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Sample records for acquire drug resistance

  1. A Research-Inspired Laboratory Sequence Investigating Acquired Drug Resistance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Elizabeth Vogel; Fortune, Jennifer A.; Drennan, Catherine L.

    2010-01-01

    Here, we present a six-session laboratory exercise designed to introduce students to standard biochemical techniques in the context of investigating a high impact research topic, acquired resistance to the cancer drug Gleevec. Students express a Gleevec-resistant mutant of the Abelson tyrosine kinase domain, the active domain of an oncogenic…

  2. Mechanisms of acquired resistance to androgen receptor targeting drugs in castration resistant prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chism, David D.; De Silva, Dinuka; Whang, Young E.

    2014-01-01

    After initial response to androgen receptor targeting drugs abiraterone or enzalutamide, most patients develop progressive disease and therefore, castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) remains a terminal disease. Multiple mechanisms underlying acquired resistance have been postulated. Intratumoral androgen synthesis may resume after abiraterone treatment. A point mutation in the ligand binding domain of androgen receptor may confer resistance to enzalutamide. Emergence of androgen receptor splice variants lacking the ligand binding domain may mediate resistance to abiraterone and enzalutamide. Steroid receptors such as glucocorticoid receptor may substitute for androgen receptor. Drugs with novel mechanisms of action or combination therapy, along with biomarkers for patient selection, may be needed to improve the therapy of CRPC. PMID:24927631

  3. Increased sensitivity to platinum drugs of cancer cells with acquired resistance to trabectedin

    PubMed Central

    Colmegna, B; Uboldi, S; Frapolli, R; Licandro, S A; Panini, N; Galmarini, C M; Badri, Nadia; Spanswick, V J; Bingham, J P; Kiakos, Konstantinos; Erba, E; Hartley, J A; D'Incalci, M

    2015-01-01

    Background: In order to investigate the mechanisms of acquired resistance to trabectedin, trabectedin-resistant human myxoid liposarcoma (402-91/T) and ovarian carcinoma (A2780/T) cell lines were derived and characterised in vitro and in vivo. Methods: Resistant cell lines were obtained by repeated exposures to trabectedin. Characterisation was performed by evaluating drug sensitivity, cell cycle perturbations, DNA damage and DNA repair protein expression. In vivo experiments were performed on A2780 and A2780/T xenografts. Results: 402-91/T and A2780/T cells were six-fold resistant to trabectedin compared with parental cells. Resistant cells were found to be hypersensitive to UV light and did not express specific proteins involved in the nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway: XPF and ERCC1 in 402-91/T and XPG in A2780/T. NER deficiency in trabectedin-resistant cells was associated with the absence of a G2/M arrest induced by trabectedin and with enhanced sensitivity (two-fold) to platinum drugs. In A2780/T, this collateral sensitivity, confirmed in vivo, was associated with an increased formation of DNA interstrand crosslinks. Conclusions: Our finding that resistance to trabectedin is associated with the loss of NER function, with a consequent increased sensitivity to platinum drugs, provides the rational for sequential use of these drugs in patients who have acquired resistance to trabectedin. PMID:26633559

  4. Effects of YM155 on survivin levels and viability in neuroblastoma cells with acquired drug resistance

    PubMed Central

    Voges, Yvonne; Michaelis, Martin; Rothweiler, Florian; Schaller, Torsten; Schneider, Constanze; Politt, Katharina; Mernberger, Marco; Nist, Andrea; Stiewe, Thorsten; Wass, Mark N; Rödel, Franz; Cinatl, Jindrich

    2016-01-01

    Resistance formation after initial therapy response (acquired resistance) is common in high-risk neuroblastoma patients. YM155 is a drug candidate that was introduced as a survivin suppressant. This mechanism was later challenged, and DNA damage induction and Mcl-1 depletion were suggested instead. Here we investigated the efficacy and mechanism of action of YM155 in neuroblastoma cells with acquired drug resistance. The efficacy of YM155 was determined in neuroblastoma cell lines and their sublines with acquired resistance to clinically relevant drugs. Survivin levels, Mcl-1 levels, and DNA damage formation were determined in response to YM155. RNAi-mediated depletion of survivin, Mcl-1, and p53 was performed to investigate their roles during YM155 treatment. Clinical YM155 concentrations affected the viability of drug-resistant neuroblastoma cells through survivin depletion and p53 activation. MDM2 inhibitor-induced p53 activation further enhanced YM155 activity. Loss of p53 function generally affected anti-neuroblastoma approaches targeting survivin. Upregulation of ABCB1 (causes YM155 efflux) and downregulation of SLC35F2 (causes YM155 uptake) mediated YM155-specific resistance. YM155-adapted cells displayed increased ABCB1 levels, decreased SLC35F2 levels, and a p53 mutation. YM155-adapted neuroblastoma cells were also characterized by decreased sensitivity to RNAi-mediated survivin depletion, further confirming survivin as a critical YM155 target in neuroblastoma. In conclusion, YM155 targets survivin in neuroblastoma. Furthermore, survivin is a promising therapeutic target for p53 wild-type neuroblastomas after resistance acquisition (neuroblastomas are rarely p53-mutated), potentially in combination with p53 activators. In addition, we show that the adaptation of cancer cells to molecular-targeted anticancer drugs is an effective strategy to elucidate a drug's mechanism of action. PMID:27735941

  5. Update on HIV-1 acquired and transmitted drug resistance in Africa.

    PubMed

    Ssemwanga, Deogratius; Lihana, Raphael W; Ugoji, Chinenye; Abimiku, Alash'le; Nkengasong, John; Dakum, Patrick; Ndembi, Nicaise

    2015-01-01

    The last ten years have witnessed a significant scale-up and access to antiretroviral therapy in Africa, which has improved patient quality of life and survival. One major challenge associated with increased access to antiretroviral therapy is the development of antiretroviral resistance due to inconsistent drug supply and/or poor patient adherence. We review the current state of both acquired and transmitted drug resistance in Africa over the past ten years (2001-2011) to identify drug resistance associated with the different drug regimens used on the continent and to help guide affordable strategies for drug resistance surveillance. A total of 161 references (153 articles, six reports and two conference abstracts) were reviewed. Antiretroviral resistance data was available for 40 of 53 African countries. A total of 5,541 adult patients from 99 studies in Africa were included in this analysis. The pooled prevalence of drug resistance mutations in Africa was 10.6%, and Central Africa had the highest prevalence of 54.9%. The highest prevalence of nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor mutations was in the west (55.3%) and central (54.8%) areas; nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor mutations were highest in East Africa (57.0%) and protease inhibitors mutations highest in Southern Africa (16.3%). The major nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor mutation in all four African regions was M184V. Major nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor as well as protease inhibitor mutations varied by region. The prevalence of drug resistance has remained low in several African countries although the emergence of drug resistance mutations varied across countries. Continued surveillance of antiretroviral therapy resistance remains crucial in gauging the effectiveness of country antiretroviral therapy programs and strategizing on effective and affordable strategies for successful treatment.

  6. Trends and predictors of HIV-1 acquired drug resistance in Minas Gerais, Brazil: 2002-2012.

    PubMed

    Duani, Helena; Aleixo, Agdemir Waleria; Tupinambás, Unaí

    Several studies show that the prevalence of multidrug-resistant HIV-1 virus is declining over time. A retrospective cohort study was carried out to evaluate the trends of drug resistance in antiretroviral treatment-exposed individuals in a state of a middle-income country, Minas Gerais, southeast region of Brazil. We analyzed 2115 HIV-1 sequences from 2002 up to 2012, from 52 cities of Minas Gerais. The groups were analyzed according to the definitions: "IAS - 3 class mutations", if ≥1 drug resistance mutation from IAS 2015 list (DRM) was present in each class; "No fully susceptible drugs" as the absence of any fully susceptible drug in Stanford algorithm; and "GSS≥2″, when a maximum calculated GSS (genotypic susceptibility score) was ≥2 or ≥3, counting only drugs available in Brazil and USA at given calendar years. Time trends of resistance were analyzed by Cochran-Armitage test. We observed a decrease in the rate resistance mutations for PI, NRTI, "IAS - 3 class mutations", and "No fully susceptible drugs" over these 11 years, from 69.2% to 20.7%, 92.3% to 90.2%, 46.2% to 22.5%, and 12.8% to 5.7%, respectively (p<0.05). Resistance to NNRTI increased from 74.4% to 81.6%, mainly because of K103N mutation. The GSS score ≥2 increased during the years from 35.9% to 87.3% (p<0.001). We demonstrate that resistance to PI and to the three main classes simultaneously are declining, although the number of patients on of antiretroviral therapy has doubled in the last ten years in Brazil (125,000 in 2002 to 400,000 in 2014). Broader resistance testing and the availability of more therapeutic options might have influenced this decline. The increase in NNRTI resistance can limit this class as first line treatment in Brazil in the future.

  7. Bayesian model of signal rewiring reveals mechanisms of gene dysregulation in acquired drug resistance in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Azad, A. K. M.; Keith, Jonathan M.

    2017-01-01

    Small molecule inhibitors, such as lapatinib, are effective against breast cancer in clinical trials, but tumor cells ultimately acquire resistance to the drug. Maintaining sensitization to drug action is essential for durable growth inhibition. Recently, adaptive reprogramming of signaling circuitry has been identified as a major cause of acquired resistance. We developed a computational framework using a Bayesian statistical approach to model signal rewiring in acquired resistance. We used the p1-model to infer potential aberrant gene-pairs with differential posterior probabilities of appearing in resistant-vs-parental networks. Results were obtained using matched gene expression profiles under resistant and parental conditions. Using two lapatinib-treated ErbB2-positive breast cancer cell-lines: SKBR3 and BT474, our method identified similar dysregulated signaling pathways including EGFR-related pathways as well as other receptor-related pathways, many of which were reported previously as compensatory pathways of EGFR-inhibition via signaling cross-talk. A manual literature survey provided strong evidence that aberrant signaling activities in dysregulated pathways are closely related to acquired resistance in EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Our approach predicted literature-supported dysregulated pathways complementary to both node-centric (SPIA, DAVID, and GATHER) and edge-centric (ESEA and PAGI) methods. Moreover, by proposing a novel pattern of aberrant signaling called V-structures, we observed that genes were dysregulated in resistant-vs-sensitive conditions when they were involved in the switch of dependencies from targeted to bypass signaling events. A literature survey of some important V-structures suggested they play a role in breast cancer metastasis and/or acquired resistance to EGFR-TKIs, where the mRNA changes of TGFBR2, LEF1 and TP53 in resistant-vs-sensitive conditions were related to the dependency switch from targeted to bypass signaling links

  8. Bayesian model of signal rewiring reveals mechanisms of gene dysregulation in acquired drug resistance in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Azad, A K M; Lawen, Alfons; Keith, Jonathan M

    2017-01-01

    Small molecule inhibitors, such as lapatinib, are effective against breast cancer in clinical trials, but tumor cells ultimately acquire resistance to the drug. Maintaining sensitization to drug action is essential for durable growth inhibition. Recently, adaptive reprogramming of signaling circuitry has been identified as a major cause of acquired resistance. We developed a computational framework using a Bayesian statistical approach to model signal rewiring in acquired resistance. We used the p1-model to infer potential aberrant gene-pairs with differential posterior probabilities of appearing in resistant-vs-parental networks. Results were obtained using matched gene expression profiles under resistant and parental conditions. Using two lapatinib-treated ErbB2-positive breast cancer cell-lines: SKBR3 and BT474, our method identified similar dysregulated signaling pathways including EGFR-related pathways as well as other receptor-related pathways, many of which were reported previously as compensatory pathways of EGFR-inhibition via signaling cross-talk. A manual literature survey provided strong evidence that aberrant signaling activities in dysregulated pathways are closely related to acquired resistance in EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Our approach predicted literature-supported dysregulated pathways complementary to both node-centric (SPIA, DAVID, and GATHER) and edge-centric (ESEA and PAGI) methods. Moreover, by proposing a novel pattern of aberrant signaling called V-structures, we observed that genes were dysregulated in resistant-vs-sensitive conditions when they were involved in the switch of dependencies from targeted to bypass signaling events. A literature survey of some important V-structures suggested they play a role in breast cancer metastasis and/or acquired resistance to EGFR-TKIs, where the mRNA changes of TGFBR2, LEF1 and TP53 in resistant-vs-sensitive conditions were related to the dependency switch from targeted to bypass signaling links

  9. Activation of the Met kinase confers acquired drug resistance in FGFR-targeted lung cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Kim, S-M; Kim, H; Yun, M R; Kang, H N; Pyo, K-H; Park, H J; Lee, J M; Choi, H M; Ellinghaus, P; Ocker, M; Paik, S; Kim, H R; Cho, B C

    2016-07-18

    Aberrant fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) activation/expression is a common feature in lung cancer (LC). In this study, we evaluated the antitumor activity of and the mechanisms underlying acquired resistance to two potent selective FGFR inhibitors, AZD4547 and BAY116387, in LC cell lines. The antitumor activity of AZD4547 and BAY1163877 was screened in 24 LC cell lines, including 5 with FGFR1 amplification. Two cell lines containing FGFR1 amplifications, H1581 and DMS114, were sensitive to FGFR inhibitors (IC50<250 nm). Clones of FGFR1-amplified H1581 cells resistant to AZD4547 or BAY116387 (H1581AR and H1581BR cells, respectively) were established. Receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) array and immunoblotting analyses showed strong overexpression and activation of Met in H1581AR/BR cells, compared with that in the parental cells. Gene set enrichment analysis against the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) database showed that cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction pathways were significantly enriched in H1581AR/BR cells, with Met contributing significantly to the core enrichment. Genomic DNA quantitative PCR and fluorescent in situ hybridization analyses showed MET amplification in H1581AR, but not in H1581BR, cells. Met amplification drives acquired resistance to AZD4547 in H1581AR cells by activating ErbB3. Combination treatment with FGFR inhibitors and an anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)/Met inhibitor, crizotinib, or Met-specific short interfering RNA (siRNA) synergistically inhibited cell proliferation in both H1581AR and H1581BR cells. Conversely, ectopic expression of Met in H1581 cells conferred resistance to AZD4547 and BAY1163877. Acquired resistance to FGFR inhibitors not only altered cellular morphology, but also promoted migration and invasion of resistant clones, in part by inducing epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. Taken together, our data suggest that Met activation is sufficient to bypass dependency on FGFR signaling. Concurrent

  10. Acquired resistance of malarial parasites against artemisinin-based drugs: social and economic impacts.

    PubMed

    Porter-Kelley, Johanna M; Cofie, Joann; Jean, Sophonie; Brooks, Mark E; Lassiter, Mia; Mayer, Dc Ghislaine

    2010-01-01

    Malaria, a disease of poverty and high morbidity and mortality in the tropical world, has led to a worldwide search for control measures. To that end, good antimalarial chemotherapies have been difficult to find in the global market and those that seem to be most effective are rapidly becoming ineffective due to the emergence and spread of drug resistance. Artemisinin, a very effective yet expensive antimalarial, has quickly become the recommended drug of choice when all other possibilities fail. However, for all its promise as the next great antimalarial, the outlook is bleak. Resistance is developing to artemisinin while another effective antimalarial is not in sight. Malaria endemic areas which are mostly in developing countries must deal with the multifaceted process of changing and implementing new national malaria treatment guidelines. This requires complex interactions between several sectors of the affected society which in some cases take place within the context of political instability. Moreover, the cost associated with preventing and containing the spread of antimalarial resistance is detrimental to economic progress. This review addresses the impact of artemisinin resistance on the socioeconomic structure of malaria endemic countries.

  11. Community acquired multi drug resistant Staphylococcus aureus in a rural setting of North Western Ethiopia: a tough challenge.

    PubMed

    Tibebu, Martha; Embiyale, Wondimagegn

    2014-07-01

    Commnunity acquired Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus species are common causes of skin and soft tissue infections. Foot ulcer of former leprosy patients can be invaded by a multi-microbial infection. Cervicitis is usually caused by certain sexually transmitted agents. Here we report a series of cases of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, isolated from two patients presenting with foot ulcer and cervicitis respectively, both in an outpatient or community setting (community onset) in rural North Western Ethiopia. The strains were resistant to all commonly available drugs such as trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, ciprofloxacin, erythromycin, chloramphenicol and tetracycline but sensitive to clindamycin. This is the first report of CA-MRSA in the study area.

  12. Drug Resistance

    MedlinePlus

    HIV Treatment Drug Resistance (Last updated 3/2/2017; last reviewed 3/2/2017) Key Points As HIV multiplies in the ... the risk of drug resistance. What is HIV drug resistance? Once a person becomes infected with HIV, ...

  13. Evolution of pre-existing versus acquired resistance to platinum drugs and PARP inhibitors in BRCA-associated cancers.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Kimiyo N; Hirota, Kouji; Takeda, Shunichi; Haeno, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Platinum drugs and PARP inhibitors ("PARPis") are considered to be effective in BRCA-associated cancers with impaired DNA repair. These agents cause stalled and collapsed replication forks and create double-strand breaks effectively in the absence of repair mechanisms, resulting in arrest of the cell cycle and induction of cell death. However, recent studies have shown failure of these chemotherapeutic agents due to emerging drug resistance. In this study, we developed a stochastic model of BRCA-associated cancer progression in which there are four cancer populations: those with (i) functional BRCA, (ii) dysfunctional BRCA, (iii) functional BRCA and a growth advantage, and (iv) dysfunctional BRCA and a growth advantage. These four cancer populations expand from one cancer cell with normal repair function until the total cell number reaches a detectable amount. We derived formulas for the probability and expected numbers of each population at the time of detection. Furthermore, we extended the model to consider the tumor dynamics during treatment. Results from the model were validated and showed good agreement with clinical and experimental evidence in BRCA-associated cancers. Based on the model, we investigated conditions in which drug resistance during the treatment course originated from either a pre-existing drug-resistant population or a de novo population, due to secondary mutations. Finally, we found that platinum drugs and PARPis were effective if (i) BRCA inactivation is present, (ii) the cancer was diagnosed early, and (iii) tumor growth is rapid. Our results indicate that different types of cancers have a preferential way of acquiring resistance to platinum drugs and PARPis according to their growth and mutational characteristics.

  14. Integrating Enzymatic Self-Assembly and Mitochondria Targeting for Selectively Killing Cancer Cells without Acquired Drug Resistance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huaimin; Feng, Zhaoqianqi; Wang, Youzhi; Zhou, Rong; Yang, Zhimou; Xu, Bing

    2016-12-14

    Targeting organelles by modulating the redox potential of mitochondria is a promising approach to kill cancer cells that minimizes acquired drug resistance. However, it lacks selectivity because mitochondria perform essential functions for (almost) all cells. We show that enzyme-instructed self-assembly (EISA), a bioinspired molecular process, selectively generates the assemblies of redox modulators (e.g., triphenyl phosphinium (TPP)) in the pericellular space of cancer cells for uptake, which allows selectively targeting the mitochondria of cancer cells. The attachment of TPP to a pair of enantiomeric, phosphorylated tetrapeptides produces the precursors (L-1P or D-1P) that form oligomers. Upon dephosphorylation catalyzed by ectophosphatases (e.g., alkaline phosphatase (ALP)) overexpressed on cancer cells (e.g., Saos2), the oligomers self-assemble to form nanoscale assemblies only on the surface of the cancer cells. The cancer cells thus uptake these assemblies of TPP via endocytosis, mainly via a caveolae/raft-dependent pathway. Inside the cells, the assemblies of TPP-peptide conjugates escape from the lysosome, induce dysfunction of mitochondria to release cytochrome c, and result in cell death, while the controls (i.e., omitting TPP motif, inhibiting ALP, or removing phosphate trigger) hardly kill the Saos2 cells. Most importantly, the repeated stimulation of the cancers by the precursors, unexpectedly, sensitizes the cancer cells to the precursors. As the first example of the integration of subcellular targeting with cell targeting, this study validates the spatial control of the assemblies of nonspecific cytotoxic agents by EISA as a promising molecular process for selectively killing cancer cells without inducing acquired drug resistance.

  15. Azithromycin Dose To Maximize Efficacy and Suppress Acquired Drug Resistance in Pulmonary Mycobacterium avium Disease

    PubMed Central

    Deshpande, Devyani; Pasipanodya, Jotam G.

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium complex is now the leading mycobacterial cause of chronic pneumonia in the United States. Macrolides and ethambutol form the backbone of the regimen used in the treatment of pulmonary disease. However, therapy outcomes remain poor, with microbial cure rates of 4% in cavitary disease. The treatment dose of azithromycin has mostly been borrowed from that used to treat other bacterial pneumonias; there are no formal dose-response studies in pulmonary M. avium disease and the optimal dose is unclear. We utilized population pharmacokinetics and pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics-derived azithromycin exposures associated with optimal microbial kill or resistance suppression to perform 10,000 patient Monte Carlo simulations of dose effect studies for daily azithromycin doses of 0.5 to 10 g. The currently recommended dose of 500 mg per day achieved the target exposures in 0% of patients. Exposures associated with optimal kill and resistance suppression were achieved in 87 and 54% of patients, respectively, only by the very high dose of 8 g per day. The azithromycin susceptibility breakpoint above which patients failed therapy on the very high doses of 8 g per day was an MIC of 16 mg/liter, suggesting a critical concentration of 32 mg/liter, which is 8-fold lower than the currently used susceptibility breakpoint of 256 mg/liter. If the standard dose of 500 mg a day were used, then the critical concentration would fall to 2 mg/liter, 128-fold lower than 256 mg/liter. The misclassification of resistant isolates as susceptible could explain the high failure rates of current doses. PMID:26810646

  16. CXCR4-targeted lipid-coated PLGA nanoparticles deliver sorafenib and overcome acquired drug resistance in liver cancer.

    PubMed

    Gao, Dong-Yu; Lin, Ts-Ting; Sung, Yun-Chieh; Liu, Ya Chi; Chiang, Wen-Hsuan; Chang, Chih-Chun; Liu, Jia-Yu; Chen, Yunching

    2015-10-01

    Sorafenib, a multikinase inhibitor, has been used as an anti-angiogenic agent against highly vascular hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) - yet associated with only moderate therapeutic effect and the high incidence of HCC recurrence. We have shown intratumoral hypoxia induced by sorafenib activated C-X-C receptor type 4 (CXCR4)/stromal-derived factor 1α (SDF1α) axis, resulting in polarization toward a tumor-promoting microenvironment and resistance to anti-angiogenic therapy in HCC. Herein, we formulated sorafenib in CXCR4-targeted lipid-coated poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles (NPs) modified with a CXCR4 antagonist, AMD3100 to systemically deliver sorafenib into HCC and sensitize HCC to sorafenib treatment. We demonstrated that CXCR4-targeted NPs efficiently delivered sorafenib into HCCs and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) to achieve cytotoxicity and anti-angiogenic effect in vitro and in vivo. Despite the increased expression of SDF1α upon the persistent hypoxia induced by sorafenib-loaded CXCR4-targeted NPs, AMD3100 attached to the NPs can block CXCR4/SDF1α, leading to the reduced infiltration of tumor-associated macrophages, enhanced anti-angiogenic effect, a delay in tumor progression and increased overall survival in the orthotopic HCC model compared with other control groups. In conclusion, our results highlight the clinical potential of CXCR4-targeted NPs for delivering sorafenib and overcoming acquired drug resistance in liver cancer.

  17. Induction of autophagy counteracts the anticancer effect of cisplatin in human esophageal cancer cells with acquired drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Yu, Le; Gu, Chunping; Zhong, Desheng; Shi, Lili; Kong, Yi; Zhou, Zhitao; Liu, Shuwen

    2014-12-01

    Cisplatin-based chemotherapy frequently resulted in acquired resistance. The underpinning mechanism of such resistance remains obscure especially in relation to autophagic response. This study thus investigated the role of autophagy in the anticancer activity of cisplatin in human esophageal cancer cells with acquired cisplatin resistance. In response to cisplatin treatment, EC109 cells exhibited substantial apoptosis and senescence whereas cisplatin-resistant EC109/CDDP cells exhibited resistance. In this respect, cisplatin increased ERK phosphorylation whose inhibition by MEK inhibitor significantly attenuated the cytotoxic and cytostatic effect of cisplatin. Notably, cisplatin preferentially induces autophagy in EC109/CDDP cells but not in EC109 cells. Moreover, the induction of autophagy was accompanied by the suppression of mTORC1 activity. Abolition of autophagy by pharmacological inhibitors or knockdown of ATG5/7 re-sensitized EC109/CDDP cells. Co-administration of an autophagy inhibitor chloroquine and cisplatin significantly suppressed tumor growth whereas cisplatin monotherapy failed to elicit anticancer activity in nude mice xenografted with EC109/CDDP cells. To conclude, our data implicate autophagic response as a key mechanism of acquired resistance to cisplatin, suggesting that autophagy is a novel target to improve therapy efficiency of cisplatin toward human esophageal cancers with acquired resistance.

  18. Tunable-combinatorial Mechanisms of Acquired Resistance Limit the Efficacy of BRAF/MEK Co-targeting but Result in Melanoma Drug Addiction

    PubMed Central

    Moriceau, Gatien; Hugo, Willy; Hong, Aayoung; Shi, Hubing; Kong, Xiangju; Yu, Clarissa C.; Koya, Richard C.; Samatar, Ahmed A.; Khanlou, Negar; Braun, Jonathan; Ruchalski, Kathleen; Seifert, Heike; Larkin, James; Dahlman, Kimberly B.; Johnson, Douglas B.; Algazi, Alain; Sosman, Jeffrey A.; Ribas, Antoni; Lo, Roger S.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Combined BRAF and MEK targeted therapy improves upon BRAF inhibitor (BRAFi) therapy but is still beset by acquired resistance. We show that melanomas acquire resistance to combined BRAF and MEK inhibition by augmenting or combining mechanisms of single-agent BRAFi resistance. These double-drug resistance-associated genetic configurations significantly altered molecular interactions underlying MAPK pathway reactivation. V600EBRAF, expressed at supra-physiological levels because of V600EBRAF ultra-amplification, dimerized with and activated CRAF. In addition, MEK mutants enhanced interaction with over-expressed V600EBRAF via a regulatory interface at R662 of V600EBRAF. Importantly, melanoma cell lines selected for resistance to BRAFi+MEKi, but not those to BRAFi alone, displayed robust drug addiction, providing a potentially exploitable therapeutic opportunity. PMID:25600339

  19. HLA class I downregulation is associated with enhanced NK-cell killing of melanoma cells with acquired drug resistance to BRAF inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Sottile, Rosa; Pangigadde, Pradeepa N; Tan, Thomas; Anichini, Andrea; Sabbatino, Francesco; Trecroci, Francesca; Favoino, Elvira; Orgiano, Laura; Roberts, James; Ferrone, Soldano; Kärre, Klas; Colucci, Francesco; Carbone, Ennio

    2016-02-01

    The frequent development of drug resistance to targeted therapies in cancer patients has stimulated interest in strategies counteracting resistance. Combining immunotherapies with targeted therapies is one such strategy. In this context, we asked whether human NK cells can target melanoma cells that have acquired resistance to selective inhibitors targeting activating mutants of the B-Raf kinase (BRAF inhibitors, BRAFi). We generated drug-resistant cell variants in vitro from human BRAF-mutant melanoma cell lines MEL-HO, COLO-38, SK-MEL-37, 1520 and from primary melanoma cells freshly isolated from two patients. All drug-resistant cell variants remained susceptible to lysis by IL-2-activated NK cells; and two BRAFi-resistant lines (BRAFi-R) became significantly more susceptible to NK-cell lysis than their parental lines. This was associated with significant HLA class I antigen downregulation and PD-L1 upregulation on the drug-resistant lines. Although blocking HLA class I enhanced the extent of lysis of both BRAFi-R and parental cells to NK-cell-mediated lysis, antibody-mediated inhibition of PD1-PD-L1 interactions had no detectable effect. HLA class I antigen expression on BRAFi-R melanoma variants thus appears to play a major role in their susceptibility to NK-cell cytotoxicity. These findings suggest that NK-cell-based immunotherapy may be a viable approach to treat melanoma patients with acquired resistance to BRAF inhibitors.

  20. Overcoming acquired drug resistance in colorectal cancer cells by targeted delivery of 5-FU with EGF grafted hollow mesoporous silica nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lijue; She, Xiaodong; Wang, Tao; He, Li; Shigdar, Sarah; Duan, Wei; Kong, Lingxue

    2015-08-01

    Acquired drug resistance (ADR) can be developed in colorectal cancer cells after 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) treatment and diminish the effectiveness of chemotherapy. In this work, acquired 5-FU resistance in the colorectal cancer cell line SW480 was obtained with the up-regulation of dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPYD) gene expression which can convert 5-FU to its inactive metabolite. To overcome ADR in colorectal cancer, hollow mesoporous silica nanoparticles (HMSNs) grafted with epidermal growth factor (EGF) were used as nanocarriers to deliver 5-FU to colorectal cancer cells with acquired drug resistance. The effect and mechanism of 5-FU loaded EGF grafted HMSNs (EGF-HMSNs-5-FU) in overcoming acquired drug resistance in SW480/ADR cells were studied. The EGF-HMSNs were demonstrated to be specifically internalized in EGFR overexpressed SW480/ADR cells via a receptor-mediated endocytosis and can escape from endo-lysosomes. The EGF-HMSNs-5-FU exhibited much higher cytotoxicity on SW480/ADR cells than HMSNs-5-FU and free 5-FU while the plain HMSNs did not show significant cytotoxicity. The mechanism of EGF-HMSNs-5-FU in overcoming drug resistance in SW480/ADR cells could be attributed to the specific internalization of EGF-HMSNs-5-FU in EGFR overexpressed cells which can lead to high intracellular drug accumulation and cause cell death through S phase arrest.Acquired drug resistance (ADR) can be developed in colorectal cancer cells after 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) treatment and diminish the effectiveness of chemotherapy. In this work, acquired 5-FU resistance in the colorectal cancer cell line SW480 was obtained with the up-regulation of dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPYD) gene expression which can convert 5-FU to its inactive metabolite. To overcome ADR in colorectal cancer, hollow mesoporous silica nanoparticles (HMSNs) grafted with epidermal growth factor (EGF) were used as nanocarriers to deliver 5-FU to colorectal cancer cells with acquired drug resistance. The

  1. A platinum-based hybrid drug design approach to circumvent acquired resistance to molecular targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Yuming; Poon, Daniel C.; Fei, Rong; Lam, Amy S. M.; Au-Yeung, Steve C. F.; To, Kenneth K. W.

    2016-05-01

    Three molecular targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) were conjugated to classical platinum-based drugs with an aim to circumvent TKI resistance, predominately mediated by the emergence of secondary mutations on oncogenic kinases. The hybrids were found to maintain specificity towards the same oncogenic kinases as the original TKI. Importantly, they are remarkably less affected by TKI resistance, presumably due to their unique structure and the observed dual mechanism of anticancer activity (kinase inhibition and DNA damage). The study is also the first to report the application of a hybrid drug approach to switch TKIs from being efflux transporter substrates into non-substrates. TKIs cannot penetrate into the brain for treating metastases because of efflux transporters at the blood brain barrier. The hybrids were found to escape drug efflux and they accumulate more than the original TKI in the brain in BALB/c mice. Further development of the hybrid compounds is warranted.

  2. A platinum-based hybrid drug design approach to circumvent acquired resistance to molecular targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Yuming; Poon, Daniel C.; Fei, Rong; Lam, Amy S. M.; Au-Yeung, Steve C. F.; To, Kenneth K. W.

    2016-01-01

    Three molecular targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) were conjugated to classical platinum-based drugs with an aim to circumvent TKI resistance, predominately mediated by the emergence of secondary mutations on oncogenic kinases. The hybrids were found to maintain specificity towards the same oncogenic kinases as the original TKI. Importantly, they are remarkably less affected by TKI resistance, presumably due to their unique structure and the observed dual mechanism of anticancer activity (kinase inhibition and DNA damage). The study is also the first to report the application of a hybrid drug approach to switch TKIs from being efflux transporter substrates into non-substrates. TKIs cannot penetrate into the brain for treating metastases because of efflux transporters at the blood brain barrier. The hybrids were found to escape drug efflux and they accumulate more than the original TKI in the brain in BALB/c mice. Further development of the hybrid compounds is warranted. PMID:27150583

  3. HLA class I downregulation is associated with enhanced NK‐cell killing of melanoma cells with acquired drug resistance to BRAF inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Sottile, Rosa; Pangigadde, Pradeepa N.; Tan, Thomas; Anichini, Andrea; Sabbatino, Francesco; Trecroci, Francesca; Favoino, Elvira; Orgiano, Laura; Roberts, James; Ferrone, Soldano; Kärre, Klas; Colucci, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    The frequent development of drug resistance to targeted therapies in cancer patients has stimulated interest in strategies counteracting resistance. Combining immunotherapies with targeted therapies is one such strategy. In this context, we asked whether human NK cells can target melanoma cells that have acquired resistance to selective inhibitors targeting activating mutants of the B‐Raf kinase (BRAF inhibitors, BRAFi). We generated drug‐resistant cell variants in vitro from human BRAF‐mutant melanoma cell lines MEL‐HO, COLO‐38, SK‐MEL‐37, 1520 and from primary melanoma cells freshly isolated from two patients. All drug‐resistant cell variants remained susceptible to lysis by IL‐2‐activated NK cells; and two BRAFi‐resistant lines (BRAFi‐R) became significantly more susceptible to NK‐cell lysis than their parental lines. This was associated with significant HLA class I antigen downregulation and PD‐L1 upregulation on the drug‐resistant lines. Although blocking HLA class I enhanced the extent of lysis of both BRAFi‐R and parental cells to NK‐cell‐mediated lysis, antibody‐mediated inhibition of PD1–PD‐L1 interactions had no detectable effect. HLA class I antigen expression on BRAFi‐R melanoma variants thus appears to play a major role in their susceptibility to NK‐cell cytotoxicity. These findings suggest that NK‐cell‐based immunotherapy may be a viable approach to treat melanoma patients with acquired resistance to BRAF inhibitors. PMID:26564811

  4. Natural and acquired macrolide resistance in mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Doucet-Populaire, F; Buriánková, K; Weiser, J; Pernodet, J-L

    2002-12-01

    The genus Mycobacterium contains two of the most important human pathogens, Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium leprae, the etiologic agents of tuberculosis and leprosy, respectively. Other mycobacteria are mostly saprophytic organisms, living in soil and water, but some of them can cause opportunistic infections. The increasing incidence of tuberculosis as well as infections with non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) in AIDS patients has renewed interest in molecular mechanisms of drug resistance in these pathogens. Mycobacteria show a high degree of intrinsic resistance to most common antibiotics. For instance, species from the M. tuberculosis complex (MTC) are intrinsically resistant to macrolides. Nevertheless, some semi-synthetic macrolides as the erythromycin derivatives clarithromycin, azithromycin and most recently the ketolides, are active against NTM, particularly Mycobacterium avium, and some of them are widely used for infection treatment. However, shortly after the introduction of these new drugs, resistant strains appeared due to mutations in the macrolide target, the ribosome. The mycobacterial cell wall with its specific composition and structure is considered to be a major factor in promoting the natural resistance of mycobacteria to various antibiotics. However, to explain the difference in macrolide sensitivity between the MTC and NTM, the synergistic contribution of a specific resistance mechanism might be required, in addition to possible differences in cell wall permeability. This mini-review summarizes the current knowledge on the natural and acquired macrolide resistance in mycobacteria, gives an overview of potential mechanisms implicated in the intrinsic resistance and brings recent data concerning a macrolide resistance determinant in the MTC.

  5. Cancer Cells Acquire Mitotic Drug Resistance Properties Through Beta I-Tubulin Mutations and Alterations in the Expression of Beta-Tubulin Isotypes

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Chun Hei Antonio; Wu, Su-Ying; Lee, Tian-Ren; Chang, Chi-Yen; Wu, Jian-Sung; Hsieh, Hsing-Pang; Chang, Jang-Yang

    2010-01-01

    Background Anti-mitotic compounds (microtubule de-stabilizers) such as vincristine and vinblastine have been shown clinically successful in treating various cancers. However, development of drug-resistance cells limits their efficacies in clinical situations. Therefore, experiments were performed to determine possible drug resistance mechanisms related to the application of anti-mitotic cancer therapy. Principal Findings A KB-derived microtubule de-stabilizer-resistant KB-L30 cancer cell line was generated for this study. KB-L30 cells showed cross-resistance to various microtubule de-stabilizers including BPR0L075, vincristine and colchicine through multiple-drug resistant (MDR)-independent mechanisms. Surprisingly, KB-L30 cells showed hyper-sensitivity to the microtubule-stabilizer, paclitaxel. Results of the RT-PCR analysis revealed that expression of both class II and III β-tubulin was down-regulated in KB-L30 cells as compared to its parental KB cancer cells. In addition, DNA sequencing analysis revealed six novel mutation sites present in exon four of the βI-tubulin gene. Computational modeling indicated that a direct relationship exists between βI-tubulin mutations and alteration in the microtubule assembly and dynamic instability in KB-L30 cells and this predicted model was supported by an increased microtubule assembly and reduced microtubule dynamic instability in KB-L30 cells, as shown by Western blot analysis. Conclusions and Significance Our study demonstrated that these novel mutations in exon four of the βI-tubulin induced resistance to microtubule de-stabilizers and hyper-sensitivity to microtubule stabilizer through an alteration in the microtubule assembly and dynamics in cancer cells. Importantly, the current study reveals that cancer cells may acquire drug resistance ability to anti-mitotic compounds through multiple changes in the microtubule networks. This study further provided molecular information in drug selection for patients with

  6. Mechanisms of polymyxin resistance: acquired and intrinsic resistance in bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Olaitan, Abiola O.; Morand, Serge; Rolain, Jean-Marc

    2014-01-01

    Polymyxins are polycationic antimicrobial peptides that are currently the last-resort antibiotics for the treatment of multidrug-resistant, Gram-negative bacterial infections. The reintroduction of polymyxins for antimicrobial therapy has been followed by an increase in reports of resistance among Gram-negative bacteria. Some bacteria, such as Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Acinetobacter baumannii, develop resistance to polymyxins in a process referred to as acquired resistance, whereas other bacteria, such as Proteus spp., Serratia spp., and Burkholderia spp., are naturally resistant to these drugs. Reports of polymyxin resistance in clinical isolates have recently increased, including acquired and intrinsically resistant pathogens. This increase is considered a serious issue, prompting concern due to the low number of currently available effective antibiotics. This review summarizes current knowledge concerning the different strategies bacteria employ to resist the activities of polymyxins. Gram-negative bacteria employ several strategies to protect themselves from polymyxin antibiotics (polymyxin B and colistin), including a variety of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) modifications, such as modifications of lipid A with phosphoethanolamine and 4-amino-4-deoxy-L-arabinose, in addition to the use of efflux pumps, the formation of capsules and overexpression of the outer membrane protein OprH, which are all effectively regulated at the molecular level. The increased understanding of these mechanisms is extremely vital and timely to facilitate studies of antimicrobial peptides and find new potential drugs targeting clinically relevant Gram-negative bacteria. PMID:25505462

  7. Antimicrobial (Drug) Resistance Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... Visitor Information Contact Us Research > NIAID's Role in Research > Antimicrobial (Drug) Resistance > Understanding share with facebook share with twitter ... Prevention, Antimicrobial (Drug) Resistance Antimicrobial (Drug) Resistance Antimicrobial ... To prevent antimicrobial resistance, you and your healthcare ...

  8. Significant Differences in the Development of Acquired Resistance to the MDM2 Inhibitor SAR405838 between In Vitro and In Vivo Drug Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman-Luca, C. Gianna; Yang, Chao-Yie; Lu, Jianfeng; Ziazadeh, Daniel; McEachern, Donna; Debussche, Laurent; Wang, Shaomeng

    2015-01-01

    SAR405838 is a potent and specific MDM2 inhibitor currently being evaluated in Phase I clinical trials for the treatment of human cancer. Using the SJSA-1 osteosarcoma cell line which harbors an amplified MDM2 gene and wild-type p53, we have investigated the acquired resistance mechanisms both in vitro and in vivo to SAR405838. Treatment of SJSA-1 cells with SAR405838 in vitro leads to dose-dependent cell growth inhibition, cell cycle arrest and robust apoptosis. However, prolonged treatment of SJSA-1 cells in vitro with SAR405838 results in profound acquired resistance to the drug. Analysis of in vitro-derived resistant cell lines showed that p53 is mutated in the DNA binding domain and can no longer be activated by SAR405838. Treatment of the parental SJSA-1 xenograft tumors with SAR405838 in mice yields rapid tumor regression but the tumors eventually regrow. Culturing the regrown tumors established a number of sublines, which showed only modest (3–5 times) loss of sensitivity to SAR405838 in vitro. Sequencing of the p53 showed that it retains its wild-type status in these in vivo sublines, with the exception of one subline, which harbors a single heterozygous C176F p53 mutation. Using xenograft models of two in vivo derived sublines, which has either wild-type p53 or p53 containing a single heterozygous C176F mutation, we showed that while SAR405838 effectively achieves partial tumor regression in these models, it no longer induces complete tumor regression and tumors resume growth once the treatment is stopped. Harvesting and culturing tumors obtained from a prolonged treatment with SAR405838 in mice established additional in vivo sublines, which all contain a single heterozygous C176F mutation with no additional p53 mutation detected. Interestingly, SAR405838 can still effectively activate p53 in all sublines containing a single heterozygous C176F mutation, with a moderately reduced potency as compared to that in the parental cell line. Consistently, SAR

  9. HIV-1 virologic failure and acquired drug resistance among first-line antiretroviral experienced adults at a rural HIV clinic in coastal Kenya: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background An increasing number of people on antiretroviral therapy (ART) in sub-Saharan Africa has led to declines in HIV related morbidity and mortality. However, virologic failure (VF) and acquired drug resistance (ADR) may negatively affect these gains. This study describes the prevalence and correlates of HIV-1 VF and ADR among first-line ART experienced adults at a rural HIV clinic in Coastal Kenya. Methods HIV-infected adults on first-line ART for ≥6 months were cross-sectionally recruited between November 2008 and March 2011. The primary outcome was VF, defined as a one-off plasma viral load of ≥400 copies/ml. The secondary outcome was ADR, defined as the presence of resistance associated mutations. Logistic regression and Fishers exact test were used to describe correlates of VF and ADR respectively. Results Of the 232 eligible participants on ART over a median duration of 13.9 months, 57 (24.6% [95% CI: 19.2 – 30.6]) had VF. Fifty-five viraemic samples were successfully amplified and sequenced. Of these, 29 (52.7% [95% CI: 38.8 – 66.3]) had at least one ADR, with 25 samples having dual-class resistance mutations. The most prevalent ADR mutations were the M184V (n = 24), K103N/S (n = 14) and Y181C/Y/I/V (n = 8). Twenty-six of the 55 successfully amplified viraemic samples (47.3%) did not have any detectable resistance mutation. Younger age (15–34 vs. ≥35 years: adjusted odd ratios [95% CI], p-value: 0.3 [0.1–0.6], p = 0.002) and unsatisfactory adherence (<95% vs. ≥95%: 3.0 [1.5–6.5], p = 0.003) were strong correlates of VF. Younger age, unsatisfactory adherence and high viral load were also strong correlates of ADR. Conclusions High levels of VF and ADR were observed in younger patients and those with unsatisfactory adherence. Youth-friendly ART initiatives and strengthened adherence support should be prioritized in this Coastal Kenyan setting. To prevent unnecessary/premature switches, targeted HIV drug resistance

  10. Targets for Combating the Evolution of Acquired Antibiotic Resistance.

    PubMed

    Culyba, Matthew J; Mo, Charlie Y; Kohli, Rahul M

    2015-06-16

    Bacteria possess a remarkable ability to rapidly adapt and evolve in response to antibiotics. Acquired antibiotic resistance can arise by multiple mechanisms but commonly involves altering the target site of the drug, enzymatically inactivating the drug, or preventing the drug from accessing its target. These mechanisms involve new genetic changes in the pathogen leading to heritable resistance. This recognition underscores the importance of understanding how such genetic changes can arise. Here, we review recent advances in our understanding of the processes that contribute to the evolution of antibiotic resistance, with a particular focus on hypermutation mediated by the SOS pathway and horizontal gene transfer. We explore the molecular mechanisms involved in acquired resistance and discuss their viability as potential targets. We propose that additional studies into these adaptive mechanisms not only can provide insights into evolution but also can offer a strategy for potentiating our current antibiotic arsenal.

  11. Targets for Combating the Evolution of Acquired Antibiotic Resistance

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria possess a remarkable ability to rapidly adapt and evolve in response to antibiotics. Acquired antibiotic resistance can arise by multiple mechanisms but commonly involves altering the target site of the drug, enzymatically inactivating the drug, or preventing the drug from accessing its target. These mechanisms involve new genetic changes in the pathogen leading to heritable resistance. This recognition underscores the importance of understanding how such genetic changes can arise. Here, we review recent advances in our understanding of the processes that contribute to the evolution of antibiotic resistance, with a particular focus on hypermutation mediated by the SOS pathway and horizontal gene transfer. We explore the molecular mechanisms involved in acquired resistance and discuss their viability as potential targets. We propose that additional studies into these adaptive mechanisms not only can provide insights into evolution but also can offer a strategy for potentiating our current antibiotic arsenal. PMID:26016604

  12. Acquired resistance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis to bedaquiline.

    PubMed

    Andries, Koen; Villellas, Cristina; Coeck, Nele; Thys, Kim; Gevers, Tom; Vranckx, Luc; Lounis, Nacer; de Jong, Bouke C; Koul, Anil

    2014-01-01

    Bedaquiline (BDQ), an ATP synthase inhibitor, is the first drug to be approved for treatment of multi-drug resistant tuberculosis in decades. In vitro resistance to BDQ was previously shown to be due to target-based mutations. Here we report that non-target based resistance to BDQ, and cross-resistance to clofazimine (CFZ), is due to mutations in Rv0678, a transcriptional repressor of the genes encoding the MmpS5-MmpL5 efflux pump. Efflux-based resistance was identified in paired isolates from patients treated with BDQ, as well as in mice, in which it was confirmed to decrease bactericidal efficacy. The efflux inhibitors verapamil and reserpine decreased the minimum inhibitory concentrations of BDQ and CFZ in vitro, but verapamil failed to increase the bactericidal effect of BDQ in mice and was unable to reverse efflux-based resistance in vivo. Cross-resistance between BDQ and CFZ may have important clinical implications.

  13. Acquired Antibiotic Resistance Genes: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    van Hoek, Angela H. A. M.; Mevius, Dik; Guerra, Beatriz; Mullany, Peter; Roberts, Adam Paul; Aarts, Henk J. M.

    2011-01-01

    In this review an overview is given on antibiotic resistance (AR) mechanisms with special attentions to the AR genes described so far preceded by a short introduction on the discovery and mode of action of the different classes of antibiotics. As this review is only dealing with acquired resistance, attention is also paid to mobile genetic elements such as plasmids, transposons, and integrons, which are associated with AR genes, and involved in the dispersal of antimicrobial determinants between different bacteria. PMID:22046172

  14. Mechanisms of drug resistance: quinolone resistance

    PubMed Central

    Hooper, David C.; Jacoby, George A.

    2015-01-01

    Quinolone antimicrobials are synthetic and widely used in clinical medicine. Resistance emerged with clinical use and became common in some bacterial pathogens. Mechanisms of resistance include two categories of mutation and acquisition of resistance-conferring genes. Resistance mutations in one or both of the two drug target enzymes, DNA gyrase and DNA topoisomerase IV, are commonly in a localized domain of the GyrA and ParE subunits of the respective enzymes and reduce drug binding to the enzyme-DNA complex. Other resistance mutations occur in regulatory genes that control the expression of native efflux pumps localized in the bacterial membrane(s). These pumps have broad substrate profiles that include quinolones as well as other antimicrobials, disinfectants, and dyes. Mutations of both types can accumulate with selection pressure and produce highly resistant strains. Resistance genes acquired on plasmids can confer low-level resistance that promotes the selection of mutational high-level resistance. Plasmid-encoded resistance is due to Qnr proteins that protect the target enzymes from quinolone action, one mutant aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme that also modifies certain quinolones, and mobile efflux pumps. Plasmids with these mechanisms often encode additional antimicrobial resistances and can transfer multidrug resistance that includes quinolones. Thus, the bacterial quinolone resistance armamentarium is large. PMID:26190223

  15. Mechanisms of drug resistance: quinolone resistance.

    PubMed

    Hooper, David C; Jacoby, George A

    2015-09-01

    Quinolone antimicrobials are synthetic and widely used in clinical medicine. Resistance emerged with clinical use and became common in some bacterial pathogens. Mechanisms of resistance include two categories of mutation and acquisition of resistance-conferring genes. Resistance mutations in one or both of the two drug target enzymes, DNA gyrase and DNA topoisomerase IV, are commonly in a localized domain of the GyrA and ParE subunits of the respective enzymes and reduce drug binding to the enzyme-DNA complex. Other resistance mutations occur in regulatory genes that control the expression of native efflux pumps localized in the bacterial membrane(s). These pumps have broad substrate profiles that include quinolones as well as other antimicrobials, disinfectants, and dyes. Mutations of both types can accumulate with selection pressure and produce highly resistant strains. Resistance genes acquired on plasmids can confer low-level resistance that promotes the selection of mutational high-level resistance. Plasmid-encoded resistance is due to Qnr proteins that protect the target enzymes from quinolone action, one mutant aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme that also modifies certain quinolones, and mobile efflux pumps. Plasmids with these mechanisms often encode additional antimicrobial resistances and can transfer multidrug resistance that includes quinolones. Thus, the bacterial quinolone resistance armamentarium is large.

  16. Acquired resistance to gemcitabine and cross-resistance in human pancreatic cancer clones.

    PubMed

    Yoneyama, Hiroshi; Takizawa-Hashimoto, Asako; Takeuchi, Osamu; Watanabe, Yukiko; Atsuda, Koichiro; Asanuma, Fumiki; Yamada, Yoshinori; Suzuki, Yukio

    2015-01-01

    The efficacy of gemcitabine (GEM), a standard treatment agent for pancreatic cancer, is insufficient because of primary or acquired resistance to this drug. Patients with tumors intrinsically sensitive to GEM gradually acquire resistance and require a shift to second agents, which are associated with the risk of cross-resistance. However, whether cross-resistance is actually present has long been disputed. Using six GEM-resistant and four highly GEM-resistant clones derived from the pancreatic cancer cell line BxPC-3, we determined the resistance of each clone and parent cell line to GEM and four anticancer agents (5-FU, CDDP, CPT-11, and DTX). The GEM-resistant clones had different resistances to GEM and other agents, and did not develop a specific pattern of cross-resistance. This result shows that tumor cells are heterogeneous. However, all highly GEM-resistant clones presented overexpression of ribonucleotide reductase subunit M1 (RRM1), a target enzyme for metabolized GEM, and showed cross-resistance with 5-FU. The expression level of RRM1 was high; therefore, resistance to GEM was high. We showed that a tumor cell acquired resistance to GEM, and cross-resistance developed in one clone. These results suggest that only cells with certain mechanisms for high-level resistance to GEM survive against selective pressure applied by highly concentrated GEM. RRM1 may be one of the few factors that can induce high resistance to GEM and a suitable therapeutic target for GEM-resistant pancreatic cancer.

  17. Risk of Drug Resistance Among Persons Acquiring HIV Within a Randomized Clinical Trial of Single- or Dual-Agent Preexposure Prophylaxis

    PubMed Central

    Lehman, Dara A.; Baeten, Jared M.; McCoy, Connor O.; Weis, Julie F.; Peterson, Dylan; Mbara, Gerald; Donnell, Deborah; Thomas, Katherine K.; Hendrix, Craig W.; Marzinke, Mark A.; Frenkel, Lisa; Ndase, Patrick; Mugo, Nelly R.; Celum, Connie; Overbaugh, Julie; Matsen, Frederick A.; Celum, Connie; Baeten, Jared M.; Donnell, Deborah; Coombs, Robert W.; Frenkel, Lisa; Hendrix, Craig W.; Marzinke, Mark A.; Lingappa, Jairam; McElrath, M. Juliana; Fife, Kenneth; Were, Edwin; Tumwesigye, Elioda; Ndase, Patrick; Katabira, Elly; Katabira, Elly; Ronald, Allan; Bukusi, Elizabeth; Cohen, Craig; Wangisi, Jonathan; Campbell, James; Tappero, Jordan; Kiarie, James; Farquhar, Carey; John-Stewart, Grace; Mugo, Nelly Rwamba; Campbell, James; Tappero, Jordan; Wangisi, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Background. Preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) with emtricitabine plus tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (FTC/TDF) or TDF alone reduces the risk of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) acquisition. Understanding the risk of antiretroviral resistance selected by PrEP during breakthrough infections is important because of the risk of treatment failure during subsequent antiretroviral use. Methods. Within the largest randomized trial of FTC/TDF versus TDF as PrEP, plasma samples were tested for HIV with resistance mutations associated with FTC (K65R and M184IV) and TDF (K65R and K70E), using 454 sequencing. Results. Of 121 HIV seroconverters, 25 received FTC/TDF, 38 received TDF, and 58 received placebo. Plasma drug levels in 26 individuals indicated PrEP use during or after HIV acquisition, of which 5 had virus with resistance mutations associated with their PrEP regimen. Among those with PrEP drug detected during infection, resistance was more frequent in the FTC/TDF arm (4 of 7 [57%]), compared with the TDF arm (1 of 19 [5.3%]; P = .01), owing to the FTC-associated mutation M184IV. Of these cases, 3 had unrecognized acute infection at PrEP randomization, and 2 were HIV negative at enrollment. Conclusions. These results suggest that resistance selected by PrEP is rare but can occur both with PrEP initiation during acute seronegative HIV infection and in PrEP breakthrough infections and that FTC is associated with a greater frequency of resistance mutations than TDF. PMID:25587020

  18. Signal regulators of systemic acquired resistance

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Qing-Ming; Zhu, Shifeng; Kachroo, Pradeep; Kachroo, Aardra

    2015-01-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) is an important phytohormone that plays a vital role in a number of physiological responses, including plant defense. The last two decades have witnessed a number of breakthroughs related to biosynthesis, transport, perception and signaling mediated by SA. These findings demonstrate that SA plays a crictical role in both local and systemic defense responses. Systemic acquired resistance (SAR) is one such SA-dependent response. SAR is a long distance signaling mechanism that provides broad spectrum and long-lasting resistance to secondary infections throughout the plant. This unique feature makes SAR a highly desirable trait in crop production. This review summarizes the recent advances in the role of SA in SAR and discusses its relationship to other SAR inducers. PMID:25918514

  19. Ethics and drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Selgelid, Michael J

    2007-05-01

    This paper reviews the dynamics behind, and ethical issues associated with, the phenomenon of drug resistance. Drug resistance is an important ethical issue partly because of the severe consequences likely to result from the increase in drug resistant pathogens if more is not done to control them. Drug resistance is also an ethical issue because, rather than being a mere quirk of nature, the problem is largely a product of drug distribution. Drug resistance results from the over-consumption of antibiotics by the wealthy; and it, ironically, results from the under-consumption of antibiotics, usually by the poor or otherwise marginalized. In both kinds of cases the phenomenon of drug resistance illustrates why health (care)--at least in the context of infectious disease--should be treated as a (global) public good. The point is that drug resistance involves 'externalities' affecting third parties. When one patient develops a resistant strain of disease because of her over- or under-consumption of medication, this more dangerous malady poses increased risk to others. The propriety of free-market distribution of goods subject to externalities is famously dubious--given that the 'efficiency' rationale behind markets assumes an absence of externalities. Market failure in the context of drug resistance is partly revealed by the fact that no new classes of antibiotics have been developed since 1970. I conclude by arguing that the case of drug resistance reveals additional reasons--to those traditionally appealed to by bioethicists--for treating health care as something special when making policy decisions about its distribution.

  20. Free radicals mediate systemic acquired resistance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Caixia; El-Shetehy, Mohamed; Shine, M B; Yu, Keshun; Navarre, Duroy; Wendehenne, David; Kachroo, Aardra; Kachroo, Pradeep

    2014-04-24

    Systemic acquired resistance (SAR) is a form of resistance that protects plants against a broad spectrum of secondary infections. However, exploiting SAR for the protection of agriculturally important plants warrants a thorough investigation of the mutual interrelationships among the various signals that mediate SAR. Here, we show that nitric oxide (NO) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) serve as inducers of SAR in a concentration-dependent manner. Thus, genetic mutations that either inhibit NO/ROS production or increase NO accumulation (e.g., a mutation in S-nitrosoglutathione reductase [GSNOR]) abrogate SAR. Different ROS function additively to generate the fatty-acid-derived azelaic acid (AzA), which in turn induces production of the SAR inducer glycerol-3-phosphate (G3P). Notably, this NO/ROS→AzA→G3P-induced signaling functions in parallel with salicylic acid-derived signaling. We propose that the parallel operation of NO/ROS and SA pathways facilitates coordinated regulation in order to ensure optimal induction of SAR.

  1. Antimicrobial (Drug) Resistance

    MedlinePlus

    ... NIAID invests in basic research to understand the biology of microbes, their behavior, and how drug resistance ... Nucleotide Polymorphism Phylogenetics & Ontology Proteomics & Protein Analysis Systems Biology Data Portals Software Applications BCBB Mobyle Interface Designer ( ...

  2. Socioeconomic and behavioral factors leading to acquired bacterial resistance to antibiotics in developing countries.

    PubMed Central

    Okeke, I. N.; Lamikanra, A.; Edelman, R.

    1999-01-01

    In developing countries, acquired bacterial resistance to antimicrobial agents is common in isolates from healthy persons and from persons with community-acquired infections. Complex socioeconomic and behavioral factors associated with antibiotic resistance, particularly regarding diarrheal and respiratory pathogens, in developing tropical countries, include misuse of antibiotics by health professionals, unskilled practitioners, and laypersons; poor drug quality; unhygienic conditions accounting for spread of resistant bacteria; and inadequate surveillance. PMID:10081668

  3. Antimicrobial drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Marilyn; Silley, Peter

    2010-01-01

    This chapter provides an overview of our current understanding of the mechanisms associated with the development of antimicrobial drug resistance, international differences in definitions of resistance, ongoing efforts to track shifts in drug susceptibility, and factors that can influence the selection of therapeutic intervention. The latter presents a matrix of complex variables that includes the mechanism of drug action, the pharmacokinetics (PK) of the antimicrobial agent in the targeted patient population, the pharmacodynamics (PD) of the bacterial response to the antimicrobial agent, the PK/PD relationship that will influence dose selection, and the integrity of the host immune system. Finally, the differences between bacterial tolerance and bacterial resistance are considered, and the potential for non-traditional anti-infective therapies is discussed.

  4. Augmented HR Repair Mediates Acquired Temozolomide Resistance in Glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Gil Del Alcazar, Carlos Rodrigo; Todorova, Pavlina Krasimirova; Habib, Amyn A; Mukherjee, Bipasha; Burma, Sandeep

    2016-10-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common and aggressive primary brain tumor in adults and is universally fatal. The DNA alkylating agent temozolomide is part of the standard-of-care for GBM. However, these tumors eventually develop therapy-driven resistance and inevitably recur. While loss of mismatch repair (MMR) and re-expression of MGMT have been shown to underlie chemoresistance in a fraction of GBMs, resistance mechanisms operating in the remaining GBMs are not well understood. To better understand the molecular basis for therapy-driven temozolomide resistance, mice bearing orthotopic GBM xenografts were subjected to protracted temozolomide treatment, and cell lines were generated from the primary (untreated) and recurrent (temozolomide-treated) tumors. As expected, the cells derived from primary tumors were sensitive to temozolomide, whereas the cells from the recurrent tumors were significantly resistant to the drug. Importantly, the acquired resistance to temozolomide in the recurrent lines was not driven by re-expression of MGMT or loss of MMR but was due to accelerated repair of temozolomide-induced DNA double-strand breaks (DSB). Temozolomide induces DNA replication-associated DSBs that are primarily repaired by the homologous recombination (HR) pathway. Augmented HR appears to underpin temozolomide resistance in the recurrent lines, as these cells were cross-resistant to other agents that induced replication-associated DSBs, exhibited faster resolution of damage-induced Rad51 foci, and displayed higher levels of sister chromatid exchanges (SCE). Furthermore, in light of recent studies demonstrating that CDK1 and CDK2 promote HR, it was found that CDK1/2 inhibitors countered the heightened HR in recurrent tumors and sensitized these therapy-resistant tumor cells to temozolomide.

  5. Biophysics of cell membrane lipids in cancer drug resistance: Implications for drug transport and drug delivery with nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Peetla, Chiranjeevi; Vijayaraghavalu, Sivakumar; Labhasetwar, Vinod

    2013-11-01

    In this review, we focus on the biophysics of cell membrane lipids, particularly when cancers develop acquired drug resistance, and how biophysical changes in resistant cell membrane influence drug transport and nanoparticle-mediated drug delivery. Recent advances in membrane lipid research show the varied roles of lipids in regulating membrane P-glycoprotein function, membrane trafficking, apoptotic pathways, drug transport, and endocytic functions, particularly endocytosis, the primary mechanism of cellular uptake of nanoparticle-based drug delivery systems. Since acquired drug resistance alters lipid biosynthesis, understanding the role of lipids in cell membrane biophysics and its effect on drug transport is critical for developing effective therapeutic and drug delivery approaches to overcome drug resistance. Here we discuss novel strategies for (a) modulating the biophysical properties of membrane lipids of resistant cells to facilitate drug transport and regain endocytic function and (b) developing effective nanoparticles based on their biophysical interactions with membrane lipids to enhance drug delivery and overcome drug resistance.

  6. Acquired resistance of pancreatic cancer cells to cisplatin is multifactorial with cell context-dependent involvement of resistance genes

    PubMed Central

    Mezencev, R; Matyunina, L V; Wagner, G T; McDonald, J F

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is one of the most lethal of malignancies, in large measure, due to the propensity of PDAC cells to acquire resistance to chemotherapeutic agents. A better understanding of the molecular basis of acquired resistance is a major focus of contemporary PDAC research. We report here the results of a study to independently develop cisplatin resistance in two distinct parental PDAC cell lines, AsPC1 and BxPC3, and to subsequently examine the molecular mechanisms associated with the acquired resistance. Cisplatin resistance in both resistant cell lines was found to be multifactorial and to be associated with mechanisms related to drug transport, drug inactivation, DNA damage response, DNA repair and the modulation of apoptosis. Our results demonstrate that the two resistant cell lines employed alternative molecular strategies in acquiring resistance dictated, in part, by pre-existing molecular differences between the parental cell lines. Collectively, our findings indicate that strategies to inhibit or reverse acquired resistance of PDAC cells to cisplatin, and perhaps other chemotherapeutic agents, may not be generalized but will require individual molecular profiling and analysis to be effective. PMID:27910856

  7. Intrinsic, adaptive and acquired antimicrobial resistance in Gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Arzanlou, Mohsen; Chai, Wern Chern; Venter, Henrietta

    2017-02-28

    Gram-negative bacteria are responsible for a large proportion of antimicrobial-resistant infections in humans and animals. Among this class of bacteria are also some of the most successful environmental organisms. Part of this success is their adaptability to a variety of different niches, their intrinsic resistance to antimicrobial drugs and their ability to rapidly acquire resistance mechanisms. These mechanisms of resistance are not exclusive and the interplay of several mechanisms causes high levels of resistance. In this review, we explore the molecular mechanisms underlying resistance in Gram-negative organisms and how these different mechanisms enable them to survive many different stress conditions.

  8. The evolution of resistance through costly acquired immunity.

    PubMed Central

    Boots, Michael; Bowers, Roger G.

    2004-01-01

    We examine the evolutionary dynamics of resistance to parasites through acquired immunity. Resistance can be achieved through the innate mechanisms of avoidance of infection and reduced pathogenicity once infected, through recovery from infection and through remaining immune to infection: acquired immunity. We assume that each of these mechanisms is costly to the host and find that the evolutionary dynamics of innate immunity in hosts that also have acquired immunity are quantitatively the same as in hosts that possess only innate immunity. However, compared with resistance through avoidance or recovery, there is less likely to be polymorphism in the length of acquired immunity within populations. Long-lived organisms that can recover at intermediate rates faced with fast-transmitting pathogens that cause intermediate pathogenicity (mortality of infected individuals) are most likely to evolve long-lived acquired immunity. Our work emphasizes that because whether or not acquired immunity is beneficial depends on the characteristics of the disease, organisms may be selected to only develop acquired immunity to some of the diseases that they encounter. PMID:15209105

  9. [Travellers and multi-drug resistance bacteria].

    PubMed

    Takeshita, Nozomi

    2012-02-01

    The number of international travellers has increased. There is enormous diversity in medical backgrounds, purposes of travel, and travelling styles among travellers. Travellers are hospitalized abroad because of exotic and common diseases via medical tourism. This is one way of transporting and importing human bacteria between countries, including multi-drug resistant organisms. In developing countries, the antimicrobial resistance in Shigella sp. and Salmonella sp. have been a problem, because of this trend, the first choice of antibiotics has changed in some countries. Community acquired infections as well as hospital acquired infections with MRSA, multi-drug resistance (MDR) Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and ESBL have been a problem. This review will discuss the risk of MDR bacterial infectious diseases for travellers.

  10. Mechanisms of echinocandin antifungal drug resistance

    PubMed Central

    Perlin, David S.

    2015-01-01

    Fungal infections due to Candida and Aspergillus species cause extensive morbidity and mortality, especially among immunosuppressed patients, and antifungal therapy is critical to patient management. Yet only a few drug classes are available to treat invasive fungal diseases, and this problem is compounded by the emergence of antifungal resistance. Echinocandin drugs are the preferred choice to treat candidiasis. They are the first cell wall–active agents and target the fungal-specific enzyme glucan synthase, which catalyzes the biosynthesis of β-1,3-glucan, a key cell wall polymer. Therapeutic failures occur rarely among common Candida species, with the exception of Candida glabrata, which are frequently multidrug resistant. Echinocandin resistance in susceptible species is always acquired during therapy. The mechanism of resistance involves amino acid changes in hot-spot regions of Fks subunits of glucan synthase, which decrease the sensitivity of the enzyme to drug. Cellular stress response pathways lead to drug adaptation, which promote the formation of resistant fks strains. Clinical factors promoting echinocandin resistance include empiric therapy, prophylaxis, gastrointestinal reservoirs, and intra-abdominal infections. A better understanding of the echinocandin resistance mechanism, along with cellular and clinical factors promoting resistance, will promote more effective strategies to overcome and prevent echinocandin resistance. PMID:26190298

  11. Drug-resistant tuberculous meningitis.

    PubMed

    Garg, Ravindra K; Jain, Amita; Malhotra, Hardeep S; Agrawal, Avinash; Garg, Rajiv

    2013-06-01

    Drug-resistant tuberculosis, including drug-resistant tuberculous meningitis, is an emerging health problem in many countries. An association with Beijing strains and drug resistance-related mutations, such as mutations in katG and rpoB genes, has been found. The pathology, clinical features and neuroimaging characteristics of drug-resistant tuberculous meningitis are similar to drug-responsive tuberculous meningitis. Detection of mycobacteria in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) by conventional methods (smear examination or culture) is often difficult. Nucleic acid amplification assays are better methods owing to their rapidity and high sensitivity. The Xpert MTB/RIF assay (Cepheid, CA, USA) is a fully-automated test that has also been found to be effective for CSF samples. Treatment of multidrug-resistant tuberculous meningitis depends on the drug susceptibility pattern of the isolate and/or the previous treatment history of the patient. Second-line drugs with good penetration of the CSF should be preferred. Isoniazid monoresistant disease requires addition of another drug with better CSF penetration. Drug-resistant tuberculous meningitis is associated with a high mortality. HIV infected patients with drug-resistant tuberculous meningitis have severe clinical manifestations with exceptionally high mortality. Prevention of tuberculosis is the key to reduce drug-resistant tuberculous meningitis.

  12. Drug-resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae: latest developments.

    PubMed

    Suay-García, B; Pérez-Gracia, M T

    2017-02-16

    Gonorrhea is the second most frequently reported notifiable disease in the United States and is becoming increasingly common in Europe. The purpose of this review was to assess the current state of drug-resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae in order to evaluate future prospects for its treatment. An exhaustive literature search was conducted to include the latest research regarding drug resistance and treatment guidelines for gonorrhea. Gonococci have acquired all known resistance mechanisms to all antimicrobials used for treatment. Currently, the European Union, the United States, and the United Kingdom have established surveillance programs to assess, on a yearly basis, the development of gonococcal resistance. Current treatment guidelines are being threatened by the increasing number of ceftriaxone-, cefixime-, and azithromycin-resistant N. gonorrhoeae strains being detected worldwide. This has led the scientific community to develop new treatment options with new molecules in order to persevere in the battle against this "superbug".

  13. Drugs and drug resistance in African trypanosomiasis.

    PubMed

    Delespaux, Vincent; de Koning, Harry P

    2007-01-01

    Despite the many decades of use of most of the current trypanocides, we know little of their mode of action. This may in part be because most of these will act on multiple targets once inside the cell, and they derive their selective action on the parasite from selective accumulation by the pathogen. Loss of this capacity for drug uptake by the trypanosome would thus be a major cause for drug resistance. We here discuss the use of current drugs against human and veterinary African trypanosomiasis, the prevalence, causes and mechanisms of drug resistance and new developments in trypanosomiasis therapy such as the introduction of nifurtimox and DB289.

  14. Trypanosoma congolense: Natural and Acquired Resistance in the Bovine

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-08-01

    of Immune or natural and acquired Immunity In cattle to partially Immune dams (Whiteside 1962). trypanosomiasis . It has been postulated Certain breeds...of cattle also appear to be that young animals are more resistant to naturally resistant to trypanosome infection trypanosomiasis than adults (Fiennes...1970), Murray el al. (1979). Attempts to induce immunity to trypanosomiasis under field I Reprint requests should be addressed to B. T, conditions

  15. Long-term persistence of acquired resistance to 5-fluorouracil in the colon cancer cell line SW620

    SciTech Connect

    Tentes, I.K.; Schmidt, W.M.; Krupitza, G.; Steger, G.G.; Mikulits, W.; Kortsaris, A.; Mader, R.M.

    2010-11-15

    Treatment resistance to antineoplastic drugs represents a major clinical problem. Here, we investigated the long-term stability of acquired resistance to 5-fluorouracil (FU) in an in vitro colon cancer model, using four sub-clones characterised by increasing FU-resistance derived from the cell line SW620. The resistance phenotype was preserved after FU withdrawal for 15 weeks ({approx} 100 cell divisions) independent of the established level of drug resistance and of epigenetic silencing. Remarkably, resistant clones tolerated serum deprivation, adopted a CD133{sup +} CD44{sup -} phenotype, and further exhibited loss of membrane-bound E-cadherin together with predominant nuclear {beta}-catenin localisation. Thus, we provide evidence for a long-term memory of acquired drug resistance, driven by multiple cellular strategies (epithelial-mesenchymal transition and selective propagation of CD133{sup +} cells). These resistance phenomena, in turn, accentuate the malignant phenotype.

