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Sample records for acquire digital images

  1. Methods for identification of images acquired with digital cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geradts, Zeno J.; Bijhold, Jurrien; Kieft, Martijn; Kurosawa, Kenji; Kuroki, Kenro; Saitoh, Naoki

    2001-02-01

    From the court we were asked whether it is possible to determine if an image has been made with a specific digital camera. This question has to be answered in child pornography cases, where evidence is needed that a certain picture has been made with a specific camera. We have looked into different methods of examining the cameras to determine if a specific image has been made with a camera: defects in CCDs, file formats that are used, noise introduced by the pixel arrays and watermarking in images used by the camera manufacturer.

  2. Pixel Color Clustering of Multi-Temporally Acquired Digital Photographs of a Rice Canopy by Luminosity-Normalization and Pseudo-Red-Green-Blue Color Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Doi, Ryoichi; Arif, Chusnul

    2014-01-01

    Red-green-blue (RGB) channels of RGB digital photographs were loaded with luminosity-adjusted R, G, and completely white grayscale images, respectively (RGwhtB method), or R, G, and R + G (RGB yellow) grayscale images, respectively (RGrgbyB method), to adjust the brightness of the entire area of multi-temporally acquired color digital photographs of a rice canopy. From the RGwhtB or RGrgbyB pseudocolor image, cyan, magenta, CMYK yellow, black, L*, a*, and b* grayscale images were prepared. Using these grayscale images and R, G, and RGB yellow grayscale images, the luminosity-adjusted pixels of the canopy photographs were statistically clustered. With the RGrgbyB and the RGwhtB methods, seven and five major color clusters were given, respectively. The RGrgbyB method showed clear differences among three rice growth stages, and the vegetative stage was further divided into two substages. The RGwhtB method could not clearly discriminate between the second vegetative and midseason stages. The relative advantages of the RGrgbyB method were attributed to the R, G, B, magenta, yellow, L*, and a* grayscale images that contained richer information to show the colorimetrical differences among objects than those of the RGwhtB method. The comparison of rice canopy colors at different time points was enabled by the pseudocolor imaging method. PMID:25302325

  3. Optimal angular dose distribution to acquire 3D and extra 2D images for digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hye-Suk; Kim, Ye-Seul; Lee, Haeng-Hwa; Gang, Won-Suk; Kim, Hee-Joung; Choi, Young-Wook; Choi, JaeGu

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the optimal non-uniform angular dose distribution to improve the quality of the 3D reconstructed images and to acquire extra 2D projection images. In this analysis, 7 acquisition sets were generated by using four different values for the number of projections (11, 15, 21, and 29) and total angular range (±14°, ±17.5°, ±21°, and ±24.5° ). For all acquisition sets, the zero-degree projection was used as the 2D image that was close to that of standard conventional mammography (CM). Exposures used were 50, 100, 150, and 200 mR for the zero-degree projection, and the remaining dose was distributed over the remaining projection angles. To quantitatively evaluate image quality, we computed the CNR (contrast-to-noise ratio) and the ASF (artifact spread function) for the same radiation dose. The results indicate that, for microcalcifications, acquisition sets with approximately 4 times higher exposure on the zero-degree projection than the average exposure for the remaining projection angles yielded higher CNR values and were 3% higher than the uniform distribution. However, very high dose concentrations toward the zero-degree projection may reduce the quality of the reconstructed images due to increasing noise in the peripheral views. The zero-degree projection of the non-uniform dose distribution offers a 2D image similar to that of standard CM, but with a significantly lower radiation dose. Therefore, we need to evaluate the diagnostic potential of extra 2D projection image when diagnose breast cancer by using 3D images with non-uniform angular dose distributions.

  4. Computer analysis of mammography phantom images (CAMPI): an application to the measurement of microcalcification image quality of directly acquired digital images.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, D P

    1997-08-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to apply the recently developed CAMPI (computer analysis of mammography phantom images) method to a Fischer Mammotest Stereotactic Digital Biopsy machine. Another aim was to further elucidate the nature of the empirically introduced CAMPI measures. Images of an American College of Radiology (ACR) accreditation phantom centered on the largest two speck groups were obtained on this machine under a variety of x-ray conditions. An additional measure, alternative SNR (ASNR) is introduced which is complementary to the SNR measure. Analyses of the Mammotest images revealed that the mAs and kVp dependencies of the CAMPI measures could be understood from basic imaging physics principles. It is shown that: (1) the measures reflect the expected linearity of the digital detector and Poisson photon statistics; (2) under automatic exposure control (AEC) conditions the signal (SIG) measure is proportional to subject contrast; and (3) under AEC conditions the noise (NOI) measure is proportional to the square root of the average absorbed photon energy. Correspondence with basic imaging physics principles shows that the measures are significantly free of artifacts. Precision of the CAMPI measures exceeds that of human observers by orders of magnitude. CAMPI measures are expected to be more relevant to clinical mammography than Fourier metrics as the measurements are done on objects of arbitrary shape and size that were designed by the manufacturer to resemble various detection tasks in mammography. It is concluded that CAMPI can perform objective and highly precise evaluations of phantom image quality in mammography. It could be used as a sophisticated quality control tool, as a replacement for the current ACR/MQSA phantom evaluation program, and to evaluate the rapidly evolving digital mammography technology. PMID:9284251

  5. A method to produce and validate a digitally reconstructed radiograph-based computer simulation for optimisation of chest radiographs acquired with a computed radiography imaging system

    PubMed Central

    Moore, C S; Liney, G P; Beavis, A W; Saunderson, J R

    2011-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to develop and validate a computer model to produce realistic simulated computed radiography (CR) chest images using CT data sets of real patients. Methods Anatomical noise, which is the limiting factor in determining pathology in chest radiography, is realistically simulated by the CT data, and frequency-dependent noise has been added post-digitally reconstructed radiograph (DRR) generation to simulate exposure reduction. Realistic scatter and scatter fractions were measured in images of a chest phantom acquired on the CR system simulated by the computer model and added post-DRR calculation. Results The model has been validated with a phantom and patients and shown to provide predictions of signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs), tissue-to-rib ratios (TRRs: a measure of soft tissue pixel value to that of rib) and pixel value histograms that lie within the range of values measured with patients and the phantom. The maximum difference in measured SNR to that calculated was 10%. TRR values differed by a maximum of 1.3%. Conclusion Experienced image evaluators have responded positively to the DRR images, are satisfied they contain adequate anatomical features and have deemed them clinically acceptable. Therefore, the computer model can be used by image evaluators to grade chest images presented at different tube potentials and doses in order to optimise image quality and patient dose for clinical CR chest radiographs without the need for repeat patient exposures. PMID:21933979

  6. Digital Imaging Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bamberger, Casimir; Renz, Uwe; Bamberger, Andreas

    2011-06-01

    Methods to visualize the two-dimensional (2D) distribution of molecules by mass spectrometric imaging evolve rapidly and yield novel applications in biology, medicine, and material surface sciences. Most mass spectrometric imagers acquire high mass resolution spectra spot-by-spot and thereby scan the object's surface. Thus, imaging is slow and image reconstruction remains cumbersome. Here we describe an imaging mass spectrometer that exploits the true imaging capabilities by ion optical means for the time of flight mass separation. The mass spectrometer is equipped with the ASIC Timepix chip as an array detector to acquire the position, mass, and intensity of ions that are imaged by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) directly from the target sample onto the detector. This imaging mass spectrometer has a spatial resolving power at the specimen of (84 ± 35) μm with a mass resolution of 45 and locates atoms or organic compounds on a surface area up to ~2 cm2. Extended laser spots of ~5 mm2 on structured specimens allows parallel imaging of selected masses. The digital imaging mass spectrometer proves high hit-multiplicity, straightforward image reconstruction, and potential for high-speed readout at 4 kHz or more. This device demonstrates a simple way of true image acquisition like a digital photographic camera. The technology may enable a fast analysis of biomolecular samples in near future.

  7. A comparison of the precision of three-dimensional images acquired by 2 digital intraoral scanners: effects of tooth irregularity and scanning direction

    PubMed Central

    Anh, Ji-won; Park, Ji-Man; Chun, Youn-Sic; Kim, Miae

    2016-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to compare the precision of three-dimensional (3D) images acquired using iTero® (Align Technology Inc., San Jose, CA, USA) and Trios® (3Shape Dental Systems, Copenhagen, Denmark) digital intraoral scanners, and to evaluate the effects of the severity of tooth irregularities and scanning sequence on precision. Methods Dental arch models were fabricated with differing degrees of tooth irregularity and divided into 2 groups based on scanning sequence. To assess their precision, images were superimposed and an optimized superimposition algorithm was employed to measure any 3D deviation. The t-test, paired t-test, and one-way ANOVA were performed (p < 0.05) for statistical analysis. Results The iTero® and Trios® systems showed no statistically significant difference in precision among models with differing degrees of tooth irregularity. However, there were statistically significant differences in the precision of the 2 scanners when the starting points of scanning were different. The iTero® scanner (mean deviation, 29.84 ± 12.08 µm) proved to be less precise than the Trios® scanner (22.17 ± 4.47 µm). Conclusions The precision of 3D images differed according to the degree of tooth irregularity, scanning sequence, and scanner type. However, from a clinical standpoint, both scanners were highly accurate regardless of the degree of tooth irregularity. PMID:26877977

  8. Digital image processing.

    PubMed

    Seeram, Euclid

    2004-01-01

    Digital image processing is now commonplace in radiology, nuclear medicine and sonography. This article outlines underlying principles and concepts of digital image processing. After completing this article, readers should be able to: List the limitations of film-based imaging. Identify major components of a digital imaging system. Describe the history and application areas of digital image processing. Discuss image representation and the fundamentals of digital image processing. Outline digital image processing techniques and processing operations used in selected imaging modalities. Explain the basic concepts and visualization tools used in 3-D and virtual reality imaging. Recognize medical imaging informatics as a new area of specialization for radiologic technologists. PMID:15352557

  9. Point cloud generation from aerial image data acquired by a quadrocopter type micro unmanned aerial vehicle and a digital still camera.

    PubMed

    Rosnell, Tomi; Honkavaara, Eija

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this investigation was to develop and investigate methods for point cloud generation by image matching using aerial image data collected by quadrocopter type micro unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) imaging systems. Automatic generation of high-quality, dense point clouds from digital images by image matching is a recent, cutting-edge step forward in digital photogrammetric technology. The major components of the system for point cloud generation are a UAV imaging system, an image data collection process using high image overlaps, and post-processing with image orientation and point cloud generation. Two post-processing approaches were developed: one of the methods is based on Bae Systems' SOCET SET classical commercial photogrammetric software and another is built using Microsoft(®)'s Photosynth™ service available in the Internet. Empirical testing was carried out in two test areas. Photosynth processing showed that it is possible to orient the images and generate point clouds fully automatically without any a priori orientation information or interactive work. The photogrammetric processing line provided dense and accurate point clouds that followed the theoretical principles of photogrammetry, but also some artifacts were detected. The point clouds from the Photosynth processing were sparser and noisier, which is to a large extent due to the fact that the method is not optimized for dense point cloud generation. Careful photogrammetric processing with self-calibration is required to achieve the highest accuracy. Our results demonstrate the high performance potential of the approach and that with rigorous processing it is possible to reach results that are consistent with theory. We also point out several further research topics. Based on theoretical and empirical results, we give recommendations for properties of imaging sensor, data collection and processing of UAV image data to ensure accurate point cloud generation. PMID:22368479

  10. Point Cloud Generation from Aerial Image Data Acquired by a Quadrocopter Type Micro Unmanned Aerial Vehicle and a Digital Still Camera

    PubMed Central

    Rosnell, Tomi; Honkavaara, Eija

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this investigation was to develop and investigate methods for point cloud generation by image matching using aerial image data collected by quadrocopter type micro unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) imaging systems. Automatic generation of high-quality, dense point clouds from digital images by image matching is a recent, cutting-edge step forward in digital photogrammetric technology. The major components of the system for point cloud generation are a UAV imaging system, an image data collection process using high image overlaps, and post-processing with image orientation and point cloud generation. Two post-processing approaches were developed: one of the methods is based on Bae Systems’ SOCET SET classical commercial photogrammetric software and another is built using Microsoft®’s Photosynth™ service available in the Internet. Empirical testing was carried out in two test areas. Photosynth processing showed that it is possible to orient the images and generate point clouds fully automatically without any a priori orientation information or interactive work. The photogrammetric processing line provided dense and accurate point clouds that followed the theoretical principles of photogrammetry, but also some artifacts were detected. The point clouds from the Photosynth processing were sparser and noisier, which is to a large extent due to the fact that the method is not optimized for dense point cloud generation. Careful photogrammetric processing with self-calibration is required to achieve the highest accuracy. Our results demonstrate the high performance potential of the approach and that with rigorous processing it is possible to reach results that are consistent with theory. We also point out several further research topics. Based on theoretical and empirical results, we give recommendations for properties of imaging sensor, data collection and processing of UAV image data to ensure accurate point cloud generation. PMID:22368479

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging of acquired cardiac disease.

    PubMed Central

    Carrol, C L; Higgins, C B; Caputo, G R

    1996-01-01

    Over the last 15 years, advances in magnetic resonance imaging techniques have increased the accuracy and applicability of cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging. These advances have improved the utility of magnetic resonance imaging in evaluating cardiac morphology, blood flow, and myocardial contractility, all significant diagnostic features in the evaluation of the patient with acquired heart disease. Utilization of cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging has been limited, primarily due to clinical reliance upon nuclear scintigraphy and echocardiography. Recent developments in fast and ultrafast imaging should continue to enhance the significance of magnetic resonance imaging in this field. Widespread use of magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of the cardiovascular system will ultimately depend upon its maturation into a comprehensive, noninvasive imaging technique for the varying manifestations of acquired heart disease, including cardiomyopathy, ischemic heart disease, and acquired valvular disease. Images PMID:8792545

  12. Digital Image Access & Retrieval.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heidorn, P. Bryan, Ed.; Sandore, Beth, Ed.

    Recent technological advances in computing and digital imaging technology have had immediate and permanent consequences for visual resource collections. Libraries are involved in organizing and managing large visual resource collections. The central challenges in working with digital image collections mirror those that libraries have sought to…

  13. Digital Image Velocimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cho, Y. C.

    1991-01-01

    Proposed technique for production of velocity maps from sequences of photographic video images of flows seeded with small particles. In digital image velocimetry, image analyzed by digital Fourier tranformation. Process free of noise, more precise, and consumes less time. Eliminates need to process photographs, indicates directions of velocity vectors unambiguously, and offers increased dynamic ranges. Because all processing performed electronically, eventually capable of mapping flow-velocity fields in real time.

  14. Managing digital images.

    PubMed

    Swartz, M L

    2000-09-01

    Although most orthodontists can rely on their orthodontic image software, those who have the need to go beyond just the monitor display of the images will need to get behind the scenes. Understanding a little of what makes up digital images and how to manipulate the variables will enable them to get optimum image quality as well as conserve on time, file size, and storage media. For those who import bitmapped images into digital presentations, the ability to adjust these variables can enable them to create presentation files that are manageable in size, will display without delays, and are of optimum resolution. PMID:10982939

  15. Digital Imaging in Cytopathology

    PubMed Central

    Khalbuss, Walid E.; Pantanowitz, Liron; Parwani, Anil V.

    2011-01-01

    Rapid advances are occurring in the field of cytopathology, particularly in the field of digital imaging. Today, digital images are used in a variety of settings including education (E-education), as a substitute to multiheaded sessions, multisite conferences, publications, cytopathology web pages, cytology proficiency testing, telecytology, consultation through telecytology, and automated screening of Pap test slides. The accessibility provided by digital imaging in cytopathology can improve the quality and efficiency of cytopathology services, primarily by getting the expert cytopathologist to remotely look at the slide. This improved accessibility saves time and alleviates the need to ship slides, wait for glass slides, or transport pathologists. Whole slide imaging (WSI) is a digital imaging modality that uses computerized technology to scan and convert pathology and cytology glass slides into digital images (digital slides) that can be viewed remotely on a workstation using viewing software. In spite of the many advances, challenges remain such as the expensive initial set-up costs, workflow interruption, length of time to scan whole slides, large storage size for WSI, bandwidth restrictions, undefined legal implications, professional reluctance, and lack of standardization in the imaging process. PMID:21785680

  16. Digital Image Velocimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cho, Y.-C.

    1991-01-01

    Digital image velocimetry is technique for extracting two-dimensional (in image planes) velocities of objects from multiple photographs or video images of objects. Devised to overcome disadvantages of particle-image velocimetry and laser-speckle velocimetry, both of which involve use of illuminated seed particles to make flows visible. Directions of velocity vectors determined unambiguously, and dynamic range limited only by speed of camera or, equivalently, by speed of stroboscopic illumination.

  17. Method for acquiring, storing and analyzing crystal images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gester, Thomas E. (Inventor); Rosenblum, William M. (Inventor); Christopher, Gayle K. (Inventor); Hamrick, David T. (Inventor); Delucas, Lawrence J. (Inventor); Tillotson, Brian (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A system utilizing a digital computer for acquiring, storing and evaluating crystal images. The system includes a video camera (12) which produces a digital output signal representative of a crystal specimen positioned within its focal window (16). The digitized output from the camera (12) is then stored on data storage media (32) together with other parameters inputted by a technician and relevant to the crystal specimen. Preferably, the digitized images are stored on removable media (32) while the parameters for different crystal specimens are maintained in a database (40) with indices to the digitized optical images on the other data storage media (32). Computer software is then utilized to identify not only the presence and number of crystals and the edges of the crystal specimens from the optical image, but to also rate the crystal specimens by various parameters, such as edge straightness, polygon formation, aspect ratio, surface clarity, crystal cracks and other defects or lack thereof, and other parameters relevant to the quality of the crystals.

  18. Artifacts in digital images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorre, J. J.; Gillespie, A. R.

    1980-01-01

    Three kinds of artifacts unique to digital images are illustrated, namely aliasing caused by undersampling, interference phenomena caused by improper display of images, and harmonic overtones caused by quantization of amplitudes. Special attention is given to undersampling when the sample size and interval are the same. It is noted that this situation is important because it is typical of solid-state cameras. Quantization of image data of necessity introduces energy at harmonic overtones of the image spectrum. This energy is aliased if the frequency of the overtones is greater than 0.5 cycle/pixel. It cannot be selectively removed from the image through filtering, and the best way to suppress it is to maximize the amplification of the sensor before digital encoding.

  19. Digital Image Correlation Engine

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, Dan; Crozier, Paul; Reu, Phil

    2015-10-06

    DICe is an open source digital image correlation (DIC) tool intended for use as a module in an external application or as a standalone analysis code. It's primary capability is computing full –field displacements and strains from sequences of digital These images are typically of a material sample undergoing a materials characterization experiment, but DICe is also useful for other applications (for example, trajectory tracking). DICe is machine portable (Windows, Linux and Mac) and can be effectively deployed on a high performance computing platform. Capabilities from DICe can be invoked through a library interface, via source code integration of DICe classes or through a graphical user interface.

  20. Digital imaging in dentistry.

    PubMed

    Essen, S Donovan

    2011-01-01

    Information technology is vital to operations, marketing, accounting, finance and administration. One of the most exciting and quickly evolving technologies in the modern dental office is digital applications. The dentist is often the business manager, information technology officer and strategic planning chief for his small business. The information systems triangle applies directly to this critical manager supported by properly trained ancillary staff and good equipment. With emerging technology driving all medical disciplines and the rapid pace at which it emerges, it is vital for the contemporary practitioner to keep abreast of the newest information technology developments. This article compares the strategic and operational advantages of digital applications, specifically imaging. The focus of this paper will be on digital radiography (DR), 3D computerized tomography, digital photography and digitally-driven CAD/CAM to what are now considered obsolescing modalities and contemplates what may arrive in the future. It is the purpose of this essay to succinctly evaluate the decisions involved in the role, application and implications of employing this tool in the dental environment PMID:22132658

  1. Digital Image Correlation Engine

    2015-10-06

    DICe is an open source digital image correlation (DIC) tool intended for use as a module in an external application or as a standalone analysis code. It's primary capability is computing full –field displacements and strains from sequences of digital These images are typically of a material sample undergoing a materials characterization experiment, but DICe is also useful for other applications (for example, trajectory tracking). DICe is machine portable (Windows, Linux and Mac) and canmore » be effectively deployed on a high performance computing platform. Capabilities from DICe can be invoked through a library interface, via source code integration of DICe classes or through a graphical user interface.« less

  2. Digital image velocimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cho, Y.-C.

    1989-01-01

    Digital image velocimetry is proposed for the measurement of the instantaneous velocity fields of time dependent flows. This technique improves the flow measurement by eliminating some of the restrictions on existing optical methods (i.e., laser speckle velocimetry and particle image velocimetry). Among these restrictions are the limited dynamic range of the velocity measurement, directional ambiguity of the velocity vector, and the difficulty of a real-time capability. The present technique greatly enhances the dynamic range of the velocity measurement and unequivocally determines the direction of the velocity vector.

  3. The Apollo Digital Image Archive: Project Status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paris, K. N.; Robinson, M. S.; Lawrence, S. J.; Danton, J.; Bowman-Cisneros, E.; Licht, A.; Close, W.; Ingram, R.

    2012-03-01

    Photographs acquired by the Apollo astronauts are currently being scanned at JSC and the files sent to ASU for the Apollo Digital Image Archive. The metric frames are nearing completion while the panoramic frames are in the process of being released.

  4. Digital Image Analysis of Cereals

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Image analysis is the extraction of meaningful information from images, mainly digital images by means of digital processing techniques. The field was established in the 1950s and coincides with the advent of computer technology, as image analysis is profoundly reliant on computer processing. As t...

  5. Answering Your Digital Imaging Questions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koelling, Jill Marie

    1998-01-01

    Discusses two reasons why institutions should create digital image files--access and preservation. Suggests a collection survey for determining what to scan. Describes the five most important technical issues of digital imaging: resolution, file formats, storage, refreshment, and copyright. Discusses digitization of manuscript collections and…

  6. Digital imaging overview.

    PubMed

    Carrino, John A

    2003-07-01

    Digital imaging consists of digital acquisition modalities, image, and information management systems. All modalities are available to be purchased as digital acquisition devices. Image management has been the domain for PACSs. PACSs are complex systems designed to transmit, store, and display medical images. They use and rely on many types of different information and display technologies. The initial focus for PACSs has been on solving the engineering issues associated with the transfer of large image data sets and the suitability of softcopy displays for diagnosis particular to the human visual system. For operating within a centralized radiology department, these are largely solved. However, for enterprise wide dissemination and distribution, there are still challenges in the form of expedient transfer syntaxes and image quality, but these are also being effectively addressed. Information management is the domain of the RIS. One of the goals of radiology management should encompass the development of a robust practice environment that emphasizes workflow enhancements with seamless integration of decision support tools. The concept of "person-machine" systems emphasizes taking full advantage of both human and machine capabilities with a capacity to grow and change function. As the computer capabilities increase, more jobs can be relinquished to the machine. The physician can then focus on tasks that require more complex judgment and comprehension. The goal of this human-machine hybrid is to have more power than either of its components alone. This multifaceted role will most likely be embedded in the background having agents query and retrieve context specific information to be presented to the user. As augmenters of human talent, computers can turn data into information and information into knowledge. Medical imaging is a beneficiary of the information technology developments driven by the consumer and business sectors. Although these applications of

  7. Guide to Digital Radiographic Imaging.

    PubMed

    Mol, André; Yoon, Douglas C

    2015-09-01

    This is a resource for clinicians who are considering purchasing a digital imaging system or those already using one who want to optimize its use. It covers selected topics in digital imaging fundamentals, detector technology, image processing and quality assurance. Through a critical appraisal of the strengths and limitations of digital imaging components, the goal of this guide is to contribute to the appropriate use of these systems to maximize the health benefit for patients. PMID:26820007

  8. Digital focusing schlieren imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckner, Benjamin D.; Trolinger, James D.; L'Esperance, Drew

    2015-09-01

    Since its invention in the 19th century, schlieren imaging has been an essential method for studying many aerodynamic effects, particularly convection and shock waves, but the classical method using parabolic mirrors is extremely difficult to set up and very expensive for large fields of view. Focusing schlieren methods have made large- area schlieren more feasible but have tended to be difficult to align and set up, limiting their utility in many applications We recently developed an alternative approach which utilizes recent advances in digital display technology to produce simpler schlieren system that yields similar sensitivity with greater flexibility.

  9. The use of digital images in pathology.

    PubMed

    Furness, P N

    1997-11-01

    Digital images are routinely used by the publishing industry, but most diagnostic pathologists are unfamiliar with the technology and its possibilities. This review aims to explain the basic principles of digital image acquisition, storage, manipulation and use, and the possibilities provided not only in research, but also in teaching and in routine diagnostic pathology. Images of natural objects are usually expressed digitally as 'bitmaps'--rectilinear arrays of small dots. The size of each dot can vary, but so can its information content in terms, for example, of colour, greyscale or opacity. Various file formats and compression algorithms are available. Video cameras connected to microscopes are familiar to most pathologists; video images can be converted directly to a digital form by a suitably equipped computer. Digital cameras and scanners are alternative acquisition tools of relevance to pathologists. Once acquired, a digital image can easily be subjected to the digital equivalent of any conventional darkroom manipulation and modern software allows much more flexibility, to such an extent that a new tool for scientific fraud has been created. For research, image enhancement and analysis is an increasingly powerful and affordable tool. Morphometric measurements are, after many predictions, at last beginning to be part of the toolkit of the diagnostic pathologist. In teaching, the potential to create dramatic yet informative presentations is demonstrated daily by the publishing industry; such methods are readily applicable to the classroom. The combination of digital images and the Internet raises many possibilities; for example, instead of seeking one expert diagnostic opinion, one could simultaneously seek the opinion of many, all around the globe. It is inevitable that in the coming years the use of digital images will spread from the laboratory to the medical curriculum and to the whole of diagnostic pathology. PMID:9422979

  10. Digital imaging in anatomic pathology.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, M J; Sotnikov, A V

    1996-10-01

    Advances in computer technology continue to bring new innovations to departments of anatomic pathology. This article briefly reviews the present status of digital optical imaging, and explores the directions that this technology may lead over the next several years. Technical requirements for digital microscopic and gross imaging, and the available options for image archival and retrieval are summarized. The advantages of digital images over conventional photography in the conference room, and the usefulness of digital imaging in the frozen section suite and gross room, as an adjunct to surgical signout and as a resource for training and education, are discussed. An approach to the future construction of digital histologic sections and the computer as microscope is described. The digital technologic applications that are now available as components of the surgical pathologist's workstation are enumerated. These include laboratory information systems, computerized voice recognition, and on-line or CD-based literature searching, texts and atlases and, in some departments, on-line image databases. The authors suggest that, in addition to these resources that are already available, tomorrow's surgical pathology workstation will include network-linked digital histologic databases, on-line software for image analysis and 3-D image enhancement, expert systems, and ultimately, advanced pattern recognition capabilities. In conclusion, the authors submit that digital optical imaging is likely to have a significant and positive impact on the future development of anatomic pathology. PMID:8853053

  11. Digital Breast Tomosynthesis: Observer Performance of Clustered Microcalcification Detection on Breast Phantom Images Acquired with an Experimental System Using Variable Scan Angles, Angular Increments, and Number of Projection Views

    PubMed Central

    Goodsitt, Mitchell M.; Helvie, Mark A.; Zelakiewicz, Scott; Schmitz, Andrea; Noroozian, Mitra; Paramagul, Chintana; Roubidoux, Marilyn A.; Nees, Alexis V.; Neal, Colleen H.; Carson, Paul; Lu, Yao; Hadjiiski, Lubomir; Wei, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the dependence of microcalcification cluster detectability on tomographic scan angle, angular increment, and number of projection views acquired at digital breast tomosynthesis (DBTdigital breast tomosynthesis). Materials and Methods A prototype DBTdigital breast tomosynthesis system operated in step-and-shoot mode was used to image breast phantoms. Four 5-cm-thick phantoms embedded with 81 simulated microcalcification clusters of three speck sizes (subtle, medium, and obvious) were imaged by using a rhodium target and rhodium filter with 29 kV, 50 mAs, and seven acquisition protocols. Fixed angular increments were used in four protocols (denoted as scan angle, angular increment, and number of projection views, respectively: 16°, 1°, and 17; 24°, 3°, and nine; 30°, 3°, and 11; and 60°, 3°, and 21), and variable increments were used in three (40°, variable, and 13; 40°, variable, and 15; and 60°, variable, and 21). The reconstructed DBTdigital breast tomosynthesis images were interpreted by six radiologists who located the microcalcification clusters and rated their conspicuity. Results The mean sensitivity for detection of subtle clusters ranged from 80% (22.5 of 28) to 96% (26.8 of 28) for the seven DBTdigital breast tomosynthesis protocols; the highest sensitivity was achieved with the 16°, 1°, and 17 protocol (96%), but the difference was significant only for the 60°, 3°, and 21 protocol (80%, P < .002) and did not reach significance for the other five protocols (P = .01–.15). The mean sensitivity for detection of medium and obvious clusters ranged from 97% (28.2 of 29) to 100% (24 of 24), but the differences fell short of significance (P = .08 to >.99). The conspicuity of subtle and medium clusters with the 16°, 1°, and 17 protocol was rated higher than those with other protocols; the differences were significant for subtle clusters with the 24°, 3°, and nine protocol and for medium clusters with 24°, 3°, and nine

  12. Imagers for digital still photography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosiers, Jan; Dillen, Bart; Draijer, Cees; Manoury, Erik-Jan; Meessen, Louis; Peters, Inge

    2006-04-01

    This paper gives an overview of the requirements for, and current state-of-the-art of, CCD and CMOS imagers for use in digital still photography. Four market segments will be reviewed: mobile imaging, consumer "point-and-shoot cameras", consumer digital SLR cameras and high-end professional camera systems. The paper will also present some challenges and innovations with respect to packaging, testing, and system integration.

  13. Automatic digital image registration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goshtasby, A.; Jain, A. K.; Enslin, W. R.

    1982-01-01

    This paper introduces a general procedure for automatic registration of two images which may have translational, rotational, and scaling differences. This procedure involves (1) segmentation of the images, (2) isolation of dominant objects from the images, (3) determination of corresponding objects in the two images, and (4) estimation of transformation parameters using the center of gravities of objects as control points. An example is given which uses this technique to register two images which have translational, rotational, and scaling differences.

  14. An image-guided tool to prevent hospital acquired infections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagy, Melinda; Szilágyi, László; Lehotsky, Ákos; Haidegger, Tamás; Benyó, Balázs

    2011-03-01

    Hospital Acquired Infections (HAI) represent the fourth leading cause of death in the United States, and claims hundreds of thousands of lives annually in the rest of the world. This paper presents a novel low-cost mobile device|called Stery-Hand|that helps to avoid HAI by improving hand hygiene control through providing an objective evaluation of the quality of hand washing. The use of the system is intuitive: having performed hand washing with a soap mixed with UV re ective powder, the skin appears brighter in UV illumination on the disinfected surfaces. Washed hands are inserted into the Stery-Hand box, where a digital image is taken under UV lighting. Automated image processing algorithms are employed in three steps to evaluate the quality of hand washing. First, the contour of the hand is extracted in order to distinguish the hand from the background. Next, a semi-supervised clustering algorithm classies the pixels of the hand into three groups, corresponding to clean, partially clean and dirty areas. The clustering algorithm is derived from the histogram-based quick fuzzy c-means approach, using a priori information extracted from reference images, evaluated by experts. Finally, the identied areas are adjusted to suppress shading eects, and quantied in order to give a verdict on hand disinfection quality. The proposed methodology was validated through tests using hundreds of images recorded in our laboratory. The proposed system was found robust and accurate, producing correct estimation for over 98% of the test cases. Stery-Hand may be employed in general practice, and it may also serve educational purposes.

  15. Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome: Ga-67 citrate imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Woolfenden, J.M.; Carrasquillo, J.A.; Larson, S.M.; Simmons, J.T.; Masur, H.; Smith, P.D.; Shelhamer, J.H.; Ognibene, F.P.

    1987-02-01

    All gallium-67 citrate scans obtained in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) at the Clinical Center, National Institutes of Health (Bethesda, Md.) were retrospectively analyzed and correlated with the results of bronchoscopy, chest radiography, and endoscopy. There were 164 scans of 95 patients. Twenty scans were from patients with Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia; 19 were abnormal, for a sensitivity of 95%. Ga-67 uptake tended to be less in patients receiving therapy for P. carinii pneumonia. Chest radiographs were normal at least initially in three patients with abnormal scans and P. carinii pneumonia. Unusually prominent colonic activity was associated with infection in some patients. No lesions of Kaposi sarcoma showed tracer uptake. Gallium scanning is useful for detecting P. carinii pneumonia and other opportunistic infections in patients with AIDS, but it is not useful for localizing Kaposi sarcoma.

  16. Pediatric digital chest imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Tarver, R.D.; Cohen, M.; Broderick, N.J.; Conces, D.J. Jr. )

    1990-01-01

    The Philips Computed Radiography system performs well with pediatric portable chest radiographs, handling the throughout of a busy intensive care service 24 hours a day. Images are excellent and routinely provide a conventional (unenhanced) image and an edge-enhanced image. Radiation dose is decreased by the lowered frequency of repeat examinations and the ability of the plates to respond to a much lower dose and still provide an adequate image. The high quality and uniform density of serial PCR portable radiographs greatly enhances diagnostic content of the films. Decreased resolution has not been a problem clinically. Image manipulation and electronic transfer to remote viewing stations appear to be helpful and are currently being evaluated further. The PCR system provides a marked improvement in pediatric portable chest radiology.

  17. Effects of Digitization and JPEG Compression on Land Cover Classification Using Astronaut-Acquired Orbital Photographs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Julie A.; Webb, Edward L.; Evangelista, Arlene

    2000-01-01

    Studies that utilize astronaut-acquired orbital photographs for visual or digital classification require high-quality data to ensure accuracy. The majority of images available must be digitized from film and electronically transferred to scientific users. This study examined the effect of scanning spatial resolution (1200, 2400 pixels per inch [21.2 and 10.6 microns/pixel]), scanning density range option (Auto, Full) and compression ratio (non-lossy [TIFF], and lossy JPEG 10:1, 46:1, 83:1) on digital classification results of an orbital photograph from the NASA - Johnson Space Center archive. Qualitative results suggested that 1200 ppi was acceptable for visual interpretive uses for major land cover types. Moreover, Auto scanning density range was superior to Full density range. Quantitative assessment of the processing steps indicated that, while 2400 ppi scanning spatial resolution resulted in more classified polygons as well as a substantially greater proportion of polygons < 0.2 ha, overall agreement between 1200 ppi and 2400 ppi was quite high. JPEG compression up to approximately 46:1 also did not appear to have a major impact on quantitative classification characteristics. We conclude that both 1200 and 2400 ppi scanning resolutions are acceptable options for this level of land cover classification, as well as a compression ratio at or below approximately 46:1. Auto range density should always be used during scanning because it acquires more of the information from the film. The particular combination of scanning spatial resolution and compression level will require a case-by-case decision and will depend upon memory capabilities, analytical objectives and the spatial properties of the objects in the image.

  18. Detecting jaundice by using digital image processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro-Ramos, J.; Toxqui-Quitl, C.; Villa Manriquez, F.; Orozco-Guillen, E.; Padilla-Vivanco, A.; Sánchez-Escobar, JJ.

    2014-03-01

    When strong Jaundice is presented, babies or adults should be subject to clinical exam like "serum bilirubin" which can cause traumas in patients. Often jaundice is presented in liver disease such as hepatitis or liver cancer. In order to avoid additional traumas we propose to detect jaundice (icterus) in newborns or adults by using a not pain method. By acquiring digital images in color, in palm, soles and forehead, we analyze RGB attributes and diffuse reflectance spectra as the parameter to characterize patients with either jaundice or not, and we correlate that parameters with the level of bilirubin. By applying support vector machine we distinguish between healthy and sick patients.

  19. Feature-Based Digital Watermarking for Remote Sensing Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, P.-H.; Chen, C.-C.

    2012-08-01

    With the rapid development of information and communication technology, people can acquire and distribute many kinds of digital data more conveniently than before. The consequence is that the "copyright protection" which prevents digital data from been duplicated illegally should be paid much more attention. Digital watermarking is the process of embedding visible or invisible information into a digital signal which may be used to verify its authenticity or the identity of its owners. In the past, digital watermarking technology has been successfully applied to the "copyright protection" of multimedia data, however the researches and applications of applying digital watermarking to geo-information data are still very inadequate. In this study, a novel digital watermarking algorithm based on the scale-space feature points is applied to the remote sensing images, and the robustness of the embedded digital watermark and the impact on satellite image quality are evaluated and analysed. This kind of feature points are commonly invariant to Image rotation, scaling and translation, therefore they naturally fit into the requirement of geometrically robust image watermarking. The experiment results show almost all extracted watermarks have high values of normal correlation and can be recognized clearly after the processing of image compression, brightness adjustment and contrast adjustment. In addition, most of the extracted watermarks are identified after the geometric attacks. Furthermore, the unsupervised image classification is implemented on the watermarked images to evaluate the image quality reduction and the results show that classification accuracy is affected slightly after embedding watermarks into the satellite images.

  20. Image processing techniques for digital orthophotoquad production

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hood, Joy J.; Ladner, L. J.; Champion, Richard A.

    1989-01-01

    Orthophotographs have long been recognized for their value as supplements or alternatives to standard maps. Recent trends towards digital cartography have resulted in efforts by the US Geological Survey to develop a digital orthophotoquad production system. Digital image files were created by scanning color infrared photographs on a microdensitometer. Rectification techniques were applied to remove tile and relief displacement, thereby creating digital orthophotos. Image mosaicking software was then used to join the rectified images, producing digital orthophotos in quadrangle format.

  1. Image Acquisition and Quality in Digital Radiography.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Shannon

    2016-09-01

    Medical imaging has undergone dramatic changes and technological breakthroughs since the introduction of digital radiography. This article presents information on the development of digital radiography and types of digital radiography systems. Aspects of image quality and radiation exposure control are highlighted as well. In addition, the article includes related workplace changes and medicolegal considerations in the digital radiography environment. PMID:27601691

  2. Digital imaging access library

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Jay F.; Hansen, Mark; Francoise, James J.; Leckie, Robert G.; Smith, Donald V.

    1994-05-01

    The ability to access a vast array of radiological and pathologic diagnoses through computer searches of local medical facility databases is a by-product of the continued development of filmless imaging systems. The Department of Defense (DoD) Medical Diagnostic Imaging Support initiative is expanding through the addition of on-line systems at several DoD health care facilities. Madigan Army Medical Center, as the initial site, will soon be 90% filmless, with over one million images archived. Multiple other DoD medical centers are under installation. The eventual goal is an interconnected network of PACS systems of DoD medical centers and their supported medical facilities throughout the United States. To access this potential pool of medical information requires a centralized database capable of acting as a diagnostic index system. The establishment of a multi-center film library index begins with an initial analysis of issues regarding data storage and access, indexing, cross-coding with pathological files, communication formats, cost sharing, and patient confidentiality. In initiating these first steps to developing this telecommunications library these issues and their implications are discussed. The final implementation of this system will facilitate markedly improved research and teaching capabilities in both radiological and pathological fields.

  3. Nanophotonic filters for digital imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walls, Kirsty

    There has been an increasing demand for low cost, portable CMOS image sensors because of increased integration, and new applications in the automotive, mobile communication and medical industries, amongst others. Colour reproduction remains imperfect in conventional digital image sensors, due to the limitations of the dye-based filters. Further improvement is required if the full potential of digital imaging is to be realised. In alternative systems, where accurate colour reproduction is a priority, existing equipment is too bulky for anything but specialist use. In this work both these issues are addressed by exploiting nanophotonic techniques to create enhanced trichromatic filters, and multispectral filters, all of which can be fabricated on-chip, i.e. integrated into a conventional digital image sensor, to create compact, low cost, mass produceable imaging systems with accurate colour reproduction. The trichromatic filters are based on plasmonic structures. They exploit the excitation of surface plasmon resonances in arrays of subwavelength holes in metal films to filter light. The currently-known analytical expressions are inadequate for optimising all relevant parameters of a plasmonic structure. In order to obtain arbitrary filter characteristics, an automated design procedure was developed that integrated a genetic algorithm and 3D finite-difference time-domain tool. The optimisation procedure's efficacy is demonstrated by designing a set of plasmonic filters that replicate the CIE (1931) colour matching functions, which themselves mimic the human eye's daytime colour response.

  4. Digital Images on the DIME

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    With NASA on its side, Positive Systems, Inc., of Whitefish, Montana, is veering away from the industry standards defined for producing and processing remotely sensed images. A top developer of imaging products for geographic information system (GIS) and computer-aided design (CAD) applications, Positive Systems is bucking traditional imaging concepts with a cost-effective and time-saving software tool called Digital Images Made Easy (DIME(trademark)). Like piecing a jigsaw puzzle together, DIME can integrate a series of raw aerial or satellite snapshots into a single, seamless panoramic image, known as a 'mosaic.' The 'mosaicked' images serve as useful backdrops to GIS maps - which typically consist of line drawings called 'vectors' - by allowing users to view a multidimensional map that provides substantially more geographic information.

  5. Digital panoramic and extraoral imaging.

    PubMed

    Dove, S B; McDavid, W D

    1993-10-01

    Intraoral, panoramic, and extraoral radiographs are the primary means of diagnosing hard-tissue disorders of the dentomaxillofacial region. These imaging methods require the use of x-ray film and subsequent chemical processing to produce diagnostic images. A goal of recent research has been the replacement of this film-based technology with computer-based devices that use electronic or storage phosphor receptors to record the x-ray image in a digital format. This article discusses some of these emerging technologies and their potential effect on the future of panoramic and extraoral radiology. PMID:8224331

  6. Digital imaging and fabrication.

    PubMed

    Zandparsa, Roya

    2014-01-01

    Bioceramics have been adopted in dental restorations for implants, bridges, inlays, onlays, and all-ceramic crowns. Dental bioceramics include glass ceramics, reinforced porcelains, zirconias, aluminas, fiber-reinforced ceramic composites, and multilayered ceramic structures. The process of additive manufacturing is ideally suited to dentistry. Models are designed using data from a computed tomography scan or magnetic resonance imaging. Since its development in 2001, direct ceramic machining of presintered yttria tetragonal zirconia polycrystal has become increasingly popular in dentistry. There are wide variety commercially available cements for luting all-ceramic restorations. However, resin cements have lower solubility and better aesthetic characteristics. PMID:24286650

  7. Digital diagnosis of medical images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinonen, Tomi; Kuismin, Raimo; Jormalainen, Raimo; Dastidar, Prasun; Frey, Harry; Eskola, Hannu

    2001-08-01

    The popularity of digital imaging devices and PACS installations has increased during the last years. Still, images are analyzed and diagnosed using conventional techniques. Our research group begun to study the requirements for digital image diagnostic methods to be applied together with PACS systems. The research was focused on various image analysis procedures (e.g., segmentation, volumetry, 3D visualization, image fusion, anatomic atlas, etc.) that could be useful in medical diagnosis. We have developed Image Analysis software (www.medimag.net) to enable several image-processing applications in medical diagnosis, such as volumetry, multimodal visualization, and 3D visualizations. We have also developed a commercial scalable image archive system (ActaServer, supports DICOM) based on component technology (www.acta.fi), and several telemedicine applications. All the software and systems operate in NT environment and are in clinical use in several hospitals. The analysis software have been applied in clinical work and utilized in numerous patient cases (500 patients). This method has been used in the diagnosis, therapy and follow-up in various diseases of the central nervous system (CNS), respiratory system (RS) and human reproductive system (HRS). In many of these diseases e.g. Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (CNS), nasal airways diseases (RS) and ovarian tumors (HRS), these methods have been used for the first time in clinical work. According to our results, digital diagnosis improves diagnostic capabilities, and together with PACS installations it will become standard tool during the next decade by enabling more accurate diagnosis and patient follow-up.

  8. Digital image analyser for autoradiography

    SciTech Connect

    Muth, R.A.; Plotnick, J.

    1985-05-01

    The most critical parameter in quantitative autoradiography for assay of tissue concentrations of tracers is the ability to obtain precise and accurate measurements of optical density of the images. Existing high precision systems for image analysis, rotating drum densitometers, are expensive, suffer from mechanical problems and are slow. More moderately priced and reliable video camera based systems are available, but their outputs generally do not have the uniformity and stability necessary for high resolution quantitative autoradiography. The authors have designed and constructed an image analyser optimized for quantitative single and multiple tracer autoradiography which the authors refer to as a memory-mapped charged-coupled device scanner (MM-CCD). The input is from a linear array of CCD's which is used to optically scan the autoradiograph. Images are digitized into 512 x 512 picture elements with 256 gray levels and the data is stored in buffer video memory in less than two seconds. Images can then be transferred to RAM memory by direct memory-mapping for further processing. Arterial blood curve data and optical density-calibrated standards data can be entered and the optical density images can be converted automatically to tracer concentration or functional images. In double tracer studies, images produced from both exposures can be stored and processed in RAM to yield ''pure'' individual tracer concentration or functional images. Any processed image can be transmitted back to the buffer memory to be viewed on a monitor and processed for region of interest analysis.

  9. Digital image inpainting and microscopy imaging.

    PubMed

    Stanciu, Stefan G; Hristu, Radu; Stanciu, George A

    2011-11-01

    A considerable amount of image processing techniques known as inpainting techniques have been recently developed aiming to provide solutions for filling in missing or damaged regions in a digital image. Typical such techniques reconstruct a defined area by using information from its neighborhood, for example, by completing inside the missing region the isophote lines arriving at its boundaries. In this article, we show that inpainting techniques have considerable potential usefulness in microscopy imaging, even though experimenting and using them in this domain has been almost entirely neglected up until now. In this purpose, we experiment the "curvature-preserving" partial differential equations as a solution to inpainting regions in images collected by several optical and scanning probe microscopy techniques. The results achieved are presented along with a discussion on typical problematic scenarios of microscopy imaging for which this type of techniques can provide a viable solution. PMID:21563264

  10. Digital Images and Human Vision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Andrew B.; Null, Cynthia H. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Processing of digital images destined for visual consumption raises many interesting questions regarding human visual sensitivity. This talk will survey some of these questions, including some that have been answered and some that have not. There will be an emphasis upon visual masking, and a distinction will be drawn between masking due to contrast gain control processes, and due to processes such as hypothesis testing, pattern recognition, and visual search.

  11. Digital image-based titrations.

    PubMed

    Gaiao, Edvaldo da Nobrega; Martins, Valdomiro Lacerda; Lyra, Wellington da Silva; de Almeida, Luciano Farias; da Silva, Edvan Cirino; Araújo, Mário César Ugulino

    2006-06-16

    The exploitation of digital images obtained from a CCD camera (WebCam) as a novel instrumental detection technique for titration is proposed for the first time. Named of digital image-based (DIB) titration, it also requires, as a traditional titration (for example, spectrophotometric, potentiometric, conductimetric), a discontinuity in titration curves where there is an end point, which is associated to the chemical equivalence condition. The monitored signal in the DIB titration is a RGB-based value that is calculated, for each digital image, by using a proposed procedure based on the red, green, and blue colour system. The DIB titration was applied to determine HCl and H3PO4 in aqueous solutions and total alkalinity in mineral and tap waters. Its results were compared to the spectrophotometric (SPEC) titration and, by applying the paired t-test, no statistic difference between the results of both methods was verified at the 95% confidence level. Identical standard deviations were obtained by both titrations in the determinations of HCl and H3PO4, with a slightly better precision for DIB titration in the determinations of total alkalinity. The DIB titration shows to be an efficient and promising tool for quantitative chemical analysis and, as it employs an inexpensive device (WebCam) as analytical detector, it offers an economically viable alternative to titrations that need instrumental detection. PMID:17723410

  12. Digital image film generation: from the photoscientist's perspective

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boyd, John E.

    1982-01-01

    The technical sophistication of photoelectronic transducers, integrated circuits, and laser-beam film recorders has made digital imagery an alternative to traditional analog imagery for remote sensing. Because a digital image is stored in discrete digital values, image enhancement is possible before the data are converted to a photographic image. To create a special film-reproduction curve - which can simulate any desired gamma, relative film speed, and toe/shoulder response - the digital-to-analog transfer function of the film recorder is uniquely defined and implemented by a lookup table in the film recorder. Because the image data are acquired in spectral bands, false-color composites also can be given special characteristics by selecting a reproduction curve tailored for each band.

  13. Digital image transformation and rectification of spacecraft and radar images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, S. S. C.

    1985-12-01

    The application of digital processing techniques to spacecraft television pictures and radar images is discussed. The use of digital rectification to produce contour maps from spacecraft pictures is described; images with azimuth and elevation angles are converted into point-perspective frame pictures. The digital correction of the slant angle of radar images to ground scale is examined. The development of orthophoto and stereoscopic shaded relief maps from digital terrain and digital image data is analyzed. Digital image transformations and rectifications are utilized on Viking Orbiter and Lander pictures of Mars.

  14. Digital image transformation and rectification of spacecraft and radar images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, S. S. C.

    1985-01-01

    The application of digital processing techniques to spacecraft television pictures and radar images is discussed. The use of digital rectification to produce contour maps from spacecraft pictures is described; images with azimuth and elevation angles are converted into point-perspective frame pictures. The digital correction of the slant angle of radar images to ground scale is examined. The development of orthophoto and stereoscopic shaded relief maps from digital terrain and digital image data is analyzed. Digital image transformations and rectifications are utilized on Viking Orbiter and Lander pictures of Mars.

  15. Digital processing of radiographic images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bond, A. D.; Ramapriyan, H. K.

    1973-01-01

    Some techniques are presented and the software documentation for the digital enhancement of radiographs. Both image handling and image processing operations are considered. The image handling operations dealt with are: (1) conversion of format of data from packed to unpacked and vice versa; (2) automatic extraction of image data arrays; (3) transposition and 90 deg rotations of large data arrays; (4) translation of data arrays for registration; and (5) reduction of the dimensions of data arrays by integral factors. Both the frequency and the spatial domain approaches are presented for the design and implementation of the image processing operation. It is shown that spatial domain recursive implementation of filters is much faster than nonrecursive implementations using fast fourier transforms (FFT) for the cases of interest in this work. The recursive implementation of a class of matched filters for enhancing image signal to noise ratio is described. Test patterns are used to illustrate the filtering operations. The application of the techniques to radiographic images of metallic structures is demonstrated through several examples.

  16. Detecting Copy Move Forgery In Digital Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Ashima; Saxena, Nisheeth; Vasistha, S. K.

    2012-03-01

    In today's world several image manipulation software's are available. Manipulation of digital images has become a serious problem nowadays. There are many areas like medical imaging, digital forensics, journalism, scientific publications, etc, where image forgery can be done very easily. To determine whether a digital image is original or doctored is a big challenge. To find the marks of tampering in a digital image is a challenging task. The detection methods can be very useful in image forensics which can be used as a proof for the authenticity of a digital image. In this paper we propose the method to detect region duplication forgery by dividing the image into overlapping block and then perform searching to find out the duplicated region in the image.

  17. Mars Digital Image Mosaic Globe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The photomosaic that forms the base for this globe was created by merging two global digital image models (DIM's) of Mars-a medium-resolution monochrome mosaic processed to emphasize topographic features and a lower resolution color mosaic emphasizing color and albedo variations.

    The medium-resolution (1/256 or roughly 231 m/pixel) monochromatic image model was constructed from about 6,000 images having resolutions of 150-350 m/pixel and oblique illumination (Sun 20 o -45 o above the horizon). Radiometric processing was intended to suppress or remove the effects of albedo variations through the use of a high-pass divide filter, followed by photometric normalization so that the contrast of a given topographic slope would be approximately the same in all images.

    The global color mosaic was assembled at 1/64 or roughly 864 m/pixel from about 1,000 red- and green-filter images having 500-1,000 m/pixel resolution. These images were first mosaiced in groups, each taken on a single orbit of the Viking spacecraft. The orbit mosaics were then processed to remove spatially and temporally varying atmospheric haze in the overlap regions. After haze removal, the per-orbit mosaics were photometrically normalized to equalize the contrast of albedo features and mosaiced together with cosmetic seam removal. The medium-resolution DIM was used for geometric control of this color mosaic. A green-filter image was synthesized by weighted averaging of the red- and violet-filter mosaics. Finally, the product seen here was obtained by multiplying each color image by the medium-resolution monochrome image. The color balance selected for images in this map series was designed to be close to natural color for brighter, redder regions, such as Arabia Terra and the Tharsis region, but the data have been stretched so that the relatively dark regions appear darker and less red than they actually are.

    The images are presented in a projection that portrays the entire surface of Mars in a

  18. Interactive digital image manipulation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henze, J.; Dezur, R.

    1975-01-01

    The system is designed for manipulation, analysis, interpretation, and processing of a wide variety of image data. LANDSAT (ERTS) and other data in digital form can be input directly into the system. Photographic prints and transparencies are first converted to digital form with an on-line high-resolution microdensitometer. The system is implemented on a Hewlett-Packard 3000 computer with 128 K bytes of core memory and a 47.5 megabyte disk. It includes a true color display monitor, with processing memories, graphics overlays, and a movable cursor. Image data formats are flexible so that there is no restriction to a given set of remote sensors. Conversion between data types is available to provide a basis for comparison of the various data. Multispectral data is fully supported, and there is no restriction on the number of dimensions. In this way multispectral data collected at more than one point in time may simply be treated as a data collected with twice (three times, etc.) the number of sensors. There are various libraries of functions available to the user: processing functions, display functions, system functions, and earth resources applications functions.

  19. Digital Image Compression Using Artificial Neural Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serra-Ricart, M.; Garrido, L.; Gaitan, V.; Aloy, A.

    1993-01-01

    The problem of storing, transmitting, and manipulating digital images is considered. Because of the file sizes involved, large amounts of digitized image information are becoming common in modern projects. Our goal is to described an image compression transform coder based on artificial neural networks techniques (NNCTC). A comparison of the compression results obtained from digital astronomical images by the NNCTC and the method used in the compression of the digitized sky survey from the Space Telescope Science Institute based on the H-transform is performed in order to assess the reliability of the NNCTC.

  20. Evaluation of outliers in acquired brain MR images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moldovanu, S.; (Vişan Pungǎ, M.; Moraru, L.

