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Sample records for acquire polarization resolved

  1. Time Resolved Spectroscopy of Eclipsing Polars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, Paul

    2005-01-01

    No changes have been made since the last annual progress report was submitted in conjunction with a unilateral NCX. Dr. Barrett was affected by an STScI Reduction in Force (RIF). He is now employed by the Johns Hopkins University and plans to continue his research there. No expenses have been charged to this grant, however the FUSE data for the eclipsing polar V1432 Aql has been received and processed using CALFWSE v3.0.6. The resulting summed spectrum has been used for a preliminary analysis of the interstellar absorption towards V1432 Aql. We find a hydrogen column density of less than 1.5e21 cm^-2. We have used this result in the paper "X-Ray Emission and Optical Polarization of V1432 Aquilae: An Asynchronous Polar" to fix the hydrogen column density in the soft (<0.5 keV) X-ray band when analyzing the XMM-Newton spectra of this polar. This has enabled us to find an accurate temperature for the blackbody component of 88+/-2 eV, which is significantly higher than that of other polars (20 - 40 eV). We hope to complete our analysis of the phase-resolved emission line spectra of V1432 Aql and to prepare the results for publication in a refereed journal. We hope to begin work on this star within the next few months.

  2. Time Resolved Spectroscopy of Eclipsing Polars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, Paul

    2005-09-01

    No changes have been made since the last annual progress report was submitted in conjunction with a unilateral NCX. Dr. Barrett was affected by an STScI Reduction in Force (RIF). He is now employed by the Johns Hopkins University and plans to continue his research there. No expenses have been charged to this grant, however the FUSE data for the eclipsing polar V1432 Aql has been received and processed using CALFWSE v3.0.6. The resulting summed spectrum has been used for a preliminary analysis of the interstellar absorption towards V1432 Aql. We find a hydrogen column density of less than 1.5e21 cm^-2. We have used this result in the paper "X-Ray Emission and Optical Polarization of V1432 Aquilae: An Asynchronous Polar" to fix the hydrogen column density in the soft (<0.5 keV) X-ray band when analyzing the XMM-Newton spectra of this polar. This has enabled us to find an accurate temperature for the blackbody component of 88+/-2 eV, which is significantly higher than that of other polars (20 - 40 eV). We hope to complete our analysis of the phase-resolved emission line spectra of V1432 Aql and to prepare the results for publication in a refereed journal. We hope to begin work on this star within the next few months.

  3. Polarization resolved angular optical scattering of aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redding, B.; Pan, Y.; Wang, C.; Videen, G.; Cao, Hui

    2014-05-01

    Real-time detection and identification of bio-aerosol particles are crucial for the protection against chemical and biological agents. The strong elastic light scattering properties of airborne particles provides a natural means for rapid, non-invasive aerosol characterization. Recent theoretical predictions suggested that variations in the polarization dependent angular scattering cross section could provide an efficient means of classifying different airborne particles. In particular, the polarization dependent scattering cross section of aggregate particles is expected to depend on the shape of the primary particles. In order to experimentally validate this prediction, we built a high throughput, sampling system, capable of measuring the polarization resolved angular scattering cross section of individual aerosol particles flowing through an interrogating volume with a single shot of laser pulse. We calibrated the system by comparing the polarization dependent scattering cross section of individual polystyrene spheres with that predicted by Mie theory. We then used the system to study different particles types: Polystyrene aggregates composed 500 nm spheres and Bacillus subtilis (BG, Anthrax simulant) spores composed of elongated 500 nm × 1000 nm cylinder-line particles. We found that the polarization resolved scattering cross section depends on the shape of the constituent elements of the aggregates. This work indicates that the polarization resolved scattering cross section could be used for rapid discrimination between different bio-aerosol particles.

  4. Acquired umbilical hernias in four captive polar bears (Ursus maritimus).

    PubMed

    Velguth, Karen E; Rochat, Mark C; Langan, Jennifer N; Backues, Kay

    2009-12-01

    Umbilical hernias are a common occurrence in domestic animals and humans but have not been well documented in polar bears. Surgical reduction and herniorrhaphies were performed to correct acquired hernias in the region of the umbilicus in four adult captive polar bears (Ursus maritimus) housed in North American zoos. Two of the four bears were clinically unaffected by their hernias prior to surgery. One bear showed signs of severe discomfort following acute enlargement of the hernia. In another bear, re-herniation led to acute abdominal pain due to gastric entrapment and strangulation. The hernias in three bears were surgically repaired by debridement of the hernia ring and direct apposition of the abdominal wall, while the large defect in the most severely affected bear was closed using polypropylene mesh to prevent excessive tension. The cases in this series demonstrate that while small hernias may remain clinically inconsequential for long periods of time, enlargement or recurrence of the defect can lead to incarceration and acute abdominal crisis. Umbilical herniation has not been reported in free-ranging polar bears, and it is suspected that factors such as body condition, limited exercise, or enclosure design potentially contribute to the development of umbilical hernias in captive polar bears.

  5. Time-resolved polarization study of anisotropy in bacteriorhodopsin

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, Chaozhi; Qian, Jun; Johnson, C.K. )

    1990-11-01

    Time-resolved polarization spectroscopy is sensitive to the orientational dynamics of chromophores, and as a result it can be applied to study internal motion in restrictive environments. This paper describes the application of polarization spectroscopy to the photoactive protein bacteriorhodopsin on time scales from picoseconds to hundreds of microseconds. Anisotropy persists in both the ground-state bacteriorhodopsin population and in the photocycle intermediates due to a population bottleneck in the bacteriorhodopsin photocycle. The time dependence of the polarization signal expected for a sequence of intermediates is described and is shown to be sensitive both to population kinetics and to internal motion. The observed time dependence of the polarization signal reveals internal motion in the purple membrane fragments on the time scale of the K {yields} L transition ({approximately} 1 {mu}s). The results are consistent with the known kinetics of the bacteriorhodopsin photocycle. Evidence is also presented and discussed for a decay component on a time scale of < 50 ps.

  6. Depth-resolved measurements with elliptically polarized reflectance spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Maria J.; Sokolov, Konstantin

    2016-01-01

    The ability of elliptical polarized reflectance spectroscopy (EPRS) to detect spectroscopic alterations in tissue mimicking phantoms and in biological tissue in situ is demonstrated. It is shown that there is a linear relationship between light penetration depth and ellipticity. This dependence is used to demonstrate the feasibility of a depth-resolved spectroscopic imaging using EPRS. The advantages and drawbacks of EPRS in evaluation of biological tissue are analyzed and discussed. PMID:27446712

  7. Imaging dental sections with polarization-resolved SHG and time-resolved autofluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jun Huang; Lin, Po-Yen; Hsu, Stephen C. Y.; Kao, Fu-Jen

    2009-02-01

    In this study, we are using two-photon (2-p) excited autofluorescence and second harmonic (SH) as imaging modalities to investigate dental sections that contains the enamel and the dentin. The use of near-infrared wavelengths for multiphoton excitation greatly facilitates the observation of these sections due to the hard tissue's larger index of refraction and highly scattering nature. Clear imaging can be achieved without feature altering preparation procedures of the samples. Specifically, we perform polarization resolving on SH and lifetime analysis on autofluorescence. Polarization resolved SH reflects the preferred orientation of collagen while very different autofluorescence lifetimes are observed from the dentin and the enamel. The origin of 2-p autofluorescence and SH signals are attributed to hydroxyapatite crystals and collagen fibrils, respectively. Hydroxyapatite is found to be present throughout the sections while collagen fibrils exist only in the dentin and dentinoenamel junctions.

  8. Polarization resolved near-IR imaging of sound and carious dental enamel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darling, Cynthia L.; Chan, Kenneth H.; Fried, Daniel

    2011-03-01

    A thorough understanding of how polarized near-IR light is reflected from and transmitted through sound and carious dental hard tissues is important for the development of optical imaging devices. New optical imaging tools employing non-ionizing radiation are needed for the detection and assessment of dental caries. In this investigation, an automated system was developed to collect images for the full 16-element Mueller Matrix. The polarized light was controlled by linear polarizers and liquid crystal retarders and the 36 images were acquired as the polarized near-IR light is reflected from the occlusal surface or transmitted through thin sections of extracted human whole teeth. Previous near-IR imaging studies suggest that polarization imaging can be exploited to obtain higher contrast images of early dental caries due to the rapid depolarization of incident polarized light by the highly scattering areas of decay. In this study, the reflectance from tooth occlusal surfaces with demineralization and transmitted light through tooth thin sections with caries lesions were investigated. Major differences in the Mueller matrix elements were observed in both sound and demineralized enamel. This study suggests that polarization resolved optical imaging can be exploited to obtain higher contrast images of dental decay.

  9. Nonselective and polarization effects in time-resolved optogalvanic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhechev, D.; Steflekova, V.

    2016-02-01

    Three interfering effects in optogalvanic (OG) spectroscopy are identified in a hollow cathode discharge (HCD) - OG detector. The laser beam is found to generate two nonselective processes, namely photoelectron emission (PE) from the cathode surface with a sub-breakdown bias applied, and nonresonant space ionization. The convolution of these galvanic contributions was determined experimentally as an instrumental function and a deconvolution procedure to determine the actual OG signal was developed. Specific plasma conductance is detected dependent on the polarization of the laser beam irradiating. Linearly/circularly polarized light beam is found to induce OG signals differ in amplitude (and their shape parameters in the time-resolved OG signals (TROGS)). The phenomena coherence and specific conductance are found to be in causal relationship. The additional conductance due to coherent states of atoms manifests itself as an intrinsic instrumental property of OG detector.

  10. POC in the process of acquiring polarization characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xiaojun; Cao, Ercong; Gu, Guohua; Qian, Weixian; Yang, Wei; Zhang, Haiyue

    2016-09-01

    Considering the change of optical information on material surface, this paper proposes a useful notion called pixel-level optical constants (POC). Through Fresnel equations, traditional optical constants (refractive index n and extinction coefficient k ) can reflect photoelectric characteristics on material surface. Combining with Mueller calculus in polarization optics, POC can describe the distrbution of photoelectric characteristics on material surface. POC is mainly calculated by the decomposition of Mueller matrix which includes Fresnel amplitude, ratio of two orthogonal reflection coefficient component P and variation of phase difference between incident light and reflected light Δ . With the regularity of polarized light and the statistics of Mueller matrices, optical characteristics can be detailed to each pixel in POC, which will independently show the distribution of polarization characteristics on material surface. And it can also be approximately averaged to obtain traditional optical constants. So POC is significant to optical researches on material surface.

  11. Spectrally- and polarization-resolved hyper-Rayleigh scattering measurements with polarization-insensitive detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Němec, P.; Pásztor, F.; Brajer, M.; Němec, I.

    2017-04-01

    Determination of the molecular first hyperpolarizability by hyper-Rayleigh scattering (HRS) is usually significantly complicated by a presence of the multiphoton excited fluorescence which has to be separated from HRS to obtain a meaningful values of the hyperpolarizability. We show, by performing a spectrally-resolved measurement, that the intensity and spectral shape of the fluorescence can depend strongly on the fundamental laser wavelength. Consequently, a properly selected excitation wavelength can significantly simplify the process of separation of HRS from the detected signal. We tested the developed experimental setup with a polarization-insensitive detection by measuring HRS generated in water and in aqueous solutions of 2-aminopyrimidine (AMP) and its monocation (HAMP). The effective hyperpolarizability of AMP and HAMP was measured experimentally and compared with that obtained by quantum chemical calculations. The polarization-resolved HRS measurement was performed for AMP and the experimentally obtained depolarization ratio agrees well with that predicted theoretically, which confirms that routine density functional theory computations of static hyperpolarizability tensor components can be considered as a sufficient approach suitable for non-interacting molecules dissolved in water.

  12. Optical diagnosis and characterization of dental caries with polarization-resolved hyperspectral stimulated Raman scattering microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zi; Zheng, Wei; Hsu, Stephen Chin-Ying; Huang, Zhiwei

    2016-01-01

    We report the utility of a rapid polarization-resolved hyperspectral stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) imaging technique developed for optical diagnosis and characterization of dental caries in the tooth. Hyperspectral SRS images (512 × 512 pixels) of the tooth covering both the fingerprint (800-1800 cm−1) and high-wavenumber (2800-3600 cm−1) regions can be acquired within 15 minutes, which is at least 103 faster in imaging speed than confocal Raman mapping. Hyperspectral SRS imaging uncovers the biochemical distributions and variations across the carious enamel in the tooth. SRS imaging shows that compared to the sound enamel, the mineral content in the body of lesion decreases by 55%; while increasing up to 110% in the surface zone, indicating the formation of a hyper-mineralized layer due to the remineralization process. Further polarized SRS imaging shows that the depolarization ratios of hydroxyapatite crystals (ν1-PO43- of SRS at 959 cm−1) of the tooth in the sound enamel, translucent zone, body of lesion and the surface zone are 0.035 ± 0.01, 0.052 ± 0.02, 0.314 ± 0.1, 0.038 ± 0.02, respectively, providing a new diagnostic criterion for discriminating carious lesions from sound enamel in the teeth. This work demonstrates for the first time that the polarization-resolved hyperspectral SRS imaging technique can be used for quantitatively determining tooth mineralization levels and discriminating carious lesions from sound enamel in a rapid fashion, proving its promising potential of early detection and diagnosis of dental caries without labeling. PMID:27446654

  13. A LACK OF RESOLVED NEAR-INFRARED POLARIZATION ACROSS THE FACE OF M51

    SciTech Connect

    Pavel, Michael D.; Clemens, Dan P. E-mail: clemens@bu.edu

    2012-12-20

    The galaxy M51 was observed using the Mimir instrument on the Perkins Telescope to constrain the resolved H-band (1.6 {mu}m) polarization across the galaxy. These observations place an upper limit of P{sub H} < 0.05% on the H-band polarization across the face of M51, at 0.6 arcsec pixel sampling. Even with smoothing to coarser angular resolutions, to reduce polarization uncertainty, the H-band polarization remains undetected. The polarization upper limit at H band, when combined with previous resolved optical polarimetry, rules out a Serkowski-like polarization dependence on wavelength. Other polarization mechanisms cannot account for the observed polarization ratio (P{sub H}/P{sub VRI} {approx}< 0.05) across the face of M51.

  14. Wavelength resolved polarized elastic scatter measurements from micron-sized single particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivaprakasam, Vasanthi; Czege, Jozsef; Eversole, Jay D.

    2013-05-01

    The goal of this project is to investigate correlations of polarimetric angular scattering patterns from individual aerosol particles with the particles' physical structure and composition. Such signature patterns may be able to provide particle classification capability, such as, for example, discrimination between man-made and naturally occurring aerosols. If successful, this effort could improve current detection methods for biological warfare (BW) agent aerosols. So far, we have demonstrated an experimental arrangement to measure polarization-state resolved, multi-angle, scattering intensities from single aerosol particles on-the-fly. Our novel approach is a radical departure from conventional polarimetric measurement methods, and a key factor is the use of a multiple-order retarder to prepare different polarization states, depending on the wavelength of the incident light. This novel experimental technique uses a supercontinuum light source, an array of optical fibers, an imaging spectrometer and an EMCCD camera to simultaneously acquire wavelength and angle dependent particle light scattering data as a two-dimensional snapshot. Mueller matrix elements were initially measured from individual particles held in an optical trap (at 405 nm). Since particles can be stably trapped for long periods (hours), we were able to change the optical configuration to acquire multiple Mueller matrix element measurements on a single particle. We have computationally modeled these measurements at specific angles, and the comparison with experimental measurements shows good agreement. Similar measurements have also been made on slowly falling particles, and our current efforts are focused on improving experimental technique sufficiently to make such measurements on flowing particles.

  15. Measuring polarization dependent dispersion of non-polarizing beam splitter cubes with spectrally resolved white light interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Csonti, K.; Hanyecz, V.; Mészáros, G.; Kovács, A. P.

    2017-06-01

    In this work we have measured the group-delay dispersion of an empty Michelson interferometer for s- and p-polarized light beams applying two different non-polarizing beam splitter cubes. The interference pattern appearing at the output of the interferometer was resolved with two different spectrometers. It was found that the group-delay dispersion of the empty interferometer depended on the polarization directions in case of both beam splitter cubes. The results were checked by inserting a glass plate in the sample arm of the interferometer and similar difference was obtained for the two polarization directions. These results show that to reach high precision, linearly polarized white light beam should be used and the residual dispersion of the empty interferometer should be measured at both polarization directions.

  16. Time-resolved scanning electron microscopy with polarization analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Frömter, Robert Oepen, Hans Peter; Kloodt, Fabian; Rößler, Stefan; Frauen, Axel; Staeck, Philipp; Cavicchia, Demetrio R.; Bocklage, Lars; Röbisch, Volker; Quandt, Eckhard

    2016-04-04

    We demonstrate the feasibility of investigating periodically driven magnetization dynamics in a scanning electron microscope with polarization analysis based on spin-polarized low-energy electron diffraction. With the present setup, analyzing the time structure of the scattering events, we obtain a temporal resolution of 700 ps, which is demonstrated by means of imaging the field-driven 100 MHz gyration of the vortex in a soft-magnetic FeCoSiB square. Owing to the efficient intrinsic timing scheme, high-quality movies, giving two components of the magnetization simultaneously, can be recorded on the time scale of hours.

  17. Polarization-Resolved Raman Spectroscopy of Rhenium Disulfide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chenet, Daniel; Aslan, Ozgur; Heinz, Tony; van der Zande, Arend; Hone, James

    2015-03-01

    Rhenium Disulfide (ReS2) is a layered semiconductor with each layer exhibiting a distorted 1T crystal structure. The reduced symmetry of the distorted 1T structure creates anisotropic optical and electrical properties that have been previously studied in bulk films. Herein, we demonstrate anisotropic behavior in its Raman spectra. We then correlate these vibrational modes with polarized absorption measurements in thin films in order to develop a versatile technique for determining the crystal orientation of anisotropic semiconducting thin films.

  18. Polar plot representation of time-resolved fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Eichorst, John Paul; Wen Teng, Kai; Clegg, Robert M

    2014-01-01

    Measuring changes in a molecule's fluorescence emission is a common technique to study complex biological systems such as cells and tissues. Although the steady-state fluorescence intensity is frequently used, measuring the average amount of time that a molecule spends in the excited state (the fluorescence lifetime) reveals more detailed information about its local environment. The lifetime is measured in the time domain by detecting directly the decay of fluorescence following excitation by short pulse of light. The lifetime can also be measured in the frequency domain by recording the phase and amplitude of oscillation in the emitted fluorescence of the sample in response to repetitively modulated excitation light. In either the time or frequency domain, the analysis of data to extract lifetimes can be computationally intensive. For example, a variety of iterative fitting algorithms already exist to determine lifetimes from samples that contain multiple fluorescing species. However, recently a method of analysis referred to as the polar plot (or phasor plot) is a graphical tool that projects the time-dependent features of the sample's fluorescence in either the time or frequency domain into the Cartesian plane to characterize the sample's lifetime. The coordinate transformations of the polar plot require only the raw data, and hence, there are no uncertainties from extensive corrections or time-consuming fitting in this analysis. In this chapter, the history and mathematical background of the polar plot will be presented along with examples that highlight how it can be used in both cuvette-based and imaging applications.

  19. RESOLVE for Lunar Polar Ice/Volatile Characterization Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, G. B.; Larson, W. E.; Quinn, J. W.; Colaprete, A.; Picard, M.; Boucher, D.

    2011-01-01

    Ever since data from the neutron spectrometer instrument on the Lunar Prospector mission indicated the possibility of significant concentrations of hydrogen at the lunar poles, speculation on the form and concentration of the hydrogen has been debated. The recent impact of the Lunar Crater Observation and Sensing Satellite (LCROSS) along with thermal, topographic, neutron spectrometry, and radar frequency data obtained from the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) have provided more information suggesting significant amounts of water/ice and other volatiles may be available in the top 1 to 2 meters of regolith at the lunar poles. The next step in understanding what resources are available at the lunar poles is to perform a mission to obtain ground truth. data. To meet this need, the US National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) along with the Canadian Space Agency (CSA) have been working on a prototype payload known as the Regolith & Environment Science and Oxygen & Lunar Volatile Extraction experiment, or RESOLVE.

  20. Forward versus backward polarization-resolved SHG imaging of collagen structure in tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teulon, Claire; Gusachenko, Ivan; Latour, Gaël.; Schanne-Klein, Marie-Claire

    2016-03-01

    Second harmonic generation (SHG) is a powerful technique to observe fibrillar collagen without any staining and with a good contrast. More information about the molecular structure of collagen fibrils in tissues and their 3D distribution can be gained with polarization-resolved SHG imaging. Nevertheless, strong focusing is required for effective imaging and light propagation in tissues is complex and not thoroughly understood yet, preventing accurate and reproducible measurements. Theoretical analysis, vectorial numerical simulations and experiments were implemented to understand how the SHG signal builds up and how geometrical parameters affect polarization-resolved measurements in homogeneous collagen-rich tissues.

  1. Improved quantification of collagen anisotropy with polarization-resolved second harmonic generation microscopy.

    PubMed

    Hristu, Radu; Stanciu, Stefan G; Tranca, Denis E; Stanciu, George A

    2017-09-01

    Imaging tissue samples by polarization-resolved second harmonic generation microscopy provides both qualitative and quantitative insights into collagen organization in a label-free manner. Polarization-resolved second harmonic generation microscopy goes beyond simple intensity-based imaging by adding the laser beam polarization component and applying different quantitative metrics such as the anisotropy factor. It thus provides valuable information on collagen arrangement not available with intensity measurements alone. Current established approaches are limited to calculating the anisotropy factor for only a particular laser beam polarization and no general guidelines on how to select the best laser beam polarization have yet been defined. Here, we introduce a novel methodology for selecting the optimal laser beam polarization for characterizing tissues using the anisotropy in the purpose of identifying cancer signatures. We show that the anisotropy factor exhibits a similar laser beam polarization dependence to the second harmonic intensity and we combine it with the collagen orientation index computed by Fast Fourier Transform analysis of the recorded images to establish a framework for choosing the laser beam polarization that is optimal for an accurate interpretation of polarization-resolved second harmonic generation microscopy images and anisotropy maps, and hence a better differentiation between healthy and dysplastic areas. SHG image of skin tissue (a) and a selected area of interest for which we compute the SHG intensity (b) and anisotropy factor (c) dependence on the laser beam polarization and also the FFT spectrum (d) to evaluate the collagen orientation index. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Prospecting for Polar Volatiles: Results from the Resolve Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elphic, Richard C.; Colarprete, Anthony; Deans, Matthew C.; Heldman, Jennifer; Sanders, Gerald B.; Larson, William E.

    2013-01-01

    Both the Moon and Mercury evidently host ice and other volatile compounds in cold traps at the planets poles. Determining the form, spatial distribution, and abundance of these volatiles at the lunar poles can help us understand how and when they were delivered and emplaced. This bears directly on the delivery of water and prebiotic compounds to the inner planets over the solar system s history, and also informs plans for utilizing the volatiles as resources for sustained human exploration as well as the commercial development of space. Temperature models and orbital data suggest near-surface volatile concentrations may exist at polar locations not strictly in permanent shadow. Remote operation of a robotic lunar rover mission for the 7-10 days of available sunlight would permit key questions to be answered. But such a short, quick-tempo mission has unique challenges and requires a new concept of operations. Both science and rover operations decisionmaking must be done in real time, requiring immediate situational awareness, data analysis, and decision support tools.

  3. Hierarchical model of fibrillar collagen distribution for polarization-resolved SHG microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuer, Adam E.; Akens, Margarete K.; Krouglov, Serguei; Sandkuijl, Daaf; Wilson, Brian C.; Whyne, Cari M.; Barzda, Virginijus

    2013-02-01

    A hierarchical model of the organization of fibrillar collagen is developed and its implications on polarization-resolved second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy are investigated. A "ground-up" approach is employed to develop the theory for understanding of the origin of SHG from fibrillar collagen. The effects of fibril ultrastructure and fibril macroscopic organization on the second-order polarization properties of fibrillar collagen are presented in conjunction with recent ab initio results performed on a collagen triple-helix model (-GLY-PRO-HYP-)n. Various tissues containing fibrillar collagen are quantified using a polarization-resolved SHG technique, termed polarization-in, polarization-out (PIPO) and interpreted in light of the aforementioned theory. The method involves varying the incident laser polarization, while monitoring the SHG intensity through an analyzer. From the SHG polarization data the orientation of the fibers, in biological tissue, can be deduced. Unique PIPO signatures are observed for different rat tissues and interpreted in terms of the collagen composition, fibril ultrastructure, and macroscopic organization. Similarities and discrepancies in the second-order polarization properties of different collagen types and ultrastructures will be presented. PIPO SHG microscopy shows promise in its ability to quantify the organization of collagen in various tissues. The ability to characterize the structure of collagen in various tissue microenvironments will aid in the study of numerous collagen related biological process, including tissue diseases, wound repair, and tumor development and progression.

  4. Motionless polarization-resolved second harmonic generation imaging of corneal collagen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breunig, Hans G.; Batista, Ana; Uchugonova, Aisada; König, Karsten

    2015-03-01

    Polarization-resolved second harmonic generation microscopy was used to investigate the collagenous structures of cornea samples in vitro in forward and backward direction. Although structural features appear different in both directions, following an approach by Latour et al. the collagen domain orientation is determined in forward as well as in backward direction, the latter being the only accessible direction for in vivo imaging. The experimental setup enables fast and completely motionless rotation of the polarization direction of 100 fs pulses by a polarization rotation based on a liquid crystal retarder.

  5. Early dental caries detection using a fibre-optic coupled polarization-resolved Raman spectroscopic system.

    PubMed

    Ko, Alex C-T; Hewko, Mark; Sowa, Michael G; Dong, Cecilia C S; Cleghorn, Blaine; Choo-Smith, Lin-P'ing

    2008-04-28

    A new fibre-optic coupled polarization-resolved Raman spectroscopic system was developed for simultaneous collection of orthogonally polarized Raman spectra in a single measurement. An application of detecting incipient dental caries based on changes observed in Raman polarization anisotropy was also demonstrated using the developed fibre-optic Raman spectroscopic system. The predicted reduction of polarization anisotropy in the Raman spectra of caries lesions was observed and the results were consistent with those reported previously with Raman microspectroscopy. The capability of simultaneous collection of parallel- and cross-polarized Raman spectra of tooth enamel in a single measurement and the improved laser excitation delivery through fibre-optics demonstrated in this new design illustrates its future clinical potential.

  6. Early dental caries detection using a fibre-optic coupled polarization-resolved Raman spectroscopic system

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Alex C.-T.; Hewko, Mark; Sowa, Michael G.; Dong, Cecilia C.S.; Cleghorn, Blaine; Choo-Smith, Lin-P’ing

    2008-01-01

    A new fibre-optic coupled polarization-resolved Raman spectroscopic system was developed for simultaneous collection of orthogonally polarized Raman spectra in a single measurement. An application of detecting incipient dental caries based on changes observed in Raman polarization anisotropy was also demonstrated using the developed fibre-optic Raman spectroscopic system. The predicted reduction of polarization anisotropy in the Raman spectra of caries lesions was observed and the results were consistent with those reported previously with Raman microspectroscopy. The capability of simultaneous collection of parallel-and cross-polarized Raman spectra of tooth enamel in a single measurement and the improved laser excitation delivery through fibre-optics demonstrated in this new design illustrates its future clinical potential. PMID:18545331

  7. Automated system to acquire fluorescence, polarization and anisotropy maps within liquid flows

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves, Cristiane C.; Pepe, Iuri; Lima, Angelo M. V.; Musse, Ana Paula S.

    2002-01-01

    Maps of polarization and anisotropy can be helpful for flow analysis systems (FIA, CFA, etc.) with reactions dependent on the intermolecular alignment as well as for dispersion control. Maps can be acquired manually, but when a scan over a sample area is required, the acquisition becomes tiresome and has low precision. The paper describes an automatic flexible system for high-precision sample positioning with closed loop self control, remote data acquisition and storage controlled by a BASIC program. The system was developed to acquire maps up to 850 mm2 of the sample (liquid flows, solids, interfaces, etc.), with up to 100 μm2 precision. To evaluate the equipment, performance is presented as the scan of a thin liquid film of monoethylene glycol (MEG) flowing on borosilicate. Tests were performed with and without surfactantes at submicellar concentrations: two concentrations of sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) and one of polyethylene oxide (PEO). For pure MEG, the intermolecular alignment initially increased, then decreased. When SDS was added, both polarization and anisotropy only increased progressively with the flow. This might be explained by the surfactant decrease of interfacial interaction. When PEO was added, both polarization and anisotropy decreased pronouncedly over the entire map, which might be due to macromolecular aggregates within the bulk generating misaligned molecular domains. The system presented as sample positioning repeatability of 0.1% and a high polarization reproducibility (error margin < 6 in 1000). PMID:18924741

  8. In vivo multiphoton imaging of the cornea: polarization-resolved second harmonic generation from stromal collagen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latour, G.; Gusachenko, I.; Kowalczuk, L.; Lamarre, I.; Schanne-Klein, M.-C.

    2012-03-01

    Multiphoton microscopy provides specific and contrasted images of unstained collagenous tissues such as tendons or corneas. Polarization-resolved second harmonic generation (SHG) measurements have been implemented in a laserscanning multiphoton microscope. Distortion of the polarimetric response due to birefringence and diattenuation during propagation of the laser excitation has been shown in rat-tail tendons. A model has been developed to account for these effects and correct polarization-resolved SHG images in thick tissues. This new modality is then used in unstained human corneas to access two quantitative parameters: the fibrils orientation within the collagen lamellae and the ratio of the main second-order nonlinear tensorial components. Orientation maps obtained from polarization resolution of the trans-detected SHG images are in good agreement with the striated features observed in the raw images. Most importantly, polarization analysis of the epi-detected SHG images also enables to map the fibrils orientation within the collagen lamellae while epi-detected SHG images of corneal stroma are spatially homogenous and do not enable direct visualization of the fibrils orientation. Depth profiles of the polarimetric SHG response are also measured and compared to models accounting for orientation changes of the collagen lamellae within the focal volume. Finally, in vivo polarization-resolved SHG is performed in rat corneas and structural organization of corneal stroma is determined using epi-detected signals.

  9. Measurement of orientation and susceptibility ratios using a polarization-resolved second-harmonic generation holographic microscope

    PubMed Central

    Winters, David G.; Smith, David R.; Schlup, Philip; Bartels, Randy A.

    2012-01-01

    Three-dimensional second-harmonic fields, sample orientation, and susceptibility ratios of biological samples are measured using polarization-resolved second-harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy. The three-dimensional (3D) polarization is gathered by measurement of a series of holograms for which excitation and analyzer polarizations are systematically varied, and the 3D SHG field is recovered through numerical back propagation. Harmonophore orientation is resolved in 3D from a sub-set of polarization-resolved SHG holograms. We further expand on previous approaches for the determination of susceptibility ratios, adding the calculation of multiple ratio values to allow intrinsic verification. PMID:23024896

  10. Polarization-resolved second harmonic generation microscopy of chiral G-shaped metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamonov, Evgeniy A.; Maydykovskiy, Anton I.; Kolmychek, Irina A.; Magnitskiy, Sergey A.; Murzina, Tatiana V.

    2017-08-01

    Chiral planar metamaterials are known for their possibility to show strong nonlinear optical effects such as second harmonic generation (SHG) circular dichroism or asymmetric SHG. The underlying mechanisms are commonly discussed in terms of local field effects and formation of localized SHG sources (so called "hotspots") that are sensitive to the shape and size of meta-atoms. Nevertheless, a full characterization of the polarization state of the nonlinear optical radiation from the hotspots has not been performed until now. Here we present the results of the polarization-resolved second harmonic generation microscopy studies of planar chiral G-shaped metamaterials. We demonstrate that the SHG radiation coming from the hotspots that are localized within a single meta-atom is partially polarized; moreover, the SHG polarization state reveals the chirality of the structure. The observed effects are attributed to the induced plasmonic current oscillations at the fundamental frequency along with the local field distribution.

  11. Polarization-resolved near-backscattering of airborne aggregates composed of different primary particles.

    PubMed

    Redding, Brandon; Pan, Yong-Le; Wang, Chuji; Cao, Hui

    2014-07-15

    We measured the polarization-resolved angular elastic scattering intensity distribution of aggregates composed of primary particles with different shapes and packing densities in the near-backward directions (155°-180°). Specifically, we compare aggregates composed of spherical polystyrene latex spheres, cylinder-like Bacillus subtilis particles, and Arizona road dust, as well as tryptophan particles. We observe clearly differentiable polarization aspect ratios and find that the negative polarization dip is more pronounced in more densely packed aggregates or particles. This work indicates that the polarization aspect ratio in the near-backward direction may be used as a fingerprint to discriminate between aggregates with the same size and overall shape by differences in their constituent particles.

  12. Time-resolved dynamical Franz-Keldysh effect produced by an elliptically polarized laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otobe, T.

    2016-10-01

    An analytical formula is reported describing the time-resolved dynamical Franz-Keldysh effect (Tr-DFKE) produced by an elliptically polarized laser at subfemtosecond timescale. The Houston function is assumed as the time-dependent wave function of the parabolic two-band system. For elliptical polarization, the resulting formula exhibits subcycle changes in the optical properties; the modulation of the dielectric function is smaller than that for linear polarization. In contrast, the subcycle modulation of the dielectric function, a significant feature of the Tr-DFKE, disappears for a circularly polarized laser. This analytical formula shows good qualitative agreement with the first-principle calculation employing the time-dependent density functional theory for diamond.

  13. Spectroscopic approaches to resolving ambiguities of hyper-polarized NMR signals from different reaction cascades.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Pernille Rose; Meier, Sebastian

    2016-02-07

    The influx of exogenous substrates into cellular reaction cascades on the seconds time scale is directly observable by NMR spectroscopy when using nuclear spin polarization enhancement. Conventional NMR assignment spectra for the identification of reaction intermediates are not applicable in these experiments due to the non-equilibrium nature of the nuclear spin polarization enhancement. We show that ambiguities in the intracellular identification of transient reaction intermediates can be resolved by experimental schemes using site-specific isotope labelling, optimised referencing and response to external perturbations.

  14. Crop discrimination on ENVISAT ASAR images acquired in alternating polarization mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stankiewicz, Krystyna A.

    2005-10-01

    The objective of this study is to find an efficient method of crop classification based solely on satellite microwave data. Microwave data can sometimes be the only non-contaminated satellite data available for a selected area, where frequent cloudiness makes optical data useless. Hence, this approach has to be studied at least as an alternative method for application when other data are missing. Although ASAR is not a fully polarimetric instrument, a selection of dual polarization modes and a selection of incidence angles are available when using ASAR alternating polarization product (APP). Larger incidence angle and cross-polarized data are better for crop discrimination, while lower incidence angle and co-polarized data contain more information on soil moisture. In the years 2003 and 2004 a sequence of ASAR IS2, IS4 and IS6 images acquired during a growth season was analyzed. Supervised classification of ASAR APP was performed with ground truth data collected for 700 plots covered by homogeneous crops. For growth seasons of 2003 and 2004 various combination of images were tested in order to find the best set of data providing the highest accuracy of crop classification.

  15. Spectrally resolved fluorescence lifetime imaging of Nile red for measurements of intracellular polarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levitt, James A.; Chung, Pei-Hua; Suhling, Klaus

    2015-09-01

    Spectrally resolved confocal microscopy and fluorescence lifetime imaging have been used to measure the polarity of lipid-rich regions in living HeLa cells stained with Nile red. The emission peak from the solvatochromic dye in lipid droplets is at a shorter wavelength than other, more polar, stained internal membranes, and this is indicative of a low polarity environment. We estimate that the dielectric constant, ɛ, is around 5 in lipid droplets and 25<ɛ<40 in other lipid-rich regions. Our spectrally resolved fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) data show that intracellular Nile red exhibits complex, multiexponential fluorescence decays due to emission from a short lifetime locally excited state and a longer lifetime intramolecular charge transfer state. We measure an increase in the average fluorescence lifetime of the dye with increasing emission wavelength, as shown using phasor plots of the FLIM data. We also show using these phasor plots that the shortest lifetime decay components arise from lipid droplets. Thus, fluorescence lifetime is a viable contrast parameter for distinguishing lipid droplets from other stained lipid-rich regions. Finally, we discuss the FLIM of Nile red as a method for simultaneously mapping both polarity and relative viscosity based on fluorescence lifetime measurements.

  16. Numerical simulation of polarization-resolved second-harmonic microscopy in birefringent media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gusachenko, Ivan; Schanne-Klein, Marie-Claire

    2013-11-01

    Polarization-resolved second-harmonic microscopy has recently emerged as a valuable technique for in situ imaging of collagen structure in tissues. Nevertheless, collagen-rich tissues such as tendon, ligament, skin dermis, bone, cornea, or artery exhibit a heterogeneous and anisotropic architecture that results in complex optical properties. While experimental evidence of polarization distortions has been reported in various tissues, the physics of second-harmonic imaging within such tissues is not fully understood yet. In this work, we performed numerical simulations of polarization-resolved second-harmonic generation in a strongly focused regime within a birefringent tissue. We show that vectorial components due to strong focusing have a rather small effect on the measurement of the second-harmonic tensorial response, while birefringence and optical dispersion may affect these measurements dramatically. We show indeed that a difference in the focal field distribution for ordinary and extraordinary waves results in different phase-matching conditions, which strongly affects the relative efficacy of second-harmonic generation for different polarizations. These results are of great interest for extracting reliable quantitative parameters from second-harmonic images.

  17. Identifying the crystalline orientation of black phosphorus using angle-resolved polarized Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Wu, Juanxia; Mao, Nannan; Xie, Liming; Xu, Hua; Zhang, Jin

    2015-02-16

    An optical anisotropic nature of black phosphorus (BP) is revealed by angle-resolved polarized Raman spectroscopy (ARPRS), and for the first time, an all-optical method was realized to identify the crystal orientation of BP sheets, that is, the zigzag and armchair directions. We found that Raman intensities of Ag(1), B2g, and Ag(2) modes of BP not only depend on the polarization angle α, but also relate to the sample rotation angle θ. Furthermore, their intensities reach the local maximum or minimum values when the crystalline orientation is along with the polarization direction of scattered light (es). Combining with the angle-resolved conductance, it is confirmed that Ag(2) mode intensity achieves a relative larger (or smaller) local maximum under parallel polarization configuration when armchair (or zigzag) direction is parallel to es. Therefore, ARPRS can be used as a rapid, precise, and nondestructive method to identify the crystalline orientation of BP layers. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. An imaging spectro-polarimeter for measuring hemispherical spectrally resolved down-welling sky polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chenault, David B.; Pezzaniti, J. L.; Roche, Michael; Hyatt, Brian

    2016-05-01

    A full sky imaging spectro-polarimeter has been developed that measures spectrally resolved (~2.5 nm resolution) radiance and polarization (𝑠0, 𝑠1, 𝑠2 Stokes Elements) of natural sky down-welling over approximately 2π sr between 400nm and 1000nm. The sensor is based on a scanning push broom hyperspectral imager configured with a continuously rotating polarizer (sequential measurement in time polarimeter). Sensor control and processing software (based on Polaris Sensor Technologies Grave' camera control software) has a straight-forward and intuitive user interface that provides real-time updated sky down-welling spectral radiance/polarization maps and statistical analysis tools.

  19. Phase-resolved Spectroscopy of the Intermediate Polars -- TV Col and V1223 Sgr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, K.

    The cataclysmic variables called intermediate polars are characterized by magnetic fields that rip material from an accretion disk and funnel it to a WD that is not phase-locked to the binary period of the system. This is a proposal to use FUSE to conduct a time-resolved spectroscopic study to dissect the emission of two long-period intermediate polars, V1223 Sgr and TV Col, with very different inclination angles. These, along with the short-period high-inclination IP EX Hya (already observed with FUSE), comprise the only IPs with accurate distances derived from HST astrometry. We will isolate emission from the photosphere of the WD, the magnetically dominated accretion curtain, and the accretion stream. Having characterized the emission sources, we will explore the physical conditions in these same regions, and develop an integrated picture of these two intermediate polars.

