(2+) oscillations in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells, Ca(2+) waves in cardiomyocytes in intact hearts and stress-induced VT in mice harbouring a catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT)-causing RyR2 mutation. Importantly, R-carvedilol did not significantly alter heart rate or blood pressure. Therefore, the non-β-blocking R-carvedilol enantiomer represents a very promising prophylactic treatment for Ca(2+)- triggered arrhythmia without the bradycardia and hypotension often associated with racemic carvedilol. Systematic clinical assessments of R-carvedilol as a new anti-arrhythmic agent may be warranted. PMID:26348911

  16. Lattice dynamics approach to determine the dependence of the time-of-flight of transversal polarized acoustic waves on external stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarar, K. S.; Pluta, M.; Amjad, U.; Grill, W.

    2011-04-01

    Based on the lattice dynamics approach the dependence of the time-of-flight (TOF) on stress has been modeled for transversal polarized acoustic waves. The relevant dispersion relation is derived from the appropriate mass-spring model together with the dependencies on the restoring forces including the effect of externally applied stress. The lattice dynamics approach can also be interpreted as a discrete and strictly periodic lumped circuit. In that case the modeling represents a finite element approach. In both cases the properties relevant for wavelengths large with respect to the periodic structure can be derived from the respective limit relating also to low frequencies. The model representing a linear chain with stiffness to shear and additional stiffness introduced by extensional stress is presented and compared to existing models, which so far represent each only one of the effects treated here in combination. For a string this effect is well known from musical instruments. The counteracting effects are discussed and compared to experimental results.

  17. Direct measurements of wall shear stress by buried wire gages in a shock-wave boundary-layer interaction region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, V. S.; Rose, W. C.

    1977-01-01

    Detailed measurements of wall shear stress (skin friction) were made with specially developed buried wire gages in the interaction regions of a Mach 2.9 turbulent boundary layer with externally generated shocks. Separation and reattachment points inferred by these measurements support the findings of earlier experiments which used a surface oil flow technique and pitot profile measurements. The measurements further indicate that the boundary layer tends to attain significantly higher skin-friction values downstream of the interaction region as compared to upstream. Comparisons between measured wall shear stress and published results of some theoretical calculation schemes show that the general, but not detailed, behavior is predicted well by such schemes.

  18. Nonlinear stability of Kelvin-Helmholtz waves in magnetic fluids stressed by a time-dependent acceleration and a tangential magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Dib, Yusry O.

    1996-04-01

    The nonlinear stability of surface waves propagating between two superposed streaming magnetic fluids is investigated. The fluids are stressed by a constant tangential magnetic field and a vertical periodic acceleration. The solution employs the method of multiple scales. Owing to the periodicity, resonant cases appear. Two parametrically nonlinear Schrödinger equations are derived for the resonant cases to describe the elevation of weakly nonlinear capillary waves. The standard nonlinear Schrödinger equation is satisfied for the non resonant cases. Necessary and sufficient conditions for stability are obtained. A formula for the surface elevation is obtained in each case. It is found that the magnetic field, the velocities and the frequency of the applied periodic force play dual roles in the resonant region. Investigation of the stability criterion by nonlinear perturbation shows that an increase in the acceleration frequency has a stabilizing effect. The stabilizing role of the frequency is due to the destabilizing effect of the amplitude of the periodic acceleration.

  19. l-Citrulline supplementation attenuates blood pressure, wave reflection and arterial stiffness responses to metaboreflex and cold stress in overweight men.

    PubMed

    Figueroa, Arturo; Alvarez-Alvarado, Stacey; Jaime, Salvador J; Kalfon, Roy

    2016-07-01

    Combined isometric exercise or metaboreflex activation (post-exercise muscle ischaemia (PEMI)) and cold pressor test (CPT) increase cardiac afterload, which may lead to adverse cardiovascular events. l-Citrulline supplementation (l-CIT) reduces systemic arterial stiffness (brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV)) at rest and aortic haemodynamic responses to CPT. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of l-CIT on aortic haemodynamic and baPWV responses to PEMI+CPT. In all, sixteen healthy, overweight/obese males (age 24 (sem 6) years; BMI 29·3 (sem 4·0) kg/m2) were randomly assigned to placebo or l-CIT (6 g/d) for 14 d in a cross-over design. Brachial and aortic systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP) and mean arterial pressure (MAP), aortic augmented pressure (AP), augmentation index (AIx), baPWV, reflection timing (Tr) and heart rate (HR) were evaluated at rest and during isometric handgrip exercise (IHG), PEMI and PEMI+CPT at baseline and after 14 d. No significant effects were evident after l-CIT at rest. l-CIT attenuated the increases in aortic SBP and wave reflection (AP and AIx) during IHG, aortic DBP, MAP and AIx during PEMI, and aortic SBP, DBP, MAP, AP, AIx and baPWV during PEMI+CPT compared with placebo. HR and Tr were unaffected by l-CIT in all conditions. Our findings demonstrate that l-CIT attenuates aortic blood pressure and wave reflection responses to exercise-related metabolites. Moreover, l-CIT attenuates the exaggerated arterial stiffness response to combined metaboreflex activation and cold exposure, suggesting a protective effect against increased cardiac afterload during physical stress. PMID:27160957

  20. Fully vectorial laser resonator modeling of continuous-wave solid-state lasers including rate equations, thermal lensing and stress-induced birefringence.

    PubMed

    Asoubar, Daniel; Wyrowski, Frank

    2015-07-27

    The computer-aided design of high quality mono-mode, continuous-wave solid-state lasers requires fast, flexible and accurate simulation algorithms. Therefore in this work a model for the calculation of the transversal dominant mode structure is introduced. It is based on the generalization of the scalar Fox and Li algorithm to a fully-vectorial light representation. To provide a flexible modeling concept of different resonator geometries containing various optical elements, rigorous and approximative solutions of Maxwell's equations are combined in different subdomains of the resonator. This approach allows the simulation of plenty of different passive intracavity components as well as active media. For the numerically efficient simulation of nonlinear gain, thermal lensing and stress-induced birefringence effects in solid-state active crystals a semi-analytical vectorial beam propagation method is discussed in detail. As a numerical example the beam quality and output power of a flash-lamp-pumped Nd:YAG laser are improved. To that end we compensate the influence of stress-induced birefringence and thermal lensing by an aspherical mirror and a 90° quartz polarization rotator. PMID:26367545

  1. As compared to allopurinol, urate-lowering therapy with febuxostat has superior effects on oxidative stress and pulse wave velocity in patients with severe chronic tophaceous gout.

    PubMed

    Tausche, A-K; Christoph, M; Forkmann, M; Richter, U; Kopprasch, S; Bielitz, C; Aringer, M; Wunderlich, C

    2014-01-01

    We prospectively evaluated whether an effective 12-month uric acid-lowering therapy (ULT) with the available xanthine oxidase (XO) inhibitors allopurinol and febuxostat in patients with chronic tophaceous gout has an impact on oxidative stress and/or vascular function. Patients with chronic tophaceous gout who did not receive active ULT were included. After clinical evaluation, serum uric acid levels (SUA) and markers of oxidative stress were measured, and carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cfPWV) was assessed. Patients were then treated with allopurinol (n = 9) or with febuxostat (n = 8) to target a SUA level ≤ 360 μmol/L. After 1 year treatment, the SUA levels, markers of oxidative stress and the cfPWV were measured again. Baseline characteristics of both groups showed no significant differences except a higher prevalence of moderate impairment of renal function (estimated glomerular filtration rate <60 ml/min) in the febuxostat group. Uric acid lowering with either inhibitors of XO resulted in almost equally effective reduction in SUA levels. The both treatment groups did not differ in their baseline cfPWV (allopurinol group: 14.1 ± 3.4 m/s, febuxostat group: 13.7 ± 2.7 m/s, p = 0.80). However, after 1 year of therapy, we observed a significant cfPWV increase in the allopurinol group (16.8 ± 4.3 m/s, p = 0.001 as compared to baseline), but not in the febuxostat patients (13.3 ± 2.3 m/s, p = 0.55). Both febuxostat and allopurinol effectively lower SUA levels in patients with severe gout. However, we observed that febuxostat also appeared to be beneficial in preventing further arterial stiffening. Since cardiovascular events are an important issue in treating patients with gout, this unexpected finding may have important implications and should be further investigated in randomized controlled trials. PMID:24026528

  2. Overpressure blast-wave induced brain injury elevates oxidative stress in the hypothalamus and catecholamine biosynthesis in the rat adrenal medulla.

    PubMed

    Tümer, Nihal; Svetlov, Stanislav; Whidden, Melissa; Kirichenko, Nataliya; Prima, Victor; Erdos, Benedek; Sherman, Alexandra; Kobeissy, Firas; Yezierski, Robert; Scarpace, Philip J; Vierck, Charles; Wang, Kevin K W

    2013-06-01

    Explosive overpressure brain injury (OBI) impacts the lives of both military and civilian population. We hypothesize that a single exposure to OBI results in increased hypothalamic expression of oxidative stress and activation of the sympatho-adrenal medullary axis. Since a key component of blast-induced organ injury is the primary overpressure wave, we assessed selective biochemical markers of autonomic function and oxidative stress in male Sprague Dawley rats subjected to head-directed overpressure insult. Rats were subjected to single head-directed OBI with a 358kPa peak overpressure at the target. Control rats were exposed to just noise signal being placed at ~2m distance from the shock tube nozzle. Sympathetic nervous system activation of the adrenal medullae (AM) was evaluated at 6h following blast injury by assessing the expression of catecholamine biosynthesizing enzymes, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), dopamine-β hydroxylase (DβH), neuropeptide Y (NPY) along with plasma norepinephrine (NE). TH, DβH and NPY expression increased 20%, 25%, and 91% respectively, following OBI (P<0.05). Plasma NE was also significantly elevated by 23% (P<0.05) following OBI. OBI significantly elevated TH (49%, P<0.05) in the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) of the brain stem while AT1 receptor expression and NADPH oxidase activity, a marker of oxidative stress, was elevated in the hypothalamus following OBI. Collectively, the increased levels of TH, DβH and NPY expression in the rat AM, elevated TH in NTS along with increased plasma NE suggest that single OBI exposure results in increased sympathoexcitation. The mechanism may involve the elevated AT1 receptor expression and NADPH oxidase levels in the hypothalamus. Taken together, such effects may be important factors contributing to pathology of brain injury and autonomic dysfunction associated with the clinical profile of patients following OBI. PMID:23570732

  3. Three-dimensional elastic wave modeling using a CG-FFT approach to the solution of a contrast-source stress-velocity integral-equation formulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, J.; Abubakar, A.

    2012-12-01

    The ability to accurately and efficiently simulate elastic wave scattering processes is very important in geophysical prospecting applications. A recently proposed formulation of an integral equation for solving three-dimensional elastic wave scattering problems is numerically implemented. The approach is formulated in terms of the stress tensor and particle velocity vector, where the symmetric tensors of rank two are decomposed into their omnidirectional and deviatoric constituents. Subsequently, this integral equation is used to obtain a contrast-source type integral equation. For solving these integral equations we employ a Conjugate Gradient Fast Fourier Transform (CG-FFT) scheme, which is based on quadrature formulas that provide (second-order) accurate approximations while retaining the convolution nature of the relevant integrals that make them amenable to efficient evaluation via Fast Fourier Transforms. As linear solvers we employ the Conjugate Gradient for Normal Residual (CGNR) scheme, which is always monotonically convergent, but has a slow convergent rate, and the Bi-Conjugate Gradient Stabilized (BiCGSTAB) scheme, which is more efficient, but it is less stable. The convergence rates of iterative schemes are further improved through the use of a simple diagonal preconditioner. We show a number of numerical results that demonstrate the accuracy and efficiency of the implemented 3D elastic modeling approach. Numerical models include both simple synthetic models and classic seismic test models (such as the SEG/EAGE salt model and the Marmousi2 model). Excellent benchmark results against a Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) algorithm are also presented. These features suggest that the present numerical scheme may provide the basis for the so-called contrast-source inversion method.

  4. Extracorporeal shock wave therapy ameliorates cyclophosphamide-induced rat acute interstitial cystitis though inhibiting inflammation and oxidative stress-in vitro and in vivo experiment studies

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yen-Ta; Yang, Chih-Chao; Sun, Cheuk-Kwan; Chiang, Hsin-Ju; Chen, Yi-Ling; Sung, Pei-Hsun; Zhen, Yen-Yi; Huang, Tein-Hung; Chang, Chia-Lo; Chen, Hong-Hwa; Chang, Hsueh-Wen; Yip, Hon-Kan

    2014-01-01

    Background: We investigated whether extracorporeal shock wave (ECSW) therapy can attenuate cyclophosphamide (CYP)-induced acute interstitial cystitis (AIC) in rats. Methods and Results: Eighteen male-adult Sprague-Dawley rats were equally divided into group 1 (sham control), group 2 (AIC induced by 150 mg/kg CYP by intra-peritoneal injection) and group 3 (AIC + ECSW 200 impulses at 0.11 mJ/mm2 to the urinary bladder at 3 and 24 h after CYP treatment). Smooth-muscle cells co-culture with menadione (25 µM) with and without ECSW treatment was performed. Western-blot results demonstrated that ECSW significant attenuated oxidative stress and inflammatory reactions in this in-vitro studies (all p < 0.001). 24-hour urine amount and microscopic findings of red-blood-cell count (i.e., hematuria) were higher in group 2 than in groups 1 and 3, and significantly higher in group 3 than in group 1 (all p < 0.001). The urine levels of albumin and interleukin-6 showed an identical pattern of hematuria among all three groups (all p < 0.001). The cellular and mRNA expressions of macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF)+, CD74+, CD68+, substance p+, and Cox-2+ cells in the bladder tissue exhibited an identical pattern of hematuria among all groups (all p < 0.0001). The integrity of epithelial layer and collagen-deposition area as stained by Sirius red displayed an opposite pattern of hematuria among the three groups (p < 0.0001). The protein expression of IL-12, iNOS, TNF-α, NF-κB, MMP-9, NOX-1, NOX-2, RANTES, and Oxyblot displayed an identical pattern of hematuria among all groups (all p < 0.01). Conclusion: ECSW therapy markedly attenuated CYP-induced AIC through inhibitions of the inflammation and oxidative stress. PMID:25628776

  5. Effect of exposure and withdrawal of 900-MHz-electromagnetic waves on brain, kidney and liver oxidative stress and some biochemical parameters in male rats.

    PubMed

    Ragy, Merhan Mamdouh

    2015-01-01

    Increasing use of mobile phones in daily life with increasing adverse effects of electromagnetic radiation (EMR), emitted from mobile on some physiological processes, cause many concerns about their effects on human health. Therefore, this work was designed to study the effects of exposure to mobile phone emits 900-MHz EMR on the brain, liver and kidney of male albino rats. Thirty male adult rats were randomly divided into four groups (10 each) as follows: control group (rats without exposure to EMR), exposure group (exposed to 900-MHz EMR for 1 h/d for 60 d) and withdrawal group (exposed to 900-MHz electromagnetic wave for 1 h/d for 60 d then left for 30 d without exposure). EMR emitted from mobile phone led to a significant increase in malondialdehyde (MDA) levels and significant decrease total antioxidant capacity (TAC) levels in brain, liver and kidneys tissues. The sera activity of alanine transaminase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), urea, creatinine and corticosterone were significantly increased (p < 0.05), while serum catecholamines were insignificantly higher in the exposed rats. These alterations were corrected by withdrawal. In conclusion, electromagnetic field emitting from mobile phone might produce impairments in some biochemicals changes and oxidative stress in brain, liver and renal tissue of albino rats. These alterations were corrected by withdrawal. PMID:24712749

  6. A review of issues and strategies in nondestructive evaluation of fiber reinforced structural composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vary, A.

    1979-01-01

    The need for advanced nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques for quantitative assessment of the mechanical strength and integrity of fiber composites during manufacture and service and following repair operations is stressed. The discussion covers problems and different approaches in regard to acceptance criteria, calibration standards, and methods for NDE of composites in strength critical applications. Finally, it is concluded that acousto-ultrasonic techniques provide the 'methods of choice' in this area.

  7. Hysteretic Faraday waves.

    PubMed

    Périnet, Nicolas; Falcón, Claudio; Chergui, Jalel; Juric, Damir; Shin, Seungwon

    2016-06-01

    We report on the numerical and theoretical study of the subcritical bifurcation of parametrically amplified waves appearing at the interface between two immiscible incompressible fluids when the layer of the lower fluid is very shallow. As a critical control parameter is surpassed, small amplitude surface waves bifurcate subcritically toward highly nonlinear ones with twice their amplitude. We relate this hysteresis with the change of shear stress using a simple stress balance, in agreement with numerical results. PMID:27415365

  8. Forces and stress in second order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory for condensed phase systems within the resolution-of-identity Gaussian and plane waves approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Ben, Mauro; Hutter, Jürg; VandeVondele, Joost

    2015-09-01

    The forces acting on the atoms as well as the stress tensor are crucial ingredients for calculating the structural and dynamical properties of systems in the condensed phase. Here, these derivatives of the total energy are evaluated for the second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation energy (MP2) in the framework of the resolution of identity Gaussian and plane waves method, in a way that is fully consistent with how the total energy is computed. This consistency is non-trivial, given the different ways employed to compute Coulomb, exchange, and canonical four center integrals, and allows, for example, for energy conserving dynamics in various ensembles. Based on this formalism, a massively parallel algorithm has been developed for finite and extended system. The designed parallel algorithm displays, with respect to the system size, cubic, quartic, and quintic requirements, respectively, for the memory, communication, and computation. All these requirements are reduced with an increasing number of processes, and the measured performance shows excellent parallel scalability and efficiency up to thousands of nodes. Additionally, the computationally more demanding quintic scaling steps can be accelerated by employing graphics processing units (GPU's) showing, for large systems, a gain of almost a factor two compared to the standard central processing unit-only case. In this way, the evaluation of the derivatives of the RI-MP2 energy can be performed within a few minutes for systems containing hundreds of atoms and thousands of basis functions. With good time to solution, the implementation thus opens the possibility to perform molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in various ensembles (microcanonical ensemble and isobaric-isothermal ensemble) at the MP2 level of theory. Geometry optimization, full cell relaxation, and energy conserving MD simulations have been performed for a variety of molecular crystals including NH3, CO2, formic acid, and benzene.

  9. Forces and stress in second order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory for condensed phase systems within the resolution-of-identity Gaussian and plane waves approach

    SciTech Connect

    Del Ben, Mauro Hutter, Jürg; VandeVondele, Joost

    2015-09-14

    The forces acting on the atoms as well as the stress tensor are crucial ingredients for calculating the structural and dynamical properties of systems in the condensed phase. Here, these derivatives of the total energy are evaluated for the second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation energy (MP2) in the framework of the resolution of identity Gaussian and plane waves method, in a way that is fully consistent with how the total energy is computed. This consistency is non-trivial, given the different ways employed to compute Coulomb, exchange, and canonical four center integrals, and allows, for example, for energy conserving dynamics in various ensembles. Based on this formalism, a massively parallel algorithm has been developed for finite and extended system. The designed parallel algorithm displays, with respect to the system size, cubic, quartic, and quintic requirements, respectively, for the memory, communication, and computation. All these requirements are reduced with an increasing number of processes, and the measured performance shows excellent parallel scalability and efficiency up to thousands of nodes. Additionally, the computationally more demanding quintic scaling steps can be accelerated by employing graphics processing units (GPU’s) showing, for large systems, a gain of almost a factor two compared to the standard central processing unit-only case. In this way, the evaluation of the derivatives of the RI-MP2 energy can be performed within a few minutes for systems containing hundreds of atoms and thousands of basis functions. With good time to solution, the implementation thus opens the possibility to perform molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in various ensembles (microcanonical ensemble and isobaric-isothermal ensemble) at the MP2 level of theory. Geometry optimization, full cell relaxation, and energy conserving MD simulations have been performed for a variety of molecular crystals including NH{sub 3}, CO{sub 2}, formic acid, and benzene.

  10. Forces and stress in second order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory for condensed phase systems within the resolution-of-identity Gaussian and plane waves approach.

    PubMed

    Del Ben, Mauro; Hutter, Jürg; VandeVondele, Joost

    2015-09-14

    The forces acting on the atoms as well as the stress tensor are crucial ingredients for calculating the structural and dynamical properties of systems in the condensed phase. Here, these derivatives of the total energy are evaluated for the second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation energy (MP2) in the framework of the resolution of identity Gaussian and plane waves method, in a way that is fully consistent with how the total energy is computed. This consistency is non-trivial, given the different ways employed to compute Coulomb, exchange, and canonical four center integrals, and allows, for example, for energy conserving dynamics in various ensembles. Based on this formalism, a massively parallel algorithm has been developed for finite and extended system. The designed parallel algorithm displays, with respect to the system size, cubic, quartic, and quintic requirements, respectively, for the memory, communication, and computation. All these requirements are reduced with an increasing number of processes, and the measured performance shows excellent parallel scalability and efficiency up to thousands of nodes. Additionally, the computationally more demanding quintic scaling steps can be accelerated by employing graphics processing units (GPU's) showing, for large systems, a gain of almost a factor two compared to the standard central processing unit-only case. In this way, the evaluation of the derivatives of the RI-MP2 energy can be performed within a few minutes for systems containing hundreds of atoms and thousands of basis functions. With good time to solution, the implementation thus opens the possibility to perform molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in various ensembles (microcanonical ensemble and isobaric-isothermal ensemble) at the MP2 level of theory. Geometry optimization, full cell relaxation, and energy conserving MD simulations have been performed for a variety of molecular crystals including NH3, CO2, formic acid, and benzene. PMID:26373996

  11. Analysis of spurious bulk waves in ball surface wave device.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Satoru; Cho, Hideo; Tsukahara, Yusuke; Nakaso, Noritaka; Yamanaka, Kazushi

    2003-01-01

    We analyzed the acoustic waves propagating in a sphere to establish a useful guideline for the design of NDE apparatus and ball surface acoustic wave (SAW) device exploiting the diffraction-free propagation of SAW on a sphere. First, we calculated the laser-generated acoustic displacements both under ablation condition and under thermoelastic condition and verified experimentally the validity of the calculation. Next, the acoustic waves excited by out-of-plane stress and those excited by in-plane stress were compared. The results showed that when the out-of-plane stress was applied, the relative amplitudes of the bulk waves to that of the SAW were larger and the number of bulk waves was larger than that when the in-plane stress was applied, while the SAW had similar waveforms in each case. The ratio of the relative amplitude of the bulk waves for the out-of-plane stress and the in-plane stress was 3.1:1 at phi(1)=90 degrees and 1.67:1 at phi(1)=0 degrees. The large amplitude for the out-of-plane stress can be explained by wide directivities of bulk waves. Consequently, we found that it is necessary for ball SAW device to select a piezoelectric material and form of interdigital transducer so that the in-plane stress becomes dominant. PMID:12464407

  12. Heat waves imposed during early pod development in soybean (Glycine max) cause significant yield loss despite a rapid recovery from oxidative stress

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study is the first field based experiment that uses IR heaters to study the effects of a regionally defined heat wave on soybean physiology and productivity. The heating technology was successful and all of the heat waves were maintained at the target temperature for the three day duration of t...

  13. Nondestructive Determination of Heat/Fire Damage to Polymer- Matrix Composites Using Obliquely Insonified Ultrasonic Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Y.; Mal, A.; Lih, S.

    1995-01-01

    Heat and fire damage to composite structures cause loss of strength that cannot be detected by current NDE methods unless physical damage occurs. Further, there is a lack of fundamental understanding of the mechanism of damage from thermal exposure of organic matrix composites to elevated temperatures. Information compiled from field reports and lab experiments increasingly suggests that there is material degradation and it is not necessarily involved with the introduction of physical defects. In recent years, various researchers examined the potential to identifying thermal degradation to organic matrix composites prior to delamination. The methods that were used include: ultrasonics, backscattered X-ray, eddy current, thermography, drift and LPF spectroscopies, acousto-ultrasonics and hardness testing. None of these methods were able to correlate NDE results with loss of mechanical properties.

  14. Stress echocardiography

    MedlinePlus

    Echocardiography stress test; Stress test - echocardiography; CAD - stress echocardiography; Coronary artery disease - stress Echocardiography; Chest pain - stress echocardiography; Angina - stress echocardiography; ...

  15. Automated nondestructive evaluation method for characterizing ceramic and metallic hot gas filters.

    SciTech Connect

    Ellingson, W. A.; Koehl, E. R.; Deemer, C.; Pastilla, P.; Wheeler, B.; Forster, G. A.

    2002-06-03

    In advanced coal-fired power generation, one technology under development to clean up hot gases before their use as fuel for gas turbines is rigid ceramic candle filters. These porous filters are typically 1.5 m long and 60 mm in diameter and are made of various ceramic materials, including clay-bonded SiC. The high costs of downtime in a large utility demands that nondestructive evaluation/characterization (NDE/C) methods be available. At shutdowns, data from such analysis are needed to decide which filters are still usable and which need to be replaced, and if possible, to estimate the remaining lifetimes. Thus our objective was to develop reliable low-cost NDE technology for these filters. Our approach was to develop NDE/C technology, referred to as acousto-ultrasonics (AU), for application to hot gas filters. Lamb waves generated by the AU method were analyzed to derive a stress wave factor (SWF). This technology was tested by comparing SWF data with the measured strength for a variety of rigid ceramic filters and was shown to work on iron-aluminide filters as well but no strength data have been obtained on the iron-aluminides at this time.

  16. Interaction between a normal shock wave and a turbulent boundary layer at high transonic speeds. Part 1: Pressure distribution. Part 2: Wall shear stress. Part 3: Simplified formulas for the prediction of surface pressures and skin friction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamson, T. C., Jr.; Liou, M. S.; Messiter, A. F.

    1980-01-01

    An asymptotic description is derived for the interaction between a shock wave and a turbulent boundary layer in transonic flow, for a particular limiting case. The dimensionless difference between the external flow velocity and critical sound speed is taken to be much smaller than one, but large in comparison with the dimensionless friction velocity. The basic results are derived for a flat plate, and corrections for longitudinal wall curvature and for flow in a circular pipe are also shown. Solutions are given for the wall pressure distribution and the shape of the shock wave. Solutions for the wall shear stress are obtained, and a criterion for incipient separation is derived. Simplified solutions for both the wall pressure and skin friction distributions in the interaction region are given. These results are presented in a form suitable for use in computer programs.