    2015-01-01

    Pre-processing is an important stage in the analysis of magnetic resonance images (MRI), because the effect of specific image artefacts, such as intensity inhomogeneity, noise and low contrast can adversely affect the quantitative image analysis. The image histogram is a useful tool in the analysis of MR images given that it allows a close relationship with important image features such as contrast and noise. The noise and variable contrast are elements that locally modify the quality of images. The key issue of this study derives from the fact that the spatial histogram can contain outliers indicating corrupted image information through the disorder of the bins. These aberrant errors should be excluded from the studied data sets. Here, the outliers are evaluated by using rigorous methods based on the probability theory and Chauvenet (CC), Grubbs (GC) and Peirce's (PC) criteria. In order to check the quality of the MR images, the Minkowsky (MD), Euclidean (ED) and cosine (CD) distance functions were used. They act as similarity scores between the histogram of the acquired MRI and the processed image. This analysis is necessary because, sometimes, the distance function exceeds the co-domain because of the outliers. In this paper, 32 MRIs are tested and the outliers are removed so that the distance functions generate uncorrupted and real values.

  1. Digital image transformation and rectification of spacecraft and radar images

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wu, S.S.C.

    1985-01-01

    Digital image transformation and rectification can be described in three categories: (1) digital rectification of spacecraft pictures on workable stereoplotters; (2) digital correction of radar image geometry; and (3) digital reconstruction of shaded relief maps and perspective views including stereograms. Digital rectification can make high-oblique pictures workable on stereoplotters that would otherwise not accommodate such extreme tilt angles. It also enables panoramic line-scan geometry to be used to compile contour maps with photogrammetric plotters. Rectifications were digitally processed on both Viking Orbiter and Lander pictures of Mars as well as radar images taken by various radar systems. By merging digital terrain data with image data, perspective and three-dimensional views of Olympus Mons and Tithonium Chasma, also of Mars, are reconstructed through digital image processing. ?? 1985.

  2. In-line digital holographic imaging in volume holographic microscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Xiaomin; Lin, Wei-Tang; Chen, Hsi-Hsun; Wang, Po-Hao; Yeh, Li-Hao; Tsai, Jui-Chang; Singh, Vijay Raj; Luo, Yuan

    2015-12-01

    A dual-plane in-line digital holographic imaging method incorporating volume holographic microscopy (VHM) is presented to reconstruct objects in a single shot while eliminating zero-order and twin-image diffracted waves. The proposed imaging method is configured such that information from different axial planes is acquired simultaneously using multiplexed volume holographic imaging gratings, as used in VHM, and recorded as in-line holograms where the corresponding reference beams are generated in the fashion of Gabor's in-line holography. Unlike conventional VHM, which can take axial intensity information only at focal depths, the proposed method digitally reconstructs objects at any axial position. Further, we demonstrate the proposed imaging technique's ability to effectively eliminate zero-order and twin images for single-shot three-dimensional object reconstruction. PMID:26625046

  3. Authenticity and integrity of digital mammography images.

    PubMed

    Zhou, X Q; Huang, H K; Lou, S L

    2001-08-01

    Data security becomes more and more important in telemammography which uses a public high-speed wide area network connecting the examination site with the mammography expert center. Generally, security is characterized in terms of privacy, authenticity and integrity of digital data. Privacy is a network access issue and is not considered in this paper. We present a method, authenticity and integrity of digital mammography, here which can meet the requirements of authenticity and integrity for mammography image (IM) transmission. The authenticity and integrity for mammography (AIDM) consists of the following four modules. 1) Image preprocessing: To segment breast pixels from background and extract patient information from digital imaging and communication in medicine (DICOM) image header. 2) Image hashing: To compute an image hash value of the mammogram using the MD5 hash algorithm. 3) Data encryption: To produce a digital envelope containing the encrypted image hash value (digital signature) and corresponding patient information. 4) Data embedding: To embed the digital envelope into the image. This is done by replacing the least significant bit of a random pixel of the mammogram by one bit of the digital envelope bit stream and repeating for all bits in the bit stream. Experiments with digital IMs demonstrate the following. 1) In the expert center, only the user who knows the private key can open the digital envelope and read the patient information data and the digital signature of the mammogram transmitted from the examination site. 2) Data integrity can be verified by matching the image hash value decrypted from the digital signature with that computed from the transmitted image. 3) No visual quality degradation is detected in the embedded image compared with the original. Our preliminary results demonstrate that AIDM is an effective method for image authenticity and integrity in telemammography application. PMID:11513029

  4. An approach of DSM generation from multi-view images acquired by UAVs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, DaTian; Ai, Mingyao; Hu, Qingwu; Li, Jiayuan

    2016-03-01

    In the past few years, for its lower-cost, safer and high-resolution images, unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) demonstrated great potential for photogrammetric measurements in numerous application fields. Nevertheless, these images are often affected by large rotation, big viewpoint change as well as small overlaps, in which case traditional procedure are not able to orientate images or generate reliable Digital Generation Models (DSM). This paper introduces the whole procedure of the DSM generation, which comprehensively utilizes advantage of both computer vision and multi-image matching algorithms in extracting points and generating a dense DSM. Experiment shows that, based on this procedure, it can quickly extract points from the high-resolution images acquired by UAVs with high location accuracy.

  5. Digital imaging applications in anatomic pathology.

    PubMed

    Leong, F Joel W-M; Leong, Anthony S-Y

    2003-03-01

    Digital imaging has progressed at a rapid rate and is likely to eventually replace chemical photography in most areas of professional and amateur digital image acquisition. In pathology, digital microscopy has implications beyond that of taking a photograph. The arguments for adopting this new medium are compelling, and given similar developments in other areas of pathology and radiologic imaging, acceptance of the digital medium should be viewed as a component of the technological evolution of the laboratory. A digital image may be stored, replicated, catalogued, employed for educational purposes, transmitted for further interpretation (telepathology), analyzed for salient features (medical vision/image analysis), or form part of a wider digital healthcare strategy. Despite advances in digital camera technology, good image acquisition still requires good microscope optics and the correct calibration of all system components, something which many neglect. The future of digital imaging in pathology is very promising and new applications in the fields of automated quantification and interpretation are likely to have profound long-term influence on the practice of anatomic pathology. This paper discusses the state of the art of digital imaging in anatomic pathology. PMID:12605090

  6. A Prototype Digital Image Management System

    PubMed Central

    Dwyer, Samuel J.; Templeton, Arch W.; Anderson, William H.; Tarlton, Mark A.; Hensley, Kenneth S.; Lee, Kyo Rak; Batnitzky, Solomon; Rosenthal, Stanton J.; Johnson, Joy A.; Preston, David F.

    1983-01-01

    A prototype digital image management system has been designed, implemented and is being evaluated by our department. The system satisfies two major requirements: (a) an on-line access, rapid response microcomputer network providing 9 day archiving of digital data; (b) a long-term, low demand archiving system. This paper provides an estimate of the cost of the system, the potential cost-savings, and identifies the digital data throughput using the Ethernet communications protocol. ImagesFigure 4

  7. Ethical Implications of Digital Imaging in Photojournalism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terry, Danal; Lasorsa, Dominic L.

    Arguing that the news media are about to adopt digital imaging systems that will have far-reaching implications for the practice of journalism, this paper discusses how the news media is expected to adopt the new technology and explains why the marriage of journalism and digital imaging will create ethical issues with respect to photo manipulation…

  8. Digital Imaging in the Biology Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moxon, Terry; Wightman, Gaynor

    2005-01-01

    The advent of cheaper SLR digital cameras and associated software has allowed the rapid creation of digital images. We explain three simple techniques that allow the generation of micrographs. A further technique is described that allows the production of an image from a full section of the microscope slide. Class sets of micrographs greatly…

  9. Digital Imaging: An Adobe Photoshop Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cobb, Kristine

    2007-01-01

    This article introduces digital imaging, an Adobe Photoshop course at Shrewsbury High School in Shrewsbury, Massachusetts. Students are able to earn art credits to graduate by successfully completing the course. Digital imaging must cover art criteria as well as technical skills. The course begins with tutorials created by the instructor and other…

  10. Adaptive SVD-Based Digital Image Watermarking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirvanian, Maliheh; Torkamani Azar, Farah

    Digital data utilization along with the increase popularity of the Internet has facilitated information sharing and distribution. However, such applications have also raised concern about copyright issues and unauthorized modification and distribution of digital data. Digital watermarking techniques which are proposed to solve these problems hide some information in digital media and extract it whenever needed to indicate the data owner. In this paper a new method of image watermarking based on singular value decomposition (SVD) of images is proposed which considers human visual system prior to embedding watermark by segmenting the original image into several blocks of different sizes, with more density in the edges of the image. In this way the original image quality is preserved in the watermarked image. Additional advantages of the proposed technique are large capacity of watermark embedding and robustness of the method against different types of image manipulation techniques.

  11. How Digital Image Processing Became Really Easy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cannon, Michael

    1988-02-01

    In the early and mid-1970s, digital image processing was the subject of intense university and corporate research. The research lay along two lines: (1) developing mathematical techniques for improving the appearance of or analyzing the contents of images represented in digital form, and (2) creating cost-effective hardware to carry out these techniques. The research has been very effective, as evidenced by the continued decline of image processing as a research topic, and the rapid increase of commercial companies to market digital image processing software and hardware.

  12. Coastal Digital Surface Model on Low Contrast Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosu, A.-M.; Assenbaum, M.; De la Torre, Y.; Pierrot-Deseilligny, M.

    2015-08-01

    Coastal sandy environments are extremely dynamic and require regular monitoring that can easily be achieved by using an unmanned aerial system (UAS) including a drone and a photo camera. The acquired images have low contrast and homogeneous texture. Using these images and with very few, if any, ground control points (GCPs), it is difficult to obtain a digital surface model (DSM) by classical correlation and automatic interest points determination approach. A possible response to this problem is to work with enhanced, contrast filtered images. To achieve this, we use and tune the free open-source software MicMac.

  13. Image rejects in general direct digital radiography

    PubMed Central

    Rosanowsky, Tine Blomberg; Jensen, Camilla; Wah, Kenneth Hong Ching

    2015-01-01

    Background The number of rejected images is an indicator of image quality and unnecessary imaging at a radiology department. Image reject analysis was frequent in the film era, but comparably few and small studies have been published after converting to digital radiography. One reason may be a belief that rejects have been eliminated with digitalization. Purpose To measure the extension of deleted images in direct digital radiography (DR), in order to assess the rates of rejects and unnecessary imaging and to analyze reasons for deletions, in order to improve the radiological services. Material and Methods All exposed images at two direct digital laboratories at a hospital in Norway were reviewed in January 2014. Type of examination, number of exposed images, and number of deleted images were registered. Each deleted image was analyzed separately and the reason for deleting the image was recorded. Results Out of 5417 exposed images, 596 were deleted, giving a deletion rate of 11%. A total of 51.3% were deleted due to positioning errors and 31.0% due to error in centering. The examinations with the highest percentage of deleted images were the knee, hip, and ankle, 20.6%, 18.5%, and 13.8% respectively. Conclusion The reject rate is at least as high as the deletion rate and is comparable with previous film-based imaging systems. The reasons for rejection are quite different in digital systems. This falsifies the hypothesis that digitalization would eliminates rejects. A deleted image does not contribute to diagnostics, and therefore is an unnecessary image. Hence, the high rates of deleted images have implications for management, training, education, as well as for quality. PMID:26500784

  14. Digital image registration method based upon binary boundary maps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jayroe, R. R., Jr.; Andrus, J. F.; Campbell, C. W.

    1974-01-01

    A relatively fast method is presented for matching or registering the digital data of imagery from the same ground scene acquired at different times, or from different multispectral images, sensors, or both. It is assumed that the digital images can be registed by using translations and rotations only, that the images are of the same scale, and that little or no distortion exists between images. It is further assumed that by working with several local areas of the image, the rotational effects in the local areas can be neglected. Thus, by treating the misalignments of local areas as translations, it is possible to determine rotational and translational misalignments for a larger portion of the image containing the local areas. This procedure of determining the misalignment and then registering the data according to the misalignment can be repeated until the desired degree of registration is achieved. The method to be presented is based upon the use of binary boundary maps produced from the raw digital imagery rather than the raw digital data.

  15. Parallel Analog-to-Digital Image Processor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lokerson, D. C.

    1987-01-01

    Proposed integrated-circuit network of many identical units convert analog outputs of imaging arrays of x-ray or infrared detectors to digital outputs. Converter located near imaging detectors, within cryogenic detector package. Because converter output digital, lends itself well to multiplexing and to postprocessing for correction of gain and offset errors peculiar to each picture element and its sampling and conversion circuits. Analog-to-digital image processor is massively parallel system for processing data from array of photodetectors. System built as compact integrated circuit located near local plane. Buffer amplifier for each picture element has different offset.

  16. Digital imaging technology assessment: Digital document storage project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    An ongoing technical assessment and requirements definition project is examining the potential role of digital imaging technology at NASA's STI facility. The focus is on the basic components of imaging technology in today's marketplace as well as the components anticipated in the near future. Presented is a requirement specification for a prototype project, an initial examination of current image processing at the STI facility, and an initial summary of image processing projects at other sites. Operational imaging systems incorporate scanners, optical storage, high resolution monitors, processing nodes, magnetic storage, jukeboxes, specialized boards, optical character recognition gear, pixel addressable printers, communications, and complex software processes.

  17. Materials characterization through quantitative digital image analysis

    SciTech Connect

    J. Philliber; B. Antoun; B. Somerday; N. Yang

    2000-07-01

    A digital image analysis system has been developed to allow advanced quantitative measurement of microstructural features. This capability is maintained as part of the microscopy facility at Sandia, Livermore. The system records images digitally, eliminating the use of film. Images obtained from other sources may also be imported into the system. Subsequent digital image processing enhances image appearance through the contrast and brightness adjustments. The system measures a variety of user-defined microstructural features--including area fraction, particle size and spatial distributions, grain sizes and orientations of elongated particles. These measurements are made in a semi-automatic mode through the use of macro programs and a computer controlled translation stage. A routine has been developed to create large montages of 50+ separate images. Individual image frames are matched to the nearest pixel to create seamless montages. Results from three different studies are presented to illustrate the capabilities of the system.

  18. Digital image processing: a primer for JVIR authors and readers: part 2: digital image acquisition.

    PubMed

    LaBerge, Jeanne M; Andriole, Katherine P

    2003-11-01

    This is the second installment of a three-part series on digital image processing intended to prepare authors for online submission of manuscripts. In the first article of the series, we reviewed the fundamentals of digital image architecture. In this article, we describe the ways that an author can import digital images to the computer desktop. We explore the modern imaging network and explain how to import picture archiving and communications systems (PACS) images to the desktop. Options and techniques for producing digital hard copy film are also presented. PMID:14605101

  19. Role of Radiologic Imaging in Genetic and Acquired Neuromuscular Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Zanato, Riccardo; Coran, Alessandro; Beltrame, Valeria; Stramare, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Great technologic and clinical progress have been made in the last two decades in identifying genetic defects of several neuromuscular diseases, as Spinal Muscular Atrophy, genetic muscular dystrophies and other genetic myopathies. The diagnosis is usually challenging, due to great variability in genetic abnormalities and clinical phenotypes and the poor specificity of complementary analyses, i.e., serum creatine kinase (CK) and electrophysiology. Muscle biopsy represents the gold standard for the diagnosis of genetic neuromuscular diseases, but clinical imaging of muscle tissue is an important diagnostic tool to identify and quantifyies muscle damage. Radiologic imaging is, indeed, increasingly used as a diagnostic tool to describe patterns and the extent of muscle involvement, thanks to modern techniques that enable to definethe definition of degrees of muscle atrophy and changes in connective tissue. They usually grade the severity of the disease process with greater accuracy than clinical scores. Clinical imaging is more than complementary to perform muscle biopsy, especially as ultrasound scans are often mandatory to identify the muscle to be biopsied. We will here detail and provideWe will herein provide detailed examples of the radiologic methods that can be used in genetic and acquired neuromuscular disorders, stressing pros and cons. Key Words: Muscle Imaging, MRI, CT, genetic muscle disorders, myopathies, dystrophies PMID:26913153

  20. Digital Image Distribution: A Study of Costs and Uses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Besser, Howard

    1999-01-01

    Describes a study that examined an experimental multi-site image distribution scheme among museums and universities in California, The Museum Educational Site Licensing Project, whose content was primarily digital images and metadata. Discusses barriers to using digital images; digital image distribution; comparing digital images to analog slide…

  1. Image Interpolation With Dedicated Digital Hardware

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartenstein, R.; Wagner, G.; Simons, D.; Coulson, J.

    1986-01-01

    Algorithm for interpolating two-dimensional image data to change picture-element spacing implemented in dedicated digital hardware for high-speed execution. System interpolates 100 times as fast as generalpurpose computer. Image resampling occurs first along one image axis and then along other, using two interpolation devices implemented in series.

  2. Digital Imaging and Conservation: Model Guidelines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dean, John F.

    2003-01-01

    Examines the intersection of conservation and digital imaging based on guidelines at the Cornell University (Ithaca, NY) library. Discusses the digitization of artifacts; assessing the condition prior to scanning; scanning considerations, including temperature and humidity, lighting, and security; stable storage of artifacts after scanning; and…

  3. Development of Standard Digital Images for Pneumoconiosis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Won-Jeong; Kim, Sung Jin; Park, Choong-Ki; Park, Jai-Soung; Tae, Seok; Hering, Kurt Georg

    2011-01-01

    We developed the standard digital images (SDIs) to be used in the classification and recognition of pneumoconiosis. From July 3, 2006 through August 31, 2007, 531 retired male workers exposed to inorganic dust were examined by digital (DR) and analog radiography (AR) on the same day, after being approved by our institutional review board and obtaining informed consent from all participants. All images were twice classified according to the International Labour Office (ILO) 2000 guidelines with reference to ILO standard analog radiographs (SARs) by four chest radiologists. After consensus reading on 349 digital images matched with the first selected analog images, 120 digital images were selected as the SDIs that considered the distribution of pneumoconiosis findings. Images with profusion category 0/1, 1, 2, and 3 were 12, 50, 40, and 15, respectively, and a large opacity were in 43 images (A = 20, B = 22, C = 1). Among pleural abnormality, costophrenic angle obliteration, pleural plaque and thickening were in 11 (9.2%), 31 (25.8%), and 9 (7.5%) images, respectively. Twenty-one of 29 symbols were present except cp, ef, ho, id, me, pa, ra, and rp. A set of 120 SDIs had more various pneumoconiosis findings than ILO SARs that were developed from adequate methods. It can be used as digital reference images for the recognition and classification of pneumoconiosis. PMID:22065894

  4. Checking Fits With Digital Image Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, R. M.; Geaslen, W. D.

    1988-01-01

    Computer-aided video inspection of mechanical and electrical connectors feasible. Report discusses work done on digital image processing for computer-aided interface verification (CAIV). Two kinds of components examined: mechanical mating flange and electrical plug.

  5. High-description image acquisition for digital archiving of rare books

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashimura, Masaaki; Nakajima, Toshifumi; Maeda, Taizo; Onda, Norikazu; Saito, Hideo; Ozawa, Shinji

    1998-12-01

    At first in this paper, we given an outline of activity of the Humanities Media Interface (HUMI) Project. This project was established by Keio University for the purpose of digital archiving of rare books held in Keio University Library, and of realizing a research oriented digital library. Then our way of acquiring rare book images of super high definition is introduced and image compensation method for acquiring just- front view of page using the 3-D information extracted from the shape of top line of the page area depicted in the image is proposed. Our approach of acquiring higher resolution image by joining close-up partial images of a page is also introduced. The proposing image adjustment method is extended for partial images of a page as preprocess of joining them together. In the experiment, well-adjusted and joined page images could be obtained.

  6. Computer-vision-based weed identification of images acquired by 3CCD camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yun; He, Yong; Fang, Hui

    2006-09-01

    Selective application of herbicide to weeds at an earlier stage in crop growth is an important aspect of site-specific management of field crops. For approaches more adaptive in developing the on-line weed detecting application, more researchers involves in studies on image processing techniques for intensive computation and feature extraction tasks to identify the weeds from the other crops and soil background. This paper investigated the potentiality of applying the digital images acquired by the MegaPlus TM MS3100 3-CCD camera to segment the background soil from the plants in question and further recognize weeds from the crops using the Matlab script language. The image of the near-infrared waveband (center 800 nm; width 65 nm) was selected principally for segmenting soil and identifying the cottons from the thistles was achieved based on their respective relative area (pixel amount) in the whole image. The results show adequate recognition that the pixel proportion of soil, cotton leaves and thistle leaves were 78.24%(-0.20% deviation), 16.66% (+ 2.71% SD) and 4.68% (-4.19% SD). However, problems still exists by separating and allocating single plants for their clustering in the images. The information in the images acquired via the other two channels, i.e., the green and the red bands, need to be extracted to help the crop/weed discrimination. More optical specimens should be acquired for calibration and validation to establish the weed-detection model that could be effectively applied in fields.

  7. Self-acquired patient images: the promises and the pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Damanpour, Shadi; Srivastava, Divya; Nijhawan, Rajiv I

    2016-03-01

    Self-acquired patient images, also known as selfies, are increasingly utilized in the practice of dermatology; however, research on their utility is somewhat limited. While the implementation of selfies has yet to be universally accepted, their role in triage appears to be especially useful. The potential for reducing office wait times, expediting referrals, and providing dermatologic services to patients with limited access to care is promising. In addition, as technology advances, the number of smartphone applications related to dermatology that are available to the general public has risen exponentially. With appropriate standardization, regulation, and confidentiality measures, these tools can be feasible adjuncts in clinical practice, dermatologic surgery, and teledermatology. Selfies likely will have a large role in dermatologic practice and delivery in the future. PMID:26963112

  8. Digital image centering. II. [for astronomical photography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Auer, L. H.; Van Altena, W. F.

    1978-01-01

    Digital image centering algorithms were compared in a test involving microdensitometer raster scans of a refractor parallax series consisting of 22 stars on 26 plates. The highest accuracy in determining stellar image positions was provided by an algorithm which involved fitting of a symmetric Gaussian curve and a flat background to the image marginal density distributions. Algorithms involving transmission marginals instead of density marginals were found to be less accurate. The repeatability and computational efficiency of the digital image centering technique were also studied.

  9. Building a training image with Digital Outcrop Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pickel, A.; Frechette, J. D.; Comunian, A.; Weissmann, G. S.

    2015-12-01

    Current standard geostatistical approaches to characterizing subsurface heterogeneity may not capture realistic facies geometries and fluid flow paths. Multiple-point statistics (MPS) has shown promise in portraying complex geometries realistically; however, realizations are limited by the reliability of the model of heterogeneity upon which MPS relies, that is the Training Image (TI). Attempting to increase realism captured in TIs, a quantitative outcrop analog based approach utilizing terrestrial lidar and high-resolution, calibrated digital photography is combined with lithofacies analysis to produce TIs. Terrestrial lidar scans and high-resolution digital imagery were acquired of a Westwater Canyon Member, Morrison Formation outcrop in Ojito Wilderness, New Mexico, USA. The resulting point cloud was used to develop a cm scale mesh. Digital images of the outcrop were processed through a combination of photogrammetric techniques and manual digitizing to delineate different facies and sedimentary structures. The classified images were projected onto the high-resolution mesh creating a physically plausible Digital Outcrop Model (DOM), portions of which were used to build MPS TIs. The resulting MPS realization appears to capture realistic geometries of the deposit and empirically honors facies distributions.

  10. Applications of Digital Image Processing 11

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cho, Y. -C.

    1988-01-01

    A new technique, digital image velocimetry, is proposed for the measurement of instantaneous velocity fields of time dependent flows. A time sequence of single-exposure images of seed particles are captured with a high-speed camera, and a finite number of the single-exposure images are sampled within a prescribed period in time. The sampled images are then digitized on an image processor, enhanced, and superimposed to construct an image which is equivalent to a multiple exposure image used in both laser speckle velocimetry and particle image velocimetry. The superimposed image and a single-exposure Image are digitally Fourier transformed for extraction of information on the velocity field. A great enhancement of the dynamic range of the velocity measurement is accomplished through the new technique by manipulating the Fourier transform of both the single-exposure image and the superimposed image. Also the direction of the velocity vector is unequivocally determined. With the use of a high-speed video camera, the whole process from image acquisition to velocity determination can be carried out electronically; thus this technique can be developed into a real-time capability.

  11. RF Device for Acquiring Images of the Human Body

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaier, Todd C.; McGrath, William R.

    2010-01-01

    A safe, non-invasive method for forming images through clothing of large groups of people, in order to search for concealed weapons either made of metal or not, has been developed. A millimeter wavelength scanner designed in a unique, ring-shaped configuration can obtain a full 360 image of the body with a resolution of less than a millimeter in only a few seconds. Millimeter waves readily penetrate normal clothing, but are highly reflected by the human body and concealed objects. Millimeter wave signals are nonionizing and are harmless to human tissues when used at low power levels. The imager (see figure) consists of a thin base that supports a small-diameter vertical post about 7 ft (=2.13 m) tall. Attached to the post is a square-shaped ring 2 in. (=5 cm) wide and 3 ft (=91 cm) on a side. The ring is oriented horizontally, and is supported halfway along one side by a connection to a linear bearing on the vertical post. A planar RF circuit board is mounted to the inside of each side of the ring. Each circuit board contains an array of 30 receivers, one transmitter, and digitization electronics. Each array element has a printed-circuit patch antenna coupled to a pair of mixers by a 90 coupler. The mixers receive a reference local oscillator signal to a subharmonic of the transmitter frequency. A single local oscillator line feeds all 30 receivers on the board. The resulting MHz IF signals are amplified and carried to the edge of the board where they are demodulated and digitized. The transmitted signal is derived from the local oscillator at a frequency offset determined by a crystal oscillator. One antenna centrally located on each side of the square ring provides the source illumination power. The total transmitted power is less than 100 mW, resulting in an exposure level that is completely safe to humans. The output signals from all four circuit boards are fed via serial connection to a data processing computer. The computer processes the approximately 1-MB

  12. Digital image forensics for photographic copying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Jing; Fang, Yanmei

    2012-03-01

    Image display technology has greatly developed over the past few decades, which make it possible to recapture high-quality images from the display medium, such as a liquid crystal display(LCD) screen or a printed paper. The recaptured images are not regarded as a separate image class in the current research of digital image forensics, while the content of the recaptured images may have been tempered. In this paper, two sets of features based on the noise and the traces of double JPEG compression are proposed to identify these recaptured images. Experimental results showed that our proposed features perform well for detecting photographic copying.

  13. A new lossless digital image encryption scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pareek, Narendra K.; Patidar, Vinod; Sud, Krishan K.

    2011-12-01

    We propose a new lossless digital image encryption scheme based on the permutation and substitution architecture. Initially, original image is divided into squared sub-images and then three layers of pixels corresponding to additive primary colours (RGB) of each sub-image are separated. Each layer of pixels of squared sub-images are scrambled by three different ways in the permutation process whereas a simple arithmetic, mainly sorting and differencing, is performed on each layer of pixels to achieve the substitution. The results of several experiments show that the proposed image cipher provides an efficient way for image encryption with high decryption rate.

  14. Digital image envelope: method and evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, H. K.; Cao, Fei; Zhou, Michael Z.; Mogel, Greg T.; Liu, Brent J.; Zhou, Xiaoqiang

    2003-05-01

    Health data security, characterized in terms of data privacy, authenticity, and integrity, is a vital issue when digital images and other patient information are transmitted through public networks in telehealth applications such as teleradiology. Mandates for ensuring health data security have been extensively discussed (for example The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act, HIPAA) and health informatics guidelines (such as the DICOM standard) are beginning to focus on issues of data continue to be published by organizing bodies in healthcare; however, there has not been a systematic method developed to ensure data security in medical imaging Because data privacy and authenticity are often managed primarily with firewall and password protection, we have focused our research and development on data integrity. We have developed a systematic method of ensuring medical image data integrity across public networks using the concept of the digital envelope. When a medical image is generated regardless of the modality, three processes are performed: the image signature is obtained, the DICOM image header is encrypted, and a digital envelope is formed by combining the signature and the encrypted header. The envelope is encrypted and embedded in the original image. This assures the security of both the image and the patient ID. The embedded image is encrypted again and transmitted across the network. The reverse process is performed at the receiving site. The result is two digital signatures, one from the original image before transmission, and second from the image after transmission. If the signatures are identical, there has been no alteration of the image. This paper concentrates in the method and evaluation of the digital image envelope.

  15. Image microarrays (IMA): Digital pathology's missing tool

    PubMed Central

    Hipp, Jason; Cheng, Jerome; Pantanowitz, Liron; Hewitt, Stephen; Yagi, Yukako; Monaco, James; Madabhushi, Anant; Rodriguez-canales, Jaime; Hanson, Jeffrey; Roy-Chowdhuri, Sinchita; Filie, Armando C.; Feldman, Michael D.; Tomaszewski, John E.; Shih, Natalie NC.; Brodsky, Victor; Giaccone, Giuseppe; Emmert-Buck, Michael R.; Balis, Ulysses J.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: The increasing availability of whole slide imaging (WSI) data sets (digital slides) from glass slides offers new opportunities for the development of computer-aided diagnostic (CAD) algorithms. With the all-digital pathology workflow that these data sets will enable in the near future, literally millions of digital slides will be generated and stored. Consequently, the field in general and pathologists, specifically, will need tools to help extract actionable information from this new and vast collective repository. Methods: To address this limitation, we designed and implemented a tool (dCORE) to enable the systematic capture of image tiles with constrained size and resolution that contain desired histopathologic features. Results: In this communication, we describe a user-friendly tool that will enable pathologists to mine digital slides archives to create image microarrays (IMAs). IMAs are to digital slides as tissue microarrays (TMAs) are to cell blocks. Thus, a single digital slide could be transformed into an array of hundreds to thousands of high quality digital images, with each containing key diagnostic morphologies and appropriate controls. Current manual digital image cut-and-paste methods that allow for the creation of a grid of images (such as an IMA) of matching resolutions are tedious. Conclusion: The ability to create IMAs representing hundreds to thousands of vetted morphologic features has numerous applications in education, proficiency testing, consensus case review, and research. Lastly, in a manner analogous to the way conventional TMA technology has significantly accelerated in situ studies of tissue specimens use of IMAs has similar potential to significantly accelerate CAD algorithm development. PMID:22200030

  16. Image display device in digital TV

    DOEpatents

    Choi, Seung Jong

    2006-07-18

    Disclosed is an image display device in a digital TV that is capable of carrying out the conversion into various kinds of resolution by using single bit map data in the digital TV. The image display device includes: a data processing part for executing bit map conversion, compression, restoration and format-conversion for text data; a memory for storing the bit map data obtained according to the bit map conversion and compression in the data processing part and image data inputted from an arbitrary receiving part, the receiving part receiving one of digital image data and analog image data; an image outputting part for reading the image data from the memory; and a display processing part for mixing the image data read from the image outputting part and the bit map data converted in format from the a data processing part. Therefore, the image display device according to the present invention can convert text data in such a manner as to correspond with various resolution, carry out the compression for bit map data, thereby reducing the memory space, and support text data of an HTML format, thereby providing the image with the text data of various shapes.

  17. Digital Image Processing in Private Industry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Connie

    1986-01-01

    Examines various types of private industry optical disk installations in terms of business requirements for digital image systems in five areas: records management; transaction processing; engineering/manufacturing; information distribution; and office automation. Approaches for implementing image systems are addressed as well as key success…

  18. Photography/Digital Imaging: Parallel & Paradoxical Histories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Witte, Mary Stieglitz

    With the introduction of photography and photomechanical printing processes in the 19th century, the first age of machine pictures and reproductions emerged. The 20th century introduced computer image processing systems, creating a digital imaging revolution. Rather than concentrating on the adversarial aspects of the computer's influence on…

  19. Digital Image Exploration at Maui Community College

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morzinski, K. M.; Crockett, C. J.; Crossfield, I. J.

    2010-12-01

    We designed a two-day laboratory exploration of fundamental concepts in digital images for an introductory engineering course at Maui Community College. Our objective was for the students to understand spatial vs. brightness resolution, standard file formats, image tradeoffs, and the engineering design cycle. We used open investigation, question generation, and an engineering design challenge to help our students achieve these learning goals. We also experimented with incorporating Hawaiian language and cultural awareness into our activity. We present our method, student response, and reflections on the success of our design. The 2008 re-design of this activity focused on better incorporating authentic engineering process skills, and on using a rubric for summative assessment of the students' poster presentations. A single file containing all documents and presentations used in this lesson is available online. (http://www.astro.ucla.edu/ ianc/files/digital_images_inquiry.pdf)

  20. FBI compression standard for digitized fingerprint images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brislawn, Christopher M.; Bradley, Jonathan N.; Onyshczak, Remigius J.; Hopper, Thomas

    1996-11-01

    The FBI has formulated national standards for digitization and compression of gray-scale fingerprint images. The compression algorithm for the digitized images is based on adaptive uniform scalar quantization of a discrete wavelet transform subband decomposition, a technique referred to as the wavelet/scalar quantization method. The algorithm produces archival-quality images at compression ratios of around 15 to 1 and will allow the current database of paper fingerprint cards to be replaced by digital imagery. A compliance testing program is also being implemented to ensure high standards of image quality and interchangeability of data between different implementations. We will review the current status of the FBI standard, including the compliance testing process and the details of the first-generation encoder.

  1. CT Image Processing Using Public Digital Networks

    PubMed Central

    Rhodes, Michael L.; Azzawi, Yu-Ming; Quinn, John F.; Glenn, William V.; Rothman, Stephen L.G.

    1984-01-01

    Nationwide commercial computer communication is now commonplace for those applications where digital dialogues are generally short and widely distributed, and where bandwidth does not exceed that of dial-up telephone lines. Image processing using such networks is prohibitive because of the large volume of data inherent to digital pictures. With a blend of increasing bandwidth and distributed processing, network image processing becomes possible. This paper examines characteristics of a digital image processing service for a nationwide network of CT scanner installations. Issues of image transmission, data compression, distributed processing, software maintenance, and interfacility communication are also discussed. Included are results that show the volume and type of processing experienced by a network of over 50 CT scanners for the last 32 months.

  2. Effect of image quality on calcification detection in digital mammography

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, Lucy M.; Mackenzie, Alistair; Cooke, Julie; Given-Wilson, Rosalind M.; Wallis, Matthew G.; Chakraborty, Dev P.; Dance, David R.; Bosmans, Hilde; Young, Kenneth C.

    2012-06-15

    Purpose: This study aims to investigate if microcalcification detection varies significantly when mammographic images are acquired using different image qualities, including: different detectors, dose levels, and different image processing algorithms. An additional aim was to determine how the standard European method of measuring image quality using threshold gold thickness measured with a CDMAM phantom and the associated limits in current EU guidelines relate to calcification detection. Methods: One hundred and sixty two normal breast images were acquired on an amorphous selenium direct digital (DR) system. Microcalcification clusters extracted from magnified images of slices of mastectomies were electronically inserted into half of the images. The calcification clusters had a subtle appearance. All images were adjusted using a validated mathematical method to simulate the appearance of images from a computed radiography (CR) imaging system at the same dose, from both systems at half this dose, and from the DR system at quarter this dose. The original 162 images were processed with both Hologic and Agfa (Musica-2) image processing. All other image qualities were processed with Agfa (Musica-2) image processing only. Seven experienced observers marked and rated any identified suspicious regions. Free response operating characteristic (FROC) and ROC analyses were performed on the data. The lesion sensitivity at a nonlesion localization fraction (NLF) of 0.1 was also calculated. Images of the CDMAM mammographic test phantom were acquired using the automatic setting on the DR system. These images were modified to the additional image qualities used in the observer study. The images were analyzed using automated software. In order to assess the relationship between threshold gold thickness and calcification detection a power law was fitted to the data. Results: There was a significant reduction in calcification detection using CR compared with DR: the alternative FROC

  3. Effect of image quality on calcification detection in digital mammography

    PubMed Central

    Warren, Lucy M.; Mackenzie, Alistair; Cooke, Julie; Given-Wilson, Rosalind M.; Wallis, Matthew G.; Chakraborty, Dev P.; Dance, David R.; Bosmans, Hilde; Young, Kenneth C.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to investigate if microcalcification detection varies significantly when mammographic images are acquired using different image qualities, including: different detectors, dose levels, and different image processing algorithms. An additional aim was to determine how the standard European method of measuring image quality using threshold gold thickness measured with a CDMAM phantom and the associated limits in current EU guidelines relate to calcification detection. Methods: One hundred and sixty two normal breast images were acquired on an amorphous selenium direct digital (DR) system. Microcalcification clusters extracted from magnified images of slices of mastectomies were electronically inserted into half of the images. The calcification clusters had a subtle appearance. All images were adjusted using a validated mathematical method to simulate the appearance of images from a computed radiography (CR) imaging system at the same dose, from both systems at half this dose, and from the DR system at quarter this dose. The original 162 images were processed with both Hologic and Agfa (Musica-2) image processing. All other image qualities were processed with Agfa (Musica-2) image processing only. Seven experienced observers marked and rated any identified suspicious regions. Free response operating characteristic (FROC) and ROC analyses were performed on the data. The lesion sensitivity at a nonlesion localization fraction (NLF) of 0.1 was also calculated. Images of the CDMAM mammographic test phantom were acquired using the automatic setting on the DR system. These images were modified to the additional image qualities used in the observer study. The images were analyzed using automated software. In order to assess the relationship between threshold gold thickness and calcification detection a power law was fitted to the data. Results: There was a significant reduction in calcification detection using CR compared with DR: the alternative FROC

  4. Quantitative analysis of digital microscope images.

    PubMed

    Wolf, David E; Samarasekera, Champika; Swedlow, Jason R

    2013-01-01

    This chapter discusses quantitative analysis of digital microscope images and presents several exercises to provide examples to explain the concept. This chapter also presents the basic concepts in quantitative analysis for imaging, but these concepts rest on a well-established foundation of signal theory and quantitative data analysis. This chapter presents several examples for understanding the imaging process as a transformation from sample to image and the limits and considerations of quantitative analysis. This chapter introduces to the concept of digitally correcting the images and also focuses on some of the more critical types of data transformation and some of the frequently encountered issues in quantization. Image processing represents a form of data processing. There are many examples of data processing such as fitting the data to a theoretical curve. In all these cases, it is critical that care is taken during all steps of transformation, processing, and quantization. PMID:23931513

  5. Resolution in digital imaging: enough already?

    PubMed

    Siegel, Daniel Mark

    2002-09-01

    Digital images have become the new currency for the exchange of information in dermatology. The main value of the digital image, its ability to be transported via the Internet, is optimal if the image can be shared by all interested parties without the need for the still relatively uncommon broadband connection. The technology behind these captured images is progressing rapidly with a resultant increase in image size and resolution. For all practical purposes in clinical dermatology, the current technology with regard to resolution has already gone beyond the needs of the clinician. This article, using freeware and commercially used software, offers proof that a single megapixel image is adequate for on screen evaluation and publication purposes. PMID:12322995

  6. Method of improving a digital image

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rahman, Zia-ur (Inventor); Jobson, Daniel J. (Inventor); Woodell, Glenn A. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A method of improving a digital image is provided. The image is initially represented by digital data indexed to represent positions on a display. The digital data is indicative of an intensity value I.sub.i (x,y) for each position (x,y) in each i-th spectral band. The intensity value for each position in each i-th spectral band is adjusted to generate an adjusted intensity value for each position in each i-th spectral band in accordance with ##EQU1## where S is the number of unique spectral bands included in said digital data, W.sub.n is a weighting factor and * denotes the convolution operator. Each surround function F.sub.n (x,y) is uniquely scaled to improve an aspect of the digital image, e.g., dynamic range compression, color constancy, and lightness rendition. The adjusted intensity value for each position in each i-th spectral band is filtered with a common function and then presented to a display device. For color images, a novel color restoration step is added to give the image true-to-life color that closely matches human observation.

  7. Digital image processing of vascular angiograms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Selzer, R. H.; Beckenbach, E. S.; Blankenhorn, D. H.; Crawford, D. W.; Brooks, S. H.

    1975-01-01

    The paper discusses the estimation of the degree of atherosclerosis in the human femoral artery through the use of a digital image processing system for vascular angiograms. The film digitizer uses an electronic image dissector camera to scan the angiogram and convert the recorded optical density information into a numerical format. Another processing step involves locating the vessel edges from the digital image. The computer has been programmed to estimate vessel abnormality through a series of measurements, some derived primarily from the vessel edge information and others from optical density variations within the lumen shadow. These measurements are combined into an atherosclerosis index, which is found in a post-mortem study to correlate well with both visual and chemical estimates of atherosclerotic disease.

  8. Digital deformation model for fisheye image rectification.

    PubMed

    Hou, Wenguang; Ding, Mingyue; Qin, Nannan; Lai, Xudong

    2012-09-24

    Fisheye lens can provide a wide view over 180°. It then has prominence advantages in three dimensional reconstruction and machine vision applications. However, the serious deformation in the image limits fisheye lens's usage. To overcome this obstacle, a new rectification method named DDM (Digital Deformation Model) is developed based on two dimensional perspective transformation. DDM is a type of digital grid representation of the deformation of each pixel on CCD chip which is built by interpolating the difference between the actual image coordinate and pseudo-ideal coordinate of each mark on a control panel. This method obtains the pseudo-ideal coordinate according to two dimensional perspective transformation by setting four mark's deformations on image. The main advantages are that this method does not rely on the optical principle of fisheye lens and has relatively less computation. In applications, equivalent pinhole images can be obtained after correcting fisheye lens images using DDM. PMID:23037373

  9. An Archive of Digital Images.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fantini, M.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Describes the architecture of the prototype of an image management system that has been used to develop an application concerning images of frescoes in the Sistina Chapel in the Vatican. Hardware and software design are described, the use of local area networks (LANs) is discussed, and data organization is explained. (15 references) (LRW)

  10. Comparison of Image Quality Criteria between Digital Storage Phosphor Plate in Mammography and Full-Field Digital Mammography in the Detection of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Thevi Rajendran, Pushpa; Krishnapillai, Vijayalakshmi; Tamanang, Sulaiman; Kumari Chelliah, Kanaga

    2012-01-01

    Background: Digital mammography is slowly replacing screen film mammography. In digital mammography, 2 methods are available in acquiring images: digital storage phosphor plate and full-field digital mammography. The aim of this study was to compare the image quality acquired from the 2 methods of digital mammography in the detection of breast cancer. Methods: The study took place at the National Cancer Society, Kuala Lumpur, and followed 150 asymptomatic women for the duration of 1 year. Participating women gave informed consent and were exposed to 4 views from each system. Two radiologists independently evaluated the printed images based on the image quality criteria in mammography. McNemar’s test was used to compare the image quality criteria between the systems. Results: The agreement between the radiologists for the digital storage phosphor plate was к = 0.551 and for full-field digital mammography was к = 0.523. Full-field digital mammography was significantly better compared with the digital storage phosphor plate in right and left mediolateral oblique views (P < 0.05) in the detection of microcalcifications, which are early signs of breast cancer. However, both systems were comparable in all other aspects of image quality. Conclusion: Digital mammography is a useful screening tool for the detection of early breast cancer and ensures better prognosis and quality of life. PMID:22977375

  11. Image database for digital hand atlas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Fei; Huang, H. K.; Pietka, Ewa; Gilsanz, Vicente; Dey, Partha S.; Gertych, Arkadiusz; Pospiech-Kurkowska, Sywia

    2003-05-01

    Bone age assessment is a procedure frequently performed in pediatric patients to evaluate their growth disorder. A commonly used method is atlas matching by a visual comparison of a hand radiograph with a small reference set of old Greulich-Pyle atlas. We have developed a new digital hand atlas with a large set of clinically normal hand images of diverse ethnic groups. In this paper, we will present our system design and implementation of the digital atlas database to support the computer-aided atlas matching for bone age assessment. The system consists of a hand atlas image database, a computer-aided diagnostic (CAD) software module for image processing and atlas matching, and a Web user interface. Users can use a Web browser to push DICOM images, directly or indirectly from PACS, to the CAD server for a bone age assessment. Quantitative features on the examined image, which reflect the skeletal maturity, are then extracted and compared with patterns from the atlas image database to assess the bone age. The digital atlas method built on a large image database and current Internet technology provides an alternative to supplement or replace the traditional one for a quantitative, accurate and cost-effective assessment of bone age.

  12. Using Digital Imaging in Classroom and Outdoor Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomasson, Joseph R.

    2002-01-01

    Explains how to use digital cameras and related basic equipment during indoor and outdoor activities. Uses digital imaging in general botany class to identify unknown fungus samples. Explains how to select a digital camera and other necessary equipment. (YDS)

  13. Integrated optical 3D digital imaging based on DSP scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaodong; Peng, Xiang; Gao, Bruce Z.

    2008-03-01

    We present a scheme of integrated optical 3-D digital imaging (IO3DI) based on digital signal processor (DSP), which can acquire range images independently without PC support. This scheme is based on a parallel hardware structure with aid of DSP and field programmable gate array (FPGA) to realize 3-D imaging. In this integrated scheme of 3-D imaging, the phase measurement profilometry is adopted. To realize the pipeline processing of the fringe projection, image acquisition and fringe pattern analysis, we present a multi-threads application program that is developed under the environment of DSP/BIOS RTOS (real-time operating system). Since RTOS provides a preemptive kernel and powerful configuration tool, with which we are able to achieve a real-time scheduling and synchronization. To accelerate automatic fringe analysis and phase unwrapping, we make use of the technique of software optimization. The proposed scheme can reach a performance of 39.5 f/s (frames per second), so it may well fit into real-time fringe-pattern analysis and can implement fast 3-D imaging. Experiment results are also presented to show the validity of proposed scheme.

  14. 21 CFR 892.2030 - Medical image digitizer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Medical image digitizer. 892.2030 Section 892.2030...) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.2030 Medical image digitizer. (a) Identification. A medical image digitizer is a device intended to convert an analog medical image into a...

  15. 21 CFR 892.2030 - Medical image digitizer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Medical image digitizer. 892.2030 Section 892.2030...) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.2030 Medical image digitizer. (a) Identification. A medical image digitizer is a device intended to convert an analog medical image into a...

  16. 21 CFR 892.2030 - Medical image digitizer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Medical image digitizer. 892.2030 Section 892.2030...) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.2030 Medical image digitizer. (a) Identification. A medical image digitizer is a device intended to convert an analog medical image into a...

  17. 21 CFR 892.2030 - Medical image digitizer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Medical image digitizer. 892.2030 Section 892.2030...) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.2030 Medical image digitizer. (a) Identification. A medical image digitizer is a device intended to convert an analog medical image into a...

  18. 21 CFR 892.2030 - Medical image digitizer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Medical image digitizer. 892.2030 Section 892.2030...) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.2030 Medical image digitizer. (a) Identification. A medical image digitizer is a device intended to convert an analog medical image into a...

  19. Fundamental Concepts of Digital Image Processing

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Twogood, R. E.

    1983-03-01

    The field of a digital-image processing has experienced dramatic growth and increasingly widespread applicability in recent years. Fortunately, advances in computer technology have kept pace with the rapid growth in volume of image data in these and other applications. Digital image processing has become economical in many fields of research and in industrial and military applications. While each application has requirements unique from the others, all are concerned with faster, cheaper, more accurate, and more extensive computation. The trend is toward real-time and interactive operations, where the user of the system obtains preliminary results within a short enough time that the next decision can be made by the human processor without loss of concentration on the task at hand. An example of this is the obtaining of two-dimensional (2-D) computer-aided tomography (CAT) images. A medical decision might be made while the patient is still under observation rather than days later.

  20. A LANDSAT digital image rectification system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanwie, P.; Stein, M.

    1976-01-01

    DIRS is a digital image rectification system for the geometric correction of LANDSAT multispectral scanner digital image data. DIRS removes spatial distortions from the data and brings it into conformance with the Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) map projection. Scene data in the form of landmarks are used to drive the geometric correction algorithms. Two dimensional least squares polynominal and spacecraft attitude modeling techniques for geometric mapping are provided. Entire scenes or selected quadrilaterals may be rectified. Resampling through nearest neighbor or cubic convolution at user designated intervals is available. The output products are in the form of digital tape in band interleaved, single band or CCT format in a rotated UTM projection. The system was designed and implemented on large scale IBM 360 computers.

  1. Image digitizer system for bubble chamber laser

    SciTech Connect

    Haggerty, H

    1986-12-08

    An IBM PC-based image digitizer system has been assembled to monitor the laser flash used for holography at the 15 foot bubble chamber. The hardware and the operating software are outlined. For an operational test of the system, an array of LEDs was flashed with a 10 microsecond pulse and the image was grabbed by one of the operating programs and processed. (LEW)

  2. Measuring the Environment through Digital Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pickle, J.; Schloss, A. L.

    2009-12-01

    A network of sites for citizen scientists to take a consistent time sequence of digital photographs of the landscape and an Internet site (http://picturepost.unh.edu/) that efficiently stores and distributes the digital images creates a low-cost and sustainable resource for scientific environmental monitoring and formal and informal science education. Digital photographs taken from the same location and positioned in the same direction and orientation allow scientists to monitor a variety of environmental parameters, including plant health, growth, and phenology; erosion and deposition; water levels; and cloud and canopy cover. The PicturePost platform is simply an octagon placed in the center of a flat surface and secured to a post anchored in the ground or onto a building. The edges of the octagon allow positioning of the camera so the complete landscape may be photographed in less than a minute. A NASA-funded project, Digital Earth Watch (aka Measuring Vegetation Health, (http://mvh.sr.unh.edu) provides educational activities and background materials that help people learn about plants as environmental “green canaries” and about the basics of cameras and digital images. The website also provides free software to analyze digital images. Although this project has been in development for four years, it is only beginning to find partners in which the data support multiple efforts. A large part of this integration is a result of recent NASA funding, which has allowed a new website to be developed to archive and display the images. The developing collaborations and the development of the new website at the same time enhanced both efforts. Because the website could include tools/features that appealed to the collaborating groups, all participants contributed ideas facing fewer restrictions. PicturePost made from recycled plastic lumber.

  3. Applying robust multibit watermarks to digital images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsolis, Dimitrios; Nikolopoulos, Spiridon; Drossos, Lambros; Sioutas, Spyros; Papatheodorou, Theodore

    2009-05-01

    The current work is focusing on the implementation of a robust multibit watermarking algorithm for digital images, which is based on an innovative spread spectrum technique analysis. The paper presents the watermark embedding and detection algorithms, which use both wavelets and the Discrete Cosine Transform and analyzes the arising issues.

  4. Digital enhancement of flow field images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kudlinski, Robert A.; Park, Stephen K.

    1988-01-01

    Most photographs of experimentally generated fluid flow fields have inherently poor photographic quality, specifically low contrast. Thus, there is a need to establish a process for quickly and accurately enhancing these photographs to provide improved versions for physical interpretation, analysis, and publication. A sequence of digital image processing techniques which have been demonstrated to effectively enhance such photographs is described.

  5. Applications and challenges of digital pathology and whole slide imaging.

    PubMed

    Higgins, C

    2015-07-01

    Virtual microscopy is a method for digitizing images of tissue on glass slides and using a computer to view, navigate, change magnification, focus and mark areas of interest. Virtual microscope systems (also called digital pathology or whole slide imaging systems) offer several advantages for biological scientists who use slides as part of their general, pharmaceutical, biotechnology or clinical research. The systems usually are based on one of two methodologies: area scanning or line scanning. Virtual microscope systems enable automatic sample detection, virtual-Z acquisition and creation of focal maps. Virtual slides are layered with multiple resolutions at each location, including the highest resolution needed to allow more detailed review of specific regions of interest. Scans may be acquired at 2, 10, 20, 40, 60 and 100 × or a combination of magnifications to highlight important detail. Digital microscopy starts when a slide collection is put into an automated or manual scanning system. The original slides are archived, then a server allows users to review multilayer digital images of the captured slides either by a closed network or by the internet. One challenge for adopting the technology is the lack of a universally accepted file format for virtual slides. Additional challenges include maintaining focus in an uneven sample, detecting specimens accurately, maximizing color fidelity with optimal brightness and contrast, optimizing resolution and keeping the images artifact-free. There are several manufacturers in the field and each has not only its own approach to these issues, but also its own image analysis software, which provides many options for users to enhance the speed, quality and accuracy of their process through virtual microscopy. Virtual microscope systems are widely used and are trusted to provide high quality solutions for teleconsultation, education, quality control, archiving, veterinary medicine, research and other fields. PMID:25978139

  6. The impact of digital imaging in the field of cytopathology

    PubMed Central

    Hornish, Maryanne; Goulart, Robert A.

    2009-01-01

    With the introduction of digital imaging, pathology is undergoing a digital transformation. In the field of cytology, digital images are being used for telecytology, automated screening of Pap test slides, training and education (e.g. online digital atlases), and proficiency testing. To date, there has been no systematic review on the impact of digital imaging on the practice of cytopathology. This article critically addresses the emerging role of computer-assisted screening and the application of digital imaging to the field of cytology, including telecytology, virtual microscopy, and the impact of online cytology resources. The role of novel diagnostic techniques like image cytometry is also reviewed. PMID:19495408

  7. Digital restoration of multichannel images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galatsanos, Nikolas P.; Chin, Roland T.

    1989-01-01

    The Wiener solution of a multichannel restoration scheme is presented. Using matrix diagonalization and block-Toeplitz to block-circulant approximation, the inversion of the multichannel, linear space-invariant imaging system becomes feasible by utilizing a fast iterative matrix inversion procedure. The restoration uses both the within-channel (spatial) and between-channel (spectral) correlation; hence, the restored result is a better estimate than that produced by independent channel restoration. Simulations are also presented.

  8. Digital image registration method using boundary maps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrus, J. F.; Campbell, C. W.; Jayroe, R. R.

    1975-01-01

    A new method of automatic image registration (matching) is presented. It requires that the original single or multichannel images first be converted to binary boundary maps having elements equal to zero or unity. The method corrects for both translational and rotational errors. One feature of the technique is the rapid calculation of a pseudo correlation matrix NCOR using only integer additions. It is argued that the use of boundary maps is advisable when the data from the two images are acquired under different conditions; i.e., weather conditions, lighting conditions, etc.

  9. Digital image centering. I. [for precision astrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Altena, W. F.; Auer, L. H.

    1975-01-01

    A series of parallax plates have been measured on a PDS microdensitometer to assess the possibility of using the PDS for precision relative astrometry and to investigate centering algorithms that might be used to analyze digital images obtained with the Large Space Telescope. The basic repeatability of the PDS is found to be plus or minus 0.6 micron, with the potential for reaching plus or minus 0.2 micron. A very efficient centering algorithm has been developed which fits the marginal density distributions of the image with a Gaussian profile and a sloping background. The accuracy is comparable with the best results obtained with a photoelectric image bisector.

