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Sample records for acquire drug resistance

  1. A Research-Inspired Laboratory Sequence Investigating Acquired Drug Resistance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Elizabeth Vogel; Fortune, Jennifer A.; Drennan, Catherine L.

    2010-01-01

    Here, we present a six-session laboratory exercise designed to introduce students to standard biochemical techniques in the context of investigating a high impact research topic, acquired resistance to the cancer drug Gleevec. Students express a Gleevec-resistant mutant of the Abelson tyrosine kinase domain, the active domain of an oncogenic…

  2. Acquired Drug Resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Poor Outcomes among Patients with Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Kipiani, Maia; Mirtskhulava, Veriko; Tukvadze, Nestani; Magee, Matthew J.; Blumberg, Henry M.

    2015-01-01

    Rates and risk factors for acquired drug resistance and association with outcomes among patients with multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR TB) are not well defined. In an MDR TB cohort from the country of Georgia, drug susceptibility testing for second-line drugs (SLDs) was performed at baseline and every third month. Acquired resistance was defined as any SLD whose status changed from susceptible at baseline to resistant at follow-up. Among 141 patients, acquired resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis was observed in 19 (14%); prevalence was 9.1% for ofloxacin and 9.8% for capreomycin or kanamycin. Baseline cavitary disease and resistance to >6 drugs were associated with acquired resistance. Patients with M. tuberculosis that had acquired resistance were at significantly increased risk for poor treatment outcome compared with patients without these isolates (89% vs. 36%; p<0.01). Acquired resistance occurs commonly among patients with MDR TB and impedes successful treatment outcomes. PMID:25993036

  3. Imaging the urokinase plasminongen activator receptor in preclinical breast cancer models of acquired drug resistance.

    PubMed

    LeBeau, Aaron M; Sevillano, Natalia; King, Mandy L; Duriseti, Sai; Murphy, Stephanie T; Craik, Charles S; Murphy, Laura L; VanBrocklin, Henry F

    2014-01-01

    Subtype-targeted therapies can have a dramatic impact on improving the quality and quantity of life for women suffering from breast cancer. Despite an initial therapeutic response, cancer recurrence and acquired drug-resistance are commonplace. Non-invasive imaging probes that identify drug-resistant lesions are urgently needed to aid in the development of novel drugs and the effective utilization of established therapies for breast cancer. The protease receptor urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) is a target that can be exploited for non-invasive imaging. The expression of uPAR has been associated with phenotypically aggressive breast cancer and acquired drug-resistance. Acquired drug-resistance was modeled in cell lines from two different breast cancer subtypes, the uPAR negative luminal A subtype and the uPAR positive triple negative subtype cell line MDA-MB-231. MCF-7 cells, cultured to be resistant to tamoxifen (MCF-7 TamR), were found to significantly over-express uPAR compared to the parental cell line. uPAR expression was maintained when resistance was modeled in triple-negative breast cancer by generating doxorubicin and paclitaxel resistant MDA-MB-231 cells (MDA-MB-231 DoxR and MDA-MB-231 TaxR). Using the antagonistic uPAR antibody 2G10, uPAR was imaged in vivo by near-infrared (NIR) optical imaging and (111)In-single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Tumor uptake of the (111)In-SPECT probe was high in the three drug-resistant xenografts (> 46 %ID/g) and minimal in uPAR negative xenografts at 72 hours post-injection. This preclinical study demonstrates that uPAR can be targeted for imaging breast cancer models of acquired resistance leading to potential clinical applications. PMID:24505235

  4. Genomic Insights into Intrinsic and Acquired Drug Resistance Mechanisms in Achromobacter xylosoxidans

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yongfei; Zhu, Yuying; Ma, Yanan; Liu, Fei; Lu, Na; Yang, Xi; Luan, Chunguang; Yi, Yong

    2014-01-01

    Achromobacter xylosoxidans is an opportunistic pathogen known to be resistant to a wide range of antibiotics; however, the knowledge about the drug resistance mechanisms is limited. We used a high-throughput sequencing approach to sequence the genomes of the A. xylosoxidans type strain ATCC 27061 and a clinical isolate, A. xylosoxidans X02736, and then we used different bioinformatics tools to analyze the drug resistance genes in these bacteria. We obtained the complete genome sequence for A. xylosoxidans ATCC 27061 and the draft sequence for X02736. We predicted a total of 50 drug resistance-associated genes in the type strain, including 5 genes for β-lactamases and 17 genes for efflux pump systems; these genes are also conserved among other A. xylosoxidans genomes. In the clinical isolate, except for the conserved resistance genes, we also identified several acquired resistance genes carried by a new transposon embedded in a novel integrative and conjugative element. Our study provides new insights into the intrinsic and acquired drug resistance mechanisms in A. xylosoxidans, which will be helpful for better understanding the physiology of A. xylosoxidans and the evolution of antibiotic resistance in this bacterium. PMID:25487802

  5. Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus: community transmission, pathogenesis, and drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Tatsuo; Nishiyama, Akihito; Takano, Tomomi; Yabe, Shizuka; Higuchi, Wataru; Razvina, Olga; Shi, Da

    2010-08-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is able to persist not only in hospitals (with a high level of antimicrobial agent use) but also in the community (with a low level of antimicrobial agent use). The former is called hospital-acquired MRSA (HA-MRSA) and the latter community-acquired MRSA (CA-MRSA). It is believed MRSA clones are generated from S. aureus through insertion of the staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec), and outbreaks occur as they spread. Several worldwide and regional clones have been identified, and their epidemiological, clinical, and genetic characteristics have been described. CA-MRSA is likely able to survive in the community because of suitable SCCmec types (type IV or V), a clone-specific colonization/infection nature, toxin profiles (including Pantone-Valentine leucocidin, PVL), and narrow drug resistance patterns. CA-MRSA infections are generally seen in healthy children or young athletes, with unexpected cases of diseases, and also in elderly inpatients, occasionally surprising clinicians used to HA-MRSA infections. CA-MRSA spreads within families and close-contact groups or even through public transport, demonstrating transmission cores. Re-infection (including multifocal infection) frequently occurs, if the cores are not sought out and properly eradicated. Recently, attention has been given to CA-MRSA (USA300), which originated in the US, and is growing as HA-MRSA and also as a worldwide clone. CA-MRSA infection in influenza season has increasingly been noted as well. MRSA is also found in farm and companion animals, and has occasionally transferred to humans. As such, the epidemiological, clinical, and genetic behavior of CA-MRSA, a growing threat, is focused on in this study. PMID:20336341

  6. Naturally occurring dominant drug resistance mutations occur infrequently in the setting of recently acquired hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Applegate, Tanya L; Gaudieri, Silvana; Plauzolles, Anne; Chopra, Abha; Grebely, Jason; Lucas, Michaela; Hellard, Margaret; Luciani, Fabio; Dore, Gregory J; Matthews, Gail V

    2014-01-01

    Background Directly Acting Antivirals (DAAs) are predicted to transform hepatitis C (HCV) therapy, yet little is known about the prevalence of naturally occurring resistance mutations in recently acquired HCV. This study aimed to determine the prevalence and frequency of drug resistance mutations in the viral quasispecies among HIV positive and negative individuals with recent HCV. Methods The NS3 protease, NS5A and NS5B polymerase genes were amplified from fifty genotype 1a participants of the Australian Trial in Acute Hepatitis C. Amino acid variations at sites known to be associated with possible drug resistance were analysed by ultra-deep pyrosequencing. Results Twelve percent of individuals harboured dominant resistance mutations, while 36% demonstrated non dominant resistant variants below that detectable by bulk sequencing (ie < 20%) but above a threshold of 1%. Resistance variants (< 1%) were observed at most sites associated with DAA resistance from all classes, with the exception of sofosbuvir. Conclusions Dominant resistant mutations were uncommonly observed in the setting of recent HCV. However, low level mutations to all DAA classes were observed by deep sequencing at the majority of sites, and in most individuals. The significance of these variants and impact on future treatment options remains to be determined. PMID:25105742

  7. Multidrug-resistant, extensively drug-resistant and pandrug-resistant bacteria: an international expert proposal for interim standard definitions for acquired resistance.

    PubMed

    Magiorakos, A-P; Srinivasan, A; Carey, R B; Carmeli, Y; Falagas, M E; Giske, C G; Harbarth, S; Hindler, J F; Kahlmeter, G; Olsson-Liljequist, B; Paterson, D L; Rice, L B; Stelling, J; Struelens, M J; Vatopoulos, A; Weber, J T; Monnet, D L

    2012-03-01

    Many different definitions for multidrug-resistant (MDR), extensively drug-resistant (XDR) and pandrug-resistant (PDR) bacteria are being used in the medical literature to characterize the different patterns of resistance found in healthcare-associated, antimicrobial-resistant bacteria. A group of international experts came together through a joint initiative by the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), to create a standardized international terminology with which to describe acquired resistance profiles in Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus spp., Enterobacteriaceae (other than Salmonella and Shigella), Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter spp., all bacteria often responsible for healthcare-associated infections and prone to multidrug resistance. Epidemiologically significant antimicrobial categories were constructed for each bacterium. Lists of antimicrobial categories proposed for antimicrobial susceptibility testing were created using documents and breakpoints from the Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI), the European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST) and the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA). MDR was defined as acquired non-susceptibility to at least one agent in three or more antimicrobial categories, XDR was defined as non-susceptibility to at least one agent in all but two or fewer antimicrobial categories (i.e. bacterial isolates remain susceptible to only one or two categories) and PDR was defined as non-susceptibility to all agents in all antimicrobial categories. To ensure correct application of these definitions, bacterial isolates should be tested against all or nearly all of the antimicrobial agents within the antimicrobial categories and selective reporting and suppression of results should be avoided.

  8. Systemic Acquired Resistance

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Upon infection with necrotizing pathogens many plants develop an enhanced resistance to further pathogen attack also in the uninoculated organs. This type of enhanced resistance is referred to as systemic acquired resistance (SAR). In the SAR state, plants are primed (sensitized) to more quickly and more effectively activate defense responses the second time they encounter pathogen attack. Since SAR depends on the ability to access past experience, acquired disease resistance is a paradigm for the existence of a form of “plant memory”. Although the phenomenon has been known since the beginning of the 20th century, major progress in the understanding of SAR was made over the past sixteen years. This review covers the current knowledge of molecular, biochemical and physiological mechanisms that are associated with SAR. PMID:19521483

  9. Activation of the Met kinase confers acquired drug resistance in FGFR-targeted lung cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Kim, S-M; Kim, H; Yun, M R; Kang, H N; Pyo, K-H; Park, H J; Lee, J M; Choi, H M; Ellinghaus, P; Ocker, M; Paik, S; Kim, H R; Cho, B C

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) activation/expression is a common feature in lung cancer (LC). In this study, we evaluated the antitumor activity of and the mechanisms underlying acquired resistance to two potent selective FGFR inhibitors, AZD4547 and BAY116387, in LC cell lines. The antitumor activity of AZD4547 and BAY1163877 was screened in 24 LC cell lines, including 5 with FGFR1 amplification. Two cell lines containing FGFR1 amplifications, H1581 and DMS114, were sensitive to FGFR inhibitors (IC50<250 nm). Clones of FGFR1-amplified H1581 cells resistant to AZD4547 or BAY116387 (H1581AR and H1581BR cells, respectively) were established. Receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) array and immunoblotting analyses showed strong overexpression and activation of Met in H1581AR/BR cells, compared with that in the parental cells. Gene set enrichment analysis against the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) database showed that cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction pathways were significantly enriched in H1581AR/BR cells, with Met contributing significantly to the core enrichment. Genomic DNA quantitative PCR and fluorescent in situ hybridization analyses showed MET amplification in H1581AR, but not in H1581BR, cells. Met amplification drives acquired resistance to AZD4547 in H1581AR cells by activating ErbB3. Combination treatment with FGFR inhibitors and an anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)/Met inhibitor, crizotinib, or Met-specific short interfering RNA (siRNA) synergistically inhibited cell proliferation in both H1581AR and H1581BR cells. Conversely, ectopic expression of Met in H1581 cells conferred resistance to AZD4547 and BAY1163877. Acquired resistance to FGFR inhibitors not only altered cellular morphology, but also promoted migration and invasion of resistant clones, in part by inducing epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. Taken together, our data suggest that Met activation is sufficient to bypass dependency on FGFR signaling. Concurrent

  10. Drug Resistance

    MedlinePlus

    HIV Treatment Drug Resistance (Last updated 3/1/2016; last reviewed 3/1/2016) Key Points As HIV multiplies in the ... the risk of drug resistance. What is HIV drug resistance? Once a person becomes infected with HIV, ...

  11. Potential therapeutic drug target identification in Community Acquired-Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) using computational analysis.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Pramod Kumar; Singh, Gurmit; Singh, Satendra; Gautam, Budhayash; Saad, Esmaiel If

    2012-01-01

    The emergence of multidrug-resistant strain of community-acquired methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) strain has highlighted the urgent need for the alternative and effective therapeutic approach to combat the menace of this nosocomial pathogen. In the present work novel potential therapeutic drug targets have been identified through the metabolic pathways analysis. All the gene products involved in different metabolic pathways of CA-MRSA in KEGG database were searched against the proteome of Homo sapiens using the BLASTp program and the threshold of E-value was set to as 0.001. After database searching, 152 putative targets were identified. Among all 152 putative targets, 39 genes encoding for putative targets were identified as the essential genes from the DEG database which are indispensable for the survival of CA-MRSA. After extensive literature review, 7 targets were identified as potential therapeutic drug target. These targets are Fructose-bisphosphate aldolase, Phosphoglyceromutase, Purine nucleoside phosphorylase, Uridylate kinase, Tryptophan synthase subunit beta, Acetate kinase and UDP-N-acetylglucosamine 1-carboxyvinyltransferase. Except Uridylate kinase all the identified targets were involved in more than one metabolic pathways of CA-MRSA which underlines the importance of drug targets. These potential therapeutic drug targets can be exploited for the discovery of novel inhibitors for CA-MRSA using the structure based drug design (SBDD) strategy.

  12. Draft Genome Sequence of Extremely Drug-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa (ST357) Strain CMC_VB_PA_B22862 Isolated from a Community-Acquired Bloodstream Infection

    PubMed Central

    Pragasam, Agila Kumari; Yesurajan, Francis; Doss C, George Priya; George, Biju; Devanga Ragupathi, Naveen Kumar; Walia, Kamini

    2016-01-01

    Extremely drug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains causing severe infections have become a serious concern across the world. Here, we report draft genome sequence of P. aeruginosa with an extremely drug-resistant profile isolated from a patient with community-acquired bloodstream infection in India. PMID:27795257

  13. Estimating Trends in the Proportion of Transmitted and Acquired HIV Drug Resistance in a Long Term Observational Cohort in Germany

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Daniel; Kollan, Christian; Fätkenheuer, Gerd; Schülter, Eugen; Stellbrink, Hans-Jürgen; Noah, Christian; Jensen, Björn-Erik Ole; Stoll, Matthias; Bogner, Johannes R.; Eberle, Josef; Meixenberger, Karolin; Kücherer, Claudia; Hamouda, Osamah; Bartmeyer, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    Objective We assessed trends in the proportion of transmitted (TDR) and acquired (ADR) HIV drug resistance and associated mutations between 2001 and 2011 in the German ClinSurv-HIV Drug Resistance Study. Method The German ClinSurv-HIV Drug Resistance Study is a subset of the German ClinSurv-HIV Cohort. For the ClinSurv-HIV Drug Resistance Study all available sequences isolated from patients in five study centres of the long term observational ClinSurv-HIV Cohort were included. TDR was estimated using the first viral sequence of antiretroviral treatment (ART) naïve patients. One HIV sequence/patient/year of ART experienced patients was considered to estimate the proportion of ADR. Trends in the proportion of HIV drug resistance were calculated by logistic regression. Results 9,528 patients were included into the analysis. HIV-sequences of antiretroviral naïve and treatment experienced patients were available from 34% (3,267/9,528) of patients. The proportion of TDR over time was stable at 10.4% (95% CI 9.1–11.8; p for trend = 0.6; 2001–2011). The proportion of ADR among all treated patients was 16%, whereas it was high among those with available HIV genotypic resistance test (64%; 1,310/2,049 sequences; 95% CI 62–66) but declined significantly over time (OR 0.8; 95% CI 0.77–0.83; p for trend<0.001; 2001–2011). Viral load monitoring subsequent to resistance testing was performed in the majority of treated patients (96%) and most of them (67%) were treated successfully. Conclusions The proportion of TDR was stable in this study population. ADR declined significantly over time. This decline might have been influenced by broader resistance testing, resistance test guided therapy and the availability of more therapeutic options and not by a decline in the proportion of TDR within the study population. PMID:25148412

  14. Azithromycin Dose To Maximize Efficacy and Suppress Acquired Drug Resistance in Pulmonary Mycobacterium avium Disease

    PubMed Central

    Deshpande, Devyani; Pasipanodya, Jotam G.

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium complex is now the leading mycobacterial cause of chronic pneumonia in the United States. Macrolides and ethambutol form the backbone of the regimen used in the treatment of pulmonary disease. However, therapy outcomes remain poor, with microbial cure rates of 4% in cavitary disease. The treatment dose of azithromycin has mostly been borrowed from that used to treat other bacterial pneumonias; there are no formal dose-response studies in pulmonary M. avium disease and the optimal dose is unclear. We utilized population pharmacokinetics and pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics-derived azithromycin exposures associated with optimal microbial kill or resistance suppression to perform 10,000 patient Monte Carlo simulations of dose effect studies for daily azithromycin doses of 0.5 to 10 g. The currently recommended dose of 500 mg per day achieved the target exposures in 0% of patients. Exposures associated with optimal kill and resistance suppression were achieved in 87 and 54% of patients, respectively, only by the very high dose of 8 g per day. The azithromycin susceptibility breakpoint above which patients failed therapy on the very high doses of 8 g per day was an MIC of 16 mg/liter, suggesting a critical concentration of 32 mg/liter, which is 8-fold lower than the currently used susceptibility breakpoint of 256 mg/liter. If the standard dose of 500 mg a day were used, then the critical concentration would fall to 2 mg/liter, 128-fold lower than 256 mg/liter. The misclassification of resistant isolates as susceptible could explain the high failure rates of current doses. PMID:26810646

  15. CXCR4-targeted lipid-coated PLGA nanoparticles deliver sorafenib and overcome acquired drug resistance in liver cancer.

    PubMed

    Gao, Dong-Yu; Lin, Ts-Ting; Sung, Yun-Chieh; Liu, Ya Chi; Chiang, Wen-Hsuan; Chang, Chih-Chun; Liu, Jia-Yu; Chen, Yunching

    2015-10-01

    Sorafenib, a multikinase inhibitor, has been used as an anti-angiogenic agent against highly vascular hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) - yet associated with only moderate therapeutic effect and the high incidence of HCC recurrence. We have shown intratumoral hypoxia induced by sorafenib activated C-X-C receptor type 4 (CXCR4)/stromal-derived factor 1α (SDF1α) axis, resulting in polarization toward a tumor-promoting microenvironment and resistance to anti-angiogenic therapy in HCC. Herein, we formulated sorafenib in CXCR4-targeted lipid-coated poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles (NPs) modified with a CXCR4 antagonist, AMD3100 to systemically deliver sorafenib into HCC and sensitize HCC to sorafenib treatment. We demonstrated that CXCR4-targeted NPs efficiently delivered sorafenib into HCCs and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) to achieve cytotoxicity and anti-angiogenic effect in vitro and in vivo. Despite the increased expression of SDF1α upon the persistent hypoxia induced by sorafenib-loaded CXCR4-targeted NPs, AMD3100 attached to the NPs can block CXCR4/SDF1α, leading to the reduced infiltration of tumor-associated macrophages, enhanced anti-angiogenic effect, a delay in tumor progression and increased overall survival in the orthotopic HCC model compared with other control groups. In conclusion, our results highlight the clinical potential of CXCR4-targeted NPs for delivering sorafenib and overcoming acquired drug resistance in liver cancer.

  16. Tunable-combinatorial mechanisms of acquired resistance limit the efficacy of BRAF/MEK cotargeting but result in melanoma drug addiction.

    PubMed

    Moriceau, Gatien; Hugo, Willy; Hong, Aayoung; Shi, Hubing; Kong, Xiangju; Yu, Clarissa C; Koya, Richard C; Samatar, Ahmed A; Khanlou, Negar; Braun, Jonathan; Ruchalski, Kathleen; Seifert, Heike; Larkin, James; Dahlman, Kimberly B; Johnson, Douglas B; Algazi, Alain; Sosman, Jeffrey A; Ribas, Antoni; Lo, Roger S

    2015-02-01

    Combined BRAF- and MEK-targeted therapy improves upon BRAF inhibitor (BRAFi) therapy but is still beset by acquired resistance. We show that melanomas acquire resistance to combined BRAF and MEK inhibition by augmenting or combining mechanisms of single-agent BRAFi resistance. These double-drug resistance-associated genetic configurations significantly altered molecular interactions underlying MAPK pathway reactivation. (V600E)BRAF, expressed at supraphysiological levels because of (V600E)BRAF ultra-amplification, dimerized with and activated CRAF. In addition, MEK mutants enhanced interaction with overexpressed (V600E)BRAF via a regulatory interface at R662 of (V600E)BRAF. Importantly, melanoma cell lines selected for resistance to BRAFi+MEKi, but not those to BRAFi alone, displayed robust drug addiction, providing a potentially exploitable therapeutic opportunity.

  17. Tunable-combinatorial Mechanisms of Acquired Resistance Limit the Efficacy of BRAF/MEK Co-targeting but Result in Melanoma Drug Addiction

    PubMed Central

    Moriceau, Gatien; Hugo, Willy; Hong, Aayoung; Shi, Hubing; Kong, Xiangju; Yu, Clarissa C.; Koya, Richard C.; Samatar, Ahmed A.; Khanlou, Negar; Braun, Jonathan; Ruchalski, Kathleen; Seifert, Heike; Larkin, James; Dahlman, Kimberly B.; Johnson, Douglas B.; Algazi, Alain; Sosman, Jeffrey A.; Ribas, Antoni; Lo, Roger S.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Combined BRAF and MEK targeted therapy improves upon BRAF inhibitor (BRAFi) therapy but is still beset by acquired resistance. We show that melanomas acquire resistance to combined BRAF and MEK inhibition by augmenting or combining mechanisms of single-agent BRAFi resistance. These double-drug resistance-associated genetic configurations significantly altered molecular interactions underlying MAPK pathway reactivation. V600EBRAF, expressed at supra-physiological levels because of V600EBRAF ultra-amplification, dimerized with and activated CRAF. In addition, MEK mutants enhanced interaction with over-expressed V600EBRAF via a regulatory interface at R662 of V600EBRAF. Importantly, melanoma cell lines selected for resistance to BRAFi+MEKi, but not those to BRAFi alone, displayed robust drug addiction, providing a potentially exploitable therapeutic opportunity. PMID:25600339

  18. Bufalin reverses intrinsic and acquired drug resistance to cisplatin through the AKT signaling pathway in gastric cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hongyan; Zhao, Dali; Jin, Huilin; Li, Hongwei; Yang, Xiaoying; Zhuang, Liwei; Liu, Tiefu

    2016-08-01

    Cisplatin is the most common chemotherapeutic agent for gastric cancer (GC), however it activates AKT, which contributes to intrinsic and acquired resistance. Bufalin, a traditional Chinese medicine, shows significant anticancer activity by inhibiting the AKT pathway. It was therefore hypothesized that bufalin could counteract cisplatin resistance in GC cells. SGC7901, MKN‑45 and BGC823 human GC cells were cultured under normoxic and hypoxic conditions. Effects of cisplatin and bufalin on GC cells were measured by a cell counting kit, apoptosis was analyzed by flow cytometry, and immunoblotting was used to detect proteins associated with the AKT signaling pathway. It was demonstrated that bufalin synergized with cisplatin to inhibit proliferation and promote apoptosis of GC cells by diminishing the activation of cisplatin-induced AKT under normoxic and hypoxic conditions. Bufalin also inhibits cisplatin-activated molecules downstream of AKT that affect proliferation and apoptosis, including glycogen synthase kinase, mammalian target of rapamycin, ribosomal protein S6 Kinase and eukaryotic translation initiation factor-4E-binding protein-1. To investigate acquired cisplatin resistance, a cisplatin‑resistant cell line SGC7901‑CR was used. It was demonstrated that bufalin reversed acquired cisplatin resistance and significantly induced apoptosis through the AKT pathway. These results imply that bufalin could extend the therapeutic effect of cisplatin on GC cells when administered in combination. PMID:27357249

  19. Overcoming acquired drug resistance in colorectal cancer cells by targeted delivery of 5-FU with EGF grafted hollow mesoporous silica nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lijue; She, Xiaodong; Wang, Tao; He, Li; Shigdar, Sarah; Duan, Wei; Kong, Lingxue

    2015-08-01

    Acquired drug resistance (ADR) can be developed in colorectal cancer cells after 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) treatment and diminish the effectiveness of chemotherapy. In this work, acquired 5-FU resistance in the colorectal cancer cell line SW480 was obtained with the up-regulation of dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPYD) gene expression which can convert 5-FU to its inactive metabolite. To overcome ADR in colorectal cancer, hollow mesoporous silica nanoparticles (HMSNs) grafted with epidermal growth factor (EGF) were used as nanocarriers to deliver 5-FU to colorectal cancer cells with acquired drug resistance. The effect and mechanism of 5-FU loaded EGF grafted HMSNs (EGF-HMSNs-5-FU) in overcoming acquired drug resistance in SW480/ADR cells were studied. The EGF-HMSNs were demonstrated to be specifically internalized in EGFR overexpressed SW480/ADR cells via a receptor-mediated endocytosis and can escape from endo-lysosomes. The EGF-HMSNs-5-FU exhibited much higher cytotoxicity on SW480/ADR cells than HMSNs-5-FU and free 5-FU while the plain HMSNs did not show significant cytotoxicity. The mechanism of EGF-HMSNs-5-FU in overcoming drug resistance in SW480/ADR cells could be attributed to the specific internalization of EGF-HMSNs-5-FU in EGFR overexpressed cells which can lead to high intracellular drug accumulation and cause cell death through S phase arrest.Acquired drug resistance (ADR) can be developed in colorectal cancer cells after 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) treatment and diminish the effectiveness of chemotherapy. In this work, acquired 5-FU resistance in the colorectal cancer cell line SW480 was obtained with the up-regulation of dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPYD) gene expression which can convert 5-FU to its inactive metabolite. To overcome ADR in colorectal cancer, hollow mesoporous silica nanoparticles (HMSNs) grafted with epidermal growth factor (EGF) were used as nanocarriers to deliver 5-FU to colorectal cancer cells with acquired drug resistance. The

  20. Low Incidence of HIV-1C Acquired Drug Resistance 10 Years after Roll-Out of Antiretroviral Therapy in Ethiopia: A Prospective Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Mulu, Andargachew; Maier, Melanie; Liebert, Uwe Gerd

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of HIV-1 drug resistance mutations has mainly been linked to the duration and composition of antiretroviral treatment (ART), as well as the level of adherence. This study reports the incidence and pattern of acquired antiretroviral drug resistance mutations and long-term outcomes of ART in a prospective cohort from Northwest Ethiopia. Two hundred and twenty HIV-1C infected treatment naïve patients were enrolled and 127 were followed-up for up to 38 months on ART. ART initiation and patients' monitoring was based on the WHO clinical and immunological parameters. HIV viral RNA measurement and drug resistance genotyping were done at baseline (N = 160) and after a median time of 30 (IQR, 27-38) months on ART (N = 127). Viral suppression rate (HIV RNA levels ≤ 400 copies/ml) after a median time of 30 months on ART was found to be 88.2% (112/127), which is in the range for HIV drug resistance prevention suggested by WHO. Of those 15 patients with viral load >400 copies/ml, six harboured one or more drug resistant associated mutations in the reverse transcriptase (RT) region. Observed NRTIs resistance associated mutations were the lamivudine-induced mutation M184V (n = 4) and tenofovir associated mutation K65R (n = 1). The NNRTIs resistance associated mutations were K103N (n = 2), V106M, Y181S, Y188L, V90I, K101E and G190A (n = 1 each). Thymidine analogue mutations and major drug resistance mutations in the protease (PR) region were not detected. Most of the patients (13/15) with virologic failure and accumulated drug resistance mutations had not met the WHO clinical and/or immunological failure criteria and continued the failing regimen. The incidence and pattern of acquired antiretroviral drug resistance mutations is lower and less complex than previous reports from sub Saharan Africa countries. Nevertheless, the data suggest the need for virological monitoring and resistance testing for early detection of failure. Moreover, adherence reinforcement will

  1. A platinum-based hybrid drug design approach to circumvent acquired resistance to molecular targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Yuming; Poon, Daniel C.; Fei, Rong; Lam, Amy S. M.; Au-Yeung, Steve C. F.; To, Kenneth K. W.

    2016-05-01

    Three molecular targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) were conjugated to classical platinum-based drugs with an aim to circumvent TKI resistance, predominately mediated by the emergence of secondary mutations on oncogenic kinases. The hybrids were found to maintain specificity towards the same oncogenic kinases as the original TKI. Importantly, they are remarkably less affected by TKI resistance, presumably due to their unique structure and the observed dual mechanism of anticancer activity (kinase inhibition and DNA damage). The study is also the first to report the application of a hybrid drug approach to switch TKIs from being efflux transporter substrates into non-substrates. TKIs cannot penetrate into the brain for treating metastases because of efflux transporters at the blood brain barrier. The hybrids were found to escape drug efflux and they accumulate more than the original TKI in the brain in BALB/c mice. Further development of the hybrid compounds is warranted.

  2. A platinum-based hybrid drug design approach to circumvent acquired resistance to molecular targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yuming; Poon, Daniel C; Fei, Rong; Lam, Amy S M; Au-Yeung, Steve C F; To, Kenneth K W

    2016-05-06

    Three molecular targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) were conjugated to classical platinum-based drugs with an aim to circumvent TKI resistance, predominately mediated by the emergence of secondary mutations on oncogenic kinases. The hybrids were found to maintain specificity towards the same oncogenic kinases as the original TKI. Importantly, they are remarkably less affected by TKI resistance, presumably due to their unique structure and the observed dual mechanism of anticancer activity (kinase inhibition and DNA damage). The study is also the first to report the application of a hybrid drug approach to switch TKIs from being efflux transporter substrates into non-substrates. TKIs cannot penetrate into the brain for treating metastases because of efflux transporters at the blood brain barrier. The hybrids were found to escape drug efflux and they accumulate more than the original TKI in the brain in BALB/c mice. Further development of the hybrid compounds is warranted.

  3. A platinum-based hybrid drug design approach to circumvent acquired resistance to molecular targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Yuming; Poon, Daniel C.; Fei, Rong; Lam, Amy S. M.; Au-Yeung, Steve C. F.; To, Kenneth K. W.

    2016-01-01

    Three molecular targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) were conjugated to classical platinum-based drugs with an aim to circumvent TKI resistance, predominately mediated by the emergence of secondary mutations on oncogenic kinases. The hybrids were found to maintain specificity towards the same oncogenic kinases as the original TKI. Importantly, they are remarkably less affected by TKI resistance, presumably due to their unique structure and the observed dual mechanism of anticancer activity (kinase inhibition and DNA damage). The study is also the first to report the application of a hybrid drug approach to switch TKIs from being efflux transporter substrates into non-substrates. TKIs cannot penetrate into the brain for treating metastases because of efflux transporters at the blood brain barrier. The hybrids were found to escape drug efflux and they accumulate more than the original TKI in the brain in BALB/c mice. Further development of the hybrid compounds is warranted. PMID:27150583

  4. Low expression of Abelson interactor-1 is linked to acquired drug resistance in Bcr-Abl-induced leukemia.

    PubMed

    Chorzalska, A; Salloum, I; Shafqat, H; Khan, S; Marjon, P; Treaba, D; Schorl, C; Morgan, J; Bryke, C R; Falanga, V; Zhao, T C; Reagan, J; Winer, E; Olszewski, A J; Al-Homsi, A S; Kouttab, N; Dubielecka, P M

    2014-11-01

    The basis for persistence of leukemic stem cells in the bone marrow microenvironment remains poorly understood. We present evidence that signaling cross-talk between α4 integrin and Abelson interactor-1 (Abi-1) is involved in the acquisition of an anchorage-dependent phenotype and drug resistance in Bcr-Abl-positive leukemia cells. Comparison of Abi-1 (ABI-1) and α4 integrin (ITGA4) gene expression in relapsing Bcr-Abl-positive CD34+progenitor cells demonstrated a reduction in Abi-1 and an increase in α4 integrin mRNA in the absence of Bcr-Abl mutations. This inverse correlation between Abi-1 and α4 integrin expression, as well as linkage to elevated phospho-Akt and phospho-Erk signaling, was confirmed in imatinib mesylate -resistant leukemic cells. These results indicate that the α4-Abi-1 signaling pathway may mediate acquisition of the drug-resistant phenotype of leukemic cells.

  5. Mechanisms of polymyxin resistance: acquired and intrinsic resistance in bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Olaitan, Abiola O.; Morand, Serge; Rolain, Jean-Marc

    2014-01-01

    Polymyxins are polycationic antimicrobial peptides that are currently the last-resort antibiotics for the treatment of multidrug-resistant, Gram-negative bacterial infections. The reintroduction of polymyxins for antimicrobial therapy has been followed by an increase in reports of resistance among Gram-negative bacteria. Some bacteria, such as Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Acinetobacter baumannii, develop resistance to polymyxins in a process referred to as acquired resistance, whereas other bacteria, such as Proteus spp., Serratia spp., and Burkholderia spp., are naturally resistant to these drugs. Reports of polymyxin resistance in clinical isolates have recently increased, including acquired and intrinsically resistant pathogens. This increase is considered a serious issue, prompting concern due to the low number of currently available effective antibiotics. This review summarizes current knowledge concerning the different strategies bacteria employ to resist the activities of polymyxins. Gram-negative bacteria employ several strategies to protect themselves from polymyxin antibiotics (polymyxin B and colistin), including a variety of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) modifications, such as modifications of lipid A with phosphoethanolamine and 4-amino-4-deoxy-L-arabinose, in addition to the use of efflux pumps, the formation of capsules and overexpression of the outer membrane protein OprH, which are all effectively regulated at the molecular level. The increased understanding of these mechanisms is extremely vital and timely to facilitate studies of antimicrobial peptides and find new potential drugs targeting clinically relevant Gram-negative bacteria. PMID:25505462

  6. Mechanisms of polymyxin resistance: acquired and intrinsic resistance in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Olaitan, Abiola O; Morand, Serge; Rolain, Jean-Marc

    2014-01-01

    Polymyxins are polycationic antimicrobial peptides that are currently the last-resort antibiotics for the treatment of multidrug-resistant, Gram-negative bacterial infections. The reintroduction of polymyxins for antimicrobial therapy has been followed by an increase in reports of resistance among Gram-negative bacteria. Some bacteria, such as Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Acinetobacter baumannii, develop resistance to polymyxins in a process referred to as acquired resistance, whereas other bacteria, such as Proteus spp., Serratia spp., and Burkholderia spp., are naturally resistant to these drugs. Reports of polymyxin resistance in clinical isolates have recently increased, including acquired and intrinsically resistant pathogens. This increase is considered a serious issue, prompting concern due to the low number of currently available effective antibiotics. This review summarizes current knowledge concerning the different strategies bacteria employ to resist the activities of polymyxins. Gram-negative bacteria employ several strategies to protect themselves from polymyxin antibiotics (polymyxin B and colistin), including a variety of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) modifications, such as modifications of lipid A with phosphoethanolamine and 4-amino-4-deoxy-L-arabinose, in addition to the use of efflux pumps, the formation of capsules and overexpression of the outer membrane protein OprH, which are all effectively regulated at the molecular level. The increased understanding of these mechanisms is extremely vital and timely to facilitate studies of antimicrobial peptides and find new potential drugs targeting clinically relevant Gram-negative bacteria.

  7. [Resistance to antituberculous drugs].

    PubMed

    Veziris, N; Cambau, E; Sougakoff, W; Robert, J; Jarlier, V

    2005-08-01

    Mycobacteria responsible for tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis, M. bovis, M. africanum) are susceptible to a very small number of antibiotics. As soon as these drugs were used in humans all gave rise to the selection of resistant mycobacteria. Study of the mechanisms of acquired resistance, with the help of the genetics of mycobacteria, led to a more accurate understanding of the mode of action of antituberculous drugs. The antibiotics isoniazid, pyrazinamide, ethionamide and ethambutol are mycobacteria-specific because they inhibit the synthesis of mycolic acids, which are specific constituants of the bacterial wall. Mutations responsible for resistance to these drugs affect genes coding for activator enzymes (katg for isoniazid, pncA for pyrazinamide) or genes coding for their target (inhA for isoniazid/ethionamide, embB for ethambutol). With rifamycins, aminosides and quinolones, mechanisms of action and resistance are the same for mycobacteria as for non-mycobacterial organisms. No plasmid or resistance transposon has been described in M. tuberculosis. Currently a test for the quick detection of resistance to rifampicin is widely available but in the future DNA chips may allow the simultaneous detection of multiple resistances. Monitoring of antituberculous drugs shows that in France the prevalence of multiresistance ( resistance to both isoniazid and rifampicin) is 0.5%, primary resistance (before treatment) is 9%, and secondary resistance (after treatment) is 16%.

  8. Antimicrobial (Drug) Resistance

    MedlinePlus

    ... Antimicrobial (Drug) Resistance Antibiotic-Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis (TB) Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococci (VRE) Multidrug-Resistant Neisseria ...

  9. Detecting mechanisms of acquired BRAF inhibitor resistance in melanoma.

    PubMed

    Lo, Roger S; Shi, Hubing

    2014-01-01

    (V600)BRAF mutation was identified as an ideal target for clinical therapy due to its indispensable roles in supporting melanoma initiation and progression. Despite the fact that BRAF inhibitors (BRAFi) can elicit anti-tumor responses in the majority of treated patients and confer overall survival benefits, acquired drug resistance is a formidable obstacle to long-term management of the disease. Several aberrant events including RTK upregulation, NRAS mutation, mutant BRAF amplification or alternative splicing, and MEK mutation have been reported as acquired BRAFi resistance mechanisms. Clinially, detection of these resistance mechanisms help understand drug response patterns and help guide combinatorial therapeutic strategies. Therefore, quick and accurate diagnosis of the resistant mechanisms in tumor biopsies has become an important starting point for personalized therapy. In this chapter, we review the major acquired BRAFi resistance mechanisms, highlight their therapeutic implications, and provide the diagnostic methods from clinical samples.

  10. Targets for Combating the Evolution of Acquired Antibiotic Resistance.

    PubMed

    Culyba, Matthew J; Mo, Charlie Y; Kohli, Rahul M

    2015-06-16

    Bacteria possess a remarkable ability to rapidly adapt and evolve in response to antibiotics. Acquired antibiotic resistance can arise by multiple mechanisms but commonly involves altering the target site of the drug, enzymatically inactivating the drug, or preventing the drug from accessing its target. These mechanisms involve new genetic changes in the pathogen leading to heritable resistance. This recognition underscores the importance of understanding how such genetic changes can arise. Here, we review recent advances in our understanding of the processes that contribute to the evolution of antibiotic resistance, with a particular focus on hypermutation mediated by the SOS pathway and horizontal gene transfer. We explore the molecular mechanisms involved in acquired resistance and discuss their viability as potential targets. We propose that additional studies into these adaptive mechanisms not only can provide insights into evolution but also can offer a strategy for potentiating our current antibiotic arsenal.

  11. Targets for Combating the Evolution of Acquired Antibiotic Resistance

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria possess a remarkable ability to rapidly adapt and evolve in response to antibiotics. Acquired antibiotic resistance can arise by multiple mechanisms but commonly involves altering the target site of the drug, enzymatically inactivating the drug, or preventing the drug from accessing its target. These mechanisms involve new genetic changes in the pathogen leading to heritable resistance. This recognition underscores the importance of understanding how such genetic changes can arise. Here, we review recent advances in our understanding of the processes that contribute to the evolution of antibiotic resistance, with a particular focus on hypermutation mediated by the SOS pathway and horizontal gene transfer. We explore the molecular mechanisms involved in acquired resistance and discuss their viability as potential targets. We propose that additional studies into these adaptive mechanisms not only can provide insights into evolution but also can offer a strategy for potentiating our current antibiotic arsenal. PMID:26016604

  12. Acquired Antibiotic Resistance Genes: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    van Hoek, Angela H. A. M.; Mevius, Dik; Guerra, Beatriz; Mullany, Peter; Roberts, Adam Paul; Aarts, Henk J. M.

    2011-01-01

    In this review an overview is given on antibiotic resistance (AR) mechanisms with special attentions to the AR genes described so far preceded by a short introduction on the discovery and mode of action of the different classes of antibiotics. As this review is only dealing with acquired resistance, attention is also paid to mobile genetic elements such as plasmids, transposons, and integrons, which are associated with AR genes, and involved in the dispersal of antimicrobial determinants between different bacteria. PMID:22046172

  13. Acquired inducible antimicrobial resistance in Gram-positive bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Chancey, Scott T; Zähner, Dorothea; Stephens, David S

    2012-01-01

    A major contributor to the emergence of antibiotic resistance in Gram-positive bacterial pathogens is the expansion of acquired, inducible genetic elements. Although acquired, inducible antibiotic resistance is not new, the interest in its molecular basis has been accelerated by the widening distribution and often ‘silent’ spread of the elements responsible, the diagnostic challenges of such resistance and the mounting limitations of available agents to treat Gram-positive infections. Acquired, inducible antibiotic resistance elements belong to the accessory genome of a species and are horizontally acquired by transformation/recombination or through the transfer of mobile DNA elements. The two key, but mechanistically very different, induction mechanisms are: ribosome-sensed induction, characteristic of the macrolide–lincosamide–streptogramin B antibiotics and tetracycline resistance, leading to ribosomal modifications or efflux pump activation; and resistance by cell surface-associated sensing of β-lactams (e.g., oxacillin), glycopeptides (e.g., vancomycin) and the polypeptide bacitracin, leading to drug inactivation or resistance due to cell wall alterations. PMID:22913355

  14. Mechanisms of drug resistance: quinolone resistance

    PubMed Central

    Hooper, David C.; Jacoby, George A.

    2015-01-01

    Quinolone antimicrobials are synthetic and widely used in clinical medicine. Resistance emerged with clinical use and became common in some bacterial pathogens. Mechanisms of resistance include two categories of mutation and acquisition of resistance-conferring genes. Resistance mutations in one or both of the two drug target enzymes, DNA gyrase and DNA topoisomerase IV, are commonly in a localized domain of the GyrA and ParE subunits of the respective enzymes and reduce drug binding to the enzyme-DNA complex. Other resistance mutations occur in regulatory genes that control the expression of native efflux pumps localized in the bacterial membrane(s). These pumps have broad substrate profiles that include quinolones as well as other antimicrobials, disinfectants, and dyes. Mutations of both types can accumulate with selection pressure and produce highly resistant strains. Resistance genes acquired on plasmids can confer low-level resistance that promotes the selection of mutational high-level resistance. Plasmid-encoded resistance is due to Qnr proteins that protect the target enzymes from quinolone action, one mutant aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme that also modifies certain quinolones, and mobile efflux pumps. Plasmids with these mechanisms often encode additional antimicrobial resistances and can transfer multidrug resistance that includes quinolones. Thus, the bacterial quinolone resistance armamentarium is large. PMID:26190223

  15. Acquired resistance to gemcitabine and cross-resistance in human pancreatic cancer clones.

    PubMed

    Yoneyama, Hiroshi; Takizawa-Hashimoto, Asako; Takeuchi, Osamu; Watanabe, Yukiko; Atsuda, Koichiro; Asanuma, Fumiki; Yamada, Yoshinori; Suzuki, Yukio

    2015-01-01

    The efficacy of gemcitabine (GEM), a standard treatment agent for pancreatic cancer, is insufficient because of primary or acquired resistance to this drug. Patients with tumors intrinsically sensitive to GEM gradually acquire resistance and require a shift to second agents, which are associated with the risk of cross-resistance. However, whether cross-resistance is actually present has long been disputed. Using six GEM-resistant and four highly GEM-resistant clones derived from the pancreatic cancer cell line BxPC-3, we determined the resistance of each clone and parent cell line to GEM and four anticancer agents (5-FU, CDDP, CPT-11, and DTX). The GEM-resistant clones had different resistances to GEM and other agents, and did not develop a specific pattern of cross-resistance. This result shows that tumor cells are heterogeneous. However, all highly GEM-resistant clones presented overexpression of ribonucleotide reductase subunit M1 (RRM1), a target enzyme for metabolized GEM, and showed cross-resistance with 5-FU. The expression level of RRM1 was high; therefore, resistance to GEM was high. We showed that a tumor cell acquired resistance to GEM, and cross-resistance developed in one clone. These results suggest that only cells with certain mechanisms for high-level resistance to GEM survive against selective pressure applied by highly concentrated GEM. RRM1 may be one of the few factors that can induce high resistance to GEM and a suitable therapeutic target for GEM-resistant pancreatic cancer.

  16. Signal regulators of systemic acquired resistance

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Qing-Ming; Zhu, Shifeng; Kachroo, Pradeep; Kachroo, Aardra

    2015-01-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) is an important phytohormone that plays a vital role in a number of physiological responses, including plant defense. The last two decades have witnessed a number of breakthroughs related to biosynthesis, transport, perception and signaling mediated by SA. These findings demonstrate that SA plays a crictical role in both local and systemic defense responses. Systemic acquired resistance (SAR) is one such SA-dependent response. SAR is a long distance signaling mechanism that provides broad spectrum and long-lasting resistance to secondary infections throughout the plant. This unique feature makes SAR a highly desirable trait in crop production. This review summarizes the recent advances in the role of SA in SAR and discusses its relationship to other SAR inducers. PMID:25918514

  17. MECHANISMS OF ACQUIRED RESISTANCE IN MOUSE TYPHOID

    PubMed Central

    Blanden, R. V.; Mackaness, G. B.; Collins, F. M.

    1966-01-01

    Experiments in vitro comparing normal mouse peritoneal macrophages with cells from Salmonella typhimurium-infected mice have shown that the "immune" macrophages have conspicuously enhanced microbicidal properties. Whereas normal macrophages could inactivate only 50 to 60% of intracellular S. typhimurium pretreated with immune serum, cells from infected animals killed virtually all ingested organisms and did so at an accelerated rate. Macrophages from Listeria monocytogenes-infected mice were shown to possess similarly enhanced microbicidal activity against S. typhimurium. Furthermore, the growth of S. typhimurium in the liver and spleen was more effectively restricted in Listeria-infected mice than in animals vaccinated with heat-killed S. typhimurium, even though the Listeria-infected animals possessed no demonstrable cross-reacting antibody to S. typhimurium. The lack of resistance in the mice vaccinated with heat-killed organisms could not be attributed to any deficiency of humoral factors, since the serum from these animals was as effective at promoting phagocytosis and killing by macrophages as serum from actively infected (and demonstrably resistant) mice. Conversely, Salmonella-infected mice were totally resistant to intravenous challenge with L. monocytogenes. The level of resistance in individual animals was related to the numbers of residual Salmonellae remaining in the tissues; mice with heavier residual infections being the more resistant. Specific antiserum from mice vaccinated with heat-killed S. typhimurium was found to be significantly protective only when the intraperitoneal route of challenge was employed. The foregoing studies have been interpreted to mean that enhancement of the microbicidal ability of macrophages is the mechanism of major importance in acquired resistance to S. typhimurium infection in mice. PMID:4958757

  18. Drug Resistance in Leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    Chakravarty, Jaya; Sundar, Shyam

    2010-01-01

    The treatment options of leishmaniasis are limited and far from satisfactory. For more than 60 years, treatment of leishmaniasis has centered around pentavalent antimonials (Sbv). Widespread misuse has led to the emergence of Sbv resistance in the hyperendemic areas of North Bihar. Other antileishmanials could also face the same fate, especially in the anthroponotic cycle. The HIV/ visceral leishmaniasis (VL) coinfected patients are another potential source for the emergence of drug resistance. At present no molecular markers of resistance are available and the only reliable method for monitoring resistance of isolates is the technically demanding in vitro amastigote-macrophage model. As the armametrium of drugs for leishmaniasis is limited, it is important that effective monitoring of drug use and response should be done to prevent the spread of resistance. Regimens of simultaneous or sequential combinations should be seriously considered to limit the emergence of resistance. PMID:20606973

  19. Socioeconomic and behavioral factors leading to acquired bacterial resistance to antibiotics in developing countries.

    PubMed Central

    Okeke, I. N.; Lamikanra, A.; Edelman, R.

    1999-01-01

    In developing countries, acquired bacterial resistance to antimicrobial agents is common in isolates from healthy persons and from persons with community-acquired infections. Complex socioeconomic and behavioral factors associated with antibiotic resistance, particularly regarding diarrheal and respiratory pathogens, in developing tropical countries, include misuse of antibiotics by health professionals, unskilled practitioners, and laypersons; poor drug quality; unhygienic conditions accounting for spread of resistant bacteria; and inadequate surveillance. PMID:10081668

  20. The molecular mechanisms of acquired proteasome inhibitor resistance

    PubMed Central

    Kale, Andrew J.; Moore, Bradley S.

    2012-01-01

    The development of proteasome inhibitors (PIs) has transformed the treatment of multiple myeloma and mantle cell lymphoma. To date, two PIs have been FDA approved, the boronate peptide bortezomib and, most recently, the epoxyketone peptide carfilzomib. However, intrinsic and acquired resistance to PIs, for which the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood, may limit their efficacy. In this perspective, we discuss recent advances in the molecular understanding of PI resistance through acquired bortezomib resistance in human cell lines to evolved saliniosporamide A (marizomib) resistance in nature. Resistance mechanisms discussed include the upregulation of proteasome subunits and mutations of the catalytic β-subunits. Additionally, we explore potential strategies to overcome PI resistance. PMID:22978849

  1. Biophysics of Cell Membrane Lipids in Cancer Drug Resistance: Implications for Drug Transport and Drug Delivery with Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Peetla, Chiranjeevi; Vijayaraghavalu, Sivakumar; Labhasetwar, Vinod

    2013-01-01

    In this review, we focus on the biophysics of cell membrane lipids, particularly when cancers develop acquired drug resistance, and how biophysical changes in resistant cell membrane influence drug transport and nanoparticle-mediated drug delivery. Recent advances in membrane lipid research show the varied roles of lipids in regulating membrane P-glycoprotein function, membrane trafficking, apoptotic pathways, drug transport, and endocytic functions, particularly endocytosis, the primary mechanism of cellular uptake of nanoparticle-based drug delivery systems. Since acquired drug resistance alters lipid biosynthesis, understanding the role of lipids in cell membrane biophysics and its effect on drug transport is critical for developing effective therapeutic and drug delivery approaches to overcoming drug resistance. Here we discuss novel strategies for (a) modulating the biophysical properties of membrane lipids of resistant cells to facilitate drug transport and regain endocytic function and (b) developing effective nanoparticles based on their biophysical interactions with membrane lipids to enhance drug delivery and overcome drug resistance. PMID:24055719

  2. Biophysics of cell membrane lipids in cancer drug resistance: Implications for drug transport and drug delivery with nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Peetla, Chiranjeevi; Vijayaraghavalu, Sivakumar; Labhasetwar, Vinod

    2013-11-01

    In this review, we focus on the biophysics of cell membrane lipids, particularly when cancers develop acquired drug resistance, and how biophysical changes in resistant cell membrane influence drug transport and nanoparticle-mediated drug delivery. Recent advances in membrane lipid research show the varied roles of lipids in regulating membrane P-glycoprotein function, membrane trafficking, apoptotic pathways, drug transport, and endocytic functions, particularly endocytosis, the primary mechanism of cellular uptake of nanoparticle-based drug delivery systems. Since acquired drug resistance alters lipid biosynthesis, understanding the role of lipids in cell membrane biophysics and its effect on drug transport is critical for developing effective therapeutic and drug delivery approaches to overcome drug resistance. Here we discuss novel strategies for (a) modulating the biophysical properties of membrane lipids of resistant cells to facilitate drug transport and regain endocytic function and (b) developing effective nanoparticles based on their biophysical interactions with membrane lipids to enhance drug delivery and overcome drug resistance.

  3. Overcoming acquired resistance to kinase inhibition: the cases of EGFR, ALK and BRAF.

    PubMed

    Giroux, Simon

    2013-01-15

    In the past decade, several kinase inhibitors have been approved based on their clinical benefit for cancer patients. Unfortunately, in many cases, patients develop resistance to these agents via secondary mutations and alternative mechanisms. This review will focus on the cases of acquired resistance to EGFR and ALK inhibitors for non-small cell lung cancer patients and BRAF inhibitors for melanoma patients. I will overview the main causes of acquired resistance, and explore the chemical scaffolds as well as combination of drugs, used to tackle these major causes of resistance. PMID:23245516

  4. Current Perspectives on HIV-1 Antiretroviral Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Iyidogan, Pinar; Anderson, Karen S.

    2014-01-01

    Current advancements in antiretroviral therapy (ART) have turned HIV-1 infection into a chronic and manageable disease. However, treatment is only effective until HIV-1 develops resistance against the administered drugs. The most recent antiretroviral drugs have become superior at delaying the evolution of acquired drug resistance. In this review, the viral fitness and its correlation to HIV-1 mutation rates and drug resistance are discussed while emphasizing the concept of lethal mutagenesis as an alternative therapy. The development of resistance to the different classes of approved drugs and the importance of monitoring antiretroviral drug resistance are also summarized briefly. PMID:25341668

  5. Evolution of Drug Resistance in Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Waclaw, B

    2016-01-01

    Resistance to antibiotics is an important and timely problem of contemporary medicine. Rapid evolution of resistant bacteria calls for new preventive measures to slow down this process, and a longer-term progress cannot be achieved without a good understanding of the mechanisms through which drug resistance is acquired and spreads in microbial populations. Here, we discuss recent experimental and theoretical advances in our knowledge how the dynamics of microbial populations affects the evolution of antibiotic resistance . We focus on the role of spatial and temporal drug gradients and show that in certain situations bacteria can evolve de novo resistance within hours. We identify factors that lead to such rapid onset of resistance and discuss their relevance for bacterial infections. PMID:27193537

  6. Evolution of Drug Resistance in Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Waclaw, B

    2016-01-01

    Resistance to antibiotics is an important and timely problem of contemporary medicine. Rapid evolution of resistant bacteria calls for new preventive measures to slow down this process, and a longer-term progress cannot be achieved without a good understanding of the mechanisms through which drug resistance is acquired and spreads in microbial populations. Here, we discuss recent experimental and theoretical advances in our knowledge how the dynamics of microbial populations affects the evolution of antibiotic resistance . We focus on the role of spatial and temporal drug gradients and show that in certain situations bacteria can evolve de novo resistance within hours. We identify factors that lead to such rapid onset of resistance and discuss their relevance for bacterial infections.

  7. Antimalarial drug resistance: An overview

    PubMed Central

    Antony, Hiasindh Ashmi; Parija, Subhash Chandra

    2016-01-01

    Malaria is a major public health burden throughout the world. Resistance to the antimalarial drugs has increased the mortality and morbidity rate that is achieved so far through the malaria control program. Monitoring the drug resistance to the available antimalarial drugs helps to implement effective drug policy, through the in vivo efficacy studies, in vitro drug susceptibility tests and detection of molecular markers. It is important to understand the mechanism of the antimalarial drugs, as it is one of the key factors in the emergence and spread of drug resistance. This review summarizes the commonly used antimalarial drugs, their mechanism of action and the genetic markers validated so far for the detection of drug-resistant parasites. PMID:26998432

  8. [Travellers and multi-drug resistance bacteria].

    PubMed

    Takeshita, Nozomi

    2012-02-01

    The number of international travellers has increased. There is enormous diversity in medical backgrounds, purposes of travel, and travelling styles among travellers. Travellers are hospitalized abroad because of exotic and common diseases via medical tourism. This is one way of transporting and importing human bacteria between countries, including multi-drug resistant organisms. In developing countries, the antimicrobial resistance in Shigella sp. and Salmonella sp. have been a problem, because of this trend, the first choice of antibiotics has changed in some countries. Community acquired infections as well as hospital acquired infections with MRSA, multi-drug resistance (MDR) Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and ESBL have been a problem. This review will discuss the risk of MDR bacterial infectious diseases for travellers. PMID:22413540

  9. Mechanisms of echinocandin antifungal drug resistance

    PubMed Central

    Perlin, David S.

    2015-01-01

    Fungal infections due to Candida and Aspergillus species cause extensive morbidity and mortality, especially among immunosuppressed patients, and antifungal therapy is critical to patient management. Yet only a few drug classes are available to treat invasive fungal diseases, and this problem is compounded by the emergence of antifungal resistance. Echinocandin drugs are the preferred choice to treat candidiasis. They are the first cell wall–active agents and target the fungal-specific enzyme glucan synthase, which catalyzes the biosynthesis of β-1,3-glucan, a key cell wall polymer. Therapeutic failures occur rarely among common Candida species, with the exception of Candida glabrata, which are frequently multidrug resistant. Echinocandin resistance in susceptible species is always acquired during therapy. The mechanism of resistance involves amino acid changes in hot-spot regions of Fks subunits of glucan synthase, which decrease the sensitivity of the enzyme to drug. Cellular stress response pathways lead to drug adaptation, which promote the formation of resistant fks strains. Clinical factors promoting echinocandin resistance include empiric therapy, prophylaxis, gastrointestinal reservoirs, and intra-abdominal infections. A better understanding of the echinocandin resistance mechanism, along with cellular and clinical factors promoting resistance, will promote more effective strategies to overcome and prevent echinocandin resistance. PMID:26190298

  10. Long-term persistence of acquired resistance to 5-fluorouracil in the colon cancer cell line SW620

    SciTech Connect

    Tentes, I.K.; Schmidt, W.M.; Krupitza, G.; Steger, G.G.; Mikulits, W.; Kortsaris, A.; Mader, R.M.

    2010-11-15

    Treatment resistance to antineoplastic drugs represents a major clinical problem. Here, we investigated the long-term stability of acquired resistance to 5-fluorouracil (FU) in an in vitro colon cancer model, using four sub-clones characterised by increasing FU-resistance derived from the cell line SW620. The resistance phenotype was preserved after FU withdrawal for 15 weeks ({approx} 100 cell divisions) independent of the established level of drug resistance and of epigenetic silencing. Remarkably, resistant clones tolerated serum deprivation, adopted a CD133{sup +} CD44{sup -} phenotype, and further exhibited loss of membrane-bound E-cadherin together with predominant nuclear {beta}-catenin localisation. Thus, we provide evidence for a long-term memory of acquired drug resistance, driven by multiple cellular strategies (epithelial-mesenchymal transition and selective propagation of CD133{sup +} cells). These resistance phenomena, in turn, accentuate the malignant phenotype.

  11. [Resistance to the antimalarial drugs].

    PubMed

    Venanzi, E; López-Vélez, R

    2016-09-01

    Malaria is one of the most widespread infectious diseases around the world with 214 million cases and 438,000 deaths in 2015. In the early twentieth century it was described for the first time the resistance to quinine and, since then, drug resistance to antimalarial drugs has spread up to represent a global challenge in the fight and control of malaria. Understanding the mechanisms, geography and monitoring tools that we can act against resistance to antimalarial drugs is critical to prevent its expansion. PMID:27608319

  12. Surveillance for Travel and Domestically Acquired Multidrug-Resistant Human Shigella Infections-Pennsylvania, 2006-2014.

    PubMed

    Li, Yu Lung; Tewari, Deepanker; Yealy, Courtney C; Fardig, David; M'ikanatha, Nkuchia M

    2016-01-01

    Shigellosis is a leading cause of enteric infections in the United States. We compared antimicrobial resistance in Shigella infections related to overseas travel (travel-associated) and in those acquired domestically by analyzing antimicrobial resistance patterns, geographic distributions, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) patterns. We tested samples (n = 204) from a collection of isolates recovered from patients in Pennsylvania between 2006 and 2014. Isolates were grouped into travel- and non-travel-associated categories. Eighty-one (79.4%) of the Shigella isolates acquired during international travel were resistant to multiple antibiotics compared to 53 (52.1%) of the infections transmitted in domestic settings. A majority (79.4%) of isolates associated with international travel demonstrated resistance to aminoglycosides and tetracyclines, whereas 47 (46.1%) of the infections acquired domestically were resistant to tetracycline. Almost all isolates (92.2%) transmitted in domestic settings were resistant to aminoglycosides, and 5 isolates from adult male patients were resistant to azithromycin, a drug often used for empiric treatment of severe shigellosis. Twenty (19.6%) isolates associated with illnesses acquired during overseas travel in 4 countries were resistant to quinolones. One S. sonnei PFGE pattern was traced to a multidrug-resistant isolate acquired overseas that had caused a multistate outbreak of shigellosis, suggesting global dissemination of a drug-resistant species. Resistance to certain drugs-for example, tetracycline-increased in both overseas- and domestic-acquired infections during the study period. The prevalence of resistance to macrolides (azithromycin) and third-generation cephalosporins (ceftriaxone) was less than 1%; however, efforts to better monitor changes in drug resistance over time combined with increased antimicrobial stewardship are essential at the local, national, and global levels. PMID:27314654

  13. Inducible and Acquired Clarithromycin Resistance in the Mycobacterium abscessus Complex

    PubMed Central

    Rubio, Marc; March, Francesca; Garrigó, Montserrat; Moreno, Carmen; Español, Montserrat; Coll, Pere

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Clarithromycin was considered the cornerstone for the treatment of Mycobacterium abscessus complex infections. Genetic resistance mechanisms have been described and many experts propose amikacin as an alternative. Nevertheless, clarithromycin has several advantages; therefore, it is necessary to identify the non-functional erm(41) allele to determine the most suitable treatment. The aims of this study were to characterize the molecular mechanisms of clarithromycin resistance in a collection of Mycobacterium abscessus complex isolates and to verify the relationship between these mechanisms and the antibiogram. Materials and Methods Clinical isolates of M. abscessus complex (n = 22) from 16 patients were identified using four housekeeping genes (rpoB, secA1, sodA and hsp65), and their genetic resistance was characterized by studying erm(41) and rrl genes. Nine strains were recovered from the clinical isolates and subjected to E-test and microdilution clarithromycin susceptibility tests, with readings at 3, 7 and 14 days. Results We classified 11/16 (68.8%) M. abscessus subsp. abscessus, 4/16 (25.0%) M. abscessus subsp. bolletii, and 1/16 (6.3%) M. abscessus subsp. massiliense. T28 erm(41) allele was observed in 8 Mycobacterium abscessus subps. abscessus and 3 Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. bolletii. One strain of M. abscessus subsp. bolletii had an erm(41) gene truncated and was susceptible to clarithromycin. No mutations were observed in rrl gene first isolates. In three patients, follow-up of initial rrl wild-type strains showed acquired resistance. Conclusions Most clinical isolates of M. abscessus complex had inducible resistance to clarithromycin and total absence of constitutive resistance. Our findings showed that the acquisition of resistance mutations in rrl gene was associated with functional and non-functional erm(41) gene. Caution is needed when using erm(41) sequencing alone to identify M. abscessus subspecies. This study reports an acquired

  14. Transcriptional plasticity promotes primary and acquired resistance to BET inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Neumann, Tobias; Muerdter, Felix; Roe, Jae-Seok; Muhar, Matthias; Deswal, Sumit; Cerny-Reiterer, Sabine; Peter, Barbara; Jude, Julian; Hoffmann, Thomas; Boryń, Łukasz M.; Axelsson, Elin; Schweifer, Norbert; Tontsch-Grunt, Ulrike; Dow, Lukas E.; Gianni, Davide; Pearson, Mark; Valent, Peter; Stark, Alexander; Kraut, Norbert; Vakoc, Christopher R.; Zuber, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Summary Following the discovery of BRD4 as a non-oncogene addiction target in acute myeloid leukemia (AML)1,2, BET inhibitors are being explored as promising therapeutic avenue in numerous cancers3–5. While clinical trials have reported single-agent activity in advanced hematologic malignancies6, mechanisms determining the response to BET inhibition remain poorly understood. To identify factors involved in primary and acquired BET resistance in leukemia, we performed a chromatin-focused RNAi screen in a sensitive MLL/AF9; NrasG12D -driven AML model, and investigated dynamic transcriptional profiles in sensitive and resistant murine and human leukemias. Our screen reveals that suppression of the PRC2 complex, contrary to effects in other contexts, promotes BET inhibitor resistance in AML. PRC2 suppression does not directly affect the regulation of Brd4-dependent transcripts, but facilitates the remodeling of regulatory pathways that restore the transcription of key targets such as Myc. Similarly, while BET inhibition triggers acute MYC repression in human leukemias regardless of their sensitivity, resistant leukemias are uniformly characterized by their ability to rapidly restore MYC transcription. This process involves the activation and recruitment of WNT signaling components, which compensate for the loss of BRD4 and drive resistance in various cancer models. Dynamic ChIP- and STARR-seq enhancer profiles reveal that BET-resistant states are characterized by remodeled regulatory landscapes, involving the activation of a focal MYC enhancer that recruits WNT machinery in response to BET inhibition. Together, our results identify and validate WNT signaling as a driver and candidate biomarker of primary and acquired BET resistance in leukemia, and implicate the rewiring of transcriptional programs as an important mechanism promoting resistance to BET inhibitors and, potentially, other chromatin-targeted therapies. PMID:26367798

  15. Drug resistance in eukaryotic microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Fairlamb, Alan H; Gow, Neil A R; Matthews, Keith R; Waters, Andrew P

    2016-06-24

    Eukaryotic microbial pathogens are major contributors to illness and death globally. Although much of their impact can be controlled by drug therapy as with prokaryotic microorganisms, the emergence of drug resistance has threatened these treatment efforts. Here, we discuss the challenges posed by eukaryotic microbial pathogens and how these are similar to, or differ from, the challenges of prokaryotic antibiotic resistance. The therapies used for several major eukaryotic microorganisms are then detailed, and the mechanisms that they have evolved to overcome these therapies are described. The rapid emergence of resistance and the restricted pipeline of new drug therapies pose considerable risks to global health and are particularly acute in the developing world. Nonetheless, we detail how the integration of new technology, biological understanding, epidemiology and evolutionary analysis can help sustain existing therapies, anticipate the emergence of resistance or optimize the deployment of new therapies.

  16. Drug resistance in eukaryotic microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Fairlamb, Alan H; Gow, Neil A R; Matthews, Keith R; Waters, Andrew P

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic microbial pathogens are major contributors to illness and death globally. Although much of their impact can be controlled by drug therapy as with prokaryotic microorganisms, the emergence of drug resistance has threatened these treatment efforts. Here, we discuss the challenges posed by eukaryotic microbial pathogens and how these are similar to, or differ from, the challenges of prokaryotic antibiotic resistance. The therapies used for several major eukaryotic microorganisms are then detailed, and the mechanisms that they have evolved to overcome these therapies are described. The rapid emergence of resistance and the restricted pipeline of new drug therapies pose considerable risks to global health and are particularly acute in the developing world. Nonetheless, we detail how the integration of new technology, biological understanding, epidemiology and evolutionary analysis can help sustain existing therapies, anticipate the emergence of resistance or optimize the deployment of new therapies. PMID:27572976

  17. Disseminated cryptococcosis and fluconazole resistant oral candidiasis in a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS).

    PubMed

    Kothavade, Rajendra J; Oberai, Chetan M; Valand, Arvind G; Panthaki, Mehroo H

    2010-10-28

    Disseminated cryptococcosis and recurrent oral candidiasis was presented in a-heterosexual AIDS patient. Candida tropicalis (C.tropicalis) was isolated from the oral pseudomembranous plaques and Cryptococcus neoformans (C. neoformans) was isolated from maculopapular lesions on body parts (face, hands and chest) and body fluids (urine, expectorated sputum, and cerebrospinal fluid). In vitro drug susceptibility testing on the yeast isolates demonstrated resistance to fluconazole acquired by C. tropicalis which was a suggestive possible root cause of recurrent oral candidiasis in this patient.

  18. Antimicrobial (Drug) Resistance Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... Action Plan for Combating Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria (PDF) ​​​​​​ Javascript Error Your browser JavaScript is turned off causing certain features of the ... incorrectly. Please visit your browser settings and turn JavaScript on. Read more information on enabling JavaScript. Skip ...

  19. Factors affecting the reversal of antimicrobial-drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Johnsen, Pål J; Townsend, Jeffrey P; Bøhn, Thomas; Simonsen, Gunnar S; Sundsfjord, Arnfinn; Nielsen, Kaare M

    2009-06-01

    The persistence or loss of acquired antimicrobial-drug resistance in bacterial populations previously exposed to drug-selective pressure depends on several biological processes. We review mechanisms promoting or preventing the loss of resistance, including rates of reacquisition, effects of resistance traits on bacterial fitness, linked selection, and segregational stability of resistance determinants. As a case study, we discuss the persistence of glycopeptide-resistant enterococci in Norwegian and Danish poultry farms 12 years after the ban of the animal growth promoter avoparcin. We conclude that complete eradication of antimicrobial resistance in bacterial populations following relaxed drug-selective pressures is not straightforward. Resistance determinants may persist at low, but detectable, levels for many years in the absence of the corresponding drugs. PMID:19467475

  20. Antiviral Drug Resistance: Mechanisms and Clinical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Sunwen

    2010-01-01

    Summary Antiviral drug resistance is an increasing concern in immunocompromised patient populations, where ongoing viral replication and prolonged drug exposure lead to the selection of resistant strains. Rapid diagnosis of resistance can be made by associating characteristic viral mutations with resistance to various drugs as determined by phenotypic assays. Management of drug resistance includes optimization of host factors and drug delivery, selection of alternative therapies based on knowledge of mechanisms of resistance, and the development of new antivirals. This article discusses drug resistance in herpesviruses and hepatitis B. PMID:20466277

  1. Evidence for the role of microRNA 374b in acquired cisplatin resistance in pancreatic cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Schreiber, R; Mezencev, R; Matyunina, L V; McDonald, J F

    2016-01-01

    Recent evidence has implicated microRNAs (miRNAs) as potentially significant players in the acquisition of cancer-drug resistance in pancreatic and other cancers. To evaluate the potential contribution of miRNAs in acquired resistance to cisplatin in pancreatic cancer, we compared levels of more than 2000 human miRNAs in a cisplatin-resistant cell line (BxPC3-R) derived from parental (BxPC3) cells by step-wise exposure to increasing concentrations of the drug over more than 20 passages. The acquired drug resistance was accompanied by significant changes in the expression of 57 miRNAs, of which 23 were downregulated and 34 were upregulated. Employing a hidden Markov model (HMM) algorithm, we identified downregulation of miR-374b as likely being directly involved in acquisition of the drug-resistant phenotype. Consistent with this prediction, ectopic overexpression of miR-374b in the resistant BxPC3-R cells restored cisplatin sensitivity to levels approaching those displayed by the BxPC3 parental cells. The results are consistent with a growing body of evidence implicating miRNAs in acquired cancer-drug resistance and with the potential therapeutic value of these small regulatory RNAs in blocking and/or reversing the process. PMID:27229158

  2. Evidence for the role of microRNA 374b in acquired cisplatin resistance in pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Schreiber, R; Mezencev, R; Matyunina, L V; McDonald, J F

    2016-08-01

    Recent evidence has implicated microRNAs (miRNAs) as potentially significant players in the acquisition of cancer-drug resistance in pancreatic and other cancers. To evaluate the potential contribution of miRNAs in acquired resistance to cisplatin in pancreatic cancer, we compared levels of more than 2000 human miRNAs in a cisplatin-resistant cell line (BxPC3-R) derived from parental (BxPC3) cells by step-wise exposure to increasing concentrations of the drug over more than 20 passages. The acquired drug resistance was accompanied by significant changes in the expression of 57 miRNAs, of which 23 were downregulated and 34 were upregulated. Employing a hidden Markov model (HMM) algorithm, we identified downregulation of miR-374b as likely being directly involved in acquisition of the drug-resistant phenotype. Consistent with this prediction, ectopic overexpression of miR-374b in the resistant BxPC3-R cells restored cisplatin sensitivity to levels approaching those displayed by the BxPC3 parental cells. The results are consistent with a growing body of evidence implicating miRNAs in acquired cancer-drug resistance and with the potential therapeutic value of these small regulatory RNAs in blocking and/or reversing the process. PMID:27229158

  3. Risk Factors for Acquisition of Drug Resistance during Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis Treatment, Arkhangelsk Oblast, Russia, 2005–2010

    PubMed Central

    Ershova, Julia; Vlasova, Natalia; Nikishova, Elena; Tarasova, Irina; Eliseev, Platon; Maryandyshev, Andrey O.; Shemyakin, Igor G.; Kurbatova, Ekaterina; Cegielski, J. Peter

    2015-01-01

    Acquired resistance to antituberculosis drugs decreases effective treatment options and the likelihood of treatment success. We identified risk factors for acquisition of drug resistance during treatment for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR TB) and evaluated the effect on treatment outcomes. Data were collected prospectively from adults from Arkhangelsk Oblast, Russia, who had pulmonary MDR TB during 2005–2008. Acquisition of resistance to capreomycin and of extensively drug-resistant TB were more likely among patients who received <3 effective drugs than among patients who received >3 effective drugs (9.4% vs. 0% and 8.6% vs. 0.8%, respectively). Poor outcomes were more likely among patients with acquired capreomycin resistance (100% vs. 25.9%), acquired ofloxacin resistance (83.6% vs. 22.7%), or acquired extensive drug resistance (100% vs. 24.4%). To prevent acquired drug resistance and poor outcomes, baseline susceptibility to first- and second-line drugs should be determined quickly, and treatment should be adjusted to contain >3 effective drugs. PMID:25988954

  4. Risk factors for acquisition of drug resistance during multidrug-resistant tuberculosis treatment, Arkhangelsk Oblast, Russia, 2005-2010.