  16. Distinct mechanisms contribute to acquired cisplatin resistance of urothelial carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Höhn, Annika; Krüger, Katharina; Skowron, Margaretha A.; Bormann, Stefanie; Schumacher, Lena; Schulz, Wolfgang A.; Hoffmann, Michèle J.; Niegisch, Günter; Fritz, Gerhard

    2016-01-01

    Cisplatin (CisPt) is frequently used in the therapy of urothelial carcinoma (UC). Its therapeutic efficacy is limited by inherent or acquired drug resistance. Here, we comparatively investigated the CisPt-induced response of two different parental urothelial carcinoma cell lines (RT-112, J-82) with that of respective drug resistant variants (RT-112R, J-82R) obtained upon month-long CisPt selection. Parental RT-112 cells were ~2.5 fold more resistant to CisPt than J-82 cells and showed a different expression pattern of CisPt-related resistance factors. CisPt resistant RT-112R and J-82R variants revealed a 2–3-fold increased CisPt resistance as compared to their corresponding parental counterparts. Acquired CisPt resistance was accompanied by morphological alterations resembling epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT). RT-112R cells revealed lower apoptotic frequency and more pronounced G2/M arrest following CisPt exposure than RT-112 cells, whereas no differences in death induction were observed between J-82 and J-82R cells. CisPt resistant J-82R cells however were characterized by a reduced formation of CisPt-induced DNA damage and related DNA damage response (DDR) as compared to J-82 cells. Such difference was not observed between RT-112R and RT-112 cells. J-82R cells showed an enhanced sensitivity to pharmacological inhibition of checkpoint kinase 1 (Chk1) and, moreover, could be re-sensitized to CisPt upon Chk1 inhibition. Based on the data we suggest that mechanisms of acquired CisPt resistance of individual UC cells are substantially different, with apoptosis- and DDR-related mechanisms being of particular relevance. Moreover, the findings indicate that targeting of Chk1 might be useful to overcome acquired CisPt resistance of certain subtypes of UC. PMID:27191498

  17. CancerDR: cancer drug resistance database.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rahul; Chaudhary, Kumardeep; Gupta, Sudheer; Singh, Harinder; Kumar, Shailesh; Gautam, Ankur; Kapoor, Pallavi; Raghava, Gajendra P S

    2013-01-01

    Cancer therapies are limited by the development of drug resistance, and mutations in drug targets is one of the main reasons for developing acquired resistance. The adequate knowledge of these mutations in drug targets would help to design effective personalized therapies. Keeping this in mind, we have developed a database "CancerDR", which provides information of 148 anti-cancer drugs, and their pharmacological profiling across 952 cancer cell lines. CancerDR provides comprehensive information about each drug target that includes; (i) sequence of natural variants, (ii) mutations, (iii) tertiary structure, and (iv) alignment profile of mutants/variants. A number of web-based tools have been integrated in CancerDR. This database will be very useful for identification of genetic alterations in genes encoding drug targets, and in turn the residues responsible for drug resistance. CancerDR allows user to identify promiscuous drug molecules that can kill wide range of cancer cells. CancerDR is freely accessible at http://crdd.osdd.net/raghava/cancerdr/

  18. Antifungal drug resistance to azoles and polyenes.

    PubMed

    Masiá Canuto, Mar; Gutiérrez Rodero, Félix

    2002-09-01

    There is an increased awareness of the morbidity and mortality associated with fungal infections caused by resistant fungi in various groups of patients. Epidemiological studies have identified risk factors associated with antifungal drug resistance. Selection pressure due to the continuous exposure to azoles seems to have an essential role in developing resistance to fluconazole in Candida species. Haematological malignancies, especially acute leukaemia with severe and prolonged neutropenia, seem to be the main risk factors for acquiring deep-seated mycosis caused by resistant filamentous fungi, such us Fusarium species, Scedosporium prolificans, and Aspergillus terreus. The still unacceptably high mortality rate associated with some resistant mycosis indicates that alternatives to existing therapeutic options are needed. Potential measures to overcome antifungal resistance ranges from the development of new drugs with better antifungal activity to improving current therapeutic strategies with the present antifungal agents. Among the new antifungal drugs, inhibitors of beta glucan synthesis and second-generation azole and triazole derivatives have characteristics that render them potentially suitable agents against some resistant fungi. Other strategies including the use of high doses of lipid formulations of amphotericin B, combination therapy, and adjunctive immune therapy with cytokines are under investigation. In addition, antifungal control programmes to prevent extensive and inappropriate use of antifungals may be needed.

  19. Identification of New Drug Targets in Multi-Drug Resistant Bacterial Infections

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    Identification of New Drug Targets in Multi-Drug Resistant Bacterial Infections PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Andrew M. Gulick, PhD...Identification of New Drug Targets in Multi-Drug Resistant Bacterial Infections 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-11-2-0218 5c... infections . Recently, community-acquired infections , infections in wounded U.S. service members, and infections in residents of long-term care facilities

  20. Anticoagulation therapy for a LVAD patient with acquired warfarin resistance.

    PubMed

    Yoshioka, Daisuke; Toda, Koichi; Hidaka, Takayuki; Yasuda, Soichiro; Saito, Shunsuke; Domae, Keitaro; Sawa, Yoshiki

    2017-03-27

    Anticoagulation therapy with warfarin is essential for postoperative management in patients with left ventricular assist device (LVAD). In this manuscript, we report the case of a patient who developed warfarin resistance after LVAD implantation. Although we administered a novel anticoagulant drug in addition to warfarin and aspirin therapy, the patient developed a major stroke. The patient needed continuous intravenous heparinization until heart transplantation for approximately 2 years. Meticulous management of anticoagulation therapy is essential for a LVAD with warfarin resistance. To our best knowledge, our case is the first case of warfarin resistance in a patient with LVAD.

  1. Myeloid cells that impair immunotherapy are restored in melanomas which acquire resistance to BRAF inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Steinberg, Shannon M; Shabaneh, Tamer; Zhang, Peisheng; Martyanov, Viktor; Li, Zhenghui; Malik, Brian; Wood, Tammara; Boni, Andrea; Molodtsov, Aleksey; Angeles, Christina V; Curiel, Tyler J; Whitfield, Michael; Turk, Mary Jo

    2017-02-15

    Acquired resistance to BRAFV600E inhibitors (BRAFi) in melanoma remains a common clinical obstacle, as is the case for any targeted drug therapy that can be developed given the plastic nature of cancers. While there has been significant focus on the cancer cell-intrinsic properties of BRAFi resistance, the impact of BRAFi resistance on host immunity has not been explored. Here we provide preclinical evidence that resistance to BRAFi in an autochthonous mouse model of melanoma is associated with restoration of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) in the tumor microenvironment initially reduced by BRAFi treatment. In contrast to restoration of MDSC, levels of T regulatory cells remained reduced in BRAFi-resistant tumors. Accordingly, tumor gene expression signatures specific for myeloid cell chemotaxis and homeostasis reappeared in BRAFi-resistant tumors. Notably, MDSC restoration relied upon MAPK pathway reactivation and downstream production of the myeloid attractant CCL2 in BRAFi-resistant melanoma cells. Strikingly, while combination checkpoint blockade (anti-CTLA-4 + anti-PD-1) was ineffective against BRAFi-resistant melanomas, the addition of MDSC depletion/blockade (anti-Gr-1 + CCR2 antagonist) prevented outgrowth of BRAFi-resistant tumors. Our results illustrate how extrinsic pathways of immunosuppression elaborated by melanoma cells dominate the tumor microenvironment and highlight the need to target extrinsic as well as intrinsic mechanisms of drug resistance.

  2. Disseminated cryptococcosis and fluconazole resistant oral candidiasis in a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS).

    PubMed

    Kothavade, Rajendra J; Oberai, Chetan M; Valand, Arvind G; Panthaki, Mehroo H

    2010-10-28

    Disseminated cryptococcosis and recurrent oral candidiasis was presented in a-heterosexual AIDS patient. Candida tropicalis (C.tropicalis) was isolated from the oral pseudomembranous plaques and Cryptococcus neoformans (C. neoformans) was isolated from maculopapular lesions on body parts (face, hands and chest) and body fluids (urine, expectorated sputum, and cerebrospinal fluid). In vitro drug susceptibility testing on the yeast isolates demonstrated resistance to fluconazole acquired by C. tropicalis which was a suggestive possible root cause of recurrent oral candidiasis in this patient.

  3. Drug resistance in eukaryotic microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Fairlamb, Alan H; Gow, Neil A R; Matthews, Keith R; Waters, Andrew P

    2016-06-24

    Eukaryotic microbial pathogens are major contributors to illness and death globally. Although much of their impact can be controlled by drug therapy as with prokaryotic microorganisms, the emergence of drug resistance has threatened these treatment efforts. Here, we discuss the challenges posed by eukaryotic microbial pathogens and how these are similar to, or differ from, the challenges of prokaryotic antibiotic resistance. The therapies used for several major eukaryotic microorganisms are then detailed, and the mechanisms that they have evolved to overcome these therapies are described. The rapid emergence of resistance and the restricted pipeline of new drug therapies pose considerable risks to global health and are particularly acute in the developing world. Nonetheless, we detail how the integration of new technology, biological understanding, epidemiology and evolutionary analysis can help sustain existing therapies, anticipate the emergence of resistance or optimize the deployment of new therapies.

  4. Drug resistance in eukaryotic microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    Fairlamb, Alan H.; Gow, Neil A. R.; Matthews, Keith R.; Waters, Andrew P.

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic microbial pathogens are major contributors to illness and death globally. Although much of their impact can be controlled by drug therapy as with prokaryotic microorganisms, the emergence of drug resistance has threatened these treatment efforts. Here, we discuss the challenges posed by eukaryotic microbial pathogens and how these are similar to, or differ from, the challenges of prokaryotic antibiotic resistance. The therapies used for several major eukaryotic microorganisms are then detailed, and the mechanisms that they have evolved to overcome these therapies are described. The rapid emergence of resistance and the restricted pipeline of new drug therapies pose considerable risks to global health and are particularly acute in the developing world. Nonetheless, we detail how the integration of new technology, biological understanding, epidemiology and evolutionary analysis can help sustain existing therapies, anticipate the emergence of resistance or optimize the deployment of new therapies. PMID:27572976

  5. Activation of Alternate Prosurvival Pathways Accounts for Acquired Sunitinib Resistance in U87MG Glioma Xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Hua; Mazloom, Amin R.; Xu, Huilei; Ma'ayan, Avi; Gallo, James M.

    2012-01-01

    Acquired drug resistance represents a major obstacle to using sunitinib for the treatment of solid tumors. Here, we examined the cellular and molecular alterations in tumors that are associated with acquired brain tumor resistance to sunitinib by using an in vivo model. U87MG tumors obtained from nude mice that received sunitinib (40 mg/kg/day) for 30 days were classified into sunitinib-sensitive and -resistant groups based on tumor volume and underwent targeted gene microarray and protein array analyses. The expression of several angiogenesis-associated genes was significantly modulated in sunitinib-treated tumors compared with those in control tumors (p < 0.05), whereas no significant differences were observed between sunitinib-sensitive and -resistant tumors (p > 0.05). Tumor vasculature based on microvessel density, neurogenin 2 chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan density, and α-smooth muscle actin density was also similar in sunitinib-treatment groups (p > 0.05). The moderate increase in unbound sunitinib tumor-to-plasma area-under-the-curve ratio in sunitinib-resistant mice was accompanied by up-regulated ATP-binding cassette G2 expression in tumor. The most profound difference between the sunitinib-sensitive and -resistant groups was found in the expression of several phosphorylated proteins involved in intracellular signaling. In particular, phospholipase C-γ1 phosphorylation in sunitinib-resistant tumors was up-regulated by 2.6-fold compared with that in sunitinib-sensitive tumors (p < 0.05). In conclusion, acquired sunitinib resistance in U87MG tumors is not associated with revascularization in tumors, but rather with the activation of alternate prosurvival pathways involved in an escape mechanism facilitating tumor growth and possibly insufficient drug uptake in tumor cells caused by an up-regulated membrane efflux transporter. PMID:22869928

  6. Broad-spectrum acquired resistance in barley induced by the Pseudomonas pathosystem shares transcriptional components with Arabidopsis systemic acquired resistance.

    PubMed

    Colebrook, E H; Creissen, G; McGrann, G R D; Dreos, R; Lamb, C; Boyd, L A

    2012-05-01

    Inducible resistance responses play a central role in the defense of plants against pathogen attack. Acquired resistance (AR) is induced alongside defense toward primary attack, providing broad-spectrum protection against subsequent pathogen challenge. The localization and molecular basis of AR in cereals is poorly understood, in contrast with the well-characterized systemic acquired resistance (SAR) response in Arabidopsis. Here, we use Pseudomonas syringae as a biological inducer of AR in barley, providing a clear frame of reference to the Arabidopsis-P. syringae pathosystem. Inoculation of barley leaf tissue with the nonadapted P. syringae pv. tomato avrRpm1 (PstavrRpm1) induced an active local defense response. Furthermore, inoculation of barley with PstavrRpm1 resulted in the induction of broad-spectrum AR at a distance from the local lesion, "adjacent" AR, effective against compatible isolates of P. syringae and Magnaporthe oryzae. Global transcriptional profiling of this adjacent AR revealed similarities with the transcriptional profile of SAR in Arabidopsis, as well as transcripts previously associated with chemically induced AR in cereals, suggesting that AR in barley and SAR in Arabidopsis may be mediated by analogous pathways.

  7. Antitubercular Drug Resistance in Four Healthcare Facilities in North India

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Anamika; Mathuria, Jitendra Prasad; Singh, Surya Kumar; Gulati, Anil Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a major public-health problem in India, having the highest number of incident and multidrug-resistant (MDR) TB cases. The study was carried out to appraise the prevalence of first-line anti-TB drug resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) and its patterns among different types of TB patients from different settings in a province of North India. Of 3,704 clinical specimens, 345 (9.3%) were culture-positive, and drug-susceptibility testing was carried out for 301 MTB strains. A high level of primary and acquired drug resistance of MTB was observed in the region studied, with weighted mean of 10.5% and 28.08%, 12.81% and 29.72%, 17.12% and 29.94%, 11.97% and 27.84%, and 10.74% and 23.54% for rifampicin, isoniazid, streptomycin, ethambutol-resistant and MDR cases respectively. Drug resistance was significantly higher in pulmonary (p=0.014) and acquired drug-resistant TB cases (p<0.001). Any drug resistance (p=0.002) and MDR TB were significantly (p=0.009) associated with HIV-seropositive cases. An urgent plan is needed to continuously monitor the transmission trends of drug-resistant strains, especially MDR-TB strains, in the region. PMID:22283032

  8. Cellular memory of acquired stress resistance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Guan, Qiaoning; Haroon, Suraiya; Bravo, Diego González; Will, Jessica L; Gasch, Audrey P

    2012-10-01

    Cellular memory of past experiences has been observed in several organisms and across a variety of experiences, including bacteria "remembering" prior nutritional status and amoeba "learning" to anticipate future environmental conditions. Here, we show that Saccharomyces cerevisiae maintains a multifaceted memory of prior stress exposure. We previously demonstrated that yeast cells exposed to a mild dose of salt acquire subsequent tolerance to severe doses of H(2)O(2). We set out to characterize the retention of acquired tolerance and in the process uncovered two distinct aspects of cellular memory. First, we found that H(2)O(2) resistance persisted for four to five generations after cells were removed from the prior salt treatment and was transmitted to daughter cells that never directly experienced the pretreatment. Maintenance of this memory did not require nascent protein synthesis after the initial salt pretreatment, but rather required long-lived cytosolic catalase Ctt1p that was synthesized during salt exposure and then distributed to daughter cells during subsequent cell divisions. In addition to and separable from the memory of H(2)O(2) resistance, these cells also displayed a faster gene-expression response to subsequent stress at >1000 genes, representing transcriptional memory. The faster gene-expression response requires the nuclear pore component Nup42p and serves an important function by facilitating faster reacquisition of H(2)O(2) tolerance after a second cycle of salt exposure. Memory of prior stress exposure likely provides a significant advantage to microbial populations living in ever-changing environments.

  9. Drug induced phospholipidosis: an acquired lysosomal storage disorder.

    PubMed

    Shayman, James A; Abe, Akira

    2013-03-01

    There is a strong association between lysosome enzyme deficiencies and monogenic disorders resulting in lysosomal storage disease. Of the more than 75 characterized lysosomal proteins, two thirds are directly linked to inherited diseases of metabolism. Only one lysosomal storage disease, Niemann-Pick disease, is associated with impaired phospholipid metabolism. However, other phospholipases are found in the lysosome but remain poorly characterized. A recent exception is lysosomal phospholipase A2 (group XV phospholipase A2). Although no inherited disorder of lysosomal phospholipid metabolism has yet been associated with a loss of function of this lipase, this enzyme may be a target for an acquired form of lysosomal storage, drug induced phospholipidosis. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Phospholipids and Phospholipid Metabolism.

  10. Risk Factors for Acquisition of Drug Resistance during Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis Treatment, Arkhangelsk Oblast, Russia, 2005–2010

    PubMed Central

    Ershova, Julia; Vlasova, Natalia; Nikishova, Elena; Tarasova, Irina; Eliseev, Platon; Maryandyshev, Andrey O.; Shemyakin, Igor G.; Kurbatova, Ekaterina; Cegielski, J. Peter

    2015-01-01

    Acquired resistance to antituberculosis drugs decreases effective treatment options and the likelihood of treatment success. We identified risk factors for acquisition of drug resistance during treatment for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR TB) and evaluated the effect on treatment outcomes. Data were collected prospectively from adults from Arkhangelsk Oblast, Russia, who had pulmonary MDR TB during 2005–2008. Acquisition of resistance to capreomycin and of extensively drug-resistant TB were more likely among patients who received <3 effective drugs than among patients who received >3 effective drugs (9.4% vs. 0% and 8.6% vs. 0.8%, respectively). Poor outcomes were more likely among patients with acquired capreomycin resistance (100% vs. 25.9%), acquired ofloxacin resistance (83.6% vs. 22.7%), or acquired extensive drug resistance (100% vs. 24.4%). To prevent acquired drug resistance and poor outcomes, baseline susceptibility to first- and second-line drugs should be determined quickly, and treatment should be adjusted to contain >3 effective drugs. PMID:25988954

  11. Acquired Multidrug Antifungal Resistance in Candida lusitaniae during Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Asner, Sandra A.; Giulieri, Stefano; Diezi, Manuel; Marchetti, Oscar

    2015-01-01

    Candida lusitaniae is usually susceptible to echinocandins. Beta-1,3-glucan synthase encoded by FKS genes is the target of echinocandins. A few missense mutations in the C. lusitaniae FKS1 hot spot 1 (HS1) have been reported. We report here the rapid emergence of antifungal resistance in C. lusitaniae isolated during therapy with amphotericin B (AMB), caspofungin (CAS), and azoles for treatment of persistent candidemia in an immunocompromised child with severe enterocolitis and visceral adenoviral disease. As documented from restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) and random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis, the five C. lusitaniae isolates examined were related to each other. From antifungal susceptibility and molecular analyses, 5 different profiles (P) were obtained. These profiles included the following: profile 1 (P1) (CAS MIC [μg/ml], 0.5; fluconazole [FLC] MIC, 0.25), determined while the patient was being treated with liposomal AMB for 3 months; P2 (FLC MIC [μg/ml], 0.25; CAS MIC, 4), while the patient was being treated with CAS for 2 weeks; P3 (CAS MIC [μg/ml], 0.5; FLC MIC, 32), while the patient was being treated with azoles and CAS initially followed by azoles alone for a week; P4 (CAS MIC [μg/ml], 8; FLC MIC, 8), while the patient was being treated with both drugs for 3 weeks; and P5 (AMB MIC [μg/ml], 0.125; CAS MIC, 8), while the patient was being treated with AMB and FLC for 2 weeks. CAS resistance was associated with resistance not only to micafungin and anidulafungin but also to AMB. Analysis of CAS resistance revealed 3 novel FKS1 mutations in CAS-resistant isolates (S638Y in P2; S631Y in P4; S638P in P5). While S638Y and -P are within HS1, S631Y is in close proximity to this domain but was confirmed to confer candin resistance using a site-directed mutagenesis approach. FLC resistance could be linked with overexpression of major facilitator gene 7 (MFS7) in C. lusitaniae P2 and P4 and was associated with resistance to 5

  12. Sunitinib treatment enhances metastasis of innately drug resistant breast tumors

    PubMed Central

    Wragg, Joseph W; Heath, Victoria L; Bicknell, Roy

    2017-01-01

    Anti-angiogenic therapies have failed to confer survival benefits in patients with metastatic breast cancer (mBC). However, to date there has not been an inquiry into roles for acquired versus innate drug resistance in this setting. In this study, we report roles for these distinct phenotypes in determining therapeutic response in a murine model of mBC resistance to the anti-angiogenic tyrosine kinase inhibitor sunitinib. Using tumor measurement and vascular patterning approaches, we differentiated tumors displaying innate versus acquired resistance. Bioluminescent imaging of tumor metastases to the liver, lungs and spleen revealed that sunitinib administration enhances metastasis, but only in tumors displaying innate resistance to therapy. Transcriptomic analysis of tumors displaying acquired versus innate resistance allowed the identification of specific biomarkers, many of which have a role in angiogenesis. In particular, aquaporin-1 upregulation occurred in acquired resistance, mTOR in innate resistance, and pleiotrophin in both settings, suggesting their utility as candidate diagnostics to predict drug response or to design tactics to circumvent resistance. Our results unravel specific features of antiangiogenic resistance, with potential therapeutic implications. PMID:28011623

  13. Cancer stem cells and drug resistance: the potential of nanomedicine

    PubMed Central

    Vinogradov, Serguei; Wei, Xin

    2012-01-01

    Properties of the small group of cancer cells called tumor-initiating or cancer stem cells (CSCs) involved in drug resistance, metastasis and relapse of cancers can significantly affect tumor therapy. Importantly, tumor drug resistance seems to be closely related to many intrinsic or acquired properties of CSCs, such as quiescence, specific morphology, DNA repair ability and overexpression of antiapoptotic proteins, drug efflux transporters and detoxifying enzymes. The specific microenvironment (niche) and hypoxic stability provide additional protection against anticancer therapy for CSCs. Thus, CSC-focused therapy is destined to form the core of any effective anticancer strategy. Nanomedicine has great potential in the development of CSC-targeting drugs, controlled drug delivery and release, and the design of novel gene-specific drugs and diagnostic modalities. This review is focused on tumor drug resistance-related properties of CSCs and describes current nanomedicine approaches, which could form the basis of novel combination therapies for eliminating metastatic and CSCs. PMID:22471722

  14. Exocytosis of polyubiquitinated proteins in bortezomib-resistant leukemia cells: a role for MARCKS in acquired resistance to proteasome inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Franke, Niels E.; Kaspers, Gertjan L.; Assaraf, Yehuda G.; van Meerloo, Johan; Niewerth, Denise; Kessler, Floortje L.; Poddighe, Pino J.; Kole, Jeroen; Smeets, Serge J.; Ylstra, Bauke; Bi, Chonglei; Chng, Wee Joo; Horton, Terzah M.; Menezes, Rene X.; Musters, Renée J.P.; Zweegman, Sonja; Jansen, Gerrit; Cloos, Jacqueline

    2016-01-01

    PSMB5 mutations and upregulation of the β5 subunit of the proteasome represent key determinants of acquired resistance to the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib (BTZ) in leukemic cells in vitro. We here undertook a multi-modality (DNA, mRNA, miRNA) array-based analysis of human CCRF-CEM leukemia cells and BTZ-resistant subclones to determine whether or not complementary mechanisms contribute to BTZ resistance. These studies revealed signatures of markedly reduced expression of proteolytic stress related genes in drug resistant cells over a broad range of BTZ concentrations along with a high upregulation of myristoylated alanine-rich C-kinase substrate (MARCKS) gene expression. MARCKS upregulation was confirmed on protein level and also observed in other BTZ-resistant tumor cell lines as well as in leukemia cells with acquired resistance to other proteasome inhibitors. Moreover, when MARCKS protein expression was demonstrated in specimens derived from therapy-refractory pediatric leukemia patients (n = 44), higher MARCKS protein expression trended (p = 0.073) towards a dismal response to BTZ-containing chemotherapy. Mechanistically, we show a BTZ concentration-dependent association of MARCKS protein levels with the emergence of ubiquitin-containing vesicles in BTZ-resistant CEM cells. These vesicles were found to be extruded and taken up in co-cultures with proteasome-proficient acceptor cells. Consistent with these observations, MARCKS protein associated with ubiquitin-containing vesicles was also more prominent in clinical leukemic specimen with ex vivo BTZ resistance compared to BTZ-sensitive leukemia cells. Collectively, we propose a role for MARCKS in a novel mechanism of BTZ resistance via exocytosis of ubiquitinated proteins in BTZ-resistant cells leading to quenching of proteolytic stress. PMID:27542283

  15. Community-Acquired Methicillin-Resistant Pyogenic Liver Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Cherian, Joel; Singh, Rahul; Varma, Muralidhar; Vidyasagar, Sudha; Mukhopadhyay, Chiranjay

    2016-01-01

    Pyogenic liver abscesses are rare with an incidence of 0.5% to 0.8% and are mostly due to hepatobiliary causes (40% to 60%). Most are polymicrobial with less than 10% being caused by Staphylococcus aureus. Of these, few are caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and fewer still by a community-acquired strain. Here we present a case study of a patient with a community-acquired MRSA liver abscess. The patient presented with fever since 1 month and tender hepatomegaly. Blood tests revealed elevated levels of alkaline phosphatase, C-reactive protein, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and neutrophilic leukocytosis. Blood cultures were sterile. Ultrasound of the abdomen showed multiple abscesses, from which pus was drained and MRSA isolated. Computed tomography of the abdomen did not show any source of infection, and an amebic serology was negative. The patient was started on vancomycin for 2 weeks, following which he became afebrile and was discharged on oral linezolid for 4 more weeks. Normally a liver abscess is treated empirically with ceftriaxone for pyogenic liver abscess and metronidazole for amebic liver abscess. However, if the patient has risk factors for a Staphylococcal infection, it is imperative that antibiotics covering gram-positive organisms be added while waiting for culture reports. PMID:27540556

  16. The dynamics of drug resistance: a mathematical perspective.

    PubMed

    Lavi, Orit; Gottesman, Michael M; Levy, Doron

    2012-01-01

    Resistance to chemotherapy is a key impediment to successful cancer treatment that has been intensively studied for the last three decades. Several central mechanisms have been identified as contributing to the resistance. In the case of multidrug resistance (MDR), the cell becomes resistant to a variety of structurally and mechanistically unrelated drugs in addition to the drug initially administered. Mathematical models of drug resistance have dealt with many of the known aspects of this field, such as pharmacologic sanctuary and location/diffusion resistance, intrinsic resistance, induced resistance and acquired resistance. In addition, there are mathematical models that take into account the kinetic/phase resistance, and models that investigate intracellular mechanisms based on specific biological functions (such as ABC transporters, apoptosis and repair mechanisms). This review covers aspects of MDR that have been mathematically studied, and explains how, from a methodological perspective, mathematics can be used to study drug resistance. We discuss quantitative approaches of mathematical analysis, and demonstrate how mathematics can be used in combination with other experimental and clinical tools. We emphasize the potential benefits of integrating analytical and mathematical methods into future clinical and experimental studies of drug resistance.

  17. Multidrug efflux pumps as main players in intrinsic and acquired resistance to antimicrobials.

    PubMed

    Hernando-Amado, Sara; Blanco, Paula; Alcalde-Rico, Manuel; Corona, Fernando; Reales-Calderón, Jose A; Sánchez, María B; Martínez, José L

    2016-09-01

    Multidrug efflux pumps constitute a group of transporters that are ubiquitously found in any organism. In addition to other functions with relevance for the cell physiology, efflux pumps contribute to the resistance to compounds used for treating different diseases, including resistance to anticancer drugs, antibiotics or antifungal compounds. In the case of antimicrobials, efflux pumps are major players in both intrinsic and acquired resistance to drugs currently in use for the treatment of infectious diseases. One important aspect not fully explored of efflux pumps consists on the identification of effectors able to induce their expression. Indeed, whereas the analysis of clinical isolates have shown that mutants overexpressing these resistance elements are frequently found, less is known on the conditions that may trigger expression of efflux pumps, hence leading to transient induction of resistance in vivo, a situation that is barely detectable using classical susceptibility tests. In the current article we review the structure and mechanisms of regulation of the expression of bacterial and fungal efflux pumps, with a particular focus in those for which a role in clinically relevant resistance has been reported.

  18. Drug resistance in Giardia duodenalis.

    PubMed

    Ansell, Brendan R E; McConville, Malcolm J; Ma'ayeh, Showgy Y; Dagley, Michael J; Gasser, Robin B; Svärd, Staffan G; Jex, Aaron R

    2015-11-01

    Giardia duodenalis is a microaerophilic parasite of the human gastrointestinal tract and a major contributor to diarrheal and post-infectious chronic gastrointestinal disease world-wide. Treatment of G. duodenalis infection currently relies on a small number of drug classes. Nitroheterocyclics, in particular metronidazole, have represented the front line treatment for the last 40 years. Nitroheterocyclic-resistant G. duodenalis have been isolated from patients and created in vitro, prompting considerable research into the biomolecular mechanisms of resistance. These compounds are redox-active and are believed to damage proteins and DNA after being activated by oxidoreductase enzymes in metabolically active cells. In this review, we explore the molecular phenotypes of nitroheterocyclic-resistant G. duodenalis described to date in the context of the protist's unusual glycolytic and antioxidant systems. We propose that resistance mechanisms are likely to extend well beyond currently described resistance-associated enzymes (i.e., pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductases and nitroreductases), to include NAD(P)H- and flavin-generating pathways, and possibly redox-sensitive epigenetic regulation. Mechanisms that allow G. duodenalis to tolerate oxidative stress may lead to resistance against both oxygen and nitroheterocyclics, with implications for clinical control. The present review highlights the potential for systems biology tools and advanced bioinformatics to further investigate the multifaceted mechanisms of nitroheterocyclic resistance in this important pathogen.

  19. Acquired resistance to BRAF inhibition in BRAFV600E mutant gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Tsun-Wen; Zhang, Jie; Prados, Michael; Weiss, William A.; James, C. David; Nicolaides, Theodore

    2017-01-01

    Activating mutation of BRAF is a common finding in pediatric gliomas. As many as 14% of high grade and up to 66% of certain subtypes of low grade pediatric glioma have the BRAFV600E mutation. Small molecule inhibitors that selectively target BRAFV600E are FDA approved for melanoma and have shown significant efficacy in treating BRAFV600E glioma in pre-clinical trials. Despite showing initial anti-tumor activity, acquired drug resistance significantly limits the benefit from being treated with BRAFV600E inhibitors. Here, we have identified molecular responses to BRAFV600E inhibitor treatment in human glioma models that have substantial clinical implications. Specifically, we show that BRAFV600E inhibitor resistant cells upregulate pro-survival mediators such as Wnt, and additionally increase receptor tyrosine kinase activity, including EGFR and Axl, promoting resistance to BRAFV600E inhibition. Our results suggest strategies to circumvent acquired resistance to BRAFV600E inhibitor therapy, and thereby improve outcomes for patients with BRAFV600E gliomas. PMID:27611946

  20. Insect eggs induce a systemic acquired resistance in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Hilfiker, Olivier; Groux, Raphaël; Bruessow, Friederike; Kiefer, Karin; Zeier, Jürgen; Reymond, Philippe

    2014-12-01

    Although they constitute an inert stage of the insect's life, eggs trigger plant defences that lead to egg mortality or attraction of egg parasitoids. We recently found that salicylic acid (SA) accumulates in response to oviposition by the Large White butterfly Pieris brassicae, both in local and systemic leaves, and that plants activate a response that is similar to the recognition of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), which are involved in PAMP-triggered immunity (PTI). Here we discovered that natural oviposition by P. brassicae or treatment with egg extract inhibit growth of different Pseudomonas syringae strains in Arabidopsis through the activation of a systemic acquired resistance (SAR). This egg-induced SAR involves the metabolic SAR signal pipecolic acid, depends on ALD1 and FMO1, and is accompanied by a stronger induction of defence genes upon secondary infection. Although P. brassicae larvae showed a reduced performance when feeding on Pseudomonas syringae-infected plants, this effect was less pronounced when infected plants had been previously oviposited. Altogether, our results indicate that egg-induced SAR might have evolved as a strategy to prevent the detrimental effect of bacterial pathogens on feeding larvae.

  1. Totally drug-resistant tuberculosis and adjunct therapies.

    PubMed

    Parida, S K; Axelsson-Robertson, R; Rao, M V; Singh, N; Master, I; Lutckii, A; Keshavjee, S; Andersson, J; Zumla, A; Maeurer, M

    2015-04-01

    The first cases of totally drug-resistant (TDR) tuberculosis (TB) were reported in Italy 10 years ago; more recently, cases have also been reported in Iran, India and South Africa. Although there is no consensus on terminology, it is most commonly described as 'resistance to all first- and second-line drugs used to treat TB'. Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb) acquires drug resistance mutations in a sequential fashion under suboptimal drug pressure due to monotherapy, inadequate dosing, treatment interruptions and drug interactions. The treatment of TDR-TB includes antibiotics with disputed or minimal effectiveness against M.tb, and the fatality rate is high. Comorbidities such as diabetes and infection with human immunodeficiency virus further impact on TB treatment options and survival rates. Several new drug candidates with novel modes of action are under late-stage clinical evaluation (e.g., delamanid, bedaquiline, SQ109 and sutezolid). 'Repurposed' antibiotics have also recently been included in the treatment of extensively drug resistant TB. However, because of mutations in M.tb, drugs will not provide a cure for TB in the long term. Adjunct TB therapies, including therapeutic vaccines, vitamin supplementation and/or repurposing of drugs targeting biologically and clinically relevant molecular pathways, may achieve better clinical outcomes in combination with standard chemotherapy. Here, we review broader perspectives of drug resistance in TB and potential adjunct treatment options.

  2. Drug resistance mechanisms and novel drug targets for tuberculosis therapy.

    PubMed

    Islam, Md Mahmudul; Hameed, H M Adnan; Mugweru, Julius; Chhotaray, Chiranjibi; Wang, Changwei; Tan, Yaoju; Liu, Jianxiong; Li, Xinjie; Tan, Shouyong; Ojima, Iwao; Yew, Wing Wai; Nuermberger, Eric; Lamichhane, Gyanu; Zhang, Tianyu

    2017-01-20

    Drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB) poses a significant challenge to the successful treatment and control of TB worldwide. Resistance to anti-TB drugs has existed since the beginning of the chemotherapy era. New insights into the resistant mechanisms of anti-TB drugs have been provided. Better understanding of drug resistance mechanisms helps in the development of new tools for the rapid diagnosis of drug-resistant TB. There is also a pressing need in the development of new drugs with novel targets to improve the current treatment of TB and to prevent the emergence of drug resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. This review summarizes the anti-TB drug resistance mechanisms, furnishes some possible novel drug targets in the development of new agents for TB therapy and discusses the usefulness using known targets to develop new anti-TB drugs. Whole genome sequencing is currently an advanced technology to uncover drug resistance mechanisms in M. tuberculosis. However, further research is required to unravel the significance of some newly discovered gene mutations in their contribution to drug resistance.

  3. Emergence of Hospital Acquired Carbapenem Resistant Non-Fermenters in Teaching Institute

    PubMed Central

    Katare, Neeraj; Pandey, Aparna; Bhatambare, Ganesh Shivmurti; Bajpai, Trupti

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Non-Fermenting Gram Negative Bacilli (NFGNB) are emerging now-a-days because of their tendency to colonize various surfaces and inherent resistance to commonly used disinfectants. They are responsible for multi-drug resistant hospital acquired infections. Detection of carbapenem resistance mechanisms is essential for treatment and infection control purpose as can spread to other organisms causing hospital outbreaks. Aim To characterize non-fermenters from various clinical samples and to detect different carbapenem resistance mechanisms in meropenem resistant isolates. Materials and Methods The prospective study was conducted at Sri Aurobindo Medical College and Post Graduate Institute, Indore over a period of one and half year from December 2014 to May 2016. A total of 1310 samples were collected from Ventilator Associated Pneumonia (VAP), Surgical Site Infection (SSI), Urinary Tract Infection (UTI), septicaemia, Lower Respiratory Tract Infection (LRTI) and middle ear infected patients. Non-fermenters were identified by standard microbiological tests. Meropenem resistance was determined by Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method and resistant isolates were further tested by Modified Hodge test, Combined disc test and AmpC disc test. Results Isolation rate of non-fermenters was 13.82% (181/1310). Colistin, amikacin and imipenem were the antibiotics with maximum sensitivity. Overall meropenem resistance was found to be 44.2% (80/181). Metallo-β-lactamase and AmpC-β-lactamase were produced by 56.82% (25/44) and 72.22% (26/36) of meropenem resistant Pseudomonas and Acinetobacter species respectively. Conclusion Detection of carbapenem resistance mechanisms and implementation of antibiotic policy are needed to prevent the emergence of non-fermenter infections. PMID:28208857

  4. Adaptive and Acquired Resistance to EGFR Inhibitors Converge on the MAPK Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Pengfei; Fu, Yujie; Chen, Minjiang; Jing, Ying; Wu, Jie; Li, Ke; Shen, Ying; Gao, Jian-Xin; Wang, Mengzhao; Zhao, Xiaojing; Zhuang, Guanglei

    2016-01-01

    Both adaptive and acquired resistance significantly limits the efficacy of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) kinase inhibitors. However, the distinct or common mechanisms of adaptive and acquired resistance have not been fully characterized. Here, through systematic modeling of erlotinib resistance in lung cancer, we found that feedback reactivation of MAPK signaling following erlotinib treatment, which was dependent on the MET receptor, contributed to the adaptive resistance of EGFR inhibitors. Interestingly, acquired resistance to erlotinib was also associated with the MAPK pathway activation as a result of CRAF or NRAS amplification. Consequently, combined inhibition of EGFR and MAPK impeded the development of both adaptive and acquired resistance. These observations demonstrate that adaptive and acquired resistance to EGFR inhibitors can converge on the same pathway and credential cotargeting EGFR and MAPK as a promising therapeutic approach in EGFR mutant tumors. PMID:27279914

  5. Quorum sensing and microbial drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Yufan, Chen; Shiyin, Liu; Zhibin, Liang; Mingfa, Lv; Jianuan, Zhou; Lianhui, Zhang

    2016-10-20

    Microbial drug resistance has become a serious problem of global concern, and the evolution and regulatory mechanisms of microbial drug resistance has become a hotspot of research in recent years. Recent studies showed that certain microbial resistance mechanisms are regulated by quorum sensing system. Quorum sensing is a ubiquitous cell-cell communication system in the microbial world, which associates with cell density. High-density microbial cells produce sufficient amount of small signal molecules, activating a range of downstream cellular processes including virulence and drug resistance mechanisms, which increases bacterial drug tolerance and causes infections on host organisms. In this review, the general mechanisms of microbial drug resistance and quorum-sensing systems are summarized with a focus on the association of quorum sensing and chemical signaling systems with microbial drug resistance mechanisms, including biofilm formation and drug efflux pump. The potential use of quorum quenching as a new strategy to control microbial resistance is also discussed.

  6. Drug resistance in trypanosomes; effects of metabolic inhibitors, ph and oxidation-reduction potential on normal and resistant trypanosoma rhodesiense

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, J.

    1959-01-01

    A wide variety of metabolic inhibitors tested in vitro for trypanocidal activity on normal and drug-resistant strains of Trypanosoma rhodesiense showed no relation between acquired drug resistance and changes in specific enzymatic function. Oxidation-reduction potential is an important factor in trypanocidal action but is not obviously related to the development of resistance. The dependence on pH of the trypanocidal action of ionizing drugs against both normal and resistant trypanosomes supports the postulate that the development of resistance involves physical changes in cell structures associated with the uptake of drug. PMID:13844959

  7. ABCB1 as predominant resistance mechanism in cells with acquired SNS-032 resistance

    PubMed Central

    Rothweiler, Florian; Voges, Yvonne; Balónová, Barbora; Blight, Barry A.; Cinatl, Jindrich

    2016-01-01

    The CDK inhibitor SNS-032 had previously exerted promising anti-neuroblastoma activity via CDK7 and 9 inhibition. ABCB1 expression was identified as major determinant of SNS-032 resistance. Here, we investigated the role of ABCB1 in acquired SNS-032 resistance. In contrast to ABCB1-expressing UKF-NB-3 sub-lines resistant to other ABCB1 substrates, SNS-032-adapted UKF-NB-3 (UKF-NB-3rSNS- 032300nM) cells remained sensitive to the non-ABCB1 substrate cisplatin and were completely re-sensitized to cytotoxic ABCB1 substrates by ABCB1 inhibition. Moreover, UKF-NB-3rSNS-032300nM cells remained similarly sensitive to CDK7 and 9 inhibition as UKF-NB-3 cells. In contrast, SHEPrSNS-0322000nM, the SNS-032-resistant sub-line of the neuroblastoma cell line SHEP, displayed low level SNS-032 resistance also when ABCB1 was inhibited. This discrepancy may be explained by the higher SNS-032 concentrations that were used to establish SHEPrSNS-0322000nM cells, since SHEP cells intrinsically express ABCB1 and are less sensitive to SNS-032 (IC50 912 nM) than UKF-NB-3 cells (IC50 153 nM). In conclusion, we show that ABCB1 expression represents the primary (sometimes exclusive) resistance mechanism in neuroblastoma cells with acquired resistance to SNS-032. Thus, ABCB1 inhibitors may increase the SNS-032 efficacy in ABCB1-expressing cells and prolong or avoid resistance formation. PMID:27517323

  8. Overcoming drug resistance through in silico prediction.

    PubMed

    Carbonell, Pablo; Trosset, Jean-Yves

    2014-03-01

    Prediction tools are commonly used in pre-clinical research to assist target selection, to optimize drug potency or to predict the pharmacological profile of drug candidates. In silico prediction and overcoming drug resistance is a new opportunity that creates a high interest in pharmaceutical research. This review presents two main in silico strategies to meet this challenge: a structure-based approach to study the influence of mutations on the drug-target interaction and a system-biology approach to identify resistance pathways for a given drug. In silico screening of synergies between therapeutic and resistant pathways through biological network analysis is an example of technique to escape drug resistance. Structure-based drug design and in silico system biology are complementary approaches to reach few objectives at once: increase efficiency, reduce toxicity and overcoming drug resistance.

  9. Origin of robustness in generating drug-resistant malaria parasites.

    PubMed

    Kümpornsin, Krittikorn; Modchang, Charin; Heinberg, Adina; Ekland, Eric H; Jirawatcharadech, Piyaporn; Chobson, Pornpimol; Suwanakitti, Nattida; Chaotheing, Sastra; Wilairat, Prapon; Deitsch, Kirk W; Kamchonwongpaisan, Sumalee; Fidock, David A; Kirkman, Laura A; Yuthavong, Yongyuth; Chookajorn, Thanat

    2014-07-01

    Biological robustness allows mutations to accumulate while maintaining functional phenotypes. Despite its crucial role in evolutionary processes, the mechanistic details of how robustness originates remain elusive. Using an evolutionary trajectory analysis approach, we demonstrate how robustness evolved in malaria parasites under selective pressure from an antimalarial drug inhibiting the folate synthesis pathway. A series of four nonsynonymous amino acid substitutions at the targeted enzyme, dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR), render the parasites highly resistant to the antifolate drug pyrimethamine. Nevertheless, the stepwise gain of these four dhfr mutations results in tradeoffs between pyrimethamine resistance and parasite fitness. Here, we report the epistatic interaction between dhfr mutations and amplification of the gene encoding the first upstream enzyme in the folate pathway, GTP cyclohydrolase I (GCH1). gch1 amplification confers low level pyrimethamine resistance and would thus be selected for by pyrimethamine treatment. Interestingly, the gch1 amplification can then be co-opted by the parasites because it reduces the cost of acquiring drug-resistant dhfr mutations downstream in the same metabolic pathway. The compensation of compromised fitness by extra GCH1 is an example of how robustness can evolve in a system and thus expand the accessibility of evolutionary trajectories leading toward highly resistant alleles. The evolution of robustness during the gain of drug-resistant mutations has broad implications for both the development of new drugs and molecular surveillance for resistance to existing drugs.

  10. Epigenetic strategies to reverse drug resistance in heterogeneous multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Issa, Mark E; Takhsha, Farnaz Sedigheh; Chirumamilla, Chandra Sekhar; Perez-Novo, Claudina; Vanden Berghe, Wim; Cuendet, Muriel

    2017-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a hematological malignancy, which remains incurable because most patients eventually relapse or become refractory to current treatments. Due to heterogeneity within the cancer cell microenvironment, cancer cell populations employ a dynamic survival strategy to chemotherapeutic treatments, which frequently results in a rapid acquisition of therapy resistance. Besides resistance-conferring genetic alterations within a tumor cell population selected during drug treatment, recent findings also reveal non-mutational mechanisms of drug resistance, involving a small population of "cancer stem cells" (CSCs) which are intrinsically more refractory to the effects of a variety of anticancer drugs. Other studies have implicated epigenetic mechanisms in reversible drug tolerance to protect the population from eradication by potentially lethal exposures, suggesting that acquired drug resistance does not necessarily require a stable heritable genetic alteration. Clonal evolution of MM cells and the bone marrow microenvironment changes contribute to drug resistance. MM-CSCs may not be a static population and survive as phenotypically and functionally different cell types via the transition between stem-like and non-stem-like states in local microenvironments, as observed in other types of cancers. Targeting MM-CSCs is clinically relevant, and different approaches have been suggested to target molecular, metabolic and epigenetic signatures, and the self-renewal signaling characteristic of MM CSC-like cells. Here, we summarize epigenetic strategies to reverse drug resistance in heterogeneous multiple myeloma.

  11. Drug resistance confounding prion therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Berry, David B.; Lu, Duo; Geva, Michal; Watts, Joel C.; Bhardwaj, Sumita; Oehler, Abby; Renslo, Adam R.; DeArmond, Stephen J.; Prusiner, Stanley B.; Giles, Kurt

    2013-01-01

    There is not a single pharmaceutical that halts or even slows any neurodegenerative disease. Mounting evidence shows that prions cause many neurodegenerative diseases, and arguably, scrapie and Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease prions represent the best therapeutic targets. We report here that the previously identified 2-aminothiazoles IND24 and IND81 doubled the survival times of scrapie-infected, wild-type mice. However, mice infected with Rocky Mountain Laboratory (RML) prions, a scrapie-derived strain, and treated with IND24 eventually exhibited neurological dysfunction and died. We serially passaged their brain homogenates in mice and cultured cells. We found that the prion strain isolated from IND24-treated mice, designated RML[IND24], emerged during a single passage in treated mice. Although RML prions infect both the N2a and CAD5 cell lines, RML[IND24] prions could only infect CAD5 cells. When passaged in CAD5 cells, the prions remained resistant to high concentrations of IND24. However, one passage of RML[IND24] prions in untreated mice restored susceptibility to IND24 in CAD5 cells. Although IND24 treatment extended the lives of mice propagating different prion strains, including RML, another scrapie-derived prion strain ME7, and chronic wasting disease, it was ineffective in slowing propagation of Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease prions in transgenic mice. Our studies demonstrate that prion strains can acquire resistance upon exposure to IND24 that is lost upon passage in mice in the absence of IND24. These data suggest that monotherapy can select for resistance, thus intermittent therapy with mixtures of antiprion compounds may be required to slow or stop neurodegeneration. PMID:24128760

  12. Epigenetic modulation of the biophysical properties of drug-resistant cell lipids to restore drug transport and endocytic functions.

    PubMed

    Vijayaraghavalu, Sivakumar; Peetla, Chiranjeevi; Lu, Shan; Labhasetwar, Vinod

    2012-09-04

    In our recent studies exploring the biophysical characteristics of resistant cell lipids, and the role they play in drug transport, we demonstrated the difference of drug-resistant breast cancer cells from drug-sensitive cells in lipid composition and biophysical properties, suggesting that cancer cells acquire a drug-resistant phenotype through the alteration of lipid synthesis to inhibit intracellular drug transport to protect from cytotoxic effect. In cancer cells, epigenetic changes (e.g., DNA hypermethylation) are essential to maintain this drug-resistant phenotype. Thus, altered lipid synthesis may be linked to epigenetic mechanisms of drug resistance. We hypothesize that reversing DNA hypermethylation in resistant cells with an epigenetic drug could alter lipid synthesis, changing the cell membrane's biophysical properties to facilitate drug delivery to overcome drug resistance. Herein we show that treating drug-resistant breast cancer cells (MCF-7/ADR) with the epigenetic drug 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (decitabine) significantly alters cell lipid composition and biophysical properties, causing the resistant cells to acquire biophysical characteristics similar to those of sensitive cell (MCF-7) lipids. Following decitabine treatment, resistant cells demonstrated increased sphingomyelinase activity, resulting in a decreased sphingomyelin level that influenced lipid domain structures, increased membrane fluidity, and reduced P-glycoprotein expression. Changes in the biophysical characteristics of resistant cell lipids facilitated doxorubicin transport and restored endocytic function for drug delivery with a lipid-encapsulated form of doxorubicin, enhancing the drug efficacy. In conclusion, we have established a new mechanism for efficacy of an epigenetic drug, mediated through changes in lipid composition and biophysical properties, in reversing cancer drug resistance.

  13. Mechanisms of Resistance to Antibody-Drug Conjugates.

    PubMed

    Loganzo, Frank; Sung, Matthew; Gerber, Hans-Peter

    2016-12-01

    Drug resistance limits the effectiveness of cancer therapies. Despite attempts to develop curative anticancer treatments, tumors evolve evasive mechanisms limiting durable responses. Hence, diverse therapies are used to attack cancer, including cytotoxic and targeted agents. Antibody-drug conjugates (ADC) are biotherapeutics designed to deliver potent cytotoxins to cancer cells via tumor-specific antigens. Little is known about the clinical manifestations of drug resistance to this class of therapy; however, recent preclinical studies reveal potential mechanisms of resistance. Because ADCs are a combination of antibody and small molecule cytotoxin, multifactorial modes of resistance are emerging that are inherent to the structure and function of the ADC. Decreased cell-surface antigen reduces antibody binding, whereas elevated drug transporters such as MDR1 and MRP1 reduce effectiveness of the payload. Inherent to the uniqueness of the ADC, other novel resistance mechanisms are emerging, including altered antibody trafficking, ADC processing, and intracellular drug release. Most importantly, the modular nature of the ADC allows components to be switched and replaced, enabling development of second-generation ADCs that overcome acquired resistance. This review is intended to highlight recent progress in our understanding of ADC resistance, including approaches to create preclinical ADC-refractory models and to characterize their emerging mechanisms of resistance. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(12); 2825-34. ©2016 AACR.

  14. Understanding and overcoming the mechanisms of primary and acquired resistance to abiraterone and enzalutamide in castration resistant prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Buttigliero, Consuelo; Tucci, Marcello; Bertaglia, Valentina; Vignani, Francesca; Bironzo, Paolo; Di Maio, Massimo; Scagliotti, Giorgio Vittorio

    2015-12-01

    In recent years, in castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), several new drugs have been approved that prolong overall survival, including enzalutamide and abiraterone, two new-generation hormonal therapies. Despite the demonstrated benefit of these agents, not all patients with CRPC are responsive to treatment, the gain in median progression-free survival with these therapies compared to standard of care is, rather disappointingly, still less than six months and the appearance of acquired resistance is almost universal. Approximately one third of patients treated with abiraterone and 25% of those treated with enzalutamide show primary resistance to these agents. Even if the mechanisms of resistance to these agents are not fully defined, many hypotheses are emerging, including systemic and intratumoral androgen biosynthesis up-regulation, androgen receptor (AR) gene mutations and amplifications, alteration of pathways involved in cross-talk with AR signaling, glucocorticoid receptor overexpression, neuroendocrine differentiation, immune system deregulation and others. The aim of this paper is to review currently available data about mechanisms of resistance to abiraterone and enzalutamide, and to discuss how these mechanisms could be potentially overcome through novel therapeutic agents.

  15. Pentamidine sensitizes Gram-negative pathogens to antibiotics and overcomes acquired colistin resistance.

    PubMed

    Stokes, Jonathan M; MacNair, Craig R; Ilyas, Bushra; French, Shawn; Côté, Jean-Philippe; Bouwman, Catrien; Farha, Maya A; Sieron, Arthur O; Whitfield, Chris; Coombes, Brian K; Brown, Eric D

    2017-03-06

    The increasing use of polymyxins(1) in addition to the dissemination of plasmid-borne colistin resistance threatens to cause a serious breach in our last line of defence against multidrug-resistant Gram-negative pathogens, and heralds the emergence of truly pan-resistant infections. Colistin resistance often arises through covalent modification of lipid A with cationic residues such as phosphoethanolamine-as is mediated by Mcr-1 (ref. 2)-which reduce the affinity of polymyxins for lipopolysaccharide(3). Thus, new strategies are needed to address the rapidly diminishing number of treatment options for Gram-negative infections(4). The difficulty in eradicating Gram-negative bacteria is largely due to their highly impermeable outer membrane, which serves as a barrier to many otherwise effective antibiotics(5). Here, we describe an unconventional screening platform designed to enrich for non-lethal, outer-membrane-active compounds with potential as adjuvants for conventional antibiotics. This approach identified the antiprotozoal drug pentamidine(6) as an effective perturbant of the Gram-negative outer membrane through its interaction with lipopolysaccharide. Pentamidine displayed synergy with antibiotics typically restricted to Gram-positive bacteria, yielding effective drug combinations with activity against a wide range of Gram-negative pathogens in vitro, and against systemic Acinetobacter baumannii infections in mice. Notably, the adjuvant activity of pentamidine persisted in polymyxin-resistant bacteria in vitro and in vivo. Overall, pentamidine and its structural analogues represent unexploited molecules for the treatment of Gram-negative infections, particularly those having acquired polymyxin resistance determinants.

  16. Understanding drug resistance in human intestinal protozoa.

    PubMed

    El-Taweel, Hend Aly

    2015-05-01

    Infections with intestinal protozoa continue to be a major health problem in many areas of the world. The widespread use of a limited number of therapeutic agents for their management and control raises concerns about development of drug resistance. Generally, the use of any antimicrobial agent should be accompanied by meticulous monitoring of its efficacy and measures to minimize resistance formation. Evidence for the occurrence of drug resistance in different intestinal protozoa comes from case studies and clinical trials, sometimes with a limited number of patients. Large-scale field-based assessment of drug resistance and drug sensitivity testing of clinical isolates are needed. Furthermore, the association of drug resistance with certain geographic isolates or genotypes deserves consideration. Drug resistance has been triggered in vitro and has been linked to modification of pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase, nitroreductases, antioxidant defense, or cytoskeletal system. Further mechanistic studies will have important implications in the development of second generation therapeutic agents.

  17. Efflux pump-mediated drug resistance in Burkholderia

    PubMed Central

    Podnecky, Nicole L.; Rhodes, Katherine A.; Schweizer, Herbert P.

    2015-01-01

    Several members of the genus Burkholderia are prominent pathogens. Infections caused by these bacteria are difficult to treat because of significant antibiotic resistance. Virtually all Burkholderia species are also resistant to polymyxin, prohibiting use of drugs like colistin that are available for treatment of infections caused by most other drug resistant Gram-negative bacteria. Despite clinical significance and antibiotic resistance of Burkholderia species, characterization of efflux pumps lags behind other non-enteric Gram-negative pathogens such as Acinetobacter baumannii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Although efflux pumps have been described in several Burkholderia species, they have been best studied in Burkholderia cenocepacia and B. pseudomallei. As in other non-enteric Gram-negatives, efflux pumps of the resistance nodulation cell division (RND) family are the clinically most significant efflux systems in these two species. Several efflux pumps were described in B. cenocepacia, which when expressed confer resistance to clinically significant antibiotics, including aminoglycosides, chloramphenicol, fluoroquinolones, and tetracyclines. Three RND pumps have been characterized in B. pseudomallei, two of which confer either intrinsic or acquired resistance to aminoglycosides, macrolides, chloramphenicol, fluoroquinolones, tetracyclines, trimethoprim, and in some instances trimethoprim+sulfamethoxazole. Several strains of the host-adapted B. mallei, a clone of B. pseudomallei, lack AmrAB-OprA, and are therefore aminoglycoside and macrolide susceptible. B. thailandensis is closely related to B. pseudomallei, but non-pathogenic to humans. Its pump repertoire and ensuing drug resistance profile parallels that of B. pseudomallei. An efflux pump in B. vietnamiensis plays a significant role in acquired aminoglycoside resistance. Summarily, efflux pumps are significant players in Burkholderia drug resistance. PMID:25926825

  18. Prediction of Cancer Drug Resistance and Implications for Personalized Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Volm, Manfred; Efferth, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Drug resistance still impedes successful cancer chemotherapy. A major goal of early concepts in individualized therapy was to develop in vitro tests to predict tumors’ drug responsiveness. We have developed an in vitro short-term test based on nucleic acid precursor incorporation to determine clinical drug resistance. This test detects inherent and acquired resistance in vitro and transplantable syngeneic and xenografted tumors in vivo. In several clinical trials, clinical resistance was predictable with more than 90% accuracy, while drug sensitivity was detected with less accuracy (~60%). Remarkably, clinical cross-resistance to numerous drugs (multidrug resistance, broad spectrum resistance) was detectable by a single compound, doxorubicin, due to its multifactorial modes of action. The results of this predictive test were in good agreement with predictive assays of other authors. As no predictive test has been established as yet for clinical diagnostics, the identification of sensitive drugs may not reach sufficiently high reliability for clinical routine. A meta-analysis of the literature published during the past four decades considering test results of more than 15,000 tumor patients unambiguously demonstrated that, in the majority of studies, resistance was correctly predicted with an accuracy between 80 and 100%, while drug sensitivity could only be predicted with an accuracy of 50–80%. This synopsis of the published literature impressively illustrates that prediction of drug resistance could be validated. The determination of drug resistance was reliable independent of tumor type, test assay, and drug used in these in vitro tests. By contrast, chemosensitivity could not be predicted with high reliability. Therefore, we propose a rethinking of the “chemosensitivity” concept. Instead, predictive in vitro tests may reliably identify drug-resistant tumors. The clinical consequence imply to subject resistant tumors not to chemotherapy, but to other new

  19. Lichenoid drug reaction to isoniazid presenting as exfoliative dermatitis in a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Thakur, B K; Verma, S; Mishra, J

    2015-06-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients are at increased risk of drug reactions because of immune dysregulation and multiple drug intake. Lichenoid drug reactions to isoniazid have been reported previously in the literature. However, for lichenoid drug reaction to isoniazid to be so extensive to present as exfoliative dermatitis is rare. We report here a rare case of lichenoid drug reaction to isoniazid presenting as exfoliative dermatitis in a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

  20. Acquired Tolerance to Ivermectin and Moxidectin after Drug Selection Pressure in the Nematode Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Alberich, Mélanie; Kansoh, Dalia; Blanchard, Alexandra; Lespine, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Ivermectin and moxidectin are the most widely administered anthelmintic macrocyclic lactones (MLs) to treat human and animal nematode infections. Their widespread and frequent use has led to a high level of resistance to these drugs. Although they have the same mode of action, differences in terms of selection for drug resistance have been reported. Our objective was to study and compare changes occurring upon ivermectin or moxidectin selection in the model nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. C. elegans worms were submitted to stepwise exposure to increasing doses of moxidectin. The sensitivity of moxidectin-selected worms to MLs was determined in a larval development assay and compared with those of wild-type and ivermectin-selected strains. Selection with either ivermectin or moxidectin led to acquired tolerance to ivermectin, moxidectin, and eprinomectin. Importantly, moxidectin was the most potent ML in both ivermectin- and moxidectin-selected strains. Interestingly, this order of potency was also observed in a resistant Haemonchus contortus isolate. In addition, ivermectin- and moxidectin-selected strains displayed constitutive overexpression of several genes involved in xenobiotic metabolism and transport. Moreover, verapamil potentiated sensitivity to ivermectin and moxidectin, demonstrating that ABC transporters play a role in ML sensitivity in ML-selected C. elegans strains. Finally, both ivermectin- and moxidectin-selected strains displayed a dye-filling-defective phenotype. Overall, this work demonstrated that selection with ivermectin or moxidectin led to cross-resistance to several MLs in nematodes and that the induction of detoxification systems and defects in the integrity of amphidial neurons are two mechanisms that appear to affect the responsiveness of worms to both ivermectin and moxidectin. PMID:27246778

  1. Non-invasive analysis of acquired resistance to cancer therapy by sequencing of plasma DNA.

    PubMed

    Murtaza, Muhammed; Dawson, Sarah-Jane; Tsui, Dana W Y; Gale, Davina; Forshew, Tim; Piskorz, Anna M; Parkinson, Christine; Chin, Suet-Feung; Kingsbury, Zoya; Wong, Alvin S C; Marass, Francesco; Humphray, Sean; Hadfield, James; Bentley, David; Chin, Tan Min; Brenton, James D; Caldas, Carlos; Rosenfeld, Nitzan

    2013-05-02

    mutations associated with acquired drug resistance in advanced cancers. Serial analysis of cancer genomes in plasma constitutes a new paradigm for the study of clonal evolution in human cancers.

  2. Medical Management of Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Doosoo

    2015-07-01

    Drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB) is still a major threat worldwide. However, recent scientific advances in diagnostic and therapeutic tools have improved the management of drug-resistant TB. The development of rapid molecular testing methods allows for the early detection of drug resistance and prompt initiation of an appropriate treatment. In addition, there has been growing supportive evidence for shorter treatment regimens in multidrug-resistant TB; and for the first time in over 50 years, new anti-TB drugs have been developed. The World Health Organization has recently revised their guidelines, primarily based on evidence from a meta-analysis of individual patient data (n=9,153) derived from 32 observational studies, and outlined the recommended combination and correct use of available anti-TB drugs. This review summarizes the updated guidelines with a focus on the medical management of drug-resistant TB.

  3. New Drugs and Drug Resistance in Malaria: Molecular Genetic Analysis.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-06-26

    heterologous expressions system in yeast for potential drug target enzymes. The yeast expression system should allow rapid screening of new drugs , greatly...medication yet the world faces a crisis-drug resistance is emerging and spreading faster than drugs are being developed and the flow in the pipeline of new ... drugs has all but stopped. This represents a particular threat to the US Military. In a short time there may be parts of the world where no effective

  4. New Drugs and Drug Resistance in Malaria: Molecular Genetic Analysis.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-06-20

    heterologous expressions system in yeast for potential drug target enzymes. The yeast expression system should allow rapid screening of new drugs , greatly...medication yet the world faces a crisis-drug resistance is emerging and spreading faster than drugs are being developed and the flow in the pipeline of new ... drugs has all but stopped. This represents a particular threat to the US Military. In a short time there may be parts of the world where no effective

  5. Preventing drug resistance in severe influenza

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrovolny, Hana; Deecke, Lucas

    2015-03-01

    Severe, long-lasting influenza infections are often caused by new strains of influenza. The long duration of these infections leads to an increased opportunity for the emergence of drug resistant mutants. This is particularly problematic for new strains of influenza since there is often no vaccine, so drug treatment is the first line of defense. One strategy for trying to minimize drug resistance is to apply periodic treatment. During treatment the wild-type virus decreases, but resistant virus might increase; when there is no treatment, wild-type virus will hopefully out-compete the resistant virus, driving down the number of resistant virus. We combine a mathematical model of severe influenza with a model of drug resistance to study emergence of drug resistance during a long-lasting infection. We apply periodic treatment with two types of antivirals: neuraminidase inhibitors, which block release of virions; and adamantanes, which block replication of virions. We compare the efficacy of the two drugs in reducing emergence of drug resistant mutants and examine the effect of treatment frequency on the emergence of drug resistant mutants.

  6. Clinical definition of acquired resistance to epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors in non-small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Jackman, David; Pao, William; Riely, Gregory J; Engelman, Jeffrey A; Kris, Mark G; Jänne, Pasi A; Lynch, Thomas; Johnson, Bruce E; Miller, Vincent A

    2010-01-10

    Ten percent of North American patients with non-small-cell lung cancer have tumors with somatic mutations in the gene for the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Approximately 70% of patients whose lung cancers harbor somatic mutations in exons encoding the tyrosine kinase domain of EGFR experience significant tumor regressions when treated with the EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) gefitinib or erlotinib. However, the overwhelming majority of these patients inevitably acquire resistance to either drug. Currently, the clinical definition of such secondary or acquired resistance is not clear. We propose the following criteria be used to define more precisely acquired resistance to EGFR TKIs. All patients should have the following criteria: previous treatment with a single-agent EGFR TKI (eg, gefitinib or erlotinib); either or both of the following: a tumor that harbors an EGFR mutation known to be associated with drug sensitivity or objective clinical benefit from treatment with an EGFR TKI; systemic progression of disease (Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors [RECIST] or WHO) while on continuous treatment with gefitinib or erlotinib within the last 30 days; and no intervening systemic therapy between cessation of gefitinib or erlotinib and initiation of new therapy. The relatively simple definition proposed here will lead to a more uniform approach to investigating the problem of acquired resistance to EGFR TKIs in this unique patient population. These guidelines should minimize reporting of false-positive and false-negative activity in these clinical trials and would facilitate the identification of agents that truly overcome acquired resistance to gefitinib and erlotinib.

  7. Community-acquired Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Uruguay

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xiao Xue; Galiana, Antonio; Pedreira, Walter; Mowszowicz, Martin; Christophersen, Inés; Machiavello, Silvia; Lope, Liliana; Benaderet, Sara; Buela, Fernanda; Vicentino, Walter; Albini, María; Bertaux, Olivier; Constenla, Irene; Bagnulo, Homero; Llosa, Luis; Ito, Teruyo

    2005-01-01

    A novel, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus clone (Uruguay clone) with a non–multidrug-resistant phenotype caused a large outbreak, including 7 deaths, in Montevideo, Uruguay. The clone was distinct from the highly virulent community clone represented by strain MW2, although both clones carried Panton-Valentine leukocidin gene and cna gene. PMID:15963301

  8. Acquired resistance to dasatinib in lung cancer cell lines conferred by DDR2 gatekeeper mutation and NF1 loss.

    PubMed

    Beauchamp, Ellen M; Woods, Brittany A; Dulak, Austin M; Tan, Li; Xu, Chunxiao; Gray, Nathanael S; Bass, Adam J; Wong, Kwok-kin; Meyerson, Matthew; Hammerman, Peter S

    2014-02-01

    The treatment of non-small cell lung cancer has evolved dramatically over the past decade with the adoption of widespread use of effective targeted therapies in patients with distinct molecular alterations. In lung squamous cell carcinoma (lung SqCC), recent studies have suggested that DDR2 mutations are a biomarker for therapeutic response to dasatinib and clinical trials are underway testing this hypothesis. Although targeted therapeutics are typically quite effective as initial therapy for patients with lung cancer, nearly all patients develop resistance with long-term exposure to targeted drugs. Here, we use DDR2-dependent lung cancer cell lines to model acquired resistance to dasatinib therapy. We perform targeted exome sequencing to identify two distinct mechanisms of acquired resistance: acquisition of the T654I gatekeeper mutation in DDR2 and loss of NF1. We show that NF1 loss activates a bypass pathway, which confers ERK dependency downstream of RAS activation. These results indicate that acquired resistance to dasatinib can occur via both second-site mutations in DDR2 and by activation of bypass pathways. These data may help to anticipate mechanisms of resistance that may be identified in upcoming clinical trials of anti-DDR2 therapy in lung cancer and suggest strategies to overcome resistance.

  9. Acquisition of a single EZH2 D1 domain mutation confers acquired resistance to EZH2-targeted inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Theresa; Nerle, Sujata; Pritchard, Justin; Zhao, Boyang; Rivera, Victor M.

    2015-01-01

    Although targeted therapies have revolutionized cancer treatment, overcoming acquired resistance remains a major clinical challenge. EZH2 inhibitors (EZH2i), EPZ-6438 and GSK126, are currently in the early stages of clinical evaluation and the first encouraging signs of efficacy have recently emerged in the clinic. To anticipate mechanisms of resistance to EZH2i, we used a forward genetic platform combining a mutagenesis screen with next generation sequencing technology and identified a hotspot of secondary mutations in the EZH2 D1 domain (Y111 and I109). Y111D mutation within the WT or A677G EZH2 allele conferred robust resistance to both EPZ-6438 and GSK126, but it only drove a partial resistance within the Y641F allele. EZH2 mutants required histone methyltransferase (HMT) catalytic activity and the polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) components, SUZ12 and EED, to drive drug resistance. Furthermore, D1 domain mutations not only blocked the ability of EZH2i to bind to WT and A677G mutant, but also abrogated drug binding to the Y641F mutant. These data provide the first cellular validation of the mechanistic model underpinning the oncogenic function of WT and mutant EZH2. Importantly, our findings suggest that acquired-resistance to EZH2i may arise in WT and mutant EZH2 patients through a single mutation that remains targetable by second generation EZH2i. PMID:26360609

  10. Systemic acquired resistance delays race shifts to major resistance genes in bell pepper.

    PubMed

    Romero, A M; Ritchie, D F

    2004-12-01

    ABSTRACT The lack of durability of host plant disease resistance is a major problem in disease control. Genotype-specific resistance that involves major resistance (R) genes is especially prone to failure. The compatible (i.e., disease) host-pathogen interaction with systemic acquired resistance (SAR) has been studied extensively, but the incompatible (i.e., resistant) interaction less so. Using the pepper-bacterial spot (causal agent, Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. vesicatoria) pathosystem, we examined the effect of SAR in reducing the occurrence of race-change mutants that defeat R genes in laboratory, greenhouse, and field experiments. Pepper plants carrying one or more R genes were sprayed with the plant defense activator acibenzolar-S-methyl (ASM) and challenged with incompatible strains of the pathogen. In the greenhouse, disease lesions first were observed 3 weeks after inoculation. ASM-treated plants carrying a major R gene had significantly fewer lesions caused by both the incompatible (i.e., hypersensitive) and compatible (i.e., disease) responses than occurred on nonsprayed plants. Bacteria isolated from the disease lesions were confirmed to be race-change mutants. In field experiments, there was a delay in the detection of race-change mutants and a reduction in disease severity. Decreased disease severity was associated with a reduction in the number of race-change mutants and the suppression of disease caused by the race-change mutants. This suggests a possible mechanism related to a decrease in the pathogen population size, which subsequently reduces the number of race-change mutants for the selection pressure of R genes. Thus, inducers of SAR are potentially useful for increasing the durability of genotype-specific resistance conferred by major R genes.

  11. Antimicrobial Resistance and Clinical Outcomes in Nursing Home-Acquired Pneumonia, Compared to Community-Acquired Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Yun-Seong; Ryoo, Soo Ryeong; Byun, Seung Joo; Jeong, Yun-Jeong; Oh, Jin Young

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Patients with nursing home-acquired pneumonia (NHAP) should be treated as hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP) according to guidelines published in 2005. However, controversy still exists on whether the high mortality of NHAP results from multidrug resistant pathogens or underlying disease. We aimed to outline differences and factors contributing to mortality between NHAP and community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) patients. Materials and Methods We retrospectively evaluated patients aged 65 years or older with either CAP or NHAP from 2008 to 2014. Patients with healthcare-associated pneumonia other than NHAP or HAP were excluded. Results Among 317 patients, 212 patients had CAP and 105 had NHAP. Patients with NHAP had higher mortality, more frequently used a ventilator, and had disease of higher severity than CAP. The incidences of aspiration, tube feeding, and poor functional status were higher in NHAP. Twenty three out of 54 NHAP patients and three out of 62 CAP patients had multidrug resistant pathogens (p<0.001). Eleven patients with NHAP died at discharge, compared to 7 patients with CAP (p=0.009). However, there was no association between mortality rate and presence of multidrug-resistant pathogens. The number of involved lobes on chest X-ray [odds ratio (OR)=1.708; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.120 to 2.605] and use of mechanical ventilation (OR=9.537; 95% CI, 1.635 to 55.632) were significantly associated with in-hospital mortality. Conclusion Patients with NHAP had higher mortality than patients with CAP. The excess mortality among patients with NHAP and CAP was related to disease severity but not to the presence of multidrug resistant pathogens. PMID:27873512

  12. Spatial heterogeneity in drug concentrations can facilitate the emergence of resistance to cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Fu, Feng; Nowak, Martin A; Bonhoeffer, Sebastian

    2015-03-01

    Acquired resistance is one of the major barriers to successful cancer therapy. The development of resistance is commonly attributed to genetic heterogeneity. However, heterogeneity of drug penetration of the tumor microenvironment both on the microscopic level within solid tumors as well as on the macroscopic level across metastases may also contribute to acquired drug resistance. Here we use mathematical models to investigate the effect of drug heterogeneity on the probability of escape from treatment and the time to resistance. Specifically we address scenarios with sufficiently potent therapies that suppress growth of all preexisting genetic variants in the compartment with the highest possible drug concentration. To study the joint effect of drug heterogeneity, growth rate, and evolution of resistance, we analyze a multi-type stochastic branching process describing growth of cancer cells in multiple compartments with different drug concentrations and limited migration between compartments. We show that resistance is likely to arise first in the sanctuary compartment with poor drug penetrations and from there populate non-sanctuary compartments with high drug concentrations. Moreover, we show that only below a threshold rate of cell migration does spatial heterogeneity accelerate resistance evolution, otherwise deterring drug resistance with excessively high migration rates. Our results provide new insights into understanding why cancers tend to quickly become resistant, and that cell migration and the presence of sanctuary sites with little drug exposure are essential to this end.