  20. Advanced receptor models for exploiting highly time-resolved data acquired in the EPA supersite preject

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ke, Haohao

    Receptor models have been widely used in air quality studies to identify pollution sources and estimate their contributions. A common problem for most current receptor models is insufficient consideration of realistic constraints such as can be obtained from emission inventories, chemical composition profiles of the sources, and the physics of plume dispersion. In addition, poor resolving of collinear sources was often found. With the high quality time-, composition-, and size-resolved measurements during the EPA Supersite project, efforts towards resolving nearby industrial sources were made by combinative use of Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) and the Pseudo-Deterministic Receptor Model (PDRM). The PMF modeling of Baltimore data in September 2001 revealed coal-fired and oil-fired power plants (CFPP and OFPP, respectively) with significant cross contamination, as indicated by the high Se/Ni ratio in the OFPP profile. Nevertheless, the PMF results provided a good estimate of background and the PMF-constrained emission rates well seeded the trajectory-driven PDRM modeling. Using NOx as the tracer gas for chi/Q tuning, ultimately resolved emissions from individual stacks exhibited acceptable tracer ratios and the emission rates of metals generally agreed with the TRI estimates. This approach was later applied to two metal pollution episodes in St. Louis during in November 2001 and March 2002 and met a similar success. As NOx measurements were unavailable at those metal-production facilities, highly-specific tracer metals (i.e., Cd, Zn, and Cu) for the corresponding units were used to tune chi/Qs and their contributions were well resolved with the PMF-seeded PDRM. Opportunistically a PM2.5 excursion during a windless morning in November 2002 allowed the extraction of an in-situ profile of vehicular emissions in Baltimore. The profiles obtained by direct peak observation, windless model linear regression (WMA), PMF, and UNMIX were comparable and the WMA profile

  1. Time-resolved fluorescence polarization spectroscopy of visible and near infrared dyes in picosecond dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pu, Yang; Alfano, Robert R.

    2015-03-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) dyes absorb and emit light within the range from 700 to 900 nm have several benefits in biological studies for one- and/or two-photon excitation for deeper penetration of tissues. These molecules undergo vibrational and rotational motion in the relaxation of the excited electronic states, Due to the less than ideal anisotropy behavior of NIR dyes stemming from the fluorophores elongated structures and short fluorescence lifetime in picosecond range, no significant efforts have been made to recognize the theory of these dyes in time-resolved polarization dynamics. In this study, the depolarization of the fluorescence due to emission from rotational deactivation in solution will be measured with the excitation of a linearly polarized femtosecond laser pulse and a streak camera. The theory, experiment and application of the ultrafast fluorescence polarization dynamics and anisotropy are illustrated with examples of two of the most important medical based dyes. One is NIR dye, namely Indocyanine Green (ICG) and is compared with Fluorescein which is in visible range with much longer lifetime. A set of first-order linear differential equations was developed to model fluorescence polarization dynamics of NIR dye in picosecond range. Using this model, the important parameters of ultrafast polarization spectroscopy were identified: risetime, initial time, fluorescence lifetime, and rotation times.

  2. Haze and cloud distribution in Uranus' atmosphere based on high-contrast spatially resolved polarization measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostogryz, Nadiia; Berdyugina, Svetlana; Gisler, Daniel; Berkefeld, Thomas

    2017-04-01

    In planetary atmospheres, main sources of opacity are molecular absorption and scattering on molecules, hazes and aerosols. Hence, light reflected from a planetary atmosphere can be linearly polarized. Polarization study of inner solar system planets and exoplanets is a powerful method to characterize their atmospheres, because of a wide range of observable phase angles. For outer solar system planets, observable phase angles are very limited. For instance, Uranus can only be observed up to 3.2 degrees away from conjunctions, and its disk-integrated polarization is close to zero due to the back-scattering geometry. However, resolving the disk of Uranus and measuring the center-to-limb polarization can help constraining the vertical atmospheric structure and the nature of scattering aerosols and particles. In October 2016, we carried out polarization measurements of Uranus in narrow-band filters centered at methane bands and the adjacent continuum using the GREGOR Planet Polarimeter (GPP). The GPP is a high-precision polarimeter and is mounted at the 1.5-m GREGOR solar telescope, which is suitable for observing at night. In order to reach a high spatial resolution, the instrument uses an adaptive-optics system of the telescope. To interpret our measurements, we solve the polarized radiative transfer problem taking into account different scattering and absorption opacities. We calculate the center-to-limb variation of polarization of Uranus' disk in the continuum spectrum and in methane bands. By varying the vertical distribution of haze and cloud layers, we derive the vertical structure of the best-fit Uranus atmosphere.

  3. Polarization-resolved SHG microscopy of rat-tail tendon with controlled mechanical strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gusachenko, I.; Goulam Houssen, Y.; Tran, V.; Allain, J.-M.; Schanne-Klein, M.-C.

    2013-06-01

    We combined polarization-resolved SHG microscopy with mechanical assays in rat-tail-tendon and measured collagen remodeling upon controlled stretching. This approach aimed to analyze the relationship between macroscopic response and sub-micrometer scale organization of collagen fibrils. We observed a straightening of the crimps followed by a sliding of the fibrils with increasing stretching of the tendon fascicles. Polarization resolution of the SHG images provided complementary information about the orientation dispersion of collagen fibrils within the focal volume and enabled monitoring of collagen remodeling at the sub-micrometer scale. Our approach can be readily generalized to other tissues and should bring new valuable information about biomechanics of microstructured tissues.

  4. Orientation-resolved domain mapping in tetragonal SrTiO3 using polarized Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, Dodd J.; Merz, Tyler A.; Hikita, Yasuyuki; Hwang, Harold Y.; Mabuchi, Hideo

    2016-12-01

    We present microscopically resolved, polarized spectroscopy of Raman scattering collected from tetragonal SrTiO3. The anisotropic response of first-order Raman peaks within a single tetragonal domain has been measured. From these data, we assign symmetries to the phonons seen in the first-order Raman spectrum which is normally complicated by uncontrolled domain structure. Using a translation stage, we map the local domain orientation of a 3 -μ m3 crystal volume near the laser focus and compare it to wide-field polarized images. This technique can be performed with readily available instruments and is relevant to the study of a wide range of related materials, interfaces, and devices.

  5. Polar Dunes Resolved by the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter Gridded Topography and Pulse Widths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neumann, Gregory A.

    2003-01-01

    The Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) polar data have been refined to the extent that many features poorly imaged by Viking Orbiters are now resolved in densely gridded altimetry. Individual linear polar dunes with spacings of 0.5 km or more can be seen as well as sparsely distributed and partially mantled dunes. The refined altimetry will enable measurements of the extent and possibly volume of the north polar ergs. MOLA pulse widths have been recalibrated using inflight data, and a robust algorithm applied to solve for the surface optical impulse response. It shows the surface root-mean-square (RMS) roughness at the 75-m-diameter MOLA footprint scale, together with a geological map. While the roughness is of vital interest for landing site safety studies, a variety of geomorphological studies may also be performed. Pulse widths corrected for regional slope clearly delineate the extent of the polar dunes. The MOLA PEDR profile data have now been re-released in their entirety (Version L). The final Mission Experiment Gridded Data Records (MEGDR's) are now provided at up to 128 pixels per degree globally. Densities as high as 512 pixels per degree are available in a polar stereographic projection. A large computational effort has been expended in improving the accuracy of the MOLA altimetry themselves, both in improved orbital modeling and in after-the-fact adjustment of tracks to improve their registration at crossovers. The current release adopts the IAU2000 rotation model and cartographic frame recommended by the Mars Cartography Working Group. Adoption of the current standard will allow registration of images and profiles globally with an uncertainty of less than 100 m. The MOLA detector is still operational and is currently collecting radiometric data at 1064 nm. Seasonal images of the reflectivity of the polar caps can be generated with a resolution of about 300 m per pixel.

  6. Polar Dunes Resolved by the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter Gridded Topography and Pulse Widths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neumann, Gregory A.

    2003-01-01

    The Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) polar data have been refined to the extent that many features poorly imaged by Viking Orbiters are now resolved in densely gridded altimetry. Individual linear polar dunes with spacings of 0.5 km or more can be seen as well as sparsely distributed and partially mantled dunes. The refined altimetry will enable measurements of the extent and possibly volume of the north polar ergs. MOLA pulse widths have been recalibrated using inflight data, and a robust algorithm applied to solve for the surface optical impulse response. It shows the surface root-mean-square (RMS) roughness at the 75-m-diameter MOLA footprint scale, together with a geological map. While the roughness is of vital interest for landing site safety studies, a variety of geomorphological studies may also be performed. Pulse widths corrected for regional slope clearly delineate the extent of the polar dunes. The MOLA PEDR profile data have now been re-released in their entirety (Version L). The final Mission Experiment Gridded Data Records (MEGDR's) are now provided at up to 128 pixels per degree globally. Densities as high as 512 pixels per degree are available in a polar stereographic projection. A large computational effort has been expended in improving the accuracy of the MOLA altimetry themselves, both in improved orbital modeling and in after-the-fact adjustment of tracks to improve their registration at crossovers. The current release adopts the IAU2000 rotation model and cartographic frame recommended by the Mars Cartography Working Group. Adoption of the current standard will allow registration of images and profiles globally with an uncertainty of less than 100 m. The MOLA detector is still operational and is currently collecting radiometric data at 1064 nm. Seasonal images of the reflectivity of the polar caps can be generated with a resolution of about 300 m per pixel.

  7. Spin-orbit-induced photoelectron spin polarization in angle-resolved photoemission from both atomic and condensed matter targets.

    PubMed

    Heinzmann, Ulrich; Dil, J Hugo

    2012-05-02

    The existence of highly spin polarized photoelectrons emitted from non-magnetic solids as well as from unpolarized atoms and molecules has been found to be very common in many studies over the past 40 years. This so-called Fano effect is based upon the influence of the spin-orbit interaction in the photoionization or the photoemission process. In a non-angle-resolved photoemission experiment, circularly polarized radiation has to be used to create spin polarized photoelectrons, while in angle-resolved photoemission even unpolarized or linearly polarized radiation is sufficient to get a high spin polarization. In past years the Rashba effect has become very important in the angle-resolved photoemission of solid surfaces, also with an observed high photoelectron spin polarization. It is the purpose of the present topical review to cross-compare the spin polarization experimentally found in angle-resolved photoelectron emission spectroscopy of condensed matter with that of free atoms, to compare it with the Rashba effect and topological insulators to describe the influence and the importance of the spin-orbit interaction and to show and disentangle the matrix element and phase shift effects therein.The relationship between the energy dispersion of these phase shifts and the emission delay of photoelectron emission in attosecond-resolved photoemission is also discussed. Furthermore the influence of chiral structures of the photo-effect target on the spin polarization, the interferences of different spin components in coherent superpositions in photoemission and a cross-comparison of spin polarization in photoemission from non-magnetic solids with XMCD on magnetic materials are presented; these are all based upon the influence of the spin-orbit interaction in angle-resolved photoemission.

  8. Nanosecond Time-Resolved Polarization Spectroscopies: Tools for Probing Protein Reaction Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Eefei; Goldbeck, Robert A.; Kliger, David S.

    2010-01-01

    Polarization methods, introduced in the 1800’s, offered one of the earliest ways to examine protein structure. Since then, many other structure-sensitive probes have been developed, but circular dichroism (CD) remains a powerful technique because of its versatility and the specificity of protein structural information that can be explored. With improvements in time-resolution, from millisecond to picosecond CD measurements, it has proven to be an important tool for studying the mechanism of folding and function in many biomolecules. For example, nanosecond time-resolved CD (TRCD) studies of the sub-microsecond events of reduced cytochrome c folding have provided direct experimental evidence of kinetic heterogeneity, which is an inherent property of the diffusional nature of early folding dynamics on the energy landscape. In addition, TRCD has been applied to the study of many biochemical processes, such as ligand rebinding in hemoglobin and myoglobin and signaling state formation in photoactive yellow protein and prototropin 1 LOV2. The basic approach to TRCD has also been extended to include a repertoire of nanosecond polarization spectroscopies: optical rotatory dispersion (ORD), magnetic CD and ORD, and linear dichroism. This article will discuss the details of the polarization methods used in this laboratory, as well as the coupling of timeresolved ORD with the temperature-jump trigger so that protein folding can be studied in a larger number of proteins. PMID:20438842

  9. Polarization-resolved SHG microscopy in cardiac hypertrophy study (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhonghai; Yuan, Cai; Shao, Yonghong; Bradshaw, Amy D.; Borg, Thomas K.; Gao, Bruce Z.

    2017-02-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy, a process initiated by mechanical alterations, is hypothesized to cause long-term molecular-level alteration in the sarcomere lattice, which is the main force-generating component in the heart muscle. This molecular-level alteration is beyond the resolving capacity of common light microscopy. Second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy has unique capability for visualizing ordered molecular structures in biological tissues without labeling. Combined with polarization imaging technique, SHG microscopy is able to extract structural details of myosin at the molecular level so as to reveal molecular-level alterations that occur during hypertrophy. The myosin filaments are believed to possess C6 symmetry; thus, the nonlinear polarization response relationship between generated second harmonic light I^2ωand incident fundamental light I^ω is determined by nonlinear coefficients, χ_15, χ_31 and χ_33. χ_31/χ_15 is believed to be an indicator of the molecular symmetry of myosin filament, whileχ_33/χ_15represents the intramyosin orientation angle of the double helix. By changing the polarization of the incident light and evaluating the corresponding SHG signals, the molecular structure of the myosin, reflected by the χ coefficients, can be revealed. With this method, we studied the structural properties of heart tissues in different conditions, including those in normal, physiologically hypertrophic (heart tissue from postpartum female rats), and pathologically hypertrophic (heart tissue from transverse-aorta constricted rats) conditions. We found that ratios of χ_31/χ_15 showed no significant difference between heart tissues from different conditions; their values were all close to 1, which demonstrated that Kleinman symmetry held for all conditions. Ratios of χ_33/χ_15 from physiologically or pathologically hypertrophic heart tissues were raised and showed significant difference from those from normal heart tissues, which indicated that

  10. Real-time inversion of polarization gate frequency-resolved optical gating spectrograms.

    PubMed

    Kane, Daniel J; Weston, Jeremy; Chu, Kai-Chien J

    2003-02-20

    Frequency-resolved optical gating (FROG) is a technique used to measure the intensity and phase of ultrashort laser pulses through the optical construction of a spectrogram of the pulse. To obtain quantitative information about the pulse from its spectrogram, an iterative two-dimensional phase retrieval algorithm must be used. Current algorithms are quite robust but retrieval of all the pulse information can be slow. Previous real-time FROG trace inversion work focused on second-harmonic-generation FROG, which has an ambiguity in the direction of time, and required digital signal processors (DSPs). We develop a simplified real-time FROG device based on a single-shot geometry that no longer requires DSPs. We use it and apply the principal component generalized projections algorithm to invert polarization gate FROG traces at rates as high as 20 Hz.

  11. Identification of stacking faults in silicon carbide by polarization-resolved second harmonic generation microscopy.

    PubMed

    Hristu, Radu; Stanciu, Stefan G; Tranca, Denis E; Polychroniadis, Efstathios K; Stanciu, George A

    2017-07-07

    Although silicon carbide is a highly promising crystalline material for a wide range of electronic devices, extended and point defects which perturb the lattice periodicity hold deep implications with respect to device reliability. There is thus a great need for developing new methods that can detect silicon carbide defects which are detrimental to device functionality. Our experiment demonstrates that polarization-resolved second harmonic generation microscopy can extend the efficiency of the "optical signature" concept as an all-optical rapid and non-destructive set of investigation methods for the differentiation between hexagonal and cubic stacking faults in silicon carbide. This technique can be used for fast and in situ characterization and optimization of growth conditions for epilayers of silicon carbide and similar materials.

  12. Polarization-resolved second-harmonic generation imaging for liver fibrosis assessment without labeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jian; Pan, Shiying; Zheng, Wei; Huang, Zhiwei

    2013-10-01

    We apply the polarization-resolved second-harmonic generation (PR-SHG) microscopy to investigate the changes of collagen typings (type I vs type III) and collagen fibril orientations of liver tissue in bile-duct-ligation (BDL) rat models. The PR-SHG results show that the second-order susceptibility tensor ratios (χ31/χ15 and χ33/χ15) of collagen fibers increase with liver fibrotic progression after BDL surgery, reflecting an increase of the type III collagen component with the severity of liver fibrosis; and the square root of the collagen type III to type I ratio linearly correlates (R2 = 0.98) with histopathological scores. Furthermore, the collagen fibril orientations become more random with liver fibrosis transformation as compared to normal liver tissue. This work demonstrates that PR-SHG microscopy has the potential for label-free diagnosis and characterization of liver fibrosis based on quantitative analysis of collagen typings and fibril orientations.

  13. Resolving the biophysics of axon transmembrane polarization in a single closed-form description

    SciTech Connect

    Melendy, Robert F.

    2015-12-28

    When a depolarizing event occurs across a cell membrane there is a remarkable change in its electrical properties. A complete depolarization event produces a considerably rapid increase in voltage that propagates longitudinally along the axon and is accompanied by changes in axial conductance. A dynamically changing magnetic field is associated with the passage of the action potential down the axon. Over 75 years of research has gone into the quantification of this phenomenon. To date, no unified model exist that resolves transmembrane polarization in a closed-form description. Here, a simple but formative description of propagated signaling phenomena in the membrane of an axon is presented in closed-form. The focus is on using both biophysics and mathematical methods for elucidating the fundamental mechanisms governing transmembrane polarization. The results presented demonstrate how to resolve electromagnetic and thermodynamic factors that govern transmembrane potential. Computational results are supported by well-established quantitative descriptions of propagated signaling phenomena in the membrane of an axon. The findings demonstrate how intracellular conductance, the thermodynamics of magnetization, and current modulation function together in generating an action potential in a unified closed-form description. The work presented in this paper provides compelling evidence that three basic factors contribute to the propagated signaling in the membrane of an axon. It is anticipated this work will compel those in biophysics, physical biology, and in the computational neurosciences to probe deeper into the classical and quantum features of membrane magnetization and signaling. It is hoped that subsequent investigations of this sort will be advanced by the computational features of this model without having to resort to numerical methods of analysis.

  14. Resolving the biophysics of axon transmembrane polarization in a single closed-form description

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melendy, Robert F.

    2015-12-01

    When a depolarizing event occurs across a cell membrane there is a remarkable change in its electrical properties. A complete depolarization event produces a considerably rapid increase in voltage that propagates longitudinally along the axon and is accompanied by changes in axial conductance. A dynamically changing magnetic field is associated with the passage of the action potential down the axon. Over 75 years of research has gone into the quantification of this phenomenon. To date, no unified model exist that resolves transmembrane polarization in a closed-form description. Here, a simple but formative description of propagated signaling phenomena in the membrane of an axon is presented in closed-form. The focus is on using both biophysics and mathematical methods for elucidating the fundamental mechanisms governing transmembrane polarization. The results presented demonstrate how to resolve electromagnetic and thermodynamic factors that govern transmembrane potential. Computational results are supported by well-established quantitative descriptions of propagated signaling phenomena in the membrane of an axon. The findings demonstrate how intracellular conductance, the thermodynamics of magnetization, and current modulation function together in generating an action potential in a unified closed-form description. The work presented in this paper provides compelling evidence that three basic factors contribute to the propagated signaling in the membrane of an axon. It is anticipated this work will compel those in biophysics, physical biology, and in the computational neurosciences to probe deeper into the classical and quantum features of membrane magnetization and signaling. It is hoped that subsequent investigations of this sort will be advanced by the computational features of this model without having to resort to numerical methods of analysis.

  15. Study of Microheterogeneity in Acetonitrile-Water Binary Mixtures by using Polarity-Resolved Solvation Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Koley, Somnath; Ghosh, Subhadip

    2015-11-16

    The solvation dynamics of three coumarin dyes with widely varying polarities were studied in acetonitrile-water (ACN-H2O) mixtures across the entire composition range. At low ACN concentrations [ACN mole fractions (X(ACN))≤0.1], the solvation dynamics are fast (<40 ps), indicating a nearly homogeneous environment. This fast region is followed by a sudden retardation of the average solvation time (230-1120 ps) at higher ACN concentrations (X(ACN)≈0.2), thus indicating the onset of nonideality within the mixture that continues until X(ACN)≈0.8. This nonideality regime (X(ACN)≈0.2-0.8) comprises of multiple dye-dependent anomalous regions. At very high ACN concentrations (X(ACN)≈0.8-1), the ACN-H2O mixtures regain homogeneity, with faster solvation times. The source of the inherent nonideality of the ACN-H2O mixtures is a subject of debate. However, a careful examination of the widths of time-resolved emission spectra shows that the origin of the slow dynamics may be due to the diffusion of polar solvent molecules into the first solvation shell of the excited coumarin dipole.

  16. Moisture-insensitive optical fingerprint scanner based on polarization resolved in-finger scattered light.

    PubMed

    Back, Seon-Woo; Lee, Yong-Geon; Lee, Sang-Shin; Son, Geun-Sik

    2016-08-22

    A moisture-insensitive optical fingerprint scanner (FPS) that is based on polarization resolved in-finger light is proposed and realized. Incident visible light, which is selectively fed to a fingerprint sample via a polarization beam splitter (PBS), is deemed to be partially scattered backward by tissues associated with the skin of the finger. The backscattered light is mostly index-guided in the ridge comprising the fingerprint, which has a higher refractive index, and is drastically dispersed in the valley, which is typically filled with water or air and so has a lower index. However, when light reflects directly off the surface of the finger skin, it fundamentally prevents the scanned image from being determined. The proposed FPS produces bright and dark intensity patterns that are alternately created on the surface of the PBS and correspond to the ridges and valleys, respectively. Thus, this method can especially distinguish between a fake synthetic fingerprint and a genuine fingerprint due to its use of in-finger scattered light. The scanner has been rigorously designed by carrying out ray-optic simulations depending on the wavelength, with tissue-induced scattering taken into account. The device was constructed by incorporating a wire-grid type PBS in conjunction with visible LED sources, including blue, green and red. The scanner adopting a blue LED, which exhibits the strongest light scattering, resulted in the best fingerprint image, enabling enhanced fidelity under the wet and dry situations. Finally, a fake synthetic fingerprint could be successfully discriminated.

  17. Multiscale analysis of polarization-resolved third-harmonic generation microscopy from ordered lipid assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmerley, Maxwell; Mahou, Pierre; Débarre, Delphine; Schanne-Klein, Marie-Claire; Beaurepaire, Emmanuel

    2013-03-01

    Nonlinear optical microscopy is a biocompatible avenue for probing ordered molecular assemblies in biological tissues. As in linear optics, the nonlinear optical response from ordered systems is polarization-sensitive. This dependence can be used to identify and characterize local molecular ordering with micrometer-scale 3D resolution in a nonlinear microscope. In particular, third-harmonic generation (THG) microscopy is a nonlinear optical modality sensitive to the electronic nonlinear susceptibility χ(3) of a material. THG microscopy can be used to map χ(3) spatial variations (i.e. material interfaces), and to probe birefringence. In principle, polarization-resolved THG (P-THG) can therefore be used to probe ordered molecular arrays. However, the orientation, distribution, and nonlinear optical properties of the molecules near the beam focus all affect the detected signal. It is therefore necessary to develop a theoretical method which decouples these effects and permits the extraction of orientational information from P-THG images. In this report, we first present P-THG images of model systems (lipid droplets, multilamellar lipid vesicles) and biological tissues (human skin biopsy) which establish that P-THG is sensitive to lipid ordering and that it is maximized when excitation polarization is parallel to the ordered lipid molecules, giving impetus for the development of a thorough theoretical analysis. We then outline a multiscale model spanning the molecular (nm) and ensemble (μm) scales predicting the PTHG signal, consisting of three main steps: (i) calculation of the molecular electronic hyperpolarizability; (ii) determination of the anisotropic χ(3) for various molecular distribution parameters; and (iii) numerical calculations of the P-THG signal from lipid-water interfaces. This analysis links the measured P-THG response to lipid molecular structure and ordering.

  18. TIME-RESOLVED SPECTROSCOPY OF THE POLAR EU CANCRI IN THE OPEN CLUSTER MESSIER 67

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Kurtis A.; Howell, Steve B.; Bellini, Andrea; Rubin, Kate H. R.; Bolte, Michael E-mail: steve.b.howell@nasa.gov E-mail: psmith@as.arizona.edu E-mail: rubin@mpia.de

    2013-05-15

    We present time-resolved spectroscopic and polarimetric observations of the AM Her system EU Cnc. EU Cnc is located near the core of the old open cluster Messier 67; new proper motion measurements indicate that EU Cnc is indeed a member of the star cluster, and this system therefore is useful to constrain the formation and evolution of magnetic cataclysmic variables. The spectra exhibit two-component emission features with independent radial velocity variations as well as time-variable cyclotron emission indicating a magnetic field strength of 41 MG. The period of the radial velocity and cyclotron hump variations are consistent with the previously known photometric period, and the spectroscopic flux variations are consistent in amplitude with previous photometric amplitude measurements. The secondary star is also detected in the spectrum. We also present polarimetric imaging measurements of EU Cnc that show a clear detection of polarization, and the degree of polarization drops below our detection threshold at phases when the cyclotron emission features are fading or not evident. The combined data are all consistent with the interpretation that EU Cnc is a low-state polar in the cluster Messier 67. The mass function of the system gives an estimate of the accretor mass of M{sub WD} {>=} 0.68 M{sub Sun} with M{sub WD} Almost-Equal-To 0.83 M{sub Sun} for an average inclination. We are thus able to place a lower limit on the progenitor mass of the accreting white dwarf of {>=}1.43 M{sub Sun }.

  19. Nodal gap detection through polar angle-resolved density of states measurements in uniaxial superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsutsumi, Yasumasa; Nomoto, Takuya; Ikeda, Hiroaki; Machida, Kazushige

    2016-12-01

    We propose a spectroscopic method to identify the nodal gap structure in unconventional superconductors. This method is best suited for locating the horizontal line node and for pinpointing the isolated point nodes by measuring polar angle (θ ) resolved zero-energy density of states N (θ ) . This is measured by specific heat or thermal conductivity at low temperatures under a magnetic field. We examine a variety of uniaxially symmetric nodal structures, including point and/or line nodes with linear and quadratic dispersions, by solving the Eilenberger equation in vortex states. It is found that (a) the maxima of N (θ ) continuously shift from the antinodal to the nodal direction (θn) as a field increases accompanying the oscillation pattern reversal at low and high fields. Furthermore, (b) local minima emerge next to θn on both sides, except for the case of the linear point node. These features are robust and detectable experimentally. Experimental results of N (θ ) performed on several superconductors, UPd2Al3,URu2Si2,CuxBi2Se3 , and UPt3, are examined and commented on in light of the present theory.

  20. Development of a polarization-modulation spectroscopy system for the temporally resolved measurement of linear polarization in plasma emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasui, Kenji; Shikama, Taiichi; Higashi, Takanori; Hasuo, Masahiro

    2016-10-01

    A system to measure linear polarization in the HeI 21P-31D emission line (667.8 nm) was developed for application to plasma polarization spectroscopy. To verify the system performance, the normalized Stokes parameters were evaluated. A measurement error of less than 1% with a time resolution of 1 ms was achieved for monochromatic light in the state of complete linear polarization.

  1. Polarization-resolved hyperspectral stimulated Raman scattering microscopy for label-free biomolecular imaging of the tooth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zi; Zheng, Wei; Hsu, Chin-Ying Stephen; Huang, Zhiwei

    2016-01-01

    We report the development and implementation of a rapid polarization-resolved hyperspectral stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy technique for label-free biomolecular imaging of the tooth. The hyperspectral SRS imaging technique developed covers both fingerprint (800-1800 cm-1) and high-wavenumber (2800-3600 cm-1) regions for tooth Raman imaging without fluorescence background interference with an imaging speed of <0.3 s per frame of 512 × 512 pixels (˜1 μs per pixel), that is, >106 faster than confocal Raman imaging. Significant differences of hyperspectral SRS spectra among different tooth locations (e.g., dentin, enamel, and dentin-enamel junction) are observed, revealing the biochemical distribution differences across the tooth. Further polarization-resolved SRS imaging shows different polarization dependences related to the molecular orientation differences of various tooth locations. This work demonstrates the potential of polarization-resolved hyperspectral SRS imaging technique developed in rapidly characterizing biochemical structures and compositions as well as biomolecule organizations/orientations of the tooth without labeling.

  2. Generation of an axially super-resolved quasi-spherical focal spot using an amplitude-modulated radially polarized beam.

    PubMed

    Lin, Han; Jia, Baohua; Gu, Min

    2011-07-01

    An axially super-resolved quasi-spherical focal spot can be generated by focusing an amplitude-modulated radially polarized beam through a high numerical aperture objective. A method based on the unique depolarization properties of a circular focus is proposed to design the amplitude modulation. The generated focal spot shows a ratio of x:y:z=1:1:1.48 for the normalized FWHM in three dimensions, compared to that of x:y:z=1:0.74:1.72 under linear polarization (in the x direction) illumination. Moreover, the focusable light efficiency of the designed amplitude-modulated beam is 65%, which is more than 3 times higher than the optimized case under linear polarization and thus make the amplitude-modulated radial polarization beam more suitable for a wide range of applications.

  3. Highly polarized emission in spin resolved photoelectron spectroscopy of alpha-Fe(001)/GaAs(001)

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, James; Yu, Sung Woo; Morton, Simon; Waddill, George; Thompson, Jamie; Neal, James; Spangenberg, Matthais; Shen, T.H.

    2009-05-19

    Highly spin-polarized sources of electrons, Integrated into device design, remain of great interest to the spintronic and magneto-electronic device community Here, the growth of Fe upon GaAs(001) has been studied with photoelectron spectroscopy (PES), including Spin Resolved PES. Despite evidence of atomic level disorder such as intermixing, an over-layer with the spectroscopic signature of alpha-Fe(001), with a bcc real space ordering, Is obtained The results will be discussed in light of the possibility of using such films as a spin-polarized source in device applications.

  4. Circularly polarized near-field optical mapping of spin-resolved quantum Hall chiral edge states.

    PubMed

    Mamyouda, Syuhei; Ito, Hironori; Shibata, Yusuke; Kashiwaya, Satoshi; Yamaguchi, Masumi; Akazaki, Tatsushi; Tamura, Hiroyuki; Ootuka, Youiti; Nomura, Shintaro

    2015-04-08

    We have successfully developed a circularly polarized near-field scanning optical microscope (NSOM) that enables us to irradiate circularly polarized light with spatial resolution below the diffraction limit. As a demonstration, we perform real-space mapping of the quantum Hall chiral edge states near the edge of a Hall-bar structure by injecting spin polarized electrons optically at low temperature. The obtained real-space mappings show that spin-polarized electrons are injected optically to the two-dimensional electron layer. Our general method to locally inject spins using a circularly polarized NSOM should be broadly applicable to characterize a variety of nanomaterials and nanostructures.

  5. Stokes vector based polarization resolved second harmonic microscopy of starch granules

    PubMed Central

    Mazumder, Nirmal; Qiu, Jianjun; Foreman, Matthew R.; Romero, Carlos Macías; Török, Peter; Kao, Fu-Jen

    2013-01-01

    We report on the measurement and analysis of the polarization state of second harmonic signals generated by starch granules, using a four-channel photon counting based Stokes-polarimeter. Various polarization parameters, such as the degree of polarization (DOP), the degree of linear polarization (DOLP), the degree of circular polarization (DOCP), and anisotropy are extracted from the 2D second harmonic Stokes images of starch granules. The concentric shell structure of a starch granule forms a natural photonic crystal structure. By integration over all the solid angle, it will allow very similar SHG quantum efficiency regardless of the angle or the states of incident polarization. Given type I phase matching and the concentric shell structure of a starch granule, one can easily infer the polarization states of the input beam from the resulting SH micrograph. PMID:23577289

  6. Annually resolved seawater temperature variability of the Sub-polar North Atlantic over the last 1000 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, David; Scourse, James; Hall, Ian; Nederbragt, Alexandra; Wanamaker, Alan; Halloran, Paul; Butler, Paul; Richardson, Chris; Eiríksson, Jon; Heinemeier, Jan; Luise Knudsen, Karen

    2015-04-01

    The lack of annually-resolved marine climate records spanning the last millennium constrains our understanding of the natural variability of the global climate system. We present a continuous annually-resolved reconstruction of sub-polar (N Iceland) sea water temperatures (SWT) derived from the 18O analyses of carbonate material drilled from the annually resolved growth increments contained in an absolutely dated master Arctica islandica sclerochronology spanning the period 953-2000. The calibrated SWT reconstruction contains a significant cooling trend over the period 953-1891 (0.1oC per century) and a marked warming trend over the period 1891-2000 (2.3oC per century). The underlying natural variability is controlled by solar irradiance changes modulated by volcanic forcing and internal variability. The modern SWT warming is demonstrated to lie outside the range of natural variability of the last 1000 years consistent with an anthropogenic influence.

  7. Cell growth characteristics from angle- and polarization-resolved light scattering: Prospects for two-dimensional correlation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herran Cuspinera, Roxana M.; Hore, Dennis K.

    2016-11-01

    We highlight the potential of generalized two-dimensional correlation analysis for the fingerprinting of cell growth in solution monitored by light scattering, where the synchronous and asynchronous responses serve as a sensitive marker for the effect of growth conditions on the distribution of cell morphologies. The polarization of the scattered light varies according to the cell size distribution, and so the changes in the polarization over time are an excellent indicator of the dynamic growth conditions. However, direct comparison of the polarization-, time-, and angle-resolved signals between different experiments is hindered by the subtle changes in the data, and the inability to easily adapt models to account for these differences. Using Mie scattering simulations of different growth conditions, and some preliminary experimental data for a single set of conditions, we illustrate that correlation analysis provides rapid and sensitive qualitative markers of growth characteristics.

  8. Robust polarization filter for separation of Lamb wave modes acquired using a 3D laser vibrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambroziński, Łukasz; Stepinski, Tadeusz

    2017-09-01

    Interpretation of signals related to Lamb waves propagation and scattering can rise serious difficulties due to the multi-modal nature of these waves. Different modes propagating with different velocities can be mixed up and hinder extraction of damage reflected components. As a feasible solution to this problem we propose a technique for separation of the propagating modes using a new type of polarization filter. The proposed directional polarization filter (DPF) can be applied if two components of particle movement, the in-plane and the out-of-plane, are available, for instance, from the measurement performed using laser vibrometer. The DPF is robust in the sense that it does not need a complete amplitude information of both components. Operation principle of the DPF is presented and illustrated by the simulated results in the form of B-scans obtained for an aluminum plate. The simulated results are verified by the experimental data obtained by processing the signals captured using a 3D laser vibrometer.

  9. SAMRAI: A novel variably polarized angle-resolved photoemission beamline in the VUV region at UVSOR-II

    SciTech Connect

    Kimura, Shin-Ichi; Ito, Takahiro; Hosaka, Masahito; Katoh, Masahiro; Sakai, Masahiro; Nakamura, Eiken; Kondo, Naonori; Horigome, Toshio; Hayashi, Kenji; Goto, Tomohiro; Ejima, Takeo; Soda, Kazuo

    2010-05-15

    A novel variably polarized angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy beamline in the vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) region has been installed at the UVSOR-II 750 MeV synchrotron light source. The beamline is equipped with a 3 m long APPLE-II type undulator with horizontally/vertically linear and right/left circular polarizations, a 10 m Wadsworth type monochromator covering a photon energy range of 6-43 eV, and a 200 mm radius hemispherical photoelectron analyzer with an electron lens of a {+-}18 deg. acceptance angle. Due to the low emittance of the UVSOR-II storage ring, the light source is regarded as an entrance slit, and the undulator light is directly led to a grating by two plane mirrors in the monochromator while maintaining a balance between high-energy resolution and high photon flux. The energy resolving power (h{nu}/{Delta}h{nu}) and photon flux of the monochromator are typically 1x10{sup 4} and 10{sup 12} photons/s, respectively, with a 100 {mu}m exit slit. The beamline is used for angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy with an energy resolution of a few meV covering the UV-to-VUV energy range.

  10. SAMRAI: a novel variably polarized angle-resolved photoemission beamline in the VUV region at UVSOR-II.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Shin-Ichi; Ito, Takahiro; Sakai, Masahiro; Nakamura, Eiken; Kondo, Naonori; Horigome, Toshio; Hayashi, Kenji; Hosaka, Masahito; Katoh, Masahiro; Goto, Tomohiro; Ejima, Takeo; Soda, Kazuo

    2010-05-01

    A novel variably polarized angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy beamline in the vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) region has been installed at the UVSOR-II 750 MeV synchrotron light source. The beamline is equipped with a 3 m long APPLE-II type undulator with horizontally/vertically linear and right/left circular polarizations, a 10 m Wadsworth type monochromator covering a photon energy range of 6-43 eV, and a 200 mm radius hemispherical photoelectron analyzer with an electron lens of a +/-18 degrees acceptance angle. Due to the low emittance of the UVSOR-II storage ring, the light source is regarded as an entrance slit, and the undulator light is directly led to a grating by two plane mirrors in the monochromator while maintaining a balance between high-energy resolution and high photon flux. The energy resolving power (hnu/Deltahnu) and photon flux of the monochromator are typically 1 x 10(4) and 10(12) photons/s, respectively, with a 100 microm exit slit. The beamline is used for angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy with an energy resolution of a few meV covering the UV-to-VUV energy range.

  11. Genomic evidence for island population conversion resolves conflicting theories of polar bear evolution.

    PubMed

    Cahill, James A; Green, Richard E; Fulton, Tara L; Stiller, Mathias; Jay, Flora; Ovsyanikov, Nikita; Salamzade, Rauf; St John, John; Stirling, Ian; Slatkin, Montgomery; Shapiro, Beth

    2013-01-01

    Despite extensive genetic analysis, the evolutionary relationship between polar bears (Ursus maritimus) and brown bears (U. arctos) remains unclear. The two most recent comprehensive reports indicate a recent divergence with little subsequent admixture or a much more ancient divergence followed by extensive admixture. At the center of this controversy are the Alaskan ABC Islands brown bears that show evidence of shared ancestry with polar bears. We present an analysis of genome-wide sequence data for seven polar bears, one ABC Islands brown bear, one mainland Alaskan brown bear, and a black bear (U. americanus), plus recently published datasets from other bears. Surprisingly, we find clear evidence for gene flow from polar bears into ABC Islands brown bears but no evidence of gene flow from brown bears into polar bears. Importantly, while polar bears contributed <1% of the autosomal genome of the ABC Islands brown bear, they contributed 6.5% of the X chromosome. The magnitude of sex-biased polar bear ancestry and the clear direction of gene flow suggest a model wherein the enigmatic ABC Island brown bears are the descendants of a polar bear population that was gradually converted into brown bears via male-dominated brown bear admixture. We present a model that reconciles heretofore conflicting genetic observations. We posit that the enigmatic ABC Islands brown bears derive from a population of polar bears likely stranded by the receding ice at the end of the last glacial period. Since then, male brown bear migration onto the island has gradually converted these bears into an admixed population whose phenotype and genotype are principally brown bear, except at mtDNA and X-linked loci. This process of genome erosion and conversion may be a common outcome when climate change or other forces cause a population to become isolated and then overrun by species with which it can hybridize.