  10. Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onken, Michael; Eichelberg, Marco; Riesmeier, Jörg; Jensch, Peter

    Over the past 15 years Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) has established itself as the international standard for medical image communication. Most medical imaging equipment uses DICOM network and media services to export image data, thus making this standard highly relevant for medical image processing. The first section of this chapter provides a basic introduction into DICOM with its more than 3,600 pages of technical documentation, followed by a section covering selected advanced topics of special interest for medical image processing. The introductory text familiarizes the reader with the standard's main concepts such as information objects and DICOM media and network services. The rendering pipeline for image display and the concept of DICOM conformance are also discussed. Specialized DICOM services such as advanced image display services that provide means for storing how an image was viewed ("Softcopy Presentation States") and how multiple images should be aligned on an output device ("Structured Display" and "Hanging Protocols") are described. We further describe DICOM's sophisticated approach ("Structured Reporting") for storing structured documents such as CAD information, which is then covered in more detail. Finally, the last section provides an insight into a newly developed DICOM service called "Application Hosting", which introduces a standardized plug-in architecture for image processing, thus permitting users to utilize cross-vendor image processing plug-ins in DICOM applications.

  11. Digital image processing: a primer for JVIR authors and readers: Part 3: Digital image editing.

    PubMed

    LaBerge, Jeanne M; Andriole, Katherine P

    2003-12-01

    This is the final installment of a three-part series on digital image processing intended to prepare authors for online submission of manuscripts. In the first two articles of the series, the fundamentals of digital image architecture were reviewed and methods of importing images to the computer desktop were described. In this article, techniques are presented for editing images in preparation for online submission. A step-by-step guide to basic editing with use of Adobe Photoshop is provided and the ethical implications of this activity are explored. PMID:14654480

  12. Evaluation of clinical image processing algorithms used in digital mammography.

    PubMed

    Zanca, Federica; Jacobs, Jurgen; Van Ongeval, Chantal; Claus, Filip; Celis, Valerie; Geniets, Catherine; Provost, Veerle; Pauwels, Herman; Marchal, Guy; Bosmans, Hilde

    2009-03-01

    Screening is the only proven approach to reduce the mortality of breast cancer, but significant numbers of breast cancers remain undetected even when all quality assurance guidelines are implemented. With the increasing adoption of digital mammography systems, image processing may be a key factor in the imaging chain. Although to our knowledge statistically significant effects of manufacturer-recommended image processings have not been previously demonstrated, the subjective experience of our radiologists, that the apparent image quality can vary considerably between different algorithms, motivated this study. This article addresses the impact of five such algorithms on the detection of clusters of microcalcifications. A database of unprocessed (raw) images of 200 normal digital mammograms, acquired with the Siemens Novation DR, was collected retrospectively. Realistic simulated microcalcification clusters were inserted in half of the unprocessed images. All unprocessed images were subsequently processed with five manufacturer-recommended image processing algorithms (Agfa Musica 1, IMS Raffaello Mammo 1.2, Sectra Mamea AB Sigmoid, Siemens OPVIEW v2, and Siemens OPVIEW v1). Four breast imaging radiologists were asked to locate and score the clusters in each image on a five point rating scale. The free-response data were analyzed by the jackknife free-response receiver operating characteristic (JAFROC) method and, for comparison, also with the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) method. JAFROC analysis revealed highly significant differences between the image processings (F = 8.51, p < 0.0001), suggesting that image processing strongly impacts the detectability of clusters. Siemens OPVIEW2 and Siemens OPVIEW1 yielded the highest and lowest performances, respectively. ROC analysis of the data also revealed significant differences between the processing but at lower significance (F = 3.47, p = 0.0305) than JAFROC. Both statistical analysis methods revealed that the

  13. Imaging of acquired coronary diseases: From children to adults.

    PubMed

    Dehaene, A; Jacquier, A; Falque, C; Gorincour, G; Gaubert, J Y

    2016-05-01

    Acquired coronary diseases include aneurysms, fistulae, dissections, and stenosis. Aneurysms may occur secondarily to Kawasaki disease, a childhood vasculitis, the prognosis of which depends on the coronary involvement, or they may be degenerative, infectious, inflammatory, or traumatic in origin. Fistulae develop between the coronary arterial system and a pulmonary or bronchial artery, or cardiac cavity. Dissections may occur spontaneously or may be post-traumatic. These coronary abnormalities may be found incidentally or may present as complications, infarction or rupture. The goals of this article are to understand acquired childhood and adult coronary diseases and their usual means of presentation, the ways of investigating them, and the principles of their treatment. PMID:27130480

  14. Digital Image Enhancement of Indic Historical Manuscripts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Zhixin; Setlur, Srirangaraj; Govindaraju, Venu

    Historical documents in Indic scripts can be found on a wide range of media such as paper, palm leaves, and parchment. Palm leaves are believed to be one of the earliest forms of writing media and their use as writing material has been recorded in various parts of the world including India. Ancient palm leaf manuscripts relating to religion, science, medicine, astronomy are still available for reference today due to many ongoing efforts for preservation of ancient documents by libraries and universities around the world. These manuscripts typically last a few centuries but with time the leaves degrade and the writing becomes illegible. Image processing techniques can help enhance the images of these manuscripts so as to enable readability of the written text. In this chapter, we propose methods for enhancing digital images of palm leaf and other historical manuscripts. We approximate the background of a gray-scale image using piece-wise linear and nonlinear models. Normalization algorithms are used on the color channels of the palm leaf image to obtain an enhanced gray-scale image. Experimental results show significant improvement in readability. An adaptive local connectivity map is used to try to segment lines of text from the enhanced images with the objective of facilitating techniques such as keyword spotting or partial OCR and thereby making it possible to index these documents for retrieval from a digital library.

  15. Image Viewer using Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baraskar, Trupti N.

    2010-11-01

    Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine is a standard for handling, storing, printing, and transmitting information in medical imaging. The National Electrical Manufacturers Association holds the copyright to this standard. It was developed by the DICOM Standards committee. The other image viewers cannot collectively store the image details as well as the patient's information. So the image may get separated from the details, but DICOM file format stores the patient's information and the image details. Main objective is to develop a DICOM image viewer. The image viewer will open .dcm i.e. DICOM image file and also will have additional features such as zoom in, zoom out, black and white inverter, magnifier, blur, B/W inverter, horizontal and vertical flipping, sharpening, contrast, brightness and .gif converter are incorporated.

  16. Digital Imaging and the Cognitive Revolution: A Media Challenge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sartorius, Ute

    This paper discusses the role of digital technology within the cognitive revolution of the perception of images. It analyzes the traditional values placed on images as a source of cognition. These values are discussed in terms of the ethical and social issues raised by the use of digital image manipulation in so far as the digital era is falsely…

  17. Digital Shaded-Relief Image of Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Riehle, J.R.; Fleming, Michael D.; Molnia, B.F.; Dover, J.H.; Kelley, J.S.; Miller, M.L.; Nokleberg, W.J.; Plafker, George; Till, A.B.

    1997-01-01

    Introduction One of the most spectacular physiographic images of the conterminous United States, and the first to have been produced digitally, is that by Thelin and Pike (USGS I-2206, 1991). The image is remarkable for its crispness of detail and for the natural appearance of the artificial land surface. Our goal has been to produce a shaded-relief image of Alaska that has the same look and feel as the Thelin and Pike image. The Alaskan image could have been produced at the same scale as its lower 48 counterpart (1:3,500,000). But by insetting the Aleutian Islands into the Gulf of Alaska, we were able to print the Alaska map at a larger scale (1:2,500,000) and about the same physical size as the Thelin and Pike image. Benefits of the 1:2,500,000 scale are (1) greater resolution of topographic features and (2) ease of reference to the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) (1987) Alaska Map E and the statewide geologic map (Beikman, 1980), which are both 1:2,500,000 scale. Manually drawn, shaded-relief images of Alaska's land surface have long been available (for example, Department of the Interior, 1909; Raisz, 1948). The topography depicted on these early maps is mainly schematic. Maps showing topographic contours were first available for the entire State in 1953 (USGS, 1:250,000) (J.H. Wittmann, USGS, written commun., 1996). The Alaska Map E was initially released in 1954 in both planimetric (revised in 1973 and 1987) and shaded-relief versions (revised in 1973, 1987, and 1996); topography depicted on the shaded-relief version is based on the 1:250,000-scale USGS topographic maps. Alaska Map E was later modified to include hypsometric tinting by Raven Maps and Images (1989, revised 1993) as copyrighted versions. Other shaded-relief images were produced for The National Geographic Magazine (LaGorce, 1956; 1:3,000,000) or drawn by Harrison (1970; 1:7,500,000) for The National Atlas of the United States. Recently, the State of Alaska digitally produced a shaded-relief image

  18. Conductive resins improve charging and resolution of acquired images in electron microscopic volume imaging.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Huy Bang; Thai, Truc Quynh; Saitoh, Sei; Wu, Bao; Saitoh, Yurika; Shimo, Satoshi; Fujitani, Hiroshi; Otobe, Hirohide; Ohno, Nobuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in serial block-face imaging using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) have enabled the rapid and efficient acquisition of 3-dimensional (3D) ultrastructural information from a large volume of biological specimens including brain tissues. However, volume imaging under SEM is often hampered by sample charging, and typically requires specific sample preparation to reduce charging and increase image contrast. In the present study, we introduced carbon-based conductive resins for 3D analyses of subcellular ultrastructures, using serial block-face SEM (SBF-SEM) to image samples. Conductive resins were produced by adding the carbon black filler, Ketjen black, to resins commonly used for electron microscopic observations of biological specimens. Carbon black mostly localized around tissues and did not penetrate cells, whereas the conductive resins significantly reduced the charging of samples during SBF-SEM imaging. When serial images were acquired, embedding into the conductive resins improved the resolution of images by facilitating the successful cutting of samples in SBF-SEM. These results suggest that improving the conductivities of resins with a carbon black filler is a simple and useful option for reducing charging and enhancing the resolution of images obtained for volume imaging with SEM. PMID:27020327

  19. Conductive resins improve charging and resolution of acquired images in electron microscopic volume imaging

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Huy Bang; Thai, Truc Quynh; Saitoh, Sei; Wu, Bao; Saitoh, Yurika; Shimo, Satoshi; Fujitani, Hiroshi; Otobe, Hirohide; Ohno, Nobuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in serial block-face imaging using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) have enabled the rapid and efficient acquisition of 3-dimensional (3D) ultrastructural information from a large volume of biological specimens including brain tissues. However, volume imaging under SEM is often hampered by sample charging, and typically requires specific sample preparation to reduce charging and increase image contrast. In the present study, we introduced carbon-based conductive resins for 3D analyses of subcellular ultrastructures, using serial block-face SEM (SBF-SEM) to image samples. Conductive resins were produced by adding the carbon black filler, Ketjen black, to resins commonly used for electron microscopic observations of biological specimens. Carbon black mostly localized around tissues and did not penetrate cells, whereas the conductive resins significantly reduced the charging of samples during SBF-SEM imaging. When serial images were acquired, embedding into the conductive resins improved the resolution of images by facilitating the successful cutting of samples in SBF-SEM. These results suggest that improving the conductivities of resins with a carbon black filler is a simple and useful option for reducing charging and enhancing the resolution of images obtained for volume imaging with SEM. PMID:27020327

  20. [Digital thoracic radiology: devices, image processing, limits].

    PubMed

    Frija, J; de Géry, S; Lallouet, F; Guermazi, A; Zagdanski, A M; De Kerviler, E

    2001-09-01

    In a first part, the different techniques of digital thoracic radiography are described. Since computed radiography with phosphore plates are the most commercialized it is more emphasized. But the other detectors are also described, as the drum coated with selenium and the direct digital radiography with selenium detectors. The other detectors are also studied in particular indirect flat panels detectors and the system with four high resolution CCD cameras. In a second step the most important image processing are discussed: the gradation curves, the unsharp mask processing, the system MUSICA, the dynamic range compression or reduction, the soustraction with dual energy. In the last part the advantages and the drawbacks of computed thoracic radiography are emphasized. The most important are the almost constant good quality of the pictures and the possibilities of image processing. PMID:11567193

  1. Validation of no-reference image quality index for the assessment of digital mammographic images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Oliveira, Helder C. R.; Barufaldi, Bruno; Borges, Lucas R.; Gabarda, Salvador; Bakic, Predrag R.; Maidment, Andrew D. A.; Schiabel, Homero; Vieira, Marcelo A. C.

    2016-03-01

    To ensure optimal clinical performance of digital mammography, it is necessary to obtain images with high spatial resolution and low noise, keeping radiation exposure as low as possible. These requirements directly affect the interpretation of radiologists. The quality of a digital image should be assessed using objective measurements. In general, these methods measure the similarity between a degraded image and an ideal image without degradation (ground-truth), used as a reference. These methods are called Full-Reference Image Quality Assessment (FR-IQA). However, for digital mammography, an image without degradation is not available in clinical practice; thus, an objective method to assess the quality of mammograms must be performed without reference. The purpose of this study is to present a Normalized Anisotropic Quality Index (NAQI), based on the Rényi entropy in the pseudo-Wigner domain, to assess mammography images in terms of spatial resolution and noise without any reference. The method was validated using synthetic images acquired through an anthropomorphic breast software phantom, and the clinical exposures on anthropomorphic breast physical phantoms and patient's mammograms. The results reported by this noreference index follow the same behavior as other well-established full-reference metrics, e.g., the peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR) and structural similarity index (SSIM). Reductions of 50% on the radiation dose in phantom images were translated as a decrease of 4dB on the PSNR, 25% on the SSIM and 33% on the NAQI, evidencing that the proposed metric is sensitive to the noise resulted from dose reduction. The clinical results showed that images reduced to 53% and 30% of the standard radiation dose reported reductions of 15% and 25% on the NAQI, respectively. Thus, this index may be used in clinical practice as an image quality indicator to improve the quality assurance programs in mammography; hence, the proposed method reduces the subjectivity

  2. [Whole slide imaging technology: from digitization to online applications].

    PubMed

    Ameisen, David; Le Naour, Gilles; Daniel, Christel

    2012-11-01

    As e-health becomes essential to modern care, whole slide images (virtual slides) are now an important clinical, teaching and research tool in pathology. Virtual microscopy consists of digitizing a glass slide by acquiring hundreds of tiles of regions of interest at different zoom levels and assembling them into a structured file. This gigapixel image can then be remotely viewed over a terminal, exactly the way pathologists use a microscope. In this article, we will first describe the key elements of this technology, from the acquisition, using a scanner or a motorized microscope, to the broadcasting of virtual slides through a local or distant viewer over an intranet or Internet connection. As virtual slides are now commonly used in virtual classrooms, clinical data and research databases, we will highlight the main issues regarding its uses in modern pathology. Emphasis will be made on quality assurance policies, standardization and scaling. PMID:23171902

  3. The Collaborative Digital Imaging Network Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greberman, Melvyn; Goeringer, Fred; Shannon, Roger; Hagen, Raoul; Sweeney, Thomas; Ghaed, Victor; Thomas, Jerry

    1988-06-01

    The Digital Imaging Network (DIN) Project is a collaborative project among numerous components of the Department of Defense, Public Health Service, Veterans Administration, industry, academia, and the MITRE Corporation. The project is evaluating prototype DIN systems (DINS) at Georgetown University (in collaboration with George Washington University) in Washington, DC, and at the University of Washington in Seattle, WA. Results of the project will be used to plan DINS for implementation in fixed and deployable military medical care facilities in the 1990's.

  4. Storage and retrieval of large digital images

    DOEpatents

    Bradley, J.N.

    1998-01-20

    Image compression and viewing are implemented with (1) a method for performing DWT-based compression on a large digital image with a computer system possessing a two-level system of memory and (2) a method for selectively viewing areas of the image from its compressed representation at multiple resolutions and, if desired, in a client-server environment. The compression of a large digital image I(x,y) is accomplished by first defining a plurality of discrete tile image data subsets T{sub ij}(x,y) that, upon superposition, form the complete set of image data I(x,y). A seamless wavelet-based compression process is effected on I(x,y) that is comprised of successively inputting the tiles T{sub ij}(x,y) in a selected sequence to a DWT routine, and storing the resulting DWT coefficients in a first primary memory. These coefficients are periodically compressed and transferred to a secondary memory to maintain sufficient memory in the primary memory for data processing. The sequence of DWT operations on the tiles T{sub ij}(x,y) effectively calculates a seamless DWT of I(x,y). Data retrieval consists of specifying a resolution and a region of I(x,y) for display. The subset of stored DWT coefficients corresponding to each requested scene is determined and then decompressed for input to an inverse DWT, the output of which forms the image display. The repeated process whereby image views are specified may take the form an interaction with a computer pointing device on an image display from a previous retrieval. 6 figs.

  5. Storage and retrieval of large digital images

    DOEpatents

    Bradley, Jonathan N.

    1998-01-01

    Image compression and viewing are implemented with (1) a method for performing DWT-based compression on a large digital image with a computer system possessing a two-level system of memory and (2) a method for selectively viewing areas of the image from its compressed representation at multiple resolutions and, if desired, in a client-server environment. The compression of a large digital image I(x,y) is accomplished by first defining a plurality of discrete tile image data subsets T.sub.ij (x,y) that, upon superposition, form the complete set of image data I(x,y). A seamless wavelet-based compression process is effected on I(x,y) that is comprised of successively inputting the tiles T.sub.ij (x,y) in a selected sequence to a DWT routine, and storing the resulting DWT coefficients in a first primary memory. These coefficients are periodically compressed and transferred to a secondary memory to maintain sufficient memory in the primary memory for data processing. The sequence of DWT operations on the tiles T.sub.ij (x,y) effectively calculates a seamless DWT of I(x,y). Data retrieval consists of specifying a resolution and a region of I(x,y) for display. The subset of stored DWT coefficients corresponding to each requested scene is determined and then decompressed for input to an inverse DWT, the output of which forms the image display. The repeated process whereby image views are specified may take the form an interaction with a computer pointing device on an image display from a previous retrieval.

  6. Milne "en Masse": A Case Study in Digitizing Large Image Collections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harkema, Craig; Avery, Cheryl

    2015-01-01

    In December 2012, the University of Saskatchewan Library's University Archives and Special Collections acquired the complete image collection of Courtney Milne, a professional photographer whose worked encompassed documentary, abstract and fine art photographs. From acquisition to digital curation, the authors identify, outline, and discuss the…

  7. Geometric assessment of image quality using digital image registration techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tisdale, G. E.

    1976-01-01

    Image registration techniques were developed to perform a geometric quality assessment of multispectral and multitemporal image pairs. Based upon LANDSAT tapes, accuracies to a small fraction of a pixel were demonstrated. Because it is insensitive to the choice of registration areas, the technique is well suited to performance in an automatic system. It may be implemented at megapixel-per-second rates using a commercial minicomputer in combination with a special purpose digital preprocessor.

  8. Evaluating Commercial Scanners for Astronomical Image Digitization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simcoe, R. J.

    2009-08-01

    Many organizations have been interested in understanding if commercially available scanners are adequate for scientifically useful digitization. These scanners range in price from a few hundred to a few tens of thousands of dollars (USD), often with little apparent difference in performance specifications. This paper describes why the underlying technology used in flatbed scanners tends to effectively limit resolutions to the 600-1200 dots per inch (dpi) range and how the overall system Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) can be used to evaluate the quality of the digitized data for the small feature sizes found in astronomical images. Two scanners, the Epson V750 flatbed scanner and the Nikon Cool Scan 9000ED film strip scanner, are evaluated through their Modulation Transfer Functions (MTF). The MTF of the Harvard DASCH scanner is also shown for comparison. The particular goal of this evaluation was to understand if the scanners could be used for digitizing spectral plates at the University of Toronto. The plates of primary interest were about 15 mm (5/8 inch) wide by 180 mm (7~inches) long and ˜50 mm x 80 mm (2 x 3 inches). The results of the MTF work show that the Epson scanner, despite claims of high resolution, is of limited value for scientific imaging of feature sizes below about 50 μm and therefore not a good candidate for digitizing the spectral plates and problematic for scanning direct plates. The Nikon scanner is better and, except for some frustrating limitations in its software, its performance seems to hold promise as a digitizer for spectral plates in the University of Toronto collection.

  9. APQ-102 imaging radar digital image quality study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, C. R.; Estes, J. M.

    1982-11-01

    A modified APQ-102 sidelooking radar collected synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data which was digitized and recorded on wideband magnetic tape. These tapes were then ground processed into computer compatible tapes (CCT's). The CCT's may then be processed into high resolution radar images by software on the CYBER computer.

  10. APQ-102 imaging radar digital image quality study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, C. R.; Estes, J. M.

    1982-01-01

    A modified APQ-102 sidelooking radar collected synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data which was digitized and recorded on wideband magnetic tape. These tapes were then ground processed into computer compatible tapes (CCT's). The CCT's may then be processed into high resolution radar images by software on the CYBER computer.

  11. Digital stain separation for histological images.

    PubMed

    Tadrous, P J

    2010-11-01

    It is often desirable to perform digital image analyses on sections prepared for human interpretation, e.g. nuclear chromatin texture analysis or three-dimensional reconstructions using sections requiring human delineation of structures of interest. Unfortunately such analyses are often more effective using stains with less complex contrast. Here an automated selective 'de-staining' method for digital images is presented. The method separates an image into its red, green and blue and hue, saturation and intensity components. A mask of stained tissue is prepared by automatic percentile thresholding. A single weighted inverted colour channel is then added to each of the three primary colour channels separately by an iterative algorithm that adjusts the weights to give minimum variance within the mask. The modified red, green and blue channels are then recombined. This method is automatic requiring no pre-definition of stain colours or special hardware. The method is demonstrated to 'de-stain' nuclei in haematoxylin and eosin (H&E) sections (and a separate haematoxylin image can be derived from this). An image of isolated brown reaction product is produced with immunoperoxidase preparations counterstained with haematoxylin. Furthermore trichrome (haematoxylin van Gieson, picrosirius red) and other common stains may be separated into their components with modifications of the same algorithm. Although other methods for colour separation do exist (e.g. spectral pathology and colour deconvolution) these require special apparatus or precise calibration and foreknowledge of pure dye colour spectra. The present method of digital stain separation is fully automatic with no such prerequisites. PMID:20946383

  12. Classification of Images Acquired with Colposcopy Using Artificial Neural Networks

    PubMed Central

    Simões, Priscyla W; Izumi, Narjara B; Casagrande, Ramon S; Venson, Ramon; Veronezi, Carlos D; Moretti, Gustavo P; da Rocha, Edroaldo L; Cechinel, Cristian; Ceretta, Luciane B; Comunello, Eros; Martins, Paulo J; Casagrande, Rogério A; Snoeyer, Maria L; Manenti, Sandra A

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To explore the advantages of using artificial neural networks (ANNs) to recognize patterns in colposcopy to classify images in colposcopy. PURPOSE Transversal, descriptive, and analytical study of a quantitative approach with an emphasis on diagnosis. The training test e validation set was composed of images collected from patients who underwent colposcopy. These images were provided by a gynecology clinic located in the city of Criciúma (Brazil). The image database (n = 170) was divided; 48 images were used for the training process, 58 images were used for the tests, and 64 images were used for the validation. A hybrid neural network based on Kohonen self-organizing maps and multilayer perceptron (MLP) networks was used. RESULTS After 126 cycles, the validation was performed. The best results reached an accuracy of 72.15%, a sensibility of 69.78%, and a specificity of 68%. CONCLUSION Although the preliminary results still exhibit an average efficiency, the present approach is an innovative and promising technique that should be deeply explored in the context of the present study. PMID:25374454

  13. Comparison of different phantoms used in digital diagnostic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bor, Dogan; Unal, Elif; Uslu, Anil

    2015-09-01

    The organs of extremity, chest, skull and lumbar were physically simulated using uniform PMMA slabs with different thicknesses alone and using these slabs together with aluminum plates and air gaps (ANSI Phantoms). The variation of entrance surface air kerma and scatter fraction with X-ray beam qualities was investigated for these phantoms and the results were compared with those measured from anthropomorphic phantoms. A flat panel digital radiographic system was used for all the experiments. Considerable variations of entrance surface air kermas were found for the same organs of different designs, and highest doses were measured for the PMMA slabs. A low contrast test tool and a contrast detail test object (CDRAD) were used together with each organ simulation of PMMA slabs and ANSI phantoms in order to test the clinical image qualities. Digital images of these phantom combinations and anthropomorphic phantoms were acquired in raw and clinically processed formats. Variation of image quality with kVp and post processing was evaluated using the numerical metrics of these test tools and measured contrast values from the anthropomorphic phantoms. Our results indicated that design of some phantoms may not be efficient enough to reveal the expected performance of the post processing algorithms.

  14. Digitally enhanced GLORIA images for petroleum exploration

    SciTech Connect

    Prindle, R.O. ); Lanz, K )

    1990-05-01

    This poster presentation graphically depicts the geological and structural information that can be derived from digitally enhanced Geological Long Range Inclined Asdic (GLORIA) sonar images. This presentation illustrates the advantages of scale enlargement as an interpreter's tool in an offshore area within the Eel River Basin, Northern California. Sonographs were produced from digital tapes originally collected for the exclusive economic zone (EEZ)-SCAN 1984 survey, which was published in the Atlas of the Western Conterminous US at a scale of 1:500,000. This scale is suitable for displaying regional offshore tectonic features but does not have the resolution required for detailed geological mapping necessary for petroleum exploration. Applications of digital enhancing techniques which utilize contrast stretching and assign false colors to wide-swath sonar imagery (approximately 40 km) with 50-m resolution enables the acquisition and interpretation of significantly more geological and structural data. This, combined with a scale enlargement to 1:100,000 and high contrast contact prints vs. the offset prints of the atlas, increases the resolution and sharpness of bathymetric features so that many more subtle features may be mapped in detail. A tectonic interpretation of these digitally enhanced GLORIA sonographs from the Eel River basin is presented, displaying anticlines, lineaments, ridge axis, pathways of sediment flow, and subtle doming. Many of these features are not present on published bathymetric maps and have not been derived from seismic data because the plan view spatial resolution is much less than that available from the GLORIA imagery.

  15. Digital image management: networking, display, and archiving.

    PubMed

    Cox, G G; Templeton, A W; Dwyer, S J

    1986-01-01

    The requirements for implementing a radiology imaging network are similar to those for local area networks now being designed for other purposes to manage large data films. A radiology department serving a 500-bed hospital generates about 927 megabytes of digitally formatted data per working day. These data are expected to be on line for the patient's hospitalization period. The retrieval rate of these data among the interactive diagnosis display stations requires data throughput rates of between 2 and 5 megabits per second. This throughput rate requires signaling rates of between 20 and 50 megabits per second. Analog hard-copy generation of the images on the network is required by the referring physician for selected images that support the consultation report. Digital laser recorders using paper may be quite satisfactory. Long-term archiving must be low in cost and requires a database scheme capable of managing more than a terabyte of image data. Radiology networks must be required to bridge with other hospital information systems. PMID:3762452

  16. Digital image management: networking, display, and archiving.

    PubMed

    Cox, G G; Templeton, A W; Dwyer, S J

    1986-03-01

    The requirements for implementing a radiology imaging network are similar to those for local area networks now being designed for other purposes to manage large data films. A radiology department serving a 500-bed hospital generates about 927 megabytes of digitally formatted data per working day. These data are expected to be on line for the patient's hospitalization period. The retrieval rate of these data among the interactive diagnosis display stations requires data throughput rates of between 2 and 5 megabits per second. This throughput rate requires signaling rates of between 20 and 50 megabits per second. Analog hard-copy generation of the images on the network is required by the referring physician for selected images that support the consultation report. Digital laser recorders using paper may be quite satisfactory. Long-term archiving must be low in cost and requires a database scheme capable of managing more than a terabyte of image data. Radiology networks must be required to bridge with other hospital information systems. PMID:3961127

  17. A Landsat Digital Image Rectification System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Wie, P.; Stein, M.

    1976-01-01

    DIRS is a Digital Image Rectification System for the geometric correction of Landsat Multispectral Scanner digital image data. DIRS removes spatial distortions from the data and brings it into conformance with the Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) map projection. Scene data in the form of landmarks or Ground Control Points (GCPs) are used to drive the geometric correction algorithms. The system offers extensive capabilities for 'shade printing' to aid in the determination of GCPs. Affine, two dimensional least squares polynominal and spacecraft attitude modeling techniques for geometric mapping are provided. Entire scenes or selected quadralaterals may be rectified. Resampling through nearest neighbor or cubic convolution at user designated intervals is available. The output products are in the form of digital tape in band interleaved, single band or CCT format in a rotated UTM projection. The system was designed and implemented on large scale IBM 360 computers with at least 300-500K bytes of memory for user application programs and five nine track tapes plus direct access storage.

  18. Digital image georeferencing from a multiple camera system by GPS/INS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostafa, Mohamed M. R.; Schwarz, Klaus-Peter

    In this paper, the development and testing of an airborne fully digital multi-sensor system for digital mapping data acquisition is presented. The system acquires two streams of data, namely, navigation (georeferencing) data and imaging data. The navigation data are obtained by integrating an accurate strapdown inertial navigation system with a differential GPS system (DGPS). The imaging data are acquired by two low-cost digital cameras, configured in such a way so as to reduce their geometric limitations. The two cameras capture strips of overlapping nadir and oblique images. The GPS/INS-derived trajectory contains the full translational and rotational motion of the carrier aircraft. Thus, image exterior orientation information is extracted from the trajectory, during post-processing. This approach eliminates the need for ground control (GCP) when computing 3D positions of objects that appear in the field of view of the system imaging component. Two approaches for calibrating the system are presented, namely, terrestrial calibration and in-flight calibration. Test flights were conducted over the campus of The University of Calgary. Testing the system showed that best ground point positioning accuracy at 1:12,000 average image scale is 0.2 m (RMS) in easting and northing and 0.3 m (RMS) in height. Preliminary results indicate that major applications of such a system in the future are in the field of digital mapping, at scales of 1:5000 and smaller, and in the generation of digital elevation models for engineering applications.

  19. Georeferencing airborne images from a multiple digital camera system by GPS/INS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostafa, Mohamed Mohamed Rashad

    2000-10-01

    In this thesis, the development and testing of an airborne fully digital multi-sensor system for kinematic mapping is presented. The system acquires two streams of data, namely navigation data and imaging data. The navigation data are obtained by integrating an accurate strapdown Inertial Navigation System with two GPS receivers. The imaging data are acquired by two digital cameras, configured in such a way so as to reduce their geometric limitations. The two digital cameras capture strips of overlapping nadir and oblique images. The INS/GPS-derived trajectory contains the full translational and rotational motion of the carrier aircraft. Thus, image exterior orientation information is extracted from the trajectory, during postprocessing. This approach eliminates the need for ground control when computing 3D positions of objects that appear in the field of view of the system imaging component. Test flights were conducted over the campus of The University of Calgary. Two approaches for calibrating the system are presented, namely pre-mission calibration and in-flight calibration. Testing the system in flight showed that best ground point positioning accuracy at 1:12000 average image scale is 0.2 m (RMS) in easting and northing and 0.3 m (RMS) in height. Preliminary results indicate that major applications of such a system in the future are in the field of digital mapping, at scales of 1:10000 and smaller, and the generation of digital elevation models for engineering applications.

  20. D Point Cloud Model Colorization by Dense Registration of Digital Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crombez, N.; Caron, G.; Mouaddib, E.

    2015-02-01

    Architectural heritage is a historic and artistic property which has to be protected, preserved, restored and must be shown to the public. Modern tools like 3D laser scanners are more and more used in heritage documentation. Most of the time, the 3D laser scanner is completed by a digital camera which is used to enrich the accurate geometric informations with the scanned objects colors. However, the photometric quality of the acquired point clouds is generally rather low because of several problems presented below. We propose an accurate method for registering digital images acquired from any viewpoints on point clouds which is a crucial step for a good colorization by colors projection. We express this image-to-geometry registration as a pose estimation problem. The camera pose is computed using the entire images intensities under a photometric visual and virtual servoing (VVS) framework. The camera extrinsic and intrinsic parameters are automatically estimated. Because we estimates the intrinsic parameters we do not need any informations about the camera which took the used digital image. Finally, when the point cloud model and the digital image are correctly registered, we project the 3D model in the digital image frame and assign new colors to the visible points. The performance of the approach is proven in simulation and real experiments on indoor and outdoor datasets of the cathedral of Amiens, which highlight the success of our method, leading to point clouds with better photometric quality and resolution.

  1. An image adaptive, wavelet-based watermarking of digital images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agreste, Santa; Andaloro, Guido; Prestipino, Daniela; Puccio, Luigia

    2007-12-01

    In digital management, multimedia content and data can easily be used in an illegal way--being copied, modified and distributed again. Copyright protection, intellectual and material rights protection for authors, owners, buyers, distributors and the authenticity of content are crucial factors in solving an urgent and real problem. In such scenario digital watermark techniques are emerging as a valid solution. In this paper, we describe an algorithm--called WM2.0--for an invisible watermark: private, strong, wavelet-based and developed for digital images protection and authenticity. Using discrete wavelet transform (DWT) is motivated by good time-frequency features and well-matching with human visual system directives. These two combined elements are important in building an invisible and robust watermark. WM2.0 works on a dual scheme: watermark embedding and watermark detection. The watermark is embedded into high frequency DWT components of a specific sub-image and it is calculated in correlation with the image features and statistic properties. Watermark detection applies a re-synchronization between the original and watermarked image. The correlation between the watermarked DWT coefficients and the watermark signal is calculated according to the Neyman-Pearson statistic criterion. Experimentation on a large set of different images has shown to be resistant against geometric, filtering and StirMark attacks with a low rate of false alarm.

  2. Pixel-level robust digital image correlation.

    PubMed

    Cofaru, Corneliu; Philips, Wilfried; Van Paepegem, Wim

    2013-12-01

    Digital Image Correlation (DIC) is a well-established non-contact optical metrology method. It employs digital image analysis to extract the full-field displacements and strains that occur in objects subjected to external stresses. Despite recent DIC progress, many problematic areas which greatly affect accuracy and that can seldomly be avoided, received very little attention. Problems posed by the presence of sharp displacement discontinuities, reflections, object borders or edges can be linked to the analysed object's properties and deformation. Other problematic areas, such as image noise, localized reflections or shadows are related more to the image acquisition process. This paper proposes a new subset-based pixel-level robust DIC method for in-plane displacement measurement which addresses all of these problems in a straightforward and unified approach, significantly improving DIC measurement accuracy compared to classic approaches. The proposed approach minimizes a robust energy functional which adaptively weighs pixel differences in the motion estimation process. The aim is to limit the negative influence of pixels that present erroneous or inconsistent motions by enforcing local motion consistency. The proposed method is compared to the classic Newton-Raphson DIC method in terms of displacement accuracy in three experiments. The first experiment is numerical and presents three combined problems: sharp displacement discontinuities, missing image information and image noise. The second experiment is a real experiment in which a plastic specimen is developing a lateral crack due to the application of uniaxial stress. The region around the crack presents both reflections that saturate the image intensity levels leading to missing image information, as well as sharp motion discontinuities due to the plastic film rupturing. The third experiment compares the proposed and classic DIC approaches with generic computer vision optical flow methods using images from

  3. Approximating large convolutions in digital images.

    PubMed

    Mount, D M; Kanungo, T; Netanyahu, N S; Piatko, C; Silverman, R; Wu, A Y

    2001-01-01

    Computing discrete two-dimensional (2-D) convolutions is an important problem in image processing. In mathematical morphology, an important variant is that of computing binary convolutions, where the kernel of the convolution is a 0-1 valued function. This operation can be quite costly, especially when large kernels are involved. We present an algorithm for computing convolutions of this form, where the kernel of the binary convolution is derived from a convex polygon. Because the kernel is a geometric object, we allow the algorithm some flexibility in how it elects to digitize the convex kernel at each placement, as long as the digitization satisfies certain reasonable requirements. We say that such a convolution is valid. Given this flexibility we show that it is possible to compute binary convolutions more efficiently than would normally be possible for large kernels. Our main result is an algorithm which, given an m x n image and a k-sided convex polygonal kernel K, computes a valid convolution in O(kmn) time. Unlike standard algorithms for computing correlations and convolutions, the running time is independent of the area or perimeter of K, and our techniques do not rely on computing fast Fourier transforms. Our algorithm is based on a novel use of Bresenham's (1965) line-drawing algorithm and prefix-sums to update the convolution incrementally as the kernel is moved from one position to another across the image. PMID:18255522

  4. The PICASSO digital detector for Diffraction Enhanced Imaging at ELETTRA

    SciTech Connect

    Arfelli, F.; Longo, R.; Castelli, E.; Astolfo, A.; Menk, R.-H.; Rigon, L.; Vallazza, E.; Zanconati, F.; De Pellegrin, A.; Chen, R. C.; Dreossi, D.

    2010-07-23

    A clinical mammography program is in progress at the medical beamline SYRMEP of the Italian synchrotron radiation laboratory ELETTRA in Trieste. A conventional screen-film system is utilized as detector for the examinations on patients. For the next experimental step a digital detector has been designed taking into account the essential requirements for mammography such as high spatial and contrast resolution, high efficiency for low dose examinations and high speed for short acquisition time. A double-layer prototype has already been tested in the frame of the PICASSO project. In addition, an analyzer crystal set-up for Diffraction Enhanced Imaging (DEI) has been available for many years at the SYRMEP beamline. Applying the DEI technique several successful experiments have been carried out in biomedical imaging and in particular in-vitro breast imaging utilizing commercially available detectors. Recently a system upgrade yielded a double-crystal analyzer set-up with improved stability and higher angular resolution. In this study the PICASSO detector has been utilized in combination with the new analyzer set-up for imaging in-vitro breast tissue samples. In order to test the potential of the combined system planar and tomographic images have been acquired and the first results are here presented.

  5. The PICASSO digital detector for Diffraction Enhanced Imaging at ELETTRA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arfelli, F.; Astolfo, A.; Menk, R.-H.; Rigon, L.; Zanconati, F.; De Pellegrin, A.; Chen, R. C.; Dreossi, D.; Longo, R.; Vallazza, E.; Castelli, E.

    2010-07-01

    A clinical mammography program is in progress at the medical beamline SYRMEP of the Italian synchrotron radiation laboratory ELETTRA in Trieste. A conventional screen-film system is utilized as detector for the examinations on patients. For the next experimental step a digital detector has been designed taking into account the essential requirements for mammography such as high spatial and contrast resolution, high efficiency for low dose examinations and high speed for short acquisition time. A double-layer prototype has already been tested in the frame of the PICASSO project. In addition, an analyzer crystal set-up for Diffraction Enhanced Imaging (DEI) has been available for many years at the SYRMEP beamline. Applying the DEI technique several successful experiments have been carried out in biomedical imaging and in particular in-vitro breast imaging utilizing commercially available detectors. Recently a system upgrade yielded a double-crystal analyzer set-up with improved stability and higher angular resolution. In this study the PICASSO detector has been utilized in combination with the new analyzer set-up for imaging in-vitro breast tissue samples. In order to test the potential of the combined system planar and tomographic images have been acquired and the first results are here presented.

  6. Digital Image Correlation with Dynamic Subset Selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, Ghulam Mubashar; MacNish, Cara; Dyskin, Arcady; Shufrin, Igor

    2016-09-01

    The quality of the surface pattern and selection of subset size play a critical role in achieving high accuracy in Digital Image Correlation (DIC). The subset size in DIC is normally selected by testing different subset sizes across the entire image, which is a laborious procedure. This also leads to the problem that the worst region of the surface pattern influences the performance of DIC across the entire image. In order to avoid these limitations, a Dynamic Subset Selection (DSS) algorithm is proposed in this paper to optimize the subset size for each point in an image before optimizing the correlation parameters. The proposed DSS algorithm uses the local pattern around the point of interest to calculate a parameter called the Intensity Variation Ratio (Λ), which is used to optimize the subset size. The performance of the DSS algorithm is analyzed using numerically generated images and is compared with the results of traditional DIC. Images obtained from laboratory experiments are also used to demonstrate the utility of the DSS algorithm. Results illustrate that the DSS algorithm provides a better alternative to subset size "guessing" and finds an appropriate subset size for each point of interest according to the local pattern.

  7. Improved digital breast tomosynthesis images using automated ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xing; Yuan, Jie; Du, Sidan; Kripfgans, Oliver D.; Wang, Xueding; Carson, Paul L.; Liu, Xiaojun

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) offers poor image quality along the depth direction. This paper presents a new method that improves the image quality of DBT considerably through the a priori information from automated ultrasound (AUS) images. Methods: DBT and AUS images of a complex breast-mimicking phantom are acquired by a DBT/AUS dual-modality system. The AUS images are taken in the same geometry as the DBT images and the gradient information of the in-slice AUS images is adopted into the new loss functional during the DBT reconstruction process. The additional data allow for new iterative equations through solving the optimization problem utilizing the gradient descent method. Both visual comparison and quantitative analysis are employed to evaluate the improvement on DBT images. Normalized line profiles of lesions are obtained to compare the edges of the DBT and AUS-corrected DBT images. Additionally, image quality metrics such as signal difference to noise ratio (SDNR) and artifact spread function (ASF) are calculated to quantify the effectiveness of the proposed method. Results: In traditional DBT image reconstructions, serious artifacts can be found along the depth direction (Z direction), resulting in the blurring of lesion edges in the off-focus planes parallel to the detector. However, by applying the proposed method, the quality of the reconstructed DBT images is greatly improved. Visually, the AUS-corrected DBT images have much clearer borders in both in-focus and off-focus planes, fewer Z direction artifacts and reduced overlapping effect compared to the conventional DBT images. Quantitatively, the corrected DBT images have better ASF, indicating a great reduction in Z direction artifacts as well as better Z resolution. The sharper line profiles along the Y direction show enhancement on the edges. Besides, noise is also reduced, evidenced by the obviously improved SDNR values. Conclusions: The proposed method provides great improvement on

  8. Digital mammography, cancer screening: Factors important for image compression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, Laurence P.; Blaine, G. James; Doi, Kunio; Yaffe, Martin J.; Shtern, Faina; Brown, G. Stephen; Winfield, Daniel L.; Kallergi, Maria

    1993-01-01

    The use of digital mammography for breast cancer screening poses several novel problems such as development of digital sensors, computer assisted diagnosis (CAD) methods for image noise suppression, enhancement, and pattern recognition, compression algorithms for image storage, transmission, and remote diagnosis. X-ray digital mammography using novel direct digital detection schemes or film digitizers results in large data sets and, therefore, image compression methods will play a significant role in the image processing and analysis by CAD techniques. In view of the extensive compression required, the relative merit of 'virtually lossless' versus lossy methods should be determined. A brief overview is presented here of the developments of digital sensors, CAD, and compression methods currently proposed and tested for mammography. The objective of the NCI/NASA Working Group on Digital Mammography is to stimulate the interest of the image processing and compression scientific community for this medical application and identify possible dual use technologies within the NASA centers.

  9. Digital Imaging in the Introductory Astronomy Course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marschall, Laurence A.; Hayden, Michael B.

    The availability of small, inexpensive CCD cameras is making it possible to offer non-science students in introductory astronomy courses hands-on experience in astronomical imaging. For the past three years at Gettysburg College we have been developing laboratory exercises using ST-4, ST-6, and Lynxx CCD cameras attached to 8-inch telescopes. We discuss the hardware and the procedures involved in these exercises, pointing out the benefits and limitations of digital observations with introductory students. We also offer tips for making successful observations with students, and describe plans for further development.

  10. Applications Of Digital Image Acquisition In Anthropometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woolford, Barbara; Lewis, James L.

    1981-10-01

    Anthropometric data on reach and mobility have traditionally been collected by time consuming and relatively inaccurate manual methods. Three dimensional digital image acquisition promises to radically increase the speed and ease of data collection and analysis. A three-camera video anthropometric system for collecting position, velocity, and force data in real time is under development for the Anthropometric Measurement Laboratory at NASA's Johnson Space Center. The use of a prototype of this system for collecting data on reach capabilities and on lateral stability is described. Two extensions of this system are planned.

  11. Hierarchical nucleus segmentation in digital pathology images

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yi; Ratner, Vadim; Zhu, Liangjia; Diprima, Tammy; Kurc, Tahsin; Tannenbaum, Allen; Saltz, Joel

    2016-01-01

    Extracting nuclei is one of the most actively studied topic in the digital pathology researches. Most of the studies directly search the nuclei (or seeds for the nuclei) from the finest resolution available. While the richest information has been utilized by such approaches, it is sometimes difficult to address the heterogeneity of nuclei in different tissues. In this work, we propose a hierarchical approach which starts from the lower resolution level and adaptively adjusts the parameters while progressing into finer and finer resolution. The algorithm is tested on brain and lung cancers images from The Cancer Genome Atlas data set. PMID:27375315

  12. Dose and diagnostic image quality in digital tomosynthesis imaging of facial bones in pediatrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, J. M.; Hickling, S.; Elbakri, I. A.; Reed, M.; Wrogemann, J.

    2011-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the use of digital tomosynthesis (DT) for pediatric facial bone imaging. We compared the eye lens dose and diagnostic image quality of DT facial bone exams relative to digital radiography (DR) and computed tomography (CT), and investigated whether we could modify our current DT imaging protocol to reduce patient dose while maintaining sufficient diagnostic image quality. We measured the dose to the eye lens for all three modalities using high-sensitivity thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) and an anthropomorphic skull phantom. To assess the diagnostic image quality of DT compared to the corresponding DR and CT images, we performed an observer study where the visibility of anatomical structures in the DT phantom images were rated on a four-point scale. We then acquired DT images at lower doses and had radiologists indicate whether the visibility of each structure was adequate for diagnostic purposes. For typical facial bone exams, we measured eye lens doses of 0.1-0.4 mGy for DR, 0.3-3.7 mGy for DT, and 26 mGy for CT. In general, facial bone structures were visualized better with DT then DR, and the majority of structures were visualized well enough to avoid the need for CT. DT imaging provides high quality diagnostic images of the facial bones while delivering significantly lower doses to the lens of the eye compared to CT. In addition, we found that by adjusting the imaging parameters, the DT effective dose can be reduced by up to 50% while maintaining sufficient image quality.

  13. Fatigue Crack Closure Analysis Using Digital Image Correlation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leser, William P.; Newman, John A.; Johnston, William M.

    2010-01-01

    Fatigue crack closure during crack growth testing is analyzed in order to evaluate the critieria of ASTM Standard E647 for measurement of fatigue crack growth rates. Of specific concern is remote closure, which occurs away from the crack tip and is a product of the load history during crack-driving-force-reduction fatigue crack growth testing. Crack closure behavior is characterized using relative displacements determined from a series of high-magnification digital images acquired as the crack is loaded. Changes in the relative displacements of features on opposite sides of the crack are used to generate crack closure data as a function of crack wake position. For the results presented in this paper, remote closure did not affect fatigue crack growth rate measurements when ASTM Standard E647 was strictly followed and only became a problem when testing parameters (e.g., load shed rate, initial crack driving force, etc.) greatly exceeded the guidelines of the accepted standard.

  14. Remote sensing in marine environment - acquiring, processing, and interpreting GLORIA sidescan sonor images of deep sea floor

    SciTech Connect

    O'Leary, D.W.

    1989-03-01

    The US Geological Survey's remote sensing instrument for regional imaging of the deep sea floor (> 400 m water depth) is the GLORIA (Geologic Long-Range Inclined Asdic) sidescan sonar system, designed and operated by the British Institute of Oceanographic Sciences. A 30-sec sweep rate provides for a swath width of approximately 45 km, depending on water depth. The return signal is digitally recorded as 8 bit data to provide a cross-range pixel dimension of 50 m. Postcruise image processing is carried out by using USGS software. Processing includes precision water-column removal, geometric and radiometric corrections, and contrast enhancement. Mosaicking includes map grid fitting, concatenation, and tone matching. Seismic reflection profiles, acquired along track during the survey, are image correlative and provide a subsurface dimension unique to marine remote sensing. Generally GLORIA image interpretation is based on brightness variations which are largely a function of (1) surface roughness at a scale of approximately 1 m and (2) slope changes of more than about 4/degrees/ over distances of at least 50 m. Broader, low-frequency changes in slope that cannot be detected from the Gloria data can be determined from seismic profiles. Digital files of bathymetry derived from echo-sounder data can be merged with GLORIA image data to create relief models of the sea floor for geomorphic interpretation of regional slope effects.

  15. Quantitative Evaluation of Surface Color of Tomato Fruits Cultivated in Remote Farm Using Digital Camera Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Atsushi; Suehara, Ken-Ichiro; Kameoka, Takaharu

    To measure the quantitative surface color information of agricultural products with the ambient information during cultivation, a color calibration method for digital camera images and a remote monitoring system of color imaging using the Web were developed. Single-lens reflex and web digital cameras were used for the image acquisitions. The tomato images through the post-ripening process were taken by the digital camera in both the standard image acquisition system and in the field conditions from the morning to evening. Several kinds of images were acquired with the standard RGB color chart set up just behind the tomato fruit on a black matte, and a color calibration was carried out. The influence of the sunlight could be experimentally eliminated, and the calibrated color information consistently agreed with the standard ones acquired in the system through the post-ripening process. Furthermore, the surface color change of the tomato on the tree in a greenhouse was remotely monitored during maturation using the digital cameras equipped with the Field Server. The acquired digital color images were sent from the Farm Station to the BIFE Laboratory of Mie University via VPN. The time behavior of the tomato surface color change during the maturing process could be measured using the color parameter calculated based on the obtained and calibrated color images along with the ambient atmospheric record. This study is a very important step in developing the surface color analysis for both the simple and rapid evaluation of the crop vigor in the field and to construct an ambient and networked remote monitoring system for food security, precision agriculture, and agricultural research.

  16. Ultraviolet digital imaging for nuclear safeguards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attas, E. Michael; Burton, G. R.; Chen, J. Dennis; Hildingsson, Lars; Nilsson, A.; Trepte, O.; Young, Gary J.

    1996-03-01

    An ultraviolet-sensitive scientific CCD camera has been tested at a power reactor facility to image the faint Cerenkov light from irradiated nuclear fuel. The instrument mates custom optical components (lens, UV-pass filter) to a commercial scientific camera (Astrocam 4100) with a coated frame-transfer CCD chip (EEV 37-10) to produce 12-bit images of 512 X 512 pixels at a near-real-time frame rate. A 250-mm f/2.6 catadioptric lens has been designed with transmissive optics optimized for this application, incorporating color correction for viewing through 10 m of water. The filter has an average transmission of 80% from 280 to 320 nm, with visible-light transmission of less than 0.01% to block artificial lighting in the fuel bay. Measurements were made with this instrument at the Ringhals Nuclear Power Plant, Varobacka, Sweden. Both fuel and non-fuel assemblies of boiling-water reactor type were studied. Performance is superior to that of the earlier Cerenkov viewing devices based on image intensifier tubes. Increased sensitivity extends the range of the Cerenkov verification technique to fuel with older discharge dates. Increased resolution allows fine details of the fuel to be examined for higher-confidence safeguards verification. Sample digital images are presented, and the advantages to irradiated-fuel verification of image quantitation, storage, transmission, and processing are discussed.

  17. Integrating Digital Images into the Art and Art History Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pitt, Sharon P.; Updike, Christina B.; Guthrie, Miriam E.

    2002-01-01

    Describes an Internet-based image database system connected to a flexible, in-class teaching and learning tool (the Madison Digital Image Database) developed at James Madison University to bring digital images to the arts and humanities classroom. Discusses content, copyright issues, ensuring system effectiveness, instructional impact, sharing the…

  18. The Artist, the Color Copier, and Digital Imaging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Witte, Mary Stieglitz

    The impact that color-copying technology and digital imaging have had on art, photography, and design are explored. Color copiers have provided new opportunities for direct and spontaneous image making an the potential for new transformations in art. The current generation of digital color copiers permits new directions in imaging, but the…

  19. A clinical image preference study comparing digital tomosynthesis with digital radiography for pediatric spinal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Jenna M.; Elbakri, Idris A.; Reed, Martin; Wrogemann, Jens

    2011-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic quality of digital tomosynthesis (DT) images for pediatric imaging of the spine. We performed a phantom image rating study to assess the visibility of anatomical spinal structures in DT images relative to digital radiography (DR) and computed tomography (CT). We collected DT and DR images of the cervical, thoracic and lumbar spine using anthropomorphic phantoms. Four pediatric radiologists and two residents rated the visibility of structures on the DT image sets compared to DR using a four point scale (0 = not visible; 1 = visible; 2 = superior to DR; 3 = excellent, CT unnecessary). In general, the structures in the spine received ratings between 1 and 3 (cervical), or 2 and 3 (thoracic, lumbar), with a few mixed scores for structures that are usually difficult to see on diagnostic images, such as vertebrae near the cervical-thoracic joint and the apophyseal joints of the lumbar spine. The DT image sets allow most critical structures to be visualized as well or better than DR. When DR imaging is inconclusive, DT is a valuable tool to consider before sending a pediatric patient for a higher-dose CT exam.

  20. Accuracy of food portion size estimation from digital pictures acquired by a chest-worn camera

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Wenyan; Chen, Hsin-Chen; Yue, Yaofeng; Li, Zhaoxin; Fernstrom, John; Bai, Yicheng; Li, Chengliu; Sun, Mingui

    2014-01-01

    Objective Accurate estimation of food portion size is of paramount importance in dietary studies. We have developed a small, chest-worn electronic device called eButton which automatically takes pictures of consumed foods for objective dietary assessment. From the acquired pictures, the food portion size can be calculated semi-automatically with the help of computer software. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the accuracy of the calculated food portion size (volumes) from eButton pictures. Design Participants wore an eButton during their lunch. The volume of food in each eButton picture was calculated using software. For comparison, three raters estimated the food volume by viewing the same picture. The actual volume was determined by physical measurement using seed displacement. Setting Dining room and offices in a research laboratory. Subjects Seven lab member volunteers. Results Images of 100 food samples (fifty Western and fifty Asian foods) were collected and each food volume was estimated from these images using software. The mean relative error between the estimated volume and the actual volume over all the samples was −2.8 % (95 % CI −6.8 %, 1.2%) with SD of 20.4 %. For eighty-five samples, the food volumes determined by computer differed by no more than 30 % from the results of actual physical measurements. When the volume estimates by the computer and raters were compared, the computer estimates showed much less bias and variability. Conclusions From the same eButton pictures, the computer-based method provides more objective and accurate estimates of food volume than the visual estimation method. PMID:24476848

  1. Image manipulation: Fraudulence in digital dental records: Study and review

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhry, Aman; Sircar, Keya; Popli, Deepika Bablani; Tandon, Ankita

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: In present-day times, freely available software allows dentists to tweak their digital records as never before. But, there is a fine line between acceptable enhancements and scientific delinquency. Aims and Objective: To manipulate digital images (used in forensic dentistry) of casts, lip prints, and bite marks in order to highlight tampering techniques and methods of detecting and preventing manipulation of digital images. Materials and Methods: Digital image records of forensic data (casts, lip prints, and bite marks photographed using Samsung Techwin L77 digital camera) were manipulated using freely available software. Results: Fake digital images can be created either by merging two or more digital images, or by altering an existing image. Discussion and Conclusion: Retouched digital images can be used for fraudulent purposes in forensic investigations. However, tools are available to detect such digital frauds, which are extremely difficult to assess visually. Thus, all digital content should mandatorily have attached metadata and preferably watermarking in order to avert their malicious re-use. Also, computer alertness, especially about imaging software's, should be promoted among forensic odontologists/dental professionals. PMID:24696587

  2. Detectability of pulmonary nodules in linearly and logarithmically amplified digital images of the chest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plenkovich, Dinko

    1992-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare detectability of pulmonary nodules in linearly and logarithmically amplified digital images of the chest. One hundred and sixty digital x-ray images of a frozen, unembalmed, human chest phantom with simulated pulmonary nodules were acquired using a 40 cm diameter image intensifier-television camera system. Signal from the video camera was digitized with a frame grabber using MicroVAX 3400 as the host computer. Each of these 160 images was processed using both linear and logarithmic amplification, resulting in 320 digital images of the chest. A free-response receiver operating characteristic (FROC) study was performed in which an experienced radiologist was asked to locate multiple simulated nodules on all 320 digital images and to record one of three levels of confidence for each assumed nodule. For each criterion, the total number of correct responses was divided by the total number of nodules to obtain the ordinate of the point. The total number of false-positive answers generated was divided by the number of images to obtain the abscissa of the point. Examination of FROC curves demonstrated that significantly more mediastinal nodules were identified in logarithmically amplified images.