  13. Plasmodium falciparum drug resistance in Angola.

    PubMed

    Fançony, Cláudia; Brito, Miguel; Gil, Jose Pedro

    2016-02-09

    Facing chloroquine drug resistance, Angola promptly adopted artemisinin-based combination therapy as the first-line to treat malaria. Currently, the country aims to consolidate malaria control, while preparing for the elimination of the disease, along with others African countries in the region. However, the remarkable capacity of Plasmodium to develop drug resistance represents an alarming threat for those achievements. Herein, the available, but relatively scarce and dispersed, information on malaria drug resistance in Angola, is reviewed and discussed. The review aims to inform but also to encourage future research studies that monitor and update the information on anti-malarial drug efficacy and prevalence of molecular markers of drug resistance, key fields in the context and objectives of elimination.

  14. Mechanisms of Drug Resistance: Daptomycin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Truc T.; Munita, Jose M.; Arias, Cesar A.

    2016-01-01

    Daptomycin (DAP) is a cyclic lipopeptide with in vitro activity against a variety of Gram-positive pathogens, including multidrug-resistant organisms. Since its introduction in clinical practice in 2003, DAP has become an important key front-line antibiotic for severe or deep-seated infections caused by Gram-positive organisms. Unfortunately, DAP-resistance (R) has been extensively documented in clinically important organisms such as Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus spp, and Streptococcus spp. Studies on the mechanisms of DAP-R in Bacillus subtilis and other Gram-positive bacteria indicate that the genetic pathways of DAP resistance are diverse and complex. However, a common phenomenon emerging from these mechanistic studies is that DAP-R is associated with important adaptive changes in cell wall and cell membrane homeostasis with critical changes in cell physiology. Findings related to these adaptive changes have offered novel insights into the genetics and molecular mechanisms of bacterial cell envelope stress response and the manner in which Gram-positive bacteria cope with the antimicrobial peptide attack and protect vital structures of the cell envelope such as the cell membrane. In this review, we will examine the most recent findings related to the molecular mechanisms of resistance to DAP in relevant Gram-positive pathogens and discuss the clinical implications for therapy against these important bacteria. PMID:26495887

  15. An analysis of drug resistance among people living with HIV/AIDS in Shanghai, China

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Meiyan; Sun, Jianjun; Lu, Hongzhou

    2017-01-01

    Background Understanding the mechanisms of drug resistance can facilitate better management of antiretroviral therapy, helping to prevent transmission and decrease the morbidity and mortality of people living with HIV/AIDS. However, there is little data about transmitted drug resistance and acquired drug resistance for HIV/AIDS patients in Shanghai. Methods A retrospective cohort study of HIV-infected patients who visited the Department of Infectious Disease from June 2008 to June 2015 was conducted in Shanghai, China. Logistic regression analysis was performed to analyze risk factors for drug resistance among HIV-infected people with virological failure. The related collected factors included patient age, gender, marital status, infection route, baseline CD4 count, antiretroviral therapy regimens, time between HIV diagnosis and initiating antiretroviral therapy. Factors with p<0.1 in the univariate logistic regression test were analyzed by multivariate logistic regression test. Results There were 575 subjects selected for this study and 369 participated in this research. For the antiretroviral therapy drugs, the rates of transmitted drug resistance and acquired drug resistance were significantly different. The non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) had the highest drug resistance rate (transmitted drug resistance, 10.9%; acquired drug resistance, 53.3%) and protease inhibitors (PIs) had the lowest drug resistance rate (transmitted drug resistance, 1.7%; acquired drug resistance, 2.7%). Logistic regression analysis found no factors that were related to drug resistance except marital status (married status for tenofovir: odds ratio = 6.345, 95% confidence interval = 1.553–25.921, P = 0.010) and the time span between HIV diagnosis and initiating antiretroviral therapy (≤6M for stavudine: odds ratio = 0.271, 95% confidence interval = 0.086–0.850, P = 0.025; ≤6M for didanosine: odds ratio = 0.284, 95% confidence interval = 0.096–0.842, P = 0

  16. Clinical and biologic aspects of human cytomegalovirus resistance to antiviral drugs.

    PubMed

    Baldanti, Fausto; Lurain, Nell; Gerna, Giuseppe

    2004-05-01

    The emergence of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) drug resistant strains is a life-threatening condition in immunocompromised individuals with active HCMV infection. HCMV drug resistance represented a major problem in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome until the recent introduction of highly active antiretroviral combination therapy, which dramatically decreased the incidence in this clinical setting. However, HCMV resistance to antiviral drugs is now an emerging problem in the transplantation setting. The molecular mechanisms of HCMV drug resistance have been elucidated and rely on the selection during treatment of HCMV strains harboring mutations in two key viral genes: UL97 coding for a viral phosphotransferase and UL54 coding for the viral DNA polymerase.

  17. Preventing and managing antiretroviral drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Kuritzkes, Daniel R

    2004-05-01

    Development of resistance to antiretroviral drugs (ARVs) is a major impediment to optimum treatment of HIV-1 infection. Although resistance testing can help to select subsequent regimens when virologic failure occurs, cross-resistance, which affects all classes of ARVs, may make it more difficult to achieve optimum control of HIV. We have known for some time that our first choice of antiretroviral therapy offers the best chance to control HIV replication and that initial therapy should be selected with an eye on future options. Potency is the first line of defense against the development of resistance. Other factors that affect resistance development include: tolerability, potential for optimum adherence, and genetic and pharmacologic barriers to development of resistance. If resistance emerges, only a single drug may be affected initially, and a rapid change in ARVs may preserve the efficacy of other components. One cautionary note is that we can no longer assume that a patient's HIV is fully susceptible to all ARVs even in the initial regimen. Transmission of drug-resistant HIV means that the genetic composition may be that of an "experienced" virus with reduced susceptibility to ARVs. Resistance testing at the time of transmission is most likely to reveal this resistance, but over time the dominant genetic pattern may revert to wild-type, and be missed by resistance testing. Because "archived" resistant HIV may emerge quickly once treatment is initiated, we need to keep this in mind when selecting initial therapy.

  18. Mechanisms of drug resistance: daptomycin resistance.

    PubMed

    Tran, Truc T; Munita, Jose M; Arias, Cesar A

    2015-09-01

    Daptomycin (DAP) is a cyclic lipopeptide with in vitro activity against a variety of Gram-positive pathogens, including multidrug-resistant organisms. Since its introduction into clinical practice in 2003, DAP has become an important key frontline antibiotic for severe or deep-seated infections caused by Gram-positive organisms. Unfortunately, DAP resistance (DAP-R) has been extensively documented in clinically important organisms such as Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus spp., and Streptococcus spp. Studies on the mechanisms of DAP-R in Bacillus subtilis and other Gram-positive bacteria indicate that the genetic pathways of DAP-R are diverse and complex. However, a common phenomenon emerging from these mechanistic studies is that DAP-R is associated with important adaptive changes in cell wall and cell membrane homeostasis with critical changes in cell physiology. Findings related to these adaptive changes have provided novel insights into the genetics and molecular mechanisms of bacterial cell envelope stress response and the manner in which Gram-positive bacteria cope with the antimicrobial peptide attack and protect vital structures of the cell envelope, such as the cell membrane. In this review, we will examine the most recent findings related to the molecular mechanisms of resistance to DAP in relevant Gram-positive pathogens and discuss the clinical implications for therapy against these important bacteria.

  19. Microvesicle removal of anticancer drugs contributes to drug resistance in human pancreatic cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Muralidharan-Chari, Vandhana; Kohan, Hamed Gilzad; Asimakopoulos, Alexandros G.; Sudha, Thangirala; Sell, Stewart; Kannan, Kurunthachalam; Boroujerdi, Mehdi; Davis, Paul J.; Mousa, Shaker A.

    2016-01-01

    High mortality in pancreatic cancer patients is partly due to resistance to chemotherapy. We describe that human pancreatic cancer cells acquire drug resistance by a novel mechanism in which they expel and remove chemotherapeutic drugs from the microenvironment via microvesicles (MVs). Using human pancreatic cancer cells that exhibit varied sensitivity to gemcitabine (GEM), we show that GEM exposure triggers the cancer cells to release MVs in an amount that correlates with that cell line's sensitivity to GEM. The importance of MV-release in gaining drug resistance in GEM-resistant pancreatic cancer cells was confirmed when the inhibition of MV-release sensitized the cells to GEM treatment, both in vitro and in vivo. Mechanistically, MVs remove drugs that are internalized into the cells and that are in the microenvironment. The differences between the drug-resistant and drug-sensitive pancreatic cancer cell lines tested here are explained based on the variable content of influx/efflux proteins present on MVs, which directly dictates the ability of MVs either to trap GEM or to allow GEM to flow back to the microenvironment. PMID:27391262

  20. Emerging pathogens: Dynamics, mutation and drug resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Perelson, A.S.; Goldstein, B.; Korber, B.T.

    1997-10-01

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The objectives of this project were to develop models of the spread of pathogens, such as HIV-1 and influenza, in humans, and then to use the models to address the possibility of designing appropriate drug therapies that may limit the ability of the pathogen to escape treatment by mutating into a drug resistant form. We have developed a model of drug-resistance to amantidine and rimantadine, the two major antiviral drugs used to treat influenza, and have used the model to suggest treatment strategies during an epidemic.

  1. Giardiasis, drug resistance, and new target discovery.

    PubMed

    Tian, Hai-Feng; Chen, Bing; Wen, Jian-Fan

    2010-08-01

    Giardiasis is a worldwide parasitic disease caused by the protozoan Giardia lamblia in humans and other animals, especially live stocks. Here, we briefly review the current state of therapeutic availability for giardiasis, including chemical drugs and vaccines, and the dilemma in the prevention and treatment of this disease, including the emergence of drug resistance and the shortage of vaccine (especially for humans). Future efforts and progress in controlling giardiasis are expected in three aspects: clarification of the drug resistance mechanisms, development of efficient vaccines, and identification of more targets for new drugs and vaccines.

  2. Identifying representative drug resistant mutants of HIV

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Drug resistance is one of the most important causes for failure of anti-AIDS treatment. During therapy, multiple mutations accumulate in the HIV genome, eventually rendering the drugs ineffective in blocking replication of the mutant virus. The huge number of possible mutants precludes experimental analysis to explore the molecular mechanisms of resistance and develop improved antiviral drugs. Results In order to solve this problem, we have developed a new algorithm to reveal the most representative mutants from the whole drug resistant mutant database based on our newly proposed unified protein sequence and 3D structure encoding method. Mean shift clustering and multiple regression analysis were applied on genotype-resistance data for mutants of HIV protease and reverse transcriptase. This approach successfully chooses less than 100 mutants with the highest resistance to each drug out of about 10K in the whole database. When considering high level resistance to multiple drugs, the numbers reduce to one or two representative mutants. Conclusion This approach for predicting the most representative mutants for each drug has major importance for experimental verification since the results provide a small number of representative sequences, which will be amenable for in vitro testing and characterization of the expressed mutant proteins. PMID:26678327

  3. Primary, Adaptive, and Acquired Resistance to Cancer Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Padmanee; Hu-Lieskovan, Siwen; Wargo, Jennifer A; Ribas, Antoni

    2017-02-09

    Cancer immunotherapy can induce long lasting responses in patients with metastatic cancers of a wide range of histologies. Broadening the clinical applicability of these treatments requires an improved understanding of the mechanisms limiting cancer immunotherapy. The interactions between the immune system and cancer cells are continuous, dynamic, and evolving from the initial establishment of a cancer cell to the development of metastatic disease, which is dependent on immune evasion. As the molecular mechanisms of resistance to immunotherapy are elucidated, actionable strategies to prevent or treat them may be derived to improve clinical outcomes for patients.

  4. [MOLECULAR MECHANISMS OF DRUG RESISTANCE NEISSERIA GONORRHOEAE HISTORY AND PROSPECTS].

    PubMed

    Bodoev, I N; Il'ina, E N

    2015-01-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae (gonococcus) is a strict human pathogen, which causes gonorrhea--an infectious disease, whose origin dates back to more than two thousand years. Due to the unique plasticity of the genetic material, these bacteria have acquired the capacity to adapt to the host immune system, cause repeated infections, as well as withstand antimicrobials. Since the introduction of antibiotics in 1930s, gonococcus has displayed its propensity to develop resistance to all clinically useful antibiotics. It is important to note that the known resistance determinants of N. gonorrhoeae were acquired through horizontal gene transfer, recombination and spontaneous mutagenesis, and may be located both in the chromosome and on the plasmid. After introduction of a new antimicrobial drug, gonococcus becomes resistant within two decades and replaces sensitive bacterial population. Currently Ceftriaxone is the last remaining antibiotic for first-line treatment of gonorrhea. However, the first gonococcus displaying high-level resistance to Ceftriaxone was isolated in Japan a few years ago. Therefore, in the near future, gonorrhea may become untreatable. In the present review, we discuss the chronology of the anti-gonorrhea drugs (antibiotics) replacement, the evolution of resistance mechanisms emergence and future perspectives of N. gonorrhoeae treatment.

  5. Evolution of drug resistance in Salmonella panama isolates in Chile.

    PubMed Central

    Cordano, A M; Virgilio, R

    1996-01-01

    In a search for Salmonella isolates in the environment in Chile in 1975, drug-susceptible strains of Salmonella panama were recovered for the first time from river water and vegetables in the vicinity of Santiago. Two to 3 years later, antibiotic-resistant S. panama began to appear in a variety of sources (meat, animals, vegetables, etc.), giving rise to a human epidemic that involved the entire nation. Of 139 clinical isolates studied, 7 were drug susceptible, 11 were resistant only to nitrofurans, and 3 were streptomycin, spectinomycin, and nitrofuran resistant; none of these 21 isolates harbored plasmid DNA. Most isolates (n = 107) were resistant to nitrofurans (chromosomal) and to streptomycin, spectinomycin, sulfonamides, tetracycline, and mercuric and tellurite salts; this multidrug resistance was encoded on a 218-kb plasmid classified in a number of strains as being in the IncHI2 group. From 1982 to 1993, 11 isolates acquired an additional self-transferable plasmid coding for resistance to any one of ampicillin (61 kb), ampicillin and trimethoprim (65 kb), ampicillin, trimethoprim, streptomycin, and sulfonamides (71 kb), ampicillin, gentamicin, kanamycin, and tetracycline (120 kb), or a nontransferable plasmid of approximately 6 kb encoding resistance to ampicillin or kanamycin. With the exception of ampicillin or ampicillin and trimethoprim resistance, S. panama isolates from foodstuffs, mainly pork meat products, and animals had resistance patterns that were the same as those found in clinical specimens. Remarkably, strains from goats and goat cheese and from shellfish isolated in particular rural regions were either drug susceptible or resistant only to streptomycin-spectinomycin encoded on a mobile genetic element and to nitrofurans. The report describes the arrival of a susceptible S. panama strain, its spread all over the country, and the evolution of progressively complex resistance patterns. PMID:8834876

  6. Community-Acquired Methicillin-Resistant "Staphylococcus aureus": Considerations for School Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alex, Aniltta; Letizia, MariJo

    2007-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant "Staphylococcus aureus" (MRSA) is a disease-causing organism that has been present in hospital settings since the 1960s. However, a genetically distinct strain of MRSA, called community-acquired methicillin-resistant "Staphylococcus aureus" (CA-MRSA), has emerged in recent years in community settings among healthy…

  7. PeaT1-induced systemic acquired resistance in tobacco follows salicylic acid-dependent pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Yang, Xiufen; Qiu, Dewen; Guo, Lihua; Zeng, Hongmei; Mao, Jianjun; Gao, Qiufeng

    2011-04-01

    Systemic acquired resistance (SAR) is an inducible defense mechanism which plays a central role in protecting plants from pathogen attack. A new elicitor, PeaT1 from Alternaria tenuissima, was expressed in Escherichia coil and characterized with systemic acquired resistance to tobacco mosaic virus (TMV). PeaT1-treated plants exhibited enhanced systemic resistance with a significant reduction in number and size of TMV lesions on wild tobacco leaves as compared with control. The quantitative analysis of TMV CP gene expression with real-time quantitative PCR showed there was reduction in TMV virus concentration after PeaT1 treatment. Similarly, peroxidase (POD) activity and lignin increased significantly after PeaT1 treatment. The real-time quantitative PCR revealed that PeaT1 also induced the systemic accumulation of pathogenesis-related gene, PR-1a and PR-1b which are the markers of systemic acquired resistance (SAR), NPR1 gene for salicylic acid (SA) signal transduction pathway and PAL gene for SA synthesis. The accumulation of SA and the failure in development of similar level of resistance as in wild type tobacco plants in PeaT1 treated nahG transgenic tobacco plants indicated that PeaT1-induced resistance depended on SA accumulation. The present work suggested that the molecular mechanism of PeaT1 inducing disease resistance in tobacco was likely through the systemic acquired resistance pathway mediated by salicylic acid and the NPR1 gene.

  8. MICROBIAL DRUG RESISTANCE (EPIDEMIOLOGY, GENETICS).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    resistance. Antibacterial and inducer activities of LM and its derivatives were examined. Mechanisms of Mac-resistance after induction was investigated...combination of ribosomes from S.aureus and supernatant of E.coli. The ribosomes decrease their binding to spiramycin (SP) in parallel with the increase

  9. Genotypic diversity of multidrug-, quinolone- and extensively drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Disratthakit, Areeya; Meada, Shinji; Prammananan, Therdsak; Thaipisuttikul, Iyarit; Doi, Norio; Chaiprasert, Angkana

    2015-06-01

    Drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB), which includes multidrug-resistant (MDR-TB), quinolone-resistant (QR-TB) and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB), is a serious threat to TB control. We aimed to characterize the genotypic diversity of drug-resistant TB clinical isolates collected in Thailand to establish whether the emergence of drug-resistant TB is attributable to transmitted resistance or acquired resistance. We constructed the first molecular phylogeny of MDR-TB (n=95), QR-TB (n=69) and XDR-TB (n=28) in Thailand based on spoligotyping and proposed 24-locus multilocus variable-number of tandem repeat analysis (MLVA). Clustering analysis was performed using the unweighted pair group method with arithmetic mean. Spoligotyping identified the Beijing strain (SIT1) as the most predominant genotype (n=139; 72.4%). The discriminatory power of 0.9235 Hunter-Gaston Discriminatory Index (HGDI) with the 15-locus variable-number tandem repeats of mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units typing was improved to a 0.9574 HGDI with proposed 24-locus MLVA, thereby resulting in the subdivision of a large cluster of Beijing strains (SIT1) into 17 subclusters. We identified the spread of drug-resistant TB clones caused by three different MLVA types in the Beijing strain (SIT1) and a specific clone of XDR-TB caused by a rare genotype, the Manu-ancestor strain (SIT523). Overall, 49.5% of all isolates were clustered. These findings suggest that a remarkable transmission of drug-resistant TB occurred in Thailand. The remaining 50% of drug-resistant TB isolates were unique genotypes, which may have arisen from the individual acquisition of drug resistance. Our results suggest that transmitted and acquired resistance have played an equal role in the emergence of drug-resistant TB. Further characterization of whole genome sequences of clonal strains could help to elucidate the mycobacterial genetic factors relevant for drug resistance, transmissibility and virulence.

  10. Carfilzomib and oprozomib synergize with histone deacetylase inhibitors in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma models of acquired resistance to proteasome inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Zang, Yan; Kirk, Christopher J; Johnson, Daniel E

    2014-09-01

    Acquired resistance to proteasome inhibitors represents a considerable impediment to their effective clinical application. Carfilzomib and its orally bioavailable structural analog oprozomib are second-generation, highly-selective, proteasome inhibitors. However, the mechanisms of acquired resistance to carfilzomib and oprozomib are incompletely understood, and effective strategies for overcoming this resistance are needed. Here, we developed models of acquired resistance to carfilzomib in two head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cell lines, UMSCC-1 and Cal33, through gradual exposure to increasing drug concentrations. The resistant lines R-UMSCC-1 and R-Cal33 demonstrated 205- and 64-fold resistance, respectively, relative to the parental lines. Similarly, a high level of cross-resistance to oprozomib, as well as paclitaxel, was observed, whereas only moderate resistance to bortezomib (8- to 29-fold), and low level resistance to cisplatin (1.5- to 5-fold) was seen. Synergistic induction of apoptosis signaling and cell death, and inhibition of colony formation followed co-treatment of acquired resistance models with carfilzomib and the histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) vorinostat. Synergism was also seen with other combinations, including oprozomib plus vorinostat, or carfilzomib plus the HDACi entinostat. Synergism was accompanied by upregulation of proapoptotic Bik, and suppression of Bik attenuated the synergy. The acquired resistance models also exhibited elevated levels of MDR-1/P-gp. Inhibition of MDR-1/P-gp with reversin 121 partially overcame carfilzomib resistance in R-UMSCC-1 and R-Cal33 cells. Collectively, these studies indicate that combining carfilzomib or oprozomib with HDAC or MDR-1/P-gp inhibitors may be a useful strategy for overcoming acquired resistance to these proteasome inhibitors.

  11. Antifungal drug resistance among Candida species: mechanisms and clinical impact.

    PubMed

    Sanguinetti, Maurizio; Posteraro, Brunella; Lass-Flörl, Cornelia

    2015-06-01

    The epidemiology of Candida infections has changed in recent years. Although Candida albicans is still the main cause of invasive candidiasis in most clinical settings, a substantial proportion of patients is now infected with non-albicans Candida species. The various Candida species vary in their susceptibility to the most commonly used antifungal agents, and the intrinsic resistance to antifungal therapy seen in some species, along with the development of acquired resistance during treatment in others, is becoming a major problem in the management of Candida infection. A better understanding of the mechanisms and clinical impact of antifungal drug resistance is essential for the efficient treatment of patients with Candida infection and for improving treatment outcomes. Herein, we report resistance to the azoles and echinocandins among Candida species.

  12. Malaria epidemic and drug resistance, Djibouti.

    PubMed

    Rogier, Christophe; Pradines, Bruno; Bogreau, H; Koeck, Jean-Louis; Kamil, Mohamed-Ali; Mercereau-Puijalon, Odile

    2005-02-01

    Analysis of Plasmodium falciparum isolates collected before, during, and after a 1999 malaria epidemic in Djibouti shows that, despite a high prevalence of resistance to chloroquine, the epidemic cannot be attributed to a sudden increase in drug resistance of local parasite populations.

  13. Novobiocin Inhibits the Antimicrobial Resistance Acquired through DNA Damage-Induced Mutagenesis in Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    Jara, Luis M.; Pérez-Varela, María; Corral, Jordi; Arch, Marta; Cortés, Pilar; Bou, Germán; Barbé, Jordi

    2015-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii, a worldwide emerging nosocomial pathogen, acquires antimicrobial resistances in response to DNA-damaging agents, which increase the expression of multiple error-prone DNA polymerase components. Here we show that the aminocoumarin novobiocin, which inhibits the DNA damage response in Gram-positive bacteria, also inhibits the expression of error-prone DNA polymerases in this Gram-negative multidrug-resistant pathogen and, consequently, its potential acquisition of antimicrobial resistance through DNA damage-induced mutagenesis. PMID:26503651

  14. CYP3A5 mediates basal and acquired therapy resistance in different subtypes of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Noll, Elisa M.; Eisen, Christian; Stenzinger, Albrecht; Espinet, Elisa; Muckenhuber, Alexander; Klein, Corinna; Vogel, Vanessa; Klaus, Bernd; Nadler, Wiebke; Rösli, Christoph; Lutz, Christian; Kulke, Michael; Engelhardt, Jan; Zickgraf, Franziska M.; Espinosa, Octavio; Schlesner, Matthias; Jiang, Xiaoqi; Kopp-Schneider, Annette; Neuhaus, Peter; Bahra, Marcus; Sinn, Bruno V.; Eils, Roland; Giese, Nathalia A.; Hackert, Thilo; Strobel, Oliver; Werner, Jens; Büchler, Markus W.; Weichert, Wilko; Trumpp, Andreas; Sprick, Martin R.

    2016-01-01

    Although subtypes of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) were described, this malignancy is clinically still treated as a single disease. Here, we present patient-derived models representing the full spectrum of previously identified quasi-mesenchymal (QM-PDA), classical and exocrine-like PDAC subtypes, and identify two markers—HNF1A and KRT81—that enable stratification of tumors into different subtypes by immunohistochemistry. Individuals bearing tumors of these subtypes show significant differences in overall survival and their tumors differ in drug sensitivity, with the exocrine-like subtype being resistant to tyrosine kinase inhibitors and paclitaxel. Cytochrome P450 3A5 (CYP3A5) metabolizes these compounds in tumors of the exocrine-like subtype, and pharmacological or shRNA-mediated CYP3A5 inhibition sensitizes tumor cells to these drugs. Whereas hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 alpha (HNF4A) controls basal expression of CYP3A5, drug-induced CYP3A5 upregulation is mediated by the nuclear receptor NR1I2. CYP3A5 also contributes to acquired drug resistance in QM-PDA and classical PDAC, and is highly expressed in several additional malignancies. These findings designate CYP3A5 as predictor of therapy response and as a tumor cell-autonomous detoxification mechanism that must be overcome to prevent drug resistance. PMID:26855150

  15. Targeting mitochondrial biogenesis to overcome drug resistance to MAPK inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Gao; Frederick, Dennie T.; Wu, Lawrence; Wei, Zhi; Krepler, Clemens; Srinivasan, Satish; Chae, Young Chan; Xu, Xiaowei; Choi, Harry; Dimwamwa, Elaida; Shannan, Batool; Basu, Devraj; Zhang, Dongmei; Guha, Manti; Xiao, Min; Randell, Sergio; Sproesser, Katrin; Xu, Wei; Liu, Jephrey; Karakousis, Giorgos C.; Schuchter, Lynn M.; Gangadhar, Tara C.; Amaravadi, Ravi K.; Gu, Mengnan; Xu, Caiyue; Ghosh, Abheek; Xu, Weiting; Tian, Tian; Zhang, Jie; Zha, Shijie; Brafford, Patricia; Weeraratna, Ashani; Davies, Michael A.; Wargo, Jennifer A.; Avadhani, Narayan G.; Lu, Yiling; Mills, Gordon B.; Altieri, Dario C.; Flaherty, Keith T.

    2016-01-01

    Targeting multiple components of the MAPK pathway can prolong the survival of patients with BRAFV600E melanoma. This approach is not curative, as some BRAF-mutated melanoma cells are intrinsically resistant to MAPK inhibitors (MAPKi). At the systemic level, our knowledge of how signaling pathways underlie drug resistance needs to be further expanded. Here, we have shown that intrinsically resistant BRAF-mutated melanoma cells with a low basal level of mitochondrial biogenesis depend on this process to survive MAPKi. Intrinsically resistant cells exploited an integrated stress response, exhibited an increase in mitochondrial DNA content, and required oxidative phosphorylation to meet their bioenergetic needs. We determined that intrinsically resistant cells rely on the genes encoding TFAM, which controls mitochondrial genome replication and transcription, and TRAP1, which regulates mitochondrial protein folding. Therefore, we targeted mitochondrial biogenesis with a mitochondrium-targeted, small-molecule HSP90 inhibitor (Gamitrinib), which eradicated intrinsically resistant cells and augmented the efficacy of MAPKi by inducing mitochondrial dysfunction and inhibiting tumor bioenergetics. A subset of tumor biopsies from patients with disease progression despite MAPKi treatment showed increased mitochondrial biogenesis and tumor bioenergetics. A subset of acquired drug-resistant melanoma cell lines was sensitive to Gamitrinib. Our study establishes mitochondrial biogenesis, coupled with aberrant tumor bioenergetics, as a potential therapy escape mechanism and paves the way for a rationale-based combinatorial strategy to improve the efficacy of MAPKi. PMID:27043285

  16. [Drug resistant epilepsy. Clinical and neurobiological concepts].

    PubMed

    Espinosa-Jovel, Camilo A; Sobrino-Mejía, Fidel E

    2015-08-16

    Drug-resistant epilepsy, is a condition defined by the International League Against Epilepsy as persistent seizures despite having used at least two appropriate and adequate antiepileptic drug treatments. Approximately 20-30% of patients with epilepsy are going to be resistant to antiepileptic drugs, with different patterns of clinical presentation, which are related to the biological basis of this disease (de novo resistance, relapsing-remitting and progressive). Drug resistant epilepsy, impacts negatively the quality of life and significantly increases the risk of premature death. From the neurobiological point of view, this medical condition is the result of the interaction of multiple variables related to the underlying disease, drug interactions and proper genetic aspects of each patient. Thanks to advances in pharmacogenetics and molecular biology research, currently some hypotheses may explain the cause of this condition and promote the study of new therapeutic options. Currently, overexpression of membrane transporters such as P-glycoprotein, appears to be one of the most important mechanisms in the development of drug resistant epilepsy. The objective of this review is to deepen the general aspects of this clinical condition, addressing the definition, epidemiology, differential diagnosis and the pathophysiological bases.

  17. Efficacy of moxifloxacin for treatment of penicillin-, macrolide- and multidrug-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae in community-acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Fogarty, C; Torres, A; Choudhri, S; Haverstock, D; Herrington, J; Ambler, J

    2005-11-01

    This pooled analysis of six prospective, multicentre trials aimed to determine the efficacy of moxifloxacin in community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) due to penicillin-, macrolide- and multidrug-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae (MDRSP). At a central laboratory, isolates were identified and antimicrobial susceptibility determined (microbroth dilution). MDRSP was defined as resistance > or =3 drug classes. Patients received oral or sequential intravenous/oral 400 mg moxifloxacin once daily for 7-14 days. The primary endpoint was clinical success at test-of-cure for efficacy-valid patients with proven pretherapy S. pneumoniae infection. Of 140 S. pneumoniae isolated (112 respiratory, 28 blood), 23 (16.4%) were penicillin resistant, 26 (18.6%) macrolide resistant and 31 (22.1%) MDRSP. The moxifloxacin MIC90 was 0.25 microg/ml. Clinical cure with moxifloxacin was 95.4% (125/131) overall, and 100% (21/21) for penicillin-, 95.7% (22/23) for macrolide- and 96.4% (27/28) for multidrug-resistant strains. Moxifloxacin provided excellent clinical and bacteriological cure rates in CAP due to drug-resistant pneumococci.

  18. Current role of community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus among children with skin and soft tissue infections.

    PubMed

    Teran, Carlos G; Sura, Sunitha; Mohamed, Tarek; Lin, Thant; Meadows, Marsha; Cynthia, Donkor; Wong, Sze H

    2012-01-02

    Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus has become a well-established pathogen with alarming rates during the last decade. The current situation of this bacteria in pediatric infections is very limited and motivated us to conduct this study. This is a retrospective and analytical study including patients less than 18 years of age with the diagnosis of skin or soft tissue infections in 2008 and 2009 meeting the criteria of Community-acquired infection. A prevalence of 41.9% among skin and soft tissue infections was found. Inducible resistance to clindamycin was detected in 1.3% of the strains and the infection shows a seasonal predilection for summer (P=0.003); 57.8% of the cases required hospitalization with a mean stay of 3.3±2.5 days. The susceptibility to clindamycin and co-trimoxazole is 88 and 97% respectively. The resistance to erythromycin has reached 92%. The main diagnoses at presentation was gluteal abscess plus cellulitis (34.2%).The prevalence of CA-MRSA is trending up and seems to become a large burden for the health system in our community. Clindamycin is still an excellent option in the community setting since inducible clindamycin resistance is extremely low in this community. Co-trimoxazole should be kept as a reserved drug to avoid the rapid resurgence resistance in the community.

  19. Non-genomic and Immune Evolution of Melanoma Acquiring MAPKi Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Hugo, Willy; Shi, Hubing; Sun, Lu; Piva, Marco; Song, ChunYing; Kong, Xiangju; Moriceau, Gatien; Hong, Aayoung; Dahlman, Kimberly B.; Johnson, Douglas B.; Sosman, Jeffrey A.; Ribas, Antoni; Lo, Roger S.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Clinically acquired resistance to MAPK inhibitor (MAPKi) therapies for melanoma cannot be fully explained by genomic mechanisms and may be accompanied by co-evolution of intra-tumoral immunity. We sought to discover non-genomic mechanisms of acquired resistance and dynamic immune compositions by a comparative, transcriptomic-methylomic analysis of patient-matched melanoma tumors biopsied before therapy and during disease progression. Transcriptomic alterations across resistant tumors were highly recurrent, in contrast to mutations, and were frequently correlated with differential methylation of tumor cell-intrinsic CpG sites. We identified in the tumor cell compartment supra-physiologic c-MET up-expression, infra-physiologic LEF1 down-expression, and YAP1 signature enrichment as drivers of acquired resistance. Importantly, high intra-tumoral cytolytic T-cell inflammation prior to MAPKi therapy preceded CD8 T-cell deficiency/exhaustion and loss of antigen-presentation in half of disease-progressive melanomas, suggesting cross-resistance to salvage anti-PD-1/PD-L1 immunotherapy. Thus, melanoma acquires MAPKi-resistance with highly dynamic and recurrent non-genomic alterations and co-evolving intra-tumoral immunity. PMID:26359985

  20. Non-genomic and Immune Evolution of Melanoma Acquiring MAPKi Resistance.

    PubMed

    Hugo, Willy; Shi, Hubing; Sun, Lu; Piva, Marco; Song, Chunying; Kong, Xiangju; Moriceau, Gatien; Hong, Aayoung; Dahlman, Kimberly B; Johnson, Douglas B; Sosman, Jeffrey A; Ribas, Antoni; Lo, Roger S

    2015-09-10

    Clinically acquired resistance to MAPK inhibitor (MAPKi) therapies for melanoma cannot be fully explained by genomic mechanisms and may be accompanied by co-evolution of intra-tumoral immunity. We sought to discover non-genomic mechanisms of acquired resistance and dynamic immune compositions by a comparative, transcriptomic-methylomic analysis of patient-matched melanoma tumors biopsied before therapy and during disease progression. Transcriptomic alterations across resistant tumors were highly recurrent, in contrast to mutations, and were frequently correlated with differential methylation of tumor cell-intrinsic CpG sites. We identified in the tumor cell compartment supra-physiologic c-MET up-expression, infra-physiologic LEF1 down-expression and YAP1 signature enrichment as drivers of acquired resistance. Importantly, high intra-tumoral cytolytic T cell inflammation prior to MAPKi therapy preceded CD8 T cell deficiency/exhaustion and loss of antigen presentation in half of disease-progressive melanomas, suggesting cross-resistance to salvage anti-PD-1/PD-L1 immunotherapy. Thus, melanoma acquires MAPKi resistance with highly dynamic and recurrent non-genomic alterations and co-evolving intra-tumoral immunity.

  1. Primary and acquired resistance to PD-1/PD-L1 blockade in cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiaohong; Wu, Xia

    2017-05-01

    PD-1/PD-L1 blockade appears to be a very promising immunotherapy with significant clinical benefits and durable responses in multiple tumor types. However, the effectual clinical benefits of PD-1/PD-L1 blockade are hampered by a high rate of primary resistance, where patients do not respond to PD-1/PD-L1 blockade initially. And more distressingly, most patients eventually develop acquired resistance after an initial response to PD-1/PD-L1 blockade. The mechanisms underlying primary and acquired resistance to PD-1/PD-L1 blockade have remained ambiguous. This review documents in detail the current understanding of the mechanisms through which resistance to anti-PD1/PD-L1 therapy occurs. The mechanisms underlying primary resistance to PD-1/PD-L1 blockade contain several immunoregulatory factors affecting tumor-specific immune responses within the immune microenvironment, co-enrichment of a group of 26 transcriptomic signatures (named innate anti-PD-1 resistance (IPRES) signatures) and cancer-cell-autonomous cues. The mechanism attributable to acquired resistance harbors evolution of neoantigen landscape, mutations of JAK and β-2-microglobulin, and epigenetic stability of exhausted T cells. At last, the promising therapeutic strategies to sensitize the resistant patients are also briefly discussed.

  2. Antimicrobial Drugs in Fighting against Antimicrobial Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Guyue; Dai, Menghong; Ahmed, Saeed; Hao, Haihong; Wang, Xu; Yuan, Zonghui

    2016-01-01

    The outbreak of antimicrobial resistance, together with the lack of newly developed antimicrobial drugs, represents an alarming signal for both human and animal healthcare worldwide. Selection of rational dosage regimens for traditional antimicrobial drugs based on pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic principles as well as development of novel antimicrobials targeting new bacterial targets or resistance mechanisms are key approaches in tackling AMR. In addition to the cellular level resistance (i.e., mutation and horizontal gene transfer of resistance determinants), the community level resistance (i.e., bilofilms and persisters) is also an issue causing antimicrobial therapy difficulties. Therefore, anti-resistance and antibiofilm strategies have currently become research hotspot to combat antimicrobial resistance. Although metallic nanoparticles can both kill bacteria and inhibit biofilm formation, the toxicity is still a big challenge for their clinical applications. In conclusion, rational use of the existing antimicrobials and combinational use of new strategies fighting against antimicrobial resistance are powerful warranties to preserve potent antimicrobial drugs for both humans and animals. PMID:27092125

  3. Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus: an ongoing challenge for WOC nursing.

    PubMed

    Price, Molly

    2010-01-01

    Infection is a common complication of chronic wounds that delays healing. Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus has emerged as a common pathogen and major impediment to healing affected chronic wounds. Community-acquired methicillin-resistant S aureus is virulent, highly communicable, and difficult to eradicate. Treatment options include incision and drainage, debridement, and systemic antimicrobials. Early aggressive wound management and appropriate antibiotic therapy are considered essential to successful treatment. Facility-specific protocols should be developed to minimize the spread of this organism to the general population, with particular attention focused on protecting patients burdened with chronic wounds. This article reviews current knowledge of community-acquired methicillin-resistant S aureus, focusing on its impact on persons with chronic wounds.

  4. Drug targeting of leptin resistance.

    PubMed

    Santoro, Anna; Mattace Raso, Giuseppina; Meli, Rosaria

    2015-11-01

    Leptin regulates glucose, lipid and energy homeostasis as well as feeding behavior, serving as a bridge between peripheral metabolically active tissues and the central nervous system (CNS). Indeed, this adipocyte-derived hormone, whose circulating levels mirror fat mass, not only exerts its anti-obesity effects mainly modulating the activity of specific hypothalamic neurons expressing the long form of the leptin receptor (Ob-Rb), but it also shows pleiotropic functions due to the activation of Ob-Rb in peripheral tissues. Nevertheless, several mechanisms have been suggested to mediate leptin resistance, including obesity-associated hyperleptinemia, impairment of leptin access to CNS and the reduction in Ob-Rb signal transduction effectiveness, among others. During the onset and progression of obesity, the dampening of leptin sensitivity often occurs, preventing the efficacy of leptin replacement therapy from overcoming obesity and/or its comorbidities. This review focuses on obesity-associated leptin resistance and the mechanisms underpinning this condition, to highlight the relevance of leptin sensitivity restoration as a useful therapeutic strategy to treat common obesity and its complications. Interestingly, although promising strategies to counteract leptin resistance have been proposed, these pharmacological approaches have shown limited efficacy or even relevant adverse effects in preclinical and clinical studies. Therefore, the numerous findings from this review clearly indicate a lack of a single and efficacious treatment for leptin resistance, highlighting the necessity to find new therapeutic tools to improve leptin sensitivity, especially in patients with most severe disease profiles.

  5. Antibacterial drug discovery in the resistance era.

    PubMed

    Brown, Eric D; Wright, Gerard D

    2016-01-21

    The looming antibiotic-resistance crisis has penetrated the consciousness of clinicians, researchers, policymakers, politicians and the public at large. The evolution and widespread distribution of antibiotic-resistance elements in bacterial pathogens has made diseases that were once easily treatable deadly again. Unfortunately, accompanying the rise in global resistance is a failure in antibacterial drug discovery. Lessons from the history of antibiotic discovery and fresh understanding of antibiotic action and the cell biology of microorganisms have the potential to deliver twenty-first century medicines that are able to control infection in the resistance era.

  6. Acquired subglottic stenosis caused by methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus that produce epidermal cell differentiation inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Y; Sugai, M; Woo, M; Nishida, N; Sugimoto, T

    2001-01-01

    Local infection of the trachea in intubated neonates is one of the main risk factors for development of acquired subglottic stenosis, although its role in the pathogenesis is unclear. Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is often the cause of critical illness in neonatal patients. Two cases are reported of acquired subglottic stenosis following bacterial infection of the trachea, suggesting an association with the staphylococcal exotoxin, epidermal cell differentiation inhibitor (EDIN). EDIN-producing MRSA were isolated from purulent tracheal secretions from both infants. Acquired subglottic stenosis in both cases was probably caused by delayed wound healing as the result of EDIN inhibition of epithelial cell migration.

 PMID:11124922

  7. Garenoxacin activity against isolates form patients hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia and multidrug-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Jones, Ronald N; Sader, Helio S; Stilwell, Matthew G; Fritsche, Thomas R

    2007-05-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) continues to cause significant morbidity worldwide, and the principal bacterial pathogens (Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae) have acquired numerous resistance mechanisms over the last few decades. CAP treatment guidelines have suggested the use of broader spectrum agents, such as antipneumococcal fluoroquinolones as the therapy for at-risk patient population. In this report, we studied 3087 CAP isolates from the SENTRY Antimicrobial Surveillance Program (1999-2005) worldwide and all respiratory tract infection (RTI) isolate population of pneumococci (14665 strains) grouped by antibiogram patterns against a new des-F(6)-quinolone, garenoxacin. Results indicated that garenoxacin was highly active against CAP isolates of S. pneumoniae (MIC(90), 0.06 microg/mL) and H. influenzae (MIC(90), < or =0.03 microg/mL). This garenoxacin potency was 8- to 32-fold greater than gatifloxacin, levofloxacin, and ciprofloxacin against the pneumococci and >99.9% of strains were inhibited at < or =1 microg/mL (proposed susceptible breakpoint). Garenoxacin MIC values were not affected by resistances among S. pneumoniae strains to penicillin or erythromycin; however, coresistances were high among the beta-lactams (penicillins and cephalosporins), macrolides, tetracyclines, and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole. Analysis of S. pneumoniae isolates with various antimicrobial resistance patterns to 6 drug classes demonstrated that garenoxacin was active against >99.9% (MIC, < or =1 microg/mL) of strains, and the most resistant pneumococci (6-drug resistance, 1051 strains or 7.2% of all isolates) were completely susceptible (100.0% at < or =1 microg/mL) to garenoxacin (MIC(90), 0.06 microg/mL). These results illustrate the high activity of garenoxacin against contemporary CAP isolates and especially against multidrug-resistant (MDR) S. pneumoniae that have created therapeutic dilemmas for all RTI presentations. Garenoxacin appears to be a

  8. High rate of mutation K103N causing resistance to nevirapine in Indian children with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sehgal, S; Pasricha, N; Singh, S

    2008-01-01

    In north India the number of paediatric cases with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) is on the rise. Most drug combinations used for treatment of AIDS incorporate nevirapine, resistance to which develops very fast if given singly or because of unplanned interruptions. This paper investigates presence of mutations at codon 103 and codon 215 of the HIV pol gene causing resistance to nevirapine and zidovudine (AZT) respectively in 25 children with AIDS. Mutations T215Y and K103N were detected by a nested cum amplification refractory mutation system polymerase chain reaction (ARMS PCR) and the results were confirmed by direct sequencing in five randomly selected cases. Nineteen patients had received nevirapine containing regimen and six were drug naive. Mutation K103N was observed in 56% (14/25) of the children while mutation T215Y was found in none. Two of the six drug naïve children also showed K103N mutation. Thus, Indian children drug naïve or treated with nevirapine containing regimens show a high rate of mutation conferring resistance to nevirapine which calls for a judicious use of nevirapine both in antenatal and postnatal setting.

  9. Drug-resistant tuberculosis: an insurmountable epidemic?

    PubMed

    Chakroborty, Amitabha

    2011-06-01

    Drug-resistant tuberculosis has brought back the spectre of pre-antibiotic days. WHO surveillance data from 2007 showed multi-drug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB)-tubercle bacillus resistant to both isoniazid and rifampicin accounting for 4.8% of all new and subsequent cases of tuberculosis. India and China-the two most populated countries of the world, house the maximum number of drug-resistant tuberculosis cases. In eastern European and central Asian countries, more than 6% of new TB cases are MDR-TB, whereas the number is <3% in the countries of the western world. Extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB) has emerged with the prospect of tuberculosis becoming an incurable disease. A surveillance spreading over the six continents showed 10% of MDR-TB cases were also XDR-TB. The fact that tuberculosis is the most common opportunistic infection among HIV-infected patients in developing countries makes the challenge almost insurmountable. The mortality of HIV and MDR-TB co-infected patients is exceedingly high. The absence of guidelines for treatment of drug-resistant tuberculosis and of infrastructure for delivery of DOT program and rapid laboratory diagnostic facilities, including drug susceptibility testing for both first and second-line drugs, and lack of trained human resource in most of the developing world account for the emergence and perpetuation of this menacing problem. WHO along with partnership with Green Light Committee and individual national governments has started DOT plus program to control this global epidemic.

  10. Chemotherapy of drug-resistant malaria

    PubMed Central

    Kain, Kevin C

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review the impact of drug-resistant malaria on current management of plasmodial infections. DATA SOURCES: A MEDLINE search of the English-language medical literature from 1985 to 1995; bibliographies of selected papers; international malaria advisory experts. DATA SYNTHESIS: Combinations of artemisinin derivatives and mefloquine or atovaquone plus proguanil appear to be the most active drug regimens against multidrug-resistant falciparum malaria from Southeast Asia. The optimal therapy for chloroquine-resistant Plasmodium vivax is unknown, but recent data indicate that halofantrine or chloroquine plus high doses of primaquine are efficacious. CONCLUSIONS: The incidence of drug-resistant malaria continues to increase at a rate that exceeds new drug development. Ultimately the control of malaria will require more creative approaches than just the development of additional inhibitory drugs. These might include the identification of biochemical pathways unique to the parasite (such as drug efflux and heme polymerization), making it possible to design new classes of antimalarial agents that are selectively toxic to the parasite; methods to block parasite development in the mosquito vector; and multistage vaccines against asexual and sexual stages to block both the pathophysiology and the transmission of disease. PMID:22514413

  11. Exosomes from adriamycin-resistant breast cancer cells transmit drug resistance partly by delivering miR-222.

    PubMed

    Yu, Dan-Dan; Wu, Ying; Zhang, Xiao-Hui; Lv, Meng-Meng; Chen, Wei-Xian; Chen, Xiu; Yang, Su-Jin; Shen, Hongyu; Zhong, Shan-Liang; Tang, Jin-Hai; Zhao, Jian-Hua

    2016-03-01

    Breast cancer (BCa) is one of the major deadly cancers in women. However, treatment of BCa is still hindered by the acquired-drug resistance. It is increasingly reported that exosomes take part in the development, metastasis, and drug resistance of BCa. However, the specific role of exosomes in drug resistance of BCa is poorly understood. In this study, we investigate whether exosomes transmit drug resistance through delivering miR-222. We established an adriamycin-resistant variant of Michigan Cancer Foundation-7 (MCF-7) breast cancer cell line (MCF-7/Adr) from a drug-sensitive variant (MCF-7/S). Exosomes were isolated from cell supernatant by ultracentrifugation. Cell viability was assessed by MTT assay and apoptosis assay. Individual miR-222 molecules in BCa cells were detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Then, FISH was combined with locked nucleic acid probes and enzyme-labeled fluorescence (LNA-ELF-FISH). Individual miR-222 could be detected as bright photostable fluorescent spots and then the quantity of miR-222 per cell could be counted. Stained exosomes were taken in by the receipt cells. MCF-7/S acquired drug resistance after co-culture with exosomes from MCF-7/Adr (A/exo) but did not after co-culture with exosomes from MCF-7/S (S/exo). The quantity of miR-222 in A/exo-treated MCF-7/S was significantly greater than in S/exo-treated MCF-7/S. MCF-7/S transfected with miR-222 mimics acquired adriamycin resistance while MCF-7/S transfected with miR-222 inhibitors lost resistance. In conclusion, exosomes are effective in transmitting drug resistance and the delivery of miR-222 via exosomes may be a mechanism.

  12. Acquired antibiotic resistance among wild animals: the case of Iberian Lynx (Lynx pardinus).

    PubMed

    Sousa, Margarida; Gonçalves, Alexandre; Silva, Nuno; Serra, Rodrigo; Alcaide, Eva; Zorrilla, Irene; Torres, Carmen; Caniça, Manuela; Igrejas, Gilberto; Poeta, Patrícia

    2014-01-01

    The selective pressure generated by the clinical misuse of antibiotics has been the major driving force leading to the emergence of antibiotic resistance among bacteria. Antibiotics or even resistant bacteria are released into the environment and contaminate the surrounding areas. Human and animal populations in contact with these sources are able to become reservoirs of these resistant organisms. Then, due to the convergence between habitats, the contact of wild animals with other animals, humans, or human sources is now more common and this leads to an increase in the exchange of resistance determinants between their microbiota. Indeed, it seems that wildlife populations living in closer proximity to humans have higher levels of antibiotic resistance. Now, the Iberian Lynx (Lynx pardinus) is a part of this issue, being suggested as natural reservoir of acquired resistant bacteria. The emerging public health concern regarding microbial resistance to antibiotics is becoming true: the bacteria are evolving and are now affecting unintentional hosts.

  13. Severe Community-Acquired Bloodstream Infection with Acinetobacter ursingii in Person who Injects Drugs.

    PubMed

    Salzer, Helmut J F; Rolling, Thierry; Schmiedel, Stefan; Klupp, Eva-Maria; Lange, Christoph; Seifert, Harald

    2016-01-01

    We report a community-acquired bloodstream infection with Acinteobacter ursingii in an HIV-negative woman who injected drugs. The infection was successfully treated with meropenem. Species identification was performed by using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Improved identification of Acinetobacter spp. by using this method will help identify clinical effects of this underdiagnosed pathogen.

  14. Drug-resistant tuberculosis: emerging treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Adhvaryu, Meghna; Vakharia, Bhasker

    2011-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis has emerged worldwide, with an increasing incidence due to failure of implementation of apparently effective first-line antituberculous therapy as well as primary infection with drug-resistant strains. Failure of current therapy is attributed to a long duration of treatment leading to nonadherence and irregular therapy, lack of patient education about the disease, poverty, irregular supply by care providers, drug–drug interactions in patients coinfected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), inadequate regulations causing market overlap and irresponsible drug usage in the private sector, and lack of research, with no addition of new drugs in the last four decades. Present standards of care for the treatment of drugsusceptible tuberculosis, multidrug-resistant tuberculosis, tuberculosis-HIV coinfection, and latent tuberculosis infection are all unsatisfactory. Since 2000, the World Health Organization (WHO) has focused on drug development for tuberculosis, as well as research in all relevant aspects to discover new regimens by 2015 and to eliminate tuberculosis as a public health concern by 2050. As a result, some 20 promising compounds from 14 groups of drugs have been discovered. Twelve candidates from eight classes are currently being evaluated in clinical trials. Ongoing research should prioritize identification of novel targets and newer application of existing drugs, discovery of multitargeted drugs from natural compounds, strengthening host factors by immunopotentiation with herbal immunomodulators, as well as protective vaccines before and after exposure, consideration of surgical measures when indicated, development of tools for rapid diagnosis, early identification of resistant strains, and markers for adequacy of treatment and an integrative approach to fulfill WHO goals. However, regulatory control over the drug market, as well as public-private partnership to use health program facilities to track patients and ensure

  15. Characterization of In Vivo acquired resistance of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae to macrolides and lincosamides.

    PubMed

    Stakenborg, Tim; Vicca, Jo; Butaye, Patrick; Maes, Dominiek; Minion, F Chris; Peeters, Johan; De Kruif, Aart; Haesebrouck, Freddy

    2005-01-01

    Macrolides and related antibiotics are used to control mycoplasma infections in the pig industry worldwide. Some porcine mycoplasmas, however, survive these treatments by acquiring resistance. The mechanism of acquired resistance to macrolides and lincosamides was studied in more detail for Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae by comparing both the phenotype and genotype of a resistant field isolate to five susceptible isolates. The MICs were significantly higher for the resistant strain for all antibiotics tested. The MICs for the 16-membered macrolide tylosin ranged from 8 to 16 microg for the resistant strain and from 0.03 to 0.125 microg/ml for the five susceptible strains. The MICs for the 15-membered macrolides and lincosamides were higher than 64 microg/ml for the resistant strain while only 0.06 to 0.5 microg/ml for the susceptible strains. Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae strains are intrinsically resistant to the 14-membered macrolides due to a G 2057 A transition (E. coli numbering) in their 23S rDNA. Therefore, high MICs were observed for all strains, although the MICs for the resistant strain were clearly increased. An additional, acquired A 2058 G point mutation was found in the 23S rRNA gene of the resistant strain. No differences linked to resistance were found in the ribosomal proteins L4 and L22. The present study showed that 23S rRNA mutations resulting in resistance to macrolides and lincosamides as described in other Mycoplasma spp. also occur under field conditions in M. hyopneumoniae.

  16. Communicating trends in resistance using a drug resistance index

    PubMed Central

    Klugman, Keith P

    2011-01-01

    Background Antibiotic resistance is a growing problem worldwide, but communicating this challenge to policymakers and non-experts is complicated by the multiplicity of bacterial pathogens and the distinct classes of antibiotics used to treat them. It is difficult, even for experts aware of the pharmacodynamics of antibiotics, to infer the seriousness of resistance without information on how commonly the antibiotic is being used and whether alternative antibiotics are available. Difficulty in aggregating resistance to multiple drugs to assess trends poses a further challenge to quantifying and communicating changes in resistance over time and across locations. Methods We developed a method for aggregating bacterial resistance to multiple antibiotics, creating an index comparable to the composite economic indices that measure consumer prices and stock market values. The resulting drug resistance index (DRI) and various subindices show antibiotic resistance and consumption trends in the USA but can be applied at any geographical level. Findings The DRI based on use patterns in 1999 for Escherichia coli rose from 0.25 (95% CI 0.23 to 0.26) to 0.30 (95% CI 0.29 to 0.32) between 1999 and 2006. However, the adaptive DRI, which includes treatment of baseline resistant strains with alternative agents, climbed from 0.25 to 0.27 (95% CI 0.25 to 0.28) during that period. In contrast, both the static-use and the adaptive DRIs for Acinetobacter spp. rose from 0.41 (95% CI 0.4 to 0.42) to 0.48 (95% CI 0.46 to 0.49) between 1999 and 2006. Interpretation Divergence between the static-use and the adaptive-use DRIs for E coli reflects the ability of physicians to adapt to increasing resistance. However, antibiotic use patterns did not change much in response to growing resistance to Acinetobacter spp. because physicians were unable to adapt; new drugs for Acinetobacter spp. are therefore needed. Composite indices that aggregate resistance to various drugs can be useful for assessing

  17. Communicating trends in resistance using a drug resistance index.

    PubMed

    Laxminarayan, Ramanan; Klugman, Keith P

    2011-01-01

    Background Antibiotic resistance is a growing problem worldwide, but communicating this challenge to policymakers and non-experts is complicated by the multiplicity of bacterial pathogens and the distinct classes of antibiotics used to treat them. It is difficult, even for experts aware of the pharmacodynamics of antibiotics, to infer the seriousness of resistance without information on how commonly the antibiotic is being used and whether alternative antibiotics are available. Difficulty in aggregating resistance to multiple drugs to assess trends poses a further challenge to quantifying and communicating changes in resistance over time and across locations. Methods We developed a method for aggregating bacterial resistance to multiple antibiotics, creating an index comparable to the composite economic indices that measure consumer prices and stock market values. The resulting drug resistance index (DRI) and various subindices show antibiotic resistance and consumption trends in the USA but can be applied at any geographical level. Findings The DRI based on use patterns in 1999 for Escherichia coli rose from 0.25 (95% CI 0.23 to 0.26) to 0.30 (95% CI 0.29 to 0.32) between 1999 and 2006. However, the adaptive DRI, which includes treatment of baseline resistant strains with alternative agents, climbed from 0.25 to 0.27 (95% CI 0.25 to 0.28) during that period. In contrast, both the static-use and the adaptive DRIs for Acinetobacter spp. rose from 0.41 (95% CI 0.4 to 0.42) to 0.48 (95% CI 0.46 to 0.49) between 1999 and 2006. Interpretation Divergence between the static-use and the adaptive-use DRIs for E coli reflects the ability of physicians to adapt to increasing resistance. However, antibiotic use patterns did not change much in response to growing resistance to Acinetobacter spp. because physicians were unable to adapt; new drugs for Acinetobacter spp. are therefore needed. Composite indices that aggregate resistance to various drugs can be useful for assessing

  18. First-Line Anti-Tubercular Drug Resistance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in IRAN: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Pourakbari, Babak; Mamishi, Setareh; Mohammadzadeh, Mona; Mahmoudi, Shima

    2016-01-01

    Background: The spread of drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB) is one of the major public health problems through the world. Surveillance of anti-TB drug resistance is essential for monitoring of TB control strategies. The occurrence of drug resistance, particularly multi-drug resistance Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MDR), defined as resistance to at least rifampicin (RIF) and isoniazid (INH), has become a significant public health dilemma. The status of drug-resistance TB in Iran, one of the eastern Mediterranean countries locating between Azerbaijan and Armenia and high-TB burden countries (such as Afghanistan and Pakistan) has been reported inconsistently. Therefore, the aim of this study was to summarize reports of first-line anti-tubercular drug resistance in M. tuberculosis in Iran. Material and Methods: We systematically reviewed published studies on drug-resistant M. tuberculosis in Iran. The search terms were “Mycobacterium tuberculosis susceptibility” or “Mycobacterium tuberculosis resistant” and Iran. Results: Fifty-two eligible articles, published during 1998–2014, were included in this review. Most of the studies were conducted in Tehran. The most common used laboratory method for detecting M. tuberculosis drug resistant was Agar proportion. The highest resistance to first-line drugs was seen in Tehran, the capital city of Iran. The average prevalence of isoniazid (INH), rifampin (RIF), streptomycin (SM), and ethambotol (EMB) resistance via Agar proportion method in Tehran was 26, 23, 22.5, and 16%, respectively. In general, resistance to INH was more common than RIF, SM, and EMB in Tehran Conclusions: In conclusion, this systematic review summarized the prevalence and distribution of first-line anti-tubercular drug resistance of M. tuberculosis in Iran. Our results suggested that effective strategies to minimize the acquired drug resistance, to control the transmission of resistance and improve the diagnosis measures for TB control in Iran. PMID

  19. HIV-1 Drug Resistance Mutations: Potential Applications for Point-of-Care Genotypic Resistance Testing

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Soo-Yon; Jordan, Michael R.; Raizes, Elliot; Chua, Arlene; Parkin, Neil; Kantor, Rami; Van Zyl, Gert U.; Mukui, Irene; Hosseinipour, Mina C.; Frenkel, Lisa M.; Ndembi, Nicaise; Hamers, Raph L.; Rinke de Wit, Tobias F.; Wallis, Carole L.; Gupta, Ravindra K.; Fokam, Joseph; Zeh, Clement; Schapiro, Jonathan M.; Carmona, Sergio; Katzenstein, David; Tang, Michele; Aghokeng, Avelin F.; De Oliveira, Tulio; Wensing, Annemarie M. J.; Gallant, Joel E.; Wainberg, Mark A.; Richman, Douglas D.; Fitzgibbon, Joseph E.; Schito, Marco; Bertagnolio, Silvia; Yang, Chunfu; Shafer, Robert W.

    2015-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of acquired and transmitted HIV-1 drug resistance is an obstacle to successful antiretroviral therapy (ART) in the low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) hardest hit by the HIV-1 pandemic. Genotypic drug resistance testing could facilitate the choice of initial ART in areas with rising transmitted drug resistance (TDR) and enable care-providers to determine which individuals with virological failure (VF) on a first- or second-line ART regimen require a change in treatment. An inexpensive near point-of-care (POC) genotypic resistance test would be useful in settings where the resources, capacity, and infrastructure to perform standard genotypic drug resistance testing are limited. Such a test would be particularly useful in conjunction with the POC HIV-1 viral load tests that are currently being introduced in LMICs. A POC genotypic resistance test is likely to involve the use of allele-specific point mutation assays for detecting drug-resistance mutations (DRMs). This study proposes that two major nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI)-associated DRMs (M184V and K65R) and four major NNRTI-associated DRMs (K103N, Y181C, G190A, and V106M) would be the most useful for POC genotypic resistance testing in LMIC settings. One or more of these six DRMs was present in 61.2% of analyzed virus sequences from ART-naïve individuals with intermediate or high-level TDR and 98.8% of analyzed virus sequences from individuals on a first-line NRTI/NNRTI-containing regimen with intermediate or high-level acquired drug resistance. The detection of one or more of these DRMs in an ART-naïve individual or in a individual with VF on a first-line NRTI/NNRTI-containing regimen may be considered an indication for a protease inhibitor (PI)-containing regimen or closer virological monitoring based on cost-effectiveness or country policy. PMID:26717411

  20. Acquired and Native Resistance of Staphylococcus aureus to Cephalexin and Other β-Lactam Antibiotics 1

    PubMed Central

    Kayser, Fritz H.; Benner, E. Jack; Hoeprich, Paul D.

    1970-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus cells that are initially susceptible to cephalexin can be induced to acquire intrinsic resistance to cephalexin in comparatively few steps. Concomitantly, resistance to cephalothin, oxacillin, and dicloxacillin increases. By population analysis, there is heteroresistance to cephalexin in some strains of S. aureus. Heterogeneity in colonial morphology on prolonged incubation in the presence of subinhibitory concentrations of cephalexin may constitute an expression of such heteroresistance. Images PMID:5201887

  1. Nuclear Factor-kappa B as a Resistance Factor to Platinum-Based Antineoplasic Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Lagunas, Vilma Maldonado; Meléndez-Zajgla, Jorge

    2008-01-01

    Platinum drugs continue to be major chemotherapy drugs for cancer treatment. Nevertheless, acquired or intrinsic resistance to these compounds is common in human tumors. One important mechanism for this resistance is the avoidance of cells entering the apoptotic pathway. Nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kappa B, NF-κB) is a pleiotropic transcription factor key in determining the death threshold of human cells. This factor is important in the final response of cells to platinum drugs, as exemplified by in vitro and in vivo models showing that inhibition of NF-κB sensitizes cancer cells to the effects of these drugs. New approaches focusing on the inhibition of NF-κB could help to minimize or even eliminate intrinsic or acquired resistance to platinum drugs. PMID:18414584

  2. Oncolytic Virotherapy Targeting Lung Cancer Drug Resistance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-01

    vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) can exert a dual antitumor effect by triggering direct tumor lysis and eliciting tumor specific immunity. VSV can also...tumors, and the levels of infiltrating leukocytes were similar across the VSV-treated tumors. Altogether the data indicate that VSV-based therapy is...effective against a cisplatin-resistant lung tumor model. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Drug resistance, oncolytic virotherapy, vesicular stomatitis virus, lung

  3. Environment-Mediated Drug Resistance in Neuroblastoma

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    Neuroblastoma PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Yves A. DeClerck, MD CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Children’s Hospital Los Angeles Los Angeles, CA...3. DATES COVERED 30September2012 – 29September2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Environment-Mediated Drug Resistance in Neuroblastoma 5a. CONTRACT...demonstrating that interleukin-6 protects neuroblastoma cells from drug-induced apoptosis via activation of signal transduction and activator of

  4. Acquired immunity and stochasticity in epidemic intervals impede the evolution of host disease resistance.

    PubMed

    Harding, Karin C; Hansen, B Johan L; Goodman, Simon J

    2005-12-01

    Disease can generate intense selection pressure on host populations, but here we show that acquired immunity in a population subject to repeated disease outbreaks can impede the evolution of genetic disease resistance by maintaining susceptible genotypes in the population. Interference between the life-history schedule of a species and periodicity of the disease has unintuitive effects on selection intensity, and stochasticity in outbreak period further reduces the rate of spread of disease-resistance alleles. A general age-structured population genetic model was developed and parameterized using empirical data for phocine distemper virus (PDV) epizootics in harbor seals. Scenarios with acquired immunity had lower levels of epizootic mortality compared with scenarios without acquired immunity for the first PDV outbreaks, but this pattern was reversed after about five disease cycles. Without acquired immunity, evolution of disease resistance was more rapid, and long-term population size variation is efficiently dampened. Acquired immunity has the potential to significantly influence rapid evolutionary dynamics of a host population in response to age-structured disease selection and to alter predicted selection intensities compared with epidemiological models that do not consider such feedback. This may have important implications for evolutionary population dynamics in a range of human, agricultural, and wildlife disease settings.

  5. Acquired resistance affects male sexual display and female choice in guppies

    PubMed Central

    pez, S. L

    1998-01-01

    Is resistance to parasites related to the expression of male secondary sex characters? Handicap models predict a positive relationship, proposing that males displaying extravagant sex characters may be honestly signalling their resistance to females. However, no current evidence addresses whether individual changes in immunity (acquired resistance) are reflected in sexual traits. In this experiment I use guppies to compare male orange colour, sigmoid display and female preferences for individual males, before and after a primary challenge infection of males. Challenge infections were terminated chemically and fish were given ten days' recovery time before proceeding with the second measurements. The degree of acquired resistance was quantified a posteriori, by exposing males to a secondary infection. Sigmoid display rates and female preference for males differed for males of different resistance groups after challenge infection only. This difference was due to resistant males displaying more than non-resistant ones. No differences were detected in male orange colour, but this may be because colour needs a longer time than ten days to be recovered and adjusted. The results show that the level of acquired resistance affects sexual display and attractiveness in guppies. They suggest that once an effective immunity is built up by a male, he can afford to incur higher costs for sexual characteristics, whereas a male that lacks the ability to build up effective resistance cannot. These costs probably consist of higher energy expenditure and/or higher circulating levels of testosterone, which may be needed to increase display. Priming and effective establishment of an individual's resistance to parasitic infection could eventually result in a higher availability of resources for sexual functions.

  6. Hope and Disappointment: Covalent Inhibitors to Overcome Drug Resistance in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    In the last five years, the detailed understanding of how to overcome T790M drug resistance in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) has culminated in the development of a third-generation of covalent EGFR inhibitors with excellent clinical outcomes. However, the emergence of a newly discovered acquired drug resistance challenges the concept of small molecule targeted cancer therapy in NSCLC. PMID:26819655

  7. Drug Targets and Mechanisms of Resistance in the Anaerobic Protozoa

    PubMed Central

    Upcroft, Peter; Upcroft, Jacqueline A.

    2001-01-01

    The anaerobic protozoa Giardia duodenalis, Trichomonas vaginalis, and Entamoeba histolytica infect up to a billion people each year. G. duodenalis and E. histolytica are primarily pathogens of the intestinal tract, although E. histolytica can form abscesses and invade other organs, where it can be fatal if left untreated. T. vaginalis infection is a sexually transmitted infection causing vaginitis and acute inflammatory disease of the genital mucosa. T. vaginalis has also been reported in the urinary tract, fallopian tubes, and pelvis and can cause pneumonia, bronchitis, and oral lesions. Respiratory infections can be acquired perinatally. T. vaginalis infections have been associated with preterm delivery, low birth weight, and increased mortality as well as predisposing to human immunodeficiency virus infection, AIDS, and cervical cancer. All three organisms lack mitochondria and are susceptible to the nitroimidazole metronidazole because of similar low-redox-potential anaerobic metabolic pathways. Resistance to metronidazole and other drugs has been observed clinically and in the laboratory. Laboratory studies have identified the enzyme that activates metronidazole, pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase, to its nitroso form and distinct mechanisms of decreasing drug susceptibility that are induced in each organism. Although the nitroimidazoles have been the drug family of choice for treating the anaerobic protozoa, G. duodenalis is less susceptible to other antiparasitic drugs, such as furazolidone, albendazole, and quinacrine. Resistance has been demonstrated for each agent, and the mechanism of resistance has been investigated. Metronidazole resistance in T. vaginalis is well documented, and the principal mechanisms have been defined. Bypass metabolism, such as alternative oxidoreductases, have been discovered in both organisms. Aerobic versus anaerobic resistance in T. vaginalis is discussed. Mechanisms of metronidazole resistance in E. histolytica have recently

  8. Virologic Tools for HCV Drug Resistance Testing

    PubMed Central

    Fourati, Slim; Pawlotsky, Jean-Michel

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in molecular biology have led to the development of new antiviral drugs that target specific steps of the Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) lifecycle. These drugs, collectively termed direct-acting antivirals (DAAs), include non-structural (NS) HCV protein inhibitors, NS3/4A protease inhibitors, NS5B RNA-dependent RNA polymerase inhibitors (nucleotide analogues and non-nucleoside inhibitors), and NS5A inhibitors. Due to the high genetic variability of HCV, the outcome of DAA-based therapies may be altered by the selection of amino-acid substitutions located within the targeted proteins, which affect viral susceptibility to the administered compounds. At the drug developmental stage, preclinical and clinical characterization of HCV resistance to new drugs in development is mandatory. In the clinical setting, accurate diagnostic tools have become available to monitor drug resistance in patients who receive treatment with DAAs. In this review, we describe tools available to investigate drug resistance in preclinical studies, clinical trials and clinical practice. PMID:26690198

  9. Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus: an emerging cause of acute bacterial parotitis.

    PubMed

    Nicolasora, Nelson P; Zacharek, Mark A; Malani, Anurag N

    2009-02-01

    Staphylococcus aureus has long been recognized as a cause of acute bacterial parotitis. A case of community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) parotitis is presented, highlighting the emergence of this increasingly important pathogen to cause a wide variety of infections. Also reviewed are the salient clinical and microbiologic features of this novel infection.

  10. In vitro antimicrobial susceptibility of Alloscardovia omnicolens and molecular mechanisms of acquired resistance.

    PubMed

    Isnard, Christophe; Lienhard, Reto; Reissier, Sophie; Rodriguez, Sonia; Krähenbühl, Joanna; Liassine, Nadia; Guérin, François; Cattoir, Vincent

    2016-03-01

    All the 31 isolates of Alloscardovia omnicolens exhibited low MICs for β-lactams, glycopeptides, linezolid, tetracyclines, and cotrimoxazole. One strain showed MICs ≥256μg/mL for both erythromycin and clindamycin with a single point mutation in 23S rRNA. One strain likely had acquired fluoroquinolone resistance associated with a unique mutation in ParC.

  11. EGFR inhibitor and chemotherapy combinations for acquired TKI resistance in EGFR-mutant NSCLC models.

    PubMed

    Laurila, Niina; Koivunen, Jussi P

    2015-07-01

    Acquired resistance to EGFR TKIs is the most important limiting factor for treatment efficiency in EGFR-mutant NSCLC. Although the continuation of EGFR TKI beyond disease progression in combination with chemotherapy is often suggested as a strategy for treating acquired resistance, the optimal treatment sequence for EGFR TKI and chemotherapy is unknown. In the current work, NSCLC cell lines PC9ER, H1975 and HCC827GR, representing the acquired TKI resistance genotypes (T790M, cMET), were exposed to a chemotherapeutic agent, cisplatin or paclitaxel, in combination with EGFR TKIs (erlotinib, WZ4002) in vitro and analysed for cytotoxicity and apoptotic response. The result showed that all the combinations of EGFR TKIs with a chemotherapeutic agent tested had a synergistic effect on cytotoxicity and increased the apoptotic response. The sequences involving a chemotherapeutic agent concurrently with an EGFR TKI or preceding it were the most efficient strategies. Our in vitro models suggest that the combination of an EGFR TKI and chemotherapy is beneficial in cases of acquired EGFR TKI resistance. Furthermore, the sequence of chemotherapy followed by EGFR TKI is significantly more powerful than the reversed order, so that an intercalated approach is likely to be the most active strategy in clinical use and ought to be tested in a randomized clinical trial.

  12. Acquired antimicrobial resistance in the intestinal microbiota of diverse cat populations.

    PubMed

    Moyaert, H; De Graef, E M; Haesebrouck, F; Decostere, A

    2006-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of acquired antimicrobial resistance in the resident intestinal microbiota of cats and to identify significant differences between various cat populations. Escherichia coli, Enterococcus faecalis, E. faecium and Streptococcus canis were isolated as faecal indicator bacteria from rectal swabs of 47 individually owned cats, 47 cattery cats and 18 hospitalised cats, and submitted through antimicrobial sensitivity tests. The results revealed that bacteria isolated from hospitalised and/or cattery cats were more frequently resistant than those from individually owned cats. E. coli isolates from hospitalised cats were particularly resistant to ampicillin, tetracycline and sulfonamide. Both enterococci and streptococci showed high resistance to tetracycline and in somewhat lesser extent to erythromycin and tylosin. Most E. faecium isolates were resistant to lincomycin and penicillin. One E. faecalis as well as one E. faecium isolate from hospitalised cats showed 'high-level resistance' (MIC > 500 microg/ml) against gentamicin, a commonly used antimicrobial agent in case of human enterococcal infections. The results of this research demonstrate that the extent of acquired antimicrobial resistance in the intestinal microbiota of cats depends on the social environment of the investigated population. It is obvious that the flora of healthy cats may act as a reservoir of resistance genes.

