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Sample records for acquire digital images

  1. Methods of automatically acquiring images from digital medical systems.

    PubMed

    Lou, S L; Wang, J; Moskowitz, M; Bazzill, T; Huang, H K

    1995-01-01

    Automated image acquisition plays an important role in a picture archiving and communication system (PACS). However, there is no single solution for automated data acquisition from existing digital medical imaging systems. We have gained a great deal of experience on automatic acquiring data by interfacing imaging scanners of major manufacturers. In this paper, we categorize the interface methods supported by the current image scanners. This categorization consists of five architectural models: (a) sequential chain; (b) direct interface; (c) memory access; (d) shared disk; and (e) interconnected network. The cost, rate of data transfer, and ease of implementation of each model are discussed. To ensure the integrity and availability of patient images in a PACS system, automated fault tolerance design in image acquisition is required. Based upon our field data, we report common scenarios which cause the acquisition to fail. We also describe techniques employed to automatically restart the operations which include recovery from acquisition processes' errors and traps, image acquisition computer down-time occurrence, and shutdown occurrence of medical imaging system.

  2. Methods for identification of images acquired with digital cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geradts, Zeno J.; Bijhold, Jurrien; Kieft, Martijn; Kurosawa, Kenji; Kuroki, Kenro; Saitoh, Naoki

    2001-02-01

    From the court we were asked whether it is possible to determine if an image has been made with a specific digital camera. This question has to be answered in child pornography cases, where evidence is needed that a certain picture has been made with a specific camera. We have looked into different methods of examining the cameras to determine if a specific image has been made with a camera: defects in CCDs, file formats that are used, noise introduced by the pixel arrays and watermarking in images used by the camera manufacturer.

  3. Toward a universal definition of speed for digitally acquired projection images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Metter, Richard; Yorkston, John

    2005-04-01

    A variety of incompatible speed metrics for digitally acquired projection images are currently provided by system vendors. As digital acquisition has become more widely adopted, the need for a universal vendor-independent speed metric is increasingly evident. This paper proposes a method for defining the speed of digital projection images that can be readily implemented on any system that acquires a projection x-ray image and produces a display-ready image. Radiographic speed for screen-film combinations is currently defined by ISO in terms of the exposure needed to produce a net density of one on the developed film. An analogous speed method is proposed for digital images. It requires that the system produce an original image (calibrated in terms of the relationship between system response and exposure for the standard set of x-ray beam qualities defined by ISO-9236-1) and a display-ready image. The speed is computed in terms of the median pixel value in the original image that corresponds to a reference pixel value in the display-ready image. The exposure response of selected digital radiography acquisition systems has been measured for the ISO beam qualities. The proposed speed metric was computed for a representative suite of digital images and correlated well with a currently available vendor-specific speed metric. Changes in patient exposure and image-processing parameters affect the speed metric in the appropriate way. In conclusion, the proposed speed metric provides a vendor-independent definition of speed for digitally acquired projection radiographs that is consistent with current speed standards for screen-film radiography and applicable to all currently available digital acquisition systems.

  4. Non-mechanical sub-pixel image shifter for acquiring super-resolution digital images.

    PubMed

    Lan, Hsiao-Chin; Wu, Mount-Learn; Yeatman, Eric M

    2009-12-07

    A sub-pixel image shifter is presented, for use in enhancing the spatial resolution of digital image sensors by combining multiple displaced sub-images using a super-resolution (SR) algorithm. The device uses the walk-off phenomenon in birefringent crystals to separate images with opposite polarizations by a sub-pixel displacement. A liquid crystal (LC) waveplate plus a polarizer can then select the specific image to be exposed, with fast, non-mechanical control. This cascaded device, comprising two sapphire crystals, two LCs, and a single polarizer, is capable of 2-dimensional image shift with displacements of 0.5 pixels. The experimental results show that the image registration stability can be precisely controlled within 0.05 pixels and the contrast transfer function ratio of the SR image is enhanced by up to 1.36 times compared to the original captured image. Moreover, based on the fast transition time of LCs, the displaced sub-images can be recorded in video form with a frame rate of 40 fps.

  5. Acquiring multi-viewpoint image of 3D object for integral imaging using synthetic aperture phase-shifting digital holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Min-Ok; Kim, Nam; Park, Jae-Hyeung; Jeon, Seok-Hee; Gil, Sang-Keun

    2009-02-01

    We propose a method generating elemental images for the auto-stereoscopic three-dimensional display technique, integral imaging, using phase-shifting digital holography. Phase shifting digital holography is a way recording the digital hologram by changing phase of the reference beam and extracting the complex field of the object beam. Since all 3D information is captured by the phase-shifting digital holography, the elemental images for any specifications of the lens array can be generated from single phase-shifting digital holography. We expanded the viewing angle of the generated elemental image by using the synthetic aperture phase-shifting digital hologram. The principle of the proposed method is verified experimentally.

  6. Digital imaging.

    PubMed

    Daniel, Gregory B

    2009-07-01

    Medical imaging is rapidly moving toward a digital-based image system. An understanding of the principles of digital imaging is necessary to evaluate features of imaging systems and can play an important role in purchasing decisions.

  7. Digital Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Digital Imaging is the computer processed numerical representation of physical images. Enhancement of images results in easier interpretation. Quantitative digital image analysis by Perceptive Scientific Instruments, locates objects within an image and measures them to extract quantitative information. Applications are CAT scanners, radiography, microscopy in medicine as well as various industrial and manufacturing uses. The PSICOM 327 performs all digital image analysis functions. It is based on Jet Propulsion Laboratory technology, is accurate and cost efficient.

  8. Pixel color clustering of multi-temporally acquired digital photographs of a rice canopy by luminosity-normalization and pseudo-red-green-blue color imaging.

    PubMed

    Doi, Ryoichi; Arif, Chusnul; Setiawan, Budi Indra; Mizoguchi, Masaru

    2014-01-01

    Red-green-blue (RGB) channels of RGB digital photographs were loaded with luminosity-adjusted R, G, and completely white grayscale images, respectively (RGwhtB method), or R, G, and R + G (RGB yellow) grayscale images, respectively (RGrgbyB method), to adjust the brightness of the entire area of multi-temporally acquired color digital photographs of a rice canopy. From the RGwhtB or RGrgbyB pseudocolor image, cyan, magenta, CMYK yellow, black, L*, a*, and b* grayscale images were prepared. Using these grayscale images and R, G, and RGB yellow grayscale images, the luminosity-adjusted pixels of the canopy photographs were statistically clustered. With the RGrgbyB and the RGwhtB methods, seven and five major color clusters were given, respectively. The RGrgbyB method showed clear differences among three rice growth stages, and the vegetative stage was further divided into two substages. The RGwhtB method could not clearly discriminate between the second vegetative and midseason stages. The relative advantages of the RGrgbyB method were attributed to the R, G, B, magenta, yellow, L*, and a* grayscale images that contained richer information to show the colorimetrical differences among objects than those of the RGwhtB method. The comparison of rice canopy colors at different time points was enabled by the pseudocolor imaging method.

  9. A method to produce and validate a digitally reconstructed radiograph-based computer simulation for optimisation of chest radiographs acquired with a computed radiography imaging system

    PubMed Central

    Moore, C S; Liney, G P; Beavis, A W; Saunderson, J R

    2011-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to develop and validate a computer model to produce realistic simulated computed radiography (CR) chest images using CT data sets of real patients. Methods Anatomical noise, which is the limiting factor in determining pathology in chest radiography, is realistically simulated by the CT data, and frequency-dependent noise has been added post-digitally reconstructed radiograph (DRR) generation to simulate exposure reduction. Realistic scatter and scatter fractions were measured in images of a chest phantom acquired on the CR system simulated by the computer model and added post-DRR calculation. Results The model has been validated with a phantom and patients and shown to provide predictions of signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs), tissue-to-rib ratios (TRRs: a measure of soft tissue pixel value to that of rib) and pixel value histograms that lie within the range of values measured with patients and the phantom. The maximum difference in measured SNR to that calculated was 10%. TRR values differed by a maximum of 1.3%. Conclusion Experienced image evaluators have responded positively to the DRR images, are satisfied they contain adequate anatomical features and have deemed them clinically acceptable. Therefore, the computer model can be used by image evaluators to grade chest images presented at different tube potentials and doses in order to optimise image quality and patient dose for clinical CR chest radiographs without the need for repeat patient exposures. PMID:21933979

  10. Digital Imaging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howell, Les

    1996-01-01

    Defines a digital photograph as a numerical record of light electronically measured and recorded by a computer's scanner. States that most personal computers cannot do digital photography successfully and that digital pictures can be hard to manage and present a storage problem. Finds that, once the school has the hardware/software, picture…

  11. Digital image processing.

    PubMed

    Seeram, Euclid

    2004-01-01

    Digital image processing is now commonplace in radiology, nuclear medicine and sonography. This article outlines underlying principles and concepts of digital image processing. After completing this article, readers should be able to: List the limitations of film-based imaging. Identify major components of a digital imaging system. Describe the history and application areas of digital image processing. Discuss image representation and the fundamentals of digital image processing. Outline digital image processing techniques and processing operations used in selected imaging modalities. Explain the basic concepts and visualization tools used in 3-D and virtual reality imaging. Recognize medical imaging informatics as a new area of specialization for radiologic technologists.

  12. A comparison of the precision of three-dimensional images acquired by 2 digital intraoral scanners: effects of tooth irregularity and scanning direction

    PubMed Central

    Anh, Ji-won; Park, Ji-Man; Chun, Youn-Sic; Kim, Miae

    2016-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to compare the precision of three-dimensional (3D) images acquired using iTero® (Align Technology Inc., San Jose, CA, USA) and Trios® (3Shape Dental Systems, Copenhagen, Denmark) digital intraoral scanners, and to evaluate the effects of the severity of tooth irregularities and scanning sequence on precision. Methods Dental arch models were fabricated with differing degrees of tooth irregularity and divided into 2 groups based on scanning sequence. To assess their precision, images were superimposed and an optimized superimposition algorithm was employed to measure any 3D deviation. The t-test, paired t-test, and one-way ANOVA were performed (p < 0.05) for statistical analysis. Results The iTero® and Trios® systems showed no statistically significant difference in precision among models with differing degrees of tooth irregularity. However, there were statistically significant differences in the precision of the 2 scanners when the starting points of scanning were different. The iTero® scanner (mean deviation, 29.84 ± 12.08 µm) proved to be less precise than the Trios® scanner (22.17 ± 4.47 µm). Conclusions The precision of 3D images differed according to the degree of tooth irregularity, scanning sequence, and scanner type. However, from a clinical standpoint, both scanners were highly accurate regardless of the degree of tooth irregularity. PMID:26877977

  13. Point cloud generation from aerial image data acquired by a quadrocopter type micro unmanned aerial vehicle and a digital still camera.

    PubMed

    Rosnell, Tomi; Honkavaara, Eija

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this investigation was to develop and investigate methods for point cloud generation by image matching using aerial image data collected by quadrocopter type micro unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) imaging systems. Automatic generation of high-quality, dense point clouds from digital images by image matching is a recent, cutting-edge step forward in digital photogrammetric technology. The major components of the system for point cloud generation are a UAV imaging system, an image data collection process using high image overlaps, and post-processing with image orientation and point cloud generation. Two post-processing approaches were developed: one of the methods is based on Bae Systems' SOCET SET classical commercial photogrammetric software and another is built using Microsoft(®)'s Photosynth™ service available in the Internet. Empirical testing was carried out in two test areas. Photosynth processing showed that it is possible to orient the images and generate point clouds fully automatically without any a priori orientation information or interactive work. The photogrammetric processing line provided dense and accurate point clouds that followed the theoretical principles of photogrammetry, but also some artifacts were detected. The point clouds from the Photosynth processing were sparser and noisier, which is to a large extent due to the fact that the method is not optimized for dense point cloud generation. Careful photogrammetric processing with self-calibration is required to achieve the highest accuracy. Our results demonstrate the high performance potential of the approach and that with rigorous processing it is possible to reach results that are consistent with theory. We also point out several further research topics. Based on theoretical and empirical results, we give recommendations for properties of imaging sensor, data collection and processing of UAV image data to ensure accurate point cloud generation.

  14. Point Cloud Generation from Aerial Image Data Acquired by a Quadrocopter Type Micro Unmanned Aerial Vehicle and a Digital Still Camera

    PubMed Central

    Rosnell, Tomi; Honkavaara, Eija

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this investigation was to develop and investigate methods for point cloud generation by image matching using aerial image data collected by quadrocopter type micro unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) imaging systems. Automatic generation of high-quality, dense point clouds from digital images by image matching is a recent, cutting-edge step forward in digital photogrammetric technology. The major components of the system for point cloud generation are a UAV imaging system, an image data collection process using high image overlaps, and post-processing with image orientation and point cloud generation. Two post-processing approaches were developed: one of the methods is based on Bae Systems’ SOCET SET classical commercial photogrammetric software and another is built using Microsoft®’s Photosynth™ service available in the Internet. Empirical testing was carried out in two test areas. Photosynth processing showed that it is possible to orient the images and generate point clouds fully automatically without any a priori orientation information or interactive work. The photogrammetric processing line provided dense and accurate point clouds that followed the theoretical principles of photogrammetry, but also some artifacts were detected. The point clouds from the Photosynth processing were sparser and noisier, which is to a large extent due to the fact that the method is not optimized for dense point cloud generation. Careful photogrammetric processing with self-calibration is required to achieve the highest accuracy. Our results demonstrate the high performance potential of the approach and that with rigorous processing it is possible to reach results that are consistent with theory. We also point out several further research topics. Based on theoretical and empirical results, we give recommendations for properties of imaging sensor, data collection and processing of UAV image data to ensure accurate point cloud generation. PMID:22368479

  15. Digital imaging in pathology.

    PubMed

    Park, Seung; Pantanowitz, Liron; Parwani, Anil Vasdev

    2012-12-01

    Advances in computing speed and power have made a pure digital work flow for pathology. New technologies such as whole slide imaging (WSI), multispectral image analysis, and algorithmic image searching seem poised to fundamentally change the way in which pathology is practiced. This article provides the practicing pathologist with a primer on digital imaging. Building on this primer, the current state of the art concerning digital imaging in pathology is described. Emphasis is placed on WSI and its ramifications, showing how it is useful in both anatomic (histology, cytopathology) and clinical (hematopathology) pathology. Future trends are also extrapolated.

  16. Digital Image Access & Retrieval.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heidorn, P. Bryan, Ed.; Sandore, Beth, Ed.

    Recent technological advances in computing and digital imaging technology have had immediate and permanent consequences for visual resource collections. Libraries are involved in organizing and managing large visual resource collections. The central challenges in working with digital image collections mirror those that libraries have sought to…

  17. Digital Imaging in Cytopathology

    PubMed Central

    Khalbuss, Walid E.; Pantanowitz, Liron; Parwani, Anil V.

    2011-01-01

    Rapid advances are occurring in the field of cytopathology, particularly in the field of digital imaging. Today, digital images are used in a variety of settings including education (E-education), as a substitute to multiheaded sessions, multisite conferences, publications, cytopathology web pages, cytology proficiency testing, telecytology, consultation through telecytology, and automated screening of Pap test slides. The accessibility provided by digital imaging in cytopathology can improve the quality and efficiency of cytopathology services, primarily by getting the expert cytopathologist to remotely look at the slide. This improved accessibility saves time and alleviates the need to ship slides, wait for glass slides, or transport pathologists. Whole slide imaging (WSI) is a digital imaging modality that uses computerized technology to scan and convert pathology and cytology glass slides into digital images (digital slides) that can be viewed remotely on a workstation using viewing software. In spite of the many advances, challenges remain such as the expensive initial set-up costs, workflow interruption, length of time to scan whole slides, large storage size for WSI, bandwidth restrictions, undefined legal implications, professional reluctance, and lack of standardization in the imaging process. PMID:21785680

  18. Digital image storage.

    PubMed

    Wallack, Seth

    2008-01-01

    Digital image archival requires less physical storage space, allows for rapid storage and retrieval and avoids loss in image quality over time or with image duplication compared with film storage. Because medical imaging data are critically important and, by law, must be stored in a safe, accessible manner, it is imperative not to have one computer error destroy all copies of the image data. Several options for image storage media are available including magnetic tape, optical media, spinning disks and solid state. Other considerations include on-site vs. off-site storage, redundancy, on-line vs. off-line storage, and removable storage media for disaster recovery. The different storage media can be used in different configurations to provide sufficient protection of digital data. Choose a storage system that will keep your data safe from unauthorized access, hardware failure, and clinic disasters.

  19. Principles of digital imaging.

    PubMed

    van der Stelt, P F

    2000-04-01

    Electronic sensors in diagnostic radiology are gradually replacing radiographic film. The advantages of this new technology include a lower radiation dose to the patient, an almost instantaneous availability of images without the need for chemical film processing, and the possibility of image enhancement and computer-aided feature extraction. Digital radiography is a promising technology, opening the door to new diagnostic procedures not available with traditional film-based imaging.

  20. Artifacts in digital images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorre, J. J.; Gillespie, A. R.

    1980-01-01

    Three kinds of artifacts unique to digital images are illustrated, namely aliasing caused by undersampling, interference phenomena caused by improper display of images, and harmonic overtones caused by quantization of amplitudes. Special attention is given to undersampling when the sample size and interval are the same. It is noted that this situation is important because it is typical of solid-state cameras. Quantization of image data of necessity introduces energy at harmonic overtones of the image spectrum. This energy is aliased if the frequency of the overtones is greater than 0.5 cycle/pixel. It cannot be selectively removed from the image through filtering, and the best way to suppress it is to maximize the amplification of the sensor before digital encoding.

  1. Digital Image Correlation Engine

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, Dan; Crozier, Paul; Reu, Phil

    2015-10-06

    DICe is an open source digital image correlation (DIC) tool intended for use as a module in an external application or as a standalone analysis code. It's primary capability is computing full –field displacements and strains from sequences of digital These images are typically of a material sample undergoing a materials characterization experiment, but DICe is also useful for other applications (for example, trajectory tracking). DICe is machine portable (Windows, Linux and Mac) and can be effectively deployed on a high performance computing platform. Capabilities from DICe can be invoked through a library interface, via source code integration of DICe classes or through a graphical user interface.

  2. Light microscopy digital imaging.

    PubMed

    Joubert, James; Sharma, Deepak

    2011-10-01

    This unit presents an overview of digital imaging hardware used in light microscopy. CMOS, CCD, and EMCCDs are the primary sensors used. The strengths and weaknesses of each define the primary applications for these sensors. Sensor architecture and formats are also reviewed. Color camera design strategies and sensor window cleaning are also described in the unit.

  3. Method for acquiring, storing and analyzing crystal images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gester, Thomas E. (Inventor); Rosenblum, William M. (Inventor); Christopher, Gayle K. (Inventor); Hamrick, David T. (Inventor); Delucas, Lawrence J. (Inventor); Tillotson, Brian (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A system utilizing a digital computer for acquiring, storing and evaluating crystal images. The system includes a video camera (12) which produces a digital output signal representative of a crystal specimen positioned within its focal window (16). The digitized output from the camera (12) is then stored on data storage media (32) together with other parameters inputted by a technician and relevant to the crystal specimen. Preferably, the digitized images are stored on removable media (32) while the parameters for different crystal specimens are maintained in a database (40) with indices to the digitized optical images on the other data storage media (32). Computer software is then utilized to identify not only the presence and number of crystals and the edges of the crystal specimens from the optical image, but to also rate the crystal specimens by various parameters, such as edge straightness, polygon formation, aspect ratio, surface clarity, crystal cracks and other defects or lack thereof, and other parameters relevant to the quality of the crystals.

  4. Software for Acquiring Image Data for PIV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wernet, Mark P.; Cheung, H. M.; Kressler, Brian

    2003-01-01

    PIV Acquisition (PIVACQ) is a computer program for acquisition of data for particle-image velocimetry (PIV). In the PIV system for which PIVACQ was developed, small particles entrained in a flow are illuminated with a sheet of light from a pulsed laser. The illuminated region is monitored by a charge-coupled-device camera that operates in conjunction with a data-acquisition system that includes a frame grabber and a counter-timer board, both installed in a single computer. The camera operates in "frame-straddle" mode where a pair of images can be obtained closely spaced in time (on the order of microseconds). The frame grabber acquires image data from the camera and stores the data in the computer memory. The counter/timer board triggers the camera and synchronizes the pulsing of the laser with acquisition of data from the camera. PIVPROC coordinates all of these functions and provides a graphical user interface, through which the user can control the PIV data-acquisition system. PIVACQ enables the user to acquire a sequence of single-exposure images, display the images, process the images, and then save the images to the computer hard drive. PIVACQ works in conjunction with the PIVPROC program which processes the images of particles into the velocity field in the illuminated plane.

  5. Digital imaging in dentistry.

    PubMed

    Essen, S Donovan

    2011-01-01

    Information technology is vital to operations, marketing, accounting, finance and administration. One of the most exciting and quickly evolving technologies in the modern dental office is digital applications. The dentist is often the business manager, information technology officer and strategic planning chief for his small business. The information systems triangle applies directly to this critical manager supported by properly trained ancillary staff and good equipment. With emerging technology driving all medical disciplines and the rapid pace at which it emerges, it is vital for the contemporary practitioner to keep abreast of the newest information technology developments. This article compares the strategic and operational advantages of digital applications, specifically imaging. The focus of this paper will be on digital radiography (DR), 3D computerized tomography, digital photography and digitally-driven CAD/CAM to what are now considered obsolescing modalities and contemplates what may arrive in the future. It is the purpose of this essay to succinctly evaluate the decisions involved in the role, application and implications of employing this tool in the dental environment

  6. The Apollo Digital Image Archive: Project Status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paris, K. N.; Robinson, M. S.; Lawrence, S. J.; Danton, J.; Bowman-Cisneros, E.; Licht, A.; Close, W.; Ingram, R.

    2012-03-01

    Photographs acquired by the Apollo astronauts are currently being scanned at JSC and the files sent to ASU for the Apollo Digital Image Archive. The metric frames are nearing completion while the panoramic frames are in the process of being released.

  7. Acquired portosystemic collaterals: anatomy and imaging.

    PubMed

    Leite, Andréa Farias de Melo; Mota, Américo; Chagas-Neto, Francisco Abaeté; Teixeira, Sara Reis; Elias Junior, Jorge; Muglia, Valdair Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Portosystemic shunts are enlarged vessels that form collateral pathological pathways between the splanchnic circulation and the systemic circulation. Although their causes are multifactorial, portosystemic shunts all have one mechanism in common-increased portal venous pressure, which diverts the blood flow from the gastrointestinal tract to the systemic circulation. Congenital and acquired collateral pathways have both been described in the literature. The aim of this pictorial essay was to discuss the distinct anatomic and imaging features of portosystemic shunts, as well as to provide a robust method of differentiating between acquired portosystemic shunts and similar pathologies, through the use of illustrations and schematic drawings. Imaging of portosystemic shunts provides subclinical markers of increased portal venous pressure. Therefore, radiologists play a crucial role in the identification of portosystemic shunts. Early detection of portosystemic shunts can allow ample time to perform endovascular shunt operations, which can relieve portal hypertension and prevent acute or chronic complications in at-risk patient populations.

  8. Acquired portosystemic collaterals: anatomy and imaging*

    PubMed Central

    Leite, Andréa Farias de Melo; Mota Jr., Américo; Chagas-Neto, Francisco Abaeté; Teixeira, Sara Reis; Elias Junior, Jorge; Muglia, Valdair Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Portosystemic shunts are enlarged vessels that form collateral pathological pathways between the splanchnic circulation and the systemic circulation. Although their causes are multifactorial, portosystemic shunts all have one mechanism in common-increased portal venous pressure, which diverts the blood flow from the gastrointestinal tract to the systemic circulation. Congenital and acquired collateral pathways have both been described in the literature. The aim of this pictorial essay was to discuss the distinct anatomic and imaging features of portosystemic shunts, as well as to provide a robust method of differentiating between acquired portosystemic shunts and similar pathologies, through the use of illustrations and schematic drawings. Imaging of portosystemic shunts provides subclinical markers of increased portal venous pressure. Therefore, radiologists play a crucial role in the identification of portosystemic shunts. Early detection of portosystemic shunts can allow ample time to perform endovascular shunt operations, which can relieve portal hypertension and prevent acute or chronic complications in at-risk patient populations. PMID:27777479

  9. Digital Image Analysis of Cereals

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Image analysis is the extraction of meaningful information from images, mainly digital images by means of digital processing techniques. The field was established in the 1950s and coincides with the advent of computer technology, as image analysis is profoundly reliant on computer processing. As t...

  10. Digital imaging overview.

    PubMed

    Carrino, John A

    2003-07-01

    Digital imaging consists of digital acquisition modalities, image, and information management systems. All modalities are available to be purchased as digital acquisition devices. Image management has been the domain for PACSs. PACSs are complex systems designed to transmit, store, and display medical images. They use and rely on many types of different information and display technologies. The initial focus for PACSs has been on solving the engineering issues associated with the transfer of large image data sets and the suitability of softcopy displays for diagnosis particular to the human visual system. For operating within a centralized radiology department, these are largely solved. However, for enterprise wide dissemination and distribution, there are still challenges in the form of expedient transfer syntaxes and image quality, but these are also being effectively addressed. Information management is the domain of the RIS. One of the goals of radiology management should encompass the development of a robust practice environment that emphasizes workflow enhancements with seamless integration of decision support tools. The concept of "person-machine" systems emphasizes taking full advantage of both human and machine capabilities with a capacity to grow and change function. As the computer capabilities increase, more jobs can be relinquished to the machine. The physician can then focus on tasks that require more complex judgment and comprehension. The goal of this human-machine hybrid is to have more power than either of its components alone. This multifaceted role will most likely be embedded in the background having agents query and retrieve context specific information to be presented to the user. As augmenters of human talent, computers can turn data into information and information into knowledge. Medical imaging is a beneficiary of the information technology developments driven by the consumer and business sectors. Although these applications of

  11. Acquisition hardware for digital imaging.

    PubMed

    Widmer, William R

    2008-01-01

    Use of digital radiography is growing rapidly in veterinary medicine. Two basic digital imaging systems are available, computed radiography (CR) and direct digital radiography (DDR). Computed radiographic detectors use a two-step process for image capture and processing. Image capture is by X-ray sensitive phosphors in the image plate. The image plate reader transforms the latent phosphor image to light photons that are converted to an analog electrical signal. An analog to digital converter is used to digitize the electrical signal before computer analysis. Direct digital detectors provide digital data by direct readout after image capture--a reader unnecessary. Types of DDR detectors are flat panel detectors and charge coupled device (CCD) detectors. Flat panel detectors are composed of layers of semiconductors for image capture with transistor and microscopic circuitry embedded in a pixel array. Direct converting flat panel detectors convert incident X-rays directly into electrical charges. Indirect detectors convert X-rays to visible light, then to electrical charges. All flat panel detectors send a digitized electrical signal to a computer using a direct link. Charge coupled device detectors have a small chip similar to those used in digital cameras. A scintillator first converts X-rays to a light signal that is minified by an optical system before reaching the chip. The chip sends a digital signal directly to a computer. Both CR and DDR provide quality diagnostic images. CR is a mature technology while DDR is an emerging technology.

  12. The use of digital images in pathology.

    PubMed

    Furness, P N

    1997-11-01

    Digital images are routinely used by the publishing industry, but most diagnostic pathologists are unfamiliar with the technology and its possibilities. This review aims to explain the basic principles of digital image acquisition, storage, manipulation and use, and the possibilities provided not only in research, but also in teaching and in routine diagnostic pathology. Images of natural objects are usually expressed digitally as 'bitmaps'--rectilinear arrays of small dots. The size of each dot can vary, but so can its information content in terms, for example, of colour, greyscale or opacity. Various file formats and compression algorithms are available. Video cameras connected to microscopes are familiar to most pathologists; video images can be converted directly to a digital form by a suitably equipped computer. Digital cameras and scanners are alternative acquisition tools of relevance to pathologists. Once acquired, a digital image can easily be subjected to the digital equivalent of any conventional darkroom manipulation and modern software allows much more flexibility, to such an extent that a new tool for scientific fraud has been created. For research, image enhancement and analysis is an increasingly powerful and affordable tool. Morphometric measurements are, after many predictions, at last beginning to be part of the toolkit of the diagnostic pathologist. In teaching, the potential to create dramatic yet informative presentations is demonstrated daily by the publishing industry; such methods are readily applicable to the classroom. The combination of digital images and the Internet raises many possibilities; for example, instead of seeking one expert diagnostic opinion, one could simultaneously seek the opinion of many, all around the globe. It is inevitable that in the coming years the use of digital images will spread from the laboratory to the medical curriculum and to the whole of diagnostic pathology.

  13. Could digital imaging be an alternative for digital colorimeters?

    PubMed

    Caglar, Alper; Yamanel, Kivanc; Gulsahi, Kamran; Bagis, Bora; Ozcan, Mutlu

    2010-12-01

    This study evaluated the colour parameters of composite and ceramic shade guides determined using a colorimeter and digital imaging method with illuminants at different colour temperatures. Two different resin composite shade guides, namely Charisma (Heraeus Kulzer) and Premise (Kerr Corporation), and two different ceramic shade guides, Vita Lumin Vacuum (VITA Zahnfabrik) and Noritake (Noritake Co.), were evaluated at three different colour temperatures (2,700 K, 2,700-6,500 K, and 6500 K) of illuminants. Ten shade tabs were selected (A1, A2, A3, A3,5, A4, B1, B2, B3, C2 and C3) from each shade guide. CIE Lab values were obtained using digital imaging and a colorimeter (ShadeEye NCC Dental Chroma Meter, Shofu Inc.). The data were analysed using two-way ANOVA, and Pearson's correlation. While mean L* values of both composite and ceramic shade guides were not affected from the colour temperature, L* values obtained with the colorimeter showed significantly lower values than those of the digital imaging (p < 0.01). At combined 2,700-6500 K colour temperature, the means of a* values obtained from colorimeter and digital imaging did not show significant differences (p > 0.05). For both composite and ceramic shade guides, L* and b* values obtained from colorimeter and digital imaging method presented a high level of correlation. High-level correlations were also acquired for a* values in all shade guides except for the Charisma composite shade guide. Digital imaging method could be an alternative for the colorimeters unless the proper object-camera distance, digital camera settings and suitable illumination conditions could be supplied. However, variations in shade guides, especially for composites, may affect the correlation.

  14. Male body image following acquired brain injury.

    PubMed

    Howes, Hannah; Edwards, Stephen; Benton, David

    2005-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate body image concerns and psycho-emotional health in males with acquired brain injury (ABI). Using a between subjects study of 25 males with ABI and 25 matched controls, variables were analysed using correlations and 2 x 2 analyses of variance (ANOVAs) with head injury and injury type as independent variables. Body image and psycho-emotional health were evaluated using self-report questionnaires. Disability and cognitive impairment were measured using a mixture of self-report, cognitive testing and clinical notes. Results indicated that males with ABI had significantly lower self-esteem and body dissatisfaction on a number of items relating to physical and sexual functioning. There were significant differences in body image between stroke and TBI, but there was no corresponding relationship with psycho-emotional health. These body image differences might be explained by age. The finding that ABI has a negative effect on body image and that this relates to psycho-emotional health should be investigated further, perhaps being included in future rehabilitation strategies.

  15. Continuous Representations of Digital Images.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-10-01

    adjacency topology on a 2D digital image S is well represented by the standard Euclidean topology on F (S ) (resp. U (S )). The topological spaces F(S) and U...space R as primitive approximation of a 2D digital image S by con- tinuous topological spaces . This space F (S) is not new. In fact, it has always been

  16. A novel digital magnetic resonance imaging spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhengmin; Zhao, Cong; Zhou, Heqin; Feng, Huanqing

    2006-01-01

    Spectrometer is the essential part of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system. It controls the transmitting and receiving of signals. Many commercial spectrometers are now available. However, they are usually costly and complex. In this paper, a new digital spectrometer based on PCI extensions for instrumentation (PXI) architecture is presented. Radio frequency (RF) pulse is generated with the method of digital synthesis and its frequency and phase are continuously tunable. MR signal acquired by receiver coils is processed by digital quadrature detection and filtered to get the k-space data, which avoid the spectral distortion due to amplitude and phase errors between two channels of traditional detection. Compared to the conventional design, the presented spectrometer is built with general PXI platform and boards. This design works in a digital manner with features of low cost, high performance and accuracy. The experiments demonstrate its efficiency.

  17. Imagers for digital still photography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosiers, Jan; Dillen, Bart; Draijer, Cees; Manoury, Erik-Jan; Meessen, Louis; Peters, Inge

    2006-04-01

    This paper gives an overview of the requirements for, and current state-of-the-art of, CCD and CMOS imagers for use in digital still photography. Four market segments will be reviewed: mobile imaging, consumer "point-and-shoot cameras", consumer digital SLR cameras and high-end professional camera systems. The paper will also present some challenges and innovations with respect to packaging, testing, and system integration.

  18. Digital X-Ray Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dance, David R.

    The use of X-ray image receptors that produce a digital image is becoming increasingly important. Possible benefits include improved dynamic range and detective quantum efficiency, improved detectability for objects of low intrinsic contrast, and reduced radiation dose. The image can be available quickly. The display is separated from the image capture so that processing and contrast adjustment are possible before the image is viewed. The availability of a digital image means ready input into PACS and opens up the possibility of computer-aided detection and classification of abnormality. Possible drawbacks of digital systems include high cost, limited high contrast resolution and the fact that their clinical value is sometimes not proven in comparison with conventional, analogue techniques. The high contrast resolution attainable with such systems is discussed and the problem of sampling limitations and aliasing considered. The properties and limitations of digital systems using computed radiography, caesium iodide plus CCDs and active matrix arrays with either caesium iodide or selenium detectors are demonstrated. Examples are given of digital systems for mammography and general radiography and their performance is demonstrated in terms of clinical assessment and measurements of the modulation transfer function and detective quantum efficiency.

  19. Characterization of SEM speckle pattern marking and imaging distortion by digital image correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guery, Adrien; Latourte, Félix; Hild, François; Roux, Stéphane

    2014-01-01

    Surface patterning by e-beam lithography and scanning electron microscope (SEM) imaging distortions are studied via digital image correlation. The global distortions from the reference pattern, which has been numerically generated, are first quantified from a digital image correlation procedure between the (virtual) reference pattern and the actual SEM image both in secondary and backscattered electron imaging modes. These distortions result from both patterning and imaging techniques. These two contributions can be separated (without resorting to an external caliper) based on the images of the same patterned surface acquired at different orientations. Patterning distortions are much smaller than those due to imaging on wide field images.

  20. Digital imaging and video: principles and applications.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Andrew L; Hausman, Michael

    2003-01-01

    Digital imaging has provided orthopaedic surgeons with new, powerful tools that offer a multitude of applications. Already integral to several common medical devices, digital images can be used for case documentation and presentation as well as for diagnostic and surgical patient care information. Educational presentation has been transformed by the use of computers and digital projectors. Understanding the basic foundations of digital imaging technology is important for effectively creating digital images, videos, and presentations.

  1. Detecting jaundice by using digital image processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro-Ramos, J.; Toxqui-Quitl, C.; Villa Manriquez, F.; Orozco-Guillen, E.; Padilla-Vivanco, A.; Sánchez-Escobar, JJ.

    2014-03-01

    When strong Jaundice is presented, babies or adults should be subject to clinical exam like "serum bilirubin" which can cause traumas in patients. Often jaundice is presented in liver disease such as hepatitis or liver cancer. In order to avoid additional traumas we propose to detect jaundice (icterus) in newborns or adults by using a not pain method. By acquiring digital images in color, in palm, soles and forehead, we analyze RGB attributes and diffuse reflectance spectra as the parameter to characterize patients with either jaundice or not, and we correlate that parameters with the level of bilirubin. By applying support vector machine we distinguish between healthy and sick patients.

  2. Three-dimensional digital breast histopathology imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, G. M.; Peressotti, C.; Mawdsley, G. E.; Eidt, S.; Ge, M.; Morgan, T.; Zubovits, J. T.; Yaffe, M. J.

    2005-04-01

    We have developed a digital histology imaging system that has the potential to improve the accuracy of surgical margin assessment in the treatment of breast cancer by providing finer sampling and 3D visualization. The system is capable of producing a 3D representation of histopathology from an entire lumpectomy specimen. We acquire digital photomicrographs of a stack of large (120 x 170 mm) histology slides cut serially through the entire specimen. The images are then registered and displayed in 2D and 3D. This approach dramatically improves sampling and can improve visualization of tissue structures compared to current, small-format histology. The system consists of a brightfield microscope, adapted with a freeze-frame digital video camera and a large, motorized translation stage. The image of each slide is acquired as a mosaic of adjacent tiles, each tile representing one field-of-view of the microscope, and the mosaic is assembled into a seamless composite image. The assembly is done by a program developed to build image sets at six different levels within a multiresolution pyramid. A database-linked viewing program has been created to efficiently register and display the animated stack of images, which occupies about 80 GB of disk space per lumpectomy at full resolution, on a high-resolution (3840 x 2400 pixels) colour monitor. The scanning or tiling approach to digitization is inherently susceptible to two artefacts which disrupt the composite image, and which impose more stringent requirements on system performance. Although non-uniform illumination across any one isolated tile may not be discernible, the eye readily detects this non-uniformity when the entire assembly of tiles is viewed. The pattern is caused by deficiencies in optical alignment, spectrum of the light source, or camera corrections. The imaging task requires that features as small as 3.2 &mum in extent be seamlessly preserved. However, inadequate accuracy in positioning of the translation

  3. Digital imaging analysis to assess scar phenotype.

    PubMed

    Smith, Brian J; Nidey, Nichole; Miller, Steven F; Moreno Uribe, Lina M; Baum, Christian L; Hamilton, Grant S; Wehby, George L; Dunnwald, Martine

    2014-01-01

    In order to understand the link between the genetic background of patients and wound clinical outcomes, it is critical to have a reliable method to assess the phenotypic characteristics of healed wounds. In this study, we present a novel imaging method that provides reproducible, sensitive, and unbiased assessments of postsurgical scarring. We used this approach to investigate the possibility that genetic variants in orofacial clefting genes are associated with suboptimal healing. Red-green-blue digital images of postsurgical scars of 68 patients, following unilateral cleft lip repair, were captured using the 3dMD imaging system. Morphometric and colorimetric data of repaired regions of the philtrum and upper lip were acquired using ImageJ software, and the unaffected contralateral regions were used as patient-specific controls. Repeatability of the method was high with intraclass correlation coefficient score > 0.8. This method detected a very significant difference in all three colors, and for all patients, between the scarred and the contralateral unaffected philtrum (p ranging from 1.20(-05) to 1.95(-14) ). Physicians' clinical outcome ratings from the same images showed high interobserver variability (overall Pearson coefficient = 0.49) as well as low correlation with digital image analysis results. Finally, we identified genetic variants in TGFB3 and ARHGAP29 associated with suboptimal healing outcome.

  4. Digital imaging analysis to assess scar phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Brian J.; Nidey, Nichole; Miller, Steven F.; Moreno, Lina M.; Baum, Christian L.; Hamilton, Grant S.; Wehby, George L.; Dunnwald, Martine

    2015-01-01

    In order to understand the link between the genetic background of patients and wound clinical outcomes, it is critical to have a reliable method to assess the phenotypic characteristics of healed wounds. In this study, we present a novel imaging method that provides reproducible, sensitive and unbiased assessments of post-surgical scarring. We used this approach to investigate the possibility that genetic variants in orofacial clefting genes are associated with suboptimal healing. Red-green-blue (RGB) digital images of post-surgical scars of 68 patients, following unilateral cleft lip repair, were captured using the 3dMD image system. Morphometric and colorimetric data of repaired regions of the philtrum and upper lip were acquired using ImageJ software and the unaffected contralateral regions were used as patient-specific controls. Repeatability of the method was high with interclass correlation coefficient score > 0.8. This method detected a very significant difference in all three colors, and for all patients, between the scarred and the contralateral unaffected philtrum (P ranging from 1.20−05 to 1.95−14). Physicians’ clinical outcome ratings from the same images showed high inter-observer variability (overall Pearson coefficient = 0.49) as well as low correlation with digital image analysis results. Finally, we identified genetic variants in TGFB3 and ARHGAP29 associated with suboptimal healing outcome. PMID:24635173

  5. An image-guided tool to prevent hospital acquired infections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagy, Melinda; Szilágyi, László; Lehotsky, Ákos; Haidegger, Tamás; Benyó, Balázs

    2011-03-01

    Hospital Acquired Infections (HAI) represent the fourth leading cause of death in the United States, and claims hundreds of thousands of lives annually in the rest of the world. This paper presents a novel low-cost mobile device|called Stery-Hand|that helps to avoid HAI by improving hand hygiene control through providing an objective evaluation of the quality of hand washing. The use of the system is intuitive: having performed hand washing with a soap mixed with UV re ective powder, the skin appears brighter in UV illumination on the disinfected surfaces. Washed hands are inserted into the Stery-Hand box, where a digital image is taken under UV lighting. Automated image processing algorithms are employed in three steps to evaluate the quality of hand washing. First, the contour of the hand is extracted in order to distinguish the hand from the background. Next, a semi-supervised clustering algorithm classies the pixels of the hand into three groups, corresponding to clean, partially clean and dirty areas. The clustering algorithm is derived from the histogram-based quick fuzzy c-means approach, using a priori information extracted from reference images, evaluated by experts. Finally, the identied areas are adjusted to suppress shading eects, and quantied in order to give a verdict on hand disinfection quality. The proposed methodology was validated through tests using hundreds of images recorded in our laboratory. The proposed system was found robust and accurate, producing correct estimation for over 98% of the test cases. Stery-Hand may be employed in general practice, and it may also serve educational purposes.

  6. Image processing techniques for digital orthophotoquad production

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hood, Joy J.; Ladner, L. J.; Champion, Richard A.

    1989-01-01

    Orthophotographs have long been recognized for their value as supplements or alternatives to standard maps. Recent trends towards digital cartography have resulted in efforts by the US Geological Survey to develop a digital orthophotoquad production system. Digital image files were created by scanning color infrared photographs on a microdensitometer. Rectification techniques were applied to remove tile and relief displacement, thereby creating digital orthophotos. Image mosaicking software was then used to join the rectified images, producing digital orthophotos in quadrangle format.

  7. Digital image processing in cephalometric analysis.

    PubMed

    Jäger, A; Döler, W; Schormann, T

    1989-01-01

    Digital image processing methods were applied to improve the practicability of cephalometric analysis. The individual X-ray film was digitized by the aid of a high resolution microscope-photometer. Digital processing was done using a VAX 8600 computer system. An improvement of the image quality was achieved by means of various digital enhancement and filtering techniques.

  8. Digital Color Image Restoration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-08-01

    color image recording system is derived and the equations representing the model and the equations of colorimetry are expressed in matrix form. Computer ... algorithms are derived which correct color errors introduced by imperfections in the color recording system. The sources of color error which are

  9. Digital Images on the DIME

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    With NASA on its side, Positive Systems, Inc., of Whitefish, Montana, is veering away from the industry standards defined for producing and processing remotely sensed images. A top developer of imaging products for geographic information system (GIS) and computer-aided design (CAD) applications, Positive Systems is bucking traditional imaging concepts with a cost-effective and time-saving software tool called Digital Images Made Easy (DIME(trademark)). Like piecing a jigsaw puzzle together, DIME can integrate a series of raw aerial or satellite snapshots into a single, seamless panoramic image, known as a 'mosaic.' The 'mosaicked' images serve as useful backdrops to GIS maps - which typically consist of line drawings called 'vectors' - by allowing users to view a multidimensional map that provides substantially more geographic information.

  10. Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome: Ga-67 citrate imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Woolfenden, J.M.; Carrasquillo, J.A.; Larson, S.M.; Simmons, J.T.; Masur, H.; Smith, P.D.; Shelhamer, J.H.; Ognibene, F.P.

    1987-02-01

    All gallium-67 citrate scans obtained in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) at the Clinical Center, National Institutes of Health (Bethesda, Md.) were retrospectively analyzed and correlated with the results of bronchoscopy, chest radiography, and endoscopy. There were 164 scans of 95 patients. Twenty scans were from patients with Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia; 19 were abnormal, for a sensitivity of 95%. Ga-67 uptake tended to be less in patients receiving therapy for P. carinii pneumonia. Chest radiographs were normal at least initially in three patients with abnormal scans and P. carinii pneumonia. Unusually prominent colonic activity was associated with infection in some patients. No lesions of Kaposi sarcoma showed tracer uptake. Gallium scanning is useful for detecting P. carinii pneumonia and other opportunistic infections in patients with AIDS, but it is not useful for localizing Kaposi sarcoma.

  11. Effects of Digitization and JPEG Compression on Land Cover Classification Using Astronaut-Acquired Orbital Photographs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Julie A.; Webb, Edward L.; Evangelista, Arlene

    2000-01-01

    Studies that utilize astronaut-acquired orbital photographs for visual or digital classification require high-quality data to ensure accuracy. The majority of images available must be digitized from film and electronically transferred to scientific users. This study examined the effect of scanning spatial resolution (1200, 2400 pixels per inch [21.2 and 10.6 microns/pixel]), scanning density range option (Auto, Full) and compression ratio (non-lossy [TIFF], and lossy JPEG 10:1, 46:1, 83:1) on digital classification results of an orbital photograph from the NASA - Johnson Space Center archive. Qualitative results suggested that 1200 ppi was acceptable for visual interpretive uses for major land cover types. Moreover, Auto scanning density range was superior to Full density range. Quantitative assessment of the processing steps indicated that, while 2400 ppi scanning spatial resolution resulted in more classified polygons as well as a substantially greater proportion of polygons < 0.2 ha, overall agreement between 1200 ppi and 2400 ppi was quite high. JPEG compression up to approximately 46:1 also did not appear to have a major impact on quantitative classification characteristics. We conclude that both 1200 and 2400 ppi scanning resolutions are acceptable options for this level of land cover classification, as well as a compression ratio at or below approximately 46:1. Auto range density should always be used during scanning because it acquires more of the information from the film. The particular combination of scanning spatial resolution and compression level will require a case-by-case decision and will depend upon memory capabilities, analytical objectives and the spatial properties of the objects in the image.

  12. Digital imaging and fabrication.

    PubMed

    Zandparsa, Roya

    2014-01-01

    Bioceramics have been adopted in dental restorations for implants, bridges, inlays, onlays, and all-ceramic crowns. Dental bioceramics include glass ceramics, reinforced porcelains, zirconias, aluminas, fiber-reinforced ceramic composites, and multilayered ceramic structures. The process of additive manufacturing is ideally suited to dentistry. Models are designed using data from a computed tomography scan or magnetic resonance imaging. Since its development in 2001, direct ceramic machining of presintered yttria tetragonal zirconia polycrystal has become increasingly popular in dentistry. There are wide variety commercially available cements for luting all-ceramic restorations. However, resin cements have lower solubility and better aesthetic characteristics.

  13. Optical-digital hybrid image search system in cloud environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, Kanami; Kodate, Kashiko; Watanabe, Eriko

    2016-09-01

    To improve the versatility and usability of optical correlators, we developed an optical-digital hybrid image search system consisting of digital servers and an optical correlator that can be used to perform image searches in the cloud environment via a web browser. This hybrid system employs a simple method to obtain correlation signals and has a distributed network design. The correlation signals are acquired by using an encoder timing signal generated by a rotating disk, and the distributed network design facilitates the replacement and combination of the digital correlation server and the optical correlator.

  14. Reconstruction of 3d Digital Image of Weepingforsythia Pollen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Dongwu; Chen, Zhiwei; Xu, Hongzhi; Liu, Wenqi; Wang, Lina

    Confocal microscopy, which is a major advance upon normal light microscopy, has been used in a number of scientific fields. By confocal microscopy techniques, cells and tissues can be visualized deeply, and three-dimensional images created. Compared with conventional microscopes, confocal microscope improves the resolution of images by eliminating out-of-focus light. Moreover, confocal microscope has a higher level of sensitivity due to highly sensitive light detectors and the ability to accumulate images captured over time. In present studies, a series of Weeping Forsythia pollen digital images (35 images in total) were acquired with confocal microscope, and the three-dimensional digital image of the pollen reconstructed with confocal microscope. Our results indicate that it's a very easy job to analysis threedimensional digital image of the pollen with confocal microscope and the probe Acridine orange (AO).

  15. Digital diagnosis of medical images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinonen, Tomi; Kuismin, Raimo; Jormalainen, Raimo; Dastidar, Prasun; Frey, Harry; Eskola, Hannu

    2001-08-01

    The popularity of digital imaging devices and PACS installations has increased during the last years. Still, images are analyzed and diagnosed using conventional techniques. Our research group begun to study the requirements for digital image diagnostic methods to be applied together with PACS systems. The research was focused on various image analysis procedures (e.g., segmentation, volumetry, 3D visualization, image fusion, anatomic atlas, etc.) that could be useful in medical diagnosis. We have developed Image Analysis software (www.medimag.net) to enable several image-processing applications in medical diagnosis, such as volumetry, multimodal visualization, and 3D visualizations. We have also developed a commercial scalable image archive system (ActaServer, supports DICOM) based on component technology (www.acta.fi), and several telemedicine applications. All the software and systems operate in NT environment and are in clinical use in several hospitals. The analysis software have been applied in clinical work and utilized in numerous patient cases (500 patients). This method has been used in the diagnosis, therapy and follow-up in various diseases of the central nervous system (CNS), respiratory system (RS) and human reproductive system (HRS). In many of these diseases e.g. Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (CNS), nasal airways diseases (RS) and ovarian tumors (HRS), these methods have been used for the first time in clinical work. According to our results, digital diagnosis improves diagnostic capabilities, and together with PACS installations it will become standard tool during the next decade by enabling more accurate diagnosis and patient follow-up.

  16. Photoacoustic mammography capable of simultaneously acquiring photoacoustic and ultrasound images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asao, Yasufumi; Hashizume, Yohei; Suita, Takahiro; Nagae, Ken-ichi; Fukutani, Kazuhiko; Sudo, Yoshiaki; Matsushita, Toshikazu; Kobayashi, Shuichi; Tokiwa, Mariko; Yamaga, Iku; Fakhrejahani, Elham; Torii, Masae; Kawashima, Masahiro; Takada, Masahiro; Kanao, Shotaro; Kataoka, Masako; Shiina, Tsuyoshi; Toi, Masakazu

    2016-11-01

    We have constructed a prototype photoacoustic mammography system (PAM-02) capable of simultaneously acquiring photoacoustic (PA) and ultrasound (US) images. Each PA, US, and fused PA/US image can be acquired over a wide area of the breast using the scanning module of a US transducer, a PA detector, and optical prisms. The resolution of the PA images exhibits improvement from 2 to 1 mm compared to images acquired using our previous prototype. The maximum scan area of PAM-02 is 90 mm along the horizontal axis and 150 mm along the vertical axis. In a phantom experiment, the available depth was at least 45 mm. A representative example of the application of the PAM-02 prototype in clinical research at Kyoto University is presented and shows S-factor images, which are considered an approximation parameter related to hemoglobin saturation of tumor-related blood vessels. We confirmed the applicability of the system for anatomical and biological research.

  17. Digital Images and Human Vision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Andrew B.; Null, Cynthia H. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Processing of digital images destined for visual consumption raises many interesting questions regarding human visual sensitivity. This talk will survey some of these questions, including some that have been answered and some that have not. There will be an emphasis upon visual masking, and a distinction will be drawn between masking due to contrast gain control processes, and due to processes such as hypothesis testing, pattern recognition, and visual search.

  18. Digital image film generation: from the photoscientist's perspective

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boyd, John E.

    1982-01-01

    The technical sophistication of photoelectronic transducers, integrated circuits, and laser-beam film recorders has made digital imagery an alternative to traditional analog imagery for remote sensing. Because a digital image is stored in discrete digital values, image enhancement is possible before the data are converted to a photographic image. To create a special film-reproduction curve - which can simulate any desired gamma, relative film speed, and toe/shoulder response - the digital-to-analog transfer function of the film recorder is uniquely defined and implemented by a lookup table in the film recorder. Because the image data are acquired in spectral bands, false-color composites also can be given special characteristics by selecting a reproduction curve tailored for each band.

  19. Nephropathology consultation via digitized images.

    PubMed

    Cronenberger, J H; Hsiao, H; Falk, R J; Jennette, J C

    1992-12-17

    Investigations into a digitized image communications system were prompted by a need to bring expert consultation to physicians in community practice. Pathologists desired the capability to concomitantly view, annotate, and discuss images with referring physicians at distant sites. Methods included evaluation of the human and procedural domain into which the system was to be integrated. The GDCN computer consultation system has the consultant nephropathologist first evaluate the processed biopsy slides, digitize representative images, transmit them with the diagnosis to referring nephrologist, and, finally, conduct an interactive consultation and review of the biopsy and case. Image resolution and compression variables must be set for each individual medical consulting application. For the GDCN, it was found that the 640 x 496 x unlimited color with compression ratios not exceeding 1:32 are acceptable. An obvious improvement of this computerized system over the noncomputerized review sessions is the ability to immediately share and discuss a new image that had not been previously sent. In the old noncomputerized consultation, only images that had been mailed could be discussed. The computerized sessions allow transmission (10 sec) of a new image that the consultation might demand. The computerized sessions also provide the ability to show the referring nephrologist an area of biopsy interest that the pathologist had not previously transmitted. Biopsy slides can be viewed during the consultation, an area digitized, and that image transmitted to the nephrologist during the consultation. Hardware and costs for the sending station were: [table: see text] This system far exceeds the requirements for this particular application; however, it is sufficient to support future, higher-technology computer applications. If necessary, this same system could be used with a less expensive computer, a less expensive camera, software compression, and a single monitor. These

  20. Detecting Copy Move Forgery In Digital Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Ashima; Saxena, Nisheeth; Vasistha, S. K.