  12. Genomic Evidence for Island Population Conversion Resolves Conflicting Theories of Polar Bear Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Cahill, James A.; Green, Richard E.; Fulton, Tara L.; Stiller, Mathias; Jay, Flora; Ovsyanikov, Nikita; Salamzade, Rauf; St. John, John; Stirling, Ian; Slatkin, Montgomery; Shapiro, Beth

    2013-01-01

    Despite extensive genetic analysis, the evolutionary relationship between polar bears (Ursus maritimus) and brown bears (U. arctos) remains unclear. The two most recent comprehensive reports indicate a recent divergence with little subsequent admixture or a much more ancient divergence followed by extensive admixture. At the center of this controversy are the Alaskan ABC Islands brown bears that show evidence of shared ancestry with polar bears. We present an analysis of genome-wide sequence data for seven polar bears, one ABC Islands brown bear, one mainland Alaskan brown bear, and a black bear (U. americanus), plus recently published datasets from other bears. Surprisingly, we find clear evidence for gene flow from polar bears into ABC Islands brown bears but no evidence of gene flow from brown bears into polar bears. Importantly, while polar bears contributed <1% of the autosomal genome of the ABC Islands brown bear, they contributed 6.5% of the X chromosome. The magnitude of sex-biased polar bear ancestry and the clear direction of gene flow suggest a model wherein the enigmatic ABC Island brown bears are the descendants of a polar bear population that was gradually converted into brown bears via male-dominated brown bear admixture. We present a model that reconciles heretofore conflicting genetic observations. We posit that the enigmatic ABC Islands brown bears derive from a population of polar bears likely stranded by the receding ice at the end of the last glacial period. Since then, male brown bear migration onto the island has gradually converted these bears into an admixed population whose phenotype and genotype are principally brown bear, except at mtDNA and X-linked loci. This process of genome erosion and conversion may be a common outcome when climate change or other forces cause a population to become isolated and then overrun by species with which it can hybridize. PMID:23516372

  13. NASA's Lunar Polar Ice Prospector, RESOLVE: Mission Rehearsal in Apollo Valley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, William E.; Picard, Martin; Quinn, Jacqueline; Sanders, Gerald B.; Colaprete, Anthony; Elphic, Richard C.

    2012-01-01

    After the completion of the Apollo Program, space agencies didn't visit the moon for many years. But then in the 90's, the Clementine and Lunar Prospector missions returned and showed evidence of water ice at the poles. Then in 2009 the Lunar Crater Observation and Sensing Satellite indisputably showed that the Cabeus crater contained water ice and other useful volatiles. Furthermore, instruments aboard the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) show evidence that the water ice may also be present in areas that receive several days of continuous sunlight each month. However, before we can factor this resource into our mission designs, we must understand the distribution and quantity of ice or other volatiles at the poles and whether it can be reasonably harvested for use as propellant or mission consumables. NASA, in partnership with the Canadian Space Agency (CSA), has been developing a payload to answer these questions. The payload is named RESOLVE. RESOLVE is on a development path that will deliver a tested flight design by the end of 2014. The team has developed a Design Reference Mission using LRO data that has RESOLVE landing near Cabeus Crater in May of2016. One of the toughest obstacles for RESOLVE's solar powered mission is its tight timeline. RESOLVE must be able to complete its objectives in the 5-7 days of available sunlight. The RESOLVE team must be able to work around obstacles to the mission timeline in real time. They can't afford to take a day off to replan as other planetary missions have done. To insure that this mission can be executed as planned, a prototype version of RESOLVE was developed this year and tested at a lunar analog site on Hawaii, known as Apollo Valley, which was once used to train the Apollo astronauts. The RESOLVE team planned the mission with the same type of orbital imagery that would be available from LRO. The simulation team prepositioned a Lander in Apollo Valley with RESOLVE on top mounted on its CSA rover. Then the mission

  14. Time-resolved spectropolarimetric observations of polars WX LMi and BY Cam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tutar Özdarcan, D.; Smith, P. S.; Keskin, V.

    2017-07-01

    Time-series spectropolarimetric observations of polar WX LMi and asynchronous polar BY Cam are presented. Magnetic field properties, radial velocities and optical polarization are investigated via consecutive observations with good phase sampling during a single orbital cycle. Both systems are found to have a decentred dipole magnetic field configuration. One of the poles of WX LMi has a field strength of 49 MG, while the other pole may have possible field strengths of 69, 104 or 207 MG, depending on the harmonic numbers of the cyclotron humps observed in the circularly polarized spectrum. For BY Cam, a field strength of 168 MG is found for one of the poles, while field strengths of 70, 160 or 212 MG are possible for the other pole.

  15. Polarization-resolved sensing with tilted fiber Bragg gratings: theory and limits of detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bialiayeu, Aliaksandr; Ianoul, Anatoli; Albert, Jacques

    2015-08-01

    Polarization based sensing with tilted fiber Bragg grating (TFBG) sensors is analysed theoretically by two alternative approaches. The first method is based on tracking the grating transmission for two orthogonal states of linear polarized light that are extracted from the measured Jones matrix or Stokes vectors of the TFBG transmission spectra. The second method is based on the measurements along the system principle axes and polarization dependent loss (PDL) parameter, also calculated from measured data. It is shown that the frequent crossing of the Jones matrix eigenvalues as a function of wavelength leads to a non-physical interchange of the calculated principal axes; a method to remove this unwanted mathematical artefact and to restore the order of the system eigenvalues and the corresponding principal axes is provided. A comparison of the two approaches reveals that the PDL method provides a smaller standard deviation and therefore lower limit of detection in refractometric sensing. Furthermore, the polarization analysis of the measured spectra allows for the identification of the principal states of polarization of the sensor system and consequentially for the calculation of the transmission spectrum for any incident polarization state. The stability of the orientation of the system principal axes is also investigated as a function of wavelength.

  16. Spatially and spectrally resolved ultra-narrowband TE-polarization absorber based on the guide-mode resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Yan-Lin; Zhao, Yan; Zhang, Xingfang; Zhang, Wen; Wang, Zhongzhu

    2017-08-01

    A spatially and spectrally resolved ultra-narrowband absorber with a dielectric grating and metal substrate has been reported. The absorber shows that the absorption rate is more than 0.99 with the absorption bandwidth less than 1.5 nm at normal incidence for TE polarization (electric field is parallel to grating grooves). The angular width of the absorption is about 0.27∘. The wavelength-angle sensitivity and absorption-angle sensitivity are 13.4 nm per degree and 296.3% per degree, respectively. The simulation results also show the spatially and spectrally resolved ultra-narrowband absorption is originated from the guide-mode resonance. In addition, the wavelength-angle sensitivity can be improved by enlarging the grating period according to the guide-mode resonance mechanism. The proposed absorber has potential applications in optical filters, angle measurement and thermal emitters.

  17. Retinal pigment epithelium pathologies investigated with phase resolved polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pircher, M.; Goetzinger, E.; Findl, O.; Michels, S.; Geitzenauer, W.; Schmidt-Erfurth, U.; Hitzenberger, C. K.

    2006-02-01

    A polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) instrument was used to investigate the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). The instrument uses the polarization properties of light to record backscattered intensity, retardation and fast axis orientation simultaneously and needs only one measurement per sample location to retrieve these parameters. The polarization state of light backscattered from within the RPE was found to be random. This can be observed in PS-OCT images by random retardation and axis orientation values within the RPE layer. In diseased eyes where the normal retinal structure is corrupted (e.g. RPE atrophy, RPE detachment) the localization of the RPE within OCT images which do not provide polarization information (standard OCT) is rather difficult. Since the RPE is the only structure within the retina to cause this polarization scrambling, PS-OCT can be used for contrast enhancement and enables the exact localization of the RPE in these pathologies. Therefore it is possible to determine if the RPE is still preserved in regions of interest. Furthermore, in patients with RPE atrophy an enhanced penetration depth into the choroid and even into the sclera was observed. Because of birefringence introduced by the sclera the border between choroid and sclera could easily be determined.

  18. Polarization-resolved evanescent wave scattering from gold-coated tilted fiber gratings.

    PubMed

    Shen, Changyu; Zhou, Wenjun; Albert, Jacques

    2014-03-10

    The scatterings of TE- and TM-polarized evanescent wave on the surface of a tilted fiber Bragg grating (TFBG) with a 50 nm thick gold coating were investigated experimentally by observing radiation patterns from discontinuities in the coating. The scattering intensity for TM-polarized light is larger than for TE light when the evanescent wave propagates from the coating towards the discontinuity. The opposite occurs for light propagating from an uncoated section towards the coating edge. However in the latter case the scattering is much weaker. These results confirm that cladding modes with TE and TM polarization can be excited selectively with a TFBG, and that they scatter light differentially at discontinuities. These results are used to propose a simple polarimeter design based on total scattered light intensity monitoring.

  19. Dissection of rovibronic band structure by polarization-resolved degenerate four-wave mixing spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bracamonte, Alfredo E.; Vaccaro, Patrick H.

    2003-07-01

    Judicious selection of polarization characteristics in degenerate four-wave mixing (DFWM) spectroscopy is shown to provide a facile and robust means for discriminating rovibronic features according to their changes in rotational angular momentum, ΔJ. Building upon a perturbative (weak-field) treatment of the resonant DFWM response, theoretical analyses are presented for a collinear arrangement of linearly polarized electromagnetic waves that interact with an isotropic ensemble of gas-phase target molecules. The polarization unit vectors for two input fields (E1 and E3) are presumed to be fixed along the Y-axis (φ1=φ3=π/2), while the remaining incident field (E2) has its orientation within the transverse X-Y plane specified by angular coordinate φ2. For φ2=π/4, complete elimination of high-J Q-branch (ΔJ=0) and P-/R-branch (ΔJ=±1) structure is found to occur when the detected direction of linear polarization is switched between the limiting values of φ4,Q=-18.43° and φ4,P/R=+26.57°, respectively. These predictions are corroborated experimentally by probing the tunneling-split origin region of the tropolone à 1B2-X˜ 1A1 (π*←π) absorption system under ambient, bulk-gas conditions. Other polarization-based schemes for rovibronic branch suppression are discussed as are the effects incurred by (strong-field) optical saturation phenomena. The implementations of DFWM suggested by this work should prove useful for dissecting and unraveling the congested spectra often exhibited by massive polyatomic species.

  20. Two-Dimensional Subpicosecond Time-Resolved Fluorescence Anisotropy: Optical Kerr-Gating with a Dynamic Polarization Excitation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiwara, Takashige; Romano, Natalie C.; Modarelli, David A.; Lim, Edward C.

    2013-06-01

    With an advent of ultrafast lasers, a number of applications are widely adopted to probe photophysical and photochemical properties of a molecule that occurs in an ultrafast (femtosecond to picosecond) time scale. Intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) or proton transfer in photoexcited electron donor-acceptor (EDA) molecules, for instance, has been a topic of very extensive time-resolved studies for several decades. Time-evolution of an anisotropic property can track dipole orientations or conformational changes in their photoexcited molecular systems, which is of extreme importance to examine its structure and excited-state dynamics rather than probing an isotropic "population change".With this respect, we recently developed a subpicosecond time-resolved 2-D fluorescence anisotropy (TRFA) in which method implements a dynamic alternation of laser polarizations to excite a sample using a photoelastic modulator (PEM). In the combination of an ultrafast optical shutter (Kerr-gating) and a spectrograph that is coupled with a CCD, two signal phases so-obtained dynamically, I_{∥}( t, λ) and I_{⊥}( t, λ), provide a 2-D mapped information on both a wide range for spectra and time-resolved kinetics of photoexcited molecules of interest. From the definition of an anisotropy 2-D TRFA, r (t, λ), is given instantly and even more reliably at a single measurement. In this paper we will present benchmark tests of some target samples to establish performance of TRFA.

  1. Multiple-view spectrally resolved x-ray imaging observations of polar-direct-drive implosions on OMEGA

    SciTech Connect

    Mancini, R. C.; Johns, H. M.; Joshi, T.; Mayes, D.; Nagayama, T.; Hsu, S. C.; Baumgaertel, J. A.; Cobble, J.; Krasheninnikova, N. S.; Bradley, P. A.; Hakel, P.; Murphy, T. J.; Schmitt, M. J.; Shah, R. C.; Tregillis, I. L.; Wysocki, F. J.

    2014-12-15

    We present spatially, temporally, and spectrally resolved narrow- and broad-band x-ray images of polar-direct-drive (PDD) implosions on OMEGA. These self-emission images were obtained during the deceleration phase and bang time using several multiple monochromatic x-ray imaging instruments fielded along two or three quasi-orthogonal lines-of-sight, including equatorial and polar views. The instruments recorded images based on K-shell lines from a titanium tracer located in the shell as well as continuum emission. These observations constitute the first such data obtained for PDD implosions. The image data show features attributed to laser imprinting and zero-order hydrodynamics. Equatorial-view images show a “double bun” structure that is consistent with synthetic images obtained from post-processing 2D and 3D radiation-hydrodynamic simulations of the experiment. Polar-view images show a pentagonal, petal pattern that correlates with the PDD laser illumination used on OMEGA, thus revealing a 3D aspect of PDD OMEGA implosions not previously observed. Differences are noted with respect to a PDD experiment performed at National Ignition Facility.

  2. Vectorial spin polarization detection in multichannel spin-resolved photoemission spectroscopy using an Ir(001) imaging spin filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, Erik D.; Borek, Stephan; Braun, Jürgen; Minár, Ján; Ebert, Hubert; Medjanik, Katerina; Kutnyakhov, Dmytro; Schönhense, Gerd; Elmers, Hans-Joachim

    2017-03-01

    We report on spin- and angular-resolved photoemission spectroscopy using a high-resolution imaging spin filter based on a large Ir(001) crystal enhancing the effective figure of merit for spin detection by a factor of over 103 compared to standard single-channel detectors. Furthermore, we review the spin filter preparation and its lifetime. The spin filter efficiency is mapped on a broad range of scattering energies and azimuthal angles. Large spin filter efficiencies are observed for the spin component perpendicular as well as parallel to the scattering plane depending on the azimuthal orientation of the spin filter crystal. A spin rotator capable of manipulating the spin direction prior to detection complements the measurement of three observables, thus allowing for a derivation of all three components of the spin polarization vector in multichannel spin polarimetry. The experimental results nicely agree with spin-polarized low-energy electron diffraction calculations based on a fully relativistic multiple scattering method in the framework of spin-polarized density functional theory.

  3. Horizontally resolved structures of polar mesospheric echoes obtained with the Middle Atmosphere Alomar Radar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latteck, Ralph; Zecha, Marius; Rapp, Markus; Stober, Gunter; Singer, Werner

    2012-07-01

    Polar Mesosphere Summer Echoes have been observed in Andenes/Norway (69°N, 16°E) for more than 18 years using the Alomar SOUSY and the ALWIN VHF radars. In 2011 the Leibniz-Institute of Atmospheric Physics in Kühlungsborn completed the installation of the Middle Atmosphere Alomar Radar System ({MAARSY}). The new radar is designed for atmospheric studies from the troposphere up to the lower thermosphere, especially for the investigation of horizontal structures of polar mesospheric echoes. The system is composed of an active phased antenna consisting of 433 array elements and an identical number of transceiver modules individually controllable in frequency, phase, and output power on a pulse-to-pulse basis. This arrangement allows very high flexibility of beam forming and beam steering with a symmetric 3.6° small radar beam and arbitrary beam pointing directions down to 30° off-zenith. The monitoring of polar mesosphere echoes using a vertical pointed radar beam has been continued already during the construction period of MAARSY in order to complete the long term data base available for Andenes. Additionally first multi-beam scanning experiments using up to 97 beams quasi-simultaneously in the mesosphere have been carried out during several campaigns starting in summer 2010. Sophisticated wind analysis methods such as an extended velocity azimuth display have been applied to retrieve additional parameters from the wind field, e.g. horizontal divergence, vertical velocity, stretching and shearing deformation. The results provide a first insight into the strong horizontal variability of scattering structures occurring in the polar mesosphere over Andenes during summer and winter time. The implementation of interferometric radar imaging methods offers further improvement of the horizontal and the vertical resolution.

  4. Seasonal and solar-cycle variations of polar magnetic fields resolved via eigenanalysis and graph theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shore, Robert; Freeman, Mervyn; Gjerloev, Jesper

    2017-04-01

    We apply the meteorological analysis method of Empirical Orthogonal Functions (EOF) to ground magnetometer measurements, and subsequently use graph theory to classify the results. The EOF method is used to characterise and separate contributions to the variability of the Earth's external magnetic field (EMF) in the northern polar region. EOFs decompose the noisy EMF data into a small number of independent spatio-temporal basis functions, which collectively describe the majority of the magnetic field variance. We use these basis functions (computed monthly) to infill where data are missing, providing a self-consistent description of the EMF at 5-minute resolution spanning 1997—2009 (solar cycle 23). Each of the EOF basis functions can typically be associated with one of the Disturbance Polar (DP)-type current systems (e.g. DP2, DP1, DPY, NBZ), or with the motion of these systems. This association allows us to describe the varying behaviour of the current systems over the 144 months (i.e. 1997—2009) of our reanalysis. However, the EOF basis functions are (by definition) ranked by their contribution to the total variance, and thus a given current system may be described by a different rank of basis vector from month to month. We use graph theory to find clusters of quantifiably-similar spatial basis functions, and thereby track a given pattern throughout the span of 144 months. Via this method, we present the seasonal and solar cycle variations in the polar current systems.

  5. Time-resolved emission spectroscopy of CdSe quantum dots in polar and nonpolar solvents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kloepfer, Jeremiah; Bradforth, Stephen; Nadeau, Jay

    2004-03-01

    Nanocrystal quantum dots (QD) offer the opportunity to study semiconductors in liquid environments. QD biological labels in water are often protected from emission quenching and surface oxidation. We wish to exploit these processes to construct novel "on/off" sensors based on energy and electron transfer. These systems offer the chance to probe the semiconductor surface-solvent interface. Time-correlated-single-photon-counting was used to measure the emission lifetimes of several QD-solvent systems. Typical lifetimes could be divided into fast single exponential ( 100 ps) and slow stretched exponential ( 10 ns) decays. CdSe and ZnS(CdSe) were prepared in non-polar solvents with high quantum yields. QD were solubilized in water with thiol-compounds, polymer/protein coats, and micelles/vesicles. Large changes in the emission profiles of the different systems were observed. Systems in water experienced a reduction in quantum yield and loss of the longtime emission decay. Surface oxidation lead to a recovery of the longtime decay which matched that of the ZnS-capped counterpart in non-polar solvents. Lifetimes of QD in the presence of energy/electron transfer donors/acceptors was measured to test the viability of constructing nanocrystal sensors that exploit these processes.

  6. Polarization-resolved simulations of multiple-order rainbows using realistic raindrop shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haußmann, Alexander

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents selected results of a simulation study of the first five (primary-quinary) rainbow orders based on a realistic, size-dependent shape model for falling raindrops, taking into account that the drops' bottom part is flattened to higher degree than the dome-like top part. Moreover, broad drop size distributions are included in the simulations, as it is one goal of this paper to analyze, whether the predicted amplification and attenuation patterns for higher-order rainbows, as derived from previous simulations with monodisperse drop sizes, will still be pronounced under the conditions of natural rainfall. Secondly, deviations of the multiple rainbow orders' polarization state from the reference case of spherical drops are discussed. It is shown that each rainbow order may contain a small amount of circularly polarized light due to total internal reflections. Thirdly, it is investigated, how the conditions that generate twinned primary rainbows will affect the higher orders. For the simulations, geometric-optic ray tracing of the full Stokes vector as well as an approximate approach using appropriately shifted Debye series data is applied.

  7. Time- and polarization-resolved cellular autofluorescence towards quantitative biochemistry on living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfveby, John; TImerman, Randi; Soto Velasquez, Monica P.; Wickramasinghe, Dhanushka W. P. M.; Bartusek, Jillian; Heikal, Ahmed A.

    2014-09-01

    Native coenzymes such as the reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) and oxidized flavin adenine dinucleotide play pivotal roles in energy metabolism and a myriad of biochemical reactions in living cells/tissues. These coenzymes are naturally fluorescent and, therefore, have the potential to serve as intrinsic biomarkers for mitochondrial activities, programmed cell death (apoptosis), oxidative stress, aging, and neurodegenerative disease. In this contribution, we employ two-photon fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) and time-resolved anisotropy imaging of intracellular NADH for quantitative, non-invasive biochemistry on living cells in response to hydrogenperoxide- induced oxidative stress. In contrast with steady-state one-photon, UV-excited autofluorescence, two-photon FLIM is sensitive to both molecular conformation and stimuli-induced changes in the local environment in living cells with minimum photodamage and inherently enhanced spatial resolution. On the other hand, time-resolved, two-photon anisotropy imaging of cellular autofluorescence allows for quantitative assessment of binding state and environmental restrictions on the tumbling mobility of intrinsic NADH. Our measurements reveal that free and enzyme-bound NADH exist at equilibrium, with a dominant autofluorescence contribution of the bound fraction in living cells. Parallel studies on NADH-enzyme binding in controlled environments serve as a point of reference in analyzing autofluorescence in living cells. These autofluorescence-based approaches complement the conventional analytical biochemistry methods that require the destruction of cells/tissues, while serving as an important step towards establishing intracellular NADH as a natural biomarker for monitoring changes in energy metabolism and redox state of living cells in response to environmental hazards.

  8. Resolving spectral information from time domain induced polarization data through 2-D inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiandaca, Gianluca; Ramm, James; Binley, Andrew; Gazoty, Aurélie; Christiansen, Anders Vest; Auken, Esben

    2013-02-01

    Field-based time domain (TD) induced polarization (IP) surveys are usually modelled by taking into account only the integral chargeability, thus disregarding spectral content. Furthermore, the effect of the transmitted waveform is commonly neglected, biasing inversion results. Given these limitations of conventional approaches, a new 2-D inversion algorithm has been developed using the full voltage decay of the IP response, together with an accurate description of the transmitter waveform and receiver transfer function. This allows reconstruction of the spectral information contained in the TD decay series. The inversion algorithm is based around a 2-D complex conductivity kernel that is computed over a range of frequencies and converted to the TD through a fast Hankel transform. Two key points in the implementation ensure that computation times are minimized. First, the speed of the Jacobian computation, time transformed from frequency domain through the same transformation adopted for the forward response is optimized. Secondly, the reduction of the number of frequencies where the forward response and Jacobian are calculated: cubic splines are used to interpolate the responses to the frequency sampling necessary in the fast Hankel transform. These features, together with parallel computation, ensure inversion times comparable with those of direct current algorithms. The algorithm has been developed in a laterally constrained inversion scheme, and handles both smooth and layered inversions; the latter being helpful in sedimentary environments, where quasi-layered models often represent the actual geology more accurately than smooth minimum-structure models. In the layered inversion approach, a general method to derive the thickness derivative from the complex conductivity Jacobian is also proposed. One synthetic example of layered inversion and one field example of smooth inversion show the capability of the algorithm and illustrates a complete uncertainty

  9. Calculation of the vibrationally resolved, circularly polarized luminescence of d-camphorquinone and (S,S)-trans-beta-hydrindanone.

    PubMed

    Pritchard, Benjamin; Autschbach, Jochen

    2010-08-02

    Circularly polarized luminescence (CPL), the differential emission of left- and right-handed circularly polarized light from a molecule, is modeled by using time-dependent density functional theory. Calculations of the CPL spectra for the first electronic excited states of d-camphorquinone and (S,S)-trans-beta-hydrindanone under the Franck-Condon approximation and using various functionals are presented, as well as calculations of absorption, emission, and circular dichroism spectra. The functionals B3LYP, BHLYP, and CAM-B3LYP are employed, along with the TZVP and aug-cc-pVDZ Gaussian-type basis sets. For the lowest-energy transitions, all functionals and basis sets perform comparably, with the long-range-corrected CAM-B3LYP better reproducing the excitation energy of camphorquinone but leading to a blue shift with respect to experiment for hydrindanone. The vibrationally resolved spectra of camphorquinone are very well reproduced in terms of peak location, widths, shapes, and intensities. The spectra of hydrindanone are well reproduced in terms of overall envelope shape and width, as well as the lack of prominent vibrational structure in the emission and CPL spectra. Overall the simulated spectra compare well with experiment, and reproduce the band shapes, emission red shifts, and presence or absence of visible vibrational fine structure.

  10. Polarization resolved electric field measurements on plasma bullets in N2 using four-wave mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Schans, Marc; Boehm, Patrick; Nijdam, Sander; Ijzerman, Wilbert; Czarnetzki, Uwe

    2016-09-01

    Atmospheric pressure plasma jets generated by kHz AC or pulsed DC voltages typically consist of discrete guided ionization waves called plasma bullets. In this work, the electric field of plasma bullets generated in a pulsed DC jet with N2 as feed gas is investigated using the four-wave mixing method. In this diagnostic two laser beams, where one is Stokes shifted from the other, non-linearly interact with the N2 molecules and the bullet's electric field. As a result of the interaction a coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattered (CARS) beam and an infrared beam are generated from which the electric field can be determined. Compared to emission-based methods, this technique has the advantage of being able to also probe the electric field in regions around the plasma bullet where no photons are emitted. The four-wave mixing method and its analysis have been adapted to work with the non-uniform electric field of plasma bullets. In addition, an ex-situ calibration procedure using an electrode geometry different from the discharge geometry has been developed. An experimentally obtained radial profile of the axial electric field component of a plasma bullet in N2 is presented. The position of this profile is related to the location of the propagating bullet from temporally resolved images.

  11. Resolving stress tensor components in space from polarized Raman spectra: polycrystalline alumina.

    PubMed

    Pezzotti, Giuseppe; Zhu, Wenliang

    2015-01-28

    A method of Raman spectroscopic analysis has been proposed for evaluating tensorial stress fields stored in alumina polycrystals with a corundum structure (α-Al2O3). Raman selection rules for all the vibrational modes of the structure were expanded into explicit functions of both 3 Euler angles in space and 4 Raman tensor elements (RTE) of corundum. A theoretical treatment was then worked out according to the phonon deformation potential (PDP) formalism, which explicitly expressed the changes in force constants under stress in matricial form. Close-form solutions could be obtained for the matrix eigenvalues as a function of 9 unknown variables, namely 6 independent stress tensor components and 3 Euler angles in space, the latter parameters being representatives of local crystal orientation. Successively, two separate sets of Raman calibration experiments were performed for the determination of both RTE and PDP constants of the corundum structure of alumina. Calibration experiments provided a quantitative frame to the newly developed Raman formalism. Polarized Raman spectra were systematically recorded in both single-crystalline and polycrystalline samples, with both A1g and Eg vibrational bands being characterized. Regarding polycrystalline samples, a validation of the proposed Raman method could be done through a comparison between Raman and fluorescence data collected at the same locations across an alumina/metal interface embedded in a steeply graded residual stress field.

  12. A One Billion Year Martian Climate Model: The Importance of Seasonally Resolved Polar Caps and the Role of Wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, J. C.; Leovy, C. B.; Quinn, T. R.; Haberle, R. M.; Schaeffer, J.

    2003-01-01

    Wind deflation and deposition are powerful agents of surface change in the present Mars climate regime. Recent studies indicate that, while the distribution of regions of potential deflation (or erosion) and deposition is remarkably insensitive to changes in orbital parameters (obliquity, timing of perihelion passage, etc.), rates of aeolian surface modification may be highly sensitive to these parameters even if the atmospheric mass remains constant. But previous work suggested the atmospheric mass is likely to be sensitive to obliquity, especially if a significant mass of carbon dioxide can be stored in the regolith or deposited in the form of massive polar caps. Deflation and erosion are highly sensitive to surface pressure, so feedback between orbit variations and surface pressure can greatly enhance the sensitivity of aeolian modification rates to orbital parameters. We used statistics derived from a 1 Gyr orbital integration of the spin axis of Mars, coupled with 3D general circulation models (GCMs) at a variety of orbital conditions and pressures, to explore this feedback. We also employed a seasonally resolved 1D energy balance model to illuminate the gross characteristics of the longterm atmospheric evolution, wind erosion and deposition over one billion years. We find that seasonal polar cycles have a critical influence on the ability for the regolith to release CO2 at high obliquities, and find that the atmospheric CO2 actually decreases at high obliquities due to the cooling effect of polar deposits at latitudes where seasonal caps form. At low obliquity, the formation of massive, permanent polar caps depends critically on the values of the frost albedo, A(sub frost), and frost emissivity, E(sub frost). Using our 1D model with values of A(sub frost) = 0.67 and E(sub frost) = 0.55, matched to the NASA Ames GCM results, we find that permanent caps only form at low obliquities (< 10 degrees). Thus, contrary to expectations, the Martian atmospheric pressure

  13. A One Billion Year Martian Climate Model: The Importance of Seasonally Resolved Polar Caps and the Role of Wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, J. C.; Leovy, C. B.; Quinn, T. R.; Haberle, R. M.; Schaeffer, J.

    2003-01-01

    Wind deflation and deposition are powerful agents of surface change in the present Mars climate regime. Recent studies indicate that, while the distribution of regions of potential deflation (or erosion) and deposition is remarkably insensitive to changes in orbital parameters (obliquity, timing of perihelion passage, etc.), rates of aeolian surface modification may be highly sensitive to these parameters even if the atmospheric mass remains constant. But previous work suggested the atmospheric mass is likely to be sensitive to obliquity, especially if a significant mass of carbon dioxide can be stored in the regolith or deposited in the form of massive polar caps. Deflation and erosion are highly sensitive to surface pressure, so feedback between orbit variations and surface pressure can greatly enhance the sensitivity of aeolian modification rates to orbital parameters. We used statistics derived from a 1 Gyr orbital integration of the spin axis of Mars, coupled with 3D general circulation models (GCMs) at a variety of orbital conditions and pressures, to explore this feedback. We also employed a seasonally resolved 1D energy balance model to illuminate the gross characteristics of the longterm atmospheric evolution, wind erosion and deposition over one billion years. We find that seasonal polar cycles have a critical influence on the ability for the regolith to release CO2 at high obliquities, and find that the atmospheric CO2 actually decreases at high obliquities due to the cooling effect of polar deposits at latitudes where seasonal caps form. At low obliquity, the formation of massive, permanent polar caps depends critically on the values of the frost albedo, A(sub frost), and frost emissivity, E(sub frost). Using our 1D model with values of A(sub frost) = 0.67 and E(sub frost) = 0.55, matched to the NASA Ames GCM results, we find that permanent caps only form at low obliquities (< 10 degrees). Thus, contrary to expectations, the Martian atmospheric pressure

  14. Seasonal and solar-cycle variations of DP-type polar magnetic fields resolved via EOF analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shore, Robert; Freeman, Mervyn; Wild, James; Dorrian, Gareth; Gjerloev, Jesper

    2016-04-01

    We describe our application of the Empirical Orthogonal Function (EOF) method to characterise and separate contributions to the variability of the Earth's external magnetic field (EMF) in the northern polar region, using ground magnetometer measurements. The EOF method analyses the spatio-temporal co-variance of the data to decompose it into dynamically distinct modes (each mode is a pair of spatial and temporal basis vectors). Briefly, the benefits of this analysis method are firstly that a small number of the modes can cumulatively represent most of the variance of the original data, and secondly that the basis vectors are defined by the data. Hence, the structure of the EMF is resolved compactly without a priori assumptions, in contrast to other decomposition methods such as Fourier and spherical harmonic expansions. We present the modes from 11 years (1997 - 2008) of magnetic vector data at 5 minutes resolution, recently collated by the SuperMAG archive of observatory and variometer data. Despite the sparse and irregular station distribution, a complete spatial morphology of the EMF is achieved using a self-consistent iterative infill method. Using a comparison of the temporal behaviour of the modes alongside independent measures of solar-terrestrial coupling, we demonstrate that the leading three modes describe the well-known Disturbance-Polar currents types 2 and 1 (DP2, DP1) and the system of cusp currents (DPY). These three modes account for the majority of the variance of the data - other modes describe the spatial motions of these current systems. The variation in the DP2, DP1 and DPY currents throughout the last solar cycle is presented, and the utility of this database of magnetic perturbations (to which further analysis methods can be applied) is highlighted.

  15. Electronic structure of the topological insulator Bi2Se3 using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy: evidence for a nearly full surface spin polarization.

    PubMed

    Pan, Z-H; Vescovo, E; Fedorov, A V; Gardner, D; Lee, Y S; Chu, S; Gu, G D; Valla, T

    2011-06-24

    We performed high-resolution spin- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy studies of the electronic structure and the spin texture on the surface of Bi2Se3, a model TI. By tuning the photon energy, we found that the topological surface state is well separated from the bulk states in the vicinity of kz = Z plane of the bulk Brillouin zone. The spin-resolved measurements in that region indicate a very high degree of spin polarization of the surface state, ~0.75, much higher than previously reported. Our results demonstrate that the topological surface state on Bi2Se3 is highly spin polarized and that the dominant factors limiting the polarization are mainly extrinsic.

  16. Electronic Structure of the Topological Insulator Bi2Se3 Using Angle-Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy: Evidence for a Nearly Full Surface Spin Polarization

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Z.H.; Vescovo, E.; Fedorov, A.V.; Gardner, D.; Lee, Y.S.; Chu, S.; Gu, G.D.; Valla, T.

    2011-06-22

    We performed high-resolution spin- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy studies of the electronic structure and the spin texture on the surface of Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3}, a model TI. By tuning the photon energy, we found that the topological surface state is well separated from the bulk states in the vicinity of k{sub z} = Z plane of the bulk Brillouin zone. The spin-resolved measurements in that region indicate a very high degree of spin polarization of the surface state, {approx}0.75, much higher than previously reported. Our results demonstrate that the topological surface state on Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} is highly spin polarized and that the dominant factors limiting the polarization are mainly extrinsic.

  17. Electronic Structure of the Topological Insulator Bi2Se3 Using Angle-Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy: Evidence for a Nearly Full Surface Spin Polarization

    SciTech Connect

    Z Pan; E Vescovo; A Fedorov; D Gardner; Y Lee; S Chu; G Gu; T Valla

    2011-12-31

    We performed high-resolution spin- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy studies of the electronic structure and the spin texture on the surface of Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3}, a model TI. By tuning the photon energy, we found that the topological surface state is well separated from the bulk states in the vicinity of k{sub z} = Z plane of the bulk Brillouin zone. The spin-resolved measurements in that region indicate a very high degree of spin polarization of the surface state, {approx}0.75, much higher than previously reported. Our results demonstrate that the topological surface state on Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} is highly spin polarized and that the dominant factors limiting the polarization are mainly extrinsic.

  18. Functional and shunt states of bacteriorhodopsin resolved by 250 GHz dynamic nuclear polarization-enhanced solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Bajaj, Vikram S; Mak-Jurkauskas, Melody L; Belenky, Marina; Herzfeld, Judith; Griffin, Robert G

    2009-06-09

    Observation and structural studies of reaction intermediates of proteins are challenging because of the mixtures of states usually present at low concentrations. Here, we use a 250 GHz gyrotron (cyclotron resonance maser) and cryogenic temperatures to perform high-frequency dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) NMR experiments that enhance sensitivity in magic-angle spinning NMR spectra of cryo-trapped photocycle intermediates of bacteriorhodopsin (bR) by a factor of approximately 90. Multidimensional spectroscopy of U-(13)C,(15)N-labeled samples resolved coexisting states and allowed chemical shift assignments in the retinylidene chromophore for several intermediates not observed previously. The correlation spectra reveal unexpected heterogeneity in dark-adapted bR, distortion in the K state, and, most importantly, 4 discrete L substates. Thermal relaxation of the mixture of L's showed that 3 of these substates revert to bR(568) and that only the 1 substate with both the strongest counterion and a fully relaxed 13-cis bond is functional. These definitive observations of functional and shunt states in the bR photocycle provide a preview of the mechanistic insights that will be accessible in membrane proteins via sensitivity-enhanced DNP NMR. These observations would have not been possible absent the signal enhancement available from DNP.

  19. Polarization-Resolved Raman Study of Bulk-like and Davydov-Induced Vibrational Modes of Exfoliated Black Phosphorus.

    PubMed

    Phaneuf-L'Heureux, Anne-Laurence; Favron, Alexandre; Germain, Jean-Francis; Lavoie, Patrick; Desjardins, Patrick; Leonelli, Richard; Martel, Richard; Francoeur, Sebastien

    2016-12-14

    Owing to its crystallographic structure, black phosphorus is one of the few 2D materials expressing strongly anisotropic optical, transport, and mechanical properties. We report on the anisotropy of electron-phonon interactions through a polarization-resolved Raman study of the four vibrational modes of atomically thin black phosphorus (2D phosphane): the three bulk-like modes Ag(1), B2g, and Ag(2) and the Davydov-induced mode labeled Ag(B2u). The complex Raman tensor elements reveal that the relative variation in permittivity of all Ag modes is irrespective of the atomic motion involved lowest along the zigzag direction, the basal anisotropy of these variations is most pronounced for Ag(2) and Ag(B2u), and interlayer interactions in multilayer samples lead to reduced anisotropy. The bulk-forbidden Ag(B2u) mode appears for n ≥ 2 and quickly subsides in thicker layers. It is assigned to a Davydov-induced IR to Raman conversion of the bulk IR mode B2u and exhibits characteristics similar to Ag(2). Although this mode is expected to be weak, an electronic resonance significantly enhances its Raman efficiency such that it becomes a dominant mode in the spectrum of bilayer 2D phosphane.

  20. Motion-artifact-robust, polarization-resolved second-harmonic-generation microscopy based on rapid polarization switching with electro-optic Pockells cell and its application to in vivo visualization of collagen fiber orientation in human facial skin.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yuji; Hase, Eiji; Fukushima, Shuichiro; Ogura, Yuki; Yamashita, Toyonobu; Hirao, Tetsuji; Araki, Tsutomu; Yasui, Takeshi

    2014-04-01

    Polarization-resolved second-harmonic-generation (PR-SHG) microscopy is a powerful tool for investigating collagen fiber orientation quantitatively with low invasiveness. However, the waiting time for the mechanical polarization rotation makes it too sensitive to motion artifacts and hence has hampered its use in various applications in vivo. In the work described in this article, we constructed a motion-artifact-robust, PR-SHG microscope based on rapid polarization switching at every pixel with an electro-optic Pockells cell (PC) in synchronization with step-wise raster scanning of the focus spot and alternate data acquisition of a vertical-polarization-resolved SHG signal and a horizontal-polarization-resolved one. The constructed PC-based PR-SHG microscope enabled us to visualize orientation mapping of dermal collagen fiber in human facial skin in vivo without the influence of motion artifacts. Furthermore, it implied the location and/or age dependence of the collagen fiber orientation in human facial skin. The robustness to motion artifacts in the collagen orientation measurement will expand the application scope of SHG microscopy in dermatology and collagen-related fields.

  1. Motion-artifact-robust, polarization-resolved second-harmonic-generation microscopy based on rapid polarization switching with electro-optic Pockells cell and its application to in vivo visualization of collagen fiber orientation in human facial skin

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Yuji; Hase, Eiji; Fukushima, Shuichiro; Ogura, Yuki; Yamashita, Toyonobu; Hirao, Tetsuji; Araki, Tsutomu; Yasui, Takeshi

    2014-01-01

    Polarization-resolved second-harmonic-generation (PR-SHG) microscopy is a powerful tool for investigating collagen fiber orientation quantitatively with low invasiveness. However, the waiting time for the mechanical polarization rotation makes it too sensitive to motion artifacts and hence has hampered its use in various applications in vivo. In the work described in this article, we constructed a motion-artifact-robust, PR-SHG microscope based on rapid polarization switching at every pixel with an electro-optic Pockells cell (PC) in synchronization with step-wise raster scanning of the focus spot and alternate data acquisition of a vertical-polarization-resolved SHG signal and a horizontal-polarization-resolved one. The constructed PC-based PR-SHG microscope enabled us to visualize orientation mapping of dermal collagen fiber in human facial skin in vivo without the influence of motion artifacts. Furthermore, it implied the location and/or age dependence of the collagen fiber orientation in human facial skin. The robustness to motion artifacts in the collagen orientation measurement will expand the application scope of SHG microscopy in dermatology and collagen-related fields. PMID:24761292

  2. Super-resolved pure-transverse focal fields with an enhanced energy density through focus of an azimuthally polarized first-order vortex beam.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiangping; Venugopalan, Priyamvada; Ren, Haoran; Hong, Minghui; Gu, Min

    2014-10-15

    We report on the experimental demonstration of super-resolved pure-transverse focal fields through focusing an azimuthally polarized first-order vortex (FOV) beam. The optimized confinement of focal fields by creating constructive interference through the superposition of the FOV on an azimuthally polarized beam is observed by both a scanning near-field microscope and a two-photon fluorescence microscope. An enhanced peak intensity of the focal spot by a factor of 1.8 has been observed compared with that of the unmodulated azimuthally polarized beam. The super-resolved and pure-transverse focal fields with a 31% reduced focal area determined by the full-width at half-maximum compared to that of tightly focused circular polarization is experimentally corroborated. This superiority over the circular polarization stands for any numerical aperture greater than 0.4. This technique holds the potential for applications requiring subwavelength resolution and pure-transverse fields such as high-density optical data storage and high-resolution microscopy.