  17. Slow frictional waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viswanathan, Koushik; Sundaram, Narayan; Chandrasekar, Srinivasan

    Stick-slip, manifest as intermittent tangential motion between two dry solid surfaces, is a friction instability that governs diverse phenomena from automobile brake squeals to earthquakes. We show, using high-speed in situ imaging of an adhesive polymer interface, that low velocity stick-slip is fundamentally of three kinds, corresponding to passage of three different surface waves -- separation pulses, slip pulses and the well-known Schallamach waves. These waves, traveling much slower than elastic waves, have clear distinguishing properties. Separation pulses and Schallamach waves involve local interface separation, and propagate in opposite directions while slip pulses are characterized by a sharp stress front and do not display any interface detachment. A change in the stick-slip mode from separation to slip pulse is effected simply by increasing the normal force. Together, these three waves constitute all possible stick-slip modes in adhesive friction and are shown to have direct analogues in muscular locomotory waves in soft bodied invertebrates. A theory for slow wave propagation is also presented which is capable of explaining the attendant interface displacements, velocities and stresses.

  18. Wave slamming on offshore structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, B. L.

    1980-03-01

    Experimental and theoretical work on the slamming of circular cylinders is surveyed. Data are included from controlled drop tests. The influence of inclined impact and beam dynamics on the resulting stresses is calculated for a wide range of wave conditions. The statistical distributions of the estimated stresses are analyzed to provide data for the calculation of slamming loads on fixed offshore structures using simple formulas in which the slamming coefficients incorporate both the member dynamics and the sea wave statistics. Slamming coefficients and associated stress calculation methods are presented for extreme values and fatigue damage. These may also be used for slamming during jacket launching. A film of wave slam was also produced.

  19. THERMOPLASTIC WAVES IN MAGNETARS

    SciTech Connect

    Beloborodov, Andrei M.; Levin, Yuri E-mail: yuri.levin@monash.edu.au

    2014-10-20

    Magnetar activity is generated by shear motions of the neutron star surface, which relieve internal magnetic stresses. An analogy with earthquakes and faults is problematic, as the crust is permeated by strong magnetic fields which greatly constrain crustal displacements. We describe a new deformation mechanism that is specific to strongly magnetized neutron stars. The magnetically stressed crust begins to move because of a thermoplastic instability, which launches a wave that shears the crust and burns its magnetic energy. The propagating wave front resembles the deflagration front in combustion physics. We describe the conditions for the instability, the front structure, and velocity, and discuss implications for observed magnetar activity.

  20. Interaction between a serotonin transporter gene promoter region polymorphism and stress predicts depressive symptoms in Chinese adolescents: a multi-wave longitudinal study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The serotonin transporter (5-HTT) gene may play an important role in the onset and development of mental disorders. Past studies have tested whether a functional polymorphism in the 5-HTT gene linked promoter region (5-HTTLPR) moderated the association between stress and depressive symptoms, but the results of these studies were inconsistent. Thus, the aim of the current study was to examine the interaction between 5-HTTLPR and stress that predict depressive symptoms in Chinese adolescents. Methods A total of 252 healthy adolescents (131 females and 121 males, aged from 14 to 18, mean = 16.00, standard deviation = 0.60) participated in this study. During the initial assessment, all participants completed the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale (CES-D) and Adolescent Life Events Questionnaire (ALEQ) and were genotyped for the 5-HTTLPR polymorphism. Participants subsequently completed CES-D and ALEQ once every three months during the subsequent 24 months. A multilevel model was used to investigate the 5-HTTLPR × stress interaction in predicting depressive symptoms. Results The results indicated no main effect of 5-HTTLPR and a significant 5-HTTLPR × stress interaction in females only. Females with at least one 5-HTTLPR S allele exhibited more depressive symptoms under stressful situations. No significant 5-HTTLPR × stress interaction was found in males. Conclusions In Chinese adolescents, there are gender differences on the interaction between 5-HTTLPR and stress that predict depressive symptoms. The association between stress and depressive symptoms is moderated by 5-HTTLPR in Chinese female adolescents. PMID:23683292

  1. Subsurface pressure profiling: a novel mathematical paradigm for computing colony pressures on substrate during fungal infections

    PubMed Central

    Patra, Subir; Banerjee, Sourav; Terejanu, Gabriel; Chanda, Anindya

    2015-01-01

    Colony expansion is an essential feature of fungal infections. Although mechanisms that regulate hyphal forces on the substrate during expansion have been reported previously, there is a critical need of a methodology that can compute the pressure profiles exerted by fungi on substrates during expansion; this will facilitate the validation of therapeutic efficacy of novel antifungals. Here, we introduce an analytical decoding method based on Biot’s incremental stress model, which was used to map the pressure distribution from an expanding mycelium of a popular plant pathogen, Aspergillus parasiticus. Using our recently developed Quantitative acoustic contrast tomography (Q-ACT) we detected that the mycelial growth on the solid agar created multiple surface and subsurface wrinkles with varying wavelengths across the depth of substrate that were computable with acousto-ultrasonic waves between 50 MHz–175 MHz. We derive here the fundamental correlation between these wrinkle wavelengths and the pressure distribution on the colony subsurface. Using our correlation we show that A. parasiticus can exert pressure as high as 300 KPa on the surface of a standard agar growth medium. The study provides a novel mathematical foundation for quantifying fungal pressures on substrate during hyphal invasions under normal and pathophysiological growth conditions. PMID:26262897

  2. The detection and characterization of natural fractures using P-wave reflection data, multicomponent VSP, borehole image logs and the in-situ stress field determination

    SciTech Connect

    Hoekstra, P.

    1995-04-01

    The objectives of this project are to detect and characterize fractures in a naturally fractured tight gas reservoir, using surface seismic methods, borehole imaging logs, and in-situ stress field data. Further, the project aims to evaluate the various seismic methods as to their effectiveness in characterizing the fractures, and to formulate the optimum employment of the seismic methods as regards fracture characterization.

  3. Longitudinal Linkages between Depressive and Posttraumatic Stress Symptoms in Adolescent Survivors Following the Wenchuan Earthquake in China: A Three-Wave, Cross-Lagged Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ying, Liu-Hua; Wu, Xin-Chun; Lin, Chong-De

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the relationships between depressive and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms in a sample of adolescent survivors following the Wenchuan earthquake in China. Two-hundred adolescent survivors were reviewed at 12, 18 and 24-months post-earthquake. Depression and PTSD were assessed by two self-report…

  4. Dynamic Triggering Stress Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Huizar, H.; Velasco, A. A.

    2008-12-01

    It has been well established that static (permanent) stress changes can trigger nearby earthquakes, within a few fault lengths from the causative event, whereas triggering by dynamic (transient) stresses carried by seismic waves both nearby and at remote distances has not been as well documented nor understood. An analysis of the change in the local stress caused by the passing of surfaces waves is important for the understanding of this phenomenon. In this study, we modeled the change in the stress that the passing of Rayleigh and Loves waves causes on a fault plane of arbitrary orientation, and applied a Coulomb failure criteria to calculate the potential of these stress changes to trigger reverse, normal or strike-slip failure. We preliminarily test these model results with data from dynamically triggering earthquakes in the Australian Bowen Basin. In the Bowen region, the modeling predicts a maximum triggering potential for Rayleigh waves arriving perpendicularly to the strike of the reverse faults present in the region. The modeled potentials agree with our observations, and give us an understanding of the dynamic stress orientation needed to trigger different type of earthquakes.

  5. Marine pipeline dynamic response to waves from directional wave spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Lambrakos, K.F.

    1982-07-01

    A methodology has been developed to calculate the dynamic probabilistic movement and resulting stresses for marine pipelines subjected to storm waves. A directional wave spectrum is used with a Fourier series expansion to simulate short-crested waves and calculate their loads on the pipeline. The pipeline displacements resulting from these loads are solutions to the time-dependent beam-column equation which also includes the soil resistance as external loading. The statistics of the displacements for individual waves are combined with the wave statistics for a given period of time, e.g. pipeline lifetime, to generate probabilistic estimates for net pipeline movement. On the basis of displacements for specified probability levels the pipeline configuration is obtained from which pipeline stresses can be estimated using structural considerations, e.g. pipeline stiffness, end restraints, etc.

  6. ASTER Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The pattern on the right half of this image of the Bay of Bengal is the result of two opposing wave trains colliding. This ASTER sub-scene, acquired on March 29, 2000, covers an area 18 kilometers (13 miles) wide and 15 kilometers (9 miles) long in three bands of the reflected visible and infrared wavelength region. The visible and near-infrared bands highlight surface waves due to specular reflection of sunlight off of the wave faces.

    Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of International Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products. Dr. Anne Kahle at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, is the U.S. science team leader; Moshe Pniel of JPL is the project manager. ASTER is the only high-resolution imaging sensor on Terra. The primary goal of the ASTER mission is to obtain high-resolution image data in 14 channels over the entire land surface, as well as black and white stereo images. With revisit time of between 4 and 16 days, ASTER will provide the capability for repeat coverage of changing areas on Earth's surface. Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of International Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products. Dr. Anne Kahle at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, is the U.S. science team leader; Moshe Pniel of JPL is the project manager. ASTER is the only high-resolution imaging sensor on Terra. The primary goal of the ASTER mission is to obtain high-resolution image data in 14 channels

  7. Wave turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazarenko, Sergey

    2015-07-01

    Wave turbulence is the statistical mechanics of random waves with a broadband spectrum interacting via non-linearity. To understand its difference from non-random well-tuned coherent waves, one could compare the sound of thunder to a piece of classical music. Wave turbulence is surprisingly common and important in a great variety of physical settings, starting with the most familiar ocean waves to waves at quantum scales or to much longer waves in astrophysics. We will provide a basic overview of the wave turbulence ideas, approaches and main results emphasising the physics of the phenomena and using qualitative descriptions avoiding, whenever possible, involved mathematical derivations. In particular, dimensional analysis will be used for obtaining the key scaling solutions in wave turbulence - Kolmogorov-Zakharov (KZ) spectra.

  8. Stress and stress counselling.

    PubMed Central

    Matheson, K. H.

    1990-01-01

    This is a report by the 1989 National Association of Clinical Tutors Wyeth Travelling Fellow to the United States of America. The stresses of postgraduate training and attempts to modify these are described, including stress counselling. The significance of stress and the relevance of the findings for postgraduate training in the United Kingdom are considered. PMID:2235808

  9. Heat Waves

    MedlinePlus

    Heat Waves Dangers we face during periods of very high temperatures include: Heat cramps: These are muscular pains and spasms due ... that the body is having trouble with the heat. If a heat wave is predicted or happening… - ...

  10. Stress Management

    MedlinePlus

    ... Awards Healthy Workplace Food and Beverage Toolkit Stress Management Banner 1 - To Stress or Not to Stress - ... Decide But We Can Help What Is Stress Management? Banner 2 - Stress Continuum Graphic Banner Live life ...

  11. Gravity Waves

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-19

    article title:  Gravity Waves Ripple over Marine Stratocumulus Clouds ... Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR), a fingerprint-like gravity wave feature occurs over a deck of marine stratocumulus clouds. Similar ... that occur when a pebble is thrown into a still pond, such "gravity waves" sometimes appear when the relatively stable and stratified air ...

  12. Wave Propagation in the Vicinities of Rock Fractures Under Obliquely Incident Wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Yang; Li, Jianchun; He, Lei; laloui, Lyesse; Zhao, Jian

    2016-05-01

    Though obliquely incident plane wave across rock fractures has been extensively investigated by theoretical analysis, the quantitative identification of each wave emerged from fractures has not been achieved either in numerical simulation or laboratory experiment. On the other hand, there are no theoretical results describing the stress/velocity state of the rocks beside a fracture. The superposition of the multiple waves propagating in the media results in the variation of the stress/velocity state. To understand the superposition of the wave components in the adjacent rocks of a facture, based on the geometrical analysis of the wave paths, the lag times among passing waves at an arbitrary point are determined. The normalised critical distances from the fracture to the measuring locations where the corresponding harmonic waves depart from other waves for a certain duration are then derived. Discussion on the correction for an arbitrary incident wave is then carried out considering the changes of the duration of the reflected and transmitted waves. Under the guidance of the analysis, wave superposition is performed for theoretical results and separated waves are obtained from numerical model. They are demonstrated to be consistent with each other. The measurement and the data processing provide an approach for wave separation in a relatively unbounded media. In addition, based on the mechanical analysis on the wave front, an indirect wave separation method is proposed which provides a possibility for laboratory experiments of wave propagation with an arbitrary incident angle.

  13. Piezoelectric wave motor

    DOEpatents

    Yerganian, Simon Scott

    2001-07-17

    A piezoelectric motor having a stator in which piezoelectric elements are contained in slots formed in the stator transverse to the desired wave motion. When an electric field is imposed on the elements, deformation of the elements imposes a force perpendicular to the sides of the slot, deforming the stator. Appropriate frequency and phase shifting of the electric field will produce a wave in the stator and motion in a rotor. In a preferred aspect, the piezoelectric elements are configured so that deformation of the elements in direction of an imposed electric field, generally referred to as the d.sub.33 direction, is utilized to produce wave motion in the stator. In a further aspect, the elements are compressed into the slots so as to minimize tensile stresses on the elements in use.

  14. Piezoelectric wave motor

    DOEpatents

    Yerganian, Simon Scott

    2003-02-11

    A piezoelectric motor having a stator in which piezoelectric elements are contained in slots formed in the stator transverse to the desired wave motion. When an electric field is imposed on the elements, deformation of the elements imposes a force perpendicular to the sides of the slot, deforming the stator. Appropriate frequency and phase-shifting of the electric field will produce a wave in the stator and motion in a rotor. In a preferred aspect, the piezoelectric elements are configured so that deformation of the elements in the direction of an imposed electric field, generally referred to as the d.sub.33 direction, is utilized to produce wave motion in the stator. In a further aspect, the elements are compressed into the slots so as to minimize tensile stresses on the elements in use.

  15. Lactotripeptides effect on office and 24-h ambulatory blood pressure, blood pressure stress response, pulse wave velocity and cardiac output in patients with high-normal blood pressure or first-degree hypertension: a randomized double-blind clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Cicero, Arrigo F G; Rosticci, Martina; Gerocarni, Beatrice; Bacchelli, Stefano; Veronesi, Maddalena; Strocchi, Enrico; Borghi, Claudio

    2011-09-01

    Contrasting data partially support a certain antihypertensive efficacy of lactotripeptides (LTPs) derived from enzymatic treatment of casein hydrolysate. Our aim was to evaluate this effect on a large number of hemodynamic parameters. We conducted a prospective double-blind randomized clinical trial, which included 52 patients affected by high-normal blood pressure (BP) or first-degree hypertension. We investigated the effect of a 6-week treatment with the LTPs isoleucine-proline-proline and valine-proline-proline at 3 mg per day, assumed to be functional food, on office BP, 24-h ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM) values, stress-induced BP increase and cardiac output-related parameters. In the LTP-treated subjects, we observed a significant reduction in office systolic BP (SBP; -5±8 mm Hg, P=0.013) and a significant improvement in pulse wave velocity (PWV; -0.66±0.81 m s(-1), P=0.001; an instrumental biomarker of vascular rigidity). No effect on 24-h ABPM parameters and BP reaction to stress was observed from treatment with the combined LTPs. LTPs, but not placebo, were associated with a mild but significant change in the stroke volume (SV), SV index (markers of cardiac flow), the acceleration index (ACI) and velocity index (VI) (markers of cardiac contractility). No effect was observed on parameters related to fluid dynamics or vascular resistance. LTPs positively influenced the office SBP, PWV, SV, SV index, ACI and VI in patients with high-normal BP or first-degree hypertension. PMID:21753776

  16. Stress and stress reduction.

    PubMed

    Straub, Heather; Qadir, Sameen; Miller, Greg; Borders, Ann

    2014-09-01

    Chronic stress contributes to preterm birth (PTB), through direct physiological mechanisms or behavioral pathways. This review identified interventions to prevent PTB through decreased maternal stress. Studies were grouped according to intervention: group prenatal care (11 studies), care coordination (8 studies), health insurance expansion (4 studies), expanded prenatal education/support in the clinic (8 studies), home visitation (9 studies), telephone contact (2 studies), or stress-reduction strategies (5 studies). Group prenatal care had the most evidence for PTB prevention. Comparative studies of PTB prevention through different models of prenatal care and maternal support, education, empowerment, stress-reduction, and coping strategies are needed. PMID:24979355

  17. Underdetermined system theory applied to qualitative analysis of response caused by attenuating plane waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sano, Yukio

    1989-05-01

    A qualitative analysis of the mechanical response of rate-dependent media caused by a one-dimensional plane smooth wave front and by a continuous wave front attenuating in the media is performed by an underdetermined system of nonlinear partial differential equations. The analysis reveals that smooth strain, particle velocity, and stress profiles, which the smooth wave front has, are not similar and that the wave front is composed of some partial waves having different properties. The property is represented by a set of strain rate, acceleration, and stress rate. The wave front derived here from the analysis is composed of four different partial waves. The front of the wave front is necessarily a contraction wave in which strain, particle velocity, and stress increase with time, while the rear is a rarefaction wave where they all decrease with time. Between these two wave fronts there are two remaining wave fronts. We call these wave fronts mesocontraction waves I and II. Wave front I is a wave in which stress decreases notwithstanding the increase in strain and particle velocity with time, which is followed by the other, i.e., wave front II, where with time, particle velocity, and stress decrease in spite of the increase in strain. The continuous wave front having continuous and nonsmooth profiles of strain, particle velocity, and stress can also be composed of four waves. These waves possess the same property as the corresponding waves in the smooth wave front mentioned above. The velocities at three boundaries that the waves have are discontinuous. Therefore, these four wave fronts are independent waves, just as a shock wave and a rarefraction wave. Specifically, the front wave, i.e., a contraction wave front is being outrun by a second wave front, the second one is being outrun by a third wave front, and the third is being outrun by a fourth wave front, i.e., a rarefaction wave. We call the second wave front degenerate contraction wave I. We also call the third

  18. Compaction Waves in Granular HMX

    SciTech Connect

    E. Kober; R. Menikoff

    1999-01-01

    Piston driven compaction waves in granular HMX are simulated with a two-dimensional continuum mechanics code in which individual grains are resolved. The constitutive properties of the grains are modeled with a hydrostatic pressure and a simple elastic-plastic model for the shear stress. Parameters are chosen to correspond to inert HMX. For a tightly packed random grain distribution (with initial porosity of 19%) we varied the piston velocity to obtain weak partly compacted waves and stronger fully compacted waves. The average stress and wave speed are compatible with the porous Hugoniot locus for uni- axial strain. However, the heterogeneities give rise to stress concentrations, which lead to localized plastic flow. For weak waves, plastic deformation is the dominant dissipative mechanism and leads to dispersed waves that spread out in time. In addition to dispersion, the granular heterogeneities give rise to subgrain spatial variation in the thermodynamic variables. The peaks in the temperature fluctuations, known as hot spots, are in the range such that they are the critical factor for initiation sensitivity.

  19. Manage Stress

    MedlinePlus

    ... Manage Stress Print This Topic En español Manage Stress Browse Sections The Basics Overview Signs and Health ... and Health Effects What are the signs of stress? When people are under stress, they may feel: ...

  20. Third Wave.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Chris

    2000-01-01

    Third Wave is a Christian charity based in Derby (England) that offers training in vocational skills, preindustrial crafts, horticultural and agricultural skills, environmental education, and woodland survival skills to disadvantaged people at city and farm locations. Third Wave employs a holistic approach to personal development in a community…

  1. Microfluidic waves.

    PubMed

    Utz, Marcel; Begley, Matthew R; Haj-Hariri, Hossein

    2011-11-21

    The propagation of pressure waves in fluidic channels with elastic covers is discussed in view of applications to flow control in microfluidic devices. A theory is presented which describes pressure waves in the fluid that are coupled to bending waves in the elastic cover. At low frequencies, the lateral bending of the cover dominates over longitudinal bending, leading to propagating, non-dispersive longitudinal pressure waves in the channel. The theory addresses effects due to both the finite viscosity and compressibility of the fluid. The coupled waves propagate without dispersion, as long as the wave length is larger than the channel width. It is shown that in channels of typical microfluidic dimensions, wave velocities in the range of a few 10 m s(-1) result if the channels are covered by films of a compliant material such as PDMS. The application of this principle to design microfluidic band pass filters based on standing waves is discussed. Characteristic frequencies in the range of a few kHz are readily achieved with quality factors above 30. PMID:21966667

  2. Biaxial stress effects on hysteresis and MIVC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sablik, M. J.; Kwun, H.; Burkhardt, G. L.

    1995-02-01

    Changes in the magnetic properties of a cruciform-shaped SAE-4130 steel specimen were measured under biaxial stress conditions. Compared to model predictions are the experimental remanence at various biaxial stresses and the magnetically induced velocity changes (MIVC) of ultrasonic shear and longitudinal waves propagated perpendicular to the stress plane.

  3. Atmospheric Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    With its Multispectral Visible Imaging Camera (MVIC), half of the Ralph instrument, New Horizons captured several pictures of mesoscale gravity waves in Jupiter's equatorial atmosphere. Buoyancy waves of this type are seen frequently on Earth - for example, they can be caused when air flows over a mountain and a regular cloud pattern forms downstream. In Jupiter's case there are no mountains, but if conditions in the atmosphere are just right, it is possible to form long trains of these small waves. The source of the wave excitation seems to lie deep in Jupiter's atmosphere, below the visible cloud layers at depths corresponding to pressures 10 times that at Earth's surface. The New Horizons measurements showed that the waves move about 100 meters per second faster than surrounding clouds; this is about 25% of the speed of sound on Earth and is much greater than current models of these waves predict. Scientists can 'read' the speed and patterns these waves to learn more about activity and stability in the atmospheric layers below.

  4. Quasitravelling waves

    SciTech Connect

    Beklaryan, Leva A

    2011-02-11

    A finite difference analogue of the wave equation with potential perturbation is investigated, which simulates the behaviour of an infinite rod under the action of an external longitudinal force field. For a homogeneous rod, describing solutions of travelling wave type is equivalent to describing the full space of classical solutions to an induced one-parameter family of functional differential equations of point type, with the characteristic of the travelling wave as parameter. For an inhomogeneous rod, the space of solutions of travelling wave type is trivial, and their 'proper' extension is defined as solutions of 'quasitravelling' wave type. By contrast to the case of a homogeneous rod, describing the solutions of quasitravelling wave type is equivalent to describing the quotient of the full space of impulsive solutions to an induced one-parameter family of point-type functional differential equations by an equivalence relation connected with the definition of solutions of quasitravelling wave type. Stability of stationary solutions is analyzed. Bibliography: 9 titles.

  5. Moreton Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, B. J.

    1999-01-01

    "Moreton waves," named for the observer who popularized them, are a solar phenomenon also known in scientific literature as "Moreton-Ramsey wave," "flare waves," "flare-associated waves," "MHD blast waves," "chromospheric shock fronts" and various other combinations of terms which connote violently propagating impulsive disturbances. It is unclear whether all of the observations to which these terms have been applied pertain to a single physical phenomenon: there has perhaps been some overlap between the observations and the assumed physical properties of the observed occurrence. Moreton waves are ideally observed in the wings of H alpha, and appear as semi-circular fronts propagating at speeds ranging from several hundred to over a thousand km/sec. They form an arc, or "brow shape" which can span up to 180 degrees. Extrapolating the speed and locations of the arc indicates that the phenomenon's origin intersects well with the impulsive phase of the associated H alpha flare (if the flare exhibits an impulsive phase). However, the arc may not form or may not be observable until it is tens of megameters from the flaring region, and subsequently can propagate to distances exceeding 100 megameters. The high speeds and distances of propagation, plus the associated radio and energetic particle observations, provided strong evidence of a coronal, rather than a chromospheric origin. The H alpha manifestation of the wave is assumed to be the "ground track" or "skirt" of a three-dimensional disturbance.

  6. Ship waves and lee waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharman, R. D.; Wurtele, M. G.

    1983-01-01

    Dynamics analogous to those of surface ship waves on water of finite depth are noted for the three-dimensional trapped lee wave modes produced by an isolated obstacle in a stratified fluid. This vertical trapping of wave energy is modeled by uniform upstream flow and stratification, bounded above by a rigid lid, and by a semiinfinite fluid of uniform stability whose wind velocity increases exponentially with height, representing the atmosphere. While formal asymptotic solutions are produced, limited quantitative usefulness is obtained through them because of the limitations of the approximations and the infinity of modes in the solution. Time-dependent numerical models are accordingly developed for both surface ship waves and internal and atmospheric ship waves, yielding a variety of results.

  7. Summer Heat Waves - Extreme Years

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The performance of four heat stress indices was compared for response to known events. A 12-yr period of weather data was analyzed for occurrence of heat wave events at each of three locations--Grand Island and Concord, NE and Rockport, MO. Numerous events were detected at each location. The Temp...

  8. Nuclear stress test

    MedlinePlus

    ... Persantine stress test; Thallium stress test; Stress test - nuclear; Adenosine stress test; Regadenoson stress test; CAD - nuclear stress; Coronary artery disease - nuclear stress; Angina - nuclear ...

  9. Childhood Stress

    MedlinePlus

    ... for a Move What Kids Say About: Handling Stress Anxiety, Fears, and Phobias How to Talk to Your ... About School? 5 Ways to Deal With Anxiety Anxiety Disorders Can Stress Affect My Weight? Stress Contact Us Print Resources ...

  10. Coal Thickness Gauging Using Elastic Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nazarian, Soheil; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph

    1999-01-01

    The efforts of a mining crew can be optimized, if the thickness of the coal layers to be excavated is known before excavation. Wave propagation techniques can be used to estimate the thickness of the layer based on the contrast in the wave velocity between coal and rock beyond it. Another advantage of repeated wave measurement is that the state of the stress within the mine can be estimated. The state of the stress can be used in many safety-related decisions made during the operation of the mine. Given these two advantages, a study was carried out to determine the feasibility of the methodology. The results are presented herein.