    2012-03-01

    In today's world several image manipulation software's are available. Manipulation of digital images has become a serious problem nowadays. There are many areas like medical imaging, digital forensics, journalism, scientific publications, etc, where image forgery can be done very easily. To determine whether a digital image is original or doctored is a big challenge. To find the marks of tampering in a digital image is a challenging task. The detection methods can be very useful in image forensics which can be used as a proof for the authenticity of a digital image. In this paper we propose the method to detect region duplication forgery by dividing the image into overlapping block and then perform searching to find out the duplicated region in the image.

  1. Improved Digital Image Correlation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mudassar, Asloob Ahmad; Butt, Saira

    2016-12-01

    Digital Image Correlation (DIC) is a powerful technique which is used to correlate two image segments to determine the similarity between them. A correlation image is formed which gives a peak known as correlation peak. If the two image segments are identical the peak is known as auto-correlation peak otherwise it is known as cross correlation peak. The location of the peak in a correlation image gives the relative displacement between the two image segments. Use of DIC for in-plane displacement and deformation measurements in Electronic Speckle Photography (ESP) is well known. In ESP two speckle images are correlated using DIC and relative displacement is measured. We are presenting background review of ESP and disclosing a technique based on DIC for improved relative measurements which we regard as the improved DIC method. Simulation and experimental results reveal that the proposed improved-DIC method is superior to the conventional DIC method in two aspects, in resolution and in the availability of reference position in displacement measurements.

  2. Digital processing of radiographic images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bond, A. D.; Ramapriyan, H. K.

    1973-01-01

    Some techniques are presented and the software documentation for the digital enhancement of radiographs. Both image handling and image processing operations are considered. The image handling operations dealt with are: (1) conversion of format of data from packed to unpacked and vice versa; (2) automatic extraction of image data arrays; (3) transposition and 90 deg rotations of large data arrays; (4) translation of data arrays for registration; and (5) reduction of the dimensions of data arrays by integral factors. Both the frequency and the spatial domain approaches are presented for the design and implementation of the image processing operation. It is shown that spatial domain recursive implementation of filters is much faster than nonrecursive implementations using fast fourier transforms (FFT) for the cases of interest in this work. The recursive implementation of a class of matched filters for enhancing image signal to noise ratio is described. Test patterns are used to illustrate the filtering operations. The application of the techniques to radiographic images of metallic structures is demonstrated through several examples.

  3. Perceptual watermarks for digital images and video

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfgang, Raymond B.; Podilchuk, Christine I.; Delp, Edward J., III

    1999-04-01

    The growth of new imaging technologies has created a need for techniques that can be used for copyright protection of digital images. One approach for copyright protection is to introduce an invisible signal known as a digital watermark in the image. In this paper, we describe digital image watermarking techniques known as perceptually watermarks that are designed to exploit aspects of the human visual system in order to produce a transparent, yet robust watermark.

  4. Digital holography and 3-D imaging.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Partha; Barbastathis, George; Kim, Myung; Kukhtarev, Nickolai

    2011-03-01

    This feature issue on Digital Holography and 3-D Imaging comprises 15 papers on digital holographic techniques and applications, computer-generated holography and encryption techniques, and 3-D display. It is hoped that future work in the area leads to innovative applications of digital holography and 3-D imaging to biology and sensing, and to the development of novel nonlinear dynamic digital holographic techniques.

  5. The future of digital imaging in dentistry.

    PubMed

    Miles, D A; Razzano, M R

    2000-04-01

    Digital radiographic imaging in dentistry has matured. All the reasons dentists have cited for keeping conventional, film-based systems have been refuted: cost, sensors, storage, and training are not issues. There are many reasons to switch to digital. This article outlines external factors that dentists may not have considered that will influence the way they conduct business in their offices related to radiographic imaging. The evidence points to the inevitable adoption of digital imaging systems.

  6. Mars Digital Image Mosaic Globe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The photomosaic that forms the base for this globe was created by merging two global digital image models (DIM's) of Mars-a medium-resolution monochrome mosaic processed to emphasize topographic features and a lower resolution color mosaic emphasizing color and albedo variations.

    The medium-resolution (1/256 or roughly 231 m/pixel) monochromatic image model was constructed from about 6,000 images having resolutions of 150-350 m/pixel and oblique illumination (Sun 20 o -45 o above the horizon). Radiometric processing was intended to suppress or remove the effects of albedo variations through the use of a high-pass divide filter, followed by photometric normalization so that the contrast of a given topographic slope would be approximately the same in all images.

    The global color mosaic was assembled at 1/64 or roughly 864 m/pixel from about 1,000 red- and green-filter images having 500-1,000 m/pixel resolution. These images were first mosaiced in groups, each taken on a single orbit of the Viking spacecraft. The orbit mosaics were then processed to remove spatially and temporally varying atmospheric haze in the overlap regions. After haze removal, the per-orbit mosaics were photometrically normalized to equalize the contrast of albedo features and mosaiced together with cosmetic seam removal. The medium-resolution DIM was used for geometric control of this color mosaic. A green-filter image was synthesized by weighted averaging of the red- and violet-filter mosaics. Finally, the product seen here was obtained by multiplying each color image by the medium-resolution monochrome image. The color balance selected for images in this map series was designed to be close to natural color for brighter, redder regions, such as Arabia Terra and the Tharsis region, but the data have been stretched so that the relatively dark regions appear darker and less red than they actually are.

    The images are presented in a projection that portrays the entire surface of Mars in a

  7. Interactive digital image manipulation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henze, J.; Dezur, R.

    1975-01-01

    The system is designed for manipulation, analysis, interpretation, and processing of a wide variety of image data. LANDSAT (ERTS) and other data in digital form can be input directly into the system. Photographic prints and transparencies are first converted to digital form with an on-line high-resolution microdensitometer. The system is implemented on a Hewlett-Packard 3000 computer with 128 K bytes of core memory and a 47.5 megabyte disk. It includes a true color display monitor, with processing memories, graphics overlays, and a movable cursor. Image data formats are flexible so that there is no restriction to a given set of remote sensors. Conversion between data types is available to provide a basis for comparison of the various data. Multispectral data is fully supported, and there is no restriction on the number of dimensions. In this way multispectral data collected at more than one point in time may simply be treated as a data collected with twice (three times, etc.) the number of sensors. There are various libraries of functions available to the user: processing functions, display functions, system functions, and earth resources applications functions.

  8. Algorithm For Enlargement Of Digitized Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhea, William J.

    1993-01-01

    Digital Image Enlarging Balanced Reconstruction Algorithm (DIEBRA) enlarges digitized image composed of square pixels to make image look more like real scene. Synthesizes enlarged image at greater number of pixels, smoothing out blockiness while providing resolution finer than original pixels and closer to scene. Based on more-realistic treatment of pixels, not as points but as areas representing spatial-resolution elements or fields of view of imaging instrument.

  9. Digital Image Compression Using Artificial Neural Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serra-Ricart, M.; Garrido, L.; Gaitan, V.; Aloy, A.

    1993-01-01

    The problem of storing, transmitting, and manipulating digital images is considered. Because of the file sizes involved, large amounts of digitized image information are becoming common in modern projects. Our goal is to described an image compression transform coder based on artificial neural networks techniques (NNCTC). A comparison of the compression results obtained from digital astronomical images by the NNCTC and the method used in the compression of the digitized sky survey from the Space Telescope Science Institute based on the H-transform is performed in order to assess the reliability of the NNCTC.

  10. LEDs as light source: examining quality of acquired images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachnak, Rafic; Funtanilla, Jeng; Hernandez, Jose

    2004-05-01

    Recent advances in technology have made light emitting diodes (LEDs) viable in a number of applications, including vehicle stoplights, traffic lights, machine-vision-inspection, illumination, and street signs. This paper presents the results of comparing images taken by a videoscope using two different light sources. One of the sources is the internal metal halide lamp and the other is a LED placed at the tip of the insertion tube. Images acquired using these two light sources were quantitatively compared using their histogram, intensity profile along a line segment, and edge detection. Also, images were qualitatively compared using image registration and transformation. The gray-level histogram, edge detection, image profile and image registration do not offer conclusive results. The LED light source, however, produces good images for visual inspection by an operator. The paper will present the results and discuss the usefulness and shortcomings of various comparison methods.

  11. Digital x-ray imager

    SciTech Connect

    1998-06-18

    The global objective of this cooperation was to lower the cost and improve the quality of breast health care in the United States. We planned to achieve it by designing a very high performance digital radiography unit for breast surgical specimen radiography in the operating room. These technical goals needed to be achieved at reasonable manufacturing costs to enable MedOptics to achieve high market penetration at a profit. Responsibility for overall project execution rested with MedOptics. MedOptics fabricated and demonstrated hardware, and selected components and handled the overall integration. After completion of this CRADA, MedOptics worked with collaborators to demonstrate clinical performance and utility. Finally, the company marketed the device. LLNL convened a multi-directorate expert panel for an intensive review of MedOptics point design. A written brief of panel conclusions and recommendations was prepared. In addition, LLNL was responsible for: computationally simulating the effects of varying source voltage and filtering (predicting the required dynamic range for the detector); evaluating CsI:Tl, CdWO4 and scintillating glass as image converters; recommending image enhancement algorithms. The LLNL modeling results guided the design and experimental elements of the project. The Laboratory's unique array of sources and detectors was employed to resolve specific technical questions. Our image processing expertise was applied to the selection of enhancement tools for image display.

  12. Digital imaging applications in anatomic pathology.

    PubMed

    Leong, F Joel W-M; Leong, Anthony S-Y

    2003-03-01

    Digital imaging has progressed at a rapid rate and is likely to eventually replace chemical photography in most areas of professional and amateur digital image acquisition. In pathology, digital microscopy has implications beyond that of taking a photograph. The arguments for adopting this new medium are compelling, and given similar developments in other areas of pathology and radiologic imaging, acceptance of the digital medium should be viewed as a component of the technological evolution of the laboratory. A digital image may be stored, replicated, catalogued, employed for educational purposes, transmitted for further interpretation (telepathology), analyzed for salient features (medical vision/image analysis), or form part of a wider digital healthcare strategy. Despite advances in digital camera technology, good image acquisition still requires good microscope optics and the correct calibration of all system components, something which many neglect. The future of digital imaging in pathology is very promising and new applications in the fields of automated quantification and interpretation are likely to have profound long-term influence on the practice of anatomic pathology. This paper discusses the state of the art of digital imaging in anatomic pathology.

  13. Ethical Implications of Digital Imaging in Photojournalism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terry, Danal; Lasorsa, Dominic L.

    Arguing that the news media are about to adopt digital imaging systems that will have far-reaching implications for the practice of journalism, this paper discusses how the news media is expected to adopt the new technology and explains why the marriage of journalism and digital imaging will create ethical issues with respect to photo manipulation…

  14. Digital Imaging: An Adobe Photoshop Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cobb, Kristine

    2007-01-01

    This article introduces digital imaging, an Adobe Photoshop course at Shrewsbury High School in Shrewsbury, Massachusetts. Students are able to earn art credits to graduate by successfully completing the course. Digital imaging must cover art criteria as well as technical skills. The course begins with tutorials created by the instructor and other…

  15. Adaptive SVD-Based Digital Image Watermarking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirvanian, Maliheh; Torkamani Azar, Farah

    Digital data utilization along with the increase popularity of the Internet has facilitated information sharing and distribution. However, such applications have also raised concern about copyright issues and unauthorized modification and distribution of digital data. Digital watermarking techniques which are proposed to solve these problems hide some information in digital media and extract it whenever needed to indicate the data owner. In this paper a new method of image watermarking based on singular value decomposition (SVD) of images is proposed which considers human visual system prior to embedding watermark by segmenting the original image into several blocks of different sizes, with more density in the edges of the image. In this way the original image quality is preserved in the watermarked image. Additional advantages of the proposed technique are large capacity of watermark embedding and robustness of the method against different types of image manipulation techniques.

  16. An approach of DSM generation from multi-view images acquired by UAVs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, DaTian; Ai, Mingyao; Hu, Qingwu; Li, Jiayuan

    2016-03-01

    In the past few years, for its lower-cost, safer and high-resolution images, unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) demonstrated great potential for photogrammetric measurements in numerous application fields. Nevertheless, these images are often affected by large rotation, big viewpoint change as well as small overlaps, in which case traditional procedure are not able to orientate images or generate reliable Digital Generation Models (DSM). This paper introduces the whole procedure of the DSM generation, which comprehensively utilizes advantage of both computer vision and multi-image matching algorithms in extracting points and generating a dense DSM. Experiment shows that, based on this procedure, it can quickly extract points from the high-resolution images acquired by UAVs with high location accuracy.

  17. How Digital Image Processing Became Really Easy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cannon, Michael

    1988-02-01

    In the early and mid-1970s, digital image processing was the subject of intense university and corporate research. The research lay along two lines: (1) developing mathematical techniques for improving the appearance of or analyzing the contents of images represented in digital form, and (2) creating cost-effective hardware to carry out these techniques. The research has been very effective, as evidenced by the continued decline of image processing as a research topic, and the rapid increase of commercial companies to market digital image processing software and hardware.

  18. Eliminating "Hotspots" in Digital Image Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salomon, P. M.

    1984-01-01

    Signals from defective picture elements rejected. Image processing program for use with charge-coupled device (CCD) or other mosaic imager augmented with algorithm that compensates for common type of electronic defect. Algorithm prevents false interpretation of "hotspots". Used for robotics, image enhancement, image analysis and digital television.

  19. Digital signal and image processing in echocardiography. The American Society of Echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Skorton, D J; Collins, S M; Garcia, E; Geiser, E A; Hillard, W; Koppes, W; Linker, D; Schwartz, G

    1985-12-01

    Digital signal and image processing techniques are acquiring an increasingly important role in the generation and analysis of cardiac images. This is particularly true of 2D echocardiography, in which image acquisition, manipulation, and storage within the echocardiograph, as well as quantitative analysis of echocardiographic data by means of "off-line" systems, depend upon digital techniques. The increasing role of computers in echocardiography makes it essential that echocardiographers and technologists understand the basic principles of digital techniques applied to echocardiographic instrumentation and data analysis. In this article, we have discussed digital techniques as applied to image generation (digital scan conversion, preprocessing, and postprocessing) as well as to the analysis of image data (computer-assisted border detection, 3D reconstruction, tissue characterization, and contrast echocardiography); a general introduction to off-line analysis systems was also given. Experience with other cardiac imaging methods indicates that digital techniques will likely play a dominant role in the future of echocardiographic imaging.

  20. Coastal Digital Surface Model on Low Contrast Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosu, A.-M.; Assenbaum, M.; De la Torre, Y.; Pierrot-Deseilligny, M.

    2015-08-01

    Coastal sandy environments are extremely dynamic and require regular monitoring that can easily be achieved by using an unmanned aerial system (UAS) including a drone and a photo camera. The acquired images have low contrast and homogeneous texture. Using these images and with very few, if any, ground control points (GCPs), it is difficult to obtain a digital surface model (DSM) by classical correlation and automatic interest points determination approach. A possible response to this problem is to work with enhanced, contrast filtered images. To achieve this, we use and tune the free open-source software MicMac.

  1. Digital image registration method based upon binary boundary maps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jayroe, R. R., Jr.; Andrus, J. F.; Campbell, C. W.

    1974-01-01

    A relatively fast method is presented for matching or registering the digital data of imagery from the same ground scene acquired at different times, or from different multispectral images, sensors, or both. It is assumed that the digital images can be registed by using translations and rotations only, that the images are of the same scale, and that little or no distortion exists between images. It is further assumed that by working with several local areas of the image, the rotational effects in the local areas can be neglected. Thus, by treating the misalignments of local areas as translations, it is possible to determine rotational and translational misalignments for a larger portion of the image containing the local areas. This procedure of determining the misalignment and then registering the data according to the misalignment can be repeated until the desired degree of registration is achieved. The method to be presented is based upon the use of binary boundary maps produced from the raw digital imagery rather than the raw digital data.

  2. Parallel Analog-to-Digital Image Processor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lokerson, D. C.

    1987-01-01

    Proposed integrated-circuit network of many identical units convert analog outputs of imaging arrays of x-ray or infrared detectors to digital outputs. Converter located near imaging detectors, within cryogenic detector package. Because converter output digital, lends itself well to multiplexing and to postprocessing for correction of gain and offset errors peculiar to each picture element and its sampling and conversion circuits. Analog-to-digital image processor is massively parallel system for processing data from array of photodetectors. System built as compact integrated circuit located near local plane. Buffer amplifier for each picture element has different offset.

  3. Materials characterization through quantitative digital image analysis

    SciTech Connect

    J. Philliber; B. Antoun; B. Somerday; N. Yang

    2000-07-01

    A digital image analysis system has been developed to allow advanced quantitative measurement of microstructural features. This capability is maintained as part of the microscopy facility at Sandia, Livermore. The system records images digitally, eliminating the use of film. Images obtained from other sources may also be imported into the system. Subsequent digital image processing enhances image appearance through the contrast and brightness adjustments. The system measures a variety of user-defined microstructural features--including area fraction, particle size and spatial distributions, grain sizes and orientations of elongated particles. These measurements are made in a semi-automatic mode through the use of macro programs and a computer controlled translation stage. A routine has been developed to create large montages of 50+ separate images. Individual image frames are matched to the nearest pixel to create seamless montages. Results from three different studies are presented to illustrate the capabilities of the system.

  4. Digital imaging technology assessment: Digital document storage project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    An ongoing technical assessment and requirements definition project is examining the potential role of digital imaging technology at NASA's STI facility. The focus is on the basic components of imaging technology in today's marketplace as well as the components anticipated in the near future. Presented is a requirement specification for a prototype project, an initial examination of current image processing at the STI facility, and an initial summary of image processing projects at other sites. Operational imaging systems incorporate scanners, optical storage, high resolution monitors, processing nodes, magnetic storage, jukeboxes, specialized boards, optical character recognition gear, pixel addressable printers, communications, and complex software processes.

  5. Digital Imaging and Conservation: Model Guidelines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dean, John F.

    2003-01-01

    Examines the intersection of conservation and digital imaging based on guidelines at the Cornell University (Ithaca, NY) library. Discusses the digitization of artifacts; assessing the condition prior to scanning; scanning considerations, including temperature and humidity, lighting, and security; stable storage of artifacts after scanning; and…

  6. Development of standard digital images for pneumoconiosis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Won-Jeong; Choi, Byung-Soon; Kim, Sung Jin; Park, Choong-Ki; Park, Jai-Soung; Tae, Seok; Hering, Kurt Georg

    2011-11-01

    We developed the standard digital images (SDIs) to be used in the classification and recognition of pneumoconiosis. From July 3, 2006 through August 31, 2007, 531 retired male workers exposed to inorganic dust were examined by digital (DR) and analog radiography (AR) on the same day, after being approved by our institutional review board and obtaining informed consent from all participants. All images were twice classified according to the International Labour Office (ILO) 2000 guidelines with reference to ILO standard analog radiographs (SARs) by four chest radiologists. After consensus reading on 349 digital images matched with the first selected analog images, 120 digital images were selected as the SDIs that considered the distribution of pneumoconiosis findings. Images with profusion category 0/1, 1, 2, and 3 were 12, 50, 40, and 15, respectively, and a large opacity were in 43 images (A = 20, B = 22, C = 1). Among pleural abnormality, costophrenic angle obliteration, pleural plaque and thickening were in 11 (9.2%), 31 (25.8%), and 9 (7.5%) images, respectively. Twenty-one of 29 symbols were present except cp, ef, ho, id, me, pa, ra, and rp. A set of 120 SDIs had more various pneumoconiosis findings than ILO SARs that were developed from adequate methods. It can be used as digital reference images for the recognition and classification of pneumoconiosis.

  7. High-description image acquisition for digital archiving of rare books

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashimura, Masaaki; Nakajima, Toshifumi; Maeda, Taizo; Onda, Norikazu; Saito, Hideo; Ozawa, Shinji

    1998-12-01

    At first in this paper, we given an outline of activity of the Humanities Media Interface (HUMI) Project. This project was established by Keio University for the purpose of digital archiving of rare books held in Keio University Library, and of realizing a research oriented digital library. Then our way of acquiring rare book images of super high definition is introduced and image compensation method for acquiring just- front view of page using the 3-D information extracted from the shape of top line of the page area depicted in the image is proposed. Our approach of acquiring higher resolution image by joining close-up partial images of a page is also introduced. The proposing image adjustment method is extended for partial images of a page as preprocess of joining them together. In the experiment, well-adjusted and joined page images could be obtained.

  8. Quality assessment of digital X-ray chest images using an anthropomorphic chest phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vodovatov, A. V.; Kamishanskaya, I. G.; Drozdov, A. A.; Bernhardsson, C.

    2017-02-01

    The current study is focused on determining the optimal tube voltage for the conventional X-ray digital chest screening examinations, using a visual grading analysis method. Chest images of an anthropomorphic phantom were acquired in posterior-anterior projection on four digital X-ray units with different detector types. X-ray images obtained with an anthropomorphic phantom were accepted by the radiologists as corresponding to a normal human anatomy, hence allowing using phantoms in image quality trials without limitations.

  9. Digital Image Analysis for DETCHIP® Code Determination

    PubMed Central

    Lyon, Marcus; Wilson, Mark V.; Rouhier, Kerry A.; Symonsbergen, David J.; Bastola, Kiran; Thapa, Ishwor; Holmes, Andrea E.

    2013-01-01

    DETECHIP® is a molecular sensing array used for identification of a large variety of substances. Previous methodology for the analysis of DETECHIP® used human vision to distinguish color changes induced by the presence of the analyte of interest. This paper describes several analysis techniques using digital images of DETECHIP®. Both a digital camera and flatbed desktop photo scanner were used to obtain Jpeg images. Color information within these digital images was obtained through the measurement of red-green-blue (RGB) values using software such as GIMP, Photoshop and ImageJ. Several different techniques were used to evaluate these color changes. It was determined that the flatbed scanner produced in the clearest and more reproducible images. Furthermore, codes obtained using a macro written for use within ImageJ showed improved consistency versus pervious methods. PMID:25267940

  10. Kinematic analysis of human walking gait using digital image processing.

    PubMed

    O'Malley, M; de Paor, D L

    1993-07-01

    A system using digital image processing techniques for kinematic analysis of human gait has been developed. The system is cheap, easy to use, automated and provides useful detailed quantitative information to the medical profession. Passive markers comprising black annuli on white card are placed on the anatomical landmarks of the subject. Digital images at the standard television rate of 25 per second are acquired of the subject walking past a white background. The images are obtained, stored and processed using standard commercially available hardware, i.e. video camera, video recorder, digital framestore and an IBM PC. Using a single-threshold grey level, all the images are thresholded to produce binary images. An automatic routine then uses a set of pattern recognition algorithms to locate accurately and consistently the markers in each image. The positions of the markers are analysed to determine to which anatomical landmark they correspond, and thus a stick diagram for each image is obtained. There is also a facility where the positions of the markers may be entered manually and errors corrected. The results may be presented in a variety of ways: stick diagram animation, sagittal displacement graphs, flexion diagrams and gait parameters.

  11. Digital hardware and computer system for a digital image recorder.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennison, E. W.

    1973-01-01

    Description of the digital memory and related computer system used at the Palomar Mountain Observatory. The memory was designed to have a large number of pixels, a high capacity for each pixel, and fast access for use with a variety of image sensors. As an image integration and storage device, this memory is shown to possess ideal properties, namely, it is strictly linear, has a wide dynamic range, and the image does not deteriorate with time. The observer has a visual display which enables him to monitor the image as it is being integrated.-

  12. Digital image centering. II. [for astronomical photography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Auer, L. H.; Van Altena, W. F.

    1978-01-01

    Digital image centering algorithms were compared in a test involving microdensitometer raster scans of a refractor parallax series consisting of 22 stars on 26 plates. The highest accuracy in determining stellar image positions was provided by an algorithm which involved fitting of a symmetric Gaussian curve and a flat background to the image marginal density distributions. Algorithms involving transmission marginals instead of density marginals were found to be less accurate. The repeatability and computational efficiency of the digital image centering technique were also studied.

  13. Comparison of rotation algorithms for digital images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starovoitov, Valery V.; Samal, Dmitry

    1999-09-01

    The paper presents a comparative study of several algorithms developed for digital image rotation. No losing generality we studied gray scale images. We have tested methods preserving gray values of the original images, performing some interpolation and two procedures implemented into the Corel Photo-paint and Adobe Photoshop soft packages. By the similar way methods for rotation of color images may be evaluated also.

  14. Image microarrays (IMA): Digital pathology's missing tool

    PubMed Central

    Hipp, Jason; Cheng, Jerome; Pantanowitz, Liron; Hewitt, Stephen; Yagi, Yukako; Monaco, James; Madabhushi, Anant; Rodriguez-canales, Jaime; Hanson, Jeffrey; Roy-Chowdhuri, Sinchita; Filie, Armando C.; Feldman, Michael D.; Tomaszewski, John E.; Shih, Natalie NC.; Brodsky, Victor; Giaccone, Giuseppe; Emmert-Buck, Michael R.; Balis, Ulysses J.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: The increasing availability of whole slide imaging (WSI) data sets (digital slides) from glass slides offers new opportunities for the development of computer-aided diagnostic (CAD) algorithms. With the all-digital pathology workflow that these data sets will enable in the near future, literally millions of digital slides will be generated and stored. Consequently, the field in general and pathologists, specifically, will need tools to help extract actionable information from this new and vast collective repository. Methods: To address this limitation, we designed and implemented a tool (dCORE) to enable the systematic capture of image tiles with constrained size and resolution that contain desired histopathologic features. Results: In this communication, we describe a user-friendly tool that will enable pathologists to mine digital slides archives to create image microarrays (IMAs). IMAs are to digital slides as tissue microarrays (TMAs) are to cell blocks. Thus, a single digital slide could be transformed into an array of hundreds to thousands of high quality digital images, with each containing key diagnostic morphologies and appropriate controls. Current manual digital image cut-and-paste methods that allow for the creation of a grid of images (such as an IMA) of matching resolutions are tedious. Conclusion: The ability to create IMAs representing hundreds to thousands of vetted morphologic features has numerous applications in education, proficiency testing, consensus case review, and research. Lastly, in a manner analogous to the way conventional TMA technology has significantly accelerated in situ studies of tissue specimens use of IMAs has similar potential to significantly accelerate CAD algorithm development. PMID:22200030

  15. Role of Radiologic Imaging in Genetic and Acquired Neuromuscular Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Zanato, Riccardo; Coran, Alessandro; Beltrame, Valeria; Stramare, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Great technologic and clinical progress have been made in the last two decades in identifying genetic defects of several neuromuscular diseases, as Spinal Muscular Atrophy, genetic muscular dystrophies and other genetic myopathies. The diagnosis is usually challenging, due to great variability in genetic abnormalities and clinical phenotypes and the poor specificity of complementary analyses, i.e., serum creatine kinase (CK) and electrophysiology. Muscle biopsy represents the gold standard for the diagnosis of genetic neuromuscular diseases, but clinical imaging of muscle tissue is an important diagnostic tool to identify and quantifyies muscle damage. Radiologic imaging is, indeed, increasingly used as a diagnostic tool to describe patterns and the extent of muscle involvement, thanks to modern techniques that enable to definethe definition of degrees of muscle atrophy and changes in connective tissue. They usually grade the severity of the disease process with greater accuracy than clinical scores. Clinical imaging is more than complementary to perform muscle biopsy, especially as ultrasound scans are often mandatory to identify the muscle to be biopsied. We will here detail and provideWe will herein provide detailed examples of the radiologic methods that can be used in genetic and acquired neuromuscular disorders, stressing pros and cons. Key Words: Muscle Imaging, MRI, CT, genetic muscle disorders, myopathies, dystrophies PMID:26913153

  16. Image display device in digital TV

    DOEpatents

    Choi, Seung Jong

    2006-07-18

    Disclosed is an image display device in a digital TV that is capable of carrying out the conversion into various kinds of resolution by using single bit map data in the digital TV. The image display device includes: a data processing part for executing bit map conversion, compression, restoration and format-conversion for text data; a memory for storing the bit map data obtained according to the bit map conversion and compression in the data processing part and image data inputted from an arbitrary receiving part, the receiving part receiving one of digital image data and analog image data; an image outputting part for reading the image data from the memory; and a display processing part for mixing the image data read from the image outputting part and the bit map data converted in format from the a data processing part. Therefore, the image display device according to the present invention can convert text data in such a manner as to correspond with various resolution, carry out the compression for bit map data, thereby reducing the memory space, and support text data of an HTML format, thereby providing the image with the text data of various shapes.

  17. Digital Image Processing in Private Industry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Connie

    1986-01-01

    Examines various types of private industry optical disk installations in terms of business requirements for digital image systems in five areas: records management; transaction processing; engineering/manufacturing; information distribution; and office automation. Approaches for implementing image systems are addressed as well as key success…

  18. Photography/Digital Imaging: Parallel & Paradoxical Histories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Witte, Mary Stieglitz

    With the introduction of photography and photomechanical printing processes in the 19th century, the first age of machine pictures and reproductions emerged. The 20th century introduced computer image processing systems, creating a digital imaging revolution. Rather than concentrating on the adversarial aspects of the computer's influence on…

  19. Digital image registration by correlation techniques.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Popp, D. J.; Mccormack, D. S.; Lee, G. M.

    1972-01-01

    This study considers the translation problem associated with digital image registration and develops a means for comparing commonly used correlation techniques. Using suitably defined constraints, an optimum and four suboptimum registration techniques are defined and evaluated. A computational comparison is made and Gaussian image statistics are used to compare the selected techniques in terms of radial position location error.

  20. Effect of image quality on calcification detection in digital mammography

    PubMed Central

    Warren, Lucy M.; Mackenzie, Alistair; Cooke, Julie; Given-Wilson, Rosalind M.; Wallis, Matthew G.; Chakraborty, Dev P.; Dance, David R.; Bosmans, Hilde; Young, Kenneth C.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to investigate if microcalcification detection varies significantly when mammographic images are acquired using different image qualities, including: different detectors, dose levels, and different image processing algorithms. An additional aim was to determine how the standard European method of measuring image quality using threshold gold thickness measured with a CDMAM phantom and the associated limits in current EU guidelines relate to calcification detection. Methods: One hundred and sixty two normal breast images were acquired on an amorphous selenium direct digital (DR) system. Microcalcification clusters extracted from magnified images of slices of mastectomies were electronically inserted into half of the images. The calcification clusters had a subtle appearance. All images were adjusted using a validated mathematical method to simulate the appearance of images from a computed radiography (CR) imaging system at the same dose, from both systems at half this dose, and from the DR system at quarter this dose. The original 162 images were processed with both Hologic and Agfa (Musica-2) image processing. All other image qualities were processed with Agfa (Musica-2) image processing only. Seven experienced observers marked and rated any identified suspicious regions. Free response operating characteristic (FROC) and ROC analyses were performed on the data. The lesion sensitivity at a nonlesion localization fraction (NLF) of 0.1 was also calculated. Images of the CDMAM mammographic test phantom were acquired using the automatic setting on the DR system. These images were modified to the additional image qualities used in the observer study. The images were analyzed using automated software. In order to assess the relationship between threshold gold thickness and calcification detection a power law was fitted to the data. Results: There was a significant reduction in calcification detection using CR compared with DR: the alternative FROC

  1. Effect of image quality on calcification detection in digital mammography

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, Lucy M.; Mackenzie, Alistair; Cooke, Julie; Given-Wilson, Rosalind M.; Wallis, Matthew G.; Chakraborty, Dev P.; Dance, David R.; Bosmans, Hilde; Young, Kenneth C.

    2012-06-15

    Purpose: This study aims to investigate if microcalcification detection varies significantly when mammographic images are acquired using different image qualities, including: different detectors, dose levels, and different image processing algorithms. An additional aim was to determine how the standard European method of measuring image quality using threshold gold thickness measured with a CDMAM phantom and the associated limits in current EU guidelines relate to calcification detection. Methods: One hundred and sixty two normal breast images were acquired on an amorphous selenium direct digital (DR) system. Microcalcification clusters extracted from magnified images of slices of mastectomies were electronically inserted into half of the images. The calcification clusters had a subtle appearance. All images were adjusted using a validated mathematical method to simulate the appearance of images from a computed radiography (CR) imaging system at the same dose, from both systems at half this dose, and from the DR system at quarter this dose. The original 162 images were processed with both Hologic and Agfa (Musica-2) image processing. All other image qualities were processed with Agfa (Musica-2) image processing only. Seven experienced observers marked and rated any identified suspicious regions. Free response operating characteristic (FROC) and ROC analyses were performed on the data. The lesion sensitivity at a nonlesion localization fraction (NLF) of 0.1 was also calculated. Images of the CDMAM mammographic test phantom were acquired using the automatic setting on the DR system. These images were modified to the additional image qualities used in the observer study. The images were analyzed using automated software. In order to assess the relationship between threshold gold thickness and calcification detection a power law was fitted to the data. Results: There was a significant reduction in calcification detection using CR compared with DR: the alternative FROC

  2. FBI compression standard for digitized fingerprint images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brislawn, Christopher M.; Bradley, Jonathan N.; Onyshczak, Remigius J.; Hopper, Thomas

    1996-11-01

    The FBI has formulated national standards for digitization and compression of gray-scale fingerprint images. The compression algorithm for the digitized images is based on adaptive uniform scalar quantization of a discrete wavelet transform subband decomposition, a technique referred to as the wavelet/scalar quantization method. The algorithm produces archival-quality images at compression ratios of around 15 to 1 and will allow the current database of paper fingerprint cards to be replaced by digital imagery. A compliance testing program is also being implemented to ensure high standards of image quality and interchangeability of data between different implementations. We will review the current status of the FBI standard, including the compliance testing process and the details of the first-generation encoder.

  3. CT Image Processing Using Public Digital Networks

    PubMed Central

    Rhodes, Michael L.; Azzawi, Yu-Ming; Quinn, John F.; Glenn, William V.; Rothman, Stephen L.G.

    1984-01-01

    Nationwide commercial computer communication is now commonplace for those applications where digital dialogues are generally short and widely distributed, and where bandwidth does not exceed that of dial-up telephone lines. Image processing using such networks is prohibitive because of the large volume of data inherent to digital pictures. With a blend of increasing bandwidth and distributed processing, network image processing becomes possible. This paper examines characteristics of a digital image processing service for a nationwide network of CT scanner installations. Issues of image transmission, data compression, distributed processing, software maintenance, and interfacility communication are also discussed. Included are results that show the volume and type of processing experienced by a network of over 50 CT scanners for the last 32 months.

  4. Method of improving a digital image

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rahman, Zia-ur (Inventor); Jobson, Daniel J. (Inventor); Woodell, Glenn A. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A method of improving a digital image is provided. The image is initially represented by digital data indexed to represent positions on a display. The digital data is indicative of an intensity value I.sub.i (x,y) for each position (x,y) in each i-th spectral band. The intensity value for each position in each i-th spectral band is adjusted to generate an adjusted intensity value for each position in each i-th spectral band in accordance with ##EQU1## where S is the number of unique spectral bands included in said digital data, W.sub.n is a weighting factor and * denotes the convolution operator. Each surround function F.sub.n (x,y) is uniquely scaled to improve an aspect of the digital image, e.g., dynamic range compression, color constancy, and lightness rendition. The adjusted intensity value for each position in each i-th spectral band is filtered with a common function and then presented to a display device. For color images, a novel color restoration step is added to give the image true-to-life color that closely matches human observation.

  5. RF Device for Acquiring Images of the Human Body

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaier, Todd C.; McGrath, William R.

    2010-01-01

    A safe, non-invasive method for forming images through clothing of large groups of people, in order to search for concealed weapons either made of metal or not, has been developed. A millimeter wavelength scanner designed in a unique, ring-shaped configuration can obtain a full 360 image of the body with a resolution of less than a millimeter in only a few seconds. Millimeter waves readily penetrate normal clothing, but are highly reflected by the human body and concealed objects. Millimeter wave signals are nonionizing and are harmless to human tissues when used at low power levels. The imager (see figure) consists of a thin base that supports a small-diameter vertical post about 7 ft (=2.13 m) tall. Attached to the post is a square-shaped ring 2 in. (=5 cm) wide and 3 ft (=91 cm) on a side. The ring is oriented horizontally, and is supported halfway along one side by a connection to a linear bearing on the vertical post. A planar RF circuit board is mounted to the inside of each side of the ring. Each circuit board contains an array of 30 receivers, one transmitter, and digitization electronics. Each array element has a printed-circuit patch antenna coupled to a pair of mixers by a 90 coupler. The mixers receive a reference local oscillator signal to a subharmonic of the transmitter frequency. A single local oscillator line feeds all 30 receivers on the board. The resulting MHz IF signals are amplified and carried to the edge of the board where they are demodulated and digitized. The transmitted signal is derived from the local oscillator at a frequency offset determined by a crystal oscillator. One antenna centrally located on each side of the square ring provides the source illumination power. The total transmitted power is less than 100 mW, resulting in an exposure level that is completely safe to humans. The output signals from all four circuit boards are fed via serial connection to a data processing computer. The computer processes the approximately 1-MB

  6. Digital image processing of vascular angiograms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Selzer, R. H.; Beckenbach, E. S.; Blankenhorn, D. H.; Crawford, D. W.; Brooks, S. H.

    1975-01-01

    The paper discusses the estimation of the degree of atherosclerosis in the human femoral artery through the use of a digital image processing system for vascular angiograms. The film digitizer uses an electronic image dissector camera to scan the angiogram and convert the recorded optical density information into a numerical format. Another processing step involves locating the vessel edges from the digital image. The computer has been programmed to estimate vessel abnormality through a series of measurements, some derived primarily from the vessel edge information and others from optical density variations within the lumen shadow. These measurements are combined into an atherosclerosis index, which is found in a post-mortem study to correlate well with both visual and chemical estimates of atherosclerotic disease.

  7. Three Basic Steps for Applying Digital Images 
to Oral and Facial Surgery.

    PubMed

    Zawartka, Michelle; Wang, Jing; Zheng, Bin

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, the authors discuss three basic steps related to the application of digital technology to reconstructive oral and maxillofacial surgery (OMFS), in an effort to improve surgical outcomes. These steps include acquiring digital images, processing images in order to build three-dimentional structures, and mapping images to patient anatomy for guided surgery. For each step mentionioned, available technologies and barriers that need to be overcome are discussed. Digital technology is still under development and it has begun to merge into surgical care. Surgeons and computer scientists are required to work together to find solutions when facing such challenges.

  8. Myeloma-associated systemic amyloidosis presenting with acquired digital cutis laxa-like changes.

    PubMed

    Dicker, Tony J; Morton, James; Williamson, Richard M; Chick, Jeff

    2002-05-01

    A 59-year-old woman presented with a 6-year history of lax skin on the distal fingers of both hands, as well as a recent increase in the size of her tongue. Histopathology of skin from her distal finger showed amyloid deposition and bone marrow biopsy revealed an underlying plasma cell dyscrasia. Initial treatment with cyclophosphamide, vincristine, adriamycin and methylprednisolone has produced a significant reduction in the swelling of both her hands and tongue. Acquired digital cutis laxa-like changes are a rare cutaneous manifestation of systemic amyloidosis.

  9. Using Digital Imaging in Classroom and Outdoor Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomasson, Joseph R.

    2002-01-01

    Explains how to use digital cameras and related basic equipment during indoor and outdoor activities. Uses digital imaging in general botany class to identify unknown fungus samples. Explains how to select a digital camera and other necessary equipment. (YDS)

  10. Image processing of digital chest ionograms.

    PubMed

    Yarwood, J R; Moores, B M

    1988-10-01

    A number of image-processing techniques have been applied to a digital ionographic chest image in order to evaluate their possible effects on this type of image. In order to quantify any effect, a simulated lesion was superimposed on the image at a variety of locations representing different types of structural detail. Visualization of these lesions was evaluated by a number of observers both pre- and post-processing operations. The operations employed included grey-scale transformations, histogram operations, edge-enhancement and smoothing functions. The resulting effects of these operations on the visualization of the simulated lesions are discussed.

  11. Fundamental Concepts of Digital Image Processing

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Twogood, R. E.

    1983-03-01

    The field of a digital-image processing has experienced dramatic growth and increasingly widespread applicability in recent years. Fortunately, advances in computer technology have kept pace with the rapid growth in volume of image data in these and other applications. Digital image processing has become economical in many fields of research and in industrial and military applications. While each application has requirements unique from the others, all are concerned with faster, cheaper, more accurate, and more extensive computation. The trend is toward real-time and interactive operations, where the user of the system obtains preliminary results within a short enough time that the next decision can be made by the human processor without loss of concentration on the task at hand. An example of this is the obtaining of two-dimensional (2-D) computer-aided tomography (CAT) images. A medical decision might be made while the patient is still under observation rather than days later.

  12. Fourier-domain digital holographic optical coherence imaging of living tissue.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Kwan; Turek, John J; Nolte, David D

    2007-08-01

    Digital holographic optical coherence imaging is a full-frame coherence-gated imaging approach that uses a CCD camera to record and reconstruct digital holograms from living tissue. Recording digital holograms at the optical Fourier plane has advantages for diffuse targets compared with Fresnel off-axis digital holography. A digital hologram captured at the Fourier plane requires only a 2D fast Fourier transform for numerical reconstruction. We have applied this technique for the depth-resolved imaging of rat osteogenic tumor multicellular spheroids and acquired cross-section images of the anterior segment and the retinal region of a mouse eye. A penetration depth of 1.4 mm for the tumor spheroids was achieved.

  13. A LANDSAT digital image rectification system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanwie, P.; Stein, M.

    1976-01-01

    DIRS is a digital image rectification system for the geometric correction of LANDSAT multispectral scanner digital image data. DIRS removes spatial distortions from the data and brings it into conformance with the Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) map projection. Scene data in the form of landmarks are used to drive the geometric correction algorithms. Two dimensional least squares polynominal and spacecraft attitude modeling techniques for geometric mapping are provided. Entire scenes or selected quadrilaterals may be rectified. Resampling through nearest neighbor or cubic convolution at user designated intervals is available. The output products are in the form of digital tape in band interleaved, single band or CCT format in a rotated UTM projection. The system was designed and implemented on large scale IBM 360 computers.

  14. Digital enhancement of flow field images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kudlinski, Robert A.; Park, Stephen K.

    1988-01-01

    Most photographs of experimentally generated fluid flow fields have inherently poor photographic quality, specifically low contrast. Thus, there is a need to establish a process for quickly and accurately enhancing these photographs to provide improved versions for physical interpretation, analysis, and publication. A sequence of digital image processing techniques which have been demonstrated to effectively enhance such photographs is described.

  15. Image Quality in Analog and Digital Microtechniques.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, William

    1991-01-01

    Discusses the basic principles of the application of microfilm (analog) and electronic (digital) technologies for data storage. Image quality is examined, searching and retrieval capabilities are considered, and hardcopy output resolution is described. It is concluded that microfilm is still the preferred archival medium. (5 references) (LRW)

  16. Measuring the Environment through Digital Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pickle, J.; Schloss, A. L.

    2009-12-01

    A network of sites for citizen scientists to take a consistent time sequence of digital photographs of the landscape and an Internet site (http://picturepost.unh.edu/) that efficiently stores and distributes the digital images creates a low-cost and sustainable resource for scientific environmental monitoring and formal and informal science education. Digital photographs taken from the same location and positioned in the same direction and orientation allow scientists to monitor a variety of environmental parameters, including plant health, growth, and phenology; erosion and deposition; water levels; and cloud and canopy cover. The PicturePost platform is simply an octagon placed in the center of a flat surface and secured to a post anchored in the ground or onto a building. The edges of the octagon allow positioning of the camera so the complete landscape may be photographed in less than a minute. A NASA-funded project, Digital Earth Watch (aka Measuring Vegetation Health, (http://mvh.sr.unh.edu) provides educational activities and background materials that help people learn about plants as environmental “green canaries” and about the basics of cameras and digital images. The website also provides free software to analyze digital images. Although this project has been in development for four years, it is only beginning to find partners in which the data support multiple efforts. A large part of this integration is a result of recent NASA funding, which has allowed a new website to be developed to archive and display the images. The developing collaborations and the development of the new website at the same time enhanced both efforts. Because the website could include tools/features that appealed to the collaborating groups, all participants contributed ideas facing fewer restrictions. PicturePost made from recycled plastic lumber.

  17. Applications and challenges of digital pathology and whole slide imaging.

    PubMed

    Higgins, C

    2015-07-01

    Virtual microscopy is a method for digitizing images of tissue on glass slides and using a computer to view, navigate, change magnification, focus and mark areas of interest. Virtual microscope systems (also called digital pathology or whole slide imaging systems) offer several advantages for biological scientists who use slides as part of their general, pharmaceutical, biotechnology or clinical research. The systems usually are based on one of two methodologies: area scanning or line scanning. Virtual microscope systems enable automatic sample detection, virtual-Z acquisition and creation of focal maps. Virtual slides are layered with multiple resolutions at each location, including the highest resolution needed to allow more detailed review of specific regions of interest. Scans may be acquired at 2, 10, 20, 40, 60 and 100 × or a combination of magnifications to highlight important detail. Digital microscopy starts when a slide collection is put into an automated or manual scanning system. The original slides are archived, then a server allows users to review multilayer digital images of the captured slides either by a closed network or by the internet. One challenge for adopting the technology is the lack of a universally accepted file format for virtual slides. Additional challenges include maintaining focus in an uneven sample, detecting specimens accurately, maximizing color fidelity with optimal brightness and contrast, optimizing resolution and keeping the images artifact-free. There are several manufacturers in the field and each has not only its own approach to these issues, but also its own image analysis software, which provides many options for users to enhance the speed, quality and accuracy of their process through virtual microscopy. Virtual microscope systems are widely used and are trusted to provide high quality solutions for teleconsultation, education, quality control, archiving, veterinary medicine, research and other fields.

  18. Digital image comparison using feature extraction and luminance matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachnak, Ray A.; Steidley, Carl W.; Funtanilla, Jeng

    2005-03-01

    This paper presents the results of comparing two digital images acquired using two different light sources. One of the sources is a 50-W metal halide lamp located in the compartment of an industrial borescope and the other is a 1 W LED placed at the tip of the insertion tube of the borescope. The two images are compared quantitatively and qualitatively using feature extraction and luminance matching approaches. Quantitative methods included the images' histograms, intensity profiles along a line segment, edges, and luminance measurement. Qualitative methods included image registration and linear conformal transformation with eight control points. This transformation is useful when shapes in the input image are unchanged, but the image is distorted by some combination of translation, rotation, and scaling. The gray-level histogram, edge detection, image profile and image registration do not offer conclusive results. The LED light source, however, produces good images for visual inspection by the operator. The paper presents the results and discusses the usefulness and shortcomings of various comparison methods.

  19. The impact of digital imaging in the field of cytopathology

    PubMed Central

    Hornish, Maryanne; Goulart, Robert A.

    2009-01-01

    With the introduction of digital imaging, pathology is undergoing a digital transformation. In the field of cytology, digital images are being used for telecytology, automated screening of Pap test slides, training and education (e.g. online digital atlases), and proficiency testing. To date, there has been no systematic review on the impact of digital imaging on the practice of cytopathology. This article critically addresses the emerging role of computer-assisted screening and the application of digital imaging to the field of cytology, including telecytology, virtual microscopy, and the impact of online cytology resources. The role of novel diagnostic techniques like image cytometry is also reviewed. PMID:19495408

  20. Digital restoration of multichannel images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galatsanos, Nikolas P.; Chin, Roland T.

    1989-01-01

    The Wiener solution of a multichannel restoration scheme is presented. Using matrix diagonalization and block-Toeplitz to block-circulant approximation, the inversion of the multichannel, linear space-invariant imaging system becomes feasible by utilizing a fast iterative matrix inversion procedure. The restoration uses both the within-channel (spatial) and between-channel (spectral) correlation; hence, the restored result is a better estimate than that produced by independent channel restoration. Simulations are also presented.

  1. Digital image watermarking using visual models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podilchuk, Christine I.; Zeng, Wenjun

    1997-06-01

    The huge success of the Internet permits the transmission and wide distribution and access of electronic data in an effortless manner. Content providers are faced with the challenge of how to protect their electronic data. This problem has generated a flurry of recent research activity in the area of digital watermarking of electronic content for copyright protection. Unlike the traditional visible watermark found on paper, the challenge here is to introduce a digital watermark that does not alter the perceived quality of the electronic content while being extremely robust to attack. For instance, in the case of image data, editing the picture or illegal tampering should not destroy or alter the watermark. Equally important, the watermark should not alter the perceived visual quality of the image. From a signal processing viewpoint, the two basic requirements for an effective watermarking scheme, robustness and transparency, conflict with each other. We propose a watermarking technique for digital images that is based on utilizing visual models which have been developed in the context of image compression. Specifically, we propose a watermarking scheme where visual models are used to determine image dependent modulation masks for watermark insertion. In other words, for each image we can determine the maximum amount of watermark signal that each portion of the image can tolerate without affecting the visual quality of the image. This allow us to provide the maximum strength watermark which in turn, is extremely robust to common image processing and editing such as JPEG compression, rescaling, and cropping. We have watermarking results in a DCT framework as well as a wavelet framework. The DCT framework allows the direct insertion of watermarks to JPEG -- compressed data whereas the wavelet based scheme provides a framework where we can take advantage of both a local and global approach. Our scheme is shown to provide dramatic improvement over the current state

  2. Camouflaging in Digital Image for Secure Communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jindal, B.; Singh, A. P.

    2013-06-01

    The present paper reports on a new type of camouflaging in digital image for hiding crypto-data using moderate bit alteration in the pixel. In the proposed method, cryptography is combined with steganography to provide a two layer security to the hidden data. The novelty of the algorithm proposed in the present work lies in the fact that the information about hidden bit is reflected by parity condition in one part of the image pixel. The remaining part of the image pixel is used to perform local pixel adjustment to improve the visual perception of the cover image. In order to examine the effectiveness of the proposed method, image quality measuring parameters are computed. In addition to this, security analysis is also carried by comparing the histograms of cover and stego images. This scheme provides a higher security as well as robustness to intentional as well as unintentional attacks.

  3. Digital image correlation through a rigid borescope.

    SciTech Connect

    Reu, Phillip L.

    2010-10-01

    There occasionally occur situations in field measurements where direct optical access to the area of interest is not possible. In these cases the borescope is the standard method of imaging. Furthermore, if shape, displacement, or strain are desired in these hidden locations, it would be advantageous to be able to do digital image correlation (DIC) through the borescope. This paper will present the added complexities and errors associated with imaging through a borescope for DIC. Discussion of non-radial distortions and their effects on the measurements, along with a possible correction scheme will be discussed.

  4. Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onken, Michael; Eichelberg, Marco; Riesmeier, Jörg; Jensch, Peter

    Over the past 15 years Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) has established itself as the international standard for medical image communication. Most medical imaging equipment uses DICOM network and media services to export image data, thus making this standard highly relevant for medical image processing. The first section of this chapter provides a basic introduction into DICOM with its more than 3,600 pages of technical documentation, followed by a section covering selected advanced topics of special interest for medical image processing. The introductory text familiarizes the reader with the standard's main concepts such as information objects and DICOM media and network services. The rendering pipeline for image display and the concept of DICOM conformance are also discussed. Specialized DICOM services such as advanced image display services that provide means for storing how an image was viewed ("Softcopy Presentation States") and how multiple images should be aligned on an output device ("Structured Display" and "Hanging Protocols") are described. We further describe DICOM's sophisticated approach ("Structured Reporting") for storing structured documents such as CAD information, which is then covered in more detail. Finally, the last section provides an insight into a newly developed DICOM service called "Application Hosting", which introduces a standardized plug-in architecture for image processing, thus permitting users to utilize cross-vendor image processing plug-ins in DICOM applications.

  5. Evaluation of clinical image processing algorithms used in digital mammography.

    PubMed

    Zanca, Federica; Jacobs, Jurgen; Van Ongeval, Chantal; Claus, Filip; Celis, Valerie; Geniets, Catherine; Provost, Veerle; Pauwels, Herman; Marchal, Guy; Bosmans, Hilde

    2009-03-01

    Screening is the only proven approach to reduce the mortality of breast cancer, but significant numbers of breast cancers remain undetected even when all quality assurance guidelines are implemented. With the increasing adoption of digital mammography systems, image processing may be a key factor in the imaging chain. Although to our knowledge statistically significant effects of manufacturer-recommended image processings have not been previously demonstrated, the subjective experience of our radiologists, that the apparent image quality can vary considerably between different algorithms, motivated this study. This article addresses the impact of five such algorithms on the detection of clusters of microcalcifications. A database of unprocessed (raw) images of 200 normal digital mammograms, acquired with the Siemens Novation DR, was collected retrospectively. Realistic simulated microcalcification clusters were inserted in half of the unprocessed images. All unprocessed images were subsequently processed with five manufacturer-recommended image processing algorithms (Agfa Musica 1, IMS Raffaello Mammo 1.2, Sectra Mamea AB Sigmoid, Siemens OPVIEW v2, and Siemens OPVIEW v1). Four breast imaging radiologists were asked to locate and score the clusters in each image on a five point rating scale. The free-response data were analyzed by the jackknife free-response receiver operating characteristic (JAFROC) method and, for comparison, also with the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) method. JAFROC analysis revealed highly significant differences between the image processings (F = 8.51, p < 0.0001), suggesting that image processing strongly impacts the detectability of clusters. Siemens OPVIEW2 and Siemens OPVIEW1 yielded the highest and lowest performances, respectively. ROC analysis of the data also revealed significant differences between the processing but at lower significance (F = 3.47, p = 0.0305) than JAFROC. Both statistical analysis methods revealed that the

  6. Digital image compression in dermatology: format comparison.

    PubMed

    Guarneri, F; Vaccaro, M; Guarneri, C

    2008-09-01

    Digital image compression (reduction of the amount of numeric data needed to represent a picture) is widely used in electronic storage and transmission devices. Few studies have compared the suitability of the different compression algorithms for dermatologic images. We aimed at comparing the performance of four popular compression formats, Tagged Image File (TIF), Portable Network Graphics (PNG), Joint Photographic Expert Group (JPEG), and JPEG2000 on clinical and videomicroscopic dermatologic images. Nineteen (19) clinical and 15 videomicroscopic digital images were compressed using JPEG and JPEG2000 at various compression factors and TIF and PNG. TIF and PNG are "lossless" formats (i.e., without alteration of the image), JPEG is "lossy" (the compressed image has a lower quality than the original), JPEG2000 has a lossless and a lossy mode. The quality of the compressed images was assessed subjectively (by three expert reviewers) and quantitatively (by measuring, point by point, the color differences from the original). Lossless JPEG2000 (49% compression) outperformed the other lossless algorithms, PNG and TIF (42% and 31% compression, respectively). Lossy JPEG2000 compression was slightly less efficient than JPEG, but preserved image quality much better, particularly at higher compression factors. For its good quality and compression ratio, JPEG2000 appears to be a good choice for clinical/videomicroscopic dermatologic image compression. Additionally, its diffusion and other features, such as the possibility of embedding metadata in the image file and to encode various parts of an image at different compression levels, make it perfectly suitable for the current needs of dermatology and teledermatology.