  3. Time-resolved x-ray magnetic circular dichroism study of ultrafast demagnetization in a CoPd ferromagnetic film excited by circularly polarized laser pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Flores, Víctor; Arabski, Jacek; Stamm, Christian; Halté, Valérie; Pontius, Niko; Beaurepaire, Eric; Boeglin, Christine

    2012-07-01

    The magnetization dynamics of CoPd films excited by circularly polarized ultrashort laser pulses is studied by time-resolved x-ray magnetic circular dichroism. In those films the ultrafast dynamics measured at the Co-L3 edge is strongly sensitive to the orbital magnetic moment Lz. The amount of angular momentum transferred by the circularly polarized ultrashort laser pulses to the ferromagnetic films is evaluated to ±0.1 ℏ/atom, which is above the detection limit of the experiment. Despite this, no polarization-dependent difference on the magnetization dynamics could be evidenced. These results are explained by ultrafast electronic relaxation mechanisms of the transferred angular momentum, faster than ˜100 fs. This experiment sets the methodology as well as an upper time limit for determination of angular momentum relaxation processes.

  4. [Is superstitious behavior more easily acquired by negative reinforcement schedules than positive reinforcement schedules? Examinations of the polarity and the duration of a consequence].

    PubMed

    Hori, Mayuko; Numata, Keitaro; Nakajima, Sadahiko

    2014-02-01

    This study investigated the effects of positive and negative reinforcement on superstitious behaviors. Participants were instructed to produce the word "GOOD" on a computer display (positive reinforcement condition) or to remove the word "BAD" (negative reinforcement condition) by pressing any of six keys. The words GOOD or BAD were presented at fixed-time intervals regardless of the participant's responses. In Experiment 1, only participants exposed to the negative reinforcement condition acquired superstitious behaviors. However, the observed asymmetry may not have been due to the polarity of consequences (positive vs. negative) but instead to the amount of time of goal states, because the period of the absence of BAD was longer than the period of the presence of GOOD. Experiment 2 varied the duration of word presentations to match the period of goal state between the positive and negative reinforcement conditions, and found that participants acquired superstitious behaviors equally under the two conditions. These results indicate that the duration of a consequence rather than its polarity is a critical factor controlling superstitious behaviors. The theoretical relationship between superstitious behavior and the illusion of control is discussed.

  5. Polarization-resolved photoluminescence study of individual GaN nanowires grown by catalyst-free molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlager, John B.; Sanford, Norman A.; Bertness, Kris A.; Barker, Joy M.; Roshko, Alexana; Blanchard, Paul T.

    2006-05-01

    Polarization- and temperature-dependent photoluminescence (PL) measurements were performed on individual GaN nanowires. These were grown by catalyst-free molecular beam epitaxy on Si(111) substrates, ultrasonically removed, and subsequently dispersed on sapphire substrates. The wires were typically 5-10μm in length, c-axis oriented, and 30-100nm in diameter. Single wires produced sufficient emission intensity to enable high signal-to-noise PL data. Polarized PL spectra differed for the σ and π polarization cases, illustrating the polarization anisotropy of the exciton emission associated with high-quality wurtzite GaN. This anisotropy in PL emission persisted even up to room temperature (4-296K). Additionally, the nanowire PL varied with excitation intensity and with (325nm) pump exposure time.

  6. Spin-resolved magnetic studies of BCT Fe/Mn/BCT Fe(1 0 0)/FCC Pd(1 0 0) films using scanning ion microscopy with polarization analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jian; Rau, Carl

    2005-02-01

    We report on spin-resolved magnetic studies of wedge-shaped, epitaxial BCT Fe/Mn/BCT Fe(1 0 0)/FCC Pd(1 0 0) films by using scanning ion microscopy with polarization analysis (SIMPA) and magneto-optical Kerr effect (MOKE). SIMPA is used to perform in situ spin-resolved magnetic domain imaging, and MOKE is utilized to study magnetic hysteresis loops. Fe/Mn/Fe films are deposited on well-prepared, atomically flat Pd(1 0 0) substrates. Medium energy electron diffraction (MEED) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) are used for detailed studies of growth modes, surface and interface structures. Various non-uniform, curling domain and domain wall structures, which are strongly affected by canted magnetic couplings, are found.

  7. Temporally and spatially resolved photoluminescence investigation of (112{sup ¯}2) semi-polar InGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells grown on nanorod templates

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, B.; Smith, R.; Athanasiou, M.; Yu, X.; Bai, J.; Wang, T.

    2014-12-29

    By means of time-resolved photoluminescence (PL) and confocal PL measurements, temporally and spatially resolved optical properties have been investigated on a number of In{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}N/GaN multiple-quantum-well (MQW) structures with a wide range of indium content alloys from 13% to 35% on (112{sup ¯}2) semi-polar GaN with high crystal quality, obtained through overgrowth on nanorod templates. With increasing indium content, the radiative recombination lifetime initially increases as expected, but decreases if the indium content further increases to 35%, corresponding to emission in the green spectral region. The reduced radiative recombination lifetime leads to enhanced optical performance for the high indium content MQWs as a result of strong exciton localization, which is different from the behaviour of c-plane InGaN/GaN MQWs, where quantum confined Stark effect plays a dominating role in emission process.

  8. When combined X-ray and polarized neutron diffraction data challenge high-level calculations: spin-resolved electron density of an organic radical.

    PubMed

    Voufack, Ariste Bolivard; Claiser, Nicolas; Lecomte, Claude; Pillet, Sébastien; Pontillon, Yves; Gillon, Béatrice; Yan, Zeyin; Gillet, Jean Michel; Marazzi, Marco; Genoni, Alessandro; Souhassou, Mohamed

    2017-08-01

    Joint refinement of X-ray and polarized neutron diffraction data has been carried out in order to determine charge and spin density distributions simultaneously in the nitronyl nitroxide (NN) free radical Nit(SMe)Ph. For comparison purposes, density functional theory (DFT) and complete active-space self-consistent field (CASSCF) theoretical calculations were also performed. Experimentally derived charge and spin densities show significant differences between the two NO groups of the NN function that are not observed from DFT theoretical calculations. On the contrary, CASSCF calculations exhibit the same fine details as observed in spin-resolved joint refinement and a clear asymmetry between the two NO groups.

  9. Angle-resolved photoemission with circularly polarized light in the nodal mirror plane of underdoped Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ superconductor

    DOE PAGES

    He, Junfeng; Mion, Thomas R.; Gao, Shang; ...

    2016-10-31

    Unraveling the nature of pseudogap phase in high-temperature superconductors holds the key to understanding their superconducting mechanisms and potentially broadening their applications via enhancement of their superconducting transition temperatures. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) experiments using circularly polarized light have been proposed to detect possible symmetry breaking state in the pseudogap phase of cuprates. Here, the presence (absence) of an electronic order which breaks mirror symmetry of the crystal would in principle induce a finite (zero) circular dichroism in photoemission. Different orders breaking reflection symmetries about different mirror planes can also be distinguished by the momentum dependence of the measured circularmore » dichroism.« less

  10. Investigation on Surface Polarization of Al2O3-capped GaN/AlGaN/GaN Heterostructure by Angle-Resolved X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Duan, Tian Li; Pan, Ji Sheng; Wang, Ning; Cheng, Kai; Yu, Hong Yu

    2017-08-17

    The surface polarization of Ga-face gallium nitride (GaN) (2 nm)/AlGaN (22 nm)/GaN channel (150 nm)/buffer/Si with Al2O3 capping layer is investigated by angle-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (ARXPS). It is found that the energy band varies from upward bending to downward bending in the interface region, which is believed to be corresponding to the polarization variation. An interfacial layer is formed between top GaN and Al2O3 due to the occurrence of Ga-N bond break and Ga-O bond forming during Al2O3 deposition via the atomic layer deposition (ALD). This interfacial layer is believed to eliminate the GaN polarization, thus reducing the polarization-induced negative charges. Furthermore, this interfacial layer plays a key role for the introduction of the positive charges which lead the energy band downward. Finally, a N2 annealing at 400 °C is observed to enhance the interfacial layer growth thus increasing the density of positive charges.

  11. Polarization-resolved terahertz third-harmonic generation in a single-crystal superconductor NbN: Dominance of the Higgs mode beyond the BCS approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsunaga, Ryusuke; Tsuji, Naoto; Makise, Kazumasa; Terai, Hirotaka; Aoki, Hideo; Shimano, Ryo

    2017-07-01

    Recent advances in time-domain terahertz (THz) spectroscopy have unveiled that resonantly enhanced strong THz third-harmonic generation (THG) mediated by the collective Higgs amplitude mode occurs in s -wave superconductors, where charge-density fluctuations (CDFs) have been shown to also contribute to the nonlinear third-order susceptibility. It has been theoretically proposed that the nonlinear responses of Higgs and CDF exhibit essentially different polarization dependences. Here we experimentally discriminate the two contributions by polarization-resolved intense THz transmission spectroscopy for a single-crystal NbN film. The result shows that the resonant THG in the transmitted light always appears in the polarization parallel to that of the incident light with no appreciable polarization-angle dependence relative to the crystal axis. When we compare this with the theoretical calculation here with the BCS approximation and the dynamical mean-field theory for a model of NbN constructed from first principles, the experimental result strongly indicates that the Higgs mode rather than the CDF dominates the THG resonance in NbN. A possible mechanism for this is the retardation effect in the phonon-mediated pairing interaction beyond BCS.

  12. Investigation on Surface Polarization of Al2O3-capped GaN/AlGaN/GaN Heterostructure by Angle-Resolved X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Tian Li; Pan, Ji Sheng; Wang, Ning; Cheng, Kai; Yu, Hong Yu

    2017-08-01

    The surface polarization of Ga-face gallium nitride (GaN) (2 nm)/AlGaN (22 nm)/GaN channel (150 nm)/buffer/Si with Al2O3 capping layer is investigated by angle-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (ARXPS). It is found that the energy band varies from upward bending to downward bending in the interface region, which is believed to be corresponding to the polarization variation. An interfacial layer is formed between top GaN and Al2O3 due to the occurrence of Ga-N bond break and Ga-O bond forming during Al2O3 deposition via the atomic layer deposition (ALD). This interfacial layer is believed to eliminate the GaN polarization, thus reducing the polarization-induced negative charges. Furthermore, this interfacial layer plays a key role for the introduction of the positive charges which lead the energy band downward. Finally, a N2 annealing at 400 °C is observed to enhance the interfacial layer growth thus increasing the density of positive charges.

  13. Cross-relaxation mechanism for the formation of nuclear polarization: a quantitative time-resolved CIDNP study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozova, O. B.; Tsentalovich, Yu. P.; Yurkovskaya, A. V.; Sagdeev, R. Z.

    1995-12-01

    The kinetics of the nuclear polarization formed during the photolysis of acetone in isopropanol- d8 were analyzed quantitatively. Model calculations show that the spin-selective recombination of radicals gives rise to the electron polarization and, with regard to the electron-nuclear cross-relaxation, are adequate to describe the formation of the net nuclear polarization of the reaction products even if the solution contains only one type of radical. For the 2-hydroxy-2-propyl radicals at a magnetic field of 7 T, fitting the theoretical results to the experimental data gives the electron relaxation time T1e = 1.0 ± 0.2 μs and the cross-relaxation time Tx = 92 ± 18 μs.

  14. Polar Second-Harmonic Imaging to Resolve Pure and Mixed Crystal Phases along GaAs Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Timofeeva, Maria; Bouravleuv, Alexei; Cirlin, George; Shtrom, Igor; Soshnikov, Ilya; Reig Escalé, Marc; Sergeyev, Anton; Grange, Rachel

    2016-10-12

    In this work, we report an optical method for characterizing crystal phases along single-semiconductor III-V nanowires based on the measurement of polarization-dependent second-harmonic generation. This powerful imaging method is based on a per-pixel analysis of the second-harmonic-generated signal on the incoming excitation polarization. The dependence of the second-harmonic generation responses on the nonlinear second-order susceptibility tensor allows the distinguishing of areas of pure wurtzite, zinc blende, and mixed and rotational twins crystal structures in individual nanowires. With a far-field nonlinear optical microscope, we recorded the second-harmonic generation in GaAs nanowires and precisely determined their various crystal structures by analyzing the polar response for each pixel of the images. The predicted crystal phases in GaAs nanowire are confirmed with scanning transmission electron and high-resolution transmission electron measurements. The developed method of analyzing the nonlinear polar response of each pixel can be used for an investigation of nanowire crystal structure that is quick, sensitive to structural transitions, nondestructive, and on-the-spot. It can be applied for the crystal phase characterization of nanowires built into optoelectronic devices in which electron microscopy cannot be performed (for example, in lab-on-a-chip devices). Moreover, this method is not limited to GaAs nanowires but can be used for other nonlinear optical nanostructures.

  15. Atomically-resolved mapping of polarization and electric fields across ferroelectric-oxide interfaces by Z-contrast imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Hye Jung; Kalinin, Sergei; Morozovska, A. N.; Huijben, Mark; Chu, Ying-Hao; Yu, P; Ramesh, R.; Eliseev, E. A.; Svechnikov, S. V.; Pennycook, Stephen J; Borisevich, Albina Y

    2011-01-01

    Direct atomic displacement mapping at ferroelectric interfaces by aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy(STEM) (a-STEM image, b-corresponding displacement profile) is combined with Landau-Ginsburg-Devonshire theory to obtain the complete interface electrostatics in real space, including separate estimates for the polarization and intrinsic interface charge contributions.

  16. Intrinsic spin polarized electronic structure of CrO{sub 2} epitaxial film revealed by bulk-sensitive spin-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Fujiwara, Hirokazu; Sunagawa, Masanori; Kittaka, Tomoko; Terashima, Kensei; Wakita, Takanori; Muraoka, Yuji; Yokoya, Takayoshi

    2015-05-18

    We have performed bulk-sensitive spin-resolved photoemission spectroscopy in order to clarify the intrinsic spin-resolved electronic states of half-metallic ferromagnet CrO{sub 2}. We used CrO{sub 2} epitaxial films on TiO{sub 2}(100), which shows a peak at 1 eV with a clear Fermi edge, consistent with the bulk-sensitive PES spectrum for CrO{sub 2}. In spin-resolved spectra at 40 K, while the Fermi edge was observed in the spin up (majority spin) state, no states at the Fermi level (E{sub F}) with an energy gap of 0.5 eV below E{sub F} were observed in the spin down (minority spin) state. At 300 K, the gap in the spin down state closes. These results are consistent with resistivity measurements and magnetic hysteresis curves of the fabricated CrO{sub 2} film, constituting spectroscopic evidence for the half-metallicity of CrO{sub 2} at low temperature and reducing the spin polarization at room temperature. We also discuss the electron correlation effects of Cr 3d.

  17. A novel model on time-resolved photoluminescence measurements of polar InGaN/GaN multi-quantum-well structures

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Yuchen; Wang, Lai; Yang, Di; Wang, Zilan; Hao, Zhibiao; Sun, Changzheng; Xiong, Bing; Luo, Yi; Han, Yanjun; Wang, Jian; Li, Hongtao

    2017-01-01

    Based on carrier rate equation, a new model is proposed to explain the non-exponential nature of time-resolved photoluminescence (TRPL) decay curves in the polar InGaN/GaN multi-quantum-well structures. From the study of TRPL curves at different temperatures, it is found that both radiative and non-radiative recombination coefficients vary from low temperature to room temperature. The variation of the coefficients is compatible with the carrier density of states distribution as well as the carrier localization process. These results suggest that there is a novel method to calculate the internal quantum efficiency, which is a complement to the traditional one based on temperature dependent photoluminescence measurement. PMID:28327629

  18. Determination of the absolute carrier-envelope phase by angle-resolved photoelectron spectra of Ar by intense circularly polarized few-cycle pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukahori, Shinichi; Ando, Toshiaki; Miura, Shun; Kanya, Reika; Yamanouchi, Kaoru; Rathje, Tim; Paulus, Gerhard G.

    2017-05-01

    The angle-resolved photoelectron spectra of Ar are recorded using intense circularly polarized near-infrared few-cycle laser pulses, and the effect of the depletion of Ar atoms by the ionization and the effect of the Coulombic potential are examined by the classical trajectory Monte Carlo simulations. On the basis of the comparison between the experimental and theoretical photoelectron spectra, a procedure for estimating the absolute carrier-envelope phase (CEP) of the few-cycle laser pulses interacting with atoms and molecules is proposed. It is confirmed that the absolute CEP can securely be estimated without any numerical calculations once the angular distribution of the yield of photoelectrons having the kinetic energy larger than 30 eV is measured with the peak laser intensity in the range between 1 ×1014 and 5 ×1014W /c m2 .

  19. A novel model on time-resolved photoluminescence measurements of polar InGaN/GaN multi-quantum-well structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Yuchen; Wang, Lai; Yang, Di; Wang, Zilan; Hao, Zhibiao; Sun, Changzheng; Xiong, Bing; Luo, Yi; Han, Yanjun; Wang, Jian; Li, Hongtao

    2017-03-01

    Based on carrier rate equation, a new model is proposed to explain the non-exponential nature of time-resolved photoluminescence (TRPL) decay curves in the polar InGaN/GaN multi-quantum-well structures. From the study of TRPL curves at different temperatures, it is found that both radiative and non-radiative recombination coefficients vary from low temperature to room temperature. The variation of the coefficients is compatible with the carrier density of states distribution as well as the carrier localization process. These results suggest that there is a novel method to calculate the internal quantum efficiency, which is a complement to the traditional one based on temperature dependent photoluminescence measurement.

  20. A novel model on time-resolved photoluminescence measurements of polar InGaN/GaN multi-quantum-well structures.

    PubMed

    Xing, Yuchen; Wang, Lai; Yang, Di; Wang, Zilan; Hao, Zhibiao; Sun, Changzheng; Xiong, Bing; Luo, Yi; Han, Yanjun; Wang, Jian; Li, Hongtao

    2017-03-22

    Based on carrier rate equation, a new model is proposed to explain the non-exponential nature of time-resolved photoluminescence (TRPL) decay curves in the polar InGaN/GaN multi-quantum-well structures. From the study of TRPL curves at different temperatures, it is found that both radiative and non-radiative recombination coefficients vary from low temperature to room temperature. The variation of the coefficients is compatible with the carrier density of states distribution as well as the carrier localization process. These results suggest that there is a novel method to calculate the internal quantum efficiency, which is a complement to the traditional one based on temperature dependent photoluminescence measurement.

  1. Depth-resolved birefringence imaging of the primate retinal nerve fiber layer using polarization-sensitive OCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemp, Nathaniel J.; Park, Jesung; Marsack, Jason D.; Dave, Digant P.; Parekh, Sapun H.; Milner, Thomas E.; Rylander, Henry G., III

    2002-06-01

    Imaging the optical phase retardation per unit depth (OPR/UD) in the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) may aid in glaucoma diagnosis. Polarization Sensitive Optical Coherence Tomography (PSOCT) was used to record in vivo high-resolution images of the RNFL in two cynomologous monkeys. The depth variation in the Stokes vector of reflected light was used to calculate the OPR/UD as a function of RNFL position. OPR/UD decreased from 35 degree(s)/100 micrometers near the optic nerve to 5 degree(s)/100 micrometers at a location 600 micrometers superior to the optic nerve. Variation of OPR/UD in the RNFL with retinal position demonstrates a change in birefringence for different densities of ganglion cell axons. PSOCT may be useful for noninvasive determination of RNFL thickness and fiber density.

  2. Angle-resolved photoemission with circularly polarized light in the nodal mirror plane of underdoped Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Junfeng; Mion, Thomas R.; Gao, Shang; Myers, Gavin T.; Arita, Masashi; Shimada, Kenya; Gu, G. D.; He, Rui-Hua

    2016-10-01

    Unraveling the nature of pseudogap phase in high-temperature superconductors holds the key to understanding their superconducting mechanisms and potentially broadening their applications via enhancement of their superconducting transition temperatures. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) experiments using circularly polarized light have been proposed to detect possible symmetry breaking state in the pseudogap phase of cuprates. The presence (absence) of an electronic order which breaks mirror symmetry of the crystal would in principle induce a finite (zero) circular dichroism in photoemission. Different orders breaking reflection symmetries about different mirror planes can also be distinguished by the momentum dependence of the measured circular dichroism. Here, we report ARPES experiment on an underdoped Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ (Bi2212) superconductor in the Γ (0,0)-Y (π,π) nodal mirror plane using circularly polarized light. No circular dichroism is observed on the level of ˜2% at low temperature, which places a clear constraint on the forms of possible symmetry breaking orders in this sample. Meanwhile, we find that the geometric dichroism remains substantial very close to its perfect extinction such that a very small sample angular offset is sufficient to induce a sizeable dichroic signal. It highlights the importance to establish a perfect extinction of geometric dichroism as a prerequisite for the identification of any intrinsic circular dichroism in this material.

  3. Very efficient spin polarization analysis (VESPA): new exchange scattering-based setup for spin-resolved ARPES at APE-NFFA beamline at Elettra.

    PubMed

    Bigi, Chiara; Das, Pranab K; Benedetti, Davide; Salvador, Federico; Krizmancic, Damjan; Sergo, Rudi; Martin, Andrea; Panaccione, Giancarlo; Rossi, Giorgio; Fujii, Jun; Vobornik, Ivana

    2017-07-01

    Complete photoemission experiments, enabling measurement of the full quantum set of the photoelectron final state, are in high demand for studying materials and nanostructures whose properties are determined by strong electron and spin correlations. Here the implementation of the new spin polarimeter VESPA (Very Efficient Spin Polarization Analysis) at the APE-NFFA beamline at Elettra is reported, which is based on the exchange coupling between the photoelectron spin and a ferromagnetic surface in a reflectometry setup. The system was designed to be integrated with a dedicated Scienta-Omicron DA30 electron energy analyzer allowing for two simultaneous reflectometry measurements, along perpendicular axes, that, after magnetization switching of the two targets, allow the three-dimensional vectorial reconstruction of the spin polarization to be performed while operating the DA30 in high-resolution mode. VESPA represents the very first installation for spin-resolved ARPES (SPARPES) at the Elettra synchrotron in Trieste, and is being heavily exploited by SPARPES users since autumn 2015.

  4. Spatially resolved analysis of Kα x-ray emission from plasmas induced by a femtosecond weakly relativistic laser pulse at various polarizations.

    PubMed

    Cristoforetti, G; Anania, M P; Faenov, A Ya; Giulietti, A; Giulietti, D; Hansen, S B; Koester, P; Labate, L; Levato, T; Pikuz, T A; Gizzi, L A

    2013-02-01

    Spatially resolved K-shell spectroscopy is used here to investigate the interaction of an ultrashort laser pulse (λ=800 nm, τ=40 fs) with a Ti foil under intense irradiation (Iλ(2)=2×10(18)Wμm(2)cm(-2)) and the following fast electron generation and transport into the target. The effect of laser pulse polarization (p, s, and circular) on the Kα yield and line shape is probed. The radial structure of intensity and width of the lines, obtained by a discretized Abel deconvolution algorithm, suggests an annular distribution of both the hot electron propagation into the target and the target temperature. An accurate modeling of Kα line shapes was performed, revealing temperature gradients, going from a few eV up to 15-20 eV, depending on the pulse polarization. Results are discussed in terms of mechanisms of hot electron generation and of their transport through the preplasma in front of the target.

  5. Electronic structure and polar catastrophe at the surface of LixCoO2 studied by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, Y.; Matsumoto, R.; Yagihara, T.; Iwai, C.; Miyoshi, K.; Takeuchi, J.; Horiba, K.; Kobayashi, M.; Ono, K.; Kumigashira, H.; Saini, N. L.; Mizokawa, T.

    2017-09-01

    We report an angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) study of LixCoO2 single crystals which have a hole-doped CoO2 triangular lattice. Similar to NaxCoO2 , the Co 3 d a1 g band crosses the Fermi level with strongly renormalized band dispersion while the Co 3 d eg' bands are fully occupied in LixCoO2 (x =0.46 and 0.71). At x =0.46 , the Fermi surface area is consistent with the bulk hole concentration indicating that the ARPES result represents the bulk electronic structure. On the other hand, at x =0.71 , the Fermi surface area is larger than the expectation which can be associated with the inhomogeneous distribution of Li reported in the previous scanning tunneling microscopy study by Iwaya et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 126104 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.111.126104]. However, the Co 3 d peak is systematically shifted towards the Fermi level with hole doping excluding phase separation between hole rich and hole poor regions in the bulk. Therefore, the deviation of the Fermi surface area at x =0.71 can be attributed to hole redistribution at the surface avoiding polar catastrophe. The bulk Fermi surface of Co 3 d a1 g is very robust around x =0.5 even in the topmost CoO2 layer due to the absence of the polar catastrophe.

  6. Development of a polarization resolved spectroscopic diagnostic for measurements of the magnetic field in the Caltech coaxial magnetized plasma jet experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shikama, Taiichi; Bellan, Paul M.

    2011-11-01

    Measurements of the magnetic field strength in current-carrying magnetically confined plasmas are necessary for understanding the underlying physics governing the dynamical behavior. Such a measurement would be particularly useful in the Caltech coaxial magnetized plasma gun, an experiment used for fundamental studies relevant to spheromak formation, astrophysical jet formation/propagation, solar coronal physics, and the general behavior of twisted magnetic flux tubes that intercept a boundary. In order to measure the field strength in the Caltech experiment, a non-perturbing spectroscopic method is being implemented to observe the Zeeman splitting in the emission spectra. The method is based on polarization-resolving spectroscopy of the Zeeman-split σ components, a technique previously used in both solar and laboratory plasmas. We have designed and constructed an optical system that can simultaneously detect left- and right-circularly polarized emission with both high throughput and small extinction ratio. The system will be used on the 489.5 nm NII line, chosen because of its simple Zeeman structure and minimal Stark broadening.

  7. Structure of collagen adsorbed on a model implant surface resolved by polarization modulation infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Brand, Izabella; Habecker, Florian; Ahlers, Michael; Klüner, Thorsten

    2015-03-05

    The polarization modulation infrared reflection-absorption spectra of collagen adsorbed on a titania surface and quantum chemical calculations are used to describe components of the amide I mode to the protein structure at a sub-molecular level. In this study, imino acid rich and poor fragments, representing the entire collagen molecule, are taken into account. The amide I mode of the collagen triple helix is composed of three absorption bands which involve: (i) (∼1690cm(-1)) the CO stretching modes at unhydrated groups, (ii) (1655-1673cm(-1)) the CO stretching at carbonyl groups at imino acids and glycine forming intramolecular hydrogen bonds with H atoms at both NH2 and, unusual for proteins, CH2 groups at glycine at a neighbouring chain and (iii) (∼1640cm(-1)) the CO stretching at carbonyl groups forming hydrogen bonds between two, often charged, amino acids as well as hydrogen bonds to water along the entire helix. The IR spectrum of films prepared from diluted solutions (c<50μgml(-1)) corresponds to solution spectra indicating that native collagen molecules interact with water adsorbed on the titania surface. In films prepared from solutions (c⩾50μgml(-1)) collagen multilayers are formed. The amide I mode is blue-shifted by 18cm(-1), indicating that intramolecular hydrogen bonds at imino acid rich fragments are weakened. Simultaneous red-shift of the amide A mode implies that the strength of hydrogen bonds at the imino acid poor fragments increases. Theoretically predicted distortion of the collagen structure upon adsorption on the titania surface is experimentally confirmed.

  8. Structure of collagen adsorbed on a model implant surface resolved by polarization modulation infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brand, Izabella; Habecker, Florian; Ahlers, Michael; Klüner, Thorsten

    2015-03-01

    The polarization modulation infrared reflection-absorption spectra of collagen adsorbed on a titania surface and quantum chemical calculations are used to describe components of the amide I mode to the protein structure at a sub-molecular level. In this study, imino acid rich and poor fragments, representing the entire collagen molecule, are taken into account. The amide I mode of the collagen triple helix is composed of three absorption bands which involve: (i) (∼1690 cm-1) the Cdbnd O stretching modes at unhydrated groups, (ii) (1655-1673 cm-1) the Cdbnd O stretching at carbonyl groups at imino acids and glycine forming intramolecular hydrogen bonds with H atoms at both NH2 and, unusual for proteins, CH2 groups at glycine at a neighbouring chain and (iii) (∼1640 cm-1) the Cdbnd O stretching at carbonyl groups forming hydrogen bonds between two, often charged, amino acids as well as hydrogen bonds to water along the entire helix. The IR spectrum of films prepared from diluted solutions (c < 50 μg ml-1) corresponds to solution spectra indicating that native collagen molecules interact with water adsorbed on the titania surface. In films prepared from solutions (c ⩾ 50 μg ml-1) collagen multilayers are formed. The amide I mode is blue-shifted by 18 cm-1, indicating that intramolecular hydrogen bonds at imino acid rich fragments are weakened. Simultaneous red-shift of the amide A mode implies that the strength of hydrogen bonds at the imino acid poor fragments increases. Theoretically predicted distortion of the collagen structure upon adsorption on the titania surface is experimentally confirmed.

  9. Development of Multi-Field of view-Multiple-Scattering-Polarization Lidar : analysis of angular resolved backscattered signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makino, T.; Okamoto, H.; Sato, K.; Tanaka, K.; Nishizawa, T.; Sugimoto, N.; Matsui, I.; Jin, Y.; Uchiyama, A.; Kudo, R.

    2014-12-01

    We have developed a new type of ground-based lidar, Multi-Field of view-Multiple-Scattering-Polarization Lidar (MFMSPL), to analyze multiple scattering contribution due to low-level clouds. One issue of the ground based lidar is the limitation of optical thickness of about 3 due to the strong attenuation in the lidar signals so that only the cloud bottom part can be observed. In order to overcome the problem, we have proposed the MFMSPL that has been designed to observe similar degree of multiple scattering contribution expected from space-borne lidar CALIOP on CALIPSO satellite. The system consists of eight detectors; four telescopes for parallel channels and four for perpendicular channels. The four pairs of telescope have been mounted with four different off-beam angles, ranging from -5 to 35mrad, where the angle is defined as the one between the direction of laser beam and the direction of telescope. Consequently, similar large foot print (100m) as CALIOP can be achieved in the MFMSPL observations when the altitude of clouds is located at about 1km. The use of multi-field of views enables to measure depolarization ratio from optically thick clouds. The outer receivers attached with larger angles generally detect backscattered signals from clouds located at upper altitudes due to the enhanced multiple scattering compared with the inner receiver that detects signals only from cloud bottom portions. Therefore the information of cloud microphysics from optically thicker regions is expected by the MFMSPL observations compared with the conventional lidar with small FOV. The MFMSPL have been continuously operated in Tsukuba, Japan since June 2014.Initial analyses have indicated expected performances from the theoretical estimation by backward Monte-Carlo simulations. The depolarization ratio from deeper part of the clouds detected by the receiver with large off-beam angle showed much larger values than those from the one with small angle. The calibration procedures

  10. Electronic transitions and heterogeneity of the bacteriophytochrome Pr absorption band: An angle balanced polarization resolved femtosecond VIS pump-IR probe study.

    PubMed

    Linke, Martin; Yang, Yang; Zienicke, Benjamin; Hammam, Mostafa A S; von Haimberger, Theodore; Zacarias, Angelica; Inomata, Katsuhiko; Lamparter, Tilman; Heyne, Karsten

    2013-10-15

    Photoisomerization of biliverdin (BV) chromophore triggers the photoresponse in native Agp1 bacteriophytochrome. We discuss heterogeneity in phytochrome Pr form to account for the shape of the absorption profile. We investigated different regions of the absorption profile by angle balanced polarization resolved femtosecond VIS pump-IR probe spectroscopy. We studied the Pr form of Agp1 with its natural chromophore and with a sterically locked 18Et-BV (locked Agp1). We followed the dynamics and orientations of the carbonyl stretching vibrations of ring D and ring A in their ground and electronically excited states. Photoisomerization of ring D is reflected by strong signals of the ring D carbonyl vibration. In contrast, orientational data on ring A show no rotation of ring A upon photoexcitation. Orientational data allow excluding a ZZZasa geometry and corroborates a nontwisted ZZZssa geometry of the chromophore. We found no proof for heterogeneity but identified a new, to our knowledge, electronic transition in the absorption profile at 644 nm (S0→S2). Excitation of the S0→S2 transition will introduce a more complex photodynamics compared with S0→S1 transition. Our approach provides fundamental information on disentanglement of absorption profiles, identification of chromophore structures, and determination of molecular groups involved in the photoisomerization process of photoreceptors.

  11. A Dual Readout Assay Based on Fluorescence Polarization and Time-Resolved Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer to Screen for RSK1 Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Eun-mi; Lee, Mi Young; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Lee, Byung Ho; Oh, Kwang-Seok

    2016-01-01

    A dual readout assay based on fluorescence polarization (FP) and time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer (TR-FRET) exhibits many advantages over single assay technology in terms of screening quality and efficiency. In this study, we developed a dual readout assay combining FP and TR-FRET to identify ribosomal S6 kinase 1 (RSK1) inhibitors. This dual readout assay can monitor both FP and TR-FRET signals from a single RSK1 kinase reaction by using the immobilized metal affinity for phosphochemical (IMAP)-based assay. The Z' value and signal to background (S/B) ratio were 0.85 and 4.0 using FP, and 0.79 and 10.6 using TR-FRET, which led to performance of a pilot library screening against the drug repositioning set consisting of 2320 compounds with a reasonable reproducibility. From this screening, we identified 16 compounds showing greater than 50% inhibition against RSK1 for both FP and TR-FRET; 6 compounds with greater than 50% inhibition only for FP; and 4 compounds with greater than 50% inhibition only for TR-FRET. In a cell-based functional assay to validate the hit compounds, 10 compounds identified only in a single assay had little effect on the RSK-mediated phosphorylation of liver kinase B1, whereas 5 compounds showing greater than 80% inhibition for both FP and TR-FRET reduced the phosphorylation of liver kinase B1. These results demonstrate that the dual readout assay can be used to identify hit compounds by subsequently monitoring both FP and TR-FRET signals from one RSK1 reaction.

  12. Macrophages are recruited to hypoxic tumor areas and acquire a Pro-Angiogenic M2-Polarized phenotype via hypoxic cancer cell derived cytokines Oncostatin M and Eotaxin

    PubMed Central

    Tripathi, Chakrapani; Tewari, Brij Nath; Kanchan, Ranjana Kumari; Baghel, Khemraj Singh; Nautiyal, Naveen; Shrivastava, Richa; Kaur, Harbeer; Bhatt, Madan Lal Bramha; Bhadauria, Smrati

    2014-01-01

    TAMs, a unique and distinct M2-skewed myeloid population of tumor stroma, exhibiting pro-tumor functions is fast emerging as a potential target for anti-cancer immunotherapy. Macrophage-recruitment and M2-polarization represent key TAMs-related phenomenon that are amenable to therapeutic intervention. However successful translation of these approaches into effective therapeutic regimen requires better characterization of tumor-microenvironment derived signals that regulate macrophage recruitment and their polarization. Owing to hypoxic milieu being a persistent feature of tumor-microenvironment and a major contributor to malignancy and treatment resistance, the current study was planned with an aim to decipher tumor cell responses to hypoxia vis-a-vis macrophage homing and phenotype switching. Here, we show that hypoxia-primed cancer cells chemoattract and polarize macrophages to pro-angiogenic M2-polarized subtype via Eotaxin and Oncostatin M. Concordantly, hypoxic regions of human breast-cancer specimen exhibited elevated Eotaxin and Oncostatin M levels with concurrently elevated M2-macrophage content. Blockade of Eotaxin/Oncostatin M not only prevented hypoxic breast-cancer cells from recruiting and polarizing macrophages towards an M2-polarized phenotype and retarded tumor progression in 4T1/BALB/c-syngenic-mice-model of breast-cancer but also enhanced the efficacy of anti-angiogenic Bevacizumab. The findings established these two cytokines as novel targets for devising effective anticancer therapy particularly for tumors that are refractory or develop resistance to anti-angiogenic therapeutics. PMID:25051364

  13. A simple approach to spectrally resolved fluorescence and bright field microscopy over select regions of interest

    PubMed Central

    Dahlberg, Peter D.; Boughter, Christopher T.; Faruk, Nabil F.; Hong, Lu; Koh, Young Hoon; Reyer, Matthew A.; Sherani, Aiman; Hammond, Adam T.

    2016-01-01

    A standard wide field inverted microscope was converted to a spatially selective spectrally resolved microscope through the addition of a polarizing beam splitter, a pair of polarizers, an amplitude-mode liquid crystal-spatial light modulator, and a USB spectrometer. The instrument is capable of simultaneously imaging and acquiring spectra over user defined regions of interest. The microscope can also be operated in a bright-field mode to acquire absorption spectra of micron scale objects. The utility of the instrument is demonstrated on three different samples. First, the instrument is used to resolve three differently labeled fluorescent beads in vitro. Second, the instrument is used to recover time dependent bleaching dynamics that have distinct spectral changes in the cyanobacteria, Synechococcus leopoliensis UTEX 625. Lastly, the technique is used to acquire the absorption spectra of CH3NH3PbBr3 perovskites and measure differences between nanocrystal films and micron scale crystals. PMID:27910631

  14. A simple approach to spectrally resolved fluorescence and bright field microscopy over select regions of interest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahlberg, Peter D.; Boughter, Christopher T.; Faruk, Nabil F.; Hong, Lu; Koh, Young Hoon; Reyer, Matthew A.; Shaiber, Alon; Sherani, Aiman; Zhang, Jiacheng; Jureller, Justin E.; Hammond, Adam T.

    2016-11-01

    A standard wide field inverted microscope was converted to a spatially selective spectrally resolved microscope through the addition of a polarizing beam splitter, a pair of polarizers, an amplitude-mode liquid crystal-spatial light modulator, and a USB spectrometer. The instrument is capable of simultaneously imaging and acquiring spectra over user defined regions of interest. The microscope can also be operated in a bright-field mode to acquire absorption spectra of micron scale objects. The utility of the instrument is demonstrated on three different samples. First, the instrument is used to resolve three differently labeled fluorescent beads in vitro. Second, the instrument is used to recover time dependent bleaching dynamics that have distinct spectral changes in the cyanobacteria, Synechococcus leopoliensis UTEX 625. Lastly, the technique is used to acquire the absorption spectra of CH3NH3PbBr3 perovskites and measure differences between nanocrystal films and micron scale crystals.

  15. A simple approach to spectrally resolved fluorescence and bright field microscopy over select regions of interest.

    PubMed

    Dahlberg, Peter D; Boughter, Christopher T; Faruk, Nabil F; Hong, Lu; Koh, Young Hoon; Reyer, Matthew A; Shaiber, Alon; Sherani, Aiman; Zhang, Jiacheng; Jureller, Justin E; Hammond, Adam T

    2016-11-01

    A standard wide field inverted microscope was converted to a spatially selective spectrally resolved microscope through the addition of a polarizing beam splitter, a pair of polarizers, an amplitude-mode liquid crystal-spatial light modulator, and a USB spectrometer. The instrument is capable of simultaneously imaging and acquiring spectra over user defined regions of interest. The microscope can also be operated in a bright-field mode to acquire absorption spectra of micron scale objects. The utility of the instrument is demonstrated on three different samples. First, the instrument is used to resolve three differently labeled fluorescent beads in vitro. Second, the instrument is used to recover time dependent bleaching dynamics that have distinct spectral changes in the cyanobacteria, Synechococcus leopoliensis UTEX 625. Lastly, the technique is used to acquire the absorption spectra of CH3NH3PbBr3 perovskites and measure differences between nanocrystal films and micron scale crystals.

  16. Molecular motion, dielectric response, and phase transition of charge-transfer crystals: acquired dynamic and dielectric properties of polar molecules in crystals.