  11. Spin waves in fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kistler, E. L.

    1972-01-01

    A working report is presented in order to document early results of research on the stability of laminar boundary layers. The report shows that constitutive equations for a structured continua may be derived by the technique of reinterpreting velocity in the conventional stress to rate-of-strain relationship so as to account for effects of particle rotation. It is demonstrated that accounting for particle structure even at a molecular level makes the fluid viscoelastic with the ability to propagate vector waves. It is shown that particle structure modifies the basic stability equation for the system, which in turn would alter values for critical Reynolds number.

  12. Qualitative analysis of response caused by growing plane waves by underdetermined system theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sano, Yukio

    1991-03-01

    A qualitative analysis of the mechanical response of rate-dependent media caused by one-dimensional plane smooth- and continuous-wave fronts with the growing peaks of strain, particle velocity, and stress is performed by an underdetermined system of nonlinear partial differential equations. The response found by the analysis reveals that strain, particle velocity, and stress profiles in the smooth-wave front are not similar and that the front is composed of five partial waves having different properties. The property is represented by the set of strain rate, acceleration, and stress rate as in a previous study. The front of the wave front is necessarily a contraction wave in which strain, particle velocity, and stress increase with time. The second partial wave is another contraction wave. We call the wave a vice-contraction wave. The rear is assumed to be a rarefaction wave where they all decrease with time. Between these two partial waves there are two remaining partial waves. We call these waves mesorarefaction waves I and II. Wave II is a wave in which particle velocity and stress increase, notwithstanding the decrease in strain with time. It is followed by wave I in which the increase in stress with time occurs in spite of the decrease in strain and particle velocity. The continuous-wave front, which has discontinuous-movement velocities at the continuous, but nonsmooth, positions in the profiles of strain, particle velocity, and stress, is composed of five independent waves. These waves are a contraction wave, a vice-contraction wave, evolutional rarefaction waves II and I, and a rarefaction wave which possess the same properties as the corresponding partial waves in the smooth-wave front mentioned above. Both in the smooth-growing-wave front and in the continuous one the peak precedence is in the order of the strain, particle velocity, and stress peaks. The stress-strain path and stress-particle velocity path at a position in a rate-dependent medium which is

  13. Bolt Stress Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    In photo, an engineer is using a new Ultrasonic Bolt Stress Monitor developed by NASA's Langley Research Center to determine whether a bolt is properly tightened. A highly accurate device, the monitor is an important tool in construction of such structures as pressure vessels, bridges and power plants, wherein precise measurement of the stress on a tightened bolt is critical. Overtightened or undertightened bolts can fail and cause serious industrial accidents or costly equipment break-downs. There are a number of methods for measuring bolt stress. Most widely used and least costly is the torque wrench, which is inherently inaccurate; it does not take into account the friction between nut and bolt, which has an influence on stress. At the other end of the spectrum, there are accurate stress-measuring systems, but they are expensive and not portable. The battery-powered Langley monitor fills a need; it is inexpensive, lightweight, portable and extremely accurate because it is not subject to friction error. Sound waves are transmitted to the bolt and a return signal is received. As the bolt is tightened, it undergoes changes in resonance due to stress, in the manner that a violin string changes tone when it is tightened. The monitor measures the changes in resonance and provides a reading of real stress on the bolt. The device, patented by NASA, has aroused wide interest and a number of firms have applied for licenses to produce it for the commercial market.

  14. Stress Evaluation and Model Validation Using Laser Ultrasonics

    SciTech Connect

    Dike, Jay J.; Lu, Wei-yang; Peng, Lawrence W.; Wang, James C. F.

    1999-02-01

    Rayleigh surface waves can be used to evaluate surface stresses and through-thickness stress gradients based on acoustoelasticity. Laser based ultrasonic techniques, which generate and detect surface waves, have the advantages of good spatial resolution and remote operation. The techniques have many potential applications. This is the final report of a LDRD project that is the first to exploit the benefits of laser ultrasonics for stress and stress gradient evaluation.

  15. Residual stress measurement and analysis using ultrasonic techniques.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noronha, P. J.; Chapman, J. R.; Wert, J. J.

    1973-01-01

    A technique which utilizes ultrasonic radiation has been developed to measure residual stresses in metals. This technique makes it possible to detect and measure the magnitude of the principle stresses and also to obtain their direction. The velocities of ultrasonic waves in materials are measured as the time to travel a fixed path length, and the change in transit time is related to the applied stress. The linear relationship obtained allows a procedure based on this principle to be used for the measurement of residual stress using surface waves and shear waves. A method for plotting stress profiles through a material using surface waves uses varying frequencies for the ultrasonic wave. A limitation of the shear wave method is considered. The system used for this technique is called the Modified Time of Flight System.

  16. [Heat waves: health impacts].

    PubMed

    Marto, Natália

    2005-01-01

    During the summer of 2003, record high temperatures were reported across Europe, causing thousands of casualties. Heat waves are sporadic recurrent events, characterised by intense and prolonged heat, associated with excess mortality and morbidity. The most frequent cause of death directly attributable to heat is heat stroke but heat waves are known to cause increases in all-cause mortality, specially circulatory and respiratory mortality. Epidemiological studies demonstrate excess casualties cluster in specific risk groups. The elderly, those with chronic medical conditions and the socially isolated are particularly vulnerable. Air conditioning is the strongest protective factor against heat-related disorders. Heat waves cause disease indirectly, by aggravating chronic disorders, and directly, by causing heat-related illnesses (HRI). Classic HRI include skin eruptions, heat cramps, heat syncope, heat exhaustion and heat stroke. Heat stroke is a medical emergency characterised by hyperthermia and central nervous system dysfunction. Treatment includes immediate cooling and support of organ-system function. Despite aggressive treatment, heat stroke is often fatal and permanent neurological damage is frequent in those who survive. Heat related illness and death are preventable through behavioural adaptations, such as use of air conditioning and increased fluid intake. Other adaptation measures include heat emergency warning systems and intervention plans and environmental heat stress reduction. Heat related mortality is expected to rise as a consequence of the increasing proportion of elderly persons, the growing urban population, and the anticipated increase in number and intensity of heat waves associated with global warming. Improvements in surveillance and response capability may limit the adverse health conditions of future heat waves. It is crucial that health professionals are prepared to recognise, prevent and treat HRI and learn to cooperate with local health

  17. Principal Stress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, Larry

    This paper describes the symptoms and ways of coping with chronic stress and briefly discusses effects of job related stress on school principals. Although stress is a normal condition, the symptoms should be identified. Under long-term stress individuals may experience six types of reactions, such as feelings of fatique and difficulty sleeping.…

  18. Earthquake Apparent Stress Scaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, W. R.; Mayeda, K.; Ruppert, S.

    2002-12-01

    There is currently a disagreement within the geophysical community on the way earthquake energy scales with magnitude. One set of recent papers finds evidence that energy release per seismic moment (apparent stress) is constant (e.g. Choy and Boatwright, 1995; McGarr, 1999; Ide and Beroza, 2001). Another set of recent papers finds the apparent stress increases with magnitude (e.g. Kanamori et al., 1993 Abercrombie, 1995; Mayeda and Walter, 1996; Izutani and Kanamori, 2001). The resolution of this issue is complicated by the difficulty of accurately accounting for and determining the seismic energy radiated by earthquakes over a wide range of event sizes in a consistent manner. We have just started a project to reexamine this issue by analyzing aftershock sequences in the Western U.S. and Turkey using two different techniques. First we examine the observed regional S-wave spectra by fitting with a parametric model (Walter and Taylor, 2002) with and without variable stress drop scaling. Because the aftershock sequences have common stations and paths we can examine the S-wave spectra of events by size to determine what type of apparent stress scaling, if any, is most consistent with the data. Second we use regional coda envelope techniques (e.g. Mayeda and Walter, 1996; Mayeda et al, 2002) on the same events to directly measure energy and moment. The coda techniques corrects for path and site effects using an empirical Green function technique and independent calibration with surface wave derived moments. Our hope is that by carefully analyzing a very large number of events in a consistent manner using two different techniques we can start to resolve this apparent stress scaling issue. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by the University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract No. W-7405-Eng-48.

  19. Magnetoacoustic stress measurements in steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Namkung, M.; Utrata, D.; Allison, S. G.; Heyman, J. S.

    1985-01-01

    Uniaxial stress effects on the low-field magnetoacoustic interaction have been studied using bulk compressional waves and Rayleigh surface waves in numerous steel samples having various impurity concentrations (Namkung et al., 1984). The results invariably showed that the initial slope of acoustic natural velocity variations, with respect to net induced magnetization parallel to the stress axis, is positive under tension and negative under compression. The results of current measurements in railroad rail steel having about 0.68 wt percent carbon content are typical for medium range carbon steels. The low-field natural velocity slope in this particular type of steel, which is almost zero when unstressed, becomes steeper with increased magnitude of stress in both directions. Hence, the nondestructive determination of the sign of residual stress in railroad wheels and rails is possible using this technique. This paper discusses the basic physical mechanism underlying the experimental observations and presents the results obtained in railroad rail steel.

  20. Ultrasonics used to measure residual stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1967-01-01

    Ultrasonic method is used to measure residual stress in metal structures. By using this method, various forms of wave propagation in metals are possible, and more thorough analysis of complex geometric structures may be had.

  1. Biological responses of audiogenic stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathur, R.; Behari, J.; Sharma, K. N.

    1986-12-01

    Biological effects of prolonged exposure to sound waves (˜17 kHz) on developing female rats were examined. Rat pups of day 80 were grouped into two. Experimental group was exposed to sound waves and control group, who were not so exposed. Daily food, water intake were measured in developing animals and spontaneous motor activity, electrocardiogram and blood sugar were studied in adults. It was found that the experimental group of animals behaved differently from the control group. It is concluded that the sound waves produced changes in the animals which were within the physiological limits but were suggestive of development of stress.

  2. Dynamic stresses, Coulomb failure, and remote triggering

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hill, D.P.

    2008-01-01

    Dynamic stresses associated with crustal surface waves with 15-30-sec periods and peak amplitudes 5 km). The latter is consistent with the observation that extensional or transtensional tectonic regimes are more susceptible to remote triggering by Rayleigh-wave dynamic stresses than compressional or transpressional regimes. Locally elevated pore pressures may have a role in the observed prevalence of dynamic triggering in extensional regimes and geothermal/volcanic systems.

  3. Stress-dependent ultrasonic scattering in polycrystalline materials.

    PubMed

    Kube, Christopher M; Turner, Joseph A

    2016-02-01

    Stress-dependent elastic moduli of polycrystalline materials are used in a statistically based model for the scattering of ultrasonic waves from randomly oriented grains that are members of a stressed polycrystal. The stress is assumed to be homogeneous and can be either residual or generated from external loads. The stress-dependent elastic properties are incorporated into the definition of the differential scattering cross-section, which defines how strongly an incident wave is scattered into various directions. Nine stress-dependent differential scattering cross-sections or scattering coefficients are defined to include all possibilities of incident and scattered waves, which can be either longitudinal or (two) transverse wave types. The evaluation of the scattering coefficients considers polycrystalline aluminum that is uniaxially stressed. An analysis of the influence of incident wave propagation direction, scattering direction, frequency, and grain size on the stress-dependency of the scattering coefficients follows. Scattering coefficients for aluminum indicate that ultrasonic scattering is much more sensitive to a uniaxial stress than ultrasonic phase velocities. By developing the stress-dependent scattering properties of polycrystals, the influence of acoustoelasticity on the amplitudes of waves propagating in stressed polycrystalline materials can be better understood. This work supports the ongoing development of a technique for monitoring and measuring stresses in metallic materials. PMID:26936563

  4. Turbulent boundary layers under irregular waves and currents: Experiments and the equivalent-wave concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Jing

    2016-04-01

    A full-scale experimental study of turbulent boundary layer flows under irregular waves and currents is conducted with the primary objective to investigate the equivalent-wave concept by Madsen (1994). Irregular oscillatory flows following the bottom-velocity spectrum under realistic surface irregular waves are produced over two fixed rough bottoms in an oscillatory water tunnel, and flow velocities are measured using a Particle Image Velocimetry. The root-mean-square (RMS) value and representative phase lead of wave velocities have vertical variations very similar to those of the first-harmonic velocity of periodic wave boundary layers, e.g., the RMS wave velocity follows a logarithmic distribution controlled by the physical bottom roughness in the very near-bottom region. The RMS wave bottom shear stress and the associated representative phase lead can be accurately predicted using the equivalent-wave approach. The spectra of wave bottom shear stress and boundary layer velocity are found to be proportional to the spectrum of free-stream velocity. Currents in the presence of irregular waves exhibit the classic two-log-profile structure with the lower log-profile controlled by the physical bottom roughness and the upper log-profile controlled by a much larger apparent roughness. Replacing the irregular waves by their equivalent sinusoidal waves virtually makes no difference for the coexisting currents. These observations, together with the excellent agreement between measurements and model predictions, suggest that the equivalent-wave representation adequately characterizes the basic wave-current interaction under irregular waves.

  5. Use of anisotropy to guide acoustic waves along desired trajectories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tehranian, Aref; Amirkhizi, Alireza V.; Nemat-Nasser, Sia

    2010-03-01

    Acoustic stress waves can be guided to follow pre-determined paths in solids, using elastic anisotropy. Recently, there has been intense interest to design materials and structures that can shield specific regions within the material by redirecting the incident stress-waves along desired paths. Some of the proposed techniques involve variable mass density and stiffness. We have designed a material with isotropic mass density but highly anisotropic elasticity that can guide incident waves along desired trajectories. Harmonic excitations are imposed, and it is shown that the stress-wave energy would travel around a protected central region. The model is also evaluated using numerical simulations, which confirm that majority of the stress-wave energy is guided around the central cavity and is delivered exactly to the opposing face in a location corresponding to the incident excitation location.

  6. Method and apparatus for measuring stress

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, R.B.

    1983-07-28

    A method and apparatus for determining stress in a material independent of micro-structural variations and anisotropies. The method comprises comparing the velocities of two horizontally polarized and horizontally propagating ultrasonic shear waves with interchanged directions of propagation and polarization. The apparatus for carrying out the method comprises periodic permanent magnet-electromagnetic acoustic transducers for generating and detecting the shear waves and means for determining the wave velocities.

  7. Method and apparatus for measuring stress

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, R. Bruce

    1985-06-11

    A method and apparatus for determining stress in a material independent of micro-structural variations and anisotropies. The method comprises comparing the velocities of two horizontally polarized and horizontally propagating ultrasonic shear waves with interchanged directions of propagation and polarization. The apparatus for carrying out the method comprises periodic permanent magnet-electromagnetic acoustic transducers for generating and detecting the shear waves and means for determining the wave velocities.

  8. Internal Ocean Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    Internal waves are waves that travel within the interior of a fluid. The waves propagate at the interface or boundary between two layers with sharp density differences, such as temperature. They occur wherever strong tides or currents and stratification occur in the neighborhood of irregular topography. They can propagate for several hundred kilometers. The ASTER false-color VNIR image off the island of Tsushima in the Korea Strait shows the signatures of several internal wave packets, indicating a northern propagation direction.

    With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER provides scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring of dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal pollution monitoring; coral reef degradation; surface temperature mapping of soils and geology; and measuring surface heat balance.

    The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

    Size: 60 by 120 kilometers (37.2 by 74.4 miles) Location: 34.6 degrees North latitude, 129.5 degrees East longitude Orientation: North at top Image Data: ASTER bands 3, 2, and 1

  9. On neutron surface waves

    SciTech Connect

    Ignatovich, V. K.

    2009-01-15

    It is shown that neutron surface waves do not exist. The difference between the neutron wave mechanics and the wave physics of electromagnetic and acoustic processes, which allows the existence of surface waves, is analyzed.

  10. Caregiver Stress

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2005). Psychophysiological mediators of caregiver stress and differential cognitive decline . Psychology and Aging, 20 (3), 402–411. Pew Research ... 2005). Psychophysiological mediators of caregiver stress and differential cognitive decline . Psychology and Aging, 20 (3), 402–411. Return to ...

  11. Feeling Stressed

    MedlinePlus

    ... other physical activity. Can stress lead to more serious problems? top Stress that's too much for you to handle may play a role in some serious problems. These problems include eating disorders , hurting yourself , ...

  12. Manage Stress

    MedlinePlus

    ... sections Take Action: Get Support 8. Talk to friends and family. Tell your friends and family if you are feeling stressed. They may be able to help. Learn how friends and family can help you feel less stressed. ...

  13. Gravity Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanzandt, T. E.

    1985-01-01

    Atmospheric parameters fluctuate on all scales. In the mesoscale these fluctuations are occasionally sinusoidal so that they can be interpreted as gravity waves. Usually, however, the fluctuations are noise like, so that their cause is not immediately evident. Results of mesoscale observations in the 20 to 120 m altitude range that are suitable for incorporation into a model atmosphere are very limited. In the stratosphere and lower mesosphere observations are sparse and very little data has been summarized into appropriate form. There is much more data in the upper mesosphere and lower thermosphere, but again very little of it has been summarized. The available mesoscale spectra of horizontal wind u versus vertical wave number m in the 20 to 120 km altitude range are shown together with a spectrum from the lower atmosphere for comparison. Further information about these spectra is given. In spite of the large range of altitudes and latitudes, the spectra from the lower atmosphere (NASA, 1971 and DEWAN, 1984) are remarkably similar in both shape and amplitude. The mean slopes of -2.38 for the NASA spectrum and -2.7 for the Dewan spectra are supported by the mean slope of -2.75 found by ROSENBERG et al. (1974). The mesospheric spectrum is too short to establish a shape. Its amplitude is about an order of magnitude larger than the NASA spectrum in the same wave number range. The NASA and Dewan spectra suggest that the mesoscale spectra in the lower atmosphere are insensitive to meteorological conditions.

  14. Controlling Stress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelehear, Zach

    2004-01-01

    Stress occurs among all groups in a school community and can affect morale, performance, and leadership ability. This article discusses how educators must deal with and control stress. Principals must address their own stress to create a healthy school culture. Moreover, the author presents two survival strategies that can provide support and…

  15. Understanding Stress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bellott, Fred K.

    Stress affects everyone in his/her work and everyday life. Some persons are more effective when they are under a certain level of stress, but there are limits to the amount of stress under which one can perform effectively. Competition within complex organizations today is a risk factor not often recognized by the organizations. All organizations…

  16. Study of stress corrosion in aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brummer, S. B.

    1967-01-01

    Mechanism of the stress corrosion cracking of high-strength aluminum alloys was investigated using electrochemical, mechanical, and electron microscopic techniques. The feasibility of detecting stress corrosion damage in fabricated aluminum alloy parts by nondestructive testing was investigated using ultrasonic surface waves and eddy currents.

  17. A critical survey of wave propagation and impact in composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moon, F. C.

    1973-01-01

    A review of the field of stress waves in composite materials is presented covering the period up to December 1972. The major properties of waves in composites are discussed and a summary is made of the major experimental results in this field. Various theoretical models for analysis of wave propagation in laminated, fiber and particle reinforced composites are surveyed. The anisotropic, dispersive and dissipative properties of stress pulses and shock waves in such materials are reviewed. A review of the behavior of composites under impact loading is presented along with the application of wave propagation concepts to the determination of impact stresses in composite plates.

  18. Analysis of critically refracted longitudinal waves

    SciTech Connect

    Pei, Ning Bond, Leonard J.

    2015-03-31

    Fabrication processes, such as, welding, forging, and rolling can induce residual stresses in metals that will impact product performance and phenomena such as cracking and corrosion. To better manage residual stress tools are needed to map their distribution. The critically refracted ultrasonic longitudinal (LCR) wave is one such approach that has been used for residual stress characterization. It has been shown to be sensitive to stress and less sensitive to the effects of the texture of the material. Although the LCR wave is increasingly widely applied, the factors that influence the formation of the LCR beam are seldom discussed. This paper reports a numerical model used to investigate the transducers' parameters that can contribute to the directionality of the LCR wave and hence enable performance optimization when used for industrial applications. An orthogonal test method is used to study the transducer parameters which influence the LCR wave beams. This method provides a design tool that can be used to study and optimize multiple parameter experiments and it can identify which parameter or parameters are of most significance. The simulation of the sound field in a 2-D 'water-steel' model is obtained using a Spatial Fourier Analysis method. The effects of incident angle, standoff, the aperture and the center frequency of the transducer were studied. Results show that the aperture of the transducer, the center frequency and the incident angle are the most important factors in controlling the directivity of the resulting LCR wave fields.

  19. Analysis of critically refracted longitudinal waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, Ning; Bond, Leonard J.

    2015-03-01

    Fabrication processes, such as, welding, forging, and rolling can induce residual stresses in metals that will impact product performance and phenomena such as cracking and corrosion. To better manage residual stress tools are needed to map their distribution. The critically refracted ultrasonic longitudinal (LCR) wave is one such approach that has been used for residual stress characterization. It has been shown to be sensitive to stress and less sensitive to the effects of the texture of the material. Although the LCR wave is increasingly widely applied, the factors that influence the formation of the LCR beam are seldom discussed. This paper reports a numerical model used to investigate the transducers' parameters that can contribute to the directionality of the LCR wave and hence enable performance optimization when used for industrial applications. An orthogonal test method is used to study the transducer parameters which influence the LCR wave beams. This method provides a design tool that can be used to study and optimize multiple parameter experiments and it can identify which parameter or parameters are of most significance. The simulation of the sound field in a 2-D "water-steel" model is obtained using a Spatial Fourier Analysis method. The effects of incident angle, standoff, the aperture and the center frequency of the transducer were studied. Results show that the aperture of the transducer, the center frequency and the incident angle are the most important factors in controlling the directivity of the resulting LCR wave fields.

  20. Ambient tectonic stress as fragile geological feature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sleep, Norman H.

    2014-09-01

    seismic waves produce frictional failure within shallow pervasively cracked rocks. Distributed failure preferentially relaxes ambient tectonic stresses, providing a fragility measure of past strong shaking. Relaxation of the regional fault-normal compression appears to have occurred within granite from 768 m down to ˜1000-1600 m depth at the Pilot Hole near Parkfield, California. Subsequent movements on the main fault have imposed strike-slip stress within the relaxed region. Peak ground velocities of ˜2 m s-1 are inferred for infrequent (few 1000 yr recurrence) past earthquakes from stress relaxation within the granite and from the variation of S wave velocity with depth in the overlying sandstone. Conversely, frequent strong shaking in slowly deforming regions relaxes shallow ambient tectonic stress. This situation is expected beneath Whittier Narrows, where strong Love waves from numerous San Andreas events repeatedly produced nonlinear behavior.

  1. Residual stress measurements in carbon steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyman, J. S.; Min, N.

    1986-01-01

    External dc magnetic field-induced changes in natural velocity of Rayleigh surface waves were measured in steel specimens under various stress conditions. The low field slopes of curves representing the fractional changes of natural velocity were proved to provide correct stress information in steels with different metallurgical properties. The slopes of curves under uniaxial compression, exceeding about one third of the yield stress, fell below zero in all the specimens when magnetized along the stress axis. The slopes under tension varied among different steels but remained positive in any circumstances. The stress effect was observed for both applied and residual stress. A physical interpretation of these results is given based on the stress-induced domain structure changes and the delta epsilon effect. Most importantly, it is found that the influence of detailed metallurgical properties cause only secondary effects on the obtained stress information.

  2. Longitudinal nonlinear wave propagation through soft tissue.

    PubMed

    Valdez, M; Balachandran, B

    2013-04-01

    In this paper, wave propagation through soft tissue is investigated. A primary aim of this investigation is to gain a fundamental understanding of the influence of soft tissue nonlinear material properties on the propagation characteristics of stress waves generated by transient loadings. Here, for computational modeling purposes, the soft tissue is modeled as a nonlinear visco-hyperelastic material, the geometry is assumed to be one-dimensional rod geometry, and uniaxial propagation of longitudinal waves is considered. By using the linearized model, a basic understanding of the characteristics of wave propagation is developed through the dispersion relation and in terms of the propagation speed and attenuation. In addition, it is illustrated as to how the linear system can be used to predict brain tissue material parameters through the use of available experimental ultrasonic attenuation curves. Furthermore, frequency thresholds for wave propagation along internal structures, such as axons in the white matter of the brain, are obtained through the linear analysis. With the nonlinear material model, the authors analyze cases in which one of the ends of the rods is fixed and the other end is subjected to a loading. Two variants of the nonlinear model are analyzed and the associated predictions are compared with the predictions of the corresponding linear model. The numerical results illustrate that one of the imprints of the nonlinearity on the wave propagation phenomenon is the steepening of the wave front, leading to jump-like variations in the stress wave profiles. This phenomenon is a consequence of the dependence of the local wave speed on the local deformation of the material. As per the predictions of the nonlinear material model, compressive waves in the structure travel faster than tensile waves. Furthermore, it is found that wave pulses with large amplitudes and small elapsed times are attenuated over shorter spans. This feature is due to the elevated

  3. Ocean wave dynamics and El Nino

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, E.K.; Huang, B.; Shukla, J.

    1995-10-01

    The response of an ocean general circulation model to specified wind stress is used to understand the role of ocean wave propagation in the evolution of El Nino events in sea surface temperatures (SST) in the equatorial Pacific Ocean. In a control experiment the ocean model reproduces observed equatorial Pacific interannual variability in response to forcing by the observed wind stress. The ocean model is then forced with the same wind stress but with the time evolution of the wind stress forcing reversed. An analysis of the anomalies from the annual cycle in these two experiments delineates the parts of the response that are in equilibrium with and out of equilibrium with the wind stress forcing. The experiment demonstrates that the heat content is not in equilibrium with the wind stress forcing either on or near the equator. Very close to the equator the slope of the thermocline is in equilibrium with the wind stress, but the mean heat content is far from equilibrium. Slightly off of the equator in the western Pacific westward propagating heat content anomalies appear to originate in regions of strong wind stress forcing and then propagate to the western boundary. These westward propagating anomalies also depart significantly from equilibrium with the wind stress forcing. Additional experiments allow these westward propagating anomalies to be identified as freely propagating Rossby waves. The Rossby waves are shown to determine the equatorial heat content response to the wind stress forcing when they arrive at the western boundary and to be responsible for the nonequilibrium behavior of the equatorial mean heat content. A simplified coupled model is derived by fitting the results and estimating parameter values from the numerical experiments. 45 refs., 16 figs.