  3. Digital image-based classification of biodiesel.

    PubMed

    Costa, Gean Bezerra; Fernandes, David Douglas Sousa; Almeida, Valber Elias; Araújo, Thomas Souto Policarpo; Melo, Jessica Priscila; Diniz, Paulo Henrique Gonçalves Dias; Véras, Germano

    2015-07-01

    This work proposes a simple, rapid, inexpensive, and non-destructive methodology based on digital images and pattern recognition techniques for classification of biodiesel according to oil type (cottonseed, sunflower, corn, or soybean). For this, differing color histograms in RGB (extracted from digital images), HSI, Grayscale channels, and their combinations were used as analytical information, which was then statistically evaluated using Soft Independent Modeling by Class Analogy (SIMCA), Partial Least Squares Discriminant Analysis (PLS-DA), and variable selection using the Successive Projections Algorithm associated with Linear Discriminant Analysis (SPA-LDA). Despite good performances by the SIMCA and PLS-DA classification models, SPA-LDA provided better results (up to 95% for all approaches) in terms of accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity for both the training and test sets. The variables selected Successive Projections Algorithm clearly contained the information necessary for biodiesel type classification. This is important since a product may exhibit different properties, depending on the feedstock used. Such variations directly influence the quality, and consequently the price. Moreover, intrinsic advantages such as quick analysis, requiring no reagents, and a noteworthy reduction (the avoidance of chemical characterization) of waste generation, all contribute towards the primary objective of green chemistry. PMID:25882407

  4. On digital image processing technology and application in geometric measure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Jiugen; Xing, Ruonan; Liao, Na

    2014-04-01

    Digital image processing technique is an emerging science that emerging with the development of semiconductor integrated circuit technology and computer science technology since the 1960s.The article introduces the digital image processing technique and principle during measuring compared with the traditional optical measurement method. It takes geometric measure as an example and introduced the development tendency of digital image processing technology from the perspective of technology application.

  5. Fast reconstruction of digital tomosynthesis using on-board images

    SciTech Connect

    Yan Hui; Godfrey, Devon J.; Yin Fangfang

    2008-05-15

    Digital tomosynthesis (DTS) is a method to reconstruct pseudo three-dimensional (3D) volume images from two-dimensional x-ray projections acquired over limited scan angles. Compared with cone-beam computed tomography, which is frequently used for 3D image guided radiation therapy, DTS requires less imaging time and dose. Successful implementation of DTS for fast target localization requires the reconstruction process to be accomplished within tight clinical time constraints (usually within 2 min). To achieve this goal, substantial improvement of reconstruction efficiency is necessary. In this study, a reconstruction process based upon the algorithm proposed by Feldkamp, Davis, and Kress was implemented on graphics hardware for the purpose of acceleration. The performance of the novel reconstruction implementation was tested for phantom and real patient cases. The efficiency of DTS reconstruction was improved by a factor of 13 on average, without compromising image quality. With acceleration of the reconstruction algorithm, the whole DTS generation process including data preprocessing, reconstruction, and DICOM conversion is accomplished within 1.5 min, which ultimately meets clinical requirement for on-line target localization.

  6. Reliability-guided digital image correlation for image deformation measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Pan Bing

    2009-03-10

    A universally applicable reliability-guided digital image correlation (DIC) method is proposed for reliable image deformation measurement. The zero-mean normalized cross correlation (ZNCC) coefficient is used to identify the reliability of the point computed. The correlation calculation begins with a seed point and is then guided by the ZNCC coefficient. That means the neighbors of the point with the highest ZNCC coefficient in a queue for computed points will be processed first. Thus the calculation path is always along the most reliable direction, and possible error propagation of the conventional DIC method can be avoided. The proposed novel DIC method is universally applicable to the images with shadows, discontinuous areas, and deformation discontinuity. Two image pairs were used to evaluate the performance of the proposed technique, and the successful results clearly demonstrate its robustness and effectiveness.

  7. Avoiding Twisted Pixels: Ethical Guidelines for the Appropriate Use and Manipulation of Scientific Digital Images

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Digital imaging has provided scientists with new opportunities to acquire and manipulate data using techniques that were difficult or impossible to employ in the past. Because digital images are easier to manipulate than film images, new problems have emerged. One growing concern in the scientific community is that digital images are not being handled with sufficient care. The problem is twofold: (1) the very small, yet troubling, number of intentional falsifications that have been identified, and (2) the more common unintentional, inappropriate manipulation of images for publication. Journals and professional societies have begun to address the issue with specific digital imaging guidelines. Unfortunately, the guidelines provided often do not come with instructions to explain their importance. Thus they deal with what should or should not be done, but not the associated ‘why’ that is required for understanding the rules. This article proposes 12 guidelines for scientific digital image manipulation and discusses the technical reasons behind these guidelines. These guidelines can be incorporated into lab meetings and graduate student training in order to provoke discussion and begin to bring an end to the culture of “data beautification”. PMID:20567932

  8. Digital image archiving: challenges and choices.

    PubMed

    Dumery, Barbara

    2002-01-01

    In the last five years, imaging exam volume has grown rapidly. In addition to increased image acquisition, there is more patient information per study. RIS-PACS integration and information-rich DICOM headers now provide us with more patient information relative to each study. The volume of archived digital images is increasing and will continue to rise at a steeper incline than film-based storage of the past. Many filmless facilities have been caught off guard by this increase, which has been stimulated by many factors. The most significant factor is investment in new digital and DICOM-compliant modalities. A huge volume driver is the increase in images per study from multi-slice technology. Storage requirements also are affected by disaster recovery initiatives and state retention mandates. This burgeoning rate of imaging data volume presents many challenges: cost of ownership, data accessibility, storage media obsolescence, database considerations, physical limitations, reliability and redundancy. There are two basic approaches to archiving--single tier and multi-tier. Each has benefits. With a single-tier approach, all the data is stored on a single media that can be accessed very quickly. A redundant copy of the data is then stored onto another less expensive media. This is usually a removable media. In this approach, the on-line storage is increased incrementally as volume grows. In a multi-tier approach, storage levels are set up based on access speed and cost. In other words, all images are stored at the deepest archiving level, which is also the least expensive. Images are stored on or moved back to the intermediate and on-line levels if they will need to be accessed more quickly. It can be difficult to decide what the best approach is for your organization. The options include RAIDs (redundant array of independent disks), direct attached RAID storage (DAS), network storage using RAIDs (NAS and SAN), removable media such as different types of tape, compact

  9. A protocol-based evaluation of medical image digitizers.

    PubMed

    Efstathopoulos, E P; Costaridou, L; Kocsis, O; Panayiotakis, G

    2001-09-01

    Medical film digitizers play an important transitory role as digital-to-analogue bridges in radiology. Their use requires performance evaluation to assure medical image quality. A complete quality control protocol is presented, based on a set of test objects adaptable to the specification of various digitizers. The protocol includes parameters such as uniformity, input-output response, noise, geometric distortion, spatial resolution, low contrast discrimination, film slippage and light leakage, as well as associated measurement methods. The applicability of the protocol is demonstrated with two types of medical film digitizers; a charge-coupled device (CCD) digitizer and a laser digitizer. The potential value of the protocol is also discussed. PMID:11560833

  10. Classroom multispectral imaging using inexpensive digital cameras.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortes, A. D.

    2007-12-01

    The proliferation of increasingly cheap digital cameras in recent years means that it has become easier to exploit the broad wavelength sensitivity of their CCDs (360 - 1100 nm) for classroom-based teaching. With the right tools, it is possible to open children's eyes to the invisible world of UVA and near-IR radiation either side of our narrow visual band. The camera-filter combinations I describe can be used to explore the world of animal vision, looking for invisible markings on flowers, or in bird plumage, for example. In combination with a basic spectroscope (such as the Project-STAR handheld plastic spectrometer, 25), it is possible to investigate the range of human vision and camera sensitivity, and to explore the atomic and molecular absorption lines from the solar and terrestrial atmospheres. My principal use of the cameras has been to teach multispectral imaging of the kind used to determine remotely the composition of planetary surfaces. A range of camera options, from 50 circuit-board mounted CCDs up to $900 semi-pro infrared camera kits (including mobile phones along the way), and various UV-vis-IR filter options will be presented. Examples of multispectral images taken with these systems are used to illustrate the range of classroom topics that can be covered. Particular attention is given to learning about spectral reflectance curves and comparing images from Earth and Mars taken using the same filter combination that it used on the Mars Rovers.

  11. Counterfeit deterrence and digital imaging technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Church, Sara E.; Fuller, Reese H.; Jaffe, Annette B.; Pagano, Lorelei W.

    2000-04-01

    The US government recognizes the growing problem of counterfeiting currency using digital imaging technology, as desktop systems become more sophisticated, less expensive and more prevalent. As the rate of counterfeiting with this type of equipment has grown, the need for specific prevention methods has become apparent to the banknote authorities. As a result, the Treasury Department and Federal Reserve have begun to address issues related specifically to this type of counterfeiting. The technical representatives of these agencies are taking a comprehensive approach to minimize counterfeiting using digital technology. This approach includes identification of current technology solutions for banknote recognition, data stream intervention and output marking, outreach to the hardware and software industries and enhancement of public education efforts. Other aspects include strong support and cooperation with existing international efforts to prevent counterfeiting, review and amendment of existing anti- counterfeiting legislation and investigation of currency design techniques to make faithful reproduction more difficult. Implementation of these steps and others are to lead to establishment of a formal, permanent policy to address and prevent the use of emerging technologies to counterfeit currency.

  12. Multispectral imaging for digital painting analysis: a Gauguin case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornelis, Bruno; Dooms, Ann; Leen, Frederik; Munteanu, Adrian; Schelkens, Peter

    2010-08-01

    This paper is an introduction into the analysis of multispectral recordings of paintings. First, we will give an overview of the advantages of multispectral image analysis over more traditional techniques: first of all, the bands residing in the visible domain provide an accurate measurement of the color information which can be used for analysis but also for conservational and archival purposes (i.e. preserving the art patrimonial by making a digital library). Secondly, inspection of the multispectral imagery by art experts and art conservators has shown that combining the information present in the spectral bands residing in- and outside the visible domain can lead to a richer analysis of paintings. In the remainder of the paper, practical applications of multispectral analysis are demonstrated, where we consider the acquisition of thirteen different, high resolution spectral bands. Nine of these reside in the visible domain, one in the near ultraviolet and three in the infrared. The paper will illustrate the promising future of multispectral analysis as a non-invasive tool for acquiring data which cannot be acquired by visual inspection alone and which is highly relevant to art preservation, authentication and restoration. The demonstrated applications include detection of restored areas and detection of aging cracks.

  13. Imaging of community-acquired pneumonia: Roles of imaging examinations, imaging diagnosis of specific pathogens and discrimination from noninfectious diseases

    PubMed Central

    Nambu, Atsushi; Ozawa, Katsura; Kobayashi, Noriko; Tago, Masao

    2014-01-01

    This article reviews roles of imaging examinations in the management of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), imaging diagnosis of specific CAP and discrimination between CAP and noninfectious diseases. Chest radiography is usually enough to confirm the diagnosis of CAP, whereas computed tomography is required to suggest specific pathogens and to discriminate from noninfectious diseases. Mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia, tuberculosis, Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia and some cases of viral pneumonia sometimes show specific imaging findings. Peribronchial nodules, especially tree-in-bud appearance, are fairly specific for infection. Evidences of organization, such as concavity of the opacities, traction bronchiectasis, visualization of air bronchograms over the entire length of the bronchi, or mild parenchymal distortion are suggestive of organizing pneumonia. We will introduce tips to effectively make use of imaging examinations in the management of CAP. PMID:25349662

  14. On imaging with or without grid in digital mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Han; Danielsson, Mats; Cederström, Björn

    2014-03-01

    The grids used in digital mammography to reduce scattered radiation from the breast are not perfect and lead to partial absorption of primary radiation at the same time as not all of the scattered radiation is absorbed. It has therefore lately been suggested to remove the grids and correct for effects of scattered radiation by post- processing the images. In this paper, we investigated the dose reduction that might be achieved if the gird were to be removed. Dose reduction is determined as a function of PMMA thickness by comparing the contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs) of images acquired with and without grid at a constant exposure. We used a theoretical model validated with Monte Carlo simulations and phantom studies. To evaluate the CNR, we applied aluminum filters of two different sizes, 4x8 cm2 and 1x1 cm2. When the large Al filter was used, the resulting CNR value for the grid-less images was overestimated as a result of a difference in amount of scattered radiation in the background region and of the region covered by the filter, a difference that could be eliminated by selecting a region of interest close to the edge of the filter. The optimal CNR when the PMMA thickness was above about 4 cm was obtained with a grid, whereas removing the grid leaded to a dose saving in thinner PMMAs. The results suggest not removing grids in breast cancer screening.

  15. FISH digital imaging microscopy in mosquito genomics.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, M L; Brown, S E; Knudson, D L

    1996-03-01

    The yellow fever mosquito, Aedes aegypti, transmits pathogens that affect both humans and livestock, and has been the focus of extensive research to identify genetic loci that may be useful in control strategies. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and digital imaging microscopy have provided a rapid mechanism to populate the physical map with probes derived from genetic markers, cDNAs and recombinant genomic libraries. When the physical and genetic linkage maps are aligned, map-based cloning will allow the rapid isolation of target genomic sequences. The strategy of FISH mapping and the results of initial hybridization studies are reviewed here by Martin Ferguson, Susan Brown and Dennis Knudson. An Ae. aegypti-specific genomic database, which collates data from mapping studies, sequences, references and other relevant information, is also discussed. PMID:15275237

  16. Advanced digital detectors for neutron imaging.

    SciTech Connect

    Doty, F. Patrick

    2003-12-01

    Neutron interrogation provides unique information valuable for Nonproliferation & Materials Control and other important applications including medicine, airport security, protein crystallography, and corrosion detection. Neutrons probe deep inside massive objects to detect small defects and chemical composition, even through high atomic number materials such as lead. However, current detectors are bulky gas-filled tubes or scintillator/PM tubes, which severely limit many applications. Therefore this project was undertaken to develop new semiconductor radiation detection materials to develop the first direct digital imaging detectors for neutrons. The approach relied on new discovery and characterization of new solid-state sensor materials which convert neutrons directly to electronic signals via reactions BlO(n,a)Li7 and Li6(n,a)T.

  17. Improvement of the detection rate in digital watermarked images against image degradation caused by image processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishio, Masato; Ando, Yutaka; Tsukamoto, Nobuhiro; Kawashima, Hironao; Nakamura, Shinya

    2004-04-01

    In the current environment of medical information disclosure, the general-purpose image format such as JPEG/BMP which does not require special software for viewing, is suitable for carrying and managing medical image information individually. These formats have no way to know patient and study information. We have therefore developed two kinds of ID embedding methods: one is Bit-swapping method for embedding Alteration detection ID and the other is data-imposing method in Fourier domain using Discrete Cosine Transform (DCT) for embedding Original image source ID. We then applied these two digital watermark methods to four modality images (Chest X-ray, Head CT, Abdomen CT, Bone scintigraphy). However, there were some cases where the digital watermarked ID could not be detected correctly due to image degradation caused by image processing. In this study, we improved the detection rate in digital watermarked image using several techniques, which are Error correction method, Majority correction method, and Scramble location method. We applied these techniques to digital watermarked images against image processing (Smoothing) and evaluated the effectiveness. As a result, Majority correction method is effective to improve the detection rate in digital watermarked image against image degradation.

  18. Image resolution in the digital era: notion and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Rakhshan, Vahid

    2014-12-01

    Digital radiographs need additional metadata in order to be accurate when being converted to analog media. Resolution is a major reason of failures in proper printing or digitizing the images. This letter shortly explains the overlooked pitfalls of digital radiography and photography in dental practice, and briefly instructs the reader how to avoid or rectify common problems associated with resolution calibration of digital radiographs. PMID:25469352

  19. X-ray imaging using digital cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winch, Nicola M.; Edgar, Andrew

    2012-03-01

    The possibility of using the combination of a computed radiography (storage phosphor) cassette and a semiprofessional grade digital camera for medical or dental radiography is investigated. We compare the performance of (i) a Canon 5D Mk II single lens reflex camera with f1.4 lens and full-frame CMOS array sensor and (ii) a cooled CCD-based camera with a 1/3 frame sensor and the same lens system. Both systems are tested with 240 x 180 mm cassettes which are based on either powdered europium-doped barium fluoride bromide or needle structure europium-doped cesium bromide. The modulation transfer function for both systems has been determined and falls to a value of 0.2 at around 2 lp/mm, and is limited by light scattering of the emitted light from the storage phosphor rather than the optics or sensor pixelation. The modulation transfer function for the CsBr:Eu2+ plate is bimodal, with a high frequency wing which is attributed to the light-guiding behaviour of the needle structure. The detective quantum efficiency has been determined using a radioisotope source and is comparatively low at 0.017 for the CMOS camera and 0.006 for the CCD camera, attributed to the poor light harvesting by the lens. The primary advantages of the method are portability, robustness, digital imaging and low cost; the limitations are the low detective quantum efficiency and hence signal-to-noise ratio for medical doses, and restricted range of plate sizes. Representative images taken with medical doses are shown and illustrate the potential use for portable basic radiography.

  20. [Development of a digital EEG signal acquiring system based on virtual instrument technology].

    PubMed

    Ying, Jun; Chen, Guang-Fei; He, Shi-Lin

    2009-09-01

    This paper introduces an 16-lead digital EEG signal acquisition system, which applies MCU MSP430 as central control unit with high performance analog devices and high speed multi-channel, multi-bit analog-to-digital converter as peripheral to retrench analog circuit. Data is transferred to PC by USART interface. Software on PC based on virtual instrument technology realizes real-time detection, display and storage. The system has many advantages such as high precision, stable performance, small volume and low power dissipation, thus provides a new means for digital EEG signal acquisition. PMID:20073237

  1. Digital camera with apparatus for authentication of images produced from an image file

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedman, Gary L. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A digital camera equipped with a processor for authentication of images produced from an image file taken by the digital camera is provided. The digital camera processor has embedded therein a private key unique to it, and the camera housing has a public key that is so uniquely based upon the private key that digital data encrypted with the private key by the processor may be decrypted using the public key. The digital camera processor comprises means for calculating a hash of the image file using a predetermined algorithm, and second means for encrypting the image hash with the private key, thereby producing a digital signature. The image file and the digital signature are stored in suitable recording means so they will be available together. Apparatus for authenticating at any time the image file as being free of any alteration uses the public key for decrypting the digital signature, thereby deriving a secure image hash identical to the image hash produced by the digital camera and used to produce the digital signature. The apparatus calculates from the image file an image hash using the same algorithm as before. By comparing this last image hash with the secure image hash, authenticity of the image file is determined if they match, since even one bit change in the image hash will cause the image hash to be totally different from the secure hash.

  2. Digital Archival Image Collections: Who Are the Users?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herold, Irene M. H.

    2010-01-01

    Archival digital image collections are a relatively new phenomenon in college library archives. Digitizing archival image collections may make them accessible to users worldwide. There has been no study to explore whether collections on the Internet lead to users who are beyond the institution or a comparison of users to a national or…

  3. User-Driven Planning for Digital-Image Delivery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pisciotta, Henry; Halm, Michael J.; Dooris, Michael J.

    2006-01-01

    This article draws on two projects funded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation concerning the ways colleges and universities can support the legitimate sharing of digital learning resources for scholarly use. The 2001-03 Visual Image User Study (VIUS) assessed the scholarly needs of digital image users-faculty, staff, and students. That study led to…

  4. Hounsfield unit recovery in clinical cone beam CT images of the thorax acquired for image guided radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Thing, Rune Slot; Bernchou, Uffe; Mainegra-Hing, Ernesto; Hansen, Olfred; Brink, Carsten

    2016-08-01

    A comprehensive artefact correction method for clinical cone beam CT (CBCT) images acquired for image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) on a commercial system is presented. The method is demonstrated to reduce artefacts and recover CT-like Hounsfield units (HU) in reconstructed CBCT images of five lung cancer patients. Projection image based artefact corrections of image lag, detector scatter, body scatter and beam hardening are described and applied to CBCT images of five lung cancer patients. Image quality is evaluated through visual appearance of the reconstructed images, HU-correspondence with the planning CT images, and total volume HU error. Artefacts are reduced and CT-like HUs are recovered in the artefact corrected CBCT images. Visual inspection confirms that artefacts are indeed suppressed by the proposed method, and the HU root mean square difference between reconstructed CBCTs and the reference CT images are reduced by 31% when using the artefact corrections compared to the standard clinical CBCT reconstruction. A versatile artefact correction method for clinical CBCT images acquired for IGRT has been developed. HU values are recovered in the corrected CBCT images. The proposed method relies on post processing of clinical projection images, and does not require patient specific optimisation. It is thus a powerful tool for image quality improvement of large numbers of CBCT images. PMID:27405692

  5. Hounsfield unit recovery in clinical cone beam CT images of the thorax acquired for image guided radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slot Thing, Rune; Bernchou, Uffe; Mainegra-Hing, Ernesto; Hansen, Olfred; Brink, Carsten

    2016-08-01

    A comprehensive artefact correction method for clinical cone beam CT (CBCT) images acquired for image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) on a commercial system is presented. The method is demonstrated to reduce artefacts and recover CT-like Hounsfield units (HU) in reconstructed CBCT images of five lung cancer patients. Projection image based artefact corrections of image lag, detector scatter, body scatter and beam hardening are described and applied to CBCT images of five lung cancer patients. Image quality is evaluated through visual appearance of the reconstructed images, HU-correspondence with the planning CT images, and total volume HU error. Artefacts are reduced and CT-like HUs are recovered in the artefact corrected CBCT images. Visual inspection confirms that artefacts are indeed suppressed by the proposed method, and the HU root mean square difference between reconstructed CBCTs and the reference CT images are reduced by 31% when using the artefact corrections compared to the standard clinical CBCT reconstruction. A versatile artefact correction method for clinical CBCT images acquired for IGRT has been developed. HU values are recovered in the corrected CBCT images. The proposed method relies on post processing of clinical projection images, and does not require patient specific optimisation. It is thus a powerful tool for image quality improvement of large numbers of CBCT images.

  6. Imaging properties of digital magnification radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Boyce, Sarah J.; Samei, Ehsan

    2006-04-15

    Flat panel detectors exhibit improved signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and display capabilities compared to film. This improvement necessitates a new evaluation of optimal geometry for conventional projection imaging applications such as digital projection mammography as well as for advanced x-ray imaging applications including cone-beam computed tomography (CT), tomosynthesis, and mammotomography. Such an evaluation was undertaken in this study to examine the effects of x-ray source distribution, inherent detector resolution, magnification, scatter rejection, and noise characteristics including noise aliasing. A model for x-ray image acquisition was used to develop generic results applicable to flat panel detectors with similar x-ray absorption characteristics. The model assumed a Gaussian distribution for the focal spot and a rectangular distribution for a pixel. A generic model for the modulated transfer function (MTF) of indirect flat panel detectors was derived by a nonlinear fit of empirical receptor data to the Burgess model for phosphor MTFs. Noise characteristics were investigated using a generic noise power spectrum (NPS) model for indirect phosphor-based detectors. The detective quantum efficiency (DQE) was then calculated from the MTF and NPS models. The results were examined as a function of focal spot size (0.1, 0.3, and 0.6 mm) and pixel size (50, 100, 150, and 200 {mu}m) for magnification ranges 1 to 3. Mammography, general radiography (also applicable to mammotomography), and chest radiography applications were explored using x-ray energies of 28, 74, and 120 kVp, respectively. Nodule detection was examined using the effective point source scatter model, effective DQE, and the Hotelling SNR{sup 2} efficiency. Results indicate that magnification can potentially improve the signal and noise performance of digital images. Results also show that a cross over point occurs in the spatial frequency above and below which the effects of magnification differ

  7. Imaging properties of digital magnification radiography.

    PubMed

    Boyce, Sarah J; Samei, Ehsan

    2006-04-01

    Flat panel detectors exhibit improved signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and display capabilities compared to film. This improvement necessitates a new evaluation of optimal geometry for conventional projection imaging applications such as digital projection mammography as well as for advanced x-ray imaging applications including cone-beam computed tomography (CT), tomosynthesis, and mammotomography. Such an evaluation was undertaken in this study to examine the effects of x-ray source distribution, inherent detector resolution, magnification, scatter rejection, and noise characteristics including noise aliasing. A model for x-ray image acquisition was used to develop generic results applicable to flat panel detectors with similar x-ray absorption characteristics. The model assumed a Gaussian distribution for the focal spot and a rectangular distribution for a pixel. A generic model for the modulated transfer function (MTF) of indirect flat panel detectors was derived by a nonlinear fit of empirical receptor data to the Burgess model for phosphor MTFs. Noise characteristics were investigated using a generic noise power spectrum (NPS) model for indirect phosphor-based detectors. The detective quantum efficiency (DQE) was then calculated from the MTF and NPS models. The results were examined as a function of focal spot size (0.1, 0.3, and 0.6 mm) and pixel size (50, 100, 150, and 200 microm) for magnification ranges 1 to 3. Mammography, general radiography (also applicable to mammotomography), and chest radiography applications were explored using x-ray energies of 28, 74, and 120 kVp, respectively. Nodule detection was examined using the effective point source scatter model, effective DQE, and the Hotelling SNR2 efficiency. Results indicate that magnification can potentially improve the signal and noise performance of digital images. Results also show that a cross over point occurs in the spatial frequency above and below which the effects of magnification differ

  8. [Digital oral-maxillofacial imaging: present and future].

    PubMed

    Li, G; Yu, Q

    2016-04-01

    Digital imaging has been widely used in the field of oral and maxillofacial radiology. The present work summarizes the use of digital imaging from the following aspects: ①The origin of digital oral and maxillofacial imaging; ②The influence of digital imaging on the work mode and work flow of oral and maxillofacial radiology; ③ Application of picture archiving and communication system(PACS)in oral and maxillofacial radiology; ④The influence of three dimensional medical data sets on diagnosis, prognosis and treatment plan; ⑤Digital imaging facilitates the development of telemedicine and internet-medicine; ⑥The significance of establishing a medical database or data center; ⑦Problems and challenges. PMID:27117210

  9. Geometric processing of digital images of the planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, Kathleen

    1987-01-01

    New procedures and software have been developed for geometric transformation of images to support digital cartography of the planets. The procedures involve the correction of spacecraft camera orientation of each image with the use of ground control and the transformation of each image to a Sinusoidal Equal-Area map projection with an algorithm which allows the number of transformation calculations to vary as the distortion varies within the image. When the distortion is low in an area of an image, few transformation computations are required, and most pixels can be interpolated. When distortion is extreme, the location of each pixel is computed. Mosaics are made of these images and stored as digital databases. Completed Sinusoidal databases may be used for digital analysis and registration with other spatial data. They may also be reproduced as published image maps by digitally transforming them to appropriate map projections.

  10. Digital image fusion systems: color imaging and low-light targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estrera, Joseph P.

    2009-05-01

    This paper presents digital image fusion (enhanced A+B) systems in color imaging and low light target applications. This paper will discuss first the digital sensors that are utilized in the noted image fusion applications which is a 1900x1086 (high definition format) CMOS imager coupled to a Generation III image intensifier for the visible/near infrared (NIR) digital sensor and 320x240 or 640x480 uncooled microbolometer thermal imager for the long wavelength infrared (LWIR) digital sensor. Performance metrics for these digital imaging sensors will be presented. The digital image fusion (enhanced A+B) process will be presented in context of early fused night vision systems such as the digital image fused system (DIFS) and the digital enhanced night vision goggle and later, the long range digitally fused night vision sighting system. Next, this paper will discuss the effects of user display color in a dual color digital image fusion system. Dual color image fusion schemes such as Green/Red, Cyan/Yellow, and White/Blue for image intensifier and thermal infrared sensor color representation, respectively, are discussed. Finally, this paper will present digitally fused imagery and image analysis of long distance targets in low light from these digital fused systems. The result of this image analysis with enhanced A+B digital image fusion systems is that maximum contrast and spatial resolution is achieved in a digital fusion mode as compared to individual sensor modalities in low light, long distance imaging applications. Paper has been cleared by DoD/OSR for Public Release under Ref: 08-S-2183 on August 8, 2008.

  11. System for objective assessment of image differences in digital cinema

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fliegel, Karel; Krasula, Lukáš; Páta, Petr; Myslík, Jiří; Pecák, Josef; Jícha, Marek

    2014-09-01

    There is high demand for quick digitization and subsequent image restoration of archived film records. Digitization is very urgent in many cases because various invaluable pieces of cultural heritage are stored on aging media. Only selected records can be reconstructed perfectly using painstaking manual or semi-automatic procedures. This paper aims to answer the question what are the quality requirements on the restoration process in order to obtain acceptably close visual perception of the digitally restored film in comparison to the original analog film copy. This knowledge is very important to preserve the original artistic intention of the movie producers. Subjective experiment with artificially distorted images has been conducted in order to answer the question what is the visual impact of common image distortions in digital cinema. Typical color and contrast distortions were introduced and test images were presented to viewers using digital projector. Based on the outcome of this subjective evaluation a system for objective assessment of image distortions has been developed and its performance tested. The system utilizes calibrated digital single-lens reflex camera and subsequent analysis of suitable features of images captured from the projection screen. The evaluation of captured image data has been optimized in order to obtain predicted differences between the reference and distorted images while achieving high correlation with the results of subjective assessment. The system can be used to objectively determine the difference between analog film and digital cinema images on the projection screen.

  12. Digital Camera with Apparatus for Authentication of Images Produced from an Image File

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedman, Gary L. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A digital camera equipped with a processor for authentication of images produced from an image file taken by the digital camera is provided. The digital camera processor has embedded therein a private key unique to it, and the camera housing has a public key that is so uniquely related to the private key that digital data encrypted with the private key may be decrypted using the public key. The digital camera processor comprises means for calculating a hash of the image file using a predetermined algorithm, and second means for encrypting the image hash with the private key, thereby producing a digital signature. The image file and the digital signature are stored in suitable recording means so they will be available together. Apparatus for authenticating the image file as being free of any alteration uses the public key for decrypting the digital signature, thereby deriving a secure image hash identical to the image hash produced by the digital camera and used to produce the digital signature. The authenticating apparatus calculates from the image file an image hash using the same algorithm as before. By comparing this last image hash with the secure image hash, authenticity of the image file is determined if they match. Other techniques to address time-honored methods of deception, such as attaching false captions or inducing forced perspectives, are included.

  13. RADIOPACITY OF RESTORATIVE MATERIALS USING DIGITAL IMAGES

    PubMed Central

    Salzedas, Leda Maria Pescinini; Louzada, Mário Jefferson Quirino; de Oliveira, Antonio Braz

    2006-01-01

    The radiopacity of esthetic restorative materials has been established as an important requirement, improving the radiographic diagnosis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the radiopacity of six restorative materials using a direct digital image system, comparing them to the dental tissues (enamel-dentin), expressed as equivalent thickness of aluminum (millimeters of aluminum). Five specimens of each material were made. Three 2-mm thick longitudinal sections were cut from an intact extracted permanent molar tooth (including enamel and dentin). An aluminum step wedge with 9 steps was used. The samples of different materials were placed on a phosphor plate together with a tooth section, aluminum step wedge and metal code letter, and were exposed using a dental x-ray unit. Five measurements of radiographic density were obtained from each image of each item assessed (restorative material, enamel, dentin, each step of the aluminum step wedge) and the mean of these values was calculated. Radiopacity values were subsequently calculated as equivalents of aluminum thickness. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) indicated significant differences in radiopacity values among the materials (P<0.0001). The radiopacity values of the restorative materials evaluated were, in decreasing order: TPH, F2000, Synergy, Prisma Flow, Degufill, Luxat. Only Luxat had significantly lower radiopacity values than dentin. One material (Degufill) had similar radiopacity values to enamel and four (TPH, F2000, Synergy and Prisma Flow) had significantly higher radiopacity values than enamel. In conclusion, to assess the adequacy of posterior composite restorations it is important that the restorative material to be used has enough radiopacity, in order to be easily distinguished from the tooth structure in the radiographic image. Knowledge on the radiopacity of different materials helps professionals to select the most suitable material, along with other properties such as biocompatibility, adhesion and

  14. Chest radiographic image quality: comparison of asymmetric screen-film, digital storage phosphor, and digital selenium drum systems--preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Beute, G H; Flynn, M J; Eyler, W R; Samei, E; Spizarny, D L; Zylak, C J

    1998-01-01

    Conventional screen-film radiography does not display all regions of the thorax satisfactorily. Three chest radiographic techniques display both the lung and the mediastinum with good contrast. These techniques are asymmetric screen-film (ASF), digital storage phosphor (DSP), and digital selenium drum (DSD) imaging. ASF systems use two asymmetric screen-film combinations to produce a wide-latitude image of the thorax with good contrast in the lungs. In DSP systems, image data are acquired digitally with a wide dynamic range by using the optical output of a photostimulable phosphor plate; in DSD systems, the wide-range digital image data are acquired by using the electronic charge generated on a drum coated with a thin layer of amorphous selenium. The appearance of a DSP or DSD radiograph is then determined by user-selected image processing operations: tone scaling, spatial frequency processing, and dynamic range compensation. Digital chest radiographs processed with strong regional equalization provide both excellent contrast in the lungs and effective display of the mediastinum and chest wall. At visual comparison, the high lung contrast and good mediastinal, retrocardiac, and subdiaphragmatic detail provided by the DSD method distinguish it from the other two methods. PMID:9599395

  15. Image quality requirements for the digitization of photographic collections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frey, Franziska S.; Suesstrunk, Sabine E.

    1996-02-01

    Managers of photographic collections in libraries and archives are exploring digital image database systems, but they usually have few sources of technical guidance and analysis available. Correctly digitizing photographs puts high demands on the imaging system and the human operators involved in the task. Pictures are very dense with information, requiring high-quality scanning procedures. In order to provide advice to libraries and archives seeking to digitize photographic collections, it is necessary to thoroughly understand the nature of the various originals and the purposes for digitization. Only with this understanding is it possible to choose adequate image quality for the digitization process. The higher the quality, the more expertise, time, and cost is likely to be involved in generating and delivering the image. Despite all the possibilities for endless copying, distributing, and manipulating of digital images, image quality choices made when the files are first created have the same 'finality' that they have in conventional photography. They will have a profound effect on project cost, the value of the final project to researchers, and the usefulness of the images as preservation surrogates. Image quality requirements therefore have to be established carefully before a digitization project starts.

  16. Digital imaging with solid state x-ray image intensifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damento, Michael A.; Radspinner, Rachel; Roehrig, Hans

    1999-10-01

    X-ray cameras in which a CCD is lens coupled to a large phosphor screen are known to suffer from a loss of x-ray signal due to poor light collection from conventional phosphors, making them unsuitable for most medical imaging applications. By replacing the standard phosphor with a solid-state image intensifier, it may be possible to improve the signal-to-noise ratio of the images produced with these cameras. The solid-state x-ray image intensifier is a multi- layer device in which a photoconductor layer controls the light output from an electroluminescent phosphor layer. While prototype devices have been used for direct viewing and video imaging, they are only now being evaluated in a digital imaging system. In the present work, the preparation and evaluation of intensifiers with a 65 mm square format are described. The intensifiers are prepared by screen- printing or doctor blading the following layers onto an ITO coated glass substrate: ZnS phosphor, opaque layer, CdS photoconductor, and carbon conductor. The total thickness of the layers is approximately 350 micrometers , 350 VAC at 400 Hz is applied to the device for operation. For a given x-ray dose, the intensifiers produce up to three times the intensity (after background subtracting) of Lanex Fast Front screens. X-ray images produced with the present intensifiers are somewhat noisy and their resolution is about half that of Lanex screens. Modifications are suggested which could improve the resolution and noise of the intensifiers.

  17. A stationary digital breast tomosynthesis system: Design simulation, characterization and image reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajaram, Ramya

    Conventional screen-film and/or digital mammography, despite being the most popular breast imaging modalities, suffer from certain limitations, most important of which is tissue overlap and false diagnoses arising thereof. A new three-dimensional alternative for breast cancer screening and diagnosis is tomosynthesis in which a limited number of low-dose two-dimensional projection images of a patient are used to reconstruct the three-dimensional tissue information. The tomosynthesis systems currently under development all incorporate an x-ray source that moves over a certain angle to acquire images. This tube motion is a major limitation because it degrades image quality, increases the scan time and causes prolonged patient discomfort. The availability of independently controllable carbon nanotube cathodes enabled us to explore the possibility of setting up a stationary multi-beam imaging system. In this dissertation we have proposed a stationary digital breast tomosynthesis scanner using spatially distributed carbon nanotube based field emission x-ray sources. We have presented details about the design, set-up, characterization and image reconstruction of the completely stationary digital breast tomosynthesis system. This system has the potential to reduce the total scan time and improve the image quality in breast imaging. Extensive design simulation results have been used to decide on the final system set-up. The fully assembled actual experimental system is capable of acquiring all the images in as little as eight seconds and yield superior image quality as well. The system has been completely characterized in terms of focal spot size, system resolution and geometric calibration. Certain important results have been obtained during the process that we hope will set the standard for the characterization of the future systems. A novel iterative reconstruction algorithm has been tried on the projection images obtained from the tomosynthesis system. Our algorithm has

  18. Digital document imaging systems: An overview and guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    This is an aid to NASA managers in planning the selection of a Digital Document Imaging System (DDIS) as a possible solution for document information processing and storage. Intended to serve as a manager's guide, this document contains basic information on digital imaging systems, technology, equipment standards, issues of interoperability and interconnectivity, and issues related to selecting appropriate imaging equipment based upon well defined needs.

  19. Digital image classification by the Bessel masks methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solorza, S.; Álvarez-Borrego, J.

    2014-10-01

    Since the evolution of the computer's hardware in the middle of last century, the automatization processes are very productive in fields such as industry, security, engineering and science. In this work a pattern recognition methodology to classified images is presented. Here, the Bessel masks digital image system invariant to position and rotation is utilized to classified gray-scale images. Moreover, by the use of the Fisher's Z distribution the digital system get a 99% confidence level performance.

  20. A technique for image encryption using digital signature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Aloka; Singh, Kehar

    2003-04-01

    We propose a new technique to encrypt an image for secure image transmission. The digital signature of the original image is added to the encoded version of the original image. The encoding of the image is done using an appropriate error control code, such as a Bose-Chaudhuri Hochquenghem (BCH) code. At the receiver end, after the decryption of the image, the digital signature can be used to verify the authenticity of the image. Detailed simulations have been carried out to test the encryption technique. An optical correlator, in either the JTC or the VanderLugt geometry, or a digital correlation technique, can be used to verify the authenticity of the decrypted image.

  1. Seeking the Green Basilisk Lizard: Acquiring Digital Literacy Practices in the Home

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davidson, Christina

    2012-01-01

    Research confirms that young children engage in digital literacy practices in the home. While there is an emerging body of work that documents the diversity of these practices, there is little research that examines their acquisition in situ. This article uses conversation analysis to describe and explicate the social accomplishment of a number of…

  2. Precision Agriculture: Using Low-Cost Systems to Acquire Low-Altitude Images.

    PubMed

    Ponti, Moacir; Chaves, Arthur A; Jorge, Fabio R; Costa, Gabriel B P; Colturato, Adimara; Branco, Kalinka R L J C

    2016-01-01

    Low cost remote sensing imagery has the potential to make precision farming feasible in developing countries. In this article, the authors describe image acquisition from eucalyptus, bean, and sugarcane crops acquired by low-cost and low-altitude systems. They use different approaches to handle low-altitude images in both the RGB and NIR (near-infrared) bands to estimate and quantify plantation areas. PMID:27514030

  3. Multitemporal burnt area detection methods based on a couple of images acquired after the fire event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlà, R.; Santurri, L.; Bonora, L.; Conese, C.

    2009-09-01

    Fire detection methods based on remote sensing data are gaining more and more attention among the scientific community, and many algorithms have been developed for this purpose. In order to assess the location and the characteristics of burned areas, some of them apply a suitable threshold to a multispectral index such as the NBR (Noise Burn Ratio) index or the NDII (Normalized Difference Infrared Index) evaluated on a single image acquired after the fire season. Other methods use a multitemporal approach based on the processing of a couple of images, the former acquired before and the latter after the fire season, and applying a chosen threshold to the differential value of the same, or other multispectral indexes. This paper focuses the problem of assessing the performance of some burnt areas detection methods based on a couple of satellite images acquired both after the fire season. In particular the threshold method applied to the differential form of the NDII and NDVI (Normalized Differential Vegetation Index) are considered as concern their capacity of locating or detecting (not characterizing) burnt areas and the resulting performances are evaluated and compared with the corresponding ones of the same methods applied to a single image only, acquired after the fire season.

  4. Developing tools for digital radar image data evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Domik, G.; Leberl, F.; Raggam, J.

    1986-01-01

    The refinement of radar image analysis methods has led to a need for a systems approach to radar image processing software. Developments stimulated through satellite radar are combined with standard image processing techniques to create a user environment to manipulate and analyze airborne and satellite radar images. One aim is to create radar products for the user from the original data to enhance the ease of understanding the contents. The results are called secondary image products and derive from the original digital images. Another aim is to support interactive SAR image analysis. Software methods permit use of a digital height model to create ortho images, synthetic images, stereo-ortho images, radar maps or color combinations of different component products. Efforts are ongoing to integrate individual tools into a combined hardware/software environment for interactive radar image analysis.

  5. Digital Image Correlation for Performance Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palaviccini, Miguel; Turner, Dan; Herzberg, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Evaluating the health of a mechanism requires more than just a binary evaluation of whether an operation was completed. It requires analyzing more comprehensive, full-field data. Health monitoring is a process of non-destructively identifying characteristics that indicate the fitness of an engineered component. In order to monitor unit health in a production setting, an automated test system must be created to capture the motion of mechanism parts in a real-time and non-intrusive manner. One way to accomplish this is by using high-speed video and Digital Image Correlation (DIC). In this approach, individual frames of the video are analyzed to track the motion of mechanism components. The derived performance metrics allow for state-of-health monitoring and improved fidelity of mechanism modeling. The results are in-situ state-of-health identification and performance prediction. This paper introduces basic concepts of this test method, and discusses two main themes: the use of laser marking to add fiducial patterns to mechanism components, and new software developed to track objects with complex shapes, even as they move behind obstructions. Finally, the implementation of these tests into an automated tester is discussed.

  6. Applications of digital image acquisition in anthropometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woolford, B.; Lewis, J. L.

    1981-01-01

    A description is given of a video kinesimeter, a device for the automatic real-time collection of kinematic and dynamic data. Based on the detection of a single bright spot by three TV cameras, the system provides automatic real-time recording of three-dimensional position and force data. It comprises three cameras, two incandescent lights, a voltage comparator circuit, a central control unit, and a mass storage device. The control unit determines the signal threshold for each camera before testing, sequences the lights, synchronizes and analyzes the scan voltages from the three cameras, digitizes force from a dynamometer, and codes the data for transmission to a floppy disk for recording. Two of the three cameras face each other along the 'X' axis; the third camera, which faces the center of the line between the first two, defines the 'Y' axis. An image from the 'Y' camera and either 'X' camera is necessary for determining the three-dimensional coordinates of the point.

  7. [Managing digital medical imaging projects in healthcare services: lessons learned].

    PubMed

    Rojas de la Escalera, D

    2013-01-01

    Medical imaging is one of the most important diagnostic instruments in clinical practice. The technological development of digital medical imaging has enabled healthcare services to undertake large scale projects that require the participation and collaboration of many professionals of varied backgrounds and interests as well as substantial investments in infrastructures. Rather than focusing on systems for dealing with digital medical images, this article deals with the management of projects for implementing these systems, reviewing various organizational, technological, and human factors that are critical to ensure the success of these projects and to guarantee the compatibility and integration of digital medical imaging systems with other health information systems. To this end, the author relates several lessons learned from a review of the literature and the author's own experience in the technical coordination of digital medical imaging projects. PMID:22944485

  8. Copy-move forgery detection in digital image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alamro, Loai; Yusoff, Nooraini

    2016-08-01

    Copy-move is considered as one of the most popular kind of digital image tempering, in which one or more parts of a digital image are copied and pasted into different locations. Geometric transformation is among the major challenges in detecting copy-move forgery of a digital image. In such forgery, the copied and moved parts of a forged image are either rotated or/and re-scaled. Hence, in this study we propose a combination of Discrete Wavelet Transform (DWT) and Speeded Up Robust Features (SURF) to detect a copy-move activity. The experiments results prove that the proposed method is superior with overall accuracy 95%. The copy-move attacks in digital image has been successfully detected and the method is also can detect the fraud parts exposed to rotation and scaling issue.

  9. Calibration of x-ray digital tomosynthesis system including the compensation for image distortion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roh, Young Jun; Koh, Kuk Won; Cho, Hyungsuck; Kim, Jin-Young; Kim, Hyung C.; Byun, Jong-Eun

    1998-10-01

    X-ray laminography and DT (digital tomosynthesis) are promising technologies to form a cross-section image of 3D objects and can be a good solution for inspection interior defects of industrial products. It has been known that digital tomosynthesis method has several advantages over laminography method in that it can overcome the problems such as blurring effect or artifact. The DT system consists of a scanning x-ray tube, an image intensifier as an x-ray image detector, and a CCD camera. To acquire an x-ray image of an arbitrary plane of objects, a set of images (8 images or more) should be synthesized by averaging or minimally calculating point by point. The images, however are distorted according to the configurations of the image intensifier and the x-ray source position. To get a clear and accurate synthesized image, the corresponding points in the distorted images should be accurately determined, and therefore, precise calibration of the DT system is needed to map the corresponding points correctly. In this work, a series of calibration methods for the DT system are presented including the correction of the center offset between the x-ray and the image intensifer, the x-ray steering calibration, and the correction of the distortion of the image. The calibration models are implemented to the DT system and the experiment results are presented and discussed in detail.

  10. Digital image acquisition in in vivo confocal microscopy.

    PubMed

    Petroll, W M; Cavanagh, H D; Lemp, M A; Andrews, P M; Jester, J V

    1992-01-01

    A flexible system for the real-time acquisition of in vivo images has been developed. Images are generated using a tandem scanning confocal microscope interfaced to a low-light-level camera. The video signal from the camera is digitized and stored using a Gould image processing system with a real-time digital disk (RTDD). The RTDD can store up to 3200 512 x 512 pixel images at video rates (30 images s-1). Images can be input directly from the camera during the study, or off-line from a Super VHS video recorder. Once a segment of experimental interest is digitized onto the RTDD, the user can interactively step through the images, average stable sequences, and identify candidates for further processing and analysis. Examples of how this system can be used to study the physiology of various organ systems in vivo are presented. PMID:1552573

  11. Image gathering and coding for digital restoration: Information efficiency and visual quality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huck, Friedrich O.; John, Sarah; Mccormick, Judith A.; Narayanswamy, Ramkumar

    1989-01-01

    Image gathering and coding are commonly treated as tasks separate from each other and from the digital processing used to restore and enhance the images. The goal is to develop a method that allows us to assess quantitatively the combined performance of image gathering and coding for the digital restoration of images with high visual quality. Digital restoration is often interactive because visual quality depends on perceptual rather than mathematical considerations, and these considerations vary with the target, the application, and the observer. The approach is based on the theoretical treatment of image gathering as a communication channel (J. Opt. Soc. Am. A2, 1644(1985);5,285(1988). Initial results suggest that the practical upper limit of the information contained in the acquired image data range typically from approximately 2 to 4 binary information units (bifs) per sample, depending on the design of the image-gathering system. The associated information efficiency of the transmitted data (i.e., the ratio of information over data) ranges typically from approximately 0.3 to 0.5 bif per bit without coding to approximately 0.5 to 0.9 bif per bit with lossless predictive compression and Huffman coding. The visual quality that can be attained with interactive image restoration improves perceptibly as the available information increases to approximately 3 bifs per sample. However, the perceptual improvements that can be attained with further increases in information are very subtle and depend on the target and the desired enhancement.

  12. Multispectral Digital Image Analysis of Varved Sediments in Thin Sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jäger, K.; Rein, B.; Dietrich, S.

    2006-12-01

    An update of the recently developed method COMPONENTS (Rein, 2003, Rein & Jäger, subm.) for the discrimination of sediment components in thin sections is presented here. COMPONENTS uses a 6-band (multispectral) image analysis. To derive six-band spectral information of the sediments, thin sections are scanned with a digital camera mounted on a polarizing microscope. The thin sections are scanned twice, under polarized and under unpolarized plain light. During each run RGB images are acquired which are subsequently stacked to a six-band file. The first three bands (Blue=1, Green=2, Red=3) result from the spectral behaviour in the blue, green and red band with unpolarized light conditions, and the bands 4 to 6 (Blue=4, Green=5, Red=6) from the polarized light run. The next step is the discrimination of the sediment components by their transmission behaviour. Automatic classification algorithms broadly used in remote sensing applications cannot be used due to unavoidable variations of sediment particle or thin section thicknesses that change absolute grey values of the sediment components. Thus, we use an approach based on band ratios, also known as indices. By using band ratios, the grey values measured in different bands are normalized against each other and illumination variations (e.g. thickness variations) are eliminated. By combining specific ratios we are able to detect all seven major components in the investigated sediments (carbonates, diatoms, fine clastic material, plant rests, pyrite, quartz and resin). Then, the classification results (compositional maps) are validated. Although the automatic classification and the analogous classification show high concordances, some systematic errors could be identified. For example, the transition zone between the sediment and resin filled cracks is classified as fine clastic material and very coarse carbonates are partly classified as quartz because coarse carbonates can be very bright and spectra are partly

  13. Venus Atmospheric Circulation from Digital Tracking of VMC Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limaye, S.; Moissl, R.; Markiewicz, W.; Titov, D.

    2008-09-01

    The Venus Monitoring Camera on Venus Express has been returning images of Venus in four filters since April 2006 on almost every orbit. These images portray the southern hemisphere of Venus at spatial resolutions ranging from ~ 50 km per pixel to better than ~ 10 km per pixel depending on when the planet was imaged from orbit. Images covering a substantial portion of the planet and separated by ~ 45 min to one hour have been mapped into rectilinear projection to enable use of digital tracking technique for the measurement of cloud motions on an orbit by orbit basis. The aggregate results are in good agreement with visual tracking results as well as from the previous missions [1] and show evidence of temporal variations, large scale waves and solar thermal tides in low and mid latitudes. The digital tracking results for the meridional component confirm the poleward flow increasing from low latitudes to mid-latitudes and then showing a tendency to weaken. However, the confidence in high latitude measurements is lower due to the peculiar nature of the cloud morphology that is generally streaky and quite different from the low latitudes. The meridional profile of the average zonal wind at higher latitudes is of considerable interest. At high and polar latitudes, a vortex organization is evident in the data consistently, with the core region centered over the pole. The images show variability in structure of the ultraviolet signature of the "S" shaped feature seen in the VIRTIS data on the capture orbit [2]. However, the cloud morphologies seen poleward of ~ 50 degrees latitude also makes digital tracking less reliable due to absence of discrete features at the spatial resolution of the VMC images acquired in the apoapsis portion of the Venus Express orbit. It is expected that images obtained closer to the planet will enable a determination of the zonal wind profile with better confidence which will be useful in elucidating the nature of the transient features seen in

  14. Semi-automatic registration of digital histopathology images to in-vivo MR images in molded and unmolded prostates

    PubMed Central

    Starobinets, Olga; Guo, Richard; Simko, Jeffry P.; Kuchinsky, Kyle; Kurhanewicz, John; Carroll, Peter R.; Greene, Kirsten L.; Noworolski, Susan M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate a semi-automatic software-based method of registering in vivo prostate magnetic resonance (MR) images to digital histopathology images using two approaches: 1) in which the prostates were molded to simulate distortion due to the endorectal imaging coil prior to fixation, and 2) in which the prostates were not molded. Materials and Methods T2-weighted MR images and digitized whole-mount histopathology images were acquired for twenty-six patients with biopsy-confirmed prostate cancer who underwent radical prostatectomy. Ten excised prostates were molded prior to fixation. A semi-automatic method was used to align MR images to histopathology. Percent overlap between MR and histopathology images, as well as distances between corresponding anatomical landmarks were calculated and used to evaluate the registration technique for molded and unmolded cases. Results The software successfully morphed histology-based prostate images into corresponding MR images. Percent overlap improved from 80.4±5.8% prior to morphing to 99.7±0.62% post morphing. Molded prostates had a smaller distance between landmarks (1.91±0.75mm) versus unmolded (2.34±0.68mm), p<0.08. Conclusion Molding a prostate prior to fixation provided a better alignment of internal structures within the prostate, but this did not reach statistical significance. Software-based morphing allowed for nearly complete overlap between the pathology slides and the MR images. PMID:24136783

  15. Sliding mean edge estimation. [in digital image processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ford, G. E.

    1978-01-01

    A method for determining the locations of the major edges of objects in digital images is presented. The method is based on an algorithm utilizing maximum likelihood concepts. An image line-scan interval is processed to determine if an edge exists within the interval and its location. The proposed algorithm has demonstrated good results even in noisy images.