    PubMed

    Harada, Jun; Ohtani, Masaki; Takahashi, Yukihiro; Inabe, Tamotsu

    2015-04-08

    Molecules in crystals often suffer from severe limitations on their dynamic processes, especially on those involving large structural changes. Crystalline compounds, therefore, usually fail to realize their potential as dielectric materials even when they have large dipole moments. To enable polar molecules to undergo dynamic processes and to provide their crystals with dielectric properties, weakly bound charge-transfer (CT) complex crystals have been exploited as a molecular architecture where the constituent polar molecules have some freedom of dynamic processes, which contribute to the dielectric properties of the crystals. Several CT crystals of polar tetrabromophthalic anhydride (TBPA) molecules were prepared using TBPA as an electron acceptor and aromatic hydrocarbons, such as coronene and perylene, as electron donors. The crystal structures and dielectric properties of the CT crystals as well as the single-component crystal of TBPA were investigated at various temperatures. Molecular reorientation of TBPA molecules did not occur in the single-component crystal, and the crystal did not show a dielectric response due to orientational polarization. We have found that the CT crystal formation provides a simple and versatile method to develop molecular dielectrics, revealing that the molecular dynamics of the TBPA molecules and the dielectric property of their crystals were greatly changed in CT crystals. The TBPA molecules underwent rapid in-plane reorientations in their CT crystals, which exhibited marked dielectric responses arising from the molecular motion. An order-disorder phase transition was observed for one of the CT crystals, which resulted in an abrupt change in the dielectric constant at the transition temperature.

  17. Factors Associated with Immunoglobulin G Subclass Polarization in Naturally Acquired Antibodies to Plasmodium falciparum Merozoite Surface Proteins: a Cross-Sectional Survey in Brazilian Amazonia

    PubMed Central

    Scopel, Kézia K. G.; Fontes, Cor J. F.; Ferreira, Marcelo U.; Braga, Érika M.

    2006-01-01

    We investigated immunoglobulin G (IgG) subclass antibody responses to Plasmodium falciparum merozoite surface protein 1 (MSP-1) and MSP-2 in 112 malaria-exposed subjects in Brazil. IgG3 polarization was primarily epitope driven, being little affected by cumulative or current exposure to malaria and not affected by a subject's age and Fcγ receptor IIA genotype. PMID:16829621

  18. The impact of absorption coefficient on polarimetric determination of Berry phase based depth resolved characterization of biomedical scattering samples: a polarized Monte Carlo investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Baba, Justin S; Koju, Vijay; John, Dwayne O

    2016-01-01

    The modulation of the state of polarization of photons due to scatter generates associated geometric phase that is being investigated as a means for decreasing the degree of uncertainty in back-projecting the paths traversed by photons detected in backscattered geometry. In our previous work, we established that polarimetrically detected Berry phase correlates with the mean photon penetration depth of the backscattered photons collected for image formation. In this work, we report on the impact of state-of-linear-polarization (SOLP) filtering on both the magnitude and population distributions of image forming detected photons as a function of the absorption coefficient of the scattering sample. The results, based on Berry phase tracking implemented Polarized Monte Carlo Code, indicate that sample absorption plays a significant role in the mean depth attained by the image forming backscattered detected photons.

  19. Polarization-modulation infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy affording time-resolved simultaneous detection of surface and liquid phase species at catalytic solid-liquid interfaces.

    PubMed

    Meier, Daniel M; Urakawa, Atsushi; Baiker, Alfons

    2009-09-01

    Polarization-modulation infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy (PM-IRRAS) combined with concentration modulation allows simultaneous monitoring of dynamic evolutions of surface and liquid phase species during reactions at catalytic interfaces as demonstrated for the Pt-catalysed oxidation of CO by O2 in cyclohexane.

  20. Acquired hyperpigmentations*

    PubMed Central

    Cestari, Tania Ferreira; Dantas, Lia Pinheiro; Boza, Juliana Catucci

    2014-01-01

    Cutaneous hyperpigmentations are frequent complaints, motivating around 8.5% of all dermatological consultations in our country. They can be congenital, with different patterns of inheritance, or acquired in consequence of skin problems, systemic diseases or secondary to environmental factors. The vast majority of them are linked to alterations on the pigment melanin, induced by different mechanisms. This review will focus on the major acquired hyperpigmentations associated with increased melanin, reviewing their mechanisms of action and possible preventive measures. Particularly prominent aspects of diagnosis and therapy will be emphasized, with focus on melasma, post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation, periorbital pigmentation, dermatosis papulosa nigra, phytophotodermatoses, flagellate dermatosis, erythema dyschromicum perstans, cervical poikiloderma (Poikiloderma of Civatte), acanthosis nigricans, cutaneous amyloidosis and reticulated confluent dermatitis PMID:24626644

  1. The polarization properties of a tilted polarizer.

    PubMed

    Korger, Jan; Kolb, Tobias; Banzer, Peter; Aiello, Andrea; Wittmann, Christoffer; Marquardt, Christoph; Leuchs, Gerd

    2013-11-04

    Polarizers are key components in optical science and technology. Thus, understanding the action of a polarizer beyond oversimplifying approximations is crucial. In this work, we study the interaction of a polarizing interface with an obliquely incident wave experimentally. To this end, a set of Mueller matrices is acquired employing a novel procedure robust against experimental imperfections. We connect our observation to a geometric model, useful to predict the effect of polarizers on complex light fields.

  2. Progovac on Polarity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horn, Laurence R.; Lee, Young-Suk

    1995-01-01

    This article presents an analysis and review of Ljiljana Progovac's "Negative and Positive Polarity: A Binding Approach" (1994). It concludes that by pushing a syntactic analysis of polarity to, if not beyond, its limits, Progovac has focused attention on the work that remains for any approach to polarity to resolve. Contains 59…

  3. Information Content Analysis for the Multi-Viewing, Multi-Channel, Multi-Polarization Imaging (3MI) Instrument : Toward Retrieval of Vertically Resolved Cloud Properties from Passive Only Measurements.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riedi, J.; Merlin, G.; Labonnote, L.; Cornet, C.; Ferlay, N.; Desmons, M.; Dubuisson, P.; Parol, F.; Davis, A. B.; Marbach, T.

    2014-12-01

    efforts to obtain vertically resolved information on cloud properties from 3MI passive measurements only. In particular the synergy of multiangle polarization measurements at 443 and 865 nm with Oxygen A-band differential absorption information to retrieve cloud geometrical thickness will be discussed.

  4. Theoretical study of dynamic electron-spin-polarization via the doublet-quartet quantum-mixed state and time-resolved ESR spectra of the quartet high-spin state.

    PubMed

    Teki, Yoshio; Matsumoto, Takafumi

    2011-04-07

    The mechanism of the unique dynamic electron polarization of the quartet (S = 3/2) high-spin state via a doublet-quartet quantum-mixed state and detail theoretical calculations of the population transfer are reported. By the photo-induced electron transfer, the quantum-mixed charge-separate state is generated in acceptor-donor-radical triad (A-D-R). This mechanism explains well the unique dynamic electron polarization of the quartet state of A-D-R. The generation of the selectively populated quantum-mixed state and its transfer to the strongly coupled pure quartet and doublet states have been treated both by a perturbation approach and by exact numerical calculations. The analytical solutions show that generation of the quantum-mixed states with the selective populations after de-coherence and/or accompanying the (complete) dephasing during the charge-recombination are essential for the unique dynamic electron polarization. Thus, the elimination of the quantum coherence (loss of the quantum information) is the key process for the population transfer from the quantum-mixed state to the quartet state. The generation of high-field polarization on the strongly coupled quartet state by the charge-recombination process can be explained by a polarization transfer from the quantum-mixed charge-separate state. Typical time-resolved ESR patterns of the quantum-mixed state and of the strongly coupled quartet state are simulated based on the generation mechanism of the dynamic electron polarization. The dependence of the spectral pattern of the quartet high-spin state has been clarified for the fine-structure tensor and the exchange interaction of the quantum-mixed state. The spectral pattern of the quartet state is not sensitive towards the fine-structure tensor of the quantum-mixed state, because this tensor contributes only as a perturbation in the population transfer to the spin-sublevels of the quartet state. Based on the stochastic Liouville equation, it is also

  5. Spatially-resolved optical and structural properties of semi-polar [Formula: see text] Al x Ga1-x N with x up to 0.56.

    PubMed

    Bruckbauer, Jochen; Li, Zhi; Naresh-Kumar, G; Warzecha, Monika; Edwards, Paul R; Jiu, Ling; Gong, Yipin; Bai, Jie; Wang, Tao; Trager-Cowan, Carol; Martin, Robert W

    2017-09-07

    Pushing the emission wavelength of efficient ultraviolet (UV) emitters further into the deep-UV requires material with high crystal quality, while also reducing the detrimental effects of built-in electric fields. Crack-free semi-polar [Formula: see text] Al x Ga1-x N epilayers with AlN contents up to x = 0.56 and high crystal quality were achieved using an overgrowth method employing GaN microrods on m-sapphire. Two dominant emission peaks were identified using cathodoluminescence hyperspectral imaging. The longer wavelength peak originates near and around chevron-shaped features, whose density is greatly increased for higher contents. The emission from the majority of the surface is dominated by the shorter wavelength peak, influenced by the presence of basal-plane stacking faults (BSFs). Due to the overgrowth technique BSFs are bunched up in parallel stripes where the lower wavelength peak is broadened and hence appears slightly redshifted compared with the higher quality regions in-between. Additionally, the density of threading dislocations in these region is one order of magnitude lower compared with areas affected by BSFs as ascertained by electron channelling contrast imaging. Overall, the luminescence properties of semi-polar AlGaN epilayers are strongly influenced by the overgrowth method, which shows that reducing the density of extended defects improves the optical performance of high AlN content AlGaN structures.

  6. Resolving Two Closely Overlapping -CN Vibrations and Structure in the Langmuir Monolayer of the Long-Chain Nonadecanenitrile by Polarization Sum Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Zhen; Guo, Yuan; Lu, Zhou; Velarde Ruiz Esparza, Luis A.; Wang, Hongfei

    2012-01-10

    Polarization sum frequency generation vibrational spectra (SFG-VS) reveals that there are two distinctively different but closely overlapping -CN vibrations at 2244.5 cm{sup -1} and 2251.1 cm{sup -1}, respectively, in the Langmuir monolayer of the long-chain nonadecanenitrile (C18CN, CH{sub 3}(CH{sub 2}){sub 17}CN, or C18CN)at the air/water interface. The blue shifted -CN groups at 2251.1 cm{sup -1} peak is about 1.8 times broader than that of the 2244.5 cm{sup -1}. Both the spectral shift and spectral width are consistent with the picture that this blue shifted peak corresponds to the solvated -CN group; while the 2244.5 cm{sup -1} peak is the signature of the less solvated -CN group. Polarization dependence of these two peaks further suggest that the -CN group corresponding to the 2251.1 cm{sup -1} peak is tilted with an average angle of 50{sup o} from interface normal, where that to the 2244.5 cm{sup -1} peak is tilted with an angle around 67{sup o}. The relative population for the -CN groups corresponding to the 2251.1 cm{sup -1} peak is about three times of that of the 2244.5 cm{sup -1} peak. These results suggest that the -CN head groups in the C18CN Langmuir monolayer are not aligned uniformly at slightly different depth, in order to avoid the strong repulsive forces between the strong -CN dipoles. The SFG-VS spectra of the O-H stretches at C18CN Langmuir monolayer is similar to those of the 4''-n-pentyl-4-cyano-p-terphenyl (5CT) monolayer, indicating complete exclusion of the water molecules from the C18CN Langmuir monolayer, but significantly different from those of the 4''-n-octyl-4-p-cyanobiphenyl (8CB) monolayer, as well as those of the air/acetonitrile aqueous solution interface. Different from previous held understandings, these results suggest that the structure of the insoluble long-chain C18CN Langmuir monolayer is significantly different from that of the Gibbs adsorption layer of the short chain soluble acetonitrile or propanenitrile aqueous

  7. Limiting factors of room-temperature nonradiative photoluminescence lifetime in polar and nonpolar GaN studied by time-resolved photoluminescence and slow positron annihilation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chichibu, S. F.; Uedono, A.; Onuma, T.; Sota, T.; Haskell, B. A.; DenBaars, S. P.; Speck, J. S.; Nakamura, S.

    2005-01-01

    Room-temperature nonradiative lifetime (τnr) of the near-band-edge excitonic photoluminescence (PL) peak in {0001} polar, (112¯0), (11¯00), and (001) nonpolar GaN was shown to increase with the decrease in density or size of Ga vacancies (VGa) and with the decrease in gross density of point defects including complexes, leading to the increase in the PL intensity. As the edge threading dislocation density decreased, density or size of VGa tended to decrease and τnr tended to increase. However, there existed remarkable exceptions. The results indicate that nonradiative recombination process is governed not by single point defects, but by certain defects introduced with the incorporation of VGa, such as VGa-defect complexes.

  8. Energy- and momentum-resolved exchange and spin-orbit interaction in cobalt film by spin-polarized two-electron spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Samarin, S; Artamonov, O M; Sergeant, A D; Stamps, R; Williams, J F

    2006-09-01

    Spontaneous ordering of electronic spins in ferromagnetic materials is one of the best known and most studied examples of quantum correlations. Exchange correlations are responsible for long range spin order and the spin-orbit interaction (SOI) can create preferred crystalline directions for the spins, i.e., magnetic anisotropy. Presented experimental data illustrate how novel spin-polarized two-electron spectroscopy in-reflection mode allows observation of the localization of spin-dependent interactions in energy-momentum space. Comparison of spin-orbit asymmetries in spectra of Co film and clean W(110) may indicate the presence of interface specific proximity effects providing important clues to the formation of preferred orientations for the magnetic moment of the Co film. These results may help to understand the microscopic origin of interface magnetic anisotropy.

  9. Primate retina imaging with polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ducros, Mathieu G.; Marsack, Jason D.; Rylander, H. Grady; Thomsen, Sharon L.; Milner, Thomas E.

    2001-12-01

    Polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PSOCT) is applied to determine the depth-resolved polarization state of light backreflected from the eye. The birefringence of the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) was observed and measured from PSOCT images recorded postmortem in a Rhesus monkey. An image-processing algorithm was developed to identify birefringent regions in acquired PSOCT retinal images and automatically determine the thickness of the RNFL. Values of the RNFL thickness determined from histology and PSOCT were compared. PSOCT may provide a new method to determine RNFL thickness and birefringence for glaucoma diagnostics.

  10. Depth-resolved simplified characterization of collagen depletion in dermis with polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography applicable to non-laboratory conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tougbaev, Vitali; Eom, Tae Joong; Shin, Woojin; Lee, Yeung Lak; Yu, Bong-Ahn; Kee, Chul-Sik; Ko, Do-Kyeong; Lee, Jongmin

    2007-07-01

    A further insight into the prior concept of polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography system intended for non-laboratory conditions is brought forward and an experimental proof-of-concept is presented. A phenomenological model is adopted from the theory of light depolarization in crystalline polymers and modified to yield a simplified algorithm for mapping depolarization ratio in dermis. The algorithm could distinguish between dermal layers with depleted collagen content and normal dermis of normal perilesional skin. Dermis is simulated by bireringent lamellae of collagen arranged chaotically in multiple layers parallel to the skin surface. Both the design concept and the model imply the sub-millimeter tumor thickness as a proofed prognostic factor and an important criterion for complementary functional diagnostics of skin cancers at their early phase of vertical growth. Choice of the model is inspired by similarity of structural and optical properties between liquid-crystal collagen fibers in dermis and birefringent crystalline lamellae in polymer materials. The numerical computation based on the model allowing for real characteristics of dermis gives plausible interpreting of depolarization peculiarities caused by collagen depletion. Feasibility is discussed of exploiting fiber optic analogs of achromatic retarders. Fabrication of the fiber retarders is shown to be realistic by making use of the photonics technology possessed by the authors.

  11. Mercury's South Polar Region

    NASA Image and Video Library

    This animation shows 89 wide-angle camera (WAC) images of Mercury’s south polar region acquired by the Mercury Dual Imaging System (MDIS) over one complete Mercury solar day (176 Earth days). Thi...

  12. Subtraction MR Venography Acquired from Time-Resolved Contrast-Enhanced MR Angiography: Comparison with Phase-Contrast MR Venography and Single-Phase Contrast-Enhanced MR Venography.

    PubMed

    Jang, Jinhee; Kim, Bum-Soo; Sung, Jinkyeong; Kim, Bom-Yi; Choi, Hyun Seok; Jung, So-Lyung; Ahn, Kook-Jin

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the image characteristics of subtraction magnetic resonance venography (SMRV) from time-resolved contrast-enhanced MR angiography (TRMRA) compared with phase-contrast MR venography (PCMRV) and single-phase contrast-enhanced MR venography (CEMRV). Twenty-one patients who underwent brain MR venography (MRV) using standard protocols (PCMRV, CEMRV, and TRMRA) were included. SMRV was made by subtracting the arterial phase data from the venous phase data in TRMRA. Co-registration and subtraction of the two volume data was done using commercially available software. Image quality and the degree of arterial contamination of the three MRVs were compared. In the three MRVs, 19 pre-defined venous structures (14 dural sinuses and 5 cerebral veins) were evaluated. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of the three MRVs were also compared. Single-phase contrast-enhanced MR venography showed better image quality (median score 4 in both reviewers) than did the other two MRVs (p < 0.001), whereas SMRV (median score 3 in both reviewers) and PCMRV (median score 3 in both reviewers) had similar image quality (p ≥ 0.951). SMRV (median score 0 in both reviewers) suppressed arterial signal better than did the other MRVs (median score 1 in CEMRV, median score 2 in PCMRV, both reviewers) (p < 0.001). The dural sinus score of SMRV (median and interquartile range [IQR] 48, 43-50 for reviewer 1, 47, 43-49 for reviewer 2) was significantly higher than for PCMRV (median and IQR 31, 25-34 for reviewer 1, 30, 23-32 for reviewer 2) (p < 0.01) and did not differ from that of CEMRV (median and IQR 50, 47-52 for reviewer 1, 49, 45-51 for reviewer 2) (p = 0.146 in reviewer 1 and 0.123 in reviewer 2). The SNR and CNR of SMRV (median and IQR 104.5, 83.1-121.2 and 104.1, 74.9-120.5, respectively) were between those of CEMRV (median and IQR 150.3, 111-182.6 and 148.4, 108-178.2) and PCMRV (median and IQR 59.4, 49.2-74.9 and 53.6, 43.8-69.2). Subtraction magnetic

  13. Subtraction MR Venography Acquired from Time-Resolved Contrast-Enhanced MR Angiography: Comparison with Phase-Contrast MR Venography and Single-Phase Contrast-Enhanced MR Venography

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Jinhee; Sung, Jinkyeong; Kim, Bom-Yi; Choi, Hyun Seok; Jung, So-Lyung; Ahn, Kook-Jin

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the image characteristics of subtraction magnetic resonance venography (SMRV) from time-resolved contrast-enhanced MR angiography (TRMRA) compared with phase-contrast MR venography (PCMRV) and single-phase contrast-enhanced MR venography (CEMRV). Materials and Methods Twenty-one patients who underwent brain MR venography (MRV) using standard protocols (PCMRV, CEMRV, and TRMRA) were included. SMRV was made by subtracting the arterial phase data from the venous phase data in TRMRA. Co-registration and subtraction of the two volume data was done using commercially available software. Image quality and the degree of arterial contamination of the three MRVs were compared. In the three MRVs, 19 pre-defined venous structures (14 dural sinuses and 5 cerebral veins) were evaluated. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of the three MRVs were also compared. Results Single-phase contrast-enhanced MR venography showed better image quality (median score 4 in both reviewers) than did the other two MRVs (p < 0.001), whereas SMRV (median score 3 in both reviewers) and PCMRV (median score 3 in both reviewers) had similar image quality (p ≥ 0.951). SMRV (median score 0 in both reviewers) suppressed arterial signal better than did the other MRVs (median score 1 in CEMRV, median score 2 in PCMRV, both reviewers) (p < 0.001). The dural sinus score of SMRV (median and interquartile range [IQR] 48, 43-50 for reviewer 1, 47, 43-49 for reviewer 2) was significantly higher than for PCMRV (median and IQR 31, 25-34 for reviewer 1, 30, 23-32 for reviewer 2) (p < 0.01) and did not differ from that of CEMRV (median and IQR 50, 47-52 for reviewer 1, 49, 45-51 for reviewer 2) (p = 0.146 in reviewer 1 and 0.123 in reviewer 2). The SNR and CNR of SMRV (median and IQR 104.5, 83.1-121.2 and 104.1, 74.9-120.5, respectively) were between those of CEMRV (median and IQR 150.3, 111-182.6 and 148.4, 108-178.2) and PCMRV (median and IQR 59.4, 49.2-74.9 and

  14. THz polarization difference imaging of aqueous targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sung, Shijun; Bajwa, Neha; Ramirez, Lucia; Grundfest, Warren; Taylor, Zachary

    2015-08-01

    This paper describes the basic design, implementation, and testing of a polarization difference imaging system for use on aqueous targets. The ultimate performance limitation of THz imaging in many active areas of research is clutter from surface geometry. While the signal to nose ratio (SNR) of standard THz imaging systems is quite large, the signal to clutter ratio (SCR) often faced in an imaging application is orders of magnitude lower and, in many cases, lower than the contrast to noise (CNR) resulting in imagery where the contrast mechanism of interest does not significantly contribute to the overall observed contrast. To overcome these limitations we develop a system that uses a circularly polarized source and linearly polarized detectors to acquire images of transverse electric (TE) and transverse magnetic (TM) reflectivities of the target over the same field of view. Geletin based tissue mimicking phantoms are fabricated with spatially varying water content and modified with a range of surface topologies and surface roughness. TE and TM images are combined to yield self-calibrated clutter-suppressed images. The resulting image indicates that the imaging field clutter affected both polarization channels nearly equally allowing the system to resolve differences in phantom water content. This design is a step toward windowless THz imaging capability critical for clinical translation where patient imaging is dominated by clutter.

  15. RESOLVE Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Ray; Coan, Mary; Cryderman, Kate; Captain, Janine

    2013-01-01

    The RESOLVE project is a lunar prospecting mission whose primary goal is to characterize water and other volatiles in lunar regolith. The Lunar Advanced Volatiles Analysis (LAVA) subsystem is comprised of a fluid subsystem that transports flow to the gas chromatograph - mass spectrometer (GC-MS) instruments that characterize volatiles and the Water Droplet Demonstration (WDD) that will capture and display water condensation in the gas stream. The LAVA Engineering Test Unit (ETU) is undergoing risk reduction testing this summer and fall within a vacuum chamber to understand and characterize component and integrated system performance. Testing of line heaters, printed circuit heaters, pressure transducers, temperature sensors, regulators, and valves in atmospheric and vacuum environments was done. Test procedures were developed to guide experimental tests and test reports to analyze and draw conclusions from the data. In addition, knowledge and experience was gained with preparing a vacuum chamber with fluid and electrical connections. Further testing will include integrated testing of the fluid subsystem with the gas supply system, near-infrared spectrometer, WDD, Sample Delivery System, and GC-MS in the vacuum chamber. This testing will provide hands-on exposure to a flight forward spaceflight subsystem, the processes associated with testing equipment in a vacuum chamber, and experience working in a laboratory setting. Examples of specific analysis conducted include: pneumatic analysis to calculate the WDD's efficiency at extracting water vapor from the gas stream to form condensation; thermal analysis of the conduction and radiation along a line connecting two thermal masses; and proportional-integral-derivative (PID) heater control analysis. Since LAVA is a scientific subsystem, the near-infrared spectrometer and GC-MS instruments will be tested during the ETU testing phase.

  16. RESOLVE Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Ray O.

    2012-01-01

    The RESOLVE project is a lunar prospecting mission whose primary goal is to characterize water and other volatiles in lunar regolith. The Lunar Advanced Volatiles Analysis (LAVA) subsystem is comprised of a fluid subsystem that transports flow to the gas chromatograph- mass spectrometer (GC-MS) instruments that characterize volatiles and the Water Droplet Demonstration (WDD) that will capture and display water condensation in the gas stream. The LAVA Engineering Test Unit (ETU) is undergoing risk reduction testing this summer and fall within a vacuum chamber to understand and characterize C!Jmponent and integrated system performance. Ray will be assisting with component testing of line heaters, printed circuit heaters, pressure transducers, temperature sensors, regulators, and valves in atmospheric and vacuum environments. He will be developing procedures to guide these tests and test reports to analyze and draw conclusions from the data. In addition, he will gain experience with preparing a vacuum chamber with fluid and electrical connections. Further testing will include integrated testing of the fluid subsystem with the gas supply system, near-infrared spectrometer, WDD, Sample Delivery System, and GC-MS in the vacuum chamber. This testing will provide hands-on exposure to a flight forward spaceflight subsystem, the processes associated with testing equipment in a vacuum chamber, and experience working in a laboratory setting. Examples of specific analysis Ray will conduct include: pneumatic analysis to calculate the WOO's efficiency at extracting water vapor from the gas stream to form condensation; thermal analysis of the conduction and radiation along a line connecting two thermal masses; and proportional-integral-derivative (PID) heater control analysis. In this Research and Technology environment, Ray will be asked to problem solve real-time as issues arise. Since LAVA is a scientific subsystem, Ray will be utilizing his chemical engineering background to

  17. Acquired reactive perforating collagenosis

    PubMed Central

    Fei, Chengwen; Wang, Yao; Gong, Yu; Xu, Hui; Yu, Qian; Shi, Yuling

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Reactive perforating collagenosis (RPC) is a rare form of transepithelial elimination, in which altered collagen is extruded through the epidermis. There are 2 types of RPC, acquired RPC (ARPC) and inherited RPC, while the latter is extremely rare. Here we report on 1 case of ARPC. Methods: A 73-year-old female was presented with strongly itchy papules over her back and lower limbs for 3 months. She denied the history of oozing or vesiculation. A cutaneous examination showed diffusely distributed multiple well-defined keratotic papules, 4 to 10 mm in diameter, on the bilateral lower limbs and back as well as a few papules on her chest and forearm. Scratching scars were over the resolved lesions while Koebner phenomenon was negative. The patient had a history of type 2 diabetes for 15 years. Laboratory examinations showed elevated blood glucose level. Skin lesion biopsy showed a well-circumscribed area of necrosis filled with a keratotic plug. Parakeratotic cells and lymphocytic infiltration could be seen in the necrosed area. In dermis, sparse fiber bundles were seen perforating the epidermis. These degenerated fiber bundles were notarized as collagen fiber by elastic fiber stain, suggesting a diagnosis of RPC. Results: Then a diagnosis of ARPC was made according to the onset age and the history of diabetes mellitus. She was treated with topical application of corticosteroids twice a day and oral antihistamine once a day along with compound glycyrrhizin tablets 3 times a day. And the blood glucose was controlled in a satisfying range. Two months later, a significant improvement was seen in this patient. Conclusion: Since there is no efficient therapy to RPC, moreover, ARPC is considered to be associated with some systemic diseases, the management of the coexisting disease is quite crucial. The patient in this case received a substantial improvement due to the control of blood glucose and application of compound glycyrrhizin tablets. PMID

  18. Multipulse interferometric frequency-resolved optical gating

    SciTech Connect

    Siders, C.W.; Siders, J.L.W.; Omenetto, F.G.; Taylor, A.J.

    1999-04-01

    The authors review multipulse interferometric frequency-resolved optical gating (MI-FROG) as a technique, uniquely suited for pump-probe coherent spectroscopy using amplified visible and near-infrared short-pulse systems and/or emissive targets, for time-resolving ultrafast phase shifts and intensity changes. Application of polarization-gate MI-FROG to the study of ultrafast ionization in gases is presented.

  19. Angle-resolved photoemission with circularly polarized light in the nodal mirror plane of underdoped Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ superconductor

    SciTech Connect

    He, Junfeng; Mion, Thomas R.; Gao, Shang; Myers, Gavin T.; Arita, Masashi; Shimada, Kenya; Gu, G. D.; He, Rui -Hua

    2016-10-31

    Unraveling the nature of pseudogap phase in high-temperature superconductors holds the key to understanding their superconducting mechanisms and potentially broadening their applications via enhancement of their superconducting transition temperatures. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) experiments using circularly polarized light have been proposed to detect possible symmetry breaking state in the pseudogap phase of cuprates. Here, the presence (absence) of an electronic order which breaks mirror symmetry of the crystal would in principle induce a finite (zero) circular dichroism in photoemission. Different orders breaking reflection symmetries about different mirror planes can also be distinguished by the momentum dependence of the measured circular dichroism.

  20. Clustering of polarization-encoded images.

    PubMed

    Zallat, Jihad; Collet, Christophe; Takakura, Yoshitate

    2004-01-10

    Polarization-encoded imaging consists of the distributed measurements of polarization parameters for each pixel of an image. We address clustering of multidimensional polarization-encoded images. The spatial coherence of polarization information is considered. Two methods of analysis are proposed: polarization contrast enhancement and a more-sophisticated image-processing algorithm based on a Markovian model. The proposed algorithms are applied and validated with two different Mueller images acquired by a fully polarimetric imaging system.

  1. LABORATORY-ACQUIRED MYCOSES

    DTIC Science & Technology

    laboratory- acquired mycoses . Insofar as possible, the etiological fungus, type of laboratory, classification of personnel, type of work conducted, and other...pertinent data have been listed in this study. More than 288 laboratory- acquired mycoses are described here, including 108 cases of

  2. Acquired Idiopathic Generalized Anhidrosis.

    PubMed

    Gangadharan, Geethu; Criton, Sebastian; Surendran, Divya

    2015-01-01

    Acquired idiopathic generalized anhidrosis is a rare condition, where the exact pathomechanism is unknown. We report a case of acquired idiopathic generalized anhidrosis in a patient who later developed lichen planus. Here an autoimmune-mediated destruction of sweat glands may be the probable pathomechanism.

  3. Polarized cells, polar actions.

    PubMed

    Maddock, J R; Alley, M R; Shapiro, L

    1993-11-01

    The recognition of polar bacterial organization is just emerging. The examples of polar localization given here are from a variety of bacterial species and concern a disparate array of cellular functions. A number of well-characterized instances of polar localization of bacterial proteins, including the chemoreceptor complex in both C. crescentus and E. coli, the maltose-binding protein in E. coli, the B. japonicum surface attachment proteins, and the actin tail of L. monocytogenes within a mammalian cell, involve proteins or protein complexes that facilitate bacterial interaction with the environment, either the extracellular milieux or that within a plant or mammalian host. The significance of this observation remains unclear. Polarity in bacteria poses many problems, including the necessity for a mechanism for asymmetrically distributing proteins as well as a mechanism by which polar localization is maintained. Large structures, such as a flagellum, are anchored at the pole by means of the basal body that traverses the peptidoglycan wall. But for proteins and small complexes, whether in the periplasm or the membrane, one must invoke a mechanism that prevents the diffusion of these proteins away from the cell pole. Perhaps the periplasmic proteins are retained at the pole by the presence of the periseptal annulus (35). The constraining features for membrane components are not known. For large aggregates, such as the clusters of MCP, CheA, and CheW complexes, perhaps the size of the aggregate alone prevents displacement. In most cases of cellular asymmetry, bacteria are able to discriminate between the new pole and the old pole and to utilize this information for localization specificity. The maturation of new pole to old pole appears to be a common theme as well. Given numerous examples reported thus far, we propose that bacterial polarity displays specific rules and is a more general phenomenon than has been previously recognized.

  4. Time-Resolved Hard X-Ray Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Kenneth Moya; Ian McKennaa; Thomas Keenana; Michael Cuneob

    2007-03-01

    Wired array studies are being conducted at the SNL Z accelerator to maximize the x-ray generation for inertial confinement fusion targets and high energy density physics experiments. An integral component of these studies is the characterization of the time-resolved spectral content of the x-rays. Due to potential spatial anisotropy in the emitted radiation, it is also critical to diagnose the time-evolved spectral content in a space-resolved manner. To accomplish these two measurement goals, we developed an x-ray spectrometer using a set of high-speed detectors (silicon PIN diodes) with a collimated field-of-view that converged on a 1-cm-diameter spot at the pinch axis. Spectral discrimination is achieved by placing high Z absorbers in front of these detectors. We built two spectrometers to permit simultaneous different angular views of the emitted radiation. Spectral data have been acquired from recent Z shots for the radial and polar views. UNSPEC1 has been adapted to analyze and unfold the measured data to reconstruct the x-ray spectrum. The unfold operator code, UFO2, is being adapted for a more comprehensive spectral unfolding treatment.

  5. Time-resolved hard x-ray spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moy, Kenneth; Cuneo, Michael; McKenna, Ian; Keenan, Thomas; Sanford, Thomas; Mock, Ray

    2006-08-01

    Wired array studies are being conducted at the SNL Z accelerator to maximize the x-ray generation for inertial confinement fusion targets and high energy density physics experiments. An integral component of these studies is the characterization of the time-resolved spectral content of the x-rays. Due to potential spatial anisotropy in the emitted radiation, it is also critical to diagnose the time-evolved spectral content in a space-resolved manner. To accomplish these two measurement goals, we developed an x-ray spectrometer using a set of high-speed detectors (silicon PIN diodes) with a collimated field-of-view that converged on a 1-cm-diameter spot at the pinch axis. Spectral discrimination is achieved by placing high Z absorbers in front of these detectors. We built two spectrometers to permit simultaneous different angular views of the emitted radiation. Spectral data have been acquired from recent Z shots for the radial and axial (polar) views. UNSPEC 1 has been adapted to analyze and unfold the measured data to reconstruct the x-ray spectrum. The unfold operator code, UFO2, is being adapted for a more comprehensive spectral unfolding treatment.

  6. Generalized mosaicing: polarization panorama.

    PubMed

    Schechner, Yoav Y; Nayar, Shree K

    2005-04-01

    We present an approach to image the polarization state of object points in a wide field of view, while enhancing the radiometric dynamic range of maging systems by generalizing image mosaicing. The approach is biologically-inspired, as it emulates spatially varying polarization sensitivity of some animals. In our method, a spatially varying polarization and attenuation filter is rigidly attached to a camera. As the system moves, it senses each scene point multiple times, each time filtering it through a different filter polarizing angle, polarizance, and transmittance. Polarization is an additional dimension of the generalized mosaicing paradigm, which has recently yielded high dynamic range images and multispectral images in a wide field of view using other kinds of filters. The image acquisition is as easy as in traditional image mosaics. The computational algorithm can easily handle nonideal polarization filters (partial polarizers), variable exposures, and saturation in a single framework. The resulting mosaic represents the polarization state at each scene point. Using data acquired by this method, we demonstrate attenuation and enhancement of specular reflections and semireflection separation in an image mosaic.

  7. Transmission of polarized light in skeletal muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuaib, Ali; Li, Xin; Yao, Gang

    2011-02-01

    Experiments were conducted to study polarized light transmission in fresh bovine skeletal muscle of varying thicknesses. Two-dimensional polarization-sensitive transmission images were acquired and analyzed using a numerical parametric fitting algorithm. The total transmittance intensity and degree-of-polarization were calculated for both central ballistic and surrounding scattering regions. Full Mueller matrix images were derived from the raw polarization images and the polar decomposition algorithm was applied to extract polarization parameters. The results suggest that polarized light propagation through skeletal muscle is affected by strong birefringence, diattenuation, multiple scattering induced depolarization and the sarcomere diffraction effect.

  8. Acquired inflammatory demyelinating neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Ensrud, E R; Krivickas, L S

    2001-05-01

    The acquired demyelinating neuropathies can be divided into those with an acute onset and course and those with a more chronic course. The acute neuropathies present as Guillain-Barré syndrome and include acute inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (AIDP), Miller Fisher syndrome, acute motor axonal neuropathy (AMAN), acute motor and sensory axonal neuropathy (AMSAN), and acute pandysautonomia. The chronic neuropathies are collectively known as chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) and include MADSAM (multifocal acquired demyelinating sensory and motor neuropathy, also know as Lewis-Sumner syndrome) and DADS (distal acquired demyelinating symmetric neuropathy) as variants. The clinical features, pathology, pathogenesis, diagnosis, treatment, rehabilitation, and prognosis of these neuropathies are discussed.

  9. Hospital-acquired pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    ... levels in the blood Sputum culture or sputum gram stain , to check what germs are causing the pneumonia ... Aspiration Immunodeficiency disorders Pneumonia - adults (community acquired) Patient Instructions Pneumonia in adults - discharge Review Date 2/2/ ...

  10. Acquired color vision deficiency.

    PubMed

    Simunovic, Matthew P

    2016-01-01

    Acquired color vision deficiency occurs as the result of ocular, neurologic, or systemic disease. A wide array of conditions may affect color vision, ranging from diseases of the ocular media through to pathology of the visual cortex. Traditionally, acquired color vision deficiency is considered a separate entity from congenital color vision deficiency, although emerging clinical and molecular genetic data would suggest a degree of overlap. We review the pathophysiology of acquired color vision deficiency, the data on its prevalence, theories for the preponderance of acquired S-mechanism (or tritan) deficiency, and discuss tests of color vision. We also briefly review the types of color vision deficiencies encountered in ocular disease, with an emphasis placed on larger or more detailed clinical investigations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Acquired Cerebral Trauma: Epilogue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bigler, Erin D., Ed.

    1988-01-01

    The article summarizes a series of articles concerning acquired cerebral trauma. Reviewed are technological advances, treatment, assessment, potential innovative therapies, long-term outcome, family impact of chronic brain injury, and prevention. (DB)

  12. Pneumonia - children - community acquired

    MedlinePlus

    ... CL, Bradley JS. Pediatric community-acquired pneumonia. In: Cherry JD, Harrison GJ, Kaplan SL, Steinback WJ, and Hotez PJ, eds. Feigin and Cherry's Textbook of Pediatric Infectious Diseases. 7th ed. Philadelphia, ...

  13. Polarization measurement through combination polarizers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Yunfeng; Li, Linjun; He, Zhelong; Liu, Yanwei; Ma, Cheng; Shi, Guang; Liu, Lu

    2014-02-01

    Polarization measurement approaches only using polarizer and grating is present. The combination polarizers consists of two polarizers: one is γ degree with the X axis; the other is along the Y axis. Binary grating is covered by the combination polarizers, and based on Fraunhofer diffraction, the diffraction intensity formula is deduced. The polarization state of incident light can be gotten by fitting the diffraction pattern with the deduced formula. Compared with the traditional polarization measurement method, this measurement only uses polarizer and grating, therefore, it can be applied to measure a wide wavelength range without replacing device in theory.

  14. Dark Polar Dunes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    20 January 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image, acquired during northern summer in December 2004, shows dark, windblown sand dunes in the north polar region of Mars. A vast sea of sand dunes nearly surrounds the north polar cap. These landforms are located near 80.3oN, 144.1oW. Light-toned features in the image are exposures of the substrate that underlies the dune field. The image covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) wide and is illuminated by sunlight from the lower left.

  15. Dark Polar Dunes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    20 January 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image, acquired during northern summer in December 2004, shows dark, windblown sand dunes in the north polar region of Mars. A vast sea of sand dunes nearly surrounds the north polar cap. These landforms are located near 80.3oN, 144.1oW. Light-toned features in the image are exposures of the substrate that underlies the dune field. The image covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) wide and is illuminated by sunlight from the lower left.

  16. IFM-Modeled Response of the High-Latitude Ionosphere to Auroral Dynamics Based on Auroral Observations Acquired with the Visible Imaging System(VIS) on the Polar Spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekerat, H.; Sigwarth, J.; Schunk, R.; Eccles, V.

