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Sample records for acp synthase iii

  1. Biochemical and Structural Characterization of Germicidin Synthase: Analysis of a Type III Polyketide Synthase That Employs Acyl-ACP as a Starter Unit Donor

    SciTech Connect

    Chemler, Joseph A.; Buchholz, Tonia J.; Geders, Todd W.; Akey, David L.; Rath, Christopher M.; Chlipala, George E.; Smith, Janet L.; Sherman, David H.

    2012-08-10

    Germicidin synthase (Gcs) from Streptomyces coelicolor is a type III polyketide synthase (PKS) with broad substrate flexibility for acyl groups linked through a thioester bond to either coenzyme A (CoA) or acyl carrier protein (ACP). Germicidin synthesis was reconstituted in vitro by coupling Gcs with fatty acid biosynthesis. Since Gcs has broad substrate flexibility, we directly compared the kinetic properties of Gcs with both acyl-ACP and acyl-CoA. The catalytic efficiency of Gcs for acyl-ACP was 10-fold higher than for acyl-CoA, suggesting a strong preference toward carrier protein starter unit transfer. The 2.9 {angstrom} germicidin synthase crystal structure revealed canonical type III PKS architecture along with an unusual helical bundle of unknown function that appears to extend the dimerization interface. A pair of arginine residues adjacent to the active site affect catalytic activity but not ACP binding. This investigation provides new and surprising information about the interactions between type III PKSs and ACPs that will facilitate the construction of engineered systems for production of novel polyketides.

  2. Type III polyketide synthase beta-ketoacyl-ACP starter unit and ethylmalonyl-CoA extender unit selectivity discovered by Streptomyces coelicolor genome mining.

    PubMed

    Song, Lijiang; Barona-Gomez, Francisco; Corre, Christophe; Xiang, Longkuan; Udwary, Daniel W; Austin, Michael B; Noel, Joseph P; Moore, Bradley S; Challis, Gregory L

    2006-11-22

    Polyketide synthases (PKSs) are involved in the biosynthesis of many important natural products. In bacteria, type III PKSs typically catalyze iterative decarboxylation and condensation reactions of malonyl-CoA building blocks in the biosynthesis of polyhydroxyaromatic products. Here it is shown that Gcs, a type III PKS encoded by the sco7221 ORF of the bacterium Streptomyces coelicolor, is required for biosynthesis of the germicidin family of 3,6-dialkyl-4-hydroxypyran-2-one natural products. Evidence consistent with Gcs-catalyzed elongation of specific beta-ketoacyl-ACP products of the fatty acid synthase FabH with ethyl- or methylmalonyl-CoA in the biosynthesis of germicidins is presented. Selectivity for beta-ketoacyl-ACP starter units and ethylmalonyl-CoA as an extender unit is unprecedented for type III PKSs, suggesting these enzymes may be capable of utilizing a far wider range of starter and extender units for natural product assembly than believed until now. PMID:17105255

  3. Shewanella oneidensis FabB: A β-ketoacyl-ACP Synthase That Works with C16:1-ACP

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Qixia; Li, Meng; Fu, Huihui; Meng, Qiu; Gao, Haichun

    2016-01-01

    It is established that Escherichia coli β-ketoacyl-ACP synthase (KAS) I (encoded by EcfabB) is the primary, if not exclusive, factor for elongation of the cis-3-decenoyl-ACP (C10:1-ACP) but not effective with C16:1- or longer-chain-ACPs. To test the extent to which these features apply to KAS I proteins in other species, in this study, we examined the physiological role of FabB in Shewanella oneidensis, an excellent model for researching type II fatty acid synthetic (FAS) system and its regulation. We showed that the loss of either FabA (the enzyme that introduces double bond) or FabB, in the absence of DesA which desaturizes C16 and C18 to generate respective C16:1 and C18:1, leads to a UFA auxotroph. However, fatty acid profiles of membrane phospholipid of the fabA and fabB mutants are significantly different, suggesting that FabB participates in steps beyond elongation of C10:1-ACP. Further analyses demonstrated that S. oneidensis FabB differs from EcFabB in that (i) it is not the only enzyme capable of catalyzing elongation of the cis-3-decenoyl-ACP produced by FabA, (ii) it plays a critical role in elongation of C16:1- and longer-chain-ACPs, and (iii) its overproduction is detrimental. PMID:27014246

  4. Substrate recognition by β-ketoacyl-ACP synthases.

    PubMed

    Borgaro, Janine G; Chang, Andrew; Machutta, Carl A; Zhang, Xujie; Tonge, Peter J

    2011-12-13

    β-Ketoacyl-ACP synthase (KAS) enzymes catalyze Claisen condensation reactions in the fatty acid biosynthesis pathway. These reactions follow a ping-pong mechanism in which a donor substrate acylates the active site cysteine residue after which the acyl group is condensed with the malonyl-ACP acceptor substrate to form a β-ketoacyl-ACP. In the priming KASIII enzymes the donor substrate is an acyl-CoA while in the elongating KASI and KASII enzymes the donor is an acyl-ACP. Although the KASIII enzyme in Escherichia coli (ecFabH) is essential, the corresponding enzyme in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (mtFabH) is not, suggesting that the KASI or II enzyme in M. tuberculosis (KasA or KasB, respectively) must be able to accept a CoA donor substrate. Since KasA is essential, the substrate specificity of this KASI enzyme has been explored using substrates based on phosphopantetheine, CoA, ACP, and AcpM peptide mimics. This analysis has been extended to the KASI and KASII enzymes from E. coli (ecFabB and ecFabF) where we show that a 14-residue malonyl-phosphopantetheine peptide can efficiently replace malonyl-ecACP as the acceptor substrate in the ecFabF reaction. While ecFabF is able to catalyze the condensation reaction when CoA is the carrier for both substrates, the KASI enzymes ecFabB and KasA have an absolute requirement for an ACP substrate as the acyl donor. Provided that this requirement is met, variation in the acceptor carrier substrate has little impact on the k(cat)/K(m) for the KASI reaction. For the KASI enzymes we propose that the binding of ecACP (AcpM) results in a conformational change that leads to an open form of the enzyme to which the malonyl acceptor substrate binds. Finally, the substrate inhibition observed when palmitoyl-CoA is the donor substrate for the KasA reaction has implications for the importance of mtFabH in the mycobacterial FASII pathway. PMID:22017312

  5. Evolution of acyl-ACP-thioesterases and β-ketoacyl-ACP-synthases revealed by protein-protein interactions

    PubMed Central

    Beld, Joris; Blatti, Jillian L.; Behnke, Craig; Mendez, Michael; Burkart, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    The fatty acid synthase (FAS) is a conserved primary metabolic enzyme complex capable of tolerating cross-species engineering of domains for the development of modified and overproduced fatty acids. In eukaryotes, acyl-acyl carrier protein thioesterases (TEs) off-load mature cargo from the acyl carrier protein (ACP), and plants have developed TEs for short/medium-chain fatty acids. We showed that engineering plant TEs into the green microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii does not result in the predicted shift in fatty acid profile. Since fatty acid biosynthesis relies on substrate recognition and protein-protein interactions between the ACP and its partner enzymes, we hypothesized that plant TEs and algal ACP do not functionally interact. Phylogenetic analysis revealed major evolutionary differences between FAS enzymes, including TEs and ketoacyl synthases (KSs), in which the former is present only in some species, whereas the latter is present in all, and has a common ancestor. In line with these results, TEs appeared to be selective towards their ACP partners whereas KSs showed promiscuous behavior across bacterial, plant and algal species. Based on phylogenetic analyses, in silico docking, in vitro mechanistic crosslinking and in vivo algal engineering, we propose that phylogeny can predict effective interactions between ACPs and partner enzymes. PMID:25110394

  6. Modeling holo-ACP:DH and holo-ACP:KR complexes of modular polyketide synthases: a docking and molecular dynamics study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Modular polyketide synthases are multifunctional megasynthases which biosynthesize a variety of secondary metabolites using various combinations of dehydratase (DH), ketoreductase (KR) and enoyl-reductase (ER) domains. During the catalysis of various reductive steps these domains act on a substrate moiety which is covalently attached to the phosphopantetheine (P-pant) group of the holo-Acyl Carrier Protein (holo-ACP) domain, thus necessitating the formation of holo-ACP:DH and holo-ACP:KR complexes. Even though three dimensional structures are available for DH, KR and ACP domains, no structures are available for DH or KR domains in complex with ACP or substrate moieties. Since Ser of holo-ACP is covalently attached to a large phosphopantetheine group, obtaining complexes involving holo-ACP by standard protein-protein docking has been a difficult task. Results We have modeled the holo-ACP:DH and holo-ACP:KR complexes for identifying specific residues on DH and KR domains which are involved in interaction with ACP, phosphopantetheine and substrate moiety. A novel combination of protein-protein and protein-ligand docking has been used to first model complexes involving apo-ACP and then dock the phosphopantetheine and substrate moieties using covalent connectivity between ACP, phosphopantetheine and substrate moiety as constraints. The holo-ACP:DH and holo-ACP:KR complexes obtained from docking have been further refined by restraint free explicit solvent MD simulations to incorporate effects of ligand and receptor flexibilities. The results from 50 ns MD simulations reveal that substrate enters into a deep tunnel in DH domain while in case of KR domain the substrate binds a shallow surface exposed cavity. Interestingly, in case of DH domain the predicted binding site overlapped with the binding site in the inhibitor bound crystal structure of FabZ, the DH domain from E.Coli FAS. In case of KR domain, the substrate binding site identified by our simulations

  7. Inhibition of a Mycobacterium tuberculosis beta-ketoacyl ACP synthase by isoniazid.

    PubMed

    Mdluli, K; Slayden, R A; Zhu, Y; Ramaswamy, S; Pan, X; Mead, D; Crane, D D; Musser, J M; Barry, C E

    1998-06-01

    Although isoniazid (isonicotinic acid hydrazide, INH) is widely used for the treatment of tuberculosis, its molecular target has remained elusive. In response to INH treatment, saturated hexacosanoic acid (C26:0) accumulated on a 12-kilodalton acyl carrier protein (AcpM) that normally carried mycolic acid precursors as long as C50. A protein species purified from INH-treated Mycobacterium tuberculosis was shown to consist of a covalent complex of INH, AcpM, and a beta-ketoacyl acyl carrier protein synthase, KasA. Amino acid-altering mutations in the KasA protein were identified in INH-resistant patient isolates that lacked other mutations associated with resistance to this drug. PMID:9616124

  8. Acyl-ACP Substrate Recognition in Burkholderia mallei BmaI1 Acyl-Homoserine Lactone Synthase

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The acyl-homoserine lactone (AHL) autoinducer mediated quorum sensing regulates virulence in several pathogenic bacteria. The hallmark of an efficient quorum sensing system relies on the tight specificity in the signal generated by each bacterium. Since AHL signal specificity is derived from the acyl-chain of the acyl-ACP (ACP = acyl carrier protein) substrate, AHL synthase enzymes must recognize and react with the native acyl-ACP with high catalytic efficiency while keeping reaction rates with non-native acyl-ACPs low. The mechanism of acyl-ACP substrate recognition in these enzymes, however, remains elusive. In this study, we investigated differences in catalytic efficiencies for shorter and longer chain acyl-ACP substrates reacting with an octanoyl-homoserine lactone synthase Burkholderia mallei BmaI1. With the exception of two-carbon shorter hexanoyl-ACP, the catalytic efficiencies of butyryl-ACP, decanoyl-ACP, and octanoyl-CoA reacting with BmaI1 decreased by greater than 20-fold compared to the native octanoyl-ACP substrate. Furthermore, we also noticed kinetic cooperativity when BmaI1 reacted with non-native acyl-donor substrates. Our kinetic data suggest that non-native acyl-ACP substrates are unable to form a stable and productive BmaI1·acyl-ACP·SAM ternary complex and are thus effectively discriminated by the enzyme. These results offer insights into the molecular basis of substrate recognition for the BmaI1 enzyme. PMID:25215658

  9. The β-ketoacyl-ACP synthase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis as potential drug targets.

    PubMed

    Singh, V; Mani, I; Chaudhary, D K; Somvanshi, P

    2011-01-01

    The continuous preventive measures and control of tuberculosis are often hampered by re-emergence of multi-drug-resistant (MDR) strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. A novel drug approach is desperately needed to combat the global threat posed by MDR strains. In spite of current advancement in biological techniques viz. microarray and proteomics data for tuberculosis, no such potent drug has been developed in the past decades yet. Therefore, mycolic acid is an essential constituent which is involved in the formation of cell wall of Mycobacterium species. The biosynthesis of mycolic acid is involved in two fatty acid synthase systems, the multifunctional polypeptide fatty acid synthase I (FASI) which performs de novo fatty acid synthesis and dissociate FASII system. FASII system consists of monofunctional enzymes and acyl carrier protein (ACP), elongating FASI products to long chain mycolic acid precursor. In this review, the β-ketoacyl-ACP synthases (fadH, kasA and kasB) are distinct and play a vital role in mycolic acid synthesis, cell wall synthesis, biofilm formation and also pathogenesis. On the basis of substantial observation we suggest that these enzymes may be used as promising and attractive targets for novel anti-TB drugs designing and discovery. PMID:21370994

  10. Thiolactomycin-Based Inhibitors of Bacterial β-Ketoacyl-ACP Synthases with in Vivo Activity.

    PubMed

    Bommineni, Gopal R; Kapilashrami, Kanishk; Cummings, Jason E; Lu, Yang; Knudson, Susan E; Gu, Chendi; Walker, Stephen G; Slayden, Richard A; Tonge, Peter J

    2016-06-01

    β-Ketoacyl-ACP synthases (KAS) are key enzymes involved in the type II bacterial fatty acid biosynthesis (FASII) pathway and are putative targets for antibacterial discovery. Several natural product KAS inhibitors have previously been reported, including thiolactomycin (TLM), which is produced by Nocardia spp. Here we describe the synthesis and characterization of optically pure 5R-thiolactomycin (TLM) analogues that show improved whole cell activity against bacterial strains including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and priority pathogens such as Francisella tularensis and Burkholderia pseudomallei. In addition, we identify TLM analogues with in vivo efficacy against MRSA and Klebsiella pneumoniae in animal models of infection. PMID:27187871

  11. Mycolic acid biosynthesis and enzymic characterization of the beta-ketoacyl-ACP synthase A-condensing enzyme from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Kremer, Laurent; Dover, Lynn G; Carrère, Séverine; Nampoothiri, K Madhavan; Lesjean, Sarah; Brown, Alistair K; Brennan, Patrick J; Minnikin, David E; Locht, Camille; Besra, Gurdyal S

    2002-06-01

    Mycolic acids consist of long-chain alpha-alkyl-beta-hydroxy fatty acids that are produced by successive rounds of elongation catalysed by a type II fatty acid synthase (FAS-II). A key feature in the elongation process is the condensation of a two-carbon unit from malonyl-acyl-carrier protein (ACP) to a growing acyl-ACP chain catalysed by a beta-ketoacyl-ACP synthase (Kas). In the present study, we provide evidence that kasA from Mycobacterium tuberculosis encodes an enzyme that elongates in vivo the meromycolate chain, in both Mycobacterium smegmatis and Mycobacterium chelonae. We demonstrate that KasA belongs to the FAS-II system, which utilizes primarily palmitoyl-ACP rather than short-chain acyl-ACP primers. Furthermore, in an in vitro condensing assay using purified recombinant KasA, palmitoyl-AcpM and malonyl-AcpM, KasA was found to express Kas activity. Also, mutated KasA proteins, with mutation of Cys(171), His(311), Lys(340) and His(345) to Ala abrogated the condensation activity of KasA in vitro completely. Finally, purified KasA was highly sensitive to cerulenin, a well-known inhibitor of Kas, which may lead to the development of novel anti-mycobacterial drugs targeting KasA. PMID:12023885

  12. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of enoyl-ACP reductase III (FabL) from Bacillus subtilis

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Kook-Han; Park, Joon Kyu; Ha, Byung Hak; Moon, Jin Ho; Kim, Eunice EunKyeong

    2007-03-01

    Enoyl-ACP reductase III (FabL) from B. subtilis has been overexpressed, purified and crystallized. The crystal belongs to space group P622, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 139.56, c = 62.75 Å, α = β = 90, γ = 120°, and data were collected to 2.5 Å resolution using synchrotron radiation. Enoyl-[acyl-carrier protein] reductase (enoyl-ACP reductase; ENR) is a key enzyme in type II fatty-acid synthase that catalyzes the last step in each elongation cycle. It has been considered as an antibiotic target since it is an essential enzyme in bacteria. However, recent studies indicate that some pathogens have more than one ENR. Bacillus subtilis is reported to have two ENRs, namely BsFabI and BsFabL. While BsFabI is similar to other FabIs, BsFabL shows very little sequence similarity and is NADPH-dependent instead of NADH-dependent as in the case of FabI. In order to understand these differences on a structural basis, BsFabL has been cloned, expressed and and crystallized. The crystal belongs to space group P622, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 139.56, c = 62.75 Å, α = β = 90, γ = 120° and one molecule of FabL in the asymmetric unit. Data were collected using synchrotron radiation (beamline 4A at the Pohang Light Source, Korea). The crystal diffracted to 2.5 Å resolution.

  13. Campylobacter jejuni fatty acid synthase II: Structural and functional analysis of [beta]-hydroxyacyl-ACP dehydratase (FabZ)

    SciTech Connect

    Kirkpatrick, Andrew S.; Yokoyama, Takeshi; Choi, Kyoung-Jae; Yeo, Hye-Jeong

    2009-08-14

    Fatty acid biosynthesis is crucial for all living cells. In contrast to higher organisms, bacteria use a type II fatty acid synthase (FAS II) composed of a series of individual proteins, making FAS II enzymes excellent targets for antibiotics discovery. The {beta}-hydroxyacyl-ACP dehydratase (FabZ) catalyzes an essential step in the FAS II pathway. Here, we report the structure of Campylobacter jejuni FabZ (CjFabZ), showing a hexamer both in crystals and solution, with each protomer adopting the characteristic hot dog fold. Together with biochemical analysis of CjFabZ, we define the first functional FAS II enzyme from this pathogen, and provide a framework for investigation on roles of FAS II in C. jejuni virulence

  14. Modulation of Medium-Chain Fatty Acid Synthesis in Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 by Replacing FabH with a Chaetoceros Ketoacyl-ACP Synthase

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Huiya; Jinkerson, Robert E.; Davies, Fiona K.; Sisson, Lyle A.; Schneider, Philip E.; Posewitz, Matthew C.

    2016-01-01

    The isolation or engineering of algal cells synthesizing high levels of medium-chain fatty acids (MCFAs) is attractive to mitigate the high clouding point of longer chain fatty acids in algal based biodiesel. To develop a more informed understanding of MCFA synthesis in photosynthetic microorganisms, we isolated several algae from Great Salt Lake and screened this collection for MCFA accumulation to identify strains naturally accumulating high levels of MCFA. A diatom, Chaetoceros sp. GSL56, accumulated particularly high levels of C14 (up to 40%), with the majority of C14 fatty acids allocated in triacylglycerols. Using whole cell transcriptome sequencing and de novo assembly, putative genes encoding fatty acid synthesis enzymes were identified. Enzymes from this Chaetoceros sp. were expressed in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 to validate gene function and to determine whether eukaryotic enzymes putatively lacking bacterial evolutionary control mechanisms could be used to improve MCFA production in this promising production strain. Replacement of the Synechococcus 7002 native FabH with a Chaetoceros ketoacyl-ACP synthase III increased MCFA synthesis up to fivefold. The level of increase is dependent on promoter strength and culturing conditions. PMID:27303412

  15. Modulation of Medium-Chain Fatty Acid Synthesis in Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 by Replacing FabH with a Chaetoceros Ketoacyl-ACP Synthase.

    PubMed

    Gu, Huiya; Jinkerson, Robert E; Davies, Fiona K; Sisson, Lyle A; Schneider, Philip E; Posewitz, Matthew C

    2016-01-01

    The isolation or engineering of algal cells synthesizing high levels of medium-chain fatty acids (MCFAs) is attractive to mitigate the high clouding point of longer chain fatty acids in algal based biodiesel. To develop a more informed understanding of MCFA synthesis in photosynthetic microorganisms, we isolated several algae from Great Salt Lake and screened this collection for MCFA accumulation to identify strains naturally accumulating high levels of MCFA. A diatom, Chaetoceros sp. GSL56, accumulated particularly high levels of C14 (up to 40%), with the majority of C14 fatty acids allocated in triacylglycerols. Using whole cell transcriptome sequencing and de novo assembly, putative genes encoding fatty acid synthesis enzymes were identified. Enzymes from this Chaetoceros sp. were expressed in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 to validate gene function and to determine whether eukaryotic enzymes putatively lacking bacterial evolutionary control mechanisms could be used to improve MCFA production in this promising production strain. Replacement of the Synechococcus 7002 native FabH with a Chaetoceros ketoacyl-ACP synthase III increased MCFA synthesis up to fivefold. The level of increase is dependent on promoter strength and culturing conditions. PMID:27303412

  16. Transcriptional activation of Brassica napus β-ketoacyl-ACP synthase II with an engineered zinc finger protein transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Manju; DeKelver, Russell C; Palta, Asha; Clifford, Carla; Gopalan, Sunita; Miller, Jeffrey C; Novak, Stephen; Desloover, Daniel; Gachotte, Daniel; Connell, James; Flook, Josh; Patterson, Thomas; Robbins, Kelly; Rebar, Edward J; Gregory, Philip D; Urnov, Fyodor D; Petolino, Joseph F

    2012-09-01

    Targeted gene regulation via designed transcription factors has great potential for precise phenotypic modification and acceleration of novel crop trait development. Canola seed oil composition is dictated largely by the expression of genes encoding enzymes in the fatty acid biosynthetic pathway. In the present study, zinc finger proteins (ZFPs) were designed to bind DNA sequences common to two canola β-ketoacyl-ACP Synthase II (KASII) genes downstream of their transcription start site. Transcriptional activators (ZFP-TFs) were constructed by fusing these ZFP DNA-binding domains to the VP16 transcriptional activation domain. Following transformation using Agrobacterium, transgenic events expressing ZFP-TFs were generated and shown to have elevated KASII transcript levels in the leaves of transgenic T(0) plants when compared to 'selectable marker only' controls as well as of T(1) progeny plants when compared to null segregants. In addition, leaves of ZFP-TF-expressing T(1) plants contained statistically significant decreases in palmitic acid (consistent with increased KASII activity) and increased total C18. Similarly, T(2) seed displayed statistically significant decreases in palmitic acid, increased total C18 and reduced total saturated fatty acid contents. These results demonstrate that designed ZFP-TFs can be used to regulate the expression of endogenous genes to elicit specific phenotypic modifications of agronomically relevant traits in a crop species. PMID:22520333

  17. Direct transfer of starter substrates from type I fatty acid synthase to type III polyketide synthases in phenolic lipid synthesis.

    PubMed

    Miyanaga, Akimasa; Funa, Nobutaka; Awakawa, Takayoshi; Horinouchi, Sueharu

    2008-01-22

    Alkylresorcinols and alkylpyrones, which have a polar aromatic ring and a hydrophobic alkyl chain, are phenolic lipids found in plants, fungi, and bacteria. In the Gram-negative bacterium Azotobacter vinelandii, phenolic lipids in the membrane of dormant cysts are essential for encystment. The aromatic moieties of the phenolic lipids in A. vinelandii are synthesized by two type III polyketide synthases (PKSs), ArsB and ArsC, which are encoded by the ars operon. However, details of the synthesis of hydrophobic acyl chains, which might serve as starter substrates for the type III polyketide synthases (PKSs), were unknown. Here, we show that two type I fatty acid synthases (FASs), ArsA and ArsD, which are members of the ars operon, are responsible for the biosynthesis of C(22)-C(26) fatty acids from malonyl-CoA. In vivo and in vitro reconstitution of phenolic lipid synthesis systems with the Ars enzymes suggested that the C(22)-C(26) fatty acids produced by ArsA and ArsD remained attached to the ACP domain of ArsA and were transferred hand-to-hand to the active-site cysteine residues of ArsB and ArsC. The type III PKSs then used the fatty acids as starter substrates and carried out two or three extensions with malonyl-CoA to yield the phenolic lipids. The phenolic lipids in A. vinelandii were thus found to be synthesized solely from malonyl-CoA by the four members of the ars operon. This is the first demonstration that a type I FAS interacts directly with a type III PKS through substrate transfer. PMID:18199837

  18. Probing the Mechanism of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis [beta]-Ketoacyl-Acyl Carrier Protein Synthase III mtFabH: Factors Influencing Catalysis and Substrate Specificity

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Alistair K.; Sridharan, Sudharsan; Kremer, Laurent; Lindenberg, Sandra; Dover, Lynn G.; Sacchettini, James C.; Besra, Gurdyal S.

    2010-11-30

    Mycolic acids are the dominant feature of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis cell wall. These {alpha}-alkyl, {beta}-hydroxy fatty acids are formed by the condensation of two fatty acids, a long meromycolic acid and a shorter C{sub 24}-C{sub 26} fatty acid. The component fatty acids are produced via a combination of type I and II fatty acid synthases (FAS) with FAS-I products being elongated by FAS-II toward meromycolic acids. The {beta}-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) synthase III encoded by mtfabH (mtFabH) links FAS-I and FAS-II, catalyzing the condensation of FAS-I-derived acyl-CoAs with malonyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP). The acyl-CoA chain length specificity of mtFabH was assessed in vitro; the enzyme extended longer, physiologically relevant acyl-CoA primers when paired with AcpM, its natural partner, than with Escherichia coli ACP. The ability of the enzyme to use E. coli ACP suggests that a similar mode of binding is likely with both ACPs, yet it is clear that unique factors inherent to AcpM modulate the substrate specificity of mtFabH. Mutation of proposed key mtFabH residues was used to define their catalytic roles. Substitution of supposed acyl-CoA binding residues reduced transacylation, with double substitutions totally abrogating activity. Mutation of Arg{sup 46} revealed its more critical role in malonyl-AcpM decarboxylation than in the acyl-CoA binding role. Interestingly, this effect was suppressed intragenically by Arg{sup 161} {yields} Ala substitution. Our structural studies suggested that His{sup 258}, previously implicated in malonyl-ACP decarboxylation, also acts as an anchor point for a network of water molecules that we propose promotes deprotonation and transacylation of Cys{sup 122}.

  19. Exploiting the Biosynthetic Potential of Type III Polyketide Synthases.

    PubMed

    Lim, Yan Ping; Go, Maybelle K; Yew, Wen Shan

    2016-01-01

    Polyketides are structurally and functionally diverse secondary metabolites that are biosynthesized by polyketide synthases (PKSs) using acyl-CoA precursors. Recent studies in the engineering and structural characterization of PKSs have facilitated the use of target enzymes as biocatalysts to produce novel functionally optimized polyketides. These compounds may serve as potential drug leads. This review summarizes the insights gained from research on type III PKSs, from the discovery of chalcone synthase in plants to novel PKSs in bacteria and fungi. To date, at least 15 families of type III PKSs have been characterized, highlighting the utility of PKSs in the development of natural product libraries for therapeutic development. PMID:27338328

  20. Insights from computational analysis of full-length β-ketoacyl-[ACP] synthase-II cDNA isolated from American and African oil palms

    PubMed Central

    Bhore, Subhash J.; Cha, Thye S.; Amelia, Kassim; Shah, Farida H.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Palm oil derived from fruits (mesocarp) of African oil palm (Elaeis guineensis Jacq. Tenera) and American oil palm (E. oleifera) is important for food industry. Due to high yield, Elaeis guineensis (Tenera) is cultivated on commercial scale, though its oil contains high (~54%) level of saturated fatty acids. The rate-limiting activity of beta-ketoacyl-[ACP] synthase-II (KAS-II) is considered mainly responsible for the high (44%) level of palmitic acid (C16:0) in the oil obtained from E. guineensis. Objective: The objective of this study was to annotate KAS-II cDNA isolated from American and African oil palms. Materials and Methods: The full-length E. oleifera KAS-II (EoKAS-II) cDNA clone was isolated using random method of gene isolation. Whereas, the E. guineensis KAS-II (EgTKAS-II) cDNA was isolated using reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) technique; and missing ends were obtained by employing 5’and 3’ RACE technique. Results: The results show that EoKAS-II and EgTKAS-II open reading frames (ORFs) are of 1689 and 1721 bp in length, respectively. Further analysis of the both EoKAS-II and EgTKAS-II predicted protein illustrates that they contains conserved domains for ‘KAS-I and II’, ‘elongating’ condensing enzymes, ‘condensing enzymes super-family’, and ‘3-oxoacyl-[ACP] synthase II’. The predicted protein sequences shows 95% similarity with each other. Consecutively, the three active sites (Cys, His, and His) were identified in both proteins. However, difference in positions of two active Histidine (His) residues was noticed. Conclusion: These insights may serve as the foundation in understanding the variable activity of KAS-II in American and African oil palms; and cDNA clones could be useful in the genetic engineering of oil palms. PMID:24678202

  1. Molecular cloning and expression profile of ß-ketoacyl-acp synthase gene from tung tree (Vernicia fordii Hemsl.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tung tree (Vernicia fordii) is an important woody oil tree. Tung tree seeds contain 50-60% oil with approximately 80 mole a-eleostearic acid (9cis, 11trans, 13trans octadecatrienoic acid). Fatty acid synthesis is catalyzed by the concerted action of acetyl-CoA carboxylase and fatty acid synthase, a ...

  2. Modulation of medium-chain fatty acid synthesis in Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 by replacing FabH with a Chaetoceros Ketoacyl-ACP synthase

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gu, Huiya; Jinkerson, Robert E.; Davies, Fiona K.; Sisson, Lyle A.; Schneider, Philip E.; Posewitz, Matthew C.

    2016-05-26

    The isolation or engineering of algal cells synthesizing high levels of medium-chain fatty acids (MCFAs) is attractive to mitigate the high clouding point of longer chain fatty acids in algal based biodiesel. To develop a more informed understanding of MCFA synthesis in photosynthetic microorganisms, we isolated several algae from Great Salt Lake and screened this collection for MCFA accumulation to identify strains naturally accumulating high levels of MCFA. A diatom, Chaetoceros sp. GSL56, accumulated particularly high levels of C14 (up to 40%), with the majority of C14 fatty acids allocated in triacylglycerols. Using whole cell transcriptome sequencing and de novomore » assembly, putative genes encoding fatty acid synthesis enzymes were identified. Enzymes from this Chaetoceros sp. were expressed in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 to validate gene function and to determine whether eukaryotic enzymes putatively lacking bacterial evolutionary control mechanisms could be used to improve MCFA production in this promising production strain. Replacement of the Synechococcus 7002 native FabH with a Chaetoceros ketoacyl-ACP synthase Ill increased MCFA synthesis up to fivefold. In conclusion, the level of increase is dependent on promoter strength and culturing conditions.« less

  3. Physiological function of mycobacterial mtFabD, an essential malonyl-CoA:AcpM transacylase of type 2 fatty acid synthase FASII, in yeast mct1Delta cells.

    PubMed

    Gurvitz, Aner

    2009-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis mtFabD is an essential malonyl-CoA:AcpM transacylase and is important for vital protein-protein interactions within type 2 fatty acid synthase FASII. mtFabD contacts KasA, KasB, FabH, InhA, and possibly also HadAB, HadBC, and FabG1/MabA. Disruption of mtFabD's interactions during FASII has been proposed for drug development. Here, the gene for a mitochondrially targeted mtFabD was ectopically expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae mct1Delta mutant cells lacking the corresponding mitochondrial malonyl-CoA transferase Mct1p, allowing the mutants to recover their abilities to respire on glycerol and synthesize lipoic acid. Hence, mtFabD could physiologically function in an environment lacking holo-AcpM or other native interaction partners. PMID:19859569

  4. Production of long chain alcohols and alkanes upon coexpression of an acyl-ACP reductase and aldehyde-deformylating oxgenase with a bacterial type-I fatty acid synthase in E. coli

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Coursolle, Dan; Shanklin, John; Lian, Jiazhang; Zhao, Huimin

    2015-06-23

    Microbial long chain alcohols and alkanes are renewable biofuels that could one day replace petroleum-derived fuels. Here we report a novel pathway for high efficiency production of these products in Escherichia coli strain BL21(DE3). We first identified the acyl-ACP reductase/aldehyde deformylase combinations with the highest activity in this strain. Next, we used catalase coexpression to remove toxic byproducts and increase the overall titer. Finally, by introducing the type-I fatty acid synthase from Corynebacterium ammoniagenes, we were able to bypass host regulatory mechanisms of fatty acid synthesis that have thus far hampered efforts to optimize the yield of acyl-ACP-derived products inmore » BL21(DE3). When all these engineering strategies were combined with subsequent optimization of fermentation conditions, we were able to achieve a final titer around 100 mg/L long chain alcohol/alkane products including a 57 mg/L titer of pentadecane, the highest titer reported in E. coli BL21(DE3) to date. The expression of prokaryotic type-I fatty acid synthases offer a unique strategy to produce fatty acid-derived products in E. coli that does not rely exclusively on the endogenous type-II fatty acid synthase system.« less

  5. Production of long chain alcohols and alkanes upon coexpression of an acyl-ACP reductase and aldehyde-deformylating oxgenase with a bacterial type-I fatty acid synthase in E. coli

    SciTech Connect

    Coursolle, Dan; Shanklin, John; Lian, Jiazhang; Zhao, Huimin

    2015-06-23

    Microbial long chain alcohols and alkanes are renewable biofuels that could one day replace petroleum-derived fuels. Here we report a novel pathway for high efficiency production of these products in Escherichia coli strain BL21(DE3). We first identified the acyl-ACP reductase/aldehyde deformylase combinations with the highest activity in this strain. Next, we used catalase coexpression to remove toxic byproducts and increase the overall titer. Finally, by introducing the type-I fatty acid synthase from Corynebacterium ammoniagenes, we were able to bypass host regulatory mechanisms of fatty acid synthesis that have thus far hampered efforts to optimize the yield of acyl-ACP-derived products in BL21(DE3). When all these engineering strategies were combined with subsequent optimization of fermentation conditions, we were able to achieve a final titer around 100 mg/L long chain alcohol/alkane products including a 57 mg/L titer of pentadecane, the highest titer reported in E. coli BL21(DE3) to date. The expression of prokaryotic type-I fatty acid synthases offer a unique strategy to produce fatty acid-derived products in E. coli that does not rely exclusively on the endogenous type-II fatty acid synthase system.

  6. Production of long chain alcohols and alkanes upon coexpression of an acyl-ACP reductase and aldehyde-deformylating oxygenase with a bacterial type-I fatty acid synthase in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Coursolle, Dan; Lian, Jiazhang; Shanklin, John; Zhao, Huimin

    2015-09-01

    Microbial long chain alcohols and alkanes are renewable biofuels that could one day replace petroleum-derived fuels. Here we report a novel pathway for high efficiency production of these products in Escherichia coli strain BL21(DE3). We first identified the acyl-ACP reductase/aldehyde deformylase combinations with the highest activity in this strain. Next, we used catalase coexpression to remove toxic byproducts and increase the overall titer. Finally, by introducing the type-I fatty acid synthase from Corynebacterium ammoniagenes, we were able to bypass host regulatory mechanisms of fatty acid synthesis that have thus far hampered efforts to optimize the yield of acyl-ACP-derived products in BL21(DE3). When all these engineering strategies were combined with subsequent optimization of fermentation conditions, we were able to achieve a final titer around 100 mg L(-1) long chain alcohol/alkane products including a 57 mg L(-1) titer of pentadecane, the highest titer reported in E. coli BL21(DE3) to date. The expression of prokaryotic type-I fatty acid synthases offer a unique strategy to produce fatty acid-derived products in E. coli that does not rely exclusively on the endogenous type-II fatty acid synthase system. PMID:26135500

  7. Three-dimensional (3D) structure prediction of the American and African oil-palms β-ketoacyl-[ACP] synthase-II protein by comparative modelling

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Edina; Chinni, Suresh; Bhore, Subhash Janardhan

    2014-01-01

    Background: The fatty-acid profile of the vegetable oils determines its properties and nutritional value. Palm-oil obtained from the African oil-palm [Elaeis guineensis Jacq. (Tenera)] contains 44% palmitic acid (C16:0), but, palm-oil obtained from the American oilpalm [Elaeis oleifera] contains only 25% C16:0. In part, the b-ketoacyl-[ACP] synthase II (KASII) [EC: 2.3.1.179] protein is responsible for the high level of C16:0 in palm-oil derived from the African oil-palm. To understand more about E. guineensis KASII (EgKASII) and E. oleifera KASII (EoKASII) proteins, it is essential to know its structures. Hence, this study was undertaken. Objective: The objective of this study was to predict three-dimensional (3D) structure of EgKASII and EoKASII proteins using molecular modelling tools. Materials and Methods: The amino-acid sequences for KASII proteins were retrieved from the protein database of National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), USA. The 3D structures were predicted for both proteins using homology modelling and ab-initio technique approach of protein structure prediction. The molecular dynamics (MD) simulation was performed to refine the predicted structures. The predicted structure models were evaluated and root mean square deviation (RMSD) and root mean square fluctuation (RMSF) values were calculated. Results: The homology modelling showed that EgKASII and EoKASII proteins are 78% and 74% similar with Streptococcus pneumonia KASII and Brucella melitensis KASII, respectively. The EgKASII and EoKASII structures predicted by using ab-initio technique approach shows 6% and 9% deviation to its structures predicted by homology modelling, respectively. The structure refinement and validation confirmed that the predicted structures are accurate. Conclusion: The 3D structures for EgKASII and EoKASII proteins were predicted. However, further research is essential to understand the interaction of EgKASII and EoKASII proteins with its substrates. PMID

  8. Human uroporphyrinogen III synthase: NMR-based mapping of the active site.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Luis; Kuti, Miklos; Bishop, David F; Mezei, Mihaly; Zeng, Lei; Zhou, Ming-Ming; Desnick, Robert J

    2008-05-01

    Uroporphyrinogen III synthase (URO-synthase) catalyzes the cyclization and D-ring isomerization of hydroxymethylbilane (HMB) to uroporphyrinogen (URO'gen) III, the cyclic tetrapyrrole and physiologic precursor of heme, chlorophyl, and corrin. The deficient activity of human URO-synthase results in the autosomal recessive cutaneous disorder, congenital erythropoietic porphyria. Mapping of the structural determinants that specify catalysis and, potentially, protein-protein interactions is lacking. To map the active site and assess the enzyme's possible interaction in a complex with hydroxymethylbilane-synthase (HMB-synthase) and/or uroporphyrinogen-decarboxylase (URO-decarboxylase) by NMR, an efficient expression and purification procedure was developed for these cytosolic enzymes of heme biosynthesis that enabled preparation of special isotopically-labeled protein samples for NMR characterization. Using an 800 MHz instrument, assignment of the URO-synthase backbone (13)C(alpha) (100%), (1)H(alpha) (99.6%), and nonproline (1)H(N) and (15)N resonances (94%) was achieved as well as 85% of the side-chain (13)C and (1)H resonances. NMR analyses of URO-synthase titrated with competitive inhibitors N(D)-methyl-1-formylbilane (NMF-bilane) or URO'gen III, revealed resonance perturbations of specific residues lining the cleft between the two major domains of URO synthase that mapped the enzyme's active site. In silico docking of the URO-synthase crystal structure with NMF-bilane and URO'gen III was consistent with the perturbation results and provided a 3D model of the enzyme-inhibitor complex. The absence of chemical shift changes in the (15)N spectrum of URO-synthase mixed with the homogeneous HMB-synthase holoenzyme or URO-decarboxylase precluded occurrence of a stable cytosolic enzyme complex. PMID:18004775

  9. Identification of a cryptic type III polyketide synthase (1,3,6,8-tetrahydroxynaphthalene synthase) from Streptomyces peucetius ATCC 27952.

    PubMed

    Ghimire, Gopal Prasad; Oh, Tae-Jin; Liou, Kwangkyoung; Sohng, Jae Kyung

    2008-10-31

    We identified a 1,134-bp putative type III polyketide synthase from the sequence analysis of Streptomyces peucetius ATCC 27952, named Sp-RppA, which is characterized as 1,3,6,8-tetrahydroxynaphthalene synthase and shares 33% identity with SCO1206 from S. coelicolor A3(2) and 32% identity with RppA from S. griseus. The 1,3,6,8-tetrahydroxynaphthalene synthase is known to catalyze the sequential decarboxylative condensation, intramolecular cyclization, and aromatization of an oligoketide derived from five units of malonyl-CoA to give 1,3,6,8-tetrahydroxynaphthalene, which spontaneously oxidizes to form 2,5,7-trihydroxy-1,4-naphthoquinone (flaviolin). In this study, we report the in vivo expression and in vitro synthesis of flaviolin from purified gene product (Sp-RppA). PMID:18612244

  10. Evolutionary Implications and Physicochemical Analyses of Selected Proteins of Type III Polyketide Synthase Family

    PubMed Central

    Mallika, V.; Sivakumar, K.C.; Soniya, E.V.

    2011-01-01

    Type III polyketide synthases have a substantial role in the biosynthesis of various polyketides in plants and microorganisms. Comparative proteomic analysis of type III polyketide synthases showed evolutionarily and structurally related positions in a compilation of amino acid sequences from different families. Bacterial and fungal type III polyketide synthase proteins showed <50% similarity but in higher plants, it exhibited >80% among chalcone synthases and >70% in the case of non-chalcone synthases. In a consensus phylogenetic tree based on 1000 replicates; bacterial, fungal and plant proteins were clustered in separate groups. Proteins from bryophytes and pteridophytes grouped immediately near to the fungal cluster, demonstrated how evolutionary lineage has occurred among type III polyketide synthase proteins. Upon physicochemical analysis, it was observed that the proteins localized in the cytoplasm and were hydrophobic in nature. Molecular structural analysis revealed comparatively stable structure comprising of alpha helices and random coils as major structural components. It was found that there was a decline in the structural stability with active site mutation as prophesied by the in silico mutation studies. PMID:21697991

  11. Crystal structure and substrate specificity of the [beta]-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein synthase III (FabH) from Staphylococcus aureus

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu, Xiayang; Choudhry, Anthony E.; Janson, Cheryl A.; Grooms, Michael; Daines, Robert A.; Lonsdale, John T.; Khandekar, Sanjay S.

    2010-07-20

    {beta}-Ketoacyl-ACP synthase III (FabH), an essential enzyme for bacterial viability, catalyzes the initiation of fatty acid elongation by condensing malonyl-ACP with acetyl-CoA. We have determined the crystal structure of FabH from Staphylococcus aureus, a Gram-positive human pathogen, to 2 {angstrom} resolution. Although the overall structure of S. aureus FabH is similar to that of Escherichia coli FabH, the primer binding pocket in S. aureus FabH is significantly larger than that present in E. coli FabH. The structural differences, which agree with kinetic parameters, provide explanation for the observed varying substrate specificity for E. coli and S. aureus FabH. The rank order of activity of S. aureus FabH with various acyl-CoA primers was as follows: isobutyryl- > hexanoyl- > butyryl- > isovaleryl- >> acetyl-CoA. The availability of crystal structure may aid in designing potent, selective inhibitors of S. aureus FabH.

  12. Purification, Characterization, and Identification of Novel Inhibitors of the β-Ketoacyl-Acyl Carrier Protein Synthase III (FabH) from Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    He, Xin; Reynolds, Kevin A.

    2002-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a versatile and dangerous pathogen and one of the major causes of community-acquired and hospital-acquired infections. The rise of multidrug-resistant strains of S. aureus requires the development of new antibiotics with previously unexploited mechanisms of action, such as inhibition of the β-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) synthase III (FabH). This enzyme initiates fatty acid biosynthesis in a bacterial type II fatty acid synthase, catalyzing a decarboxylative condensation between malonyl-ACP and an acyl coenzyme A (CoA) substrate and is essential for viability. We have identified only one fabH in the genome of S. aureus and have shown that it encodes a protein with 57, 40, and 34% amino acid sequence identity with the FabH proteins of Bacillus subtilis (bFabH1), Escherichia coli (ecFabH), and Mycobacterium tuberculosis (mtFabH). Additional genomic sequence analysis revealed that this S. aureus FabH (saFabH) is not mutated in certain methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) and vancomycin-resistant S. aureus (VRSA) strains. saFabH was expressed in E. coli with an N-terminal polyhistidine tag and subsequently purified by metal chelate and size exclusion chromatography. Analysis by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed a molecular mass of 37 kDa, while gel filtration demonstrated a mass of 66.7 kDa, suggesting a noncovalent homodimeric structure for saFabH. The apparent Km for malonyl-ACP was 1.76 ± 0.40 μM, and the enzyme was active with acetyl-CoA (kcat, 16.18 min−1; Km, 6.18 ± 0.9 μM), butyryl-CoA (kcat, 42.90 min−1; Km, 2.32 ± 0.12 μM), and isobutyryl-CoA (kcat, 98.0 min−1; Km, 0.32 ± 0.04 μM). saFabH was weakly inhibited by thiolactomycin (50% inhibitory concentration [IC50], >100 μM) yet was efficiently inhibited by two new FabH inhibitors, 5-chloro-4-phenyl-[1,2]-dithiol-3-one (IC50, 1.87 ± 0.10 μM) and 4-phenyl-5-phenylimino-[1,2,4]dithiazolidin-3-one (IC50, 0.775 ± 0.08 μM). PMID

  13. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of an octaketide-producing plant type III polyketide synthase

    SciTech Connect

    Morita, Hiroyuki; Kondo, Shin; Kato, Ryohei; Wanibuchi, Kiyofumi; Noguchi, Hiroshi; Sugio, Shigetoshi; Abe, Ikuro; Kohno, Toshiyuki

    2007-11-01

    Octaketide synthase from A. arborescens has been overexpressed in E. coli, purified and crystallized. Diffraction data have been collected to 2.6 Å. Octaketide synthase (OKS) from Aloe arborescens is a plant-specific type III polyketide synthase that produces SEK4 and SEK4b from eight molecules of malonyl-CoA. Recombinant OKS expressed in Escherichia coli was crystallized by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. The crystals belonged to space group I422, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 110.2, c = 281.4 Å, α = β = γ = 90.0°. Diffraction data were collected to 2.6 Å resolution using synchrotron radiation at BL24XU of SPring-8.

  14. Pullulanase and Starch Synthase III Are Associated with Formation of Vitreous Endosperm in Quality Protein Maize.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hao; Clay, Kasi; Thompson, Stephanie S; Hennen-Bierwagen, Tracie A; Andrews, Bethany J; Zechmann, Bernd; Gibbon, Bryan C

    2015-01-01

    The opaque-2 (o2) mutation of maize increases lysine content, but the low seed density and soft texture of this type of mutant are undesirable. Lines with modifiers of the soft kernel phenotype (mo2) called "Quality Protein Maize" (QPM) have high lysine and kernel phenotypes similar to normal maize. Prior research indicated that the formation of vitreous endosperm in QPM might involve changes in starch granule structure. In this study, we focused on analysis of two starch biosynthetic enzymes that may influence kernel vitreousness. Analysis of recombinant inbred lines derived from a cross of W64Ao2 and K0326Y revealed that pullulanase activity had significant positive correlation with kernel vitreousness. We also found that decreased Starch Synthase III abundance may decrease the pullulanase activity and average glucan chain length given the same Zpu1 genotype. Therefore, Starch Synthase III could indirectly influence the kernel vitreousness by affecting pullulanase activity and coordinating with pullulanase to alter the glucan chain length distribution of amylopectin, resulting in different starch structural properties. The glucan chain length distribution had strong positive correlation with the polydispersity index of glucan chains, which was positively associated with the kernel vitreousness based on nonlinear regression analysis. Therefore, we propose that pullulanase and Starch Synthase III are two important factors responsible for the formation of the vitreous phenotype of QPM endosperms. PMID:26115014

  15. Pullulanase and Starch Synthase III Are Associated with Formation of Vitreous Endosperm in Quality Protein Maize

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hao; Clay, Kasi; Thompson, Stephanie S.; Hennen-Bierwagen, Tracie A.; Andrews, Bethany J.; Zechmann, Bernd; Gibbon, Bryan C.

    2015-01-01

    The opaque-2 (o2) mutation of maize increases lysine content, but the low seed density and soft texture of this type of mutant are undesirable. Lines with modifiers of the soft kernel phenotype (mo2) called “Quality Protein Maize” (QPM) have high lysine and kernel phenotypes similar to normal maize. Prior research indicated that the formation of vitreous endosperm in QPM might involve changes in starch granule structure. In this study, we focused on analysis of two starch biosynthetic enzymes that may influence kernel vitreousness. Analysis of recombinant inbred lines derived from a cross of W64Ao2 and K0326Y revealed that pullulanase activity had significant positive correlation with kernel vitreousness. We also found that decreased Starch Synthase III abundance may decrease the pullulanase activity and average glucan chain length given the same Zpu1 genotype. Therefore, Starch Synthase III could indirectly influence the kernel vitreousness by affecting pullulanase activity and coordinating with pullulanase to alter the glucan chain length distribution of amylopectin, resulting in different starch structural properties. The glucan chain length distribution had strong positive correlation with the polydispersity index of glucan chains, which was positively associated with the kernel vitreousness based on nonlinear regression analysis. Therefore, we propose that pullulanase and Starch Synthase III are two important factors responsible for the formation of the vitreous phenotype of QPM endosperms. PMID:26115014

  16. Type III polyketide synthase repertoire in Zingiberaceae: computational insights into the sequence, structure and evolution.

    PubMed

    Mallika, Vijayanathan; Aiswarya, Girija; Gincy, Paily Thottathil; Remakanthan, Appukuttan; Soniya, Eppurathu Vasudevan

    2016-07-01

    Zingiberaceae or 'ginger family' is the largest family in the order 'Zingiberales' with more than 1300 species in 52 genera, which are mostly distributed throughout Asia, tropical Africa and the native regions of America with their maximum diversity in Southeast Asia. Many of the members are important spice, medicinal or ornamental plants including ginger, turmeric, cardamom and kaempferia. These plants are distinguished for the highly valuable metabolic products, which are synthesised through phenylpropanoid pathway, where type III polyketide synthase is the key enzyme. In our present study, we used sequence, structural and evolutionary approaches to scrutinise the type III polyketide synthase (PKS) repertoire encoded in the Zingiberaceae family. Highly conserved amino acid residues in the sequence alignment and phylogram suggested strong relationships between the type III PKS members of Zingiberaceae. Sequence and structural level investigation of type III PKSs showed a small number of variations in the substrate binding pocket, leading to functional divergence among these PKS members. Molecular evolutionary studies indicate that type III PKSs within Zingiberaceae evolved under strong purifying selection pressure, and positive selections were rarely detected in the family. Structural modelling and protein-small molecule interaction studies on Zingiber officinale PKS 'a representative from Zingiberaceae' suggested that the protein is comparatively stable without much disorder and exhibited wide substrate acceptance. PMID:27138283

  17. Rat hepatic uroporphyrinogen III co-synthase. Purification and evidence for a bound folate coenzyme participating in the biosynthesis of uroporphyrinogen III.

    PubMed Central

    Kohashi, M; Clement, R P; Tse, J; Piper, W N

    1984-01-01

    Rat hepatic uroporphyrinogen III co-synthase was isolated and purified 73-fold with a 13% yield by (NH4)2SO4 fractionation and sequential chromatography on DEAE-Sephacel, Sephadex G-100 (superfine grade) and folate-AH-Sepharose 4B. The purified co-synthase has an Mr of approx. 42 000, and is resolved into two bands, each possessing co-synthase activity, by polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis. A factor was dissociated from the purified co-synthase. Results of both microbiological and competitive protein-binding assays suggest that it is a pteroylpolyglutamate. The isolated pteroylpolyglutamate factor was co-eluted with authentic N5-methyltetrahydropteroylheptaglutamate on DEAE-Sephacel. Uroporphyrinogen III is formed by cosynthase-free preparations of uroporphyrinogen I synthase in the presence of tetrahydropteroylglutamate. Tetrahydropeteroylheptaglutamate is also able to direct the formation of equivalent amounts of uroporphyrinogen III at a concentration approximately one-hundredth that of tetrahydropteroylmonoglutamate. These results suggest that a reduced pteroylpolyglutamate factor is associated with rat hepatic uroporphyrinogen III co-synthase, and that this may function as a coenzyme for the biosynthesis of uroporphyrinogen III. Images Fig. 5. PMID:6466301

  18. A type III polyketide synthase from Wachendorfia thyrsiflora and its role in diarylheptanoid and phenylphenalenone biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Brand, S; Hölscher, D; Schierhorn, A; Svatos, A; Schröder, J; Schneider, B

    2006-07-01

    Chalcone synthase (CHS) related type III plant polyketide synthases (PKSs) are likely to be involved in the biosynthesis of diarylheptanoids (e.g. curcumin and polycyclic phenylphenalenones), but no such activity has been reported. Root cultures from Wachendorfia thyrsiflora (Haemodoraceae) are a suitable source to search for such enzymes because they synthesize large amounts of phenylphenalenones, but no other products that are known to require CHSs or related enzymes (e.g. flavonoids or stilbenes). A homology-based RT-PCR strategy led to the identification of cDNAs for a type III PKS sharing only approximately 60% identity with typical CHSs. It was named WtPKS1 (W. thyrsiflora polyketide synthase 1). The purified recombinant protein accepted a large variety of aromatic and aliphatic starter CoA esters, including phenylpropionyl- and side-chain unsaturated phenylpropanoid-CoAs. The simplest model for the initial reaction in diarylheptanoid biosynthesis predicts a phenylpropanoid-CoA as starter and a single condensation reaction to a diketide. Benzalacetones, the expected release products, were observed only with unsaturated phenylpropanoid-CoAs, and the best results were obtained with 4-coumaroyl-CoA (80% of the products). With all other substrates, WtPKS1 performed two condensation reactions and released pyrones. We propose that WtPKS1 catalyses the first step in diarylheptanoid biosynthesis and that the observed pyrones are derailment products in the absence of downstream processing proteins. PMID:16496097

  19. Expression, purification and crystallization of a fungal type III polyketide synthase that produces the csypyrones

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Dengfeng; Mori, Takahiro; Matsui, Takashi; Hashimoto, Makoto; Morita, Hiroyuki; Fujii, Isao; Abe, Ikuro

    2014-01-01

    CsyB from Aspergillus oryzae is a novel type III polyketide synthase that catalyzes the formation of csypyrone B1 [4-(3-acetyl-4-hydroxy-2-oxo-2H-pyran-6-yl)butyric acid] from fatty acyl-CoA, malonyl-CoA and acetoacetyl-CoA. Recombinant CsyB expressed in Escherichia coli was crystallized by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method. The crystals belonged to space P21, with unit-cell parameters a = 70.0, b = 104.8, c = 73.5 Å, β = 114.4°. PMID:24915080

  20. [Cloning, expression and functional identification of a type III polyketide synthase gene from Huperzia serrata].

    PubMed

    Ye, Jin-cui; Zhang, Ping; Sun, Jie-yin; Guo, Chao-tan; Chen, Guo-shen; Abe, Ikuro; Noguchi, Hiroshi

    2011-10-01

    A cDNA encoding novel type III polyketide synthase (PKS) was cloned and sequenced from young leaves of Chinese club moss Huperzia serrata (Thunb.) Trev. by RT-PCR using degenerated primers based on the conserved sequences of known CHSs, and named as H. serrata PKS2. The terminal sequences of cDNA were obtained by the 3'- and 5'-RACE method. The full-length cDNA of H. serrata PKS2 contained a 1212 bp open reading frame encoding a 46.4 kDa protein with 404 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence of H. serrata PKS2 showed 50%-66% identities to those of other chalcone synthase super family enzymes of plant origin. The recombinant H. serrata PKS2 was functionally expressed in Escherichia coli with an additional hexahistidine tag at the N-terminus and showed unusually versatile catalytic potency to produce various aromatic tetraketides, including chalcones, benzophenones, phloroglucinols, and acridones. In particular, the enzyme accepted bulky starter substrates N-methylanthraniloyl-CoA, and carried out three condensations with malonyl-CoA to produce 1, 3-dihydroxy-N-methylacridone. Interestingly, H. serrata PKS2 lacks most of the consensus active site sequences with acridone synthase from Ruta graveolens (Rutaceae). PMID:22242464

  1. 3-Ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein synthase III from spinach (Spinacia oleracea) is not similar to other condensing enzymes of fatty acid synthase.

    PubMed Central

    Tai, H; Jaworski, J G

    1993-01-01

    A cDNA clone encoding spinach (Spinacia oleracea) 3-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein synthase III (KAS III), which catalyzes the initial condensing reaction in fatty acid biosynthesis, was isolated. Based on the amino acid sequence of tryptic digests of purified spinach KAS III, degenerate polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primers were designed and used to amplify a 612-bp fragment from first-strand cDNA of spinach leaf RNA. A root cDNA library was probed with the PCR fragment, and a 1920-bp clone was isolated. Its deduced amino acid sequence matched the sequences of the tryptic digests obtained from the purified KAS III. Northern analysis confirmed that it was expressed in both leaf and root. The clone contained a 1218-bp open reading frame coding for 405 amino acids. The identity of the clone was confirmed by expression in Escherichia coli BL 21 as a glutathione S-transferase fusion protein. The deduced amino acid sequence was 48 and 45% identical with the putative KAS III of Porphyra umbilicalis and KAS III of E. coli, respectively. It also had a strong local homology to the plant chalcone synthases but had little homology with other KAS isoforms from plants, bacteria, or animals. PMID:8290632

  2. Distinct Structural Elements Dictate the Specificity of the Type III Pentaketide Synthase from Neurospora crassa

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin-Pitel, Sheryl B.; Zhang, Houjin; Vu, Trang; Brunzelle, Joseph S.; Zhao, Huimin; Nair, Satish K.

    2009-01-15

    The fungal type III polyketide synthase 2'-oxoalkylresorcyclic acid synthase (ORAS) primes with a range of acyl-Coenzyme A thioesters (C{sub 4}--C{sub 20}) and extends using malonyl-Coenzyme A to produce pyrones, resorcinols, and resorcylic acids. To gain insight into this unusual substrate specificity and product profile, we have determined the crystal structures of ORAS to 1.75 {angstrom} resolution, the Phe-252{yields}Gly site-directed mutant to 2.1 {angstrom} resolution, and a binary conplex of ORAS with eicosanoic acid to 2.0 {angstrom} resolution. The structures reveal a distinct rearrangement of structural elements near the active site that allows accomodation of long-chain fatty acid esters and a reorientation of the gating mechanism that controls cyclization and polyketide chain length. The roles of these structural elements are further elucidated by characterization of various structure-based site-directed variants. These studies establish an unexpected plasticity to the PKS fold, unanticipated from structural studies of other members of this enzyme family.

  3. Functional Promiscuity of Two Divergent Paralogs of Type III Plant Polyketide Synthases.

    PubMed

    Pandith, Shahzad A; Dhar, Niha; Rana, Satiander; Bhat, Wajid Waheed; Kushwaha, Manoj; Gupta, Ajai P; Shah, Manzoor A; Vishwakarma, Ram; Lattoo, Surrinder K

    2016-08-01

    Plants effectively defend themselves against biotic and abiotic stresses by synthesizing diverse secondary metabolites, including health-protective flavonoids. These display incredible chemical diversity and ubiquitous occurrence and confer impeccable biological and agricultural applications. Chalcone synthase (CHS), a type III plant polyketide synthase, is critical for flavonoid biosynthesis. It catalyzes acyl-coenzyme A thioesters to synthesize naringenin chalcone through a polyketidic intermediate. The functional divergence among the evolutionarily generated members of a gene family is pivotal in driving the chemical diversity. Against this backdrop, this study was aimed to functionally characterize members of the CHS gene family from Rheum emodi, an endangered and endemic high-altitude medicinal herb of northwestern Himalayas. Two full-length cDNAs (1,179 bp each), ReCHS1 and ReCHS2, encoding unique paralogs were isolated and characterized. Heterologous expression and purification in Escherichia coli, bottom-up proteomic characterization, high-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry analysis, and enzyme kinetic studies using five different substrates confirmed their catalytic potential. Phylogenetic analysis revealed the existence of higher synonymous mutations in the intronless divergents of ReCHS. ReCHS2 displayed significant enzymatic efficiency (Vmax/Km) with different substrates. There were significant spatial and altitudinal variations in messenger RNA transcript levels of ReCHSs correlating positively with metabolite accumulation. Furthermore, the elicitations in the form of methyl jasmonate, salicylic acid, ultraviolet B light, and wounding, chosen on the basis of identified cis-regulatory promoter elements, presented considerable differences in the transcript profiles of ReCHSs. Taken together, our results demonstrate differential propensities of CHS paralogs in terms of the accumulation of flavonoids and

  4. Development of an ACP facility

    SciTech Connect

    Gil-Sung You; Won-Myung Choung; Jeong-Hoe Ku; il-Je Cho; Dong-Hak Kook; Kie-Chan Kwon; Eun-Pyo Lee; Ji-Sup Yoon; Seong-Won Park; Won-Kyung Lee

    2007-07-01

    KAERI has been developing an advanced spent fuel conditioning process (ACP). The ACP facility for a process demonstration consists of two air-sealed type hot cells. The safety analysis results showed that the facility was designed safely. The relevant integrated performance tests were also carried out successfully. (authors)

  5. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of a novel plant type III polyketide synthase that produces pentaketide chromone

    SciTech Connect

    Morita, Hiroyuki; Kondo, Shin; Abe, Tsuyoshi; Noguchi, Hiroshi; Sugio, Shigetoshi; Abe, Ikuro; Kohno, Toshiyuki

    2006-09-01

    Pentaketide chromone synthase from A. arborescens has been overexpressed in E. coli, purified and crystallized. Diffraction data have been collected to 1.6 Å. Pentaketide chromone synthase (PCS) from Aloe arborescens is a novel plant-specific type III polyketide synthase that catalyzes the formation of 5,7-dihydroxy-2-methylchromone from five molecules of malonyl-CoA. Recombinant PCS expressed in Escherichia coli was crystallized by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. The crystals belonged to space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 73.2, b = 88.4, c = 70.0 Å, α = γ = 90.0, β = 95.6°. Diffraction data were collected to 1.6 Å resolution using synchrotron radiation at BL24XU of SPring-8.

  6. Biocatalytic role of potato starch synthase III for α-glucan biosynthesis in Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 mutants.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Sang-Ho; Lee, Byung-Hoo; Li, Li; Perris, Shayani D N; Spalding, Martin H; Han, Sang Yun; Jane, Jay-lin

    2015-11-01

    A potato starch synthase III (PSSIII) was expressed in the Synechocystis mutants deficient in either glycogen synthase I (M1) or II (M2) to replenish α-(1,4) linkage synthesizing activity, resulting in new mutants, PM1 and PM2, respectively. These mutants were applied to study the role of exogenous plant starch synthase for starch/glycogen biosynthesis mechanism established in the cyanobacteria. The remaining glycogen synthase genes in PM1 and PM2 were further disrupted to make the mutants PM12 and PM21 which contained PSSIII as the sole glycogen/starch synthase. Among wild type and mutants, there were no significant differences in the amount of α-glucan produced. All the mutants harboring active PSSIII produced α-glucans with relatively much shorter and less longer α-1,4 chains than wild-type glycogen, which was exactly in accordance with the increase in glycogen branching enzyme activity. In fact, α-glucan structure of PM1 was very similar to those of PM12 and PM21, and PM2 had more intermediate chains than M2. This result suggests PSSIII may have distributive elongation property during α-glucan synthesis. In conclusion, the Synechocystis as an expression model system of plant enzymes can be applied to determine the role of starch synthesizing enzymes and their association during α-glucan synthesis. PMID:26358554

  7. Congenital erythropoietic porphyria: identification and expression of 10 mutations in the uroporphyrinogen III synthase gene.

    PubMed Central

    Xu, W; Warner, C A; Desnick, R J

    1995-01-01

    To investigate the molecular basis of the phenotypic heterogeneity in congenital erythropoietic porphyria, the mutations in the uroporphyrinogen III synthase gene from unrelated patients were determined. Six missense (L4F, Y19C, V82F, V99A, A104V, and G225S), a nonsense (Q249X), a frameshift (633insA), and two splicing mutations (IVS2+1 and IVS9 delta A + 4) were identified. When L4F, Y19C, V82F, V99A, A104V, 633insA, G225S, and Q249X were expressed in Escherichia coli, only the V82F, V99A, and A104V alleles expressed residual enzymatic activity. Of note, the V82F mutation, which occurs adjacent to the 5' donor site of intron 4, resulted in approximately 54% aberrantly spliced transcripts with exon 4 deleted. Thus, this novel exonic single-base substitution caused two lesions, a missense mutation and an aberrantly spliced transcript. Of the splicing mutations, the IVS2+1 allele produced a single transcript with exon 2 deleted, whereas the IVS9 delta A+4 allele was alternatively spliced, approximately 26% being normal transcripts and the remainder with exon 9 deleted. The amount of residual activity expressed by each allele provided a basis to correlate genotype with disease severity, thereby permitting genotype/phenotype predictions in this clinically heterogeneous disease. Images PMID:7860775

  8. Composition of clusters and building blocks in amylopectins from maize mutants deficient in starch synthase III.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Fan; Bertoft, Eric; Seetharaman, Koushik

    2013-12-18

    Branches in amylopectin are distributed along the backbone. Units of the branches are building blocks (smaller) and clusters (larger) based on the distance between branches. In this study, composition of clusters and building blocks of amylopectins from dull1 maize mutants deficient in starch synthase III (SSIII) with a common genetic background (W64A) were characterized and compared with the wild type. Clusters were produced from amylopectins by partial hydrolysis using α-amylase of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens and were subsequently treated with phosphorylase a and β-amylase to produce φ,β-limit dextrins. Clusters were further extensively hydrolyzed with the α-amylase to produce building blocks. Structures of clusters and building blocks were analyzed by diverse chromatographic techniques. The results showed that the dull1 mutation resulted in larger clusters with more singly branched building blocks. The average cluster contained ~5.4 blocks in dull1 mutants and ~4.2 blocks in the wild type. The results are compared with previous results from SSIII-deficient amo1 barley and suggest fundamental differences in the cluster structures. PMID:24229421

  9. A type III ACC synthase, ACS7, is involved in root gravitropism in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ing-Feng

    2013-01-01

    Ethylene is an important plant hormone that regulates developmental processes in plants. The ethylene biosynthesis pathway is a highly regulated process at both the transcriptional and post-translational level. The transcriptional regulation of these ethylene biosynthesis genes is well known. However, post-translational modifications of the key ethylene biosynthesis enzyme 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) synthase (ACS) are little understood. In vitro kinase assays were conducted on the type III ACS, AtACS7, fusion protein and peptides to determine whether the AtACS7 protein can be phosphorylated by calcium-dependent protein kinase (CDPK). AtACS7 was phosphorylated at Ser216, Thr296, and Ser299 by AtCDPK16 in vitro. To investigate further the function of the ACS7 gene in Arabidopsis, an acs7-1 loss-of-function mutant was isolated. The acs7-1 mutant exhibited less sensitivity to the inhibition of root gravitropism by treatment with the calcium chelator ethylene glycol tetraacetic acid (EGTA). Seedlings were treated with gradient concentrations of ACC. The results showed that a certain concentration of ethylene enhanced the gravity response. Moreover, the acs7-1 mutant was less sensitive to inhibition of the gravity response by treatment with the auxin polar transport inhibitor 1-naphthylphthalamic acid, but exogenous ACC application recovered root gravitropism. Altogether, the results indicate that AtACS7 is involved in root gravitropism in a calcium-dependent manner in Arabidopsis. PMID:23943848

  10. Substrate Recognition by β-Ketoacyl-ACP Synthases†

    PubMed Central

    Borgaro, Janine G.; Chang, Andrew; Machutta, Carl A.; Zhang, Xujie; Tonge, Peter J.

    2011-01-01

    β-Ketoacyl-ACP synthase (KAS) enzymes catalyze Claisen condensation reactions in the fatty acid biosynthesis pathway. These reactions follow a ping-pong mechanism in which a donor substrate acylates the active site cysteine residue after which the acyl group is condensed with the malonyl-ACP acceptor substrate to form a β-ketoacyl-ACP. In the priming KASIII enzymes the donor substrate is an acyl-CoA while in the elongating KASI and KASII enzymes the donor is an acyl-ACP. Although the KASIII enzyme in Escherichia coli (ecFabH) is essential, the corresponding enzyme in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (mtFabH) is not, suggesting that the KASI or II enzyme in M. tuberculosis (KasA or KasB, respectively) must be able to accept a CoA donor substrate. Since KasA is essential, the substrate specificity of this KASI enzyme has been explored using substrates based on phosphopantetheine, CoA, ACP and AcpM peptide mimics. This analysis has been extended to the KASI and KASII enzymes from E. coli (ecFabB and ecFabF) where we show that a 14 residue malonyl-phosphopantetheine peptide can efficiently replace malonyl-ecACP as the acceptor substrate in the ecFabF reaction. While ecFabF is able to catalyze the condensation reaction when CoA is the carrier for both substrates, the KASI enzymes ecFabB and KasA have an absolute requirement for an ACP substrate as the acyl donor. Provided that this requirement is met, variation in the acceptor carrier substrate has little impact on the kcat/Km for the KASI reaction. For the KASI enzymes we propose that the binding of ecACP (AcpM) results in a conformational change that leads to an open form of the enzyme to which the malonyl acceptor substrate binds. Finally, the substrate inhibition observed when palmitoyl-CoA is the donor substrate for the KasA reaction has implications for the importance of mtFabH in the mycobacterial FASII pathway. PMID:22017312

  11. Enhanced acetohydroxy acid synthase III activity in an ilvH mutant of Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed Central

    Ricca, E; Limauro, D; Lago, C T; de Felice, M

    1988-01-01

    The acetohydroxy acid synthase III isozyme, which catalyzes the first common step in the biosynthesis of isoleucine, leucine, and valine in Escherichia coli K-12, is composed of two subunits, the ilvI and ilvH gene products. A missense mutation in ilvH (ilvH612), which reduced the sensitivity of the enzyme to the end product inhibition by valine, also increased its specific activity and lowered the Km for alpha-acetolactate synthesis. The mutation increased the sensitivity of acetohydroxy acid synthase III to dialysis and heat treatment and reduced the requirement for thiamine pyrophosphate addition to the assay mixture for activity. A strain carrying the ilvH612 mutation grew better than a homologous ilvH+ strain in the presence of leucine. The data indicate that this is a consequence of a more active acetohydroxy acid synthase III isozyme rather than the result of an alteration of the leucine-mediated repression of the ilvIH operon. PMID:3053650

  12. Cloning and Structure-Function Analyses of Quinolone- and Acridone-producing Novel Type III Polyketide Synthases from Citrus microcarpa*

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Takahiro; Shimokawa, Yoshihiko; Matsui, Takashi; Kinjo, Keishi; Kato, Ryohei; Noguchi, Hiroshi; Sugio, Shigetoshi; Morita, Hiroyuki; Abe, Ikuro

    2013-01-01

    Two novel type III polyketide synthases, quinolone synthase (QNS) and acridone synthase (ACS), were cloned from Citrus microcarpa (Rutaceae). The deduced amino acid sequence of C. microcarpa QNS is unique, and it shared only 56–60% identities with C. microcarpa ACS, Medicago sativa chalcone synthase (CHS), and the previously reported Aegle marmelos QNS. In contrast to the quinolone- and acridone-producing A. marmelos QNS, C. microcarpa QNS produces 4-hydroxy-N-methylquinolone as the “single product” by the one-step condensation of N-methylanthraniloyl-CoA and malonyl-CoA. However, C. microcarpa ACS shows broad substrate specificities and produces not only acridone and quinolone but also chalcone, benzophenone, and phloroglucinol from 4-coumaroyl-CoA, benzoyl-CoA, and hexanoyl-CoA, respectively. Furthermore, the x-ray crystal structures of C. microcarpa QNS and ACS, solved at 2.47- and 2.35-Å resolutions, respectively, revealed wide active site entrances in both enzymes. The wide active site entrances thus provide sufficient space to facilitate the binding of the bulky N-methylanthraniloyl-CoA within the catalytic centers. However, the active site cavity volume of C. microcarpa ACS (760 Å3) is almost as large as that of M. sativa CHS (750 Å3), and ACS produces acridone by employing an active site cavity and catalytic machinery similar to those of CHS. In contrast, the cavity of C. microcarpa QNS (290 Å3) is significantly smaller, which makes this enzyme produce the diketide quinolone. These results as well as mutagenesis analyses provided the first structural bases for the anthranilate-derived production of the quinolone and acridone alkaloid by type III polyketide synthases. PMID:23963450

  13. Phylogenetic and experimental characterization of an acyl-ACP thioesterase family reveals significant diversity in enzymatic specificity and activity

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Acyl-acyl carrier protein thioesterases (acyl-ACP TEs) catalyze the hydrolysis of the thioester bond that links the acyl chain to the sulfhydryl group of the phosphopantetheine prosthetic group of ACP. This reaction terminates acyl chain elongation of fatty acid biosynthesis, and in plant seeds it is the biochemical determinant of the fatty acid compositions of storage lipids. Results To explore acyl-ACP TE diversity and to identify novel acyl ACP-TEs, 31 acyl-ACP TEs from wide-ranging phylogenetic sources were characterized to ascertain their in vivo activities and substrate specificities. These acyl-ACP TEs were chosen by two different approaches: 1) 24 TEs were selected from public databases on the basis of phylogenetic analysis and fatty acid profile knowledge of their source organisms; and 2) seven TEs were molecularly cloned from oil palm (Elaeis guineensis), coconut (Cocos nucifera) and Cuphea viscosissima, organisms that produce medium-chain and short-chain fatty acids in their seeds. The in vivo substrate specificities of the acyl-ACP TEs were determined in E. coli. Based on their specificities, these enzymes were clustered into three classes: 1) Class I acyl-ACP TEs act primarily on 14- and 16-carbon acyl-ACP substrates; 2) Class II acyl-ACP TEs have broad substrate specificities, with major activities toward 8- and 14-carbon acyl-ACP substrates; and 3) Class III acyl-ACP TEs act predominantly on 8-carbon acyl-ACPs. Several novel acyl-ACP TEs act on short-chain and unsaturated acyl-ACP or 3-ketoacyl-ACP substrates, indicating the diversity of enzymatic specificity in this enzyme family. Conclusion These acyl-ACP TEs can potentially be used to diversify the fatty acid biosynthesis pathway to produce novel fatty acids. PMID:21831316

  14. Identification of a type III polyketide synthase involved in the biosynthesis of spirolaxine.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lei; Wang, Siyuan; Zhang, Shuwei; Yu, Dayu; Qin, Yuhui; Huang, Huiyong; Wang, Wei; Zhan, Jixun

    2016-08-01

    Spirolaxine is a natural product isolated from Sporotrichum laxum ATCC 15155, which has shown a variety of biological activities including promising anti-Helicobacter pylori property. To understand how this compound is biosynthesized, the genome of S. laxum was sequenced. Analysis of the genome sequence revealed two putative type III polyketide synthase (PKS) genes in this strain, Sl-pks1 and Sl-pks2, which are located adjacent to each other (~2.0 kb apart) in a tail-to-tail arrangement. Disruption of these two genes revealed that Sl-PKS2 is the dedicated PKS involved in the biosynthesis of spirolaxine. The intron-free Sl-pks2 gene was amplified from the cDNA of S. laxum and ligated into the expression vector pET28a for expression in Escherichia coli BL21-CodonPlus (DE3)-RIL. The major products of Sl-PKS2 in E. coli were characterized as alkylresorcinols that contain a C13-C17 saturated or unsaturated hydrocarbon side chain based on the spectral data. This enzyme was purified and reacted with malonyl-CoA and a series of fatty acyl-SNACs (C6-C10). Corresponding alkylresorcinols were formed from the decarboxylation of the synthesized tetraketide resorcylic acids, together with fatty acyl-primed triketide and tetraketide pyrones as byproducts. This work provides important information about the PKS involved in the biosynthesis of spirolaxine, which will facilitate further understanding and engineering of the biosynthetic pathway of this medicinally important molecule. PMID:27023915

  15. Biosynthesis of Dictyostelium discoideum differentiation-inducing factor by a hybrid type I fatty acid-type III polyketide synthase.

    PubMed

    Austin, Michael B; Saito, Tamao; Bowman, Marianne E; Haydock, Stephen; Kato, Atsushi; Moore, Bradley S; Kay, Robert R; Noel, Joseph P

    2006-09-01

    Differentiation-inducing factors (DIFs) are well known to modulate formation of distinct communal cell types from identical Dictyostelium discoideum amoebas, but DIF biosynthesis remains obscure. We report complimentary in vivo and in vitro experiments identifying one of two approximately 3,000-residue D. discoideum proteins, termed 'steely', as responsible for biosynthesis of the DIF acylphloroglucinol scaffold. Steely proteins possess six catalytic domains homologous to metazoan type I fatty acid synthases (FASs) but feature an iterative type III polyketide synthase (PKS) in place of the expected FAS C-terminal thioesterase used to off load fatty acid products. This new domain arrangement likely facilitates covalent transfer of steely N-terminal acyl products directly to the C-terminal type III PKS active sites, which catalyze both iterative polyketide extension and cyclization. The crystal structure of a steely C-terminal domain confirms conservation of the homodimeric type III PKS fold. These findings suggest new bioengineering strategies for expanding the scope of fatty acid and polyketide biosynthesis. PMID:16906151

  16. Biosynthesis of Dictyostelium discoideum differentiation-inducing factor by a hybrid type I fatty acid–type III polyketide synthase

    PubMed Central

    Austin, Michael B; Saito, Tamao; Bowman, Marianne E; Haydock, Stephen; Kato, Atsushi; Moore, Bradley S; Kay, Robert R; Noel, Joseph P

    2010-01-01

    Differentiation-inducing factors (DIFs) are well known to modulate formation of distinct communal cell types from identical Dictyostelium discoideum amoebas, but DIF biosynthesis remains obscure. We report complimentary in vivo and in vitro experiments identifying one of two ~3,000-residue D. discoideum proteins, termed ‘steely’, as responsible for biosynthesis of the DIF acylphloroglucinol scaffold. Steely proteins possess six catalytic domains homologous to metazoan type I fatty acid synthases (FASs) but feature an iterative type III polyketide synthase (PKS) in place of the expected FAS C-terminal thioesterase used to off load fatty acid products. This new domain arrangement likely facilitates covalent transfer of steely N-terminal acyl products directly to the C-terminal type III PKS active sites, which catalyze both iterative polyketide extension and cyclization. The crystal structure of a steely C-terminal domain confirms conservation of the homodimeric type III PKS fold. These findings suggest new bioengineering strategies for expanding the scope of fatty acid and polyketide biosynthesis. PMID:16906151

  17. Study of Class I and Class III Polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) Synthases with Substrates Containing a Modified Side Chain.

    PubMed

    Jia, Kaimin; Cao, Ruikai; Hua, Duy H; Li, Ping

    2016-04-11

    Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) are carbon and energy storage polymers produced by a variety of microbial organisms under nutrient-limited conditions. They have been considered as an environmentally friendly alternative to oil-based plastics due to their renewability, versatility, and biodegradability. PHA synthase (PhaC) plays a central role in PHA biosynthesis, in which its activity and substrate specificity are major factors in determining the productivity and properties of the produced polymers. However, the effects of modifying the substrate side chain are not well understood because of the difficulty to accessing the desired analogues. In this report, a series of 3-(R)-hydroxyacyl coenzyme A (HACoA) analogues were synthesized and tested with class I synthases from Chromobacterium sp. USM2 (PhaCCs and A479S-PhaCCs) and Caulobacter crescentus (PhaCCc) as well as class III synthase from Allochromatium vinosum (PhaECAv). It was found that, while different PHA synthases displayed distinct preference with regard to the length of the alkyl side chains, they could withstand moderate side chain modifications such as terminal unsaturated bonds and the azide group. Specifically, the specific activity of PhaCCs toward propynyl analogue (HHxyCoA) was only 5-fold less than that toward the classical substrate HBCoA. The catalytic efficiency (kcat/Km) of PhaECAv toward azide analogue (HABCoA) was determined to be 2.86 × 10(5) M(-1) s(-1), which was 6.2% of the value of HBCoA (4.62 × 10(6) M(-1) s(-1)) measured in the presence of bovine serum albumin (BSA). These side chain modifications may be employed to introduce new material functions to PHAs as well as to study PHA biogenesis via click-chemistry, in which the latter remains unknown and is important for metabolic engineering to produce PHAs economically. PMID:26974339

  18. Engineered biosynthesis of plant polyketides: chain length control in an octaketide-producing plant type III polyketide synthase.

    PubMed

    Abe, Ikuro; Oguro, Satoshi; Utsumi, Yoriko; Sano, Yukie; Noguchi, Hiroshi

    2005-09-14

    The chalcone synthase (CHS) superfamily of type III polyketide synthases (PKSs) produces a variety of plant secondary metabolites with remarkable structural diversity and biological activities (e.g., chalcones, stilbenes, benzophenones, acrydones, phloroglucinols, resorcinols, pyrones, and chromones). Here we describe an octaketide-producing novel plant-specific type III PKS from aloe (Aloe arborescens) sharing 50-60% amino acid sequence identity with other plant CHS-superfamily enzymes. A recombinant enzyme expressed in Escherichia coli catalyzed seven successive decarboxylative condensations of malonyl-CoA to yield aromatic octaketides SEK4 and SEK4b, the longest polyketides known to be synthesized by the structurally simple type III PKS. Surprisingly, site-directed mutagenesis revealed that a single residue Gly207 (corresponding to the CHS's active site Thr197) determines the polyketide chain length and product specificity. Small-to-large substitutions (G207A, G207T, G207M, G207L, G207F, and G207W) resulted in loss of the octaketide-forming activity and concomitant formation of shorter chain length polyketides (from triketide to heptaketide) including a pentaketide chromone, 2,7-dihydroxy-5-methylchromone, and a hexaketide pyrone, 6-(2,4-dihydroxy-6-methylphenyl)-4-hydroxy-2-pyrone, depending on the size of the side chain. Notably, the functional diversity of the type III PKS was shown to evolve from simple steric modulation of the chemically inert single residue lining the active-site cavity accompanied by conservation of the Cys-His-Asn catalytic triad. This provided novel strategies for the engineered biosynthesis of pharmaceutically important plant polyketides. PMID:16144421

  19. Mycobacterium tuberculosis acyl carrier protein synthase adopts two different pH-dependent structural conformations

    SciTech Connect

    Gokulan, Kuppan; Aggarwal, Anup; Shipman, Lance; Besra, Gurdyal S.; Sacchettini, James C.