    PubMed

    Smith, Sarah E; Ershova, Julia; Vlasova, Natalia; Nikishova, Elena; Tarasova, Irina; Eliseev, Platon; Maryandyshev, Andrey O; Shemyakin, Igor G; Kurbatova, Ekaterina; Cegielski, J Peter

    2015-06-01

    Acquired resistance to antituberculosis drugs decreases effective treatment options and the likelihood of treatment success. We identified risk factors for acquisition of drug resistance during treatment for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR TB) and evaluated the effect on treatment outcomes. Data were collected prospectively from adults from Arkhangelsk Oblast, Russia, who had pulmonary MDR TB during 2005-2008. Acquisition of resistance to capreomycin and of extensively drug-resistant TB were more likely among patients who received <3 effective drugs than among patients who received >3 effective drugs (9.4% vs. 0% and 8.6% vs. 0.8%, respectively). Poor outcomes were more likely among patients with acquired capreomycin resistance (100% vs. 25.9%), acquired ofloxacin resistance (83.6% vs. 22.7%), or acquired extensive drug resistance (100% vs. 24.4%). To prevent acquired drug resistance and poor outcomes, baseline susceptibility to first- and second-line drugs should be determined quickly, and treatment should be adjusted to contain >3 effective drugs. PMID:25988954

  5. Risk factors for acquisition of drug resistance during multidrug-resistant tuberculosis treatment, Arkhangelsk Oblast, Russia, 2005-2010.

    PubMed

    Smith, Sarah E; Ershova, Julia; Vlasova, Natalia; Nikishova, Elena; Tarasova, Irina; Eliseev, Platon; Maryandyshev, Andrey O; Shemyakin, Igor G; Kurbatova, Ekaterina; Cegielski, J Peter

    2015-06-01

    Acquired resistance to antituberculosis drugs decreases effective treatment options and the likelihood of treatment success. We identified risk factors for acquisition of drug resistance during treatment for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR TB) and evaluated the effect on treatment outcomes. Data were collected prospectively from adults from Arkhangelsk Oblast, Russia, who had pulmonary MDR TB during 2005-2008. Acquisition of resistance to capreomycin and of extensively drug-resistant TB were more likely among patients who received <3 effective drugs than among patients who received >3 effective drugs (9.4% vs. 0% and 8.6% vs. 0.8%, respectively). Poor outcomes were more likely among patients with acquired capreomycin resistance (100% vs. 25.9%), acquired ofloxacin resistance (83.6% vs. 22.7%), or acquired extensive drug resistance (100% vs. 24.4%). To prevent acquired drug resistance and poor outcomes, baseline susceptibility to first- and second-line drugs should be determined quickly, and treatment should be adjusted to contain >3 effective drugs.

  6. Recent advances in systemic acquired resistance research--a review.

    PubMed

    Hunt, M D; Neuenschwander, U H; Delaney, T P; Weymann, K B; Friedrich, L B; Lawton, K A; Steiner, H Y; Ryals, J A

    1996-11-01

    Little is known about the signal transduction events that lead to the establishment of the broad-spectrum, inducible plant immunity called systemic acquired resistance (SAR). Salicylic acid (SA) accumulation has been shown to be essential for the expression of SAR and plays a key role in SAR signaling. Hydrogen peroxide has been proposed to serve as a second messenger of SA. However, our results do not support such a role in the establishment of SAR. Further elucidation of SAR signal transduction has been facilitated by the identification and characterization of mutants. The lesions simulating disease (lsd). resistance response mutant class exhibits spontaneous lesions similar to those that occur during the hypersensitive response. Interestingly, some lsd mutants lose their lesioned phenotype when SA accumulation is prevented by expression of the nahG gene (encoding salicylate hydroxylase), thereby providing evidence for a feedback loop in SAR signal transduction. Characterization of a mutant non-responsive to SAR activator treatments has provided additional evidence for common signaling components between SAR and gene-for-gene resistance.

  7. Inhaled drugs as risk factors for community-acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Almirall, J; Bolíbar, I; Serra-Prat, M; Palomera, E; Roig, J; Hospital, I; Carandell, E; Agustí, M; Ayuso, P; Estela, A; Torres, A

    2010-11-01

    The effect of inhaled drugs in community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is unclear. This case-control study was designed to determine whether inhaled drugs were risk factors for CAP. All incident cases of confirmed CAP that occurred over 1 yr in patients with chronic bronchitis (CB), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) or asthma were included, as well as CB, COPD and asthma controls. Risk factors for CAP and inhaled treatment were recorded during a personal interview. An effect of inhaled drugs on the risk of CAP was observed in COPD and asthma patients after adjusting for the effect of other respiratory diseases and their concomitant treatments. In COPD patients, inhaled steroids had a risk OR of 3.26 (95% CI 1.07-9.98) and in asthma patients inhaled anticholinergics had a risk OR of 8.80 (95% CI 1.02-75.7). In CB patients, no association with CAP was observed for any inhaler. These effects were independent of adjusting variables related to severity and other respiratory and non-respiratory risk factors for CAP, including vaccines. Inhaled β(2)-adrenergic agonists did not show a significant effect on the risk of CAP in any of the respiratory diseases. Inhaled steroids may favour CAP in COPD patients, whereas anticholinergics may favour CAP in asthma patients. It is difficult to differentiate the effect of inhaled therapy from the effect of COPD or asthma severity on the risk of CAP, and these relationships may not be causal, but could call attention to inhaled therapy in COPD and asthma patients.

  8. Resistant TB: Newer Drugs and Community Approach.

    PubMed

    Gothi, Dipti; Joshi, Jyotsna M

    2011-01-01

    Drug resistance in tuberculosis (TB) is a serious problem compromising both the treatment and control programs. Poor usage of the available anti TB drugs has led to progressive drug resistance-multi drug resistance (MDR), extensively drug-resistance (XDR) and even total drug resistance (TDR). While drug sensitive TB is completely curable, MDR-TB is difficult to treat, XDR and TDR are often fatal. Non availability of new drugs to treat drug resistant cases further complicates the problem. The Global Alliance for Tuberculosis Drug Developments, a non-profit organization with the World Health Organization (WHO) as a partner was formed in February 2000 for the development of new drugs. In the last decade this venture has resulted in several promising new antituberculosis drugs like TMC207 (diaryquinoline), PA-824 (nitroimidazo-oxazine), OPC-67683 (nitroimidazo-oxazole) and SQ 109 (diamine compound). Drug resistance in TB is a man made problem. Therefore, while global efforts towards new drug development must continue it is equally important to have a well defined community approach to prevent the emergence of drug resistance to the existing and newer drugs. The present review article discusses some recent drug patents for the treatment of tuberculosis and the appropriate community approach to prevent and treat drug resistant TB.

  9. Community-Acquired Methicillin-Resistant Pyogenic Liver Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Cherian, Joel; Singh, Rahul; Varma, Muralidhar; Vidyasagar, Sudha; Mukhopadhyay, Chiranjay

    2016-01-01

    Pyogenic liver abscesses are rare with an incidence of 0.5% to 0.8% and are mostly due to hepatobiliary causes (40% to 60%). Most are polymicrobial with less than 10% being caused by Staphylococcus aureus. Of these, few are caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and fewer still by a community-acquired strain. Here we present a case study of a patient with a community-acquired MRSA liver abscess. The patient presented with fever since 1 month and tender hepatomegaly. Blood tests revealed elevated levels of alkaline phosphatase, C-reactive protein, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and neutrophilic leukocytosis. Blood cultures were sterile. Ultrasound of the abdomen showed multiple abscesses, from which pus was drained and MRSA isolated. Computed tomography of the abdomen did not show any source of infection, and an amebic serology was negative. The patient was started on vancomycin for 2 weeks, following which he became afebrile and was discharged on oral linezolid for 4 more weeks. Normally a liver abscess is treated empirically with ceftriaxone for pyogenic liver abscess and metronidazole for amebic liver abscess. However, if the patient has risk factors for a Staphylococcal infection, it is imperative that antibiotics covering gram-positive organisms be added while waiting for culture reports. PMID:27540556

  10. Cellular Memory of Acquired Stress Resistance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Qiaoning; Haroon, Suraiya; Bravo, Diego González; Will, Jessica L.; Gasch, Audrey P.

    2012-01-01

    Cellular memory of past experiences has been observed in several organisms and across a variety of experiences, including bacteria “remembering” prior nutritional status and amoeba “learning” to anticipate future environmental conditions. Here, we show that Saccharomyces cerevisiae maintains a multifaceted memory of prior stress exposure. We previously demonstrated that yeast cells exposed to a mild dose of salt acquire subsequent tolerance to severe doses of H2O2. We set out to characterize the retention of acquired tolerance and in the process uncovered two distinct aspects of cellular memory. First, we found that H2O2 resistance persisted for four to five generations after cells were removed from the prior salt treatment and was transmitted to daughter cells that never directly experienced the pretreatment. Maintenance of this memory did not require nascent protein synthesis after the initial salt pretreatment, but rather required long-lived cytosolic catalase Ctt1p that was synthesized during salt exposure and then distributed to daughter cells during subsequent cell divisions. In addition to and separable from the memory of H2O2 resistance, these cells also displayed a faster gene-expression response to subsequent stress at >1000 genes, representing transcriptional memory. The faster gene-expression response requires the nuclear pore component Nup42p and serves an important function by facilitating faster reacquisition of H2O2 tolerance after a second cycle of salt exposure. Memory of prior stress exposure likely provides a significant advantage to microbial populations living in ever-changing environments. PMID:22851651

  11. Cellular memory of acquired stress resistance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Guan, Qiaoning; Haroon, Suraiya; Bravo, Diego González; Will, Jessica L; Gasch, Audrey P

    2012-10-01

    Cellular memory of past experiences has been observed in several organisms and across a variety of experiences, including bacteria "remembering" prior nutritional status and amoeba "learning" to anticipate future environmental conditions. Here, we show that Saccharomyces cerevisiae maintains a multifaceted memory of prior stress exposure. We previously demonstrated that yeast cells exposed to a mild dose of salt acquire subsequent tolerance to severe doses of H(2)O(2). We set out to characterize the retention of acquired tolerance and in the process uncovered two distinct aspects of cellular memory. First, we found that H(2)O(2) resistance persisted for four to five generations after cells were removed from the prior salt treatment and was transmitted to daughter cells that never directly experienced the pretreatment. Maintenance of this memory did not require nascent protein synthesis after the initial salt pretreatment, but rather required long-lived cytosolic catalase Ctt1p that was synthesized during salt exposure and then distributed to daughter cells during subsequent cell divisions. In addition to and separable from the memory of H(2)O(2) resistance, these cells also displayed a faster gene-expression response to subsequent stress at >1000 genes, representing transcriptional memory. The faster gene-expression response requires the nuclear pore component Nup42p and serves an important function by facilitating faster reacquisition of H(2)O(2) tolerance after a second cycle of salt exposure. Memory of prior stress exposure likely provides a significant advantage to microbial populations living in ever-changing environments. PMID:22851651

  12. Multidrug efflux pumps as main players in intrinsic and acquired resistance to antimicrobials.

    PubMed

    Hernando-Amado, Sara; Blanco, Paula; Alcalde-Rico, Manuel; Corona, Fernando; Reales-Calderón, Jose A; Sánchez, María B; Martínez, José L

    2016-09-01

    Multidrug efflux pumps constitute a group of transporters that are ubiquitously found in any organism. In addition to other functions with relevance for the cell physiology, efflux pumps contribute to the resistance to compounds used for treating different diseases, including resistance to anticancer drugs, antibiotics or antifungal compounds. In the case of antimicrobials, efflux pumps are major players in both intrinsic and acquired resistance to drugs currently in use for the treatment of infectious diseases. One important aspect not fully explored of efflux pumps consists on the identification of effectors able to induce their expression. Indeed, whereas the analysis of clinical isolates have shown that mutants overexpressing these resistance elements are frequently found, less is known on the conditions that may trigger expression of efflux pumps, hence leading to transient induction of resistance in vivo, a situation that is barely detectable using classical susceptibility tests. In the current article we review the structure and mechanisms of regulation of the expression of bacterial and fungal efflux pumps, with a particular focus in those for which a role in clinically relevant resistance has been reported. PMID:27620952

  13. Drug Resistance in Cancer: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Housman, Genevieve; Byler, Shannon; Heerboth, Sarah; Lapinska, Karolina; Longacre, Mckenna; Snyder, Nicole; Sarkar, Sibaji

    2014-01-01

    Cancers have the ability to develop resistance to traditional therapies, and the increasing prevalence of these drug resistant cancers necessitates further research and treatment development. This paper outlines the current knowledge of mechanisms that promote or enable drug resistance, such as drug inactivation, drug target alteration, drug efflux, DNA damage repair, cell death inhibition, and the epithelial-mesenchymal transition, as well as how inherent tumor cell heterogeneity plays a role in drug resistance. It also describes the epigenetic modifications that can induce drug resistance and considers how such epigenetic factors may contribute to the development of cancer progenitor cells, which are not killed by conventional cancer therapies. Lastly, this review concludes with a discussion on the best treatment options for existing drug resistant cancers, ways to prevent the formation of drug resistant cancers and cancer progenitor cells, and future directions of study. PMID:25198391

  14. Drug Resistance Mechanisms in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Palomino, Juan Carlos; Martin, Anandi

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a serious public health problem worldwide. Its situation is worsened by the presence of multidrug resistant (MDR) strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of the disease. In recent years, even more serious forms of drug resistance have been reported. A better knowledge of the mechanisms of drug resistance of M. tuberculosis and the relevant molecular mechanisms involved will improve the available techniques for rapid drug resistance detection and will help to explore new targets for drug activity and development. This review article discusses the mechanisms of action of anti-tuberculosis drugs and the molecular basis of drug resistance in M. tuberculosis. PMID:27025748

  15. Drug Resistance Mechanisms in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Palomino, Juan Carlos; Martin, Anandi

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a serious public health problem worldwide. Its situation is worsened by the presence of multidrug resistant (MDR) strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of the disease. In recent years, even more serious forms of drug resistance have been reported. A better knowledge of the mechanisms of drug resistance of M. tuberculosis and the relevant molecular mechanisms involved will improve the available techniques for rapid drug resistance detection and will help to explore new targets for drug activity and development. This review article discusses the mechanisms of action of anti-tuberculosis drugs and the molecular basis of drug resistance in M. tuberculosis. PMID:27025748

  16. Overcoming acquired BRAF inhibitor resistance in melanoma via targeted inhibition of Hsp90 with ganetespib.

    PubMed

    Acquaviva, Jaime; Smith, Donald L; Jimenez, John-Paul; Zhang, Chaohua; Sequeira, Manuel; He, Suqin; Sang, Jim; Bates, Richard C; Proia, David A

    2014-02-01

    Activating BRAF kinase mutations serve as oncogenic drivers in over half of all melanomas, a feature that has been exploited in the development of new molecularly targeted approaches to treat this disease. Selective BRAF(V600E) inhibitors, such as vemurafenib, typically induce initial, profound tumor regressions within this group of patients; however, durable responses have been hampered by the emergence of drug resistance. Here, we examined the activity of ganetespib, a small-molecule inhibitor of Hsp90, in melanoma lines harboring the BRAF(V600E) mutation. Ganetespib exposure resulted in the loss of mutant BRAF expression and depletion of mitogen-activated protein kinase and AKT signaling, resulting in greater in vitro potency and antitumor efficacy compared with targeted BRAF and MAP-ERK kinase (MEK) inhibitors. Dual targeting of Hsp90 and BRAF(V600E) provided combinatorial benefit in vemurafenib-sensitive melanoma cells in vitro and in vivo. Importantly, ganetespib overcame mechanisms of intrinsic and acquired resistance to vemurafenib, the latter of which was characterized by reactivation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling. Continued suppression of BRAF(V600E) by vemurafenib potentiated sensitivity to MEK inhibitors after acquired resistance had been established. Ganetespib treatment reduced, but not abolished, elevations in steady-state ERK activity. Profiling studies revealed that the addition of a MEK inhibitor could completely abrogate ERK reactivation in the resistant phenotype, with ganetespib displaying superior combinatorial activity over vemurafenib. Moreover, ganetespib plus the MEK inhibitor TAK-733 induced tumor regressions in vemurafenib-resistant xenografts. Overall these data highlight the potential of ganetespib as a single-agent or combination treatment in BRAF(V600E)-driven melanoma, particularly as a strategy to overcome acquired resistance to selective BRAF inhibitors. PMID:24398428

  17. Effects of Sorafenib Dose on Acquired Reversible Resistance and Toxicity in Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kuczynski, Elizabeth A; Lee, Christina R; Man, Shan; Chen, Eric; Kerbel, Robert S

    2015-06-15

    Acquired evasive resistance is a major limitation of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) treatment with the tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) sorafenib. Recent findings suggest that resistance to sorafenib may have a reversible phenotype. In addition, loss of responsiveness has been proposed to be due to a gradual decrease in sorafenib plasma levels in patients. Here, the possible mechanisms underlying reversible sorafenib resistance were investigated using a Hep3B-hCG orthotopic human xenograft model of locally advanced HCC. Tissue and plasma sorafenib and metabolite levels, downstream antitumor targets, and toxicity were assessed during standard and dose-escalated sorafenib treatment. Drug levels were found to decline significantly over time in mice treated with 30 mg/kg sorafenib, coinciding with the onset of resistance but a greater magnitude of change was observed in tissues compared with plasma. Skin rash also correlated with drug levels and tended to decrease in severity over time. Drug level changes appeared to be partially tumor dependent involving induction of tumoral CYP3A4 metabolism, with host pretreatment alone unable to generate resistance. Escalation from 30 to 60 mg/kg sorafenib improved antitumor efficacy but worsened survival due to excessive body weight loss. Microvessel density was inhibited by sorafenib treatment but remained suppressed over time and dose increase. In conclusion, tumor CYP3A4 induction by sorafenib is a novel mechanism to account for variability in systemic drug levels; however, declining systemic sorafenib levels may only be a minor resistance mechanism. Escalating the dose may be an effective treatment strategy, provided toxicity can be controlled. PMID:25908587

  18. The multiple facets of drug resistance: one history, different approaches

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Some cancers like melanoma and pancreatic and ovarian cancers, for example, commonly display resistance to chemotherapy, and this is the major obstacle to a better prognosis of patients. Frequently, literature presents studies in monolayer cell cultures, 3D cell cultures or in vivo studies, but rarely the same work compares results of drug resistance in different models. Several of these works are presented in this review and show that usually cells in 3D culture are more resistant to drugs than monolayer cultured cells due to different mechanisms. Searching for new strategies to sensitize different tumors to chemotherapy, many methods have been studied to understand the mechanisms whereby cancer cells acquire drug resistance. These methods have been strongly advanced along the years and therapies using different drugs have been increasingly proposed to induce cell death in resistant cells of different cancers. Recently, cancer stem cells (CSCs) have been extensively studied because they would be the only cells capable of sustaining tumorigenesis. It is believed that the resistance of CSCs to currently used chemotherapeutics is a major contributing factor in cancer recurrence and later metastasis development. This review aims to appraise the experimental progress in the study of acquired drug resistance of cancer cells in different models as well as to understand the role of CSCs as the major contributing factor in cancer recurrence and metastasis development, describing how CSCs can be identified and isolated. PMID:24775603

  19. Risk Factors for Acquired Rifamycin and Isoniazid Resistance: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Rockwood, Neesha; Abdullahi, Leila H.; Wilkinson, Robert J.; Meintjes, Graeme

    2015-01-01

    Background Studies looking at acquired drug resistance (ADR) are diverse with respect to geographical distribution, HIV co-infection rates, retreatment status and programmatic factors such as regimens administered and directly observed therapy. Our objective was to examine and consolidate evidence from clinical studies of the multifactorial aetiology of acquired rifamycin and/or isoniazid resistance within the scope of a single systematic review. This is important to inform policy and identify key areas for further studies. Methods Case-control and cohort studies and randomised controlled trials that reported ADR as an outcome during antitubercular treatment regimens including a rifamycin and examined the association of at least 1 risk factor were included. Post hoc, we carried out random effects Mantel-Haenszel weighted meta-analyses of the impact of 2 key risk factors 1) HIV and 2) baseline drug resistance on the binary outcome of ADR. Heterogeneity was assessed used I2 statistic. As a secondary outcome, we calculated median cumulative incidence of ADR, weighted by the sample size of the studies. Results Meta-analysis of 15 studies showed increased risk of ADR with baseline mono- or polyresistance (RR 4.85 95% CI 3.26 to 7.23, heterogeneity I2 58%, 95% CI 26 to 76%). Meta-analysis of 8 studies showed that HIV co-infection was associated with increased risk of ADR (RR 3.02, 95% CI 1.28 to 7.11); there was considerable heterogeneity amongst these studies (I2 81%, 95% CI 64 to 90%). Non-adherence, extrapulmonary/disseminated disease and advanced immunosuppression in HIV co-infection were other risk factors noted. The weighted median cumulative incidence of acquired multi drug resistance calculated in 24 studies (assuming whole cohort as denominator, regardless of follow up DST) was 0.1% (5th to 95th percentile 0.07 to 3.2%). Conclusion Baseline drug resistance and HIV co-infection were significant risk factors for ADR. There was a trend of positive association with

  20. Disulfiram targets cancer stem-like cells and reverses resistance and cross-resistance in acquired paclitaxel-resistant triple-negative breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, P; Kumar, I S; Brown, S; Kannappan, V; Tawari, P E; Tang, J Z; Jiang, W; Armesilla, A L; Darling, J L; Wang, W

    2013-01-01

    Background: Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) has significantly worse prognosis. Acquired chemoresistance remains the major cause of therapeutic failure of TNBC. In clinic, the relapsed TNBC is commonly pan-resistant to various drugs with completely different resistant mechanisms. Investigation of the mechanisms and development of new drugs to target pan-chemoresistance will potentially improve the therapeutic outcomes of TNBC patients. Methods: In this study, 1-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-3,5-diphenylformazan (MTT), combination index (CI)–isobologram, western blot, ALDEFLUOR analysis, clonogenic assay and immunocytochemistry were used. Results: The chemoresistant MDA-MB-231PAC10 cells are highly cross-resistant to paclitaxel (PAC), cisplatin (CDDP), docetaxel and doxorubicin. The MDA-MB-231PAC10 cells are quiescent with significantly longer doubling time (64.9 vs 31.7 h). This may be caused by high expression of p21Waf1. The MDA-MB-231PAC10 cells express high aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activity and a panel of embryonic stem cell-related proteins, for example, Oct4, Sox2, Nanog and nuclealisation of HIF2α and NF-κBp65. We have previously reported that disulfiram (DS), an antialcoholism drug, targets cancer stem cells (CSCs) and enhances cytotoxicity of anticancer drugs. Disulfiram abolished CSC characters and completely reversed PAC and CDDP resistance in MDA-MB-231PAC10 cells. Conclusion: Cancer stem cells may be responsible for acquired pan-chemoresistance. As a drug used in clinic, DS may be repurposed as a CSC inhibitor to reverse the acquired pan-chemoresistance. PMID:24008666

  1. Cancer Metabolism and Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Mahbuba; Hasan, Mohammad Rubayet

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic alterations, driven by genetic and epigenetic factors, have long been known to be associated with the etiology of cancer. Furthermore, accumulating evidence suggest that cancer metabolism is intimately linked to drug resistance, which is currently one of the most important challenges in cancer treatment. Altered metabolic pathways help cancer cells to proliferate at a rate higher than normal, adapt to nutrient limited conditions, and develop drug resistance phenotypes. Application of systems biology, boosted by recent advancement of novel high-throughput technologies to obtain cancer-associated, transcriptomic, proteomic and metabolomic data, is expected to make a significant contribution to our understanding of metabolic properties related to malignancy. Indeed, despite being at a very early stage, quantitative data obtained from the omics platforms and through applications of 13C metabolic flux analysis (MFA) in in vitro studies, researchers have already began to gain insight into the complex metabolic mechanisms of cancer, paving the way for selection of molecular targets for therapeutic interventions. In this review, we discuss some of the major findings associated with the metabolic pathways in cancer cells and also discuss new evidences and achievements on specific metabolic enzyme targets and target-directed small molecules that can potentially be used as anti-cancer drugs. PMID:26437434

  2. Adaptive and Acquired Resistance to EGFR Inhibitors Converge on the MAPK Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Pengfei; Fu, Yujie; Chen, Minjiang; Jing, Ying; Wu, Jie; Li, Ke; Shen, Ying; Gao, Jian-Xin; Wang, Mengzhao; Zhao, Xiaojing; Zhuang, Guanglei

    2016-01-01

    Both adaptive and acquired resistance significantly limits the efficacy of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) kinase inhibitors. However, the distinct or common mechanisms of adaptive and acquired resistance have not been fully characterized. Here, through systematic modeling of erlotinib resistance in lung cancer, we found that feedback reactivation of MAPK signaling following erlotinib treatment, which was dependent on the MET receptor, contributed to the adaptive resistance of EGFR inhibitors. Interestingly, acquired resistance to erlotinib was also associated with the MAPK pathway activation as a result of CRAF or NRAS amplification. Consequently, combined inhibition of EGFR and MAPK impeded the development of both adaptive and acquired resistance. These observations demonstrate that adaptive and acquired resistance to EGFR inhibitors can converge on the same pathway and credential cotargeting EGFR and MAPK as a promising therapeutic approach in EGFR mutant tumors. PMID:27279914

  3. Benznidazole-Resistance in Trypanosoma cruzi Is a Readily Acquired Trait That Can Arise Independently in a Single Population

    PubMed Central

    Mejia, Ana Maria; Hall, Belinda S.; Taylor, Martin C.; Gómez-Palacio, Andrés; Wilkinson, Shane R.; Triana-Chávez, Omar; Kelly, John M.

    2012-01-01

    Benznidazole is the frontline drug used against Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease. However, treatment failures are often reported. Here, we demonstrate that independently acquired mutations in the gene encoding a mitochondrial nitroreductase (TcNTR) can give rise to distinct drug-resistant clones within a single population. Following selection of benznidazole-resistant parasites, all clones examined had lost one of the chromosomes containing the TcNTR gene. Sequence analysis of the remaining TcNTR allele revealed 3 distinct mutant genes in different resistant clones. Expression studies showed that these mutant proteins were unable to activate benznidazole. This correlated with loss of flavin mononucleotide binding. The drug-resistant phenotype could be reversed by transfection with wild-type TcNTR. These results identify TcNTR as a central player in acquired resistance to benznidazole. They also demonstrate that T. cruzi has a propensity to undergo genetic changes that can lead to drug resistance, a finding that has implications for future therapeutic strategies. PMID:22551809

  4. The changing face of community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Kale, P; Dhawan, B

    2016-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is an important cause of infection, both in hospitalised patients with significant healthcare exposure and in patients without healthcare risk factors. Community-acquired methicillin-resistant S. aureus (CA-MRSA) are known for their rapid community transmission and propensity to cause aggressive skin and soft tissue infections and community-acquired pneumonia. The distinction between the healthcare-associated (HA)-MRSA and CA-MRSA is gradually fading owing to the acquisition of multiple virulence factors and genetic elements. The movement of CA-MRSA strains into the nosocomial setting limits the utility of using clinical risk factors alone to designate community or HA status. Identification of unique genetic characteristics and genotyping are valuable tools for MRSA epidemiological studies. Although the optimum pharmacotherapy for CA-MRSA infections has not been determined, many CA-MRSA strains remain broadly susceptible to several non-β-lactam antibacterial agents. This review aimed at illuminating the characteristic features of CA-MRSA, virulence factors, changing clinical settings and molecular epidemiology, insurgence into the hospital settings and therapy with drug resistance. PMID:27514947

  5. The changing face of community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Kale, P; Dhawan, B

    2016-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is an important cause of infection, both in hospitalised patients with significant healthcare exposure and in patients without healthcare risk factors. Community-acquired methicillin-resistant S. aureus (CA-MRSA) are known for their rapid community transmission and propensity to cause aggressive skin and soft tissue infections and community-acquired pneumonia. The distinction between the healthcare-associated (HA)-MRSA and CA-MRSA is gradually fading owing to the acquisition of multiple virulence factors and genetic elements. The movement of CA-MRSA strains into the nosocomial setting limits the utility of using clinical risk factors alone to designate community or HA status. Identification of unique genetic characteristics and genotyping are valuable tools for MRSA epidemiological studies. Although the optimum pharmacotherapy for CA-MRSA infections has not been determined, many CA-MRSA strains remain broadly susceptible to several non-β-lactam antibacterial agents. This review aimed at illuminating the characteristic features of CA-MRSA, virulence factors, changing clinical settings and molecular epidemiology, insurgence into the hospital settings and therapy with drug resistance.

  6. Origin of robustness in generating drug-resistant malaria parasites.

    PubMed

    Kümpornsin, Krittikorn; Modchang, Charin; Heinberg, Adina; Ekland, Eric H; Jirawatcharadech, Piyaporn; Chobson, Pornpimol; Suwanakitti, Nattida; Chaotheing, Sastra; Wilairat, Prapon; Deitsch, Kirk W; Kamchonwongpaisan, Sumalee; Fidock, David A; Kirkman, Laura A; Yuthavong, Yongyuth; Chookajorn, Thanat

    2014-07-01

    Biological robustness allows mutations to accumulate while maintaining functional phenotypes. Despite its crucial role in evolutionary processes, the mechanistic details of how robustness originates remain elusive. Using an evolutionary trajectory analysis approach, we demonstrate how robustness evolved in malaria parasites under selective pressure from an antimalarial drug inhibiting the folate synthesis pathway. A series of four nonsynonymous amino acid substitutions at the targeted enzyme, dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR), render the parasites highly resistant to the antifolate drug pyrimethamine. Nevertheless, the stepwise gain of these four dhfr mutations results in tradeoffs between pyrimethamine resistance and parasite fitness. Here, we report the epistatic interaction between dhfr mutations and amplification of the gene encoding the first upstream enzyme in the folate pathway, GTP cyclohydrolase I (GCH1). gch1 amplification confers low level pyrimethamine resistance and would thus be selected for by pyrimethamine treatment. Interestingly, the gch1 amplification can then be co-opted by the parasites because it reduces the cost of acquiring drug-resistant dhfr mutations downstream in the same metabolic pathway. The compensation of compromised fitness by extra GCH1 is an example of how robustness can evolve in a system and thus expand the accessibility of evolutionary trajectories leading toward highly resistant alleles. The evolution of robustness during the gain of drug-resistant mutations has broad implications for both the development of new drugs and molecular surveillance for resistance to existing drugs.

  7. Origin of Robustness in Generating Drug-Resistant Malaria Parasites

    PubMed Central

    Kümpornsin, Krittikorn; Modchang, Charin; Heinberg, Adina; Ekland, Eric H.; Jirawatcharadech, Piyaporn; Chobson, Pornpimol; Suwanakitti, Nattida; Chaotheing, Sastra; Wilairat, Prapon; Deitsch, Kirk W.; Kamchonwongpaisan, Sumalee; Fidock, David A.; Kirkman, Laura A.; Yuthavong, Yongyuth; Chookajorn, Thanat

    2014-01-01

    Biological robustness allows mutations to accumulate while maintaining functional phenotypes. Despite its crucial role in evolutionary processes, the mechanistic details of how robustness originates remain elusive. Using an evolutionary trajectory analysis approach, we demonstrate how robustness evolved in malaria parasites under selective pressure from an antimalarial drug inhibiting the folate synthesis pathway. A series of four nonsynonymous amino acid substitutions at the targeted enzyme, dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR), render the parasites highly resistant to the antifolate drug pyrimethamine. Nevertheless, the stepwise gain of these four dhfr mutations results in tradeoffs between pyrimethamine resistance and parasite fitness. Here, we report the epistatic interaction between dhfr mutations and amplification of the gene encoding the first upstream enzyme in the folate pathway, GTP cyclohydrolase I (GCH1). gch1 amplification confers low level pyrimethamine resistance and would thus be selected for by pyrimethamine treatment. Interestingly, the gch1 amplification can then be co-opted by the parasites because it reduces the cost of acquiring drug-resistant dhfr mutations downstream in the same metabolic pathway. The compensation of compromised fitness by extra GCH1 is an example of how robustness can evolve in a system and thus expand the accessibility of evolutionary trajectories leading toward highly resistant alleles. The evolution of robustness during the gain of drug-resistant mutations has broad implications for both the development of new drugs and molecular surveillance for resistance to existing drugs. PMID:24739308

  8. Drug rechallenge and treatment beyond progression—implications for drug resistance

    PubMed Central

    Kuczynski, Elizabeth A.; Sargent, Daniel J.; Grothey, Axel; Kerbel, Robert S.

    2015-01-01

    The established dogma in oncology for managing recurrent or refractory disease dictates that therapy is changed at disease progression, because the cancer is assumed to have become drug-resistant. Drug resistance, whether pre-existing or acquired, is largely thought to be a stable and heritable process; thus, reuse of therapeutic agents that have failed is generally contraindicated. Over the past few decades, clinical evidence has suggested a role for unstable, non-heritable mechanisms of acquired drug resistance pertaining to chemotherapy and targeted agents. There are many examples of circumstances where patients respond to reintroduction of the same therapy (drug rechallenge) after a drug holiday following disease relapse or progression during therapy. Additional, albeit limited, evidence suggests that, in certain circumstances, continuing a therapy beyond disease progression can also have antitumour activity. In this Review, we describe the anticancer agents used in these treatment strategies and discuss the potential mechanisms explaining the apparent tumour re-sensitization with reintroduced or continued therapy. The extensive number of malignancies and drugs that challenge the custom of permanently switching to different drugs at each line of therapy warrants a more in-depth examination of the definitions of disease progression and drug resistance and the resulting implications for patient care. PMID:23999218

  9. Phenotypic drug profiling in droplet microfluidics for better targeting of drug-resistant tumors

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, S.; Cohen, N.; Sabhachandani, P.; Konry, T.

    2015-01-01

    Acquired drug resistance is a key factor in the failure of chemotherapy. Due to intratumoral heterogeneity, cancer cells depict variations in intracellular drug uptake and efflux at the single cell level, which may not be detectable in bulk assays. In this study we present a droplet microfluidics-based approach to assess the dynamics of drug uptake, efflux and cytotoxicity in drug-sensitive and drug-resistant breast cancer cells. An integrated droplet generation and docking microarray was utilized to encapsulate single cells as well as homotypic cell aggregates. Drug-sensitive cells showed greater death in the presence or absence of Doxorubicin (Dox) compared to the drug-resistant cells. We observed heterogeneous Dox uptake in individual drug-sensitive cells while the drug-resistant cells showed uniformly low uptake and retention. Dox-resistant cells were classified into distinct subsets based on their efflux properties. Cells that showed longer retention of extracellular reagents also demonstrated maximal death. We further observed homotypic fusion of both cell types in droplets, which resulted in increased cell survival in the presence of high doses of Dox. Our results establish the applicability of this microfluidic platform for quantitative drug screening in single cells and multicellular interactions. PMID:26456240

  10. Understanding drug resistance in human intestinal protozoa.

    PubMed

    El-Taweel, Hend Aly

    2015-05-01

    Infections with intestinal protozoa continue to be a major health problem in many areas of the world. The widespread use of a limited number of therapeutic agents for their management and control raises concerns about development of drug resistance. Generally, the use of any antimicrobial agent should be accompanied by meticulous monitoring of its efficacy and measures to minimize resistance formation. Evidence for the occurrence of drug resistance in different intestinal protozoa comes from case studies and clinical trials, sometimes with a limited number of patients. Large-scale field-based assessment of drug resistance and drug sensitivity testing of clinical isolates are needed. Furthermore, the association of drug resistance with certain geographic isolates or genotypes deserves consideration. Drug resistance has been triggered in vitro and has been linked to modification of pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase, nitroreductases, antioxidant defense, or cytoskeletal system. Further mechanistic studies will have important implications in the development of second generation therapeutic agents.

  11. Aggressive chemotherapy and the selection of drug resistant pathogens.

    PubMed

    Huijben, Silvie; Bell, Andrew S; Sim, Derek G; Tomasello, Danielle; Mideo, Nicole; Day, Troy; Read, Andrew F

    2013-09-01

    Drug resistant pathogens are one of the key public health challenges of the 21st century. There is a widespread belief that resistance is best managed by using drugs to rapidly eliminate target pathogens from patients so as to minimize the probability that pathogens acquire resistance de novo. Yet strong drug pressure imposes intense selection in favor of resistance through alleviation of competition with wild-type populations. Aggressive chemotherapy thus generates opposing evolutionary forces which together determine the rate of drug resistance emergence. Identifying treatment regimens which best retard resistance evolution while maximizing health gains and minimizing disease transmission requires empirical analysis of resistance evolution in vivo in conjunction with measures of clinical outcomes and infectiousness. Using rodent malaria in laboratory mice, we found that less aggressive chemotherapeutic regimens substantially reduced the probability of onward transmission of resistance (by >150-fold), without compromising health outcomes. Our experiments suggest that there may be cases where resistance evolution can be managed more effectively with treatment regimens other than those which reduce pathogen burdens as fast as possible.

  12. Acquired resistance and clonal evolution in melanoma during BRAF inhibitor therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Xiangju; Hong, Aayoung; Koya, Richard C.; Moriceau, Gatien; Chodon, Thinle; Guo, Rongqing; Johnson, Douglas B.; Dahlman, Kimberly B.; Kelley, Mark C.; Kefford, Richard F.; Chmielowski, Bartosz; Glaspy, John A.; Sosman, Jeffrey A.; van Baren, Nicolas; Long, Georgina V.; Ribas, Antoni; Lo, Roger S.

    2013-01-01

    BRAF inhibitors elicit rapid anti-tumor responses in the majority of patients with V600BRAF mutant melanoma, but acquired drug resistance is almost universal. We sought to identify the core resistance pathways and the extent of tumor heterogeneity during disease progression. We show that MAPK reactivation mechanisms were detected among 70% of disease-progressive tissues, with RAS mutations, mutant BRAF amplification and alternative splicing being most common. We also detected PI3K-PTEN-AKT-upregulating genetic alterations among 22% of progressive melanomas. Distinct molecular lesions, in both core drug escape pathways, were commonly detected concurrently in the same tumor or among multiple tumors from the same patient. Beyond harboring extensively heterogeneous resistance mechanisms, melanoma re-growth emerging from BRAF inhibitor selection displayed branched evolution marked by altered mutational spectra/signatures and increased fitness. Thus, melanoma genomic heterogeneity contributes significantly to BRAF inhibitor treatment failure, implying upfront, co-targeting of two core pathways as an essential strategy for durable responses. PMID:24265155

  13. Diverse drug-resistance mechanisms can emerge from drug-tolerant cancer persister cells

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez, Michael; Rajaram, Satwik; Steininger, Robert J.; Osipchuk, Daria; Roth, Maike A.; Morinishi, Leanna S.; Evans, Louise; Ji, Weiyue; Hsu, Chien-Hsiang; Thurley, Kevin; Wei, Shuguang; Zhou, Anwu; Koduru, Prasad R.; Posner, Bruce A.; Wu, Lani F.; Altschuler, Steven J.

    2016-01-01

    Cancer therapy has traditionally focused on eliminating fast-growing populations of cells. Yet, an increasing body of evidence suggests that small subpopulations of cancer cells can evade strong selective drug pressure by entering a ‘persister' state of negligible growth. This drug-tolerant state has been hypothesized to be part of an initial strategy towards eventual acquisition of bona fide drug-resistance mechanisms. However, the diversity of drug-resistance mechanisms that can expand from a persister bottleneck is unknown. Here we compare persister-derived, erlotinib-resistant colonies that arose from a single, EGFR-addicted lung cancer cell. We find, using a combination of large-scale drug screening and whole-exome sequencing, that our erlotinib-resistant colonies acquired diverse resistance mechanisms, including the most commonly observed clinical resistance mechanisms. Thus, the drug-tolerant persister state does not limit—and may even provide a latent reservoir of cells for—the emergence of heterogeneous drug-resistance mechanisms. PMID:26891683

  14. Clinical Management of HIV Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Cortez, Karoll J.; Maldarelli, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Combination antiretroviral therapy for HIV-1 infection has resulted in profound reductions in viremia and is associated with marked improvements in morbidity and mortality. Therapy is not curative, however, and prolonged therapy is complicated by drug toxicity and the emergence of drug resistance. Management of clinical drug resistance requires in depth evaluation, and includes extensive history, physical examination and laboratory studies. Appropriate use of resistance testing provides valuable information useful in constructing regimens for treatment-experienced individuals with viremia during therapy. This review outlines the emergence of drug resistance in vivo, and describes clinical evaluation and therapeutic options of the individual with rebound viremia during therapy. PMID:21994737

  15. Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis: Challenges and Progress.

    PubMed

    Kurz, Sebastian G; Furin, Jennifer J; Bark, Charles M

    2016-06-01

    Antimicrobial resistance is a natural evolutionary process, which in the case of Mycobacterium tuberculosis is based on spontaneous chromosomal mutations, meaning that well-designed combination drug regimens provided under supervised therapy will prevent the emergence of drug-resistant strains. Unfortunately, limited resources, poverty, and neglect have led to the emergence of drug-resistant tuberculosis throughout the world. The international community has responded with financial and scientific support, leading to new rapid diagnostics, new drugs and regimens in advanced clinical development, and an increasingly sophisticated understanding of resistance mechanisms and their application to all aspects of TB control and treatment. PMID:27208770

  16. Efflux pump-mediated drug resistance in Burkholderia.

    PubMed

    Podnecky, Nicole L; Rhodes, Katherine A; Schweizer, Herbert P

    2015-01-01

    Several members of the genus Burkholderia are prominent pathogens. Infections caused by these bacteria are difficult to treat because of significant antibiotic resistance. Virtually all Burkholderia species are also resistant to polymyxin, prohibiting use of drugs like colistin that are available for treatment of infections caused by most other drug resistant Gram-negative bacteria. Despite clinical significance and antibiotic resistance of Burkholderia species, characterization of efflux pumps lags behind other non-enteric Gram-negative pathogens such as Acinetobacter baumannii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Although efflux pumps have been described in several Burkholderia species, they have been best studied in Burkholderia cenocepacia and B. pseudomallei. As in other non-enteric Gram-negatives, efflux pumps of the resistance nodulation cell division (RND) family are the clinically most significant efflux systems in these two species. Several efflux pumps were described in B. cenocepacia, which when expressed confer resistance to clinically significant antibiotics, including aminoglycosides, chloramphenicol, fluoroquinolones, and tetracyclines. Three RND pumps have been characterized in B. pseudomallei, two of which confer either intrinsic or acquired resistance to aminoglycosides, macrolides, chloramphenicol, fluoroquinolones, tetracyclines, trimethoprim, and in some instances trimethoprim+sulfamethoxazole. Several strains of the host-adapted B. mallei, a clone of B. pseudomallei, lack AmrAB-OprA, and are therefore aminoglycoside and macrolide susceptible. B. thailandensis is closely related to B. pseudomallei, but non-pathogenic to humans. Its pump repertoire and ensuing drug resistance profile parallels that of B. pseudomallei. An efflux pump in B. vietnamiensis plays a significant role in acquired aminoglycoside resistance. Summarily, efflux pumps are significant players in Burkholderia drug resistance.

  17. Efflux pump-mediated drug resistance in Burkholderia

    PubMed Central

    Podnecky, Nicole L.; Rhodes, Katherine A.; Schweizer, Herbert P.

    2015-01-01

    Several members of the genus Burkholderia are prominent pathogens. Infections caused by these bacteria are difficult to treat because of significant antibiotic resistance. Virtually all Burkholderia species are also resistant to polymyxin, prohibiting use of drugs like colistin that are available for treatment of infections caused by most other drug resistant Gram-negative bacteria. Despite clinical significance and antibiotic resistance of Burkholderia species, characterization of efflux pumps lags behind other non-enteric Gram-negative pathogens such as Acinetobacter baumannii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Although efflux pumps have been described in several Burkholderia species, they have been best studied in Burkholderia cenocepacia and B. pseudomallei. As in other non-enteric Gram-negatives, efflux pumps of the resistance nodulation cell division (RND) family are the clinically most significant efflux systems in these two species. Several efflux pumps were described in B. cenocepacia, which when expressed confer resistance to clinically significant antibiotics, including aminoglycosides, chloramphenicol, fluoroquinolones, and tetracyclines. Three RND pumps have been characterized in B. pseudomallei, two of which confer either intrinsic or acquired resistance to aminoglycosides, macrolides, chloramphenicol, fluoroquinolones, tetracyclines, trimethoprim, and in some instances trimethoprim+sulfamethoxazole. Several strains of the host-adapted B. mallei, a clone of B. pseudomallei, lack AmrAB-OprA, and are therefore aminoglycoside and macrolide susceptible. B. thailandensis is closely related to B. pseudomallei, but non-pathogenic to humans. Its pump repertoire and ensuing drug resistance profile parallels that of B. pseudomallei. An efflux pump in B. vietnamiensis plays a significant role in acquired aminoglycoside resistance. Summarily, efflux pumps are significant players in Burkholderia drug resistance. PMID:25926825

  18. Prediction of Cancer Drug Resistance and Implications for Personalized Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Volm, Manfred; Efferth, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Drug resistance still impedes successful cancer chemotherapy. A major goal of early concepts in individualized therapy was to develop in vitro tests to predict tumors’ drug responsiveness. We have developed an in vitro short-term test based on nucleic acid precursor incorporation to determine clinical drug resistance. This test detects inherent and acquired resistance in vitro and transplantable syngeneic and xenografted tumors in vivo. In several clinical trials, clinical resistance was predictable with more than 90% accuracy, while drug sensitivity was detected with less accuracy (~60%). Remarkably, clinical cross-resistance to numerous drugs (multidrug resistance, broad spectrum resistance) was detectable by a single compound, doxorubicin, due to its multifactorial modes of action. The results of this predictive test were in good agreement with predictive assays of other authors. As no predictive test has been established as yet for clinical diagnostics, the identification of sensitive drugs may not reach sufficiently high reliability for clinical routine. A meta-analysis of the literature published during the past four decades considering test results of more than 15,000 tumor patients unambiguously demonstrated that, in the majority of studies, resistance was correctly predicted with an accuracy between 80 and 100%, while drug sensitivity could only be predicted with an accuracy of 50–80%. This synopsis of the published literature impressively illustrates that prediction of drug resistance could be validated. The determination of drug resistance was reliable independent of tumor type, test assay, and drug used in these in vitro tests. By contrast, chemosensitivity could not be predicted with high reliability. Therefore, we propose a rethinking of the “chemosensitivity” concept. Instead, predictive in vitro tests may reliably identify drug-resistant tumors. The clinical consequence imply to subject resistant tumors not to chemotherapy, but to other new

  19. Lichenoid drug reaction to isoniazid presenting as exfoliative dermatitis in a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Thakur, B K; Verma, S; Mishra, J

    2015-06-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients are at increased risk of drug reactions because of immune dysregulation and multiple drug intake. Lichenoid drug reactions to isoniazid have been reported previously in the literature. However, for lichenoid drug reaction to isoniazid to be so extensive to present as exfoliative dermatitis is rare. We report here a rare case of lichenoid drug reaction to isoniazid presenting as exfoliative dermatitis in a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

  20. Medical Management of Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB) is still a major threat worldwide. However, recent scientific advances in diagnostic and therapeutic tools have improved the management of drug-resistant TB. The development of rapid molecular testing methods allows for the early detection of drug resistance and prompt initiation of an appropriate treatment. In addition, there has been growing supportive evidence for shorter treatment regimens in multidrug-resistant TB; and for the first time in over 50 years, new anti-TB drugs have been developed. The World Health Organization has recently revised their guidelines, primarily based on evidence from a meta-analysis of individual patient data (n=9,153) derived from 32 observational studies, and outlined the recommended combination and correct use of available anti-TB drugs. This review summarizes the updated guidelines with a focus on the medical management of drug-resistant TB. PMID:26175768

  1. Preventing drug resistance in severe influenza

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrovolny, Hana; Deecke, Lucas

    2015-03-01

    Severe, long-lasting influenza infections are often caused by new strains of influenza. The long duration of these infections leads to an increased opportunity for the emergence of drug resistant mutants. This is particularly problematic for new strains of influenza since there is often no vaccine, so drug treatment is the first line of defense. One strategy for trying to minimize drug resistance is to apply periodic treatment. During treatment the wild-type virus decreases, but resistant virus might increase; when there is no treatment, wild-type virus will hopefully out-compete the resistant virus, driving down the number of resistant virus. We combine a mathematical model of severe influenza with a model of drug resistance to study emergence of drug resistance during a long-lasting infection. We apply periodic treatment with two types of antivirals: neuraminidase inhibitors, which block release of virions; and adamantanes, which block replication of virions. We compare the efficacy of the two drugs in reducing emergence of drug resistant mutants and examine the effect of treatment frequency on the emergence of drug resistant mutants.

  2. Community-acquired Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Uruguay

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xiao Xue; Galiana, Antonio; Pedreira, Walter; Mowszowicz, Martin; Christophersen, Inés; Machiavello, Silvia; Lope, Liliana; Benaderet, Sara; Buela, Fernanda; Vicentino, Walter; Albini, María; Bertaux, Olivier; Constenla, Irene; Bagnulo, Homero; Llosa, Luis; Ito, Teruyo

    2005-01-01

    A novel, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus clone (Uruguay clone) with a non–multidrug-resistant phenotype caused a large outbreak, including 7 deaths, in Montevideo, Uruguay. The clone was distinct from the highly virulent community clone represented by strain MW2, although both clones carried Panton-Valentine leukocidin gene and cna gene. PMID:15963301

  3. Microbial persistence and the road to drug resistance

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Nadia R.; Lobritz, Michael A.; Collins, James J.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Microbial drug persistence is a widespread phenomenon in which a sub-population of microorganisms is able to survive antimicrobial treatment without acquiring resistance-conferring genetic changes. Microbial persisters can cause recurrent or intractable infections, and like resistant mutants, they carry an increasing clinical burden. In contrast to heritable drug resistance, however, the biology of persistence is only beginning to be unraveled. Persisters have traditionally been thought of as metabolically dormant, non-dividing cells. However, as discussed in this review, increasing evidence suggests that persistence is in fact an actively maintained state, triggered and enabled by a network of intracellular stress-responses that can accelerate processes of adaptive evolution. Beyond shedding light on the basis of persistence, these findings raise the possibility that persisters behave as an evolutionary reservoir from which resistant organisms can emerge. As persistence and its consequences come into clearer focus, clinically relevant eradication strategies are urgently needed. PMID:23768488

  4. Acquired Resistance to Clinical Cancer Therapy: A Twist in Physiological Signaling.

    PubMed

    Wicki, Andreas; Mandalà, Mario; Massi, Daniela; Taverna, Daniela; Tang, Huifang; Hemmings, Brian A; Xue, Gongda

    2016-07-01

    Although modern therapeutic strategies have brought significant progress to cancer care in the last 30 years, drug resistance to targeted monotherapies has emerged as a major challenge. Aberrant regulation of multiple physiological signaling pathways indispensable for developmental and metabolic homeostasis, such as hyperactivation of pro-survival signaling axes, loss of suppressive regulations, and impaired functionalities of the immune system, have been extensively investigated aiming to understand the diversity of molecular mechanisms that underlie cancer development and progression. In this review, we intend to discuss the molecular mechanisms of how conventional physiological signal transduction confers to acquired drug resistance in cancer patients. We will particularly focus on protooncogenic receptor kinase inhibition-elicited tumor cell adaptation through two major core downstream signaling cascades, the PI3K/Akt and MAPK pathways. These pathways are crucial for cell growth and differentiation and are frequently hyperactivated during tumorigenesis. In addition, we also emphasize the emerging roles of the deregulated host immune system that may actively promote cancer progression and attenuate immunosurveillance in cancer therapies. Understanding these mechanisms may help to develop more effective therapeutic strategies that are able to keep the tumor in check and even possibly turn cancer into a chronic disease.

  5. Acquired resistance of non-small cell lung cancer to epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Nurwidya, Fariz; Takahashi, Fumiyuki; Murakami, Akiko; Kobayashi, Isao; Kato, Motoyasu; Shukuya, Takehito; Tajima, Ken; Shimada, Naoko; Takahashi, Kazuhisa

    2014-03-01

    Activation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) triggers anti-apoptotic signaling, proliferation, angiogenesis, invasion, metastasis, and drug resistance, which leads to development and progression of human epithelial cancers, including non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Inhibition of EGFR by tyrosine kinase inhibitors such as gefitinib and erlotinib has provided a new hope for the cure of NSCLC patients. However, acquired resistance to gefitinib and erlotinib via EGFR-mutant NSCLC has occurred through various molecular mechanisms such as T790M secondary mutation, MET amplification, hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) overexpression, PTEN downregulation, epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), and other mechanisms. This review will discuss the biology of receptor tyrosine kinase inhibition and focus on the molecular mechanisms of acquired resistance to tyrosine kinase inhibitors of EGFR-mutant NSCLC.

  6. Old drugs, novel ways out: Drug resistance toward cytotoxic chemotherapeutics.

    PubMed

    Wijdeven, Ruud H; Pang, Baoxu; Assaraf, Yehuda G; Neefjes, Jacques

    2016-09-01

    Efficacy of chemotherapy in the treatment of distinct malignancies is often hampered by drug resistance arising in the tumor. Understanding the molecular basis of drug resistance and translating this knowledge into personalized treatment decisions can enhance therapeutic efficacy and even curative outcome. Over the years, multiple drug resistance mechanisms have been identified that enable tumors to cope with the damage instigated by a specific drug or group of anti-tumor agents. Here we provide an overview of the molecular pathways leading to resistance against conventional anti-cancer drugs, with emphasis on the utility of these pathways for rational selection of treatments for individual cancer patients. We further complement the review by discussing the pitfalls and difficulties in translating these findings into novel treatment strategies for cancer patients. PMID:27620955

  7. Clinical implications of resistance to antiretroviral drugs.

    PubMed

    Vella, S

    1997-06-01

    New virological concepts are emerging and results from trials using potent combinations have demonstrated that drug resistance in AIDS therapy can be delayed, if not completely overcome, by appropriate treatment strategies. The definition and measures of resistance are explained, including the general mechanisms of resistance. Resistance patterns with nucleoside analogues, non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors, and protease inhibitors are examined, followed by a discussion of the clinical implications. It is suggested that, based on HIV-1 replication in vivo, early and aggressive antiretroviral therapy is needed to minimize the negative consequences of its replication. Recommended clinical guidelines for avoiding drug resistance are listed. PMID:11364354

  8. Acquisition of a single EZH2 D1 domain mutation confers acquired resistance to EZH2-targeted inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Theresa; Nerle, Sujata; Pritchard, Justin; Zhao, Boyang; Rivera, Victor M.

    2015-01-01

    Although targeted therapies have revolutionized cancer treatment, overcoming acquired resistance remains a major clinical challenge. EZH2 inhibitors (EZH2i), EPZ-6438 and GSK126, are currently in the early stages of clinical evaluation and the first encouraging signs of efficacy have recently emerged in the clinic. To anticipate mechanisms of resistance to EZH2i, we used a forward genetic platform combining a mutagenesis screen with next generation sequencing technology and identified a hotspot of secondary mutations in the EZH2 D1 domain (Y111 and I109). Y111D mutation within the WT or A677G EZH2 allele conferred robust resistance to both EPZ-6438 and GSK126, but it only drove a partial resistance within the Y641F allele. EZH2 mutants required histone methyltransferase (HMT) catalytic activity and the polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) components, SUZ12 and EED, to drive drug resistance. Furthermore, D1 domain mutations not only blocked the ability of EZH2i to bind to WT and A677G mutant, but also abrogated drug binding to the Y641F mutant. These data provide the first cellular validation of the mechanistic model underpinning the oncogenic function of WT and mutant EZH2. Importantly, our findings suggest that acquired-resistance to EZH2i may arise in WT and mutant EZH2 patients through a single mutation that remains targetable by second generation EZH2i. PMID:26360609

  9. Systemic acquired resistance delays race shifts to major resistance genes in bell pepper.

    PubMed

    Romero, A M; Ritchie, D F

    2004-12-01

    ABSTRACT The lack of durability of host plant disease resistance is a major problem in disease control. Genotype-specific resistance that involves major resistance (R) genes is especially prone to failure. The compatible (i.e., disease) host-pathogen interaction with systemic acquired resistance (SAR) has been studied extensively, but the incompatible (i.e., resistant) interaction less so. Using the pepper-bacterial spot (causal agent, Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. vesicatoria) pathosystem, we examined the effect of SAR in reducing the occurrence of race-change mutants that defeat R genes in laboratory, greenhouse, and field experiments. Pepper plants carrying one or more R genes were sprayed with the plant defense activator acibenzolar-S-methyl (ASM) and challenged with incompatible strains of the pathogen. In the greenhouse, disease lesions first were observed 3 weeks after inoculation. ASM-treated plants carrying a major R gene had significantly fewer lesions caused by both the incompatible (i.e., hypersensitive) and compatible (i.e., disease) responses than occurred on nonsprayed plants. Bacteria isolated from the disease lesions were confirmed to be race-change mutants. In field experiments, there was a delay in the detection of race-change mutants and a reduction in disease severity. Decreased disease severity was associated with a reduction in the number of race-change mutants and the suppression of disease caused by the race-change mutants. This suggests a possible mechanism related to a decrease in the pathogen population size, which subsequently reduces the number of race-change mutants for the selection pressure of R genes. Thus, inducers of SAR are potentially useful for increasing the durability of genotype-specific resistance conferred by major R genes.

  10. An Autopsy Case of Two Distinct, Acquired Drug Resistance Mechanisms in Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor-mutant Lung Adenocarcinoma: Small Cell Carcinoma Transformation and Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor T790M Mutation.

    PubMed

    Furugen, Makoto; Uechi, Kayoko; Hirai, Jun; Aoyama, Hajime; Saio, Masanao; Yoshimi, Naoki; Kinjo, Takeshi; Miyagi, Kazuya; Haranaga, Shusaku; Higa, Futoshi; Tateyama, Masao; Fujita, Jiro

    2015-01-01

    We herein describe the case of a 63-year-old man who died from relapsed epidermal growth factor receptor gene (EGFR) exon 19 deletion lung adenocarcinoma treated with erlotinib. According to the autopsy results, he was confirmed to have small cell carcinoma without the EGFR T790M mutation in his pancreas and left kidney metastatic specimens, while the adenocarcinoma metastatic lesion in his right kidney had the EGFR T790M mutation; both retained the somatic EGFR exon 19 deletion. We herein report an autopsy case of resistance to an EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor via small cell carcinoma transformation and the EGFRT790M mutation in separate metastatic organs. PMID:26424310

  11. Mechanisms of Drug Resistance: Daptomycin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Truc T.; Munita, Jose M.; Arias, Cesar A.

    2016-01-01

    Daptomycin (DAP) is a cyclic lipopeptide with in vitro activity against a variety of Gram-positive pathogens, including multidrug-resistant organisms. Since its introduction in clinical practice in 2003, DAP has become an important key front-line antibiotic for severe or deep-seated infections caused by Gram-positive organisms. Unfortunately, DAP-resistance (R) has been extensively documented in clinically important organisms such as Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus spp, and Streptococcus spp. Studies on the mechanisms of DAP-R in Bacillus subtilis and other Gram-positive bacteria indicate that the genetic pathways of DAP resistance are diverse and complex. However, a common phenomenon emerging from these mechanistic studies is that DAP-R is associated with important adaptive changes in cell wall and cell membrane homeostasis with critical changes in cell physiology. Findings related to these adaptive changes have offered novel insights into the genetics and molecular mechanisms of bacterial cell envelope stress response and the manner in which Gram-positive bacteria cope with the antimicrobial peptide attack and protect vital structures of the cell envelope such as the cell membrane. In this review, we will examine the most recent findings related to the molecular mechanisms of resistance to DAP in relevant Gram-positive pathogens and discuss the clinical implications for therapy against these important bacteria. PMID:26495887

  12. Emerging pathogens: Dynamics, mutation and drug resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Perelson, A.S.; Goldstein, B.; Korber, B.T.

    1997-10-01

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The objectives of this project were to develop models of the spread of pathogens, such as HIV-1 and influenza, in humans, and then to use the models to address the possibility of designing appropriate drug therapies that may limit the ability of the pathogen to escape treatment by mutating into a drug resistant form. We have developed a model of drug-resistance to amantidine and rimantadine, the two major antiviral drugs used to treat influenza, and have used the model to suggest treatment strategies during an epidemic.

  13. Co-option of Liver Vessels and Not Sprouting Angiogenesis Drives Acquired Sorafenib Resistance in Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kuczynski, Elizabeth A.; Yin, Melissa; Bar-Zion, Avinoam; Lee, Christina R.; Butz, Henriett; Man, Shan; Daley, Frances; Vermeulen, Peter B.; Yousef, George M.; Foster, F. Stuart

    2016-01-01

    Background: The anti-angiogenic Sorafenib is the only approved systemic therapy for advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, acquired resistance limits its efficacy. An emerging theory to explain intrinsic resistance to other anti-angiogenic drugs is ‘vessel co-option,’ ie, the ability of tumors to hijack the existing vasculature in organs such as the lungs or liver, thus limiting the need for sprouting angiogenesis. Vessel co-option has not been evaluated as a potential mechanism for acquired resistance to anti-angiogenic agents. Methods: To study sorafenib resistance mechanisms, we used an orthotopic human HCC model (n = 4-11 per group), where tumor cells are tagged with a secreted protein biomarker to monitor disease burden and response to therapy. Histopathology, vessel perfusion assessed by contrast-enhanced ultrasound, and miRNA sequencing and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction were used to monitor changes in tumor biology. Results: While sorafenib initially inhibited angiogenesis and stabilized tumor growth, no angiogenic ‘rebound’ effect was observed during development of resistance unless therapy was stopped. Instead, resistant tumors became more locally infiltrative, which facilitated extensive incorporation of liver parenchyma and the co-option of liver-associated vessels. Up to 75% (±10.9%) of total vessels were provided by vessel co-option in resistant tumors relative to 23.3% (±10.3%) in untreated controls. miRNA sequencing implicated pro-invasive signaling and epithelial-to-mesenchymal-like transition during resistance development while functional imaging further supported a shift from angiogenesis to vessel co-option. Conclusions: This is the first documentation of vessel co-option as a mechanism of acquired resistance to anti-angiogenic therapy and could have important implications including the potential therapeutic benefits of targeting vessel co-option in conjunction with vascular endothelial growth factor

  14. Antimicrobial (Drug) Resistance: Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)

    MedlinePlus

    ... NIAID invests in basic research to understand the biology of microbes, their behavior, and how drug resistance ... Nucleotide Polymorphism Phylogenetics & Ontology Proteomics & Protein Analysis Systems Biology Data Portals Software Applications BCBB Mobyle Interface Designer ( ...

  15. Evolution of drug resistance in Salmonella panama isolates in Chile.

    PubMed Central

    Cordano, A M; Virgilio, R

    1996-01-01

    In a search for Salmonella isolates in the environment in Chile in 1975, drug-susceptible strains of Salmonella panama were recovered for the first time from river water and vegetables in the vicinity of Santiago. Two to 3 years later, antibiotic-resistant S. panama began to appear in a variety of sources (meat, animals, vegetables, etc.), giving rise to a human epidemic that involved the entire nation. Of 139 clinical isolates studied, 7 were drug susceptible, 11 were resistant only to nitrofurans, and 3 were streptomycin, spectinomycin, and nitrofuran resistant; none of these 21 isolates harbored plasmid DNA. Most isolates (n = 107) were resistant to nitrofurans (chromosomal) and to streptomycin, spectinomycin, sulfonamides, tetracycline, and mercuric and tellurite salts; this multidrug resistance was encoded on a 218-kb plasmid classified in a number of strains as being in the IncHI2 group. From 1982 to 1993, 11 isolates acquired an additional self-transferable plasmid coding for resistance to any one of ampicillin (61 kb), ampicillin and trimethoprim (65 kb), ampicillin, trimethoprim, streptomycin, and sulfonamides (71 kb), ampicillin, gentamicin, kanamycin, and tetracycline (120 kb), or a nontransferable plasmid of approximately 6 kb encoding resistance to ampicillin or kanamycin. With the exception of ampicillin or ampicillin and trimethoprim resistance, S. panama isolates from foodstuffs, mainly pork meat products, and animals had resistance patterns that were the same as those found in clinical specimens. Remarkably, strains from goats and goat cheese and from shellfish isolated in particular rural regions were either drug susceptible or resistant only to streptomycin-spectinomycin encoded on a mobile genetic element and to nitrofurans. The report describes the arrival of a susceptible S. panama strain, its spread all over the country, and the evolution of progressively complex resistance patterns. PMID:8834876

  16. [MOLECULAR MECHANISMS OF DRUG RESISTANCE NEISSERIA GONORRHOEAE HISTORY AND PROSPECTS].

    PubMed

    Bodoev, I N; Il'ina, E N

    2015-01-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae (gonococcus) is a strict human pathogen, which causes gonorrhea--an infectious disease, whose origin dates back to more than two thousand years. Due to the unique plasticity of the genetic material, these bacteria have acquired the capacity to adapt to the host immune system, cause repeated infections, as well as withstand antimicrobials. Since the introduction of antibiotics in 1930s, gonococcus has displayed its propensity to develop resistance to all clinically useful antibiotics. It is important to note that the known resistance determinants of N. gonorrhoeae were acquired through horizontal gene transfer, recombination and spontaneous mutagenesis, and may be located both in the chromosome and on the plasmid. After introduction of a new antimicrobial drug, gonococcus becomes resistant within two decades and replaces sensitive bacterial population. Currently Ceftriaxone is the last remaining antibiotic for first-line treatment of gonorrhea. However, the first gonococcus displaying high-level resistance to Ceftriaxone was isolated in Japan a few years ago. Therefore, in the near future, gonorrhea may become untreatable. In the present review, we discuss the chronology of the anti-gonorrhea drugs (antibiotics) replacement, the evolution of resistance mechanisms emergence and future perspectives of N. gonorrhoeae treatment.

  17. Telomerase activity and telomere length in human tumor cells with acquired resistance to anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Smith, V; Dai, F; Spitz, M; Peters, G J; Fiebig, H H; Hussain, A; Burger, A M

    2009-11-01

    Telomeres and telomerase are targets for anticancer drug development and specific inhibitors are currently under clinical investigation. However, it has been reported that standard cytotoxic agents can affect telomere length and telomerase activity suggesting that they also have of a role in drug resistance. in this study, telomere lengths and telomerase activity as well as drug efflux pump expression, glutathione (GSH) levels and polyadenosine-ribose polymerase (PARP) cleavage were assessed in a panel of human tumor cell lines made resistant to vindesine, gemcitabine and cisplatin. these included two lung cancer cell lines resistant to vindesine (LXFL 529L/Vind, LXFA 526L/Vind), a renal cancer cell line (RXF944L/Gem) and an ovarian cancer cell line (AG6000) resistant to gemcitabine, and one resistant to cisplatin (ADDP). The resistant clones were compared to their parental lines and evaluated for cross resistance to other cytotoxic agents. Several drug specific resistance patterns were found, and various complex patterns of cross resistance emerged from some cell lines, but these mechanisms of resistance could not be related to drug efflux pump expression, GSH levels or pARp cleavage. However, all displayed changes in telomerase activity and/or telomere length. Our studies present evidence that telomere maintenance should be taken into consideration in efforts not only to overcome drug resistance, but also to optimize the use of telomere-based therapeutics.

  18. Expression of cytokeratin confers multiple drug resistance.

    PubMed Central

    Bauman, P A; Dalton, W S; Anderson, J M; Cress, A E

    1994-01-01

    The cytokeratin network is an extensive filamentous structure in the cytoplasm whose biological function(s) is unknown. Based upon previous data showing the modification of cytokeratin by mitoxantrone, we investigated the ability of cytokeratin networks to influence the survival response of cells to chemotherapeutic agents. We have compared the survival of mouse L fibroblasts lacking cytokeratins with that of L cells transfected with cytokeratins 8 and 18 in the presence of chemotherapeutic drugs. The expression of cytokeratins 8 and 18 conferred a multiple drug resistance phenotype on cells exposed to mitoxantrone, doxorubicin, methotrexate, melphalan, Colcemid, and vincristine. The degree of drug resistance was 5-454 times that of parental cells, depending upon the agent used. Drug resistance could not be attributed to altered growth characteristics, altered drug accumulation, or an altered drug efflux in the transfected cells. Cytokeratin does not confer resistance to ionizing radiation, which damages DNA independently of intracellular transport mechanisms. These data suggest a role for cytokeratin networks in conferring a drug resistance phenotype. Images PMID:7515497

  19. Legal issues associated with antimicrobial drug resistance.

    PubMed Central

    Fidler, D. P.

    1998-01-01

    An effective public health strategy against the development of antimicrobial drug resistance needs to be informed by legal as well as scientific analysis. This article describes some legal issues arising from current efforts against antimicrobial resistance and underscores the interdependence between law and public health in these efforts. PMID:9621187

  20. Acquired resistance to daunorubicin in a patient with acute myelogenous leukaemia.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, B. J.; Kundu, D.

    1976-01-01

    Measurement of in vitro and in vivo resistance to daunorubicin in AML patients suggests that there is no simple correlation between the two. In a patient who became clinically resistant and whose cells showed a parallel increased resistance in vitro we found the acquisition of multiple drug resistance. The increased in vitro resistance to daunorubicin could to some extent be overcome by conjugating daunorubicin to DNA. PMID:1066148

  1. Community-Acquired Methicillin-Resistant "Staphylococcus aureus": Considerations for School Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alex, Aniltta; Letizia, MariJo

    2007-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant "Staphylococcus aureus" (MRSA) is a disease-causing organism that has been present in hospital settings since the 1960s. However, a genetically distinct strain of MRSA, called community-acquired methicillin-resistant "Staphylococcus aureus" (CA-MRSA), has emerged in recent years in community settings among healthy…

  2. Overexpression of Specific CD44 Isoforms Is Associated with Aggressive Cell Features in Acquired Endocrine Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Bellerby, Rebecca; Smith, Chris; Kyme, Sue; Gee, Julia; Günthert, Ursula; Green, Andy; Rakha, Emad; Barrett-Lee, Peter; Hiscox, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    While endocrine therapy is the mainstay of ER+ breast cancer, the clinical effectiveness of these agents is limited by the phenomenon of acquired resistance that is associated with disease relapse and poor prognosis. Our previous studies revealed that acquired resistance is accompanied by a gain in cellular invasion and migration and also that CD44 family proteins are overexpressed in the resistant phenotype. Given the association of CD44 with tumor progression, we hypothesized that its overexpression may act to promote the aggressive behavior of endocrine-resistant breast cancers. Here, we have investigated further the role of two specific CD44 isoforms, CD44v3 and CD44v6, in the endocrine-resistant phenotype. Our data revealed that overexpression of CD44v6, but not CD44v3, in endocrine-sensitive MCF-7 cells resulted in a gain in EGFR signaling, enhanced their endogenous invasive capacity, and attenuated their response to endocrine treatment. Suppression of CD44v6 in endocrine-resistant cell models was associated with a reduction in their invasive capacity. Our data suggest that upregulation of CD44v6 in acquired resistant breast cancer may contribute to a gain in the aggressive phenotype of these cells and loss of endocrine response through transactivation of the EGFR pathway. Future therapeutic targeting of CD44v6 may prove to be an effective strategy alongside EGFR-targeted agents in delaying/preventing acquired resistance in breast cancer. PMID:27379207

  3. Antimicrobial (Drug) Resistance: Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococci (VRE) Frequently Asked Questions

    MedlinePlus

    ... Understanding Antimicrobial (Drug) Resistance Examples of Antimicrobial Resistance Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococci (VRE) Overview Transmission Diagnosis ...

  4. Nitroheterocyclic drug resistance mechanisms in Trypanosoma brucei

    PubMed Central

    Wyllie, Susan; Foth, Bernardo J.; Kelner, Anna; Sokolova, Antoaneta Y.; Berriman, Matthew; Fairlamb, Alan H.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The objective of this study was to identify the mechanisms of resistance to nifurtimox and fexinidazole in African trypanosomes. Methods Bloodstream-form Trypanosoma brucei were selected for resistance to nifurtimox and fexinidazole by stepwise exposure to increasing drug concentrations. Clones were subjected to WGS to identify putative resistance genes. Transgenic parasites modulating expression of genes of interest were generated and drug susceptibility phenotypes determined. Results Nifurtimox-resistant (NfxR) and fexinidazole-resistant (FxR) parasites shared reciprocal cross-resistance suggestive of a common mechanism of action. Previously, a type I nitroreductase (NTR) has been implicated in nitro drug activation. WGS of resistant clones revealed that NfxR parasites had lost >100 kb from one copy of chromosome 7, rendering them hemizygous for NTR as well as over 30 other genes. FxR parasites retained both copies of NTR, but lost >70 kb downstream of one NTR allele, decreasing NTR transcription by half. A single knockout line of NTR displayed 1.6- and 1.9-fold resistance to nifurtimox and fexinidazole, respectively. Since NfxR and FxR parasites are ∼6- and 20-fold resistant to nifurtimox and fexinidazole, respectively, additional factors must be involved. Overexpression and knockout studies ruled out a role for a putative oxidoreductase (Tb927.7.7410) and a hypothetical gene (Tb927.1.1050), previously identified in a genome-scale RNAi screen. Conclusions NTR was confirmed as a key resistance determinant, either by loss of one gene copy or loss of gene expression. Further work is required to identify which of the many dozens of SNPs identified in the drug-resistant cell lines contribute to the overall resistance phenotype. PMID:26581221

  5. Acquired resistance mechanisms to tyrosine kinase inhibitors in lung cancer with activating epidermal growth factor receptor mutation--diversity, ductility, and destiny.