    2007-12-01

    Global physics-based models for the high-latitude ionosphere have been developed to such an extent that the large and small ionospheric features during magnetic storms and substorms can be studied. These models, however, require inputs for the magnetospheric forcing, i.e. Magnetospheric convection and particle precipitation. More specifically, for these models to yield reliable results during magnetic storms and substorms, reliable global maps for the high-latitude magnetospheric convection and auroral electron particle precipitation patterns as a function of time are needed. Over the last decades several statistical models for the high-latitude convection and particle precipitation have been developed and used to drive ionospheric models. However, due to the statistical nature of these models, they represent the average characteristics of the true convection and precipitation patten and they are very limited to simulate the effect of magnetic storms and substorms. Recently, with the realization of the Visible Imaging System (VIS) on the Polar Spacecraft, auroral images that yield information of auroral dynamics on a global scale with a spatial resolution of less than 100 km and temporal resolution of ~ 1 minute have become available. These images can be used to calculate reliable global maps for the particle precipitation parameters, electron energy flux and average energies, as a function of time. In this poster we present the preliminary results of our attempt to drive the Ionosphere Forecast Model (IFM) using global maps for the electron precipitation parameters calculated from the corresponding VIS images. In order to elucidate the effect of auroral dynamics on the high-latitude ionosphere, a one-day data set of VIS images during which the aurora was highly active is selected for this study. Then, these images are used to calculate global maps for the electron precipitation parameters using the Lumerzheim model. Next, the maps obtained in the previous step are

  17. Acquired Immunity to Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Doolan, Denise L.; Dobaño, Carlota; Baird, J. Kevin

    2009-01-01

    Naturally acquired immunity to falciparum malaria protects millions of people routinely exposed to Plasmodium falciparum infection from severe disease and death. There is no clear concept about how this protection works. There is no general agreement about the rate of onset of acquired immunity or what constitutes the key determinants of protection; much less is there a consensus regarding the mechanism(s) of protection. This review summarizes what is understood about naturally acquired and experimentally induced immunity against malaria with the help of evolving insights provided by biotechnology and places these insights in the context of historical, clinical, and epidemiological observations. We advocate that naturally acquired immunity should be appreciated as being virtually 100% effective against severe disease and death among heavily exposed adults. Even the immunity that occurs in exposed infants may exceed 90% effectiveness. The induction of an adult-like immune status among high-risk infants in sub-Saharan Africa would greatly diminish disease and death caused by P. falciparum. The mechanism of naturally acquired immunity that occurs among adults living in areas of hyper- to holoendemicity should be understood with a view toward duplicating such protection in infants and young children in areas of endemicity. PMID:19136431

  18. Time-Resolved Imaging of the Phase Transition in the Melt-Grown Spherulites of Isotactic Polybutene-1 as Detected by the Two-Dimensional Polarized IR Imaging Technique.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jian; Tashiro, Kohji

    2016-05-26

    In order to visualize the 2D spatial distribution of the structural change in the phase transition from crystal form II to I of isotactic polybutene-1 spherulite grown from the melt, the time-dependent measurement of the 2D polarized FTIR spectra has been performed. At a melt-isothermal crystallization temperature of 103 °C, the square-shape spherulite appeared from the melt and grew with time. When the isothermal crystallization occurred at 98 °C, the round-shaped spherulite was observed. In both cases, after the temperature jump to an ambient temperature, the 2D images changed clearly in the process of the phase transition from form II to form I, but the spherulite morphology itself was not changed detectably. The polarized IR imaging has revealed the preferential orientation of the crystallites in the spherulite. In the case of the spherulite grown at 103 °C, the ab plane is oriented in parallel to the spherulite plane and the molecular chains stand along the normal to the surface. On the other hand, in the spherulite grown at 98 °C, the chains were found to lie on the spherulite plane preferentially. Such a difference in the crystal orientation in the spherulite is related intimately with the outer shape of the spherulite and also with the growth mechanism of the spherulite. In this way, the polarized 2D IR imaging was found to be quite useful for the in situ detection of the time-dependently changing 2D spatial distribution of the crystallites in the spherulite.

  19. Forward Monte Carlo Computations of Polarized Microwave Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Battaglia, A.; Kummerow, C.

    2000-01-01

    Microwave radiative transfer computations continue to acquire greater importance as the emphasis in remote sensing shifts towards the understanding of microphysical properties of clouds and with these to better understand the non linear relation between rainfall rates and satellite-observed radiance. A first step toward realistic radiative simulations has been the introduction of techniques capable of treating 3-dimensional geometry being generated by ever more sophisticated cloud resolving models. To date, a series of numerical codes have been developed to treat spherical and randomly oriented axisymmetric particles. Backward and backward-forward Monte Carlo methods are, indeed, efficient in this field. These methods, however, cannot deal properly with oriented particles, which seem to play an important role in polarization signatures over stratiform precipitation. Moreover, beyond the polarization channel, the next generation of fully polarimetric radiometers challenges us to better understand the behavior of the last two Stokes parameters as well. In order to solve the vector radiative transfer equation, one-dimensional numerical models have been developed, These codes, unfortunately, consider the atmosphere as horizontally homogeneous with horizontally infinite plane parallel layers. The next development step for microwave radiative transfer codes must be fully polarized 3-D methods. Recently a 3-D polarized radiative transfer model based on the discrete ordinate method was presented. A forward MC code was developed that treats oriented nonspherical hydrometeors, but only for plane-parallel situations.

  20. Polarization Imager Technology. Phase I

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    orientation axes (e.g., with a polarizing filter). Resolving image irradiance at three (3) unique orientations is sufficient for unique measurement. Using...an orientation reference and resolving the electric field at relative 0’, 450, 900, if the image irradiances obtained at each pixel are respectively...with the video rate of the camera. See Figure 2. The unpolarized component is not effected . Each TN liquid crystal is binary in the sense that it either

  1. Community-acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Falguera, M; Ramírez, M F

    2015-11-01

    This article not only reviews the essential aspects of community-acquired pneumonia for daily clinical practice, but also highlights the controversial issues and provides the newest available information. Community-acquired pneumonia is considered in a broad sense, without excluding certain variants that, in recent years, a number of authors have managed to delineate, such as healthcare-associated pneumonia. The latter form is nothing more than the same disease that affects more frail patients, with a greater number of risk factors, both sharing an overall common approach.

  2. Acquired hypofibrinogenemia: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Besser, Martin W; MacDonald, Stephen G

    2016-01-01

    Acquired hypofibrinogenemia is most frequently caused by hemodilution and consumption of clotting factors. The aggressive replacement of fibrinogen has become one of the core principles of modern management of massive hemorrhage. The best method for determining the patient’s fibrinogen level remains controversial, and particularly in acquired dysfibrinogenemia, could have major therapeutic implications depending on which quantification method is chosen. This review introduces the available laboratory and point-of-care methods and discusses the relative advantages and limitations. It also discusses current strategies for the correction of hypofibrinogenemia. PMID:27713652

  3. Temporally resolved GC-MS-based metabolic profiling of herbicide treated plants treated reveals that changes in polar primary metabolites alone can distinguish herbicides of differing mode of action.

    PubMed

    Trenkamp, Sandra; Eckes, Peter; Busch, Marco; Fernie, Alisdair R

    2009-09-01

    We conducted a comprehensive metabolic phenotyping of primary metabolism of photosynthetic tissue of Arabidopsis thaliana following spray treatment with a number of commercially used herbicides using a well established gas-chromatography mass-spectrometry profiling method. Applying this technique we were able to identify and quantify in excess of 80 polar metabolites and based on a combination of co-elution with standards and prediction from the mass spectra a similar number of lipophillic components within two chromatographic runs. The herbicides selected were glufosinate, sulcotrione, AE944 [N2-(1-ethyl-3-phenylpropyl)-6-(1-fluoro-1-methylethyl)-1,3,5-triazine-2,4-diamine], foramsulfuron, benfuresate and glyphosate. We determined causal changes in the metabolite profiles by following their time-dependent changes using a serial sampling strategy. The resultant profiles were compared both by looking at the largest changes in a metabolite by metabolite manner and by performance of statistical analyses. These data revealed that analysis of the polar metabolites allows clear separation of the compounds under test. This finding is discussed in the context of current strategies for agrochemical discovery. ELECTRONIC SUPPLEMENTARY MATERIAL: The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s11306-008-0149-8) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.

  4. Acquired Brain Injury Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Stacey Hunter

    This paper reviews the Acquired Brain Injury (ABI) Program at Coastline Community College (California). The ABI Program is a two-year, for-credit educational curriculum designed to provide structured cognitive retraining for adults who have sustained an ABI due to traumatic (such as motor vehicle accident or fall) or non-traumatic(such as…

  5. Laboratory-acquired Brucellosis

    PubMed Central

    Gallo, Richard; Kelly, Molly; Limberger, Ronald J.; DeAngelis, Karen; Cain, Louise; Wallace, Barbara; Dumas, Nellie

    2004-01-01

    We report two laboratory-acquired Brucella melitensis infections that were shown to be epidemiologically related. Blood culture isolates were initially misidentified because of variable Gram stain results, which led to misdiagnoses and subsequent laboratory exposures. Notifying laboratory personnel who unknowingly processed cultures from brucellosis patients is an important preventive measure. PMID:15504276

  6. 43 CFR 3837.30 - Disputes about acquiring a delinquent co-claimant's interests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Disputes about acquiring a delinquent co... DELINQUENT CO-CLAIMANT'S INTERESTS IN A MINING CLAIM OR SITE Resolving Co-Claimant Disputes About Acquiring a Delinquent Co-Claimant's Interests § 3837.30 Disputes about acquiring a delinquent co-claimant's...

  7. 43 CFR 3837.30 - Disputes about acquiring a delinquent co-claimant's interests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Disputes about acquiring a delinquent co... DELINQUENT CO-CLAIMANT'S INTERESTS IN A MINING CLAIM OR SITE Resolving Co-Claimant Disputes About Acquiring a Delinquent Co-Claimant's Interests § 3837.30 Disputes about acquiring a delinquent co-claimant's...

  8. 43 CFR 3837.30 - Disputes about acquiring a delinquent co-claimant's interests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Disputes about acquiring a delinquent co... DELINQUENT CO-CLAIMANT'S INTERESTS IN A MINING CLAIM OR SITE Resolving Co-Claimant Disputes About Acquiring a Delinquent Co-Claimant's Interests § 3837.30 Disputes about acquiring a delinquent co-claimant's...

  9. 43 CFR 3837.30 - Disputes about acquiring a delinquent co-claimant's interests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Disputes about acquiring a delinquent co... DELINQUENT CO-CLAIMANT'S INTERESTS IN A MINING CLAIM OR SITE Resolving Co-Claimant Disputes About Acquiring a Delinquent Co-Claimant's Interests § 3837.30 Disputes about acquiring a delinquent co-claimant's...

  10. Polarization Imaging Apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zou, Yingyin K.; Chen, Qiushui

    2010-01-01

    A polarization imaging apparatus has shown promise as a prototype of instruments for medical imaging with contrast greater than that achievable by use of non-polarized light. The underlying principles of design and operation are derived from observations that light interacts with tissue ultrastructures that affect reflectance, scattering, absorption, and polarization of light. The apparatus utilizes high-speed electro-optical components for generating light properties and acquiring polarization images through aligned polarizers. These components include phase retarders made of OptoCeramic (registered TradeMark) material - a ceramic that has a high electro-optical coefficient. The apparatus includes a computer running a program that implements a novel algorithm for controlling the phase retarders, capturing image data, and computing the Stokes polarization images. Potential applications include imaging of superficial cancers and other skin lesions, early detection of diseased cells, and microscopic analysis of tissues. The high imaging speed of this apparatus could be beneficial for observing live cells or tissues, and could enable rapid identification of moving targets in astronomy and national defense. The apparatus could also be used as an analysis tool in material research and industrial processing.

  11. Design and implementation of the parallel processing system of multi-channel polarization images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhi-yong; Huang, Qin-chao

    2013-08-01

    Compared with traditional optical intensity image processing, polarization images processing has two main problems. One is that the amount of data is larger. The other is that processing tasks is more complex. To resolve these problems, the parallel processing system of multi-channel polarization images is designed by the multi-DSP technique. It contains a communication control unit (CCU) and a data processing array (DPA). CCU controls communications inside and outside the system. Its logics are designed by a FPGA chip. DPA is made up of four Digital Signal Processor (DSP) chips, which are interlinked by the loose coupling method. DPA implements processing tasks including images registration and images synthesis by parallel processing methods. The polarization images parallel processing model is designed on multi levels including the system task, the algorithm and the operation. Its program is designed by the assemble language. While the polarization image resolution is 782x582 pixels, the pixel data length is 12 bits in the experiment. After it received 3 channels of polarization image simultaneously, this system implements parallel task to acquire the target polarization characteristics. Experimental results show that this system has good real-time and reliability. The processing time of images registration is 293.343ms while the registration accuracy achieves 0.5 pixel. The processing time of images synthesis is 3.199ms.

  12. Polarization Effects in Optical Coherence Tomography of Various Biological Tissues

    PubMed Central

    de Boer, Johannes F.; Srinivas, Shyam M.; Park, B. Hyle; Pham, Tuan H.; Chen, Zhongping; Milner, Thomas E.; Nelson, J. Stuart

    2015-01-01

    Polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) was used to obtain spatially resolved ex vivo images of polarization changes in skeletal muscle, bone, skin and brain. Through coherent detection of two orthogonal polarization states of the signal formed by interference of light reflected from the biological sample and a mirror in the reference arm of a Michelson interferometer, the depth resolved change in polarization was measured. Inasmuch as any fibrous structure will influence the polarization of light, PS-OCT is a potentially powerful technique investigating tissue structural properties. In addition, the effects of single polarization state detection on OCT image formation is demonstrated. PMID:25774083

  13. Imaging caries lesions and lesion progression with polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fried, Daniel; Xie, John; Shafi, Sahar; Featherstone, John D. B.; Breunig, Thomas; Le, Charles Q.

    2002-06-01

    New diagnostic tools are needed for the characterization of dental caries in the early stages of development. If carious lesions are detected early enough, they can be arrested without the need for surgical intervention. The objective of this study was to demonstrate that polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) can be used for the imaging of early caries lesions and for the monitoring of lesion progression over time. High-resolution polarization resolved images were acquired of natural caries lesions and simulated caries lesions of varying severity created over time periods of 1 to 14 days. Linearly polarized light was incident on the tooth samples and the reflected intensity in both orthogonal polarizations was measured. PS-OCT was invaluable for removing the confounding influence of surface reflections and native birefringence and for resolving the surface structure of caries lesions. This study demonstrated that PS-OCT is well suited for the resolution of interproximal and occlusal caries, early root caries, and secondary caries around composite fillings. Longitudinal measurements of lesion progression established a strong correlation (p<0.001) between the reflected light from the lesion area and the square root of time indicating that PS-OCT is well suited for monitoring changes in enamel mineralization over time.

  14. SCATTERING POLARIZATION IN SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Štěpán, Jiří; Heinzel, Petr

    2013-11-20

    There is ongoing debate about the origin and even the very existence of a high degree of linear polarization of some chromospheric spectral lines observed in solar flares. The standard explanation of these measurements is in terms of the impact polarization caused by non-thermal proton and/or electron beams. In this work, we study the possible role of resonance line polarization due to radiation anisotropy in the inhomogeneous medium of the flare ribbons. We consider a simple two-dimensional model of the flaring chromosphere and we self-consistently solve the non-LTE problem taking into account the role of resonant scattering polarization and of the Hanle effect. Our calculations show that the horizontal plasma inhomogeneities at the boundary of the flare ribbons can lead to a significant radiation anisotropy in the line formation region and, consequently, to a fractional linear polarization of the emergent radiation of the order of several percent. Neglecting the effects of impact polarization, our model can provide a clue for resolving some of the common observational findings, namely: (1) why a high degree of polarization appears mainly at the edges of the flare ribbons; (2) why polarization can also be observed during the gradual phase of a flare; and (3) why polarization is mostly radial or tangential. We conclude that radiation transfer in realistic multi-dimensional models of solar flares needs to be considered as an essential ingredient for understanding the observed spectral line polarization.

  15. Desmosomes in acquired disease.

    PubMed

    Stahley, Sara N; Kowalczyk, Andrew P

    2015-06-01

    Desmosomes are cell-cell junctions that mediate adhesion and couple the intermediate filament cytoskeleton to sites of cell-cell contact. This architectural arrangement integrates adhesion and cytoskeletal elements of adjacent cells. The importance of this robust adhesion system is evident in numerous human diseases, both inherited and acquired, which occur when desmosome function is compromised. This review focuses on autoimmune and infectious diseases that impair desmosome function. In addition, we discuss emerging evidence that desmosomal genes are often misregulated in cancer. The emphasis of our discussion is placed on the way in which human diseases can inform our understanding of basic desmosome biology and in turn, the means by which fundamental advances in the cell biology of desmosomes might lead to new treatments for acquired diseases of the desmosome.

  16. Desmosomes in acquired disease

    PubMed Central

    Stahley, Sara N.; Kowalczyk, Andrew P.

    2015-01-01

    Desmosomes are cell-cell junctions that mediate adhesion and couple the intermediate filament cytoskeleton to sites of cell-cell contact. This architectural arrangement functions to integrate adhesion and cytoskeletal elements of adjacent cells. The importance of this robust adhesion system is evident in numerous human diseases, both inherited and acquired, that occur when desmosome function is compromised. This review focuses on autoimmune and infectious diseases that impair desmosome function. In addition, we discuss emerging evidence that desmosomal genes are often misregulated in cancer. The emphasis of our discussion is placed on how human diseases inform our understanding of basic desmosome biology, and in turn, how fundamental advances in the cell biology of desmosomes may lead to new treatments for acquired diseases of the desmosome. PMID:25795143

  17. Hospital-acquired thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Christine M; Cuker, Adam

    2014-10-01

    The development of thrombocytopenia is common in hospitalized patients and is associated with increased mortality. Frequent and important causes of thrombocytopenia in hospitalized patients include etiologies related to the underlying illness for which the patient is admitted, such as infection and disseminated intravascular coagulation, and iatrogenic etiologies such as drug-induced immune thrombocytopenia, heparin-induced thrombocytopenia, posttransfusion purpura, hemodilution, major surgery, and extracorporeal circuitry. This review presents a brief discussion of the pathophysiology, distinguishing clinical features, and management of these etiologies, and provides a diagnostic approach to hospital-acquired thrombocytopenia that considers the timing and severity of the platelet count fall, the presence of hemorrhage or thrombosis, the clinical context, and the peripheral blood smear. This approach may offer guidance to clinicians in distinguishing among the various causes of hospital-acquired thrombocytopenia and providing management appropriate to the etiology.

  18. A new movable polarized target at Dubna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anischenko, N. G.; Bazhanov, N. A.; Benda, B.; Borisov, N. S.; Borzunov, Yu. T.; Burinov, V. F.; Durand, G.; Dzyubak, A. P.; Gevchuk, A. V.; Golovanov, L. B.; Gurevich, G. M.; Kovalev, A. I.; Lazarev, A. B.; Leconte, Ph.; Lehar, F.; de Lesquen, A.; Lukhanin, A. A.; Matafonov, V. N.; Matyushevsky, E. A.; Mironov, S.; Neganov, A. B.; Piskunov, N. M.; Plis, Yu. A.; Shilov, S. N.; Shishov, Yu. A.; Sorokin, P. V.; Teterin, V. V.; Topalov, S.; Trautman, V. Yu.; Tsvinev, A. P.; Usov, Yu. A.

    1995-09-01

    A description of the recently installed mouable Polarized Proton Targe (MPT) at the JINR in Dubna is described. This target was acquired from Fermilab. The physics program based on the MPT at Dbna is outlined. (AIP)

  19. Resolving the Pericenter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wisdom, Jack

    2015-10-01

    The Wisdom-Holman mapping method and its variations have become a mainstay of research in solar system dynamics. But the method is not without its limitations. Rauch & Holman noted that at large eccentricities sufficiently small steps must be taken to resolve the pericenter. In this paper, I explore in more detail what it means to resolve the pericenter.

  20. Fast frequency-resolved terahertz imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuda, Takashi; Kawada, Yoichi; Toyoda, Haruyoshi; Nakanishi, Atsushi; Akiyama, Koichiro; Takahashi, Hironori

    2011-03-01

    We propose a fast, frequency-resolved, real-time, terahertz imaging method. With our method, images at two specific terahertz frequencies can be acquired in 1 min. Three kinds of drugs (L-histidine, maltose, and CBZ3), which have absorption peaks in the terahertz region, were distinguished in 3 min by using our method. This technique can be used in industrial applications, such as nondestructive testing.

  1. Characterization of Ultrafast Laser Pulses using a Low-dispersion Frequency Resolved Optical Grating Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitelock, Hope; Bishop, Michael; Khosravi, Soroush; Obaid, Razib; Berrah, Nora

    2016-05-01

    A low dispersion frequency-resolved optical gating (FROG) spectrometer was designed to characterize ultrashort (<50 femtosecond) laser pulses from a commercial regenerative amplifier, optical parametric amplifier, and a home-built non-colinear optical parametric amplifier. This instrument splits a laser pulse into two replicas with a 90:10 intensity ratio using a thin pellicle beam-splitter and then recombines the pulses in a birefringent medium. The instrument detects a wavelength-sensitive change in polarization of the weak probe pulse in the presence of the stronger pump pulse inside the birefringent medium. Scanning the time delay between the two pulses and acquiring spectra allows for characterization of the frequency and time content of ultrafast laser pulses, that is needed for interpretation of experimental results obtained from these ultrafast laser systems. Funded by the DoE-BES, Grant No. DE-SC0012376.

  2. The interfacial and surface properties of thin Fe and Gd films grown on W(110) as studied by scanning tunneling microscopy, site-resolved photoelectron diffraction, and spin polarized photoelectron diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Tober, Eric D.

    1997-06-01

    Combined scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and low energy electron diffraction (LEED) measurements from Gd films grown on W(110) prepared with and without annealing have been used to provide a detailed picture of the growth of such films, permitting a quantitative structural explanation for previously-measured magnetic properties and the identification of a new two-dimensional structure for the first monolayer. The analysis of the film roughness of room-temperature-grown films as a function of coverage and lateral length scale reveals that the growing Gd surface follows scaling laws for a self-affine surface. Annealing these as-deposited films at elevated temperatures is found to drastically alter the morphology of the films, as seen by both STM and LEED. Nanometer-scale islands of relatively well-defined size and shape are observed under certain conditions. Finally, the first monolayer of Gd is observed to form a (7x14) superstructure with pseudo-(7x7) symmetry that is consistent with a minimally-distorted hexagonal two-dimensional Gd(0001) film. Furthermore, a new beamline and photoelectron spectrometer/diffractometer at the Advanced Light Source have been used to obtain full-solid-angle and site-specific photoelectron diffraction (PD) data from interface W atoms just beneath (1x1) Fe and (7x14) Gd monolayers on W(110) by utilizing the core level shift in the W 4f7/2 spectrum. A comparison of experiment with multiple scattering calculations permits determining the Fe adsorption site and the relative interlayer spacing to the first and second W layers. These Fe results are also compared to those from the very different Gd overlayer and from the clean W(110) surface. Such interface PD measurements show considerable promise for future studies. Finally, the rare-earth ferromagnetic system of Gd(0001) has been examined through the use of spin polarized photoelectron diffraction from the Gd 4s and 5s photoelectron multiplets.

  3. Acquired Factor V Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Hirai, Daisuke; Yamashita, Yugo; Masunaga, Nobutoyo; Katsura, Toshiaki; Akao, Masaharu; Okuno, Yoshiaki; Koyama, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Inhibitors directed against factor V rarely occur, and the clinical symptoms vary. We herein report the case of a patient who presented with a decreased factor V activity that had decreased to <3 %. We administered vitamin K and 6 units of fresh frozen plasma, but she thereafter developed an intracerebral hemorrhage. It is unclear whether surgery >10 years earlier might have caused the development of a factor V inhibitor. The treatment of acquired factor V inhibitors is mainly the transfusion of platelet concentrates and corticosteroids. Both early detection and the early initiation of the treatment of factor V inhibitor are thus considered to be important. PMID:27746446

  4. Angle-resolved optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desjardins, Adrien Emmanuel

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has emerged as a powerful tool for probing the microstructure of biological tissue non-invasively at high-speed. OCT measures depth-resolved reflectance of infrared light, generating cross-sectional images non-invasively with micron-scale resolution. As with other imaging modalities that employ coherent detection, OCT images are confounded by speckle noise. Speckle imposes a grainy texture on images that reduces the signal-to-noise ratio to near unity values. As a result, it conceals subtle differences in scattering properties known to be crucial for differentiating normal from diseased tissue states. In this thesis, we developed a novel OCT modality called "Angle-Resolved OCT" in which depth scans (A-lines) are obtained simultaneously from a broad range of backscattering angles. We demonstrated that high levels of speckle reduction can be achieved by averaging the magnitudes of A-lines corresponding to the same transverse locations. With both experimental and analytic approaches, we demonstrated that this averaging method does not lead to a substantial loss in spatial resolution. We developed two different imaging systems for performing Angle-Resolved OCT. With the first system, angular data was acquired simultaneously; with the second, it was acquired sequentially. The first system had superior speckle-reduction capabilities but image quality degraded significantly with small sample movements. The second system allowed for in vivo imaging, as demonstrated with Resolved OCT systems, the speckle-reduced images showed hitherto unprecedented delineation of tissue microstructure.

  5. Polarization Aberrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcguire, James P., Jr.; Chipman, Russell A.

    1990-01-01

    The analysis of the polarization characteristics displayed by optical systems can be divided into two categories: geometrical and physical. Geometrical analysis calculates the change in polarization of a wavefront between pupils in an optical instrument. Physical analysis propagates the polarized fields wherever the geometrical analysis is not valid, i.e., near the edges of stops, near images, in anisotropic media, etc. Polarization aberration theory provides a starting point for geometrical design and facilitates subsequent optimization. The polarization aberrations described arise from differences in the transmitted (or reflected) amplitudes and phases at interfaces. The polarization aberration matrix (PAM) is calculated for isotropic rotationally symmetric systems through fourth order and includes the interface phase, amplitude, linear diattenuation, and linear retardance aberrations. The exponential form of Jones matrices used are discussed. The PAM in Jones matrix is introduced. The exact calculation of polarization aberrations through polarization ray tracing is described. The report is divided into three sections: I. Rotationally Symmetric Optical Systems; II. Tilted and Decentered Optical Systems; and Polarization Analysis of LIDARs.

  6. [Acquired coagulant factor inhibitors].

    PubMed

    Nogami, Keiji

    2015-02-01

    Acquired coagulation factor inhibitors are an autoimmune disease causing bleeding symptoms due to decreases in the corresponding factor (s) which result from the appearance of autoantibodies against coagulation factors (inhibitor). This disease is quite different from congenital coagulation factor deficiencies based on genetic abnormalities. In recent years, cases with this disease have been increasing, and most have anti-factor VIII autoantibodies. The breakdown of the immune control mechanism is speculated to cause this disease since it is common in the elderly, but the pathology and pathogenesis are presently unclear. We herein describe the pathology and pathogenesis of factor VIII and factor V inhibitors. Characterization of these inhibitors leads to further analysis of the coagulation process and the activation mechanisms of clotting factors. In the future, with the development of new clotting examination method (s), we anticipate that further novel findings will be obtained in this field through inhibitor analysis. In addition, detailed elucidation of the coagulation inhibitory mechanism possibly leading to hemostatic treatment strategies for acquired coagulation factor disorders will be developed.

  7. Myelofibrosis and acquired hemophilia A: a case report.

    PubMed

    Wrobel, Marie; Comio, Emilie; Gay, Valerie; Baroudi, Noureddine; Meyer, Pascal; Chuniaud-Louche, Christine; Hacini, Maya; Pica, Gian Matteo

    2016-05-07

    Myelofibrosis and acquired hemophilia A is a rare association. To the best of our knowledge only one case of myelofibrosis and acquired hemophilia A has been previously described. A 66-year-old Caucasian man diagnosed with myelofibrosis evolving in acute myeloid leukemia was referred to us for postoperative bleeding. Hemostatic studies showed prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time, decreased factor VIII coagulation, and a high factor VIII inhibitor titer; these findings led to a diagnosis of acquired hemophilia A for which he was treated with methylprednisolone and recombinant activated factor VII on admission. Due to a lack of response he was subsequently treated with rituximab combined with activated prothrombin complex concentrates. Furthermore, he received azacytidine to treat the underlying hematological malignancies. Immunosuppressive rituximab therapy resolved acquired hemophilia A with marked efficacy. Rapid and accurate diagnosis, effective hemostatic therapy, and timely treatment for underlying disease are important in the management of acquired hemophilia A secondary to hematological malignancy.

  8. Polar Bear

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Amstrup, S.D.; ,; Lentfer, J.W.

    1988-01-01

    Polar bears are long-lived, late-maturing carnivores that have relatively low rates of reproduction and natural mortality. Their populations are susceptible to disturbance from human activities, such as the exploration and development of mineral resources or hunting. Polar bear populations have been an important renewable resource available to coastal communities throughout the Arctic for thousands of years.

  9. Acquired Porphyria Cutanea Tarda

    PubMed Central

    Koval, Andrew; Danby, C. W. E.; Petermann, H.

    1965-01-01

    Currently, the porphyrias are classified in four main groups: congenital porphyria, acute intermittent porphyria, porphyria cutanea tarda hereditaria, and porphyria cutanea tarda symptomatica. The acquired form of porphyria (porphyria cutanea tarda symptomatica) occurs in older males and is nearly always associated with chronic alcoholism and hepatic cirrhosis. The main clinical changes are dermatological, with excessive skin fragility and photosensitivity resulting in erosions and bullae. Biochemically, high levels of uroporphyrin are found in the urine and stools. Treatment to date has been symptomatic and usually unsuccessful. A case of porphyria cutanea tarda symptomatica is presented showing dramatic improvement of both the skin lesions and porphyrin levels in urine and blood following repeated phlebotomy. Possible mechanisms of action of phlebotomy on porphyria cutanea tarda symptomatica are discussed. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2 PMID:14341652

  10. AIDS: acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Gilmore, N. J.; Beaulieu, R.; Steben, M.; Laverdière, M.

    1983-01-01

    Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, or AIDS, is a new illness that occurs in previously healthy individuals. It is characterized by immunodeficiency, opportunistic infections and unusual malignant diseases. Life-threatening single or multiple infections with viruses, mycobacteria, fungi or protozoa are common. A rare neoplasm, Kaposi's sarcoma, has developed in approximately one third of patients with AIDS. More than 800 cases of AIDS have been reported in North America, over 24 of them in Canada. The majority of patients are male homosexuals, although AIDS has also developed in abusers of intravenously administered drugs, Haitian immigrants, individuals with hemophilia, recipients of blood transfusions, prostitutes, and infants, spouses and partners of patients with AIDS. The cause of AIDS is unknown, but the features are consistent with an infectious process. Early diagnosis can be difficult owing to the nonspecific symptoms and signs of the infections and malignant diseases. Therefore, vigilance by physicians is of utmost importance. PMID:6342737

  11. AIDS: acquired immunodeficiency syndrome *

    PubMed Central

    Gilmore, N.J.; Beaulieu, R.; Steben, M.; Laverdière, M.

    1992-01-01

    Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, or AIDS, is a new illness that occurs in previously healthy individuals. It is characterized by immunodeficiency, opportunistic infections and unusual malignant diseases. Life-threatening single or multiple infections with viruses, mycobacteria, fungi or protozoa are common. A rare neoplasm, Kaposi's sarcoma, has developed in approximately one third of patients with AIDS. More than 800 cases of AIDS have been reported in North America, over 24 of them in Canada. The majority of patients are male homosexuals, although AIDS has also developed in abusers of intravenously administered drugs, Haitian immigrants, individuals with hemophilia, recipients of blood transfusions, prostitutes, and infants, spouses and partners of patients with AIDS. The cause of AIDS is unknown, but the features are consistent with an infectious process. Early diagnosis can be difficult owing to the nonspecific symptoms and signs of the infections and malignant diseases. Therefore, vigilance by physicians is of the utmost importance. PMID:1544049

  12. Acquired epidermodysplasia verruciformis.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Heather D; Macgregor, Jennifer L; Nord, Kristin M; Tyring, Stephen; Rady, Peter; Engler, Danielle E; Grossman, Marc E

    2009-02-01

    Epidermodysplasia verruciformis (EV) is a rare autosomal recessive genodermatosis with an increased susceptibility to specific human papillomavirus (HPV) genotypes. Classically, this viral infection leads to the development of tinea versicolor-like macules on the trunk, neck, arms, and face during childhood, and over time, these lesions can progress to squamous cell carcinoma. More recently, an EV-like syndrome has been described in patients with impaired cell-mediated immunity. We describe two cases of EV-like syndrome in HIV-positive patients, review all previously reported cases of EV in patients with impaired cell-mediated immunity, introduce the term "acquired epidermodysplasia verruciformis" to describe EV developing in the immunocompromised host and examine the limited treatment options for these patients.

  13. South Polar Spiral

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-04-06

    This hill in the South Polar layered deposits has influenced the erosion of the icy layers as seen by by NASA Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. The hill protects the layers from erosion, so the pattern of erosion to the sides of the hill forms a beautiful spiral pattern. The map is projected here at a scale of 50 centimeters (19.7 inches) per pixel. [The original image scale is 49.7 centimeters (19.6 inches) per pixel (with 2 x 2 binning); objects on the order of 149 centimeters (58.6 inches) across are resolved.] North is up. https://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21579

  14. Macrophage Polarization.

    PubMed

    Murray, Peter J

    2017-02-10

    Macrophage polarization refers to how macrophages have been activated at a given point in space and time. Polarization is not fixed, as macrophages are sufficiently plastic to integrate multiple signals, such as those from microbes, damaged tissues, and the normal tissue environment. Three broad pathways control polarization: epigenetic and cell survival pathways that prolong or shorten macrophage development and viability, the tissue microenvironment, and extrinsic factors, such as microbial products and cytokines released in inflammation. A plethora of advances have provided a framework for rationally purifying, describing, and manipulating macrophage polarization. Here, I assess the current state of knowledge about macrophage polarization and enumerate the major questions about how activated macrophages regulate the physiology of normal and damaged tissues.

  15. Real-time Imaging Orientation Determination System to Verify Imaging Polarization Navigation Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Hao; Zhao, Kaichun; Wang, Xiaochu; You, Zheng; Huang, Kaoli

    2016-01-01

    Bio-inspired imaging polarization navigation which can provide navigation information and is capable of sensing polarization information has advantages of high-precision and anti-interference over polarization navigation sensors that use photodiodes. Although all types of imaging polarimeters exist, they may not qualify for the research on the imaging polarization navigation algorithm. To verify the algorithm, a real-time imaging orientation determination system was designed and implemented. Essential calibration procedures for the type of system that contained camera parameter calibration and the inconsistency of complementary metal oxide semiconductor calibration were discussed, designed, and implemented. Calibration results were used to undistort and rectify the multi-camera system. An orientation determination experiment was conducted. The results indicated that the system could acquire and compute the polarized skylight images throughout the calibrations and resolve orientation by the algorithm to verify in real-time. An orientation determination algorithm based on image processing was tested on the system. The performance and properties of the algorithm were evaluated. The rate of the algorithm was over 1 Hz, the error was over 0.313°, and the population standard deviation was 0.148° without any data filter. PMID:26805851

  16. North Polar Layers

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-02-28

    The North Polar layered deposits are a 3-kilometer thick stack of dusty water ice layers that are about 1000 kilometers across. The layers record information about climate stretching back a few million years into Martian history. In many locations erosion has created scarps and troughs that expose this layering. The tan colored layers are the dusty water ice of the polar layered deposits; however a section of bluish layers are is visible below them. These bluish layers contain sand-sized rock fragments that likely formed a large polar dunefield before the overlying dusty ice was deposited. The lack of a polar ice cap in this past epoch attests to the variability of the Martian climate, which undergoes larger changes over time than that of the Earth. The map is projected here at a scale of 50 centimeters (19.6 inches) per pixel. [The original image scale is 63.6 centimeters (25 inches) per pixel (with 2 x 2 binning); objects on the order of 191 centimeters (75.2 inches) across are resolved.] North is up. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21465

  17. Surgical treatment of acquired tracheocele.

    PubMed

    Porubsky, Edward A; Gourin, Christine G

    2006-06-01

    Acquired tracheoceles are rare clinical entities that can cause a variety of chronic and recurrent aerodigestive tract symptoms. The management of acquired tracheoceles is primarily conservative, but surgical intervention may be indicated for patients with refractory symptoms. We present a case of acquired tracheocele and describe a method of successful surgical management.

  18. Polar Bears

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Amstrup, Steven C.; Douglas, David C.; Reynolds, Patricia E.; Rhode, E.B.

    2002-01-01

    Polar bears (Ursus maritimus) are hunted throughout most of their range. In addition to hunting polar bears of the Beaufort Sea region are exposed to mineral and petroleum extraction and related human activities such as shipping road-building, and seismic testing (Stirling 1990).Little was known at the start of this project about how polar bears move about in their environment, and although it was understood that many bears travel across political borders, the boundaries of populations had not been delineated (Amstrup 1986, Amstrup et al. 1986, Amstrup and DeMaster 1988, Garner et al. 1994, Amstrup 1995, Amstrup et al. 1995, Amstrup 2000).As human populations increase and demands for polar bears and other arctic resources escalate, managers must know the sizes and distributions of the polar bear populations. Resource managers also need reliable estimates of breeding rates, reproductive intervals, litter sizes, and survival of young and adults.Our objectives for this research were 1) to determine the seasonal and annual movements of polar bears in the Beaufort Sea, 2) to define the boundaries of the population(s) using this region, 3) to determine the size and status of the Beaufort Sea polar bear population, and 4) to establish reproduction and survival rates (Amstrup 2000).

  19. Polar Glaciology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robin, G. D.

    1984-01-01

    Two fields of research on polar ice sheets are likely to be of dominant interest during the 1990s. These are: the role of polar ice sheets in the hydrological cycle ocean-atmosphere-ice sheets-oceans, especially in relation to climate change; and the study and interpretation of material in deep ice cores to provide improved knowledge of past climates and of the varying levels of atmospheric constituents such as CO2, NOx, SO2, aerosols, etc., over the past 200,000 years. Both topics require a better knowledge of ice dynamics. Many of the studies that should be undertaken in polar regions by Earth Observing System require similar instruments and techniques to those used elsewhere over oceans and inland surfaces. However to study polar regions two special requirements need to be met: Earth Observing System satellite(s) need to be in a sufficiently high inclination orbit to cover most of the polar regions. Instruments must also be adapted, often by relatively limited changes, to give satisfactory data over polar ice. The observational requirements for polar ice sheets in the 1990s are summarized.

  20. South Polar Autumn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    22 April 2006 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a portion of the south polar residual cap. The darkened edges of the pits and mesas are evidence of the removal -- by sublimation -- of frozen carbon dioxide during the recent martian summer. Summer ended and autumn began in January 2006, shortly before this image was acquired.

    Location near: 86.8oS, 90.5oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Summer

  1. South Polar Autumn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    18 March 2006 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a portion of the south polar residual cap. The darkened edges of the pits and mesas are evidence of the removal - by sublimation -- of frozen carbon dioxide during the recent martian summer. Summer ended and autumn began the day this image was acquired in January 2006.

    Location near: 86.8oS, 90.5oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Summer/Autumn

  2. Acquired spatial dyslexia.

    PubMed

    Siéroff, E

    2015-08-10

    Acquired spatial dyslexia is a reading disorder frequently occurring after left or right posterior brain lesions. This article describes several types of spatial dyslexia with an attentional approach. After right posterior lesions, patients show left neglect dyslexia with errors on the left side of text, words, and non-words. The deficit is frequently associated with left unilateral spatial neglect. Severe left neglect dyslexia can be detected with unlimited exposure duration of words or non-words. Minor neglect dyslexia is detected with brief presentation of bilateral words, one in the left and one in the right visual field (phenomenon of contralesional extinction). Neglect dyslexia can be explained as a difficulty in orienting attention to the left side of verbal stimuli. With left posterior lesions, spatial dyslexia is also frequent but multiform. Right neglect dyslexia is frequent, but right unilateral spatial neglect is rare. Attentional dyslexia represents difficulty in selecting a stimulus, letter or word among other similar stimuli; it is a deficit of attentional selection, and the left hemisphere plays a crucial role in selection. Two other types of spatial dyslexia can be found after left posterior lesions: paradoxical ipsilesional extinction and stimulus-centred neglect dyslexia. Disconnections between left or right parietal attentional areas and the left temporal visual word form area could explain these deficits. Overall, a model of attention dissociating modulation, selection control, and selection positioning can help in understanding these reading disorders.

  3. Acquired aplastic anemia.

    PubMed

    Keohane, Elaine M

    2004-01-01

    Acquired aplastic anemia (AA) is a disorder characterized by a profound deficit of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells, bone marrow hypocellularity, and peripheral blood pancytopenia. It primarily affects children, young adults, and those over 60 years of age. The majority of cases are idiopathic; however, idiosyncratic reactions to some drugs, chemicals, and viruses have been implicated in its etiology. An autoimmune T-cell reaction likely causes the stem cell depletion, but the precise mechanism, as well as the eliciting and target antigens, is unknown. Symptoms vary from severe life-threatening cytopenias to moderate or non-severe disease that does not require transfusion support. The peripheral blood typically exhibits pancytopenia, reticulocytopenia, and normocytic or macrocytic erythrocytes. The bone marrow is hypocellular and may exhibit dysplasia of the erythrocyte precursors. First line treatment for severe AA consists of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in young patients with HLA identical siblings, while immunosuppression therapy is used for older patients and for those of any age who lack a HLA matched donor. Patients with AA have an increased risk of developing paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH), myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), or acute leukemia. Further elucidation of the pathophysiology of this disease will result in a better understanding of the interrelationship among AA, PNH, and MDS, and may lead to novel targeted therapies.