  16. Experiences with digital processing of images at INPE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mascarenhas, N. D. A. (Principal Investigator)

    1984-01-01

    Four different research experiments with digital image processing at INPE will be described: (1) edge detection by hypothesis testing; (2) image interpolation by finite impulse response filters; (3) spatial feature extraction methods in multispectral classification; and (4) translational image registration by sequential tests of hypotheses.

  17. Affordable, Accessible, Immediate: Capture Stunning Images with Digital Infrared Photography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Technology educators who teach digital photography should consider incorporating an infrared (IR) photography component into their program. This is an area where digital photography offers significant benefits. Either type of IR imaging is very interesting to explore, but traditional film-based IR photography is difficult and expensive. In…

  18. Information Seeking Behavior in Digital Image Collections: A Cognitive Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matusiak, Krystyna K.

    2006-01-01

    Presents the results of a qualitative study that focuses on search patterns of college students and community users interacting with a digital image collection. The study finds a distinct difference between the two groups of users and examines the role of mental models in information seeking behavior in digital libraries.

  19. Digital image processing system for a high-powered CO2 laser radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbett, Francis J.; Groden, Michael; Dryden, Gordon L.; Pfeiffer, George; Boos, Robert; Youmans, Douglas G.

    1996-11-01

    Textron has designed and built a high-powered CO2 laser radar for long range targeting and remote sensing. This is a coherent, multi-wavelength system with a 2D, wide-band image processing capability. The digital processor produces several output products from the transmitter return signals including range, velocity, angle, and 2D range-Doppler images of hard-body targets (LADAR mode). In addition, the processor sorts and reports on data acquired from gaseous targets by wavelength and integrated path absorption (LIDAR mode). The digital processor has been developed from commercial components with a SUN SPARC 20 serving as the operator workstation and display. The digital output products are produced in real time and stored off-line for post-mission analysis and further target enhancements. This LADAR is distinguished from other designs primarily by the waveforms produced by the laser for target interrogation. The digital processing algorithms are designed to extract certain features through operation on each of the two waveforms. The waveforms are a pulse-tone and a pulse-burst designed for target acquisition and track, and 2D imaging respectively. The algorithms are categorized by function as acquisition/track, 2D imaging, integrated absorption for gaseous targets, and post mission enhancements such as tomographic reconstruction for multiple looks at targets from different perspectives. Field tests are now in process and results acquired from Feb.-June '96 will be reported on. The digital imaging system, its architecture, algorithms, simulations, and products will be described.

  20. Digital Image Collections: Issues and Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ester, Michael

    The Commission on Preservation and Access has published a number of reports on the preservation and access implications of scanning text and microfilm. This report focuses on what sets the digitization of visual collections apart from other scanning projects. Projects to digitize visual collections present their own unique set of questions and…

  1. Using Digital Images To Engage Young Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Scoter, Judy

    2004-01-01

    Take a look into an active classroom where students use a variety of resources for learning. Some students are finishing pattern block constructions. After marking the line of symmetry with yarn, they record the accomplishment with a digital camera. A group of students gathers around a digital microscope investigating a pine cone, predicting what…

  2. A procedure for detection and measurement of interfaces in remotely acquired data using a digital computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faller, K. H.

    1977-01-01

    A technique developed and evaluated for the detection and measurement of surface feature interfaces in remotely acquired data is described. A computer implementation of this technique has been effected to automatically process categorized data derived from various sources such as the LANDSAT multispectral scanner and other scanner type sensors. The basic elements of the operational theory of the technique are described together with details of the procedure. An example application of the technique to the analysis of tidal shoreline length is given with a breakdown of manpower requirements.

  3. Procedure for detection and measurement of interfaces in remotely acquired data using a digital computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faller, K. H.

    1976-01-01

    A technique for the detection and measurement of surface feature interfaces in remotely acquired data was developed and evaluated. A computer implementation of this technique was effected to automatically process classified data derived from various sources such as the LANDSAT multispectral scanner and other scanning sensors. The basic elements of the operational theory of the technique are described, followed by the details of the procedure. An example of an application of the technique to the analysis of tidal shoreline length is given with a breakdown of manpower requirements.

  4. NEQR: a novel enhanced quantum representation of digital images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yi; Lu, Kai; Gao, Yinghui; Wang, Mo

    2013-08-01

    Quantum computation is becoming an important and effective tool to overcome the high real-time computational requirements of classical digital image processing. In this paper, based on analysis of existing quantum image representations, a novel enhanced quantum representation (NEQR) for digital images is proposed, which improves the latest flexible representation of quantum images (FRQI). The newly proposed quantum image representation uses the basis state of a qubit sequence to store the gray-scale value of each pixel in the image for the first time, instead of the probability amplitude of a qubit, as in FRQI. Because different basis states of qubit sequence are orthogonal, different gray scales in the NEQR quantum image can be distinguished. Performance comparisons with FRQI reveal that NEQR can achieve a quadratic speedup in quantum image preparation, increase the compression ratio of quantum images by approximately 1.5X, and retrieve digital images from quantum images accurately. Meanwhile, more quantum image operations related to gray-scale information in the image can be performed conveniently based on NEQR, for example partial color operations and statistical color operations. Therefore, the proposed NEQR quantum image model is more flexible and better suited for quantum image representation than other models in the literature.

  5. Ultra-high resolution color images of the surface of comet 67P acquired by ROLIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröder, Stefan; Mottola, Stefano; Arnold, Gabriele; Grothues, Hans-Georg; Hamm, Maximilian; Jaumann, Ralf; Michaelis, Harald; Pelivan, Ivanka; Proffe, Gerrit; Bibring, Jean-Pierre

    2015-04-01

    On Nov 12, 2014, the Rosetta Philae lander descended towards comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. The onboard ROLIS camera successfully acquired high resolution images of the surface looking down from its vantage point on the instrument platform. ROLIS is a compact CCD imager with a 1024×1024 pixel sensor and a 57° field of view (Mottola et al., 2007, SSR 128, 241). It is equipped with an infinity lens (IFL), without which the camera focus is 30 cm. At Philae's final landing site, ROLIS removed the IFL and initiated an imaging sequence that shows the surface at the highest resolution ever obtained for a cometary surface (~0.5 mm per pixel). Illumination of the scene was provided by an onboard array of LEDs in four different colors: red, green, blue, and near-IR. ROLIS acquired one image for each color and a single dark exposure. The images show a unique, almost fractal morphology for the surface below the landing site that defies easy interpretation. However, there are similarities with some structures seen by the CIVA camera. Color and albedo variations over the surface are minor, and individual grains cannot be distinguished. The images are out-of-focus, indicating the surface was further away than the nominal 30 cm. The location of the illumination spot and the change of focus over the image are consistent with an inclined surface, indicating that Philae's final resting position is strongly tilted. In fact, it was inclined so much that we see the local horizon, even though ROLIS is downward-looking. Remarkably, the scene beyond the horizon is illuminated by the Sun, and out-of-focus particles can be seen to travel in the sky. The images suggest the environment of the lander is laden with fine dust, but a final assessment requires careful consideration of possible sources of stray light. Just before Philae went to sleep, ROLIS acquired an additional exposure with the IFL and the red LED. The resulting image is fully in focus. Because Philae had rotated and lifted

  6. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-047). March 2005. AREA OF MAGNET REMOVAL, NORTHEAST QUADRANT, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  7. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-158). March 2005. CONNECTION OF MAGNET ROOM CRANE TO OUTER TRACK, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  8. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-006). March 2005. JACKBOLTS BETWEEN MAGNET AND MAGNET FOUNDATION, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  9. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-015). March 2005. INTERIOR WALL OF MAGNET INSIDE CENTER OF BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  10. Building Access for Digital Images: Databases, Meta-data, Interfaces.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Steven D.

    1999-01-01

    When providing access to digital images, there are three elements to consider: structure, location, and appearance. These considerations are illustrated with two examples--a book and a photograph collection. Each of the elements is then described in detail. (AEF)

  11. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-066). March 2005. LOCAL INJECTOR, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  12. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-108). March 2005. FAN ROOM WITH STAIR TO FILTER BANKS, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  13. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-143). March 2005. BUILDING 51A, EXTERIOR WALL, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  14. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-005). March 2005. PASSAGEWAY UNDER SOUTHEAST QUADRANT, AIR DUCT OPENINGS, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  15. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-107). March 2005. NORTH FAN, FAN ROOM, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  16. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-082). June 2005. CEILING AND CRANE OF BUILDING 51A, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  17. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-106). March 2005. SOUTH FAN, FAN ROOM, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  18. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-052). March 2005. LOCAL INJECTOR, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  19. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-087). March 2005. GENERATOR PIT AREA, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  20. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-110). March 2005. SOUTH FAN FROM MEZZANINE, FAN ROOM, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  1. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-054). March 2005. LOCAL INJECTOR ENTERING SHIELDING, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  2. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-004). March 2005. ENTRY TO IGLOO, ILLUSTRATING THICKNESS OF IGLOO WALL, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  3. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-077). March 2005. STUB OF SUPERHILAC BEAM, ENTERING SHIELDING, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  4. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection XBD200503-00117-089). March 2005. GENERATOR PIT AREA, CONCRETE FOUNDATION FOR EQUIPMENT MOUNTS, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  5. Application of digital image processing techniques to astronomical imagery 1977

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorre, J. J.; Lynn, D. J.

    1978-01-01

    Nine specific techniques of combination of techniques developed for applying digital image processing technology to existing astronomical imagery are described. Photoproducts are included to illustrate the results of each of these investigations.

  6. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-043). March 2005. MOUSE AT EAST TANGENT, PLUNGING MECHANISM, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  7. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-027). March 2005. MOUSE AT EAST TANGENT, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  8. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-026). March 2005. MOUSE AT EAST TANGENT, LOOKING TOWARD EAST TANGENT, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  9. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-012). March 2005. PASSAGEWAY UNDER QUADRANT AND DIFFUSION PUMPS, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  10. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-050). March 2005. DIFFUSION PUMPS UNDER WEST TANGENT, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  11. Digital Image Analysis for DETCHIP(®) Code Determination.

    PubMed

    Lyon, Marcus; Wilson, Mark V; Rouhier, Kerry A; Symonsbergen, David J; Bastola, Kiran; Thapa, Ishwor; Holmes, Andrea E; Sikich, Sharmin M; Jackson, Abby

    2012-08-01

    DETECHIP(®) is a molecular sensing array used for identification of a large variety of substances. Previous methodology for the analysis of DETECHIP(®) used human vision to distinguish color changes induced by the presence of the analyte of interest. This paper describes several analysis techniques using digital images of DETECHIP(®). Both a digital camera and flatbed desktop photo scanner were used to obtain Jpeg images. Color information within these digital images was obtained through the measurement of red-green-blue (RGB) values using software such as GIMP, Photoshop and ImageJ. Several different techniques were used to evaluate these color changes. It was determined that the flatbed scanner produced in the clearest and more reproducible images. Furthermore, codes obtained using a macro written for use within ImageJ showed improved consistency versus pervious methods. PMID:25267940

  12. Digital image processing of bone - Problems and potentials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morey, E. R.; Wronski, T. J.

    1980-01-01

    The development of a digital image processing system for bone histomorphometry and fluorescent marker monitoring is discussed. The system in question is capable of making measurements of UV or light microscope features on a video screen with either video or computer-generated images, and comprises a microscope, low-light-level video camera, video digitizer and display terminal, color monitor, and PDP 11/34 computer. Capabilities demonstrated in the analysis of an undecalcified rat tibia include the measurement of perimeter and total bone area, and the generation of microscope images, false color images, digitized images and contoured images for further analysis. Software development will be based on an existing software library, specifically the mini-VICAR system developed at JPL. It is noted that the potentials of the system in terms of speed and reliability far exceed any problems associated with hardware and software development.

  13. Temporal registration of multispectral digital satellite images using their edge images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nack, M. L.

    1975-01-01

    An algorithm is described which will form an edge image by detecting the edges of features in a particular spectral band of a digital satellite image. It is capable also of forming composite multispectral edge images. In addition, an edge image correlation algorithm is presented which performs rapid automatic registration of the edge images and, consequently, the grey level images.

  14. Taking digital imaging to the next level: challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Hobbs, W Cecyl

    2004-01-01

    New medical imaging technology, such as multi-detector computed tomography (CT) scanners and positron emission tomography (PET) scanners, are creating new possibilities for non-invasive diagnosis that are leading providers to invest heavily in these new technologies. The volume of data produced by such technology is so large that it cannot be "read" using traditional film-based methods, and once in digital form, it creates a massive data integration and archiving challenge. Despite the benefits of digital imaging and archiving, there are several key challenges that healthcare organizations should consider in planning, selecting, and implementing the information technology (IT) infrastructure to support digital imaging. Decisions about storage and image distribution are essentially questions of "where" and "how fast." When planning the digital archiving infrastructure, organizations should think about where they want to store and distribute their images. This is similar to decisions that organizations have to make in regard to physical film storage and distribution, except the portability of images is even greater in a digital environment. The principle of "network effects" seems like a simple concept, yet the effect is not always considered when implementing a technology plan. To fully realize the benefits of digital imaging, the radiology department must integrate the archiving solutions throughout the department and, ultimately, with applications across other departments and enterprises. Medical institutions can derive a number of benefits from implementing digital imaging and archiving solutions like PACS. Hospitals and imaging centers can use the transition from film-based imaging as a foundational opportunity to reduce costs, increase competitive advantage, attract talent, and improve service to patients. The key factors in achieving these goals include attention to the means of data storage, distribution and protection. PMID:15098897

  15. Improving the quality of radiographic images acquired with conical radiation beams through divergence correction and filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silvani, M. I.; Almeida, G. L.; Latini, R. M.; Bellido, A. V. B.; Souza, E. S.; Lopes, R. T.

    2015-07-01

    Earlier works have shown the feasibility to correct the deformation of the attenuation map in radiographs acquired with conical radiation beams provided that the inspected object could be expressed into analytical geometry terms. This correction reduces the contribution of the main object in the radiograph, allowing thus the visualization of its otherwise concealed heterogeneities. However, the non-punctual character of the source demanded a cumbersome trial-and-error approach in order to determine the proper correction parameters for the algorithm. Within this frame, this work addresses the improvement of radiographs of specially tailored test-objects acquired with a conical beam through correction of its divergence by using the information contained in the image itself. The corrected images have afterwards undergone a filtration in the frequency domain aiming at the reduction of statistical fluctuation and noise by using a 2D Fourier transform. All radiographs have been acquired using 165Dy and 198Au gamma-ray sources produced at the Argonauta research reactor in Institutode Engenharia Nuclear - CNEN, and an X-ray sensitive imaging plate as detector. The processed images exhibit features otherwise invisible in the original ones. Their processing by conventional histogram equalization carried out for comparison purposes did not succeed to detect those features.

  16. Imaging the urokinase plasminongen activator receptor in preclinical breast cancer models of acquired drug resistance.

    PubMed

    LeBeau, Aaron M; Sevillano, Natalia; King, Mandy L; Duriseti, Sai; Murphy, Stephanie T; Craik, Charles S; Murphy, Laura L; VanBrocklin, Henry F

    2014-01-01

    Subtype-targeted therapies can have a dramatic impact on improving the quality and quantity of life for women suffering from breast cancer. Despite an initial therapeutic response, cancer recurrence and acquired drug-resistance are commonplace. Non-invasive imaging probes that identify drug-resistant lesions are urgently needed to aid in the development of novel drugs and the effective utilization of established therapies for breast cancer. The protease receptor urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) is a target that can be exploited for non-invasive imaging. The expression of uPAR has been associated with phenotypically aggressive breast cancer and acquired drug-resistance. Acquired drug-resistance was modeled in cell lines from two different breast cancer subtypes, the uPAR negative luminal A subtype and the uPAR positive triple negative subtype cell line MDA-MB-231. MCF-7 cells, cultured to be resistant to tamoxifen (MCF-7 TamR), were found to significantly over-express uPAR compared to the parental cell line. uPAR expression was maintained when resistance was modeled in triple-negative breast cancer by generating doxorubicin and paclitaxel resistant MDA-MB-231 cells (MDA-MB-231 DoxR and MDA-MB-231 TaxR). Using the antagonistic uPAR antibody 2G10, uPAR was imaged in vivo by near-infrared (NIR) optical imaging and (111)In-single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Tumor uptake of the (111)In-SPECT probe was high in the three drug-resistant xenografts (> 46 %ID/g) and minimal in uPAR negative xenografts at 72 hours post-injection. This preclinical study demonstrates that uPAR can be targeted for imaging breast cancer models of acquired resistance leading to potential clinical applications. PMID:24505235

  17. The digital optical module - How IceCube will acquire data

    SciTech Connect

    Stokstad, R.G.

    2003-01-09

    IceCube will be a km-scale neutrino detector consisting of 4800 optical modules (OMs) on 80 strings of 60 OMs each. The DAQ technology will have the following desirable features: (1) the robustness of copper cable between the OMs and the surface. (2) digitization and time-stamping of signals that are unattenuated and undispersed. (3) calibration methods (particularly for timing) appropriate for a large number of OMs. The PMT anode waveform is digitized and time-stamped in the OM. The time calibration procedure is both accurate and automatic. A system having these features has been tested in AMANDA. A prototype digital system consisting of 40 OMs was deployed in Jan., 2000. The principal components of the Digital Optical Module (DOM) signal processing circuitry are: the analog transient waveform digitizer (ATWD), a low-power custom integrated circuit that captures the waveform in 128 samples at a rate of {approx}500 Megasamples/s; an ADC operating at {approx}30 MS/s covering several microseconds; a FPGA that provides state control, time stamps events, handles communications, etc.; a low-power 32-bit ARM CPU with a real-time operating system. A 16.8 MHz oscillator, made by Toyocom, is free-running, very stable ({delta}f/f {approx} 5 {center_dot} 10{sup -11} over {approx} 5s) and provides clock signals to several components. Short (12 m) cables connecting adjacent modules enable a local time coincidence, which eliminates most of the {approx}1 kHz of dark noise pulses. A critical requirement is the ability to calibrate the DOM oscillator against a master clock at the surface. In essence, timing pulses sent in one direction at known time intervals can be used to determine relative frequency, and the round trip time of pulses sent in both directions can determine the offset. After receiving a timing pulse at the DOM and waiting for a short time, {delta}t, measured on the DOM clock, a pulse is sent from the DOM to the surface. The shapes of the pulses sent down and up are

  18. Multimodal digital color imaging system for facial skin lesion analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, Youngwoo; Lee, Youn-Heum; Jung, Byungjo

    2008-02-01

    In dermatology, various digital imaging modalities have been used as an important tool to quantitatively evaluate the treatment effect of skin lesions. Cross-polarization color image was used to evaluate skin chromophores (melanin and hemoglobin) information and parallel-polarization image to evaluate skin texture information. In addition, UV-A induced fluorescent image has been widely used to evaluate various skin conditions such as sebum, keratosis, sun damages, and vitiligo. In order to maximize the evaluation efficacy of various skin lesions, it is necessary to integrate various imaging modalities into an imaging system. In this study, we propose a multimodal digital color imaging system, which provides four different digital color images of standard color image, parallel and cross-polarization color image, and UV-A induced fluorescent color image. Herein, we describe the imaging system and present the examples of image analysis. By analyzing the color information and morphological features of facial skin lesions, we are able to comparably and simultaneously evaluate various skin lesions. In conclusion, we are sure that the multimodal color imaging system can be utilized as an important assistant tool in dermatology.

  19. CAMAC interface for digitally recording infrared camera images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyer, G. R.

    1986-06-01

    An instrument has been built to store the digital signals from a modified imaging infrared scanner directly in a digital memory. This procedure avoids the signal-to-noise degradation and dynamic range limitations associated with successive analog-to-digital and digital-to-analog conversions and the analog recording method normally used to store data from the scanner. This technique also allows digital data processing methods to be applied directly to recorded data and permits processing and image reconstruction to be done using either a mainframe or a microcomputer. If a suitable computer and CAMAC-based data collection system are already available, digital storage of up to 12 scanner images can be implemented for less than 1750 in materials cost. Each image is stored as a frame of 60×80 eight-bit pixels, with an acquisition rate of one frame every 16.7 ms. The number of frames stored is limited only by the available memory. Initially, data processing for this equipment was done on a VAX 11-780, but images may also be displayed on the screen of a microcomputer. Software for setting the displayed gray scale, generating contour plots and false-color displays, and subtracting one image from another (e.g., background suppression) has been developed for IBM-compatible personal computers.

  20. Digital images in the map revision process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newby, P. R. T.

    Progress towards the adoption of digital (or softcopy) photogrammetric techniques for database and map revision is reviewed. Particular attention is given to the Ordnance Survey of Great Britain, the author's former employer, where digital processes are under investigation but have not yet been introduced for routine production. Developments which may lead to increasing automation of database update processes appear promising, but because of the cost and practical problems associated with managing as well as updating large digital databases, caution is advised when considering the transition to softcopy photogrammetry for revision tasks.

  1. Experimental research of digital image correlation system in high temperature test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Li; Wang, Yonghong; Dan, Xizuo; Xiao, Ying; Yang, Lianxiang

    2016-01-01

    Digital Image Correlation (DIC) is a full-field technique based on white-light illumination for displacement and strain measurement. But radiation on the specimen surface at high temperature affects the quality of acquired speckle pattern images for traditional DIC measurement. In order to minimize the radiation effect in high temperature measurement, this paper proposes a two-dimensional ultraviolet digital image correlation system (2D UV-DIC) containing UV LED and UV band-pass filter. It is confirmed by experiments that images acquired by this system saturate at higher temperature in comparison with DIC using filtered blue light imaging system. And the UV-DIC remains minimally affected by radiation at the temperature which is nearing the specimen's maximum working temperature (about 1250°C). In addition, considering the heat disturbance that can't be ignored in actual high temperature measurement, this paper also proposes a method using an air controller in combination with image average algorithm, and the method was then used to obtain the thermal expansion coefficient of the Austenitic chromium-nickel stainless steel specimen at different temperatures. By comparing the coefficients with the results calculated by other method, it shows that this comprehensive method has the advantages of strong anti-interference ability and high precision.

  2. Topology-Preserving Rigid Transformation of 2D Digital Images.

    PubMed

    Ngo, Phuc; Passat, Nicolas; Kenmochi, Yukiko; Talbot, Hugues

    2014-02-01

    We provide conditions under which 2D digital images preserve their topological properties under rigid transformations. We consider the two most common digital topology models, namely dual adjacency and well-composedness. This paper leads to the proposal of optimal preprocessing strategies that ensure the topological invariance of images under arbitrary rigid transformations. These results and methods are proved to be valid for various kinds of images (binary, gray-level, label), thus providing generic and efficient tools, which can be used in particular in the context of image registration and warping. PMID:26270925

  3. Wavelength scanning digital interference holography for high-resolution ophthalmic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potcoava, Mariana C.; Kim, M. K.; Kay, Christine N.

    2009-02-01

    An improved digital interference holography (DIH) technique suitable for fundus images is proposed. This technique incorporates a dispersion compensation algorithm to compensate for the unknown axial length of the eye. Using this instrument we acquired successfully tomographic fundus images in human eye with narrow axial resolution less than 5μm. The optic nerve head together with the surrounding retinal vasculature were constructed. We were able to quantify a depth of 84μm between the retinal fiber and the retinal pigmented epithelium layers. DIH provides high resolution 3D information which could potentially aid in guiding glaucoma diagnosis and treatment.

  4. SU-E-J-186: Acquiring and Assessing Upright CBCT Images for Future Treatment Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Fave, X; Yang, J; Balter, P; Court, L

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To acquire upright CBCT images using the onboard imager of a Varian TrueBeam. An easy to implement upright imaging protocol could allow for widespread upright radiation therapy which would greatly benefit certain patients. These include thoracic cancer patients (because lung volume increases in a seated position) and patients who experience substantial discomfort during supine treatment. Methods: To acquire upright CBCT images, the gantry head remained stationary at 0 degrees with the KV imager arms extended to their lateral positions. Phantoms were placed upright at the end of the treatment couch. During a scan, the couch rotated from 270 to 90 degrees while continuous fluoroscopic projections were taken by the onboard imager. To extend the field-of-view, this sequence was performed twice: once with the KV detector longitudinally offset +14.5cm and once with it longitudinally offset −14.5cm. The resulting two image sets were stitched together before reconstruction. The imaging beam parameters were chosen to deliver a dose similar to that given during a simulation CT. Image quality was evaluated for spatial linearity, high and low contrast resolution, and HU linearity using CatPhan and anthropomorphic phantoms. A deformable registration technique was used to evaluate HU mapping from a simulation CT. Results: Spatial linearity and high contrast resolution were maintained in upright CBCT when compared to simulation CT. However, low contrast resolution and HU linearity degraded. Streak artifacts were caused by the limited 180 degree arc of the couch, and the stitching process created a sharp artifact at the center of the reconstruction. The deformable registration was robust in the HU mapping even with these artifacts and the loss of HU linearity. Conclusions: The image quality obtained from upright CBCT was sufficient for treatment planning. The success of this novel technique is an important step towards a future clinical protocol. This project was funded

  5. Digital fluorescent imaging system for quantitative analysis of facial sebum production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Byungkwan; Jung, Byungjo; Choi, Eung-Ho; Nelson, J. Stuart

    2007-02-01

    Current methods for analysis of sebum excretion have limitations, such as irreproducible results in repeatable measurements due to the point measurement method, user-dependent artifact due to contact measurement or qualitative evaluation of the image, and long measurement time. A UV-induced fluorescent digital imaging system was developed to acquire facial images so that the distribution of sebum excretion on the face could be analyzed. The imaging system consisted of a constant UV-A light source, digital color camera, and head-positioning device. We describe the system characterization for acquisition of a fluorescent facial image and the image analysis method. The imaging modality provided uniform light distribution on the facial mannequin model and presented a discernible color fluorescent image. Valuable parameters of sebum excretion were obtained after image analysis. The imaging system, which provides a non-contact method, was proven to be a useful tool to evaluate sebum excretion and to characterize the pattern of sebum excretion. When compared to conventional "Wood's lamp" and "Sebutape" methods that provide similar parameters for sebum excretion, the method described herein is simpler and more reliable to evaluate the dynamics of sebum excretion in nearly real-time.

  6. Analysis of facial sebum distribution using a digital fluorescent imaging system.

    PubMed

    Han, Byungkwan; Jung, Byungjo; Nelson, J Stuart; Choi, Eung-Ho

    2007-01-01

    Current methods for analysis of sebum excretion have limitations, such as irreproducible results in repeatable measurements due to the point measurement method, user-dependent artifacts due to contact measurement or qualitative evaluation of the image, and long measurement time. A UV-induced fluorescent digital imaging system is developed to acquire facial images so that the distribution of sebum excretion on the face could be analyzed. The imaging system consists of a constant UV-A light source, digital color camera, and head-positioning device. The system for acquisition of a fluorescent facial image and the image analysis method is described. The imaging modality provides uniform light distribution and presents a discernible color fluorescent image. Valuable parameters of sebum excretion are obtained after image analysis. The imaging system, which provides a noncontact method, is proved to be a useful tool to evaluate the amount and pattern of sebum excretion. When compared to conventional "Wood's lamp" and "Sebutape" methods that provide similar parameters for sebum excretion, the described method is simpler and more reliable to evaluate the dynamics of sebum excretion in nearly real-time. PMID:17343481

  7. Tracking of vessel diameter fluctuations using digital image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aggarwal, Shanti J.; Yip, C.-Y.; Diller, Kenneth R.; Bovik, Alan C.

    1990-05-01

    An automatic digital image processing technique for vasomotion analysis in peripheral microcirculation at multiple sites simultaneously and in real time, is presented. The algorithm utilizes either fluorescent or bright field microimages of the vasculature as input. The video images are digitized and analyzed on-line by an IBM RT PC. Using digital filtering and edge detection, the technique allows simultaneous diameter measurement at more than one site. The sampling frequency is higher than 5 Hz when only one site is tracked. The performance of the algorithm is tested in the hamster cutaneous microcirculation.

  8. Digital management and regulatory submission of medical images from clinical trials: role and benefits of the core laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robbins, William L.; Conklin, James J.

    1995-10-01

    Medical images (angiography, CT, MRI, nuclear medicine, ultrasound, x ray) play an increasingly important role in the clinical development and regulatory review process for pharmaceuticals and medical devices. Since medical images are increasingly acquired and archived digitally, or are readily digitized from film, they can be visualized, processed and analyzed in a variety of ways using digital image processing and display technology. Moreover, with image-based data management and data visualization tools, medical images can be electronically organized and submitted to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for review. The collection, processing, analysis, archival, and submission of medical images in a digital format versus an analog (film-based) format presents both challenges and opportunities for the clinical and regulatory information management specialist. The medical imaging 'core laboratory' is an important resource for clinical trials and regulatory submissions involving medical imaging data. Use of digital imaging technology within a core laboratory can increase efficiency and decrease overall costs in the image data management and regulatory review process.

  9. Construction and interpretation of a digital inertia image. [of Pisgah Crater and Lavic Lake in Southern California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillespie, A. R.; Kahle, A. B.

    1977-01-01

    An image representing the thermal inertia in the vicinity of Pisgah Crater and Lavic Lake in Southern California has been generated from visible, near IR, and thermal images taken from aircraft. Construction of the thermal inertia image required radiometric calibration and geometric rectification of the acquired images as well as registration to a topographic map. The Kahle thermal model used in the construction of the thermal inertia image requires specification of albedo, topographic slope and slope azimuth, diurnal temperature range and local meteorological conditions. Albedo information was derived from the visible image; digital topographic information was computed from digitized stereo aerial photographs; and thermal ranges were calculated by subtracting the predawn from the afternoon thermal image data. Our computed values of thermal inertia were in close agreement with published values for similar surface materials. Thermal inertia provides complementary information to conventional images of reflected solar radiation for use in lithologic mapping.

  10. Analysis of the Effects of Image Quality on Digital Map Generation from Satellite Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, H.; Kim, D.; Kim, S.; Kim, T.

    2012-07-01

    High resolution satellite images are widely used to produce and update a digital map since they became widely available. It is well known that the accuracy of digital map produced from satellite images is decided largely by the accuracy of geometric modelling. However digital maps are made by a series of photogrammetric workflow. Therefore the accuracy of digital maps are also affected by the quality of satellite images, such as image interpretability. For satellite images, parameters such as Modulation Transfer Function(MTF), Signal to Noise Ratio(SNR) and Ground Sampling Distance(GSD) are used to present images quality. Our previous research stressed that such quality parameters may not represent the quality of image products such as digital maps and that parameters for image interpretability such as Ground Resolved Distance(GRD) and National Imagery Interpretability Rating Scale(NIIRS) need to be considered. In this study, we analyzed the effects of the image quality on accuracy of digital maps produced by satellite images. QuickBird, IKONOS and KOMPSAT-2 imagery were used to analyze as they have similar GSDs. We measured various image quality parameters mentioned above from these images. Then we produced digital maps from the images using a digital photogrammetric workstation. We analyzed the accuracy of the digital maps in terms of their location accuracy and their level of details. Then we compared the correlation between various image quality parameters and the accuracy of digital maps. The results of this study showed that GRD and NIIRS were more critical for map production then GSD, MTF or SNR.

  11. 49 CFR 384.227 - Record of digital image or photograph.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Record of digital image or photograph. 384.227... § 384.227 Record of digital image or photograph. The State must: (a) Record the digital color image or.... The digital color image or photograph or black and white laser engraved photograph must either be...

  12. 49 CFR 384.227 - Record of digital image or photograph.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Record of digital image or photograph. 384.227... § 384.227 Record of digital image or photograph. The State must: (a) Record the digital color image or.... The digital color image or photograph or black and white laser engraved photograph must either be...

  13. 49 CFR 384.227 - Record of digital image or photograph.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Record of digital image or photograph. 384.227... § 384.227 Record of digital image or photograph. The State must: (a) Record the digital color image or.... The digital color image or photograph or black and white laser engraved photograph must either be...

  14. 49 CFR 384.227 - Record of digital image or photograph.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Record of digital image or photograph. 384.227... § 384.227 Record of digital image or photograph. The State must: (a) Record the digital color image or.... The digital color image or photograph or black and white laser engraved photograph must either be...

  15. Novel method to calculate pulmonary compliance images in rodents from computed tomography acquired at constant pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerrero, Thomas; Castillo, Richard; Sanders, Kevin; Price, Roger; Komaki, Ritsuko; Cody, Dianna

    2006-03-01

    Our goal was to develop a method for generating high-resolution three-dimensional pulmonary compliance images in rodents from computed tomography (CT) images acquired at a series of constant pressures in ventilated animals. One rat and one mouse were used to demonstrate this technique. A pre-clinical GE flat panel CT scanner (maximum 31 line-pairs cm-1 resolution) was utilized for image acquisition. The thorax of each animal was imaged with breath-holds at 2, 6, 10, 14 and 18 cm H2O pressure in triplicate. A deformable image registration algorithm was applied to each pair of CT images to map corresponding tissue elements. Pulmonary compliance was calculated on a voxel by voxel basis using adjacent pairs of CT images. Triplicate imaging was used to estimate the measurement error of this technique. The 3D pulmonary compliance images revealed regional heterogeneity of compliance. The maximum total lung compliance measured 0.080 (±0.007) ml air per cm H2O per ml of lung and 0.039 (±0.004) ml air per cm H2O per ml of lung for the rat and mouse, respectively. In this study, we have demonstrated a unique method of quantifying regional lung compliance from 4 to 16 cm H2O pressure with sub-millimetre spatial resolution in rodents. Presented at the Third IASTED Int. Conf. on Biomechanics (Benidorm, Spain), 7-9 September 2005.

  16. Marking-dots digital image correlation and application to studies of spinal biomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jinlong; Sun, Cuiru; Qin, Yuwen; Ji, Xinhua

    2005-04-01

    A method of marking-dots digital image correlation is developed to measure the biomechanics behavior of cattle spine. In the system, a video camera and personal computer are used to acquire digitized images of a random speckle pattern on the surface of a marking-dot before and after deformation. The method of making-dots digital image correlation can immediately measure the transformation by tracking the gray value pattern in small local neighborhoods commonly referred to as subsets. In the experiment, a specimen was selected from the cattle's spine that was covered with some muscles and tissues. It is apparent that the covering muscles and tissues cannot be treated as the information carrier, for they must be kept active and moist curing by the physiological brine in the course of the experiment. In order to solve the problem, the marking-dots were fixed into the vertebrae, and the front surface of a marking-dot was coated with a thin layer of white paint and splattered with black spot so as to create a random black-on-white speckle pattern. Experimental results have shown that the marking-dots digital image correlation method can be applied to the measurement of the biomechanical behavior of cattle spine, and offer an effective measurement tool to research the range of motion of the adjacent segment in spine under intervertebral fusion.

  17. ROPtool analysis of images acquired using a noncontact handheld fundus camera (Pictor)--a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Vickers, Laura A; Freedman, Sharon F; Wallace, David K; Prakalapakorn, S Grace

    2015-12-01

    The presence of plus disease is the primary indication for treatment of retinopathy of prematurity (ROP), but its diagnosis is subjective and prone to error. ROPtool is a semiautomated computer program that quantifies vascular tortuosity and dilation. Pictor is an FDA-approved, noncontact, handheld digital fundus camera. This pilot study evaluated ROPtool's ability to analyze high-quality Pictor images of premature infants and its accuracy in diagnosing plus disease compared to clinical examination. In our small sample of images, ROPtool could trace and identify the presence of plus disease with high accuracy. PMID:26691046

  18. A GPU Simulation Tool for Training and Optimisation in 2D Digital X-Ray Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Gallio, Elena; Rampado, Osvaldo; Gianaria, Elena; Bianchi, Silvio Diego; Ropolo, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Conventional radiology is performed by means of digital detectors, with various types of technology and different performance in terms of efficiency and image quality. Following the arrival of a new digital detector in a radiology department, all the staff involved should adapt the procedure parameters to the properties of the detector, in order to achieve an optimal result in terms of correct diagnostic information and minimum radiation risks for the patient. The aim of this study was to develop and validate a software capable of simulating a digital X-ray imaging system, using graphics processing unit computing. All radiological image components were implemented in this application: an X-ray tube with primary beam, a virtual patient, noise, scatter radiation, a grid and a digital detector. Three different digital detectors (two digital radiography and a computed radiography systems) were implemented. In order to validate the software, we carried out a quantitative comparison of geometrical and anthropomorphic phantom simulated images with those acquired. In terms of average pixel values, the maximum differences were below 15%, while the noise values were in agreement with a maximum difference of 20%. The relative trends of contrast to noise ratio versus beam energy and intensity were well simulated. Total calculation times were below 3 seconds for clinical images with pixel size of actual dimensions less than 0.2 mm. The application proved to be efficient and realistic. Short calculation times and the accuracy of the results obtained make this software a useful tool for training operators and dose optimisation studies. PMID:26545097

  19. A GPU Simulation Tool for Training and Optimisation in 2D Digital X-Ray Imaging.

    PubMed

    Gallio, Elena; Rampado, Osvaldo; Gianaria, Elena; Bianchi, Silvio Diego; Ropolo, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Conventional radiology is performed by means of digital detectors, with various types of technology and different performance in terms of efficiency and image quality. Following the arrival of a new digital detector in a radiology department, all the staff involved should adapt the procedure parameters to the properties of the detector, in order to achieve an optimal result in terms of correct diagnostic information and minimum radiation risks for the patient. The aim of this study was to develop and validate a software capable of simulating a digital X-ray imaging system, using graphics processing unit computing. All radiological image components were implemented in this application: an X-ray tube with primary beam, a virtual patient, noise, scatter radiation, a grid and a digital detector. Three different digital detectors (two digital radiography and a computed radiography systems) were implemented. In order to validate the software, we carried out a quantitative comparison of geometrical and anthropomorphic phantom simulated images with those acquired. In terms of average pixel values, the maximum differences were below 15%, while the noise values were in agreement with a maximum difference of 20%. The relative trends of contrast to noise ratio versus beam energy and intensity were well simulated. Total calculation times were below 3 seconds for clinical images with pixel size of actual dimensions less than 0.2 mm. The application proved to be efficient and realistic. Short calculation times and the accuracy of the results obtained make this software a useful tool for training operators and dose optimisation studies. PMID:26545097

  20. Automatic rice crop height measurement using a field server and digital image processing.

    PubMed

    Sritarapipat, Tanakorn; Rakwatin, Preesan; Kasetkasem, Teerasit

    2014-01-01

    Rice crop height is an important agronomic trait linked to plant type and yield potential. This research developed an automatic image processing technique to detect rice crop height based on images taken by a digital camera attached to a field server. The camera acquires rice paddy images daily at a consistent time of day. The images include the rice plants and a marker bar used to provide a height reference. The rice crop height can be indirectly measured from the images by measuring the height of the marker bar compared to the height of the initial marker bar. Four digital image processing steps are employed to automatically measure the rice crop height: band selection, filtering, thresholding, and height measurement. Band selection is used to remove redundant features. Filtering extracts significant features of the marker bar. The thresholding method is applied to separate objects and boundaries of the marker bar versus other areas. The marker bar is detected and compared with the initial marker bar to measure the rice crop height. Our experiment used a field server with a digital camera to continuously monitor a rice field located in Suphanburi Province, Thailand. The experimental results show that the proposed method measures rice crop height effectively, with no human intervention required. PMID:24451465

  1. Automatic Rice Crop Height Measurement Using a Field Server and Digital Image Processing

    PubMed Central

    Sritarapipat, Tanakorn; Rakwatin, Preesan; Kasetkasem, Teerasit

    2014-01-01

    Rice crop height is an important agronomic trait linked to plant type and yield potential. This research developed an automatic image processing technique to detect rice crop height based on images taken by a digital camera attached to a field server. The camera acquires rice paddy images daily at a consistent time of day. The images include the rice plants and a marker bar used to provide a height reference. The rice crop height can be indirectly measured from the images by measuring the height of the marker bar compared to the height of the initial marker bar. Four digital image processing steps are employed to automatically measure the rice crop height: band selection, filtering, thresholding, and height measurement. Band selection is used to remove redundant features. Filtering extracts significant features of the marker bar. The thresholding method is applied to separate objects and boundaries of the marker bar versus other areas. The marker bar is detected and compared with the initial marker bar to measure the rice crop height. Our experiment used a field server with a digital camera to continuously monitor a rice field located in Suphanburi Province, Thailand. The experimental results show that the proposed method measures rice crop height effectively, with no human intervention required. PMID:24451465

  2. Automated analysis of phantom images for the evaluation of long-term reproducibility in digital mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gennaro, G.; Ferro, F.; Contento, G.; Fornasin, F.; di Maggio, C.

    2007-03-01

    The performance of an automatic software package was evaluated with phantom images acquired by a full-field digital mammography unit. After the validation, the software was used, together with a Leeds TORMAS test object, to model the image acquisition process. Process modelling results were used to evaluate the sensitivity of the method in detecting changes of exposure parameters from routine image quality measurements in digital mammography, which is the ultimate purpose of long-term reproducibility tests. Image quality indices measured by the software included the mean pixel value and standard deviation of circular details and surrounding background, contrast-to-noise ratio and relative contrast; detail counts were also collected. The validation procedure demonstrated that the software localizes the phantom details correctly and the difference between automatic and manual measurements was within few grey levels. Quantitative analysis showed sufficient sensitivity to relate fluctuations in exposure parameters (kVp or mAs) to variations in image quality indices. In comparison, detail counts were found less sensitive in detecting image quality changes, even when limitations due to observer subjectivity were overcome by automatic analysis. In conclusion, long-term reproducibility tests provided by the Leeds TORMAS phantom with quantitative analysis of multiple IQ indices have been demonstrated to be effective in predicting causes of deviation from standard operating conditions and can be used to monitor stability in full-field digital mammography.

  3. TM digital image products for applications. [computer compatible tapes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barker, J. L.; Gunther, F. J.; Abrams, R. B.; Ball, D.

    1984-01-01

    The image characteristics of digital data generated by LANDSAT 4 thematic mapper (TM) are discussed. Digital data from the TM resides in tape files at various stages of image processing. Within each image data file, the image lines are blocked by a factor of either 5 for a computer compatible tape CCT-BT, or 4 for a CCT-AT and CCT-PT; in each format, the image file has a different format. Nominal geometric corrections which provide proper geodetic relationships between different parts of the image are available only for the CCT-PT. It is concluded that detector 3 of band 5 on the TM does not respond; this channel of data needs replacement. The empty bin phenomenon in CCT-AT images results from integer truncations of mixed-mode arithmetric operations.

  4. Resolution enhancement phase-contrast imaging by microsphere digital holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yunxin; Guo, Sha; Wang, Dayong; Lin, Qiaowen; Rong, Lu; Zhao, Jie

    2016-05-01

    Microsphere has shown the superiority of super-resolution imaging in the traditional 2D intensity microscope. Here a microsphere digital holography approach is presented to realize the resolution enhancement phase-contrast imaging. The system is designed by combining the microsphere with the image-plane digital holography. A microsphere very close to the object can increase the resolution by transforming the object wave from the higher frequency to the lower one. The resolution enhancement amplitude and phase images can be retrieved from a single hologram. The experiments are carried on the 1D and 2D gratings, and the results demonstrate that the observed resolution has been improved, meanwhile, the phase-contrast image is obtained. The proposed method can improve the transverse resolution in all directions based on a single exposure. Furthermore, this system has extended the application of the microsphere from the conventional 2D microscopic imaging to 3D phase-contrast microscopic imaging.

  5. Integration of digital gross pathology images for enterprise-wide access

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Milon; Sharma, Gaurav; Parwani, Anil V.; Anderson, Ralph; Kolowitz, Brian J; Piccoli, Anthony; Shrestha, Rasu B.; Lauro, Gonzalo Romero; Pantanowitz, Liron

    2012-01-01

    Background: Sharing digital pathology images for enterprise- wide use into a picture archiving and communication system (PACS) is not yet widely adopted. We share our solution and 3-year experience of transmitting such images to an enterprise image server (EIS). Methods: Gross pathology images acquired by prosectors were integrated with clinical cases into the laboratory information system's image management module, and stored in JPEG2000 format on a networked image server. Automated daily searches for cases with gross images were used to compile an ASCII text file that was forwarded to a separate institutional Enterprise Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) Wrapper (EDW) server. Concurrently, an HL7-based image order for these cases was generated, containing the locations of images and patient data, and forwarded to the EDW, which combined data in these locations to generate images with patient data, as required by DICOM standards. The image and data were then “wrapped” according to DICOM standards, transferred to the PACS servers, and made accessible on an institution-wide basis. Results: In total, 26,966 gross images from 9,733 cases were transmitted over the 3-year period from the laboratory information system to the EIS. The average process time for cases with successful automatic uploads (n=9,688) to the EIS was 98 seconds. Only 45 cases (0.5%) failed requiring manual intervention. Uploaded images were immediately available to institution- wide PACS users. Since inception, user feedback has been positive. Conclusions: Enterprise- wide PACS- based sharing of pathology images is feasible, provides useful services to clinical staff, and utilizes existing information system and telecommunications infrastructure. PACS-shared pathology images, however, require a “DICOM wrapper” for multisystem compatibility. PMID:22530178

  6. Digital Topology and Geometry in Medical Imaging: A Survey.

    PubMed

    Saha, Punam K; Strand, Robin; Borgefors, Gunilla

    2015-09-01

    Digital topology and geometry refers to the use of topologic and geometric properties and features for images defined in digital grids. Such methods have been widely used in many medical imaging applications, including image segmentation, visualization, manipulation, interpolation, registration, surface-tracking, object representation, correction, quantitative morphometry etc. Digital topology and geometry play important roles in medical imaging research by enriching the scope of target outcomes and by adding strong theoretical foundations with enhanced stability, fidelity, and efficiency. This paper presents a comprehensive yet compact survey on results, principles, and insights of methods related to digital topology and geometry with strong emphasis on understanding their roles in various medical imaging applications. Specifically, this paper reviews methods related to distance analysis and path propagation, connectivity, surface-tracking, image segmentation, boundary and centerline detection, topology preservation and local topological properties, skeletonization, and object representation, correction, and quantitative morphometry. A common thread among the topics reviewed in this paper is that their theory and algorithms use the principle of digital path connectivity, path propagation, and neighborhood analysis. PMID:25879908

  7. Terahertz digital holography image processing based on MAP algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Guang-Hao; Li, Qi

    2015-04-01

    Terahertz digital holography combines the terahertz technology and digital holography technology at present, fully exploits the advantages in both of them. Unfortunately, the quality of terahertz digital holography reconstruction images is gravely harmed by speckle noise which hinders the popularization of this technology. In this paper, the maximum a posterior estimation (MAP) filter is harnessed for the restoration of the digital reconstruction images. The filtering results are compared with images filtered by Wiener Filter and conventional frequency-domain filters from both subjective and objective perspectives. As for objective assessment, we adopted speckle index (SPKI) and edge preserving index (EPI) to quantitate the quality of images. In this paper, Canny edge detector is also used to outline the target in original and reconstruction images, which then act as an important role in the evaluation of filter performance. All the analysis indicate that maximum a posterior estimation filtering algorithm performs superiorly compared with the other two competitors in this paper and has enhanced the terahertz digital holography reconstruction images to a certain degree, allowing for a more accurate boundary identification.

  8. Global Digital Image Mosaics of Mars: Assessment of Geodetic Accuracy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirk, R.; Archinal, B. A.; Lee, E. M.; Davies, M. E.; Colvin, T. R.; Duxbury, T. C.

    2001-01-01

    A revised global image mosaic of Mars (MDIM 2.0) was recently completed by USGS. Comparison with high-resolution gridded Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) digital image mosaics will allow us to quantify its geodetic errors; linking the next MDIM to the MOLA data will help eliminate those errors. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  9. Digital filter design for radar image formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, John W.; Nelson, Jeffrey E.; Banh, N. D.; Moncada, John J.; Bayma, Robert W.

    1989-01-01

    Novel weighted-least-squares approaches to the design of digital filters for SAR applications are presented. The filters belong to three different categories according to their combinations of minimax passband, least-squares stopband, minimax stopband, and maximally-flat passband. For real-time applications, it is important to design the sets of digital filter coefficient tables in an offline environment; the appropriate precomputed filter is then selected for each SAR signal-processing function, as a function of both mode and mapping geometry during real-time processing.

  10. Image processing in digital chest radiography: effect on diagnostic efficacy.

    PubMed

    Manninen, H; Partanen, K; Lehtovirta, J; Matsi, P; Soimakallio, S

    1992-01-01

    The usefulness of digital image processing of chest radiographs was evaluated in a clinical study. In 54 patients, chest radiographs in the posteroanterior projection were obtained by both 14 inch digital image intensifier equipment and the conventional screen-film technique. The digital radiographs (512 x 512 image format) viewed on a 625 line monitor were processed in three different ways: (1) standard display; (2) digital edge enhancement for the standard display; and (3) inverse intensity display. The radiographs were interpreted independently by three radiologists. The diagnoses were confirmed by CT, follow-up radiographs and clinical records. Chest abnormalities of the films analyzed included 21 primary lung tumors, 44 pulmonary nodules, 16 cases with mediastinal disease and 17 cases with pneumonia/atelectasis. Interstitial lung disease, pleural plaques, and pulmonary emphysema were found in 30, 18 and 19 cases, respectively. The sensitivity of conventional radiography when averaged overall findings was better than that of the digital techniques (P less than 0.001). The differences in diagnostic accuracy measured by sensitivity and specificity between the three digital display modes were small. Standard image display showed better sensitivity for pulmonary nodules (0.74 vs 0.66; P less than 0.05) but poorer specificity for pulmonary emphysema (0.85 vs. 0.93; P less than 0.05) compared with inverse intensity display. We conclude that when using 512 x 512 image format, the routine use of digital edge enhancement and tone reversal at digital chest radiographs is not warranted. PMID:1563421

  11. The FBI compression standard for digitized fingerprint images

    SciTech Connect

    Brislawn, C.M.; Bradley, J.N.; Onyshczak, R.J.; Hopper, T.

    1996-10-01

    The FBI has formulated national standards for digitization and compression of gray-scale fingerprint images. The compression algorithm for the digitized images is based on adaptive uniform scalar quantization of a discrete wavelet transform subband decomposition, a technique referred to as the wavelet/scalar quantization method. The algorithm produces archival-quality images at compression ratios of around 15 to 1 and will allow the current database of paper fingerprint cards to be replaced by digital imagery. A compliance testing program is also being implemented to ensure high standards of image quality and interchangeability of data between different implementations. We will review the current status of the FBI standard, including the compliance testing process and the details of the first-generation encoder.

  12. Generation and Analysis of Wire Rope Digital Radiographic Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakhlov, S.; Anpilogov, P.; Batranin, A.; Osipov, S.; Zhumabekova, Sh; Yadrenkin, I.

    2016-06-01

    The paper is dealt with different structures of the digital radiographic system intended for wire rope radiography. The scanning geometry of the wire rope is presented and the main stages of its digital radiographic image generation are identified herein. Correction algorithms are suggested for X-ray beam hardening. A complex internal structure of the wire rope is illustrated by its 25 mm diameter image obtained from X-ray computed tomography. The paper considers the approach to the analysis of digital radiographic image algorithms based on the closeness of certain parameters (invariants) of all unit cross-sections of the reference wire rope or its sections with the length equaling to the lay. The main invariants of wire rope radiographic images are identified and compared with its typical defects.

  13. ASPRS Digital Imagery Guideline Image Gallery Discussion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, Robert

    2002-01-01

    The objectives of the image gallery are to 1) give users and providers a simple means of identifying appropriate imagery for a given application/feature extraction; and 2) define imagery sufficiently to be described in engineering and acquisition terms. This viewgraph presentation includes a discussion of edge response and aliasing for image processing, and a series of images illustrating the effects of signal to noise ratio (SNR) on images. Another series of images illustrates how images are affected by varying the ground sample distances (GSD).

  14. A new method to acquire 3-D images of a dental cast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhongke; Yi, Yaxing; Zhu, Zhen; Li, Hua; Qin, Yongyuan

    2006-01-01

    This paper introduced our newly developed method to acquire three-dimensional images of a dental cast. A rotatable table, a laser-knife, a mirror, a CCD camera and a personal computer made up of a three-dimensional data acquiring system. A dental cast is placed on the table; the mirror is installed beside the table; a linear laser is projected to the dental cast; the CCD camera is put up above the dental cast, it can take picture of the dental cast and the shadow in the mirror; while the table rotating, the camera records the shape of the laser streak projected on the dental cast, and transmit the data to the computer. After the table rotated one circuit, the computer processes the data, calculates the three-dimensional coordinates of the dental cast's surface. In data processing procedure, artificial neural networks are enrolled to calibrate the lens distortion, map coordinates form screen coordinate system to world coordinate system. According to the three-dimensional coordinates, the computer reconstructs the stereo image of the dental cast. It is essential for computer-aided diagnosis and treatment planning in orthodontics. In comparison with other systems in service, for example, laser beam three-dimensional scanning system, the characteristic of this three-dimensional data acquiring system: a. celerity, it casts only 1 minute to scan a dental cast; b. compact, the machinery is simple and compact; c. no blind zone, a mirror is introduced ably to reduce blind zone.

  15. Dynamic Linear Model Analysis of Optical Imaging Data Acquired from the Human Neocortex

    PubMed Central

    Lavine, Michael; Haglund, Michael M.; Hochman, Daryl W.

    2011-01-01

    The amount of light absorbed and scattered by neocortical tissue is altered by neuronal activity. Imaging of intrinsic optical signals (ImIOS), a technique for mapping these activity-evoked optical changes with an imaging detector, has the potential to be useful for both clinical and experimental investigations of the human neocortex. However, its usefulness for human studies is currently limited because intraoperatively acquired ImIOS data is noisy. To improve the reliability and usefulness of ImIOS for human studies, it is desirable to find appropriate methods for the removal of noise artifacts and its statistical analysis. Here we develop a Bayesian, dynamic linear modeling approach that appears to address these problems. A dynamic linear model (DLM) was constructed that included cyclic components to model the heartbeat and respiration artifacts, and a local linear component to model the activity-evoked response. The robustness of the model was tested on a set of ImIOS data acquired from the exposed cortices of six human subjects illuminated with either 535 nm or 660 nm light. The DLM adequately reduced noise artifacts in these data while reliably preserving their activity-evoked optical responses. To demonstrate how these methods might be used for intraoperative neurosurgical mapping, optical data acquired from a single human subject during direct electrical stimulation of the cortex were quantitatively analyzed. This example showed that the DLM can be used to provide quantitative information about human ImIOS data that is not available through qualitative analysis alone. PMID:21640137

  16. Skin hydration imaging using a long-wavelength near-infrared digital camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attas, E. Michael; Posthumus, Trevor B.; Schattka, Bernhard J.; Sowa, Michael G.; Mantsch, Henry H.; Zhang, Shuliang L.