  4. Roll waves in mud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balmforth, N. J.; Liu, J. J.

    2004-11-01

    The stability of a viscoplastic fluid film falling down an inclined plane is explored, with the aim of determining the critical Reynolds number for the onset of roll waves. The Herschel Bulkley constitutive law is adopted and the fluid is assumed two-dimensional and incompressible. The linear stability problem is described for an equilibrium in the form of a uniform sheet flow, when perturbed by introducing an infinitesimal stress perturbation. This flow is stable for very high Reynolds numbers because the rigid plug riding atop the fluid layer cannot be deformed and the free surface remains flat. If the flow is perturbed by allowing arbitrarily small strain rates, on the other hand, the plug is immediately replaced by a weakly yielded ‘pseudo-plug’ that can deform and reshape the free surface. This situation is modelled by lubrication theory at zero Reynolds number, and it is shown how the fluid exhibits free-surface instabilities at order-one Reynolds numbers. Simpler models based on vertical averages of the fluid equations are evaluated, and one particular model is identified that correctly predicts the onset of instability. That model is used to describe nonlinear roll waves.

  5. Failure Waves in Cylindrical Glass Bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cazamias, James U.; Bless, Stephan J.; Marder, Michael P.

    1997-07-01

    Failure waves, a propagating front separating virgin and comminuted material, have been receiving a fair amount of attention the last couple of years. While most scientists have been looking at failure waves in plate impact geometries, we have conducted a series of experiments on Pyrex bars. In this paper, we present two types of photographic data from a series of tests. A streak camera was used to determine velocities of the failure front as a function of impact stress. A polaroid camera and a flash lamp provide detailed pictures of the actual event. Attempts were made to observe failure waves in amorphous quartz and acrylic.

  6. MHD simple waves and the divergence wave

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, G. M.; Pogorelov, N. V.; Zank, G. P.

    2010-03-25

    In this paper we investigate magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simple divergence waves in MHD, for models in which nablacentre dotBnot =0. These models are related to the eight wave Riemann solvers in numerical MHD, in which the eighth wave is the divergence wave associated with nablacentre dotBnot =0. For simple wave solutions, all physical variables (the gas density, pressure, fluid velocity, entropy, and magnetic field induction in the MHD case) depend on a single phase function phi. We consider the form of the MHD equations used by both Powell et al. and Janhunen. It is shown that the Janhunen version of the equations possesses fully nonlinear, exact simple wave solutions for the divergence wave, but no physically meaningful simple divergence wave solution exists for the Powell et al. system. We suggest that the 1D simple, divergence wave solution for the Janhunen system, may be useful for the testing and validation of numerical MHD codes.

  7. Spiral waves on a contractile tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesin, L.; Ambrosi, D.

    2011-02-01

    In a healthy cardiac tissue, electric waves propagate in the form of a travelling pulse, from the apex to the base, and activate the contraction of the heart. Defects in the propagation can destabilize travelling fronts and originate possible new periodic solutions, as spiral waves. Spiral waves are quite stable, but the interplay between currents and strain can distort the periodic pattern, provided the coupling is strong enough. In this paper we investigate the stability of spiral waves on a contractile medium in a non-standard framework, in which the electrical potential dictates the active strain (not stress) of the muscle. The role of conducting and contracting fibers is included in the model and periodic boundary conditions are adopted. A correlation analysis allows to evaluate numerically the range of stability of the parameters for the spiral waves, depending on the strain of the contracted fibers and on the magnitude of the stretch activated current.

  8. Improving coastal wave hindcasts by combining offshore buoy observations with global wave models.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crosby, S. C.; O'Reilly, W. C.; Guza, R. T.

    2014-12-01

    Waves conditions in southern California are sensitive to offshore wave directions. Due to blocking by coastal islands and refraction across complex bathymetry, a <10o difference in incident wave direction can dramatically change coastal wave energy. Directional wave buoys are fundamentally low-resolution instruments, while the directional bin widths of operational wind-wave models are coarse (e.g. 10o). Operational wind-wave models have useful prediction skill in the nearshore, however, wave buoy measurements, when combined with standard directional estimation techniques, are shown to provide significantly better hindcasts. Techniques to combine offshore global wave model predictions (NOAA's Wave Watch 3 hindcasts) and offshore buoy measurements are being developed. The skill of different combination methodologies as an offshore boundary condition is assessed using spectral ray-tracing methods to transform incident offshore swell-spectra to shallow water buoy locations. A nearly continuous 10 yr data set of approximately 14 buoys is used. Comparisons include standard bulk parameters (e.g. significant wave height, peak period), the frequency-dependent energy spectrum (needed for run-up estimation) and radiation stress component Sxy (needed for alongshore current and sediment transport estimation). Global wave model uncertainties are unknown, complicating the formulation of optimum assimilation constraints. Several plausible models for estimating offshore waves are tested. Future work includes assimilating nearshore buoy observations, with the long-term objective of accurate regional wave hindcasts using an efficient mix of global wave models and buoys. This work is supported by the California Department of Parks and Recreation, Division of Boating and Waterways Oceanography Program.

  9. Observations of wave effects on inlet circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orescanin, Mara; Raubenheimer, Britt; Elgar, Steve

    2014-07-01

    Observations of water levels, winds, waves, and currents in Katama Bay, Edgartown Channel, and Katama Inlet on Martha's Vineyard, Massachusetts are used to test the hypothesis that wave forcing is important to circulation in inlet channels of two-inlet systems and to water levels in the bay between the inlets. Katama Bay is connected to the Atlantic Ocean via Katama Inlet and to Vineyard Sound via Edgartown Channel. A numerical model based on the momentum and continuity equations that uses measured bathymetry and is driven with observed water levels in the ocean and sound, ocean waves, and local winds predicts the currents observed in Katama Inlet more accurately when wave forcing is included than when waves are ignored. During Hurricanes Irene and Sandy, when incident (12-m water depth) significant wave heights were greater than 5 m, breaking-wave cross-shore (along-inlet-channel) radiation stress gradients enhanced flows from the ocean into the bay during flood tides, and reduced (almost to zero during Irene) flows out of the bay during ebb tides. Model simulations without the effects of waves predict net discharge from the sound to the ocean both during Hurricane Irene and over a 1-month period with a range of conditions. In contrast, simulations that include wave forcing predict net discharge from the ocean to the sound, consistent with the observations.

  10. Waves and Tsunami Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frashure, K. M.; Chen, R. F.; Stephen, R. A.; Bolmer, T.; Lavin, M.; Strohschneider, D.; Maichle, R.; Micozzi, N.; Cramer, C.

    2007-01-01

    Demonstrating wave processes quantitatively in the classroom using standard classroom tools (such as Slinkys and wave tanks) can be difficult. For example, waves often travel too fast for students to actually measure amplitude or wavelength. Also, when teaching propagating waves, reflections from the ends set up standing waves, which can confuse…

  11. Debriefing Stress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Jonnie L.; Lance, Cynthia G.

    2002-01-01

    Discussion pf the stress associated with the educational use of games and simulations focuses on a study of graduate students that used the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator to determine that people with certain personality types experience stress at different intensities. Also found that all participants, regardless of personality type, needed…

  12. Surface wave tomography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, D. L.

    1984-01-01

    Vertically polarized shear wave velocity (VSV), determined primarily from fundamental mode Rayleigh waves, and the difference between the velocity of horizontally polarized shear waves (VSH) and VSV, therefore a measure of anisotropy, are shown.

  13. Wave bottom boundary layer processes below irregular surfzone breaking waves with light-weight sheet flow particle transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chassagneux, François Xavier; Hurther, David

    2014-03-01

    The present work investigates the structure of the near-bed flow below irregular surfzone breaking waves inducing light-weight sheet flow particle transport. The experiments are carried out in the LEGI flume under steady equilibrium conditions between the wave forcing and the underlying bed morphology. Synchronized ACVP and video images provide detailed information about the mean wave and current characteristics and the coupled flow regimes across the entire wave breaking region including the outer and the inner surfzones. An analysis of the impact of breaking eddies in the Wave Boundary Layer (WBL) is undertaken at the beginning of the inner surfzone. Subsequently, the intrawave variation of several contributions of the total shearing force per unit area and the net values of the Reynolds stress related to phase-averaged velocities are analyzed. It is found that -ρu˜w˜ is the dominant term. The turbulent Reynolds stress, the low frequency, and the mean terms are at least 1 order of magnitude lower. Due to the irregular wave forcing, the net values are separated into the net wave-by-wave Reynolds stress and the wave Reynolds stress averaged over the entire irregular wave sequence. All these measured bed shear stress terms are then compared to estimations obtained with two different parameterized models in order to evaluate their prediction performances. The values of the model parameters are discussed in comparison to those found in the literature. Finally, the vertical profile of net Reynolds shear stress exhibits a nearly constant value across the sheet-flow layer.

  14. Dynamic stresses, coulomb failure, and remote triggering: corrected

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hill, David P.

    2012-01-01

    Dynamic stresses associated with crustal surface waves with 15–30 s periods and peak amplitudes <1  MPa are capable of triggering seismicity at sites remote from the generating mainshock under appropriate conditions. Coulomb failure models based on a frictional strength threshold offer one explanation for instances of rapid‐onset triggered seismicity that develop during the surface‐wave peak dynamic stressing. Evaluation of the triggering potential of surface‐wave dynamic stresses acting on critically stressed faults using a Mohr’s circle representation together with the Coulomb failure criteria indicates that Love waves should have a higher triggering potential than Rayleigh waves for most fault orientations and wave incidence angles. That (1) the onset of triggered seismicity often appears to begin during the Rayleigh wave rather than the earlier arriving Love wave, and (2) Love‐wave amplitudes typically exceed those for Rayleigh waves suggests that the explanation for rapid‐onset dynamic triggering may not reside solely with a simple static‐threshold friction mode. The results also indicate that normal faults should be more susceptible to dynamic triggering by 20‐s Rayleigh‐wave stresses than thrust faults in the shallow seismogenic crust (<10  km) while the advantage tips in favor of reverse faults greater depths. This transition depth scales with wavelength and coincides roughly with the transition from retrograde‐to‐prograde particle motion. Locally elevated pore pressures may have a role in the observed prevalence of dynamic triggering in extensional regimes and geothermal/volcanic systems. The result is consistent with the apparent elevated susceptibility of extensional or transtensional tectonic regimes to remote triggering by Rayleigh‐wave dynamic stresses than compressional or transpressional regimes.

  15. Airplane Stress Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zahm, A F; Crook, L H

    1918-01-01

    Report presents stress analysis of individual components of an airplane. Normal and abnormal loads, sudden loads, simple stresses, indirect simple stresses, resultant unit stress, repetitive and equivalent stress, maximum steady load and stress are considered.

  16. Geometrical versus wave optics under gravitational waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angélil, Raymond; Saha, Prasenjit

    2015-06-01

    We present some new derivations of the effect of a plane gravitational wave on a light ray. A simple interpretation of the results is that a gravitational wave causes a phase modulation of electromagnetic waves. We arrive at this picture from two contrasting directions, namely, null geodesics and Maxwell's equations, or geometric and wave optics. Under geometric optics, we express the geodesic equations in Hamiltonian form and solve perturbatively for the effect of gravitational waves. We find that the well-known time-delay formula for light generalizes trivially to massive particles. We also recover, by way of a Hamilton-Jacobi equation, the phase modulation obtained under wave optics. Turning then to wave optics—rather than solving Maxwell's equations directly for the fields, as in most previous approaches—we derive a perturbed wave equation (perturbed by the gravitational wave) for the electromagnetic four-potential. From this wave equation it follows that the four-potential and the electric and magnetic fields all experience the same phase modulation. Applying such a phase modulation to a superposition of plane waves corresponding to a Gaussian wave packet leads to time delays.

  17. IWA : an analysis program for isentropic wave measurements.

    SciTech Connect

    Ao, Tommy

    2009-02-01

    IWA (Isentropic Wave Analysis) is a program for analyzing velocity profiles of isentropic compression experiments. IWA applies incremental impedance matching correction to measured velocity profiles to obtain in-situ particle velocity profiles for Lagrangian wave analysis. From the in-situ velocity profiles, material properties such as wave velocities, stress, strain, strain rate, and strength are calculated. The program can be run in any current version of MATLAB (2008a or later) or as a Windows XP executable.

  18. Nonlinear guided wave propagation in prestressed plates.

    PubMed

    Pau, Annamaria; Lanza di Scalea, Francesco

    2015-03-01

    The measurement of stress in a structure presents considerable interest in many fields of engineering. In this paper, the diagnostic potential of nonlinear elastic guided waves in a prestressed plate is investigated. To do so, an analytical model is formulated accounting for different aspects involved in the phenomenon. The fact that the initial strains can be finite is considered using the Green Lagrange strain tensor, and initial and final configurations are not merged, as it would be assumed in the infinitesimal strain theory. Moreover, an appropriate third-order expression of the strain energy of the hyperelastic body is adopted to account for the material nonlinearities. The model obtained enables to investigate both the linearized case, which gives the variation of phase and group velocity as a function of the initial stress, and the nonlinear case, involving second-harmonic generation as a function of the initial state of stress. The analysis is limited to Rayleigh-Lamb waves propagating in a plate. Three cases of initial prestress are considered, including prestress in the direction of the wave propagation, prestress orthogonal to the direction of wave propagation, and plane isotropic stress. PMID:25786963

  19. Development and validation of a three-dimensional, wave-current coupled model on unstructured meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, JinHua; Shen, YongMing

    2011-01-01

    Using unstructured meshes provides great flexibility for modeling the flow in complex geomorphology of tidal creeks, barriers and islands, with refined grid resolution in regions of interest and not elsewhere. In this paper, an unstructured three-dimensional fully coupled wave-current model is developed. Firstly, a parallel, unstructured wave module is developed. Variations in wave properties are governed by a wave energy equation that includes wave-current interactions and dissipation representative of wave breaking. Then, the existing Finite-Volume Coastal Ocean Model (FVCOM) is modified to couple with the wave module. The couple procedure includes depth dependent wave radiation stress terms, Stokes drift, vertical transfer of wave-generated pressure transfer to the mean momentum equation, wave dissipation as a source term in the turbulence kinetic energy equation, and mean current advection and refraction of wave energy. Several applications are presented to evaluate the developed model. In particular the wind and wave-induced storm surge generated by Hurricane Katrina is investigated. The obtained results have been compared to the in situ measurements with respect to the wave heights and water level elevations revealing good accuracy of the model in reproduction of the investigated events. In a comparison to water level measurements at Dauphin Island, inclusion of the wave induced water level setup reduced the normalized root mean square error from 0.301 to 0.257 m and increased the correlation coefficient from 0.860 to 0.929. Several runs were carried out to analyze the effects of waves. The experiments show that among the processes that represent wave effects, radiation stress and wave-induced surface stress are more important than wave-induced bottom stress in affecting the water level. The Hurricane Katrina simulations showed the importance of the inclusion of the wave effects for the hindcast of the water levels during the storm surge.

  20. Dynamic triggering: Stress modeling and a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Huizar, Hector; Velasco, Aaron A.

    2011-02-01

    Changes in the static stress can trigger nearby earthquakes that occur within a few fault lengths from the causative event. Transient stresses caused by passage of surface waves commonly trigger events at remote distances, yet little is documented or understood about the processes and stresses necessary for remote triggering. To understand the causative stresses and environments behind remote, or dynamic, triggering, we must decipher the stresses caused by the passage of the surface waves in relation to the local stress field and fault conditions where the triggered events occur. In this study, we model the change in the stress field that the passing of Rayleigh and Love waves causes on a fault plane of arbitrary orientation relative to the direction of propagation of the waves, and we apply a Coulomb failure criterion to calculate the potential of these stress changes to trigger reverse, normal, or strike-slip failure. We compare these model results with data from dynamically triggered earthquakes in the Australian Bowen Basin, an area with low seismicity and mapped regional stress and that is at the margin of a stable continental craton. Our data analysis shows that for this region, surface waves arriving at 45° from the average strike direction are the most likely to trigger local seismicity. This agrees with our observations.

  1. Stability of post-fertilization traveling waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, Gilberto; Plaza, Ramón G.

    This paper studies the stability of a family of traveling wave solutions to the system proposed by Lane et al. [D.C. Lane, J.D. Murray, V.S. Manoranjan, Analysis of wave phenomena in a morphogenetic mechanochemical model and an application to post-fertilization waves on eggs, IMA J. Math. Appl. Med. Biol. 4 (4) (1987) 309-331], to model a pair of mechanochemical phenomena known as post-fertilization waves on eggs. The waves consist of an elastic deformation pulse on the egg's surface, and a free calcium concentration front. The family is indexed by a coupling parameter measuring contraction stress effects on the calcium concentration. This work establishes the spectral, linear and nonlinear orbital stability of these post-fertilization waves for small values of the coupling parameter. The usual methods for the spectral and evolution equations cannot be applied because of the presence of mixed partial derivatives in the elastic equation. Nonetheless, exponential decay of the directly constructed semigroup on the complement of the zero eigenspace is established. We show that small perturbations of the waves yield solutions to the nonlinear equations decaying exponentially to a phase-modulated traveling wave.

  2. Cold Stress

    MedlinePlus

    ... be at risk of cold stress. Extreme cold weather is a dangerous situation that can bring on ... the country. In regions relatively unaccustomed to winter weather, near freezing temperatures are considered factors for cold ...

  3. Heat Stress

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stress Learn some tips to protect workers including: acclimatization, rest breaks, and fluid recommendations. NIOSH Workplace Solution: ... Blog: Adjusting to Work in the Heat: Why Acclimatization Matters The natural adaptation to the heat takes ...

  4. Students' Stress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shirom, Arie

    1986-01-01

    A study of undergraduate students' perceived stresses, as solicited by graduate students, found the greatest stressors to be examination-related, followed by those related to meeting class assignments and to the teaching process. (MSE)

  5. Wave-current interaction in Willapa Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olabarrieta, M.; Warner, J.C.; Kumar, N.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the importance of wave-current interaction in an inlet-estuary system. The three-dimensional, fully coupled, Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere-Wave-Sediment Transport (COAWST) modeling system was applied in Willapa Bay (Washington State) from 22 to 29 October 1998 that included a large storm event. To represent the interaction between waves and currents, the vortex-force method was used. Model results were compared with water elevations, currents, and wave measurements obtained by the U.S. Army Corp of Engineers. In general, a good agreement between field data and computed results was achieved, although some discrepancies were also observed in regard to wave peak directions in the most upstream station. Several numerical experiments that considered different forcing terms were run in order to identify the effects of each wind, tide, and wave-current interaction process. Comparison of the horizontal momentum balances results identified that wave-breaking-induced acceleration is one of the leading terms in the inlet area. The enhancement of the apparent bed roughness caused by waves also affected the values and distribution of the bottom shear stress. The pressure gradient showed significant changes with respect to the pure tidal case. During storm conditions the momentum balance in the inlet shares the characteristics of tidal-dominated and wave-dominated surf zone environments. The changes in the momentum balance caused by waves were manifested both in water level and current variations. The most relevant effect on hydrodynamics was a wave-induced setup in the inner part of the estuary. Copyright 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  6. Structure of the airflow above surface waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckley, Marc; Veron, Fabrice

    2016-04-01

    Weather, climate and upper ocean patterns are controlled by the exchanges of momentum, heat, mass, and energy across the ocean surface. These fluxes are, in turn, influenced by the small-scale physics at the wavy air-sea interface. We present laboratory measurements of the fine-scale airflow structure above waves, achieved in over 15 different wind-wave conditions, with wave ages Cp/u* ranging from 1.4 to 66.7 (where Cp is the peak phase speed of the waves, and u* the air friction velocity). The experiments were performed in the large (42-m long) wind-wave-current tank at University of Delaware's Air-Sea Interaction laboratory (USA). A combined Particle Image Velocimetry and Laser Induced Fluorescence system was specifically developed for this study, and provided two-dimensional airflow velocity measurement as low as 100 um above the air-water interface. Starting at very low wind speeds (U10~2m/s), we directly observe coherent turbulent structures within the buffer and logarithmic layers of the airflow above the air-water interface, whereby low horizontal velocity air is ejected away from the surface, and higher velocity fluid is swept downward. Wave phase coherent quadrant analysis shows that such turbulent momentum flux events are wave-phase dependent. Airflow separation events are directly observed over young wind waves (Cp/u*<3.7) and counted using measured vorticity and surface viscous stress criteria. Detached high spanwise vorticity layers cause intense wave-coherent turbulence downwind of wave crests, as shown by wave-phase averaging of turbulent momentum fluxes. Mean wave-coherent airflow motions and fluxes also show strong phase-locked patterns, including a sheltering effect, upwind of wave crests over old mechanically generated swells (Cp/u*=31.7), and downwind of crests over young wind waves (Cp/u*=3.7). Over slightly older wind waves (Cp/u* = 6.5), the measured wave-induced airflow perturbations are qualitatively consistent with linear critical layer

  7. Calculating wave-generated bottom orbital velocities from surface-wave parameters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wiberg, P.L.; Sherwood, C.R.

    2008-01-01

    Near-bed wave orbital velocities and shear stresses are important parameters in many sediment-transport and hydrodynamic models of the coastal ocean, estuaries, and lakes. Simple methods for estimating bottom orbital velocities from surface-wave statistics such as significant wave height and peak period often are inaccurate except in very shallow water. This paper briefly reviews approaches for estimating wave-generated bottom orbital velocities from near-bed velocity data, surface-wave spectra, and surface-wave parameters; MATLAB code for each approach is provided. Aspects of this problem have been discussed elsewhere. We add to this work by providing a method for using a general form of the parametric surface-wave spectrum to estimate bottom orbital velocity from significant wave height and peak period, investigating effects of spectral shape on bottom orbital velocity, comparing methods for calculating bottom orbital velocity against values determined from near-bed velocity measurements at two sites on the US east and west coasts, and considering the optimal representation of bottom orbital velocity for calculations of near-bed processes. Bottom orbital velocities calculated using near-bed velocity data, measured wave spectra, and parametric spectra for a site on the northern California shelf and one in the mid-Atlantic Bight compare quite well and are relatively insensitive to spectral shape except when bimodal waves are present with maximum energy at the higher-frequency peak. These conditions, which are most likely to occur at times when bottom orbital velocities are small, can be identified with our method as cases where the measured wave statistics are inconsistent with Donelan's modified form of the Joint North Sea Wave Project (JONSWAP) spectrum. We define the 'effective' forcing for wave-driven, near-bed processes as the product of the magnitude of forcing times its probability of occurrence, and conclude that different bottom orbital velocity statistics

  8. Calculating wave-generated bottom orbital velocities from surface-wave parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiberg, Patricia L.; Sherwood, Christopher R.

    2008-10-01

    Near-bed wave orbital velocities and shear stresses are important parameters in many sediment-transport and hydrodynamic models of the coastal ocean, estuaries, and lakes. Simple methods for estimating bottom orbital velocities from surface-wave statistics such as significant wave height and peak period often are inaccurate except in very shallow water. This paper briefly reviews approaches for estimating wave-generated bottom orbital velocities from near-bed velocity data, surface-wave spectra, and surface-wave parameters; MATLAB code for each approach is provided. Aspects of this problem have been discussed elsewhere. We add to this work by providing a method for using a general form of the parametric surface-wave spectrum to estimate bottom orbital velocity from significant wave height and peak period, investigating effects of spectral shape on bottom orbital velocity, comparing methods for calculating bottom orbital velocity against values determined from near-bed velocity measurements at two sites on the US east and west coasts, and considering the optimal representation of bottom orbital velocity for calculations of near-bed processes. Bottom orbital velocities calculated using near-bed velocity data, measured wave spectra, and parametric spectra for a site on the northern California shelf and one in the mid-Atlantic Bight compare quite well and are relatively insensitive to spectral shape except when bimodal waves are present with maximum energy at the higher-frequency peak. These conditions, which are most likely to occur at times when bottom orbital velocities are small, can be identified with our method as cases where the measured wave statistics are inconsistent with Donelan's modified form of the Joint North Sea Wave Project (JONSWAP) spectrum. We define the "effective" forcing for wave-driven, near-bed processes as the product of the magnitude of forcing times its probability of occurrence, and conclude that different bottom orbital velocity statistics

  9. Direct Experimental Measurement of the Speed-Stress Relation for Dislocations in a Plasma Crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Nosenko, V.; Morfill, G. E.; Rosakis, P.

    2011-04-15

    The speed-stress relation for gliding edge dislocations was experimentally measured for the first time. The experimental system used, a two-dimensional plasma crystal, allowed observation of individual dislocations at the ''atomistic'' level and in real time. At low applied stress dislocations moved subsonically, at higher stress their speed abruptly increased to 1.9 times the speed of shear waves, then slowly grew with stress. There is evidence that immediately after nucleation dislocations can move faster than pressure waves.

  10. A Simple Wave Driver

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Temiz, Burak Kagan; Yavuz, Ahmet

    2015-01-01

    This study was done to develop a simple and inexpensive wave driver that can be used in experiments on string waves. The wave driver was made using a battery-operated toy car, and the apparatus can be used to produce string waves at a fixed frequency. The working principle of the apparatus is as follows: shortly after the car is turned on, the…

  11. Financial Rogue Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Zhen-Ya

    2010-11-01

    We analytically give the financial rogue waves in the nonlinear option pricing model due to Ivancevic, which is nonlinear wave alternative of the Black—Scholes model. These rogue wave solutions may he used to describe the possible physical mechanisms for rogue wave phenomenon in financial markets and related fields.

  12. Acoustic radiation stress in solids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantrell, John H.; Yost, William T.

    1986-01-01

    It is shown that the radiation-induced static strains associated with acoustic waves propagating in solids are obtained directly from the virial theorem for an elastic continuum and that the radiation stresses result from combining the virial theorem with the Boltzmann-Ehrenfest principle of adiabatic invariance. The experimental confirmation of critical theoretical predictions in solids is reported. The implications of the results for the fundamental thermal properties of crystals are addressed.

  13. Radio wave propagation and acoustic sounding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singal, S. P.

    Radio wave propagation of the decimetric and centimetric waves depends to a large extent on the boundary layer meteorological conditions which give rise to severe fadings, very often due to multipath propagation. Sodar is one of the inexpensive remote sensing techniques which can be employed to probe the boundary layer structure. In the paper a historical perspective has been given of the simultaneously conducted studies on radio waves and sodar at various places. The radio meteorological information needed for propagation studies has been clearly spelt out and conditions of a ray path especially in the presence of a ducting layer have been defined as giving rise to fading or signal enhancement conditions. Finally the potential of the sodar studies to obtain information about the boundary layer phenomena has been stressed, clearly spelling out the use of acoustic sounding in radio wave propagation studies.