  4. ICU-Acquired Weakness.

    PubMed

    Jolley, Sarah E; Bunnell, Aaron E; Hough, Catherine L

    2016-11-01

    Survivorship after critical illness is an increasingly important health-care concern as ICU use continues to increase while ICU mortality is decreasing. Survivors of critical illness experience marked disability and impairments in physical and cognitive function that persist for years after their initial ICU stay. Newfound impairment is associated with increased health-care costs and use, reductions in health-related quality of life, and prolonged unemployment. Weakness, critical illness neuropathy and/or myopathy, and muscle atrophy are common in patients who are critically ill, with up to 80% of patients admitted to the ICU developing some form of neuromuscular dysfunction. ICU-acquired weakness (ICUAW) is associated with longer durations of mechanical ventilation and hospitalization, along with greater functional impairment for survivors. Although there is increasing recognition of ICUAW as a clinical entity, significant knowledge gaps exist concerning identifying patients at high risk for its development and understanding its role in long-term outcomes after critical illness. This review addresses the epidemiologic and pathophysiologic aspects of ICUAW; highlights the diagnostic challenges associated with its diagnosis in patients who are critically ill; and proposes, to our knowledge, a novel strategy for identifying ICUAW. Copyright © 2016 American College of Chest Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Polar Plumage

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-05-08

    This Mars MOC image shows dunes in the north polar region of Mars covered by a layer of carbon dioxide frost that accumulated during the winter in 2005. Dark spots indicate areas where frost has begun to sublime away

  6. Polar Dunes

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-09-27

    By high summer, the extensive dune fields of the north polar region are completely defrosted and the number and variety of dunes are readily visible. This image was captured by NASA Mars Odyssey on August 31, 2010.

  7. Polar Cone

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-07-10

    This MOC image shows a cone-shaped hill, perhaps a remnant of a material that was once more laterally extensive across the area, on a textured plain in the Hyperboreus Labyrinthus region in the north polar region of Mars

  8. Polarizing cues.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, Stephen P

    2012-01-01

    People categorize themselves and others, creating ingroup and outgroup distinctions. In American politics, parties constitute the in- and outgroups, and party leaders hold sway in articulating party positions. A party leader's endorsement of a policy can be persuasive, inducing co-partisans to take the same position. In contrast, a party leader's endorsement may polarize opinion, inducing out-party identifiers to take a contrary position. Using survey experiments from the 2008 presidential election, I examine whether in- and out-party candidate cues—John McCain and Barack Obama—affected partisan opinion. The results indicate that in-party leader cues do not persuade but that out-party leader cues polarize. This finding holds in an experiment featuring President Bush in which his endorsement did not persuade Republicans but it polarized Democrats. Lastly, I compare the effect of party leader cues to party label cues. The results suggest that politicians, not parties, function as polarizing cues.

  9. Polar Clouds

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-02-27

    With the changing of seasons comes changes in weather. This image from NASA 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft shows clouds in the north polar region. The surface is just barely visible in part of the image.

  10. Time-resolved imaging of material response during laser-induced bulk damage in SiO2

    SciTech Connect

    Demos, S G; Negres, R A

    2008-10-24

    We report on time resolved imaging of the dynamic events taking place during laser-induced damage in the bulk of fused silica samples with nanosecond temporal resolution and one micron spatial resolution. These events include: shock/pressure wave formation and propagation, transient absorption, crack propagation and formation of residual stress fields. The work has been performed using a time-resolved microscope system that utilizes a probe pulse to acquire images at delay times covering the entire timeline of a damage event. Image information is enhanced using polarized illumination and simultaneously recording the two orthogonal polarization image components. For the case of fused silica, an electronic excitation is first observed accompanied by the onset of a pressure wave generation and propagation. Cracks are seen to form early in the process and reach their final size at about 25 ns into the damage event. In addition, changes that in part are attributed to transient absorption in the modified material are observed for delays up to about 200 microseconds.

  11. Acquired localised hypertrichosis in a Chinese child after cast immobilisation.

    PubMed

    Yuen, M W; Lai, Loretta K P; Chan, P F; Chao, David V K

    2015-08-01

    Hypertrichosis refers to excessive hair growth that is independent of any androgen effect. Hypertrichosis could be congenital or acquired, localised or generalised. The phenomenon of acquired localised hypertrichosis following cast application for a fracture is well known to orthopaedic surgeons, but is rarely encountered by primary care physicians. We describe a 28-month-old Chinese boy who had fracture of right leg as a result of an injury. He had a cast applied by an orthopaedic surgeon as treatment. On removal of the cast 6 weeks later, he was noticed to have significant hair growth on his right leg compared with the left leg. The patient was reassessed 3 months after removal of the cast. The hypertrichosis resolved completely with time. This patient was one of the youngest among the reported cases of acquired localised hypertrichosis after cast application. We illustrate the significance of management of post-cast-acquired localised hypertrichosis in the primary care setting.

  12. Hepatocyte Polarity

    PubMed Central

    Treyer, Aleksandr; Müsch, Anne

    2013-01-01

    Hepatocytes, like other epithelia, are situated at the interface between the organism’s exterior and the underlying internal milieu and organize the vectorial exchange of macromolecules between these two spaces. To mediate this function, epithelial cells, including hepatocytes, are polarized with distinct luminal domains that are separated by tight junctions from lateral domains engaged in cell-cell adhesion and from basal domains that interact with the underlying extracellular matrix. Despite these universal principles, hepatocytes distinguish themselves from other nonstriated epithelia by their multipolar organization. Each hepatocyte participates in multiple, narrow lumina, the bile canaliculi, and has multiple basal surfaces that face the endothelial lining. Hepatocytes also differ in the mechanism of luminal protein trafficking from other epithelia studied. They lack polarized protein secretion to the luminal domain and target single-spanning and glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored bile canalicular membrane proteins via transcytosis from the basolateral domain. We compare this unique hepatic polarity phenotype with that of the more common columnar epithelial organization and review our current knowledge of the signaling mechanisms and the organization of polarized protein trafficking that govern the establishment and maintenance of hepatic polarity. The serine/threonine kinase LKB1, which is activated by the bile acid taurocholate and, in turn, activates adenosine monophosphate kinase-related kinases including AMPK1/2 and Par1 paralogues has emerged as a key determinant of hepatic polarity. We propose that the absence of a hepatocyte basal lamina and differences in cell-cell adhesion signaling that determine the positioning of tight junctions are two crucial determinants for the distinct hepatic and columnar polarity phenotypes. PMID:23720287

  13. 16 CFR 801.2 - Acquiring and acquired persons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Acquiring and acquired persons. 801.2 Section 801.2 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION RULES, REGULATIONS, STATEMENTS AND INTERPRETATIONS UNDER THE HART-SCOTT-RODINO ANTITRUST IMPROVEMENTS ACT OF 1976 COVERAGE RULES § 801.2...

  14. 16 CFR 801.2 - Acquiring and acquired persons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Acquiring and acquired persons. 801.2 Section 801.2 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION RULES, REGULATIONS, STATEMENTS AND INTERPRETATIONS UNDER THE HART-SCOTT-RODINO ANTITRUST IMPROVEMENTS ACT OF 1976 COVERAGE RULES § 801.2...

  15. Cilia organize ependymal planar polarity.

    PubMed

    Mirzadeh, Zaman; Han, Young-Goo; Soriano-Navarro, Mario; García-Verdugo, Jose Manuel; Alvarez-Buylla, Arturo

    2010-02-17

    Multiciliated epithelial cells, called ependymal cells, line the ventricles in the adult brain. Most ependymal cells are born prenatally and are derived from radial glia. Ependymal cells have a remarkable planar polarization that determines orientation of ciliary beating and propulsion of CSF. Disruption of ependymal ciliary beating, by injury or disease, results in aberrant CSF circulation and hydrocephalus, a common disorder of the CNS. Very little is known about the mechanisms guiding ependymal planar polarity and whether this organization is acquired during ependymal cell development or is already present in radial glia. Here we show that basal bodies in ependymal cells in the lateral ventricle walls of adult mice are polarized in two ways: (1) rotational; angle of individual basal bodies with respect to their long axis and (2) translational; the position of basal bodies on the apical surface of the cell. Conditional ablation of motile cilia disrupted rotational orientation, but translational polarity was largely preserved. In contrast, translational polarity was dramatically affected when radial glial primary cilia were ablated earlier in development. Remarkably, radial glia in the embryo have a translational polarity that predicts the orientation of mature ependymal cells. These results suggest that ependymal planar cell polarity is a multistep process initially organized by primary cilia in radial glia and then refined by motile cilia in ependymal cells.

  16. Cilia organize ependymal planar polarity

    PubMed Central

    Mirzadeh, Zaman; Han, Young-Goo; Soriano-Navarro, Mario; García-Verdugo, Jose Manuel; Alvarez-Buylla, Arturo

    2010-01-01

    Multi-ciliated epithelial cells, called ependymal cells, line the ventricles in the adult brain. Most ependymal cells are born prenatally and are derived from radial glia. Ependymal cells have a remarkable planar polarization that determines orientation of ciliary beating and propulsion of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Disruption of ependymal ciliary beating, by injury or disease, results in aberrant CSF circulation and hydrocephalus, a common disorder of the central nervous system. Very little is known about the mechanisms guiding ependymal planar polarity and whether this organization is acquired during ependymal cell development or is already present in radial glia. Here we show that basal bodies in ependymal cells in the lateral ventricle walls of adult mice are polarized in two ways: i) rotational; angle of individual basal bodies with respect to their long axis and ii) translational; the position of basal bodies on the apical surface of the cell. Conditional ablation of motile cilia disrupted rotational orientation, but translational polarity was largely preserved. In contrast, translational polarity was dramatically affected when radial glial primary cilia were ablated earlier in development. Remarkably, radial glia in the embryo have a translational polarity that predicts the orientation of mature ependymal cells. These results suggest that ependymal planar cell polarity is a multi-step process initially organized by primary cilia in radial glia and then refined by motile cilia in ependymal cells. PMID:20164345

  17. Mycosis fungoides: an important differential diagnosis for acquired palmoplantar keratoderma.

    PubMed

    Kim, Janet; Foster, Rachael; Lam, Minh; Kumarasinghe, Sujith Prasad

    2015-02-01

    Mycosis fungoides is the most common subtype of primary cutaneous lymphoma and has several clinical variants. We report a 74-year-old man presenting with an acquired palmoplantar keratoderma initially diagnosed and treated as psoriasis with suboptimal improvement. Several months later the patient developed patches and plaques that were histologically consistent with mycosis fungoides. These lesions were ameliorated with the treatment of the underlying mycosis fungoides and the palmoplantar keratoderma resolved promptly with radiotherapy. This case highlights the importance of considering mycosis fungoides as an infrequent but serious cause of acquired palmoplantar keratoderma.

  18. Acquired epidermodysplasia verruciformis in a child with atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Kristen H; Rady, Peter; Tyring, Steven; Stone, Mary S

    2014-01-01

    A 4-year-old girl with an established diagnosis of atopic dermatitis, previously severe and treated with cyclosporine, developed widespread papules that demonstrated changes consistent with epidermodysplasia verruciformis on biopsy. Human papilloma virus (HPV) typing was performed and was consistent with epidermodysplasia verruciformis-type HPV (type 5). These lesions rapidly resolved with a 2-week course of imiquimod. Rapid resolution and no family history of epidermodysplasia verruciformis make this most consistent with acquired epidermodysplasia verruciformis. This case is the first reported case of acquired epidermodysplasia verruciformis in a child without the human immunodeficiency virus and may be linked to cyclosporine use, which also has never been previously reported.

  19. Resolving writer's block.

    PubMed Central

    Huston, P.

    1998-01-01

    PROBLEM BEING ADDRESSED: Writer's block, or a distinctly uncomfortable inability to write, can interfere with professional productivity. OBJECTIVE OF PROGRAM: To identify writer's block and to outline suggestions for its early diagnosis, treatment, and prevention. MAIN COMPONENTS OF PROGRAM: Once the diagnosis has been established, a stepwise approach to care is recommended. Mild blockage can be resolved by evaluating and revising expectations, conducting a task analysis, and giving oneself positive feedback. Moderate blockage can be addressed by creative exercises, such as brainstorming and role-playing. Recalcitrant blockage can be resolved with therapy. Writer's block can be prevented by taking opportunities to write at the beginning of projects, working with a supportive group of people, and cultivating an ongoing interest in writing. CONCLUSIONS: Writer's block is a highly treatable condition. A systematic approach can help to alleviate anxiety, build confidence, and give people the information they need to work productively. PMID:9481467

  20. Frosty North Polar Dunes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    10 January 2004 While it is summer in Gusev Crater, where the Mars Exploration Rover, Spirit, is operating, it is winter in the martian northern hemisphere. Just this week, the north polar dune fields began to emerge into sunlight after months of frigid darkness. This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) view of frost-covered north polar dunes was acquired on 8 January 2004. The steepest slopes on the dunes--their slipfaces--point toward the upper right (northeast), indicating that the dominant winds responsible for their formation came from the opposite direction (lower left, southwest). Sunlight illuminates these dunes from the lower left, which may seem surprising because the brightest slopes on the dunes face the lower right. The brighter slopes are a frost phenomenon; most likely, these are areas with thicker frost deposits. In summer, the dunes would not have frost and would appear much darker than their surroundings. This early view of north polar dunes in winter is located near 75.8oN, 266.3oW. This view covers an area 3 km (1.9 mi) wide.

  1. Operation Inherent Resolve

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-04-01

    model. OIR is a military mission included within a wider, complex, whole-of-government effort to counter ISIL and address the ongoing refugee crisis...DoS OIG made recom- mendations to improve the administration and monitoring of activi- ties with the Bureau of Population, Refugees and Migration (PRM...operations against ISIL in Iraq and Syria had been named Operation Inherent Resolve (OIR). OIR applied retroactively to all military airstrikes that had been

  2. Coast Guard Polar Icebreaker Modernization: Background and Issues for Congress

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-24

    polar icebreaker fleet is in need of recapitalization, the decision to acquire this capability through purchase of new vessels, reconstruction of...exactly the same sort of lease versus buy analysis, and in fact, the Coast Guard had a two track procurement strategy to compare leasing a new...scientific research in the Arctic. With the reactivation of Polar Star, the operational U.S. polar icebreaking fleet consists of one heavy polar

  3. Optical detection dental disease using polarized light

    DOEpatents

    Everett, Matthew J.; Colston, Jr., Billy W.; Sathyam, Ujwal S.; Da Silva, Luiz B.; Fried, Daniel

    2003-01-01

    A polarization sensitive optical imaging system is used to detect changes in polarization in dental tissues to aid the diagnosis of dental disease such as caries. The degree of depolarization is measured by illuminating the dental tissue with polarized light and measuring the polarization state of the backscattered light. The polarization state of this reflected light is analyzed using optical polarimetric imaging techniques. A hand-held fiber optic dental probe is used in vivo to direct the incident beam to the dental tissue and collect the reflected light. To provide depth-resolved characterization of the dental tissue, the polarization diagnostics may be incorporated into optical coherence domain reflectometry and optical coherence tomography (OCDR/OCT) systems, which enables identification of subsurface depolarization sites associated with demineralization of enamel or bone.

  4. Polarized Campuses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parr, Susan Resneck

    1991-01-01

    On college campuses, the climate is polarized because of intolerance and discrimination, censorship, factionalism, and anger among students and faculty. As a result, the campus is in danger of becoming dominated by political issues and discouraging the exchange of ideas characteristic of a true liberal arts education. (MSE)

  5. Polar Stratigraphy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    These three images were taken on three different orbits over the north polar cap in April 1999. Each shows a different part of the same ice-free trough. The left and right images are separated by a distance of more than 100 kilometers (62 miles). Note the similar layers in each image.

  6. Polar Dune

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-07-01

    A large sand sheet with surface dune forms is located on the floor of this crater near the south pole. The polar cap rests against the southern part of the sand sheet. The dune appears bright in this daytime 2001 Mars Odyssey THEMIS IR image.

  7. Non-polar InGaN quantum dot emission with crystal-axis oriented linear polarization

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, Benjamin P. L. Chan, Christopher C. S.; Taylor, Robert A.; Kocher, Claudius; Zhu, Tongtong; Oehler, Fabrice; Oliver, Rachel A.

    2015-04-27

    Polarization sensitive photoluminescence is performed on single non-polar InGaN quantum dots. The studied InGaN quantum dots are found to have linearly polarized emission with a common polarization direction defined by the [0001] crystal axis. Around half of ∼40 studied dots have a polarization degree of 1. For those lines with a polarization degree less than 1, we can resolve fine structure splittings between −800 μeV and +800 μeV, with no clear correlation between fine structure splitting and emission energy.

  8. Polarized light detection in spiders.

    PubMed

    Dacke, M; Doan, T A; O'Carroll, D C

    2001-07-01

    We describe here the detection of polarized light by the simple eyes of spiders. Using behavioural, morphological, electrophysiological and optical studies, we show that spiders have evolved two different mechanisms to resolve the e-vector of light. Wolf spiders (Lycosidae), are able to turn in response to rotation of a polarized pattern at the zenith of their visual fields, and we also describe a strip in the ventral retina of the principal (anterio-median) eyes that views this location and has receptors tiered into two layers. This provides each pair of receptors with a similar optical solution to that provided by the 'dorsal rim area' of the insect compound eye. In contrast, gnaphosid spiders have evolved a pair of lensless secondary eyes for the detection of polarized light. These two eyes, each sensitive to orthogonal directions of polarization, are perfectly designed to integrate signals from the larger part of the sky and cooperate to analyse the polarization of light. Built-in polarizers help to improve signal purity. Similar organisation in the eyes of several other spider families suggests that these two mechanisms are not restricted to only a few families.

  9. Angle- and spin-resolved photoemission from ferromagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherepkov, N. A.; Kuznetsov, V. V.

    1996-07-01

    Equations for angle- and spin-resolved photoemission from core levels of ferromagnets are derived using the atomic model. They are applied to the n p subshells and to the particular geometries of experiment with the photoemission normal to the surface, which have been used already in several experiments. It is shown that for these geometries the spin-resolved spectra obtained with linearly polarized light are especially simple and contain the contribution of only one or two magnetic sublevels of the 0953-8984/8/27/008/img5 state, and of only one sublevel of the 0953-8984/8/27/008/img6 state, which allow one to resolve the magnetic splitting of core levels. The use of circularly polarized or unpolarized light gives a less transparent picture.

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging of spin-polarization transfer of polarized Xe atoms dissolving into ethanol.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Kiyoshi; Imai, Hirohiko; Takagi, Yoshihiro

    2004-04-22

    We detect the free-induction signals of xenon atoms polarized by spin-exchange optical pumping. The temperature dependence of dissolution and spin-polarization transfer of xenon atoms to ethanol is measured by simultaneous detection of both xenon and proton signals. The polarization of proton is efficiently enhanced in the xenon-saturated solution at low magnetic fields. The large polarization and chemical shift enable us to obtain clearly the distribution image of xenon atoms near the gas-liquid and liquid-liquid boundaries. Therefore the localization of polarized xenon atoms is observed near the surface. By time-resolved magnetic resonance imaging of polarized xenon and polarization-enhanced proton, the spin dynamics is qualitatively studied for the nuclear spins interacting with each other in a dense solution. (c) 2004 American Institute of Physics

  11. A model of plant canopy polarization response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanderbilt, V. C.

    1980-01-01

    Sensors to remotely measure the linear polarization of ground scenes have been proposed for the Multispectral Resource Sampler (MRS), a satellite sensor system proposed to complement the Thematic Mapper. At present justification for a sensor on MRS to measure scene polarization is limited. This paper discusses a model for the amount of linearly polarized light reflected by the shiny leaves of such crops as wheat, corn, and sorghum. The theory demonstrates that, potentially, measurements of the linearly polarized light from a crop canopy may be used as an additional feature to discriminate between crops. Examination of the model suggests that, potentially, satellite polarization measurements may be used to monitor crop development stage, leaf water content, leaf area index, hail damage, and certain plant diseases. The model adds to the understanding of the potential information content of scene polarization measurements acquired by future satellite sensor systems such as MRS.

  12. A model of plant canopy polarization response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanderbilt, V. C.

    1980-01-01

    Sensors to remotely measure the linear polarization of ground scenes have been proposed for the Multispectral Resource Sampler (MRS), a satellite sensor system proposed to complement the Thematic Mapper. At present justification for a sensor on MRS to measure scene polarization is limited. This paper discusses a model for the amount of linearly polarized light reflected by the shiny leaves of such crops as wheat, corn, and sorghum. The theory demonstrates that, potentially, measurements of the linearly polarized light from a crop canopy may be used as an additional feature to discriminate between crops. Examination of the model suggests that, potentially, satellite polarization measurements may be used to monitor crop development stage, leaf water content, leaf area index, hail damage, and certain plant diseases. The model adds to the understanding of the potential information content of scene polarization measurements acquired by future satellite sensor systems such as MRS.

  13. Terahertz polarization imaging for colon cancer detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doradla, Pallavi; Alavi, Karim; Joseph, Cecil S.; Giles, Robert H.

    2014-03-01

    Continuous wave terahertz (THz) imaging has the potential to offer a safe, noninvasive medical imaging modality for delineating colorectal cancer. The terahertz reflectance measurements of fresh 3 - 5 mm thick human colonic excisions were acquired using a continuous-wave polarization imaging technique. A CO2 optically pumped Far- Infrared molecular gas laser operating at 584 GHz was used to illuminate the colon tissue, while the reflected signals were detected using a liquid Helium cooled silicon bolometer. Both co-polarized and cross-polarized remittance from the samples was collected using wire grid polarizers in the experiment. The experimental analysis of 2D images obtained from THz reflection polarization imaging techniques showed intrinsic contrast between cancerous and normal regions based on increased reflection from the tumor. Also, the study demonstrates that the cross-polarized terahertz images not only correlates better with the histology, but also provide consistent relative reflectance difference values between normal and cancerous regions for all the measured specimens.

  14. Resource Prospector: The RESOLVE Payload

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinn, J.; Smith, J.; J., Captain; Paz, A.; Colaprete, A.; Elphic, R.; Zacny, K.

    2015-10-01

    NASA has been developing a lunar volatiles exploration payload named RESOLVE. Now the primary science payload on-board the Resource Prospector (RP) mission, RESOLVE, consists of several instruments that evaluate lunar volatiles.

  15. Full Stokes polarization imaging camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vedel, M.; Breugnot, S.; Lechocinski, N.

    2011-10-01

    Objective and background: We present a new version of Bossa Nova Technologies' passive polarization imaging camera. The previous version was performing live measurement of the Linear Stokes parameters (S0, S1, S2), and its derivatives. This new version presented in this paper performs live measurement of Full Stokes parameters, i.e. including the fourth parameter S3 related to the amount of circular polarization. Dedicated software was developed to provide live images of any Stokes related parameters such as the Degree Of Linear Polarization (DOLP), the Degree Of Circular Polarization (DOCP), the Angle Of Polarization (AOP). Results: We first we give a brief description of the camera and its technology. It is a Division Of Time Polarimeter using a custom ferroelectric liquid crystal cell. A description of the method used to calculate Data Reduction Matrix (DRM)5,9 linking intensity measurements and the Stokes parameters is given. The calibration was developed in order to maximize the condition number of the DRM. It also allows very efficient post processing of the images acquired. Complete evaluation of the precision of standard polarization parameters is described. We further present the standard features of the dedicated software that was developed to operate the camera. It provides live images of the Stokes vector components and the usual associated parameters. Finally some tests already conducted are presented. It includes indoor laboratory and outdoor measurements. This new camera will be a useful tool for many applications such as biomedical, remote sensing, metrology, material studies, and others.

  16. Resolve at CEBAF

    SciTech Connect

    Yunn, B C; Li, R; Simrock, S

    1995-01-01

    M. Lee's program RESOLVE has recently been in extensive use at CEBAF to help identify and correct optics problems in recirculation arcs and in linac beamlines encountered during the commissioning of the 4-GeV accelerator. The authors describe the integration of the program with their machine applications software package. A significant vertical focusing error in one of the recirculation arcs, which is attributed to edge focusing of dipole magnets, was found from the analysis of difference orbit measurement data. A corrective measure has been successfully implemented. Optics checks in the spreader and recombiner regions are discussed along with linac optics and 60Hz jitter. 7 refs., 4 figs.

  17. Resolve at CEBAF

    SciTech Connect

    Yunn, B. C.; Li, R.; Simrock, S.

    1995-12-31

    M. Lee`s program RESOLVE has recently been in extensive use at CEBAF to help identify and correct optics problems in recirculation arcs and in linac beamlines encountered during the commissioning of the 4- GeV accelerator. We describe the integration of the program with our machine applications software package. A significant vertical focusing error in one of the recirculation arcs, which is attributed to edge focusing of dipole magnets, was found from the analysis of difference orbit measurement data. A corrective measure has been successfully implemented. Optics checks in the spreader and recombiner regions are discussed along with linac optics and 60Hz jitter. 7 refs., 4 figs.

  18. Cell polarity

    PubMed Central

    Romereim, Sarah M

    2011-01-01

    Despite extensive genetic analysis of the dynamic multi-phase process that transforms a small population of lateral plate mesoderm into the mature limb skeleton, the mechanisms by which signaling pathways regulate cellular behaviors to generate morphogenetic forces are not known. Recently, a series of papers have offered the intriguing possibility that regulated cell polarity fine-tunes the morphogenetic process via orienting cell axes, division planes and cell movements. Wnt5a-mediated non-canonical signaling, which may include planar cell polarity, has emerged as a common thread in the otherwise distinct signaling networks that regulate morphogenesis in each phase of limb development. These findings position the limb as a key model to elucidate how global tissue patterning pathways direct local differences in cell behavior that, in turn, generate growth and form. PMID:22064549

  19. Polar Diving

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    3 July 2006 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows layers exposed by erosion in a trough within the north polar residual cap of Mars, diving beneath a younger covering of polar materials. The layers have, since the Mariner 9 mission in 1972, been interpreted to be composed of a combination of dust and ice in unknown proportions. In this scene, a layer of solid carbon dioxide, which was deposited during the previous autumn and winter, blankets the trough as well as the adjacent terrain. Throughout northern spring, the carbon dioxide will be removed; by summer, the layers will be frost-free.

    Location near: 81.4oN, 352.2oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: lower left Season: Northern Spring

  20. Polar Diving

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    3 July 2006 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows layers exposed by erosion in a trough within the north polar residual cap of Mars, diving beneath a younger covering of polar materials. The layers have, since the Mariner 9 mission in 1972, been interpreted to be composed of a combination of dust and ice in unknown proportions. In this scene, a layer of solid carbon dioxide, which was deposited during the previous autumn and winter, blankets the trough as well as the adjacent terrain. Throughout northern spring, the carbon dioxide will be removed; by summer, the layers will be frost-free.

    Location near: 81.4oN, 352.2oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: lower left Season: Northern Spring

  1. South Polar Residual Ice Cap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    This mosaic is composed of 18 Viking Orbiter images (6 each in red, green, and violet filters), acquired on September 28, 1977, during revolution 407 of Viking Orbiter 2. The south pole is located just off the lower left edge of the polar cap, and the 0 degree longitude meridian extends toward the top of the mosaic. The large crater near the right edge (named 'South') is about 100 km in diameter. These images were acquired during southern summer on Mars (Ls = 341 degrees); the sub-solar declination was 8 degrees S., and the south polar cap was nearing its final stage of retreat just prior to vernal equinox. The south residual cap is approximately 400 km across, and the exposed surface is thought to consist dominantly of carbon-dioxide frost. This is in contrast to the water-ice surface of the north polar residual cap. It is likely that water ice is present in layers that underlie the south polar cap and that comprise the surrounding layered terrains. Near the top of this image, irregular pits with sharp-rimmed cliffs appear 'etched', presumably by wind. A series of rugged mountains (extending toward the upper right corner of the image) are of unknown origin.

  2. South Polar Residual Ice Cap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    This mosaic is composed of 18 Viking Orbiter images (6 each in red, green, and violet filters), acquired on September 28, 1977, during revolution 407 of Viking Orbiter 2. The south pole is located just off the lower left edge of the polar cap, and the 0 degree longitude meridian extends toward the top of the mosaic. The large crater near the right edge (named 'South') is about 100 km in diameter. These images were acquired during southern summer on Mars (Ls = 341 degrees); the sub-solar declination was 8 degrees S., and the south polar cap was nearing its final stage of retreat just prior to vernal equinox. The south residual cap is approximately 400 km across, and the exposed surface is thought to consist dominantly of carbon-dioxide frost. This is in contrast to the water-ice surface of the north polar residual cap. It is likely that water ice is present in layers that underlie the south polar cap and that comprise the surrounding layered terrains. Near the top of this image, irregular pits with sharp-rimmed cliffs appear 'etched', presumably by wind. A series of rugged mountains (extending toward the upper right corner of the image) are of unknown origin.

  3. Dual Brushless Resolver Rate Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, David E. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A resolver rate sensor is disclosed in which dual brushless resolvers are mechanically coupled to the same output shaft. Diverse inputs are provided to each resolver by providing the first resolver with a DC input and the second resolver with an AC sinusoidal input. A trigonometric identity in which the sum of the squares of the sin and cosine components equal one is used to advantage in providing a sensor of increased accuracy. The first resolver may have a fixed or variable DC input to permit dynamic adjustment of resolver sensitivity thus permitting a wide range of coverage. In one embodiment of the invention the outputs of the first resolver are directly inputted into two separate multipliers and the outputs of the second resolver are inputted into the two separate multipliers, after being demodulated in a pair of demodulator circuits. The multiplied signals are then added in an adder circuit to provide a directional sensitive output. In another embodiment the outputs from the first resolver is modulated in separate modulator circuits and the output from the modulator circuits are used to excite the second resolver. The outputs from the second resolver are demodulated in separate demodulator circuit and added in an adder circuit to provide a direction sensitive rate output.

  4. Polar Textures

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-06-08

    This VIS image of the south pole was taken at the end of summer. Frost will soon start to form as the season transitions into fall. Fall in the southern hemisphere means spring in the northern, so the north polar cap is just starting to thaw. Orbit Number: 67893 Latitude: -87.0251 Longitude: 275.679 Instrument: VIS Captured: 2017-04-04 06:19 https://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21679

  5. Time-resolved videothermography at above-frame-rate frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepard, Steven M.; Sass, David T.; Imirowicz, Thomas P.; Meng, A.

    1991-03-01

    Temporal aliasing is a problem common all video imaging systems. IR video systems are particularly susceptible because of the relatively low (30 Hz) RS-170 frame rate. We have developed a system which compensates for the effects of aliasing, and allows images of repetitive thermal phenomena at frequencies up to 4 kHz to be acquired. The system utilizes an unmodified commercial imager (Inframetrics IR 600) and a microcomputer. Data is acquired selectively using a 'line-by-line' scheme which compares the motion of the camera's horizontal scanning mirror to a reference signal correlated to the event of interest. Only those horizontal lines that have a user-specified phase relationship to the reference signal are acquired. The resulting images have an effective integration time of 125 microseconds. This ability to acquire 'time-resolved' IR images allows investigation of phenomena not possible with a conventional RS-170 IR imaging system. For example, a conventional thermal image of an integrated circuit operating at several kilohertz yields no temporal information whatsoever. By comparison, we have acquired time-resolved images which show the AC heating and cooling of the circuit, so that we may identify AC hot spots. The system has also been applied to a running internal combustion engine. The imager views the piston head through an IR transparent (ZnS) window. Acquired images clearly show the motion of the flame front through the combustion chamber, and the subsequent heating and cooling of the piston head.

  6. Brief resolved unexplained event

    PubMed Central

    Arane, Karen; Claudius, Ilene; Goldman, Ran D.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Question For many years, the term apparent life-threatening event (ALTE) was associated with sudden infant death syndrome, and parents who described an acute event in their infants were sent to the hospital for admission. I understand that for infants new terminology is recommended. What is the current approach to a near-death experience of an infant? Answer A recent clinical practice guideline revised the name and definition of an ALTE to a brief resolved unexplained event (BRUE). The diagnosis of BRUE in infants younger than 1 year of age is made when infants experience 1 of the following BRUE symptoms: a brief episode (ie, less than 1 minute and usually less than 20 to 30 seconds) that is entirely resolved (infant is at baseline), which remains unexplained after the history and physical examination are completed, and includes an event characterized by cyanosis or pallor; absent, decreased, or irregular breathing; hypertonia or hypotonia; or altered responsiveness. Low-risk infants should not be admitted to the hospital and overtesting is discouraged. PMID:28115439

  7. Cloud Resolving Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo

    2007-01-01

    One of the most promising methods to test the representation of cloud processes used in climate models is to use observations together with cloud-resolving models (CRMs). CRMs use more sophisticated and realistic representations of cloud microphysical processes, and they can reasonably well resolve the time evolution, structure, and life cycles of clouds and cloud systems (with sizes ranging from about 2-200 km). CRMs also allow for explicit interaction between clouds, outgoing longwave (cooling) and incoming solar (heating) radiation, and ocean and land surface processes. Observations are required to initialize CRMs and to validate their results. This paper provides a brief discussion and review of the main characteristics of CRMs as well as some of their major applications. These include the use of CRMs to improve our understanding of: (1) convective organization, (2) cloud temperature and water vapor budgets, and convective momentum transport, (3) diurnal variation of precipitation processes, (4) radiative-convective quasi-equilibrium states, (5) cloud-chemistry interaction, (6) aerosol-precipitation interaction, and (7) improving moist processes in large-scale models. In addition, current and future developments and applications of CRMs will be presented.

  8. RESOLVE 2010 Field Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Captain, J.; Quinn, J.; Moss, T.; Weis, K.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the field tests conducted in 2010 of the Regolith Environment Science & Oxygen & Lunar Volatile Extraction (RESOLVE). The Resolve program consist of several mechanism: (1) Excavation and Bulk Regolith Characterization (EBRC) which is designed to act as a drill and crusher, (2) Regolith Volatiles Characterization (RVC) which is a reactor and does gas analysis,(3) Lunar Water Resources Demonstration (LWRD) which is a fluid system, water and hydrogen capture device and (4) the Rover. The scientific goal of this test is to demonstrate evolution of low levels of hydrogen and water as a function of temperature. The Engineering goals of this test are to demonstrate:(1) Integration onto new rover (2) Miniaturization of electronics rack (3) Operation from battery packs (elimination of generator) (4) Remote command/control and (5) Operation while roving. Views of the 2008 and the 2010 mechanisms, a overhead view of the mission path, a view of the terrain, the two drill sites, and a graphic of the Master Events Controller Graphical User Interface (MEC GUI) are shown. There are descriptions of the Gas chromatography (GC), the operational procedure, water and hydrogen doping of tephra. There is also a review of some of the results, and future direction for research and tests.

  9. Asymmetric transmission and polarization conversion of linearly polarized waves with bilayer L-shaped metasurfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Xiong-Jun; Zhai, Xiang; Wang, Ling-Ling; He, Meng-Dong; Li, Quan; Luo, Xin; Duan, Hui-Gao

    2017-05-01

    We numerically and theoretically investigate the optical anisotropy of ultra-thin bilayer L-shaped metal metasurfaces separated by a 200-nm-thick silicon dioxide (SiO2) substrate spacer. A broadband asymmetric transmission (AT) to forward and backward propagate electromagnetic waves can be acquired from linearly polarized waves. Additionally, narrowband cross-polarization conversion (CPC) can be realized by x linearly polarized electromagnetic illumination. The calculated results demonstrate that the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of AT is 965 nm, and the maximum value of the asymmetric parameter can reach up to 0.48. The polarization conversion rate (PCR) for CPC is more than 80%.

  10. South Polar Knob

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    1 July 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a small, relatively light-toned knob of layered material, and the erosional expression of the underlying layers, in the south polar region of Mars. When the image was acquired in April 2005, the surface was still covered with seasonal carbon dioxide frost. Dark spots and streaks mark locations where the frost had begun to change and sublime away.

    Location near: 84.2oS, 138.3oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season Southern Spring

  11. Frosty Polar Slope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    11 August 2004 Acquired just last week on 3 August 2004, this Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a dark, layered scarp in the martian north polar region. All of the light-toned surfaces in this image are covered by frost left over from the previous winter. On the scarp, about half of the surfaces once covered by frost are now exposed (as the frost has sublimed away), leaving a large number of bright patches. These patches of frost enhance the appearance of layering on the slopes. This image is located near 81.8oN, 84.4oW. The image covers an area 3 km (1.9 mi) wide, and is illuminated by sunlight from the lower left.

  12. Frosty Polar Slope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    11 August 2004 Acquired just last week on 3 August 2004, this Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a dark, layered scarp in the martian north polar region. All of the light-toned surfaces in this image are covered by frost left over from the previous winter. On the scarp, about half of the surfaces once covered by frost are now exposed (as the frost has sublimed away), leaving a large number of bright patches. These patches of frost enhance the appearance of layering on the slopes. This image is located near 81.8oN, 84.4oW. The image covers an area 3 km (1.9 mi) wide, and is illuminated by sunlight from the lower left.

  13. Spin polarization of photoelectrons from topological insulators.

    PubMed

    Park, Cheol-Hwan; Louie, Steven G

    2012-08-31

    We show that the degree of spin polarization of photoelectrons from the surface states of topological insulators is 100% if fully polarized light is used as in typical photoemission measurements, and, hence, can be significantly higher than that of the initial state. Further, the spin orientation of these photoelectrons in general can also be very different from that of the initial surface state and is controlled by the photon polarization. A rich set of predicted phenomena have recently been confirmed by spin- and angle-resolved photoemission experiments.

  14. An electrically tunable polarization and polarization-independent liquid-crystal microlens array for imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Zhaowei; Tong, Qing; Lei, Yu; Wei, Dong; Zhang, Xinyu; Liao, Jing; Wang, Haiwei; Xie, Changsheng

    2017-09-01

    In this study, a polarization-independent microlens array composed of two layered nematic liquid crystal (LC) materials with orthogonal alignment and separated by a double-sided indium-tin oxide silica with a thickness of ∼500 μm, is proposed. The functioned stacking of two polarization LC microstructures lead to an electrically tuning polarization and also polarization-independent light control architecture. Experimental investigations reveal key characters such as a high beam utilization efficiency of more than 90% and a compound point spread function tuned electrically. Dual-mode imaging including the polarization mode and the polarization-independent mode can be realized based on the novel configuration with both independent voltage signals applied over two functioned LC layers. The normalized focusing intensity demonstrates a special property of no polarization dependence on beams processed. An image criteria for evaluating the quality of polarization-insensitive images based on the difference image between the horizontal and vertical polarization images, is introduced. Considering the advantages of electrically tunable composed focal length and then switching the polarization and polarization-independent mode, it can be expected that the developed devices can not only be used to measure and further tune the polarization state of beams propagating in LC layers but also acquire high quality target images.

  15. Multi-frequency, multi-polarization SAR and radiometer sea ice classification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drinkwater, Mark R.; Crawford, John P.; Cavalieri, Donald J.

    1991-01-01

    Microwave remotely sensed data were acquired simultaneously in March 1988 over Beaufort, Chukchi, and Bering Sea ice using the JPL multifrequency, polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (SAR), and multifrequency dual-polarization GSFC radiometer. The experiment was conducted as a series of coordinated underflights of the DMSP SSM/I satellite radiometer to validate ice products derived from its radiance values. Concurrent flights by an NRL P-3 aircraft enabled overlapping high-resolution, single-frequency images to be acquired over the same surfaces using a Ka-band scanning microwave radiometer. Precise coregistration to an accuracy of 100 m, +/- 25 m enables comparison of temporally and spatially coincident active and passive microwave datasets. Three-channel polarimetric SAR data are compared with dual-polarized radiometer data at several SSM/I frequencies, showing backscatter signatures to be highly correlated with radiometric temperatures. Further comparisons are used to evaluate ice concentration retrievals and to show how multiparameter datasets can be used to resolve ambiguities present in identifying certain sea ice forms with a single microwave instrument.