  13. Drug resistance in human African trypanosomiasis.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Michael P; Vincent, Isabel M; Burchmore, Richard J S; Kazibwe, Anne J N; Matovu, Enock

    2011-09-01

    Human African trypanosomiasis or 'sleeping sickness' is a neglected tropical disease caused by the parasite Trypanosoma brucei. A decade of intense international cooperation has brought the incidence to fewer than 10,000 reported cases per annum with anti-trypanosomal drugs, particularly against stage 2 disease where the CNS is involved, being central to control. Treatment failures with melarsoprol started to appear in the 1990s and their incidence has risen sharply in many foci. Loss of plasma membrane transporters involved in drug uptake, particularly the P2 aminopurine transporter and also a transporter termed the high affinity pentamidine transporter, relate to melarsoprol resistance selected in the laboratory. The same two transporters are also responsible for the uptake of the stage 1 drug pentamidine and, to varying extents, other diamidines. However, reports of treatment failures with pentamidine have been rare from the field. Eflornithine (difluoromethylornithine) has replaced melarsoprol as first-line treatment in many regions. However, a need for protracted and complicated drug dosing regimens slowed widespread implementation of eflornithine monotherapy. A combination of eflornithine with nifurtimox substantially decreases the required dose and duration of eflornithine administration and this nifurtimox-eflornithine combination therapy has enjoyed rapid implementation. Unfortunately, selection of resistance to eflornithine in the laboratory is relatively easy (through loss of an amino acid transporter believed to be involved in its uptake), as is selection of resistance to nifurtimox. The first anecdotal reports of treatment failures with eflornithine monotherapy are emerging from some foci. The possibility that parasites resistant to melarsoprol on the one hand, and eflornithine on the other, are present in the field indicates that genes capable of conferring drug resistance to both drugs are in circulation. If new drugs, that act in ways that will not

  14. Environment-Mediated Drug Resistance in Neuroblastoma

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    Neuroblastoma PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Yves A. DeClerck CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION... Neuroblastoma 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-12-1-0571 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) DE CLERCK, YVES 5d. PROJECT...experiments have demonstrated that monocytes collaborate with MSC in inducing STAT3-dependent drug resistance in neuroblastoma . Further

  15. Serotonergic hyperactivity as a potential factor in developmental, acquired and drug-induced synesthesia.

    PubMed

    Brogaard, Berit

    2013-01-01

    Though synesthesia research has seen a huge growth in recent decades, and tremendous progress has been made in terms of understanding the mechanism and cause of synesthesia, we are still left mostly in the dark when it comes to the mechanistic commonalities (if any) among developmental, acquired and drug-induced synesthesia. We know that many forms of synesthesia involve aberrant structural or functional brain connectivity. Proposed mechanisms include direct projection and disinhibited feedback mechanisms, in which information from two otherwise structurally or functionally separate brain regions mix. We also know that synesthesia sometimes runs in families. However, it is unclear what causes its onset. Studies of psychedelic drugs, such as psilocybin, LSD and mescaline, reveal that exposure to these drugs can induce synesthesia. One neurotransmitter suspected to be central to the perceptual changes is serotonin. Excessive serotonin in the brain may cause many of the characteristics of psychedelic intoxication. Excessive serotonin levels may also play a role in synesthesia acquired after brain injury. In brain injury sudden cell death floods local brain regions with serotonin and glutamate. This neurotransmitter flooding could perhaps result in unusual feature binding. Finally, developmental synesthesia that occurs in individuals with autism may be a result of alterations in the serotonergic system, leading to a blockage of regular gating mechanisms. I conclude on these grounds that one commonality among at least some cases of acquired, developmental and drug-induced synesthesia may be the presence of excessive levels of serotonin, which increases the excitability and connectedness of sensory brain regions.

  16. Genetic basis for natural and acquired resistance to the diarylquinoline R207910 in mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Petrella, Stephanie; Cambau, Emmanuelle; Chauffour, Aurelie; Andries, Koen; Jarlier, Vincent; Sougakoff, Wladimir

    2006-08-01

    The atpE gene encoding the subunit c of the ATP synthase of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the target of the new diarylquinoline drug R207910, has been sequenced from in vitro mutants resistant to the drug. The previously reported mutation A63P and a new mutation, I66M, were found. The genetic diversity of atpE in 13 mycobacterial species was also investigated, revealing that the region involved in resistance to R207910 is conserved, except in Mycobacterium xenopi in which the highly conserved residue Ala63 is replaced by Met, a modification that may be associated with the natural resistance of M. xenopi to R207910.

  17. Genetic Basis for Natural and Acquired Resistance to the Diarylquinoline R207910 in Mycobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Petrella, Stephanie; Cambau, Emmanuelle; Chauffour, Aurelie; Andries, Koen; Jarlier, Vincent; Sougakoff, Wladimir

    2006-01-01

    The atpE gene encoding the subunit c of the ATP synthase of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the target of the new diarylquinoline drug R207910, has been sequenced from in vitro mutants resistant to the drug. The previously reported mutation A63P and a new mutation, I66M, were found. The genetic diversity of atpE in 13 mycobacterial species was also investigated, revealing that the region involved in resistance to R207910 is conserved, except in Mycobacterium xenopi in which the highly conserved residue Ala63 is replaced by Met, a modification that may be associated with the natural resistance of M. xenopi to R207910. PMID:16870785

  18. CIPROFLOXACIN RESISTANCE PATTERN AMONG BACTERIA ISOLATED FROM PATIENTS WITH COMMUNITY-ACQUIRED URINARY TRACT INFECTION

    PubMed Central

    REIS, Ana Carolina Costa; SANTOS, Susana Regia da Silva; de SOUZA, Siane Campos; SALDANHA, Milena Góes; PITANGA, Thassila Nogueira; OLIVEIRA, Ricardo Riccio

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Objective: To identify the main bacterial species associated with community-acquired urinary tract infection (UTI) and to assess the pattern of ciprofloxacin susceptibility among bacteria isolated from urine cultures. Methods: We conducted a retrospective study in all the patients with community-acquired UTI seen in Santa Helena Laboratory, Camaçari, Bahia, Brazil during five years (2010-2014). All individuals who had a positive urine culture result were included in this study. Results: A total of 1,641 individuals met the inclusion criteria. Despite the fact that participants were female, we observed a higher rate of resistance to ciprofloxacin in males. The most frequent pathogens identified in urine samples were Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Staphylococcus saprophyticus. Antimicrobial resistance has been observed mainly for ampicillin, sulfamethoxazole + trimethoprim and ciprofloxacin. Moreover, E. coli has shown the highest rate of ciprofloxacin resistance, reaching 36% of ciprofloxacin resistant strains in 2014. Conclusion: The rate of bacterial resistance to ciprofloxacin observed in the studied population is much higher than expected, prompting the need for rational use of this antibiotic, especially in infections caused by E. coli. Prevention of bacterial resistance can be performed through control measures to limit the spread of resistant microorganisms and a rational use of antimicrobial policy. PMID:27410913

  19. Antimicrobial resistance trends among community-acquired respiratory tract pathogens in Greece, 2009-2012.

    PubMed

    Maraki, Sofia; Papadakis, Ioannis S

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the antimicrobial resistance trends of respiratory tract pathogens isolated from patients with community-acquired respiratory tract infections (CARTIs) in Crete, Greece, over a 4-year period (2009-2012). A total of 588 community-acquired respiratory pathogens were isolated during the study period. Streptococcus pneumoniae was the most common organism responsible for 44.4% of CARTIs, followed by Haemophilus influenzae (44.2%) and Moraxella catarrhalis (11.4%). Among S. pneumoniae, the prevalence of isolates with intermediate- and high-level resistance to penicillin was 27.2% and 12.3%, respectively. Macrolide resistance slightly decreased from 29.4% over the period 2009-2010 to 28.8% over the period 2011-2012. Multiresistance was observed among 56 (54.4%) penicillin nonsusceptible isolates. A nonsignificant increase in resistance of H. influenzae isolates was noted for β -lactams, cotrimoxazole, and tetracycline. Among the 67 M. catarrhalis tested, 32 produced beta-lactamase and were resistant to ampicillin. Macrolide resistance decreased over the study period. All isolates were susceptible to amoxicillin + clavulanic acid, chloramphenicol, rifampicin, and the fluoroquinolones. Although a decreasing trend in the prevalence of resistance of the three most common pathogens involved in CARTIs was noted, continuous surveillance of antimicrobial susceptibility at the local and national level remains important, in order to guide appropriate empirical antimicrobial therapy.

  20. Reduced accumulation of drug in Candida krusei accounts for itraconazole resistance.

    PubMed Central

    Venkateswarlu, K; Denning, D W; Manning, N J; Kelly, S L

    1996-01-01

    Due to intrinsic resistance Candida krusei is emerging as a systemic pathogen in AIDS patients undergoing fluconazole therapy, but acquired resistance to itraconazole has not been studied biochemically. We report here studies on the basis for azole resistance and sterol composition in C. krusei. An itraconazole-resistant isolate showed reduced susceptibility to azole drugs in in vitro growth inhibition studies. Accumulation of 14 alpha-methyl-3,6-diol under azole treatment was associated with growth arrest. In vitro ergosterol biosynthesis and type II binding studies suggested no alteration in the affinity to azole drugs of the target enzyme, the cytochrome P-450 sterol 14 alpha-demethylase, in the resistant isolate. Resistance was associated with a decreased intracellular content of drug in the resistant isolate. PMID:8913443

  1. Protein arginine methyltransferase 1 may be involved in pregnane x receptor-activated overexpression of multidrug resistance 1 gene during acquired multidrug resistant

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tingting; Kong, Ah-Ng Tony; Ma, Zhiqiang; Liu, Haiyan; Liu, Pinghua; Xiao, Yu; Jiang, Xuehua; Wang, Ling

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Pregnane x receptor (PXR) - activated overexpression of the multidrug resistance 1 (MDR1) gene is an important way for tumor cells to acquire drug resistance. However, the detailed mechanism still remains unclear. In the present study, we aimed to investigate whether protein arginine methyl transferase 1(PRMT1) is involved in PXR - activated overexpression of MDR1 during acquired multidrug resistant. Experimental Design Arginine methyltransferase inhibitor 1 (AMI-1) was used to pharmacologically block PRMT1 in resistant breast cancer cells (MCF7/adr). The mRNA and protein levels of MDR1 were detected by real-time PCR and western blotting analysis. Immunofluorescence microscopy and co-immunoprecipitation were used to investigate the physical interaction between PXR and PRMT1. Then, 136 candidate compounds were screened for PRMT1 inhibitors. Lastly, luciferase reporter gene and nude mice bearing resistant breast cancer xenografts were adopted to investigate the anti-tumor effect of PRMT1 inhibitors when combined with adriamycin. Results AMI-1 significantly suppressed the expression of MDR1 in MCF7/adr cells and increased cells sensitivity of MCF7/adr to adriamycin. Physical interaction between PRMT1 and PXR exists in MCF7/adr cells, which could be disrupted by AMI-1. Those results suggest that PRMT1 may be involved in PXR-activated overexpression of MDR1 in resistant breast cancer cells, and AMI-1 may suppress MDR1 by disrupting the interaction between PRMT1 and PXR. Then, five compounds including rutin, isoquercitrin, salvianolic acid A, naproxen, and felodipline were identified to be PRMT1 inhibitors. Finally, those PRMT1 inhibitors were observed to significantly decrease MDR1 promoter activity in vitro and enhance the antitumor effect of adriamycin in nude mice that bearing resistant breast cancer xenografts. Conclusions PRMT1 may be an important co-activator of PXR in activating MDR1 gene during acquired resistance, and PRMT1 inhibitor combined with

  2. Environmental mutagens may be implicated in the emergence of drug-resistant microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Miyahara, Emiko; Nishie, Makiko; Takumi, Shota; Miyanohara, Hiroaki; Nishi, Junichiro; Yoshiie, Kiyotaka; Oda, Hiroshi; Takeuchi, Minoru; Komatsu, Masaharu; Aoyama, Kohji; Horiuchi, Masahisa; Takeuchi, Toru

    2011-04-01

    The emergence of drug-resistant microorganisms is an important medical and social problem. Drug-resistant microorganisms are thought to grow selectively in the presence of antibiotics. Most clinically isolated drug-resistant microorganisms have mutations in the target genes for the drugs. While any of the many mutagens in the environment may cause such genetic mutations, no reports have yet described whether these mutagens can confer drug resistance to clinically important microorganisms. We investigated how environmental mutagens might be implicated in acquired resistance to antibiotics in clinically important microorganisms, which causes human diseases. We selected mutagens found in the environment, in cigarette smoke, or in drugs, and then exposed Pseudomonas aeruginosa to them. After exposure, the incidence of rifampicin- and ciprofloxacin-resistant P. aeruginosa strains markedly increased, and we found mutations in genes for the antibiotic-target molecule. These mutations were similar to those found in drug-resistant microorganisms isolated from clinical samples. Our findings show that environmental mutagens, and an anticancer drug, are capable of inducing drug-resistant P. aeruginosa similar to strains found in clinical settings.

  3. Amphibians acquire resistance to live and dead fungus overcoming fungal immunosuppression.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Taegan A; Sears, Brittany F; Venesky, Matthew D; Bessler, Scott M; Brown, Jenise M; Deutsch, Kaitlin; Halstead, Neal T; Lentz, Garrett; Tenouri, Nadia; Young, Suzanne; Civitello, David J; Ortega, Nicole; Fites, J Scott; Reinert, Laura K; Rollins-Smith, Louise A; Raffel, Thomas R; Rohr, Jason R

    2014-07-10

    Emerging fungal pathogens pose a greater threat to biodiversity than any other parasitic group, causing declines of many taxa, including bats, corals, bees, snakes and amphibians. Currently, there is little evidence that wild animals can acquire resistance to these pathogens. Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis is a pathogenic fungus implicated in the recent global decline of amphibians. Here we demonstrate that three species of amphibians can acquire behavioural or immunological resistance to B. dendrobatidis. Frogs learned to avoid the fungus after just one B. dendrobatidis exposure and temperature-induced clearance. In subsequent experiments in which B. dendrobatidis avoidance was prevented, the number of previous exposures was a negative predictor of B. dendrobatidis burden on frogs and B. dendrobatidis-induced mortality, and was a positive predictor of lymphocyte abundance and proliferation. These results suggest that amphibians can acquire immunity to B. dendrobatidis that overcomes pathogen-induced immunosuppression and increases their survival. Importantly, exposure to dead fungus induced a similar magnitude of acquired resistance as exposure to live fungus. Exposure of frogs to B. dendrobatidis antigens might offer a practical way to protect pathogen-naive amphibians and facilitate the reintroduction of amphibians to locations in the wild where B. dendrobatidis persists. Moreover, given the conserved nature of vertebrate immune responses to fungi and the fact that many animals are capable of learning to avoid natural enemies, these results offer hope that other wild animal taxa threatened by invasive fungi might be rescued by management approaches based on herd immunity.

  4. Assessing transmissibility of HIV-1 drug resistance mutations from treated and from drug-naive individuals

    PubMed Central

    Winand, Raf; Theys, Kristof; Eusébio, Mónica; Aerts, Jan; Camacho, Ricardo J.; Gomes, Perpetua; Suchard, Marc A.; Vandamme, Anne-Mieke; Abecasis, Ana B.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Surveillance drug resistance mutations (SDRMs) in drug-naive patients are typically used to survey HIV-1-transmitted drug resistance (TDR). We test here how SDRMs in patients failing treatment, the original source of TDR, contribute to assessing TDR, transmissibility and transmission source of SDRMs. Design: This is a retrospective observational study analyzing a Portuguese cohort of HIV-1-infected patients. Methods: The prevalence of SDRMs to protease inhibitors, nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) and nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) in drug-naive and treatment-failing patients was measured for 3554 HIV-1 subtype B patients. Transmission ratio (prevalence in drug-naive/prevalence in treatment-failing patients), average viral load and robust linear regression with outlier detection (prevalence in drug-naive versus in treatment-failing patients) were analyzed and used to interpret transmissibility. Results: Prevalence of SDRMs in drug-naive and treatment-failing patients were linearly correlated, but some SDRMs were classified as outliers – above (PRO: D30N, N88D/S, L90 M, RT: G190A/S/E) or below (RT: M184I/V) expectations. The normalized regression slope was 0.073 for protease inhibitors, 0.084 for NRTIs and 0.116 for NNRTIs. Differences between SDRMs transmission ratios were not associated with differences in viral loads. Conclusion: The significant linear correlation between prevalence of SDRMs in drug-naive and in treatment-failing patients indicates that the prevalence in treatment-failing patients can be useful to predict levels of TDR. The slope is a cohort-dependent estimate of rate of TDR per drug class and outlier detection reveals comparative persistence of SDRMs. Outlier SDRMs with higher transmissibility are more persistent and more likely to have been acquired from drug-naive patients. Those with lower transmissibility have faster reversion dynamics after transmission and are associated with

  5. Clinical Significance of Community- and Healthcare-Acquired Carbapenem-Resistant Enterobacteriaceae Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Hung-Jen; Hsieh, Cheng-Fang; Chang, Ping-Chin; Chen, Jyh-Jou; Lin, Yu-Hsiu; Lai, Chih-Cheng; Chao, Chien-Ming; Chuang, Yin-Ching

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the clinical significance, manifestations, microbiological characteristics and outcomes of carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) isolates, and compare the clinical features of community- and healthcare-acquired CRE isolates. A total of 78 patients were identified to have CRE. Klebsiella pneumoniae was the most common pathogens (n = 42, 53.8%), followed by Enterobacter cloacae (n = 24, 30.8%), and Escherichia coli (n = 11, 14.1%). Most of the patients acquired CRE from healthcare settings (n = 55, 70.5%), and other cases got CRE from community settings (n = 23, 29.5%). Nine cases (11.5%) were classified as CRE colonization. Among the remaining 69 cases of CRE infections, pneumonia (n = 28, 40.6%) was the most common type of infections, followed by urinary tract infection (n = 24, 34.8%), and intra-abdominal infection (n = 16, 23.2%). The patients acquired CRE from community settings were more likely to be elderly, female, and had more urinary tract infections than from healthcare settings. In contrast, the patients acquired CRE from healthcare settings had more intra-abdominal infections, intra-abdominal surgery, and presence of indwelling device than from community settings. In conclusion, community-acquired CRE are not rare, and their associated clinical presentations are different from healthcare-acquired CRE. PMID:26999356

  6. In silico assessment of kinetics and state dependent binding properties of drugs causing acquired LQTS.

    PubMed

    Lee, William; Mann, Stefan A; Windley, Monique J; Imtiaz, Mohammad S; Vandenberg, Jamie I; Hill, Adam P

    2016-01-01

    The Kv11.1 or hERG potassium channel is responsible for one of the major repolarising currents (IKr) in cardiac myocytes. Drug binding to hERG can result in reduction in IKr, action potential prolongation, acquired long QT syndrome and fatal cardiac arrhythmias. The current guidelines for pre-clinical assessment of drugs in development is based on the measurement of the drug concentration that causes 50% current block, i.e., IC50. However, drugs with the same apparent IC50 may have very different kinetics of binding and unbinding, as well as different affinities for the open and inactivated states of Kv11.1. Therefore, IC50 measurements may not reflect the true risk of drug induced arrhythmias. Here we have used an in silico approach to test the hypothesis that drug binding kinetics and differences in state-dependent affinity will influence the extent of cardiac action potential prolongation independent of apparent IC50 values. We found, in general that drugs with faster overall kinetics and drugs with higher affinity for the open state relative to the inactivated state cause more action potential prolongation. These characteristics of drug-hERG interaction are likely to be more arrhythmogenic but cannot be predicted by IC50 measurement alone. Our results suggest that the pre-clinical assessment of Kv11.1-drug interactions should include descriptions of the kinetics and state dependence of drug binding. Further, incorporation of this information into sophisticated in silico models should be able to better predict arrhythmia risk and therefore more accurately assess safety of new drugs in development.

  7. Characterization of in vivo-acquired resistance to macrolides of Mycoplasma gallisepticum strains isolated from poultry

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The macrolide class of antibiotics, including tylosin and tilmicosin, is widely used in the veterinary field for prophylaxis and treatment of mycoplasmosis. In vitro susceptibility testing of 50 strains of M. gallisepticum isolated in Israel during the period 1997-2010 revealed that acquired resistance to tylosin as well as to tilmicosin was present in 50% of them. Moreover, 72% (13/18) of the strains isolated from clinical samples since 2006 showed acquired resistance to enrofloxacin, tylosin and tilmicosin. Molecular typing of the field isolates, performed by gene-target sequencing (GTS), detected 13 molecular types (I-XIII). Type II was the predominant type prior to 2006 whereas type X, first detected in 2008, is currently prevalent. All ten type X strains were resistant to both fluoroquinolones and macrolides, suggesting selective pressure leading to clonal dissemination of resistance. However, this was not a unique event since resistant strains with other GTS molecular types were also found. Concurrently, the molecular basis for macrolide resistance in M. gallisepticum was identified. Our results revealed a clear-cut correlation between single point mutations A2058G or A2059G in domain V of the gene encoding 23S rRNA (rrnA, MGA_01) and acquired macrolide resistance in M. gallisepticum. Indeed, all isolates with MIC ≥ 0.63 μg/mL to tylosin and with MIC ≥ 1.25 μg/mL to tilmicosin possess one of these mutations, suggesting an essential role in decreased susceptibility of M. gallisepticum to 16-membered macrolides. PMID:21810258

  8. Characterization of in vivo-acquired resistance to macrolides of Mycoplasma gallisepticum strains isolated from poultry.

    PubMed

    Gerchman, Irena; Levisohn, Sharon; Mikula, Inna; Manso-Silván, Lucía; Lysnyansky, Inna

    2011-08-02

    The macrolide class of antibiotics, including tylosin and tilmicosin, is widely used in the veterinary field for prophylaxis and treatment of mycoplasmosis. In vitro susceptibility testing of 50 strains of M. gallisepticum isolated in Israel during the period 1997-2010 revealed that acquired resistance to tylosin as well as to tilmicosin was present in 50% of them. Moreover, 72% (13/18) of the strains isolated from clinical samples since 2006 showed acquired resistance to enrofloxacin, tylosin and tilmicosin. Molecular typing of the field isolates, performed by gene-target sequencing (GTS), detected 13 molecular types (I-XIII). Type II was the predominant type prior to 2006 whereas type X, first detected in 2008, is currently prevalent. All ten type X strains were resistant to both fluoroquinolones and macrolides, suggesting selective pressure leading to clonal dissemination of resistance. However, this was not a unique event since resistant strains with other GTS molecular types were also found. Concurrently, the molecular basis for macrolide resistance in M. gallisepticum was identified. Our results revealed a clear-cut correlation between single point mutations A2058G or A2059G in domain V of the gene encoding 23S rRNA (rrnA, MGA_01) and acquired macrolide resistance in M. gallisepticum. Indeed, all isolates with MIC ≥ 0.63 μg/mL to tylosin and with MIC ≥ 1.25 μg/mL to tilmicosin possess one of these mutations, suggesting an essential role in decreased susceptibility of M. gallisepticum to 16-membered macrolides.

  9. In vitro assessment of antifungal drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Holmberg, K

    1986-01-01

    Several studies have documented the variability in the susceptibility pattern of fungi to antifungal drugs, and fungi possess resistance determinants to negate the effects of antifungal agents. In vitro assessment of both resistance and susceptibility are measured by suitable concentration endpoints of the antifungal drug, the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC). MICs serve as the main parameter to define the fungistatic action on fungi growing in culture. For the antifungals used for treatment of local mycoses, the limit between a MIC value indicating susceptibility and one indicating resistance is usually determined empirically on the basis of the correlation between MIC values, and either positive or negative response to chemotherapy. The principles of susceptibility testing of fungi are essentially the same as those for bacteria. However, testing with fungi must deal with the fact that interpretation of the results is complicated by inherent differences in fungal morphology, growth rate, and optimal culture conditions. Several factors could adversely affect the test results and must be considered in the design of susceptibility testing of fungi. It is obvious when the present data on fungal susceptibility testing are reviewed that much more work on standardization of techniques and interpretation of results is necessary. This presentation will focus on the in vitro susceptibility testing for determining primary and secondary drug resistance of griseofulvin and azole antifungal agents, and the correlation between the activities of these antifungals in vitro and in vivo.

  10. Deciphering an Outbreak of Drug-Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Dahle, Ulf R.; Sandven, Per; Heldal, Einar; Mannsaaker, Turid; Caugant, Dominique A.

    2003-01-01

    There have been ample warnings that multidrug-resistant (MDR) tuberculosis (TB) will continue to emerge if countries do not strengthen their control of TB. In low-incidence European countries, however, these warnings have been substantiated mainly by outbreaks in association with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive patients. The aim of this study was to investigate an outbreak of infection with MDR and drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis that was diagnosed among 20 HIV-negative patients living in Norway. Of these, 19 were immigrants from East Africa and one was an ethnic Norwegian. We wanted to find out if transmission had taken place in Norway or abroad and to identify the genetic basis of drug resistance. The strains were analyzed by IS6110 restriction fragment length polymorphism, antibiotic susceptibility tests, spoligotyping, reverse hybridization to regions of the rpoB gene, and sequencing of the katG gene. Epidemiological links between the patients were mapped, and the strains were compared to those isolated in 36 other countries and regions. All strains were resistant to isoniazid and carried Ala234Gly, Ser315Thr, and Arg463Leu substitutions in the katG gene. Eleven strains were MDR and carried a Ser531Leu substitution in the rpoB gene. MDR was acquired in the index patient after arrival in Norway. Links were found among 14 patients. The strain was imported from Somalia but acquired MDR and was transmitted in Norway. This demonstrated that MDR strains are not necessarily imported from high-incidence countries and can be highly communicable. The outbreak underscores a deficiency in the TB control measures employed in many countries and challenges the adequacy of the policy of screening immigrants for TB only on arrival. PMID:12517827

  11. The phenomenon of acquired resistance to metformin in breast cancer cells: The interaction of growth pathways and estrogen receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Scherbakov, Alexander M; Sorokin, Danila V; Tatarskiy, Victor V; Prokhorov, Nikolay S; Semina, Svetlana E; Berstein, Lev M; Krasil'nikov, Mikhail A

    2016-04-01

    Metformin, a biguanide antidiabetic drug, is used to decrease hyperglycemia in patients with type 2 diabetes. Recently, the epidemiological studies revealed the potential of metformin as an anti-tumor drug for several types of cancer, including breast cancer. Anti-tumor metformin action was found to be mediated, at least in part, via activation of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK)-intracellular energy sensor, which inhibits the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and some other signaling pathways. Nevertheless, some patients can be non-sensitive or resistant to metformin action. Here we analyzed the mechanism of the formation of metformin-resistant phenotype in breast cancer cells and its role in estrogen receptor (ER) regulation. The experiments were performed on the ER-positive MCF-7 breast cancer cells and metformin-resistant MCF-7 subline (MCF-7/M) developed due to long-term metformin treatment. The transcriptional activity of NF-κB and ER was measured by the luciferase reporter gene analysis. The protein expression was determined by immunoblotting (Snail1, (phospho)AMPK, (phospho)IκBα, (phospho)mTOR, cyclin D1, (phospho)Akt and ERα) and immunohistochemical analysis (E-cadherin). We have found that: 1) metformin treatment of MCF-7 cells is accompanied with the stimulation of AMPK and inhibition of growth-related proteins including IκBα, NF-κB, cyclin D1 and ERα; 2) long-term metformin treatment lead to the appearance and progression of cross-resistance to metformin and tamoxifen; the resistant cells are characterized with the unaffected AMPK activity, but the irreversible ER suppression and constitutive activation of Akt/Snail1 signaling; 3) Akt/Snail1 signaling is involved into progression of metformin resistance. The results presented may be considered as the first evidence of the progression of cross-resistance to metformin and tamoxifen in breast cancer cells. Importantly, the acquired resistance to both drugs is based on the

  12. Successful Use of Cyclophosphamide as an Add-On Therapy for Multiple Myeloma Patients with Acquired Resistance to Bortezomib or Lenalidomide

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Shigeki; Oyake, Tatsuo; Murai, Kazunori; Ishida, Yoji

    2013-01-01

    Novel agents such as thalidomide, lenalidomide, and bortezomib have been shown to possess potent activity against multiple myeloma. However, the treatment strategy for patients who acquired resistance to these agents has not been established. In addition to switching drug classes, intensified treatment strategy, including increase in the dosage of current agents and addition of other agents, may be considered for these patients. We here describe 2 myeloma patients with acquired resistance to bortezomib or lenalidomide, in whom add-on therapy with low-dose cyclophosphamide was effective and tolerable. These cases suggest that add-on therapy with cyclophosphamide is one of the treatment options to overcome resistance to novel agents in patients with multiple myeloma. A larger prospective study is needed to clarify the efficacy and safety of this strategy for novel agent-resistant multiple myeloma. PMID:23607005

  13. Targeting glucosylceramide synthase induction of cell surface globotriaosylceramide (Gb3) in acquired cisplatin-resistance of lung cancer and malignant pleural mesothelioma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tyler, Andreas; Johansson, Anders; Karlsson, Terese; Gudey, Shyam Kumar; Brännström, Thomas; Grankvist, Kjell; Behnam-Motlagh, Parviz

    2015-08-01

    Background: Acquired resistance to cisplatin treatment is a caveat when treating patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM). Ceramide increases in response to chemotherapy, leading to proliferation arrest and apoptosis. However, a tumour stress activation of glucosylceramide synthase (GCS) follows to eliminate ceramide by formation of glycosphingolipids (GSLs) such as globotriaosylceramide (Gb3), the functional receptor of verotoxin-1. Ceramide elimination enhances cell proliferation and apoptosis blockade, thus stimulating tumor progression. GSLs transactivate multidrug resistance 1/P-glycoprotein (MDR1) and multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP1) expression which further prevents ceramide accumulation and stimulates drug efflux. We investigated the expression of Gb3, MDR1 and MRP1 in NSCLC and MPM cells with acquired cisplatin resistance, and if GCS activity or MDR1 pump inhibitors would reduce their expression and reverse cisplatin-resistance. Methods: Cell surface expression of Gb3, MDR1 and MRP1 and intracellular expression of MDR1 and MRP1 was analyzed by flow cytometry and confocal microscopy on P31 MPM and H1299 NSCLC cells and subline cells with acquired cisplatin resistance. The effect of GCS inhibitor PPMP and MDR1 pump inhibitor cyclosporin A for 72 h on expression and cisplatin cytotoxicity was tested. Results: The cisplatin-resistant cells expressed increased cell surface Gb3. Cell surface Gb3 expression of resistant cells was annihilated by PPMP whereas cyclosporin A decreased Gb3 and MDR1 expression in H1299 cells. No decrease of MDR1 by PPMP was noted in using flow cytometry, whereas a decrease of MDR1 in H1299 and H1299res was indicated with confocal microscopy. No certain co-localization of Gb3 and MDR1 was noted. PPMP, but not cyclosporin A, potentiated cisplatin cytotoxicity in all cells. Conclusions: Cell surface Gb3 expression is a likely tumour biomarker for acquired cisplatin

  14. Fungal Biofilms, Drug Resistance, and Recurrent Infection

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Jigar V.; Mitchell, Aaron P.; Andes, David R.

    2014-01-01

    A biofilm is a surface-associated microbial community. Diverse fungi are capable of biofilm growth. The significance of this growth form for infection biology is that biofilm formation on implanted devices is a major cause of recurrent infection. Biofilms also have limited drug susceptibility, making device-associated infection extremely difficult to treat. Biofilm-like growth can occur during many kinds of infection, even when an implanted device is not present. Here we summarize the current understanding of fungal biofilm formation, its genetic control, and the basis for biofilm drug resistance. PMID:25274758

  15. Community Acquired Enterococcal Urinary Tract Infections and Antibiotic Resistance Profile in North India

    PubMed Central

    Goel, Varun; Kumar, Dinesh; Kumar, Rajendra; Mathur, Purva; Singh, Sarman

    2016-01-01

    Background: Urinary tract infections (UTIs) remain a major problem both in hospitalized and outdoor patients. Multidrug-resistant enterococci are emerging as a major nosocomial pathogen with increasing frequency. However, the incidence of community-acquired enterococcal infections and species prevalent in India is not thoroughly investigated. Objectives: This study aims to estimate the burden of community-acquired UTIs seen at a tertiary care hospital and to identify the Enterococcus species isolated from these patients. The study also aims to determine the antibiotic susceptibility pattern with reference to high-level aminoglycosides and vancomycin. Materials and Methods: Semi-quantitative cultures from a total of 22,810 urine samples obtained from patients seen at various Outpatient Departments were analyzed. From them 115 nonduplicate isolates of enterococci were obtained as significant pure growth (>105 cfu/ml) and speciated. Antibiotic susceptibility was performed by Kirby–Bauer disc diffusion method. Vancomycin resistance screening was performed by the vancomycin screen agar method recommended by Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute and confirmed by determination of minimum inhibitory concentration by agar dilution method. Results: Of 115 enterococcal isolates, 61 were identified as Enterococcus faecalis, 42 as Enterococcus faecium, 3 each as Enterococcus dispar, and Enterococcus pseudoavium. High-level gentamicin resistance (HLGR) was higher in E. faecium (47.6%) than E. faecalis (32.7%) and HLSR also showed the same pattern with 47.6% and 27.9% resistance, respectively. Vancomycin resistant enterococci accounted for 11.3% of the isolates, and out of them 53.8% were E. faecium by agar dilution method. Conclusion: High rate of resistance to antibiotics of penicillin group and aminoglycosides was observed in our tertiary care hospital even in community acquired UTIs. Hence, there is an urgent need for more rational and restricted use of antimicrobials

  16. [A mathematical model for the chemical control of Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae) having acquired chemical resistance].

    PubMed

    Restrepo-Alape, Leonardo D; Toro-Zapata, Hernán D; Muñoz-Loaiza, Aníbal

    2010-12-01

    Dengue fever is a common vector-borne disease in tropical and subtropical areas. It is transmitted to humans by the bite of an infected female Aedes mosquito. Since no vaccines are currently available which can protect against infection, disease control relies on controlling the mosquito population. This work was aimed at modelling such mosquito's population dynamics regarding chemical control of the adult population and its acquired resistance to chemicals. The model was analysed by using classical dynamic system theory techniques and mosquito growth threshold was determined as this establishes when a particular population may prosper in the environment or when it is likely to disappear. A suitable chemical control strategy was developed from such threshold. Simulations were made in control and non-control scenarios; this determined the degree of control application effectiveness against different levels of acquired resistance.

  17. An insight into the drug resistance profile & mechanism of drug resistance in Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Patel, Achchhe Lal; Chaudhry, Uma; Sachdev, Divya; Sachdeva, Poonam Nagpal; Bala, Manju; Saluja, Daman

    2011-10-01

    Among the aetiological agents of treatable sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), Neissseria gonorrhoeae is considered to be most important because of emerging antibiotic resistant strains that compromise the effectiveness of treatment of the disease - gonorrhoea. In most of the developing countries, treatment of gonorrhoea relies mainly on syndromic management rather than the aetiological based therapy. Gonococcal infections are usually treated with single-dose therapy with an agent found to cure > 95 per cent of cases. Unfortunately during the last few decades, N. gonorrhoeae has developed resistance not only to less expensive antimicrobials such as sulphonamides, penicillin and tetracyclines but also to fluoroquinolones. The resistance trend of N. gonorrhoeae towards these antimicrobials can be categorised into pre-quinolone, quinolone and post-quinolone era. Among the antimicrobials available so far, only the third-generation cephalosporins could be safely recommended as first-line therapy for gonorrhoea globally. However, resistance to oral third-generation cephalosporins has also started emerging in some countries. Therefore, it has become imperative to initiate sustained national and international efforts to reduce infection and misuse of antibiotics so as to prevent further emergence and spread of antimicrobial resistance. It is necessary not only to monitor drug resistance and optimise treatment regimens, but also to gain insight into how gonococcus develops drug resistance. Knowledge of mechanism of resistance would help us to devise methods to prevent the occurrence of drug resistance against existing and new drugs. Such studies could also help in finding out new drug targets in N. gonorrhoeae and also a possibility of identification of new drugs for treating gonorrhoea.

  18. Drug Resistance Is Not Directly Affected by Mating Type Locus Zygosity in Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Pujol, Claude; Messer, Shawn A.; Pfaller, Michael; Soll, David R.

    2003-01-01

    Recently, evidence was presented that in a collection of fluconazole-resistant strains of Candida albicans there was a much higher proportion of homozygotes for the mating type locus (MTL) than in a collection of fluconazole-sensitive isolates, suggesting the possibility that when cells become MTL homozygous they acquire intrinsic drug resistance. To investigate this possibility, an opposite strategy was employed. First, drug susceptibility was measured in a collection of isolates selected for MTL homozygosity. The majority of these isolates had not been exposed to antifungal drugs. Second, the level of drug susceptibility was compared between spontaneously generated MTL-homozygous progeny and their MTL-heterozygous parent strains which had not been exposed to antifungal drugs. The results demonstrate that naturally occurring MTL-homozygous strains are not intrinsically more drug resistant, supporting the hypotheses that either the higher incidence of MTL homozygosity previously demonstrated among fluconazole-resistant isolates involved associated homozygosity of a drug resistance gene linked to the MTL locus, or that MTL-homozygous strains may be better at developing drug resistance upon exposure to the drug than MTL-heterozygous strains. Furthermore, the results demonstrate that a switch by an MTL-homozygous strain from the white to opaque phenotype, the latter functioning as the facilitator of mating, does not notably alter drug susceptibility. PMID:12654648

  19. European recommendations on surveillance of antituberculosis drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Schwoebel, V; Lambregts, C.S.B.; Moro, M.L.; Drobniewski, F; Hoffner, S.E.; Raviglione, M.C.; Rieder, H.L.

    2000-10-01

    Antituberculosis drug resistance, whose extent in Europe is not well documented, is a serious threat to tuberculosis control. The aim of the recent European recommendations on antituberculosis drug resistance surveillance, issued by a working group compos

  20. The epidemiology and spread of drug resistant human influenza viruses.

    PubMed

    Hurt, Aeron C

    2014-10-01

    Significant changes in the circulation of antiviral-resistant influenza viruses have occurred over the last decade. The emergence and continued circulation of adamantane-resistant A(H3N2) and A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses mean that the adamantanes are no longer recommended for use. Resistance to the newer class of drugs, the neuraminidase inhibitors, is typically associated with poorer viral replication and transmission. But 'permissive' mutations, that compensated for impairment of viral function in A(H1N1) viruses during 2007/2008, enabled them to acquire the H275Y NA resistance mutation without fitness loss, resulting in their rapid global spread. Permissive mutations now appear to be present in A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses thereby increasing the risk that oseltamivir-resistant A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses may also spread globally, a concerning scenario given that oseltamivir is the most widely used influenza antiviral.

  1. Community-acquired methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus: a new aetiological agent of prostatic abscess

    PubMed Central

    Abreu, Diego; Arroyo, Carlos; Suarez, Ruben; Campolo, Horacio; Izaguirre, Juan; Decía, Ricardo; Machado, Miguel; Carvalhal, Gustavo Franco; Clavijo, Jorge

    2011-01-01

    Prostatic abscess is rare. Its potentially serious course requires a high level of clinical suspicion and prompt and effective treatment. The causative germs are usually either enterobacteria or Enterococcus. The authors highlight the importance of considering epidemiological and clinical aspects in the early diagnosis and treatment. Prostatic abscess due to community-acquired methicillin resistant Staphylococcus has three typical characteristics: skin entry point, periprostatic compromise, and anaemia and low prothrombin. PMID:22696740

  2. Smart nanoparticles improve therapy for drug-resistant tumors by overcoming pathophysiological barriers

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jian-ping; Wang, Ting-ting; Wang, Dang-ge; Dong, An-jie; Li, Ya-ping; Yu, Hai-jun

    2017-01-01

    The therapeutic outcome of chemotherapy is severely limited by intrinsic or acquired drug resistance, the most common causes of chemotherapy failure. In the past few decades, advancements in nanotechnology have provided alternative strategies for combating tumor drug resistance. Drug-loaded nanoparticles (NPs) have several advantages over the free drug forms, including reduced cytotoxicity, prolonged circulation in the blood and increased accumulation in tumors. Currently, however, nanoparticulate drugs have only marginally improved the overall survival rate in clinical trials because of the various pathophysiological barriers that exist in the tumor microenvironment, such as intratumoral distribution, penetration and intracellular trafficking, etc. Smart NPs with stimulus-adaptable physico-chemical properties have been extensively developed to improve the therapeutic efficacy of nanomedicine. In this review, we summarize the recent advances of employing smart NPs to treat the drug-resistant tumors by overcoming the pathophysiological barriers in the tumor microenvironment. PMID:27569390

  3. DDTRP: Database of Drug Targets for Resistant Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Sundaramurthi, Jagadish Chandrabose; Ramanandan, Prabhakaran; Brindha, Sridharan; Subhasree, Chelladurai Ramarathnam; Prasad, Abhimanyu; Kumaraswami, Vasanthapuram; Hanna, Luke Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    Emergence of drug resistance is a major threat to public health. Many pathogens have developed resistance to most of the existing antibiotics, and multidrug-resistant and extensively drug resistant strains are extremely difficult to treat. This has resulted in an urgent need for novel drugs. We describe a database called ‘Database of Drug Targets for Resistant Pathogens’ (DDTRP). The database contains information on drugs with reported resistance, their respective targets, metabolic pathways involving these targets, and a list of potential alternate targets for seven pathogens. The database can be accessed freely at http://bmi.icmr.org.in/DDTRP. PMID:21938213

  4. Spontaneous Lactobacillus delbrueckii phage-resistant mutants with acquired bile tolerance.

    PubMed

    Guglielmotti, Daniela; Marcó, Mariángeles Briggiler; Vinderola, Celso; de Los Reyes Gavilán, Clara; Reinheimer, Jorge; Quiberoni, Andrea

    2007-11-01

    Three commercial phage-sensitive strains of Lactobacillus delbrueckii (strains Ab(1), YSD V and Ib(3)) and four spontaneous phage-resistant mutants (strains A(7), A(17), V(2) and I(39)) isolated from them, all with a probiotic potential previously demonstrated were studied for their tolerance of bile salts (ox gall). Minimal Inhibitory Concentrations (MICs) ranged from 0.30% to 0.35% (w/v) of ox gall. These strains were exposed to gradually increasing concentrations of ox gall with the aim of isolating bile resistant derivatives. Stable derivatives able to tolerate up to 0.9% of ox gall were obtained from L. delbrueckii Ab(1), as well as from its spontaneous phage-resistant mutants A(7) and A(17). Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD-PCR) analysis revealed a strong genetic homology between the ox gall-tolerant derivatives and their respective non-adapted original strains. These derivatives maintained, in general, the phage resistance phenotype of the non-adapted strains, with only one exception (phage-resistant mutant A(7)). After progressive ox gall adaptation, the phage-resistant mutant A(7) also exhibited progressive reversion of the phage resistance phenotype. The derivative with the highest ox gall-acquired tolerance (A(7)(0.9)) became sensitive to the phage, but derivatives with low (A(7)(0.3)) and intermediate (A(7)(0.6)) ox gall-acquired tolerance retained phage resistance. The technological properties of ox gall derivatives were comparable to those of their respective parent strains. However, the cells of the former were smaller than those of the original strains. Finally, the tolerant derivatives grew faster in the presence of ox gall than the parent strains. Our results demonstrated that it was possible to obtain, by a natural selection strategy, probiotic strains with acquired ox gall-tolerance from three (L. delbrueckii Ab(1) and their phage-resistant mutants A(7) and A(17)) of seven tested strains. Since such derivatives keep both phage resistance

  5. Multi drug resistance in strong biofilm forming clinical isolates of Staphylococcus epidermidis.

    PubMed

    Sahal, Gulcan; Bilkay, Isil Seyis

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcus epidermidis which exists in healthy human skin as a commensal inhabitant is also an important pathogen forming biofilms on many surfaces and recently, increased resistance traits were suggested to be acquired in biofilm environments. In this study; clinical Prevalences, antibiotic resistances and biofilm formations of S. epidermidis strains were determined and comparison of all these findings with each other was carried out in order to take precautions against them and figure out if high biofilm forming S. epidermidis strains display multi drug resistance. According to our results; samples of wound and blood were the most S. epidermidis isolated clinical materials (40%; 35%) and cardiothoracic surgery was the most S. epidermidis observed service unit. All of these strains were sensitive to vancomycin, however 65% of them showed resistance to all β-lactam antibiotics (Penicillin, Oxacillin, Amoxicilin/Clavulonic acid), used in this study and 60% of all S. epidermidis strains were found as multi drug resistant. When the results of strong biofilm forming S. epidermidis strains are examined; they were isolated from sample of blood and service unit of cardiovascular surgery in highest frequency and 80% of them were β-lactam resistant whereas 100% of them were multi drug resistant. One of these multi drug resistant strains which was resistant to maximum amount of different antimicrobial classes, was also observed as maximum biofilm forming strain among all the other S. epidermidis isolates. Multi drug resistance in strong biofilm forming strains shows that; biofilms play a role in antimicrobial resistance traits of S. epidermidis.

  6. MECHANISMS OF ACQUIRED RESISTANCE TO ENDOCRINE THERAPY IN HORMONE-DEPENDENT BREAST CANCER CELLS1

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Wei; Fan, Ping; Wang, Jiping; Li, Yuebai; Santen, Richard J.

    2007-01-01

    Acquired resistance is a major problem limiting the clinical benefit of endocrine therapy. To investigate the mechanisms involved, two in vitro models were developed from MCF-7 cells. Long-term culture of MCF-7 cells in estrogen deprived medium (LTED) mimics aromatase inhibition in patients. Continued exposure of MCF-7 to tamoxifen represents a model of acquired resistance to antiestrogens (TAM-R). Long-term estrogen deprivation results in sustained activation of the ERK MAP kinase and the PI3 kinase/mTOR pathways. Using a novel Ras inhibitor, farnesylthiosalicylic acid (FTS), to achieve dual inhibition of the pathways, we found that the mTOR pathway plays the primary role in mediation of proliferation of LTED cells. In contrast to the LTED model, there is no sustained activation of ERK MAPK but enhanced responsiveness to rapid stimulation induced by E2 and TAM in TAM-R cells. An increased amount of ERα formed complexes with EGFR and c-Src in TAM-R cells, which apparently resulted from extra-nuclear redistribution of ERα. Blockade of c-Src activity drove ERα back to the nucleus and reduced ERα-EGFR interaction. Prolonged blockade of c-Src activity restored sensitivity of TAM-R cells to tamoxifen. Our results suggest that different mechanisms are involved in acquired endocrine resistance and the necessity for individualized treatment of recurrent diseases. PMID:17616457

  7. Drug Resistance in Malaria: Investigation of Mechanisms and Patterns of Drug Resistance and Cross Resistance in Malaria.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-10-19

    sites of drugs (fefloquine, etc.) in erythrocytes and/or parasites, 2) investigation of bindihg of drugs ( mefloquine in particular) in malaria strains...resistant and suscePible to other drugs (chloroquine in particu- lar), 3) investigation of the echanism of action of drugs ( mefloquine in particular...binds to phospholipids (13). This observation is of particular interest because mefloquine binds with high affinity to phospholipids (14). It is

  8. Acquired resistance to oxaliplatin is not directly associated with increased resistance to DNA damage in SK-N-ASrOXALI4000, a newly established oxaliplatin-resistant sub-line of the neuroblastoma cell line SK-N-AS

    PubMed Central

    Saintas, Emily; Abrahams, Liam; Ahmad, Gulshan T.; Ajakaiye, Anu-Oluwa M.; AlHumaidi, Abdulaziz S. H. A. M.; Ashmore-Harris, Candice; Clark, Iain; Dura, Usha K.; Fixmer, Carine N.; Ike-Morris, Chinedu; Mato Prado, Mireia; Mccullough, Danielle; Mishra, Shishir; Schöler, Katia M. U.; Timur, Husne; Williamson, Maxwell D. C.; Alatsatianos, Markella; Bahsoun, Basma; Blackburn, Edith; Hogwood, Catherine E.; Lithgow, Pamela E.; Rowe, Michelle; Yiangou, Lyto; Rothweiler, Florian; Cinatl, Jindrich; Zehner, Richard; Baines, Anthony J.; Garrett, Michelle D.; Gourlay, Campbell W.; Griffin, Darren K.; Gullick, William J.; Hargreaves, Emma; Howard, Mark J.; Lloyd, Daniel R.; Rossman, Jeremy S.; Smales, C. Mark; Tsaousis, Anastasios D.; von der Haar, Tobias; Wass, Mark N.

    2017-01-01

    The formation of acquired drug resistance is a major reason for the failure of anti-cancer therapies after initial response. Here, we introduce a novel model of acquired oxaliplatin resistance, a sub-line of the non-MYCN-amplified neuroblastoma cell line SK-N-AS that was adapted to growth in the presence of 4000 ng/mL oxaliplatin (SK-N-ASrOXALI4000). SK-N-ASrOXALI4000 cells displayed enhanced chromosomal aberrations compared to SK-N-AS, as indicated by 24-chromosome fluorescence in situ hybridisation. Moreover, SK-N-ASrOXALI4000 cells were resistant not only to oxaliplatin but also to the two other commonly used anti-cancer platinum agents cisplatin and carboplatin. SK-N-ASrOXALI4000 cells exhibited a stable resistance phenotype that was not affected by culturing the cells for 10 weeks in the absence of oxaliplatin. Interestingly, SK-N-ASrOXALI4000 cells showed no cross resistance to gemcitabine and increased sensitivity to doxorubicin and UVC radiation, alternative treatments that like platinum drugs target DNA integrity. Notably, UVC-induced DNA damage is thought to be predominantly repaired by nucleotide excision repair and nucleotide excision repair has been described as the main oxaliplatin-induced DNA damage repair system. SK-N-ASrOXALI4000 cells were also more sensitive to lysis by influenza A virus, a candidate for oncolytic therapy, than SK-N-AS cells. In conclusion, we introduce a novel oxaliplatin resistance model. The oxaliplatin resistance mechanisms in SK-N-ASrOXALI4000 cells appear to be complex and not to directly depend on enhanced DNA repair capacity. Models of oxaliplatin resistance are of particular relevance since research on platinum drugs has so far predominantly focused on cisplatin and carboplatin. PMID:28192521

  9. Acquired resistance to oxaliplatin is not directly associated with increased resistance to DNA damage in SK-N-ASrOXALI4000, a newly established oxaliplatin-resistant sub-line of the neuroblastoma cell line SK-N-AS.

    PubMed

    Saintas, Emily; Abrahams, Liam; Ahmad, Gulshan T; Ajakaiye, Anu-Oluwa M; AlHumaidi, Abdulaziz S H A M; Ashmore-Harris, Candice; Clark, Iain; Dura, Usha K; Fixmer, Carine N; Ike-Morris, Chinedu; Mato Prado, Mireia; Mccullough, Danielle; Mishra, Shishir; Schöler, Katia M U; Timur, Husne; Williamson, Maxwell D C; Alatsatianos, Markella; Bahsoun, Basma; Blackburn, Edith; Hogwood, Catherine E; Lithgow, Pamela E; Rowe, Michelle; Yiangou, Lyto; Rothweiler, Florian; Cinatl, Jindrich; Zehner, Richard; Baines, Anthony J; Garrett, Michelle D; Gourlay, Campbell W; Griffin, Darren K; Gullick, William J; Hargreaves, Emma; Howard, Mark J; Lloyd, Daniel R; Rossman, Jeremy S; Smales, C Mark; Tsaousis, Anastasios D; von der Haar, Tobias; Wass, Mark N; Michaelis, Martin

    2017-01-01

    The formation of acquired drug resistance is a major reason for the failure of anti-cancer therapies after initial response. Here, we introduce a novel model of acquired oxaliplatin resistance, a sub-line of the non-MYCN-amplified neuroblastoma cell line SK-N-AS that was adapted to growth in the presence of 4000 ng/mL oxaliplatin (SK-N-ASrOXALI4000). SK-N-ASrOXALI4000 cells displayed enhanced chromosomal aberrations compared to SK-N-AS, as indicated by 24-chromosome fluorescence in situ hybridisation. Moreover, SK-N-ASrOXALI4000 cells were resistant not only to oxaliplatin but also to the two other commonly used anti-cancer platinum agents cisplatin and carboplatin. SK-N-ASrOXALI4000 cells exhibited a stable resistance phenotype that was not affected by culturing the cells for 10 weeks in the absence of oxaliplatin. Interestingly, SK-N-ASrOXALI4000 cells showed no cross resistance to gemcitabine and increased sensitivity to doxorubicin and UVC radiation, alternative treatments that like platinum drugs target DNA integrity. Notably, UVC-induced DNA damage is thought to be predominantly repaired by nucleotide excision repair and nucleotide excision repair has been described as the main oxaliplatin-induced DNA damage repair system. SK-N-ASrOXALI4000 cells were also more sensitive to lysis by influenza A virus, a candidate for oncolytic therapy, than SK-N-AS cells. In conclusion, we introduce a novel oxaliplatin resistance model. The oxaliplatin resistance mechanisms in SK-N-ASrOXALI4000 cells appear to be complex and not to directly depend on enhanced DNA repair capacity. Models of oxaliplatin resistance are of particular relevance since research on platinum drugs has so far predominantly focused on cisplatin and carboplatin.

  10. Antibacterial Cleaning Products and Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Bonnie; Levy, Stuart B.; Della-Latta, Phyllis; Lin, Susan X.; Larson, Elaine

    2005-01-01

    We examined whether household use of antibacterial cleaning and hygiene products is an emerging risk factor for carriage of antimicrobial drug–resistant bacteria on hands of household members. Households (N = 224) were randomized to use of antibacterial or nonantibacterial cleaning and hygiene products for 1 year. Logistic regression was used to assess the influence of antibacterial product use in homes. Antibacterial product use did not lead to a significant increase in antimicrobial drug resistance after 1 year (odds ratio 1.33, 95% confidence interval 0.74–2.41), nor did it have an effect on bacterial susceptibility to triclosan. However, more extensive and longer term use of triclosan might provide a suitable environment for emergence of resistant species. Further research on this issue is needed. PMID:16318697

  11. Inhibitory effect of steroidal alkaloids on drug transport and multidrug resistance in human cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lavie, Y; Harel-Orbital, T; Gaffield, W; Liscovitch, M

    2001-01-01

    Intrinsic or acquired resistance of tumor cells to multiple cytotoxic drugs (multidrug resistance MDR) is a major cause of failure of cancer chemotherapy. MDR is often caused by elevated expression of drug transporters such as P-glycoprotein (P-gp) or multidrug resistance protein (MRP). A number of compounds, termed chemosensitizers, have little or no cytotoxic action of their own, but inhibit (P-gp) or MRP-mediated drug export and are capable of sensitizing MDR cells to the cytotoxic effects of chemotherapeutic drugs. Here we examined the ability of steroidal alkaloids of plant origin, namely the Veratrum sp. alkaloid cyclopamine and the Lycopersicon sp. alkaloid tomatidine, to act as potent and effective chemosensitizers in multidrug resistant tumor cells. Drug uptake was determined by measuring accumulation of tetramethylrosamine in multidrug resistant NCI AdrR human adenocarcinoma cells. Resistance to adriamycin and vinblastine was determined by utilizing the MTT cell survival assay. Cyclopamine and tomatidine elevate tetramethylrosamine uptake by NCI AdrR cells and sensitize the cells to the cytotoxic action of adriamycin and vinblastine. In both cases these agents are comparable in patency and efficacy to verapamil, a reversal agent commonly used in MDR research. It is concluded that steroidal alkaloids of plant origin act as inhibitors of P-gp-mediated drug transport and multidrug resistance and therefore may serve as chemosensitizers in combination chemotherapy with conventional cytotoxic drugs for treating multidrug resistant cancer.

  12. Resistance to Second-Line Antituberculosis Drugs and Delay in Drug Susceptibility Testing among Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis Patients in Shanghai

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Zhengan; Shen, Xin; Wu, Jie; Wu, Zheyuan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Second-line antituberculosis drugs (SLDs) are used for treating multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB). Prolonged delays before confirming MDR-TB with drug susceptibility testing (DST) could result in transmission of drug-resistant strains and inappropriate use of SLDs, thereby increasing the risk of resistance to SLDs. This study investigated the diagnostic delay in DST and prevalence of baseline SLD resistance in Shanghai and described the distribution of SLD resistance with varied delays to DST. Methods. All registered patients from 2011 to 2013 in Shanghai were enrolled. Susceptibility to ofloxacin, amikacin, kanamycin, and capreomycin was tested. Total delay in DST completion was measured from the onset of symptoms to reporting DST results. Results. Resistance to SLDs was tested in 217 of the 276 MDR-TB strains, with 118 (54.4%) being resistant to at least one of the four SLDs. The median total delay in DST was 136 days. Patients with delay longer than median days were roughly twice more likely to have resistance to at least one SLD (OR 2.22, 95% CI 1.19–4.11). Conclusions. During prolonged delay in DST, primary and acquired resistance to SLDs might occur more frequently. Rapid diagnosis of MDR-TB, improved nosocomial infection controls, and regulated treatment are imperative to prevent SLD resistance. PMID:27652260

  13. Resistance to Second-Line Antituberculosis Drugs and Delay in Drug Susceptibility Testing among Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis Patients in Shanghai.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yong; Yuan, Zhengan; Shen, Xin; Wu, Jie; Wu, Zheyuan; Xu, Biao

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Second-line antituberculosis drugs (SLDs) are used for treating multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB). Prolonged delays before confirming MDR-TB with drug susceptibility testing (DST) could result in transmission of drug-resistant strains and inappropriate use of SLDs, thereby increasing the risk of resistance to SLDs. This study investigated the diagnostic delay in DST and prevalence of baseline SLD resistance in Shanghai and described the distribution of SLD resistance with varied delays to DST. Methods. All registered patients from 2011 to 2013 in Shanghai were enrolled. Susceptibility to ofloxacin, amikacin, kanamycin, and capreomycin was tested. Total delay in DST completion was measured from the onset of symptoms to reporting DST results. Results. Resistance to SLDs was tested in 217 of the 276 MDR-TB strains, with 118 (54.4%) being resistant to at least one of the four SLDs. The median total delay in DST was 136 days. Patients with delay longer than median days were roughly twice more likely to have resistance to at least one SLD (OR 2.22, 95% CI 1.19-4.11). Conclusions. During prolonged delay in DST, primary and acquired resistance to SLDs might occur more frequently. Rapid diagnosis of MDR-TB, improved nosocomial infection controls, and regulated treatment are imperative to prevent SLD resistance.

  14. Overcoming drug resistance in multi-drug resistant cancers and microorganisms: a conceptual framework.

    PubMed

    Avner, Benjamin S; Fialho, Arsenio M; Chakrabarty, Ananda M

    2012-01-01

    Resistance development against multiple drugs is a common feature among many pathogens--including bacteria such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa, viruses, and parasites--and also among cancers. The reasons are two-fold. Most commonly-used rationally-designed small molecule drugs or monoclonal antibodies, as well as antibiotics, strongly inhibit a key single step in the growth and proliferation of the pathogen or cancer cells. The disease agents quickly change or switch off this single target, or activate the efflux mechanisms to pump out the drug, thereby becoming resistant to the drug. A second problem is the way drugs are designed. The pharmaceutical industry chooses to use, by high-throughput screening, compounds that are maximally inhibitory to the key single step in the growth of the pathogen or cancer, thereby promoting selective pressure. An ideal drug would be one that inhibits multiple steps in the disease progression pathways with less stringency in these steps. Low levels of inhibition at multiple steps provide cumulative strong inhibitory effect, but little incentives or ability on the part of the pathogen/cancer to develop resistance. Such intelligent drug design involving multiple less stringent inhibitory steps is beyond the scope of the drug industry and requires evolutionary wisdom commonly possessed by bacteria. This review surveys assessments of the current clinical situation with regard to drug resistance in P. aeruginosa, and examines tools currently employed to limit this trend. We then provide a conceptual framework in which we explore the similarities between multi-drug resistance in pathogens and in cancers. We summarize promising work on anti-cancer drugs derived from the evolutionary wisdom of bacteria such as P. aeruginosa, and how such strategies can be the basis for how to look for candidate protein/peptide antibiotic drugs from bioengineered bugs. Such multi-domain proteins, unlike diffusible antibiotics, are not diffusible because of their

  15. Bacterial viruses enable their host to acquire antibiotic resistance genes from neighbouring cells

    PubMed Central

    Haaber, Jakob; Leisner, Jørgen J.; Cohn, Marianne T.; Catalan-Moreno, Arancha; Nielsen, Jesper B.; Westh, Henrik; Penadés, José R.; Ingmer, Hanne

    2016-01-01

    Prophages are quiescent viruses located in the chromosomes of bacteria. In the human pathogen, Staphylococcus aureus, prophages are omnipresent and are believed to be responsible for the spread of some antibiotic resistance genes. Here we demonstrate that release of phages from a subpopulation of S. aureus cells enables the intact, prophage-containing population to acquire beneficial genes from competing, phage-susceptible strains present in the same environment. Phage infection kills competitor cells and bits of their DNA are occasionally captured in viral transducing particles. Return of such particles to the prophage-containing population can drive the transfer of genes encoding potentially useful traits such as antibiotic resistance. This process, which can be viewed as ‘auto-transduction', allows S. aureus to efficiently acquire antibiotic resistance both in vitro and in an in vivo virulence model (wax moth larvae) and enables it to proliferate under strong antibiotic selection pressure. Our results may help to explain the rapid exchange of antibiotic resistance genes observed in S. aureus. PMID:27819286

  16. Acquired platinum resistance involves epithelial to mesenchymal transition through ubiquitin ligase FBXO32 dysregulation

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Miyazaki, Yasumasa; Mikami, Shuji; Niwa, Naoya; Otsuka, Yutaro; Mizuno, Ryuichi; Kikuchi, Eiji; Miyajima, Akira; Sabe, Hisataka; Okada, Yasunori; Suematsu, Makoto; Oya, Mototsugu

    2016-01-01

    To identify the molecules involved in epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) in urothelial carcinoma (UC) after acquisition of platinum resistance, here we examined the changes in global gene expression before and after platinum treatment. Four invasive UC cell lines, T24, 5637, and their corresponding sublines T24PR and 5637PR with acquired platinum resistance, were assessed by microarray, and the ubiquitin E3 ligase FBXO32 was newly identified as a negative regulator of EMT in UC tumors after acquisition of platinum resistance. In vitro and in vivo studies showed an intimate relationship between FBXO32 expression and EMT, demonstrating that FBXO32 dysregulation in T24PR cells results in elevated expression of the mesenchymal molecules SNAIL and vimentin and decreased expression of the epithelial molecule E-cadherin. The association between FBXO32 expression and EMT was further validated using clinical samples. Knockdown of MyoD expression, a specific target of FBXO32 polyubiquitination, revealed upregulation of E-cadherin expression and downregulation of SNAIL and vimentin expression in T24PR cells. Comparative genomic hybridization array analysis demonstrated loss of heterozygosity at 8q24.13 in T24PR cells, which harbors FBXO32. Our findings suggest the importance of the association between EMT and ubiquitin-proteasome regulation when tumors develop acquired platinum resistance. PMID:27812537

  17. Acquired platinum resistance involves epithelial to mesenchymal transition through ubiquitin ligase FBXO32 dysregulation.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Kosaka, Takeo; Miyazaki, Yasumasa; Mikami, Shuji; Niwa, Naoya; Otsuka, Yutaro; Minamishima, Yoji Andrew; Mizuno, Ryuichi; Kikuchi, Eiji; Miyajima, Akira; Sabe, Hisataka; Okada, Yasunori; Uhlén, Per; Suematsu, Makoto; Oya, Mototsugu

    2016-11-03

    To identify the molecules involved in epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) in urothelial carcinoma (UC) after acquisition of platinum resistance, here we examined the changes in global gene expression before and after platinum treatment. Four invasive UC cell lines, T24, 5637, and their corresponding sublines T24PR and 5637PR with acquired platinum resistance, were assessed by microarray, and the ubiquitin E3 ligase FBXO32 was newly identified as a negative regulator of EMT in UC tumors after acquisition of platinum resistance. In vitro and in vivo studies showed an intimate relationship between FBXO32 expression and EMT, demonstrating that FBXO32 dysregulation in T24PR cells results in elevated expression of the mesenchymal molecules SNAIL and vimentin and decreased expression of the epithelial molecule E-cadherin. The association between FBXO32 expression and EMT was further validated using clinical samples. Knockdown of MyoD expression, a specific target of FBXO32 polyubiquitination, revealed upregulation of E-cadherin expression and downregulation of SNAIL and vimentin expression in T24PR cells. Comparative genomic hybridization array analysis demonstrated loss of heterozygosity at 8q24.13 in T24PR cells, which harbors FBXO32. Our findings suggest the importance of the association between EMT and ubiquitin-proteasome regulation when tumors develop acquired platinum resistance.

  18. Evolving trends in Streptococcus pneumoniae resistance: implications for therapy of community-acquired bacterial pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Jones, Ronald N; Jacobs, Michael R; Sader, Helio S

    2010-09-01

    Pneumonia is a major infectious disease associated with significant morbidity, mortality and utilisation of healthcare resources. Streptococcus pneumoniae is the predominant pathogen in community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), accounting for 20-60% of bacterial cases. Emergence of multidrug-resistant S. pneumoniae has become a significant problem in the management of CAP. Although pneumococcal conjugate vaccine usage in children has led to significant decreases in morbidity and mortality due to S. pneumoniae in all age groups, disease management has been further complicated by the unexpected increase in resistant serotypes, such as 19A, in some regions. Until rapid and accurate diagnostic tests become available, initial treatment of CAP will remain empirical. Thus, selection of appropriate antimicrobial therapy for CAP must be based on prediction of the most likely pathogens and their local antimicrobial susceptibility patterns. This article reviews information on antimicrobial resistance patterns amongst S. pneumoniae and implications for managing CAP.

  19. Laboratory-Based Surveillance of Extensively Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis in Eastern China.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yu; Wu, Qingqing; Xu, Shuiyang; Zhong, Jieming; Chen, Songhua; Xu, Jinghang; Zhu, Liping; He, Haibo; Wang, Xiaomeng

    2017-03-01

    With 25% of the global burden, China has the highest incidence of drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB) in the world. However, surveillance data on extensively drug-resistant TB (XDR-TB) from China are scant. To estimate the prevalence of XDR-TB in Zhejiang, Eastern China, 30 of 90 TB treatment centers in Zhejiang were recruited. Patients with suspected TB who reported to the clinics for diagnosis were requested to undergo a smear sputum test. Positive sputum samples were tested for drug susceptibility. Data on anti-TB drug resistance from 1999 to 2008 were also collected to assess drug resistance trends. A total of 931 cases were recruited for drug susceptibility testing (DST). Among these, 23.6% (95% confidence interval [CI], 18.8-24.4) were resistant to any of the following drugs: isoniazid, rifampin, streptomycin, and ethambutol. Multidrug resistant (MDR) strains were identified in 5.1% of all cases (95% CI, 3.61-6.49). Among MDR-TB cases, 6.4% were XDR (95% CI, 1.7-18.6) and 8.9% (95% CI, 7.0-10.8) of all cases were resistant to either isoniazid or rifampin (but not both). Among MDR-TB cases, 23.4% (95% CI, 12.8-38.4) were resistant to either fluoroquinolones or a second-line anti-TB injectable drug, but not both. From 1999 to 2014, the percentage of MDR cases decreased significantly, from 8.6% to 5.1% (p = 0.00). The Global Fund to Fight TB program showed signs of success in Eastern China. However, drug-resistant TB, MDR-TB, and XDR-TB still pose a challenge for TB control in Eastern China. High-quality directly observed treatment, short-course, and universal DST for TB cases to determine appropriate treatment regimens are urgently needed to prevent acquired drug resistance.

  20. Adaptation or selection? Old issues and new stakes in the postwar debates over bacterial drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Creager, Angela N H

    2007-03-01

    The 1940s and 1950s were marked by intense debates over the origin of drug resistance in microbes. Bacteriologists had traditionally invoked the notions of 'training' and 'adaptation' to account for the ability of microbes to acquire new traits. As the field of bacterial genetics emerged, however, its participants rejected 'Lamarckian' views of microbial heredity, and offered statistical evidence that drug resistance resulted from the selection of random resistant mutants. Antibiotic resistance became a key issue among those disputing physiological (usually termed 'adaptationist') vs. genetic (mutation and selection) explanations of variation in bacteria. Postwar developments connected with the Lysenko affair gave this debate a new political valence. Proponents of the neo-Darwinian synthesis weighed in with support for the genetic theory. However, certain features of drug resistance seemed inexplicable by mutation and selection, particularly the phenomenon of 'multiple resistance'--the emergence of resistance in a single strain against several unrelated antibiotics. In the late 1950s, Tsutomu Watanabe and his collaborators solved this puzzle by determining that resistance could be conferred by cytoplasmic resistance factors rather than chromosomal mutation. These R factors could carry resistance to many antibiotics and seemed able to promote their own dissemination in bacterial populations. In the end, the vindication of the genetic view of drug resistance was accompanied by a recasting of the 'gene' to include extrachromosomal hereditary units carried on viruses and plasmids.

  1. Neurostimulation for Drug-Resistant Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    DeGiorgio, Christopher M.; Krahl, Scott E.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of Review: The purpose of this review is to provide an evidence-based update on the neurostimulation options available for patients with drug-resistant epilepsy in the United States and in European countries. Recent Findings: The field of neurostimulation for epilepsy has grown dramatically since 1997, when vagus nerve stimulation became the first device to be approved for epilepsy by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). New data from recently completed randomized controlled trials are available for deep brain stimulation of the anterior thalamus, responsive neurostimulation, and trigeminal nerve stimulation. Although vagus nerve stimulation is the only device currently approved in the United States, deep brain stimulation and responsive neurostimulation devices are awaiting FDA approval. Deep brain stimulation, trigeminal nerve stimulation, and transcutaneous vagus nerve stimulation are now approved for epilepsy in the European Union. In this article, the mechanisms of action, safety, and efficacy of new neurostimulation devices are reviewed, and the key advantages and disadvantages of each are discussed. Summary: The exponential growth of the field of neuromodulation for epilepsy is an exciting development; these new devices provide physicians with new options for patients with drug-resistant epilepsy. PMID:23739108

  2. Multiplicity of acquired cross-resistance in paclitaxel-resistant cancer cells is associated with feedback control of TUBB3 via FOXO3a-mediated ABCB1 regulation

    PubMed Central

    Aldonza, Mark Borris D.; Hong, Ji-Young; Alinsug, Malona V.; Song, Jayoung; Lee, Sang Kook

    2016-01-01

    Acquired drug resistance is a primary obstacle for effective cancer therapy. The correlation of point mutations in class III β-tubulin (TUBB3) and the prominent overexpression of ATP-binding cassette P-glycoprotein (ABCB1), a multidrug resistance gene, have been protruding mechanisms of resistance to microtubule disruptors such as paclitaxel (PTX) for many cancers. However, the precise underlying mechanism of the rapid onset of cross-resistance to an array of structurally and functionally unrelated drugs in PTX-resistant cancers has been poorly understood. We determined that our established PTX-resistant cancer cells display ABCB1/ABCC1-associated cross-resistance to chemically different drugs such as 5-fluorouracil, docetaxel, and cisplatin. We found that feedback activation of TUBB3 can be triggered through the FOXO3a-dependent regulation of ABCB1, which resulted in the accentuation of induced PTX resistance and encouraged multiplicity in acquired cross-resistance. FOXO3a-directed regulation of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) function suggests that control of ABCB1 involves methylation-dependent activation. Consistently, transcriptional overexpression or downregulation of FOXO3a directs inhibitor-controlled protease-degradation of TUBB3. The functional PI3K/Akt signaling is tightly responsive to FOXO3a activation alongside doxorubicin treatment, which directs FOXO3a arginine hypermethylation. In addition, we found that secretome factors from PTX-resistant cancer cells with acquired cross-resistance support a P-gp-dependent association in multidrug resistance (MDR) development, which assisted the FOXO3a-mediated control of TUBB3 feedback. The direct silencing of TUBB3 reverses induced multiple cross-resistance, reduces drug-resistant tumor mass, and suppresses the impaired microtubule stability status of PTX-resistant cells with transient cross-resistance. These findings highlight the control of the TUBB3 response to ABCB1 genetic suppressors as a mechanism to reverse the

  3. Management of multiple drug-resistant tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Hutchison, D C S; Drobniewski, F A; Milburn, H J

    2003-01-01

    There has been a worldwide increase in multiple drug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) which has in the past been associated with a poor prognosis. In the U.K., about half of the cases live in the London area and we have set out to obtain further information on their treatment and outcome. We examined the risk factors, drug resistance, drug treatment, sputum conversion, and outcome in patients with MDR-TB at three hospitals in South London and diagnosed during the period June 1995-January 1999. Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)-positive patients were excluded. There were 760 patients resident in Lambeth, Southwark and Lewisham Health Authority (LSLHA) who were notified as tuberculosis (TB) during the time period and who were of negative or unknown HIV status. (The population of LSLHA is approx.750,000.) There was a total of 13 patients with MDR-TB, known or presumed to be HlV negative. Their median age was 28 years (range 15-53); nine (69%) were born outside the U.K. and 11 had pulmonary disease; they had organisms resistant to a median of two first-line drugs (range 2-4) and to a median of four of all drugs tested (range 2-10). They received treatment with a median of six drugs (range 3-9). Eight were followed up for at least 3 years (range 3-6) after the completion of treatment; at their last assessment none had features of active TB and all were sputum negative (smear and culture). Two returned to their countries of origin during treatment; they were sputum negative at that time. Two patients are well and continue on treatment in the U.K. One patient (known HIV negative) died following treatment failure. In conclusion, we obtained disease-free survival in eight cases of MDR-TB, known or presumed to be HIV negative and followed up for 3 years or more. The prognosis for patients treated at specialised centres is good (and better than is generally believed). We describe a new protocol for the detection and management of MDR-TB.