    2011-07-01

    Bacterial acyl carrier protein synthase plays an essential role in the synthesis of fatty acids, nonribosomal peptides and polyketides. In Mycobacterium tuberculosis, AcpS or group I phosphopentatheine transferase exhibits two different structural conformations depending upon the pH. The crystal structures of acyl carrier protein synthase (AcpS) from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) and Corynebacterium ammoniagenes determined at pH 5.3 and pH 6.5, respectively, are reported. Comparison of the Mtb apo-AcpS structure with the recently reported structure of the Mtb AcpS–ADP complex revealed that AcpS adopts two different conformations: the orthorhombic and trigonal space-group structures show structural differences in the α2 helix and in the conformation of the α3–α4 connecting loop, which is in a closed conformation. The apo-AcpS structure shows electron density for the entire model and was obtained at lower pH values (4.4–6.0). In contrast, at a higher pH value (6.5) AcpS undergoes significant conformational changes, resulting in disordered regions that show no electron density in the AcpS model. The solved structures also reveal that C. ammoniagenes AcpS undergoes structural rearrangement in two regions, similar to the recently reported Mtb AcpS–ADP complex structure. In vitro reconstitution experiments show that AcpS has a higher post-translational modification activity between pH 4.4 and 6.0 than at pH values above 6.5, where the activity drops owing to the change in conformation. The results show that apo-AcpS and AcpS–ADP adopt different conformations depending upon the pH conditions of the crystallization solution.

  20. Thiolactomycin-based β-ketoacyl-AcpM synthase A (KasA) inhibitors: fragment-based inhibitor discovery using transient one-dimensional nuclear overhauser effect NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kapilashrami, Kanishk; Bommineni, Gopal R; Machutta, Carl A; Kim, Pilho; Lai, Cheng-Tsung; Simmerling, Carlos; Picart, Francis; Tonge, Peter J

    2013-03-01

    Thiolactomycin (TLM) is a natural product inhibitor of KasA, the β-ketoacyl synthase A from Mycobacterium tuberculosis. To improve the affinity of TLM for KasA, a series of TLM analogs have been synthesized based on interligand NOEs between TLM and a pantetheine analog when both are bound simultaneously to the enzyme. Kinetic binding data reveal that position 3 of the thiolactone ring is a suitable position for elaboration of the TLM scaffold, and the structure-activity relationship studies provide information on the molecular features that govern time-dependent inhibition in this enzyme system. These experiments also exemplify the utility of transient one-dimensional NOE spectroscopy for obtaining interligand NOEs compared with traditional steady state two-dimensional NOESY spectroscopy. PMID:23306195

  1. Modified acyl-ACP desaturase

    DOEpatents

    Cahoon, Edgar B.; Shanklin, John; Lindgvist, Ylva; Schneider, Gunter

    1998-01-06

    Disclosed is a methods for modifying the chain length and double bond positional specificities of a soluble plant fatty acid desaturase. More specifically, the method involves modifying amino acid contact residues in the substrate binding channel of the soluble fatty acid desaturase which contact the fatty acid. Specifically disclosed is the modification of an acyl-ACP desaturase. Amino acid contact residues which lie within the substrate binding channel are identified, and subsequently replaced with different residues to effect the modification of activity.

  2. Modified Acyl-ACP desaturase

    DOEpatents

    Cahoon, Edgar B.; Shanklin, John; Lindqvist, Ylva; Schneider, Gunter

    1999-03-30

    Disclosed is a method for modifying the chain length and double bond positional specificities of a soluble plant fatty acid desaturase. More specifically, the method involves modifying amino acid contact residues in the substrate binding channel of the soluble fatty acid desaturase which contact the fatty acid. Specifically disclosed is the modification of an acyl-ACP desaturase. Amino acid contact residues which lie within the substrate binding channel are identified, and subsequently replaced with different residues to effect the modification of activity.

  3. Lumazine Synthase Protein Nanoparticle-Gd(III)-DOTA Conjugate as a T1 contrast agent for high-field MRI

    PubMed Central

    Song, YoungKyu; Kang, Young Ji; Jung, Hoesu; Kim, Hansol; Kang, Sebyung; Cho, HyungJoon

    2015-01-01

    With the applications of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at higher magnetic fields increasing, there is demand for MRI contrast agents with improved relaxivity at higher magnetic fields. Macromolecule-based contrast agents, such as protein-based ones, are known to yield significantly higher r1 relaxivity at low fields, but tend to lose this merit when used as T1 contrast agents (r1/r2 = 0.5 ~ 1), with their r1 decreasing and r2 increasing as magnetic field strength increases. Here, we developed and characterized an in vivo applicable magnetic resonance (MR) positive contrast agent by conjugating Gd(III)-chelating agent complexes to lumazine synthase isolated from Aquifex aeolicus (AaLS). The r1 relaxivity of Gd(III)-DOTA-AaLS-R108C was 16.49 mM−1s−1 and its r1/r2 ratio was 0.52 at the magnetic field strength of 7 T. The results of 3D MR angiography demonstrated the feasibility of vasculature imaging within 2 h of intravenous injection of the agent and a significant reduction in T1 values were observed in the tumor region 7 h post-injection in the SCC-7 flank tumor model. Our findings suggest that Gd(III)-DOTA-AaLS-R108C could serve as a potential theranostic nanoplatform at high magnetic field strength. PMID:26493381

  4. Lumazine Synthase Protein Nanoparticle-Gd(III)-DOTA Conjugate as a T1 contrast agent for high-field MRI.

    PubMed

    Song, YoungKyu; Kang, Young Ji; Jung, Hoesu; Kim, Hansol; Kang, Sebyung; Cho, HyungJoon

    2015-01-01

    With the applications of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at higher magnetic fields increasing, there is demand for MRI contrast agents with improved relaxivity at higher magnetic fields. Macromolecule-based contrast agents, such as protein-based ones, are known to yield significantly higher r1 relaxivity at low fields, but tend to lose this merit when used as T1 contrast agents (r1/r2 = 0.5 ~ 1), with their r1 decreasing and r2 increasing as magnetic field strength increases. Here, we developed and characterized an in vivo applicable magnetic resonance (MR) positive contrast agent by conjugating Gd(III)-chelating agent complexes to lumazine synthase isolated from Aquifex aeolicus (AaLS). The r1 relaxivity of Gd(III)-DOTA-AaLS-R108C was 16.49 mM(-1)s(-1) and its r1/r2 ratio was 0.52 at the magnetic field strength of 7 T. The results of 3D MR angiography demonstrated the feasibility of vasculature imaging within 2 h of intravenous injection of the agent and a significant reduction in T1 values were observed in the tumor region 7 h post-injection in the SCC-7 flank tumor model. Our findings suggest that Gd(III)-DOTA-AaLS-R108C could serve as a potential theranostic nanoplatform at high magnetic field strength. PMID:26493381

  5. Solution Structure of 4'-Phosphopantetheine - GmACP3 from Geobacter Metallireducens: A Specialized Acyl Carrier Protein with Atypical Structural Features and a Putative Role in Lipopolysaccharide Biosyntheses

    SciTech Connect

    Ramelot, Theresa A.; Smola, Matthew J.; Lee, Hsiau-Wei; Ciccosanti, Colleen; Hamilton, Keith; Acton, Thomas; Xiao, Rong; Everett, John K.; Prestegard, James H.; Montelione, Gaetano; Kennedy, Michael A.

    2011-03-08

    GmACP3 from Geobacter metallireducens is a specialized acyl carrier protein (ACP) whose gene, gmet_2339, is located near genes encoding many proteins involved in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) biosynthesis, indicating a likely function for GmACP3 in LPS production. By overexpression in Escherichia coli, about 50% holo-GmACP3 and 50% apo-GmACP3 were obtained. Apo-GmACP3 exhibited slow precipitation and non-monomeric behavior by 15NNMRrelaxation measurements. Addition of 4'-phosphopantetheine (4'-PP) via enzymatic conversion by E. coli holo-ACP synthase resulted in stable >95% holo-GmACP3 that was characterized as monomeric by 15N relaxation measurements and had no indication of conformational exchange. We have determined a high-resolution solution structure of holo-GmACP3 by standard NMR methods, including refinement with two sets of NH residual dipolar couplings, allowing for a detailed structural analysis of the interactions between 4'-PP and GmACP3. Whereas the overall four helix bundle topology is similar to previously solved ACP structures, this structure has unique characteristics, including an ordered 4'-PP conformation that places the thiol at the entrance to a central hydrophobic cavity near a conserved hydrogen-bonded Trp-His pair. These residues are part of a conservedWDSLxH/N motif found in GmACP3 and its orthologs. The helix locations and the large hydrophobic cavity are more similar tomediumand long-chain acyl-ACPs than to other apo- and holo-ACP structures. Taken together, structural characterization along with bioinformatic analysis of nearby genes suggests that GmACP3 is involved in lipid A acylation, possibly by atypical long-chain hydroxy fatty acids, and potentially is involved in synthesis of secondary metabolites.

  6. Mannose 6 Dephosphorylation of Lysosomal Proteins Mediated by Acid Phosphatases Acp2 and Acp5

    PubMed Central

    Makrypidi, Georgia; Damme, Markus; Müller-Loennies, Sven; Trusch, Maria; Schmidt, Bernhard; Schlüter, Hartmut; Heeren, Joerg; Lübke, Torben; Saftig, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Mannose 6-phosphate (Man6P) residues represent a recognition signal required for efficient receptor-dependent transport of soluble lysosomal proteins to lysosomes. Upon arrival, the proteins are rapidly dephosphorylated. We used mice deficient for the lysosomal acid phosphatase Acp2 or Acp5 or lacking both phosphatases (Acp2/Acp5−/−) to examine their role in dephosphorylation of Man6P-containing proteins. Two-dimensional (2D) Man6P immunoblot analyses of tyloxapol-purified lysosomal fractions revealed an important role of Acp5 acting in concert with Acp2 for complete dephosphorylation of lysosomal proteins. The most abundant lysosomal substrates of Acp2 and Acp5 were identified by Man6P affinity chromatography and mass spectrometry. Depending on the presence of Acp2 or Acp5, the isoelectric point of the lysosomal cholesterol-binding protein Npc2 ranged between 7.0 and 5.4 and may thus regulate its interaction with negatively charged lysosomal membranes at acidic pH. Correspondingly, unesterified cholesterol was found to accumulate in lysosomes of cultured hepatocytes of Acp2/Acp5−/− mice. The data demonstrate that dephosphorylation of Man6P-containing lysosomal proteins requires the concerted action of Acp2 and Acp5 and is needed for hydrolysis and removal of degradation products. PMID:22158965

  7. Aspects of Subunit Interactions in the Chloroplast ATP Synthase (I. Isolation of a Chloroplast Coupling Factor 1-Subunit III Complex from Spinach Thylakoids).

    PubMed Central

    Wetzel, C. M.; McCarty, R. E.

    1993-01-01

    A chloroplast ATP synthase complex (CF1 [chloroplast-coupling factor 1]-CF0 [membrane-spanning portion of chloroplast ATP synthase]) depleted of all CF0 subunits except subunit III (also known as the proteolipid subunit) was purified to study the interaction between CF1 and subunit III. Subunit III has a putative role in proton translocation across the thylakoid membrane during photophosphorylation; therefore, an accurate model of subunit inter-actions involving subunit III will be valuable for elucidating the mechanism and regulation of energy coupling. Purification of the complex from a crude CF1-CF0 preparation from spinach (Spinacia oleracea) thylakoids was accomplished by detergent treatment during anion-exchange chromatography. Subunit III in the complex was positively identified by amino acid analysis and N-terminal sequencing. The association of subunit III with CF1 was verified by linear sucrose gradient centrifugation, immunoprecipitation, and incorporation of the complex into asolectin liposomes. After incorporation into liposomes, CF1 was removed from the CF1-III complex by ethylenediaminetetracetate treatment. The subunit III-proteoliposomes were competent to rebind purified CF1. These results indicate that subunit III directly interacts with CF1 in spinach thylakoids. PMID:12231815

  8. Heterologous gene expression and functional analysis of a type III polyketide synthase from Aspergillus niger NRRL 328.

    PubMed

    Kirimura, Kohtaro; Watanabe, Shotaro; Kobayashi, Keiichi

    2016-05-13

    Type III polyketide synthases (PKSs) catalyze the formation of pyrone- and resorcinol-types aromatic polyketides. The genomic analysis of the filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger NRRL 328 revealed that this strain has a putative gene (chr_8_2: 2978617-2979847) encoding a type III PKS, although its functions are unknown. In this study, for functional analysis of this putative type III PKS designated as An-CsyA, cloning and heterologous expression of the An-CsyA gene (An-csyA) in Escherichia coli were performed. Recombinant His-tagged An-CsyA was successfully expressed in E. coli BL21 (DE3), purified by Ni(2+)-affinity chromatography, and used for in vitro assay. Tests on the substrate specificity of the His-tagged An-CsyA with myriad acyl-CoAs as starter substrates and malonyl-CoA as extender substrate showed that His-tagged An-CsyA accepted fatty acyl-CoAs (C2-C14) and produced triketide pyrones (C2-C14), tetraketide pyrones (C2-C10), and pentaketide resorcinols (C10-C14). Furthermore, acetoacetyl-CoA, malonyl-CoA, isobutyryl-CoA, and benzoyl-CoA were also accepted as starter substrates, and both of triketide pyrones and tetraketide pyrones were produced. It is noteworthy that the His-tagged An-CsyA produced polyketides from malonyl-CoA as starter and extender substrates and produced tetraketide pyrones from short-chain fatty acyl-CoAs as starter substrates. Therefore, this is the first report showing the functional properties of An-CsyA different from those of other fungal type III PKSs. PMID:27060547

  9. Modified Acyl-ACP desaturase

    DOEpatents

    Cahoon, E.B.; Shanklin, J.; Lindqvist, Y.; Schneider, G.

    1999-03-30

    Disclosed is a method for modifying the chain length and double bond positional specificities of a soluble plant fatty acid desaturase. More specifically, the method involves modifying amino acid contact residues in the substrate binding channel of the soluble fatty acid desaturase which contact the fatty acid. Specifically disclosed is the modification of an acyl-ACP desaturase. Amino acid contact residues which lie within the substrate binding channel are identified, and subsequently replaced with different residues to effect the modification of activity. 2 figs.

  10. Modified acyl-ACP desaturase

    DOEpatents

    Cahoon, E.B.; Shanklin, J.; Lindgvist, Y.; Schneider, G.

    1998-01-06

    Disclosed is a method for modifying the chain length and double bond positional specificities of a soluble plant fatty acid desaturase. More specifically, the method involves modifying amino acid contact residues in the substrate binding channel of the soluble fatty acid desaturase which contact the fatty acid. Specifically disclosed is the modification of an acyl-ACP desaturase. Amino acid contact residues which lie within the substrate binding channel are identified, and subsequently replaced with different residues to effect the modification of activity. 1 fig.

  11. Isolation of Vibrio harveyi acyl carrier protein and the fabG, acpP, and fabF genes involved in fatty acid biosynthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Z; Byers, D M

    1996-01-01

    We report the isolation of Vibrio harveyi acyl carrier protein (ACP) and cloning of a 3,973-bp region containing the fabG (encoding 3-ketoacyl-ACP reductase, 25.5 kDa), acpP (encoding ACP, 8.7 kDa), fabF (encoding 3-ketoacyl-ACP synthase II, 43.1 kDa), and pabC (encoding aminodeoxychorismate lyase, 29.9 kDa) genes. Predicted amino acid sequences were, respectively, 78, 86, 76, and 35% identical to those of the corresponding Escherichia coli proteins. Five of the 11 sequence differences between V. harveyi and E. coli ACP were nonconservative amino acid differences concentrated in a loop region between helices I and II. PMID:8550484

  12. Molecular cloning, modeling, and site-directed mutagenesis of type III polyketide synthase from Sargassum binderi (Phaeophyta).

    PubMed

    Baharum, Hariyanti; Morita, Hiroyuki; Tomitsuka, Akifumi; Lee, Fong-Chin; Ng, Kim-Yong; Rahim, Raha Abdul; Abe, Ikuro; Ho, Chai-Ling

    2011-10-01

    Type III polyketide synthases (PKSs) produce an array of metabolites with diverse functions. In this study, we have cloned the complete reading frame encoding type III PKS (SbPKS) from a brown seaweed, Sargassum binderi, and characterized the activity of its recombinant protein biochemically. The deduced amino acid sequence of SbPKS is 414 residues in length, sharing a higher sequence similarity with bacterial PKSs (38% identity) than with plant PKSs. The Cys-His-Asn catalytic triad of PKS is conserved in SbPKS with differences in some of the residues lining the active and CoA binding sites. The wild-type SbPKS displayed broad starter substrate specificity to aliphatic long-chain acyl-CoAs (C(6)-C(14)) to produce tri- and tetraketide pyrones. Mutations at H(331) and N(364) caused complete loss of its activity, thus suggesting that these two residues are the catalytic residues for SbPKS as in other type III PKSs. Furthermore, H227G, H227G/L366V substitutions resulted in increased tetraketide-forming activity, while wild-type SbPKS produces triketide α-pyrone as a major product. On the other hand, mutant H227G/L366V/F93A/V95A demonstrated a dramatic decrease of tetraketide pyrone formation. These observations suggest that His(227) and Leu(366) play an important role for the polyketide elongation reaction in SbPKS. The conformational changes in protein structure especially the cavity of the active site may have more significant effect to the activity of SbPKS compared with changes in individual residues. PMID:21181422

  13. Acyl Carrier Protein Synthases from Gram-Negative, Gram-Positive, and Atypical Bacterial Species: Biochemical and Structural Properties and Physiological Implications

    PubMed Central

    McAllister, Kelly A.; Peery, Robert B.; Zhao, Genshi

    2006-01-01

    Acyl carrier protein (ACP) synthase (AcpS) catalyzes the transfer of the 4′-phosphopantetheine moiety from coenzyme A (CoA) onto a serine residue of apo-ACP, resulting in the conversion of apo-ACP to the functional holo-ACP. The holo form of bacterial ACP plays an essential role in mediating the transfer of acyl fatty acid intermediates during the biosynthesis of fatty acids and phospholipids. AcpS is therefore an attractive target for therapeutic intervention. In this study, we have purified and characterized the AcpS enzymes from Escherichia coli, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Mycoplasma pneumoniae, which exemplify gram-negative, gram-positive, and atypical bacteria, respectively. Our gel filtration column chromatography and cross-linking studies demonstrate that the AcpS enzyme from M. pneumoniae, like E. coli enzyme, exhibits a homodimeric structure, but the enzyme from S. pneumoniae exhibits a trimeric structure. Our biochemical studies show that the AcpS enzymes from M. pneumoniae and S. pneumoniae can utilize both short- and long-chain acyl CoA derivatives but prefer long-chain CoA derivatives as substrates. On the other hand, the AcpS enzyme from E. coli can utilize short-chain CoA derivatives but not the long-chain CoA derivatives tested. Finally, our biochemical studies show that M. pneumoniae AcpS is kinetically a very sluggish enzyme compared with those from E. coli and S. pneumoniae. Together, the results of these studies show that the AcpS enzymes from different bacterial species exhibit different native structures and substrate specificities with regard to the utilization of CoA and its derivatives. These findings suggest that AcpS from different microorganisms plays a different role in cellular physiology. PMID:16788183

  14. Synthesis of Unnatural 2-Substituted Quinolones and 1,3-Diketones by a Member of Type III Polyketide Synthases from Huperzia serrata.

    PubMed

    Wang, Juan; Wang, Xiao-Hui; Liu, Xiao; Li, Jun; Shi, Xiao-Ping; Song, Yue-Lin; Zeng, Ke-Wu; Zhang, Le; Tu, Peng-Fei; Shi, She-Po

    2016-08-01

    A curcuminoids, benzalacetone-, and quinolone-producing type III polyketide synthase (HsPKS3) from Huperzia serrata uniquely catalyzes the formation of unnatural 2-substituted quinolones and 1,3-diketones via head-to-head condensation of two completely different substrates. The broad range of substrate tolerance of HsPKS3 facilitates accessing structurally diverse 2-substituted quinolones and 1,3-diketones. PMID:27399835

  15. Mycobacterium tuberculosis acyl carrier protein synthase adopts two different pH-dependent structural conformations

    SciTech Connect

    Gokulan, Kuppan; Aggarwal, Anup; Shipman, Lance; Besra, Gurdyal S.; Sacchettini, James C.

    2011-09-20

    The crystal structures of acyl carrier protein synthase (AcpS) from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) and Corynebacterium ammoniagenes determined at pH 5.3 and pH 6.5, respectively, are reported. Comparison of the Mtb apo-AcpS structure with the recently reported structure of the Mtb AcpS-ADP complex revealed that AcpS adopts two different conformations: the orthorhombic and trigonal space-group structures show structural differences in the {alpha}2 helix and in the conformation of the {alpha}3-{alpha}4 connecting loop, which is in a closed conformation. The apo-AcpS structure shows electron density for the entire model and was obtained at lower pH values (4.4-6.0). In contrast, at a higher pH value (6.5) AcpS undergoes significant conformational changes, resulting in disordered regions that show no electron density in the AcpS model. The solved structures also reveal that C. ammoniagenes AcpS undergoes structural rearrangement in two regions, similar to the recently reported Mtb AcpS-ADP complex structure. In vitro reconstitution experiments show that AcpS has a higher post-translational modification activity between pH 4.4 and 6.0 than at pH values above 6.5, where the activity drops owing to the change in conformation. The results show that apo-AcpS and AcpS-ADP adopt different conformations depending upon the pH conditions of the crystallization solution.

  16. Solution Structure of 4′-Phosphopantetheine - GmACP3 from Geobacter metallireducens: A Specialized Acyl Carrier Protein with Atypical Structural Features and a Putative Role in Lipopolysaccharide Biosynthesis†

    PubMed Central

    Ramelot, Theresa A.; Smola, Matthew J.; Lee, Hsiau-Wei; Ciccosanti, Colleen; Hamilton, Keith; Acton, Thomas B.; Xiao, Rong; Everett, John K.; Prestegard, James H.; Montelione, Gaetano T.; Kennedy, Michael A.

    2011-01-01

    GmACP3 from Geobacter metallireducens is a specialized acyl carrier protein (ACP) whose gene, gmet_2339, is located near genes encoding many proteins involved in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) biosynthesis, indicating a likely function for GmACP3 in LPS production. By overexpression in Escherichia coli, about 50% holo-GmACP3 and 50% apo-GmACP3 were obtained. Apo-GmACP3 exhibited slow precipitation and non-monomeric behavior by 15N NMR relaxation measurements. Addition of 4′-phosphopantetheine (4′-PP) via enzymatic conversion by E. coli holo-ACP synthase, resulted in stable >95% holo-GmACP3 that was characterized as monomeric by 15N relaxation measurements and had no indication of conformational exchange. We have determined a high-resolution solution structure of holo-GmACP3 by standard NMR methods, including refinement with two sets of NH residual dipolar couplings, allowing for a detailed structural analysis of the interactions between 4′-PP and GmACP3. Whereas the overall four helix bundle topology is similar to previously solved ACP structures, this structure has unique characteristics, including an ordered 4′-PP conformation that places the thiol at the entrance to a central hydrophobic cavity near a conserved hydrogen-bonded Trp-His pair. These residues are part of a conserved WDSLxH/N motif found in GmACP3 and it’s orthologs. The helix locations and the large hydrophobic cavity are more similar to medium- and long-chain acyl-ACPs than to other apo- and holo-ACP structures. Taken together, structural characterization along with bioinformatic analysis of nearby genes suggest that GmACP3 is involved in lipid A acylation, possibly by atypical long-chain hydroxy fatty acids, and potentially involved in synthesis of secondary metabolites. PMID:21235239

  17. Decarboxylation of malonyl-(acyl carrier protein) by 3-oxoacyl-(acyl carrier protein) synthases in plant fatty acid biosynthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Winter, E; Brummel, M; Schuch, R; Spener, F

    1997-01-01

    In order to identify regulatory steps in fatty acid biosynthesis, the influence of intermediate 3-oxoacyl-(acyl carrier proteins) (3-oxoacyl-ACPs) and end-product acyl-ACPs of the fatty acid synthase reaction on the condensation reaction was investigated in vitro, using total fatty acid synthase preparations and purified 3-oxoacyl-ACP synthases (KASs; EC 2.3.1.41) from Cuphea lanceolata seeds. KAS I and II in the fatty acid synthase preparations were assayed for the elongation of octanoyl- and hexadecanoyl-ACP respectively, and the accumulation of the corresponding condensation product 3-oxoacyl-ACP was studied by modulating the content of the reducing equivalentS NADH and NADPH. Complete omission of reducing equivalents resulted with either KAS in the abnormal synthesis of acetyl-ACP from malonyl-ACP by a decarboxylation reaction. Supplementation with NADPH or NADH, separately or in combination with recombinant 3-oxoacyl-ACP reductase (EC 1.1.1.100), led to a decrease in the amount of acetyl-ACP and a simultaneous increase in elongation products. This demonstrates that the accumulation of 3-oxoacyl-ACP inhibits the condensation reaction on the one hand, and induces the decarboxylation of malonyl-ACP on the other. By carrying out similar experiments with purified enzymes, this decarboxylation was attributed to the action of KAS. Our data point to a regulatory mechanism for the degradation of malonyl-ACP in plants which is activated by the accumulation of the fatty acid synthase intermediate 3-oxoacyl-ACP. PMID:9020860

  18. Structure and stereospecificity of the dehydratase domain from the terminal module of the rifamycin polyketide synthase

    PubMed Central

    Gay, Darren; You, Young-Ok; Keatinge-Clay, Adrian; Cane, David E.

    2014-01-01

    RifDH10, the dehydratase domain from the terminal module of the rifamycin polyketide synthase, catalyzed the stereospecific syn dehydration of the model substrate (2S,3S)-2-methyl-3-hydroxypentanoyl-RifACP10, resulting in exclusive formation of (E)-2-methyl-2-pentenoyl-RifACP10. RifDH10 did not dehydrate any of the other three diastereomeric, RifACP10-bound, diketide thioester substrates. On the other hand, when EryACP6, from the sixth module of the erythromycin polyketide synthase, was substituted for RifACP10, RifDH10 stereospecifically dehydrated only (2R,3R)-2-methyl-3-hydroxypentanoyl-EryACP6 to give exclusively (E)-2-methyl-2-pentenoyl-EryACP6, with no detectable dehydration of any of the other three diastereomeric, EryACP6-bound, diketides. An identical alteration in substrate diastereospecificity was observed for the corresponding N-acetylcysteamine or pantetheine thioester analogues, regardless of acyl chain length or substitution pattern. Incubation of (2RS)-2-methyl-3-ketopentanoyl-RifACP10 with the didomain reductase-dehydratase RifKR10-RifDH10 yielded (E)-2-methyl-2-pentenoyl-RifACP10, the expected product of syn dehydration of (2S,3S)-2-methyl-3-hydroxypentanoyl-RifACP10, while incubation with the corresponding EryACP6-bound substrate, (2RS)-2-methyl-3-ketopentanoyl-EryACP6, gave only the reduction product (2S,3S)-2-methyl-3-hydroxypentanoyl-EryACP6 with no detectable dehydration. These results establish the intrinsic syn dehydration stereochemistry and substrate diastereoselectivity of RifDH10 and highlight the critical role of the natural RifACP10 domain in chaperoning the proper recognition and processing of the natural ACP-bound undecaketide substrate. The 1.82 Å-resolution structure of RifDH10 revealed the atomic resolution details of the active site and allowed modeling of the syn-dehydration of the (2S,3S)-2-methyl-3-hydroxyacyl-RifACP10 substrate. These results suggest that generation of the characteristic cis double bond of the rifamycins

  19. Structural characterization and comparison of three acyl-carrier-protein synthases from pathogenic bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Halavaty, Andrei S.; Kim, Youngchang; Minasov, George; Shuvalova, Ludmilla; Dubrovska, Ievgeniia; Winsor, James; Zhou, Min; Onopriyenko, Olena; Skarina, Tatiana; Papazisi, Leka; Kwon, Keehwan; Peterson, Scott N.; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Savchenko, Alexei; Anderson, Wayne F.

    2012-10-01

    The structural characterization of acyl-carrier-protein synthase (AcpS) from three different pathogenic microorganisms is reported. One interesting finding of the present work is a crystal artifact related to the activity of the enzyme, which fortuitously represents an opportunity for a strategy to design a potential inhibitor of a pathogenic AcpS. Some bacterial type II fatty-acid synthesis (FAS II) enzymes have been shown to be important candidates for drug discovery. The scientific and medical quest for new FAS II protein targets continues to stimulate research in this field. One of the possible additional candidates is the acyl-carrier-protein synthase (AcpS) enzyme. Its holo form post-translationally modifies the apo form of an acyl carrier protein (ACP), which assures the constant delivery of thioester intermediates to the discrete enzymes of FAS II. At the Center for Structural Genomics of Infectious Diseases (CSGID), AcpSs from Staphylococcus aureus (AcpS{sub SA}), Vibrio cholerae (AcpS{sub VC}) and Bacillus anthracis (AcpS{sub BA}) have been structurally characterized in their apo, holo and product-bound forms, respectively. The structure of AcpS{sub BA} is emphasized because of the two 3′, 5′-adenosine diphosphate (3′, 5′-ADP) product molecules that are found in each of the three coenzyme A (CoA) binding sites of the trimeric protein. One 3′, 5′-ADP is bound as the 3′, 5′-ADP part of CoA in the known structures of the CoA–AcpS and 3′, 5′-ADP–AcpS binary complexes. The position of the second 3′, 5′-ADP has never been described before. It is in close proximity to the first 3′, 5′-ADP and the ACP-binding site. The coordination of two ADPs in AcpS{sub BA} may possibly be exploited for the design of AcpS inhibitors that can block binding of both CoA and ACP.

  20. Structure/Function Analysis of a Type III Polyketide Synthase in the Brown Alga Ectocarpus siliculosus Reveals a Biochemical Pathway in Phlorotannin Monomer Biosynthesis[W

    PubMed Central

    Meslet-Cladière, Laurence; Delage, Ludovic; Leroux, Cédric J.-J.; Goulitquer, Sophie; Leblanc, Catherine; Creis, Emeline; Gall, Erwan Ar; Stiger-Pouvreau, Valérie; Czjzek, Mirjam; Potin, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Brown algal phlorotannins are structural analogs of condensed tannins in terrestrial plants and, like plant phenols, they have numerous biological functions. Despite their importance in brown algae, phlorotannin biosynthetic pathways have been poorly characterized at the molecular level. We found that a predicted type III polyketide synthase in the genome of the brown alga Ectocarpus siliculosus, PKS1, catalyzes a major step in the biosynthetic pathway of phlorotannins (i.e., the synthesis of phloroglucinol monomers from malonyl-CoA). The crystal structure of PKS1 at 2.85-Å resolution provided a good quality electron density map showing a modified Cys residue, likely connected to a long chain acyl group. An additional pocket not found in other known type III PKSs contains a reaction product that might correspond to a phloroglucinol precursor. In vivo, we also found a positive correlation between the phloroglucinol content and the PKS III gene expression level in cells of a strain of Ectocarpus adapted to freshwater during its reacclimation to seawater. The evolution of the type III PKS gene family in Stramenopiles suggests a lateral gene transfer event from an actinobacterium. PMID:23983220

  1. Effect of chronic prenatal ethanol exposure on nitric oxide synthase I and III proteins in the hippocampus of the near-term fetal guinea pig.

    PubMed

    Kimura, K A; Chiu, J; Reynolds, J N; Brien, J F

    1999-01-01

    Chronic prenatal ethanol exposure suppresses nitric oxide synthase (NOS) enzymatic activity, in the hippocampus of the near-term fetal guinea pig at gestational day (GD) 62. The objective of this study was to determine if this decrease in NOS activity is the result of decreased NOS I and NOS III protein expression. Pregnant guinea pigs received oral administration of 4 g ethanol/kg maternal body weight/day (n = 8), isocaloric-sucrose/pair feeding (n = 8), or water (n = 8) from GD 2 to GD 61. The NOS I and NOS III protein expression and localization in the hippocampus were determined using Western blot analysis and immunohistochemistry, respectively. The chronic ethanol regimen produced fetal body, brain, and hippocampal growth restriction compared with the isocaloric-sucrose/pair fed and water groups but did not affect the expression or localization of NOS I and NOS III proteins in the hippocampus. The decrease in NOS enzymatic activity induced by chronic prenatal ethanol exposure may be the result of posttranslational modification of NOS I and/or NOS III protein in the hippocampus of the near-term fetal guinea pig. PMID:10386828

  2. Purification and characterization of the acyl carrier protein of the Streptomyces glaucescens tetracenomycin C polyketide synthase.

    PubMed Central

    Shen, B; Summers, R G; Gramajo, H; Bibb, M J; Hutchinson, C R

    1992-01-01

    The acyl carrier protein (ACP) of the tetracenomycin C polyketide synthase, encoded by the tcmM gene, has been expressed in both Streptomyces glaucescens and Escherichia coli and purified to homogeneity. Expression of the tcmM gene in E. coli results mainly in the TcmM apo-ACP, whereas expression in S. glaucescens yields solely the holo-ACP. The purified holo-TcmM is active in a malonyl coenzyme A:ACP transacylase assay and is labeled by radioactive beta-alanine, confirming that it carries a 4'-phosphopantetheine prosthetic group. Images PMID:1592832

  3. 7 CFR 701.44 - Agricultural Conservation Program (ACP) contracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... be subject to, the regulations for ACP contracts and the ACP program that were contained in the 7 CFR... 7 Agriculture 7 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Agricultural Conservation Program (ACP) contracts. 701... AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGRICULTURAL CONSERVATION PROGRAM EMERGENCY CONSERVATION...

  4. 7 CFR 701.44 - Agricultural Conservation Program (ACP) contracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... be subject to, the regulations for ACP contracts and the ACP program that were contained in the 7 CFR... 7 Agriculture 7 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Agricultural Conservation Program (ACP) contracts. 701... AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGRICULTURAL CONSERVATION PROGRAM EMERGENCY CONSERVATION...

  5. 7 CFR 701.44 - Agricultural Conservation Program (ACP) contracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... be subject to, the regulations for ACP contracts and the ACP program that were contained in the 7 CFR... 7 Agriculture 7 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Agricultural Conservation Program (ACP) contracts. 701... AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGRICULTURAL CONSERVATION PROGRAM EMERGENCY CONSERVATION...

  6. 7 CFR 701.44 - Agricultural Conservation Program (ACP) contracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... be subject to, the regulations for ACP contracts and the ACP program that were contained in the 7 CFR... 7 Agriculture 7 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Agricultural Conservation Program (ACP) contracts. 701... AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGRICULTURAL CONSERVATION PROGRAM EMERGENCY CONSERVATION...

  7. 7 CFR 701.44 - Agricultural Conservation Program (ACP) contracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... regulations for ACP contracts and the ACP program that were contained in the 7 CFR, parts 700 to 899, edition... 7 Agriculture 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Agricultural Conservation Program (ACP) contracts. 701... AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGRICULTURAL CONSERVATION PROGRAM EMERGENCY CONSERVATION PROGRAM...

  8. Recognition of acyl carrier proteins by ketoreductases in assembly line polyketide synthases.

    PubMed

    Ostrowski, Matthew P; Cane, David E; Khosla, Chaitan

    2016-07-01

    Ketoreductases (KRs) are the most widespread tailoring domains found in individual modules of assembly line polyketide synthases (PKSs), and are responsible for controlling the configurations of both the α-methyl and β-hydroxyl stereogenic centers in the growing polyketide chain. Because they recognize substrates that are covalently bound to acyl carrier proteins (ACPs) within the same PKS module, we sought to quantify the extent to which protein-protein recognition contributes to the turnover of these oxidoreductive enzymes using stand-alone domains from the 6-deoxyerythronolide B synthase (DEBS). Reduced 2-methyl-3-hydroxyacyl-ACP substrates derived from two enantiomeric acyl chains and four distinct ACP domains were synthesized and presented to four distinct KR domains. Two KRs, from DEBS modules 2 and 5, displayed little preference for oxidation of substrates tethered to their cognate ACP domains over those attached to the other ACP domains tested. In contrast, the KR from DEBS module 1 showed an ~10-50-fold preference for substrate attached to its native ACP domain, whereas the KR from DEBS module 6 actually displayed an ~10-fold preference for the ACP from DEBS module 5. Our findings suggest that recognition of the ACP by a KR domain is unlikely to affect the rate of native assembly line polyketide biosynthesis. In some cases, however, unfavorable KR-ACP interactions may suppress the rate of substrate processing when KR domains are swapped to construct hybrid PKS modules. PMID:27118242

  9. The first example of a centro-symmetrical bis(imido)-bridged dinuclear cobalt(III) complex: synthesis via oxidative dehydrogenation and phenoxazinone synthase activity.

    PubMed

    Panja, Anangamohan; Guionneau, Philippe

    2013-04-14

    A bis(imido)-bridged dinuclear cobalt(III) complex, [Co2(amp)2(μ-imp)2Cl2]Cl2·2H2O () [amp = 2-aminomethylpyridine; imp = 2-iminomethylpyridine anion], was synthesized by the reaction of cobalt(II) chloride with 2-aminomethylpyridine in the presence of alkaline hydrogen peroxide at room temperature. X-ray crystallography reveals that both the metal centres in the molecule are related to each other through an inversion centre, and the geometry of each of the Co(III) ions is a distorted octahedral structure having a CoN5Cl coordination environment. The most important feature of the structure is the modification of half of the coordinated amines by the oxidative dehydrogenation process which involves double bridging in the complex cation. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first example of a bis(imido)-bridged dinuclear cobalt(III) complex derived from metal-assisted oxidative dehydrogenation of the coordinated primary amine ligand. Complex was found to be an excellent functional model for the phenoxazinone synthase, catalyzing the oxidative coupling of 2-aminophenol to the corresponding 2-aminophenoxazinone chromophore in dioxygen saturated methanol. The detailed kinetic investigations reveal that the phenoxazinone chromophore is produced via a potential complex-substrate intermediate. PMID:23396321

  10. Cobalamin in inflammation III — glutathionylcobalamin and methylcobalamin/adenosylcobalamin coenzymes: the sword in the stone? How cobalamin may directly regulate the nitric oxide synthases

    PubMed Central

    Wheatley, Carmen

    2007-01-01

    Several mysteries surround the structure and function of the nitric oxide synthases (NOS). The NOS oxygenase domain structure is unusually open with a large area of solvent that could accommodate an unidentified ligand. The exact mechanism of the two-step five-electron monoxygenation of arginine to NG-hydroxy-L-arginine, thence to citrulline and nitric oxide (NO), is not clear, particularly as arginine/NG-hydroxy-L-arginine is bound at a great distance to the supposed catalytic heme Fe [III], as the anti-stereoisomer. The Return of the Scarlet Pimpernel Paper proposed that cobalamin is a primary indirect regulator of the NOS. An additional direct regulatory effect of the ‘base-off’ dimethylbenzimidazole of glutathionylcobalamin (GSCbl), which may act as a sixth ligand to the heme iron, promote Co-oriented, BH4/BH3 radical catalysed oxidation of L-arginine to NO, and possibly regulate the rate of inducible NOS/NO production by the NOS dimers, is further advanced. The absence of homology between the NOS and methionine synthase/methylmalonyl CoA mutase may enable GSCbl to regulate both sets of enzymes simultaneously by completely separate mechanisms. Thus, cobalamin may exert central control over both pro-and anti-inflammatory systems. PMID:18923642

  11. Cobalamin in inflammation III - glutathionylcobalamin and methylcobalamin/adenosylcobalamin coenzymes: the sword in the stone? How cobalamin may directly regulate the nitric oxide synthases.

    PubMed

    Wheatley, Carmen

    2007-09-01

    Several mysteries surround the structure and function of the nitric oxide synthases (NOS). The NOS oxygenase domain structure is unusually open with a large area of solvent that could accommodate an unidentified ligand. The exact mechanism of the two-step five-electron monoxygenation of arginine to N(G)-hydroxy-L-arginine, thence to citrulline and nitric oxide (NO), is not clear, particularly as arginine/N(G)-hydroxy-L-arginine is bound at a great distance to the supposed catalytic heme Fe [III], as the anti-stereoisomer. The Return of the Scarlet Pimpernel Paper proposed that cobalamin is a primary indirect regulator of the NOS. An additional direct regulatory effect of the 'base-off' dimethylbenzimidazole of glutathionylcobalamin (GSCbl), which may act as a sixth ligand to the heme iron, promote Co-oriented, BH(4)/BH(3) radical catalysed oxidation of L-arginine to NO, and possibly regulate the rate of inducible NOS/NO production by the NOS dimers, is further advanced. The absence of homology between the NOS and methionine synthase/methylmalonyl CoA mutase may enable GSCbl to regulate both sets of enzymes simultaneously by completely separate mechanisms. Thus, cobalamin may exert central control over both pro-and anti-inflammatory systems. PMID:18923642

  12. Structural basis for the formation of acylalkylpyrones from two β-ketoacyl units by the fungal type III polyketide synthase CsyB.

    PubMed

    Mori, Takahiro; Yang, Dengfeng; Matsui, Takashi; Hashimoto, Makoto; Morita, Hiroyuki; Fujii, Isao; Abe, Ikuro

    2015-02-20

    The acylalkylpyrone synthase CsyB from Aspergillus oryzae catalyzes the one-pot formation of the 3-acyl-4-hydroxy-6-alkyl-α-pyrone scaffold from acetoacetyl-CoA, fatty acyl-CoA, and malonyl-CoA. This is the first type III polyketide synthase that performs not only the polyketide chain elongation but also the condensation of two β-ketoacyl units. The crystal structures of wild-type CsyB and its I375F and I375W mutants were solved at 1.7-, 2.3-, and 2.0-Å resolutions, respectively. The crystal structures revealed a unique active site architecture featuring a hitherto unidentified novel pocket for accommodation of the acetoacetyl-CoA starter in addition to the conventional elongation/cyclization pocket with the Cys-His-Asn catalytic triad and the long hydrophobic tunnel for binding the fatty acyl chain. The structures also indicated the presence of a putative nucleophilic water molecule activated by the hydrogen bond networks with His-377 and Cys-155 at the active site center. Furthermore, an in vitro enzyme reaction confirmed that the (18)O atom of the H2(18)O molecule is enzymatically incorporated into the final product. These observations suggested that the enzyme reaction is initiated by the loading of acetoacetyl-CoA onto Cys-155, and subsequent thioester bond cleavage by the nucleophilic water generates the β-keto acid intermediate, which is placed within the novel pocket. The second β-ketoacyl unit is then produced by polyketide chain elongation of fatty acyl-CoA with one molecule of malonyl-CoA, and the condensation with the β-keto acid generates the final products. Indeed, steric modulation of the novel pocket by the structure-based I375F and I375W mutations resulted in altered specificities for the chain lengths of the substrates. PMID:25564614

  13. Cloning and functional analysis of the promoter of a maize starch synthase III gene (ZmDULL1).

    PubMed

    Wu, J D; Jiang, C P; Zhu, H S; Jiang, H Y; Cheng, B J; Zhu, S W

    2015-01-01

    The ZmDULL1 gene encodes a starch synthase and is a determinant of the structure of endosperm starch in maize (Zea mays L.). However, little is known regarding the regulatory mechanism of the ZmDULL1 gene. In this study, we isolated and characterized the ZmDULL1 promoter (PDULL1), which is the 5' flanking region of ZmDULL1 in maize. Sequence analysis showed that several cis-acting elements important for endosperm expression (GCN4_motif and AACA-element) were located within the promoter. A series of PDULL1 deletion derivatives, PDULL1-1-PDULL1-4, from the translation start code (-1676, -1216, -740, and -343) were fused to the β-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene. Each deletion construct was transformed into rice using the Agrobacterium-mediated method, and then GUS activity was measured in transgenic plants. The results showed that PDULL1 was an endosperm-specific promoter. Further analysis showed that the promoter sequence (-343 to -1 base pairs) was sufficient for mediating GUS gene expression in endosperm. These results indicate that the region from -343 to -1 base pairs of PDULL1 is valuable for transgenic rice breeding and genetic engineering studies. PMID:26125743

  14. Ontogeny of nitric oxide synthase I and III protein expression and enzymatic activity in the guinea pig hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Kimura, K A; Reynolds, J N; Brien, J F

    1999-09-01

    60. NOS enzymatic activity increased throughout prenatal and postnatal life, and attained highest activity in the adult. The developmental profile of NOS III protein expression was similar to that for NOS enzymatic activity. There was differential expression of NOS I protein, which was low in the GD 50 fetus and increased rapidly during fetal development to attain adult level by GD 62. These data suggest that the guinea pig is a reliable animal model in which to investigate the roles of NO in normal hippocampal development and in mediating neuronal injury in this brain region. PMID:10521566

  15. Primary structure of a cerulenin-binding. beta. -ketoacyl-(acyl carrier protein) synthase from barley chloroplasts

    SciTech Connect

    Siggaard-Andersen, M.; Kauppinen, S. ); von Wettstein-Knowles, P. Univ. of Copenhagen )

    1991-05-15

    The radioactively labeled {beta}-ketoacyl thioester synthase inhibitor ({sup 3}H)cerulenin was used to tag three dimeric barley chloroplast proteins ({alpha}{alpha}, {alpha}{beta}, and {beta}{beta}) from the stromal fraction. Oligonucleotides corresponding to amino acid sequences obtained from the purified proteins were used to generate with the polymerase chain reaction a probe for cDNAs encoding the {beta} subunit. cDNA sequencing revealed an open reading frame for 462 residues comprising the mature protein and a 35-amino acid transit peptide. The deduced amino acid sequence of the mature protein is homologous to the {beta}-ketoacyl-(acyl carrier protein) (ACP) synthase I (3-oxoacyl-ACP synthase; acyl-ACP:malonyl-ACP C-acyltransferase (decarboxylating), EC 2.3.1.41) of Escherichia coli. Under analogous experimental conditions ({sup 3}H)cerulenin tagged a single dimeric protein from spinach chloroplasts.

  16. Transition metal HE`s - VII ACP. Progress report, August 1971--October 1971

    SciTech Connect

    Clink, G.L.

    1998-12-31

    Physical and physicochemical properties of hexaamminechromium III perchlorate (ACP) were investigated to determine its potentiality for HE and/or HE component application. Physicochemical properties obtained through investigation of isothermally aged ACP under conditions of various system and boundary restrictions (open and closed; 50 and 80 C; 0.65 and 0.85 g/cc) show the material to be substantially stable under these simulated isothermal storage conditions from a standpoint of infrared and DTA thermal pattern behavior and chemical analysis of aged residues. Spark sensitivity was 0.25 joules at 5 kv (by LASL type test) and impact sensitivity was about 23 and 14 cm on sandpaper (12A) and steel (12B), respectively.

  17. Expression of Ribonucleotide Reductase Subunit-2 and Thymidylate Synthase Correlates with Poor Prognosis in Patients with Resected Stages I–III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Grossi, Francesco; Dal Bello, Maria Giovanna; Salvi, Sandra; Puzone, Roberto; Pfeffer, Ulrich; Fontana, Vincenzo; Alama, Angela; Rijavec, Erika; Barletta, Giulia; Genova, Carlo; Sini, Claudio; Ratto, Giovanni Battista; Taviani, Mario; Truini, Mauro; Merlo, Domenico Franco

    2015-01-01

    Biomarkers can help to identify patients with early-stages or locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who have high risk of relapse and poor prognosis. To correlate the expression of seven biomarkers involved in DNA synthesis and repair and in cell division with clinical outcome, we consecutively collected 82 tumour tissues from radically resected NSCLC patients. The following biomarkers were investigated using IHC and qRT-PCR: excision repair cross-complementation group 1 (ERCC1), breast cancer 1 (BRCA1), ribonucleotide reductase subunits M1 and M2 (RRM1 and RRM2), subunit p53R2, thymidylate synthase (TS), and class III beta-tubulin (TUBB3). Gene expression levels were also validated in an available NSCLC microarray dataset. Multivariate analysis identified the protein overexpression of RRM2 and TS as independent prognostic factors of shorter overall survival (OS). Kaplan-Meier analysis showed a trend in shorter OS for patients with RRM2, TS, and ERCC1, BRCA1 overexpressed tumours. For all of the biomarkers except TUBB3, the OS trends relative to the gene expression levels were in agreement with those relative to the protein expression levels. The NSCLC microarray dataset showed RRM2 and TS as biomarkers significantly associated with OS. This study suggests that high expression levels of RRM2 and TS might be negative prognostic factors for resected NSCLC patients. PMID:26663950

  18. Starch phosphorylation in potato tubers is influenced by allelic variation in the genes encoding glucan water dikinase, starch branching enzymes I and II, and starch synthase III

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, Margaret A.; Joyce, Nigel I.; Genet, Russell A.; Cooper, Rebecca D.; Murray, Sarah R.; Noble, Alasdair D.; Butler, Ruth C.; Timmerman-Vaughan, Gail M.

    2015-01-01

    Starch phosphorylation is an important aspect of plant metabolism due to its role in starch degradation. Moreover, the degree of phosphorylation of starch determines its physicochemical properties and is therefore relevant for industrial uses of starch. Currently, starch is chemically phosphorylated to increase viscosity and paste stability. Potato cultivars with elevated starch phosphorylation would make this process unnecessary, thereby bestowing economic and environmental benefits. Starch phosphorylation is a complex trait which has been previously shown by antisense gene repression to be influenced by a number of genes including those involved in starch synthesis and degradation. We have used an association mapping approach to discover genetic markers associated with the degree of starch phosphorylation. A diverse collection of 193 potato lines was grown in replicated field trials, and the levels of starch phosphorylation at the C6 and C3 positions of the glucosyl residues were determined by mass spectrometry of hydrolyzed starch from tubers. In addition, the potato lines were genotyped by amplicon sequencing and microsatellite analysis, focusing on candidate genes known to be involved in starch synthesis. As potato is an autotetraploid, genotyping included determination of allele dosage. Significant associations (p < 0.001) were found with SNPs in the glucan water dikinase (GWD), starch branching enzyme I (SBEI) and the starch synthase III (SSIII) genes, and with a SSR allele in the SBEII gene. SNPs in the GWD gene were associated with C6 phosphorylation, whereas polymorphisms in the SBEI and SBEII genes were associated with both C6 and C3 phosphorylation and the SNP in the SSIII gene was associated with C3 phosphorylation. These allelic variants have potential as genetic markers for starch phosphorylation in potato. PMID:25806042

  19. The ACP (Advanced Computer Program) Branch bus and real-time applications of the ACP multiprocessor system

    SciTech Connect

    Hance, R.; Areti, H.; Atac, R.; Biel, J.; Cook, A.; Fischler, M.; Gaines, I.; Husby, D.; Nash, T.; Zmuda, T.

    1987-05-08

    The ACP Branchbus, a high speed differential bus for data movement in multiprocessing and data acquisition environments, is described. This bus was designed as the central bus in the ACP multiprocessing system. In its full implementation with 16 branches and a bus switch, it will handle data rates of 160 MByte/sec and allow reliable data transmission over inter rack distances. We also summarize applications of the ACP system in experimental data acquisition, triggering and monitoring, with special attention paid to FASTBUS environments.

  20. The Interactions of CPP–ACP with Saliva

    PubMed Central

    Huq, Noorjahan Laila; Myroforidis, Helen; Cross, Keith J.; Stanton, David P.; Veith, Paul D.; Ward, Brent R.; Reynolds, Eric C.

    2016-01-01

    The repair of early dental caries lesions has been demonstrated by the application of the remineralisation technology based on casein phosphopeptide-stabilised amorphous calcium phosphate complexes (CPP–ACP). These complexes consist of an amorphous calcium phosphate mineral phase stabilised and encapsulated by the self-assembly of milk-derived phosphopeptides. During topical application of CPP–ACP complexes in the oral cavity, the CPP encounters the enamel pellicle consisting of salivary proteins and peptides. However the interactions of the CPP with the enamel salivary pellicle are not known. The studies presented here reveal that the predominant peptides of CPP–ACP complexes do interact with specific salivary proteins and peptides of the enamel pellicle, and provide a mechanism by which the CPP–ACP complexes are localised at the tooth surface to promote remineralisation. PMID:27294918

  1. The Interactions of CPP-ACP with Saliva.

    PubMed

    Huq, Noorjahan Laila; Myroforidis, Helen; Cross, Keith J; Stanton, David P; Veith, Paul D; Ward, Brent R; Reynolds, Eric C

    2016-01-01

    The repair of early dental caries lesions has been demonstrated by the application of the remineralisation technology based on casein phosphopeptide-stabilised amorphous calcium phosphate complexes (CPP-ACP). These complexes consist of an amorphous calcium phosphate mineral phase stabilised and encapsulated by the self-assembly of milk-derived phosphopeptides. During topical application of CPP-ACP complexes in the oral cavity, the CPP encounters the enamel pellicle consisting of salivary proteins and peptides. However the interactions of the CPP with the enamel salivary pellicle are not known. The studies presented here reveal that the predominant peptides of CPP-ACP complexes do interact with specific salivary proteins and peptides of the enamel pellicle, and provide a mechanism by which the CPP-ACP complexes are localised at the tooth surface to promote remineralisation. PMID:27294918

  2. Selection on the Drosophila seminal fluid protein Acp62F

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Alex; Rundle, Howard

    2013-01-01

    Sperm competition and sexual conflict are thought to underlie the rapid evolution of reproductive proteins in many taxa. While comparative data are generally consistent with these hypotheses, few manipulative tests have been conducted and those that have provided contradictory results in some cases. Here, we use both comparative and experimental techniques to investigate the evolution of the Drosophila melanogaster seminal fluid protein Acp62F, a protease inhibitor for which extensive functional tests have yielded ambiguous results. Using between-species sequence comparisons, we show that Acp62F has been subject to recurrent positive selection. In addition, we experimentally evolved populations polymorphic for an Acp62F null allele over eight generations, manipulating the opportunities for natural and sexual selection. We found that the Acp62F null allele increased in frequency in the presence of natural selection, with no effect of sexual selection. PMID:23919141

  3. 26 CFR 1.401(m)-2 - ACP test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... satisfy the ACP test, but not in excess of 100%. In this case, an increase in the match rate from 50% to... under the ACP test only to the extent they do not exceed 25.00% of compensation. In this case, all of... determined under § 1.401(m)-2(b)(2)(iv) (as it appeared in the April 1, 2007, edition of 26 CFR part 1)....

  4. Mode of action of anticancer peptides (ACPs) from amphibian origin.

    PubMed

    Oelkrug, Christopher; Hartke, Martin; Schubert, Andreas

    2015-02-01

    Although cancer belongs to one of the leading causes of death around the world, fortunately studies have shown that tumor cells have various targets that are susceptible to attack. Interestingly, tumor cells are comprised of cellular membranes, which are altered in chemical composition relative to non-neoplastic cells, giving them an increased net negative charge. These altered membranes are ideal targets for antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) shown to have additional tumoricidal properties and, hence, named anticancer peptides (ACPs). Several hundred ACPs have been explored in vitro and in vivo on various types of cancer. Novel anticancer agents are supposed not to cause serious side effects and the formation of multidrug-resistant tumor cells. During the quest for potent ACPs, promising candidates were isolated from skin secretions of amphibians, such as the granular glands of the Chinese brown frog, Rana chensinensis. ACPs have to be selective to cancer cells and should not induce strong immune responses or be cleared from the body rapidly. Several modifications can improve ACPs either by optimizing the primary structure rationally or randomly or even by introducing other chemical modifications. PMID:25667440

  5. ACP research and scientific coordination: Annual performance report

    SciTech Connect

    Hales, J.M.

    1992-09-17

    This research grant addresses two primary objectives: 1. Conduct of specific research tasks under the DOE Atmospheric Chemistry Program (ACP), and 2. Provision of scientific coordination for the Atmospheric Chemistry Program. In summary, the project is progressing essentially as expected, with some minor exceptions. Higher than anticipated demands within Objective 2, associated primarily with the ACP Ozone Project and the recompetition of the National Laboratories protion of ACP, have resulted in a somewhat higher proportionate emphasis on the coordination activities associated with this objective. Also, the immediate need for pre-campaign modeling of the North Pacific has resulted in an acceleration of the Pacific modeling task relative to other tasks, particularly the Atlantic modeling task. Modeling activities in general have been delayed somewhat because of the noted Objective 2 demands and because of the extended time that was necessary to complete financial agreements for this grant.

  6. Palmitoyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) thioesterase and the evolutionary origin of plant acyl-ACP thioesterases.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, A; Davies, H M; Voelker, T A

    1995-01-01

    Acyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) thioesterases play an essential role in chain termination during de novo fatty acid synthesis and in the channeling of carbon flux between the two lipid biosynthesis pathways in plants. We have discovered that there are two distinct but related thioesterase gene classes in higher plants, termed FatA and FatB, whose evolutionary divergence appears to be ancient. FatA encodes the already described 18:1-ACP thioesterase. In contrast, FatB representatives encode thioesterases preferring acyl-ACPs having saturated acyl groups. We unexpectedly obtained a 16:0-ACP thioesterase cDNA from Cuphea hookeriana seed, which accumulate predominantly 8:0 and 10:0. The 16:0 thioesterase transcripts were found in non-seed tissues, and expression in transgenic Brassica napus led to the production of a 16:0-rich oil. We present evidence that this type of FatB gene is ancient and ubiquitous in plants and that specialized plant medium-chain thioesterases have evolved independently from such enzymes several times during angiosperm evolution. Also, the ubiquitous 18:1-ACP thioesterase appears to be a derivative of a 16:0 thioesterase. PMID:7734968

  7. Fatty Acid Biosynthesis in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Is Initiated by the FabY Class of β-Ketoacyl Acyl Carrier Protein Synthases

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Yanqiu; Sachdeva, Meena; Leeds, Jennifer A.

    2012-01-01

    The prototypical type II fatty acid synthesis (FAS) pathway in bacteria utilizes two distinct classes of β-ketoacyl synthase (KAS) domains to assemble long-chain fatty acids, the KASIII domain for initiation and the KASI/II domain for elongation. The central role of FAS in bacterial viability and virulence has stimulated significant effort toward developing KAS inhibitors, particularly against the KASIII domain of the β-acetoacetyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) synthase FabH. Herein, we show that the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa does not utilize a FabH ortholog but rather a new class of divergent KAS I/II enzymes to initiate the FAS pathway. When a P. aeruginosa cosmid library was used to rescue growth in a fabH downregulated strain of Escherichia coli, a single unannotated open reading frame, PA5174, complemented fabH depletion. While deletion of all four KASIII domain-encoding genes in the same P. aeruginosa strain resulted in a wild-type growth phenotype, deletion of PA5174 alone specifically attenuated growth due to a defect in de novo FAS. Siderophore secretion and quorum-sensing signaling, particularly in the rhl and Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS) systems, was significantly muted in the absence of PA5174. The defect could be repaired by intergeneric complementation with E. coli fabH. Characterization of recombinant PA5174 confirmed a preference for short-chain acyl coenzyme A (acyl-CoA) substrates, supporting the identification of PA5174 as the predominant enzyme catalyzing the condensation of acetyl coenzyme A with malonyl-ACP in P. aeruginosa. The identification of the functional role for PA5174 in FAS defines the new FabY class of β-ketoacyl synthase KASI/II domain condensation enzymes. PMID:22753059

  8. Trapping of intermediates with substrate analog HBOCoA in the polymerizations catalyzed by class III polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) synthase from Allochromatium vinosum.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chao; Cao, Ruikai; Shrestha, Ruben; Ward, Christina; Katz, Benjamin B; Fischer, Christopher J; Tomich, John M; Li, Ping

    2015-05-15

    Polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) synthases (PhaCs) catalyze the formation of biodegradable PHB polymers that are considered as an ideal alternative to petroleum-based plastics. To provide strong evidence for the preferred mechanistic model involving covalent and noncovalent intermediates, a substrate analog HBOCoA was synthesized chemoenzymatically. Substitution of sulfur in the native substrate HBCoA with an oxygen in HBOCoA enabled detection of (HB)nOCoA (n = 2-6) intermediates when the polymerization was catalyzed by wild-type (wt-)PhaECAv at 5.84 h(-1). This extremely slow rate is due to thermodynamically unfavorable steps that involve the formation of enzyme-bound PHB species (thioesters) from corresponding CoA oxoesters. Synthesized standards (HB)nOCoA (n = 2-3) were found to undergo both reacylation and hydrolysis catalyzed by the synthase. Distribution of the hydrolysis products highlights the importance of the penultimate ester group as previously suggested. Importantly, the reaction between primed synthase [(3)H]-sT-PhaECAv and HBOCoA yielded [(3)H]-sTet-O-CoA at a rate constant faster than 17.4 s(-1), which represents the first example that a substrate analog undergoes PHB chain elongation at a rate close to that of the native substrate (65.0 s(-1)). Therefore, for the first time with a wt-synthase, strong evidence was obtained to support our favored PHB chain elongation model. PMID:25686368

  9. Trapping of Intermediates with Substrate Analog HBOCoA in the Polymerizations Catalyzed by Class III Polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) Synthase from Allochromatium Vinosum

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Ruben; Ward, Christina; Katz, Benjamin B.; Fischer, Christopher J.; Tomich, John M.; Li, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) synthases (PhaCs) catalyze the formation of biodegradable PHB polymers that are considered as an ideal alternative to petroleum-based plastics. To provide strong evidence for the preferred mechanistic model involving covalent and noncovalent intermediates, a substrate analog HBOCoA was synthesized chemoenzymatically. Substitution of sulfur in the native substrate HBCoA with an oxygen in HBOCoA enabled detection of (HB)nOCoA (n = 2–6) intermediates when the polymerization was catalyzed by wild-type (wt-)PhaECAv at 5.84 hr−1. This extremely slow rate is due to thermodynamically unfavorable steps that involve formation of enzyme-bound PHB species (thioesters) from corresponding CoA oxoesters. Synthesized standards (HB)nOCoA (n = 2–3) were found to undergo both reacylation and hydrolysis catalyzed by the synthase. Distribution of the hydrolysis products highlights the importance of the penultimate ester group as previously suggested. Importantly, the reaction between primed synthase [3H]-sT-PhaECAv and HBOCoA yielded [3H]-sTet-O-CoA at a rate constant faster than 17.4 s−1, which represents the first example that a substrate analog undergoes PHB chain elongation at a rate close to that of the native substrate (65.0 s−1). Therefore, for the first time with a wt-synthase, strong evidence was obtained to support our favored PHB chain elongation model. PMID:25686368

  10. Acalabrutinib (ACP-196): a selective second-generation BTK inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jingjing; Zhang, Mingzhi; Liu, Delong

    2016-01-01

    More and more targeted agents become available for B cell malignancies with increasing precision and potency. The first-in-class Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) inhibitor, ibrutinib, has been in clinical use for the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia, mantle cell lymphoma, and Waldenstrom's macroglobulinemia. More selective BTK inhibitors (ACP-196, ONO/GS-4059, BGB-3111, CC-292) are being explored. Acalabrutinib (ACP-196) is a novel irreversible second-generation BTK inhibitor that was shown to be more potent and selective than ibrutinib. This review summarized the preclinical research and clinical data of acalabrutinib. PMID:26957112

  11. Combining CPP-ACP with fluoride: a synergistic remineralization potential of artificially demineralized enamel or not?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Sayad, I. I.; Sakr, A. K.; Badr, Y. A.

    2008-08-01

    Background and objective: Minimal intervention dentistry (MID) calls for early detection and remineralization of initial demineralization. Laser fluorescence is efficient in detecting changes in mineral tooth content. Recaldent is a product of casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP- ACP) which delivers calcium and phosphate ions to enamel. A new product which also contains fluoride is launched in United States. The remineralizing potential of CPP- ACP per se, or when combined with 0.22% Fl supplied in an oral care gel on artificially demineralised enamel using laser fluorescence was investigated. Methods: Fifteen sound human molars were selected. Mesial surfaces were tested using He-Cd laser beam at 441.5nm with 18mW power as excitation source on a suitable set-up based on Spex 750 M monochromator provided with PMT for detection of collected auto-fluorescence from sound enamel. Mesial surfaces were subjected to demineralization for ten days. The spectra from demineralized enamel were measured. Teeth were then divided according to the remineralizing regimen into three groups: group I recaldent per se, group II recaldent combined with fluoride gel and group III artificial saliva as a positive control. After following these protocols for three weeks, the spectra from remineralized enamel from the three groups were measured. The spectra of enamel auto-fluorescence were recorded and normalized to peak intensity at about 540 nm to compare between spectra from sound, demineralized and remineralized enamel surfaces. Results: A slight red shift was noticed in spectra from demineralized enamel, while a blue shift may occur in remineralized enamel. Group II showed the highest remineralizing potential. Conclusions: Combining fluoride with CPP-ACP had a synergistic effect on enamel remineralization. In addition, laser auto-fluorescence is an accurate technique for assessment of changes in tooth enamel minerals.

  12. Metabolism of glucose 1,6-P2--III. Partial purification and characterization of glucose 1,6-P2 synthase from pig skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Carreras, M; Carreras, J; Climent, F

    1988-01-01

    1. Glycerate 1,3-P2-dependent glucose, 1,6-P2 synthase has been purified 2000-fold from pig skeletal muscle, with a yield of 75%. 2. The enzyme possesses fructose 1,6-P2-dependent glucose 1,6-P2 synthase and phosphoglucomutase activities, which represent 0.1 and 60% of the main activity, respectively. 3. Both glucose 1-P and glucose 6-P can act as acceptors of the phosphoryl group from glycerate 1,3-P2. 4. The Km values are 19 microM and 67 nM for glucose 1-P and glycerate 1,3-P2, respectively. 5. The enzyme is inhibited by glycerate 2,3-P2, fructose 1,6-P2, glycerate 3-P, phosphoenolpyruvate and lithium, the inhibition pattern varying with the compound. PMID:2854765

  13. A Community-oriented CEOS Atmospheric Composition Portal (ACP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernonville, S.; Goussev, O.; Falke, S.; Lindsay, F.; Lynnes, C. S.; Yang, W.; Zhao, P.; Johnson, J.

    2012-04-01

    The Atmospheric Composition Constellation (ACC) and the Workgroup for Information Systems and Services (WGISS) within the Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS) is developing a portal to support interoperability among the atmospheric composition research and applications communities. The CEOS Atmospheric Composition Portal (ACP) is defining approaches for providing data access, tools and contextual guidance for an international suite of remote sensing datasets. An initial prototype provides access to data services and analysis tools hosted by the World Data Center for Remote Sensing of the Atmosphere (WDC-RSAT), NASA's Goddard Earth Sciences Data and Information Services Center (GES DISC) and DataFed. Distributed access to data is implemented via interoperability standards, including the Open Geospatial Consortium's (OGC) Web Map Service (WMS) and Web Coverage Service (WCS). A fundamental aspect to the design, implementation and evolution of the ACP is community collaboration. The portal is intended as a community resource that is created through collaboration across remotely sensed atmospheric composition data organizations and used by a variety of groups across the climate, air quality, and stratospheric ozone domains. The implementation of interoperability standards in the ACP has involved coordination on identifying the most applicable standards and the definition of community-specific conventions to ensure consistent adoption of standards. This presentation includes an overview of the ACP, its community oriented approach, and use of community-conventions in achieving standards-based interoperability.

  14. Chitin synthase III: Synthetic lethal mutants and “stress related” chitin synthesis that bypasses the CSD3/CHS6 localization pathway

    PubMed Central

    Osmond, Barbara C.; Specht, Charles A.; Robbins, Phillips W.

    1999-01-01

    We screened Saccharomyces strains for mutants that are synthetically lethal with deletion of the major chitin synthase gene CHS3. In addition to finding, not surprisingly, that mutations in major cell wall-related genes such as FKS1 (glucan synthase) and mutations in any of the Golgi glycosylation complex genes (MNN9 family) are lethal in combination with chs3Δ, we found that a mutation in Srv2p, a bifunctional regulatory gene, is notably lethal in the chs3 deletion. In extending studies of fks1-chitin synthase 3 interactions, we made the surprising discovery that deletion of CSD3/CHS6, a gene normally required for Chs3p delivery and activity in vivo, was not lethal with fks1 and, in fact, that lack of Csd3p/Chs6p did not decrease the high level of stress-related chitin made in the fks1 mutant. This finding suggests that “stress response” chitin synthesis proceeds through an alternate Chs3p targeting pathway. PMID:10500155

  15. Specificities of the Acyl-Acyl Carrier Protein (ACP) Thioesterase and Glycerol-3-Phosphate Acyltransferase for Octadecenoyl-ACP Isomers (Identification of a Petroselinoyl-ACP Thioesterase in Umbelliferae).

    PubMed Central

    Dormann, P.; Frentzen, M.; Ohlrogge, J. B.

    1994-01-01

    This study was designed to address the question: How specific for double bond position and conformation are plant enzymes that act on oleoyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP)? Octadecenoyl-ACPs with cis double bonds at positions [delta]6, [delta]7, [delta]8, [delta]9, [delta]10, [delta]11, or [delta]12 and elaidyl (18:1[delta]9trans)-ACP were synthesized and used to characterize the substrate specificity of the acyl-ACP thioesterase and acyl-ACP:sn-glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase. The two enzymes were found to be specific for the [delta]9 position of the double bond. The thioesterase was highly specific for the [delta]9 cis conformation, but the transferase was almost equally active with the cis and the trans isomer of 18:1[delta]9-ACP. In plants such as the Umbelliferae species coriander (Coriandrum sativum L.) that accumulate petroselinic acid (18:1[delta]6cis) in their seed triacylglycerols, a high petroselinoyl-ACP thioesterase activity was found in addition to the oleoyl-ACP thioesterase. The two activities could be separated by anion-exchange chromatography, indicating that the petroselinoyl-ACP thioesterase is represented by a distinct polypeptide. PMID:12232130

  16. Development of markers for Delta9-Stearoyl-ACP-Desaturase (SAD) to screen for cold acclimation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Delta 9-Stearoyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) desaturase (SAD) is an important enzyme of fatty acid biosynthesis in higher plants. Located in the plastid stroma, SAD catalyzes the desaturation of stearoyl-ACP to oleyl-ACP. SAD plays a key role in determining the ratio of saturated fatty acids to unsat...

  17. ATP synthase.

    PubMed

    Junge, Wolfgang; Nelson, Nathan

    2015-01-01

    Oxygenic photosynthesis is the principal converter of sunlight into chemical energy. Cyanobacteria and plants provide aerobic life with oxygen, food, fuel, fibers, and platform chemicals. Four multisubunit membrane proteins are involved: photosystem I (PSI), photosystem II (PSII), cytochrome b6f (cyt b6f), and ATP synthase (FOF1). ATP synthase is likewise a key enzyme of cell respiration. Over three billion years, the basic machinery of oxygenic photosynthesis and respiration has been perfected to minimize wasteful reactions. The proton-driven ATP synthase is embedded in a proton tight-coupling membrane. It is composed of two rotary motors/generators, FO and F1, which do not slip against each other. The proton-driven FO and the ATP-synthesizing F1 are coupled via elastic torque transmission. Elastic transmission decouples the two motors in kinetic detail but keeps them perfectly coupled in thermodynamic equilibrium and (time-averaged) under steady turnover. Elastic transmission enables operation with different gear ratios in different organisms. PMID:25839341

  18. Structure of 3-oxoacyl-(acyl-carrier protein) synthase II from Thermus thermophilus HB8

    SciTech Connect

    Bagautdinov, Bagautdin Ukita, Yoko; Miyano, Masashi; Kunishima, Naoki

    2008-05-01

    The crystal structure of 3-oxoacyl-(acyl-carrier protein) synthase II from T. thermophilus HB8 has been determined at 2.0 Å resolution and compared with the structures of β-keto-ACP synthases from other sources. The β-ketoacyl-(acyl carrier protein) synthases (β-keto-ACP synthases; KAS) catalyse the addition of two-carbon units to the growing acyl chain during the elongation phase of fatty-acid synthesis. As key regulators of bacterial fatty-acid synthesis, they are promising targets for the development of new antibacterial agents. The crystal structure of 3-oxoacyl-ACP synthase II from Thermus thermophilus HB8 (TtKAS II) has been solved by molecular replacement and refined at 2.0 Å resolution. The crystal is orthorhombic, space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2, with unit-cell parameters a = 72.07, b = 185.57, c = 62.52 Å, and contains one homodimer in the asymmetric unit. The subunits adopt the well known α-β-α-β-α thiolase fold that is common to ACP synthases. The structural and sequence similarities of TtKAS II to KAS I and KAS II enzymes of known structure from other sources support the hypothesis of comparable enzymatic activity. The dimeric state of TtKAS II is important to create each fatty-acid-binding pocket. Closer examination of KAS structures reveals that compared with other KAS structures in the apo form, the active site of TtKAS II is more accessible because of the ‘open’ conformation of the Phe396 side chain.

  19. 26 CFR 1.401(m)-2 - ACP test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... determined under § 1.401(m)-2(b)(2)(iv) (as it appeared in the April 1, 2007, edition of 26 CFR part 1). (E... determined under § 1.401(m)-2(b)(2)(vi) (as it appeared in the April 1, 2007, edition of 26 CFR Part 1). If... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false ACP test. 1.401(m)-2 Section 1.401(m)-2...

  20. Divergence of multimodular polyketide synthases revealed by a didomain structure

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Jianting; Gay, Darren C.; Demeler, Borries; White, Mark A.; Keatinge-Clay, Adrian T.

    2012-01-01

    The enoylreductase (ER) is the final common enzyme from modular polyketide synthases (PKSs) to be structurally characterized. The 3.0 Å resolution structure of the didomain comprised of the ketoreductase (KR) and ER from the second module of the spinosyn PKS reveals that ER shares an ~600 Å2 interface with KR distinct from that of the related mammalian fatty acid synthase (FAS). In contrast to the ER domains of the mammalian FAS, the ER domains of the second module of the spinosyn PKS do not make contact across the twofold axis of the synthase. This monomeric organization may have been necessary in the evolution of multimodular PKSs to enable acyl carrier proteins (ACPs) to access each of their cognate enzymes. The isolated ER domain showed activity towards a substrate analog, enabling the contributions of its active site residues to be determined. PMID:22634636

  1. Purification and biochemical characterization of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis beta-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein synthases KasA and KasB.

    PubMed

    Schaeffer, M L; Agnihotri, G; Volker, C; Kallender, H; Brennan, P J; Lonsdale, J T

    2001-12-14

    Mycolic acids are vital components of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis cell wall, and enzymes involved in their formation represent attractive targets for the discovery of novel anti-tuberculosis agents. Biosynthesis of the fatty acyl chains of mycolic acids involves two fatty acid synthetic systems, the multifunctional polypeptide fatty acid synthase I (FASI), which performs de novo fatty acid synthesis, and the dissociated FASII system, which consists of monofunctional enzymes, and acyl carrier protein (ACP) and elongates FASI products to long chain mycolic acid precursors. In this study, we present the initial characterization of purified KasA and KasB, two beta-ketoacyl-ACP synthase (KAS) enzymes of the M. tuberculosis FASII system. KasA and KasB were expressed in E. coli and purified by affinity chromatography. Both enzymes showed activity typical of bacterial KASs, condensing an acyl-ACP with malonyl-ACP. Consistent with the proposed role of FASII in mycolic acid synthesis, analysis of various acyl-ACP substrates indicated KasA and KasB had higher specificity for long chain acyl-ACPs containing at least 16 carbons. Activity of KasA and KasB increased with use of M. tuberculosis AcpM, suggesting that structural differences between AcpM and E. coli ACP may affect their recognition by the enzymes. Both enzymes were sensitive to KAS inhibitors cerulenin and thiolactomycin. These results represent important steps in characterizing KasA and KasB as targets for antimycobacterial drug discovery. PMID:11600501

  2. Structure of 3-oxoacyl-(acyl-carrier protein) synthase II from Thermus thermophilus HB8

    PubMed Central

    Bagautdinov, Bagautdin; Ukita, Yoko; Miyano, Masashi; Kunishima, Naoki

    2008-01-01

    The β-ketoacyl-(acyl carrier protein) synthases (β-keto-ACP synthases; KAS) catalyse the addition of two-carbon units to the growing acyl chain during the elongation phase of fatty-acid synthesis. As key regulators of bacterial fatty-acid synthesis, they are promising targets for the development of new antibacterial agents. The crystal structure of 3-oxoacyl-ACP synthase II from Thermus thermophilus HB8 (TtKAS II) has been solved by molecular replacement and refined at 2.0 Å resolution. The crystal is orthorhombic, space group P21212, with unit-cell parameters a = 72.07, b = 185.57, c = 62.52 Å, and contains one homodimer in the asymmetric unit. The subunits adopt the well known α-β-α-β-α thiolase fold that is common to ACP synthases. The structural and sequence similarities of TtKAS II to KAS I and KAS II enzymes of known structure from other sources support the hypothesis of comparable enzymatic activity. The dimeric state of TtKAS II is important to create each fatty-acid-binding pocket. Closer examination of KAS structures reveals that compared with other KAS structures in the apo form, the active site of TtKAS II is more accessible because of the ‘open’ conformation of the Phe396 side chain. PMID:18453702

  3. Structure of 3-oxoacyl-(acyl-carrier protein) synthase II from Thermus thermophilus HB8.

    PubMed

    Bagautdinov, Bagautdin; Ukita, Yoko; Miyano, Masashi; Kunishima, Naoki

    2008-05-01

    The beta-ketoacyl-(acyl carrier protein) synthases (beta-keto-ACP synthases; KAS) catalyse the addition of two-carbon units to the growing acyl chain during the elongation phase of fatty-acid synthesis. As key regulators of bacterial fatty-acid synthesis, they are promising targets for the development of new antibacterial agents. The crystal structure of 3-oxoacyl-ACP synthase II from Thermus thermophilus HB8 (TtKAS II) has been solved by molecular replacement and refined at 2.0 A resolution. The crystal is orthorhombic, space group P2(1)2(1)2, with unit-cell parameters a = 72.07, b = 185.57, c = 62.52 A, and contains one homodimer in the asymmetric unit. The subunits adopt the well known alpha-beta-alpha-beta-alpha thiolase fold that is common to ACP synthases. The structural and sequence similarities of TtKAS II to KAS I and KAS II enzymes of known structure from other sources support the hypothesis of comparable enzymatic activity. The dimeric state of TtKAS II is important to create each fatty-acid-binding pocket. Closer examination of KAS structures reveals that compared with other KAS structures in the apo form, the active site of TtKAS II is more accessible because of the ;open' conformation of the Phe396 side chain. PMID:18453702

  4. Walking Together: A Narrative/Pastoral Approach to the ACPE Accreditation Site Visit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oertli, Karrie

    2010-01-01

    Walking together is a strong theme in religious literature: God companions persons, and persons companion one another. All share and hear stories in that action. The Association for Clinical Pastoral Education, Inc. (ACPE) began to walk together in 1967, as it gathered four organizations into one. ACPE has grown and changed, becoming world's…

  5. A Polyketide Synthase Acyltransferase Domain Structure Suggests a Recognition Mechanism for Its Hydroxymalonyl-Acyl Carrier Protein Substrate

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hyunjun; Kevany, Brian M.; Dyer, David H.; Thomas, Michael G.; Forest, Katrina T.