    PubMed

    Suda, Kenichi; Mizuuchi, Hiroshi; Maehara, Yoshihiko; Mitsudomi, Tetsuya

    2012-12-01

    Lung cancers that harbor somatic activating mutations in the gene for the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) depend on mutant EGFR for their proliferation and survival; therefore, lung cancer patients with EGFR mutations often dramatically respond to orally available EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). However, emergence of acquired resistance is virtually inevitable, thus limiting improvement in patient outcomes. To elucidate and overcome this acquired resistance, multidisciplinary basic and clinical investigational approaches have been applied, using in vitro cell line models or samples obtained from lung cancer patients treated with EGFR-TKIs. These efforts have revealed several acquired resistance mechanisms and candidates, including EGFR secondary mutations (T790M and other rare mutations), MET amplification, PTEN downregulation, CRKL amplification, high-level HGF expression, FAS-NFκB pathway activation, epithelial-mesenchymal transition, and conversion to small cell lung cancer. Interestingly, cancer cells harbor potential destiny and ductility together in acquiring resistance to EGFR-TKIs, as shown in in vitro acquired resistance models. Molecular mechanisms of "reversible EGFR-TKI tolerance" that occur in early phase EGFR-TKI exposure have been identified in cell line models. Furthermore, others have reported molecular markers that can predict response to EGFR-TKIs in clinical settings. Deeper understanding of acquired resistance mechanisms to EGFR-TKIs, followed by the development of molecular target drugs that can overcome the resistance, might turn this fatal disease into a chronic disorder.

  6. EPHA2 Blockade Overcomes Acquired Resistance to EGFR Kinase Inhibitors in Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Amato, Katherine R; Wang, Shan; Tan, Li; Hastings, Andrew K; Song, Wenqiang; Lovly, Christine M; Meador, Catherine B; Ye, Fei; Lu, Pengcheng; Balko, Justin M; Colvin, Daniel C; Cates, Justin M; Pao, William; Gray, Nathanael S; Chen, Jin

    2016-01-15

    Despite the success of treating EGFR-mutant lung cancer patients with EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI), all patients eventually acquire resistance to these therapies. Although various resistance mechanisms have been described, there are currently no FDA-approved therapies that target alternative mechanisms to treat lung tumors with acquired resistance to first-line EGFR TKI agents. Here we found that EPHA2 is overexpressed in EGFR TKI-resistant tumor cells. Loss of EPHA2 reduced the viability of erlotinib-resistant tumor cells harboring EGFR(T790M) mutations in vitro and inhibited tumor growth and progression in an inducible EGFR(L858R+T790M)-mutant lung cancer model in vivo. Targeting EPHA2 in erlotinib-resistant cells decreased S6K1-mediated phosphorylation of cell death agonist BAD, resulting in reduced tumor cell proliferation and increased apoptosis. Furthermore, pharmacologic inhibition of EPHA2 by the small-molecule inhibitor ALW-II-41-27 decreased both survival and proliferation of erlotinib-resistant tumor cells and inhibited tumor growth in vivo. ALW-II-41-27 was also effective in decreasing viability of cells with acquired resistance to the third-generation EGFR TKI AZD9291. Collectively, these data define a role for EPHA2 in the maintenance of cell survival of TKI-resistant, EGFR-mutant lung cancer and indicate that EPHA2 may serve as a useful therapeutic target in TKI-resistant tumors.

  7. EPHA2 Blockade Overcomes Acquired Resistance to EGFR Kinase Inhibitors in Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Amato, Katherine R; Wang, Shan; Tan, Li; Hastings, Andrew K; Song, Wenqiang; Lovly, Christine M; Meador, Catherine B; Ye, Fei; Lu, Pengcheng; Balko, Justin M; Colvin, Daniel C; Cates, Justin M; Pao, William; Gray, Nathanael S; Chen, Jin

    2016-01-15

    Despite the success of treating EGFR-mutant lung cancer patients with EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI), all patients eventually acquire resistance to these therapies. Although various resistance mechanisms have been described, there are currently no FDA-approved therapies that target alternative mechanisms to treat lung tumors with acquired resistance to first-line EGFR TKI agents. Here we found that EPHA2 is overexpressed in EGFR TKI-resistant tumor cells. Loss of EPHA2 reduced the viability of erlotinib-resistant tumor cells harboring EGFR(T790M) mutations in vitro and inhibited tumor growth and progression in an inducible EGFR(L858R+T790M)-mutant lung cancer model in vivo. Targeting EPHA2 in erlotinib-resistant cells decreased S6K1-mediated phosphorylation of cell death agonist BAD, resulting in reduced tumor cell proliferation and increased apoptosis. Furthermore, pharmacologic inhibition of EPHA2 by the small-molecule inhibitor ALW-II-41-27 decreased both survival and proliferation of erlotinib-resistant tumor cells and inhibited tumor growth in vivo. ALW-II-41-27 was also effective in decreasing viability of cells with acquired resistance to the third-generation EGFR TKI AZD9291. Collectively, these data define a role for EPHA2 in the maintenance of cell survival of TKI-resistant, EGFR-mutant lung cancer and indicate that EPHA2 may serve as a useful therapeutic target in TKI-resistant tumors. PMID:26744526

  8. Antifungal drug resistance among Candida species: mechanisms and clinical impact.

    PubMed

    Sanguinetti, Maurizio; Posteraro, Brunella; Lass-Flörl, Cornelia

    2015-06-01

    The epidemiology of Candida infections has changed in recent years. Although Candida albicans is still the main cause of invasive candidiasis in most clinical settings, a substantial proportion of patients is now infected with non-albicans Candida species. The various Candida species vary in their susceptibility to the most commonly used antifungal agents, and the intrinsic resistance to antifungal therapy seen in some species, along with the development of acquired resistance during treatment in others, is becoming a major problem in the management of Candida infection. A better understanding of the mechanisms and clinical impact of antifungal drug resistance is essential for the efficient treatment of patients with Candida infection and for improving treatment outcomes. Herein, we report resistance to the azoles and echinocandins among Candida species.

  9. CYP3A5 mediates basal and acquired therapy resistance in different subtypes of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Noll, Elisa M.; Eisen, Christian; Stenzinger, Albrecht; Espinet, Elisa; Muckenhuber, Alexander; Klein, Corinna; Vogel, Vanessa; Klaus, Bernd; Nadler, Wiebke; Rösli, Christoph; Lutz, Christian; Kulke, Michael; Engelhardt, Jan; Zickgraf, Franziska M.; Espinosa, Octavio; Schlesner, Matthias; Jiang, Xiaoqi; Kopp-Schneider, Annette; Neuhaus, Peter; Bahra, Marcus; Sinn, Bruno V.; Eils, Roland; Giese, Nathalia A.; Hackert, Thilo; Strobel, Oliver; Werner, Jens; Büchler, Markus W.; Weichert, Wilko; Trumpp, Andreas; Sprick, Martin R.

    2016-01-01

    Although subtypes of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) were described, this malignancy is clinically still treated as a single disease. Here, we present patient-derived models representing the full spectrum of previously identified quasi-mesenchymal (QM-PDA), classical and exocrine-like PDAC subtypes, and identify two markers—HNF1A and KRT81—that enable stratification of tumors into different subtypes by immunohistochemistry. Individuals bearing tumors of these subtypes show significant differences in overall survival and their tumors differ in drug sensitivity, with the exocrine-like subtype being resistant to tyrosine kinase inhibitors and paclitaxel. Cytochrome P450 3A5 (CYP3A5) metabolizes these compounds in tumors of the exocrine-like subtype, and pharmacological or shRNA-mediated CYP3A5 inhibition sensitizes tumor cells to these drugs. Whereas hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 alpha (HNF4A) controls basal expression of CYP3A5, drug-induced CYP3A5 upregulation is mediated by the nuclear receptor NR1I2. CYP3A5 also contributes to acquired drug resistance in QM-PDA and classical PDAC, and is highly expressed in several additional malignancies. These findings designate CYP3A5 as predictor of therapy response and as a tumor cell-autonomous detoxification mechanism that must be overcome to prevent drug resistance. PMID:26855150

  10. CYP3A5 mediates basal and acquired therapy resistance in different subtypes of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Noll, Elisa M; Eisen, Christian; Stenzinger, Albrecht; Espinet, Elisa; Muckenhuber, Alexander; Klein, Corinna; Vogel, Vanessa; Klaus, Bernd; Nadler, Wiebke; Rösli, Christoph; Lutz, Christian; Kulke, Michael; Engelhardt, Jan; Zickgraf, Franziska M; Espinosa, Octavio; Schlesner, Matthias; Jiang, Xiaoqi; Kopp-Schneider, Annette; Neuhaus, Peter; Bahra, Marcus; Sinn, Bruno V; Eils, Roland; Giese, Nathalia A; Hackert, Thilo; Strobel, Oliver; Werner, Jens; Büchler, Markus W; Weichert, Wilko; Trumpp, Andreas; Sprick, Martin R

    2016-03-01

    Although subtypes of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) have been described, this malignancy is clinically still treated as a single disease. Here we present patient-derived models representing the full spectrum of previously identified quasi-mesenchymal (QM-PDA), classical and exocrine-like PDAC subtypes, and identify two markers--HNF1A and KRT81--that enable stratification of tumors into different subtypes by using immunohistochemistry. Individuals with tumors of these subtypes showed substantial differences in overall survival, and their tumors differed in drug sensitivity, with the exocrine-like subtype being resistant to tyrosine kinase inhibitors and paclitaxel. Cytochrome P450 3A5 (CYP3A5) metabolizes these compounds in tumors of the exocrine-like subtype, and pharmacological or short hairpin RNA (shRNA)-mediated CYP3A5 inhibition sensitizes tumor cells to these drugs. Whereas hepatocyte nuclear factor 4, alpha (HNF4A) controls basal expression of CYP3A5, drug-induced CYP3A5 upregulation is mediated by the nuclear receptor NR1I2. CYP3A5 also contributes to acquired drug resistance in QM-PDA and classical PDAC, and it is highly expressed in several additional malignancies. These findings designate CYP3A5 as a predictor of therapy response and as a tumor cell-autonomous detoxification mechanism that must be overcome to prevent drug resistance. PMID:26855150

  11. Targeting mitochondrial biogenesis to overcome drug resistance to MAPK inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Gao; Frederick, Dennie T.; Wu, Lawrence; Wei, Zhi; Krepler, Clemens; Srinivasan, Satish; Chae, Young Chan; Xu, Xiaowei; Choi, Harry; Dimwamwa, Elaida; Shannan, Batool; Basu, Devraj; Zhang, Dongmei; Guha, Manti; Xiao, Min; Randell, Sergio; Sproesser, Katrin; Xu, Wei; Liu, Jephrey; Karakousis, Giorgos C.; Schuchter, Lynn M.; Gangadhar, Tara C.; Amaravadi, Ravi K.; Gu, Mengnan; Xu, Caiyue; Ghosh, Abheek; Xu, Weiting; Tian, Tian; Zhang, Jie; Zha, Shijie; Brafford, Patricia; Weeraratna, Ashani; Davies, Michael A.; Wargo, Jennifer A.; Avadhani, Narayan G.; Lu, Yiling; Mills, Gordon B.; Altieri, Dario C.; Flaherty, Keith T.

    2016-01-01

    Targeting multiple components of the MAPK pathway can prolong the survival of patients with BRAFV600E melanoma. This approach is not curative, as some BRAF-mutated melanoma cells are intrinsically resistant to MAPK inhibitors (MAPKi). At the systemic level, our knowledge of how signaling pathways underlie drug resistance needs to be further expanded. Here, we have shown that intrinsically resistant BRAF-mutated melanoma cells with a low basal level of mitochondrial biogenesis depend on this process to survive MAPKi. Intrinsically resistant cells exploited an integrated stress response, exhibited an increase in mitochondrial DNA content, and required oxidative phosphorylation to meet their bioenergetic needs. We determined that intrinsically resistant cells rely on the genes encoding TFAM, which controls mitochondrial genome replication and transcription, and TRAP1, which regulates mitochondrial protein folding. Therefore, we targeted mitochondrial biogenesis with a mitochondrium-targeted, small-molecule HSP90 inhibitor (Gamitrinib), which eradicated intrinsically resistant cells and augmented the efficacy of MAPKi by inducing mitochondrial dysfunction and inhibiting tumor bioenergetics. A subset of tumor biopsies from patients with disease progression despite MAPKi treatment showed increased mitochondrial biogenesis and tumor bioenergetics. A subset of acquired drug-resistant melanoma cell lines was sensitive to Gamitrinib. Our study establishes mitochondrial biogenesis, coupled with aberrant tumor bioenergetics, as a potential therapy escape mechanism and paves the way for a rationale-based combinatorial strategy to improve the efficacy of MAPKi. PMID:27043285

  12. [Drug resistant epilepsy. Clinical and neurobiological concepts].

    PubMed

    Espinosa-Jovel, Camilo A; Sobrino-Mejía, Fidel E

    2015-08-16

    Drug-resistant epilepsy, is a condition defined by the International League Against Epilepsy as persistent seizures despite having used at least two appropriate and adequate antiepileptic drug treatments. Approximately 20-30% of patients with epilepsy are going to be resistant to antiepileptic drugs, with different patterns of clinical presentation, which are related to the biological basis of this disease (de novo resistance, relapsing-remitting and progressive). Drug resistant epilepsy, impacts negatively the quality of life and significantly increases the risk of premature death. From the neurobiological point of view, this medical condition is the result of the interaction of multiple variables related to the underlying disease, drug interactions and proper genetic aspects of each patient. Thanks to advances in pharmacogenetics and molecular biology research, currently some hypotheses may explain the cause of this condition and promote the study of new therapeutic options. Currently, overexpression of membrane transporters such as P-glycoprotein, appears to be one of the most important mechanisms in the development of drug resistant epilepsy. The objective of this review is to deepen the general aspects of this clinical condition, addressing the definition, epidemiology, differential diagnosis and the pathophysiological bases.

  13. [Drug resistant epilepsy. Clinical and neurobiological concepts].

    PubMed

    Espinosa-Jovel, Camilo A; Sobrino-Mejía, Fidel E

    2015-08-16

    Drug-resistant epilepsy, is a condition defined by the International League Against Epilepsy as persistent seizures despite having used at least two appropriate and adequate antiepileptic drug treatments. Approximately 20-30% of patients with epilepsy are going to be resistant to antiepileptic drugs, with different patterns of clinical presentation, which are related to the biological basis of this disease (de novo resistance, relapsing-remitting and progressive). Drug resistant epilepsy, impacts negatively the quality of life and significantly increases the risk of premature death. From the neurobiological point of view, this medical condition is the result of the interaction of multiple variables related to the underlying disease, drug interactions and proper genetic aspects of each patient. Thanks to advances in pharmacogenetics and molecular biology research, currently some hypotheses may explain the cause of this condition and promote the study of new therapeutic options. Currently, overexpression of membrane transporters such as P-glycoprotein, appears to be one of the most important mechanisms in the development of drug resistant epilepsy. The objective of this review is to deepen the general aspects of this clinical condition, addressing the definition, epidemiology, differential diagnosis and the pathophysiological bases. PMID:26204087

  14. Axl mediates acquired resistance of head and neck cancer cells to the epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor erlotinib.

    PubMed

    Giles, Keith M; Kalinowski, Felicity C; Candy, Patrick A; Epis, Michael R; Zhang, Priscilla M; Redfern, Andrew D; Stuart, Lisa M; Goodall, Gregory J; Leedman, Peter J

    2013-11-01

    Elevated expression and activity of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is associated with development and progression of head and neck cancer (HNC) and a poor prognosis. Clinical trials with EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (e.g., erlotinib) have been disappointing in HNC. To investigate the mechanisms mediating resistance to these agents, we developed an HNC cell line (HN5-ER) with acquired erlotinib resistance. In contrast to parental HN5 HNC cells, HN5-ER cells exhibited an epithelial-mesenchymal (EMT) phenotype with increased migratory potential, reduced E-cadherin and epithelial-associated microRNAs (miRNA), and elevated vimentin expression. Phosphorylated receptor tyrosine kinase profiling identified Axl activation in HN5-ER cells. Growth and migration of HN5-ER cells were blocked with a specific Axl inhibitor, R428, and R428 resensitized HN5-ER cells to erlotinib. Microarray analysis of HN5-ER cells confirmed the EMT phenotype associated with acquired erlotinib resistance, and identified activation of gene expression associated with cell migration and inflammation pathways. Moreover, increased expression and secretion of interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8 in HN5-ER cells suggested a role for inflammatory cytokine signaling in EMT and erlotinib resistance. Expression of the tumor suppressor miR-34a was reduced in HN5-ER cells and increasing its expression abrogated Axl expression and reversed erlotinib resistance. Finally, analysis of 302 HNC patients revealed that high tumor Axl mRNA expression was associated with poorer survival (HR = 1.66, P = 0.007). In summary, our results identify Axl as a key mediator of acquired erlotinib resistance in HNC and suggest that therapeutic inhibition of Axl by small molecule drugs or specific miRNAs might overcome anti-EGFR therapy resistance. PMID:24026012

  15. Contribution of rural-to-urban migration in the prevalence of drug resistant tuberculosis in China.

    PubMed

    Wang, W; Wang, J; Zhao, Q; Darling, N D; Yu, M; Zhou, B; Xu, B

    2011-04-01

    Increased drug resistance rates to the first-line anti-tuberculosis drugs and multidrug resistance (MDR) were observed in China. The objectives of this study were to determine the prevalence and risk factors for drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB) in urban China and, more specifically, to determine the contribution of migration to case burden and drug resistance rates of urban cities. A facility-based epidemiological study of all active TB patients reported in the four districts of Shanghai and Ningbo between April 1, 2008 and March 31, 2009 was conducted. Residents had significantly higher drug-resistance rates than migrants (any drug resistance: 29.8% vs. 23.5%, respectively, P = 0.038; MDR: 10.9% vs. 6.1%, P = 0.048). Previously treated migrant patients were more likely to harbor drug-resistant TB and MDR-TB than new migrant cases, with adjusted odds ratios of 3.85 and 6.52, respectively. In total, 46.2% of the previously treated cases were resistant to INH, 38.5% to SM, 33.3% to RMP and 30.8% to EMB, while 13.1%, 17.5%, 7.0% and 6.8% of new cases were resistant to the four agents, respectively. To prevent the transmission of drug-resistant TB among migrants and residents, improved case management and appropriate treatment regimens should be sustained to prevent acquired drug resistance.

  16. Antimicrobial Drugs in Fighting against Antimicrobial Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Guyue; Dai, Menghong; Ahmed, Saeed; Hao, Haihong; Wang, Xu; Yuan, Zonghui

    2016-01-01

    The outbreak of antimicrobial resistance, together with the lack of newly developed antimicrobial drugs, represents an alarming signal for both human and animal healthcare worldwide. Selection of rational dosage regimens for traditional antimicrobial drugs based on pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic principles as well as development of novel antimicrobials targeting new bacterial targets or resistance mechanisms are key approaches in tackling AMR. In addition to the cellular level resistance (i.e., mutation and horizontal gene transfer of resistance determinants), the community level resistance (i.e., bilofilms and persisters) is also an issue causing antimicrobial therapy difficulties. Therefore, anti-resistance and antibiofilm strategies have currently become research hotspot to combat antimicrobial resistance. Although metallic nanoparticles can both kill bacteria and inhibit biofilm formation, the toxicity is still a big challenge for their clinical applications. In conclusion, rational use of the existing antimicrobials and combinational use of new strategies fighting against antimicrobial resistance are powerful warranties to preserve potent antimicrobial drugs for both humans and animals. PMID:27092125

  17. Antimicrobial Drugs in Fighting against Antimicrobial Resistance.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Guyue; Dai, Menghong; Ahmed, Saeed; Hao, Haihong; Wang, Xu; Yuan, Zonghui

    2016-01-01

    The outbreak of antimicrobial resistance, together with the lack of newly developed antimicrobial drugs, represents an alarming signal for both human and animal healthcare worldwide. Selection of rational dosage regimens for traditional antimicrobial drugs based on pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic principles as well as development of novel antimicrobials targeting new bacterial targets or resistance mechanisms are key approaches in tackling AMR. In addition to the cellular level resistance (i.e., mutation and horizontal gene transfer of resistance determinants), the community level resistance (i.e., bilofilms and persisters) is also an issue causing antimicrobial therapy difficulties. Therefore, anti-resistance and antibiofilm strategies have currently become research hotspot to combat antimicrobial resistance. Although metallic nanoparticles can both kill bacteria and inhibit biofilm formation, the toxicity is still a big challenge for their clinical applications. In conclusion, rational use of the existing antimicrobials and combinational use of new strategies fighting against antimicrobial resistance are powerful warranties to preserve potent antimicrobial drugs for both humans and animals. PMID:27092125

  18. Coinfection and the evolution of drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Hansen, J; Day, T

    2014-12-01

    Recent experimental work in the rodent malaria model has shown that when two or more strains share a host, there is competitive release of drug-resistant strains upon treatment. In other words, the propagule output of a particular strain is repressed when competing with other strains and increases upon the removal of this competition. This within-host effect is predicted to have an important impact on the evolution and growth of resistant strains. However, how this effect translates to epidemiological parameters at the between-host level, the level at which disease and resistance spread, has yet to be determined. Here we present a general, between-host epidemiological model that explicitly takes into account the effect of coinfection and competitive release. Although our model does show that when there is coinfection competitive release may contribute to the emergence of resistance, it also highlights an additional between-host effect. It is the combination of these two effects, the between-host effect and the within-host effect, that determines the overall influence of coinfection on the emergence of resistance. Therefore, even when competitive release of drug-resistant strains occurs, within an infected individual, it is not necessarily true that coinfection will result in the increased emergence of resistance. These results have important implications for the control of the emergence and spread of drug resistance. PMID:25417787

  19. Drug targeting of leptin resistance.

    PubMed

    Santoro, Anna; Mattace Raso, Giuseppina; Meli, Rosaria

    2015-11-01

    Leptin regulates glucose, lipid and energy homeostasis as well as feeding behavior, serving as a bridge between peripheral metabolically active tissues and the central nervous system (CNS). Indeed, this adipocyte-derived hormone, whose circulating levels mirror fat mass, not only exerts its anti-obesity effects mainly modulating the activity of specific hypothalamic neurons expressing the long form of the leptin receptor (Ob-Rb), but it also shows pleiotropic functions due to the activation of Ob-Rb in peripheral tissues. Nevertheless, several mechanisms have been suggested to mediate leptin resistance, including obesity-associated hyperleptinemia, impairment of leptin access to CNS and the reduction in Ob-Rb signal transduction effectiveness, among others. During the onset and progression of obesity, the dampening of leptin sensitivity often occurs, preventing the efficacy of leptin replacement therapy from overcoming obesity and/or its comorbidities. This review focuses on obesity-associated leptin resistance and the mechanisms underpinning this condition, to highlight the relevance of leptin sensitivity restoration as a useful therapeutic strategy to treat common obesity and its complications. Interestingly, although promising strategies to counteract leptin resistance have been proposed, these pharmacological approaches have shown limited efficacy or even relevant adverse effects in preclinical and clinical studies. Therefore, the numerous findings from this review clearly indicate a lack of a single and efficacious treatment for leptin resistance, highlighting the necessity to find new therapeutic tools to improve leptin sensitivity, especially in patients with most severe disease profiles.

  20. Antibacterial drug discovery in the resistance era.

    PubMed

    Brown, Eric D; Wright, Gerard D

    2016-01-21

    The looming antibiotic-resistance crisis has penetrated the consciousness of clinicians, researchers, policymakers, politicians and the public at large. The evolution and widespread distribution of antibiotic-resistance elements in bacterial pathogens has made diseases that were once easily treatable deadly again. Unfortunately, accompanying the rise in global resistance is a failure in antibacterial drug discovery. Lessons from the history of antibiotic discovery and fresh understanding of antibiotic action and the cell biology of microorganisms have the potential to deliver twenty-first century medicines that are able to control infection in the resistance era. PMID:26791724

  1. Antibacterial drug discovery in the resistance era.

    PubMed

    Brown, Eric D; Wright, Gerard D

    2016-01-21

    The looming antibiotic-resistance crisis has penetrated the consciousness of clinicians, researchers, policymakers, politicians and the public at large. The evolution and widespread distribution of antibiotic-resistance elements in bacterial pathogens has made diseases that were once easily treatable deadly again. Unfortunately, accompanying the rise in global resistance is a failure in antibacterial drug discovery. Lessons from the history of antibiotic discovery and fresh understanding of antibiotic action and the cell biology of microorganisms have the potential to deliver twenty-first century medicines that are able to control infection in the resistance era.

  2. Persistence and Fitness of Multidrug-Resistant Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Acquired in Primary Infection

    PubMed Central

    Brenner, Bluma G.; Routy, Jean-Pierre; Petrella, Marco; Moisi, Daniela; Oliveira, Maureen; Detorio, Mervi; Spira, Bonnie; Essabag, Vidal; Conway, Brian; Lalonde, Richard; Sekaly, Rafick-Pierre; Wainberg, Mark A.

    2002-01-01

    This study examines the persistence and fitness of multidrug-resistant (MDR) viruses acquired during primary human immunodeficiency virus infection (PHI). In four individuals, MDR infections persisted over the entire study period, ranging from 36 weeks to 5 years, in the absence of antiretroviral therapy. In stark contrast, identified source partners in two cases showed expected outgrowth of wild-type (WT) virus within 12 weeks of treatment interruption. In the first PHI case, triple-class MDR resulted in low plasma viremia (1.6 to 3 log copies/ml) over time compared with mean values obtained for an untreated PHI group harboring WT infections (4.1 to 4.3 log copies/ml). Increasing viremia in PHI patient 1 at week 52 was associated with the de novo emergence of a protease inhibitor-resistant variant through a recombination event involving the original MDR virus. MDR infections in two other untreated PHI patients yielded viremia levels typical of the untreated WT group. A fourth patient's MDR infection yielded low viremia (<50 to 500 copies/ml) for 5 years despite his having phenotypic resistance to all antiretroviral drugs in his treatment regimen. In two of these PHI cases, a rebound to higher levels of plasma viremia only occurred when the M184V mutation in reverse transcriptase could no longer be detected and, in a third case, nondetection of M184V was associated with an inability to isolate virus. To further evaluate the fitness of MDR variants acquired in PHI, MDR and corresponding WT viruses were isolated from index and source partners, respectively. Although MDR viral infectivity (50% tissue culture infective dose) was comparable to that observed for WT viruses, MDR infections in each case demonstrated 2-fold and 13- to 23-fold reductions in p24 antigen and reverse transcriptase enzymatic activity, respectively. In dual-infection competition assays, MDR viruses consistently demonstrated a marked replicative disadvantage compared with WT virus. These results

  3. Drug resistance genomics of the antimalarial drug artemisinin.

    PubMed

    Winzeler, Elizabeth A; Manary, Micah J

    2014-01-01

    Across the globe, over 200 million annual malaria infections result in up to 660,000 deaths, 77% of which occur in children under the age of five years. Although prevention is important, malaria deaths are typically prevented by using antimalarial drugs that eliminate symptoms and clear parasites from the blood. Artemisinins are one of the few remaining compound classes that can be used to cure multidrug-resistant Plasmodium falciparum infections. Unfortunately, clinical trials from Southeast Asia are showing that artemisinin-based treatments are beginning to lose their effectiveness, adding renewed urgency to the search for the genetic determinants of parasite resistance to this important drug class. We review the genetic and genomic approaches that have led to an improved understanding of artemisinin resistance, including the identification of resistance-conferring mutations in the P. falciparum kelch13 gene. PMID:25470531

  4. The kinetics and quality of acquired resistance in self-healing and metastatic leishmaniasis.

    PubMed Central

    Poulter, L W

    1979-01-01

    Quantitative methods for enumerating viable L. enriettii in tissues have been used to determine the course of cutaneous leishmaniasis in guinea-pigs. The development and kinetics of acquired resistance have been evaluated in self-healing and chronic metastatic forms of the disease. It is revealed that 3 weeks after a primary local infection, a standard challenge infection is totally eliminated within 7 days. This resistance is as strong in animals with a current infection as it is in those that have fully recovered from such an infection. Animals developing metastatic disease also develop resistance to the standard challenge. This is initially as strong as in animals with only localized disease, but wanes with the progression of the infection. Although the quality of resistance becomes poorer in animals with metastatic infection, it is not lost completely. The relationship between acquired resistance and the resolution of the primary infection is discussed. PMID:380855

  5. Antimalarial drug resistance and combination chemotherapy.

    PubMed Central

    White, N

    1999-01-01

    Antimarial drug resistance develops when spontaneously occurring parasite mutants with reduced susceptibility are selected, and are then transmitted. Drugs for which a single point mutation confers a marked reduction in susceptibility are particularly vulnerable. Low clearance and a shallow concentration-effect relationship increase the chance of selection. Use of combinations of antimalarials that do not share the same resistance mechanisms will reduce the chance of selection because the chance of a resistant mutant surviving is the product of the per parasite mutation rates for the individual drugs, multiplied by the number of parasites in an infection that are exposed to the drugs. Artemisinin derivatives are particularly effective combination partners because (i) they are very active antimalarials, producing up to 10,000-fold reductions in parasite biomass per asexual cycle; (ii) they reduce malaria transmissibility; and (iii) no resistance to these drugs has been reported yet. There are good arguments for no longer using antimalarial drugs alone in treatment, and instead always using a combination with artemisinin or one of its derivatives. PMID:10365399

  6. How could preventive therapy affect the prevalence of drug resistance? Causes and consequences

    PubMed Central

    Kunkel, Amber; Colijn, Caroline; Lipsitch, Marc; Cohen, Ted

    2015-01-01

    Various forms of preventive and prophylactic antimicrobial therapies have been proposed to combat HIV (e.g. pre-exposure prophylaxis), tuberculosis (e.g. isoniazid preventive therapy) and malaria (e.g. intermittent preventive treatment). However, the potential population-level effects of preventative therapy (PT) on the prevalence of drug resistance are not well understood. PT can directly affect the rate at which resistance is acquired among those receiving PT. It can also indirectly affect resistance by altering the rate at which resistance is acquired through treatment for active disease and by modifying the level of competition between transmission of drug-resistant and drug-sensitive pathogens. We propose a general mathematical model to explore the ways in which PT can affect the long-term prevalence of drug resistance. Depending on the relative contributions of these three mechanisms, we find that increasing the level of coverage of PT may result in increases, decreases or non-monotonic changes in the overall prevalence of drug resistance. These results demonstrate the complexity of the relationship between PT and drug resistance in the population. Care should be taken when predicting population-level changes in drug resistance from small pilot studies of PT or estimates based solely on its direct effects. PMID:25918446

  7. How could preventive therapy affect the prevalence of drug resistance? Causes and consequences.

    PubMed

    Kunkel, Amber; Colijn, Caroline; Lipsitch, Marc; Cohen, Ted

    2015-06-01

    Various forms of preventive and prophylactic antimicrobial therapies have been proposed to combat HIV (e.g. pre-exposure prophylaxis), tuberculosis (e.g. isoniazid preventive therapy) and malaria (e.g. intermittent preventive treatment). However, the potential population-level effects of preventative therapy (PT) on the prevalence of drug resistance are not well understood. PT can directly affect the rate at which resistance is acquired among those receiving PT. It can also indirectly affect resistance by altering the rate at which resistance is acquired through treatment for active disease and by modifying the level of competition between transmission of drug-resistant and drug-sensitive pathogens. We propose a general mathematical model to explore the ways in which PT can affect the long-term prevalence of drug resistance. Depending on the relative contributions of these three mechanisms, we find that increasing the level of coverage of PT may result in increases, decreases or non-monotonic changes in the overall prevalence of drug resistance. These results demonstrate the complexity of the relationship between PT and drug resistance in the population. Care should be taken when predicting population-level changes in drug resistance from small pilot studies of PT or estimates based solely on its direct effects.

  8. Non-genomic and Immune Evolution of Melanoma Acquiring MAPKi Resistance.

    PubMed

    Hugo, Willy; Shi, Hubing; Sun, Lu; Piva, Marco; Song, Chunying; Kong, Xiangju; Moriceau, Gatien; Hong, Aayoung; Dahlman, Kimberly B; Johnson, Douglas B; Sosman, Jeffrey A; Ribas, Antoni; Lo, Roger S

    2015-09-10

    Clinically acquired resistance to MAPK inhibitor (MAPKi) therapies for melanoma cannot be fully explained by genomic mechanisms and may be accompanied by co-evolution of intra-tumoral immunity. We sought to discover non-genomic mechanisms of acquired resistance and dynamic immune compositions by a comparative, transcriptomic-methylomic analysis of patient-matched melanoma tumors biopsied before therapy and during disease progression. Transcriptomic alterations across resistant tumors were highly recurrent, in contrast to mutations, and were frequently correlated with differential methylation of tumor cell-intrinsic CpG sites. We identified in the tumor cell compartment supra-physiologic c-MET up-expression, infra-physiologic LEF1 down-expression and YAP1 signature enrichment as drivers of acquired resistance. Importantly, high intra-tumoral cytolytic T cell inflammation prior to MAPKi therapy preceded CD8 T cell deficiency/exhaustion and loss of antigen presentation in half of disease-progressive melanomas, suggesting cross-resistance to salvage anti-PD-1/PD-L1 immunotherapy. Thus, melanoma acquires MAPKi resistance with highly dynamic and recurrent non-genomic alterations and co-evolving intra-tumoral immunity.

  9. Non-genomic and Immune Evolution of Melanoma Acquiring MAPKi Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Hugo, Willy; Shi, Hubing; Sun, Lu; Piva, Marco; Song, ChunYing; Kong, Xiangju; Moriceau, Gatien; Hong, Aayoung; Dahlman, Kimberly B.; Johnson, Douglas B.; Sosman, Jeffrey A.; Ribas, Antoni; Lo, Roger S.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Clinically acquired resistance to MAPK inhibitor (MAPKi) therapies for melanoma cannot be fully explained by genomic mechanisms and may be accompanied by co-evolution of intra-tumoral immunity. We sought to discover non-genomic mechanisms of acquired resistance and dynamic immune compositions by a comparative, transcriptomic-methylomic analysis of patient-matched melanoma tumors biopsied before therapy and during disease progression. Transcriptomic alterations across resistant tumors were highly recurrent, in contrast to mutations, and were frequently correlated with differential methylation of tumor cell-intrinsic CpG sites. We identified in the tumor cell compartment supra-physiologic c-MET up-expression, infra-physiologic LEF1 down-expression, and YAP1 signature enrichment as drivers of acquired resistance. Importantly, high intra-tumoral cytolytic T-cell inflammation prior to MAPKi therapy preceded CD8 T-cell deficiency/exhaustion and loss of antigen-presentation in half of disease-progressive melanomas, suggesting cross-resistance to salvage anti-PD-1/PD-L1 immunotherapy. Thus, melanoma acquires MAPKi-resistance with highly dynamic and recurrent non-genomic alterations and co-evolving intra-tumoral immunity. PMID:26359985

  10. [Investigation of extensive drug resistance in multidrug resistance tuberculosis isolates].

    PubMed

    Bektöre, Bayhan; Haznedaroğlu, Tunçer; Baylan, Orhan; Ozyurt, Mustafa; Ozkütük, Nuri; Satana, Dilek; Cavuşoğlu, Cengiz; Seber, Engin

    2013-01-01

    Increasing number of drug resistant tuberculosis (TB) cases, observed in recent years, is an important public health problem. Extensively drug resistant TB (XDR-TB) is the development of resistance against any fluoroquinolones and at least one of the injectable second line anti-TB drugs in addition to resistance against isoniazide and rifampicin which are the first line anti-TB drugs [definition of multidrug resistant TB (MDR-TB)]. Anti-TB therapy failed with first-line anti-TB drugs due to MDR-TB cases is being planned according to second-line anti-TB drug susceptibility test results if available and if not, standart treatment protocols are used. Although it is recommended that individual anti-TB therapy should be designed according to the isolate's susceptibility test results, standart therapeutic protocols are always needed since second-line anti-TB drug susceptibility testing generally could not be performed in developing countries like Turkey. For this reason, nationwide and regional surveillance studies to determine the resistance patterns are always needed to make decisions about the standard therapy algorithms. In this study, it was aimed to investigate the presence of extensive drug resistance among 81 MDR-TB isolates obtained from various health care facilities from Istanbul, Izmir and Manisa and to determine the XDR-TB incidence in Marmara and Aegean regions. Furthermore, we aimed to provide epidemiological data to clinicians to support their choice of second-line anti-TB drugs for MDR-TB infections. Susceptibility testing of isolates for the first and the second-line anti-TB drugs were performed by using modified Middlebrook 7H9 broth in fluorometric BACTEC MGIT 960 system (Becton Dickinson, USA). Eighty-one MDR-TB isolates included in this study were isolated from 43 (53.1%) patients residing in Istanbul, 26 (32.1%) in Izmir and 12 (14.8%) in Manisa provinces. We could not find any isolate consistent with XDR-TB definition in this study. Second

  11. Mechanisms of drug resistance that target the androgen axis in castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC).

    PubMed

    Penning, Trevor M

    2015-09-01

    Castrate resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) is the fatal-form of prostate cancer and remains androgen dependent. The reactivation of the androgen axis occurs due to adaptive intratumoral androgen biosynthesis which can be driven by adrenal androgens and/or by changes in the androgen receptor (AR) including AR gene amplification. These mechanisms are targeted with P450c17 inhibitors e.g., abiraterone acetate and AR super-antagonists e.g., enzalutamide, respectively. Clinical experience indicates that with either agent an initial response is followed by drug resistance and the patient clinically progresses on these agents. This article reviews the mechanisms of intrinsic and acquired drug resistance that target the androgen axis and how this might be surmounted.

  12. Drug-resistant tuberculosis: emerging treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Adhvaryu, Meghna; Vakharia, Bhasker

    2011-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis has emerged worldwide, with an increasing incidence due to failure of implementation of apparently effective first-line antituberculous therapy as well as primary infection with drug-resistant strains. Failure of current therapy is attributed to a long duration of treatment leading to nonadherence and irregular therapy, lack of patient education about the disease, poverty, irregular supply by care providers, drug–drug interactions in patients coinfected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), inadequate regulations causing market overlap and irresponsible drug usage in the private sector, and lack of research, with no addition of new drugs in the last four decades. Present standards of care for the treatment of drugsusceptible tuberculosis, multidrug-resistant tuberculosis, tuberculosis-HIV coinfection, and latent tuberculosis infection are all unsatisfactory. Since 2000, the World Health Organization (WHO) has focused on drug development for tuberculosis, as well as research in all relevant aspects to discover new regimens by 2015 and to eliminate tuberculosis as a public health concern by 2050. As a result, some 20 promising compounds from 14 groups of drugs have been discovered. Twelve candidates from eight classes are currently being evaluated in clinical trials. Ongoing research should prioritize identification of novel targets and newer application of existing drugs, discovery of multitargeted drugs from natural compounds, strengthening host factors by immunopotentiation with herbal immunomodulators, as well as protective vaccines before and after exposure, consideration of surgical measures when indicated, development of tools for rapid diagnosis, early identification of resistant strains, and markers for adequacy of treatment and an integrative approach to fulfill WHO goals. However, regulatory control over the drug market, as well as public-private partnership to use health program facilities to track patients and ensure

  13. Risk reduction for the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome among intravenous drug users.

    PubMed

    Des Jarlais, D C; Friedman, S R; Hopkins, W

    1985-11-01

    Intravenous drug users are the second largest risk group for the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and a bridge to two other groups: children and heterosexual partners. In the absence of effective treatment or vaccines, control of the epidemic among drug users will rely on efforts to reduce needle sharing. However, the traditional image of intravenous drug users leads one to expect little or no risk reduction. We review characteristics of AIDS as a disease that impede efforts at risk reduction among drug users and report on current risk reduction among intravenous drug users in New York City. There has been a sustained increase in the demand for new, unused needles, as shown in the emergence of "resealed" needles and in interviews with persons selling needles in illicit drug-purchasing areas.

  14. First-Line Anti-Tubercular Drug Resistance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in IRAN: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Pourakbari, Babak; Mamishi, Setareh; Mohammadzadeh, Mona; Mahmoudi, Shima

    2016-01-01

    Background: The spread of drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB) is one of the major public health problems through the world. Surveillance of anti-TB drug resistance is essential for monitoring of TB control strategies. The occurrence of drug resistance, particularly multi-drug resistance Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MDR), defined as resistance to at least rifampicin (RIF) and isoniazid (INH), has become a significant public health dilemma. The status of drug-resistance TB in Iran, one of the eastern Mediterranean countries locating between Azerbaijan and Armenia and high-TB burden countries (such as Afghanistan and Pakistan) has been reported inconsistently. Therefore, the aim of this study was to summarize reports of first-line anti-tubercular drug resistance in M. tuberculosis in Iran. Material and Methods: We systematically reviewed published studies on drug-resistant M. tuberculosis in Iran. The search terms were “Mycobacterium tuberculosis susceptibility” or “Mycobacterium tuberculosis resistant” and Iran. Results: Fifty-two eligible articles, published during 1998–2014, were included in this review. Most of the studies were conducted in Tehran. The most common used laboratory method for detecting M. tuberculosis drug resistant was Agar proportion. The highest resistance to first-line drugs was seen in Tehran, the capital city of Iran. The average prevalence of isoniazid (INH), rifampin (RIF), streptomycin (SM), and ethambotol (EMB) resistance via Agar proportion method in Tehran was 26, 23, 22.5, and 16%, respectively. In general, resistance to INH was more common than RIF, SM, and EMB in Tehran Conclusions: In conclusion, this systematic review summarized the prevalence and distribution of first-line anti-tubercular drug resistance of M. tuberculosis in Iran. Our results suggested that effective strategies to minimize the acquired drug resistance, to control the transmission of resistance and improve the diagnosis measures for TB control in Iran. PMID

  15. Acquired antibiotic resistance among wild animals: the case of Iberian Lynx (Lynx pardinus).

    PubMed

    Sousa, Margarida; Gonçalves, Alexandre; Silva, Nuno; Serra, Rodrigo; Alcaide, Eva; Zorrilla, Irene; Torres, Carmen; Caniça, Manuela; Igrejas, Gilberto; Poeta, Patrícia

    2014-01-01

    The selective pressure generated by the clinical misuse of antibiotics has been the major driving force leading to the emergence of antibiotic resistance among bacteria. Antibiotics or even resistant bacteria are released into the environment and contaminate the surrounding areas. Human and animal populations in contact with these sources are able to become reservoirs of these resistant organisms. Then, due to the convergence between habitats, the contact of wild animals with other animals, humans, or human sources is now more common and this leads to an increase in the exchange of resistance determinants between their microbiota. Indeed, it seems that wildlife populations living in closer proximity to humans have higher levels of antibiotic resistance. Now, the Iberian Lynx (Lynx pardinus) is a part of this issue, being suggested as natural reservoir of acquired resistant bacteria. The emerging public health concern regarding microbial resistance to antibiotics is becoming true: the bacteria are evolving and are now affecting unintentional hosts.

  16. HIV-1 Drug Resistance Mutations: Potential Applications for Point-of-Care Genotypic Resistance Testing

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Soo-Yon; Jordan, Michael R.; Raizes, Elliot; Chua, Arlene; Parkin, Neil; Kantor, Rami; Van Zyl, Gert U.; Mukui, Irene; Hosseinipour, Mina C.; Frenkel, Lisa M.; Ndembi, Nicaise; Hamers, Raph L.; Rinke de Wit, Tobias F.; Wallis, Carole L.; Gupta, Ravindra K.; Fokam, Joseph; Zeh, Clement; Schapiro, Jonathan M.; Carmona, Sergio; Katzenstein, David; Tang, Michele; Aghokeng, Avelin F.; De Oliveira, Tulio; Wensing, Annemarie M. J.; Gallant, Joel E.; Wainberg, Mark A.; Richman, Douglas D.; Fitzgibbon, Joseph E.; Schito, Marco; Bertagnolio, Silvia; Yang, Chunfu; Shafer, Robert W.

    2015-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of acquired and transmitted HIV-1 drug resistance is an obstacle to successful antiretroviral therapy (ART) in the low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) hardest hit by the HIV-1 pandemic. Genotypic drug resistance testing could facilitate the choice of initial ART in areas with rising transmitted drug resistance (TDR) and enable care-providers to determine which individuals with virological failure (VF) on a first- or second-line ART regimen require a change in treatment. An inexpensive near point-of-care (POC) genotypic resistance test would be useful in settings where the resources, capacity, and infrastructure to perform standard genotypic drug resistance testing are limited. Such a test would be particularly useful in conjunction with the POC HIV-1 viral load tests that are currently being introduced in LMICs. A POC genotypic resistance test is likely to involve the use of allele-specific point mutation assays for detecting drug-resistance mutations (DRMs). This study proposes that two major nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI)-associated DRMs (M184V and K65R) and four major NNRTI-associated DRMs (K103N, Y181C, G190A, and V106M) would be the most useful for POC genotypic resistance testing in LMIC settings. One or more of these six DRMs was present in 61.2% of analyzed virus sequences from ART-naïve individuals with intermediate or high-level TDR and 98.8% of analyzed virus sequences from individuals on a first-line NRTI/NNRTI-containing regimen with intermediate or high-level acquired drug resistance. The detection of one or more of these DRMs in an ART-naïve individual or in a individual with VF on a first-line NRTI/NNRTI-containing regimen may be considered an indication for a protease inhibitor (PI)-containing regimen or closer virological monitoring based on cost-effectiveness or country policy. PMID:26717411

  17. HIV-1 Drug Resistance Mutations: Potential Applications for Point-of-Care Genotypic Resistance Testing.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Soo-Yon; Jordan, Michael R; Raizes, Elliot; Chua, Arlene; Parkin, Neil; Kantor, Rami; Van Zyl, Gert U; Mukui, Irene; Hosseinipour, Mina C; Frenkel, Lisa M; Ndembi, Nicaise; Hamers, Raph L; Rinke de Wit, Tobias F; Wallis, Carole L; Gupta, Ravindra K; Fokam, Joseph; Zeh, Clement; Schapiro, Jonathan M; Carmona, Sergio; Katzenstein, David; Tang, Michele; Aghokeng, Avelin F; De Oliveira, Tulio; Wensing, Annemarie M J; Gallant, Joel E; Wainberg, Mark A; Richman, Douglas D; Fitzgibbon, Joseph E; Schito, Marco; Bertagnolio, Silvia; Yang, Chunfu; Shafer, Robert W

    2015-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of acquired and transmitted HIV-1 drug resistance is an obstacle to successful antiretroviral therapy (ART) in the low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) hardest hit by the HIV-1 pandemic. Genotypic drug resistance testing could facilitate the choice of initial ART in areas with rising transmitted drug resistance (TDR) and enable care-providers to determine which individuals with virological failure (VF) on a first- or second-line ART regimen require a change in treatment. An inexpensive near point-of-care (POC) genotypic resistance test would be useful in settings where the resources, capacity, and infrastructure to perform standard genotypic drug resistance testing are limited. Such a test would be particularly useful in conjunction with the POC HIV-1 viral load tests that are currently being introduced in LMICs. A POC genotypic resistance test is likely to involve the use of allele-specific point mutation assays for detecting drug-resistance mutations (DRMs). This study proposes that two major nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI)-associated DRMs (M184V and K65R) and four major NNRTI-associated DRMs (K103N, Y181C, G190A, and V106M) would be the most useful for POC genotypic resistance testing in LMIC settings. One or more of these six DRMs was present in 61.2% of analyzed virus sequences from ART-naïve individuals with intermediate or high-level TDR and 98.8% of analyzed virus sequences from individuals on a first-line NRTI/NNRTI-containing regimen with intermediate or high-level acquired drug resistance. The detection of one or more of these DRMs in an ART-naïve individual or in a individual with VF on a first-line NRTI/NNRTI-containing regimen may be considered an indication for a protease inhibitor (PI)-containing regimen or closer virological monitoring based on cost-effectiveness or country policy. PMID:26717411

  18. Mechanisms of Candida biofilm drug resistance

    PubMed Central

    Taff, Heather T; Mitchell, Kaitlin F; Edward, Jessica A; Andes, David R

    2013-01-01

    Candida commonly adheres to implanted medical devices, growing as a resilient biofilm capable of withstanding extraordinarily high antifungal concentrations. As currently available antifungals have minimal activity against biofilms, new drugs to treat these recalcitrant infections are urgently needed. Recent investigations have begun to shed light on the mechanisms behind the profound resistance associated with the biofilm mode of growth. This resistance appears to be multifactorial, involving both mechanisms similar to conventional, planktonic antifungal resistance, such as increased efflux pump activity, as well as mechanisms specific to the biofilm lifestyle. A unique biofilm property is the production of an extracellular matrix. Two components of this material, β-glucan and extracellular DNA, promote biofilm resistance to multiple antifungals. Biofilm formation also engages several stress response pathways that impair the activity of azole drugs. Resistance within a biofilm is often heterogeneous, with the development of a subpopulation of resistant persister cells. In this article we review the molecular mechanisms underlying Candida biofilm antifungal resistance and their relative contributions during various growth phases. PMID:24059922

  19. First report of infection with community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in South America.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Apoena; Dias, Cícero; Silva-Carvalho, Maria Cícera; Berquó, Laura; Ferreira, Fabienne Antunes; Santos, Raquel Neves Soares; Ferreira-Carvalho, Bernadete Teixeira; Figueiredo, Agnes Marie

    2005-04-01

    Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) has recently emerged in the southwestern Pacific, North America, and Europe. These S. aureus isolates frequently shared some genetic characteristics, including the SCCmec type IV and lukS-lukF genes. In this paper we show that typical CA-MRSA isolates have spread to South America (Brazil).

  20. Acquired antimicrobial resistance in the intestinal microbiota of diverse cat populations.

    PubMed

    Moyaert, H; De Graef, E M; Haesebrouck, F; Decostere, A

    2006-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of acquired antimicrobial resistance in the resident intestinal microbiota of cats and to identify significant differences between various cat populations. Escherichia coli, Enterococcus faecalis, E. faecium and Streptococcus canis were isolated as faecal indicator bacteria from rectal swabs of 47 individually owned cats, 47 cattery cats and 18 hospitalised cats, and submitted through antimicrobial sensitivity tests. The results revealed that bacteria isolated from hospitalised and/or cattery cats were more frequently resistant than those from individually owned cats. E. coli isolates from hospitalised cats were particularly resistant to ampicillin, tetracycline and sulfonamide. Both enterococci and streptococci showed high resistance to tetracycline and in somewhat lesser extent to erythromycin and tylosin. Most E. faecium isolates were resistant to lincomycin and penicillin. One E. faecalis as well as one E. faecium isolate from hospitalised cats showed 'high-level resistance' (MIC > 500 microg/ml) against gentamicin, a commonly used antimicrobial agent in case of human enterococcal infections. The results of this research demonstrate that the extent of acquired antimicrobial resistance in the intestinal microbiota of cats depends on the social environment of the investigated population. It is obvious that the flora of healthy cats may act as a reservoir of resistance genes. PMID:16330058

  1. Acquired resistance to combination treatment through loss of synergy with MEK and PI3K inhibitors in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Bhaskar; Low, Sarah Hong Hui; Chong, Mei Ling; Chia, Dilys; Koh, King Xin; Sapari, Nur Sabrina; Kaye, Stanley; Hung, Huynh; Benoukraf, Touati; Soong, Richie

    2016-01-01

    Historically, understanding of acquired resistance (AQR) to combination treatment has been based on knowledge of resistance to its component agents. To test whether an altered drug interaction could be an additional factor in AQR to combination treatment, models of AQR to combination and single agent MEK and PI3K inhibitor treatment were generated. Combination indices indicated combination treatment of PI3K and MEK inhibitors remained synergistic in cells with AQR to single agent but not combination AQR cells. Differences were also observed between the models in cellular phenotypes, pathway signaling and drug cross-resistance. Genomics implicated TGFB2-EDN1 overexpression as candidate determinants in models of AQR to combination treatment. Supplementation of endothelin in parental cells converted synergism to antagonism. Silencing of TGFB2 or EDN1 in cells with AQR conferred synergy between PI3K and MEK inhibitor. These results highlight that AQR to combination treatment may develop through alternative mechanisms to those of single agent treatment, including a change in drug interaction. PMID:27081080

  2. [Estimation of Probiotic Lactobacilli Drug Resistance].

    PubMed

    Bruslik, N L; Akhatova, D R; Toimentseva, A A; Abdulkhakov, S R; Ilyinskaya, O N; Yarullina, D R

    2015-01-01

    An actual problem of analysis of probiotic lactobacilli resistance to antibiotics and other drugs used in the treatment of gastro-intestinal disturbances has been for the first time solved. The levels of resistance of 19 strains of Lactobacillus (14 strains of L. fermentum, 4 strains of L.plantarum and 1 strain of L.rhamnosus) isolated from commercial probiotics and sour milk products to 14 antibiotics of various nature, i.e. β-lactams, aminoglycosides, macrolides, clindamycin, vancomycin, rifampicin, ciprofloxacin, tetracycline and chloramphenicol were determined. All the isolates were practically susceptible to the drugs of the first line antihelicobacterial therapy, i.e. amoxicillin and clarithromycin, that makes inexpedient the parallel use of the probiotics containing the above lactobacilli in the treatment of gastritis and gastric ulcer, despite the lactobacilli antagonism with respect to Helicobacter pylory. Lactobacilli are as well resistant to mesalazin and can be used for correction of dysbiosis in inflammatory affections of the intestine.

  3. Serotonergic hyperactivity as a potential factor in developmental, acquired and drug-induced synesthesia.

    PubMed

    Brogaard, Berit

    2013-01-01

    Though synesthesia research has seen a huge growth in recent decades, and tremendous progress has been made in terms of understanding the mechanism and cause of synesthesia, we are still left mostly in the dark when it comes to the mechanistic commonalities (if any) among developmental, acquired and drug-induced synesthesia. We know that many forms of synesthesia involve aberrant structural or functional brain connectivity. Proposed mechanisms include direct projection and disinhibited feedback mechanisms, in which information from two otherwise structurally or functionally separate brain regions mix. We also know that synesthesia sometimes runs in families. However, it is unclear what causes its onset. Studies of psychedelic drugs, such as psilocybin, LSD and mescaline, reveal that exposure to these drugs can induce synesthesia. One neurotransmitter suspected to be central to the perceptual changes is serotonin. Excessive serotonin in the brain may cause many of the characteristics of psychedelic intoxication. Excessive serotonin levels may also play a role in synesthesia acquired after brain injury. In brain injury sudden cell death floods local brain regions with serotonin and glutamate. This neurotransmitter flooding could perhaps result in unusual feature binding. Finally, developmental synesthesia that occurs in individuals with autism may be a result of alterations in the serotonergic system, leading to a blockage of regular gating mechanisms. I conclude on these grounds that one commonality among at least some cases of acquired, developmental and drug-induced synesthesia may be the presence of excessive levels of serotonin, which increases the excitability and connectedness of sensory brain regions.

  4. Rate and Amplification of Drug Resistance among Previously-Treated Patients with Tuberculosis in Kampala, Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Temple, Beth; Ayakaka, Irene; Ogwang, Sam; Nabanjja, Helen; Kayes, Susan; Nakubulwa, Susan; Worodria, William; Levin, Jonathan; Joloba, Moses; Okwera, Alphonse; Eisenach, Kathleen D.; McNerney, Ruth; Elliott, Alison M.; Smith, Peter G.; Mugerwa, Roy D.; Ellner, Jerrold J.; Jones-López, Edward C.

    2010-01-01

    Background Drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis has emerged as a global threat. In resource-constrained settings, patients with a history of tuberculosis (TB) treatment may have drug-resistant disease and may experience poor outcomes. There is a need to measure the extent of and risk factors for drug resistance in such patients. Methods From July 2003 through November 2006, we enrolled 410 previously treated patients with TB in Kampala, Uganda. We measured the prevalence of resistance to first- and second-line drugs and analyzed risk factors associated with baseline and acquired drug resistance. Results The prevalence of multidrug-resistant TB was 12.7% (95% confidence interval [95% CI], 9.6%–16.3%). Resistance to second-line drugs was low. Factors associated with multidrug-resistant TB at enrollment included a history of treatment failure (odds ratio, 23.6; 95% CI, 7.7–72.4), multiple previous TB episodes (odds ratio, 15.6; 95% CI, 5.0–49.1), and cavities present on chest radiograph (odds ratio, 5.9; 95% CI, 1.2–29.5). Among a cohort of 250 patients, 5.2% (95% CI, 2.8%–8.7%) were infected with M. tuberculosis that developed additional drug resistance. Amplification of drug resistance was associated with existing drug resistance at baseline (P<.01) and delayed sputum culture conversion (P<.01). Conclusions The burden of drug resistance in previously treated patients with TB in Uganda is sizeable, and the risk of generating additional drug resistance is significant. There is an urgent need to improve the treatment for such patients in low-income countries. PMID:18808360

  5. Update on tamper-resistant drug formulations.

    PubMed

    Romach, M K; Schoedel, K A; Sellers, E M

    2013-06-01

    An expert panel convened in 2005 by the College on Problems of Drug Dependence (CPDD) to consider strategies to reduce the risk of prescription medication abuse concluded that drug formulation plays a significant role in determining risk of abuse. Efforts on the part of the pharmaceutical industry to develop drugs that deter abuse have focused primarily on opioid formulations resistant to common forms of tampering, most notably crushing or dissolving the tablet to accelerate release. Several opioid formulations developed to be tamper resistant have been approved, but the US Food and Drug Administration has not approved explicit label claims of abuse deterrence and has stated that any such claim will require substantial postmarketing data. Drug development efforts in this area raise questions about the relative impact of abuse-deterrent formulations, not only on individuals who might abuse a medication, but also on patients who are compliant with therapy. This review discusses progress since the 2005 CPDD meeting with an emphasis on opioids. Articles cited in the review were identified via a PubMed search covering the period between January 1, 2000, and October 5, 2011. Scientific work presented by the authors and their colleagues at meetings held through May 2012 also was included. Published literature suggests that development of abuse-deterrent products will require broad public health support and continued encouragement from regulatory authorities so that such products will become the expected standard of care for certain drug classes.

  6. Assessing transmissibility of HIV-1 drug resistance mutations from treated and from drug-naive individuals

    PubMed Central

    Winand, Raf; Theys, Kristof; Eusébio, Mónica; Aerts, Jan; Camacho, Ricardo J.; Gomes, Perpetua; Suchard, Marc A.; Vandamme, Anne-Mieke; Abecasis, Ana B.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Surveillance drug resistance mutations (SDRMs) in drug-naive patients are typically used to survey HIV-1-transmitted drug resistance (TDR). We test here how SDRMs in patients failing treatment, the original source of TDR, contribute to assessing TDR, transmissibility and transmission source of SDRMs. Design: This is a retrospective observational study analyzing a Portuguese cohort of HIV-1-infected patients. Methods: The prevalence of SDRMs to protease inhibitors, nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) and nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) in drug-naive and treatment-failing patients was measured for 3554 HIV-1 subtype B patients. Transmission ratio (prevalence in drug-naive/prevalence in treatment-failing patients), average viral load and robust linear regression with outlier detection (prevalence in drug-naive versus in treatment-failing patients) were analyzed and used to interpret transmissibility. Results: Prevalence of SDRMs in drug-naive and treatment-failing patients were linearly correlated, but some SDRMs were classified as outliers – above (PRO: D30N, N88D/S, L90 M, RT: G190A/S/E) or below (RT: M184I/V) expectations. The normalized regression slope was 0.073 for protease inhibitors, 0.084 for NRTIs and 0.116 for NNRTIs. Differences between SDRMs transmission ratios were not associated with differences in viral loads. Conclusion: The significant linear correlation between prevalence of SDRMs in drug-naive and in treatment-failing patients indicates that the prevalence in treatment-failing patients can be useful to predict levels of TDR. The slope is a cohort-dependent estimate of rate of TDR per drug class and outlier detection reveals comparative persistence of SDRMs. Outlier SDRMs with higher transmissibility are more persistent and more likely to have been acquired from drug-naive patients. Those with lower transmissibility have faster reversion dynamics after transmission and are associated with

  7. Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Central Australia.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Claire L; Ralph, Anna; McLeod, James E T; McDonald, Malcolm I

    2006-01-01

    To date, there has been scant information about the burden of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections in Central Australia. Our aims were to determine the proportion of Staphylococcus aureus infections due to methicillin-resistant strains in Central Australia, to characterise resistance to non-beta lactam antibiotics and to correlate findings with available demographic information. We retrospectively reviewed S. aureus isolates identified by the Microbiology Laboratory of the Pathology Department, Alice Springs Hospital between September 2005 and February 2006. Multi-resistance was defined as resistance to three or more non-beta lactam antibiotics. We identified the recovery site and extended antibiotic resistance profile of each isolate. Demographic data included place of residence, discharge diagnosis and ethnicity. There were 524 S. aureus isolates: 417 (79.6%) methicillin-sensitive S. aureus, 104 (19.7%) non-multi-resistant MRSA (nmrMRSA) and 3 (0.7%) multi-resistant MRSA (mrMRSA). MRSA accounted for 7/22 (32%) invasive infections and 91/474 (19.2%) cases of staphylococcal skin infections. Aboriginal people comprised 89 per cent (93/104) of patients with nmrMRSA; 57 per cent lived in remote communities, 21 per cent in suburban Alice Springs, and 18 per cent in Alice Springs Town Camps. Six per cent (6/104) of nmrMRSA were hospital-acquired. Of the nmrMRSA isolates, 57 per cent (59/104) were resistant to erythromycin and 7 per cent (7/104) to fusidic acid. All MRSA isolates were susceptible to co-trimoxazole. In conclusion, Central Australia has high rates of community-acquired nmrMRSA and low rates of multi-resistant MRSA. Erythromycin resistance in S. aureus is also common. These findings should prompt the review of antimicrobial prescribing guidelines for the region, especially for treatment of skin and soft tissue infections.

  8. CIPROFLOXACIN RESISTANCE PATTERN AMONG BACTERIA ISOLATED FROM PATIENTS WITH COMMUNITY-ACQUIRED URINARY TRACT INFECTION

    PubMed Central

    REIS, Ana Carolina Costa; SANTOS, Susana Regia da Silva; de SOUZA, Siane Campos; SALDANHA, Milena Góes; PITANGA, Thassila Nogueira; OLIVEIRA, Ricardo Riccio

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Objective: To identify the main bacterial species associated with community-acquired urinary tract infection (UTI) and to assess the pattern of ciprofloxacin susceptibility among bacteria isolated from urine cultures. Methods: We conducted a retrospective study in all the patients with community-acquired UTI seen in Santa Helena Laboratory, Camaçari, Bahia, Brazil during five years (2010-2014). All individuals who had a positive urine culture result were included in this study. Results: A total of 1,641 individuals met the inclusion criteria. Despite the fact that participants were female, we observed a higher rate of resistance to ciprofloxacin in males. The most frequent pathogens identified in urine samples were Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Staphylococcus saprophyticus. Antimicrobial resistance has been observed mainly for ampicillin, sulfamethoxazole + trimethoprim and ciprofloxacin. Moreover, E. coli has shown the highest rate of ciprofloxacin resistance, reaching 36% of ciprofloxacin resistant strains in 2014. Conclusion: The rate of bacterial resistance to ciprofloxacin observed in the studied population is much higher than expected, prompting the need for rational use of this antibiotic, especially in infections caused by E. coli. Prevention of bacterial resistance can be performed through control measures to limit the spread of resistant microorganisms and a rational use of antimicrobial policy. PMID:27410913

  9. Protein arginine methyltransferase 1 may be involved in pregnane x receptor-activated overexpression of multidrug resistance 1 gene during acquired multidrug resistant

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tingting; Kong, Ah-Ng Tony; Ma, Zhiqiang; Liu, Haiyan; Liu, Pinghua; Xiao, Yu; Jiang, Xuehua; Wang, Ling

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Pregnane x receptor (PXR) - activated overexpression of the multidrug resistance 1 (MDR1) gene is an important way for tumor cells to acquire drug resistance. However, the detailed mechanism still remains unclear. In the present study, we aimed to investigate whether protein arginine methyl transferase 1(PRMT1) is involved in PXR - activated overexpression of MDR1 during acquired multidrug resistant. Experimental Design Arginine methyltransferase inhibitor 1 (AMI-1) was used to pharmacologically block PRMT1 in resistant breast cancer cells (MCF7/adr). The mRNA and protein levels of MDR1 were detected by real-time PCR and western blotting analysis. Immunofluorescence microscopy and co-immunoprecipitation were used to investigate the physical interaction between PXR and PRMT1. Then, 136 candidate compounds were screened for PRMT1 inhibitors. Lastly, luciferase reporter gene and nude mice bearing resistant breast cancer xenografts were adopted to investigate the anti-tumor effect of PRMT1 inhibitors when combined with adriamycin. Results AMI-1 significantly suppressed the expression of MDR1 in MCF7/adr cells and increased cells sensitivity of MCF7/adr to adriamycin. Physical interaction between PRMT1 and PXR exists in MCF7/adr cells, which could be disrupted by AMI-1. Those results suggest that PRMT1 may be involved in PXR-activated overexpression of MDR1 in resistant breast cancer cells, and AMI-1 may suppress MDR1 by disrupting the interaction between PRMT1 and PXR. Then, five compounds including rutin, isoquercitrin, salvianolic acid A, naproxen, and felodipline were identified to be PRMT1 inhibitors. Finally, those PRMT1 inhibitors were observed to significantly decrease MDR1 promoter activity in vitro and enhance the antitumor effect of adriamycin in nude mice that bearing resistant breast cancer xenografts. Conclusions PRMT1 may be an important co-activator of PXR in activating MDR1 gene during acquired resistance, and PRMT1 inhibitor combined with

  10. Benzothiadiazole, a novel class of inducers of systemic acquired resistance, activates gene expression and disease resistance in wheat.

    PubMed Central

    Görlach, J; Volrath, S; Knauf-Beiter, G; Hengy, G; Beckhove, U; Kogel, K H; Oostendorp, M; Staub, T; Ward, E; Kessmann, H; Ryals, J

    1996-01-01

    Systemic acquired resistance is an important component of the disease resistance repertoire of plants. In this study, a novel synthetic chemical, benzo(1,2,3)thiadiazole-7-carbothioic acid S-methyl ester (BTH), was shown to induce acquired resistance in wheat. BTH protected wheat systemically against powdery mildew infection by affecting multiple steps in the life cycle of the pathogen. The onset of resistance was accompanied by the induction of a number of newly described wheat chemically induced (WCI) genes, including genes encoding a lipoxygenase and a sulfur-rich protein. With respect to both timing and effectiveness, a tight correlation existed between the onset of resistance and the induction of the WCI genes. Compared with other plant activators, such as 2,6-dichloroisonicotinic acid and salicylic acid, BTH was the most potent inducer of both resistance and gene induction. BTH is being developed commercially as a novel type of plant protection compound that works by inducing the plant's inherent disease resistance mechanisms. PMID:8624439

  11. Acquired Resistance to EGFR Kinase Inhibitors Associated with a Novel T854A Mutation in a Patient with EGFR-Mutant Lung Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Bean, James; Riely, Gregory J.; Balak, Marissa; Marks, Jenifer L.; Ladanyi, Marc; Miller, Vincent A.; Pao, William

    2008-01-01

    Purpose Somatic mutations in the tyrosine kinase domain of EGFR are associated with sensitivity of lung adenocarcinomas to the EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), gefitinib and erlotinib. Acquired drug resistance is frequently associated with a secondary somatic mutation that leads to substitution of methionine for threonine at position 790 (T790M). We aimed to identify additional second-site alterations associated with acquired resistance. Experimental Design Tumor samples were obtained from 48 patients with acquired resistance. Tumor cell DNA was analyzed for EGFR kinase domain mutations. Molecular analyses were then performed to characterize biological properties of a novel mutant EGFR allele. Results A previously unreported mutation in exon 21 of EGFR, which leads to substitution of alanine for threonine at position 854 (T854A), was identified in one patient with a drug-sensitive EGFR L858R-mutant lung adenocarcinoma after long-term treatment with TKIs. The T854A mutation was not detected in a pretreatment tumor sample. Crystal structure analyses of EGFR suggest that the T854 side chain is within contact distance of gefitinib and erlotinib. Surrogate kinase assays demonstrate that the EGFR T854A mutation abrogates inhibition of tyrosine phosphorylation by erlotinib. Such resistance appears to be overcome by a new irreversible dual EGFR/HER2 inhibitor, BIBW 2992. Conclusions The T854A mutation is the second reported second-site acquired resistance mutation that is within contact distance of gefitinib and erlotinib. These data suggest that acquired resistance to ATP-mimetic EGFR kinase inhibitors may often be associated with amino acid substitutions that alter drug contact residues in the EGFR ATP-binding pocket. PMID:19010870

  12. Challenges of drug-resistant malaria.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Shweta; Medhi, Bikash; Sehgal, Rakesh

    2014-01-01

    Over the past six decades, the drug resistance of Plasmodium falciparum has become an issue of utmost concern. Despite the remarkable progress that has been made in recent years in reducing the mortality rate to about 30% with the scaling-up of vector control, introduction of artemisinin-based combination therapies and other malaria control strategies, the confirmation of artemisinin resistance on the Cambodia-Thailand border threatened all the previous success. This review addresses the global scenario of antimalarial resistance and factors associated with it, with the main emphasis on futuristic approaches like nanotechnology and stem cell therapy that may impede resistant malaria, along with novel medications which are preparing to enter the global antimalarial market. These novel studies are likely to escalate over the coming years and will hopefully help to reduce the burden of malaria. PMID:25402734

  13. Amphibians acquire resistance to live and dead fungus overcoming fungal immunosuppression.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Taegan A; Sears, Brittany F; Venesky, Matthew D; Bessler, Scott M; Brown, Jenise M; Deutsch, Kaitlin; Halstead, Neal T; Lentz, Garrett; Tenouri, Nadia; Young, Suzanne; Civitello, David J; Ortega, Nicole; Fites, J Scott; Reinert, Laura K; Rollins-Smith, Louise A; Raffel, Thomas R; Rohr, Jason R

    2014-07-10

    Emerging fungal pathogens pose a greater threat to biodiversity than any other parasitic group, causing declines of many taxa, including bats, corals, bees, snakes and amphibians. Currently, there is little evidence that wild animals can acquire resistance to these pathogens. Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis is a pathogenic fungus implicated in the recent global decline of amphibians. Here we demonstrate that three species of amphibians can acquire behavioural or immunological resistance to B. dendrobatidis. Frogs learned to avoid the fungus after just one B. dendrobatidis exposure and temperature-induced clearance. In subsequent experiments in which B. dendrobatidis avoidance was prevented, the number of previous exposures was a negative predictor of B. dendrobatidis burden on frogs and B. dendrobatidis-induced mortality, and was a positive predictor of lymphocyte abundance and proliferation. These results suggest that amphibians can acquire immunity to B. dendrobatidis that overcomes pathogen-induced immunosuppression and increases their survival. Importantly, exposure to dead fungus induced a similar magnitude of acquired resistance as exposure to live fungus. Exposure of frogs to B. dendrobatidis antigens might offer a practical way to protect pathogen-naive amphibians and facilitate the reintroduction of amphibians to locations in the wild where B. dendrobatidis persists. Moreover, given the conserved nature of vertebrate immune responses to fungi and the fact that many animals are capable of learning to avoid natural enemies, these results offer hope that other wild animal taxa threatened by invasive fungi might be rescued by management approaches based on herd immunity.

  14. Severe Community-Acquired Bloodstream Infection with Acinetobacter ursingii in Person who Injects Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Salzer, Helmut J.F.; Rolling, Thierry; Schmiedel, Stefan; Klupp, Eva-Maria; Lange, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    We report a community-acquired bloodstream infection with Acinteobacter ursingii in an HIV-negative woman who injected drugs. The infection was successfully treated with meropenem. Species identification was performed by using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Improved identification of Acinetobacter spp. by using this method will help identify clinical effects of this underdiagnosed pathogen. PMID:26689082

  15. A case of cavernous sinus thrombosis with meningitis caused by community acquired methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Dinaker, Manjunath; Sharabu, Chandrahasa; Kattula, Sri Rama Surya Tez; Kommalapati, Varun

    2014-05-01

    Septic cavernous sinus thrombosis is a rare clinical condition. Although Staphylococcus aureus is the most common pathogen causing septic cavernous sinus thrombosis [CST], it is an uncommon cause of meningitis. We report the first case of CST with meningitis in Hyderabad, Andhra Pradesh, caused by community acquired epidemic strain of Methicillin resistant staphylococcus aureus [MRSA], in a previously healthy individual with no risk factors. The patient recovered completely following treatment with Vancomycin. We consecutively reviewed all cases of community acquired staphylococcus aureus [CA-MRSA] with central nervous system involvement available in literature. PMID:25508014

  16. A case of cavernous sinus thrombosis with meningitis caused by community acquired methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Dinaker, Manjunath; Sharabu, Chandrahasa; Kattula, Sri Rama Surya Tez; Kommalapati, Varun

    2014-05-01

    Septic cavernous sinus thrombosis is a rare clinical condition. Although Staphylococcus aureus is the most common pathogen causing septic cavernous sinus thrombosis [CST], it is an uncommon cause of meningitis. We report the first case of CST with meningitis in Hyderabad, Andhra Pradesh, caused by community acquired epidemic strain of Methicillin resistant staphylococcus aureus [MRSA], in a previously healthy individual with no risk factors. The patient recovered completely following treatment with Vancomycin. We consecutively reviewed all cases of community acquired staphylococcus aureus [CA-MRSA] with central nervous system involvement available in literature. PMID:25438497

  17. Genetic dissection of drug resistance in trypanosomes.

    PubMed

    Alsford, Sam; Kelly, John M; Baker, Nicola; Horn, David

    2013-10-01

    The trypanosomes cause two neglected tropical diseases, Chagas disease in the Americas and African trypanosomiasis in sub-Saharan Africa. Over recent years a raft of molecular tools have been developed enabling the genetic dissection of many aspects of trypanosome biology, including the mechanisms underlying resistance to some of the current clinical and veterinary drugs. This has led to the identification and characterization of key resistance determinants, including transporters for the anti-Trypanosoma brucei drugs, melarsoprol, pentamidine and eflornithine, and the activator of nifurtimox-benznidazole, the anti-Trypanosoma cruzi drugs. More recently, advances in sequencing technology, combined with the development of RNA interference libraries in the clinically relevant bloodstream form of T. brucei have led to an exponential increase in the number of proteins known to interact either directly or indirectly with the anti-trypanosomal drugs. In this review, we discuss these findings and the technological developments that are set to further revolutionise our understanding of drug-trypanosome interactions. The new knowledge gained should inform the development of novel interventions against the devastating diseases caused by these parasites.