  4. Why does drug resistance readily evolve but vaccine resistance does not?

    PubMed

    Kennedy, David A; Read, Andrew F

    2017-03-29

    Why is drug resistance common and vaccine resistance rare? Drugs and vaccines both impose substantial pressure on pathogen populations to evolve resistance and indeed, drug resistance typically emerges soon after the introduction of a drug. But vaccine resistance has only rarely emerged. Using well-established principles of population genetics and evolutionary ecology, we argue that two key differences between vaccines and drugs explain why vaccines have so far proved more robust against evolution than drugs. First, vaccines tend to work prophylactically while drugs tend to work therapeutically. Second, vaccines tend to induce immune responses against multiple targets on a pathogen while drugs tend to target very few. Consequently, pathogen populations generate less variation for vaccine resistance than they do for drug resistance, and selection has fewer opportunities to act on that variation. When vaccine resistance has evolved, these generalities have been violated. With careful forethought, it may be possible to identify vaccines at risk of failure even before they are introduced.

  5. Selinexor is effective in acquired resistance to ibrutinib and synergizes with ibrutinib in chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Hing, Zachary A.; Mantel, Rose; Beckwith, Kyle A.; Guinn, Daphne; Williams, Erich; Smith, Lisa L.; Williams, Katie; Johnson, Amy J.; Lehman, Amy M.; Byrd, John C.; Woyach, Jennifer A.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the therapeutic efficacy of ibrutinib in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), complete responses are infrequent, and acquired resistance to Bruton agammaglobulinemia tyrosine kinase (BTK) inhibition is being observed in an increasing number of patients. Combination regimens that increase frequency of complete remissions, accelerate time to remission, and overcome single agent resistance are of considerable interest. We previously showed that the XPO1 inhibitor selinexor is proapoptotic in CLL cells and disrupts B-cell receptor signaling via BTK depletion. Herein we show the combination of selinexor and ibrutinib elicits a synergistic cytotoxic effect in primary CLL cells and increases overall survival compared with ibrutinib alone in a mouse model of CLL. Selinexor is effective in cells isolated from patients with prolonged lymphocytosis following ibrutinib therapy. Finally, selinexor is effective in ibrutinib-refractory mice and in a cell line harboring the BTK C481S mutation. This is the first report describing the combined activity of ibrutinib and selinexor in CLL, which represents a new treatment paradigm and warrants further evaluation in clinical trials of CLL patients including those with acquired ibrutinib resistance. PMID:25838351

  6. Signalling to drug resistance in CLL.

    PubMed

    Hertlein, Erin; Byrd, John C

    2010-03-01

    The nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-kappaB) signalling pathway is constitutively active in a variety of cancers, including chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL). The importance of this signalling pathway identifies it as a prime therapeutic target; however, the complexity and potential side effects of inhibiting NF-kappaB have thus far made the clinical use of NF-kappaB inhibitors a relatively unexplored resource in this disease. This article discusses the role of NF-kappaB in CLL as a common crossroad for pathways promoting drug resistance in CLL. We provide the background on how this pathway contributes to both spontaneous and drug-induced apoptosis. Potential new avenues to regulate this pathway in CLL are also discussed.

  7. Characterization of fecal vancomycin-resistant enterococci with acquired and intrinsic resistance mechanisms in wild animals, Spain.

    PubMed

    Lozano, Carmen; Gonzalez-Barrio, David; Camacho, Maria Cruz; Lima-Barbero, Jose Francisco; de la Puente, Javier; Höfle, Ursula; Torres, Carmen

    2016-11-01

    The objectives were to evaluate the presence of vancomycin-resistant enterococci with acquired (VRE-a) and intrinsic (VRE-i) resistance mechanisms in fecal samples from different wild animals, and analyze their phenotypes and genotypes of antimicrobial resistance. A total of 348 cloacal/rectal samples from red-legged partridges (127), white storks (81), red kites (59), and wild boars (81) (June 2014/February 2015) were inoculated in Slanetz-Bartley agar supplemented with vancomycin (4 μg/mL). We investigated the susceptibility to 12 antimicrobials and the presence of 19 antimicrobial resistance and five virulence genes. In addition, we performed multilocus sequence typing, detection of IS16 and studied Tn1546 structure. One VRE-a isolate was identified in one wild boar. This isolate was identified as Enterococcus faecium, harbored vanA gene included into Tn1546 (truncated with IS1542/IS1216), and belonged to the new ST993. This isolate contained the erm(A), erm(B), tet(M), dfrG, and dfrK genes. Neither element IS16 nor the studied virulence genes were detected. Ninety-six VRE-i isolates were identified (89 Enterococcus gallinarum and seven Enterococcus casseliflavus), with the following prevalence: red kites (71.2 %), white storks (46.9 %), red-legged partridges (7.9 %), and wild boars (4.9 %). Most E. gallinarum isolates showed resistance to tetracycline (66.3 %) and/or erythromycin (46.1 %). High-level resistance to aminoglycosides was present among our VRE-i isolates: kanamycin (22.9 %), streptomycin (11.5 %), and gentamicin (9.4 %). In general, VRE-i isolates of red kites showed higher rates of resistance for non-glycopeptide agents than those of other animal species. The dissemination of acquired resistance mechanisms in natural environments could have implications in the global spread of resistance with public health implications.

  8. Pneumococcal antimicrobial resistance: therapeutic strategy and management in community-acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Aspa, Javier; Rajas, Olga; de Castro, Felipe Rodríguez

    2008-02-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae has been consistently shown to represent the most frequent causative agent of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) and pneumococcal antibiotic resistance towards different families of antibiotics continues to be a much-debated issue. Microbial resistance causes a great deal of confusion in choosing an empirical treatment for pneumonia and this makes it necessary to know which factors actually determine the real impact of antimicrobial resistance on the outcome of pneumococcal infections. Several different aspects have to be taken into account when analyzing this matter, such as the study design, the condition of the patient at the time of diagnosis, the choice of the initial antimicrobial regimen (combination or monotherapy) and the pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic variables of the chosen antibiotic. It is generally accepted that in the treatment of beta-lactam-resistant pneumococcal infections, the use of standard antipneumococcal beta-lactam agents is unlikely to impact negatively on the outcome of CAP when appropriate agents are given in sufficient doses. As a general rule, for infections with penicillin-sensitive strains, penicillin or an aminopenicillin in a standard dosage will be effective; in the cases of strains with intermediate resistance, beta-lactam agents are still considered appropriate treatment although higher dosages are recommended; finally, infections with isolates of high-level penicillin resistance should be treated with alternative agents such as the third-generation cephalosporins or the new antipneumococcal fluoroquinolones. In areas of high prevalence of high-level macrolide resistance, empirical monotherapy with a macrolide is not optimal for the treatment of hospitalised patients with moderate or moderately-severe CAP. Fluoroquinolones are considered to be excellent antibiotics in the treatment of pneumococcal CAP in adults, but their general recommendation has been withheld due to fears of a widespread development

  9. Systemic acquired resistance (50 years after discovery): moving from the lab to the field.

    PubMed

    Gozzo, Franco; Faoro, Franco

    2013-12-26

    Induction of plant defense(s) against pathogen challenge(s) has been the object of progressively more intense research in the past two decades. Insights on mechanisms of systemic acquired resistance (SAR) and similar, alternative processes, as well as on problems encountered on moving to their practical application in open field, have been carefully pursued and, as far as possible, defined. In reviewing the number of research works published in metabolomic, genetic, biochemical, and crop protection correlated disciplines, the following outline has been adopted: 1, introduction to the processes currently considered as models of the innate immunity; 2, primary signals, such as salicylic acid (SA), jasmonic acid (JA), and abscisic acid (ABA), involved with different roles in the above-mentioned processes; 3, long-distance signals, identified from petiole exudates as mobile signaling metabolites during expressed resistance; 4, exogenous inducers, including the most significant chemicals known to stimulate the plant resistance induction and originated from both synthetic and natural sources; 5, fungicides shown to act as stimulators of SAR in addition to their biocidal action; 6, elusive mechanism of priming, reporting on the most recent working hypotheses on the pretranscriptional ways through which treated plants may express resistance upon pathogen attack and how this resistance can be transmitted to the next generation; 7, fitness costs and benefits of SAR so far reported from field application of induced resistance; 8, factors affecting efficacy of induced resistance in the open field, indicating that forces, unrevealed under controlled conditions, may be operative in the field; 9, concluding remarks address the efforts required to apply the strategy of crop resistance induction according to the rules of integrated pest management.

  10. Acquired METD1228V Mutation and Resistance to MET Inhibition in Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Bahcall, Magda; Sim, Taebo; Paweletz, Cloud P; Patel, Jyoti D; Alden, Ryan S; Kuang, Yanan; Sacher, Adrian G; Kim, Nam Doo; Lydon, Christine A; Awad, Mark M; Jaklitsch, Michael T; Sholl, Lynette M; Jänne, Pasi A; Oxnard, Geoffrey R

    2016-12-01

    Amplified and/or mutated MET can act as both a primary oncogenic driver and as a promoter of tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) resistance in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, the landscape of MET-specific targeting agents remains underdeveloped, and understanding of mechanisms of resistance to MET TKIs is limited. Here, we present a case of a patient with lung adenocarcinoma harboring both a mutation in EGFR and an amplification of MET, who after progression on erlotinib responded dramatically to combined MET and EGFR inhibition with savolitinib and osimertinib. When resistance developed to this combination, a new MET kinase domain mutation, D1228V, was detected. Our in vitro findings demonstrate that MET(D1228V) induces resistance to type I MET TKIs through impaired drug binding, while sensitivity to type II MET TKIs is maintained. Based on these findings, the patient was treated with erlotinib combined with cabozantinib, a type II MET inhibitor, and exhibited a response.

  11. 75 FR 33317 - Antibacterial Resistance and Diagnostic Device and Drug Development Research for Bacterial...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-11

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Antibacterial Resistance and Diagnostic Device and Drug... resistance, rapid diagnostic device development for bacterial diseases, and antibacterial drug development. The workshop will address antibacterial drug resistance, mechanisms of resistance, epidemiology...

  12. Acquired resistance with epigenetic alterations under long-term anti-angiogenic therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ohata, Yoshiteru; Shimada, Shu; Akiyama, Yoshimitsu; Mogushi, Kaoru; Nakao, Keisuke; Matsumura, Satoshi; Aihara, Arihiro; Mitsunori, Yusuke; Ban, Daisuke; Ochiai, Takanori; Kudo, Atsushi; Arii, Shigeki; Tanabe, Minoru; Tanaka, Shinji

    2017-02-28

    Anti-angiogenic therapy is initially effective for several solid tumors including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC); however, they finally relapse and progress, resulting in poor prognosis. We here established in vivo drug-tolerant subclones of human HCC cells by long-term treatment with vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR) inhibitor and serial transplantation in immunocompromised mice (total 12 months), and then compared them with the parental cells in molecular and biological features. Gene expression profiles elucidated a G-actin monomer binding protein thymosin β 4 (Tβ4) as one of the genes enriched in the resistant cancer cells relative to the initially sensitive ones. Highlighting epigenetic alterations involved in drug resistance, we revealed that Tβ4 could be aberrantly expressed following demethylation of DNA and active modification of histone H3 at the promoter region. Ectopic overexpression of Tβ4 in HCC cells could significantly enhance sphere-forming capacities and infiltrating phenotypes in vitro, and promote growth of tumors refractory to the VEGFR mutltikinase inhibitor sorafenib in vivo. Clinically, sorafenib failed to improve the progression-free survival in patients with Tβ4-high HCC, indicating that Tβ4 expression could be available as a surrogate marker of susceptibility to this drug. This study suggests that Tβ4 expression triggered by epigenetic alterations could contribute to the development of resistance to anti-angiogenic therapy by the acquisition of stemness, and that epigenetic control might be one of the key targets to regulate the resistance in HCC.

  13. Mutational and acquired carbapenem resistance mechanisms in multidrug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolates from Recife, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Cavalcanti, Felipe Lira de Sá; Mirones, Cristina Rodríguez; Paucar, Elena Román; Montes, Laura Álvarez; Leal-Balbino, Tereza Cristina; de Morais, Marcia Maria Camargo; Martínez-Martínez, Luis; Ocampo-Sosa, Alain Antonio

    2015-01-01

    An investigation was carried out into the genetic mechanisms responsible for multidrug resistance in nine carbapenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosaisolates from different hospitals in Recife, Brazil. Susceptibility to antimicrobial agents was determined by broth microdilution. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was employed to detect the presence of genes encoding β-lactamases, aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes (AMEs), 16S rRNA methylases, integron-related genes and OprD. Expression of genes coding for efflux pumps and AmpC cephalosporinase were assessed by quantitative PCR. The outer membrane proteins were separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The blaSPM-1, blaKPC-2 and blaGES-1 genes were detected in P. aeruginosaisolates in addition to different AME genes. The loss of OprD in nine isolates was mainly due to frameshift mutations, premature stop codons and point mutations. An association of loss of OprD with the overexpression of MexAB-OprM and MexXY-OprM was observed in most isolates. Hyper-production of AmpC was also observed in three isolates. Clonal relationship of the isolates was determined by repetitive element palindromic-PCR and multilocus sequence typing. Our results show that the loss of OprD along with overexpression of efflux pumps and β-lactamase production were responsible for the multidrug resistance in the isolates analysed. PMID:26676375

  14. Mutational and acquired carbapenem resistance mechanisms in multidrug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolates from Recife, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Cavalcanti, Felipe Lira de Sá; Mirones, Cristina Rodríguez; Paucar, Elena Román; Montes, Laura Álvarez; Leal-Balbino, Tereza Cristina; Morais, Marcia Maria Camargo de; Martínez-Martínez, Luis; Ocampo-Sosa, Alain Antonio

    2015-12-01

    An investigation was carried out into the genetic mechanisms responsible for multidrug resistance in nine carbapenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from different hospitals in Recife, Brazil. Susceptibility to antimicrobial agents was determined by broth microdilution. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was employed to detect the presence of genes encoding β-lactamases, aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes (AMEs), 16S rRNA methylases, integron-related genes and OprD. Expression of genes coding for efflux pumps and AmpC cephalosporinase were assessed by quantitative PCR. The outer membrane proteins were separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The blaSPM-1, blaKPC-2 and blaGES-1 genes were detected in P. aeruginosa isolates in addition to different AME genes. The loss of OprD in nine isolates was mainly due to frameshift mutations, premature stop codons and point mutations. An association of loss of OprD with the overexpression of MexAB-OprM and MexXY-OprM was observed in most isolates. Hyper-production of AmpC was also observed in three isolates. Clonal relationship of the isolates was determined by repetitive element palindromic-PCR and multilocus sequence typing. Our results show that the loss of OprD along with overexpression of efflux pumps and β-lactamase production were responsible for the multidrug resistance in the isolates analysed.

  15. TrxR1 inhibition overcomes both hypoxia-induced and acquired bortezomib resistance in multiple myeloma through NF-кβ inhibition.

    PubMed

    Raninga, Prahlad V; Di Trapani, Giovanna; Vuckovic, Slavica; Tonissen, Kathryn F

    2016-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a B-cell malignancy characterized by an accumulation of abnormal clonal plasma cells in the bone marrow. Introduction of the proteasome-inhibitor bortezomib has improved MM prognosis and survival; however hypoxia-induced or acquired bortezomib resistance remains a clinical problem. This study highlighted the role of thioredoxin reductase 1 (TrxR1) in the hypoxia-induced and acquired bortezomib resistance in MM. Higher TrxR1 gene expression correlated with high-risk disease, adverse overall survival, and poor prognosis in myeloma patients. We demonstrated that hypoxia induced bortezomib resistance in myeloma cells and increased TrxR1 protein levels. Inhibition of TrxR1 using auranofin overcame hypoxia-induced bortezomib resistance and restored the sensitivity of hypoxic-myeloma cells to bortezomib. Hypoxia increased NF-кβ subunit p65 nuclear protein levels and TrxR1 inhibition decreased hypoxia-induced NF-кβ p65 protein levels in the nucleus and reduced the expression of NF-кβ-regulated genes. In addition, higher TrxR1 protein levels were observed in bortezomib-resistant myeloma cells compared to the naïve cells, and its inhibition using either auranofin or TrxR1-specific siRNAs reversed bortezomib resistance. TrxR1 inhibition reduced p65 mRNA and protein expression in bortezomib-resistant myeloma cells, and also decreased the expression of NF-кβ-regulated anti-apoptotic and proliferative genes. Thus, TrxR1 inhibition overcomes both hypoxia-induced and acquired bortezomib resistance by inhibiting the NF-кβ signaling pathway. Our findings demonstrate that elevated TrxR1 levels correlate with the acquisition of bortezomib resistance in MM. We propose considering TrxR1-inhibiting drugs, such as auranofin, either for single agent or combination therapy to circumvent bortezomib-resistance and improve survival outcomes of MM patients.

  16. Radiation-resistant acquired immunity of vaccinated mice to Schistosoma mansoni

    SciTech Connect

    Aitken, R.; Coulson, P.S.; Dixon, B.; Wilson, R.A.

    1987-11-01

    Vaccination of mice with attenuated cercariae of Schistosoma mansoni induces specific acquired resistance to challenge infection. This resistance is immunologically-mediated, possibly via a delayed-type hypersensitivity. Studies of parasite migration have shown that the protective mechanism operates most effectively in the lungs of vaccinated mice. We have probed the mechanism by exposing mice to 500 rads of gamma radiation before challenge infection. Our results show that the effector mechanism operative against challenge larvae is resistant to radiation. In contrast, classical immune responses are markedly suppressed by the same treatment. While leukocyte populations in the blood fall dramatically after irradiation, numbers of cells recoverable by bronchoalveolar lavage are unaffected. We suggest that vaccination with attenuated cercariae establishes populations of sensitized cells in the lungs which trigger the mechanism of resistance when challenge schistosomula migrate through pulmonary capillary beds. Although the cells may be partially disabled by irradiation, they remain responsive to worm antigens and thereby capable of initiating the elimination mechanism. This hypothesis would explain the radiation resistance of vaccine-induced immunity to S. mansoni.

  17. Antibacterial mechanisms of rhodomyrtone against important hospital-acquired antibiotic-resistant pathogenic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Leejae, Sukanlaya; Taylor, Peter William; Voravuthikunchai, Supayang Piyawan

    2013-01-01

    The antibacterial mechanisms of rhodomyrtone, a member of the acylphloroglucinols isolated from Rhodomyrtus tomentosa leaves, against important hospital-acquired antibiotic-resistant pathogenic bacteria were assessed. The results indicated that rhodomyrtone exhibited pronounced antibacterial activity against key antibiotic-resistant pathogens including epidemic meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (EMRSA), vancomycin-intermediate S. aureus and vancomycin-resistant enterococcal strains. The strains EMRSA-16, Enterococcus faecalis ATCC 29212 and VRE-3 demonstrated a significant decrease in survival ability after treatment with rhodomyrtone at 1× (0.5 µg ml(-1)), 2×, 4× and 8× MIC for 24 h. Moreover, the compound was observed in the cytoplasmic fraction of rhodomyrtone-treated S. aureus, and only a very fine band of the compound was seen following separation of the cell-wall and cell-membrane fractions of the treated cells. In addition, exposure of S. aureus to rhodomyrtone at 4×, 2× and 1× MIC for 24 h produced no significant effect on the bacterial cell membrane and cell lysis, suggesting that neither of these is the main target of rhodomyrtone action in these organisms. Stepwise isolation of the bacterial cells with increasing resistance to rhodomyrtone was not induced in either S. aureus or EMRSA-16 after 45 passages on Luria-Bertani agar supplemented with rhodomyrtone. In addition, in vitro toxicity of rhodomyrtone at 128× MIC on human erythrocytes was not observed. These results provide evidence to support therapeutic challenges of rhodomyrtone against Gram-positive pathogens.

  18. Liver biopsies in the acquired immune deficiency syndrome: influence of endemic disease and drug abuse.

    PubMed

    Comer, G M; Mukherjee, S; Scholes, J V; Holness, L G; Clain, D J

    1989-12-01

    A retrospective review of 48 liver biopsies in 34 patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) and 10 patients with AIDS-related complex (ARC) was performed at Harlem Hospital Center to assess the diagnostic yield of liver biopsies in this distinct patient population. Among the patients, 93.2% were black and 32 were males, with a mean age of 36.7 yr. Intravenous drug abuse was a risk factor for AIDS in 81.8% of patients. Liver biopsies were particularly useful in patients with fever of unclear origin, which was positively correlated with the presence of granulomas (p = 0.01). Granulomas due to mycobacteria were present in 16 (33.3%) of the biopsies. Liver biopsy proved to be clinically significant in 14 of 17 patients (82.3%) with mycobacterial disease, or 29.3% of the liver biopsies. Chronic active hepatitis was present in 12 (29.2%) of the biopsies, and in all but one was due to non-A non-B hepatitis viruses. All patients with chronic active hepatitis were intravenous drug abusers or the sexual partners of intravenous drug abusers. Liver biopsy can provide important diagnostic information in AIDS patients. The pathological findings in this series reflect the high risk of exposure to tuberculosis and hepatitis in the intravenous drug abusers in Harlem.

  19. Daunorubicin-Loaded DNA Origami Nanostructures Circumvent Drug-Resistance Mechanisms in a Leukemia Model.

    PubMed

    Halley, Patrick D; Lucas, Christopher R; McWilliams, Emily M; Webber, Matthew J; Patton, Randy A; Kural, Comert; Lucas, David M; Byrd, John C; Castro, Carlos E

    2016-01-20

    Many cancers show primary or acquired drug resistance due to the overexpression of efflux pumps. A novel mechanism to circumvent this is to integrate drugs, such as anthracycline antibiotics, with nanoparticle delivery vehicles that can bypass intrinsic tumor drug-resistance mechanisms. DNA nanoparticles serve as an efficient binding platform for intercalating drugs (e.g., anthracyclines doxorubicin and daunorubicin, which are widely used to treat acute leukemias) and enable precise structure design and chemical modifications, for example, for incorporating targeting capabilities. Here, DNA nanostructures are utilized to circumvent daunorubicin drug resistance at clinically relevant doses in a leukemia cell line model. The fabrication of a rod-like DNA origami drug carrier is reported that can be controllably loaded with daunorubicin. It is further directly verified that nanostructure-mediated daunorubicin delivery leads to increased drug entry and retention in cells relative to free daunorubicin at equal concentrations, which yields significantly enhanced drug efficacy. Our results indicate that DNA origami nanostructures can circumvent efflux-pump-mediated drug resistance in leukemia cells at clinically relevant drug concentrations and provide a robust DNA nanostructure design that could be implemented in a wide range of cellular applications due to its remarkably fast self-assembly (≈5 min) and excellent stability in cell culture conditions.

  20. On the Spread of Drug-Resistant Diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schinazi, Rinaldo B.

    1999-10-01

    We introduce an interacting particle system to model the emergence of drug-resistant diseases, one of the most serious health problems in modern society. We are interested in diseases for which a natural strain may mutate into a drug-resistant strain. This happens, for instance, when antibiotics are misused. The main result of our analysis is that with an efficient drug against the natural strain, if there is even a small chance that the natural strain mutates into the drug-resistant one, then there will eventually be an outbreak of the drug-resistant strain throughout the population. In that case the natural strain disappears and is replaced by the drug-resistant strain. The disturbing part of this is that an efficient treatment of the natural strain gives an edge to the drug-resistant strain.

  1. Arabidopsis TTR1 causes LRR-dependent lethal systemic necrosis, rather than systemic acquired resistance, to Tobacco ringspot virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Most Arabidopsis ecotypes display tolerance to the Tobacco ringspot virus (TRSV), but a subset of Arabidopsis ecotypes, including Estland (Est), develop lethal systemic necrosis (LSN), which differs from the localized hypersensitive responses (HRs) or systemic acquired resistance (SAR) characteristi...

  2. Transmission of Extensively Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Shah, N Sarita; Auld, Sara C; Brust, James C M; Mathema, Barun; Ismail, Nazir; Moodley, Pravi; Mlisana, Koleka; Allana, Salim; Campbell, Angela; Mthiyane, Thuli; Morris, Natashia; Mpangase, Primrose; van der Meulen, Hermina; Omar, Shaheed V; Brown, Tyler S; Narechania, Apurva; Shaskina, Elena; Kapwata, Thandi; Kreiswirth, Barry; Gandhi, Neel R

    2017-01-19

    Background Drug-resistant tuberculosis threatens recent gains in the treatment of tuberculosis and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection worldwide. A widespread epidemic of extensively drug-resistant (XDR) tuberculosis is occurring in South Africa, where cases have increased substantially since 2002. The factors driving this rapid increase have not been fully elucidated, but such knowledge is needed to guide public health interventions. Methods We conducted a prospective study involving 404 participants in KwaZulu-Natal Province, South Africa, with a diagnosis of XDR tuberculosis between 2011 and 2014. Interviews and medical-record reviews were used to elicit information on the participants' history of tuberculosis and HIV infection, hospitalizations, and social networks. Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates underwent insertion sequence (IS)6110 restriction-fragment-length polymorphism analysis, targeted gene sequencing, and whole-genome sequencing. We used clinical and genotypic case definitions to calculate the proportion of cases of XDR tuberculosis that were due to inadequate treatment of multidrug-resistant (MDR) tuberculosis (i.e., acquired resistance) versus those that were due to transmission (i.e., transmitted resistance). We used social-network analysis to identify community and hospital locations of transmission. Results Of the 404 participants, 311 (77%) had HIV infection; the median CD4+ count was 340 cells per cubic millimeter (interquartile range, 117 to 431). A total of 280 participants (69%) had never received treatment for MDR tuberculosis. Genotypic analysis in 386 participants revealed that 323 (84%) belonged to 1 of 31 clusters. Clusters ranged from 2 to 14 participants, except for 1 large cluster of 212 participants (55%) with a LAM4/KZN strain. Person-to-person or hospital-based epidemiologic links were identified in 123 of 404 participants (30%). Conclusions The majority of cases of XDR tuberculosis in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa, an

  3. My Cousin, My Enemy: quasispecies suppression of drug resistance

    PubMed Central

    Kirkegaard, Karla; van Buuren, Nicholas J; Mateo, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    If a freshly minted genome contains a mutation that confers drug resistance, will it be selected in the presence of the drug? Not necessarily. During viral infections, newly synthesized viral genomes occupy the same cells as parent and other progeny genomes. If the antiviral target is chosen so that the drug-resistant progeny’s growth is dominantly inhibited by the drug-susceptible members of its intracellular family, its outgrowth can be suppressed. Precedent for ‘dominant drug targeting’ as a deliberate approach to suppress the outgrowth of inhibitor-resistant viruses has been established for envelope variants of vesicular stomatitis virus and for capsid variants of poliovirus and dengue virus. Small molecules that stabilize oligomeric assemblages are a promising means to an unfit family to destroy the effectiveness of a newborn drug-resistant relative due to the co-assembly of drug-susceptible and drug-resistant monomers. PMID:27764731

  4. Comprehensive Treatment of Extensively Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Mitnick, Carole D.; Shin, Sonya S.; Seung, Kwonjune J.; Rich, Michael L.; Atwood, Sidney S.; Furin, Jennifer J.; Fitzmaurice, Garrett M.; Alcantara Viru, Felix A.; Appleton, Sasha C.; Bayona, Jaime N.; Bonilla, Cesar A.; Chalco, Katiuska; Choi, Sharon; Franke, Molly F.; Fraser, Hamish S.F.; Guerra, Dalia; Hurtado, Rocio M.; Jazayeri, Darius; Joseph, Keith; Llaro, Karim; Mestanza, Lorena; Mukherjee, Joia S.; Muñoz, Maribel; Palacios, Eda; Sanchez, Epifanio; Sloutsky, Alexander; Becerra, Mercedes C.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND Extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis has been reported in 45 countries, including countries with limited resources and a high burden of tuberculosis. We describe the management of extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis and treatment outcomes among patients who were referred for individualized outpatient therapy in Peru. METHODS A total of 810 patients were referred for free individualized therapy, including drug treatment, resective surgery, adverse-event management, and nutritional and psychosocial support. We tested isolates from 651 patients for extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis and developed regimens that included five or more drugs to which the infecting isolate was not resistant. RESULTS Of the 651 patients tested, 48 (7.4%) had extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis; the remaining 603 patients had multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. The patients with extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis had undergone more treatment than the other patients (mean [±SD] number of regimens, 4.2±1.9 vs. 3.2±1.6; P<0.001) and had isolates that were resistant to more drugs (number of drugs, 8.4±1.1 vs. 5.3±1.5; P<0.001). None of the patients with extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis were coinfected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Patients with extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis received daily, supervised therapy with an average of 5.3±1.3 drugs, including cycloserine, an injectable drug, and a fluoroquinolone. Twenty-nine of these patients (60.4%) completed treatment or were cured, as compared with 400 patients (66.3%) with multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (P=0.36). CONCLUSIONS Extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis can be cured in HIV-negative patients through outpatient treatment, even in those who have received multiple prior courses of therapy for tuberculosis. PMID:18687637

  5. Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in a Malaysian tertiary centre.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Zetti Zainol; Bahari, Norazlah; Othman, Amizah; Jaafar, Roslinda; Mohamed, Nurul Azmawati; Jabbari, Idimaz; Sulong, Anita; Hashim, Rohaidah; Ahmad, Norazah

    2013-01-01

    Abstract. Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) is a pathogen recognized to be distinct in both phenotype and genotype from hospital-acquired MRSA. We have identified CA-MRSA cases in Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Centre, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, including their antibiotic susceptibility patterns and genotypic characteristics. Cases were identified during January to December 2009 from routine clinical specimens, where culture and antibiotic susceptibility results yielded pauci-resistant MRSA isolates suspected as being CA-MRSA. The patients' clinical data were collected and their specimens were sent for molecular confirmation and analysis. Five cases of CA-MRSA were identified, which had a multi-sensitive pattern on antibiotic susceptibility tests and were resistant to only penicillin and oxacillin. All cases were skin and soft-tissue infections, including diabetic foot with gangrene, infected scalp hematoma, philtrum abscess in a healthcare worker, thrombophlebitis complicated with abscess and infected bedsore. All five cases were confirmed MRSA by detection of mecA. SCCmec typing (ccr and mec complex) revealed SCCmec type IV for all cases except the infected bedsore case. Panton-Valentine leukocidin gene was positive in all isolates. As clinical features among methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus, CA-MRSA and "nosocomial CA-MRSA" are indistinct, early recognition is necessary in order to initiate appropriate antibiotics and infection control measures. Continual surveillance of pauci-resistant MRSA and molecular analysis are necessary in order to identify emerging strains as well as their epidemiology and transmission, both in the community and in healthcare setting.

  6. Rhabdomyolysis associated with antimicrobial drug-resistant Mycoplasma pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Oishi, Tomohiro; Narita, Mitsuo; Ohya, Hitomi; Yamanaka, Takayuki; Aizawa, Yuta; Matsuo, Mai; Matsunaga, Masamichi; Tsukano, Shinya; Taguchi, Testuo

    2012-05-01

    We describe a case of rhabdomyolysis in a patient infected with antimicrobial drug-resistant Mycoplasma pneumoniae The patient's acute-phase serum levels of interleukin-18 and tumor necrosis factor-α were high, which suggests a pathogenic role for M. pneumoniae. In an era of increasing antimicrobial drug resistance, a system for rapidly identifying resistant M. pneumoniae would be beneficial.

  7. Young Women's Experiences of Resisting Invitations to Use Illicit Drugs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koehn, Corinne V.; O'Neill, Linda K.

    2011-01-01

    Ten young women were interviewed regarding their experiences of resisting invitations to use illicit drugs. Hermeneutic phenomenology was used to gather and analyze information. One key theme was the motivations that inspired women to refuse drug offers. Young women resisted drug invitations because of their desires to be authentic, protect their…

  8. Evaluation of Idaho's DARE "Drug Abuse Resistance Education Projects."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silva, Roberta K.

    The goal of DARE (Drug Abuse Resistance Education) is not to completely eliminate the drug and alcohol problems of society. It is a proactive prevention program designed to equip youth (focusing on elementary school) with skills for resisting peer pressure to experiment with drugs, and to manage anger without resorting to violence or the use of…

  9. 2015 Update of the Drug Resistance Mutations in HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Wensing, Annemarie M; Calvez, Vincent; Günthard, Huldrych F; Johnson, Victoria A; Paredes, Roger; Pillay, Deenan; Shafer, Robert W; Richman, Douglas D

    2015-01-01

    The 2015 edition of the IAS-USA drug resistance mutations list updates the figures last published in July 2014. The mutations listed are those that have been identified by specific criteria for evidence and drugs described. The figures are designed to assist practitioners in identifying key mutations associated with resistance to antiretroviral drugs and, therefore, in making clinical decisions regarding antiretroviral therapy.

  10. 2017 Update of the Drug Resistance Mutations in HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Wensing, Annemarie M; Calvez, Vincent; Günthard, Huldrych F; Johnson, Victoria A; Paredes, Roger; Pillay, Deenan; Shafer, Robert W; Richman, Douglas D

    The 2017 edition of the IAS-USA drug resistance mutations list updates the figures last published in November 2015. The mutations listed are those that have been identified by specific criteria for evidence and drugs described. The figures are designed to assist practitioners in identifying key mutations associated with resistance to antiretroviral drugs and, therefore, in making clinical decisions regarding antiretroviral therapy.

  11. LIMITING THE DEVELOPMENT OF ANTI-CANCER DRUG RESISTANCE IN A SPATIAL MODEL OF MICROMETASTASES

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Ami B.; Rejniak, Katarzyna A.; Gevertz, Jana L.

    2016-01-01

    While chemoresistance in primary tumors is well-studied, much less is known about the influence of systemic chemotherapy on the development of drug resistance at metastatic sites. In this work, we use a hybrid spatial model of tumor response to a DNA damaging drug to study how the development of chemoresistance in micrometastases depends on the drug dosing schedule. We separately consider cell populations that harbor pre-existing resistance to the drug, and those that acquire resistance during the course of treatment. For each of these independent scenarios, we consider one hypothetical cell line that is responsive to metronomic chemotherapy, and another that with high probability cannot be eradicated by a metronomic protocol. Motivated by experimental work on ovarian cancer xenografts, we consider all possible combinations of a one week treatment protocol, repeated for three weeks, and constrained by the total weekly drug dose. Simulations reveal a small number of fractionated-dose protocols that are at least as effective as metronomic therapy in eradicating micrometastases with acquired resistance (weak or strong), while also being at least as effective on those that harbor weakly pre-existing resistant cells. Given the responsiveness of very different theoretical cell lines to these few fractionated-dose protocols, these may represent more effective ways to schedule chemotherapy with the goal of limiting metastatic tumor progression. PMID:27775375

  12. Bedaquiline: a novel antitubercular drug for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Nagabushan, H; Roopadevi, H S

    2014-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB) are emerging global health threats. Bedaquiline is a new antituberculous drug belonging to the diarylquinoline class that efficiently inhibits the adenosine triphosphate synthase enzyme of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. It is a bactericidal and long-acting drug. It inhibits both dormant as well as replicating bacterial sub-populations and thus shortens the duration of TB treatment. This drug has been approved by the Food and Drug Administration in December 2012 for the management of multidrug resistant-TB. The drug marks the introduction of a new addition to the TB armamentarium after four decades.

  13. Multiple means to the same end: the genetic basis of acquired stress resistance in yeast.

    PubMed

    Berry, David B; Guan, Qiaoning; Hose, James; Haroon, Suraiya; Gebbia, Marinella; Heisler, Lawrence E; Nislow, Corey; Giaever, Guri; Gasch, Audrey P

    2011-11-01

    In nature, stressful environments often occur in combination or close succession, and thus the ability to prepare for impending stress likely provides a significant fitness advantage. Organisms exposed to a mild dose of stress can become tolerant to what would otherwise be a lethal dose of subsequent stress; however, the mechanism of this acquired stress tolerance is poorly understood. To explore this, we exposed the yeast gene-deletion libraries, which interrogate all essential and non-essential genes, to successive stress treatments and identified genes necessary for acquiring subsequent stress resistance. Cells were exposed to one of three different mild stress pretreatments (salt, DTT, or heat shock) and then challenged with a severe dose of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)). Surprisingly, there was little overlap in the genes required for acquisition of H(2)O(2) tolerance after different mild-stress pretreatments, revealing distinct mechanisms of surviving H(2)O(2) in each case. Integrative network analysis of these results with respect to protein-protein interactions, synthetic-genetic interactions, and functional annotations identified many processes not previously linked to H(2)O(2) tolerance. We tested and present several models that explain the lack of overlap in genes required for H(2)O(2) tolerance after each of the three pretreatments. Together, this work shows that acquired tolerance to the same severe stress occurs by different mechanisms depending on prior cellular experiences, underscoring the context-dependent nature of stress tolerance.

  14. Increased thymidylate synthase in L1210 cells possessing acquired resistance to N10-propargyl-5,8-dideazafolic acid (CB3717): development, characterization, and cross-resistance studies

    SciTech Connect

    Jackman, A.L.; Alison, D.L.; Calvert, A.H.; Harrap, K.R.

    1986-06-01

    The properties are described of a mutant L1210 cell line (L1210:C15) with acquired resistance (greater than 200-fold) to the thymidylate synthase (TS) inhibitor N10-propargyl-5,8-dideazafolic acid. TS was overproduced 45-fold and was accompanied by a small increase in the activity of dihydrofolate reductase (2.6-fold). Both the level of resistance and enzyme activities were maintained in drug-free medium (greater than 300 generations). Failure of N10-propargyl-5,8-dideazafolic acid to suppress the (/sup 3/H)-2'-deoxyuridine incorporation into the acid-precipitable material of the resistant line supported the evidence that TS overproduction was the mechanism of resistance; consequently the L1210:C15 cells were largely cross-resistant to another (but weaker) TS inhibitor, 5,8-dideazafolic acid. Minimal cross-resistance was observed to the dihydrofolate reductase inhibitors methotrexate and 5-methyl-5,8-dideazaaminopterin (5- and 2-fold, respectively). L1210 and L1210:C15 cells were, however, equally sensitive to 5-fluorodeoxyuridine (FdUrd), an unexpected finding since a metabolite, 5-fluorodeoxyuridine monophosphate, is a potent TS inhibitor; however, this cytotoxicity against the L1210:C15 cells was antagonized by coincubation with 5 microM folinic acid although folinic acid potentiated the cytotoxicity of FdUrd to the N10-propargyl-5,8-dideazafolic acid-sensitive L1210 line. Thymidine was much less effective as a FdUrd protecting agent in the L1210:C15 when compared with the L1210 cells; however, a combination of thymidine plus hypoxanthine was without any additional effect (compared with thymidine alone) against the sensitive line but effectively protected L1210:C15 cells.

  15. GEAR: A database of Genomic Elements Associated with drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yin-Ying; Chen, Wei-Hua; Xiao, Pei-Pei; Xie, Wen-Bin; Luo, Qibin; Bork, Peer; Zhao, Xing-Ming

    2017-01-01

    Drug resistance is becoming a serious problem that leads to the failure of standard treatments, which is generally developed because of genetic mutations of certain molecules. Here, we present GEAR (A database of Genomic Elements Associated with drug Resistance) that aims to provide comprehensive information about genomic elements (including genes, single-nucleotide polymorphisms and microRNAs) that are responsible for drug resistance. Right now, GEAR contains 1631 associations between 201 human drugs and 758 genes, 106 associations between 29 human drugs and 66 miRNAs, and 44 associations between 17 human drugs and 22 SNPs. These relationships are firstly extracted from primary literature with text mining and then manually curated. The drug resistome deposited in GEAR provides insights into the genetic factors underlying drug resistance. In addition, new indications and potential drug combinations can be identified based on the resistome. The GEAR database can be freely accessed through http://gear.comp-sysbio.org. PMID:28294141

  16. GEAR: A database of Genomic Elements Associated with drug Resistance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yin-Ying; Chen, Wei-Hua; Xiao, Pei-Pei; Xie, Wen-Bin; Luo, Qibin; Bork, Peer; Zhao, Xing-Ming

    2017-03-15

    Drug resistance is becoming a serious problem that leads to the failure of standard treatments, which is generally developed because of genetic mutations of certain molecules. Here, we present GEAR (A database of Genomic Elements Associated with drug Resistance) that aims to provide comprehensive information about genomic elements (including genes, single-nucleotide polymorphisms and microRNAs) that are responsible for drug resistance. Right now, GEAR contains 1631 associations between 201 human drugs and 758 genes, 106 associations between 29 human drugs and 66 miRNAs, and 44 associations between 17 human drugs and 22 SNPs. These relationships are firstly extracted from primary literature with text mining and then manually curated. The drug resistome deposited in GEAR provides insights into the genetic factors underlying drug resistance. In addition, new indications and potential drug combinations can be identified based on the resistome. The GEAR database can be freely accessed through http://gear.comp-sysbio.org.

  17. Acquired resistance to venetoclax (ABT-199) in t(14;18) positive lymphoma cells.

    PubMed

    Bodo, Juraj; Zhao, Xiaoxian; Durkin, Lisa; Souers, Andrew J; Phillips, Darren C; Smith, Mitchell R; Hsi, Eric D

    2016-10-25

    The chromosomal translocation t(14;18) in follicular lymphoma (FL) is a primary oncogenic event resulting in BCL-2 over-expression. This study investigates activity of the BH3 mimetic venetoclax (ABT-199), which targets BCL-2, and mechanisms of acquired resistance in FL.The sensitivity of FL cells to venetoclax treatment correlated with BCL-2/BIM ratio. Cells with similar expression of anti-apoptotic proteins, but with higher levels of BIM were more sensitive to the treatment. Venetoclax induced dissociation of BCL-2/ BIM complex and a decrease in mitochondrial potential. Interestingly the population of cells that survived venetoclax treatment showed increased p-ERK1/2 and p-BIM (S69), as well as a decrease in total BIM levels. Venetoclax resistant cells initially showed elevated levels of p-AKT and p-Foxo1/3a, a dissociation of BIM/BCL-2/BECLIN1 complex, and a decrease in SQSTM1/p62 level (indicating increased autophagy) together with a slight decline in BIM expression. After stable resistant cell lines were established, a significant reduction of BCL-2 levels and almost total absence of BIM was observed.The acquisition of these resistance phenotypes could be prevented via selective ERK/AKT inhibition or anti-CD20 antibody treatment, thus highlighting possible combination therapies for FL patients.

  18. Effect of United States buckwheat honey on antibiotic-resistant hospital acquired pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, Eric Nee-Armah; Duster, Megan; Musuuza, Jackson Ssentalo; Safdar, Nasia

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Due to an upsurge in antibiotic-resistant infections and lack of therapeutic options, new approaches are needed for treatment. Honey may be one such potential therapeutic option. We investigated the susceptibility of hospital acquired pathogens to four honeys from Wisconsin, United States, and then determined if the antibacterial effect of each honey against these pathogens is primarily due to the high sugar content. Methods Thirteen pathogens including: four Clostridium difficile, two Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, two Pseudomonas aeruginosa, one Methicillin-Susceptible Staphylococcus aureus, two Vancomycin-resistance Enterococcus, one Enterococcus faecalis and one Klebsiella pneumoniae were exposed to 1-50% (w/v) four Wisconsin honeys and Artificial honey to determine their minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) using the broth dilution method. Results Buckwheat honey predominantly exhibited a bactericidal mode of action against the tested pathogens, and this varied with each pathogen. C. difficile isolates were more sensitive to the Wisconsin buckwheat honey as compared to the other pathogens. Artificial honey at 50% (w/v) failed to kill any of the pathogens. The high sugar content of Wisconsin buckwheat honey is not the only factor responsible for its bactericidal activity. Conclusion Wisconsin buckwheat honey has the potential to be an important addition to therapeutic armamentarium against resistant pathogens and should be investigated further. PMID:28292167

  19. Discordant resistance to kanamycin and amikacin in drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Krüüner, Annika; Jureen, Pontus; Levina, Klavdia; Ghebremichael, Solomon; Hoffner, Sven

    2003-09-01

    It is generally thought that there is full cross-resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis between the aminoglycoside drugs kanamycin and amikacin. However, kanamycin resistance and amikacin susceptibility were seen in 43 of 79 (54%) multidrug-resistant Estonian isolates, indicating that there might be a need to test the resistance of M. tuberculosis isolates to both drugs.

  20. Human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immune deficiency syndrome: Using drug from mathematical perceptive.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Amar Nath; Saha, Shubhankar; Roy, Priti Kumar

    2015-11-12

    Entry of acquired immune deficiency syndrome virus into the host immune cell involves the participation of various components of host and viral cell unit. These components may be categorized as attachment of the viral surface envelope protein subunit, gp120, to the CD4(+) receptor and chemokine coreceptors, CCR5 and CXCR4, present on T cell surface. The viral fusion protein, gp41, the second cleaved subunit of Env undergoes reconfiguration and the membrane fusion reaction itself. Since the CD4(+) T cell population is actively involved; the ultimate outcome of human immunodeficiency virus infection is total collapse of the host immune system. Mathematical modeling of the stages in viral membrane protein-host cell receptor-coreceptor interaction and the effect of antibody vaccine on the viral entry into the susceptible host cell has been carried out using as impulsive differential equations. We have studied the effect of antibody vaccination and determined analytically the threshold value of drug dosage and dosing interval for optimum levels of infection. We have also investigated the effect of perfect adherence of drug dose on the immune cell count in extreme cases and observed that systematic drug dosage of the immune cells leads to longer and improved lives.

  1. Specific Cell Targeting Therapy Bypasses Drug Resistance Mechanisms in African Trypanosomiasis

    PubMed Central

    Unciti-Broceta, Juan D.; Arias, José L.; Maceira, José; Soriano, Miguel; Ortiz-González, Matilde; Hernández-Quero, José; Muñóz-Torres, Manuel; de Koning, Harry P.; Magez, Stefan; Garcia-Salcedo, José A.

    2015-01-01

    African trypanosomiasis is a deadly neglected disease caused by the extracellular parasite Trypanosoma brucei. Current therapies are characterized by high drug toxicity and increasing drug resistance mainly associated with loss-of-function mutations in the transporters involved in drug import. The introduction of new antiparasitic drugs into therapeutic use is a slow and expensive process. In contrast, specific targeting of existing drugs could represent a more rapid and cost-effective approach for neglected disease treatment, impacting through reduced systemic toxicity and circumventing resistance acquired through impaired compound uptake. We have generated nanoparticles of chitosan loaded with the trypanocidal drug pentamidine and coated by a single domain nanobody that specifically targets the surface of African trypanosomes. Once loaded into this nanocarrier, pentamidine enters trypanosomes through endocytosis instead of via classical cell surface transporters. The curative dose of pentamidine-loaded nanobody-chitosan nanoparticles was 100-fold lower than pentamidine alone in a murine model of acute African trypanosomiasis. Crucially, this new formulation displayed undiminished in vitro and in vivo activity against a trypanosome cell line resistant to pentamidine as a result of mutations in the surface transporter aquaglyceroporin 2. We conclude that this new drug delivery system increases drug efficacy and has the ability to overcome resistance to some anti-protozoal drugs. PMID:26110623

  2. Specific Cell Targeting Therapy Bypasses Drug Resistance Mechanisms in African Trypanosomiasis.

    PubMed

    Unciti-Broceta, Juan D; Arias, José L; Maceira, José; Soriano, Miguel; Ortiz-González, Matilde; Hernández-Quero, José; Muñóz-Torres, Manuel; de Koning, Harry P; Magez, Stefan; Garcia-Salcedo, José A

    2015-06-01

    African trypanosomiasis is a deadly neglected disease caused by the extracellular parasite Trypanosoma brucei. Current therapies are characterized by high drug toxicity and increasing drug resistance mainly associated with loss-of-function mutations in the transporters involved in drug import. The introduction of new antiparasitic drugs into therapeutic use is a slow and expensive process. In contrast, specific targeting of existing drugs could represent a more rapid and cost-effective approach for neglected disease treatment, impacting through reduced systemic toxicity and circumventing resistance acquired through impaired compound uptake. We have generated nanoparticles of chitosan loaded with the trypanocidal drug pentamidine and coated by a single domain nanobody that specifically targets the surface of African trypanosomes. Once loaded into this nanocarrier, pentamidine enters trypanosomes through endocytosis instead of via classical cell surface transporters. The curative dose of pentamidine-loaded nanobody-chitosan nanoparticles was 100-fold lower than pentamidine alone in a murine model of acute African trypanosomiasis. Crucially, this new formulation displayed undiminished in vitro and in vivo activity against a trypanosome cell line resistant to pentamidine as a result of mutations in the surface transporter aquaglyceroporin 2. We conclude that this new drug delivery system increases drug efficacy and has the ability to overcome resistance to some anti-protozoal drugs.

  3. PrEP-selected Drug Resistance Decays Rapidly After Drug Cessation

    PubMed Central

    Weis, Julie F.; Baeten, Jared M.; Mccoy, Connor O.; Warth, Chris; Donnell, Deborah; Thomas, Katherine K.; Hendrix, Craig W.; Marzinke, Mark A.; Mugo, Nelly; Matsen, Frederick A.; Celum, Connie; Lehman, Dara A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Resistance to emtricitabine plus tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (FTC/TDF) or TDF alone used as pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) has been detected in individuals who initiated PrEP during unrecognized acute HIV infection and, rarely, in PrEP breakthrough infections. PrEP-selected resistance could alter future treatment options, and therefore we sought to determine how long resistance persisted after PrEP cessation. Methods The Partners PrEP Study was a randomized placebo-controlled trial of FTC/TDF or TDF as PrEP for HIV prevention. We previously reported that PrEP-related mutations (K65R, K70E or M184IV) were detected by 454 sequencing following seroconversion in 9 individuals who acquired HIV during the Partners PrEP Study. In the current study, we used 454 sequencing to detect and quantify PrEP-related mutations in HIV RNA-positive plasma samples prior to seroconversion, as well as in plasma from 6, 12, and 24 months after PrEP cessation from these 9 individuals. Results HIV RNA-positive, antibody-negative samples were available prior to seroconversion for 4 of 9 individuals with resistance detected at seroconversion. In all 4 cases, K65R, K70E and M184IV were not detected prior to seroconversion, suggesting PrEP-related resistance was selected and not transmitted. All PrEP-selected mutations were no longer detectable by 6 months after PrEP cessation and remained undetectable at 12 and 24 months in the absence of antiretroviral therapy. Conclusion Using highly sensitive assays, PrEP-selected resistance in plasma decays below detection by six months following drug cessation and remains undetectable for ≥24 months. Even high levels of resistance mutations during acute infection decay rapidly in the absence of ongoing PrEP exposure. PMID:26731753

  4. AN ELEMENTARY APPROACH TO MODELING DRUG RESISTANCE IN CANCER

    PubMed Central

    Tomasetti, Cristian; Levy, Doron

    2013-01-01

    Resistance to drugs has been an ongoing obstacle to a successful treatment of many diseases. In this work we consider the problem of drug resistance in cancer, focusing on random genetic point mutations. Most previous works on mathematical models of such drug resistance have been based on stochastic methods. In contrast, our approach is based on an elementary, compartmental system of ordinary differential equations. We use our very simple approach to derive results on drug resistance that are comparable to those that were previously obtained using much more complex mathematical techniques. The simplicity of our model allows us to obtain analytic results for resistance to any number of drugs. In particular, we show that the amount of resistance generated before the start of the treatment, and present at some given time afterward, always depends on the turnover rate, no matter how many drugs are simultaneously used in the treatment. PMID:21077714

  5. New strategies against Stenotrophomonas maltophilia: a serious worldwide intrinsically drug-resistant opportunistic pathogen.

    PubMed

    Brooke, Joanna S

    2014-01-01

    Stenotrophomonas maltophilia is a worldwide human opportunistic pathogen associated with serious infections in humans, and is most often recovered from respiratory tract infections. In addition to its intrinsic drug resistance, this organism may acquire resistance via multiple molecular mechanisms. New antimicrobial strategies are needed to combat S. maltophilia infections, particularly in immunocompromised patients, cystic fibrosis patients with polymicrobial infections of the lung, and in patients with chronic infections. This editorial reports on newer drugs and antimicrobial strategies and their potential for use in treatment of S. maltophilia infections, the development of new technologies to detect this organism, and identifies strategies currently in use to reduce transmission of this pathogen.

  6. Design of HIV Protease Inhibitors Targeting Protein Backbone: An Effective Strategy for Combating Drug Resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Arun K.; Chapsal, Bruno D.; Weber, Irene T.; Mitsuya, Hiroaki

    2008-06-03

    The discovery of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) protease inhibitors (PIs) and their utilization in highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) have been a major turning point in the management of HIV/acquired immune-deficiency syndrome (AIDS). However, despite the successes in disease management and the decrease of HIV/AIDS-related mortality, several drawbacks continue to hamper first-generation protease inhibitor therapies. The rapid emergence of drug resistance has become the most urgent concern because it renders current treatments ineffective and therefore compels the scientific community to continue efforts in the design of inhibitors that can efficiently combat drug resistance.

  7. Drug resistance reversal--are we getting closer?

    PubMed

    Baird, R D; Kaye, S B

    2003-11-01

    Clinical drug resistance is a major barrier to overcome before chemotherapy can become curative for most patients presenting with metastatic cancer. Rational attempts to tackle clinical drug resistance need to be based on an understanding of the mechanisms involved; these are likely to be complex and multifactorial, and may be due to inadequate drug exposure or alterations in the cancer cell itself. This article reviews a number of strategies used to tackle drug resistance, focussing on work in our institution related to the treatment of ovarian cancer and resistance to platinum and taxane-based chemotherapy. Further progress towards drug resistance reversal will require a three-pronged approach, namely: the development of novel cytotoxics which exploit selectively expressed targets; modulation of resistance to conventional agents and, most importantly, a serious attempt to understand resistance mechanisms in tumour samples taken both pre- and post-chemotherapy.

  8. Antibiotic Resistance, Virulence, and Genetic Background of Community-Acquired Uropathogenic Escherichia coli from Algeria.

    PubMed

    Yahiaoui, Merzouk; Robin, Frédéric; Bakour, Rabah; Hamidi, Moufida; Bonnet, Richard; Messai, Yamina

    2015-10-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate antibiotic resistance mechanisms, virulence traits, and genetic background of 150 nonrepetitive community-acquired uropathogenic Escherichia coli (CA-UPEC) from Algeria. A rate of 46.7% of isolates was multidrug resistant. bla genes detected were blaTEM (96.8% of amoxicillin-resistant isolates), blaCTX-M-15 (4%), overexpressed blaAmpC (4%), blaSHV-2a, blaTEM-4, blaTEM-31, and blaTEM-35 (0.7%). All tetracycline-resistant isolates (51.3%) had tetA and/or tetB genes. Sulfonamides and trimethoprim resistance genes were sul2 (60.8%), sul1 (45.9%), sul3 (6.7%), dfrA14 (25.4%), dfrA1 (18.2%), dfrA12 (16.3%), and dfrA25 (5.4%). High-level fluoroquinolone resistance (22.7%) was mediated by mutations in gyrA (S83L-D87N) and parC (S80I-E84G/V or S80I) genes. qnrB5, qnrS1, and aac(6')-Ib-cr were rare (5.3%). Class 1 and/or class 2 integrons were detected (40.7%). Isolates belonged to phylogroups B2+D (50%), A+B1 (36%), and F+C+Clade I (13%). Most of D (72.2%) and 38.6% of B2 isolates were multidrug resistant; they belong to 14 different sequence types, including international successful ST131, ST73, and ST69, reported for the first time in the community in Algeria and new ST4494 and ST4529 described in this study. Besides multidrug resistance, B2 and D isolates possessed virulence factors of colonization, invasion, and long-term persistence. The study highlighted multidrug-resistant CA-UPEC with high virulence traits and an epidemic genetic background.

  9. EPIDEMIOLOGICAL AND GENETICAL STUDIES ON THE DRUG-RESISTANCE OF SHIGELLAE AND STAPHYLOCOCCI.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    ANTIBIOTICS , RESISTANCE (BIOLOGY)), (*SHIGELLA, RESISTANCE(BIOLOGY)), (*STAPHYLOCOCCUS, RESISTANCE(BIOLOGY)), EPIDEMIOLOGY, GENETICS, DRUGS, BACTERIOPHAGES, TETRACYCLINES, PENICILLINS, ESCHERICHIA COLI, JAPAN

  10. Mutations Associated with Acquired Resistance to PD-1 Blockade in Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Zaretsky, Jesse M.; Garcia-Diaz, Angel; Shin, Daniel S.; Escuin-Ordinas, Helena; Hugo, Willy; Hu-Lieskovan, Siwen; Torrejon, Davis Y.; Abril-Rodriguez, Gabriel; Sandoval, Salemiz; Barthly, Lucas; Saco, Justin; Moreno, Blanca Homet; Mezzadra, Riccardo; Chmielowski, Bartosz; Ruchalski, Kathleen; Shintaku, I. Peter; Sanchez, Phillip J.; Puig-Saus, Cristina; Cherry, Grace; Seja, Elizabeth; Kong, Xiangju; Pang, Jia; Berent-Maoz, Beata; Comin-Anduix, Begoña; Graeber, Thomas G.; Tumeh, Paul C.; Schumacher, Ton N.M.; Lo, Roger S.; Ribas, Antoni

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Approximately 75% of objective responses to anti–programmed death 1 (PD-1) therapy in patients with melanoma are durable, lasting for years, but delayed relapses have been noted long after initial objective tumor regression despite continuous therapy. Mechanisms of immune escape in this context are unknown. METHODS We analyzed biopsy samples from paired baseline and relapsing lesions in four patients with metastatic melanoma who had had an initial objective tumor regression in response to anti–PD-1 therapy (pembrolizumab) followed by disease progression months to years later. RESULTS Whole-exome sequencing detected clonal selection and outgrowth of the acquired resistant tumors and, in two of the four patients, revealed resistance-associated loss-of-function mutations in the genes encoding interferon-receptor–associated Janus kinase 1 (JAK1) or Janus kinase 2 (JAK2), concurrent with deletion of the wild-type allele. A truncating mutation in the gene encoding the antigen-presenting protein beta-2-microglobulin (B2M) was identified in a third patient. JAK1 and JAK2 truncating mutations resulted in a lack of response to interferon gamma, including insensitivity to its antiproliferative effects on cancer cells. The B2M truncating mutation led to loss of surface expression of major histocompatibility complex class I. CONCLUSIONS In this study, acquired resistance to PD-1 blockade immunotherapy in patients with melanoma was associated with defects in the pathways involved in interferon-receptor signaling and in antigen presentation. (Funded by the National Institutes of Health and others.) PMID:27433843

  11. Acquired resistance to the 16-membered macrolides tylosin and tilmicosin by Mycoplasma bovis.

    PubMed

    Lerner, Uri; Amram, Eytan; Ayling, Roger D; Mikula, Inna; Gerchman, Irena; Harrus, Shimon; Teff, Dina; Yogev, David; Lysnyansky, Inna

    2014-01-31

    The molecular mechanism of acquired resistance to the 16-membered macrolides tylosin (Ty) and tilmicosin (Tm) was investigated in Mycoplasma bovis field isolates. Sequence analysis of domains II and V of the two 23S rRNA alleles and ribosomal proteins L4 and L22 was performed on 54 M. bovis isolates showing different minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC). The presence of any one of the point mutations G748A, C752T, A2058G, A2059G or A2059C (Escherichia coli numbering) in one or both alleles of the 23S rRNAs was correlated with decreased susceptibility to Ty (8-1024 μg/ml) and to Tm (32 to >256 μg/ml) in 27/27 and 27/31 M. bovis isolates, respectively. Although a single mutation in domain II or V could be sufficient to cause decreased susceptibility to Ty, our data imply that a combination of mutations in two domains is necessary to achieve higher MICs (≥ 128 μg/ml). The influence of a combination of mutations in two domains II and V on enhancement of resistance to Tm was less clear. In addition, the amino acid (aa) substitution L22-Q90H was found in 24/32 representative M. bovis isolates with different MICs, but no correlation with decreased susceptibility to Ty or Tm was identified. Multiple aa substitutions were also identified in the L4 protein, including at positions 185-186 (positions 64 and 65 in E. coli) which are adjacent to the macrolide-binding site. This is the first description of the molecular mechanism of acquired resistance to the 16-membered macrolides in M. bovis.

  12. Osteopontin is involved in the development of acquired chemo-resistance of cisplatin in small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Gu, Tao; Ohashi, Rina; Cui, Ri; Tajima, Ken; Yoshioka, Masakata; Iwakami, Shinichiro; Sasaki, Shinichi; Shinohara, Atsuko; Matsukawa, Takehisa; Kobayashi, Jun; Inaba, Yutaka; Takahashi, Kazuhisa

    2009-11-01

    Osteopontin (OPN) is a multi-functional cytokine involved in cell survival, migration and adhesion which is associated with tumorigenesis, progression and metastasis. However, the role of OPN in chemo-sensitivity of human lung cancer has not yet been elucidated. The purpose of this study is to investigate the role of OPN in chemo-sensitivity of lung cancer cells. We developed a stable OPN transfectant (SBC-3/OPN) and a control transfectant (SBC-3/NEO) from human small cell lung cancer cell line, SBC-3. SBC-3/OPN cells were more resistant to cisplatin than SBC-3/NEO cells. Multi-drug resistance-associated protein (MRP) does not appear to be involved in the development of acquired chemo-resistance, since MRP inhibitor did not alter chemo-sensitivity. After exposure to cisplatin, the apoptotic SBC-3/OPN cells were reduced in number compared to SBC-3/NEO cells. Treatment with cisplatin revealed that the expression of anti-apoptotic protein, bcl-2, was down-regulated in SBC-3/NEO cells, while that of SBC-3/OPN cells was not altered. In contrast, pro-apoptotic protein, bax, was not altered in both SBC-3/OPN and SBC-3/NEO cells, thus bcl-2/bax ratio was decreased in SBC-3/NEO but not altered in SBC-3/OPN cells. Activation of caspase-3 and caspase-9 was increased in SBC-3/NEO cells, but not in SBC-3/OPN cells. Our results suggest that OPN enhances chemo-resistance of cisplatin in SBC-3 cells by suppressing bcl-2 protein down-regulation, thereby blocking the caspase-9- and caspase-3-dependent cell apoptosis.

  13. Brazilian response to the human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome epidemic among injection drug users.

    PubMed

    Mesquita, Fábio; Doneda, Denise; Gandolfi, Denise; Nemes, Maria Inês Battistella; Andrade, Tarcísio; Bueno, Regina; Piconez e Trigueiros, Daniela

    2003-12-15

    The Brazilian response to the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) epidemic is being observed all over the world because of its success. Understanding the role of injection drug users (IDUs) in the epidemic and the political response thereto is a key factor in the control of the epidemic in Brazil. This paper summarizes some of the most important analyses of the Brazilian response to the HIV/AIDS epidemic among and from IDUs. Key elements of the response include the support of the Brazilian Universal Public Health System, the provision of universal access to highly active antiretroviral therapy, and the creation of harm reduction projects that are politically and financially supported by the federal government. The response among and from IDUs is a key element in overall control of the HIV/AIDS epidemic. The response to the epidemic among and from IDUs has been headed in the correct direction since its beginning and is now being intensively expanded.

  14. Active viral B hepatitis in parenteral drug abusers with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS).

    PubMed

    Leevy, C B; Nurse, H; Kapila, R

    1989-01-01

    Eighty-percent of 47 parenteral drug abusers with hepatomegaly and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome had HBV DNA in serum, although only 27% were HBsAg or "e" antigen-positive by polyclonal radioimmunoassay. Liver biopsies from each of 37 HBV DNA seropositive patients showed HBV DNA and were HBcAg-positive. The absence of positive HBsAg and "e" antigen in HBV DNA-positive patients was attributable to the presence of immune complexes; after in vitro dissociation of these complexes there was an increase in HBsAg from 24% to 86%, and of "e" antigen from 19% to 62%. These data indicate that actively replicating hepatitis B virus is common in patients with AIDS, and that precautions should be taken to prevent its dissemination. Therapy in these patients should address both human immunodeficiency and hepatitis B virus infections.

  15. What is Multidrug and Extensively Drug Resistant TB?

    MedlinePlus

    ... org > Lung Health and Diseases > Lung Disease Lookup > Tuberculosis (TB) What Is Multidrug and Extensively Drug Resistant TB? Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis ( MDR TB ) is a very dangerous form of ...

  16. Low MITF/AXL ratio predicts early resistance to multiple targeted drugs in melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Judith; Krijgsman, Oscar; Tsoi, Jennifer; Robert, Lidia; Hugo, Willy; Song, Chunying; Kong, Xiangju; Possik, Patricia A.; Cornelissen-Steijger, Paulien D.M.; Foppen, Marnix H. Geukes; Kemper, Kristel; Goding, Colin R.; McDermott, Ultan; Blank, Christian; Haanen, John; Graeber, Thomas G.; Ribas, Antoni; Lo, Roger S.; Peeper, Daniel S.

    2015-01-01

    Increased expression of the Microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) contributes to melanoma progression and resistance to BRAF pathway inhibition. Here we show that the lack of MITF is associated with more severe resistance to a range of inhibitors, while its presence is required for robust drug responses. Both in primary and acquired resistance, MITF levels inversely correlate with the expression of several activated receptor tyrosine kinases, most frequently AXL. The MITF-low/AXL-high/drug-resistance phenotype is common among mutant BRAF and NRAS melanoma cell lines. The dichotomous behaviour of MITF in drug response is corroborated in vemurafenib-resistant biopsies, including MITF-high and -low clones in a relapsed patient. Furthermore, drug cocktails containing AXL inhibitor enhance melanoma cell elimination by BRAF or ERK inhibition. Our results demonstrate that a low MITF/AXL ratio predicts early resistance to multiple targeted drugs, and warrant clinical validation of AXL inhibitors to combat resistance of BRAF and NRAS mutant MITF-low melanomas. PMID:25502142

  17. Emergence of Multidrug-Resistant Campylobacter Species Isolates with a Horizontally Acquired rRNA Methylase

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yang; Zhang, Maojun; Deng, Fengru; Shen, Zhangqi; Wu, Congming; Zhang, Jianzhong

    2014-01-01

    Antibiotic-resistant Campylobacter constitutes a serious threat to public health, and resistance to macrolides is of particular concern, as this class of antibiotics is the drug of choice for clinical therapy of campylobacteriosis. Very recently, a horizontally transferrable macrolide resistance mediated by the rRNA methylase gene erm(B) was reported in a Campylobacter coli isolate, but little is known about the dissemination of erm(B) among Campylobacter isolates and the association of erm(B)-carrying isolates with clinical disease. To address this question and facilitate the control of antibiotic-resistant Campylobacter, we determined the distribution of erm(B) in 1,554 C. coli and Campylobacter jejuni isolates derived from food-producing animals and clinically confirmed human diarrheal cases. The results revealed that 58 of the examined isolates harbored erm(B) and exhibited high-level resistance to macrolides, and most were recent isolates, derived in 2011-2012. In addition, the erm(B)-positive isolates were all resistant to fluoroquinolones, another clinically important antibiotic used for treating campylobacteriosis. The erm(B) gene is found to be associated with chromosomal multidrug resistance genomic islands (MDRGIs) of Gram-positive origin or with plasmids of various sizes. All MDRGIs were transferrable to macrolide-susceptible C. jejuni by natural transformation under laboratory conditions. Molecular typing of the erm(B)-carrying isolates by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multilocus sequence typing (MLST) identified diverse genotypes and outbreak-associated diarrheal isolates. Molecular typing also suggested zoonotic transmission of erm(B)-positive Campylobacter. These findings reveal an emerging and alarming trend of dissemination of erm(B) and MDRGIs in Campylobacter and underscore the need for heightened efforts to control their further spread. PMID:24982085

  18. Is Salicylic Acid a Translocated Signal of Systemic Acquired Resistance in Tobacco?

    PubMed Central

    Shulaev, V.; Leon, J.; Raskin, I.

    1995-01-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) is a likely endogenous signal in the development of systemic acquired resistance (SAR) in some dicotyledonous plants. In tobacco mosaic virus (TMV)-resistant Xanthi-nc tobacco, SA levels increase systemically following the inoculation of a single leaf with TMV. To determine the extent to which systemic increases in SA result from SA export from the inoculated leaf, SA produced in TMV-inoculated or healthy leaves was noninvasively labeled with 18O2. Spatial and temporal distribution of 18O-SA indicated that most of the SA detected in the healthy tissues was synthesized in the inoculated leaf. No significant increase in the activity of benzoic acid 2-hydroxylase, the last enzyme involved in SA biosynthesis, was detected in upper uninoculated leaves, although the basal level of enzyme activity was relatively high. No increases in SA level, pathogenesis-related PR-1 gene expression, or TMV resistance in the upper uninoculated leaf were observed if the TMV-inoculated leaf was detached up to 60 hr after inoculation. Apart from the inoculated tissues, the highest increase in SA was observed in the leaf located directly above the inoculated leaf. The systemic SA increase observed during SAR may be explained by phloem transport of SA from the inoculation sites. PMID:12242358

  19. Interconnection between flowering time control and activation of systemic acquired resistance.

    PubMed

    Banday, Zeeshan Z; Nandi, Ashis K

    2015-01-01

    The ability to avoid or neutralize pathogens is inherent to all higher organisms including plants. Plants recognize pathogens through receptors, and mount resistance against the intruders, with the help of well-elaborated defense arsenal. In response to some localinfections, plants develop systemic acquired resistance (SAR), which provides heightened resistance during subsequent infections. Infected tissues generate mobile signaling molecules that travel to the systemic tissues, where they epigenetically modify expression o a set of genes to initiate the manifestation of SAR in distant tissues. Immune responses are largely regulated at transcriptional level. Flowering is a developmental transition that occurs as a result of the coordinated action of large numbers of transcription factors that respond to intrinsic signals and environmental conditions. The plant hormone salicylic acid (SA) which is required for SAR activation positively regulates flowering. Certain components of chromatin remodeling complexes that are recruited for suppression of precocious flowering are also involved in suppression of SAR in healthy plants. FLOWERING LOCUS D, a putative histone demethylase positively regulates SAR manifestation and flowering transition in Arabidopsis. Similarly, incorporation of histone variant H2A.Z in nucleosomes mediated by PHOTOPERIOD-INDEPENDENT EARLY FLOWERING 1, an ortholog of yeast chromatin remodeling complex SWR1, concomitantly influences SAR and flowering time. SUMO conjugation and deconjugation mechanisms also similarly affect SAR and flowering in an SA-dependent manner. The evidences suggest a common underlying regulatory mechanism for activation of SAR and flowering in plants.