    2014-01-01

    We have previously shown that the acyl transferase domain of ZmaA (ZmaA-AT) is involved in the biosynthesis of the aminopolyol polyketide/nonribosomal peptide hybrid molecule zwittermicin A from cereus UW85, and that it specifically recognizes the precursor hydroxymalonyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) and transfers the hydroxymalonyl extender unit to a downstream second ACP via a transacylated AT domain intermediate. We now present the X-ray crystal structure of ZmaA-AT at a resolution of 1.7 Å. The structure shows a patch of solvent-exposed hydrophobic residues in the area where the AT is proposed to interact with the precursor ACP. We addressed the significance of the AT/ACP interaction in precursor specificity of the AT by testing whether malonyl- or methylmalonyl-ACP can be recognized by ZmaA-AT. We found that the ACP itself biases extender unit selection. Until now, structural information for ATs has been limited to ATs specific for the CoA-linked precursors malonyl-CoA and (2S)-methylmalonyl-CoA. This work contributes to polyketide synthase engineering efforts by expanding our knowledge of AT/substrate interactions with the structure of an AT domain that recognizes an ACP-linked substrate, the rare hydroxymalonate. Our structure suggests a model in which ACP interaction with a hydrophobic motif promotes secondary structure formation at the binding site, and opening of the adjacent substrate pocket lid to allow extender unit binding in the AT active site. PMID:25340352

  6. The mitochondrial acyl carrier protein (ACP) coordinates mitochondrial fatty acid synthesis with iron sulfur cluster biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Van Vranken, Jonathan G; Jeong, Mi-Young; Wei, Peng; Chen, Yu-Chan; Gygi, Steven P; Winge, Dennis R; Rutter, Jared

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial fatty acid synthesis (FASII) and iron sulfur cluster (FeS) biogenesis are both vital biosynthetic processes within mitochondria. In this study, we demonstrate that the mitochondrial acyl carrier protein (ACP), which has a well-known role in FASII, plays an unexpected and evolutionarily conserved role in FeS biogenesis. ACP is a stable and essential subunit of the eukaryotic FeS biogenesis complex. In the absence of ACP, the complex is destabilized resulting in a profound depletion of FeS throughout the cell. This role of ACP depends upon its covalently bound 4’-phosphopantetheine (4-PP)-conjugated acyl chain to support maximal cysteine desulfurase activity. Thus, it is likely that ACP is not simply an obligate subunit but also exploits the 4-PP-conjugated acyl chain to coordinate mitochondrial fatty acid and FeS biogenesis. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17828.001 PMID:27540631

  7. The mitochondrial acyl carrier protein (ACP) coordinates mitochondrial fatty acid synthesis with iron sulfur cluster biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Van Vranken, Jonathan G; Jeong, Mi-Young; Wei, Peng; Chen, Yu-Chan; Gygi, Steven P; Winge, Dennis R; Rutter, Jared

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial fatty acid synthesis (FASII) and iron sulfur cluster (FeS) biogenesis are both vital biosynthetic processes within mitochondria. In this study, we demonstrate that the mitochondrial acyl carrier protein (ACP), which has a well-known role in FASII, plays an unexpected and evolutionarily conserved role in FeS biogenesis. ACP is a stable and essential subunit of the eukaryotic FeS biogenesis complex. In the absence of ACP, the complex is destabilized resulting in a profound depletion of FeS throughout the cell. This role of ACP depends upon its covalently bound 4'-phosphopantetheine (4-PP)-conjugated acyl chain to support maximal cysteine desulfurase activity. Thus, it is likely that ACP is not simply an obligate subunit but also exploits the 4-PP-conjugated acyl chain to coordinate mitochondrial fatty acid and FeS biogenesis. PMID:27540631

  8. A Homologue of the 3-Oxoacyl-(Acyl Carrier Protein) Synthase III Gene Located in the Glycosylation Island of Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci Regulates Virulence Factors via N-Acyl Homoserine Lactone and Fatty Acid Synthesis▿

    PubMed Central

    Taguchi, Fumiko; Ogawa, Yujiro; Takeuchi, Kasumi; Suzuki, Tomoko; Toyoda, Kazuhiro; Shiraishi, Tomonori; Ichinose, Yuki

    2006-01-01

    Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci 6605 possesses a genetic region involved in flagellin glycosylation. This region is composed of three open reading frames: orf1, orf2, and orf3. Our previous study revealed that orf1 and orf2 encode glycosyltransferases; on the other hand, orf3 has no role in posttranslational modification of flagellin. Although the function of Orf3 remained unclear, an orf3 deletion mutant (Δorf3 mutant) had reduced virulence on tobacco plants. Orf3 shows significant homology to a 3-oxoacyl-(acyl carrier protein) synthase III in the fatty acid elongation cycle. The Δorf3 mutant had a significantly reduced ability to form acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs), which are quorum-sensing molecules, suggesting that Orf3 is required for AHL synthesis. In comparison with the wild-type strain, swarming motility, biosurfactant production, and tolerance to H2O2 and antibiotics were enhanced in the Δorf3 mutant. A scanning electron micrograph of inoculated bacteria on the tobacco leaf surface revealed that there is little extracellular polymeric substance matrix surrounding the cells in the Δorf3 mutant. The phenotypes of the Δorf3 mutant and an AHL synthesis (ΔpsyI) mutant were similar, although the mutant-specific characteristics were more extreme in the Δorf3 mutant. The swarming motility of the Δorf3 mutant was greater than that of the ΔpsyI mutant. This was attributed to the synergistic effects of the overproduction of biosurfactants and/or alternative fatty acid metabolism in the Δorf3 mutant. Furthermore, the amounts of iron and biosurfactant seem to be involved in biofilm development under quorum-sensing regulation in P. syringae pv. tabaci 6605. PMID:17028280

  9. Mechanism and stereospecificity of a fully saturating polyketide synthase module: nanchangmycin synthase module 2 and its dehydratase domain.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xun; Liu, Tiangang; Valenzano, Chiara R; Deng, Zixin; Cane, David E

    2010-10-27

    Recombinant nanchangmycin synthase module 2 (NANS module 2), with the thioesterase domain from the 6-deoxyerythronolide B synthase (DEBS TE) appended to the C-terminus, was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. Incubation of NANS module 2+TE with (±)-2-methyl-3-keto-butyryl-N-acetylcysteamine thioester (1), the SNAC analog of the natural ACP-bound substrate, with methylmalonyl-CoA (MM-CoA) in the absence of NADPH gave 3,5,6-trimethyl-4-hydroxypyrone (2), identified by direct comparison with synthetic 2 by radio-TLC-phosphorimaging and LC-ESI(+)-MS-MS. The reaction showed k(cat) 0.5 ± 0.1 min(-1) and K(m)(1) 19 ± 5 mM at 0.5 mM MM-CoA and k(cat)(app) 0.26 ± 0.02 min(-1) and K(m)(MM-CoA) 0.11 ± 0.02 mM at 8 mM 1. Incubation in the presence of NADPH generated the fully saturated triketide chain elongation product as a 5:3 mixture of (2S,4R)-2,4-dimethyl-5-ketohexanoic acid (3a) and the diastereomeric (2S,4S)-3b. The structure and stereochemistry of each product was established by comparison with synthetic 3a and 3b by a combination of radio-TLC-phosphorimaging and LC-ESI(-)-MS-MS, as well as chiral capillary GC-MS analysis of the corresponding methyl esters 3a-Me and 3b-Me. The recombinant dehydratase domain from NANS module 2, NANS DH2, was shown to catalyze the formation of an (E)-double bond by syn-dehydration of the ACP-bound substrate anti-(2R,3R,4S,5R)-2,4-dimethyl-3,5-dihydroxyheptanoyl-ACP6 (4), generated in situ by incubation of (2S,3R)-2-methyl-3-hydroxypentanoyl-SNAC (5), methylmalonyl-CoA, and NADPH with the recombinant [KS6][AT6] didomain and ACP6 from DEBS module 6 along with the ketoreductase from the tylactone synthase module 1 (TYLS KR1). These results also indirectly establish the stereochemistry of the reactions catalyzed by the KR and enoylreductase (ER) domains of NANS module 2. PMID:20925339

  10. Sticky swinging arm dynamics: studies of an acyl carrier protein domain from the mycolactone polyketide synthase

    PubMed Central

    Vance, Steven; Tkachenko, Olga; Thomas, Ben; Bassuni, Mona; Hong, Hui; Nietlispach, Daniel; Broadhurst, William

    2016-01-01

    Type I modular polyketide synthases (PKSs) produce polyketide natural products by passing a growing acyl substrate chain between a series of enzyme domains housed within a gigantic multifunctional polypeptide assembly. Throughout each round of chain extension and modification reactions, the substrate stays covalently linked to an acyl carrier protein (ACP) domain. In the present study we report on the solution structure and dynamics of an ACP domain excised from MLSA2, module 9 of the PKS system that constructs the macrolactone ring of the toxin mycolactone, cause of the tropical disease Buruli ulcer. After modification of apo ACP with 4′-phosphopantetheine (Ppant) to create the holo form, 15N nuclear spin relaxation and paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE) experiments suggest that the prosthetic group swings freely. The minimal chemical shift perturbations displayed by Ppant-attached C3 and C4 acyl chains imply that these substrate-mimics remain exposed to solvent at the end of a flexible Ppant arm. By contrast, hexanoyl and octanoyl chains yield much larger chemical shift perturbations, indicating that they interact with the surface of the domain. The solution structure of octanoyl-ACP shows the Ppant arm bending to allow the acyl chain to nestle into a nonpolar pocket, whereas the prosthetic group itself remains largely solvent exposed. Although the highly reduced octanoyl group is not a natural substrate for the ACP from MLSA2, similar presentation modes would permit partner enzyme domains to recognize an acyl group while it is bound to the surface of its carrier protein, allowing simultaneous interactions with both the substrate and the ACP. PMID:26920023

  11. Essential role of the donor acyl carrier protein in stereoselective chain translocation to a fully reducing module of the nanchangmycin polyketide synthase.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xun; Liu, Tiangang; Deng, Zixin; Cane, David E

    2012-01-31

    Incubation of recombinant module 2 of the polyether nanchangmycin synthase (NANS), carrying an appended thioesterase domain, with the ACP-bound substrate (2RS)-2-methyl-3-ketobutyryl-NANS_ACP1 (2-ACP1) and methylmalonyl-CoA in the presence of NADPH gave diastereomerically pure (2S,4R)-2,4-dimethyl-5-ketohexanoic acid (4a). These results contrast with the previously reported weak discrimination by NANS module 2+TE between the enantiomers of the corresponding N-acetylcysteamine-conjugated substrate analogue (±)-2-methyl-3-ketobutyryl-SNAC (2-SNAC), which resulted in formation of a 5:3 mixture of 4a and its (2S,4S)-diastereomer 4b. Incubation of NANS module 2+TE with 2-ACP1 in the absence of NADPH gave unreduced 3,5,6-trimethyl-4-hydroxypyrone (3) with a k(cat) of 4.4 ± 0.9 min⁻¹ and a k(cat)/K(m) of 67 min⁻¹ mM⁻¹, corresponding to a ∼2300-fold increase compared to the k(cat)/K(m) for the diffusive substrate 2-SNAC. Covalent tethering of the 2-methyl-3-ketobutyryl thioester substrate to the NANS ACP1 domain derived from the natural upstream PKS module of the nanchangmycin synthase significantly enhanced both the stereospecificity and the kinetic efficiency of the sequential polyketide chain translocation and condensation reactions catalyzed by the ketosynthase domain of NANS module 2. PMID:22229794

  12. Enzymatic assembly of epothilones: the EpoC subunit and reconstitution of the EpoA-ACP/B/C polyketide and nonribosomal peptide interfaces.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Sarah E; Chen, Huawei; Walsh, Christopher T

    2002-04-30

    The biosynthesis of epothilones, a family of hybrid polyketide (PK)/nonribosomal peptide (NRP) antitumor agents, provides an ideal system to study a hybrid PK/NRP natural product with significant biomedical value. Here the third enzyme involved in epothilone production, the five domain 195 kDa polyketide synthase (PKS) EpoC protein, has been expressed and purified from Escherichia coli. EpoC was combined with the first two enzymes of the epothilone biosynthesis pathway, the acyl carrier protein (ACP) domain of EpoA and EpoB, to reconstitute the early steps in epothilone biosynthesis. The acyltransferase (AT) domain of EpoC transfers the methylmalonyl moiety from methylmalonyl-CoA to the holo HS-acyl carrier protein (ACP) in an autoacylation reaction. The ketosynthase (KS) domain of EpoC decarboxylates the methylmalonyl-S-EpoC acyl enzyme to generate the carbon nucleophile that reacts with methylthiazolylcarboxyl-S-EpoB. The resulting condensation product can be reduced in the presence of NADPH by the ketoreductase (KR) domain of EpoC and then dehydrated by the dehydratase (DH) domain to produce the methylthiazolylmethylacrylyl-S-EpoC acyl enzyme intermediate that serves as the acyl donor for subsequent elongation of the epothilone chain. The acetyl-CoA donor can be replaced with propionyl-CoA, isobutyryl-CoA, and benzoyl-CoA and the acyl chains accepted by both EpoB and EpoC subunits to produce ethyl-, isopropyl-, and phenylthiazolylmethylacrylyl-S-EpoC acyl enzyme intermediates, suggesting that future combinatorial biosynthetic variations in epothilone assembly may be feasible. These results demonstrate in vitro reconstitution of both the PKS/NRPS interface (EpoA-ACP/B) and the NRPS/PKS interface (EpoB/C) in the assembly line for this antitumor natural product. PMID:11969430

  13. Stilbene Synthase and Chalcone Synthase 1

    PubMed Central

    Rolfs, Claus-Henning; Kindl, Helmut

    1984-01-01

    Cultured cells of Picea excelsa capable of forming stilbenes and flavanoids have been established. Unlike needles of intact plants containing piceatannol (3,3′,4′,5-tetrahydroxystilbene) and stilbene glycosides the cultured cells converted phenylalanine and p-coumaric acid primarily into resveratrol monomethyl ether (3,4′-dihydroxy-5-methoxystilbene) and naringenin. Partially purified enzyme preparations were assayed for chalcone synthase as well as for stilbene synthase activity converting malonyl-CoA plus p-coumaroyl-CoA into 3,4′,5-trihydroxystilbene (resveratrol). Although stilbene synthase and chalcone synthase use the same substrates and exhibit similar molecular properties, i.e. molecular weight and subunit molecular weight, they are two different proteins. This difference was demonstrated by gel electrophoresis and by means of monospecific antibodies. PMID:16663649

  14. Expression and specificity profile of the major acetate transporter AcpA in Aspergillus nidulans.

    PubMed

    Sá-Pessoa, Joana; Amillis, Sotiris; Casal, Margarida; Diallinas, George

    2015-03-01

    AcpA has been previously characterized as a high-affinity transporter essential for the uptake and use of acetate as sole carbon source in Aspergillus nidulans. Here, we follow the expression profile of AcpA and define its substrate specificity. AcpA-mediated acetate transport is detected from the onset of conidiospore germination, peaks at the time of germ tube emergence, and drops to low basal levels in germlings and young mycelia, where a second acetate transporter is also becoming apparent. AcpA activity also responds to acetate presence in the growth medium, but is not subject to either carbon or nitrogen catabolite repression. Short-chain monocarboxylates (benzoate, formate, butyrate and propionate) inhibit AcpA-mediated acetate transport with apparent inhibition constants (Ki) of 16.89±2.12, 9.25±1.01, 12.06±3.29 and 1.44±0.13mM, respectively. AcpA is also shown not to be directly involved in ammonia export, as proposed for its Saccharomyces cerevisiae homologue Ady2p. In the second part of this work, we search for the unknown acetate transporter expressed in mycelia, and for other transporters that might contribute to acetate uptake. In silico analysis, genetic construction of relevant null mutants, and uptake assays, reveal that the closest AcpA homologue (AN1839), named AcpB, is the 'missing' secondary acetate transporter in mycelia. We also identify two major short-chain carboxylate (lactate, succinate, pyruvate and malate) transporters, named JenA (AN6095) and JenB (AN6703), which however are not involved in acetate uptake. This work establishes a framework for further exploiting acetate and carboxylate transport in filamentous ascomycetes. PMID:25708319

  15. Efficient free fatty acid production in Escherichia coli using plant acyl-ACP thioesterases.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiujun; Li, Mai; Agrawal, Arpita; San, Ka-Yiu

    2011-11-01

    Microbial biosynthesis of fatty acid-like chemicals from renewable carbon sources has attracted significant attention in recent years. Free fatty acids can be used as precursors for the production of fuels or chemicals. Free fatty acids can be produced by introducing an acyl-acyl carrier protein thioesterase gene into Escherichia coli. The presence of the acyl-ACP thioesterase will break the fatty acid elongation cycle and release free fatty acid. Depending on their sequence similarity and substrate specificity, class FatA thioesterase is active on unsaturated acyl-ACPs and class FatB prefers saturated acyl group. Different acyl-ACP thioesterases have different degrees of chain length specificity. Although some of these enzymes have been characterized from a number of sources, information on their ability to produce free fatty acid in microbial cells has not been extensively examined until recently. In this study, we examined the effect of the overexpression of acyl-ACP thioesterase genes from Diploknema butyracea, Gossypium hirsutum, Ricinus communis and Jatropha curcas on free fatty acid production. In particular, we are interested in studying the effect of different acyl-ACP thioesterase on the quantities and compositions of free fatty acid produced by an E. coli strain ML103 carrying these constructs. It is shown that the accumulation of free fatty acid depends on the acyl-ACP thioesterase used. The strain carrying the acyl-ACP thioesterase gene from D. butyracea produced approximately 0.2g/L of free fatty acid while the strains carrying the acyl-ACP thioesterase genes from R. communis and J. curcas produced the most free fatty acid at a high level of more than 2.0 g/L at 48 h. These two strains accumulated three major straight chain free fatty acids, C14, C16:1 and C16 at levels about 40%, 35% and 20%, respectively. PMID:22001432

  16. The chain-flipping mechanism of ACP (acyl carrier protein)-dependent enzymes appears universal.

    PubMed

    Cronan, John E

    2014-06-01

    ACPs (acyl carrier proteins) play essential roles in the synthesis of fatty acids, polyketides and non-ribosomal polypeptides. ACP function requires the modification of the protein by attachment of 4'-phosphopantetheine to a conserved serine residue. The phosphopantetheine thiol acts to tether the starting materials and intermediates as their thioesters. ACPs are small highly soluble proteins composed of four α-helices. The helices form a bundle that acts as a hydrophobic sleeve that sequesters the acyl chains and activated thioesters from solvent. However, in the synthesis of fatty acids and complex lipids the enzymes of the pathway must access the thioester and the proximal carbon atoms in order to perform the needed chemistry. How such access is provided without exposure of the acyl chains to solvent has been a longstanding question due to the lack of acyl-ACP-enzyme complexes, a situation generally attributed to the brevity of the interactions of acyl-ACPs with their cognate enzymes. As discussed in the present review the access question has now been answered by four recent crystal structures, each of which shows that the entire acyl chain plus the 4'-phosphopantetheine prosthetic group partitions from the ACP hydrophobic sleeve into a hydrophobic pocket or groove of the enzyme protein, a process termed chain flipping. PMID:24825445

  17. Using modern tools to probe the structure-function relationship of fatty acid synthases

    PubMed Central

    Burkart, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    Fatty acid biosynthesis is essential to life and represents one of the most conserved pathways in Nature, preserving the same handful of chemical reactions over all species. Recent interest in the molecular details of the de novo fatty acid synthase (FAS) has been heightened by demand for renewable fuels and the emergence of multidrug resistant bacterial strains. Central to FAS is the acyl carrier protein (ACP), a protein chaperone that shuttles the growing acyl chain between catalytic enzymes within the FAS. Human efforts to alter fatty acid biosynthesis for oil production, chemical feedstock or antimicrobial purposes has been met with limited success in part due to a lack of detailed molecular information behind the ACP-partner protein interactions inherent to the pathway. This review will focus on recently developed tools for the modification of ACP and analysis of protein-protein interactions, such as mechanism-based crosslinking, and the studies exploiting them. Discussion specific to each enzymatic domain focuses first on mechanism and known inhibitors, followed by available structures and known interactions with ACP. While significant unknowns remain, new understandings into the intricacies of FAS point to future advances in manipulating this complex molecular factory. PMID:25676190

  18. Structural rearrangements of a polyketide synthase module during its catalytic cycle

    PubMed Central

    Whicher, Jonathan R.; Dutta, Somnath; Hansen, Douglas A.; Hale, Wendi A.; Chemler, Joseph A.; Dosey, Annie M.; Narayan, Alison R.; Håkansson, Kristina; Sherman, David H.

    2014-01-01

    The polyketide synthase (PKS) mega-enzyme assembly line uses a modular architecture to synthesize diverse and bioactive natural products that often constitute the core structures or complete chemical entities for many clinically approved therapeutic agents1. The architecture of a full-length PKS module from the pikromycin pathway creates a reaction chamber for the intra-module acyl carrier protein (ACP) domain that carries building blocks and intermediates between acyltransferase (AT), ketosynthase (KS), and ketoreductase (KR) active sites (see accompanying paper by Dutta et al.). Here we determined electron cryo-microscopy (cryo-EM) structures of a full-length PKS module in three key biochemical states of its catalytic cycle. Each biochemical state was confirmed by bottom-up liquid chromatography Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (LC/FT-ICR MS). The ACP domain is differentially and precisely positioned after polyketide chain substrate loading on the active site of KS, after extension to the β-keto-intermediate, and after β-hydroxy product generation. The structures reveal the ACP dynamics for sequential binding to catalytic domains within the reaction chamber, and for transferring the elongated and processed polyketide substrate to the next module in the PKS pathway. During the enzymatic cycle the KR domain undergoes dramatic conformational rearrangements that enable optimal positioning for reductive processing of the ACP-bound polyketide chain elongation intermediate. These findings have crucial implications for the design of functional PKS modules, and for the engineering of pathways to generate pharmacologically relevant molecules. PMID:24965656

  19. Structural rearrangements of a polyketide synthase module during its catalytic cycle.

    PubMed

    Whicher, Jonathan R; Dutta, Somnath; Hansen, Douglas A; Hale, Wendi A; Chemler, Joseph A; Dosey, Annie M; Narayan, Alison R H; Håkansson, Kristina; Sherman, David H; Smith, Janet L; Skiniotis, Georgios

    2014-06-26

    The polyketide synthase (PKS) mega-enzyme assembly line uses a modular architecture to synthesize diverse and bioactive natural products that often constitute the core structures or complete chemical entities for many clinically approved therapeutic agents. The architecture of a full-length PKS module from the pikromycin pathway of Streptomyces venezuelae creates a reaction chamber for the intramodule acyl carrier protein (ACP) domain that carries building blocks and intermediates between acyltransferase, ketosynthase and ketoreductase active sites (see accompanying paper). Here we determine electron cryo-microscopy structures of a full-length pikromycin PKS module in three key biochemical states of its catalytic cycle. Each biochemical state was confirmed by bottom-up liquid chromatography/Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry. The ACP domain is differentially and precisely positioned after polyketide chain substrate loading on the active site of the ketosynthase, after extension to the β-keto intermediate, and after β-hydroxy product generation. The structures reveal the ACP dynamics for sequential interactions with catalytic domains within the reaction chamber, and for transferring the elongated and processed polyketide substrate to the next module in the PKS pathway. During the enzymatic cycle the ketoreductase domain undergoes dramatic conformational rearrangements that enable optimal positioning for reductive processing of the ACP-bound polyketide chain elongation intermediate. These findings have crucial implications for the design of functional PKS modules, and for the engineering of pathways to generate pharmacologically relevant molecules. PMID:24965656

  20. Cellulose synthase interacting protein

    PubMed Central

    Somerville, Chris

    2010-01-01

    Cellulose is the most abundant biopolymer on earth. The great abundance of cellulose places it at the forefront as a primary source of biomass for renewable biofuels. However, the knowledge of how plant cells make cellulose remains very rudimentary. Cellulose microfibrils are synthesized at the plasma membrane by hexameric protein complexes, also known as cellulose synthase complexes. The only known components of cellulose synthase complexes are cellulose synthase (CESA) proteins until the recent identification of a novel component. CSI1, which encodes CESA interacting protein 1 (CSI1) in Arabidopsis. CSI1, as the first non-CESA proteins associated with cellulose synthase complexes, opens up many opportunities. PMID:21150290

  1. Characterization of soluble acyl-ACP desaturases from Camelina sativa, Macadamia tetraphylla and Dolichandra unguis-cati.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Manuel Fernando Rodríguez; Sánchez-García, Alicia; Salas, Joaquín J; Garcés, Rafael; Martínez-Force, Enrique

    2015-04-15

    Acyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) desaturases (EC 1.14.19.2) are soluble enzymes that catalyse the insertion of a double bond into saturated fatty acid bound in saturated acyl chains bound to ACP in higher plants, producing cis-monounsaturated fatty acids. Three types of soluble acyl-ACP desaturases have been described: Δ(9)-acyl-ACP, Δ(6)-acyl-ACP and Δ(4)-acyl-ACP desaturases, which differ in the substrate specificity and the position in which the double bond is introduced. In the present work, Camelina sativa (CsSAD), Macadamia tetraphylla (MtSAD) and Dolichandra unguis-cati (DuSAD) desaturases were cloned, sequenced and characterized. Single copies of CsSAD, MtSAD and DuSAD with three, one and two different alleles, respectively, were found. The corresponding mature proteins were heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli for biochemical characterization in protein extracts. The recombinant CsSAD enzyme showed 300-fold higher specificity towards 18:0-ACP than 16:0-ACP. Similar profile exhibited MtSAD although the differences in the specificity were lower, around 170-fold higher for 18:0-ACP than 16:0-ACP. Furthermore, DuSAD presented a profile showing preference towards 16:0-ACP against 18:0-ACP, around twice more, being so a Δ(9) palmitoyl-ACP desaturase. Also, we reported the expression profile of CsSAD, which showed the highest levels of expression in expanding tissues that typically are very active in lipid biosynthesis such as developing seed endosperm. Moreover, the possibility to express a new desaturase in C. sativa (oilseed crop that store high levels of oil and is easy to transform) to create a new line rich in short monounsaturated fatty acid is discussed. PMID:25765361

  2. Protein-Protein Interactions, Not Substrate Recognition, Dominate the Turnover of Chimeric Assembly Line Polyketide Synthases.

    PubMed

    Klaus, Maja; Ostrowski, Matthew P; Austerjost, Jonas; Robbins, Thomas; Lowry, Brian; Cane, David E; Khosla, Chaitan

    2016-07-29

    The potential for recombining intact polyketide synthase (PKS) modules has been extensively explored. Both enzyme-substrate and protein-protein interactions influence chimeric PKS activity, but their relative contributions are unclear. We now address this issue by studying a library of 11 bimodular and 8 trimodular chimeric PKSs harboring modules from the erythromycin, rifamycin, and rapamycin synthases. Although many chimeras yielded detectable products, nearly all had specific activities below 10% of the reference natural PKSs. Analysis of selected bimodular chimeras, each with the same upstream module, revealed that turnover correlated with the efficiency of intermodular chain translocation. Mutation of the acyl carrier protein (ACP) domain of the upstream module in one chimera at a residue predicted to influence ketosynthase-ACP recognition led to improved turnover. In contrast, replacement of the ketoreductase domain of the upstream module by a paralog that produced the enantiomeric ACP-bound diketide caused no changes in processing rates for each of six heterologous downstream modules compared with those of the native diketide. Taken together, these results demonstrate that protein-protein interactions play a larger role than enzyme-substrate recognition in the evolution or design of catalytically efficient chimeric PKSs. PMID:27246853

  3. The Crystal Structure of the Ivy delta4-16:0-ACP Desaturase Reveals Structural Details of the Oxidized Active Site and Potential Determinants of Regioselectivity

    SciTech Connect

    Guy,J.; Whittle, E.; Kumaran, D.; Lindqvist, Y.; Shanklin, J.

    2007-01-01

    The multifunctional acyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) desaturase from Hedera helix (English ivy) catalyzes the {Delta}{sup 4} desaturation of 16:0-ACP and the{Delta}{sup 9} desaturation of 18:0-ACP and further desaturates{Delta}{sup 9}-16:1 or {Delta}{sup 9}-18:1 to the corresponding {Delta}{sup 4,9} dienes. The crystal structure of the enzyme has been solved to 1.95{angstrom} resolution, and both the iron-iron distance of 3.2{angstrom} and the presence of a {mu}-oxo bridge reveal this to be the only reported structure of a desaturase in the oxidized FeIII-FeIII form. Significant differences are seen between the oxidized active site and the reduced active site of the Ricinus communis (castor) desaturase; His{sup 227} coordination to Fe2 is lost, and the side chain of Glu{sup 224}, which bridges the two iron ions in the reduced structure, does not interact with either iron. Although carboxylate shifts have been observed on oxidation of other diiron proteins, this is the first example of the residue moving beyond the coordination range of both iron ions. Comparison of the ivy and castor structures reveal surface amino acids close to the annulus of the substrate-binding cavity and others lining the lower portion of the cavity that are potential determinants of their distinct substrate specificities. We propose a hypothesis that differences in side chain packing explains the apparent paradox that several residues lining the lower portion of the cavity in the ivy desaturase are bulkier than their equivalents in the castor enzyme despite the necessity for the ivy enzyme to accommodate three more carbons beyond the diiron site.

  4. Interaction between infectious diseases and personality traits: ACP1*C as a potential mediator.

    PubMed

    Napolioni, Valerio; Murray, Damian R; Comings, David E; Peters, Warren R; Gade-Andavolu, Radhika; MacMurray, James

    2014-08-01

    In geographical regions characterized by high pathogen prevalence, it has been shown that human populations tend to be characterized by lower levels of extraversion (E) and openness to experience (OtE). According to the "behavioral immune system" hypothesis, the reduction of extraversion and openness levels represents a behavioral defense against infections. Like the 'classical' immune system, the "behavioral immune system" could also be shaped by its underlying genetic background. Previous studies have shown that the *C allele of the ACP1 gene confers increased susceptibility to infectious/parasitic diseases. We hypothesized that carriers of the ACP1*C allele should likewise be associated with reduced E and OtE. We tested this hypothesis using two samples comprised of 153 students from Southern California (Group 1), and 162 female subjects recruited from an executive health program (Group 2), genotyped for ACP1 polymorphism and evaluated by the NEO Five-Factor Inventory (NEO-FFI). ACP1 was significantly associated with E: we found that carriers of ACP1*C showed reduced scores for E (Group 1: β=-4.263, P=0.027; Group 2: β=-8.315, P=0.003; Group 1+Group 2: β=-5.366, P=0.001). Across groups, ACP1 was only marginally associated with OtE. In conclusion, the present study found that the ACP1*C allele, previously associated with an increased vulnerability to infectious/parasitic diseases may also be able to shape behavioral immune defenses by interaction with the level of E. PMID:24933463

  5. Effect of CPP/ACP on initial bioadhesion to enamel and dentin in situ.

    PubMed

    Grychtol, Susann; Basche, Sabine; Hannig, Matthias; Hannig, Christian

    2014-01-01

    The present in situ study investigated the influence of a preparation containing CPP/ACP (caseinphosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate) (GC Tooth mousse) on initial bacterial colonization of enamel and dentin. Therefore, pellicle formation was performed in situ on bovine enamel and dentin specimens fixed to individual upper jaw splints worn by 8 subjects. After 1 min of pellicle formation GC Tooth mousse was used according to manufacturer's recommendations. Rinses with chlorhexidine served as positive controls. Specimens carried without any rinse served as negative controls. After 8 h overnight exposure of the splints, bacterial colonization was quantified by fluorescence microscopy (DAPI and BacLight live/dead staining). Additionally, the colony forming units (CFU) were determined after desorption. Furthermore, the effects on Streptococcus mutans bacteria were tested in vitro (BacLight). There was no significant impact of CPP/ACP on initial bacterial colonization proved with DAPI and BacLight. Determination of CFU showed statistical significance for CPP/ACP to reduce bacterial adherence on enamel. The in vitro investigation indicated no antimicrobial effects for CPP/ACP on Streptococcus mutans suspension. Under the chosen conditions, CPP/ACP (GC Tooth mousse) had no significant impact on initial biofilm formation on dental hard tissues. The tested preparation cannot be recommended for biofilm management. PMID:25386603

  6. Effect of CPP/ACP on Initial Bioadhesion to Enamel and Dentin In Situ

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The present in situ study investigated the influence of a preparation containing CPP/ACP (caseinphosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate) (GC Tooth mousse) on initial bacterial colonization of enamel and dentin. Therefore, pellicle formation was performed in situ on bovine enamel and dentin specimens fixed to individual upper jaw splints worn by 8 subjects. After 1 min of pellicle formation GC Tooth mousse was used according to manufacturer's recommendations. Rinses with chlorhexidine served as positive controls. Specimens carried without any rinse served as negative controls. After 8 h overnight exposure of the splints, bacterial colonization was quantified by fluorescence microscopy (DAPI and BacLight live/dead staining). Additionally, the colony forming units (CFU) were determined after desorption. Furthermore, the effects on Streptococcus mutans bacteria were tested in vitro (BacLight). There was no significant impact of CPP/ACP on initial bacterial colonization proved with DAPI and BacLight. Determination of CFU showed statistical significance for CPP/ACP to reduce bacterial adherence on enamel. The in vitro investigation indicated no antimicrobial effects for CPP/ACP on Streptococcus mutans suspension. Under the chosen conditions, CPP/ACP (GC Tooth mousse) had no significant impact on initial biofilm formation on dental hard tissues. The tested preparation cannot be recommended for biofilm management. PMID:25386603

  7. Efficacious long-term cooling and freezing of Sapajus apella semen in ACP-118(®).

    PubMed

    Leão, D L; Miranda, S A; Brito, A B; Lima, J S; Santos, R R; Domingues, S F S

    2015-08-01

    The objectives of the present study were to test the effect of coconut water solution (CWS), TES-TRIS and ACP-118(®) on the seminal cooling and cryopreservation of semen from capuchin monkeys (Sapajus apella). Semen was collected from six males by electro-ejaculation, diluted in TES-TRIS, CWS or ACP-118(®), and maintained at 4°C for 28h. Semen was subsequently evaluated (Experiment I) or cryopreserved in the presence of different glycerol concentrations (3%, 5% or 7%) (Experiment II). ACP-118(®) was the preferred extender to preserve sperm motility and viability after 28h incubation at 4°C. Cooled sperm were successfully frozen-thawed in a medium containing 3% glycerol. After thawing, sperm retained the capacity to fertilize oocytes and zygotes were obtained. In conclusion, ACP-118(®) can be effectively and efficiently used as extender for the cooling of S. apella semen. Furthermore, cryopreservation using ACP-118(®) by adding 3% glycerol is suitable to maintain sperm morphology and the capacity of these cells to fertilize in vitro. PMID:26071650

  8. iACP: a sequence-based tool for identifying anticancer peptides

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wei; Ding, Hui; Feng, Pengmian; Lin, Hao; Chou, Kuo-Chen

    2016-01-01

    Cancer remains a major killer worldwide. Traditional methods of cancer treatment are expensive and have some deleterious side effects on normal cells. Fortunately, the discovery of anticancer peptides (ACPs) has paved a new way for cancer treatment. With the explosive growth of peptide sequences generated in the post genomic age, it is highly desired to develop computational methods for rapidly and effectively identifying ACPs, so as to speed up their application in treating cancer. Here we report a sequence-based predictor called iACP developed by the approach of optimizing the g-gap dipeptide components. It was demonstrated by rigorous cross-validations that the new predictor remarkably outperformed the existing predictors for the same purpose in both overall accuracy and stability. For the convenience of most experimental scientists, a publicly accessible web-server for iACP has been established at http://lin.uestc.edu.cn/server/iACP, by which users can easily obtain their desired results. PMID:26942877

  9. [Constructing an ACP Simulation-Situation Communication Training Program for Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease].

    PubMed

    Chen, Jui-O; Lin, Chiu-Chu

    2016-06-01

    The aging population and changing lifestyles have lead to the increased general risk of chronic kidney disease. Taiwan currently has the highest incidence and prevalence of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) of any country or region in the world. Hemodialysis patients must endure comorbidities and face the uncertainties of death. The best way to achieve a good death is for patients to sign advance care planning (ACP). However, the key factors contributing to low ACP signature rates have been the lack of communication skills and related training among medical staffs. This article explores the dilemma of ACP using an example of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and proposes a theory-based approach to develop a theoretical framework for an ACP simulation-situation communication training program that integrates the simulation situation model, PREPARED model, and scaffolding theory. Readers may use this framework to design ACP simulation-situation communication training programs that conform to their own conditions and then test the effectiveness and feasibility of these programs in clinical settings. PMID:27250964

  10. Isoniazid affects multiple components of the type II fatty acid synthase system of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Slayden, R A; Lee, R E; Barry, C E

    2000-11-01

    Genetic and biochemical evidence has implicated two different target enzymes for isoniazid (INH) within the unique type II fatty acid synthase (FAS) system involved in the production of mycolic acids. These two components are an enoyl acyl carrier protein (ACP) reductase, InhA, and a beta-ketoacyl-ACP synthase, KasA. We compared the consequences of INH treatment of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) with two inhibitors having well-defined targets: triclosan (TRC), which inhibits InhA; and thiolactomycin (TLM), which inhibits KasA. INH and TLM, but not TRC, upregulate the expression of an operon containing five FAS II components, including kasA and acpM. Although all three compounds inhibit mycolic acid synthesis, treatment with INH and TLM, but not with TRC, results in the accumulation of ACP-bound lipid precursors to mycolic acids that were 26 carbons long and fully saturated. TLM-resistant mutants of MTB were more cross-resistant to INH than TRC-resistant mutants. Overexpression of KasA conferred more resistance to TLM and INH than to TRC. Overexpression of InhA conferred more resistance to TRC than to INH and TLM. Co-overexpression of both InhA and KasA resulted in strongly enhanced levels of INH resistance, in addition to cross-resistance to both TLM and TRC. These results suggest that these components of the FAS II complex are not independently regulated and that alterations in the expression level of InhA affect expression levels of KasA. Nonetheless, INH appeared to resemble TLM more closely in overall mode of action, and KasA levels appeared to be tightly correlated with INH sensitivity. PMID:11069675

  11. In vitro reconstitution and steady-state analysis of the fatty acid synthase from Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xingye; Liu, Tiangang; Zhu, Fayin; Khosla, Chaitan

    2011-01-01

    Microbial fatty acid derivatives are emerging as promising alternatives to fossil fuel derived transportation fuels. Among bacterial fatty acid synthases (FAS), the Escherichia coli FAS is perhaps the most well studied, but little is known about its steady-state kinetic behavior. Here we describe the reconstitution of E. coli FAS using purified protein components and report detailed kinetic analysis of this reconstituted system. When all ketosynthases are present at 1 μM, the maximum rate of free fatty acid synthesis of the FAS exceeded 100 μM/ min. The steady-state turnover frequency was not significantly inhibited at high concentrations of any substrate or cofactor. FAS activity was saturated with respect to most individual protein components when their concentrations exceeded 1 μM. The exceptions were FabI and FabZ, which increased FAS activity up to concentrations of 10 μM; FabH and FabF, which decreased FAS activity at concentrations higher than 1 μM; and holo-ACP and TesA, which gave maximum FAS activity at 30 μM concentrations. Analysis of the S36T mutant of the ACP revealed that the unusual dependence of FAS activity on holo-ACP concentration was due, at least in part, to the acyl-phosphopantetheine moiety. MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry analysis of the reaction mixture further revealed medium and long chain fatty acyl-ACP intermediates as predominant ACP species. We speculate that one or more of such intermediates are key allosteric regulators of FAS turnover. Our findings provide a new basis for assessing the scope and limitations of using E. coli as a biocatalyst for the production of diesel-like fuels. PMID:22042840

  12. Advanced spent fuel conditioning process (ACP) progress with respect to remote operation and maintenance

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Hyo Jik; Lee, Jong Kwang; Park, Byung Suk; Yoon, Ji Sup

    2007-07-01

    Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) has been developing an Advanced Spent Fuel Conditioning Process (ACP) to reduce the volume of spent fuel, and the construction of the ACP facility (ACPF) for a demonstration of its technical feasibility has been completed. In 2006 two inactive demonstrations were performed with simulated fuels in the ACPF. Accompanied by process equipment performance tests, its remote operability and maintainability were also tested during that time. Procedures for remote operation tasks are well addressed in this study and evaluated thoroughly. Also, remote maintenance and repair tasks are addressed regarding some important modules with a high priority order. The above remote handling test's results provided a lot of information such as items to be revised to improve the efficiency of the remote handling tasks. This paper deals with the current status of ACP and the progress of remote handling of ACPF. (authors)

  13. BIOGENESIS FACTOR REQUIRED FOR ATP SYNTHASE 3 Facilitates Assembly of the Chloroplast ATP Synthase Complex.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lin; Duan, Zhikun; Zhang, Jiao; Peng, Lianwei

    2016-06-01

    Thylakoid membrane-localized chloroplast ATP synthases use the proton motive force generated by photosynthetic electron transport to produce ATP from ADP. Although it is well known that the chloroplast ATP synthase is composed of more than 20 proteins with α3β3γ1ε1δ1I1II1III14IV1 stoichiometry, its biogenesis process is currently unclear. To unravel the molecular mechanisms underlying the biogenesis of chloroplast ATP synthase, we performed extensive screening for isolating ATP synthase mutants in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). In the recently identified bfa3 (biogenesis factors required for ATP synthase 3) mutant, the levels of chloroplast ATP synthase subunits were reduced to approximately 25% of wild-type levels. In vivo labeling analysis showed that assembly of the CF1 component of chloroplast ATP synthase was less efficient in bfa3 than in the wild type, indicating that BFA3 is required for CF1 assembly. BFA3 encodes a chloroplast stromal protein that is conserved in higher plants, green algae, and a few species of other eukaryotic algae, and specifically interacts with the CF1β subunit. The BFA3 binding site was mapped to a region in the catalytic site of CF1β. Several residues highly conserved in eukaryotic CF1β are crucial for the BFA3-CF1β interaction, suggesting a coevolutionary relationship between BFA3 and CF1β. BFA3 appears to function as a molecular chaperone that transiently associates with unassembled CF1β at its catalytic site and facilitates subsequent association with CF1α during assembly of the CF1 subcomplex of chloroplast ATP synthase. PMID:27208269

  14. Stacking of a stearoyl-ACP thioesterase with a dual-silenced palmitoyl-ACP thioesterase and ∆12 fatty acid desaturase in transgenic soybean.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyunwoo; Graef, George; Xu, Yixiang; Tenopir, Patrick; Clemente, Tom E

    2014-10-01

    Soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr) is valued for both its protein and oil, whose seed is composed of 40% and 20% of each component, respectively. Given its high percentage of polyunsaturated fatty acids, linoleic acid and linolenic acid, soybean oil oxidative stability is relatively poor. Historically food processors have employed a partial hydrogenation process to soybean oil as a means to improve both the oxidative stability and functionality in end-use applications. However, the hydrogenation process leads to the formation of trans-fats, which are associated with negative cardiovascular health. As a means to circumvent the need for the hydrogenation process, genetic approaches are being pursued to improve oil quality in oilseeds. In this regard, we report here on the introduction of the mangosteen (Garcinia mangostana) stearoyl-ACP thioesterase into soybean and the subsequent stacking with an event that is dual-silenced in palmitoyl-ACP thioesterase and ∆12 fatty acid desaturase expression in a seed-specific fashion. Phenotypic analyses on transgenic soybean expressing the mangosteen stearoyl-ACP thioesterase revealed increases in seed stearic acid levels up to 17%. The subsequent stacked with a soybean event silenced in both palmitoyl-ACP thioesterase and ∆12 fatty acid desaturase activity, resulted in a seed lipid phenotype of approximately 11%-19% stearate and approximately 70% oleate. The oil profile created by the stack was maintained for four generations under greenhouse conditions and a fifth generation under a field environment. However, in generation six and seven under field conditions, the oleate levels decreased to 30%-40%, while the stearic level remained elevated. PMID:24909647

  15. USGS tethered ACP platforms: New design means more safety and accuracy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morlock, S.E.; Stewart, J.A.; Rehmel, M.S.

    2004-01-01

    The US Geological Survey has developed an innovative tethered platform that supports an Acoustic Current Profiler (ACP) in making stream-flow measurements (use of the term ACP in this article refers to a class of instruments and not a specific brand name or model). The tethered platform reduces the hazards involved in conventional methods of stream-flow measurement. The use of the platform reduces or eliminates time spent by personnel in streams and boats or on bridges and cableway and stream-flow measurement accuracy is increased.

  16. Iterative type I polyketide synthases for enediyne core biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Horsman, Geoffrey P; Van Lanen, Steven G; Shen, Ben

    2009-01-01

    Enediyne natural products are extremely potent antitumor antibiotics with a remarkable core structure consisting of two acetylenic groups conjugated to a double bond within either a 9- or 10-membered ring. Biosynthesis of this fascinating scaffold is catalyzed in part by an unusual iterative type I polyketide synthase, PKSE, that is shared among all enediyne biosynthetic pathways whose gene clusters have been sequenced to date. The PKSE is unusual in two main respects: (1) it contains an acyl carrier protein (ACP) domain with no sequence homology to any known proteins, and (2) it is self-phosphopantetheinylated by an integrated phosphopantetheinyl transferase (PPTase) domain. The unusual domain architecture and biochemistry of the PKSE hold promise both for the rapid identification of new enediyne natural products and for obtaining fundamental catalytic insights into enediyne biosynthesis. This chapter describes methods for rapid PCR-based classification of conserved enediyne biosynthetic genes, heterologous production of 9-membered PKSE proteins and isolation of the resulting polyene product, and in vitro characterization of the PKSE ACP domain. PMID:19362637

  17. Specificity of acyl-homoserine lactone synthases examined by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gould, Ty A; Herman, Jake; Krank, Jessica; Murphy, Robert C; Churchill, Mair E A

    2006-01-01

    Many gram-negative bacteria produce a specific set of N-acyl-L-homoserine-lactone (AHL) signaling molecules for the purpose of quorum sensing, which is a means of regulating coordinated gene expression in a cell-density-dependent manner. AHLs are produced from acylated acyl-carrier protein (acyl-ACP) and S-adenosyl-L-methionine by the AHL synthase enzyme. The appearance of specific AHLs is due in large part to the intrinsic specificity of the enzyme for subsets of acyl-ACP substrates. Structural studies of the Pantoea stewartii enzyme EsaI and AHL-sensitive bioassays revealed that threonine 140 in the acyl chain binding pocket directs the enzyme toward production of 3-oxo-homoserine lactones. Mass spectrometry was used to examine the range of AHL molecular species produced by AHL synthases under a variety of conditions. An AHL selective normal-phase chromatographic purification with addition of a deuterated AHL internal standard was followed by reverse-phase liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry in order to obtain estimates of the relative amounts of different AHLs from biological samples. The AHLs produced by wild-type and engineered EsaI and LasI AHL synthases show that intrinsic specificity and different cellular conditions influence the production of AHLs. The threonine at position 140 in EsaI is important for the preference for 3-oxo-acyl-ACPs, but the role of the equivalent threonine in LasI is less clear. In addition, LasI expressed in Escherichia coli produces a high proportion of unusual AHLs with acyl chains consisting of an odd number of carbons. Furthermore, these studies offer additional methods that will be useful for surveying and quantitating AHLs from different sources. PMID:16385066

  18. Preparation of fatty-acylated derivatives of acyl carrier protein using Vibrio harveyi acyl-ACP synthetase.

    PubMed

    Shen, Z; Fice, D; Byers, D M

    1992-07-01

    A simple two-step purification of Vibrio harveyi fatty acyl-acyl carrier protein (acyl-ACP) synthetase, which is useful for the quantitative preparation and analysis of fatty-acylated derivatives of ACP, is described. Acyl-ACP synthetase can be partially purified from extracts of this bioluminescent bacterium by Cibacron blue chromatography and Sephacryl S-300 gel filtration and is stable for months at -20 degrees C in the presence of glycerol. Incubation of ACP from Escherichia coli with ATP and radiolabeled fatty acids (6 to 16 carbons in length) in the presence of the enzyme resulted in quantitative conversion to biologically active acylated derivatives. The enzyme reaction can be monitored by a filter disk assay to quantitate levels of ACP or by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and fluorography to detect ACP in cell extracts. With its broad fatty acid chain length specificity and optimal activity in mild nondenaturing buffers, the soluble V. harveyi acyl-ACP synthetase provides an attractive alternative to current chemical and enzymatic methods of acyl-ACP preparation and analysis. PMID:1514693

  19. What's in a Number? Estimating numbers of viable Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus cells in citrus and ACP

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Knowledge of CLas viability is critical for answering questions about how the organism is proliferating within citrus and ACP, what is the response to therapeutic treatments, and for understanding disease development. Because CLas cannot be grown in culture, estimating cell viability has not been po...

  20. Introducing an Absolute Cavity Pyrgeometer (ACP) for Improving the Atmospheric Longwave Irradiance Measurement (Poster)

    SciTech Connect

    Reda, I.; Stoffel, T.

    2012-03-01

    Advancing climate change research requires accurate and traceable measurement of the atmospheric longwave irradiance. Current measurement capabilities are limited to an estimated uncertainty of larger than +/- 4 W/m2 using the interim World Infrared Standard Group (WISG). WISG is traceable to the Systeme international d'unites (SI) through blackbody calibrations. An Absolute Cavity Pyrgeometer (ACP) is being developed to measure absolute outdoor longwave irradiance with traceability to SI using the temperature scale (ITS-90) and the sky as the reference source, instead of a blackbody. The ACP was designed by NREL and optically characterized by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). Under clear-sky and stable conditions, the responsivity of the ACP is determined by lowering the temperature of the cavity and calculating the rate of change of the thermopile output voltage versus the changing net irradiance. The absolute atmospheric longwave irradiance is then calculated with an uncertainty of +/- 3.96 W/m2 with traceability to SI. The measured irradiance by the ACP was compared with the irradiance measured by two pyrgeometers calibrated by the World Radiation Center with traceability to the WISG.

  1. An Arabidopsis callose synthase.

    PubMed

    Ostergaard, Lars; Petersen, Morten; Mattsson, Ole; Mundy, John

    2002-08-01

    Beta-1,3-glucan polymers are major structural components of fungal cell walls, while cellulosic beta-1,4-glucan is the predominant polysaccharide in plant cell walls. Plant beta-1,3-glucan, called callose, is produced in pollen and in response to pathogen attack and wounding, but it has been unclear whether callose synthases can also produce cellulose and whether plant cellulose synthases may also produce beta-1,3-glucans. We describe here an Arabidopsis gene, AtGsl5, encoding a plasma membrane-localized protein homologous to yeast beta-1,3-glucan synthase whose expression partially complements a yeast beta-1,3-glucan synthase mutant. AtGsl5 is developmentally expressed at highest levels in flowers, consistent with flowers having high beta-1,3-glucan synthase activities for deposition of callose in pollen. A role for AtGsl5 in callose synthesis is also indicated by AtGsl5 expression in the Arabidopsis mpk4 mutant which exhibits systemic acquired resistance (SAR), elevated beta-1,3-glucan synthase activity, and increased callose levels. In addition, AtGsl5 is a likely target of salicylic acid (SA)-dependent SAR, since AtGsl5 mRNA accumulation is induced by SA in wild-type plants, while expression of the nahG salicylate hydroxylase reduces AtGsl5 mRNA levels in the mpk4 mutant. These results indicate that AtGsl5 is likely involved in callose synthesis in flowering tissues and in the mpk4 mutant. PMID:12081364

  2. Protein preparation, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of Polygonum cuspidatum bifunctional chalcone synthase/benzalacetone synthase.

    PubMed

    Lu, Heshu; Yang, Mingfeng; Liu, Chunmei; Lu, Ping; Cang, Huaixing; Ma, Lanqing

    2013-08-01

    The chalcone synthase (CHS) superfamily of type III polyketide synthases (PKSs) generate the backbones of a variety of plant secondary metabolites. An active bifunctional chalcone synthase/benzalacetone synthase (CHS/BAS) from Polygonum cuspidatum was overexpressed in Escherichia coli as a C-terminally polyhistidine-tagged fusion protein, purified to homogeneity and crystallized using polyethylene glycol 4000 as a precipitant. The production of well shaped crystals of the complex between PcPKS1 and benzalacetone was dependent on the presence of sorbitol and barium chloride as additives. The crystals belonged to the orthorhombic space group P2₁2₁2₁, with unit-cell parameters a = 80.23, b = 81.01, c = 122.89 Å, and diffracted X-rays to at least 2.0 Å resolution. PMID:23908031

  3. Results of First Outdoor Comparison Between Absolute Cavity Pyrgeometer (ACP) and Infrared Integrating Sphere (IRIS) Radiometer at PMOD (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Reda, I.; Grobner, J.; Wacker, S.; Stoffel, T.

    2013-03-01

    The ACP and IRIS are developed to establish a world reference for calibrating pyrgeometers with traceability to SI units. The two radiometers are unwindowed with negligible spectral dependence, and traceable to SI units through the temperature scale (ITS-90). The first outdoor comparison between the two designs was held from January 28 to February 8, 2013 at the Physikalisch-Metorologisches Observatorium Davos (PMOD). The difference between the irradiance measured by ACP and that of IRIS was within 1 W/m2. A difference of 5 W/m2 was observed between the irradiance measured by ACP&IRIS and that of the interim World Infrared Standard Group (WISG).

  4. Geranyl diphosphate synthase from mint

    SciTech Connect

    Croteau, Rodney Bruce; Wildung, Mark Raymond; Burke, Charles Cullen; Gershenzon, Jonathan

    1999-01-01

    A cDNA encoding geranyl diphosphate synthase from peppermint has been isolated and sequenced, and the corresponding amino acid sequence has been determined. Accordingly, an isolated DNA sequence (SEQ ID No:1) is provided which codes for the expression of geranyl diphosphate synthase (SEQ ID No:2) from peppermint (Mentha piperita). In other aspects, replicable recombinant cloning vehicles are provided which code for geranyl diphosphate synthase or for a base sequence sufficiently complementary to at least a portion of the geranyl diphosphate synthase DNA or RNA to enable hybridization therewith (e.g., antisense geranyl diphosphate synthase RNA or fragments of complementary geranyl diphosphate synthase DNA which are useful as polymerase chain reaction primers or as probes for geranyl diphosphate synthase or related genes). In yet other aspects, modified host cells are provided that have been transformed, transfected, infected and/or injected with a recombinant cloning vehicle and/or DNA sequence encoding geranyl diphosphate synthase. Thus, systems and methods are provided for the recombinant expression of geranyl diphosphate synthase that may be used to facilitate the production, isolation and purification of significant quantities of recombinant geranyl diphosphate synthase for subsequent use, to obtain expression or enhanced expression of geranyl diphosphate synthase in plants in order to enhance the production of monoterpenoids, to produce geranyl diphosphate in cancerous cells as a precursor to monoterpenoids having anti-cancer properties or may be otherwise employed for the regulation or expression of geranyl diphosphate synthase or the production of geranyl diphosphate.

  5. Geranyl diphosphate synthase from mint

    SciTech Connect

    Croteau, R.B.; Wildung, M.R.; Burke, C.C.; Gershenzon, J.

    1999-03-02

    A cDNA encoding geranyl diphosphate synthase from peppermint has been isolated and sequenced, and the corresponding amino acid sequence has been determined. Accordingly, an isolated DNA sequence (SEQ ID No:1) is provided which codes for the expression of geranyl diphosphate synthase (SEQ ID No:2) from peppermint (Mentha piperita). In other aspects, replicable recombinant cloning vehicles are provided which code for geranyl diphosphate synthase or for a base sequence sufficiently complementary to at least a portion of the geranyl diphosphate synthase DNA or RNA to enable hybridization therewith (e.g., antisense geranyl diphosphate synthase RNA or fragments of complementary geranyl diphosphate synthase DNA which are useful as polymerase chain reaction primers or as probes for geranyl diphosphate synthase or related genes). In yet other aspects, modified host cells are provided that have been transformed, transfected, infected and/or injected with a recombinant cloning vehicle and/or DNA sequence encoding geranyl diphosphate synthase. Thus, systems and methods are provided for the recombinant expression of geranyl diphosphate synthase that may be used to facilitate the production, isolation and purification of significant quantities of recombinant geranyl diphosphate synthase for subsequent use, to obtain expression or enhanced expression of geranyl diphosphate synthase in plants in order to enhance the production of monoterpenoids, to produce geranyl diphosphate in cancerous cells as a precursor to monoterpenoids having anti-cancer properties or may be otherwise employed for the regulation or expression of geranyl diphosphate synthase or the production of geranyl diphosphate. 5 figs.

  6. Effects of the addition of casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP) on mechanical properties of luting and lining glass ionomer cement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heravi, Farzin; Bagheri, Hossein; Rangrazi, Abdolrasoul; Mojtaba Zebarjad, Seyed

    2016-07-01

    Recently, the addition of casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP) into glass ionomer cements (GICs) has attracted interest due to its remineralization of teeth and its antibacterial effects. However, it should be investigated to ensure that the incorporation of CPP-ACP does not have significant adverse effects on its mechanical properties. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of the addition of CPP-ACP on the mechanical properties of luting and lining GIC. The first step was to synthesize the CPP-ACP. Then the CPP-ACP at concentrations of 1%, 1.56% and 2% of CPP-ACP was added into a luting and lining GIC. GIC without CPP-ACP was used as a control group. The results revealed that the incorporation of CPP-ACP up to 1.56%(w/w) increased the flexural strength (29%), diametral tensile strength (36%) and microhardness (18%), followed by a reduction in these mechanical properties at 2%(w/w) CPP-ACP. The wear rate was significantly decreased (23%) in 1.56%(w/w) concentration of CPP-ACP and it was increased in 2%(w/w). Accordingly, the addition of 1.56%(w/w) CPP-ACP into luting and lining GIC had no adverse effect on the mechanical properties of luting and lining GIC and could be used in clinical practice.

  7. Roles of Conserved Active Site Residues in the Ketosynthase Domain of an Assembly Line Polyketide Synthase.

    PubMed

    Robbins, Thomas; Kapilivsky, Joshuah; Cane, David E; Khosla, Chaitan

    2016-08-16

    Ketosynthase (KS) domains of assembly line polyketide synthases (PKSs) catalyze intermodular translocation of the growing polyketide chain as well as chain elongation via decarboxylative Claisen condensation. The mechanistic roles of ten conserved residues in the KS domain of Module 1 of the 6-deoxyerythronolide B synthase were interrogated via site-directed mutagenesis and extensive biochemical analysis. Although the C211A mutant at the KS active site exhibited no turnover activity, it was still a competent methylmalonyl-ACP decarboxylase. The H346A mutant exhibited reduced rates of both chain translocation and chain elongation, with a greater effect on the latter half-reaction. H384 contributed to methylmalonyl-ACP decarboxylation, whereas K379 promoted C-C bond formation. S315 played a role in coupling decarboxylation to C-C bond formation. These findings support a mechanism for the translocation and elongation half-reactions that provides a well-defined starting point for further analysis of the key chain-building domain in assembly line PKSs. PMID:27441852

  8. Effect of CPP-ACP Paste on Dental Caries in Primary Teeth

    PubMed Central

    Sitthisettapong, T.; Phantumvanit, P.; Huebner, C.; DeRouen, T.

    2012-01-01

    This clinical trial tested the effect of daily application of 10% w/v calcium phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP) paste for 1 yr when added to regular toothbrushing with fluoridated toothpaste to prevent dental caries in pre-school children. High-caries-risk children aged 2½ to 3½ yrs in a suburban area of central Thailand were assigned to receive either CPP-ACP (n = 150) or a placebo control (n = 146) in addition to fluoridated toothpaste. The International Caries Detection and Assessment System (ICDAS) was recorded at baseline, 6 mos, and 1 yr. At 1 yr, a significant increase in mean numbers of enamel and dentin caries lesions, as well as dmfs, was found in both groups (p < 0.001). No significant difference was observed between groups on these 3 outcome measures (p = 0.23, 0.84, and 0.91, respectively). The odds of enamel caries lesion transitions to a state of regression or stability, compared with progression from baseline, was also not different between groups [OR = 1.00, 95% CI (0.86, 1.17)]. This trial found that daily application of 10% w/v CPP-ACP paste on school days for 1 yr, when added to regular toothbrushing with a fluoride toothpaste, had no significant added effect in preventing caries in the primary dentition of these pre-school children (ClinicalTrials.gov number CT01 604109). PMID:22805294

  9. Effect of CPP-ACP paste on dental caries in primary teeth: a randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Sitthisettapong, T; Phantumvanit, P; Huebner, C; Derouen, T

    2012-09-01

    This clinical trial tested the effect of daily application of 10% w/v calcium phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP) paste for 1 yr when added to regular toothbrushing with fluoridated toothpaste to prevent dental caries in pre-school children. High-caries-risk children aged 2½ to 3½ yrs in a suburban area of central Thailand were assigned to receive either CPP-ACP (n = 150) or a placebo control (n = 146) in addition to fluoridated toothpaste. The International Caries Detection and Assessment System (ICDAS) was recorded at baseline, 6 mos, and 1 yr. At 1 yr, a significant increase in mean numbers of enamel and dentin caries lesions, as well as dmfs, was found in both groups (p < 0.001). No significant difference was observed between groups on these 3 outcome measures (p = 0.23, 0.84, and 0.91, respectively). The odds of enamel caries lesion transitions to a state of regression or stability, compared with progression from baseline, was also not different between groups [OR = 1.00, 95% CI (0.86, 1.17)]. This trial found that daily application of 10% w/v CPP-ACP paste on school days for 1 yr, when added to regular toothbrushing with a fluoride toothpaste, had no significant added effect in preventing caries in the primary dentition of these pre-school children (ClinicalTrials.gov number CT01 604109). PMID:22805294

  10. Histochemical localization and characterization of AKP, ACP, NSE, and POD from cultured Apostichopus japonicus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiye; Sun, Xiuqin; Zheng, Fengrong; Sun, Hushan

    2009-09-01

    We investigated the distribution of four enzymes involved in the immune response of Apostichopus japonicus. We collected samples of the tentacles, papillate podium, integument, respiratory tree, and digestive tract and stained them for acid phosphatase (ACP), alkaline phosphatase (AKP), non-specific esterase (NSE) and peroxidase (POD) activity. The distribution and content of ACP, AKP, NSE, and POD differed among the tissues. The coelomic epithelium of the tentacle, papillate podium, and integument and the mucous layer of respiratory tree were positive for ACP activity. The coelomic epithelium and cuticular layer of the tentacle, papillate podium, and integument and the mucous layer and tunica externa of the respiratory tree and digestive tract stained positive or weakly positive for AKP activity. Almost all the epithelial tissues stained positive, strongly positive, or very strongly positive for NSE activity. The cuticular layer of the tentacle and integument and the mucous layer, tunica submucosa, and tunica externa of the respiratory tree and digestive tract stained positive for POD activity. We hypothesize that these enzymes play a role in the immune response in A. japonicus.

  11. Acyl-ACP thioesterases from macadamia (Macadamia tetraphylla) nuts: cloning, characterization and their impact on oil composition.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Pérez, Antonio J; Sánchez-García, Alicia; Salas, Joaquín J; Garcés, Rafael; Martínez-Force, Enrique

    2011-01-01

    The mechanisms by which macadamia nuts accumulate the unusual palmitoleic and asclepic acyl moieties, which constitute up to 20% of the fatty acids in some varieties, are still unknown. Acyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) thioesterases (EC 3.1.2.14) are intraplastidial enzymes that terminate the synthesis of fatty acids in plants and that facilitate the export of the acyl moieties to the endoplasmic reticulum where they can be used in the production of glycerolipids. Here, we have investigated the possible role of acyl-ACP thioesterase activity in the composition of macadamia kernel oil. Accordingly, two acyl-ACP thioesterases were cloned from developing macadamia kernels, one of the FatA type and the other of the FatB type. These enzymes were heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli, and the recombinant thioesterases were purified, characterized kinetically and assayed with a variety of substrates, demonstrating the high specificity of macadamia FatA towards 16:1-ACP. Acyl-ACP thioesterase activity was also characterized in crude extracts from two different varieties of macadamia, Cate and Beaumont, which accumulate different amounts of n-7 fatty acids. The impact of acyl-ACP thioesterase activities on the oil composition of these kernels is discussed in the light of these results. PMID:21071236

  12. Hybrid polyketide synthases

    DOEpatents

    Fortman, Jeffrey L.; Hagen, Andrew; Katz, Leonard; Keasling, Jay D.; Poust, Sean; Zhang, Jingwei; Zotchev, Sergey

    2016-05-10

    The present invention provides for a polyketide synthase (PKS) capable of synthesizing an even-chain or odd-chain diacid or lactam or diamine. The present invention also provides for a host cell comprising the PKS and when cultured produces the even-chain diacid, odd-chain diacid, or KAPA. The present invention also provides for a host cell comprising the PKS capable of synthesizing a pimelic acid or KAPA, and when cultured produces biotin.

  13. Comparative Analysis of the Substrate Specificity of trans- versus cis-Acyltransferases of Assembly Line Polyketide Synthases

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Due to their pivotal role in extender unit selection during polyketide biosynthesis, acyltransferase (AT) domains are important engineering targets. A subset of assembly line polyketide synthases (PKSs) are serviced by discrete, trans-acting ATs. Theoretically, these trans-ATs can complement an inactivated cis-AT, promoting introduction of a noncognate extender unit. This approach requires a better understanding of the substrate specificity and catalytic mechanism of naturally occurring trans-ATs. We kinetically analyzed trans-ATs from the disorazole and kirromycin synthases and compared them to a representative cis-AT from the 6-deoxyerythronolide B synthase (DEBS). During transacylation, the disorazole AT favored malonyl-CoA over methylmalonyl-CoA by >40000-fold, whereas the kirromycin AT favored ethylmalonyl-CoA over methylmalonyl-CoA by 20-fold. Conversely, the disorazole AT had broader specificity than its kirromycin counterpart for acyl carrier protein (ACP) substrates. The presence of the ACP had little effect on the specificity (kcat/KM) of the cis-AT domain for carboxyacyl-CoA substrates but had a marked influence on the corresponding specificity parameters for the trans-ATs, suggesting that these enzymes do not act strictly by a canonical ping-pong mechanism. To investigate the relevance of the kinetic analysis of isolated ATs in the context of intact PKSs, we complemented an in vitro AT-null DEBS assembly line with either trans-AT. Whereas the disorazole AT efficiently complemented the mutant PKS at substoichiometric protein ratios, the kirromycin AT was considerably less effective. Our findings suggest that knowledge of both carboxyacyl-CoA and ACP specificity is critical to the choice of a trans-AT in combination with a mutant PKS to generate novel polyketides. PMID:24871074

  14. Identification of Genes Required for Secretion of the Francisella Oxidative Burst-Inhibiting Acid Phosphatase AcpA.

    PubMed

    Hoang, Ky Van; Chen, Carolyn G; Koopman, Jacob; Moshiri, Jasmine; Adcox, Haley E; Gunn, John S

    2016-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is a Tier 1 bioterror threat and the intracellular pathogen responsible for tularemia in humans and animals. Upon entry into the host, Francisella uses multiple mechanisms to evade killing. Our previous studies have shown that after entering its primary cellular host, the macrophage, Francisella immediately suppresses the oxidative burst by secreting a series of acid phosphatases including AcpA-B-C and HapA, thereby evading the innate immune response of the macrophage and enhancing survival and further infection. However, the mechanism of acid phosphatase secretion by Francisella is still unknown. In this study, we screened for genes required for AcpA secretion in Francisella. We initially demonstrated that the known secretion systems, the putative Francisella-pathogenicity island (FPI)-encoded Type VI secretion system and the Type IV pili, do not secrete AcpA. Using random transposon mutagenesis in conjunction with ELISA, Western blotting and acid phosphatase enzymatic assays, a transposon library of 5450 mutants was screened for strains with a minimum 1.5-fold decrease in secreted (culture supernatant) AcpA, but no defect in cytosolic AcpA. Three mutants with decreased supernatant AcpA were identified. The transposon insertion sites of these mutants were revealed by direct genomic sequencing or inverse-PCR and sequencing. One of these mutants has a severe defect in AcpA secretion (at least 85% decrease) and is a predicted hypothetical inner membrane protein. Interestingly, this mutant also affected the secretion of the FPI-encoded protein, VgrG. Thus, this screen identified novel protein secretion factors involved in the subversion of host defenses. PMID:27199935

  15. Identification of Genes Required for Secretion of the Francisella Oxidative Burst-Inhibiting Acid Phosphatase AcpA

    PubMed Central

    Hoang, Ky Van; Chen, Carolyn G.; Koopman, Jacob; Moshiri, Jasmine; Adcox, Haley E.; Gunn, John S.

    2016-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is a Tier 1 bioterror threat and the intracellular pathogen responsible for tularemia in humans and animals. Upon entry into the host, Francisella uses multiple mechanisms to evade killing. Our previous studies have shown that after entering its primary cellular host, the macrophage, Francisella immediately suppresses the oxidative burst by secreting a series of acid phosphatases including AcpA-B-C and HapA, thereby evading the innate immune response of the macrophage and enhancing survival and further infection. However, the mechanism of acid phosphatase secretion by Francisella is still unknown. In this study, we screened for genes required for AcpA secretion in Francisella. We initially demonstrated that the known secretion systems, the putative Francisella-pathogenicity island (FPI)-encoded Type VI secretion system and the Type IV pili, do not secrete AcpA. Using random transposon mutagenesis in conjunction with ELISA, Western blotting and acid phosphatase enzymatic assays, a transposon library of 5450 mutants was screened for strains with a minimum 1.5-fold decrease in secreted (culture supernatant) AcpA, but no defect in cytosolic AcpA. Three mutants with decreased supernatant AcpA were identified. The transposon insertion sites of these mutants were revealed by direct genomic sequencing or inverse-PCR and sequencing. One of these mutants has a severe defect in AcpA secretion (at least 85% decrease) and is a predicted hypothetical inner membrane protein. Interestingly, this mutant also affected the secretion of the FPI-encoded protein, VgrG. Thus, this screen identified novel protein secretion factors involved in the subversion of host defenses. PMID:27199935

  16. Monoterpene synthases from common sage (Salvia officinalis)

    DOEpatents

    Croteau, Rodney Bruce; Wise, Mitchell Lynn; Katahira, Eva Joy; Savage, Thomas Jonathan

    1999-01-01

    cDNAs encoding (+)-bornyl diphosphate synthase, 1,8-cineole synthase and (+)-sabinene synthase from common sage (Salvia officinalis) have been isolated and sequenced, and the corresponding amino acid sequences has been determined. Accordingly, isolated DNA sequences (SEQ ID No:1; SEQ ID No:3 and SEQ ID No:5) are provided which code for the expression of (+)-bornyl diphosphate synthase (SEQ ID No:2), 1,8-cineole synthase (SEQ ID No:4) and (+)-sabinene synthase SEQ ID No:6), respectively, from sage (Salvia officinalis). In other aspects, replicable recombinant cloning vehicles are provided which code for (+)-bornyl diphosphate synthase, 1,8-cineole synthase or (+)-sabinene synthase, or for a base sequence sufficiently complementary to at least a portion of (+)-bornyl diphosphate synthase, 1,8-cineole synthase or (+)-sabinene synthase DNA or RNA to enable hybridization therewith. In yet other aspects, modified host cells are provided that have been transformed, transfected, infected and/or injected with a recombinant cloning vehicle and/or DNA sequence encoding (+)-bornyl diphosphate synthase, 1,8-cineole synthase or (+)-sabinene synthase. Thus, systems and methods are provided for the recombinant expression of the aforementioned recombinant monoterpene synthases that may be used to facilitate their production, isolation and purification in significant amounts. Recombinant (+)-bornyl diphosphate synthase, 1,8-cineole synthase and (+)-sabinene synthase may be used to obtain expression or enhanced expression of (+)-bornyl diphosphate synthase, 1,8-cineole synthase and (+)-sabinene synthase in plants in order to enhance the production of monoterpenoids, or may be otherwise employed for the regulation or expression of (+)-bornyl diphosphate synthase, 1,8-cineole synthase and (+)-sabinene synthase, or the production of their products.

  17. Development of the ACP safeguards neutron counter for PWR spent fuel rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Tae-Hoon; Menlove, Howard O.; Lee, Sang-Yoon; Kim, Ho-Dong

    2008-04-01

    An advanced neutron multiplicity counter has been developed for measuring spent fuel in the Advanced spent fuel Conditioning Process (ACP) at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI). The counter uses passive neutron multiplicity counting to measure the 244Cm content in spent fuel. The input to the ACP process is spent fuel from pressurized water reactors (PWRs), and the high intensity of the gamma-ray exposure from spent fuel requires a careful design of the counter to measure the neutrons without gamma-ray interference. The nuclear safeguards for the ACP facility requires the measurement of the spent fuel input to the process and the Cm/Pu ratio for the plutonium mass accounting. This paper describes the first neutron counter that has been used to measure the neutron multiplicity distribution from spent fuel rods. Using multiple samples of PWR spent fuel rod-cuts, the singles (S), doubles (D), and triples (T) rates of the neutron distribution for the 244Cm nuclide were measured and calibration curves were produced. MCNPX code simulations were also performed to obtain the three counting rates and to compare them with the measurement results. The neutron source term was evaluated by using the ORIGEN-ARP code. The results showed systematic difference of 21-24% in the calibration graphs between the measured and simulation results. A possible source of the difference is that the burnup codes have a 244Cm uncertainty greater than ±15% and it would be systematic for all of the calibration samples. The S/D and D/T ratios are almost constant with an increment of the 244Cm mass, and this indicates that the bias is in the 244Cm neutron source calculation using the ORIGEN-ARP source code. The graphs of S/D and D/T ratios show excellent agreement between measurement and MCNPX simulation results.

  18. Short-term storage of canine preantral ovarian follicles using a powdered coconut water (ACP)-based medium.

    PubMed

    Lima, G L; Costa, L L M; Cavalcanti, D M L P; Rodrigues, C M F; Freire, F A M; Fontenele-Neto, J D; Silva, A R

    2010-07-01

    The objective was to investigate the use of powdered coconut water (ACP)-based medium for short-term preservation of canine preantral follicles. Pairs of ovaries from mongrel bitches (n=9) were divided into fragments. One ovarian fragment, treated as a fresh control, was immediately fixed for histological analysis, whereas the other six ovarian fragments were stored either in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS; control group) or ACP medium in isothermal Styrofoam boxes containing biological ice packs. The boxes were sealed and opened only after 12, 24, or 36h. After opening each box, the ovarian fragments were submitted to histological analysis. In total, 12,302 preantral follicles were evaluated, with 64.5% primordial, 33.3% primary, and 2.3% secondary follicles. There were multiple oocytes in 1.3% of the follicles analyzed. At 24h, ACP was more efficient in preserving follicular morphology than PBS (P<0.05). Compared with the fresh control group, a significant reduction in the percentage of morphologically normal ovarian follicles was observed for PBS, starting at 24h; however, the decline started only at 36h for the ACP medium. During the experiment, the temperature inside the isothermal boxes increased from 3 to 9 degrees C (P<0.05), despite a constant room temperature. In conclusion, powdered coconut water (ACP) was an appropriate medium for short-term storage of canine preantral ovarian follicles. PMID:20207405

  19. Acyl-ACP thioesterases from Camelina sativa: cloning, enzymatic characterization and implication in seed oil fatty acid composition.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Manuel Fernando; Salas, Joaquín J; Garcés, Rafael; Martínez-Force, Enrique

    2014-11-01

    Acyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) thioesterases are intraplastidial enzymes that terminate de novo fatty acid biosynthesis in the plastids of higher plants by hydrolyzing the thioester bond between ACP and the fatty acid synthesized. Free fatty acids are then esterified with coenzyme A prior to being incorporated into the glycerolipids synthesized through the eukaryotic pathway. Acyl-ACP thioesterases belong to the TE14 family of thioester-active enzymes and can be classified as FatAs and FatBs, which differ in their amino acid sequence and substrate specificity. Here, the FatA and FatB thioesterases from Camelina sativa seeds, a crop of interest in plant biotechnology, were cloned, sequenced and characterized. The mature proteins encoded by these genes were characterized biochemically after they were heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli and purified. C. sativa contained three different alleles of both the FatA and FatB genes. These genes were expressed most strongly in expanding tissues in which lipids are very actively synthesized, such as developing seed endosperm. The CsFatA enzyme displayed high catalytic efficiency on oleoyl-ACP and CsFatB acted efficiently on palmitoyl-ACP. The contribution of these two enzymes to the synthesis of C. sativa oil was discussed in the light of these results. PMID:25212866

  20. The condensing activities of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis type II fatty acid synthase are differentially regulated by phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Molle, Virginie; Brown, Alistair K; Besra, Gurdyal S; Cozzone, Alain J; Kremer, Laurent

    2006-10-01

    Phosphorylation of proteins by Ser/Thr protein kinases (STPKs) has recently become of major physiological importance because of its possible involvement in virulence of bacterial pathogens. Although Mycobacterium tuberculosis has eleven STPKs, the nature and function of the substrates of these enzymes remain largely unknown. In this work, we have identified for the first time STPK substrates in M. tuberculosis forming part of the type II fatty acid synthase (FAS-II) system involved in mycolic acid biosynthesis: the malonyl-CoA::AcpM transacylase mtFabD, and the beta-ketoacyl AcpM synthases KasA and KasB. All three enzymes were phosphorylated in vitro by different kinases, suggesting a complex network of interactions between STPKs and these substrates. In addition, both KasA and KasB were efficiently phosphorylated in M. bovis BCG each at different sites and could be dephosphorylated by the M. tuberculosis Ser/Thr phosphatase PstP. Enzymatic studies revealed that, whereas phosphorylation decreases the activity of KasA in the elongation process of long chain fatty acids synthesis, this modification enhances that of KasB. Such a differential effect of phosphorylation may represent an unusual mechanism of FAS-II system regulation, allowing pathogenic mycobacteria to produce full-length mycolates, which are required for adaptation and intracellular survival in macrophages. PMID:16873379

  1. Identification of a starter unit acyl-carrier protein transacylase domain in an iterative type I polyketide synthase

    PubMed Central

    Crawford, Jason M.; Dancy, Blair C. R.; Hill, Eric A.; Udwary, Daniel W.; Townsend, Craig A.

    2006-01-01

    Polyketides are a class of natural products that exhibit a wide range of functional and structural diversity. They include antibiotics, immunosuppressants, antifungals, antihypercholesterolemics, and cytotoxins. Polyketide synthases (PKSs) use chemistry similar to fatty acid synthases (FASs), although building block variation and differing extents of reduction of the growing polyketide chain underlie their biosynthetic versatility. In contrast to the well studied sequential modular type I PKSs, less is known about how the iterative type I PKSs carry out and control chain initiation, elongation, folding, and cyclization during polyketide processing. Domain structure analysis of a group of related fungal, nonreducing PKSs has revealed well defined N-terminal domains longer than commonly seen for FASs and modular PKSs. Predicted structure of this domain disclosed a region similar to malonyl-CoA:acyl-carrier protein (ACP) transacylases (MATs). MATs play a key role transferring precursor CoA thioesters from solution onto FASs and PKSs for chain elongation. On the basis of site-directed mutagenesis, radiolabeling, and kinetics experiments carried out with individual domains of the norsolorinic acid PKS, we propose that the N-terminal domain is a starter unit:ACP transacylase (SAT domain) that selects a C6 fatty acid from a dedicated yeast-like FAS and transfers this unit onto the PKS ACP, leading to the production of the aflatoxin precursor, norsolorinic acid. These findings could indicate a much broader role for SAT domains in starter unit selection among nonreducing iterative, fungal PKSs, and they provide a biochemical rationale for the classical acetyl “starter unit effect.” PMID:17071746

  2. Chaplain Documentation and the Electronic Medical Record: A Survey of ACPE Residency Programs.

    PubMed

    Tartaglia, Alexander; Dodd-McCue, Diane; Ford, Timothy; Demm, Charles; Hassell, Alma

    2016-01-01

    This study explores the extent to which chaplaincy departments at ACPE-accredited residency programs make use of the electronic medical record (EMR) for documentation and training. Survey data solicited from 219 programs with a 45% response rate and interview findings from 11 centers demonstrate a high level of usage of the EMR as well as an expectation that CPE residents document each patient/family encounter. Centers provided considerable initial training, but less ongoing monitoring of chaplain documentation. Centers used multiple sources to develop documentation tools for the EMR. One center was verified as having created the spiritual assessment component of the documentation tool from a peer reviewed published model. Interviews found intermittent use of the student chart notes for educational purposes. One center verified a structured manner of monitoring chart notes as a performance improvement activity. Findings suggested potential for the development of a standard documentation tool for chaplain charting and training. PMID:26168408

  3. A Project Management Approach to an ACPE Accreditation Self-study

    PubMed Central

    Iwanowicz, Susan L.; Bailie, George R.; Clarke, David W.; McGraw, Patrick S.

    2007-01-01

    In preparation for an on-site evaluation and accreditation by the American Council on Pharmaceutical Education (ACPE), the Albany College of Pharmacy employed project management techniques to complete a comprehensive self-study. A project lifecycle approach, including planning, production, and turnover phases, was used by the project's Self-Study Steering Committee. This approach, with minimal disruption to college operations, resulted in the completion of the self-study process on schedule. Throughout the project, the Steering Committee maintained a log of functions that either were executed successfully or in hindsight, could have been improved. To assess the effectiveness of the project management approach to the the self-study process, feedback was obtained from the College community through a poststudy survey. This feedback, coupled with the Steering Committee's data on possible improvements, form the basis for the lessons learned during this self-study process. PMID:17533432

  4. Evaluation of the remineralization capacity of CPP-ACP containing fluoride varnish by different quantitative methods

    PubMed Central

    SAVAS, Selcuk; KAVRÌK, Fevzi; KUCUKYÌLMAZ, Ebru

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of CPP-ACP containing fluoride varnish for remineralizing white spot lesions (WSLs) with four different quantitative methods. Material and Methods Four windows (3x3 mm) were created on the enamel surfaces of bovine incisor teeth. A control window was covered with nail varnish, and WSLs were created on the other windows (after demineralization, first week and fourth week) in acidified gel system. The test material (MI Varnish) was applied on the demineralized areas, and the treated enamel samples were stored in artificial saliva. At the fourth week, the enamel surfaces were tested by surface microhardness (SMH), quantitative light-induced fluorescence-digital (QLF-D), energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and laser fluorescence (LF pen). The data were statistically analyzed (α=0.05). Results While the LF pen measurements showed significant differences at baseline, after demineralization, and after the one-week remineralization period (p<0.05), the difference between the 1- and 4-week was not significant (p>0.05). With regards to the SMH and QLF-D analyses, statistically significant differences were found among all the phases (p<0.05). After the 1- and 4-week treatment periods, the calcium (Ca) and phosphate (P) concentrations and Ca/P ratio were higher compared to those of the demineralization surfaces (p<0.05). Conclusion CPP-ACP containing fluoride varnish provides remineralization of WSLs after a single application and seems suitable for clinical use. PMID:27383699

  5. Rhamnolipid and poly (hydrozyalkanoate) biosynthesis in 3-hydrozyacyl-ACP:COA transacylase (phaG) - knockouts of pseudomonas chloroaphis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The 3-hydroxyacyl-ACP:CoA transacylase gene (phaG(Pc30761)) of P. chlororaphis NRRL B-30761 was cloned and analyzed. The nucleotide and translated amino-acid sequences of phaG(Pc30761) had 99% identities (at 100% query coverage) with the phaG gene of P. fluorescens O6. Two phaG-knockout strains of...

  6. Design and Synthesis of 2-Pyridones as Novel Inhibitors of the Bacillus Anthracis Enoyl–ACP Reductase

    PubMed Central

    Tipparaju, Suresh K.; Joyasawal, Sipak; Forrester, Sara; Mulhearn, Debbie C.; Pegan, Scott; Johnson, Michael E.; Mesecar, Andrew D.; Kozikowski, Alan P.

    2008-01-01

    Enoyl-ACP reductase (ENR), the product of the FabI gene, from Bacillus anthracis (BaENR) is responsible for catalyzing the final step of bacterial fatty acid biosynthesis. A number of novel 2-pyridone derivatives were synthesized and shown to be potent inhibitors of BaENR. PMID:18499454

  7. Crystal Structure and Substrate Specificity of Human Thioesterase 2: INSIGHTS INTO THE MOLECULAR BASIS FOR THE MODULATION OF FATTY ACID SYNTHASE.