  14. Holocaust survivors: three waves of resilience research.

    PubMed

    Greene, Roberta R; Hantman, Shira; Sharabi, Adi; Cohen, Harriet

    2012-01-01

    Three waves of resilience research have resulted in resilience-enhancing educational and therapeutic interventions. In the first wave of inquiry, researchers explored the traits and environmental characteristics that enabled people to overcome adversity. In the second wave, researchers investigated the processes related to stress and coping. In the third wave, studies examined how people grow and are transformed following adverse events, often leading to self-actualize, client creativity and spirituality. In this article the authors examined data from a study, "Forgiveness, Resiliency, and Survivorship among Holocaust Survivors" funded by the John Templeton Foundation ( Greene, Armour, Hantman, Graham, & Sharabi, 2010 ). About 65% of the survivors scored on the high side for resilience traits. Of the survivors, 78% engaged in processes considered resilient and felt they were transcendent or had engaged in behaviors that help them grow and change over the years since the Holocaust, including leaving a legacy and contributing to the community. PMID:23092377

  15. Quantum stress in chaotic billiards.

    PubMed

    Berggren, Karl-Fredrik; Maksimov, Dmitrii N; Sadreev, Almas F; Höhmann, Ruven; Kuhl, Ulrich; Stöckmann, Hans-Jürgen

    2008-06-01

    This paper reports on a joint theoretical and experimental study of the Pauli quantum-mechanical stress tensor T_{alphabeta}(x,y) for open two-dimensional chaotic billiards. In the case of a finite current flow through the system the interior wave function is expressed as psi=u+iv . With the assumption that u and v are Gaussian random fields we derive analytic expressions for the statistical distributions for the quantum stress tensor components T_{alphabeta} . The Gaussian random field model is tested for a Sinai billiard with two opposite leads by analyzing the scattering wave functions obtained numerically from the corresponding Schrödinger equation. Two-dimensional quantum billiards may be emulated from planar microwave analogs. Hence we report on microwave measurements for an open two-dimensional cavity and how the quantum stress tensor analog is extracted from the recorded electric field. The agreement with the theoretical predictions for the distributions for T_{alphabeta}(x,y) is quite satisfactory for small net currents. However, a distinct difference between experiments and theory is observed at higher net flow, which could be explained using a Gaussian random field, where the net current was taken into account by an additional plane wave with a preferential direction and amplitude. PMID:18643352

  16. Input-output characterization of fiber composites by SH waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Renneisen, John D.; Williams, James H., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Input-output characterization of fiber composites is studied theoretically by tracing SH waves in the media. A fiberglass epoxy composite is modeled as a homogeneous transversely isotropic continuum plate. The reflection of an SH wave at a stress-free plane boundary in a semi-infinite transversely isotropic medium is considered first. It is found that an incident SH wave reflects only a similar SH wave back into the medium. It is also established that the angle of reflection of the reflected wave is equal to the angle of incidence of the incident wave. The phase velocity of the SH waves and the delay time of the SH waves in reaching the receiving transducer are computed as functions of a reflection index, defined as the number of reflections of the SH waves from the bottom face of the continuum plate. The directivity function corresponding to the shear stress associated with the SH waves in the continuum plate is also derived as a function of the reflection index. A theoretical output voltage from the receiving transducer is calculated for a tone burst (a periodic input voltage of finite duration). The output voltage is shown for tone bursts of duration 60 microseconds and center frequencies of 0.75, 1.00, and 1.25 MHz. The study enhances the quantitative and qualitative understanding of the nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of fiber composites which can be modeled as transversely isotropic media.

  17. Gravity wave transmission diagram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomikawa, Yoshihiro

    2016-07-01

    A possibility of gravity wave propagation from a source region to the airglow layer around the mesopause has been discussed based on the gravity wave blocking diagram taking into account the critical level filtering alone. This paper proposes a new gravity wave transmission diagram in which both the critical level filtering and turning level reflection of gravity waves are considered. It shows a significantly different distribution of gravity wave transmissivity from the blocking diagram.

  18. Photoelectron wave function in photoionization: plane wave or Coulomb wave?

    PubMed

    Gozem, Samer; Gunina, Anastasia O; Ichino, Takatoshi; Osborn, David L; Stanton, John F; Krylov, Anna I

    2015-11-19

    The calculation of absolute total cross sections requires accurate wave functions of the photoelectron and of the initial and final states of the system. The essential information contained in the latter two can be condensed into a Dyson orbital. We employ correlated Dyson orbitals and test approximate treatments of the photoelectron wave function, that is, plane and Coulomb waves, by comparing computed and experimental photoionization and photodetachment spectra. We find that in anions, a plane wave treatment of the photoelectron provides a good description of photodetachment spectra. For photoionization of neutral atoms or molecules with one heavy atom, the photoelectron wave function must be treated as a Coulomb wave to account for the interaction of the photoelectron with the +1 charge of the ionized core. For larger molecules, the best agreement with experiment is often achieved by using a Coulomb wave with a partial (effective) charge smaller than unity. This likely derives from the fact that the effective charge at the centroid of the Dyson orbital, which serves as the origin of the spherical wave expansion, is smaller than the total charge of a polyatomic cation. The results suggest that accurate molecular photoionization cross sections can be computed with a modified central potential model that accounts for the nonspherical charge distribution of the core by adjusting the charge in the center of the expansion. PMID:26509428

  19. Shock wave-turbulent boundary layer interactions in transonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamson, T. C., Jr.; Messiter, A. F.

    1976-01-01

    The method of matched asymptotic expansions is used in analyzing the structure of the interaction region formed when a shock wave impinges on a turbulent flat plate boundary layer in transonic flow. Solutions in outer regions, governed by inviscid flow equations, lead to relations for the wall pressure distribution. Solutions in the inner regions, governed by equations in which Reynolds and/or viscous stresses are included, lead to a relation for the wall shear stress. Solutions for the wall pressure distribution are reviewed for both oblique and normal incoming shock waves. Solutions for the wall shear stress are discussed.

  20. Incidence of cavitation in the fragmentation process of extracorporeal shock wave lithotriptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rink, K.; Delacrétaz, G.; Pittomvils, G.; Boving, R.; Lafaut, J. P.

    1994-05-01

    The fragmentation mechanism occurring in extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) is investigated using a fiber optic stress sensing technique. With our technique, we demonstrate that cavitation is a major cause of fragmentation in ESWL procedures. When a target is placed in the operating area of the lithotriptor, two shock waves are detected. The first detected shock wave corresponds to the incoming shock wave generated by the lithotriptor. The second shock wave, detected some hundreds of microseconds later, is generated in situ. It results from the collapse of a cavitation bubble, formed by the reflection of the incoming shock wave at the target boundary. This cavitation induced shock wave generates the largest stress in the target area according to our stress sensing measurements.

  1. Stress-corrosion-induced property changes in aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bankston, B. F.; Clotfelter, W. N.

    1968-01-01

    Measurements of electrical conductivity, ultrasonic surface wave attenuation, and internal friction loss were made on aluminum alloys 7079-T6, 2219-T31, and 2219-T81 as a function of the onset of stress corrosion.

  2. Near-field tsunami edge waves and complex earthquake rupture

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Geist, Eric L.

    2013-01-01

    The effect of distributed coseismic slip on progressive, near-field edge waves is examined for continental shelf tsunamis. Detailed observations of edge waves are difficult to separate from the other tsunami phases that are observed on tide gauge records. In this study, analytic methods are used to compute tsunami edge waves distributed over a finite number of modes and for uniformly sloping bathymetry. Coseismic displacements from static elastic theory are introduced as initial conditions in calculating the evolution of progressive edge-waves. Both simple crack representations (constant stress drop) and stochastic slip models (heterogeneous stress drop) are tested on a fault with geometry similar to that of the M w = 8.8 2010 Chile earthquake. Crack-like ruptures that are beneath or that span the shoreline result in similar longshore patterns of maximum edge-wave amplitude. Ruptures located farther offshore result in reduced edge-wave excitation, consistent with previous studies. Introduction of stress-drop heterogeneity by way of stochastic slip models results in significantly more variability in longshore edge-wave patterns compared to crack-like ruptures for the same offshore source position. In some cases, regions of high slip that are spatially distinct will yield sub-events, in terms of tsunami generation. Constructive interference of both non-trapped and trapped waves can yield significantly larger tsunamis than those that produced by simple earthquake characterizations.

  3. A Coupled Wave-Current-Sediment model for Skagit Bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowles, G. W.; Holmes, E. M.; Ralston, D. K.

    2010-12-01

    Along with tidal currents, waves provide a dominant forcing mechanism for sediment transport on many tidal flats. In semi-enclosed regions such as Skagit Bay, Washington, the wave action is due mainly to local wind forcing that occurs over seasonal and event scales. Due to the limited fetch, variations in along-flat wave characteristics can drive gradients in the wave-induced bottom stress and resulting sediment transport. In this work, we use an unstructured grid, coupled wave-current-sediment model to study the influence of wave-induced near bottom stresses in the presence of tidal currents on the sediment transport within the Skagit River delta and Skagit Bay. The coupled model consists of three primary components: the Finite Volume Coastal Ocean Model (FVCOM) for hydrodynamics, the unstructured grid model SWAN to compute the phase-averaged wave field, and the Community Sediment Transport Modeling System. Model sensitivities to the choice of coupling and bottom boundary layer formulations are examined. Results from process oriented simulations will be presented. The process studies use a realistic domain with controlled forcing conditions to quantify the influence of wave-induced bed stresses on the sediment dynamics in Skagit Bay.

  4. Nonlinear wave propagation in constrained solids subjected to thermal loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nucera, Claudio; Lanza di Scalea, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    The classical mathematical treatment governing nonlinear wave propagation in solids relies on finite strain theory. In this scenario, a system of nonlinear partial differential equations can be derived to mathematically describe nonlinear phenomena such as acoustoelasticity (wave speed dependency on quasi-static stress), wave interaction, wave distortion, and higher-harmonic generation. The present work expands the topic of nonlinear wave propagation to the case of a constrained solid subjected to thermal loads. The origin of nonlinear effects in this case is explained on the basis of the anharmonicity of interatomic potentials, and the absorption of the potential energy corresponding to the (prevented) thermal expansion. Such "residual" energy is, at least, cubic as a function of strain, hence leading to a nonlinear wave equation and higher-harmonic generation. Closed-form solutions are given for the longitudinal wave speed and the second-harmonic nonlinear parameter as a function of interatomic potential parameters and temperature increase. The model predicts a decrease in longitudinal wave speed and a corresponding increase in nonlinear parameter with increasing temperature, as a result of the thermal stresses caused by the prevented thermal expansion of the solid. Experimental measurements of the ultrasonic nonlinear parameter on a steel block under constrained thermal expansion confirm this trend. These results suggest the potential of a nonlinear ultrasonic measurement to quantify thermal stresses from prevented thermal expansion. This knowledge can be extremely useful to prevent thermal buckling of various structures, such as continuous-welded rails in hot weather.

  5. Shear wave logging using guided waves

    SciTech Connect

    Winbow, G.A.; Chen, S.T.; Rice, J.A.

    1988-09-27

    This patent describes a method for acoustically logging an earth formation surrounding a borehole which contains a liquid where the approximate shear wave velocity v of the formation is known. The method consists of: vibrating a dipole source in the liquid to generate in the liquid a guided wave the frequencies of which include a critical frequency f given by zeta = ..nu..12a where a is the borehole radius, so that the fastest component of the guided wave has velocity substantially equal to ..nu..; and detecting the arrival of the fastest component of the guided wave at least one location in the liquid spaced longitudinally along the borehole from the dipole source.

  6. Experimental Measurement of In Situ Stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tibbo, Maria; Milkereit, Bernd; Nasseri, Farzine; Schmitt, Douglas; Young, Paul

    2016-04-01

    The World Stress Map data is determined by stress indicators including earthquake focal mechanisms, in situ measurement in mining, oil and gas boreholes as well as the borehole cores, and geologic data. Unfortunately, these measurements are not only infrequent but sometimes infeasible, and do not provide nearly enough data points with high accuracy to correctly infer stress fields in deep mines around the world. Improvements in stress measurements of Earth's crust is fundamental to several industries such as oil and gas, mining, nuclear waste management, and enhanced geothermal systems. Quantifying the state of stress and the geophysical properties of different rock types is a major complication in geophysical monitoring of deep mines. Most stress measurement techniques involve either the boreholes or their cores, however these measurements usually only give stress along one axis, not the complete stress tensor. The goal of this project is to investigate a new method of acquiring a complete stress tensor of the in situ stress in the Earth's crust. This project is part of a comprehensive, exploration geophysical study in a deep, highly stressed mine located in Sudbury, Ontario, Canada, and focuses on two boreholes located in this mine. These boreholes are approximately 400 m long with NQ diameters and are located at depths of about 1300 - 1600 m and 1700 - 2000 m. Two borehole logging surveys were performed on both boreholes, October 2013 and July 2015, in order to perform a time-lapse analysis of the geophysical changes in the mine. These multi-parameter surveys include caliper, full waveform sonic, televiewer, chargeability (IP), and resistivity. Laboratory experiments have been performed on borehole core samples of varying geologies from each borehole. These experiments have measured the geophysical properties including elastic modulus, bulk modulus, P- and S-wave velocities, and density. The apparatus' used for this project are geophysical imaging cells capable

  7. Influence of a superficial field of residual stress on the propagation of surface waves—Applied to the estimation of the depth of the superficial stressed zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duquennoy, Marc; Ouaftouh, Mohammadi; Deboucq, Julien; Lefebvre, Jean-Etienne; Jenot, Frédéric; Ourak, Mohamed

    2012-12-01

    In this study, we were interested in the dispersion of surface waves caused by the presence of a micrometric field of residual stress on the surface of an amorphous medium. We have shown that in relation to surface waves, a stressed structure like this is comparable to a layer on substrate type structure. The design and implementation of SAW-IDT MEMS sensors enabled quasi-monochromatic Rayleigh-type surface waves to be generated and the dispersion phenomenon to be studied over a wide range of frequencies for different superficial fields of residual stress. The thicknesses of the stressed cortical zones were estimated with good accuracy using an inverse method.

  8. Magneto-atmospheric waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, J. H.

    1983-01-01

    A theoretical treatment of magneto-atmospheric waves is presented and applied to the modelling of waves in the solar atmosphere. The waves arise in compressible, stratified, electrically conductive atmospheres within gravitational fields when permeated by a magnetic field. Compression, buoyancy, and distortion of the magnetic field all contribute to the existence of the waves. Basic linearized equations are introduced to describe the waves and attention is given to plane-stratified atmospheres and their stability. A dispersion relation is defined for wave propagation in a plane-stratified atmosphere when there are no plane-wave solutions. Solutions are found for the full wave equation in the presence of either a vertical or a horizontal magnetic field. The theory is applied to describing waves in sunspots, in penumbrae, and flare-induced coronal disturbances.

  9. ULF Waves at Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, E.-H.; Boardsen, S. A.; Johnson, J. R.; Slavin, J. A.

    2016-02-01

    This chapter provides a brief overview of the observed characteristics of ultra-low-frequency (ULF) waves at Mercury. It shows how field-aligned propagating ULF waves at Mercury can be generated by externally driven fast compressional waves (FWs) via mode conversion at the ion-ion hybrid resonance. Then, the chapter reviews the interpretation that the strong magnetic compressional waves near and its harmonics observed with 20 of Mercury's magnetic equator could be the ion Bernstein wave (IBW) mode. A recent statistical study of ULF waves at Mercury based on MESSENGER data reported the occurrence and polarization of the detected waves. The chapter further introduces the field line resonance and the electromagnetic ion Bernstein waves to explain such waves, and shows that both theories can partially explain the observations.

  10. Fracture channel waves

    SciTech Connect

    Nihei, K.T.; Yi, W.; Myer, L.R.; Cook, N.G.; Schoenberg, M.

    1999-03-01

    The properties of guided waves which propagate between two parallel fractures are examined. Plane wave analysis is used to obtain a dispersion equation for the velocities of fracture channel waves. Analysis of this equation demonstrates that parallel fractures form an elastic waveguide that supports two symmetric and two antisymmetric dispersive Rayleigh channel waves, each with particle motions and velocities that are sensitive to the normal and tangential stiffnesses of the fractures. These fracture channel waves degenerate to shear waves when the fracture stiffnesses are large, to Rayleigh waves and Rayleigh-Lamb plate waves when the fracture stiffnesses are low, and to fracture interface waves when the fractures are either very closely spaced or widely separated. For intermediate fracture stiffnesses typical of fractured rock masses, fracture channel waves are dispersive and exhibit moderate to strong localization of guided wave energy between the fractures. The existence of these waves is examined using laboratory acoustic measurements on a fractured marble plate. This experiment confirms the distinct particle motion of the fundamental antisymmetric fracture channel wave (A{sub 0} mode) and demonstrates the ease with which a fracture channel wave can be generated and detected. {copyright} 1999 American Geophysical Union

  11. Constitutive modeling for blast-induced wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drumm, E. C.

    1985-03-01

    The description of stress-time history acting on a buried structure is a major source of error in the analysis of underground structures to weapons loadings. The stress wave propagating spherically from the weapon is attenuated as it travels from the source. This attenuation is a function of the inelastic response of the soil, and results in an increase in the loading rise time or decrease in the loading rate. Since the inelastic soil response is a function of the loading rate, a wave propagation analysis should be conducted to determine the stresses on the structure. At the interface between the soil and structure, the stress is modified further by soil-structure interaction effects. Thus, the stress on the structure is a function of both the structural and soil properties as well as the distance traveled by the stress wave. These related phenomena can be included in a numerical analysis, but the accuracy depends on the constitutive representation of the materials. One-dimensional wave propagation experiments and impact tests with various soils are reviewed, and the attenuation as a function of the soil stress-strain response is discussed.

  12. Experimental study of the acoustoelastic Lamb wave in thin plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, Ning; Bond, Leonard J.

    2016-02-01

    Many factors can cause residual stresses in industry, like rolling, welding and coating. Residual stresses can have both benefits and shortcomings on components, so it is important to find the residual stresses out and enhance its benefits part and get rid of its harmful part. There are many methods for residual stresses detection and ultrasonic method turns out to be a good one for it is nondestructive, relative cheap and portable. The critically refracted longitudinal (LCR) wave is widely used for it is regarded most sensitive to stress and less sensitive to texture which can influence detection results. Ultrasonic methods for residual stresses detection are based on time of flight (TOF) measurement, but because the measurement should reach nanosecond to show stress change, there are many other factors that can influence TOF, like temperature, texture of the components and even the thickness of the couplant. So increasing the TOF's sensitivity to stress is very important. In this paper the relationships between velocity and frequency are studied experimentally[6] for different Lamb modes, under various stress loadings. The result shows that the sensitivity of different modes various a lot, the A1 mode is the most sensitivity, compared to S0, S1 and A0 modes; if the force is added to 100 MPa, the change stress of A1 mode can be as large to 80 m/s, which is about 10 times more sensitive than the traditional bulk wave. This makes it as a good choice for residual stress detection.

  13. The Chlamydomonas heat stress response.

    PubMed

    Schroda, Michael; Hemme, Dorothea; Mühlhaus, Timo

    2015-05-01

    Heat waves occurring at increased frequency as a consequence of global warming jeopardize crop yield safety. One way to encounter this problem is to genetically engineer crop plants toward increased thermotolerance. To identify entry points for genetic engineering, a thorough understanding of how plant cells perceive heat stress and respond to it is required. Using the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii as a model system to study the fundamental mechanisms of the plant heat stress response has several advantages. Most prominent among them is the suitability of Chlamydomonas for studying stress responses system-wide and in a time-resolved manner under controlled conditions. Here we review current knowledge on how heat is sensed and signaled to trigger temporally and functionally grouped sub-responses termed response elements to prevent damage and to maintain cellular homeostasis in plant cells. PMID:25754362

  14. Triggering of earthquake aftershocks by dynamic stresses.

    PubMed

    Kilb, D; Gomberg, J; Bodin, P

    2000-11-30

    It is thought that small 'static' stress changes due to permanent fault displacement can alter the likelihood of, or trigger, earthquakes on nearby faults. Many studies of triggering in the near-field, particularly of aftershocks, rely on these static changes as the triggering agent and consider them only in terms of equivalent changes in the applied load on the fault. Here we report a comparison of the aftershock pattern of the moment magnitude Mw = 7.3 Landers earthquake, not only with static stress changes but also with transient, oscillatory stress changes transmitted as seismic waves (that is, 'dynamic' stresses). Dynamic stresses do not permanently change the applied load and thus can trigger earthquakes only by altering the mechanical state or properties of the fault zone. These dynamically weakened faults may fail after the seismic waves have passed by, and might even cause earthquakes that would not otherwise have occurred. We find similar asymmetries in the aftershock and dynamic stress patterns, the latter being due to rupture propagation, whereas the static stress changes lack this asymmetry. Previous studies have shown that dynamic stresses can promote failure at remote distances, but here we show that they can also do so nearby. PMID:11117741

  15. Waves in stratified geomaterials with sliding layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasternak, Elena; Dyskin, Arcady

    2016-04-01

    Wave propagation in stratified geomaterials with sliding layers is strongly anisotropic. The simplest representation of this behaviour is an elastic transverse-isotropic (orthotropic in 2D) continuum. Such a model is however only applicable when loading that is sufficiently uniform or when the wavelength is much larger than the layer thickness. In this case the stress non-uniformity over the layer thickness and the associated layer bending can be neglected. In an intermediate case when the wavelength is still higher than the layer thickness but not as high to neglect the stress non-uniformity at least bending moments and layer bending need to be taken into account. This is equivalent to retaining only the linear term of the normal stress variation over the layer thickness. The layer bending creates additional, rotational degrees of freedom. In 2D only one rotational degree of freedom exists, which considerably simplifies the modelling. The corresponding rotation is represented by the average gradient of layer deflection. The presence of rotations makes the stress tensor non-symmetrical. On top of that the rotation gradient creates moment stresses, which represent bending moments over the unit area in the layer cross-section. This requires the use of a 2D orthotropic Cosserat continuum to model the dynamics of such a stratified geomaterial. We show that in the stratified geomaterial shear-bending waves propagate. We determine the wave velocities and demonstrate that as the resistance to sliding reduces, the waves tend to localise over a line normal to the layering.

  16. Wood Bond Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    A joint development program between Hartford Steam Boiler Inspection Technologies and The Weyerhaeuser Company resulted in an internal bond analyzer (IBA), a device which combines ultrasonics with acoustic emission testing techniques. It is actually a spinoff from a spinoff, stemming from a NASA Lewis invented acousto-ultrasonic technique that became a system for testing bond strength of composite materials. Hartford's parent company, Acoustic Emission Technology Corporation (AET) refined and commercialized the technology. The IBA builds on the original system and incorporates on-line process control systems. The IBA determines bond strength by measuring changes in pulsar ultrasonic waves injected into a board. Analysis of the wave determines the average internal bond strength for the panel. Results are displayed immediately. Using the system, a mill operator can adjust resin/wood proportion, reduce setup time and waste, produce internal bonds of a consistent quality and automatically mark deficient products.

  17. Effect of stress on ultrasonic pulses in fiber reinforced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemann, J. H.; Baaklini, G. Y.

    1986-01-01

    An acoustical-ultrasonic technique was used to demonstrate relationships existing between changes in attenuation of stress waves and tensile stress on an eight ply 0 degree graphite-epoxy fiber reinforced composite. All tests were conducted in the linear range of the material for which no mechanical or macroscopic damage was evident. Changes in attenuation were measured as a function of tensile stress in the frequency domain and in the time domain. Stress wave propagation in these specimens was dispersive, i.e., the wave speed depends on frequency. Wave speeds varied from 267,400 cm/sec to 680,000 cm/sec as the frequency of the signal was varied from 150 kHz to 1.9 MHz which strongly suggests that flexural/lamb wave modes of propagation exist. The magnitude of the attenuation changes depended strongly on tensile stress. It was further observed that the wave speeds increased slightly for all tested frequencies as the stress was increased.

  18. Alongshore momentum transfer to the nearshore zone from energetic ocean waves generated by passing hurricanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulligan, Ryan P.; Hanson, Jeffrey L.

    2016-06-01

    Wave and current measurements from a cross-shore array of nearshore sensors in Duck, NC, are used to elucidate the balance of alongshore momentum under energetic wave conditions with wide surf zones, generated by passing hurricanes that are close to and far from to the coast. The observations indicate that a distant storm (Hurricane Bill, 2009) with large waves has low variability in directional wave characteristics resulting in alongshore currents that are driven mainly by the changes in wave energy. A storm close to the coast (Hurricane Earl, 2010), with strong local wind stress and combined sea and swell components in wave energy spectra, has high variability in wave direction and wave period that influence wave breaking and nearshore circulation as the storm passes. During both large wave events, the horizontal current shear is strong and radiation stress gradients, bottom stress, wind stress, horizontal mixing, and cross-shore advection contribute to alongshore momentum at different spatial locations across the nearshore region. Horizontal mixing during Hurricane Earl, estimated from rotational velocities, was particularly strong suggesting that intense eddies were generated by the high horizontal shear from opposing wind-driven and wave-driven currents. The results provide insight into the cross-shore distribution of the alongshore current and the connection between flows inside and outside the surf zone during major storms, indicating that the current shear and mixing at the interface between the surf zone and shallow inner shelf is strongly dependent on the distance from the storm center to the coast.

  19. Dust-Acoustic Waves: Visible Sound Waves

    SciTech Connect

    Merlino, Robert L.

    2009-11-10

    A historical overview of some of the early theoretical and experimental work on dust acoustic waves is given. The basic physics of the dust acoustic wave and some of the theoretical refinements that have been made, including the effects of collisions, plasma absorption, dust charge fluctuations, particle drifts and strong coupling effects are discussed. Some recent experimental findings and outstanding problems are also presented.