  20. Characterization of a Pipecolic Acid Biosynthesis Pathway Required for Systemic Acquired Resistance.

    PubMed

    Ding, Pingtao; Rekhter, Dmitrij; Ding, Yuli; Feussner, Kirstin; Busta, Lucas; Haroth, Sven; Xu, Shaohua; Li, Xin; Jetter, Reinhard; Feussner, Ivo; Zhang, Yuelin

    2016-10-01

    Systemic acquired resistance (SAR) is an immune response induced in the distal parts of plants following defense activation in local tissue. Pipecolic acid (Pip) accumulation orchestrates SAR and local resistance responses. Here, we report the identification and characterization of SAR-DEFICIENT4 (SARD4), which encodes a critical enzyme for Pip biosynthesis in Arabidopsis thaliana Loss of function of SARD4 leads to reduced Pip levels and accumulation of a Pip precursor, Δ(1)-piperideine-2-carboxylic acid (P2C). In Escherichia coli, expression of the aminotransferase ALD1 leads to production of P2C and addition of SARD4 results in Pip production, suggesting that a Pip biosynthesis pathway can be reconstituted in bacteria by coexpression of ALD1 and SARD4. In vitro experiments showed that ALD1 can use l-lysine as a substrate to produce P2C and P2C is converted to Pip by SARD4. Analysis of sard4 mutant plants showed that SARD4 is required for SAR as well as enhanced pathogen resistance conditioned by overexpression of the SAR regulator FLAVIN-DEPENDENT MONOOXYGENASE1. Compared with the wild type, pathogen-induced Pip accumulation is only modestly reduced in the local tissue of sard4 mutant plants, but it is below detection in distal leaves, suggesting that Pip is synthesized in systemic tissue by SARD4-mediated reduction of P2C and biosynthesis of Pip in systemic tissue contributes to SAR establishment.

  1. XPO1 inhibitor combination therapy with bortezomib or carfilzomib induces nuclear localization of IκBα and overcomes acquired proteasome inhibitor resistance in human multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Turner, Joel G; Kashyap, Trinayan; Dawson, Jana L; Gomez, Juan; Bauer, Alexis A; Grant, Steven; Dai, Yun; Shain, Kenneth H; Meads, Mark; Landesman, Yosef; Sullivan, Daniel M

    2016-11-29

    Acquired proteasome-inhibitor (PI) resistance is a major obstacle in the treatment of multiple myeloma (MM). We investigated whether the clinical XPO1-inhibitor selinexor, when combined with bortezomib or carfilzomib, could overcome acquired resistance in MM. PI-resistant myeloma cell lines both in vitro and in vivo and refractory myeloma patient biopsies were treated with selinexor/bortezomib or carfilzomib and assayed for apoptosis. Mechanistic studies included NFκB pathway protein expression assays, immunofluorescence microscopy, ImageStream flow-cytometry, and proximity-ligation assays. IκBα knockdown and NFκB activity were measured in selinexor/bortezomib-treated MM cells. We found that selinexor restored sensitivity of PI-resistant MM to bortezomib and carfilzomib. Selinexor/bortezomib treatment inhibited PI-resistant MM tumor growth and increased survival in mice. Myeloma cells from PI-refractory MM patients were sensitized by selinexor to bortezomib and carfilzomib without affecting non-myeloma cells. Immunofluorescence microscopy, Western blot, and ImageStream analyses of MM cells showed increases in total and nuclear IκBα by selinexor/bortezomib. Proximity ligation found increased IκBα-NFκB complexes in treated MM cells. IκBα knockdown abrogated selinexor/bortezomib-induced cytotoxicity in MM cells. Selinexor/bortezomib treatment decreased NFκB transcriptional activity. Selinexor, when used with bortezomib or carfilzomib, has the potential to overcome PI drug resistance in MM. Sensitization may be due to inactivation of the NFκB pathway by IκBα.

  2. Curcumin mediates oxaliplatin-acquired resistance reversion in colorectal cancer cell lines through modulation of CXC-Chemokine/NF-κB signalling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz de Porras, Vicenç; Bystrup, Sara; Martínez-Cardús, Anna; Pluvinet, Raquel; Sumoy, Lauro; Howells, Lynne; James, Mark I.; Iwuji, Chinenye; Manzano, José Luis; Layos, Laura; Bugés, Cristina; Abad, Albert; Martínez-Balibrea, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Resistance to oxaliplatin (OXA) is a complex process affecting the outcomes of metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC) patients treated with this drug. De-regulation of the NF-κB signalling pathway has been proposed as an important mechanism involved in this phenomenon. Here, we show that NF-κB was hyperactivated in in vitro models of OXA-acquired resistance but was attenuated by the addition of Curcumin, a non-toxic NF-κB inhibitor. The concomitant combination of Curcumin + OXA was more effective and synergistic in cell lines with acquired resistance to OXA, leading to the reversion of their resistant phenotype, through the inhibition of the NF-κB signalling cascade. Transcriptomic profiling revealed the up-regulation of three NF-κB-regulated CXC-chemokines, CXCL8, CXCL1 and CXCL2, in the resistant cells that were more efficiently down-regulated after OXA + Curcumin treatment as compared to the sensitive cells. Moreover, CXCL8 and CXCL1 gene silencing made resistant cells more sensitive to OXA through the inhibition of the Akt/NF-κB pathway. High expression of CXCL1 in FFPE samples from explant cultures of CRC patients-derived liver metastases was associated with response to OXA + Curcumin. In conclusion, we suggest that combination of OXA + Curcumin could be an effective treatment, for which CXCL1 could be used as a predictive marker, in CRC patients. PMID:27091625

  3. Impaired acquired resistance of mice to Klebsiella pneumoniae infection induced by acute NO/sub 2/ exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Bouley, G.; Azoulay-Dupuis, E.; Gaudebout, C.

    1985-12-01

    The natural resistance of nonimmunized C57B1/6 mice to an intraperitoneal Klebsiella pneumoniae challenge was not significantly affected by prior continuous exposure to 20 ppm NO/sub 2/ for 4 days. In contrast, the acquired resistance of mice immunized just before and infected just after NO/sub 2/ exposure was seriously impaired. This could not be explained by the loss of appetite (about 30%) observed in NO/sub 2/ treated mice, for neither the natural nor acquired resistance of control air exposure mice given approximately 70% ad libitum food and water were significantly modified.

  4. Acquired resistance to BRAF inhibition induces epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition in BRAF (V600E) mutant thyroid cancer by c-Met-mediated AKT activation

    PubMed Central

    Byeon, Hyung Kwon; Na, Hwi Jung; Yang, Yeon Ju; Ko, Sooah; Yoon, Sun Och; Ku, Minhee; Yang, Jaemoon; Kim, Jae Wook; Ban, Myung Jin; Kim, Ji-Hoon; Kim, Da Hee; Kim, Jung Min; Choi, Eun Chang; Kim, Chang-Hoon; Yoon, Joo-Heon; Koh, Yoon Woo

    2017-01-01

    Previously, the authors have identified that c-Met mediates reactivation of the PI3K/AKT pathway following BRAF inhibitor treatment in BRAF (V600E) mutant anaplastic thyroid cancer, thereby contributing to the acquired drug resistance. Therefore dual inhibition of BRAF and c-Met led to sustained treatment response, thereby maximizing the specific anti-tumor effect of targeted therapy. The present study goes one step further and aims to investigate the effect of acquired resistance of BRAF inhibitor on epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in BRAF mutant thyroid cancer cells and the effect of dual inhibition from combinatorial therapy. Two thyroid cancer cell lines, 8505C and BCPAP were selected and treated with BRAF inhibitor, PLX4032 and its effect on EMT were examined and compared. Further investigation was carried out in orthotopic xenograft mouse models. Unlike BCPAP cells, the BRAF inhibitor resistant 8505C cells showed increased expressions of EMT related markers such as vimentin, β-catenin, and CD44. The combinatorial treatment of PLX4032 and PHA665752, a c-Met inhibitor reversed EMT. Similar results were confirmed in vivo. c-Met-mediated reactivation of the PI3K/AKT pathway contributes to the drug resistance to PLX4032 in BRAF (V600E) mutant anaplastic thyroid cancer cells and further promotes tumor cell migration and invasion by upregulated EMT mechanism. Dual inhibition of BRAF and c-Met leads to reversal of EMT, suggesting a maximal therapeutic response. PMID:27880942

  5. Targeted cancer therapy; nanotechnology approaches for overcoming drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yan; Shen, Jacson K; Milane, Lara; Hornicek, Francis J; Amiji, Mansoor M; Duan, Zhenfeng

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in cancer molecular biology have resulted in parallel and unprecedented progress in the development of targeted cancer therapy. Targeted therapy can provide higher efficacy and lower toxicity than conventional chemotherapy for cancer. However, like traditional chemotherapy, molecularly targeted cancer therapy also faces the challenge of drug resistance. Multiple mechanisms are responsible for chemotherapy resistance in tumors, including over-expression of efflux transporters, somatic alterations of drug targets, deregulation of apoptosis, and numerous pharmacokinetic issues. Nanotechnology based approaches are proving to be efficacious in overcoming drug resistance in cancer. Combination of targeted therapies with nanotechnology approaches is a promising strategy to overcome targeted therapy drug resistance in cancer treatment. This review discusses the mechanisms of targeted drug resistance in cancer and discusses nanotechnology approaches to circumvent this resistance.

  6. Targeting efflux pumps to overcome antifungal drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Ann R; Cardno, Tony S; Strouse, J Jacob; Ivnitski-Steele, Irena; Keniya, Mikhail V; Lackovic, Kurt; Monk, Brian C; Sklar, Larry A; Cannon, Richard D

    2016-08-01

    Resistance to antifungal drugs is an increasingly significant clinical problem. The most common antifungal resistance encountered is efflux pump-mediated resistance of Candida species to azole drugs. One approach to overcome this resistance is to inhibit the pumps and chemosensitize resistant strains to azole drugs. Drug discovery targeting fungal efflux pumps could thus result in the development of azole-enhancing combination therapy. Heterologous expression of fungal efflux pumps in Saccharomyces cerevisiae provides a versatile system for screening for pump inhibitors. Fungal efflux pumps transport a range of xenobiotics including fluorescent compounds. This enables the use of fluorescence-based detection, as well as growth inhibition assays, in screens to discover compounds targeting efflux-mediated antifungal drug resistance. A variety of medium- and high-throughput screens have been used to identify a number of chemical entities that inhibit fungal efflux pumps.

  7. Drug resistance in Leishmania: similarities and differences to other organisms.

    PubMed

    Papadopoulou, B; Kündig, C; Singh, A; Ouellette, M

    1998-01-01

    The main line of defense available against parasitic protozoa is chemotherapy. Drug resistance has emerged however, as a primary obstacle to the successful treatment and control of parasitic diseases. Leishmania spp., the causative agents of leishmaniasis, have served as a useful model for studying mechanisms of drug resistance in vitro. Antimonials and amphotericin B are the first line drugs to treat Leishmania followed by pentamidine and a number of other drugs. Parasites resistant against all these classes of drugs have been selected under laboratory conditions. A multiplicity of resistance mechanisms has been detected, the most prevalent being gene amplification and transport mutations. With the tools now available, it should be possible to elucidate the mechanisms that govern drug resistance in field isolates and develop more effective chemotherapeutic agents.

  8. New approaches for understanding mechanisms of drug resistance in schistosomes

    PubMed Central

    GREENBERG, ROBERT M.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Schistosomes are parasitic flatworms that cause schistosomiasis, a neglected tropical disease that affects hundreds of millions worldwide. Treatment and control of schistosomiasis relies almost entirely on the single drug praziquantel (PZQ), making the prospect of emerging drug resistance particularly worrisome. This review will survey reports of PZQ (and other drug) resistance in schistosomes and other platyhelminths, and explore mechanisms by which drug resistance might develop. Newer genomic and post-genomic strategies that offer the promise of better understanding of how drug resistance might arise in these organisms will be discussed. These approaches could also lead to insights into the mode of action of these drugs and potentially provide markers for monitoring the emergence of resistance. PMID:23552512

  9. Effectiveness of various hospital-based solutions against community- acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Perona, Paul J; Johnson, Aaron J; Perona, John P; Issa, Kimona; Kapadia, Bhaveen H; Bonutti, Peter M; Mont, Michael A

    2013-01-01

    Periprosthetic infections with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) can be particularly burdensome and difficult to eradicate. One of the measures that infection control officers have emphasized in our hospitals has been the use of various hand sanitizers throughout the hospital. Our objective was to determine the level of growth inhibition of common hand sanitizers and surgical scrub solutions that are used to prevent the spread of community-acquired strains of MRSA. Various hospital and surgical agents (n = 13) were applied to community-acquired MRSA bacteria that had been cultured on agar plates. These different commercially available solutions were incubated for 48 h, and the plates were assessed to determine the level of growth inhibition (0, 25, 75, or 100%). The negative control was a test in which no agent was added to the MRSA culture, while a positive control tested 100% alcohol. Eight of the solutions tested had 100% growth inhibition, four solutions had partial growth inhibition effects, and one solution did not inhibit MRSA. Of the solutions with alcohol, the 62% solution did not kill MRSA, while the 80% solution only inhibited MRSA. Both the 95 and 100% alcohol solutions had 100% growth inhibition. Of the two surgical scrub solutions, only the one with iodine had 100% growth inhibition, whereas the solution with chloroxylenol (PCMX 3%) had only partial growth inhibition. This study suggests that the solutions with high levels of alcohol, chlorhexidine, or iodine appear to better kill MRSA and might best be used to prevent the spread of community-acquired MRSA in both the hospital and the surgical environment.

  10. Fulminant necrotising fasciitis by community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Non, Lemuel; Kosmin, Aaron

    2015-01-01

    Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) is a rare cause of necrotising fasciitis (NF), and is usually not fulminant as in group A Streptococcus (GAS), the archetypal aetiology. We report an unusually fulminant case of NF by CA-MRSA in an immunocompetent patient. A 52-year-old man presented to the emergency department with 1 week of progressive left thigh pain and swelling. The patient had ecchymoses, bullae and hypoesthesia of the involved skin, and CT scan revealed extensive fascial oedema. He was immediately started on broad spectrum antibiotics. Within 12 h of presentation, he underwent surgical debridement. Despite aggressive supportive care, the patient died less than 24 h after presentation. MRSA, with an antibiogram suggestive of a community-acquired strain, was recovered from intraoperative specimens and admission blood cultures. This case underscores that CA-MRSA, while rarely reported, can cause a fulminant presentation of NF similar to GAS in immunocompetent patients. PMID:25824286

  11. Emergence of antibiotic resistance and prudent use of antibiotic therapy in nosocomially acquired urinary tract infections.

    PubMed

    Wagenlehner, F M E; Naber, K G

    2004-03-01

    Nosocomially acquired urinary tract infections (NAUTI) are common. The reported rates, however, depend very much on the definitions used and the number of investigations requested. In a prospective study on a surgical intensive care unit and adhering closely to the CDC criteria, NAUTI was diagnosed in about 17% of the patients. The urinary catheter associated UTI rate per 1000 catheter days was 14.5 much higher than otherwise reported. Whereas the rates of symptomatic NAUTI and other nosocomially acquired infections were similar, the main difference was found for asymptomatic UTI which depends very much on the effort to search for it systematically. In a prospective study on a urological ward it could be demonstrated that cross-transmission probably plays a much greater role than so far suggested. Continuous surveillance of the bacterial spectrum and resistance is necessary not only on a global but also on a local level. Selection of an appropriate agent for empirical antibacterial therapy can be better tailored if not only the total bacterial spectrum is considered but if all information already available during the identification process is used, such as Gram stain and other simple and rapid tests for stratification of the pathogens. Since in NAUTI usually some kind of biofilm infection is involved, the fluoroquinolones can be considered agents of choice. Only those substances with high antibacterial activity, good bioavailability and those that are mainly excreted by the kidneys should be chosen and they have to be administered at sufficiently high doses.

  12. Ubenimex attenuates acquired sorafenib resistance in renal cell carcinoma by inhibiting Akt signaling in a lipophagy associated mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shuai; Gao, Mingwei; Wang, Xiaoqing; Ding, Sentai; Lv, Jiaju; Gao, Dexuan; Wang, Zhiyang; Niu, Zhihong

    2016-01-01

    Sorafenib is used as first line treatment of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) due to the poor sensitivity to radiotherapy and chemotherapy of this malignancy; however, acquired resistance limits the application of sorafenib and its analogues. In this study, we explored a new strategy to overcome acquired resistance to sorafenib. The RCC cell lines 786-O and ACHN were cultured in presence of increasing concentrations of sorafenib to generate sorafenib-resistant cell lines, 786-O-R and ACHN-R. Interestingly, treatment with ubenimex (0.25 mg/ml) and 3-MA (2 mM) restored the sensitivity of resistant cell lines to sorafenib, indicating the involvement of autophagy in acquired resistance. High levels of autophagy flux were observed in resistant cells, and the opposite effects of ubenimex and 3-MA suggested a complex role for autophagy. While 3-MA abolished protection in sorafenib-resistant cells, ubenimex induced uncontrolled autophagy and autophagic cell death. Lipophagy, characterized by a lipid droplet cargo, was observed in RCC tissues and cells. In sorafenib-resistant cells, ubenimex inhibited the Akt signaling pathway that regulates autophagy. In summary, lipophagy participates in sorafenib-resistance of RCC, which could be reversed by interventions targeting the Akt pathway. PMID:27816967

  13. The vitamin D receptor and inducible nitric oxide synthase associated pathways in acquired resistance to Cooperia oncophora infection in cattle

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Cooperia oncophora is an economically important gastrointestinal nematode in ruminants. Acquired resistance to Cooperia oncophora infection in cattle develops rapidly as a result of prior infections. Naïve cattle, when given a primary infection of high-dose infective L3 larvae, develop a strong immunity to subsequent reinfection. Compared to primary infection, reinfection resulted in a marked reduction in worm establishment. In order to understand molecular mechanisms underlying the development of acquired resistance, we characterized the transcriptomic responses of the bovine small intestine to a primary infection and reinfection. A total of 23 pathways were significantly impacted during infection. The vitamin D receptor activation was strongly induced only during reinfection, suggesting that this pathway may play an important role in the development of acquired resistance via its potential roles in immune regulation and intestinal mucosal integrity maintenance. The expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS2) was strongly induced during reinfection but not during primary infection. As a result, several canonical pathways associated with NOS2 were impacted. The genes involved in eicosanoid synthesis, including prostaglandin synthase 2 (PTGS2 or COX2), remained largely unchanged during infection. The rapid development of acquired resistance may help explain the lack of relative pathogenicity by Cooperia oncophora infection in cattle. Our findings facilitate the understanding of molecular mechanisms underlying the development of acquired resistance, which could have an important implication in vaccine design. PMID:21414188

  14. Modeling of signaling crosstalk-mediated drug resistance and its implications on drug combination

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiaoqiang; Bao, Jiguang; You, Zhuhong; Chen, Xing; Cui, Jun

    2016-01-01

    The efficacy of pharmacological perturbation to the signaling transduction network depends on the network topology. However, whether and how signaling dynamics mediated by crosstalk contributes to the drug resistance are not fully understood and remain to be systematically explored. In this study, motivated by a realistic signaling network linked by crosstalk between EGF/EGFR/Ras/MEK/ERK pathway and HGF/HGFR/PI3K/AKT pathway, we develop kinetic models for several small networks with typical crosstalk modules to investigate the role of the architecture of crosstalk in inducing drug resistance. Our results demonstrate that crosstalk inhibition diminishes the response of signaling output to the external stimuli. Moreover, we show that signaling crosstalk affects the relative sensitivity of drugs, and some types of crosstalk modules that could yield resistance to the targeted drugs were identified. Furthermore, we quantitatively evaluate the relative efficacy and synergism of drug combinations. For the modules that are resistant to the targeted drug, we identify drug targets that can not only increase the relative drug efficacy but also act synergistically. In addition, we analyze the role of the strength of crosstalk in switching a module between drug-sensitive and drug-resistant. Our study provides mechanistic insights into the signaling crosstalk-mediated mechanisms of drug resistance and provides implications for the design of synergistic drug combinations to reduce drug resistance. PMID:27590512

  15. Arabidopsis thaliana FLOWERING LOCUS D is required for systemic acquired resistance.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vijayata; Roy, Shweta; Giri, Mrunmay Kumar; Chaturvedi, Ratnesh; Chowdhury, Zulkarnain; Shah, Jyoti; Nandi, Ashis Kumar

    2013-09-01

    Localized infection in plants often induces systemic acquired resistance (SAR), which provides long-term protection against subsequent infections. A signal originating in the SAR-inducing organ is transported to the distal organs, where it stimulates salicylic acid (SA) accumulation and priming, a mechanism that results in more robust activation of defenses in response to subsequent pathogen infection. In recent years, several metabolites that promote long-distance SAR signaling have been identified. However, the mechanism or mechanisms by which plants perceive and respond to the SAR signals are largely obscure. Here, we show that, in Arabidopsis thaliana, the FLOWERING LOCUS D (FLD) is required for responding to the SAR signals leading to the systemic accumulation of SA and enhancement of disease resistance. Although the fld mutant was competent in accumulating the SAR-inducing signal, it was unable to respond to the SAR signal that accumulates in petiole exudates of wild-type leaves inoculated with a SAR-inducing pathogen. Supporting FLD's role in systemic SAR signaling, we observed that dehydroabietinal and azelaic acid, two metabolites that, in wild-type plants, promote SAR-associated systemic accumulation of SA and priming, respectively, were unable to promote SAR in the fld mutant. FLD also participates in flowering, where it functions to repress expression of the flowering repressor FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC). However, epistasis analysis indicates that FLD's function in SAR is independent of FLC.

  16. Caterpillar saliva interferes with induced Arabidopsis thaliana defence responses via the systemic acquired resistance pathway

    PubMed Central

    Weech, Marie-Hélène; Chapleau, Mélanie; Pan, Li; Ide, Christine; Bede, Jacqueline C.

    2008-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. genotypes limited in their ability to mount either octadecanoid-dependent induced resistance (IR–) or systemic acquired resistance (SAR–) were used to characterize the roles of these pathways in plant–herbivore interactions. Molecular and biochemical markers of IR were analysed in plants subject to herbivory by caterpillars of the beet armyworm, Spodoptera exigua Hübner, which had either intact or impaired salivary secretions since salivary enzymes, such as glucose oxidase, have been implicated in the ability of caterpillars to circumvent induced plant defences. Transcript expression of genes encoding laccase-like multicopper oxidase [AtLMCO4 (polyphenol oxidase)] and defensin (AtPDF1.2) showed salivary-specific patterns which were disrupted in the SAR– mutant plants. The activity of octadecanoid-associated anti-nutritive proteins, such as LMCO and trypsin inhibitor, showed similar patterns. Gene and protein changes parallel plant hormone levels where elevated jasmonic acid was observed in wild-type plants fed upon by caterpillars with impaired salivary secretions compared with plants subject to herbivory by normal caterpillars. This salivary-specific difference in jasmonic acid levels was alleviated in SAR– mutants. These results support the model that caterpillar saliva interferes with jasmonate-dependent plant defences by activating the SAR pathway. PMID:18487634

  17. Nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species are required for systemic acquired resistance in plants.

    PubMed

    El-Shetehy, Mohamed; Wang, Caixia; Shine, M B; Yu, Keshun; Kachroo, Aardra; Kachroo, Pradeep

    2015-01-01

    Systemic acquired resistance (SAR) is a form of broad-spectrum disease resistance that is induced in response to primary infection and that protects uninfected portions of the plant against secondary infections by related or unrelated pathogens. SAR is associated with an increase in chemical signals that operate in a collective manner to confer protection against secondary infections. These include, the phytohormone salicylic acid (SA), glycerol-3-phosphate (G3P), azelaic acid (AzA) and more recently identified signals nitric oxide (NO) and reactive oxygen species (ROS). NO, ROS, AzA and G3P function in the same branch of the SAR pathway, and in parallel to the SA-regulated branch. NO and ROS function upstream of AzA/G3P and different reactive oxygen species functions in an additive manner to mediate chemical cleavage of the C9 double bond on C18 unsaturated fatty acids to generate AzA. The parallel and additive functioning of various chemical signals provides important new insights in the overlapping pathways leading to SAR.

  18. Diclofop-methyl affects microbial rhizosphere community and induces systemic acquired resistance in rice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Si; Li, Xingxing; Lavoie, Michel; Jin, Yujian; Xu, Jiahui; Fu, Zhengwei; Qian, Haifeng

    2017-01-01

    Diclofop-methyl (DM), a widely used herbicide in food crops, may partly contaminate the soil surface of natural ecosystems in agricultural area and exert toxic effects at low dose to nontarget plants. Even though rhizosphere microorganisms strongly interact with root cells, little is known regarding their potential modulating effect on herbicide toxicity in plants. Here we exposed rice seedlings (Xiushui 63) to 100μg/L DM for 2 to 8days and studied the effects of DM on rice rhizosphere microorganisms, rice systemic acquired resistance (SAR) and rice-microorganisms interactions. The results of metagenomic 16S rDNA Illumina tags show that DM increases bacterial biomass and affects their community structure in the rice rhizosphere. After DM treatment, the relative abundance of the bacterium genera Massilia and Anderseniella increased the most relative to the control. In parallel, malate and oxalate exudation by rice roots increased, potentially acting as a carbon source for several rhizosphere bacteria. Transcriptomic analyses suggest that DM induced SAR in rice seedlings through the salicylic acid (but not the jasmonic acid) signal pathway. This response to DM stress conferred resistance to infection by a pathogenic bacterium, but was not influenced by the presence of bacteria in the rhizosphere since SAR transcripts did not change significantly in xenic and axenic plant roots exposed to DM. The present study provides new insights on the response of rice and its associated microorganisms to DM stress.

  19. Extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis in a young child after travel to India.

    PubMed

    Salazar-Austin, Nicole; Ordonez, Alvaro A; Hsu, Alice Jenh; Benson, Jane E; Mahesh, Mahadevappa; Menachery, Elizabeth; Razeq, Jafar H; Salfinger, Max; Starke, Jeffrey R; Milstone, Aaron M; Parrish, Nicole; Nuermberger, Eric L; Jain, Sanjay K

    2015-12-01

    Extensively drug-resistant (XDR) tuberculosis is becoming increasingly prevalent worldwide, but little is known about XDR tuberculosis in young children. In this Grand Round we describe a 2-year-old child from the USA who developed pneumonia after a 3 month visit to India. Symptoms resolved with empirical first-line tuberculosis treatment; however, a XDR strain of Mycobacterium tuberculosis grew in culture. In the absence of clinical or microbiological markers, low-radiation exposure pulmonary CT imaging was used to monitor treatment response, and guide an individualised drug regimen. Management was complicated by delays in diagnosis, uncertainties about drug selection, and a scarcity of child-friendly formulations. Treatment has been successful so far, and the child is in remission. This report of XDR tuberculosis in a young child in the USA highlights the risks of acquiring drug-resistant tuberculosis overseas, and the unique challenges in management of tuberculosis in this susceptible population.

  20. Diagnosis and Treatment of Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Caminero, José A; Cayla, Joan A; García-García, José-María; García-Pérez, Francisco J; Palacios, Juan J; Ruiz-Manzano, Juan

    2017-03-27

    In the last 2 decades, drug-resistant tuberculosis has become a threat and a challenge to worldwide public health. The diagnosis and treatment of these forms of tuberculosis are much more complex and prognosis clearly worsens as the resistance pattern intensifies. Nevertheless, it is important to remember that with the appropriatesystematic clinical management, most of these patients can be cured. These guidelines itemize the basis for the diagnosis and treatment of all tuberculosis patients, from those infected by strains that are sensitive to all drugs, to those who are extensively drug-resistant. Specific recommendations are given forall cases. The current and future role of new molecular methods for detecting resistance, shorter multi-drug-resistant tuberculosis regimens, and new drugs with activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis are also addressed.

  1. Alectinib: a novel second generation anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) inhibitor for overcoming clinically-acquired resistance

    PubMed Central

    Song, Zilan; Wang, Meining; Zhang, Ao

    2015-01-01

    The development of inhibitors for the tyrosine anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) has advanced rapidly, driven by biology and medicinal chemistry. The first generation ALK inhibitor crizotinib was granted US FDA approval with only four years of preclinical and clinical testing. Although this drug offers significant clinical benefit to the ALK-positive patients, resistance has been developed through a variety of mechanisms. In addition to ceritinib, alectinib is another second-generation ALK inhibitor launched in 2014 in Japan. This drug has a unique chemical structure bearing a 5H-benzo[b]carbazol-11(6H)-one structural scaffold with an IC50 value of 1.9 nmol/L, and is highly potent against ALK bearing the gatekeeper mutation L1196M with an IC50 of 1.56 nmol/L. In the clinic, alectinib is highly efficacious in treatment of ALK-positive non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), and retains potency to combat crizotinib-resistant ALK mutations L1196M, F1174L, R1275Q and C1156Y. PMID:26579422

  2. The liver in acquired immune deficiency syndrome: emphasis on patients with intravenous drug abuse.

    PubMed

    Dworkin, B M; Stahl, R E; Giardina, M A; Wormser, G P; Weiss, L; Jankowski, R; Rosenthal, W S

    1987-03-01

    To assess the spectrum of hepatic abnormalities in acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS), we reviewed clinical, biochemical, and pathological material in 32 patients with AIDS. Eight-four percent of AIDS cases had a history of intravenous drug abuse. Ninety percent of AIDS patients has some liver biochemical abnormality at the first presentation of illness. During the course of AIDS, significant (p less than 0.05, paired Student's t test) rises in alkaline phosphatase and bilirubin occurred, without rises in aminotransferases. Mean abnormalities were mild, reflecting approximately 2-fold increases over baseline. Liver failure was not believed to contribute to the death of any AIDS patient. Pathological findings in AIDS included specific infectious diagnosis in 26%, granulomas in 16%, hemosiderosis in 26%, nonspecific abnormalities in 39%, cirrhosis in 23%, and chronic active hepatitis in 3%. AIDS cases were also compared to 10 selected age, sex, and epidemiologically similar non-AIDS patients. Although granulomas or infections were not seen in our comparison group, only the incidence of chronic active hepatitis was significantly different between the groups. If only those with intravenous drug abuse were studied, then none of 24 AIDS patients versus four of eight non-AIDS cases (p less than 0.005) had chronic active hepatitis. AIDS patients with specific hepatic infections tended to have a higher alkaline phosphatase and aspartate aminotransferase (p less than 0.05) than noninfected cases. However, substantial overlap existed, and no difference in hepatomegaly was noted. Ninety percent of AIDS patients were ingesting at least one potentially hepatotoxic drug. We conclude that AIDS patients have a high incidence of underlying hepatic abnormalities. However, clinical and biochemical abnormalities are similar in our selected liver biopsy patients with intravenous drug abuse with or without AIDS. As expected, AIDS patients have a higher incidence of hepatic

  3. High frequency of resistance to the drugs isoniazid and rifampicin among tuberculosis cases in the city of Cabo de Santo Agostinho, an urban area in Northeastern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Baliza, Marcilio; Bach, Artur Henrique; Queiroz, Gabriel Lobo de; Melo, Inês Cardoso; Carneiro, Maria Madileuza; Albuquerque, Maria de Fátima Pessoa Militão de; Suffys, Philip; Rodrigues, Laura; Ximenes, Ricardo; Lucena-Silva, Norma

    2008-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the frequency and risk factors for developing multidrug-resistant tuberculosis in Cabo de Santo Agostinho, PE. This was a prospective study conducted from 2000 to 2003, in which suspected cases were investigated using bacilloscopy and culturing. Out of 232 confirmed cases of tuberculosis, culturing and antibiotic susceptibility tests were performed on 174. Thirty-five of the 174 cultures showed resistance to all drugs. The frequencies of primary and acquired resistance to any drug were 14% and 50% respectively, while the frequencies of primary and acquired multidrug resistance were 8.3% and 40%. Previous tuberculosis treatment and abandonment of treatment were risk factors for drug resistance. The high levels of primary and acquired resistance to the combination of isoniazid and rifampicin contributed towards the difficulties in controlling tuberculosis transmission in the city.

  4. Comparative Proteomics Analysis of Phloem Exudates Collected during the Induction of Systemic Acquired Resistance1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Daniel C.; Dey, Sanjukta; Hauck, Stefanie M.; Vlot, A. Corina; Cameron, Robin K.

    2016-01-01

    Systemic acquired resistance (SAR) is a plant defense response that provides long-lasting, broad-spectrum pathogen resistance to uninfected systemic leaves following an initial localized infection. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), local infection with virulent or avirulent strains of Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato generates long-distance SAR signals that travel from locally infected to distant leaves through the phloem to establish SAR. In this study, a proteomics approach was used to identify proteins that accumulate in phloem exudates in response to the induction of SAR. To accomplish this, phloem exudates collected from mock-inoculated or SAR-induced leaves of wild-type Columbia-0 plants were subjected to label-free quantitative liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry proteomics. Comparing mock- and SAR-induced phloem exudate proteomes, 16 proteins were enriched in phloem exudates collected from SAR-induced plants, while 46 proteins were suppressed. SAR-related proteins THIOREDOXIN h3, ACYL-COENZYME A-BINDING PROTEIN6, and PATHOGENESIS-RELATED1 were enriched in phloem exudates of SAR-induced plants, demonstrating the strength of this approach and suggesting a role for these proteins in the phloem during SAR. To identify novel components of SAR, transfer DNA mutants of differentially abundant phloem proteins were assayed for SAR competence. This analysis identified a number of new proteins (m-type thioredoxins, major latex protein-like protein, ULTRAVIOLET-B RESISTANCE8 photoreceptor) that contribute to the SAR response. The Arabidopsis SAR phloem proteome is a valuable resource for understanding SAR long-distance signaling and the dynamic nature of the phloem during plant-pathogen interactions. PMID:27208255

  5. Therapy-induced developmental reprogramming of prostate cancer cells and acquired therapy resistance.

    PubMed

    Nouri, Mannan; Caradec, Josselin; Lubik, Amy Anne; Li, Na; Hollier, Brett G; Takhar, Mandeep; Altimirano-Dimas, Manuel; Chen, Mengqian; Roshan-Moniri, Mani; Butler, Miriam; Lehman, Melanie; Bishop, Jennifer; Truong, Sarah; Huang, Shih-Chieh; Cochrane, Dawn; Cox, Michael; Collins, Colin; Gleave, Martin; Erho, Nicholas; Alshalafa, Mohamed; Davicioni, Elai; Nelson, Colleen; Gregory-Evans, Sheryl; Karnes, R Jeffrey; Jenkins, Robert B; Klein, Eric A; Buttyan, Ralph

    2017-01-27

    Treatment-induced neuroendocrine transdifferentiation (NEtD) complicates therapies for metastatic prostate cancer (PCa). Based on evidence that PCa cells can transdifferentiate to other neuroectodermally-derived cell lineages in vitro, we proposed that NEtD requires first an intermediary reprogramming to metastable cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) of a neural class and we demonstrate that several different AR+/PSA+ PCa cell lines were efficiently reprogrammed to, maintained and propagated as CSCs by growth in androgen-free neural/neural crest (N/NC) stem medium. Such reprogrammed cells lost features of prostate differentiation; gained features of N/NC stem cells and tumor-initiating potential; were resistant to androgen signaling inhibition; and acquired an invasive phenotype in vitro and in vivo. When placed back into serum-containing mediums, reprogrammed cells could be re-differentiated to N-/NC-derived cell lineages or return back to an AR+ prostate-like state. Once returned, the AR+ cells were resistant to androgen signaling inhibition. Acute androgen deprivation or anti-androgen treatment in serum-containing medium led to the transient appearance of a sub-population of cells with similar characteristics. Finally, a 132 gene signature derived from reprogrammed PCa cell lines distinguished tumors from PCa patients with adverse outcomes. This model may explain neural manifestations of PCa associated with lethal disease. The metastable nature of the reprogrammed stem-like PCa cells suggests that cycles of PCa cell reprogramming followed by re-differentiation may support disease progression and therapeutic resistance. The ability of a gene signature from reprogrammed PCa cells to identify tumors from patients with metastasis or PCa-specific mortality implies that developmental reprogramming is linked to aggressive tumor behaviors.

  6. Origin and Evolution of European Community-Acquired Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Wirth, Thierry; Andersen, Paal S.; Skov, Robert L.; De Grassi, Anna; Simões, Patricia Martins; Tristan, Anne; Petersen, Andreas; Aziz, Maliha; Kiil, Kristoffer; Cirković, Ivana; Udo, Edet E.; del Campo, Rosa; Vuopio-Varkila, Jaana; Ahmad, Norazah; Tokajian, Sima; Peters, Georg; Schaumburg, Frieder; Olsson-Liljequist, Barbro; Givskov, Michael; Driebe, Elizabeth E.; Vigh, Henrik E.; Shittu, Adebayo; Ramdani-Bougessa, Nadjia; Rasigade, Jean-Philippe; Price, Lance B.; Vandenesch, Francois; Larsen, Anders R.; Laurent, Frederic

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) was recognized in Europe and worldwide in the late 1990s. Within a decade, several genetically and geographically distinct CA-MRSA lineages carrying the small SCCmec type IV and V genetic elements and the Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) emerged around the world. In Europe, the predominant CA-MRSA strain belongs to clonal complex 80 (CC80) and is resistant to kanamycin/amikacin and fusidic acid. CC80 was first reported in 1993 but was relatively rare until the late 1990s. It has since been identified throughout North Africa, the Middle East, and Europe, with recent sporadic reports in sub-Saharan Africa. While strongly associated with skin and soft tissue infections, it is rarely found among asymptomatic carriers. Methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA) CC80 strains are extremely rare except in sub-Saharan Africa. In the current study, we applied whole-genome sequencing to a global collection of both MSSA and MRSA CC80 isolates. Phylogenetic analyses strongly suggest that the European epidemic CA-MRSA lineage is derived from a PVL-positive MSSA ancestor from sub-Saharan Africa. Moreover, the tree topology suggests a single acquisition of both the SCCmec element and a plasmid encoding the fusidic acid resistance determinant. Four canonical SNPs distinguish the derived CA-MRSA lineage and include a nonsynonymous mutation in accessory gene regulator C (agrC). These changes were associated with a star-like expansion into Europe, the Middle East, and North Africa in the early 1990s, including multiple cases of cross-continent imports likely driven by human migrations. PMID:25161186

  7. Relationship between the Level of Acquired Resistance to Gentamicin and Synergism with Amoxicillin in Enterococcus faecalis

    PubMed Central

    Aslangul, Elisabeth; Ruimy, Raymond; Chau, Françoise; Garry, Louis; Andremont, Antoine; Fantin, Bruno

    2005-01-01

    In enterococci, intrinsic low-level resistance to gentamicin does not abolish synergism with a cell wall-active antibiotic while high-level resistance due to acquired aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes does. To study the impact of intermediate levels of resistance to gentamicin (64 < MIC < 500 μg/ml), we selected in vitro three consecutive generations of mutants of Enterococcus faecalis JH2-2 with MICs of gentamicin at 128 μg/ml for G1-1477, 256 μg/ml for G2-1573, and 512 μg/ml for G3-1688. E. faecalis 102, which is highly resistant to gentamicin by enzymatic inactivation was used as control. In in vitro killing curves experiments, gentamicin concentrations allowing bactericidal activity and synergism in combination with amoxicillin increased from 4 μg/ml (1/16th the MIC), 16 μg/ml (one-eighth the MIC), 64 μg/ml (one-quarter the MIC), and 256 μg/ml (one-half the MIC) for strains JH2-2, G1-1477, G2-1573 and G3-1688, respectively. As expected, no bactericidal effect of the combination or synergism could be obtained with strain 102. In rabbits with aortic endocarditis caused by strain G1-1477 or G2-1573, combination therapy with amoxicillin and gentamicin was significantly more active than amoxicillin alone (P < 0.05) but not in those infected with the strains G3-1688 and 102. Thus, intermediate levels of resistance to gentamicin was not associated with a loss of a beneficial effect of the gentamicin-amoxicillin combination in vivo even though higher concentrations of gentamicin were necessary to achieve in vitro synergism. Therefore, the use of an MIC of 500 μg/ml as a clinical cutoff limit to predict in vivo benefit of the combination remains a simple and effective tool. PMID:16189091

  8. Quantifying the Determinants of Evolutionary Dynamics Leading to Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Chevereau, Guillaume; Dravecká, Marta; Batur, Tugce; Guvenek, Aysegul; Ayhan, Dilay Hazal; Toprak, Erdal; Bollenbach, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of drug resistant pathogens is a serious public health problem. It is a long-standing goal to predict rates of resistance evolution and design optimal treatment strategies accordingly. To this end, it is crucial to reveal the underlying causes of drug-specific differences in the evolutionary dynamics leading to resistance. However, it remains largely unknown why the rates of resistance evolution via spontaneous mutations and the diversity of mutational paths vary substantially between drugs. Here we comprehensively quantify the distribution of fitness effects (DFE) of mutations, a key determinant of evolutionary dynamics, in the presence of eight antibiotics representing the main modes of action. Using precise high-throughput fitness measurements for genome-wide Escherichia coli gene deletion strains, we find that the width of the DFE varies dramatically between antibiotics and, contrary to conventional wisdom, for some drugs the DFE width is lower than in the absence of stress. We show that this previously underappreciated divergence in DFE width among antibiotics is largely caused by their distinct drug-specific dose-response characteristics. Unlike the DFE, the magnitude of the changes in tolerated drug concentration resulting from genome-wide mutations is similar for most drugs but exceptionally small for the antibiotic nitrofurantoin, i.e., mutations generally have considerably smaller resistance effects for nitrofurantoin than for other drugs. A population genetics model predicts that resistance evolution for drugs with this property is severely limited and confined to reproducible mutational paths. We tested this prediction in laboratory evolution experiments using the “morbidostat”, a device for evolving bacteria in well-controlled drug environments. Nitrofurantoin resistance indeed evolved extremely slowly via reproducible mutations—an almost paradoxical behavior since this drug causes DNA damage and increases the mutation rate. Overall

  9. Drug Response and Resistance in Advanced NF-1-Associated Cancers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-01

    in Nf1 mutant mice and have investigated mechanisms of drug responses and resistance. Our studies of MEK inhibitors in Nf1 mutant mice unexpectedly...Nf1 inactivation; (4) implementing protocols for treating mice with CPX-351; and (5) performing in vivo studies of drug combinations in Nf1 mutant AML...MPN and AML in Nf1 mutant mice and have investigated mechanisms of drug response and resistance. Our studies of MEK inhibitors in Nf1 mutant mice

  10. Resistance to anti-influenza drugs: adamantanes and neuraminidase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Hurt, Aeron C; Ho, Hui-Ting; Barr, Ian

    2006-10-01

    Development of effective drugs for the treatment or prevention of epidemic and pandemic influenza is important in order to reduce its impact. Adamantanes and neuraminidase inhibitors are two classes of anti-influenza drugs available for influenza therapy currently. However, emergence of resistance to these drugs has been detected, which raises concerns regarding their widespread use. In this review, resistance to the adamantanes and neuraminidase inhibitors will be discussed in relation to both epidemic and pandemic influenza viruses.

  11. Fitness cost of chromosomal drug resistance-conferring mutations.

    PubMed

    Sander, Peter; Springer, Burkhard; Prammananan, Therdsak; Sturmfels, Antje; Kappler, Martin; Pletschette, Michel; Böttger, Erik C

    2002-05-01

    To study the cost of chromosomal drug resistance mutations to bacteria, we investigated the fitness cost of mutations that confer resistance to different classes of antibiotics affecting bacterial protein synthesis (aminocyclitols, 2-deoxystreptamines, macrolides). We used a model system based on an in vitro competition assay with defined Mycobacterium smegmatis laboratory mutants; selected mutations were introduced by genetic techniques to address the possibility that compensatory mutations ameliorate the resistance cost. We found that the chromosomal drug resistance mutations studied often had only a small fitness cost; compensatory mutations were not involved in low-cost or no-cost resistance mutations. When drug resistance mutations found in clinical isolates were considered, selection of those mutations that have little or no fitness cost in the in vitro competition assay seems to occur. These results argue against expectations that link decreased levels of antibiotic consumption with the decline in the level of resistance.

  12. Overcome Cancer Cell Drug Resistance Using Natural Products

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Pu; Yang, Hua Li; Yang, Ying Juan; Wang, Lan; Lee, Shao Chin

    2015-01-01

    Chemotherapy is one of the major treatment methods for cancer. However, failure in chemotherapy is not uncommon, mainly due to dose-limiting toxicity associated with drug resistance. Management of drug resistance is important towards successful chemotherapy. There are many reports in the Chinese literature that natural products can overcome cancer cell drug resistance, which deserve sharing with scientific and industrial communities. We summarized the reports into four categories: (1) in vitro studies using cell line models; (2) serum pharmacology; (3) in vivo studies using animal models; and (4) clinical studies. Fourteen single compounds were reported to have antidrug resistance activity for the first time. In vitro, compounds were able to overcome drug resistance at nontoxic or subtoxic concentrations, in a dose-dependent manner, by inhibiting drug transporters, cell detoxification capacity, or cell apoptosis sensitivity. Studies in vivo showed that single compounds, herbal extract, and formulas had potent antidrug resistance activities. Importantly, many single compounds, herbal extracts, and formulas have been used clinically to treat various diseases including cancer. The review provides comprehensive data on use of natural compounds to overcome cancer cell drug resistance in China, which may facilitate the therapeutic development of natural products for clinical management of cancer drug resistance. PMID:26421052

  13. Mycobacterium tuberculosis resistance to antituberculosis drugs in Mozambique*, **

    PubMed Central

    Pires, Germano Manuel; Folgosa, Elena; Nquobile, Ndlovu; Gitta, Sheba; Cadir, Nureisha

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the drug resistance profile of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Mozambique. METHODS: We analyzed secondary data from the National Tuberculosis Referral Laboratory, in the city of Maputo, Mozambique, and from the Beira Regional Tuberculosis Referral Laboratory, in the city of Beira, Mozambique. The data were based on culture-positive samples submitted to first-line drug susceptibility testing (DST) between January and December of 2011. We attempted to determine whether the frequency of DST positivity was associated with patient type or provenance. RESULTS: During the study period, 641 strains were isolated in culture and submitted to DST. We found that 374 (58.3%) were resistant to at least one antituberculosis drug and 280 (43.7%) were resistant to multiple antituberculosis drugs. Of the 280 multidrug-resistant tuberculosis cases, 184 (65.7%) were in previously treated patients, most of whom were from southern Mozambique. Two (0.71%) of the cases of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis were confirmed to be cases of extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis. Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis was most common in males, particularly those in the 21-40 year age bracket. CONCLUSIONS: M. tuberculosis resistance to antituberculosis drugs is high in Mozambique, especially in previously treated patients. The frequency of M. tuberculosis strains that were resistant to isoniazid, rifampin, and streptomycin in combination was found to be high, particularly in samples from previously treated patients. PMID:24831398

  14. Efflux-Mediated Drug Resistance in Bacteria: an Update

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xian-Zhi; Nikaido, Hiroshi

    2010-01-01

    Drug efflux pumps play a key role in drug resistance and also serve other functions in bacteria. There has been a growing list of multidrug and drug-specific efflux pumps characterized from bacteria of human, animal, plant and environmental origins. These pumps are mostly encoded on the chromosome although they can also be plasmid-encoded. A previous article (Li X-Z and Nikaido H, Drugs, 2004; 64[2]: 159–204) had provided a comprehensive review regarding efflux-mediated drug resistance in bacteria. In the past five years, significant progress has been achieved in further understanding of drug resistance-related efflux transporters and this review focuses on the latest studies in this field since 2003. This has been demonstrated in multiple aspects that include but are not limited to: further molecular and biochemical characterization of the known drug efflux pumps and identification of novel drug efflux pumps; structural elucidation of the transport mechanisms of drug transporters; regulatory mechanisms of drug efflux pumps; determining the role of the drug efflux pumps in other functions such as stress responses, virulence and cell communication; and development of efflux pump inhibitors. Overall, the multifaceted implications of drug efflux transporters warrant novel strategies to combat multidrug resistance in bacteria. PMID:19678712

  15. Vorinostat-induced autophagy switches from a death-promoting to a cytoprotective signal to drive acquired resistance.

    PubMed

    Dupéré-Richer, D; Kinal, M; Ménasché, V; Nielsen, T H; Del Rincon, S; Pettersson, F; Miller, W H

    2013-02-07

    Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) have shown promising activity against hematological malignancies in clinical trials and have led to the approval of vorinostat for the treatment of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. However, de novo or acquired resistance to HDACi therapy is inevitable, and their molecular mechanisms are still unclear. To gain insight into HDACi resistance, we developed vorinostat-resistant clones from the hematological cell lines U937 and SUDHL6. Although cross-resistant to some but not all HDACi, the resistant cell lines exhibit dramatically increased sensitivity toward chloroquine, an inhibitor of autophagy. Consistent with this, resistant cells growing in vorinostat show increased autophagy. Inhibition of autophagy in vorinostat-resistant U937 cells by knockdown of Beclin-1 or Lamp-2 (lysosome-associated membrane protein 2) restores sensitivity to vorinostat. Interestingly, autophagy is also activated in parental U937 cells by de novo treatment with vorinostat. However, in contrast to the resistant cells, inhibition of autophagy decreases sensitivity to vorinostat. These results indicate that autophagy can switch from a proapoptotic signal to a prosurvival function driving acquired resistance. Moreover, inducers of autophagy (such as mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors) synergize with vorinostat to induce cell death in parental cells, whereas the resistant cells remain insensitive. These data highlight the complexity of the design of combination strategies using modulators of autophagy and HDACi for the treatment of hematological malignancies.

  16. Antiretroviral drug use and HIV drug resistance among HIV-infected Black men who have sex with men: HIV Prevention Trials Network 061

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Iris; Connor, Matthew B.; Clarke, William; Marzinke, Mark A.; Cummings, Vanessa; Breaud, Autumn; Fogel, Jessica M.; Laeyendecker, Oliver; Fields, Sheldon D.; Donnell, Deborah; Griffith, Sam; Scott, Hyman M.; Shoptaw, Steven; del Rio, Carlos; Magnus, Manya; Mannheimer, Sharon; Wheeler, Darrell P.; Mayer, Kenneth H.; Koblin, Beryl A.; Eshleman, Susan H.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND HPTN 061 enrolled Black men who have sex with men in the United States. Some men with low/undetectable HIV RNA had unusual patterns of antiretroviral (ARV) drug use or had drugs detected in the absence of viral suppression. This report includes a comprehensive analysis of ARV drug use and drug resistance among men in HPTN 061 who were not virally suppressed. METHODS The analysis included 169 men who had viral loads >400 copies/mL at enrollment, including three with acute infection and 13 with recent infection. By self-report, 88 were previously diagnosed, including 31 in care; 137 men reported no ARV drug use. Samples from these 169 men and 23 seroconverters were analyzed with HIV genotyping and ARV drug assays. RESULTS Forty-eight (28%) of the 169 men had ≥1 drug resistance mutation (DRM); 19 (11%) had multi-class resistance. Sixty men (36%) had ≥1 ARV drug detected, 42 (70%) of whom reported no ARV drug use. Nine (23%) of 39 newly-infected men had ≥1 DRM; 10 had ≥1 ARV drug detected. Unusual patterns of ARV drugs were detected more frequently in newly-diagnosed men than previously-diagnosed men. The rate of transmitted drug resistance (TDR) was 23% based on HIV genotyping and self-reported ARV drug use, but was 12% after adjusting for ARV drug detection. CONCLUSIONS Many men in HPTN 061 had drug-resistant HIV and many were at risk of acquiring additional DRMs. ARV drug testing revealed unusual patterns of ARV drug use and provided a more accurate estimate of TDR. PMID:25861015

  17. The epidemiology, pathogenesis, transmission, diagnosis, and management of multidrug-resistant, extensively drug-resistant, and incurable tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Dheda, Keertan; Gumbo, Tawanda; Maartens, Gary; Dooley, Kelly E; McNerney, Ruth; Murray, Megan; Furin, Jennifer; Nardell, Edward A; London, Leslie; Lessem, Erica; Theron, Grant; van Helden, Paul; Niemann, Stefan; Merker, Matthias; Dowdy, David; Van Rie, Annelies; Siu, Gilman K H; Pasipanodya, Jotam G; Rodrigues, Camilla; Clark, Taane G; Sirgel, Frik A; Esmail, Aliasgar; Lin, Hsien-Ho; Atre, Sachin R; Schaaf, H Simon; Chang, Kwok Chiu; Lange, Christoph; Nahid, Payam; Udwadia, Zarir F; Horsburgh, C Robert; Churchyard, Gavin J; Menzies, Dick; Hesseling, Anneke C; Nuermberger, Eric; McIlleron, Helen; Fennelly, Kevin P; Goemaere, Eric; Jaramillo, Ernesto; Low, Marcus; Jara, Carolina Morán; Padayatchi, Nesri; Warren, Robin M

    2017-03-15

    Global tuberculosis incidence has declined marginally over the past decade, and tuberculosis remains out of control in several parts of the world including Africa and Asia. Although tuberculosis control has been effective in some regions of the world, these gains are threatened by the increasing burden of multidrug-resistant (MDR) and extensively drug-resistant (XDR) tuberculosis. XDR tuberculosis has evolved in several tuberculosis-endemic countries to drug-incurable or programmatically incurable tuberculosis (totally drug-resistant tuberculosis). This poses several challenges similar to those encountered in the pre-chemotherapy era, including the inability to cure tuberculosis, high mortality, and the need for alternative methods to prevent disease transmission. This phenomenon mirrors the worldwide increase in antimicrobial resistance and the emergence of other MDR pathogens, such as malaria, HIV, and Gram-negative bacteria. MDR and XDR tuberculosis are associated with high morbidity and substantial mortality, are a threat to health-care workers, prohibitively expensive to treat, and are therefore a serious public health problem. In this Commission, we examine several aspects of drug-resistant tuberculosis. The traditional view that acquired resistance to antituberculous drugs is driven by poor compliance and programmatic failure is now being questioned, and several lines of evidence suggest that alternative mechanisms-including pharmacokinetic variability, induction of efflux pumps that transport the drug out of cells, and suboptimal drug penetration into tuberculosis lesions-are likely crucial to the pathogenesis of drug-resistant tuberculosis. These factors have implications for the design of new interventions, drug delivery and dosing mechanisms, and public health policy. We discuss epidemiology and transmission dynamics, including new insights into the fundamental biology of transmission, and we review the utility of newer diagnostic tools, including

  18. A Hybrid Drug Limits Resistance by Evading the Action of the Multiple Antibiotic Resistance Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kathy K.; Stone, Laura K.; Lieberman, Tami D.; Shavit, Michal; Baasov, Timor; Kishony, Roy

    2016-01-01

    Hybrid drugs are a promising strategy to address the growing problem of drug resistance, but the mechanism by which they modulate the evolution of resistance is poorly understood. Integrating high-throughput resistance measurements and genomic sequencing, we compared Escherichia coli populations evolved in a hybrid antibiotic that links ciprofloxacin and neomycin B with populations evolved in combinations of the component drugs. We find that populations evolved in the hybrid gain less resistance than those evolved in an equimolar mixture of the hybrid’s components, in part because the hybrid evades resistance mediated by the multiple antibiotic resistance (mar) operon. Furthermore, we find that the ciprofloxacin moiety of the hybrid inhibits bacterial growth whereas the neomycin B moiety diminishes the effectiveness of mar activation. More generally, comparing the phenotypic and genotypic paths to resistance across different drug treatments can pinpoint unique properties of new compounds that limit the emergence of resistance. PMID:26538141

  19. A Hybrid Drug Limits Resistance by Evading the Action of the Multiple Antibiotic Resistance Pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kathy K; Stone, Laura K; Lieberman, Tami D; Shavit, Michal; Baasov, Timor; Kishony, Roy

    2016-02-01

    Hybrid drugs are a promising strategy to address the growing problem of drug resistance, but the mechanism by which they modulate the evolution of resistance is poorly understood. Integrating high-throughput resistance measurements and genomic sequencing, we compared Escherichia coli populations evolved in a hybrid antibiotic that links ciprofloxacin and neomycin B with populations evolved in combinations of the component drugs. We find that populations evolved in the hybrid gain less resistance than those evolved in an equimolar mixture of the hybrid's components, in part because the hybrid evades resistance mediated by the multiple antibiotic resistance (mar) operon. Furthermore, we find that the ciprofloxacin moiety of the hybrid inhibits bacterial growth whereas the neomycin B moiety diminishes the effectiveness of mar activation. More generally, comparing the phenotypic and genotypic paths to resistance across different drug treatments can pinpoint unique properties of new compounds that limit the emergence of resistance.

  20. Rapid evolution of drug resistance of multiple myeloma in the microenvironment with drug gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Amy; Zhang, Qiucen; Lambert, Guillaume; Khin, Zayar; Silva, Ariosto; Gatenby, Robert; Kim, John; Pourmand, Nader; Austin, Robert; Sturm, James

    2013-03-01

    Drug resistance in cancer is usually caused by the spatial drug gradients in tumor environment. Here, we culture multiple myeloma in a gradient from 0 to 20 nM of doxorubicin (genotoxic drug) across 2 mm wide region for 12 days. The myeloma cells grew rapidly and formed 3D colonies in the regions with less drug concentration. However, we have seen emergent colonies forming in regions with drug concentration above the minimal inhibitory concentration in less than one week. Once the cells have occupied the regions with less drug concentration, they tend to migrate toward the regions with higher drug concentration in a collective behavior. To characterize their resistance, we collect them from this microfluidic system, for further analysis of the dose response. We find that the IC50 (drug concentration that inhibits 50% of controlled population) of the cells, undergone a drug gradient, increase 16-fold of the wildtype cells. We further discover that these resistant cells express more Multidrug Resistance (mdr) protein, which pumps out the drugs and causes drug resistance, than the wildtype. Our current works on RNA-sequencing analysis may discover other biomolecular mechanisms that may confer the drug resistance.

  1. Potential of L-Buthionine Sulfoximine to Enhance the Apoptotic Action of Estradiol to Reverse Acquired Antihormonal Resistance in Metastatic Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lewis-Wambi, Joan S; Swaby, Ramona; Kim, Helen; Jordan, V. Craig

    2010-01-01

    L-buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) is a potent inhibitor of glutathione biosynthesis and studies have shown that it is capable of enhancing the apoptotic effects of several chemotherapeutic agents. Previous studies have shown that long term antihormonal therapy leads to acquired drug resistance and that estrogen, which is normally a survival signal, is a potent apoptotic agent in these resistant cells. Interestingly, we have developed an antihormone resistant breast cancer cell line, MCF-7:2A, which is resistant to estrogen-induced apoptosis but has elevated levels of glutathione. In the present study, we examined whether BSO is capable of sensitizing antihormone resistant MCF-7:2A cells to estrogen-induced apoptosis. Our results showed that treatment of MCF-7:2A cells with 1 nM E2 plus 100 μM BSO combination for 1 week reduced the growth of these cells by almost 80-90% whereas the individual treatments had no significant effect on growth. TUNEL and DAPI staining showed that the inhibitory effect of the combination treatment was due to apoptosis. Our data indicates that glutathione participates in retarding apoptosis in antihormone-resistant human breast cancer cells and that depletion of this molecule by BSO may be critical in predisposing resistant cells to estrogen-induced apoptosis. PMID:19167492

  2. The Pathway Analysis of Micrornas Regulated Drug-Resistant Responses in HeLa Cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yubo; Dai, Cuihong; Cai, Zhipeng; Hou, Aiju; Cheng, Dayou; Wu, Guanying; Li, Jing; Cui, Jie; Xu, Dechang

    2016-03-01

    Chemotherapy is the main strategy in the treatment of cancer; however, the development of drug-resistance is the obstacle in long-term treatment of cervical cancer. Cisplatin is one of the most common drugs used in cancer therapy. Recently, accumulating evidence suggests that miRNAs are involved in various bioactivities in oncogenesis. It is not unexpected that miRNAs play a key role in acquiring of drug-resistance in the progression of tumor. In this study, we induced and maintained four levels of cisplatin-resistant HeLa cell lines (HeLa/CR1, HeLa/CR2, HeLa/CR3, and HeLa/CR4). According to the previous studies and existing evidence, we selected five miRNAs (miR-183, miR-182, miR-30a, miR-15b, and miR-16) and their potential target mRNAs as our research targets. The real-time RT-PCR was adopted to detect the relative expression of miRNAs and their mRNAs. The results show that miR-182 and miR-15b were up-regulated in resistant cell lines, while miR-30a was significantly down-regulated. At the same time, their targets are related to drug resistance. Compared to their parent HeLa cell line, the expression of selected miRNAs in resistant cell lines altered. The alteration suggests that HeLa cell drug resistance is associated with distinct miRNAs, which indicates that miRNAs may be one of the therapy targets in the treatment of cervical cancer by sensitizing cell to chemotherapy. We suggested a possible network diagram based on the existing theory and the preliminary results of candidate miRNAs and their targets in HeLa cells during development of drug resistance.

  3. The Pathway Analysis of Micrornas Regulated Drug-Resistant Responses in HeLa Cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yubo; Dai, Cuihong; Cai, Zhipeng; Hou, Aiju; Cheng, Dayou; Wu, Guanying; Li, Jing; Cui, Jie; Xu, Dechang

    2016-03-23

    Chemotherapy is the main strategy in the treatment of cancer, however, the development of drug-resistance is the obstacle in long-term treatment of cervical cancer. Cisplatin is one of the most common drugs used in cancer therapy. Recently, accumulating evidence suggests that miRNAs are involved in various bioactivities in oncogenesis. It is not unexpected that miRNAs play a key role in acquiring of drug-resistance in the progression of tumor. In this study, we induced and maintained four levels of cisplatin-resistant HeLa cell lines (HeLa/CR1, HeLa/CR2, HeLa/CR3 and HeLa/CR4). According to the previous studies and existing evidence, we selected five miRNAs (miR-183, miR-182, miR-30a, miR-15b and miR-16) and their potential target mRNAs as our research targets. The real-time RT-PCR was adopted to detect the relative expression of miRNAs and their mRNAs. The results show that miR-182 and miR-15b were up-regulated in resistant cell lines, while miR-30a was significantly down-regulated. At the same time, their targets are related to drug resistance. Compared to their parent HeLa cell line, the expression of selected miRNAs in resistant cell lines altered. The alteration suggests that HeLa cell drug resistance is associated with distinct miRNAs, which indicates that miRNAs may be one of the therapy targets in the treatment of cervical cancer by sensitizing cell to chemotherapy. We suggested a possible network diagram based on the existing theory and the preliminary results of candidate miRNAs and their targets in HeLa cells during development of drug resistance.

  4. Exploiting bacterial drug resistance: a single construct for the diagnosis and treatment of drug resistant infections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sallum, Ulysses W.; Zheng, Xiang; Verma, Sarika; Hasan, Tayyaba

    2009-06-01

    β-lactamase enzyme-activated photosensitizer (β-LEAP). We aim to exploit drug resistance mechanisms to selectively release photosensitizers (PSs) for a specific photodynamic antimicrobial effect and reduced host tissue damage. Consequently, the fluorescence emission intensity of the PSs increases and allows for the detection of enzyme activity. In this work we sought to evaluate β-LEAP for use as a sensitive molecular probe. We have reported the enzyme specific antibacterial action of β-LEAP. Here we report the use of β-LEAP for the rapid functional definition of a β-lactamase.

  5. The mechanism of resistance to sulfa drugs in Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Triglia, Tony; Cowman, Alan F.

    1999-02-01

    The sulfonamide and sulfone (sulfa) group of antimalarials has been used extensively throughout malaria endemic regions of the world to control this important infectious disease of humans. Sulfadoxine is the most extensively used drug of this group of drugs and is usually combined with pyrimethamine (Fansidar), particularly for the control of Plasmodium falciparum, the causative agent of the most lethal form of malaria. Resistance to the sulfadoxine/pyrimethamine combination is widespread. Analysis using molecular, genetic and biochemical approaches has shown that the mechanism of resistance to sulfadoxine involves mutation of dihydropteroate synthase, the enzyme target of this group of drugs. Understanding the mechanism of resistance of P. falciparum to sulfa drugs has allowed detailed analysis of the epidemiology of the spread of drug resistance alleles in the field(1)and, in the future, opens the way to the development of novel antimalarials to this target enzyme. Copyright 1999 Harcourt Publishers Ltd.

  6. Understanding Drug Resistance in Breast Cancer with Mathematical Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Brocato, Terisse; Dogra, Prashant; Koay, Eugene J.; Day, Armin; Chuang, Yao-Li; Wang, Zhihui; Cristini, Vittorio

    2014-01-01

    Chemotherapy is mainstay of treatment for the majority of patients with breast cancer, but results in only 26% of patients with distant metastasis living 5 years past treatment in the United States, largely due to drug resistance. The complexity of drug resistance calls for an integrated approach of mathematical modeling and experimental investigation to develop quantitative tools that reveal insights into drug resistance mechanisms, predict chemotherapy efficacy, and identify novel treatment approaches. This paper reviews recent modeling work for understanding cancer drug resistance through the use of computer simulations of molecular signaling networks and cancerous tissues, with a particular focus on breast cancer. These mathematical models are developed by drawing on current advances in molecular biology, physical characterization of tumors, and emerging drug delivery methods (e.g., nanotherapeutics). We focus our discussion on representative modeling works that have provided quantitative insight into chemotherapy resistance in breast cancer and how drug resistance can be overcome or minimized to optimize chemotherapy treatment. We also discuss future directions of mathematical modeling in understanding drug resistance. PMID:24891927

  7. [New tuberculosis drugs in resistant and multiresistant tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Ramírez Lapausa, Marta; Pascual Pareja, José Francisco; Noguerado Asensio, Arturo

    2013-10-05

    Drug-resistant tuberculosis is a globally emerging problem with a rising incidence. According to the WHO in 2008, 17% of strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, in untreated cases were resistant to at least one drug and 3.6% were resistant to rifampicin and isoniazid, which is called multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. The problem is greater in patients previously treated and in some countries, where rates of multidrug resistance reach 60%. Approximately 5% of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis patients are also resistant to any fluoroquinolone and at least one injectable drug, being called extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis. The treatment of these forms of tuberculosis requires the use of second-line drugs, which causes higher cost, higher toxicity and a longer duration of treatment. There is a need for new compounds with efficacy and safety profiles better than those currently used to treat these forms of tuberculosis. In the last decade different drugs have being reassessed and appeared, which are at different stages of development.

  8. Carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii acquired before liver transplantation: Impact on recipient outcomes.

    PubMed

    Freire, Maristela Pinheiro; Pierrotti, Ligia Câmera; Oshiro, Isabel Cristina Villela Soares; Bonazzi, Patrícia Rodrigues; Oliveira, Larissa Marques de; Machado, Anna Silva; Van Der Heijden, Inneke Marie; Rossi, Flavia; Costa, Silvia Figueiredo; D'Albuquerque, Luiz Augusto Carneiro; Abdala, Edson

    2016-05-01

    Infection with carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (CRAB) after liver transplantation (LT) is associated with high mortality. This study aimed to identify risk factors for post-LT CRAB infection, as well as to evaluate the impact of pre-LT CRAB acquisition on the incidence of post-LT CRAB infection. This was a prospective cohort study of all patients undergoing LT at our facility between October 2009 and October 2011. Surveillance cultures (SCs) were collected immediately before LT and weekly thereafter, until discharge. We analyzed 196 patients who were submitted to 222 LTs. CRAB was identified in 105 (53.6%); 24 (22.9%) of these patients were found to have acquired CRAB before LT, and 85 (81.0%) tested positive on SCs. Post-LT CRAB infection occurred in 56 (28.6%), the most common site being the surgical wound. Multivariate analysis showed that the risk factors for developing CRAB infection were prolonged cold ischemia, post-LT dialysis, LT due to fulminant hepatitis, and pre-LT CRAB acquisition with pre-LT CRAB acquisition showing a considerable trend toward significance (P = 0.06). Among the recipients with CRAB infection, 60-day mortality was 46.4%, significantly higher than among those without (P < 0.001). Mortality risk factors were post-LT infection with multidrug-resistant bacteria, LT performed because of fulminant hepatitis, retransplantation, prolonged cold ischemia, longer LT surgical time, and pre-LT CRAB acquisition, the last showing a trend toward significance (P = 0.08). In conclusion, pre-LT CRAB acquisition appears to increase the risk of post-LT CRAB infection, which has a negative impact on recipient survival. Liver Transplantation 22 615-626 2016 AASLD.

  9. Genomic analysis of ST88 community-acquired methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Buultjens, Andrew H.; Giulieri, Stefano; Owusu-Mireku, Evelyn; Aboagye, Samuel Y.; Baines, Sarah L.; Gonçalves da Silva, Anders; Howden, Benjamin P.; Pluschke, Gerd; Yeboah-Manu, Dorothy

    2017-01-01

    Background The emergence and evolution of community-acquired methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) strains in Africa is poorly understood. However, one particular MRSA lineage called ST88, appears to be rapidly establishing itself as an “African” CA-MRSA clone. In this study, we employed whole genome sequencing to provide more information on the genetic background of ST88 CA-MRSA isolates from Ghana and to describe in detail ST88 CA-MRSA isolates in comparison with other MRSA lineages worldwide. Methods We first established a complete ST88 reference genome (AUS0325) using PacBio SMRT sequencing. We then used comparative genomics to assess relatedness among 17 ST88 CA-MRSA isolates recovered from patients attending Buruli ulcer treatment centres in Ghana, three non-African ST88s and 15 other MRSA lineages. Results We show that Ghanaian ST88 forms a discrete MRSA lineage (harbouring SCCmec-IV [2B]). Gene content analysis identified five distinct genomic regions enriched among ST88 isolates compared with the other S. aureus lineages. The Ghanaian ST88 isolates had only 658 core genome SNPs and there was no correlation between phylogeny and geography, suggesting the recent spread of this clone. The lineage was also resistant to multiple classes of antibiotics including β-lactams, tetracycline and chloramphenicol. Discussion This study reveals that S. aureus ST88-IV is a recently emerging and rapidly spreading CA-MRSA clone in Ghana. The study highlights the capacity of small snapshot genomic studies to provide actionable public health information in resource limited settings. To our knowledge this is the first genomic assessment of the ST88 CA-MRSA clone. PMID:28265515

  10. Drug resistance analysis of bacterial strains isolated from burn patients.

    PubMed

    Wang, L F; Li, J L; Ma, W H; Li, J Y

    2014-01-22

    This study aimed to analyze the spectrum and drug resistance of bacteria isolated from burn patients to provide a reference for rational clinical use of antibiotics. Up to 1914 bacterial strain specimens isolated from burn patients admitted to hospital between 2001 and 2010 were subjected to resistance monitoring by using the K-B paper disk method. Retrospective analysis was performed on drug resistance analysis of burn patients. The top eight bacterium strains according to detection rate. A total of 1355 strains of Gram-negative (G(-)) bacteria and 559 strains of Gram-positive (G(+)) bacteria were detected. The top eight bacterium strains, according to detection rate, were Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Enterobacter cloacae, and Enterococcus. Drug resistance rates were higher than 90% in A. baumannii, P. aeruginosa, S. epidermidis, and S. aureus, which accounted for 52.2, 21.7, 27.8, and 33.3%, respectively, of the entire sample. Those with drug resistance rates lower than 30% accounted for 4.3, 30.4, 16.7, and 16.7%, respectively. Multidrug-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) and methicillin-resistant S. epidermidis (MRSE) accounted for 49.2 and 76.4% of the S. epidermis and S. aureus resistance, respectively. Antibacterial drugs that had drug resistance rates to MRSE and MRSA higher than 90% accounted for 38.9 and 72.2%, respectively, whereas those with lower than 30% drug resistance rates accounted for 11.1 and 16.7%, respectively. The burn patients enrolled in the study were mainly infected with G(-) bacteria. These results strongly suggest that clinicians should practice rational use of antibiotics based on drug susceptibility test results.

  11. PfCRT and its role in antimalarial drug resistance

    PubMed Central

    Ecker, Andrea; Lehane, Adele M.; Clain, Jérôme; Fidock, David A.