    PubMed

    Ritchie, Melissa K; Johnson, Lynnette C; Clodfelter, Jill E; Pemble, Charles W; Fulp, Brian E; Furdui, Cristina M; Kridel, Steven J; Lowther, W Todd

    2016-02-12

    The type I fatty acid synthase (FASN) is responsible for the de novo synthesis of palmitate. Chain length selection and release is performed by the C-terminal thioesterase domain (TE1). FASN expression is up-regulated in cancer, and its activity levels are controlled by gene dosage and transcriptional and post-translational mechanisms. In addition, the chain length of fatty acids produced by FASN is controlled by a type II thioesterase called TE2 (E.C. 3.1.2.14). TE2 has been implicated in breast cancer and generates a broad lipid distribution within milk. The molecular basis for the ability of the TE2 to compete with TE1 for the acyl chain attached to the acyl carrier protein (ACP) domain of FASN is unknown. Herein, we show that human TE1 efficiently hydrolyzes acyl-CoA substrate mimetics. In contrast, TE2 prefers an engineered human acyl-ACP substrate and readily releases short chain fatty acids from full-length FASN during turnover. The 2.8 Å crystal structure of TE2 reveals a novel capping domain insert within the α/β hydrolase core. This domain is reminiscent of capping domains of type II thioesterases involved in polyketide synthesis. The structure also reveals that the capping domain had collapsed onto the active site containing the Ser-101-His-237-Asp-212 catalytic triad. This observation suggests that the capping domain opens to enable the ACP domain to dock and to place the acyl chain and 4'-phosphopantetheinyl-linker arm correctly for catalysis. Thus, the ability of TE2 to prematurely release fatty acids from FASN parallels the role of editing thioesterases involved in polyketide and non-ribosomal peptide synthase synthases. PMID:26663084

  8. Thymidylate synthase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Danenberg, P V; Malli, H; Swenson, S

    1999-12-01

    Thymidylate synthase (TS) is a critical enzyme for DNA replication and cell growth because it is the only de novo source of thymine nucleotide precursors for DNA synthesis. TS is the primary target of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), which has been used for cancer treatment for more than 40 years. However, dissatisfaction with the overall activity of 5-FU against the major cancers, and the recognition that TS still remains an attractive target for anticancer drugs because of its central position in the pathway of DNA synthesis, led to a search for new inhibitors of TS structurally analogous to 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate, the second substrate of TS. TS inhibitory antifolates developed to date that are in various stages of clinical evaluation are ZD 1694 and ZD9331 (Astra-Zeneca, London, UK), (Eli Lilly, Indianapolis, IN), LY231514 (BW1843U89 (Glaxo-Wellcome, Research Triangle Park, NC), and AG337 and AG331 (Agouron, La Jolla, CA). Although each of these compounds has TS as its major intracellular site of action, they differ in propensity for polyglutamylation and for transport by the reduced folate carrier. LY231514 also has secondary target enzymes. As a result, each compound is likely to have a different spectrum of antitumor activity and toxicity. This review will summarize the development and properties of this new class of TS inhibitors. PMID:10606255

  9. Microleakage of Three Types of Glass Ionomer Cement Restorations: Effect of CPP-ACP Paste Tooth Pretreatment

    PubMed Central

    Doozandeh, Maryam; Shafiei, Fereshteh; Alavi, Mostafa

    2015-01-01

    Statement of the Problem Casein phosphopeptide–amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP) increases the mineral content of tooth structure. This may enhance the chemical bonding of glass ionomer cements (GIC) and marginal sealing of their restorations. Purpose The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of CPP-ACP paste pretreatment on the microleakage of three types of GIC. Materials and Method In this study, 72 Class V cavities were prepared on the buccal and lingual surfaces of molars with occlusal margins in enamel and gingival margins in root. The cavities were divided into 6 groups. Cavities in group 1 and 2 were restored with Fuji II, group 3 and 4 with Fuji II LC, and group 5 and 6 with Ketac N100 with respect to the manufacturers’ instructions. In groups 2, 4 and 6, CPP-ACP containing paste (MI paste) was placed into the cavities for 3 minutes before being filled with GIC. The teeth were thermocycled, stained with dye, sectioned, and scored for microleakage under stereomicroscope. Kruskall-Wallis and Chi-Square tests were used to analyze the data. Result There were no statistically significant differences between the control and the CPP-ACP pretreatment groups in enamel and dentin margins. In pairwise comparisons, there were no significant differences between the control and the experimental groups in enamel margin, and in dentin margins of G1 and 2, G5 and 6; however, a significant differences was detected in dentin margins between G3 and 4 (p= 0.041). Conclusion CPP-ACP paste pretreatment did not affect the microleakage of Fuji II and Ketac N100 in enamel or dentin, but decreased the microleakage in dentine margins of Fuji II LC when cavity conditioner was applied before surface treatment. PMID:26331147

  10. The Acid Phosphatase-Encoding Gene GmACP1 Contributes to Soybean Tolerance to Low-Phosphorus Stress

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Derong; Wang, Hui; Kan, Guizhen; Jin, Hangxia; Yu, Deyue

    2014-01-01

    Phosphorus (P) is essential for all living cells and organisms, and low-P stress is a major factor constraining plant growth and yield worldwide. In plants, P efficiency is a complex quantitative trait involving multiple genes, and the mechanisms underlying P efficiency are largely unknown. Combining linkage analysis, genome-wide and candidate-gene association analyses, and plant transformation, we identified a soybean gene related to P efficiency, determined its favorable haplotypes and developed valuable functional markers. First, six major genomic regions associated with P efficiency were detected by performing genome-wide associations (GWAs) in various environments. A highly significant region located on chromosome 8, qPE8, was identified by both GWAs and linkage mapping and explained 41% of the phenotypic variation. Then, a regional mapping study was performed with 40 surrounding markers in 192 diverse soybean accessions. A strongly associated haplotype (P = 10−7) consisting of the markers Sat_233 and BARC-039899-07603 was identified, and qPE8 was located in a region of approximately 250 kb, which contained a candidate gene GmACP1 that encoded an acid phosphatase. GmACP1 overexpression in soybean hairy roots increased P efficiency by 11–20% relative to the control. A candidate-gene association analysis indicated that six natural GmACP1 polymorphisms explained 33% of the phenotypic variation. The favorable alleles and haplotypes of GmACP1 associated with increased transcript expression correlated with higher enzyme activity. The discovery of the optimal haplotype of GmACP1 will now enable the accurate selection of soybeans with higher P efficiencies and improve our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying P efficiency in plants. PMID:24391523

  11. Biomimetic remineralization of demineralized dentine using scaffold of CMC/ACP nanocomplexes in an in vitro tooth model of deep caries.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhen; Cao, Shansong; Wang, Haorong; Li, Yanqiu; Kishen, Anil; Deng, Xuliang; Yang, Xiaoping; Wang, Yinghui; Cong, Changhong; Wang, Huajun; Zhang, Xu

    2015-01-01

    Currently, it is still a tough task for dentists to remineralize dentine in deep caries. The aim of this study was to remineralize demineralized dentine in a tooth model of deep caries using nanocomplexes of carboxymethyl chitosan/amorphous calcium phosphate (CMC/ACP) based on mimicking the stabilizing effect of dentine matrix protein 1 (DMP1) on ACP in the biomineralization of dentine. The experimental results indicate that CMC can stabilize ACP to form nanocomplexes of CMC/ACP, which is able to be processed into scaffolds by lyophilization. In the single-layer collagen model, ACP nanoparticles are released from scaffolds of CMC/ACP nanocomplexes dissolved and then infiltrate into collagen fibrils via the gap zones (40 nm) to accomplish intrafibrillar mineralization of collagen. With this method, the completely demineralized dentine was partially remineralized in the tooth mode. This is a bottom-up remineralizing strategy based on non-classical crystallization theory. Since nanocomplexes of CMC/ACP show a promising effect of remineralization on demineralized dentine via biomimetic strategy, thereby preserving dentinal tissue to the maximum extent possible, it would be a potential indirect pulp capping (IPC) material for the management of deep caries during vital pulp therapy based on the concept of minimally invasive dentistry (MID). PMID:25587986

  12. Biomimetic Remineralization of Demineralized Dentine Using Scaffold of CMC/ACP Nanocomplexes in an In Vitro Tooth Model of Deep Caries

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhen; Cao, Shansong; Wang, Haorong; Li, Yanqiu; Kishen, Anil; Deng, Xuliang; Yang, Xiaoping; Wang, Yinghui; Cong, Changhong; Wang, Huajun; Zhang, Xu

    2015-01-01

    Currently, it is still a tough task for dentists to remineralize dentine in deep caries. The aim of this study was to remineralize demineralized dentine in a tooth model of deep caries using nanocomplexes of carboxymethyl chitosan/amorphous calcium phosphate (CMC/ACP) based on mimicking the stabilizing effect of dentine matrix protein 1 (DMP1) on ACP in the biomineralization of dentine. The experimental results indicate that CMC can stabilize ACP to form nanocomplexes of CMC/ACP, which is able to be processed into scaffolds by lyophilization. In the single-layer collagen model, ACP nanoparticles are released from scaffolds of CMC/ACP nanocomplexes dissolved and then infiltrate into collagen fibrils via the gap zones (40 nm) to accomplish intrafibrillar mineralization of collagen. With this method, the completely demineralized dentine was partially remineralized in the tooth mode. This is a bottom-up remineralizing strategy based on non-classical crystallization theory. Since nanocomplexes of CMC/ACP show a promising effect of remineralization on demineralized dentine via biomimetic strategy, thereby preserving dentinal tissue to the maximum extent possible, it would be a potential indirect pulp capping (IPC) material for the management of deep caries during vital pulp therapy based on the concept of minimally invasive dentistry (MID). PMID:25587986

  13. Overexpression of the olive acyl carrier protein gene (OeACP1) produces alterations in fatty acid composition of tobacco leaves.

    PubMed

    De Marchis, Francesca; Valeri, Maria Cristina; Pompa, Andrea; Bouveret, Emmanuelle; Alagna, Fiammetta; Grisan, Simone; Stanzione, Vitale; Mariotti, Roberto; Cultrera, Nicolò; Baldoni, Luciana; Bellucci, Michele

    2016-02-01

    Taking into account that fatty acid (FA) biosynthesis plays a crucial role in lipid accumulation in olive (Olea europaea L.) mesocarp, we investigated the effect of olive acyl carrier protein (ACP) on FA composition by overexpressing an olive ACP cDNA in tobacco plants. The OeACP1.1A cDNA was inserted in the nucleus or in the chloroplast DNA of different tobacco plants, resulting in extensive transcription of the transgenes. The transplastomic plants accumulated lower olive ACP levels in comparison to nuclear-transformed plants. Moreover, the phenotype of the former plants was characterized by pale green/white cotyledons with abnormal chloroplasts, delayed germination and reduced growth. We suggest that the transplastomic phenotype was likely caused by inefficient olive ACP mRNA translation in chloroplast stroma. Conversely, total lipids from leaves of nuclear transformants expressing high olive ACP levels showed a significant increase in oleic acid (18:1) and linolenic acid (18:3), and a concomitant significant reduction of hexadecadienoic acid (16:2) and hexadecatrienoic acid (16:3). This implies that in leaves of tobacco transformants, as likely in the mesocarp of olive fruit, olive ACP not only plays a general role in FA synthesis, but seems to be specifically involved in chain length regulation forwarding the elongation to C18 FAs and the subsequent desaturation to 18:1 and 18:3. PMID:26560313

  14. Type III Polyketide Synthases: Discovery, Characterization, and Engineering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pitel, Sheryl Beth Rubin

    2009-01-01

    The polyketides are a diverse group of natural products with important applications in medicine and industry. Industry, especially the pharmaceutical industry, is under pressure to deliver "greener" chemical syntheses that are less environmentally damaging and incorporate renewable resources. There exists potential to replace current chemical…

  15. Genetics Home Reference: GM3 synthase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... GM3 synthase deficiency is characterized by recurrent seizures (epilepsy) and problems with brain development. Within the first ... diagnosis or management of GM3 synthase deficiency: American Epilepsy Society: Find a Doctor Clinic for Special Children ( ...

  16. Radiosynthesis and biological evaluation of a novel enoyl-ACP reductase inhibitor for Staphylococcus aureus

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wang, Hui; Lu, Yang; Liu, Li; Kim, Sung Won; Hooker, Jacob M.; Fowler, Joanna S.; Tonge, Peter J.

    2014-09-06

    Here we evaluated the pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD) of PT119, a potent Staphylococcus aureus enoyl-ACP reductase (saFabI) inhibitor with a Ki value of 0.01 nM and a residence time of 750 min on the enzyme target in mice. PT119 was found to have promising antibacterial activity in two different S. aureus infection models: it caused a 3 log reduction in the CFU’s in a mouse thigh muscle infection model and increased the survival rate from 0% to 50% in a mouse systemic infection model. PT119 was then radiolabeled with carbon-11 to evaluate its biodistribution and PK in both healthymore » and S. aureus infected mice using positron emission tomography (PET). The biodistribution of [11C]PT119 and/or its labeled metabolites did not differ significantly between the healthy group and the infected group, and PT119 was found to distribute equally between serum and tissue during the ~1 h of analysis permitted by the carbon-11 half life. This approach provides important data for PK/PD modeling and is the first step in identifying radiotracers that can non-invasively image bacterial infection in vivo.« less

  17. Radiosynthesis and biological evaluation of a novel enoyl-ACP reductase inhibitor for Staphylococcus aureus

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hui; Lu, Yang; Liu, Li; Kim, Sung Won; Hooker, Jacob M.; Fowler, Joanna S.; Tonge, Peter J.

    2014-09-06

    Here we evaluated the pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD) of PT119, a potent Staphylococcus aureus enoyl-ACP reductase (saFabI) inhibitor with a Ki value of 0.01 nM and a residence time of 750 min on the enzyme target in mice. PT119 was found to have promising antibacterial activity in two different S. aureus infection models: it caused a 3 log reduction in the CFU’s in a mouse thigh muscle infection model and increased the survival rate from 0% to 50% in a mouse systemic infection model. PT119 was then radiolabeled with carbon-11 to evaluate its biodistribution and PK in both healthy and S. aureus infected mice using positron emission tomography (PET). The biodistribution of [11C]PT119 and/or its labeled metabolites did not differ significantly between the healthy group and the infected group, and PT119 was found to distribute equally between serum and tissue during the ~1 h of analysis permitted by the carbon-11 half life. This approach provides important data for PK/PD modeling and is the first step in identifying radiotracers that can non-invasively image bacterial infection in vivo.

  18. A MUTATION IN A 3-KETO-ACYL-ACP SYNTHASE II GENE IS ASSOCIATED WITH ELEVATED PALMITIC ACID LEVELS IN SOYBEAN SEEDS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Palmitic acid is the major saturated fatty acid component of soybean [Glycine max, (L.) Merr.] oil, typically accounting for ~11 % of total seed oil content. Several genetic loci have been shown to control the seed palmitate content of soybean. One such locus, fap2, mediates an elevated seed palmit...

  19. Mycocerosic acid synthase exemplifies the architecture of reducing polyketide synthases.

    PubMed

    Herbst, Dominik A; Jakob, Roman P; Zähringer, Franziska; Maier, Timm

    2016-03-24

    Polyketide synthases (PKSs) are biosynthetic factories that produce natural products with important biological and pharmacological activities. Their exceptional product diversity is encoded in a modular architecture. Modular PKSs (modPKSs) catalyse reactions colinear to the order of modules in an assembly line, whereas iterative PKSs (iPKSs) use a single module iteratively as exemplified by fungal iPKSs (fiPKSs). However, in some cases non-colinear iterative action is also observed for modPKSs modules and is controlled by the assembly line environment. PKSs feature a structural and functional separation into a condensing and a modifying region as observed for fatty acid synthases. Despite the outstanding relevance of PKSs, the detailed organization of PKSs with complete fully reducing modifying regions remains elusive. Here we report a hybrid crystal structure of Mycobacterium smegmatis mycocerosic acid synthase based on structures of its condensing and modifying regions. Mycocerosic acid synthase is a fully reducing iPKS, closely related to modPKSs, and the prototype of mycobacterial mycocerosic acid synthase-like PKSs. It is involved in the biosynthesis of C20-C28 branched-chain fatty acids, which are important virulence factors of mycobacteria. Our structural data reveal a dimeric linker-based organization of the modifying region and visualize dynamics and conformational coupling in PKSs. On the basis of comparative small-angle X-ray scattering, the observed modifying region architecture may be common also in modPKSs. The linker-based organization provides a rationale for the characteristic variability of PKS modules as a main contributor to product diversity. The comprehensive architectural model enables functional dissection and re-engineering of PKSs. PMID:26976449

  20. ACRIM III

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-12-30

    ACRIM III Data and Information Active Cavity Radiometer Irradiance ... the ACRIMSAT spacecraft on December 20, 1999. ACRIM III data are reprocessed every 90 days to utilize instrument recalibration.   ... ACRIM III Instrument Team Page ACRIM II Data Sets SCAR-B Block:  SCAR-B Products ...

  1. Results of Second Outdoor Comparison Between Absolute Cavity Pyrgeometer (ACP) and Infrared Integrating Sphere (IRIS) Radiometer at PMOD (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Reda, I.; Grobner, J.; Wacker, S.

    2014-01-01

    The Absolute Cavity Pyrgeometer (ACP) and InfraRed Integrating Sphere radiometer (IRIS) are developed to establish a world reference for calibrating pyrgeometers with traceability to SI units. The two radiometers are un-windowed with negligible spectral dependence, and traceable to SI units through the temperature scale (ITS-90). The second outdoor comparison between the two designs was held from September 30 to October 11, 2013 at the Physikalisch-Metorologisches Observatorium Davos (PMOD). The difference between the irradiance measured by ACP and that of the IRIS was within 1 W/m2 (3 IRISs: PMOD + Australia + Germany). From the first and second comparisons, a difference of 4-6 W/m2 was observed between the irradiance measured by ACP&IRIS and that of the interim World Infrared Standard Group (WISG). This presentation includes results from the first and second comparison in an effort to establish the world reference for pyrgeometer calibrations, a key deliverable for the World Meteorological Organization (WMO), and the DOE-ASR.

  2. Sucrose Synthase: Expanding Protein Function

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sucrose synthase (SUS: EC 2.4.1.13), a key enzyme in plant sucrose catabolism, is uniquely able to mobilize sucrose into multiple pathways involved in metabolic, structural, and storage functions. Our research indicates that the biological function of SUS may extend beyond its catalytic activity. Th...

  3. Acyl-ACP thioesterases from castor (Ricinus communis L.): an enzymatic system appropriate for high rates of oil synthesis and accumulation.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-García, Alicia; Moreno-Pérez, Antonio J; Muro-Pastor, Alicia M; Salas, Joaquín J; Garcés, Rafael; Martínez-Force, Enrique

    2010-06-01

    Acyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) thioesterases are enzymes that terminate the intraplastidial fatty acid synthesis in plants by hydrolyzing the acyl-ACP intermediates and releasing free fatty acids to be incorporated into glycerolipids. These enzymes are classified in two families, FatA and FatB, which differ in amino acid sequence and substrate specificity. In the present work, both FatA and FatB thioesterases were cloned, sequenced and characterized from castor (Ricinus communis) seeds, a crop of high interest in oleochemistry. Single copies of FatA and FatB were found in castor resulting to be closely related with those of Jatropha curcas. The corresponding mature proteins were heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli for biochemical characterization after purification, resulting in high catalytic efficiency of RcFatA on oleoyl-ACP and palmitoleoyl-ACP and high efficiencies of RcFatB for oleoyl-ACP and palmitoyl-ACP. The expression profile of these genes displayed the highest levels in expanding tissues that typically are very active in lipid biosynthesis such as developing seed endosperm and young expanding leaves. The contribution of these two enzymes to the synthesis of castor oil is discussed. PMID:20382402

  4. Isoprene synthase genes form a monophyletic clade of acyclic terpene synthases in the TPS-B terpene synthase family.

    PubMed

    Sharkey, Thomas D; Gray, Dennis W; Pell, Heather K; Breneman, Steven R; Topper, Lauren

    2013-04-01

    Many plants emit significant amounts of isoprene, which is hypothesized to help leaves tolerate short episodes of high temperature. Isoprene emission is found in all major groups of land plants including mosses, ferns, gymnosperms, and angiosperms; however, within these groups isoprene emission is variable. The patchy distribution of isoprene emission implies an evolutionary pattern characterized by many origins or many losses. To better understand the evolution of isoprene emission, we examine the phylogenetic relationships among isoprene synthase and monoterpene synthase genes in the angiosperms. In this study we identify nine new isoprene synthases within the rosid angiosperms. We also document the capacity of a myrcene synthase in Humulus lupulus to produce isoprene. Isoprene synthases and (E)-β-ocimene synthases form a monophyletic group within the Tps-b clade of terpene synthases. No asterid genes fall within this clade. The chemistry of isoprene synthase and ocimene synthase is similar and likely affects the apparent relationships among Tps-b enzymes. The chronology of rosid evolution suggests a Cretaceous origin followed by many losses of isoprene synthase over the course of evolutionary history. The phylogenetic pattern of Tps-b genes indicates that isoprene emission from non-rosid angiosperms likely arose independently. PMID:23550753

  5. Classification of fungal chitin synthases.

    PubMed Central

    Bowen, A R; Chen-Wu, J L; Momany, M; Young, R; Szaniszlo, P J; Robbins, P W

    1992-01-01

    Comparison of the chitin synthase genes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae CHS1 and CHS2 with the Candida albicans CHS1 gene (UDP-N-acetyl-D-glucosamine:chitin 4-beta-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase, EC 2.4.1.16) revealed two small regions of complete amino acid sequence conservation that were used to design PCR primers. Fragments homologous to chitin synthase (approximately 600 base pairs) were amplified from the genomic DNA of 14 fungal species. These fragments were sequenced, and their deduced amino acid sequences were aligned. With the exception of S. cerevisiae CHS1, the sequences fell into three distinct classes, which could represent separate functional groups. Within each class phylogenetic analysis was performed. Although not the major purpose of the investigation, this analysis tends to confirm some relationships consistent with current taxonomic groupings. Images PMID:1731323

  6. Investigation of potential glycogen synthase kinase 3 inhibitors using pharmacophore mapping and virtual screening.

    PubMed

    Dessalew, Nigus; Bharatam, Prasad V

    2006-09-01

    Glycogen synthase kinase-3 is a serine/threonine kinase that has attracted significant drug discovery attention in recent years. To investigate the identification of new potential glycogen synthase kinase-3 inhibitors, a pharmacophore mapping study was carried out using a set of 21 structurally diverse glycogen synthase kinase-3 inhibitors. A hypothesis containing four features: two hydrophobic, one hydrogen bond donor and another hydrogen bond acceptor was found to be the best from the 10 common feature hypotheses produced by HipHop module of Catalyst. The best hypothesis has a high cost of 156.592 and higher best fit values were obtained for the 21 inhibitors using this best hypothesis than the other HipHop hypotheses. The best hypothesis was then used to screen electronically the NCI2000 database. The hits obtained were docked into glycogen synthase kinase-3beta active site. A total of five novel potential leads were proposed after: (i) visual examination of how well they dock into the glycogen synthase kinase-3beta-binding site, (ii) comparative analysis of their FlexX, G-Score, PMF-Score, ChemScore and D-Scores values, (iii) comparison of their best fit value with the known inhibitors and (iv) examination of the how the hits retain interactions with the important amino acid residues of glycogen synthase kinase-3beta-binding site. PMID:17062013

  7. [Preparation and crystallization of Polygonum cuspidatum benzalacetone synthase].

    PubMed

    Ma, Wenrui; Liu, Chunmei; Yang, Mingfeng; Xue, Feiyan; Chen, Qing; Ma, Lanqing; Lü, Heshu

    2016-02-01

    The chalcone synthase (CHS) superfamily of the type III polyketide synthases (PKSs) generates backbones of a variety of plant secondary metabolites. Benzalacetone synthase (BAS) catalyzes a condensation reaction of decarboxylation between the substrates of 4-coumaric coenzyme A and malonyl coenzyme A to generate benzylidene acetone, whose derivatives are series of compounds with various biological activities. A BAS gene Pcpks2 and a bifunctional CHS/BAS PcPKSI were isolated from medicinal plant P. cuspidatum. Crystallographic and structure-based mutagenesis studies indicate that the functional diversity of the CHS-superfamily enzymes is principally derived from small modifications of the active site architecture. In order to obtain an understanding of the biosynthesis of polyketides in P. cuspidatum, which has been poorly described, as well as of its activation mechanism, PcPKS2 was overexpressed in Escherichia coli as a C-terminally poly-His-tagged fusion protein, purified to homogeneity and crystallized, which is helpful for the clarification of the catalytic mechanism of the enzyme and lays the foundation for its genetic engineering manipulation. PMID:27382775

  8. Starter unit flexibility for engineered product synthesis by the nonreducing polyketide synthase PksA.

    PubMed

    Huitt-Roehl, Callie R; Hill, Eric A; Adams, Martina M; Vagstad, Anna L; Li, Jesse W; Townsend, Craig A

    2015-06-19

    Nonreducing polyketide synthases (NR-PKSs) are unique among PKSs in their domain structure, notably including a starter unit:acyl-carrier protein (ACP) transacylase (SAT) domain that selects an acyl group as the primer for biosynthesis, most commonly acetyl-CoA from central metabolism. This clan of mega-enzymes resembles fatty acid synthases (FASs) by sharing both their central chain elongation steps and their capacity for iterative catalysis. In this mode of synthesis, catalytic domains involved in chain extension exhibit substrate plasticity to accommodate growing chains as small as two carbons to 20 or more. PksA is the NR-PKS central to the biosynthesis of the mycotoxin aflatoxin B1 whose SAT domain accepts an unusual hexanoyl starter from a dedicated yeast-like FAS. Explored in this paper is the ability of PksA to utilize a selection of potential starter units as substrates to initiate and sustain extension and cyclization to on-target, programmed polyketide synthesis. Most of these starter units were successfully accepted and properly processed by PksA to achieve biosynthesis of the predicted naphthopyrone product. Analysis of the on-target and derailment products revealed trends of tolerance by individual PksA domains to alternative starter units. In addition, natural and un-natural variants of the active site cysteine were examined and found to be capable of biosynthesis, suggesting possible direct loading of starter units onto the β-ketoacyl synthase (KS) domain. In light of the data assembled here, the predictable synthesis of unnatural products by NR-PKSs is more fully defined. PMID:25714897

  9. SAGE III

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-06-15

    SAGE III Data and Information The Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas ... on the spacecraft. SAGE III produced L1 and L2 scientific data from 5/07/2002 until 12/31/2005. The flight of the second instrument is as ... Guide Documents:  Project Guide Data Products User's Guide  (PDF) Relevant Documents:  ...

  10. Studies on the chalcone synthase gene of two higher plants: petroselinum hortense and matthiola incana

    SciTech Connect

    Hemleben, V.; Frey, M.; Rall, S.; Koch, M.; Kittel, M.; Kreuzaler, F.; Ragg, H.; Fautz, E.; Hahlbrock, K.

    1982-01-01

    Two higher plant systems are presented which allow to study coordinated gene expression of the light-induced metabolic pathway of flavonoid biosynthesis: tissue culture cells of Petroselinum hortense (Apiaceae) and different developmental stages of various genotypes of Matthiola incana (Brassicaceae). The gene structure of the chalcone synthase is mainly studied. A cDNA clone (pLF56) of parsley has been constructed and characterized conferring the chalcone synthase gene sequence. Strong cross hybridization between the parsley cDNA and Matthiola DNA allowed to identify a HindIII fragment (6000 bp) identical in size for parsley and different Matthiola wild type lines and a mutant line.

  11. Can laboratory tholins mimic the chemistry producing Titan's aerosols? A review in light of ACP experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coll, P.; Navarro-González, R.; Szopa, C.; Poch, O.; Ramírez, S. I.; Coscia, D.; Raulin, F.; Cabane, M.; Buch, A.; Israël, G.

    2013-03-01

    The first results obtained by the ACP experiment onboard Huygens probe revealed that the main products obtained after thermolysis of Titan's collected aerosols, were ammonia (NH3) and hydrogen cyanide (HCN). Titan's aerosols, and their laboratory analogues named tholins, have been the subject of experimental or theoretical studies during the last four decades. These studies have been mainly devoted to understanding their origin and formation mechanisms, their physical, chemical and optical properties, and their role in the radiative equilibrium of the satellite. Before the arrival of the Cassini-Huygens mission, the dense layer of aerosols hid many aspects of the satellite's surface and precious information about its composition. If Titan's aerosols have been in the eye and mind of planetary scientists during such a long time, it is not surprising that a literature survey displays a good quantity of papers on aerosol analogues. With aerosol analogues we mean any material produced in a terrestrial laboratory under conditions that try to represent those of Titan's atmosphere. We present here a study aimed to understand the particularities of aerosol analogues synthesized in different laboratories around the world in order to determine some of their most representative chemical fingerprints and in some cases, to perform a direct comparison of the volatiles produced after a thermal treatment done in conditions similar to the ones used by the ACP experiment. From the information collected, we propose a broad classification of aerosol analogues highlighting the materials that can be more representative of Titan's aerosols in terms of their content of organic volatiles. We identify the laboratory analogs that best suit the ACP results; such identification is of prime importance to correctly predict the optical properties of Titan's aerosol and to accurately estimate their contribution in radiative equilibrium models and/or to assess their role in chemical reactions of

  12. A functional cellulose synthase from ascidian epidermis

    PubMed Central

    Matthysse, Ann G.; Deschet, Karine; Williams, Melanie; Marry, Mazz; White, Alan R.; Smith, William C.

    2004-01-01

    Among animals, urochordates (e.g., ascidians) are unique in their ability to biosynthesize cellulose. In ascidians cellulose is synthesized in the epidermis and incorporated into a protective coat know as the tunic. A putative cellulose synthase-like gene was first identified in the genome sequences of the ascidian Ciona intestinalis. We describe here a cellulose synthase gene from the ascidian Ciona savignyi that is expressed in the epidermis. The predicted C. savignyi cellulose synthase amino acid sequence showed conserved features found in all cellulose synthases, including plants, but was most similar to cellulose synthases from bacteria, fungi, and Dictyostelium discoidium. However, unlike other known cellulose synthases, the predicted C. savignyi polypeptide has a degenerate cellulase-like region near the carboxyl-terminal end. An expression construct carrying the C. savignyi cDNA was found to restore cellulose biosynthesis to a cellulose synthase (CelA) minus mutant of Agrobacterium tumefaciens, showing that the predicted protein has cellulose synthase activity. The lack of cellulose biosynthesis in all other groups of metazoans and the similarity of the C. savignyi cellulose synthase to enzymes from cellulose-producing organisms support the hypothesis that the urochordates acquired the cellulose biosynthetic pathway by horizontal transfer. PMID:14722352

  13. Efficient heterocyclisation by (di)terpene synthases.

    PubMed

    Mafu, S; Potter, K C; Hillwig, M L; Schulte, S; Criswell, J; Peters, R J

    2015-09-11

    While cyclic ether forming terpene synthases are known, the basis for such heterocyclisation is unclear. Here it is reported that numerous (di)terpene synthases, particularly including the ancestral ent-kaurene synthase, efficiently produce isomers of manoyl oxide from the stereochemically appropriate substrate. Accordingly, such heterocyclisation is easily accomplished by terpene synthases. Indeed, the use of single residue changes to induce production of the appropriate substrate in the upstream active site leads to efficient bifunctional enzymes producing isomers of manoyl oxide, representing novel enzymatic activity. PMID:26214384

  14. Expression of Vibrio harveyi Acyl-ACP Synthetase Allows Efficient Entry of Exogenous Fatty Acids into the Escherichia coli Fatty Acid and Lipid A Synthetic Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yanfang; Morgan-Kiss, Rachael M.; Campbell, John W.; Chan, Chi Ho; Cronan, John E.

    2010-01-01

    Although the Escherichia coli fatty acid synthesis (FAS) pathway is the best studied type II fatty acid synthesis system, a major experimental limitation has been the inability to feed intermediates into the pathway in vivo because exogenously-supplied free fatty acids are not efficiently converted to the acyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) thioesters required by the pathway. We report that expression of Vibrio harveyi acyl-ACP synthetase (AasS), a soluble cytosolic enzyme that ligates free fatty acids to ACP to form acyl-ACPs, allows exogenous fatty acids to enter the E. coli fatty acid synthesis pathway. The free fatty acids are incorporated intact and can be elongated or directly incorporated into complex lipids by acyltransferases specific for acyl-ACPs. Moreover, expression of AasS strains and supplementation with the appropriate fatty acid restored growth to E. coli mutant strains that lack essential fatty acid synthesis enzymes. Thus, this strategy provides a new tool for circumventing the loss of enzymes essential for FAS function. PMID:20028080

  15. Bifunctional cis-Abienol Synthase from Abies balsamea Discovered by Transcriptome Sequencing and Its Implications for Diterpenoid Fragrance Production*

    PubMed Central

    Zerbe, Philipp; Chiang, Angela; Yuen, Macaire; Hamberger, Björn; Hamberger, Britta; Draper, Jason A.; Britton, Robert; Bohlmann, Jörg

    2012-01-01

    The labdanoid diterpene alcohol cis-abienol is a major component of the aromatic oleoresin of balsam fir (Abies balsamea) and serves as a valuable bioproduct material for the fragrance industry. Using high-throughput 454 transcriptome sequencing and metabolite profiling of balsam fir bark tissue, we identified candidate diterpene synthase sequences for full-length cDNA cloning and functional characterization. We discovered a bifunctional class I/II cis-abienol synthase (AbCAS), along with the paralogous levopimaradiene/abietadiene synthase and isopimaradiene synthase, all of which are members of the gymnosperm-specific TPS-d subfamily. The AbCAS-catalyzed formation of cis-abienol proceeds via cyclization and hydroxylation at carbon C-8 of a postulated carbocation intermediate in the class II active site, followed by cleavage of the diphosphate group and termination of the reaction sequence without further cyclization in the class I active site. This reaction mechanism is distinct from that of synthases of the isopimaradiene- or levopimaradiene/abietadiene synthase type, which employ deprotonation reactions in the class II active site and secondary cyclizations in the class I active site, leading to tricyclic diterpenes. Comparative homology modeling suggested the active site residues Asp-348, Leu-617, Phe-696, and Gly-723 as potentially important for the specificity of AbCAS. As a class I/II bifunctional enzyme, AbCAS is a promising target for metabolic engineering of cis-abienol production. PMID:22337889

  16. Producing biofuels using polyketide synthases

    DOEpatents

    Katz, Leonard; Fortman, Jeffrey L; Keasling, Jay D

    2013-04-16

    The present invention provides for a non-naturally occurring polyketide synthase (PKS) capable of synthesizing a carboxylic acid or a lactone, and a composition such that a carboxylic acid or lactone is included. The carboxylic acid or lactone, or derivative thereof, is useful as a biofuel. The present invention also provides for a recombinant nucleic acid or vector that encodes such a PKS, and host cells which also have such a recombinant nucleic acid or vector. The present invention also provides for a method of producing such carboxylic acids or lactones using such a PKS.

  17. Polyester synthases: natural catalysts for plastics.

    PubMed Central

    Rehm, Bernd H A

    2003-01-01

    Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) are biopolyesters composed of hydroxy fatty acids, which represent a complex class of storage polyesters. They are synthesized by a wide range of different Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, as well as by some Archaea, and are deposited as insoluble cytoplasmic inclusions. Polyester synthases are the key enzymes of polyester biosynthesis and catalyse the conversion of (R)-hydroxyacyl-CoA thioesters to polyesters with the concomitant release of CoA. These soluble enzymes turn into amphipathic enzymes upon covalent catalysis of polyester-chain formation. A self-assembly process is initiated resulting in the formation of insoluble cytoplasmic inclusions with a phospholipid monolayer and covalently attached polyester synthases at the surface. Surface-attached polyester synthases show a marked increase in enzyme activity. These polyester synthases have only recently been biochemically characterized. An overview of these recent findings is provided. At present, 59 polyester synthase structural genes from 45 different bacteria have been cloned and the nucleotide sequences have been obtained. The multiple alignment of the primary structures of these polyester synthases show an overall identity of 8-96% with only eight strictly conserved amino acid residues. Polyester synthases can been assigned to four classes based on their substrate specificity and subunit composition. The current knowledge on the organization of the polyester synthase genes, and other genes encoding proteins related to PHA metabolism, is compiled. In addition, the primary structures of the 59 PHA synthases are aligned and analysed with respect to highly conserved amino acids, and biochemical features of polyester synthases are described. The proposed catalytic mechanism based on similarities to alpha/beta-hydrolases and mutational analysis is discussed. Different threading algorithms suggest that polyester synthases belong to the alpha/beta-hydrolase superfamily, with

  18. Discovery of an Allosteric Inhibitor Binding Site in 3-Oxo-acyl-ACP Reductase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    3-Oxo-acyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) reductase (FabG) plays a key role in the bacterial fatty acid synthesis II system in pathogenic microorganisms, which has been recognized as a potential drug target. FabG catalyzes reduction of a 3-oxo-acyl-ACP intermediate during the elongation cycle of fatty acid biosynthesis. Here, we report gene deletion experiments that support the essentiality of this gene in P. aeruginosa and the identification of a number of small molecule FabG inhibitors with IC50 values in the nanomolar to low micromolar range and good physicochemical properties. Structural characterization of 16 FabG-inhibitor complexes by X-ray crystallography revealed that the compounds bind at a novel allosteric site located at the FabG subunit–subunit interface. Inhibitor binding relies primarily on hydrophobic interactions, but specific hydrogen bonds are also observed. Importantly, the binding cavity is formed upon complex formation and therefore would not be recognized by virtual screening approaches. The structure analysis further reveals that the inhibitors act by inducing conformational changes that propagate to the active site, resulting in a displacement of the catalytic triad and the inability to bind NADPH. PMID:24015914

  19. In silico analysis and modeling of ACP-MIP–PilQ chimeric antigen from Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B

    PubMed Central

    Gholami, Mehrdad; Salimi Chirani, Alireza; Moshiri, Mona; Sedighi, Mansour; Pournajaf, Abazar; Tohidfar, Masoud; Irajian, Gholamreza

    2015-01-01

    Background: Neisseria meningitidis, a life-threatening human pathogen with the potential to cause large epidemics, can be isolated from the nasopharynx of 5–15% of adults. The aim of the current study was to evaluate biophysical and biochemical properties and immunological aspects of chimeric acyl-carrier protein-macrophage infectivity potentiator protein-type IV pilus biogenesis protein antigen (ACP-MIP-PilQ) from N. meningitidis serogroup B strain. Methods: Biochemical properties and multiple alignments were predicted by appropriate web servers. Secondary molecular structures were predicted based on Chou and Fasman, Garnier-Osguthorpe-Robson, and Neural Network methods. Tertiary modeling elucidated conformational properties of the chimeric protein. Proteasome cleavage and transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP) binding sites, and T- and B-cell antigenic epitopes, were predicted using bioinformatic web servers. Results: Based on our in silico and immunoinformatics analyses, the ACP-MIP-PilQ protein (AMP) can induce high-level cross-strain bactericidal activity. In addition, several immune proteasomal cleavage sites were detected. The 22 epitopes associated with MHC class I and class II (DR) alleles were confirmed in the AMP. Thirty linear B-cell epitopes as antigenic regions were predicted from the full-length protein. Conclusion: All predicted properties of the AMP indicate it could be a good candidate for further immunological in vitro and in vivo studies. PMID:26989750

  20. Identification of differentially expressed genes using an annealing control primer system in stage III serous ovarian carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Most patients with ovarian cancer are diagnosed with advanced stage disease (i.e., stage III-IV), which is associated with a poor prognosis. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in stage III serous ovarian carcinoma compared to normal tissue were screened by a new differential display method, the annealing control primer (ACP) system. The potential targets for markers that could be used for diagnosis and prognosis, for stage III serous ovarian cancer, were found by cluster and survival analysis. Methods The ACP-based reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT PCR) technique was used to identify DEGs in patients with stage III serous ovarian carcinoma. The DEGs identified by the ACP system were confirmed by quantitative real-time PCR. Cluster analysis was performed on the basis of the expression profile produced by quantitative real-time PCR and survival analysis was carried out by the Kaplan-Meier method and Cox proportional hazards multivariate model; the results of gene expression were compared between chemo-resistant and chemo-sensitive groups. Results A total of 114 DEGs were identified by the ACP-based RT PCR technique among patients with stage III serous ovarian carcinoma. The DEGs associated with an apoptosis inhibitory process tended to be up-regulated clones while the DEGs associated with immune response tended to be down-regulated clones. Cluster analysis of the gene expression profile obtained by quantitative real-time PCR revealed two contrasting groups of DEGs. That is, a group of genes including: SSBP1, IFI6 DDT, IFI27, C11orf92, NFKBIA, TNXB, NEAT1 and TFG were up-regulated while another group of genes consisting of: LAMB2, XRCC6, MEF2C, RBM5, FOXP1, NUDCP2, LGALS3, TMEM185A, and C1S were down-regulated in most patients. Survival analysis revealed that the up-regulated genes such as DDAH2, RNase K and TCEAL2 might be associated with a poor prognosis. Furthermore, the prognosis of patients with chemo-resistance was predicted to be

  1. Molecular evolution and sequence divergence of plant chalcone synthase and chalcone synthase-Like genes.

    PubMed

    Han, Yingying; Zhao, Wenwen; Wang, Zhicui; Zhu, Jingying; Liu, Qisong

    2014-06-01

    Plant chalcone synthase (CHS) and CHS-Like (CHSL) proteins are polyketide synthases. In this study, we evaluated the molecular evolution of this gene family using representative types of CHSL genes, including stilbene synthase (STS), 2-pyrone synthase (2-PS), bibenzyl synthase (BBS), acridone synthase (ACS), biphenyl synthase (BIS), benzalacetone synthase, coumaroyl triacetic acid synthase (CTAS), and benzophenone synthase (BPS), along with their CHS homologs from the same species of both angiosperms and gymnosperms. A cDNA-based phylogeny indicated that CHSLs had diverse evolutionary patterns. STS, ACS, and 2-PS clustered with CHSs from the same species (late diverged pattern), while CTAS, BBS, BPS, and BIS were distant from their CHS homologs (early diverged pattern). The amino-acid phylogeny suggested that CHS and CHSL proteins formed clades according to enzyme function. The CHSs and CHSLs from Polygonaceae and Arachis had unique evolutionary histories. Synonymous mutation rates were lower in late diverged CHSLs than in early diverged ones, indicating that gene duplications occurred more recently in late diverged CHSLs than in early diverged ones. Relative rate tests proved that late diverged CHSLs had unequal rates to CHSs from the same species when using fatty acid synthase, which evolved from the common ancestor with the CHS superfamily, as the outgroup, while the early diverged lineages had equal rates. This indicated that late diverged CHSLs experienced more frequent mutation than early diverged CHSLs after gene duplication, allowing obtaining new functions in relatively short period of time. PMID:24849013

  2. Altered Composition of Ralstonia eutropha Poly(hydroxyalkanoate) through Expression of PHA Synthase from Allochromatium vinosum ATCC 35206

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The class III poly(hydroxyalkanoate) synthase (PHAS) genes (phaC and phaE) of a photosynthetic bacterium, Allochromatium vinosum ATCC 35206, were cloned, sequenced and expressed in a heterologous host. We employed a PCR technique coupled with a chromosomal gene-walking method to clone and subsequen...

  3. Crystal structure of riboflavin synthase

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, D.-I.; Wawrzak, Z.; Calabrese, J.C.; Viitanen, P.V.; Jordan, D.B.

    2010-03-05

    Riboflavin synthase catalyzes the dismutation of two molecules of 6,7-dimethyl-8-(1'-D-ribityl)-lumazine to yield riboflavin and 4-ribitylamino-5-amino-2,6-dihydroxypyrimidine. The homotrimer of 23 kDa subunits has no cofactor requirements for catalysis. The enzyme is nonexistent in humans and is an attractive target for antimicrobial agents of organisms whose pathogenicity depends on their ability to biosynthesize riboflavin. The first three-dimensional structure of the enzyme was determined at 2.0 {angstrom} resolution using the multiwavelength anomalous diffraction (MAD) method on the Escherichia coli protein containing selenomethionine residues. The homotrimer consists of an asymmetric assembly of monomers, each of which comprises two similar {beta} barrels and a C-terminal {alpha} helix. The similar {beta} barrels within the monomer confirm a prediction of pseudo two-fold symmetry that is inferred from the sequence similarity between the two halves of the protein. The {beta} barrels closely resemble folds found in phthalate dioxygenase reductase and other flavoproteins. The three active sites of the trimer are proposed to lie between pairs of monomers in which residues conserved among species reside, including two Asp-His-Ser triads and dyads of Cys-Ser and His-Thr. The proposed active sites are located where FMN (an analog of riboflavin) is modeled from an overlay of the {beta} barrels of phthalate dioxygenase reductase and riboflavin synthase. In the trimer, one active site is formed, and the other two active sites are wide open and exposed to solvent. The nature of the trimer configuration suggests that only one active site can be formed and be catalytically competent at a time.

  4. Welding III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allegheny County Community Coll., Pittsburgh, PA.

    Instructional objectives and performance requirements are outlined in this course guide for Welding III, an advanced course in arc welding offered at the Community College of Allegheny County to provide students with the proficiency necessary for industrial certification. The course objectives, which are outlined first, specify that students will…

  5. LANDVIEW III

    EPA Science Inventory

    LandView III is a desktop mapping system that includes database extracts from the Environmental Protection Agency, the Bureau of the Census, The U.S. Geological Survey, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the Department of Transportation, and the Federal Emergency Management Agenc...

  6. Cloning of Acyl-ACP Thioesterase FatA from Arachis hypogaea L. and Its Expression in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Gao; Peng, Zhen-ying; Shan, Lei; Xuan, Ning; Tang, Gui-ying; Zhang, Yan; Li, Lan; He, Qing-fang; Bi, Yu-ping

    2012-01-01

    In this study, a full-length cDNA of the acyl-ACP thioesterase, AhFatA, was cloned from developing seeds of Arachis hypogaea L. by 3′-RACE. Sequence analysis showed that the open reading frame encodes a peptide of 372 amino acids and has 50–70% identity with FatA from other plants. Real-time quantitative PCR analysis revealed that AhFatA was expressed in all tissues of A. hypogaea L., but most strongly in the immature seeds harvested at 60 days after pegging. Heterologous expression of AhFatA in Escherichia coli affected bacterial growth and changed the fatty acid profiles of the membrane lipid, resulting in directed accumulation towards palmitoleic acid and oleic acid. These results indicate that AhFatA is at least partially responsible for determining the high palmitoleic acid and oleic acid composition of E. coli. PMID:23093853

  7. X-Ray Crystal Structure of Mycobacterium Tuberculosis β-Ketoacyl Acyl Carrier Protein Synthase II (mtKasB)

    PubMed Central

    Sridharan, Sudharsan; Wang, Lei; Brown, Alistair K.; Dover, Lynn G.; Kremer, Laurent; Besra, Gurdyal S.; Sacchettini, James C.

    2007-01-01

    Summary Mycolic acids are long chain α-alkyl branched, β-hydroxy fatty acids that represent a characteristic component of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis cell wall. Through their covalent attachment to peptidoglycan via an arabinogalactan polysaccharide, they provide the basis for an essential outer envelope membrane. Mycobacteria possess two fatty acid synthases (FAS); FAS-I carries out de novo synthesis of fatty acids while FAS-II is considered to elongate medium chain length fatty acyl primers to provide long chain (C56) precursors of mycolic acids. Here we report the crystal structure of Mycobacterium tuberculosis β-ketoacyl acyl carrier protein synthase (ACP) II mtKasB, a mycobacterial elongation condensing enzyme involved in FAS-II. This enzyme, along with the M. tuberculosis β-ketoacyl ACP synthase I mtKasA, catalyzes the Claisen-type condensation reaction responsible for fatty acyl elongation in FAS-II and are potential targets for development of novel anti-tubercular drugs. The crystal structure refined to 2.4 Å resolution revealed that, like other KAS-II enzymes, mtKasB adopts a thiolase fold but contains unique structural features in the capping region that may be crucial to its preference for longer fatty acyl chains than its counterparts from other bacteria. Modeling of mtKasA using the mtKasB structure as a template predicts the overall structures to be almost identical, but a larger entrance to the active site tunnel is envisaged that might contribute to the greater sensitivity of mtKasA to the inhibitor thiolactomycin (TLM). Modeling of TLM binding in mtKasB shows that the drug fits the active site poorly and results of enzyme inhibition assays using TLM analogues are wholly consistent with our structural observations. Consequently, the structure described here further highlights the potential of TLM as an anti-tubercular lead compound and will aid further exploration of the TLM scaffold towards the design of novel compounds which inhibit

  8. X-ray structure of putative acyl-ACP desaturase DesA2 from Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv

    SciTech Connect

    Dyer, David H.; Lyle, Karen S.; Rayment, Ivan; Fox, Brian G.

    2010-07-13

    Genome sequencing showed that two proteins in Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv contain the metal binding motif (D/E)X{sub 2}HX{sub {approx}100}(D/E)X{sub 2}H characteristic of the soluble diiron enzyme superfamily. These putative acyl-ACP desaturase genes desA1 and desA2 were cloned from genomic DNA and expressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3). DesA1 was found to be insoluble, but in contrast, DesA2 was a soluble protein amenable to biophysical characterization. Here, we report the 2.0 {angstrom} resolution X-ray structure of DesA2 determined by multiple anomalous dispersion (MAD) phasing from a Se-met derivative and refinement against diffraction data obtained on the native protein. The X-ray structure shows that DesA2 is a homodimeric protein with a four-helix bundle core flanked by five additional helices that overlay with 192 structurally equivalent amino acids in the structure of stearoyl-ACP {Delta}9 desaturase from castor plant with an rms difference 1.42 {angstrom}. In the DesA2 crystals, one metal (likely Mn from the crystallization buffer) was bound in high occupancy at the B-site of the conserved metal binding motif, while the A-site was not occupied by a metal ion. Instead, the amino group of Lys-76 occupied this position. The relationships between DesA2 and known diiron enzymes are discussed.

  9. Effect of a mutagenized acyl-ACP thioesterase FATA allele from sunflower with improved activity in tobacco leaves and Arabidopsis seeds.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Pérez, Antonio Javier; Venegas-Calerón, Mónica; Vaistij, Fabián E; Salas, Joaquin J; Larson, Tony R; Garcés, Rafael; Graham, Ian A; Martínez-Force, Enrique

    2014-03-01

    The substrate specificity of the acyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) thioesterases significantly determines the type of fatty acids that are exported from plastids. Thus, designing acyl-ACP thioesterases with different substrate specificities or kinetic properties would be of interest for plant lipid biotechnology to produce oils enriched in specialty fatty acids. In the present work, the FatA thioesterase from Helianthus annuus was used to test the impact of changes in the amino acids present in the binding pocket on substrate specificity and catalytic efficiency. Amongst all the mutated enzymes studied, Q215W was especially interesting as it had higher specificity towards saturated acyl-ACP substrates and higher catalytic efficiency compared to wild-type H. annuus FatA. Null, wild type and high-efficiency alleles were transiently expressed in tobacco leaves to check their effect on lipid biosynthesis. Expression of active FatA thioesterases altered the composition of leaf triacylglycerols but did not alter total lipid content. However, the expression of the wild type and the high-efficiency alleles in Arabidopsis thaliana transgenic seeds resulted in a strong reduction in oil content and an increase in total saturated fatty acid content. The role and influence of acyl-ACP thioesterases in plant metabolism and their possible applications in lipid biotechnology are discussed. PMID:24327259

  10. Expanding Access and Increasing Success in Postsecondary Education for Arizonans. The Arizona Commission for Postsecondary Education (ACPE) 2007-2008 Annual Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arizona Commission for Postsecondary Education, 2008

    2008-01-01

    The work of the Arizona Commission for Postsecondary Education (ACPE) is guided by a 5-year strategic plan. The purpose of the plan is to provide focus for the activity of this small agency and its nine staff members in order to increase productivity and impact in the areas of its statutory authority. The mission and goals were accepted by …

  11. A comparison of surface roughness after micro abrasion of enamel with and without using CPP-ACP: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Mathias, Jones; Kavitha, S; Mahalaxmi, S

    2009-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate the surface roughness of enamel after micro abrasion with and without using remineralization agent, CPP-ACP (Casein Phosphopeptide-Amorphous Calcium Phosphate). Materials and Methods: Thirty freshly extracted anterior teeth were collected. The samples were randomly assigned to two study and one control group. Group A (n = 10) containing teeth in which only micro abrasion was done, Group B (n = 10) containing teeth in which CPP-ACP (G C Tooth Mousse) was applied after micro abrasion for a period of 30 days, once daily for three minutes and Group C (n = 10) in which no preparation was done and which acted as the control group. The samples were stored in artificial saliva and evaluated after 30 days, using surface profilometer. The results were tabulated and statistically analyzed. Results: According to the results of this study, a combination of the micro abrasion procedure and CPP-ACP application reduced the enamel surface roughness significantly, when compared to micro abrasion done alone. Conclusion: Application of CPP-ACP after micro abrasion procedure significantly reduces the enamel surface roughness thereby decreasing the risk of caries. PMID:20379436

  12. Expanding Access and Increasing Success in Postsecondary Education for Arizonans. The Arizona Commission for Postsecondary Education (ACPE) 2008-2009 Annual Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arizona Commission for Postsecondary Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The work of the Arizona Commission for Postsecondary Education (ACPE) is guided by a 5-year strategic plan. The purpose of the plan is to provide focus for the activity of this small agency and its eight staff members in order to increase productivity and impact in the areas of its statutory authority. The mission and goals were accepted by…

  13. Expanding Access and Increasing Success in Postsecondary Education for Arizonans. The Arizona Commission for Postsecondary Education (ACPE) 2009-2010 Annual Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arizona Commission for Postsecondary Education, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The work of the Arizona Commission for Postsecondary Education (ACPE) is guided by a strategic plan. The purpose of the plan is to provide focus for the activity of this small agency and its five staff members in order to increase productivity and impact in the areas of its statutory authority. The mission and goals were accepted by Commissioners…

  14. Expanding Access and Increasing Success in Postsecondary Education for Arizonans. Arizona Commission for Postsecondary Education (ACPE) Fiscal Year 2005-2006 Annual Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arizona Commission for Postsecondary Education, 2006

    2006-01-01

    The work of the Arizona Commission for Postsecondary Education (ACPE) is guided by a 5-year strategic plan. The purpose of the plan is to provide focus for the activity of this small agency and its seven staff members in order to increase productivity and impact in the areas of its statutory authority. The mission and goals were accepted by…

  15. Enhanced free fatty acid production by codon-optimized Lactococcus lactis acyl-ACP thioesterase gene expression in Escherichia coli using crude glycerol.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sunhee; Park, Soohyun; Park, Chulhwan; Pack, Seung Pil; Lee, Jinwon

    2014-12-01

    Fatty acid production and composition are determined by the type of acyl-acyl carrier protein thioesterases (acyl-ACP TEs) expressed in Escherichia coli. Bacterial acyl-ACP TEs from Lactococcus lactis (SGJS47), Enterococcus faecalis (SGJS49), and Burkholderia cepacia (SGJS50) were codon-optimized and expressed in E. coli for enhanced fatty acid production. Samples were extracted at the lag, log, and stationary phases of cell growth, and gene expression levels of the codon optimized acy-ACP TEs as well as fatty acid production were monitored. At 24h after initiation of gene expression, the OPLlTE expression level and fatty acid production in SGJS47 increased up to 15.8-fold and 3.2-fold compared to the control and other recombinant strains, respectively. Additionally, in SGJS47, improvement in free fatty acid (FFA) composition, high-specificity production of short-chain fatty acids (C8, C10) and unsaturated fatty acids (C16:1) was achieved in crude glycerol medium condition. Compared with control strain, the percentage of FFAs (C8 and C10) was enhanced by approximately 16- to 21-fold, C16:1 FFA ratio increased approximately 18-fold. Observation of codon-optimized acyl-ACP TE genes expression level in E. coli may be useful for understanding mechanisms towards improving fatty acid production. Engineered strains have the potential to overproduce specific FFAs and thereby reduce the cost of fatty acid production by using industrially inexpensive carbon sources. PMID:25442943

  16. Morphological and metabolic changes in transgenic wheat with altered glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase or acyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) thioesterase activities.

    PubMed

    Edlin, D A; Kille, P; Wilkinson, M D; Jones, H D; Harwood, J L

    2000-12-01

    We have transformed varieties of wheat with a Pisum sativum glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase gene, and also with an Arabidopsis thaliana acyl-ACP thioesterase gene. Morphological (growth, organelle development) and metabolic changes (fatty acid labelling of chloroplast and non-chloroplast lipids) have been observed in transgenics with altered gene expression for either enzyme. PMID:11171169

  17. Expanding Access and Increasing Success in Postsecondary Education for Arizonans. The Arizona Commission for Postsecondary Education (ACPE) 2006-2007 Annual Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arizona Commission for Postsecondary Education, 2007

    2007-01-01

    The work of the Arizona Commission for Postsecondary Education (ACPE) is guided by a 5 year strategic plan. The purpose of the plan is to provide focus for the activity of this small agency and its eight staff members in order to increase productivity and impact in the areas of its statutory authority. The mission and goals were accepted by…

  18. A structure-based mechanism for benzalacetone synthase from Rheum palmatum.

    PubMed

    Morita, Hiroyuki; Shimokawa, Yoshihiko; Tanio, Michikazu; Kato, Ryohei; Noguchi, Hiroshi; Sugio, Shigetoshi; Kohno, Toshiyuki; Abe, Ikuro

    2010-01-12

    Benzalacetone synthase (BAS), a plant-specific type III polyketide synthase (PKS), catalyzes a one-step decarboxylative condensation of malonyl-CoA and 4-coumaroyl-CoA to produce the diketide benzalacetone. We solved the crystal structures of both the wild-type and chalcone-producing I207L/L208F mutant of Rheum palmatum BAS at 1.8 A resolution. In addition, we solved the crystal structure of the wild-type enzyme, in which a monoketide coumarate intermediate is covalently bound to the catalytic cysteine residue, at 1.6 A resolution. This is the first direct evidence that type III PKS utilizes the cysteine as the nucleophile and as the attachment site for the polyketide intermediate. The crystal structures revealed that BAS utilizes an alternative, novel active-site pocket for locking the aromatic moiety of the coumarate, instead of the chalcone synthase's coumaroyl-binding pocket, which is lost in the active-site of the wild-type enzyme and restored in the I207L/L208F mutant. Furthermore, the crystal structures indicated the presence of a putative nucleophilic water molecule which forms hydrogen bond networks with the Cys-His-Asn catalytic triad. This suggested that BAS employs novel catalytic machinery for the thioester bond cleavage of the enzyme-bound diketide intermediate and the final decarboxylation reaction to produce benzalacetone. These findings provided a structural basis for the functional diversity of the type III PKS enzymes. PMID:20080733

  19. Slow onset inhibition of bacterial beta-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein synthases by thiolactomycin.

    PubMed

    Machutta, Carl A; Bommineni, Gopal R; Luckner, Sylvia R; Kapilashrami, Kanishk; Ruzsicska, Bela; Simmerling, Carlos; Kisker, Caroline; Tonge, Peter J

    2010-02-26

    Thiolactomycin (TLM), a natural product thiolactone antibiotic produced by species of Nocardia and Streptomyces, is an inhibitor of the beta-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein synthase (KAS) enzymes in the bacterial fatty acid synthase pathway. Using enzyme kinetics and direct binding studies, TLM has been shown to bind preferentially to the acyl-enzyme intermediates of the KASI and KASII enzymes from Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Escherichia coli. These studies, which utilized acyl-enzyme mimics in which the active site cysteine was replaced by a glutamine, also revealed that TLM is a slow onset inhibitor of the KASI enzymes KasA and ecFabB but not of the KASII enzymes KasB and ecFabF. The differential affinity of TLM for the acyl-KAS enzymes is proposed to result from structural change involving the movement of helices alpha5 and alpha6 that prepare the enzyme to bind malonyl-AcpM or TLM and that is initiated by formation of hydrogen bonds between the acyl-enzyme thioester and the oxyanion hole. The finding that TLM is a slow onset inhibitor of ecFabB supports the proposal that the long residence time of TLM on the ecFabB homologues in Serratia marcescens and Klebsiella pneumonia is an important factor for the in vivo antibacterial activity of TLM against these two organisms despite the fact that the in vitro MIC values are only 100-200 microg/ml. The mechanistic data on the interaction of TLM with KasA will provide an important foundation for the rational development of high affinity KasA inhibitors based on the thiolactone skeleton. PMID:20018879

  20. Engineering a Polyketide Synthase for In Vitro Production of Adipic Acid.

    PubMed

    Hagen, Andrew; Poust, Sean; Rond, Tristan de; Fortman, Jeffrey L; Katz, Leonard; Petzold, Christopher J; Keasling, Jay D

    2016-01-15

    Polyketides have enormous structural diversity, yet polyketide synthases (PKSs) have thus far been engineered to produce only drug candidates or derivatives thereof. Thousands of other molecules, including commodity and specialty chemicals, could be synthesized using PKSs if composing hybrid PKSs from well-characterized parts derived from natural PKSs was more efficient. Here, using modern mass spectrometry techniques as an essential part of the design-build-test cycle, we engineered a chimeric PKS to enable production one of the most widely used commodity chemicals, adipic acid. To accomplish this, we introduced heterologous reductive domains from various PKS clusters into the borrelidin PKS' first extension module, which we previously showed produces a 3-hydroxy-adipoyl intermediate when coincubated with the loading module and a succinyl-CoA starter unit. Acyl-ACP intermediate analysis revealed an unexpected bottleneck at the dehydration step, which was overcome by introduction of a carboxyacyl-processing dehydratase domain. Appending a thioesterase to the hybrid PKS enabled the production of free adipic acid. Using acyl-intermediate based techniques to "debug" PKSs as described here, it should one day be possible to engineer chimeric PKSs to produce a variety of existing commodity and specialty chemicals, as well as thousands of chemicals that are difficult to produce from petroleum feedstocks using traditional synthetic chemistry. PMID:26501439

  1. The PIP training programme: building of ACP experts capacities in crop protection and food safety to support local companies to comply with EU regulations on pesticides residues.

    PubMed

    Schiffers, B C; Schubert, A; Schiffers, C; Fontaine, S; Gumusboga, N; Werner, B; Webb, M; Lugros, H; Stinglhamber, G

    2006-01-01

    Regulatory requirements, and in particular phytosanitary quality standards change rapidly. As ACP producers/exporters race to become more competitive, to keep their market share and to satisfay their customers' commercial demands (e.g. EUREP-GAP certification), the need for competent staff who are aware of the company's quality objectives and trained to follow instructions is crucial. Mastering sanitary quality is only possible if matched with a programme to build the skills of companies' human resources. The Pesticide Initiative Programme (PIP), mindful of the importance of making operators autonomous and of training them to monitor EU food safety regulations and technology on their own, has successfully developed a training programme while building a quality network of local/ACP service providers. By building the capacities of ACP experts and then securing their services as trainers, PIP also guarantees companies' access to expertise and the sustainability of their efforts to comply with new EU regulations. The training strategy developed by PIP rests on two pilars: instructor training and collective training. Instructor training consists in reinforcing the technical knowledge of local experts (agronomists, hygienists, etc.) by providing them with active teaching methods. Once the ACP experts have gained enough technical knowledge of the key areas of crop protection--mainly pesticides management--and food safety, and have demonstrated their capacity to train the technical staff of local companies, the PIP has carried out a collective training programme in 2004, 2005 and 2006. To date, more than 130 consultants covering about 15 ACP countries have received instructor training, and more than 700 people have participated in collective and in-company training sessions. PMID:17390771

  2. Cryo-EM structure of fatty acid synthase (FAS) from Rhodosporidium toruloides provides insights into the evolutionary development of fungal FAS

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Manuel; Rhinow, Daniel; Zhu, Zhiwei; Mills, Deryck J; Zhao, Zongbao K; Vonck, Janet; Grininger, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Fungal fatty acid synthases Type I (FAS I) are up to 2.7 MDa large molecular machines composed of large multifunctional polypeptides. Half of the amino acids in fungal FAS I are involved in structural elements that are responsible for scaffolding the elaborate barrel-shaped architecture and turning fungal FAS I into highly efficient de novo producers of fatty acids. Rhodosporidium toruloides is an oleaginous fungal species and renowned for its robust conversion of carbohydrates into lipids to over 70% of its dry cell weight. Here, we use cryo-EM to determine a 7.8-Å reconstruction of its FAS I that reveals unexpected features; its novel form of splitting the multifunctional polypeptide chain into the two subunits α and β, and its duplicated ACP domains. We show that the specific distribution into α and β occurs by splitting at one of many possible sites that can be accepted by fungal FAS I. While, therefore, the specific distribution in α and β chains in R. toruloides FAS I is not correlated to increased protein activities, we also show that the duplication of ACP is an evolutionary late event and argue that duplication is beneficial for the lipid overproduction phenotype. PMID:25761671

  3. Identification of sucrose synthase as an actin-binding protein

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winter, H.; Huber, J. L.; Huber, S. C.; Davies, E. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Several lines of evidence indicate that sucrose synthase (SuSy) binds both G- and F-actin: (i) presence of SuSy in the Triton X-100-insoluble fraction of microsomal membranes (i.e. crude cytoskeleton fraction); (ii) co-immunoprecipitation of actin with anti-SuSy monoclonal antibodies; (iii) association of SuSy with in situ phalloidin-stabilized F-actin filaments; and (iv) direct binding to F-actin, polymerized in vitro. Aldolase, well known to interact with F-actin, interfered with binding of SuSy, suggesting that a common or overlapping binding site may be involved. We postulate that some of the soluble SuSy in the cytosol may be associated with the actin cytoskeleton in vivo.

  4. Cloning, purification, and properties of Candida albicans thymidylate synthase.

    PubMed Central

    Singer, S C; Richards, C A; Ferone, R; Benedict, D; Ray, P

    1989-01-01

    The thymidylate synthase (TS) gene was isolated from a genomic Candida albicans library by functional complementation of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain deficient in TS. The gene was localized on a 4-kilobase HindIII DNA fragment and was shown to be expressed in a Thy- strain of Escherichia coli. The nucleotide sequence of the TS gene predicted a protein of 315 amino acids with a molecular weight of 36,027. The gene was cloned into a T7 expression vector in E. coli, allowing purification of large amounts of C. albicans TS. It was also purified from a wild-type C. albicans strain. Comparison of several enzyme properties including analysis of amino-terminal amino acid sequences showed the native and cloned C. albicans TS to be the same. PMID:2646281

  5. Bismuth(III) complexes with 2-acetylpyridine- and 2-benzoylpyridine-derived hydrazones: Antimicrobial and cytotoxic activities and effects on the clonogenic survival of human solid tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Isabella P; Piló, Elisa D L; Recio-Despaigne, Angel A; Da Silva, Jeferson G; Ramos, Jonas P; Marques, Lucas B; Prazeres, Pedro H D M; Takahashi, Jacqueline A; Souza-Fagundes, Elaine M; Rocha, Willian; Beraldo, Heloisa

    2016-07-01

    Complexes [Bi(2AcPh)Cl2]·0.5H2O (1), [Bi(2AcpClPh)Cl2] (2), [Bi(2AcpNO2Ph)Cl2] (3), [Bi(2AcpOHPh)Cl2]·2H2O (4), [Bi(H2BzPh)Cl3]·2H2O (5), [Bi(H2BzpClPh)Cl3] (6), [Bi(2BzpNO2Ph)Cl2]·2H2O (7) and [Bi(H2BzpOHPh)Cl3]·2H2O (8) were obtained with 2-acetylpyridine phenylhydrazone (H2AcPh), its -para-chloro-phenyl- (H2AcpClPh), -para-nitro-phenyl (H2AcpNO2Ph) and -para-hydroxy-phenyl (H2AcpOHPh) derivatives, as well as with the 2-benzoylpyridine phenylhydrazone analogues (H2BzPh, H2BzpClPh, H2BzpNO2Ph, H2BzpOHPh). Upon coordination to bismuth(III) antibacterial activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial strains significantly improved except for complex (4). The cytotoxic effects of the compounds under study were evaluated on HL-60, Jurkat and THP-1 leukemia, and on MCF-7 and HCT-116 solid tumor cells, as well as on non-malignant Vero cells. In general, 2-acetylpyridine-derived hydrazones proved to be more potent and more selective as cytotoxic agents than the corresponding 2-benzoylpyridine-derived counterparts. Exposure of HCT-116 cells to H2AcpClPh, H2AcpNO2Ph and complex (3) led to 99% decrease of the clonogenic survival. The IC50 values of these compounds were three-fold smaller when cells were cultured in soft-agar (3D) than when cells were cultured in monolayer (2D), suggesting that they constitute interesting scaffolds, which should be considered in further studies aiming to develop new drug candidates for the treatment of colon cancer. PMID:27209169

  6. Inducible nitric oxide synthase and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Salvemini, D; Marino, M H

    1998-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO), derived from L-arginine (L-Arg) by the enzyme nitric oxide synthase (NOS), is involved in acute and chronic inflammatory events. In view of the complexity associated with the inflammatory response, the dissection of possible mechanisms by which NO modulates this response will be profitable in designing novel and more efficacious NOS inhibitors. In this review we describe the consequences associated with the induction of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and its therapeutic implications. PMID:15991919

  7. Unique animal prenyltransferase with monoterpene synthase activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilg, Anna B.; Tittiger, Claus; Blomquist, Gary J.

    2009-06-01

    Monoterpenes are structurally diverse natural compounds that play an essential role in the chemical ecology of a wide array of organisms. A key enzyme in monoterpene biosynthesis is geranyl diphosphate synthase (GPPS). GPPS is an isoprenyl diphosphate synthase that catalyzes a single electrophilic condensation reaction between dimethylallyl diphosphate (C5) and isopentenyl diphosphate (C5) to produce geranyl diphosphate (GDP; C10). GDP is the universal precursor to all monoterpenes. Subsequently, monoterpene synthases are responsible for the transformation of GDP to a variety of acyclic, monocyclic, and bicyclic monoterpene products. In pheromone-producing male Ips pini bark beetles (Coleoptera: Scolytidae), the acyclic monoterpene myrcene is required for the production of the major aggregation pheromone component, ipsdienol. Here, we report monoterpene synthase activity associated with GPPS of I. pini. Enzyme assays were performed on recombinant GPPS to determine the presence of monoterpene synthase activity, and the reaction products were analyzed by coupled gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The functionally expressed recombinant enzyme produced both GDP and myrcene, making GPPS of I. pini a bifunctional enzyme. This unique insect isoprenyl diphosphate synthase possesses the functional plasticity that is characteristic of terpene biosynthetic enzymes of plants, contributing toward the current understanding of product specificity of the isoprenoid pathway.

  8. Ceramide synthases in biomedical research.

    PubMed

    Cingolani, Francesca; Futerman, Anthony H; Casas, Josefina

    2016-05-01

    Sphingolipid metabolism consists of multiple metabolic pathways that converge upon ceramide, one of the key molecules among sphingolipids (SLs). In mammals, ceramide synthesis occurs via N-acylation of sphingoid backbones, dihydrosphingosine (dhSo) or sphingosine (So). The reaction is catalyzed by ceramide synthases (CerS), a family of enzymes with six different isoforms, with each one showing specificity towards a restricted group of acyl-CoAs, thus producing ceramides (Cer) and dihydroceramides (dhCer) with different fatty acid chain lengths. A large body of evidence documents the role of both So and dhSo as bioactive molecules, as well as the involvement of dhCer and Cer in physiological and pathological processes. In particular, the fatty acid composition of Cer has different effects in cell biology and in the onset and progression of different diseases. Therefore, modulation of CerS activity represents an attractive target in biomedical research and in finding new treatment modalities. In this review, we discuss functional, structural and biochemical features of CerS and examine CerS inhibitors that are currently available. PMID:26248326

  9. Functional replacement of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae fatty acid synthase with a bacterial type II system allows flexible product profiles.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Moya, Ruben; Leber, Christopher; Cardenas, Javier; Da Silva, Nancy A

    2015-12-01

    The native yeast type I fatty acid synthase (FAS) is a complex, rigid enzyme, and challenging to engineer for the production of medium- or short-chain fatty acids. Introduction of a type II FAS is a promising alternative as it allows expression control for each discrete enzyme and the addition of heterologous thioesterases. In this study, the native Saccharomyces cerevisiae FAS was functionally replaced by the Escherichia coli type II FAS (eFAS) system. The E. coli acpS + acpP (together), fabB, fabD, fabG, fabH, fabI, fabZ, and tesA were expressed in individual S. cerevisiae strains, and enzyme activity was confirmed by in vitro activity assays. Eight genes were then integrated into the yeast genome, while tesA or an alternate thioesterase gene, fatB from Ricinus communis or TEII from Rattus novergicus, was expressed from a multi-copy plasmid. Native FAS activity was eliminated by knocking out the yeast FAS2 gene. The strains expressing only the eFAS as de novo fatty acid source grew without fatty acid supplementation demonstrating that this type II FAS is able to functionally replace the native yeast FAS. The engineered strain expressing the R. communis fatB thioesterase increased total fatty acid titer 1.7-fold and shifted the fatty acid profile towards C14 production, increasing it from <1% in the native strain to more than 30% of total fatty acids, and reducing C18 production from 39% to 8%. PMID:26084339

  10. LAP6/POLYKETIDE SYNTHASE A and LAP5/POLYKETIDE SYNTHASE B encode hydroxyalkyl α-pyrone synthases required for pollen development and sporopollenin biosynthesis in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung Soo; Grienenberger, Etienne; Lallemand, Benjamin; Colpitts, Che C; Kim, Sun Young; Souza, Clarice de Azevedo; Geoffroy, Pierrette; Heintz, Dimitri; Krahn, Daniel; Kaiser, Markus; Kombrink, Erich; Heitz, Thierry; Suh, Dae-Yeon; Legrand, Michel; Douglas, Carl J

    2010-12-01

    Plant type III polyketide synthases (PKSs) catalyze the condensation of malonyl-CoA units with various CoA ester starter molecules to generate a diverse array of natural products. The fatty acyl-CoA esters synthesized by Arabidopsis thaliana ACYL-COA SYNTHETASE5 (ACOS5) are key intermediates in the biosynthesis of sporopollenin, the major constituent of exine in the outer pollen wall. By coexpression analysis, we identified two Arabidopsis PKS genes, POLYKETIDE SYNTHASE A (PKSA) and PKSB (also known as LAP6 and LAP5, respectively) that are tightly coexpressed with ACOS5. Recombinant PKSA and PKSB proteins generated tri-and tetraketide α-pyrone compounds in vitro from a broad range of potential ACOS5-generated fatty acyl-CoA starter substrates by condensation with malonyl-CoA. Furthermore, substrate preference profile and kinetic analyses strongly suggested that in planta substrates for both enzymes are midchain- and ω-hydroxylated fatty acyl-CoAs (e.g., 12-hydroxyoctadecanoyl-CoA and 16-hydroxyhexadecanoyl-CoA), which are the products of sequential actions of anther-specific fatty acid hydroxylases and acyl-CoA synthetase. PKSA and PKSB are specifically and transiently expressed in tapetal cells during microspore development in Arabidopsis anthers. Mutants compromised in expression of the PKS genes displayed pollen exine layer defects, and a double pksa pksb mutant was completely male sterile, with no apparent exine. These results show that hydroxylated α-pyrone polyketide compounds generated by the sequential action of ACOS5 and PKSA/B are potential and previously unknown sporopollenin precursors. PMID:21193570

  11. The tomato terpene synthase gene family.

    PubMed

    Falara, Vasiliki; Akhtar, Tariq A; Nguyen, Thuong T H; Spyropoulou, Eleni A; Bleeker, Petra M; Schauvinhold, Ines; Matsuba, Yuki; Bonini, Megan E; Schilmiller, Anthony L; Last, Robert L; Schuurink, Robert C; Pichersky, Eran

    2011-10-01

    Compounds of the terpenoid class play numerous roles in the interactions of plants with their environment, such as attracting pollinators and defending the plant against pests. We show here that the genome of cultivated tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) contains 44 terpene synthase (TPS) genes, including 29 that are functional or potentially functional. Of these 29 TPS genes, 26 were expressed in at least some organs or tissues of the plant. The enzymatic functions of eight of the TPS proteins were previously reported, and here we report the specific in vitro catalytic activity of 10 additional tomato terpene synthases. Many of the tomato TPS genes are found in clusters, notably on chromosomes 1, 2, 6, 8, and 10. All TPS family clades previously identified in angiosperms are also present in tomato. The largest clade of functional TPS genes found in tomato, with 12 members, is the TPS-a clade, and it appears to encode only sesquiterpene synthases, one of which is localized to the mitochondria, while the rest are likely cytosolic. A few additional sesquiterpene synthases are encoded by TPS-b clade genes. Some of the tomato sesquiterpene synthases use z,z-farnesyl diphosphate in vitro as well, or more efficiently than, the e,e-farnesyl diphosphate substrate. Genes encoding monoterpene synthases are also prevalent, and they fall into three clades: TPS-b, TPS-g, and TPS-e/f. With the exception of two enzymes involved in the synthesis of ent-kaurene, the precursor of gibberellins, no other tomato TPS genes could be demonstrated to encode diterpene synthases so far. PMID:21813655

  12. Terpene synthases are widely distributed in bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Yuuki; Kuzuyama, Tomohisa; Komatsu, Mamoru; Shin-ya, Kazuo; Omura, Satoshi; Cane, David E.; Ikeda, Haruo

    2015-01-01

    Odoriferous terpene metabolites of bacterial origin have been known for many years. In genome-sequenced Streptomycetaceae microorganisms, the vast majority produces the degraded sesquiterpene alcohol geosmin. Two minor groups of bacteria do not produce geosmin, with one of these groups instead producing other sesquiterpene alcohols, whereas members of the remaining group do not produce any detectable terpenoid metabolites. Because bacterial terpene synthases typically show no significant overall sequence similarity to any other known fungal or plant terpene synthases and usually exhibit relatively low levels of mutual sequence similarity with other bacterial synthases, simple correlation of protein sequence data with the structure of the cyclized terpene product has been precluded. We have previously described a powerful search method based on the use of hidden Markov models (HMMs) and protein families database (Pfam) search that has allowed the discovery of monoterpene synthases of bacterial origin. Using an enhanced set of HMM parameters generated using a training set of 140 previously identified bacterial terpene synthase sequences, a Pfam search of 8,759,463 predicted bacterial proteins from public databases and in-house draft genome data has now revealed 262 presumptive terpene synthases. The biochemical function of a considerable number of these presumptive terpene synthase genes could be determined by expression in a specially engineered heterologous Streptomyces host and spectroscopic identification of the resulting terpene products. In addition to a wide variety of terpenes that had been previously reported from fungal or plant sources, we have isolated and determined the complete structures of 13 previously unidentified cyclic sesquiterpenes and diterpenes. PMID:25535391

  13. Properties of phosphorylated thymidylate synthase.

    PubMed

    Frączyk, Tomasz; Ruman, Tomasz; Wilk, Piotr; Palmowski, Paweł; Rogowska-Wrzesinska, Adelina; Cieśla, Joanna; Zieliński, Zbigniew; Nizioł, Joanna; Jarmuła, Adam; Maj, Piotr; Gołos, Barbara; Wińska, Patrycja; Ostafil, Sylwia; Wałajtys-Rode, Elżbieta; Shugar, David; Rode, Wojciech

    2015-12-01

    Thymidylate synthase (TS) may undergo phosphorylation endogenously in mammalian cells, and as a recombinant protein expressed in bacterial cells, as indicated by the reaction of purified enzyme protein with Pro-Q® Diamond Phosphoprotein Gel Stain (PGS). With recombinant human, mouse, rat, Trichinella spiralis and Caenorhabditis elegans TSs, expressed in Escherichia coli, the phosphorylated, compared to non-phosphorylated recombinant enzyme forms, showed a decrease in Vmax(app), bound their cognate mRNA (only rat enzyme studied), and repressed translation of their own and several heterologous mRNAs (human, rat and mouse enzymes studied). However, attempts to determine the modification site(s), whether endogenously expressed in mammalian cells, or recombinant proteins, did not lead to unequivocal results. Comparative ESI-MS/analysis of IEF fractions of TS preparations from parental and FdUrd-resistant mouse leukemia L1210 cells, differing in sensitivity to inactivation by FdUMP, demonstrated phosphorylation of Ser(10) and Ser(16) in the resistant enzyme only, although PGS staining pointed to the modification of both L1210 TS proteins. The TS proteins phosphorylated in bacterial cells were shown by (31)P NMR to be modified only on histidine residues, like potassium phosphoramidate (KPA)-phosphorylated TS proteins. NanoLC-MS/MS, enabling the use of CID and ETD peptide fragmentation methods, identified several phosphohistidine residues, but certain phosphoserine and phosphothreonine residues were also implicated. Molecular dynamics studies, based on the mouse TS crystal structure, allowed one to assess potential of several phosphorylated histidine residues to affect catalytic activity, the effect being phosphorylation site dependent. PMID:26315778

  14. Mechanistic Insight with HBCH2CoA as a Probe to Polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) Synthases

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) synthases catalyze the polymerization of 3-(R)-hydroxybutyrate coenzyme A (HBCoA) to produce polyoxoesters of 1–2 MDa. A substrate analogue HBCH2CoA, in which the S in HBCoA is replaced with a CH2 group, was synthesized in 13 steps using a chemoenzymatic approach in a 7.5% overall yield. Kinetic studies reveal it is a competitive inhibitor of a class I and a class III PHB synthases, with Kis of 40 and 14 μM, respectively. To probe the elongation steps of the polymerization, HBCH2CoA was incubated with a synthase acylated with a [3H]-saturated trimer-CoA ([3H]-sTCoA). The products of the reaction were shown to be the methylene analogue of [3H]-sTCoA ([3H]-sT-CH2-CoA), saturated dimer-([3H]-sD-CO2H), and trimer-acid ([3H]-sT-CO2H), distinct from the expected methylene analogue of [3H]-saturated tetramer-CoA ([3H]-sTet-CH2-CoA). Detection of [3H]-sT-CH2-CoA and its slow rate of formation suggest that HBCH2CoA may be reporting on the termination and repriming process of the synthases, rather than elongation. PMID:24896226

  15. Aromatic Polyketide Synthases (Purification, Characterization, and Antibody Development to Benzalacetone Synthase from Raspberry Fruits).

    PubMed Central

    Borejsza-Wysocki, W.; Hrazdina, G.