  20. Solitary Wave in One-dimensional Buckyball System at Nanoscale

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jun; Zheng, Bowen; Liu, Yilun

    2016-01-01

    We have studied the stress wave propagation in one-dimensional (1-D) nanoscopic buckyball (C60) system by molecular dynamics (MD) simulation and quantitative modeling. Simulation results have shown that solitary waves are generated and propagating in the buckyball system through impacting one buckyball at one end of the buckyball chain. We have found the solitary wave behaviors are closely dependent on the initial temperature and impacting speed of the buckyball chain. There are almost no dispersion and dissipation of the solitary waves (stationary solitary wave) for relatively low temperature and high impacting speed. While for relatively high temperature and low impacting speed the profile of the solitary waves is highly distorted and dissipated after propagating several tens of buckyballs. A phase diagram is proposed to describe the effect of the temperature and impacting speed on the solitary wave behaviors in buckyball system. In order to quantitatively describe the wave behavior in buckyball system, a simple nonlinear-spring model is established, which can describe the MD simulation results at low temperature very well. The results presented in this work may lay a solid step towards the further understanding and manipulation of stress wave propagation and impact energy mitigation at nanoscale. PMID:26891624

  1. Solitary Wave in One-dimensional Buckyball System at Nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jun; Zheng, Bowen; Liu, Yilun

    2016-01-01

    We have studied the stress wave propagation in one-dimensional (1-D) nanoscopic buckyball (C60) system by molecular dynamics (MD) simulation and quantitative modeling. Simulation results have shown that solitary waves are generated and propagating in the buckyball system through impacting one buckyball at one end of the buckyball chain. We have found the solitary wave behaviors are closely dependent on the initial temperature and impacting speed of the buckyball chain. There are almost no dispersion and dissipation of the solitary waves (stationary solitary wave) for relatively low temperature and high impacting speed. While for relatively high temperature and low impacting speed the profile of the solitary waves is highly distorted and dissipated after propagating several tens of buckyballs. A phase diagram is proposed to describe the effect of the temperature and impacting speed on the solitary wave behaviors in buckyball system. In order to quantitatively describe the wave behavior in buckyball system, a simple nonlinear-spring model is established, which can describe the MD simulation results at low temperature very well. The results presented in this work may lay a solid step towards the further understanding and manipulation of stress wave propagation and impact energy mitigation at nanoscale. PMID:26891624

  2. Simulation of storm surge, wave, currents, and inundation in the Outer Banks and Chesapeake Bay during Hurricane Isabel in 2003: The importance of waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, Y. Peter; Alymov, Vadim; Paramygin, Vladimir A.

    2010-04-01

    This paper investigates the effects of waves on storm surge, currents, and inundation in the Outer Banks and Chesapeake Bay during Hurricane Isabel in 2003 through detailed comparison between observed wind, wave, surge, and inundation data and results from an integrated storm surge modeling system, CH3D-SSMS. CH3D-SSMS, which includes coupled coastal and basin-scale storm surge and wave models, successfully simulated measured winds, waves, storm surge, currents, and inundation during Isabel. Comprehensive modeling and data analysis revealed noticeable effects of waves on storm surge, currents, and inundation. Among the processes that represent wave effects, radiation stress (outside the estuaries) and wave-induced stress (outside and inside the estuaries) are more important than wave-induced bottom stress in affecting the water level. Maximum surge was 3 m, while maximum wave height was 20 m offshore and 2.5 m inside the Chesapeake Bay, where the maximum wave-induced water level reached 1 m. Significant waves reached 3.5 m and 16 s at Duck Pier, North Carolina, and 1.6 m and 5 s at Gloucester, Virginia. At Duck, wave effects accounted for ˜36 cm or 20% of the peak surge elevation of 1.71 m. Inside the Chesapeake Bay, wave effects account for 5-10% of observed peak surge level. A two-layer flow is found at Kitty Hawk, North Carolina, during the peak of storm surge owing to the combined effects of wind and wave breaking. Higher surge elevations result when the 3-D surge model, instead of the 2-D surge model, is coupled with the 2-D wave model owing to its relatively lower bottom friction. Wave heights obtained with 3- and 2-D surge models show little difference.

  3. Wave Meteorology and Soaring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiley, Scott

    2008-01-01

    This viewgraph document reviews some mountain wave turbulence and operational hazards while soaring. Maps, photographs, and satellite images of the meteorological phenomena are included. Additionally, photographs of aircraft that sustained mountain wave damage are provided.

  4. Cold wave lotion poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002693.htm Cold wave lotion poisoning To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Cold wave lotion is a hair care product used ...

  5. Detonation Wave Profile

    SciTech Connect

    Menikoff, Ralph

    2015-12-14

    The Zel’dovich-von Neumann-Doering (ZND) profile of a detonation wave is derived. Two basic assumptions are required: i. An equation of state (EOS) for a partly burned explosive; P(V, e, λ). ii. A burn rate for the reaction progress variable; d/dt λ = R(V, e, λ). For a steady planar detonation wave the reactive flow PDEs can be reduced to ODEs. The detonation wave profile can be determined from an ODE plus algebraic equations for points on the partly burned detonation loci with a specified wave speed. Furthermore, for the CJ detonation speed the end of the reaction zone is sonic. A solution to the reactive flow equations can be constructed with a rarefaction wave following the detonation wave profile. This corresponds to an underdriven detonation wave, and the rarefaction is know as a Taylor wave.

  6. Laboratory study of the wind structure over surface waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckley, Marc; Veron, Fabrice

    2011-11-01

    Airflow dynamics above waves strongly influence exchanges of heat, momentum and mass between the Ocean and the Atmosphere. We present experimental results on the detailed structure of the airflow above waves. The experiments took place at University of Delaware's large (42m long, 1m wide, and 1.25m high) wind-wave facility where a variety of winds, wave ages and steepnesses were generated by a wind-tunnel and a mechanical wave generator. Airflow properties within and above the viscous sublayer were obtained using PIV, while wave profiles and spectra were measured by laser-induced fluorescence. We intermittently observe a separation of the viscous sublayer past the wave crest in certain wind-wave conditions. Despite the intermittent aspect of this sheltering effect, when averaged over all wave phases, our results suggest that there is a substantial along-wave variability of the surface viscous tangential stress, which in turn may affect wave growth and the air-water momentum balance.

  7. Wave dynamics of a Pacific Atoll with high frictional effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Justin S.; Monismith, Stephen G.; Koweek, David A.; Dunbar, Robert B.

    2016-01-01

    We report field measurements of waves and currents made from September 2011 to July 2014 on Palmyra Atoll in the central Pacific that were used in conjunction with the SWAN wave model to characterize the wave dynamics operant on the atoll. Our results indicate that wave energy is primarily from the north during the northern hemisphere winter and from the south in the northern hemisphere summer. Refraction of waves along the reef terraces due to variations in bathymetry leads to focusing of waves in specific locations. Bottom friction, modeled with a modified bottom roughness formulation, is the significant source of wave energy dissipation on the atoll, a result that is consistent with available observations of wave damping on Palmyra. Indeed modeled wave dissipation rates from bottom friction are on average larger than dissipation rates due to breaking and are an order of magnitude larger than what has been observed on other, less geometrically complex reefs, a result which should be corroborated with future in situ measurements. The SWAN wave model with a modified bottom friction formulation better predicts bulk wave energy properties than the existing formulation at our measurement stations. The near bed squared velocity, a proxy for bottom stress, shows strong spatial variability across the atoll and exerts control over geomorphic structure and benthic community composition.

  8. Analysis of Blast Wave Interaction with a Rock Joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jianchun; Ma, Guowei

    2010-11-01

    The interaction between rock joints and blast waves is crucial in rock engineering when rock mass is suffered from artificial or accidental explosions, bursts or weapon attacks. Based on the conservation of momentum at the wave fronts and the displacement discontinuity method, quantitative analysis for the interaction between obliquely incident P- or S-blast wave and a linear elastic rock joint is carried out in the present study, so as to deduce a wave propagation equation. For some special cases, such as normal or tangential incidence, rigid or weak joint, the analytical solution of the stress wave interaction with a rock joint is obtained by simplifying the wave propagation equation. By verification, it is found that the transmission and reflection coefficients from the wave propagation equation agree very well with the existing results. Parametric studies are then conducted to evaluate the effects of the joint stiffness and incident waves on wave transmission and reflection. The wave propagation equation derived in the present study can be straightforwardly extended for different incident waveforms and nonlinear rock joints to calculate the transmitted and reflected waves without mathematical methods such as the Fourier and inverse Fourier transforms.

  9. Oceanic wave measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, J. F.; Miles, R. T. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    An oceanic wave measured system is disclosed wherein wave height is sensed by a barometer mounted on a buoy. The distance between the trough and crest of a wave is monitored by sequentially detecting positive and negative peaks of the output of the barometer and by combining (adding) each set of two successive half cycle peaks. The timing of this measurement is achieved by detecting the period of a half cycle of wave motion.

  10. Waves of Hanta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramson, Guillermo

    2003-03-01

    A spatially extended model of the hantavirus infection in deer mice is analyzed. Traveling waves solutions of the infected and susceptible populations are studied in different regimes, controlled by an environmental parameter. The wave of infection is shown to lag behind the wave of susceptible population, and the delay between the two is analyzed numerically and through a piecewise linearization.

  11. An experimental investigation of wave propagation in fractured brittle material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Bibhuti Bhusan

    An experimental method for visualizing and analyzing the propagation of plate stress waves in a brittle plate is developed. A procedure has been developed to cast Break-Away glass (a low molecular weight polystyrene material) plate specimens in an open mold. The specimens are loaded with short duration (200 [...]s) stress pulses on one edge by an electromagnetic stress wave generator. The propagating stress waves generate out-of-plane deformations on the specimen surface, which are observed using Twyman-Green interferometry. The fringe patterns created by the propagating stress waves are captured using a high speed camera - pulsing laser combination at 4[...]s intervals.A generalized "Fringe Analysis Procedure" is developed to subtract the reference interferogram from the subsequent interferograms. The "Fringe Analysis Procedure" employs a fringe edge detection algorithm to obtain the sharp edge lines of the fringes in an interferogram. A digitizer is used to extract points on these edge lines and assign them fringe numbers. The "griddata" option in the commercial software "Matlab" is utilized to interpolate the deformation field on to the nodes of a uniform grid. The field values at these nodes in the reference image are then subtracted from corresponding values in the subsequent images to obtain the actual deformation patterns generated by the propagating stress waves. The "Fringe Analysis Procedure" has eliminated the subjective element introduced by human judgment in manual fringe tracing procedures.The developed experimental method and the image analysis technique is used to investigate the propagation of stress waves in Break-Away glass plate specimens.

  12. Seismic Wave Propagation Along Fracture Intersections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abell, B.; Pyrak-Nolte, L. J.; Knobloch, J.

    2012-12-01

    Past research has shown that fractures support guided-modes such as coupled Rayleigh waves as well as confined modes such as Love waves and leaky-mode compressional waves. We demonstrated experimentally that fracture intersections support a mode that is similar to interface waves but propagates at speeds below the Rayleigh wave for low applied load. In this experimental study, we demonstrated that at low stress, fracture intersections support highly-localized wedge waves whose existence depends on stress and source-receiver polarization. Wedge waves (W.W.) were propagated along the orthogonal edge of aluminum samples. The sample measured 100 x 150 x 150 mm and was machined with two orthogonal fractures, intersecting at the center, such that four independent pieces of aluminum could be measured independently or pieced together. Seismic measurements were performed for two cases: (1) two right angle blocks in contact to examine the stress dependence of two corners in contact and (2) four right angle blocks in contact to study the behavior of four intersecting corners in contact. Seismic transducers with a central frequency of 1MHz were used to propagate shear (S) waves along the corners of the blocks that form an intersection, along the fractures and through the bulk. Measurements were made with the shear transducers polarized at 0, 45, 90 and 135 deg. to the direction of loading for a range (0 to 66 kN) of applied normal loads. When only two blocks were in contact, a W.W. was observed traveling at speeds between 2650 m/s and 3000 m/s. This is below the Rayleigh speed (2830 m/s) for low stress. As the applied load was increased, the wave speed increased, indicating a change in the local stiffness. Although an increase in speed was observed for both polarizations, the measured speed was lower for 135 deg. polarization indicating that the local stiffness of the top wedge was dramatically different than the bottom aluminum block. All four blocks were also examined under

  13. Nondestructive Evaluation Approaches Developed for Material Characterization in Aeronautics and Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baaklini, George Y.; Kautz, Harold E.; Gyekenyesi, Andrew L.; Abdul-Aziz, Ali; Martin, Richard E.

    2001-01-01

    At the NASA Glenn Research Center, nondestructive evaluation (NDE) approaches were developed or tailored for characterizing advanced material systems. The emphasis was on high-temperature aerospace propulsion applications. The material systems included monolithic ceramics, superalloys, and high-temperature composites. In the aeronautics area, the major applications were cooled ceramic plate structures for turbine applications, gamma-TiAl blade materials for low-pressure turbines, thermoelastic stress analysis for residual stress measurements in titanium-based and nickel-based engine materials, and acousto-ultrasonics for creep damage assessment in nickel-based alloys. In the space area, applications consisted of cooled carbon-carbon composites for gas generator combustors and flywheel rotors composed of carbon-fiber-reinforced polymer matrix composites for energy storage on the International Space Station.

  14. Extreme Wave Impact on a Flexible Plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, Aliza; Techet, Alexandra

    2015-11-01

    Digital image correlation (DIC) and particle image velocimetry (PIV) are combined to characterize the flow-structure interaction of a breaking wave impacting a flexible vertically mounted plate. DIC is used with the beam bending equation to determine the stresses on the plate and PIV is used to describe the flow of the wave. In this experiment, a simulated dam break in which water is rapidly released from a reservoir generates the wave, which impinges on a cantilevered stainless steel plate downstream. Pressure sensors mounted on the plate are used to gather further information about the forces acting on it. A series of waves of different heights and breaking locations are tested, controlled by the volume of water in the tank and the volume of water in the dam break reservoir. The deflection of the plate varies depending on the point of breaking and the height of the wave. These results shed light on the effect of breaking wave impacts on offshore structures and ship hulls.

  15. Flow separation and resuspension beneath shoaling nonlinear internal waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boegman, Leon; Ivey, Gregory N.

    2009-02-01

    Laboratory observations are presented showing the structure and dynamics of the turbulent bottom boundary layer beneath nonlinear internal waves (NLIWs) of depression shoaling upon sloping topography. The adverse pressure gradient beneath the shoaling waves causes the rear face to steepen, flow separation to occur, and wave-induced near-bottom vortices to suspend bed material. The resuspension is directly attributed to the near-bed viscous stress and to near-bed patches of elevated positive Reynolds stress generated by the vortical structures. These results are consistent with published field observations of resuspension events beneath shoaling NLIWs. Elevated near-bed viscous stresses are found throughout the domain at locations that are not correlated to the resuspension events. Near-bed viscous stress is thus required for incipient sediment motion but is not necessarily a precursor for resuspension. Resuspension is dependent on the vertical velocity field associated with positive Reynolds stress and is also found to occur where the mean (wave-averaged) vertical velocity is directed away from the bed. The results are interpreted by analogy to the eddy-stress and turbulent bursting resuspension models developed for turbulent channel flows.

  16. Wave turbulence in annular wave tank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onorato, Miguel; Stramignoni, Ettore

    2014-05-01

    We perform experiments in an annular wind wave tank at the Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita' di Torino. The external diameter of the tank is 5 meters while the internal one is 1 meter. The tank is equipped by two air fans which can lead to a wind of maximum 5 m/s. The present set up is capable of studying the generation of waves and the development of wind wave spectra for large duration. We have performed different tests including different wind speeds. For large wind speed we observe the formation of spectra consistent with Kolmogorv-Zakharov predictions.

  17. Detectors of gravitational waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pizzella, G.

    Gravitational waves Motion of test bodies in a g.w. field Energy carried by gravitational waves Gravitational-wave sources Spinning star Double-star systems Fall into a Schwarzschild black hole Radiation from gravitational collapse Gravitational-wave detectors The nonresonant detectors The resonant detectors Electromechnical transducers Piezoelectric ceramic The capacitor The inductor Data analysis The Brownian noise The back-action The wide-band noise, data analysis and optimization The resonant transducer The Wiener-Kolmogoroff filter The cross-section and the effective temperature The antenna bandwidth The gravitational-wave experiments in the world The laser interferometers The resonant detectors

  18. Effects of obliquely opposing and following currents on wave propagation in a new 3D wave-current basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lieske, Mike; Schlurmann, Torsten

    2016-04-01

    INTRODUCTION & MOTIVATION The design of structures in coastal and offshore areas and their maintenance are key components of coastal protection. Usually, assessments of processes and loads on coastal structures are derived from experiments with flow and wave parameters in separate physical models. However, Peregrin (1976) already points out that processes in natural shallow coastal waters flow and sea state processes do not occur separately, but influence each other nonlinearly. Kemp & Simons (1982) perform 2D laboratory tests and study the interactions between a turbulent flow and following waves. They highlight the significance of wave-induced changes in the current properties, especially in the mean flow profiles, and draw attention to turbulent fluctuations and bottom shear stresses. Kemp & Simons (1983) also study these processes and features with opposing waves. Studies on the wave-current interaction in three-dimensional space for a certain wave height, wave period and water depth were conducted by MacIver et al. (2006). The research focus is set on the investigation of long-crested waves on obliquely opposing and following currents in the new 3D wave-current basin. METHODOLOGY In a first step the flow analysis without waves is carried out and includes measurements of flow profiles in the sweet spot of the basin at predefined measurement positions. Five measuring points in the water column have been delineated in different water depths in order to obtain vertical flow profiles. For the characterization of the undisturbed flow properties in the basin, an uniformly distributed flow was generated in the wave basin. In the second step wave analysis without current, the unidirectional wave propagation and wave height were investigated for long-crested waves in intermediate wave conditions. In the sweet spot of the wave basin waves with three different wave directions, three wave periods and uniform wave steepness were examined. For evaluation, we applied a common

  19. Bound infragravity waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okihiro, Michele; Guza, R. T.; Seymour, R. J.

    1992-07-01

    Model predictions of bound (i.e., nonlinearly forced by and coupled to wave groups) infragravity wave energy are compared with about 2 years of observations in 8- to 13-m depths at Imperial Beach, California, and Barbers Point, Hawaii. Frequency-directional spectra of free waves at sea and swell frequencies, estimated with a small array of four pressure sensors, are used to predict the bound wave spectra below 0.04 Hz. The predicted total bound wave energy is always less than the observed infragravity energy, and the underprediction increases with increasing water depth and especially with decreasing swell energy. At most half, and usually much less, of the observed infragravity energy is bound. Bound wave spectra are also predicted with data from a single wave gage in 183-m depth at Point Conception, California, and the assumption of unidirectional sea and swell. Even with energetic swell, less than 10% of the total observed infragravity energy in 183-m depth is bound. Free waves, either leaky or edge waves, are more energetic than bound waves at both the shallow and deep sites. The low level of infragravity energy observed in 183-m depth compared with 8- to 13-m depths, with similarly moderate sea and swell energy, suggests that leaky (and very high-mode edge) waves contribute less than 10% of the infragravity energy in 8-13 m. Most of the free infragravity energy in shallow water is refractively trapped and does not reach deep water.

  20. MHD Wave in Sunspots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sych, Robert

    2016-02-01

    The study of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves and oscillations in the solar atmosphere is one of the fastest developing fields in solar physics, and lies in the mainstream of using solar instrumentation data. This chapter first addresses the spatial frequency morphology of sources of sunspot oscillations and waves, including their localization, size, oscillation periods, and height localization with the mechanism of cutoff frequency that forms the observed emission variability. Then, it presents a review dynamic of sunspot wave processes, provides the information about the structure of wave fronts and their time variations, and investigates the oscillation frequency transformation depending on the wave energy. The chapter also addresses the initializing solar flares caused by trigger agents like magnetoacoustic waves, accelerated particle beams, and shocks. Special attention is paid to the relation between the flare reconnection periodic initialization and the dynamics of sunspot slow magnetoacoustic waves.

  1. Martian atmospheric lee waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pirraglia, J. A.

    1975-01-01

    Mariner 9 television pictures of Mars extensive mountain lee wave phenomenon in the northern mid-latitudes during winter were evaluated. The characteristic wave length of the lee waves is readily observable, and in a few cases the boundaries of the wave patterns, as well as the wave length, are observed. The cloud patterns resulting from the waves generated by the flow across a mountain or crater are shown to be dependent upon the velocity profile of the air stream and the vertical stability of the atmosphere. Using the stability as inferred by the temperature structure obtained from the infrared spectrometer data, a two layer velocity model of the air stream is used in calculations based on the theory of mountain lee waves. Results yield magnitudes generally in agreement with various other circulation models.

  2. Teleseismic S wave microseisms.

    PubMed

    Nishida, Kiwamu; Takagi, Ryota

    2016-08-26

    Although observations of microseisms excited by ocean swells were firmly established in the 1940s, the source locations remain difficult to track. Delineation of the source locations and energy partition of the seismic wave components are key to understanding the excitation mechanisms. Using a seismic array in Japan, we observed both P and S wave microseisms excited by a severe distant storm in the Atlantic Ocean. Although nonlinear forcing of an ocean swell with a one-dimensional Earth model can explain P waves and vertically polarized S waves (SV waves), it cannot explain horizontally polarized S waves (SH waves). The precise source locations may provide a new catalog for exploring Earth's interior. PMID:27563094

  3. Numerical simulations of coupled sea waves and boundary layer dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chalikov, D.

    2009-04-01

    potential equations, while an atmospheric model is based on Reynolds equations with 2nd order closing. Hundreds of long-term numerical experiments for different initial wave spectra were carried out to investigate statistical structure of the wave boundary layer (WBL) and particularly, for construction of effective beta-function, taking into account real shapes of waves, occasional separation of boundary layer and the effect of parameterized wave breaking. Naturally, beta-function determined in such a way, has a wide scatter, however extensive statistics allows to derive that function with high accuracy. Data on vertical distribution of spectral components of wave-produced momentum flux are used for construction of 1-D model of WBL. It is shown, that most of the momentum flux to waves is concentrated in a high wave number part of spectrum where dispersion relation is actually not valid. Wind waves form rough surface, so all of the momentum flux is absorbed by waves, while local tangent stress is negligibly small. The approach allows to investigate WBL structure for arbitrary wind conditions and wave spectra. It is shown that wide scatter for drag coefficient can be easily explained by different wave conditions. For example, decrease of effective surface roughness at storm winds can be explained by dumping of high-frequency waves by foam.

  4. Stress and Infertility

    MedlinePlus

    ... the American Society for Reproductive Medicine Stress and infertility It is not clear how exactly stress impacts ... How can stress impact a fertility patient? Sometimes, infertility patients respond to the stress of being unable ...

  5. Stress and Your Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... ePublications > Stress and your health fact sheet ePublications Stress and your health fact sheet Print this fact ... a big difference in my life! What is stress? Stress is a feeling you get when faced ...

  6. Stress and your heart

    MedlinePlus

    Coronary heart disease - stress; Coronary artery disease - stress ... Your body responds to stress on many levels. First, it releases stress hormones that make you breathe faster. Your blood pressure goes up. Your muscles ...

  7. Seismic waves increase permeability.

    PubMed

    Elkhoury, Jean E; Brodsky, Emily E; Agnew, Duncan C

    2006-06-29

    Earthquakes have been observed to affect hydrological systems in a variety of ways--water well levels can change dramatically, streams can become fuller and spring discharges can increase at the time of earthquakes. Distant earthquakes may even increase the permeability in faults. Most of these hydrological observations can be explained by some form of permeability increase. Here we use the response of water well levels to solid Earth tides to measure permeability over a 20-year period. At the time of each of seven earthquakes in Southern California, we observe transient changes of up to 24 degrees in the phase of the water level response to the dilatational volumetric strain of the semidiurnal tidal components of wells at the Piñon Flat Observatory in Southern California. After the earthquakes, the phase gradually returns to the background value at a rate of less than 0.1 degrees per day. We use a model of axisymmetric flow driven by an imposed head oscillation through a single, laterally extensive, confined, homogeneous and isotropic aquifer to relate the phase response to aquifer properties. We interpret the changes in phase response as due to changes in permeability. At the time of the earthquakes, the permeability at the site increases by a factor as high as three. The permeability increase depends roughly linearly on the amplitude of seismic-wave peak ground velocity in the range of 0.21-2.1 cm s(-1). Such permeability increases are of interest to hydrologists and oil reservoir engineers as they affect fluid flow and might determine long-term evolution of hydrological and oil-bearing systems. They may also be interesting to seismologists, as the resulting pore pressure changes can affect earthquakes by changing normal stresses on faults. PMID:16810253

  8. Shock wave structure in heterogeneous reactive media

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, M.R.

    1997-06-01

    Continuum mixture theory and mesoscale modeling are applied to describe the behavior of shock-loaded heterogeneous media. One-dimensional simulations of gas-gun experiments demonstrate that the wave features are well described by mixture theory, including reflected wave behavior and conditions where significant reaction is initiated. Detailed wave fields are resolved in numerical simulations of impact on a lattice of discrete explosive {open_quotes}crystals{close_quotes}. It is shown that rapid distortion first occurs at material contact points; the nature of the dispersive fields includes large amplitude fluctuations of stress over several particle pathlengths. Localization of energy causes {open_quotes}hot-spots{close_quotes} due to shock focusing and plastic work as material flows into interstitial regions.

  9. Large eddy simulation of boundary layer flow under cnoidal waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yin-Jun; Chen, Jiang-Bo; Zhou, Ji-Fu; Zhang, Qiang

    2016-02-01

    Water waves in coastal areas are generally nonlinear, exhibiting asymmetric velocity profiles with different amplitudes of crest and trough. The behaviors of the boundary layer under asymmetric waves are of great significance for sediment transport in natural circumstances. While previous studies have mainly focused on linear or symmetric waves, asymmetric wave-induced flows remain unclear, particularly in the flow regime with high Reynolds numbers. Taking cnoidal wave as a typical example of asymmetric waves, we propose to use an infinite immersed plate oscillating cnoidally in its own plane in quiescent water to simulate asymmetric wave boundary layer. A large eddy simulation approach with Smagorinsky subgrid model is adopted to investigate the flow characteristics of the boundary layer. It is verified that the model well reproduces experimental and theoretical results. Then a series of numerical experiments are carried out to study the boundary layer beneath cnoidal waves from laminar to fully developed turbulent regimes at high Reynolds numbers, larger than ever studied before. Results of velocity profile, wall shear stress, friction coefficient, phase lead between velocity and wall shear stress, and the boundary layer thickness are obtained. The dependencies of these boundary layer properties on the asymmetric degree and Reynolds number are discussed in detail.