  7. 21 CFR 892.2030 - Medical image digitizer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) Identification. A medical image digitizer is a device intended to convert an analog medical image into a digital...-coupled devices. (b) Classification. Class II (special controls; voluntary standards—Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) Std., Joint Photographic Experts Group (JPEG) Std.)....

  8. Digital Imaging and the Cognitive Revolution: A Media Challenge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sartorius, Ute

    This paper discusses the role of digital technology within the cognitive revolution of the perception of images. It analyzes the traditional values placed on images as a source of cognition. These values are discussed in terms of the ethical and social issues raised by the use of digital image manipulation in so far as the digital era is falsely…

  9. The NCSA Astronomy Digital Image Library

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plante, Raymond L.; Crutcher, Richard M.; Sharpe, Randall K.

    We announce the opening of the NCSA Astronomy Digital Image Library (URL = http://imagelib.ncsa.uiuc.edu/imagelib.html). The mission of the Library is to collect fully processed astronomical images in FITS format and make them available to the research community and the general public via the World Wide Web. Users may search the Library's contents, browse preview images, and download the full FITS images. All items contained in the Library may either be accessed via the HTML interface or through unique URNs. The latter method allows for easy linking to Library items from other databases or hypertext documents on the Web. The Library is expected to provide many benefits not only to users retrieving information but also to authors who add to the images in the Library's collection.

  10. Digital Shaded-Relief Image of Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Riehle, J.R.; Fleming, Michael D.; Molnia, B.F.; Dover, J.H.; Kelley, J.S.; Miller, M.L.; Nokleberg, W.J.; Plafker, George; Till, A.B.

    1997-01-01

    Introduction One of the most spectacular physiographic images of the conterminous United States, and the first to have been produced digitally, is that by Thelin and Pike (USGS I-2206, 1991). The image is remarkable for its crispness of detail and for the natural appearance of the artificial land surface. Our goal has been to produce a shaded-relief image of Alaska that has the same look and feel as the Thelin and Pike image. The Alaskan image could have been produced at the same scale as its lower 48 counterpart (1:3,500,000). But by insetting the Aleutian Islands into the Gulf of Alaska, we were able to print the Alaska map at a larger scale (1:2,500,000) and about the same physical size as the Thelin and Pike image. Benefits of the 1:2,500,000 scale are (1) greater resolution of topographic features and (2) ease of reference to the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) (1987) Alaska Map E and the statewide geologic map (Beikman, 1980), which are both 1:2,500,000 scale. Manually drawn, shaded-relief images of Alaska's land surface have long been available (for example, Department of the Interior, 1909; Raisz, 1948). The topography depicted on these early maps is mainly schematic. Maps showing topographic contours were first available for the entire State in 1953 (USGS, 1:250,000) (J.H. Wittmann, USGS, written commun., 1996). The Alaska Map E was initially released in 1954 in both planimetric (revised in 1973 and 1987) and shaded-relief versions (revised in 1973, 1987, and 1996); topography depicted on the shaded-relief version is based on the 1:250,000-scale USGS topographic maps. Alaska Map E was later modified to include hypsometric tinting by Raven Maps and Images (1989, revised 1993) as copyrighted versions. Other shaded-relief images were produced for The National Geographic Magazine (LaGorce, 1956; 1:3,000,000) or drawn by Harrison (1970; 1:7,500,000) for The National Atlas of the United States. Recently, the State of Alaska digitally produced a shaded-relief image

  11. Applications of digital terrain data to multisensor image analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, D.L.; Schenck, L.R.

    1985-02-01

    Some of the key factors for detection of facies changes in sedimentary environments, such as changes in surface composition and texture, are parameters that can be detected using the remote sensing techniques presently available. For example, multipolarization aircraft synthetic aperture radar (SAR), Landsat 4 Thematic Mapper (TM), and airborne Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner (TIMS) images were acquired over the Deadman Butte area of the Wind River basin, Wyoming. The SAR images were acquired at L-band (wavelength = 24.6 cm) simultaneously in 4 polarization states (HH, HV, VV, VH). The 6 visible and near infrared TM bands range in wavelength from 0.45 to 2.35 ..mu..m, and the 6 TIMS bandpasses range from 8 to 12 ..mu..m. Thus, reflected and emitted radiation, and radar backscatter from geologic targets can be simultaneously analyzed using a coregistered image data set. In this way, lithologic variations can be mapped based on compositional information derived from the TM and TIMS data and detailed surface scattering information derived from the multipolarization SAR data. In addition, coregistration of the image data set to digital terrain data results in the ability to generate a stratigraphic column based on the remote sensing data, and to perform detailed structural analyses.

  12. Validation of no-reference image quality index for the assessment of digital mammographic images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Oliveira, Helder C. R.; Barufaldi, Bruno; Borges, Lucas R.; Gabarda, Salvador; Bakic, Predrag R.; Maidment, Andrew D. A.; Schiabel, Homero; Vieira, Marcelo A. C.

    2016-03-01

    To ensure optimal clinical performance of digital mammography, it is necessary to obtain images with high spatial resolution and low noise, keeping radiation exposure as low as possible. These requirements directly affect the interpretation of radiologists. The quality of a digital image should be assessed using objective measurements. In general, these methods measure the similarity between a degraded image and an ideal image without degradation (ground-truth), used as a reference. These methods are called Full-Reference Image Quality Assessment (FR-IQA). However, for digital mammography, an image without degradation is not available in clinical practice; thus, an objective method to assess the quality of mammograms must be performed without reference. The purpose of this study is to present a Normalized Anisotropic Quality Index (NAQI), based on the Rényi entropy in the pseudo-Wigner domain, to assess mammography images in terms of spatial resolution and noise without any reference. The method was validated using synthetic images acquired through an anthropomorphic breast software phantom, and the clinical exposures on anthropomorphic breast physical phantoms and patient's mammograms. The results reported by this noreference index follow the same behavior as other well-established full-reference metrics, e.g., the peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR) and structural similarity index (SSIM). Reductions of 50% on the radiation dose in phantom images were translated as a decrease of 4dB on the PSNR, 25% on the SSIM and 33% on the NAQI, evidencing that the proposed metric is sensitive to the noise resulted from dose reduction. The clinical results showed that images reduced to 53% and 30% of the standard radiation dose reported reductions of 15% and 25% on the NAQI, respectively. Thus, this index may be used in clinical practice as an image quality indicator to improve the quality assurance programs in mammography; hence, the proposed method reduces the subjectivity

  13. Network support for lossless digital image browsing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parris, Colin; Zhang, Hui

    1994-04-01

    There are two main characteristics that distinguish ordinary video applications from lossless digital image browsing: first, digital images used in medical imaging and scientific visualization applications usually can not tolerate any compromise of image quality; second, unlike live or playback video, browsing implies different playback rates. With these differences, it is not longer possible to increase the browsing speed by dropping alternate frames or by increasing compression ratios as done in video applications. From a network's point of view, the image browsing applications send data at different rates during different periods of time. These type of applications require guaranteed performance service in terms of bandwidth, end-to-end delay and jitter, however, their performance requirements change during the lifetime of the application. Most of the existing solutions that support guaranteed performance services require resource reservation on a per-connection basis and the amount of resources reserved during the lifetime of the connection is usually fixed. The static nature of this type of resource reservation does not easily accommodate the dynamics inherent in applications like lossless image browsing. In this paper, we propose a new abstraction called Dynamic Connection Management (DCM) within the framework of guaranteed performance communications. The DCM scheme provides the network with the ability to modify the performance parameters of any active connection subject to a modification contract. We describe the DCM scheme, validate the design with simulation experiments, and present a prototype implementation within the context of the Sequoia 2000 project.

  14. [Digital thoracic radiology: devices, image processing, limits].

    PubMed

    Frija, J; de Géry, S; Lallouet, F; Guermazi, A; Zagdanski, A M; De Kerviler, E

    2001-09-01

    In a first part, the different techniques of digital thoracic radiography are described. Since computed radiography with phosphore plates are the most commercialized it is more emphasized. But the other detectors are also described, as the drum coated with selenium and the direct digital radiography with selenium detectors. The other detectors are also studied in particular indirect flat panels detectors and the system with four high resolution CCD cameras. In a second step the most important image processing are discussed: the gradation curves, the unsharp mask processing, the system MUSICA, the dynamic range compression or reduction, the soustraction with dual energy. In the last part the advantages and the drawbacks of computed thoracic radiography are emphasized. The most important are the almost constant good quality of the pictures and the possibilities of image processing.

  15. Fatigue Crack Detection Using Digital Image Correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cawley, P.; Hutt, T. D.

    2009-03-01

    At present, detecting structural defects such as cracking and corrosion before they become critical is largely achieved by time consuming techniques such as eddy current and ultrasonic testing. These techniques require point-by-point scanning over the area to be tested. Digital Image Correlation could provide a cheaper and quicker testing technique. It works by correlating images of the structure surface in unloaded and loaded states taken with a standard digital camera, giving the displacement and strain fields. The specific case of a crack at a hole in an aluminium plate was investigated. It was found that the strain concentration around the crack tip is too localised to detect; however the displacement jump across the crack could be seen. This technique allows the cracks to be detected and would allow rapid testing of a structure if it can easily be loaded.

  16. Digital image processing of cephalometric radiographs: a preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Jackson, P H; Dickson, G C; Birnie, D J

    1985-07-01

    The principles of image capture, image storage and image processing in digital radiology are described. The enhancement of radiographic images using digital image processing techniques and its application to cephalometry is discussed. The results of a pilot study which compared some common cephalometric measurements made from manual point identification with those made by direct digitization of digital radiographic images from video monitors are presented. Although in an early stage of development, the results from the image processing system were comparable with those obtained by traditional methods.

  17. Storage and retrieval of large digital images

    DOEpatents

    Bradley, Jonathan N.

    1998-01-01

    Image compression and viewing are implemented with (1) a method for performing DWT-based compression on a large digital image with a computer system possessing a two-level system of memory and (2) a method for selectively viewing areas of the image from its compressed representation at multiple resolutions and, if desired, in a client-server environment. The compression of a large digital image I(x,y) is accomplished by first defining a plurality of discrete tile image data subsets T.sub.ij (x,y) that, upon superposition, form the complete set of image data I(x,y). A seamless wavelet-based compression process is effected on I(x,y) that is comprised of successively inputting the tiles T.sub.ij (x,y) in a selected sequence to a DWT routine, and storing the resulting DWT coefficients in a first primary memory. These coefficients are periodically compressed and transferred to a secondary memory to maintain sufficient memory in the primary memory for data processing. The sequence of DWT operations on the tiles T.sub.ij (x,y) effectively calculates a seamless DWT of I(x,y). Data retrieval consists of specifying a resolution and a region of I(x,y) for display. The subset of stored DWT coefficients corresponding to each requested scene is determined and then decompressed for input to an inverse DWT, the output of which forms the image display. The repeated process whereby image views are specified may take the form an interaction with a computer pointing device on an image display from a previous retrieval.

  18. Storage and retrieval of large digital images

    DOEpatents

    Bradley, J.N.

    1998-01-20

    Image compression and viewing are implemented with (1) a method for performing DWT-based compression on a large digital image with a computer system possessing a two-level system of memory and (2) a method for selectively viewing areas of the image from its compressed representation at multiple resolutions and, if desired, in a client-server environment. The compression of a large digital image I(x,y) is accomplished by first defining a plurality of discrete tile image data subsets T{sub ij}(x,y) that, upon superposition, form the complete set of image data I(x,y). A seamless wavelet-based compression process is effected on I(x,y) that is comprised of successively inputting the tiles T{sub ij}(x,y) in a selected sequence to a DWT routine, and storing the resulting DWT coefficients in a first primary memory. These coefficients are periodically compressed and transferred to a secondary memory to maintain sufficient memory in the primary memory for data processing. The sequence of DWT operations on the tiles T{sub ij}(x,y) effectively calculates a seamless DWT of I(x,y). Data retrieval consists of specifying a resolution and a region of I(x,y) for display. The subset of stored DWT coefficients corresponding to each requested scene is determined and then decompressed for input to an inverse DWT, the output of which forms the image display. The repeated process whereby image views are specified may take the form an interaction with a computer pointing device on an image display from a previous retrieval. 6 figs.

  19. A dual-view digital tomosynthesis imaging technique for improved chest imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong, Yuncheng; Lai, Chao-Jen; Wang, Tianpeng; Shaw, Chris C.

    2015-09-15

    Purpose: Digital tomosynthesis (DTS) has been shown to be useful for reducing the overlapping of abnormalities with anatomical structures at various depth levels along the posterior–anterior (PA) direction in chest radiography. However, DTS provides crude three-dimensional (3D) images that have poor resolution in the lateral view and can only be displayed with reasonable quality in the PA view. Furthermore, the spillover of high-contrast objects from off-fulcrum planes generates artifacts that may impede the diagnostic use of the DTS images. In this paper, the authors describe and demonstrate the use of a dual-view DTS technique to improve the accuracy of the reconstructed volume image data for more accurate rendition of the anatomy and slice images with improved resolution and reduced artifacts, thus allowing the 3D image data to be viewed in views other than the PA view. Methods: With the dual-view DTS technique, limited angle scans are performed and projection images are acquired in two orthogonal views: PA and lateral. The dual-view projection data are used together to reconstruct 3D images using the maximum likelihood expectation maximization iterative algorithm. In this study, projection images were simulated or experimentally acquired over 360° using the scanning geometry for cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). While all projections were used to reconstruct CBCT images, selected projections were extracted and used to reconstruct single- and dual-view DTS images for comparison with the CBCT images. For realistic demonstration and comparison, a digital chest phantom derived from clinical CT images was used for the simulation study. An anthropomorphic chest phantom was imaged for the experimental study. The resultant dual-view DTS images were visually compared with the single-view DTS images and CBCT images for the presence of image artifacts and accuracy of CT numbers and anatomy and quantitatively compared with root-mean-square-deviation (RMSD) values

  20. Geometric assessment of image quality using digital image registration techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tisdale, G. E.

    1976-01-01

    Image registration techniques were developed to perform a geometric quality assessment of multispectral and multitemporal image pairs. Based upon LANDSAT tapes, accuracies to a small fraction of a pixel were demonstrated. Because it is insensitive to the choice of registration areas, the technique is well suited to performance in an automatic system. It may be implemented at megapixel-per-second rates using a commercial minicomputer in combination with a special purpose digital preprocessor.

  1. Going digital: image preparation for biomedical publishing.

    PubMed

    Schenk, M P; Manning, R J; Paalman, M H

    1999-08-15

    Authors are more often being held responsible for readying their own data figures for digital publication by scanning them at the proper resolution and preparing them for presentation in both print and on-line journals. In this manner, the visuals can be printed at the highest quality the publisher can provide and be ready for rapid electronic distribution on the Internet. Therefore, authors must become knowledgeable in the visual preparation process in order to generate electronic images that will be as true a representation of the original image as possible. Perfecting this procedure can be a learning experience and often requires some experimentation. When accomplished, the author will have more control of exactly how the images will look before they are published. In addition to the scan resolution, the type of digital scanner and software applications used are very important, and instruction manuals should be followed closely so as to understand the full potential of the digitizing equipment. Anat Rec (New Anat): 257:128-136, 1999.

  2. Slant transform watermarking for digital images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Anthony T. S.; Zhu, Xunzhan; Shen, Jun

    2003-06-01

    In this paper, we propose a digital watermarking algorithm based on the Slant transform for the copyright protection of images. Our earlier research work associated with the fast Hadamard transform for robust watermark embedding and retrieval of images and characters suggests that this transform could also provide a good "hidden" space for digital watermarking. The Slant transform has many similar properties to the Walsh-Hadamard transform. In terms of transform coding, the Slant transform is considered to be a sub-optimum orthogonal transform for energy compaction. For digital watermarking, the energy spread becomes a significant advantage, as there is now a good spread of middle to higher frequencies with significant energies for robust information hiding. In this paper, an analytical comparative study on the performance of the Slant transform adapting our earlier watermarking schemes for fast Hadamrd transform will be performed based on its robustness against various Stirmark attacks. The performance results of the Slant transform for image watermarking against other transforms such as Cosine transform will also be presented.

  3. APQ-102 imaging radar digital image quality study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, C. R.; Estes, J. M.

    1982-01-01

    A modified APQ-102 sidelooking radar collected synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data which was digitized and recorded on wideband magnetic tape. These tapes were then ground processed into computer compatible tapes (CCT's). The CCT's may then be processed into high resolution radar images by software on the CYBER computer.

  4. Milne "en Masse": A Case Study in Digitizing Large Image Collections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harkema, Craig; Avery, Cheryl

    2015-01-01

    In December 2012, the University of Saskatchewan Library's University Archives and Special Collections acquired the complete image collection of Courtney Milne, a professional photographer whose worked encompassed documentary, abstract and fine art photographs. From acquisition to digital curation, the authors identify, outline, and discuss the…

  5. Comparison of different phantoms used in digital diagnostic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bor, Dogan; Unal, Elif; Uslu, Anil

    2015-09-01

    The organs of extremity, chest, skull and lumbar were physically simulated using uniform PMMA slabs with different thicknesses alone and using these slabs together with aluminum plates and air gaps (ANSI Phantoms). The variation of entrance surface air kerma and scatter fraction with X-ray beam qualities was investigated for these phantoms and the results were compared with those measured from anthropomorphic phantoms. A flat panel digital radiographic system was used for all the experiments. Considerable variations of entrance surface air kermas were found for the same organs of different designs, and highest doses were measured for the PMMA slabs. A low contrast test tool and a contrast detail test object (CDRAD) were used together with each organ simulation of PMMA slabs and ANSI phantoms in order to test the clinical image qualities. Digital images of these phantom combinations and anthropomorphic phantoms were acquired in raw and clinically processed formats. Variation of image quality with kVp and post processing was evaluated using the numerical metrics of these test tools and measured contrast values from the anthropomorphic phantoms. Our results indicated that design of some phantoms may not be efficient enough to reveal the expected performance of the post processing algorithms.

  6. Digital acquisition system for high-speed 3-D imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yafuso, Eiji

    1997-11-01

    High-speed digital three-dimensional (3-D) imagery is possible using multiple independent charge-coupled device (CCD) cameras with sequentially triggered acquisition and individual field storage capability. The system described here utilizes sixteen independent cameras, providing versatility in configuration and image acquisition. By aligning the cameras in nearly coincident lines-of-sight, a sixteen frame two-dimensional (2-D) sequence can be captured. The delays can be individually adjusted lo yield a greater number of acquired frames during the more rapid segments of the event. Additionally, individual integration periods may be adjusted to ensure adequate radiometric response while minimizing image blur. An alternative alignment and triggering scheme arranges the cameras into two angularly separated banks of eight cameras each. By simultaneously triggering correlated stereo pairs, an eight-frame sequence of stereo images may be captured. In the first alignment scheme the camera lines-of-sight cannot be made precisely coincident. Thus representation of the data as a monocular sequence introduces the issue of independent camera coordinate registration with the real scene. This issue arises more significantly using the stereo pair method to reconstruct quantitative 3-D spatial information of the event as a function of time. The principal development here will be the derivation and evaluation of a solution transform and its inverse for the digital data which will yield a 3-D spatial mapping as a function of time.

  7. Digitally enhanced GLORIA images for petroleum exploration

    SciTech Connect

    Prindle, R.O. ); Lanz, K )

    1990-05-01

    This poster presentation graphically depicts the geological and structural information that can be derived from digitally enhanced Geological Long Range Inclined Asdic (GLORIA) sonar images. This presentation illustrates the advantages of scale enlargement as an interpreter's tool in an offshore area within the Eel River Basin, Northern California. Sonographs were produced from digital tapes originally collected for the exclusive economic zone (EEZ)-SCAN 1984 survey, which was published in the Atlas of the Western Conterminous US at a scale of 1:500,000. This scale is suitable for displaying regional offshore tectonic features but does not have the resolution required for detailed geological mapping necessary for petroleum exploration. Applications of digital enhancing techniques which utilize contrast stretching and assign false colors to wide-swath sonar imagery (approximately 40 km) with 50-m resolution enables the acquisition and interpretation of significantly more geological and structural data. This, combined with a scale enlargement to 1:100,000 and high contrast contact prints vs. the offset prints of the atlas, increases the resolution and sharpness of bathymetric features so that many more subtle features may be mapped in detail. A tectonic interpretation of these digitally enhanced GLORIA sonographs from the Eel River basin is presented, displaying anticlines, lineaments, ridge axis, pathways of sediment flow, and subtle doming. Many of these features are not present on published bathymetric maps and have not been derived from seismic data because the plan view spatial resolution is much less than that available from the GLORIA imagery.

  8. Java, Image Browsing, and the NCSA Astronomy Digital Image Library

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plante, R. L.; Goscha, D.

    We review our experience, including some lessons learned, with using Java to create data browsing tools for use with the Astronomy Digital Image Library (ADIL) and related digital library projects at NCSA\\@. We give an overview of our Image Data Browser, a generalized tool under development through a collaboration with the NCSA/NASA Project Horizon in support of access to earth and space science data. Emphasis has been placed on a design that can support a variety of data formats and applications both within and outside of astronomy. ADIL will use this tool in a variety of guises to browse and download images from the Library's collection. We see such a tool filling an important niche as a pipeline from a data repository to specialized, native data analysis software (e.g., IRAF, AIPS).

  9. A new multivariate statistical model for change detection in images acquired by homogeneous and heterogeneous sensors.

    PubMed

    Prendes, Jorge; Chabert, Marie; Pascal, Frederic; Giros, Alain; Tourneret, Jean-Yves

    2015-03-01

    Remote sensing images are commonly used to monitor the earth surface evolution. This surveillance can be conducted by detecting changes between images acquired at different times and possibly by different kinds of sensors. A representative case is when an optical image of a given area is available and a new image is acquired in an emergency situation (resulting from a natural disaster for instance) by a radar satellite. In such a case, images with heterogeneous properties have to be compared for change detection. This paper proposes a new approach for similarity measurement between images acquired by heterogeneous sensors. The approach exploits the considered sensor physical properties and specially the associated measurement noise models and local joint distributions. These properties are inferred through manifold learning. The resulting similarity measure has been successfully applied to detect changes between many kinds of images, including pairs of optical images and pairs of optical-radar images.

  10. Digital processing of radiographic images from PACS to publishing.

    PubMed

    Christian, M E; Davidson, H C; Wiggins, R H; Berges, G; Cannon, G; Jackson, G; Chapman, B; Harnsberger, H R

    2001-03-01

    Several studies have addressed the implications of filmless radiologic imaging on telemedicine, diagnostic ability, and electronic teaching files. However, many publishers still require authors to submit hard-copy images for publication of articles and textbooks. This study compares the quality digital images directly exported from picture archive and communications systems (PACS) to images digitized from radiographic film. The authors evaluated the quality of publication-grade glossy photographs produced from digital radiographic images using 3 different methods: (1) film images digitized using a desktop scanner and then printed, (2) digital images obtained directly from PACS then printed, and (3) digital images obtained from PACS and processed to improve sharpness prior to printing. Twenty images were printed using each of the 3 different methods and rated for quality by 7 radiologists. The results were analyzed for statistically significant differences among the image sets. Subjective evaluations of the filmless images found them to be of equal or better quality than the digitized images. Direct electronic transfer of PACS images reduces the number of steps involved in creating publication-quality images as well as providing the means to produce high-quality radiographic images in a digital environment.

  11. The PICASSO digital detector for Diffraction Enhanced Imaging at ELETTRA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arfelli, F.; Astolfo, A.; Menk, R.-H.; Rigon, L.; Zanconati, F.; De Pellegrin, A.; Chen, R. C.; Dreossi, D.; Longo, R.; Vallazza, E.; Castelli, E.

    2010-07-01

    A clinical mammography program is in progress at the medical beamline SYRMEP of the Italian synchrotron radiation laboratory ELETTRA in Trieste. A conventional screen-film system is utilized as detector for the examinations on patients. For the next experimental step a digital detector has been designed taking into account the essential requirements for mammography such as high spatial and contrast resolution, high efficiency for low dose examinations and high speed for short acquisition time. A double-layer prototype has already been tested in the frame of the PICASSO project. In addition, an analyzer crystal set-up for Diffraction Enhanced Imaging (DEI) has been available for many years at the SYRMEP beamline. Applying the DEI technique several successful experiments have been carried out in biomedical imaging and in particular in-vitro breast imaging utilizing commercially available detectors. Recently a system upgrade yielded a double-crystal analyzer set-up with improved stability and higher angular resolution. In this study the PICASSO detector has been utilized in combination with the new analyzer set-up for imaging in-vitro breast tissue samples. In order to test the potential of the combined system planar and tomographic images have been acquired and the first results are here presented.

  12. Dose and diagnostic image quality in digital tomosynthesis imaging of facial bones in pediatrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, J. M.; Hickling, S.; Elbakri, I. A.; Reed, M.; Wrogemann, J.

    2011-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the use of digital tomosynthesis (DT) for pediatric facial bone imaging. We compared the eye lens dose and diagnostic image quality of DT facial bone exams relative to digital radiography (DR) and computed tomography (CT), and investigated whether we could modify our current DT imaging protocol to reduce patient dose while maintaining sufficient diagnostic image quality. We measured the dose to the eye lens for all three modalities using high-sensitivity thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) and an anthropomorphic skull phantom. To assess the diagnostic image quality of DT compared to the corresponding DR and CT images, we performed an observer study where the visibility of anatomical structures in the DT phantom images were rated on a four-point scale. We then acquired DT images at lower doses and had radiologists indicate whether the visibility of each structure was adequate for diagnostic purposes. For typical facial bone exams, we measured eye lens doses of 0.1-0.4 mGy for DR, 0.3-3.7 mGy for DT, and 26 mGy for CT. In general, facial bone structures were visualized better with DT then DR, and the majority of structures were visualized well enough to avoid the need for CT. DT imaging provides high quality diagnostic images of the facial bones while delivering significantly lower doses to the lens of the eye compared to CT. In addition, we found that by adjusting the imaging parameters, the DT effective dose can be reduced by up to 50% while maintaining sufficient image quality.

  13. Refined measurement of digital image texture loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, Peter D.

    2013-01-01

    Image texture is the term given to the information-bearing fluctuations such as those for skin, grass and fabrics. Since image processing aimed at reducing unwanted fluctuations (noise are other artifacts) can also remove important texture, good product design requires a balance between the two. The texture-loss MTF method, currently under international standards development, is aimed at the evaluation of digital and mobile-telephone cameras for capture of image texture. The method uses image fields of pseudo-random objects, such as overlapping disks, often referred to as `dead-leaves' targets. The analysis of these target images is based on noise-power spectrum (NPS) measurements, which are subject to estimation error. We describe a simple method for compensation of non-stationary image statistics, aimed at improving practical NPS estimates. A benign two-dimensional linear function (plane) is fit to the data and subtracted. This method was implemented and results were compared with those without compensation. The adapted analysis method resulted in reduced NPS and MTF measurement variation (20%) and low-frequency bias error. This is a particular advantage at low spatial frequencies, where texture-MTF scaling is performed. We conclude that simple trend removal should be used.

  14. Digital Image Correlation with Dynamic Subset Selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, Ghulam Mubashar; MacNish, Cara; Dyskin, Arcady; Shufrin, Igor

    2016-09-01

    The quality of the surface pattern and selection of subset size play a critical role in achieving high accuracy in Digital Image Correlation (DIC). The subset size in DIC is normally selected by testing different subset sizes across the entire image, which is a laborious procedure. This also leads to the problem that the worst region of the surface pattern influences the performance of DIC across the entire image. In order to avoid these limitations, a Dynamic Subset Selection (DSS) algorithm is proposed in this paper to optimize the subset size for each point in an image before optimizing the correlation parameters. The proposed DSS algorithm uses the local pattern around the point of interest to calculate a parameter called the Intensity Variation Ratio (Λ), which is used to optimize the subset size. The performance of the DSS algorithm is analyzed using numerically generated images and is compared with the results of traditional DIC. Images obtained from laboratory experiments are also used to demonstrate the utility of the DSS algorithm. Results illustrate that the DSS algorithm provides a better alternative to subset size "guessing" and finds an appropriate subset size for each point of interest according to the local pattern.

  15. Digital mammography, cancer screening: Factors important for image compression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, Laurence P.; Blaine, G. James; Doi, Kunio; Yaffe, Martin J.; Shtern, Faina; Brown, G. Stephen; Winfield, Daniel L.; Kallergi, Maria

    1993-01-01

    The use of digital mammography for breast cancer screening poses several novel problems such as development of digital sensors, computer assisted diagnosis (CAD) methods for image noise suppression, enhancement, and pattern recognition, compression algorithms for image storage, transmission, and remote diagnosis. X-ray digital mammography using novel direct digital detection schemes or film digitizers results in large data sets and, therefore, image compression methods will play a significant role in the image processing and analysis by CAD techniques. In view of the extensive compression required, the relative merit of 'virtually lossless' versus lossy methods should be determined. A brief overview is presented here of the developments of digital sensors, CAD, and compression methods currently proposed and tested for mammography. The objective of the NCI/NASA Working Group on Digital Mammography is to stimulate the interest of the image processing and compression scientific community for this medical application and identify possible dual use technologies within the NASA centers.

  16. Performance evaluation of image processing algorithms in digital mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanca, Federica; Van Ongeval, Chantal; Jacobs, Jurgen; Pauwels, Herman; Marchal, Guy; Bosmans, Hilde

    2008-03-01

    The purpose of the study is to evaluate the performance of different image processing algorithms in terms of representation of microcalcification clusters in digital mammograms. Clusters were simulated in clinical raw ("for processing") images. The entire dataset of images consisted of 200 normal mammograms, selected out of our clinical routine cases and acquired with a Siemens Novation DR system. In 100 of the normal images a total of 142 clusters were simulated; the remaining 100 normal mammograms served as true negative input cases. Both abnormal and normal images were processed with 5 commercially available processing algorithms: Siemens OpView1 and Siemens OpView2, Agfa Musica1, Sectra Mamea AB Sigmoid and IMS Raffaello Mammo 1.2. Five observers were asked to locate and score the cluster(s) in each image, by means of dedicated software tool. Observer performance was assessed using the JAFROC Figure of Merit. FROC curves, fitted using the IDCA method, have also been calculated. JAFROC analysis revealed significant differences among the image processing algorithms in the detection of microcalcifications clusters (p=0.0000369). Calculated average Figures of Merit are: 0.758 for Siemens OpView2, 0.747 for IMS Processing 1.2, 0.736 for Agfa Musica1 processing, 0.706 for Sectra Mamea AB Sigmoid processing and 0.703 for Siemens OpView1. This study is a first step towards a quantitative assessment of image processing in terms of cluster detection in clinical mammograms. Although we showed a significant difference among the image processing algorithms, this method does not on its own allow for a global performance ranking of the investigated algorithms.

  17. Hierarchical nucleus segmentation in digital pathology images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yi; Ratner, Vadim; Zhu, Liangjia; Diprima, Tammy; Kurc, Tahsin; Tannenbaum, Allen; Saltz, Joel

    2016-03-01

    Extracting nuclei is one of the most actively studied topic in the digital pathology researches. Most of the studies directly search the nuclei (or seeds for the nuclei) from the finest resolution available. While the richest information has been utilized by such approaches, it is sometimes difficult to address the heterogeneity of nuclei in different tissues. In this work, we propose a hierarchical approach which starts from the lower resolution level and adaptively adjusts the parameters while progressing into finer and finer resolution. The algorithm is tested on brain and lung cancers images from The Cancer Genome Atlas data set.

  18. Hierarchical nucleus segmentation in digital pathology images

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yi; Ratner, Vadim; Zhu, Liangjia; Diprima, Tammy; Kurc, Tahsin; Tannenbaum, Allen; Saltz, Joel

    2016-01-01

    Extracting nuclei is one of the most actively studied topic in the digital pathology researches. Most of the studies directly search the nuclei (or seeds for the nuclei) from the finest resolution available. While the richest information has been utilized by such approaches, it is sometimes difficult to address the heterogeneity of nuclei in different tissues. In this work, we propose a hierarchical approach which starts from the lower resolution level and adaptively adjusts the parameters while progressing into finer and finer resolution. The algorithm is tested on brain and lung cancers images from The Cancer Genome Atlas data set. PMID:27375315

  19. Applications Of Digital Image Acquisition In Anthropometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woolford, Barbara; Lewis, James L.

    1981-10-01

    Anthropometric data on reach and mobility have traditionally been collected by time consuming and relatively inaccurate manual methods. Three dimensional digital image acquisition promises to radically increase the speed and ease of data collection and analysis. A three-camera video anthropometric system for collecting position, velocity, and force data in real time is under development for the Anthropometric Measurement Laboratory at NASA's Johnson Space Center. The use of a prototype of this system for collecting data on reach capabilities and on lateral stability is described. Two extensions of this system are planned.

  20. Fatigue Crack Closure Analysis Using Digital Image Correlation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leser, William P.; Newman, John A.; Johnston, William M.

    2010-01-01

    Fatigue crack closure during crack growth testing is analyzed in order to evaluate the critieria of ASTM Standard E647 for measurement of fatigue crack growth rates. Of specific concern is remote closure, which occurs away from the crack tip and is a product of the load history during crack-driving-force-reduction fatigue crack growth testing. Crack closure behavior is characterized using relative displacements determined from a series of high-magnification digital images acquired as the crack is loaded. Changes in the relative displacements of features on opposite sides of the crack are used to generate crack closure data as a function of crack wake position. For the results presented in this paper, remote closure did not affect fatigue crack growth rate measurements when ASTM Standard E647 was strictly followed and only became a problem when testing parameters (e.g., load shed rate, initial crack driving force, etc.) greatly exceeded the guidelines of the accepted standard.

  1. Quantitative Evaluation of Surface Color of Tomato Fruits Cultivated in Remote Farm Using Digital Camera Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Atsushi; Suehara, Ken-Ichiro; Kameoka, Takaharu

    To measure the quantitative surface color information of agricultural products with the ambient information during cultivation, a color calibration method for digital camera images and a remote monitoring system of color imaging using the Web were developed. Single-lens reflex and web digital cameras were used for the image acquisitions. The tomato images through the post-ripening process were taken by the digital camera in both the standard image acquisition system and in the field conditions from the morning to evening. Several kinds of images were acquired with the standard RGB color chart set up just behind the tomato fruit on a black matte, and a color calibration was carried out. The influence of the sunlight could be experimentally eliminated, and the calibrated color information consistently agreed with the standard ones acquired in the system through the post-ripening process. Furthermore, the surface color change of the tomato on the tree in a greenhouse was remotely monitored during maturation using the digital cameras equipped with the Field Server. The acquired digital color images were sent from the Farm Station to the BIFE Laboratory of Mie University via VPN. The time behavior of the tomato surface color change during the maturing process could be measured using the color parameter calculated based on the obtained and calibrated color images along with the ambient atmospheric record. This study is a very important step in developing the surface color analysis for both the simple and rapid evaluation of the crop vigor in the field and to construct an ambient and networked remote monitoring system for food security, precision agriculture, and agricultural research.

  2. The use of digital image capture in contact lens practice.

    PubMed

    Meyler, J; Hodd, N B

    1998-01-01

    The present decade has seen the introduction of digital imaging systems to a number of medical environments, including contact lens practice. During the past year, the authors have used two anterior segment video-based digital image capture systems. These systems allow instantaneous image capture and have both diagnostic value to practitioners and educational value to patients. This paper discusses and clarifies the terminology that surrounds such systems and looks carefully at the advantages and disadvantages when compared to more traditional 35 mm photography in particular with reference to image colour, resolution and storage. The difference between video digital image capture and the more recently available digital camera image capture is also discussed. The value of digital imaging is shown by a series of images from the authors' archives.

  3. Classification of Images Acquired with Colposcopy Using Artificial Neural Networks

    PubMed Central

    Simões, Priscyla W; Izumi, Narjara B; Casagrande, Ramon S; Venson, Ramon; Veronezi, Carlos D; Moretti, Gustavo P; da Rocha, Edroaldo L; Cechinel, Cristian; Ceretta, Luciane B; Comunello, Eros; Martins, Paulo J; Casagrande, Rogério A; Snoeyer, Maria L; Manenti, Sandra A

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To explore the advantages of using artificial neural networks (ANNs) to recognize patterns in colposcopy to classify images in colposcopy. PURPOSE Transversal, descriptive, and analytical study of a quantitative approach with an emphasis on diagnosis. The training test e validation set was composed of images collected from patients who underwent colposcopy. These images were provided by a gynecology clinic located in the city of Criciúma (Brazil). The image database (n = 170) was divided; 48 images were used for the training process, 58 images were used for the tests, and 64 images were used for the validation. A hybrid neural network based on Kohonen self-organizing maps and multilayer perceptron (MLP) networks was used. RESULTS After 126 cycles, the validation was performed. The best results reached an accuracy of 72.15%, a sensibility of 69.78%, and a specificity of 68%. CONCLUSION Although the preliminary results still exhibit an average efficiency, the present approach is an innovative and promising technique that should be deeply explored in the context of the present study. PMID:25374454

  4. Advanced digital image archival system using MPEG technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Wo

    2009-08-01

    Digital information and records are vital to the human race regardless of the nationalities and eras in which they were produced. Digital image contents are produced at a rapid pace from cultural heritages via digitalization, scientific and experimental data via high speed imaging sensors, national defense satellite images from governments, medical and healthcare imaging records from hospitals, personal collection of photos from digital cameras. With these mass amounts of precious and irreplaceable data and knowledge, what standards technologies can be applied to preserve and yet provide an interoperable framework for accessing the data across varieties of systems and devices? This paper presents an advanced digital image archival system by applying the international standard of MPEG technologies to preserve digital image content.

  5. Integrating Digital Images into the Art and Art History Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pitt, Sharon P.; Updike, Christina B.; Guthrie, Miriam E.

    2002-01-01

    Describes an Internet-based image database system connected to a flexible, in-class teaching and learning tool (the Madison Digital Image Database) developed at James Madison University to bring digital images to the arts and humanities classroom. Discusses content, copyright issues, ensuring system effectiveness, instructional impact, sharing the…

  6. The Artist, the Color Copier, and Digital Imaging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Witte, Mary Stieglitz

    The impact that color-copying technology and digital imaging have had on art, photography, and design are explored. Color copiers have provided new opportunities for direct and spontaneous image making an the potential for new transformations in art. The current generation of digital color copiers permits new directions in imaging, but the…

  7. Digital tracking and control of retinal images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, Steven F.; Jerath, Maya R.; Rylander, Henry G.; Welch, Ashley J.

    1994-01-01

    Laser-induced retinal lesions are used to treat a variety of eye disorders such as diabetic retinopathy and retinal tears. An instrumentation system has been developed to track a specific lesion coordinate on the retinal surface and provide corrective signals to maintain laser position on the coordinate. High-resolution retinal images are acquired via a CCD camera coupled to a fundus camera and video frame grabber. Optical filtering and histogram modification are used to enhance the retinal vessel network against the lighter retinal background. Six distinct retinal landmarks are tracked on the high contrast image obtained from the frame grabber using 2D blood vessel templates. An overview of the robotic laser system design is followed by implementation and testing of a development system for proof of concept and, finally, specifications for a real-time system are provided.

  8. On digital image processing technology and application in geometric measure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Jiugen; Xing, Ruonan; Liao, Na

    2014-04-01

    Digital image processing technique is an emerging science that emerging with the development of semiconductor integrated circuit technology and computer science technology since the 1960s.The article introduces the digital image processing technique and principle during measuring compared with the traditional optical measurement method. It takes geometric measure as an example and introduced the development tendency of digital image processing technology from the perspective of technology application.

  9. Theory of Digital Imaging from Orbital Synthetic Aperture Radar

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-11-01

    FROM ORBITAL SYNTHETIC APERTURE RADAR O by B. C. Barber SUMMARY Digital synthetic aperture radar ( SAR ) imaging techniques have pre- viously only been...reported in the literature in a fragmentary manner. This article presents a comprehensive review of the theory of digital SAR imaging from Earth...orbiting satellites. The digital SAR imaging process is explained, including a discussion of various aspects which are specific to satellite-borne SAR . A

  10. Reliability-guided digital image correlation for image deformation measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Pan Bing

    2009-03-10

    A universally applicable reliability-guided digital image correlation (DIC) method is proposed for reliable image deformation measurement. The zero-mean normalized cross correlation (ZNCC) coefficient is used to identify the reliability of the point computed. The correlation calculation begins with a seed point and is then guided by the ZNCC coefficient. That means the neighbors of the point with the highest ZNCC coefficient in a queue for computed points will be processed first. Thus the calculation path is always along the most reliable direction, and possible error propagation of the conventional DIC method can be avoided. The proposed novel DIC method is universally applicable to the images with shadows, discontinuous areas, and deformation discontinuity. Two image pairs were used to evaluate the performance of the proposed technique, and the successful results clearly demonstrate its robustness and effectiveness.

  11. Fast reconstruction of digital tomosynthesis using on-board images

    SciTech Connect

    Yan Hui; Godfrey, Devon J.; Yin Fangfang

    2008-05-15

    Digital tomosynthesis (DTS) is a method to reconstruct pseudo three-dimensional (3D) volume images from two-dimensional x-ray projections acquired over limited scan angles. Compared with cone-beam computed tomography, which is frequently used for 3D image guided radiation therapy, DTS requires less imaging time and dose. Successful implementation of DTS for fast target localization requires the reconstruction process to be accomplished within tight clinical time constraints (usually within 2 min). To achieve this goal, substantial improvement of reconstruction efficiency is necessary. In this study, a reconstruction process based upon the algorithm proposed by Feldkamp, Davis, and Kress was implemented on graphics hardware for the purpose of acceleration. The performance of the novel reconstruction implementation was tested for phantom and real patient cases. The efficiency of DTS reconstruction was improved by a factor of 13 on average, without compromising image quality. With acceleration of the reconstruction algorithm, the whole DTS generation process including data preprocessing, reconstruction, and DICOM conversion is accomplished within 1.5 min, which ultimately meets clinical requirement for on-line target localization.

  12. Fast reconstruction of digital tomosynthesis using on-board images.

    PubMed

    Yan, Hui; Godfrey, Devon J; Yin, Fang-Fang

    2008-05-01

    Digital tomosynthesis (DTS) is a method to reconstruct pseudo three-dimensional (3D) volume images from two-dimensional x-ray projections acquired over limited scan angles. Compared with cone-beam computed tomography, which is frequently used for 3D image guided radiation therapy, DTS requires less imaging time and dose. Successful implementation of DTS for fast target localization requires the reconstruction process to be accomplished within tight clinical time constraints (usually within 2 min). To achieve this goal, substantial improvement of reconstruction efficiency is necessary. In this study, a reconstruction process based upon the algorithm proposed by Feldkamp, Davis, and Kress was implemented on graphics hardware for the purpose of acceleration. The performance of the novel reconstruction implementation was tested for phantom and real patient cases. The efficiency of DTS reconstruction was improved by a factor of 13 on average, without compromising image quality. With acceleration of the reconstruction algorithm, the whole DTS generation process including data preprocessing, reconstruction, and DICOM conversion is accomplished within 1.5 min, which ultimately meets clinical requirement for on-line target localization.

  13. A new image calibration system in digital colposcopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wenjing; Soto-Thompson, Marcelo; Gustafsson, Ulf

    2006-12-01

    Colposcopy is a primary diagnostic method used to detect cancer and precancerous lesions of the uterine cervix. During the examination, the metaplastic and abnormal tissues exhibit different degrees of whiteness (acetowhitening effect) after applying a 3%-5% acetic acid solution. Colposcopists evaluate the color and density of the acetowhite tissue to assess the severity of lesions for the purpose of diagnosis, telemedicine, and annotation. However, the color and illumination of the colposcopic images vary with the light sources, the instruments and camera settings, as well as the clinical environments. This makes assessment of the color information very challenging even for an expert. In terms of developing a Computer-Aided Diagnosis (CAD) system for colposcopy, these variations affect the performance of the feature extraction algorithm for the acetowhite color. Non-uniform illumination from the light source is also an obstacle for detecting acetowhite regions, lesion margins, and anatomic features. There fore, in digital colposcopy, it is critical to map the color appearance of the images taken with different colposcopes into one standard color space with normalized illumination. This paper presents a novel image calibration technique for colposcopic images. First, a specially designed calibration unit is mounted on the colposcope to acquire daily calibration data prior to performing subject examinations. The calibration routine is fast, automated, accurate and reliable. We then use our illumination correction algorithm and a color calibration algorithm to calibrate the exam data. In this paper we describe these techniques and demonstrate their applications in clinical studies.

  14. X-Ray Detector for Digital Fluoroscopy and Digital Radiography in Medical Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Keiichi

    Recently digital X-ray detectors are developed for medical imaging. By comparison with the structure of X-ray image intensifier system and X-ray flat panel detector (FPD), the dynamic of digital images is more superior and would result in enhanced diagnosis. Moreover the difference from the detective quantum efficiency (DQE) of X-ray image intensifier and FPD is shown as the significant index of X-ray image quality.

  15. A tool for designing digital test objects for module performance evaluation in medical digital imaging.

    PubMed

    Kocsis, O; Costaridou, L; Efstathopoulos, E P; Lymberopoulos, D; Panayiotakis, G

    1999-01-01

    Currently, medical digital imaging systems are characterized by the introduction of additional modules such as digital display, image compression and image processing, as well as film printing and digitization. These additional modules require performance evaluation to ensure high image quality. A tool for designing computer-generated test objects applicable to performance evaluation of these modules is presented. The test objects can be directly used as digital images in the case of film printing, display, compression and image processing, or indirectly as images on film in the case of digitization. The performance evaluation approach is quality control protocol based. Digital test object design is user-driven according to specifications related to the requirements of the modules being tested. The available quality control parameters include input/output response curve, high contrast resolution, low contrast discrimination, noise, geometric distortion and field uniformity. The tool has been designed and implemented according to an object oriented approach in Visual C++ 5.0, and its user interface is based on the Microsoft Foundation Class Library version 4.2, which provides interface items such as windows, dialog boxes, lists, buttons, etc. The compatibility with DICOM 3.0 part 10 image formats specifications allows the integration of the tool in the existing software framework for medical digital imaging systems. The capability of the tool is demonstrated by direct use of the test objects in case of image processing, and indirect use of the test objects in case of film digitization.

  16. Avoiding twisted pixels: ethical guidelines for the appropriate use and manipulation of scientific digital images.

    PubMed

    Cromey, Douglas W

    2010-12-01

    Digital imaging has provided scientists with new opportunities to acquire and manipulate data using techniques that were difficult or impossible to employ in the past. Because digital images are easier to manipulate than film images, new problems have emerged. One growing concern in the scientific community is that digital images are not being handled with sufficient care. The problem is twofold: (1) the very small, yet troubling, number of intentional falsifications that have been identified, and (2) the more common unintentional, inappropriate manipulation of images for publication. Journals and professional societies have begun to address the issue with specific digital imaging guidelines. Unfortunately, the guidelines provided often do not come with instructions to explain their importance. Thus they deal with what should or should not be done, but not the associated 'why' that is required for understanding the rules. This article proposes 12 guidelines for scientific digital image manipulation and discusses the technical reasons behind these guidelines. These guidelines can be incorporated into lab meetings and graduate student training in order to provoke discussion and begin to bring an end to the culture of "data beautification".

  17. Avoiding Twisted Pixels: Ethical Guidelines for the Appropriate Use and Manipulation of Scientific Digital Images

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Digital imaging has provided scientists with new opportunities to acquire and manipulate data using techniques that were difficult or impossible to employ in the past. Because digital images are easier to manipulate than film images, new problems have emerged. One growing concern in the scientific community is that digital images are not being handled with sufficient care. The problem is twofold: (1) the very small, yet troubling, number of intentional falsifications that have been identified, and (2) the more common unintentional, inappropriate manipulation of images for publication. Journals and professional societies have begun to address the issue with specific digital imaging guidelines. Unfortunately, the guidelines provided often do not come with instructions to explain their importance. Thus they deal with what should or should not be done, but not the associated ‘why’ that is required for understanding the rules. This article proposes 12 guidelines for scientific digital image manipulation and discusses the technical reasons behind these guidelines. These guidelines can be incorporated into lab meetings and graduate student training in order to provoke discussion and begin to bring an end to the culture of “data beautification”. PMID:20567932

  18. Remote sensing in marine environment - acquiring, processing, and interpreting GLORIA sidescan sonor images of deep sea floor

    SciTech Connect

    O'Leary, D.W.

    1989-03-01

    The US Geological Survey's remote sensing instrument for regional imaging of the deep sea floor (> 400 m water depth) is the GLORIA (Geologic Long-Range Inclined Asdic) sidescan sonar system, designed and operated by the British Institute of Oceanographic Sciences. A 30-sec sweep rate provides for a swath width of approximately 45 km, depending on water depth. The return signal is digitally recorded as 8 bit data to provide a cross-range pixel dimension of 50 m. Postcruise image processing is carried out by using USGS software. Processing includes precision water-column removal, geometric and radiometric corrections, and contrast enhancement. Mosaicking includes map grid fitting, concatenation, and tone matching. Seismic reflection profiles, acquired along track during the survey, are image correlative and provide a subsurface dimension unique to marine remote sensing. Generally GLORIA image interpretation is based on brightness variations which are largely a function of (1) surface roughness at a scale of approximately 1 m and (2) slope changes of more than about 4/degrees/ over distances of at least 50 m. Broader, low-frequency changes in slope that cannot be detected from the Gloria data can be determined from seismic profiles. Digital files of bathymetry derived from echo-sounder data can be merged with GLORIA image data to create relief models of the sea floor for geomorphic interpretation of regional slope effects.

  19. A color image processing pipeline for digital microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yan; Liu, Peng; Zhuang, Zhefeng; Chen, Enguo; Yu, Feihong

    2012-10-01

    Digital microscope has found wide application in the field of biology, medicine et al. A digital microscope differs from traditional optical microscope in that there is no need to observe the sample through an eyepiece directly, because the optical image is projected directly on the CCD/CMOS camera. However, because of the imaging difference between human eye and sensor, color image processing pipeline is needed for the digital microscope electronic eyepiece to get obtain fine image. The color image pipeline for digital microscope, including the procedures that convert the RAW image data captured by sensor into real color image, is of great concern to the quality of microscopic image. The color pipeline for digital microscope is different from digital still cameras and video cameras because of the specific requirements of microscopic image, which should have the characters of high dynamic range, keeping the same color with the objects observed and a variety of image post-processing. In this paper, a new color image processing pipeline is proposed to satisfy the requirements of digital microscope image. The algorithm of each step in the color image processing pipeline is designed and optimized with the purpose of getting high quality image and accommodating diverse user preferences. With the proposed pipeline implemented on the digital microscope platform, the output color images meet the various analysis requirements of images in the medicine and biology fields very well. The major steps of color imaging pipeline proposed include: black level adjustment, defect pixels removing, noise reduction, linearization, white balance, RGB color correction, tone scale correction and gamma correction.

  20. Digital image archiving: challenges and choices.

    PubMed

    Dumery, Barbara

    2002-01-01

    In the last five years, imaging exam volume has grown rapidly. In addition to increased image acquisition, there is more patient information per study. RIS-PACS integration and information-rich DICOM headers now provide us with more patient information relative to each study. The volume of archived digital images is increasing and will continue to rise at a steeper incline than film-based storage of the past. Many filmless facilities have been caught off guard by this increase, which has been stimulated by many factors. The most significant factor is investment in new digital and DICOM-compliant modalities. A huge volume driver is the increase in images per study from multi-slice technology. Storage requirements also are affected by disaster recovery initiatives and state retention mandates. This burgeoning rate of imaging data volume presents many challenges: cost of ownership, data accessibility, storage media obsolescence, database considerations, physical limitations, reliability and redundancy. There are two basic approaches to archiving--single tier and multi-tier. Each has benefits. With a single-tier approach, all the data is stored on a single media that can be accessed very quickly. A redundant copy of the data is then stored onto another less expensive media. This is usually a removable media. In this approach, the on-line storage is increased incrementally as volume grows. In a multi-tier approach, storage levels are set up based on access speed and cost. In other words, all images are stored at the deepest archiving level, which is also the least expensive. Images are stored on or moved back to the intermediate and on-line levels if they will need to be accessed more quickly. It can be difficult to decide what the best approach is for your organization. The options include RAIDs (redundant array of independent disks), direct attached RAID storage (DAS), network storage using RAIDs (NAS and SAN), removable media such as different types of tape, compact

  1. Digital tracking and control of retinal images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, Steven F.; Jerath, Maya R.; Rylander, Henry G., III; Welch, Ashley J.