    1996-01-01

    p-Hydroxyphenylbutan-2-one, the characteristic aroma compound of raspberries (Rubus idaeus L.), is synthesized from p-coumaryl-coenzyme A and malonyl-coenzyme A in a two-step reaction sequence that is catalyzed by benzalacetone synthase and benzalacetone reductase (W. Borejsza-Wysocki and G. Hrazdina [1994] Phytochemistry 35: 623-628). Benzalacetone synthase condenses one malonate with p-coumarate to form the pathway intermediate p-hydroxyphenylbut-3-ene-2-one (p-hydroxybenzalacetone) in a reaction that is similar to those catalyzed by chalcone and stilbene synthases. We have obtained an enzyme preparation from ripe raspberries that was preferentially enriched in benzalacetone synthase (approximately 170-fold) over chalcone synthase (approximately 14-fold) activity. This preparation was used to characterize benzalacetone synthase and to develop polyclonal antibodies in rabbits. Benzalacetone synthase showed similarity in its molecular properties to chalcone synthase but differed distinctly in its substrate specificity, response to 2-mercaptoethanol and ethylene glycol, and induction in cell-suspension cultures. The product of the enzyme, p-hydroxybenzalacetone, inhibited mycelial growth of the raspberry pathogen Phytophthora fragariae var rubi at 250 [mu]M. We do not know whether the dual activity in the benzalacetone synthase preparation is the result of a bifunctional enzyme or is caused by contamination with chalcone synthase that was also present. The rapid induction of the enzyme in cell-suspension cultures upon addition of yeast extract and the toxicity of its product, p-hydroxybenzalacetone, to phytopathogenic fungi also suggest that the pathway may be part of a plant defense response. PMID:12226219

  16. Distribution of Callose Synthase, Cellulose Synthase, and Sucrose Synthase in Tobacco Pollen Tube Is Controlled in Dissimilar Ways by Actin Filaments and Microtubules1[W

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Giampiero; Faleri, Claudia; Del Casino, Cecilia; Emons, Anne Mie C.; Cresti, Mauro

    2011-01-01

    Callose and cellulose are fundamental components of the cell wall of pollen tubes and are probably synthesized by distinct enzymes, callose synthase and cellulose synthase, respectively. We examined the distribution of callose synthase and cellulose synthase in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) pollen tubes in relation to the dynamics of actin filaments, microtubules, and the endomembrane system using specific antibodies to highly conserved peptide sequences. The role of the cytoskeleton and membrane flow was investigated using specific inhibitors (latrunculin B, 2,3-butanedione monoxime, taxol, oryzalin, and brefeldin A). Both enzymes are associated with the plasma membrane, but cellulose synthase is present along the entire length of pollen tubes (with a higher concentration at the apex) while callose synthase is located in the apex and in distal regions. In longer pollen tubes, callose synthase accumulates consistently around callose plugs, indicating its involvement in plug synthesis. Actin filaments and endomembrane dynamics are critical for the distribution of callose synthase and cellulose synthase, showing that enzymes are transported through Golgi bodies and/or vesicles moving along actin filaments. Conversely, microtubules appear to be critical in the positioning of callose synthase in distal regions and around callose plugs. In contrast, cellulose synthases are only partially coaligned with cortical microtubules and unrelated to callose plugs. Callose synthase also comigrates with tubulin by Blue Native-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Membrane sucrose synthase, which expectedly provides UDP-glucose to callose synthase and cellulose synthase, binds to actin filaments depending on sucrose concentration; its distribution is dependent on the actin cytoskeleton and the endomembrane system but not on microtubules. PMID:21205616

  17. An investigation into eukaryotic pseudouridine synthases.

    PubMed

    King, Ross D; Lu, Chuan

    2014-08-01

    A common post-transcriptional modification of RNA is the conversion of uridine to its isomer pseudouridine. We investigated the biological significance of eukaryotic pseudouridine synthases using the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We conducted a comprehensive statistical analysis on growth data from automated perturbation (gene deletion) experiments, and used bi-logistic curve analysis to characterise the yeast phenotypes. The deletant strains displayed different alteration in growth properties, including in some cases enhanced growth and/or biphasic growth curves not seen in wild-type strains under matched conditions. These results demonstrate that disrupting pseudouridine synthases can have a significant qualitative effect on growth. We further investigated the significance of post-transcriptional pseudouridine modification through investigation of the scientific literature. We found that (1) In Toxoplasma gondii, a pseudouridine synthase gene is critical in cellular differentiation between the two asexual forms: Tachyzoites and bradyzoites; (2) Mutation of pseudouridine synthase genes has also been implicated in human diseases (mitochondrial myopathy and sideroblastic anemia (MLASA); dyskeratosis congenita). Taken together, these results are consistent with pseudouridine synthases having a Gene Ontology function of "biological regulation". PMID:25152040

  18. Expanding the chemical space of polyketides through structure-guided mutagenesis of Vitis vinifera stilbene synthase.

    PubMed

    Bhan, Namita; Cress, Brady F; Linhardt, Robert J; Koffas, Mattheos

    2015-08-01

    Several natural polyketides (PKs) have been associated with important pharmaceutical properties. Type III polyketide synthases (PKS) that generate aromatic PK polyketides have been studied extensively for their substrate promiscuity and product diversity. Stilbene synthase-like (STS) enzymes are unique in the type III PKS class as they possess a hydrogen bonding network, furnishing them with thioesterase-like properties, resulting in aldol condensation of the polyketide intermediates formed. Chalcone synthases (CHS) in contrast, lack this hydrogen-bonding network, resulting primarily in the Claisen condensation of the polyketide intermediates formed. We have attempted to expand the chemical space of this interesting class of compounds generated by creating structure-guided mutants of Vitis vinifera STS. Further, we have utilized a previously established workflow to quickly compare the wild-type reaction products to those generated by the mutants and identify novel PKs formed by using XCMS analysis of LC-MS and LC-MS/MS data. Based on this approach, we were able to generate 15 previously unreported PK molecules by exploring the substrate promiscuity of the wild-type enzyme and all mutants using unnatural substrates. These structures were specific to STSs and cannot be formed by their closely related CHS-like counterparts. PMID:26048582

  19. A conserved motif flags Acyl Carrier Proteins for β-branching in polyketide synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Song, Zhongshu; Farmer, Rohit; Williams, Christopher; Hothersall, Joanne; Płoskoń, Eliza; Wattana-amorn, Pakorn; Stephens, Elton R.; Yamada, Erika; Gurney, Rachel; Takebayashi, Yuiko; Masschelein, Joleen; Cox, Russell J.; Lavigne, Rob; Willis, Christine L.; Simpson, Thomas J.; Crosby, John; Winn, Peter J.; Thomas, Christopher M.; Crump, Matthew P.

    2015-01-01

    Type I PKSs often utilise programmed β-branching, via enzymes of an “HMG-CoA synthase (HCS) cassette”, to incorporate various side chains at the second carbon from the terminal carboxylic acid of growing polyketide backbones. We identified a strong sequence motif in Acyl Carrier Proteins (ACPs) where β-branching is known. Substituting ACPs confirmed a correlation of ACP type with β-branching specificity. While these ACPs often occur in tandem, NMR analysis of tandem β-branching ACPs indicated no ACP-ACP synergistic effects and revealed that the conserved sequence motif forms an internal core rather than an exposed patch. Modelling and mutagenesis identified ACP Helix III as a probable anchor point of the ACP-HCS complex whose position is determined by the core. Mutating the core affects ACP functionality while ACP-HCS interface substitutions modulate system specificity. Our method for predicting β-carbon branching expands the potential for engineering novel polyketides and lays a basis for determining specificity rules. PMID:24056399

  20. Modification of Triclosan Scaffold in Search of Improved Inhibitors for Enoyl-Acyl Carrier Protein (ACP) Reductase in Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    Stec, Jozef; Fomovska, Alina; Afanador, Gustavo A.; Muench, Stephen P.; Zhou, Ying; Lai, Bo-Shiun; Bissati, Kamal El; Hickman, Mark R.; Lee, Patty J.; Leed, Susan E.; Auschwitz, Jennifer M.; Sommervile, Caroline; Woods, Stuart; Roberts, Craig W.; Rice, David; Prigge, Sean T.; McLeod, Rima; Kozikowski, Alan P.

    2013-01-01

    Through our focused effort to discover new and effective agents against toxoplasmosis, a structure-based drug design approach was utilized to develop a series of potent inhibitors of the enoyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) reductase (ENR) enzyme in Toxoplasma gondii (TgENR). Modifications to positions 5 and 4′ of the well-known ENR inhibitor triclosan afforded a series of 29 new analogs. Among the resulting compounds, many showed high potency and improved physicochemical properties in comparison with the lead. The most potent compounds 16a and 16c have IC50 values of 250 nM against Toxoplasma gondii tachyzoites without apparent toxicity to the host cells. Their IC50 values against the recombinant TgENR were 43 and 26 nM, respectively. Additionally, 11 other analogs in this series had IC50 values ranging from 17 to 130 nM in the enzyme-based assay. With respect to their excellent in vitro activity as well as improved drug-like properties, the lead compounds 16a and 16c are deemed to be an excellent starting point for the development of new medicines to effectively treat Toxoplasma gondii infections. PMID:23776166

  1. 3-Oxoacyl-ACP Reductase from Schistosoma japonicum: Integrated In Silico-In Vitro Strategy for Discovering Antischistosomal Lead Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jian; Dyer, Dave; Wang, Jipeng; Wang, Shuqi; Du, Xiaofeng; Xu, Bin; Zhang, Haobing; Wang, Xiaoning; Hu, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Background Schistosomiasis is a disease caused by parasitic worms and more than 200 million people are infected worldwide. The emergence of resistance to the most commonly used drug, praziquantel (PZQ), makes the development of novel drugs an urgent task. 3-oxoacyl-ACP reductase (OAR), a key enzyme involved in the fatty acid synthesis pathway, has been identified as a potential drug target against many pathogenic organisms. However, no research on Schistosoma japonicum OAR (SjOAR) has been reported. The characterization of the SjOAR protein will provide new strategies for screening antischistosomal drugs that target SjOAR. Methodology/Principal Findings After cloning the SjOAR gene, recombinant SjOAR protein was purified and assayed for enzymatic activity. The tertiary structure of SjOAR was obtained by homology modeling and 27 inhibitor candidates were identified from 14,400 compounds through molecular docking based on the structure. All of these compounds were confirmed to be able to bind to the SjOAR protein by BIAcore analysis. Two compounds exhibited strong antischistosomal activity and inhibitory effects on the enzymatic activity of SjOAR. In contrast, these two compounds showed relatively low toxicity towards host cells. Conclusions/Significance The work presented here shows the feasibility of isolation of new antischistosomal compounds using a combination of virtual screening and experimental validation. Based on this strategy, we successfully identified 2 compounds that target SjOAR with strong antischistosomal activity but relatively low cytotoxicity to host cells. PMID:23762275

  2. A [32P]-NAD+-based method to identify and quantitate long residence time enoyl-ACP reductase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Weixuan; Neckles, Carla; Chang, Andrew; Bommineni, Gopal Reddy; Spagnuolo, Lauren; Zhang, Zhuo; Liu, Nina; Lai, Christina; Truglio, James; Tonge, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    The classical methods for quantifying drug-target residence time (tR) use loss or regain of enzyme activity in progress curve kinetic assays. However, such methods become imprecise at very long residence times, mitigating the use of alternative strategies. Using the NAD(P)H-dependent FabI enoyl-ACP reductase as a model system, we developed a Penefsky column-based method for direct measurement of tR, where the off-rate of the drug was determined with radiolabeled [adenylate-32P] NAD(P+) cofactor. Twenty-three FabI inhibitors were analyzed and a mathematical model was used to estimate limits to the tR values of each inhibitor based on percent drug-target complex recovery following gel filtration. In general, this method showed good agreement with the classical steady state kinetic methods for compounds with tR values of 10-100 min. In addition, we were able to identify seven long tR inhibitors (100-1500 min) and to accurately determine their tR values. The method was then used to measure tR as a function of temperature, an analysis not previously possible using the standard kinetic approach due to decreased NAD(P)H stability at elevated temperatures. In general, a 4-fold difference in tR was observed when the temperature was increased from 25 °C to 37 °C . PMID:25684450

  3. A preliminary study of enamel remineralization by dentifrices based on Recalden (CPP-ACP) and Novamin (calcium-sodium-phosphosilicate).

    PubMed

    Gjorgievska, Elizabeta S; Nicholson, John W

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the enamel remineralization potential of two toothpastes, one of which was based on Recaldent (CPP- ACP) and the other on NovaMin (Calcium-sodium-phosphosilicate). Human permanent molar teeth were subjected to three consecutive demineralization cycles. These cycles were followed by remineralization of the experimental groups by toothpastes containing Recalden and NovaMin respectively. The samples were analyzed by Scanning Electron Microscope, (SEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analysis (EDX). Extensive demineralization was noted in the control group (without remineralization) while the groups treated with the dentifices demonstrated various degrees of remineralization, as shown by formation of different types of deposits on the enamel surface. The EDX analysis showed increased amounts of Ca, P Si and Zn in the enamel of the experimental groups, compared to the control one. Toothpastes containing Recalden and especially NovaMin have the potential to remineralize enamel, a property which might be important in finding a substitute to pit and fissure sealing. PMID:21638965

  4. Enzymatic formation of a resorcylic acid by creating a structure-guided single-point mutation in stilbene synthase

    PubMed Central

    Bhan, Namita; Li, Lingyun; Cai, Chao; Xu, Peng; Linhardt, Robert J; Koffas, Mattheos A G

    2015-01-01

    A novel C17 resorcylic acid was synthesized by a structure-guided Vitis vinifera stilbene synthase (STS) mutant, in which threonine 197 was replaced with glycine (T197G). Altering the architecture of the coumaroyl binding and cyclization pocket of the enzyme led to the attachment of an extra acetyl unit, derived from malonyl-CoA, to p-coumaroyl-CoA. The resulting novel pentaketide can be produced strictly by STS-like enzymes and not by Chalcone synthase-like type III polyketide synthases; due to the unique thioesterase like activity of STS-like enzymes. We utilized a liquid chromatography mass spectrometry-based data analysis approach to directly compare the reaction products of the mutant and wild type STS. The findings suggest an easy to employ platform for precursor-directed biosynthesis and identification of unnatural polyketides by structure-guided mutation of STS-like enzymes. PMID:25402946

  5. Cloning and characterization of cDNAs encoding for long-chain saturated acyl-ACP thioesterases from the developing seeds of Brassica juncea.

    PubMed

    Jha, Saheli Sinha; Jha, Jyoti K; Chattopadhyaya, Banani; Basu, Asitava; Sen, Soumitra K; Maiti, Mrinal K

    2010-06-01

    Four types of cDNAs corresponding to the fatty acyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) thioesterase (Fat) enzyme were isolated from the developing seeds of Brassica juncea, a widely cultivated species amongst the oil-seed crops. The mature polypeptides deduced from the cDNAs showed sequence identity with the FatB class of plant thioesterases. Southern hybridization revealed the presence of at least four copies of BjFatB gene in the genome of this amphidiploid species. Western blot and RT-PCR analyses showed that the BjFatB class thioesterase is expressed poorly in flowers and leaves, but significantly in seeds at the mid-maturation stage. The enzymatic activities of different BjFatB isoforms were established upon heterologous expression of the four BjFatB CDSs in Escherichia coli K27fadD88, a mutant strain of fatty acid beta-oxidation pathway. The substrate specificity of each BjFatB isoform was determined in vivo by fatty acid profile analyses of the culture supernatant and membrane lipid of the recombinant K27fadD88 and E. coli DH10B (fadD(+)) clones, respectively. The BjFatB1 and BjFatB3 were predominantly active on C18:0-ACP substrate, whereas BjFatB2 and BjFatB4 were specific towards C18:0-ACP as well as C16:0-ACP. These novel FatB genes may find potential application in metabolic engineering of crop plants through their over-expression in seed tissues to generate stearate-rich vegetable fats/oils of commercial importance. PMID:20356753

  6. Cryopreservation of collared peccaries (Tayassu tajacu) semen using a powdered coconut water (ACP-116c) based extender plus various concentrations of egg yolk and glycerol.

    PubMed

    Silva, M A; Peixoto, G C X; Lima, G L; Bezerra, J A B; Campos, L B; Paiva, A L C; Paula, V V; Silva, A R

    2012-08-01

    The objective was to determine the effectiveness of a powdered coconut water-based extender (ACP-116c), plus various concentrations of egg-yolk and glycerol, as an alternative for cryopreservation of collared peccary semen. Twelve ejaculates were obtained from captive adult males by electroejaculation, and evaluated for sperm motility, kinetic rating, viability, morphology, and functional membrane integrity. The ejaculates were apportioned into aliquots that were diluted in Tris plus 10% egg yolk and 3% glycerol, or in ACP-116c plus 10 or 20% egg yolk and 1.5 or 3% glycerol. Samples were frozen in liquid nitrogen and, after 1 mo, thawed at 37 °C for 1 min. After thawing, samples were evaluated as reported for fresh semen, and also for sperm membrane integrity (fluorescent probes) and kinematic parameters (computerized analysis). Results were presented as means ± SEM. Freezing and thawing decreased sperm characteristics relative to fresh semen. Overall, ACP-116c plus 20% egg yolk and 3% glycerol provided better (P < 0.05) sperm motility and kinetic rating (48 ± 6.1% and 2.8 ± 0.2, respectively) after thawing than Tris extender (30.4 ± 5.7% and 2.4 ± 0.2). However, there were no differences (P > 0.05) among treatments with regard to the other sperm characteristics. Based on computerized motion analysis, total (26.5 ± 5.9%) and progressive (8.1 ± 2.2%) motility were best preserved (P < 0.05) with the above-mentioned treatment. In conclusion, a coconut water-based extender, ACP-116c, plus 20% egg yolk and 3% glycerol, was effective for cryopreservation of semen from collared peccaries. PMID:22538005

  7. Radiolabelling and positron emission tomography of PT70, a time-dependent inhibitor of InhA, the Mycobacterium tuberculosis enoyl-ACP reductase

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wang, Hui; Liu, Li; Lu, Yang; Pan, Pan; Hooker, Jacob M.; Fowler, Joanna S.; Tonge, Peter J.

    2015-07-14

    PT70 is a diaryl ether inhibitor of InhA, the enoyl-ACP reductase in the Mycobacterium tuberculosis fatty acid biosynthesis pathway. It has a residence time of 24 min on the target, and also shows antibacterial activity in a mouse model of tuberculosis infection. Due to the interest in studying target tissue pharmacokinetics of PT70, we developed a method to radiolabel PT70 with carbon-11 and have studied its pharmacokinetics in mice and baboons using positron emission tomography.

  8. Chitin synthase homologs in three ectomycorrhizal truffles.

    PubMed

    Lanfranco, L; Garnero, L; Delpero, M; Bonfante, P

    1995-12-01

    Degenerate PCR primers were used to amplify a conserved gene portion coding chitin synthase from genomic DNA of six species of ectomycorrhizal truffles. DNA was extracted from both hypogeous fruitbodies and in vitro growing mycelium of Tuber borchii. A single fragment of about 600 bp was amplified for each species. The amplification products from Tuber magnatum, T. borchii and T. ferrugineum were cloned and sequenced, revealing a high degree of identity (91.5%) at the nucleotide level. On the basis of the deduced amino acid sequences these clones were assigned to class II chitin synthase. Southern blot experiments performed on genomic DNA showed that the amplification products derive from a single copy gene. Phylogenetic analysis of the nucleotide sequences of class II chitin synthase genes confirmed the current taxonomic position of the genus Tuber, and suggested a close relationship between T. magnatum and T. uncinatum. PMID:8593947

  9. Feline acute intermittent porphyria: a phenocopy masquerading as an erythropoietic porphyria due to dominant and recessive hydroxymethylbilane synthase mutations

    PubMed Central

    Clavero, Sonia; Bishop, David F.; Haskins, Mark E.; Giger, Urs; Kauppinen, Raili; Desnick, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Human acute intermittent porphyria (AIP), the most common acute hepatic porphyria, is an autosomal dominant inborn error of heme biosynthesis due to the half-normal activity of hydroxymethylbilane synthase (HMB-synthase). Here, we describe the first naturally occurring animal model of AIP in four unrelated cat lines who presented phenotypically as congenital erythropoietic porphyria (CEP). Affected cats had erythrodontia, brownish urine, fluorescent bones, and markedly elevated urinary uroporphyrin (URO) and coproporphyrin (COPRO) consistent with CEP. However, their uroporphyrinogen-III-synthase (URO-synthase) activities (deficient in CEP) were normal. Notably, affected cats had half-normal HMB-synthase activities and elevated urinary 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) and porphobilinogen (PBG), the deficient enzyme and accumulated metabolites in human AIP. Sequencing the feline HMB-synthase gene revealed different mutations in each line: a duplication (c.189dupT), an in-frame 3 bp deletion (c.842_844delGAG) identical to that causing human AIP and two missense mutations, c.250G>A (p.A84T) and c.445C>T (p.R149W). Prokaryotic expression of mutations c.842_844delGAG and c.445C>T resulted in mutant enzymes with <1% wild-type activity, whereas c.250G>A expressed a stable enzyme with ∼35% of wild-type activity. The discolored teeth from the affected cats contained markedly elevated URO I and III, accounting for the CEP-like phenocopy. In three lines, the phenotype was an autosomal dominant trait, while affected cats with the c.250G>A (p.A84T) mutation were homozygous, a unique recessive form of AIP. These animal models may permit further investigation of the pathogenesis of the acute, life-threatening neurological attacks in human AIP and the evaluation of therapeutic strategies. GenBank Accession Numbers: GQ850461–GQ850464. PMID:19934113

  10. Homology study of two polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) synthases from Pseudomonas aureofaciens.

    PubMed

    Umeda, F; Nishikawa, T; Miyasaka, H; Maeda, I; Kawase, M; Yagi, K

    2001-11-01

    Recently, we have cloned and analyzed two polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) synthase genes (phaC1 and phaC2 in the pha cluster) from Pseudomonas aureofaciens. In this report, the deduced amino acid (AA) sequences of PHA synthase 1 and PHA synthase 2 from P. aureofaciens are compared with those from three other bacterial strains (Pseudomonas sp. 61-3, P. oleovorans and P. aeruginosa) containing the homologous pha cluster. The level of homology of either PHA synthase 1 or PHA synthase 2 was high with each enzyme from these three bacterial strains. Furthermore, multialignment of PHA synthase AA sequences implied that both enzymes of PHA synthase 1 and PHA synthase 2 were highly conserved in the four strains including P. aureofaciens. PMID:11916262

  11. Cloning and nucleotide sequence of the gene coding for citrate synthase from a thermotolerant Bacillus sp

    SciTech Connect

    Schendel, F.J.; August, P.R.; Anderson, C.R.; Flickinger, M.C. ); Hanson, R.S. )

    1992-01-01

    Acetate salts are emerging as potentially attractive bulk chemicals for a variety of environmental applications, for example, as catalysts to facilitate combustion of high-sulfur coal by electrical utilities and as the biodegradable noncorrosive highway deicing salt calcium magnesium acetate. The structural gene coding for citrate synthase from the gram-positive soil isolate Bacillus sp. strain C4 (ATCC 55182) capable of secreting acetic acid at pH 5.0 to 7.0 in the presence of dolime has been cloned from a genomic library by complementation of an Escherichia coli auxotrophic mutant lacking citrate synthase. The nucleotide sequence of the entire 3.1-kb HindIII fragment has been determined, and one major open reading frame was found coding for citrate synthase (ctsA). Citrate synthase from Bacillus sp. strain C4 was found to be a dimer (M{sub r}, 84,500) with a sub unit with an M{sub r} of 42,000. The N-terminal sequence was found to be identical with that predicted from the gene sequence. The kinetics were best fit to a bisubstrate enzyme with an ordered mechanism. Bacillus sp. strain C4 citrate synthase was not activated by potassium chloride and was not inhibited by NADH, ATP, ADP, or AMP at levels up to 1 mM. The predicted amino acid sequence was compared with that of the E. coli, Acinetobacter anitratum, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Rickettsia prowazekii, porcine heart, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae cytoplasmic and mitochondrial enzymes.

  12. SIRT3 Deacetylates Ceramide Synthases: IMPLICATIONS FOR MITOCHONDRIAL DYSFUNCTION AND BRAIN INJURY.

    PubMed

    Novgorodov, Sergei A; Riley, Christopher L; Keffler, Jarryd A; Yu, Jin; Kindy, Mark S; Macklin, Wendy B; Lombard, David B; Gudz, Tatyana I

    2016-01-22

    Experimental evidence supports the role of mitochondrial ceramide accumulation as a cause of mitochondrial dysfunction and brain injury after stroke. Herein, we report that SIRT3 regulates mitochondrial ceramide biosynthesis via deacetylation of ceramide synthase (CerS) 1, 2, and 6. Reciprocal immunoprecipitation experiments revealed that CerS1, CerS2, and CerS6, but not CerS4, are associated with SIRT3 in cerebral mitochondria. Furthermore, CerS1, -2, and -6 are hyperacetylated in the mitochondria of SIRT3-null mice, and SIRT3 directly deacetylates the ceramide synthases in a NAD(+)-dependent manner that increases enzyme activity. Investigation of the SIRT3 role in mitochondrial response to brain ischemia/reperfusion (IR) showed that SIRT3-mediated deacetylation of ceramide synthases increased enzyme activity and ceramide accumulation after IR. Functional studies demonstrated that absence of SIRT3 rescued the IR-induced blockade of the electron transport chain at the level of complex III, attenuated mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization, and decreased reactive oxygen species generation and protein carbonyls in mitochondria. Importantly, Sirt3 gene ablation reduced the brain injury after IR. These data support the hypothesis that IR triggers SIRT3-dependent deacetylation of ceramide synthases and the elevation of ceramide, which could inhibit complex III, leading to increased reactive oxygen species generation and brain injury. The results of these studies highlight a novel mechanism of SIRT3 involvement in modulating mitochondrial ceramide biosynthesis and suggest an important role of SIRT3 in mitochondrial dysfunction and brain injury after experimental stroke. PMID:26620563

  13. Identification of novel sesterterpene/triterpene synthase from Bacillus clausii.

    PubMed

    Sato, Tsutomu; Yamaga, Hiroaki; Kashima, Shoji; Murata, Yusuke; Shinada, Tetsuro; Nakano, Chiaki; Hoshino, Tsutomu

    2013-05-10

    Basic enzyme: The tetraprenyl-β-curcumene synthase homologue from the alkalophilic Bacillus clausii catalyses conversions of a geranylfarnesyl diphosphate and a hexaprenyl diphosphate into novel head-to-tail acyclic sesterterpene and triterpene. Tetraprenyl-β-curcumene synthase homologues represent a new family of terpene synthases that form not only sesquarterpene but also sesterterpene and triterpene. PMID:23554321

  14. Lessons from 455 Fusarium polyketide synthases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In fungi, polyketide synthases (PKSs) synthesize a structurally diverse array of secondary metabolites (SMs) with a range of biological activities. The most studied SMs are toxic to animals and/or plants, alter plant growth, have beneficial pharmaceutical activities, and/or are brightly colored pigm...

  15. Producing dicarboxylic acids using polyketide synthases

    SciTech Connect

    Katz, Leonard; Fortman, Jeffrey L; Keasling, Jay D

    2013-10-29

    The present invention provides for a polyketide synthase (PKS) capable of synthesizing a dicarboxylic acid (diacid). Such diacids include diketide-diacids and triketide-diacids. The invention includes recombinant nucleic acid encoding the PKS, and host cells comprising the PKS. The invention also includes methods for producing the diacids.

  16. Producing dicarboxylic acids using polyketide synthases

    SciTech Connect

    Katz, Leonard; Fortman, Jeffrey L.; Keasling, Jay D.

    2015-05-26

    The present invention provides for a polyketide synthase (PKS) capable of synthesizing a dicarboxylic acid (diacid). Such diacids include diketide-diacids and triketide-diacids. The invention includes recombinant nucleic acid encoding the PKS, and host cells comprising the PKS. The invention also includes methods for producing the diacids.

  17. Mutations in a delta9-Stearoyl-ACP-Desaturase Gene Are Associated with Enhanced Stearic Acid Levels in Soybean Seeds

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, P.; Shanklin, J.; Burton, J. W.; Upchurch, R. G.; Whittle, E.; Dewey, R. E.

    2008-11-01

    Stearic acid (18:0) is typically a minor component of soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] oil, accounting for only 2 to 4% of the total fatty acid content. Increasing stearic acid levels of soybean oil would lead to enhanced oxidative stability, potentially reducing the need for hydrogenation, a process leading to the formation of undesirable trans fatty acids. Although mutagenesis strategies have been successful in developing soybean germplasm with elevated 18:0 levels in the seed oil, the specific gene mutations responsible for this phenotype were not known. We report a newly identified soybean gene, designated SACPD-C, that encodes a unique isoform of {Delta}{sup 9}-stearoyl-ACP-desaturase, the enzyme responsible for converting stearic acid to oleic acid (18:1). High levels of SACPD-C transcript were only detected in developing seed tissue, suggesting that the encoded desaturase functions to enhance oleic acid biosynthetic capacity as the immature seed is actively engaged in triacylglycerol production and storage. The participation of SACPD-C in storage triacylglycerol synthesis is further supported by the observation of mutations in this gene in two independent sources of elevated 18:0 soybean germplasm, A6 (30% 18:0) and FAM94-41 (9% 18:0). A molecular marker diagnostic for the FAM94-41 SACPD-C gene mutation strictly associates with the elevated 18:0 phenotype in a segregating population, and could thus serve as a useful tool in the development of cultivars with oils possessing enhanced oxidative stability.

  18. Effect of ACP-CPP Chewing Gum and Natural Chewable Products on Plaque pH, Calcium and Phosphate Concentration

    PubMed Central

    Sultan, Saima; Chaudhary, Seema; Manuja, Naveen; Kaur, Harsimran; Amit, Sinha Ashish; Lingesha, Ravishankar Telgi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Numerous epidemiological studies have documented dental caries as the major public health problems throughout the world. It is gradually increasing in the underdeveloped and developing countries especially in children due to increasing popularity of refined sugars. Aim The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of natural chewable products (Tulsi, sesame seeds, fennel seeds, coconut) and ACP-CPP chewing gum on plaque pH, calcium and phosphate concentration. Materials and Methods A randomized controlled trial, with a cross-over study design, was conducted. Ten subjects aged 15-17 years who agreed to refrain from oral hygiene practice for 48 hours prior to the sample collection were selected for the study. The baseline plaque pH, calcium and phosphate was measured and repeated after 5 and 30 minutes. It was ensured that each study participant was subjected to all the products making an effective sample of ten subjects per product. The data was statistically analysed. Results The mean pH in all the study groups increased after 5 minutes and 30 minutes compared to baseline, except for coconut group at 30 minutes and fennel group at 5 minutes. Highest increase in plaque calcium concentration was found in fennel group followed by recaldent and sesame, respectively. Whereas, the highest increase in plaque phosphate was found in recaldent group followed by sesame group and fennel group respectively. Conclusion Plant products can be effective, inexpensive, easily accessible methods of maintaining oral health. Further studies are recommended to confirm long term effects. PMID:27190943

  19. Selectivity of Pyridone- and Diphenyl Ether-Based Inhibitors for the Yersinia pestis FabV Enoyl-ACP Reductase.

    PubMed

    Neckles, Carla; Pschibul, Annica; Lai, Cheng-Tsung; Hirschbeck, Maria; Kuper, Jochen; Davoodi, Shabnam; Zou, Junjie; Liu, Nina; Pan, Pan; Shah, Sonam; Daryaee, Fereidoon; Bommineni, Gopal R; Lai, Cristina; Simmerling, Carlos; Kisker, Caroline; Tonge, Peter J

    2016-05-31

    The enoyl-ACP reductase (ENR) catalyzes the last reaction in the elongation cycle of the bacterial type II fatty acid biosynthesis (FAS-II) pathway. While the FabI ENR is a well-validated drug target in organisms such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Staphylococcus aureus, alternate ENR isoforms have been discovered in other pathogens, including the FabV enzyme that is the sole ENR in Yersinia pestis (ypFabV). Previously, we showed that the prototypical ENR inhibitor triclosan was a poor inhibitor of ypFabV and that inhibitors based on the 2-pyridone scaffold were more potent [Hirschbeck, M. (2012) Structure 20 (1), 89-100]. These studies were performed with the T276S FabV variant. In the work presented here, we describe a detailed examination of the mechanism and inhibition of wild-type ypFabV and the T276S variant. The T276S mutation significantly reduces the affinity of diphenyl ether inhibitors for ypFabV (20-fold → 100-fold). In addition, while T276S ypFabV generally displays an affinity for 2-pyridone inhibitors higher than that of the wild-type enzyme, the 4-pyridone scaffold yields compounds with similar affinity for both wild-type and T276S ypFabV. T276 is located at the N-terminus of the helical substrate-binding loop, and structural studies coupled with site-directed mutagenesis reveal that alterations in this residue modulate the size of the active site portal. Subsequently, we were able to probe the mechanism of time-dependent inhibition in this enzyme family by extending the inhibition studies to include P142W ypFabV, a mutation that results in a gain of slow-onset inhibition for the 4-pyridone PT156. PMID:27136302

  20. Trichinella pseudospiralis vs. T. spiralis thymidylate synthase gene structure and T. pseudospiralis thymidylate synthase retrogene sequence

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Thymidylate synthase is a housekeeping gene, designated ancient due to its role in DNA synthesis and ubiquitous phyletic distribution. The genomic sequences were characterized coding for thymidylate synthase in two species of the genus Trichinella, an encapsulating T. spiralis and a non-encapsulating T. pseudospiralis. Methods Based on the sequence of parasitic nematode Trichinella spiralis thymidylate synthase cDNA, PCR techniques were employed. Results Each of the respective gene structures encompassed 6 exons and 5 introns located in conserved sites. Comparison with the corresponding gene structures of other eukaryotic species revealed lack of common introns that would be shared among selected fungi, nematodes, mammals and plants. The two deduced amino acid sequences were 96% identical. In addition to the thymidylate synthase gene, the intron-less retrocopy, i.e. a processed pseudogene, with sequence identical to the T. spiralis gene coding region, was found to be present within the T. pseudospiralis genome. This pseudogene, instead of the gene, was confirmed by RT-PCR to be expressed in the parasite muscle larvae. Conclusions Intron load, as well as distribution of exon and intron phases in thymidylate synthase genes from various sources, point against the theory of gene assembly by the primordial exon shuffling and support the theory of evolutionary late intron insertion into spliceosomal genes. Thymidylate synthase pseudogene expressed in T. pseudospiralis muscle larvae is designated a retrogene. PMID:24716800

  1. Polyketide genes in the marine sponge Plakortis simplex: a new group of mono-modular type I polyketide synthases from sponge symbionts

    PubMed Central

    Della Sala, Gerardo; Hochmuth, Thomas; Costantino, Valeria; Teta, Roberta; Gerwick, William; Gerwick, Lena; Piel, Jörn; Mangoni, Alfonso

    2013-01-01

    Summary Sponge symbionts are a largely unexplored source of new and unusual metabolic pathways. Insights into the distribution and function of metabolic genes of sponge symbionts are crucial to dissect and exploit their biotechnological potential. Screening of the metagenome of the marine sponge Plakortis simplex led to the discovery of the swf family, a new group of mono-modular type I polyketide synthase/fatty acid synthase (PKS/FAS) specifically associated with sponge symbionts. Two different examples of the swf cluster were present in the metagenome of P. simplex. A third example of the cluster is present in the previously sequenced genome of a poribacterium from the sponge Aplysina aerophoba but was formerly considered orthologous to the wcb/rkp cluster. The swf cluster was also found in six additional species of sponges. Therefore, the swf cluster represents the second group of mono-modular PKS, after the supA family, to be widespread in marine sponges. The putative swf operon consists of swfA (type I PKS/FAS), swfB (reductase and sulphotransferase domains) and swfC (radical S-adenosylmethionine, or radical SAM). Activation of the acyl carrier protein (ACP) domain of the SwfA protein to its holo-form by co-expression with Svp is the first functional proof of swf type genes in marine sponges. However, the precise biosynthetic role of the swf clusters remains unknown. PMID:24249289

  2. Polyketide genes in the marine sponge Plakortis simplex: a new group of mono-modular type I polyketide synthases from sponge symbionts.

    PubMed

    Della Sala, Gerardo; Hochmuth, Thomas; Costantino, Valeria; Teta, Roberta; Gerwick, William; Gerwick, Lena; Piel, Jörn; Mangoni, Alfonso

    2013-12-01

    Sponge symbionts are a largely unexplored source of new and unusual metabolic pathways. Insights into the distribution and function of metabolic genes of sponge symbionts are crucial to dissect and exploit their biotechnological potential. Screening of the metagenome of the marine sponge Plakortis simplex led to the discovery of the swf family, a new group of mono-modular type I polyketide synthase/fatty acid synthase (PKS/FAS) specifically associated with sponge symbionts. Two different examples of the swf cluster were present in the metagenome of P. simplex. A third example of the cluster is present in the previously sequenced genome of a poribacterium from the sponge Aplysina aerophoba but was formerly considered orthologous to the wcb/rkp cluster. The swf cluster was also found in six additional species of sponges. Therefore, the swf cluster represents the second group of mono-modular PKS, after the supA family, to be widespread in marine sponges. The putative swf operon consists of swfA (type I PKS/FAS), swfB (reductase and sulphotransferase domains) and swfC (radical S-adenosylmethionine, or radical SAM). Activation of the acyl carrier protein (ACP) domain of the SwfA protein to its holo-form by co-expression with Svp is the first functional proof of swf type genes in marine sponges. However, the precise biosynthetic role of the swf clusters remains unknown. PMID:24249289

  3. Geranyl diphosphate synthase large subunit, and methods of use

    DOEpatents

    Croteau, Rodney B.; Burke, Charles C.; Wildung, Mark R.

    2001-10-16

    A cDNA encoding geranyl diphosphate synthase large subunit from peppermint has been isolated and sequenced, and the corresponding amino acid sequence has been determined. Replicable recombinant cloning vehicles are provided which code for geranyl diphosphate synthase large subunit). In another aspect, modified host cells are provided that have been transformed, transfected, infected and/or injected with a recombinant cloning vehicle and/or DNA sequence encoding geranyl diphosphate synthase large subunit. In yet another aspect, the present invention provides isolated, recombinant geranyl diphosphate synthase protein comprising an isolated, recombinant geranyl diphosphate synthase large subunit protein and an isolated, recombinant geranyl diphosphate synthase small subunit protein. Thus, systems and methods are provided for the recombinant expression of geranyl diphosphate synthase.

  4. Taxadiene Synthase Structure and Evolution of Modular Architecture in Terpene Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Köksal, Mustafa; Jin, Yinghua; Coates, Robert M.; Croteau, Rodney; Christianson, David W.

    2010-01-01

    With more than 55,000 members identified to date in all forms of life, the family of terpene or terpenoid natural products represents the epitome of molecular biodiversity. A particularly eminent member of this family is the polycyclic diterpenoid Taxol (paclitaxel), which promotes tubulin polymerization1 and exhibits remarkable efficacy in cancer chemotherapy2. The first committed step of Taxol biosynthesis in the Pacific yew (Taxus brevifolia)3 is the cyclization of the linear isoprenoid substrate geranylgeranyl diphosphate (GGPP) to form taxa-4(5),11(12)diene4, which is catalyzed by taxadiene synthase5. The full-length form of this diterpene cyclase contains 862-residues, but an ~80-residue N-terminal transit sequence is cleaved upon maturation in plastids6. We now report the X-ray crystal structure of a truncation variant lacking the transit sequence and an additional 27 residues at the N-terminus, henceforth designated TXS. Specifically, we have determined structures of TXS complexed with 13-aza-13,14-dihydrocopalyl diphosphate (ACP, 1.82 Å resolution) and 2-fluorogeranylgeranyl diphosphate (FGP, 2.25 Å resolution). The TXS structure is the first of a diterpene cyclase and reveals a modular assembly of three α-helical domains. The C-terminal catalytic domain is a class I terpenoid cyclase, which binds and activates substrate GGPP with a three-metal ion cluster. Surprisingly, the N-terminal domain and a third "insertion" domain together adopt the fold of a vestigial class II terpenoid cyclase. A class II cyclase activates the isoprenoid substrate by protonation instead of ionization, and the TXS structure reveals a definitive connection between the two distinct cyclase classes in the evolution of terpenoid biosynthesis. PMID:21160477

  5. Structural and evolutionary relationships of "AT-less" type I polyketide synthase ketosynthases

    SciTech Connect

    Lohman, Jeremy; Ma, Ming; Osipiuk, Jerzy; Nocek, Boguslaw; Kim, Youngchang; Chang, Changsoo; Cuff, Marianne E.; Mack, Jamey; Bigelow, Lance; Li, Hui; Endres, Michael; Babnigg, Gyorgy; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Phillips, George N.; Shen, B G

    2015-10-13

    Acyltransferase (AT)-less type I polyketide synthases (PKSs) break the type I PKS paradigm. They lack the integrated AT domains within their modules and instead use a discrete AT that acts in trans, whereas a type I PKS module minimally contains AT, acyl carrier protein (ACP), and ketosynthase (KS) domains. Structures of canonical type I PKS KS-AT didomains reveal structured linkers that connect the two domains. AT-less type I PKS KSs have remnants of these linkers, which have been hypothesized to be AT docking domains. Natural products produced by AT-less type I PKSs are very complex because of an increased representation of unique modifying domains. AT-less type I PKS KSs possess substrate specificity and fall into phylogenetic clades that correlate with their substrates, whereas canonical type I PKS KSs are monophyletic. We have solved crystal structures of seven AT-less type I PKS KS domains that represent various sequence clusters, revealing insight into the large structural and subtle amino acid residue differences that lead to unique active site topologies and substrate specificities. One set of structures represents a larger group of KS domains from both canonical and AT-less type I PKSs that accept amino acid-containing substrates. One structure has a partial AT-domain, revealing the structural consequences of a type I PKS KS evolving into an AT-less type I PKS KS. These structures highlight the structural diversity within the AT-less type I PKS KS family, and most important, provide a unique opportunity to study the molecular evolution of substrate specificity within the type I PKSs.

  6. The cellulose synthase companion proteins act non-redundantly with CELLULOSE SYNTHASE INTERACTING1/POM2 and CELLULOSE SYNTHASE 6

    PubMed Central

    Endler, Anne; Schneider, Rene; Kesten, Christopher; Lampugnani, Edwin R.; Persson, Staffan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cellulose is a cell wall constituent that is essential for plant growth and development, and an important raw material for a range of industrial applications. Cellulose is synthesized at the plasma membrane by massive cellulose synthase (CesA) complexes that track along cortical microtubules in elongating cells of Arabidopsis through the activity of the protein CELLULOSE SYNTHASE INTERACTING1 (CSI1). In a recent study we identified another family of proteins that also are associated with the CesA complex and microtubules, and that we named COMPANIONS OF CELLULOSE SYNTHASE (CC). The CC proteins protect the cellulose synthesising capacity of Arabidopsis seedlings during exposure to adverse environmental conditions by enhancing microtubule dynamics. In this paper we provide cell biology and genetic evidence that the CSI1 and the CC proteins fulfil distinct functions during cellulose synthesis. We also show that the CC proteins are necessary to aid cellulose synthesis when components of the CesA complex are impaired. These data indicate that the CC proteins have a broad role in aiding cellulose synthesis during environmental changes and when core complex components are non-functional. PMID:26829351

  7. Identification and expression of a stearoyl-ACP desaturase gene responsible for oleic acid accumulation in Xanthoceras sorbifolia seeds.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Na; Zhang, Yuan; Li, Qiuqi; Li, Rufang; Xia, Xinli; Qin, Xiaowei; Guo, Huihong

    2015-02-01

    Xanthoceras sorbifolia Bunge is an oilseed tree that grows well on barren lands in dry climate. Its seeds contain a large amount of oil rich in oleic acid (18:1(Δ9)) and linoleic acid (18:2(Δ9, 12)). However, the molecular regulation of oil biosynthesis in X. sorbifolia seeds is poorly understood. Stearoyl-ACP desaturase (SAD, EC 1.14.99.6) is a plastid-localized soluble desaturase that catalyzes the conversion of stearic acid (18:0) to oleic acid, which plays a key role in determining the ratio of saturated to unsaturated fatty acids. In this study, a full-length cDNA of XsSAD was isolated from developing X. sorbifolia embryos. The XsSAD open reading frame had 1194-bp, encoding a polypeptide of 397 amino acids. XsSAD expression in Escherichia coli cells resulted in increased 18:1(Δ9) level, confirming the biological activity of the enzyme encoded by XsSAD. XsSAD expression in Arabidopsis ssi2 mutants partially restored the morphological phenotype and effectively increased the 18:1(Δ9) level. The levels of other unsaturated fatty acids synthesized with 18:1(Δ9) as the substrate also increased to some degree. XsSAD in X. sorbifolia had a much higher expression in embryos than in leaves and petals. XsSAD expression also correlated well with the oleic acid, unsaturated fatty acid, and total fatty acid levels in developing embryos. These data suggested that XsSAD determined the synthesis of oleic acid and contributed to the accumulation of unsaturated fatty acid and total oil in X. sorbifolia seeds. A preliminary tobacco rattle virus-based virus-induced gene silencing system established in X. sorbifolia can also be helpful for further analyzing the functions of XsSAD and other oil synthesis-related genes in woody plants. PMID:25528221

  8. Effect of CPP-ACP Paste on Enamel Carious Lesion of Primary Upper Anterior Teeth Assessed by Quantitative Light-Induced Fluorescence: A One-Year Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Sitthisettapong, Thanya; Doi, Takashi; Nishida, Yuhei; Kambara, Masaki; Phantumvanit, Prathip

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this clinical trial was to evaluate the effect of 1 year of daily application of 10% w/v CPP-ACP (casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate) paste in addition to regular toothbrushing with fluoridated toothpaste on the remineralization of enamel carious lesions in preschool children using quantitative light-induced fluorescence (QLF). A total of 103 Thai children (aged 2(1)/2-3(1)/2 years) with high caries risk who had at least 1 enamel carious lesion (ICDAS 1-3) on the labial surface of the upper anterior teeth were assigned to receive either CPP-ACP paste (n = 53) or placebo control (n = 50) following toothbrushing with fluoridated toothpaste after lunch at school. QLF measurement was performed at baseline, 6 months and 1 year. At 1 year, a significant reduction in fluorescence loss (ΔF), lesion area and lesion volume (ΔQ; p ≤ 0.001) of the lesions were found over time in both groups. However, no significant difference was observed between the groups (p = 0.79, 0.98 and 0.88, respectively). There was no statistically significant difference between the odds of ΔQ transition to a stage of regression or arrest compared with progression from baseline to 1 year between the two groups (OR = 1.03, 95% CI 0.31-3.39). The daily application of 10% w/v CPP-ACP paste on a school day for 1 year resulted in no improvement of enamel carious lesion remineralization in the primary upper anterior teeth as assessed by QLF. The lesion improvement was not superior to remineralization from regular toothbrushing with fluoridated toothpaste alone in these children. PMID:26228178

  9. Cloning, characterization, and expression analysis of acyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP)-thioesterase B from seeds of Chinese Spicehush (Lindera communis).

    PubMed

    Dong, Shubin; Huang, Jiacong; Li, Yannan; Zhang, Jing; Lin, Shanzhi; Zhang, Zhixiang

    2014-05-25

    Acyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) thioesterases (TE EC 3.1.2.14) are fatty acid biosynthesis key enzymes that determine fatty acid carbon chain length in most plant tissues. A full-length cDNA corresponding to one of the fatty acyl-ACP thioesterase (Fat) genes, designated LcFatB, was isolated from developing Lindera communis seeds using PCR and RACE with degenerate primers based on conserved sequences of multiple TE gene sequences obtained from GenBank. The 1788 bp cDNA had an open reading frame (ORF) of 1260 bp encoding a protein of 419 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence showed 61-73% identity to proteins in the FatB class of plant thioesterases. Real-time quantitative PCR analysis revealed that LcFatB was expressed in all tissues of L. communis, with the highest expression in the developing seeds 75days after flowering. Recombinant pET-MLcFatB was constructed using the pET-30 a vector and transformed into Escherichia coli BL21(DE3)△FadE, a strain that deleted the acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (FadE). SDS-PAGE analysis of proteins isolated from pET-MLcFatB E. coli cells after induction with IPTG revealed a protein band at ~40.5kDa, corresponding to the predicted size of LcFatB mature protein. The decanoic acid and lauric acid contents of the pET-MLcFatB transformant were increased significantly. These findings suggest that an LcFatB gene from a non-traditional oil-seed tree could be used to function as a saturated acyl-ACP thioesterase and could potentially be used to modify the fatty acid composition of seed oil from L. communis or other species through transgenic approaches. PMID:24631366

  10. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae FKS1 (ETG1) gene encodes an integral membrane protein which is a subunit of 1,3-beta-D-glucan synthase.

    PubMed Central

    Douglas, C M; Foor, F; Marrinan, J A; Morin, N; Nielsen, J B; Dahl, A M; Mazur, P; Baginsky, W; Li, W; el-Sherbeini, M

    1994-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, mutations in FKS1 confer hypersensitivity to the immunosuppressants FK506 and cyclosporin A, while mutations in ETG1 confer resistance to the cell-wall-active echinocandins (inhibitors of 1,3-beta-D-glucan synthase) and, in some cases, concomitant hypersensitivity to the chitin synthase inhibitor nikkomycin Z. The FKS1 and ETG1 genes were cloned by complementation of these phenotypes and were found to be identical. Disruption of the gene results in (i) a pronounced slow-growth phenotype, (ii) hypersensitivity to FK506 and cyclosporin A, (iii) a slight increase in sensitivity to echinocandin, and (iv) a significant reduction in 1,3-beta-D-glucan synthase activity in vitro. The nucleotide sequence encodes a 215-kDa polypeptide predicted to be an integral membrane protein with 16 transmembrane helices, consistent with previous observations that the etg1-1 mutation results in echinocandin-resistant glucan synthase activity associated with the nonextractable membrane fraction of the enzyme. These results suggest that FKS1 encodes a subunit of 1,3-beta-D-glucan synthase. The residual activity present in the disruption mutant, the nonessential nature of the gene, and results of Southern blot hybridization analysis point to the existence of a glucan synthase isozyme. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 Fig. 5 PMID:7528927

  11. (R)-citramalate synthase in methanogenic archaea.

    PubMed

    Howell, D M; Xu, H; White, R H

    1999-01-01

    The Methanococcus jannaschii gene MJ1392 was cloned, and its protein product was hyperexpressed in Escherichia coli. The resulting protein was purified and shown to catalyze the condensation of pyruvate and acetyl coenzyme A, with the formation of (R)-citramalate. Thus, this gene (cimA) encodes an (R)-citramalate synthase (CimA). This is the first identification of this enzyme, which is likely involved in the biosynthesis of isoleucine. PMID:9864346

  12. Assessment of White Spot Lesions and In-Vivo Evaluation of the Effect of CPP-ACP on White Spot Lesions in Permanent Molars of Children

    PubMed Central

    Munjal, Deepti; Garg, Shalini; Dhindsa, Abhishek; Sidhu, Gagandeep Kaur

    2016-01-01

    Introduction As hindrance of remineralisation process occurs during orthodontic therapy resulting in decalcification of enamel because number of plaque retention sites increases due to banding and bonding of appliances to teeth. Aim The present analytic study was undertaken to assess the occurrence of white spot lesions in permanent molars of children with and without orthodontic therapy and to evaluate the effect of Casein PhosphoPeptide-Amorphous Calcium Phosphate (CPP-ACP) on white spot lesions in post-orthodontic patients in a given period of time. Materials and Methods The study comprised of examination of 679 first permanent molars which were examined to assess the occurrence of smooth surface white spot lesions in children of 8 to 16 years age group. Group I comprised subjects without any orthodontic treatment and Group II comprised of subjects who had undergone orthodontic therapy. The sample size was calculated using the epi-info6 computer package. Treatment group included 20 post-orthodontic patients examined with at least one white spot lesion within the enamel who received remineralizing cream (GC Tooth Mousse, Recaldent, GC Corporation.) i.e., CPP–ACP cream two times a day for 12 consecutive weeks. Computerized image analysis method was taken to evaluate white spot lesions. These frequency and percentages were compared with chi-square test. For comparison of numeric data, paired t-test was used. Results Of the total 278 (49.6%) first permanent molars showed occurrence of smooth surface white spot lesions out of 560 in Group I and 107 (89.9%) first permanent molars showed presence of white spot lesions out of 119 debanded first permanent molars of children examined in Group II. CPP-ACP therapy group showed reduction in severity of codes which was found to be highly significant after 12 weeks and eight weeks on gingival-third, p-value (<0.001) and significant after eight weeks and four weeks on middle-third according to ICDAS II criteria and

  13. Radiolabelling and positron emission tomography of PT70, a time-dependent inhibitor of InhA, the Mycobacterium tuberculosis enoyl-ACP reductase.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Liu, Li; Lu, Yang; Pan, Pan; Hooker, Jacob M; Fowler, Joanna S; Tonge, Peter J

    2015-11-01

    PT70 is a diaryl ether inhibitor of InhA, the enoyl-ACP reductase in the Mycobacterium tuberculosis fatty acid biosynthesis pathway. It has a residence time of 24 min on the target, and also shows antibacterial activity in a mouse model of tuberculosis infection. Due to the interest in studying target tissue pharmacokinetics of PT70, we developed a method to radiolabel PT70 with carbon-11 and have studied its pharmacokinetics in mice and baboons using positron emission tomography. PMID:26227776

  14. Chrysanthemyl Diphosphate Synthase Operates in Planta as a Bifunctional Enzyme with Chrysanthemol Synthase Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ting; Gao, Liping; Hu, Hao; Stoopen, Geert; Wang, Caiyun; Jongsma, Maarten A.

    2014-01-01

    Chrysanthemyl diphosphate synthase (CDS) is the first pathway-specific enzyme in the biosynthesis of pyrethrins, the most widely used plant-derived pesticide. CDS catalyzes c1′-2-3 cyclopropanation reactions of two molecules of dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMAPP) to yield chrysanthemyl diphosphate (CPP). Three proteins are known to catalyze this cyclopropanation reaction of terpene precursors. Two of them, phytoene and squalene synthase, are bifunctional enzymes with both prenyltransferase and terpene synthase activity. CDS, the other member, has been reported to perform only the prenyltransferase step. Here we show that the NDXXD catalytic motif of CDS, under the lower substrate conditions prevalent in plants, also catalyzes the next step, converting CPP into chrysanthemol by hydrolyzing the diphosphate moiety. The enzymatic hydrolysis reaction followed conventional Michaelis-Menten kinetics, with a Km value for CPP of 196 μm. For the chrysanthemol synthase activity, DMAPP competed with CPP as substrate. The DMAPP concentration required for half-maximal activity to produce chrysanthemol was ∼100 μm, and significant substrate inhibition was observed at elevated DMAPP concentrations. The N-terminal peptide of CDS was identified as a plastid-targeting peptide. Transgenic tobacco plants overexpressing CDS emitted chrysanthemol at a rate of 0.12–0.16 μg h−1 g−1 fresh weight. We propose that CDS should be renamed a chrysanthemol synthase utilizing DMAPP as substrate. PMID:25378387

  15. Chrysanthemyl diphosphate synthase operates in planta as a bifunctional enzyme with chrysanthemol synthase activity.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ting; Gao, Liping; Hu, Hao; Stoopen, Geert; Wang, Caiyun; Jongsma, Maarten A

    2014-12-26

    Chrysanthemyl diphosphate synthase (CDS) is the first pathway-specific enzyme in the biosynthesis of pyrethrins, the most widely used plant-derived pesticide. CDS catalyzes c1'-2-3 cyclopropanation reactions of two molecules of dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMAPP) to yield chrysanthemyl diphosphate (CPP). Three proteins are known to catalyze this cyclopropanation reaction of terpene precursors. Two of them, phytoene and squalene synthase, are bifunctional enzymes with both prenyltransferase and terpene synthase activity. CDS, the other member, has been reported to perform only the prenyltransferase step. Here we show that the NDXXD catalytic motif of CDS, under the lower substrate conditions prevalent in plants, also catalyzes the next step, converting CPP into chrysanthemol by hydrolyzing the diphosphate moiety. The enzymatic hydrolysis reaction followed conventional Michaelis-Menten kinetics, with a Km value for CPP of 196 μm. For the chrysanthemol synthase activity, DMAPP competed with CPP as substrate. The DMAPP concentration required for half-maximal activity to produce chrysanthemol was ∼100 μm, and significant substrate inhibition was observed at elevated DMAPP concentrations. The N-terminal peptide of CDS was identified as a plastid-targeting peptide. Transgenic tobacco plants overexpressing CDS emitted chrysanthemol at a rate of 0.12-0.16 μg h(-1) g(-1) fresh weight. We propose that CDS should be renamed a chrysanthemol synthase utilizing DMAPP as substrate. PMID:25378387

  16. CTP synthase forms cytoophidia in the cytoplasm and nucleus

    SciTech Connect

    Gou, Ke-Mian; Chang, Chia-Chun; Shen, Qing-Ji; Sung, Li-Ying; Liu, Ji-Long

    2014-04-15

    CTP synthase is an essential metabolic enzyme responsible for the de novo synthesis of CTP. Multiple studies have recently showed that CTP synthase protein molecules form filamentous structures termed cytoophidia or CTP synthase filaments in the cytoplasm of eukaryotic cells, as well as in bacteria. Here we report that CTP synthase can form cytoophidia not only in the cytoplasm, but also in the nucleus of eukaryotic cells. Both glutamine deprivation and glutamine analog treatment promote formation of cytoplasmic cytoophidia (C-cytoophidia) and nuclear cytoophidia (N-cytoophidia). N-cytoophidia are generally shorter and thinner than their cytoplasmic counterparts. In mammalian cells, both CTP synthase 1 and CTP synthase 2 can form cytoophidia. Using live imaging, we have observed that both C-cytoophidia and N-cytoophidia undergo multiple rounds of fusion upon glutamine analog treatment. Our study reveals the coexistence of cytoophidia in the cytoplasm and nucleus, therefore providing a good opportunity to investigate the intracellular compartmentation of CTP synthase. - Highlights: • CTP synthase forms cytoophidia not only in the cytoplasm but also in the nucleus. • Glutamine deprivation and Glutamine analogs promotes cytoophidium formation. • N-cytoophidia exhibit distinct morphology when compared to C-cytoophidia. • Both CTP synthase 1 and CTP synthase 2 form cytoophidia in mammalian cells. • Fusions of cytoophidia occur in the cytoplasm and nucleus.

  17. Oligosaccharide Binding in Escherichia coli Glycogen Synthase

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng, Fang; Yep, Alejandra; Feng, Lei; Preiss, Jack; Geiger, James H.

    2010-11-17

    Glycogen/starch synthase elongates glucan chains and is the key enzyme in the synthesis of glycogen in bacteria and starch in plants. Cocrystallization of Escherichia coli wild-type glycogen synthase (GS) with substrate ADPGlc and the glucan acceptor mimic HEPPSO produced a closed form of GS and suggests that domain-domain closure accompanies glycogen synthesis. Cocrystallization of the inactive GS mutant E377A with substrate ADPGlc and oligosaccharide results in the first oligosaccharide-bound glycogen synthase structure. Four bound oligosaccharides are observed, one in the interdomain cleft (G6a) and three on the N-terminal domain surface (G6b, G6c, and G6d). Extending from the center of the enzyme to the interdomain cleft opening, G6a mostly interacts with the highly conserved N-terminal domain residues lining the cleft of GS. The surface-bound oligosaccharides G6c and G6d have less interaction with enzyme and exhibit a more curled, helixlike structural arrangement. The observation that oligosaccharides bind only to the N-terminal domain of GS suggests that glycogen in vivo probably binds to only one side of the enzyme to ensure unencumbered interdomain movement, which is required for efficient, continuous glucan-chain synthesis.

  18. Thermostable malate synthase of Streptomyces thermovulgaris.

    PubMed

    Goh, L L; Koh, R; Loke, P; Sim, T S

    2003-10-01

    The gene, encoding malate synthase (MS), aceB, was cloned from the thermophilic bacterium Streptomyces thermovulgaris by homology-based PCR. The 1,626-bp cloned fragment encodes a protein consisting of 541 amino acids. S. thermovulgaris malate synthase (stMS) gene was over-expressed in Escherichia coli using a glutathione-S transferase (GST) fusion vector (pGEX-6P-1), purified by affinity chromatography, and subsequently cleaved from its GST fusion partner. The purified stMS was characterized and compared to a mesophilic malate synthase (scMS) from Streptomyces coelicolor. stMS exhibited higher temperature optima (40-60 degrees C) than those of scMS (28-37 degrees C). It was more thermostable and very resistant to the chemical denaturant urea. Amino acid sequence comparison of stMS with four mesophilic streptomycete MSs indicated that they share 70.9-91.4% amino acid identities, with stMS possessing slightly more charged residues (approximately 31%) than its mesophilic counterparts (approximately 28-29%). Seven charged residues (E85, R187, R209, H239, H364, R382 and K520) that were unique to stMS may be selectively and strategically placed to support its peculiar characteristics. PMID:13680388

  19. Structure of a modular polyketide synthase

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Somnath; Whicher, Jonathan R.; Hansen, Douglas A.; Hale, Wendi A.; Chemler, Joseph A.; Congdon, Grady R.; Narayan, Alison R.; Håkansson, Kristina; Sherman, David H.; Smith, Janet L.

    2014-01-01

    Polyketide natural products constitute a broad class of compounds with diverse structural features and biological activities. Their biosynthetic machinery, represented by type I polyketide synthases, has an architecture in which successive modules catalyze two-carbon linear extensions and keto group processing reactions on intermediates covalently tethered to carrier domains. We employed electron cryo-microscopy to visualize a full-length module and determine sub-nanometer resolution 3D reconstructions that revealed an unexpectedly different architecture compared to the homologous dimeric mammalian fatty acid synthase. A single reaction chamber provides access to all catalytic sites for the intra-module carrier domain. In contrast, the carrier from the preceding module uses a separate entrance outside the reaction chamber to deliver the upstream polyketide intermediate for subsequent extension and modification. This study reveals for the first time the structural basis for both intra-module and inter-module substrate transfer in polyketide synthases, and establishes a new model for molecular dissection of these multifunctional enzyme systems. PMID:24965652

  20. Genomic organization of plant terpene synthases and molecular evolutionary implications.

    PubMed Central

    Trapp, S C; Croteau, R B

    2001-01-01

    Terpenoids are the largest, most diverse class of plant natural products and they play numerous functional roles in primary metabolism and in ecological interactions. The first committed step in the formation of the various terpenoid classes is the transformation of the prenyl diphosphate precursors, geranyl diphosphate, farnesyl diphosphate, and geranylgeranyl diphosphate, to the parent structures of each type catalyzed by the respective monoterpene (C(10)), sesquiterpene (C(15)), and diterpene synthases (C(20)). Over 30 cDNAs encoding plant terpenoid synthases involved in primary and secondary metabolism have been cloned and characterized. Here we describe the isolation and analysis of six genomic clones encoding terpene synthases of conifers, [(-)-pinene (C(10)), (-)-limonene (C(10)), (E)-alpha-bisabolene (C(15)), delta-selinene (C(15)), and abietadiene synthase (C(20)) from Abies grandis and taxadiene synthase (C(20)) from Taxus brevifolia], all of which are involved in natural products biosynthesis. Genome organization (intron number, size, placement and phase, and exon size) of these gymnosperm terpene synthases was compared to eight previously characterized angiosperm terpene synthase genes and to six putative terpene synthase genomic sequences from Arabidopsis thaliana. Three distinct classes of terpene synthase genes were discerned, from which assumed patterns of sequential intron loss and the loss of an unusual internal sequence element suggest that the ancestral terpenoid synthase gene resembled a contemporary conifer diterpene synthase gene in containing at least 12 introns and 13 exons of conserved size. A model presented for the evolutionary history of plant terpene synthases suggests that this superfamily of genes responsible for natural products biosynthesis derived from terpene synthase genes involved in primary metabolism by duplication and divergence in structural and functional specialization. This novel molecular evolutionary approach focused

  1. A mechanism of paraquat toxicity involving nitric oxide synthase

    PubMed Central

    Day, Brian J.; Patel, Manisha; Calavetta, Lisa; Chang, Ling-Yi; Stamler, Jonathan S.

    1999-01-01

    Paraquat (PQ) is a well described pneumotoxicant that produces toxicity by redox cycling with cellular diaphorases, thereby elevating intracellular levels of superoxide (O2⨪). NO synthase (NOS) has been shown to participate in PQ-induced lung injury. Current theory holds that NO reacts with O2⨪ generated by PQ to produce the toxin peroxynitrite. We asked whether NOS might alternatively function as a PQ diaphorase and reexamined the question of whether NO/O2⨪ reactions were toxic or protective. Here, we show that: (i) neuronal NOS has PQ diaphorase activity that inversely correlates with NO formation; (ii) PQ-induced endothelial cell toxicity is attenuated by inhibitors of NOS that prevent NADPH oxidation, but is not attenuated by those that do not; (iii) PQ inhibits endothelium-derived, but not NO-induced, relaxations of aortic rings; and (iv) PQ-induced cytotoxicity is potentiated in cytokine-activated macrophages in a manner that correlates with its ability to block NO formation. These data indicate that NOS is a PQ diaphorase and that toxicity of such redox-active compounds involves a loss of NO-related activity. PMID:10535996

  2. Geranyl diphosphate synthase molecules, and nucleic acid molecules encoding same

    SciTech Connect

    Croteau, Rodney Bruce; Burke, Charles Cullen

    2008-06-24

    In one aspect, the present invention provides isolated nucleic acid molecules that each encode a geranyl diphosphate synthase protein, wherein each isolated nucleic acid molecule hybridizes to a nucleic acid molecule consisting of the sequence set forth in SEQ ID NO:1 under conditions of 5.times.SSC at 45.degree. C. for one hour. The present invention also provides isolated geranyl diphosphate synthase proteins, and methods for altering the level of expression of geranyl diphosphate synthase protein in a host cell.

  3. Mitochondrial citrate synthase crystals: novel finding in Sengers syndrome caused by acylglycerol kinase (AGK) mutations.

    PubMed

    Siriwardena, Komudi; Mackay, Nevena; Levandovskiy, Valeriy; Blaser, Susan; Raiman, Julian; Kantor, Paul F; Ackerley, Cameron; Robinson, Brian H; Schulze, Andreas; Cameron, Jessie M

    2013-01-01

    We report on two families with Sengers syndrome and mutations in the acylglycerol kinase gene (AGK). In the first family, two brothers presented with vascular strokes, lactic acidosis, cardiomyopathy and cataracts, abnormal muscle cell histopathology and mitochondrial function. One proband had very abnormal mitochondria with citrate synthase crystals visible in electron micrographs, associated with markedly high citrate synthase activity. Exome sequencing was used to identify mutations in the AGK gene in the index patient. Targeted sequencing confirmed the same homozygous mutation (c.3G>A, p.M1I) in the brother. The second family had four affected members, of which we examined two. They also presented with similar clinical symptoms, but no strokes. Postmortem heart and skeletal muscle tissues showed low complex I, III and IV activities in the heart, but normal in the muscle. Skin fibroblasts showed elevated lactate/pyruvate ratios and low complex I+III activity. Targeted sequencing led to identification of a homozygous c.979A>T, p.K327* mutation. AGK is located in the mitochondria and phosphorylates monoacylglycerol and diacylglycerol to lysophosphatidic acid and phosphatidic acid. Disruption of these signaling molecules affects the mitochondria's response to superoxide radicals, resulting in oxidative damage to mitochondrial DNA, lipids and proteins, and stimulation of cellular detoxification pathways. High levels of manganese superoxide dismutase protein were detected in all four affected individuals, consistent with increased free radical damage. Phosphatidic acid is also involved in the synthesis of phospholipids and its loss will result in changes to the lipid composition of the inner mitochondrial membrane. These effects manifest as cataract formation in the eye, respiratory chain dysfunction and cardiac hypertrophy in heart tissue. These two pedigrees confirm that mutation of AGK is responsible for the severe neonatal presentation of Sengers syndrome. The

  4. Differential expression of biphenyl synthase gene family members in fire-blight-infected apple 'Holsteiner Cox'.

    PubMed

    Chizzali, Cornelia; Gaid, Mariam M; Belkheir, Asma K; Hänsch, Robert; Richter, Klaus; Flachowsky, Henryk; Peil, Andreas; Hanke, Magda-Viola; Liu, Benye; Beerhues, Ludger

    2012-02-01

    Fire blight, caused by the bacterium Erwinia amylovora, is a devastating disease of apple (Malus × domestica). The phytoalexins of apple are biphenyls and dibenzofurans, whose carbon skeleton is formed by biphenyl synthase (BIS), a type III polyketide synthase. In the recently published genome sequence of apple 'Golden Delicious', nine BIS genes and four BIS gene fragments were detected. The nine genes fall into four subfamilies, referred to as MdBIS1 to MdBIS4. In a phylogenetic tree, the BIS amino acid sequences from apple and Sorbus aucuparia formed an individual cluster within the clade of the functionally diverse type III polyketide synthases. cDNAs encoding MdBIS1 to MdBIS4 were cloned from fire-blight-infected shoots of apple 'Holsteiner Cox,' heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli, and functionally analyzed. Benzoyl-coenzyme A and salicoyl-coenzyme A were the preferred starter substrates. In response to inoculation with E. amylovora, the BIS3 gene was expressed in stems of cv Holsteiner Cox, with highest transcript levels in the transition zone between necrotic and healthy tissues. The transition zone was the accumulation site of biphenyl and dibenzofuran phytoalexins. Leaves contained transcripts for BIS2 but failed to form immunodetectable amounts of BIS protein. In cell cultures of apple 'Cox Orange,' expression of the BIS1 to BIS3 genes was observed after the addition of an autoclaved E. amylovora suspension. Using immunofluorescence localization under a confocal laser-scanning microscope, the BIS3 protein in the transition zone of stems was detected in the parenchyma of the bark. Dot-shaped immunofluorescence was confined to the junctions between neighboring cortical parenchyma cells. PMID:22158676

  5. Divinyl ether synthase gene and protein, and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Howe, Gregg A.; Itoh, Aya

    2011-09-13

    The present invention relates to divinyl ether synthase genes, proteins, and methods of their use. The present invention encompasses both native and recombinant wild-type forms of the synthase, as well as mutants and variant forms, some of which possess altered characteristics relative to the wild-type synthase. The present invention also relates to methods of using divinyl ether synthase genes and proteins, including in their expression in transgenic organisms and in the production of divinyl ether fatty acids, and to methods of suing divinyl ether fatty acids, including in the protection of plants from pathogens.

  6. Divinyl ether synthase gene, and protein and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Howe, Gregg A.; Itoh, Aya

    2006-12-26

    The present invention relates to divinyl ether synthase genes, proteins, and methods of their use. The present invention encompasses both native and recombinant wild-type forms of the synthase, as well as mutants and variant forms, some of which possess altered characteristics relative to the wild-type synthase. The present invention also relates to methods of using divinyl ether synthase genes and proteins, including in their expression in transgenic organisms and in the production of divinyl ether fatty acids, and to methods of suing divinyl ether fatty acids, including in the protection of plants from pathogens.

  7. Evolutinoary Consideration on 5-Aminolevulinate Synthase in Nature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh-Hama, Tamiko

    1997-08-01

    5-Aminolevulinic acid (ALA), a universal precursor of tetrapyrrole compounds can be synthesized by two pathways: the C5 (glutamate) pathway and ALA synthase. From the phylogenetic distribution it is shown that distribution of ALA synthase is restricted to the α subclass of purple bacteria in prokaryotes, and further distributed to mitochondria of eukaryotes. The monophyletic origin of bacterial and eukaryotic ALA synthase is shown by sequence analysis of the enzyme. Evolution of ALA synthase in the α subclass of purple bacteria is discussed in relation to the energy-generating and biosynthetic devices in subclasses of this bacteria.

  8. Vitis vinifera terpenoid cyclases: functional identification of two sesquiterpene synthase cDNAs encoding (+)-valencene synthase and (-)-germacrene D synthase and expression of mono- and sesquiterpene synthases in grapevine flowers and berries.

    PubMed

    Lücker, Joost; Bowen, Pat; Bohlmann, Jörg

    2004-10-01

    Valencene is a volatile sesquiterpene emitted from flowers of grapevine, Vitis vinifera L. A full-length cDNA from the cultivar Gewürztraminer was functionally expressed in Escherichia coli and found to encode valencene synthase (VvVal). The two major products formed by recombinant VvVal enzyme activity with farnesyl diphosphate (FPP) as substrate are (+)-valencene and (-)-7-epi-alpha-selinene. Grapevine valencene synthase is closely related to a second sesquiterpene synthase from this species, (-)-germacrene D synthase (VvGerD). VvVal and VvGerD cDNA probes revealed strong signals in Northern hybridizations with RNA isolated from grapevine flower buds. Transcript levels were lower in open pre-anthesis flowers, flowers after anthesis, or at early onset of fruit development. Similar results were obtained using a third probe, (-)-alpha-terpineol synthase, a monoterpenol synthase. Sesquiterpene synthase and monoterpene synthase transcripts were not detected in the mesocarp and exocarp during early stages of fruit development, but transcripts hybridizing with VvVal appeared during late ripening of the berries. Sesquiterpene synthase transcripts were also detected in young seeds. PMID:15464152

  9. Functional Prostacyclin Synthase Promoter Polymorphisms. Impact in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Cornelius, Amber R.; Lu, Xiao; Conklin, David S.; Del Rosario, Mark J.; Lowe, Anita M.; Elos, Mihret T.; Fettig, Lynsey M.; Wong, Randall E.; Hara, Naoko; Cogan, Joy D.; Phillips, John A.; Taylor, Matthew R.; Graham, Brian B.; Tuder, Rubin M.; Loyd, James E.; Geraci, Mark W.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a progressive disease characterized by elevated pulmonary artery pressure, vascular remodeling, and ultimately right ventricular heart failure. PAH can have a genetic component (heritable PAH), most often through mutations of bone morphogenetic protein receptor 2, and idiopathic and associated forms. Heritable PAH is not completely penetrant within families, with approximately 20% concurrence of inactivating bone morphogenetic protein receptor 2 mutations and delayed onset of PAH disease. Because one of the treatment options is using prostacyclin analogs, we hypothesized that prostacyclin synthase promoter sequence variants associated with increased mRNA expression may play a protective role in the bone morphogenetic protein receptor 2 unaffected carriers. Objectives: To characterize the range of prostacyclin synthase promoter variants and assess their transcriptional activities in PAH-relevant cell types. To determine the distribution of prostacyclin synthase promoter variants in PAH, unaffected carriers in heritable PAH families, and control populations. Methods: Polymerase chain reaction approaches were used to genotype prostacyclin synthase promoter variants in more than 300 individuals. Prostacyclin synthase promoter haplotypes’ transcriptional activities were determined with luciferase reporter assays. Measurements and Main Results: We identified a comprehensive set of prostacyclin synthase promoter variants and tested their transcriptional activities in PAH-relevant cell types. We demonstrated differences of prostacyclin synthase promoter activities dependent on their haplotype. Conclusions: Prostacyclin synthase promoter sequence variants exhibit a range of transcriptional activities. We discovered a significant bias for more active prostacyclin synthase promoter variants in unaffected carriers as compared with affected patients with PAH. PMID:24605778

  10. 2.0 Angstrom Structure of Prostaglandin H2 Synthase-1 Reconstituted with a Manganese Porphyrin Cofactor

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta,K.; Selinsky, B.; Loll, P.

    2006-01-01

    Prostaglandin H{sub 2} synthase (EC 1.14.99.1) is a clinically important drug target that catalyzes two key steps in the biosynthesis of the eicosanoid hormones. The enzyme contains spatially distinct cyclooxygenase and peroxidase active sites, both of which require a heme cofactor. Substitution of ferric heme by Mn{sup III} protoporphyrin IX greatly diminishes the peroxidase activity, but has little effect on the cyclooxygenase activity. Here, the 2.0 Angstrom resolution crystal structure of the Mn{sup III} form of ovine prostaglandin H{sub 2} synthase-1 is described (R = 21.8%, R{sub free} = 23.7%). Substitution of Mn{sup III} for Fe{sup III} causes no structural perturbations in the protein. However, the out-of-plane displacement of the manganese ion with respect to the porphyrin is greater than that of the iron by approximately 0.2 Angstroms. This perturbation may help to explain the altered catalytic properties of the manganese enzyme.

  11. Molecular characterization of the homo-phytochelatin synthase of soybean Glycine max: relation to phytochelatin synthase.

    PubMed

    Oven, Matjaz; Page, Jonathan E; Zenk, Meinhart H; Kutchan, Toni M

    2002-02-15

    The phytochelatin homologs homo-phytochelatins are heavy metal-binding peptides present in many legumes. To study the biosynthesis of these compounds, we have isolated and functionally expressed a cDNA GmhPCS1 encoding homo-phytochelatin synthase from Glycine max, a plant known to accumulate homo-phytochelatins rather than phytochelatins upon the exposure to heavy metals. The catalytic properties of GmhPCS1 were compared with the phytochelatin synthase AtPCS1 from Arabidopsis thaliana. When assayed only in the presence of glutathione, both enzymes catalyzed phytochelatin formation. GmhPCS1 accepted homoglutathione as the sole substrate for the synthesis of homo-phytochelatins whereas AtPCS1 did not. Homo-phytochelatin synthesis activity of both recombinant enzymes was significantly higher when glutathione was included in the reaction mixture. The incorporation of both glutathione and homoglutathione into homo-phytochelatin, n = 2, was demonstrated using GmhPCS1 and AtPCS1. In addition to bis(glutathionato)-metal complexes, various other metal-thiolates were shown to contribute to the activation of phytochelatin synthase. These complexes were not accepted as substrates by the enzyme, thereby suggesting that a recently proposed model of activation cannot fully explain the catalytic mechanism of phytochelatin synthase (Vatamaniuk, O. K., Mari, S., Lu, Y. P., and Rea, P. A. (2000) J. Biol. Chem. 275, 31451-31459). PMID:11706029

  12. Thymidylate synthase gene of herpesvirus ateles.

    PubMed Central

    Richter, J; Puchtler, I; Fleckenstein, B

    1988-01-01

    The putative thymidylate synthase (TS) gene of herpesvirus ateles, a T-lymphotropic tumor virus of New World primates, has a single large open reading frame encoding a polypeptide of 32.9 kilodaltons. The gene is transcribed into an unspliced 2.4-kilobase mRNA that is abundantly expressed late in virus replication. The AT-rich 5' untranslated leader sequence of TS mRNA in herpesvirus ateles-infected cells is remarkable in length (1,184 nucleotides), containing 29 minicistrons; this may indicate a role in translation regulation. Images PMID:3404583

  13. Engineering of chimeric class II polyhydroxyalkanoate synthases.

    PubMed

    Niamsiri, Nuttawee; Delamarre, Soazig C; Kim, Young-Rok; Batt, Carl A

    2004-11-01

    PHA synthase is a key enzyme involved in the biosynthesis of polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs). Using a combinatorial genetic strategy to create unique chimeric class II PHA synthases, we have obtained a number of novel chimeras which display improved catalytic properties. To engineer the chimeric PHA synthases, we constructed a synthetic phaC gene from Pseudomonas oleovorans (phaC1Po) that was devoid of an internal 540-bp fragment. Randomly amplified PCR products (created with primers based on conserved phaC sequences flanking the deleted internal fragment) were generated using genomic DNA isolated from soil and were substituted for the 540-bp internal region. The chimeric genes were expressed in a PHA-negative strain of Ralstonia eutropha, PHB(-)4 (DSM 541). Out of 1,478 recombinant clones screened for PHA production, we obtained five different chimeric phaC1Po genes that produced more PHA than the native phaC1Po. Chimeras S1-71, S4-8, S5-58, S3-69, and S3-44 exhibited 1.3-, 1.4-, 2.0-, 2.1-, and 3.0-fold-increased levels of in vivo activity, respectively. All of the mutants mediated the synthesis of PHAs with a slightly increased molar fraction of 3-hydroxyoctanoate; however, the weight-average molecular weights (Mw) of the PHAs in all cases remained almost the same. Based upon DNA sequence analyses, the various phaC fragments appear to have originated from Pseudomonas fluorescens and Pseudomonas aureofaciens. The amino acid sequence analyses showed that the chimeric proteins had 17 to 20 amino acid differences from the wild-type phaC1Po, and these differences were clustered in the same positions in the five chimeric clones. A threading model of PhaC1Po, developed based on homology of the enzyme to the Burkholderia glumae lipase, suggested that the amino acid substitutions found in the active chimeras were located mostly on the protein model surface. Thus, our combinatorial genetic engineering strategy proved to be broadly useful for improving the catalytic

  14. Novel family of terpene synthases evolved from trans-isoprenyl diphosphate synthases in a flea beetle

    PubMed Central

    Beran, Franziska; Rahfeld, Peter; Luck, Katrin; Nagel, Raimund; Vogel, Heiko; Wielsch, Natalie; Irmisch, Sandra; Ramasamy, Srinivasan; Gershenzon, Jonathan; Heckel, David G.; Köllner, Tobias G.

    2016-01-01

    Sesquiterpenes play important roles in insect communication, for example as pheromones. However, no sesquiterpene synthases, the enzymes involved in construction of the basic carbon skeleton, have been identified in insects to date. We investigated the biosynthesis of the sesquiterpene (6R,7S)-himachala-9,11-diene in the crucifer flea beetle Phyllotreta striolata, a compound previously identified as a male-produced aggregation pheromone in several Phyllotreta species. A (6R,7S)-himachala-9,11-diene–producing sesquiterpene synthase activity was detected in crude beetle protein extracts, but only when (Z,E)-farnesyl diphosphate [(Z,E)-FPP] was offered as a substrate. No sequences resembling sesquiterpene synthases from plants, fungi, or bacteria were found in the P. striolata transcriptome, but we identified nine divergent putative trans-isoprenyl diphosphate synthase (trans-IDS) transcripts. Four of these putative trans-IDSs exhibited terpene synthase (TPS) activity when heterologously expressed. Recombinant PsTPS1 converted (Z,E)-FPP to (6R,7S)-himachala-9,11-diene and other sesquiterpenes observed in beetle extracts. RNAi-mediated knockdown of PsTPS1 mRNA in P. striolata males led to reduced emission of aggregation pheromone, confirming a significant role of PsTPS1 in pheromone biosynthesis. Two expressed enzymes showed genuine IDS activity, with PsIDS1 synthesizing (E,E)-FPP, whereas PsIDS3 produced neryl diphosphate, (Z,Z)-FPP, and (Z,E)-FPP. In a phylogenetic analysis, the PsTPS enzymes and PsIDS3 were clearly separated from a clade of known coleopteran trans-IDS enzymes including PsIDS1 and PsIDS2. However, the exon–intron structures of IDS and TPS genes in P. striolata are conserved, suggesting that this TPS gene family evolved from trans-IDS ancestors. PMID:26936952

  15. Novel family of terpene synthases evolved from trans-isoprenyl diphosphate synthases in a flea beetle.

    PubMed

    Beran, Franziska; Rahfeld, Peter; Luck, Katrin; Nagel, Raimund; Vogel, Heiko; Wielsch, Natalie; Irmisch, Sandra; Ramasamy, Srinivasan; Gershenzon, Jonathan; Heckel, David G; Köllner, Tobias G

    2016-03-15

    Sesquiterpenes play important roles in insect communication, for example as pheromones. However, no sesquiterpene synthases, the enzymes involved in construction of the basic carbon skeleton, have been identified in insects to date. We investigated the biosynthesis of the sesquiterpene (6R,7S)-himachala-9,11-diene in the crucifer flea beetle Phyllotreta striolata, a compound previously identified as a male-produced aggregation pheromone in several Phyllotreta species. A (6R,7S)-himachala-9,11-diene-producing sesquiterpene synthase activity was detected in crude beetle protein extracts, but only when (Z,E)-farnesyl diphosphate [(Z,E)-FPP] was offered as a substrate. No sequences resembling sesquiterpene synthases from plants, fungi, or bacteria were found in the P. striolata transcriptome, but we identified nine divergent putative trans-isoprenyl diphosphate synthase (trans-IDS) transcripts. Four of these putative trans-IDSs exhibited terpene synthase (TPS) activity when heterologously expressed. Recombinant PsTPS1 converted (Z,E)-FPP to (6R,7S)-himachala-9,11-diene and other sesquiterpenes observed in beetle extracts. RNAi-mediated knockdown of PsTPS1 mRNA in P. striolata males led to reduced emission of aggregation pheromone, confirming a significant role of PsTPS1 in pheromone biosynthesis. Two expressed enzymes showed genuine IDS activity, with PsIDS1 synthesizing (E,E)-FPP, whereas PsIDS3 produced neryl diphosphate, (Z,Z)-FPP, and (Z,E)-FPP. In a phylogenetic analysis, the PsTPS enzymes and PsIDS3 were clearly separated from a clade of known coleopteran trans-IDS enzymes including PsIDS1 and PsIDS2. However, the exon-intron structures of IDS and TPS genes in P. striolata are conserved, suggesting that this TPS gene family evolved from trans-IDS ancestors. PMID:26936952

  16. Replacement of the catalytic nucleophile cysteine-296 by serine in class II polyhydroxyalkanoate synthase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa-mediated synthesis of a new polyester: identification of catalytic residues.