    2001-07-01

    Skin hydration is a key factor in skin health. Hydration measurements can provide diagnostic information on the condition of skin and can indicate the integrity of the skin barrier function. Near-infrared spectroscopy measures the water content of living tissue by its effect on tissue reflectance at a particular wavelength. Imaging has the important advantage of showing the degree of hydration as a function of location. Short-wavelength (650-1050 nm) near infrared spectroscopic reflectance imaging has previously been used in-vivo to determine the relative water content of skin under carefully controlled laboratory conditions. We have recently developed a novel spectroscopic imaging system to acquire image sets in the long-wavelength region of the near infrared (960 to 1700 nm), where the water absorption bands are more intense. The LW-NIR systems uses a liquid- crystal tunable filter in front of the objective lens and incorporates a 12-bit digital camera with a 320-by-240-pixel indium-gallium arsenide array sensor. Custom software controls the camera and tunable filter, allowing image sets to be acquired and displayed in near-real time. Forearm skin hydration was measured in a clinical context using the long- wavelength imaging system, a short-wavelength imaging system, and non-imaging instrumentation. Among these, the LW-NIR system appears to be the most sensitive at measuring dehydration of skin.

  17. A novel method to acquire 3D data from serial 2D images of a dental cast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Yaxing; Li, Zhongke; Chen, Qi; Shao, Jun; Li, Xinshe; Liu, Zhiqin

    2007-05-01

    This paper introduced a newly developed method to acquire three-dimensional data from serial two-dimensional images of a dental cast. The system consists of a computer and a set of data acquiring device. The data acquiring device is used to take serial pictures of the a dental cast; an artificial neural network works to translate two-dimensional pictures to three-dimensional data; then three-dimensional image can reconstruct by the computer. The three-dimensional data acquiring of dental casts is the foundation of computer-aided diagnosis and treatment planning in orthodontics.

  18. Digital image compression for a 2f multiplexing optical setup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas, J.; Amaya, D.; Rueda, E.

    2016-07-01

    In this work a virtual 2f multiplexing system was implemented in combination with digital image compression techniques and redundant information elimination. Depending on the image type to be multiplexed, a memory-usage saving of as much as 99% was obtained. The feasibility of the system was tested using three types of images, binary characters, QR codes, and grey level images. A multiplexing step was implemented digitally, while a demultiplexing step was implemented in a virtual 2f optical setup following real experimental parameters. To avoid cross-talk noise, each image was codified with a specially designed phase diffraction carrier that would allow the separation and relocation of the multiplexed images on the observation plane by simple light propagation. A description of the system is presented together with simulations that corroborate the method. The present work may allow future experimental implementations that will make use of all the parallel processing capabilities of optical systems.

  19. Interactive display system having a digital micromirror imaging device

    DOEpatents

    Veligdan, James T.; DeSanto, Leonard; Kaull, Lisa; Brewster, Calvin

    2006-04-11

    A display system includes a waveguide optical panel having an inlet face and an opposite outlet face. A projector cooperates with a digital imaging device, e.g. a digital micromirror imaging device, for projecting an image through the panel for display on the outlet face. The imaging device includes an array of mirrors tiltable between opposite display and divert positions. The display positions reflect an image light beam from the projector through the panel for display on the outlet face. The divert positions divert the image light beam away from the panel, and are additionally used for reflecting a probe light beam through the panel toward the outlet face. Covering a spot on the panel, e.g. with a finger, reflects the probe light beam back through the panel toward the inlet face for detection thereat and providing interactive capability.

  20. GEOMETRIC PROCESSING OF DIGITAL IMAGES OF THE PLANETS.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Edwards, Kathleen

    1987-01-01

    New procedures and software have been developed for geometric transformations of images to support digital cartography of the planets. The procedures involve the correction of spacecraft camera orientation of each image with the use of ground control and the transformation of each image to a Sinusoidal Equal-Area map projection with an algorithm which allows the number of transformation calculations to vary as the distortion varies within the image. When the distortion is low in an area of an image, few transformation computations are required, and most pixels can be interpolated. When distortion is extreme, the location of each pixel is computed. Mosaics are made of these images and stored as digital databases.

  1. Low-Light Image Enhancement Using Adaptive Digital Pixel Binning

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Yoonjong; Im, Jaehyun; Paik, Joonki

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an image enhancement algorithm for low-light scenes in an environment with insufficient illumination. Simple amplification of intensity exhibits various undesired artifacts: noise amplification, intensity saturation, and loss of resolution. In order to enhance low-light images without undesired artifacts, a novel digital binning algorithm is proposed that considers brightness, context, noise level, and anti-saturation of a local region in the image. The proposed algorithm does not require any modification of the image sensor or additional frame-memory; it needs only two line-memories in the image signal processor (ISP). Since the proposed algorithm does not use an iterative computation, it can be easily embedded in an existing digital camera ISP pipeline containing a high-resolution image sensor. PMID:26121609

  2. Low-Light Image Enhancement Using Adaptive Digital Pixel Binning.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Yoonjong; Im, Jaehyun; Paik, Joonki

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an image enhancement algorithm for low-light scenes in an environment with insufficient illumination. Simple amplification of intensity exhibits various undesired artifacts: noise amplification, intensity saturation, and loss of resolution. In order to enhance low-light images without undesired artifacts, a novel digital binning algorithm is proposed that considers brightness, context, noise level, and anti-saturation of a local region in the image. The proposed algorithm does not require any modification of the image sensor or additional frame-memory; it needs only two line-memories in the image signal processor (ISP). Since the proposed algorithm does not use an iterative computation, it can be easily embedded in an existing digital camera ISP pipeline containing a high-resolution image sensor. PMID:26121609

  3. Digital adaptive optics line-scanning confocal imaging system.

    PubMed

    Liu, Changgeng; Kim, Myung K

    2015-01-01

    A digital adaptive optics line-scanning confocal imaging (DAOLCI) system is proposed by applying digital holographic adaptive optics to a digital form of line-scanning confocal imaging system. In DAOLCI, each line scan is recorded by a digital hologram, which allows access to the complex optical field from one slice of the sample through digital holography. This complex optical field contains both the information of one slice of the sample and the optical aberration of the system, thus allowing us to compensate for the effect of the optical aberration, which can be sensed by a complex guide star hologram. After numerical aberration compensation, the corrected optical fields of a sequence of line scans are stitched into the final corrected confocal image. In DAOLCI, a numerical slit is applied to realize the confocality at the sensor end. The width of this slit can be adjusted to control the image contrast and speckle noise for scattering samples. DAOLCI dispenses with the hardware pieces, such as Shack–Hartmann wavefront sensor and deformable mirror, and the closed-loop feedbacks adopted in the conventional adaptive optics confocal imaging system, thus reducing the optomechanical complexity and cost. Numerical simulations and proof-of-principle experiments are presented that demonstrate the feasibility of this idea. PMID:26140334

  4. Digital adaptive optics line-scanning confocal imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Changgeng; Kim, Myung K.

    2015-11-01

    A digital adaptive optics line-scanning confocal imaging (DAOLCI) system is proposed by applying digital holographic adaptive optics to a digital form of line-scanning confocal imaging system. In DAOLCI, each line scan is recorded by a digital hologram, which allows access to the complex optical field from one slice of the sample through digital holography. This complex optical field contains both the information of one slice of the sample and the optical aberration of the system, thus allowing us to compensate for the effect of the optical aberration, which can be sensed by a complex guide star hologram. After numerical aberration compensation, the corrected optical fields of a sequence of line scans are stitched into the final corrected confocal image. In DAOLCI, a numerical slit is applied to realize the confocality at the sensor end. The width of this slit can be adjusted to control the image contrast and speckle noise for scattering samples. DAOLCI dispenses with the hardware pieces, such as Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor and deformable mirror, and the closed-loop feedbacks adopted in the conventional adaptive optics confocal imaging system, thus reducing the optomechanical complexity and cost. Numerical simulations and proof-of-principle experiments are presented that demonstrate the feasibility of this idea.

  5. A comparison of defect size and film quality obtained from Film digitized image and digital image radiographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamlangkeng, Poramate; Asa, Prateepasen; Mai, Noipitak

    2014-06-01

    Digital radiographic testing is an acceptable premature nondestructive examination technique. Its performance and limitation comparing to the old technique are still not widely well known. In this paper conducted the study on the comparison of the accuracy of the defect size measurement and film quality obtained from film and digital radiograph techniques by testing in specimens and known size sample defect. Initially, one specimen was built with three types of internal defect; which are longitudinal cracking, lack of fusion, and porosity. For the known size sample defect, it was machined various geometrical size for comparing the accuracy of the measuring defect size to the real size in both film and digital images. To compare the image quality by considering at smallest detectable wire and the three defect images. In this research used Image Quality Indicator (IQI) of wire type 10/16 FE EN BS EN-462-1-1994. The radiographic films were produced by X-ray and gamma ray using Kodak AA400 size 3.5x8 inches, while the digital images were produced by Fuji image plate type ST-VI with 100 micrometers resolution. During the tests, a radiator GE model MF3 was implemented. The applied energy is varied from 120 to 220 kV and the current from 1.2 to 3.0 mA. The intensity of Iridium 192 gamma ray is in the range of 24-25 Curie. Under the mentioned conditions, the results showed that the deviation of the defect size measurement comparing to the real size obtained from the digital image radiographs is below than that of the film digitized, whereas the quality of film digitizer radiographs is higher in comparison.

  6. Determination of localization accuracy based on experimentally acquired image sets: applications to single molecule microscopy.

    PubMed

    Tahmasbi, Amir; Ward, E Sally; Ober, Raimund J

    2015-03-23

    Fluorescence microscopy is a photon-limited imaging modality that allows the study of subcellular objects and processes with high specificity. The best possible accuracy (standard deviation) with which an object of interest can be localized when imaged using a fluorescence microscope is typically calculated using the Cramér-Rao lower bound, that is, the inverse of the Fisher information. However, the current approach for the calculation of the best possible localization accuracy relies on an analytical expression for the image of the object. This can pose practical challenges since it is often difficult to find appropriate analytical models for the images of general objects. In this study, we instead develop an approach that directly uses an experimentally collected image set to calculate the best possible localization accuracy for a general subcellular object. In this approach, we fit splines, i.e. smoothly connected piecewise polynomials, to the experimentally collected image set to provide a continuous model of the object, which can then be used for the calculation of the best possible localization accuracy. Due to its practical importance, we investigate in detail the application of the proposed approach in single molecule fluorescence microscopy. In this case, the object of interest is a point source and, therefore, the acquired image set pertains to an experimental point spread function. PMID:25837101

  7. Automatic Analysis for the Chemical Testing of Urine Examination Using Digital Image Processing Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilardy, Juan M.; Peña, Jose C.; Daza, Miller F.; Torres, Cesar O.; Mattos, Lorenzo

    2008-04-01

    For to make the chemical testing of urine examination a dipstick is used, which contains pads that have incorporated within them the reagents for chemical reactions for the detection of a number from substances in the urine. Urine is added to the pads for reaction by dipping the dipstick into the urine and then slowly withdrawing it. The subsequent colorimetric reactions are timed to an endpoint; the extent of colors formation is directly related to the level of the urine constituent. The colors can be read manually by comparison with color charts or with the use of automated reflectance meters. The aim of the System described in this paper is to analyze and to determine automatically the changes of the colors in the dipstick when this is retired of the urine sample and to compare the results with color charts for the diagnosis of many common diseases such as diabetes. The system consists of: (a) a USB camera. (b) Computer. (c) Software Matlab v7.4. Image analysis begins with a digital capturing of the image as data. Once the image is acquired in digital format, the data can be manipulated through digital image processing. Our objective was to develop a computerised image processing system and an interactive software package for the backing of clinicians, medical research and medical students.

  8. CT reconstruction from portal images acquired during volumetric-modulated arc therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poludniowski, G.; Thomas, M. D. R.; Evans, P. M.; Webb, S.

    2010-10-01

    Volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT), a form of intensity-modulated arc therapy (IMAT), has become a topic of research and clinical activity in recent years. As a form of arc therapy, portal images acquired during the treatment fraction form a (partial) Radon transform of the patient. We show that these portal images, when used in a modified global cone-beam filtered backprojection (FBP) algorithm, allow a surprisingly recognizable CT-volume to be reconstructed. The possibility of distinguishing anatomy in such VMAT-CT reconstructions suggests that this could prove to be a valuable treatment position-verification tool. Further, some potential for local-tomography techniques to improve image quality is shown.

  9. Communication and storage of digital medical images in database.

    PubMed

    Evangelista, N; Camapum, J; Amemiya, E

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents the development of an application for communication and storage of clinical images based upon the Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) protocol. The proposed solution is composed of three different databases servers, PostgreSQL, Firebird and Oracle, and a DICOM client software, that uses the protocol TCP/IP. It provides the communication services, transmission, storage and administration of medical images. PMID:17281491

  10. Quantitative phase imaging by three-wavelength digital holography

    SciTech Connect

    Mann, Christopher J; Bingham, Philip R; Tobin Jr, Kenneth William; Paquit, Vincent C

    2008-01-01

    Three-wavelength digital holography is applied to obtain surface height measurements over several microns of range, while simultaneously maintaining the low noise precision of the single wavelength phase measurement. The precision is preserved by the use of intermediate synthetic wavelength steps generated from the three wavelengths and the use of hierarchical optical phase unwrapping. As the complex wave-front of each wavelength can be captured simultaneously in one digital image, real-time performance is achievable.

  11. Digital image processing of earth observation sensor data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernstein, R.

    1976-01-01

    This paper describes digital image processing techniques that were developed to precisely correct Landsat multispectral earth observation data and gives illustrations of the results achieved, e.g., geometric corrections with an error of less than one picture element, a relative error of one-fourth picture element, and no radiometric error effect. Techniques for enhancing the sensor data, digitally mosaicking multiple scenes, and extracting information are also illustrated.

  12. Research on embedding invisible digital watermarking in ultrasonic image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Huashan; Shi, Qing; Ding, Mingyue

    2009-10-01

    In this paper, we proposed an adaptive watermarking algorithm to embed invisible digital watermarking in the wavelet domain of ultrasonic image. By analyzing the characteristic of detail sub-band coefficients of the ultrasonic image after discrete wavelet transform (DWT), we use the mean and variance of the detail sub-bands to modify the wavelet coefficients adaptively, and the embedded watermark is invisible to human visual system (HVS) and adapted to the original image. We can derive the just noticeable different (JND), which describes the maximum signal intensity that the various parts of image can tolerate the digital watermarking. By using this digital watermarking technique we can embed a certainty or confidentiality information directly into original ultrasonic images so that the replication and transmission of ultrasonic image can be tracked efficiently. Therefore, the copyright and ownership of ultrasonic images can be protected, which is critical for the authorization usage of the source of ultrasonic images. The experimental results and attack analysis showed that the proposed algorithm is effective and robust to ultrasonic image processing operations and geometric attacks.

  13. Figure of Image Quality and Information Capacity in Digital Mammography

    PubMed Central

    Michail, Christos M.; Kalyvas, Nektarios E.; Valais, Ioannis G.; Fudos, Ioannis P.; Fountos, George P.; Dimitropoulos, Nikos; Kandarakis, Ioannis S.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. In this work, a simple technique to assess the image quality characteristics of the postprocessed image is developed and an easy to use figure of image quality (FIQ) is introduced. This FIQ characterizes images in terms of resolution and noise. In addition information capacity, defined within the context of Shannon's information theory, was used as an overall image quality index. Materials and Methods. A digital mammographic image was postprocessed with three digital filters. Resolution and noise were calculated via the Modulation Transfer Function (MTF), the coefficient of variation, and the figure of image quality. In addition, frequency dependent parameters such as the noise power spectrum (NPS) and noise equivalent quanta (NEQ) were estimated and used to assess information capacity. Results. FIQs for the “raw image” data and the image processed with the “sharpen edges” filter were found 907.3 and 1906.1, correspondingly. The information capacity values were 60.86 × 103 and 78.96 × 103 bits/mm2. Conclusion. It was found that, after the application of the postprocessing techniques (even commercial nondedicated software) on the raw digital mammograms, MTF, NPS, and NEQ are improved for medium to high spatial frequencies leading to resolving smaller structures in the final image. PMID:24895593

  14. Digital and conventional chest images: observer performance with Film Digital Radiography System.

    PubMed

    Goodman, L R; Foley, W D; Wilson, C R; Rimm, A A; Lawson, T L

    1986-01-01

    The Film Digital Radiography System (FilmDRS) is a device with a laser optical film digitizer, 2,000 X 2,000 X 12-bit memory, and a 1,000-line video display. To evaluate the adequacy of this device for general radiography of the chest, four readers independently analyzed both radiographs and the corresponding video display of the digitized chest images of 150 patients, consisting of 100 images of abnormalities and 50 normal images. The overall results indicate equal sensitivity for the two systems. The FilmDRS, with interactive windowing, proved superior in the detection of hilar and mediastinal disease. X-ray film was superior in allowing detection of hyperlucent states. There was equivalent sensitivity for other disease categories. Superior specificity was achieved with conventional radiographs. PMID:3940392

  15. Dual Level Digital Watermarking for Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, V. K.; Singh, A. K.

    2010-11-01

    More than 700 years ago, watermarks were used in Italy to indicate the paper brand and the mill that produced it. By the 18th century watermarks began to be used as anti counterfeiting measures on money and other documents.The term watermark was introduced near the end of the 18th century. It was probably given because the marks resemble the effects of water on paper. The first example of a technology similar to digital watermarking is a patent filed in 1954 by Emil Hembrooke for identifying music works. In 1988, Komatsu and Tominaga appear to be the first to use the term "digital watermarking". Consider the following hypothetical situations. You go to a shop, buy some goods and at the counter you are given a currency note you have never come across before. How do you verify that it is not counterfeit? Or say you go to a stationery shop and ask for a ream of bond paper. How do you verify that you have actually been given what you asked for? How does a philatelist verify the authenticity of a stamp? In all these cases, the watermark is used to authenticate. Watermarks have been in existence almost from the time paper has been in use. The impression created by the mesh moulds on the slurry of fibre and water remains on the paper. It serves to identify the manufacturer and thus authenticate the product without actually degrading the aesthetics and utility of the stock. It also makes forgery significantly tougher. Even today, important government and legal documents are watermarked. But what is watermarking, when it comes to digital data? Information is no longer present on a physical material but is represented as a series of zeros and ones. Duplication of information is achieved easily by just reproducing that combination of zeros and ones. How then can one protect ownership rights and authenticate data? The digital watermark is the same as that of conventional watermarks.

  16. Highest Resolution Image of Dust and Sand Yet Acquired on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on image for Figure 1Click on image for Figure 2Click on image for Figure 3

    This mosaic of four side-by-side microscope images (one a color composite) was acquired by the Optical Microscope, a part of the Microscopy, Electrochemistry, and Conductivity Analyzer (MECA) instrument suite on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander. Taken on the ninth Martian day of the mission, or Sol 9 (June 3, 2008), the image shows a 3 millimeter (0.12 inch) diameter silicone target after it has been exposed to dust kicked up by the landing. It is the highest resolution image of dust and sand ever acquired on Mars. The silicone substrate provides a sticky surface for holding the particles to be examined by the microscope.

    Martian Particles on Microscope's Silicone Substrate In figure 1, the particles are on a silcone substrate target 3 millimeters (0.12 inch) in diameter, which provides a sticky surface for holding the particles while the microscope images them. Blow-ups of four of the larger particles are shown in the center. These particles range in size from about 30 microns to 150 microns (from about one one-thousandth of an inch to six one-thousandths of an inch).

    Possible Nature of Particles Viewed by Mars Lander's Optical Microscope In figure 2, the color composite on the right was acquired to examine dust that had fallen onto an exposed surface. The translucent particle highlighted at bottom center is of comparable size to white particles in a Martian soil sample (upper pictures) seen two sols earlier inside the scoop of Phoenix's Robotic Arm as imaged by the lander's Robotic Arm Camera. The white particles may be examples of the abundant salts that have been found in the Martian soil by previous missions. Further investigations will be needed to determine the white material's composition and whether translucent particles

  17. Experience with CANDID: Comparison algorithm for navigating digital image databases

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, P.; Cannon, M.

    1994-10-01

    This paper presents results from the authors experience with CANDID (Comparison Algorithm for Navigating Digital Image Databases), which was designed to facilitate image retrieval by content using a query-by-example methodology. A global signature describing the texture, shape, or color content is first computed for every image stored in a database, and a normalized similarity measure between probability density functions of feature vectors is used to match signatures. This method can be used to retrieve images from a database that are similar to a user-provided example image. Results for three test applications are included.

  18. Viking image processing. [digital stereo imagery and computer mosaicking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, W. B.

    1977-01-01

    The paper discusses the camera systems capable of recording black and white and color imagery developed for the Viking Lander imaging experiment. Each Viking Lander image consisted of a matrix of numbers with 512 rows and an arbitrary number of columns up to a maximum of about 9,000. Various techniques were used in the processing of the Viking Lander images, including: (1) digital geometric transformation, (2) the processing of stereo imagery to produce three-dimensional terrain maps, and (3) computer mosaicking of distinct processed images. A series of Viking Lander images is included.

  19. Study on the improvement of overall optical image quality via digital image processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Cheng-Mu; Fang, Yi Chin; Lin, Yu Chin

    2008-12-01

    This paper studies the effects of improving overall optical image quality via Digital Image Processing (DIP) and compares the promoted optical image with the non-processed optical image. Seen from the optical system, the improvement of image quality has a great influence on chromatic aberration and monochromatic aberration. However, overall image capture systems-such as cellphones and digital cameras-include not only the basic optical system but also many other factors, such as the electronic circuit system, transducer system, and so forth, whose quality can directly affect the image quality of the whole picture. Therefore, in this thesis Digital Image Processing technology is utilized to improve the overall image. It is shown via experiments that system modulation transfer function (MTF) based on the proposed DIP technology and applied to a comparatively bad optical system can be comparable to, even possibly superior to, the system MTF derived from a good optical system.

  20. Beam quality measurements using digitized laser beam images

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan, M.D. ); Mahon, R. )

    1989-11-01

    A method is described for measuring various laser beam characteristics with modest experimental complexity by digital processing of the near and far field images. Gaussian spot sizes, peak intensities, and spatial distributions of the images are easily found. Far field beam focusability is determined by computationally applying apertures of circular of elliptical diameters to the digitized image. Visualization of the magnitude of phase and intensity distortions is accomplished by comparing the 2-D fast Fourier transform of both smoothed and unsmoothed near field data to the actual far field data. The digital processing may be performed on current personal computers to give the experimenter unprecedented capabilities for rapid beam characteriztion at relatively low cost.

  1. Transmission of digital images within the NTSC analog format

    DOEpatents

    Nickel, George H.

    2004-06-15

    HDTV and NTSC compatible image communication is done in a single NTSC channel bandwidth. Luminance and chrominance image data of a scene to be transmitted is obtained. The image data is quantized and digitally encoded to form digital image data in HDTV transmission format having low-resolution terms and high-resolution terms. The low-resolution digital image data terms are transformed to a voltage signal corresponding to NTSC color subcarrier modulation with retrace blanking and color bursts to form a NTSC video signal. The NTSC video signal and the high-resolution digital image data terms are then transmitted in a composite NTSC video transmission. In a NTSC receiver, the NTSC video signal is processed directly to display the scene. In a HDTV receiver, the NTSC video signal is processed to invert the color subcarrier modulation to recover the low-resolution terms, where the recovered low-resolution terms are combined with the high-resolution terms to reconstruct the scene in a high definition format.

  2. Fuzzy Index to Evaluate Edge Detection in Digital Images

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Ornelas, Felicitas; Mendoza, Olivia; Melin, Patricia; Castro, Juan R.; Rodriguez-Diaz, Antonio; Castillo, Oscar

    2015-01-01

    In literature, we can find different metrics to evaluate the detected edges in digital images, like Pratt's figure of merit (FOM), Jaccard’s index (JI) and Dice’s coefficient (DC). These metrics compare two images, the first one is the reference edges image, and the second one is the detected edges image. It is important to mention that all existing metrics must binarize images before their evaluation. Binarization step causes information to be lost because an incomplete image is being evaluated. In this paper, we propose a fuzzy index (FI) for edge evaluation that does not use a binarization step. In order to process all detected edges, images are represented in their fuzzy form and all calculations are made with fuzzy sets operators and fuzzy Euclidean distance between both images. Our proposed index is compared to the most used metrics using synthetic images, with good results. PMID:26115362

  3. Damage in dual phase steel DP1000 investigated using digital image correlation and microstructure simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alharbi, Khaled; Ghadbeigi, Hassan; Efthymiadis, Panos; Zanganeh, Mohammad; Celotto, Steven; Dashwood, Richard; Pinna, Christophe

    2015-12-01

    Microstructure failure mechanisms and void nucleation in dual-phase (DP) steels during deformation have been studied using a combination of in situ tensile testing in a scanning electron microscope (SEM), digital image correlation (DIC) and finite element (FE) modelling. SEM images acquired during in situ tests were used to follow the evolution of damage within the microstructure of a DP1000 steel. From these images, strain maps were generated using DIC and used as boundary conditions for a FE model to investigate the stress state of martensite and ferrite before the onset of the martensite phase cracking. Based on the simulation results, a maximum principal stress of about 1700 MPa has been estimated for crack initiation in the martensite of the investigated DP1000 steel. The SEM image observations in combination with the FE analyses provide new insights for the development of physically-based damage models for DP-steels.

  4. The sonographic digital portfolio: a longitudinal ultrasound image tracking program

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Ultrasonography (US) at the medical student level is developing. As clinical skills and simulation centers expand, US equipment miniaturizes, and more students are exposed to ultrasound; a digital portfolio comprised of US images and videos may be useful in demonstrating experience and possibly competency. Methods Medical students participated in US curricula consisting of didactics and hands-on training. From 1 July 2006 to 30 June 2008, student images and videos were saved. Total images and videos were evaluated and catalogued. Results A total of 10,074 images and 1,227 videos were saved during the 2-year period. For the academic year 2006 to 2007, 159 medical students obtained 3,641 of the images (84.9%) and 270 of the videos (86.0%). First year students obtained 778 images and 20 videos; second year students, 1,174 images and 64 videos; third year students, 211 images and 20 videos; and fourth year students, 1,478 images and 166 videos. For the academic year 2007 to 2008, 222 medical students obtained 4,340 images (75%) and 619 videos (67.8%). First year students obtained 624 images and 109 videos; second year students, 555 images and 81 videos; third year students, 132 images and 14 videos; and fourth year students, 3,029 images and 415 videos. Conclusions The ultrasound digital portfolio allows medical students to collate and document their ultrasound experience. Currently, there is no requirement for ultrasound training, documentation of competency, or minimum numbers of US exams for medical education. The ultrasound digital portfolio may be a useful tool in documenting ultrasound proficiency. PMID:22871130

  5. Matching images from digital modalities to exams scheduled via RIS or PACS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, R. Anthony; Strickland, Nicola H.; Bruckner, Philip M.; Mayer, Robert M.; Niggemann, Mark

    1995-05-01

    In many hospitals, radiological examinations are scheduled via a Radiology Information System (RIS) or Picture Archiving and Communication System (PACS) before the imaging is performed. Demographic and examination information is first entered into the PACS database; when the images are later acquired, they have to match up with the correct pre-scheduled exam. This problem is non-trivial because patients may be scheduled for several exams on the same modality on the same day, and older modalities are unable to identify unambiguously the type of examination being performed. The purpose of this work is to develop practical and reliable strategies to assist in matching up the correct exam. Three potential solutions are considered: (1) modifications to imaging hardware and/or software, which force a PACS- generated exam ID into the image headers at acquisition time and thus guarantee a perfect match; (2) profiling algorithms, which attempt to find a match based on information already contained within the image headers; and (3) interactive Modality Examination Terminals (METs), which query the PACS database and assist human operators in manually selecting an appropriate exam. Solution (1) was found to be impractical with our existing digital imaging equipment, therefore solutions (2) and (3) were implemented and evaluated. Configuration files read at start-up time permitted the same hardware to be operated in either profiling or true MET mode. For each digital imaging modality the most appropriate mode of operation was determined, maintaining as far as possible a consistent hardware and software user interface.

  6. Optical and digital microscopic imaging techniques and applications in pathology.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaodong; Zheng, Bin; Liu, Hong

    2011-01-01

    The conventional optical microscope has been the primary tool in assisting pathological examinations. The modern digital pathology combines the power of microscopy, electronic detection, and computerized analysis. It enables cellular-, molecular-, and genetic-imaging at high efficiency and accuracy to facilitate clinical screening and diagnosis. This paper first reviews the fundamental concepts of microscopic imaging and introduces the technical features and associated clinical applications of optical microscopes, electron microscopes, scanning tunnel microscopes, and fluorescence microscopes. The interface of microscopy with digital image acquisition methods is discussed. The recent developments and future perspectives of contemporary microscopic imaging techniques such as three-dimensional and in vivo imaging are analyzed for their clinical potentials. PMID:21483100

  7. On detection of median filtering in digital images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirchner, Matthias; Fridrich, Jessica

    2010-01-01

    In digital image forensics, it is generally accepted that intentional manipulations of the image content are most critical and hence numerous forensic methods focus on the detection of such 'malicious' post-processing. However, it is also beneficial to know as much as possible about the general processing history of an image, including content-preserving operations, since they can affect the reliability of forensic methods in various ways. In this paper, we present a simple yet effective technique to detect median filtering in digital images-a widely used denoising and smoothing operator. As a great variety of forensic methods relies on some kind of a linearity assumption, a detection of non-linear median filtering is of particular interest. The effectiveness of our method is backed with experimental evidence on a large image database.

  8. Digital Images and the Z-Axis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cross, Judie

    2010-01-01

    This article argues that while a semiotic analysis of composition in the screen, page and image has significant heuristic value, this would be further enhanced were it also to take into account surface and depth. It is argued that these two aspects of composition are critical for successful reading/viewing of images, and especially for digital…

  9. Balanced Multiwavelets Based Digital Image Watermarking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Na; Huang, Hua; Zhou, Quan; Qi, Chun

    In this paper, an adaptive blind watermarking algorithm based on balanced multiwavelets transform is proposed. According to the properties of balanced multiwavelets and human vision system, a modified version of the well-established Lewis perceptual model is given. Therefore, the strength of embedded watermark is controlled by the local properties of the host image .The subbands of balanced multiwavelets transformation are similar to each other in the same scale, so the most similar subbands are chosen to embed the watermark by modifying the relation of the two subbands adaptively under the model, the watermark extraction can be performed without original image. Experimental results show that the watermarked images look visually identical to the original ones, and the watermark also successfully survives after image processing operations such as image cropping, scaling, filtering and JPEG compression.

  10. Compression of CCD raw images for digital still cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sriram, Parthasarathy; Sudharsanan, Subramania

    2005-03-01

    Lossless compression of raw CCD images captured using color filter arrays has several benefits. The benefits include improved storage capacity, reduced memory bandwidth, and lower power consumption for digital still camera processors. The paper discusses the benefits in detail and proposes the use of a computationally efficient block adaptive scheme for lossless compression. Experimental results are provided that indicate that the scheme performs well for CCD raw images attaining compression factors of more than two. The block adaptive method also compares favorably with JPEG-LS. A discussion is provided indicating how the proposed lossless coding scheme can be incorporated into digital still camera processors enabling lower memory bandwidth and storage requirements.

  11. The role of camera-bundled image management software in the consumer digital imaging value chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Milton; Mundkur, Anuradha; Balasubramanian, Ashok; Chirania, Virat

    2005-02-01

    This research was undertaken by the Convergence Center at the Syracuse University School of Information Studies (www.digital-convergence.info). Project ICONICA, the name for the research, focuses on the strategic implications of digital Images and the CONvergence of Image management and image CApture. Consumer imaging - the activity that we once called "photography" - is now recognized as in the throes of a digital transformation. At the end of 2003, market researchers estimated that about 30% of the households in the U.S. and 40% of the households in Japan owned digital cameras. In 2004, of the 86 million new cameras sold (excluding one-time use cameras), a majority (56%) were estimated to be digital cameras. Sales of photographic film, while still profitable, are declining precipitously.

  12. Image processing and classification procedures for analysis of sub-decimeter imagery acquired with an unmanned aircraft over arid rangelands

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Using five centimeter resolution images acquired with an unmanned aircraft system (UAS), we developed and evaluated an image processing workflow that included the integration of resolution-appropriate field sampling, feature selection, object-based image analysis, and processing approaches for UAS i...

  13. Linear digital imaging system fidelity analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Stephen K.

    1989-01-01

    The combined effects of imaging gathering, sampling and reconstruction are analyzed in terms of image fidelity. The analysis is based upon a standard end-to-end linear system model which is sufficiently general so that the results apply to most line-scan and sensor-array imaging systems. Shift-variant sampling effects are accounted for with an expected value analysis based upon the use of a fixed deterministic input scene which is randomly shifted (mathematically) relative to the sampling grid. This random sample-scene phase approach has been used successfully by the author and associates in several previous related papers.

  14. A digital magnetic resonance imaging spectrometer using digital signal processor and field programmable gate array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Xiao; Binghe, Sun; Yueping, Ma; Ruyan, Zhao

    2013-05-01

    A digital spectrometer for low-field magnetic resonance imaging is described. A digital signal processor (DSP) is utilized as the pulse programmer on which a pulse sequence is executed as a subroutine. Field programmable gate array (FPGA) devices that are logically mapped into the external addressing space of the DSP work as auxiliary controllers of gradient control, radio frequency (rf) generation, and rf receiving separately. The pulse programmer triggers an event by setting the 32-bit control register of the corresponding FPGA, and then the FPGA automatically carries out the event function according to preset configurations in cooperation with other devices; accordingly, event control of the spectrometer is flexible and efficient. Digital techniques are in widespread use: gradient control is implemented in real-time by a FPGA; rf source is constructed using direct digital synthesis technique, and rf receiver is constructed using digital quadrature detection technique. Well-designed performance is achieved, including 1 μs time resolution of the gradient waveform, 1 μs time resolution of the soft pulse, and 2 MHz signal receiving bandwidth. Both rf synthesis and rf digitalization operate at the same 60 MHz clock, therefore, the frequency range of transmitting and receiving is from DC to ˜27 MHz. A majority of pulse sequences have been developed, and the imaging performance of the spectrometer has been validated through a large number of experiments. Furthermore, the spectrometer is also suitable for relaxation measurement in nuclear magnetic resonance field.

  15. A digital magnetic resonance imaging spectrometer using digital signal processor and field programmable gate array.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xiao; Binghe, Sun; Yueping, Ma; Ruyan, Zhao

    2013-05-01

    A digital spectrometer for low-field magnetic resonance imaging is described. A digital signal processor (DSP) is utilized as the pulse programmer on which a pulse sequence is executed as a subroutine. Field programmable gate array (FPGA) devices that are logically mapped into the external addressing space of the DSP work as auxiliary controllers of gradient control, radio frequency (rf) generation, and rf receiving separately. The pulse programmer triggers an event by setting the 32-bit control register of the corresponding FPGA, and then the FPGA automatically carries out the event function according to preset configurations in cooperation with other devices; accordingly, event control of the spectrometer is flexible and efficient. Digital techniques are in widespread use: gradient control is implemented in real-time by a FPGA; rf source is constructed using direct digital synthesis technique, and rf receiver is constructed using digital quadrature detection technique. Well-designed performance is achieved, including 1 μs time resolution of the gradient waveform, 1 μs time resolution of the soft pulse, and 2 MHz signal receiving bandwidth. Both rf synthesis and rf digitalization operate at the same 60 MHz clock, therefore, the frequency range of transmitting and receiving is from DC to ~27 MHz. A majority of pulse sequences have been developed, and the imaging performance of the spectrometer has been validated through a large number of experiments. Furthermore, the spectrometer is also suitable for relaxation measurement in nuclear magnetic resonance field. PMID:23742570

  16. Review of hard copy systems for digital medical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apple, Bernard A.; Tennant, Mark H.; Thomas, Jule W., Jr.

    1996-03-01

    In this paper we review image requirements and the potential use of various printing technologies to record digital diagnostic radiographic information. An analysis of limitations and advantages of alternate imaging systems compared to current laser imager/silver halide film systems will be presented. The future move to digital radiology along with its hard copy requirements will also be discussed. The winning technologies in the market place will be determined by their ability to provide adequate image quality at low cost while meeting productivity, durability, and convenience requirements. The first technology to meet these requirements will have a tremendous advantage in the market place. Medical imaging hard copy is dominated by the use of silver halide media providing monochrome images of diagnostic image quality. As new digital medical imaging modalities have emerged they have opened the door to new hard copy technologies. These new technologies have been born and nurtured outside the medical market by small markets with high image quality requirements or by large markets with lower image quality requirements. The former have tended to provide high cost, high quality solutions and the latter low cost, low quality solutions. Silver halide media still dominates, at least in part, because it provides high image quality at a relatively low cost. Yet, the trend away from wet silver halide is evident. These new hard copy technologies are being tested to determine their applicability to the medical market and are finding niches where they provide value. A clear winner that provides the required image quality at low cost has yet to emerge.

  17. Dose assessment of digital tomosynthesis in pediatric imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gislason, Amber; Elbakri, Idris A.; Reed, Martin

    2009-02-01

    We investigated the potential for digital tomosynthesis (DT) to reduce pediatric x-ray dose while maintaining image quality. We utilized the DT feature (VolumeRadTM) on the GE DefiniumTM 8000 flat panel system installed in the Winnipeg Children's Hospital. Facial bones, cervical spine, thoracic spine, and knee of children aged 5, 10, and 15 years were represented by acrylic phantoms for DT dose measurements. Effective dose was estimated for DT and for corresponding digital radiography (DR) and computed tomography (CT) patient image sets. Anthropomorphic phantoms of selected body parts were imaged by DR, DT, and CT. Pediatric radiologists rated visualization of selected anatomic features in these images. Dose and image quality comparisons between DR, DT, and CT determined the usefulness of tomosynthesis for pediatric imaging. CT effective dose was highest; total DR effective dose was not always lowest - depending how many projections were in the DR image set. For the cervical spine, DT dose was close to and occasionally lower than DR dose. Expert radiologists rated visibility of the central facial complex in a skull phantom as better than DR and comparable to CT. Digital tomosynthesis has a significantly lower dose than CT. This study has demonstrated DT shows promise to replace CT for some facial bones and spinal diagnoses. Other clinical applications will be evaluated in the future.

  18. Digital tomosynthesis with an on-board kilovoltage imaging device

    SciTech Connect

    Godfrey, Devon J. . E-mail: devon.godfrey@duke.edu; Yin, F.-F.; Oldham, Mark; Yoo, Sua; Willett, Christopher

    2006-05-01

    Purpose: To generate on-board digital tomosynthesis (DTS) and reference DTS images for three-dimensional image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) as an alternative to conventional portal imaging or on-board cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Methods and Materials: Three clinical cases (prostate, head-and-neck, and liver) were selected to illustrate the capabilities of on-board DTS for IGRT. Corresponding reference DTS images were reconstructed from digitally reconstructed radiographs computed from planning CT image sets. The effect of scan angle on DTS slice thickness was examined by computing the mutual information between coincident CBCT and DTS images, as the DTS scan angle was varied from 0{sup o} to 165{sup o}. A breath-hold DTS acquisition strategy was implemented to remove respiratory motion artifacts. Results: Digital tomosynthesis slices appeared similar to coincident CBCT planes and yielded substantially more anatomic information than either kilovoltage or megavoltage radiographs. Breath-hold DTS acquisition improved soft-tissue visibility by suppressing respiratory motion. Conclusions: Improved bony and soft-tissue visibility in DTS images is likely to improve target localization compared with radiographic verification techniques and might allow for daily localization of a soft-tissue target. Breath-hold DTS is a potential alternative to on-board CBCT for sites prone to respiratory motion.

  19. Study of Ice Sheet Basal Processes With Visible Light Images Acquired from a Borehole Probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carsey, F. D.; Behar, A.; Engelhardt, H.; Craven, M.; Vogel, S.; Christoffersen, P.

    2004-12-01

    We have developed and deployed the JPL Ice Borehole Camera system into boreholes in two sites in Antarctica (and are deploying it in a third at the time of this meeting), and we have analyzed the image data to improve our understanding of processes at the bed of ice streams and the at basal surface of ice shelves. Though quite simple, the image data sets permitted interpretation of basal freeze-on associated with "binge and purge" processes of the Kamb Ice Stream as well as ice accretion processes, marine ice character and the marine ice-meteoric ice interface of the Amery Ice Shelf. In many ways the hot-water drilled hole is an excellent photographic environment for study of ice sheet phenomena; we are now examining means of augmenting simple digital imagery with additional optical, noninvasive interrogation strategies in order to obtain data on included particle properties, clathrate content, biological materials and phenomena, and on-going dynamic processes.

  20. Digital images for eternity: color microfilm as archival medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Normand, C.; Gschwind, R.; Fornaro, P.

    2007-01-01

    In the archiving and museum communities, the long-term preservation of artworks has traditionally been guaranteed by making duplicates of the original. For photographic reproductions, digital imaging devices have now become standard, providing better quality control and lower costs than film photography. However, due to the very short life cycle of digital data, losses are unavoidable without repetitive data migrations to new file formats and storage media. We present a solution for the long-term archiving of digital images on color microfilm (Ilfochrome® Micrographic). This extremely stable and high-resolution medium, combined with the use of a novel laser film recorder is particularly well suited for this task. Due to intrinsic limitations of the film, colorimetric reproductions of the originals are not always achievable. The microfilm must be first considered as an information carrier and not primarily as an imaging medium. Color transformations taking into account the film characteristics and possible degradations of the medium due to aging are investigated. An approach making use of readily available color management tools is presented which assures the recovery of the original colors after re-digitization. An extension of this project considering the direct recording of digital information as color bit-code on the film is also introduced.

  1. [Digital scanning converter for medical endoscopic ultrasound imaging].

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaodong; Zhang, Hongxu; Zhou, Peifan; Wen, Shijie; Yu, Daoyin

    2009-02-01

    This paper mainly introduces the design of digital scanning converter (DSC) for medical endoscopic ultrasound imaging. Fast modified vector totational CORDIC (FMVR-CORDIC) arithmetic complete coordinate conversion is used to increase the speed of ultrasonic scanning imaging. FPGA is used as the kernel module to control data transferring, related circuits and relevant chips' working, and to accomplish data preprocessing. With the advantages of simple structure, nice flexibility and convenience, it satisfies the demand for real-time displaying in this system. Finally, the original polar coordinate image is transformed to rectangular coordinate grey image through coordinate transformation. The system performances have been validated by the experimental result. PMID:19334546

  2. CANDID: Comparison algorithm for navigating digital image databases

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, P.M.; Cannon, T.M.

    1994-02-21

    In this paper, we propose a method for calculating the similarity between two digital images. A global signature describing the texture, shape, or color content is first computed for every image stored in a database, and a normalized distance between probability density functions of feature vectors is used to match signatures. This method can be used to retrieve images from a database that are similar to an example target image. This algorithm is applied to the problem of search and retrieval for database containing pulmonary CT imagery, and experimental results are provided.

  3. Performance of the SIR-B digital image processing subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curlander, J. C.

    1986-01-01

    A ground-based system to generate digital SAR image products has been developed and implemented in support of the SIR-B mission. This system is designed to achieve the maximum throughput while meeting strict image fidelity criteria. Its capabilities include: automated radiometric and geometric correction of the output imagery; high-precision absolute location without tiepoint registration; filtering of the raw data to remove spurious signals from alien radars; and automated catologing to maintain a full set of radar and image production facility in support of the SIR-B science investigators routinely produces over 80 image frames per week.

  4. Segmentation and image navigation in digitized spine x rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, L. Rodney; Thoma, George R.

    2000-06-01

    The National Library of Medicine has archived a collection of 17,000 digitized x-rays of the cervical and lumbar spines. Extensive health information has been collected on the subjects of these x-rays, but no information has been derived from the image contents themselves. We are researching algorithms to segment anatomy in these images and to derive from the segmented data measurements useful for indexing this image set for characteristics important to researchers in rheumatology, bone morphometry, and related areas. Active Shape Modeling is currently being investigated for use in location and boundary definition for the vertebrae in these images.

  5. Calculation of the nematic entropy using digital images.

    PubMed

    Freire, F M C; Kimura, N M; Luders, D D; Palangana, A J; Simões, M

    2013-12-01

    In this work we will use digital images to compute the entropy dependence on temperature of a nematic lyotropic sample. The set of images comprehend the entire temperature range between a reentrant nematic isotropic phase transition, at a low temperature, and a usual nematic isotropic phase transition at a higher temperature. We will show that, inside the nematic phase, the image entropy profile agrees accurately with the entropy given by the Maier-Saupe model. As far as we know, this is the first time that the entropy of a lyotropic nematic phase is evaluated by this method, which introduces a way to measure their macroscopic variables. Namely, being that the entropy is a thermodynamical potential, this result implies that digital images can be used to compute mean values of nematic random variables. PMID:24483590

  6. Low-dose digital computed radiography in pediatric chest imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Kogutt, M.S.; Jones, J.P.; Perkins, D.D.

    1988-10-01

    A prototype digital computed radiographic imaging system that uses laser-stimulated luminescence was evaluated for its ability to achieve reproducible, high-detail, low-dose pediatric chest radiographs. Using this system, we performed a total of 401 examinations in infants and children, and achieved an 85% reduction in radiation dose, as compared with that delivered when film-screen techniques were used. We also achieved satisfactory image resolution, and the images obtained were of acceptable diagnostic quality. A direct comparison of analog and digital radiographs showed that comparable quality and clinical acceptability could be readily maintained between the two techniques. This study shows that high-quality images can be produced by this system at radiation doses reduced by 85% when compared with doses from standard radiographic techniques.

  7. Image deconvolution in digital autoradiography: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mutian; Chen, Qing; Li, Xiao-Feng; O'Donoghue, Joseph; Ruan, Shutian; Zanzonico, Pat; Ling, C Clifton; Humm, John L

    2008-02-01

    Digital autoradiography (DAR) is a powerful method to determine quantitatively the "small-scale" (i.e., submillimeter) distribution of a radiotracer within a tissue section. However, the limited spatial resolution of the DAR image, due to blurring by the point spread function (PSF), can result in a poor correlation with tissue histology and immunohistochemistry. The authors attempt to overcome this limitation by recovering the radiotracer distribution by image deconvolution using the Richardson-Lucy algorithm and a measured PSF obtained from a small radioactive source on hydrophobic microscope slide. Simulation studies have shown that the deconvolution algorithm reliably recovers the pixel values corresponding to the radioactivity distributions. As an example, the proposed image restoration approach has been tested with DAR images of different radiolabeled markers on tumor sections obtained from clinical and preclinical animal model studies. Digital autoradiograms following deconvolution show improved sharpness and contrast relative to the unprocessed autoradiograms. PMID:18383673

  8. A pragmatic discussion on establishing a multicenter digital imaging network.

    PubMed

    Ingeholm, Mary Lou; Levine, Betty A; Fatemi, Seyed Ali; Moser, And Hugo W

    2002-01-01

    Multicenter clinical trials for therapy evaluation of rare diseases are necessary. A digital imaging network improves the ability to share information between collaborating institutions for adrenoleukodystrophy. The DICOM 3.0 standard is used to move images over the Internet from contributing sites to the central clinical database and on to the reviewing physicians' workstations. Patient confidentiality and data integrity are ensured during transmission using virtual private network technology. Fifteen sites are participating in the network. Of these sites, 6 use the proposed protocol. The other 9 sites have either security policy issues or technical considerations that dictate alternative protocols. Network infrastructure, Internet access, image management practices, and security policies vary significantly between sites. Successful implementation of a multicenter digital imaging network requires flexibility in the implementation of network connectivity. Flexibility increases participation as well as complexity of the network. PMID:12105723

  9. Parallel digital signal processing architectures for image processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kshirsagar, Shirish P.; Hartley, David A.; Harvey, David M.; Hobson, Clifford A.

    1994-10-01

    This paper describes research into a high speed image processing system using parallel digital signal processors for the processing of electro-optic images. The objective of the system is to reduce the processing time of non-contact type inspection problems including industrial and medical applications. A single processor can not deliver sufficient processing power required for the use of applications hence, a MIMD system is designed and constructed to enable fast processing of electro-optic images. The Texas Instruments TMS320C40 digital signal processor is used due to its high speed floating point CPU and the support for the parallel processing environment. A custom designed VISION bus is provided to transfer images between processors. The system is being applied for solder joint inspection of high technology printed circuit boards.

  10. Image reconstruction for digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) by using projection-angle-dependent filter functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Yeonok; Park, Chulkyu; Cho, Hyosung; Je, Uikyu; Hong, Daeki; Lee, Minsik; Cho, Heemoon; Choi, Sungil; Koo, Yangseo

    2014-09-01

    Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) is considered in clinics as a standard three-dimensional imaging modality, allowing the earlier detection of cancer. It typically acquires only 10-30 projections over a limited angle range of 15-60° with a stationary detector and typically uses a computationally-efficient filtered-backprojection (FBP) algorithm for image reconstruction. However, a common FBP algorithm yields poor image quality resulting from the loss of average image value and the presence of severe image artifacts due to the elimination of the dc component of the image by the ramp filter and to the incomplete data, respectively. As an alternative, iterative reconstruction methods are often used in DBT to overcome these difficulties, even though they are still computationally expensive. In this study, as a compromise, we considered a projection-angle-dependent filtering method in which one-dimensional geometry-adapted filter kernels are computed with the aid of a conjugate-gradient method and are incorporated into the standard FBP framework. We implemented the proposed algorithm and performed systematic simulation works to investigate the imaging characteristics. Our results indicate that the proposed method is superior to a conventional FBP method for DBT imaging and has a comparable computational cost, while preserving good image homogeneity and edge sharpening with no serious image artifacts.

  11. Digital image colorization based on distance transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagodzinski, Przemyslaw; Smolka, Bogdan

    2008-01-01

    Colorization is a term introduced by W. Markle1 to describe a computerized process for adding color to black and white pictures, movies or TV programs. The task involves replacing a scalar value stored at each pixel of the gray scale image by a vector in a three dimensional color space with luminance, saturation and hue or simply RGB. Since different colors may carry the same luminance value but vary in hue and/or saturation, the problem of colorization has no inherently "correct" solution. Due to these ambiguities, human interaction usually plays a large role. In this paper we present a novel colorization method that takes advantage of the morphological distance transformation, changes of neighboring pixel intensities and gradients to propagate the color within the gray scale image. The proposed method frees the user of segmenting the image, as color is provided simply by scribbles which are next automatically propagated within the image. The effectiveness of the algorithm allows the user to work interactively and to obtain the desired results promptly after providing the color scribbles. In the paper we show that the proposed method allows for high quality colorization results for still images.

  12. Digital interactive image analysis by array processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sabels, B. E.; Jennings, J. D.

    1973-01-01

    An attempt is made to draw a parallel between the existing geophysical data processing service industries and the emerging earth resources data support requirements. The relationship of seismic data analysis to ERTS data analysis is natural because in either case data is digitally recorded in the same format, resulting from remotely sensed energy which has been reflected, attenuated, shifted and degraded on its path from the source to the receiver. In the seismic case the energy is acoustic, ranging in frequencies from 10 to 75 cps, for which the lithosphere appears semi-transparent. In earth survey remote sensing through the atmosphere, visible and infrared frequency bands are being used. Yet the hardware and software required to process the magnetically recorded data from the two realms of inquiry are identical and similar, respectively. The resulting data products are similar.

  13. VirtualShave: automated hair removal from digital dermatoscopic images.

    PubMed

    Fiorese, M; Peserico, E; Silletti, A

    2011-01-01

    VirtualShave is a novel tool to remove hair from digital dermatoscopic images. First, individual hairs are identified using a top-hat filter followed by morphological postprocessing. Then, they are replaced through PDE-based inpainting with an estimate of the underlying occluded skin. VirtualShave's performance is comparable to that of a human operator removing hair manually, and the resulting images are almost indistinguishable from those of hair-free skin. PMID:22255497

  14. Digital Images: Capturing America's Past with the Technology of Today

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berson, Michael J.

    2004-01-01

    The use of digital photography in the social studies classroom offers students an application of technology that can help them develop the skills necessary to access, analyze, and evaluate all forms of information and communication. Students learn to recognize how images represent diverse perspectives, connect disparate pieces of information, and…

  15. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-049). March 2005. TUNNEL ENTRY FROM MAIN FLOOR OF MAGNET ROOM INTO CENTER OF BEVATRON, BENEATH SOUTHWEST QUADRANT - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  16. Digital Image Manipulation and Avatar Configuration: Implications for Inclusive Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oravec, Jo Ann

    2012-01-01

    This paper outlines concerns for inclusive classrooms involving personal digital image modifications and selections, as well as avatar configurations. Classroom interactions incorporate various dimensions of personal appearance; however, educators try to make them primarily about knowledge and wisdom. Students in environments where they can…

  17. Using Digital Images with Young Children: Challenges of Integration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schiller, John; Tillett, Beryl

    2004-01-01

    In what ways can information and communications technologies (ICT) be integrated into classroom practice to create a 'community of learners'? This paper describes an action research project, over a six-month period, in which a class of seven-year-old and eight-year-old children in a metropolitan South Australian school created digital images to…

  18. Digital Image Processing application to spray and flammability studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hernan, M. A.; Parikh, P.; Sarohia, V.

    1985-01-01

    Digital Image Processing has been integrated into a new technique for measurements of fuel spray characteristics. The advantages of this technique are: a wide dynamic range of droplet sizes, accounting for nonspherical droplet shapes not possible with other spray assessment techniques. Finally, the technique has been applied to the study of turbojet engine fuel nozzle atomization performance with Jet A and antimisting fuel.