    1993-06-01

    Laser induced retinal lesions are used to treat a variety of eye diseases such as diabetic retinopathy and retinal detachment. An instrumentation system has been developed to track a specific lesion coordinate on the retinal surface and provide corrective signals to maintain laser position on the coordinate. High resolution retinal images are acquired via a CCD camera coupled to a fundus camera and video frame grabber. Optical filtering and histogram modification are used to enhance the retinal vessel network against the lighter retinal background. Six distinct retinal landmarks are tracked on the high contrast image obtained from the frame grabber using two-dimensional blood vessel templates. The frame grabber is hosted on a 486 PC. The PC performs correction signal calculations using an exhaustive search on selected image portions. An X and Y laser correction signal is derived from the landmark tracking information and provided to a pair of galvanometer steered mirrors via a data acquisition and control subsystem. This subsystem also responds to patient inputs and the system monitoring lesion growth. This paper begins with an overview of the robotic laser system design followed by implementation and testing of a development system for proof of concept. The paper concludes with specifications for a real time system.

  2. Digital camera with apparatus for authentication of images produced from an image file

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedman, Gary L. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A digital camera equipped with a processor for authentication of images produced from an image file taken by the digital camera is provided. The digital camera processor has embedded therein a private key unique to it, and the camera housing has a public key that is so uniquely based upon the private key that digital data encrypted with the private key by the processor may be decrypted using the public key. The digital camera processor comprises means for calculating a hash of the image file using a predetermined algorithm, and second means for encrypting the image hash with the private key, thereby producing a digital signature. The image file and the digital signature are stored in suitable recording means so they will be available together. Apparatus for authenticating at any time the image file as being free of any alteration uses the public key for decrypting the digital signature, thereby deriving a secure image hash identical to the image hash produced by the digital camera and used to produce the digital signature. The apparatus calculates from the image file an image hash using the same algorithm as before. By comparing this last image hash with the secure image hash, authenticity of the image file is determined if they match, since even one bit change in the image hash will cause the image hash to be totally different from the secure hash.

  3. Counterfeit deterrence and digital imaging technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Church, Sara E.; Fuller, Reese H.; Jaffe, Annette B.; Pagano, Lorelei W.

    2000-04-01

    The US government recognizes the growing problem of counterfeiting currency using digital imaging technology, as desktop systems become more sophisticated, less expensive and more prevalent. As the rate of counterfeiting with this type of equipment has grown, the need for specific prevention methods has become apparent to the banknote authorities. As a result, the Treasury Department and Federal Reserve have begun to address issues related specifically to this type of counterfeiting. The technical representatives of these agencies are taking a comprehensive approach to minimize counterfeiting using digital technology. This approach includes identification of current technology solutions for banknote recognition, data stream intervention and output marking, outreach to the hardware and software industries and enhancement of public education efforts. Other aspects include strong support and cooperation with existing international efforts to prevent counterfeiting, review and amendment of existing anti- counterfeiting legislation and investigation of currency design techniques to make faithful reproduction more difficult. Implementation of these steps and others are to lead to establishment of a formal, permanent policy to address and prevent the use of emerging technologies to counterfeit currency.

  4. Digital image restoration using quadratic programming.

    PubMed

    Abdelmalek, N N; Kasvand, T

    1980-10-01

    The problem of digital image restoration is considered by obtaining an approximate solution to the Fredholm integral equation of the first kind in two variables. The system of linear equations resulting from the discretization of the integral equation is converted to a consistent system of linear equations. The problem is then solved as a quadratic programming problem with bounded variables where the unknown solution is minimized in the L(2) norm. In this method minimum computer storage is needed, and the repeated solutions are obtained in an efficient way. Also the rank of the consistent system which gives a best or near best solution is estimated. Computer simulated examples using spatially separable pointspread functions are presented. Comments and conclusion are given.

  5. X-ray imaging using digital cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winch, Nicola M.; Edgar, Andrew

    2012-03-01

    The possibility of using the combination of a computed radiography (storage phosphor) cassette and a semiprofessional grade digital camera for medical or dental radiography is investigated. We compare the performance of (i) a Canon 5D Mk II single lens reflex camera with f1.4 lens and full-frame CMOS array sensor and (ii) a cooled CCD-based camera with a 1/3 frame sensor and the same lens system. Both systems are tested with 240 x 180 mm cassettes which are based on either powdered europium-doped barium fluoride bromide or needle structure europium-doped cesium bromide. The modulation transfer function for both systems has been determined and falls to a value of 0.2 at around 2 lp/mm, and is limited by light scattering of the emitted light from the storage phosphor rather than the optics or sensor pixelation. The modulation transfer function for the CsBr:Eu2+ plate is bimodal, with a high frequency wing which is attributed to the light-guiding behaviour of the needle structure. The detective quantum efficiency has been determined using a radioisotope source and is comparatively low at 0.017 for the CMOS camera and 0.006 for the CCD camera, attributed to the poor light harvesting by the lens. The primary advantages of the method are portability, robustness, digital imaging and low cost; the limitations are the low detective quantum efficiency and hence signal-to-noise ratio for medical doses, and restricted range of plate sizes. Representative images taken with medical doses are shown and illustrate the potential use for portable basic radiography.

  6. User-Driven Planning for Digital-Image Delivery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pisciotta, Henry; Halm, Michael J.; Dooris, Michael J.

    2006-01-01

    This article draws on two projects funded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation concerning the ways colleges and universities can support the legitimate sharing of digital learning resources for scholarly use. The 2001-03 Visual Image User Study (VIUS) assessed the scholarly needs of digital image users-faculty, staff, and students. That study led to…

  7. 21 CFR 892.2030 - Medical image digitizer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Medical image digitizer. 892.2030 Section 892.2030 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.2030 Medical image digitizer....

  8. 21 CFR 892.2030 - Medical image digitizer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Medical image digitizer. 892.2030 Section 892.2030 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.2030 Medical image digitizer....

  9. 21 CFR 892.2030 - Medical image digitizer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Medical image digitizer. 892.2030 Section 892.2030 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.2030 Medical image digitizer....

  10. 21 CFR 892.2030 - Medical image digitizer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Medical image digitizer. 892.2030 Section 892.2030 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.2030 Medical image digitizer....

  11. Digital Archival Image Collections: Who Are the Users?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herold, Irene M. H.

    2010-01-01

    Archival digital image collections are a relatively new phenomenon in college library archives. Digitizing archival image collections may make them accessible to users worldwide. There has been no study to explore whether collections on the Internet lead to users who are beyond the institution or a comparison of users to a national or…

  12. IT Infrastructure to support the secondary use of routinely acquired clinical imaging data for research.

    PubMed

    Leung, Kai Yan Eugene; van der Lijn, Fedde; Vrooman, Henri A; Sturkenboom, Miriam C J M; Niessen, Wiro J

    2015-01-01

    We propose an infrastructure for the automated anonymization, extraction and processing of image data stored in clinical data repositories to make routinely acquired imaging data available for research purposes. The automated system, which was tested in the context of analyzing routinely acquired MR brain imaging data, consists of four modules: subject selection using PACS query, anonymization of privacy sensitive information and removal of facial features, quality assurance on DICOM header and image information, and quantitative imaging biomarker extraction. In total, 1,616 examinations were selected based on the following MRI scanning protocols: dementia protocol (246), multiple sclerosis protocol (446) and open question protocol (924). We evaluated the effectiveness of the infrastructure in accessing and successfully extracting biomarkers from routinely acquired clinical imaging data. To examine the validity, we compared brain volumes between patient groups with positive and negative diagnosis, according to the patient reports. Overall, success rates of image data retrieval and automatic processing were 82.5 %, 82.3 % and 66.2 % for the three protocol groups respectively, indicating that a large percentage of routinely acquired clinical imaging data can be used for brain volumetry research, despite image heterogeneity. In line with the literature, brain volumes were found to be significantly smaller (p-value <0.001) in patients with a positive diagnosis of dementia (915 ml) compared to patients with a negative diagnosis (939 ml). This study demonstrates that quantitative image biomarkers such as intracranial and brain volume can be extracted from routinely acquired clinical imaging data. This enables secondary use of clinical images for research into quantitative biomarkers at a hitherto unprecedented scale.

  13. Digital image fusion systems: color imaging and low-light targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estrera, Joseph P.

    2009-05-01

    This paper presents digital image fusion (enhanced A+B) systems in color imaging and low light target applications. This paper will discuss first the digital sensors that are utilized in the noted image fusion applications which is a 1900x1086 (high definition format) CMOS imager coupled to a Generation III image intensifier for the visible/near infrared (NIR) digital sensor and 320x240 or 640x480 uncooled microbolometer thermal imager for the long wavelength infrared (LWIR) digital sensor. Performance metrics for these digital imaging sensors will be presented. The digital image fusion (enhanced A+B) process will be presented in context of early fused night vision systems such as the digital image fused system (DIFS) and the digital enhanced night vision goggle and later, the long range digitally fused night vision sighting system. Next, this paper will discuss the effects of user display color in a dual color digital image fusion system. Dual color image fusion schemes such as Green/Red, Cyan/Yellow, and White/Blue for image intensifier and thermal infrared sensor color representation, respectively, are discussed. Finally, this paper will present digitally fused imagery and image analysis of long distance targets in low light from these digital fused systems. The result of this image analysis with enhanced A+B digital image fusion systems is that maximum contrast and spatial resolution is achieved in a digital fusion mode as compared to individual sensor modalities in low light, long distance imaging applications. Paper has been cleared by DoD/OSR for Public Release under Ref: 08-S-2183 on August 8, 2008.

  14. Imaging properties of digital magnification radiography.

    PubMed

    Boyce, Sarah J; Samei, Ehsan

    2006-04-01

    Flat panel detectors exhibit improved signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and display capabilities compared to film. This improvement necessitates a new evaluation of optimal geometry for conventional projection imaging applications such as digital projection mammography as well as for advanced x-ray imaging applications including cone-beam computed tomography (CT), tomosynthesis, and mammotomography. Such an evaluation was undertaken in this study to examine the effects of x-ray source distribution, inherent detector resolution, magnification, scatter rejection, and noise characteristics including noise aliasing. A model for x-ray image acquisition was used to develop generic results applicable to flat panel detectors with similar x-ray absorption characteristics. The model assumed a Gaussian distribution for the focal spot and a rectangular distribution for a pixel. A generic model for the modulated transfer function (MTF) of indirect flat panel detectors was derived by a nonlinear fit of empirical receptor data to the Burgess model for phosphor MTFs. Noise characteristics were investigated using a generic noise power spectrum (NPS) model for indirect phosphor-based detectors. The detective quantum efficiency (DQE) was then calculated from the MTF and NPS models. The results were examined as a function of focal spot size (0.1, 0.3, and 0.6 mm) and pixel size (50, 100, 150, and 200 microm) for magnification ranges 1 to 3. Mammography, general radiography (also applicable to mammotomography), and chest radiography applications were explored using x-ray energies of 28, 74, and 120 kVp, respectively. Nodule detection was examined using the effective point source scatter model, effective DQE, and the Hotelling SNR2 efficiency. Results indicate that magnification can potentially improve the signal and noise performance of digital images. Results also show that a cross over point occurs in the spatial frequency above and below which the effects of magnification differ

  15. [Digital oral-maxillofacial imaging: present and future].

    PubMed

    Li, G; Yu, Q

    2016-04-09

    Digital imaging has been widely used in the field of oral and maxillofacial radiology. The present work summarizes the use of digital imaging from the following aspects: ①The origin of digital oral and maxillofacial imaging; ②The influence of digital imaging on the work mode and work flow of oral and maxillofacial radiology; ③ Application of picture archiving and communication system(PACS)in oral and maxillofacial radiology; ④The influence of three dimensional medical data sets on diagnosis, prognosis and treatment plan; ⑤Digital imaging facilitates the development of telemedicine and internet-medicine; ⑥The significance of establishing a medical database or data center; ⑦Problems and challenges.

  16. Accuracy of food portion size estimation from digital pictures acquired by a chest-worn camera

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Wenyan; Chen, Hsin-Chen; Yue, Yaofeng; Li, Zhaoxin; Fernstrom, John; Bai, Yicheng; Li, Chengliu; Sun, Mingui

    2014-01-01

    Objective Accurate estimation of food portion size is of paramount importance in dietary studies. We have developed a small, chest-worn electronic device called eButton which automatically takes pictures of consumed foods for objective dietary assessment. From the acquired pictures, the food portion size can be calculated semi-automatically with the help of computer software. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the accuracy of the calculated food portion size (volumes) from eButton pictures. Design Participants wore an eButton during their lunch. The volume of food in each eButton picture was calculated using software. For comparison, three raters estimated the food volume by viewing the same picture. The actual volume was determined by physical measurement using seed displacement. Setting Dining room and offices in a research laboratory. Subjects Seven lab member volunteers. Results Images of 100 food samples (fifty Western and fifty Asian foods) were collected and each food volume was estimated from these images using software. The mean relative error between the estimated volume and the actual volume over all the samples was −2.8 % (95 % CI −6.8 %, 1.2%) with SD of 20.4 %. For eighty-five samples, the food volumes determined by computer differed by no more than 30 % from the results of actual physical measurements. When the volume estimates by the computer and raters were compared, the computer estimates showed much less bias and variability. Conclusions From the same eButton pictures, the computer-based method provides more objective and accurate estimates of food volume than the visual estimation method. PMID:24476848

  17. Digital Camera with Apparatus for Authentication of Images Produced from an Image File

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedman, Gary L. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A digital camera equipped with a processor for authentication of images produced from an image file taken by the digital camera is provided. The digital camera processor has embedded therein a private key unique to it, and the camera housing has a public key that is so uniquely related to the private key that digital data encrypted with the private key may be decrypted using the public key. The digital camera processor comprises means for calculating a hash of the image file using a predetermined algorithm, and second means for encrypting the image hash with the private key, thereby producing a digital signature. The image file and the digital signature are stored in suitable recording means so they will be available together. Apparatus for authenticating the image file as being free of any alteration uses the public key for decrypting the digital signature, thereby deriving a secure image hash identical to the image hash produced by the digital camera and used to produce the digital signature. The authenticating apparatus calculates from the image file an image hash using the same algorithm as before. By comparing this last image hash with the secure image hash, authenticity of the image file is determined if they match. Other techniques to address time-honored methods of deception, such as attaching false captions or inducing forced perspectives, are included.

  18. System for objective assessment of image differences in digital cinema

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fliegel, Karel; Krasula, Lukáš; Páta, Petr; Myslík, Jiří; Pecák, Josef; Jícha, Marek

    2014-09-01

    There is high demand for quick digitization and subsequent image restoration of archived film records. Digitization is very urgent in many cases because various invaluable pieces of cultural heritage are stored on aging media. Only selected records can be reconstructed perfectly using painstaking manual or semi-automatic procedures. This paper aims to answer the question what are the quality requirements on the restoration process in order to obtain acceptably close visual perception of the digitally restored film in comparison to the original analog film copy. This knowledge is very important to preserve the original artistic intention of the movie producers. Subjective experiment with artificially distorted images has been conducted in order to answer the question what is the visual impact of common image distortions in digital cinema. Typical color and contrast distortions were introduced and test images were presented to viewers using digital projector. Based on the outcome of this subjective evaluation a system for objective assessment of image distortions has been developed and its performance tested. The system utilizes calibrated digital single-lens reflex camera and subsequent analysis of suitable features of images captured from the projection screen. The evaluation of captured image data has been optimized in order to obtain predicted differences between the reference and distorted images while achieving high correlation with the results of subjective assessment. The system can be used to objectively determine the difference between analog film and digital cinema images on the projection screen.

  19. Imaging of congenital anomalies and acquired lesions of the inner ear.

    PubMed

    Krombach, Gabriele A; Honnef, Dagmar; Westhofen, Martin; Di Martino, Ercole; Günther, Rolf W

    2008-02-01

    Imaging of the temporal bone is under continous developement. In the recent decades the technical advances of magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography have contributed to improved imaging quality in assessment of the temporal bone. Dedicated imaging protocols have been developed and are routinely employed in most institutions. However, imaging interpretation remains challenging, since the temporal bone is an anatomically highly complex region and most diseases of the inner ear occur with low incidence, so that even radiologists experienced in the field may be confronted with such entities for the first time. The current review gives an overview about symptoms and imaging appearance of malformations and acquired lesion of the inner ear.

  20. Cell imaging techniques based on digital image plane holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhaoji; Gong, Wendi; Liu, Feifei; Wang, Huaying

    2010-11-01

    This paper has further studied the implementation methods and recording conditions of digital microscopic image plane holography (DMIPH). Two optical systems of DMIPH were built: one is recording hologram by using plane waves as reference light, the other is recording hologram by spherical reference light. Breast cancer cells and USAF resolution test target is used as tested samples in the experiment. Then the intensity distribution and three-dimensional shape information of the cells are got accurately. The experiment results show that DMIPH avoids the process of finding recording distance by using auto-focusing approach. The recording and reconstruction process of DMIPH is simple. Therefore DMIPH can be applied to the microscopic imaging of cells more effectively.

  1. Digital Detection of Exosomes by Interferometric Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Daaboul, George G.; Gagni, Paola; Benussi, Luisa; Bettotti, Paolo; Ciani, Miriam; Cretich, Marina; Freedman, David S.; Ghidoni, Roberta; Ozkumur, Ayca Yalcin; Piotto, Chiara; Prosperi, Davide; Santini, Benedetta; Ünlü, M. Selim; Chiari, Marcella

    2016-01-01

    Exosomes, which are membranous nanovesicles, are actively released by cells and have been attributed to roles in cell-cell communication, cancer metastasis, and early disease diagnostics. The small size (30–100 nm) along with low refractive index contrast of exosomes makes direct characterization and phenotypical classification very difficult. In this work we present a method based on Single Particle Interferometric Reflectance Imaging Sensor (SP-IRIS) that allows multiplexed phenotyping and digital counting of various populations of individual exosomes (>50 nm) captured on a microarray-based solid phase chip. We demonstrate these characterization concepts using purified exosomes from a HEK 293 cell culture. As a demonstration of clinical utility, we characterize exosomes directly from human cerebrospinal fluid (hCSF). Our interferometric imaging method could capture, from a very small hCSF volume (20 uL), nanoparticles that have a size compatible with exosomes, using antibodies directed against tetraspanins. With this unprecedented capability, we foresee revolutionary implications in the clinical field with improvements in diagnosis and stratification of patients affected by different disorders. PMID:27853258

  2. Digital subtraction angiography: principles and pitfalls of image improvement techniques.

    PubMed

    Levin, D C; Schapiro, R M; Boxt, L M; Dunham, L; Harrington, D P; Ergun, D L

    1984-09-01

    The technology of imaging methods in digital subtraction angiography (DSA) is discussed in detail. Areas covered include function of the video camera in both interlaced and sequential scan modes, digitization by the analog-to-digital converter, logarithmic signal processing, dose rates, and acquisition of images using frame integration and pulsed-sequential techniques. Also discussed are various methods of improving image content and quality by both hardware and software modifications. These include the development of larger image intensifiers, larger matrices, video camera improvements, reregistration, hybrid subtraction, matched filtering, recursive filtering, DSA tomography, and edge enhancement.

  3. Modeling digital breast tomosynthesis imaging systems for optimization studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, Beverly Amy

    Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) is a new imaging modality for breast imaging. In tomosynthesis, multiple images of the compressed breast are acquired at different angles, and the projection view images are reconstructed to yield images of slices through the breast. One of the main problems to be addressed in the development of DBT is the optimal parameter settings to obtain images ideal for detection of cancer. Since it would be unethical to irradiate women multiple times to explore potentially optimum geometries for tomosynthesis, it is ideal to use a computer simulation to generate projection images. Existing tomosynthesis models have modeled scatter and detector without accounting for oblique angles of incidence that tomosynthesis introduces. Moreover, these models frequently use geometry-specific physical factors measured from real systems, which severely limits the robustness of their algorithms for optimization. The goal of this dissertation was to design the framework for a computer simulation of tomosynthesis that would produce images that are sensitive to changes in acquisition parameters, so an optimization study would be feasible. A computer physics simulation of the tomosynthesis system was developed. The x-ray source was modeled as a polychromatic spectrum based on published spectral data, and inverse-square law was applied. Scatter was applied using a convolution method with angle-dependent scatter point spread functions (sPSFs), followed by scaling using an angle-dependent scatter-to-primary ratio (SPR). Monte Carlo simulations were used to generate sPSFs for a 5-cm breast with a 1-cm air gap. Detector effects were included through geometric propagation of the image onto layers of the detector, which were blurred using depth-dependent detector point-spread functions (PRFs). Depth-dependent PRFs were calculated every 5-microns through a 200-micron thick CsI detector using Monte Carlo simulations. Electronic noise was added as Gaussian noise as a

  4. Iris recognition: on the segmentation of degraded images acquired in the visible wavelength.

    PubMed

    Proença, Hugo

    2010-08-01

    Iris recognition imaging constraints are receiving increasing attention. There are several proposals to develop systems that operate in the visible wavelength and in less constrained environments. These imaging conditions engender acquired noisy artifacts that lead to severely degraded images, making iris segmentation a major issue. Having observed that existing iris segmentation methods tend to fail in these challenging conditions, we present a segmentation method that can handle degraded images acquired in less constrained conditions. We offer the following contributions: 1) to consider the sclera the most easily distinguishable part of the eye in degraded images, 2) to propose a new type of feature that measures the proportion of sclera in each direction and is fundamental in segmenting the iris, and 3) to run the entire procedure in deterministically linear time in respect to the size of the image, making the procedure suitable for real-time applications.

  5. RADIOPACITY OF RESTORATIVE MATERIALS USING DIGITAL IMAGES

    PubMed Central

    Salzedas, Leda Maria Pescinini; Louzada, Mário Jefferson Quirino; de Oliveira, Antonio Braz

    2006-01-01

    The radiopacity of esthetic restorative materials has been established as an important requirement, improving the radiographic diagnosis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the radiopacity of six restorative materials using a direct digital image system, comparing them to the dental tissues (enamel-dentin), expressed as equivalent thickness of aluminum (millimeters of aluminum). Five specimens of each material were made. Three 2-mm thick longitudinal sections were cut from an intact extracted permanent molar tooth (including enamel and dentin). An aluminum step wedge with 9 steps was used. The samples of different materials were placed on a phosphor plate together with a tooth section, aluminum step wedge and metal code letter, and were exposed using a dental x-ray unit. Five measurements of radiographic density were obtained from each image of each item assessed (restorative material, enamel, dentin, each step of the aluminum step wedge) and the mean of these values was calculated. Radiopacity values were subsequently calculated as equivalents of aluminum thickness. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) indicated significant differences in radiopacity values among the materials (P<0.0001). The radiopacity values of the restorative materials evaluated were, in decreasing order: TPH, F2000, Synergy, Prisma Flow, Degufill, Luxat. Only Luxat had significantly lower radiopacity values than dentin. One material (Degufill) had similar radiopacity values to enamel and four (TPH, F2000, Synergy and Prisma Flow) had significantly higher radiopacity values than enamel. In conclusion, to assess the adequacy of posterior composite restorations it is important that the restorative material to be used has enough radiopacity, in order to be easily distinguished from the tooth structure in the radiographic image. Knowledge on the radiopacity of different materials helps professionals to select the most suitable material, along with other properties such as biocompatibility, adhesion and

  6. Automated quality assessment of autonomously acquired microscopic images of fluorescently stained bacteria.

    PubMed

    Zeder, M; Kohler, E; Pernthaler, J

    2010-01-01

    Quality assessment of autonomously acquired microscopic images is an important issue in high-throughput imaging systems. For example, the presence of low quality images (>or=10%) in a dataset significantly influences the counting precision of fluorescently stained bacterial cells. We present an approach based on an artificial neural network (ANN) to assess the quality of such images. Spatially invariant estimators were extracted as ANN input data from subdivided images by low level image processing. Different ANN designs were compared and >400 ANNs were trained and tested on a set of 25,000 manually classified images. The optimal ANN featured a correct identification rate of 94% (3% false positives, 3% false negatives) and could process about 10 images per second. We compared its performance with the image quality assessment by different humans and discuss the difficulties in assigning images to the correct quality class. The computer program and the documented source code (VB.NET) are provided under General Public Licence.

  7. Polaroid Graphics Imaging Direct Digital Color Proofing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Patrick F.

    1989-04-01

    Good morning ladies and gentlemen. I represent Polaroid Graphics Imaging, a wholly owned subsidiary of the Polaroid Corporation. We wish to thank Ken Cloud and the SPIE for the opportunity to speak today. Several criterion are fundamental in the role for Direct Digital Color Proofing (DDCP), First, the DDCP must represent a first generation hardcopy of the exact color information in the production stream. If must, as it's name suggests be an exact, proof (hence the name direct) of the electronic or digital information which would otherwise be directed toward film working. It is after all the most critical means to evaluate the quality of whatever pagination, scanner or color work which has gone be for it. Second, the DDCP must represent an opportunity. That opportunity is to reconvene the production stream and move to film making, optical or magnetic storage, or satellite transmission with the confidence that the DDCP is identical to some conventional counterpart. In the case of film it must match a conventional proof and press sheet, dot for dot. Otherwise it is merely an exercise in interpretation. For magnetic or optical storage and satellite transmission there must be assurance that at any opportunity either a duplicate DDCP or a conventional film/proof could reproduce earlier results. Finally as the printed product is the final goal and direct to press is evolving in direct to plate and direct to gravure printing the DDCP must share the half toner lineage of these products. Thirdly and hardly least, the whole purpose for DDCP is increased productivity. However, our industry struggles to maintain individuality and variety. Somehow DDCP must balance these forces.

  8. A Digital Staining Algorithm for Optical Coherence Tomography Images of the Optic Nerve Head

    PubMed Central

    Mari, Jean-Martial; Aung, Tin; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Strouthidis, Nicholas G.; Girard, Michaël J. A.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To digitally stain spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) images of the optic nerve head (ONH), and highlight either connective or neural tissues. Methods OCT volumes of the ONH were acquired from one eye of 10 healthy subjects. We processed all volumes with adaptive compensation to remove shadows and enhance deep tissue visibility. For each ONH, we identified the four most dissimilar pixel-intensity histograms, each of which was assumed to represent a tissue group. These four histograms formed a vector basis on which we ‘projected' each OCT volume in order to generate four digitally stained volumes P1 to P4. Digital staining was also verified using a digital phantom, and compared with k-means clustering for three and four clusters. Results Digital staining was able to isolate three regions of interest from the proposed phantom. For the ONH, the digitally stained images P1 highlighted mostly connective tissues, as demonstrated through an excellent contrast increase across the anterior lamina cribrosa boundary (3.6 ± 0.6 times). P2 highlighted the nerve fiber layer and the prelamina, P3 the remaining layers of the retina, and P4 the image background. Further, digital staining was able to separate ONH tissue layers that were not well separated by k-means clustering. Conclusion We have described an algorithm that can digitally stain connective and neural tissues in OCT images of the ONH. Translational Relevance Because connective and neural tissues are considerably altered in glaucoma, digital staining of the ONH tissues may be of interest in the clinical management of this pathology. PMID:28174676

  9. Hounsfield unit recovery in clinical cone beam CT images of the thorax acquired for image guided radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slot Thing, Rune; Bernchou, Uffe; Mainegra-Hing, Ernesto; Hansen, Olfred; Brink, Carsten

    2016-08-01

    A comprehensive artefact correction method for clinical cone beam CT (CBCT) images acquired for image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) on a commercial system is presented. The method is demonstrated to reduce artefacts and recover CT-like Hounsfield units (HU) in reconstructed CBCT images of five lung cancer patients. Projection image based artefact corrections of image lag, detector scatter, body scatter and beam hardening are described and applied to CBCT images of five lung cancer patients. Image quality is evaluated through visual appearance of the reconstructed images, HU-correspondence with the planning CT images, and total volume HU error. Artefacts are reduced and CT-like HUs are recovered in the artefact corrected CBCT images. Visual inspection confirms that artefacts are indeed suppressed by the proposed method, and the HU root mean square difference between reconstructed CBCTs and the reference CT images are reduced by 31% when using the artefact corrections compared to the standard clinical CBCT reconstruction. A versatile artefact correction method for clinical CBCT images acquired for IGRT has been developed. HU values are recovered in the corrected CBCT images. The proposed method relies on post processing of clinical projection images, and does not require patient specific optimisation. It is thus a powerful tool for image quality improvement of large numbers of CBCT images.

  10. Hounsfield unit recovery in clinical cone beam CT images of the thorax acquired for image guided radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Thing, Rune Slot; Bernchou, Uffe; Mainegra-Hing, Ernesto; Hansen, Olfred; Brink, Carsten

    2016-08-07

    A comprehensive artefact correction method for clinical cone beam CT (CBCT) images acquired for image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) on a commercial system is presented. The method is demonstrated to reduce artefacts and recover CT-like Hounsfield units (HU) in reconstructed CBCT images of five lung cancer patients. Projection image based artefact corrections of image lag, detector scatter, body scatter and beam hardening are described and applied to CBCT images of five lung cancer patients. Image quality is evaluated through visual appearance of the reconstructed images, HU-correspondence with the planning CT images, and total volume HU error. Artefacts are reduced and CT-like HUs are recovered in the artefact corrected CBCT images. Visual inspection confirms that artefacts are indeed suppressed by the proposed method, and the HU root mean square difference between reconstructed CBCTs and the reference CT images are reduced by 31% when using the artefact corrections compared to the standard clinical CBCT reconstruction. A versatile artefact correction method for clinical CBCT images acquired for IGRT has been developed. HU values are recovered in the corrected CBCT images. The proposed method relies on post processing of clinical projection images, and does not require patient specific optimisation. It is thus a powerful tool for image quality improvement of large numbers of CBCT images.

  11. Generation of high-dynamic range image from digital photo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ying; Potemin, Igor S.; Zhdanov, Dmitry D.; Wang, Xu-yang; Cheng, Han

    2016-10-01

    A number of the modern applications such as medical imaging, remote sensing satellites imaging, virtual prototyping etc use the High Dynamic Range Image (HDRI). Generally to obtain HDRI from ordinary digital image the camera is calibrated. The article proposes the camera calibration method based on the clear sky as the standard light source and takes sky luminance from CIE sky model for the corresponding geographical coordinates and time. The article considers base algorithms for getting real luminance values from ordinary digital image and corresponding programmed implementation of the algorithms. Moreover, examples of HDRI reconstructed from ordinary images illustrate the article.

  12. Cross-sectional imaging of congenital and acquired abnormalities of the portal venous system

    PubMed Central

    Özbayrak, Mustafa; Tatlı, Servet

    2016-01-01

    Knowing the normal anatomy, variations, congenital and acquired pathologies of the portal venous system are important, especially when planning liver surgery and percutaneous interventional procedures. The portal venous system pathologies can be congenital such as agenesis of portal vein (PV) or can be involved by other hepatic disorders such as cirrhosis and malignancies. In this article, we present normal anatomy, variations, and acquired pathologies involving the portal venous system as seen on computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). PMID:27731302

  13. Digital document imaging systems: An overview and guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    This is an aid to NASA managers in planning the selection of a Digital Document Imaging System (DDIS) as a possible solution for document information processing and storage. Intended to serve as a manager's guide, this document contains basic information on digital imaging systems, technology, equipment standards, issues of interoperability and interconnectivity, and issues related to selecting appropriate imaging equipment based upon well defined needs.

  14. [Myocardial perfusion imaging by digital subtraction angiography].

    PubMed

    Kadowaki, H; Ishikawa, K; Ogai, T; Katori, R

    1986-03-01

    Several methods of digital subtraction angiography (DSA) were compared to determine which could better visualize regional myocardial perfusion using coronary angiography in seven patients with myocardial infarction, two with angina pectoris and five with normal coronary arteries. Satisfactory DSA was judged to be achieved if the shape of the heart on the mask film was identical to that on the live film and if both films were exactly superimposed. To obtain an identical mask film in the shape of each live film, both films were selected from the following three phases of the cardiac cycle; at the R wave of the electrocardiogram, 100 msec before the R wave, and 200 msec before the R wave. The last two were superior for obtaining mask and live films which were similar in shape, because the cardiac motion in these phases was relatively small. Using these mask and live films, DSA was performed either with the continuous image mode (CI mode) or the time interval difference mode (TID mode). The overall perfusion of contrast medium through the artery to the vein was adequately visualized using the CI mode. Passage of contrast medium through the artery, capillary and vein was visualized at each phase using TID mode. Subtracted images were displayed and photographed, and the density of the contrast medium was adequate to display contour lines as in a relief map. Using this DSA, it was found that regional perfusion of the contrast medium was not always uniform in normal subjects, depending on the typography of the coronary artery.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. Copy-move forgery detection in digital image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alamro, Loai; Yusoff, Nooraini

    2016-08-01

    Copy-move is considered as one of the most popular kind of digital image tempering, in which one or more parts of a digital image are copied and pasted into different locations. Geometric transformation is among the major challenges in detecting copy-move forgery of a digital image. In such forgery, the copied and moved parts of a forged image are either rotated or/and re-scaled. Hence, in this study we propose a combination of Discrete Wavelet Transform (DWT) and Speeded Up Robust Features (SURF) to detect a copy-move activity. The experiments results prove that the proposed method is superior with overall accuracy 95%. The copy-move attacks in digital image has been successfully detected and the method is also can detect the fraud parts exposed to rotation and scaling issue.

  16. Digital Image Correlation for Performance Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palaviccini, Miguel; Turner, Dan; Herzberg, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Evaluating the health of a mechanism requires more than just a binary evaluation of whether an operation was completed. It requires analyzing more comprehensive, full-field data. Health monitoring is a process of non-destructively identifying characteristics that indicate the fitness of an engineered component. In order to monitor unit health in a production setting, an automated test system must be created to capture the motion of mechanism parts in a real-time and non-intrusive manner. One way to accomplish this is by using high-speed video and Digital Image Correlation (DIC). In this approach, individual frames of the video are analyzed to track the motion of mechanism components. The derived performance metrics allow for state-of-health monitoring and improved fidelity of mechanism modeling. The results are in-situ state-of-health identification and performance prediction. This paper introduces basic concepts of this test method, and discusses two main themes: the use of laser marking to add fiducial patterns to mechanism components, and new software developed to track objects with complex shapes, even as they move behind obstructions. Finally, the implementation of these tests into an automated tester is discussed.

  17. Digital Image Correlation for Performance Monitoring.

    SciTech Connect

    Palaviccini, Miguel; Turner, Daniel Z.; Herzberg, Michael

    2016-02-01

    Evaluating the health of a mechanism requires more than just a binary evaluation of whether an operation was completed. It requires analyzing more comprehensive, full-field data. Health monitoring is a process of nondestructively identifying characteristics that indicate the fitness of an engineered component. In order to monitor unit health in a production setting, an automated test system must be created to capture the motion of mechanism parts in a real-time and non-intrusive manner. One way to accomplish this is by using high-speed video (HSV) and Digital Image Correlation (DIC). In this approach, individual frames of the video are analyzed to track the motion of mechanism components. The derived performance metrics allow for state-of-health monitoring and improved fidelity of mechanism modeling. The results are in-situ state-of-health identification and performance prediction. This paper introduces basic concepts of this test method, and discusses two main themes: the use of laser marking to add fiducial patterns to mechanism components, and new software developed to track objects with complex shapes, even as they move behind obstructions. Finally, the implementation of these tests into an automated tester is discussed.

  18. Applications of digital image acquisition in anthropometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woolford, B.; Lewis, J. L.

    1981-01-01

    A description is given of a video kinesimeter, a device for the automatic real-time collection of kinematic and dynamic data. Based on the detection of a single bright spot by three TV cameras, the system provides automatic real-time recording of three-dimensional position and force data. It comprises three cameras, two incandescent lights, a voltage comparator circuit, a central control unit, and a mass storage device. The control unit determines the signal threshold for each camera before testing, sequences the lights, synchronizes and analyzes the scan voltages from the three cameras, digitizes force from a dynamometer, and codes the data for transmission to a floppy disk for recording. Two of the three cameras face each other along the 'X' axis; the third camera, which faces the center of the line between the first two, defines the 'Y' axis. An image from the 'Y' camera and either 'X' camera is necessary for determining the three-dimensional coordinates of the point.

  19. Infrared digital imaging of the equine anterior segment.

    PubMed

    McMullen, Richard J; Clode, Alison B; Gilger, Brian C

    2009-01-01

    Ocular photographs are an increasingly important method of documenting lesions for inclusion in medical records, teaching purposes, and research. Availability of affordable high-quality digital imaging equipment has allowed for enhanced capture of desired images because of immediate on-camera viewing and editing. Conversion of the standard digital camera sensor to one that is sensitive to infrared light (i.e. > 760 nm < 1 mm wavelength) can be done inexpensively. In the equine eye, advantages of infrared digital photography include increased contrast of anterior segment images, identification and monitoring of pigmentary changes, and increased visualization of the anterior segment through a cloudy or edematous cornea.

  20. [Development of a digital EEG signal acquiring system based on virtual instrument technology].

    PubMed

    Ying, Jun; Chen, Guang-Fei; He, Shi-Lin

    2009-09-01

    This paper introduces an 16-lead digital EEG signal acquisition system, which applies MCU MSP430 as central control unit with high performance analog devices and high speed multi-channel, multi-bit analog-to-digital converter as peripheral to retrench analog circuit. Data is transferred to PC by USART interface. Software on PC based on virtual instrument technology realizes real-time detection, display and storage. The system has many advantages such as high precision, stable performance, small volume and low power dissipation, thus provides a new means for digital EEG signal acquisition.

  1. Evaluating the image quality of cone beam CT acquired during rotational delivery

    PubMed Central

    Maria Das, K J; Maria Midunvaleja, K; Gowtham Raj, D; Agarwal, Arpita; Velmurugan, J; Kumar, Shaleen

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this work was to evaluate the quality of kilovoltage (kV) cone beam CT (CBCT) images acquired during arc delivery. Methods: Arc plans were delivered on a Catphan® 600 phantom (The Phantom Laboratory Inc., Salem, NY), and kV CBCT images were acquired during the treatment. The megavoltage (MV) scatter effect on kV CBCT image quality was evaluated using parameters such as Hounsfield unit (HU) accuracy, spatial resolution, contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and spatial non-uniformity (SNU). These CBCT images were compared with reference scans acquired with the same acquisition parameters without MV “beam on”. This evaluation was carried out for different photon beams (6 and 15 MV), arc types (half vs full arc), static field sizes (10 × 10 and 25 × 25 cm2) and source-to-imager distances (SID) (150 and 170 cm). Results and Conclusion: HU accuracy, CNR and SNU were considerably affected by MV scatter, and this effect was increased with increasing field size and decreasing photon energy, whereas the spatial resolution was almost unchanged. The MV scatter effect was observed to be more for full-rotation arc delivery than for half-arc delivery. In addition, increasing the SID resulted in decreased MV scatter effect and improved the image quality. Advances in knowledge: Nowadays, volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) is increasingly used in clinics, and this arc therapy enables us to acquire CBCT imaging simultaneously. But, the main issue of concurrent imaging is the “MV scatter” effect on CBCT imaging. This study aims to experimentally quantify the effect of MV scatter on CBCT image quality. PMID:26226396

  2. Dynamic imaging through turbid media based on digital holography.

    PubMed

    Li, Shiping; Zhong, Jingang

    2014-03-01

    Imaging through turbid media using visible or IR light instead of harmful x ray is still a challenging problem, especially in dynamic imaging. A method of dynamic imaging through turbid media using digital holography is presented. In order to match the coherence length between the dynamic object wave and the reference wave, a cw laser is used. To solve the problem of difficult focusing in imaging through turbid media, an autofocus technology is applied. To further enhance the image contrast, a spatial filtering technique is used. A description of digital holography and experiments of imaging the objects hidden in turbid media are presented. The experimental result shows that dynamic images of the objects can be achieved by the use of digital holography.

  3. [Generation and processing of digital images in radiodiagnosis].

    PubMed

    Bajla, I; Belan, V

    1993-05-01

    The paper describes universal principles of diagnostic imaging. The attention is focused particularly on digital image generation in medicine. The methodology of display visualization of measured data is discussed. The problems of spatial relation representation and visual perception of image brightness are mentioned. The methodological issues of digital image processing (DIP) are discussed, particularly the relation of DIP to the other related disciplines, fundamental tasks in DIP and classification of DIP operations from the computational viewpoint. The following examples of applying DIP operations in diagnostic radiology are overviewed: local contrast enhancement in digital image, spatial filtering, quantitative texture analysis, synthesis of the 3D pseudospatial image based on the 2D tomogram set, multimodal processing of medical images. New trends of application of DIP methods in diagnostic radiology are outlined: evaluation of the diagnostic efficiency of DIP operations by means of ROC analysis, construction of knowledge-based systems of DIP in medicine. (Fig. 12, Ref. 26.)

  4. Study of digital mammographic equipments by phantom image quality.

    PubMed

    Mayo, P; Rodenas, F; Verdú, G; Campayo, J M; Villaescusa, J I

    2006-01-01

    Nowadays, the digital radiographic equipments are replacing the traditional film-screen equipments and it is necessary to update the parameters to guarantee the quality of the process. Contrast-detail phantoms are applied to digital radiography to study the threshold contrast-detail sensitivity at operation conditions of the equipment. The phantom that is studied in this work is CDMAM 3.4. One of the most extended indexes to measure the image quality in an objective way is the image quality figure (IQF). The aim of this work is to study the image quality of different images contrast-detail phantom CDMAM 3.4, carrying out the automatic detection of the contrast-detail combination and to establish a parameter which characterize in an objective way the mammographic image quality. This is useful to compare images obtained at different digital mammographic equipments to study the functioning of the equipments that facilitates the evaluation of image contrast and detail resolution.

  5. Invited article: Digital beam-forming imaging riometer systems.

    PubMed

    Honary, Farideh; Marple, Steve R; Barratt, Keith; Chapman, Peter; Grill, Martin; Nielsen, Erling

    2011-03-01

    The design and operation of a new generation of digital imaging riometer systems developed by Lancaster University are presented. In the heart of the digital imaging riometer is a field-programmable gate array (FPGA), which is used for the digital signal processing and digital beam forming, completely replacing the analog Butler matrices which have been used in previous designs. The reconfigurable nature of the FPGA has been exploited to produce tools for remote system testing and diagnosis which have proven extremely useful for operation in remote locations such as the Arctic and Antarctic. Different FPGA programs enable different instrument configurations, including a 4 × 4 antenna filled array (producing 4 × 4 beams), an 8 × 8 antenna filled array (producing 7 × 7 beams), and a Mills cross system utilizing 63 antennas producing 556 usable beams. The concept of using a Mills cross antenna array for riometry has been successfully demonstrated for the first time. The digital beam forming has been validated by comparing the received signal power from cosmic radio sources with results predicted from the theoretical beam radiation pattern. The performances of four digital imaging riometer systems are compared against each other and a traditional imaging riometer utilizing analog Butler matrices. The comparison shows that digital imaging riometer systems, with independent receivers for each antenna, can obtain much better measurement precision for filled arrays or much higher spatial resolution for the Mills cross configuration when compared to existing imaging riometer systems.

  6. A review of some digital image processing in cometary research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, S. M.

    The development of electronic digitizers, digital detector arrays and modern high speed computer processing has led to more efficient, quantitative methods of studying the spatial, temporal and photometric properties of cometary phenomena. Digital image processing techniques are being used and further developed to reduce two dimensional data, to enhance the visibility of cometary features, and to quantify spatial and temporal changes. Some of these methods are reviewed, and their merits and limitations are discussed.

  7. Image gathering and coding for digital restoration: Information efficiency and visual quality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huck, Friedrich O.; John, Sarah; Mccormick, Judith A.; Narayanswamy, Ramkumar

    1989-01-01

    Image gathering and coding are commonly treated as tasks separate from each other and from the digital processing used to restore and enhance the images. The goal is to develop a method that allows us to assess quantitatively the combined performance of image gathering and coding for the digital restoration of images with high visual quality. Digital restoration is often interactive because visual quality depends on perceptual rather than mathematical considerations, and these considerations vary with the target, the application, and the observer. The approach is based on the theoretical treatment of image gathering as a communication channel (J. Opt. Soc. Am. A2, 1644(1985);5,285(1988). Initial results suggest that the practical upper limit of the information contained in the acquired image data range typically from approximately 2 to 4 binary information units (bifs) per sample, depending on the design of the image-gathering system. The associated information efficiency of the transmitted data (i.e., the ratio of information over data) ranges typically from approximately 0.3 to 0.5 bif per bit without coding to approximately 0.5 to 0.9 bif per bit with lossless predictive compression and Huffman coding. The visual quality that can be attained with interactive image restoration improves perceptibly as the available information increases to approximately 3 bifs per sample. However, the perceptual improvements that can be attained with further increases in information are very subtle and depend on the target and the desired enhancement.

  8. An image processing system for digital chest X-ray images.

    PubMed

    Cocklin, M; Gourlay, A; Jackson, P; Kaye, G; Miessler, M; Kerr, I; Lams, P

    1984-01-01

    This paper investigates the requirements for image processing of digital chest X-ray images. These images are conventionally recorded on film and are characterised by large size, wide dynamic range and high resolution. X-ray detection systems are now becoming available for capturing these images directly in photoelectronic-digital form. In this report, the hardware and software facilities required for handling these images are described. These facilities include high resolution digital image displays, programmable video look up tables, image stores for image capture and processing and a full range of software tools for image manipulation. Examples are given of the application of digital image processing techniques to this class of image.

  9. The Reduction Of Motion Artifacts In Digital Subtraction Angiography By Geometrical Image Transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzpatrick, J. Michael; Pickens, David R.; Mandava, Venkateswara R.; Grefenstette, John J.

    1988-06-01

    In the diagnosis of arteriosclerosis, radio-opaque dye is injected into the interior of the arteries to make them visible. Because of its increased contrast sensitivity, digital subtraction angiography has the potential for providing diagnostic images of arteries with reduced dye volumes. In the conventional technique, a mask image, acquired before the introduction of the dye, is subtracted from the contrast image, acquired after the dye is introduced, to produce a difference image in which only the dye in the arteries is visible. The usefulness of this technique has been severely limited by the image degradation caused by patient motion during image acquisition. This motion produces artifacts in the difference image that obscure the arteries. One technique for dealing with this problem is to reduce the degradation by means of image registration. The registration is carried out by means of a geometrical transformation of the mask image before subtraction so that it is in registration with the contrast image. This paper describes our technique for determining an optimal transformation. We employ a one-to-one elastic mapping and the Jacobian of that mapping to produce a geometrical image transformation. We choose a parameterized class of such mappings and use a heuristic search algorithm to optimize the parameters to minimize the severity of the motion artifacts. To increase the speed of the optimization process we use a statistical image comparison technique that provides a quick approximate evaluation of each image transformation. We present the experimental results of the application of our registration system to mask-contrast pairs, for images acquired from a specially designed phantom (described in a companion paper), and for clinical images.

  10. Multispectral Digital Image Analysis of Varved Sediments in Thin Sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jäger, K.; Rein, B.; Dietrich, S.

    2006-12-01

    An update of the recently developed method COMPONENTS (Rein, 2003, Rein & Jäger, subm.) for the discrimination of sediment components in thin sections is presented here. COMPONENTS uses a 6-band (multispectral) image analysis. To derive six-band spectral information of the sediments, thin sections are scanned with a digital camera mounted on a polarizing microscope. The thin sections are scanned twice, under polarized and under unpolarized plain light. During each run RGB images are acquired which are subsequently stacked to a six-band file. The first three bands (Blue=1, Green=2, Red=3) result from the spectral behaviour in the blue, green and red band with unpolarized light conditions, and the bands 4 to 6 (Blue=4, Green=5, Red=6) from the polarized light run. The next step is the discrimination of the sediment components by their transmission behaviour. Automatic classification algorithms broadly used in remote sensing applications cannot be used due to unavoidable variations of sediment particle or thin section thicknesses that change absolute grey values of the sediment components. Thus, we use an approach based on band ratios, also known as indices. By using band ratios, the grey values measured in different bands are normalized against each other and illumination variations (e.g. thickness variations) are eliminated. By combining specific ratios we are able to detect all seven major components in the investigated sediments (carbonates, diatoms, fine clastic material, plant rests, pyrite, quartz and resin). Then, the classification results (compositional maps) are validated. Although the automatic classification and the analogous classification show high concordances, some systematic errors could be identified. For example, the transition zone between the sediment and resin filled cracks is classified as fine clastic material and very coarse carbonates are partly classified as quartz because coarse carbonates can be very bright and spectra are partly

  11. Digital holography and 3D imaging: introduction to feature issue.

    PubMed

    Kim, Myung K; Hayasaki, Yoshio; Picart, Pascal; Rosen, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    This feature issue of Applied Optics on Digital Holography and 3D Imaging is the sixth of an approximately annual series. Forty-seven papers are presented, covering a wide range of topics in phase-shifting methods, low coherence methods, particle analysis, biomedical imaging, computer-generated holograms, integral imaging, and many others.

  12. Experiences with digital processing of images at INPE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mascarenhas, N. D. A. (Principal Investigator)

    1984-01-01

    Four different research experiments with digital image processing at INPE will be described: (1) edge detection by hypothesis testing; (2) image interpolation by finite impulse response filters; (3) spatial feature extraction methods in multispectral classification; and (4) translational image registration by sequential tests of hypotheses.

  13. Edge Detection in Digital Images Using Dispersive Phase Stretch Transform

    PubMed Central

    Asghari, Mohammad H.; Jalali, Bahram

    2015-01-01

    We describe a new computational approach to edge detection and its application to biomedical images. Our digital algorithm transforms the image by emulating the propagation of light through a physical medium with specific warped diffractive property. We show that the output phase of the transform reveals transitions in image intensity and can be used for edge detection. PMID:25878656

  14. Affordable, Accessible, Immediate: Capture Stunning Images with Digital Infrared Photography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Technology educators who teach digital photography should consider incorporating an infrared (IR) photography component into their program. This is an area where digital photography offers significant benefits. Either type of IR imaging is very interesting to explore, but traditional film-based IR photography is difficult and expensive. In…

  15. The British Library Initiatives for Access Seminar: Digital Imaging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, Michael

    1996-01-01

    Provides an overview of the British Library's Initiatives for Access program which uses digital imaging. Highlights include digitization of microfilm, the electronic "Beowulf", electronic photographic viewing system, computer software that uses neural networks and fuzzy matching to provide links to search terms, and international…

  16. Application of digital image processing techniques to astronomical imagery 1977

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorre, J. J.; Lynn, D. J.

    1978-01-01

    Nine specific techniques of combination of techniques developed for applying digital image processing technology to existing astronomical imagery are described. Photoproducts are included to illustrate the results of each of these investigations.

  17. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-087). March 2005. GENERATOR PIT AREA, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  18. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-012). March 2005. PASSAGEWAY UNDER QUADRANT AND DIFFUSION PUMPS, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  19. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection XBD200503-00117-089). March 2005. GENERATOR PIT AREA, CONCRETE FOUNDATION FOR EQUIPMENT MOUNTS, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  20. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-054). March 2005. LOCAL INJECTOR ENTERING SHIELDING, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  1. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-006). March 2005. JACKBOLTS BETWEEN MAGNET AND MAGNET FOUNDATION, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  2. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-158). March 2005. CONNECTION OF MAGNET ROOM CRANE TO OUTER TRACK, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  3. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-050). March 2005. DIFFUSION PUMPS UNDER WEST TANGENT, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  4. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-106). March 2005. SOUTH FAN, FAN ROOM, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  5. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-052). March 2005. LOCAL INJECTOR, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  6. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-110). March 2005. SOUTH FAN FROM MEZZANINE, FAN ROOM, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  7. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-066). March 2005. LOCAL INJECTOR, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  8. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-026). March 2005. MOUSE AT EAST TANGENT, LOOKING TOWARD EAST TANGENT, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  9. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-004). March 2005. ENTRY TO IGLOO, ILLUSTRATING THICKNESS OF IGLOO WALL, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  10. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-027). March 2005. MOUSE AT EAST TANGENT, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  11. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-005). March 2005. PASSAGEWAY UNDER SOUTHEAST QUADRANT, AIR DUCT OPENINGS, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  12. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-107). March 2005. NORTH FAN, FAN ROOM, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  13. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-015). March 2005. INTERIOR WALL OF MAGNET INSIDE CENTER OF BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  14. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-108). March 2005. FAN ROOM WITH STAIR TO FILTER BANKS, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  15. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-047). March 2005. AREA OF MAGNET REMOVAL, NORTHEAST QUADRANT, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  16. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-082). June 2005. CEILING AND CRANE OF BUILDING 51A, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  17. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-043). March 2005. MOUSE AT EAST TANGENT, PLUNGING MECHANISM, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  18. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-077). March 2005. STUB OF SUPERHILAC BEAM, ENTERING SHIELDING, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  19. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-143). March 2005. BUILDING 51A, EXTERIOR WALL, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  20. Using Digital Images To Engage Young Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Scoter, Judy

    2004-01-01

    Take a look into an active classroom where students use a variety of resources for learning. Some students are finishing pattern block constructions. After marking the line of symmetry with yarn, they record the accomplishment with a digital camera. A group of students gathers around a digital microscope investigating a pine cone, predicting what…

  1. Digital Image Collections: Issues and Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ester, Michael

    The Commission on Preservation and Access has published a number of reports on the preservation and access implications of scanning text and microfilm. This report focuses on what sets the digitization of visual collections apart from other scanning projects. Projects to digitize visual collections present their own unique set of questions and…

  2. Digital image processing of bone - Problems and potentials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morey, E. R.; Wronski, T. J.

    1980-01-01

    The development of a digital image processing system for bone histomorphometry and fluorescent marker monitoring is discussed. The system in question is capable of making measurements of UV or light microscope features on a video screen with either video or computer-generated images, and comprises a microscope, low-light-level video camera, video digitizer and display terminal, color monitor, and PDP 11/34 computer. Capabilities demonstrated in the analysis of an undecalcified rat tibia include the measurement of perimeter and total bone area, and the generation of microscope images, false color images, digitized images and contoured images for further analysis. Software development will be based on an existing software library, specifically the mini-VICAR system developed at JPL. It is noted that the potentials of the system in terms of speed and reliability far exceed any problems associated with hardware and software development.