    PubMed

    Amara, Amro A; Rehm, Bernd H A

    2003-09-01

    The class II PHA (polyhydroxyalkanoate) synthases [PHA(MCL) synthases (medium-chain-length PHA synthases)] are mainly found in pseudomonads and catalyse synthesis of PHA(MCL)s using CoA thioesters of medium-chain-length 3-hydroxy fatty acids (C6-C14) as a substrate. Only recently PHA(MCL) synthases from Pseudomonas oleovorans and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were purified and in vitro activity was achieved. A threading model of the P. aeruginosa PHA(MCL) synthase PhaC1 was developed based on the homology to the epoxide hydrolase (1ek1) from mouse which belongs to the alpha/beta-hydrolase superfamily. The putative catalytic residues Cys-296, Asp-452, His-453 and His-480 were replaced by site-specific mutagenesis. In contrast to class I and III PHA synthases, the replacement of His-480, which aligns with the conserved base catalyst of the alpha/beta-hydrolases, with Gln did not affect in vivo enzyme activity and only slightly in vitro enzyme activity. The second conserved histidine His-453 was then replaced by Gln, and the modified enzyme showed only 24% of wild-type in vivo activity, which indicated that His-453 might functionally replace His-480 in class II PHA synthases. Replacement of the postulated catalytic nucleophile Cys-296 by Ser only reduced in vivo enzyme activity to 30% of wild-type enzyme activity and drastically changed substrate specificity. Moreover, the C296S mutation turned the enzyme sensitive towards PMSF inhibition. The replacement of Asp-452 by Asn, which is supposed to be required as general base catalyst for elongation reaction, did abolish enzyme activity as was found for the respective amino acid residue of class I and III enzymes. In the threading model residues Cys-296, Asp-452, His-453 and His-480 reside in the core structure with the putative catalytic nucleophile Cys-296 localized at the highly conserved gamma-turns of the alpha/beta-hydrolases. Inhibitor studies indicated that catalytic histidines reside in the active site. The conserved

  17. Torque generation mechanism of ATP synthase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, John; Maric, Sladjana; Scoppa, M.; Cheung, M.

    2010-03-01

    ATP synthase is a rotary motor that produces adenosine triphosphate (ATP), the chemical currency of life. Our proposed electric field driven torque (EFT) model of FoF1-ATP synthase describes how torque, which scales with the number of c-ring proton binding sites, is generated by the proton motive force (pmf) across the mitochondrial inner membrane. When Fo is coupled to F1, the model predicts a critical pmf to drive ATP production. In order to fully understand how the electric field resulting from the pmf drives the c-ring to rotate, it is important to examine the charge distributions in the protonated c-ring and a-subunit containing the proton channels. Our calculations use a self-consistent field approach based on a refinement of reported structural data. The results reveal changes in pKa for key residues on the a-subunit and c-ring, as well as titration curves and protonation state energy diagrams. Health implications will be briefly discussed.

  18. ATP synthase: a tentative structural model.

    PubMed

    Engelbrecht, S; Junge, W

    1997-09-15

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) synthase produces ATP from ADP and inorganic phosphate at the expense of proton- or sodium-motive force across the respective coupling membrane in Archaea, Bacteria and Eucarya. Cation flow through the intrinsic membrane portion of this enzyme (Fo, subunits ab2c9-12) and substrate turnover in the headpiece (F1, subunits alpha3beta3 gammadeltaepsilon) are mechanically coupled by the rotation of subunit gamma in the center of the catalytic hexagon of subunits (alphabeta)3 in F1. ATP synthase is the smallest rotatory engine in nature. With respect to the headpiece alone, it probably operates with three steps. Partial structures of six out of its at least eight different subunits have been published and a 3-dimensional structure is available for the assembly (alphabeta)3gamma. In this article, we review the available structural data and build a tentative topological model of the holoenzyme. The rotor portion is proposed to consist of a wheel of at least nine copies of subunits c, epsilon and a portion of gamma as a spoke, and another portion of gamma as a crankshaft. The stator is made up from a, the transmembrane portion of b2, delta and the catalytic hexagon of (alphabeta)3. As an educated guess, the model may be of heuristic value for ongoing studies on this fascinating electrochemical-to-mechanical-to-chemical transducer. PMID:9323021

  19. Loss of LRPPRC causes ATP synthase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Mourier, Arnaud; Ruzzenente, Benedetta; Brandt, Tobias; Kühlbrandt, Werner; Larsson, Nils-Göran

    2014-05-15

    Defects of the oxidative phosphorylation system, in particular of cytochrome-c oxidase (COX, respiratory chain complex IV), are common causes of Leigh syndrome (LS), which is a rare neurodegenerative disorder with severe progressive neurological symptoms that usually present during infancy or early childhood. The COX-deficient form of LS is commonly caused by mutations in genes encoding COX assembly factors, e.g. SURF1, SCO1, SCO2 or COX10. However, other mutations affecting genes that encode proteins not directly involved in COX assembly can also cause LS. The leucine-rich pentatricopeptide repeat containing protein (LRPPRC) regulates mRNA stability, polyadenylation and coordinates mitochondrial translation. In humans, mutations in Lrpprc cause the French Canadian type of LS. Despite the finding that LRPPRC deficiency affects the stability of most mitochondrial mRNAs, its pathophysiological effect has mainly been attributed to COX deficiency. Surprisingly, we show here that the impaired mitochondrial respiration and reduced ATP production observed in Lrpprc conditional knockout mouse hearts is caused by an ATP synthase deficiency. Furthermore, the appearance of inactive subassembled ATP synthase complexes causes hyperpolarization and increases mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production. Our findings shed important new light on the bioenergetic consequences of the loss of LRPPRC in cardiac mitochondria. PMID:24399447

  20. Activities and regulation of peptidoglycan synthases

    PubMed Central

    Egan, Alexander J. F.; Biboy, Jacob; van't Veer, Inge; Breukink, Eefjan; Vollmer, Waldemar

    2015-01-01

    Peptidoglycan (PG) is an essential component in the cell wall of nearly all bacteria, forming a continuous, mesh-like structure, called the sacculus, around the cytoplasmic membrane to protect the cell from bursting by its turgor. Although PG synthases, the penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs), have been studied for 70 years, useful in vitro assays for measuring their activities were established only recently, and these provided the first insights into the regulation of these enzymes. Here, we review the current knowledge on the glycosyltransferase and transpeptidase activities of PG synthases. We provide new data showing that the bifunctional PBP1A and PBP1B from Escherichia coli are active upon reconstitution into the membrane environment of proteoliposomes, and that these enzymes also exhibit DD-carboxypeptidase activity in certain conditions. Both novel features are relevant for their functioning within the cell. We also review recent data on the impact of protein–protein interactions and other factors on the activities of PBPs. As an example, we demonstrate a synergistic effect of multiple protein–protein interactions on the glycosyltransferase activity of PBP1B, by its cognate lipoprotein activator LpoB and the essential cell division protein FtsN. PMID:26370943

  1. Discovery of DF-461, a Potent Squalene Synthase Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    We report the development of a new trifluoromethyltriazolobenzoxazepine series of squalene synthase inhibitors. Structure–activity studies and pharmacokinetics optimization on this series led to the identification of compound 23 (DF-461), which exhibited potent squalene synthase inhibitory activity, high hepatic selectivity, excellent rat hepatic cholesterol synthesis inhibitory activity, and plasma lipid lowering efficacy in nonrodent repeated dose studies. PMID:24900587

  2. Probing myo-inositol 1-phosphate synthase with multisubstrate adducts

    PubMed Central

    Deranieh, Rania M.; Greenberg, Miriam L.; Le Calvez, Pierre-B.; Mooney, Maura C.; Migaud, Marie E.

    2015-01-01

    The synthesis of a series of carbohydrate-nucleotide hybrids, designed to be multisubstrate adducts mimicking myo-inositol 1-phosphate synthase first oxidative transition state, is reported. Their ability to inhibit the synthase has been assessed and results have been rationalised computationally to estimate their likely binding mode. PMID:23132282

  3. Over-expression of bael quinolone synthase in tobacco improves plant vigor under favorable conditions, drought, or salt stress.

    PubMed

    Resmi, Mohankumar Saraladevi; Vivek, Padmanabhan Jayanthi; Soniya, Eppurathu Vasudevan

    2015-01-30

    Type III polyketide synthases (PKSs) catalyze the biosynthesis of various medicinally important secondary metabolites in plants, but their role in growth and stress response is unclear. Here, we overexpressed quinolone synthase (QNS) from bael in tobacco. QNS-overexpressing plants showed an overall increase in growth, photosynthetic efficiency and chlorophyll content compared to wild type plants. Second-generation (T2) transgenic plants grew to maturity, flowered early and set viable seeds under favorable conditions without yield penalty. An increased accumulation of flavonoids, phenols and alkaloids was associated with higher tolerance to drought and salinity stress in transgenic plants. Thus, bael QNS seems to function as a positive regulator of plant growth and stress response, and could be potentially used for engineering plants tolerant to abiotic stress. PMID:25555382

  4. Ubiquitination and filamentous structure of cytidine triphosphate synthase.

    PubMed

    Pai, Li-Mei; Wang, Pei-Yu; Lin, Wei-Cheng; Chakraborty, Archan; Yeh, Chau-Ting; Lin, Yu-Hung

    2016-07-01

    Living organisms respond to nutrient availability by regulating the activity of metabolic enzymes. Therefore, the reversible post-translational modification of an enzyme is a common regulatory mechanism for energy conservation. Recently, cytidine-5'-triphosphate (CTP) synthase was discovered to form a filamentous structure that is evolutionarily conserved from flies to humans. Interestingly, induction of the formation of CTP synthase filament is responsive to starvation or glutamine depletion. However, the biological roles of this structure remain elusive. We have recently shown that ubiquitination regulates CTP synthase activity by promoting filament formation in Drosophila ovaries during endocycles. Intriguingly, although the ubiquitination process was required for filament formation induced by glutamine depletion, CTP synthase ubiquitination was found to be inversely correlated with filament formation in Drosophila and human cell lines. In this article, we discuss the putative dual roles of ubiquitination, as well as its physiological implications, in the regulation of CTP synthase structure. PMID:27116391

  5. The capability to synthesize phytochelatins and the presence of constitutive and functional phytochelatin synthases are ancestral (plesiomorphic) characters for basal land plants.

    PubMed

    Petraglia, Alessandro; De Benedictis, Maria; Degola, Francesca; Pastore, Giovanni; Calcagno, Margherita; Ruotolo, Roberta; Mengoni, Alessio; Sanità di Toppi, Luigi

    2014-03-01

    Bryophytes, a paraphyletic group which includes liverworts, mosses, and hornworts, have been stated as land plants that under metal stress (particularly cadmium) do not synthesize metal-binding peptides such as phytochelatins. Moreover, very little information is available to date regarding phytochelatin synthesis in charophytes, postulated to be the direct ancestors of land plants, or in lycophytes, namely very basal tracheophytes. In this study, it was hypothesized that basal land plants and charophytes have the capability to produce phytochelatins and possess constitutive and functional phytochelatin synthases. To verify this hypothesis, twelve bryophyte species (six liverworts, four mosses, and two hornworts), three charophytes, and two lycophyte species were exposed to 0-36 μM cadmium for 72 h, and then assayed for: (i) glutathione and phytochelatin quali-quantitative content by HPLC and mass spectrometry; (ii) the presence of putative phytochelatin synthases by western blotting; and (iii) in vitro activity of phytochelatin synthases. Of all the species tested, ten produced phytochelatins in vivo, while the other seven did not. The presence of a constitutively expressed and functional phytochelatin synthase was demonstrated in all the bryophyte lineages and in the lycophyte Selaginella denticulata, but not in the charophytes. Hence, current knowledge according to phytochelatins have been stated as being absent in bryophytes was therefore confuted by this work. It is argued that the capability to synthesize phytochelatins, as well as the presence of active phytochelatin synthases, are ancestral (plesiomorphic) characters for basal land plants. PMID:24449382

  6. A Comparison of the Effects of Neuronal Nitric Oxide Synthase and Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase Inhibition on Cartilage Damage

    PubMed Central

    Gokay, Nevzat Selim; Yilmaz, Ibrahim; Demiroz, Ahu Senem; Gokce, Alper; Dervisoglu, Sergülen; Gokay, Banu Vural

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of selective inducible nitric oxide synthase and neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitors on cartilage regeneration. The study involved 27 Wistar rats that were divided into five groups. On Day 1, both knees of 3 rats were resected and placed in a formalin solution as a control group. The remaining 24 rats were separated into 4 groups, and their right knees were surgically damaged. Depending on the groups, the rats were injected with intra-articular normal saline solution, neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitor 7-nitroindazole (50 mg/kg), inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibitor amino-guanidine (30 mg/kg), or nitric oxide precursor L-arginine (200 mg/kg). After 21 days, the right and left knees of the rats were resected and placed in formalin solution. The samples were histopathologically examined by a blinded evaluator and scored on 8 parameters. Although selective neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibition exhibited significant (P = 0.044) positive effects on cartilage regeneration following cartilage damage, it was determined that inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibition had no statistically significant effect on cartilage regeneration. It was observed that the nitric oxide synthase activation triggered advanced arthrosis symptoms, such as osteophyte formation. The fact that selective neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitors were observed to have mitigating effects on the severity of the damage may, in the future, influence the development of new agents to be used in the treatment of cartilage disorders. PMID:27382570

  7. Light/Dark Profiles of Sucrose Phosphate Synthase, Sucrose Synthase, and Acid Invertase in Leaves of Sugar Beets

    PubMed Central

    Vassey, Terry L.

    1989-01-01

    The activity of sucrose phosphate synthase, sucrose synthase, and acid invertase was monitored in 1- to 2-month-old sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) leaves. Sugar beet leaves achieve full laminar length in 13 days. Therefore, leaves were harvested at 2-day intervals for 15 days. Sucrose phosphate synthase activity was not detectable for 6 days in the dark-grown leaves. Once activity was measurable, sucrose phosphate synthase activity never exceeded half that observed in the light-grown leaves. After 8 days in the dark, leaves which were illuminated for 30 minutes showed no significant change in sucrose phosphate synthase activity. Leaves illuminated for 24 hours after 8 days in darkness, however, recovered sucrose phosphate synthase activity to 80% of that of normally grown leaves. Sucrose synthase and acid invertase activity in the light-grown leaves both increased for the first 7 days and then decreased as the leaves matured. In contrast, the activity of sucrose synthase oscillated throughout the growth period in the dark-grown leaves. Acid invertase activity in the dark-grown leaves seemed to be the same as the activity found in the light-grown leaves. PMID:16666537

  8. Functional Contribution of Chorismate Synthase, Anthranilate Synthase, and Chorismate Mutase to Penetration Resistance in Barley-Powdery Mildew Interactions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant processes resulting from primary or secondary metabolism have been hypothesized to contribute to defense against microbial attack. Barley chorismate synthase (HvCS), anthranilate synthase alpha subunit 2 (HvASa2) and chorismate mutase 1 (HvCM1) occupy pivotal branch-points downstream of the s...

  9. AFN-1252 is a potent inhibitor of enoyl-ACP reductase from Burkholderia pseudomallei—Crystal structure, mode of action, and biological activity

    PubMed Central

    Narasimha Rao, Krishnamurthy; Lakshminarasimhan, Anirudha; Joseph, Sarah; Lekshmi, Swathi U; Lau, Ming-Seong; Takhi, Mohammed; Sreenivas, Kandepu; Nathan, Sheila; Yusof, Rohana; Abd Rahman, Noorsaadah; Ramachandra, Murali; Antony, Thomas; Subramanya, Hosahalli

    2015-01-01

    Melioidosis is a tropical bacterial infection caused by Burkholderia pseudomallei (B. pseudomallei; Bpm), a Gram-negative bacterium. Current therapeutic options are largely limited to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and β-lactam drugs, and the treatment duration is about 4 months. Moreover, resistance has been reported to these drugs. Hence, there is a pressing need to develop new antibiotics for Melioidosis. Inhibition of enoyl-ACP reducatase (FabI), a key enzyme in the fatty acid biosynthesis pathway has shown significant promise for antibacterial drug development. FabI has been identified as the major enoyl-ACP reductase present in B. pseudomallei. In this study, we evaluated AFN-1252, a Staphylococcus aureus FabI inhibitor currently in clinical development, for its potential to bind to BpmFabI enzyme and inhibit B. pseudomallei bacterial growth. AFN-1252 stabilized BpmFabI and inhibited the enzyme activity with an IC50 of 9.6 nM. It showed good antibacterial activity against B. pseudomallei R15 strain, isolated from a melioidosis patient (MIC of 2.35 mg/L). X-ray structure of BpmFabI with AFN-1252 was determined at a resolution of 2.3 Å. Complex of BpmFabI with AFN-1252 formed a symmetrical tetrameric structure with one molecule of AFN-1252 bound to each monomeric subunit. The kinetic and thermal melting studies supported the finding that AFN-1252 can bind to BpmFabI independent of cofactor. The structural and mechanistic insights from these studies might help the rational design and development of new FabI inhibitors. PMID:25644789

  10. Cloning and functional expression of an acyl-ACP thioesterase FatB type from Diploknema (Madhuca) butyracea seeds in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Jha, J K; Maiti, M K; Bhattacharjee, A; Basu, A; Sen, P C; Sen, S K

    2006-01-01

    A cDNA of fatty acyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) thioesterase (Fat) from developing seed of Madhuca butyracea has been cloned. The deduced amino acid sequence of the cDNA corresponding to the mature polypeptide showed 30-40% and 60-75% identity to the reported FatA and FatB class of plant thioesterases, respectively. This gene, MbFatB, is present as a single copy in M. butyracea genome and the MbFatB protein was detected clearly in seed tissues of this plant but not in that of Indian mustard (Brassica juncea). Heterologous expression of the MbFatB gene driven by different promoters in E. coli wild type and fatty acid beta-oxidation mutant (fadD88) strains resulted production of the recombinant protein with various fusion tags either as biologically inactive (insoluble) or functionally active forms. Expression of functionally active recombinant MbFatB in E. coli affected bacterial growth and cell morphology as well as changed the fatty acid profiles of the membrane lipid and the culture supernatant. Alteration of the fatty acid composition was directed predominantly towards palmitate and to a lesser extent myristate and oleate due to acyl chain termination activity of plant thioesterase in bacteria. Thus, this new MbFatB gene isolated from a non-traditional oil-seed tree can be used in future for transgenic development of oil-seed Brassica, a widely cultivated crop that expresses predominantly oleoyl-ACP thioesterase (FatA) in its seed tissue and has high amount of unwanted erucic acid in edible oil in order to alter the fatty acid profile in a desirable way. PMID:17092734

  11. AFN-1252 is a potent inhibitor of enoyl-ACP reductase from Burkholderia pseudomallei--Crystal structure, mode of action, and biological activity.

    PubMed

    Rao, Krishnamurthy Narasimha; Lakshminarasimhan, Anirudha; Joseph, Sarah; Lekshmi, Swathi U; Lau, Ming-Seong; Takhi, Mohammed; Sreenivas, Kandepu; Nathan, Sheila; Yusof, Rohana; Abd Rahman, Noorsaadah; Ramachandra, Murali; Antony, Thomas; Subramanya, Hosahalli

    2015-05-01

    Melioidosis is a tropical bacterial infection caused by Burkholderia pseudomallei (B. pseudomallei; Bpm), a Gram-negative bacterium. Current therapeutic options are largely limited to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and β-lactam drugs, and the treatment duration is about 4 months. Moreover, resistance has been reported to these drugs. Hence, there is a pressing need to develop new antibiotics for Melioidosis. Inhibition of enoyl-ACP reducatase (FabI), a key enzyme in the fatty acid biosynthesis pathway has shown significant promise for antibacterial drug development. FabI has been identified as the major enoyl-ACP reductase present in B. pseudomallei. In this study, we evaluated AFN-1252, a Staphylococcus aureus FabI inhibitor currently in clinical development, for its potential to bind to BpmFabI enzyme and inhibit B. pseudomallei bacterial growth. AFN-1252 stabilized BpmFabI and inhibited the enzyme activity with an IC50 of 9.6 nM. It showed good antibacterial activity against B. pseudomallei R15 strain, isolated from a melioidosis patient (MIC of 2.35 mg/L). X-ray structure of BpmFabI with AFN-1252 was determined at a resolution of 2.3 Å. Complex of BpmFabI with AFN-1252 formed a symmetrical tetrameric structure with one molecule of AFN-1252 bound to each monomeric subunit. The kinetic and thermal melting studies supported the finding that AFN-1252 can bind to BpmFabI independent of cofactor. The structural and mechanistic insights from these studies might help the rational design and development of new FabI inhibitors. PMID:25644789

  12. Hyaluronan synthases and hyaluronidases in nasal polyps.

    PubMed

    Panogeorgou, T; Tserbini, E; Filou, S; Vynios, D H; Naxakis, S S; Papadas, T A; Goumas, P D; Mastronikolis, N S

    2016-07-01

    Nasal polyps (NPs) are benign lesions of nasal and paranasal sinuses mucosa affecting 1-4 % of all adults. Nasal polyposis affects the quality of patient's life as it causes nasal obstruction, postnasal drainage, purulent nasal discharge, hyposmia or anosmia, chronic sinusitis, facial pain and snoring. Without treatment, the disease can alter the craniofacial skeleton in cases of extended growth of polyps. The development of NPs is caused by the hyperplasia of nasal or paranasal sinuses mucosa, and edema of extracellular matrix. This is usually the result of high concentration of high molecular mass hyaluronan (HA) which is either overproduced or accumulated from blood supply. The size of HA presents high diversity and, especially in pathologic conditions, chains of low molecular mass can be observed. In NPs, chains of about 200 kDa have been identified and considered to be responsible for the inflammation. The purpose of the present study was the investigation, in NPs and normal nasal mucosa (NM), of the expression of the wild-type and alternatively spliced forms of hyaluronidases, their immunolocalization, and the expression of HA synthases to examine the isoform(s) responsible for the increased amounts of HA in NPs. Hyaluronidases' presence was examined on mRNA (RT-PCR analysis) and protein (immunohistochemistry) levels. Hyaluronan synthases' presence was examined on mRNA levels. Hyaluronidases were localized in the cytoplasm of epithelial and inflammatory cells, as well as in the matrix. On mRNA level, it was found that hyal-1-wt was decreased in NPs compared to NM and hyal-1-v3, -v4 and -v5 were substantially increased. Moreover, HAS2 and HAS3 were the only hyaluronan synthases detected, the expression of which was almost similar in NPs and NM. Overall, the results of the present study support that hyaluronidases are the main enzymes responsible for the decreased size of hyaluronan observed in NPs; thus they behave as inflammatory agents. Therefore, they

  13. C-S bond cleavage by a polyketide synthase domain

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Ming; Lohman, Jeremy R.; Liu, Tao; Shen, Ben

    2015-01-01

    Leinamycin (LNM) is a sulfur-containing antitumor antibiotic featuring an unusual 1,3-dioxo-1,2-dithiolane moiety that is spiro-fused to a thiazole-containing 18-membered lactam ring. The 1,3-dioxo-1,2-dithiolane moiety is essential for LNM’s antitumor activity, by virtue of its ability to generate an episulfonium ion intermediate capable of alkylating DNA. We have previously cloned and sequenced the lnm gene cluster from Streptomyces atroolivaceus S-140. In vivo and in vitro characterizations of the LNM biosynthetic machinery have since established that: (i) the 18-membered macrolactam backbone is synthesized by LnmP, LnmQ, LnmJ, LnmI, and LnmG, (ii) the alkyl branch at C-3 of LNM is installed by LnmK, LnmL, LnmM, and LnmF, and (iii) leinamycin E1 (LNM E1), bearing a thiol moiety at C-3, is the nascent product of the LNM hybrid nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS)-acyltransferase (AT)-less type I polyketide synthase (PKS). Sulfur incorporation at C-3 of LNM E1, however, has not been addressed. Here we report that: (i) the bioinformatics analysis reveals a pyridoxal phosphate (PLP)-dependent domain, we termed cysteine lyase (SH) domain (LnmJ-SH), within PKS module-8 of LnmJ; (ii) the LnmJ-SH domain catalyzes C-S bond cleavage by using l-cysteine and l-cysteine S-modified analogs as substrates through a PLP-dependent β-elimination reaction, establishing l-cysteine as the origin of sulfur at C-3 of LNM; and (iii) the LnmJ-SH domain, sharing no sequence homology with any other enzymes catalyzing C-S bond cleavage, represents a new family of PKS domains that expands the chemistry and enzymology of PKSs and might be exploited to incorporate sulfur into polyketide natural products by PKS engineering. PMID:26240335

  14. Heterologous expression in Saccharopolyspora erythraea of a pentaketide synthase derived from the spinosyn polyketide synthase.

    PubMed

    Martin, Christine J; Timoney, Máire C; Sheridan, Rose M; Kendrew, Steven G; Wilkinson, Barrie; Staunton, James C; Leadlay, Peter F

    2003-12-01

    A truncated version of the spinosyn polyketide synthase comprising the loading module and the first four extension modules fused to the erythromycin thioesterase domain was expressed in Saccharopolyspora erythraea. A novel pentaketide lactone product was isolated, identifying cryptic steps of spinosyn biosynthesis and indicating the potential of this approach for the biosynthetic engineering of spinosyn analogues. A pathway for the formation of the tetracyclic spinosyn aglycone is proposed. PMID:14685317

  15. Substrate Controlled Divergence in Polyketide Synthase Catalysis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Biochemical characterization of polyketide synthases (PKSs) has relied on synthetic substrates functionalized as electrophilic esters to acylate the enzyme and initiate the catalytic cycle. In these efforts, N-acetylcysteamine thioesters have typically been employed for in vitro studies of full PKS modules as well as excised domains. However, substrate engineering approaches to control the catalytic cycle of a full PKS module harboring multiple domains remain underexplored. This study examines a series of alternatively activated native hexaketide substrates on the catalytic outcome of PikAIV, the sixth and final module of the pikromycin (Pik) pathway. We demonstrate the ability to control product formation with greater than 10:1 selectivity for either full module catalysis, leading to a 14-membered macrolactone, or direct cyclization to a 12-membered ring. This outcome was achieved through modifying the type of hexaketide ester employed, demonstrating the utility of substrate engineering in PKS functional studies and biocatalysis. PMID:25730816

  16. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase in the microcirculation.

    PubMed

    Shu, Xiaohong; Keller, T C Stevenson; Begandt, Daniela; Butcher, Joshua T; Biwer, Lauren; Keller, Alexander S; Columbus, Linda; Isakson, Brant E

    2015-12-01

    Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS, NOS3) is responsible for producing nitric oxide (NO)--a key molecule that can directly (or indirectly) act as a vasodilator and anti-inflammatory mediator. In this review, we examine the structural effects of regulation of the eNOS enzyme, including post-translational modifications and subcellular localization. After production, NO diffuses to surrounding cells with a variety of effects. We focus on the physiological role of NO and NO-derived molecules, including microvascular effects on vessel tone and immune response. Regulation of eNOS and NO action is complicated; we address endogenous and exogenous mechanisms of NO regulation with a discussion of pharmacological agents used in clinical and laboratory settings and a proposed role for eNOS in circulating red blood cells. PMID:26390975

  17. Bacterial phytoene synthase: molecular cloning, expression, and characterization of Erwinia herbicola phytoene synthase.

    PubMed

    Iwata-Reuyl, Dirk; Math, Shivanand K; Desai, Shrivallabh B; Poulter, C Dale

    2003-03-25

    Phytoene synthase (PSase) catalyzes the condensation of two molecules of geranylgeranyl diphosphate (GGPP) to give prephytoene diphosphate (PPPP) and the subsequent rearrangement of the cyclopropylcarbinyl intermediate to phytoene. These reactions constitute the first pathway specific step in carotenoid biosynthesis. The crtB gene encoding phytoene synthase was isolated from a plasmid containing the carotenoid gene cluster in Erwinia herbicola and cloned into an Escherichia coli expression system. Upon induction, recombinant phytoene synthase constituted 5-10% of total soluble protein. To facilitate purification of the recombinant enzyme, the structural gene for PSase was modified by site-directed mutagenesis to incorporate a C-terminal Glu-Glu-Phe (EEF) tripepetide to allow purification by immunoaffinity chromatography on an immobilized monoclonal anti-alpha-tubulin antibody YL1/2 column. Purified recombinant PSase-EEF gave a band at 34.5 kDa upon SDS-PAGE. Recombinant PSase-EEF was then purified to >90% homogeneity in two steps by ion-exchange and immunoaffinity chromatography. The enzyme required Mn(2+) for activity, had a pH optimum of 8.2, and was strongly stimulated by detergent. The concentration of GGPP needed for half-maximal activity was approximately 35 microM, and a significant inhibition of activity was seen at GGPP concentrations above 100 microM. The sole product of the reaction was 15,15'-Z-phytoene. PMID:12641468

  18. CLYBL is a polymorphic human enzyme with malate synthase and β-methylmalate synthase activity

    PubMed Central

    Strittmatter, Laura; Li, Yang; Nakatsuka, Nathan J.; Calvo, Sarah E.; Grabarek, Zenon; Mootha, Vamsi K.

    2014-01-01

    CLYBL is a human mitochondrial enzyme of unknown function that is found in multiple eukaryotic taxa and conserved to bacteria. The protein is expressed in the mitochondria of all mammalian organs, with highest expression in brown fat and kidney. Approximately 5% of all humans harbor a premature stop polymorphism in CLYBL that has been associated with reduced levels of circulating vitamin B12. Using comparative genomics, we now show that CLYBL is strongly co-expressed with and co-evolved specifically with other components of the mitochondrial B12 pathway. We confirm that the premature stop polymorphism in CLYBL leads to a loss of protein expression. To elucidate the molecular function of CLYBL, we used comparative operon analysis, structural modeling and enzyme kinetics. We report that CLYBL encodes a malate/β-methylmalate synthase, converting glyoxylate and acetyl-CoA to malate, or glyoxylate and propionyl-CoA to β-methylmalate. Malate synthases are best known for their established role in the glyoxylate shunt of plants and lower organisms and are traditionally described as not occurring in humans. The broader role of a malate/β-methylmalate synthase in human physiology and its mechanistic link to vitamin B12 metabolism remain unknown. PMID:24334609

  19. Structure and Function of Fusicoccadiene Synthase, a Hexameric Bifunctional Diterpene Synthase.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mengbin; Chou, Wayne K W; Toyomasu, Tomonobu; Cane, David E; Christianson, David W

    2016-04-15

    Fusicoccin A is a diterpene glucoside phytotoxin generated by the fungal pathogen Phomopsis amygdali that causes the plant disease constriction canker, first discovered in New Jersey peach orchards in the 1930s. Fusicoccin A is also an emerging new lead in cancer chemotherapy. The hydrocarbon precursor of fusicoccin A is the tricyclic diterpene fusicoccadiene, which is generated by a bifunctional terpenoid synthase. Here, we report X-ray crystal structures of the individual catalytic domains of fusicoccadiene synthase: the C-terminal domain is a chain elongation enzyme that generates geranylgeranyl diphosphate, and the N-terminal domain catalyzes the cyclization of geranylgeranyl diphosphate to form fusicoccadiene. Crystal structures of each domain complexed with bisphosphonate substrate analogues suggest that three metal ions and three positively charged amino acid side chains trigger substrate ionization in each active site. While in vitro incubations reveal that the cyclase domain can utilize farnesyl diphosphate and geranyl diphosphate as surrogate substrates, these shorter isoprenoid diphosphates are mainly converted into acyclic alcohol or hydrocarbon products. Gel filtration chromatography and analytical ultracentrifugation experiments indicate that full-length fusicoccadiene synthase adopts hexameric quaternary structure, and small-angle X-ray scattering data yield a well-defined molecular envelope illustrating a plausible model for hexamer assembly. PMID:26734760

  20. Biosynthetic potential of sesquiterpene synthases: product profiles of Egyptian Henbane premnaspirodiene synthase and related mutants.

    PubMed

    Koo, Hyun Jo; Vickery, Christopher R; Xu, Yi; Louie, Gordon V; O'Maille, Paul E; Bowman, Marianne; Nartey, Charisse M; Burkart, Michael D; Noel, Joseph P

    2016-07-01

    The plant terpene synthase (TPS) family is responsible for the biosynthesis of a variety of terpenoid natural products possessing diverse biological functions. TPSs catalyze the ionization and, most commonly, rearrangement and cyclization of prenyl diphosphate substrates, forming linear and cyclic hydrocarbons. Moreover, a single TPS often produces several minor products in addition to a dominant product. We characterized the catalytic profiles of Hyoscyamus muticus premnaspirodiene synthase (HPS) and compared it with the profile of a closely related TPS, Nicotiana tabacum 5-epi-aristolochene synthase (TEAS). The profiles of two previously studied HPS and TEAS mutants, each containing nine interconverting mutations, dubbed HPS-M9 and TEAS-M9, were also characterized. All four TPSs were compared under varying temperature and pH conditions. In addition, we solved the X-ray crystal structures of TEAS and a TEAS quadruple mutant complexed with substrate and products to gain insight into the enzymatic features modulating product formation. These informative structures, along with product profiles, provide new insight into plant TPS catalytic promiscuity. PMID:27328867

  1. Cellulose in Cyanobacteria. Origin of Vascular Plant Cellulose Synthase?

    PubMed Central

    Nobles, David R.; Romanovicz, Dwight K.; Brown, R. Malcolm

    2001-01-01

    Although cellulose biosynthesis among the cyanobacteria has been suggested previously, we present the first conclusive evidence, to our knowledge, of the presence of cellulose in these organisms. Based on the results of x-ray diffraction, electron microscopy of microfibrils, and cellobiohydrolase I-gold labeling, we report the occurrence of cellulose biosynthesis in nine species representing three of the five sections of cyanobacteria. Sequence analysis of the genomes of four cyanobacteria revealed the presence of multiple amino acid sequences bearing the DDD35QXXRW motif conserved in all cellulose synthases. Pairwise alignments demonstrated that CesAs from plants were more similar to putative cellulose synthases from Anabaena sp. Pasteur Culture Collection 7120 and Nostoc punctiforme American Type Culture Collection 29133 than any other cellulose synthases in the database. Multiple alignments of putative cellulose synthases from Anabaena sp. Pasteur Culture Collection 7120 and N. punctiforme American Type Culture Collection 29133 with the cellulose synthases of other prokaryotes, Arabidopsis, Gossypium hirsutum, Populus alba × Populus tremula, corn (Zea mays), and Dictyostelium discoideum showed that cyanobacteria share an insertion between conserved regions U1 and U2 found previously only in eukaryotic sequences. Furthermore, phylogenetic analysis indicates that the cyanobacterial cellulose synthases share a common branch with CesAs of vascular plants in a manner similar to the relationship observed with cyanobacterial and chloroplast 16s rRNAs, implying endosymbiotic transfer of CesA from cyanobacteria to plants and an ancient origin for cellulose synthase in eukaryotes. PMID:11598227

  2. Class IV polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) synthases and PHA-producing Bacillus.

    PubMed

    Tsuge, Takeharu; Hyakutake, Manami; Mizuno, Kouhei

    2015-08-01

    This review highlights the recent investigations of class IV polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) synthases, the newest classification of PHA synthases. Class IV synthases are prevalent in organisms of the Bacillus genus and are composed of a catalytic subunit PhaC (approximately 40 kDa), which has a PhaC box sequence ([GS]-X-C-X-[GA]-G) at the active site, and a second subunit PhaR (approximately 20 kDa). The representative PHA-producing Bacillus strains are Bacillus megaterium and Bacillus cereus; the nucleotide sequence of phaC and the genetic organization of the PHA biosynthesis gene locus are somewhat different between these two strains. It is generally considered that class IV synthases favor short-chain-length monomers such as 3-hydroxybutyrate (C4) and 3-hydroxyvalerate (C5) for polymerization, but can polymerize some unusual monomers as minor components. In Escherichia coli expressing PhaRC from B. cereus YB-4, the biosynthesized PHA undergoes synthase-catalyzed alcoholytic cleavage using endogenous and exogenous alcohols. This alcoholysis is thought to be shared among class IV synthases, and this reaction is useful not only for the regulation of PHA molecular weight but also for the modification of the PHA carboxy terminus. The novel properties of class IV synthases will open up the possibility for the design of new PHA materials. PMID:26135986

  3. Acetolactate Synthase Activity in Developing Maize (Zea mays L.) Kernels

    PubMed Central

    Muhitch, Michael J.

    1988-01-01

    Acetolactate synthase (EC 4.1.3.18) activity was examined in maize (Zea mays L.) endosperm and embryos as a function of kernel development. When assayed using unpurified homogenates, embryo acetolactate synthase activity appeared less sensitive to inhibition by leucine + valine and by the imidazolinone herbicide imazapyr than endosperm acetolactate synthase activity. Evidence is presented to show that pyruvate decarboxylase contributes to apparent acetolactate synthase activity in crude embryo extracts and a modification of the acetolactate synthase assay is proposed to correct for the presence of pyruvate decarboxylase in unpurified plant homogenates. Endosperm acetolactate synthase activity increased rapidly during early kernel development, reaching a maximum of 3 micromoles acetoin per hour per endosperm at 25 days after pollination. In contrast, embryo activity was low in young kernels and steadily increased throughout development to a maximum activity of 0.24 micromole per hour per embryo by 45 days after pollination. The sensitivity of both endosperm and embryo acetolactate synthase activities to feedback inhibition by leucine + valine did not change during kernel development. The results are compared to those found for other enzymes of nitrogen metabolism and discussed with respect to the potential roles of the embryo and endosperm in providing amino acids for storage protein synthesis. PMID:16665871

  4. Generation and Functional Evaluation of Designer Monoterpene Synthases.

    PubMed

    Srividya, N; Lange, I; Lange, B M

    2016-01-01

    Monoterpene synthases are highly versatile enzymes that catalyze the first committed step in the pathways toward terpenoids, the structurally most diverse class of plant natural products. Recent advancements in our understanding of the reaction mechanism have enabled engineering approaches to develop mutant monoterpene synthases that produce specific monoterpenes. In this chapter, we are describing protocols to introduce targeted mutations, express mutant enzyme catalysts in heterologous hosts, and assess their catalytic properties. Mutant monoterpene synthases have the potential to contribute significantly to synthetic biology efforts aimed at producing larger amounts of commercially attractive monoterpenes. PMID:27480686

  5. The Pseudouridine Synthases Proceed through a Glycal Intermediate

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The pseudouridine synthases isomerize (U) in RNA to pseudouridine (Ψ), and the mechanism that they follow has long been a question of interest. The recent elucidation of a product of the mechanistic probe 5-fluorouridine that had been epimerized to the arabino isomer suggested that the Ψ synthases might operate through a glycal intermediate formed by deprotonation of C2′. When that position in substrate U is deuterated, a primary kinetic isotope effect is observed, which indisputably indicates that the proposed deprotonation occurs during the isomerization of U to Ψ and establishes the mechanism followed by the Ψ synthases. PMID:27292228

  6. Computational design and selections for an engineered, thermostable terpene synthase

    PubMed Central

    Diaz, Juan E; Lin, Chun-Shi; Kunishiro, Kazuyoshi; Feld, Birte K; Avrantinis, Sara K; Bronson, Jonathan; Greaves, John; Saven, Jeffery G; Weiss, Gregory A

    2011-01-01

    Terpenoids include structurally diverse antibiotics, flavorings, and fragrances. Engineering terpene synthases for control over the synthesis of such compounds represents a long sought goal. We report computational design, selections, and assays of a thermostable mutant of tobacco 5-epi-aristolochene synthase (TEAS) for the catalysis of carbocation cyclization reactions at elevated temperatures. Selection for thermostability included proteolytic digestion followed by capture of intact proteins. Unlike the wild-type enzyme, the mutant TEAS retains enzymatic activity at 65°C. The thermostable terpene synthase variant denatures above 80°C, approximately twice the temperature of the wild-type enzyme. PMID:21739507

  7. The Pseudouridine Synthases Proceed through a Glycal Intermediate.

    PubMed

    Veerareddygari, Govardhan Reddy; Singh, Sanjay K; Mueller, Eugene G

    2016-06-29

    The pseudouridine synthases isomerize (U) in RNA to pseudouridine (Ψ), and the mechanism that they follow has long been a question of interest. The recent elucidation of a product of the mechanistic probe 5-fluorouridine that had been epimerized to the arabino isomer suggested that the Ψ synthases might operate through a glycal intermediate formed by deprotonation of C2'. When that position in substrate U is deuterated, a primary kinetic isotope effect is observed, which indisputably indicates that the proposed deprotonation occurs during the isomerization of U to Ψ and establishes the mechanism followed by the Ψ synthases. PMID:27292228

  8. Geranylfarnesyl diphosphate synthase from Methanosarcina mazei: Different role, different evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, Takuya; Yoshimura, Tohru; Hemmi, Hisashi

    2010-02-26

    The gene of (all-E) geranylfarnesyl diphosphate synthase that is responsible for the biosynthesis of methanophenazine, an electron carrier utilized for methanogenesis, was cloned from a methanogenic archaeon Methanosarcina mazei Goe1. The properties of the recombinant enzyme and the results of phylogenetic analysis suggest that the enzyme is closely related to (all-E) prenyl diphosphate synthases that are responsible for the biosynthesis of respiratory quinones, rather than to the enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of archaeal membrane lipids, including (all-E) geranylfarnesyl diphosphate synthase from a thermophilic archaeon.

  9. Construction and Characterization of Fusion Class III Poly(hydroxyalkanoate) Biopolymer Synthase Genes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Poly(hydroxyalkanoates) (PHAs) are polyesters produced by bacteria. Because these polymers are biodegradable and are produced using renewable fermentative substrates, PHAs have been studied as environmentally friendly replacement for petroleum-based polymers. High production costs and limited appl...

  10. Enzymatic Properties and Mutational Studies of Chalcone Synthase from Physcomitrella patens

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Raja Noor Zaliha Raja Abdul; Zakaria, Iffah Izzati; Salleh, Abu Bakar; Basri, Mahiran

    2012-01-01

    PpCHS is a member of the type III polyketide synthase family and catalyses the synthesis of the flavonoid precursor naringenin chalcone from p-coumaroyl-CoA. Recent research reports the production of pyrone derivatives using either hexanoyl-CoA or butyryl-CoA as starter molecule. The Cys-His-Asn catalytic triad found in other plant chalcone synthase predicted polypeptides is conserved in PpCHS. Site directed mutagenesis involving these amino acids residing in the active-site cavity revealed that the cavity volume of the active-site plays a significant role in the selection of starter molecules as well as product formation. Substitutions of Cys 170 with Arg and Ser amino acids decreased the ability of the PpCHS to utilize hexanoyl-CoA as a starter molecule, which directly effected the production of pyrone derivatives (products). These substitutions are believed to have a restricted number of elongations of the growing polypeptide chain due to the smaller cavity volume of the mutant’s active site. PMID:22949824

  11. The c-Ring of the F1FO-ATP Synthase: Facts and Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Nesci, Salvatore; Trombetti, Fabiana; Ventrella, Vittoria; Pagliarani, Alessandra

    2016-04-01

    The F1FO-ATP synthase is the only enzyme in nature endowed with bi-functional catalytic mechanism of synthesis and hydrolysis of ATP. The enzyme functions, not only confined to energy transduction, are tied to three intrinsic features of the annular arrangement of c subunits which constitutes the so-called c-ring, the core of the membrane-embedded FO domain: (i) the c-ring constitution is linked to the number of ions (H(+) or Na(+)) channeled across the membrane during the dissipation of the transmembrane electrochemical gradient, which in turn determines the species-specific bioenergetic cost of ATP, the "molecular currency unit" of energy transfer in all living beings; (ii) the c-ring is increasingly involved in the mitochondrial permeability transition, an event linked to cell death and to most mitochondrial dysfunctions; (iii) the c subunit species-specific amino acid sequence and susceptibility to post-translational modifications can address antibacterial drug design according to the model of enzyme inhibitors which target the c subunits. Therefore, the simple c-ring structure not only allows the F1FO-ATP synthase to perform the two opposite tasks of molecular machine of cell life and death, but it also amplifies the enzyme's potential role as a drug target. PMID:26621635

  12. SUPERSTARS III: K-2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina State Dept. of Public Education, Raleigh.

    SUPERSTARS III is a K-8 program designed as an enrichment opportunity for self-directed learners in mathematics. The basic purpose of SUPERSTARS III is to provide the extra challenge that self-motivated students need in mathematics and to do so in a structured, long-term program that does not impinge on the normal classroom routine or the…

  13. CITY III Player's Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Envirometrics, Inc., Washington, DC.

    CITY III is a computer-assisted simulation game in which participants make decisions affecting the economic, governmental, and social conditions of a simulated urban area. In CITY III, the computer stores all the relevant statistics for the area, updates data when changes are made, and prints out yearly reports. The computer also simulates…

  14. CITY III Operator's Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Envirometrics, Inc., Washington, DC.

    CITY III is a computer-assisted simulation game of an urban system involving player operation of and interaction with economic, social, and government components. The role of operator in the game is to take the handwritten inputs (decisions) from the CITY III participants, process them, and return output which initiates the next round of…

  15. Dimer ribbons of ATP synthase shape the inner mitochondrial membrane

    PubMed Central

    Strauss, Mike; Hofhaus, Götz; Schröder, Rasmus R; Kühlbrandt, Werner

    2008-01-01

    ATP synthase converts the electrochemical potential at the inner mitochondrial membrane into chemical energy, producing the ATP that powers the cell. Using electron cryo-tomography we show that the ATP synthase of mammalian mitochondria is arranged in long ∼1-μm rows of dimeric supercomplexes, located at the apex of cristae membranes. The dimer ribbons enforce a strong local curvature on the membrane with a 17-nm outer radius. Calculations of the electrostatic field strength indicate a significant increase in charge density, and thus in the local pH gradient of ∼0.5 units in regions of high membrane curvature. We conclude that the mitochondrial cristae act as proton traps, and that the proton sink of the ATP synthase at the apex of the compartment favours effective ATP synthesis under proton-limited conditions. We propose that the mitochondrial ATP synthase organises itself into dimer ribbons to optimise its own performance. PMID:18323778

  16. Thymoquinone Inhibits Escherichia coli ATP Synthase and Cell Growth

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Zulfiqar; Laughlin, Thomas F.; Kady, Ismail O.

    2015-01-01

    We examined the thymoquinone induced inhibition of purified F1 or membrane bound F1FO E. coli ATP synthase. Both purified F1 and membrane bound F1FO were completely inhibited by thymoquinone with no residual ATPase activity. The process of inhibition was fully reversible and identical in both membrane bound F1Fo and purified F1 preparations. Moreover, thymoquinone induced inhibition of ATP synthase expressing wild-type E. coli cell growth and non-inhibition of ATPase gene deleted null control cells demonstrates that ATP synthase is a molecular target for thymoquinone. This also links the beneficial dietary based antimicrobial and anticancer effects of thymoquinone to its inhibitory action on ATP synthase. PMID:25996607

  17. Neuronal nitric-oxide synthase localization mediated by a ternary complex with synapsin and CAPON

    PubMed Central

    Jaffrey, Samie R.; Benfenati, Fabio; Snowman, Adele M.; Czernik, Andrew J.; Snyder, Solomon H.

    2002-01-01

    The specificity of the reactions of nitric oxide (NO) with its neuronal targets is determined in part by the precise localizations of neuronal NO synthase (nNOS) within the cell. The targeting of nNOS is mediated by adapter proteins that interact with its PDZ domain. Here, we show that the nNOS adapter protein, CAPON, interacts with synapsins I, II, and III through an N-terminal phosphotyrosine-binding domain interaction, which leads to a ternary complex comprising nNOS, CAPON, and synapsin I. The significance of this ternary complex is demonstrated by changes in subcellular localization of nNOS in mice harboring genomic deletions of both synapsin I and synapsin II. These results suggest a mechanism for specific actions of NO at presynaptic sites. PMID:11867766

  18. A phosphopantetheinylating polyketide synthase producing a linear polyene to initiate enediyne antitumor antibiotic biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian; Van Lanen, Steven G; Ju, Jianhua; Liu, Wen; Dorrestein, Pieter C; Li, Wenli; Kelleher, Neil L; Shen, Ben

    2008-02-01

    The enediynes, unified by their unique molecular architecture and mode of action, represent some of the most potent anticancer drugs ever discovered. The biosynthesis of the enediyne core has been predicted to be initiated by a polyketide synthase (PKS) that is distinct from all known PKSs. Characterization of the enediyne PKS involved in C-1027 (SgcE) and neocarzinostatin (NcsE) biosynthesis has now revealed that (i) the PKSs contain a central acyl carrier protein domain and C-terminal phosphopantetheinyl transferase domain; (ii) the PKSs are functional in heterologous hosts, and coexpression with an enediyne thioesterase gene produces the first isolable compound, 1,3,5,7,9,11,13-pentadecaheptaene, in enediyne core biosynthesis; and (iii) the findings for SgcE and NcsE are likely shared among all nine-membered enediynes, thereby supporting a common mechanism to initiate enediyne biosynthesis. PMID:18223152

  19. Biosynthesis of riboflavin: an unusual riboflavin synthase of Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum.

    PubMed Central

    Eberhardt, S; Korn, S; Lottspeich, F; Bacher, A

    1997-01-01

    Riboflavin synthase was purified by a factor of about 1,500 from cell extract of Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum. The enzyme had a specific activity of about 2,700 nmol mg(-1) h(-1) at 65 degrees C, which is relatively low compared to those of riboflavin synthases of eubacteria and yeast. Amino acid sequences obtained after proteolytic cleavage had no similarity with known riboflavin synthases. The gene coding for riboflavin synthase (designated ribC) was subsequently cloned by marker rescue with a ribC mutant of Escherichia coli. The ribC gene of M. thermoautotrophicum specifies a protein of 153 amino acid residues. The predicted amino acid sequence agrees with the information gleaned from Edman degradation of the isolated protein and shows 67% identity with the sequence predicted for the unannotated reading frame MJ1184 of Methanococcus jannaschii. The ribC gene is adjacent to a cluster of four genes with similarity to the genes cbiMNQO of Salmonella typhimurium, which form part of the cob operon (this operon contains most of the genes involved in the biosynthesis of vitamin B12). The amino acid sequence predicted by the ribC gene of M. thermoautotrophicum shows no similarity whatsoever to the sequences of riboflavin synthases of eubacteria and yeast. Most notably, the M. thermoautotrophicum protein does not show the internal sequence homology characteristic of eubacterial and yeast riboflavin synthases. The protein of M. thermoautotrophicum can be expressed efficiently in a recombinant E. coli strain. The specific activity of the purified, recombinant protein is 1,900 nmol mg(-1) h(-1) at 65 degrees C. In contrast to riboflavin synthases from eubacteria and fungi, the methanobacterial enzyme has an absolute requirement for magnesium ions. The 5' phosphate of 6,7-dimethyl-8-ribityllumazine does not act as a substrate. The findings suggest that riboflavin synthase has evolved independently in eubacteria and methanobacteria. PMID:9139911

  20. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of polyketide synthase-1 (PKS-1) from Cannabis sativa

    SciTech Connect

    Taguchi, Chiho; Taura, Futoshi; Tamada, Taro; Shoyama, Yoshinari; Shoyama, Yukihiro; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Kuroki, Ryota; Morimoto, Satoshi

    2008-03-01

    Polyketide synthase-1 from C. sativa has been crystallized. The crystal diffracted to 1.55 Å resolution with sufficient quality for further structure determination. Polyketide synthase-1 (PKS-1) is a novel type III polyketide synthase that catalyzes the biosynthesis of hexanoyl triacetic acid lactone in Cannabis sativa (Mexican strain). PKS-1 was overproduced in Escherichia coli, purified and finally crystallized in two different space groups. The crystal obtained in 0.1 M HEPES buffer pH 7.5 containing 0.2 M calcium acetate and 20%(w/v) polyethylene glycol 3350 diffracted to 1.65 Å resolution and belonged to space group P1, with unit-cell parameters a = 54.3, b = 59.3, c = 62.6 Å, α = 69, β = 81, γ = 80°. Another crystal obtained in 0.1 M HEPES buffer pH 7.5 containing 0.2 M sodium chloride and 20%(w/v) polyethylene glycol 3350 diffracted to 1.55 Å resolution and belonged to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 54.3, b = 110, c = 130 Å. These data will enable us to determine the crystal structure of PKS-1.

  1. Nitric oxide synthase in ferret brain: localization and characterization.

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, T.; Mitchell, J. A.; Schmidt, H. H.; Kohlhaas, K. L.; Warner, T. D.; Förstermann, U.; Murad, F.

    1992-01-01

    1. In the present study, we have investigated the distribution of nitric oxide synthase in the ferret brain. Nitric oxide synthase was determined biochemically and immunochemically. 2. In the rat brain, the highest nitric oxide synthase activity has been detected in the cerebellum. However, in the ferret brain, the highest activity was found in the striatum and the lowest in the cerebellum and cerebral cortex. The enzymatic activity was localized predominantly in the cytosolic fractions, it was dependent on NADPH and Ca2+, and inhibited by NG-nitro-L-arginine or NG-methyl-L-arginine. 3. Western blot analysis revealed that all regions of the ferret brain contained a 160 kD protein crossreacting with an antibody to nitric oxide synthase purified from the rat cerebellum, and the levels of relative intensity of staining by the antibody correlated with the distribution of nitric oxide synthase activity. 4. These results indicate that the ferret brain contains a nitric oxide synthase similar to the rat brain, but the distribution of enzymatic activity in the ferret brain differs markedly from the rat brain. Images Figure 1 PMID:1282076

  2. Understanding structure, function, and mutations in the mitochondrial ATP synthase

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ting; Pagadala, Vijayakanth; Mueller, David M.

    2015-01-01

    The mitochondrial ATP synthase is a multimeric enzyme complex with an overall molecular weight of about 600,000 Da. The ATP synthase is a molecular motor composed of two separable parts: F1 and Fo. The F1 portion contains the catalytic sites for ATP synthesis and protrudes into the mitochondrial matrix. Fo forms a proton turbine that is embedded in the inner membrane and connected to the rotor of F1. The flux of protons flowing down a potential gradient powers the rotation of the rotor driving the synthesis of ATP. Thus, the flow of protons though Fo is coupled to the synthesis of ATP. This review will discuss the structure/function relationship in the ATP synthase as determined by biochemical, crystallographic, and genetic studies. An emphasis will be placed on linking the structure/function relationship with understanding how disease causing mutations or putative single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes encoding the subunits of the ATP synthase, will affect the function of the enzyme and the health of the individual. The review will start by summarizing the current understanding of the subunit composition of the enzyme and the role of the subunits followed by a discussion on known mutations and their effect on the activity of the ATP synthase. The review will conclude with a summary of mutations in genes encoding subunits of the ATP synthase that are known to be responsible for human disease, and a brief discussion on SNPs. PMID:25938092

  3. Nitric Oxide Synthases in Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Carnicer, Ricardo; Crabtree, Mark J.; Sivakumaran, Vidhya

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Significance: The regulation of myocardial function by constitutive nitric oxide synthases (NOS) is important for the maintenance of myocardial Ca2+ homeostasis, relaxation and distensibility, and protection from arrhythmia and abnormal stress stimuli. However, sustained insults such as diabetes, hypertension, hemodynamic overload, and atrial fibrillation lead to dysfunctional NOS activity with superoxide produced instead of NO and worse pathophysiology. Recent Advances: Major strides in understanding the role of normal and abnormal constitutive NOS in the heart have revealed molecular targets by which NO modulates myocyte function and morphology, the role and nature of post-translational modifications of NOS, and factors controlling nitroso-redox balance. Localized and differential signaling from NOS1 (neuronal) versus NOS3 (endothelial) isoforms are being identified, as are methods to restore NOS function in heart disease. Critical Issues: Abnormal NOS signaling plays a key role in many cardiac disorders, while targeted modulation may potentially reverse this pathogenic source of oxidative stress. Future Directions: Improvements in the clinical translation of potent modulators of NOS function/dysfunction may ultimately provide a powerful new treatment for many hearts diseases that are fueled by nitroso-redox imbalance. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 18, 1078–1099. PMID:22871241

  4. Human Isoprenoid Synthase Enzymes as Therapeutic Targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jaeok; Matralis, Alexios; Berghuis, Albert; Tsantrizos, Youla

    2014-07-01

    The complex biochemical network known as the mevalonate pathway is responsible for the biosynthesis of all isoprenoids in the human body, which consists of a vast array of metabolites that are vital for proper cellular functions. Two key isoprenoids, farnesyl pyrophosphate (FPP) and geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate (GGPP) are responsible for the post-translational prenylation of small GTP-binding proteins, and serve as the biosynthetic precursors to numerous other biomolecules. The down-stream metabolite of FPP and GGPP is squalene, the precursor to steroids, bile acids, lipoproteins and vitamin D. In the past, interest in prenyl synthase inhibitors focused mainly on the role of the FPP in lytic bone diseases. More recently, pre-clinical and clinical studies have strongly implicated high levels of protein prenylation in a plethora of human diseases, including non-skeletal cancers, the progression of neurodegenerative diseases and cardiovascular diseases. In this review, we focus mainly on the potential therapeutic value of down-regulating the biosynthesis of FPP, GGPP and squalene. We summarize the most recent drug discovery efforts and the structural data available that support the current on-going studies.

  5. Human isoprenoid synthase enzymes as therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jaeok; Matralis, Alexios N.; Berghuis, Albert M.; Tsantrizos, Youla S.

    2014-01-01

    In the human body, the complex biochemical network known as the mevalonate pathway is responsible for the biosynthesis of all isoprenoids, which consists of a vast array of metabolites that are vital for proper cellular functions. Two key isoprenoids, farnesyl pyrophosphate (FPP) and geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate (GGPP) are responsible for the post-translational prenylation of small GTP-binding proteins, and serve as the biosynthetic precursors to numerous other biomolecules. The down-stream metabolite of FPP and GGPP is squalene, the precursor to steroids, bile acids, lipoproteins, and vitamin D. In the past, interest in prenyl synthase inhibitors focused mainly on the role of the FPP in lytic bone diseases. More recently pre-clinical and clinical studies have strongly implicated high levels of protein prenylation in a plethora of human diseases, including non-skeletal cancers, the progression of neurodegenerative diseases and cardiovascular diseases. In this review, we focus mainly on the potential therapeutic value of down-regulating the biosynthesis of FPP, GGPP, and squalene. We summarize the most recent drug discovery efforts and the structural data available that support the current on-going studies. PMID:25101260

  6. Tapentadol and nitric oxide synthase systems.

    PubMed

    Bujalska-Zadrożny, Magdalena; Wolińska, Renata; Gąsińska, Emilia; Nagraba, Łukasz

    2015-04-01

    Tapentadol, a new analgesic drug with a dual mechanism of action (μ-opioid receptor agonism and norepinephrine reuptake inhibition), is indicated for the treatment of moderate to severe acute and chronic pain. In this paper, the possible additional involvement of the nitric oxide synthase (NOS) system in the antinociceptive activity of tapentadol was investigated using an unspecific inhibitor of NOS, L-NOArg, a relatively specific inhibitor of neuronal NOS, 7-NI, a relatively selective inhibitor of inducible NOS, L-NIL, and a potent inhibitor of endothelial NOS, L-NIO. Tapentadol (1-10 mg/kg, intraperitoneal) increased the threshold for mechanical (Randall-Selitto test) and thermal (tail-flick test) nociceptive stimuli in a dose-dependent manner. All four NOS inhibitors, administered intraperitoneally in the dose range 0.1-10 mg/kg, potentiated the analgesic action of tapentadol at a low dose of 2 mg/kg in both models of pain. We conclude that NOS systems participate in tapentadol analgesia. PMID:25485639

  7. Undecaprenyl diphosphate synthase inhibitors: antibacterial drug leads.

    PubMed

    Sinko, William; Wang, Yang; Zhu, Wei; Zhang, Yonghui; Feixas, Ferran; Cox, Courtney L; Mitchell, Douglas A; Oldfield, Eric; McCammon, J Andrew

    2014-07-10

    There is a significant need for new antibiotics due to the rise in drug resistance. Drugs such as methicillin and vancomycin target bacterial cell wall biosynthesis, but methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and vancomycin-resistant Enterococci (VRE) have now arisen and are of major concern. Inhibitors acting on new targets in cell wall biosynthesis are thus of particular interest since they might also restore sensitivity to existing drugs, and the cis-prenyl transferase undecaprenyl diphosphate synthase (UPPS), essential for lipid I, lipid II, and thus, peptidoglycan biosynthesis, is one such target. We used 12 UPPS crystal structures to validate virtual screening models and then assayed 100 virtual hits (from 450,000 compounds) against UPPS from S. aureus and Escherichia coli. The most promising inhibitors (IC50 ∼2 μM, Ki ∼300 nM) had activity against MRSA, Listeria monocytogenes, Bacillus anthracis, and a vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus sp. with MIC or IC50 values in the 0.25-4 μg/mL range. Moreover, one compound (1), a rhodanine with close structural similarity to the commercial diabetes drug epalrestat, exhibited good activity as well as a fractional inhibitory concentration index (FICI) of 0.1 with methicillin against the community-acquired MRSA USA300 strain, indicating strong synergism. PMID:24827744

  8. Electric Field Driven Torque in ATP Synthase

    PubMed Central

    Miller, John H.; Rajapakshe, Kimal I.; Infante, Hans L.; Claycomb, James R.

    2013-01-01

    FO-ATP synthase (FO) is a rotary motor that converts potential energy from ions, usually protons, moving from high- to low-potential sides of a membrane into torque and rotary motion. Here we propose a mechanism whereby electric fields emanating from the proton entry and exit channels act on asymmetric charge distributions in the c-ring, due to protonated and deprotonated sites, and drive it to rotate. The model predicts a scaling between time-averaged torque and proton motive force, which can be hindered by mutations that adversely affect the channels. The torque created by the c-ring of FO drives the γ-subunit to rotate within the ATP-producing complex (F1) overcoming, with the aid of thermal fluctuations, an opposing torque that rises and falls with angular position. Using the analogy with thermal Brownian motion of a particle in a tilted washboard potential, we compute ATP production rates vs. proton motive force. The latter shows a minimum, needed to drive ATP production, which scales inversely with the number of proton binding sites on the c-ring. PMID:24040370

  9. Catalytic site interactions in yeast OMP synthase.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Michael Riis; Barr, Eric W; Jensen, Kaj Frank; Willemoës, Martin; Grubmeyer, Charles; Winther, Jakob R

    2014-01-15

    The enigmatic kinetics, half-of-the-sites binding, and structural asymmetry of the homodimeric microbial OMP synthases (orotate phosphoribosyltransferase, EC 2.4.2.10) have been proposed to result from an alternating site mechanism in these domain-swapped enzymes [R.W. McClard et al., Biochemistry 45 (2006) 5330-5342]. This behavior was investigated in the yeast enzyme by mutations in the conserved catalytic loop and 5-phosphoribosyl-1-diphosphate (PRPP) binding motif. Although the reaction is mechanistically sequential, the wild-type (WT) enzyme shows parallel lines in double reciprocal initial velocity plots. Replacement of Lys106, the postulated intersubunit communication device, produced intersecting lines in kinetic plots with a 2-fold reduction of kcat. Loop (R105G K109S H111G) and PRPP-binding motif (D131N D132N) mutant proteins, each without detectable enzymatic activity and ablated ability to bind PRPP, complemented to produce a heterodimer with a single fully functional active site showing intersecting initial velocity plots. Equilibrium binding of PRPP and orotidine 5'-monophosphate showed a single class of two binding sites per dimer in WT and K106S enzymes. Evidence here shows that the enzyme does not follow half-of-the-sites cooperativity; that interplay between catalytic sites is not an essential feature of the catalytic mechanism; and that parallel lines in steady-state kinetics probably arise from tight substrate binding. PMID:24262852

  10. Pharmacological and immunohistochemical evidence for a functional nitric oxide synthase system in rat peritoneal eosinophils

    PubMed Central

    Zanardo, Renata C. O.; Costa, Edmar; Ferreira, Heloisa H. A.; Antunes, Edson; Martins, Antonio R.; Murad, Ferid; De Nucci, Gilberto

    1997-01-01

    Eosinophil migration in vivo is markedly attenuated in rats treated chronically with the NO synthase (NOS) inhibitor Nω-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME). In this study, we investigated the existence of a NOS system in eosinophils. Our results demonstrated that rat peritoneal eosinophils strongly express both type II (30.2 ± 11.6% of counted cells) and type III (24.7 ± 7.4% of counted cells) NOS, as detected by immunohistochemistry using affinity purified mouse mAbs. Eosinophil migration in vitro was evaluated by using 48-well microchemotaxis chambers and the chemotactic agents used were N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP, 5 × 10−8 M) and leukotriene B4 (LTB4, 10−8 M). l-NAME (but not d-NAME) significantly inhibited the eosinophil migration induced by both fMLP (54% reduction for 1.0 mM; P < 0.05) and LTB4 (61% reduction for 1.0 mM; P < 0.05). In addition, the type II NOS inhibitor 2-amino-5,6-dihydro-6-methyl-4H-1,3-thiazine and the type I/II NOS inhibitor 1-(2-trifluoromethylphenyl) imidazole also markedly (P < 0.05) attenuated fMLP- (52% and 38% reduction for 1.0 mM, respectively) and LTB4- (52% and 51% reduction for 1.0 mM, respectively) induced migration. The inhibition of eosinophil migration by l-NAME was mimicked by the soluble guanylate cyclase inhibitor 1H-[1,2,4] oxadiazolo [4,3,-a] quinoxalin-1-one (0.01 and 0.1 mM) and reversed by either sodium nitroprusside (0.1 mM) or dibutyryl cyclic GMP (1 mM). We conclude that eosinophils do express NO synthase(s) and that nitric oxide plays an essential role in eosinophil locomotion by acting through a cyclic GMP transduction mechanism. PMID:9391161

  11. A Cd/Fe/Zn-responsive phytochelatin synthase is constitutively present in the ancient liverwort Lunularia cruciata (L.) dumort.

    PubMed

    Degola, Francesca; De Benedictis, Maria; Petraglia, Alessandro; Massimi, Alberto; Fattorini, Laura; Sorbo, Sergio; Basile, Adriana; Sanità di Toppi, Luigi

    2014-11-01

    Lunularia cruciata occupies a very basal position in the phylogenetic tree of liverworts, which in turn have been recognized as a very early clade of land plants. It would therefore seem appropriate to take L. cruciata as the startingpoint for investigating character evolution in plants' metal(loid) response. One of the strongest evolutionary pressures for land colonization by plants has come from potential access to much greater amounts of nutritive ions from surface rocks, compared to water. This might have resulted in the need to precisely regulate trace element homeostasis and to minimize the risk of exposure to toxic concentrations of certain metals, prompting the evolution of a number of response mechanisms, such as synthesis of phytochelatins, metal(loid)-binding thiol-peptides. Accordingly, if the ability to synthesize phytochelatins and the occurrence of an active phytochelatin synthase are traits present in a basal liverwort species, and have been even reinforced in 'modern' tracheophytes, e.g. Arabidopsis thaliana, then such traits would presumably have played an essential role in plant fitness over time. Hence, we demonstrated here that: (i) L. cruciata compartmentalizes cadmium in the vacuoles of the phototosynthetic parenchyma by means of a phytochelatin-mediated detoxification strategy, and possesses a phytochelatin synthase that is activated by cadmium and homeostatic concentrations of iron(II) and zinc; and (ii) A. thaliana phytochelatin synthase displays a higher and broader response to several metal(loid)s [namely: cadmium, iron(II), zinc, copper, mercury, lead, arsenic(III)] than L. cruciata phytochelatin synthase. PMID:25189342

  12. Binding Modes of Zaragozic Acid A to Human Squalene Synthase and Staphylococcal Dehydrosqualene Synthase*

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chia-I; Jeng, Wen-Yih; Chang, Wei-Jung; Ko, Tzu-Ping; Wang, Andrew H.-J.

    2012-01-01

    Zaragozic acids (ZAs) belong to a family of fungal metabolites with nanomolar inhibitory activity toward squalene synthase (SQS). The enzyme catalyzes the committed step of sterol synthesis and has attracted attention as a potential target for antilipogenic and antiinfective therapies. Here, we have determined the structure of ZA-A complexed with human SQS. ZA-A binding induces a local conformational change in the substrate binding site, and its C-6 acyl group also extends over to the cofactor binding cavity. In addition, ZA-A effectively inhibits a homologous bacterial enzyme, dehydrosqualene synthase (CrtM), which synthesizes the precursor of staphyloxanthin in Staphylococcus aureus to cope with oxidative stress. Size reduction at Tyr248 in CrtM further increases the ZA-A binding affinity, and it reveals a similar overall inhibitor binding mode to that of human SQS/ZA-A except for the C-6 acyl group. These structures pave the way for further improving selectivity and development of a new generation of anticholesterolemic and antimicrobial inhibitors. PMID:22474324

  13. Binding modes of zaragozic acid A to human squalene synthase and staphylococcal dehydrosqualene synthase.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chia-I; Jeng, Wen-Yih; Chang, Wei-Jung; Ko, Tzu-Ping; Wang, Andrew H-J

    2012-05-25

    Zaragozic acids (ZAs) belong to a family of fungal metabolites with nanomolar inhibitory activity toward squalene synthase (SQS). The enzyme catalyzes the committed step of sterol synthesis and has attracted attention as a potential target for antilipogenic and antiinfective therapies. Here, we have determined the structure of ZA-A complexed with human SQS. ZA-A binding induces a local conformational change in the substrate binding site, and its C-6 acyl group also extends over to the cofactor binding cavity. In addition, ZA-A effectively inhibits a homologous bacterial enzyme, dehydrosqualene synthase (CrtM), which synthesizes the precursor of staphyloxanthin in Staphylococcus aureus to cope with oxidative stress. Size reduction at Tyr(248) in CrtM further increases the ZA-A binding affinity, and it reveals a similar overall inhibitor binding mode to that of human SQS/ZA-A except for the C-6 acyl group. These structures pave the way for further improving selectivity and development of a new generation of anticholesterolemic and antimicrobial inhibitors. PMID:22474324

  14. Antithrombin III blood test

    MedlinePlus

    ... AT III) is a protein that helps control blood clotting. A blood test can determine the amount of ... may mean you have an increased risk of blood clotting. This can occur when there is not enough ...

  15. Antithrombin III blood test

    MedlinePlus

    ... be due to: Bone marrow transplant Disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) AT III deficiency, an inherited condition Liver ... Schmaier AH, Miller JL. Coagulation and fibrinolysis. In: McPherson ... Management by Laboratory Methods . 22nd ed. Philadelphia, PA: ...

  16. Measurement of the Branching Fraction and Photon Energy Moments of B→Xsγ and ACP(B→Xs+dγ)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Bona, M.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Chen, J. C.; Qi, N. D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y. S.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B.; Abrams, G. S.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D. N.; Button-Shafer, J.; Cahn, R. N.; Charles, E.; Gill, M. S.; Groysman, Y.; Jacobsen, R. G.; Kadyk, J. A.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Kukartsev, G.; Lynch, G.; Mir, L. M.; Oddone, P. J.; Orimoto, T. J.; Pripstein, M.; Roe, N. A.; Ronan, M. T.; Wenzel, W. A.; Del Amo Sanchez, P.; Barrett, M.; Ford, K. E.; Harrison, T. J.; Hart, A. J.; Hawkes, C. M.; Morgan, S. E.; Watson, A. T.; Goetzen, K.; Held, T.; Koch, H.; Lewandowski, B.; Pelizaeus, M.; Peters, K.; Schroeder, T.; Steinke, M.; Boyd, J. T.; Burke, J. P.; Cottingham, W. N.; Walker, D.; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T.; Fulsom, B. G.; Hearty, C.; Knecht, N. S.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; Khan, A.; Kyberd, P.; Saleem, M.; Sherwood, D. J.; Teodorescu, L.; Blinov, V. E.; Bukin, A. D.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K. Yu; Best, D. S.; Bondioli, M.; Bruinsma, M.; Chao, M.; Curry, S.; Eschrich, I.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Lund, P.; Mandelkern, M.; Mommsen, R. K.; Roethel, W.; Stoker, D. P.; Abachi, S.; Buchanan, C.; Foulkes, S. D.; Gary, J. W.; Long, O.; Shen, B. C.; Wang, K.; Zhang, L.; Hadavand, H. K.; Hill, E. J.; Paar, H. P.; Rahatlou, S.; Sharma, V.; Berryhill, J. W.; Campagnari, C.; Cunha, A.; Dahmes, B.; Hong, T. M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Richman, J. D.; Beck, T. W.; Eisner, A. M.; Flacco, C. J.; Heusch, C. A.; Kroseberg, J.; Lockman, W. S.; Nesom, G.; Schalk, T.; Schmitz, R. E.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Spradlin, P.; Williams, D. C.; Wilson, M. G.; Albert, J.; Chen, E.; Dvoretskii, A.; Fang, F.; Hitlin, D. G.; Narsky, I.; Piatenko, T.; Porter, F. C.; Ryd, A.; Samuel, A.; Mancinelli, G.; Meadows, B. T.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Blanc, F.; Bloom, P. C.; Chen, S.; Ford, W. T.; Hirschauer, J. F.; Kreisel, A.; Nauenberg, U.; Olivas, A.; Ruddick, W. O.; Smith, J. G.; Ulmer, K. A.; Wagner, S. R.; Zhang, J.; Chen, A.; Eckhart, E. A.; Soffer, A.; Toki, W. H.; Wilson, R. J.; Winklmeier, F.; Zeng, Q.; Altenburg, D. D.; Feltresi, E.; Hauke, A.; Jasper, H.; Petzold, A.; Spaan, B.; Brandt, T.; Klose, V.; Lacker, H. M.; Mader, W. F.; Nogowski, R.; Schubert, J.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Sundermann, J. E.; Volk, A.; Bernard, D.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Grenier, P.; Latour, E.; Thiebaux, Ch.; Verderi, M.; Bard, D. J.; Clark, P. J.; Gradl, W.; Muheim, F.; Playfer, S.; Robertson, A. I.; Xie, Y.; Andreotti, M.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cibinetto, G.; Luppi, E.; Negrini, M.; Petrella, A.; Piemontese, L.; Prencipe, E.; Anulli, F.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Pacetti, S.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Rama, M.; Zallo, A.; Buzzo, A.; Capra, R.; Contri, R.; Lo Vetere, M.; Macri, M. M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Santroni, A.; Tosi, S.; Brandenburg, G.; Chaisanguanthum, K. S.; Morii, M.; Wu, J.; Dubitzky, R. S.; Marks, J.; Schenk, S.; Uwer, U.; Bhimji, W.; Bowerman, D. A.; Dauncey, P. D.; Egede, U.; Flack, R. L.; Nash, J. A.; Nikolich, M. B.; Panduro Vazquez, W.; Chai, X.; Charles, M. J.; Mallik, U.; Meyer, N. T.; Ziegler, V.; Cochran, J.; Crawley, H. B.; Dong, L.; Eyges, V.; Meyer, W. T.; Prell, S.; Rosenberg, E. I.; Rubin, A. E.; Gritsan, A. V.; Fritsch, M.; Schott, G.; Arnaud, N.; Davier, M.; Grosdidier, G.; Höcker, A.; Le Diberder, F.; Lepeltier, V.; Lutz, A. M.; Oyanguren, A.; Pruvot, S.; Rodier, S.; Roudeau, P.; Schune, M. H.; Stocchi, A.; Wang, W. F.; Wormser, G.; Cheng, C. H.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Chavez, C. A.; Forster, I. J.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Gamet, R.; George, K. A.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Schofield, K. C.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; di Lodovico, F.; Menges, W.; Sacco, R.; Cowan, G.; Flaecher, H. U.; Hopkins, D. A.; Jackson, P. S.; McMahon, T. R.; Ricciardi, S.; Salvatore, F.; Wren, A. C.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Allison, J.; Barlow, N. R.; Barlow, R. J.; Chia, Y. M.; Edgar, C. L.; Lafferty, G. D.; Naisbit, M. T.; Williams, J. C.; Yi, J. I.; Chen, C.; Hulsbergen, W. D.; Jawahery, A.; Lae, C. K.; Roberts, D. A.; Simi, G.; Blaylock, G.; Dallapiccola, C.; Hertzbach, S. S.; Li, X.; Moore, T. B.; Saremi, S.; Staengle, H.; Cowan, R.; Sciolla, G.; Sekula, S. J.; Spitznagel, M.; Taylor, F.; Yamamoto, R. K.; Kim, H.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Lazzaro, A.; Lombardo, V.; Palombo, F.; Bauer, J. M.; Cremaldi, L.; Eschenburg, V.; Godang, R.; Kroeger, R.; Sanders, D. A.; Summers, D. J.; Zhao, H. W.; Brunet, S.; Côté, D.; Taras, P.; Viaud, F. B.; Nicholson, H.; Cavallo, N.; de Nardo, G.; Fabozzi, F.; Gatto, C.; Lista, L.; Monorchio, D.; Paolucci, P.; Piccolo, D.; Sciacca, C.; Baak, M.; Raven, G.; Snoek, H. L.; Jessop, C. P.; Losecco, J. M.; Allmendinger, T.; Benelli, G.; Gan, K. K.; Honscheid, K.; Hufnagel, D.; Jackson, P. D.; Kagan, H.; Kass, R.; Rahimi, A. M.; Ter-Antonyan, R.; Wong, Q. K.; Blount, N. L.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Igonkina, O.; Lu, M.; Potter, C. T.; Rahmat, R.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Strube, J.; Torrence, E.; Galeazzi, F.; Gaz, A.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Pompili, A.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Voci, C.; Benayoun, M.; Chauveau, J.; David, P.; Del Buono, L.; de La Vaissière, Ch.; Hamon, O.; Hartfiel, B. L.; John, M. J. J.; Malclès, J.; Ocariz, J.; Roos, L.; Therin, G.; Behera, P. K.; Gladney, L.; Panetta, J.; Biasini, M.; Covarelli, R.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bucci, F.; Calderini, G.; Carpinelli, M.; Cenci, R.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Marchiori, G.; Mazur, M. A.; Morganti, M.; Neri, N.; Paoloni, E.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Haire, M.; Judd, D.; Wagoner, D. E.; Biesiada, J.; Danielson, N.; Elmer, P.; Lau, Y. P.; Lu, C.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Telnov, A. V.; Bellini, F.; Cavoto, G.; D'Orazio, A.; Del Re, D.; di Marco, E.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Li Gioi, L.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Morganti, S.; Piredda, G.; Polci, F.; Safai Tehrani, F.; Voena, C.; Ebert, M.; Schröder, H.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; de Groot, N.; Franek, B.; Olaiya, E. O.; Wilson, F. F.; Aleksan, R.; Emery, S.; Gaidot, A.; Ganzhur, S. F.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Kozanecki, W.; Legendre, M.; Vasseur, G.; Yèche, Ch.; Zito, M.; Chen, X. R.; Liu, H.; Park, W.; Purohit, M. V.; Wilson, J. R.; Allen, M. T.; Aston, D.; Bartoldus, R.; Bechtle, P.; Berger, N.; Claus, R.; Coleman, J. P.; Convery, M. R.; Cristinziani, M.; Dingfelder, J. C.; Dorfan, J.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dujmic, D.; Dunwoodie, W.; Field, R. C.; Glanzman, T.; Gowdy, S. J.; Graham, M. T.; Halyo, V.; Hast, C.; Hryn'Ova, T.; Innes, W. R.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kim, P.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Li, S.; Libby, J.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H. L.; Macfarlane, D. B.; Marsiske, H.; Messner, R.; Muller, D. R.; O'Grady, C. P.; Ozcan, V. E.; Perazzo, A.; Perl, M.; Pulliam, T.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Roodman, A.; Salnikov, A. A.; Schindler, R. H.; Schwiening, J.; Snyder, A.; Stelzer, J.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Suzuki, K.; Swain, S. K.; Thompson, J. M.; Tinslay, J. S.; Va'Vra, J.; van Bakel, N.; Weaver, M.; Weinstein, A. J. R.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wittgen, M.; Wright, D. H.; Yarritu, A. K.; Yi, K.; Young, C. C.; Burchat, P. R.; Edwards, A. J.; Majewski, S. A.; Petersen, B. A.; Roat, C.; Wilden, L.; Ahmed, S.; Alam, M. S.; Bula, R.; Ernst, J. A.; Jain, V.; Pan, B.; Saeed, M. A.; Wappler, F. R.; Zain, S. B.; Bugg, W.; Krishnamurthy, M.; Spanier, S. M.; Eckmann, R.; Ritchie, J. L.; Satpathy, A.; Schilling, C. J.; Schwitters, R. F.; Izen, J. M.; Lou, X. C.; Ye, S.; Bianchi, F.; Gallo, F.; Gamba, D.; Bomben, M.; Bosisio, L.; Cartaro, C.; Cossutti, F.; Della Ricca, G.; Dittongo, S.; Lanceri, L.; Vitale, L.; Azzolini, V.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bhuyan, B.; Brown, C. M.; Fortin, D.; Hamano, K.; Kowalewski, R.; Nugent, I. M.; Roney, J. M.; Sobie, R. J.; Back, J. J.; Harrison, P. F.; Latham, T. E.; Mohanty, G. B.; Pappagallo, M.; Band, H. R.; Chen, X.; Cheng, B.; Dasu, S.; Datta, M.; Flood, K. T.; Hollar, J. J.; Kutter, P. E.; Mellado, B.; Mihalyi, A.; Pan, Y.; Pierini, M.; Prepost, R.; Wu, S. L.; Yu, Z.; Neal, H.