  19. Data Manipulation in an XML-Based Digital Image Library

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Naicheng

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To help to clarify the role of XML tools and standards in supporting transition and migration towards a fully XML-based environment for managing access to information. Design/methodology/approach: The Ching Digital Image Library, built on a three-tier architecture, is used as a source of examples to illustrate a number of methods of data…

  20. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-046). March 2005. ROOF SHIELDING BLOCK AND I-BEAM SUPPORT CONSTRUCTION, CENTER OF BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  1. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-129). March 2005. ENTRY TO ROOM 24, MAIN FLOOR, OFFICE-AND-SHOPS SECTION, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  2. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-009). March 2005. OPENINGS OF AIR DUCTS INTO PASSAGEWAY UNDER SOUTHEAST QUADRANT, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  3. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-035). March 2005. WEST TANGENT VIEWED FROM INTERIOR OF BEVATRON. EQUIPMENT ACCESS STAIRWAY ON LEFT - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  4. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200506-00198-11). June 2005. DUCTWORK BETWEEN FAN ROOM AND PASSAGEWAY UNDER BEVATRON, NORTH SIDE OF ROOM 10, MAIN FLOOR, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  5. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-139). March 2005. TOP OF BEVATRON, INCLUDING WOOD STAIRWAY FROM OUTER EDGE OF SHIELDING TO TOP OF ROOF BLOCK SHIELDING - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  6. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200506-00198-08). June 2005. DUCTWORK BETWEEN FAN ROOM AND PASSAGEWAY UNDER BEVATRON, SOUTH SIDE OF ROOM 10, MAIN FLOOR, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  7. Photocopy of photograph (digital image maintained in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image maintained in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-176). March 2005. CENTRAL COLUMN SUPPORT TO ROOF SHOWING CRANES CENTER SUPPORT TRACK, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  8. Digital radiography. A comparison with modern conventional imaging

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, G J

    2006-01-01

    The development of computed radiography over the past two decades has transformed radiological imaging. The radiology departments in the 21st century will look very different from those in the preceding period. In this review, the development of digital radiography is presented with a description of its various forms and a comparison with screen film radiography. PMID:16822918

  9. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200506-00218-12). June 2005. DEEP TUNNEL INTO FOUNDATION UNDER BEVATRON, VIEW OF CART ON RAILS FOR TRANSPORTING EQUIPMENT - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  10. Spectral reflectance and digital image relations among five aquatic weeds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study reports on the use of an artificial quartz halogen lighting source to facilitate the acquisition of spectral light reflectance measurements and digital imaging of invasive aquatic weeds. Spectral leaf or leaf/stem reflectance measurements were made on five aquatic weeds: Eurasian watermil...

  11. Identification and Quantification Soil Redoximorphic Features by Digital Image Processing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil redoximorphic features (SRFs) have provided scientists and land managers with insight into relative soil moisture for approximately 60 years. The overall objective of this study was to develop a new method of SRF identification and quantification from soil cores using a digital camera and imag...

  12. An algorithm for approximate rectification of digital aerial images

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    High-resolution aerial photography is one of the most valuable tools available for managing extensive landscapes. With recent advances in digital camera technology, computer hardware, and software, aerial photography is easier to collect, store, and transfer than ever before. Images can be automa...

  13. ArtShow: An Efficient Digital Image Database.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paliokas, I.; Kekkeris, G.; Karakos, A.

    2000-01-01

    ArtShow is a digital image database that employs sophisticated features for interactive presentations of data. To demonstrate the program, an example database was prepared, based on the collection at the National Bank of Greece with names, comments and keywords in the Greek language. Discussion includes: the database platform and internal…

  14. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-031). March 2005. MOUSE AT EAST TANGENT, WITH COVER OPEN, LOOKING TOWARD CENTER IGLOO, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  15. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-034). March 2005. MOUSE AT EAST TANGENT WITH COVER CLOSED, LOOKING TOWARD CENTER IGLOO, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  16. [Digital imaging in the surgical detection of breast neoplasms].

    PubMed

    Rulli, A; Cirocchi, R; Carli, L; Cagini, L

    1993-12-01

    Microcalcific clusters represent good indicators for breast cancer detection. The Authors evaluated 98 cases of breast microcalcifications in patients with no palpable lesions. The patients had undergone mammography, biopsy and excised specimen's radiography to confirm that the target lesion was adequately removed. The presence of microcalcifications was detected through a computerized instrument which allows the digitalization of the image. PMID:8167081

  17. Detection of Artificial Satellites in Images Acquired in Track Rate Mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levesque, M.

    2011-09-01

    For surveillance of space needs, satellites must be re-observed periodically to measure their position and update their orbital parameters. This represents an incredible volume of data for which an automatic processing capability is desired. Previous developments [1,2,3] produced automatic detection algorithms for images acquired in Step Stare mode (SSM) with sidereal tracking. However, it was proven that the track rate mode (TRM) [6] is more sensitive. Hence, the algorithmic framework was redesigned and applied to this mode. When an imaging sensor tracks a satellite (or a satellite cluster), the stars appear as streaks while the satellites are point-like objects. A series of algorithms was developed for the detection of satellites and star streaks. The centroids of the star streaks are first detected. They are necessary for the astrometric calibration of the image. Thereafter, the satellites are detected using two sets of logical conditions; they are detected with the maximum of sensitivity against the dark sky background, and with the contrast criteria if they are overlapping star streaks. This algorithm framework automatically extracts all required information from the image and adapts the processing parameters and strategy consequently, so no a priori knowledge is require for their execution, which is a requirement for automatic processing capacity.

  18. Digital Three-dimensional Reconstruction Based On Integral Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chao; Chen, Qian; Hua, Hong; Mao, Chen; Shao, Ajun

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a digital three dimensional reconstruction method based on a set of small-baseline elemental images captured with a micro-lens array and a CCD sensor. In this paper, we adopt the ASIFT (Affine Scale-invariant feature transform) operator as the image registration method. Among the set of captured elemental images, the elemental image located in the middle of the overall image field is used as the reference and corresponding matching points in each elemental image around the reference elemental are calculated, which enables to accurately compute the depth value of object points relatively to the reference image frame. Using optimization algorithm with redundant matching points can achieve 3D reconstruction finally. Our experimental results are presented to demonstrate excellent performance in accuracy and speed of the proposed algorithm. PMID:26236151

  19. Study of optical techniques for the Ames unitary wind tunnel: Digital image processing, part 6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, George

    1993-01-01

    A survey of digital image processing techniques and processing systems for aerodynamic images has been conducted. These images covered many types of flows and were generated by many types of flow diagnostics. These include laser vapor screens, infrared cameras, laser holographic interferometry, Schlieren, and luminescent paints. Some general digital image processing systems, imaging networks, optical sensors, and image computing chips were briefly reviewed. Possible digital imaging network systems for the Ames Unitary Wind Tunnel were explored.

  20. Do we really need standards in digital image management?

    PubMed Central

    Ho, ELM

    2008-01-01

    Convention dictates that standards are a necessity rather than a luxury. Standards are supposed to improve the exchange of health and image data information resulting in improved quality and efficiency of patient care. True standardisation is some time away yet, as barriers exist with evolving equipment, storage formats and even the standards themselves. The explosive growth in the size and complexity of images such as those generated by multislice computed tomography have driven the need for digital image management, created problems of storage space and costs, and created a challenge for increasing or getting an adequate speed for transmitting, accessing and retrieving the image data. The search for a suitable and practical format for storing the data without loss of information and medico-legal implications has become a necessity and a matter of ‘urgency’. Existing standards are either open or proprietary and must comply with local, regional or national laws. Currently there are the Picture Archiving and Communications System (PACS); Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM); Health Level 7 (HL7) and Integrating the Healthcare Enterprise (IHE). Issues in digital image management can be categorised as operational, procedural, technical and administrative. Standards must stay focussed on the ultimate goal – that is, improved patient care worldwide. PMID:21611012

  1. Using Digital Radiography To Image Liquid Nitrogen in Voids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, Dwight; Blevins, Elana

    2007-01-01

    Digital radiography by use of (1) a field-portable x-ray tube that emits low-energy x rays and (2) an electronic imaging x-ray detector has been found to be an effective technique for detecting liquid nitrogen inside voids in thermal-insulation panels. The technique was conceived as a means of investigating cryopumping (including cryoingestion) as a potential cause of loss of thermal insulation foam from space-shuttle external fuel tanks. The technique could just as well be used to investigate cryopumping and cryoingestion in other settings. In images formed by use of low-energy x-rays, one can clearly distinguish between voids filled with liquid nitrogen and those filled with gaseous nitrogen or other gases. Conventional film radiography is of some value, but yields only non-real-time still images that do not show time dependences of levels of liquids in voids. In contrast, the present digital radiographic technique yields a succession of images in real time at a rate of about 10 frames per second. The digitized images can be saved for subsequent analysis to extract data on time dependencies of levels of liquids and, hence, of flow paths and rates of filling and draining. The succession of images also amounts to a real-time motion picture that can be used as a guide to adjustment of test conditions.

  2. Digital rock physics benchmarks—Part I: Imaging and segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrä, Heiko; Combaret, Nicolas; Dvorkin, Jack; Glatt, Erik; Han, Junehee; Kabel, Matthias; Keehm, Youngseuk; Krzikalla, Fabian; Lee, Minhui; Madonna, Claudio; Marsh, Mike; Mukerji, Tapan; Saenger, Erik H.; Sain, Ratnanabha; Saxena, Nishank; Ricker, Sarah; Wiegmann, Andreas; Zhan, Xin

    2013-01-01

    The key paradigm of digital rock physics (DRP) "image and compute" implies imaging and digitizing the pore space and mineral matrix of natural rock and then numerically simulating various physical processes in this digital object to obtain such macroscopic rock properties as permeability, electrical conductivity, and elastic moduli. The steps of this process include image acquisition, image processing (noise reduction, smoothing, and segmentation); setting up the numerical experiment (object size and resolution as well as the boundary conditions); and numerically solving the field equations. Finally, we need to interpret the solution thus obtained in terms of the desired macroscopic properties. For each of these DRP steps, there is more than one method and implementation. Our goal is to explore and record the variability of the computed effective properties as a function of using different tools and workflows. Such benchmarking is the topic of the two present companion papers. Here, in the first part, we introduce four 3D microstructures, a segmented Fontainebleau sandstone sample (porosity 0.147), a gray-scale Berea sample; a gray-scale Grosmont carbonate sample; and a numerically constructed pack of solid spheres (porosity 0.343). Segmentation of the gray-scale images by three independent teams reveals the uncertainty of this process: the segmented porosity range is between 0.184 and 0.209 for Berea and between 0.195 and 0.271 for the carbonate. The implications of the uncertainty associated with image segmentation are explored in a second paper.

  3. Matching rendered and real world images by digital image processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitjà, Carles; Bover, Toni; Bigas, Miquel; Escofet, Jaume

    2010-05-01

    Recent advances in computer-generated images (CGI) have been used in commercial and industrial photography providing a broad scope in product advertising. Mixing real world images with those rendered from virtual space software shows a more or less visible mismatching between corresponding image quality performance. Rendered images are produced by software which quality performance is only limited by the resolution output. Real world images are taken with cameras with some amount of image degradation factors as lens residual aberrations, diffraction, sensor low pass anti aliasing filters, color pattern demosaicing, etc. The effect of all those image quality degradation factors can be characterized by the system Point Spread Function (PSF). Because the image is the convolution of the object by the system PSF, its characterization shows the amount of image degradation added to any taken picture. This work explores the use of image processing to degrade the rendered images following the parameters indicated by the real system PSF, attempting to match both virtual and real world image qualities. The system MTF is determined by the slanted edge method both in laboratory conditions and in the real picture environment in order to compare the influence of the working conditions on the device performance; an approximation to the system PSF is derived from the two measurements. The rendered images are filtered through a Gaussian filter obtained from the taking system PSF. Results with and without filtering are shown and compared measuring the contrast achieved in different final image regions.

  4. Digitizing Images for Curriculum 21: Phase II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Alice D.

    Although visual databases exist for the study of art, architecture, geography, health care, and other areas, readily accessible sources of quality images are not available for engineering faculty interested in developing multimedia modules or for student projects. Presented here is a brief review of Phase I of the Engineering Visual Database…

  5. Medical applications of digital image morphing.

    PubMed

    Penska, Keith; Folio, Les; Bunger, Rolf

    2007-09-01

    The authors present a unique medical technical application for illustrating the success and/or failure of the physiological healing process as a dynamically morphed video. Two examples used in this report include the healing of a severely fractured humerus from an explosion in Iraq and the other of dramatic tissue destruction from a poisonous spider bite. For the humerus, several sequential x-rays obtained throughout orthopedic surgical procedures and the healing process were morphed together representing a time-lapsed video of the healing process. The end result is a video that demonstrates the healing process in an animation that radiologists envision and report to other clinicians. For the brown recluse spider bite, a seemingly benign skin lesion transforms into a wide gaping necrotic wound with dramatic appearance within days. This novel technique is not presented for readily apparent clinical advantage, rather, it may have more immediate application in providing treatment options to referring providers and/or patients, as well as educational value of healing or disease progression over time. Image morphing is one of those innovations that is just starting to come into its own. Morphing is an image processing technology that transforms one image into another by generating a series of intermediate synthetic images. It is the same process that Hollywood uses to turn people into animals in movies, for example. The ability to perform morphing, once restricted to high-end graphics workstations, is now widely available for desktop computers. The authors describe how a series of radiographic images were morphed into a short movie clip using readily available software and an average laptop. The resultant video showed the healing process of an open comminuted humerus fracture that helped demonstrate how amazingly the human body heals in a case presentation in a time-lapse fashion. PMID:17273920

  6. Radiological images on personal computers: introduction and fundamental principles of digital images.

    PubMed

    Gillespy, T; Rowberg, A H

    1993-05-01

    This series of articles will explore the issue related to displaying, manipulating, and analyzing radiological images on personal computers (PC). This first article discusses the digital image data file, standard PC graphic file formats, and various methods for importing radiological images into the PC. PMID:8334176

  7. Recent developments in digital image processing at the Image Processing Laboratory of JPL.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Handley, D. A.

    1973-01-01

    Review of some of the computer-aided digital image processing techniques recently developed. Special attention is given to mapping and mosaicking techniques and to preliminary developments in range determination from stereo image pairs. The discussed image processing utilization areas include space, biomedical, and robotic applications.

  8. Comparison of DSMs acquired by terrestrial laser scanning, UAV-based aerial images and ground-based optical images at the Super-Sauze landslide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothmund, Sabrina; Niethammer, Uwe; Walter, Marco; Joswig, Manfred

    2013-04-01

    In recent years, the high-resolution and multi-temporal 3D mapping of the Earth's surface using terrestrial laser scanning (TLS), ground-based optical images and especially low-cost UAV-based aerial images (Unmanned Aerial Vehicle) has grown in importance. This development resulted from the progressive technical improvement of the imaging systems and the freely available multi-view stereo (MVS) software packages. These different methods of data acquisition for the generation of accurate, high-resolution digital surface models (DSMs) were applied as part of an eight-week field campaign at the Super-Sauze landslide (South French Alps). An area of approximately 10,000 m² with long-term average displacement rates greater than 0.01 m/day has been investigated. The TLS-based point clouds were acquired at different viewpoints with an average point spacing between 10 to 40 mm and at different dates. On these days, more than 50 optical images were taken on points along a predefined line on the side part of the landslide by a low-cost digital compact camera. Additionally, aerial images were taken by a radio-controlled mini quad-rotor UAV equipped with another low-cost digital compact camera. The flight altitude ranged between 20 m and 250 m and produced a corresponding ground resolution between 0.6 cm and 7 cm. DGPS measurements were carried out as well in order to geo-reference and validate the point cloud data. To generate unscaled photogrammetric 3D point clouds from a disordered and tilted image set, we use the widespread open-source software package Bundler and PMVS2 (University of Washington). These multi-temporal DSMs are required on the one hand to determine the three-dimensional surface deformations and on the other hand it will be required for differential correction for orthophoto production. Drawing on the example of the acquired data at the Super-Sauze landslide, we demonstrate the potential but also the limitations of the photogrammetric point clouds. To

  9. Digital Longitudinal Tomosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rimkus, Daniel Steven

    1985-12-01

    The purpose of this dissertation was to investigate the clinical utility of digital longitudinal tomosynthesis in radiology. By acquiring a finite group of digital images during a longitudinal tomographic exposure, and processing these images, tomographic planes, other than the fulcrum plane, can be reconstructed. This process is now termed "tomosynthesis". A prototype system utilizing this technique was developed. Both phantom and patient studies were done with this system. The phantom studies were evaluated by subjective, visual criterion and by quantitative analysis of edge sharpness and noise in the reconstructions. Two groups of patients and one volunteer were studied. The first patient group consisted of 8 patients undergoing intravenous urography (IVU). These patients had digital tomography and film tomography of the abdomen. The second patient group consisted of 4 patients with lung cancer admitted to the hospital for laser resection of endobronchial tumor. These patients had mediastinal digital tomograms to evaluate the trachea and mainstem bronchi. The knee of one volunteer was imaged by film tomography and digital tomography. The results of the phantom studies showed that the digital reconstructions accurately produced images of the desired planes. The edge sharpness of the reconstructions approached that of the acquired images. Adequate reconstructions were achieved with as few as 5 images acquired during the exposure, with the quality of the reconstructions improving as the number of images acquired increased. The IVU patients' digital studies had less contrast and spatial resolution than the film tomograms. The single renal lesion visible on the film tomograms was also visible in the digital images. The digital mediastinal studies were felt by several radiologists to be superior to a standard chest xray in evaluating the airways. The digital images of the volunteer's knee showed many of the same anatomic features as the film tomogram, but the digital

  10. kV x-ray dual digital tomosynthesis for image guided lung SBRT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partain, Larry; Boyd, Douglas; Kim, Namho; Hernandez, Andrew; Daly, Megan; Boone, John

    2016-03-01

    Two simulated sets of digital tomosynthesis images of the lungs, each acquired at a 90 degree angle from the other, with 19 projection images used for each set and SART iterative reconstructed, gives dual tomosynthesis slice image quality approaching that of spiral CT, and with a data acquisition time that is 3% of that of cone beam CT. This fast kV acquisition, should allow near real time tracking of lung tumors in patients receiving SBRT, based on a novel TumoTrakTM multi-source X-ray tube design. Until this TumoTrakTM prototype is completed over the next year, its projected performance was simulated from the DRR images created from a spiral CT data set from a lung cancer patient. The resulting dual digital tomosynthesis reconstructed images of the lung tumor were exceptional and approached that of the gold standard Feldkamp CT reconstruction of breath hold, diagnostic, spiral, multirow, CT data. The relative dose at 46 mAs was less than 10% of what it would have been if the digital tomosynthesis had been done at the 472 mAs of the CT data set. This is for a 0.77 fps imaging rate sufficient to resolve respiratory motion in many free breathing patients during SBRT. Such image guidance could decrease the magnitudes of targeting error margins by as much as 20 mm or more in the craniocaudal direction for lower lobe lesions while markedly reducing dose to normal lung, heart and other critical structures. These initial results suggest a wide range of topics for future work.

  11. Recording multiple spatially-heterodyned direct to digital holograms in one digital image

    DOEpatents

    Hanson, Gregory R.; Bingham, Philip R.

    2008-03-25

    Systems and methods are described for recording multiple spatially-heterodyned direct to digital holograms in one digital image. A method includes digitally recording, at a first reference beam-object beam angle, a first spatially-heterodyned hologram including spatial heterodyne fringes for Fourier analysis; Fourier analyzing the recorded first spatially-heterodyned hologram by shifting a first original origin of the recorded first spatially-heterodyned hologram to sit on top of a first spatial-heterodyne carrier frequency defined by the first reference beam-object beam angle; digitally recording, at a second reference beam-object beam angle, a second spatially-heterodyned hologram including spatial heterodyne fringes for Fourier analysis; Fourier analyzing the recorded second spatially-heterodyned hologram by shifting a second original origin of the recorded second spatially-heterodyned hologram to sit on top of a second spatial-heterodyne carrier frequency defined by the second reference beam-object beam angle; applying a first digital filter to cut off signals around the first original origin and define a first result; performing a first inverse Fourier transform on the first result; applying a second digital filter to cut off signals around the second original origin and define a second result; and performing a second inverse Fourier transform on the second result, wherein the first reference beam-object beam angle is not equal to the second reference beam-object beam angle and a single digital image includes both the first spatially-heterodyned hologram and the second spatially-heterodyned hologram.

  12. Digital image processing of vascular angiograms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Selzer, R. H.; Blankenhorn, D. H.; Beckenbach, E. S.; Crawford, D. W.; Brooks, S. H.

    1975-01-01

    A computer image processing technique was developed to estimate the degree of atherosclerosis in the human femoral artery. With an angiographic film of the vessel as input, the computer was programmed to estimate vessel abnormality through a series of measurements, some derived primarily from the vessel edge information and others from optical density variations within the lumen shadow. These measurements were combined into an atherosclerosis index, which was found to correlate well with both visual and chemical estimates of atherosclerotic disease.

  13. Image optimization in digital dental radiography.

    PubMed

    Silverstrim, Kelli J; Schneider, Erich; van der Hoeven, Christopher

    2015-06-01

    Presented is a method for establishing the appropriate balance of image quality and radiation dose for dental imaging. Using the Monte Carlo N-Particle Extended (MCNPX) radiation transport code, the DC Planmeca radiographic unit and a dental bitewing phantom were modeled. The Carestream 6100 RVG sensor signal response, noise response, dose rate dependence, and reproducibility were determined experimentally, including uncertainties and inter/intraunit variabilities. The computationally varied parameters were peak kilovoltage and tube filtration. The entrance air kerma for the current clinical technique was used to establish reference image quality. Four figures of merit (FOM) were chosen to encompass parameter variation. With equal weighting of FOMs and no equipment limitations, the optimal parameters were 90 kVp with 0.1 mm added copper filtration. The optimal technique in the radiographic units' operating range was 70 kVp and 0.1 mm added copper filtration, resulting in a ∼50% (±17%) entrance dose and ∼40% effective dose savings. PMID:25905519

  14. Color calibration of swine gastrointestinal tract images acquired by radial imaging capsule endoscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ou-Yang, Mang; Jeng, Wei-De; Lai, Chien-Cheng; Wu, Hsien-Ming; Lin, Jyh-Hung

    2016-01-01

    The type of illumination systems and color filters used typically generate varying levels of color difference in capsule endoscopes, which influence medical diagnoses. In order to calibrate the color difference caused by the optical system, this study applied a radial imaging capsule endoscope (RICE) to photograph standard color charts, which were then employed to calculate the color gamut of RICE. Color gamut was also measured using a spectrometer in order to get a high-precision color information, and the results obtained using both methods were compared. Subsequently, color-correction methods, namely polynomial transform and conformal mapping, were used to improve the color difference. Before color calibration, the color difference value caused by the influences of optical systems in RICE was 21.45±1.09. Through the proposed polynomial transformation, the color difference could be reduced effectively to 1.53±0.07. Compared to another proposed conformal mapping, the color difference value was substantially reduced to 1.32±0.11, and the color difference is imperceptible for human eye because it is <1.5. Then, real-time color correction was achieved using this algorithm combined with a field-programmable gate array, and the results of the color correction can be viewed from real-time images.

  15. Autocorrelation and regularization in digital images. II - Simple image models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jupp, David L. B.; Strahler, Alan H.; Woodcock, Curtis E.

    1989-01-01

    The variogram function used in geostatistical analysis is a useful statistic in the analysis of remotely sensed images. Using the results derived by Jupp et al. (1988), the basic second-order, or covariance, properties of scenes modeled by simple disks of varying size and spacing after imaging into disk-shaped pixels are analyzed to explore the relationship betwee image variograms and discrete object scene structure. The models provide insight into the nature of real images of the earth's surface and the tools for a complete analysis of the more complex case of three-dimensional illuminated discrete-object images.

  16. A fusion algorithm of digital neutron radiation image and digital x-ray image with contourlet transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Peng; Wei, Biao; Jin, Wei; Mi, De-ling

    2008-12-01

    In this article, the Contourlet-based image fusion method of digital neutron radiation image and X-ray radiograph is proposed. As one of the multi-scale geometric analysis, Contourlet transform is full of application potentials in the field of image process due to its good capability of representing high dimensional singularity of image. Meanwhile, in order to overcome the shortcoming of pixel-based fusion, this method proposed realizes the local adaptive fusion through Neighborhood Homogeneity Measurement (NHM). Experiments show that this fusion method retains more image detail and therefore provides more accurate information than traditional image fusion methods. It is proved to be a novel idea for the complementary application of neutron radiation imaging and X-ray radiograph

  17. An automated digital imaging system for environmental monitoring applications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bogle, Rian; Velasco, Miguel; Vogel, John

    2013-01-01

    Recent improvements in the affordability and availability of high-resolution digital cameras, data loggers, embedded computers, and radio/cellular modems have advanced the development of sophisticated automated systems for remote imaging. Researchers have successfully placed and operated automated digital cameras in remote locations and in extremes of temperature and humidity, ranging from the islands of the South Pacific to the Mojave Desert and the Grand Canyon. With the integration of environmental sensors, these automated systems are able to respond to local conditions and modify their imaging regimes as needed. In this report we describe in detail the design of one type of automated imaging system developed by our group. It is easily replicated, low-cost, highly robust, and is a stand-alone automated camera designed to be placed in remote locations, without wireless connectivity.

  18. Digital holographic optical coherence imaging of tumor tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Kwan; Turek, John J.; Nolte, David D.

    2006-02-01

    Holographic Optical Coherence Imaging (OCI) uses spatial heterodyne detection in direct analogy with the temporal heterodyne detection of time-domain OCT. The spatial demodulator can be a sensitive dynamic holographic film or can be a CCD array placed directly at the hologram plane. We show that a digital hologram captured at the Fourier plane requires only a simple 2D inverse FFT of the digital hologram to compute the real image and its conjugate. Our recording on the optical Fourier plane has an advantage for diffuse targets because the intensity distribution of diffuse targets is relatively uniform at the Fourier plane and hence uses the full dynamic range of CCD camera. We applied this technique to human liver tumor spheroids and produced depth-resolved images to depth of 1.4 mm.

  19. Introduction to computers and digital processing in medical imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Kuni, C.C.

    1988-01-01

    The author provides a nontechnical, nonmathematical explanation of computers, programs, peripheral devices, and imaging applications so that radiologists can more completely control the digital devices they use. There are additional reasons for radiologists to understand computers and computing. First, knowledge of computes allows a fundamental understanding of the next generation of imaging devices and leads to more intelligent interpretation of images. Second, recognition of artifacts and system failures is facilitated. Finally, the radiologist with such knowledge will remain a central figure in imaging departments. This book is organized into three sections. The first series of five chapters is devoted to the fundamentals of computers, image formation, manipulation, and display. The second section is five chapters each on a specific modality, such as computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging. The final section is a chapter that discusses networks and archiving.

  20. Results of precision processing (scene correction) of ERTS-1 images using digital image processing techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernstein, R.

    1973-01-01

    ERTS-1 MSS and RBV data recorded on computer compatible tapes have been analyzed and processed, and preliminary results have been obtained. No degradation of intensity (radiance) information occurred in implementing the geometric correction. The quality and resolution of the digitally processed images are very good, due primarily to the fact that the number of film generations and conversions is reduced to a minimum. Processing times of digitally processed images are about equivalent to the NDPF electro-optical processor.

  1. Physical Activity Recognition Based on Motion in Images Acquired by a Wearable Camera

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hong; Li, Lu; Jia, Wenyan; Fernstrom, John D.; Sclabassi, Robert J.; Mao, Zhi-Hong; Sun, Mingui

    2011-01-01

    A new technique to extract and evaluate physical activity patterns from image sequences captured by a wearable camera is presented in this paper. Unlike standard activity recognition schemes, the video data captured by our device do not include the wearer him/herself. The physical activity of the wearer, such as walking or exercising, is analyzed indirectly through the camera motion extracted from the acquired video frames. Two key tasks, pixel correspondence identification and motion feature extraction, are studied to recognize activity patterns. We utilize a multiscale approach to identify pixel correspondences. When compared with the existing methods such as the Good Features detector and the Speed-up Robust Feature (SURF) detector, our technique is more accurate and computationally efficient. Once the pixel correspondences are determined which define representative motion vectors, we build a set of activity pattern features based on motion statistics in each frame. Finally, the physical activity of the person wearing a camera is determined according to the global motion distribution in the video. Our algorithms are tested using different machine learning techniques such as the K-Nearest Neighbor (KNN), Naive Bayesian and Support Vector Machine (SVM). The results show that many types of physical activities can be recognized from field acquired real-world video. Our results also indicate that, with a design of specific motion features in the input vectors, different classifiers can be used successfully with similar performances. PMID:21779142

  2. The trustworthy digital camera: Restoring credibility to the photographic image

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedman, Gary L.

    1994-01-01

    The increasing sophistication of computers has made digital manipulation of photographic images, as well as other digitally-recorded artifacts such as audio and video, incredibly easy to perform and increasingly difficult to detect. Today, every picture appearing in newspapers and magazines has been digitally altered to some degree, with the severity varying from the trivial (cleaning up 'noise' and removing distracting backgrounds) to the point of deception (articles of clothing removed, heads attached to other people's bodies, and the complete rearrangement of city skylines). As the power, flexibility, and ubiquity of image-altering computers continues to increase, the well-known adage that 'the photography doesn't lie' will continue to become an anachronism. A solution to this problem comes from a concept called digital signatures, which incorporates modern cryptographic techniques to authenticate electronic mail messages. 'Authenticate' in this case means one can be sure that the message has not been altered, and that the sender's identity has not been forged. The technique can serve not only to authenticate images, but also to help the photographer retain and enforce copyright protection when the concept of 'electronic original' is no longer meaningful.

  3. MaterialCloning: Acquiring Elasticity Parameters from Images for Medical Applications.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shan; Lin, Ming C

    2016-09-01

    We present a practical approach for automatically estimating the material properties of soft bodies from two sets of images, taken before and after deformation. We reconstruct 3D geometry from the given sets of multiple-view images; we use a coupled simulation-optimization-identification framework to deform one soft body at its original, non-deformed state to match the deformed geometry of the same object in its deformed state. For shape correspondence, we use a distance-based error metric to compare the estimated deformation fields against the actual deformation field from the reconstructed geometry. The optimal set of material parameters is thereby determined by minimizing the error metric function. This method can simultaneously recover the elasticity parameters of multiple types of soft bodies using Finite Element Method-based simulation (of either linear or nonlinear materials undergoing large deformation) and particle-swarm optimization methods. We demonstrate this approach on real-time interaction with virtual organs in patient-specific surgical simulation, using parameters acquired from low-resolution medical images. We also highlight the results on physics-based animation of virtual objects using sketches from an artist's conception. PMID:26661471

  4. Algorithm For Automatic Road Recognition On Digitized Map Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zhipu; Kim, Yongmin

    1989-09-01

    This paper presents an algorithm to detect road lines on digitized map images. This algorithm detects road lines based on object shape (line thickness) and gray level values. The road detection process is accomplished in two steps: road line extraction and road tracking. The road line extraction consists of level slicing, morphological filtering, and connected component analysis. The road tracking routine is capable of connecting broken road lines caused by the overlapping of text labels. The algorithm has been implemented on an IBM PC/AT-based image processing system and applied to various map images.

  5. TM digital image products for applications. [computer compatible tapes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barker, J. L.; Gunther, F. J.; Abrams, R. B.; Ball, D.

    1984-01-01

    Computer compatible tapes (CCTs) of LANDSAT 4 thematic mapper (TM) digital image products are compared and reviewed. The following tape formats are discussed: (1) raw band-sequential data (CCT-BT); (2) calibrated data (CCT-AT); and (3) geometrically resampled data (CCT-PT). Each format represents different steps in the process of producing fully corrected TM data. The CCT-BT images are uncorrected radiometrically or geometrically, CCT-AT data are radiometrically calibrated, and CCT-PT images are both radiometrically and geometrically corrected.

  6. Image/video encryption using single shot digital holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaoyu; Tang, Chen; Zhu, Xinjun; Li, Biyuan; Wang, Linlin; Yan, Xiusheng

    2015-05-01

    We propose a method for image/video encryption that combines double random-phase encoding in the Fresnel domain with a single shot digital holography. In this method, a complex object field can be reconstructed with only single frame hologram based on a constrained optimization method. The system without multiple shots and Fourier lens is simple, and allows to dynamically encrypt information. We test the proposed method on a computer simulated image, a grayscale image and a video in AVI format. Also we investigate the quality of the decryption process and the performance against noise attacks. The experimental results demonstrate the performance of the method.

  7. A digital imaging photometry system for cometary data acquisition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clifton, K. S.; Benson, C. M.; Gary, G. A.

    1986-01-01

    This report describes a digital imaging photometry system developed in the Space Science Laboratory at the Marshall Space Flight center. The photometric system used for cometary data acquisition is based on an intensified secondary electron conduction (ISEC) vidicon coupled to a versatile data acquisition system which allows real-time interactive operation. Field tests on the Orion and Rosette nebulas indicate a limiting magnitude of approximately m sub v = 14 over the 40 arcmin field-of-view. Observations were conducted of Comet Giacobini-Zinner in August 1985. The resulting data are discussed in relation to the capabilities of the digital analysis system. The development program concluded on August 31, 1985.

  8. Digital image processing: a primer for JVIR authors and readers: part 1: the fundamentals.

    PubMed

    LaBerge, Jeanne M; Andriole, Katherine P

    2003-10-01

    Online submission of manuscripts will be mandatory for most journals in the near future. To prepare authors for this requirement and to acquaint readers with this new development, herein the basics of digital image processing are described. From the fundamentals of digital image architecture, through acquisition, editing, and storage of digital images, the steps necessary to prepare an image for online submission are reviewed. In this article, the first of a three-part series, the structure of the digital image is described. In subsequent articles, the acquisition and editing of digital images will be reviewed. PMID:14551267

  9. A new CMOS-based digital imaging detector for applications in mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baysal, Mehmet A.; Toker, Emre

    2005-09-01

    We have developed a CMOS-based x-ray imaging detector in the same form factor of a standard film cassette (18 cm × 24 cm) for Small Field-of-view Digital Mammography (SFDM) applications. This SFDM cassette is based on our three-side buttable, 25 mm × 50 mm, 48μm active-pixel CMOS sensor modules and utilizes a 150μm columnar CsI(Tl) scintillator. For imaging up to 100 mm × 100 mm field-of-view, a number of CMOS sensor modules need to be tiled and electronically synchronized together. By using fiber-optic communication, acquired images from the SFDM cassette can be transferred, processed and displayed on a review station within approximately 5 seconds of exposure, greatly enhancing patient flow. We present the physical performance of this CMOS-based SFDM cassette, using established objective criteria such as the Modulation Transfer Function (MTF), Detective Quantum Efficiency (DQE), and more subjective criteria, by evaluating images from a phantom study and the clinical studies of our collaborators. Driven by the strong demand from the computer industry, CMOS technology is one of the lowest cost, and the most readily accessible technologies available for digital mammography today. Recent popular use of CMOS imagers in high-end consumer cameras have also resulted in significant advances in the imaging performance of CMOS sensors against rivaling CCD sensors. The SFDM cassette can be employed in various mammography applications, including spot imaging, stereotactic biopsy imaging, core biopsy and surgical biopsy specimen radiography. This study demonstrates that all the image quality requirements for demanding mammography applications can be addressed with CMOS technology.

  10. Review of digital image security in Dermatology.

    PubMed

    Nielson, Colton; West, Cameron; Shimizu, Ikue

    2015-10-01

    The inherently visual nature of dermatology naturally lends itself to photography. As technology has evolved, smartphone cameras have become ubiquitous and have the potential to improve education and patient care in dermatology. Although patients and physicians may agree that photography can improve patient care, there are certain risks involved with smartphone photography in the medical field. Perhaps most concerning is the number of dermatologists using smartphones to take unsecured images in their daily practice. A recent study revealed that 22% of surveyed dermatologists used smartphone cameras multiple times per day in their practice. Dermatologists may also overestimate patient comfort with smartphone use in clinical photography. We present a review of the use of smartphones in dermatology and address the potential lack of security and accompanying ethical dilemmas. PMID:26632792

  11. The influence of hologram aperture on speckle noise in the reconstructed image of digital holography and its reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Xiao-ou; Wang, Hui

    2008-01-01

    Based on the whole process of the recording and reconstruction of digital holography, we study the formation cause of speckle noise in its reconstructed image and acquire the conclusion that the small size of hologram aperture diffraction aggravates the speckle noise of reconstructed image and the speckle noise has been one of primary noise sources in the reconstruction process. In order to reduce the speckle noise resulting from little hologram aperture diffraction, we set an appropriate aperture function matching the recording parameter and aperture size of hologram and deconvolve the reconstructed image with it. The validity has been proved in theory and experiment. Therefore, it offers a brand-new thought and practical way to reduce the speckle noise in the reconstructed image of digital holography.

  12. Digital implementation of a neural network for imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Richard; McGlashan, Alex; Yatulis, Jay; Mascher, Peter; Bruce, Ian

    2012-10-01

    This paper outlines the design and testing of a digital imaging system that utilizes an artificial neural network with unsupervised and supervised learning to convert streaming input (real time) image space into parameter space. The primary objective of this work is to investigate the effectiveness of using a neural network to significantly reduce the information density of streaming images so that objects can be readily identified by a limited set of primary parameters and act as an enhanced human machine interface (HMI). Many applications are envisioned including use in biomedical imaging, anomaly detection and as an assistive device for the visually impaired. A digital circuit was designed and tested using a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) and an off the shelf digital camera. Our results indicate that the networks can be readily trained when subject to limited sets of objects such as the alphabet. We can also separate limited object sets with rotational and positional invariance. The results also show that limited visual fields form with only local connectivity.

  13. Digital imaging in pathology: theoretical and practical considerations, and applications.

    PubMed

    Leong, F Joel W-M; Leong, Anthony S Y

    2004-06-01

    Digital imaging is rapidly replacing photographic prints and Kodachromes for pathology reporting and conference purposes. Advanced systems linked to computers allow greater versatility and speed of turn-around as well as lower costs, allowing the incorporation of macroscopic and microscopic pictures into routine pathology reports and publications. Digital images allow transmission to remote sites via the Internet for primary diagnosis, consultation, quality assurance and educational purposes and can be stored and disseminated in CD-ROMs. Total slide digitisation is now a reality and has the potential to replace glass slides to a large extent. There are extensive applications of digital images in education and research, allowing more objective and automated quantitation of a variety of morphological and immunohistological parameters. Three-dimensional images of gross specimens can be developed and posted on websites for interactive educational programs and preliminary reports indicate that medical vision systems are a reality and can provide for automated computer generated histopathological diagnosis and quality assurance. PMID:15203727

  14. Frame Your Images: Making Digital Images Accessible for Study & Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gepner, Ivan

    2009-01-01

    Images, whether at the level of molecules, cells, organs, organisms, or environments, are at the core of many biological disciplines. Even with the contemporary emphasis on molecular analysis, biology has retained its traditional strong visual component. In courses that rely on the study of biological structure, the presentation of images for…

  15. Integrated terrain mapping with digital Landsat images in Queensland, Australia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robinove, Charles Joseph

    1979-01-01

    Mapping with Landsat images usually is done by selecting single types of features, such as soils, vegetation, or rocks, and creating visually interpreted or digitally classified maps of each feature. Individual maps can then be overlaid on or combined with other maps to characterize the terrain. Integrated terrain mapping combines several terrain features into each map unit which, in many cases, is more directly related to uses of the land and to methods of land management than the single features alone. Terrain brightness, as measured by the multispectral scanners in Landsat 1 and 2, represents an integration of reflectance from the terrain features within the scanner's instantaneous field of view and is therefore more correlatable with integrated terrain units than with differentiated ones, such as rocks, soils, and vegetation. A test of the feasibilty of the technique of mapping integrated terrain units was conducted in a part of southwestern Queensland, Australia, in cooperation with scientists of the Queensland Department of Primary Industries. The primary purpose was to test the use of digital classification techniques to create a 'land systems map' usable for grazing land management. A recently published map of 'land systems' in the area (made by aerial photograph interpretation and ground surveys), which are integrated terrain units composed of vegetation, soil, topography, and geomorphic features, was used as a basis for comparison with digitally classified Landsat multispectral images. The land systems, in turn, each have a specific grazing capacity for cattle (expressed in beasts per km 2 ) which is estimated following analysis of both research results and property carrying capacities. Landsat images, in computer-compatible tape form, were first contrast-stretched to increase their visual interpretability, and digitally classified by the parallelepiped method into distinct spectral classes to determine their correspondence to the land systems classes and

  16. Getting the bigger picture: Using precision Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV) videography to acquire high-definition mosaic images of newly discovered hydrothermal vents in the Southern Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsh, Leigh; Copley, Jonathan T.; Huvenne, Veerle A. I.; Tyler, Paul A.; Isis ROV Facility

    2013-08-01

    Direct visual observations from submersible vehicles at hydrothermal vents typically only reveal a fraction of the vent environment at any one time. We describe the use of precision Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV) videography to produce extensive mosaic images of hydrothermal vent chimneys and surrounding seafloor areas (c. 250 m2), with sufficient resolution to determine distributions of macro- and megafauna. Doppler velocity log navigation (DVLNAV) was used to follow overlapping vertical survey lines in a fixed plane facing a vent chimney, while acquiring high-definition video imagery using a forward-looking camera. The DVLNAV also enabled the vehicle to follow overlapping horizontal survey lines while acquiring seafloor imagery from a downward-looking video camera and mapping variations in seawater temperature. Digital stills images extracted from video were used to compile high-resolution composite views of the surveyed areas. Applying these image acquisition techniques at vent fields on the East Scotia Ridge, Southern Ocean, revealed consistent patterns of faunal zonation around vent sources, variations in proportions of faunal assemblage types on different faces of a vent chimney, and differences in proportions of faunal assemblages between two different vent fields. The technique can therefore be used to determine the composition and spatial distribution of fauna across complex areas of topography, such as vent fields, where mosaic images of vertical structures cannot currently be acquired using other platforms such as autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs). These image acquisition techniques, demonstrated here in the first ROV dives at newly discovered vent fields, may offer an appropriate technology for rapid baseline studies required by the potential mining of seafloor massive sulfides (SMS).

  17. Dental digital radiography.

    PubMed

    Moore, William S

    2002-05-01

    Digital images offer tremendous advantages to dentistry in terms of the potential for lower exposure to patients, absence of darkroom or processing problems, convenience of image enhancement techniques and capacity for remote teledentistry. Digital systems are now able to acquire all types of images including panoramic and cephalometric. As technology continues to improve they may ultimately replace film as the medium of choice for dental imaging. PMID:12046403

  18. Optical Synchrotron Radiation Beam Imaging with a Digital Mask

    SciTech Connect

    Fiorito, R. B.; Zhang, H. D.; Corbett, W. J.; Fisher, A. S.; Mok, W. Y.; Tian, K.; Douglas, D.; Wilson, F. G.; Zhang, S.; Mitsuhashi, T. M.; Shkvarunets, A. G.

    2012-11-01

    We have applied a new imaging/optical masking technique, which employs a digital micro-mirror device (DMD) and optical synchrotron radiation (OSR), to perform high dynamic range (DR) beam imaging at the JLAB Energy Recovery Linac and the SLAC/SPEAR3 Synchrotron Light Source. The OSR from the beam is first focused onto the DMD to produce a primary image; selected areas of this image are spatially filtered by controlling the state of individual micro-mirrors; and finally, the filtered image is refocused onto a CCD camera. At JLAB this technique has been used successfully to view the beam halo with a DR ~ 105. At SPEAR3 the DMD was used to filter out the bright core of the stored beam to study the turn-by-turn dynamics of the 10-3 weaker injected beam. We describe the optical performance, present limitations and our plans to improve the DR of both experimental systems.

  19. Forensic detection of noise addition in digital images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Gang; Zhao, Yao; Ni, Rongrong; Ou, Bo; Wang, Yongbin

    2014-03-01

    We proposed a technique to detect the global addition of noise to a digital image. As an anti-forensics tool, noise addition is typically used to disguise the visual traces of image tampering or to remove the statistical artifacts left behind by other operations. As such, the blind detection of noise addition has become imperative as well as beneficial to authenticate the image content and recover the image processing history, which is the goal of general forensics techniques. Specifically, the special image blocks, including constant and strip ones, are used to construct the features for identifying noise addition manipulation. The influence of noising on blockwise pixel value distribution is formulated and analyzed formally. The methodology of detectability recognition followed by binary decision is proposed to ensure the applicability and reliability of noising detection. Extensive experimental results demonstrate the efficacy of our proposed noising detector.

  20. Superresolved imaging in digital holography by superposition of tilted wavefronts.

    PubMed

    Mico, Vicente; Zalevsky, Zeev; García-Martínez, Pascuala; García, Javier

    2006-02-10

    A technique based on superresolution by digital holographic microscopic imaging is presented. We used a two dimensional (2-D) vertical-cavity self-emitting laser (VCSEL) array as spherical-wave illumination sources. The method is defined in terms of an incoherent superposition of tilted wavefronts. The tilted spherical wave originating from the 2-D VCSEL elements illuminates the target in transmission mode to obtain a hologram in a Mach-Zehnder interferometer configuration. Superresolved images of the input object above the common lens diffraction limit are generated by sequential recording of the individual holograms and numerical reconstruction of the image with the extended spatial frequency range. We have experimentally tested the approach for a microscope objective with an exact 2-D reconstruction image of the input object. The proposed approach has implementation advantages for applications in biological imaging or the microelectronic industry in which structured targets are being inspected. PMID:16512523

  1. Digital Image Processing Overview For Helmet Mounted Displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parise, Michael J.

    1989-09-01

    Digital image processing provides a means to manipulate an image and presents a user with a variety of display formats that are not available in the analog image processing environment. When performed in real time and presented on a Helmet Mounted Display, system capability and flexibility are greatly enhanced. The information content of a display can be increased by the addition of real time insets and static windows from secondary sensor sources, near real time 3-D imaging from a single sensor can be achieved, graphical information can be added, and enhancement techniques can be employed. Such increased functionality is generating a considerable amount of interest in the military and commercial markets. This paper discusses some of these image processing techniques and their applications.

  2. Digital imaging of surgical specimens using a wet scanning technique

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, T; Denney, P

    2001-01-01

    Aim—To develop a simple method of recording digital images of surgical specimens on to a personal computer (PC) for use in presentations for teaching and reporting of their pathology. Methods—A perspex box was constructed to international A4 size 100 mm deep. This box had a base of 3 mm clear perspex with sides and top of 5 mm white perspex. This box was partially filled with distilled water and a specimen immersed in it. It was then placed on top of a standard A4 scanner. The specimen was then scanned into a PC using image capture software. Results—The images produced showed noticeable improvement over normal photographs, especially with specimens prone to wet highlights. Conclusions—The method has proved to be a rapid and efficient means of producing macroscopic images of surgical specimens. Key Words: scanning • personal computer • macroscopic images • surgical specimens PMID:11304853

  3. Digital holographic method for tomography-image reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Cheng; Yan, Changchun; Gao, Shumei

    2004-02-01

    A digital holographic method for three-dimensional reconstruction of tomography images is demonstrated theoretically and experimentally. In this proposed method, a numerical hologram is first computed by calculating the total diffraction field of all transect images of a detected organ. Then, the numerical hologram is transferred to the usual recording medium to generate a physical hologram. Last, all the transect images are reconstructed in their original position by illuminating the physical hologram with a laser, thereby forming a three-dimensional transparent image of the organ detected. Due to its true third dimension, the reconstructed image using this method is much more vivid and accurate than that of other methods. Potentially, it may have great prospects for application in medical engineering.

  4. Development of a digital receiver for range imaging atmospheric radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Masayuki K.; Fujita, Toshiyuki; Abdul Aziz, Noor Hafizah Binti; Gan, Tong; Hashiguchi, Hiroyuki; Yu, Tian-You; Yamamoto, Mamoru

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, we describe a new digital receiver developed for a 1.3-GHz range imaging atmospheric radar. The digital receiver comprises a general-purpose software-defined radio receiver referred to as the Universal Software Radio Peripheral 2 (USRP2) and a commercial personal computer (PC). The receiver is designed to collect received signals at an intermediate frequency (IF) of 130 MHz with a sample rate of 10 MS s-1. The USRP2 digitizes IF received signals, produces IQ time series, and then transfers the IQ time series to the PC through Gigabit Ethernet. The PC receives the IQ time series, performs range sampling, carries out filtering in the range direction, decodes the phase-modulated received signals, integrates the received signals in time, and finally saves the processed data to the hard disk drive (HDD). Because only sequential data transfer from the USRP2 to the PC is available, the range sampling is triggered by transmitted pulses leaked to the receiver. For range imaging, the digital receiver performs real-time signal processing for each of the time series collected at different frequencies. Further, the receiver is able to decode phase-modulated oversampled signals. Because the program code for real-time signal processing is written in a popular programming language (C++) and widely used libraries, the signal processing is easy to implement, reconfigure, and reuse. From radar experiments using a 1-μs subpulse width and 1-MHz frequency span (i.e., 2-MHz frequency bandwidth), we demonstrate that range imaging in combination with oversampling, which was implemented for the first time by the digital receiver, is able to resolve the fine-scale structure of turbulence with a vertical scale as small as 100 m or finer.

  5. Digital Pathology: Data-Intensive Frontier in Medical Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Lee A. D.; Carter, Alexis B.; Farris, Alton B.; Wang, Fusheng; Kong, Jun; Gutman, David A.; Widener, Patrick; Pan, Tony C.; Cholleti, Sharath R.; Sharma, Ashish; Kurc, Tahsin M.; Brat, Daniel J.; Saltz, Joel H.

    2013-01-01

    Pathology is a medical subspecialty that practices the diagnosis of disease. Microscopic examination of tissue reveals information enabling the pathologist to render accurate diagnoses and to guide therapy. The basic process by which anatomic pathologists render diagnoses has remained relatively unchanged over the last century, yet advances in information technology now offer significant opportunities in image-based diagnostic and research applications. Pathology has lagged behind other healthcare practices such as radiology where digital adoption is widespread. As devices that generate whole slide images become more practical and affordable, practices will increasingly adopt this technology and eventually produce an explosion of data that will quickly eclipse the already vast quantities of radiology imaging data. These advances are accompanied by significant challenges for data management and storage, but they also introduce new opportunities to improve patient care by streamlining and standardizing diagnostic approaches and uncovering disease mechanisms. Computer-based image analysis is already available in commercial diagnostic systems, but further advances in image analysis algorithms are warranted in order to fully realize the benefits of digital pathology in medical discovery and patient care. In coming decades, pathology image analysis will extend beyond the streamlining of diagnostic workflows and minimizing interobserver variability and will begin to provide diagnostic assistance, identify therapeutic targets, and predict patient outcomes and therapeutic responses. PMID:25328166

  6. IMAGEP - A FORTRAN ALGORITHM FOR DIGITAL IMAGE PROCESSING

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, D. J.

    1994-01-01

    IMAGEP is a FORTRAN computer algorithm containing various image processing, analysis, and enhancement functions. It is a keyboard-driven program organized into nine subroutines. Within the subroutines are other routines, also, selected via keyboard. Some of the functions performed by IMAGEP include digitization, storage and retrieval of images; image enhancement by contrast expansion, addition and subtraction, magnification, inversion, and bit shifting; display and movement of cursor; display of grey level histogram of image; and display of the variation of grey level intensity as a function of image position. This algorithm has possible scientific, industrial, and biomedical applications in material flaw studies, steel and ore analysis, and pathology, respectively. IMAGEP is written in VAX FORTRAN for DEC VAX series computers running VMS. The program requires the use of a Grinnell 274 image processor which can be obtained from Mark McCloud Associates, Campbell, CA. An object library of the required GMR series software is included on the distribution media. IMAGEP requires 1Mb of RAM for execution. The standard distribution medium for this program is a 1600 BPI 9track magnetic tape in VAX FILES-11 format. It is also available on a TK50 tape cartridge in VAX FILES-11 format. This program was developed in 1991. DEC, VAX, VMS, and TK50 are trademarks of Digital Equipment Corporation.

  7. Fingerprint pattern restoration by digital image processing techniques.

    PubMed

    Wen, Che-Yen; Yu, Chiu-Chung

    2003-09-01

    Fingerprint evidence plays an important role in solving criminal problems. However, defective (lacking information needed for completeness) or contaminated (undesirable information included) fingerprint patterns make identifying and recognizing processes difficult. Unfortunately. this is the usual case. In the recognizing process (enhancement of patterns, or elimination of "false alarms" so that a fingerprint pattern can be searched in the Automated Fingerprint Identification System (AFIS)), chemical and physical techniques have been proposed to improve pattern legibility. In the identifying process, a fingerprint examiner can enhance contaminated (but not defective) fingerprint patterns under guidelines provided by the Scientific Working Group on Friction Ridge Analysis, Study and Technology (SWGFAST), the Scientific Working Group on Imaging Technology (SWGIT), and an AFIS working group within the National Institute of Justice. Recently, the image processing techniques have been successfully applied in forensic science. For example, we have applied image enhancement methods to improve the legibility of digital images such as fingerprints and vehicle plate numbers. In this paper, we propose a novel digital image restoration technique based on the AM (amplitude modulation)-FM (frequency modulation) reaction-diffusion method to restore defective or contaminated fingerprint patterns. This method shows its potential application to fingerprint pattern enhancement in the recognizing process (but not for the identifying process). Synthetic and real images are used to show the capability of the proposed method. The results of enhancing fingerprint patterns by the manual process and our method are evaluated and compared. PMID:14535661

  8. Retrieval of aerosol optical thickness from PROBA-CHRIS images acquired over a coniferous forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maffei, Carmine; Leone, Antonio P.; Menenti, Massimo; Pippi, Ivan; Maselli, Fabio; Antonelli, Paolo

    2005-10-01

    In the present work we show the potential of multiangular hyperspectral PROBA-CHRIS data to estimate aerosol optical properties over dense dark vegetation. Data acquired over San Rossore test site (Pisa, Italy) have been used together with simultaneous ground measurements. Additionally, spectral measurement over the canopy have been performed to describe the directional behavior of a Pinus pinaster canopy. Determination of aerosol properties from optical remote sensing images over land is an under-determined problem, and some assumptions have to be made on both the aerosol and the surface being imaged. Radiance measured on multiple directions add extra information that help in reducing retrieval ambiguity. Nevertheless, multiangular observations don't allow to ignore directional spectral properties of vegetation canopies. Since surface reflectivity is the parameter we wish to determine with remote sensing after atmospheric correction, at least the shape of the bi-directional reflectance factor has to be assumed. We have adopted a Rahman BRF, and have estimated its geometrical parameters from ground spectral measurements. The inversion of measured radiance to obtain aerosol optical properties has been performed, allowing simultaneous retrieval of aerosol model and optical thickness together with the vegetation reflectivity parameter of the Rahman model.