    2012-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum resistance to chloroquine, the former gold standard antimalarial drug, is mediated primarily by mutant forms of the ‘Chloroquine Resistance Transporter’ (PfCRT). These mutations impart upon PfCRT the ability to efflux chloroquine from the intracellular digestive vacuole, the site of drug action. Recent studies reveal that PfCRT variants can also affect parasite fitness, protect immature gametocytes against chloroquine action, and alter P. falciparum susceptibility to current first-line therapies. These results highlight the need to be vigilant in screening for the appearance of novel pfcrt alleles that could contribute to new multi-drug resistance phenotypes. PMID:23020971

  12. PCP prevention--more cases of resistance to sulfa drugs.

    PubMed

    1998-09-01

    Three studies that are highlighted suggest that PCP-causing microbes are developing resistance to Bactrim/Septra (B/S), the drug of choice for preventing the life-threatening complications caused by PCP, toxoplasmosis, and bacterial pneumonia. While resistance does not appear to be happening on a large scale, it is a concern because no other drug has the same beneficial effects of B/S. Research is needed for simple, low-toxicity treatments and prophylactic drugs for PCP, before resistance becomes a common problem.

  13. Microenvironment drug resistance in multiple myeloma: emerging new players

    PubMed Central

    Solimando, Antonio Giovanni; Ruggieri, Simona; Annese, Tiziana; Nico, Beatrice; Fumarulo, Ruggiero; Vacca, Angelo; Frassanito, Maria Antonia

    2016-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) drug resistance (DR) is a multistep transformation process based on a powerful interplay between bone marrow stromal cells and MM cells that allows the latter to escape anti-myeloma therapies. Here we present an overview of the role of the bone marrow microenvironment in both soluble factors-mediated drug resistance (SFM-DR) and cell adhesion-mediated drug resistance (CAM-DR), focusing on the role of new players, namely miRNAs, exosomes and cancer-associated fibroblasts. PMID:27474171

  14. Surveillance of Antibiotic Resistance among Hospital- and Community-Acquired Toxigenic Clostridium difficile Isolates over 5-Year Period in Kuwait

    PubMed Central

    Jamal, Wafaa Y.; Rotimi, Vincent O.

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is a leading and an important cause of diarrhea in a healthcare setting especially in industrialized countries. Community-associated CDI appears to add to the burden on healthcare setting problems. The aim of the study was to investigate the antimicrobial resistance of healthcare-associated and community-acquired C. difficile infection over 5 years (2008–2012) in Kuwait. A total of 111 hospital-acquired (HA-CD) and 35 community-acquired Clostridium difficile (CA-CD) clinical isolates from stool of patients with diarrhoea were studied. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing of 15 antimicrobial agents against these pathogens was performed using E test method. There was no evidence of resistance to amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, daptomycin, linezolid, piperacillin-tazobactam, teicoplanin and vancomycin by both HA-CD and CA-CD isolates. Metronidazole had excellent activity against CA-CD but there was a 2.9% resistance rate against HA-CD isolates. Ampicillin, clindamycin, levofloxacin and imipenem resistance rates among the HC-CD vs. CA-CD isolates were 100 vs. 47.4%; 43 vs. 47.4%; 100 vs. 100% and 100 vs. 89%, respectively. An unexpected high rifampicin resistance rate of 15.7% emerged amongst the HA-CD isolates. In conclusion, vancomycin resistance amongst the HA-CD and CA-CD isolates was not encountered in this series but few metronidazole resistant hospital isolates were isolated. High resistance rates of ampicillin, clindamycin, levofloxacin, and imipenem resistance were evident among both CA-CD and HA-CD isolates. Rifampicin resistance is emerging among the HA-CD isolates. PMID:27536994

  15. Why does drug resistance readily evolve but vaccine resistance does not?

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Why is drug resistance common and vaccine resistance rare? Drugs and vaccines both impose substantial pressure on pathogen populations to evolve resistance and indeed, drug resistance typically emerges soon after the introduction of a drug. But vaccine resistance has only rarely emerged. Using well-established principles of population genetics and evolutionary ecology, we argue that two key differences between vaccines and drugs explain why vaccines have so far proved more robust against evolution than drugs. First, vaccines tend to work prophylactically while drugs tend to work therapeutically. Second, vaccines tend to induce immune responses against multiple targets on a pathogen while drugs tend to target very few. Consequently, pathogen populations generate less variation for vaccine resistance than they do for drug resistance, and selection has fewer opportunities to act on that variation. When vaccine resistance has evolved, these generalities have been violated. With careful forethought, it may be possible to identify vaccines at risk of failure even before they are introduced. PMID:28356449

  16. Induction of systemic acquired resistance by Rotylenchulus reniformis and Meloidogyne incognita in cotton following separate and concomitant inoculations.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Systemic acquired resistance (SAR) can be elicited by virulent and avirulent pathogenic strains and SAR against plant-parasitic nematodes has been documented. Our objective was to determine whether co-infection of cotton by Meloidogyne incognita and Rotylenchulus reniformis affects the population le...

  17. Saccharin-induced systemic acquired resistance against rust (Phakopsora pachyrhizi) infection in soybean: Effects on growth and development

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We examined the effect of saccharin on the systemic acquired resistance (SAR) response of soybean to the fungus Phakopsora pachyrhizi, the causal agent of soybean rust. Plants were grown hydroponically in half-strength Hoagland’s solution and were challenged with the pathogen 1, 5, 10 and 15 days af...

  18. Bedaquiline for the treatment of drug-resistant tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Bélard, Sabine; Heuvelings, Charlotte C; Janssen, Saskia; Grobusch, Martin P

    2015-05-01

    Bedaquiline is a much-needed novel drug which is highly effective against drug-resistant tuberculosis. While its clinical development has been laudably fast-tracked and the drug is now available for inclusion into treatment regimens when no suitable alternatives exist, clinical experience with bedaquiline is still limited. Phase III trial data and Phase IV studies are needed particularly to study different patient populations and to optimize treatment regimens. Drug resistance to bedaquiline needs to be monitored carefully, and full access to bedaquiline treatment where it is appropriate and needed must be promoted.

  19. Antimicrobial resistance determinant microarray for analysis of multi-drug resistant isolates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taitt, Chris Rowe; Leski, Tomasz; Stenger, David; Vora, Gary J.; House, Brent; Nicklasson, Matilda; Pimentel, Guillermo; Zurawski, Daniel V.; Kirkup, Benjamin C.; Craft, David; Waterman, Paige E.; Lesho, Emil P.; Bangurae, Umaru; Ansumana, Rashid

    2012-06-01

    The prevalence of multidrug-resistant infections in personnel wounded in Iraq and Afghanistan has made it challenging for physicians to choose effective therapeutics in a timely fashion. To address the challenge of identifying the potential for drug resistance, we have developed the Antimicrobial Resistance Determinant Microarray (ARDM) to provide DNAbased analysis for over 250 resistance genes covering 12 classes of antibiotics. Over 70 drug-resistant bacteria from different geographic regions have been analyzed on ARDM, with significant differences in patterns of resistance identified: genes for resistance to sulfonamides, trimethoprim, chloramphenicol, rifampin, and macrolide-lincosamidesulfonamide drugs were more frequently identified in isolates from sources in Iraq/Afghanistan. Of particular concern was the presence of genes responsible for resistance to many of the last-resort antibiotics used to treat war traumaassociated infections.

  20. New Real-Time PCR Assays for Detection of Inducible and Acquired Clarithromycin Resistance in the Mycobacterium abscessus Group

    PubMed Central

    Shallom, Shamira J.; Moura, Natalia S.; Olivier, Kenneth N.; Sampaio, Elizabeth P.; Holland, Steven M.

    2015-01-01

    Members of the Mycobacterium abscessus group (MAG) cause lung, soft tissue, and disseminated infections. The oral macrolides clarithromycin and azithromycin are commonly used for treatment. MAG can display clarithromycin resistance through the inducible erm(41) gene or via acquired mutations in the rrl (23S rRNA) gene. Strains harboring a truncation or a T28C substitution in erm(41) lose the inducible resistance trait. Phenotypic detection of clarithromycin resistance requires extended incubation (14 days), highlighting the need for faster methods to detect resistance. Two real-time PCR-based assays were developed to assess inducible and acquired clarithromycin resistance and tested on a total of 90 clinical and reference strains. A SYBR green assay was designed to distinguish between a full-length and truncated erm(41) gene by temperature shift in melting curve analysis. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) allele discrimination assays were developed to distinguish T or C at position 28 of erm(41) and 23S rRNA rrl gene mutations at position 2058 and/or 2059. Truncated and full-size erm(41) genes were detected in 21/90 and 69/90 strains, respectively, with 64/69 displaying T at nucleotide position 28 and 5/69 containing C at that position. Fifteen isolates showed rrl mutations conferring clarithromycin resistance, including A2058G (11 isolates), A2058C (3 isolates), and A2059G (1 isolate). Targeted sequencing and phenotypic assessment of resistance concurred with molecular assay results. Interestingly, we also noted cooccurring strains harboring an active erm(41), inactive erm(41), and/or acquired mutational resistance, as well as slowly growing MAG strains and also strains displaying an inducible resistance phenotype within 5 days, long before the recommended 14-day extended incubation. PMID:26269619

  1. Bedaquiline: A novel drug to combat multiple drug-resistant tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Goel, Divya

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is among the most common infectious diseases and continues as a major global health problem. The scenario is worsened by the emergence and spread of multiple drug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) and extensive drug-resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB). Cure rates are high for drug sensitive strains of Myobacterium tuberculosis if treatment protocols are adhered to, but treatment of MDR-TB and extensive drug drug-resistant strains is virtually impossible. The treatment of MDR-TB and XDR-TB relies on the drugs, which are less potent, more toxic and more costly and have to be administered for the longer duration. No new drug had come in to market for last 40 years, but the emergence of MDR-TB and XDR-TB has spurred interest in the development of novel drugs. For the effective treatment outcome, there is a dire need of new drugs with a different mechanism of action that can tackle both drug sensitive as well as drug-resistant strains. Bedaquiline is one such new drug with unique mechanism of action. Food and Drug Administration has approved bedaquiline for MDR-TB in December 2012. This article reviews the available evidence of efficacy and safety of bedaquiline.

  2. Co-delivery of multiple drug resistance inhibitors by polymer/inorganic hybrid nanoparticles to effectively reverse cancer drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Wu, Cong; Gong, Meng-Qing; Liu, Bo-Ya; Zhuo, Ren-Xi; Cheng, Si-Xue

    2017-01-01

    To effectively reverse multiple drug resistance (MDR) in tumor treatments, a functional nano-sized drug delivery system with active targeting function and pH sensitivity was prepared for the co-delivery of multiple drug resistance inhibitors. Buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) to inhibit GSH synthesis and celecoxib (CXB) to down-regulate P-gp expression were co-loaded in polymer/inorganic hybrid nanoparticles to form buthionine sulfoximine/celecoxib@biotin-heparin/heparin/calcium carbonate/calcium phosphate nanoparticles (BSO/CXB@BNP). To investigate the reversal of MDR, the drug resistant cells (MCF-7/ADR) were pretreated by the dual-inhibitor loaded nanoparticles (BSO/CXB@BNP) followed by the treatment of doxorubicin (DOX) loaded nanoparticles (DOX@BNP). The dual-inhibitor loaded nanoparticles (BSO/CXB@BNP) exhibited greatly enhanced efficiency in down-regulation of GSH and P-gp since BSO and CXB had combined effects on the reduction of GSH and P-gp in drug resistant tumor cells. As a result, BSO/CXB@BNP exhibited a significantly improved capability in reversal of MDR compared with mono-inhibitor loaded nanoparticles (CXB@BNP and BSO@BNP). As compared with free drug resistance inhibitors, delivery of drug resistance inhibitors by functional nanocarriers could obviously improve the therapeutic efficiency due to enhanced cellular uptake and increased intracellular drug accumulation. The study on immunostimulatory effects of different treatments showed that BSO/CXB@BNP treatment resulted in the lowest concentration of interleukin 10, a cytokine related to tumor development. These results suggest the nanoparticulate drug delivery platform developed in this study has promising applications in multiple drug delivery to overcome drug resistance in tumor treatments.

  3. Mechanisms of Drug Resistance in Plasmodium falciparum

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-09-11

    parasites. With the collaboration of Dr. Esther Orozco, we cloned two mdr-like genes from Entamoeba histolytica and demonstrated an association of...Orozco (1990). " Entamoeba histolytica : "Physiology of multidrug resistance." Exp Parasitol. 71:169-175. Buschman, E., and P. Gros. (1991). "Functional...Ayala, E. Orozco, and D. Wirth. (1990). "Emetine-resistant mutants of Entamoeba histolytica overexpress mRNAs for multidrug resistance." Mol Biochem

  4. Drug resistance and biochemical characteristics of Salmonella from turkeys.

    PubMed Central

    Poppe, C; Kolar, J J; Demczuk, W H; Harris, J E

    1995-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the antibiotic resistance and biochemical characteristics of 2690 Salmonella strains belonging to 52 serovars and isolated from environmental and feed samples from 270 turkey flocks in Canada. Resistance of the Salmonella strains to the aminoglycoside antibiotics varied widely; none of the strains were resistant to amikacin, 14.2% were resistant to neomycin, 25.8% were resistant to gentamicin, and 27.7% of the strains were resistant to kanamycin. Most strains (97.6%) were resistant to the aminocyclitol, spectinomycin. Regarding resistance to the beta-lactam antibiotics, 14.3% and 14.4% of the strains were resistant to ampicillin and carbenicillin, respectively, whereas only 5 (0.2%) of the strains were resistant to cephalothin. None of the strains were resistant to the fluoroquinolone ciprofloxacin or to polymyxin B. Resistance to chloramphenicol and nitrofurantoin was found in 2.4% and 7% of the strains, respectively. Only 1.7% of the strains were resistant to the trimethoprimsulfamethoxazole combination, whereas 58.1% were resistant to sulfisoxazole. Thirty-eight percent of the strains were resistant to tetracycline. Salmonella serovars differed markedly in their drug resistance profiles. Biochemical characterization of the Salmonella showed that the S. anatum, S. saintpaul and S. reading serovars could be divided into distinct biotypes. PMID:8548684

  5. Structure-based drug design to overcome drug resistance: challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Rafaela S; Andricopulo, Adriano D

    2014-01-01

    Drug resistance is a common concern for the development of novel antiviral, antimicrobial and anticancer therapies. To overcome this problem, several strategies have been developed, many of which involving the theme of this review, the use of structure-based drug design (SBDD) approaches. These include the successful design of new compounds that target resistant mutant proteins, as well as the development of drugs that target multiple proteins involved in specific biochemical pathways. Finally, drug resistance can also be considered in the early stages of drug discovery, through the use of strategies to delay the development of resistance. The purpose of this brief review is to underline the usefulness of SBDD approaches based on case studies, highlighting present challenges and opportunities in drug design.

  6. Drug resistance in African trypanosomiasis: the melarsoprol and pentamidine story.

    PubMed

    Baker, Nicola; de Koning, Harry P; Mäser, Pascal; Horn, David

    2013-03-01

    Melarsoprol and pentamidine represent the two main classes of drugs, the arsenicals and diamidines, historically used to treat the diseases caused by African trypanosomes: sleeping sickness in humans and Nagana in livestock. Cross-resistance to these drugs was first observed over 60 years ago and remains the only example of cross-resistance among sleeping sickness therapies. A Trypanosoma brucei adenosine transporter is well known for its role in the uptake of both drugs. More recently, aquaglyceroporin 2 (AQP2) loss of function was linked to melarsoprol-pentamidine cross-resistance. AQP2, a channel that appears to facilitate drug accumulation, may also be linked to clinical cases of resistance. Here, we review these findings and consider some new questions as well as future prospects for tackling the devastating diseases caused by these parasites.

  7. Drug resistance in cancer: molecular evolution and compensatory proliferation.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Ran

    2016-03-15

    Targeted therapies have revolutionized cancer treatment. Unfortunately, their success is limited due to the development of drug resistance within the tumor, which is an evolutionary process. Understanding how drug resistance evolves is a prerequisite to a better success of targeted therapies. Resistance is usually explained as a response to evolutionary pressure imposed by treatment. Thus, evolutionary understanding can and should be used in the design and treatment of cancer. In this article, drug-resistance to targeted therapies is reviewed from an evolutionary standpoint. The concept of apoptosis-induced compensatory proliferation (AICP) is developed. It is shown that AICP helps to explain some of the phenomena that are observed experimentally in cancers. Finally, potential drug targets are suggested in light of AICP.

  8. Highly active ozonides selected against drug resistant malaria

    PubMed Central

    Lobo, Lis; de Sousa, Bruno; Cabral, Lília; Cristiano, Maria LS; Nogueira, Fátima

    2016-01-01

    Ever increasing multi-drug resistance by Plasmodium falciparum is creating new challenges in malaria chemotherapy. In the absence of licensed vaccines, treatment and prevention of malaria is heavily dependent on drugs. Potency, range of activity, safety, low cost and ease of administration are crucial issues in the design and formulation of antimalarials. We have tested three synthetic ozonides NAC89, LC50 and LCD67 in vitro and in vivo against multidrug resistant Plasmodium. In vitro, LC50 was at least 10 times more efficient inhibiting P. falciparum multidrug resistant Dd2 strain than chloroquine and mefloquine and as efficient as artemisinin (ART), artesunate and dihydroartemisinin. All three ozonides showed high efficacy in clearing parasitaemia in mice, caused by multi-drug resistant Plasmodium chabaudi strains, by subcutaneous administration, demonstrating high efficacy in vivo against ART and artesunate resistant parasites. PMID:27276364

  9. Highly active ozonides selected against drug resistant malaria.

    PubMed

    Lobo, Lis; Sousa, Bruno de; Cabral, Lília; Cristiano, Maria Ls; Nogueira, Fátima

    2016-06-07

    Ever increasing multi-drug resistance by Plasmodium falciparum is creating new challenges in malaria chemotherapy. In the absence of licensed vaccines, treatment and prevention of malaria is heavily dependent on drugs. Potency, range of activity, safety, low cost and ease of administration are crucial issues in the design and formulation of antimalarials. We have tested three synthetic ozonides NAC89, LC50 and LCD67 in vitro and in vivo against multidrug resistant Plasmodium. In vitro, LC50 was at least 10 times more efficient inhibiting P. falciparum multidrug resistant Dd2 strain than chloroquine and mefloquine and as efficient as artemisinin (ART), artesunate and dihydroartemisinin. All three ozonides showed high efficacy in clearing parasitaemia in mice, caused by multi-drug resistant Plasmodium chabaudi strains, by subcutaneous administration, demonstrating high efficacy in vivo against ART and artesunate resistant parasites.

  10. Combined antiretroviral and anti-tuberculosis drug resistance following incarceration

    PubMed Central

    Stott, K E; de Oliviera, T; Lessells, R J

    2013-01-01

    We describe a case of HIV/tuberculosis (TB) co-infection from KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa, characterised by drug resistance in both pathogens. The development of drug resistance was linked temporally to two periods of incarceration. This highlights the urgent need for improved integration of HIV/TB control strategies within prison health systems and within the broader public health framework. PMID:24273475

  11. Identifying clinically relevant drug resistance genes in drug-induced resistant cancer cell lines and post-chemotherapy tissues.

    PubMed

    Tong, Mengsha; Zheng, Weicheng; Lu, Xingrong; Ao, Lu; Li, Xiangyu; Guan, Qingzhou; Cai, Hao; Li, Mengyao; Yan, Haidan; Guo, You; Chi, Pan; Guo, Zheng

    2015-12-01

    Until recently, few molecular signatures of drug resistance identified in drug-induced resistant cancer cell models can be translated into clinical practice. Here, we defined differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between pre-chemotherapy colorectal cancer (CRC) tissue samples of non-responders and responders for 5-fluorouracil and oxaliplatin-based therapy as clinically relevant drug resistance genes (CRG5-FU/L-OHP). Taking CRG5-FU/L-OHP as reference, we evaluated the clinical relevance of several types of genes derived from HCT116 CRC cells with resistance to 5-fluorouracil and oxaliplatin, respectively. The results revealed that DEGs between parental and resistant cells, when both were treated with the corresponding drug for a certain time, were significantly consistent with the CRG5-FU/L-OHP as well as the DEGs between the post-chemotherapy CRC specimens of responders and non-responders. This study suggests a novel strategy to extract clinically relevant drug resistance genes from both drug-induced resistant cell models and post-chemotherapy cancer tissue specimens.

  12. The challenges of multi-drug-resistance in hepatology.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Javier; Bert, Frédéric; Nicolas-Chanoine, Marie-Hélène

    2016-11-01

    Antimicrobial resistance has become a major global public health security problem that needs coordinated approaches at regional, national and international levels. Antibiotic overuse and the failure of control measures to prevent the spread of resistant bacteria in the healthcare environment have led to an alarming increase in the number of infections caused by resistant bacteria, organisms that resist many (multi-drug and extensively drug-resistant strains), if not all (pan-drug-resistant bacteria) currently available antibiotics. While Gram-positive cocci resistance (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and vancomycin-resistant enterococci) shows a heterogeneous geographical distribution, extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae and carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae have become pandemic worldwide and endemic in some parts of the world, respectively. Moreover, currently available therapeutic options for resistant bacteria are very limited, with very few new agents in development. Antimicrobial resistance is especially relevant in decompensated cirrhosis. Firstly, cirrhotic patients are highly susceptible to develop infections caused by resistant bacteria as risk factors of multiresistance concentrate in this population (mainly repeated hospitalizations and antibiotic exposure). Secondly, inappropriate empirical antibiotic schedules easily translate into increased morbidity (acute kidney injury, acute-on-chronic liver failure, septic shock) and hospital mortality in advanced cirrhosis. Therefore, hepatologists must face nowadays a complex clinical scenario that requires new empirical antibiotic strategies that may further spread resistance. Global, regional and local preventive measures should therefore be implemented to combat antimicrobial resistance in cirrhosis including the restriction of antibiotic prophylaxis to high-risk populations, investigation on non-antibiotic prophylaxis, stewardship programs on adequate antibiotic

  13. Extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis: epidemiology and management.

    PubMed

    Matteelli, Alberto; Roggi, Alberto; Carvalho, Anna Cc

    2014-01-01

    The advent of antibiotics for the treatment of tuberculosis (TB) represented a major breakthrough in the fight against the disease. However, since its first use, antibiotic therapy has been associated with the emergence of resistance to drugs. The incorrect use of anti-TB drugs, either due to prescription errors, low patient compliance, or poor quality of drugs, led to the widespread emergence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains with an expanding spectrum of resistance. The spread of multidrug-resistant (MDR) strains (ie, strains resistant to both isoniazid and rifampicin) has represented a major threat to TB control since the 1990s. In 2006, the first cases of MDR strains with further resistance to fluoroquinolone and injectable drugs were described and named extensively drug-resistant TB (XDR-TB). The emergence of XDR-TB strains is a result of mismanagement of MDR cases, and treatment relies on drugs that are less potent and more toxic than those used to treat drug-susceptible or MDR strains. Furthermore, treatment success is lower and mortality higher than achieved in MDR-TB cases, and the number of drugs necessary in the intensive phase of treatment may be higher than the four drugs recommended for MDR-TB. Linezolid may represent a valuable drug to treat cases of XDR-TB. Delamanid, bedaquiline, and PA-824 are new anti-TB agents in the development pipeline that have the potential to enhance the cure rate of XDR-TB. The best measures to prevent new cases of XDR-TB are the correct management of MDR-TB patients, early detection, and proper treatment of existing patients with XDR-TB.

  14. Drug efflux pump deficiency and drug target resistance masking in growing bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Fange, David; Nilsson, Karin; Tenson, Tanel; Ehrenberg, Måns

    2009-01-01

    Recent experiments have shown that drug efflux pump deficiency not only increases the susceptibility of pathogens to antibiotics, but also seems to “mask” the effects of mutations, that decrease the affinities of drugs to their intracellular targets, on the growth rates of drug-exposed bacteria. That is, in the presence of drugs, the growth rates of drug-exposed WT and target mutated strains are the same in a drug efflux pump deficient background, but the mutants grow faster than WT in a drug efflux pump proficient background. Here, we explain the mechanism of target resistance masking and show that it occurs in response to drug efflux pump inhibition among pathogens with high-affinity drug binding targets, low cell-membrane drug-permeability and insignificant intracellular drug degradation. We demonstrate that target resistance masking is fundamentally linked to growth-bistability, i.e., the existence of 2 different steady state growth rates for one and the same drug concentration in the growth medium. We speculate that target resistance masking provides a hitherto unknown mechanism for slowing down the evolution of target resistance among pathogens. PMID:19416855

  15. XPO1 inhibitor combination therapy with bortezomib or carfilzomib induces nuclear localization of IκBα and overcomes acquired proteasome inhibitor resistance in human multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Joel G.; Kashyap, Trinayan; Dawson, Jana L.; Gomez, Juan; Bauer, Alexis A.; Grant, Steven; Dai, Yun; Shain, Kenneth H.; Meads, Mark; Landesman, Yosef; Sullivan, Daniel M.

    2016-01-01

    Acquired proteasome-inhibitor (PI) resistance is a major obstacle in the treatment of multiple myeloma (MM). We investigated whether the clinical XPO1-inhibitor selinexor, when combined with bortezomib or carfilzomib, could overcome acquired resistance in MM. PI-resistant myeloma cell lines both in vitro and in vivo and refractory myeloma patient biopsies were treated with selinexor/bortezomib or carfilzomib and assayed for apoptosis. Mechanistic studies included NFκB pathway protein expression assays, immunofluorescence microscopy, ImageStream flow-cytometry, and proximity-ligation assays. IκBα knockdown and NFκB activity were measured in selinexor/bortezomib-treated MM cells. We found that selinexor restored sensitivity of PI-resistant MM to bortezomib and carfilzomib. Selinexor/bortezomib treatment inhibited PI-resistant MM tumor growth and increased survival in mice. Myeloma cells from PI-refractory MM patients were sensitized by selinexor to bortezomib and carfilzomib without affecting non-myeloma cells. Immunofluorescence microscopy, Western blot, and ImageStream analyses of MM cells showed increases in total and nuclear IκBα by selinexor/bortezomib. Proximity ligation found increased IκBα-NFκB complexes in treated MM cells. IκBα knockdown abrogated selinexor/bortezomib-induced cytotoxicity in MM cells. Selinexor/bortezomib treatment decreased NFκB transcriptional activity. Selinexor, when used with bortezomib or carfilzomib, has the potential to overcome PI drug resistance in MM. Sensitization may be due to inactivation of the NFκB pathway by IκBα. PMID:27806331

  16. Regulatory and Functional Aspects of Indolic Metabolism in Plant Systemic Acquired Resistance.

    PubMed

    Stahl, Elia; Bellwon, Patricia; Huber, Stefan; Schlaeppi, Klaus; Bernsdorff, Friederike; Vallat-Michel, Armelle; Mauch, Felix; Zeier, Jürgen

    2016-05-02

    Tryptophan-derived, indolic metabolites possess diverse functions in Arabidopsis innate immunity to microbial pathogen infection. Here, we investigate the functional role and regulatory characteristics of indolic metabolism in Arabidopsis systemic acquired resistance (SAR) triggered by the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae. Indolic metabolism is broadly activated in both P. syringae-inoculated and distant, non-inoculated leaves. At inoculation sites, camalexin, indol-3-ylmethylamine (I3A), and indole-3-carboxylic acid (ICA) are the major accumulating compounds. Camalexin accumulation is positively affected by MYB122, and the cytochrome P450 genes CYP81F1 and CYP81F2. Local I3A production, by contrast, occurs via indole glucosinolate breakdown by PEN2- dependent and independent pathways. Moreover, exogenous application of the defense hormone salicylic acid stimulates I3A generation at the expense of its precursor indol-3-ylmethylglucosinolate (I3M), and the SAR regulator pipecolic acid primes plants for enhanced P. syringae-induced activation of distinct branches of indolic metabolism. In uninfected systemic tissue, the metabolic response is more specific and associated with enhanced levels of the indolics I3A, ICA, and indole-3-carbaldehyde (ICC). Systemic indole accumulation fully depends on functional CYP79B2/3, PEN2, and MYB34/51/122, and requires functional SAR signaling. Genetic analyses suggest that systemically elevated indoles are dispensable for SAR and associated systemic increases of salicylic acid. However, soil-grown but not hydroponically -cultivated cyp79b2/3 and pen2 plants, both defective in indolic secondary metabolism, exhibit pre-induced immunity, which abrogates their intrinsic ability to induce SAR.

  17. Sparse Representation for Prediction of HIV-1 Protease Drug Resistance.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiaxia; Weber, Irene T; Harrison, Robert W

    2013-01-01

    HIV rapidly evolves drug resistance in response to antiviral drugs used in AIDS therapy. Estimating the specific resistance of a given strain of HIV to individual drugs from sequence data has important benefits for both the therapy of individual patients and the development of novel drugs. We have developed an accurate classification method based on the sparse representation theory, and demonstrate that this method is highly effective with HIV-1 protease. The protease structure is represented using our newly proposed encoding method based on Delaunay triangulation, and combined with the mutated amino acid sequences of known drug-resistant strains to train a machine-learning algorithm both for classification and regression of drug-resistant mutations. An overall cross-validated classification accuracy of 97% is obtained when trained on a publically available data base of approximately 1.5×10(4) known sequences (Stanford HIV database http://hivdb.stanford.edu/cgi-bin/GenoPhenoDS.cgi). Resistance to four FDA approved drugs is computed and comparisons with other algorithms demonstrate that our method shows significant improvements in classification accuracy.

  18. Mechanisms of action of systemic antibiotics used in periodontal treatment and mechanisms of bacterial resistance to these drugs

    PubMed Central

    SOARES, Geisla Mary Silva; FIGUEIREDO, Luciene Cristina; FAVERI, Marcelo; CORTELLI, Sheila Cavalca; DUARTE, Poliana Mendes; FERES, Magda

    2012-01-01

    Antibiotics are important adjuncts in the treatment of infectious diseases, including periodontitis. The most severe criticisms to the indiscriminate use of these drugs are their side effects and, especially, the development of bacterial resistance. The knowledge of the biological mechanisms involved with the antibiotic usage would help the medical and dental communities to overcome these two problems. Therefore, the aim of this manuscript was to review the mechanisms of action of the antibiotics most commonly used in the periodontal treatment (i.e. penicillin, tetracycline, macrolide and metronidazole) and the main mechanisms of bacterial resistance to these drugs. Antimicrobial resistance can be classified into three groups: intrinsic, mutational and acquired. Penicillin, tetracycline and erythromycin are broad-spectrum drugs, effective against gram-positive and gram-negative microorganisms. Bacterial resistance to penicillin may occur due to diminished permeability of the bacterial cell to the antibiotic; alteration of the penicillin-binding proteins, or production of β-lactamases. However, a very small proportion of the subgingival microbiota is resistant to penicillins. Bacteria become resistant to tetracyclines or macrolides by limiting their access to the cell, by altering the ribosome in order to prevent effective binding of the drug, or by producing tetracycline/macrolide-inactivating enzymes. Periodontal pathogens may become resistant to these drugs. Finally, metronidazole can be considered a prodrug in the sense that it requires metabolic activation by strict anaerobe microorganisms. Acquired resistance to this drug has rarely been reported. Due to these low rates of resistance and to its high activity against the gram-negative anaerobic bacterial species, metronidazole is a promising drug for treating periodontal infections. PMID:22858695

  19. Mechanisms of action of systemic antibiotics used in periodontal treatment and mechanisms of bacterial resistance to these drugs.

    PubMed

    Soares, Geisla Mary Silva; Figueiredo, Luciene Cristina; Faveri, Marcelo; Cortelli, Sheila Cavalca; Duarte, Poliana Mendes; Feres, Magda

    2012-01-01

    Antibiotics are important adjuncts in the treatment of infectious diseases, including periodontitis. The most severe criticisms to the indiscriminate use of these drugs are their side effects and, especially, the development of bacterial resistance. The knowledge of the biological mechanisms involved with the antibiotic usage would help the medical and dental communities to overcome these two problems. Therefore, the aim of this manuscript was to review the mechanisms of action of the antibiotics most commonly used in the periodontal treatment (i.e. penicillin, tetracycline, macrolide and metronidazole) and the main mechanisms of bacterial resistance to these drugs. Antimicrobial resistance can be classified into three groups: intrinsic, mutational and acquired. Penicillin, tetracycline and erythromycin are broad-spectrum drugs, effective against gram-positive and gram-negative microorganisms. Bacterial resistance to penicillin may occur due to diminished permeability of the bacterial cell to the antibiotic; alteration of the penicillin-binding proteins, or production of β-lactamases. However, a very small proportion of the subgingival microbiota is resistant to penicillins. Bacteria become resistant to tetracyclines or macrolides by limiting their access to the cell, by altering the ribosome in order to prevent effective binding of the drug, or by producing tetracycline/macrolide-inactivating enzymes. Periodontal pathogens may become resistant to these drugs. Finally, metronidazole can be considered a prodrug in the sense that it requires metabolic activation by strict anaerobe microorganisms. Acquired resistance to this drug has rarely been reported. Due to these low rates of resistance and to its high activity against the gram-negative anaerobic bacterial species, metronidazole is a promising drug for treating periodontal infections.

  20. The interplay between drug resistance and fitness in malaria parasites.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, Philip J

    2013-09-01

    Controlling the spread of antimalarial drug resistance, especially resistance of Plasmodium falciparum to artemisinin-based combination therapies, is a high priority. Available data indicate that, as with other microorganisms, the spread of drug-resistant malaria parasites is limited by fitness costs that frequently accompany resistance. Resistance-mediating polymorphisms in malaria parasites have been identified in putative drug transporters and in target enzymes. The impacts of these polymorphisms on parasite fitness have been characterized in vitro and in animal models. Additional insights have come from analyses of samples from clinical studies, both evaluating parasites under different selective pressures and determining the clinical consequences of infection with different parasites. With some exceptions, resistance-mediating polymorphisms lead to malaria parasites that, compared with wild type, grow less well in culture and in animals, and are replaced by wild type when drug pressure diminishes in the clinical setting. In some cases, the fitness costs of resistance may be offset by compensatory mutations that increase virulence or changes that enhance malaria transmission. However, not enough is known about effects of resistance mediators on parasite fitness. A better appreciation of the costs of fitness-mediating mutations will facilitate the development of optimal guidelines for the treatment and prevention of malaria.

  1. Bacteremic pneumonia caused by extensively drug-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Kang, Cheol-In; Baek, Jin Yang; Jeon, Kyeongman; Kim, So Hyun; Chung, Doo Ryeon; Peck, Kyong Ran; Lee, Nam Yong; Song, Jae-Hoon

    2012-12-01

    The emergence of antimicrobial resistance threatens the successful treatment of pneumococcal infections. Here we report a case of bacteremic pneumonia caused by an extremely drug-resistant strain of Streptococcus pneumoniae, nonsusceptible to at least one agent in all classes but vancomycin and linezolid, posing an important new public health threat in our region.

  2. Combinatorial Genetic Modeling of pfcrt-Mediated Drug Resistance Evolution in Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Gabryszewski, Stanislaw J; Modchang, Charin; Musset, Lise; Chookajorn, Thanat; Fidock, David A

    2016-06-01

    The emergence of drug resistance continuously threatens global control of infectious diseases, including malaria caused by the protozoan parasite Plasmodium falciparum A critical parasite determinant is the P. falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter (PfCRT), the primary mediator of chloroquine (CQ) resistance (CQR), and a pleiotropic modulator of susceptibility to several first-line artemisinin-based combination therapy partner drugs. Aside from the validated CQR molecular marker K76T, P. falciparum parasites have acquired at least three additional pfcrt mutations, whose contributions to resistance and fitness have been heretofore unclear. Focusing on the quadruple-mutant Ecuadorian PfCRT haplotype Ecu1110 (K76T/A220S/N326D/I356L), we genetically modified the pfcrt locus of isogenic, asexual blood stage P. falciparum parasites using zinc-finger nucleases, producing all possible combinations of intermediate pfcrt alleles. Our analysis included the related quintuple-mutant PfCRT haplotype 7G8 (Ecu1110 + C72S) that is widespread throughout South America and the Western Pacific. Drug susceptibilities and in vitro growth profiles of our combinatorial pfcrt-modified parasites were used to simulate the mutational trajectories accessible to parasites as they evolved CQR. Our results uncover unique contributions to parasite drug resistance and growth for mutations beyond K76T and predict critical roles for the CQ metabolite monodesethyl-CQ and the related quinoline-type drug amodiaquine in driving mutant pfcrt evolution. Modeling outputs further highlight the influence of parasite proliferation rates alongside gains in drug resistance in dictating successful trajectories. Our findings suggest that P. falciparum parasites have navigated constrained pfcrt adaptive landscapes by means of probabilistically rare mutational bursts that led to the infrequent emergence of pfcrt alleles in the field.

  3. Proteomic analysis of acquired tamoxifen resistance in MCF-7 cells reveals expression signatures associated with enhanced migration

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Acquired tamoxifen resistance involves complex signaling events that are not yet fully understood. Successful therapeutic intervention to delay the onset of hormone resistance depends critically on mechanistic elucidation of viable molecular targets associated with hormone resistance. This study was undertaken to investigate the global proteomic alterations in a tamoxifen resistant MCF-7 breast cancer cell line obtained by long term treatment of the wild type MCF-7 cell line with 4-hydroxytamoxifen (4-OH Tam). Methods We cultured MCF-7 cells with 4-OH Tam over a period of 12 months to obtain the resistant cell line. A gel-free, quantitative proteomic method was used to identify and quantify the proteome of the resistant cell line. Nano-flow high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to high resolution Fourier transform mass spectrometry was used to analyze fractionated peptide mixtures that were isobarically labeled from the resistant and control cell lysates. Real time quantitative PCR and Western blots were used to verify selected proteomic changes. Lentiviral vector transduction was used to generate MCF-7 cells stably expressing S100P. Online pathway analysis was performed to assess proteomic signatures in tamoxifen resistance. Survival analysis was done to evaluate clinical relevance of altered proteomic expressions. Results Quantitative proteomic analysis revealed a wide breadth of signaling events during transition to acquired tamoxifen resistance. A total of 629 proteins were found significantly changed with 364 up-regulated and 265 down-regulated. Collectively, these changes demonstrated the suppressed state of estrogen receptor (ER) and ER-regulated genes, activated survival signaling and increased migratory capacity of the resistant cell line. The protein S100P was found to play a critical role in conferring tamoxifen resistance and enhanced cell motility. Conclusions Our data demonstrate that the adaptive changes in the proteome of

  4. Loss of the histone methyltransferase EZH2 induces resistance to multiple drugs in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Göllner, Stefanie; Oellerich, Thomas; Agrawal-Singh, Shuchi; Schenk, Tino; Klein, Hans-Ulrich; Rohde, Christian; Pabst, Caroline; Sauer, Tim; Lerdrup, Mads; Tavor, Sigal; Stölzel, Friedrich; Herold, Sylvia; Ehninger, Gerhard; Köhler, Gabriele; Pan, Kuan-Ting; Urlaub, Henning; Serve, Hubert; Dugas, Martin; Spiekermann, Karsten; Vick, Binje; Jeremias, Irmela; Berdel, Wolfgang E; Hansen, Klaus; Zelent, Arthur; Wickenhauser, Claudia; Müller, Lutz P; Thiede, Christian; Müller-Tidow, Carsten

    2017-01-01

    In acute myeloid leukemia (AML), therapy resistance frequently occurs, leading to high mortality among patients. However, the mechanisms that render leukemic cells drug resistant remain largely undefined. Here, we identified loss of the histone methyltransferase EZH2 and subsequent reduction of histone H3K27 trimethylation as a novel pathway of acquired resistance to tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) and cytotoxic drugs in AML. Low EZH2 protein levels correlated with poor prognosis in AML patients. Suppression of EZH2 protein expression induced chemoresistance of AML cell lines and primary cells in vitro and in vivo. Low EZH2 levels resulted in derepression of HOX genes, and knockdown of HOXB7 and HOXA9 in the resistant cells was sufficient to improve sensitivity to TKIs and cytotoxic drugs. The endogenous loss of EZH2 expression in resistant cells and primary blasts from a subset of relapsed AML patients resulted from enhanced CDK1-dependent phosphorylation of EZH2 at Thr487. This interaction was stabilized by heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) and followed by proteasomal degradation of EZH2 in drug-resistant cells. Accordingly, inhibitors of HSP90, CDK1 and the proteasome prevented EZH2 degradation, decreased HOX gene expression and restored drug sensitivity. Finally, patients with reduced EZH2 levels at progression to standard therapy responded to the combination of bortezomib and cytarabine, concomitant with the re-establishment of EZH2 expression and blast clearance. These data suggest restoration of EZH2 protein as a viable approach to overcome treatment resistance in this AML patient population.

  5. Acquired BRAF inhibitor resistance: a multicenter meta-analysis of the spectrum and frequencies, clinical behavior, and phenotypic associations of resistance mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Douglas B.; Menzies, Alexander M.; Zimmer, Lisa; Eroglu, Zeynep; Ye, Fei; Zhao, Shilin; Rizos, Helen; Sucker, Antje; Scolyer, Richard A.; Gutzmer, Ralf; Gogas, Helen; Kefford, Richard F.; Thompson, John F.; Becker, Jürgen C.; Berking, Carola; Egberts, Friederike; Loquai, Carmen; Goldinger, Simone M.; Pupo, Gulietta M.; Hugo, Willy; Kong, Xiangju; Garraway, Levi A.; Sosman, Jeffrey A.; Ribas, Antoni; Lo, Roger S.; Long, Georgina V.; Schadendorf, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Background Acquired resistance to BRAF inhibitors (BRAFi) is a near-universal phenomenon caused by numerous genetic and non-genetic alterations. In this study, we evaluated the spectrum, onset, pattern of progression, and subsequent clinical outcomes associated with specific mechanisms of resistance. Methods We compiled clinical and genetic data from 100 patients with 132 tissue samples obtained at progression on BRAFi therapy from 3 large, previously published studies of BRAFi resistance. These samples were subjected to whole exome sequencing and/or PCR-based genetic testing. Results Among 132 samples, putative resistance mechanisms were identified in 58%, including NRAS or KRAS mutations (20%), BRAF splice variants (16%), BRAFV600E/K amplifications (13%), MEK1/2 mutations (7%), and non-MAPK pathway alterations (11%). Marked heterogeneity was observed within tumors and patients; 18 of 19 patients (95%) with >1 progression biopsy had distinct/unknown drivers of resistance between samples. NRAS mutations were associated with vemurafenib use (p=0.045) and intracranial metastases (p=0.036), and MEK1/2 mutations correlated with hepatic progression (p=0.011). Progression-free survival and overall survival were similar across resistance mechanisms. The median survival after disease progression was 6.9 months, and responses to subsequent BRAF and MEK inhibition were uncommon (2 of 15; 13%). Post-progression outcomes did not correlate with specific acquired BRAFi resistance mechanisms. Conclusions This is the first study to systematically characterize the clinical implications of particular acquired BRAFi resistance mechanisms in patients with BRAF-mutant melanoma largest study to compile the landscape of resistance. Despite marked heterogeneity of resistance mechanisms within patients, NRAS mutations correlated with vemurafenib use and intracranial disease involvement. PMID:26608120

  6. Panton-Valentine Leukocidin associated with community acquired methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus: a case report and review of interim guidelines.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, L N; Lowe, A D

    2008-07-01

    We report a case of community acquired methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus pneumonia. The causative organism was positive for the toxin Panton-Valentine Leukocidin. This resulted in a severe pneumonia requiring a prolonged stay on our intensive care unit. This infection is becoming more common in the United Kingdom. It can cause a far more aggressive illness than the hospital acquired infection with a high mortality if it becomes an invasive infection. The Department of Health has recently produced interim guidelines for its treatment which we have also reviewed.

  7. The Warburg effect and drug resistance

    PubMed Central

    Mohd Omar, Mohd Feroz; Soong, Richie

    2016-01-01

      The Warburg effect describes the increased utilization of glycolysis rather than oxidative phosphorylation by tumour cells for their energy requirements under physiological oxygen conditions. This effect has been the basis for much speculation on the survival advantage of tumour cells, tumourigenesis and the microenvironment of tumours. More recently, studies have begun to reveal how the Warburg effect could influence drug efficacy and how our understanding of tumour energetics could be exploited to improve drug development. In particular, evidence is emerging demonstrating how better modelling of the tumour metabolic microenvironment could lead to a better prediction of drug efficacy and the identification of new combination strategies. This review will provide details of the current understanding of the complex interplay between glucose metabolism and pharmacology and discuss opportunities for utilizing the Warburg effect in future drug development. PMID:26750865

  8. Human APOBEC3 proteins, retrovirus restriction, and HIV drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Haché, Guylaine; Mansky, Louis M; Harris, Reuben S

    2006-01-01

    Over 40 million people worldwide currently have HIV/AIDS. Many antiretroviral drugs have proven effective, but drug-resistant HIV variants frequently emerge to thwart treatment efforts. Reverse transcription errors undoubtedly contribute to drug resistance, but additional significant sources of viral genetic variation are debatable. The human APOBEC3F and APOBEC3G proteins can potently inhibit retrovirus infection by a mechanism that involves retroviral cDNA cytosine deamination. Here we review the current knowledge on the mechanism of APOBEC3-dependent retrovirus restriction and discuss whether this innate host-defense system actively contributes to HIV genetic variation.

  9. Acquired stimulus control of drug-induced changes in aggressive display in betta splendens.

    PubMed

    Braud, W G; Weibel, J E

    1969-09-01

    Male Siamese fighting fish exhibit stereotyped aggression reactions to their mirror reflections. When distinctive neutral stimuli (flickering colored lights) were repeatedly associated with drug-potentiated aggression (morphine sulfate) and drug-depressed aggression (phenergan), the stimuli came to exert specific stimulus control over aggressive display even after the drugs were discontinued.

  10. Mechanisms of resistance to EGFR-targeted drugs: lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Morgillo, Floriana; Della Corte, Carminia Maria; Fasano, Morena; Ciardiello, Fortunato

    2016-01-01

    Despite the improvement in clinical outcomes derived by the introduction of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors (EGFR-TKIs) in the treatment of patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) whose tumours harbour EGFR-activating mutations, prognosis remains unfavourable because of the occurrence of either intrinsic or acquired resistance. We reviewed the published literature and abstracts of oral and poster presentations from international conferences addressing EGFR-TKIs resistance mechanisms discovered in preclinical models and in patients with NSCLC. The molecular heterogeneity of lung cancer has several implications in terms of possible mechanisms of either intrinsic or acquired resistance to EGFR-targeted inhibitors. Several mechanisms of resistance have been described to EGFR-TKIs, such as the occurrence of secondary mutation (T790M, C797S), the activation of alternative signalling (Met, HGF, AXL, Hh, IGF-1R), the aberrance of the downstream pathways (AKT mutations, loss of PTEN), the impairment of the EGFR-TKIs-mediated apoptosis pathway (BCL2-like 11/BIM deletion polymorphism) and histological transformation. Although some of the mechanisms of resistance have been identified, much additional information is needed to understand and overcome resistance to EGFR-TKI agents. The majority of resistance mechanisms described are the result of a selection of pre-existing clones; thus, studies on the mechanisms by which subclonal alterations have an impact on tumour biology and influence cancer progression are extremely important in order to define the best treatment strategy.

  11. Rational drug design approach for overcoming drug resistance: application to pyrimethamine resistance in malaria.

    PubMed

    McKie, J H; Douglas, K T; Chan, C; Roser, S A; Yates, R; Read, M; Hyde, J E; Dascombe, M J; Yuthavong, Y; Sirawaraporn, W

    1998-04-23

    Pyrimethamine acts by selectively inhibiting malarial dihydrofolate reductase-thymidylate synthase (DHFR-TS). Resistance in the most important human parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, initially results from an S108N mutation in the DHFR domain, with additional mutation (most commonly C59R or N51I or both) imparting much greater resistance. From a homology model of the 3-D structure of DHFR-TS, rational drug design techniques have been used to design and subsequently synthesize inhibitors able to overcome malarial pyrimethamine resistance. Compared to pyrimethamine (Ki 1.5 nM) with purified recombinant DHFR fromP. falciparum, the Ki value of the m-methoxy analogue of pyrimethamine was 1.07 nM, but against the DHFR bearing the double mutation (C59R + S108N), the Ki values for pyrimethamine and the m-methoxy analogue were 71.7 and 14.0 nM, respectively. The m-chloro analogue of pyrimethamine was a stronger inhibitor of both wild-type DHFR (with Ki 0.30 nM) and the doubly mutant (C59R +S108N) purified enzyme (with Ki 2.40 nM). Growth of parasite cultures of P. falciparum in vitro was also strongly inhibited by these compounds with 50% inhibition of growth occurring at 3.7 microM for the m-methoxy and 0.6 microM for the m-chloro compounds with the K1 parasite line bearing the double mutation (S108N + C59R), compared to 10.2 microM for pyrimethamine. These inhibitors were also found in preliminary studies to retain antimalarial activity in vivo in P. berghei-infected mice.

  12. Learning the ABC of oral fungal drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Cannon, R D; Holmes, A R

    2015-12-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) proteins are ubiquitous in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. They are involved in energy-dependent transport of molecules across membranes. ABC proteins are often promiscuous transporters that can translocate a variety of substrates. In oral fungi, especially in Candida species, they have been implicated as major contributors to the high-level azole resistance of clinical isolates from infections that do not respond to drug therapy. Although this is predominantly due to efflux of azoles from the cells, ABC proteins can contribute to fungal drug resistance in other ways as well. Cells in biofilms are notoriously resistant to antifungal agents. ABC proteins can contribute to this resistance through the efflux of drugs. Biofilms are complex communities of myriad microorganisms which, to survive in such a milieu, need to communicate with, and respond to, other microorganisms and their products. ABC proteins are involved in the secretion of fungal mating factors and quorum sensing molecules. These molecules affect biofilm structure and behavior that can result in increased drug resistance. Hence, ABC proteins make multiple contributions to oral fungal drug resistance through a variety of responses to environmental signals.

  13. Indoleamides are active against drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Lun, Shichun; Guo, Haidan; Onajole, Oluseye K.; Pieroni, Marco; Gunosewoyo, Hendra; Chen, Gang; Tipparaju, Suresh K.; Ammerman, Nicole C.; Kozikowski, Alan P.; Bishai, William R.

    2014-01-01

    Responsible for nearly two million deaths each year, the infectious disease tuberculosis remains a serious global health challenge. The emergence of multidrug- and extensively drug-resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis confounds control efforts, and new drugs with novel molecular targets are desperately needed. Here we describe lead compounds, the indoleamides, with potent activity against both drug-susceptible and drug-resistant strains of M. tuberculosis by targeting the mycolic acid transporter MmpL3. We identify a single mutation in mmpL3 which confers high resistance to the indoleamide class while remaining susceptible to currently used first- and second-line tuberculosis drugs, indicating a lack of cross-resistance. Importantly, an indoleamide derivative exhibits dose-dependent anti-mycobacterial activity when orally administered to M. tuberculosis-infected mice. The bioavailability of the indoleamides, combined with their ability to kill tubercle bacilli, indicates great potential for translational developments of this structure class for the treatment of drug-resistant tuberculosis. PMID:24352433

  14. Molecular Biology of Drug Resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Tasha; Wolff, Kerstin A.; Nguyen, Liem

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) has become a curable disease thanks to the discovery of antibiotics. However, it has remained one of the most difficult infections to treat. Most current TB regimens consist of six to nine months of daily doses of four drugs that are highly toxic to patients. The purpose of these lengthy treatments is to completely eradicate Mycobacterium tuberculosis, notorious for its ability to resist most antibacterial agents, thereby preventing the formation of drug resistant mutants. On the contrary, the prolonged therapies have led to poor patient adherence. This, together with a severe limit of drug choices, has resulted in the emergence of strains that are increasingly resistant to the few available antibiotics. Here we review our current understanding of molecular mechanisms underlying the profound drug resistance of M. tuberculosis. This knowledge is essential for the development of more effective antibiotics that not only are potent against drug resistant M. tuberculosis strains but also help shorten the current treatment courses required for drug susceptible TB. PMID:23179675

  15. Randomized pilot trial of eight weeks of bedaquiline (TMC207) treatment for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis: long-term outcome, tolerability, and effect on emergence of drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Diacon, A H; Donald, P R; Pym, A; Grobusch, M; Patientia, R F; Mahanyele, R; Bantubani, N; Narasimooloo, R; De Marez, T; van Heeswijk, R; Lounis, N; Meyvisch, P; Andries, K; McNeeley, D F

    2012-06-01

    The 2-year follow-up results for a randomized placebo-controlled study of 47 patients with multidrug-resistant pulmonary tuberculosis treated with either the new diarylquinoline TMC207, recently renamed bedaquiline, or placebo, added to the first 8 weeks of a background regimen, are presented. Bedaquiline significantly reduced the time to culture conversion over 24 weeks (hazard ratio, 2.253; 95% confidence interval, 1.08 to 4.71; P = 0.031). With the exception of nausea reported in 26% of patients receiving bedaquiline and none receiving placebo, adverse events occurred at similar frequencies in both groups of patients: bilateral hearing impairment, extremity pain, acne, and noncardiac chest pain occurred in 13 and 21%, 17 and 13%, 9 and 17%, and 4 and 17% of patients, respectively, receiving bedaquiline or placebo. Excluding resistance to ethambutol and ethionamide, only one patient receiving bedaquiline acquired resistance to companion drugs, but five patients receiving placebo (4.8% versus 21.7%; P = 0.18) acquired resistance to companion drugs, and resistance to ofloxacin was acquired in four patients receiving placebo and none receiving bedaquiline (0% versus 22%; 0 = 0.066). In all, 23 patients (49%), including 13 receiving placebo (54%) and 10 receiving bedaquiline (44%), discontinued the study prior to its completion, 12 during the first 24 weeks of treatment. Eight subjects were withdrawn for noncompliance or default, and seven withdrew consent, citing the rigorous program of investigations for safety and pharmacokinetic monitoring. Bedaquiline may contribute to the management of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis by effecting more rapid sputum culture negativity and by preventing acquired resistance to companion drugs.

  16. The Effect of Infection Control Nurses on the Occurrence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Healthcare-Acquired Infection and Multidrug-Resistant Strains in Critically-Ill Children

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wei; He, Linxi; Liu, Chunfeng; Rong, Jian; Shi, Yongyan; Song, Wenliang; Zhang, Tao; Wang, Lijie

    2015-01-01

    Background Healthcare-acquired Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) infections in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU), which have a high incidence, increase treatment costs and mortality, and seriously threaten the safety of critically ill children. It is essential to seek convenient and effective methods to control and prevent healthcare-acquired infections (HAIs). This research was conducted to study the effect of infection control nurses on the occurrence of P. aeruginosa HAIs and multi-drug resistance (MDR) strains in PICU. Methods The clinical data was divided into two groups, with the age ranging from 1 month to 14 years. One group of the critically ill patients(N = 3,722) was admitted to PICU from 2007 to 2010, without the management of infection control nurses. The other group of the critically ill patients (N = 3,943) was admitted to PICU from 2011 to 2013, with the management of infection control nurses. Compare the mortality, morbidity and the incidence of acquired P. aeruginosa infections to evaluate the effect of infection control nurses. Results After implementation of the post of infection control nurses, the patient's overall mortality fell from 4.81% to 3.73%. Among the patients with endotracheal intubation more than 48 hours, the incidence of endotracheal intubation-related pneumonia decreased from 44.6% to 34.32%. The mortality of patients with endotracheal intubation decreased from 16.96% to 10.17%, and the morbidity of HAIs with P. aeruginosa decreased from 1.89% to 1.07%. The mutual different rate (MDR) dropped from 67.95% to 44.23%. There were remarkable differences in these rates between the two groups (p<0.05). Conclusion Implementing the post of infection control nurses is associated with effectively reducing the HAI rate, especially the incidence and morbidity of P. aeruginosa HAIs, reducing PICU mortality, improving P. aeruginosa drug resistance. PMID:26630032

  17. The priorities for antiviral drug resistance surveillance and research.

    PubMed

    Pillay, Deenan

    2007-08-01

    The number of available antiviral drugs is growing fast. The emergence of drug-resistant viruses is well documented as a cause for drug failure. Such viruses also carry the potential for transmission, the risks for which vary according to specific viral transmission dynamics. This potential is best described for HIV and influenza. Resistance to the new generation of hepatitis C virus inhibitors is also likely to become a cause for concern. The priorities for future action to limit resistance include application of sophisticated surveillance mechanisms linked to detailed virological data, development of optimal treatment regimens (e.g. combination therapies) to limit emergence of resistance, and a focus on prevention strategies to prevent transmission.

  18. Multidrug and extensively drug-resistant TB (M/XDR-TB): problems and solutions.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Rajendra

    2010-10-01

    Multi Drug Resistant Tuberculosis (MDR-TB) and Extensively Drug Resistant Tuberculosis (XDR-TB) are posing a threat to the control of tuberculosis. The first WHO-IUATLD antituberculosis drug resistance surveillance carried out in 1994 in 35 countries reported the median prevalence of primary and acquired multi drug resistance as 1.4% and 13% respectively. Subsequently, second, third and fourth WHO-IUATLD global drug resistance surveillances were carried out in 1996-99, 1999-2002 and 2002-2007 respectively. Based on drug resistance information from 114 countries, the proportion of MDR-TB among all cases was estimated for countries with no survey information. It was estimated that 4,89,139 cases of MDR-TB emerged in 2006. China and India carry approximately 50% of the global burden. 35 countries and two Special Administrative Regions (SARs) reported data on XDR-TB for the first time in 2006. Multidrug and extensively drug-resistant TB 2010 Global report on Surveillance and response estimated that 4,40,000 cases of MDR-TB emerged globally in 2008 and caused an estimated 1,50,000 deaths. 5.4% of MDR-TB cases were found to have XDR-TB. To date, a cumulative total of 58 countries have confirmed at least one case of XDR-TB. M/XDR-TB is a man-made problem and its emergence can be prevented by prompt diagnosis and effective use of first line drugs in every new patient. The DOTS Plus proposed by WHO highlights the comprehensive management strategy to control MDR-TB. Laboratory services for adequate and timely diagnosis of M/XDR-TB must be strengthened and programmatic management of M/XDR-TB must be scaled up as per target set by global plan. Proper use of second-line drugs must be ensured to cure existing MDR-TB, to reduce its transmission and to prevent XDR-TB. Sound infection control measures to avoid further transmission of M/XDR-TB and research towards development of new diagnostics, drugs and vaccines should be promoted to control M/XDR-TB.

  19. Antifungal drug resistance evoked via RNAi-dependent epimutations.

    PubMed

    Calo, Silvia; Shertz-Wall, Cecelia; Lee, Soo Chan; Bastidas, Robert J; Nicolás, Francisco E; Granek, Joshua A; Mieczkowski, Piotr; Torres-Martínez, Santiago; Ruiz-Vázquez, Rosa M; Cardenas, Maria E; Heitman, Joseph

    2014-09-25

    Microorganisms evolve via a range of mechanisms that may include or involve sexual/parasexual reproduction, mutators, aneuploidy, Hsp90 and even prions. Mechanisms that may seem detrimental can be repurposed to generate diversity. Here we show that the human fungal pathogen Mucor circinelloides develops spontaneous resistance to the antifungal drug FK506 (tacrolimus) via two distinct mechanisms. One involves Mendelian mutations that confer stable drug resistance; the other occurs via an epigenetic RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated pathway resulting in unstable drug resistance. The peptidylprolyl isomerase FKBP12 interacts with FK506 forming a complex that inhibits the protein phosphatase calcineurin. Calcineurin inhibition by FK506 blocks M. circinelloides transition to hyphae and enforces yeast growth. Mutations in the fkbA gene encoding FKBP12 or the calcineurin cnbR or cnaA genes confer FK506 resistance and restore hyphal growth. In parallel, RNAi is spontaneously triggered to silence the fkbA gene, giving rise to drug-resistant epimutants. FK506-resistant epimutants readily reverted to the drug-sensitive wild-type phenotype when grown without exposure to the drug. The establishment of these epimutants is accompanied by generation of abundant fkbA small RNAs and requires the RNAi pathway as well as other factors that constrain or reverse the epimutant state. Silencing involves the generation of a double-stranded RNA trigger intermediate using the fkbA mature mRNA as a template to produce antisense fkbA RNA. This study uncovers a novel epigenetic RNAi-based epimutation mechanism controlling phenotypic plasticity, with possible implications for antimicrobial drug resistance and RNAi-regulatory mechanisms in fungi and other eukaryotes.

  20. Incidence, risk factors and risk prediction of hospital-acquired suspected adverse drug reactions: a prospective cohort of Ugandan inpatients

    PubMed Central

    Kiguba, Ronald; Karamagi, Charles; Bird, Sheila M

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To determine the incidence and risk factors of hospital-acquired suspected adverse drug reactions (ADRs) among Ugandan inpatients. We also constructed risk scores to predict and qualitatively assess for peculiarities between low-risk and high-risk ADR patients. Methods Prospective cohort of consented adults admitted on medical and gynaecological wards of the 1790-bed Mulago National Referral Hospital. Hospital-acquired suspected ADRs were dichotomised as possible (possible/probable/definite) or not and probable (probable/definite) or not, using the Naranjo scale. Risk scores were generated from coefficients of ADR risk-factor logistic regression models. Results The incidence of possible hospital-acquired suspected ADRs was 25% (194/762, 95% CI: 22% to 29%): 44% (85/194) experienced serious possible ADRs. The risk of probable ADRs was 11% (87/762, 95% CI 9% to 14%): 46% (40/87) had serious probable ADRs. Antibacterials-only (51/194), uterotonics-only (21/194), cardiovascular drugs-only (16/194), antimalarials-only (12/194) and analgesics-only (10/194) were the most frequently implicated. Treatment with six or more conventional medicines during hospitalisation (OR=2.31, 95% CI 1.29 to 4.15) and self-reported herbal medicine use during the 4 weeks preadmission (OR=1.96, 95% CI 1.22 to 3.13) were the risk factors for probable hospital-acquired ADRs. Risk factors for possible hospital-acquired ADRs were: treatment with six or more conventional medicines (OR=2.72, 95% CI 1.79 to 4.13), herbal medicine use during the 4 weeks preadmission (OR=1.68, 95% CI 1.16 to 2.43), prior 3 months hospitalisation (OR=1.57, 95% CI 1.09 to 2.26) and being on gynaecological ward (OR=2.16, 95% CI 1.36 to 3.44). More drug classes were implicated among high-risk ADR-patients, with cardiovascular drugs being the most frequently linked to possible ADRs. Conclusions The risk of hospital-acquired suspected ADRs was higher with preadmission herbal medicine use and treatment with

  1. Non-toxic antimicrobials that evade drug resistance

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Stephen A.; Vincent, Benjamin M.; Endo, Matthew M.; Whitesell, Luke; Marchillo, Karen; Andes, David R.; Lindquist, Susan; Burke, Martin D.

    2015-01-01

    Drugs that act more promiscuously provide fewer routes for the emergence of resistant mutants. But this benefit often comes at the cost of serious off-target and dose-limiting toxicities. The classic example is the antifungal amphotericin B (AmB), which has evaded resistance for more than half a century. We report dramatically less toxic amphotericins that nevertheless evade resistance. They are scalably accessed in just three steps from the natural product, and bind their target (the fungal sterol, ergosterol) with far greater selectivity than AmB. Hence, they are less toxic and far more effective in a mouse model of systemic candidiasis. Surprisingly, exhaustive efforts to select for mutants resistant to these more selective compounds revealed that they are just as impervious to resistance as AmB. Thus, highly selective cytocidal action and the evasion of resistance are not mutually exclusive, suggesting practical routes to the discovery of less toxic, resistance-evasive therapies. PMID:26030729

  2. Induction of anti-actin drug resistance in Tetrahymena.

    PubMed

    Zackroff, Robert V; Hufnagel, Linda A

    2002-01-01

    Both cytochalasin D and latrunculin B reversibly inhibited Tetrahymena phagocytosis at concentrations similar to those effective in mammalian systems, even though ciliate actins are known to be highly divergent from mammalian actins. Overnight exposure to relatively low (0.25 microM) concentrations of latrunculin B induced resistance in Tetrahymena to the inhibitory effects of that drug, as well as cross-resistance to cytochalasin D. However, much higher (> 30 microM) concentrations of cytochalasin D were required for induction of cross-resistance to latrunculin B. Anti-actin drug resistance in Tetrahymena may involve a general multidrug resistance mechanism and/or specific feedback regulation of F-actin assembly and stability.

  3. Modeling the evolution of drug resistance in malaria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hecht, David; Fogel, Gary B.

    2012-12-01

    Plasmodium falciparum, the causal agent of malaria, continues to evolve resistance to frontline therapeutics such as chloroquine and sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine. Here we study the amino acid replacements in dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) that confer resistance to pyrimethamine while still binding the natural DHFR substrate, 7,8-dihydrofolate, and cofactor, NADPH. The chain of amino acid replacements that has led to resistance can be inferred in a computer, leading to a broader understanding of the coevolution between the drug and target. This in silico approach suggests that only a small set of specific active site replacements in the proper order could have led to the resistant strains in the wild today. A similar approach can be used on any target of interest to anticipate likely pathways of future resistance for more effective drug development.

  4. Population-Based Drug Resistance Surveillance of Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis in Taiwan, 2007-2014

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Shin-Yuan; Lin, Keng-Yu; Jou, Ruwen

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine the extent of drug resistance in multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) cases, we conducted a retrospective, population-based analysis using drug susceptibility testing (DST) results of MDR Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex isolates obtained from 2007–2014 in Taiwan. Methods M. tuberculosis isolates collected from 1,331 MDR-TB cases were included in this survey. Treatment histories, age, sex, chest radiograph and bacteriological results of patients were analyzed. Standard DST was performed to assess resistance to the following drugs: isoniazid (INH), rifampicin (RIF), streptomycin (SM), ethambutol (EMB), amikacin (AM), kanamycin (KM), capreomycin (CAP), ofloxacin (OFX), moxifloxacin (MOX), levofloxacin (LVX), gatifloxacin (GAT), para-aminosalicylate (PAS), ethionamide (EA), and pyrazinamide (PZA). The Cochran-Armitage trend test was used for statistical analysis. Results We observed a significant increasing trend in portion of new MDR-TB cases, from 59.5% to 80.2% (p < 0.0001), and significant decreasing trend of portion in the 15-44-year-old age group (p < 0.05). Of the MDR M. tuberculosis isolates tested, 6.2% were resistant to AM, 8.6% were resistant to KM, 4.6% were resistant to CAP, 19.5% were resistant to OFX, 17.1% were resistant to MOX, 16.0% were resistant to LVX, 5.8% were resistant to GAT, 9.5% were resistant to PAS, 28.5% were resistant to EA and 33.3% were resistant to PZA. Fifty (3.8%) extensively drug-resistant TB cases were identified. No significant differences were found in drug resistance frequencies between new and previously treated MDR cases. However, we observed significant decreases in the rates of AM resistance (p < 0.05), OFX resistance (p < 0.00001), PAS resistance (p < 0.00001), EA resistance (p < 0.05) and PZA resistance (p < 0.05). Moreover, younger age groups had higher rates of resistance to fluoroquinolones. Conclusion A policy implemented in 2007 to restrict the prescription of fluoroquinolones was

  5. Establishing Drug Resistance in Microorganisms by Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demirev, Plamen A.; Hagan, Nathan S.; Antoine, Miquel D.; Lin, Jeffrey S.; Feldman, Andrew B.

    2013-08-01

    A rapid method to determine drug resistance in bacteria based on mass spectrometry is presented. In it, a mass spectrum of an intact microorganism grown in drug-containing stable isotope-labeled media is compared with a mass spectrum of the intact microorganism grown in non-labeled media without the drug present. Drug resistance is determined by predicting characteristic mass shifts of one or more microorganism biomarkers using bioinformatics algorithms. Observing such characteristic mass shifts indicates that the microorganism is viable even in the presence of the drug, thus incorporating the isotopic label into characteristic biomarker molecules. The performance of the method is illustrated on the example of intact E. coli, grown in control (unlabeled) and 13C-labeled media, and analyzed by MALDI TOF MS. Algorithms for data analysis are presented as well.

  6. Establishing drug resistance in microorganisms by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Demirev, Plamen A; Hagan, Nathan S; Antoine, Miquel D; Lin, Jeffrey S; Feldman, Andrew B

    2013-08-01

    A rapid method to determine drug resistance in bacteria based on mass spectrometry is presented. In it, a mass spectrum of an intact microorganism grown in drug-containing stable isotope-labeled media is compared with a mass spectrum of the intact microorganism grown in non-labeled media without the drug present. Drug resistance is determined by predicting characteristic mass shifts of one or more microorganism biomarkers using bioinformatics algorithms. Observing such characteristic mass shifts indicates that the microorganism is viable even in the presence of the drug, thus incorporating the isotopic label into characteristic biomarker molecules. The performance of the method is illustrated on the example of intact E. coli, grown in control (unlabeled) and (13)C-labeled media, and analyzed by MALDI TOF MS. Algorithms for data analysis are presented as well.

  7. Acquisition of second-line drug resistance and extensive drug resistance during recent transmission of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in rural China.

    PubMed

    Hu, Y; Mathema, B; Zhao, Q; Chen, L; Lu, W; Wang, W; Kreiswirth, B; Xu, B

    2015-12-01

    Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) is prevalent in countries with a high TB burden, like China. As little is known about the emergence and spread of second-line drug (SLD) -resistant TB, we investigate the emergence and transmission of SLD-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis in rural China. In a multi-centre population-based study, we described the bacterial population structure and the transmission characteristics of SLD-resistant TB using Spoligotyping in combination with genotyping based on 24-locus MIRU-VNTR (mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit-variable-number tandem repeat) plus four highly variable loci for the Beijing family, in four rural Chinese regions with diverse geographic and socio-demographic characteristics. Transmission networks among genotypically clustered patients were constructed using social network analysis. Of 1332 M. tuberculosis patient isolates recovered, the Beijing family represented 74.8% of all isolates and an association with MDR and simultaneous resistance between first-line drugs and SLDs. The genotyping analysis revealed that 189 isolates shared MIRU-VNTR patterns in 78 clusters with clustering rate and recent transmission rate of 14.2% and 8.3%, respectively. Fifty-three SLD-resistant isolates were observed in 31 clusters, 30 of which contained the strains with different drug susceptibility profiles and genetic mutations. In conjunction with molecular data, socio-network analysis indicated a key role of Central Township in the transmission across a highly interconnected network where SLD resistance accumulation occurred during transmission. SLD-resistant M. tuberculosis has been spreading in rural China with Beijing family being the dominant strains. Primary transmission of SLD-resistant strains in the population highlights the importance of routine drug susceptibility testing and effective anti-tuberculosis regimens for drug-resistant TB.

  8. Role of Acinetobacter baumannii UmuD homologs in antibiotic resistance acquired through DNA damage-induced mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Aranda, Jesús; López, Mario; Leiva, Enoy; Magán, Andrés; Adler, Ben; Bou, Germán; Barbé, Jordi

    2014-01-01

    The role of Acinetobacter baumannii ATCC 17978 UmuDC homologs A1S_0636-A1S_0637, A1S_1174-A1S_1173, and A1S_1389 (UmuDAb) in antibiotic resistance acquired through UV-induced mutagenesis was evaluated. Neither the growth rate nor the UV-related survival of any of the three mutants was significantly different from that of the wild-type parental strain. However, all mutants, and especially the umuDAb mutant, were less able to acquire resistance to rifampin and streptomycin through the activities of their error-prone DNA polymerases. Furthermore, in the A. baumannii mutant defective in the umuDAb gene, the spectrum of mutations included a dramatic reduction in the frequency of transition mutations, the mutagenic signature of the DNA polymerase V encoded by umuDC.