  18. Fungal Biofilms, Drug Resistance, and Recurrent Infection

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Jigar V.; Mitchell, Aaron P.; Andes, David R.

    2014-01-01

    A biofilm is a surface-associated microbial community. Diverse fungi are capable of biofilm growth. The significance of this growth form for infection biology is that biofilm formation on implanted devices is a major cause of recurrent infection. Biofilms also have limited drug susceptibility, making device-associated infection extremely difficult to treat. Biofilm-like growth can occur during many kinds of infection, even when an implanted device is not present. Here we summarize the current understanding of fungal biofilm formation, its genetic control, and the basis for biofilm drug resistance. PMID:25274758

  19. Characterization of in vivo-acquired resistance to macrolides of Mycoplasma gallisepticum strains isolated from poultry.

    PubMed

    Gerchman, Irena; Levisohn, Sharon; Mikula, Inna; Manso-Silván, Lucía; Lysnyansky, Inna

    2011-01-01

    The macrolide class of antibiotics, including tylosin and tilmicosin, is widely used in the veterinary field for prophylaxis and treatment of mycoplasmosis. In vitro susceptibility testing of 50 strains of M. gallisepticum isolated in Israel during the period 1997-2010 revealed that acquired resistance to tylosin as well as to tilmicosin was present in 50% of them. Moreover, 72% (13/18) of the strains isolated from clinical samples since 2006 showed acquired resistance to enrofloxacin, tylosin and tilmicosin. Molecular typing of the field isolates, performed by gene-target sequencing (GTS), detected 13 molecular types (I-XIII). Type II was the predominant type prior to 2006 whereas type X, first detected in 2008, is currently prevalent. All ten type X strains were resistant to both fluoroquinolones and macrolides, suggesting selective pressure leading to clonal dissemination of resistance. However, this was not a unique event since resistant strains with other GTS molecular types were also found. Concurrently, the molecular basis for macrolide resistance in M. gallisepticum was identified. Our results revealed a clear-cut correlation between single point mutations A2058G or A2059G in domain V of the gene encoding 23S rRNA (rrnA, MGA_01) and acquired macrolide resistance in M. gallisepticum. Indeed, all isolates with MIC ≥ 0.63 μg/mL to tylosin and with MIC ≥ 1.25 μg/mL to tilmicosin possess one of these mutations, suggesting an essential role in decreased susceptibility of M. gallisepticum to 16-membered macrolides. PMID:21810258

  20. Characterization of in vivo-acquired resistance to macrolides of Mycoplasma gallisepticum strains isolated from poultry

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The macrolide class of antibiotics, including tylosin and tilmicosin, is widely used in the veterinary field for prophylaxis and treatment of mycoplasmosis. In vitro susceptibility testing of 50 strains of M. gallisepticum isolated in Israel during the period 1997-2010 revealed that acquired resistance to tylosin as well as to tilmicosin was present in 50% of them. Moreover, 72% (13/18) of the strains isolated from clinical samples since 2006 showed acquired resistance to enrofloxacin, tylosin and tilmicosin. Molecular typing of the field isolates, performed by gene-target sequencing (GTS), detected 13 molecular types (I-XIII). Type II was the predominant type prior to 2006 whereas type X, first detected in 2008, is currently prevalent. All ten type X strains were resistant to both fluoroquinolones and macrolides, suggesting selective pressure leading to clonal dissemination of resistance. However, this was not a unique event since resistant strains with other GTS molecular types were also found. Concurrently, the molecular basis for macrolide resistance in M. gallisepticum was identified. Our results revealed a clear-cut correlation between single point mutations A2058G or A2059G in domain V of the gene encoding 23S rRNA (rrnA, MGA_01) and acquired macrolide resistance in M. gallisepticum. Indeed, all isolates with MIC ≥ 0.63 μg/mL to tylosin and with MIC ≥ 1.25 μg/mL to tilmicosin possess one of these mutations, suggesting an essential role in decreased susceptibility of M. gallisepticum to 16-membered macrolides. PMID:21810258

  1. Drug Resistant Fetal Arrhythmia in Obstetric Cholestasis

    PubMed Central

    Altug, Nahide; Kirbas, Ayse; Daglar, Korkut; Biberoglu, Ebru; Uygur, Dilek; Danisman, Nuri

    2015-01-01

    Obstetric cholestasis (OC) is a pregnancy specific liver disease characterized by increased levels of bile acid (BA) and pruritus. Raised maternal BA levels could be associated with intrauterine death, fetal distress, and preterm labor and also alter the rate and rhythm of cardiomyocyte contraction and may cause fetal arrhythmic events. We report a case of drug resistant fetal supraventricular tachycardia and concomitant OC. Conclusion. If there are maternal OC and concomitant fetal arrhythmia, possibility of the resistance to antiarrhythmic treatment should be kept in mind. PMID:25821617

  2. Drug-resistant tuberculosis in Africa.

    PubMed

    Mwinga, A

    2001-12-01

    Africa has the highest incidence rate per capita of tuberculosis, although the rate varies among the African countries from 17.8% in Cameroon to 70% in Botswana, Zambia, and Zimbabwe. Nevertheless, the levels of drug resistance are relatively low, compared to countries like Russia and Estonia. Because treatment of MDR TB is beyond the reach of most African countries, prevention of the development of resistance should be a major priority. Establishment of programs to ensure prompt diagnosis of TB and adequate treatment with supervision should be undertaken by national governments with cooperating partners. PMID:11795401

  3. Transcriptome Analysis Reveals Mechanisms by Which Lactococcus lactis Acquires Nisin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Naomi E.; van Hijum, Sacha A. F. T.; Knol, Jan; Kok, Jan; Kuipers, Oscar P.

    2006-01-01

    Nisin, a posttranslationally modified antimicrobial peptide produced by Lactococcus lactis, is widely used as a food preservative. Yet, the mechanisms leading to the development of nisin resistance in bacteria are poorly understood. We used whole-genome DNA microarrays of L. lactis IL1403 to identify the factors underlying acquired nisin resistance mechanisms. The transcriptomes of L. lactis IL1403 and L. lactis IL1403 Nisr, which reached a 75-fold higher nisin resistance level, were compared. Differential expression was observed in genes encoding proteins that are involved in cell wall biosynthesis, energy metabolism, fatty acid and phospholipid metabolism, regulatory functions, and metal and/or peptide transport and binding. These results were further substantiated by showing that several knockout and overexpression mutants of these genes had strongly altered nisin resistance levels and that some knockout strains could no longer become resistant to the same level of nisin as that of the wild-type strain. The acquired nisin resistance mechanism in L. lactis is complex, involving various different mechanisms. The four major mechanisms are (i) preventing nisin from reaching the cytoplasmic membrane, (ii) reducing the acidity of the extracellular medium, thereby stimulating the binding of nisin to the cell wall, (iii) preventing the insertion of nisin into the membrane, and (iv) possibly transporting nisin across the membrane or extruding nisin out of the membrane. PMID:16641446

  4. An insight into the drug resistance profile & mechanism of drug resistance in Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Patel, Achchhe Lal; Chaudhry, Uma; Sachdev, Divya; Sachdeva, Poonam Nagpal; Bala, Manju; Saluja, Daman

    2011-10-01

    Among the aetiological agents of treatable sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), Neissseria gonorrhoeae is considered to be most important because of emerging antibiotic resistant strains that compromise the effectiveness of treatment of the disease - gonorrhoea. In most of the developing countries, treatment of gonorrhoea relies mainly on syndromic management rather than the aetiological based therapy. Gonococcal infections are usually treated with single-dose therapy with an agent found to cure > 95 per cent of cases. Unfortunately during the last few decades, N. gonorrhoeae has developed resistance not only to less expensive antimicrobials such as sulphonamides, penicillin and tetracyclines but also to fluoroquinolones. The resistance trend of N. gonorrhoeae towards these antimicrobials can be categorised into pre-quinolone, quinolone and post-quinolone era. Among the antimicrobials available so far, only the third-generation cephalosporins could be safely recommended as first-line therapy for gonorrhoea globally. However, resistance to oral third-generation cephalosporins has also started emerging in some countries. Therefore, it has become imperative to initiate sustained national and international efforts to reduce infection and misuse of antibiotics so as to prevent further emergence and spread of antimicrobial resistance. It is necessary not only to monitor drug resistance and optimise treatment regimens, but also to gain insight into how gonococcus develops drug resistance. Knowledge of mechanism of resistance would help us to devise methods to prevent the occurrence of drug resistance against existing and new drugs. Such studies could also help in finding out new drug targets in N. gonorrhoeae and also a possibility of identification of new drugs for treating gonorrhoea. PMID:22089602

  5. The phenomenon of acquired resistance to metformin in breast cancer cells: The interaction of growth pathways and estrogen receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Scherbakov, Alexander M; Sorokin, Danila V; Tatarskiy, Victor V; Prokhorov, Nikolay S; Semina, Svetlana E; Berstein, Lev M; Krasil'nikov, Mikhail A

    2016-04-01

    Metformin, a biguanide antidiabetic drug, is used to decrease hyperglycemia in patients with type 2 diabetes. Recently, the epidemiological studies revealed the potential of metformin as an anti-tumor drug for several types of cancer, including breast cancer. Anti-tumor metformin action was found to be mediated, at least in part, via activation of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK)-intracellular energy sensor, which inhibits the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and some other signaling pathways. Nevertheless, some patients can be non-sensitive or resistant to metformin action. Here we analyzed the mechanism of the formation of metformin-resistant phenotype in breast cancer cells and its role in estrogen receptor (ER) regulation. The experiments were performed on the ER-positive MCF-7 breast cancer cells and metformin-resistant MCF-7 subline (MCF-7/M) developed due to long-term metformin treatment. The transcriptional activity of NF-κB and ER was measured by the luciferase reporter gene analysis. The protein expression was determined by immunoblotting (Snail1, (phospho)AMPK, (phospho)IκBα, (phospho)mTOR, cyclin D1, (phospho)Akt and ERα) and immunohistochemical analysis (E-cadherin). We have found that: 1) metformin treatment of MCF-7 cells is accompanied with the stimulation of AMPK and inhibition of growth-related proteins including IκBα, NF-κB, cyclin D1 and ERα; 2) long-term metformin treatment lead to the appearance and progression of cross-resistance to metformin and tamoxifen; the resistant cells are characterized with the unaffected AMPK activity, but the irreversible ER suppression and constitutive activation of Akt/Snail1 signaling; 3) Akt/Snail1 signaling is involved into progression of metformin resistance. The results presented may be considered as the first evidence of the progression of cross-resistance to metformin and tamoxifen in breast cancer cells. Importantly, the acquired resistance to both drugs is based on the

  6. The phenomenon of acquired resistance to metformin in breast cancer cells: The interaction of growth pathways and estrogen receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Scherbakov, Alexander M; Sorokin, Danila V; Tatarskiy, Victor V; Prokhorov, Nikolay S; Semina, Svetlana E; Berstein, Lev M; Krasil'nikov, Mikhail A

    2016-04-01

    Metformin, a biguanide antidiabetic drug, is used to decrease hyperglycemia in patients with type 2 diabetes. Recently, the epidemiological studies revealed the potential of metformin as an anti-tumor drug for several types of cancer, including breast cancer. Anti-tumor metformin action was found to be mediated, at least in part, via activation of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK)-intracellular energy sensor, which inhibits the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and some other signaling pathways. Nevertheless, some patients can be non-sensitive or resistant to metformin action. Here we analyzed the mechanism of the formation of metformin-resistant phenotype in breast cancer cells and its role in estrogen receptor (ER) regulation. The experiments were performed on the ER-positive MCF-7 breast cancer cells and metformin-resistant MCF-7 subline (MCF-7/M) developed due to long-term metformin treatment. The transcriptional activity of NF-κB and ER was measured by the luciferase reporter gene analysis. The protein expression was determined by immunoblotting (Snail1, (phospho)AMPK, (phospho)IκBα, (phospho)mTOR, cyclin D1, (phospho)Akt and ERα) and immunohistochemical analysis (E-cadherin). We have found that: 1) metformin treatment of MCF-7 cells is accompanied with the stimulation of AMPK and inhibition of growth-related proteins including IκBα, NF-κB, cyclin D1 and ERα; 2) long-term metformin treatment lead to the appearance and progression of cross-resistance to metformin and tamoxifen; the resistant cells are characterized with the unaffected AMPK activity, but the irreversible ER suppression and constitutive activation of Akt/Snail1 signaling; 3) Akt/Snail1 signaling is involved into progression of metformin resistance. The results presented may be considered as the first evidence of the progression of cross-resistance to metformin and tamoxifen in breast cancer cells. Importantly, the acquired resistance to both drugs is based on the

  7. [Drug-resistant tropical malaria in Angola].

    PubMed

    Suleĭmanov, S D

    1994-01-01

    Three antimalarial treatment regimens by the complete standard WHO tests were examined in 105 Plasmodium falciparum-infected patients who were nonimmune newcomers treated at the Russian hospital in Luanda in 1991-1992, 61% showed chloroquine resistance and 40% fansidar resistance. All 59 patients with high rates of parasitemia were successfully cured with quinine in combination with tetracycline. Thick, if required thin, blood smears were microscopically examined. The findings suggest that Fansidar should be a drug of first-line therapy in Angola, though in the neighbouring countries quinine continues preserving its efficacy, but there is a delayed elimination of the parasites within 7 days of initiation of the therapy, making it necessary to prolong therapy with this drug up to 10 days.

  8. Targeting glucosylceramide synthase induction of cell surface globotriaosylceramide (Gb3) in acquired cisplatin-resistance of lung cancer and malignant pleural mesothelioma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tyler, Andreas; Johansson, Anders; Karlsson, Terese; Gudey, Shyam Kumar; Brännström, Thomas; Grankvist, Kjell; Behnam-Motlagh, Parviz

    2015-08-01

    Background: Acquired resistance to cisplatin treatment is a caveat when treating patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM). Ceramide increases in response to chemotherapy, leading to proliferation arrest and apoptosis. However, a tumour stress activation of glucosylceramide synthase (GCS) follows to eliminate ceramide by formation of glycosphingolipids (GSLs) such as globotriaosylceramide (Gb3), the functional receptor of verotoxin-1. Ceramide elimination enhances cell proliferation and apoptosis blockade, thus stimulating tumor progression. GSLs transactivate multidrug resistance 1/P-glycoprotein (MDR1) and multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP1) expression which further prevents ceramide accumulation and stimulates drug efflux. We investigated the expression of Gb3, MDR1 and MRP1 in NSCLC and MPM cells with acquired cisplatin resistance, and if GCS activity or MDR1 pump inhibitors would reduce their expression and reverse cisplatin-resistance. Methods: Cell surface expression of Gb3, MDR1 and MRP1 and intracellular expression of MDR1 and MRP1 was analyzed by flow cytometry and confocal microscopy on P31 MPM and H1299 NSCLC cells and subline cells with acquired cisplatin resistance. The effect of GCS inhibitor PPMP and MDR1 pump inhibitor cyclosporin A for 72 h on expression and cisplatin cytotoxicity was tested. Results: The cisplatin-resistant cells expressed increased cell surface Gb3. Cell surface Gb3 expression of resistant cells was annihilated by PPMP whereas cyclosporin A decreased Gb3 and MDR1 expression in H1299 cells. No decrease of MDR1 by PPMP was noted in using flow cytometry, whereas a decrease of MDR1 in H1299 and H1299res was indicated with confocal microscopy. No certain co-localization of Gb3 and MDR1 was noted. PPMP, but not cyclosporin A, potentiated cisplatin cytotoxicity in all cells. Conclusions: Cell surface Gb3 expression is a likely tumour biomarker for acquired cisplatin

  9. The epidemiology and spread of drug resistant human influenza viruses.

    PubMed

    Hurt, Aeron C

    2014-10-01

    Significant changes in the circulation of antiviral-resistant influenza viruses have occurred over the last decade. The emergence and continued circulation of adamantane-resistant A(H3N2) and A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses mean that the adamantanes are no longer recommended for use. Resistance to the newer class of drugs, the neuraminidase inhibitors, is typically associated with poorer viral replication and transmission. But 'permissive' mutations, that compensated for impairment of viral function in A(H1N1) viruses during 2007/2008, enabled them to acquire the H275Y NA resistance mutation without fitness loss, resulting in their rapid global spread. Permissive mutations now appear to be present in A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses thereby increasing the risk that oseltamivir-resistant A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses may also spread globally, a concerning scenario given that oseltamivir is the most widely used influenza antiviral.

  10. [A mathematical model for the chemical control of Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae) having acquired chemical resistance].

    PubMed

    Restrepo-Alape, Leonardo D; Toro-Zapata, Hernán D; Muñoz-Loaiza, Aníbal

    2010-12-01

    Dengue fever is a common vector-borne disease in tropical and subtropical areas. It is transmitted to humans by the bite of an infected female Aedes mosquito. Since no vaccines are currently available which can protect against infection, disease control relies on controlling the mosquito population. This work was aimed at modelling such mosquito's population dynamics regarding chemical control of the adult population and its acquired resistance to chemicals. The model was analysed by using classical dynamic system theory techniques and mosquito growth threshold was determined as this establishes when a particular population may prosper in the environment or when it is likely to disappear. A suitable chemical control strategy was developed from such threshold. Simulations were made in control and non-control scenarios; this determined the degree of control application effectiveness against different levels of acquired resistance.

  11. [A mathematical model for the chemical control of Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae) having acquired chemical resistance].

    PubMed

    Restrepo-Alape, Leonardo D; Toro-Zapata, Hernán D; Muñoz-Loaiza, Aníbal

    2010-12-01

    Dengue fever is a common vector-borne disease in tropical and subtropical areas. It is transmitted to humans by the bite of an infected female Aedes mosquito. Since no vaccines are currently available which can protect against infection, disease control relies on controlling the mosquito population. This work was aimed at modelling such mosquito's population dynamics regarding chemical control of the adult population and its acquired resistance to chemicals. The model was analysed by using classical dynamic system theory techniques and mosquito growth threshold was determined as this establishes when a particular population may prosper in the environment or when it is likely to disappear. A suitable chemical control strategy was developed from such threshold. Simulations were made in control and non-control scenarios; this determined the degree of control application effectiveness against different levels of acquired resistance. PMID:22030690

  12. Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in a group home setting.

    PubMed

    Collins, Rebeccah J

    2007-09-01

    Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) is an infection involving methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) with onset in the community in an individual lacking established health care-associated MRSA risk factors. A 74-year-old group home resident with a history of hypertension and mental retardation presents with a spider bite-like lesion that rapidly progresses to multiple areas of her body. Culture results reveal MRSA. The patient's advanced age and the severity and rapidity of progression of the condition warranted treatment, and options are discussed. Pharmacists should assist in selecting antibiotics for patients with resistant infections and provide strategies for preventing the spread of resistant organisms. Current and complete medical records are critical in the group home setting. The role of the caregiver and the consultant pharmacist in this setting is discussed.

  13. Multi drug resistance in strong biofilm forming clinical isolates of Staphylococcus epidermidis.

    PubMed

    Sahal, Gulcan; Bilkay, Isil Seyis

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcus epidermidis which exists in healthy human skin as a commensal inhabitant is also an important pathogen forming biofilms on many surfaces and recently, increased resistance traits were suggested to be acquired in biofilm environments. In this study; clinical Prevalences, antibiotic resistances and biofilm formations of S. epidermidis strains were determined and comparison of all these findings with each other was carried out in order to take precautions against them and figure out if high biofilm forming S. epidermidis strains display multi drug resistance. According to our results; samples of wound and blood were the most S. epidermidis isolated clinical materials (40%; 35%) and cardiothoracic surgery was the most S. epidermidis observed service unit. All of these strains were sensitive to vancomycin, however 65% of them showed resistance to all β-lactam antibiotics (Penicillin, Oxacillin, Amoxicilin/Clavulonic acid), used in this study and 60% of all S. epidermidis strains were found as multi drug resistant. When the results of strong biofilm forming S. epidermidis strains are examined; they were isolated from sample of blood and service unit of cardiovascular surgery in highest frequency and 80% of them were β-lactam resistant whereas 100% of them were multi drug resistant. One of these multi drug resistant strains which was resistant to maximum amount of different antimicrobial classes, was also observed as maximum biofilm forming strain among all the other S. epidermidis isolates. Multi drug resistance in strong biofilm forming strains shows that; biofilms play a role in antimicrobial resistance traits of S. epidermidis.

  14. Treatment Options for Carbapenem-Resistant and Extensively Drug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii Infections

    PubMed Central

    Viehman, J. Alexander; Nguyen, Minh-Hong; Doi, Yohei

    2014-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a leading cause of healthcare-associated infections worldwide. Due to various intrinsic and acquired mechanisms of resistance, most β-lactam agents are not effective against many strains, and carbapenems have played an important role in therapy. Recent trends show many infections are caused by carbapenem-resistant, or even extensively drug-resistant (XDR) strains, for which effective therapy is not well established. Evidence to date suggests that colistin constitutes the backbone of therapy, but the unique pharmacokinetic properties of colistin have led many to suggest the use of combination antimicrobial therapy. However, the combination of agents and dosing regimens that delivers the best clinical efficacy while minimizing toxicity is yet to be defined. Carbapenems, sulbactam, rifampin and tigecycline have been the most studied in the context of combination therapy. Most data regarding therapy for invasive, resistant A. baumannii infections come from uncontrolled case series and retrospective analyses, though some clinical trials have been completed and others are underway. Early institution of appropriate antimicrobial therapy is shown to consistently improve survival of patients with carbapenem-resistant and XDR A. baumannii infection, but the choice of empiric therapy in these infections remains an open question. This review summarizes the most current knowledge regarding the epidemiology, mechanisms of resistance, and treatment considerations of carbapenem-resistant and XDR A. baumannii. PMID:25091170

  15. Community-acquired methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus in a women's collegiate basketball team.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Michael P; Bearman, Gonzalo; Rosato, Adriana; Edmond, Michael

    2008-10-01

    Community-acquired methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) infections are becoming increasingly frequent, and cutaneous disease with this organism is often seen in otherwise healthy organized sports participants. A case of CA-MRSA skin and soft tissue infection in a female collegiate basketball player is presented, and screening and management of her team is discussed. Interestingly, multiple MRSA strains were discovered on testing of the team, raising concern that the prevalence of colonization in this population may be high.

  16. Serotonergic hyperactivity as a potential factor in developmental, acquired and drug-induced synesthesia.

    PubMed

    Brogaard, Berit

    2013-01-01

    Though synesthesia research has seen a huge growth in recent decades, and tremendous progress has been made in terms of understanding the mechanism and cause of synesthesia, we are still left mostly in the dark when it comes to the mechanistic commonalities (if any) among developmental, acquired and drug-induced synesthesia. We know that many forms of synesthesia involve aberrant structural or functional brain connectivity. Proposed mechanisms include direct projection and disinhibited feedback mechanisms, in which information from two otherwise structurally or functionally separate brain regions mix. We also know that synesthesia sometimes runs in families. However, it is unclear what causes its onset. Studies of psychedelic drugs, such as psilocybin, LSD and mescaline, reveal that exposure to these drugs can induce synesthesia. One neurotransmitter suspected to be central to the perceptual changes is serotonin. Excessive serotonin in the brain may cause many of the characteristics of psychedelic intoxication. Excessive serotonin levels may also play a role in synesthesia acquired after brain injury. In brain injury sudden cell death floods local brain regions with serotonin and glutamate. This neurotransmitter flooding could perhaps result in unusual feature binding. Finally, developmental synesthesia that occurs in individuals with autism may be a result of alterations in the serotonergic system, leading to a blockage of regular gating mechanisms. I conclude on these grounds that one commonality among at least some cases of acquired, developmental and drug-induced synesthesia may be the presence of excessive levels of serotonin, which increases the excitability and connectedness of sensory brain regions. PMID:24155703

  17. Serotonergic Hyperactivity as a Potential Factor in Developmental, Acquired and Drug-Induced Synesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Brogaard, Berit

    2013-01-01

    Though synesthesia research has seen a huge growth in recent decades, and tremendous progress has been made in terms of understanding the mechanism and cause of synesthesia, we are still left mostly in the dark when it comes to the mechanistic commonalities (if any) among developmental, acquired and drug-induced synesthesia. We know that many forms of synesthesia involve aberrant structural or functional brain connectivity. Proposed mechanisms include direct projection and disinhibited feedback mechanisms, in which information from two otherwise structurally or functionally separate brain regions mix. We also know that synesthesia sometimes runs in families. However, it is unclear what causes its onset. Studies of psychedelic drugs, such as psilocybin, LSD and mescaline, reveal that exposure to these drugs can induce synesthesia. One neurotransmitter suspected to be central to the perceptual changes is serotonin. Excessive serotonin in the brain may cause many of the characteristics of psychedelic intoxication. Excessive serotonin levels may also play a role in synesthesia acquired after brain injury. In brain injury sudden cell death floods local brain regions with serotonin and glutamate. This neurotransmitter flooding could perhaps result in unusual feature binding. Finally, developmental synesthesia that occurs in individuals with autism may be a result of alterations in the serotonergic system, leading to a blockage of regular gating mechanisms. I conclude on these grounds that one commonality among at least some cases of acquired, developmental and drug-induced synesthesia may be the presence of excessive levels of serotonin, which increases the excitability and connectedness of sensory brain regions. PMID:24155703

  18. Overcoming drug resistance in multi-drug resistant cancers and microorganisms: a conceptual framework.

    PubMed

    Avner, Benjamin S; Fialho, Arsenio M; Chakrabarty, Ananda M

    2012-01-01

    Resistance development against multiple drugs is a common feature among many pathogens--including bacteria such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa, viruses, and parasites--and also among cancers. The reasons are two-fold. Most commonly-used rationally-designed small molecule drugs or monoclonal antibodies, as well as antibiotics, strongly inhibit a key single step in the growth and proliferation of the pathogen or cancer cells. The disease agents quickly change or switch off this single target, or activate the efflux mechanisms to pump out the drug, thereby becoming resistant to the drug. A second problem is the way drugs are designed. The pharmaceutical industry chooses to use, by high-throughput screening, compounds that are maximally inhibitory to the key single step in the growth of the pathogen or cancer, thereby promoting selective pressure. An ideal drug would be one that inhibits multiple steps in the disease progression pathways with less stringency in these steps. Low levels of inhibition at multiple steps provide cumulative strong inhibitory effect, but little incentives or ability on the part of the pathogen/cancer to develop resistance. Such intelligent drug design involving multiple less stringent inhibitory steps is beyond the scope of the drug industry and requires evolutionary wisdom commonly possessed by bacteria. This review surveys assessments of the current clinical situation with regard to drug resistance in P. aeruginosa, and examines tools currently employed to limit this trend. We then provide a conceptual framework in which we explore the similarities between multi-drug resistance in pathogens and in cancers. We summarize promising work on anti-cancer drugs derived from the evolutionary wisdom of bacteria such as P. aeruginosa, and how such strategies can be the basis for how to look for candidate protein/peptide antibiotic drugs from bioengineered bugs. Such multi-domain proteins, unlike diffusible antibiotics, are not diffusible because of their

  19. Overcoming drug resistance in multi-drug resistant cancers and microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    Avner, Benjamin S.; Fialho, Arsenio M.; Chakrabarty, Ananda M.

    2012-01-01

    Resistance development against multiple drugs is a common feature among many pathogens—including bacteria such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa, viruses, and parasites—and also among cancers. The reasons are two-fold. Most commonly-used rationally-designed small molecule drugs or monoclonal antibodies, as well as antibiotics, strongly inhibit a key single step in the growth and proliferation of the pathogen or cancer cells. The disease agents quickly change or switch off this single target, or activate the efflux mechanisms to pump out the drug, thereby becoming resistant to the drug. A second problem is the way drugs are designed. The pharmaceutical industry chooses to use, by high-throughput screening, compounds that are maximally inhibitory to the key single step in the growth of the pathogen or cancer, thereby promoting selective pressure. An ideal drug would be one that inhibits multiple steps in the disease progression pathways with less stringency in these steps. Low levels of inhibition at multiple steps provide cumulative strong inhibitory effect, but little incentives or ability on the part of the pathogen/cancer to develop resistance. Such intelligent drug design involving multiple less stringent inhibitory steps is beyond the scope of the drug industry and requires evolutionary wisdom commonly possessed by bacteria. This review surveys assessments of the current clinical situation with regard to drug resistance in P. aeruginosa, and examines tools currently employed to limit this trend. We then provide a conceptual framework in which we explore the similarities between multi-drug resistance in pathogens and in cancers. We summarize promising work on anti-cancer drugs derived from the evolutionary wisdom of bacteria such as P. aeruginosa, and how such strategies can be the basis for how to look for candidate protein/peptide antibiotic drugs from bioengineered bugs. Such multi-domain proteins, unlike diffusible antibiotics, are not diffusible because of

  20. Heterogeneous distribution of Plasmodium falciparum drug resistance haplotypes in subsets of the host population

    PubMed Central

    Schoepflin, Sonja; Marfurt, Jutta; Goroti, Mary; Baisor, Moses; Mueller, Ivo; Felger, Ingrid

    2008-01-01

    Background The emergence of drug resistance is a major problem in malaria control. For mathematical modelling of the transmission and spread of drug resistance the determinant parameters need to be identified and measured. The underlying hypothesis is that mutations associated with drug resistance incur fitness costs to the parasite in absence of drug pressure. The distribution of drug resistance haplotypes in different subsets of the host population was investigated. In particular newly acquired haplotypes after radical cure were characterized and compared to haplotypes from persistent infections. Methods Mutations associated with antimalarial drug resistance were analysed in parasites from children, adults, and new infections occurring after treatment. Twenty-five known single nucleotide polymorphisms from four Plasmodium falciparum genes associated with drug resistance were genotyped by DNA chip technology. Results Haplotypes were found to differ between subsets of the host population. A seven-fold mutated haplotype was significantly reduced in adults compared to children and new infections, whereas parasites harbouring fewer mutations were more frequent in adults. Conclusion The reduced frequency of highly mutated parasites in chronic infections in adults is likely a result of fitness costs of drug resistance that increases with number of mutations and is responsible for reduced survival of mutant parasites. PMID:18460212

  1. HIV antiviral drug resistance: patient comprehension.

    PubMed

    Racey, C Sarai; Zhang, Wendy; Brandson, Eirikka K; Fernandes, Kimberly A; Tzemis, Despina; Harrigan, P Richard; Montaner, Julio S G; Barrios, Rolando; Toy, Junine; Hogg, Robert S

    2010-07-01

    A patient's understanding and use of healthcare information can affect their decisions regarding treatment. Better patient understanding about HIV resistance may improve adherence to therapy, decrease population viral load and extend the use of first-line HIV therapies. We examined knowledge of developing HIV resistance and explored treatment outcomes in a cohort of HIV+ persons on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). The longitudinal investigations into supportive and ancillary health services (LISA) cohort is a prospective study of HIV+ persons on HAART. A comprehensive interviewer-administrated survey collected socio-demographic variables. Drug resistance knowledge was determined using a three-part definition. Clinical markers were collected through linkage with the Drug Treatment Program (DTP) at the British Columbia Centre for Excellence in HIV/AIDS. Categorical variables were compared using Fisher's Exact Test and continuous variables using the Wilcoxon rank-sum test. Proportional odds logistic regression was performed for the adjusted multivariable analysis. Of 457 LISA participants, less than 4% completely defined HIV resistance and 20% reported that they had not discussed resistance with their physician. Overall, 61% of the cohort is >or=95% adherent based on prescription refills. Owing to small numbers pooling was preformed for analyses. The model showed that being younger (OR=0.97, 95% CI: 0.95-0.99), having greater than high school education (OR=1.64, 95% CI: 1.07-2.51), discussing medication with physicians (OR=3.67, 95% CI: 1.76-7.64), having high provider trust (OR=1.02, 95% CI: 1.01-1.03), and receiving one-to-one counseling by a pharmacist (OR=2.14, 95% CI: 1.41-3.24) are predictive of a complete or partial definition of HIV resistance. The probability of completely defining HIV resistance increased from 15.8 to 63.9% if respondents had discussed HIV medication with both a physician and a pharmacist. Although the understanding of HIV

  2. Resistance to Second-Line Antituberculosis Drugs and Delay in Drug Susceptibility Testing among Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis Patients in Shanghai

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Zhengan; Shen, Xin; Wu, Jie; Wu, Zheyuan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Second-line antituberculosis drugs (SLDs) are used for treating multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB). Prolonged delays before confirming MDR-TB with drug susceptibility testing (DST) could result in transmission of drug-resistant strains and inappropriate use of SLDs, thereby increasing the risk of resistance to SLDs. This study investigated the diagnostic delay in DST and prevalence of baseline SLD resistance in Shanghai and described the distribution of SLD resistance with varied delays to DST. Methods. All registered patients from 2011 to 2013 in Shanghai were enrolled. Susceptibility to ofloxacin, amikacin, kanamycin, and capreomycin was tested. Total delay in DST completion was measured from the onset of symptoms to reporting DST results. Results. Resistance to SLDs was tested in 217 of the 276 MDR-TB strains, with 118 (54.4%) being resistant to at least one of the four SLDs. The median total delay in DST was 136 days. Patients with delay longer than median days were roughly twice more likely to have resistance to at least one SLD (OR 2.22, 95% CI 1.19–4.11). Conclusions. During prolonged delay in DST, primary and acquired resistance to SLDs might occur more frequently. Rapid diagnosis of MDR-TB, improved nosocomial infection controls, and regulated treatment are imperative to prevent SLD resistance.

  3. Resistance to Second-Line Antituberculosis Drugs and Delay in Drug Susceptibility Testing among Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis Patients in Shanghai

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Zhengan; Shen, Xin; Wu, Jie; Wu, Zheyuan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Second-line antituberculosis drugs (SLDs) are used for treating multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB). Prolonged delays before confirming MDR-TB with drug susceptibility testing (DST) could result in transmission of drug-resistant strains and inappropriate use of SLDs, thereby increasing the risk of resistance to SLDs. This study investigated the diagnostic delay in DST and prevalence of baseline SLD resistance in Shanghai and described the distribution of SLD resistance with varied delays to DST. Methods. All registered patients from 2011 to 2013 in Shanghai were enrolled. Susceptibility to ofloxacin, amikacin, kanamycin, and capreomycin was tested. Total delay in DST completion was measured from the onset of symptoms to reporting DST results. Results. Resistance to SLDs was tested in 217 of the 276 MDR-TB strains, with 118 (54.4%) being resistant to at least one of the four SLDs. The median total delay in DST was 136 days. Patients with delay longer than median days were roughly twice more likely to have resistance to at least one SLD (OR 2.22, 95% CI 1.19–4.11). Conclusions. During prolonged delay in DST, primary and acquired resistance to SLDs might occur more frequently. Rapid diagnosis of MDR-TB, improved nosocomial infection controls, and regulated treatment are imperative to prevent SLD resistance. PMID:27652260

  4. Resistance to Second-Line Antituberculosis Drugs and Delay in Drug Susceptibility Testing among Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis Patients in Shanghai.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yong; Yuan, Zhengan; Shen, Xin; Wu, Jie; Wu, Zheyuan; Xu, Biao

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Second-line antituberculosis drugs (SLDs) are used for treating multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB). Prolonged delays before confirming MDR-TB with drug susceptibility testing (DST) could result in transmission of drug-resistant strains and inappropriate use of SLDs, thereby increasing the risk of resistance to SLDs. This study investigated the diagnostic delay in DST and prevalence of baseline SLD resistance in Shanghai and described the distribution of SLD resistance with varied delays to DST. Methods. All registered patients from 2011 to 2013 in Shanghai were enrolled. Susceptibility to ofloxacin, amikacin, kanamycin, and capreomycin was tested. Total delay in DST completion was measured from the onset of symptoms to reporting DST results. Results. Resistance to SLDs was tested in 217 of the 276 MDR-TB strains, with 118 (54.4%) being resistant to at least one of the four SLDs. The median total delay in DST was 136 days. Patients with delay longer than median days were roughly twice more likely to have resistance to at least one SLD (OR 2.22, 95% CI 1.19-4.11). Conclusions. During prolonged delay in DST, primary and acquired resistance to SLDs might occur more frequently. Rapid diagnosis of MDR-TB, improved nosocomial infection controls, and regulated treatment are imperative to prevent SLD resistance. PMID:27652260

  5. Multidrug Resistant and Extensively Drug Resistant Bacteria: A Study

    PubMed Central

    Basak, Silpi; Singh, Priyanka; Rajurkar, Monali

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective. Antimicrobial resistance is now a major challenge to clinicians for treating patients. Hence, this short term study was undertaken to detect the incidence of multidrug-resistant (MDR), extensively drug-resistant (XDR), and pandrug-resistant (PDR) bacterial isolates in a tertiary care hospital. Material and Methods. The clinical samples were cultured and bacterial strains were identified in the department of microbiology. The antibiotic susceptibility profile of different bacterial isolates was studied to detect MDR, XDR, and PDR bacteria. Results. The antibiotic susceptibility profile of 1060 bacterial strains was studied. 393 (37.1%) bacterial strains were MDR, 146 (13.8%) strains were XDR, and no PDR was isolated. All (100%) Gram negative bacterial strains were sensitive to colistin whereas all (100%) Gram positive bacterial strains were sensitive to vancomycin. Conclusion. Close monitoring of MDR, XDR, or even PDR must be done by all clinical microbiology laboratories to implement effective measures to reduce the menace of antimicrobial resistance. PMID:26942013

  6. Acquired platinum resistance involves epithelial to mesenchymal transition through ubiquitin ligase FBXO32 dysregulation

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Miyazaki, Yasumasa; Mikami, Shuji; Niwa, Naoya; Otsuka, Yutaro; Mizuno, Ryuichi; Kikuchi, Eiji; Miyajima, Akira; Sabe, Hisataka; Okada, Yasunori; Suematsu, Makoto; Oya, Mototsugu

    2016-01-01

    To identify the molecules involved in epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) in urothelial carcinoma (UC) after acquisition of platinum resistance, here we examined the changes in global gene expression before and after platinum treatment. Four invasive UC cell lines, T24, 5637, and their corresponding sublines T24PR and 5637PR with acquired platinum resistance, were assessed by microarray, and the ubiquitin E3 ligase FBXO32 was newly identified as a negative regulator of EMT in UC tumors after acquisition of platinum resistance. In vitro and in vivo studies showed an intimate relationship between FBXO32 expression and EMT, demonstrating that FBXO32 dysregulation in T24PR cells results in elevated expression of the mesenchymal molecules SNAIL and vimentin and decreased expression of the epithelial molecule E-cadherin. The association between FBXO32 expression and EMT was further validated using clinical samples. Knockdown of MyoD expression, a specific target of FBXO32 polyubiquitination, revealed upregulation of E-cadherin expression and downregulation of SNAIL and vimentin expression in T24PR cells. Comparative genomic hybridization array analysis demonstrated loss of heterozygosity at 8q24.13 in T24PR cells, which harbors FBXO32. Our findings suggest the importance of the association between EMT and ubiquitin-proteasome regulation when tumors develop acquired platinum resistance. PMID:27812537

  7. Bacteraemia and antibiotic-resistant pathogens in community acquired pneumonia: risk and prognosis.

    PubMed

    Torres, Antoni; Cillóniz, Catia; Ferrer, Miquel; Gabarrús, Albert; Polverino, Eva; Villegas, Santiago; Marco, Francesc; Mensa, Josep; Menéndez, Rosario; Niederman, Michael

    2015-05-01

    The sensitivity of blood cultures in the diagnosis of bacteraemia for community-acquired pneumonia is low. Recommendations, by guidelines, to perform blood cultures are discordant. We aimed to determine the incidence, microbial aetiology, risk factors and outcomes of bacteraemic patients with community-acquired pneumonia, including cases with antibiotic-resistant pathogens (ARP). A prospective, observational study was undertaken on consecutive adult patients admitted to the Hospital Clinic of Barcelona (Barcelona, Spain) with community-acquired pneumonia and blood cultures were obtained. Of the 2892 patients included, bacteraemia was present in 297 (10%) patients; 30 (10%) of whom had ARP (multidrug-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and an extended spectrum of beta-lactamase producing Enterobacteriaceae). In multivariate analyses, pleuritic pain, C-reactive protein ≥21.6 mg·dL(-1) and intensive care unit admissions were independently associated with bacteraemia, while prior antibiotic treatment and pneumococcal vaccine were protective factors. The risk factors for ARP bacteraemia were previous antibiotics and C-reactive protein <22.2 mg·dL(-1), while pleuritic pain was the only protective factor in the multivariate analysis. Bacteraemia (excluding ARP), appropriate empiric treatment, neurological disease, arterial oxygen tension/inspiratory oxygen fraction <250, pneumonia severity index risk classes IV and V, and intensive care unit admission were independently associated with a 30-day hospital mortality in the multivariate analysis. Inappropriate therapy was more frequent in ARP bacteraemia, compared with other bacteraemias (27% versus 3%, respectively, p<0.001). Antibiotic therapy protected against bacteraemia, but increased specifically the risk of bacteraemia from ARP due to the inappropriate coverage of these pathogens. Identifying patients at risk of ARP bacteraemia would help in

  8. Amphibians acquire resistance to live and dead fungus overcoming fungal immunosuppression

    PubMed Central

    McMahon, Taegan A.; Sears, Brittany F.; Venesky, Matthew D.; Bessler, Scott M.; Brown, Jenise M.; Deutsch, Kaitlin; Halstead, Neal T.; Lentz, Garrett; Tenouri, Nadia; Young, Suzanne; Civitello, David J.; Ortega, Nicole; Fites, J. Scott; Reinert, Laura K.; Rollins-Smith, Louise A.; Raffel, Thomas R.; Rohr, Jason R.

    2015-01-01

    Emerging fungal pathogens pose a greater threat to biodiversity than any other parasitic group1, causing declines of many taxa, including bats, corals, bees, snakes and amphibians1–4. Currently, there is little evidence that wild animals can acquire resistance to these pathogens5. Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis is a pathogenic fungus implicated in the recent global decline of amphibians6. Here we demonstrate that three species of amphibians can acquire behavioural or immunological resistance to B. dendrobatidis. Frogs learned to avoid the fungus after just one B. dendrobatidis exposure and temperature-induced clearance. In subsequent experiments in which B. dendrobatidis avoidance was prevented, the number of previous exposures was a negative predictor of B. dendrobatidis burden on frogs and B. dendrobatidis-induced mortality, and was a positive predictor of lymphocyte abundance and proliferation. These results suggest that amphibians can acquire immunity to B. dendrobatidis that overcomes pathogen-induced immunosuppression7–9 and increases their survival. Importantly, exposure to dead fungus induced a similar magnitude of acquired resistance as exposure to live fungus. Exposure of frogs to B. dendrobatidis antigens might offer a practical way to protect pathogen-naive amphibians and facilitate the reintroduction of amphibians to locations in the wild where B. dendrobatidis persists. Moreover, given the conserved nature of vertebrate immune responses to fungi5 and the fact that many animals are capable of learning to avoid natural enemies10, these results offer hope that other wild animal taxa threatened by invasive fungi might be rescued by management approaches based on herd immunity. PMID:25008531

  9. Prevalent mutator genotype identified in fungal pathogen Candida glabrata promotes multi-drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Healey, Kelley R; Zhao, Yanan; Perez, Winder B; Lockhart, Shawn R; Sobel, Jack D; Farmakiotis, Dimitrios; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P; Sanglard, Dominique; Taj-Aldeen, Saad J; Alexander, Barbara D; Jimenez-Ortigosa, Cristina; Shor, Erika; Perlin, David S

    2016-03-29

    The fungal pathogen Candida glabrata has emerged as a major health threat since it readily acquires resistance to multiple drug classes, including triazoles and/or echinocandins. Thus far, cellular mechanisms promoting the emergence of resistance to multiple drug classes have not been described in this organism. Here we demonstrate that a mutator phenotype caused by a mismatch repair defect is prevalent in C. glabrata clinical isolates. Strains carrying alterations in mismatch repair gene MSH2 exhibit a higher propensity to breakthrough antifungal treatment in vitro and in mouse models of colonization, and are recovered at a high rate (55% of all C. glabrata recovered) from patients. This genetic mechanism promotes the acquisition of resistance to multiple antifungals, at least partially explaining the elevated rates of triazole and multi-drug resistance associated with C. glabrata. We anticipate that identifying MSH2 defects in infecting strains may influence the management of patients on antifungal drug therapy.

  10. Multi-drug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and future chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Hiramatsu, K; Katayama, Y; Matsuo, M; Sasaki, T; Morimoto, Y; Sekiguchi, A; Baba, T

    2014-10-01

    Staphylococcus (S.) aureus silently stays as our natural flora, and yet sometimes threatens our life as a tenacious pathogen. In addition to its ability to outwit our immune system, its multi-drug resistance phenotype makes it one of the most intractable pathogenic bacteria in the history of antibiotic chemotherapy. It conquered practically all the antibiotics that have been developed since 1940s. In 1961, the first MRSA was found among S. aureus clinical isolates. Then MRSA prevailed throughout the world as a multi-resistant hospital pathogen. In 1997, MRSA strain Mu50 with reduced susceptibility to vancomycin was isolated. Vancomycin-intermediate S. aureus (VISA), so named according to the CLSI criteria, was the product of adaptive mutation of S. aureus against vancomycin that had long been the last resort to MRSA infection. Here, we describe the genetic basis for the remarkable ability of S. aureus to acquire multi-antibiotic resistance, and propose a novel paradigm for future chemotherapy against the multi-resistant pathogens.

  11. Sentinel cases of community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus onboard a naval ship.

    PubMed

    LaMar, James E; Carr, Russell B; Zinderman, Craig; McDonald, Kimberly

    2003-02-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is emerging as a community-acquired organism. A number of recent reports have documented its involvement in a variety of infections in which no risk factors for nosocomial transmission are present. This report presents the initial cases of a MRSA outbreak on a U.S. Navy ship. Each patient failed traditional antibiotic therapy and one required hospitalization. Their presentations evolved simultaneously and proved to be sentinel cases of an outbreak of cutaneous MRSA infections. The events of this outbreak emphasize the growing need to consider the prevalence of resistant organisms in outpatient settings, as well as the impact that infections from resistant organisms might have on the combat readiness of a military unit. Recommendations addressing infection-control guidelines for MRSA within close-quarter environments of healthy adults, such as military units, need to be developed and existing infection-control measures need to be regularly emphasized.

  12. Antimicrobial Resistance in Hospital-Acquired Gram-Negative Bacterial Infections

    PubMed Central

    Mehrad, Borna; Clark, Nina M.; Zhanel, George G.

    2015-01-01

    Aerobic gram-negative bacilli, including the family of Enterobacteriaceae and non-lactose fermenting bacteria such as Pseudomonas and Acinetobacter species, are major causes of hospital-acquired infections. The rate of antibiotic resistance among these pathogens has accelerated dramatically in recent years and has reached pandemic scale. It is no longer uncommon to encounter gram-negative infections that are untreatable using conventional antibiotics in hospitalized patients. In this review, we provide a summary of the major classes of gram-negative bacilli and their key mechanisms of antimicrobial resistance, discuss approaches to the treatment of these difficult infections, and outline methods to slow the further spread of resistance mechanisms. PMID:25940252

  13. Exploiting Nanotechnology to Overcome Tumor Drug Resistance: Challenges and Opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Kirtane, Ameya; Kalscheuer, Stephen; Panyam, Jayanth

    2013-01-01

    Tumor cells develop resistance to chemotherapeutic drugs through multiple mechanisms. Overexpression of efflux transporters is an important source of drug resistance. Efflux transporters such as P-glycoprotein reduce intracellular drug accumulation and compromise drug efficacy. Various nanoparticle-based approaches have been investigated to overcome efflux-mediated resistance. These include the use of formulation excipients that inhibit transporter activity and co-delivery of the anticancer drug with a specific inhibitor of transporter function or expression. However, the effectiveness of nanoparticles can be diminished by poor transport in the tumor tissue. Hence, adjunct therapies that improve the intratumoral distribution of nanoparticles may be vital to the successful application of nanotechnology to overcome tumor drug resistance. This review discusses the mechanisms of tumor drug resistance and highlights the opportunities and challenges in the use of nanoparticles to improve the efficacy of anticancer drugs against resistant tumors. PMID:24036273

  14. ACE2 overexpression inhibits acquired platinum resistance-induced tumor angiogenesis in NSCLC.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Qijian; Zhou, Ling; Zhou, Jianping; Wan, Huanying; Li, Qingyun; Feng, Yun

    2016-09-01

    Angiotensin II (AngII) is a multifunctional bioactive peptide in the renin-angiotensin system (RAS). Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) is a newly identified component of RAS. We previously reported that ACE2 overexpression may inhibit cell growth and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) production in vitro and in vivo. In the present study, we investigated the effect of ACE2 on tumor-associated angiogen-esis after the development of acquired platinum resistance in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Four NSCLC cell lines, A549, LLC, A549-DDP and LLC-DDP, were used in vitro, while A549 and A549-DDP cells were used in vivo. A549-DDP and LLC-DDP cells were newly established at our institution as acquired platinum-resistant sublines by culturing the former parent cells in cisplatin (CDDP)-containing conditioned medium for 6 months. These platinum-resistant cells showed significantly higher angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R), ACE and VEGF production and lower ACE2 expression than their corresponding parent cells. We showed that ACE2 overexpression inhibited the production of VEGF in vitro and in vivo compared to their corresponding parent cells. We also found that ACE2 overexpression reduced the expression of AT1R and ACE. Additionally, we confirmed that ACE2 overexpres-sion inhibited cell growth and VEGF production while simultaneously suppressing ACE and AT1R expression in human lung cancer xenografts. Our findings indicate that ACE2 overexpression may potentially suppress angiogenesis in NSCLC after the development of acquired platinum resistance. PMID:27460845

  15. Multiplicity of acquired cross-resistance in paclitaxel-resistant cancer cells is associated with feedback control of TUBB3 via FOXO3a-mediated ABCB1 regulation

    PubMed Central

    Aldonza, Mark Borris D.; Hong, Ji-Young; Alinsug, Malona V.; Song, Jayoung; Lee, Sang Kook

    2016-01-01

    Acquired drug resistance is a primary obstacle for effective cancer therapy. The correlation of point mutations in class III β-tubulin (TUBB3) and the prominent overexpression of ATP-binding cassette P-glycoprotein (ABCB1), a multidrug resistance gene, have been protruding mechanisms of resistance to microtubule disruptors such as paclitaxel (PTX) for many cancers. However, the precise underlying mechanism of the rapid onset of cross-resistance to an array of structurally and functionally unrelated drugs in PTX-resistant cancers has been poorly understood. We determined that our established PTX-resistant cancer cells display ABCB1/ABCC1-associated cross-resistance to chemically different drugs such as 5-fluorouracil, docetaxel, and cisplatin. We found that feedback activation of TUBB3 can be triggered through the FOXO3a-dependent regulation of ABCB1, which resulted in the accentuation of induced PTX resistance and encouraged multiplicity in acquired cross-resistance. FOXO3a-directed regulation of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) function suggests that control of ABCB1 involves methylation-dependent activation. Consistently, transcriptional overexpression or downregulation of FOXO3a directs inhibitor-controlled protease-degradation of TUBB3. The functional PI3K/Akt signaling is tightly responsive to FOXO3a activation alongside doxorubicin treatment, which directs FOXO3a arginine hypermethylation. In addition, we found that secretome factors from PTX-resistant cancer cells with acquired cross-resistance support a P-gp-dependent association in multidrug resistance (MDR) development, which assisted the FOXO3a-mediated control of TUBB3 feedback. The direct silencing of TUBB3 reverses induced multiple cross-resistance, reduces drug-resistant tumor mass, and suppresses the impaired microtubule stability status of PTX-resistant cells with transient cross-resistance. These findings highlight the control of the TUBB3 response to ABCB1 genetic suppressors as a mechanism to reverse the

  16. Aberrant splicing and drug resistance in AML.

    PubMed

    de Necochea-Campion, Rosalia; Shouse, Geoffrey P; Zhou, Qi; Mirshahidi, Saied; Chen, Chien-Shing

    2016-01-01

    The advent of next-generation sequencing technologies has unveiled a new window into the heterogeneity of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). In particular, recurrent mutations in spliceosome machinery and genome-wide aberrant splicing events have been recognized as a prominent component of this disease. This review will focus on how these factors influence drug resistance through altered splicing of tumor suppressor and oncogenes and dysregulation of the apoptotic signaling network. A better understanding of these factors in disease progression is necessary to design appropriate therapeutic strategies recognizing specific alternatively spliced or mutated oncogenic targets. PMID:27613060

  17. Mutational and acquired carbapenem resistance mechanisms in multidrug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolates from Recife, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Cavalcanti, Felipe Lira de Sá; Mirones, Cristina Rodríguez; Paucar, Elena Román; Montes, Laura Álvarez; Leal-Balbino, Tereza Cristina; Morais, Marcia Maria Camargo de; Martínez-Martínez, Luis; Ocampo-Sosa, Alain Antonio

    2015-12-01

    An investigation was carried out into the genetic mechanisms responsible for multidrug resistance in nine carbapenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from different hospitals in Recife, Brazil. Susceptibility to antimicrobial agents was determined by broth microdilution. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was employed to detect the presence of genes encoding β-lactamases, aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes (AMEs), 16S rRNA methylases, integron-related genes and OprD. Expression of genes coding for efflux pumps and AmpC cephalosporinase were assessed by quantitative PCR. The outer membrane proteins were separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The blaSPM-1, blaKPC-2 and blaGES-1 genes were detected in P. aeruginosa isolates in addition to different AME genes. The loss of OprD in nine isolates was mainly due to frameshift mutations, premature stop codons and point mutations. An association of loss of OprD with the overexpression of MexAB-OprM and MexXY-OprM was observed in most isolates. Hyper-production of AmpC was also observed in three isolates. Clonal relationship of the isolates was determined by repetitive element palindromic-PCR and multilocus sequence typing. Our results show that the loss of OprD along with overexpression of efflux pumps and β-lactamase production were responsible for the multidrug resistance in the isolates analysed.

  18. Mutational and acquired carbapenem resistance mechanisms in multidrug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolates from Recife, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Cavalcanti, Felipe Lira de Sá; Mirones, Cristina Rodríguez; Paucar, Elena Román; Montes, Laura Álvarez; Leal-Balbino, Tereza Cristina; de Morais, Marcia Maria Camargo; Martínez-Martínez, Luis; Ocampo-Sosa, Alain Antonio

    2015-01-01

    An investigation was carried out into the genetic mechanisms responsible for multidrug resistance in nine carbapenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosaisolates from different hospitals in Recife, Brazil. Susceptibility to antimicrobial agents was determined by broth microdilution. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was employed to detect the presence of genes encoding β-lactamases, aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes (AMEs), 16S rRNA methylases, integron-related genes and OprD. Expression of genes coding for efflux pumps and AmpC cephalosporinase were assessed by quantitative PCR. The outer membrane proteins were separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The blaSPM-1, blaKPC-2 and blaGES-1 genes were detected in P. aeruginosaisolates in addition to different AME genes. The loss of OprD in nine isolates was mainly due to frameshift mutations, premature stop codons and point mutations. An association of loss of OprD with the overexpression of MexAB-OprM and MexXY-OprM was observed in most isolates. Hyper-production of AmpC was also observed in three isolates. Clonal relationship of the isolates was determined by repetitive element palindromic-PCR and multilocus sequence typing. Our results show that the loss of OprD along with overexpression of efflux pumps and β-lactamase production were responsible for the multidrug resistance in the isolates analysed. PMID:26676375

  19. Systemic acquired resistance (50 years after discovery): moving from the lab to the field.

    PubMed

    Gozzo, Franco; Faoro, Franco

    2013-12-26

    Induction of plant defense(s) against pathogen challenge(s) has been the object of progressively more intense research in the past two decades. Insights on mechanisms of systemic acquired resistance (SAR) and similar, alternative processes, as well as on problems encountered on moving to their practical application in open field, have been carefully pursued and, as far as possible, defined. In reviewing the number of research works published in metabolomic, genetic, biochemical, and crop protection correlated disciplines, the following outline has been adopted: 1, introduction to the processes currently considered as models of the innate immunity; 2, primary signals, such as salicylic acid (SA), jasmonic acid (JA), and abscisic acid (ABA), involved with different roles in the above-mentioned processes; 3, long-distance signals, identified from petiole exudates as mobile signaling metabolites during expressed resistance; 4, exogenous inducers, including the most significant chemicals known to stimulate the plant resistance induction and originated from both synthetic and natural sources; 5, fungicides shown to act as stimulators of SAR in addition to their biocidal action; 6, elusive mechanism of priming, reporting on the most recent working hypotheses on the pretranscriptional ways through which treated plants may express resistance upon pathogen attack and how this resistance can be transmitted to the next generation; 7, fitness costs and benefits of SAR so far reported from field application of induced resistance; 8, factors affecting efficacy of induced resistance in the open field, indicating that forces, unrevealed under controlled conditions, may be operative in the field; 9, concluding remarks address the efforts required to apply the strategy of crop resistance induction according to the rules of integrated pest management.

  20. ABCG2 gene amplification and expression in esophageal cancer cells with acquired adriamycin resistance.

    PubMed

    Liu, Liang; Zuo, Lian Fu; Guo, Jian Wen

    2014-04-01

    Resistance to chemotherapeutic agents is the main reason for treatment failure in patients with cancer. The primary mechanism of multidrug resistance (MDR) is the overexpression of drug efflux transporters, including ATP‑binding cassette transporter G2 (ABCG2). To the best of our knowledge, the MDR mechanisms of esophageal cancer have not been described. An adriamycin (ADM)-resistant subline, Eca109/ADM, was generated from the Eca109 esophageal cancer cell line by a stepwise selection in ADM from 0.002 to 0.02 ng/µl. The resulting subline, designated Eca109/ADM, revealed a 3.29-fold resistance against ADM compared with the Eca109 cell line. The ABCG2 gene expression in the Eca109/ADM cells was increased compared with that of the Eca109 cells. The cellular properties of the Eca109/ADM cells were detected by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), flow cytometry and western blotting. The ABCG2 expression levels were detected by RT-PCR and flow cytometry, and the drug efflux effect was detected by flow cytometry. The present study detected the correlation between ABCG2 and the multidrug resistance of esophageal cancer. ABCG2 gene expression and the drug efflux effect of the Eca109/ADM cells were increased compared with those of the Eca109 cells. Collectively, the results of this study indicated that the overexpression of ABCG2 in the Eca109/ADM cells resulted in drug efflux, which may be responsible for the development of esophageal cancer MDR.

  1. Daunorubicin-Loaded DNA Origami Nanostructures Circumvent Drug-Resistance Mechanisms in a Leukemia Model.

    PubMed

    Halley, Patrick D; Lucas, Christopher R; McWilliams, Emily M; Webber, Matthew J; Patton, Randy A; Kural, Comert; Lucas, David M; Byrd, John C; Castro, Carlos E

    2016-01-20

    Many cancers show primary or acquired drug resistance due to the overexpression of efflux pumps. A novel mechanism to circumvent this is to integrate drugs, such as anthracycline antibiotics, with nanoparticle delivery vehicles that can bypass intrinsic tumor drug-resistance mechanisms. DNA nanoparticles serve as an efficient binding platform for intercalating drugs (e.g., anthracyclines doxorubicin and daunorubicin, which are widely used to treat acute leukemias) and enable precise structure design and chemical modifications, for example, for incorporating targeting capabilities. Here, DNA nanostructures are utilized to circumvent daunorubicin drug resistance at clinically relevant doses in a leukemia cell line model. The fabrication of a rod-like DNA origami drug carrier is reported that can be controllably loaded with daunorubicin. It is further directly verified that nanostructure-mediated daunorubicin delivery leads to increased drug entry and retention in cells relative to free daunorubicin at equal concentrations, which yields significantly enhanced drug efficacy. Our results indicate that DNA origami nanostructures can circumvent efflux-pump-mediated drug resistance in leukemia cells at clinically relevant drug concentrations and provide a robust DNA nanostructure design that could be implemented in a wide range of cellular applications due to its remarkably fast self-assembly (≈5 min) and excellent stability in cell culture conditions. PMID:26583570

  2. Hospital-acquired infections due to multidrug-resistant organisms in Hungary, 2005-2010.

    PubMed

    Caini, S; Hajdu, A; Kurcz, A; Borocz, K

    2013-01-10

    Healthcare-associated infections caused by multidrug-resistant organisms are associated with prolonged medical care, worse outcome and costly therapies. In Hungary, hospital-acquired infections (HAIs) due to epidemiologically important multidrug-resistant organisms are notifiable by law since 2004. Overall, 6,845 case-patients (59.8% men; median age: 65 years) were notified in Hungary from 2005 to 2010. One third of case-patients died in hospital. The overall incidence of infections increased from 5.4 in 2005 to 14.7 per 100,000 patient-days in 2010. Meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) was the most frequently reported pathogen (52.2%), but while its incidence seemed to stabilise after 2007, notifications of multidrug-resistant Gram-negative organisms have significantly increased from 2005 to 2010. Surgical wound and bloodstream were the most frequently reported sites of infection. Although MRSA incidence has seemingly reached a plateau in recent years, actions aiming at reducing the burden of HAIs with special focus on Gram-negative multidrug-resistant organisms are needed in Hungary. Continuing promotion of antimicrobial stewardship, infection control methodologies, reinforced HAI surveillance among healthcare and infection control practitioners, and engagement of stakeholders, hospital managers and public health authorities to facilitate the implementation of existing guidelines and protocols are essential.

  3. Fibrocyte-like cells mediate acquired resistance to anti-angiogenic therapy with bevacizumab

    PubMed Central

    Mitsuhashi, Atsushi; Goto, Hisatsugu; Saijo, Atsuro; Trung, Van The; Aono, Yoshinori; Ogino, Hirokazu; Kuramoto, Takuya; Tabata, Sho; Uehara, Hisanori; Izumi, Keisuke; Yoshida, Mitsuteru; Kobayashi, Hiroaki; Takahashi, Hidefusa; Gotoh, Masashi; Kakiuchi, Soji; Hanibuchi, Masaki; Yano, Seiji; Yokomise, Hiroyasu; Sakiyama, Shoji; Nishioka, Yasuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Bevacizumab exerts anti-angiogenic effects in cancer patients by inhibiting vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). However, its use is still limited due to the development of resistance to the treatment. Such resistance can be regulated by various factors, although the underlying mechanisms remain incompletely understood. Here we show that bone marrow-derived fibrocyte-like cells, defined as alpha-1 type I collagen-positive and CXCR4-positive cells, contribute to the acquired resistance to bevacizumab. In mouse models of malignant pleural mesothelioma and lung cancer, fibrocyte-like cells mediate the resistance to bevacizumab as the main producer of fibroblast growth factor 2. In clinical specimens of lung cancer, the number of fibrocyte-like cells is significantly increased in bevacizumab-treated tumours, and correlates with the number of treatment cycles, as well as CD31-positive vessels. Our results identify fibrocyte-like cells as a promising cell biomarker and a potential therapeutic target to overcome resistance to anti-VEGF therapy. PMID:26635184

  4. Radiation-resistant acquired immunity of vaccinated mice to Schistosoma mansoni

    SciTech Connect

    Aitken, R.; Coulson, P.S.; Dixon, B.; Wilson, R.A.

    1987-11-01

    Vaccination of mice with attenuated cercariae of Schistosoma mansoni induces specific acquired resistance to challenge infection. This resistance is immunologically-mediated, possibly via a delayed-type hypersensitivity. Studies of parasite migration have shown that the protective mechanism operates most effectively in the lungs of vaccinated mice. We have probed the mechanism by exposing mice to 500 rads of gamma radiation before challenge infection. Our results show that the effector mechanism operative against challenge larvae is resistant to radiation. In contrast, classical immune responses are markedly suppressed by the same treatment. While leukocyte populations in the blood fall dramatically after irradiation, numbers of cells recoverable by bronchoalveolar lavage are unaffected. We suggest that vaccination with attenuated cercariae establishes populations of sensitized cells in the lungs which trigger the mechanism of resistance when challenge schistosomula migrate through pulmonary capillary beds. Although the cells may be partially disabled by irradiation, they remain responsive to worm antigens and thereby capable of initiating the elimination mechanism. This hypothesis would explain the radiation resistance of vaccine-induced immunity to S. mansoni.

  5. Trastuzumab emtansine: mechanisms of action and drug resistance

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Trastuzumab emtansine (T-DM1) is an antibody-drug conjugate that is effective and generally well tolerated when administered as a single agent to treat advanced breast cancer. Efficacy has now been demonstrated in randomized trials as first line, second line, and later than the second line treatment of advanced breast cancer. T-DM1 is currently being evaluated as adjuvant treatment for early breast cancer. It has several mechanisms of action consisting of the anti-tumor effects of trastuzumab and those of DM1, a cytotoxic anti-microtubule agent released within the target cells upon degradation of the human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2)-T-DM1 complex in lysosomes. The cytotoxic effect of T-DM1 likely varies depending on the intracellular concentration of DM1 accumulated in cancer cells, high intracellular levels resulting in rapid apoptosis, somewhat lower levels in impaired cellular trafficking and mitotic catastrophe, while the lowest levels lead to poor response to T-DM1. Primary resistance of HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer to T-DM1 appears to be relatively infrequent, but most patients treated with T-DM1 develop acquired drug resistance. The mechanisms of resistance are incompletely understood, but mechanisms limiting the binding of trastuzumab to cancer cells may be involved. The cytotoxic effect of T-DM1 may be impaired by inefficient internalization or enhanced recycling of the HER2-T-DM1 complex in cancer cells, or impaired lysosomal degradation of trastuzumab or intracellular trafficking of HER2. The effect of T-DM1 may also be compromised by multidrug resistance proteins that pump DM1 out of cancer cells. In this review we discuss the mechanism of action of T-DM1 and the key clinical results obtained with it, the combinations of T-DM1 with other cytotoxic agents and anti-HER drugs, and the potential resistance mechanisms and the strategies to overcome resistance to T-DM1. PMID:24887180

  6. Young Women's Experiences of Resisting Invitations to Use Illicit Drugs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koehn, Corinne V.; O'Neill, Linda K.

    2011-01-01

    Ten young women were interviewed regarding their experiences of resisting invitations to use illicit drugs. Hermeneutic phenomenology was used to gather and analyze information. One key theme was the motivations that inspired women to refuse drug offers. Young women resisted drug invitations because of their desires to be authentic, protect their…

  7. Acquired resistance of pancreatic cancer cells to treatment with gemcitabine and HER-inhibitors is accompanied by increased sensitivity to STAT3 inhibition

    PubMed Central

    IOANNOU, NIKOLAOS; SEDDON, ALAN M.; DALGLEISH, ANGUS; MACKINTOSH, DAVID; SOLCA, FLAVIO; MODJTAHEDI, HELMOUT

    2016-01-01

    Drug-resistance is a major contributing factor for the poor prognosis in patients with pancreatic cancer. We have shown previously that the irreversible ErbB family blocker afatinib, is more effective than the reversible EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor erlotinib in inhibiting the growth of human pancreatic cancer cells. The aim of this study was to develop human pancreatic cancer cell (BxPc3) variants with acquired resistance to treatment with gemcitabine, afatinib, or erlotinib, and to investigate the molecular changes that accompany the acquisition of a drug-resistant phenotype. We also investigated the therapeutic potential of various agents in the treatment of such drug-resistant variants. Three variant forms of BxPc3 cells with acquired resistance to gemcitabine (BxPc3GEM), afatinib (BxPc3AFR) or erlotinib (BxPc3OSIR) were developed following treatment with increasing doses of such drugs. The expression level, mutational and phosphorylation status of various growth factor receptors and downstream cell signaling molecules were determined by FACS, human phopsho-RTK array, and western blot analysis while the sulforhodamine B assay was used for determining the effect of various agents on the growth of such tumours. We found that all three BxPc3 variants with acquired resistance to gemcitabine (BxPc3GEM), afatinib (BxPc3AFR) or erlotinib (BxPc3OSIR) also become less sensitive to treatment with the two other agents. Acquisition of resistance to these agents was accompanied by upregulation of p-c-MET, p-STAT3, CD44, increased autocrine production of EGFR ligand amphiregulin and differential activation status of EGFR tyrosine residues as well as downregulation of total and p-SRC. Of all therapeutic interventions examined, including the addition of an anti-EGFR antibody ICR62, an anti-CD44 monoclonal antibody, and of STAT3 or c-MET inhibitors, only treatment with the STAT3 inhibitor Stattic produced a higher growth inhibitory effect in all three drug-resistant variants

  8. Arabidopsis TTR1 causes LRR-dependent lethal systemic necrosis, rather than systemic acquired resistance, to Tobacco ringspot virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Most Arabidopsis ecotypes display tolerance to the Tobacco ringspot virus (TRSV), but a subset of Arabidopsis ecotypes, including Estland (Est), develop lethal systemic necrosis (LSN), which differs from the localized hypersensitive responses (HRs) or systemic acquired resistance (SAR) characteristi...

  9. Small cell lung cancer transformation and T790M mutation: complimentary roles in acquired resistance to kinase inhibitors in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Suda, Kenichi; Murakami, Isao; Sakai, Kazuko; Mizuuchi, Hiroshi; Shimizu, Shigeki; Sato, Katsuaki; Tomizawa, Kenji; Tomida, Shuta; Yatabe, Yasushi; Nishio, Kazuto; Mitsudomi, Tetsuya

    2015-09-24

    Lung cancers often harbour a mutation in the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene. Because proliferation and survival of lung cancers with EGFR mutation solely depend on aberrant signalling from the mutated EGFR, these tumours often show dramatic responses to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). However, acquiring resistance to these drugs is almost inevitable, thus a better understanding of the underlying resistance mechanisms is critical. Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) transformation is a relatively rare acquired resistance mechanism that has lately attracted considerable attention. In the present study, through an in-depth analysis of multiple EGFR-TKI refractory lesions obtained from an autopsy case, we observed a complementary relationship between SCLC transformation and EGFR T790M secondary mutation (resistance mutation). We also identified analogies and differences in genetic aberration between a TKI-refractory lesion with SCLC transformation and one with EGFR T790M mutation. In particular, target sequencing revealed a TP53 P151S mutation in all pre- and post-treatment lesions. PTEN M264I mutation was identified only in a TKI-refractory lesion with SCLC transformation, while PIK3CA and RB1 mutations were identified only in pre-treatment primary tumour samples. These results provide the groundwork for understanding acquired resistance to EGFR-TKIs via SCLC transformation.

  10. Increased thymidylate synthase in L1210 cells possessing acquired resistance to N10-propargyl-5,8-dideazafolic acid (CB3717): development, characterization, and cross-resistance studies

    SciTech Connect

    Jackman, A.L.; Alison, D.L.; Calvert, A.H.; Harrap, K.R.

    1986-06-01

    The properties are described of a mutant L1210 cell line (L1210:C15) with acquired resistance (greater than 200-fold) to the thymidylate synthase (TS) inhibitor N10-propargyl-5,8-dideazafolic acid. TS was overproduced 45-fold and was accompanied by a small increase in the activity of dihydrofolate reductase (2.6-fold). Both the level of resistance and enzyme activities were maintained in drug-free medium (greater than 300 generations). Failure of N10-propargyl-5,8-dideazafolic acid to suppress the (/sup 3/H)-2'-deoxyuridine incorporation into the acid-precipitable material of the resistant line supported the evidence that TS overproduction was the mechanism of resistance; consequently the L1210:C15 cells were largely cross-resistant to another (but weaker) TS inhibitor, 5,8-dideazafolic acid. Minimal cross-resistance was observed to the dihydrofolate reductase inhibitors methotrexate and 5-methyl-5,8-dideazaaminopterin (5- and 2-fold, respectively). L1210 and L1210:C15 cells were, however, equally sensitive to 5-fluorodeoxyuridine (FdUrd), an unexpected finding since a metabolite, 5-fluorodeoxyuridine monophosphate, is a potent TS inhibitor; however, this cytotoxicity against the L1210:C15 cells was antagonized by coincubation with 5 microM folinic acid although folinic acid potentiated the cytotoxicity of FdUrd to the N10-propargyl-5,8-dideazafolic acid-sensitive L1210 line. Thymidine was much less effective as a FdUrd protecting agent in the L1210:C15 when compared with the L1210 cells; however, a combination of thymidine plus hypoxanthine was without any additional effect (compared with thymidine alone) against the sensitive line but effectively protected L1210:C15 cells.

  11. [Multicenter study in southern South America of the in vitro activity of telithromycin in strains with defined resistance phenotypes isolated from community-acquired respiratory infections].

    PubMed

    Casellas, J M; Visser, M; Mac Dougall, N; Coco, B; Tomé, G; Gliosca, L

    2001-09-01

    , and all those resistant to clindamycin were resistant due to the erm inducible mechanism. Only 20 out of 36 strains of clindamycin-resistant S. pneumoniae and 25 of the 36 ampicillin-resistant H. influenzae strains could be collected, thereby showing that these resistance patterns are less common in the participating South American countries than in other areas. The in vitro activity of telithromycin suggests that it is a promising antibacterial drug for the treatment of community-acquired respiratory tract infections.

  12. Specific Cell Targeting Therapy Bypasses Drug Resistance Mechanisms in African Trypanosomiasis

    PubMed Central

    Unciti-Broceta, Juan D.; Arias, José L.; Maceira, José; Soriano, Miguel; Ortiz-González, Matilde; Hernández-Quero, José; Muñóz-Torres, Manuel; de Koning, Harry P.; Magez, Stefan; Garcia-Salcedo, José A.