  3. Digital Image Analysis for DETCHIP(®) Code Determination.

    PubMed

    Lyon, Marcus; Wilson, Mark V; Rouhier, Kerry A; Symonsbergen, David J; Bastola, Kiran; Thapa, Ishwor; Holmes, Andrea E; Sikich, Sharmin M; Jackson, Abby

    2012-08-01

    DETECHIP(®) is a molecular sensing array used for identification of a large variety of substances. Previous methodology for the analysis of DETECHIP(®) used human vision to distinguish color changes induced by the presence of the analyte of interest. This paper describes several analysis techniques using digital images of DETECHIP(®). Both a digital camera and flatbed desktop photo scanner were used to obtain Jpeg images. Color information within these digital images was obtained through the measurement of red-green-blue (RGB) values using software such as GIMP, Photoshop and ImageJ. Several different techniques were used to evaluate these color changes. It was determined that the flatbed scanner produced in the clearest and more reproducible images. Furthermore, codes obtained using a macro written for use within ImageJ showed improved consistency versus pervious methods.

  4. Applying a proposed definition for receptor dose to digital projection images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Metter, Richard; Yorkston, John

    2006-03-01

    Digital radiographs are currently characterized in terms of a variety of incompatible, vendor-specific dose metrics, which make it difficult for users to monitor receptor dose. AAPM Task Group #116 has been formed to "Standardize an Image Receptor Dose Index for Digital Radiography," prompting the publication of a proposed definition for receptor dose that can be readily implemented on any system that acquires a projection x-ray image and produces a display-ready image.1 This paper carries that work forward by demonstrating the applicability of that proposal to a range of digital detector types and to a new set of clinical images. Digital receptor dose can be usefully defined for the four ISO beam qualities, in terms of the exposure needed to produce a specified display response in a displayed image, analogous to the ISO speed definition for screen-film images. It requires that the system produce an original image (calibrated in terms of the relationship between system response and exposure for the standard set of x-ray beam qualities defined by ISO-9236-1) and a display-ready image (represented as DICOM GSDF p-values). The receptor dose is computed in terms of the median of pixels in the original image that corresponds to near midrange pixels in the display-ready image. The exposure responses of Gd IIO IIS-, CsI(Tl)-, a-Se-, and BaFBrI-based digital radiography acquisition systems, as well as a commonly used Gd IIO IIS screen-film combination, have been measured for the four ISO beam qualities. The proposed receptor dose metric was computed for a sample of 602 clinical images for which body-part thickness technique factors (kV, mAs, and SID) were known. Analysis of this data demonstrates that the proposed receptor dose can be a useful predictor of exposure adequacy over a wide range of body parts and thickness. In conclusion, the proposed vendor-independent receptor dose metric has been shown to produce consistent results across a representative range of digital

  5. MR imaging of congenital/developmental and acquired disorders of the pediatric hip and pelvis.

    PubMed

    Dillon, Johanne E; Connolly, Susan A; Connolly, Leonard P; Kim, Young-Jo; Jaramillo, Diego

    2005-11-01

    This article reviews the MR imaging findings of some of the more common congenital and acquired disorders of the pediatric hip and pelvis,with the intent of increasing the awareness of radiologists and facilitating early and accurate diagnosis and treatment. The importance of MR imaging in the pediatric population is underscored by its ability to evaluate these disorders well and without the use of ionizing radiation.

  6. Precision Agriculture: Using Low-Cost Systems to Acquire Low-Altitude Images.

    PubMed

    Ponti, Moacir; Chaves, Arthur A; Jorge, Fabio R; Costa, Gabriel B P; Colturato, Adimara; Branco, Kalinka R L J C

    2016-01-01

    Low cost remote sensing imagery has the potential to make precision farming feasible in developing countries. In this article, the authors describe image acquisition from eucalyptus, bean, and sugarcane crops acquired by low-cost and low-altitude systems. They use different approaches to handle low-altitude images in both the RGB and NIR (near-infrared) bands to estimate and quantify plantation areas.

  7. Taking digital imaging to the next level: challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Hobbs, W Cecyl

    2004-01-01

    New medical imaging technology, such as multi-detector computed tomography (CT) scanners and positron emission tomography (PET) scanners, are creating new possibilities for non-invasive diagnosis that are leading providers to invest heavily in these new technologies. The volume of data produced by such technology is so large that it cannot be "read" using traditional film-based methods, and once in digital form, it creates a massive data integration and archiving challenge. Despite the benefits of digital imaging and archiving, there are several key challenges that healthcare organizations should consider in planning, selecting, and implementing the information technology (IT) infrastructure to support digital imaging. Decisions about storage and image distribution are essentially questions of "where" and "how fast." When planning the digital archiving infrastructure, organizations should think about where they want to store and distribute their images. This is similar to decisions that organizations have to make in regard to physical film storage and distribution, except the portability of images is even greater in a digital environment. The principle of "network effects" seems like a simple concept, yet the effect is not always considered when implementing a technology plan. To fully realize the benefits of digital imaging, the radiology department must integrate the archiving solutions throughout the department and, ultimately, with applications across other departments and enterprises. Medical institutions can derive a number of benefits from implementing digital imaging and archiving solutions like PACS. Hospitals and imaging centers can use the transition from film-based imaging as a foundational opportunity to reduce costs, increase competitive advantage, attract talent, and improve service to patients. The key factors in achieving these goals include attention to the means of data storage, distribution and protection.

  8. Multimodal digital color imaging system for facial skin lesion analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, Youngwoo; Lee, Youn-Heum; Jung, Byungjo

    2008-02-01

    In dermatology, various digital imaging modalities have been used as an important tool to quantitatively evaluate the treatment effect of skin lesions. Cross-polarization color image was used to evaluate skin chromophores (melanin and hemoglobin) information and parallel-polarization image to evaluate skin texture information. In addition, UV-A induced fluorescent image has been widely used to evaluate various skin conditions such as sebum, keratosis, sun damages, and vitiligo. In order to maximize the evaluation efficacy of various skin lesions, it is necessary to integrate various imaging modalities into an imaging system. In this study, we propose a multimodal digital color imaging system, which provides four different digital color images of standard color image, parallel and cross-polarization color image, and UV-A induced fluorescent color image. Herein, we describe the imaging system and present the examples of image analysis. By analyzing the color information and morphological features of facial skin lesions, we are able to comparably and simultaneously evaluate various skin lesions. In conclusion, we are sure that the multimodal color imaging system can be utilized as an important assistant tool in dermatology.

  9. Acquisition of Diagnostic Screen and Synchrotron Radiation Images Using IEEE1394 Digital Cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehm, G.

    2004-11-01

    In the LINAC, booster synchrotron and transfer lines of DIAMOND a number of screens (YAG:Ce and OTR) as well as synchrotron radiation ports will be used to acquire information about the transverse beam distribution. Digital IEEE1394 cameras have been selected for their range of sensor sizes and resolutions available, their easy triggering to single events, and their noise-free transmission of the images into the control system. Their suitability for use under influence of high-energy radiation has been verified. Images from preliminary tests at the SRS Daresbury are presented.

  10. The influence of software filtering in digital mammography image quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michail, C.; Spyropoulou, V.; Kalyvas, N.; Valais, I.; Dimitropoulos, N.; Fountos, G.; Kandarakis, I.; Panayiotakis, G.

    2009-05-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most frequently diagnosed cancers among women. Several techniques have been developed to help in the early detection of breast cancer such as conventional and digital x-ray mammography, positron and single-photon emission mammography, etc. A key advantage in digital mammography is that images can be manipulated as simple computer image files. Thus non-dedicated commercially available image manipulation software can be employed to process and store the images. The image processing tools of the Photoshop (CS 2) software usually incorporate digital filters which may be used to reduce image noise, enhance contrast and increase spatial resolution. However, improving an image quality parameter may result in degradation of another. The aim of this work was to investigate the influence of three sharpening filters, named hereafter sharpen, sharpen more and sharpen edges on image resolution and noise. Image resolution was assessed by means of the Modulation Transfer Function (MTF).In conclusion it was found that the correct use of commercial non-dedicated software on digital mammograms may improve some aspects of image quality.

  11. Digital management and regulatory submission of medical images from clinical trials: role and benefits of the core laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robbins, William L.; Conklin, James J.

    1995-10-01

    Medical images (angiography, CT, MRI, nuclear medicine, ultrasound, x ray) play an increasingly important role in the clinical development and regulatory review process for pharmaceuticals and medical devices. Since medical images are increasingly acquired and archived digitally, or are readily digitized from film, they can be visualized, processed and analyzed in a variety of ways using digital image processing and display technology. Moreover, with image-based data management and data visualization tools, medical images can be electronically organized and submitted to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for review. The collection, processing, analysis, archival, and submission of medical images in a digital format versus an analog (film-based) format presents both challenges and opportunities for the clinical and regulatory information management specialist. The medical imaging 'core laboratory' is an important resource for clinical trials and regulatory submissions involving medical imaging data. Use of digital imaging technology within a core laboratory can increase efficiency and decrease overall costs in the image data management and regulatory review process.

  12. Construction and interpretation of a digital inertia image. [of Pisgah Crater and Lavic Lake in Southern California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillespie, A. R.; Kahle, A. B.

    1977-01-01

    An image representing the thermal inertia in the vicinity of Pisgah Crater and Lavic Lake in Southern California has been generated from visible, near IR, and thermal images taken from aircraft. Construction of the thermal inertia image required radiometric calibration and geometric rectification of the acquired images as well as registration to a topographic map. The Kahle thermal model used in the construction of the thermal inertia image requires specification of albedo, topographic slope and slope azimuth, diurnal temperature range and local meteorological conditions. Albedo information was derived from the visible image; digital topographic information was computed from digitized stereo aerial photographs; and thermal ranges were calculated by subtracting the predawn from the afternoon thermal image data. Our computed values of thermal inertia were in close agreement with published values for similar surface materials. Thermal inertia provides complementary information to conventional images of reflected solar radiation for use in lithologic mapping.

  13. Seeking the Green Basilisk Lizard: Acquiring Digital Literacy Practices in the Home

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davidson, Christina

    2012-01-01

    Research confirms that young children engage in digital literacy practices in the home. While there is an emerging body of work that documents the diversity of these practices, there is little research that examines their acquisition in situ. This article uses conversation analysis to describe and explicate the social accomplishment of a number of…

  14. Analysis of radar images by means of digital terrain models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Domik, G.; Leberl, F.; Kobrick, M.

    1984-01-01

    It is pointed out that the importance of digital terrain models in the processing, analysis, and interpretation of remote sensing data is increasing. In investigations related to the study of radar images, digital terrain models can have a particular significance, because radar reflection is a function of the terrain characteristics. A procedure for the analysis and interpretation of radar images is discussed. The procedure is based on a utilization of computer simulation which makes it possible to produce simulated radar images on the basis of a digital terrain model. The simulated radar images are used for the geometric and radiometric rectification of real radar images. A description of the employed procedures is provided, and the obtained results are discussed, taking into account a test area in Northern California.

  15. Reconstruction of MR images from data acquired on an arbitrary k-space trajectory using the same-image weight.

    PubMed

    Qian, Yongxian; Lin, Jiarui; Jin, Deqin

    2002-08-01

    A sampling density compensation function denoted "same-image (SI) weight" is proposed to reconstruct MR images from the data acquired on an arbitrary k-space trajectory. An equation for the SI weight is established on the SI criterion and an iterative scheme is developed to find the weight. The SI weight is then used to reconstruct images from the data calculated on a random trajectory in a numerical phantom case and from the data acquired on interleaved spirals in an in vivo experiment, respectively. In addition, Pipe and Menon's weight (MRM 1999;41:179-186) is also used in the reconstructions to make a comparison. The images obtained with the SI weight were found to be slightly more accurate than those obtained with Pipe's weight.

  16. Marking-dots digital image correlation and application to studies of spinal biomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jinlong; Sun, Cuiru; Qin, Yuwen; Ji, Xinhua

    2005-04-01

    A method of marking-dots digital image correlation is developed to measure the biomechanics behavior of cattle spine. In the system, a video camera and personal computer are used to acquire digitized images of a random speckle pattern on the surface of a marking-dot before and after deformation. The method of making-dots digital image correlation can immediately measure the transformation by tracking the gray value pattern in small local neighborhoods commonly referred to as subsets. In the experiment, a specimen was selected from the cattle's spine that was covered with some muscles and tissues. It is apparent that the covering muscles and tissues cannot be treated as the information carrier, for they must be kept active and moist curing by the physiological brine in the course of the experiment. In order to solve the problem, the marking-dots were fixed into the vertebrae, and the front surface of a marking-dot was coated with a thin layer of white paint and splattered with black spot so as to create a random black-on-white speckle pattern. Experimental results have shown that the marking-dots digital image correlation method can be applied to the measurement of the biomechanical behavior of cattle spine, and offer an effective measurement tool to research the range of motion of the adjacent segment in spine under intervertebral fusion.

  17. A GPU Simulation Tool for Training and Optimisation in 2D Digital X-Ray Imaging.

    PubMed

    Gallio, Elena; Rampado, Osvaldo; Gianaria, Elena; Bianchi, Silvio Diego; Ropolo, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Conventional radiology is performed by means of digital detectors, with various types of technology and different performance in terms of efficiency and image quality. Following the arrival of a new digital detector in a radiology department, all the staff involved should adapt the procedure parameters to the properties of the detector, in order to achieve an optimal result in terms of correct diagnostic information and minimum radiation risks for the patient. The aim of this study was to develop and validate a software capable of simulating a digital X-ray imaging system, using graphics processing unit computing. All radiological image components were implemented in this application: an X-ray tube with primary beam, a virtual patient, noise, scatter radiation, a grid and a digital detector. Three different digital detectors (two digital radiography and a computed radiography systems) were implemented. In order to validate the software, we carried out a quantitative comparison of geometrical and anthropomorphic phantom simulated images with those acquired. In terms of average pixel values, the maximum differences were below 15%, while the noise values were in agreement with a maximum difference of 20%. The relative trends of contrast to noise ratio versus beam energy and intensity were well simulated. Total calculation times were below 3 seconds for clinical images with pixel size of actual dimensions less than 0.2 mm. The application proved to be efficient and realistic. Short calculation times and the accuracy of the results obtained make this software a useful tool for training operators and dose optimisation studies.

  18. A GPU Simulation Tool for Training and Optimisation in 2D Digital X-Ray Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Gallio, Elena; Rampado, Osvaldo; Gianaria, Elena; Bianchi, Silvio Diego; Ropolo, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Conventional radiology is performed by means of digital detectors, with various types of technology and different performance in terms of efficiency and image quality. Following the arrival of a new digital detector in a radiology department, all the staff involved should adapt the procedure parameters to the properties of the detector, in order to achieve an optimal result in terms of correct diagnostic information and minimum radiation risks for the patient. The aim of this study was to develop and validate a software capable of simulating a digital X-ray imaging system, using graphics processing unit computing. All radiological image components were implemented in this application: an X-ray tube with primary beam, a virtual patient, noise, scatter radiation, a grid and a digital detector. Three different digital detectors (two digital radiography and a computed radiography systems) were implemented. In order to validate the software, we carried out a quantitative comparison of geometrical and anthropomorphic phantom simulated images with those acquired. In terms of average pixel values, the maximum differences were below 15%, while the noise values were in agreement with a maximum difference of 20%. The relative trends of contrast to noise ratio versus beam energy and intensity were well simulated. Total calculation times were below 3 seconds for clinical images with pixel size of actual dimensions less than 0.2 mm. The application proved to be efficient and realistic. Short calculation times and the accuracy of the results obtained make this software a useful tool for training operators and dose optimisation studies. PMID:26545097

  19. Automatic rice crop height measurement using a field server and digital image processing.

    PubMed

    Sritarapipat, Tanakorn; Rakwatin, Preesan; Kasetkasem, Teerasit

    2014-01-07

    Rice crop height is an important agronomic trait linked to plant type and yield potential. This research developed an automatic image processing technique to detect rice crop height based on images taken by a digital camera attached to a field server. The camera acquires rice paddy images daily at a consistent time of day. The images include the rice plants and a marker bar used to provide a height reference. The rice crop height can be indirectly measured from the images by measuring the height of the marker bar compared to the height of the initial marker bar. Four digital image processing steps are employed to automatically measure the rice crop height: band selection, filtering, thresholding, and height measurement. Band selection is used to remove redundant features. Filtering extracts significant features of the marker bar. The thresholding method is applied to separate objects and boundaries of the marker bar versus other areas. The marker bar is detected and compared with the initial marker bar to measure the rice crop height. Our experiment used a field server with a digital camera to continuously monitor a rice field located in Suphanburi Province, Thailand. The experimental results show that the proposed method measures rice crop height effectively, with no human intervention required.

  20. Automated analysis of phantom images for the evaluation of long-term reproducibility in digital mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gennaro, G.; Ferro, F.; Contento, G.; Fornasin, F.; di Maggio, C.

    2007-03-01

    The performance of an automatic software package was evaluated with phantom images acquired by a full-field digital mammography unit. After the validation, the software was used, together with a Leeds TORMAS test object, to model the image acquisition process. Process modelling results were used to evaluate the sensitivity of the method in detecting changes of exposure parameters from routine image quality measurements in digital mammography, which is the ultimate purpose of long-term reproducibility tests. Image quality indices measured by the software included the mean pixel value and standard deviation of circular details and surrounding background, contrast-to-noise ratio and relative contrast; detail counts were also collected. The validation procedure demonstrated that the software localizes the phantom details correctly and the difference between automatic and manual measurements was within few grey levels. Quantitative analysis showed sufficient sensitivity to relate fluctuations in exposure parameters (kVp or mAs) to variations in image quality indices. In comparison, detail counts were found less sensitive in detecting image quality changes, even when limitations due to observer subjectivity were overcome by automatic analysis. In conclusion, long-term reproducibility tests provided by the Leeds TORMAS phantom with quantitative analysis of multiple IQ indices have been demonstrated to be effective in predicting causes of deviation from standard operating conditions and can be used to monitor stability in full-field digital mammography.

  1. Ultra-high resolution color images of the surface of comet 67P acquired by ROLIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröder, Stefan; Mottola, Stefano; Arnold, Gabriele; Grothues, Hans-Georg; Hamm, Maximilian; Jaumann, Ralf; Michaelis, Harald; Pelivan, Ivanka; Proffe, Gerrit; Bibring, Jean-Pierre

    2015-04-01

    On Nov 12, 2014, the Rosetta Philae lander descended towards comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. The onboard ROLIS camera successfully acquired high resolution images of the surface looking down from its vantage point on the instrument platform. ROLIS is a compact CCD imager with a 1024×1024 pixel sensor and a 57° field of view (Mottola et al., 2007, SSR 128, 241). It is equipped with an infinity lens (IFL), without which the camera focus is 30 cm. At Philae's final landing site, ROLIS removed the IFL and initiated an imaging sequence that shows the surface at the highest resolution ever obtained for a cometary surface (~0.5 mm per pixel). Illumination of the scene was provided by an onboard array of LEDs in four different colors: red, green, blue, and near-IR. ROLIS acquired one image for each color and a single dark exposure. The images show a unique, almost fractal morphology for the surface below the landing site that defies easy interpretation. However, there are similarities with some structures seen by the CIVA camera. Color and albedo variations over the surface are minor, and individual grains cannot be distinguished. The images are out-of-focus, indicating the surface was further away than the nominal 30 cm. The location of the illumination spot and the change of focus over the image are consistent with an inclined surface, indicating that Philae's final resting position is strongly tilted. In fact, it was inclined so much that we see the local horizon, even though ROLIS is downward-looking. Remarkably, the scene beyond the horizon is illuminated by the Sun, and out-of-focus particles can be seen to travel in the sky. The images suggest the environment of the lander is laden with fine dust, but a final assessment requires careful consideration of possible sources of stray light. Just before Philae went to sleep, ROLIS acquired an additional exposure with the IFL and the red LED. The resulting image is fully in focus. Because Philae had rotated and lifted

  2. The comparative effectiveness of conventional and digital image libraries.

    PubMed

    McColl, R I; Johnson, A

    2001-03-01

    Before introducing a hospital-wide image database to improve access, navigation and retrieval speed, a comparative study between a conventional slide library and a matching image database was undertaken to assess its relative benefits. Paired time trials and personal questionnaires revealed faster retrieval rates, higher image quality, and easier viewing for the pilot digital image database. Analysis of confidentiality, copyright and data protection exposed similar issues for both systems, thus concluding that the digital image database is a more effective library system. The authors suggest that in the future, medical images will be stored on large, professionally administered, centrally located file servers, allowing specialist image libraries to be tailored locally for individual users. The further integration of the database with web technology will enable cheap and efficient remote access for a wide range of users.

  3. TM digital image products for applications. [computer compatible tapes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barker, J. L.; Gunther, F. J.; Abrams, R. B.; Ball, D.

    1984-01-01

    The image characteristics of digital data generated by LANDSAT 4 thematic mapper (TM) are discussed. Digital data from the TM resides in tape files at various stages of image processing. Within each image data file, the image lines are blocked by a factor of either 5 for a computer compatible tape CCT-BT, or 4 for a CCT-AT and CCT-PT; in each format, the image file has a different format. Nominal geometric corrections which provide proper geodetic relationships between different parts of the image are available only for the CCT-PT. It is concluded that detector 3 of band 5 on the TM does not respond; this channel of data needs replacement. The empty bin phenomenon in CCT-AT images results from integer truncations of mixed-mode arithmetric operations.

  4. Digital Topology and Geometry in Medical Imaging: A Survey.

    PubMed

    Saha, Punam K; Strand, Robin; Borgefors, Gunilla

    2015-09-01

    Digital topology and geometry refers to the use of topologic and geometric properties and features for images defined in digital grids. Such methods have been widely used in many medical imaging applications, including image segmentation, visualization, manipulation, interpolation, registration, surface-tracking, object representation, correction, quantitative morphometry etc. Digital topology and geometry play important roles in medical imaging research by enriching the scope of target outcomes and by adding strong theoretical foundations with enhanced stability, fidelity, and efficiency. This paper presents a comprehensive yet compact survey on results, principles, and insights of methods related to digital topology and geometry with strong emphasis on understanding their roles in various medical imaging applications. Specifically, this paper reviews methods related to distance analysis and path propagation, connectivity, surface-tracking, image segmentation, boundary and centerline detection, topology preservation and local topological properties, skeletonization, and object representation, correction, and quantitative morphometry. A common thread among the topics reviewed in this paper is that their theory and algorithms use the principle of digital path connectivity, path propagation, and neighborhood analysis.

  5. Patient doses and image quality in digital chest radiology.

    PubMed

    Salát, D; Nikodemová, D

    2008-01-01

    Chest X-ray examination is one of the most frequently required procedures used in clinical practice. For studying the image quality of different X-ray digital systems and for the control of patient doses during chest radiological examinations, the standard anthropomorphic lung/chest phantom RSD 330 has been used and exposed in different digital modalities available in Slovakia. To compare different techniques of chest examination, a special software has been developed that enables researchers to compare digital imaging and communications in medicine header images from different digital modalities, using a special viewer. In this paper, this special software has been used for an anonymous correspondent audit for testing image quality evaluation by comparing various parameters of chest imaging, evaluated by 84 Slovak radiologists. The results of the comparison have shown that the majority of the participating radiologists felt that the highest image quality is reached with a flat panel, assessed by the entrance surface dose value, which is approximately 75% lower than the diagnostic reference level of chest examination given in the Slovak legislation. Besides the results of the audit, the possibilities of using the software for optimisation, education and training of medical students, radiological assistants, physicists and radiologists in the field of digital radiology will be described.

  6. Restoration Of Faded Color Photographs By Digital Image Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gschwind, Rudolf

    1989-10-01

    Color photographs possess a poor stability towards light, chemicals heat and humidity. As a consequence, the colors of photographs deteriorate with time. Because of the complexity of processes that cause the dyes to fade, it is impossible to restore the images by chemical means. It is therefore attempted to restore faded color films by means of digital image processing.

  7. Digital Images of Breast Biopsies using a Silicon Strip Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Montano, Luis M.; Diaz, Claudia C.; Leyva, Antonio; Cabal, Fatima

    2006-09-08

    In our study we have used a silicon strip detector to obtain digital images of some breast tissues with micro calcifications. Some of those images will be shown and we will discuss the perspectives of using this technique as an improvement of breast cancer diagnostics.

  8. Improving the quality of radiographic images acquired with conical radiation beams through divergence correction and filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silvani, M. I.; Almeida, G. L.; Latini, R. M.; Bellido, A. V. B.; Souza, E. S.; Lopes, R. T.

    2015-07-01

    Earlier works have shown the feasibility to correct the deformation of the attenuation map in radiographs acquired with conical radiation beams provided that the inspected object could be expressed into analytical geometry terms. This correction reduces the contribution of the main object in the radiograph, allowing thus the visualization of its otherwise concealed heterogeneities. However, the non-punctual character of the source demanded a cumbersome trial-and-error approach in order to determine the proper correction parameters for the algorithm. Within this frame, this work addresses the improvement of radiographs of specially tailored test-objects acquired with a conical beam through correction of its divergence by using the information contained in the image itself. The corrected images have afterwards undergone a filtration in the frequency domain aiming at the reduction of statistical fluctuation and noise by using a 2D Fourier transform. All radiographs have been acquired using 165Dy and 198Au gamma-ray sources produced at the Argonauta research reactor in Institutode Engenharia Nuclear - CNEN, and an X-ray sensitive imaging plate as detector. The processed images exhibit features otherwise invisible in the original ones. Their processing by conventional histogram equalization carried out for comparison purposes did not succeed to detect those features.

  9. Pluto system for digitized images of photoplates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shatohina, S.; Kazantzeva, L.; Andruk, V.; Protziuk, Ju.

    2016-06-01

    Pluto's planetary system, because of its remoteness, the recent discovery of components and lack of observational data remains understudied. Modern approach to re-processing early observations of Pluto with new technologies and measurements can be an effective treatment for building models of planetary systems and the theory of motion. As a result of combining the efforts of three Ukrainian observatories – the project participants UkrVO - collected, digitized and processed observations of Pluto during 1961–1990 included in the Joint Digital Archive of UkrVO. Using common techniques astronomy negative digitization and further processing for observations obtained 5 telescopes catalogue positions and magnitudes of Pluto. An analysis of the (O-C) in the position and magnitude relative to the current standard ephemeris motion of the planet and comparison with the results of other authors treatments.

  10. The FBI compression standard for digitized fingerprint images

    SciTech Connect

    Brislawn, C.M.; Bradley, J.N.; Onyshczak, R.J.; Hopper, T.

    1996-10-01

    The FBI has formulated national standards for digitization and compression of gray-scale fingerprint images. The compression algorithm for the digitized images is based on adaptive uniform scalar quantization of a discrete wavelet transform subband decomposition, a technique referred to as the wavelet/scalar quantization method. The algorithm produces archival-quality images at compression ratios of around 15 to 1 and will allow the current database of paper fingerprint cards to be replaced by digital imagery. A compliance testing program is also being implemented to ensure high standards of image quality and interchangeability of data between different implementations. We will review the current status of the FBI standard, including the compliance testing process and the details of the first-generation encoder.

  11. SU-E-J-186: Acquiring and Assessing Upright CBCT Images for Future Treatment Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Fave, X; Yang, J; Balter, P; Court, L

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To acquire upright CBCT images using the onboard imager of a Varian TrueBeam. An easy to implement upright imaging protocol could allow for widespread upright radiation therapy which would greatly benefit certain patients. These include thoracic cancer patients (because lung volume increases in a seated position) and patients who experience substantial discomfort during supine treatment. Methods: To acquire upright CBCT images, the gantry head remained stationary at 0 degrees with the KV imager arms extended to their lateral positions. Phantoms were placed upright at the end of the treatment couch. During a scan, the couch rotated from 270 to 90 degrees while continuous fluoroscopic projections were taken by the onboard imager. To extend the field-of-view, this sequence was performed twice: once with the KV detector longitudinally offset +14.5cm and once with it longitudinally offset −14.5cm. The resulting two image sets were stitched together before reconstruction. The imaging beam parameters were chosen to deliver a dose similar to that given during a simulation CT. Image quality was evaluated for spatial linearity, high and low contrast resolution, and HU linearity using CatPhan and anthropomorphic phantoms. A deformable registration technique was used to evaluate HU mapping from a simulation CT. Results: Spatial linearity and high contrast resolution were maintained in upright CBCT when compared to simulation CT. However, low contrast resolution and HU linearity degraded. Streak artifacts were caused by the limited 180 degree arc of the couch, and the stitching process created a sharp artifact at the center of the reconstruction. The deformable registration was robust in the HU mapping even with these artifacts and the loss of HU linearity. Conclusions: The image quality obtained from upright CBCT was sufficient for treatment planning. The success of this novel technique is an important step towards a future clinical protocol. This project was funded

  12. Image digitalization and processing of contact lens fitting to astigmatic eyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Manuel F. M.

    1998-01-01

    The use of standard CCD cameras and image digitalization and processing on medical diagnosis are more and more frequent. The correction of human eye's refraction problems by the use of contact lenses is generalized. In spite its advantages in terms of users comfort, special care must be taken on its prescription and adaptation. Astigmatic eyes often place the highest problems. A careful assessment of the quality of the lens to cornea adaptation must to be performed. The basic and more traditional way to check the contact lens' fitting is to perform a fluorescein test. We intend to make the process more convenient for both patient and optometrist. The fluorescence images are acquired by a CCD camera and then digitized and processed in order to produce a semi- automated process.

  13. Digital image compression for a 2f multiplexing optical setup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas, J.; Amaya, D.; Rueda, E.

    2016-07-01

    In this work a virtual 2f multiplexing system was implemented in combination with digital image compression techniques and redundant information elimination. Depending on the image type to be multiplexed, a memory-usage saving of as much as 99% was obtained. The feasibility of the system was tested using three types of images, binary characters, QR codes, and grey level images. A multiplexing step was implemented digitally, while a demultiplexing step was implemented in a virtual 2f optical setup following real experimental parameters. To avoid cross-talk noise, each image was codified with a specially designed phase diffraction carrier that would allow the separation and relocation of the multiplexed images on the observation plane by simple light propagation. A description of the system is presented together with simulations that corroborate the method. The present work may allow future experimental implementations that will make use of all the parallel processing capabilities of optical systems.

  14. GEOMETRIC PROCESSING OF DIGITAL IMAGES OF THE PLANETS.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Edwards, Kathleen

    1987-01-01

    New procedures and software have been developed for geometric transformations of images to support digital cartography of the planets. The procedures involve the correction of spacecraft camera orientation of each image with the use of ground control and the transformation of each image to a Sinusoidal Equal-Area map projection with an algorithm which allows the number of transformation calculations to vary as the distortion varies within the image. When the distortion is low in an area of an image, few transformation computations are required, and most pixels can be interpolated. When distortion is extreme, the location of each pixel is computed. Mosaics are made of these images and stored as digital databases.

  15. Interactive display system having a digital micromirror imaging device

    DOEpatents

    Veligdan, James T.; DeSanto, Leonard; Kaull, Lisa; Brewster, Calvin

    2006-04-11

    A display system includes a waveguide optical panel having an inlet face and an opposite outlet face. A projector cooperates with a digital imaging device, e.g. a digital micromirror imaging device, for projecting an image through the panel for display on the outlet face. The imaging device includes an array of mirrors tiltable between opposite display and divert positions. The display positions reflect an image light beam from the projector through the panel for display on the outlet face. The divert positions divert the image light beam away from the panel, and are additionally used for reflecting a probe light beam through the panel toward the outlet face. Covering a spot on the panel, e.g. with a finger, reflects the probe light beam back through the panel toward the inlet face for detection thereat and providing interactive capability.

  16. Digital pathology and image analysis in tissue biomarker research.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Peter W; Bankhead, Peter; Wang, Yinhai; Hutchinson, Ryan; Kieran, Declan; McArt, Darragh G; James, Jacqueline; Salto-Tellez, Manuel

    2014-11-01

    Digital pathology and the adoption of image analysis have grown rapidly in the last few years. This is largely due to the implementation of whole slide scanning, advances in software and computer processing capacity and the increasing importance of tissue-based research for biomarker discovery and stratified medicine. This review sets out the key application areas for digital pathology and image analysis, with a particular focus on research and biomarker discovery. A variety of image analysis applications are reviewed including nuclear morphometry and tissue architecture analysis, but with emphasis on immunohistochemistry and fluorescence analysis of tissue biomarkers. Digital pathology and image analysis have important roles across the drug/companion diagnostic development pipeline including biobanking, molecular pathology, tissue microarray analysis, molecular profiling of tissue and these important developments are reviewed. Underpinning all of these important developments is the need for high quality tissue samples and the impact of pre-analytical variables on tissue research is discussed. This requirement is combined with practical advice on setting up and running a digital pathology laboratory. Finally, we discuss the need to integrate digital image analysis data with epidemiological, clinical and genomic data in order to fully understand the relationship between genotype and phenotype and to drive discovery and the delivery of personalized medicine.

  17. Digital adaptive optics line-scanning confocal imaging system.

    PubMed

    Liu, Changgeng; Kim, Myung K

    2015-01-01

    A digital adaptive optics line-scanning confocal imaging (DAOLCI) system is proposed by applying digital holographic adaptive optics to a digital form of line-scanning confocal imaging system. In DAOLCI, each line scan is recorded by a digital hologram, which allows access to the complex optical field from one slice of the sample through digital holography. This complex optical field contains both the information of one slice of the sample and the optical aberration of the system, thus allowing us to compensate for the effect of the optical aberration, which can be sensed by a complex guide star hologram. After numerical aberration compensation, the corrected optical fields of a sequence of line scans are stitched into the final corrected confocal image. In DAOLCI, a numerical slit is applied to realize the confocality at the sensor end. The width of this slit can be adjusted to control the image contrast and speckle noise for scattering samples. DAOLCI dispenses with the hardware pieces, such as Shack–Hartmann wavefront sensor and deformable mirror, and the closed-loop feedbacks adopted in the conventional adaptive optics confocal imaging system, thus reducing the optomechanical complexity and cost. Numerical simulations and proof-of-principle experiments are presented that demonstrate the feasibility of this idea.

  18. Digital adaptive optics line-scanning confocal imaging system

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Changgeng; Kim, Myung K.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. A digital adaptive optics line-scanning confocal imaging (DAOLCI) system is proposed by applying digital holographic adaptive optics to a digital form of line-scanning confocal imaging system. In DAOLCI, each line scan is recorded by a digital hologram, which allows access to the complex optical field from one slice of the sample through digital holography. This complex optical field contains both the information of one slice of the sample and the optical aberration of the system, thus allowing us to compensate for the effect of the optical aberration, which can be sensed by a complex guide star hologram. After numerical aberration compensation, the corrected optical fields of a sequence of line scans are stitched into the final corrected confocal image. In DAOLCI, a numerical slit is applied to realize the confocality at the sensor end. The width of this slit can be adjusted to control the image contrast and speckle noise for scattering samples. DAOLCI dispenses with the hardware pieces, such as Shack–Hartmann wavefront sensor and deformable mirror, and the closed-loop feedbacks adopted in the conventional adaptive optics confocal imaging system, thus reducing the optomechanical complexity and cost. Numerical simulations and proof-of-principle experiments are presented that demonstrate the feasibility of this idea. PMID:26140334

  19. Digital imaging: a promising tool for mushroom identification.

    PubMed

    Fischbein, Connie B; Mueller, Gregory M; Leacock, Patrick R; Wahl, Michael S; Aks, Steven E

    2003-07-01

    Mushroom poisoning is a diagnostic and treatment dilemma for health care professionals. Decisions regarding treatment following ingestions are usually made without a firm identification of the fungus and tend to be more aggressive than necessary. The identification of mushrooms is beyond the scope of health care professionals, and a mycologist is essential to make an accurate identification. Telemedicine and digital imaging is an emerging technology that can assist in mushroom identification and facilitate patient care. The efficacy of using digital images sent over the Internet was tested in a pilot project. This article describes three cases in which digital images and verbal descriptions assisted in mushroom identification. When the actual specimen was sent to a mycologist, a definitive identification was obtained and compared with the presumptive identification. Digital images alone do not permit definitive identification; however, they often contain sufficient information to help the clinician rule out the possibility of a severely toxic species. Data accumulated to date indicate that digital imaging can be an important tool in the diagnosis and treatment of mushroom ingestion, and possibly other biologicals such as plants, insects, and reptiles.

  20. Multiple-wavelength Color Digital Holography for Monochromatic Image Reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheremkhin, P. A.; Shevkunov, I. A.; Petrov, N. V.

    In this paper, we consider the opposite problem, namely, using of color digital holograms simultaneously recorded on several wavelengths for the reconstruction of monochromatic images. Special feature of the procedure of monochromatic image reconstruction from the color hologram is the necessity of extracting information from separate spectral channels with a corresponding overlaying of obtained images to avoid mismatching of their spatial position caused by dependence of methods of numerical reconstruction from the laser wavelength.

  1. Development of Digital Steroscopic Imaging Technique in Mammography

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-05-01

    imaging technique in which the phantom was shifted instead of the focal spot for acquisition of the left-eye and right-eye images. In a preliminary observer... Phantoms (C) Phantom Evaluation of Full Field Steremammography (D) Evaluation of the Effect of Zooming on Depth Measurements in Digital...interpretation by radiologists and reduce unnecessary biopsies. To accomplish this goal, we first performed phantom studies to develop an optimal imaging

  2. Digital imaging technology applied to crewstation display measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Leonard Y.; Green, John R.

    1993-12-01

    A `slow scan' CCD camera has been adapted for luminance and radiance measurement of displays used in night vision goggle (NVG) compatible aircraft. A video lightmeter offers several advantages compared to conventional test methods including high speed image capture and color coding of the digital image data. The color coding feature facilitates evaluation of the test display uniformity. Numerical values for luminance and infrared radiance are also extracted from the image data.

  3. The digital optical module - How IceCube will acquire data

    SciTech Connect

    Stokstad, R.G.

    2003-01-09

    IceCube will be a km-scale neutrino detector consisting of 4800 optical modules (OMs) on 80 strings of 60 OMs each. The DAQ technology will have the following desirable features: (1) the robustness of copper cable between the OMs and the surface. (2) digitization and time-stamping of signals that are unattenuated and undispersed. (3) calibration methods (particularly for timing) appropriate for a large number of OMs. The PMT anode waveform is digitized and time-stamped in the OM. The time calibration procedure is both accurate and automatic. A system having these features has been tested in AMANDA. A prototype digital system consisting of 40 OMs was deployed in Jan., 2000. The principal components of the Digital Optical Module (DOM) signal processing circuitry are: the analog transient waveform digitizer (ATWD), a low-power custom integrated circuit that captures the waveform in 128 samples at a rate of {approx}500 Megasamples/s; an ADC operating at {approx}30 MS/s covering several microseconds; a FPGA that provides state control, time stamps events, handles communications, etc.; a low-power 32-bit ARM CPU with a real-time operating system. A 16.8 MHz oscillator, made by Toyocom, is free-running, very stable ({delta}f/f {approx} 5 {center_dot} 10{sup -11} over {approx} 5s) and provides clock signals to several components. Short (12 m) cables connecting adjacent modules enable a local time coincidence, which eliminates most of the {approx}1 kHz of dark noise pulses. A critical requirement is the ability to calibrate the DOM oscillator against a master clock at the surface. In essence, timing pulses sent in one direction at known time intervals can be used to determine relative frequency, and the round trip time of pulses sent in both directions can determine the offset. After receiving a timing pulse at the DOM and waiting for a short time, {delta}t, measured on the DOM clock, a pulse is sent from the DOM to the surface. The shapes of the pulses sent down and up are

  4. Novel method to calculate pulmonary compliance images in rodents from computed tomography acquired at constant pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerrero, Thomas; Castillo, Richard; Sanders, Kevin; Price, Roger; Komaki, Ritsuko; Cody, Dianna

    2006-03-01

    Our goal was to develop a method for generating high-resolution three-dimensional pulmonary compliance images in rodents from computed tomography (CT) images acquired at a series of constant pressures in ventilated animals. One rat and one mouse were used to demonstrate this technique. A pre-clinical GE flat panel CT scanner (maximum 31 line-pairs cm-1 resolution) was utilized for image acquisition. The thorax of each animal was imaged with breath-holds at 2, 6, 10, 14 and 18 cm H2O pressure in triplicate. A deformable image registration algorithm was applied to each pair of CT images to map corresponding tissue elements. Pulmonary compliance was calculated on a voxel by voxel basis using adjacent pairs of CT images. Triplicate imaging was used to estimate the measurement error of this technique. The 3D pulmonary compliance images revealed regional heterogeneity of compliance. The maximum total lung compliance measured 0.080 (±0.007) ml air per cm H2O per ml of lung and 0.039 (±0.004) ml air per cm H2O per ml of lung for the rat and mouse, respectively. In this study, we have demonstrated a unique method of quantifying regional lung compliance from 4 to 16 cm H2O pressure with sub-millimetre spatial resolution in rodents. Presented at the Third IASTED Int. Conf. on Biomechanics (Benidorm, Spain), 7-9 September 2005.

  5. Copyright protection of images in the digital environment.

    PubMed

    Ibbotson, J

    1997-03-01

    All creators of copyright-protected works are re-assessing the protection and exploitation of their works in the digital environment. This article attempts to define 'digital' in a copyright context. It reminds artists and photographers of the essentials of copyright as they already apply in the UK before it looks at how those essentials may apply to images circulating in the digital environment. Finally it covers some of the key issues which artists and other creators are now having to address in their day to day work.

  6. Exposing digital image forgeries by 3D reconstruction technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yongqiang; Xu, Xiaojing; Li, Zhihui; Liu, Haizhen; Li, Zhigang; Huang, Wei

    2009-11-01

    Digital images are easy to tamper and edit due to availability of powerful image processing and editing software. Especially, forged images by taking from a picture of scene, because of no manipulation was made after taking, usual methods, such as digital watermarks, statistical correlation technology, can hardly detect the traces of image tampering. According to image forgery characteristics, a method, based on 3D reconstruction technology, which detect the forgeries by discriminating the dimensional relationship of each object appeared on image, is presented in this paper. This detection method includes three steps. In the first step, all the parameters of images were calibrated and each crucial object on image was chosen and matched. In the second step, the 3D coordinates of each object were calculated by bundle adjustment. In final step, the dimensional relationship of each object was analyzed. Experiments were designed to test this detection method; the 3D reconstruction and the forged image 3D reconstruction were computed independently. Test results show that the fabricating character in digital forgeries can be identified intuitively by this method.

  7. ROPtool analysis of images acquired using a noncontact handheld fundus camera (Pictor)--a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Vickers, Laura A; Freedman, Sharon F; Wallace, David K; Prakalapakorn, S Grace

    2015-12-01

    The presence of plus disease is the primary indication for treatment of retinopathy of prematurity (ROP), but its diagnosis is subjective and prone to error. ROPtool is a semiautomated computer program that quantifies vascular tortuosity and dilation. Pictor is an FDA-approved, noncontact, handheld digital fundus camera. This pilot study evaluated ROPtool's ability to analyze high-quality Pictor images of premature infants and its accuracy in diagnosing plus disease compared to clinical examination. In our small sample of images, ROPtool could trace and identify the presence of plus disease with high accuracy.

  8. Digital imaging in pathology--current applications and challenges.

    PubMed

    Brachtel, Elena; Yagi, Yukako

    2012-04-01

    Conventional histopathology is rapidly shifting towards digital integration. Will microscopes (and pathologists) soon be obsolete? Or are we dealing with just another image modality that leaves the core of tissue diagnosis intact? This article provides an overview of current digital pathology applications and research with emphasis on whole slide imaging (WSI). Static or interactive digital pathology work stations already can be used for many purposes, e.g. telepathology expert consultations, frozen section diagnosis in remote areas, cytology screening, quality assurance, diagnostic validations for clinical trials, quantitation of hormone receptor or HER2 studies in breast cancer, or three-dimensional visualization of anatomical structures, among others. Changes of workflow in histology laboratories are beginning to enable digital image acquisition and WSI in a routine setting. WSI plays an increasing role in pathology education, glass slide boxes in medical schools are being replaced by digital slide collections; digital slide seminars and virtual microscopy are used for postgraduate and continuing medical education in pathology. Research and efforts to validate WSI systems for diagnostic settings are ongoing.

  9. Experience with CANDID: Comparison algorithm for navigating digital image databases

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, P.; Cannon, M.

    1994-10-01

    This paper presents results from the authors experience with CANDID (Comparison Algorithm for Navigating Digital Image Databases), which was designed to facilitate image retrieval by content using a query-by-example methodology. A global signature describing the texture, shape, or color content is first computed for every image stored in a database, and a normalized similarity measure between probability density functions of feature vectors is used to match signatures. This method can be used to retrieve images from a database that are similar to a user-provided example image. Results for three test applications are included.

  10. LATIN AMERICAN IMAGE QUALITY SURVEY IN DIGITAL MAMMOGRAPHY STUDIES.

    PubMed

    Mora, Patricia; Khoury, Helen; Bitelli, Regina; Quintero, Ana Rosa; Garay, Fernando; Aguilar, Juan García; Gamarra, Mirtha; Ubeda, Carlos

    2016-03-23

    Under International Atomic Energy Agency regional programmeTSA3 Radiological Protection of Patients in Medical Exposures, Latin American countries evaluated the image quality and glandular doses for digital mammography equipment with the purpose of seeing the performance and compliance with international recommendations. Totally, 24 institutions participated from Brazil, Chile, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Mexico, Paraguay and Venezuela. Signal difference noise ratio results showed for CR poor compliance with tolerances; better results were obtained for full-field digital mammography equipment. Mean glandular dose results showed that the majority of units have values below the acceptable dose levels. This joint Latin American project identified common problems: difficulty in working with digital images and lack of specific training by medical physicists from the region. Image quality is a main issue not being satisfied in accordance with international recommendations; optimisation processes in which the doses are increased should be very carefully done in order to improve early detection of any cancer signs.

  11. Beam quality measurements using digitized laser beam images

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan, M.D. ); Mahon, R. )

    1989-11-01

    A method is described for measuring various laser beam characteristics with modest experimental complexity by digital processing of the near and far field images. Gaussian spot sizes, peak intensities, and spatial distributions of the images are easily found. Far field beam focusability is determined by computationally applying apertures of circular of elliptical diameters to the digitized image. Visualization of the magnitude of phase and intensity distortions is accomplished by comparing the 2-D fast Fourier transform of both smoothed and unsmoothed near field data to the actual far field data. The digital processing may be performed on current personal computers to give the experimenter unprecedented capabilities for rapid beam characteriztion at relatively low cost.

  12. Fuzzy Index to Evaluate Edge Detection in Digital Images.

    PubMed

    Perez-Ornelas, Felicitas; Mendoza, Olivia; Melin, Patricia; Castro, Juan R; Rodriguez-Diaz, Antonio; Castillo, Oscar

    2015-01-01

    In literature, we can find different metrics to evaluate the detected edges in digital images, like Pratt's figure of merit (FOM), Jaccard's index (JI) and Dice's coefficient (DC). These metrics compare two images, the first one is the reference edges image, and the second one is the detected edges image. It is important to mention that all existing metrics must binarize images before their evaluation. Binarization step causes information to be lost because an incomplete image is being evaluated. In this paper, we propose a fuzzy index (FI) for edge evaluation that does not use a binarization step. In order to process all detected edges, images are represented in their fuzzy form and all calculations are made with fuzzy sets operators and fuzzy Euclidean distance between both images. Our proposed index is compared to the most used metrics using synthetic images, with good results.

  13. Fuzzy Index to Evaluate Edge Detection in Digital Images

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Ornelas, Felicitas; Mendoza, Olivia; Melin, Patricia; Castro, Juan R.; Rodriguez-Diaz, Antonio; Castillo, Oscar

    2015-01-01

    In literature, we can find different metrics to evaluate the detected edges in digital images, like Pratt's figure of merit (FOM), Jaccard’s index (JI) and Dice’s coefficient (DC). These metrics compare two images, the first one is the reference edges image, and the second one is the detected edges image. It is important to mention that all existing metrics must binarize images before their evaluation. Binarization step causes information to be lost because an incomplete image is being evaluated. In this paper, we propose a fuzzy index (FI) for edge evaluation that does not use a binarization step. In order to process all detected edges, images are represented in their fuzzy form and all calculations are made with fuzzy sets operators and fuzzy Euclidean distance between both images. Our proposed index is compared to the most used metrics using synthetic images, with good results. PMID:26115362

  14. Transmission of digital images within the NTSC analog format

    DOEpatents

    Nickel, George H.

    2004-06-15

    HDTV and NTSC compatible image communication is done in a single NTSC channel bandwidth. Luminance and chrominance image data of a scene to be transmitted is obtained. The image data is quantized and digitally encoded to form digital image data in HDTV transmission format having low-resolution terms and high-resolution terms. The low-resolution digital image data terms are transformed to a voltage signal corresponding to NTSC color subcarrier modulation with retrace blanking and color bursts to form a NTSC video signal. The NTSC video signal and the high-resolution digital image data terms are then transmitted in a composite NTSC video transmission. In a NTSC receiver, the NTSC video signal is processed directly to display the scene. In a HDTV receiver, the NTSC video signal is processed to invert the color subcarrier modulation to recover the low-resolution terms, where the recovered low-resolution terms are combined with the high-resolution terms to reconstruct the scene in a high definition format.

  15. Parametric Imaging Of Digital Subtraction Angiography Studies For Renal Transplant Evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallagher, Joe H.; Meaney, Thomas F.; Flechner, Stuart M.; Novick, Andrew C.; Buonocore, Edward

    1981-11-01

    A noninvasive method for diagnosing acute tubular necrosis and rejection would be an important tool for the management of renal transplant patients. From a sequence of digital subtraction angiographic images acquired after an intravenous injection of radiographic contrast material, the parametric images of the maximum contrast, the time when the maximum contrast is reached, and two times the time at which one half of the maximum contrast is reached are computed. The parametric images of the time when the maximum is reached clearly distinguish normal from abnormal renal function. However, it is the parametric image of two times the time when one half of the maximum is reached which provides some assistance in differentiating acute tubular necrosis from rejection.

  16. Dual Level Digital Watermarking for Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, V. K.; Singh, A. K.

    2010-11-01

    More than 700 years ago, watermarks were used in Italy to indicate the paper brand and the mill that produced it. By the 18th century watermarks began to be used as anti counterfeiting measures on money and other documents.The term watermark was introduced near the end of the 18th century. It was probably given because the marks resemble the effects of water on paper. The first example of a technology similar to digital watermarking is a patent filed in 1954 by Emil Hembrooke for identifying music works. In 1988, Komatsu and Tominaga appear to be the first to use the term "digital watermarking". Consider the following hypothetical situations. You go to a shop, buy some goods and at the counter you are given a currency note you have never come across before. How do you verify that it is not counterfeit? Or say you go to a stationery shop and ask for a ream of bond paper. How do you verify that you have actually been given what you asked for? How does a philatelist verify the authenticity of a stamp? In all these cases, the watermark is used to authenticate. Watermarks have been in existence almost from the time paper has been in use. The impression created by the mesh moulds on the slurry of fibre and water remains on the paper. It serves to identify the manufacturer and thus authenticate the product without actually degrading the aesthetics and utility of the stock. It also makes forgery significantly tougher. Even today, important government and legal documents are watermarked. But what is watermarking, when it comes to digital data? Information is no longer present on a physical material but is represented as a series of zeros and ones. Duplication of information is achieved easily by just reproducing that combination of zeros and ones. How then can one protect ownership rights and authenticate data? The digital watermark is the same as that of conventional watermarks.

  17. High-speed Digital Color Imaging Pyrometry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-08-01

    and environment of the events. To overcome these challenges, we have characterized and calibrated a digital high-speed color camera that may be...correction) to determine their effect on the calculated temperature. Using this technique with a Phantom color camera , we measured the temperature of...constant value of approximately 1980~K. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Pyrometry, color camera 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT

  18. The role of camera-bundled image management software in the consumer digital imaging value chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Milton; Mundkur, Anuradha; Balasubramanian, Ashok; Chirania, Virat

    2005-02-01

    This research was undertaken by the Convergence Center at the Syracuse University School of Information Studies (www.digital-convergence.info). Project ICONICA, the name for the research, focuses on the strategic implications of digital Images and the CONvergence of Image management and image CApture. Consumer imaging - the activity that we once called "photography" - is now recognized as in the throes of a digital transformation. At the end of 2003, market researchers estimated that about 30% of the households in the U.S. and 40% of the households in Japan owned digital cameras. In 2004, of the 86 million new cameras sold (excluding one-time use cameras), a majority (56%) were estimated to be digital cameras. Sales of photographic film, while still profitable, are declining precipitously.

  19. Digital spiral-slit for bi-photon imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLaren, Melanie; Forbes, Andrew

    2017-04-01

    Quantum ghost imaging using entangled photon pairs has become a popular field of investigation, highlighting the quantum correlation between the photon pairs. We introduce a technique using spatial light modulators encoded with digital holograms to recover both the amplitude and the phase of the digital object. Down-converted photon pairs are entangled in the orbital angular momentum basis, and are commonly measured using spiral phase holograms. Consequently, by encoding a spiral ring-slit hologram into the idler arm, and varying it radially we can simultaneously recover the phase and amplitude of the object in question. We demonstrate that a good correlation between the encoded field function and the reconstructed images exists.

  20. Digital Images and the Z-Axis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cross, Judie

    2010-01-01

    This article argues that while a semiotic analysis of composition in the screen, page and image has significant heuristic value, this would be further enhanced were it also to take into account surface and depth. It is argued that these two aspects of composition are critical for successful reading/viewing of images, and especially for digital…

  1. Balanced Multiwavelets Based Digital Image Watermarking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Na; Huang, Hua; Zhou, Quan; Qi, Chun

    In this paper, an adaptive blind watermarking algorithm based on balanced multiwavelets transform is proposed. According to the properties of balanced multiwavelets and human vision system, a modified version of the well-established Lewis perceptual model is given. Therefore, the strength of embedded watermark is controlled by the local properties of the host image .The subbands of balanced multiwavelets transformation are similar to each other in the same scale, so the most similar subbands are chosen to embed the watermark by modifying the relation of the two subbands adaptively under the model, the watermark extraction can be performed without original image. Experimental results show that the watermarked images look visually identical to the original ones, and the watermark also successfully survives after image processing operations such as image cropping, scaling, filtering and JPEG compression.