    2006-10-01

    The photon spectrum in B→Xsγ decay, where Xs is any strange hadronic state, is studied using a data sample of 88.5×106 e+e-→Υ(4S)→BB¯ decays collected by the BABAR experiment at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. The partial branching fraction, ΔB(B→Xsγ)=(3.67±0.29(stat)±0.34(syst)±0.29(model))×10-4, the first moment ⟨Eγ⟩=2.288±0.025±0.017±0.015GeV, and the second moment ⟨Eγ2⟩=0.0328±0.0040±0.0023±0.0036GeV2 are measured for the photon energy range 1.9GeV1.6GeV. In addition, the direct CP asymmetry ACP(B→Xs+dγ) is measured to be -0.110±0.115(stat)±0.017(syst).

  17. Aqueous Molecular Dynamics Simulations of the M. tuberculosis Enoyl-ACP Reductase-NADH System and Its Complex with a Substrate Mimic or Diphenyl Ethers Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    da Silva Lima, Camilo Henrique; de Alencastro, Ricardo Bicca; Kaiser, Carlos Roland; de Souza, Marcus Vinícius Nora; Rodrigues, Carlos Rangel; Albuquerque, Magaly Girão

    2015-01-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of 12 aqueous systems of the NADH-dependent enoyl-ACP reductase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (InhA) were carried out for up to 20–40 ns using the GROMACS 4.5 package. Simulations of the holoenzyme, holoenzyme-substrate, and 10 holoenzyme-inhibitor complexes were conducted in order to gain more insight about the secondary structure motifs of the InhA substrate-binding pocket. We monitored the lifetime of the main intermolecular interactions: hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic contacts. Our MD simulations demonstrate the importance of evaluating the conformational changes that occur close to the active site of the enzyme-cofactor complex before and after binding of the ligand and the influence of the water molecules. Moreover, the protein-inhibitor total steric (ELJ) and electrostatic (EC) interaction energies, related to Gly96 and Tyr158, are able to explain 80% of the biological response variance according to the best linear equation, pKi = 7.772 − 0.1885 × Gly96 + 0.0517 × Tyr158 (R2 = 0.80; n = 10), where interactions with Gly96, mainly electrostatic, increase the biological response, while those with Tyr158 decrease. These results will help to understand the structure-activity relationships and to design new and more potent anti-TB drugs. PMID:26457706

  18. Elucidating the structural basis of diphenyl ether derivatives as highly potent enoyl-ACP reductase inhibitors through molecular dynamics simulations and 3D-QSAR study.

    PubMed

    Kamsri, Pharit; Punkvang, Auradee; Saparpakorn, Patchareenart; Hannongbua, Supa; Irle, Stephan; Pungpo, Pornpan

    2014-07-01

    Diphenyl ether derivatives are good candidates for anti-tuberculosis agents that display a promising potency for inhibition of InhA, an essential enoyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) reductase involved in fatty acid biosynthesis pathways in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. In this work, key structural features for the inhibition were identified by 3D-QSAR CoMSIA models, constructed based on available experimental binding properties of diphenyl ether inhibitors, and a set of four representative compounds was subjected to MD simulations of inhibitor-InhA complexes for the calculation of binding free energies. The results show that bulky groups are required for the R1 substituent on the phenyl A ring of the inhibitors to favor a hydrophobic pocket formed by residues Phe149, Met155, Pro156, Ala157, Tyr158, Pro193, Met199, Val203, Leu207, Ile215, and Leu218. Small substituents with a hydrophilic property are required at the R3 and R4 positions of the inhibitor phenyl B rings to form hydrogen bonds with the backbones of Gly96 and Met98, respectively. For the R2 substituent, small substituents with simultaneous hydrophilic or hydrophobic properties are required to favor the interaction with the pyrophosphate moiety of NAD(+) and the methyl side chain of Ala198, respectively. The reported data provide structural guidance for the design of new and potent diphenyl ether-based inhibitors with high inhibitory activities against M. tuberculosis InhA. PMID:24935113

  19. Characterisation of the tryptophan synthase alpha subunit in maize

    PubMed Central

    Kriechbaumer, Verena; Weigang, Linda; Fießelmann, Andreas; Letzel, Thomas; Frey, Monika; Gierl, Alfons; Glawischnig, Erich

    2008-01-01

    Background In bacteria, such as Salmonella typhimurium, tryptophan is synthesized from indole-3-glycerole phosphate (IGP) by a tryptophan synthase αββα heterotetramer. Plants have evolved multiple α (TSA) and β (TSB) homologs, which have probably diverged in biological function and their ability of subunit interaction. There is some evidence for a tryptophan synthase (TS) complex in Arabidopsis. On the other hand maize (Zea mays) expresses the TSA-homologs BX1 and IGL that efficiently cleave IGP, independent of interaction with TSB. Results In order to clarify, how tryptophan is synthesized in maize, two TSA homologs, hitherto uncharacterized ZmTSA and ZmTSAlike, were functionally analyzed. ZmTSA is localized in plastids, the major site of tryptophan biosynthesis in plants. It catalyzes the tryptophan synthase α-reaction (cleavage of IGP), and forms a tryptophan synthase complex with ZmTSB1 in vitro. The catalytic efficiency of the α-reaction is strongly enhanced upon complex formation. A 160 kD tryptophan synthase complex was partially purified from maize leaves and ZmTSA was identified as native α-subunit of this complex by mass spectrometry. ZmTSAlike, for which no in vitro activity was detected, is localized in the cytosol. ZmTSAlike, BX1, and IGL were not detectable in the native tryptophan synthase complex in leaves. Conclusion It was demonstrated in vivo and in vitro that maize forms a tryptophan synthase complex and ZmTSA functions as α-subunit in this complex. PMID:18430213

  20. The Tomato Terpene Synthase Gene Family1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Falara, Vasiliki; Akhtar, Tariq A.; Nguyen, Thuong T.H.; Spyropoulou, Eleni A.; Bleeker, Petra M.; Schauvinhold, Ines; Matsuba, Yuki; Bonini, Megan E.; Schilmiller, Anthony L.; Last, Robert L.; Schuurink, Robert C.; Pichersky, Eran

    2011-01-01

    Compounds of the terpenoid class play numerous roles in the interactions of plants with their environment, such as attracting pollinators and defending the plant against pests. We show here that the genome of cultivated tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) contains 44 terpene synthase (TPS) genes, including 29 that are functional or potentially functional. Of these 29 TPS genes, 26 were expressed in at least some organs or tissues of the plant. The enzymatic functions of eight of the TPS proteins were previously reported, and here we report the specific in vitro catalytic activity of 10 additional tomato terpene synthases. Many of the tomato TPS genes are found in clusters, notably on chromosomes 1, 2, 6, 8, and 10. All TPS family clades previously identified in angiosperms are also present in tomato. The largest clade of functional TPS genes found in tomato, with 12 members, is the TPS-a clade, and it appears to encode only sesquiterpene synthases, one of which is localized to the mitochondria, while the rest are likely cytosolic. A few additional sesquiterpene synthases are encoded by TPS-b clade genes. Some of the tomato sesquiterpene synthases use z,z-farnesyl diphosphate in vitro as well, or more efficiently than, the e,e-farnesyl diphosphate substrate. Genes encoding monoterpene synthases are also prevalent, and they fall into three clades: TPS-b, TPS-g, and TPS-e/f. With the exception of two enzymes involved in the synthesis of ent-kaurene, the precursor of gibberellins, no other tomato TPS genes could be demonstrated to encode diterpene synthases so far. PMID:21813655

  1. The distribution of acetohydroxyacid synthase in soil bacteria.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Darryl R; Duxbury, Trevor

    2008-01-01

    Most bacteria possess the enzyme acetohydroxyacid synthase, which is used to produce branched-chain amino acids. Enteric bacteria contain several isozymes suited to different conditions, but the distribution of acetohydroxyacid synthase in soil bacteria is largely unknown. Growth experiments confirmed that Escherichia coli, Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium, and Enterobacter aerogenes contain isozymes of acetohydroxyacid synthase, allowing the bacteria to grow in the presence of valine (which causes feedback inhibition of AHAS I) or the sulfonylurea herbicide triasulfuron (which inhibits AHAS II) although a slight lag phase was observed in growth in the latter case. Several common soil isolates were inhibited by triasulfuron, but Pseudomonas fluorescens and Rhodococcus erythropolis were not inhibited by any combination of triasulfuron and valine. The extent of sulfonylurea-sensitive acetohydroxyacid synthase in soil was revealed when 21 out of 27 isolated bacteria in pure culture were inhibited by triasulfuron, the addition of isoleucine and/or valine reversing the effect in 19 cases. Primers were designed to target the genes encoding the large subunits (ilvB, ilvG and ilvI) of acetohydroxyacid synthase from available sequence data and a approximately 355 bp fragment in Bacillus subtilis, Arthrobacter globiformis, E. coli and S. enterica was subsequently amplified. The primers were used to create a small clone library of sequences from an agricultural soil. Phylogenetic analysis revealed significant sequence variation, but all 19 amino acid sequences were most closely related to published large subunit acetohydroxyacid synthase amino acid sequences within several phyla including the Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria. The results suggested the majority of soil microorganisms contain only one functional acetohydroxyacid synthase enzyme sensitive to sulfonylurea herbicides. PMID:17624809

  2. Characterization of Lipoyl Synthase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Lanz, Nicholas D; Lee, Kyung-Hoon; Horstmann, Abigail K; Pandelia, Maria-Eirini; Cicchillo, Robert M; Krebs, Carsten; Booker, Squire J

    2016-03-01

    The prevalence of multiple and extensively drug-resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), the causative agent of tuberculosis, is on the rise, necessitating the identification of new targets to combat an organism that has infected one-third of the world's population, according to the World Health Organization. The biosynthesis of the lipoyl cofactor is one possible target, given its critical importance in cellular metabolism and the apparent lack of functional salvage pathways in Mtb that are found in humans and many other organisms. The lipoyl cofactor is synthesized de novo in two committed steps, involving the LipB-catalyzed transfer of an octanoyl chain derived from fatty acid biosynthesis to a lipoyl carrier protein and the LipA-catalyzed insertion of sulfur atoms at C6 and C8 of the octanoyl chain. A number of in vitro studies of lipoyl synthases from Escherichia coli, Sulfolobus solfataricus, and Thermosynechococcus elongatus have been conducted, but the enzyme from Mtb has not been characterized. Herein, we show that LipA from Mtb contains two [4Fe-4S] clusters and converts an octanoyl peptide substrate to the corresponding lipoyl peptide product via the same C6-monothiolated intermediate as that observed in the E. coli LipA reaction. In addition, we show that LipA from Mtb forms a complex with the H protein of the glycine cleavage system and that the strength of association is dependent on the presence of S-adenosyl-l-methionine. We also show that LipA from Mtb can complement a lipA mutant of E. coli, demonstrating the commonalities of the two enzymes. Lastly, we show that the substrate for LipA, which normally acts on a post-translationally modified protein, can be reduced to carboxybenzyl-octanoyllysine. PMID:26841001

  3. Nitric oxide synthases: structure, function and inhibition.

    PubMed Central

    Alderton, W K; Cooper, C E; Knowles, R G

    2001-01-01

    This review concentrates on advances in nitric oxide synthase (NOS) structure, function and inhibition made in the last seven years, during which time substantial advances have been made in our understanding of this enzyme family. There is now information on the enzyme structure at all levels from primary (amino acid sequence) to quaternary (dimerization, association with other proteins) structure. The crystal structures of the oxygenase domains of inducible NOS (iNOS) and vascular endothelial NOS (eNOS) allow us to interpret other information in the context of this important part of the enzyme, with its binding sites for iron protoporphyrin IX (haem), biopterin, L-arginine, and the many inhibitors which interact with them. The exact nature of the NOS reaction, its mechanism and its products continue to be sources of controversy. The role of the biopterin cofactor is now becoming clearer, with emerging data implicating one-electron redox cycling as well as the multiple allosteric effects on enzyme activity. Regulation of the NOSs has been described at all levels from gene transcription to covalent modification and allosteric regulation of the enzyme itself. A wide range of NOS inhibitors have been discussed, interacting with the enzyme in diverse ways in terms of site and mechanism of inhibition, time-dependence and selectivity for individual isoforms, although there are many pitfalls and misunderstandings of these aspects. Highly selective inhibitors of iNOS versus eNOS and neuronal NOS have been identified and some of these have potential in the treatment of a range of inflammatory and other conditions in which iNOS has been implicated. PMID:11463332

  4. Tertiary model of a plant cellulose synthase

    PubMed Central

    Sethaphong, Latsavongsakda; Haigler, Candace H.; Kubicki, James D.; Zimmer, Jochen; Bonetta, Dario; DeBolt, Seth; Yingling, Yaroslava G.

    2013-01-01

    A 3D atomistic model of a plant cellulose synthase (CESA) has remained elusive despite over forty years of experimental effort. Here, we report a computationally predicted 3D structure of 506 amino acids of cotton CESA within the cytosolic region. Comparison of the predicted plant CESA structure with the solved structure of a bacterial cellulose-synthesizing protein validates the overall fold of the modeled glycosyltransferase (GT) domain. The coaligned plant and bacterial GT domains share a six-stranded β-sheet, five α-helices, and conserved motifs similar to those required for catalysis in other GT-2 glycosyltransferases. Extending beyond the cross-kingdom similarities related to cellulose polymerization, the predicted structure of cotton CESA reveals that plant-specific modules (plant-conserved region and class-specific region) fold into distinct subdomains on the periphery of the catalytic region. Computational results support the importance of the plant-conserved region and/or class-specific region in CESA oligomerization to form the multimeric cellulose–synthesis complexes that are characteristic of plants. Relatively high sequence conservation between plant CESAs allowed mapping of known mutations and two previously undescribed mutations that perturb cellulose synthesis in Arabidopsis thaliana to their analogous positions in the modeled structure. Most of these mutation sites are near the predicted catalytic region, and the confluence of other mutation sites supports the existence of previously undefined functional nodes within the catalytic core of CESA. Overall, the predicted tertiary structure provides a platform for the biochemical engineering of plant CESAs. PMID:23592721

  5. Loss of ceramide synthase 2 activity, necessary for myelin biosynthesis, precedes tau pathology in the cortical pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Couttas, Timothy A; Kain, Nupur; Suchowerska, Alexandra K; Quek, Lake-Ee; Turner, Nigel; Fath, Thomas; Garner, Brett; Don, Anthony S

    2016-07-01

    The anatomical progression of neurofibrillary tangle pathology throughout Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathogenesis runs inverse to the pattern of developmental myelination, with the disease preferentially affecting thinly myelinated regions. Myelin is comprised 80% of lipids, and the prototypical myelin lipids, galactosylceramide, and sulfatide are critical for neurological function. We observed severe depletion of galactosylceramide and sulfatide in AD brain tissue, which can be traced metabolically to the loss of their biosynthetic precursor, very long chain ceramide. The synthesis of very long chain ceramides is catalyzed by ceramide synthase 2 (CERS2). We demonstrate a significant reduction in CERS2 activity as early as Braak stage I/II in temporal cortex, and Braak stage III/IV in hippocampus and frontal cortex, indicating that loss of myelin-specific ceramide synthase activity precedes neurofibrillary tangle pathology in cortical regions. These findings open a new vista on AD pathogenesis by demonstrating a defect in myelin lipid biosynthesis at the preclinical stages of the disease. We posit that, over time, this defect contributes significantly to myelin deterioration, synaptic dysfunction, and neurological decline. PMID:27255818

  6. Peroxiredoxin III protects pancreatic ß cells from apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Gabriele; Aumann, Nicole; Michalska, Marta; Bast, Antje; Sonnemann, Jürgen; Beck, James F; Lendeckel, Uwe; Newsholme, Philip; Walther, Reinhard

    2010-11-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus is characterized by a progressive autoimmune destruction of insulin-producing β cells. Macrophages and T lymphocytes release cytokines, which induce the synthesis of oxygen and nitrogen radicals in the pancreatic islets. The resulting cellular and mitochondrial damage promotes β cell death. β cells are very sensitive to the autoimmune free radical-dependent attack due to their low content of antioxidant enzymes such as glutathione peroxidase and catalase. A focal point of β cell protection should be the control of the mitochondrial redox status, which will result in the preservation of metabolic stimulus-secretion coupling. For this reason, there is a considerable interest in the mitochondrial peroxiredoxin III (PRX III), a thioredoxin-dependent peroxide reductase, which was shown to be able to protect against both oxidative and nitrosative stress. Using the Tet-On-system, we generated stably transfected rat insulinoma cells over- or under-expressing PRX III in a doxycyclin-dependent manner to analyze the effect of increased or decreased amounts of cellular PRX III, following treatment with several stressors. We provide evidence that PRX III protects pancreatic β cells from cell stress induced by accumulation of hydrogen peroxide, or the induction of inducible nitric oxide synthase or caspase-9 and -3 by pro-inflammatory cytokines or streptozotocin. Basal insulin secretion was markedly decreased in cells expressing lower levels of PRX III. We suggest PRX III may be a suitable target for promoting deceleration or even prevention of stress-associated apoptosis in pancreatic β cells and the manifestation of insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. PMID:20807727

  7. Highly Divergent Mitochondrial ATP Synthase Complexes in Tetrahymena thermophila

    PubMed Central

    Balabaskaran Nina, Praveen; Dudkina, Natalya V.; Kane, Lesley A.; van Eyk, Jennifer E.; Boekema, Egbert J.; Mather, Michael W.; Vaidya, Akhil B.

    2010-01-01

    The F-type ATP synthase complex is a rotary nano-motor driven by proton motive force to synthesize ATP. Its F1 sector catalyzes ATP synthesis, whereas the Fo sector conducts the protons and provides a stator for the rotary action of the complex. Components of both F1 and Fo sectors are highly conserved across prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Therefore, it was a surprise that genes encoding the a and b subunits as well as other components of the Fo sector were undetectable in the sequenced genomes of a variety of apicomplexan parasites. While the parasitic existence of these organisms could explain the apparent incomplete nature of ATP synthase in Apicomplexa, genes for these essential components were absent even in Tetrahymena thermophila, a free-living ciliate belonging to a sister clade of Apicomplexa, which demonstrates robust oxidative phosphorylation. This observation raises the possibility that the entire clade of Alveolata may have invented novel means to operate ATP synthase complexes. To assess this remarkable possibility, we have carried out an investigation of the ATP synthase from T. thermophila. Blue native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (BN-PAGE) revealed the ATP synthase to be present as a large complex. Structural study based on single particle electron microscopy analysis suggested the complex to be a dimer with several unique structures including an unusually large domain on the intermembrane side of the ATP synthase and novel domains flanking the c subunit rings. The two monomers were in a parallel configuration rather than the angled configuration previously observed in other organisms. Proteomic analyses of well-resolved ATP synthase complexes from 2-D BN/BN-PAGE identified orthologs of seven canonical ATP synthase subunits, and at least 13 novel proteins that constitute subunits apparently limited to the ciliate lineage. A mitochondrially encoded protein, Ymf66, with predicted eight transmembrane domains could be a substitute for the subunit a

  8. Argininosuccinate synthase: at the center of arginine metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Haines, Ricci J.; Pendleton, Laura C.; Eichler, Duane C.

    2011-01-01

    The levels of L-arginine, a cationic, semi-essential amino acid, are often controlled within a cell at the level of local availability through biosynthesis. The importance of this temporal and spatial control of cellular L-arginine is highlighted by the tissue specific roles of argininosuccinate synthase (argininosuccinate synthetase) (EC 6.3.4.5), as the rate-limiting step in the conversion of L-citrulline to L-arginine. Since its discovery, the function of argininosuccinate synthase has been linked almost exclusively to hepatic urea production despite the fact that alternative pathways involving argininosuccinate synthase were defined, such as its role in providing arginine for creatine and for polyamine biosynthesis. However, it was the discovery of nitric oxide that meaningfully extended our understanding of the metabolic importance of non-hepatic argininosuccinate synthase. Indeed, our knowledge of the number of tissues that manage distinct pools of arginine under the control of argininosuccinate synthase has expanded significantly. PMID:21494411

  9. Sucrose Phosphate Synthase and Sucrose Accumulation at Low Temperature 1

    PubMed Central

    Guy, Charles L.; Huber, Joan L. A.; Huber, Steven C.

    1992-01-01

    The influence of growth temperature on the free sugar and sucrose phosphate synthase content and activity of spinach (Spinacia oleracea) leaf tissue was studied. When plants were grown at 25°C for 3 weeks and then transferred to a constant 5°C, sucrose, glucose, and fructose accumulated to high levels during a 14-d period. Predawn sugar levels increased from 14- to 20-fold over the levels present at the outset of the low-temperature treatment. Sucrose was the most abundant free sugar before, during, and after exposure to 5°C. Leaf sucrose phosphate synthase activity was significantly increased by the low-temperature treatment, whereas sucrose synthase and invertases were not. Synthesis of the sucrose phosphate synthase subunit was increased during and after low-temperature exposure and paralleled an increase in the steady-state level of the subunit. The increases in sucrose and its primary biosynthetic enzyme, sucrose phosphate synthase, are discussed in relation to adjustment of metabolism to low nonfreezing temperature and freezing stress tolerance. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:16652990

  10. Plasticity and Evolution of (+)-3-Carene Synthase and (−)-Sabinene Synthase Functions of a Sitka Spruce Monoterpene Synthase Gene Family Associated with Weevil Resistance*

    PubMed Central

    Roach, Christopher R.; Hall, Dawn E.; Zerbe, Philipp; Bohlmann, Jörg

    2014-01-01

    The monoterpene (+)-3-carene is associated with resistance of Sitka spruce against white pine weevil, a major North American forest insect pest of pine and spruce. High and low levels of (+)-3-carene in, respectively, resistant and susceptible Sitka spruce genotypes are due to variation of (+)-3-carene synthase gene copy number, transcript and protein expression levels, enzyme product profiles, and enzyme catalytic efficiency. A family of multiproduct (+)-3-carene synthase-like genes of Sitka spruce include the three (+)-3-carene synthases, PsTPS-3car1, PsTPS-3car2, PsTPS-3car3, and the (−)-sabinene synthase PsTPS-sab. Of these, PsTPS-3car2 is responsible for the relatively higher levels of (+)-3-carene in weevil-resistant trees. Here, we identified features of the PsTPS-3car1, PsTPS-3car2, PsTPS-3car3, and PsTPS-sab proteins that determine different product profiles. A series of domain swap and site-directed mutations, supported by structural comparisons, identified the amino acid in position 596 as critical for product profiles dominated by (+)-3-carene in PsTPS-3car1, PsTPS-3car2, and PsTPS-3car3, or (−)-sabinene in PsTPS-sab. A leucine in this position promotes formation of (+)-3-carene, whereas phenylalanine promotes (−)-sabinene. Homology modeling predicts that position 596 directs product profiles through differential stabilization of the reaction intermediate. Kinetic analysis revealed position 596 also plays a role in catalytic efficiency. Mutations of position 596 with different side chain properties resulted in a series of enzymes with different product profiles, further highlighting the inherent plasticity and potential for evolution of alternative product profiles of these monoterpene synthases of conifer defense against insects. PMID:25016016

  11. The Proximal Hydrogen Bond Network Modulates Bacillus subtilis Nitric-oxide Synthase Electronic and Structural Properties

    PubMed Central

    Brunel, Albane; Wilson, Adjélé; Henry, Laura; Dorlet, Pierre; Santolini, Jérôme

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial nitric-oxide synthase (NOS)-like proteins are believed to be genuine NOSs. As for cytochromes P450 (CYPs), NOS-proximal ligand is a thiolate that exerts a push effect crucial for the process of dioxygen activation. Unlike CYPs, this catalytic electron donation seems controlled by a hydrogen bond (H-bond) interaction between the thiolate ligand and a vicinal tryptophan. Variations of the strength of this H-bond could provide a direct way to tune the stability along with the electronic and structural properties of NOS. We generated five different mutations of bsNOS Trp66, which can modulate this proximal H-bond. We investigated the effects of these mutations on different NOS complexes (FeIII, FeIICO, and FeIINO), using a combination of UV-visible absorption, EPR, FTIR, and resonance Raman spectroscopies. Our results indicate that (i) the proximal H-bond modulation can selectively decrease or increase the electron donating properties of the proximal thiolate, (ii) this modulation controls the σ-competition between distal and proximal ligands, (iii) this H-bond controls the stability of various NOS intermediates, and (iv) a fine tuning of the electron donation by the proximal ligand is required to allow at the same time oxygen activation and to prevent uncoupling reactions. PMID:21310962

  12. Kinetics of Nitrite Reduction and Peroxynitrite Formation by Ferrous Heme in Human Cystathionine β-Synthase.

    PubMed

    Carballal, Sebastián; Cuevasanta, Ernesto; Yadav, Pramod K; Gherasim, Carmen; Ballou, David P; Alvarez, Beatriz; Banerjee, Ruma

    2016-04-01

    Cystathionine β-synthase (CBS) is a pyridoxal phosphate-dependent enzyme that catalyzes the condensation of homocysteine with serine or with cysteine to form cystathionine and either water or hydrogen sulfide, respectively. Human CBS possesses a noncatalytic heme cofactor with cysteine and histidine as ligands, which in its oxidized state is relatively unreactive. Ferric CBS (Fe(III)-CBS) can be reduced by strong chemical and biochemical reductants to Fe(II)-CBS, which can bind carbon monoxide (CO) or nitric oxide (NO(•)), leading to inactive enzyme. Alternatively, Fe(II)-CBS can be reoxidized by O2to Fe(III)-CBS, forming superoxide radical anion (O2 (̇̄)). In this study, we describe the kinetics of nitrite (NO2 (-)) reduction by Fe(II)-CBS to form Fe(II)NO(•)-CBS. The second order rate constant for the reaction of Fe(II)-CBS with nitrite was obtained at low dithionite concentrations. Reoxidation of Fe(II)NO(•)-CBS by O2showed complex kinetic behavior and led to peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)) formation, which was detected using the fluorescent probe, coumarin boronic acid. Thus, in addition to being a potential source of superoxide radical, CBS constitutes a previously unrecognized source of NO(•)and peroxynitrite. PMID:26867575

  13. Subcellular localization of dinoflagellate polyketide synthases and fatty acid synthase activity.

    PubMed

    Van Dolah, Frances M; Zippay, Mackenzie L; Pezzolesi, Laura; Rein, Kathleen S; Johnson, Jillian G; Morey, Jeanine S; Wang, Zhihong; Pistocchi, Rossella

    2013-12-01

    Dinoflagellates are prolific producers of polyketide secondary metabolites. Dinoflagellate polyketide synthases (PKSs) have sequence similarity to Type I PKSs, megasynthases that encode all catalytic domains on a single polypeptide. However, in dinoflagellate PKSs identified to date, each catalytic domain resides on a separate transcript, suggesting multiprotein complexes similar to Type II PKSs. Here, we provide evidence through coimmunoprecipitation that single-domain ketosynthase and ketoreductase proteins interact, suggesting a predicted multiprotein complex. In Karenia brevis (C.C. Davis) Gert Hansen & Ø. Moestrup, previously observed chloroplast localization of PKSs suggested that brevetoxin biosynthesis may take place in the chloroplast. Here, we report that PKSs are present in both cytosol and chloroplast. Furthermore, brevetoxin is not present in isolated chloroplasts, raising the question of what chloroplast-localized PKS enzymes might be doing. Antibodies to K. brevis PKSs recognize cytosolic and chloroplast proteins in Ostreopsis cf. ovata Fukuyo, and Coolia monotis Meunier, which produce different suites of polyketide toxins, suggesting that these PKSs may share common pathways. Since PKSs are closely related to fatty acid synthases (FAS), we sought to determine if fatty acid biosynthesis colocalizes with either chloroplast or cytosolic PKSs. [(3) H]acetate labeling showed fatty acids are synthesized in the cytosol, with little incorporation in chloroplasts, consistent with a Type I FAS system. However, although 29 sequences in a K. brevis expressed sequence tag database have similarity (BLASTx e-value <10(-10) ) to PKSs, no transcripts for either Type I (cytosolic) or Type II (chloroplast) FAS are present. Further characterization of the FAS complexes may help to elucidate the functions of the PKS enzymes identified in dinoflagellates. PMID:27007632

  14. Understanding Plant Cellulose Synthases through a Comprehensive Investigation of the Cellulose Synthase Family Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Andrew; Specht, Chelsea D.

    2011-01-01

    The development of cellulose as an organizing structure in the plant cell wall was a key event in both the initial colonization and the subsequent domination of the terrestrial ecosystem by vascular plants. A wealth of experimental data has demonstrated the complicated genetic interactions required to form the large synthetic complex that synthesizes cellulose. However, these results are lacking an extensive analysis of the evolution, specialization, and regulation of the proteins that compose this complex. Here we perform an in-depth analysis of the sequences in the cellulose synthase (CesA) family. We investigate the phylogeny of the CesA family, with emphasis on evolutionary specialization. We define specialized clades and identify the class-specific regions within the CesA sequence that may explain this specialization. We investigate changes in regulation of CesAs by looking at the conservation of proposed phosphorylation sites. We investigate the conservation of sites where mutations have been documented that impair CesA function, and compare these sites to those observed in the closest cellulose synthase-like (Csl) families to better understand what regions may separate the CesAs from other Csls. Finally we identify two positions with strong conservation of the aromatic trait, but lacking conservation of amino acid identity, which may represent residues important for positioning the sugar substrate for catalysis. These analyses provide useful tools for understanding characterized mutations and post-translational modifications, and for informing further experiments to probe CesA assembly, regulation, and function through site-directed mutagenesis or domain swapping experiments. PMID:22629257

  15. Deprotonations in the Reaction of Flavin-Dependent Thymidylate Synthase.

    PubMed

    Stull, Frederick W; Bernard, Steffen M; Sapra, Aparna; Smith, Janet L; Zuiderweg, Erik R P; Palfey, Bruce A

    2016-06-14

    Many microorganisms use flavin-dependent thymidylate synthase (FDTS) to synthesize the essential nucleotide 2'-deoxythymidine 5'-monophosphate (dTMP) from 2'-deoxyuridine 5'-monophosphate (dUMP), 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate (CH2THF), and NADPH. FDTSs have a structure that is unrelated to the thymidylate synthase used by humans and a very different mechanism. Here we report nuclear magnetic resonance evidence that FDTS ionizes N3 of dUMP using an active-site arginine. The ionized form of dUMP is largely responsible for the changes in the flavin absorbance spectrum of FDTS upon dUMP binding. dUMP analogues also suggest that the phosphate of dUMP acts as the base that removes the proton from C5 of the dUMP-methylene intermediate in the FDTS-catalyzed reaction. These findings establish additional differences between the mechanisms of FDTS and human thymidylate synthase. PMID:27214228

  16. Evolutionary history of the chitin synthases of eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Morozov, Alexey A; Likhoshway, Yelena V

    2016-06-01

    Chitin synthases are widespread among eukaryotes and known to have a complex evolutionary history in some of the groups. We have reconstructed the chitin synthase phylogeny using the most taxonomically comprehensive dataset currently available and have shown the presence of independently formed paralogous groups in oomycetes, ciliates, fungi, and all diatoms except raphid pennates. There were also two cases of horizontal gene transfer (HGT): transfer from fungus to early diatoms gave rise to diatom paralogous group, while transfer from raphid pennate diatom to Acantamoeba ancestor is, to our knowledge, restricted to a single gene in amoeba. Early evolution of chitin synthases is heavily obscured by paralogy, and further sequencing effort is necessary. PMID:26887391

  17. Divergence of multimodular polyketide synthases revealed by a didomain structure.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jianting; Gay, Darren C; Demeler, Borries; White, Mark A; Keatinge-Clay, Adrian T

    2012-07-01

    The enoylreductase (ER) is the final common enzyme from modular polyketide synthases (PKSs) to be structurally characterized. The 3.0 Å-resolution structure of the didomain comprising the ketoreductase (KR) and ER from the second module of the spinosyn PKS reveals that ER shares an ∼600-Å(2) interface with KR distinct from that of the related mammalian fatty acid synthase (FAS). In contrast to the ER domains of the mammalian FAS, the ER domains of the second module of the spinosyn PKS do not make contact across the two-fold axis of the synthase. This monomeric organization may have been necessary in the evolution of multimodular PKSs to enable acyl carrier proteins to access each of their cognate enzymes. The isolated ER domain showed activity toward a substrate analog, enabling us to determine the contributions of its active site residues. PMID:22634636

  18. Plant terpenoid synthases: Molecular biology and phylogenetic analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bohlmann, Jörg; Meyer-Gauen, Gilbert; Croteau, Rodney

    1998-01-01

    This review focuses on the monoterpene, sesquiterpene, and diterpene synthases of plant origin that use the corresponding C10, C15, and C20 prenyl diphosphates as substrates to generate the enormous diversity of carbon skeletons characteristic of the terpenoid family of natural products. A description of the enzymology and mechanism of terpenoid cyclization is followed by a discussion of molecular cloning and heterologous expression of terpenoid synthases. Sequence relatedness and phylogenetic reconstruction, based on 33 members of the Tps gene family, are delineated, and comparison of important structural features of these enzymes is provided. The review concludes with an overview of the organization and regulation of terpenoid metabolism, and of the biotechnological applications of terpenoid synthase genes. PMID:9539701

  19. Synthase-dependent exopolysaccharide secretion in Gram-negative bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Whitney, J.C.; Howell, P.L.

    2014-01-01

    The biosynthesis and export of bacterial cell-surface polysaccharides is known to occur through several distinct mechanisms. Recent advances in the biochemistry and structural biology of several proteins in synthase-dependent polysaccharide secretion systems have identified key conserved components of this pathway in Gram-negative bacteria. These components include an inner-membrane-embedded polysaccharide synthase, a periplasmic tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR)-containing scaffold protein, and an outer-membrane β-barrel porin. There is also increasing evidence that many synthase-dependent systems are post-translationally regulated by the bacterial second messenger bis-(3′-5′)-cyclic dimeric guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP). Here, we compare these core proteins in the context of the alginate, cellulose, and poly-β-D-N-acetylglucosamine (PNAG) secretion systems. PMID:23117123

  20. Fusion Power Demonstration III

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.D.

    1985-07-01

    This is the third in the series of reports covering the Fusion Power Demonstration (FPD) design study. This volume considers the FPD-III configuration that incorporates an octopole end plug. As compared with the quadrupole end-plugged designs of FPD-I and FPD-II, this octopole configuration reduces the number of end cell magnets and shortens the minimum ignition length of the central cell. The end-cell plasma length is also reduced, which in turn reduces the size and cost of the end cell magnets and shielding. As a contiuation in the series of documents covering the FPD, this report does not stand alone as a design description of FPD-III. Design details of FPD-III subsystems that do not differ significantly from those of the FPD-II configuration are not duplicated in this report.

  1. Mapping a kingdom-specific functional domain of squalene synthase.

    PubMed

    Linscott, Kristin B; Niehaus, Thomas D; Zhuang, Xun; Bell, Stephen A; Chappell, Joe

    2016-09-01

    Squalene synthase catalyzes the first committed step in sterol biosynthesis and consists of both an amino-terminal catalytic domain and a carboxy-terminal domain tethering the enzyme to the ER membrane. While the overall architecture of this enzyme is identical in eukaryotes, it was previously shown that plant and animal genes cannot complement a squalene synthase knockout mutation in yeast unless the carboxy-terminal domain is swapped for one of fungal origin. This implied a unique component of the fungal carboxy-terminal domain was responsible for the complementation phenotype. To identify this motif, we used Saccharomyces cerevisiae with a squalene synthase knockout mutation, and expressed intact and chimeric squalene synthases originating from fungi, plants, and animals. In contrast to previous observations, all enzymes tested could partially complement the knockout mutation when the genes were weakly expressed. However, when highly expressed, non-fungal squalene synthases could not complement the yeast mutation and instead led to the accumulation of a toxic intermediate(s) as defined by mutations of genes downstream in the ergosterol pathway. Restoration of the complete complementation phenotype was mapped to a 26-amino acid hinge region linking the catalytic and membrane-spanning domains specific to fungal squalene synthases. Over-expression of the C-terminal domain containing a hinge domain from fungi, not from animals or plants, led to growth inhibition of wild-type yeast. Because this hinge region is unique to and highly conserved within each kingdom of life, the data suggests that the hinge domain plays an essential functional role, such as assembly of ergosterol multi-enzyme complexes in fungi. PMID:27320012

  2. Pioneer III Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1961-01-01

    Looking more like surgeons, these technicians wearing 'cleanroom' attire inspect the Pioneer III probe before shipping it to Cape Canaveral, Florida. Pioneer III was launched on December 6, 1958 aboard a Juno II rocket at the Atlantic Missile Range, Cape Canaveral, Florida. The mission objectives were to measure the radiation intensity of the Van Allen radiation belt, test long range communication systems, the launch vehicle and other subsystems. The Juno II failed to reach proper orbital escape velocity. The probe re-entered the Earth's atmosphere on December 7th ending its brief mission.

  3. Twisting and subunit rotation in single FOF1-ATP synthase

    PubMed Central

    Sielaff, Hendrik; Börsch, Michael

    2013-01-01

    FOF1-ATP synthases are ubiquitous proton- or ion-powered membrane enzymes providing ATP for all kinds of cellular processes. The mechanochemistry of catalysis is driven by two rotary nanomotors coupled within the enzyme. Their different step sizes have been observed by single-molecule microscopy including videomicroscopy of fluctuating nanobeads attached to single enzymes and single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer. Here we review recent developments of approaches to monitor the step size of subunit rotation and the transient elastic energy storage mechanism in single FOF1-ATP synthases. PMID:23267178

  4. Cloning and functional expression of a cDNA encoding stearoyl-ACP Δ9-desaturase from the endosperm of coconut (Cocos nucifera L.).

    PubMed

    Gao, Lingchao; Sun, Ruhao; Liang, Yuanxue; Zhang, Mengdan; Zheng, Yusheng; Li, Dongdong

    2014-10-01

    Coconut (Cocos nucifera L.) is an economically tropical fruit tree with special fatty acid compositions. The stearoyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) desaturase (SAD) plays a key role in the properties of the majority of cellular glycerolipids. In this paper, a full-length cDNA of a stearoyl-acyl carrier protein desaturase, designated CocoFAD, was isolated from cDNA library prepared from the endosperm of coconut (C. nucifera L.). An 1176 bp cDNA from overlapped PCR products containing ORF encoding a 391-amino acid (aa) protein was obtained. The coded protein was virtually identical and shared the homology to other Δ9-desaturase plant sequences (greater than 80% as similarity to that of Elaeis guineensis Jacq). The real-time fluorescent quantitative PCR result indicated that the yield of CocoFAD was the highest in the endosperm of 8-month-old coconut and leaf, and the yield was reduced to 50% of the highest level in the endosperm of 15-month-old coconut. The coding region showed heterologous expression in strain INVSc1 of yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). GC-MS analysis showed that the levels of palmitoleic acid (16:1) and oleic acid (18:1) were improved significantly; meanwhile stearic acid (18:0) was reduced. These results indicated that the plastidial Δ9 desaturase from the endosperm of coconut was involved in the biosynthesis of hexadecenoic acid and octadecenoic acid, which was similar with other plants. These results may be valuable for understanding the mechanism of fatty acid metabolism and the genetic improvement of CocoFAD gene in palm plants in the future. PMID:25038276

  5. Molecular basis for the inhibition of β-hydroxyacyl-ACP dehydratase HadAB complex from Mycobacterium tuberculosis by flavonoid inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yu; Qiu, Xiaodi; Shaw, Neil; Xu, Yueyang; Sun, Yuna; Li, Xuemei; Li, Jun; Rao, Zihe

    2015-07-01

    Dehydration is one of the key steps in the biosynthesis of mycolic acids and is vital to the growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). Consequently, stalling dehydration cures tuberculosis (TB). Clinically used anti-TB drugs like thiacetazone (TAC) and isoxyl (ISO) as well as flavonoids inhibit the enzyme activity of the β-hydroxyacyl-ACP dehydratase HadAB complex. How this inhibition is exerted, has remained an enigma for years. Here, we describe the first crystal structures of the MtbHadAB complex bound with flavonoid inhibitor butein, 2',4,4'-trihydroxychalcone or fisetin. Despite sharing no sequence identity from Blast, HadA and HadB adopt a very similar hotdog fold. HadA forms a tight dimer with HadB in which the proteins are sitting side-by-side, but are oriented anti-parallel. While HadB contributes the catalytically critical His-Asp dyad, HadA binds the fatty acid substrate in a long channel. The atypical double hotdog fold with a single active site formed by MtbHadAB gives rise to a long, narrow cavity that vertically traverses the fatty acid binding channel. At the base of this cavity lies Cys61, which upon mutation to Ser confers drug-resistance in TB patients. We show that inhibitors bind in this cavity and protrude into the substrate binding channel. Thus, inhibitors of MtbHadAB exert their effect by occluding substrate from the active site. The unveiling of this mechanism of inhibition paves the way for accelerating development of next generation of anti-TB drugs. PMID:26081470

  6. Analysis of the cercosporin polyketide synthase CTB1 reveals a new fungal thioesterase function

    PubMed Central

    Newman, Adam G.; Vagstad, Anna L.; Belecki, Katherine; Scheerer, Jonathan R.

    2012-01-01

    The polyketide synthase CTB1 is demonstrated to catalyze pyrone formation thereby expanding the known biosynthetic repertoire of thioesterase domains in iterative, non-reducing polyketide synthases. PMID:23108075

  7. Benzophenone Synthase and Chalcone Synthase Accumulate in the Mesophyll of Hypericum perforatum Leaves at Different Developmental Stages.

    PubMed

    Belkheir, Asma K; Gaid, Mariam; Liu, Benye; Hänsch, Robert; Beerhues, Ludger

    2016-01-01

    The active medicinal constituents in Hypericum perforatum, used to treat depression and skin irritation, include flavonoids and xanthones. The carbon skeletons of these compounds are formed by chalcone synthase (CHS) and benzophenone synthase (BPS), respectively. Polyclonal antisera were raised against the polyketide synthases from Hypericum androsaemum and their IgG fractions were isolated. Immunoblotting and immunotitration were used to test the IgGs for crossreactivity and monospecificity in H. perforatum leaf protein extract. Immunofluorescence localization revealed that both CHS and BPS are located in the mesophyll. The maximum fluorescence levels were observed in approx. 0.5 and 1 cm long leaves, respectively. The fluorescence intensity observed for CHS significantly exceeded that for BPS. Using histochemical staining, flavonoids were detected in the mesophyll, indicating that the sites of biosynthesis and accumulation coincide. Our results help understand the biosynthesis and underlying regulation of active H. perforatum constituents. PMID:27446151

  8. Benzophenone Synthase and Chalcone Synthase Accumulate in the Mesophyll of Hypericum perforatum Leaves at Different Developmental Stages

    PubMed Central

    Belkheir, Asma K.; Gaid, Mariam; Liu, Benye; Hänsch, Robert; Beerhues, Ludger

    2016-01-01

    The active medicinal constituents in Hypericum perforatum, used to treat depression and skin irritation, include flavonoids and xanthones. The carbon skeletons of these compounds are formed by chalcone synthase (CHS) and benzophenone synthase (BPS), respectively. Polyclonal antisera were raised against the polyketide synthases from Hypericum androsaemum and their IgG fractions were isolated. Immunoblotting and immunotitration were used to test the IgGs for crossreactivity and monospecificity in H. perforatum leaf protein extract. Immunofluorescence localization revealed that both CHS and BPS are located in the mesophyll. The maximum fluorescence levels were observed in approx. 0.5 and 1 cm long leaves, respectively. The fluorescence intensity observed for CHS significantly exceeded that for BPS. Using histochemical staining, flavonoids were detected in the mesophyll, indicating that the sites of biosynthesis and accumulation coincide. Our results help understand the biosynthesis and underlying regulation of active H. perforatum constituents. PMID:27446151

  9. Structure and mechanism of the diterpene cyclase ent-copalyl diphosphate synthase

    SciTech Connect

    Köksal, Mustafa; Hu, Huayou; Coates, Robert M.; Peters, Reuben J.; Christianson, David W.

    2011-09-20

    The structure of ent-copalyl diphosphate synthase reveals three {alpha}-helical domains ({alpha}, {beta} and {gamma}), as also observed in the related diterpene cyclase taxadiene synthase. However, active sites are located at the interface of the {beta}{gamma} domains in ent-copalyl diphosphate synthase but exclusively in the {alpha} domain of taxadiene synthase. Modular domain architecture in plant diterpene cyclases enables the evolution of alternative active sites and chemical strategies for catalyzing isoprenoid cyclization reactions.

  10. Induction of nitric oxide synthase activity by toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 in a macrophage-monocyte cell line.

    PubMed Central

    Zembowicz, A; Vane, J R

    1992-01-01

    Toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 (TSST-1) is a Mr 22,000 protein produced by Staphylococcus aureus. It is thought to be the cause of toxic shock syndrome. We investigated the hypothesis that TSST-1 induces nitric oxide (NO) synthase and that the NO formed may be involved in the pathogenesis of toxic shock syndrome. We used the murine monocyte-macrophage cell line J744.2 that responds to TSST-1 and also expresses NO synthase activity upon immunological stimulation. J774.2 macrophages stimulated with TSST-1 (10-100 nM) generated nitrite, a breakdown product of NO, and induced concentration-dependent elevations of cGMP in the pig kidney epithelial cell line (LLC-PK1). This latter effect was due to the generation of L-arginine-derived NO for it was (i) abolished by oxyhemoglobin (10 microM), a scavenger of NO, or by methylene blue (10 microM), an inhibitor of NO-activated guanylate cyclase; (ii) potentiated by superoxide dismutase (100 units/ml), which prolongs the life of NO; (iii) inhibited by NG-monomethyl-L-arginine (0.3 mM), an inhibitor of NO synthase; (iv) significantly decreased when L-arginine (0.4 mM) in the medium was replaced by D-arginine (0.4 mM). Moreover, TSST-1 (100 nM) enhanced the activity of cytosolic NO synthase in J774.2 cells. Hydrocortisone (1 microM) but not indomethacin (5 micrograms/ml) or salicylic acid (5 micrograms/ml) prevented the generation of NO2- and the increases in cGMP levels in LLC-PK1 cells induced by J774.2 cells stimulated with TSST-1. The effects of hydrocortisone were partially reversed by coincubation with RU 486 (1 microM), an antagonist of glucocorticoid receptors. Thus, TSST-1 and perhaps other exotoxins produced by Gram-positive bacteria induce NO synthase and the increased NO formation may contribute to toxic shock syndrome and possibly to changes in the immune responses that accompany infection. PMID:1372433

  11. Potential for Quantifying Expression of the Geobacteraceae Citrate Synthase Gene To Assess the Activity of Geobacteraceae in the Subsurface and on Current-Harvesting Electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, Dawn E.; Nevin, Kelly P.; O'Neil, Regina A.; Ward, Joy E.; Adams, Lorrie A.; Woodard, Trevor L.; Vrionis, Helen A.; Lovley, Derek R.

    2005-01-01

    The Geobacteraceae citrate synthase is phylogenetically distinct from those of other prokaryotes and is a key enzyme in the central metabolism of Geobacteraceae. Therefore, the potential for using levels of citrate synthase mRNA to estimate rates of Geobacter metabolism was evaluated in pure culture studies and in four different Geobacteraceae-dominated environments. Quantitative reverse transcription-PCR studies with mRNA extracted from cultures of Geobacter sulfurreducens grown in chemostats with Fe(III) as the electron acceptor or in batch with electrodes as the electron acceptor indicated that transcript levels of the citrate synthase gene, gltA, increased with increased rates of growth/Fe(III) reduction or current production, whereas the expression of the constitutively expressed housekeeping genes recA, rpoD, and proC remained relatively constant. Analysis of mRNA extracted from groundwater collected from a U(VI)-contaminated site undergoing in situ uranium bioremediation revealed a remarkable correspondence between acetate levels in the groundwater and levels of transcripts of gltA. The expression of gltA was also significantly greater in RNA extracted from groundwater beneath a highway runoff recharge pool that was exposed to calcium magnesium acetate in June, when acetate concentrations were high, than in October, when the levels had significantly decreased. It was also possible to detect gltA transcripts on current-harvesting anodes deployed in freshwater sediments. These results suggest that it is possible to monitor the in situ metabolic rate of Geobacteraceae by tracking the expression of the citrate synthase gene. PMID:16269721

  12. Summary of Session III

    SciTech Connect

    Furman, M.A.

    2002-06-19

    This is a summary of the talks presented in Session III ''Simulations of Electron-Cloud Build Up'' of the Mini-Workshop on Electron-Cloud Simulations for Proton and Positron Beams ECLOUD-02, held at CERN, 15-18 April 2002.

  13. The Apple III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ditlea, Steve

    1982-01-01

    Describes and evaluates the features, performance, peripheral devices, available software, and capabilities of the Apple III microcomputer. The computer's operating system, its hardware, and the commercially produced software it accepts are discussed. Specific applications programs for financial planning, accounting, and word processing are…

  14. CITY III Director's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Envirometrics, Inc., Washington, DC.

    CITY III is a computer-assisted simulation game which allows the participants to make decisions affecting various aspects of the economic, governmental, and social sectors of a simulated urban area. The game director selects one of five possible starting city configurations, may set a number of conditions in the city before the start of play, and…

  15. Loop residues and catalysis in OMP synthase.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gary P; Hansen, Michael Riis; Grubmeyer, Charles

    2012-06-01

    Residue-to-alanine mutations and a two-amino acid deletion have been made in the highly conserved catalytic loop (residues 100-109) of Salmonella typhimurium OMP synthase (orotate phosphoribosyltransferase, EC 2.4.2.10). As described previously, the K103A mutant enzyme exhibited a 10(4)-fold decrease in k(cat)/K(M) for PRPP; the K100A enzyme suffered a 50-fold decrease. Alanine mutations at His105 and Glu107 produced 40- and 7-fold decreases in k(cat)/K(M), respectively, and E101A, D104A, and G106A were slightly faster than the wild-type (WT) in terms of k(cat), with minor effects on k(cat)/K(M). Equilibrium binding of OMP or PRPP in binary complexes was affected little by loop mutation, suggesting that the energetics of ground-state binding have little contribution from the catalytic loop, or that a favorable binding energy is offset by costs of loop reorganization. Pre-steady-state kinetics for mutants showed that K103A and E107A had lost the burst of product formation in each direction that indicated rapid on-enzyme chemistry for WT, but that the burst was retained by H105A. Δ102Δ106, a loop-shortened enzyme with Ala102 and Gly106 deleted, showed a 10(4)-fold reduction of k(cat) but almost unaltered K(D) values for all four substrate molecules. The 20% (i.e., 1.20) intrinsic [1'-(3)H]OMP kinetic isotope effect (KIE) for WT is masked because of high forward and reverse commitment factors. K103A failed to express intrinsic KIEs fully (1.095 ± 0.013). In contrast, H105A, which has a smaller catalytic lesion, gave a [1'-(3)H]OMP KIE of 1.21 ± 0.0005, and E107A (1.179 ± 0.0049) also gave high values. These results are interpreted in the context of the X-ray structure of the complete substrate complex for the enzyme [Grubmeyer, C., Hansen, M. R., Fedorov, A. A., and Almo, S. C. (2012) Biochemistry 51 (preceding paper in this issue, DOI 10.1021/bi300083p )]. The full expression of KIEs by H105A and E107A may result from a less secure closure of the catalytic loop

  16. Cytotoxicity of mitochondria-targeted resveratrol derivatives: interactions with respiratory chain complexes and ATP synthase.

    PubMed

    Sassi, Nicola; Mattarei, Andrea; Azzolini, Michele; Szabo', Ildiko'; Paradisi, Cristina; Zoratti, Mario; Biasutto, Lucia

    2014-10-01

    We recently reported that mitochondria-targeted derivatives of resveratrol are cytotoxic in vitro, selectively inducing mostly necrotic death of fast-growing and tumoral cells when supplied in the low μM range (N. Sassi et al., Curr. Pharm. Des. 2014). Cytotoxicity is due to H2O2 produced upon accumulation of the compounds into mitochondria. We investigate here the mechanisms underlying ROS generation and mitochondrial depolarization caused by these agents. We find that they interact with the respiratory chain, especially complexes I and III, causing superoxide production. "Capping" free hydroxyls with acetyl or methyl groups increases their effectiveness as respiratory chain inhibitors, promoters of ROS generation and cytotoxic agents. Exposure to the compounds also induces an increase in the occurrence of short transient [Ca(2+)] "spikes" in the cells. This increase is unrelated to ROS production, and it is not the cause of cell death. These molecules furthermore inhibit the F0F1 ATPase. When added to oligomycin-treated cells, the acetylated/methylated ones cause a recovery of the cellular oxygen consumption rates depressed by oligomycin. Since a protonophoric futile cycle which might account for the uncoupling effect is impossible, we speculate that the compounds may cause the transformation of the ATP synthase and/or respiratory chain complex(es) into a conduit for uncoupled proton translocation. Only in the presence of excess oligomycin the most effective derivatives appear to induce the mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) within the cells. This may be considered to provide circumstantial support for the idea that the ATP synthase is the molecular substrate for the MPT pore. PMID:24997425

  17. Functional Analysis of the Brassica napus L. Phytoene Synthase (PSY) Gene Family

    PubMed Central

    López-Emparán, Ada; Quezada-Martinez, Daniela; Zúñiga-Bustos, Matías; Cifuentes, Víctor; Iñiguez-Luy, Federico; Federico, María Laura

    2014-01-01

    Phytoene synthase (PSY) has been shown to catalyze the first committed and rate-limiting step of carotenogenesis in several crop species, including Brassica napus L. Due to its pivotal role, PSY has been a prime target for breeding and metabolic engineering the carotenoid content of seeds, tubers, fruits and flowers. In Arabidopsis thaliana, PSY is encoded by a single copy gene but small PSY gene families have been described in monocot and dicotyledonous species. We have recently shown that PSY genes have been retained in a triplicated state in the A- and C-Brassica genomes, with each paralogue mapping to syntenic locations in each of the three “Arabidopsis-like” subgenomes. Most importantly, we have shown that in B. napus all six members are expressed, exhibiting overlapping redundancy and signs of subfunctionalization among photosynthetic and non photosynthetic tissues. The question of whether this large PSY family actually encodes six functional enzymes remained to be answered. Therefore, the objectives of this study were to: (i) isolate, characterize and compare the complete protein coding sequences (CDS) of the six B. napus PSY genes; (ii) model their predicted tridimensional enzyme structures; (iii) test their phytoene synthase activity in a heterologous complementation system and (iv) evaluate their individual expression patterns during seed development. This study further confirmed that the six B. napus PSY genes encode proteins with high sequence identity, which have evolved under functional constraint. Structural modeling demonstrated that they share similar tridimensional protein structures with a putative PSY active site. Significantly, all six B. napus PSY enzymes were found to be functional. Taking into account the specific patterns of expression exhibited by these PSY genes during seed development and recent knowledge of PSY suborganellar localization, the selection of transgene candidates for metabolic engineering the carotenoid content of

  18. Functional analysis of the Brassica napus L. phytoene synthase (PSY) gene family.

    PubMed

    López-Emparán, Ada; Quezada-Martinez, Daniela; Zúñiga-Bustos, Matías; Cifuentes, Víctor; Iñiguez-Luy, Federico; Federico, María Laura

    2014-01-01

    Phytoene synthase (PSY) has been shown to catalyze the first committed and rate-limiting step of carotenogenesis in several crop species, including Brassica napus L. Due to its pivotal role, PSY has been a prime target for breeding and metabolic engineering the carotenoid content of seeds, tubers, fruits and flowers. In Arabidopsis thaliana, PSY is encoded by a single copy gene but small PSY gene families have been described in monocot and dicotyledonous species. We have recently shown that PSY genes have been retained in a triplicated state in the A- and C-Brassica genomes, with each paralogue mapping to syntenic locations in each of the three "Arabidopsis-like" subgenomes. Most importantly, we have shown that in B. napus all six members are expressed, exhibiting overlapping redundancy and signs of subfunctionalization among photosynthetic and non photosynthetic tissues. The question of whether this large PSY family actually encodes six functional enzymes remained to be answered. Therefore, the objectives of this study were to: (i) isolate, characterize and compare the complete protein coding sequences (CDS) of the six B. napus PSY genes; (ii) model their predicted tridimensional enzyme structures; (iii) test their phytoene synthase activity in a heterologous complementation system and (iv) evaluate their individual expression patterns during seed development. This study further confirmed that the six B. napus PSY genes encode proteins with high sequence identity, which have evolved under functional constraint. Structural modeling demonstrated that they share similar tridimensional protein structures with a putative PSY active site. Significantly, all six B. napus PSY enzymes were found to be functional. Taking into account the specific patterns of expression exhibited by these PSY genes during seed development and recent knowledge of PSY suborganellar localization, the selection of transgene candidates for metabolic engineering the carotenoid content of oilseeds

  19. SUGARBEET ROOT SUCROSE SYNTHASE ISOFORMS DIFFER IN DEVELOPMENTAL EXPRESSION, SUBUNIT COMPOSITION AND RESPONSE TO PH.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two sucrose synthase isoforms have been identified by activity stained isoelectric focused polyacrylamide electrophoresis in developing sugarbeet (Beta vulgaris L.) root. Sucrose synthase isoform I (SuSyI) was present from the early stages of development to maturity. Sucrose synthase isoform II (S...

  20. Malate Synthase Activity in Cotton and Other Ungerminated Oilseeds

    PubMed Central

    Miernyk, Jan A.; Trelease, Richard N.; Choinski, John S.

    1979-01-01

    Extracts from several species and varieties of ungerminated cotton seeds plus homogenates from 18 other oilseeds (representing 11 different families) were examined for malate synthase and isocitrate lyase activity. Malate synthase activities in the various cotton seeds ranged from 35 to 129% of the units per dry seed weight found in Deltapine 16 cotton. For other oilseeds, the range was from 0.3 to 58% of Deltapine 16 cotton. Castor bean (Ricinus communis L.) had the least activity per mg dry weight (12-fold lower than the next lowest species), while Pima cotton (Gossypium barbadense L.) had the highest level (8.53 units). On a per seed basis, these values were 15 and 747 nanomoles per minute. Malate synthase activity was measurable in all seed types examined, whereas isocitrate lyase could not be detected in any of the seeds. We suggest that synthesis of malate synthase during seed development is universal among oilseeds in the absence of glyoxylate-cycle-associated isocitrate lyase activity. PMID:16660858

  1. Subcellular targeting and trafficking of nitric oxide synthases

    PubMed Central

    Oess, Stefanie; Icking, Ann; Fulton, David; Govers, Roland; Müller-Esterl, Werner

    2006-01-01

    Unlike most other endogenous messengers that are deposited in vesicles, processed on demand and/or secreted in a regulated fashion, NO (nitric oxide) is a highly active molecule that readily diffuses through cell membranes and thus cannot be stored inside the producing cell. Rather, its signalling capacity must be controlled at the levels of biosynthesis and local availability. The importance of temporal and spatial control of NO production is highlighted by the finding that differential localization of NO synthases in cardiomyocytes translates into distinct effects of NO in the heart. Thus NO synthases belong to the most tightly controlled enzymes, being regulated at transcriptional and translational levels, through co- and post-translational modifications, by substrate availability and not least via specific sorting to subcellular compartments, where they are in close proximity to their target proteins. Considerable efforts have been made to elucidate the molecular mechanisms that underlie the intracellular targeting and trafficking of NO synthases, to ultimately understand the cellular pathways controlling the formation and function of this powerful signalling molecule. In the present review, we discuss the mechanisms and triggers for subcellular routing and dynamic redistribution of NO synthases and the ensuing consequences for NO production and action. PMID:16722822

  2. Genetics Home Reference: N-acetylglutamate synthase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... of reactions that occurs in liver cells. This cycle processes excess nitrogen, generated when protein is used by the body, to make a compound called urea that is excreted by the kidneys. The ... cycle. In people with N-acetylglutamate synthase deficiency , N- ...

  3. Incremental truncation of PHA synthases results in altered product specificity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qian; Xia, Yongzhen; Chen, Quan; Qi, Qingsheng

    2012-05-10

    PHA synthase is the key enzyme involved in the biosynthesis of microbial polymers, polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA). In this study, we created a hybrid library of PHA synthase gene with different crossover points by an incremental truncation method between the C-terminal fragments of the phaC(Cn) (phaC from Cupriavidus necator) and the N-terminal fragments of the phaC1(Pa) (phaC from Pseudomonas aeruginosa). As the truncation of the hybrid enzyme increased, the in vivo PHB synthesis ability of the hybrids declined gradually. PHA synthase PhaC(Cn) with a deletion on N-terminal up to 83 amino acid residues showed no synthase activity. While with the removal of up to 270 amino acids from the N-terminus, the activity of the truncated PhaC(Cn) could be complemented by the N-terminus of PhaC1(Pa). Three of the hybrid enzymes W188, W235 and W272 (named by the deleted nucleic acid number) were found to have altered product specificities. PMID:22500895

  4. Polyhydroyxalkanoate synthase fusions as a strategy for oriented enzyme immobilisation.

    PubMed

    Hooks, David O; Venning-Slater, Mark; Du, Jinping; Rehm, Bernd H A

    2014-01-01

    Polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) is a carbon storage polymer produced by certain bacteria in unbalanced nutrient conditions. The PHA forms spherical inclusions surrounded by granule associate proteins including the PHA synthase (PhaC). Recently, the intracellular formation of PHA granules with covalently attached synthase from Ralstonia eutropha has been exploited as a novel strategy for oriented enzyme immobilisation. Fusing the enzyme of interest to PHA synthase results in a bifunctional protein able to produce PHA granules and immobilise the active enzyme of choice to the granule surface. Functionalised PHA granules can be isolated from the bacterial hosts, such as Escherichia coli, and maintain enzymatic activity in a wide variety of assay conditions. This approach to oriented enzyme immobilisation has produced higher enzyme activities and product levels than non-oriented immobilisation techniques such as protein inclusion based particles. Here, enzyme immobilisation via PHA synthase fusion is reviewed in terms of the genetic designs, the choices of enzymes, the control of enzyme orientations, as well as their current and potential applications. PMID:24962396

  5. A geraniol-synthase gene from Cinnamomum tenuipilum.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tao; Li, Jing; Wang, Hao-Xin; Zeng, Ying

    2005-02-01

    Geraniol may accumulate up to 86-98% of the leaf essential oils in geraniol chemotypes of the evergreen camphor tree Cinnamomum tenuipilum. A similarity-based cloning strategy yielded a cDNA clone that appeared to encode a terpene synthase and which could be phylogenetically grouped within the angiosperm monoterpene synthase/subfamily. After its expression in Escherichia coli and enzyme assay with prenyl diphosphates as substrates, the enzyme encoded by the putative C. tenuipilum monoterpene synthase gene was shown to specifically convert geranyl diphosphate to geraniol as a single product by GC-MS analysis. Biochemical characterization of the partially purified recombinant protein revealed a strong dependency for Mg2+ and Mn2+, and an apparent Michaelis constant of 55.8 microM for geranyl diphosphate. Thus, a new member of the monoterpene synthase family was identified and designated as CtGES. The genome contains a single copy of CtGES gene. Expression of CtGES was exclusively observed in the geraniol chemotype of C. tenuipilum. Furthermore, in situ hybridization analysis demonstrated that CtGES mRNA was localized in the oil cells of the leaves. PMID:15680985

  6. A particular phenotype in a girl with aldosterone synthase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Williams, Tracy A; Mulatero, Paolo; Bosio, Maurizio; Lewicka, Sabina; Palermo, Mario; Veglio, Franco; Armanini, Decio

    2004-07-01

    Aldosterone synthase deficiency (ASD) usually presents in infancy as a life-threatening electrolyte imbalance. A 4-wk-old child of unrelated parents was examined for failure to thrive and salt-wasting. Notable laboratory findings were hyperkalemia, high plasma renin, and low-normal aldosterone levels. Urinary metabolite ratios of corticosterone/18-hydroxycorticosterone and 18-hydroxycorticosterone/aldosterone were intermediate between ASD type I and type II. Sequence analysis of CYP11B2, the gene encoding aldosterone synthase (P450c11AS), revealed that the patient was a compound heterozygote carrying a previously described mutation located in exon 4 causing a premature stop codon (E255X) and a further, novel mutation in exon 5 that also causes a premature stop codon (Q272X). The patient's unaffected father was a heterozygous carrier of the E255X mutation, whereas the unaffected mother was a heterozygous carrier of the Q272X mutation. Therefore, the patient's CYP11B2 encodes two truncated forms of aldosterone synthase predicted to be inactive because they lack critical active site residues as well as the heme-binding site. This case of ASD is of particular interest because despite the apparent lack of aldosterone synthase activity, the patient displays low-normal aldosterone levels, thus raising the question of its source. PMID:15240589

  7. Hyper III on ramp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    The Hyper III was a full-scale lifting-body remotely piloted research vehicle (RPRV) built at what was then the NASA Flight Research Center located at Edwards Air Force Base in Southern California. The Flight Research Center (FRC--as Dryden was named from 1959 until 1976) already had experience with testing small-scale aircraft using model-airplane techniques, but the first true remotely piloted research vehicle was the Hyper III, which flew only once in December 1969. At that time, the Center was engaged in flight research with a variety of reentry shapes called lifting bodies, and there was a desire both to expand the flight research experience with maneuverable reentry vehicles, including a high-performance, variable-geometry craft, and to investigate a remotely piloted flight research technique that made maximum use of a research pilot's skill and experience by placing him 'in the loop' as if he were in the cockpit. (There have been, as yet, no female research pilots assigned to Dryden.) The Hyper III as originally conceived was a stiletto-shaped lifting body that had resulted from a study at NASA's Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia. It was one of a number of hypersonic, cross-range reentry vehicles studied at Langley. (Hypersonic means Mach 5--five times the speed of sound--or faster; cross-range means able to fly a considerable distance to the left or right of the initial reentry path.) The FRC added a small, deployable, skewed wing to compensate for the shape's extremely low glide ratio. Shop personnel built the 32-foot-long Hyper III and covered its tubular frame with dacron, aluminum, and fiberglass, for about $6,500. Hyper III employed the same '8-ball' attitude indicator developed for control-room use when flying the X-15, two model-airplane receivers to command the vehicle's hydraulic controls, and a telemetry system (surplus from the X-15 program) to transmit 12 channels of data to the ground not only for display and control but for data

  8. Inhibition of ATP Synthase by Chlorinated Adenosine Analogue

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lisa S.; Nowak, Billie J.; Ayres, Mary L.; Krett, Nancy L.; Rosen, Steven T.; Zhang, Shuxing; Gandhi, Varsha

    2009-01-01

    8-Chloroadenosine (8-Cl-Ado) is a ribonucleoside analogue that is currently in clinical trial for chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Based on the decline in cellular ATP pool following 8-Cl-Ado treatment, we hypothesized that 8-Cl-ADP and 8-Cl-ATP may interfere with ATP synthase, a key enzyme in ATP production. Mitochondrial ATP synthase is composed of two major parts; FO intermembrane base and F1 domain, containing α and β subunits. Crystal structures of both α and β subunits that bind to the substrate, ADP, are known in tight binding (αdpβdp) and loose binding (αtpβtp) states. Molecular docking demonstrated that 8-Cl-ADP/8-Cl-ATP occupied similar binding modes as ADP/ATP in the tight and loose binding sites of ATP synthase, respectively, suggesting that the chlorinated nucleotide metabolites may be functional substrates and inhibitors of the enzyme. The computational predictions were consistent with our whole cell biochemical results. Oligomycin, an established pharmacological inhibitor of ATP synthase, decreased both ATP and 8-Cl-ATP formation from exogenous substrates, however, did not affect pyrimidine nucleoside analogue triphosphate accumulation. Synthesis of ATP from ADP was inhibited in cells loaded with 8-Cl-ATP. These biochemical studies are in consent with the computational modeling; in the αtpβtp state 8-Cl-ATP occupies similar binding as ANP, a non-hydrolyzable ATP mimic that is a known inhibitor. Similarly, in the substrate binding site (αdpβdp) 8-Cl-ATP occupies a similar position as ATP mimic ADP-BeF3 −. Collectively, our current work suggests that 8-Cl-ADP may serve as a substrate and the 8-Cl-ATP may be an inhibitor of ATP synthase. PMID:19477165

  9. ACP Best Practice No 164

    PubMed Central

    Parsons, M; Start, R

    2001-01-01

    Much important information can be obtained at necropsy by the pathological examination of the eye and its adnexal structures in adults and children. This information may be related to the cause of death (for example, violent shaking trauma in physical child abuse), or may pertain to disease processes affecting the eye, the orbit, and surrounding structures outside the orbit. This article reviews the technical methods used to remove the following: the vitreous (for example, for biochemistry); the eye itself (anterior approach); the eye and orbital contents (posterior approach); the eye, orbit and orbital walls; and the eye, orbital walls, and surrounding structures. The removal of the eye and adnexal ocular structures must be recognised as a "culturally sensitive" issue, which must be approached cautiously. It should only be undertaken for sound scientific reasons, with the fully informed consent of the relatives and/or the coroner (or equivalent authority), and with properly agreed procedures for the eventual retention or disposal of the ocular tissues. For this reason, this article reviews not only the scientific indications and methods for the removal of such tissues, but also the legal and ethical issues that must underpin this pathology "best practice". Key Words: necropsy • ophthalamic pathology • enucleation PMID:11376013

  10. ACP Best Practice No 167

    PubMed Central

    Graham, J; Galloway, A

    2001-01-01

    Urinary tract infection is common, and it is not surprising that urine specimens make up a large proportion of those samples submitted to the routine diagnostic laboratory. Many of these specimens will show no evidence of infection and several methods can be used to screen out negative samples. Those that grow bacteria need to be carefully assessed to quantify the degree of bacteriuria and hence clinical relevance. To influence treatment, a final report should be produced within 24 hours of specimen receipt, with turnaround times continuously monitored. Much work needs to be done to determine the cost effectiveness involved in processing urine specimens and the evidence base for the final report provided. Key Words: laboratory diagnosis • urinary tract infection PMID:11729209

  11. Cannabidiolic-acid synthase, the chemotype-determining enzyme in the fiber-type Cannabis sativa.

    PubMed

    Taura, Futoshi; Sirikantaramas, Supaart; Shoyama, Yoshinari; Yoshikai, Kazuyoshi; Shoyama, Yukihiro; Morimoto, Satoshi

    2007-06-26

    Cannabidiolic-acid (CBDA) synthase is the enzyme that catalyzes oxidative cyclization of cannabigerolic-acid into CBDA, the dominant cannabinoid constituent of the fiber-type Cannabis sativa. We cloned a novel cDNA encoding CBDA synthase by reverse transcription and polymerase chain reactions with degenerate and gene-specific primers. Biochemical characterization of the recombinant enzyme demonstrated that CBDA synthase is a covalently flavinylated oxidase. The structural and functional properties of CBDA synthase are quite similar to those of tetrahydrocannabinolic-acid (THCA) synthase, which is responsible for the biosynthesis of THCA, the major cannabinoid in drug-type Cannabis plants. PMID:17544411

  12. Transgene silencing of sucrose synthase in alfalfa stem vascular tissue by a truncated phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase: sucrose synthase construct

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An important role of sucrose synthase (SUS, EC 2.4.1.13) in plants is to provide UDP-glucose needed for cellulose synthesis in cell walls. We examined if over-expressing SUS in alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) would increase cellulose content of stem cell walls. Alfalfa plants were transformed with two ...

  13. Identifying the catalytic components of cellulose synthase and the maize mixed-linkage beta-glucan synthase

    SciTech Connect

    Nicholas C Carpita

    2009-04-20

    Five specific objectives of this project are to develop strategies to identify the genes that encode the catalytic components of "mixed-linkage" (1→3),(1→4)-beta-D-glucans in grasses, to determine the protein components of the synthase complex, and determine the biochemical mechanism of synthesis. We have used proteomic approaches to define intrinsic and extrinsic polypeptides of Golgi membranes that are associated with polysaccharide synthesis and trafficking. We were successful in producing recombinant catalytic domains of cellulose synthase genes and discovered that they dimerize upon concentration, indicating that two CesA proteins form the catalytic unit. We characterized a brittle stalk2 mutant as a defect in a COBRA-like protein that results in compromised lignin-cellulose interactions that decrease tissue flexibility. We used virus-induced gene silencing of barley cell wall polysaccharide synthesis by BSMV in an attempt to silence specific members of the cellulose synthase-like gene family. However, we unexpectedly found that regardless of the specificity of the target gene, whole gene interaction networks were silenced. We discovered the cause to be an antisense transcript of the cellulose synthase gene initiated small interfering RNAs that spread silencing to related genes.

  14. Fueling type III secretion

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Pei-Chung

    2015-01-01

    Type III secretion systems are complex nanomachines that export proteins from the bacterial cytoplasm across the cell envelope in a single step. They are at the core of the machinery used to assemble the bacterial flagellum, and the needle complex many Gram-negative pathogens use to inject effector proteins into host cells and cause disease. Several models have been put forward to explain how this export is energized, and the mechanism has been the subject of considerable debate. Here we present an overview of these models and discuss their relative merits. Recent evidence suggests that the proton motive force is the primary energy source for type III secretion, although contribution from refolding of secreted proteins has not been ruled out. The mechanism, by which the proton motive force is converted to protein export, remains enigmatic. PMID:25701111

  15. Cranial mononeuropathy III - diabetic type

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/ency/article/000692.htm Cranial mononeuropathy III - diabetic type To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Cranial mononeuropathy III -- diabetic type -- is usually a complication of diabetes that causes ...

  16. Migration Type III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artymowicz, Pawel

    2004-03-01

    Migration type IIIMigration of objects embedded in disks (and the accompanying eccentricity evolution) is becoming a major theme in planetary system formation.The underlying physics can be distilled into the notion of disk-planet coupling via Lindblad resonances, which launch waves, sometimes spectacular spiral shock waves in gas disks. The wave pattern exchanges angular momentum with the planet. That causes (i) migration, (ii) eccentricity evolution, and (iii) gap opening by sufficiently massive planets.A competing source of disk-planet interaction, the corotationaltorques, are much less conspicuous (corotation does not produce easilydetectable waves, as galaxy observers can attest) and have often been missed in the analysis of planet migration. If spiral waves are like waves at Goleta beach, then the corotation acts more like a stealthy riptide. Corotationalflows lie at the basis of a new, surprisingly rapid, mode of migration (type III),superseding the standard type II migration (with a gap), and revising the speed of type I migration (without a gap). The talk will contain results obtained at KITP, e.g., an analytical derivation of da/dt in type III motion. It will be illustrated by videos of high-resolution numerical simulations obtained with different implementations of the Piecewise Parabolic Method hydrodynamics.

  17. The three tricarboxylate synthase activities of Corynebacterium glutamicum and increase of L-lysine synthesis.

    PubMed

    Radmacher, Eva; Eggeling, Lothar

    2007-09-01

    Corynebacterium glutamicum owns a citrate synthase and two methylcitrate synthases. Characterization of the isolated enzymes showed that the two methylcitrate synthases have comparable catalytic efficiency, k (cat)/K (m), as the citrate synthase with acetyl-CoA as substrate, although these enzymes are only synthesized during growth on propionate-containing media. Thus, the methylcitrate synthases have a relaxed substrate specifity, as also demonstrated by their activity with butyryl-CoA, whereas the citrate synthase does not accept acyl donors other than acetyl-CoA. A double mutant deleted of the citrate synthase gene gltA and one of the methylcitrate synthase genes, prpC1, was made unable to grow on glucose. From this mutant, a collection of suppressor mutants could be isolated which were demonstrated to have regained citrate synthase activity due to the relaxed specificity of the methylcitrate synthase PrpC2. Molecular characterization of these mutants showed that the regulator PrpR (Cg0800) located downstream of prpC1 is mutated with mutations likely to effect the secondary structure of the regulator, thus, resulting in expression of prpC2. This expression results in a citrate synthase activity, which is lower than that due to gltA in the original strain and results in increased L-lysine accumulation. PMID:17653710

  18. Synthesis of delta-aminolaevulinate synthase by isolated liver polyribosomes.

    PubMed Central

    Whiting, M J

    1976-01-01

    1. Postmitochondrial supernatants were prepared from the livers of chick embryos and were incubated under conditions that supported protein synthesis. delta-Aminolaevulinate synthase (EC 2.3.1.37) was synthesized by supernatants from livers treated with the porphyrinogenic drugs 2-allyl-2-isopropylacetamide and/or 3,5-diethoxycarbonyl-1,4-dihydrocollidine, but synthesis by supernatants from normal livers could not be detected. Synthesis of enzyme released from polyribosomes was measured by immunoprecipitation with specific antibody to the mitochondrial enzyme, and the specificity of the reaction was established by electrophoresis of dissociated immunoprecipitates on sodium dodecyl sulphate/polyacrylamide gels. 2. The relative synthesis of delta-aminolaevulinate synthase in vitro was comparable with that previously measured in vivo, and was correlated with the enzyme activity of the liver. 3. Enzyme synthesis in vitro occurred predominantly on free rather than membrane-bound polyribosomes. 4. The mol.wt. of the product synthesized in vitro was 7000 +/- 7000 by sodium dodecyl sulphate/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis. However, pulse-labelling of the enzyme in vivo confirmed its mol.wt. to be 49000 +/- 5000 when isolated from the mitochondrion. A small amount of immunoprecipitable enzyme of mol.wt. 70000 was detected in the cytosol in vivo. In chick embryo liver, delta-aminolaevulinate synthase therefore appears to be synthesized on cytoplasmic polyribosomes as a polypeptide of mol.wt. 70000, which in vivo is rapidly incorporated into the mitochondrion, and is then extracted as a lower-molecular-weight form. 5. Haemin added to the postmitochondrial supernatant-containing incubation mixture at concentrations up to 10 muM had no effect on general protein synthesis or the synthesis of delta-aminolaevulinate synthase. On the other hand, haemin treatment of induced chick embryo livers in vivo for 3h markedly decreased the relative synthesis of delta

  19. Mechanism of Germacradien-4-ol Synthase-Controlled Water Capture.

    PubMed

    Grundy, Daniel J; Chen, Mengbin; González, Verónica; Leoni, Stefano; Miller, David J; Christianson, David W; Allemann, Rudolf K

    2016-04-12

    The sesquiterpene synthase germacradiene-4-ol synthase (GdolS) from Streptomyces citricolor is one of only a few known high-fidelity terpene synthases that convert farnesyl diphosphate (FDP) into a single hydroxylated product. Crystals of unliganded GdolS-E248A diffracted to 1.50 Å and revealed a typical class 1 sesquiterpene synthase fold with the active site in an open conformation. The metal binding motifs were identified as D(80)DQFD and N(218)DVRSFAQE. Some bound water molecules were evident in the X-ray crystal structure, but none were obviously positioned to quench a putative final carbocation intermediate. Incubations in H2(18)O generated labeled product, confirming that the alcohol functionality arises from nucleophilic capture of the final carbocation by water originating from solution. Site-directed mutagenesis of amino acid residues from both within the metal binding motifs and without identified by sequence alignment with aristolochene synthase from Aspergillus terreus generated mostly functional germacradien-4-ol synthases. Only GdolS-N218Q generated radically different products (∼50% germacrene A), but no direct evidence of the mechanism of incorporation of water into the active site was obtained. Fluorinated FDP analogues 2F-FDP and 15,15,15-F3-FDP were potent noncompetitive inhibitors of GdolS. 12,13-DiF-FDP generated 12,13-(E)-β-farnesene upon being incubated with GdolS, suggesting stepwise formation of the germacryl cation during the catalytic cycle. Incubation of GdolS with [1-(2)H2]FDP and (R)-[1-(2)H]FDP demonstrated that following germacryl cation formation a [1,3]-hydride shift generates the final carbocation prior to nucleophilic capture. The stereochemistry of this shift is not defined, and the deuteron in the final product was scrambled. Because no clear candidate residue for binding of a nucleophilic water molecule in the active site and no significant perturbation of product distribution from the replacement of active site residues

  20. Immunoaffinity purification and characterization of thromboxane synthase from porcine lung.

    PubMed

    Shen, R F; Tai, H H

    1986-09-01

    Thromboxane synthase has been purified 620-fold from porcine lung microsomes by a three-step purification procedure including Lubrol-PX solubilization, reactive blue-agarose chromatography, and immunoaffinity chromatography. The purified enzyme exhibited a single protein band (53,000 daltons) on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Rabbit antiserum raised against the purified enzyme immunoprecipitated thromboxane synthase activity from crude enzyme preparations of porcine lung, cow lung, and human platelets, indicating the existence of structural homology of the enzyme in these species. Immunoblotting experiment identified the same polypeptide (53,000 daltons) in porcine lung and a polypeptide of 50,000 daltons in human platelets, confirming the identity of the enzyme and the specificity of the antiserum. Purified thromboxane synthase is a hemoprotein with a Soret-like absorption peak at 418 nm. The enzyme reaction has a Km for 15-hydroxy-9 alpha, 11 alpha-peroxidoprosta-5, 13-dienoic acid of 12 microM, an optimal pH of 7.5, and an optimal temperature of reaction at 30 degrees C. Purified thromboxane synthase catalyzed the formation of both thromboxane B2 and 12-hydroxy-5,8,10-heptadecatrienoic acid (HHT). The ratios of HHT to thromboxane B2 varied from 1.6 to 2.1 dependent on the reaction conditions. Except that HHT was formed at a greater rate, the formation of HHT and that of thromboxane responded identically to pH, temperature, substrate concentration, kinetics of formation, metal ions, and inhibitors suggesting that the two products are probably formed at the same active site via a common intermediate. Thromboxane synthase was irreversibly inactivated by 15-hydroxy-9 alpha, 11 alpha-peroxidoprosta-5,13-dienoic acid during catalysis and by treatment of 15-hydroperoxyeicosatetraenoic acid. The irreversible inactivation, however, could be protected by reversible inhibitors such as sodium (E)-3-[4-(1-imidazolylmethyl)phenyl]-2-propenoate and

  1. Mechanism of Germacradien-4-ol Synthase-Controlled Water Capture

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The sesquiterpene synthase germacradiene-4-ol synthase (GdolS) from Streptomyces citricolor is one of only a few known high-fidelity terpene synthases that convert farnesyl diphosphate (FDP) into a single hydroxylated product. Crystals of unliganded GdolS-E248A diffracted to 1.50 Å and revealed a typical class 1 sesquiterpene synthase fold with the active site in an open conformation. The metal binding motifs were identified as D80DQFD and N218DVRSFAQE. Some bound water molecules were evident in the X-ray crystal structure, but none were obviously positioned to quench a putative final carbocation intermediate. Incubations in H218O generated labeled product, confirming that the alcohol functionality arises from nucleophilic capture of the final carbocation by water originating from solution. Site-directed mutagenesis of amino acid residues from both within the metal binding motifs and without identified by sequence alignment with aristolochene synthase from Aspergillus terreus generated mostly functional germacradien-4-ol synthases. Only GdolS-N218Q generated radically different products (∼50% germacrene A), but no direct evidence of the mechanism of incorporation of water into the active site was obtained. Fluorinated FDP analogues 2F-FDP and 15,15,15-F3-FDP were potent noncompetitive inhibitors of GdolS. 12,13-DiF-FDP generated 12,13-(E)-β-farnesene upon being incubated with GdolS, suggesting stepwise formation of the germacryl cation during the catalytic cycle. Incubation of GdolS with [1-2H2]FDP and (R)-[1-2H]FDP demonstrated that following germacryl cation formation a [1,3]-hydride shift generates the final carbocation prior to nucleophilic capture. The stereochemistry of this shift is not defined, and the deuteron in the final product was scrambled. Because no clear candidate residue for binding of a nucleophilic water molecule in the active site and no significant perturbation of product distribution from the replacement of active site residues were

  2. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of polyketide synthase-1 (PKS-1) from Cannabis sativa.