    2015-01-01

    African trypanosomiasis is a deadly neglected disease caused by the extracellular parasite Trypanosoma brucei. Current therapies are characterized by high drug toxicity and increasing drug resistance mainly associated with loss-of-function mutations in the transporters involved in drug import. The introduction of new antiparasitic drugs into therapeutic use is a slow and expensive process. In contrast, specific targeting of existing drugs could represent a more rapid and cost-effective approach for neglected disease treatment, impacting through reduced systemic toxicity and circumventing resistance acquired through impaired compound uptake. We have generated nanoparticles of chitosan loaded with the trypanocidal drug pentamidine and coated by a single domain nanobody that specifically targets the surface of African trypanosomes. Once loaded into this nanocarrier, pentamidine enters trypanosomes through endocytosis instead of via classical cell surface transporters. The curative dose of pentamidine-loaded nanobody-chitosan nanoparticles was 100-fold lower than pentamidine alone in a murine model of acute African trypanosomiasis. Crucially, this new formulation displayed undiminished in vitro and in vivo activity against a trypanosome cell line resistant to pentamidine as a result of mutations in the surface transporter aquaglyceroporin 2. We conclude that this new drug delivery system increases drug efficacy and has the ability to overcome resistance to some anti-protozoal drugs. PMID:26110623

  13. Specific Cell Targeting Therapy Bypasses Drug Resistance Mechanisms in African Trypanosomiasis.

    PubMed

    Unciti-Broceta, Juan D; Arias, José L; Maceira, José; Soriano, Miguel; Ortiz-González, Matilde; Hernández-Quero, José; Muñóz-Torres, Manuel; de Koning, Harry P; Magez, Stefan; Garcia-Salcedo, José A

    2015-06-01

    African trypanosomiasis is a deadly neglected disease caused by the extracellular parasite Trypanosoma brucei. Current therapies are characterized by high drug toxicity and increasing drug resistance mainly associated with loss-of-function mutations in the transporters involved in drug import. The introduction of new antiparasitic drugs into therapeutic use is a slow and expensive process. In contrast, specific targeting of existing drugs could represent a more rapid and cost-effective approach for neglected disease treatment, impacting through reduced systemic toxicity and circumventing resistance acquired through impaired compound uptake. We have generated nanoparticles of chitosan loaded with the trypanocidal drug pentamidine and coated by a single domain nanobody that specifically targets the surface of African trypanosomes. Once loaded into this nanocarrier, pentamidine enters trypanosomes through endocytosis instead of via classical cell surface transporters. The curative dose of pentamidine-loaded nanobody-chitosan nanoparticles was 100-fold lower than pentamidine alone in a murine model of acute African trypanosomiasis. Crucially, this new formulation displayed undiminished in vitro and in vivo activity against a trypanosome cell line resistant to pentamidine as a result of mutations in the surface transporter aquaglyceroporin 2. We conclude that this new drug delivery system increases drug efficacy and has the ability to overcome resistance to some anti-protozoal drugs.

  14. Drug Resistance of Coliform Bacteria in Hospital and City Sewage

    PubMed Central

    Grabow, W. O. K.; Prozesky, O. W.

    1973-01-01

    The number and properties of drug-resistant coliform bacteria in hospital and city sewage were compared. There was little difference in the counts of organisms with nontransferable resistance to one or more of 13 commonly used drugs. An average of 26% of coliforms in hospital waste water had transferable resistance to at least one of the drugs ampicillin, chloramphenicol, streptomycin, sulfonamide, or tetracycline as compared to an average of 4% in city sewage. R+ bacteria in the hospital discharge were also resistant to a broader spectrum of drugs than those in city sewage. In both effluents, the occurrence of fecal Escherichia coli among R+ coliforms was twice as high as among coliforms with nontransferable resistance. Resistance was transferable to Salmonella typhi, and such drug-resistant pathogens in the water environment could be of particular concern. The significance of the results with regard to environmental pollution with R+ bacteria and the dissemination of these organisms is discussed. PMID:4597713

  15. NF-κB drives acquired resistance to a novel mutant-selective EGFR inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Galvani, Elena; Sun, Jing; Leon, Leticia G; Sciarrillo, Rocco; Narayan, Ravi S; Sjin, Robert Tjin Tham; Lee, Kwangho; Ohashi, Kadoaki; Heideman, Daniëlle A M; Alfieri, Roberta R; Heynen, Guus J; Bernards, René; Smit, Egbert F; Pao, William; Peters, Godefridus J; Giovannetti, Elisa

    2015-12-15

    The clinical efficacy of EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) harbouring activating EGFR mutations is limited by the emergence of acquired resistance, mostly ascribed to the secondary EGFR-T790M mutation. Selective EGFR-T790M inhibitors have been proposed as a new, extremely relevant therapeutic approach. Here, we demonstrate that the novel irreversible EGFR-TKI CNX-2006, a structural analog of CO-1686, currently tested in a phase-1/2 trial, is active against in vitro and in vivo NSCLC models expressing mutant EGFR, with minimal effect on the wild-type receptor. By integration of genetic and functional analyses in isogenic cell pairs we provide evidence of the crucial role played by NF-κB1 in driving CNX-2006 acquired resistance and show that NF-κB activation may replace the oncogenic EGFR signaling in NSCLC when effective and persistent inhibition of the target is achieved in the presence of the T790M mutation. In this context, we demonstrate that the sole, either genetic or pharmacologic, inhibition of NF-κB is sufficient to reduce the viability of cells that adapted to EGFR-TKIs. Overall, our findings support the rational inhibition of members of the NF-κB pathway as a promising therapeutic option for patients who progress after treatment with novel mutant-selective EGFR-TKIs.

  16. NF-κB drives acquired resistance to a novel mutant-selective EGFR inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Galvani, Elena; Sun, Jing; Leon, Leticia G.; Sciarrillo, Rocco; Narayan, Ravi S.; Tjin Tham Sjin, Robert; Lee, Kwangho; Ohashi, Kadoaki; Heideman, Daniëlle A.M.; Alfieri, Roberta R.; Heynen, Guus J.; Bernards, René; Smit, Egbert F.; Pao, William; Peters, Godefridus J.; Giovannetti, Elisa

    2015-01-01

    The clinical efficacy of EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) harbouring activating EGFR mutations is limited by the emergence of acquired resistance, mostly ascribed to the secondary EGFR-T790M mutation. Selective EGFR-T790M inhibitors have been proposed as a new, extremely relevant therapeutic approach. Here, we demonstrate that the novel irreversible EGFR-TKI CNX-2006, a structural analog of CO-1686, currently tested in a phase-1/2 trial, is active against in vitro and in vivo NSCLC models expressing mutant EGFR, with minimal effect on the wild-type receptor. By integration of genetic and functional analyses in isogenic cell pairs we provide evidence of the crucial role played by NF-κB1 in driving CNX-2006 acquired resistance and show that NF-κB activation may replace the oncogenic EGFR signaling in NSCLC when effective and persistent inhibition of the target is achieved in the presence of the T790M mutation. In this context, we demonstrate that the sole, either genetic or pharmacologic, inhibition of NF-κB is sufficient to reduce the viability of cells that adapted to EGFR-TKIs. Overall, our findings support the rational inhibition of members of the NF-κB pathway as a promising therapeutic option for patients who progress after treatment with novel mutant-selective EGFR-TKIs. PMID:26015408

  17. Potential attenuation of p38 signaling by DDB2 as a factor in acquired TNF resistance.

    PubMed

    Sun, Chun-Ling; Chao, Chuck C-K

    2005-06-20

    Our previous study demonstrated that DDB2, a DNA repair protein, attenuates cell surface membrane-associated death signal induced by UV or FasAb; DDB2 is overexpressed in cisplatin-selected cells. However, the molecular mechanism underlying the protective role of DDB2 along the apoptotic pathway remains unknown. Our study identified the cross-resistance of the cisplatin-selected cells to tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha). Since knock-down of the DDB2 level rendered cells (HR18) sensitive to the treatment, the cell sensitivity to TNF-alpha appears inversely proportional to the cellular level of DDB2. Treatment of HeLa cells with TNF-alpha transiently induced activation of p38MAPK signal, but this induction was significantly reduced in the resistant cells. Overexpression of DDB2 attenuated the activation of p38 in cells. TNF-alpha-induced apoptotic signals, represented by caspase-8 and downstream substrate cleavage, were reduced in resistant cells compared to their sensitive counterparts. Inhibition of p38 signal by SB202190 clearly attenuated TNF-alpha-induced apoptotic signals. Moreover, overexpression of DDB2 in HR18 cells also attenuated TNF-alpha induced caspase activation. These results suggest that p38MAPK activation may be a key upstream signal of TNF-alpha-induced apoptosis and that attenuation of p38 signal by DDB2 overexpression may be responsible for acquired TNF-alpha resistance. PMID:15700318

  18. Systematic identification of signaling pathways with potential to confer anticancer drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Martz, Colin A; Ottina, Kathleen A; Singleton, Katherine R; Jasper, Jeff S; Wardell, Suzanne E; Peraza-Penton, Ashley; Anderson, Grace R; Winter, Peter S; Wang, Tim; Alley, Holly M; Kwong, Lawrence N; Cooper, Zachary A; Tetzlaff, Michael; Chen, Pei-Ling; Rathmell, Jeffrey C; Flaherty, Keith T; Wargo, Jennifer A; McDonnell, Donald P; Sabatini, David M; Wood, Kris C

    2014-12-23

    Cancer cells can activate diverse signaling pathways to evade the cytotoxic action of drugs. We created and screened a library of barcoded pathway-activating mutant complementary DNAs to identify those that enhanced the survival of cancer cells in the presence of 13 clinically relevant, targeted therapies. We found that activation of the RAS-MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase), Notch1, PI3K (phosphoinositide 3-kinase)-mTOR (mechanistic target of rapamycin), and ER (estrogen receptor) signaling pathways often conferred resistance to this selection of drugs. Activation of the Notch1 pathway promoted acquired resistance to tamoxifen (an ER-targeted therapy) in serially passaged breast cancer xenografts in mice, and treating mice with a γ-secretase inhibitor to inhibit Notch signaling restored tamoxifen sensitivity. Markers of Notch1 activity in tumor tissue correlated with resistance to tamoxifen in breast cancer patients. Similarly, activation of Notch1 signaling promoted acquired resistance to MAPK inhibitors in BRAF(V600E) melanoma cells in culture, and the abundance of Notch1 pathway markers was increased in tumors from a subset of melanoma patients. Thus, Notch1 signaling may be a therapeutic target in some drug-resistant breast cancers and melanomas. Additionally, multiple resistance pathways were activated in melanoma cell lines with intrinsic resistance to MAPK inhibitors, and simultaneous inhibition of these pathways synergistically induced drug sensitivity. These data illustrate the potential for systematic identification of the signaling pathways controlling drug resistance that could inform clinical strategies and drug development for multiple types of cancer. This approach may also be used to advance clinical options in other disease contexts. PMID:25538079

  19. Insight into the Inhibition of Drug-Resistant Mutants of the Receptor Tyrosine Kinase EGFR.

    PubMed

    Engel, Julian; Becker, Christian; Lategahn, Jonas; Keul, Marina; Ketzer, Julia; Mühlenberg, Thomas; Kollipara, Laxmikanth; Schultz-Fademrecht, Carsten; Zahedi, René P; Bauer, Sebastian; Rauh, Daniel

    2016-08-26

    Targeting acquired drug resistance represents the major challenge in the treatment of EGFR-driven non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Herein, we describe the structure-based design, synthesis, and biological evaluation of a novel class of covalent EGFR inhibitors that exhibit excellent inhibition of EGFR-mutant drug-resistant cells. Protein X-ray crystallography combined with detailed kinetic studies led to a deeper understanding of the mode of inhibition of EGFR-T790M and provided insight into the key principles for effective inhibition of the recently discovered tertiary mutation at EGFR-C797S.

  20. Design of HIV Protease Inhibitors Targeting Protein Backbone: An Effective Strategy for Combating Drug Resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Arun K.; Chapsal, Bruno D.; Weber, Irene T.; Mitsuya, Hiroaki

    2008-06-03

    The discovery of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) protease inhibitors (PIs) and their utilization in highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) have been a major turning point in the management of HIV/acquired immune-deficiency syndrome (AIDS). However, despite the successes in disease management and the decrease of HIV/AIDS-related mortality, several drawbacks continue to hamper first-generation protease inhibitor therapies. The rapid emergence of drug resistance has become the most urgent concern because it renders current treatments ineffective and therefore compels the scientific community to continue efforts in the design of inhibitors that can efficiently combat drug resistance.

  1. Stop the Spread of Superbugs: Help Fight Drug Resistant Bacteria

    MedlinePlus

    ... the Spread of Superbugs Help Fight Drug-Resistant Bacteria For nearly a century, bacteria-fighting drugs known as antibiotics have helped to control and destroy many of the harmful bacteria that can make us sick. But in recent ...

  2. Brazilian response to the human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome epidemic among injection drug users.

    PubMed

    Mesquita, Fábio; Doneda, Denise; Gandolfi, Denise; Nemes, Maria Inês Battistella; Andrade, Tarcísio; Bueno, Regina; Piconez e Trigueiros, Daniela

    2003-12-15

    The Brazilian response to the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) epidemic is being observed all over the world because of its success. Understanding the role of injection drug users (IDUs) in the epidemic and the political response thereto is a key factor in the control of the epidemic in Brazil. This paper summarizes some of the most important analyses of the Brazilian response to the HIV/AIDS epidemic among and from IDUs. Key elements of the response include the support of the Brazilian Universal Public Health System, the provision of universal access to highly active antiretroviral therapy, and the creation of harm reduction projects that are politically and financially supported by the federal government. The response among and from IDUs is a key element in overall control of the HIV/AIDS epidemic. The response to the epidemic among and from IDUs has been headed in the correct direction since its beginning and is now being intensively expanded.

  3. Antibiotic Resistance, Virulence, and Genetic Background of Community-Acquired Uropathogenic Escherichia coli from Algeria.

    PubMed

    Yahiaoui, Merzouk; Robin, Frédéric; Bakour, Rabah; Hamidi, Moufida; Bonnet, Richard; Messai, Yamina

    2015-10-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate antibiotic resistance mechanisms, virulence traits, and genetic background of 150 nonrepetitive community-acquired uropathogenic Escherichia coli (CA-UPEC) from Algeria. A rate of 46.7% of isolates was multidrug resistant. bla genes detected were blaTEM (96.8% of amoxicillin-resistant isolates), blaCTX-M-15 (4%), overexpressed blaAmpC (4%), blaSHV-2a, blaTEM-4, blaTEM-31, and blaTEM-35 (0.7%). All tetracycline-resistant isolates (51.3%) had tetA and/or tetB genes. Sulfonamides and trimethoprim resistance genes were sul2 (60.8%), sul1 (45.9%), sul3 (6.7%), dfrA14 (25.4%), dfrA1 (18.2%), dfrA12 (16.3%), and dfrA25 (5.4%). High-level fluoroquinolone resistance (22.7%) was mediated by mutations in gyrA (S83L-D87N) and parC (S80I-E84G/V or S80I) genes. qnrB5, qnrS1, and aac(6')-Ib-cr were rare (5.3%). Class 1 and/or class 2 integrons were detected (40.7%). Isolates belonged to phylogroups B2+D (50%), A+B1 (36%), and F+C+Clade I (13%). Most of D (72.2%) and 38.6% of B2 isolates were multidrug resistant; they belong to 14 different sequence types, including international successful ST131, ST73, and ST69, reported for the first time in the community in Algeria and new ST4494 and ST4529 described in this study. Besides multidrug resistance, B2 and D isolates possessed virulence factors of colonization, invasion, and long-term persistence. The study highlighted multidrug-resistant CA-UPEC with high virulence traits and an epidemic genetic background.

  4. Macrolide-resistant Mycoplasma pneumoniae in adolescents with community-acquired pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Although the prevalence of macrolide-resistant Mycoplasma pneumoniae isolates in Japanese pediatric patients has increased rapidly, there have been no reports concerning macrolide-resistant M. pneumoniae infection in adolescents aged 16 to 19 years old. The purpose of this study was to clarify the prevalence and clinical characteristics of macrolide-resistant M. pneumoniae in adolescent patients with community-acquired pneumonia. Methods A total of 99 cases with M. pneumoniae pneumonia confirmed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and culture were analyzed. Forty-five cases were pediatric patients less than 16 years old, 26 cases were 16 to 19-year-old adolescent patients and 28 cases were adult patients. Primers for domain V of 23S rRNA were used and DNA sequences of the PCR products were compared with the sequence of an M. pneumoniae reference strain. Results Thirty of 45 pediatric patients (66%), 12 of 26 adolescent patients (46%) and seven of 28 adult patients (25%) with M. pneumoniae pneumonia were found to be infected with macrolide-resistant M. pneumoniae (MR patients). Although the prevalence of resistant strains was similar in pediatric patients between 2008 and 2011, an increase in the prevalence of resistant strains was observed in adolescent patients. Among 30 pediatric MR patients, 26 had an A-to-G transition at position 2063 (A2063G) and four had an A-to-G transition at position 2064 (A2064G). In 12 adolescent MR patients, 10 showed an A2063G transition and two showed an A2064G transition, and in seven adult MR patients, six showed an A2063G transition and one showed an A2064G transition. Conclusions The prevalence of macrolide-resistant M. pneumoniae is high among adolescent patients as well as pediatric patients less than 16-years old. To prevent outbreaks of M. pneumoniae infection, especially macrolide-resistant M. pneumoniae, in closed populations including among families, in schools and in university students, physicians should pay

  5. Nanobiotechnological Approaches to Overcome Drug Resistance in Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Ranji, Peyman; Heydari, Zahra; Alizadeh, Ali Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Drug resistance primarily appears where there is altered drug metabolism or target modification. It is a major challenge in cancer therapy which affects treatment process, and limits chemotherapeutics. Recently, nanotechnological approaches were shown to be capable of lowering drug side effects and protecting from enzymatic degradation. Therefore, patient's compliance and survival rate have dramatically increased. This review elaborates on the structures and functions of the factors involved in cancer drug resistance together with nanobiotechnological approaches for overcoming the obstacles in breast cancer research and therapy. The present paper provides information and suggestions to both basic and clinical researchers to develop new nanobiotechnological methods to improve breast cancer modalities especially in drug resistance.

  6. Phenotypic and genotypic characterisation of drug-resistant Plasmodium vivax.

    PubMed

    Price, Ric N; Auburn, Sarah; Marfurt, Jutta; Cheng, Qin

    2012-11-01

    In this review we present recent developments in the analysis of Plasmodium vivax clinical trials and ex vivo drug-susceptibility assays, as well approaches currently being used to identify molecular markers of drug resistance. Clinical trials incorporating the measurement of in vivo drug concentrations and parasite clearance times are needed to detect early signs of resistance. Analysis of P. vivax growth dynamics ex vivo have defined the criteria for acceptable assay thresholds for drug susceptibility testing, and their subsequent interpretation. Genotyping and next-generation sequencing studies in P. vivax field isolates are set to transform our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of drug resistance.

  7. Acquired resistance to the 16-membered macrolides tylosin and tilmicosin by Mycoplasma bovis.

    PubMed

    Lerner, Uri; Amram, Eytan; Ayling, Roger D; Mikula, Inna; Gerchman, Irena; Harrus, Shimon; Teff, Dina; Yogev, David; Lysnyansky, Inna

    2014-01-31

    The molecular mechanism of acquired resistance to the 16-membered macrolides tylosin (Ty) and tilmicosin (Tm) was investigated in Mycoplasma bovis field isolates. Sequence analysis of domains II and V of the two 23S rRNA alleles and ribosomal proteins L4 and L22 was performed on 54 M. bovis isolates showing different minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC). The presence of any one of the point mutations G748A, C752T, A2058G, A2059G or A2059C (Escherichia coli numbering) in one or both alleles of the 23S rRNAs was correlated with decreased susceptibility to Ty (8-1024 μg/ml) and to Tm (32 to >256 μg/ml) in 27/27 and 27/31 M. bovis isolates, respectively. Although a single mutation in domain II or V could be sufficient to cause decreased susceptibility to Ty, our data imply that a combination of mutations in two domains is necessary to achieve higher MICs (≥ 128 μg/ml). The influence of a combination of mutations in two domains II and V on enhancement of resistance to Tm was less clear. In addition, the amino acid (aa) substitution L22-Q90H was found in 24/32 representative M. bovis isolates with different MICs, but no correlation with decreased susceptibility to Ty or Tm was identified. Multiple aa substitutions were also identified in the L4 protein, including at positions 185-186 (positions 64 and 65 in E. coli) which are adjacent to the macrolide-binding site. This is the first description of the molecular mechanism of acquired resistance to the 16-membered macrolides in M. bovis. PMID:24393633

  8. Acquired resistance to the 16-membered macrolides tylosin and tilmicosin by Mycoplasma bovis.

    PubMed

    Lerner, Uri; Amram, Eytan; Ayling, Roger D; Mikula, Inna; Gerchman, Irena; Harrus, Shimon; Teff, Dina; Yogev, David; Lysnyansky, Inna

    2014-01-31

    The molecular mechanism of acquired resistance to the 16-membered macrolides tylosin (Ty) and tilmicosin (Tm) was investigated in Mycoplasma bovis field isolates. Sequence analysis of domains II and V of the two 23S rRNA alleles and ribosomal proteins L4 and L22 was performed on 54 M. bovis isolates showing different minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC). The presence of any one of the point mutations G748A, C752T, A2058G, A2059G or A2059C (Escherichia coli numbering) in one or both alleles of the 23S rRNAs was correlated with decreased susceptibility to Ty (8-1024 μg/ml) and to Tm (32 to >256 μg/ml) in 27/27 and 27/31 M. bovis isolates, respectively. Although a single mutation in domain II or V could be sufficient to cause decreased susceptibility to Ty, our data imply that a combination of mutations in two domains is necessary to achieve higher MICs (≥ 128 μg/ml). The influence of a combination of mutations in two domains II and V on enhancement of resistance to Tm was less clear. In addition, the amino acid (aa) substitution L22-Q90H was found in 24/32 representative M. bovis isolates with different MICs, but no correlation with decreased susceptibility to Ty or Tm was identified. Multiple aa substitutions were also identified in the L4 protein, including at positions 185-186 (positions 64 and 65 in E. coli) which are adjacent to the macrolide-binding site. This is the first description of the molecular mechanism of acquired resistance to the 16-membered macrolides in M. bovis.

  9. Low MITF/AXL ratio predicts early resistance to multiple targeted drugs in melanoma.

    PubMed

    Müller, Judith; Krijgsman, Oscar; Tsoi, Jennifer; Robert, Lidia; Hugo, Willy; Song, Chunying; Kong, Xiangju; Possik, Patricia A; Cornelissen-Steijger, Paulien D M; Geukes Foppen, Marnix H; Kemper, Kristel; Goding, Colin R; McDermott, Ultan; Blank, Christian; Haanen, John; Graeber, Thomas G; Ribas, Antoni; Lo, Roger S; Peeper, Daniel S

    2014-12-15

    Increased expression of the Microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) contributes to melanoma progression and resistance to BRAF pathway inhibition. Here we show that the lack of MITF is associated with more severe resistance to a range of inhibitors, while its presence is required for robust drug responses. Both in primary and acquired resistance, MITF levels inversely correlate with the expression of several activated receptor tyrosine kinases, most frequently AXL. The MITF-low/AXL-high/drug-resistance phenotype is common among mutant BRAF and NRAS melanoma cell lines. The dichotomous behaviour of MITF in drug response is corroborated in vemurafenib-resistant biopsies, including MITF-high and -low clones in a relapsed patient. Furthermore, drug cocktails containing AXL inhibitor enhance melanoma cell elimination by BRAF or ERK inhibition. Our results demonstrate that a low MITF/AXL ratio predicts early resistance to multiple targeted drugs, and warrant clinical validation of AXL inhibitors to combat resistance of BRAF and NRAS mutant MITF-low melanomas.

  10. Low MITF/AXL ratio predicts early resistance to multiple targeted drugs in melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Judith; Krijgsman, Oscar; Tsoi, Jennifer; Robert, Lidia; Hugo, Willy; Song, Chunying; Kong, Xiangju; Possik, Patricia A.; Cornelissen-Steijger, Paulien D.M.; Foppen, Marnix H. Geukes; Kemper, Kristel; Goding, Colin R.; McDermott, Ultan; Blank, Christian; Haanen, John; Graeber, Thomas G.; Ribas, Antoni; Lo, Roger S.; Peeper, Daniel S.

    2015-01-01

    Increased expression of the Microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) contributes to melanoma progression and resistance to BRAF pathway inhibition. Here we show that the lack of MITF is associated with more severe resistance to a range of inhibitors, while its presence is required for robust drug responses. Both in primary and acquired resistance, MITF levels inversely correlate with the expression of several activated receptor tyrosine kinases, most frequently AXL. The MITF-low/AXL-high/drug-resistance phenotype is common among mutant BRAF and NRAS melanoma cell lines. The dichotomous behaviour of MITF in drug response is corroborated in vemurafenib-resistant biopsies, including MITF-high and -low clones in a relapsed patient. Furthermore, drug cocktails containing AXL inhibitor enhance melanoma cell elimination by BRAF or ERK inhibition. Our results demonstrate that a low MITF/AXL ratio predicts early resistance to multiple targeted drugs, and warrant clinical validation of AXL inhibitors to combat resistance of BRAF and NRAS mutant MITF-low melanomas. PMID:25502142

  11. Prevalence of drug resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis among children in China.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Wei-wei; Liu, Zhi-guang; Han, Rui; Zhao, Xiu-qin; Dong, Fang; Dong, Hai-yan; Huang, Hai-rong; Li, Qin-jing; Lin, Nan; Song, Wen-qi; Wan, Kang-lin; Shen, A-dong

    2015-05-01

    The available data on the epidemic of drug resistant tuberculosis (TB) among children in China is limited. This study attempted to clarify the drug resistance profiles of clinical strains isolated from children and estimate risk factors related to acquisition of drug resistance. All Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains from children (age <15 years) and adolescent (age 15-18 years) TB patients received in the strain library of Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention between January 2005 and December 2012 were included in the study. A study collection included 450 clinical isolates (100 from children, 159 from adolescents, and 191 from adults) from all over China. Drug susceptibility testing was performed by a proportion method. As a result, the drug resistance and multi-drug resistance (MDR) rates in children were 55% (55/100) and 22% (22/100), respectively. In children with MDR-TB, new cases accounted for 40.9% (9/22). Compared with adults, the drug resistance rates were similar in all subgroups (new cases, previously treated cases and all cases) of children (P > 0.05), except for the lower resistance rate to isoniazid in total cases of children (P = 0.011). Patient related information was included in the MDR-TB association analysis. The treatment history was found to be strongly associated with MDR-TB in all three age groups (P < 0.05). Our results demonstrate that the prevalence of drug resistant TB in children in China is alarmingly high and similar to that seen in adults. In contrast, in adolescents, the drug resistance rate to most tested drugs was lower than in adults. Primary transmission and inadequate treatment are two equally important factors for the high MDR-TB rate in children. Thus, major efforts in the TB control in children should focus on decreasing the transmission of drug resistant TB and early testing of drug resistance.

  12. Emergence of Multidrug-Resistant Campylobacter Species Isolates with a Horizontally Acquired rRNA Methylase

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yang; Zhang, Maojun; Deng, Fengru; Shen, Zhangqi; Wu, Congming; Zhang, Jianzhong

    2014-01-01

    Antibiotic-resistant Campylobacter constitutes a serious threat to public health, and resistance to macrolides is of particular concern, as this class of antibiotics is the drug of choice for clinical therapy of campylobacteriosis. Very recently, a horizontally transferrable macrolide resistance mediated by the rRNA methylase gene erm(B) was reported in a Campylobacter coli isolate, but little is known about the dissemination of erm(B) among Campylobacter isolates and the association of erm(B)-carrying isolates with clinical disease. To address this question and facilitate the control of antibiotic-resistant Campylobacter, we determined the distribution of erm(B) in 1,554 C. coli and Campylobacter jejuni isolates derived from food-producing animals and clinically confirmed human diarrheal cases. The results revealed that 58 of the examined isolates harbored erm(B) and exhibited high-level resistance to macrolides, and most were recent isolates, derived in 2011-2012. In addition, the erm(B)-positive isolates were all resistant to fluoroquinolones, another clinically important antibiotic used for treating campylobacteriosis. The erm(B) gene is found to be associated with chromosomal multidrug resistance genomic islands (MDRGIs) of Gram-positive origin or with plasmids of various sizes. All MDRGIs were transferrable to macrolide-susceptible C. jejuni by natural transformation under laboratory conditions. Molecular typing of the erm(B)-carrying isolates by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multilocus sequence typing (MLST) identified diverse genotypes and outbreak-associated diarrheal isolates. Molecular typing also suggested zoonotic transmission of erm(B)-positive Campylobacter. These findings reveal an emerging and alarming trend of dissemination of erm(B) and MDRGIs in Campylobacter and underscore the need for heightened efforts to control their further spread. PMID:24982085

  13. Targeted cancer therapy; nanotechnology approaches for overcoming drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yan; Shen, Jacson K; Milane, Lara; Hornicek, Francis J; Amiji, Mansoor M; Duan, Zhenfeng

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in cancer molecular biology have resulted in parallel and unprecedented progress in the development of targeted cancer therapy. Targeted therapy can provide higher efficacy and lower toxicity than conventional chemotherapy for cancer. However, like traditional chemotherapy, molecularly targeted cancer therapy also faces the challenge of drug resistance. Multiple mechanisms are responsible for chemotherapy resistance in tumors, including over-expression of efflux transporters, somatic alterations of drug targets, deregulation of apoptosis, and numerous pharmacokinetic issues. Nanotechnology based approaches are proving to be efficacious in overcoming drug resistance in cancer. Combination of targeted therapies with nanotechnology approaches is a promising strategy to overcome targeted therapy drug resistance in cancer treatment. This review discusses the mechanisms of targeted drug resistance in cancer and discusses nanotechnology approaches to circumvent this resistance.

  14. Targeting efflux pumps to overcome antifungal drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Ann R; Cardno, Tony S; Strouse, J Jacob; Ivnitski-Steele, Irena; Keniya, Mikhail V; Lackovic, Kurt; Monk, Brian C; Sklar, Larry A; Cannon, Richard D

    2016-08-01

    Resistance to antifungal drugs is an increasingly significant clinical problem. The most common antifungal resistance encountered is efflux pump-mediated resistance of Candida species to azole drugs. One approach to overcome this resistance is to inhibit the pumps and chemosensitize resistant strains to azole drugs. Drug discovery targeting fungal efflux pumps could thus result in the development of azole-enhancing combination therapy. Heterologous expression of fungal efflux pumps in Saccharomyces cerevisiae provides a versatile system for screening for pump inhibitors. Fungal efflux pumps transport a range of xenobiotics including fluorescent compounds. This enables the use of fluorescence-based detection, as well as growth inhibition assays, in screens to discover compounds targeting efflux-mediated antifungal drug resistance. A variety of medium- and high-throughput screens have been used to identify a number of chemical entities that inhibit fungal efflux pumps. PMID:27463566

  15. Mutational Pathway Determines Whether Drug Gradients Accelerate Evolution of Drug-Resistant Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greulich, Philip; Waclaw, Bartłomiej; Allen, Rosalind J.

    2012-08-01

    Drug gradients are believed to play an important role in the evolution of bacteria resistant to antibiotics and tumors resistant to anticancer drugs. We use a statistical physics model to study the evolution of a population of malignant cells exposed to drug gradients, where drug resistance emerges via a mutational pathway involving multiple mutations. We show that a nonuniform drug distribution has the potential to accelerate the emergence of resistance when the mutational pathway involves a long sequence of mutants with increasing resistance, but if the pathway is short or crosses a fitness valley, the evolution of resistance may actually be slowed down by drug gradients. These predictions can be verified experimentally, and may help to improve strategies for combating the emergence of resistance.

  16. Interconnection between flowering time control and activation of systemic acquired resistance

    PubMed Central

    Banday, Zeeshan Z.; Nandi, Ashis K.

    2015-01-01

    The ability to avoid or neutralize pathogens is inherent to all higher organisms including plants. Plants recognize pathogens through receptors, and mount resistance against the intruders, with the help of well-elaborated defense arsenal. In response to some localinfections, plants develop systemic acquired resistance (SAR), which provides heightened resistance during subsequent infections. Infected tissues generate mobile signaling molecules that travel to the systemic tissues, where they epigenetically modify expression o a set of genes to initiate the manifestation of SAR in distant tissues. Immune responses are largely regulated at transcriptional level. Flowering is a developmental transition that occurs as a result of the coordinated action of large numbers of transcription factors that respond to intrinsic signals and environmental conditions. The plant hormone salicylic acid (SA) which is required for SAR activation positively regulates flowering. Certain components of chromatin remodeling complexes that are recruited for suppression of precocious flowering are also involved in suppression of SAR in healthy plants. FLOWERING LOCUS D, a putative histone demethylase positively regulates SAR manifestation and flowering transition in Arabidopsis. Similarly, incorporation of histone variant H2A.Z in nucleosomes mediated by PHOTOPERIOD-INDEPENDENT EARLY FLOWERING 1, an ortholog of yeast chromatin remodeling complex SWR1, concomitantly influences SAR and flowering time. SUMO conjugation and deconjugation mechanisms also similarly affect SAR and flowering in an SA-dependent manner. The evidences suggest a common underlying regulatory mechanism for activation of SAR and flowering in plants. PMID:25852723

  17. Interconnection between flowering time control and activation of systemic acquired resistance.

    PubMed

    Banday, Zeeshan Z; Nandi, Ashis K

    2015-01-01

    The ability to avoid or neutralize pathogens is inherent to all higher organisms including plants. Plants recognize pathogens through receptors, and mount resistance against the intruders, with the help of well-elaborated defense arsenal. In response to some localinfections, plants develop systemic acquired resistance (SAR), which provides heightened resistance during subsequent infections. Infected tissues generate mobile signaling molecules that travel to the systemic tissues, where they epigenetically modify expression o a set of genes to initiate the manifestation of SAR in distant tissues. Immune responses are largely regulated at transcriptional level. Flowering is a developmental transition that occurs as a result of the coordinated action of large numbers of transcription factors that respond to intrinsic signals and environmental conditions. The plant hormone salicylic acid (SA) which is required for SAR activation positively regulates flowering. Certain components of chromatin remodeling complexes that are recruited for suppression of precocious flowering are also involved in suppression of SAR in healthy plants. FLOWERING LOCUS D, a putative histone demethylase positively regulates SAR manifestation and flowering transition in Arabidopsis. Similarly, incorporation of histone variant H2A.Z in nucleosomes mediated by PHOTOPERIOD-INDEPENDENT EARLY FLOWERING 1, an ortholog of yeast chromatin remodeling complex SWR1, concomitantly influences SAR and flowering time. SUMO conjugation and deconjugation mechanisms also similarly affect SAR and flowering in an SA-dependent manner. The evidences suggest a common underlying regulatory mechanism for activation of SAR and flowering in plants.

  18. FDG-PET is a good biomarker of both early response and acquired resistance in BRAFV600 mutant melanomas treated with vemurafenib and the MEK inhibitor GDC-0973

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The BRAF inhibitor, vemurafenib, has recently been approved for the treatment of metastatic melanoma in patients harboring BRAFV600 mutations. Currently, dual BRAF and MEK inhibition are ongoing in clinical trials with the goal of overcoming the acquired resistance that has unfortunately developed in some vemurafenib patients. FDG-PET measures of metabolic activity are increasingly employed as a pharmacodynamic biomarker for guiding single-agent or combination therapies by gauging initial drug response and monitoring disease progression. However, since tumors are inherently heterogeneous, investigating the effects of BRAF and MEK inhibition on FDG uptake in a panel of different melanomas could help interpret imaging outcomes. Methods 18 F-FDG uptake was measured in vitro in cells with wild-type and mutant (V600) BRAF, and in melanoma cells with an acquired resistance to vemurafenib. We treated the cells with vemurafenib alone or in combination with MEK inhibitor GDC-0973. PET imaging was used in mice to measure FDG uptake in A375 melanoma xenografts and in A375 R1, a vemurafenib-resistant derivative. Histological and biochemical studies of glucose transporters, the MAPK and glycolytic pathways were also undertaken. Results We demonstrate that vemurafenib is equally effective at reducing FDG uptake in cell lines harboring either heterozygous or homozygous BRAFV600 but ineffective in cells with acquired resistance or having WT BRAF status. However, combination with GDC-0973 results in a highly significant increase of efficacy and inhibition of FDG uptake across all twenty lines. Drug-induced changes in FDG uptake were associated with altered levels of membrane GLUT-1, and cell lines harboring RAS mutations displayed enhanced FDG uptake upon exposure to vemurafenib. Interestingly, we found that vemurafenib treatment in mice bearing drug-resistant A375 xenografts also induced increased FDG tumor uptake, accompanied by increases in Hif-1α, Sp1 and Ksr

  19. Comparative proteomics to evaluate multi drug resistance in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Piras, Cristian; Soggiu, Alessio; Bonizzi, Luigi; Gaviraghi, Alessandro; Deriu, Francesca; De Martino, Luisa; Iovane, Giuseppe; Amoresano, Angela; Roncada, Paola

    2012-04-01

    Drug resistance in food-borne bacterial pathogens is an almost inevitable consequence of the use of antimicrobial drugs, used either therapeutically or to avoid infections in food-producing animals. In the past decades, the spread and inappropriate use of antibiotics have caused a considerable increase of antibiotics to which bacteria have developed resistance and, moreover, bacteria are becoming resistant to more than one antibiotic simultaneously. Understanding mechanisms at the molecular level is extremely important to control multi-resistant strains and to develop new therapeutic strategies. In the present study, comparative proteomics was applied to characterize membrane and cytosolic proteome in order to investigate the regulation of protein expression in multi-resistance E. coli isolated from young never vaccinated water buffalo. Results highlighted differentially expressed proteins under multi drug resistance conditions giving new insights about mechanisms involved in resistance, as quorum sensing mechanisms, and suggesting possible novel bacterial targets to develop alternative antibiotic drugs.

  20. The insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor causes acquired resistance to erlotinib in lung cancer cells with the wild-type epidermal growth factor receptor.

    PubMed

    Suda, Kenichi; Mizuuchi, Hiroshi; Sato, Katsuaki; Takemoto, Toshiki; Iwasaki, Takuya; Mitsudomi, Tetsuya

    2014-08-15

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) therapy often provides a dramatic response in lung cancer patients with EGFR mutations. In addition, moderate clinical efficacy of the EGFR-TKI, erlotinib, has been shown in lung cancer patients with the wild-type EGFR. Numerous molecular mechanisms that cause acquired resistance to EGFR-TKIs have been identified in lung cancers with the EGFR mutations; however, few have been reported in lung cancers with the wild-type EGFR. We used H358 lung adenocarcinoma cells lacking EGFR mutations that showed modest sensitivity to erlotinib. The H358 cells acquired resistance to erlotinib via chronic exposure to the drug. The H358 erlotinib-resistant (ER) cells do not have a secondary EGFR mutation, neither MET gene amplification nor PTEN downregulation; these have been identified in lung cancers with the EGFR mutations. From comprehensive screening of receptor tyrosine kinase phosphorylation, we observed increased phosphorylation of insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF1R) in H358ER cells compared with parental H358 cells. H358ER cells responded to combined therapy with erlotinib and NVP-AEW541, an IGF1R-TKI. Our results indicate that IGF1R activation is a molecular mechanism that confers acquired resistance to erlotinib in lung cancers with the wild-type EGFR.

  1. Curcumin mediates oxaliplatin-acquired resistance reversion in colorectal cancer cell lines through modulation of CXC-Chemokine/NF-κB signalling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz de Porras, Vicenç; Bystrup, Sara; Martínez-Cardús, Anna; Pluvinet, Raquel; Sumoy, Lauro; Howells, Lynne; James, Mark I.; Iwuji, Chinenye; Manzano, José Luis; Layos, Laura; Bugés, Cristina; Abad, Albert; Martínez-Balibrea, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Resistance to oxaliplatin (OXA) is a complex process affecting the outcomes of metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC) patients treated with this drug. De-regulation of the NF-κB signalling pathway has been proposed as an important mechanism involved in this phenomenon. Here, we show that NF-κB was hyperactivated in in vitro models of OXA-acquired resistance but was attenuated by the addition of Curcumin, a non-toxic NF-κB inhibitor. The concomitant combination of Curcumin + OXA was more effective and synergistic in cell lines with acquired resistance to OXA, leading to the reversion of their resistant phenotype, through the inhibition of the NF-κB signalling cascade. Transcriptomic profiling revealed the up-regulation of three NF-κB-regulated CXC-chemokines, CXCL8, CXCL1 and CXCL2, in the resistant cells that were more efficiently down-regulated after OXA + Curcumin treatment as compared to the sensitive cells. Moreover, CXCL8 and CXCL1 gene silencing made resistant cells more sensitive to OXA through the inhibition of the Akt/NF-κB pathway. High expression of CXCL1 in FFPE samples from explant cultures of CRC patients-derived liver metastases was associated with response to OXA + Curcumin. In conclusion, we suggest that combination of OXA + Curcumin could be an effective treatment, for which CXCL1 could be used as a predictive marker, in CRC patients. PMID:27091625

  2. Integrated genomic approaches identify upregulation of SCRN1 as a novel mechanism associated with acquired resistance to erlotinib in PC9 cells harboring oncogenic EGFR mutation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Nayoung; Cho, Ahye; Watanabe, Hideo; Choi, Yoon-La; Aziz, Meraj; Kassner, Michelle; Joung, Je-Gun; Park, Angela KJ; Francis, Joshua M.; Bae, Joon Seol; Ahn, Soo-min; Kim, Kyoung-Mee; Park, Joon Oh; Park, Woong-Yang; Ahn, Myung-Ju; Park, Keunchil; Koo, Jaehyung; Yin, Hongwei Holly; Cho, Jeonghee

    2016-01-01

    Therapies targeting the tyrosine kinase activity of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) have been proven to be effective in treating a subset of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients harboring activating EGFR mutations. Inevitably these patients develop resistance to the EGFR-targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). Here, we performed integrated genomic analyses using an in vitro system to uncover alternative genomic mechanisms responsible for acquired resistance to EGFR-TKIs. Specifically, we identified 80 genes whose expression is significantly increased in the erlotinib-resistant clones. RNAi-based systematic synthetic lethal screening of these candidate genes revealed that suppression of one upregulated transcript, SCRN1, a secernin family member, restores sensitivity to erlotinib by enhancing inhibition of PI3K/AKT signaling pathway. Furthermore, immunohistochemical analysis revealed increased levels of SCRN1 in 5 of 11 lung tumor specimens from EGFR-TKIs resistant patients. Taken together, we propose that upregulation of SCRN1 is an additional mechanism associated with acquired resistance to EGFR-TKIs and that its suppression serves as a novel therapeutic strategy to overcome drug resistance in these patients. PMID:26883194

  3. Electric stimulations mediated beta lactam resistance reversal and correlation with growth dynamics of community acquired methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Kainthola, Anup; Uniyal, Akshat; Srivastava, Nidhi; Bhatt, Ajay B

    2015-08-01

    The community associated methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) is a serious issue of public health. Here, we conducted an experimental approach to determine: (i) the optimal significant stimulation range of electrical current for effective checking of CA-MRSA growth; (ii) the effect of electrical stimulations on methicillin susceptibility and possible beta lactam resistance reversal; and (iii) the variation in the level of ATP as function of exposure to electric current. An 8 chambered electrical system was developed for DC flow in control and test sets, with and without drug (oxacillin 4 mg/ml). Measurement of growth by CFU/ml and spectrometry, susceptibility and ATP levels were calculated and interpreted. Linear pattern in reduction of ATP was observed with respect to the intensity of electric current (EC) and an enhanced inhibitory effect was explicit with 1000 microampere (μA) with 30 min exposure. At 4000 μA exposure to DC at 180 min and in combination of drug (μA+D), the growth of CA-MRSA was substantially checked to 0.23 absorbance in comparison to current without drug and the effect of DC electrical current to the culture showed that 10 μA, 100 μA and 4000 μA current exposure in combination of oxacillin (μA+D), markedly reduced the CFU to an average of 256.4. ATP level was linearly reduced with exposure to EC.

  4. The mechanism of acquired resistance to irreversible EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor-afatinib in lung adenocarcinoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Shang-Gin; Liu, Yi-Nan; Tsai, Meng-Feng; Chang, Yih-Leong; Yu, Chong-Jen; Yang, Pan-Chyr; Yang, James Chih-Hsin; Wen, Yueh-Feng; Shih, Jin-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) are associated with favorable response in EGFR mutant lung cancer. Acquired resistance to reversible EGFR TKIs remains a significant barrier, and acquired EGFR T790M-mutation is the major mechanism. Second-generation irreversible EGFR TKI, afatinib, had also been approved for treating EGFR mutant lung cancer patients, but the mechanism of acquired resistance to afatinib has not been well studied. Results Forty-two patients had tissue specimens taken after acquiring resistance to afatinib. The sensitizing EGFR mutation were all consistent between pre- and post-afatinib tissues. Twenty patients (47.6%) had acquired T790M mutation. T790M rate was not different between first-generation EGFR TKI-naïve patients (50%) and first-generation EGFR TKI-treated patients (46.4%) (p = 0.827). No clinical characteristics or EGFR mutation types were associated with the development of acquired T790M. No other second-site EGFR mutations were detected. There were no small cell or squamous cell lung cancer transformation. Other genetic mutations were not identified in PIK3CA, BRAF, HER2, KRAS, NRAS, MEK1, AKT2, LKB1 and JAK2. Methods Afatinib-prescription record of our department of pharmacy from January 2007 and December 2014 was retrieved. We investigated patients with tissue specimens available after acquiring resistance to afatinib. Enrolled patients should have partial response or durable stable disease of treatment response to afatinib. Various mechanisms of acquired resistance to first-generation EGFR TKIs were evaluated. Histology and cytology were reviewed. EGFR, PIK3CA, BRAF, HER2, KRAS, NRAS, MEK1, AKT2, LKB1 and JAK2 genetic alterations were evaluated by sequencing. Statistical analysis was performed using Chi-square test and Kaplan-Meier method. Conclusions T790M was detected in half of the lung adenocarcinoma after acquiring resistance to afatinib. T790M is still the major acquired

  5. Acquisition of cancer stem cell-like properties in non-small cell lung cancer with acquired resistance to afatinib

    PubMed Central

    Hashida, Shinsuke; Yamamoto, Hiromasa; Shien, Kazuhiko; Miyoshi, Yuichiro; Ohtsuka, Tomoaki; Suzawa, Ken; Watanabe, Mototsugu; Maki, Yuho; Soh, Junichi; Asano, Hiroaki; Tsukuda, Kazunori; Miyoshi, Shinichiro; Toyooka, Shinichi

    2015-01-01

    Afatinib is an irreversible epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) that is known to be effective against the EGFR T790M variant, which accounts for half of the mechanisms of acquired resistance to reversible EGFR-TKIs. However, acquired resistance to afatinib was also observed in clinical use. Thus, elucidating and overcoming the mechanisms of resistance are important issues in the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer. In this study, we established various afatinib-resistant cell lines and investigated the resistance mechanisms. EGFR T790M mutations were not detected using direct sequencing in established resistant cells. Several afatinib-resistant cell lines displayed MET amplification, and these cells were sensitive to the combination of afatinib plus crizotinib. As a further investigation, a cell line that acquired resistance to afatinib plus crizotinib, HCC827-ACR, was established from one of the MET amplified-cell lines. Several afatinib-resistant cell lines including HCC827-ACR displayed epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) features and epigenetic silencing of miR-200c, which is a suppresser of EMT. In addition, these cell lines also exhibited overexpression of ALDH1A1 and ABCB1, which are putative stem cell markers, and resistance to docetaxel. In conclusion, we established afatinib-resistant cells and found that MET amplification, EMT, and stem cell-like features are observed in cells with acquired resistance to EGFR-TKIs. This finding may provide clues to overcoming resistance to EGFR-TKIs. PMID:26202045

  6. Molecular characterization of anastrozole resistance in breast cancer: pivotal role of the Akt/mTOR pathway in the emergence of de novo or acquired resistance and importance of combining the allosteric Akt inhibitor MK-2206 with an aromatase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Vilquin, Paul; Villedieu, Marie; Grisard, Evelyne; Ben Larbi, Sabrina; Ghayad, Sandra E; Heudel, Pierre-Etienne; Bachelot, Thomas; Corbo, Laura; Treilleux, Isabelle; Vendrell, Julie A; Cohen, Pascale A

    2013-10-01

    Acquisition of resistance to aromatase inhibitors (AIs) remains a major drawback in the treatment of estrogen receptor alpha (ERα)-positive breast cancers. The Res-Ana cells, a new model of acquired resistance to anastrozole, were established by long-term exposure of aromatase-overexpressing MCF-7 cells to this drug. These resistant cells developed ER-independent mechanisms of resistance and decreased sensitivity to the AI letrozole or to ERα antagonists. They also displayed a constitutive activation of the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway and a deregulated expression of several ErbB receptors. An observed increase in the phospho-Akt/Akt ratio between primary and matched recurrent breast tumors of patients who relapsed under anastrozole adjuvant therapy also argued for a pivotal role of the Akt pathway in acquired resistance to anastrozole. Ectopic overexpression of constitutively active Akt1 in control cells was sufficient to induce de novo resistance to anastrozole. Strikingly, combining anastrozole with the highly selective and allosteric Akt inhibitor MK-2206 or with the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin increased sensitivity to this AI in the control cells and was sufficient to overcome resistance and restore sensitivity to endocrine therapy in the resistant cells. Our findings lead to us proposing a model of anastrozole-acquired resistance based on the selection of cancer-initiating-like cells possessing self-renewing properties, intrinsic resistance to anastrozole and sensitivity to MK-2206. Altogether, our work demonstrated that the Akt/mTOR pathway plays a key role in resistance to anastrozole and that combining anastrozole with Akt/mTOR pathway inhibitors represents a promising strategy in the clinical management of hormone-dependent breast cancer patients.

  7. Impaired acquired resistance of mice to Klebsiella pneumoniae infection induced by acute NO/sub 2/ exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Bouley, G.; Azoulay-Dupuis, E.; Gaudebout, C.

    1985-12-01

    The natural resistance of nonimmunized C57B1/6 mice to an intraperitoneal Klebsiella pneumoniae challenge was not significantly affected by prior continuous exposure to 20 ppm NO/sub 2/ for 4 days. In contrast, the acquired resistance of mice immunized just before and infected just after NO/sub 2/ exposure was seriously impaired. This could not be explained by the loss of appetite (about 30%) observed in NO/sub 2/ treated mice, for neither the natural nor acquired resistance of control air exposure mice given approximately 70% ad libitum food and water were significantly modified.

  8. Drug resistance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from tuberculosis lymphadenitis patients in Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Biadglegne, Fantahun; Tessema, Belay; Sack, Ulrich; Rodloff, Arne C.

    2014-01-01

    Background & objectives: The emergence of drug resistance tuberculosis (TB) is a significant challenge for TB control and prevention programmes, and the major problem is multidrug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB). The present study was carried out to determine the frequency of drug resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates among newly and retreated TB lymphadenitis patients and risk factors for acquiring this infection. Methods: Two hundred twenty five M. tuberculosis isolates from TB lymphadenitis patients who were diagnosed as new and retreated tuberculosis cases between April 2012 and May 2012 were included in this study. Isolates were tested for susceptibility to isoniazed (INH), rifampicin (RMP), streptomycin (SM), ethambutol (EMB) and pyrazinamide (PZA) using the BacT/AlerT 3D system protocol. Results: Among 225 isolates, 15 (6.7%) were resistant to at least one first line anti-TB drug. Three (1.3%) were MDR-TB. Resistance to INH, RMP, SM, and EMB was found in 8 (3.6%), 4 (1.8%), 10 (4.4%), and 4 (1.8%) isolates, respectively. Of the 212 new TB lymphadenitis cases three (1.4%) were MDR-TB. A rifampicin resistant M. tuberculosis isolate was diagnosed from smear and culture negative newly treated cases. All isolates were susceptible to PZA. Matted cervical lymph nodes were the prominent sites involved. Newly treated TB lymphadenitis patients had a greater risk for presenting resistance to anti-TB drugs (P=0.046). Interpretation & conclusions: Our study showed that TB lymphadenitis patients harboured drug resistant TB and MDR-TB, although at a low rate. Resistance was not associated with age, sex, patients’ education and contact history. Further research is required to determine transmission dynamics of drug resistant strains. PMID:25222786

  9. Effectiveness of various hospital-based solutions against community- acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Perona, Paul J; Johnson, Aaron J; Perona, John P; Issa, Kimona; Kapadia, Bhaveen H; Bonutti, Peter M; Mont, Michael A

    2013-01-01

    Periprosthetic infections with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) can be particularly burdensome and difficult to eradicate. One of the measures that infection control officers have emphasized in our hospitals has been the use of various hand sanitizers throughout the hospital. Our objective was to determine the level of growth inhibition of common hand sanitizers and surgical scrub solutions that are used to prevent the spread of community-acquired strains of MRSA. Various hospital and surgical agents (n = 13) were applied to community-acquired MRSA bacteria that had been cultured on agar plates. These different commercially available solutions were incubated for 48 h, and the plates were assessed to determine the level of growth inhibition (0, 25, 75, or 100%). The negative control was a test in which no agent was added to the MRSA culture, while a positive control tested 100% alcohol. Eight of the solutions tested had 100% growth inhibition, four solutions had partial growth inhibition effects, and one solution did not inhibit MRSA. Of the solutions with alcohol, the 62% solution did not kill MRSA, while the 80% solution only inhibited MRSA. Both the 95 and 100% alcohol solutions had 100% growth inhibition. Of the two surgical scrub solutions, only the one with iodine had 100% growth inhibition, whereas the solution with chloroxylenol (PCMX 3%) had only partial growth inhibition. This study suggests that the solutions with high levels of alcohol, chlorhexidine, or iodine appear to better kill MRSA and might best be used to prevent the spread of community-acquired MRSA in both the hospital and the surgical environment. PMID:24266441

  10. Discovery of functional genes for systemic acquired resistance in Arabidopsis thaliana through integrated data mining.

    PubMed

    Pan, Youlian; Pylatuik, Jeffrey D; Ouyang, Junjun; Famili, A Fazel; Fobert, Pierre R

    2004-12-01

    Various data mining techniques combined with sequence motif information in the promoter region of genes were applied to discover functional genes that are involved in the defense mechanism of systemic acquired resistance (SAR) in Arabidopsis thaliana. A series of K-Means clustering with difference-in-shape as distance measure was initially applied. A stability measure was used to validate this clustering process. A decision tree algorithm with the discover-and-mask technique was used to identify a group of most informative genes. Appearance and abundance of various transcription factor binding sites in the promoter region of the genes were studied. Through the combination of these techniques, we were able to identify 24 candidate genes involved in the SAR defense mechanism. The candidate genes fell into 2 highly resolved categories, each category showing significantly unique profiles of regulatory elements in their promoter regions. This study demonstrates the strength of such integration methods and suggests a broader application of this approach.

  11. A possible mechanism of acquired acid resistance of human dental enamel by laser irradiation.

    PubMed

    Oho, T; Morioka, T

    1990-01-01

    A possible mechanism of acquired acid resistance of lased enamel was proposed on the basis of the investigations of optical properties, compositional and structural changes and permeability of lased and unlased human dental enamel. Lased enamel showed a high positive birefringence, suggesting the formation of 'microspaces' in enamel. No new products were found, though a decrease of lattice strain and a slight a-axis contraction were recognized in lased enamel compared with unlased enamel. The contents of water, carbonate and organic substances were reduced in lased enamel. Gradual changes of birefringence were observed in lased enamel during treatment with acid solutions, and this change was attributed to mineralization of the microspaces. The ions released by an acid decalcification would be trapped in the microspaces in lased enamel, whereas such ions diffuse to the surrounding solution in unlased enamel.

  12. Effect of chemical systemic acquired resistance elicitors on avenanthramide biosynthesis in oat (Avena sativa).

    PubMed

    Wise, Mitchell L

    2011-07-13

    Oats produce a group of phenolic antioxidants termed avenanthramides. These metabolites are, among food crops, unique to oats and have shown, in experimental systems, certain desirable nutritional characteristics such as inhibiting atherosclerotic plaque formation and reducing inflammation. Avenanthramides occur in both the leaves and grain of oat. In the leaves they are expressed as phytoalexins in response to crown rust (Puccina coronata) infection. The experiments reported here demonstrate that avenanthramide levels in vegetative tissue can be enhanced by treatment with benzothiadiazole (BTH), an agrochemical formulated to elicit systemic acquired resistance (SAR). The response to BTH was dramatically stronger than those produced with salicylic acid treatment. The roots of BTH treated plants also showed a smaller but distinct increase in avenanthramides. The dynamics of the root avenanthramide increase was substantially slower than that observed in the leaves, suggesting that avenanthramides might be transported from the leaves.

  13. Cardiac tamponade complicating purulent pericarditis due to community acquired methicilin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA).

    PubMed

    Bagavathy, Kavitha; Raju, Shine K; Joseph, Ranjit; Kumar, Anupam

    2014-03-01

    Community acquired methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus(CA-MRSA) is a global pathogen capable of causing life-threatening infections with increasing prevalence since the 1990s. Purulentpericarditis, characterized by accumulation of purulent fluid in the pericardial space was historically a disease of the pediatric and early adult population, but through the years the median age of diagnosis has increased from 21 to 49. Mortality rates are as high as 40% even in the treated population. We report a case of purulent pericarditis due to CA-MRSA that was complicated by cardiac tamponade. Early diagnosis and intervention proved to be life-saving. A brief review of the literature and current management options are discussed.

  14. Fulminant necrotising fasciitis by community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Non, Lemuel; Kosmin, Aaron

    2015-03-30

    Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) is a rare cause of necrotising fasciitis (NF), and is usually not fulminant as in group A Streptococcus (GAS), the archetypal aetiology. We report an unusually fulminant case of NF by CA-MRSA in an immunocompetent patient. A 52-year-old man presented to the emergency department with 1 week of progressive left thigh pain and swelling. The patient had ecchymoses, bullae and hypoesthesia of the involved skin, and CT scan revealed extensive fascial oedema. He was immediately started on broad spectrum antibiotics. Within 12 h of presentation, he underwent surgical debridement. Despite aggressive supportive care, the patient died less than 24 h after presentation. MRSA, with an antibiogram suggestive of a community-acquired strain, was recovered from intraoperative specimens and admission blood cultures. This case underscores that CA-MRSA, while rarely reported, can cause a fulminant presentation of NF similar to GAS in immunocompetent patients.

  15. Community-Acquired Methicillin-Resistant Pyogenic Liver Abscess: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Cherian, Joel; Singh, Rahul; Varma, Muralidhar; Vidyasagar, Sudha; Mukhopadhyay, Chiranjay

    2016-01-01

    Pyogenic liver abscesses are rare with an incidence of 0.5% to 0.8% and are mostly due to hepatobiliary causes (40% to 60%). Most are polymicrobial with less than 10% being caused by Staphylococcus aureus. Of these, few are caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and fewer still by a community-acquired strain. Here we present a case study of a patient with a community-acquired MRSA liver abscess. The patient presented with fever since 1 month and tender hepatomegaly. Blood tests revealed elevated levels of alkaline phosphatase, C-reactive protein, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and neutrophilic leukocytosis. Blood cultures were sterile. Ultrasound of the abdomen showed multiple abscesses, from which pus was drained and MRSA isolated. Computed tomography of the abdomen did not show any source of infection, and an amebic serology was negative. The patient was started on vancomycin for 2 weeks, following which he became afebrile and was discharged on oral linezolid for 4 more weeks. Normally a liver abscess is treated empirically with ceftriaxone for pyogenic liver abscess and metronidazole for amebic liver abscess. However, if the patient has risk factors for a Staphylococcal infection, it is imperative that antibiotics covering gram-positive organisms be added while waiting for culture reports. PMID:27540556

  16. The Drug Resistance Strategies Project as Translational Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hecht, Michael L.; Miller-Day, Michelle

    2007-01-01

    This paper tells the story of the multi-layered translational process of the Drug Resistance Strategies Project. The Drug Resistance Strategies Project provides an exemplar of translational scholarship, translating adolescent narratives about their substance use experiences into an efficacious, substance abuse prevention middle school curriculum.…

  17. GWAMAR: Genome-wide assessment of mutations associated with drug resistance in bacteria

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Development of drug resistance in bacteria causes antibiotic therapies to be less effective and more costly. Moreover, our understanding of the process remains incomplete. One promising approach to improve our understanding of how resistance is being acquired is to use whole-genome comparative approaches for detection of drug resistance-associated mutations. Results We present GWAMAR, a tool we have developed for detecting of drug resistance-associated mutations in bacteria through comparative analysis of whole-genome sequences. The pipeline of GWAMAR comprises several steps. First, for a set of closely related bacterial genomes, it employs eCAMBer to identify homologous gene families. Second, based on multiple alignments of the gene families, it identifies mutations among the strains of interest. Third, it calculates several statistics to identify which mutations are the most associated with drug resistance. Conclusions Based on our analysis of two large datasets retrieved from publicly available data for M. tuberculosis, we identified a set of novel putative drug resistance-associated mutations. As a part of this work, we present also an application of our tool to detect putative compensatory mutations. PMID:25559874

  18. Drug treatment program compliance and resistance activities during implementation of California's Proposition 36.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Grace

    2009-01-01

    The Substance Abuse and Crime Prevention Act (SACPA), also known as Proposition 36, was implemented statewide in 2001 in California. This legislation remands non-violent drug offenders to drug treatment rather than prison or jail. Structured telephone interviews were conducted with a purposive sample of 72 drug treatment programs from six Southern California counties concerning compliance and resistance activities during implementation. A linear regression model was developed that used a dependent variable capturing overall experience with Proposition 36 and compliance and resistance activities as independent variables. The final model included three compliance variables (sharing problems and solutions with other treatment providers, hiring new staff, acquiring additional space through rental or purchase) that were most predictive of the programs' overall experience with Proposition 36. The implications of these findings in the context of organizational compliance and resistance activities are discussed.

  19. Multi drug resistance in strong biofilm forming clinical isolates of Staphylococcus epidermidis

    PubMed Central

    Sahal, Gulcan; Bilkay, Isil Seyis

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcus epidermidis which exists in healthy human skin as a commensal inhabitant is also an important pathogen forming biofilms on many surfaces and recently, increased resistance traits were suggested to be acquired in biofilm environments. In this study; clinical Prevalences, antibiotic resistances and biofilm formations of S. epidermidis strains were determined and comparison of all these findings with each other was carried out in order to take precautions against them and figure out if high biofilm forming S. epidermidis strains display multi drug resistance. According to our results; samples of wound and blood were the most S. epidermidis isolated clinical materials (40%; 35%) and cardiothoracic surgery was the most S. epidermidis observed service unit. All of these strains were sensitive to vancomycin, however 65% of them showed resistance to all β-lactam antibiotics (Penicillin, Oxacillin, Amoxicilin/Clavulonic acid), used in this study and 60% of all S. epidermidis strains were found as multi drug resistant. When the results of strong biofilm forming S. epidermidis strains are examined; they were isolated from sample of blood and service unit of cardiovascular surgery in highest frequency and 80% of them were β-lactam resistant whereas 100% of them were multi drug resistant. One of these multi drug resistant strains which was resistant to maximum amount of different antimicrobial classes, was also observed as maximum biofilm forming strain among all the other S. epidermidis isolates. Multi drug resistance in strong biofilm forming strains shows that; biofilms play a role in antimicrobial resistance traits of S. epidermidis. PMID:25242939

  20. Rapid detection of the epidermal growth factor receptor mutation in non-small-cell lung cancer for analysis of acquired resistance using molecular beacons.

    PubMed

    Oh, Young-Hee; Kim, Youngwook; Kim, Young-Pil; Seo, Soo-Won; Mitsudomi, Tetsuya; Ahn, Myung-Ju; Park, Keunchil; Kim, Hak-Sung

    2010-09-01

    A secondary mutation (T790M) in epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a hallmark of acquired resistance to EGFR inhibitors used to treat non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Therefore, identifying the T790M mutation is crucial to guide treatment decisions. Given that DNA sequencing methods are time-consuming and insensitive, we developed and investigated the feasibility of using molecular beacons for the detection of the T790M mutation in EGFR. A molecular beacon complementary to the region of the secondary EGFR mutation (T790M) was designed and used in NSCLC samples bearing drug-sensitive and -resistant EGFR mutations. For a rapid and simple assay, we attempted to use the molecular beacon with real-time PCR and in situ fluorescence imaging. The ability of the designed molecular beacon to specifically detect the T790M mutation of EGFR was tested for samples from two patients with drug resistance and compared with conventional DNA sequencing methods. The molecular beacon successfully detected the T790M mutation in patient samples with drug resistance. The sensitivity of the molecular beacon, which detected as little as 2% of genomic DNA from the drug-resistant cells (H1975), was much higher than direct sequencing. Furthermore, in situ fluorescence imaging with the molecular beacon gave rise to a distinguishable signal for the T790M mutation in drug-resistant cells. The molecular beacon-based approach enabled rapid and sensitive detection of the EGFR mutation (T790M) in NSCLC with in situ fluorescence imaging, which can be directed to determine various treatment options in patients with cancer.

  1. Insulin-like growth factor-I receptor signalling and acquired resistance to gefitinib (ZD1839; Iressa) in human breast and prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Jones, H E; Goddard, L; Gee, J M W; Hiscox, S; Rubini, M; Barrow, D; Knowlden, J M; Williams, S; Wakeling, A E; Nicholson, R I

    2004-12-01

    De novo and acquired resistance to the anti-tumour drug gefitinib (ZD1839; Iressa), a specific epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) has been reported. We have determined whether signalling through the IGF-I receptor (IGF-1R) pathway plays a role in the gefitinib-acquired resistance phenotype. Continuous exposure of EGFR-positive MCF-7-derived tamoxifen resistant breast cancer cells (TAM-R) to 1 microM gefitinib resulted in a sustained growth inhibition (90%) for 4 months before the surviving cells resumed proliferation. A stable gefitinib-resistant subline (TAM/TKI-R) was established after a further 2 months and this showed no detectable basal phosphorylated EGFR activity. Compared with the parental TAM-R cells, the TAM/ TKI-R cells demonstrated (a) elevated levels of activated IGF-1R, AKT and protein kinase C (PKC)delta, (b) an increased sensitivity to growth inhibition by the IGF-1R TKI AG1024 and (c) an increased migratory capacity that was reduced by AG1024 treatment. Similarly, the EGFR-positive androgen-independent human prostate cancer cell line DU145 was also continuously challenged with 1 microM gefitinib and, although substantial growth inhibition (60%) was seen initially, a gefitinib-resistant variant (DU145/TKI-R) developed after 3 months. Like their breast cancer counterparts, the DU145/TKI-R cells showed increases in the levels of components of the IGF-1R signalling pathway and an elevated sensitivity to growth inhibition by AG1024 compared with the parent DU145 cell line. Additionally, DU145/TKI-R cell migration was also decreased by this inhibitor. We have therefore concluded that in breast and prostate cancer cells acquired resistance to gefitinib is associated with increased signalling via the IGF-1R pathway, which also plays a role in the invasive capacity of the gefitinib-resistant phenotype.

  2. Superinfection and the evolution of resistance to antimalarial drugs.

    PubMed

    Klein, Eili Y; Smith, David L; Laxminarayan, Ramanan; Levin, Simon

    2012-09-22

    A major issue in the control of malaria is the evolution of drug resistance. Ecological theory has demonstrated that pathogen superinfection and the resulting within-host competition influences the evolution of specific traits. Individuals infected with Plasmodium falciparum are consistently infected by multiple parasites; however, while this probably alters the dynamics of resistance evolution, there are few robust mathematical models examining this issue. We developed a general theory for modelling the evolution of resistance with host superinfection and examine: (i) the effect of transmission intensity on the rate of resistance evolution; (ii) the importance of different biological costs of resistance; and (iii) the best measure of the frequency of resistance. We find that within-host competition retards the ability and slows the rate at which drug-resistant parasites invade, particularly as the transmission rate increases. We also find that biological costs of resistance that reduce transmission are less important than reductions in the duration of drug-resistant infections. Lastly, we find that random sampling of the population for resistant parasites is likely to significantly underestimate the frequency of resistance. Considering superinfection in mathematical models of antimalarial drug resistance may thus be important for generating accurate predictions of interventions to contain resistance.

  3. Superinfection and the evolution of resistance to antimalarial drugs

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Eili Y.; Smith, David L.; Laxminarayan, Ramanan; Levin, Simon

    2012-01-01

    A major issue in the control of malaria is the evolution of drug resistance. Ecological theory has demonstrated that pathogen superinfection and the resulting within-host competition influences the evolution of specific traits. Individuals infected with Plasmodium falciparum are consistently infected by multiple parasites; however, while this probably alters the dynamics of resistance evolution, there are few robust mathematical models examining this issue. We developed a general theory for modelling the evolution of resistance with host superinfection and examine: (i) the effect of transmission intensity on the rate of resistance evolution; (ii) the importance of different biological costs of resistance; and (iii) the best measure of the frequency of resistance. We find that within-host competition retards the ability and slows the rate at which drug-resistant parasites invade, particularly as the transmission rate increases. We also find that biological costs of resistance that reduce transmission are less important than reductions in the duration of drug-resistant infections. Lastly, we find that random sampling of the population for resistant parasites is likely to significantly underestimate the frequency of resistance. Considering superinfection in mathematical models of antimalarial drug resistance may thus be important for generating accurate predictions of interventions to contain resistance. PMID:22787024

  4. HIV resistance to antiviral drugs: public health implications.

    PubMed

    Wainberg, M A; Cameron, D W

    1998-01-01

    The widespread occurrence of HIV strains resistant to antiviral drugs has given rise to a number of important concerns distinct from the obvious question of the relationship between drug resistance and treatment failure. A major issue is the extent to which drug-resistant viruses may be transmitted in primary infection via sexual or intravenous routes and how this relates to the relative fitness of such strains. It is also important to understand the potential role of effective antiviral therapy in the decrease of viral burden in both blood and sexual secretions, and the extent to which this may be compromised in individuals harboring resistant viruses. A related subject is the important role of patient adherence to antiviral therapy in achieving sustained reduction in viral load and preventing the emergence of drug resistance. These linked topics are tied to the central role of antiviral agents in the selection of mutant forms that can attain a replication advantage in the presence of drug.

  5. Improving Viral Protease Inhibitors to Counter Drug Resistance.

    PubMed

    Kurt Yilmaz, Nese; Swanstrom, Ronald; Schiffer, Celia A

    2016-07-01

    Drug resistance is a major problem in health care, undermining therapy outcomes and necessitating novel approaches to drug design. Extensive studies on resistance to viral protease inhibitors, particularly those of HIV-1 and hepatitis C virus (HCV) protease, revealed a plethora of information on the structural and molecular mechanisms underlying resistance. These insights led to several strategies to improve viral protease inhibitors to counter resistance, such as exploiting the essential biological function and leveraging evolutionary constraints. Incorporation of these strategies into structure-based drug design can minimize vulnerability to resistance, not only for viral proteases but for other quickly evolving drug targets as well, toward designing inhibitors one step ahead of evolution to counter resistance with more intelligent and rational design. PMID:27090931

  6. Cinnarizine is a useful and well-tolerated drug in the treatment of acquired cold urticaria (ACU).

    PubMed

    Tosoni, Cinzia; Lodi-Rizzini, Fabio; Bettoni, Lorenzo; Toniati, Paola; Zane, Cristina; Capezzera, Rossana; Venturini, Marina; Calzavara-Pinton, Piergiacomo; Bettoni, Lucia

    2003-01-01

    Old generation H1-type antihistamines are the standard therapeutic option for acquired cold urticaria (ACU), but adverse effects are common. New antihistamines are well tolerated but efficacy is often poor. The present study aims to evaluate efficacy and safety of cinnarizine in the treatment of ACU patients intolerant to old antihistamines and resistant to new drugs. We studied 14 patients (4 males and 10 females). Mean duration of the disease was 48.9 (range 7-102) months. Cold cube test was positive in 78.6 % of patients. Cold urticaria was idiopathic in 10 (71.4 %) patients. Cryoglobulins were detected in the serum of 4 cases (28.6 %). Cinnarizine (25 mg t.i.d.) was administered for 3 months, and then it was gently tapered off and stopped within 2 months. A complete or good response was obtained in 8 (57.1 %) and 2 (14.3 %) patients, respectively. Only two patients were unresponsive (21.4 %). Tapering off or stopping cinnarizine was followed by the relapse of cold urticaria in 7 cases (50.0 %). These patients were amenable to a second treatment cycle. Six patients (42.9 %) had a persistent remission. A patient interrupted the therapy because of severe vertigo. Three patients reported mild and transitory adverse effects including epigastralgia, weight gain and drowsiness. In conclusion, cinnarizine at high doses may be considered as an effective and well-tolerated treatment for ACU. PMID:12609783

  7. Epidemiological control of drug resistance and compensatory mutation under resistance testing and second-line therapy.

    PubMed

    Saddler, Clare A; Wu, Yue; Valckenborgh, Frank; Tanaka, Mark M

    2013-12-01

    The fitness cost of antibiotic resistance in the absence of treatment raises the possibility that prudent use of drugs may slow or reverse the rise of resistance. Unfortunately, compensatory mutations that lower this cost may lead to entrenched resistance. Here, we develop a mathematical model of resistance evolution and compensatory mutation to determine whether reversion to sensitivity can occur, and how disease control might be facilitated by a second-line therapy. When only a single antibiotic is available, sensitive bacteria reach fixation only under treatment rates so low that hardly any cases are treated. We model a scenario in which drug sensitivity can be accurately tested so that a second-line therapy is administered to resistant cases. Before the rise of resistance to the second drug, disease eradication is possible if resistance testing and second-line treatment are conducted at a high enough rate. However, if double drug resistance arises, the possibility of disease eradication is greatly reduced and compensated resistance prevails in most of the parameter space. The boundary separating eradication from fixation of compensated resistance is strongly influenced by the underlying basic reproductive number of the pathogen and drug efficacy in sensitive cases, but depends less on the resistance cost and compensation. When double resistance is possible, the boundary is affected by the relative strengths of resistance against the two drugs in the double-resistant-compensated strain.