  2. Image performance of a new amorphous selenium flat panel x-ray detector designed for digital breast tomosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, L. K.; Jing, Z.; Bogdanovich, S.; Golden, K.; Robinson, S.; Beliaevskaia, E.; Parikh, S.

    2005-04-01

    The purpose of this work is to report the performance of an amorphous selenium (a-Se) based flat-panel x-ray imager under development for application in digital breast tomosynthesis. This detector is designed to perform both in the conventional Full Field Digital Mammography (FFDM) mode and the tomosynthesis mode. The large area 24 x 29 cm detector achieves rapid image acquisition rates of up to 4 frames per second with minimal trapped charge induced effects such as ghost or lag images of previously acquired objects. In this work, a new a-Se/TFT detector layer structure is evaluated. The design uses a top conductive layer in direct contact with the a-Se x-ray detection layer. The simple structure has few layers and minimal hole and electron trapping effects. Prototype detectors were built to investigate the basic image performance of this new a-Se/TFT detector. Image signal generation, image ghosting, image lag, and detector DQE were studied. For digital mammography applications, the residual image ghosting was less than 1% at 30 seconds elapsed time. DQE, measured at a field of 5.15 V/um, showed significantly higher values over previously reported data, especially at low exposure levels. For digital breast tomosynthesis, the image lag at dynamic readout rate was < 0.6 % at 0.5-second elapsed time. A prototype tomosynthesis system is being developed utilizing this new a-Se/TFT detector.

  3. A novel method to acquire 3D data from serial 2D images of a dental cast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Yaxing; Li, Zhongke; Chen, Qi; Shao, Jun; Li, Xinshe; Liu, Zhiqin

    2007-05-01

    This paper introduced a newly developed method to acquire three-dimensional data from serial two-dimensional images of a dental cast. The system consists of a computer and a set of data acquiring device. The data acquiring device is used to take serial pictures of the a dental cast; an artificial neural network works to translate two-dimensional pictures to three-dimensional data; then three-dimensional image can reconstruct by the computer. The three-dimensional data acquiring of dental casts is the foundation of computer-aided diagnosis and treatment planning in orthodontics.

  4. A methodology for high resolution digital image correlation in high temperature experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaber, Justin; Adair, Benjamin S.; Antoniou, Antonia

    2015-03-01

    We propose a methodology for performing high resolution Digital Image Correlation (DIC) analysis during high-temperature mechanical tests. Specifically, we describe a technique for producing a stable, high-quality pattern on metal surfaces along with a simple optical system that uses a visible-range camera and a long-range microscope. The results are analyzed with a high-quality open-source DIC software developed by us. Using the proposed technique, we successfully acquired high-resolution strain maps of the crack tip field in a nickel superalloy sample at 1000 °C.

  5. A new method to acquire 3-D images of a dental cast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhongke; Yi, Yaxing; Zhu, Zhen; Li, Hua; Qin, Yongyuan

    2006-01-01

    This paper introduced our newly developed method to acquire three-dimensional images of a dental cast. A rotatable table, a laser-knife, a mirror, a CCD camera and a personal computer made up of a three-dimensional data acquiring system. A dental cast is placed on the table; the mirror is installed beside the table; a linear laser is projected to the dental cast; the CCD camera is put up above the dental cast, it can take picture of the dental cast and the shadow in the mirror; while the table rotating, the camera records the shape of the laser streak projected on the dental cast, and transmit the data to the computer. After the table rotated one circuit, the computer processes the data, calculates the three-dimensional coordinates of the dental cast's surface. In data processing procedure, artificial neural networks are enrolled to calibrate the lens distortion, map coordinates form screen coordinate system to world coordinate system. According to the three-dimensional coordinates, the computer reconstructs the stereo image of the dental cast. It is essential for computer-aided diagnosis and treatment planning in orthodontics. In comparison with other systems in service, for example, laser beam three-dimensional scanning system, the characteristic of this three-dimensional data acquiring system: a. celerity, it casts only 1 minute to scan a dental cast; b. compact, the machinery is simple and compact; c. no blind zone, a mirror is introduced ably to reduce blind zone.

  6. Synchronized, interactive teleconferencing with digital cardiac images.

    PubMed

    Walsh, C; Cosgrave, J; Crean, P; Murray, D; Walsh, R; Kennedy, J; Buckley, M; O'Hare, N

    2006-03-01

    St James's Hospital is a tertiary referral center for percutaneous intervention and cardiothoracic surgery for a number of referring hospitals. This article reports on the development and implementation of a synchronized, interactive teleconferencing system for cardiac images that links St. James's Hospital with a remote site (Sligo General Hospital) and overcomes the problems of transmission of large image files. Teleconferencing was achieved by setting up lossless auto transmission of patient files overnight and conferencing the next morning with linked control signals and databases. As a suitable product was not available, a commercially new software was developed. The system links the imaging databases, monitors and synchronizes progress through imaging sequences, and links a range of image processing and control functions. All parties to the conference are ensured that they are looking at the same images as they are played or at specific aspects of an image that the other party is highlighting. The system allows patient management decisions to be made at a weekly joint teleconference with cardiothoracic surgeons and interventional cardiologists from both sites. Rapid decision making was facilitated with 70% of decisions obtained within 24 h, and 88% within 1 week of their procedure. In urgent cases, data can be transmitted within 20 min of the diagnostic procedure. The system allows increased access to angiography for patients living in rural areas, and provides a more focused referral for revascularization. Participation of the referring cardiologist has improved the quality of decision making.

  7. Detecting Nematode Features from Digital Images

    PubMed Central

    de la Blanca, N. Pérez; Fdez-Valdivia, J.; Castillo, P.; Gómez-Barcina, A.

    1992-01-01

    Procedures for estimating and calibrating nematode features from digitial images are described and evaluated by illustration and mathematical formulae. Technical problems, such as capturing and cleaning raw images, standardizing the grey level range of images, and the detection of characteristics of the body habitus, presence or absence of stylet knobs, and tail and lip region shape are discussed. This study is the first of a series aimed at developing a set of automated methods to permit more rapid, objective characterizations of nematode features than is achievable by cumbersome conventional methods. PMID:19282998

  8. Building 3D aerial image in photoresist with reconstructed mask image acquired with optical microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, C. S.; Tang, Y. P.; Chu, F. S.; Huang, W. C.; Liu, R. G.; Gau, T. S.

    2012-03-01

    Calibration of mask images on wafer becomes more important as features shrink. Two major types of metrology have been commonly adopted. One is to measure the mask image with scanning electron microscope (SEM) to obtain the contours on mask and then simulate the wafer image with optical simulator. The other is to use an optical imaging tool Aerial Image Measurement System (AIMSTM) to emulate the image on wafer. However, the SEM method is indirect. It just gathers planar contours on a mask with no consideration of optical characteristics such as 3D topography structures. Hence, the image on wafer is not predicted precisely. Though the AIMSTM method can be used to directly measure the intensity at the near field of a mask but the image measured this way is not quite the same as that on the wafer due to reflections and refractions in the films on wafer. Here, a new approach is proposed to emulate the image on wafer more precisely. The behavior of plane waves with different oblique angles is well known inside and between planar film stacks. In an optical microscope imaging system, plane waves can be extracted from the pupil plane with a coherent point source of illumination. Once plane waves with a specific coherent illumination are analyzed, the partially coherent component of waves could be reconstructed with a proper transfer function, which includes lens aberration, polarization, reflection and refraction in films. It is a new method that we can transfer near light field of a mask into an image on wafer without the disadvantages of indirect SEM measurement such as neglecting effects of mask topography, reflections and refractions in the wafer film stacks. Furthermore, with this precise latent image, a separated resist model also becomes more achievable.

  9. Review of hard copy systems for digital medical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apple, Bernard A.; Tennant, Mark H.; Thomas, Jule W., Jr.

    1996-03-01

    In this paper we review image requirements and the potential use of various printing technologies to record digital diagnostic radiographic information. An analysis of limitations and advantages of alternate imaging systems compared to current laser imager/silver halide film systems will be presented. The future move to digital radiology along with its hard copy requirements will also be discussed. The winning technologies in the market place will be determined by their ability to provide adequate image quality at low cost while meeting productivity, durability, and convenience requirements. The first technology to meet these requirements will have a tremendous advantage in the market place. Medical imaging hard copy is dominated by the use of silver halide media providing monochrome images of diagnostic image quality. As new digital medical imaging modalities have emerged they have opened the door to new hard copy technologies. These new technologies have been born and nurtured outside the medical market by small markets with high image quality requirements or by large markets with lower image quality requirements. The former have tended to provide high cost, high quality solutions and the latter low cost, low quality solutions. Silver halide media still dominates, at least in part, because it provides high image quality at a relatively low cost. Yet, the trend away from wet silver halide is evident. These new hard copy technologies are being tested to determine their applicability to the medical market and are finding niches where they provide value. A clear winner that provides the required image quality at low cost has yet to emerge.

  10. A digital magnetic resonance imaging spectrometer using digital signal processor and field programmable gate array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Xiao; Binghe, Sun; Yueping, Ma; Ruyan, Zhao

    2013-05-01

    A digital spectrometer for low-field magnetic resonance imaging is described. A digital signal processor (DSP) is utilized as the pulse programmer on which a pulse sequence is executed as a subroutine. Field programmable gate array (FPGA) devices that are logically mapped into the external addressing space of the DSP work as auxiliary controllers of gradient control, radio frequency (rf) generation, and rf receiving separately. The pulse programmer triggers an event by setting the 32-bit control register of the corresponding FPGA, and then the FPGA automatically carries out the event function according to preset configurations in cooperation with other devices; accordingly, event control of the spectrometer is flexible and efficient. Digital techniques are in widespread use: gradient control is implemented in real-time by a FPGA; rf source is constructed using direct digital synthesis technique, and rf receiver is constructed using digital quadrature detection technique. Well-designed performance is achieved, including 1 μs time resolution of the gradient waveform, 1 μs time resolution of the soft pulse, and 2 MHz signal receiving bandwidth. Both rf synthesis and rf digitalization operate at the same 60 MHz clock, therefore, the frequency range of transmitting and receiving is from DC to ˜27 MHz. A majority of pulse sequences have been developed, and the imaging performance of the spectrometer has been validated through a large number of experiments. Furthermore, the spectrometer is also suitable for relaxation measurement in nuclear magnetic resonance field.

  11. A Survey of Digital Image Segmentation Algorithms

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-01-01

    features. Thresholding techniques arc also useful in segmenting such binary images as printed documents, line drawings, and multispectral and x-ray...algorithms, pixel labeling and run-length connectivity analysis, arc discussed in the following sections. Therefore, in exammmg g(x, y), pixels that are...edge linking, graph searching, curve fitting, Hough transform, and others arc applicablc to image segmematio~. Difficulties with boundary-based methods

  12. Determination of visual range during fog and mist using digital camera images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, John R.; Moogan, Jamie C.

    2010-08-01

    During the winter of 2008, daily time series of images of five "unit-cell chequerboard" targets were acquired using a digital camera. The camera and targets were located in the Majura Valley approximately 3 km from Canberra airport. We show how the contrast between the black and white sections of the targets is related to the meteorological range (or standard visual range), and compare estimates of this quantity derived from images acquired during fog and mist conditions with those from the Vaisala FD-12 visibility meter operated by the Bureau of Meteorology at Canberra Airport. The two sets of ranges are consistent but show the variability of visibility in the patchy fog conditions that often prevail in the Majura Valley. Significant spatial variations of the light extinction coefficient were found to occur over the longest 570 m optical path sampled by the imaging system. Visual ranges could be estimated out to ten times the distance to the furthest target, or approximately 6 km, in these experiments. Image saturation of the white sections of the targets was the major limitation on the quantitative interpretation of the images. In the future, the camera images will be processed in real time so that the camera exposure can be adjusted to avoid saturation.

  13. Digital images for eternity: color microfilm as archival medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Normand, C.; Gschwind, R.; Fornaro, P.

    2007-01-01

    In the archiving and museum communities, the long-term preservation of artworks has traditionally been guaranteed by making duplicates of the original. For photographic reproductions, digital imaging devices have now become standard, providing better quality control and lower costs than film photography. However, due to the very short life cycle of digital data, losses are unavoidable without repetitive data migrations to new file formats and storage media. We present a solution for the long-term archiving of digital images on color microfilm (Ilfochrome® Micrographic). This extremely stable and high-resolution medium, combined with the use of a novel laser film recorder is particularly well suited for this task. Due to intrinsic limitations of the film, colorimetric reproductions of the originals are not always achievable. The microfilm must be first considered as an information carrier and not primarily as an imaging medium. Color transformations taking into account the film characteristics and possible degradations of the medium due to aging are investigated. An approach making use of readily available color management tools is presented which assures the recovery of the original colors after re-digitization. An extension of this project considering the direct recording of digital information as color bit-code on the film is also introduced.

  14. Enhancement of astronomical images using digital filtration methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korovyakovskaya, A. A.; Korovyakovskij, Y. P.

    1982-02-01

    A technique for reconstructing astronomical images using digital filtration is presented. A quantitative description of the factors causing image distortion is presented, and an algorithm for image enhancement is developed. The frequency characteristics of the reconstructing filter are given for the distorting system and the signal-to-noise ratio. Consideration is given to two-dimensional Fourier transform of the large image matrices. The technique is examined for the M 87 radio galaxy and an improvement of 2-3 times in the angular resolution of the original photograph is demonstrated.

  15. Block-wise authentication method for digital images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nahtigal, Tomaž; Žemva, Andrej

    2012-11-01

    The ability to modify digital images can cause a serious problem in some applications. In this paper we propose a novel method derived from Wong’s authentication scheme that is capable of authenticating JPEG images as well as uncompressed images, but is not a watermarking method. The method offers great flexibility in terms of the size of the authenticator and the time needed to generate the authenticator, thus making it suitable for real-time image processing. We demonstrate this by implementing it in a programmable FPGA circuit.

  16. CANDID: Comparison algorithm for navigating digital image databases

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, P.M.; Cannon, T.M.

    1994-02-21

    In this paper, we propose a method for calculating the similarity between two digital images. A global signature describing the texture, shape, or color content is first computed for every image stored in a database, and a normalized distance between probability density functions of feature vectors is used to match signatures. This method can be used to retrieve images from a database that are similar to an example target image. This algorithm is applied to the problem of search and retrieval for database containing pulmonary CT imagery, and experimental results are provided.

  17. Segmentation and image navigation in digitized spine x rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, L. Rodney; Thoma, George R.

    2000-06-01

    The National Library of Medicine has archived a collection of 17,000 digitized x-rays of the cervical and lumbar spines. Extensive health information has been collected on the subjects of these x-rays, but no information has been derived from the image contents themselves. We are researching algorithms to segment anatomy in these images and to derive from the segmented data measurements useful for indexing this image set for characteristics important to researchers in rheumatology, bone morphometry, and related areas. Active Shape Modeling is currently being investigated for use in location and boundary definition for the vertebrae in these images.

  18. Performance of the SIR-B digital image processing subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curlander, J. C.

    1986-01-01

    A ground-based system to generate digital SAR image products has been developed and implemented in support of the SIR-B mission. This system is designed to achieve the maximum throughput while meeting strict image fidelity criteria. Its capabilities include: automated radiometric and geometric correction of the output imagery; high-precision absolute location without tiepoint registration; filtering of the raw data to remove spurious signals from alien radars; and automated catologing to maintain a full set of radar and image production facility in support of the SIR-B science investigators routinely produces over 80 image frames per week.

  19. [Digital scanning converter for medical endoscopic ultrasound imaging].

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaodong; Zhang, Hongxu; Zhou, Peifan; Wen, Shijie; Yu, Daoyin

    2009-02-01

    This paper mainly introduces the design of digital scanning converter (DSC) for medical endoscopic ultrasound imaging. Fast modified vector totational CORDIC (FMVR-CORDIC) arithmetic complete coordinate conversion is used to increase the speed of ultrasonic scanning imaging. FPGA is used as the kernel module to control data transferring, related circuits and relevant chips' working, and to accomplish data preprocessing. With the advantages of simple structure, nice flexibility and convenience, it satisfies the demand for real-time displaying in this system. Finally, the original polar coordinate image is transformed to rectangular coordinate grey image through coordinate transformation. The system performances have been validated by the experimental result.

  20. New cloud free line of sight statistics measured with digital whole sky imagers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shields, Janet E.; Burden, Art R.; Johnson, Richard W.; Karr, Monette E.; Baker, Justin G.

    2005-08-01

    Cloud Free Line of Sight (CFLOS) statistics can be important to a number of applications involving transmittance of light through the atmosphere, including laser propagation, light propagation, and detection of objects by humans and instruments. This paper will discuss Cloud Free Line of Sight (CFLOS) and cloud persistence statistics determined from cloud measurements taken with Whole Sky Imagers (WSI). The WSIs are ground-based digital imaging systems that image the full upper hemisphere down to the horizon in wavebands in the visible and NIR. Digital automated WSI systems were originally developed by the Marine Physical Lab in the 1980's to address the CFLOS application, and then further developed for 24-hour day and night capability. Approximately three million image sets have been acquired with the Day/Night WSI in conjunction with DOE's ARM program. Recent advances in the cloud decision algorithms at Marine Physical Lab have enabled the extraction of processed cloud images of sufficient quality to obtain reliable cloud statistics. A test sample of approximately 4500 image sets has been processed to yield CFLOS statistics down to the horizon, as well as statistics related to the persistence of clouds and cloud holes. This talk will provide a brief overview of the instruments and current algorithm developments. The CFLOS results and sample persistence results will be presented.

  1. [Possibilities of use of digital imaging in forensic medicine].

    PubMed

    Gaval'a, P; Ivicsics, I; Mlynár, J; Novomeský, F

    2005-07-01

    Based on the daily practice with digital photography and documentation, the authors point out the achievements of the computer technologies implementation to the practice of forensic medicine. The modern methods of imaging, especially the digital photography, offer a wide spectrum of use in forensic medicine--the digital documentation and archivation of autopsy findings, the possibility of immediate consultation of findings with another experts via Internet, and many others. Another possibility is a creation of digital photographic atlas of forensic medicine as a useful aid in pre- and postgradual study. Thus the application of the state-of-the-art computer technologies to the forensic medicine discloses the unknown before possibilities for further development of such a discipline of human medical sciences.

  2. Integrating digital topology in image-processing libraries.

    PubMed

    Lamy, Julien

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes a method to integrate digital topology informations in image-processing libraries. This additional information allows a library user to write algorithms respecting topological constraints, for example, a seed fill or a skeletonization algorithm. As digital topology is absent from most image-processing libraries, such constraints cannot be fulfilled. We describe and give code samples for all the structures necessary for this integration, and show a use case in the form of a homotopic thinning filter inside ITK. The obtained filter can be up to a hundred times as fast as ITK's thinning filter and works for any image dimension. This paper mainly deals of integration within ITK, but can be adapted with only minor modifications to other image-processing libraries.

  3. Digital replacement of the distorted dentition acquired by cone beam computed tomography (CBCT): a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Nairn, N J; Ayoub, A F; Barbenel, J; Moos, K; Naudi, K; Ju, X; Khambay, B S

    2013-11-01

    During cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scanning, intra-oral metallic objects may produce streak artefacts, which impair the occlusal surface of the teeth. This study aimed to determine the accuracy of replacement of the CBCT dentition with a more accurate dentition and to determine the clinical feasibility of the method. Impressions of the teeth of six cadaveric skulls with unrestored dentitions were taken and acrylic base plates constructed incorporating radiopaque registration markers. Each appliance was fitted to the skull and a CBCT performed. Impressions were taken of the dentition with the devices in situ and dental models were produced. These were CBCT-scanned and the images of the skulls and models imported into computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) software and aligned on the registration markers. The occlusal surfaces of each dentition were then replaced with the occlusal image of the corresponding model. The absolute mean distance between the registration markers in the skulls and the dental models was 0.09±0.02mm, and for the dentition was 0.24±0.09mm. When the method was applied to patients, the distance between markers was 0.12±0.04mm for the maxilla and 0.16±0.02mm for the mandible. It is possible to replace the inaccurate dentition on a CBCT scan using this method and to create a composite skull which is clinically acceptable.

  4. The systematic error in digital image correlation induced by self-heating of a digital camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Shaopeng; Pang, Jiazhi; Ma, Qinwei

    2012-02-01

    The systematic strain measurement error in digital image correlation (DIC) induced by self-heating of digital CCD and CMOS cameras was extensively studied, and an experimental and data analysis procedure has been proposed and two parameters have been suggested to examine and evaluate this. Six digital cameras of four different types were tested to define the strain errors, and it was found that each camera needed between 1 and 2 h to reach a stable heat balance, with a measured temperature increase of around 10 °C. During the temperature increase, the virtual image expansion will cause a 70-230 µɛ strain error in the DIC measurement, which is large enough to be noticed in most DIC experiments and hence should be eliminated.

  5. VirtualShave: automated hair removal from digital dermatoscopic images.

    PubMed

    Fiorese, M; Peserico, E; Silletti, A

    2011-01-01

    VirtualShave is a novel tool to remove hair from digital dermatoscopic images. First, individual hairs are identified using a top-hat filter followed by morphological postprocessing. Then, they are replaced through PDE-based inpainting with an estimate of the underlying occluded skin. VirtualShave's performance is comparable to that of a human operator removing hair manually, and the resulting images are almost indistinguishable from those of hair-free skin.

  6. Study of optical techniques for the Ames unitary wind tunnel: Digital image processing, part 6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, George

    1993-01-01

    A survey of digital image processing techniques and processing systems for aerodynamic images has been conducted. These images covered many types of flows and were generated by many types of flow diagnostics. These include laser vapor screens, infrared cameras, laser holographic interferometry, Schlieren, and luminescent paints. Some general digital image processing systems, imaging networks, optical sensors, and image computing chips were briefly reviewed. Possible digital imaging network systems for the Ames Unitary Wind Tunnel were explored.

  7. Highest Resolution Image of Dust and Sand Yet Acquired on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on image for Figure 1Click on image for Figure 2Click on image for Figure 3

    This mosaic of four side-by-side microscope images (one a color composite) was acquired by the Optical Microscope, a part of the Microscopy, Electrochemistry, and Conductivity Analyzer (MECA) instrument suite on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander. Taken on the ninth Martian day of the mission, or Sol 9 (June 3, 2008), the image shows a 3 millimeter (0.12 inch) diameter silicone target after it has been exposed to dust kicked up by the landing. It is the highest resolution image of dust and sand ever acquired on Mars. The silicone substrate provides a sticky surface for holding the particles to be examined by the microscope.

    Martian Particles on Microscope's Silicone Substrate In figure 1, the particles are on a silcone substrate target 3 millimeters (0.12 inch) in diameter, which provides a sticky surface for holding the particles while the microscope images them. Blow-ups of four of the larger particles are shown in the center. These particles range in size from about 30 microns to 150 microns (from about one one-thousandth of an inch to six one-thousandths of an inch).

    Possible Nature of Particles Viewed by Mars Lander's Optical Microscope In figure 2, the color composite on the right was acquired to examine dust that had fallen onto an exposed surface. The translucent particle highlighted at bottom center is of comparable size to white particles in a Martian soil sample (upper pictures) seen two sols earlier inside the scoop of Phoenix's Robotic Arm as imaged by the lander's Robotic Arm Camera. The white particles may be examples of the abundant salts that have been found in the Martian soil by previous missions. Further investigations will be needed to determine the white material's composition and whether translucent particles

  8. Matching rendered and real world images by digital image processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitjà, Carles; Bover, Toni; Bigas, Miquel; Escofet, Jaume

    2010-05-01

    Recent advances in computer-generated images (CGI) have been used in commercial and industrial photography providing a broad scope in product advertising. Mixing real world images with those rendered from virtual space software shows a more or less visible mismatching between corresponding image quality performance. Rendered images are produced by software which quality performance is only limited by the resolution output. Real world images are taken with cameras with some amount of image degradation factors as lens residual aberrations, diffraction, sensor low pass anti aliasing filters, color pattern demosaicing, etc. The effect of all those image quality degradation factors can be characterized by the system Point Spread Function (PSF). Because the image is the convolution of the object by the system PSF, its characterization shows the amount of image degradation added to any taken picture. This work explores the use of image processing to degrade the rendered images following the parameters indicated by the real system PSF, attempting to match both virtual and real world image qualities. The system MTF is determined by the slanted edge method both in laboratory conditions and in the real picture environment in order to compare the influence of the working conditions on the device performance; an approximation to the system PSF is derived from the two measurements. The rendered images are filtered through a Gaussian filter obtained from the taking system PSF. Results with and without filtering are shown and compared measuring the contrast achieved in different final image regions.

  9. Digital Three-dimensional Reconstruction Based On Integral Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chao; Chen, Qian; Hua, Hong; Mao, Chen; Shao, Ajun

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a digital three dimensional reconstruction method based on a set of small-baseline elemental images captured with a micro-lens array and a CCD sensor. In this paper, we adopt the ASIFT (Affine Scale-invariant feature transform) operator as the image registration method. Among the set of captured elemental images, the elemental image located in the middle of the overall image field is used as the reference and corresponding matching points in each elemental image around the reference elemental are calculated, which enables to accurately compute the depth value of object points relatively to the reference image frame. Using optimization algorithm with redundant matching points can achieve 3D reconstruction finally. Our experimental results are presented to demonstrate excellent performance in accuracy and speed of the proposed algorithm. PMID:26236151

  10. A Realistic Approach To Evaluating Digital Imaging Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greinacher, C. F.; Bach, E.,; Muller, K.,; Patzelt, K.

    1984-06-01

    Current systems for the production of medical images and current development trends give a basis of experience for the design of a digital PACS including images and demographic data. Such a PACS must contain software and hardware concepts which permit the medical requirements, as presently understood, to be realized. As part of its research Siemens is designing and evaluating a hybrid network configuration which allows extensive flexibility and growth potential despite current limitations in available network bandwidth and storage capacity. As demand for digital data expands, additional installations can be added to the system. The modular concept permits incorporation of technological advances with minimal difficulty. The system allows different digital imaging modalities to communicate with a central data storage and processing system. Data display facilities both with and without manipulation capability are realized using high speed multi image storage devices. The human interface is designed to be ergono-metric, interactive, and user-friendly. Standardized, commercially available hardware has been included wherever possible to provide economical worldwide acceptance. Estimates of digital data per unit time under different conditions are presented and compared to the specifications of software and hardware elements both currently available and envisaged in the near future. Potential limitations of the design, as well as possible solutions incorporating expected technological developments, are discussed.

  11. Identification and Quantification Soil Redoximorphic Features by Digital Image Processing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil redoximorphic features (SRFs) have provided scientists and land managers with insight into relative soil moisture for approximately 60 years. The overall objective of this study was to develop a new method of SRF identification and quantification from soil cores using a digital camera and imag...

  12. Using Digital Images with Young Children: Challenges of Integration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schiller, John; Tillett, Beryl

    2004-01-01

    In what ways can information and communications technologies (ICT) be integrated into classroom practice to create a 'community of learners'? This paper describes an action research project, over a six-month period, in which a class of seven-year-old and eight-year-old children in a metropolitan South Australian school created digital images to…

  13. ArtShow: An Efficient Digital Image Database.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paliokas, I.; Kekkeris, G.; Karakos, A.

    2000-01-01

    ArtShow is a digital image database that employs sophisticated features for interactive presentations of data. To demonstrate the program, an example database was prepared, based on the collection at the National Bank of Greece with names, comments and keywords in the Greek language. Discussion includes: the database platform and internal…

  14. Digital Imaging Skills and the Hiring and Training of Photojournalists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russial, John; Wanta, Wayne

    1998-01-01

    Uses a national survey to examine the importance newspaper photo editors place on digital imaging and traditional photography competencies, detailing the degree of technological change in newspaper photography. Looks at implications for the training of journalists as well as their hiring. (SR)

  15. Spectral reflectance and digital image relations among five aquatic weeds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study reports on the use of an artificial quartz halogen lighting source to facilitate the acquisition of spectral light reflectance measurements and digital imaging of invasive aquatic weeds. Spectral leaf or leaf/stem reflectance measurements were made on five aquatic weeds: Eurasian watermil...

  16. An algorithm for approximate rectification of digital aerial images

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    High-resolution aerial photography is one of the most valuable tools available for managing extensive landscapes. With recent advances in digital camera technology, computer hardware, and software, aerial photography is easier to collect, store, and transfer than ever before. Images can be automa...

  17. Digital Images: Capturing America's Past with the Technology of Today

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berson, Michael J.

    2004-01-01

    The use of digital photography in the social studies classroom offers students an application of technology that can help them develop the skills necessary to access, analyze, and evaluate all forms of information and communication. Students learn to recognize how images represent diverse perspectives, connect disparate pieces of information, and…

  18. Digital Image Manipulation and Avatar Configuration: Implications for Inclusive Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oravec, Jo Ann

    2012-01-01

    This paper outlines concerns for inclusive classrooms involving personal digital image modifications and selections, as well as avatar configurations. Classroom interactions incorporate various dimensions of personal appearance; however, educators try to make them primarily about knowledge and wisdom. Students in environments where they can…

  19. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-009). March 2005. OPENINGS OF AIR DUCTS INTO PASSAGEWAY UNDER SOUTHEAST QUADRANT, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  20. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-046). March 2005. ROOF SHIELDING BLOCK AND I-BEAM SUPPORT CONSTRUCTION, CENTER OF BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  1. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-031). March 2005. MOUSE AT EAST TANGENT, WITH COVER OPEN, LOOKING TOWARD CENTER IGLOO, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  2. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200506-00198-08). June 2005. DUCTWORK BETWEEN FAN ROOM AND PASSAGEWAY UNDER BEVATRON, SOUTH SIDE OF ROOM 10, MAIN FLOOR, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  3. Photocopy of photograph (digital image maintained in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image maintained in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-176). March 2005. CENTRAL COLUMN SUPPORT TO ROOF SHOWING CRANES CENTER SUPPORT TRACK, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  4. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-139). March 2005. TOP OF BEVATRON, INCLUDING WOOD STAIRWAY FROM OUTER EDGE OF SHIELDING TO TOP OF ROOF BLOCK SHIELDING - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  5. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-049). March 2005. TUNNEL ENTRY FROM MAIN FLOOR OF MAGNET ROOM INTO CENTER OF BEVATRON, BENEATH SOUTHWEST QUADRANT - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  6. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-034). March 2005. MOUSE AT EAST TANGENT WITH COVER CLOSED, LOOKING TOWARD CENTER IGLOO, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  7. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200506-00198-11). June 2005. DUCTWORK BETWEEN FAN ROOM AND PASSAGEWAY UNDER BEVATRON, NORTH SIDE OF ROOM 10, MAIN FLOOR, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  8. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-129). March 2005. ENTRY TO ROOM 24, MAIN FLOOR, OFFICE-AND-SHOPS SECTION, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  9. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200506-00218-12). June 2005. DEEP TUNNEL INTO FOUNDATION UNDER BEVATRON, VIEW OF CART ON RAILS FOR TRANSPORTING EQUIPMENT - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  10. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-035). March 2005. WEST TANGENT VIEWED FROM INTERIOR OF BEVATRON. EQUIPMENT ACCESS STAIRWAY ON LEFT - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  11. Digital radiography. A comparison with modern conventional imaging

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, G J

    2006-01-01

    The development of computed radiography over the past two decades has transformed radiological imaging. The radiology departments in the 21st century will look very different from those in the preceding period. In this review, the development of digital radiography is presented with a description of its various forms and a comparison with screen film radiography. PMID:16822918

  12. Data Manipulation in an XML-Based Digital Image Library

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Naicheng

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To help to clarify the role of XML tools and standards in supporting transition and migration towards a fully XML-based environment for managing access to information. Design/methodology/approach: The Ching Digital Image Library, built on a three-tier architecture, is used as a source of examples to illustrate a number of methods of data…

  13. Digital interactive image analysis by array processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sabels, B. E.; Jennings, J. D.

    1973-01-01

    An attempt is made to draw a parallel between the existing geophysical data processing service industries and the emerging earth resources data support requirements. The relationship of seismic data analysis to ERTS data analysis is natural because in either case data is digitally recorded in the same format, resulting from remotely sensed energy which has been reflected, attenuated, shifted and degraded on its path from the source to the receiver. In the seismic case the energy is acoustic, ranging in frequencies from 10 to 75 cps, for which the lithosphere appears semi-transparent. In earth survey remote sensing through the atmosphere, visible and infrared frequency bands are being used. Yet the hardware and software required to process the magnetically recorded data from the two realms of inquiry are identical and similar, respectively. The resulting data products are similar.

  14. Persistent scatterers detection on synthetic aperture radar images acquired by Sentinel-1 satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dǎnişor, Cosmin; Popescu, Anca; Datcu, Mihai

    2016-12-01

    Persistent Scatterers Interferometry (PS-InSAR) has become a popular method in remote sensing because of its capability to measure terrain deformations with very high accuracy. It relies on multiple Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) acquisitions, to monitor points with stable proprieties over time, called Persistent Scatterers (PS)[1]. These points are unaffected by temporal decorrelation, therefore by analyzing their interferometric phase variation we can estimate the scene's deformation rates within a given time interval. In this work, we apply two incoherent detection algorithms to identify Persistent Scatterers candidates in the city of Focșani, Romania. The first method studies the variation of targets' intensities along the SAR acquisitions and the second method analyzes the spectral proprieties of the scatterers. The algorithms were implemented on a dataset containing 11 complex images of the region covering Buzău, Brăila and Focșani cities. Images were acquired by Sentinel-1 satellite in a time span of 5 months, from October 2014 to February 2015. The processing chain follows the requirements imposed by the new C-band SAR images delivered by the Sentinel-1 satellite (launched in April 2014) imaging in Interferometric Wide (IW) mode. Considering the particularities of the TOPS (Terrain Observation with Progressive Scans in Azimuth) imaging mode[2], special requirements had to be considered for pre-processing steps. The PS detection algorithms were implemented in Gamma RS program, a software which contains various function packages dedicated to SAR images focalization, analysis and processing.

  15. Do we really need standards in digital image management?

    PubMed Central

    Ho, ELM

    2008-01-01

    Convention dictates that standards are a necessity rather than a luxury. Standards are supposed to improve the exchange of health and image data information resulting in improved quality and efficiency of patient care. True standardisation is some time away yet, as barriers exist with evolving equipment, storage formats and even the standards themselves. The explosive growth in the size and complexity of images such as those generated by multislice computed tomography have driven the need for digital image management, created problems of storage space and costs, and created a challenge for increasing or getting an adequate speed for transmitting, accessing and retrieving the image data. The search for a suitable and practical format for storing the data without loss of information and medico-legal implications has become a necessity and a matter of ‘urgency’. Existing standards are either open or proprietary and must comply with local, regional or national laws. Currently there are the Picture Archiving and Communications System (PACS); Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM); Health Level 7 (HL7) and Integrating the Healthcare Enterprise (IHE). Issues in digital image management can be categorised as operational, procedural, technical and administrative. Standards must stay focussed on the ultimate goal – that is, improved patient care worldwide. PMID:21611012

  16. Using Digital Radiography To Image Liquid Nitrogen in Voids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, Dwight; Blevins, Elana

    2007-01-01

    Digital radiography by use of (1) a field-portable x-ray tube that emits low-energy x rays and (2) an electronic imaging x-ray detector has been found to be an effective technique for detecting liquid nitrogen inside voids in thermal-insulation panels. The technique was conceived as a means of investigating cryopumping (including cryoingestion) as a potential cause of loss of thermal insulation foam from space-shuttle external fuel tanks. The technique could just as well be used to investigate cryopumping and cryoingestion in other settings. In images formed by use of low-energy x-rays, one can clearly distinguish between voids filled with liquid nitrogen and those filled with gaseous nitrogen or other gases. Conventional film radiography is of some value, but yields only non-real-time still images that do not show time dependences of levels of liquids in voids. In contrast, the present digital radiographic technique yields a succession of images in real time at a rate of about 10 frames per second. The digitized images can be saved for subsequent analysis to extract data on time dependencies of levels of liquids and, hence, of flow paths and rates of filling and draining. The succession of images also amounts to a real-time motion picture that can be used as a guide to adjustment of test conditions.

  17. Radiological images on personal computers: introduction and fundamental principles of digital images.

    PubMed

    Gillespy, T; Rowberg, A H

    1993-05-01

    This series of articles will explore the issue related to displaying, manipulating, and analyzing radiological images on personal computers (PC). This first article discusses the digital image data file, standard PC graphic file formats, and various methods for importing radiological images into the PC.

  18. Digitizing Images for Curriculum 21: Phase II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Alice D.

    Although visual databases exist for the study of art, architecture, geography, health care, and other areas, readily accessible sources of quality images are not available for engineering faculty interested in developing multimedia modules or for student projects. Presented here is a brief review of Phase I of the Engineering Visual Database…

  19. Medical applications of digital image morphing.

    PubMed

    Penska, Keith; Folio, Les; Bunger, Rolf

    2007-09-01

    The authors present a unique medical technical application for illustrating the success and/or failure of the physiological healing process as a dynamically morphed video. Two examples used in this report include the healing of a severely fractured humerus from an explosion in Iraq and the other of dramatic tissue destruction from a poisonous spider bite. For the humerus, several sequential x-rays obtained throughout orthopedic surgical procedures and the healing process were morphed together representing a time-lapsed video of the healing process. The end result is a video that demonstrates the healing process in an animation that radiologists envision and report to other clinicians. For the brown recluse spider bite, a seemingly benign skin lesion transforms into a wide gaping necrotic wound with dramatic appearance within days. This novel technique is not presented for readily apparent clinical advantage, rather, it may have more immediate application in providing treatment options to referring providers and/or patients, as well as educational value of healing or disease progression over time. Image morphing is one of those innovations that is just starting to come into its own. Morphing is an image processing technology that transforms one image into another by generating a series of intermediate synthetic images. It is the same process that Hollywood uses to turn people into animals in movies, for example. The ability to perform morphing, once restricted to high-end graphics workstations, is now widely available for desktop computers. The authors describe how a series of radiographic images were morphed into a short movie clip using readily available software and an average laptop. The resultant video showed the healing process of an open comminuted humerus fracture that helped demonstrate how amazingly the human body heals in a case presentation in a time-lapse fashion.

  20. Objective quantification of plaque using digital image analysis.

    PubMed

    Sagel, P A; Lapujade, P G; Miller, J M; Sunberg, R J

    2000-01-01

    Dental plaque is the precursor to many oral diseases (e.g. gingivitis, periodontitis, caries) and thus its removal and control are an important aspect of oral hygiene. Many of the oral care products available today remove or inhibit the growth of dental plaque. Historically, the antiplaque efficacy of products was measured in blinded clinical trials where the amount of plaque on teeth is assessed via subjective visual grading with predefined scales such as the Turesky index. The ability of the examiner to consistently apply the index over time and the sensitivity of the scales often leads to large, expensive clinical trials. The present invention is an automatic measurement of plaque coverage on the facial surfaces of teeth using a digital image analysis technique. Dental plaque disclosed with fluorescein is digitally imaged under long-wave ultraviolet light. Ultraviolet illumination of fluorescein-disclosed plaque produces an image where the pixels of the image can be categorically classified based on color into one of five classes: teeth; plaque; gingiva; plaque on gingiva, or lip retractors. The amount of plaque on teeth can be determined by summation of the number of plaque pixels. The percent coverage is calculated from the number of plaque pixels and teeth pixels in the image. The digital image analysis of plaque allows facial plaque levels to be precisely measured (RSD = 3.77%). In application, the digital image analysis of plaque is capable of measuring highly significant plaque growth inhibition of a stannous fluoride dentifrice with as few as 10 subjects in a cross-over design.

  1. Image processing and classification procedures for analysis of sub-decimeter imagery acquired with an unmanned aircraft over arid rangelands

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Using five centimeter resolution images acquired with an unmanned aircraft system (UAS), we developed and evaluated an image processing workflow that included the integration of resolution-appropriate field sampling, feature selection, object-based image analysis, and processing approaches for UAS i...

  2. kV x-ray dual digital tomosynthesis for image guided lung SBRT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partain, Larry; Boyd, Douglas; Kim, Namho; Hernandez, Andrew; Daly, Megan; Boone, John

    2016-03-01

    Two simulated sets of digital tomosynthesis images of the lungs, each acquired at a 90 degree angle from the other, with 19 projection images used for each set and SART iterative reconstructed, gives dual tomosynthesis slice image quality approaching that of spiral CT, and with a data acquisition time that is 3% of that of cone beam CT. This fast kV acquisition, should allow near real time tracking of lung tumors in patients receiving SBRT, based on a novel TumoTrakTM multi-source X-ray tube design. Until this TumoTrakTM prototype is completed over the next year, its projected performance was simulated from the DRR images created from a spiral CT data set from a lung cancer patient. The resulting dual digital tomosynthesis reconstructed images of the lung tumor were exceptional and approached that of the gold standard Feldkamp CT reconstruction of breath hold, diagnostic, spiral, multirow, CT data. The relative dose at 46 mAs was less than 10% of what it would have been if the digital tomosynthesis had been done at the 472 mAs of the CT data set. This is for a 0.77 fps imaging rate sufficient to resolve respiratory motion in many free breathing patients during SBRT. Such image guidance could decrease the magnitudes of targeting error margins by as much as 20 mm or more in the craniocaudal direction for lower lobe lesions while markedly reducing dose to normal lung, heart and other critical structures. These initial results suggest a wide range of topics for future work.

  3. Digital Longitudinal Tomosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rimkus, Daniel Steven

    1985-12-01

    The purpose of this dissertation was to investigate the clinical utility of digital longitudinal tomosynthesis in radiology. By acquiring a finite group of digital images during a longitudinal tomographic exposure, and processing these images, tomographic planes, other than the fulcrum plane, can be reconstructed. This process is now termed "tomosynthesis". A prototype system utilizing this technique was developed. Both phantom and patient studies were done with this system. The phantom studies were evaluated by subjective, visual criterion and by quantitative analysis of edge sharpness and noise in the reconstructions. Two groups of patients and one volunteer were studied. The first patient group consisted of 8 patients undergoing intravenous urography (IVU). These patients had digital tomography and film tomography of the abdomen. The second patient group consisted of 4 patients with lung cancer admitted to the hospital for laser resection of endobronchial tumor. These patients had mediastinal digital tomograms to evaluate the trachea and mainstem bronchi. The knee of one volunteer was imaged by film tomography and digital tomography. The results of the phantom studies showed that the digital reconstructions accurately produced images of the desired planes. The edge sharpness of the reconstructions approached that of the acquired images. Adequate reconstructions were achieved with as few as 5 images acquired during the exposure, with the quality of the reconstructions improving as the number of images acquired increased. The IVU patients' digital studies had less contrast and spatial resolution than the film tomograms. The single renal lesion visible on the film tomograms was also visible in the digital images. The digital mediastinal studies were felt by several radiologists to be superior to a standard chest xray in evaluating the airways. The digital images of the volunteer's knee showed many of the same anatomic features as the film tomogram, but the digital

  4. Results of precision processing (scene correction) of ERTS-1 images using digital image processing techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernstein, R.

    1973-01-01

    ERTS-1 MSS and RBV data recorded on computer compatible tapes have been analyzed and processed, and preliminary results have been obtained. No degradation of intensity (radiance) information occurred in implementing the geometric correction. The quality and resolution of the digitally processed images are very good, due primarily to the fact that the number of film generations and conversions is reduced to a minimum. Processing times of digitally processed images are about equivalent to the NDPF electro-optical processor.

  5. Basic science in digital imaging: digital dynamic radiography, multimedia, and their potential uses for orthopaedics and arthroscopic surgery.

    PubMed

    Pavlovich, Rafael Iñigo; Vazquez-Vela, Gonzalo; Pardinas, Javier Lozano; Bustos Villarreal, Jose Maria; Rico, Eduardo Carriedo; de la Mora Behar, Gustavo

    2002-01-01

    In this article, we discuss the different types of up-to-date tools available to understand multimedia and its applications, imaging manipulation, digital video, and new approaches to surgical planning, digital dynamic radiography, and patient education aided by digital technology.

  6. Forensic Analysis of Digital Image Tampering

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-12-01

    2.2 – Example of invisible watermark using Steganography Software F5 ............. 8 Figure 2.3 – Example of copy-move image forgery [12...examples of this evolution. Audio has progressed from analog audio tapes and records to Compact Discs and MP3s. Video displays have advanced from the...on it for security or anti-tamper reasons. Figure 2.2 shows an example of this. Figure 2.2 – Example of invisible watermark using Steganography

  7. Digital image analysis of haematopoietic clusters.

    PubMed

    Benzinou, A; Hojeij, Y; Roudot, A-C

    2005-02-01

    Counting and differentiating cell clusters is a tedious task when performed with a light microscope. Moreover, biased counts and interpretation are difficult to avoid because of the difficulties to evaluate the limits between different types of clusters. Presented here, is a computer-based application able to solve these problems. The image analysis system is entirely automatic, from the stage screening, to the statistical analysis of the results of each experimental plate. Good correlations are found with measurements made by a specialised technician.

  8. Digital image processing of vascular angiograms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Selzer, R. H.; Blankenhorn, D. H.; Beckenbach, E. S.; Crawford, D. W.; Brooks, S. H.

    1975-01-01

    A computer image processing technique was developed to estimate the degree of atherosclerosis in the human femoral artery. With an angiographic film of the vessel as input, the computer was programmed to estimate vessel abnormality through a series of measurements, some derived primarily from the vessel edge information and others from optical density variations within the lumen shadow. These measurements were combined into an atherosclerosis index, which was found to correlate well with both visual and chemical estimates of atherosclerotic disease.

  9. Recording multiple spatially-heterodyned direct to digital holograms in one digital image

    DOEpatents

    Hanson, Gregory R.; Bingham, Philip R.

    2008-03-25

    Systems and methods are described for recording multiple spatially-heterodyned direct to digital holograms in one digital image. A method includes digitally recording, at a first reference beam-object beam angle, a first spatially-heterodyned hologram including spatial heterodyne fringes for Fourier analysis; Fourier analyzing the recorded first spatially-heterodyned hologram by shifting a first original origin of the recorded first spatially-heterodyned hologram to sit on top of a first spatial-heterodyne carrier frequency defined by the first reference beam-object beam angle; digitally recording, at a second reference beam-object beam angle, a second spatially-heterodyned hologram including spatial heterodyne fringes for Fourier analysis; Fourier analyzing the recorded second spatially-heterodyned hologram by shifting a second original origin of the recorded second spatially-heterodyned hologram to sit on top of a second spatial-heterodyne carrier frequency defined by the second reference beam-object beam angle; applying a first digital filter to cut off signals around the first original origin and define a first result; performing a first inverse Fourier transform on the first result; applying a second digital filter to cut off signals around the second original origin and define a second result; and performing a second inverse Fourier transform on the second result, wherein the first reference beam-object beam angle is not equal to the second reference beam-object beam angle and a single digital image includes both the first spatially-heterodyned hologram and the second spatially-heterodyned hologram.

  10. Image fusion using DFT-based digital filter banks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sezgin, Murat; Erer, Isin; Ersoy, Okan K.

    2005-08-01

    In this paper, we present a new fusion algorithm based on a multidecomposition approach with the DFT based symmetric, zero-phase, nonoverlapping digital filter bank representation. The DFT of the signal is separated into two parts leading to the low and high -pass components then decimated by two to obtain subband signals. The original signal may be recovered by interpolating the subband signals, computing their inverse DFT and summing the results. In the proposed image fusion algorithm, two or more source images are decomposed into subbands by DFT based digital filters. The detail and approximation subband coefficients are modified according to their magnitudes and mean values, respectively. Then, the modified subbands are combined in the subband domain. Finally, the fused image is obtained by the inverse transform.

  11. The application of high-speed digital image correlation.

    SciTech Connect

    Reu, Phillip L.; Miller, Timothy J.

    2008-02-01

    Digital image correlation (DIC) is a method of using digital images to calculate two-dimensional displacement and deformation or for stereo systems three-dimensional shape, displacement, and deformation. While almost any imaging system can be used with DIC, there are some important challenges when working with the technique in high- and ultra-high-speed applications. This article discusses three of these challenges: camera sensor technology, camera frame rate, and camera motion mitigation. Potential solutions are treated via three demonstration experiments showing the successful application of high-speed DIC for dynamic events. The application and practice of DIC at high speeds, rather than the experimental results themselves, provide the main thrust of the discussion.

  12. An automated digital imaging system for environmental monitoring applications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bogle, Rian; Velasco, Miguel; Vogel, John

    2013-01-01

    Recent improvements in the affordability and availability of high-resolution digital cameras, data loggers, embedded computers, and radio/cellular modems have advanced the development of sophisticated automated systems for remote imaging. Researchers have successfully placed and operated automated digital cameras in remote locations and in extremes of temperature and humidity, ranging from the islands of the South Pacific to the Mojave Desert and the Grand Canyon. With the integration of environmental sensors, these automated systems are able to respond to local conditions and modify their imaging regimes as needed. In this report we describe in detail the design of one type of automated imaging system developed by our group. It is easily replicated, low-cost, highly robust, and is a stand-alone automated camera designed to be placed in remote locations, without wireless connectivity.

  13. A novel quantum representation of color digital images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sang, Jianzhi; Wang, Shen; Li, Qiong

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel quantum representation of color digital images (NCQI) in quantum computer. The freshly proposed quantum image representation uses the basis state of a qubit sequence to store the RGB value of each pixel. All pixels are stored into a normalized superposition state and can be operated simultaneously. Comparison results with the latest multi-channel representation for quantum image reveal that NCQI can achieve a quadratic speedup in quantum image preparation. Meanwhile, some NCQI-based image processing operations are discussed. Analyses and comparisons demonstrate that many color operations can be executed conveniently based on NCQI. Therefore, the proposed NCQI model is more flexible and better suited to carry out color quantum image processing.

  14. Optimization of Image Quality and Dose in Digital Mammography.

    PubMed

    Fausto, Agnes M F; Lopes, M C; de Sousa, M C; Furquim, Tânia A C; Mol, Anderson W; Velasco, Fermin G

    2017-04-01

    Nowadays, the optimization in digital mammography is one of the most important challenges in diagnostic radiology. The new digital technology has introduced additional elements to be considered in this scenario. A major goal of mammography is related to the detection of structures on the order of micrometers (μm) and the need to distinguish the different types of tissues, with very close density values. The diagnosis in mammography faces the difficulty that the breast tissues and pathological findings have very close linear attenuation coefficients within the energy range used in mammography. The aim of this study was to develop a methodology for optimizing exposure parameters of digital mammography based on a new Figure of Merit: FOM ≡ (IQFinv)(2)/AGD, considering the image quality and dose. The study was conducted using the digital mammography Senographe DS/GE, and CDMAM and TORMAM phantoms. The characterization of clinical practice, carried out in the mammography system under study, was performed considering different breast thicknesses, the technical parameters of exposure, and processing options of images used by the equipment's automatic exposure system. The results showed a difference between the values of the optimized parameters and those ones chosen by the automatic system of the mammography unit, specifically for small breast. The optimized exposure parameters showed better results than those obtained by the automatic system of the mammography, for the image quality parameters and its impact on detection of breast structures when analyzed by radiologists.

  15. The trustworthy digital camera: Restoring credibility to the photographic image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, Gary L.

    1994-02-01

    The increasing sophistication of computers has made digital manipulation of photographic images, as well as other digitally-recorded artifacts such as audio and video, incredibly easy to perform and increasingly difficult to detect. Today, every picture appearing in newspapers and magazines has been digitally altered to some degree, with the severity varying from the trivial (cleaning up 'noise' and removing distracting backgrounds) to the point of deception (articles of clothing removed, heads attached to other people's bodies, and the complete rearrangement of city skylines). As the power, flexibility, and ubiquity of image-altering computers continues to increase, the well-known adage that 'the photography doesn't lie' will continue to become an anachronism. A solution to this problem comes from a concept called digital signatures, which incorporates modern cryptographic techniques to authenticate electronic mail messages. 'Authenticate' in this case means one can be sure that the message has not been altered, and that the sender's identity has not been forged. The technique can serve not only to authenticate images, but also to help the photographer retain and enforce copyright protection when the concept of 'electronic original' is no longer meaningful.

  16. The trustworthy digital camera: Restoring credibility to the photographic image

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedman, Gary L.

    1994-01-01

    The increasing sophistication of computers has made digital manipulation of photographic images, as well as other digitally-recorded artifacts such as audio and video, incredibly easy to perform and increasingly difficult to detect. Today, every picture appearing in newspapers and magazines has been digitally altered to some degree, with the severity varying from the trivial (cleaning up 'noise' and removing distracting backgrounds) to the point of deception (articles of clothing removed, heads attached to other people's bodies, and the complete rearrangement of city skylines). As the power, flexibility, and ubiquity of image-altering computers continues to increase, the well-known adage that 'the photography doesn't lie' will continue to become an anachronism. A solution to this problem comes from a concept called digital signatures, which incorporates modern cryptographic techniques to authenticate electronic mail messages. 'Authenticate' in this case means one can be sure that the message has not been altered, and that the sender's identity has not been forged. The technique can serve not only to authenticate images, but also to help the photographer retain and enforce copyright protection when the concept of 'electronic original' is no longer meaningful.

  17. Digital computer simulation of synthetic aperture systems and images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camporeale, Claudio; Galati, Gaspare

    1991-06-01

    Digital computer simulation is a powerful tool for the design, the mission planning and the image quality analysis of advanced SAR Systems. 'End-to-end' simulators describe the whole process of the SAR imaging including the generation of the coherent echoes and their processing and allow, unlike the 'product simulators', to evaluate the effects of the various impairments on the final image. The main disadvantage of the 'end-to-end' approach, as described in this paper, is the heavy computation burden; therefore, a new type of simulator is presented, attempting to reduce the burden but presenting a greater degree of completeness and realism than the SAR product simulators, already existing.

  18. Applications of digital image analysis capability in Idaho

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, K. A.