    PubMed

    Taguchi, Chiho; Taura, Futoshi; Tamada, Taro; Shoyama, Yoshinari; Shoyama, Yukihiro; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Kuroki, Ryota; Morimoto, Satoshi

    2008-03-01

    Polyketide synthase-1 (PKS-1) is a novel type III polyketide synthase that catalyzes the biosynthesis of hexanoyl triacetic acid lactone in Cannabis sativa (Mexican strain). PKS-1 was overproduced in Escherichia coli, purified and finally crystallized in two different space groups. The crystal obtained in 0.1 M HEPES buffer pH 7.5 containing 0.2 M calcium acetate and 20%(w/v) polyethylene glycol 3350 diffracted to 1.65 A resolution and belonged to space group P1, with unit-cell parameters a = 54.3, b = 59.3, c = 62.6 A, alpha = 69, beta = 81, gamma = 80 degrees. Another crystal obtained in 0.1 M HEPES buffer pH 7.5 containing 0.2 M sodium chloride and 20%(w/v) polyethylene glycol 3350 diffracted to 1.55 A resolution and belonged to space group P2(1)2(1)2(1), with unit-cell parameters a = 54.3, b = 110, c = 130 A. These data will enable us to determine the crystal structure of PKS-1. PMID:18323613

  3. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of polyketide synthase-1 (PKS-1) from Cannabis sativa

    PubMed Central

    Taguchi, Chiho; Taura, Futoshi; Tamada, Taro; Shoyama, Yoshinari; Shoyama, Yukihiro; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Kuroki, Ryota; Morimoto, Satoshi

    2008-01-01

    Polyketide synthase-1 (PKS-1) is a novel type III polyketide synthase that catalyzes the biosynthesis of hexanoyl triacetic acid lactone in Cannabis sativa (Mexican strain). PKS-1 was overproduced in Escherichia coli, purified and finally crystallized in two different space groups. The crystal obtained in 0.1 M HEPES buffer pH 7.5 containing 0.2 M calcium acetate and 20%(w/v) polyethylene glycol 3350 diffracted to 1.65 Å resolution and belonged to space group P1, with unit-cell parameters a = 54.3, b = 59.3, c = 62.6 Å, α = 69, β = 81, γ = 80°. Another crystal obtained in 0.1 M HEPES buffer pH 7.5 containing 0.2 M sodium chloride and 20%(w/v) polyethylene glycol 3350 diffracted to 1.55 Å resolution and belonged to space group P212121, with unit-cell parameters a = 54.3, b = 110, c = 130 Å. These data will enable us to determine the crystal structure of PKS-1. PMID:18323613

  4. Deficiency of sphingomyelin synthase-1 but not sphingomyelin synthase-2 causes hearing impairments in mice.

    PubMed

    Lu, Mei-Hong; Takemoto, Makoto; Watanabe, Ken; Luo, Huan; Nishimura, Masataka; Yano, Masato; Tomimoto, Hidekazu; Okazaki, Toshiro; Oike, Yuichi; Song, Wen-Jie

    2012-08-15

    Sphingomyelin (SM) is a sphingolipid reported to function as a structural component of plasma membranes and to participate in signal transduction. The role of SM metabolism in the process of hearing remains controversial. Here, we examined the role of SM synthase (SMS), which is subcategorized into the family members SMS1 and SMS2, in auditory function. Measurements of auditory brainstem response (ABR) revealed hearing impairment in SMS1−/− mice in a low frequency range (4–16 kHz). As a possible mechanism of this impairment, we found that the stria vascularis (SV) in these mice exhibited atrophy and disorganized marginal cells. Consequently, SMS1−/− mice exhibited significantly smaller endocochlear potentials (EPs). As a possible mechanism for EP reduction, we found altered expression patterns and a reduced level of KCNQ1 channel protein in the SV of SMS1−/− mice. These mice also exhibited reduced levels of distortion product otoacoustic emissions. Quantitative comparison of the SV atrophy, KCNQ1 expression, and outer hair cell density at the cochlear apical and basal turns revealed no location dependence, but more macrophage invasion into the SV was observed in the apical region than the basal region, suggesting a role of cochlear location-dependent oxidative stress in producing the frequency dependence of hearing loss in SMS1−/− mice. Elevated ABR thresholds, decreased EPs, and abnormal KCNQ1 expression patterns in SMS1−/− mice were all found to be progressive with age. Mice lacking SMS2, however, exhibited neither detectable hearing loss nor changes in their EPs. Taken together, our results suggest that hearing impairments occur in SMS1−/− but not SMS2−/− mice. Defects in the SV with subsequent reductions in EPs together with hair cell dysfunction may account, at least partially, for hearing impairments in SMS1−/− mice. PMID:22641779

  5. Hematopoetic prostaglandin D synthase: an ESR1-dependent oviductal epithelial cell synthase.

    PubMed

    Bridges, Phillip J; Jeoung, Myoungkun; Shim, Sarah; Park, Ji Yeon; Lee, Jae Eun; Sapsford, Lindsay A; Trudgen, Kourtney; Ko, Chemyong; Gye, Myung Chan; Jo, Misung

    2012-04-01

    Oviductal disease is a primary cause of infertility, a problem that largely stems from excessive inflammation of this key reproductive organ. Our poor understanding of the mechanisms regulating oviductal inflammation restricts our ability to diagnose, treat, and/or prevent oviductal disease. Using mice, our objective was to determine the spatial localization, regulatory mechanism, and functional attributes of a hypothesized regulator of oviductal inflammation, the hematopoietic form of prostaglandin D synthase (HPGDS). Immunohistochemistry revealed specific localization of HPGDS to the oviduct's epithelium. In the isthmus, expression of HPGDS was consistent. In the ampulla, expression of HPGDS appeared dependent upon stage of the estrous cycle. HPGDS was expressed in the epithelium of immature and cycling mice but not in the oviducts of estrogen receptor α knockouts. Two receptor subtypes bind PGD₂: PGD₂ receptor and G protein-coupled receptor 44. Expression of mRNA for Ptgdr was higher in the epithelial cells (EPI) than in the stroma (P < 0.05), whereas mRNA for Gpr44 was higher in the stroma than epithelium (P < 0.05). Treatment of human oviductal EPI with HQL-79, an inhibitor of HPGDS, decreased cell viability (P < 0.05). Treatment of mice with HQL-79 increased mRNA for chemokine (C-C motif) ligands 3, 4, and 19; chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligands 11 and 12; IL-13 and IL-17B; and TNF receptor superfamily, member 1b (P < 0.02 for each mRNA). Overall, these results suggest that HPGDS may play a role in the regulation of inflammation and EPI health within the oviduct. PMID:22374975

  6. Phasin proteins activate Aeromonas caviae polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) synthase but not Ralstonia eutropha PHA synthase.

    PubMed

    Ushimaru, Kazunori; Motoda, Yoko; Numata, Keiji; Tsuge, Takeharu

    2014-05-01

    In this study, we performed in vitro and in vivo activity assays of polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) synthases (PhaCs) in the presence of phasin proteins (PhaPs), which revealed that PhaPs are activators of PhaC derived from Aeromonas caviae (PhaCAc). In in vitro assays, among the three PhaCs tested, PhaCAc was significantly activated when PhaPs were added at the beginning of polymerization (prepolymerization PhaCAc), whereas the prepolymerization PhaCRe (derived from Ralstonia eutropha) and PhaCDa (Delftia acidovorans) showed reduced activity with PhaPs. The PhaP-activated PhaCAc showed a slight shift of substrate preference toward 3-hydroxyhexanoyl-CoA (C6). PhaPAc also activated PhaCAc when it was added during polymerization (polymer-elongating PhaCAc), while this effect was not observed for PhaCRe. In an in vivo assay using Escherichia coli TOP10 as the host strain, the effect of PhaPAc expression on PHA synthesis by PhaCAc or PhaCRe was examined. As PhaPAc expression increased, PHA production was increased by up to 2.3-fold in the PhaCAc-expressing strain, whereas it was slightly increased in the PhaCRe-expressing strain. Taken together, this study provides evidence that PhaPs function as activators for PhaCAc both in vitro and in vivo but do not activate PhaCRe. This activating effect may be attributed to the new role of PhaPs in the polymerization reaction by PhaCAc. PMID:24584238

  7. Inhibitors of the Salicylate Synthase (MbtI) from Mycobacterium tuberculosis Discovered by High-Throughput Screening

    PubMed Central

    Vasan, Mahalakshmi; Neres, João; Williams, Jessica; Wilson, Daniel J.; Teitelbaum, Aaron M.; Remmel, Rory P.; Aldrich, Courtney C.

    2010-01-01

    A simple steady-state kinetic high-throughput assay was developed for the salicylate synthase MbtI from Mycobacterium tuberculosis, which catalyzes the first committed step of mycobactin biosynthesis. The mycobactins are small-molecule iron chelators produced by M. tuberculosis, and their biosynthesis has been identified as a promising target for the development of new antitubercular agents. The assay was miniaturized to a 384-well plate format and high-throughput screening was performed at the National Screening Laboratory for the Regional Centers of Excellence in Biodefense and Emerging Infectious Diseases (NSRB). Three classes of compounds were identified comprising the benzisothiazolones (class I), diarylsulfones (class II), and benzimidazole-2-thiones (class III). Each of these compound series was further pursued to investigate their biochemical mechanism and structure–activity relationships. Benzimidazole-2-thione 4 emerged as the most promising inhibitor owing to its potent reversible inhibition. PMID:21053346

  8. PCR screening for carriers of bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency (BLAD) and uridine monophosphate synthase (DUMPS) in Argentine Holstein cattle.

    PubMed

    Poli, M A; Dewey, R; Semorile, L; Lozano, M E; Albariño, C G; Romanowski, V; Grau, O

    1996-05-01

    BLAD (Bovine Leukocyte Adhesion Deficiency) and DUMPS (Deficiency of Uridine Monophosphate Synthase) are monogenic autosomal, recessive inherited diseases of Holstein cattle. Single nucleotide changes (point mutations) responsible for the genetic disorders were detected by polymerase chain reaction coupled with restriction fragment length polymorphism assays (PCR-RFLP). Using oligonucleotide primers, DNA fragments of predicted sizes were amplified, and the products' specificity was assessed by nucleotide sequencing. Mutations were detected in DNA samples from bovine blood and semen by the presence or absence of restriction sites within the PCR amplification products (Taq I, Hae III for BLAD, Ava I for DUMPS). The test included 104 bulls and 950 cows of Argentinean Holstein breed. Defective alleles frequencies were as follows: 2.88% BLAD in bulls used in artificial insemination, 1.79% in cows; 0.96% DUMPS in bulls and 0.11% in cows. PMID:8693839

  9. Defining the Product Chemical Space of Monoterpenoid Synthases

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Boxue; Poulter, C. Dale; Jacobson, Matthew P.

    2016-01-01

    Terpenoid synthases create diverse carbon skeletons by catalyzing complex carbocation rearrangements, making them particularly challenging for enzyme function prediction. To begin to address this challenge, we have developed a computational approach for the systematic enumeration of terpenoid carbocations. Application of this approach allows us to systematically define a nearly complete chemical space for the potential carbon skeletons of products from monoterpenoid synthases. Specifically, 18758 carbocations were generated, which we cluster into 74 cyclic skeletons. Five of the 74 skeletons are found in known natural products; some of the others are plausible for new functions, either in nature or engineered. This work systematizes the description of function for this class of enzymes, and provides a basis for predicting functions of uncharacterized enzymes. To our knowledge, this is the first computational study to explore the complete product chemical space of this important class of enzymes. PMID:27517297

  10. Defining the Product Chemical Space of Monoterpenoid Synthases.

    PubMed

    Tian, Boxue; Poulter, C Dale; Jacobson, Matthew P

    2016-08-01

    Terpenoid synthases create diverse carbon skeletons by catalyzing complex carbocation rearrangements, making them particularly challenging for enzyme function prediction. To begin to address this challenge, we have developed a computational approach for the systematic enumeration of terpenoid carbocations. Application of this approach allows us to systematically define a nearly complete chemical space for the potential carbon skeletons of products from monoterpenoid synthases. Specifically, 18758 carbocations were generated, which we cluster into 74 cyclic skeletons. Five of the 74 skeletons are found in known natural products; some of the others are plausible for new functions, either in nature or engineered. This work systematizes the description of function for this class of enzymes, and provides a basis for predicting functions of uncharacterized enzymes. To our knowledge, this is the first computational study to explore the complete product chemical space of this important class of enzymes. PMID:27517297

  11. S-sulfocysteine synthase function in sensing chloroplast redox status

    PubMed Central

    Gotor, Cecilia; Romero, Luis C.

    2013-01-01

    The minor chloroplastic O-acetylserine(thiol)lyase isoform encoded by the CS26 gene in Arabidopsis thaliana has been described as an S-sulfocysteine synthase enzyme that plays an important role in chloroplast function. This enzyme is located in the thylakoid lumen, and its S-sulfocysteine activity is essential for the proper photosynthetic performance of the chloroplast under long-day growth conditions. Based on the present knowledge of this enzyme, we suggest that S-sulfocysteine synthase functions as a protein sensor to detect the accumulation of thiosulfate as a result of the inadequate detoxification of reactive oxygen species generated under conditions of excess light to produce the S-sulfocysteine molecule that triggers protection mechanisms of the photosynthetic apparatus. PMID:23333972

  12. Visualization of cellulose synthases in Arabidopsis secondary cell walls.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Y; Meents, M J; McDonnell, L M; Barkwill, S; Sampathkumar, A; Cartwright, H N; Demura, T; Ehrhardt, D W; Samuels, A L; Mansfield, S D

    2015-10-01

    Cellulose biosynthesis in plant secondary cell walls forms the basis of vascular development in land plants, with xylem tissues constituting the vast majority of terrestrial biomass. We used plant lines that contained an inducible master transcription factor controlling xylem cell fate to quantitatively image fluorescently tagged cellulose synthase enzymes during cellulose deposition in living protoxylem cells. The formation of secondary cell wall thickenings was associated with a redistribution and enrichment of CESA7-containing cellulose synthase complexes (CSCs) into narrow membrane domains. The velocities of secondary cell wall-specific CSCs were faster than those of primary cell wall CSCs during abundant cellulose production. Dynamic intracellular of endomembranes, in combination with increased velocity and high density of CSCs, enables cellulose to be synthesized rapidly in secondary cell walls. PMID:26450210

  13. Volatile emissions of scented Alstroemeria genotypes are dominated by terpenes, and a myrcene synthase gene is highly expressed in scented Alstroemeria flowers.

    PubMed

    Aros, Danilo; Gonzalez, Veronica; Allemann, Rudolf K; Müller, Carsten T; Rosati, Carlo; Rogers, Hilary J

    2012-04-01

    Native to South America, Alstroemeria flowers are known for their colourful tepals, and Alstroemeria hybrids are an important cut flower. However, in common with many commercial cut flowers, virtually all the commercial Alstroemeria hybrids are not scented. The cultivar 'Sweet Laura' is one of very few scented commercial Alstroemeria hybrids. Characterization of the volatile emission profile of these cut flowers revealed three major terpene compounds: (E)-caryophyllene, humulene (also known as α-caryophyllene), an ocimene-like compound, and several minor peaks, one of which was identified as myrcene. The profile is completely different from that of the parental scented species A. caryophyllaea. Volatile emission peaked at anthesis in both scented genotypes, coincident in cv. 'Sweet Laura' with the maximal expression of a putative terpene synthase gene AlstroTPS. This gene was preferentially expressed in floral tissues of both cv. 'Sweet Laura' and A. caryophyllaea. Characterization of the AlstroTPS gene structure from cv. 'Sweet Laura' placed it as a member of the class III terpene synthases, and the predicted 567 amino acid sequence placed it into the subfamily TPS-b. The conserved sequences R(28)(R)X(8)W and D(321)DXXD are the putative Mg(2+)-binding sites, and in vitro assay of AlstroTPS expressed in Escherichia coli revealed that the encoded enzyme possesses myrcene synthase activity, consistent with a role for AlstroTPS in scent production in Alstroemeria cv. 'Sweet Laura' flowers. PMID:22268153

  14. Use of linalool synthase in genetic engineering of scent production

    DOEpatents

    Pichersky, Eran

    1998-01-01

    A purified S-linalool synthase polypeptide from Clarkia breweri is disclosed as is the recombinant polypeptide and nucleic acid sequences encoding the polypeptide. Also disclosed are antibodies immunoreactive with the purified peptide and with recombinant versions of the polypeptide. Methods of using the nucleic acid sequences, as well as methods of enhancing the smell and the flavor of plants expressing the nucleic acid sequences are also disclosed.

  15. Inhibition of Escherichia coli ATP synthase by amphibian antimicrobial peptides.

    PubMed

    Laughlin, Thomas F; Ahmad, Zulfiqar

    2010-04-01

    Previously melittin, the alpha-helical basic honey bee venom peptide, was shown to inhibit F(1)-ATPase by binding at the beta-subunit DELSEED motif of F(1)F(o)-ATP synthase. Herein, we present the inhibitory effects of the basic alpha-helical amphibian antimicrobial peptides, ascaphin-8, aurein 2.2, aurein 2.3, carein 1.8, carein 1.9, citropin 1.1, dermaseptin, maculatin 1.1, maganin II, MRP, or XT-7, on purified F(1) and membrane bound F(1)F(0)Escherichia coli ATP synthase. We found that the extent of inhibition by amphibian peptides is variable. Whereas MRP-amide inhibited ATPase essentially completely (approximately 96% inhibition), carein 1.8 did not inhibit at all (0% inhibition). Inhibition by other peptides was partial with a range of approximately 13-70%. MRP-amide was also the most potent inhibitor on molar scale (IC(50) approximately 3.25 microM). Presence of an amide group at the c-terminal of peptides was found to be critical in exerting potent inhibition of ATP synthase ( approximately 20-40% additional inhibition). Inhibition was fully reversible and found to be identical in both F(1)F(0) membrane preparations as well as in isolated purified F(1). Interestingly, growth of E. coli was abrogated in the presence of ascaphin-8, aurein 2.2, aurein 2.3, citropin 1.1, dermaseptin, magainin II-amide, MRP, MRP-amide, melittin, or melittin-amide but was unaffected in the presence of carein 1.8, carein 1.9, maculatin 1.1, magainin II, or XT-7. Hence inhibition of F(1)-ATPase and E. coli cell growth by amphibian antimicrobial peptides suggests that their antimicrobial/anticancer properties are in part linked to their actions on ATP synthase. PMID:20100509

  16. Structure and Mechanistic Implications of a Tryptophan Synthase Quinonoid Intermediate

    SciTech Connect

    Barends,T.; Domratcheva, T.; Kulik, V.; Blumenstein, L.; Niks, D.; Dunn, M.; Schlichting, I.

    2008-01-01

    Quinonoid intermediates play a key role in the catalytic mechanism of pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzymes. Whereas structures of other PLP-bound reaction intermediates have been determined, a high-quality structure of a quinonoid species has not been reported. We present the crystal structure of the indoline quinonoid intermediate of tryptophan synthase (see figure) and discuss its implications for the enzymatic mechanism and allosteric regulation.

  17. Purification of geranylgeranyl diphosphate synthase from bovine brain.

    PubMed

    Sagami, H; Morita, Y; Korenaga, T; Ogura, K

    1994-01-01

    Geranylgeranyl diphosphate (GGPP) synthase was purified to homogeneity from bovine brain in a one-step affinity column procedure. For the construction of the affinity column, a farnesyl diphosphate (FPP) analog, O-(6-amino-1-hexyl)-P-farnesylmethyl phosphonophosphate, was synthesized and linked to the spacer of the matrix of Affigel 10 via the amino group. The native enzyme appeared to be homooligomer (150-195 kDa) with a molecular mass of the monomer of 37.5 kDa. The pI for the enzyme was 6.2. The Km values for dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMAPP), geranyl diphosphate (GPP) and FPP were estimated to be 33 microM, 0.80 microM and 0.74 microM, respectively. The Km value for isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP) in the presence of both IPP and FPP mixture was 2 microM. The ratio of the reaction velocity for formation of GGPP from DMAPP, GPP or FPP was 0.004:0.145:1. The intermediate FPP was formed in the reaction with GPP as an allylic primer. FPP synthase catalyzing the formation of FPP from DMAPP and IPP was also purified to homogeneity from the same organ by a similar affinity chromatography procedure using a GPP analog, O-(6-amino-1-hexyl)-P-geranylmethyl phosphonophosphate as a ligand. The enzyme was a homodimer with a monomeric molecular mass of 40.0 kDa. These results indicate that GGPP, a lipid precursor for the biosynthesis of a majority of prenylated proteins, is synthesized from DMAPP and IPP by the action of FPP synthase catalyzing the reactions C5-->C15 followed by the action of GGPP synthase catalyzing the reaction C15-->C20. PMID:7856400

  18. Use of linalool synthase in genetic engineering of scent production

    DOEpatents

    Pichersky, E.

    1998-12-15

    A purified S-linalool synthase polypeptide from Clarkia breweri is disclosed as is the recombinant polypeptide and nucleic acid sequences encoding the polypeptide. Also disclosed are antibodies immunoreactive with the purified peptide and with recombinant versions of the polypeptide. Methods of using the nucleic acid sequences, as well as methods of enhancing the smell and the flavor of plants expressing the nucleic acid sequences are also disclosed. 5 figs.

  19. Expression of prostaglandin E synthases in the bovine oviduct.

    PubMed

    Gauvreau, D; Moisan, V; Roy, M; Fortier, M A; Bilodeau, J-F

    2010-01-01

    The oviduct is a specialized organ responsible for the storage and the transport of male and female gametes. It also provides an optimal environment for final gamete maturation, fertilization, and early embryo development. Prostaglandin (PG) E(2) is involved in many female reproductive functions, including ovulation, fertilization, implantation, and parturition. However, the control of its synthesis in the oviduct is not fully understood. Cyclooxygenases (COXs) are involved in the first step of the transformation of arachidonic acid to PGH(2.) The prostaglandin E synthases (PGESs) constitute a family of enzymes that catalyze the conversion of PGH(2) to PGE(2), the terminal step in the formation of this bioactive prostaglandin. Quantitative real-time PCR was used to determine the expression of COX-1, COX-2, microsomal prostaglandin E synthase-1 (mPGES-1), microsomal prostaglandin E synthase-2 (mPGES-2), and cytosolic prostaglandin E synthase (cPGES) mRNA in various sections of the oviduct, both ipsilateral and contralateral (to the ovary on which ovulation occurred) at various stages of the estrous cycle. Furthermore, protein expression and localization of cPGES, mPGES-1, and mPGES-2 were determined by Western blot and immunohistochemistry. All three PGESs were detected at both mRNA and protein levels in the oviduct. These PGESs were mostly concentrated in the oviductal epithelial layer and primarily expressed in the ampulla section of the oviduct and to a lesser extent in the isthmus and the isthmic-ampullary junction. The mPGES-1 protein was highly expressed in the contralateral oviduct, which contrasted with mPGES-2 mostly expressed in the ipsilateral oviduct. This is apparently the first report documenting that the three PGESs involved in PGE(2) production were present in the Bos taurus oviduct. PMID:19875162

  20. Piriformospora indica requires kaurene synthase activity for successful plant colonization.

    PubMed

    Li, Liang; Chen, Xi; Ma, Chaoyang; Wu, Hongqing; Qi, Shuting

    2016-05-01

    Ent-kaurene (KS) synthases and ent-kaurene-like (KSL) synthases are involved in the biosynthesis of phytoalexins and/or gibberellins which play a role in plant immunity and development. The relationship between expression of five synthase genes (HvKSL1, HvKS2, HvKS4, HvKS5, HvKSL4) and plant colonization by the endophytic fungus Piriformospora indica was assessed in barley (Hordeum vulgare). The KS gene family is differently up-regulated at 1, 3 and 7 day after P. indica inoculation. By comparison, the HvKSL4 gene expression pattern is more significantly affected by UV irradiation and P. indica colonization. The characterizations of two silencing lines (HvKSL1-RNAi, HvKSL4-RNAi) also were analyzed. HvKSL1-RNAi and HvKSL4-RNAi lines in the first generation lead to less dark green leaves and slower plant development. Further, reduced spikelet fertility in progenies of RNAi plants heterozygous for HvKSL1 were observed, but not for HvKSL4. T2 generation of HvKSL1-RNAi line showed semi-dwarf phenotype while the wild type phenotype could be restored by applying GA3. Silencing of HvKSL4 and HvKSL1 resulted in reduced colonization by P. indica especially in the HvKSL1-RNAi line. These results probably suggest the presence of two ent-KS synthase in barley, one (HvKSL1) that participates in the biosynthesis of GAs and another (HvKSL4) that is involved in the biosynthesis of phytoalexins. PMID:26943021

  1. Inhibition of Escherichia coli ATP synthase by amphibian antimicrobial peptides

    PubMed Central

    Laughlin, Thomas F.; Ahmad, Zulfiqar

    2010-01-01

    Previously melittin, the α-helical basic honey bee venom peptide, was shown to inhibit F1-ATPase by binding at the β-subunit DELSEED motif of F1Fo ATP synthase. Herein, we present the inhibitory effects of the basic α-helical amphibian antimicrobial peptides, ascaphin-8, aurein 2.2, aurein 2.3, carein 1.8, carein 1.9, citropin 1.1, dermaseptin, maculatin 1.1, maganin II, MRP, or XT-7, on purified F1 and membrane bound F1Fo E. coli ATP synthase. We found that the extent of inhibition by amphibian peptides is variable. Whereas MRP-amide inhibited ATPase essentially completely (~96% inhibition), carein 1.8 did not inhibit at all (0% inhibition). Inhibition by other peptides was partial with a range of ~13% to 70%. MRP-amide was also the most potent inhibitor on molar scale (IC50 ~3.25 µM). Presence of an amide group at the c-terminal of peptides was found to be critical in exerting potent inhibition of ATP synthase (~20–40% additional inhibition). Inhibition was fully reversible and found to be identical in both F1Fo membrane preparations as well as in isolated purified F1. Interestingly, growth of Escherichia coli was abrogated in the presence of ascaphin-8, aurein 2.2, aurein 2.3, citropin 1.1, dermaseptin, magainin II-amide, MRP, MRP-amide, melittin, or melittin-amide but was unaffected in the presence of carein 1.8, carein 1.9, maculatin 1.1, magainin II, or XT-7. Hence inhibition of F1-ATPase and E. coli cell growth by amphibian antimicrobial peptides suggests that their antimicrobial/anticancer properties are in part linked to their actions on ATP synthase. PMID:20100509

  2. Suites of Terpene Synthases Explain Differential Terpenoid Production in Ginger and Turmeric Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Hyun Jo; Gang, David R.

    2012-01-01

    The essential oils of ginger (Zingiber officinale) and turmeric (Curcuma longa) contain a large variety of terpenoids, some of which possess anticancer, antiulcer, and antioxidant properties. Despite their importance, only four terpene synthases have been identified from the Zingiberaceae family: (+)-germacrene D synthase and (S)-β-bisabolene synthase from ginger rhizome, and α-humulene synthase and β-eudesmol synthase from shampoo ginger (Zingiber zerumbet) rhizome. We report the identification of 25 mono- and 18 sesquiterpene synthases from ginger and turmeric, with 13 and 11, respectively, being functionally characterized. Novel terpene synthases, (−)-caryolan-1-ol synthase and α-zingiberene/β-sesquiphellandrene synthase, which is responsible for formation of the major sesquiterpenoids in ginger and turmeric rhizomes, were also discovered. These suites of enzymes are responsible for formation of the majority of the terpenoids present in these two plants. Structures of several were modeled, and a comparison of sets of paralogs suggests how the terpene synthases in ginger and turmeric evolved. The most abundant and most important sesquiterpenoids in turmeric rhizomes, (+)-α-turmerone and (+)-β-turmerone, are produced from (−)-α-zingiberene and (−)-β-sesquiphellandrene, respectively, via α-zingiberene/β-sesquiphellandrene oxidase and a still unidentified dehydrogenase. PMID:23272109

  3. [BIOINFORMATIC SEARCH AND PHYLOGENETIC ANALYSIS OF THE CELLULOSE SYNTHASE GENES OF FLAX (LINUM USITATISSIMUM)].

    PubMed

    Pydiura, N A; Bayer, G Ya; Galinousky, D V; Yemets, A I; Pirko, Ya V; Podvitski, T A; Anisimova, N V; Khotyleva, L V; Kilchevsky, A V; Blume, Ya B

    2015-01-01

    A bioinformatic search of sequences encoding cellulose synthase genes in the flax genome, and their comparison to dicots orthologs was carried out. The analysis revealed 32 cellulose synthase gene candidates, 16 of which are highly likely to encode cellulose synthases, and the remaining 16--cellulose synthase-like proteins (Csl). Phylogenetic analysis of gene products of cellulose synthase genes allowed distinguishing 6 groups of cellulose synthase genes of different classes: CesA1/10, CesA3, CesA4, CesA5/6/2/9, CesA7 and CesA8. Paralogous sequences within classes CesA1/10 and CesA5/6/2/9 which are associated with the primary cell wall formation are characterized by a greater similarity within these classes than orthologous sequences. Whereas the genes controlling the biosynthesis of secondary cell wall cellulose form distinct clades: CesA4, CesA7, and CesA8. The analysis of 16 identified flax cellulose synthase gene candidates shows the presence of at least 12 different cellulose synthase gene variants in flax genome which are represented in all six clades of cellulose synthase genes. Thus, at this point genes of all ten known cellulose synthase classes are identify in flax genome, but their correct classification requires additional research. PMID:26638491

  4. A SEM and non-contact surface white light profilometry in vivo study of the effect of a crème containing CPP-ACP and fluoride on young etched enamel.

    PubMed

    Baroni, Chiara; Marchionni, Silvia; Bazzocchi, Maria Giulia; Cadenaro, Milena; Nucci, Cesare; Manton, David J

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this in vivo study was to evaluate the short and a longer term effect on enamel of the application of a crème containing 10% CPP-ACP and 900 ppm fluoride, in orthodontically planned, high caries-risk patients. Epoxy resin replicas of upper lateral incisors were obtained from polyvinyl siloxane (PVS) impressions, before and after etching. The right incisors were left untreated in order to control saliva remineralizing potential. The upper left surfaces were coated with a pea-size amount of the crème. Replicas were obtained at 3 weeks and 6 months and analyzed by SEM and non-contact surface white light profilometry. In the treated sample the profilometric roughness parameters at 3 weeks were statistically significantly lower than the control group values (p < 0.05). At 3 weeks SEM images of the enamel surface showed fewer irregularities. After 6 months, differences between test and control groups were not present on SEM images and profilometric values. CPP-ACP and fluoride crème had positive in vivo effects on enamel surfaces. Significant differences in surface roughness existed after a 3-week period of crème use. PMID:23843169

  5. Multi-Substrate Terpene Synthases: Their Occurrence and Physiological Significance.

    PubMed

    Pazouki, Leila; Niinemets, Ülo

    2016-01-01

    Terpene synthases are responsible for synthesis of a large number of terpenes in plants using substrates provided by two distinct metabolic pathways, the mevalonate-dependent pathway that is located in cytosol and has been suggested to be responsible for synthesis of sesquiterpenes (C15), and 2-C-methyl-D-erythritol-4-phosphate pathway located in plastids and suggested to be responsible for the synthesis of hemi- (C5), mono- (C10), and diterpenes (C20). Recent advances in characterization of genes and enzymes responsible for substrate and end product biosynthesis as well as efforts in metabolic engineering have demonstrated existence of a number of multi-substrate terpene synthases. This review summarizes the progress in the characterization of such multi-substrate terpene synthases and suggests that the presence of multi-substrate use might have been significantly underestimated. Multi-substrate use could lead to important changes in terpene product profiles upon substrate profile changes under perturbation of metabolism in stressed plants as well as under certain developmental stages. We therefore argue that multi-substrate use can be significant under physiological conditions and can result in complicate modifications in terpene profiles. PMID:27462341

  6. Kinetic Characterization of Spinach Leaf Sucrose-Phosphate Synthase 1

    PubMed Central

    Amir, Jacob; Preiss, Jack

    1982-01-01

    The spinach (Spinacia oleracea) leaf sucrose-phosphate synthase was partially purified via DEAE-cellulose chromatography, and its kinetic properties were studied. Fructose-6-phosphate saturation curves were sigmoidal, while UDPglucose saturation curves were hyperbolic. At subsaturating concentrations of fructose-6-phosphate, 1,5 anhydroglucitol-6-phosphate had a stimulatory effect on enzyme activity, suggesting multiple and interacting fructose-6-phosphate sites on sucrose-phosphate synthase. The concentrations required for 50% of maximal activity were 3.0 millimolar and 1.3 millimolar, respectively, for fructose-6-phosphate and UDPglucose. The enzyme was not stimulated by divalent cations. Inorganic phosphate proved to be a potent inhibitor, particularly at low concentrations of substrate. Phosphate inhibition was competitive with UDPglucose, and its Ki was determined to be 1.75 millimolar. Sucrose phosphate, the product of the reaction, was also shown to be a competitive inhibitor towards UDPglucose concentration and had Ki of 0.4 millimolar. The kinetic results suggest that spinach leaf sucrose-phospahte synthase is a regulatory enzyme and that its activity is modulated by the concentrations of phosphate, fructose-6-phosphate, and UDPglucose occurring in the cytoplasm of the leaf cell. PMID:16662338

  7. Dexmedetomidine inhibits vasoconstriction via activation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed

    Nong, Lidan; Ma, Jue; Zhang, Guangyan; Deng, Chunyu; Mao, Songsong; Li, Haifeng; Cui, Jianxiu

    2016-09-01

    Despite the complex vascular effects of dexmedetomidine (DEX), its actions on human pulmonary resistance arteries remain unknown. The present study tested the hypothesis that DEX inhibits vascular tension in human pulmonary arteries through the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) mediated production of nitric oxide (NO). Pulmonary artery segments were obtained from 62 patients who underwent lung resection. The direct effects of DEX on human pulmonary artery tension and changes in vascular tension were determined by isometric force measurements recorded on a myograph. Arterial contractions caused by increasing concentrations of serotonin with DEX in the presence or absence of L-NAME (endothelial nitric oxide synthase inhibitor), yohimbine (α2-adrenoceptor antagonist) and indomethacin (cyclooxygenase inhibitor) as antagonists were also measured. DEX had no effect on endothelium-intact pulmonary arteries, whereas at concentrations of 10(-8)~10(-6) mol/L, it elicited contractions in endothelium-denuded pulmonary arteries. DEX (0.3, 1, or 3×10(-9) mmol/L) inhibited serotonin-induced contraction in arteries with intact endothelium in a dose-dependent manner. L-NAME and yohimbine abolished DEX-induced inhibition, whereas indomethacin had no effect. No inhibitory effect was observed in endothelium-denuded pulmonary arteries. DEX-induced inhibition of vasoconstriction in human pulmonary arteries is mediated by NO production induced by the activation of endothelial α2-adrenoceptor and nitric oxide synthase. PMID:27610030

  8. Dexmedetomidine inhibits vasoconstriction via activation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase

    PubMed Central

    Nong, Lidan; Ma, Jue; Zhang, Guangyan; Deng, Chunyu; Mao, Songsong; Li, Haifeng

    2016-01-01

    Despite the complex vascular effects of dexmedetomidine (DEX), its actions on human pulmonary resistance arteries remain unknown. The present study tested the hypothesis that DEX inhibits vascular tension in human pulmonary arteries through the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) mediated production of nitric oxide (NO). Pulmonary artery segments were obtained from 62 patients who underwent lung resection. The direct effects of DEX on human pulmonary artery tension and changes in vascular tension were determined by isometric force measurements recorded on a myograph. Arterial contractions caused by increasing concentrations of serotonin with DEX in the presence or absence of L-NAME (endothelial nitric oxide synthase inhibitor), yohimbine (α2-adrenoceptor antagonist) and indomethacin (cyclooxygenase inhibitor) as antagonists were also measured. DEX had no effect on endothelium-intact pulmonary arteries, whereas at concentrations of 10–8~10–6 mol/L, it elicited contractions in endothelium-denuded pulmonary arteries. DEX (0.3, 1, or 3×10–9 mmol/L) inhibited serotonin-induced contraction in arteries with intact endothelium in a dose-dependent manner. L-NAME and yohimbine abolished DEX-induced inhibition, whereas indomethacin had no effect. No inhibitory effect was observed in endothelium-denuded pulmonary arteries. DEX-induced inhibition of vasoconstriction in human pulmonary arteries is mediated by NO production induced by the activation of endothelial α2-adrenoceptor and nitric oxide synthase. PMID:27610030

  9. Resistance Phenotypes Mediated by Aminoacyl-Phosphatidylglycerol Synthases

    PubMed Central

    Arendt, Wiebke; Hebecker, Stefanie; Jäger, Sonja; Nimtz, Manfred

    2012-01-01

    The specific aminoacylation of the phospholipid phosphatidylglycerol (PG) with alanine or with lysine catalyzed by aminoacyl-phosphatidylglycerol synthases (aaPGS) was shown to render various organisms less susceptible to antibacterial agents. This study makes use of Pseudomonas aeruginosa chimeric mutant strains producing lysyl-phosphatidylglycerol (L-PG) instead of the naturally occurring alanyl-phosphatidylglycerol (A-PG) to study the resulting impact on bacterial resistance. Consequences of such artificial phospholipid composition were studied in the presence of an overall of seven antimicrobials (β-lactams, a lipopeptide antibiotic, cationic antimicrobial peptides [CAMPs]) to quantitatively assess the effect of A-PG substitution (with L-PG, L-PG and A-PG, increased A-PG levels). For the employed Gram-negative P. aeruginosa model system, an exclusive charge repulsion mechanism does not explain the attenuated antimicrobial susceptibility due to PG modification. Additionally, the specificity of nine orthologous aaPGS enzymes was experimentally determined. The newly characterized protein sequences allowed for the establishment of a significant group of A-PG synthase sequences which were bioinformatically compared to the related group of L-PG synthesizing enzymes. The analysis revealed a diverse origin for the evolution of A-PG and L-PG synthases, as the specificity of an individual enzyme is not reflected in terms of a characteristic sequence motif. This finding is relevant for future development of potential aaPGS inhibitors. PMID:22267511

  10. Mechanism of Action and Inhibition of dehydrosqualene Synthase

    SciTech Connect

    F Lin; C Liu; Y Liu; Y Zhang; K Wang; W Jeng; T Ko; R Cao; A Wang; E Oldfield

    2011-12-31

    'Head-to-head' terpene synthases catalyze the first committed steps in sterol and carotenoid biosynthesis: the condensation of two isoprenoid diphosphates to form cyclopropylcarbinyl diphosphates, followed by ring opening. Here, we report the structures of Staphylococcus aureus dehydrosqualene synthase (CrtM) complexed with its reaction intermediate, presqualene diphosphate (PSPP), the dehydrosqualene (DHS) product, as well as a series of inhibitors. The results indicate that, on initial diphosphate loss, the primary carbocation so formed bends down into the interior of the protein to react with C2,3 double bond in the prenyl acceptor to form PSPP, with the lower two-thirds of both PSPP chains occupying essentially the same positions as found in the two farnesyl chains in the substrates. The second-half reaction is then initiated by the PSPP diphosphate returning back to the Mg{sup 2+} cluster for ionization, with the resultant DHS so formed being trapped in a surface pocket. This mechanism is supported by the observation that cationic inhibitors (of interest as antiinfectives) bind with their positive charge located in the same region as the cyclopropyl carbinyl group; that S-thiolo-diphosphates only inhibit when in the allylic site; activity results on 11 mutants show that both DXXXD conserved domains are essential for PSPP ionization; and the observation that head-to-tail isoprenoid synthases as well as terpene cyclases have ionization and alkene-donor sites which spatially overlap those found in CrtM.

  11. From bacterial to human dihydrouridine synthase: automated structure determination

    SciTech Connect

    Whelan, Fiona Jenkins, Huw T.; Griffiths, Samuel C.; Byrne, Robert T.; Dodson, Eleanor J.; Antson, Alfred A.

    2015-06-30

    The crystal structure of a human dihydrouridine synthase, an enzyme associated with lung cancer, with 18% sequence identity to a T. maritima enzyme, has been determined at 1.9 Å resolution by molecular replacement after extensive molecular remodelling of the template. The reduction of uridine to dihydrouridine at specific positions in tRNA is catalysed by dihydrouridine synthase (Dus) enzymes. Increased expression of human dihydrouridine synthase 2 (hDus2) has been linked to pulmonary carcinogenesis, while its knockdown decreased cancer cell line viability, suggesting that it may serve as a valuable target for therapeutic intervention. Here, the X-ray crystal structure of a construct of hDus2 encompassing the catalytic and tRNA-recognition domains (residues 1–340) determined at 1.9 Å resolution is presented. It is shown that the structure can be determined automatically by phenix.mr-rosetta starting from a bacterial Dus enzyme with only 18% sequence identity and a significantly divergent structure. The overall fold of the human Dus2 is similar to that of bacterial enzymes, but has a larger recognition domain and a unique three-stranded antiparallel β-sheet insertion into the catalytic domain that packs next to the recognition domain, contributing to domain–domain interactions. The structure may inform the development of novel therapeutic approaches in the fight against lung cancer.

  12. Cellulose Microfibril Formation by Surface-Tethered Cellulose Synthase Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Basu, Snehasish; Omadjela, Okako; Gaddes, David; Tadigadapa, Srinivas; Zimmer, Jochen; Catchmark, Jeffrey M

    2016-02-23

    Cellulose microfibrils are pseudocrystalline arrays of cellulose chains that are synthesized by cellulose synthases. The enzymes are organized into large membrane-embedded complexes in which each enzyme likely synthesizes and secretes a β-(1→4) glucan. The relationship between the organization of the enzymes in these complexes and cellulose crystallization has not been explored. To better understand this relationship, we used atomic force microscopy to visualize cellulose microfibril formation from nickel-film-immobilized bacterial cellulose synthase enzymes (BcsA-Bs), which in standard solution only form amorphous cellulose from monomeric BcsA-B complexes. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction techniques show that surface-tethered BcsA-Bs synthesize highly crystalline cellulose II in the presence of UDP-Glc, the allosteric activator cyclic-di-GMP, as well as magnesium. The cellulose II cross section/diameter and the crystal size and crystallinity depend on the surface density of tethered enzymes as well as the overall concentration of substrates. Our results provide the correlation between cellulose microfibril formation and the spatial organization of cellulose synthases. PMID:26799780

  13. Rotation and structure of FoF1-ATP synthase.

    PubMed

    Okuno, Daichi; Iino, Ryota; Noji, Hiroyuki

    2011-06-01

    F(o)F(1)-ATP synthase is one of the most ubiquitous enzymes; it is found widely in the biological world, including the plasma membrane of bacteria, inner membrane of mitochondria and thylakoid membrane of chloroplasts. However, this enzyme has a unique mechanism of action: it is composed of two mechanical rotary motors, each driven by ATP hydrolysis or proton flux down the membrane potential of protons. The two molecular motors interconvert the chemical energy of ATP hydrolysis and proton electrochemical potential via the mechanical rotation of the rotary shaft. This unique energy transmission mechanism is not found in other biological systems. Although there are other similar man-made systems like hydroelectric generators, F(o)F(1)-ATP synthase operates on the nanometre scale and works with extremely high efficiency. Therefore, this enzyme has attracted significant attention in a wide variety of fields from bioenergetics and biophysics to chemistry, physics and nanoscience. This review summarizes the latest findings about the two motors of F(o)F(1)-ATP synthase as well as a brief historical background. PMID:21524994

  14. Multi-Substrate Terpene Synthases: Their Occurrence and Physiological Significance

    PubMed Central

    Pazouki, Leila; Niinemets, Ülo

    2016-01-01

    Terpene synthases are responsible for synthesis of a large number of terpenes in plants using substrates provided by two distinct metabolic pathways, the mevalonate-dependent pathway that is located in cytosol and has been suggested to be responsible for synthesis of sesquiterpenes (C15), and 2-C-methyl-D-erythritol-4-phosphate pathway located in plastids and suggested to be responsible for the synthesis of hemi- (C5), mono- (C10), and diterpenes (C20). Recent advances in characterization of genes and enzymes responsible for substrate and end product biosynthesis as well as efforts in metabolic engineering have demonstrated existence of a number of multi-substrate terpene synthases. This review summarizes the progress in the characterization of such multi-substrate terpene synthases and suggests that the presence of multi-substrate use might have been significantly underestimated. Multi-substrate use could lead to important changes in terpene product profiles upon substrate profile changes under perturbation of metabolism in stressed plants as well as under certain developmental stages. We therefore argue that multi-substrate use can be significant under physiological conditions and can result in complicate modifications in terpene profiles. PMID:27462341

  15. Characterization and expression of human bifunctional 3'-phosphoadenosine 5'-phosphosulphate synthase isoforms.

    PubMed Central

    Fuda, Hirotoshi; Shimizu, Chikara; Lee, Young C; Akita, Harukuni; Strott, Charles A

    2002-01-01

    Sulphonation, a fundamental process essential for normal growth and development, requires the sulphonate donor molecule 3'-phosphoadenosine 5'-phosphosulphate (PAPS), which is produced from ATP and inorganic sulphate by the bifunctional enzyme PAPS synthase. In humans, two genes encode isoenzymes that are 77% identical at the amino acid level, and alternative splicing creates two subtypes of PAPS synthase 2. The question as to whether distinctions in amino acid composition are reflected in differences in activity has been examined. The specific activity of the PAPS synthase 2 subtypes is 10- to 15-fold higher than that for PAPS synthase 1. The greater catalytic efficiency of the PAPS synthase 2 subtypes is demonstrated further by the 3- to 6-fold higher k(cat)/K(m) ratios for ATP and inorganic sulphate as compared with the ratios for PAPS synthase 1. In humans, PAPS synthase 1 is expressed ubiquitously, and is the dominant isoform in most tissues, whereas expression of the PAPS synthase 2 subtypes is variable and tissue-specific. It is noteworthy that, similar to other human tissues, PAPS synthase 1 also appears to be the dominant isoform expressed in cartilage. The latter finding initially created a conundrum, since there is a specific human dwarfing disorder that is known to be caused by a mutation in the PAPS synthase 2 gene. This apparent enigma would seem to be resolved by examination of cartilage from guinea-pigs as an animal model. Similar to humans, cartilage from mature animals predominantly expresses PAPS synthase 1. In contrast, expression of PAPS synthase 1 is relatively low in the cartilage of immature guinea-pigs, including the growth plate of long bones, whereas PAPS synthase 2 is the highly expressed isoenzyme. PMID:11931637

  16. POPULATION III HYPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Smidt, Joseph; Whalen, Daniel J.; Wiggins, Brandon K.; Even, Wesley; Fryer, Chris L.; Johnson, Jarrett L.

    2014-12-20

    Population III supernovae have been of growing interest of late for their potential to directly probe the properties of the first stars, particularly the most energetic events that are visible near the edge of the observable universe. Until now, hypernovae, the unusually energetic Type Ib/c supernovae that are sometimes associated with gamma-ray bursts, have been overlooked as cosmic beacons at the highest redshifts. In this, the latest of a series of studies on Population III supernovae, we present numerical simulations of 25-50 M {sub ☉} hypernovae and their light curves done with the Los Alamos RAGE and SPECTRUM codes. We find that they will be visible at z = 10-15 to the James Webb Space Telescope and z = 4-5 to the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope, tracing star formation rates in the first galaxies and at the end of cosmological reionization. If, however, the hypernova crashes into a dense shell ejected by its progenitor, it is expected that a superluminous event will occur that may be seen at z ∼ 20 in the first generation of stars.

  17. Methionine synthase A2756G variation is associated with the risk of retinoblastoma in Iranian children.

    PubMed

    Akbari, Mohammad Taghi; Naderi, Asieh; Saremi, Leila; Sayad, Arezou; Irani, Shiva; Ahani, Ali

    2015-12-01

    Association of epigenetic modifications with cancer has been widely studied. Gene-specific hypermethylation and global DNA hypomethylation are the most frequently observed patterns in great number of tumors. The methionine synthase (MTR) gene plays key role in maintaining adequate intracellular folate, methionine and normal homocysteine concentrations and, its polymorphism have been associated with the risk of retinoblastoma and other neoplasms. We evaluated the association of MTR A2756G polymorphism with the risk of retinoblastoma in an Iranian population. Totally, 150 retinoblastoma patients and 300 individuals with no family history of cancer as control were included in this study. Genotyping of the A2756G polymorphism was performed by polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) using the restriction enzymes HaeIII. Our results showed that the "G" was the minor allele with a frequency of 31.7% and 20.3% in both retinoblastoma and control groups, respectively. The frequency of the 2756GG genotype (P=0.023) and 2756G allele (P=0.0001) were significantly higher in the patients than control group, respectively. Individual with the 2756GG genotype had a 2.99 fold increased risk for retinoblastoma. According to our results, the MTR A2756G polymorphism was associated with the risk of retinoblastoma in Iranian patients. PMID:26595280

  18. Nitrosyl-Heme Structures of Bacillus subtilis Nitric Oxide Synthase Have Implications for Understanding Substrate Oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Pant,K.; Crane, B.

    2006-01-01

    The crystal structures of nitrosyl-heme complexes of a prokaryotic nitric oxide synthase (NOS) from Bacillus subtilis (bsNOS) reveal changes in active-site hydrogen bonding in the presence of the intermediate N{sup {omega}}-hydroxy-L-arginine (NOHA) compared to the substrate L-arginine (L-Arg). Correlating with a Val-to-Ile residue substitution in the bsNOS heme pocket, the Fe(II)-NO complex with both L-Arg and NOHA is more bent than the Fe(II)-NO, L-Arg complex of mammalian eNOS. Structures of the Fe(III)-NO complex with NOHA show a nearly linear nitrosyl group, and in one subunit, partial nitrosation of bound NOHA. In the Fe(II)-NO complexes, the protonated NOHA N{sup {omega}} atom forms a short hydrogen bond with the heme-coordinated NO nitrogen, but active-site water molecules are out of hydrogen bonding range with the distal NO oxygen. In contrast, the L-Arg guanidinium interacts more weakly and equally with both NO atoms, and an active-site water molecule hydrogen bonds to the distal NO oxygen. This difference in hydrogen bonding to the nitrosyl group by the two substrates indicates that interactions provided by NOHA may preferentially stabilize an electrophilic peroxo-heme intermediate in the second step of NOS catalysis.

  19. Molecular cloning of starch synthase I from maize (W64) endosperm and expression in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Knight, M E; Harn, C; Lilley, C E; Guan, H; Singletary, G W; MuForster, C; Wasserman, B P; Keeling, P L

    1998-06-01

    A full length cDNA clone encoding a starch synthase (zSS) from maize endosperm (inbred line W64) was isolated and characterized. The cDNA clone (Ss1) is 2907 bp in length and contains an open reading frame of 1866 bp corresponding to a polypeptide of 622 amino acid residues including a transit peptide of 39 amino acids. The Ss1 cDNA clone was identified as zSSI by its direct alignment with sequences to: (i) the N-terminus obtained from the granule-associated form of the zSSI polypeptide, (ii) four internal peptide fragments obtained from the granule-associated form of the zSSI protein, and (iii) one internal fragment from the soluble form of the zSSI protein. The deduced amino acid sequence of Ss1 shares 75.7% sequence identity with rice soluble Ss and contains the highly conserved KSGGLGDV putative ADP-Glc binding site. Moreover, Ss1 exhibited significant activity when expressed in E. coli and the expressed protein is recognized by the antibody raised against the granule associated zSSI protein. Ss1 transcripts were detected in endosperm beginning at 15 days after pollination, but were not found in embryo, leaf or root. Maize contains a single copy of the Ss1 gene, which maps close to the Waxy locus of chromosome 9. PMID:9675904

  20. Pharmacogenetic Study in Rectal Cancer Patients Treated With Preoperative Chemoradiotherapy: Polymorphisms in Thymidylate Synthase, Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor, GSTP1, and DNA Repair Genes

    SciTech Connect

    Paez, David; Salazar, Juliana; Pare, Laia; Pertriz, Lourdes; Targarona, Eduardo; Rio, Elisabeth del; Barnadas, Agusti; Marcuello, Eugenio; Baiget, Montserrat

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: Several studies have been performed to evaluate the usefulness of neoadjuvant treatment using oxaliplatin and fluoropyrimidines for locally advanced rectal cancer. However, preoperative biomarkers of outcome are lacking. We studied the polymorphisms in thymidylate synthase, epidermal growth factor receptor, glutathione S-transferase pi 1 (GSTP1), and several DNA repair genes to evaluate their usefulness as pharmacogenetic markers in a cohort of 128 rectal cancer patients treated with preoperative chemoradiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Blood samples were obtained from 128 patients with Stage II-III rectal cancer. DNA was extracted from the peripheral blood nucleated cells, and the genotypes were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction amplification and automated sequencing techniques or using a 48.48 dynamic array on the BioMark system. The germline polymorphisms studied were thymidylate synthase, (VNTR/5 Prime UTR, 2R G>C single nucleotide polymorphism [SNP], 3R G>C SNP), epidermal growth factor receptor (Arg497Lys), GSTP1 (Ile105val), excision repair cross-complementing 1 (Asn118Asn, 8092C>A, 19716G>C), X-ray repair cross-complementing group 1 (XRCC1) (Arg194Trp, Arg280His, Arg399Gln), and xeroderma pigmentosum group D (Lys751Gln). The pathologic response, pathologic regression, progression-free survival, and overall survival were evaluated according to each genotype. Results: The Asterisk-Operator 3/ Asterisk-Operator 3 thymidylate synthase genotype was associated with a greater response rate (pathologic complete remission and microfoci residual tumor, 59% in Asterisk-Operator 3/ Asterisk-Operator 3 vs. 35% in Asterisk-Operator 2/ Asterisk-Operator 2 and Asterisk-Operator 2/ Asterisk-Operator 3; p = .013). For the thymidylate synthase genotype, the median progression-free survival was 103 months for the Asterisk-Operator 3/ Asterisk-Operator 3 patients and 84 months for the Asterisk-Operator 2/ Asterisk-Operator 2 and Asterisk-Operator 2/ Asterisk

  1. Chloropropionyl-CoA: a mechanism-based inhibitor of HMG-CoA synthase and fatty acid synthase

    SciTech Connect

    Miziorko, H.M.; Ahmad, F.; Behnke, C.E.

    1986-05-01

    Recent work on the mechanisms of inactivation of HMG-CoA synthase and fatty acid synthase by chloropropionyl-CoA (Cl-prop-CoA) suggests that this analog is a mechanism-based (suicide) inhibitor; the acyl group is enzymatically converted to an acrylyl derivative prior to alkylation of the target proteins. When Cl-(/sup 3/H)prop-CoA is incubated with the target enzymes, /sup 3/H/sub 2/O is produced concomitantly with enzyme inactivation; this suggests that deprotonation and chloride elimination to form an acrylyl moiety occurs. Difficulty in cleanly synthesizing acrylyl-CoA complicates direct demonstration of the intermediacy of this species. However, synthesis of a functionally equivalent reactive substrate analog, S-acrylyl-N-acetylcysteamine has been accomplished. This analog irreversibly inhibits both HMG-CoA synthase and fatty acid synthase in a site directed fashion. Concentrations required for effective inhibition (K/sub i/ values of 1.9 mM and 3.6 mM, respectively) are much higher than observed with Cl-prop-CoA. Maximal rates of inactivation (as vertical bar ..-->.. infinity) are comparable to those measured with Cl-prop-CoA, indicating that an acrylyl derivative is kinetically competent to function as an intermediate, as required if Cl-prop-CoA is a mechanism-based inhibitor. S-acrylyl-N-acetylcysteamine also inactivates HMG-CoA lyase. In this case, kinetic studies indicate that a bimolecular process is involved (k/sub 2/ = 86.7M/sup -1/min/sup -1/ at 30/sup 0/, pH 7.0).

  2. Identification of core 1 O-glycan T-synthase from Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Ju, Tongzhong; Zheng, Qinlong; Cummings, Richard D

    2006-10-01

    The common O-glycan core structure in animal glycoproteins is the core 1 disaccharide Galbeta1-3GalNAcalpha1-Ser/Thr, which is generated by the addition of Gal to GalNAcalpha1-Ser/Thr by core 1 UDP-alpha-galactose (UDP-Gal):GalNAcalpha1-Ser/Thr beta1,3-galactosyltransferase (core 1 beta3-Gal-T or T-synthase, EC2.4.1.122). Although O-glycans play important roles in vertebrates, much remains to be learned from model organisms such as the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, which offer many advantages in exploring O-glycan structure/function. Here, we report the cloning and enzymatic characterization of T-synthase from C. elegans (Ce-T-synthase). A putative C. elegans gene for T-synthase, C38H2.2, was identified in GenBank by a BlastP search using the human T-synthase protein sequence. The full-length cDNA for Ce-T-synthase, which was generated by polymerase chain reaction using a C. elegans cDNA library as the template, contains 1170 bp including the stop TAA. The cDNA encodes a protein of 389 amino acids with typical type II membrane topology and a remarkable 42.7% identity to the human T-synthase. Ce-T-synthase has seven Cys residues in the lumenal domain including six conserved Cys residues in all orthologs. The Ce-T-synthase has four potential N-glycosylation sequons, whereas the mammalian orthologs lack N-glycosylation sequons. Only one gene for Ce-T-synthase was identified in the genome-wide search, and it contains eight exons. Promoter analysis of the Ce-T-synthase using green fluorescent protein (GFP) constructs shows that the gene is expressed at all developmental stages and appears to be in all cells. Unexpectedly, only minimal activity was recovered in the recombinant, soluble Ce-T-synthase secreted from a wide variety of mammalian cell lines, whereas robust enzyme activity was recovered in the soluble Ce-T-synthase expressed in Hi-5 insect cells. Vertebrate T-synthase requires the molecular chaperone Cosmc, but our results show that Ce-T-synthase

  3. Molecular and biochemical characterization of benzalacetone synthase and chalcone synthase genes and their proteins from raspberry (Rubus idaeus L.).

    PubMed

    Zheng, Desen; Hrazdina, Geza

    2008-02-15

    Two new members of the polyketide synthase (PKS) gene family (RiPKS4 and RiPKS5) were cloned from raspberry fruits (Rubus idaeus L., cv Royalty) and expressed in Escherichia coli. Characterization of the recombinant enzyme products indicated that RiPKS4 is a bifunctional polyketide synthase producing both 4-hydroxybenzalacetone and naringenin chalcone. The recombinant RiPKS4 protein, like the native protein from raspberry fruits [W. Borejsza-Wysocki, G. Hrazdina, Plant Physiol. 1996;110: 791-799] accepted p-coumaryl-CoA and ferulyl-CoA as starter substrates and catalyzed the formation of both naringenin chalcone, 4-hydroxy-benzalacetone and 3-methoxy-4-hydroxy-benzalacetone. Although activity of RiPKS4 was higher with ferulyl-CoA than with p-coumaryl-CoA, the corresponding product, 3-methoxy-4-hydroxy phenylbutanone could not be detected in raspberries to date. Sequence analysis of the genes and proteins suggested that this feature of RiPKS4 was created by variation in the C-terminus due to DNA recombination at the 3' region of its coding sequence. RiPKS5 is a typical chalcone synthase (CHS) that uses p-coumaryl-CoA only as starter substrate and produces naringenin chalcone exclusively as the reaction product. PMID:18068110

  4. Surrogate Splicing for Functional Analysis of Sesquiterpene Synthase Genes1[w

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Shuiqin; Schoenbeck, Mark A.; Greenhagen, Bryan T.; Takahashi, Shunji; Lee, Sungbeom; Coates, Robert M.; Chappell, Joseph

    2005-01-01

    A method for the recovery of full-length cDNAs from predicted terpene synthase genes containing introns is described. The approach utilizes Agrobacterium-mediated transient expression coupled with a reverse transcription-polydeoxyribonucleotide chain reaction assay to facilitate expression cloning of processed transcripts. Subsequent expression of intronless cDNAs in a suitable prokaryotic host provides for direct functional testing of the encoded gene product. The method was optimized by examining the expression of an intron-containing β-glucuronidase gene agroinfiltrated into petunia (Petunia hybrida) leaves, and its utility was demonstrated by defining the function of two previously uncharacterized terpene synthases. A tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) terpene synthase-like gene containing six predicted introns was characterized as having 5-epi-aristolochene synthase activity, while an Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) gene previously annotated as a terpene synthase was shown to possess a novel sesquiterpene synthase activity for α-barbatene, thujopsene, and β-chamigrene biosynthesis. PMID:15965019

  5. Ammonium diphosphitoindate(III)

    PubMed Central

    Hamchaoui, Farida; Rebbah, Houria; Le Fur, Eric

    2013-01-01

    The crystal structure of the title compound, NH4[In(HPO3)2], is built up from InIII cations (site symmetry 3m.) adopting an octa­hedral environment and two different phosphite anions (each with site symmetry 3m.) exhibiting a triangular–pyramidal geometry. Each InO6 octa­hedron shares its six apices with hydrogen phosphite groups. Reciprocally, each HPO3 group shares all its O atoms with three different metal cations, leading to [In(HPO3)2]− layers which propagate in the ab plane. The ammonium cation likewise has site symmetry 3m.. In the structure, the cations are located between the [In(HPO3)2]− layers of the host framework. The sheets are held together by hydrogen bonds formed between the NH4 + cations and the O atoms of the framework. PMID:23633983

  6. Ammonium diphosphitoindate(III).

    PubMed

    Hamchaoui, Farida; Rebbah, Houria; Le Fur, Eric

    2013-04-01

    The crystal structure of the title compound, NH4[In(HPO3)2], is built up from In(III) cations (site symmetry 3m.) adopting an octa-hedral environment and two different phosphite anions (each with site symmetry 3m.) exhibiting a triangular-pyramidal geometry. Each InO6 octa-hedron shares its six apices with hydrogen phosphite groups. Reciprocally, each HPO3 group shares all its O atoms with three different metal cations, leading to [In(HPO3)2](-) layers which propagate in the ab plane. The ammonium cation likewise has site symmetry 3m.. In the structure, the cations are located between the [In(HPO3)2](-) layers of the host framework. The sheets are held together by hydrogen bonds formed between the NH4 (+) cations and the O atoms of the framework. PMID:23633983

  7. Pseudo Class III malocclusion

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hummayani, Fadia M.

    2016-01-01

    The treatment of deep anterior crossbite is technically challenging due to the difficulty of placing traditional brackets with fixed appliances. This case report represents a none traditional treatment modality to treat deep anterior crossbite in an adult pseudo class III malocclusion complicated by severely retruded, supraerupted upper and lower incisors. Treatment was carried out in 2 phases. Phase I treatment was performed by removable appliance “modified Hawley appliance with inverted labial bow,” some modifications were carried out to it to suit the presented case. Positive overbite and overjet was accomplished in one month, in this phase with minimal forces exerted on the lower incisors. Whereas, phase II treatment was performed with fixed appliances (braces) to align teeth and have proper over bite and overjet and to close posterior open bite, this phase was accomplished within 11 month. PMID:27052290

  8. Ectopic ATP synthase in endothelial cells: a novel cardiovascular therapeutic target.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yi; Zhu, Yi

    2010-01-01

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) synthase produces ATP in cells and is found on the inner membrane of mitochondria or the cell plasma membrane (ectopic ATP synthase). Here, we summarize the functions of ectopic ATP synthase in vascular endothelial cells (ECs). Ectopic ATP synthase is involved in adenosine metabolism on the cell surface through its ATP generation or hydrolysis activity. The ATP/ADP generated by the enzyme on the plasma membrane can bind to P2X/P2Y receptors and activate the related signalling pathways to regulate endothelial function. The β-chain of ectopic ATP synthase on the EC surface can recruit inflammatory cells and activate cytotoxic activity to damage ECs and induce vascular inflammation. Angiostatin and other angiogenesis inhibitors can have anti-angiogenic functions by inhibiting ectopic ATP synthase on ECs. Moreover, ectopic ATP synthase on ECs is a receptor for apoA-I, the acceptor of cholesterol efflux, which implies that endothelial ectopic ATP synthase is involved in cholesterol metabolism. Coupling factor 6 (CF6), a part of ectopic ATP synthase, is released from ECs and can inhibit prostacyclin synthesis and promote nitric oxide (NO) degradation to enhance NO bioactivity. Because ATP/ADP generated by ectopic ATP synthase can induce NO production, substances such as CF6 can inhibit NO generation by inhibiting surface ATP/ADP production. Thus, the components of ectopic ATP synthase are associated with regulation of vascular tone. Through these functions, ectopic ATP synthase on ECs is considered a potential and novel therapeutic target for atherosclerosis, hypertension and lipid disorders. PMID:21247400

  9. Force constants of phosphorus (III) cyanide and arsenic (III) cyanide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, H. G. M.; Fawcett, V.

    The force constants of phosphorus (III) cyanide and arsenic (III) cyanide have been calculated using a simple valence force-field approximation with interaction constants. Several revisions are proposed to the existing vibrational assignments for the As(CN) 3 species and the vibrational assignments for P(CN) 3 are confirmed.

  10. X-Ray Cross-Complementing Group 1 and Thymidylate Synthase Polymorphisms Might Predict Response to Chemoradiotherapy in Rectal Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Lamas, Maria J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: 5-Fluorouracil-based chemoradiotherapy before total mesorectal excision is currently the standard treatment of Stage II and III rectal cancer patients. We used known predictive pharmacogenetic biomarkers to identify the responders to preoperative chemoradiotherapy in our series. Methods and Materials: A total of 93 Stage II-III rectal cancer patients were genotyped using peripheral blood samples. The genes analyzed were X-ray cross-complementing group 1 (XRCC1), ERCC1, MTHFR, EGFR, DPYD, and TYMS. The patients were treated with 225 mg/m{sup 2}/d continuous infusion of 5-fluorouracil concomitantly with radiotherapy (50.4 Gy) followed by total mesorectal excision. The outcomes were measured by tumor regression grade (TRG) as a major response (TRG 1 and TRG 2) or as a poor response (TRG3, TRG4, and TRG5). Results: The major histopathologic response rate was 47.3%. XRCC1 G/G carriers had a greater probability of response than G/A carriers (odds ratio, 4.18; 95% confidence interval, 1.62-10.74, p = .003) Patients with polymorphisms associated with high expression of thymidylate synthase (2R/3G, 3C/3G, and 3G/3G) showed a greater pathologic response rate compared with carriers of low expression (odds ratio, 2.65; 95% confidence interval, 1.10-6.39, p = .02) No significant differences were seen in the response according to EGFR, ERCC1, MTHFR{sub C}677 and MTHFR{sub A}1298 expression. Conclusions: XRCC1 G/G and thymidylate synthase (2R/3G, 3C/3G, and 3G/3G) are independent factors of a major response. Germline thymidylate synthase and XRCC1 polymorphisms might be useful as predictive markers of rectal tumor response to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy with 5-fluorouracil.

  11. Differential Expression of Biphenyl Synthase Gene Family Members in Fire-Blight-Infected Apple ‘Holsteiner Cox’ 1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Chizzali, Cornelia; Gaid, Mariam M.; Belkheir, Asma K.; Hänsch, Robert; Richter, Klaus; Flachowsky, Henryk; Peil, Andreas; Hanke, Magda-Viola; Liu, Benye; Beerhues, Ludger

    2012-01-01

    Fire blight, caused by the bacterium Erwinia amylovora, is a devastating disease of apple (Malus × domestica). The phytoalexins of apple are biphenyls and dibenzofurans, whose carbon skeleton is formed by biphenyl synthase (BIS), a type III polyketide synthase. In the recently published genome sequence of apple ‘Golden Delicious’, nine BIS genes and four BIS gene fragments were detected. The nine genes fall into four subfamilies, referred to as MdBIS1 to MdBIS4. In a phylogenetic tree, the BIS amino acid sequences from apple and Sorbus aucuparia formed an individual cluster within the clade of the functionally diverse type III polyketide synthases. cDNAs encoding MdBIS1 to MdBIS4 were cloned from fire-blight-infected shoots of apple ‘Holsteiner Cox,’ heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli, and functionally analyzed. Benzoyl-coenzyme A and salicoyl-coenzyme A were the preferred starter substrates. In response to inoculation with E. amylovora, the BIS3 gene was expressed in stems of cv Holsteiner Cox, with highest transcript levels in the transition zone between necrotic and healthy tissues. The transition zone was the accumulation site of biphenyl and dibenzofuran phytoalexins. Leaves contained transcripts for BIS2 but failed to form immunodetectable amounts of BIS protein. In cell cultures of apple ‘Cox Orange,’ expression of the BIS1 to BIS3 genes was observed after the addition of an autoclaved E. amylovora suspension. Using immunofluorescence localization under a confocal laser-scanning microscope, the BIS3 protein in the transition zone of stems was detected in the parenchyma of the bark. Dot-shaped immunofluorescence was confined to the junctions between neighboring cortical parenchyma cells. PMID:22158676

  12. Potential therapeutic target for malignant paragangliomas: ATP synthase on the surface of paraganglioma cells

    PubMed Central

    Fliedner, Stephanie MJ; Yang, Chunzhang; Thompson, Eli; Abu-Asab, Mones; Hsu, Chang-Mei; Lampert, Gary; Eiden, Lee; Tischler, Arthur S; Wesley, Robert; Zhuang, Zhengping; Lehnert, Hendrik; Pacak, Karel

    2015-01-01

    F1FoATP synthase (ATP synthase) is a ubiquitous enzyme complex in eukaryotes. In general it is localized to the mitochondrial inner membrane and serves as the last step in the mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation of ADP to ATP, utilizing a proton gradient across the inner mitochondrial membrane built by the complexes of the electron transfer chain. However some cell types, including tumors, carry ATP synthase on the cell surface. It was suggested that cell surface ATP synthase helps tumor cells thriving on glycolysis to survive their high acid generation. Angiostatin, aurovertin, resveratrol, and antibodies against the α and β subunits of ATP synthase were shown to bind and selectively inhibit cell surface ATP synthase, promoting tumor cell death. Here we show that ATP synthase β (ATP5B) is present on the cell surface of mouse pheochromocytoma cells as well as tumor cells of human SDHB-derived paragangliomas (PGLs), while being virtually absent on chromaffin primary cells from bovine adrenal medulla by confocal microscopy. The cell surface location of ATP5B was verified in the tissue of an SDHB-derived PGL by immunoelectron microscopy. Treatment of mouse pheochromocytoma cells with resveratrol as well as ATP5B antibody led to statistically significant proliferation inhibition. Our data suggest that PGLs carry ATP synthase on their surface that promotes cell survival or proliferation. Thus, cell surface ATP synthase may present a novel therapeutic target in treating metastatic or inoperable PGLs. PMID:26101719

  13. The type I fatty acid and polyketide synthases: a tale of two megasynthases

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Shiou-Chuan

    2008-01-01

    This review chronicles the synergistic growth of the fields of fatty acid and polyketide synthesis over the last century. In both animal fatty acid synthases and modular polyketide synthases, similar catalytic elements are covalently linked in the same order in megasynthases. Whereas in fatty acid synthases the basic elements of the design remain immutable, guaranteeing the faithful production of saturated fatty acids, in the modular polyketide synthases, the potential of the basic design has been exploited to the full for the elaboration of a wide range of secondary metabolites of extraordinary structural diversity. PMID:17898897

  14. Salmonella typhimurium mutants defective in acetohydroxy acid synthases I and II.

    PubMed

    Shaw, K J; Berg, C M; Sobol, T J

    1980-03-01

    An analysis of transposon-induced mutants shows that Salmonella typhimurium possesses two major isozymes of acetohydroxy acid synthase, the enzymes which mediate the first common step in isoleucine and valine biosynthesis. A third (minor) acetohydroxy acid synthase is present, but its significance in isoleucine and valine synthesis may be negligible. Mutants defective in acetohydroxy acid synthase II (ilvG::Tn10) require isoleucine, alpha-ketobutyrate, or threonine for growth, a mutant defective in acetohydroxy acid synthase I (ilvB::Tn5) is a prototroph, and a double mutant (ilvG::Tn10 ilvB::Tn5) requires isoleucine plus valine for growth. PMID:6245063

  15. Detection of the Messenger RNA Encoding for the Ferredoxin-Dependent Glutamate Synthase in Maize Leaf

    PubMed Central

    Commere, Bernard; Vidal, Jean; Suzuki, Akira; Gadal, Pierre; Caboche, Michel

    1986-01-01

    Ferredoxin-dependent glutamate synthase (EC 1.4.7.1), glutamate oxoglutarate aminotransferase (glutamate synthase) (GOGAT) messenger RNA was extracted from maize (Zea mays L.) leaves and partially purified through oligo(dT)-cellulose chromatography and ultracentrifugation in a sucrose gradient. mRNA were translated in vitro using a reticulocyte system. The glutamate synthase subunit was characterized by immunoprecipitation with antibodies raised against the rice (Oryza sativa L.) ferredoxin-glutamate synthase. The in vitro synthesized protein and the 145 kilodaltons genuine maize leaf subunit of GOGAT were found to comigrate in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis experiments. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:16664732

  16. Physiological implications of the specificity of acetohydroxy acid synthase isozymes of enteric bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Barak, Z; Chipman, D M; Gollop, N

    1987-01-01

    The rates of formation of the two alternative products of acetohydroxy acid synthase (AHAS) have been determined by a new analytical method (N. Gollop, Z. Barak, and D. M. Chipman, Anal. Biochem., 160:323-331, 1987). For each of the three distinct isozymes of AHAS in Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium, a specificity ratio, R, was defined: Formula: see text, which is constant over a wide range of substrate concentrations. This is consistent with competition between pyruvate and 2-ketobutyrate for an active acetaldehyde intermediate formed irreversibly after addition of the first pyruvate moiety to the enzyme. Isozyme I showed no product preference (R = 1), whereas isozymes II and III form acetohydroxybutyrate (AHB) at approximately 180- and 60-fold faster rates, respectively, than acetolactate (AL) at equal pyruvate and 2-ketobutyrate concentrations. R values higher than 60 represent remarkably high specificity in favor of the substrate with one extra methylene group. In exponentially growing E. coli cells (under aerobic growth on glucose), which contain about 300 microM pyruvate and only 3 microM 2-ketobutyrate, AHAS I would produce almost entirely AL and only 1 to 2% AHB. However, isozymes II and III would synthesize AHB (on the pathway to Ile) and AL (on the pathway to valine-leucine) in essentially the ratio required for protein synthesis. The specificity ratio R of any AHAS isozyme was affected neither by the natural feedback inhibitors (Val, Ile) nor by the pH. On the basis of the specificities of the isozymes, the known regulation of AHAS I expression by the catabolite repression system, and the reported behavior of bacterial mutants containing single AHAS isozymes, we suggest that AHAS I enables a bacterium to cope with poor carbon sources, which lead to low endogenous pyruvate concentrations. Although AHAS II and III are well suited to producing the branched-chain amino acid precursors during growth on glucose, they would fail to provide

  17. Physiological implications of the specificity of acetohydroxy acid synthase isozymes of enteric bacteria.

    PubMed

    Barak, Z; Chipman, D M; Gollop, N

    1987-08-01

    The rates of formation of the two alternative products of acetohydroxy acid synthase (AHAS) have been determined by a new analytical method (N. Gollop, Z. Barak, and D. M. Chipman, Anal. Biochem., 160:323-331, 1987). For each of the three distinct isozymes of AHAS in Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium, a specificity ratio, R, was defined: Formula: see text, which is constant over a wide range of substrate concentrations. This is consistent with competition between pyruvate and 2-ketobutyrate for an active acetaldehyde intermediate formed irreversibly after addition of the first pyruvate moiety to the enzyme. Isozyme I showed no product preference (R = 1), whereas isozymes II and III form acetohydroxybutyrate (AHB) at approximately 180- and 60-fold faster rates, respectively, than acetolactate (AL) at equal pyruvate and 2-ketobutyrate concentrations. R values higher than 60 represent remarkably high specificity in favor of the substrate with one extra methylene group. In exponentially growing E. coli cells (under aerobic growth on glucose), which contain about 300 microM pyruvate and only 3 microM 2-ketobutyrate, AHAS I would produce almost entirely AL and only 1 to 2% AHB. However, isozymes II and III would synthesize AHB (on the pathway to Ile) and AL (on the pathway to valine-leucine) in essentially the ratio required for protein synthesis. The specificity ratio R of any AHAS isozyme was affected neither by the natural feedback inhibitors (Val, Ile) nor by the pH. On the basis of the specificities of the isozymes, the known regulation of AHAS I expression by the catabolite repression system, and the reported behavior of bacterial mutants containing single AHAS isozymes, we suggest that AHAS I enables a bacterium to cope with poor carbon sources, which lead to low endogenous pyruvate concentrations. Although AHAS II and III are well suited to producing the branched-chain amino acid precursors during growth on glucose, they would fail to provide

  18. Expression pattern and biochemical properties of zebrafish N-acetylglutamate synthase.

    PubMed

    Caldovic, Ljubica; Haskins, Nantaporn; Mumo, Amy; Majumdar, Himani; Pinter, Mary; Tuchman, Mendel; Krufka, Alison

    2014-01-01

    The urea cycle converts ammonia, a waste product of protein catabolism, into urea. Because fish dispose ammonia directly into water, the role of the urea cycle in fish remains unknown. Six enzymes, N-acetylglutamate synthase (NAGS), carbamylphosphate synthetase III, ornithine transcarbamylase, argininosuccinate synthase, argininosuccinate lyase and arginase 1, and two membrane transporters, ornithine transporter and aralar, comprise the urea cycle. The genes for all six enzymes and both transporters are present in the zebrafish genome. NAGS (EC 2.3.1.1) catalyzes the formation of N-acetylglutamate from glutamate and acetyl coenzyme A and in zebrafish is partially inhibited by L-arginine. NAGS and other urea cycle genes are highly expressed during the first four days of zebrafish development. Sequence alignment of NAGS proteins from six fish species revealed three regions of sequence conservation: the mitochondrial targeting signal (MTS) at the N-terminus, followed by the variable and conserved segments. Removal of the MTS yields mature zebrafish NAGS (zfNAGS-M) while removal of the variable segment from zfNAGS-M results in conserved NAGS (zfNAGS-C). Both zfNAGS-M and zfNAGS-C are tetramers in the absence of L-arginine; addition of L-arginine decreased partition coefficients of both proteins. The zfNAGS-C unfolds over a broader temperature range and has higher specific activity than zfNAGS-M. In the presence of L-arginine the apparent Vmax of zfNAGS-M and zfNAGS-C decreased, their Km(app) for acetyl coenzyme A increased while the Km(app) for glutamate remained unchanged. The expression pattern of NAGS and other urea cycle genes in developing zebrafish suggests that they may have a role in citrulline and/or arginine biosynthesis during the first day of development and in ammonia detoxification thereafter. Biophysical and biochemical properties of zebrafish NAGS suggest that the variable segment may stabilize a tetrameric state of zfNAGS-M and that under physiological

  19. Expression Pattern and Biochemical Properties of Zebrafish N-Acetylglutamate Synthase

    PubMed Central

    Caldovic, Ljubica; Haskins, Nantaporn; Mumo, Amy; Majumdar, Himani; Pinter, Mary; Tuchman, Mendel; Krufka, Alison

    2014-01-01

    The urea cycle converts ammonia, a waste product of protein catabolism, into urea. Because fish dispose ammonia directly into water, the role of the urea cycle in fish remains unknown. Six enzymes, N-acetylglutamate synthase (NAGS), carbamylphosphate synthetase III, ornithine transcarbamylase, argininosuccinate synthase, argininosuccinate lyase and arginase 1, and two membrane transporters, ornithine transporter and aralar, comprise the urea cycle. The genes for all six enzymes and both transporters are present in the zebrafish genome. NAGS (EC 2.3.1.1) catalyzes the formation of N-acetylglutamate from glutamate and acetyl coenzyme A and in zebrafish is partially inhibited by L-arginine. NAGS and other urea cycle genes are highly expressed during the first four days of zebrafish development. Sequence alignment of NAGS proteins from six fish species revealed three regions of sequence conservation: the mitochondrial targeting signal (MTS) at the N-terminus, followed by the variable and conserved segments. Removal of the MTS yields mature zebrafish NAGS (zfNAGS-M) while removal of the variable segment from zfNAGS-M results in conserved NAGS (zfNAGS-C). Both zfNAGS-M and zfNAGS-C are tetramers in the absence of L-arginine; addition of L-arginine decreased partition coefficients of both proteins. The zfNAGS-C unfolds over a broader temperature range and has higher specific activity than zfNAGS-M. In the presence of L-arginine the apparent Vmax of zfNAGS-M and zfNAGS-C decreased, their Kmapp for acetyl coenzyme A increased while the Kmapp for glutamate remained unchanged. The expression pattern of NAGS and other urea cycle genes in developing zebrafish suggests that they may have a role in citrulline and/or arginine biosynthesis during the first day of development and in ammonia detoxification thereafter. Biophysical and biochemical properties of zebrafish NAGS suggest that the variable segment may stabilize a tetrameric state of zfNAGS-M and that under physiological

  20. Title III in Special Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    The Title III Quarterly, 1972

    1972-01-01

    The journal on special education programs funded under Title III of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act contains articles on three projects, abstracts of other projects, a picture story on San Diego Schools' outdoor classroom for special education, and a state by state listing of all Title III special education projects. The programs…