  8. Pharmacogenomic approach for the identification of novel determinants of acquired resistance to oxaliplatin in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Cardús, Anna; Martinez-Balibrea, Eva; Bandrés, Eva; Malumbres, Raquel; Ginés, Alba; Manzano, José Luís; Taron, Miquel; Garcia-Foncillas, Jesús; Abad, Albert

    2009-01-01

    Oxaliplatin is a third-generation platinum agent used in colorectal cancer treatment. Oxaliplatin resistance acquisition is a complex process mainly based on alteration of genes and pathways involved in its mechanism of action. Therefore, our purpose was to perform a gene expression screening in an in vitro model to identify genes that could play a role in oxaliplatin resistance acquisition processes. Four colorectal cancer cell lines and their oxaliplatin-resistant derived sublines were compared. Microarray analysis was done using Human 19K Oligo Array Slides. RNA from cells were hybridized with a commercial RNA reference sample and labeled with both fluorochromes Cy3 and Cy5. Data were analyzed by hierarchical clustering method. Subsequently, quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) was used to corroborate microarray data, considering as positively validated those genes that showed significant differences in expression levels between groups and a correlation between microarray and qRT-PCR data. By microarray analysis, 32 candidate genes were identified. After validation process by qRT-PCR, the genes AKT1, CDK5, TRIP, GARP, RGS11, and UGCGL1 were positively validated. The 3 first genes proved to be involved in regulation of nuclear factor-kappabeta antiapoptotic transcription factor previously related to drug resistance, and the other 3 genes are novel finds. We have identified 6 genes related to oxaliplatin resistance acquisition. These findings are of paramount importance to understand these processes better and open new lines of study to elucidate the relevance of this pharmacogenomic approach into the clinic.

  9. Caterpillar saliva interferes with induced Arabidopsis thaliana defence responses via the systemic acquired resistance pathway

    PubMed Central

    Weech, Marie-Hélène; Chapleau, Mélanie; Pan, Li; Ide, Christine; Bede, Jacqueline C.

    2008-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. genotypes limited in their ability to mount either octadecanoid-dependent induced resistance (IR–) or systemic acquired resistance (SAR–) were used to characterize the roles of these pathways in plant–herbivore interactions. Molecular and biochemical markers of IR were analysed in plants subject to herbivory by caterpillars of the beet armyworm, Spodoptera exigua Hübner, which had either intact or impaired salivary secretions since salivary enzymes, such as glucose oxidase, have been implicated in the ability of caterpillars to circumvent induced plant defences. Transcript expression of genes encoding laccase-like multicopper oxidase [AtLMCO4 (polyphenol oxidase)] and defensin (AtPDF1.2) showed salivary-specific patterns which were disrupted in the SAR– mutant plants. The activity of octadecanoid-associated anti-nutritive proteins, such as LMCO and trypsin inhibitor, showed similar patterns. Gene and protein changes parallel plant hormone levels where elevated jasmonic acid was observed in wild-type plants fed upon by caterpillars with impaired salivary secretions compared with plants subject to herbivory by normal caterpillars. This salivary-specific difference in jasmonic acid levels was alleviated in SAR– mutants. These results support the model that caterpillar saliva interferes with jasmonate-dependent plant defences by activating the SAR pathway. PMID:18487634

  10. Drug-Resistant Malaria: The Era of ACT

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jessica T.; Juliano, Jonathan J.

    2010-01-01

    As drug-resistant falciparum malaria has continued to evolve and spread worldwide, artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACT) have become the centerpiece of global malaria control over the past decade. This review discusses how advances in antimalarial drug resistance monitoring and rational use of the array of ACTs now available can maximize the impact of this highly efficacious therapy, even as resistance to artemisinins is emerging in Southeast Asia. PMID:21308525

  11. [Epidemiology of multi-drug resistant gramnegative bacilli].

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Garbajosa, P; Cantón, R

    2016-09-01

    Current antimicrobial resistance in Gram negative bacilli is particularly worrisome due to development of resistance to all available antimicrobial agents. This situation dramatically limits therapeutic options. The microorganisms acquire a multiresistance phenotype as a consequence of different complex processes in which the antimicrobials acts as selective driver of resistance. Dissemination of multiresistant bacteria is driven by the expansion of the high-risk clones. These clones can be selected in the presence of antimicrobials allowing their persistence over time. PMID:27608308

  12. Overcome Cancer Cell Drug Resistance Using Natural Products

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Pu; Yang, Hua Li; Yang, Ying Juan; Wang, Lan; Lee, Shao Chin

    2015-01-01

    Chemotherapy is one of the major treatment methods for cancer. However, failure in chemotherapy is not uncommon, mainly due to dose-limiting toxicity associated with drug resistance. Management of drug resistance is important towards successful chemotherapy. There are many reports in the Chinese literature that natural products can overcome cancer cell drug resistance, which deserve sharing with scientific and industrial communities. We summarized the reports into four categories: (1) in vitro studies using cell line models; (2) serum pharmacology; (3) in vivo studies using animal models; and (4) clinical studies. Fourteen single compounds were reported to have antidrug resistance activity for the first time. In vitro, compounds were able to overcome drug resistance at nontoxic or subtoxic concentrations, in a dose-dependent manner, by inhibiting drug transporters, cell detoxification capacity, or cell apoptosis sensitivity. Studies in vivo showed that single compounds, herbal extract, and formulas had potent antidrug resistance activities. Importantly, many single compounds, herbal extracts, and formulas have been used clinically to treat various diseases including cancer. The review provides comprehensive data on use of natural compounds to overcome cancer cell drug resistance in China, which may facilitate the therapeutic development of natural products for clinical management of cancer drug resistance. PMID:26421052

  13. Efflux-Mediated Drug Resistance in Bacteria: an Update

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xian-Zhi; Nikaido, Hiroshi

    2010-01-01

    Drug efflux pumps play a key role in drug resistance and also serve other functions in bacteria. There has been a growing list of multidrug and drug-specific efflux pumps characterized from bacteria of human, animal, plant and environmental origins. These pumps are mostly encoded on the chromosome although they can also be plasmid-encoded. A previous article (Li X-Z and Nikaido H, Drugs, 2004; 64[2]: 159–204) had provided a comprehensive review regarding efflux-mediated drug resistance in bacteria. In the past five years, significant progress has been achieved in further understanding of drug resistance-related efflux transporters and this review focuses on the latest studies in this field since 2003. This has been demonstrated in multiple aspects that include but are not limited to: further molecular and biochemical characterization of the known drug efflux pumps and identification of novel drug efflux pumps; structural elucidation of the transport mechanisms of drug transporters; regulatory mechanisms of drug efflux pumps; determining the role of the drug efflux pumps in other functions such as stress responses, virulence and cell communication; and development of efflux pump inhibitors. Overall, the multifaceted implications of drug efflux transporters warrant novel strategies to combat multidrug resistance in bacteria. PMID:19678712

  14. Mycobacterium tuberculosis resistance to antituberculosis drugs in Mozambique*, **

    PubMed Central

    Pires, Germano Manuel; Folgosa, Elena; Nquobile, Ndlovu; Gitta, Sheba; Cadir, Nureisha

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the drug resistance profile of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Mozambique. METHODS: We analyzed secondary data from the National Tuberculosis Referral Laboratory, in the city of Maputo, Mozambique, and from the Beira Regional Tuberculosis Referral Laboratory, in the city of Beira, Mozambique. The data were based on culture-positive samples submitted to first-line drug susceptibility testing (DST) between January and December of 2011. We attempted to determine whether the frequency of DST positivity was associated with patient type or provenance. RESULTS: During the study period, 641 strains were isolated in culture and submitted to DST. We found that 374 (58.3%) were resistant to at least one antituberculosis drug and 280 (43.7%) were resistant to multiple antituberculosis drugs. Of the 280 multidrug-resistant tuberculosis cases, 184 (65.7%) were in previously treated patients, most of whom were from southern Mozambique. Two (0.71%) of the cases of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis were confirmed to be cases of extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis. Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis was most common in males, particularly those in the 21-40 year age bracket. CONCLUSIONS: M. tuberculosis resistance to antituberculosis drugs is high in Mozambique, especially in previously treated patients. The frequency of M. tuberculosis strains that were resistant to isoniazid, rifampin, and streptomycin in combination was found to be high, particularly in samples from previously treated patients. PMID:24831398

  15. Nasal colonization in children with community acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Davoodabadi, Fazlollah; Mobasherizadeh, Sina; Mostafavizadeh, Kamyar; Shojaei, Hasan; Havaei, Seyed Asghar; Koushki, Ali Mehrabi; Moghadasizadeh, Zahra; Meidani, Mohsen; Shirani, Kiana

    2016-01-01

    Background: Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a frequent cause of infections. The changing epidemiology of MRSA became evident in the 1990s when CA-MRSA cases were first reported. Nasal carriage of CA-MRSA is associated with an increased risk for development of infections in various populations. Materials and Methods: Anterior nares culture for the presence of methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) and MRSA was taken from 345 children attending kindergartens, who didn’t have any known risk factor for MRSA colonization. Also, children demographic variables were recorded. Identification of SA and community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) with standard microbiological test was performed. Finally, the susceptibility of isolated to various antibiotics determined. The data were analyzed with Whonet 5.6 software. Results: Of 345 children, 20 children (5.8%) were colonized with CA-MRSA, 86 children (24.9%) with MSSA and 239 cases (69.3%) didn’t have SA colonization. The highest rate of MSSA and MRSA colonization was obtained at the age of 6 years. The frequency distribution of SA (MSSA and MRSA) colonization prevalence didn’t have any significant differences based on age, gender and the admission time (P > 0.05); but it was significantly different in the urban areas (P < 0.001). The lowest resistance rate of CA-MRSA isolates, with a frequency of 10%, was detected with gentamicin, rifampin, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. Conclusions: In summary, CA-MRSA colonization was observed in child care centers remarkably. Therefore, by facing various infections due to SA especially in areas of low socio-economic status, it must be considered. Based on antibiogram test, empirical treatment with rifampin, gentamicin and ciprofloxacin is recommended during CA-MRSA infections. PMID:27274501

  16. Systemic Acquired Resistance in Moss: Further Evidence for Conserved Defense Mechanisms in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Winter, Peter S.; Bowman, Collin E.; Villani, Philip J.; Dolan, Thomas E.; Hauck, Nathanael R.

    2014-01-01

    Vascular plants possess multiple mechanisms for defending themselves against pathogens. One well-characterized defense mechanism is systemic acquired resistance (SAR). In SAR, a plant detects the presence of a pathogen and transmits a signal throughout the plant, inducing changes in the expression of various pathogenesis-related (PR) genes. Once SAR is established, the plant is capable of mounting rapid responses to subsequent pathogen attacks. SAR has been characterized in numerous angiosperm and gymnosperm species; however, despite several pieces of evidence suggesting SAR may also exist in non-vascular plants6–8, its presence in non-vascular plants has not been conclusively demonstrated, in part due to the lack of an appropriate culture system. Here, we describe and use a novel culture system to demonstrate that the moss species Amblystegium serpens does initiate a SAR-like reaction upon inoculation with Pythium irregulare, a common soil-borne oomycete. Infection of A. serpens gametophores by P. irregulare is characterized by localized cytoplasmic shrinkage within 34 h and chlorosis and necrosis within 7 d of inoculation. Within 24 h of a primary inoculation (induction), moss gametophores grown in culture became highly resistant to infection following subsequent inoculation (challenge) by the same pathogen. This increased resistance was a response to the pathogen itself and not to physical wounding. Treatment with β-1,3 glucan, a structural component of oomycete cell walls, was equally effective at triggering SAR. Our results demonstrate, for the first time, that this important defense mechanism exists in a non-vascular plant, and, together with previous studies, suggest that SAR arose prior to the divergence of vascular and non-vascular plants. In addition, this novel moss – pathogen culture system will be valuable for future characterization of the mechanism of SAR in moss, which is necessary for a better understanding of the evolutionary history of SAR

  17. Comparative Proteomics Analysis of Phloem Exudates Collected during the Induction of Systemic Acquired Resistance1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Daniel C.; Dey, Sanjukta; Hauck, Stefanie M.; Vlot, A. Corina; Cameron, Robin K.

    2016-01-01

    Systemic acquired resistance (SAR) is a plant defense response that provides long-lasting, broad-spectrum pathogen resistance to uninfected systemic leaves following an initial localized infection. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), local infection with virulent or avirulent strains of Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato generates long-distance SAR signals that travel from locally infected to distant leaves through the phloem to establish SAR. In this study, a proteomics approach was used to identify proteins that accumulate in phloem exudates in response to the induction of SAR. To accomplish this, phloem exudates collected from mock-inoculated or SAR-induced leaves of wild-type Columbia-0 plants were subjected to label-free quantitative liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry proteomics. Comparing mock- and SAR-induced phloem exudate proteomes, 16 proteins were enriched in phloem exudates collected from SAR-induced plants, while 46 proteins were suppressed. SAR-related proteins THIOREDOXIN h3, ACYL-COENZYME A-BINDING PROTEIN6, and PATHOGENESIS-RELATED1 were enriched in phloem exudates of SAR-induced plants, demonstrating the strength of this approach and suggesting a role for these proteins in the phloem during SAR. To identify novel components of SAR, transfer DNA mutants of differentially abundant phloem proteins were assayed for SAR competence. This analysis identified a number of new proteins (m-type thioredoxins, major latex protein-like protein, ULTRAVIOLET-B RESISTANCE8 photoreceptor) that contribute to the SAR response. The Arabidopsis SAR phloem proteome is a valuable resource for understanding SAR long-distance signaling and the dynamic nature of the phloem during plant-pathogen interactions. PMID:27208255

  18. Origin and Evolution of European Community-Acquired Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Wirth, Thierry; Andersen, Paal S.; Skov, Robert L.; De Grassi, Anna; Simões, Patricia Martins; Tristan, Anne; Petersen, Andreas; Aziz, Maliha; Kiil, Kristoffer; Cirković, Ivana; Udo, Edet E.; del Campo, Rosa; Vuopio-Varkila, Jaana; Ahmad, Norazah; Tokajian, Sima; Peters, Georg; Schaumburg, Frieder; Olsson-Liljequist, Barbro; Givskov, Michael; Driebe, Elizabeth E.; Vigh, Henrik E.; Shittu, Adebayo; Ramdani-Bougessa, Nadjia; Rasigade, Jean-Philippe; Price, Lance B.; Vandenesch, Francois; Larsen, Anders R.; Laurent, Frederic

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) was recognized in Europe and worldwide in the late 1990s. Within a decade, several genetically and geographically distinct CA-MRSA lineages carrying the small SCCmec type IV and V genetic elements and the Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) emerged around the world. In Europe, the predominant CA-MRSA strain belongs to clonal complex 80 (CC80) and is resistant to kanamycin/amikacin and fusidic acid. CC80 was first reported in 1993 but was relatively rare until the late 1990s. It has since been identified throughout North Africa, the Middle East, and Europe, with recent sporadic reports in sub-Saharan Africa. While strongly associated with skin and soft tissue infections, it is rarely found among asymptomatic carriers. Methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA) CC80 strains are extremely rare except in sub-Saharan Africa. In the current study, we applied whole-genome sequencing to a global collection of both MSSA and MRSA CC80 isolates. Phylogenetic analyses strongly suggest that the European epidemic CA-MRSA lineage is derived from a PVL-positive MSSA ancestor from sub-Saharan Africa. Moreover, the tree topology suggests a single acquisition of both the SCCmec element and a plasmid encoding the fusidic acid resistance determinant. Four canonical SNPs distinguish the derived CA-MRSA lineage and include a nonsynonymous mutation in accessory gene regulator C (agrC). These changes were associated with a star-like expansion into Europe, the Middle East, and North Africa in the early 1990s, including multiple cases of cross-continent imports likely driven by human migrations. PMID:25161186

  19. Antiretroviral drug use and HIV drug resistance among HIV-infected Black men who have sex with men: HIV Prevention Trials Network 061

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Iris; Connor, Matthew B.; Clarke, William; Marzinke, Mark A.; Cummings, Vanessa; Breaud, Autumn; Fogel, Jessica M.; Laeyendecker, Oliver; Fields, Sheldon D.; Donnell, Deborah; Griffith, Sam; Scott, Hyman M.; Shoptaw, Steven; del Rio, Carlos; Magnus, Manya; Mannheimer, Sharon; Wheeler, Darrell P.; Mayer, Kenneth H.; Koblin, Beryl A.; Eshleman, Susan H.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND HPTN 061 enrolled Black men who have sex with men in the United States. Some men with low/undetectable HIV RNA had unusual patterns of antiretroviral (ARV) drug use or had drugs detected in the absence of viral suppression. This report includes a comprehensive analysis of ARV drug use and drug resistance among men in HPTN 061 who were not virally suppressed. METHODS The analysis included 169 men who had viral loads >400 copies/mL at enrollment, including three with acute infection and 13 with recent infection. By self-report, 88 were previously diagnosed, including 31 in care; 137 men reported no ARV drug use. Samples from these 169 men and 23 seroconverters were analyzed with HIV genotyping and ARV drug assays. RESULTS Forty-eight (28%) of the 169 men had ≥1 drug resistance mutation (DRM); 19 (11%) had multi-class resistance. Sixty men (36%) had ≥1 ARV drug detected, 42 (70%) of whom reported no ARV drug use. Nine (23%) of 39 newly-infected men had ≥1 DRM; 10 had ≥1 ARV drug detected. Unusual patterns of ARV drugs were detected more frequently in newly-diagnosed men than previously-diagnosed men. The rate of transmitted drug resistance (TDR) was 23% based on HIV genotyping and self-reported ARV drug use, but was 12% after adjusting for ARV drug detection. CONCLUSIONS Many men in HPTN 061 had drug-resistant HIV and many were at risk of acquiring additional DRMs. ARV drug testing revealed unusual patterns of ARV drug use and provided a more accurate estimate of TDR. PMID:25861015

  20. Forfeiture of illegally acquired assets of drug traffickers: the position in India.

    PubMed

    Gujral, B B

    1983-01-01

    Trafficking in drugs and other related crimes generates huge illicit funds which are used to support other criminal activity, corruption, illicit arms trading, the smuggling of goods and currency, and other economic offences. The traditional enforcement techniques aimed only at carriers and confiscation of the seized contraband no longer provide a sufficient deterrent. The problem is international in scope and requires close cooperation of all the agencies concerned. In 1976, India enacted specific legislation providing for the forfeiture of the property and assets of smugglers, including traffickers and foreign-exchange manipulators. This legislation, known as the "Smugglers and Foreign-Exchange Manipulators (Forfeiture of Property) Act, 1976", enables the enforcement authorities to confiscate all property, both movable and immovable, illegally acquired or accumulated, or for which investment is made from unlawful earnings resulting from smuggling and foreign exchange racketeering. It covers all such property held, not only in the names of smugglers and traffickers themselves, but their relatives and associates as well. The Act provides for principles of natural justice to be followed for all forfeiture proceedings and for appeals to a high tribunal. The legislation has enabled forfeiture action in 2,297 cases, covering properties valued at $US 40 million, during the last six years.

  1. Anticancer drug nanomicelles formed by self-assembling amphiphilic dendrimer to combat cancer drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Wei, Tuo; Chen, Chao; Liu, Juan; Liu, Cheng; Posocco, Paola; Liu, Xiaoxuan; Cheng, Qiang; Huo, Shuaidong; Liang, Zicai; Fermeglia, Maurizio; Pricl, Sabrina; Liang, Xing-Jie; Rocchi, Palma; Peng, Ling

    2015-03-10

    Drug resistance and toxicity constitute challenging hurdles for cancer therapy. The application of nanotechnology for anticancer drug delivery is expected to address these issues and bring new hope for cancer treatment. In this context, we established an original nanomicellar drug delivery system based on an amphiphilic dendrimer (AmDM), which could generate supramolecular micelles to effectively encapsulate the anticancer drug doxorubicin (DOX) with high drug-loading capacity (>40%), thanks to the unique dendritic structure creating large void space for drug accommodation. The resulting AmDM/DOX nanomicelles were able to enhance drug potency and combat doxorubicin resistance in breast cancer models by significantly enhancing cellular uptake while considerably decreasing efflux of the drug. In addition, the AmDM/DOX nanoparticles abolished significantly the toxicity related to the free drug. Collectively, our studies demonstrate that the drug delivery system based on nanomicelles formed with the self-assembling amphiphilic dendrimer constitutes a promising and effective drug carrier in cancer therapy.

  2. Rapid evolution of drug resistance of multiple myeloma in the microenvironment with drug gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Amy; Zhang, Qiucen; Lambert, Guillaume; Khin, Zayar; Silva, Ariosto; Gatenby, Robert; Kim, John; Pourmand, Nader; Austin, Robert; Sturm, James

    2013-03-01

    Drug resistance in cancer is usually caused by the spatial drug gradients in tumor environment. Here, we culture multiple myeloma in a gradient from 0 to 20 nM of doxorubicin (genotoxic drug) across 2 mm wide region for 12 days. The myeloma cells grew rapidly and formed 3D colonies in the regions with less drug concentration. However, we have seen emergent colonies forming in regions with drug concentration above the minimal inhibitory concentration in less than one week. Once the cells have occupied the regions with less drug concentration, they tend to migrate toward the regions with higher drug concentration in a collective behavior. To characterize their resistance, we collect them from this microfluidic system, for further analysis of the dose response. We find that the IC50 (drug concentration that inhibits 50% of controlled population) of the cells, undergone a drug gradient, increase 16-fold of the wildtype cells. We further discover that these resistant cells express more Multidrug Resistance (mdr) protein, which pumps out the drugs and causes drug resistance, than the wildtype. Our current works on RNA-sequencing analysis may discover other biomolecular mechanisms that may confer the drug resistance.

  3. Prevalence of pyrazinamide resistance across the spectrum of drug resistant phenotypes of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Whitfield, Michael G; Streicher, Elizabeth M; Dolby, Tania; Simpson, John A; Sampson, Samantha L; Van Helden, Paul D; Van Rie, Annelies; Warren, Robin M

    2016-07-01

    Pyrazinamide resistance is largely unknown in the spectrum of drug resistant phenotypes. We summarize data on PZA resistance in clinical isolates from South Africa. PZA DST should be performed when considering its inclusion in treatment of patients with rifampicin-resistant TB or MDR-TB. PMID:27450014

  4. The mechanism of resistance to sulfa drugs in Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Triglia, Tony; Cowman, Alan F.

    1999-02-01

    The sulfonamide and sulfone (sulfa) group of antimalarials has been used extensively throughout malaria endemic regions of the world to control this important infectious disease of humans. Sulfadoxine is the most extensively used drug of this group of drugs and is usually combined with pyrimethamine (Fansidar), particularly for the control of Plasmodium falciparum, the causative agent of the most lethal form of malaria. Resistance to the sulfadoxine/pyrimethamine combination is widespread. Analysis using molecular, genetic and biochemical approaches has shown that the mechanism of resistance to sulfadoxine involves mutation of dihydropteroate synthase, the enzyme target of this group of drugs. Understanding the mechanism of resistance of P. falciparum to sulfa drugs has allowed detailed analysis of the epidemiology of the spread of drug resistance alleles in the field(1)and, in the future, opens the way to the development of novel antimalarials to this target enzyme. Copyright 1999 Harcourt Publishers Ltd.

  5. Drug resistance among TB cases and its clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Chopra, K K

    2015-07-01

    The emergence of M. tuberculosis strains resistant to at least, Isoniazid (INH) and Rifampicin (RIF), the two most potent drugs of first-line anti-TB therapy is termed multidrug drug-resistant TB (MDR-TB). This is a cause of concern to TB Control Programmes worldwide. When MDR-TB strains become resistant to the major second-line drugs, one of the fluouroquinolones and one of the three injectable drugs (Amikacin, Kanamycin and Capreomycin), it is defined as extensively drug resistant TB.(1,2) MDR-TB is a manmade, costly and deadly problem. Rapid diagnosis of MDR-TB is essential for the prompt initiation of effective second-line therapy to improve treatment outcome and limit transmission of the disease.

  6. Therapeutic siRNA for drug-resistant HER2-positive breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ngamcherdtrakul, Worapol; Castro, David J.; Morry, Jingga; Reda, Moataz M.; Gray, Joe W.; Yantasee, Wassana

    2016-01-01

    HER2 is overexpressed in about 20% of breast cancers and contributes to poor prognosis. Unfortunately, a large fraction of patients have primary or acquired resistance to the HER2-targeted therapy trastuzumab, thus a multi-drug combination is utilized in the clinic, putting significant burden on patients. We systematically identified an optimal HER2 siRNA from 76 potential sequences and demonstrated its utility in overcoming intrinsic and acquired resistance to trastuzumab and lapatinib in 18 HER2-positive cancer cell lines. We provided evidence that the drug-resistant cancer maintains dependence on HER2 for survival. Importantly, cell lines did not readily develop resistance following extended treatment with HER2 siRNA. Using our recently developed nanoparticle platform, systemic delivery of HER2 siRNA to trastuzumab-resistant tumors resulted in significant growth inhibition. Moreover, the optimal HER2 siRNA could also silence an exon 16 skipped HER2 splice variant reported to be highly oncogenic and linked to trastuzumab resistance. PMID:26894975

  7. Drug Resistance among Pulmonary Tuberculosis Patients in Calabar, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Otu, Akaninyene; Umoh, Victor; Habib, Abdulrazak; Ameh, Soter; Lawson, Lovett

    2013-01-01

    Background. This study aimed to determine the pattern of drug susceptibility to first-line drugs among pulmonary TB patients in two hospitals in Calabar, Nigeria. Methods. This was a descriptive cross-sectional study carried out between February 2011 and April 2012. Sputum samples from consecutive TB patients in Calabar were subjected to culture on Lowenstein-Jensen (LJ) slopes followed by drug susceptibility testing (DST). The DST was performed on LJ medium by the proportion method. Results. Forty-two of the 100 Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains were found to be resistant to at least one drug. Resistance to only one drug (monoresistance) was found in 17 patients. No strains with monoresistance to rifampicin were found. Resistance to two drugs was found in 22 patients, while one patient was resistant to both three and four drugs. MDR TB was seen in 4% (4/100). The independent variables of HIV serology and sex were not significantly associated with resistance (P > 0.05). Conclusion. There was a high prevalence of anti-TB drug resistance in Calabar. PMID:24078872

  8. The Pathway Analysis of Micrornas Regulated Drug-Resistant Responses in HeLa Cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yubo; Dai, Cuihong; Cai, Zhipeng; Hou, Aiju; Cheng, Dayou; Wu, Guanying; Li, Jing; Cui, Jie; Xu, Dechang

    2016-03-01

    Chemotherapy is the main strategy in the treatment of cancer; however, the development of drug-resistance is the obstacle in long-term treatment of cervical cancer. Cisplatin is one of the most common drugs used in cancer therapy. Recently, accumulating evidence suggests that miRNAs are involved in various bioactivities in oncogenesis. It is not unexpected that miRNAs play a key role in acquiring of drug-resistance in the progression of tumor. In this study, we induced and maintained four levels of cisplatin-resistant HeLa cell lines (HeLa/CR1, HeLa/CR2, HeLa/CR3, and HeLa/CR4). According to the previous studies and existing evidence, we selected five miRNAs (miR-183, miR-182, miR-30a, miR-15b, and miR-16) and their potential target mRNAs as our research targets. The real-time RT-PCR was adopted to detect the relative expression of miRNAs and their mRNAs. The results show that miR-182 and miR-15b were up-regulated in resistant cell lines, while miR-30a was significantly down-regulated. At the same time, their targets are related to drug resistance. Compared to their parent HeLa cell line, the expression of selected miRNAs in resistant cell lines altered. The alteration suggests that HeLa cell drug resistance is associated with distinct miRNAs, which indicates that miRNAs may be one of the therapy targets in the treatment of cervical cancer by sensitizing cell to chemotherapy. We suggested a possible network diagram based on the existing theory and the preliminary results of candidate miRNAs and their targets in HeLa cells during development of drug resistance.

  9. The Pathway Analysis of Micrornas Regulated Drug-Resistant Responses in HeLa Cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yubo; Dai, Cuihong; Cai, Zhipeng; Hou, Aiju; Cheng, Dayou; Wu, Guanying; Li, Jing; Cui, Jie; Xu, Dechang

    2016-03-01

    Chemotherapy is the main strategy in the treatment of cancer; however, the development of drug-resistance is the obstacle in long-term treatment of cervical cancer. Cisplatin is one of the most common drugs used in cancer therapy. Recently, accumulating evidence suggests that miRNAs are involved in various bioactivities in oncogenesis. It is not unexpected that miRNAs play a key role in acquiring of drug-resistance in the progression of tumor. In this study, we induced and maintained four levels of cisplatin-resistant HeLa cell lines (HeLa/CR1, HeLa/CR2, HeLa/CR3, and HeLa/CR4). According to the previous studies and existing evidence, we selected five miRNAs (miR-183, miR-182, miR-30a, miR-15b, and miR-16) and their potential target mRNAs as our research targets. The real-time RT-PCR was adopted to detect the relative expression of miRNAs and their mRNAs. The results show that miR-182 and miR-15b were up-regulated in resistant cell lines, while miR-30a was significantly down-regulated. At the same time, their targets are related to drug resistance. Compared to their parent HeLa cell line, the expression of selected miRNAs in resistant cell lines altered. The alteration suggests that HeLa cell drug resistance is associated with distinct miRNAs, which indicates that miRNAs may be one of the therapy targets in the treatment of cervical cancer by sensitizing cell to chemotherapy. We suggested a possible network diagram based on the existing theory and the preliminary results of candidate miRNAs and their targets in HeLa cells during development of drug resistance. PMID:27019498

  10. Increased interleukin-6 expression is associated with poor prognosis and acquired cisplatin resistance in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    GAO, JIAN; ZHAO, SEN; HALSTENSEN, TROND S.

    2016-01-01

    Increased expression of interleukin 6 (IL-6) is associated with poor prognosis and chemoresistance in many different carcinomas, but its role in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is still unsettled. Analyzing tumorous mRNA expression data from 399 HNSCC patients revealed that high IL-6 expression predicted poor prognosis. Similar tendency was observed in platinum treated patients, suggesting an IL-6 associated cisplatin resistance. IL-6 increase was also found in two in-house acquired cisplatin-resistant HNSCC cell lines (both basaloid and conventional squamous cell carcinoma) by using microarray analysis. However, although the in-house acquired cisplatin-resistant cell lines had higher basal and markedly increased cisplatin-induced IL-6 expression, IL-6 did not mediate the cisplatin resistance as neither exogenous IL-6 nor IL-6R/gp130 inhibitors affected cisplatin sensitivity. Moreover, the IL-6/STAT3 pathway was impaired in the resistant cell lines, partly due to decreased IL-6R expression. Thus, high IL-6 expression correlated to poor prognosis and acquired cisplatin resistance, but it did not mediate cisplatin resistance in the HNSCC cell lines. PMID:27108527

  11. Defeating pathogen drug resistance: guidance from evolutionary theory.

    PubMed

    Pepper, John W

    2008-12-01

    Many of the greatest challenges in medicine and public health involve the evolution of drug resistance by pathogens. Recent advances in the theory of natural selection suggest that there are two broad classes of pathogen traits that can be targeted by drugs or vaccines. The first class, consisting of traits that benefit the individual organisms bearing them, causes a strong evolutionary response and the rapid emergence of drug resistance. The second class, consisting of traits that benefit groups of pathogen organisms including the individual provider, causes a weaker evolutionary response and less drug resistance. Although most previous drug development has targeted the first class, it would be advantageous to focus on the second class as targets for drug and vaccine development. Specific examples and test cases are discussed.

  12. The pharmacogenomics of drug resistance to protein kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Gillis, Nancy K; McLeod, Howard L

    2016-09-01

    Dysregulation of growth factor cell signaling is a major driver of most human cancers. This has led to development of numerous drugs targeting protein kinases, with demonstrated efficacy in the treatment of a wide spectrum of cancers. Despite their high initial response rates and survival benefits, the majority of patients eventually develop resistance to these targeted therapies. This review article discusses examples of established mechanisms of drug resistance to anticancer therapies, including drug target mutations or gene amplifications, emergence of alternate signaling pathways, and pharmacokinetic variation. This reveals a role for pharmacogenomic analysis to identify and monitor for resistance, with possible therapeutic strategies to combat chemoresistance. PMID:27620953

  13. The pharmacogenomics of drug resistance to protein kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Gillis, Nancy K; McLeod, Howard L

    2016-09-01

    Dysregulation of growth factor cell signaling is a major driver of most human cancers. This has led to development of numerous drugs targeting protein kinases, with demonstrated efficacy in the treatment of a wide spectrum of cancers. Despite their high initial response rates and survival benefits, the majority of patients eventually develop resistance to these targeted therapies. This review article discusses examples of established mechanisms of drug resistance to anticancer therapies, including drug target mutations or gene amplifications, emergence of alternate signaling pathways, and pharmacokinetic variation. This reveals a role for pharmacogenomic analysis to identify and monitor for resistance, with possible therapeutic strategies to combat chemoresistance.

  14. Carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii acquired before liver transplantation: Impact on recipient outcomes.

    PubMed

    Freire, Maristela Pinheiro; Pierrotti, Ligia Câmera; Oshiro, Isabel Cristina Villela Soares; Bonazzi, Patrícia Rodrigues; Oliveira, Larissa Marques de; Machado, Anna Silva; Van Der Heijden, Inneke Marie; Rossi, Flavia; Costa, Silvia Figueiredo; D'Albuquerque, Luiz Augusto Carneiro; Abdala, Edson

    2016-05-01

    Infection with carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (CRAB) after liver transplantation (LT) is associated with high mortality. This study aimed to identify risk factors for post-LT CRAB infection, as well as to evaluate the impact of pre-LT CRAB acquisition on the incidence of post-LT CRAB infection. This was a prospective cohort study of all patients undergoing LT at our facility between October 2009 and October 2011. Surveillance cultures (SCs) were collected immediately before LT and weekly thereafter, until discharge. We analyzed 196 patients who were submitted to 222 LTs. CRAB was identified in 105 (53.6%); 24 (22.9%) of these patients were found to have acquired CRAB before LT, and 85 (81.0%) tested positive on SCs. Post-LT CRAB infection occurred in 56 (28.6%), the most common site being the surgical wound. Multivariate analysis showed that the risk factors for developing CRAB infection were prolonged cold ischemia, post-LT dialysis, LT due to fulminant hepatitis, and pre-LT CRAB acquisition with pre-LT CRAB acquisition showing a considerable trend toward significance (P = 0.06). Among the recipients with CRAB infection, 60-day mortality was 46.4%, significantly higher than among those without (P < 0.001). Mortality risk factors were post-LT infection with multidrug-resistant bacteria, LT performed because of fulminant hepatitis, retransplantation, prolonged cold ischemia, longer LT surgical time, and pre-LT CRAB acquisition, the last showing a trend toward significance (P = 0.08). In conclusion, pre-LT CRAB acquisition appears to increase the risk of post-LT CRAB infection, which has a negative impact on recipient survival. Liver Transplantation 22 615-626 2016 AASLD.

  15. Evolution of amoxicillin/clavulanate in the treatment of adults with acute bacterial rhinosinusitis and community-acquired pneumonia in response to antimicrobial-resistance patterns.

    PubMed

    File, Thomas M; Benninger, Michael S; Jacobs, Michael R

    2004-06-01

    Current treatment guidelines for community-acquired respiratory tract infections no longer depend solely on the characteristics of the patient and the clinical syndrome, but on those of the offending pathogen, including presence and level of antimicrobial resistance. The most common respiratory tract pathogens known to cause acute bacterial rhinosinusitis (ABRS) and community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) include Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae. The prevalence of antimicrobial resistance, especially b-lactum and macrolide resistance, among S pneumoniae and H influenzae has increased dramatically during the past 2 decades, diminishing the activity of many older antimicrobials against resistant organisms. A pharmacokinetically enhanced formulation of amoxicillin/clavulanate has been developed to fulfill the need for an oral b-lactam antimicrobial that achieves a greater time that the serum drug concentration exceeds the minimum inhibitory concentration (T > MIC) of antimicrobials against pathogens than conventional formulations to improve activity against S pneumoniae with reduced susceptibility to penicillin. The b-lactamase inhibitor clavulanate allows for coverage of b-lactamase-producing pathogens, such as H influenzae and M catarrhalis. This article reviews the rationale for, and evolution of, oral amoxicillin clavulanate for ABRS and CAP

  16. Studies on chicken acquired resistance to Argas (persicargas) persicus Latereille (Acari: Argasidae) due to repeated infestation.

    PubMed

    Habeeb, S M; Sayed, M A; El-Kammah, K M

    2001-08-01

    Spring chickens were used for feeding Argas persicus (females) daily over one week during both winter and summer seasons. Acquired resistance to ticks was monitored by: 1) failure of ticks to replenish a blood meal from chickens bitten repeatedly by the infesting ticks during winter and summer seasons; 2) measurements of anti-tick activity in the chicken sera; 3) detection of changes in their serum proteins. Chickens were bled after the 4th feeding, during the 1st, 2nd, 3rd and 4th weeks post-feeding. The titre of anti-tick antibody was determined in the chicken sera by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) technique. The change in sera protein bands after Argas persicus female repeated feeding was studied by the use of 10% SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The results showed that the nonfeeding percentage in A. persicus was significant in both winter and summer seasons. The highest concentration of antibodies against A. persicus was detected after the fourth feeding and the lowest titre was reported in sera collected after the fourth week in both seasons. Infested chicken serum proteins electrophoresis showed different patterns of separation from the non-infested chickens. The protein bands of the noninfested chicken sera had 5 and 10 bands in the winter and summer seasons, but in infested chicken sera, it ranged between 12-17 and 14-18 bands in winter and summer seasons respectively.

  17. Length of stay an important mediator of hospital-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Wong, J G; Chen, M I; Win, M K; Ng, P Y; Chow, A

    2016-04-01

    Hospital-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (HA-MRSA) is becoming increasingly established in Asian hospitals. The primary aim of this study was to decompose the risk factors for HA-MRSA based on conceptual clinical pathways. The secondary aim was to show the amount of effect attributable to antibiotic exposure and total length of stay before outcome (LBO) so that institutions can manage at-risk patients accordingly. A case-control study consisting of 1200 inpatients was conducted in a large tertiary hospital in Singapore between January and December 2006. Results from the generalized structural equation model (GSEM) show that LBO [adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 14·9, 95% confidence interval (CI) 8·7-25·5], prior hospitalization (aOR 6·2, 95% CI 3·3-11·5), and cumulative antibiotic exposure (aOR 3·5, 95% CI 2·3-5·3), directly affected HA-MRSA acquisition. LBO accounted for the majority of the effects due to age (100%), immunosuppression (67%), and surgery (96%), and to a lesser extent for male gender (22%). Our model enabled us to account and quantify effects of intermediaries. LBO was found to be an important mediator of age, immunosuppression and surgery on MRSA infection. Traditional regression approaches will not only give different conclusions but also underestimate the effects. Hospitals should minimize the hospital stay when possible to reduce the risk of MRSA.

  18. The Emerging Role of Extracellular Vesicle-Mediated Drug Resistance in Cancers: Implications in Advanced Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Soekmadji, Carolina; Nelson, Colleen C.

    2015-01-01

    Emerging evidence has shown that the extracellular vesicles (EVs) regulate various biological processes and can control cell proliferation and survival, as well as being involved in normal cell development and diseases such as cancers. In cancer treatment, development of acquired drug resistance phenotype is a serious issue. Recently it has been shown that the presence of multidrug resistance proteins such as Pgp-1 and enrichment of the lipid ceramide in EVs could have a role in mediating drug resistance. EVs could also mediate multidrug resistance through uptake of drugs in vesicles and thus limit the bioavailability of drugs to treat cancer cells. In this review, we discussed the emerging evidence of the role EVs play in mediating drug resistance in cancers and in particular the role of EVs mediating drug resistance in advanced prostate cancer. The role of EV-associated multidrug resistance proteins, miRNA, mRNA, and lipid as well as the potential interaction(s) among these factors was probed. Lastly, we provide an overview of the current available treatments for advanced prostate cancer, considering where EVs may mediate the development of resistance against these drugs. PMID:26587537

  19. [Resistance to antiplatelet drugs in patients with cerebrovascular disorders].

    PubMed

    Suslina, Z A; Tanashian, M M; Domashenko, M A

    2011-01-01

    This review concerns clinical and laboratory resistance to antiplatelet drugs (aspirin and clopidogrel) in patients with cerebrovascular disorders. Results of certain clinical trials showed that laboratory resistance to antiaggregants is associated with recurrent thromboembolic vascular events. The commonest causes of aspirin resistance are production of arachidonic acid metabolites via the lipoxygenase pathway, poor compliance with the treatment, polymorphism of the genes encoding for cyclooxygenase and glycoprotein (GP) IIb/IIIa, endothelial dysfunction. The causes of clopidogrel resistance include inadequate doses of the drug, its low absorption, poor compliance with the treatment, polymorphism of ADP receptors, GP IIb/IIIa and cytochrome P450 genes, acute coronary syndrome and stroke, metabolic syndrome. Therapeutic efficacy of antiaggregants can be improved by increasing their doses, using membranotropic agents, correcting endothelial dysfunction, etc. Because the apparent variability of antiplatelet drug resistance is currently due to the use of different test-systems by different authors, the evaluation of individual sensitivity to a given drug showing laboratory resistance and the choice of alternative therapy are thus far possible only in the framework of clinical studies. Large-scale prospective multicenter trials of antiplatelet drug resistance are needed along with research for better understanding mechanisms of individual platelet sensitivity and resistance to antiaggregants and developing efficacious methods for their correction. PMID:21901881

  20. Surveillance of Antibiotic Resistance among Hospital- and Community-Acquired Toxigenic Clostridium difficile Isolates over 5-Year Period in Kuwait

    PubMed Central

    Jamal, Wafaa Y.; Rotimi, Vincent O.

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is a leading and an important cause of diarrhea in a healthcare setting especially in industrialized countries. Community-associated CDI appears to add to the burden on healthcare setting problems. The aim of the study was to investigate the antimicrobial resistance of healthcare-associated and community-acquired C. difficile infection over 5 years (2008–2012) in Kuwait. A total of 111 hospital-acquired (HA-CD) and 35 community-acquired Clostridium difficile (CA-CD) clinical isolates from stool of patients with diarrhoea were studied. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing of 15 antimicrobial agents against these pathogens was performed using E test method. There was no evidence of resistance to amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, daptomycin, linezolid, piperacillin-tazobactam, teicoplanin and vancomycin by both HA-CD and CA-CD isolates. Metronidazole had excellent activity against CA-CD but there was a 2.9% resistance rate against HA-CD isolates. Ampicillin, clindamycin, levofloxacin and imipenem resistance rates among the HC-CD vs. CA-CD isolates were 100 vs. 47.4%; 43 vs. 47.4%; 100 vs. 100% and 100 vs. 89%, respectively. An unexpected high rifampicin resistance rate of 15.7% emerged amongst the HA-CD isolates. In conclusion, vancomycin resistance amongst the HA-CD and CA-CD isolates was not encountered in this series but few metronidazole resistant hospital isolates were isolated. High resistance rates of ampicillin, clindamycin, levofloxacin, and imipenem resistance were evident among both CA-CD and HA-CD isolates. Rifampicin resistance is emerging among the HA-CD isolates. PMID:27536994

  1. Antimicrobial resistance determinant microarray for analysis of multi-drug resistant isolates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taitt, Chris Rowe; Leski, Tomasz; Stenger, David; Vora, Gary J.; House, Brent; Nicklasson, Matilda; Pimentel, Guillermo; Zurawski, Daniel V.; Kirkup, Benjamin C.; Craft, David; Waterman, Paige E.; Lesho, Emil P.; Bangurae, Umaru; Ansumana, Rashid

    2012-06-01

    The prevalence of multidrug-resistant infections in personnel wounded in Iraq and Afghanistan has made it challenging for physicians to choose effective therapeutics in a timely fashion. To address the challenge of identifying the potential for drug resistance, we have developed the Antimicrobial Resistance Determinant Microarray (ARDM) to provide DNAbased analysis for over 250 resistance genes covering 12 classes of antibiotics. Over 70 drug-resistant bacteria from different geographic regions have been analyzed on ARDM, with significant differences in patterns of resistance identified: genes for resistance to sulfonamides, trimethoprim, chloramphenicol, rifampin, and macrolide-lincosamidesulfonamide drugs were more frequently identified in isolates from sources in Iraq/Afghanistan. Of particular concern was the presence of genes responsible for resistance to many of the last-resort antibiotics used to treat war traumaassociated infections.

  2. Upregulation of Mucin4 in ER-positive/HER2-Overexpressing Breast Cancer Xenografts with Acquired Resistance to Endocrine and HER2-Targeted Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Albert C.; Migliaccio, Ilenia; Rimawi, Mothaffar; Lopez-Tarruella, Sara; Creighton, Chad J.; Massarweh, Suleiman; Huang, Catherine; Wang, Yen-Chao; Batra, Surinder K.; Gutierrez, M. Carolina; Osborne, C. Kent; Schiff, Rachel

    2012-01-01

    Background We studied resistance to endocrine and HER2-targeted therapies using a xenograft model of estrogen receptor positive (ER)/HER2-overexpressing breast cancer. Here, we report a novel phenotype of drug resistance in this model. Methods MCF7/HER2-18 xenografts were treated with endocrine therapy alone or in combination with lapatinib and trastuzumab (LT) to inhibit HER2. Archival tumor tissues were stained with hematoxylin & eosin and mucicarmine. RNA extracted from tumors at early time points and late after acquired resistance were analyzed for mucin4 (MUC4) expression by microarray and quantitative reverse transcriptase-PCR. Protein expression of the MUC4, ER and HER2 signaling pathways was measured by immunohistochemistry and Western blotting. Results The combination of the potent anti-HER2 regimen LT with either tamoxifen (Tam+LT) or estrogen deprivation (ED+LT) can cause complete eradication of ER-positive/HER2-overexpressing tumors in mice. Tumors developing resistance to this combination, as well as those acquiring resistance to endocrine therapy alone, exhibited a distinct histological and molecular phenotype—a striking increase in mucin-filled vacuoles and upregulation of several mucins including MUC4. At the onset of resistance, MUC4 mRNA and protein were increased. These tumors also showed upregulation and reactivation of HER2 signaling, while losing ER protein and the estrogen-regulated gene, progesterone receptor. Conclusions Mucins are upregulated in a preclinical model of ER-positive/HER2-overexpressing breast cancer as resistance develops to the combination of endocrine and anti-HER2 therapy. These mucin-rich tumors reactivate the HER2 pathway and shift their molecular phenotype to become more ER-negative/HER2-positive. PMID:22644656

  3. Electrical Stimulation for Drug-Resistant Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Chambers, A; Bowen, JM

    2013-01-01

    Objective The objective of this analysis was to evaluate the effectiveness of deep brain stimulation (DBS) and vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) for the treatment of drug-resistant epilepsy in adults and children. Data Sources A literature search was performed using MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, and the Centre for Reviews and Dissemination database, for studies published from January 2007 until December 2012. Review Methods Systematic reviews, meta-analyses, randomized controlled trials (RCTs), and observational studies (in the absence of RCTs) of adults or children were included. DBS studies were included if they specified that the anterior nucleus of thalamus was the area of the brain stimulated. Outcomes of interest were seizure frequency, health resource utilization, and safety. A cost analysis was also performed. Results The search identified 6 studies that assessed changes in seizure frequency after electrical stimulation: 1 RCT on DBS in adults, 4 RCTs on VNS in adults, and 1 RCT on VNS in children. The studies of DBS and VNS in adults found significantly improved rates of seizure frequency, but the study of VNS in children did not find a significant difference in seizure frequency between the high and low stimulation groups. Significant reductions in hospitalizations and emergency department visits were found for adults and children who received VNS. No studies addressed the use of health resources for patients undergoing DBS. Five studies reported on adverse events, which ranged from serious to transient for both procedures in adults and were mostly transient in the 1 study of VNS in children. Limitations We found no evidence on DBS in children or on health care use related to DBS. The measurement of seizure frequency is self-reported and is therefore subject to bias and issues of compliance. Conclusions Based on evidence of low to moderate quality, both DBS and VNS seemed to reduce seizure frequency in adults. In children, VNS did not appear to be as

  4. A functional variomics tool for discovering drug resistance genes and drug targets

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Zhiwei; Chen, Kaifu; Zhang, Jianhuai; Li, Yongxiang; Wang, Hui; Cui, Dandan; Tang, Jiangwu; Liu, Yong; Shi, Xiaomin; Li, Wei; Liu, Dan; Chen, Rui; Sucgang, Richard S.; Pan, Xuewen

    2013-01-01

    Comprehensive discovery of genetic mechanisms of drug resistance and identification of in vivo drug targets represent significant challenges. Here we present a functional variomics technology in the model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This tool analyzes numerous genetic variants and effectively tackles both problems simultaneously. Using this tool, we discovered almost all genes that, due to mutations or modest overexpression, confer resistance to rapamycin, cycloheximide, and amphotericin B. Most significant among the resistance genes were drug targets, including multiple targets of a given drug. With amphotericin B, we discovered the highly conserved membrane protein Pmp3 as a potent resistance factor and a possible novel target. Widespread application of this tool should allow rapid identification of conserved resistance mechanisms and targets of many more compounds. New genes and alleles that confer resistance to other stresses can also be discovered. Similar tools in other systems such as human cell lines will also be useful. PMID:23416056

  5. Modeling the dynamic relationship between HIV and the risk of drug-resistant tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Sergeev, Rinat; Colijn, Caroline; Murray, Megan; Cohen, Ted

    2012-01-01

    The emergence of highly drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB) and interactions between TB and HIV epidemics pose serious challenges for TB control. Previous researchers have presented several hypotheses for why HIV-coinfected TB patients may suffer an increased risk of drug-resistant TB compared to other TB patients. Although some studies have found a positive association between an individual’s HIV status and her subsequent risk of multidrug-resistant TB (MDRTB), the observed individual-level relationship between HIV and drug-resistant TB varies substantially among settings. Here, we develop a modeling framework to explore the effect of HIV on the dynamics of drug-resistant TB. The model captures the acquisition of resistance to important classes of TB drugs, imposes fitness costs associated with resistance-conferring mutations, and allows for subsequent restoration of fitness due to compensatory mutations. Despite uncertainty in several key parameters, we demonstrate epidemic behavior that is robust over a range of assumptions. Whereas HIV facilitates the emergence of MDRTB within a community over several decades, HIV-seropositive individuals presenting with TB may, counter-intuitively, be at lower risk of drug resistant TB at early stages of the co-epidemic. This situation arises because many individuals with incident HIV infection will already harbor latent Mycobacterium Tuberculosis infection acquired at an earlier time when drug-resistance was less prevalent. We find that the rise of HIV can increase the prevalence of MDRTB within populations even as it lowers the average fitness of circulating MDRTB strains compared to similar populations unaffected by HIV. Preferential social mixing among individuals with similar HIV-status and lower average CD4 counts among HIV-seropositive individuals further increase the expected burden of MDRTB. This model suggests that the individual-level association between HIV and drug-resistant forms of TB is dynamic and therefore

  6. Drug resistance and biochemical characteristics of Salmonella from turkeys.

    PubMed Central

    Poppe, C; Kolar, J J; Demczuk, W H; Harris, J E

    1995-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the antibiotic resistance and biochemical characteristics of 2690 Salmonella strains belonging to 52 serovars and isolated from environmental and feed samples from 270 turkey flocks in Canada. Resistance of the Salmonella strains to the aminoglycoside antibiotics varied widely; none of the strains were resistant to amikacin, 14.2% were resistant to neomycin, 25.8% were resistant to gentamicin, and 27.7% of the strains were resistant to kanamycin. Most strains (97.6%) were resistant to the aminocyclitol, spectinomycin. Regarding resistance to the beta-lactam antibiotics, 14.3% and 14.4% of the strains were resistant to ampicillin and carbenicillin, respectively, whereas only 5 (0.2%) of the strains were resistant to cephalothin. None of the strains were resistant to the fluoroquinolone ciprofloxacin or to polymyxin B. Resistance to chloramphenicol and nitrofurantoin was found in 2.4% and 7% of the strains, respectively. Only 1.7% of the strains were resistant to the trimethoprimsulfamethoxazole combination, whereas 58.1% were resistant to sulfisoxazole. Thirty-eight percent of the strains were resistant to tetracycline. Salmonella serovars differed markedly in their drug resistance profiles. Biochemical characterization of the Salmonella showed that the S. anatum, S. saintpaul and S. reading serovars could be divided into distinct biotypes. PMID:8548684

  7. Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections in two scuba divers returning from the Philippines.

    PubMed

    Bochet, Mélanie; Francois, Patrice; Longtin, Yves; Gaide, Olivier; Renzi, Gesuele; Harbarth, Stephan

    2008-01-01

    We describe two patients who had skin infection due to identical strains of community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) after returning from the Philippines. Both patients did not share risk factors for CA-MRSA acquisition besides scuba diving. Scuba diving equipment may represent a possible new mode of acquisition of CA-MRSA.

  8. Saccharin-induced systemic acquired resistance against rust (Phakopsora pachyrhizi) infection in soybean: Effects on growth and development

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We examined the effect of saccharin on the systemic acquired resistance (SAR) response of soybean to the fungus Phakopsora pachyrhizi, the causal agent of soybean rust. Plants were grown hydroponically in half-strength Hoagland’s solution and were challenged with the pathogen 1, 5, 10 and 15 days af...

  9. Crosstalk between KIT and FGFR3 Promotes Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor Cell Growth and Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Javidi-Sharifi, Nathalie; Traer, Elie; Martinez, Jacqueline; Gupta, Anu; Taguchi, Takehiro; Dunlap, Jennifer; Heinrich, Michael C.; Corless, Christopher L.; Rubin, Brian P.; Druker, Brian J.; Tyner, Jeffrey W.

    2014-01-01

    Kinase inhibitors such as imatinib have dramatically improved outcomes for GIST patients, but many patients develop resistance to these treatments. While in some patients this event corresponds with mutations in the GIST driver oncogenic kinase KIT, other patients development resistance without KIT mutations. In this study, we address this patient subset in reporting a functional dependence of GIST on the FGF receptor FGFR3 and its crosstalk with KIT in GIST cells. Addition of the FGFR3 ligand FGF2 to GIST cells restored KIT phosphorylation during imatinib treatment, allowing sensitive cells to proliferate in the presence of the drug. FGF2 expression was increased in imatinib-resistant GIST cells, the growth of which was blocked by RNAi-mediated silencing of FGFR3. Moreover, combining KIT and FGFR3 inhibitors synergized to block the growth of imatinib-resistant cells. Signaling crosstalk between KIT and FGFR3 activated the MAPK pathway to promote resistance to imatinib. Clinically, an immunohistochemical analysis of tumor specimens from imatinib-resistant GIST patients revealed a relative increase in FGF2 levels, with a trend towards increased expression in imatinib-naïve samples consistent with possible involvement in drug resistance. Our findings provide a mechanistic rationale to evaluate existing FGFR inhibitors and multi-kinase inhibitors that target FGFR3 as promising strategies to improve treatment of GIST patients with de novo or acquired resistance to imatinib. PMID:25432174

  10. Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis drug susceptibility and molecular diagnostic testing.

    PubMed

    Kalokhe, Ameeta S; Shafiq, Majid; Lee, James C; Ray, Susan M; Wang, Yun F; Metchock, Beverly; Anderson, Albert M; Nguyen, Minh Ly T

    2013-02-01

    Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR TB), defined by resistance to the 2 most effective first-line drugs, isoniazid and rifampin, is on the rise globally and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Despite the increasing availability of novel rapid diagnostic tools for Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) drug susceptibility testing, the clinical applicability of these methods is unsettled. In this study, the mechanisms of action and resistance of Mtb to isoniazid and rifampin, and the utility, advantages and limitations of the available Mtb drug susceptibility testing tools are reviewed, with particular emphasis on molecular methods with rapid turnaround including line probe assays, molecular beacon-based real-time polymerase chain reaction and pyrosequencing. The authors conclude that neither rapid molecular drug testing nor phenotypic methods are perfect in predicting Mtb drug susceptibility and therefore must be interpreted within the clinical context of each patient.

  11. Overcoming Resistance of Cancer Cells to PARP-1 Inhibitors with Three Different Drug Combinations

    PubMed Central

    Castel, David; Moshe, Itai; Mazal, Inbal; Cohen, Osher; Avivi, Camila; Rosenblatt, Kineret; Aviel-Ronen, Sarit; Schiby, Ginette; Yahalom, Joachim; Amariglio, Ninette; Pfeffer, Raphael; Lawrence, Yaacov; Toren, Amos; Rechavi, Gideon; Paglin, Shoshana

    2016-01-01

    Inhibitors of poly[ADP-ribose] polymerase 1 (PARPis) show promise for treatment of cancers which lack capacity for homologous recombination repair (HRR). However, new therapeutic strategies are required in order to overcome innate and acquired resistance to these drugs and thus expand the array of cancers that could benefit from them. We show that human cancer cell lines which respond poorly to ABT-888 (a PARPi), become sensitive to it when co-treated with vorinostat (a histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi)). Vorinostat also sensitized PARPis insensitive cancer cell lines to 6-thioguanine (6-TG)–a drug that targets PARPis sensitive cells. The sensitizing effect of vorinostat was associated with increased phosphorylation of eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF) 2α which in and of itself increases the sensitivity of cancer cells to ABT-888. Importantly, these drug combinations did not affect survival of normal fibroblasts and breast cells, and significantly increased the inhibition of xenograft tumor growth relative to each drug alone, without affecting the mice weight or their liver and kidney function. Our results show that combination of vorinostat and ABT-888 could potentially prove useful for treatment of cancer with innate resistance to PARPis due to active HRR machinery, while the combination of vorinostat and 6-TG could potentially overcome innate or acquired resistance to PARPis due to secondary or reversal BRCA mutations, to decreased PARP-1 level or to increased expression of multiple drug resistant proteins. Importantly, drugs which increase phosphorylation of eIF2α may mimic the sensitizing effect of vorinostat on cellular response to PARPis or to 6-TG, without activating all of its downstream effectors. PMID:27196668

  12. Highly active ozonides selected against drug resistant malaria

    PubMed Central

    Lobo, Lis; de Sousa, Bruno; Cabral, Lília; Cristiano, Maria LS; Nogueira, Fátima

    2016-01-01

    Ever increasing multi-drug resistance by Plasmodium falciparum is creating new challenges in malaria chemotherapy. In the absence of licensed vaccines, treatment and prevention of malaria is heavily dependent on drugs. Potency, range of activity, safety, low cost and ease of administration are crucial issues in the design and formulation of antimalarials. We have tested three synthetic ozonides NAC89, LC50 and LCD67 in vitro and in vivo against multidrug resistant Plasmodium. In vitro, LC50 was at least 10 times more efficient inhibiting P. falciparum multidrug resistant Dd2 strain than chloroquine and mefloquine and as efficient as artemisinin (ART), artesunate and dihydroartemisinin. All three ozonides showed high efficacy in clearing parasitaemia in mice, caused by multi-drug resistant Plasmodium chabaudi strains, by subcutaneous administration, demonstrating high efficacy in vivo against ART and artesunate resistant parasites. PMID:27276364

  13. Drug resistance analysis by next generation sequencing in Leishmania

    PubMed Central

    Leprohon, Philippe; Fernandez-Prada, Christopher; Gazanion, Élodie; Monte-Neto, Rubens; Ouellette, Marc

    2014-01-01

    The use of next generation sequencing has the power to expedite the identification of drug resistance determinants and biomarkers and was applied successfully to drug resistance studies in Leishmania. This allowed the identification of modulation in gene expression, gene dosage alterations, changes in chromosome copy numbers and single nucleotide polymorphisms that correlated with resistance in Leishmania strains derived from the laboratory and from the field. An impressive heterogeneity at the population level was also observed, individual clones within populations often differing in both genotypes and phenotypes, hence complicating the elucidation of resistance mechanisms. This review summarizes the most recent highlights that whole genome sequencing brought to our understanding of Leishmania drug resistance and likely new directions. PMID:25941624

  14. Complex genetics of drug resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Warner, Digby F; Mizrahi, Valerie

    2013-10-01

    Three new studies have used whole-genome sequencing of M. tuberculosis to demonstrate unexpected complexity in the modern evolution of drug-resistant tuberculosis, and a fourth study suggests a close evolutionary relationship between the pathogen and its human host over a period of 70,000 years. Collectively, the observations in these studies suggest that future strategies to tackle drug-resistant tuberculosis must integrate host genetics with detailed strain epidemiology.

  15. Identifying clinically relevant drug resistance genes in drug-induced resistant cancer cell lines and post-chemotherapy tissues.

    PubMed

    Tong, Mengsha; Zheng, Weicheng; Lu, Xingrong; Ao, Lu; Li, Xiangyu; Guan, Qingzhou; Cai, Hao; Li, Mengyao; Yan, Haidan; Guo, You; Chi, Pan; Guo, Zheng

    2015-12-01

    Until recently, few molecular signatures of drug resistance identified in drug-induced resistant cancer cell models can be translated into clinical practice. Here, we defined differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between pre-chemotherapy colorectal cancer (CRC) tissue samples of non-responders and responders for 5-fluorouracil and oxaliplatin-based therapy as clinically relevant drug resistance genes (CRG5-FU/L-OHP). Taking CRG5-FU/L-OHP as reference, we evaluated the clinical relevance of several types of genes derived from HCT116 CRC cells with resistance to 5-fluorouracil and oxaliplatin, respectively. The results revealed that DEGs between parental and resistant cells, when both were treated with the corresponding drug for a certain time, were significantly consistent with the CRG5-FU/L-OHP as well as the DEGs between the post-chemotherapy CRC specimens of responders and non-responders. This study suggests a novel strategy to extract clinically relevant drug resistance genes from both drug-induced resistant cell models and post-chemotherapy cancer tissue specimens.

  16. New Real-Time PCR Assays for Detection of Inducible and Acquired Clarithromycin Resistance in the Mycobacterium abscessus Group

    PubMed Central

    Shallom, Shamira J.; Moura, Natalia S.; Olivier, Kenneth N.; Sampaio, Elizabeth P.; Holland, Steven M.

    2015-01-01

    Members of the Mycobacterium abscessus group (MAG) cause lung, soft tissue, and disseminated infections. The oral macrolides clarithromycin and azithromycin are commonly used for treatment. MAG can display clarithromycin resistance through the inducible erm(41) gene or via acquired mutations in the rrl (23S rRNA) gene. Strains harboring a truncation or a T28C substitution in erm(41) lose the inducible resistance trait. Phenotypic detection of clarithromycin resistance requires extended incubation (14 days), highlighting the need for faster methods to detect resistance. Two real-time PCR-based assays were developed to assess inducible and acquired clarithromycin resistance and tested on a total of 90 clinical and reference strains. A SYBR green assay was designed to distinguish between a full-length and truncated erm(41) gene by temperature shift in melting curve analysis. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) allele discrimination assays were developed to distinguish T or C at position 28 of erm(41) and 23S rRNA rrl gene mutations at position 2058 and/or 2059. Truncated and full-size erm(41) genes were detected in 21/90 and 69/90 strains, respectively, with 64/69 displaying T at nucleotide position 28 and 5/69 containing C at that position. Fifteen isolates showed rrl mutations conferring clarithromycin resistance, including A2058G (11 isolates), A2058C (3 isolates), and A2059G (1 isolate). Targeted sequencing and phenotypic assessment of resistance concurred with molecular assay results. Interestingly, we also noted cooccurring strains harboring an active erm(41), inactive erm(41), and/or acquired mutational resistance, as well as slowly growing MAG strains and also strains displaying an inducible resistance phenotype within 5 days, long before the recommended 14-day extended incubation. PMID:26269619

  17. Using Aspergillus nidulans to identify antifungal drug resistance mutations.

    PubMed

    He, Xiaoxiao; Li, Shengnan; Kaminskyj, Susan G W

    2014-02-01

    Systemic fungal infections contribute to at least 10% of deaths in hospital settings. Most antifungal drugs target ergosterol (polyenes) or its biosynthetic pathway (azoles and allylamines), or beta-glucan synthesis (echinocandins). Antifungal drugs that target proteins are prone to the emergence of resistant strains. Identification of genes whose mutations lead to targeted resistance can provide new information on those pathways. We used Aspergillus nidulans as a model system to exploit its tractable sexual cycle and calcofluor white as a model antifungal agent to cross-reference our results with other studies. Within 2 weeks from inoculation on sublethal doses of calcofluor white, we isolated 24 A. nidulans adaptive strains from sectoring colonies. Meiotic analysis showed that these strains had single-gene mutations. In each case, the resistance was specific to calcofluor white, since there was no cross-resistance to caspofungin (echinocandin). Mutation sites were identified in two mutants by next-generation sequencing. These were confirmed by reengineering the mutation in a wild-type strain using a gene replacement strategy. One of these mutated genes was related to cell wall synthesis, and the other one was related to drug metabolism. Our strategy has wide application for many fungal species, for antifungal compounds used in agriculture as well as health care, and potentially during protracted drug therapy once drug resistance arises. We suggest that our strategy will be useful for keeping ahead in the drug resistance arms race. PMID:24363365

  18. The medical and surgical treatment of drug-resistant tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Calligaro, Gregory L.; Moodley, Loven; Symons, Greg

    2014-01-01

    Multi drug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) and extensively drug-resistant TB (XDR-TB) are burgeoning global problems with high mortality which threaten to destabilise TB control programs in several parts of the world. Of alarming concern is the emergence, in large numbers, of patients with resistance beyond XDR-TB (totally drug-resistant TB; TDR-TB or extremely drug resistant TB; XXDR-TB). Given the burgeoning global phenomenon of MDR-TB, XDR-TB and TDR-TB, and increasing international migration and travel, healthcare workers, researchers, and policy makers in TB endemic and non-endemic countries should familiarise themselves with issues relevant to the management of these patients. Given the lack of novel TB drugs and limited access to existing drugs such as linezolid and bedaquiline in TB endemic countries, significant numbers of therapeutic failures are emerging from the ranks of those with XDR-TB. Given the lack of appropriate facilities in resource-limited settings, such patients are being discharged back into the community where there is likely ongoing disease spread. In the absence of effective drug regimens, in appropriate patients, surgery is a critical part of management. Here we review the diagnosis, medical and surgical management of MDR-TB and XDR-TB. PMID:24624282

  19. What hides behind the MASC: clinical response and acquired resistance to entrectinib after ETV6-NTRK3 identification in a mammary analogue secretory carcinoma (MASC)

    PubMed Central

    Drilon, A.; Li, G.; Dogan, S.; Gounder, M.; Shen, R.; Arcila, M.; Wang, L.; Hyman, D. M.; Hechtman, J.; Wei, G.; Cam, N. R.; Christiansen, J.; Luo, D.; Maneval, E. C.; Bauer, T.; Patel, M.; Liu, S. V.; Ou, S. H. I.; Farago, A.; Shaw, A.; Shoemaker, R. F.; Lim, J.; Hornby, Z.; Multani, P.; Ladanyi, M.; Berger, M.; Katabi, N.; Ghossein, R.; Ho, A. L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Mammary analogue secretory carcinoma (MASC) is a recently described pathologic entity. We report the case of a patient with an initial diagnosis of salivary acinic cell carcinoma later reclassified as MASC after next-generation sequencing revealed an ETV6-NTRK3 fusion. Patients and methods This alteration was targeted with the pan-Trk inhibitor entrectinib (Ignyta), which possesses potent in vitro activity against cell lines containing various NTRK1/2/3 fusions. Results A dramatic and durable response was achieved with entrectinib in this patient, followed by acquired resistance that correlated with the appearance of a novel NTRK3 G623R mutation. Structural modeling predicts that this alteration sterically interferes with drug binding, correlating to decreased sensitivity to drug inhibition observed in cell-based assays. Conclusions This first report of clinical activity with TrkC inhibition and the development of acquired resistance in an NTRK3-rearranged cancer emphasize the utility of comprehensive molecular profiling and targeted therapy for rare malignancies (NCT02097810). PMID:26884591

  20. World Antimalarial Resistance Network I: clinical efficacy of antimalarial drugs.

    PubMed

    Price, Ric N; Dorsey, Grant; Ashley, Elizabeth A; Barnes, Karen I; Baird, J Kevin; d'Alessandro, Umberto; Guerin, Philippe J; Laufer, Miriam K; Naidoo, Inbarani; Nosten, François; Olliaro, Piero; Plowe, Christopher V; Ringwald, Pascal; Sibley, Carol H; Stepniewska, Kasia; White, Nicholas J

    2007-01-01

    The proliferation of antimalarial drug trials in the last ten years provides the opportunity to launch a concerted global surveillance effort to monitor antimalarial drug efficacy. The diversity of clinical study designs and analytical methods undermines the current ability to achieve this. The proposed World Antimalarial Resistance Network (WARN) aims to establish a comprehensive clinical database from which standardised estimates of antimalarial efficacy can be derived and monitored over time from diverse geographical and endemic regions. The emphasis of this initiative is on five key variables which define the therapeutic response. Ensuring that these data are collected at the individual patient level in a consistent format will facilitate better data management and analytical practices, and ensure that clinical data can be readily collated and made amenable for pooled analyses. Such an approach, if widely adopted will permit accurate and timely recognition of trends in drug efficacy. This will guide not only appropriate interventions to deal with established multidrug resistant strains of malaria, but also facilitate prompt action when new strains of drug resistant plasmodia first emerge. A comprehensive global database incorporating the key determinants of the clinical response with in vitro, molecular and pharmacokinetic parameters will bring together relevant data on host, drug and parasite factors that are fundamental contributors to treatment efficacy. This resource will help guide rational drug policies that optimize antimalarial drug use, in the hope that the emergence and spread of resistance to new drugs can be, if not prevented, at least delayed.

  1. Demonstration of plasmid-mediated drug resistance in Mycobacterium abscessus.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Cristianne Kayoko; Bispo, Paulo José Martins; Santin, Katiane; Nogueira, Christiane Lourenço; Leão, Sylvia Cardoso

    2014-05-01

    Plasmid-mediated kanamycin resistance was detected in a strain of Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. bolletii responsible for a nationwide epidemic of surgical infections in Brazil. The plasmid did not influence susceptibility to tobramycin, streptomycin, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, clarithromycin, or ciprofloxacin. Plasmid-mediated drug resistance has not been described so far in mycobacteria. PMID:24574286

  2. The interplay between drug resistance and fitness in malaria parasites

    PubMed Central

    Rosenthal, Philip J.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Controlling the spread of antimalarial drug resistance, especially resistance of Plasmodium falciparum to artemisinin-based combination therapies, is a high priority. Available data indicate that, as with other microorganisms, the spread of drug-resistant malaria parasites is limited by fitness costs that frequently accompany resistance. Resistance-mediating polymorphisms in malaria parasites have been identified in putative drug transporters and in target enzymes. The impacts of these polymorphisms on parasite fitness have been characterized in vitro and in animal models. Additional insights have come from analyses of samples from clinical studies, both evaluating parasites under different selective pressures and determining the clinical consequences of infection with different parasites. With some exceptions, resistance-mediating polymorphisms lead to malaria parasites that, compared to wild type, grow less well in culture and in animals, and are replaced by wild type when drug pressure diminishes in the clinical setting. In some cases, the fitness costs of resistance may be offset by compensatory mutations that increase virulence or changes that enhance malaria transmission. However, not enough is known about effects of resistance mediators on parasite fitness. A better appreciation of the costs of fitness-mediating mutations will facilitate the development of optimal guidelines for the treatment and prevention of malaria. PMID:23899091

  3. Comparative efficacy of systemic acquired resistance-inducing compounds against rust infection in sunflower plants.

    PubMed

    Amzalek, Esther; Cohen, Yigal

    2007-02-01

    ABSTRACT Four inducers of systemic acquired resistance (SAR) were examined for their efficacy in controlling rust infection caused by Puccinia helianthi in sunflower plants. Of the four compounds, DL-3-amino-n-butanoic acid (DL-beta-aminobutyric acid [BABA]) was the most effective and sodium salicylate (NaSA) was the least effective in protecting against rust. In leaf disk assays, full protection was obtained with BABA at 25 mug/ml, benzodiathiazol-S-methyl ester (BTH) at 100 mug/ml, 2,6-di-chloroisonicotinic acid (INA) at 100 mug/ml, and NaSA at >200 mug/ml. L-2-amino-n-butanoic acid (AABA) was partially effective, whereas N-methyl-BABA and 4-aminobutnoic acid (GABA) were ineffective. The R-enantiomer of BABA, but not the S-enantiomer, was more effective than the racemic mixture. In intact plants, BABA applied as a foliar spray or a root dip, before or after (up to 48 h) inoculation, provided significant protection for 8 days. BTH, INA, and NaSA were less protective and more phytotoxic compared with BABA. BABA did not affect urediospore germination, germ tube growth, appressorial formation, or initial ingress of P. helianthi, but strongly suppressed mycelial colonization in the mesophyll and, consequently, pustule and urediospore formation. No accumulation of defense compounds (phenolics, lignin, or callose) was detected in BABA-treated inoculated or noninoculated plants. This is the first report on the activity of BABA against an obligate Basidomycete pathogen in planta.