    1981-01-01

    The use of digital image analysis of LANDSAT imagery in water resource assessment is discussed. The data processing systems employed are described. The determination of urban land use conversion of agricultural land in two southwestern Idaho counties involving estimation and mapping of crop types and of irrigated land is described. The system was also applied to an inventory of irrigated cropland in the Snake River basin and establishment of a digital irrigation water source/service area data base for the basin. Application of the system to a determination of irrigation development in the Big Lost River basin as part of a hydrologic survey of the basin is also described.

  19. A new and practical method to obtain grain size measurements in sandy shores based on digital image acquisition and processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baptista, P.; Cunha, T. R.; Gama, C.; Bernardes, C.

    2012-12-01

    Modern methods for the automated evaluation of sediment size in sandy shores relay on digital image processing algorithms as an alternative to time-consuming traditional sieving methodologies. However, the requirements necessary to guarantee that the considered image processing algorithm has a good grain identification success rate impose the need for dedicated hardware setups to capture the sand surface images. Examples are specially designed camera housings that maintain a constant distance between the camera lens and the sand surface, tripods to fix and maintain the camera angle orthogonal to the sand surface, external illumination systems that guarantee the light level necessary for the image processing algorithms, and special lenses and focusing systems for close proximity image capturing. In some cases, controlled image-capturing conditions can make the fieldwork more laborious which incurs in significant costs for monitoring campaigns considering large areas. To circumvent this problem, it is proposed a new automated image-processing algorithm that identifies sand grains in digital images acquired with a standard digital camera without any extra hardware attached to it. The accuracy and robustness of the proposed algorithm are evaluated in this work by means of a laboratory test on previously controlled grain samples, field tests where 64 samples (spread over a beach stretch of 65 km and with grain size ranging from 0.5 mm to 1.9 mm) were processed by both the proposed method and by sieving and finally by manual point count on all acquired images. The calculated root-mean-square (RMS) error between mean grain sizes obtained from the proposed image processing method and the sieve method (for the 64 samples) was 0.33 mm, and for the image processing method versus manual point counts comparison, with the same images, was 0.12 mm. The achieved correlation coefficients (r) were 0.91 and 0.96, respectively.

  20. Automatic registration of fused lidar/digital imagery (texel images) for three-dimensional image creation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budge, Scott E.; Badamikar, Neeraj S.; Xie, Xuan

    2015-03-01

    Several photogrammetry-based methods have been proposed that the derive three-dimensional (3-D) information from digital images from different perspectives, and lidar-based methods have been proposed that merge lidar point clouds and texture the merged point clouds with digital imagery. Image registration alone has difficulty with smooth regions with low contrast, whereas point cloud merging alone has difficulty with outliers and a lack of proper convergence in the merging process. This paper presents a method to create 3-D images that uses the unique properties of texel images (pixel-fused lidar and digital imagery) to improve the quality and robustness of fused 3-D images. The proposed method uses both image processing and point-cloud merging to combine texel images in an iterative technique. Since the digital image pixels and the lidar 3-D points are fused at the sensor level, more accurate 3-D images are generated because registration of image data automatically improves the merging of the point clouds, and vice versa. Examples illustrate the value of this method over other methods. The proposed method also includes modifications for the situation where an estimate of position and attitude of the sensor is known, when obtained from low-cost global positioning systems and inertial measurement units sensors.

  1. Digitizing the KSO white light images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pötzi, W.

    From 1989 up to 2007 the Sun was observed at the Kanzelhöhe Observatory in white light on photographic film material. The images are on transparent sheet films and are not available to the scientific community now. With a photo scanner for transparent film material the films are now scanned and then prepared for scientific use. The programs for post processing are already finished and as an output FITS and JPEG-files are produced. The scanning should be finished end of 2011 and the data should then be available via our homepage.

  2. Digital Image Analysis System for Monitoring Crack Growth at Elevated Temperature

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-05-01

    The objective of the research work reported here was to develop a new concept, based on Digital Image Analysis , for monitoring the crack-tip position...a 512 x 512 pixel frame. c) Digital Image Analysis software developed to locate and digitize the position of the crack-tip, on the observed image

  3. The influence of hologram aperture on speckle noise in the reconstructed image of digital holography and its reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Xiao-ou; Wang, Hui

    2008-01-01

    Based on the whole process of the recording and reconstruction of digital holography, we study the formation cause of speckle noise in its reconstructed image and acquire the conclusion that the small size of hologram aperture diffraction aggravates the speckle noise of reconstructed image and the speckle noise has been one of primary noise sources in the reconstruction process. In order to reduce the speckle noise resulting from little hologram aperture diffraction, we set an appropriate aperture function matching the recording parameter and aperture size of hologram and deconvolve the reconstructed image with it. The validity has been proved in theory and experiment. Therefore, it offers a brand-new thought and practical way to reduce the speckle noise in the reconstructed image of digital holography.

  4. Frame Your Images: Making Digital Images Accessible for Study & Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gepner, Ivan

    2009-01-01

    Images, whether at the level of molecules, cells, organs, organisms, or environments, are at the core of many biological disciplines. Even with the contemporary emphasis on molecular analysis, biology has retained its traditional strong visual component. In courses that rely on the study of biological structure, the presentation of images for…

  5. Review of digital image security in Dermatology.

    PubMed

    Nielson, Colton; West, Cameron; Shimizu, Ikue

    2015-10-16

    The inherently visual nature of dermatology naturally lends itself to photography. As technology has evolved, smartphone cameras have become ubiquitous and have the potential to improve education and patient care in dermatology. Although patients and physicians may agree that photography can improve patient care, there are certain risks involved with smartphone photography in the medical field. Perhaps most concerning is the number of dermatologists using smartphones to take unsecured images in their daily practice. A recent study revealed that 22% of surveyed dermatologists used smartphone cameras multiple times per day in their practice. Dermatologists may also overestimate patient comfort with smartphone use in clinical photography. We present a review of the use of smartphones in dermatology and address the potential lack of security and accompanying ethical dilemmas.

  6. Digital implementation of a neural network for imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Richard; McGlashan, Alex; Yatulis, Jay; Mascher, Peter; Bruce, Ian

    2012-10-01

    This paper outlines the design and testing of a digital imaging system that utilizes an artificial neural network with unsupervised and supervised learning to convert streaming input (real time) image space into parameter space. The primary objective of this work is to investigate the effectiveness of using a neural network to significantly reduce the information density of streaming images so that objects can be readily identified by a limited set of primary parameters and act as an enhanced human machine interface (HMI). Many applications are envisioned including use in biomedical imaging, anomaly detection and as an assistive device for the visually impaired. A digital circuit was designed and tested using a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) and an off the shelf digital camera. Our results indicate that the networks can be readily trained when subject to limited sets of objects such as the alphabet. We can also separate limited object sets with rotational and positional invariance. The results also show that limited visual fields form with only local connectivity.

  7. A Review of Digital Image Correlation Applied to Structura Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niezrecki, Christopher; Avitabile, Peter; Warren, Christopher; Pingle, Pawan; Helfrick, Mark

    2010-05-01

    A significant amount of interest exists in performing non-contacting, full-field surface velocity measurement. For many years traditional non-contacting surface velocity measurements have been made by using scanning Doppler laser vibrometry, shearography, pulsed laser interferometry, pulsed holography, or an electronic speckle pattern interferometer (ESPI). Three dimensional (3D) digital image correlation (DIC) methods utilize the alignment of a stereo pair of images to obtain full-field geometry data, in three dimensions. Information about the change in geometry of an object over time can be found by comparing a sequence of images and virtual strain gages (or position sensors) can be created over the entire visible surface of the object of interest. Digital imaging techniques were first developed in the 1980s but the technology has only recently been exploited in industry and research due to the advances of digital cameras and personal computers. The use of DIC for structural dynamic measurement has only very recently been investigated. Within this paper, the advantages and limits of using DIC for dynamic measurement are reviewed. Several examples of using DIC for dynamic measurement are presented on several vibrating and rotating structures.

  8. Digital image processing for the early localization of cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelmar, Cheryl M.

    1991-06-01

    The prognosis for cancer patients becomes much better if a tumor is diagnosed, localized and treated early, in a precancerous stage. The difficulty lies in the localization of cancerous tumors. Carcinoma in situ (CIS) refers to a tumor which is approximately 100 microns thick and one which has not penetrated through the epithelium wall or become invasive (2). A tumor of this size cannot be detected by existing techniques such as x-ray, computer tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, nuclear medicine or conventional endoscopy under white-light illumination. However, these tumors can be localized and destroyed by photodynamic diagnosis and therapy. This research shows that digital image processing and the technique of digital image ratioing contribute to photodynamic diagnosis and the early localization of cancer. A software package has been developed as a result of this research. The software package quantifies the usefulness of digital image processing for tumor localization and detectability. System parameters such as the endoscope distance and angle variations, tumor size and tumor concentration, sensitivity and specificity of the system have been tested and quantified.

  9. Centralized Digital Picture Processing System For Cardiac Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LeFree, M. T.; Vogel, R. A.

    1982-01-01

    We have designed and implemented a system for the centralized acquisition, display, analysis and archiving of diagnostic cardiac medical images from x-ray fluoroscopy, two-dimensional ultrasonography and nuclear scintigraphy. Centered around a DLC PUP 11/34 minicomputer with an existing gamma camera interface, we have added a closed-circuit television system with a 256x512x8-bit video digitizer and image display controller to interface the video output of the fluoroscope and ultrasonograph. A video disc recorder (under computer control) is used as an input and playback buffer, allowing for data transfer to and from digital disc drives. Thus, real-time video digitization is possible for up to ten seconds of incoming RS-170-compatible video. The digitizer separates video fields at real-time into two 256x256x8-bit refresh memories, providing 60Hz temporal resolution. Generally, however, we choose to record at non-real-time rates to encompass more than ten seconds. In addition to I/O software controlling data acquisition ana playback, we have developed a versatile data analysis package (offering such capabilities as image algebra, Fourier analysis and convolutional filtering), as well as interactive data reduction subroutines (such as region-of-interest definition, profile plotting and regional extraction of statistical and probabilistic information). We have found the system useful for standard cardiac image analysis, for simultaneous display of images from the three modalities, for picture storage and retrieval, and as a research tool. future plans include the addition of intelligent terminals at each modality and progression to a 32-bit machine for the central processor.

  10. Integrated terrain mapping with digital Landsat images in Queensland, Australia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robinove, Charles Joseph

    1979-01-01

    Mapping with Landsat images usually is done by selecting single types of features, such as soils, vegetation, or rocks, and creating visually interpreted or digitally classified maps of each feature. Individual maps can then be overlaid on or combined with other maps to characterize the terrain. Integrated terrain mapping combines several terrain features into each map unit which, in many cases, is more directly related to uses of the land and to methods of land management than the single features alone. Terrain brightness, as measured by the multispectral scanners in Landsat 1 and 2, represents an integration of reflectance from the terrain features within the scanner's instantaneous field of view and is therefore more correlatable with integrated terrain units than with differentiated ones, such as rocks, soils, and vegetation. A test of the feasibilty of the technique of mapping integrated terrain units was conducted in a part of southwestern Queensland, Australia, in cooperation with scientists of the Queensland Department of Primary Industries. The primary purpose was to test the use of digital classification techniques to create a 'land systems map' usable for grazing land management. A recently published map of 'land systems' in the area (made by aerial photograph interpretation and ground surveys), which are integrated terrain units composed of vegetation, soil, topography, and geomorphic features, was used as a basis for comparison with digitally classified Landsat multispectral images. The land systems, in turn, each have a specific grazing capacity for cattle (expressed in beasts per km 2 ) which is estimated following analysis of both research results and property carrying capacities. Landsat images, in computer-compatible tape form, were first contrast-stretched to increase their visual interpretability, and digitally classified by the parallelepiped method into distinct spectral classes to determine their correspondence to the land systems classes and

  11. Optical Synchrotron Radiation Beam Imaging with a Digital Mask

    SciTech Connect

    Fiorito, R. B.; Zhang, H. D.; Corbett, W. J.; Fisher, A. S.; Mok, W. Y.; Tian, K.; Douglas, D.; Wilson, F. G.; Zhang, S.; Mitsuhashi, T. M.; Shkvarunets, A. G.

    2012-11-01

    We have applied a new imaging/optical masking technique, which employs a digital micro-mirror device (DMD) and optical synchrotron radiation (OSR), to perform high dynamic range (DR) beam imaging at the JLAB Energy Recovery Linac and the SLAC/SPEAR3 Synchrotron Light Source. The OSR from the beam is first focused onto the DMD to produce a primary image; selected areas of this image are spatially filtered by controlling the state of individual micro-mirrors; and finally, the filtered image is refocused onto a CCD camera. At JLAB this technique has been used successfully to view the beam halo with a DR ~ 105. At SPEAR3 the DMD was used to filter out the bright core of the stored beam to study the turn-by-turn dynamics of the 10-3 weaker injected beam. We describe the optical performance, present limitations and our plans to improve the DR of both experimental systems.

  12. Standard Health Level Seven for Odontological Digital Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Abril-Gonzalez, Mauricio; Portilla, Fernando A.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: A guide for the implementation of dental digital imaging reports was developed and validated through the International Standard of Health Informatics–Health Level Seven (HL7), achieving interoperability with an electronic system that keeps dental records. Introduction: Digital imaging benefits patients, who can view previous close-ups of dental examinations; providers, because of greater efficiency in managing information; and insurers, because of improved accessibility, patient monitoring, and more efficient cost management. Finally, imaging is beneficial for the dentist who can be more agile in the diagnosis and treatment of patients using this tool. Materials and Methods: The guide was developed under the parameters of an HL7 standard. It was necessary to create a group of dentists and three experts in information and communication technologies from different institutions. Discussion: Diagnostic images scanned with conventional radiology or from a radiovisiograph can be converted to Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) format, while also retaining patient information. The guide shows how the information of the health record of the patient and the information of the dental image could be standardized in a Clinical Dental Record document using international informatics standard like HL7-V3-CDA document (dental document Level 2). Since it is an informatics standardized document, it could be sent, stored, or displayed using different devices—personal computers or mobile devices—independent of the platform used. Conclusions: Interoperability using dental images and dental record systems reduces adverse events, increases security for the patient, and makes more efficient use of resources. This article makes a contribution to the field of telemedicine in dental informatics. In addition to that, the results could be a reference for projects of electronic medical records when the dental documents are part of them. PMID

  13. Shape determination of microcalcifications in simulated digital mammography images with varying pixel size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruschin, Mark; Bath, Magnus; Hemdal, Bengt; Tingberg, Anders

    2005-04-01

    The purpose of this work was to study how the pixel size of digital detectors can affect shape determination of microcalcifications in mammography. Screen-film mammograms containing microcalcifications clinically proven to be indicative of malignancy were digitised at 100 lines/mm using a high-resolution Tango drum scanner. Forty microcalcifications were selected to cover an appropriate range of sizes, shapes and contrasts typically found of malignant cases. Based on the measured MTF and NPS of the combined screen-film and scanner system, these digitised images were filtered to simulate images acquired with a square sampling pixel size of 10 μm x 10 μm and a fill factor of one. To simulate images acquired with larger pixel sizes, these finely sampled images were re-binned to yield a range of effective pixel sizes from 20 μm up to 140 μm. An alternative forced-choice (AFC) observer experiment was conducted with eleven observers for this set of digitised microcalcifications to determine how pixel size affects the ability to discriminate shape. It was found that observer score increased with decreasing pixel size down to 60 μm (p<0.01), at which point no significant advantage was obtained by using smaller pixel sizes due to the excessive relative noise-per-pixel. The relative gain in shape discrimination ability at smaller pixel sizes was larger for microcalcifications that were smaller than 500 μm and circular.

  14. Development of a digital receiver for range imaging atmospheric radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Masayuki K.; Fujita, Toshiyuki; Abdul Aziz, Noor Hafizah Binti; Gan, Tong; Hashiguchi, Hiroyuki; Yu, Tian-You; Yamamoto, Mamoru

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, we describe a new digital receiver developed for a 1.3-GHz range imaging atmospheric radar. The digital receiver comprises a general-purpose software-defined radio receiver referred to as the Universal Software Radio Peripheral 2 (USRP2) and a commercial personal computer (PC). The receiver is designed to collect received signals at an intermediate frequency (IF) of 130 MHz with a sample rate of 10 MS s-1. The USRP2 digitizes IF received signals, produces IQ time series, and then transfers the IQ time series to the PC through Gigabit Ethernet. The PC receives the IQ time series, performs range sampling, carries out filtering in the range direction, decodes the phase-modulated received signals, integrates the received signals in time, and finally saves the processed data to the hard disk drive (HDD). Because only sequential data transfer from the USRP2 to the PC is available, the range sampling is triggered by transmitted pulses leaked to the receiver. For range imaging, the digital receiver performs real-time signal processing for each of the time series collected at different frequencies. Further, the receiver is able to decode phase-modulated oversampled signals. Because the program code for real-time signal processing is written in a popular programming language (C++) and widely used libraries, the signal processing is easy to implement, reconfigure, and reuse. From radar experiments using a 1 -μs subpulse width and 1-MHz frequency span (i.e., 2-MHz frequency bandwidth), we demonstrate that range imaging in combination with oversampling, which was implemented for the first time by the digital receiver, is able to resolve the fine-scale structure of turbulence with a vertical scale as small as 100 m or finer.

  15. IMAGEP - A FORTRAN ALGORITHM FOR DIGITAL IMAGE PROCESSING

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, D. J.

    1994-01-01

    IMAGEP is a FORTRAN computer algorithm containing various image processing, analysis, and enhancement functions. It is a keyboard-driven program organized into nine subroutines. Within the subroutines are other routines, also, selected via keyboard. Some of the functions performed by IMAGEP include digitization, storage and retrieval of images; image enhancement by contrast expansion, addition and subtraction, magnification, inversion, and bit shifting; display and movement of cursor; display of grey level histogram of image; and display of the variation of grey level intensity as a function of image position. This algorithm has possible scientific, industrial, and biomedical applications in material flaw studies, steel and ore analysis, and pathology, respectively. IMAGEP is written in VAX FORTRAN for DEC VAX series computers running VMS. The program requires the use of a Grinnell 274 image processor which can be obtained from Mark McCloud Associates, Campbell, CA. An object library of the required GMR series software is included on the distribution media. IMAGEP requires 1Mb of RAM for execution. The standard distribution medium for this program is a 1600 BPI 9track magnetic tape in VAX FILES-11 format. It is also available on a TK50 tape cartridge in VAX FILES-11 format. This program was developed in 1991. DEC, VAX, VMS, and TK50 are trademarks of Digital Equipment Corporation.

  16. Digital Pathology: Data-Intensive Frontier in Medical Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Lee A. D.; Carter, Alexis B.; Farris, Alton B.; Wang, Fusheng; Kong, Jun; Gutman, David A.; Widener, Patrick; Pan, Tony C.; Cholleti, Sharath R.; Sharma, Ashish; Kurc, Tahsin M.; Brat, Daniel J.; Saltz, Joel H.

    2013-01-01

    Pathology is a medical subspecialty that practices the diagnosis of disease. Microscopic examination of tissue reveals information enabling the pathologist to render accurate diagnoses and to guide therapy. The basic process by which anatomic pathologists render diagnoses has remained relatively unchanged over the last century, yet advances in information technology now offer significant opportunities in image-based diagnostic and research applications. Pathology has lagged behind other healthcare practices such as radiology where digital adoption is widespread. As devices that generate whole slide images become more practical and affordable, practices will increasingly adopt this technology and eventually produce an explosion of data that will quickly eclipse the already vast quantities of radiology imaging data. These advances are accompanied by significant challenges for data management and storage, but they also introduce new opportunities to improve patient care by streamlining and standardizing diagnostic approaches and uncovering disease mechanisms. Computer-based image analysis is already available in commercial diagnostic systems, but further advances in image analysis algorithms are warranted in order to fully realize the benefits of digital pathology in medical discovery and patient care. In coming decades, pathology image analysis will extend beyond the streamlining of diagnostic workflows and minimizing interobserver variability and will begin to provide diagnostic assistance, identify therapeutic targets, and predict patient outcomes and therapeutic responses. PMID:25328166

  17. Color calibration of swine gastrointestinal tract images acquired by radial imaging capsule endoscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ou-Yang, Mang; Jeng, Wei-De; Lai, Chien-Cheng; Wu, Hsien-Ming; Lin, Jyh-Hung

    2016-01-01

    The type of illumination systems and color filters used typically generate varying levels of color difference in capsule endoscopes, which influence medical diagnoses. In order to calibrate the color difference caused by the optical system, this study applied a radial imaging capsule endoscope (RICE) to photograph standard color charts, which were then employed to calculate the color gamut of RICE. Color gamut was also measured using a spectrometer in order to get a high-precision color information, and the results obtained using both methods were compared. Subsequently, color-correction methods, namely polynomial transform and conformal mapping, were used to improve the color difference. Before color calibration, the color difference value caused by the influences of optical systems in RICE was 21.45±1.09. Through the proposed polynomial transformation, the color difference could be reduced effectively to 1.53±0.07. Compared to another proposed conformal mapping, the color difference value was substantially reduced to 1.32±0.11, and the color difference is imperceptible for human eye because it is <1.5. Then, real-time color correction was achieved using this algorithm combined with a field-programmable gate array, and the results of the color correction can be viewed from real-time images.

  18. A robust chaotic algorithm for digital image steganography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghebleh, M.; Kanso, A.

    2014-06-01

    This paper proposes a new robust chaotic algorithm for digital image steganography based on a 3-dimensional chaotic cat map and lifted discrete wavelet transforms. The irregular outputs of the cat map are used to embed a secret message in a digital cover image. Discrete wavelet transforms are used to provide robustness. Sweldens' lifting scheme is applied to ensure integer-to-integer transforms, thus improving the robustness of the algorithm. The suggested scheme is fast, efficient and flexible. Empirical results are presented to showcase the satisfactory performance of our proposed steganographic scheme in terms of its effectiveness (imperceptibility and security) and feasibility. Comparison with some existing transform domain steganographic schemes is also presented.

  19. Speckle reduction in optical coherence tomography images using digital filtering

    PubMed Central

    Ozcan, Aydogan; Bilenca, Alberto; Desjardins, Adrien E.; Bouma, Brett E.; Tearney, Guillermo J.

    2009-01-01

    Speckle noise is a ubiquitous artifact that limits the interpretation of optical coherence tomography images. Here we apply various speckle-reduction digital filters to optical coherence tomography images and compare their performance. Our results indicate that shift-invariant, nonorthogonal wavelet-transform-based filters together with enhanced Lee and adaptive Wiener filters can significantly reduce speckle and increase the signal-to-noise ratio, while preserving strong edges. The speckle reduction capabilities of these filters are also compared with speckle reduction from incoherent angular compounding. Our results suggest that by using these digital filters, the number of individual angles required to attain a certain level of speckle reduction can be decreased. PMID:17728812

  20. Digital optical tomography system for dynamic breast imaging.

    PubMed

    Flexman, Molly L; Khalil, Michael A; Al Abdi, Rabah; Kim, Hyun K; Fong, Christopher J; Desperito, Elise; Hershman, Dawn L; Barbour, Randall L; Hielscher, Andreas H

    2011-07-01

    Diffuse optical tomography has shown promising results as a tool for breast cancer screening and monitoring response to chemotherapy. Dynamic imaging of the transient response of the breast to an external stimulus, such as pressure or a respiratory maneuver, can provide additional information that can be used to detect tumors. We present a new digital continuous-wave optical tomography system designed to simultaneously image both breasts at fast frame rates and with a large number of sources and detectors. The system uses a master-slave digital signal processor-based detection architecture to achieve a dynamic range of 160 dB and a frame rate of 1.7 Hz with 32 sources, 64 detectors, and 4 wavelengths per breast. Included is a preliminary study of one healthy patient and two breast cancer patients showing the ability to identify an invasive carcinoma based on the hemodynamic response to a breath hold.

  1. Digital-image processing and image analysis of glacier ice

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fitzpatrick, Joan J.

    2013-01-01

    This document provides a methodology for extracting grain statistics from 8-bit color and grayscale images of thin sections of glacier ice—a subset of physical properties measurements typically performed on ice cores. This type of analysis is most commonly used to characterize the evolution of ice-crystal size, shape, and intercrystalline spatial relations within a large body of ice sampled by deep ice-coring projects from which paleoclimate records will be developed. However, such information is equally useful for investigating the stress state and physical responses of ice to stresses within a glacier. The methods of analysis presented here go hand-in-hand with the analysis of ice fabrics (aggregate crystal orientations) and, when combined with fabric analysis, provide a powerful method for investigating the dynamic recrystallization and deformation behaviors of bodies of ice in motion. The procedures described in this document compose a step-by-step handbook for a specific image acquisition and data reduction system built in support of U.S. Geological Survey ice analysis projects, but the general methodology can be used with any combination of image processing and analysis software. The specific approaches in this document use the FoveaPro 4 plug-in toolset to Adobe Photoshop CS5 Extended but it can be carried out equally well, though somewhat less conveniently, with software such as the image processing toolbox in MATLAB, Image-Pro Plus, or ImageJ.

  2. Digitizing an Analog Radiography Teaching File Under Time Constraint: Trade-Offs in Efficiency and Image Quality.

    PubMed

    Loehfelm, Thomas W; Prater, Adam B; Debebe, Tequam; Sekhar, Aarti K

    2017-02-01

    We digitized the radiography teaching file at Black Lion Hospital (Addis Ababa, Ethiopia) during a recent trip, using a standard digital camera and a fluorescent light box. Our goal was to photograph every radiograph in the existing library while optimizing the final image size to the maximum resolution of a high quality tablet computer, preserving the contrast resolution of the radiographs, and minimizing total library file size. A secondary important goal was to minimize the cost and time required to take and process the images. Three workers were able to efficiently remove the radiographs from their storage folders, hang them on the light box, operate the camera, catalog the image, and repack the radiographs back to the storage folder. Zoom, focal length, and film speed were fixed, while aperture and shutter speed were manually adjusted for each image, allowing for efficiency and flexibility in image acquisition. Keeping zoom and focal length fixed, which kept the view box at the same relative position in all of the images acquired during a single photography session, allowed unused space to be batch-cropped, saving considerable time in post-processing, at the expense of final image resolution. We present an analysis of the trade-offs in workflow efficiency and final image quality, and demonstrate that a few people with minimal equipment can efficiently digitize a teaching file library.

  3. Encryption On Grayscale Image For Digital Image Confidentiality Using Shamir Secret Sharing Scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodiah; Anggraini, Dyah; Fitrianingsih; Kazhimi, Farizan

    2016-04-01

    The use of high-frequency internet in the process of exchanging information and digital transaction is often accompanied by transmitting digital image in the form of raster images. Secret sharing schemes are multiparty protocols that related to the key establishment which provides protection against any threats of losing cryptography key. The greater the key duplication, the higher the risk of losing the key and vice versa. In this study, Secret Sharing Method was used by employing Shamir Threshold Scheme Algorithm on grayscale digital image with the size of 256×256 pixel obtaining 128×128 pixels of shared image with threshold values (4, 8). The result number of shared images were 8 parts and the recovery process can be carried out by at least using 4 shares of the 8 parts. The result of encryption on grayscale image is capable of producing vague shared image (i.e., no perceptible information), therefore a message in the form of digital image can be kept confidential and secure.

  4. Measurement of knee joint motion using digital imaging.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Damien; Hanratty, Brian; Thompson, Neville; Beverland, David

    2009-12-01

    The measurement of joint motion is common practice in many aspects of orthopaedic surgery. A number of techniques and instruments have been developed for this purpose. We describe a method of recording and measuring knee joint motion using digital imaging which demonstrated high inter-observer reliability (r > 0.948) and intra-observer repeatability (r > 0.906). This technique may offer some practical advantages over other methods of measuring joint motion.

  5. Methods of Improving a Digital Image Having White Zones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wodell, Glenn A. (Inventor); Jobson, Daniel J. (Inventor); Rahman, Zia-Ur (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    The present invention is a method of processing a digital image that is initially represented by digital data indexed to represent positions on a display. The digital data is indicative of an intensity value I,(x,y) for each position (x,y) in each i-th spectral band. The intensity value for each position in each i-th spectral band is adjusted to generate an adjusted intensity value for each position in each i-th spectral band in accordance with SIGMA (sup N)(sub n=1)W(sub n)(log I(sub i)(x,y)-log[I(sub i)(x,y)*F(sub n)(x,y)]), i = 1,...,S where W(sub n) is a weighting factor, "*" is the convolution operator and S is the total number of unique spectral bands. For each n, the function F(sub n)(x,y) is a unique surround function applied to each position (x,y) and N is the total number of unique surround functions. Each unique surround function is scaled to improve some aspect of the digital image, e.g., dynamic range compression, color constancy, and lightness rendition. The adjusted intensity value for each position in each i-th spectral band of the image is then filtered with a filter function to generate a filtered intensity value R(sub i)(x,y). To Prevent graying of white zones in the image, the maximum of the original intensity value I(sub i)(x,y) and filtered intensity value R(sub i)(x,y) is selected for display.

  6. Real-Time Digital Compression Of Television Image Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, Scott P.; Shalkhauser, Mary JO; Whyte, Wayne A., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Digital encoding/decoding system compresses color television image data in real time for transmission at lower data rates and, consequently, lower bandwidths. Implements predictive coding process, in which each picture element (pixel) predicted from values of prior neighboring pixels, and coded transmission expresses difference between actual and predicted current values. Combines differential pulse-code modulation process with non-linear, nonadaptive predictor, nonuniform quantizer, and multilevel Huffman encoder.

  7. Dynamic Approaches for Facial Recognition Using Digital Image Speckle Correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafailovich-Sokolov, Sara; Guan, E.; Afriat, Isablle; Rafailovich, Miriam; Sokolov, Jonathan; Clark, Richard

    2004-03-01

    Digital image analysis techniques have been extensively used in facial recognition. To date, most static facial characterization techniques, which are usually based on Fourier transform techniques, are sensitive to lighting, shadows, or modification of appearance by makeup, natural aging or surgery. In this study we have demonstrated that it is possible to uniquely identify faces by analyzing the natural motion of facial features with Digital Image Speckle Correlation (DISC). Human skin has a natural pattern produced by the texture of the skin pores, which is easily visible with conventional digital cameras of resolution greater than 4 mega pixels. Hence the application of the DISC method to the analysis of facial motion appears to be very straightforward. Here we demonstrate that the vector diagrams produced by this method for facial images are directly correlated to the underlying muscle structure which is unique for an individual and is not affected by lighting or make-up. Furthermore, we will show that this method can also be used for medical diagnosis in early detection of facial paralysis and other forms of skin disorders.

  8. GrinLine identification using digital imaging and Adobe Photoshop.

    PubMed

    Bollinger, Susan A; Brumit, Paula C; Schrader, Bruce A; Senn, David R

    2009-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to outline a method by which an antemortem photograph of a victim can be critically compared with a postmortem photograph in an effort to facilitate the identification process. Ten subjects, between 27 and 55 years old provided historical pictures of themselves exhibiting a broad smile showing anterior teeth to some extent (a grin). These photos were termed "antemortem" for the purpose of the study. A digital camera was used to take a current photo of each subject's grin. These photos represented the "postmortem" images. A single subject's "postmortem" photo set was randomly selected to be the "unknown victim." These combined data of the unknown and the 10 antemortem subjects were digitally stored and, using Adobe Photoshop software, the images were sized and oriented for comparative analysis. The goal was to devise a technique that could facilitate the accurate determination of which "antemortem" subject was the "unknown." The generation of antemortem digital overlays of the teeth visible in a grin and the comparison of those overlays to the images of the postmortem dentition is the foundation of the technique. The comparisons made using the GrinLine Identification Technique may assist medical examiners and coroners in making identifications or exclusions.

  9. Principles of image processing in digital chest radiography.

    PubMed

    Prokop, Mathias; Neitzel, Ulrich; Schaefer-Prokop, Cornelia

    2003-07-01

    Image processing has a major impact on image quality and diagnostic performance of digital chest radiographs. Goals of processing are to reduce the dynamic range of the image data to capture the full range of attenuation differences between lungs and mediastinum, to improve the modulation transfer function to optimize spatial resolution, to enhance structural contrast, and to suppress image noise. Image processing comprises look-up table operations and spatial filtering. Look-up table operations allow for automated signal normalization and arbitrary choice of image gradation. The most simple and still widely applied spatial filtering algorithms are based on unsharp masking. Various modifications were introduced for dynamic range reduction and MTF restoration. More elaborate and more effective are multi-scale frequency processing algorithms. They are based on the subdivision of an image in multiple frequency bands according to its structural composition. This allows for a wide range of image manipulations including a size-independent enhancement of low-contrast structures. Principles of the various algorithms will be explained and their impact on image appearance will be illustrated by clinical examples. Optimum and sub-optimum parameter settings are discussed and pitfalls will be explained.

  10. Digital image processing and analysis for activated sludge wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Khan, Muhammad Burhan; Lee, Xue Yong; Nisar, Humaira; Ng, Choon Aun; Yeap, Kim Ho; Malik, Aamir Saeed

    2015-01-01

    Activated sludge system is generally used in wastewater treatment plants for processing domestic influent. Conventionally the activated sludge wastewater treatment is monitored by measuring physico-chemical parameters like total suspended solids (TSSol), sludge volume index (SVI) and chemical oxygen demand (COD) etc. For the measurement, tests are conducted in the laboratory, which take many hours to give the final measurement. Digital image processing and analysis offers a better alternative not only to monitor and characterize the current state of activated sludge but also to predict the future state. The characterization by image processing and analysis is done by correlating the time evolution of parameters extracted by image analysis of floc and filaments with the physico-chemical parameters. This chapter briefly reviews the activated sludge wastewater treatment; and, procedures of image acquisition, preprocessing, segmentation and analysis in the specific context of activated sludge wastewater treatment. In the latter part additional procedures like z-stacking, image stitching are introduced for wastewater image preprocessing, which are not previously used in the context of activated sludge. Different preprocessing and segmentation techniques are proposed, along with the survey of imaging procedures reported in the literature. Finally the image analysis based morphological parameters and correlation of the parameters with regard to monitoring and prediction of activated sludge are discussed. Hence it is observed that image analysis can play a very useful role in the monitoring of activated sludge wastewater treatment plants.

  11. Freezing effect on bread appearance evaluated by digital imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zayas, Inna Y.

    1999-01-01

    In marketing channels, bread is sometimes delivered in a frozen sate for distribution. Changes occur in physical dimensions, crumb grain and appearance of slices. Ten loaves, twelve bread slices per loaf were scanned for digital image analysis and then frozen in a commercial refrigerator. The bread slices were stored for four weeks scanned again, permitted to thaw and scanned a third time. Image features were extracted, to determine shape, size and image texture of the slices. Different thresholds of grey levels were set to detect changes that occurred in crumb, images were binarized at these settings. The number of pixels falling into these gray level settings were determined for each slice. Image texture features of subimages of each slice were calculated to quantify slice crumb grain. The image features of the slice size showed shrinking of bread slices, as a results of freezing and storage, although shape of slices did not change markedly. Visible crumb texture changes occurred and these changes were depicted by changes in image texture features. Image texture features showed that slice crumb changed differently at the center of a slice compared to a peripheral area close to the crust. Image texture and slice features were sufficient for discrimination of slices before and after freezing and after thawing.

  12. Digital pathology consultations-a new era in digital imaging, challenges and practical applications.

    PubMed

    Romero Lauro, Gonzalo; Cable, William; Lesniak, Andrew; Tseytlin, Eugene; McHugh, Jeff; Parwani, Anil; Pantanowitz, Liron

    2013-08-01

    Digital pathology has grown dramatically in the last 10 years and has created opportunities to not only support the triaging of difficult cases among specialists within an organization, but also enable remote pathology consultations with external organizations across the world. This study investigated one organization's need for a vendor agnostic Digital Pathology Consultation workflow solution that overcomes the challenges associated with the transfer of large studies across a local area network or across the Internet. The organization investigated is a large multifacility healthcare organization that consists of 20 hospitals spread across a wide geographical area. The organization has one of the largest academic pathology departments in the USA, with more than 100 diagnostic anatomic pathologists. This organization developed a set of web-based tools to support the workflow of digital pathology consultations and allow the viewing of whole slide images. The challenges and practical implementations of two different use cases are addressed: the occasional end user (professional or patient) requesting a second opinion and the external laboratory or hospital looking for an established consultative relationship with a large volume of cases. The solution presented in this study addresses the challenges associated with the distribution of large images and the lack of established imaging standards, while providing for a convenient and secure portal for pathologist report entry and distribution.

  13. A Low Power Digital Accumulation Technique for Digital-Domain CMOS TDI Image Sensor.

    PubMed

    Yu, Changwei; Nie, Kaiming; Xu, Jiangtao; Gao, Jing

    2016-09-23

    In this paper, an accumulation technique suitable for digital domain CMOS time delay integration (TDI) image sensors is proposed to reduce power consumption without degrading the rate of imaging. In terms of the slight variations of quantization codes among different pixel exposures towards the same object, the pixel array is divided into two groups: one is for coarse quantization of high bits only, and the other one is for fine quantization of low bits. Then, the complete quantization codes are composed of both results from the coarse-and-fine quantization. The equivalent operation comparably reduces the total required bit numbers of the quantization. In the 0.18 µm CMOS process, two versions of 16-stage digital domain CMOS TDI image sensor chains based on a 10-bit successive approximate register (SAR) analog-to-digital converter (ADC), with and without the proposed technique, are designed. The simulation results show that the average power consumption of slices of the two versions are 6 . 47 × 10 - 8 J/line and 7 . 4 × 10 - 8 J/line, respectively. Meanwhile, the linearity of the two versions are 99.74% and 99.99%, respectively.

  14. Digital imaging in the assessment of facial deformity.

    PubMed

    Fanibunda, K B; Thomas, P R

    1999-04-01

    A combination of digital imaging and conventional radiographic techniques has been used to obtain a life-size composite image of the facial soft tissue profile, the skull, and the teeth, anatomically superimposed on each other. The system overcomes major problems associated with assessment of facial deformity such as magnification, the exposure of photographs and radiographs from different positions, radiographs with overexposed soft tissue profiles, lengthy procedures in photographic studios, and, in addition, enables a degree of partial automation in the management of patients.

  15. Computer image processing - The Viking experience. [digital enhancement techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, W. B.

    1977-01-01

    Computer processing of digital imagery from the Viking mission to Mars is discussed, with attention given to subjective enhancement and quantitative processing. Contrast stretching and high-pass filtering techniques of subjective enhancement are described; algorithms developed to determine optimal stretch and filtering parameters are also mentioned. In addition, geometric transformations to rectify the distortion of shapes in the field of view and to alter the apparent viewpoint of the image are considered. Perhaps the most difficult problem in quantitative processing of Viking imagery was the production of accurate color representations of Orbiter and Lander camera images.

  16. Non-negative factor analysis supporting the interpretation of elemental distribution images acquired by XRF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfeld, Matthias; Wahabzada, Mirwaes; Bauckhage, Christian; Kersting, Kristian; Wellenreuther, Gerd; Falkenberg, Gerald

    2014-04-01

    Stacks of elemental distribution images acquired by XRF can be difficult to interpret, if they contain high degrees of redundancy and components differing in their quantitative but not qualitative elemental composition. Factor analysis, mainly in the form of Principal Component Analysis (PCA), has been used to reduce the level of redundancy and highlight correlations. PCA, however, does not yield physically meaningful representations as they often contain negative values. This limitation can be overcome, by employing factor analysis that is restricted to non-negativity. In this paper we present the first application of the Python Matrix Factorization Module (pymf) on XRF data. This is done in a case study on the painting Saul and David from the studio of Rembrandt van Rijn. We show how the discrimination between two different Co containing compounds with minimum user intervention and a priori knowledge is supported by Non-Negative Matrix Factorization (NMF).

  17. Robust adaptive digital watermark for still images using hybrid modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alturki, Faisal T.; Mersereau, Russell M.

    2001-08-01

    A digital watermark is a short sequence of information containing an owner identity or copyright information embedded in a way that is difficult to erase. We present a new oblivious digital watermarking technique for copyright protection of still images. The technique embeds the watermark in a subset of low to mid frequency coefficients. A key is used to randomly select a group of coefficients from that subset for watermark embedding. The original phases of the selected coefficients are removed and the new phases are set in accordance with the embedded watermark. Since the coefficients are selected at random, the powers of the low magnitude coefficients are increased to enhance their immunity against image attacks. To cope with small geometric attacks, a replica of the watermark is embedded by dividing the image into sub-blocks and taking the DCT of these blocks. The watermark is embedded in the DC component of some of these blocks selected in an adaptive way using quantization techniques. A major advantage of this technique is its complete suppression of the noise due to the host image. The robustness of the technique to a number of standard image processing attacks is demonstrated using the criteria of the latest Stirmark benchmark test.

  18. Infective endocarditis detection through SPECT/CT images digital processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, Albino; Valdés, Raquel; Jiménez, Luis; Vallejo, Enrique; Hernández, Salvador; Soto, Gabriel

    2014-03-01

    Infective endocarditis (IE) is a difficult-to-diagnose pathology, since its manifestation in patients is highly variable. In this work, it was proposed a semiautomatic algorithm based on SPECT images digital processing for the detection of IE using a CT images volume as a spatial reference. The heart/lung rate was calculated using the SPECT images information. There were no statistically significant differences between the heart/lung rates values of a group of patients diagnosed with IE (2.62+/-0.47) and a group of healthy or control subjects (2.84+/-0.68). However, it is necessary to increase the study sample of both the individuals diagnosed with IE and the control group subjects, as well as to improve the images quality.

  19. Comparison of Digital Imaging Systems for Neutron Radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pugliesi, R.; Pugliesi, Fábio; Stanojev Pereira, M. A.

    2011-09-01

    The characteristics of three digital imaging systems for neutron radiography purposes have been compared. Two of them make use of films, CR-39 and Kodak AA, and the third makes use of a LiF scintillator, for image registration. The irradiations were performed in the neutron radiography facility installed at the IEA-R1 nuclear research reactor of IPEN-CNEN/SP. According to the obtained results, the system based on CR-39 is the slowest to obtain an image, and the best in terms of resolution but the worse in terms of contrast. The system based on Kodak AA is faster than the prior, exhibits good resolution and contrast. The system based on the scintillator is the fastest to obtain an image, and best in terms of contrast but the worse in terms of resolution.

  20. Use of film digitizers to assist radiology image management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honeyman-Buck, Janice C.; Frost, Meryll M.; Staab, Edward V.

    1996-05-01

    The purpose of this development effort was to evaluate the possibility of using digital technologies to solve image management problems in the Department of Radiology at the University of Florida. The three problem areas investigated were local interpretation of images produced in remote locations, distribution of images to areas outside of radiology, and film handling. In all cases the use of a laser film digitizer interfaced to an existing Picture Archiving and Communication System (PACS) was investigated as a solution to the problem. In each case the volume of studies involved were evaluated to estimate the impact of the solution on the network, archive, and workstations. Communications were stressed in the analysis of the needs for all image transmission. The operational aspects of the solution were examined to determine the needs for training, service, and maintenance. The remote sites requiring local interpretation included were a rural hospital needing coverage for after hours studies, the University of Florida student infirmary, and the emergency room. Distribution of images to the intensive care units was studied to improve image access and patient care. Handling of films originating from remote sites and those requiring urgent reporting were evaluated to improve management functions. The results of our analysis and the decisions that were made based on the analysis are described below. In the cases where systems were installed, a description of the system and its integration into the PACS system is included. For all three problem areas, although we could move images via a digitizer to the archive and a workstation, there was no way to inform the radiologist that a study needed attention. In the case of outside films, the patient did not always have a medical record number that matched one in our Radiology Information Systems (RIS). In order to incorporate all studies for a patient, we needed common locations for orders, reports, and images. RIS orders

  1. Applicability of digital analysis and imaging technology in neuropathology assessment.

    PubMed

    Dunn, William D; Gearing, Marla; Park, Yuna; Zhang, Lifan; Hanfelt, John; Glass, Jonathan D; Gutman, David A

    2016-06-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurological disorder that affects more than 30 million people worldwide. While various dementia-related losses in cognitive functioning are its hallmark clinical symptoms, ultimate diagnosis is based on manual neuropathological assessments using various schemas, including Braak staging, CERAD (Consortium to Establish a Registry for Alzheimer's Disease) and Thal phase scoring. Since these scoring systems are based on subjective assessment, there is inevitably some degree of variation between readers, which could affect ultimate neuropathology diagnosis. Here, we report a pilot study investigating the applicability of computer-driven image analysis for characterizing neuropathological features, as well as its potential to supplement or even replace manually derived ratings commonly performed in medical settings. In this work, we quantitatively measured amyloid beta (Aβ) plaque in various brain regions from 34 patients using a robust digital quantification algorithm. We next verified these digitally derived measures to the manually derived pathology ratings using correlation and ordinal logistic regression methods, while also investigating the association with other AD-related neuropathology scoring schema commonly used at autopsy, such as Braak and CERAD. In addition to successfully verifying our digital measurements of Aβ plaques with respective categorical measurements, we found significant correlations with most AD-related scoring schemas. Our results demonstrate the potential for digital analysis to be adapted to more complex staining procedures commonly used in neuropathological diagnosis. As the efficiency of scanning and digital analysis of histology images increases, we believe that the basis of our semi-automatic approach may better standardize quantification of neuropathological changes and AD diagnosis, ultimately leading to a more comprehensive understanding of neurological disorders and more efficient patient

  2. Enhancing the Teaching of Digital Processing of Remote Sensing Image Course through Geospatial Web Processing Services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di, L.; Deng, M.

    2010-12-01

    Remote sensing (RS) is an essential method to collect data for Earth science research. Huge amount of remote sensing data, most of them in the image form, have been acquired. Almost all geography departments in the world offer courses in digital processing of remote sensing images. Such courses place emphasis on how to digitally process large amount of multi-source images for solving real world problems. However, due to the diversity and complexity of RS images and the shortcomings of current data and processing infrastructure, obstacles for effectively teaching such courses still remain. The major obstacles include 1) difficulties in finding, accessing, integrating and using massive RS images by students and educators, and 2) inadequate processing functions and computing facilities for students to freely explore the massive data. Recent development in geospatial Web processing service systems, which make massive data, computing powers, and processing capabilities to average Internet users anywhere in the world, promises the removal of the obstacles. The GeoBrain system developed by CSISS is an example of such systems. All functions available in GRASS Open Source GIS have been implemented as Web services in GeoBrain. Petabytes of remote sensing images in NASA data centers, the USGS Landsat data archive, and NOAA CLASS are accessible transparently and processable through GeoBrain. The GeoBrain system is operated on a high performance cluster server with large disk storage and fast Internet connection. All GeoBrain capabilities can be accessed by any Internet-connected Web browser. Dozens of universities have used GeoBrain as an ideal platform to support data-intensive remote sensing education. This presentation gives a specific example of using GeoBrain geoprocessing services to enhance the teaching of GGS 588, Digital Remote Sensing taught at the Department of Geography and Geoinformation Science, George Mason University. The course uses the textbook "Introductory

  3. A comparison of image interpretation times in full field digital mammography and digital breast tomosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astley, Susan; Connor, Sophie; Lim, Yit; Tate, Catriona; Entwistle, Helen; Morris, Julie; Whiteside, Sigrid; Sergeant, Jamie; Wilson, Mary; Beetles, Ursula; Boggis, Caroline; Gilbert, Fiona

    2013-03-01

    Digital Breast Tomosynthesis (DBT) provides three-dimensional images of the breast that enable radiologists to discern whether densities are due to overlapping structures or lesions. To aid assessment of the cost-effectiveness of DBT for screening, we have compared the time taken to interpret DBT images and the corresponding two-dimensional Full Field Digital Mammography (FFDM) images. Four Consultant Radiologists experienced in reading FFDM images (4 years 8 months to 8 years) with training in DBT interpretation but more limited experience (137-407 cases in the past 6 months) were timed reading between 24 and 32 two view FFDM and DBT cases. The images were of women recalled from screening for further assessment and women under surveillance because of a family history of breast cancer. FFDM images were read before DBT, according to local practice. The median time for readers to interpret FFDM images was 17.0 seconds, with an interquartile range of 12.3-23.6 seconds. For DBT, the median time was 66.0 seconds, and the interquartile range was 51.1-80.5 seconds. The difference was statistically significant (p<0.001). Reading times were significantly longer in family history clinics (p<0.01). Although it took approximately four times as long to interpret DBT than FFDM images, the cases were more complex than would be expected for routine screening, and with higher mammographic density. The readers were relatively inexperienced in DBT interpretation and may increase their speed over time. The difference in times between clinics may be due to increased throughput at assessment, or decreased density.

  4. Bone mineral imaging using a digital magnification mammography system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyofuku, Fukai; Tokumori, Kenji; Higashida, Yoshiharu; Arimura, Hidetaka; Morishita, Junji; Ohki, Masafumi

    2008-03-01

    The measurement of bone mineral content is important for diagnosis of demineralization diseases such as osteoporosis. A reliable method of obtaining bone mineral images using a digital magnification mammography system has been developed. The full-field digital phase contrast mammography (PCM) system, which has a molybdenum target of 0.1mm focal spot size, was used with 1.75 x magnification. We have performed several phantom experiments using aluminum step wedges (0.2 mm - 6.0 mm in thickness) and a bone mineral standard phantom composed of calcium carbonate and polyurethane (CaCO 3 concentration: 26.7 - 939.0 mg/cm 3) within a water or Lucite phantom. X-ray spectra on the exposure field are measured using a CdTe detector for evaluation of heel effect. From the equations of x-ray attenuation and the thickness of the subjects, quantitative images of both components were obtained. The quantitative images of the two components were obtained for different tube voltages of 24 kV to 39 kV. The relative accuracy was less than 2.5% for the entire aluminum thickness of 0.5 to 6.0 mm at 5 cm water thickness. Accuracy of bone mineral thickness was within 3.5% for 5cm water phantom. The magnified quantitative images of a hand phantom significantly increased the visibility of fine structures of bones. The digital magnification mammography system is useful not only for measurement of bone mineral content, but also high-resolution quantitative imaging of trabecular structure.

  5. Textured digital elevation model formation from low-cost UAV LADAR/digital image data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bybee, Taylor C.; Budge, Scott E.

    2015-05-01

    Textured digital elevation models (TDEMs) have valuable use in precision agriculture, situational awareness, and disaster response. However, scientific-quality models are expensive to obtain using conventional aircraft-based methods. The cost of creating an accurate textured terrain model can be reduced by using a low-cost (<$20k) UAV system fitted with ladar and electro-optical (EO) sensors. A texel camera fuses calibrated ladar and EO data upon simultaneous capture, creating a texel image. This eliminates the problem of fusing the data in a post-processing step and enables both 2D- and 3D-image registration techniques to be used. This paper describes formation of TDEMs using simulated data from a small UAV gathering swaths of texel images of the terrain below. Being a low-cost UAV, only a coarse knowledge of position and attitude is known, and thus both 2D- and 3D-image registration techniques must be used to register adjacent swaths of texel imagery to create a TDEM. The process of creating an aggregate texel image (a TDEM) from many smaller texel image swaths is described. The algorithm is seeded with the rough estimate of position and attitude of each capture. Details such as the required amount of texel image overlap, registration models, simulated flight patterns (level and turbulent), and texture image formation are presented. In addition, examples of such TDEMs are shown and analyzed for accuracy.

  6. Digital micromirror device as a spatial illuminator for fluorescence lifetime and hyperspectral imaging.

    PubMed

    Bednarkiewicz, Artur; Bouhifd, Mounir; Whelan, Maurice P

    2008-03-20

    Time-domain fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) and hyper-spectral imaging (HSI) are two advanced microscopy techniques widely used in biological studies. Typically both FLIM and HSI are performed with either a whole-field or raster-scanning approach, which often prove to be technically complex and expensive, requiring the user to accept a compromise among precision, speed, and spatial resolution. We propose the use of a digital micromirror device (DMD) as a spatial illuminator for time-domain FLIM and HSI with a laser diode excitation source. The rather unique features of the DMD allow both random and parallel access to regions of interest (ROIs) on the sample, in a very rapid and repeatable fashion. As a consequence both spectral and lifetime images can be acquired with a precision normally associated with single-point systems but with a high degree of flexibility in their spatial construction. In addition, the DMD system offers a very efficient way of implementing a global analysis approach for FLIM, where average fluorescence decay parameters are first acquired for a ROI and then used as initial estimates in determining their spatial distribution within the ROI. Experimental results obtained on phantoms employing fluorescent dyes clearly show how the DMD method supports both spectral and temporal separation for target identification in HSI and FLIM, respectively.

  7. Investigating materials for breast nodules simulation by using segmentation and similarity analysis of digital images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siqueira, Paula N.; Marcomini, Karem D.; Sousa, Maria A. Z.; Schiabel, Homero

    2015-03-01

    The task of identifying the malignancy of nodular lesions on mammograms becomes quite complex due to overlapped structures or even to the granular fibrous tissue which can cause confusion in classifying masses shape, leading to unnecessary biopsies. Efforts to develop methods for automatic masses detection in CADe (Computer Aided Detection) schemes have been made with the aim of assisting radiologists and working as a second opinion. The validation of these methods may be accomplished for instance by using databases with clinical images or acquired through breast phantoms. With this aim, some types of materials were tested in order to produce radiographic phantom images which could characterize a good enough approach to the typical mammograms corresponding to actual breast nodules. Therefore different nodules patterns were physically produced and used on a previous developed breast phantom. Their characteristics were tested according to the digital images obtained from phantom exposures at a LORAD M-IV mammography unit. Two analysis were realized the first one by the segmentation of regions of interest containing the simulated nodules by an automated segmentation technique as well as by an experienced radiologist who has delineated the contour of each nodule by means of a graphic display digitizer. Both results were compared by using evaluation metrics. The second one used measure of quality Structural Similarity (SSIM) to generate quantitative data related to the texture produced by each material. Although all the tested materials proved to be suitable for the study, the PVC film yielded the best results.