  10. Sea surface wind stress in stratified atmospheric flow

    SciTech Connect

    Myrhaug, D.; Slaattelid, O.H.

    1996-12-31

    The paper presents the wind shear stress on the sea surface as well as the velocity profile in stably stratified atmospheric boundary layer flow over wind waves by using similarity theory. For a given geostrophic velocity, Coriolis parameter, spectral peak period and stratification parameter the sea surface shear stress is determined. Further, the direction of the sea surface shear stress and the velocity profile are given. Parameterizations of the results are also presented. Finally, the engineering relevance of the results is discussed.

  11. Direct measurements of wind stress over the surf zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shabani, Behnam; Nielsen, Peter; Baldock, Tom

    2014-05-01

    Field data of the wind stress over surf zone waves are presented from an open ocean beach on the East Australian Coast. Two ultrasonic anemometers were deployed at nominal heights of 5 and 10 m above the water surface in the intertidal and inner surf zones, with concurrent measurements of water levels and offshore wave parameters. Following a rigorous quality control procedure, the wind stress was determined by the eddy correlation technique. A constant stress layer was observed between 5 and 10 m elevation. Considering near-neutral conditions only, the wind drag coefficients were found to systematically change with the wind angle of approach relative to the shoreline and are much smaller for longshore wind than during onshore wind. The concept of an apparent wave steepness changing with wind direction is suggested to explain this behavior. The drag coefficients over the surf zone during onshore wind and near-neutral conditions were determined to be almost twice the values expected at the same wind speed and open ocean conditions. The observed Charnock coefficient was similarly an order of magnitude larger than open ocean values. A wave celerity of the order of that expected in the inner surf zone is required to explain the observed large roughness and drag coefficients using existing wave age-dependent parameterizations. This suggests that the slower wave celerity in the surf zone is an important contributor to the increased wind stress, in addition to the sawtooth wave shape.

  12. Large amplitude compression and shear wave propagation in an elastomer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Y. M.; Murri, W. J.; Henley, D.

    1982-04-01

    Experimental techniques have been developed to measure the high strain-rate compression and shear response of Solithane 113. Compression and shear wave profiles have been measured in specimens compressed to 20% (compressive stresses ˜1.2 GPa). The compressive profiles are nearly steady and the compressive stress-strain response is typical of a compliant material. The shear wave profiles are dispersive and show attenuation with propagation. Analyses of these wave profiles will be presented. Shear moduli vary from 0.35 GPa to 0.8 GPa for the compression range examined to date. These values are within a factor of two of the static shear moduli in the glassy state. The data described here have been used to calculate the high strain rate compressive and shear stress-strain curves for Solithane 113.

  13. Validation and verification of the acoustic emission technique for structural health monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagar, Daniel Omatsola

    The performance of the Acoustic Emission (AE) technique was investigated to establish its reliability in detecting and locating fatigue crack damage as well as distinguishing between different AE sources in potential SHM applications. Experiments were conducted to monitor the AE signals generated during fatigue crack growth in coupon 2014 T6 aluminium. The influence of stress ratio, stress range, sample geometry and whether or not the load spectrum was of constant or variable amplitude were all investigated. AE signals detected were correlated with values of applied cyclic load throughout the tests. Measurements of time difference of arrival were taken for assessment of errors in location estimates obtained using time of flight algorithms with a 1D location setup. At the onset of crack growth high AE Hit rates were observed for the first few millimetres after which they rapidly declined to minimal values for an extended period of crack growth. Another peak and then decline in AE Hit rates was observed for subsequent crack growth before yet another increase as the sample approached final failure.. AE signals were seen to occur in the lower two-thirds of the maximum load in the first few millimetres of crack growth before occurring at progressively smaller values as the crack length increased. A separate set of AE signals were observed close to the maximum cyclic stress throughout the entire crack growth process. At the failure crack length AE signals were generated across the entire loading range. Novel metrics were developed to statistically characterise variability of AE generation with crack growth and at particular crack lengths across different samples. A novel approach for fatigue crack length estimation was developed based on monitoring applied loads to the sample corresponding with generated AE signals. An acousto-ultrasonic method was used to calibrate the AE wave velocity in a representative wing-box structure which was used to successfully locate the

  14. Scaling of Waves in Heterogeneous Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogler, Tracy

    2011-06-01

    The fourth power scaling of strain rate with stress described by Swegle and Grady describes steady waves in many homogeneous materials, but heterogeneous materials can display different scaling relationships. In particular, layered materials exhibit a second power scaling of strain rate with stress, while first power scaling has been observed in granular materials. To better understand these scaling behaviors, numerical simulations of wave propagation in layered and granular materials are performed. The simulations demonstrate that the heterogeneous nature of these materials can cause behavior similar to what has historically been termed viscosity when observed in homogeneous materials. From these simulations, non-dimensional groups that control the scaling of the waves are identified. These groups collapse the available experimental data reasonably well onto a single curve. Finally, a simple model for the first power scaling in granular materials is proposed that illustrates the importance of void space between particles to the wave structure. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin company, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  15. Heat waves, aging, and human cardiovascular health.

    PubMed

    Kenney, W Larry; Craighead, Daniel H; Alexander, Lacy M

    2014-10-01

    This brief review is based on a President's Lecture presented at the Annual Meeting of the American College of Sports Medicine in 2013. The purpose of this review was to assess the effects of climate change and consequent increases in environmental heat stress on the aging cardiovascular system. The earth's average global temperature is slowly but consistently increasing, and along with mean temperature changes come increases in heat wave frequency and severity. Extreme passive thermal stress resulting from prolonged elevations in ambient temperature and prolonged physical activity in hot environments creates a high demand on the left ventricle to pump blood to the skin to dissipate heat. Even healthy aging is accompanied by altered cardiovascular function, which limits the extent to which older individuals can maintain stroke volume, increase cardiac output, and increase skin blood flow when exposed to environmental extremes. In the elderly, the increased cardiovascular demand during heat waves is often fatal because of increased strain on an already compromised left ventricle. Not surprisingly, excess deaths during heat waves 1) occur predominantly in older individuals and 2) are overwhelmingly cardiovascular in origin. Increasing frequency and severity of heat waves coupled with a rapidly growing at-risk population dramatically increase the extent of future untoward health outcomes. PMID:24598696

  16. Internal wave energy radiated from a turbulent mixed layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munroe, James R.; Sutherland, Bruce R.

    2014-09-01

    We examine mixed-layer deepening and the generation of internal waves in stratified fluid resulting from turbulence that develops in response to an applied surface stress. In laboratory experiments the stress is applied over the breadth of a finite-length tank by a moving roughened conveyor belt. The turbulence in the shear layer is characterized using particle image velocimetry to measure the kinetic energy density. The internal waves are measured using synthetic schlieren to determine their amplitudes, frequencies, and energy density. We also perform fully nonlinear numerical simulations restricted to two dimensions but in a horizontally periodic domain. These clearly demonstrate that internal waves are generated by transient eddies at the integral length scale of turbulence and which translate with the background shear along the base of the mixed layer. In both experiments and simulations we find that the energy density of the generated waves is 1%-3% of the turbulent kinetic energy density of the turbulent layer.

  17. Internal wave energy radiated from a turbulent mixed layer

    SciTech Connect

    Munroe, James R.; Sutherland, Bruce R.

    2014-09-15

    We examine mixed-layer deepening and the generation of internal waves in stratified fluid resulting from turbulence that develops in response to an applied surface stress. In laboratory experiments the stress is applied over the breadth of a finite-length tank by a moving roughened conveyor belt. The turbulence in the shear layer is characterized using particle image velocimetry to measure the kinetic energy density. The internal waves are measured using synthetic schlieren to determine their amplitudes, frequencies, and energy density. We also perform fully nonlinear numerical simulations restricted to two dimensions but in a horizontally periodic domain. These clearly demonstrate that internal waves are generated by transient eddies at the integral length scale of turbulence and which translate with the background shear along the base of the mixed layer. In both experiments and simulations we find that the energy density of the generated waves is 1%–3% of the turbulent kinetic energy density of the turbulent layer.

  18. Effect of uniaxial tensile stress on the isomer shift of 57Fe in fcc stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratner, E.; Ron, M.

    1982-05-01

    The electron wave-function response to uniaxial tensile stress in fcc steels (SS310 and SS316) was investigated through the isomer shift of the Mössbauer effect. Stresses up to 12 kbar (the ultimate tensile stress is approximately 14 kbar) were applied at room temperature. The isomer shift changes linearly in these circumstances. It is concluded that, as in the case of hydrostatic pressure, the paramount factor here is the volume strain of the wave functions of 4S electrons.

  19. Impact induced solitary wave propagation through a woodpile structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kore, R.; Waychal, A.; Agarwal, S.; Yadav, P.; Uddin, Ahsan; Sahoo, N.; Shelke, A.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, we investigate solitary wave propagation through a one-dimensional woodpile structure excited by low and high velocity impact. Woodpile structures are a sub-class of granular metamaterial, which supports propagation of nonlinear waves. Hertz contact law governs the behavior of the solitary wave propagation through the granular media. Towards an experimental study, a woodpile structure was fabricated by orthogonally stacking cylindrical rods. A shock tube facility has been developed to launch an impactor on the woodpile structure at a velocity of 30 m s-1. Embedded granular chain sensors were fabricated to study the behavior of the solitary wave. The impact induced stress wave is studied to investigate solitary wave parameters, i.e. contact force, contact time, and solitary wave velocity. With the aid of the experimental setup, numerical simulations, and a theoretical solution based on the long wavelength approximation, formation of the solitary wave in the woodpile structure is validated to a reasonable degree of accuracy. The nondispersive and compact supported solitary waves traveling at sonic wave velocity offer unique properties that could be leveraged for application in nondestructive testing and structural health monitoring.

  20. Nonlinear waves on a string with inhomogeneous properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arredondo, Robert

    Nonlinear waves on an infinite string with a rapid change in properties at one location are treated. The string is an idealized version of more complex configurations in both fluids and solids. This idealized version treats the property change as an interface with a discontinuity in properties. Packets of waves are then considered with a reduced model, here a set of nonlinear Schrodinger (NLS) equations. The stress and the displacement must both be matched at the interface, resulting in dynamic and kinematic interfacial conditions. The dynamic condition produces an inhomogeneous effect that cannot be treated successfully with separation-of-variables. This inhomogeneity is treated here with a time-evolution approach using Laplace transforms. The results show that this inhomogeneity creates a mean longitudinal displacement on both sides of the interface and a shift in the position of the interface as the waves transit the interface. This mean longitudinal displacement corresponds to a sustained strain in the string. The mean longitudinal displacement develops three distinct features. One feature has a length scale that is half the wave-length of the incident waves, while the lengths of the other two features have the same order as the length of the wave packet. The position of maximum strain as a result of this mean is often at the interface, depending on parameter values. These results apply to a variety of applications, such as waves in ocean ice, Rayleigh waves caused by earthquakes, internal waves in the oceans and atmosphere, as well as waves in stretched cables.

  1. Direct heating rates associated with gravity wave saturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Erich

    2004-04-01

    Analysis of filtering out subscale motions is applied for internal gravity waves. This leads to a new perspective of the planetary-scale sensible heat budget of the upper mesosphere/lower thermosphere. In line with previous results of Becker and Schmitz, the present paper recapitulates that the dissipation of gravity wave kinetic energy and the local adiabatic conversion of mean enthalpy into gravity wave kinetic energy cannot be neglected, and that the net effect of both cools the upper mesosphere/lower thermosphere. In addition, the importance of the wave entropy flux-an effect which is ignored in customary gravity wave parameterizations for global circulation models-is stressed. We show that, when evaluated on the basis of Lindzen's saturation assumption, the wave entropy flux convergence behaves like a vertical diffusion of the mean stratification, where the wave-induced diffusion coefficient is involved with a Prandtl number of 2. This result imposes an upper bound of 2 for the effective Prandtl number which scales the combined entropy flux owing to turbulence and gravity waves. The direct heating rates generated by gravity wave saturation are assessed quantitatively, using an idealized general circulation model completed by a Lindzen-type gravity wave parameterization.

  2. Catecholamines and stress.

    PubMed

    Palkovits, Miklós

    2014-03-30

    A brief survey is offering of debates on two long-standing questions in stress studies and theories: 1) question of stress nonspecificity (i.e. homo- or heterogeneity in stress responses), and 2) what is the functional role of central catecholamines in stress mechanisms, especially in stress signal-transduction and in the realization of stress responses. PMID:26118253

  3. Modulation of Fear Extinction by Stress, Stress Hormones and Estradiol: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Stockhorst, Ursula; Antov, Martin I.

    2016-01-01

    Fear acquisition and extinction are valid models for the etiology and treatment of anxiety, trauma- and stressor-related disorders. These disorders are assumed to involve aversive learning under acute and/or chronic stress. Importantly, fear conditioning and stress share common neuronal circuits. The stress response involves multiple changes interacting in a time-dependent manner: (a) the fast first-wave stress response [with central actions of noradrenaline, dopamine, serotonin, corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), plus increased sympathetic tone and peripheral catecholamine release] and (b) the second-wave stress response [with peripheral release of glucocorticoids (GCs) after activation of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) axis]. Control of fear during extinction is also sensitive to these stress-response mediators. In the present review, we will thus examine current animal and human data, addressing the role of stress and single stress-response mediators for successful acquisition, consolidation and recall of fear extinction. We report studies using pharmacological manipulations targeting a number of stress-related neurotransmitters and neuromodulators [monoamines, opioids, endocannabinoids (eCBs), neuropeptide Y, oxytocin, GCs] and behavioral stress induction. As anxiety, trauma- and stressor-related disorders are more common in women, recent research focuses on female sex hormones and identifies a potential role for estradiol in fear extinction. We will thus summarize animal and human data on the role of estradiol and explore possible interactions with stress or stress-response mediators in extinction. This also aims at identifying time-windows of enhanced (or reduced) sensitivity for fear extinction, and thus also for successful exposure therapy. PMID:26858616

  4. Experimental investigation of change of energy of infragavity waves in dependence on spectral characteristics of an irregular wind waves in coastal zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saprykina, Yana; Divinskii, Boris

    2013-04-01

    no clear total dependences of energy of infrragravity waves from energy of wind waves and mean period of infragravity waves from mean period of wind waves. But significant wave height of infragravity waves depends on relative water depth (wave height of wind waves divided on water depth). There are different types of this dependence for breaking and non-breaking waves. The influence of peak period, significant wave height and directional spreading of initial wave spectrum on these dependences are discussed. The peculiarities of spectra of infragravity waves for non-breaking, breaking and multibreaking wind waves are shown. This work is supported by the RFBR, project 12-05-00965. References: Longuet-Higgins, M. S., R. W. Stewart, 1962. Radiation stress and mass transport in gravity waves, with an application to surf beats. J. Fluid Mech., 13, pp. 481-504. Symonds G., D.A. Huntley, A.J. Bowen, 1982. Two dimensional surf beat: long wave generation by a time-varying breakpoint. J. of Geoph. Res., 87(C), pp.492-498. Madsen P.A., Sorensen O.R., Shaffer H.A. 1997. Surf zone dynamics simulated by a Boussinesq type model. Coastal Engineering, 32, p. 255-287.

  5. Modeling the effects of wave skewness and beach cusps on littoral sand transport

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haas, K.A.; Check, L.A.; Hanes, D.M.

    2008-01-01

    A process-based numerical modeling system is utilized for predicting littoral sand transport. The intent is to examine conditions slightly more complex than linear waves impinging upon a plane beach. Two factors that we examine are wave skewness and longshore varying bathymetry. An empirical model is used for calculating the skewed bottom wave orbital velocity. The advection of sediment due to the skewed wave velocity is larger and in the direction of the waves, opposite to the results with sinusoidal wave velocities, due to the increase in the bottom shear stress under the wave crests. The model system is also applied to bathymetry containing beach cusps. When the wave field has relatively weak longshore wave power, the currents and the littoral transport exhibit significant longshore variability, thereby altering the overall mean littoral transport.

  6. Patterns in the Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coco, G.; Guza, R. T.; Garnier, R.; Lomonaco, P.; Lopez De San Roman Blanco, B.; Dalrymple, R. A.; Xu, M.

    2014-12-01

    Edge waves, gravity waves trapped close to the shoreline by refraction, can in some cases form a standing wave pattern with alongshore periodic sequence of high and low runup. Nonlinear mechanisms for generation of edge waves by monochromatic waves incident on a planar beach from deep water have been elaborated theoretically and in the lab. Edge waves have been long considered a potential source for alongshore periodic morphological patterns in the swash (e.g., beach cusps), and edge-wave based predictions of cusp spacing compare qualitatively well with many field observations. We will discuss the extension of lab observations and numerical modeling to include incident waves with significant frequency and directional bandwidth. Laboratory experiments were performed at the Cantabria Coastal and Ocean Basin. The large rectangular basin (25 m cross-shore by 32 m alongshore) was heavily instrumented, had reflective sidewalls, and a steep concrete beach (slope 1:5) with a constant depth (1m) section between the wavemaker and beach. With monochromatic, normally incident waves we observed the expected, previously described subharmonic observations. Edge wave vertical heights at the shoreline reached 80cm, and edge wave uprushes exceeded the sloping beach freeboard. When frequency and frequency-directional spread are increased, the excited edge wave character changes substantially. In some cases, subharmonic excitation is suppressed completely. In other cases, edge waves are excited intermittently and unpredictably. The spatially and temporally steady forcing required for strong, persistent subharmonic instability is lacking with even modestly spread (direction and frequency) incident waves. An SPH numerical model is capable of reproducing aspects of the observations. It seems unlikely to us that subhamonic edge waves alone are responsible for most cusp formation on natural beaches. The steady incident wave forcing needed to initiate subharmonic growth, and to maintain

  7. Cycloidal Wave Energy Converter

    SciTech Connect

    Stefan G. Siegel, Ph.D.

    2012-11-30

    This program allowed further advancing the development of a novel type of wave energy converter, a Cycloidal Wave Energy Converter or CycWEC. A CycWEC consists of one or more hydrofoils rotating around a central shaft, and operates fully submerged beneath the water surface. It operates under feedback control sensing the incoming waves, and converts wave power to shaft power directly without any intermediate power take off system. Previous research consisting of numerical simulations and two dimensional small 1:300 scale wave flume experiments had indicated wave cancellation efficiencies beyond 95%. The present work was centered on construction and testing of a 1:10 scale model and conducting two testing campaigns in a three dimensional wave basin. These experiments allowed for the first time for direct measurement of electrical power generated as well as the interaction of the CycWEC in a three dimensional environment. The Atargis team successfully conducted two testing campaigns at the Texas A&M Offshore Technology Research Center and was able to demonstrate electricity generation. In addition, three dimensional wave diffraction results show the ability to achieve wave focusing, thus increasing the amount of wave power that can be extracted beyond what was expected from earlier two dimensional investigations. Numerical results showed wave cancellation efficiencies for irregular waves to be on par with results for regular waves over a wide range of wave lengths. Using the results from previous simulations and experiments a full scale prototype was designed and its performance in a North Atlantic wave climate of average 30kW/m of wave crest was estimated. A full scale WEC with a blade span of 150m will deliver a design power of 5MW at an estimated levelized cost of energy (LCOE) in the range of 10-17 US cents per kWh. Based on the new results achieved in the 1:10 scale experiments these estimates appear conservative and the likely performance at full scale will

  8. Cardiovascular stress of photochemotherapy (PUVA)

    SciTech Connect

    Ciafone, R.A.; Rhodes, A.R.; Audley, M.; Freedberg, I.M.; Abelmann, W.H.

    1980-11-01

    The recently devised therapy for psoriasis and related skin diseases, consisting of long-wave ultraviolet light and oral 8-methoxypsoralen (PUVA), was investigated for its cardiovascular effects. In seventeen patients, long-wave ultraviolet light therapy in a treatment enclosure (mean duration, 19.3 minutes) resulted in ambient temperatures of 39.2 degrees C +/- 2.1 degrees C (SD) and skin temperatures of 38.2 degrees C +/- 1.4 degrees C. In upright subjects, heart rate rose 30.8% to 114.4 +/- 25.2 beats per minute (bpm). Intensive room air conditioning, outside of the treatment enclosure, although significantly lowering skin and ambient temperatures, did not affect the heart rates significantly. PUVA therapy is associated with a definite cardiovascular stress when the box type of therapeutic unit is used. Possible modifications are discussed.

  9. Gravitational Wave Propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontana, Giorgio

    2005-02-01

    There is only one experimental proof that gravitational waves exist. With such a limitation, it may seem premature to suggest the possibility that gravitational waves can became a preferred space propulsion technique. The present understanding of the problem indicates that this is not the case. The emission of gravitational waves from astrophysical sources has been confirmed by observation, the respective detection at large distance from the source is difficult and actually we have no confirmation of a successful detection. Therefore the required preliminary discovery has been already made. This opinion is enforced by many different proposals for building the required powerful gravitational wave generators that have recently appeared in the literature and discussed at conferences. It is no longer reasonable to wait for additional confirmation of the existence of gravitational waves to start a program for building generators and testing their possible application to space travel. A vast literature shows that gravitational waves can be employed for space propulsion. Gravitational wave rockets have been proposed, non-linearity of Einstein equations allows the conversion of gravitational waves to a static gravitational field and ``artificial gravity assist'' may become a new way of travelling in space-time. Different approaches to gravitational wave propulsion are reviewed and compared. Gravitational wave propulsion is also compared to traditional rocket propulsion and an undeniable advantage can be demonstrated in terms of efficiency and performance. Testing the predictions will require gravitational wave generators with high power and wavelength short enough for producing high energy densities. Detectors designed for the specific application must be developed, taking into account that non-linearity effects are expected. The study and development of Gravitational wave propulsion is a very challenging endeavor, involving the most complex theories, sophisticated

  10. Chronic Stress and Posttraumatic Stress Disorders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davidson, Laura M.; Baum, Andrew

    1986-01-01

    Examined the relationship between chronic stress and symptoms of posttraumatic stress syndrome in people living within five miles of the Three Mile Island (TMI) nuclear power station. Results provided evidence of substantive links between chronic stress and development of mild symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder. (Author/BL)

  11. Lamb wave propagation in negative Poisson's ratio composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remillat, Chrystel; Wilcox, Paul; Scarpa, Fabrizio

    2008-03-01

    Lamb wave propagation is evaluated for cross-ply laminate composites exhibiting through-the-thickness negative Poisson's ratio. The laminates are mechanically modeled using the Classical Laminate Theory, while the propagation of Lamb waves is investigated using a combination of semi analytical models and Finite Element time-stepping techniques. The auxetic laminates exhibit well spaced bending, shear and symmetric fundamental modes, while featuring normal stresses for A 0 mode 3 times lower than composite laminates with positive Poisson's ratio.

  12. Nonlinear Guided Wave Mixing for Localized Material State Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lissenden, Cliff J.; Liu, Yang; Chillara, Vamshi K.; Choi, Gloria; Cho, Hwanjeong

    Material state characterization methods sensitive to incipient damage provide new opportunities for managing the life cycle of structures. Finite element simulations of ultrasonic guided waves show the potential of nonlinear wave mixing to detect localized degradation invisible to both linear elastic stress-strain response and the eye. Correlation of material degradation to the generation of higher harmonics or combinational harmonics makes estimation of remaining life possible from material state data early in the service life.

  13. Blunted HPA axis response to stress is related to a persistent Dysregulation Profile in youth.

    PubMed

    Ayer, Lynsay; Greaves-Lord, Kirstin; Althoff, Robert R; Hudziak, James J; Dieleman, Gwendolyn C; Verhulst, Frank C; van der Ende, Jan

    2013-07-01

    The Child Behavior Checklist Dysregulation Profile (DP) in youth has been shown to be a predictor of psychopathology later in life. We examined the activity of the hypothalamic pituitary adrenal (HPA) axis in youth with remitted, new, persistent, and no DP. Data from 489 youth (47% boys) participating in a Dutch longitudinal general population study were included (Wave 1 mean age=11.5, Wave 2=14.2). Wave 2 diurnal cortisol patterns and levels in response to a laboratory stress paradigm were compared in youth with DP at Wave 1 only, Wave 2 only, both Waves, and neither Wave. Youth with the DP at Wave 2 only or at both time points showed blunted cortisol responses to stress relative to the other two groups. There were no group or sex differences in diurnal cortisol activity. More research is needed to determine how the association between DP symptoms and HPA axis functioning changes over time. PMID:23603315

  14. Transactional Associations Between Youths’ Responses to Peer Stress and Depression: The Moderating Roles of Sex and Stress Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Agoston, Anna Monica; Rudolph, Karen D.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined transactional associations between responses to peer stress and depression in youth. Specifically, it tested the hypotheses that (a) depression would predict fewer effortful responses and more involuntary, dysregulated responses to peer stress over time; and (b) fewer adaptive and more maladaptive responses would predict subsequent depression. Youth (M age = 12.41; SD = 1.19; 86 girls, 81 boys) and their maternal caregivers completed semi-structured interviews and questionnaires at three annual waves. Multi-group comparison path analyses were conducted to examine sex and stress-level differences in the proposed reciprocal-influence model. In girls and in youth exposed to high levels of peer stress, maladaptive stress responses predicted more depressive symptoms and adaptive stress responses predicted fewer depressive symptoms at each wave. These findings suggest the utility of preventive interventions for depression designed to enhance the quality of girls’ stress responses. In boys, depression predicted less adaptive and more maladaptive stress responses, but only at the second wave. These findings suggest that interventions designed to reduce boys’ depressive symptoms may help them develop more adaptive stress responses. PMID:20852929

  15. Stress measurement in thick plates using nonlinear ultrasonics

    SciTech Connect

    Abbasi, Zeynab E-mail: dozevin@uic.edu; Ozevin, Didem E-mail: dozevin@uic.edu

    2015-03-31

    In this paper the interaction between nonlinear ultrasonic characteristics and stress state of complex loaded thick steel plates using fundamental theory of nonlinear ultrasonics is investigated in order to measure the stress state at a given cross section. The measurement concept is based on phased array placement of ultrasonic transmitter-receiver to scan three angles of a given cross section using Rayleigh waves. The change in the ultrasonic data in thick steel plates is influenced by normal and shear stresses; therefore, three measurements are needed to solve the equations simultaneously. Different thickness plates are studied in order to understand the interaction of Rayleigh wave penetration depth and shear stress. The purpose is that as the thickness becomes smaller, the shear stress becomes negligible at the angled measurement. For thicker cross section, shear stress becomes influential if the depth of penetration of Rayleigh wave is greater than the half of the thickness. The influences of plate thickness and ultrasonic frequency on the identification of stress tensor are numerically studied in 3D structural geometry and Murnaghan material model. The experimental component of this study includes uniaxial loading of the plate while measuring ultrasonic wave at three directions (perpendicular, parallel and angled to the loading direction). Instead of rotating transmitter-receiver pair for each test, a device capable of measuring the three angles is designed.