  9. Multimodal Image Analysis in Acquired Vitelliform Lesions and Adult-Onset Foveomacular Vitelliform Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Rocha Bastos, Ricardo; Ferreira, Carla Sofia; Brandão, Elisete; Falcão-Reis, Fernando; Carneiro, Ângela M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To characterize vitelliform lesions (VLs) in adult-onset foveomacular vitelliform dystrophy (AOFVD) and acquired vitelliform (AVL) patients using multimodal image analysis. Methods. Retrospective study of twenty-eight eyes from nineteen patients diagnosed with AVL or AOFVD. They were evaluated by color fundus photographs, fundus autofluorescence (FAF), fluorescein angiography (FA), and spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). Results. Bilateral VLs were associated with AOFVD (p = 0.013). Regular and centered VLs were associated with AOFVD (p = 0.004 and p = 0.016), whereas irregular and noncentered lesions were more frequent in AVL patients. Visual acuity, greatest linear dimension (GLD), lesion height (LH), and pseudohypopyon were similar between groups. Whereas median LH and GLD in AVL group diminished significantly during follow-up (p = 0.009 and p = 0.001), AOFVD lesions tended to become larger and thicker. Conclusions. When consulting a patient presenting a VL with unknown age of onset, familial history, or previous retinal diseases, some aspects of multimodal imaging assessment may lead the ophthalmologist to a correct diagnosis. PMID:27190637

  10. Effective spatial database support for acquiring spatial information from remote sensing images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Peiquan; Wan, Shouhong; Yue, Lihua

    2009-12-01

    In this paper, a new approach to maintain spatial information acquiring from remote-sensing images is presented, which is based on Object-Relational DBMS. According to this approach, the detected and recognized results of targets are stored and able to be further accessed in an ORDBMS-based spatial database system, and users can access the spatial information using the standard SQL interface. This approach is different from the traditional ArcSDE-based method, because the spatial information management module is totally integrated into the DBMS and becomes one of the core modules in the DBMS. We focus on three issues, namely the general framework for the ORDBMS-based spatial database system, the definitions of the add-in spatial data types and operators, and the process to develop a spatial Datablade on Informix. The results show that the ORDBMS-based spatial database support for image-based target detecting and recognition is easy and practical to be implemented.

  11. Traffic sign detection in MLS acquired point clouds for geometric and image-based semantic inventory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soilán, Mario; Riveiro, Belén; Martínez-Sánchez, Joaquín; Arias, Pedro

    2016-04-01

    Nowadays, mobile laser scanning has become a valid technology for infrastructure inspection. This technology permits collecting accurate 3D point clouds of urban and road environments and the geometric and semantic analysis of data became an active research topic in the last years. This paper focuses on the detection of vertical traffic signs in 3D point clouds acquired by a LYNX Mobile Mapper system, comprised of laser scanning and RGB cameras. Each traffic sign is automatically detected in the LiDAR point cloud, and its main geometric parameters can be automatically extracted, therefore aiding the inventory process. Furthermore, the 3D position of traffic signs are reprojected on the 2D images, which are spatially and temporally synced with the point cloud. Image analysis allows for recognizing the traffic sign semantics using machine learning approaches. The presented method was tested in road and urban scenarios in Galicia (Spain). The recall results for traffic sign detection are close to 98%, and existing false positives can be easily filtered after point cloud projection. Finally, the lack of a large, publicly available Spanish traffic sign database is pointed out.

  12. Multimodal Image Analysis in Acquired Vitelliform Lesions and Adult-Onset Foveomacular Vitelliform Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Rocha Bastos, Ricardo; Ferreira, Carla Sofia; Brandão, Elisete; Falcão-Reis, Fernando; Carneiro, Ângela M

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To characterize vitelliform lesions (VLs) in adult-onset foveomacular vitelliform dystrophy (AOFVD) and acquired vitelliform (AVL) patients using multimodal image analysis. Methods. Retrospective study of twenty-eight eyes from nineteen patients diagnosed with AVL or AOFVD. They were evaluated by color fundus photographs, fundus autofluorescence (FAF), fluorescein angiography (FA), and spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). Results. Bilateral VLs were associated with AOFVD (p = 0.013). Regular and centered VLs were associated with AOFVD (p = 0.004 and p = 0.016), whereas irregular and noncentered lesions were more frequent in AVL patients. Visual acuity, greatest linear dimension (GLD), lesion height (LH), and pseudohypopyon were similar between groups. Whereas median LH and GLD in AVL group diminished significantly during follow-up (p = 0.009 and p = 0.001), AOFVD lesions tended to become larger and thicker. Conclusions. When consulting a patient presenting a VL with unknown age of onset, familial history, or previous retinal diseases, some aspects of multimodal imaging assessment may lead the ophthalmologist to a correct diagnosis. PMID:27190637

  13. Body image among 22 persons with acquired and congenital severe mobility impairment.

    PubMed

    Stensman, R

    1989-02-01

    Interviews concerning body image were conducted with 10 persons with tetraplegia due to traumatic spinal cord injury and 12 persons with cerebral palsy. They all needed a wheelchair and daily assistance from another person. Their satisfaction/dissatisfaction with their body in different situations was reported on a visual analogue scale. The body size as estimated on a Body Puzzle was compared with true measurements. The body mass index of the 22 persons was calculated. These results showed only slight differences between the groups of persons with acquired and congenital motor impairment and did not differ from the results in a reference group. Information was obtained about different experiences of the interviewed persons, e.g. those from the viewpoint of a wheelchair user, lack of body language and moving about in dreams. In general, the adjustments made to the problems concerning body image by the persons with severe mobility impairment were successful. This finding is important in the light of the efforts among persons with severe mobility impairment to reach equality and 'a normal life'. PMID:2922204

  14. A robust chaotic algorithm for digital image steganography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghebleh, M.; Kanso, A.

    2014-06-01

    This paper proposes a new robust chaotic algorithm for digital image steganography based on a 3-dimensional chaotic cat map and lifted discrete wavelet transforms. The irregular outputs of the cat map are used to embed a secret message in a digital cover image. Discrete wavelet transforms are used to provide robustness. Sweldens' lifting scheme is applied to ensure integer-to-integer transforms, thus improving the robustness of the algorithm. The suggested scheme is fast, efficient and flexible. Empirical results are presented to showcase the satisfactory performance of our proposed steganographic scheme in terms of its effectiveness (imperceptibility and security) and feasibility. Comparison with some existing transform domain steganographic schemes is also presented.

  15. Digital optical tomography system for dynamic breast imaging

    PubMed Central

    Flexman, Molly L.; Khalil, Michael A.; Al Abdi, Rabah; Kim, Hyun K.; Fong, Christopher J.; Desperito, Elise; Hershman, Dawn L.; Barbour, Randall L.; Hielscher, Andreas H.

    2011-01-01

    Diffuse optical tomography has shown promising results as a tool for breast cancer screening and monitoring response to chemotherapy. Dynamic imaging of the transient response of the breast to an external stimulus, such as pressure or a respiratory maneuver, can provide additional information that can be used to detect tumors. We present a new digital continuous-wave optical tomography system designed to simultaneously image both breasts at fast frame rates and with a large number of sources and detectors. The system uses a master-slave digital signal processor-based detection architecture to achieve a dynamic range of 160 dB and a frame rate of 1.7 Hz with 32 sources, 64 detectors, and 4 wavelengths per breast. Included is a preliminary study of one healthy patient and two breast cancer patients showing the ability to identify an invasive carcinoma based on the hemodynamic response to a breath hold. PMID:21806275

  16. Speckle reduction in optical coherence tomography images using digital filtering

    PubMed Central

    Ozcan, Aydogan; Bilenca, Alberto; Desjardins, Adrien E.; Bouma, Brett E.; Tearney, Guillermo J.

    2009-01-01

    Speckle noise is a ubiquitous artifact that limits the interpretation of optical coherence tomography images. Here we apply various speckle-reduction digital filters to optical coherence tomography images and compare their performance. Our results indicate that shift-invariant, nonorthogonal wavelet-transform-based filters together with enhanced Lee and adaptive Wiener filters can significantly reduce speckle and increase the signal-to-noise ratio, while preserving strong edges. The speckle reduction capabilities of these filters are also compared with speckle reduction from incoherent angular compounding. Our results suggest that by using these digital filters, the number of individual angles required to attain a certain level of speckle reduction can be decreased. PMID:17728812

  17. Digital-image processing and image analysis of glacier ice

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fitzpatrick, Joan J.

    2013-01-01

    This document provides a methodology for extracting grain statistics from 8-bit color and grayscale images of thin sections of glacier ice—a subset of physical properties measurements typically performed on ice cores. This type of analysis is most commonly used to characterize the evolution of ice-crystal size, shape, and intercrystalline spatial relations within a large body of ice sampled by deep ice-coring projects from which paleoclimate records will be developed. However, such information is equally useful for investigating the stress state and physical responses of ice to stresses within a glacier. The methods of analysis presented here go hand-in-hand with the analysis of ice fabrics (aggregate crystal orientations) and, when combined with fabric analysis, provide a powerful method for investigating the dynamic recrystallization and deformation behaviors of bodies of ice in motion. The procedures described in this document compose a step-by-step handbook for a specific image acquisition and data reduction system built in support of U.S. Geological Survey ice analysis projects, but the general methodology can be used with any combination of image processing and analysis software. The specific approaches in this document use the FoveaPro 4 plug-in toolset to Adobe Photoshop CS5 Extended but it can be carried out equally well, though somewhat less conveniently, with software such as the image processing toolbox in MATLAB, Image-Pro Plus, or ImageJ.

  18. Improving depth resolution in digital breast tomosynthesis by iterative image reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Erin G.; Kraemer, David N.; Sidky, Emil Y.; Reiser, Ingrid S.; Pan, Xiaochuan

    2015-03-01

    Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) is currently enjoying tremendous growth in its application to screening for breast cancer. This is because it addresses a major weakness of mammographic projection imaging; namely, a cancer can be hidden by overlapping fibroglandular tissue structures or the same normal structures can mimic a malignant mass. DBT addresses these issues by acquiring few projections over a limited angle scanning arc that provides some depth resolution. As DBT is a relatively new device, there is potential to improve its performance significantly with improved image reconstruction algorithms. Previously, we reported a variation of adaptive steepest descent - projection onto convex sets (ASD-POCS) for DBT, which employed a finite differencing filter to enhance edges for improving visibility of tissue structures and to allow for volume-of-interest reconstruction. In the present work we present a singular value decomposition (SVD) analysis to demonstrate the gain in depth resolution for DBT afforded by use of the finite differencing filter.

  19. Pitch evaluation of gratings based on a digital image correlation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yancong; Jia, Wei; Wei, Chunlong; Yu, Junjie; Li, Shubin; Li, Yanyang; Li, Minkang; Qiu, Jucheng; Wang, Shaoqing; Zhou, Changhe

    2016-04-01

    The digital image correlation (DIC) technique used for metrological grating evaluation is presented in this paper. A CCD camera is used to acquire the grating image, and the DIC technique together with the peak-position detection method is used to evaluate the grating pitches. The theoretical analysis and simulations are performed to confirm that the performance of our technique is as accurate as the Fourier transform (FT) technique, and is capable of noise resistance. As an example, the uniformity of the grating fabricated in our laboratory is measured using this method. The experimental results show that this grating has a peak-to-valley uniformity of 48 nm during a long range of 35 mm, and our technique has a higher repeatability than the FT technique in our measurement strategy. This work should be of great significance for the evaluation of metrological grating for optical encoders.

  20. Digital image correlation utilization in pipeline oriented residual stress estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brynk, Tomasz; Mezyk, Dariusz; Kukla, Dominik

    2014-10-01

    The aim of the paper is to present an idea of the utilization of Digital Image Correlation (DIC) method for industrial pipelines residual stress oriented investigation. For this purpose results of tests performed in laboratory and industrial conditions are presented. Obtained results showed that DIC method gives reliable near drilled hole strain/displacement distribution maps which may be used for accurate residual stress calculations.

  1. Methods of Improving a Digital Image Having White Zones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wodell, Glenn A. (Inventor); Jobson, Daniel J. (Inventor); Rahman, Zia-Ur (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    The present invention is a method of processing a digital image that is initially represented by digital data indexed to represent positions on a display. The digital data is indicative of an intensity value I,(x,y) for each position (x,y) in each i-th spectral band. The intensity value for each position in each i-th spectral band is adjusted to generate an adjusted intensity value for each position in each i-th spectral band in accordance with SIGMA (sup N)(sub n=1)W(sub n)(log I(sub i)(x,y)-log[I(sub i)(x,y)*F(sub n)(x,y)]), i = 1,...,S where W(sub n) is a weighting factor, "*" is the convolution operator and S is the total number of unique spectral bands. For each n, the function F(sub n)(x,y) is a unique surround function applied to each position (x,y) and N is the total number of unique surround functions. Each unique surround function is scaled to improve some aspect of the digital image, e.g., dynamic range compression, color constancy, and lightness rendition. The adjusted intensity value for each position in each i-th spectral band of the image is then filtered with a filter function to generate a filtered intensity value R(sub i)(x,y). To Prevent graying of white zones in the image, the maximum of the original intensity value I(sub i)(x,y) and filtered intensity value R(sub i)(x,y) is selected for display.

  2. Real-Time Digital Compression Of Television Image Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, Scott P.; Shalkhauser, Mary JO; Whyte, Wayne A., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Digital encoding/decoding system compresses color television image data in real time for transmission at lower data rates and, consequently, lower bandwidths. Implements predictive coding process, in which each picture element (pixel) predicted from values of prior neighboring pixels, and coded transmission expresses difference between actual and predicted current values. Combines differential pulse-code modulation process with non-linear, nonadaptive predictor, nonuniform quantizer, and multilevel Huffman encoder.

  3. Encryption On Grayscale Image For Digital Image Confidentiality Using Shamir Secret Sharing Scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodiah; Anggraini, Dyah; Fitrianingsih; Kazhimi, Farizan

    2016-04-01

    The use of high-frequency internet in the process of exchanging information and digital transaction is often accompanied by transmitting digital image in the form of raster images. Secret sharing schemes are multiparty protocols that related to the key establishment which provides protection against any threats of losing cryptography key. The greater the key duplication, the higher the risk of losing the key and vice versa. In this study, Secret Sharing Method was used by employing Shamir Threshold Scheme Algorithm on grayscale digital image with the size of 256×256 pixel obtaining 128×128 pixels of shared image with threshold values (4, 8). The result number of shared images were 8 parts and the recovery process can be carried out by at least using 4 shares of the 8 parts. The result of encryption on grayscale image is capable of producing vague shared image (i.e., no perceptible information), therefore a message in the form of digital image can be kept confidential and secure.

  4. Concepts for evaluation of image quality in digital radiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zscherpel, U.; Ewert, U.; Jechow, M.

    2012-05-01

    Concepts for digital image evaluation are presented for Computed Radiography (CR) and Digital Detector Arrays (DDAs) used for weld inspection. The precise DDA calibration yields an extra ordinary increase of contrast sensitivity up to 10 times in relation to film radiography. Restrictions in spatial resolution caused by pixel size of the DDA are compensated by increased contrast sensitivity. First CR standards were published in 2005 to support the application of phosphor imaging plates in lieu of X-ray film, but they need already a revision based on experiences reported by many users. One of the key concepts is the usage of signal-to-noise (SNR) measurements as equivalent to the optical density of film and film system class. The contrast sensitivity, measured by IQI visibility, depends on three essential parameters: The basic spatial resolution (SRb) of the radiographic image, the achieved signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and the specific contrast (μeff - effective attenuation coefficient). Knowing these 3 parameters for the given exposure condition, inspected material and monitor viewing condition permits the calculation of the just visible IQI element. Furthermore, this enables the optimization of exposure conditions. The new ISO/FDIS 17636-2 describes the practice for digital radiography with CR and DDAs. It considers the first time compensation principles, derived from the three essential parameters. The consequences are described.

  5. Particle Imaging, Characterization and Extinction Measurement with Digital Holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subedi, Nava; Berg, Matthew

    2015-03-01

    Digital holographic microcopy (DHM) can be a ground breaking technique in the field of particle diagnostic because of its capability for imaging, characterization and extinction measurement in situ. The beauty of this technique is that a single experimental set up is able to do all these works at the same time. In this sense DHM can be used to establish a new kind of instrumentation having the properties of cost-effective, light-weight and portable. Besides this, this technique also has lots of useful applications in the field of aerosol research, climate modeling, life science, polymer crystallization, and defense. We are using DHM for sub-micron sized particle imaging, characterization and extinction. In this work, a particle is illuminated by a pulsed laser and the interference pattern produced by superposition of particle's forward-scattered wave with the incident wave is recorded by a digital camera. The recorded pattern constitutes a digital hologram which can be numerically processed to get image, composition information and extinction cross-section of the particle. These information of the particle are the basic requirements for the characterization of respirable-sized (1-10 μm) aerosols particles.

  6. Freezing effect on bread appearance evaluated by digital imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zayas, Inna Y.

    1999-01-01

    In marketing channels, bread is sometimes delivered in a frozen sate for distribution. Changes occur in physical dimensions, crumb grain and appearance of slices. Ten loaves, twelve bread slices per loaf were scanned for digital image analysis and then frozen in a commercial refrigerator. The bread slices were stored for four weeks scanned again, permitted to thaw and scanned a third time. Image features were extracted, to determine shape, size and image texture of the slices. Different thresholds of grey levels were set to detect changes that occurred in crumb, images were binarized at these settings. The number of pixels falling into these gray level settings were determined for each slice. Image texture features of subimages of each slice were calculated to quantify slice crumb grain. The image features of the slice size showed shrinking of bread slices, as a results of freezing and storage, although shape of slices did not change markedly. Visible crumb texture changes occurred and these changes were depicted by changes in image texture features. Image texture features showed that slice crumb changed differently at the center of a slice compared to a peripheral area close to the crust. Image texture and slice features were sufficient for discrimination of slices before and after freezing and after thawing.

  7. Image query and indexing for digital x rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, L. Rodney; Thoma, George R.

    1998-12-01

    The web-based medical information retrieval system (WebMIRS) allows interned access to databases containing 17,000 digitized x-ray spine images and associated text data from National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (NHANES). WebMIRS allows SQL query of the text, and viewing of the returned text records and images using a standard browser. We are now working (1) to determine utility of data directly derived from the images in our databases, and (2) to investigate the feasibility of computer-assisted or automated indexing of the images to support image retrieval of images of interest to biomedical researchers in the field of osteoarthritis. To build an initial database based on image data, we are manually segmenting a subset of the vertebrae, using techniques from vertebral morphometry. From this, we will derive and add to the database vertebral features. This image-derived data will enhance the user's data access capability by enabling the creation of combined SQL/image-content queries.

  8. Digital image quantification of siderophores on agar plates

    PubMed Central

    Andrews, Megan Y.; Santelli, Cara M.; Duckworth, Owen W.

    2016-01-01

    This article presents visual image data and detailed methodology for the use of a new method for quantifying the exudation of siderophores during fungal growth. The data include images showing time series for calibration, fungal exudation, and negative controls, as well as replication accuracy information. In addition, we provide detailed protocols for making CAS assay layer plates, the digital analysis protocol for determining area of color change, and discuss growth media that do and do not work with the layer plate method. The results of these data, their interpretation, and further discussion can be found in Andrews et al., 2016 [1]. PMID:26937467

  9. Digital image quantification of siderophores on agar plates.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Megan Y; Santelli, Cara M; Duckworth, Owen W

    2016-03-01

    This article presents visual image data and detailed methodology for the use of a new method for quantifying the exudation of siderophores during fungal growth. The data include images showing time series for calibration, fungal exudation, and negative controls, as well as replication accuracy information. In addition, we provide detailed protocols for making CAS assay layer plates, the digital analysis protocol for determining area of color change, and discuss growth media that do and do not work with the layer plate method. The results of these data, their interpretation, and further discussion can be found in Andrews et al., 2016 [1]. PMID:26937467

  10. Computer image processing - The Viking experience. [digital enhancement techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, W. B.

    1977-01-01

    Computer processing of digital imagery from the Viking mission to Mars is discussed, with attention given to subjective enhancement and quantitative processing. Contrast stretching and high-pass filtering techniques of subjective enhancement are described; algorithms developed to determine optimal stretch and filtering parameters are also mentioned. In addition, geometric transformations to rectify the distortion of shapes in the field of view and to alter the apparent viewpoint of the image are considered. Perhaps the most difficult problem in quantitative processing of Viking imagery was the production of accurate color representations of Orbiter and Lander camera images.

  11. Three-dimensional displacement measurement based on the combination of digital holography and digital image correlation.

    PubMed

    Yan, Hao; Pan, Bing

    2014-09-01

    A new simultaneous three-dimensional (3D) displacement measurement technique based on the combination of digital holography (DH) and digital imaging correlation (DIC) is proposed. The current DH-based 3D displacement measurement technique needs three sets of DH setups, and only the phase images are utilized in measurements, with all the intensity images discarded. In contrast, the proposed new technique only adopts a single off-axis DH setup. In the proposed technique, the phase images are used to extract out-of-plane displacements, but the intensity images (instead of being discarded) are processed by an intensity correlation algorithm to retrieve in-plane displacement components. Because the proposed technique fully takes advantage of all the information obtained by an off-axis DH without additional optical arrangements, it is simpler and more practical than the existing DH-based 3D displacement measurement technique. Experiments performed on a United States Air Force (USAF) target demonstrate that both the in-plane and out-of-plane displacements can be accurately determined by the proposed technique. PMID:25166100

  12. Evaluation of digital halftones image by vector error diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouzaki, Masahiro; Itoh, Tetsuya; Kawaguchi, Takayuki; Tsumura, Norimichi; Haneishi, Hideaki; Miyake, Yoichi

    1998-12-01

    The vector error diffusion (VED) method is applied to proudce the digital halftone images by an electrophotographic printer with 600 dpi. Objective image quality of those obtained images is evaluated and analyzed. As a result, in the color reproduction of halftone image by the VED method, it was clear that there are large color difference between target color and printed color typically in the mid-tone colors. We consider it is due to the printer properties including dot-gain. It was also clear that the color noise of the VED method is larger compared with that of the conventional scalar error diffusion method in some patches. It was remarkable that ununiform patterns are generated by the VED method.

  13. Comparison of Digital Imaging Systems for Neutron Radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pugliesi, R.; Pugliesi, Fábio; Stanojev Pereira, M. A.

    2011-09-01

    The characteristics of three digital imaging systems for neutron radiography purposes have been compared. Two of them make use of films, CR-39 and Kodak AA, and the third makes use of a LiF scintillator, for image registration. The irradiations were performed in the neutron radiography facility installed at the IEA-R1 nuclear research reactor of IPEN-CNEN/SP. According to the obtained results, the system based on CR-39 is the slowest to obtain an image, and the best in terms of resolution but the worse in terms of contrast. The system based on Kodak AA is faster than the prior, exhibits good resolution and contrast. The system based on the scintillator is the fastest to obtain an image, and best in terms of contrast but the worse in terms of resolution.

  14. Variable resolution imaging fiber probe using digital spatial light modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinde, Anant; Perinchery, Sandeep M.; Vadakke Matham, Murukeshan

    2015-07-01

    Flexible fiber optic imaging systems including fiber optic confocal probes have found tremendous significance in the recent past for its applications in high resolution imaging. However, motorized stage is required for scanning the sample or tip of the fiber in fiber based confocal probes. In this context, we propose a fiber probe confocal system using digital spatial light modulator devoid of using a mechanical scanning stage. Each fiberlet in the image fiber acts not only as a light conduit but also as a confocal pinhole. The paper also introduces the variation in the contrast by varying the number of illuminated fiberlets which effectively implies variation in the effective pinhole size. This approach has enabled the probe to act as an imaging unit with resolution that can be controlled and varied from a wide-field to a confocal.

  15. Infective endocarditis detection through SPECT/CT images digital processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, Albino; Valdés, Raquel; Jiménez, Luis; Vallejo, Enrique; Hernández, Salvador; Soto, Gabriel

    2014-03-01

    Infective endocarditis (IE) is a difficult-to-diagnose pathology, since its manifestation in patients is highly variable. In this work, it was proposed a semiautomatic algorithm based on SPECT images digital processing for the detection of IE using a CT images volume as a spatial reference. The heart/lung rate was calculated using the SPECT images information. There were no statistically significant differences between the heart/lung rates values of a group of patients diagnosed with IE (2.62+/-0.47) and a group of healthy or control subjects (2.84+/-0.68). However, it is necessary to increase the study sample of both the individuals diagnosed with IE and the control group subjects, as well as to improve the images quality.

  16. A comparison of image interpretation times in full field digital mammography and digital breast tomosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astley, Susan; Connor, Sophie; Lim, Yit; Tate, Catriona; Entwistle, Helen; Morris, Julie; Whiteside, Sigrid; Sergeant, Jamie; Wilson, Mary; Beetles, Ursula; Boggis, Caroline; Gilbert, Fiona

    2013-03-01

    Digital Breast Tomosynthesis (DBT) provides three-dimensional images of the breast that enable radiologists to discern whether densities are due to overlapping structures or lesions. To aid assessment of the cost-effectiveness of DBT for screening, we have compared the time taken to interpret DBT images and the corresponding two-dimensional Full Field Digital Mammography (FFDM) images. Four Consultant Radiologists experienced in reading FFDM images (4 years 8 months to 8 years) with training in DBT interpretation but more limited experience (137-407 cases in the past 6 months) were timed reading between 24 and 32 two view FFDM and DBT cases. The images were of women recalled from screening for further assessment and women under surveillance because of a family history of breast cancer. FFDM images were read before DBT, according to local practice. The median time for readers to interpret FFDM images was 17.0 seconds, with an interquartile range of 12.3-23.6 seconds. For DBT, the median time was 66.0 seconds, and the interquartile range was 51.1-80.5 seconds. The difference was statistically significant (p<0.001). Reading times were significantly longer in family history clinics (p<0.01). Although it took approximately four times as long to interpret DBT than FFDM images, the cases were more complex than would be expected for routine screening, and with higher mammographic density. The readers were relatively inexperienced in DBT interpretation and may increase their speed over time. The difference in times between clinics may be due to increased throughput at assessment, or decreased density.

  17. Imaging strain localization in porous limestone by X-ray Computed Tomography and Digital Image Correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Y.; Baud, P.; Hall, S.; Wong, T.-f.

    2012-04-01

    The brittle-ductile transition in porous sandstones has now been studied extensively. Microstructural studies combining various techniques on samples deformed in the laboratory documented the development of a wide variety on strain localization patterns and failure modes in overall agreement with the field observations in various sandstone formations. In contrast, there is a paucity of mechanical and microstructural laboratory data on the brittle-ductile transition in porous carbonates, particularly for the high porosity end-members. The question of strain localization is in particular hard to tackle as conventional microstructural analyses cannot as in sandstone be guided by acoustic emission statistics. In this context, X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) imaging provides a promising technique to accurately describe the various failure modes associated with the brittle-ductile transition in porous limestone. In this study, we focused on a grainstone from the Majella Mountain, central Italy. Detailed field observations performed in this formation by Tondi et al. (2006) have revealed some complex interplay between deformation/compaction bands and stylolites. Our samples of Majella grainstone had a nominal porosity of 31% and were primarily composed of calcite. A series of hydrostatic and conventional triaxial experiments were performed in dry conditions at room temperature, constant strain rate and at confining pressures ranging from 5 to 50 MPa. Several sets of CT images at a resolution of 25 microns were acquired before and after deformation. Digital Image Correlation (DIC) was performed on images of the intact and deformed samples. The full 3D strain tensor field was derived. Results for the two strain invariants corresponding to the volumetric and shear components were obtained for grid steps of 500 and 250 microns. Our new results showed that deformation was compactant in Majella grainstone over the wide range of pressures investigated. Strain localization was

  18. Applicability of digital analysis and imaging technology in neuropathology assessment.

    PubMed

    Dunn, William D; Gearing, Marla; Park, Yuna; Zhang, Lifan; Hanfelt, John; Glass, Jonathan D; Gutman, David A

    2016-06-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurological disorder that affects more than 30 million people worldwide. While various dementia-related losses in cognitive functioning are its hallmark clinical symptoms, ultimate diagnosis is based on manual neuropathological assessments using various schemas, including Braak staging, CERAD (Consortium to Establish a Registry for Alzheimer's Disease) and Thal phase scoring. Since these scoring systems are based on subjective assessment, there is inevitably some degree of variation between readers, which could affect ultimate neuropathology diagnosis. Here, we report a pilot study investigating the applicability of computer-driven image analysis for characterizing neuropathological features, as well as its potential to supplement or even replace manually derived ratings commonly performed in medical settings. In this work, we quantitatively measured amyloid beta (Aβ) plaque in various brain regions from 34 patients using a robust digital quantification algorithm. We next verified these digitally derived measures to the manually derived pathology ratings using correlation and ordinal logistic regression methods, while also investigating the association with other AD-related neuropathology scoring schema commonly used at autopsy, such as Braak and CERAD. In addition to successfully verifying our digital measurements of Aβ plaques with respective categorical measurements, we found significant correlations with most AD-related scoring schemas. Our results demonstrate the potential for digital analysis to be adapted to more complex staining procedures commonly used in neuropathological diagnosis. As the efficiency of scanning and digital analysis of histology images increases, we believe that the basis of our semi-automatic approach may better standardize quantification of neuropathological changes and AD diagnosis, ultimately leading to a more comprehensive understanding of neurological disorders and more efficient patient

  19. Use of film digitizers to assist radiology image management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honeyman-Buck, Janice C.; Frost, Meryll M.; Staab, Edward V.

    1996-05-01

    The purpose of this development effort was to evaluate the possibility of using digital technologies to solve image management problems in the Department of Radiology at the University of Florida. The three problem areas investigated were local interpretation of images produced in remote locations, distribution of images to areas outside of radiology, and film handling. In all cases the use of a laser film digitizer interfaced to an existing Picture Archiving and Communication System (PACS) was investigated as a solution to the problem. In each case the volume of studies involved were evaluated to estimate the impact of the solution on the network, archive, and workstations. Communications were stressed in the analysis of the needs for all image transmission. The operational aspects of the solution were examined to determine the needs for training, service, and maintenance. The remote sites requiring local interpretation included were a rural hospital needing coverage for after hours studies, the University of Florida student infirmary, and the emergency room. Distribution of images to the intensive care units was studied to improve image access and patient care. Handling of films originating from remote sites and those requiring urgent reporting were evaluated to improve management functions. The results of our analysis and the decisions that were made based on the analysis are described below. In the cases where systems were installed, a description of the system and its integration into the PACS system is included. For all three problem areas, although we could move images via a digitizer to the archive and a workstation, there was no way to inform the radiologist that a study needed attention. In the case of outside films, the patient did not always have a medical record number that matched one in our Radiology Information Systems (RIS). In order to incorporate all studies for a patient, we needed common locations for orders, reports, and images. RIS orders

  20. Digital Tomosynthesis for Respiratory Gated Liver Treatment: Clinical Feasibility for Daily Image Guidance

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Q. Jackie; Meyer, Jeffrey; Fuller, Jessica; Godfrey, Devon; Wang Zhiheng; Zhang Junan; Yin Fangfang

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Breath-hold (BH) treatment minimizes internal target volumes (ITV) when treating sites prone to motion. Digital tomosynthesis (DTS) imaging has advantages over cone-beam CT (CBCT) for BH imaging: BH-DTS scan can be completed during a single breath-hold, whereas BH-CBCT is usually acquired by parsing the gantry rotation into multiple BH segments. This study evaluates the localization accuracy of DTS for BH treatment of liver tumors. Methods: Both planning CT and on-board DTS/CBCT images were acquired under BH, using the planning CT BH window as reference. Onboard imaging data sets included two independent DTS orientations (coronal and sagittal), and CBCT images. Soft tissue target positioning was measured by each imaging modality and translated into couch shifts. Performance of the two DTS orientations was evaluated by comparing target positioning with the CBCT benchmark, determined by two observers. Results: Image data sets were collected from thirty-eight treatment fractions (14 patients). Mean differences between the two DTS methods and the CBCT method were <1 mm in all directions (except the lateral direction with sagittal-DTS: 1.2 mm); the standard deviation was in the range of 2.1-3.5 mm for all techniques. The Pearson correlation showed good interobserver agreement for the coronal-DTS (0.72-0.78). The interobserver agreement for the sagittal-DTS was good for the in-plane directions (0.70-0.82), but poor in the out-of-plane direction (lateral, 0.26). Conclusions: BH-DTS may be a simpler alternative to BH-CBCT for onboard soft tissue localization of the liver, although the precision of DTS localization appears to be somewhat lower because of the presence of subtle out-of-plane blur.

  1. Digital merging of Landsat TM and digitized NHAP data for 1:24 000-scale image mapping.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chavez, P.S., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Merging image data collected by different remote sensors is becoming an increasingly important component of digital processing. In this study, two data sets with very different characteristics were digitally merged, and a single data set, which contains information from both sets, was generated. Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) data were selected for their spectral information, and a digitized panchromatic photograph collected as part of the National High Altitude Program (NHAP), with approximately 4-m resolution after being digitized, was used for the primary spatial information. Five image control points and a second-order polynomial fit were used to combine the information from both data sets.-from Author

  2. Enhancing the Teaching of Digital Processing of Remote Sensing Image Course through Geospatial Web Processing Services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di, L.; Deng, M.

    2010-12-01

    Remote sensing (RS) is an essential method to collect data for Earth science research. Huge amount of remote sensing data, most of them in the image form, have been acquired. Almost all geography departments in the world offer courses in digital processing of remote sensing images. Such courses place emphasis on how to digitally process large amount of multi-source images for solving real world problems. However, due to the diversity and complexity of RS images and the shortcomings of current data and processing infrastructure, obstacles for effectively teaching such courses still remain. The major obstacles include 1) difficulties in finding, accessing, integrating and using massive RS images by students and educators, and 2) inadequate processing functions and computing facilities for students to freely explore the massive data. Recent development in geospatial Web processing service systems, which make massive data, computing powers, and processing capabilities to average Internet users anywhere in the world, promises the removal of the obstacles. The GeoBrain system developed by CSISS is an example of such systems. All functions available in GRASS Open Source GIS have been implemented as Web services in GeoBrain. Petabytes of remote sensing images in NASA data centers, the USGS Landsat data archive, and NOAA CLASS are accessible transparently and processable through GeoBrain. The GeoBrain system is operated on a high performance cluster server with large disk storage and fast Internet connection. All GeoBrain capabilities can be accessed by any Internet-connected Web browser. Dozens of universities have used GeoBrain as an ideal platform to support data-intensive remote sensing education. This presentation gives a specific example of using GeoBrain geoprocessing services to enhance the teaching of GGS 588, Digital Remote Sensing taught at the Department of Geography and Geoinformation Science, George Mason University. The course uses the textbook "Introductory

  3. Characterization of the point spread function and modulation transfer function of scattered radiation using a digital imaging system.

    PubMed

    Boone, J M; Arnold, B A; Seibert, J A

    1986-01-01

    A digital radiographic system was used to measure the distribution of scattered x radiation from uniform slabs of Lucite at various thicknesses. Using collimation and air gap techniques, [primary + scatter] images and primary images were digitally acquired, and subtracted to obtain scatter images. The scatter distributions measured using small circular apertures were computer fit to an analytical function, representing the circular aperture function convolved with a modified Gaussian point spread function (PSF). On the basis of goodness of fit criterion, the proposed Gaussian function is a very good model for the scatter PSF. The measured scatter PSF's are reported for various Lucite thicknesses. Using the PSF's, the modulation transfer functions are calculated, and this spatial frequency information may have value in analytical scatter removal techniques, grid design, and air gap optimization. PMID:3702823

  4. Accurate three-dimensional shape and deformation measurement at microscale using digital image correlation.

    PubMed

    Ren, Maodong; Liang, Jin; Li, Leigang; Wei, Bin; Wang, Lizhong; Tang, Zhengzong

    2015-07-01

    Based on stereomicroscope and three-dimensional (3D) digital image correlation (DIC) method, a non-contact measurement technique is presented to measure the 3D shape and deformation data on miniature specimens and the corresponding microscopic measurement system is developed. A pair of cameras is mounted on a binocular stereo light microscope to acquire pairing micrographs from two different optical paths of a specimen surface spraying with speckle pattern. Considering complex optical paths and high magnification, an accurate equivalent relative calibration method, combining a priori warping functions, is proposed to correct image distortions and optimize the intrinsic and extrinsic parameters of stereomicroscope. Then, a fast one-dimensional synchronous stereo matching method, based on the DIC method and image rectification technique, is proposed to search for discontinuous corresponding points in the pairing micrographs. Finally, the 3D shape is reconstructed from the corresponding points, while the temporal micrographs acquired before and after deformation are employed to determine the full-field deformation. The effectiveness and accuracy of the presented microscale measurement technique are verified by a series of experiments. PMID:26233412

  5. Development of Global 30m Resolution Water Body Map with Permanent/Temporal Water Body Separation Using Satellite Acquired Images of Landsat GLS Datasets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeshima, D.; Yamazaki, D.; Yoshikawa, S.; Kanae, S.

    2015-12-01

    The specification of worldwide water body distribution is important for discovering hydrological cycle. Global 3-second Water Body Map (G3WBM) is a global scale map, which indicates the distribution of water body in 90m resolutions (http://hydro.iis.u-tokyo.ac.jp/~yamadai/G3WBM/index.html). This dataset was mainly built to identify the width of river channels, which is one of major uncertainties of continental-scale river hydrodynamics models. To survey the true width of the river channel, this water body map distinguish Permanent Water Body from Temporary Water Body, which means separating river channel and flood plain. However, rivers with narrower width, which is a major case in usual river, could not be observed in this map. To overcome this problem, updating the algorithm of G3WBM and enhancing the resolutions to 30m is the goal of this research. Although this 30m-resolution water body map uses similar algorithm as G3WBM, there are many technical issues attributed to relatively high resolutions. Those are such as lack of same high-resolution digital elevation map, or contamination problem of sub-pixel scale object on satellite acquired image, or invisibility of well-vegetated water body such as swamp. To manage those issues, this research used more than 30,000 satellite images of Landsat Global Land Survey (GLS), and lately distributed topography data of Shuttle Rader Topography Mission (SRTM) 1 arc-second (30m) digital elevation map. Also the effect of aerosol, which would scatter the sun reflectance and disturb the acquired result image, was considered. Due to these revises, the global water body distribution was established in more precise resolution.

  6. Investigating materials for breast nodules simulation by using segmentation and similarity analysis of digital images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siqueira, Paula N.; Marcomini, Karem D.; Sousa, Maria A. Z.; Schiabel, Homero

    2015-03-01

    The task of identifying the malignancy of nodular lesions on mammograms becomes quite complex due to overlapped structures or even to the granular fibrous tissue which can cause confusion in classifying masses shape, leading to unnecessary biopsies. Efforts to develop methods for automatic masses detection in CADe (Computer Aided Detection) schemes have been made with the aim of assisting radiologists and working as a second opinion. The validation of these methods may be accomplished for instance by using databases with clinical images or acquired through breast phantoms. With this aim, some types of materials were tested in order to produce radiographic phantom images which could characterize a good enough approach to the typical mammograms corresponding to actual breast nodules. Therefore different nodules patterns were physically produced and used on a previous developed breast phantom. Their characteristics were tested according to the digital images obtained from phantom exposures at a LORAD M-IV mammography unit. Two analysis were realized the first one by the segmentation of regions of interest containing the simulated nodules by an automated segmentation technique as well as by an experienced radiologist who has delineated the contour of each nodule by means of a graphic display digitizer. Both results were compared by using evaluation metrics. The second one used measure of quality Structural Similarity (SSIM) to generate quantitative data related to the texture produced by each material. Although all the tested materials proved to be suitable for the study, the PVC film yielded the best results.

  7. Initial application of digital tomosynthesis with on-board imaging in radiation oncology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baydush, Alan H.; Godfrey, Devon J.; Oldham, Mark; Dobbins, James T., III

    2005-04-01

    We present preliminary investigations that examine the feasibility of incorporating digital tomosynthesis into radiation oncology practice with the use of kilovoltage on-board imagers (OBI). Modern radiation oncology linear accelerators now include hardware options for the addition of OBI for on-line patient setup verification. These systems include an x-ray tube and detector mounted directly on the accelerator gantry that rotate with the same isocenter. Applications include cone beam computed tomography (CBCT), fluoroscopy, and radiographs to examine daily patient positioning to determine if the patient is in the same location as the treatment plan. While CBCT provides the greatest anatomical detail, this approach is limited by long acquisition and reconstruction times and higher patient dose. We propose to examine the use of tomosynthesis reconstructed volumetric data from limited angle projection images for short imaging time and reduced patient dose. Initial data uses 61 projection images acquired over an isocentric arc of twenty degrees with the detector approximately fifty-four centimeters from isocenter. A modified filtered back projection technique, which included a mathematical correction for isocentric motion, was used to reconstruct volume images. These images will be visually and mathematically compared to volumetric computed tomography images to determine efficacy of this system for daily patient positioning verification. Initial images using the tomosynthesis reconstruction technique show much promise and bode well for effective daily patient positioning verification with reduced patient dose and imaging time. Additionally, the fast image acquisition may allow for a single breath hold imaging sequence, which will have no breath motion.

  8. Anatomical noise in contrast-enhanced digital mammography. Part II. Dual-energy imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, Melissa L.; Yaffe, Martin J.; Mainprize, James G.; Carton, Ann-Katherine; Saab-Puong, Sylvie; Iordache, Răzvan; Muller, Serge; Jong, Roberta A.; Dromain, Clarisse

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: Dual-energy (DE) contrast-enhanced digital mammography (CEDM) uses an iodinated contrast agent in combination with digital mammography (DM) to evaluate lesions on the basis of tumor angiogenesis. In DE imaging, low-energy (LE) and high-energy (HE) images are acquired after contrast administration and their logarithms are subtracted to cancel the appearance of normal breast tissue. Often there is incomplete signal cancellation in the subtracted images, creating a background “clutter” that can impair lesion detection. This is the second component of a two-part report on anatomical noise in CEDM. In Part I the authors characterized the anatomical noise for single-energy (SE) temporal subtraction CEDM by a power law, with model parameters α and β. In this work the authors quantify the anatomical noise in DE CEDM clinical images and compare this with the noise in SE CEDM. The influence on the anatomical noise of the presence of iodine in the breast, the timing of imaging postcontrast administration, and the x-ray energy used for acquisition are each evaluated.Methods: The power law parameters, α and β, were measured from unprocessed LE and HE images and from DE subtracted images to quantify the anatomical noise. A total of 98 DE CEDM cases acquired in a previous clinical pilot study were assessed. Conventional DM images from 75 of the women were evaluated for comparison with DE CEDM. The influence of the imaging technique on anatomical noise was determined from an analysis of differences between the power law parameters as measured in DM, LE, HE, and DE subtracted images for each subject.Results: In DE CEDM, weighted image subtraction lowers β to about 1.1 from 3.2 and 3.1 in LE and HE unprocessed images, respectively. The presence of iodine has a small but significant effect in LE images, reducing β by about 0.07 compared to DM, with α unchanged. Increasing the x-ray energy, from that typical in DM to a HE beam, significantly decreases α by about 2

  9. Use of Digital Image Technology to 'Clearly' Depict Global Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molnia, B. F.; Carbo, C. L.

    2014-12-01

    Earth is dynamic and beautiful. Understanding why, when, how, and how fast its surface changes yields information and serves as a source of inspiration. The artistic use of geoscience information can inform the public about what is happening to their planet in a non-confrontational and apolitical way. While individual images may clearly depict a landscape, photographic comparisons are necessary to clearly capture and display annual, decadal, or century-scale impacts of climate and environmental change on Earth's landscapes. After years of effort to artistically communicate geoscience concepts with unenhanced individual photographs or pairs of images, the authors have partnered to maximize this process by using digital image enhancement technology. This is done, not to manipulate the inherent artistic content or information content of the photographs, but to insure that the comparative photo pairs produced are geometrically correct and unambiguous. For comparative photography, information-rich historical photographs are selected from archives, websites, and other sources. After determining the geographic location from which the historical photograph was made, the original site is identified and eventually revisited. There, the historical photos field of view is again photographed, ideally from the original location. From nearly 250 locations revisited, about 175 pairs have been produced. Every effort is made to reoccupy the original historical site. However, vegetation growth, visibility reduction, and co-seismic level change may make this impossible. Also, inherent differences in lens optics, camera construction, and image format may result in differences in the geometry of the new photograph when compared to the old. Upon selection, historical photos are cleaned, contrast stretched, brightness adjusted, and sharpened to maximize site identification and information extraction. To facilitate matching historical and new images, digital files of each are overlain in

  10. Clinical Application of High-Resolution Computed Tomographic Imaging Features of Community-Acquired Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Yunqiang; Li, Cuiyun; Zhang, Jingling; Wang, Hui; Han, Ping; Lv, Xin; Xu, Xinyi; Guo, Miao

    2016-01-01

    Background This article discusses the value of high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) in the diagnosis and treatment of pulmonary infections. Lung infection caused by pathogens is an important cause of death. Traditional methods to treat lung infection involved empirical antibiotic therapy. Thin-slice CT scanning is widely used in the clinical setting, and HRCT scan can very clearly show alveolar and bronchiolar involvement of infection. Material/Methods In total, 178 patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) were enrolled. All the patients underwent CT scan, qualified sputum, and blood samples for culture or immunological biochemical tests. CT imaging features, pathogenic bacteria, and treatment results were used for statistical analysis. Results In 77 patients with lobar consolidation, the rate of detection was 43.26% (77/178), and in 101 patients with lobular pneumonia it was 56.74% (101/178). In 51 patients, pathogenic bacteria were detected (28.65%, 51/178). Sixteen of 33 patients detected with bacteria had cavities (48.5%, 16/33) and 35 of 145 patients detected with bacteria had no cavities (24.1%, 35/145). The difference between the 2 groups was statistically significant (χ2=7.795, P=0.005). According to the pathogenic bacteria, 38 patients were cured (74.51%, 38/51), and according to the CT imaging features 81 patients were cured (71.05%, 81/114). No statistically significant difference was found between them (χ2=0.209, P=0.647). Conclusions Treatment effect of CAP based on HRCT findings is not inferior to treatment effect guided by microbial characterization. PMID:27031210

  11. Digital Image Processing for Noise Reduction in Medical Ultrasonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loupas, Thanasis

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. The purpose of this project was to investigate the application of digital image processing techniques as a means of reducing noise in medical ultrasonic imaging. Ultrasonic images suffer primarily from a type of acoustic noise, known as speckle, which is generally regarded as a major source of image quality degradation. The origin of speckle, its statistical properties as well as methods suggested to eliminate this artifact were reviewed. A simple model which can characterize the statistics of speckle on displays was also developed. A large number of digital noise reduction techniques was investigated. These include frame averaging techniques performed by commercially available devices and spatial filters implemented in software. Among the latter, some filters have been proposed in the scientific literature for ultrasonic, laser and microwave speckle or general noise suppression and the rest are original, developed specifically to suppress ultrasonic speckle. Particular emphasis was placed on adaptive techniques which adjust the processing performed at each point according to the local image content. In this way, they manage to suppress speckle with negligible loss of genuine image detail. Apart from preserving the diagnostically significant features of a scan another requirement a technique must satisfy before it is accepted in routine clinical practice is real-time operation. A spatial filter capable of satisfying both these requirements was designed and built in hardware using low-cost and readily available components. The possibility of incorporating all the necessary filter circuitry into a single VLSI chip was also investigated. In order to establish the effectiveness and usefulness of speckle suppression, a representative sample from the techniques examined here was applied to a large number of abdominal scans and their effect on image quality was evaluated. Finally, further

  12. High-speed digital phonoscopy images analyzed by Nyquist plots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Yuling

    2012-02-01

    Vocal-fold vibration is a key dynamic event in voice production, and the vibratory characteristics of the vocal fold correlate closely with voice quality and health condition. Laryngeal imaging provides direct means to observe the vocal fold vibration; in the past, however, available modalities were either too slow or impractical to resolve the actual vocal fold vibrations. This limitation has now been overcome by high-speed digital imaging (HSDI) (or high-speed digital phonoscopy), which records images of the vibrating vocal folds at a rate of 2000 frames per second or higher- fast enough to resolve a specific, sustained phonatory vocal fold vibration. The subsequent image-based functional analysis of voice is essential to better understanding the mechanism underlying voice production, as well as assisting the clinical diagnosis of voice disorders. Our primary objective is to develop a comprehensive analytical platform for voice analysis using the HSDI recordings. So far, we have developed various analytical approaches for the HSDI-based voice analyses. These include Nyquist plots and associated analysese that are used along with FFT and Spectrogram in the analysis of the HSDI data representing normal voice and specific voice pathologies.

  13. DIAGNOcam--a Near Infrared Digital Imaging Transillumination (NIDIT) technology.

    PubMed

    Abdelaziz, Marwa; Krejci, Ivo

    2015-01-01

    In developed countries, clinical manifestation of carious lesions is changing: instead of dentists being confronted with wide-open cavities, more and more hidden caries are seen. For a long time, the focus of the research community was on finding a method for the detection of carious lesions without the need for radiographs. The research on Digital Imaging Fiber-Optic Transillumination (DIFOTI) has been an active domain. The scope of the present article is to describe a novel technology for caries diagnostics based on Near Infrared Digital Imaging Transillumination (NIDIT), and to give first examples of its clinical indications. In addition, the coupling of NIDIT with a head-mounted retinal image display (RID) to improve clinical workflow is presented. The novel NIDIT technology was shown to be useful as a diagnostic tool in several indications, including mainly the detection of proximal caries and, less importantly, for occlusal caries, fissures, and secondary decay around amalgam and composite restorations. The coupling of this technology with a head-mounted retinal image system allows for its very efficient implementation into daily practice. PMID:25625132

  14. Development Of A Physician-Friendly Digital Image Display Console

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Voorde, F.; Arenson, R.; Kundel, H.; Miller, W.; Epstein, D.; Gefter, W.; Seshadri, S.; Brikman, I.; Khalsa, S.

    1986-06-01

    A high speed fiber optic network for the transmission of digital images has been under development for the last three years at our Hospital. This network utilizes a ring architecture with token passing contention handling. Radiographs are digitized with a high resolution camera. Images can be viewed at either high or low resolution. The software for this four node Medical Image Management System (MIMS) is now complete and is undergoing trial runs. Clinical tests begin on March 1, 1986. This paper will focus on the philosophy, evolution and the present state of the interfaces that exist between the system and the physician. Care has been taken to develop an interface that is fast, powerful and error-free. Though simple to use, it presents the physician with a number of powerful options to manipulate the image to facilitate effective interpretation. An effort has been made to incorporate those functions that are useful to the physician. We tried to avoid cluttering the user menu with an array of less-used options.

  15. Digital histologic images: practical pointers for successful electronic submission to biomedical journals.

    PubMed

    Gruber, H E; Hanley, E N; Sun, Y

    2009-12-01

    The advent of digital imaging and online submission of manuscripts has created new challenges for authors using histological images. Digital images are used routinely in today's histology research lab and authors must prepare illustrations that meet standards for resolution, color modes, image size, and digital file types for successful online submission to biomedical journals. Because authors may not be familiar with these requirements, our objective here is to present practical guidelines and information for successful image submission online. Ethical issues related to digital imaging and other current topics also are discussed with reference to available online resources. PMID:19418314

  16. Preoperative digital mammography imaging in conservative mastectomy and immediate reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Angrigiani, Claudio; Hammond, Dennis; Nava, Maurizio; Gonzalez, Eduardo; Rostagno, Roman; Gercovich, Gustavo

    2016-01-01

    Background Digital mammography clearly distinguishes gland tissue density from the overlying non-glandular breast tissue coverage, which corresponds to the existing tissue between the skin and the Cooper’s ligaments surrounding the gland (i.e., dermis and subcutaneous fat). Preoperative digital imaging can determine the thickness of this breast tissue coverage, thus facilitating planning of the most adequate surgical techniques and reconstructive procedures for each case. Methods This study aimed to describe the results of a retrospective study of 352 digital mammograms in 176 patients with different breast volumes who underwent preoperative conservative mastectomies. The breast tissue coverage thickness and its relationship with the breast volume were evaluated. Results The breast tissue coverage thickness ranged from 0.233 to 4.423 cm, with a mean value of 1.952 cm. A comparison of tissue coverage and breast volume revealed a non-direct relationship between these factors. Conclusions Preoperative planning should not depend only on breast volume. Flap evaluations based on preoperative imaging measurements might be helpful when planning a conservative mastectomy. Accordingly, we propose a breast tissue coverage classification (BTCC). PMID:26855903

  17. Dermal type I collagen assessment by digital image analysis*

    PubMed Central

    Brianezi, Gabrielli; Grandi, Fabrizio; Bagatin, Ediléia; Enokihara, Mílvia Maria S. S.; Miot, Hélio Amante

    2015-01-01

    Type I collagen is the main dermal component, and its evaluation is relevant to quantitative studies in dermatopathology. However, visual gradation (0 to 4+) has low precision and high subjectivity levels. This study aimed to develop and validate a digital morphometric analysis technique to estimate type I collagen levels in the papillary dermis. Four evaluators visually quantified (0 to 4+) the density of type I collagen in 63 images of forearm skin biopsies marked by immunohistochemistry and two evaluators analyzed the same images using digital morphometric techniques (RGB split colors (I) and color deconvolution (II)). Automated type I collagen density estimation in the papillary dermis (two techniques) were correlated with visual evaluations (Spearman's rho coefficients of 0.48 and 0.62 (p<0.01)). With regard to the inter-observer repeatability, the four evaluators who used visual classification had an intraclass correlation coefficient (for absolute agreement) of 0.53, while the other two evaluators who used digital analysis (algorithm II) had an intraclass correlation coefficient of 0.97. PMID:26560217

  18. From Horse-Drawn Wagon to Hot Rod: The University of California's Digital Image Service Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burns, Maureen A.

    2006-01-01

    This article proposes that a viable approach archivists might consider to meet increasing demands for access to digital images with functional presentation tools is to develop a reciprocal partnership with a digital library. The University of California's experience with the federation of licensed and UC-owned digital image collections is…

  19. High Res at High Speed: Automated Delivery of High-Resolution Images from Digital Library Collections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westbrook, R. Niccole; Watkins, Sean

    2012-01-01

    As primary source materials in the library are digitized and made available online, the focus of related library services is shifting to include new and innovative methods of digital delivery via social media, digital storytelling, and community-based and consortial image repositories. Most images on the Web are not of sufficient quality for most…

  20. Effect of image scaling and segmentation in digital rock characterisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, B. D.; Feng, Y. T.

    2016-04-01

    Digital material characterisation from microstructural geometry is an emerging field in computer simulation. For permeability characterisation, a variety of studies exist where the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) has been used in conjunction with computed tomography (CT) imaging to simulate fluid flow through microscopic rock pores. While these previous works show that the technique is applicable, the use of binary image segmentation and the bounceback boundary condition results in a loss of grain surface definition when the modelled geometry is compared to the original CT image. We apply the immersed moving boundary (IMB) condition of Noble and Torczynski as a partial bounceback boundary condition which may be used to better represent the geometric definition provided by a CT image. The IMB condition is validated against published work on idealised porous geometries in both 2D and 3D. Following this, greyscale image segmentation is applied to a CT image of Diemelstadt sandstone. By varying the mapping of CT voxel densities to lattice sites, it is shown that binary image segmentation may underestimate the true permeability of the sample. A CUDA-C-based code, LBM-C, was developed specifically for this work and leverages GPU hardware in order to carry out computations.