  9. The population structure of drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical isolates from Sichuan in China.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yuding; Feng, Qin; Tang, Ke; Zhang, Congcong; Sun, Honghu; Luo, Tao; Yang, Zhirong; Couvin, David; Rastogi, Nalin; Sun, Qun

    2012-06-01

    China ranks second next to India among 22 high-burden countries despite decades' effort on tuberculosis (TB) control. The Sichuan province today contains the second-largest number of TB cases among Chinese provinces, where the prevalence of drug-resistant TB, especially MDR-TB, is much higher than the average level in eastern China. In this study, the population structure and the transmission characteristics of drug-resistant TB in Sichuan province were studied by spoligotyping and 24-locus Mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units-variable number tandem DNA repeats (MIRU-VNTR), applied to a total of 306 clinical isolates. Spoligotyping-based analysis showed that Beijing family represented 69.28% of all isolates and constituted the largest group (66.24%) of MDR-TB in Sichuan. The remaining isolates, accounting for 33.76% of MDR isolates, belonged to the ill-defined T family, Manu2, H3, LAM9, and other minor unassigned clades. The discriminatory power evaluated for spoligotyping was poor (HGI=0.595), but high for 24-locus MIRU-VNTRs (HGI=0.999). The number of the most discriminatory loci (h>0.6) was 12, including locus 424, 802, 960, 1644, 1955, 2163b, 2996, 3007, 3192, 3690, 4348 and 4052. It was concluded that 24-locus MIRU-VNTRs could be a more discriminatory tool for differentiating clinical isolates from Sichuan region. The small clustering size obtained from the current population structure analysis suggested that the high prevalence of drug-resistant TB in this region might be attributed partially to the acquired resistance due to inappropriate drug use rather than active transmission of drug-resistant TB (primary resistance).

  10. Monitoring a Nuclear Factor-κB Signature of Drug Resistance in Multiple Myeloma*

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Yun; Remily-Wood, Elizabeth R.; Oliveira, Vasco; Yarde, Danielle; He, Lili; Cheng, Jin Q.; Mathews, Linda; Boucher, Kelly; Cubitt, Christopher; Perez, Lia; Gauthier, Ted J.; Eschrich, Steven A.; Shain, Kenneth H.; Dalton, William S.; Hazlehurst, Lori; Koomen, John M.

    2011-01-01

    The emergence of acquired drug resistance results from multiple compensatory mechanisms acting to prevent cell death. Simultaneous monitoring of proteins involved in drug resistance is a major challenge for both elucidation of the underlying biology and development of candidate biomarkers for assessment of personalized cancer therapy. Here, we have utilized an integrated analytical platform based on SDS-PAGE protein fractionation prior to liquid chromatography coupled to multiple reaction monitoring mass spectrometry, a versatile and powerful tool for targeted quantification of proteins in complex matrices, to evaluate a well-characterized model system of melphalan resistance in multiple myeloma (MM). Quantitative assays were developed to measure protein expression related to signaling events and biological processes relevant to melphalan resistance in multiple myeloma, specifically: nuclear factor-κB subunits, members of the Bcl-2 family of apoptosis-regulating proteins, and Fanconi Anemia DNA repair components. SDS-PAGE protein fractionation prior to liquid chromatography coupled to multiple reaction monitoring methods were developed for quantification of these selected target proteins in amounts of material compatible with direct translation to clinical specimens (i.e. less than 50,000 cells). As proof of principle, both relative and absolute quantification were performed on cell line models of MM to compare protein expression before and after drug treatment in naïve cells and in drug resistant cells; these liquid chromatography-multiple reaction monitoring results are compared with existing literature and Western blots. The initial stage of a systems biology platform for examining drug resistance in MM has been implemented in cell line models and has been translated to MM cells isolated from a patient. The ultimate application of this platform could assist in clinical decision-making for individualized patient treatment. Although these specific assays have

  11. Treatment of doxorubicin-resistant MCF7/Dx cells with nitric oxide causes histone glutathionylation and reversal of drug resistance.

    PubMed

    de Luca, Anastasia; Moroni, Noemi; Serafino, Annalucia; Primavera, Alessandra; Pastore, Anna; Pedersen, Jens Z; Petruzzelli, Raffaele; Farrace, Maria Grazia; Pierimarchi, Pasquale; Moroni, Gabriella; Federici, Giorgio; Sinibaldi Vallebona, Paola; Lo Bello, Mario

    2011-12-01

    Acquired drug resistance was found to be suppressed in the doxorubicin-resistant breast cancer cell line MCF7/Dx after pre-treatment with GSNO (nitrosoglutathione). The effect was accompanied by enhanced protein glutathionylation and accumulation of doxorubicin in the nucleus. Among the glutathionylated proteins, we identified three members of the histone family; this is, to our knowledge, the first time that histone glutathionylation has been reported. Formation of the potential NO donor dinitrosyl-diglutathionyl-iron complex, bound to GSTP1-1 (glutathione transferase P1-1), was observed in both MCF7/Dx cells and drug-sensitive MCF7 cells to a similar extent. In contrast, histone glutathionylation was found to be markedly increased in the resistant MCF7/Dx cells, which also showed a 14-fold higher amount of GSTP1-1 and increased glutathione concentration compared with MCF7 cells. These results suggest that the increased cytotoxic effect of combined doxorubicin and GSNO treatment involves the glutathionylation of histones through a mechanism that requires high glutathione levels and increased expression of GSTP1-1. Owing to the critical role of histones in the regulation of gene expression, the implication of this finding may go beyond the phenomenon of doxorubicin resistance.

  12. Whole Animal Automated Platform for Drug Discovery against Multi-Drug Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Rajamuthiah, Rajmohan; Fuchs, Beth Burgwyn; Jayamani, Elamparithi; Kim, Younghoon; Larkins-Ford, Jonah; Conery, Annie; Ausubel, Frederick M.; Mylonakis, Eleftherios

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus, the leading cause of hospital-acquired infections in the United States, is also pathogenic to the model nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. The C. elegans-S. aureus infection model was previously carried out on solid agar plates where the bacteriovorous C. elegans feeds on a lawn of S. aureus. However, agar-based assays are not amenable to large scale screens for antibacterial compounds. We have developed a high throughput liquid screening assay that uses robotic instrumentation to dispense a precise amount of methicillin resistant S. aureus (MRSA) and worms in 384-well assay plates, followed by automated microscopy and image analysis. In validation of the liquid assay, an MRSA cell wall defective mutant, MW2ΔtarO, which is attenuated for killing in the agar-based assay, was found to be less virulent in the liquid assay. This robust assay with a Z’-factor consistently greater than 0.5 was utilized to screen the Biomol 4 compound library consisting of 640 small molecules with well characterized bioactivities. As proof of principle, 27 of the 30 clinically used antibiotics present in the library conferred increased C. elegans survival and were identified as hits in the screen. Surprisingly, the antihelminthic drug closantel was also identified as a hit in the screen. In further studies, we confirmed the anti-staphylococcal activity of closantel against vancomycin-resistant S. aureus isolates and other Gram-positive bacteria. The liquid C. elegans – S. aureus assay described here allows screening for anti-staphylococcal compounds that are not toxic to the host. PMID:24586584

  13. Oncolytic Virotherapy Targeting Lung Cancer Drug Resistance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    Resistance PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dr John Hiscott CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Vaccine & Gene Therapy Institute of Florida...NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) AND ADDRESS(ES) 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER Vaccine & Gene Therapy Institute of Florida Port St...highly immunogenic platform for gene delivery, it cured established prostate tumors of the same histological type (8). Suboptimal vaccination , on the

  14. MAS NMR of the Drug Resistant S31N M2 Proton Transporter from Influenza A

    PubMed Central

    Andreas, Loren B.; Eddy, Matthew T.; Chou, James J.; Griffin, Robert G.

    2012-01-01

    We report chemical shift assignments of the drug-resistant S31N mutant of M218-60 determined with magic angle spinning (MAS) 3D spectra acquired with a 15N-13C ZF-TEDOR transfer followed by 13C-13C mixing by RFDR. The MAS spectra reveal two sets of resonances, indicating that the tetramer assembles as a dimer of dimers, similar to the wild type channel. The two sets of chemical shifts are shown to be in close proximity at residue H37, and assignments reveal a difference in the helix torsion angles, as predicted by TALOS+, for the key resistance residue N31. In contrast to wild type M218-60, chemical shift changes are minimal with addition of the inhibitor rimantadine, suggesting that the drug does not bind to S31N. PMID:22480220

  15. Bcl-2–Mediated Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Rakesh K.; Sasaki, Carl Y.; Hardwick, J. Marie; Longo, Dan L.

    1999-01-01

    Bcl-2 inhibits apoptosis induced by a variety of stimuli, including chemotherapy drugs and glucocorticoids. It is generally accepted that Bcl-2 exerts its antiapoptotic effects mainly by dimerizing with proapoptotic members of the Bcl-2 family such as Bax and Bad. However, the mechanism of the antiapoptotic effects is unclear. Paclitaxel and other drugs that disturb microtubule dynamics kill cells in a Fas/Fas ligand (FasL)-dependent manner; antibody to FasL inhibits paclitaxel-induced apoptosis. We have found that Bcl-2 overexpression leads to the prevention of chemotherapy (paclitaxel)-induced expression of FasL and blocks paclitaxel-induced apoptosis. The mechanism of this effect is that Bcl-2 prevents the nuclear translocation of NFAT (nuclear factor of activated T lymphocytes, a transcription factor activated by microtubule damage) by binding and sequestering calcineurin, a calcium-dependent phosphatase that must dephosphorylate NFAT to move to the nucleus. Without NFAT nuclear translocation, the FasL gene is not transcribed. Thus, it appears that paclitaxel and other drugs that disturb microtubule function kill cells at least in part through the induction of FasL. Furthermore, Bcl-2 antagonizes drug-induced apoptosis by inhibiting calcineurin activation, blocking NFAT nuclear translocation, and preventing FasL expression. The effects of Bcl-2 can be overcome, at least partially, through phosphorylation of Bcl-2. Phosphorylated Bcl-2 cannot bind calcineurin, and NFAT activation, FasL expression, and apoptosis can occur after Bcl-2 phosphorylation. PMID:10432288

  16. Antimicrobial Resistance Among Uropathogens That Cause Childhood Community-acquired Urinary Tract Infections in Central Israel.

    PubMed

    Yakubov, Renata; van den Akker, Machiel; Machamad, Kaba; Hochberg, Amit; Nadir, Erez; Klein, Adi

    2017-01-01

    In this retrospective study 829 positive urine cultures were analyzed. Escherichia coli bacterium was the leading uropathogen (86%). Almost 60% were resistant to ampicillin and first generation cephalosporins, and about 30% of them resistant to amoxicillin-clavulanic acid and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. Almost none of them were resistant to second and third generation cephalosporins, aminoglycosides, ciprofloxacin or nitrofurantoin.

  17. Drug Repurposing Identifies Inhibitors of Oseltamivir-Resistant Influenza Viruses.

    PubMed

    Bao, Ju; Marathe, Bindumadhav; Govorkova, Elena A; Zheng, Jie J

    2016-03-01

    The neuraminidase (NA) inhibitor, oseltamivir, is a widely used anti-influenza drug. However, oseltamivir-resistant H1N1 influenza viruses carrying the H275Y NA mutation spontaneously emerged as a result of natural genetic drift and drug treatment. Because H275Y and other potential mutations may generate a future pandemic influenza strain that is oseltamivir-resistant, alternative therapy options are needed. Herein, we show that a structure-based computational method can be used to identify existing drugs that inhibit resistant viruses, thereby providing a first line of pharmaceutical defense against this possible scenario. We identified two drugs, nalidixic acid and dorzolamide, that potently inhibit the NA activity of oseltamivir-resistant H1N1 viruses with the H275Y NA mutation at very low concentrations, but have no effect on wild-type H1N1 NA even at a much higher concentration, suggesting that the oseltamivir-resistance mutation itself caused susceptibility to these drugs.

  18. Recent Advances on the Molecular Mechanisms Involved in the Drug Resistance of Cancer Cells and Novel Targeting Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Mimeault, M; Hauke, R; Batra, SK

    2010-01-01

    This review summarizes the recent knowledge obtained on the molecular mechanisms involved in the intrinsic and acquired resistance of cancer cells to current cancer therapies. We describe the cascades that are often altered in cancer cells during cancer progression that may contribute in a crucial manner to drug resistance and disease relapse. The emphasis is on the implication of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) multidrug efflux transporters in drug disposition and antiapoptotic factors, including epidermal growth factor receptor cascades and deregulated enzymes in ceramide metabolic pathways. The altered expression and activity of these signaling elements may have a critical role in the resistance of cancer cells to cytotoxic effects induced by diverse chemotherapeutic drugs and cancer recurrence. Of therapeutic interest, new strategies for reversing the multidrug resistance and developing more effective clinical treatments against the highly aggressive, metastatic, and recurrent cancers, based on the molecular targeting of the cancer progenitor cells and their further differentiated progeny, are also described. PMID:17786164

  19. Resistance to drug by different isolates Trypanosoma evansi in China.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jinlin; Shen, Jie; Liao, Dangjin; Zhou, Yongzhi; Lin, Jiaojiao

    2004-05-01

    In order to understand drug resistance in Chinese Trypanosoma evansi isolates, the in vitro growth inhibition test was carried out to detect the sensitivities to suramin and antrycide of 12 T. evansi isolates. For suramin, 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC(50)) ranged from 0.041 to 0.752 microg/ml; for antrycide, the IC(50) values ranged from 0.00151 to 0.06694 microg/ml. In vivo experiments in mice with selected isolates showed that the isolate most resistant to suramin was not cured at a dosage of 10 mg/kg, while the isolate that was most resistant to antrycide showed only 50% cure rate at a dose rate of 5 mg/kg. The data presented here indicate that T. evansi isolates from China had differences in drug resistance, with some isolates exhibiting low sensitivity to suramin or antrycide, while a few isolates showed complete drug resistance to curative dosages of suramin or antrycide. No drug cross-resistance was observed between suramin and antrycide.

  20. Acquired resistance to the second-generation androgen receptor antagonist enzalutamide in castration-resistant prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kregel, Steven; Chen, James L.; Tom, Westin; Krishnan, Venkatesh; Kach, Jacob; Brechka, Hannah; Fessenden, Tim B.; Isikbay, Masis; Paner, Gladell P.

    2016-01-01

    Enzalutamide (MDV3100) is a second generation Androgen Receptor (AR) antagonist with proven efficacy in the treatment of castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). The majority of treated patients, however, develop resistance and disease progression and there is a critical need to identify novel targetable pathways mediating resistance. The purpose of this study was to develop and extensively characterize a series of enzalutamide-resistant prostate cancer cell lines. Four genetically distinct AR-positive and AR-pathway dependent prostate cancer cell lines (CWR-R1, LAPC-4, LNCaP, VCaP) were made resistant to enzalutamide by long-term culture (> 6 months) in enzalutamide. Extensive characterization of these lines documented divergent in vitro growth characteristics and AR pathway modulation. Enzalutamide-resistant LNCaP and CWR-R1 cells, but not LAPC-4 and VCAP cells, demonstrated increased castration-resistant and metastatic growth in vivo. Global gene expression analyses between short-term enzalutamide treated vs. enzalutamide-resistant cells identified both AR pathway and non-AR pathway associated changes that were restored upon acquisition of enzalutamide resistance. Further analyses revealed very few common gene expression changes between the four resistant cell lines. Thus, while AR-mediated pathways contribute in part to enzalutamide resistance, an unbiased approach across several cell lines demonstrates a greater contribution toward resistance via pleiotropic, non-AR mediated mechanisms. PMID:27036029

  1. Additional Drug Resistance Patterns among Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis Patients in Korea: Implications for Regimen Design

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Detailed information on additional drug resistance patterns of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) is essential to build an effective treatment regimen; however, such data are scarce in Korea. We retrospectively analyzed the results of phenotypic drug susceptibility testing (DST) of culture confirmed-TB patients from January 2010 to December 2014 in 7 university hospitals in Korea. MDR-TB was identified among 6.8% (n = 378) of 5,599 isolates. A total of 57.1% (n = 216) of the MDR-TB patients had never been treated for TB. Strains from MDR-TB patients showed additional resistance to pyrazinamide (PZA) (35.7%), any second-line injectable drug (19.3%), and any fluoroquinolone (26.2%). Extensively drug resistant TB comprised 12.4% (n = 47) of the MDR-TB patients. Of 378 MDR-TB patients, 50.3% (n = 190) were eligible for the shorter MDR-TB regimen, and 50.0% (n = 189) were fully susceptible to the 5 drugs comprising the standard conventional regimen (PZA, kanamycin, ofloxoacin, prothionamide, and cycloserine). In conclusion, the proportion of new patients and the levels of additional drug resistance were high in MDR-TB patients. Considering the high levels of drug resistance, the shorter MDR-TB treatment regimen may not be feasible; instead, an individually tailored regimen based on the results of molecular and phenotypic DST may be more appropriate in MDR-TB patients in Korea. PMID:28244290

  2. Extensively Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis: Principles of Resistance, Diagnosis, and Management.

    PubMed

    Wilson, John W; Tsukayama, Dean T

    2016-04-01

    Extensively drug-resistant (XDR) tuberculosis (TB) is an unfortunate by-product of mankind's medical and pharmaceutical ingenuity during the past 60 years. Although new drug developments have enabled TB to be more readily curable, inappropriate TB management has led to the emergence of drug-resistant disease. Extensively drug-resistant TB describes Mycobacterium tuberculosis that is collectively resistant to isoniazid, rifampin, a fluoroquinolone, and an injectable agent. It proliferates when established case management and infection control procedures are not followed. Optimized treatment outcomes necessitate time-sensitive diagnoses, along with expanded combinations and prolonged durations of antimicrobial drug therapy. The challenges to public health institutions are immense and most noteworthy in underresourced communities and in patients coinfected with human immunodeficiency virus. A comprehensive and multidisciplinary case management approach is required to optimize outcomes. We review the principles of TB drug resistance and the risk factors, diagnosis, and managerial approaches for extensively drug-resistant TB. Treatment outcomes, cost, and unresolved medical issues are also discussed.

  3. Targeting BMK1 Impairs the Drug Resistance to Combined Inhibition of BRAF and MEK1/2 in Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Song, Chengli; Wang, Lina; Xu, Qiang; Wang, Kai; Xie, Dan; Yu, Zhe; Jiang, Kui; Liao, Lujian; Yates, John R.; Lee, Jiing-Dwan; Yang, Qingkai

    2017-01-01

    Combined inhibition of BRAF and MEK1/2 (CIBM) improves therapeutic efficacy of BRAF-mutant melanoma. However, drug resistance to CIBM is inevitable and the drug resistance mechanisms still remain to be elucidated. Here, we show that BMK1 pathway contributes to the drug resistance to CIBM. Considering that ERK1/2 pathway regulates cellular processes by phosphorylating, we first performed a SILAC phosphoproteomic profiling of CIBM. Phosphorylation of 239 proteins was identified to be downregulated, while phosphorylation of 47 proteins was upregulated. Following siRNA screening of 47 upregulated proteins indicated that the knockdown of BMK1 showed the most significant ability to inhibit the proliferation of CIBM resistant cells. It was found that phosphorylation of BMK1 was enhanced in resistant cells, which suggested an association of BMK1 with drug resistance. Further study indicated that phospho-activation of BMK1 by MEK5D enhanced the resistance to CIBM. Conversely, inhibition of BMK1 by shRNAi or BMK1 inhibitor (XMD8-92) impaired not only the acquirement of resistance to CIBM, but also the proliferation of CIBM resistant cells. Further kinome-scale siRNA screening demonstrated that SRC\\MEK5 cascade promotes the phospho-activation of BMK1 in response to CIBM. Our study not only provides a global phosphoproteomic view of CIBM in melanoma, but also demonstrates that inhibition of BMK1 has therapeutic potential for the treatment of melanoma. PMID:28387310

  4. Presence of drug resistance in intestinal lactobacilli of dairy and human origin in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Cataloluk, Osman; Gogebakan, Bulent

    2004-07-01

    The prevalence of different resistance genes was investigated in lactobacilli of human and dairy origin by PCR. The presence of erm, van, tet, and cat-TC genes were determined in 16 raw milk, 15 cream, 10 yogurt, 50 hand-made cheese, and 20 industrially produced white-cheese samples of dairy origin and 16 mouth, 32 fecal, and 36 vaginal samples from different subjects of human origin. Lactobacilli of dairy and human origin were found to carry only erm(B) and tet(M) genes. The majority of the isolates, Lactobacillus crispatus (61), Lactobacillus gasseri (49), Lactobacillus plantarum (80) studied were found to harbor either erm(B) or tet(M) gene or both. No resistant lactobacilli was found in raw-milk and cream samples. All the human fecal samples and the majority of vaginal (29 of 36) and mouth (10 of 14) samples were found to carry the resistance genes. While a third of the hand-made cheeses carried resistant lactobacilli only one industrially produced cheese was found to carry resistant lactobacilli. Furthermore, the genes were found in the non-starter species, Lactobacillus acidophilus and Lb. plantarum, indicating that industrially produced cheeses in this respect could be considered more favorable. These results indicate that drug resistance seems to be very common in Turkey. Even though the number of dairy samples harboring the resistance genes (17 of 111) is smaller in regards to human samples, 10% of them were still found to carry the resistance genes as well. The presence of the resistance genes in majority of the samples of human origin and in minority of the samples of dairy origin indicates that drug resistance may be acquired in the intestinal tract during passage and spread to dairy products by the hands of workers during production.

  5. Camptothecin resistance in cancer: insights into the molecular mechanisms of a DNA-damaging drug.

    PubMed

    Beretta, G L; Gatti, L; Perego, P; Zaffaroni, N

    2013-01-01

    Poisoning of DNA topoisomerase I is the mechanism by which camptothecins interfere with tumor growth. Although the clinical use of camptothecins has had a significant impact on cancer therapy, de novo or acquired clinical resistance to these drugs is common. Clinical resistance to camptothecins is still a poorly understood phenomenon, likely involving pharmacological and tumor-related factors. Experimental models including yeast and mammalian cell cultures suggest three general mechanisms of camptothecin resistance: i) reduced cellular accumulation of drugs, ii) alteration in the structure/expression of topoisomerase I, and iii) alterations in the cellular response to camptothecin-DNA-ternary complex formation. Some lines of evidence have also suggested links between cellular camptothecin resistance, the existence of a subset of tumor-initiating cells and miRNA deregulation. In this regard, a better definition of the molecular events clarifying the regulation of tumorigenesis and gene expression might contribute to gain insight into the molecular mechanisms on the basis of camptothecin resistance of tumors and to identify new molecular tools for targeting cancer cells. The relevance of these mechanisms to clinical drug resistance has not yet been completely defined, but their evaluation in clinical specimens should help to define personalized treatments including camptothecins as single agents or in combination with other cytotoxic and target-specific anticancer agents. The present review focuses on the cellular/ molecular aspects involved in resistance of tumor cells to camptothecins, including the potential role of cancer stem cells and deregulated miRNAs, and on the approaches proposed for overcoming resistance.

  6. Mechanisms of Drug Resistance in Plasmodium Falciparum

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-06-14

    major threat to world health. Efforts to control the disease have focused on chemotherapy, mosquito control and most recently vaccine development. These...resistant mosquitoes and upheavals in spraying programs and the complicated problems of vaccine development and testing. The world is facing an...development of vaccines for several important bacterial pathogens. The malaria parasite presents a unique challenge for transfection in that it is

  7. The role of photodynamic therapy in overcoming cancer drug resistance

    PubMed Central

    Spring, Bryan Q.; Rizvi, Imran; Xu, Nan; Hasan, Tayyaba

    2015-01-01

    Many modalities of cancer therapy induce mechanisms of treatment resistance and escape pathways during chronic treatments, including photodynamic therapy (PDT). It is conceivable that resistance induced by one treatment might be overcome by another treatment. Emerging evidence suggests that the unique mechanisms of tumor cell and microenvironment damage produced by PDT could be utilized to overcome cancer drug resistance, to mitigate the compensatory induction of survival pathways and even to re-sensitize resistant cells to standard therapies. Approaches that capture the unique features of PDT, therefore, offer promising factors for increasing the efficacy of a broad range of therapeutic modalities. Here, we highlight key preclinical findings utilizing PDT to overcome classical drug resistance or escape pathways and thus enhance the efficacy of many pharmaceuticals, possibly explaining the clinical observations of the PDT response to otherwise treatment-resistant diseases. With the development of nanotechnology, it is possible that light activation may be used not only to damage and sensitize tumors but also to enable controlled drug release to inhibit escape pathways that may lead to resistance or cell proliferation. PMID:25856800

  8. Seeking Goldilocks During Evolution of Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Petrov, Dmitri A.

    2017-01-01

    Speciation can occur when a population is split and the resulting subpopulations evolve independently, accumulating mutations over time that make them incompatible with one another. It is thought that such incompatible mutations, known as Bateson–Dobzhansky–Muller (BDM) incompatibilities, may arise when the two populations face different environments, which impose different selective pressures. However, a new study in PLOS Biology by Ono et al. finds that the first-step mutations selected in yeast populations evolving in parallel in the presence of the antifungal drug nystatin are frequently incompatible with one another. This incompatibility is environment dependent, such that the combination of two incompatible alleles can become advantageous under increasing drug concentrations. This suggests that the activity for the affected pathway must have an optimum level, the value of which varies according to the drug concentration. It is likely that many biological processes similarly have an optimum under a given environment and many single-step adaptive ways to reach it; thus, not only should BDM incompatibilities commonly arise during parallel evolution, they might be virtually inevitable, as the combination of two such steps is likely to overshoot the optimum. PMID:28158184

  9. Structure-based methods for predicting target mutation-induced drug resistance and rational drug design to overcome the problem.

    PubMed

    Hao, Ge-Fei; Yang, Guang-Fu; Zhan, Chang-Guo

    2012-10-01

    Drug resistance has become one of the biggest challenges in drug discovery and/or development and has attracted great research interests worldwide. During the past decade, computational strategies have been developed to predict target mutation-induced drug resistance. Meanwhile, various molecular design strategies, including targeting protein backbone, targeting highly conserved residues and dual/multiple targeting, have been used to design novel inhibitors for combating the drug resistance. In this article we review recent advances in development of computational methods for target mutation-induced drug resistance prediction and strategies for rational design of novel inhibitors that could be effective against the possible drug-resistant mutants of the target.

  10. [Drug-resistant malaria: problems with its definition and technical approaches].

    PubMed

    Basco, L; Ringwald, P

    2000-01-01

    In antimalarial chemotherapy, drug resistance is defined as "the ability of a parasite strain to survive and/or multiply despite the administration and absorption of a drug in doses equal to or higher than those usually recommended but within the limits of tolerance of the subject". This official World Health Organization definition, based on clinical and parasitological observations, was established in 1973, when genetics, pharmacology and in vitro culture techniques were still in the early stages of development. Several techniques are currently used to detect drug-resistant Plasmodium falciparum. Several in vivo tests, the traditional gold standard for the detection of drug resistance, have been developed. Classical tests include the 28-day extended test and the 7-day test, interpreted using the S-RI-RII-RIII classification system (S for susceptible and R for resistant, with three degrees of resistance, I to III, depending on parasitological response). These tests cannot be applied in practice, in field situations, and the results do not take into account the clinical condition of the patient, largely because they were designed for use with asymptomatic carriers. These limitations led to the development in 1994 (modified in 1996) of the more practical and simplified 14-day test of therapeutic efficacy. This test classifies the patient's clinical and parasitological response as "adequate clinical response", "late treatment failure" or "early treatment failure". This in vivo test of therapeutic efficacy can be applied in the field with a minimum of health facilities, personnel and other resources. However, true cases of drug resistance may not always be detected by in vivo tests due to pharmacokinetic variations, reinfection, multiple infections, noncompliance or interference with the acquired immune response. The most commonly used reliable in vitro assay, the isotopic microtest, determines the drug concentration at which 50% of parasite growth is inhibited (50

  11. Enhanced transmission of drug-resistant parasites to mosquitoes following drug treatment in rodent malaria.

    PubMed

    Bell, Andrew S; Huijben, Silvie; Paaijmans, Krijn P; Sim, Derek G; Chan, Brian H K; Nelson, William A; Read, Andrew F

    2012-01-01

    The evolution of drug resistant Plasmodium parasites is a major challenge to effective malaria control. In theory, competitive interactions between sensitive parasites and resistant parasites within infections are a major determinant of the rate at which parasite evolution undermines drug efficacy. Competitive suppression of resistant parasites in untreated hosts slows the spread of resistance; competitive release following treatment enhances it. Here we report that for the murine model Plasmodium chabaudi, co-infection with drug-sensitive parasites can prevent the transmission of initially rare resistant parasites to mosquitoes. Removal of drug-sensitive parasites following chemotherapy enabled resistant parasites to transmit to mosquitoes as successfully as sensitive parasites in the absence of treatment. We also show that the genetic composition of gametocyte populations in host venous blood accurately reflects the genetic composition of gametocytes taken up by mosquitoes. Our data demonstrate that, at least for this mouse model, aggressive chemotherapy leads to very effective transmission of highly resistant parasites that are present in an infection, the very parasites which undermine the long term efficacy of front-line drugs.

  12. New strategies against drug resistance to herpes simplex virus

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yu-Chen; Feng, Hui; Lin, Yu-Chun; Guo, Xiu-Rong

    2016-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV), a member of the Herpesviridae family, is a significant human pathogen that results in mucocutaneous lesions in the oral cavity or genital infections. Acyclovir (ACV) and related nucleoside analogues can successfully treat HSV infections, but the emergence of drug resistance to ACV has created a barrier for the treatment of HSV infections, especially in immunocompromised patients. There is an urgent need to explore new and effective tactics to circumvent drug resistance to HSV. This review summarises the current strategies in the development of new targets (the DNA helicase/primase (H/P) complex), new types of molecules (nature products) and new antiviral mechanisms (lethal mutagenesis of Janus-type nucleosides) to fight the drug resistance of HSV. PMID:27025259

  13. Using genome-wide CRISPR library screening with library resistant DCK to find new sources of Ara-C drug resistance in AML

    PubMed Central

    Kurata, Morito; Rathe, Susan K.; Bailey, Natashay J.; Aumann, Natalie K.; Jones, Justine M.; Veldhuijzen, G. Willemijn; Moriarity, Branden S.; Largaespada, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) can display de novo or acquired resistance to cytosine arabinoside (Ara-C), a primary component of induction chemotherapy. To identify genes capable of independently imposing Ara-C resistance, we applied a genome-wide CRISPR library to human U937 cells and exposed to them to Ara-C. Interestingly, all drug resistant clones contained guide RNAs for DCK. To avoid DCK gene modification, gRNA resistant DCK cDNA was created by the introduction of silent mutations. The CRISPR screening was repeated using the gRNA resistant DCK, and loss of SLC29A was identified as also being capable of conveying Ara-C drug resistance. To determine if loss of Dck results in increased sensitivity to other drugs, we conducted a screen of 446 FDA approved drugs using two Dck-defective BXH-2 derived murine AML cell lines and their Ara-C sensitive parental lines. Both cell lines showed an increase in sensitivity to prednisolone. Guide RNA resistant cDNA rescue was a legitimate strategy and multiple DCK or SLC29A deficient human cell clones were established with one clone becoming prednisolone sensitive. Dck-defective leukemic cells may become prednisolone sensitive indicating prednisolone may be an effective adjuvant therapy in some cases of DCK-negative AML. PMID:27808171

  14. Using genome-wide CRISPR library screening with library resistant DCK to find new sources of Ara-C drug resistance in AML.

    PubMed

    Kurata, Morito; Rathe, Susan K; Bailey, Natashay J; Aumann, Natalie K; Jones, Justine M; Veldhuijzen, G Willemijn; Moriarity, Branden S; Largaespada, David A

    2016-11-03

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) can display de novo or acquired resistance to cytosine arabinoside (Ara-C), a primary component of induction chemotherapy. To identify genes capable of independently imposing Ara-C resistance, we applied a genome-wide CRISPR library to human U937 cells and exposed to them to Ara-C. Interestingly, all drug resistant clones contained guide RNAs for DCK. To avoid DCK gene modification, gRNA resistant DCK cDNA was created by the introduction of silent mutations. The CRISPR screening was repeated using the gRNA resistant DCK, and loss of SLC29A was identified as also being capable of conveying Ara-C drug resistance. To determine if loss of Dck results in increased sensitivity to other drugs, we conducted a screen of 446 FDA approved drugs using two Dck-defective BXH-2 derived murine AML cell lines and their Ara-C sensitive parental lines. Both cell lines showed an increase in sensitivity to prednisolone. Guide RNA resistant cDNA rescue was a legitimate strategy and multiple DCK or SLC29A deficient human cell clones were established with one clone becoming prednisolone sensitive. Dck-defective leukemic cells may become prednisolone sensitive indicating prednisolone may be an effective adjuvant therapy in some cases of DCK-negative AML.

  15. Ligand-associated ERBB2/3 activation confers acquired resistance to FGFR inhibition in FGFR3-dependent cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, J; Mikse, O; Liao, R G; Li, Y; Tan, L; Janne, P A; Gray, N S; Wong, K-k; Hammerman, P S

    2015-04-23

    Somatic alterations of fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFRs) have been described in a wide range of malignancies. A number of anti-FGFR therapies are currently under investigation in clinical trials for subjects with FGFR gene amplifications, mutations and translocations. Here, we develop cell line models of acquired resistance to FGFR inhibition by exposure of cell lines harboring FGFR3 gene amplification and translocation to the selective FGFR inhibitor BGJ398 and multitargeted FGFR inhibitor ponatinib. We show that the acquisition of resistance is rapid, reversible and characterized by an epithelial to mesenchymal transition and a switch from dependency on FGFR3 to ERBB family members. Acquired resistance was associated with demonstrable changes in gene expression including increased production of ERBB2/3 ligands, which were sufficient to drive resistance in the setting of FGFR3 dependency but not dependency on other FGFR family members. These data support the concept that activation of ERBB family members is sufficient to bypass dependency on FGFR3 and suggest that concurrent inhibition of these two pathways may be desirable when targeting FGFR3-dependent cancers.

  16. A set of NF-κB-regulated microRNAs induces acquired TRAIL resistance in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Young-Jun; Middleton, Justin; Kim, Taewan; Laganà, Alessandro; Piovan, Claudia; Secchiero, Paola; Nuovo, Gerard J; Cui, Ri; Joshi, Pooja; Romano, Giulia; Di Leva, Gianpiero; Lee, Bum-Kyu; Sun, Hui-Lung; Kim, Yonghwan; Fadda, Paolo; Alder, Hansjuerg; Garofalo, Michela; Croce, Carlo M

    2015-06-30

    TRAIL (TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand) is a promising anticancer agent that can be potentially used as an alternative or complementary therapy because of its specific antitumor activity. However, TRAIL can also stimulate the proliferation of cancer cells through the activation of NF-κB, but the exact mechanism is still poorly understood. In this study, we show that chronic exposure to subtoxic concentrations of TRAIL results in acquired resistance. This resistance is associated with the increase in miR-21, miR-30c, and miR-100 expression, which target tumor-suppressor genes fundamental in the response to TRAIL. Importantly, down-regulation of caspase-8 by miR-21 blocks receptor interacting protein-1 cleavage and induces the activation of NF-κB, which regulates these miRNAs. Thus, TRAIL activates a positive feedback loop that sustains the acquired resistance and causes an aggressive phenotype. Finally, we prove that combinatory treatment of NF-κB inhibitors and TRAIL is able to revert resistance and reduce tumor growth, with important consequences for the clinical practice.

  17. Acquired multi-azole resistance in Candida tropicalis during persistent urinary tract infection in a dog.

    PubMed

    Álvarez-Pérez, Sergio; García, Marta E; Cutuli, María Teresa; Fermín, María Luisa; Daza, María Ángeles; Peláez, Teresa; Blanco, José L

    2016-03-01

    Multi-azole resistance acquisition by Candida tropicalis after prolonged antifungal therapy in a dog with urinary candidiasis is reported. Pre- and post-azole treatment isolates were clonally related and had identical silent mutations in the ERG11 gene, but the latter displayed increased azole minimum inhibitory concentrations. A novel frameshift mutation in ERG3 was found in some isolates recovered after resistance development, so it appears unlikely that this mutation is responsible for multi-azole resistance.

  18. Affordable HIV drug-resistance testing for monitoring of antiretroviral therapy in sub-Saharan Africa.

    PubMed

    Inzaule, Seth C; Ondoa, Pascale; Peter, Trevor; Mugyenyi, Peter N; Stevens, Wendy S; de Wit, Tobias F Rinke; Hamers, Raph L

    2016-11-01

    Increased provision of antiretroviral therapy in sub-Saharan Africa has led to a growing number of patients with therapy failure and acquired drug-resistant HIV, driving the demand for more costly further lines of antiretroviral therapy. In conjunction with accelerated access to viral load monitoring, feasible and affordable technologies to detect drug-resistant HIV could help maximise the durability and rational use of available drug regimens. Potential low-cost technologies include in-house Sanger and next-generation sequencing in centralised laboratories, and point mutation assays and genotype-free systems that predict response to antiretroviral therapy at point-of-care. Strengthening of centralised high-throughput laboratories, including efficient systems for sample referral and results delivery, will increase economies-of-scale while reducing costs. Access barriers can be mitigated by standardisation of in-house assays into commercial kits, use of polyvalent instruments, and adopting price-reducing strategies. A stepwise rollout approach should improve feasibility, prioritising WHO-recommended population-based surveillance and management of complex patient categories, such as patients failing protease inhibitor-based antiretroviral therapy. Implementation research, adaptations of existing WHO guidance, and political commitment, will be key to support the appropriate investments and policy changes. In this Personal View, we discuss the potential role of HIV drug resistance testing for population-based surveillance and individual patient management in sub-Saharan Africa. We review the strengths and challenges of promising low-cost technologies and how they can be implemented.

  19. The analysis of HIV/AIDS drug-resistant on networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Maoxing

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we present an Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)/Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) drug-resistant model using an ordinary differential equation (ODE) model on scale-free networks. We derive the threshold for the epidemic to be zero in infinite scale-free network. We also prove the stability of disease-free equilibrium (DFE) and persistence of HIV/AIDS infection. The effects of two immunization schemes, including proportional scheme and targeted vaccination, are studied and compared. We find that targeted strategy compare favorably to a proportional condom using has prominent effect to control HIV/AIDS spread on scale-free networks.

  20. Persistence of HIV-1 transmitted drug resistance mutations.

    PubMed

    Castro, Hannah; Pillay, Deenan; Cane, Patricia; Asboe, David; Cambiano, Valentina; Phillips, Andrew; Dunn, David T

    2013-11-01

    There are few data on the persistence of individual human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) transmitted drug resistance (TDR) mutations in the absence of selective drug pressure. We studied 313 patients in whom TDR mutations were detected at their first resistance test and who had a subsequent test performed while ART-naive. The rate at which mutations became undetectable was estimated using exponential regression accounting for interval censoring. Most thymidine analogue mutations (TAMs) and T215 revertants (but not T215F/Y) were found to be highly stable, with NNRTI and PI mutations being relatively less persistent. Our estimates are important for informing HIV transmission models.

  1. Dynamic optical tweezers based assay for monitoring early drug resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiaojing; Zhang, Yuquan; Min, Changjun; Zhu, Siwei; Feng, Jie; Yuan, X.-C.

    2013-06-01

    In this letter, a dynamic optical tweezers based assay is proposed and investigated for monitoring early drug resistance with Pemetrexed-resistant non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines. The validity and stability of the method are verified experimentally in terms of the physical parameters of the optical tweezers system. The results demonstrate that the proposed technique is more convenient and faster than traditional techniques when the capability of detecting small variations of the response of cells to a drug is maintained.

  2. Overcoming MITF-conferred drug resistance through dual AURKA/MAPK targeting in human melanoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Pathria, G; Garg, B; Borgdorff, V; Garg, K; Wagner, C; Superti-Furga, G; Wagner, S N

    2016-01-01

    MITF (microphthalmia-associated transcription factor) is a frequently amplified lineage-specific oncogene in human melanoma, whose role in intrinsic drug resistance has not been systematically investigated. Utilizing chemical inhibitors for major signaling pathways/cellular processes, we witness MITF as an elicitor of intrinsic drug resistance. To search kinase(s) targets able to bypass MITF-conferred drug resistance, we employed a multi-kinase inhibitor-directed chemical proteomics-based differential affinity screen in human melanocytes carrying ectopic MITF overexpression. A subsequent methodical interrogation informed mitotic Ser/Thr kinase Aurora Kinase A (AURKA) as a crucial regulator of melanoma cell proliferation and migration, independent of the underlying molecular alterations, including TP53 functional status and MITF levels. Crucially, assessing the efficacy of investigational AURKA inhibitor MLN8237, we pre-emptively witness the procurement of a molecular program consistent with acquired drug resistance. This involved induction of multiple MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) signaling pathway components and their downstream proliferation effectors (Cyclin D1 and c-JUN) and apoptotic regulators (MITF and Bcl-2). A concomitant AURKA/BRAF and AURKA/MEK targeting overcame MAPK signaling activation-associated resistance signature in BRAF- and NRAS-mutated melanomas, respectively, and elicited heightened anti-proliferative activity and apoptotic cell death. These findings reveal a previously unreported MAPK signaling-mediated mechanism of immediate resistance to AURKA inhibitors. These findings could bear significant implications for the application and the success of anti-AURKA approaches that have already entered phase-II clinical trials for human melanoma. PMID:26962685

  3. [Drug-resistant tuberculosis. Epidemiology, diagnostics and therapy].

    PubMed

    Grobusch, M P; Schaumburg, F; Altpeter, E; Bélard, S

    2016-02-01

    Drug-resistant tuberculosis (DR-TB) is one of the serious problems in the fight against tuberculosis on a global scale. This review article describes in brief the global epidemiology, diagnostics and treatment of DR-TB. The situation in Germany, Switzerland and Austria is addressed in detail. The article concludes with a presentation of current research topics in the field of resistant TB.

  4. A Multistrain Mathematical Model To Investigate the Role of Pyrazinamide in the Emergence of Extensively Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Sourya; Knight, Gwenan M.; Cohen, Ted; White, Richard G.; Cobelens, Frank

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Several infectious diseases of global importance—e.g., HIV infection and tuberculosis (TB)—require prolonged treatment with combination antimicrobial regimens typically involving high-potency core agents coupled with additional companion drugs that protect against the de novo emergence of mutations conferring resistance to the core agents. Often, the most effective (or least toxic) companion agents are reused in sequential (first-line, second-line, etc.) regimens. We used a multistrain model of Mycobacterium tuberculosis transmission in Southeast Asia to investigate how this practice might facilitate the emergence of extensive drug resistance, i.e., resistance to multiple core agents. We calibrated this model to regional TB and drug resistance data using an approximate Bayesian computational approach. We report the proportion of data-consistent simulations in which the prevalence of pre-extensively drug-resistant (pre-XDR) TB—defined as resistance to both first-line and second-line core agents (rifampin and fluoroquinolones)—exceeds predefined acceptability thresholds (1 to 2 cases per 100,000 population by 2035). The use of pyrazinamide (the most effective companion agent) in both first-line and second-line regimens increased the proportion of simulations in which the prevalence exceeded the pre-XDR acceptability threshold by 7-fold compared to a scenario in which patients with pyrazinamide-resistant TB received an alternative drug. Model parameters related to the emergence and transmission of pyrazinamide-resistant TB and resistance amplification were among those that were the most strongly correlated with the projected pre-XDR prevalence, indicating that pyrazinamide resistance acquired during first-line treatment subsequently promotes amplification to pre-XDR TB under pyrazinamide-containing second-line treatment. These findings suggest that the appropriate use of companion drugs may be critical to preventing the emergence of strains resistant

  5. [Antibiotic resistance of strains isolated from community acquired urinary tract infections between 2007 and 2011 in Guelma (Algeria)].

    PubMed

    Bentroki, Ahmed Aimen; Gouri, Adel; Yakhlef, Amina; Touaref, Amel; Gueroudj, Abderrahim; Bensouilah, Takieddine

    2012-01-01

    Urinary tract infections are a real public health problem. They are a frequent reason for consultation as they entail a significant and sometimes inappropriate prescription of antibiotics. This is a retrospective study which involved 1,334 patients between October 2007 and February 2011. Enterobacteriaceae accounted for 85% of isolated bacteria, predominantly Escherichia coli (60%). Gram-positive bacteria account for only 11%. The highest rate of acquired resistance of Escherichia coli was observed with ampicillin (70%). This study give an idea on the rates of antibiotic resistance of the main bacteria involved in urinary tract infections and illustrate the importance of the proper use of antibiotics coupled to surveillance in order to control the spread of these resistances.

  6. Multiple transport systems mediate virus-induced acquired resistance to oxidative stress

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this paper, we report the phenomenon of acquired cross-tolerance to oxidative (UV-C and H2O2) stress in Nicotiana benthamiana plants infected with Potato virus X (PVX) and investigate the functional expression of transport systems in mediating this phenomenon. By combining multiple approaches, we...

  7. Multiple drug resistance genes in malaria -- from epistasis to epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Duraisingh, Manoj T; Refour, Philippe

    2005-08-01

    A decline in our ability to successfully treat patients with malaria infections of the parasitic protozoan Plasmodium falciparum with cheap quinoline drugs has led to a huge escalation in morbidity and mortality in recent years. Many approaches have been taken, including classical genetics, reverse genetics and molecular epidemiology, to identify the molecular determinants underlying this resistance. The contribution of the P. falciparum multidrug resistance gene, pfmdr1, to antimalarial resistance has been a source of controversy for over a decade since it was first identified. In the current issue of Molecular Microbiology, Sidhu and colleagues use powerful reverse genetics to demonstrate the importance of commonly occurring alleles of pfmdr1 in conferring resistance to the second-line drugs quinine and sensitivity to the new alternatives mefloquine and artemisinin. They also elegantly highlight the importance of genetic background and epistasis between pfmdr1 and other potential modulators of drug resistance. Such molecular knowledge will facilitate surveillance/monitoring and aid the development of strategies for the reversal of resistance.

  8. Effect and Safety of Shihogyejitang for Drug Resistant Childhood Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jinsoo; Son, Kwanghyun; Hwang, Gwiseo

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Herbal medicine has been widely used to treat drug resistant epilepsy. Shihogyejitang (SGT) has been commonly used to treat epilepsy. We investigated the effect and safety of SGT in children with drug resistant epilepsy. Design. We reviewed medical records of 54 patients with epilepsy, who failed to respond to at least two antiepileptic drugs and have been treated with SGT between April 2006 and June 2014 at the Department of Pediatric Neurology, I-Tomato Hospital, Korea. Effect was measured by the response rate, seizure-free rate, and retention rate at six months. We also checked adverse events, change in antiepileptic drugs use, and the variables related to the outcome. Results. Intent-to-treat analysis showed that, after six months, 44.4% showed a >50% seizure reduction, 24.1% including seizure-free, respectively, and 53.7% remained on SGT. Two adverse events were reported, mild skin rash and fever. Focal seizure type presented significantly more positive responses when compared with other seizure types at six months (p = 0.0284, Fisher's exact test). Conclusion. SGT is an effective treatment with excellent tolerability for drug resistant epilepsy patients. Our data provide evidence that SGT may be used as alternative treatment option when antiepileptic drug does not work in epilepsy children. PMID:27047568

  9. pncA Gene Mutations Associated with Pyrazinamide Resistance in Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis, South Africa and Georgia.

    PubMed

    Allana, Salim; Shashkina, Elena; Mathema, Barun; Bablishvili, Nino; Tukvadze, Nestani; Shah, N Sarita; Kempker, Russell R; Blumberg, Henry M; Moodley, Pravi; Mlisana, Koleka; Brust, James C M; Gandhi, Neel R

    2017-03-01

    Although pyrazinamide is commonly used for tuberculosis treatment, drug-susceptibility testing is not routinely available. We found polymorphisms in the pncA gene for 70% of multidrug-resistant and 96% of extensively drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from South Africa and Georgia. Assessment of pyrazinamide susceptibility may be prudent before using it in regimens for drug-resistant tuberculosis.

  10. Polyclonal Secondary FGFR2 Mutations Drive Acquired Resistance to FGFR Inhibition in Patients with FGFR2 Fusion-Positive Cholangiocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Lipika; Saha, Supriya K; Liu, Leah Y; Siravegna, Giulia; Leshchiner, Ignaty; Ahronian, Leanne G; Lennerz, Jochen K; Vu, Phuong; Deshpande, Vikram; Kambadakone, Avinash; Mussolin, Benedetta; Reyes, Stephanie; Henderson, Laura; Sun, Jiaoyuan Elisabeth; Van Seventer, Emily E; Gurski, Joseph M; Baltschukat, Sabrina; Schacher-Engstler, Barbara; Barys, Louise; Stamm, Christelle; Furet, Pascal; Ryan, David P; Stone, James R; Iafrate, A John; Getz, Gad; Porta, Diana Graus; Tiedt, Ralph; Bardelli, Alberto; Juric, Dejan; Corcoran, Ryan B; Bardeesy, Nabeel; Zhu, Andrew X

    2017-03-01

    Genetic alterations in the fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) pathway are promising therapeutic targets in many cancers, including intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC). The FGFR inhibitor BGJ398 displayed encouraging efficacy in patients with FGFR2 fusion-positive ICC in a phase II trial, but the durability of response was limited in some patients. Here, we report the molecular basis for acquired resistance to BGJ398 in three patients via integrative genomic characterization of cell-free circulating tumor DNA (cfDNA), primary tumors, and metastases. Serial analysis of cfDNA demonstrated multiple recurrent point mutations in the FGFR2 kinase domain at progression. Accordingly, biopsy of post-progression lesions and rapid autopsy revealed marked inter- and intralesional heterogeneity, with different FGFR2 mutations in individual resistant clones. Molecular modeling and in vitro studies indicated that each mutation led to BGJ398 resistance and was surmountable by structurally distinct FGFR inhibitors. Thus, polyclonal secondary FGFR2 mutations represent an important clinical resistance mechanism that may guide the development of future therapeutic strategies.Significance: We report the first genetic mechanisms of clinical acquired resistance to FGFR inhibition in patients with FGFR2 fusion-positive ICC. Our findings can inform future strategies for detecting resistance mechanisms and inducing more durable remissions in ICC and in the wide variety of cancers where the FGFR pathway is being explored as a therapeutic target. Cancer Discov; 7(3); 252-63. ©2016 AACR.See related commentary by Smyth et al., p. 248This article is highlighted in the In This Issue feature, p. 235.

  11. The Role of Cancer Stem Cells in Recurrent and Drug-Resistant Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Suresh, Raagini; Ali, Shadan; Ahmad, Aamir; Philip, Philip A; Sarkar, Fazlul H

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide with a 5-year overall survival rate of less than 20 %. Considering the treatments currently available, this statistics is shocking. A possible explanation for the disconnect between sophisticated treatments and the survival rate can be related to the post-treatment enrichment of Cancer Stem Cells (CSCs), which is one of a sub-set of drug resistant tumor cells with abilities of self-renewal, cancer initiation, and further maintenance of tumors. Lung CSCs have been associated with resistance to radiation and chemotherapeutic treatments. CSCs have also been implicated in tumor recurrence because CSCs are not typically killed after conventional therapy. Investigation of CSCs in determining their role in tumor recurrence and drug-resistance relied heavily on the use of specific markers present in CSCs, including CD133, ALDH, ABCG2, and Nanog. Yet another cell type that is also associated with increased resistance to treatment is epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) phenotypic cells. Through the processes of EMT, epithelial cells lose their epithelial phenotype and gain mesenchymal properties, rendering EMT phenotypic cells acquire drug-resistance. In this chapter, we will further discuss the role of microRNAs (miRNAs) especially because miRNA-based therapies are becoming attractive target with respect to therapeutic resistance and CSCs. Finally, the potential role of the natural agents and synthetic derivatives of natural compounds with anti-cancer activity, e.g. curcumin, CDF, and BR-DIM is highlighted in overcoming therapeutic resistance, suggesting that the above mentioned agents could be important for better treatment of lung cancer in combination therapy.

  12. Hepatitis C Virus and Antiviral Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seungtaek; Han, Kwang-Hyub; Ahn, Sang Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Since its discovery in 1989, hepatitis C virus (HCV) has been intensively investigated to understand its biology and develop effective antiviral therapies. The efforts of the previous 25 years have resulted in a better understanding of the virus, and this was facilitated by the development of in vitro cell culture systems for HCV replication. Antiviral treatments and sustained virological responses have also improved from the early interferon monotherapy to the current all-oral regimens using direct-acting antivirals. However, antiviral resistance has become a critical issue in the treatment of chronic hepatitis C, similar to other chronic viral infections, and retreatment options following treatment failure have become important questions. Despite the clinical challenges in the management of chronic hepatitis C, substantial progress has been made in understanding HCV, which may facilitate the investigation of other closely related flaviviruses and lead to the development of antiviral agents against these human pathogens. PMID:27784846

  13. The Role of Transport Mechanisms in Mycobacterium Tuberculosis Drug Resistance and Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Sarathy, Jansy Passiflora; Dartois, Véronique; Lee, Edmund Jon Deoon

    2012-01-01

    In the fight against tuberculosis, cell wall permeation of chemotherapeutic agents remains a critical but largely unsolved question. Here we review the major mechanisms of small molecule penetration into and efflux from Mycobacterium tuberculosis and other mycobacteria, and outline how these mechanisms may contribute to the development of phenotypic drug tolerance and induction of drug resistance. M. tuberculosis is intrinsically recalcitrant to small molecule permeation thanks to its thick lipid-rich cell wall. Passive diffusion appears to account for only a fraction of total drug permeation. As in other bacterial species, influx of hydrophilic compounds is facilitated by water-filled open channels, or porins, spanning the cell wall. However, the diversity and density of M. tuberculosis porins appears lower than in enterobacteria. Besides, physiological adaptations brought about by unfavorable conditions are thought to reduce the efficacy of porins. While intracellular accumulation of selected drug classes supports the existence of hypothesized active drug influx transporters, efflux pumps contribute to the drug resistant phenotype through their natural abundance and diversity, as well as their highly inducible expression. Modulation of efflux transporter expression has been observed in phagocytosed, non-replicating persistent and multi-drug resistant bacilli. Altogether, M. tuberculosis has evolved both intrinsic properties and acquired mechanisms to increase its level of tolerance towards xenobiotic substances, by preventing or minimizing their entry. Understanding these adaptation mechanisms is critical to counteract the natural mechanisms of defense against toxic compounds and develop new classes of chemotherapeutic agents that positively exploit the influx and efflux pathways of mycobacteria. PMID:24281307

  14. The novel ATP-competitive MEK/Aurora kinase inhibitor BI-847325 overcomes acquired BRAF inhibitor resistance through suppression of Mcl-1 and MEK expression

    PubMed Central

    Phadke, Manali S.; Sini, Patrizia; Smalley, Keiran S. M.

    2015-01-01

    Resistance to BRAF inhibitors is a major clinical problem. Here we evaluate BI-847325, an ATP-competitive inhibitor of MEK and Aurora kinases, in treatment-naïve and drug-resistant BRAF-mutant melanoma models. BI-847325 potently inhibited growth and survival of melanoma cell lines that were both BRAF inhibitor naïve and resistant in 2D culture, 3D cell culture conditions and in colony formation assays. Western blot studies showed BI-847325 to reduce expression of phospho-ERK and phospho-histone 3 in multiple models of vemurafenib resistance. Mechanistically, BI-847325 decreased the expression of MEK and Mcl-1 while increasing the expression of the pro-apoptotic protein BIM. Strong suppression of MEK expression was observed after 48 h of treatment, with no recovery following >72 h of washout. siRNA mediated knockdown of Mcl-1 enhanced the effects of BI-847325, whereas Mcl-1 overexpression reversed this in both 2D cell culture and 3D spheroid melanoma models. In vivo, once weekly BI-847325 (70 mg/kg) led to durable regression of BRAF-inhibitor naive xenografts with no regrowth seen (>65 days of treatment). In contrast, treatment with the vemurafenib analog PLX4720 was associated with tumor relapse at >30 days. BI-847325 also suppressed the long-term growth of xenografts with acquired PLX4720 resistance. Analysis of tumor samples revealed BI-847325 to induce apoptosis associated with suppression of phospho-ERK, total MEK, phospho-Histone3 and Mcl-1 expression. Our studies indicate that BI-847325 is effective in overcoming BRAF inhibitor resistance and has long-term inhibitory effects upon BRAF-mutant melanoma in vivo, through a mechanism associated with the decreased expression of both MEK and Mcl-1. PMID:25873592

  15. A snapshot of illicit drug use in Sweden acquired through sewage water analysis.

    PubMed

    Ostman, Marcus; Fick, Jerker; Näsström, Elin; Lindberg, Richard H

    2014-02-15

    Analytical measurements of sewage water have been used many times to estimate the consumption of specific drugs in an area. This study measured a large number of illicit drugs and metabolites (>30) at a large number of sewage treatment plants (STPs) distributed across Sweden. Twenty-four illicit and prescription drugs, classified as narcotic substances in Sweden, and seven selected metabolites were included in the study. A 24 hour composite sample of incoming sewage water was collected from 33 different municipalities at various geographic locations across Sweden. Species were analyzed using an on-line solid-phase extraction-liquid chromatography electrospray tandem mass spectrometry method. The method proved to be rapid with minimum need for sample work up and was able to detect 13 compounds above their respective limits of quantification. The results for all compounds were presented as per capita loads. Multivariate data analysis was used to relate drug consumption to geographical location and/or population of cities. The results showed that geographical differences in drug consumption were apparent across the country. For the narcotic pharmaceuticals, the geographical differences suggested by the multivariate model were supported by prescription statistics.

  16. [Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis: current epidemiology, therapeutic regimens, new drugs].

    PubMed

    Gómez-Ayerbe, C; Vivancos, M J; Moreno, S

    2016-09-01

    Multidrug and extensively resistant tuberculosis are especially severe forms of the disease for which no efficacious therapy exists in many cases. All the countries in the world have registered cases, although most of them are diagnosed in resource-limited countries from Asia, Africa and South America. For adequate treatment, first- and second-line antituberculosis drugs have to be judiciously used, but the development of new drugs with full activity, good tolerability and little toxicity is urgently needed. There are some drugs in development, some of which are already available through expanded-access programs.

  17. Biophysical principles predict fitness landscapes of drug resistance

    PubMed Central

    Bershtein, Shimon; Li, Annabel; Lozovsky, Elena R.; Hartl, Daniel L.; Shakhnovich, Eugene I.

    2016-01-01

    Fitness landscapes of drug resistance constitute powerful tools to elucidate mutational pathways of antibiotic escape. Here, we developed a predictive biophysics-based fitness landscape of trimethoprim (TMP) resistance for Escherichia coli dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR). We investigated the activity, binding, folding stability, and intracellular abundance for a complete set of combinatorial DHFR mutants made out of three key resistance mutations and extended this analysis to DHFR originated from Chlamydia muridarum and Listeria grayi. We found that the acquisition of TMP resistance via decreased drug affinity is limited by a trade-off in catalytic efficiency. Protein stability is concurrently affected by the resistant mutants, which precludes a precise description of fitness from a single molecular trait. Application of the kinetic flux theory provided an accurate model to predict resistance phenotypes (IC50) quantitatively from a unique combination of the in vitro protein molecular properties. Further, we found that a controlled modulation of the GroEL/ES chaperonins and Lon protease levels affects the intracellular steady-state concentration of DHFR in a mutation-specific manner, whereas IC50 is changed proportionally, as indeed predicted by the model. This unveils a molecular rationale for the pleiotropic role of the protein quality control machinery on the evolution of antibiotic resistance, which, as we illustrate here, may drastically confound the evolutionary outcome. These results provide a comprehensive quantitative genotype–phenotype map for the essential enzyme that serves as an important target of antibiotic and anticancer therapies. PMID:26929328

  18. Characterization of Genes Encoding for Acquired Bacitracin Resistance in Clostridium perfringens

    PubMed Central

    Charlebois, Audrey; Jalbert, Louis-Alexandre; Harel, Josée; Masson, Luke; Archambault, Marie

    2012-01-01

    Phenotypic bacitracin resistance has been reported in Clostridium perfringens. However, the genes responsible for the resistance have not yet been characterized. Ninety-nine C. perfringens isolates recovered from broilers and turkeys were tested for phenotypic bacitracin resistance. Bacitracin MIC90 (>256 µg/ml) was identical for both turkey and chicken isolates; whereas MIC50 was higher in turkey isolates (6 µg/ml) than in chicken isolates (3 µg/ml). Twenty-four of the 99 isolates showed high-level bacitracin resistance (MIC breakpoint >256 µg/ml) and the genes encoding for this resistance were characterized in C. perfringens c1261_A strain using primer walking. Sequence analysis and percentages of amino acid identity revealed putative genes encoding for both an ABC transporter and an overproduced undecaprenol kinase in C. perfringens c1261_A strain. These two mechanisms were shown to be both encoded by the putative bcrABD operon under the control of a regulatory gene, bcrR. Efflux pump inhibitor thioridazine was shown to increase significantly the susceptibility of strain c1261_A to bacitracin. Upstream and downstream from the bcr cluster was an IS1216-like element, which may play a role in the dissemination of this resistance determinant. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis with prior double digestion with I-CeuI/MluI enzymes followed by hybridization analyses revealed that the bacitracin resistance genes bcrABDR were located on the chromosome. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR demonstrated that this gene cluster is expressed under bacitracin stress. Microarray analysis revealed the presence of these genes in all bacitracin resistant strains. This study reports the discovery of genes encoding for a putative ABC transporter and an overproduced undecaprenol kinase associated with high-level bacitracin resistance in C. perfringens isolates from turkeys and broiler chickens. PMID:22970221

  19. Antimicrobial drug resistance of Staphylococcus aureus in dairy products

    PubMed Central

    Sasidharan, S; Prema, B; Yoga, Latha L

    2011-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the prevalence of multidrug resistant Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) in dairy products. Methods Isolation and identification of S. aureus were performed in 3 dairy-based food products. The isolates were tested for their susceptibility to 5 different common antimicrobial drugs. Results Of 50 samples examined, 5 (10%) were contaminated with S. aureus. Subsequently, the 5 isolates were subjected to antimicrobial resistance pattern using five antibiotic discs (methicillin, vancomycin, kanamycin, chloramphenicol and tetracycline). Sample 29 showed resistance to methicillin and vancomycin. Sample 18 showed intermediate response to tetracycline. The other samples were susceptible to all the antibiotics tested. Conclusions The results provide preliminary data on sources of food contamination which may act as vehicles for the transmission of antimicrobial-resistant Staphylococcus. Therefore, it enables us to develop preventive strategies to avoid the emergence of new strains of resistant S. aureus. PMID:23569742

  20. Update on the prevention and control of community-acquired meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA).

    PubMed

    Skov, Robert; Christiansen, Keryn; Dancer, Stephanie J; Daum, Robert S; Dryden, Matthew; Huang, Yhu-Chering; Lowy, Franklin D

    2012-03-01

    The rapid dissemination of community-acquired meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) since the early 2000s and the appearance of new successful lineages is a matter of concern. The burden of these infections varies widely between different groups of individuals and in different regions of the world. Estimating the total burden of disease is therefore problematic. Skin and soft-tissue infections, often in otherwise healthy young individuals, are the most common clinical manifestation of these infections. The antibiotic susceptibilities of these strains also vary, although they are often more susceptible to 'traditional' antibiotics than related hospital-acquired strains. Preventing the dissemination of these organisms throughout the general population requires a multifaceted approach, including screening and decolonisation, general hygiene and cleaning measures, antibiotic stewardship programmes and, in the future, vaccination. The current evidence on the prevention and control of CA-MRSA is appraised and summarised in this review.

  1. Acquired resistance to decitabine and cross-resistance to gemcitabine during the long-term treatment of human HCT116 colorectal cancer cells with decitabine.

    PubMed

    Hosokawa, Mika; Saito, Mai; Nakano, Aiko; Iwashita, Sakura; Ishizaka, Ayano; Ueda, Kumiko; Iwakawa, Seigo

    2015-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the effects of long-term exposure of decitabine (DAC) to HCT116 colorectal cancer (CRC) cells on the acquisition of resistance to DAC as well as cross-resistance to anticancer drugs used for CRC or other epigenetic modifiers. In the present study, DAC-resistant HCT116 CRC cells were established through long-term treatment with increasing concentrations of DAC (10 to 540 nM); and the cross-resistance to other drugs was subsequently examined. DAC-resistant HCT116 cells were obtained following a 104-day treatment with DAC, including DAC-free intervals. The results demonstrated that the IC50 value of DAC was increased ~100-fold in DAC-resistant HCT116 cells. Messenger (m)RNA expression of secreted frizzed-related protein 1 (SFRP1), which is regulated by DNA methylation, was not detected in DAC-resistant cells; however, SFRP1 mRNA was present in HCT116 cells treated with DAC for 52 days. DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1) protein levels were slightly decreased until day 81 and then returned to control levels in DAC-resistant cells. Further experiments using DAC-resistant HCT116 cells revealed that these cells exhibited cross-resistance to gemcitabine (Gem); however, cross-resistance was not observed for other DNMT inhibitors (azacitidine and zebularine), histone deacetylase inhibitors (trichostatin A, vorinostat and valproic acid) or anticancer drugs for CRC (5-fluorouracil, irinotecan and oxaliplatin). Furthermore, the protein expression levels of cytidine deaminase (CDA) were increased, while those of deoxycytidine kinase (dCK) were decreased in DAC-resistant HCT116 cells; by contrast, the mRNA expression levels for these proteins were not significantly altered. In conclusion, the results of the present study indicated that the long-term treatment of HCT116 cells with DAC led to the acquisition of resistance to both DAC and Gem. In addition, these results may be partly attributed to changes in CDA and/or dCK, which are

  2. Recent developments in genomics, bioinformatics and drug discovery to combat emerging drug-resistant tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Swaminathan, Soumya; Sundaramurthi, Jagadish Chandrabose; Palaniappan, Alangudi Natarajan; Narayanan, Sujatha

    2016-12-01

    Emergence of drug-resistant tuberculosis (DR-TB) is a big challenge in TB control. The delay in diagnosis of DR-TB leads to its increased transmission, and therefore prevalence. Recent developments in genomics have enabled whole genome sequencing (WGS) of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) from 3-day-old liquid culture and directly from uncultured sputa, while new bioinformatics tools facilitate to determine DR mutations rapidly from the resulting sequences. The present drug discovery and development pipeline is filled with candidate drugs which have shown efficacy against DR-TB. Furthermore, some of the FDA-approved drugs are being evaluated for repurposing, and this approach appears promising as several drugs are reported to enhance efficacy of the standard TB drugs, reduce drug tolerance, or modulate the host immune response to control the growth of intracellular M. tuberculosis. Recent developments in genomics and bioinformatics along with new drug discovery collectively have the potential to result in synergistic impact leading to the development of a rapid protocol to determine the drug resistance profile of the infecting strain so as to provide personalized medicine. Hence, in this review, we discuss recent developments in WGS, bioinformatics and drug discovery to perceive how they would transform the management of tuberculosis in a timely manner.

  3. Determination of Acquired Resistance Profiles of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates and Characterization of an Effective Bacteriocin-Like Inhibitory Substance (BLIS) Against These Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Shokri, Dariush; Rabbani Khorasgani, Mohammad; Zaghian, Saeideh; Fatemi, Seyed Masih; Mohkam, Milad; Ghasemi, Younes; Taheri-Kafrani, Asghar

    2016-01-01

    Background The emergence of pan-drug resistant strains (PDR) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa has led to renewed efforts to identify alternative agents, such as bacteriocins and bacteriocin-like inhibitory substances (BLISs). Objectives The aims of this study were to determine the acquired resistance profiles of multidrug-resistant (MDR), extensively drug-resistant (XDR), and PDR P. aeruginosa isolates based on the revised definitions of the CDC and ECDC and to screen and characterize effective BLISs against these isolates. Patients and Materials In a cross-sectional study, 96 P. aeruginosa strains were isolated during a 12-month period. The resistance profiles of these isolates were determined as MDR, XDR, and PDR, and the data were analyzed using WHONET5.6 software. A BLIS against the P. aeruginosa strains was characterized based on its physicochemical properties, size, growth curves, and production profiles. Results Among the 96 isolates of P. aeruginosa, 2 (2.1%), 94 (97.9%), and 63 (65.6%) were non-MDR, MDR, and XDR, respectively, and 1 (1.1%) was PDR. The most effective antibiotics against these isolates were polymyxins and fosfomycin. A BLIS isolated from the P. aeruginosa DSH22 strain had potent activity against 92 (95.8%) of the 96 isolates. The BLIS was heat stable, (up to 100°C for 10 min), UV stable, and active within a pH range of 3 - 9. The activity of BLIS disappeared when treated with trypsin, proteinase K, and pepsin, indicating its proteinous nature. Based on its size (25 kDa), the BLIS may belong to the large colicin-like bacteriocin family. BLIS production started in the midexponential phase of growth, and the maximum level (2700 AU/mL) occurred in the late-stationary phase after 25 hours of incubation at 30°C. Conclusions This BLIS with broad-spectrum activity may be a potential agent for the treatment or control of drug-resistant strains of P. aeruginosa infection. PMID:27800131

  4. Constitutive cyclic GMP accumulation in Arabidopsis thaliana compromises systemic acquired resistance induced by an avirulent pathogen by modulating local signals.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Jamshaid; Chen, Jian; Locato, Vittoria; Sabetta, Wilma; Behera, Smrutisanjita; Cimini, Sara; Griggio, Francesca; Martínez-Jaime, Silvia; Graf, Alexander; Bouneb, Mabrouk; Pachaiappan, Raman; Fincato, Paola; Blanco, Emanuela; Costa, Alex; De Gara, Laura; Bellin, Diana; de Pinto, Maria Concetta; Vandelle, Elodie

    2016-11-04

    The infection of Arabidopsis thaliana plants with avirulent pathogens causes the accumulation of cGMP with a biphasic profile downstream of nitric oxide signalling. However, plant enzymes that modulate cGMP levels have yet to be identified, so we generated transgenic A. thaliana plants expressing the rat soluble guanylate cyclase (GC) to increase genetically the level of cGMP and to study the function of cGMP in plant defence responses. Once confirmed that cGMP levels were higher in the GC transgenic lines than in wild-type controls, the GC transgenic plants were then challenged with bacterial pathogens and their defence responses were characterized. Although local resistance was similar in the GC transgenic and wild-type lines, differences in the redox state suggested potential cross-talk between cGMP and the glutathione redox system. Furthermore, large-scale transcriptomic and proteomic analysis highlighted the significant modulation of both gene expression and protein abundance at the infection site, inhibiting the establishment of systemic acquired resistance. Our data indicate that cGMP plays a key role in local responses controlling the induction of systemic acquired resistance in plants challenged with avirulent pathogens.

  5. Constitutive cyclic GMP accumulation in Arabidopsis thaliana compromises systemic acquired resistance induced by an avirulent pathogen by modulating local signals

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Jamshaid; Chen, Jian; Locato, Vittoria; Sabetta, Wilma; Behera, Smrutisanjita; Cimini, Sara; Griggio, Francesca; Martínez-Jaime, Silvia; Graf, Alexander; Bouneb, Mabrouk; Pachaiappan, Raman; Fincato, Paola; Blanco, Emanuela; Costa, Alex; De Gara, Laura; Bellin, Diana; de Pinto, Maria Concetta; Vandelle, Elodie

    2016-01-01

    The infection of Arabidopsis thaliana plants with avirulent pathogens causes the accumulation of cGMP with a biphasic profile downstream of nitric oxide signalling. However, plant enzymes that modulate cGMP levels have yet to be identified, so we generated transgenic A. thaliana plants expressing the rat soluble guanylate cyclase (GC) to increase genetically the level of cGMP and to study the function of cGMP in plant defence responses. Once confirmed that cGMP levels were higher in the GC transgenic lines than in wild-type controls, the GC transgenic plants were then challenged with bacterial pathogens and their defence responses were characterized. Although local resistance was similar in the GC transgenic and wild-type lines, differences in the redox state suggested potential cross-talk between cGMP and the glutathione redox system. Furthermore, large-scale transcriptomic and proteomic analysis highlighted the significant modulation of both gene expression and protein abundance at the infection site, inhibiting the establishment of systemic acquired resistance. Our data indicate that cGMP plays a key role in local responses controlling the induction of systemic acquired resistance in plants challenged with avirulent pathogens. PMID:27811978

  6. Alcohol and Other Drug Resistance Strategies Employed by Rural Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pettigrew, Jonathan; Miller-Day, Michelle; Krieger, Janice; Hecht, Michael L.

    2011-01-01

    This study seeks to identify how rural adolescents make health decisions and utilize communication strategies to resist influence attempts in offers of alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs (ATOD). Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 113 adolescents from rural school districts to solicit information on ATOD norms, past ATOD experiences, and…

  7. "Applied" Aspects of the Drug Resistance Strategies Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hecht, Michael L.; Miller-Day, Michelle A.

    2010-01-01

    This paper discusses the applied aspects of our Drug Resistance Strategies Project. We argue that a new definitional distinction is needed to expand t