  16. Intracellular mechanochemical waves in an active poroelastic model.

    PubMed

    Radszuweit, Markus; Alonso, Sergio; Engel, Harald; Bär, Markus

    2013-03-29

    Many processes in living cells are controlled by biochemical substances regulating active stresses. The cytoplasm is an active material with both viscoelastic and liquid properties. We incorporate the active stress into a two-phase model of the cytoplasm which accounts for the spatiotemporal dynamics of the cytoskeleton and the cytosol. The cytoskeleton is described as a solid matrix that together with the cytosol as an interstitial fluid constitutes a poroelastic material. We find different forms of mechanochemical waves including traveling, standing, and rotating waves by employing linear stability analysis and numerical simulations in one and two spatial dimensions. PMID:23581377

  17. RADIATION WAVE DETECTION

    DOEpatents

    Wouters, L.F.

    1960-08-30

    Radiation waves can be detected by simultaneously measuring radiation- wave intensities at a plurality of space-distributed points and producing therefrom a plot of the wave intensity as a function of time. To this end. a detector system is provided which includes a plurality of nuclear radiation intensity detectors spaced at equal radial increments of distance from a source of nuclear radiation. Means are provided to simultaneously sensitize the detectors at the instant a wave of radiation traverses their positions. the detectors producing electrical pulses indicative of wave intensity. The system further includes means for delaying the pulses from the detectors by amounts proportional to the distance of the detectors from the source to provide an indication of radiation-wave intensity as a function of time.

  18. Kinesthetic Transverse Wave Demonstration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pantidos, Panagiotis; Patapis, Stamatis

    2005-09-01

    This is a variation on the String and Sticky Tape demonstration "The Wave Game," suggested by Ron Edge. A group of students stand side by side, each one holding a card chest high with both hands. The teacher cues the first student to begin raising and lowering his card. When he starts lowering his card, the next student begins to raise his. As succeeding students move their cards up and down, a wave such as that shown in the figure is produced. To facilitate the process, students' motions were synchronized with the ticks of a metronome (without such synchronization it was nearly impossible to generate a satisfactory wave). Our waves typically had a frequency of about 1 Hz and a wavelength of around 3 m. We videotaped the activity so that the students could analyze the motions. The (17-year-old) students had not received any prior instruction regarding wave motion and did not know beforehand the nature of the exercise they were about to carry out. During the activity they were asked what a transverse wave is. Most of them quickly realized, without teacher input, that while the wave propagated horizontally, the only motion of the transmitting medium (them) was vertical. They located the equilibrium points of the oscillations, the crests and troughs of the waves, and identified the wavelength. The teacher defined for them the period of the oscillations of the motion of a card to be the total time for one cycle. The students measured this time and then several asserted that it was the same as the wave period. Knowing the length of the waves and the number of waves per second, the next step can easily be to find the wave speed.

  19. Thermal-Wave Microscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Robert E.; Kramarchuk, Ihor; Williams, Wallace D.; Pouch, John J.; Gilbert, Percy

    1989-01-01

    Computer-controlled thermal-wave microscope developed to investigate III-V compound semiconductor devices and materials. Is nondestructive technique providing information on subsurface thermal features of solid samples. Furthermore, because this is subsurface technique, three-dimensional imaging also possible. Microscope uses intensity-modulated electron beam of modified scanning electron microscope to generate thermal waves in sample. Acoustic waves generated by thermal waves received by transducer and processed in computer to form images displayed on video display of microscope or recorded on magnetic disk.

  20. Reverse Quantum Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, Jeffrey

    2010-02-01

    As preposterous as it might sound, if quantum waves travel in the reverse direction from subatomic particles, then most of quantum physics can be explained without quantum weirdness or Schr"odinger's cat. Quantum mathematics is unchanged. The diffraction pattern on the screen of the double slit experiment is the same. This proposal is not refuted by the Innsbruck experiments; this is NOT a hidden local variable theory. Research evidence will be presented that is consistent with the idea waves travel in the opposite direction as neutrons. If one's thinking shifts from forwards to backwards quantum waves, the world changes so drastically it is almost unimaginable. Quantum waves move from the mathematical to the real world, multiply in number, and reverse in direction. Wave-particle duality is undone. In the double slit experiment every part of the target screen is emitting such quantum waves in all directions. Some pass through the two slits. Interference occurs on the opposite side of the barrier than is usually imagined. They impinge on ``S'' and an electron is released at random. Because of the interference it is more likely to follow some waves than others. It follows one and only one wave backward; hitting the screen where it's wave originated. )

  1. Optical rogue waves.

    PubMed

    Solli, D R; Ropers, C; Koonath, P; Jalali, B

    2007-12-13

    Recent observations show that the probability of encountering an extremely large rogue wave in the open ocean is much larger than expected from ordinary wave-amplitude statistics. Although considerable effort has been directed towards understanding the physics behind these mysterious and potentially destructive events, the complete picture remains uncertain. Furthermore, rogue waves have not yet been observed in other physical systems. Here, we introduce the concept of optical rogue waves, a counterpart of the infamous rare water waves. Using a new real-time detection technique, we study a system that exposes extremely steep, large waves as rare outcomes from an almost identically prepared initial population of waves. Specifically, we report the observation of rogue waves in an optical system, based on a microstructured optical fibre, near the threshold of soliton-fission supercontinuum generation--a noise-sensitive nonlinear process in which extremely broadband radiation is generated from a narrowband input. We model the generation of these rogue waves using the generalized nonlinear Schrödinger equation and demonstrate that they arise infrequently from initially smooth pulses owing to power transfer seeded by a small noise perturbation. PMID:18075587

  2. Internal Solitary Wave Tunnelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutherland, Bruce; Keating, Scott; Shrivistava, Ishita

    2013-11-01

    In a two-layer fluid, solitary waves of depression (elevation) propagate in a shallow upper (lower) layer. The transition from depressed to elevated is known to occur as a solitary wave of depression passes over a bottom slope. If impacting a coastline the shoaling waves deposit some energy and partially reflect. Here we consider what happens if a solitary wave passes over a sill or the shoulder of an island. Specifically, through lock-release laboratory experiments, we examine the evolution of a solitary wave of depression incident upon a submerged thin vertical barrier and triangular submarine topography. From the measured interface displacement, we determine the available potential energy associated with the wave. The method of Hilbert transforms is used to subdivide the displacement signal into rightward- and leftward-propagating disturbances, from which we measure the available potential energy of the transmitted and reflected waves. These are used to measure the relative transmission, reflection and deposition of energy in terms of the barrier height and slope, the relative depths of the ambient fluid and the amplitude of the incident wave. Implications for internal wave scattering around Dongsha Atoll in the South China Sea are discussed. Research performed while visiting the University of Alberta under the UARE program.

  3. Tunable damper for an acoustic wave guide

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, S.C.

    1984-06-05

    A damper for tunably damping acoustic waves in an ultrasonic waveguide is provided which may be used in a hostile environment such as a nuclear reactor. The area of the waveguide, which may be a selected size metal rod in which acoustic waves are to be damped, is wrapped, or surrounded, by a mass of stainless steel wool. The wool wrapped portion is then sandwiched between tuning plates, which may also be stainless steel, by means of clamping screws which may be adjusted to change the clamping force of the sandwiched assembly along the waveguide section. The plates are preformed along their length in a sinusoidally bent pattern with a period approximately equal to the acoustic wavelength which is to be damped. The bent pattern of the opposing plates are in phase along their length relative to their sinusoidal patterns so that as the clamping screws are tightened a bending stress is applied to the waveguide at 180/sup 0/ intervals along the damping section to oppose the acoustic wave motions in the waveguide and provide good coupling of the wool to the guide. The damper is tuned by selectively tightening the clamping screws while monitoring the amplitude of the acoustic waves launched in the waveguide. It may be selectively tuned to damp particular acoustic wave modes (torsional or extensional, for example) and/or frequencies while allowing others to pass unattenuated.

  4. Tunable damper for an acoustic wave guide

    DOEpatents

    Rogers, Samuel C.

    1984-01-01

    A damper for tunably damping acoustic waves in an ultrasonic waveguide is provided which may be used in a hostile environment such as a nuclear reactor. The area of the waveguide, which may be a selected size metal rod in which acoustic waves are to be damped, is wrapped, or surrounded, by a mass of stainless steel wool. The wool wrapped portion is then sandwiched between tuning plates, which may also be stainless steel, by means of clamping screws which may be adjusted to change the clamping force of the sandwiched assembly along the waveguide section. The plates are preformed along their length in a sinusoidally bent pattern with a period approximately equal to the acoustic wavelength which is to be damped. The bent pattern of the opposing plates are in phase along their length relative to their sinusoidal patterns so that as the clamping screws are tightened a bending stress is applied to the waveguide at 180.degree. intervals along the damping section to oppose the acoustic wave motions in the waveguide and provide good coupling of the wool to the guide. The damper is tuned by selectively tightening the clamping screws while monitoring the amplitude of the acoustic waves launched in the waveguide. It may be selectively tuned to damp particular acoustic wave modes (torsional or extensional, for example) and/or frequencies while allowing others to pass unattenuated.

  5. Tunable damper for an acoustic wave guide

    DOEpatents

    Rogers, S.C.

    1982-10-21

    A damper for tunably damping acoustic waves in an ultrasonic waveguide is provided which may be used in a hostile environment such as a nuclear reactor. The area of the waveguide, which may be a selected size metal rod in which acoustic waves are to be damped, is wrapped, or surrounded, by a mass of stainless steel wool. The wool wrapped portion is then sandwiched between tuning plates, which may also be stainless steel, by means of clamping screws which may be adjusted to change the clamping force of the sandwiched assembly along the waveguide section. The plates are preformed along their length in a sinusoidally bent pattern with a period approximately equal to the acoustic wavelength which is to be damped. The bent pattern of the opposing plates are in phase along their length relative to their sinusoidal patterns so that as the clamping screws are tightened a bending stress is applied to the waveguide at 180/sup 0/ intervals along the damping section to oppose the acoustic wave motions in the waveguide and provide good coupling of the wool to the guide. The damper is tuned by selectively tightening the clamping screws while monitoring the amplitude of the acoustic waves launched in the waveguide. It may be selectively tuned to damp particular acoustic wave modes (torsional or extensional, for example) and/or frequencies while allowing others to pass unattenuated.

  6. Wave attenuation in the shallows of San Francisco Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lacy, Jessica R.; MacVean, Lissa J.

    2016-01-01

    Waves propagating over broad, gently-sloped shallows decrease in height due to frictional dissipation at the bed. We quantified wave-height evolution across 7 km of mudflat in San Pablo Bay (northern San Francisco Bay), an environment where tidal mixing prevents the formation of fluid mud. Wave height was measured along a cross shore transect (elevation range−2mto+0.45mMLLW) in winter 2011 and summer 2012. Wave height decreased more than 50% across the transect. The exponential decay coefficient λ was inversely related to depth squared (λ=6×10−4h−2). The physical roughness length scale kb, estimated from near-bed turbulence measurements, was 3.5×10−3 m in winter and 1.1×10−2 m in summer. Estimated wave friction factor fw determined from wave-height data suggests that bottom friction dominates dissipation at high Rew but not at low Rew. Predictions of near-shore wave height based on offshore wave height and a rough formulation for fw were quite accurate, with errors about half as great as those based on the smooth formulation for fw. Researchers often assume that the wave boundary layer is smooth for settings with fine-grained sediments. At this site, use of a smooth fw results in an underestimate of wave shear stress by a factor of 2 for typical waves and as much as 5 for more energetic waves. It also inadequately captures the effectiveness of the mudflats in protecting the shoreline through wave attenuation.

  7. Fluid pressure waves trigger earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulargia, Francesco; Bizzarri, Andrea

    2015-03-01

    Fluids-essentially meteoric water-are present everywhere in the Earth's crust, occasionally also with pressures higher than hydrostatic due to the tectonic strain imposed on impermeable undrained layers, to the impoundment of artificial lakes or to the forced injections required by oil and gas exploration and production. Experimental evidence suggests that such fluids flow along preferred paths of high diffusivity, provided by rock joints and faults. Studying the coupled poroelastic problem, we find that such flow is ruled by a nonlinear partial differential equation amenable to a Barenblatt-type solution, implying that it takes place in form of solitary pressure waves propagating at a velocity which decreases with time as v ∝ t [1/(n - 1) - 1] with n ≳ 7. According to Tresca-Von Mises criterion, these waves appear to play a major role in earthquake triggering, being also capable to account for aftershock delay without any further assumption. The measure of stress and fluid pressure inside active faults may therefore provide direct information about fault potential instability.

  8. Suppressing wall turbulence by means of a transverse traveling wave

    PubMed

    Du; Karniadakis

    2000-05-19

    Direct numerical simulations of wall-bounded flow reveal that turbulence production can be suppressed by a transverse traveling wave. Flow visualizations show that the near-wall streaks are eliminated, in contrast to other turbulence-control techniques, leading to a large shear stress reduction. The traveling wave can be induced by a spanwise force that is confined within the viscous sublayer; it has its maximum at the wall and decays exponentially away from it. We demonstrate the application of this approach in salt water, using arrays of electromagnetic tiles that produce the required traveling wave excitation at a high efficiency. PMID:10817995

  9. Gravity waves and instabilities in the lower and middle atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klostermeyer, Juergen

    1989-01-01

    Some basic aspects of mesoscale and small-scale gravity waves and instability mechanisms are discussed. Internal gravity waves with wavelengths between ten and less than one kilometer and periods between several hours and several minutes appear to play a central role in atmospheric wavenumber and frequency spectra. Therefore, the author discusses the propagation of gravity waves in simplified atmospheric models. Their interaction with the wind as well as their mutual interaction and stability mechanisms based on these processes are discussed. Mesosphere stratosphere troposphere radar observations showing the relevant hydrodynamic processes are stressed.

  10. Mechanism of fragmentation of urinary stones by underwater shock wave.

    PubMed

    Kambe, K; Kuwahara, M; Orikasa, S; Takayama, K

    1988-01-01

    The focusing of an underwater shock wave, generated by an underwater microexplosion, has been studied by several methods, such as holography, pressure measurement and pressure print. It has been shown that the shock wave could be focused within the range of a few millimeters and with an amplitude of 1 kbar. The acoustic impedances of various kinds of urinary stones were measured by the original graphical method using holographic interferrometry. The process of breaking a stone by a focused underwater shock wave was observed with high-speed cinematography. It was supposed that the main mechanism of breaking the stone is the tensile stress at the solid-water acoustic interface. PMID:3201639

  11. Controlling acoustic-wave propagation through material anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tehranian, Aref; Amirkhizi, Alireza V.; Irion, Jeffrey; Isaacs, Jon; Nemat-Nasser, Sia

    2009-03-01

    Acoustic-wave velocity is strongly direction dependent in an anisotropic medium. This can be used to design composites with preferred acoustic-energy transport characteristics. In a unidirectional fiber-glass composite, for example, the preferred direction corresponds to the fiber orientation which is associated with the highest stiffness and which can be used to guide the momentum and energy of the acoustic waves either away from or toward a region within the material, depending on whether one wishes to avoid or harvest the corresponding stress waves. The main focus of this work is to illustrate this phenomenon using numerical simulations and then check the results experimentally.

  12. Modal Waves Solved in Complex Wave Number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, W.-J.; Jenot, F.; Ourak, M.

    2005-04-01

    A numerical algorithm is proposed for the resolution in complex domain of the ultrasonic modal waves from the characteristic equation of elastic structures. The method is applicable to any numerically available function given explicitly or implicitly. The complex root loci of the modal waves are constructed by varying other parameters. Different situations which can cause the roots searching and following failure are analysed and the corresponding solutions are proposed. The computation examples are given for a three layered adhesive joint and a composite plate.

  13. Stress in the zoo: Tracking the impact of stress on memory formation over time.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Susanne; Schwabe, Lars

    2016-09-01

    Although stress is well known to modulate human memory, precisely how memory formation is altered by a stressful encounter remains unclear. Stress effects on cognition are mainly mediated by the rapidly acting sympathetic nervous system, resulting in the release of catecholamines, and the slower acting hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis secreting cortisol, which induces its effects on cognition through fast, non-genomic actions and delayed, genomic actions. Importantly, these different waves of the physiological stress response are thought to dynamically alter neural processing in brain regions important for memory such as the amygdala and the hippocampus. However, the precise time course of stress effects on memory formation is still unclear. To track the development of stress effects on memory over time, we tested individuals who underwent a stressful experience or a control procedure before a 2-h walk through a zoo, while an automatic camera continuously photographed the events they encoded. In a recognition memory test one week later, participants were presented with target photographs of their own zoo tour and lure photographs from an alternate tour. Stressed participants showed better memory for the experimental treatment than control participants, and this memory enhancement for the stressful encounter itself was directly linked to the sympathetic stress response. Moreover, stress enhanced memory for events encoded 41-65min after stressor onset, which was associated with the cortisol stress response, most likely arising from non-genomic cortisol actions. However, memory for events encoded long after the stressor, when genomic cortisol actions had most likely developed, remained unchanged. Our findings provide novel insights into how stress effects on memory formation develop over time, depending on the activity of major physiological stress response systems. PMID:27240149

  14. Simulations of Convective Excitation of Internal Waves in Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lecoanet, D.; Quataert, E.; Vasil, G. M.; Brown, B. P.; Oishi, J.

    2014-12-01

    Convection adjacent to stable stratification can excite internal waves. These convectively excited internal waves can transport energy, momentum, and other quantities in a variety of geophysical and atmospherical contexts, including in the Earth's stratosphere, and the radiative zones of stars. To better understand the excitation mechanism, we perform simplified 2D simulations of a recent experiment by Perrard et al. (2013). The simulations are run using the new, very flexible, pseudo-spectral code Dedalus. The experiment and simulations exploit water's density maximum at 4C: a linear temperature profile includes both convectively unstable and stably stratified regions. The simulations and experiment show qualitatively similar excitation spectra. We then test two heuristic models of internal wave excitation by convection, the interface forcing mechanism and the deep excitation mechanism. To test these, we run linear simulations of the simulation. In one case, we solve the linear wave equation, with a boundary condition mimicking the motions of the interface from the simulations. This successfully reproduces the low frequency waves, but overestimates the excitation of high frequency waves. This is because high frequency convective motions are nonlinear, but the interface forcing simulation treats them as linear. Next, we test the deep excitation mechanism by solving the linear wave equation with a source term related to the Reynolds stress in the convective region. This successfully reproduces all waves, and the correlation between the linear model and the full simulation is about 0.95. This suggests that the deep excitation mechanism most accurately explains the wave generation in this system.

  15. Origin of crustal anisotropy: Shear wave splitting studies in Japan

    SciTech Connect

    Kaneshima, Satoshi )

    1990-07-10

    Shear wave splitting manifested as leading shear wave polarization, that is, parallel alignment of leading shear wave particle motions from a variety of sources, has been observed at a number of seismograph stations in Japan. Detected on shear wave seismograms from crustal earthquakes over a wide range of source zones and source-receiver azimuths, the shear wave splitting can be attributed to crustal anisotropy. This paper discusses the relation between leading shear wave polarization directions and tectonic features of Japan. To explain the observed shear wave splitting, the author proposes that at least three phenomena should be taken into account: stress-induced microcracks primarily aligned in vertical or subvertical planes; cracks or fractures in the vicinity of active faults having their orientation parallel to the fault planes; and intrinsic rock anisotropy resulting from preferred orientation of minerals. Travel time differences between leading and slower split shear waves from crustal and upper mantle earthquakes analyzed for about one third of the stations suggest that the crustal anisotropy which causes the observed shear wave splitting may be limited to the upper 15-25 km. This implies that the density of nonhorizontally aligned cracks or fractures below 15-25 km and into the upper mantle is much smaller than that in the crust above 15-25 km.

  16. Oceanic-wave-measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, J. F.; Miles, R. T.

    1980-01-01

    Barometer mounted on bouy senses wave heights. As wave motion raises and lowers barometer, pressure differential is proportional to wave height. Monitoring circuit samples barometer output every half cycle of wave motion and adds magnitudes of adjacent positive and negative peaks. Resulting output signals, proportional to wave height, are transmitted to central monitoring station.

  17. Comparison and validation of physical wave parameterizations in spectral wave models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stopa, Justin E.; Ardhuin, Fabrice; Babanin, Alexander; Zieger, Stefan

    2016-07-01

    Recent developments in the physical parameterizations available in spectral wave models have already been validated, but there is little information on their relative performance especially with focus on the higher order spectral moments and wave partitions. This study concentrates on documenting their strengths and limitations using satellite measurements, buoy spectra, and a comparison between the different models. It is confirmed that all models perform well in terms of significant wave heights; however higher-order moments have larger errors. The partition wave quantities perform well in terms of direction and frequency but the magnitude and directional spread typically have larger discrepancies. The high-frequency tail is examined through the mean square slope using satellites and buoys. From this analysis it is clear that some models behave better than the others, suggesting their parameterizations match the physical processes reasonably well. However none of the models are entirely satisfactory, pointing to poorly constrained parameterizations or missing physical processes. The major space-time differences between the models are related to the swell field which stresses the importance of describing its evolution. An example swell field confirms the wave heights can be notably different between model configurations while the directional distributions remain similar. It is clear that all models have difficulty describing the directional spread. Therefore, knowledge of the source term directional distributions is paramount to improve the wave model physics in the future.

  18. The effect of wave-induced turbulence on intertidal mudflats: Impact of boat traffic and wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verney, R.; Deloffre, J.; Brun-Cottan, J.-C.; Lafite, R.

    2007-03-01

    Semi-diurnal and fortnightly surveys were carried out to quantify the effects of wind- and navigation-induced high-energy events on bed sediments above intertidal mudflats. The mudflats are located in the upper fluvial part (Oissel mudflat) and at the mouth (Vasière Nord mudflat) of the macrotidal Seine estuary. Instantaneous flow velocities and mudflat bed elevation were measured at a high frequency and high resolution with an acoustic doppler velocimeter (ADV) and an ALTUS altimeter, respectively. Suspended particulate matter concentrations were estimated by calibrating the ADV acoustic backscattered intensity with bed sediments collected at the study sites. Turbulent bed shear stress values were estimated by the turbulent kinetic energy method, using velocity variances filtered from the wave contribution. Wave shear stress and maximum wave-current shear stress values were calculated with the wave-current interaction (WCI) model, which is based on the bed roughness length, wave orbital velocities and the wave period ( TS). In the fluvial part of the estuary, boat passages occurred unevenly during the surveys and were characterized by long waves ( TS>50 s) induced by the drawdown effect and by short boat-waves ( TS<10 s). Boat waves generated large bottom shear stress values of 0.5 N m -2 for 2-5 min periods and, in burst of several seconds, larger bottom shear stress values up to 1 N m -2. At the mouth of the estuary, west south-west wind events generated short waves ( TS<10 s) of HS values ranging from 0.1 to 0.3 m. In shallow-water environment (water depth <1.5 m), these waves produced bottom shear stress values between 1 and 2 N m -2. Wave-current shear stress values are one order of magnitude larger than the current-induced shear stress and indicate that navigation and wind are the dominant hydrodynamic forcing parameters above the two mudflats. Bed elevation and SPM concentration time series showed that these high energy events induced erosion processes of

  19. Ultrafast strain gauge: Observation of THz radiation coherently generated by acoustic waves

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, M; Reed, E; Kim, K; Glownia, J; Howard, W M; Piner, E; Roberts, J

    2008-08-14

    The study of nanoscale, terahertz frequency (THz) acoustic waves has great potential for elucidating material and chemical interactions as well as nanostructure characterization. Here we report the first observation of terahertz radiation coherently generated by an acoustic wave. Such emission is directly related to the time-dependence of the stress as the acoustic wave crosses an interface between materials of differing piezoelectric response. This phenomenon enables a new class of strain wave metrology that is fundamentally distinct from optical approaches, providing passive remote sensing of the dynamics of acoustic waves with ultrafast time resolution. The new mechanism presented here enables nanostructure measurements not possible using existing optical or x-ray approaches.

  20. Advanced Gravitational Wave Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blair, D. G.; Howell, E. J.; Ju, L.; Zhao, C.

    2012-02-01

    Part I. An Introduction to Gravitational Wave Astronomy and Detectors: 1. Gravitational waves D. G. Blair, L. Ju, C. Zhao and E. J. Howell; 2. Sources of gravitational waves D. G. Blair and E. J. Howell; 3. Gravitational wave detectors D. G. Blair, L. Ju, C. Zhao, H. Miao, E. J. Howell, and P. Barriga; 4. Gravitational wave data analysis B. S. Sathyaprakash and B. F. Schutz; 5. Network analysis L. Wen and B. F. Schutz; Part II. Current Laser Interferometer Detectors: Three Case Studies: 6. The Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory P. Fritschel; 7. The VIRGO detector S. Braccini; 8. GEO 600 H. Lück and H. Grote; Part III. Technology for Advanced Gravitational Wave Detectors: 9. Lasers for high optical power interferometers B. Willke and M. Frede; 10. Thermal noise, suspensions and test masses L. Ju, G. Harry and B. Lee; 11. Vibration isolation: Part 1. Seismic isolation for advanced LIGO B. Lantz; Part 2. Passive isolation J-C. Dumas; 12. Interferometer sensing and control P. Barriga; 13. Stabilizing interferometers against high optical power effects C. Zhao, L. Ju, S. Gras and D. G. Blair; Part IV. Technology for Third Generation Gravitational Wave Detectors: 14. Cryogenic interferometers J. Degallaix; 15. Quantum theory of laser-interferometer GW detectors H. Miao and Y. Chen; 16. ET. A third generation observatory M. Punturo and H. Lück; Index.