  8. Differentiation of digital tb images using texture analysis and rbf classifier.

    PubMed

    Priya, E; Srinivasan, S; Ramakrishnan, S

    2012-01-01

    In this work, differentiation of positive and negative images of Tuberculosis (TB) sputum smear has been attempted using statistical method based on Gray Level Co-occurrence Matrix (GLCM). The sputum smear images (N=100) recorded under standard image acquisition protocol are considered for this work. Second order statistical texture analysis is performed on the acquired images using GLCM method and a set of nineteen features are derived. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) is then employed to reduce feature sets, to enhance the efficiency of differentiation and to reduce the redundancy. These feature sets are further classified using Radial Basis Function (RBF) classifier. Results show that GLCM is able to differentiate positive and negative TB images. Correlation is found to be high for many of the parameters. Application of PCA reduced the number of features to four which had maximum magnitude in the first principal component. Higher classification accuracy is achieved using RBF classifier. It appears that this method of texture analysis could be useful to develop automated system for characterization and classification of digital TB sputum smear images.

  9. Use of Digital Image Technology to 'Clearly' Depict Global Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molnia, B. F.; Carbo, C. L.

    2014-12-01

    Earth is dynamic and beautiful. Understanding why, when, how, and how fast its surface changes yields information and serves as a source of inspiration. The artistic use of geoscience information can inform the public about what is happening to their planet in a non-confrontational and apolitical way. While individual images may clearly depict a landscape, photographic comparisons are necessary to clearly capture and display annual, decadal, or century-scale impacts of climate and environmental change on Earth's landscapes. After years of effort to artistically communicate geoscience concepts with unenhanced individual photographs or pairs of images, the authors have partnered to maximize this process by using digital image enhancement technology. This is done, not to manipulate the inherent artistic content or information content of the photographs, but to insure that the comparative photo pairs produced are geometrically correct and unambiguous. For comparative photography, information-rich historical photographs are selected from archives, websites, and other sources. After determining the geographic location from which the historical photograph was made, the original site is identified and eventually revisited. There, the historical photos field of view is again photographed, ideally from the original location. From nearly 250 locations revisited, about 175 pairs have been produced. Every effort is made to reoccupy the original historical site. However, vegetation growth, visibility reduction, and co-seismic level change may make this impossible. Also, inherent differences in lens optics, camera construction, and image format may result in differences in the geometry of the new photograph when compared to the old. Upon selection, historical photos are cleaned, contrast stretched, brightness adjusted, and sharpened to maximize site identification and information extraction. To facilitate matching historical and new images, digital files of each are overlain in

  10. Digital histologic images: practical pointers for successful electronic submission to biomedical journals.

    PubMed

    Gruber, H E; Hanley, E N; Sun, Y

    2009-12-01

    The advent of digital imaging and online submission of manuscripts has created new challenges for authors using histological images. Digital images are used routinely in today's histology research lab and authors must prepare illustrations that meet standards for resolution, color modes, image size, and digital file types for successful online submission to biomedical journals. Because authors may not be familiar with these requirements, our objective here is to present practical guidelines and information for successful image submission online. Ethical issues related to digital imaging and other current topics also are discussed with reference to available online resources.

  11. Digital Image Processing for Noise Reduction in Medical Ultrasonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loupas, Thanasis

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. The purpose of this project was to investigate the application of digital image processing techniques as a means of reducing noise in medical ultrasonic imaging. Ultrasonic images suffer primarily from a type of acoustic noise, known as speckle, which is generally regarded as a major source of image quality degradation. The origin of speckle, its statistical properties as well as methods suggested to eliminate this artifact were reviewed. A simple model which can characterize the statistics of speckle on displays was also developed. A large number of digital noise reduction techniques was investigated. These include frame averaging techniques performed by commercially available devices and spatial filters implemented in software. Among the latter, some filters have been proposed in the scientific literature for ultrasonic, laser and microwave speckle or general noise suppression and the rest are original, developed specifically to suppress ultrasonic speckle. Particular emphasis was placed on adaptive techniques which adjust the processing performed at each point according to the local image content. In this way, they manage to suppress speckle with negligible loss of genuine image detail. Apart from preserving the diagnostically significant features of a scan another requirement a technique must satisfy before it is accepted in routine clinical practice is real-time operation. A spatial filter capable of satisfying both these requirements was designed and built in hardware using low-cost and readily available components. The possibility of incorporating all the necessary filter circuitry into a single VLSI chip was also investigated. In order to establish the effectiveness and usefulness of speckle suppression, a representative sample from the techniques examined here was applied to a large number of abdominal scans and their effect on image quality was evaluated. Finally, further

  12. From Horse-Drawn Wagon to Hot Rod: The University of California's Digital Image Service Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burns, Maureen A.

    2006-01-01

    This article proposes that a viable approach archivists might consider to meet increasing demands for access to digital images with functional presentation tools is to develop a reciprocal partnership with a digital library. The University of California's experience with the federation of licensed and UC-owned digital image collections is…

  13. The Challenge of Digital Imaging Technologies: A Practical View of the Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamber, Anthony

    1994-01-01

    Discusses digital imaging technologies. Topics include information technology; reprographics; scientific imaging processing; political considerations of telecommunications and the information superhighway; digital cameras; slide and transparency scanners; desktop prepress processing; digital proofing devices; direct-to-plate and direct-to-press…

  14. High Res at High Speed: Automated Delivery of High-Resolution Images from Digital Library Collections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westbrook, R. Niccole; Watkins, Sean

    2012-01-01

    As primary source materials in the library are digitized and made available online, the focus of related library services is shifting to include new and innovative methods of digital delivery via social media, digital storytelling, and community-based and consortial image repositories. Most images on the Web are not of sufficient quality for most…

  15. Sand Shear Band Thickness Measurements by Digital Imaging Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alshibli, Khalid A.; Sture, Stein

    1998-01-01

    Digital imaging analysis was used to study localized deformations in granular materials tested under plane strain condition. Two independent techniques were applied and compared. In the first, the digitized optical images of a grid printed on the latex membrane were used to measure the shear band orientation angle and thickness, and were found to be 54.5' and 3.01 mm respectively. The second technique involved introducing an ultra-low viscosity resin into the specimen in preparation for thin- sectioning and microscopic study of the internal fabric. A total of 24 microscopic images obtained from four thin sections were analyzed and void ratio variation was measured. The shear band thickness measurements from images located along the shear band axis (at two locations) were equal to 3.19 mm and 3.29 mm which are very close to the average value obtained from surface analysis. The study was then extended to investigate the effects of sand grain-size and properties, specimen density, and confining pressure on shear band thickness. It was found that the normalized shear band thickness decreases as grain-size and confining pressure increase and as density decreases. Finally, shear band thickness is highly influenced by the specimen dilatancy.

  16. Crop discrimination on ENVISAT ASAR images acquired in alternating polarization mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stankiewicz, Krystyna A.

    2005-10-01

    The objective of this study is to find an efficient method of crop classification based solely on satellite microwave data. Microwave data can sometimes be the only non-contaminated satellite data available for a selected area, where frequent cloudiness makes optical data useless. Hence, this approach has to be studied at least as an alternative method for application when other data are missing. Although ASAR is not a fully polarimetric instrument, a selection of dual polarization modes and a selection of incidence angles are available when using ASAR alternating polarization product (APP). Larger incidence angle and cross-polarized data are better for crop discrimination, while lower incidence angle and co-polarized data contain more information on soil moisture. In the years 2003 and 2004 a sequence of ASAR IS2, IS4 and IS6 images acquired during a growth season was analyzed. Supervised classification of ASAR APP was performed with ground truth data collected for 700 plots covered by homogeneous crops. For growth seasons of 2003 and 2004 various combination of images were tested in order to find the best set of data providing the highest accuracy of crop classification.

  17. Traffic sign detection in MLS acquired point clouds for geometric and image-based semantic inventory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soilán, Mario; Riveiro, Belén; Martínez-Sánchez, Joaquín; Arias, Pedro

    2016-04-01

    Nowadays, mobile laser scanning has become a valid technology for infrastructure inspection. This technology permits collecting accurate 3D point clouds of urban and road environments and the geometric and semantic analysis of data became an active research topic in the last years. This paper focuses on the detection of vertical traffic signs in 3D point clouds acquired by a LYNX Mobile Mapper system, comprised of laser scanning and RGB cameras. Each traffic sign is automatically detected in the LiDAR point cloud, and its main geometric parameters can be automatically extracted, therefore aiding the inventory process. Furthermore, the 3D position of traffic signs are reprojected on the 2D images, which are spatially and temporally synced with the point cloud. Image analysis allows for recognizing the traffic sign semantics using machine learning approaches. The presented method was tested in road and urban scenarios in Galicia (Spain). The recall results for traffic sign detection are close to 98%, and existing false positives can be easily filtered after point cloud projection. Finally, the lack of a large, publicly available Spanish traffic sign database is pointed out.

  18. Unified framework for automated iris segmentation using distantly acquired face images.

    PubMed

    Tan, Chun-Wei; Kumar, Ajay

    2012-09-01

    Remote human identification using iris biometrics has high civilian and surveillance applications and its success requires the development of robust segmentation algorithm to automatically extract the iris region. This paper presents a new iris segmentation framework which can robustly segment the iris images acquired using near infrared or visible illumination. The proposed approach exploits multiple higher order local pixel dependencies to robustly classify the eye region pixels into iris or noniris regions. Face and eye detection modules have been incorporated in the unified framework to automatically provide the localized eye region from facial image for iris segmentation. We develop robust postprocessing operations algorithm to effectively mitigate the noisy pixels caused by the misclassification. Experimental results presented in this paper suggest significant improvement in the average segmentation errors over the previously proposed approaches, i.e., 47.5%, 34.1%, and 32.6% on UBIRIS.v2, FRGC, and CASIA.v4 at-a-distance databases, respectively. The usefulness of the proposed approach is also ascertained from recognition experiments on three different publicly available databases.

  19. Gimbal Influence on the Stability of Exterior Orientation Parameters of UAV Acquired Images.

    PubMed

    Gašparović, Mateo; Jurjević, Luka

    2017-02-18

    In this paper, results from the analysis of the gimbal impact on the determination of the camera exterior orientation parameters of an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) are presented and interpreted. Additionally, a new approach and methodology for testing the influence of gimbals on the exterior orientation parameters of UAV acquired images is presented. The main motive of this study is to examine the possibility of obtaining better geometry and favorable spatial bundles of rays of images in UAV photogrammetric surveying. The subject is a 3-axis brushless gimbal based on a controller board (Storm32). Only two gimbal axes are taken into consideration: roll and pitch axes. Testing was done in a flight simulation, and in indoor and outdoor flight mode, to analyze the Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) and photogrammetric data. Within these tests the change of the exterior orientation parameters without the use of a gimbal is determined, as well as the potential accuracy of the stabilization with the use of a gimbal. The results show that using a gimbal has huge potential. Significantly, smaller discrepancies between data are noticed when a gimbal is used in flight simulation mode, even four times smaller than in other test modes. In this test the potential accuracy of a low budget gimbal for application in real conditions is determined.

  20. Gimbal Influence on the Stability of Exterior Orientation Parameters of UAV Acquired Images

    PubMed Central

    Gašparović, Mateo; Jurjević, Luka

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, results from the analysis of the gimbal impact on the determination of the camera exterior orientation parameters of an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) are presented and interpreted. Additionally, a new approach and methodology for testing the influence of gimbals on the exterior orientation parameters of UAV acquired images is presented. The main motive of this study is to examine the possibility of obtaining better geometry and favorable spatial bundles of rays of images in UAV photogrammetric surveying. The subject is a 3-axis brushless gimbal based on a controller board (Storm32). Only two gimbal axes are taken into consideration: roll and pitch axes. Testing was done in a flight simulation, and in indoor and outdoor flight mode, to analyze the Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) and photogrammetric data. Within these tests the change of the exterior orientation parameters without the use of a gimbal is determined, as well as the potential accuracy of the stabilization with the use of a gimbal. The results show that using a gimbal has huge potential. Significantly, smaller discrepancies between data are noticed when a gimbal is used in flight simulation mode, even four times smaller than in other test modes. In this test the potential accuracy of a low budget gimbal for application in real conditions is determined. PMID:28218699

  1. Using aerial-acquired images to improve cotton and peanut production systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kvien, Craig; Waters, Deborah; Pocknee, Stuart; Usery, Lynn; Wells, Natasha

    1996-11-01

    Modern agriculture management is an extraordinarily complex task. The most complex tasks are management for environmental benefits. Chemical, physical and biological characteristics are known to vary over short distances in a field. However, most fields are treated as uniform, leading to over application and environmental pollution, or under application and suboptimal yields. Affordable navigation and positioning systems linked to sensing technologies and integrated into a geographic information system (GIS) are revolutionizing the way agriculture can address environmental variabilities. One challenge to better management of within field variability is the establishment of management zones for various inputs. Our research and development group is currently using aerial acquired images to help establish management zones for nutrients, pest scouting, and to monitor crop growth and development. These images are ground truthed and coupled with additional information layers such as maps of yield, disease, insect and weed pests, soil properties, topography to help establish relationships between the various components affecting crop growth and to help improve management decisions during the growing season.

  2. Retrieval of aerosol optical thickness from PROBA-CHRIS images acquired over a coniferous forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maffei, Carmine; Leone, Antonio P.; Menenti, Massimo; Pippi, Ivan; Maselli, Fabio; Antonelli, Paolo

    2005-10-01

    In the present work we show the potential of multiangular hyperspectral PROBA-CHRIS data to estimate aerosol optical properties over dense dark vegetation. Data acquired over San Rossore test site (Pisa, Italy) have been used together with simultaneous ground measurements. Additionally, spectral measurement over the canopy have been performed to describe the directional behavior of a Pinus pinaster canopy. Determination of aerosol properties from optical remote sensing images over land is an under-determined problem, and some assumptions have to be made on both the aerosol and the surface being imaged. Radiance measured on multiple directions add extra information that help in reducing retrieval ambiguity. Nevertheless, multiangular observations don't allow to ignore directional spectral properties of vegetation canopies. Since surface reflectivity is the parameter we wish to determine with remote sensing after atmospheric correction, at least the shape of the bi-directional reflectance factor has to be assumed. We have adopted a Rahman BRF, and have estimated its geometrical parameters from ground spectral measurements. The inversion of measured radiance to obtain aerosol optical properties has been performed, allowing simultaneous retrieval of aerosol model and optical thickness together with the vegetation reflectivity parameter of the Rahman model.

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging of the equine digit with chronic laminitis.

    PubMed

    Murray, Rachel C; Dyson, Sue J; Schramme, Michael C; Branch, Marion; Woods, Sarah

    2003-01-01

    Chronic laminitis is a severe disease affecting the equine digit. It was hypothesized that magnetic resonance (MR) imaging would improve visualization of structures within the foot and pathology associated with chronic laminitis. This study aimed to describe the MR imaging findings in chronic laminitis, compare different pulse sequences for visualization of pathology, and to compare MR imaging with standard radiography. Twenty (10 forelimb, 10 hindlimb) cadaver limbs from 10 horses clinically diagnosed with chronic laminitis (group L) and 10 limbs without laminitis (group N) were used. Lateromedial radiographs and sagittal and transverse MR images of the foot were obtained. Radiographs and MR images were evaluated for anatomic definition and evidence of pathology. Dorsal hoof wall thickness and angle of rotation and displacement distance of the distal phalanx were measured. Comparisons were made between group L and N, forelimb and hindlimb within each horse, and MR imaging and radiography. Features consistently noted with MR images in group L, but not detected using radiography, included laminar disruption, circumscribed areas of laminar gas, laminar fluid, and bone medullary fluid. Other findings seen only on MR images included increased size and number of vascular channels, alterations in the corium coronae, and distal interphalangeal joint distension. Magnetic resonance imaging allowed better definition of laminar gas lines and P3 surface irregularity observed on radiographs. Based on measurements, group L had a greater angle of rotation, distal displacement, and dorsal hoof wall thickness than group N; forelimb hoof wall thickness was greater than hindlimb; and distal displacement and hoof wall thickness measurements were smaller using MR imaging than radiography, but had a similar pattern. It is concluded that there are features of chronic laminitis consistently observed using MR imaging and that these may be additional to features observed radiographically.

  4. Preoperative digital mammography imaging in conservative mastectomy and immediate reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Angrigiani, Claudio; Hammond, Dennis; Nava, Maurizio; Gonzalez, Eduardo; Rostagno, Roman; Gercovich, Gustavo

    2016-01-01

    Background Digital mammography clearly distinguishes gland tissue density from the overlying non-glandular breast tissue coverage, which corresponds to the existing tissue between the skin and the Cooper’s ligaments surrounding the gland (i.e., dermis and subcutaneous fat). Preoperative digital imaging can determine the thickness of this breast tissue coverage, thus facilitating planning of the most adequate surgical techniques and reconstructive procedures for each case. Methods This study aimed to describe the results of a retrospective study of 352 digital mammograms in 176 patients with different breast volumes who underwent preoperative conservative mastectomies. The breast tissue coverage thickness and its relationship with the breast volume were evaluated. Results The breast tissue coverage thickness ranged from 0.233 to 4.423 cm, with a mean value of 1.952 cm. A comparison of tissue coverage and breast volume revealed a non-direct relationship between these factors. Conclusions Preoperative planning should not depend only on breast volume. Flap evaluations based on preoperative imaging measurements might be helpful when planning a conservative mastectomy. Accordingly, we propose a breast tissue coverage classification (BTCC). PMID:26855903

  5. Dermal type I collagen assessment by digital image analysis*

    PubMed Central

    Brianezi, Gabrielli; Grandi, Fabrizio; Bagatin, Ediléia; Enokihara, Mílvia Maria S. S.; Miot, Hélio Amante

    2015-01-01

    Type I collagen is the main dermal component, and its evaluation is relevant to quantitative studies in dermatopathology. However, visual gradation (0 to 4+) has low precision and high subjectivity levels. This study aimed to develop and validate a digital morphometric analysis technique to estimate type I collagen levels in the papillary dermis. Four evaluators visually quantified (0 to 4+) the density of type I collagen in 63 images of forearm skin biopsies marked by immunohistochemistry and two evaluators analyzed the same images using digital morphometric techniques (RGB split colors (I) and color deconvolution (II)). Automated type I collagen density estimation in the papillary dermis (two techniques) were correlated with visual evaluations (Spearman's rho coefficients of 0.48 and 0.62 (p<0.01)). With regard to the inter-observer repeatability, the four evaluators who used visual classification had an intraclass correlation coefficient (for absolute agreement) of 0.53, while the other two evaluators who used digital analysis (algorithm II) had an intraclass correlation coefficient of 0.97. PMID:26560217

  6. Autocorrelation and regularization in digital images. I - Basic theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jupp, David L. B.; Strahler, Alan H.; Woodcock, Curtis E.

    1988-01-01

    Spatial structure occurs in remotely sensed images when the imaged scenes contain discrete objects that are identifiable in that their spectral properties are more homogeneous within than between them and other scene elements. The spatial structure introduced is manifest in statistical measures such as the autocovariance function and variogram associated with the scene, and it is possible to formulate these measures explicitly for scenes composed of simple objects of regular shapes. Digital images result from sensing scenes by an instrument with an associated point spread function (PSF). Since there is averaging over the PSF, the effect, termed regularization, induced in the image data by the instrument will influence the observable autocovariance and variogram functions of the image data. It is shown how the autocovariance or variogram of an image is a composition of the underlying scene covariance convolved with an overlap function, which is itself a convolution of the PSF. The functional form of this relationship provides an analytic basis for scene inference and eventual inversion of scene model parameters from image data.

  7. Effect of image scaling and segmentation in digital rock characterisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, B. D.; Feng, Y. T.

    2016-04-01

    Digital material characterisation from microstructural geometry is an emerging field in computer simulation. For permeability characterisation, a variety of studies exist where the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) has been used in conjunction with computed tomography (CT) imaging to simulate fluid flow through microscopic rock pores. While these previous works show that the technique is applicable, the use of binary image segmentation and the bounceback boundary condition results in a loss of grain surface definition when the modelled geometry is compared to the original CT image. We apply the immersed moving boundary (IMB) condition of Noble and Torczynski as a partial bounceback boundary condition which may be used to better represent the geometric definition provided by a CT image. The IMB condition is validated against published work on idealised porous geometries in both 2D and 3D. Following this, greyscale image segmentation is applied to a CT image of Diemelstadt sandstone. By varying the mapping of CT voxel densities to lattice sites, it is shown that binary image segmentation may underestimate the true permeability of the sample. A CUDA-C-based code, LBM-C, was developed specifically for this work and leverages GPU hardware in order to carry out computations.

  8. The wavelet/scalar quantization compression standard for digital fingerprint images

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, J.N.; Brislawn, C.M.

    1994-04-01

    A new digital image compression standard has been adopted by the US Federal Bureau of Investigation for use on digitized gray-scale fingerprint images. The algorithm is based on adaptive uniform scalar quantization of a discrete wavelet transform image decomposition and is referred to as the wavelet/scalar quantization standard. The standard produces archival quality images at compression ratios of around 20:1 and will allow the FBI to replace their current database of paper fingerprint cards with digital imagery.

  9. An image based auto-focusing algorithm for digital fundus photography.

    PubMed

    Moscaritolo, Michele; Jampel, Henry; Knezevich, Frederick; Zeimer, Ran

    2009-11-01

    In fundus photography, the task of fine focusing the image is demanding and lack of focus is quite often the cause of suboptimal photographs. The introduction of digital cameras has provided an opportunity to automate the task of focusing. We have developed a software algorithm capable of identifying best focus. The auto-focus (AF) method is based on an algorithm we developed to assess the sharpness of an image. The AF algorithm was tested in the prototype of a semi-automated nonmydriatic fundus camera designed to screen in the primary care environment for major eye diseases. A series of images was acquired in volunteers while focusing the camera on the fundus. The image with the best focus was determined by the AF algorithm and compared to the assessment of two masked readers. A set of fundus images was obtained in 26 eyes of 20 normal subjects and 42 eyes of 28 glaucoma patients. The 95% limits of agreement between the readers and the AF algorithm were -2.56 to 2.93 and -3.7 to 3.84 diopter and the bias was 0.09 and 0.71 diopter, for the two readers respectively. On average, the readers agreed with the AF algorithm on the best correction within less than 3/4 diopter. The intraobserver repeatability was 0.94 and 1.87 diopter, for the two readers respectively, indicating that the limit of agreement with the AF algorithm was determined predominantly by the repeatability of each reader. An auto-focus algorithm for digital fundus photography can identify the best focus reliably and objectively. It may improve the quality of fundus images by easing the task of the photographer.

  10. Digital micromirror devices: principles and applications in imaging.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Vivek; Saggau, Peter

    2013-05-01

    A digital micromirror device (DMD) is an array of individually switchable mirrors that can be used in many advanced optical systems as a rapid spatial light modulator. With a DMD, several implementations of confocal microscopy, hyperspectral imaging, and fluorescence lifetime imaging can be realized. The DMD can also be used as a real-time optical processor for applications such as the programmable array microscope and compressive sensing. Advantages and disadvantages of the DMD for these applications as well as methods to overcome some of the limitations will be discussed in this article. Practical considerations when designing with the DMD and sample optical layouts of a completely DMD-based imaging system and one in which acousto-optic deflectors (AODs) are used in the illumination pathway are also provided.

  11. Processing techniques for digital sonar images from GLORIA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chavez, P.S.

    1986-01-01

    Image processing techniques have been developed to handle data from one of the newest members of the remote sensing family of digital imaging systems. This paper discusses software to process data collected by the GLORIA (Geological Long Range Inclined Asdic) sonar imaging system, designed and built by the Institute of Oceanographic Sciences (IOS) in England, to correct for both geometric and radiometric distortions that exist in the original 'raw' data. Preprocessing algorithms that are GLORIA-specific include corrections for slant-range geometry, water column offset, aspect ratio distortion, changes in the ship's velocity, speckle noise, and shading problems caused by the power drop-off which occurs as a function of range.-from Author

  12. Characterisation of an oxy-coal flame through digital imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Smart, John; Riley, Gerry; Lu, Gang; Yan, Yong

    2010-06-15

    This paper presents investigations into the impact of oxy-fuel combustion on flame characteristics through the application of digital imaging and image processing techniques. The characteristic parameters of the flame are derived from flame images that are captured using a vision-based flame monitoring system. Experiments were carried out on a 0.5 MW{sub th} coal combustion test facility. Different flue gas recycle ratios and furnace oxygen levels were created for two different coals. The characteristics of the flame and the correlation between the measured flame parameters and corresponding combustion conditions are described and discussed. The results show that the flame temperature decreases with the recycle ratio for both test coals, suggesting that the flame temperature is effectively controlled by the flue gas recycle ratio. The presence of high levels of CO{sub 2} at high flue gas recycle ratios may result in delayed combustion and thus has a detrimental effect on the flame stability. (author)

  13. Automatic Microaneurysm Detection and Characterization Through Digital Color Fundus Images

    SciTech Connect

    Martins, Charles; Veras, Rodrigo; Ramalho, Geraldo; Medeiros, Fatima; Ushizima, Daniela

    2008-08-29

    Ocular fundus images can provide information about retinal, ophthalmic, and even systemic diseases such as diabetes. Microaneurysms (MAs) are the earliest sign of Diabetic Retinopathy, a frequently observed complication in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Robust detection of MAs in digital color fundus images is critical in the development of automated screening systems for this kind of disease. Automatic grading of these images is being considered by health boards so that the human grading task is reduced. In this paper we describe segmentation and the feature extraction methods for candidate MAs detection.We show that the candidate MAs detected with the methodology have been successfully classified by a MLP neural network (correct classification of 84percent).

  14. Quantifying biodiversity using digital cameras and automated image analysis.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roadknight, C. M.; Rose, R. J.; Barber, M. L.; Price, M. C.; Marshall, I. W.

    2009-04-01

    Monitoring the effects on biodiversity of extensive grazing in complex semi-natural habitats is labour intensive. There are also concerns about the standardization of semi-quantitative data collection. We have chosen to focus initially on automating the most time consuming aspect - the image analysis. The advent of cheaper and more sophisticated digital camera technology has lead to a sudden increase in the number of habitat monitoring images and information that is being collected. We report on the use of automated trail cameras (designed for the game hunting market) to continuously capture images of grazer activity in a variety of habitats at Moor House National Nature Reserve, which is situated in the North of England at an average altitude of over 600m. Rainfall is high, and in most areas the soil consists of deep peat (1m to 3m), populated by a mix of heather, mosses and sedges. The cameras have been continuously in operation over a 6 month period, daylight images are in full colour and night images (IR flash) are black and white. We have developed artificial intelligence based methods to assist in the analysis of the large number of images collected, generating alert states for new or unusual image conditions. This paper describes the data collection techniques, outlines the quantitative and qualitative data collected and proposes online and offline systems that can reduce the manpower overheads and increase focus on important subsets in the collected data. By converting digital image data into statistical composite data it can be handled in a similar way to other biodiversity statistics thus improving the scalability of monitoring experiments. Unsupervised feature detection methods and supervised neural methods were tested and offered solutions to simplifying the process. Accurate (85 to 95%) categorization of faunal content can be obtained, requiring human intervention for only those images containing rare animals or unusual (undecidable) conditions, and

  15. Digital image processing of crystalline specimens examined by electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kanaya, K

    1988-12-01

    Crystalline specimens imaged in the electron microscope are analysed using digital processing. Some principles of structural analysis using the method of Fourier decomposition are discussed. Complementary techniques, such as enhancement by gradient and Laplacian operators, have been found useful in analysing electron micrographs. The application of these techniques to some problems in Materials Science and Biology are reviewed. By selecting and phase-correcting spots in the computed diffraction pattern, it was possible to localize atoms, molecules, and their defective arrangement in evaporated gold, sputter-deposited tungsten films, and single crystals of cadmium selenide. Digital processing based on the theory of helical diffraction was used to explore the three-dimensional arrangement of molecules in cellular components of alveolar soft part sarcoma, Hirano bodies, and neurofibrillar tangles in the human brain.

  16. Dynamic magnetic resonance imaging of endoscopic third ventriculostomy patency with differently acquired fast imaging with steady-state precession sequences.

    PubMed

    Lucic, Milos A; Koprivsek, Katarina; Kozic, Dusko; Spero, Martina; Spirovski, Milena; Lucic, Silvija

    2014-08-16

    The aim of the study was to determine the possibilities of two differently acquired two-dimensional fast imaging with steady-state precession (FISP 2D) magnetic resonance sequences in estimation of the third ventricle floor fenestration patency after endoscopic third ventriculostomy (ETV) in the subjects with aqueductal stenosis/obstruction.Fifty eight subjects (37 males, 21 females, mean age 27 years) with previously successfully performed ETV underwent brain MRI on 1.5T MR imager 3-6 months after the procedure. Two different FISP 2D sequences (one included in the standard vendor provided software package, and the other, experimentally developed by our team) were performed respectively at two fixed slice positions: midsagittal and perpendicular to the ETV fenestration, and displayed in a closed-loop cinematographic format in order to estimate the patency. The ventricular volume reduction has been observed as well.Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow through the ETV fenestration was observed in midsagittal plane with both FISP 2D sequences in 93.11% subjects, while in 6.89% subjects the dynamic CSF flow MRI was inconclusive. In the perpendicular plane CSF flow through the ETV fenestration was visible only by use of experimentally developed FISP 2D (TR30/FA70) sequence. Postoperative volume reduction of lateral and third ventricle was detected in 67.24% subjects.Though both FISP 2D sequences acquired in midsagittal plane may be used to estimate the effects of performed ETV, due to achieved higher CSF pulsatile flow sensitivity, only the use of FISP 2D (TR30/FA70) sequence enables the estimation of the treatment effect in perpendicular plane in the absence of phase-contrast sequences. 

  17. Precision Improvement of Photogrammetry by Digital Image Correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, Ming-Hsiang; Sung, Wen-Pei; Tung, Shih-Heng; Hsiao, Hanwei

    2016-04-01

    The combination of aerial triangulation technology and unmanned aerial vehicle greatly reduces the cost and application threshold of the digital surface model technique. Based on the report in the literatures, the measurement error in the x-y coordinate and in the elevation lies between 8cm~15cm and 10cm~20cm respectively. The measurement accuracy for the geological structure survey already has sufficient value, but for the slope and structures in terms of deformation monitoring is inadequate. The main factors affecting the accuracy of the aerial triangulation are image quality, measurement accuracy of control point and image matching accuracy. In terms of image matching, the commonly used techniques are Harris Corner Detection and Scale Invariant Feature Transform (SIFT). Their pairing error is in scale of pixels, usually lies between 1 to 2 pixels. This study suggests that the error on the pairing is the main factor causing the aerial triangulation errors. Therefore, this study proposes the application of Digital Image Correlation (DIC) method instead of the pairing method mentioned above. DIC method can provide a pairing accuracy of less than 0.01 pixel, indeed can greatly enhance the accuracy of the aerial triangulation, to have sub-centimeter level accuracy. In this study, the effects of image pairing error on the measurement error of the 3-dimensional coordinate of the ground points are explored by numerical simulation method. It was confirmed that when the image matching error is reduced to 0.01 pixels, the ground three-dimensional coordinate measurement error can be controlled in mm level. A combination of DIC technique and the traditional aerial triangulation provides the potential of application on the deformation monitoring of slope and structures, and achieve an early warning of natural disaster.

  18. Scatter correction in digital mammography based on image deconvolution.

    PubMed

    Ducote, J L; Molloi, S

    2010-03-07

    X-ray scatter is a major cause of nonlinearity in densitometry measurements using digital mammography. Previous scatter correction techniques have primarily used a single scatter point spread function to estimate x-ray scatter. In this study, a new algorithm to correct x-ray scatter based on image convolution was implemented using a spatially variant scatter point spread function which is energy and thickness dependent. The scatter kernel was characterized in terms of its scattering fraction (SF) and scatter radial extent (k) on uniform Lucite phantoms with thickness of 0.8-8.0 cm. The algorithm operates on a pixel-by-pixel basis by grouping pixels of similar thicknesses into a series of mask images that are individually deconvolved using Fourier image analysis with a distinct kernel for each image. The algorithm was evaluated with three Lucite step phantoms and one anthropomorphic breast phantom using a full-field digital mammography system at energies of 24, 28, 31 and 49 kVp. The true primary signal was measured with a multi-hole collimator. The effect on image quality was also evaluated. For all 16 studies, the average mean percentage error in estimating the true primary signal was found to be -2.13% and the average rms percentage error was 2.60%. The image quality was seen to improve at every energy up to 25% at 49 kVp. The results indicate that a technique based on a spatially variant scatter point spread function can accurately estimate x-ray scatter.

  19. Digital image quality measurements by objective and subjective methods from series of parametrically degraded images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tachó, Aura; Mitjà, Carles; Martínez, Bea; Escofet, Jaume; Ralló, Miquel

    2013-11-01

    Many digital image applications like digitization of cultural heritage for preservation purposes operate with compressed files in one or more image observing steps. For this kind of applications JPEG compression is one of the most widely used. Compression level, final file size and quality loss are parameters that must be managed optimally. Although this loss can be monitored by means of objective image quality measurements, the real challenge is to know how it can be related with the perceived image quality by observers. A pictorial image has been degraded by two different procedures. The first, applying different levels of low pass filtering by convolving the image with progressively broad Gauss kernels. The second, saving the original file to a series of JPEG compression levels. In both cases, the objective image quality measurement is done by analysis of the image power spectrum. In order to obtain a measure of the perceived image quality, both series of degraded images are displayed on a computer screen organized in random pairs. The observers are compelled to choose the best image of each pair. Finally, a ranking is established applying Thurstone scaling method. Results obtained by both measurements are compared between them and with other objective measurement method as the Slanted Edge Test.

  20. Digital-signal-processor-based dynamic imaging system for optical tomography.

    PubMed

    Lasker, Joseph M; Masciotti, James M; Schoenecker, Matthew; Schmitz, Christoph H; Hielscher, Andreas H

    2007-08-01

    In this article, we introduce a dynamic optical tomography system that is, unlike currently available analog instrumentation, based on digital data acquisition and filtering techniques. At the core of this continuous wave instrument is a digital signal processor (DSP) that collects, collates, processes, and filters the digitized data set. The processor is also responsible for managing system timing and the imaging routines which can acquire real-time data at rates as high as 150 Hz. Many of the synchronously timed processes are controlled by a complex programmable logic device that is also used in conjunction with the DSP to orchestrate data flow. The operation of the system is implemented through a comprehensive graphical user interface designed with LABVIEW software which integrates automated calibration, data acquisition, data organization, and signal postprocessing. Performance analysis demonstrates very low system noise (approximately 1 pW rms noise equivalent power), excellent signal precision (<0.04%-0.2%) and long term system stability (<1% over 40 min). A large dynamic range (approximately 190 dB) accommodates a wide scope of measurement geometries and tissue types. First experiments on tissue phantoms show that dynamic behavior is accurately captured and spatial location can be correctly tracked using this system.

  1. Accuracy Assessment of a Complex Building 3d Model Reconstructed from Images Acquired with a Low-Cost Uas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oniga, E.; Chirilă, C.; Stătescu, F.

    2017-02-01

    Nowadays, Unmanned Aerial Systems (UASs) are a wide used technique for acquisition in order to create buildings 3D models, providing the acquisition of a high number of images at very high resolution or video sequences, in a very short time. Since low-cost UASs are preferred, the accuracy of a building 3D model created using this platforms must be evaluated. To achieve results, the dean's office building from the Faculty of "Hydrotechnical Engineering, Geodesy and Environmental Engineering" of Iasi, Romania, has been chosen, which is a complex shape building with the roof formed of two hyperbolic paraboloids. Seven points were placed on the ground around the building, three of them being used as GCPs, while the remaining four as Check points (CPs) for accuracy assessment. Additionally, the coordinates of 10 natural CPs representing the building characteristic points were measured with a Leica TCR 405 total station. The building 3D model was created as a point cloud which was automatically generated based on digital images acquired with the low-cost UASs, using the image matching algorithm and different software like 3DF Zephyr, Visual SfM, PhotoModeler Scanner and Drone2Map for ArcGIS. Except for the PhotoModeler Scanner software, the interior and exterior orientation parameters were determined simultaneously by solving a self-calibrating bundle adjustment. Based on the UAS point clouds, automatically generated by using the above mentioned software and GNSS data respectively, the parameters of the east side hyperbolic paraboloid were calculated using the least squares method and a statistical blunder detection. Then, in order to assess the accuracy of the building 3D model, several comparisons were made for the facades and the roof with reference data, considered with minimum errors: TLS mesh for the facades and GNSS mesh for the roof. Finally, the front facade of the building was created in 3D based on its characteristic points using the PhotoModeler Scanner

  2. High-performance VGA-resolution digital color CMOS imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agwani, Suhail; Domer, Steve; Rubacha, Ray; Stanley, Scott

    1999-04-01

    This paper discusses the performance of a new VGA resolution color CMOS imager developed by Motorola on a 0.5micrometers /3.3V CMOS process. This fully integrated, high performance imager has on chip timing, control, and analog signal processing chain for digital imaging applications. The picture elements are based on 7.8micrometers active CMOS pixels that use pinned photodiodes for higher quantum efficiency and low noise performance. The image processing engine includes a bank of programmable gain amplifiers, line rate clamping for dark offset removal, real time auto white balancing, per column gain and offset calibration, and a 10 bit pipelined RSD analog to digital converter with a programmable input range. Post ADC signal processing includes features such as bad pixel replacement based on user defined thresholds levels, 10 to 8 bit companding and 5 tap FIR filtering. The sensor can be programmed via a standard I2C interface that runs on 3.3V clocks. Programmable features include variable frame rates using a constant frequency master clock, electronic exposure control, continuous or single frame capture, progressive or interlace scanning modes. Each pixel is individually addressable allowing region of interest imaging and image subsampling. The sensor operates with master clock frequencies of up to 13.5MHz resulting in 30FPS. A total programmable gain of 27dB is available. The sensor power dissipation is 400mW at full speed of operation. The low noise design yields a measured 'system on a chip' dynamic range of 50dB thus giving over 8 true bits of resolution. Extremely high conversion gain result in an excellent peak sensitivity of 22V/(mu) J/cm2 or 3.3V/lux-sec. This monolithic image capture and processing engine represent a compete imaging solution making it a true 'camera on a chip'. Yet in its operation it remains extremely easy to use requiring only one clock and a 3.3V power supply. Given the available features and performance levels, this sensor will be

  3. Modulated digital images for biometric and other security applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarthy, Lawry D.; Lee, Robert A.; Swiegers, Gerhard F.

    2004-06-01

    There are, in general, two ways for an observer to deal with light that is incorrect in some way (e.g. which is partially out of focus). One approach is to correct the error (e.g. by using a lens to selectively bend the light). Another approach employs selective masking to block those portions of the light which are unwanted (e.g. out of focus). The principle of selective masking is used in a number of important industries. However it has not found widespread application in the field of optical security devices. This work describes the selective masking, or modulation, of digital images as a means of creating documents and transparent media containing overt or covert biometric and other images. In particular, we show how animation effects, flash-illumination features, color-shifting patches, information concealment devices, and biometric portraiture in various settings can be incorporated in transparent media like plastic packaging materials, credit cards, and plastic banknotes. We also demonstrate the application of modulated digital images to the preparation of optically variable diffractive foils which are readily customized to display biometric portraits and information. Selective masking is shown to be an important means of creating a diverse range of effects useful in authentication. Such effects can be readily and inexpensively produced without the need, for example, to fabricate lenses on materials which may not be conducive in this respect.

  4. HD Photo: a new image coding technology for digital photography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, Sridhar; Tu, Chengjie; Regunathan, Shankar L.; Sullivan, Gary J.

    2007-09-01

    This paper introduces the HD Photo coding technology developed by Microsoft Corporation. The storage format for this technology is now under consideration in the ITU-T/ISO/IEC JPEG committee as a candidate for standardization under the name JPEG XR. The technology was developed to address end-to-end digital imaging application requirements, particularly including the needs of digital photography. HD Photo includes features such as good compression capability, high dynamic range support, high image quality capability, lossless coding support, full-format 4:4:4 color sampling, simple thumbnail extraction, embedded bitstream scalability of resolution and fidelity, and degradation-free compressed domain support of key manipulations such as cropping, flipping and rotation. HD Photo has been designed to optimize image quality and compression efficiency while also enabling low-complexity encoding and decoding implementations. To ensure low complexity for implementations, the design features have been incorporated in a way that not only minimizes the computational requirements of the individual components (including consideration of such aspects as memory footprint, cache effects, and parallelization opportunities) but results in a self-consistent design that maximizes the commonality of functional processing components.

  5. Digital Images Are Data: And Should Be Treated as Such

    PubMed Central

    Cromey, Douglas W.

    2014-01-01

    The scientific community has become very concerned about inappropriate image manipulation. In journals that check figures after acceptance, 20–25% of the papers contained at least one figure that did not comply with the journal’s instructions to authors. The scientific press continues to report a small, but steady stream of cases of fraudulent image manipulation. Inappropriate image manipulation taints the scientific record, damages trust within science, and degrades science’s reputation with the general public. Scientists can learn from historians and photojournalists, who have provided a number of examples of attempts to alter or misrepresent the historical record. Scientists must remember that digital images are numerically sampled data that represent the state of a specific sample when examined with a specific instrument. These data should be carefully managed. Changes made to the original data need to be tracked like the protocols used for other experimental procedures. To avoid pitfalls, unexpected artifacts, and unintentional misrepresentation of the image data, a number of image processing guidelines are offered. PMID:23026995

  6. Camera system resolution and its influence on digital image correlation

    SciTech Connect

    Reu, Phillip L.; Sweatt, William; Miller, Timothy; Fleming, Darryn

    2014-09-21

    Digital image correlation (DIC) uses images from a camera and lens system to make quantitative measurements of the shape, displacement, and strain of test objects. This increasingly popular method has had little research on the influence of the imaging system resolution on the DIC results. This paper investigates the entire imaging system and studies how both the camera and lens resolution influence the DIC results as a function of the system Modulation Transfer Function (MTF). It will show that when making spatial resolution decisions (including speckle size) the resolution limiting component should be considered. A consequence of the loss of spatial resolution is that the DIC uncertainties will be increased. This is demonstrated using both synthetic and experimental images with varying resolution. The loss of image resolution and DIC accuracy can be compensated for by increasing the subset size, or better, by increasing the speckle size. The speckle-size and spatial resolution are now a function of the lens resolution rather than the more typical assumption of the pixel size. The study will demonstrate the tradeoffs associated with limited lens resolution.

  7. Camera system resolution and its influence on digital image correlation

    DOE PAGES

    Reu, Phillip L.; Sweatt, William; Miller, Timothy; ...

    2014-09-21

    Digital image correlation (DIC) uses images from a camera and lens system to make quantitative measurements of the shape, displacement, and strain of test objects. This increasingly popular method has had little research on the influence of the imaging system resolution on the DIC results. This paper investigates the entire imaging system and studies how both the camera and lens resolution influence the DIC results as a function of the system Modulation Transfer Function (MTF). It will show that when making spatial resolution decisions (including speckle size) the resolution limiting component should be considered. A consequence of the loss ofmore » spatial resolution is that the DIC uncertainties will be increased. This is demonstrated using both synthetic and experimental images with varying resolution. The loss of image resolution and DIC accuracy can be compensated for by increasing the subset size, or better, by increasing the speckle size. The speckle-size and spatial resolution are now a function of the lens resolution rather than the more typical assumption of the pixel size. The study will demonstrate the tradeoffs associated with limited lens resolution.« less

  8. Digital image modification detection using color information and its histograms.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Haoyu; Shen, Yue; Zhu, Xinghui; Liu, Bo; Fu, Zigang; Fan, Na

    2016-09-01

    The rapid development of many open source and commercial image editing software makes the authenticity of the digital images questionable. Copy-move forgery is one of the most widely used tampering techniques to create desirable objects or conceal undesirable objects in a scene. Existing techniques reported in the literature to detect such tampering aim to improve the robustness of these methods against the use of JPEG compression, blurring, noise, or other types of post processing operations. These post processing operations are frequently used with the intention to conceal tampering and reduce tampering clues. A robust method based on the color moments and other five image descriptors is proposed in this paper. The method divides the image into fixed size overlapping blocks. Clustering operation divides entire search space into smaller pieces with similar color distribution. Blocks from the tampered regions will reside within the same cluster since both copied and moved regions have similar color distributions. Five image descriptors are used to extract block features, which makes the method more robust to post processing operations. An ensemble of deep compositional pattern-producing neural networks are trained with these extracted features. Similarity among feature vectors in clusters indicates possible forged regions. Experimental results show that the proposed method can detect copy-move forgery even if an image was distorted by gamma correction, addictive white Gaussian noise, JPEG compression, or blurring.

  9. Design of variable frequency endoscope ultrasonic digital imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ya-nan; Bai, Bao-ping; Chen, Xiao-dong; Zhao, Qiang; Deng, Hao-ran; Wang, Yi; Yu, Dao-yin

    2013-12-01

    This paper presented a real-time endoscope ultrasonic digital imaging system, which was based on FPGA and applied for gastrointestinal examination. Four modules, scan-line data processing module, coordinate transformation and interpolation algorithm module, cache reading and writing control module and transmitting and receiving control module were included in this FPGA based system. Through adopting different frequency ultrasound probes in a single insertion of endoscope, the system showed a high speed data processing mechanism capable of achieving images with various display effects. A high-precision modified coordinate calibration CORDIC (HMCC-CORDIC) algorithm was employed to realize coordinate transformation and interpolation simultaneously, while the precision and reliability of the algorithm could be greatly improved through utilizing the pipeline structure based on temporal logic. Also, system real-time control by computer could be achieved through operating under the condition of USB2.0 interface. The corresponding experimental validations proved the feasibility and the correctness of the proper data processing mechanism, the HMCC-CORDIC algorithm and the USB real-time control. Finally, the specific experimental sample, a tissue mimicking phantom, was imaged in real-time (25 frames per second) by an endoscope ultrasonic imaging system with image size 1024×1024. The requirements for clinical examination could be well satisfied with the imaging parameters discussed above.

  10. Microcomputer-based digital image processing - A tutorial package for exploration geologists

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrington, J. A., Jr.; Cartin, K. F.

    1985-01-01

    An Apple II microcomputer-based software package for analysis of digital data developed at the University of Oklahoma, the Digital Image Analysis System (DIAS), provides a relatively low-cost, portable alternative to large, dedicated minicomputers for digital image processing education. Digital processing techniques for analysis of Landsat MSS data and a series of tutorial exercises for exploration geologists are described and evaluated. DIAS allows in-house training that does not interfere with computer-based prospect analysis objectives.

  11. Evaluation of Fiber Reinforced Cement Using Digital Image Correlation

    PubMed Central

    Melenka, Garrett W.; Carey, Jason P.

    2015-01-01

    The effect of short fiber reinforcements on the mechanical properties of cement has been examined using a splitting tensile – digital image correlation (DIC) measurement method. Three short fiber reinforcement materials have been used in this study: fiberglass, nylon, and polypropylene. The method outlined provides a simple experimental setup that can be used to evaluate the ultimate tensile strength of brittle materials as well as measure the full field strain across the surface of the splitting tensile test cylindrical specimen. Since the DIC measurement technique is a contact free measurement this method can be used to assess sample failure. PMID:26039590

  12. Moire technique by means of digital image processing.

    PubMed

    Gasvik, K J

    1983-11-15

    Moiré technique by means of projected fringes is a suitable method for full field measurements of out-of-plane deformations and object contouring. One disadvantage in industrial applications has been the photographic process with the involved time-consuming development of the photographic film. This paper presents a new method using a TV camera and a digital image processor whereby real-time measurements of deformations and comparison of object contours are possible. Also the principles and limitations of the projected moiré method are described.

  13. Toward Digital Staining using Imaging Mass Spectrometry and Random Forests

    PubMed Central

    Hanselmann, Michael; Köthe, Ullrich; Kirchner, Marc; Renard, Bernhard Y.; Amstalden, Erika R.; Glunde, Kristine; Heeren, Ron M. A.; Hamprecht, Fred A.

    2009-01-01

    We show on Imaging Mass Spectrometry (IMS) data that the Random Forest classifier can be used for automated tissue classification and that it results in predictions with high sensitivities and positive predictive values, even when inter-sample variability is present in the data. We further demonstrate how Markov Random Fields and vector-valued median filtering can be applied to reduce noise effects to further improve the classification results in a post-hoc smoothing step. Our study gives clear evidence that digital staining by means of IMS constitutes a promising complement to chemical staining techniques. PMID:19469555

  14. Digital volume imaging of the PEFC gas diffusion layer

    SciTech Connect

    Borup, Rodney L; Mukundan, Rangachary; Mukherjee, Partha; Shim, Eunkyoung

    2010-01-01

    The gas diffusion layer (GDL) plays a key role in the overall performance/durability of a polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC). Of profound importance, especially in the context of water management and flooding phenomena, is the influence of the underlying pore morphology and wetting characteristics Of the GDL microstructure. In this article, we present the digital volumetric imaging (DVI) technique in order to generate the 3-D carbon paper GDL microstructure. The internal pore structure and the local microstructural variations in terms of fiber alignment and fiber/binder distributions are investigated using the several 3-D thin sections of the sample obtained from DVI.

  15. Femtosecond digital lensless holographic microscopy to image biological samples.

    PubMed

    Mendoza-Yero, Omel; Calabuig, Alejandro; Tajahuerce, Enrique; Lancis, Jesús; Andrés, Pedro; Garcia-Sucerquia, Jorge

    2013-09-01

    The use of femtosecond laser radiation in digital lensless holographic microscopy (DLHM) to image biological samples is presented. A mode-locked Ti:Sa laser that emits ultrashort pulses of 12 fs intensity FWHM, with 800 nm mean wavelength, at 75 MHz repetition rate is used as a light source. For comparison purposes, the light from a light-emitting diode is also used. A section of the head of a drosophila melanogaster fly is studied with both light sources. The experimental results show very different effects of the pinhole size on the spatial resolution with DLHM. Unaware phenomena on the field of the DLHM are analyzed.

  16. Image texture classification with digital filter banks and transforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husoy, John H.; Randen, Trygve; Gulsrud, Thor O.

    1993-10-01

    Several frequency domain or joint spatial/frequency domain techniques for image texture classification have been published. We formulate these techniques within a common signal processing framework based on digital filter banks. The usefulness of computationally efficient IIR filter banks as channel filters in texture classifiers is demonstrated. Using estimates of local energy in the frequency channels we also propose a technique for selecting optimum filter banks by maximizing a between class distance measure. This optimization is particularly simple when using the IIR based filter banks.

  17. Poisson’s Ratio Extrapolation from Digital Image Correlation Experiments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER Q16H 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NO. Air Force Research Laboratory...ACRONYM(S) Air Force Research Laboratory (AFMC) AFRL/RQR 5 Pollux Drive 11. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S REPORT Edwards AFB CA 93524-7048 NUMBER(S) AFRL-RQ-ED-TP...Affairs Clearance Number XXXXX.    POISSON’S RATIO EXTRAPOLATION FROM DIGITAL IMAGE CORRELATION EXPERIMENTS Timothy C. Miller Air Force Research

  18. Quantification of fungal infection of leaves with digital images and Scion Image software.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, Paul H; Hsiang, Tom

    2010-01-01

    Digital image analysis has been used to distinguish and quantify leaf color changes arising from a variety of factors. Its use to assess the percentage of leaf area with color differences caused by plant disease symptoms, such as necrosis, chlorosis, or sporulation, can provide a rigorous and quantitative means of assessing disease severity. A method is described for measuring symptoms of different fungal foliar infections that involves capturing the image with a standard flatbed scanner or digital camera followed by quantifying the area, where the color has been affected because of fungal infection. The method uses the freely available program, Scion Image for Windows or MAC, which is derived from the public domain software, NIH Image. The method has thus far been used to quantify the percentage of tissue with necrosis, chlorosis, or sporulation on leaves of variety of plants with several different diseases (anthracnose, apple scab, powdery mildew or rust).

  19. Recent developments at JPL in the application of digital image processing techniques to astronomical images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorre, J. J.; Lynn, D. J.; Benton, W. D.

    1976-01-01

    Several techniques of a digital image-processing nature are illustrated which have proved useful in visual analysis of astronomical pictorial data. Processed digital scans of photographic plates of Stephans Quintet and NGC 4151 are used as examples to show how faint nebulosity is enhanced by high-pass filtering, how foreground stars are suppressed by linear interpolation, and how relative color differences between two images recorded on plates with different spectral sensitivities can be revealed by generating ratio images. Analyses are outlined which are intended to compensate partially for the blurring effects of the atmosphere on images of Stephans Quintet and to obtain more detailed information about Saturn's ring structure from low- and high-resolution scans of the planet and its ring system. The employment of a correlation picture to determine the tilt angle of an average spectral line in a low-quality spectrum is demonstrated for a section of the spectrum of Uranus.

  20. Live tissue viability and chemosensitivity assays using digital holographic motility contrast imaging.

    PubMed

    An, Ran; Turek, John; Matei, Daniela Elena; Nolte, David

    2013-01-01

    Holographic optical coherence imaging is an en face form of optical coherence tomography that uses low-coherence digital holography as a coherence gate to select light from a chosen depth inside scattering tissue. By acquiring successive holograms at a high camera frame rate at a fixed depth, dynamic speckle provides information concerning dynamic light scattering from intracellular motility. Motility contrast imaging (MCI) uses living motion as a label-free and functional biomarker. MCI provides a new form of viability assay and also is applicable for proliferation and cytotoxicity assays. The results presented here demonstrate that low-coherence digital holography can extract viability information from biologically relevant three-dimensional (3D) tissue based on multicellular tumor spheroids by moving beyond the format of two-dimensional cell culture used for conventional high-content analysis. This paper also demonstrates the use of MCI for chemosensitivity assays on tumor exgrafts of excised ovarian cancer tumors responding to standard-of-care cisplatin chemotherapy. This ex vivo application extends the applicability of MCI beyond 3D tissue culture grown in vitro.