  4. Combinatorial Genetic Modeling of pfcrt-Mediated Drug Resistance Evolution in Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Gabryszewski, Stanislaw J; Modchang, Charin; Musset, Lise; Chookajorn, Thanat; Fidock, David A

    2016-06-01

    The emergence of drug resistance continuously threatens global control of infectious diseases, including malaria caused by the protozoan parasite Plasmodium falciparum A critical parasite determinant is the P. falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter (PfCRT), the primary mediator of chloroquine (CQ) resistance (CQR), and a pleiotropic modulator of susceptibility to several first-line artemisinin-based combination therapy partner drugs. Aside from the validated CQR molecular marker K76T, P. falciparum parasites have acquired at least three additional pfcrt mutations, whose contributions to resistance and fitness have been heretofore unclear. Focusing on the quadruple-mutant Ecuadorian PfCRT haplotype Ecu1110 (K76T/A220S/N326D/I356L), we genetically modified the pfcrt locus of isogenic, asexual blood stage P. falciparum parasites using zinc-finger nucleases, producing all possible combinations of intermediate pfcrt alleles. Our analysis included the related quintuple-mutant PfCRT haplotype 7G8 (Ecu1110 + C72S) that is widespread throughout South America and the Western Pacific. Drug susceptibilities and in vitro growth profiles of our combinatorial pfcrt-modified parasites were used to simulate the mutational trajectories accessible to parasites as they evolved CQR. Our results uncover unique contributions to parasite drug resistance and growth for mutations beyond K76T and predict critical roles for the CQ metabolite monodesethyl-CQ and the related quinoline-type drug amodiaquine in driving mutant pfcrt evolution. Modeling outputs further highlight the influence of parasite proliferation rates alongside gains in drug resistance in dictating successful trajectories. Our findings suggest that P. falciparum parasites have navigated constrained pfcrt adaptive landscapes by means of probabilistically rare mutational bursts that led to the infrequent emergence of pfcrt alleles in the field.

  5. Combinatorial Genetic Modeling of pfcrt-Mediated Drug Resistance Evolution in Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    Gabryszewski, Stanislaw J.; Modchang, Charin; Musset, Lise; Chookajorn, Thanat; Fidock, David A.

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of drug resistance continuously threatens global control of infectious diseases, including malaria caused by the protozoan parasite Plasmodium falciparum. A critical parasite determinant is the P. falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter (PfCRT), the primary mediator of chloroquine (CQ) resistance (CQR), and a pleiotropic modulator of susceptibility to several first-line artemisinin-based combination therapy partner drugs. Aside from the validated CQR molecular marker K76T, P. falciparum parasites have acquired at least three additional pfcrt mutations, whose contributions to resistance and fitness have been heretofore unclear. Focusing on the quadruple-mutant Ecuadorian PfCRT haplotype Ecu1110 (K76T/A220S/N326D/I356L), we genetically modified the pfcrt locus of isogenic, asexual blood stage P. falciparum parasites using zinc-finger nucleases, producing all possible combinations of intermediate pfcrt alleles. Our analysis included the related quintuple-mutant PfCRT haplotype 7G8 (Ecu1110 + C72S) that is widespread throughout South America and the Western Pacific. Drug susceptibilities and in vitro growth profiles of our combinatorial pfcrt-modified parasites were used to simulate the mutational trajectories accessible to parasites as they evolved CQR. Our results uncover unique contributions to parasite drug resistance and growth for mutations beyond K76T and predict critical roles for the CQ metabolite monodesethyl-CQ and the related quinoline-type drug amodiaquine in driving mutant pfcrt evolution. Modeling outputs further highlight the influence of parasite proliferation rates alongside gains in drug resistance in dictating successful trajectories. Our findings suggest that P. falciparum parasites have navigated constrained pfcrt adaptive landscapes by means of probabilistically rare mutational bursts that led to the infrequent emergence of pfcrt alleles in the field. PMID:26908582

  6. Mechanisms of action of systemic antibiotics used in periodontal treatment and mechanisms of bacterial resistance to these drugs

    PubMed Central

    SOARES, Geisla Mary Silva; FIGUEIREDO, Luciene Cristina; FAVERI, Marcelo; CORTELLI, Sheila Cavalca; DUARTE, Poliana Mendes; FERES, Magda

    2012-01-01

    Antibiotics are important adjuncts in the treatment of infectious diseases, including periodontitis. The most severe criticisms to the indiscriminate use of these drugs are their side effects and, especially, the development of bacterial resistance. The knowledge of the biological mechanisms involved with the antibiotic usage would help the medical and dental communities to overcome these two problems. Therefore, the aim of this manuscript was to review the mechanisms of action of the antibiotics most commonly used in the periodontal treatment (i.e. penicillin, tetracycline, macrolide and metronidazole) and the main mechanisms of bacterial resistance to these drugs. Antimicrobial resistance can be classified into three groups: intrinsic, mutational and acquired. Penicillin, tetracycline and erythromycin are broad-spectrum drugs, effective against gram-positive and gram-negative microorganisms. Bacterial resistance to penicillin may occur due to diminished permeability of the bacterial cell to the antibiotic; alteration of the penicillin-binding proteins, or production of β-lactamases. However, a very small proportion of the subgingival microbiota is resistant to penicillins. Bacteria become resistant to tetracyclines or macrolides by limiting their access to the cell, by altering the ribosome in order to prevent effective binding of the drug, or by producing tetracycline/macrolide-inactivating enzymes. Periodontal pathogens may become resistant to these drugs. Finally, metronidazole can be considered a prodrug in the sense that it requires metabolic activation by strict anaerobe microorganisms. Acquired resistance to this drug has rarely been reported. Due to these low rates of resistance and to its high activity against the gram-negative anaerobic bacterial species, metronidazole is a promising drug for treating periodontal infections. PMID:22858695

  7. Resistance mechanisms and drug susceptibility testing of nontuberculous mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    van Ingen, Jakko; Boeree, Martin J; van Soolingen, Dick; Mouton, Johan W

    2012-06-01

    Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are increasingly recognized as causative agents of opportunistic infections in humans. For most NTM infections the therapy of choice is drug treatment, but treatment regimens differ by species, in particular between slow (e.g. Mycobacterium avium complex, Mycobacterium kansasii) and rapid growers (e.g. Mycobacterium abscessus, Mycobacterium fortuitum). In general, drug treatment is long, costly, and often associated with drug-related toxicities; outcome of drug treatment is poor and is likely related to the high levels of natural antibiotic resistance in NTM. The role of drug susceptibility testing (DST) in the choice of agents for antimicrobial treatment of NTM disease, mainly that by slow growers, remains subject of debate. There are important discrepancies between drug susceptibility measured in vitro and the activity of the drug observed in vivo. In part, these discrepancies derive from laboratory technical issues. There is still no consensus on a standardized method. With the increasing clinical importance of NTM disease, DST of NTM is again in the spotlight. This review provides a comprehensive overview of the mechanisms of drug resistance in NTM, phenotypic methods for testing susceptibility in past and current use for DST of NTM, as well as molecular approaches to assess drug resistance.

  8. Human APOBEC3 proteins, retrovirus restriction, and HIV drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Haché, Guylaine; Mansky, Louis M; Harris, Reuben S

    2006-01-01

    Over 40 million people worldwide currently have HIV/AIDS. Many antiretroviral drugs have proven effective, but drug-resistant HIV variants frequently emerge to thwart treatment efforts. Reverse transcription errors undoubtedly contribute to drug resistance, but additional significant sources of viral genetic variation are debatable. The human APOBEC3F and APOBEC3G proteins can potently inhibit retrovirus infection by a mechanism that involves retroviral cDNA cytosine deamination. Here we review the current knowledge on the mechanism of APOBEC3-dependent retrovirus restriction and discuss whether this innate host-defense system actively contributes to HIV genetic variation.

  9. Mechanisms of Drug Resistance in Relapse and Refractory Multiple Myeloma.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wen-Chi; Lin, Sheng-Fung

    2015-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a hematological malignancy that remains incurable because most patients eventually relapse or become refractory to current treatments. Although the treatments have improved, the major problem in MM is resistance to therapy. Clonal evolution of MM cells and bone marrow microenvironment changes contribute to drug resistance. Some mechanisms affect both MM cells and microenvironment, including the up- and downregulation of microRNAs and programmed death factor 1 (PD-1)/PD-L1 interaction. Here, we review the pathogenesis of MM cells and bone marrow microenvironment and highlight possible drug resistance mechanisms. We also review a potential molecular targeting treatment and immunotherapy for patients with refractory or relapse MM.

  10. Acquired stimulus control of drug-induced changes in aggressive display in betta splendens.

    PubMed

    Braud, W G; Weibel, J E

    1969-09-01

    Male Siamese fighting fish exhibit stereotyped aggression reactions to their mirror reflections. When distinctive neutral stimuli (flickering colored lights) were repeatedly associated with drug-potentiated aggression (morphine sulfate) and drug-depressed aggression (phenergan), the stimuli came to exert specific stimulus control over aggressive display even after the drugs were discontinued.

  11. Overcoming EMT-associated resistance to anti-cancer drugs via Src/FAK pathway inhibition.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Catherine; Nicholes, Katrina; Bustos, Daisy; Lin, Eva; Song, Qinghua; Stephan, Jean-Philippe; Kirkpatrick, Donald S; Settleman, Jeff

    2014-09-15

    Epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a key process in embryonic development and has been associated with cancer metastasis and drug resistance. For example, in EGFR mutated non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC), EMT has been associated with acquired resistance to the EGFR inhibitor erlotinib. Moreover, "EGFR-addicted" cancer cell lines induced to undergo EMT become erlotinib-resistant in vitro. To identify potential therapeutic vulnerabilities specifically within these mesenchymal, erlotinib-resistant cells, we performed a small molecule screen of ~200 established anti-cancer agents using the EGFR mutant NSCLC HCC827 cell line and a corresponding mesenchymal derivative line. The mesenchymal cells were more resistant to most tested agents; however, a small number of agents showed selective growth inhibitory activity against the mesenchymal cells, with the most potent being the Abl/Src inhibitor, dasatinib. Analysis of the tyrosine phospho-proteome revealed several Src/FAK pathway kinases that were differentially phosphorylated in the mesenchymal cells, and RNAi depletion of the core Src/FAK pathway components in these mesenchymal cells caused apoptosis. These findings reveal a novel role for Src/FAK pathway kinases in drug resistance and identify dasatinib as a potential therapeutic for treatment of erlotinib resistance associated with EMT. PMID:25193862

  12. Proteomic analysis of acquired tamoxifen resistance in MCF-7 cells reveals expression signatures associated with enhanced migration

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Acquired tamoxifen resistance involves complex signaling events that are not yet fully understood. Successful therapeutic intervention to delay the onset of hormone resistance depends critically on mechanistic elucidation of viable molecular targets associated with hormone resistance. This study was undertaken to investigate the global proteomic alterations in a tamoxifen resistant MCF-7 breast cancer cell line obtained by long term treatment of the wild type MCF-7 cell line with 4-hydroxytamoxifen (4-OH Tam). Methods We cultured MCF-7 cells with 4-OH Tam over a period of 12 months to obtain the resistant cell line. A gel-free, quantitative proteomic method was used to identify and quantify the proteome of the resistant cell line. Nano-flow high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to high resolution Fourier transform mass spectrometry was used to analyze fractionated peptide mixtures that were isobarically labeled from the resistant and control cell lysates. Real time quantitative PCR and Western blots were used to verify selected proteomic changes. Lentiviral vector transduction was used to generate MCF-7 cells stably expressing S100P. Online pathway analysis was performed to assess proteomic signatures in tamoxifen resistance. Survival analysis was done to evaluate clinical relevance of altered proteomic expressions. Results Quantitative proteomic analysis revealed a wide breadth of signaling events during transition to acquired tamoxifen resistance. A total of 629 proteins were found significantly changed with 364 up-regulated and 265 down-regulated. Collectively, these changes demonstrated the suppressed state of estrogen receptor (ER) and ER-regulated genes, activated survival signaling and increased migratory capacity of the resistant cell line. The protein S100P was found to play a critical role in conferring tamoxifen resistance and enhanced cell motility. Conclusions Our data demonstrate that the adaptive changes in the proteome of

  13. Learning the ABC of oral fungal drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Cannon, R D; Holmes, A R

    2015-12-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) proteins are ubiquitous in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. They are involved in energy-dependent transport of molecules across membranes. ABC proteins are often promiscuous transporters that can translocate a variety of substrates. In oral fungi, especially in Candida species, they have been implicated as major contributors to the high-level azole resistance of clinical isolates from infections that do not respond to drug therapy. Although this is predominantly due to efflux of azoles from the cells, ABC proteins can contribute to fungal drug resistance in other ways as well. Cells in biofilms are notoriously resistant to antifungal agents. ABC proteins can contribute to this resistance through the efflux of drugs. Biofilms are complex communities of myriad microorganisms which, to survive in such a milieu, need to communicate with, and respond to, other microorganisms and their products. ABC proteins are involved in the secretion of fungal mating factors and quorum sensing molecules. These molecules affect biofilm structure and behavior that can result in increased drug resistance. Hence, ABC proteins make multiple contributions to oral fungal drug resistance through a variety of responses to environmental signals. PMID:26042641

  14. Learning the ABC of oral fungal drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Cannon, R D; Holmes, A R

    2015-12-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) proteins are ubiquitous in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. They are involved in energy-dependent transport of molecules across membranes. ABC proteins are often promiscuous transporters that can translocate a variety of substrates. In oral fungi, especially in Candida species, they have been implicated as major contributors to the high-level azole resistance of clinical isolates from infections that do not respond to drug therapy. Although this is predominantly due to efflux of azoles from the cells, ABC proteins can contribute to fungal drug resistance in other ways as well. Cells in biofilms are notoriously resistant to antifungal agents. ABC proteins can contribute to this resistance through the efflux of drugs. Biofilms are complex communities of myriad microorganisms which, to survive in such a milieu, need to communicate with, and respond to, other microorganisms and their products. ABC proteins are involved in the secretion of fungal mating factors and quorum sensing molecules. These molecules affect biofilm structure and behavior that can result in increased drug resistance. Hence, ABC proteins make multiple contributions to oral fungal drug resistance through a variety of responses to environmental signals.

  15. Nanoparticles: Alternatives Against Drug-Resistant Pathogenic Microbes.

    PubMed

    Rudramurthy, Gudepalya Renukaiah; Swamy, Mallappa Kumara; Sinniah, Uma Rani; Ghasemzadeh, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial substances may be synthetic, semisynthetic, or of natural origin (i.e., from plants and animals). Antimicrobials are considered "miracle drugs" and can determine if an infected patient/animal recovers or dies. However, the misuse of antimicrobials has led to the development of multi-drug-resistant bacteria, which is one of the greatest challenges for healthcare practitioners and is a significant global threat. The major concern with the development of antimicrobial resistance is the spread of resistant organisms. The replacement of conventional antimicrobials by new technology to counteract antimicrobial resistance is ongoing. Nanotechnology-driven innovations provide hope for patients and practitioners in overcoming the problem of drug resistance. Nanomaterials have tremendous potential in both the medical and veterinary fields. Several nanostructures comprising metallic particles have been developed to counteract microbial pathogens. The effectiveness of nanoparticles (NPs) depends on the interaction between the microorganism and the NPs. The development of effective nanomaterials requires in-depth knowledge of the physicochemical properties of NPs and the biological aspects of microorganisms. However, the risks associated with using NPs in healthcare need to be addressed. The present review highlights the antimicrobial effects of various nanomaterials and their potential advantages, drawbacks, or side effects. In addition, this comprehensive information may be useful in the discovery of broad-spectrum antimicrobial drugs for use against multi-drug-resistant microbial pathogens in the near future. PMID:27355939

  16. Combination Approaches to Combat Multi-Drug Resistant Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Worthington, Roberta J.; Melander, Christian

    2013-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of infections caused by multi-drug resistant bacteria is a global health problem that is exacerbated by the dearth of novel classes of antibiotics entering the clinic over the past 40 years. Herein we describe recent developments toward combination therapies for the treatment of multi-drug resistant bacterial infections. These efforts include antibiotic-antibiotic combinations, and the development of adjuvants that either directly target resistance mechanisms such as the inhibition of β-lactamase enzymes, or indirectly target resistance by interfering with bacterial signaling pathways such as two-component systems. We also discuss screening of libraries of previously approved drugs to identify non-obvious antimicrobial adjuvants. PMID:23333434

  17. Advancing New Antibacterial Drug Development for Treatment of Hospital-Acquired and Ventilator-Associated Bacterial Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Toerner, Joseph G; Rubin, Daniel

    2016-08-15

    The Clinical Trials Transformation Initiative (CTTI), a public-private partnership comprised of representatives from academia, the pharmaceutical industry, and the federal government including the US Food and Drug Administration, formed a group working toward a common goal of intensified research to facilitate the development of new antibacterial drug therapies for treatment of hospital-acquired and ventilator-associated bacterial pneumonia (HABP/VABP). The summary of the CTTI HABP/VABP project in this supplement of Clinical Infectious Diseases is a first step in this direction. PMID:27481951

  18. Investigational new drugs for the treatment of resistant pneumococcal infections.

    PubMed

    Hoffman-Roberts, Holly L; C Babcock, Emily; Mitropoulos, Isaac F

    2005-08-01

    Antibiotic resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae is not only increasing with penicillin but also with other antimicrobial classes including the macrolides, tetracyclines and sulfonamides. This trend with antibiotic resistance has highlighted the need for the further development of new anti-infectives for the treatment of pneumococcal infections, particularly against multi-drug resistant pneumococci. Several new drugs with anti-pneumococcal activity are at various stages of development and will be discussed in this review. Two new cephalosporins with activity against S. pneumoniae include ceftobiprole and RWJ-54428. Faropenem is in a new class of beta-lactam antibiotics called the penems. Structurally, the penems are a hybrid between the penicillins and cephalosporins. Sitafloxacin and garenoxacin are two new quinolones that are likely to have a role in treating pneumococcal infections. Oritavancin and dalbavancin are glycopeptides with activity against methicillin-resistant S. aureus and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus spp. as well as multi-drug resistant pneumococci. Tigecycline is the first drug in a new class of anti-infectives called the glycycyclines that has activity against penicillin-resistant pneumococci. PMID:16050791

  19. Antimicrobial resistance: consideration as an adverse drug event.

    PubMed

    Martin, Steven J; Micek, Scott T; Wood, G Christopher

    2010-06-01

    Antimicrobial resistance has increased dramatically in the past 15 to 20 yrs and presents a patient safety concern unlike any other in the intensive care unit. Antimicrobial resistance in critically ill patients increases morbidity, mortality, length of hospital stay, and healthcare costs. Some organisms may have intrinsically high levels of resistance or may be spread between patients by poor infection control practices. However, a major driver of antimicrobial resistance is antibiotic use. As such, the development of antimicrobial resistance can often be thought of as an adverse drug event. This article explores the link between drug use, drug dosing, other selective pressures and resistance, and describes concepts to minimize the negative impact of antimicrobial therapy. Two broad themes of these concepts are minimizing the use of antibiotics whenever possible and optimizing antibiotic usage when they are needed. Strategies for minimizing the use of antimicrobials include using optimal diagnostic procedures to ensure the need for antimicrobials, streamlining or discontinuing therapy when possible based on culture results, and using the shortest duration of therapy needed for documented infections. Strategies for optimizing antimicrobial use include using optimal dosing based on the manufacturer's instructions and current pharmacodynamic data, guiding better prescribing based on local susceptibility patterns and formulary restriction, and avoiding drugs with more propensity to foster resistance.

  20. Canadian survey to determine the rate of drug resistance to isoniazid, PAS and streptomycin in newly detected untreated tuberculosis patients and retreatment cases.

    PubMed

    Hershfield, E S; Eidus, L; Helbecque, D M

    1979-09-01

    In 1975, a survey was carried out in Canada to determine the primary and acquired drug resistance of M. tuberculosis isolates to isoniazid (INH), para-aminosalicylic acid (PAS) and streptomycin. The results of this investigation were compared with those of the primary drug resistant study of Armstrong, undertaken in 1963-64. It revealed that primary drug resistance has increased from 4.9% to 6.3%. The increase is mainly due to immigrants having arrived in this country during the last 12 years. In these newcomers the primary resistance rate was 11.5%. Moreover, 57.8% of the immigrants examined in the survey were of Asian origin, with a drug resistance rate of 11.7%, while 15.6% had arrived from South Europe with a resistant ratio of 16.7%. In retreatment cases, the national average of drug resistance was 26.4%. Among the Canadian provinces, the highest drug resistance rate in retreatment patients (40%) was found in Quebec. While in primary resistance Streptomycin exhibited the highest incidence, in retreatment cases isoniazid resistance proved to be more frequent. In natives, the rates and patterns of primary and acquired resistance were very similar to those observed in other Canadian born patients.

  1. Multidrug and extensively drug-resistant TB (M/XDR-TB): problems and solutions.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Rajendra

    2010-10-01

    Multi Drug Resistant Tuberculosis (MDR-TB) and Extensively Drug Resistant Tuberculosis (XDR-TB) are posing a threat to the control of tuberculosis. The first WHO-IUATLD antituberculosis drug resistance surveillance carried out in 1994 in 35 countries reported the median prevalence of primary and acquired multi drug resistance as 1.4% and 13% respectively. Subsequently, second, third and fourth WHO-IUATLD global drug resistance surveillances were carried out in 1996-99, 1999-2002 and 2002-2007 respectively. Based on drug resistance information from 114 countries, the proportion of MDR-TB among all cases was estimated for countries with no survey information. It was estimated that 4,89,139 cases of MDR-TB emerged in 2006. China and India carry approximately 50% of the global burden. 35 countries and two Special Administrative Regions (SARs) reported data on XDR-TB for the first time in 2006. Multidrug and extensively drug-resistant TB 2010 Global report on Surveillance and response estimated that 4,40,000 cases of MDR-TB emerged globally in 2008 and caused an estimated 1,50,000 deaths. 5.4% of MDR-TB cases were found to have XDR-TB. To date, a cumulative total of 58 countries have confirmed at least one case of XDR-TB. M/XDR-TB is a man-made problem and its emergence can be prevented by prompt diagnosis and effective use of first line drugs in every new patient. The DOTS Plus proposed by WHO highlights the comprehensive management strategy to control MDR-TB. Laboratory services for adequate and timely diagnosis of M/XDR-TB must be strengthened and programmatic management of M/XDR-TB must be scaled up as per target set by global plan. Proper use of second-line drugs must be ensured to cure existing MDR-TB, to reduce its transmission and to prevent XDR-TB. Sound infection control measures to avoid further transmission of M/XDR-TB and research towards development of new diagnostics, drugs and vaccines should be promoted to control M/XDR-TB.

  2. Problems of Glioblastoma Multiforme Drug Resistance.

    PubMed

    Stavrovskaya, A A; Shushanov, S S; Rybalkina, E Yu

    2016-02-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBL) is the most common and aggressive brain neoplasm. A standard therapeutic approach for GBL involves combination therapy consisting of surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy. The latter is based on temozolomide (TMZ). However, even by applying such a radical treatment strategy, the mean patient survival time is only 14.6 months. Here we review the molecular mechanisms underlying the resistance of GBL cells to TMZ including genetic and epigenetic mechanisms. Present data regarding a role for genes and proteins MGMT, IDH1/2, YB-1, MELK, MVP/LRP, MDR1 (ABCB1), and genes encoding other ABC transporters as well as Akt3 kinase in developing resistance of GBL to TMZ are discussed. Some epigenetic regulators of resistance to TMZ such as microRNA and EZH2 are reviewed. PMID:27260389

  3. Establishing Drug Resistance in Microorganisms by Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demirev, Plamen A.; Hagan, Nathan S.; Antoine, Miquel D.; Lin, Jeffrey S.; Feldman, Andrew B.

    2013-08-01

    A rapid method to determine drug resistance in bacteria based on mass spectrometry is presented. In it, a mass spectrum of an intact microorganism grown in drug-containing stable isotope-labeled media is compared with a mass spectrum of the intact microorganism grown in non-labeled media without the drug present. Drug resistance is determined by predicting characteristic mass shifts of one or more microorganism biomarkers using bioinformatics algorithms. Observing such characteristic mass shifts indicates that the microorganism is viable even in the presence of the drug, thus incorporating the isotopic label into characteristic biomarker molecules. The performance of the method is illustrated on the example of intact E. coli, grown in control (unlabeled) and 13C-labeled media, and analyzed by MALDI TOF MS. Algorithms for data analysis are presented as well.

  4. New Developments in Antiepileptic Drug Resistance: An Integrative View

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Dieter; Löscher, Wolfgang

    2009-01-01

    Current theories on drug resistance in epilepsy include the drug transporter hypothesis, the drug target hypothesis, and a novel approach called the inherent severity model of epilepsy, which posits that the severity of the disease determines its relative response to medication. Valuable as each of these hypotheses is, none is currently a stand-alone theory that is able to convincingly explain drug resistance in human epilepsy. As a consequence, it may be of interest to update and integrate the various hypotheses of drug resistance and to explore possible links to the severity of epilepsy. The observation that a high frequency of seizures prior to onset of treatment is a prognostic signal of increased severity and future drug failure suggests that common neurobiological factors may underlie both disease severity and pharmacoresistance. Such a link has been proposed for depression; however, the evidence for a direct mechanistic link, genetic or otherwise, between drug response and disease severity of human epilepsy is still elusive. Although emerging data from experimental studies suggest that alterations in GABAA receptors may present one example of a mechanistic link, clearly more work is needed to explore whether common neurobiological factors may underlie both epilepsy severity and drug failure. PMID:19421380

  5. The evolution of drug resistance in clinical isolates of Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Guiducci, Candace; Martinez, Diego A; Delorey, Toni; Li, Bi yu; White, Theodore C; Cuomo, Christina; Rao, Reeta P; Berman, Judith; Thompson, Dawn A; Regev, Aviv

    2015-01-01

    Candida albicans is both a member of the healthy human microbiome and a major pathogen in immunocompromised individuals. Infections are typically treated with azole inhibitors of ergosterol biosynthesis often leading to drug resistance. Studies in clinical isolates have implicated multiple mechanisms in resistance, but have focused on large-scale aberrations or candidate genes, and do not comprehensively chart the genetic basis of adaptation. Here, we leveraged next-generation sequencing to analyze 43 isolates from 11 oral candidiasis patients. We detected newly selected mutations, including single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), copy-number variations and loss-of-heterozygosity (LOH) events. LOH events were commonly associated with acquired resistance, and SNPs in 240 genes may be related to host adaptation. Conversely, most aneuploidies were transient and did not correlate with drug resistance. Our analysis also shows that isolates also varied in adherence, filamentation, and virulence. Our work reveals new molecular mechanisms underlying the evolution of drug resistance and host adaptation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00662.001 PMID:25646566

  6. Induction of anti-actin drug resistance in Tetrahymena.

    PubMed

    Zackroff, Robert V; Hufnagel, Linda A

    2002-01-01

    Both cytochalasin D and latrunculin B reversibly inhibited Tetrahymena phagocytosis at concentrations similar to those effective in mammalian systems, even though ciliate actins are known to be highly divergent from mammalian actins. Overnight exposure to relatively low (0.25 microM) concentrations of latrunculin B induced resistance in Tetrahymena to the inhibitory effects of that drug, as well as cross-resistance to cytochalasin D. However, much higher (> 30 microM) concentrations of cytochalasin D were required for induction of cross-resistance to latrunculin B. Anti-actin drug resistance in Tetrahymena may involve a general multidrug resistance mechanism and/or specific feedback regulation of F-actin assembly and stability.

  7. A Nexus Consisting of Beta-Catenin and Stat3 Attenuates BRAF Inhibitor Efficacy and Mediates Acquired Resistance to Vemurafenib.

    PubMed

    Sinnberg, Tobias; Makino, Elena; Krueger, Marcel A; Velic, Ana; Macek, Boris; Rothbauer, Ulrich; Groll, Nicola; Pötz, Oliver; Czemmel, Stefan; Niessner, Heike; Meier, Friedegund; Ikenberg, Kristian; Garbe, Claus; Schittek, Birgit

    2016-06-01

    Acquired resistance to second generation BRAF inhibitors (BRAFis), like vemurafenib is limiting the benefits of long term targeted therapy for patients with malignant melanomas that harbor BRAF V600 mutations. Since many resistance mechanisms have been described, most of them causing a hyperactivation of the MAPK- or PI3K/AKT signaling pathways, one potential strategy to overcome BRAFi resistance in melanoma cells would be to target important common signaling nodes. Known factors that cause secondary resistance include the overexpression of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs), alternative splicing of BRAF or the occurrence of novel mutations in MEK1 or NRAS. In this study we show that β-catenin is stabilized and translocated to the nucleus in approximately half of the melanomas that were analyzed and which developed secondary resistance towards BRAFi. We further demonstrate that β-catenin is involved in the mediation of resistance towards vemurafenib in vitro and in vivo. Unexpectedly, β-catenin acts mainly independent of the TCF/LEF dependent canonical Wnt-signaling pathway in resistance development, which partly explains previous contradictory results about the role of β-catenin in melanoma progression and therapy resistance. We further demonstrate that β-catenin interacts with Stat3 after chronic vemurafenib treatment and both together cooperate in the acquisition and maintenance of resistance towards BRAFi. PMID:27428425

  8. Prevalence of HIV-1 drug resistance mutations among Spanish prison inmates.

    PubMed

    García-Guerrero, J; Sáiz de la Hoya, P; Portilla, J; Marco, A; Sánchez-Payá, J; Moreno, S

    2006-11-01

    The aim of this cross-sectional study was to analyse the prevalence of HIV-1 drug-resistance mutations among HIV-1-infected prison inmates in Spain. Treatment-naive and treatment-experienced patients with an HIV RNA viral load of >/=2,000 copies/ml were included. To ensure that the study population was representative of the entire HIV-infected Spanish inmate population, a two-stage conglomerate for selection of the sample was used. In the first stage, 15 prisons were randomly selected, and in the second stage, 38 patients (30 treatment-experienced and 8 treatment-naive) per centre were randomly selected. Genotyping was performed by automatic sequencing. Resistance testing was performed on viral strains from 184 inmates from 12 prisons. Valid sequences were obtained from 133 inmates (90 treatment-experienced and 43 treatment-naive inmates). Most (92.5%) were men and had acquired HIV infection by intravenous drug use (91%); their mean age was 35 years. One or more key resistance mutations were detected in 5 (11.6%) treatment-naive and in 35 (38.6%) treatment-experienced patients. Among treatment-naive and treatment-experienced patients, resistance to nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors was found in 3 (6.9%) and in 20 (22.2%) patients, respectively, resistance to non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors in 3 (6.9%) and in 21 (23.3%) patients, and resistance to protease inhibitors in 3 (6.9%) and in 14 (15.5%) patients. Multidrug resistance was detected in 1 of the 43 (2.3%) treatment-naive patients. These findings support the use of resistance testing in HIV-infected inmates who must begin antiretroviral therapy, given the high rate of primary resistance to drugs frequently included in the initial treatment regimens. PMID:17043836

  9. The Effect of Infection Control Nurses on the Occurrence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Healthcare-Acquired Infection and Multidrug-Resistant Strains in Critically-Ill Children

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wei; He, Linxi; Liu, Chunfeng; Rong, Jian; Shi, Yongyan; Song, Wenliang; Zhang, Tao; Wang, Lijie

    2015-01-01

    Background Healthcare-acquired Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) infections in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU), which have a high incidence, increase treatment costs and mortality, and seriously threaten the safety of critically ill children. It is essential to seek convenient and effective methods to control and prevent healthcare-acquired infections (HAIs). This research was conducted to study the effect of infection control nurses on the occurrence of P. aeruginosa HAIs and multi-drug resistance (MDR) strains in PICU. Methods The clinical data was divided into two groups, with the age ranging from 1 month to 14 years. One group of the critically ill patients(N = 3,722) was admitted to PICU from 2007 to 2010, without the management of infection control nurses. The other group of the critically ill patients (N = 3,943) was admitted to PICU from 2011 to 2013, with the management of infection control nurses. Compare the mortality, morbidity and the incidence of acquired P. aeruginosa infections to evaluate the effect of infection control nurses. Results After implementation of the post of infection control nurses, the patient's overall mortality fell from 4.81% to 3.73%. Among the patients with endotracheal intubation more than 48 hours, the incidence of endotracheal intubation-related pneumonia decreased from 44.6% to 34.32%. The mortality of patients with endotracheal intubation decreased from 16.96% to 10.17%, and the morbidity of HAIs with P. aeruginosa decreased from 1.89% to 1.07%. The mutual different rate (MDR) dropped from 67.95% to 44.23%. There were remarkable differences in these rates between the two groups (p<0.05). Conclusion Implementing the post of infection control nurses is associated with effectively reducing the HAI rate, especially the incidence and morbidity of P. aeruginosa HAIs, reducing PICU mortality, improving P. aeruginosa drug resistance. PMID:26630032

  10. Non-toxic antimicrobials that evade drug resistance

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Stephen A.; Vincent, Benjamin M.; Endo, Matthew M.; Whitesell, Luke; Marchillo, Karen; Andes, David R.; Lindquist, Susan; Burke, Martin D.

    2015-01-01

    Drugs that act more promiscuously provide fewer routes for the emergence of resistant mutants. But this benefit often comes at the cost of serious off-target and dose-limiting toxicities. The classic example is the antifungal amphotericin B (AmB), which has evaded resistance for more than half a century. We report dramatically less toxic amphotericins that nevertheless evade resistance. They are scalably accessed in just three steps from the natural product, and bind their target (the fungal sterol, ergosterol) with far greater selectivity than AmB. Hence, they are less toxic and far more effective in a mouse model of systemic candidiasis. Surprisingly, exhaustive efforts to select for mutants resistant to these more selective compounds revealed that they are just as impervious to resistance as AmB. Thus, highly selective cytocidal action and the evasion of resistance are not mutually exclusive, suggesting practical routes to the discovery of less toxic, resistance-evasive therapies. PMID:26030729

  11. Acquisition of second-line drug resistance and extensive drug resistance during recent transmission of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in rural China.

    PubMed

    Hu, Y; Mathema, B; Zhao, Q; Chen, L; Lu, W; Wang, W; Kreiswirth, B; Xu, B

    2015-12-01

    Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) is prevalent in countries with a high TB burden, like China. As little is known about the emergence and spread of second-line drug (SLD) -resistant TB, we investigate the emergence and transmission of SLD-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis in rural China. In a multi-centre population-based study, we described the bacterial population structure and the transmission characteristics of SLD-resistant TB using Spoligotyping in combination with genotyping based on 24-locus MIRU-VNTR (mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit-variable-number tandem repeat) plus four highly variable loci for the Beijing family, in four rural Chinese regions with diverse geographic and socio-demographic characteristics. Transmission networks among genotypically clustered patients were constructed using social network analysis. Of 1332 M. tuberculosis patient isolates recovered, the Beijing family represented 74.8% of all isolates and an association with MDR and simultaneous resistance between first-line drugs and SLDs. The genotyping analysis revealed that 189 isolates shared MIRU-VNTR patterns in 78 clusters with clustering rate and recent transmission rate of 14.2% and 8.3%, respectively. Fifty-three SLD-resistant isolates were observed in 31 clusters, 30 of which contained the strains with different drug susceptibility profiles and genetic mutations. In conjunction with molecular data, socio-network analysis indicated a key role of Central Township in the transmission across a highly interconnected network where SLD resistance accumulation occurred during transmission. SLD-resistant M. tuberculosis has been spreading in rural China with Beijing family being the dominant strains. Primary transmission of SLD-resistant strains in the population highlights the importance of routine drug susceptibility testing and effective anti-tuberculosis regimens for drug-resistant TB.

  12. Reciprocal positive regulation between Cx26 and PI3K/Akt pathway confers acquired gefitinib resistance in NSCLC cells via GJIC-independent induction of EMT

    PubMed Central

    Yang, J; Qin, G; Luo, M; Chen, J; Zhang, Q; Li, L; Pan, L; Qin, S

    2015-01-01

    Gefitinib efficiency in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) therapy is limited due to development of drug resistance. The molecular mechanisms of gefitinib resistance remain still unclear. In this study, we first found that connexin 26 (Cx26) is the predominant Cx isoform expressed in various NSCLC cell lines. Then, two gefitinib-resistant (GR) NSCLC cell lines, HCC827 GR and PC9 GR, from their parental cells were established. In these GR cells, the results showed that gefitinib resistance correlated with changes in cellular EMT phenotypes and upregulation of Cx26. Cx26 was detected to be accumulated in the cytoplasm and failed to establish functional gap-junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) either in GR cells or their parental cells. Ectopic expression of GJIC-deficient chimeric Cx26 was sufficient to induce EMT and gefitinib insensitivity in HCC827 and PC9 cells, while knockdown of Cx26 reversed EMT and gefitinib resistance in their GR cells both in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, Cx26 overexpression could activate PI3K/Akt signaling in these cells. Cx26-mediated EMT and gefitinib resistance were significantly blocked by inhibition of PI3K/Akt pathway. Specifically, inhibition of the constitutive activation of PI3K/Akt pathway substantially suppressed Cx26 expression, and Cx26 was confirmed to functionally interplay with PI3K/Akt signaling to promote EMT and gefitinib resistance in NSCLC cells. In conclusion, the reciprocal positive regulation between Cx26 and PI3K/Akt signaling contributes to acquired gefitinib resistance in NSCLC cells by promoting EMT via a GJIC-independent manner. PMID:26203858

  13. Antibiotic preparations contain DNA: a source of drug resistance genes?

    PubMed Central

    Webb, V; Davies, J

    1993-01-01

    Fluorescence measurements and polymerase chain reaction amplification of streptomycete 16S ribosomal DNA sequences were used to show that a number of antibiotic preparations employed for human and animal use are contaminated with chromosomal DNA of the antibiotic-producing organism. The DNA contains identifiable antibiotic resistance gene sequences; the uptake of this DNA by bacteria and its functional incorporation into bacterial replicons would lead to the generation of antibiotic resistance determinants. We propose that the presence of DNA encoding drug resistance in antibiotic preparations has been a factor in the rapid development of multiple antibiotic resistance in bacteria. Images PMID:8285621

  14. Potential risk for drug resistance globalization at the Hajj.

    PubMed

    Al-Tawfiq, J A; Memish, Z A

    2015-02-01

    Antibiotics were once considered the miracle cure for infectious diseases. The tragedy would be the loss of these miracles as we witness increased antibiotic resistance throughout the world. One of the concerns during mass gatherings is the transmission of antibiotic resistance. Hajj is one of the most common recurring mass gatherings, attracting millions of people from around the world. The transmission of drug-resistant organisms during the Hajj is not well described. In the current review, we summarize the available literature on the transmission and acquisition of antibiotic resistance during the Hajj and present possible solutions.

  15. Whole Animal Automated Platform for Drug Discovery against Multi-Drug Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Rajamuthiah, Rajmohan; Fuchs, Beth Burgwyn; Jayamani, Elamparithi; Kim, Younghoon; Larkins-Ford, Jonah; Conery, Annie; Ausubel, Frederick M.; Mylonakis, Eleftherios

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus, the leading cause of hospital-acquired infections in the United States, is also pathogenic to the model nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. The C. elegans-S. aureus infection model was previously carried out on solid agar plates where the bacteriovorous C. elegans feeds on a lawn of S. aureus. However, agar-based assays are not amenable to large scale screens for antibacterial compounds. We have developed a high throughput liquid screening assay that uses robotic instrumentation to dispense a precise amount of methicillin resistant S. aureus (MRSA) and worms in 384-well assay plates, followed by automated microscopy and image analysis. In validation of the liquid assay, an MRSA cell wall defective mutant, MW2ΔtarO, which is attenuated for killing in the agar-based assay, was found to be less virulent in the liquid assay. This robust assay with a Z’-factor consistently greater than 0.5 was utilized to screen the Biomol 4 compound library consisting of 640 small molecules with well characterized bioactivities. As proof of principle, 27 of the 30 clinically used antibiotics present in the library conferred increased C. elegans survival and were identified as hits in the screen. Surprisingly, the antihelminthic drug closantel was also identified as a hit in the screen. In further studies, we confirmed the anti-staphylococcal activity of closantel against vancomycin-resistant S. aureus isolates and other Gram-positive bacteria. The liquid C. elegans – S. aureus assay described here allows screening for anti-staphylococcal compounds that are not toxic to the host. PMID:24586584

  16. National and Regional Assessment of Antimicrobial Resistance among Community-Acquired Respiratory Tract Pathogens Identified in a 2005-2006 U.S. Faropenem Surveillance Study▿

    PubMed Central

    Critchley, Ian A.; Brown, Steven D.; Traczewski, Maria M.; Tillotson, Glenn S.; Janjic, Nebojsa

    2007-01-01

    Surveillance studies conducted in the United States over the last decade have revealed increasing resistance among community-acquired respiratory pathogens, especially Streptococcus pneumoniae, that may limit future options for empirical therapy. The objective of this study was to assess the scope and magnitude of the problem at the national and regional levels during the 2005-2006 respiratory season (the season when community-acquired respiratory pathogens are prevalent) in the United States. Also, since faropenem is an oral penem being developed for the treatment of community-acquired respiratory tract infections, another study objective was to provide baseline data to benchmark changes in the susceptibility of U.S. respiratory pathogens to the drug in the future. The in vitro activities of faropenem and other agents were determined against 1,543 S. pneumoniae isolates, 978 Haemophilus influenzae isolates, and 489 Moraxella catarrhalis isolates collected from 104 U.S. laboratories across six geographic regions during the 2005-2006 respiratory season. Among S. pneumoniae isolates, the rates of resistance to penicillin, amoxicillin-clavulanate, and cefdinir were 16, 6.4, and 19.2%, respectively. The least effective agents were trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (SXT) and azithromycin, with resistance rates of 23.5 and 34%, respectively. Penicillin resistance rates for S. pneumoniae varied by region (from 8.7 to 22.5%), as did multidrug resistance rates for S. pneumoniae (from 8.8 to 24.9%). Resistance to β-lactams, azithromycin, and SXT was higher among S. pneumoniae isolates from children than those from adults. β-Lactamase production rates among H. influenzae and M. catarrhalis isolates were 27.4 and 91.6%, respectively. Faropenem MICs at which 90% of isolates are inhibited were 0.5 μg/ml for S. pneumoniae, 1 μg/ml for H. influenzae, and 0.5 μg/ml for M. catarrhalis, suggesting that faropenem shows promise as a treatment option for respiratory infections caused

  17. National and regional assessment of antimicrobial resistance among community-acquired respiratory tract pathogens identified in a 2005-2006 U.S. Faropenem surveillance study.

    PubMed

    Critchley, Ian A; Brown, Steven D; Traczewski, Maria M; Tillotson, Glenn S; Janjic, Nebojsa

    2007-12-01

    Surveillance studies conducted in the United States over the last decade have revealed increasing resistance among community-acquired respiratory pathogens, especially Streptococcus pneumoniae, that may limit future options for empirical therapy. The objective of this study was to assess the scope and magnitude of the problem at the national and regional levels during the 2005-2006 respiratory season (the season when community-acquired respiratory pathogens are prevalent) in the United States. Also, since faropenem is an oral penem being developed for the treatment of community-acquired respiratory tract infections, another study objective was to provide baseline data to benchmark changes in the susceptibility of U.S. respiratory pathogens to the drug in the future. The in vitro activities of faropenem and other agents were determined against 1,543 S. pneumoniae isolates, 978 Haemophilus influenzae isolates, and 489 Moraxella catarrhalis isolates collected from 104 U.S. laboratories across six geographic regions during the 2005-2006 respiratory season. Among S. pneumoniae isolates, the rates of resistance to penicillin, amoxicillin-clavulanate, and cefdinir were 16, 6.4, and 19.2%, respectively. The least effective agents were trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (SXT) and azithromycin, with resistance rates of 23.5 and 34%, respectively. Penicillin resistance rates for S. pneumoniae varied by region (from 8.7 to 22.5%), as did multidrug resistance rates for S. pneumoniae (from 8.8 to 24.9%). Resistance to beta-lactams, azithromycin, and SXT was higher among S. pneumoniae isolates from children than those from adults. beta-Lactamase production rates among H. influenzae and M. catarrhalis isolates were 27.4 and 91.6%, respectively. Faropenem MICs at which 90% of isolates are inhibited were 0.5 mug/ml for S. pneumoniae, 1 mug/ml for H. influenzae, and 0.5 mug/ml for M. catarrhalis, suggesting that faropenem shows promise as a treatment option for respiratory infections

  18. HIV resistance to antiviral drugs: public health implications.

    PubMed

    Wainberg, M A; Cameron, D W

    1998-01-01

    The widespread occurrence of HIV strains resistant to antiviral drugs has given rise to a number of important concerns distinct from the obvious question of the relationship between drug resistance and treatment failure. A major issue is the extent to which drug-resistant viruses may be transmitted in primary infection via sexual or intravenous routes and how this relates to the relative fitness of such strains. It is also important to understand the potential role of effective antiviral therapy in the decrease of viral burden in both blood and sexual secretions, and the extent to which this may be compromised in individuals harboring resistant viruses. A related subject is the important role of patient adherence to antiviral therapy in achieving sustained reduction in viral load and preventing the emergence of drug resistance. These linked topics are tied to the central role of antiviral agents in the selection of mutant forms that can attain a replication advantage in the presence of drug. PMID:16904396

  19. Antifungal drug resistance evokedvia RNAi-dependent epimutations

    PubMed Central

    Calo, Silvia; Shertz-Wall, Cecelia; Lee, Soo Chan; Bastidas, Robert J.; Nicolás, Francisco E.; Granek, Joshua A.; Mieczkowski, Piotr; Torres-Martinez, Santiago; Ruiz-Vazquez, Rosa M.; Cardenas, Maria E.; Heitman, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Microorganisms evolve via mechanisms spanning sexual/parasexual reproduction, mutators, aneuploidy, Hsp90, and even prions. Mechanisms that may seem detrimental can be repurposed to generate diversity. Here we show the human fungal pathogen Mucor circinelloides develops spontaneous resistance to the antifungal drug FK506 (tacrolimus) via two distinct mechanisms. One involves Mendelian mutations that confer stable drug resistance; the other occurs via an epigenetic RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated pathway resulting in unstable drug resistance. The peptidyl-prolyl isomerase FKBP12 interacts with FK506 forming a complex that inhibits the protein phosphatase calcineurin1. Calcineurin inhibition by FK506 blocks M. circinelloides transition to hyphae and enforces yeast growth2. Mutations in the fkbA gene encoding FKBP12 or the calcineurin cnbR or cnaA genes confer FK506 resistance (FK506R) and restore hyphal growth. In parallel, RNAi is spontaneously triggered to silence the FKBP12 fkbA gene, giving rise to drug-resistant epimutants. FK506R epimutants readily reverted to the drug-sensitive wild-type (WT) phenotype when grown without drug. The establishment of these epimutants is accompanied by generation of abundant fkbA small RNA (sRNA) and requires the RNAi pathway as well as other factors that constrain or reverse the epimutant state. Silencing involves generation of a double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) trigger intermediate from the fkbA mature mRNA to produce antisense fkbA RNA. This study uncovers a novel epigenetic RNAi-based epimutation mechanism controlling phenotypic plasticity, with possible implications for antimicrobial drug resistance and RNAi-regulatory mechanisms in fungi and other eukaryotes. PMID:25079329

  20. Targeting ABCB1 and ABCC1 with their Specific Inhibitor CBT-1® can Overcome Drug Resistance in Osteosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Fanelli, Marilù; Hattinger, Claudia Maria; Vella, Serena; Tavanti, Elisa; Michelacci, Francesca; Gudeman, Beth; Barnett, Daryl; Picci, Piero; Serra, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Clinical treatment response achievable with conventional chemotherapy in high-grade osteosarcoma (OS) is severely limited by the presence of intrinsic or acquired drug resistance, which in previous studies has been mainly addressed for overexpression of ABCB1 (MDR1/P-glycoprotein). This study was aimed to estimate the impact on OS drug resistance of a group of ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters, which in other human tumors have been associated with unresponsiveness to the drugs that represent the backbone of multidrug treatment regimens for OS (doxorubicin, methotrexate, cisplatin). By using a group of 6 drug-sensitive and 20 drug-resistant human OS cell lines, the most relevant transporter which proved to be associated with the degree of drug resistance in OS cells, in addition to ABCB1, was ABCC1. We therefore evaluated the in vitro activity of the orally administrable ABCB1/ABCC1 inhibitor CBT-1(®) (Tetrandrine, NSC-77037). We found that in our OS cell lines this agent was able to revert the ABCB1/ABCC1-mediated resistance against doxorubicin, as well as against the drugs used in second-line OS treatments that are substrates of these transporters (taxotere, etoposide, vinorelbine). Our findings indicated that inhibiting ABCB1 and ABCC1 with CBT-1(®), used in association with conventional chemotherapeutic drugs, may become an interesting new therapeutic option for unresponsive or relapsed OS patients. PMID:26548759

  1. Rewired Metabolism in Drug-resistant Leukemia Cells

    PubMed Central

    Stäubert, Claudia; Bhuiyan, Hasanuzzaman; Lindahl, Anna; Broom, Oliver Jay; Zhu, Yafeng; Islam, Saiful; Linnarsson, Sten; Lehtiö, Janne; Nordström, Anders

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cells that escape induction therapy are a major cause of relapse. Understanding metabolic alterations associated with drug resistance opens up unexplored opportunities for the development of new therapeutic strategies. Here, we applied a broad spectrum of technologies including RNA sequencing, global untargeted metabolomics, and stable isotope labeling mass spectrometry to identify metabolic changes in P-glycoprotein overexpressing T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cells, which escaped a therapeutically relevant daunorubicin treatment. We show that compared with sensitive ALL cells, resistant leukemia cells possess a fundamentally rewired central metabolism characterized by reduced dependence on glutamine despite a lack of expression of glutamate-ammonia ligase (GLUL), a higher demand for glucose and an altered rate of fatty acid β-oxidation, accompanied by a decreased pantothenic acid uptake capacity. We experimentally validate our findings by selectively targeting components of this metabolic switch, using approved drugs and starvation approaches followed by cell viability analyses in both the ALL cells and in an acute myeloid leukemia (AML) sensitive/resistant cell line pair. We demonstrate how comparative metabolomics and RNA expression profiling of drug-sensitive and -resistant cells expose targetable metabolic changes and potential resistance markers. Our results show that drug resistance is associated with significant metabolic costs in cancer cells, which could be exploited using new therapeutic strategies. PMID:25697355

  2. Homeless individuals and drug-resistant tuberculosis in south Texas.

    PubMed

    Morris, J T; McAllister, C K

    1992-09-01

    Drug-resistant tuberculosis was found in 21 percent of homeless individuals in New York City between 1982 and 1987. To see if this relationship existed in south Texas, we evaluated all admissions to a Texas Health Department facility with culture-proven tuberculosis. Four hundred forty-three patients were admitted between September 1987 and October 1990. Twenty-six, (5.9 percent) of these patients were identified as homeless. Alcoholism, tobacco abuse, divorce, and unemployment were common demographic characteristics. Six male patients and one female patient (27 percent) had Mycobacterium tuberculosis resistant to one or more antituberculosis drugs. Five were Hispanic, one was white, and one was black. The six male patients had resistance to only one drug, either rifampin or ethambutol. The female patient had resistance to streptomycin, isoniazid, and rifampin. These findings illustrate that drug-resistant tuberculosis exists among homeless individuals in south Texas. As the number of homeless people increases, physicians need to recognize that pulmonary tuberculosis is a frequent infection in this population and that the causal mycobacteria may well be resistant to one or more antituberculosis agents. PMID:1516406

  3. Homeless individuals and drug-resistant tuberculosis in south Texas.

    PubMed

    Morris, J T; McAllister, C K

    1992-09-01

    Drug-resistant tuberculosis was found in 21 percent of homeless individuals in New York City between 1982 and 1987. To see if this relationship existed in south Texas, we evaluated all admissions to a Texas Health Department facility with culture-proven tuberculosis. Four hundred forty-three patients were admitted between September 1987 and October 1990. Twenty-six, (5.9 percent) of these patients were identified as homeless. Alcoholism, tobacco abuse, divorce, and unemployment were common demographic characteristics. Six male patients and one female patient (27 percent) had Mycobacterium tuberculosis resistant to one or more antituberculosis drugs. Five were Hispanic, one was white, and one was black. The six male patients had resistance to only one drug, either rifampin or ethambutol. The female patient had resistance to streptomycin, isoniazid, and rifampin. These findings illustrate that drug-resistant tuberculosis exists among homeless individuals in south Texas. As the number of homeless people increases, physicians need to recognize that pulmonary tuberculosis is a frequent infection in this population and that the causal mycobacteria may well be resistant to one or more antituberculosis agents.

  4. Multidrug-resistant to extensively drug resistant tuberculosis: what is next?

    PubMed

    Jain, Amita; Dixit, Pratima

    2008-11-01

    Drug resistant tuberculosis is a man made problem. While tuberculosis is hundred percent curable, multidrug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) is difficult to treat. Inadequate and incomplete treatment and poor treatment adherence has led to a newer form of drug resistance known as extensively drug resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB). XDR-TB is defined as tuberculosis caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain, which is resistant to at least rifampicin and isoniazid among the first line anti tubercular drugs (MDR-TB) in addition to resistance to any fluroquinolones and at least one of three injectable second line anti tubercular drugs i.e. amikacin, kanamycin and/or capreomycin. Mismanagement of tuberculosis paves the way to drug resistant tuberculosis. Emergence of XDR-TB is reported world wide. Reported prevalence rates of XDR-TB of total MDR cases are; 6.6% overall worldwide, 6.5% in industrialized countries, 13.6% in Russia and Eastern Europe, 1.5% in Asia, 0.6% in Africa and Middle East and 15.4% in Republic of Korea. Better management and control of tuberculosis specially drug resistant TB by experienced and qualified doctors, access to standard microbiology laboratory,co-morbitidy of HIV and tuberculosis,new anti-TB drug regimens, better diagnostic tests,international standards for second line drugs (SLD)-susceptibility testing,invention of newer anti- tubercular molecules and vaccines and knowing the real magnitude of XDR-TB are some of the important issues to be addressed for effective prevention and management of XDR-TB. PMID:19208985

  5. Extensively Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis: Principles of Resistance, Diagnosis, and Management.

    PubMed

    Wilson, John W; Tsukayama, Dean T

    2016-04-01

    Extensively drug-resistant (XDR) tuberculosis (TB) is an unfortunate by-product of mankind's medical and pharmaceutical ingenuity during the past 60 years. Although new drug developments have enabled TB to be more readily curable, inappropriate TB management has led to the emergence of drug-resistant disease. Extensively drug-resistant TB describes Mycobacterium tuberculosis that is collectively resistant to isoniazid, rifampin, a fluoroquinolone, and an injectable agent. It proliferates when established case management and infection control procedures are not followed. Optimized treatment outcomes necessitate time-sensitive diagnoses, along with expanded combinations and prolonged durations of antimicrobial drug therapy. The challenges to public health institutions are immense and most noteworthy in underresourced communities and in patients coinfected with human immunodeficiency virus. A comprehensive and multidisciplinary case management approach is required to optimize outcomes. We review the principles of TB drug resistance and the risk factors, diagnosis, and managerial approaches for extensively drug-resistant TB. Treatment outcomes, cost, and unresolved medical issues are also discussed.

  6. Molecular and biochemical mechanisms of drug resistance in fungi.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, H

    1999-01-01

    This paper reviews the current status of our understanding of resistance mechanisms of three major classes of antifungal drugs for systemic use, amphotericin B (AMPH), flucytosine (5-FC) and several azole antifungals, in particular fluconazole (FLCZ), at the molecular and cellular levels. Although the number of reports of AMPH- or 5-FC-resistant fungal species and strains is limited, several mechanisms of resistance have been described. AMPH-resistant Candida have a marked decrease in ergosterol content compared with AMPH-susceptible control isolates. A lesion in the UMP-pyrophosphorylase is the most frequent determinant of 5-FC resistance in C. albicans. Recently resistance of C. albicans to azoles has become an increasing problem. Extensive biochemical studies have highlighted a significant diversity in mechanisms conferring resistance to FLCZ and other azoles, which include alterations in sterol biosynthesis, target site, uptake and efflux. Among them, the most important mechanism clinically is reduced access of the drug to the intracellular P450 14 DM target, probably because of the action of a multidrug resistance efflux pump, and overproduction of that target. However, other possible resistance mechanisms for azoles remain to be identified.

  7. Molecular mechanisms in multiple myeloma drug resistance

    PubMed Central

    Nikesitch, Nicholas; Ling, Silvia C W

    2016-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is predominantly an incurable malignancy despite high-dose chemotherapy, autologous stem cell transplant and novel agents. MM is a genetically heterogeneous disease and the complexity increases as the disease progresses to a more aggressive stage. MM arises from a plasma cell, which produces and secretes non-functioning immunoglobulins. Most MM cells are sensitive to proteasome inhibitors (PIs), which have become the main drug in the treatment of newly diagnosed and relapsed MM. However, not all MM is sensitive to PIs. This review summarises the literature regarding molecular biology of MM with a focus on the unfolded protein response and explores how this could affect drug sensitivity and progression of disease. PMID:26598624

  8. D538G mutation in estrogen receptor-α: A novel mechanism for acquired endocrine resistance in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Merenbakh-Lamin, Keren; Ben-Baruch, Noa; Yeheskel, Adva; Dvir, Addie; Soussan-Gutman, Lior; Jeselsohn, Rinath; Yelensky, Roman; Brown, Myles; Miller, Vincent A; Sarid, David; Rizel, Shulamith; Klein, Baruch; Rubinek, Tami; Wolf, Ido

    2013-12-01

    Resistance to endocrine therapy occurs in virtually all patients with estrogen receptor α (ERα)-positive metastatic breast cancer, and is attributed to various mechanisms including loss of ERα expression, altered activity of coregulators, and cross-talk between the ERα and growth factor signaling pathways. To our knowledge, acquired mutations of the ERα have not been described as mediating endocrine resistance. Samples of 13 patients with metastatic breast cancer were analyzed for mutations in cancer-related genes. In five patients who developed resistance to hormonal therapy, a mutation of A to G at position 1,613 of ERα, resulting in a substitution of aspartic acid at position 538 to glycine (D538G), was identified in liver metastases. Importantly, the mutation was not detected in the primary tumors obtained prior to endocrine treatment. Structural modeling indicated that D538G substitution leads to a conformational change in the ligand-binding domain, which mimics the conformation of activated ligand-bound receptor and alters binding of tamoxifen. Indeed, experiments in breast cancer cells indicated constitutive, ligand-independent transcriptional activity of the D538G receptor, and overexpression of it enhanced proliferation and conferred resistance to tamoxifen. These data indicate a novel mechanism of acquired endocrine resistance in breast cancer. Further studies are needed to assess the frequency of D538G-ERα among patients with breast cancer and explore ways to inhibit its activity and restore endocrine sensitivity.

  9. The role of photodynamic therapy in overcoming cancer drug resistance

    PubMed Central

    Spring, Bryan Q.; Rizvi, Imran; Xu, Nan; Hasan, Tayyaba

    2015-01-01

    Many modalities of cancer therapy induce mechanisms of treatment resistance and escape pathways during chronic treatments, including photodynamic therapy (PDT). It is conceivable that resistance induced by one treatment might be overcome by another treatment. Emerging evidence suggests that the unique mechanisms of tumor cell and microenvironment damage produced by PDT could be utilized to overcome cancer drug resistance, to mitigate the compensatory induction of survival pathways and even to re-sensitize resistant cells to standard therapies. Approaches that capture the unique features of PDT, therefore, offer promising factors for increasing the efficacy of a broad range of therapeutic modalities. Here, we highlight key preclinical findings utilizing PDT to overcome classical drug resistance or escape pathways and thus enhance the efficacy of many pharmaceuticals, possibly explaining the clinical observations of the PDT response to otherwise treatment-resistant diseases. With the development of nanotechnology, it is possible that light activation may be used not only to damage and sensitize tumors but also to enable controlled drug release to inhibit escape pathways that may lead to resistance or cell proliferation. PMID:25856800

  10. Acquired resistance to the second-generation androgen receptor antagonist enzalutamide in castration-resistant prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kregel, Steven; Chen, James L.; Tom, Westin; Krishnan, Venkatesh; Kach, Jacob; Brechka, Hannah; Fessenden, Tim B.; Isikbay, Masis; Paner, Gladell P.

    2016-01-01

    Enzalutamide (MDV3100) is a second generation Androgen Receptor (AR) antagonist with proven efficacy in the treatment of castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). The majority of treated patients, however, develop resistance and disease progression and there is a critical need to identify novel targetable pathways mediating resistance. The purpose of this study was to develop and extensively characterize a series of enzalutamide-resistant prostate cancer cell lines. Four genetically distinct AR-positive and AR-pathway dependent prostate cancer cell lines (CWR-R1, LAPC-4, LNCaP, VCaP) were made resistant to enzalutamide by long-term culture (> 6 months) in enzalutamide. Extensive characterization of these lines documented divergent in vitro growth characteristics and AR pathway modulation. Enzalutamide-resistant LNCaP and CWR-R1 cells, but not LAPC-4 and VCAP cells, demonstrated increased castration-resistant and metastatic growth in vivo. Global gene expression analyses between short-term enzalutamide treated vs. enzalutamide-resistant cells identified both AR pathway and non-AR pathway associated changes that were restored upon acquisition of enzalutamide resistance. Further analyses revealed very few common gene expression changes between the four resistant cell lines. Thus, while AR-mediated pathways contribute in part to enzalutamide resistance, an unbiased approach across several cell lines demonstrates a greater contribution toward resistance via pleiotropic, non-AR mediated mechanisms. PMID:27036029

  11. An analysis of the population genetics of potential multi-drug resistance in Wuchereria bancrofti due to combination chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Schwab, A E; Churcher, T S; Schwab, A J; Basáñez, M-G; Prichard, R K

    2007-07-01

    Currently, annual mass treatments with albendazole (ABZ) plus ivermectin (IVM) or diethylcarbamazine (DEC) are administered under the Global Programme to Eliminate Lymphatic Filariasis (GPELF). Drug resistance against both ABZ and IVM is prevalent in nematodes of veterinary importance, raising awareness that if anthelmintic resistance were to develop among Wuchereria bancrofti populations, this would jeopardize GPELF's goals. Genetic structure was incorporated into an existing transmission dynamics model for lymphatic filariasis (LF) to investigate the potential development of concurrent resistance to ABZ and IVM. The resultant models explore the impact of different inheritance modes of resistance to ABZ and IVM on the likely risk of treatment failure under our model assumptions. Results indicate that under ABZ+IVM combination, selection for resistance to one drug is enhanced if resistance to the other drug is already present. Excess parasite homozygosity may increase selection for dominant IVM resistance via enhancing the frequency of recessive ABZ resistance. The model predicts that if multiple resistance genes are associated with different efficacy properties of a drug combination, then examining changes at single loci may be misleading. Sampling schemes in genetic epidemiological surveys investigating the frequency of an allele under selection should consider host age, as individuals of different ages may acquire parasites at different rates.

  12. Drugs that target pathogen public goods are robust against evolved drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Pepper, John W

    2012-11-01

    Pathogen drug resistance is a central problem in medicine and public health. It arises through somatic evolution, by mutation and selection among pathogen cells within a host. Here, we examine the hypothesis that evolution of drug resistance could be reduced by developing drugs that target the secreted metabolites produced by pathogen cells instead of directly targeting the cells themselves. Using an agent-based computational model of an evolving population of pathogen cells, we test this hypothesis and find support for it. We also use our model to explain this effect within the framework of standard evolutionary theory. We find that in our model, the drugs most robust against evolved drug resistance are those that target the most widely shared external products, or 'public goods', of pathogen cells. We also show that these drugs exert a weak selective pressure for resistance because they create only a weak correlation between drug resistance and cell fitness. The same principles apply to design of vaccines that are robust against vaccine escape. Because our theoretical results have crucial practical implications, they should be tested by empirical experiments.

  13. HIV Drug-resistant Strains as Epidemiologic Sentinels

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Robert M.; Porco, Travis C.; Getz, Wayne M.

    2006-01-01

    Observed declines in drug resistance to nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors among persons recently infected with HIV-1 in monitored subpopulations can be interpreted as a positive sign and lead public health officials to decrease efforts towards HIV prevention. By means of a mathematical model, we identified 3 processes that can account for the observed decline: increase in high-risk behavior, decrease in proportion of acutely infected persons whose conditions are treated, and change in treatment efficacy. These processes, singly or in combination, can lead to increases or decreases in disease and drug-resistance prevalence in the general population. We discuss the most appropriate public health response under each scenario and emphasize how further data collection and analyses are required to more reliably evaluate the observed time trends and the relative importance of forces shaping the epidemic. Our study highlights how drug resistance markers can be used as epidemiologic sentinels to devise public health solutions. PMID:16494741

  14. New strategies against drug resistance to herpes simplex virus.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yu-Chen; Feng, Hui; Lin, Yu-Chun; Guo, Xiu-Rong

    2016-03-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV), a member of the Herpesviridae family, is a significant human pathogen that results in mucocutaneous lesions in the oral cavity or genital infections. Acyclovir (ACV) and related nucleoside analogues can successfully treat HSV infections, but the emergence of drug resistance to ACV has created a barrier for the treatment of HSV infections, especially in immunocompromised patients. There is an urgent need to explore new and effective tactics to circumvent drug resistance to HSV. This review summarises the current strategies in the development of new targets (the DNA helicase/primase (H/P) complex), new types of molecules (nature products) and new antiviral mechanisms (lethal mutagenesis of Janus-type nucleosides) to fight the drug resistance of HSV. PMID:27025259

  15. New strategies against drug resistance to herpes simplex virus

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yu-Chen; Feng, Hui; Lin, Yu-Chun; Guo, Xiu-Rong

    2016-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV), a member of the Herpesviridae family, is a significant human pathogen that results in mucocutaneous lesions in the oral cavity or genital infections. Acyclovir (ACV) and related nucleoside analogues can successfully treat HSV infections, but the emergence of drug resistance to ACV has created a barrier for the treatment of HSV infections, especially in immunocompromised patients. There is an urgent need to explore new and effective tactics to circumvent drug resistance to HSV. This review summarises the current strategies in the development of new targets (the DNA helicase/primase (H/P) complex), new types of molecules (nature products) and new antiviral mechanisms (lethal mutagenesis of Janus-type nucleosides) to fight the drug resistance of HSV. PMID:27025259

  16. Is selection relevant in the evolutionary emergence of drug resistance?

    PubMed

    Day, Troy; Huijben, Silvie; Read, Andrew F

    2015-03-01

    The emergence of drug-resistant pathogens is often considered a canonical case of evolution by natural selection. Here we argue that the strength of selection can be a poor predictor of the rate of resistance emergence. It is possible for a resistant strain to be under negative selection and still emerge in an infection or spread in a population. Measuring the right parameters is a necessary first step toward the development of evidence-based resistance-management strategies. We argue that it is the absolute fitness of the resistant strains that matters most and that a primary determinant of the absolute fitness of a resistant strain is the ecological context in which it finds itself.

  17. Pattern of Drug Resistance and Risk Factors Associated with Development of Drug Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Ullah, Irfan; Javaid, Arshad; Tahir, Zarfishan; Ullah, Obaid; Shah, Aamer Ali; Hasan, Fariha; Ayub, Najma

    2016-01-01

    Background Drug resistant tuberculosis (DR-TB) is a major public health problem in developing countries such as Pakistan. Objective The current study was conducted to assess the frequency of drug resistant tuberculosis including multi drug resistance (MDR- TB) as well as risk factors for development of DR-TB, in Punjab, Pakistan. Methodology Drug susceptibility testing (DST) was performed, using proportion method, for 2367 culture positive Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) cases that were enrolled from January 2012 to December 2013 in the province of Punjab, Pakistan, against first-line anti-tuberculosis drugs. The data was analyzed using statistical software; SPSS version 18. Results Out of 2367 isolates, 273 (11.5%) were resistant to at least one anti-TB drug, while 221 (9.3%) showed MDR- TB. Risk factors for development of MDR-TB were early age (ranges between 10–25 years) and previously treated TB patients. Conclusion DR-TB is a considerable problem in Pakistan. Major risk factors are previous history of TB treatment and younger age group. It emphasizes the need for effective TB control Program in the country. PMID:26809127

  18. Treatment for hepatitis B in patients with drug resistance

    PubMed Central

    Kroy, Daniela C.

    2016-01-01

    Persistent hepatitis B virus (HBV) infections affect about 240 million patients worldwide that are at risk of developing liver cirrhosis or hepatocellular carcinoma. HBV is a small, partially double stranded DNA virus with four overlapping genes and a unique life cycle, which involves the generation of an RNA template for replication via reverse transcription. Mutations occur frequently during chronic infection, and particular selection pressures select distinct mutants. Nucleoside and nucleotide analogues like lamivudine (LMV), entecavir (ETV), telbivudine (LdT), adefovir dipivoxil (ADV) and tenofovir (TDF) are used to achieve long-term suppression of viral replication. Importantly, these drugs have different barriers to resistance, explaining the higher incidence of treatment failure in the past due to drug resistant viral strains for the older compounds LMV, LdT and ADV. On a molecular level, drug resistant mutations usually affect the reverse transcriptase domain of the HBV polymerase protein. Secondary compensatory mutations restore the replication fitness of the mutant virus. From a clinical point of view, patients undergoing antiviral therapy require regular testing for HBV DNA (every 3–6 months). In case of insufficient viral suppression or viral breakthrough (>1 log increase in HBV DNA above nadir), strict adherence to therapy needs to be ensured. If drug resistance is suspected or even molecularly confirmed, rescue therapy strategies exist, usually switching to a noncross-resistant antiviral drug. LMV, LdT and ETV resistant HBV can be treated with TDF monotherapy, ADV resistance with ETV or TDF, and insufficient responses to TDF may require ETV either as mono- or combination therapy. Complex treatment histories with many antivirals may sometimes necessitate the combination of highly effective antivirals like ETV and TDF. Novel treatment targets such as core (capsid) inhibitors, siRNA targeting protein translation, entry inhibitors or immune modulators

  19. Meditation improves clinicoelectroencephalographic measures in drug-resistant epileptics.

    PubMed

    Deepak, K K; Manchanda, S K; Maheshwari, M C

    1994-03-01

    Eleven adults suffering from drug-resistant epilepsies were given meditation practice, while another nine adults acted as waiting list controls. All patients were on antiepileptic drugs and their serum drug levels were monitored regularly. Patients in the intervention group were given training in meditation, and they practiced meditation 20 minutes a day for one year. They showed a significant reduction in seizure frequency and duration, an increase in the dominant background EEG frequency, a reduction in mean spectral intensity of the 0.7-7.7 Hz segment, and an increment in mean spectral intensity in the 8-12 Hz segment of the EEG. All changes were statistically significant. Control patients did not show significant changes in seizure frequency and duration during the observation period of one year. The results indicate that continued meditation practice is of substantial help in improving the clinicoelectrographic picture in drug-resistant epileptics.

  20. Elevated hepatocyte growth factor expression as an autocrine c-Met activation mechanism in acquired resistance to sorafenib in hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Firtina Karagonlar, Zeynep; Koc, Dogukan; Iscan, Evin; Erdal, Esra; Atabey, Neşe

    2016-04-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most common type of primary liver cancer and the third leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Limitations in HCC treatment result due to poor prognosis and resistance against traditional radiotherapy and chemotherapies. The multikinase inhibitor sorafenib is the only FDA approved drug available for advanced HCC patients, and development of second-line treatment options for patients who cannot tolerate or develop resistance to sorafenib is an urgent medical need. In this study, we established sorafenib-resistant cells from Huh7 and Mahlavu cell lines by long-term sorafenib exposure. Sorafenib-resistant HCC cells acquired spindle-shape morphology, upregulated mesenchymal markers, and showed significant increase in both migration and invasion abilities compared to their parental counterparts. Moreover, after long-term sorafenib treatment, HCC cells showed induction of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) synthesis and secretion along with increased levels of c-Met kinase and its active phosphorylated form, indicating autocrine activation of HGF/c-Met signaling. Importantly, the combined treatment of the resistant cells with c-Met kinase inhibitor SU11274 and HGF neutralizing antibody significantly reversed the increased invasion ability of the cells. The combined treatment also significantly augmented sorafenib-induced apoptosis, suggesting restoration of sorafenib sensitivity. These results describe, for the first time, compensatory upregulation of HGF synthesis leading to autocrine activation of HGF/c-Met signaling as a novel cellular strategy in the acquisition of sorafenib resistance. Therefore, we suggest that combinatorial therapeutic strategies with HGF and c-Met inhibitors comprise promising candidates for overcoming sorafenib resistance. PMID:26790028

  1. Persistence of HIV-1 transmitted drug resistance mutations.

    PubMed

    Castro, Hannah; Pillay, Deenan; Cane, Patricia; Asboe, David; Cambiano, Valentina; Phillips, Andrew; Dunn, David T

    2013-11-01

    There are few data on the persistence of individual human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) transmitted drug resistance (TDR) mutations in the absence of selective drug pressure. We studied 313 patients in whom TDR mutations were detected at their first resistance test and who had a subsequent test performed while ART-naive. The rate at which mutations became undetectable was estimated using exponential regression accounting for interval censoring. Most thymidine analogue mutations (TAMs) and T215 revertants (but not T215F/Y) were found to be highly stable, with NNRTI and PI mutations being relatively less persistent. Our estimates are important for informing HIV transmission models.

  2. Anticancer drug nanomicelles formed by self-assembling amphiphilic dendrimer to combat cancer drug resistance

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Tuo; Chen, Chao; Liu, Juan; Liu, Cheng; Posocco, Paola; Liu, Xiaoxuan; Cheng, Qiang; Huo, Shuaidong; Liang, Zicai; Fermeglia, Maurizio; Liang, Xing-Jie; Rocchi, Palma; Peng, Ling

    2015-01-01

    Drug resistance and toxicity constitute challenging hurdles for cancer therapy. The application of nanotechnology for anticancer drug delivery is expected to address these issues and bring new hope for cancer treatment. In this context, we established an original nanomicellar drug delivery system based on an amphiphilic dendrimer (AmDM), which could generate supramolecular micelles to effectively encapsulate the anticancer drug doxorubicin (DOX) with high drug-loading capacity (>40%), thanks to the unique dendritic structure creating large void space for drug accommodation. The resulting AmDM/DOX nanomicelles were able to enhance drug potency and combat doxorubicin resistance in breast cancer models by significantly enhancing cellular uptake while considerably decreasing efflux of the drug. In addition, the AmDM/DOX nanoparticles abolished significantly the toxicity related to the free drug. Collectively, our studies demonstrate that the drug delivery system based on nanomicelles formed with the self-assembling amphiphilic dendrimer constitutes a promising and effective drug carrier in cancer therapy. PMID:25713374

  3. Acquired multi-azole resistance in Candida tropicalis during persistent urinary tract infection in a dog.

    PubMed

    Álvarez-Pérez, Sergio; García, Marta E; Cutuli, María Teresa; Fermín, María Luisa; Daza, María Ángeles; Peláez, Teresa; Blanco, José L

    2016-03-01

    Multi-azole resistance acquisition by Candida tropicalis after prolonged antifungal therapy in a dog with urinary candidiasis is reported. Pre- and post-azole treatment isolates were clonally related and had identical silent mutations in the ERG11 gene, but the latter displayed increased azole minimum inhibitory concentrations. A novel frameshift mutation in ERG3 was found in some isolates recovered after resistance development, so it appears unlikely that this mutation is responsible for multi-azole resistance.

  4. Overcoming MITF-conferred drug resistance through dual AURKA/MAPK targeting in human melanoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Pathria, G; Garg, B; Borgdorff, V; Garg, K; Wagner, C; Superti-Furga, G; Wagner, S N

    2016-01-01

    MITF (microphthalmia-associated transcription factor) is a frequently amplified lineage-specific oncogene in human melanoma, whose role in intrinsic drug resistance has not been systematically investigated. Utilizing chemical inhibitors for major signaling pathways/cellular processes, we witness MITF as an elicitor of intrinsic drug resistance. To search kinase(s) targets able to bypass MITF-conferred drug resistance, we employed a multi-kinase inhibitor-directed chemical proteomics-based differential affinity screen in human melanocytes carrying ectopic MITF overexpression. A subsequent methodical interrogation informed mitotic Ser/Thr kinase Aurora Kinase A (AURKA) as a crucial regulator of melanoma cell proliferation and migration, independent of the underlying molecular alterations, including TP53 functional status and MITF levels. Crucially, assessing the efficacy of investigational AURKA inhibitor MLN8237, we pre-emptively witness the procurement of a molecular program consistent with acquired drug resistance. This involved induction of multiple MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) signaling pathway components and their downstream proliferation effectors (Cyclin D1 and c-JUN) and apoptotic regulators (MITF and Bcl-2). A concomitant AURKA/BRAF and AURKA/MEK targeting overcame MAPK signaling activation-associated resistance signature in BRAF- and NRAS-mutated melanomas, respectively, and elicited heightened anti-proliferative activity and apoptotic cell death. These findings reveal a previously unreported MAPK signaling-mediated mechanism of immediate resistance to AURKA inhibitors. These findings could bear significant implications for the application and the success of anti-AURKA approaches that have already entered phase-II clinical trials for human melanoma. PMID:26962685

  5. Effect and Safety of Shihogyejitang for Drug Resistant Childhood Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jinsoo; Son, Kwanghyun; Hwang, Gwiseo

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Herbal medicine has been widely used to treat drug resistant epilepsy. Shihogyejitang (SGT) has been commonly used to treat epilepsy. We investigated the effect and safety of SGT in children with drug resistant epilepsy. Design. We reviewed medical records of 54 patients with epilepsy, who failed to respond to at least two antiepileptic drugs and have been treated with SGT between April 2006 and June 2014 at the Department of Pediatric Neurology, I-Tomato Hospital, Korea. Effect was measured by the response rate, seizure-free rate, and retention rate at six months. We also checked adverse events, change in antiepileptic drugs use, and the variables related to the outcome. Results. Intent-to-treat analysis showed that, after six months, 44.4% showed a >50% seizure reduction, 24.1% including seizure-free, respectively, and 53.7% remained on SGT. Two adverse events were reported, mild skin rash and fever. Focal seizure type presented significantly more positive responses when compared with other seizure types at six months (p = 0.0284, Fisher's exact test). Conclusion. SGT is an effective treatment with excellent tolerability for drug resistant epilepsy patients. Our data provide evidence that SGT may be used as alternative treatment option when antiepileptic drug does not work in epilepsy children. PMID:27047568

  6. Determinants of Genetic Diversity of Spontaneous Drug Resistance in Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Couce, Alejandro; Rodríguez-Rojas, Alexandro; Blázquez, Jesús

    2016-07-01

    Any pathogen population sufficiently large is expected to harbor spontaneous drug-resistant mutants, often responsible for disease relapse after antibiotic therapy. It is seldom appreciated, however, that while larger populations harbor more mutants, the abundance distribution of these mutants is expected to be markedly uneven. This is because a larger population size allows early mutants to expand for longer, exacerbating their predominance in the final mutant subpopulation. Here, we investigate the extent to which this reduction in evenness can constrain the genetic diversity of spontaneous drug resistance in bacteria. Combining theory and experiments, we show that even small variations in growth rate between resistant mutants and the wild type result in orders-of-magnitude differences in genetic diversity. Indeed, only a slight fitness advantage for the mutant is enough to keep diversity low and independent of population size. These results have important clinical implications. Genetic diversity at antibiotic resistance loci can determine a population's capacity to cope with future challenges (i.e., second-line therapy). We thus revealed an unanticipated way in which the fitness effects of antibiotic resistance can affect the evolvability of pathogens surviving a drug-induced bottleneck. This insight will assist in the fight against multidrug-resistant microbes, as well as contribute to theories aimed at predicting cancer evolution.

  7. The analysis of HIV/AIDS drug-resistant on networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Maoxing

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we present an Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)/Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) drug-resistant model using an ordinary differential equation (ODE) model on scale-free networks. We derive the threshold for the epidemic to be zero in infinite scale-free network. We also prove the stability of disease-free equilibrium (DFE) and persistence of HIV/AIDS infection. The effects of two immunization schemes, including proportional scheme and targeted vaccination, are studied and compared. We find that targeted strategy compare favorably to a proportional condom using has prominent effect to control HIV/AIDS spread on scale-free networks.

  8. Hepatitis C Virus and Antiviral Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seungtaek; Han, Kwang-Hyub; Ahn, Sang Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Since its discovery in 1989, hepatitis C virus (HCV) has been intensively investigated to understand its biology and develop effective antiviral therapies. The efforts of the previous 25 years have resulted in a better understanding of the virus, and this was facilitated by the development of in vitro cell culture systems for HCV replication. Antiviral treatments and sustained virological responses have also improved from the early interferon monotherapy to the current all-oral regimens using direct-acting antivirals. However, antiviral resistance has become a critical issue in the treatment of chronic hepatitis C, similar to other chronic viral infections, and retreatment options following treatment failure have become important questions. Despite the clinical challenges in the management of chronic hepatitis C, substantial progress has been made in understanding HCV, which may facilitate the investigation of other closely related flaviviruses and lead to the development of antiviral agents against these human pathogens. PMID:27784846

  9. Proteomic Signatures of Acquired Letrozole Resistance in Breast Cancer: Suppressed Estrogen Signaling and Increased Cell Motility and Invasiveness*

    PubMed Central

    Tilghman, Syreeta L.; Townley, Ian; Zhong, Qiu; Carriere, Patrick P.; Zou, Jin; Llopis, Shawn D.; Preyan, Lynez C.; Williams, Christopher C.; Skripnikova, Elena; Bratton, Melyssa R.; Zhang, Qiang; Wang, Guangdi

    2013-01-01

    Aromatase inhibitors, such as letrozole, have become the first-line treatment for postmenopausal women with estrogen-dependent breast cancer. However, acquired resistance remains a major clinical obstacle. Previous studies demonstrated constitutive activation of the MAPK signaling, overexpression of HER2, and down-regulation of aromatase and ERα in letrozole-resistant breast cancer cells. Given the complex signaling network involved in letrozole-refractory breast cancer and the lack of effective treatment for hormone resistance, further investigation of aromatase inhibitor resistance by a novel systems biology approach may reveal previously unconsidered molecular changes that could be utilized as therapeutic targets. This study was undertaken to characterize for the first time global proteomic alterations occurring in a letrozole-resistant cell line. A quantitative proteomic analysis of the whole cell lysates of LTLT-Ca (resistant) versus AC-1 cells (sensitive) was performed to identify significant protein expression changes. A total of 1743 proteins were identified and quantified, of which 411 were significantly up-regulated and 452 significantly down-regulated (p < 0.05, fold change > 1.20). Bioinformatics analysis revealed that acquired letrozole resistance is associated with a hormone-independent, more aggressive phenotype. LTLT-Ca cells exhibited 84% and 138% increase in migration and invasion compared with the control cells. The ROCK inhibitor partially abrogated the enhanced migration and invasion of the letrozole-resistant cells. Flow cytometric analyses also demonstrated an increase in vimentin and twist expression in letrozole-resistance cells, suggesting an onset of epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT). Moreover, targeted gene expression arrays confirmed a 28-fold and sixfold up-regulation of EGFR and HER2, respectively, whereas ERα and pS2 were dramatically reduced by 28-fold and 1100-fold, respectively. Taken together, our study revealed global

  10. Genome Analysis of 17 Extensively Drug-Resistant Strains Reveals New Potential Mutations for Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Tarazona, D.; Galarza, M.; Borda, V.; Curitomay, R.

    2014-01-01

    We report the whole-genome sequence of an extensively drug-resistant (XDR) tuberculosis (TB) strain of Latin American–Mediterranean (LAM) lineage. This strain is phenotypically resistant to aminoglycosides, but carries no related mutations in rrs, tlyA, and eis. Through genome analysis comparison with 16 XDR strains, we found 218 non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) shared that could confer resistance. PMID:25081269

  11. [Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis: current epidemiology, therapeutic regimens, new drugs].

    PubMed

    Gómez-Ayerbe, C; Vivancos, M J; Moreno, S

    2016-09-01

    Multidrug and extensively resistant tuberculosis are especially severe forms of the disease for which no efficacious therapy exists in many cases. All the countries in the world have registered cases, although most of them are diagnosed in resource-limited countries from Asia, Africa and South America. For adequate treatment, first- and second-line antituberculosis drugs have to be judiciously used, but the development of new drugs with full activity, good tolerability and little toxicity is urgently needed. There are some drugs in development, some of which are already available through expanded-access programs. PMID:27608311

  12. Multiple transport systems mediate virus-induced acquired resistance to oxidative stress

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this paper, we report the phenomenon of acquired cross-tolerance to oxidative (UV-C and H2O2) stress in Nicotiana benthamiana plants infected with Potato virus X (PVX) and investigate the functional expression of transport systems in mediating this phenomenon. By combining multiple approaches, we...

  13. JNK Pathway Activation Modulates Acquired Resistance to EGFR/HER2-Targeted Therapies.

    PubMed

    Manole, Simin; Richards, Edward J; Meyer, Aaron S

    2016-09-15

    Resistance limits the effectiveness of receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK)-targeted therapies. Combination therapies targeting resistance mechanisms can considerably improve response, but will require an improved understanding of when particular combinations will be effective. One common form of resistance is bypass signaling, wherein RTKs not targeted by an inhibitor can direct reactivation of pathways essential for survival. Although this mechanism of resistance is well appreciated, it is unclear which downstream signaling events are responsible. Here, we apply a combined experimental- and statistical modeling-based approach to identify a set of pathway reactivation essential for RTK-mediated bypass resistance. Differences in the downstream pathway activation provided by particular RTKs lead to qualitative differences in the capacity of each receptor to drive therapeutic resistance. We identify and validate that the JNK pathway is activated during and strongly modulates bypass resistance. These results identify effective therapeutic combinations that block bypass-mediated resistance and provide a basic understanding of this network-level change in kinase dependence that will inform the design of prognostic assays for identifying effective therapeutic combinations in individual patients. Cancer Res; 76(18); 5219-28. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27450453

  14. Additional Drug Resistance of Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis in Patients in 9 Countries

    PubMed Central

    Dalton, Tracy; Ershova, Julia; Tupasi, Thelma; Caoili, Janice Campos; Van Der Walt, Martie; Kvasnovsky, Charlotte; Yagui, Martin; Bayona, Jaime; Contreras, Carmen; Leimane, Vaira; Via, Laura E.; Kim, HeeJin; Akksilp, Somsak; Kazennyy, Boris Y.; Volchenkov, Grigory V.; Jou, Ruwen; Kliiman, Kai; Demikhova, Olga V.; Cegielski, J. Peter

    2015-01-01

    Data from a large multicenter observational study of patients with multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR TB) were analyzed to simulate the possible use of 2 new approaches to treatment of MDR TB: a short (9-month) regimen and a bedaquiline-containing regimen. Of 1,254 patients, 952 (75.9%) had no resistance to fluoroquinolones and second-line injectable drugs and thus would qualify as candidates for the 9-month regimen; 302 (24.1%) patients with resistance to a fluoroquinolone or second-line injectable drug would qualify as candidates for a bedaquiline-containing regimen in accordance with published guidelines. Among candidates for the 9-month regimen, standardized drug-susceptibility tests demonstrated susceptibility to a median of 5 (interquartile range 5–6) drugs. Among candidates for bedaquiline, drug-susceptibility tests demonstrated susceptibility to a median of 3 (interquartile range 2–4) drugs; 26% retained susceptibility to <2 drugs. These data may assist national TB programs in planning to implement new drugs and drug regimens. PMID:25988299

  15. Biophysical principles predict fitness landscapes of drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, João V; Bershtein, Shimon; Li, Anna; Lozovsky, Elena R; Hartl, Daniel L; Shakhnovich, Eugene I

    2016-03-15

    Fitness landscapes of drug resistance constitute powerful tools to elucidate mutational pathways of antibiotic escape. Here, we developed a predictive biophysics-based fitness landscape of trimethoprim (TMP) resistance for Escherichia coli dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR). We investigated the activity, binding, folding stability, and intracellular abundance for a complete set of combinatorial DHFR mutants made out of three key resistance mutations and extended this analysis to DHFR originated from Chlamydia muridarum and Listeria grayi We found that the acquisition of TMP resistance via decreased drug affinity is limited by a trade-off in catalytic efficiency. Protein stability is concurrently affected by the resistant mutants, which precludes a precise description of fitness from a single molecular trait. Application of the kinetic flux theory provided an accurate model to predict resistance phenotypes (IC50) quantitatively from a unique combination of the in vitro protein molecular properties. Further, we found that a controlled modulation of the GroEL/ES chaperonins and Lon protease levels affects the intracellular steady-state concentration of DHFR in a mutation-specific manner, whereas IC50 is changed proportionally, as indeed predicted by the model. This unveils a molecular rationale for the pleiotropic role of the protein quality control machinery on the evolution of antibiotic resistance, which, as we illustrate here, may drastically confound the evolutionary outcome. These results provide a comprehensive quantitative genotype-phenotype map for the essential enzyme that serves as an important target of antibiotic and anticancer therapies.

  16. Biophysical principles predict fitness landscapes of drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, João V; Bershtein, Shimon; Li, Anna; Lozovsky, Elena R; Hartl, Daniel L; Shakhnovich, Eugene I

    2016-03-15

    Fitness landscapes of drug resistance constitute powerful tools to elucidate mutational pathways of antibiotic escape. Here, we developed a predictive biophysics-based fitness landscape of trimethoprim (TMP) resistance for Escherichia coli dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR). We investigated the activity, binding, folding stability, and intracellular abundance for a complete set of combinatorial DHFR mutants made out of three key resistance mutations and extended this analysis to DHFR originated from Chlamydia muridarum and Listeria grayi We found that the acquisition of TMP resistance via decreased drug affinity is limited by a trade-off in catalytic efficiency. Protein stability is concurrently affected by the resistant mutants, which precludes a precise description of fitness from a single molecular trait. Application of the kinetic flux theory provided an accurate model to predict resistance phenotypes (IC50) quantitatively from a unique combination of the in vitro protein molecular properties. Further, we found that a controlled modulation of the GroEL/ES chaperonins and Lon protease levels affects the intracellular steady-state concentration of DHFR in a mutation-specific manner, whereas IC50 is changed proportionally, as indeed predicted by the model. This unveils a molecular rationale for the pleiotropic role of the protein quality control machinery on the evolution of antibiotic resistance, which, as we illustrate here, may drastically confound the evolutionary outcome. These results provide a comprehensive quantitative genotype-phenotype map for the essential enzyme that serves as an important target of antibiotic and anticancer therapies. PMID:26929328

  17. Mathematical modeling of drug resistance due to KRAS mutation in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Sameen, Sheema; Barbuti, Roberto; Milazzo, Paolo; Cerone, Antonio; Del Re, Marzia; Danesi, Romano

    2016-01-21

    The most challenging task in colorectal cancer research nowadays is to understand the development of acquired resistance to anti-EGFR drugs. The key reason for this problem is the KRAS mutations appearance after the treatment with monoclonal antibodies (moAb). Here we present a mathematical model for the analysis of KRAS mutations behavior in colorectal cancer with respect to moAb treatments. To evaluate the drug performance we have developed equations for two types of tumors cells, KRAS mutated and KRAS wild-type. Both tumor cell populations were treated with a combination of moAb and chemotherapy drugs. It was observed that even the minimal initial concentration of KRAS mutation before the treatment has the ability to make the tumor refractory to the treatment. Minor population of KRAS mutations has strong influence on large number of wild-type cells as well rendering them resistant to chemotherapy. Patient׳s immune responses are specifically taken into considerations and it is found that, in case of KRAS mutations, the immune strength does not affect medication efficacy. Finally, cetuximab (moAb) and irinotecan (chemotherapy) drugs are analyzed as first-line treatment of colorectal cancer with few KRAS mutated cells. Results show that this combined treatment could be only effective for patients with high immune strengths and it should not be recommended as first-line therapy for patients with moderate immune strengths or weak immune systems because of a potential risk of relapse, with KRAS mutant cells acquired resistance involved with them. PMID:26551156

  18. Impact of HIV type 1 drug resistance mutations and phenotypic resistance profile on virologic response to salvage therapy.

    PubMed

    Ross, L; Liao, Q; Gao, H; Pham, S; Tolson, J; Hertogs, K; Larder, B; Saag, M S

    2001-10-10

    This study examines the association between presence of drug resistance mutations and phenotypic resistance at baseline to virologic response to salvage therapy in a community setting. The study population consisted of 58 antiretroviral drug-experienced patients with HIV-1 infection who had recently switched therapy because of virologic failure. Drug resistance mutations in the reverse transcriptase- and protease-coding regions and phenotypic susceptibility to 13 antiretroviral drugs were assessed at baseline. Plasma HIV-1 RNA levels were assessed at baseline and at subsequent clinic visits. Results showed that three variables were significant in predicting virologic response: HIV-1 levels at baseline, number of protease mutations, and phenotypic sensitivity score for the regimen at baseline. For four drugs there was a significant association between the presence of specific drug resistance mutations and >10-fold phenotypic resistance to that drug. With phenotypic resistance defined as >4-fold resistance, the association between specific drug resistance mutations and phenotypic resistance was significant for seven drugs. Overall, these data show that phenotypic susceptibility and absence of drug resistance mutations, particularly protease mutations, are significant predictors of virologic response. For several drugs, specific combinations of drug resistance mutations are associated with decreased phenotypic susceptibility and might provide useful clinical guidelines in selecting therapeutic options.

  19. "Applied" Aspects of the Drug Resistance Strategies Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hecht, Michael L.; Miller-Day, Michelle A.

    2010-01-01

    This paper discusses the applied aspects of our Drug Resistance Strategies Project. We argue that a new definitional distinction is needed to expand the notion of "applied" from the traditional notion of utilizing theory, which we call "applied.1," in order to consider theory-grounded, theory testing and theory developing applied research. We…

  20. ETS1 inactivation causes innate drug resistance to EGFR inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Tetsu, Osamu; Phuchareon, Janyaporn; Eisele, David W; McCormick, Frank

    2016-03-01

    Mutations in epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) are found in approximately 10% of lung cancers. Treatment with EGFR inhibitors, although promising, has surprisingly resulted in greater than 90% tumor reduction in only 5% of cases, prompting us to investigate the mechanism of innate drug resistance. PMID:27308601

  1. Determination of drug resistance and virus typology in HIV-1-positive pediatric patients in Istanbul, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Yoldaş, Ozlem; Ağaçfidan, Ali; Lübke, Nadine; Somer, Ayper; Hançerli, Selda; Verheyen, Jens; Kaiser, Rolf; Akgül, Baki

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the prevalence of drug resistance of HIV-1 in pediatric patients from Istanbul, Turkey. Genotypic drug resistance testing revealed transmission of drug resistance from mother to child in 20%. Due to rising numbers of children with HIV-1, baseline resistance testing is recommended for Turkey.

  2. Modeling mass drug treatment and resistant filaria disease transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuady, A. M.; Nuraini, N.; Soewono, E.; Tasman, H.; Supriatna, A. K.

    2014-03-01

    It has been indicated that a long term application of combined mass drug treatment may contribute to the development of drug resistance in lymphatic filariasis. This phenomenon is not well understood due to the complexity of filaria life cycle. In this paper we formulate a mathematical model for the spread of mass drug resistant in a filaria endemic region. The model is represented in a 13-dimensional Host-Vector system. The basic reproductive ratio of the system which is obtained from the next generation matrix, and analysis of stability of both the disease free equilibrium and the coexistence equilibria are shown. Numerical simulation for long term dynamics for possible field conditions is also shown.

  3. Mechanisms of Drug Resistance in Relapse and Refractory Multiple Myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Wen-Chi; Lin, Sheng-Fung

    2015-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a hematological malignancy that remains incurable because most patients eventually relapse or become refractory to current treatments. Although the treatments have improved, the major problem in MM is resistance to therapy. Clonal evolution of MM cells and bone marrow microenvironment changes contribute to drug resistance. Some mechanisms affect both MM cells and microenvironment, including the up- and downregulation of microRNAs and programmed death factor 1 (PD-1)/PD-L1 interaction. Here, we review the pathogenesis of MM cells and bone marrow microenvironment and highlight possible drug resistance mechanisms. We also review a potential molecular targeting treatment and immunotherapy for patients with refractory or relapse MM. PMID:26649299

  4. Recall of acquired cellular resistance in mice by antigens from killed Brucella.

    PubMed

    Halliburton, B L; Hinsdill, R D

    1972-01-01

    Mice infected with Brucella abortus 19 were challenged intravenously with Listeria monocytogenes. Spleen assays to determine the number of viable Listeria cells present revealed that these mice were highly resistant to Listeria when challenged on day 17 of the Brucella infection. Resistance was absent in mice challenged on the 5th day and was declining in mice challenged on the 33rd day. Resistance could not be detected by day 49 of the Brucella infection but could be recalled by the injection of antigens from smooth B. abortus 2308. Thus, extracted antigens appeared to be as effective in recall as the live cells used in earlier studies. Similar injections of extracts from rough B. abortus 45/20, or from B. ovis REO 198, were also effective in recalling resistance; this suggests that the smooth surface agglutinogen may be relatively unimportant in recall. PMID:4632467

  5. Drug Resistance Characteristics and Macrolide-Resistant Mechanisms of Streptococcus pneumoniae in Wenzhou City, China

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Dakang; Sun, Zheng; Luo, Xinhua; Liu, Shuangchun; Yu, Lianhua; Qu, Ying; Yang, Jinhong; Yu, Jian; Li, Xiangyang; Zhang, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Background Streptococcus pneumoniae (SP) is a Gram-positive, alpha-hemolytic, facultative anaerobic member of the genus Streptococcus. The erythromycin-resistant methylase (erm) gene and macrolide efflux (mef) gene are the 2 main genes that can mediate SP. Transposon (Tn) also plays an important role in the collection and metastasis of the gene. In the present study we investigated the drug resistance characteristics and the macrolide-resistant mechanisms of SP in Wenzhou City, China. Material/Methods Sixty-eight strains of SP were isolated from sputum samples of hospitalized children in the Second Affiliated Hospital of Wenzhou Medical University. These strains were analyzed using antimicrobial susceptibility tests to determine their drug resistance to 10 kinds of antibacterials. Macrolide-resistant phenotypes were identified using K-B method. PCR method was used to analyze the erm B gene, mef A gene, and int Tn gene. Results Drug resistance rates of 68 strains of SP were 98.5%, 100.0%, 63.2%, 52.9%, 94.1%, 89.7%, 0.0%, 0.0%, 16.2%, and 14.7% for clindamycin, erythromycin, penicillin G, cefotaxime, tetracycline, sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim, levofloxacin, vancomycin, chloramphenicol, and amoxicillin, respectively. Total detection rates of the erm B gene, mef A gene, and int Tn gene were 98.5%, 91.2%, and 100.0%, respectively. Conclusions SP shows significant multi-drug resistance in Wenzhou City, whereas there is no clinical value of macrolides antibiotics for SP. cMLSB mediated by erm B gene is the most predominant phenotype among macrolide-resistant SP. The int Tn gene may play an important role in horizontal transfer and clonal dissemination of SP drug resistance genes in Wenzhou City. PMID:27483416

  6. Drug Resistance Characteristics and Macrolide-Resistant Mechanisms of Streptococcus pneumoniae in Wenzhou City, China.

    PubMed

    Hu, Dakang; Sun, Zheng; Luo, Xinhua; Liu, Shuangchun; Yu, Lianhua; Qu, Ying; Yang, Jinhong; Yu, Jian; Li, Xiangyang; Zhang, Jin

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Streptococcus pneumoniae (SP) is a Gram-positive, alpha-hemolytic, facultative anaerobic member of the genus Streptococcus. The erythromycin-resistant methylase (erm) gene and macrolide efflux (mef) gene are the 2 main genes that can mediate SP. Transposon (Tn) also plays an important role in the collection and metastasis of the gene. In the present study we investigated the drug resistance characteristics and the macrolide-resistant mechanisms of SP in Wenzhou City, China. MATERIAL AND METHODS Sixty-eight strains of SP were isolated from sputum samples of hospitalized children in the Second Affiliated Hospital of Wenzhou Medical University. These strains were analyzed using antimicrobial susceptibility tests to determine their drug resistance to 10 kinds of antibacterials. Macrolide-resistant phenotypes were identified using K-B method. PCR method was used to analyze the erm B gene, mef A gene, and int Tn gene. RESULTS Drug resistance rates of 68 strains of SP were 98.5%, 100.0%, 63.2%, 52.9%, 94.1%, 89.7%, 0.0%, 0.0%, 16.2%, and 14.7% for clindamycin, erythromycin, penicillin G, cefotaxime, tetracycline, sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim, levofloxacin, vancomycin, chloramphenicol, and amoxicillin, respectively. Total detection rates of the erm B gene, mef A gene, and int Tn gene were 98.5%, 91.2%, and 100.0%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS SP shows significant multi-drug resistance in Wenzhou City, whereas there is no clinical value of macrolides antibiotics for SP. cMLSB mediated by erm B gene is the most predominant phenotype among macrolide-resistant SP. The int Tn gene may play an important role in horizontal transfer and clonal dissemination of SP drug resistance genes in Wenzhou City. PMID:27483416

  7. Determination of Acquired Resistance Profiles of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates and Characterization of an Effective Bacteriocin-Like Inhibitory Substance (BLIS) Against These Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Shokri, Dariush; Rabbani Khorasgani, Mohammad; Zaghian, Saeideh; Fatemi, Seyed Masih; Mohkam, Milad; Ghasemi, Younes; Taheri-Kafrani, Asghar

    2016-01-01

    Background The emergence of pan-drug resistant strains (PDR) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa has led to renewed efforts to identify alternative agents, such as bacteriocins and bacteriocin-like inhibitory substances (BLISs). Objectives The aims of this study were to determine the acquired resistance profiles of multidrug-resistant (MDR), extensively drug-resistant (XDR), and PDR P. aeruginosa isolates based on the revised definitions of the CDC and ECDC and to screen and characterize effective BLISs against these isolates. Patients and Materials In a cross-sectional study, 96 P. aeruginosa strains were isolated during a 12-month period. The resistance profiles of these isolates were determined as MDR, XDR, and PDR, and the data were analyzed using WHONET5.6 software. A BLIS against the P. aeruginosa strains was characterized based on its physicochemical properties, size, growth curves, and production profiles. Results Among the 96 isolates of P. aeruginosa, 2 (2.1%), 94 (97.9%), and 63 (65.6%) were non-MDR, MDR, and XDR, respectively, and 1 (1.1%) was PDR. The most effective antibiotics against these isolates were polymyxins and fosfomycin. A BLIS isolated from the P. aeruginosa DSH22 strain had potent activity against 92 (95.8%) of the 96 isolates. The BLIS was heat stable, (up to 100°C for 10 min), UV stable, and active within a pH range of 3 - 9. The activity of BLIS disappeared when treated with trypsin, proteinase K, and pepsin, indicating its proteinous nature. Based on its size (25 kDa), the BLIS may belong to the large colicin-like bacteriocin family. BLIS production started in the midexponential phase of growth, and the maximum level (2700 AU/mL) occurred in the late-stationary phase after 25 hours of incubation at 30°C. Conclusions This BLIS with broad-spectrum activity may be a potential agent for the treatment or control of drug-resistant strains of P. aeruginosa infection. PMID:27800131

  8. Update on the prevention and control of community-acquired meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA).

    PubMed

    Skov, Robert; Christiansen, Keryn; Dancer, Stephanie J; Daum, Robert S; Dryden, Matthew; Huang, Yhu-Chering; Lowy, Franklin D

    2012-03-01

    The rapid dissemination of community-acquired meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) since the early 2000s and the appearance of new successful lineages is a matter of concern. The burden of these infections varies widely between different groups of individuals and in different regions of the world. Estimating the total burden of disease is therefore problematic. Skin and soft-tissue infections, often in otherwise healthy young individuals, are the most common clinical manifestation of these infections. The antibiotic susceptibilities of these strains also vary, although they are often more susceptible to 'traditional' antibiotics than related hospital-acquired strains. Preventing the dissemination of these organisms throughout the general population requires a multifaceted approach, including screening and decolonisation, general hygiene and cleaning measures, antibiotic stewardship programmes and, in the future, vaccination. The current evidence on the prevention and control of CA-MRSA is appraised and summarised in this review.

  9. Southern African Treatment Resistance Network (SATuRN) RegaDB HIV drug resistance and clinical management database: supporting patient management, surveillance and research in southern Africa.

    PubMed

    Manasa, Justen; Lessells, Richard; Rossouw, Theresa; Naidu, Kevindra; Van Vuuren, Cloete; Goedhals, Dominique; van Zyl, Gert; Bester, Armand; Skingsley, Andrew; Stott, Katharine; Danaviah, Siva; Chetty, Terusha; Singh, Lavanya; Moodley, Pravi; Iwuji, Collins; McGrath, Nuala; Seebregts, Christopher J; de Oliveira, Tulio

    2014-01-01

    Substantial amounts of data have been generated from patient management and academic exercises designed to better understand the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) epidemic and design interventions to control it. A number of specialized databases have been designed to manage huge data sets from HIV cohort, vaccine, host genomic and drug resistance studies. Besides databases from cohort studies, most of the online databases contain limited curated data and are thus sequence repositories. HIV drug resistance has been shown to have a great potential to derail the progress made thus far through antiretroviral therapy. Thus, a lot of resources have been invested in generating drug resistance data for patient management and surveillance purposes. Unfortunately, most of the data currently available relate to subtype B even though >60% of the epidemic is caused by HIV-1 subtype C. A consortium of clinicians, scientists, public health experts and policy markers working in southern Africa came together and formed a network, the Southern African Treatment and Resistance Network (SATuRN), with the aim of increasing curated HIV-1 subtype C and tuberculosis drug resistance data. This article describes the HIV-1 data curation process using the SATuRN Rega database. The data curation is a manual and time-consuming process done by clinical, laboratory and data curation specialists. Access to the highly curated data sets is through applications that are reviewed by the SATuRN executive committee. Examples of research outputs from the analysis of the curated data include trends in the level of transmitted drug resistance in South Africa, analysis of the levels of acquired resistance among patients failing therapy and factors associated with the absence of genotypic evidence of drug resistance among patients failing therapy. All these studies have been important for informing first- and second-line therapy. This database is a free password-protected open source database available on

  10. Troglitazone reverses the multiple drug resistance phenotype in cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Gerald F; Juurlink, Bernhard HJ; Harkness, Troy AA

    2009-01-01

    A major problem in treating cancer is the development of drug resistance. We previously demonstrated doxorubicin (DOX) resistance in K562 human leukemia cells that was associated with upregulation of glyoxalase 1 (GLO-1) and histone H3 expression. The thiazolidinedione troglitazone (TRG) downregulated GLO-1 expression and further upregulated histone H3 expression and post-translational modifications in these cells, leading to a regained sensitivity to DOX. Given the pleiotropic effects of epigenetic changes in cancer development, we hypothesized that TRG may downregulate the multiple drug resistance (MDR) phenotype in a variety of cancer cells. To test this, MCF7 human breast cancer cells and K562 cells were cultured in the presence of low-dose DOX to establish DOX-resistant cell lines (K562/DOX and MCF7/DOX). The MDR phenotype was confirmed by Western blot analysis of the 170 kDa P-glycoprotein (Pgp) drug efflux pump multiple drug resistance protein 1 (MDR-1), and the breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP). TRG markedly decreased expression of both MDR-1 and BCRP in these cells, resulting in sensitivity to DOX. Silencing of MDR-1 expression also sensitized MCF7/DOX cells to DOX. Use of the specific and irreversible peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) inhibitor GW9662 in the nanomolar range not only demonstrated that the action of TRG on MCF/DOX was PPARγ-independent, but indicated that PPARγ may play a role in the MDR phenotype, which is antagonized by TRG. We conclude that TRG is potentially a useful adjunct therapy in chemoresistant cancers. PMID:19920924

  11. Niclosamide overcomes acquired resistance to erlotinib through suppression of STAT3 in non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Rui; Hu, Zhongliang; Sun, Shi-Yong; Chen, Zhuo G.; Owonikoko, Taofeek K.; Sica, Gabriel L.; Ramalingam, Suresh S.; Curran, Walter J.; Khuri, Fadlo R.; Deng, Xingming

    2013-01-01

    The emergence of resistance to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitor therapy is a major clinical problem for patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The mechanisms underlying tumor resistance to inhibitors of the kinase activity of EGFR are not fully understood. Here we found that inhibition of EGFR by erlotinib induces STAT3 phosphorylation at Tyr705 in association with increased Bcl2/Bcl-XL at both mRNA and protein levels in various human lung cancer cells. PTPMeg2 is a physiologic STAT3 phosphatase that can directly dephosphorylate STAT3 at the Tyr705 site. Intriguingly, treatment of cells with erlotinib results in downregulation of PTPMeg2 without activation of STAT3 kinases (i.e. JAK2 or c-Src), suggesting that erlotinib enhanced phosphorylation of STAT3 may occur, at least in part, from suppression of PTPMeg2 expression. Since elevated levels of phosphorylated STAT3 (pSTAT3), Bcl2 and Bcl-XL were observed in erlotinib-resistant lung cancer (HCC827/ER) cells as compared to erlotinib-sensitive parental HCC827 cells, we postulate that erlotinib-activated STAT3/Bcl2/Bcl-XL survival pathway may contribute to acquired resistance to erlotinib. Both blockage of Tyr705 phosphorylation of STAT3 by niclosamide and depletion of STAT3 by RNA interference in HCC827/ER cells reverses erlotinib resistance. Niclosamide in combination with erlotinib potently represses erlotinib-resistant lung cancer xenografts in association with increased apoptosis in tumor tissues, suggesting that niclosamide can restore sensitivity to erlotinib. These findings uncover a novel mechanism of erlotinib resistance and provide a novel approach to overcome resistance by blocking the STAT3/Bcl2/Bcl-XL survival signaling pathway in human lung cancer. PMID:23894143

  12. Blockade of EGFR and MEK intercepts heterogeneous mechanisms of acquired resistance to anti-EGFR therapies in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Misale, Sandra; Arena, Sabrina; Lamba, Simona; Siravegna, Giulia; Lallo, Alice; Hobor, Sebastijan; Russo, Mariangela; Buscarino, Michela; Lazzari, Luca; Sartore-Bianchi, Andrea; Bencardino, Katia; Amatu, Alessio; Lauricella, Calogero; Valtorta, Emanuele; Siena, Salvatore; Di Nicolantonio, Federica; Bardelli, Alberto

    2014-02-19

    Colorectal cancers (CRCs) that are sensitive to the anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) antibodies cetuximab or panitumumab almost always develop resistance within several months of initiating therapy. We report the emergence of polyclonal KRAS, NRAS, and BRAF mutations in CRC cells with acquired resistance to EGFR blockade. Regardless of the genetic alterations, resistant cells consistently displayed mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation, which persisted after EGFR blockade. Inhibition of MEK1/2 alone failed to impair the growth of resistant cells in vitro and in vivo. An RNA interference screen demonstrated that suppression of EGFR, together with silencing of MEK1/2, was required to hamper the proliferation of resistant cells. Indeed, concomitant pharmacological blockade of MEK and EGFR induced prolonged ERK inhibition and severely impaired the growth of resistant tumor cells. Heterogeneous and concomitant mutations in KRAS and NRAS were also detected in plasma samples from patients who developed resistance to anti-EGFR antibodies. A mouse xenotransplant from a CRC patient who responded and subsequently relapsed upon EGFR therapy showed exquisite sensitivity to combinatorial treatment with MEK and EGFR inhibitors. Collectively, these results identify genetically distinct mechanisms that mediate secondary resistance to anti-EGFR therapies, all of which reactivate ERK signaling. These observations provide a rational strategy to overcome the multifaceted clonal heterogeneity that emerges when tumors are treated with targeted agents. We propose that MEK inhibitors, in combination with cetuximab or panitumumab, should be tested in CRC patients who become refractory to anti-EGFR therapies.

  13. MicroRNA-138 promotes acquired alkylator resistance in glioblastoma by targeting the Bcl-2-interacting mediator BIM

    PubMed Central

    Stojcheva, Nina; Schechtmann, Gennadi; Sass, Steffen; Roth, Patrick; Florea, Ana-Maria; Stefanski, Anja; Stühler, Kai; Wolter, Marietta; Müller, Nikola S.; Theis, Fabian J.; Weller, Michael; Reifenberger, Guido; Happold, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma is the most aggressive brain tumor in adults with a median survival below 12 months in population-based studies. The main reason for tumor recurrence and progression is constitutive or acquired resistance to the standard of care of surgical resection followed by radiotherapy with concomitant and adjuvant temozolomide (TMZ/RT→TMZ). Here, we investigated the role of microRNA (miRNA) alterations as mediators of alkylator resistance in glioblastoma cells. Using microarray-based miRNA expression profiling of parental and TMZ-resistant cultures of three human glioma cell lines, we identified a set of differentially expressed miRNA candidates. From these, we selected miR-138 for further functional analyses as this miRNA was not only upregulated in TMZ-resistant versus parental cells, but also showed increased expression in vivo in recurrent glioblastoma tissue samples after TMZ/RT→TMZ treatment. Transient transfection of miR-138 mimics in glioma cells with low basal miR-138 expression increased glioma cell proliferation. Moreover, miR-138 overexpression increased TMZ resistance in long-term glioblastoma cell lines and glioma initiating cell cultures. The apoptosis regulator BIM was identified as a direct target of miR-138, and its silencing mediated the induced TMZ resistance phenotype. Altered sensitivity to apoptosis played only a minor role in this resistance mechanism. Instead, we identified the induction of autophagy to be regulated downstream of the miR-138/BIM axis and to promote cell survival following TMZ exposure. Our data thus define miR-138 as a glioblastoma cell survival-promoting miRNA associated with resistance to TMZ therapy in vitro and with tumor progression in vivo. PMID:26887050

  14. Balancing drug resistance and growth rates via compensatory mutations in the Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Ines; Gabryszewski, Stanislaw J.; Johnston, Geoffrey L.; Dhingra, Satish K.; Ecker, Andrea; Lewis, Rebecca E.; de Almeida, Mariana Justino; Straimer, Judith; Henrich, Philipp H.; Palatulan, Eugene; Johnson, David J.; Coburn-Flynn, Olivia; Sanchez, Cecilia; Lehane, Adele M.; Lanzer, Michael; Fidock, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The widespread use of chloroquine to treat Plasmodium falciparum infections has resulted in the selection and dissemination of variant haplotypes of the primary resistance determinant PfCRT. These haplotypes have encountered drug pressure and within-host competition with wild-type drug-sensitive parasites. To examine these selective forces in vitro, we genetically engineered P. falciparum to express geographically diverse PfCRT haplotypes. Variant alleles from the Philippines (PH1 and PH2, which differ solely by the C72S mutation) both conferred a moderate gain of chloroquine resistance and a reduction in growth rates in vitro. Of the two, PH2 showed higher IC50 values, contrasting with reduced growth. Furthermore, a highly mutated pfcrt allele from Cambodia (Cam734) conferred moderate chloroquine resistance and enhanced growth rates, when tested against wild-type pfcrt in co-culture competition assays. These three alleles mediated cross-resistance to amodiaquine, an antimalarial drug widely used in Africa. Each allele, along with the globally prevalent Dd2 and 7G8 alleles, rendered parasites more susceptible to lumefantrine, the partner drug used in the leading first-line artemisinin-based combination therapy. These data reveal ongoing region-specific evolution of PfCRT that impacts drug susceptibility and relative fitness in settings of mixed infections, and raise important considerations about optimal agents to treat chloroquine-resistant malaria. PMID:25898991

  15. Balancing drug resistance and growth rates via compensatory mutations in the Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Ines; Gabryszewski, Stanislaw J; Johnston, Geoffrey L; Dhingra, Satish K; Ecker, Andrea; Lewis, Rebecca E; de Almeida, Mariana Justino; Straimer, Judith; Henrich, Philipp P; Palatulan, Eugene; Johnson, David J; Coburn-Flynn, Olivia; Sanchez, Cecilia; Lehane, Adele M; Lanzer, Michael; Fidock, David A

    2015-07-01

    The widespread use of chloroquine to treat Plasmodium falciparum infections has resulted in the selection and dissemination of variant haplotypes of the primary resistance determinant PfCRT. These haplotypes have encountered drug pressure and within-host competition with wild-type drug-sensitive parasites. To examine these selective forces in vitro, we genetically engineered P. falciparum to express geographically diverse PfCRT haplotypes. Variant alleles from the Philippines (PH1 and PH2, which differ solely by the C72S mutation) both conferred a moderate gain of chloroquine resistance and a reduction in growth rates in vitro. Of the two, PH2 showed higher IC50 values, contrasting with reduced growth. Furthermore, a highly mutated pfcrt allele from Cambodia (Cam734) conferred moderate chloroquine resistance and enhanced growth rates, when tested against wild-type pfcrt in co-culture competition assays. These three alleles mediated cross-resistance to amodiaquine, an antimalarial drug widely used in Africa. Each allele, along with the globally prevalent Dd2 and 7G8 alleles, rendered parasites more susceptible to lumefantrine, the partner drug used in the leading first-line artemisinin-based combination therapy. These data reveal ongoing region-specific evolution of PfCRT that impacts drug susceptibility and relative fitness in settings of mixed infections, and raise important considerations about optimal agents to treat chloroquine-resistant malaria.

  16. Mechanisms of acquired resistance to insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor inhibitor in MCF-7 breast cancer cell line.

    PubMed

    Ekyalongo, Roudy Chiminch; Mukohara, Toru; Kataoka, Yu; Funakoshi, Yohei; Tomioka, Hideo; Kiyota, Naomi; Fujiwara, Yutaka; Minami, Hironobu

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to clarify the mechanism of acquired resistance to the insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R) tyrosine kinase inhibitor NVP-AEW541. We developed an acquired resistant model by continuously exposing MCF-7 breast cancer cells to NVP-AEW541 (MCF-7-NR). MCF-7 and MCF-7-NR were comparatively analyzed for cell signaling and cell growth. While phosphorylation of Akt was completely inhibited by 3 μM NVP-AEW541 in both MCF-7 and MCF-7-NR, phosphorylation of S6K remained high only in MCF-7-NR, suggesting a disconnection between Akt and S6K in MCF-7-NR. Consistently, the mTOR inhibitor everolimus inhibited phosphorylation of S6K and cell growth equally in both lines. Screening of both lines for phosphorylation of 42 receptor tyrosine kinases with and without NVP-AEW541 showed that Tyro3 phosphorylation remained high only in MCF-7-NR. Protein expression of Tyro3 was found to be higher in MCF-7-NR than in MCF-7. Gene silencing of Tyro3 using siRNA resulted in reduced cell growth and cyclin D1 expression in both lines. While Tyro3 expression was inhibited by NVP-AEW541 and everolimus in MCF-7, it was reduced only by everolimus in MCF-7-NR. These findings suggested that cyclin D1 expression was regulated in a S6K/Tyro3-dependent manner in both MCF-7 and MCF-7-NR, and that the disconnection between IGF-1R/Akt and S6K may enable MCF-7-NR to keep cyclin D1 high in the presence of NVP-AEW541. In summary, acquired resistance to NVP-AEW541 appears to result from IGF-1R/Akt-independent activation of S6K and expression of Tyro3 and cyclin D1.

  17. Bacterial Etiology and Antibiotic Resistance Profile of Community-Acquired Urinary Tract Infections in a Cameroonian City.

    PubMed

    Nzalie, Rolf Nyah-Tuku; Gonsu, Hortense Kamga; Koulla-Shiro, Sinata

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Community-acquired urinary tract infections (CAUTIs) are usually treated empirically. Geographical variations in etiologic agents and their antibiotic sensitivity patterns are common. Knowledge of antibiotic resistance trends is important for improving evidence-based recommendations for empirical treatment of UTIs. Our aim was to determine the major bacterial etiologies of CAUTIs and their antibiotic resistance patterns in a cosmopolitan area of Cameroon for comparison with prescription practices of local physicians. Methods. We performed a cross-sectional descriptive study at two main hospitals in Yaoundé, collecting a clean-catch mid-stream urine sample from 92 patients having a clinical diagnosis of UTI. The empirical antibiotherapy was noted, and identification of bacterial species was done on CLED agar; antibiotic susceptibility testing was performed using the Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method. Results. A total of 55 patients had samples positive for a UTI. Ciprofloxacin and amoxicillin/clavulanic acid were the most empirically prescribed antibiotics (30.9% and 23.6%, resp.); bacterial isolates showed high prevalence of resistance to both compounds. Escherichia coli (50.9%) was the most common pathogen, followed by Klebsiella pneumoniae (16.4%). Prevalence of resistance for ciprofloxacin was higher compared to newer quinolones. Conclusions. E. coli and K. pneumoniae were the predominant bacterial etiologies; the prevalence of resistance to commonly prescribed antibiotics was high. PMID:27667998

  18. Bacterial Etiology and Antibiotic Resistance Profile of Community-Acquired Urinary Tract Infections in a Cameroonian City

    PubMed Central

    Gonsu, Hortense Kamga; Koulla-Shiro, Sinata

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Community-acquired urinary tract infections (CAUTIs) are usually treated empirically. Geographical variations in etiologic agents and their antibiotic sensitivity patterns are common. Knowledge of antibiotic resistance trends is important for improving evidence-based recommendations for empirical treatment of UTIs. Our aim was to determine the major bacterial etiologies of CAUTIs and their antibiotic resistance patterns in a cosmopolitan area of Cameroon for comparison with prescription practices of local physicians. Methods. We performed a cross-sectional descriptive study at two main hospitals in Yaoundé, collecting a clean-catch mid-stream urine sample from 92 patients having a clinical diagnosis of UTI. The empirical antibiotherapy was noted, and identification of bacterial species was done on CLED agar; antibiotic susceptibility testing was performed using the Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method. Results. A total of 55 patients had samples positive for a UTI. Ciprofloxacin and amoxicillin/clavulanic acid were the most empirically prescribed antibiotics (30.9% and 23.6%, resp.); bacterial isolates showed high prevalence of resistance to both compounds. Escherichia coli (50.9%) was the most common pathogen, followed by Klebsiella pneumoniae (16.4%). Prevalence of resistance for ciprofloxacin was higher compared to newer quinolones. Conclusions. E. coli and K. pneumoniae were the predominant bacterial etiologies; the prevalence of resistance to commonly prescribed antibiotics was high.

  19. Bacterial Etiology and Antibiotic Resistance Profile of Community-Acquired Urinary Tract Infections in a Cameroonian City

    PubMed Central

    Gonsu, Hortense Kamga; Koulla-Shiro, Sinata

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Community-acquired urinary tract infections (CAUTIs) are usually treated empirically. Geographical variations in etiologic agents and their antibiotic sensitivity patterns are common. Knowledge of antibiotic resistance trends is important for improving evidence-based recommendations for empirical treatment of UTIs. Our aim was to determine the major bacterial etiologies of CAUTIs and their antibiotic resistance patterns in a cosmopolitan area of Cameroon for comparison with prescription practices of local physicians. Methods. We performed a cross-sectional descriptive study at two main hospitals in Yaoundé, collecting a clean-catch mid-stream urine sample from 92 patients having a clinical diagnosis of UTI. The empirical antibiotherapy was noted, and identification of bacterial species was done on CLED agar; antibiotic susceptibility testing was performed using the Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method. Results. A total of 55 patients had samples positive for a UTI. Ciprofloxacin and amoxicillin/clavulanic acid were the most empirically prescribed antibiotics (30.9% and 23.6%, resp.); bacterial isolates showed high prevalence of resistance to both compounds. Escherichia coli (50.9%) was the most common pathogen, followed by Klebsiella pneumoniae (16.4%). Prevalence of resistance for ciprofloxacin was higher compared to newer quinolones. Conclusions. E. coli and K. pneumoniae were the predominant bacterial etiologies; the prevalence of resistance to commonly prescribed antibiotics was high. PMID:27667998

  20. Bacterial Etiology and Antibiotic Resistance Profile of Community-Acquired Urinary Tract Infections in a Cameroonian City.

    PubMed

    Nzalie, Rolf Nyah-Tuku; Gonsu, Hortense Kamga; Koulla-Shiro, Sinata

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Community-acquired urinary tract infections (CAUTIs) are usually treated empirically. Geographical variations in etiologic agents and their antibiotic sensitivity patterns are common. Knowledge of antibiotic resistance trends is important for improving evidence-based recommendations for empirical treatment of UTIs. Our aim was to determine the major bacterial etiologies of CAUTIs and their antibiotic resistance patterns in a cosmopolitan area of Cameroon for comparison with prescription practices of local physicians. Methods. We performed a cross-sectional descriptive study at two main hospitals in Yaoundé, collecting a clean-catch mid-stream urine sample from 92 patients having a clinical diagnosis of UTI. The empirical antibiotherapy was noted, and identification of bacterial species was done on CLED agar; antibiotic susceptibility testing was performed using the Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method. Results. A total of 55 patients had samples positive for a UTI. Ciprofloxacin and amoxicillin/clavulanic acid were the most empirically prescribed antibiotics (30.9% and 23.6%, resp.); bacterial isolates showed high prevalence of resistance to both compounds. Escherichia coli (50.9%) was the most common pathogen, followed by Klebsiella pneumoniae (16.4%). Prevalence of resistance for ciprofloxacin was higher compared to newer quinolones. Conclusions. E. coli and K. pneumoniae were the predominant bacterial etiologies; the prevalence of resistance to commonly prescribed antibiotics was high.

  1. Quinolone resistant Aeromonas spp. as carriers and potential tracers of acquired antibiotic resistance in hospital and municipal wastewater.

    PubMed

    Varela, Ana Rita; Nunes, Olga C; Manaia, Célia M

    2016-01-15

    Members of the genus Aeromonas are recognized carriers of antibiotic resistance in aquatic environments. However, their importance on the spread of resistance from hospital effluents to the environment is poorly understood. Quinolone resistant Aeromonas spp. (n = 112) isolated from hospital effluent (HE) and from raw (RWW) and treated wastewater (TWW) of the receiving urban wastewater treatment plant (UWTP) were characterized. Species identification and genetic intraspecies diversity were assessed based on the 16S rRNA, cpn60 and gyrB genes sequence analysis. The antibiotic resistance phenotypes and genotypes (qnrA, qnrB, qnrC, qnrD, qnrS, qnrVC; qepA; oqxAB; aac(6′)-Ib-cr; blaOXA; incU) were analyzed in function of the origin and taxonomic group. Most isolates belonged to the species Aeromonas caviae and Aeromonas hydrophila (50% and 41%, respectively). The quinolone and the beta-lactamase resistance genes aac(6′)-Ib-cr and blaOXA, including gene blaOXA-101, identified for the first time in Aeromonas spp., were detected in 58% and 56% of the isolates, respectively, with identical prevalence in HE and UWTP wastewater. In contrast, the gene qnrS2 was observed mainly in isolates from the UWTP (51%) and rarely in HE isolates (3%), suggesting that its origin is not the clinical setting. Bacterial groups and genes that allow the identification of major routes of antibiotic resistance dissemination are valuable tools to control this problem. In this study, it was concluded that members of the genus Aeromonas harboring the genes aac(6′)-Ib-cr and blaOXA are relevant tracers of antibiotic resistance dissemination in wastewater habitats, while those yielding the gene qnrS2 allow the traceability from non-clinical sources.

  2. The Acinetobacter baumannii Oxymoron: Commensal Hospital Dweller Turned Pan-Drug-Resistant Menace

    PubMed Central

    Roca, Ignasi; Espinal, Paula; Vila-Farrés, Xavier; Vila, Jordi

    2012-01-01

    During the past few decades Acinetobacter baumannii has evolved from being a commensal dweller of health-care facilities to constitute one of the most annoying pathogens responsible for hospitalary outbreaks and it is currently considered one of the most important nosocomial pathogens. In a prevalence study of infections in intensive care units conducted among 75 countries of the five continents, this microorganism was found to be the fifth most common pathogen. Two main features contribute to the success of A. baumannii: (i) A. baumannii exhibits an outstanding ability to accumulate a great variety of resistance mechanisms acquired by different mechanisms, either mutations or acquisition of genetic elements such as plasmids, integrons, transposons, or resistant islands, making this microorganism multi- or pan-drug-resistant and (ii) The ability to survive in the environment during prolonged periods of time which, combined with its innate resistance to desiccation and disinfectants, makes A. baumannii almost impossible to eradicate from the clinical setting. In addition, its ability to produce biofilm greatly contributes to both persistence and resistance. In this review, the pathogenesis of the infections caused by this microorganism as well as the molecular bases of antibacterial resistance and clinical aspects such as treatment and potential future therapeutic strategies are discussed in depth. PMID:22536199

  3. Sustained Epigenetic Drug Delivery Depletes Cholesterol-Sphingomyelin Rafts from Resistant Breast Cancer Cells, Influencing Biophysical Characteristics of Membrane Lipids.

    PubMed

    Raghavan, Vijay; Vijayaraghavalu, Sivakumar; Peetla, Chiranjeevi; Yamada, Masayoshi; Morisada, Megan; Labhasetwar, Vinod

    2015-10-27

    and endocytic function, treatment of resistant cells with epigenetic drugs with altered lipid profile could facilitate anticancer drug transport to overcome acquired drug resistance in a combination therapy.

  4. The population genetics of drug resistance evolution in natural populations of viral, bacterial and eukaryotic pathogens.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Benjamin A; Garud, Nandita R; Feder, Alison F; Assaf, Zoe J; Pennings, Pleuni S

    2016-01-01

    Drug resistance is a costly consequence of pathogen evolution and a major concern in public health. In this review, we show how population genetics can be used to study the evolution of drug resistance and also how drug resistance evolution is informative as an evolutionary model system. We highlight five examples from diverse organisms with particular focus on: (i) identifying drug resistance loci in the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum using the genomic signatures of selective sweeps, (ii) determining the role of epistasis in drug resistance evolution in influenza, (iii) quantifying the role of standing genetic variation in the evolution of drug resistance in HIV, (iv) using drug resistance mutations to study clonal interference dynamics in tuberculosis and (v) analysing the population structure of the core and accessory genome of Staphylococcus aureus to understand the spread of methicillin resistance. Throughout this review, we discuss the uses of sequence data and population genetic theory in studying the evolution of drug resistance.

  5. Smart doxorubicin nanoparticles with high drug payload for enhanced chemotherapy against drug resistance and cancer diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Caitong; Zhou, Mengjiao; Zhang, Xiujuan; Wei, Weijia; Chen, Xianfeng; Zhang, Xiaohong

    2015-03-01

    Considering the obvious advantages in efficacy and price, doxorubicin (DOX) has been widely used for a range of cancers, which is usually encapsulated in various nanocarriers for drug delivery. Although effective, in most nanocarrier-based delivery systems, the drug loading capacity of DOX is rather low; this can lead to undesired systemic toxicity and excretion concern. Herein, we report for the first time the usage of pure doxorubicin nanoparticles (DOX NPs) without addition of any carriers for enhanced chemotherapy against drug-resistance. The drug payload reaches as high as 90.47%, which largely surpassed those in previous reports. These PEG stabilized DOX NPs exhibit good biocompatibility and stability, long blood circulation time, fast release in an acidic environment and high accumulation in tumors. Compared with free DOX, DOX NPs display a dramatically enhanced anticancer therapeutic efficacy in the inhibition of cell and tumor growth. Moreover, they can also be readily incorporated with other anticancer drugs for synergistic chemotherapy to overcome the drug resistance of cancers. The fluorescence properties of DOX also endow these NPs with imaging capabilities, thus making it a multifunctional system for diagnosis and treatment. This work demonstrates great potential of DOX NPs for cancer diagnosis, therapy and overcoming drug tolerance.Considering the obvious advantages in efficacy and price, doxorubicin (DOX) has been widely used for a range of cancers, which is usually encapsulated in various nanocarriers for drug delivery. Although effective, in most nanocarrier-based delivery systems, the drug loading capacity of DOX is rather low; this can lead to undesired systemic toxicity and excretion concern. Herein, we report for the first time the usage of pure doxorubicin nanoparticles (DOX NPs) without addition of any carriers for enhanced chemotherapy against drug-resistance. The drug payload reaches as high as 90.47%, which largely surpassed those in

  6. Activation of the IGF1R pathway potentially mediates acquired resistance to mutant-selective 3rd-generation EGF receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors in advanced non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ji Hyun; Choi, Yun Jung; Kim, Seon Ye; Lee, Jung-Eun; Sung, Ki Jung; Park, Sojung; Kim, Woo Sung; Song, Joon Seon; Choi, Chang-Min; Sung, Young Hoon; Rho, Jin Kyung; Lee, Jae Cheol

    2016-01-01

    Mutant-selective, 3rd-generation EGFR-TKIs were recently developed to control lung cancer cells harboring T790M-mediated resistance. However, the development of resistance to these novel drugs seems inevitable. Thus, we investigated the mechanism of acquired resistance to the mutant-selective EGFR-TKI WZ4002. We established five WZ4002-resistant cells, derived from cells harboring both EGFR and T790M mutations by long-term exposure to increasing doses of WZ4002. Compared with the parental cells, all resistant cells showed 10–100-folds higher resistance to WZ4002, as well as cross-resistance to other mutant-selective inhibitors. Among them, three resistant cells (HCC827/WR, PC-9/WR and H1975/WR) showed dependency on EGFR signaling, but two other cells (PC-9/GR/WR and PC-9/ER/WR) were not. Notably, insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF1R) was aberrantly activated in PC-9/GR/WR cells in phospho-receptor tyrosine kinase array, consistently accompanied by loss of IGF binding protein-3 (IGFBP3). Down-regulation of IGF1R by shRNA, as well as inhibition of IGF1R activity either by AG-1024 (a small molecule IGF1R inhibitor) or BI 836845 (a monoclonal anti-IGF1/2 blocking antibody), restored the sensitivity to WZ4002 both in vitro and xenograft. Taken together, these results suggest that activation of the IGF1R pathway associated with IGFBP3 loss can induce an acquired resistance to the mutant-selective EGFR-TKI, WZ4002. Therefore, a combined therapy of IGF1R inhibitors and mutant-selective EGFR-TKIs might be a viable treatment strategy for overcoming acquired resistance. PMID:26980747

  7. The tumor microenvironment underlies acquired resistance to CSF-1R inhibition in gliomas.

    PubMed

    Quail, Daniela F; Bowman, Robert L; Akkari, Leila; Quick, Marsha L; Schuhmacher, Alberto J; Huse, Jason T; Holland, Eric C; Sutton, James C; Joyce, Johanna A

    2016-05-20

    Macrophages accumulate with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) progression and can be targeted via inhibition of colony-stimulating factor-1 receptor (CSF-1R) to regress high-grade tumors in animal models of this cancer. However, whether and how resistance emerges in response to sustained CSF-1R blockade is unknown. We show that although overall survival is significantly prolonged, tumors recur in >50% of mice. Gliomas reestablish sensitivity to CSF-1R inhibition upon transplantation, indicating that resistance is tumor microenvironment-driven. Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway activity was elevated in recurrent GBM, driven by macrophage-derived insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and tumor cell IGF-1 receptor (IGF-1R). Combining IGF-1R or PI3K blockade with CSF-1R inhibition in recurrent tumors significantly prolonged overall survival. Our findings thus reveal a potential therapeutic approach for treating resistance to CSF-1R inhibitors. PMID:27199435

  8. Multiple drug resistant mechanisms against darunavir, amprenavir, and nelfinavir of HIV-1 PR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaoqing; Dai, Qi; Xiu, Zhilong

    2013-02-01

    Acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) is a disease of the human immune system caused by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), which is infecting more humans and is expanding faster in the world. The illness interferes with the immune system, making people with AIDS much more likely to get infections, including opportunistic infections and tumors that do not affect people with working immune systems. HIV-1 PR is one of the major targets of anti-AIDS drug discovery. It is, therefore, necessary to develop some inhibitors against HIV-1 PR. In this work, we executed molecular dynamics (MDs) simulation of HIV-1 PR with drugs darunavir (DRV), amprenavir (APV), nelfinavir (NFV), and examined the resistant mechanism of L10I, G48V, I54V, and L90M mutations of this PR, aiming at designing promising drugs. The comparative analysis suggests that the existences of dodecahydroisoquinoline ring at P1' subsite, 4-aminophenylsulfonamide at P2' subsite, and bis-tetrahydrofuranylurethane at P2 subsite are helpful for maintaining the high affinity of the inhibitor for the protease and exhibiting high potency against multiple drug resistance (MDR) mutant protease.

  9. On-Demand Isolation of Bacteriophages Against Drug-Resistant Bacteria for Personalized Phage Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Mattila, Sari; Ruotsalainen, Pilvi; Jalasvuori, Matti

    2015-01-01

    Bacteriophages are bacterial viruses, capable of killing even multi-drug resistant bacterial cells. For this reason, therapeutic use of phages is considered as a possible alternative to conventional antibiotics. However, phages are very host specific in comparison to wide-spectrum antibiotics and thus preparation of phage-cocktails beforehand against pathogens can be difficult. In this study, we evaluate whether it may be possible to isolate phages on-demand from environmental reservoir. We attempted to enrich infectious bacteriophages from sewage against nosocomial drug-resistant bacterial strains of different medically important species in order to evaluate the probability of discovering novel therapeutic phages. Stability and host-range were determined for the acquired phages. Our results suggest that on-demand isolation of phages is possible against Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella and extended spectrum beta-lactamase Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae. The probability of finding suitable phages was less than 40% against vancomycin resistant Enterococcus and Acinetobacter baumannii strains. Furthermore, isolation of new phages against methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains was found to be very difficult. PMID:26617601

  10. On-Demand Isolation of Bacteriophages Against Drug-Resistant Bacteria for Personalized Phage Therapy.

    PubMed

    Mattila, Sari; Ruotsalainen, Pilvi; Jalasvuori, Matti

    2015-01-01

    Bacteriophages are bacterial viruses, capable of killing even multi-drug resistant bacterial cells. For this reason, therapeutic use of phages is considered as a possible alternative to conventional antibiotics. However, phages are very host specific in comparison to wide-spectrum antibiotics and thus preparation of phage-cocktails beforehand against pathogens can be difficult. In this study, we evaluate whether it may be possible to isolate phages on-demand from environmental reservoir. We attempted to enrich infectious bacteriophages from sewage against nosocomial drug-resistant bacterial strains of different medically important species in order to evaluate the probability of discovering novel therapeutic phages. Stability and host-range were determined for the acquired phages. Our results suggest that on-demand isolation of phages is possible against Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella and extended spectrum beta-lactamase Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae. The probability of finding suitable phages was less than 40% against vancomycin resistant Enterococcus and Acinetobacter baumannii strains. Furthermore, isolation of new phages against methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains was found to be very difficult.

  11. Experience with pulmonary resection for extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Shiraishi, Yuji; Katsuragi, Naoya; Kita, Hidefumi; Toishi, Masayuki; Onda, Takahito

    2008-12-01

    Extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis is becoming a global threat. It is a relatively new phenomenon, and its optimal management remains undetermined. We report our experience in using pulmonary resection for treating patients with this disease. Records were reviewed of 54 consecutive patients undergoing a pulmonary resection for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis at Fukujuji Hospital between 2000 and 2006. These patients were identified using the definition approved by the World Health Organization Global Task Force on extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis in October 2006. Five (9%) patients (3 men and 2 women) aged 31-60 years met the definition. None of the patients was HIV-positive. Although the best available multidrug regimens were initiated, no patient could achieve sputum conversion. Adjuvant resectional surgery was considered because the patients had localized disease. Procedures performed included pneumonectomy (2) and upper lobectomy (3). There was no operative mortality or morbidity. All patients attained sputum-negative status after the operation, and they were maintained on multidrug regimens for 12-25 months postoperatively. All patients remained free from disease at the time of follow-up. Pulmonary resection under cover of state-of-the-art chemotherapy is safe and effective for patients with localized extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis.

  12. Modeling HIV-1 drug resistance as episodic directional selection.

    PubMed

    Murrell, Ben; de Oliveira, Tulio; Seebregts, Chris; Kosakovsky Pond, Sergei L; Scheffler, Konrad

    2012-01-01

    The evolution of substitutions conferring drug resistance to HIV-1 is both episodic, occurring when patients are on antiretroviral therapy, and strongly directional, with site-specific resistant residues increasing in frequency over time. While methods exist to detect episodic diversifying selection and continuous directional selection, no evolutionary model combining these two properties has been proposed. We present two models of episodic directional selection (MEDS and EDEPS) which allow the a priori specification of lineages expected to have undergone directional selection. The models infer the sites and target residues that were likely subject to directional selection, using either codon or protein sequences. Compared to its null model of episodic diversifying selection, MEDS provides a superior fit to most sites known to be involved in drug resistance, and neither one test for episodic diversifying selection nor another for constant directional selection are able to detect as many true positives as MEDS and EDEPS while maintaining acceptable levels of false positives. This suggests that episodic directional selection is a better description of the process driving the evolution of drug resistance.

  13. Antimalarial drug resistance in Bangladesh, 1996-2012.

    PubMed

    Haque, Ubydul; Glass, Gregory E; Haque, Waziul; Islam, Nazrul; Roy, Shyamal; Karim, Jahirul; Noedl, Harald

    2013-12-01

    Malaria remains an important health problem in Bangladesh, with approximately 14 million people at risk. Antimalarial drug resistance is a major obstacle to the control of malaria in endemic countries. In 2012, Bangladesh reported an estimated 29 522 malaria episodes, of which 94% were reported as being caused by Plasmodium falciparum. In this study, we reviewed and summarized antimalarial drug resistance data from Bangladesh published until June 2013. We searched published sources for data referring to any type of P. falciparum drug resistance (in vivo, in vitro, or molecular) and found 169 articles published in peer-reviewed journals. Of these, 143 articles were excluded because they did not meet our inclusion criteria. After detailed review of the remaining 26 articles, 14 were selected for evaluation. Published studies indicate that P. falciparum shows varying levels of resistance to chloroquine, mefloquine and sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine. Combination therapy of chloroquine and primaquine has proven ineffective and combinations of sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine with either quinine or chloroquine have also shown poor efficacy. Recent studies indicate that artemisinin derivatives, such as artesunate, remain highly efficacious in treating P. falciparum malaria. Available data suggest that artemisinins, quinine, doxycyline, mefloquine-artesunate and azithromycin-artesunate combination therapy remain efficacious in the treatment of P. falciparum malaria in Bangladesh.

  14. Systematic Review of the Performance of Rapid Rifampicin Resistance Testing for Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Arentz, Matthew; Sorensen, Bess; Horne, David J.; Walson, Judd L.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Rapid tests for rifampicin resistance may be useful for identifying isolates at high risk of drug resistance, including multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB). However, choice of diagnostic test and prevalence of rifampicin resistance may both impact a diagnostic strategy for identifying drug resistant-TB. We performed a systematic review to evaluate the performance of WHO-endorsed rapid tests for rifampicin resistance detection. Methods We searched MEDLINE, Embase and the Cochrane Library through January 1, 2012. For each rapid test, we determined pooled sensitivity and specificity estimates using a hierarchical random effects model. Predictive values of the tests were determined at different prevalence rates of rifampicin resistance and MDR-TB. Results We identified 60 publications involving six different tests (INNO-LiPA Rif. TB assay, Genotype MTBDR assay, Genotype MTBDRplus assay, Colorimetric Redox Indicator (CRI) assay, Nitrate Reductase Assay (NRA) and MODS tests): for all tests, negative predictive values were high when rifampicin resistance prevalence was ≤ 30%. However, positive predictive values were considerably reduced for the INNO-LiPA Rif. TB assay, the MTBDRplus assay and MODS when rifampicin resistance prevalence was < 5%. Limitations In many studies, it was unclear whether patient selection or index test performance could have introduced bias. In addition, we were unable to evaluate critical concentration thresholds for the colorimetric tests. Discussion Rapid tests for rifampicin resistance alone cannot accurately predict rifampicin resistance or MDR-TB in areas with a low prevalence of rifampicin resistance. However, in areas with a high prevalence of rifampicin resistance and MDR-TB, these tests may be a valuable component of an MDR-TB management strategy. PMID:24098523

  15. Emergence and natural selection of drug-resistant prions.

    PubMed

    Shorter, James

    2010-07-01

    Drug resistance is a refractory barrier in the battle against many fatal diseases caused by rapidly evolving agents, including HIV, apicomplexans and specific cancers. Emerging evidence suggests that drug resistance might extend to lethal prion disorders and related neurodegenerative amyloidoses. Prions are self-replicating protein conformers, usually 'cross-beta' amyloid polymers, which are naturally transmitted between individuals and promote phenotypic change. Prion conformers are catalytic templates that specifically convert other copies of the same protein to the prion form. Once in motion, this chain reaction of conformational replication can deplete all non-prion copies of a protein. Typically, prions exist as ensembles of multiple structurally distinct, self-replicating forms or 'strains'. Each strain confers a distinct phenotype and replicates at different rates depending on the environment. As replicators, prions are units of selection. Thus, natural selection inescapably enriches or depletes various prion strains from populations depending on their conformational fitness (ability to self-replicate) in the prevailing environment. The most successful prions confer advantages to their host as with numerous yeast prions. Here, I review recent evidence that drug-like small molecules can antagonize some prion strains but simultaneously select for drug-resistant prions composed of mammalian PrP or the yeast prion protein, Sup35. For Sup35, the drug-resistant strain configures original intermolecular amyloid contacts that are not ordinarily detected. Importantly, a synergistic small-molecule cocktail counters prion diversity by eliminating multiple Sup35 prion strains. Collectively, these advances illuminate the plasticity of prionogenesis and suggest that synergistic combinatorial therapies might circumvent this pathological vicissitude. PMID:20422111

  16. Resistance to antiplatelet drugs: molecular mechanisms and laboratory detection.

    PubMed

    Cattaneo, M

    2007-07-01

    The definition 'resistance to antiplatelet drugs' should be limited to situations in which failure of the drug to hit its pharmacological target has been documented by specific laboratory tests. Aspirin resistance, as determined by specific tests (e.g. serum thromboxane B(2)), appears to be rare (1-2%) and, in most instances, is caused by poor compliance. In contrast to aspirin, studies that used specific tests to measure the pharmacological effect of thienopyridines [e.g. vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP)] showed a wide variability of responses to these drugs, with significant proportions of subjects (15-30%) who are very poor responders. Inter-individual differences in the extent of metabolism of thienopyridines to their active metabolites is the most plausible mechanism for the observed inter-individual variability in platelet inhibition. The demonstration that some patients may be 'resistant' or 'poor responders' to the pharmacological effect of antiplatelet drugs, has prompted the need of laboratory monitoring of antiplatelet therapy. However, many published studies have been performed using unspecific tests of platelet function, which identify patients on antiplatelet treatment with high residual platelet reactivity, which is not necessarily because of resistance to antiplatelet drugs. Despite this drawback, identification of patients with high residual platelet reactivity may be useful to predict their risk of atherothrombotic events. However, many studies still need to be carried out to identify the ideal laboratory test and to answer basic questions on its clinical utility and cost-effectiveness, before monitoring antiplatelet therapy can be recommended in the clinical practise. Until then, monitoring of antiplatelet therapy should be considered for investigational purposes only. PMID:17635731

  17. Comparative Genome Analysis of Ciprofloxacin-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Reveals Genes Within Newly Identified High Variability Regions Associated With Drug Resistance Development

    PubMed Central

    Su, Hsun-Cheng; Khatun, Jainab; Kanavy, Dona M.

    2013-01-01

    The alarming rise of ciprofloxacin-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa has been reported in several clinical studies. Though the mutation of resistance genes and their role in drug resistance has been researched, the process by which the bacterium acquires high-level resistance is still not well understood. How does the genomic evolution of P. aeruginosa affect resistance development? Could the exposure of antibiotics to the bacteria enrich genomic variants that lead to the development of resistance, and if so, how are these variants distributed through the genome? To answer these questions, we performed 454 pyrosequencing and a whole genome analysis both before and after exposure to ciprofloxacin. The comparative sequence data revealed 93 unique resistance strain variation sites, which included a mutation in the DNA gyrase subunit A gene. We generated variation-distribution maps comparing the wild and resistant types, and isolated 19 candidates from three discrete resistance-associated high variability regions that had available transposon mutants, to perform a ciprofloxacin exposure assay. Of these region candidates with transposon disruptions, 79% (15/19) showed a reduction in the ability to gain high-level resistance, suggesting that genes within these high variability regions might enrich for certain functions associated with resistance development. PMID:23808957

  18. Insights into the mechanism of drug resistance. X-ray structure analysis of multi-drug resistant HIV-1 protease ritonavir complex