  16. Spatially resolved multicomponent gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Draper, Emily R.; Eden, Edward G. B.; McDonald, Tom O.; Adams, Dave J.

    2015-10-01

    Multicomponent supramolecular systems could be used to prepare exciting new functional materials, but it is often challenging to control the assembly across multiple length scales. Here we report a simple approach to forming patterned, spatially resolved multicomponent supramolecular hydrogels. A multicomponent gel is first formed from two low-molecular-weight gelators and consists of two types of fibre, each formed by only one gelator. One type of fibre in this ‘self-sorted network’ is then removed selectively by a light-triggered gel-to-sol transition. We show that the remaining network has the same mechanical properties as it would have done if it initially formed alone. The selective irradiation of sections of the gel through a mask leads to the formation of patterned multicomponent networks, in which either one or two networks can be present at a particular position with a high degree of spatial control.

  17. Polar Landforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    10 August 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows eroded remnants of carbon dioxide ice in the south polar residual cap of Mars. The scarps that outline each small mesa have retreated about 3 meters (10 feet) per Mars year since MGS began orbiting the red planet in 1997.

    Location near: 87.0oS, 31.9oW Image width: width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Spring

  18. Probing absolute spin polarization at the nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Eltschka, Matthias; Jäck, Berthold; Assig, Maximilian; Kondrashov, Oleg V; Skvortsov, Mikhail A; Etzkorn, Markus; Ast, Christian R; Kern, Klaus

    2014-12-10

    Probing absolute values of spin polarization at the nanoscale offers insight into the fundamental mechanisms of spin-dependent transport. Employing the Zeeman splitting in superconducting tips (Meservey-Tedrow-Fulde effect), we introduce a novel spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy that combines the probing capability of the absolute values of spin polarization with precise control at the atomic scale. We utilize our novel approach to measure the locally resolved spin polarization of magnetic Co nanoislands on Cu(111). We find that the spin polarization is enhanced by 65% when increasing the width of the tunnel barrier by only 2.3 Å due to the different decay of the electron orbitals into vacuum.

  19. 16 CFR 801.2 - Acquiring and acquired persons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... ultimate parent entitles of their respective “persons,” created a joint venture, corporation V, and that... acquisitions which comprise a single transaction. (d)(1)(i) Mergers and consolidations are transactions subject.... Examples: 1. Corporation A (the ultimate parent entity included within person “A”) proposes to acquire Y, a...

  20. 16 CFR 801.2 - Acquiring and acquired persons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... ultimate parent entitles of their respective “persons,” created a joint venture, corporation V, and that... acquisitions which comprise a single transaction. (d)(1)(i) Mergers and consolidations are transactions subject.... Examples: 1. Corporation A (the ultimate parent entity included within person “A”) proposes to acquire Y, a...

  1. 16 CFR 801.2 - Acquiring and acquired persons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... ultimate parent entitles of their respective “persons,” created a joint venture, corporation V, and that... acquisitions which comprise a single transaction. (d)(1)(i) Mergers and consolidations are transactions subject.... Examples: 1. Corporation A (the ultimate parent entity included within person “A”) proposes to acquire Y, a...

  2. Polar ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, S.; Grose, W. L.; Jones, R. L.; Mccormick, M. P.; Molina, Mario J.; Oneill, A.; Poole, L. R.; Shine, K. P.; Plumb, R. A.; Pope, V.

    1990-01-01

    The observation and interpretation of a large, unexpected ozone depletion over Antarctica has changed the international scientific view of stratospheric chemistry. The observations which show the veracity, seasonal nature, and vertical structure of the Antarctic ozone hole are presented. Evidence for Arctic and midlatitude ozone loss is also discussed. The chemical theory for Antarctic ozone depletion centers around the occurrence of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) in Antarctic winter and spring; the climatology and radiative properties of these clouds are presented. Lab studies of the physical properties of PSCs and the chemical processes that subsequently influence ozone depletion are discussed. Observations and interpretation of the chemical composition of the Antarctic stratosphere are described. It is shown that the observed, greatly enhanced abundances of chlorine monoxide in the lower stratosphere are sufficient to explain much if not all of the ozone decrease. The dynamic meteorology of both polar regions is given, interannual and interhemispheric variations in dynamical processes are outlined, and their likely roles in ozone loss are discussed.

  3. Polar Terrains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA03577 Polar Terrains

    The region surrounding the South Polar Cap contains many different terrain types. This image shows both etched terrain and a region of 'mounds'.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 75S, Longitude 286.5E. 17 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  4. Polar Textures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA03638 Polar Textures

    This image illustrates the variety of textures that appear in the south polar region during late summer.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 80.5S, Longitude 57.9E. 17 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  5. Polarization scattering from a Spectralon calibration sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noble, Hannah; Lam, Wai-Sze Tiffany; Smith, Greg; McClain, Stephen; Chipman, Russell A.

    2007-09-01

    The in-plane Mueller matrix bidirectional reflectance distribution function (MMBRDF) is measured for a Spectralon calibration target with a reflectance of 99%. Measurements are acquired using a Mueller matrix active imaging, goniometric polarimeter operated in the near infrared at 1550nm. The Spectralon is measured for both incident and scattering angles from -80 degrees to 80 degrees to within 20 degrees of retro-reflection. A range of polarization states is generated and scattered polarization states are analyzed by means of a dual rotating retarder Mueller matrix polarimeter. Complete Mueller matrix data is measured with a high-resolution camera in image form. Polarization scatter data is presented in Mueller matrix angular arrays. As expected the Spectralon is a strong depolarizer and weak s-plane oriented diattenuator. It was also a weak retarder. Diattenuation and retardance are strongest at horizontal and vertical polarizations, and weakest for circular polarization states.

  6. Polarized neutron radiography with a periscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, Michael; Neubauer, Andreas; Mühlbauer, Martin; Calzada, Elbio; Schillinger, Burkhard; Pfleiderer, Christian; Böni, Peter

    2010-01-01

    The interaction of the magnetic moment of the neutron with magnetic fields provides a powerful probe for spatially resolved magnetisation measurements in magnetic materials. We have tested a periscope as a new type of polarizer providing neutron beams with a high polarization and a low divergence. The observed inhomogeneity of the beam caused by the waviness of the glass substrates was quantified by means of Monte-Carlo simulations using the software package McStas. The results show that beams of high homogeneity can be produced if the waviness is reduced to below 1.0·10-5 rad. Finally, it is shown that radiography with polarized neutrons is a powerful method for measuring the spatially resolved magnetisation in optically float-zoned samples of the weak itinerant ferromagnet Ni3Al, thereby aiding the identification of the appropriate growth parameters.

  7. METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR PRODUCING AND ANALYZING POLARIZED GAMMA RADIATION

    DOEpatents

    Hamermesh, M.; Hanna, S.S.; Perlow, G.J.

    1964-04-21

    A method of polarizing and resolving the plane of polarization of gamma rays is described. Polarization is produced by positioning a thin disc of ferromagnetic metal, cortaining /sup 57/Co, in a magnetic field. Resolution is accomplished by rotating a thin disc of iron enriched in /sup 57/Fe relative to a second magnetic field and noting the change of gamma absorption at each rotational position. (AEC)

  8. Tunable spin polarization in bismuth ultrathin film on Si(111).

    PubMed

    Takayama, Akari; Sato, Takafumi; Souma, Seigo; Oguchi, Tamio; Takahashi, Takashi

    2012-04-11

    We performed a spin- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy of bismuth ultrathin film on Si(111) with various film thickness d. We found that the spin polarization of spin-split Rashba surface states near the Brillouin-zone boundary, which is high (0.7) at d = 40 BL (bilayers), is gradually reduced on decreasing d and almost vanishes at d = 8 BL. This finding provides a novel method to generate spin-polarized electrons with tunable spin-polarization.

  9. 12 CFR 583.1 - Acquire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... AND LOAN HOLDING COMPANIES § 583.1 Acquire. The term acquire means to acquire, directly or indirectly, ownership or control through an acquisition of shares, an acquisition of assets or assumption of liabilities...

  10. Sky light polarization detection with linear polarizer triplet in light field camera inspired by insect vision.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenjing; Cao, Yu; Zhang, Xuanzhe; Liu, Zejin

    2015-10-20

    Stable information of a sky light polarization pattern can be used for navigation with various advantages such as better performance of anti-interference, no "error cumulative effect," and so on. But the existing method of sky light polarization measurement is weak in real-time performance or with a complex system. Inspired by the navigational capability of a Cataglyphis with its compound eyes, we introduce a new approach to acquire the all-sky image under different polarization directions with one camera and without a rotating polarizer, so as to detect the polarization pattern across the full sky in a single snapshot. Our system is based on a handheld light field camera with a wide-angle lens and a triplet linear polarizer placed over its aperture stop. Experimental results agree with the theoretical predictions. Not only real-time detection but simple and costless architecture demonstrates the superiority of the approach proposed in this paper.

  11. Epitaxial growth of polar KTaO3 thin-films on polar perovskite substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, J.; Nichols, J.; Hwang, J.; Seo, S. S. A.

    2014-03-01

    The atomic polarity plays an important role in a wide range of physical phenomena at heterointerfaces. For example, the polar/non-polar nature of a LaAlO3/SrTiO3 system induces partial conducting electrons at the heterointerfaces to avoid diverging electrostatic potential, the so-called ``polar catastrophe,'' which results in intriguing two-dimensional transport and magnetic properties. In this presentation, we discuss another system in which the role of the polar interface is important: the KTaO3/GdScO3 (KTO/GSO) polar/polar system. At the KTO/GSO interface, there is a ``polar conflict'' heterointerface along the [001] direction, where the AO and BO2 layers have reversed net charges so that there is a conflict between the chemical bonding and the electrostatic charges, i.e. K1+O2-(1-)/Sc3+O24- (1-) or Ta5+O24- (1 +) /Gd3+O2-(1 +) , which is unstable in the electrostatic point of view. We ask a fundamental question: ``How is the polar conflict resolved in the atomically flat heterointerfaces of such polar/polar systems?'' We have synthesized epitaxial KTO thin films on GSO substrates using pulsed laser deposition. From X-ray diffraction and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, we have observed that the polar conflict is quite effectively avoided by forming only two non-polar mono-layers at the heterointerface, resulting in high-quality epitaxial thin films on top of the layers. Our result suggests a new way to create two-dimensional confined layers using the polar conflict of the heterointerfaces of two polar materials.

  12. Polar Scars

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-12-29

    In addition to being evidence of past impacts, craters can serve another valuable scientific purpose. By counting the number of craters in an area, scientists can estimate the age of the terrain. Older surfaces, such as on Mimas (246 miles, or 396 kilometers across), will have more craters per unit area than younger surfaces. This view looks toward the trailing hemisphere of Mimas. North on Mimas is up and rotated 4 degrees to the left. The image was taken in visible light with the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera on June 5, 2012. The view was acquired at a distance of approximately 31,000 miles (50,000 kilometers) from Mimas. Image scale is 982 feet (299 meters) per pixel. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA18292

  13. Dual Brushless Resolver Rate Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, David E. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    This invention relates to dual analog angular rate sensors which are implemented without the use of mechanical brushes. A resolver rate sensor which includes two brushless resolvers which are mechanically coupled to the same output shaft is provided with inputs which are provided to each resolver by providing the first resolver with a DC input and the second resolver with an AC sinusoidal input. A trigonometric identity in which the sum of the squares of the sin and cosine components equal one is used to advantage in providing a sensor of increased accuracy. The first resolver may have a fixed or variable DC input to permit dynamic adjustment of resolver sensitivity thus permitting a wide range of coverage. Novelty and advantages of the invention reside in the excitation of a resolver with a DC signal and in the utilization of two resolvers and the trigonometric identity of cos(exp 2)(theta) + sin(exp 2)(theta) = 1 to provide an accurate rate sensor which is sensitive to direction and accurate through zero rate.

  14. Polarization discrimination of coherently propagating light in turbid media

    SciTech Connect

    Sankaran, V.; Schoenenberger, K.; Maitland, D.J.; Walsh, J.T. Jr.

    1999-07-01

    We describe the use of degree of polarization to discriminate unscattered and weakly scattered light from multiply scattered light in an optically turbid material. We use spatially resolved measurements of the degree of polarization to compare how well linearly and circularly polarized light survives in a sample. Experiments were performed on common tissue phantoms consisting of polystyrene and Intralipid microsphere suspensions and on adipose and arterial tissue. The results indicate that polarization is maintained even after unpolarized irradiance through each sample has been extinguished by several orders of magnitude. The results show that polarized light propagation in common tissue phantoms is distinctly different from polarized light propagation in the two tissues investigated. Further, these experiments illustrate when polarization is an effective discrimination criterion and when it is not. The potential of a polarization-based discrimination scheme to image through the biological and nonbiological samples investigated here is also discussed. {copyright} 1999 Optical Society of America

  15. Acquired aplastic anemia in children.

    PubMed

    Hartung, Helge D; Olson, Timothy S; Bessler, Monica

    2013-12-01

    This article provides a practice-based and concise review of the etiology, diagnosis, and management of acquired aplastic anemia in children. Bone marrow transplantation, immunosuppressive therapy, and supportive care are discussed in detail. The aim is to provide the clinician with a better understanding of the disease and to offer guidelines for the management of children with this uncommon yet serious disorder.

  16. Duplicated Information Acquired by Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Carl M.

    The object of this study is to make a start toward determining the extent of duplicated information that is being acquired in spite of customary precautions to avoid it. Referring to a specific case, the percentages in Table II show the frequency of appearance in five other works of 19 items in Mitchell's "Encyclopedia of American Politics." While…

  17. Musicality: instinct or acquired skill?

    PubMed

    Marcus, Gary F

    2012-10-01

    Is the human tendency toward musicality better thought of as the product of a specific, evolved instinct or an acquired skill? Developmental and evolutionary arguments are considered, along with issues of domain-specificity. The article also considers the question of why humans might be consistently and intensely drawn to music if musicality is not in fact the product of a specifically evolved instinct.

  18. Acquired Equivalence Changes Stimulus Representations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meeter, M.; Shohamy, D.; Myers, C. E.

    2009-01-01

    Acquired equivalence is a paradigm in which generalization is increased between two superficially dissimilar stimuli (or antecedents) that have previously been associated with similar outcomes (or consequents). Several possible mechanisms have been proposed, including changes in stimulus representations, either in the form of added associations or…

  19. A new movable polarized target at Dubna

    SciTech Connect

    Anischenko, N.G.; Bazhanov, N.A.; Benda, B.; Borisov, N.S.; Borzunov, Y.T.; Burinov, V.F.; Durand, G.; Dzyubak, A.P.; Gevchuk, A.V.; Golovanov, L.B.; Gurevich, G.M.; Kovalev, A.I.; Lazarev, A.B.; Leconte, P.; Lehar, F.; de Lesquen, A.; Lukhanin, A.A.; Matafonov, V.N.; Matyushevsky, E.A.; Mironov, S.; Neganov, A.B.; Piskunov, N.M.; Plis, Y.A.; Shilov, S.N.; Shishov, Y.A.; Sorokin, P.V.; Teterin, V.V.; Topalov, S.

    1995-09-01

    A description of the recently installed mouable Polarized Proton Targe (MPT) at the JINR in Dubna is described. This target was acquired from Fermilab. The physics program based on the MPT at Dbna is outlined. (AIP) {copyright} {ital 1995 American Institute of Physics.}

  20. Polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography for quantifying the severity of natural caries lesions on occlusal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fried, Daniel; Ngaotheppitak, Patara; Darling, Cynthia L.; Ho, Chi M.

    2007-02-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that Polarization Sensitive Optical Coherence Tomography (PS-OCT) can be used to image early dental caries. The purpose of this study was to compare the measured integrated reflectivity of natural caries lesions with the mineral loss measured using digital microradiography in order to determine if PS-OCT can be used as a nondestructive in vivo method to measure the severity of dental decay in the important occlusal surfaces. A PS-OCT system operating at 1310-nm was used to acquire polarization resolved images of natural caries lesions on the occlusal surfaces of extracted teeth. The integrated reflectivity from lesion areas was compared to the integrated mineral loss from the same lesion area measured using digital microradiography. There was a strong correlation between the integrated mineral loss of the caries lesion measured using high resolution digital microradiography and the integrated reflectivity in the perpendicular polarization axis of the PS-OCT system demonstrating the potential for this method to nondestructively monitor the severity of caries lesion in the occlusal pit and fissure where most new decay is found. Although we find these results encouraging, we desire a higher correlation between the integrated mineral loss and the integrated reflectivity and we believe a higher correlation is attainable with better matching of the PS-OCT scans and the histological thin sections.

  1. Polar Barchans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    20 July 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows dark, barchan sand dunes of the north polar region of Mars. Barchan dunes are simple, rounded forms with two horns that extend downwind. Inequalities in local wind patterns may result in one horn being extended farther than the other, as is the case for several dunes in this image. The image also shows several barchans may merge to form a long dune ridge. The horns and attendant slip faces on these dunes indicate wind transport of sand from the upper left toward the lower right. The image is located near 77.6oN, 103.6oW. The picture covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) wide; sunlight illuminates the scene from the lower left.

  2. Polar Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA03581 Polar Layers

    This image shows just one example of the bright and dark markings that appear during summer time. The marks are related to the polar layers. If you happen to see a wild-eyed guy sticking his tongue out at you, you'll know why this image qualifies for the old 'art' category of THEMIS releases.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 80.6S, Longitude 34.1E. 17 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  3. Polarization Phase-Shift Interferometry: A Simple Laboratory Setup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vannoni, Maurizio; Trivi, Marcelo; Molesini, Giuseppe

    2008-04-01

    An interferometry experiment is proposed, working on a Twyman-Green optical configuration. The interferogram is acquired with a digital camera and processed. Using polarization components the interferogram is phase-shifted and four different interferograms are acquired. The experiment is proposed as an introduction to modern phase-shift interferometry, using concepts and laboratory equipment at the level of undergraduate optics courses.

  4. Representing and Acquiring Geographic Knowledge.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-01-01

    Management, Inc. 5 copies 1300 Wilson Boulevard, Suite 102 Arlington, Virginia 22209 Ms. Robin Dillard 1 copy Naval Ocean System Center C2 Information...the road. Conceivably, it could curl round and come closer to *the pond at some other point. We mus,. therefore ask for the minimal distance between...both of th’se. There is no general scheme for resolving these interactions. Rather, we must simply decide priorities , and force the lower priority

  5. North Polar Layered Deposits in Summer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    The High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter acquired this image during its first day of test imaging from the spacecraft's low-altitude mapping orbit, Sept. 29, 2006.

    This image of Mars' north polar layered deposits was taken during the summer season (solar longitude of 113.6 degrees), when carbon dioxide frost had evaporated from the surface. The bright spots seen here are most likely patches of water frost, but the location of the frost patches does not appear to be controlled by topography. Layers are visible at the bottom of the image, mostly due to difference in slope between them. The variations in slope are probably caused by differences in the physical properties of the layers. Thinner layers that have previously been observed in these deposits are visible, and may represent annual deposition of water ice and dust that is thought to form the polar layered deposits. These deposits are thought to record global climate variations on Mars, similar to ice ages on Earth. HiRISE images such as this should allow Mars' climate record to be inferred and compared with climate changes on Earth.

    Image TRA_000825_2665 was taken by the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera onboard the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft on September 29, 2006. Shown here is the full image, centered at 86.5 degree latitude, 172.0 degrees east longitude. The image is oriented such that north is to the top. The range to the target site was 298.9 kilometers (186.8 miles). At this distance the image scale is 59.8 centimeters (23.5 inches) per pixel (with two-by-two binning} so objects about 1.79 meters (70 inches) across are resolved. In total the original image was 12.2 kilometers 7.58 mile; 10024 pixels) wide and 6.1 kilometers (3.79 miles; 5000 pixels) long. The image was taken at a local Mars time of 3:30 PM and the scene is illuminated from the southwest with a solar incidence angle of 63.5 degrees

  6. Nursing home-acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    El Solh, Ali A

    2009-02-01

    Nursing home-acquired pneumonia (NHAP) was first described in 1978. Since then there has been much written regarding NHAP and its management despite the lack of well-designed studies in this patient population. The most characteristic features of patients with NHAP are the atypical presentation, which may lead to delay in diagnosis and therapy. The microbial etiology of pneumonia encompasses a wide spectrum that spans microbes recovered from patients with community-acquired pneumonia to organisms considered specific only to nosocomial settings. Decision to transfer a nursing home patient to an acute care facility depends on a host of factors, which include the level of staffing available at the nursing home, patients' advance directives, and complexity of treatment. The presence of risk factors for multidrug-resistant pathogens dictates approach to therapy. Prevention remains the cornerstone of reducing the incidence of disease. Despite the advance in medical services, mortality from NHAP remains high.

  7. Occupationally Acquired American Cutaneous Leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    Felinto de Brito, Maria Edileuza; Andrade, Maria Sandra; de Almeida, Éricka Lima; Medeiros, Ângela Cristina Rapela; Werkhäuser, Roberto Pereira; de Araújo, Ana Isabele Freitas; Brandão-Filho, Sinval Pinto; Paiva de Almeida, Alzira Maria; Gomes Rodrigues, Eduardo Henrique

    2012-01-01

    We report two occupationally acquired cases of American cutaneous leishmaniasis (ACL): one accidental laboratory autoinoculation by contaminated needlestick while handling an ACL lesion sample, and one acquired during field studies on bird biology. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays of patient lesions were positive for Leishmania, subgenus Viannia. One isolate was obtained by culture (from patient 2 biopsy samples) and characterized as Leishmania (Viannia) naiffi through an indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA) with species-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and by multilocus enzyme electrophoresis (MLEE). Patients were successfully treated with N-methyl-glucamine. These two cases highlight the potential risks of laboratory and field work and the need to comply with strict biosafety procedures in daily routines. The swab collection method, coupled with PCR detection, has greatly improved ACL laboratory diagnosis. PMID:23227369

  8. [Acquired disorders of color vision].

    PubMed

    Lascu, Lidia; Balaş, Mihaela

    2002-01-01

    This article is a general view of acquired disorders of color vision. The revision of the best known methods and of the etiopathogenic classification is not very important in ophthalmology but on the other hand, the detection of the blue defect advertise and associated ocular pathology. There is a major interest in serious diseases as multiple sclerosis, AIDS, diabetes melitus, when the first ocular sign can be a defect in the color vision.

  9. The dynamics of spatially-resolved laser eigenstates

    SciTech Connect

    Bretenaker, F.; LeFloch, A. )

    1990-09-01

    The existence of partially spatially-resolved laser eigenstates is proven, using the polarization walkoff provided by an uniaxial birefringent crystal. The coupling between the ordinary and extraordinary eigenstates is shown to depend drastically on the relative positions of the different elements in the cavity, leading to different eigenstates dynamics. Rotation and inhibition vectorial bistability and vectorial simultaneity are successively isolated, the removal of the transversal degeneracy of the two eigenstates allowing a simple eigenstate selection.

  10. Community-acquired bacterial meningitis.

    PubMed

    van de Beek, Diederik; Brouwer, Matthijs; Hasbun, Rodrigo; Koedel, Uwe; Whitney, Cynthia G; Wijdicks, Eelco

    2016-11-03

    Meningitis is an inflammation of the meninges and subarachnoid space that can also involve the brain cortex and parenchyma. It can be acquired spontaneously in the community - community-acquired bacterial meningitis - or in the hospital as a complication of invasive procedures or head trauma (nosocomial bacterial meningitis). Despite advances in treatment and vaccinations, community-acquired bacterial meningitis remains one of the most important infectious diseases worldwide. Streptococcus pneumoniae and Neisseria meningitidis are the most common causative bacteria and are associated with high mortality and morbidity; vaccines targeting these organisms, which have designs similar to the successful vaccine that targets Haemophilus influenzae type b meningitis, are now being used in many routine vaccination programmes. Experimental and genetic association studies have increased our knowledge about the pathogenesis of bacterial meningitis. Early antibiotic treatment improves the outcome, but the growing emergence of drug resistance as well as shifts in the distribution of serotypes and groups are fuelling further development of new vaccines and treatment strategies. Corticosteroids were found to be beneficial in high-income countries depending on the bacterial species. Further improvements in the outcome are likely to come from dampening the host inflammatory response and implementing preventive measures, especially the development of new vaccines.

  11. Acquired causes of intestinal malabsorption.

    PubMed

    van der Heide, F

    2016-04-01

    This review focuses on the acquired causes, diagnosis, and treatment of intestinal malabsorption. Intestinal absorption is a complex process that depends on many variables, including the digestion of nutrients within the intestinal lumen, the absorptive surface of the small intestine, the membrane transport systems, and the epithelial absorptive enzymes. Acquired causes of malabsorption are classified by focussing on the three phases of digestion and absorption: 1) luminal/digestive phase, 2) mucosal/absorptive phase, and 3) transport phase. Most acquired diseases affect the luminal/digestive phase. These include short bowel syndrome, extensive small bowel inflammation, motility disorders, and deficiencies of digestive enzymes or bile salts. Diagnosis depends on symptoms, physical examination, and blood and stool tests. There is no gold standard for the diagnosis of malabsorption. Further testing should be based on the specific clinical context and the suspected underlying disease. Therapy is directed at nutritional support by enteral or parenteral feeding and screening for and supplementation of deficiencies in vitamins and minerals. Early enteral feeding is important for intestinal adaptation in short bowel syndrome. Medicinal treatment options for diarrhoea in malabsorption include loperamide, codeine, cholestyramine, or antibiotics. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Millicharged fermion vacuum polarization in a cosmic magnetic field and generation of CMB elliptic polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ejlli, Damian

    2017-07-01

    The contribution of one-loop millicharged fermion vacuum polarization in a cosmic magnetic field to the cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization is considered. Exact and perturbative solutions of the density matrix equations of motion in terms of the Stokes parameters are presented. For linearly polarized CMB at the decoupling time, it is shown that the propagation of CMB photons in a cosmic magnetic field would generate elliptic polarization (circular and linear) of the CMB due to millicharged fermion vacuum polarization. Analytic expressions for the degree of circular polarization and rotation angle of the polarization plane of the CMB are presented. Depending on the ratio of millicharged fermion relative charge to mass, ɛ /mɛ, magnetic field amplitude, and CMB observation frequency, it is shown that the acquired CMB degree of circular polarization could be of the order of magnitude PC(T0)˜10-10- 10-6 in the best scenario for a canonical value of magnetic field amplitude of the order of ˜nG and ɛ /mɛ˜10-4-few ×10-3. The mechanism considered in this work generates CMB polarization even in the case when the CMB is initially in thermal equilibrium. Limits on the magnetic field amplitude due to prior-decoupling CMB polarization are presented.

  13. Polarization in Scattering

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    we refer to the linear polarization as parallel if the polarization vector is in the scattering plane or perpendicular if the polarization vector is...obvious that the different polarization states can all be represented as linear combinations of any of the independent pairs of polarization states...J.C. (1976) “Improvement of underwater visibility by reduction of backscatter with a circular polarization technique, Applied Optics, 6, 321-330

  14. Polarized internal target apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Holt, R.J.

    1984-10-10

    A polarized internal target apparatus with a polarized gas target of improved polarization and density (achieved by mixing target gas atoms with a small amount of alkali metal gas atoms, and passing a high intensity polarized light source into the mixture to cause the alkali metal gas atoms to become polarized which interact in spin exchange collisions with target gas atoms yielding polarized target gas atoms) is described.

  15. Polarized internal target apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Holt, Roy J.

    1986-01-01

    A polarized internal target apparatus with a polarized gas target of improved polarization and density achieved by mixing target gas atoms with a small amount of alkali metal gas atoms, and passing a high intensity polarized light source into the mixture to cause the alkali metal gas atoms to become polarized which interact in spin exchange collisions with target gas atoms yielding polarized target gas atoms.

  16. First-principles approach to excitons in time-resolved and angle-resolved photoemission spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perfetto, E.; Sangalli, D.; Marini, A.; Stefanucci, G.

    2016-12-01

    In this work we put forward a first-principles approach and propose an accurate diagrammatic approximation to calculate the time-resolved (TR) and angle-resolved photoemission spectrum of systems with excitons. We also derive an alternative formula to the TR photocurrent which involves a single time-integral of the lesser Green's function. The diagrammatic approximation applies to the relaxed regime characterized by the presence of quasistationary excitons and vanishing polarization. The nonequilibrium self-energy diagrams are evaluated using excited Green's functions; since this is not standard, the analytic derivation is presented in detail. The final result is an expression for the lesser Green's function in terms of quantities that can all be calculated in a first-principles manner. The validity of the proposed theory is illustrated in a one-dimensional model system with a direct gap. We discuss possible scenarios and highlight some universal features of the exciton peaks. Our results indicate that the exciton dispersion can be observed in TR and angle-resolved photoemission.

  17. Polymorphous hemangioendothelioma in a child with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS).

    PubMed

    Paul, Stephan R; Hurford, Matthew T; Miettinen, Markku M; Aronoff, Stephen C; Delvecchio, Michael; Grewal, Harsh; Tuluc, Madalina

    2008-03-01

    Polymorphous hemangioendotheliomas (PH) are rare and borderline malignant tumors that are among the wide range of vascular tumors. We report here a 13-year-old male presenting with a history of weight loss, opportunistic infections, and lymphadenopathy. He was determined to be HIV positive and to have acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). A biopsy of a femoral node was diagnostic of PH. His systemic lymphadenopathy appeared to resolve with anti-retroviral therapy. This tumor should be considered within the differential diagnoses of pediatric and immunocompromised patients.

  18. Acquired 5-oxoproline acidemia successfully treated with N-acetylcysteine

    PubMed Central

    Fenves, Andrew Z.

    2017-01-01

    Acquired 5-oxoprolinemia is increasingly recognized as a cause of anion gap metabolic acidosis. It predominantly occurs in chronically ill, malnourished women with impaired renal function and chronic acetaminophen ingestion. Depletion of glutathione and cysteine stores leads to elevated 5-oxoproline levels. N-acetylcysteine, given its effect in repleting glutathione and cysteine stores, has been proposed as a potential treatment for 5-oxoprolinemia, though reports of its successful use are lacking. We present a case of 5-oxoproline metabolic acidosis that persisted despite discontinuation of acetaminophen. However, the acidosis rapidly resolved with N-acetylcysteine administration. PMID:28405069

  19. DISCOVERY OF POLARIZED LINE EMISSION IN SN 1006

    SciTech Connect

    Sparks, W. B.; Pringle, J. E.; Long, K. S.; Cracraft, M.; Carswell, R. F.

    2015-12-10

    Laming predicted that the narrow Balmer line core of the ∼3000 km s{sup −1} shock in the SN 1006 remnant would be significantly polarized due to electron and proton impact polarization. Here, based on deep spectrally resolved polarimetry obtained with the European Southern Observatory (ESO)’s Very Large Telescope (VLT), we report the discovery of polarized line emission with a polarization degree of 1.3% and position angle orthogonal to the SNR filament. Correcting for an unpolarized broad line component, the implied narrow line polarization is ≈2.0%, close to the predictions of Laming. The predicted polarization is primarily sensitive to shock velocity and post-shock temperature equilibration. By measuring polarization for the SN 1006 remnant, we validate and enable a new diagnostic that has important applications in a wide variety of astrophysical situations, such as shocks, intense radiation fields, high energy particle streams, and conductive interfaces.

  20. The Polarization Characteristics of Mercury-like Exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, J.; Qu, Z. Q.; Yan, X. L.

    2012-11-01

    This paper aims at studying the polarization characteristics of Mercury-like exoplanets via the polarization phase curve of the unresolved Mercury. We utilize the Bayesian non-linear fitting method to get the photometric phase curve and the polarization phase curve of Mercury. From these two kinds of curves, we obtain the polarization phase curve of the unresolved Mercury. The results from the unresolved polarization phase curve are as follows: first, in the visible light band the magnitude order of the polarization degree is 10^{-12}; second, its maximum value in the case parallel to the scattering plane is comparable to that in the case vertical to the scattering plane, and their corresponding phase angles are changed evidently in comparison with the resolved Mercury case; third, the polarization amplitudes decrease to zero when the phase angle becomes larger than 158°.

  1. Acquired Upper Extremity Growth Arrest.

    PubMed

    Gauger, Erich M; Casnovsky, Lauren L; Gauger, Erica J; Bohn, Deborah C; Van Heest, Ann E

    2017-01-01

    This study reviewed the clinical history and management of acquired growth arrest in the upper extremity in pediatric patients. The records of all patients presenting from 1996 to 2012 with radiographically proven acquired growth arrest were reviewed. Records were examined to determine the etiology and site of growth arrest, management, and complications. Patients with tumors or hereditary etiology were excluded. A total of 44 patients (24 boys and 20 girls) with 51 physeal arrests who presented at a mean age of 10.6 years (range, 0.8-18.2 years) were included in the study. The distal radius was the most common site (n=24), followed by the distal humerus (n=8), metacarpal (n=6), distal ulna (n=5), proximal humerus (n=4), radial head (n=3), and olecranon (n=1). Growth arrest was secondary to trauma (n=22), infection (n=11), idiopathy (n=6), inflammation (n=2), compartment syndrome (n=2), and avascular necrosis (n=1). Twenty-six patients (59%) underwent surgical intervention to address deformity caused by the physeal arrest. Operative procedures included ipsilateral unaffected bone epiphysiodesis (n=21), shortening osteotomy (n=10), lengthening osteotomy (n=8), excision of physeal bar or bone fragment (n=2), angular correction osteotomy (n=1), and creation of single bone forearm (n=1). Four complications occurred; 3 of these required additional procedures. Acquired upper extremity growth arrest usually is caused by trauma or infection, and the most frequent site is the distal radius. Growth disturbances due to premature arrest can be treated effectively with epiphysiodesis or osteotomy. In this series, the specific site of anatomic growth arrest was the primary factor in determining treatment. [Orthopedics. 2017; 40(1):e95-e103.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  2. Angle-Resolved Polarimetry of Antenna-Mediated Fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohtashami, Abbas; Osorio, Clara I.; Koenderink, A. Femius

    2015-11-01

    Optical phase-array antennas can be used to control not only the angular distribution but also the polarization of fluorescence from quantum emitters. The emission pattern of the resulting system is determined by the properties of the antenna, the properties of the emitters, and the strength of the antenna-emitter coupling. Here we show that Fourier polarimetry can be used to characterize these three contributions. To this end, we measure the angle- and Stokes-parameter-resolved emission of bullseye plasmon antennas as well as spiral antennas excited by an ensemble of emitters. We estimate the average antenna-emitter coupling on the basis of the degree of polarization and determine the effect of anisotropy in the intrinsic emitter orientation on polarization of the resulting emission pattern. Our results provide not only new insights into the behavior of bullseye and spiral antennas but also demonstrate the potential of Fourier polarimetry when characterizing antenna-mediated fluorescence.

  3. Broadband graphene polarizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Qiaoliang; Zhang, Han; Wang, Bing; Ni, Zhenhua; Lim, Candy Haley Yi Xuan; Wang, Yu; Tang, Ding Yuan; Loh, Kian Ping

    2011-07-01

    Conventional polarizers can be classified into three main modes of operation: sheet polarizer using anisotropic absorption media, prism polarizer by refraction and Brewster-angle polarizer by reflection. These polarizing components are not easily integrated with photonic circuits. The in-line fibre polarizer, which relies on polarization-selective coupling between the evanescent field and birefringent crystal or metal, is a promising alternative because of its compatibility with most fibre-optic systems. Here, we demonstrate the operation of a broadband fibre polarizer based on graphene, an ultrathin two-dimensional carbon material. The out-coupled light in the telecommunication band shows a strong s-polarization effect with an extinction ratio of 27 dB. Unlike polarizers made from thin metal film, a graphene polarizer can support transverse-electric-mode surface wave propagation due to its linear dispersion of Dirac electrons.

  4. The inhibition of acquired fear.

    PubMed

    Izquierdo, Iván; Cammarota, Martín; Vianna, Mónica M R; Bevilaqua, Lía R M

    2004-01-01

    A conditioned stimulus (CS) associated with a fearsome unconditioned stimulus (US) generates learned fear. Acquired fear is at the root of a variety of mental disorders, among which phobias, generalized anxiety, the posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and some forms of depression. The simplest way to inhibit learned fear is to extinguish it, which is usually done by repeatedly presenting the CS alone, so that a new association, CS-"no US", will eventually overcome the previously acquired CS-US association. Extinction was first described by Pavlov as a form of "internal inhibition" and was recommended by Freud and Ferenczi in the 1920s (who called it "habituation") as the treatment of choice for phobic disorders. It is used with success till this day, often in association with anxiolytic drugs. Extinction has since then been applied, also successfully and also often in association with anxiolytics, to the treatment of panic, generalized anxiety disorders and, more recently, PTSD. Extinction of learned fear involves gene expression, protein synthesis, N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors and signaling pathways in the hippocampus and the amygdala at the time of the first CS-no US association. It can be enhanced by increasing the exposure to the "no US" component at the time of behavioral testing, to the point of causing the complete uninstallment of the original fear response. Some theorists have recently proposed that reiteration of the CS alone may induce a reconsolidation of the learned behavior instead of its extinction. Reconsolidation would preserve the original memory from the labilization induced by its retrieval. If true, this would of course be disastrous for the psychotherapy of fear-motivated disorders. Here we show that neither the CS nor retrieval cause anything remotely like reconsolidation, but just extinction. In fact, our findings indicate that the reconsolidation hypothesis is essentially incorrect, at least for the form of contextual fear most

  5. Polar Color

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 3 May 2004 This nighttime visible color image was collected on January 1, 2003 during the Northern Summer season near the North Polar Troughs.

    This daytime visible color image was collected on September 4, 2002 during the Northern Spring season in Vastitas Borealis. The THEMIS VIS camera is capable of capturing color images of the martian surface using its five different color filters. In this mode of operation, the spatial resolution and coverage of the image must be reduced to accommodate the additional data volume produced from the use of multiple filters. To make a color image, three of the five filter images (each in grayscale) are selected. Each is contrast enhanced and then converted to a red, green, or blue intensity image. These three images are then combined to produce a full color, single image. Because the THEMIS color filters don't span the full range of colors seen by the human eye, a color THEMIS image does not represent true color. Also, because each single-filter image is contrast enhanced before inclusion in the three-color image, the apparent color variation of the scene is exaggerated. Nevertheless, the color variation that does appear is representative of some change in color, however subtle, in the actual scene. Note that the long edges of THEMIS color images typically contain color artifacts that do not represent surface variation.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 79, Longitude 346 East (14 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with

  6. Neuronal Polarity: Demarcation, growth and commitment

    PubMed Central

    Cáceres, Alfredo; Ye, Bing; Dotti, Carlos G.

    2012-01-01

    In a biological sense, polarity refers to the extremity of the main axis of an organelle, cell, or organism. In neurons, morphological polarity begins with the appearance of the first neurite from the cell body. In multipolar neurons, a second phase of polarization occurs when a single neurite initiates a phase of rapid growth to become the neuron’s axon, while the others later differentiate as dendrites. Finally, during a third phase, axons and dendrites develop an elaborate architecture, acquiring special morphological and molecular features that commit them to their final identities. Mechanistically, each phase must be preceded by spatial restriction of growth activity. We will review recent work on the mechanisms underlying the polarized growth of neurons. PMID:22726583

  7. {lambda}0 Polarization in Exclusive pp Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Felix, J.

    2006-09-25

    Among all properties of baryons, the polarization they acquire when created from unpolarized p-nucleus collisions is the most recent discovered one; so far, the origin of this polarization remains unexplained in spite of the experimental evidences accumulated in the past thirty years. Up to these days, {lambda}0 is the most studied baryon for polarization, due to it is very easy to produce {lambda}0's at the energies of the principal high energy physics accelerators of the world. This article is a review of the experimental experience accumulated on the polarization of {lambda}0 in unpolarized exclusive pp collisions as function of xF, PT, and M({lambda}0K+) in the past fifteen years here at the Instituto de Fisica, Universidad de Guanajuato, inside Fermilab e690 and Brookhaven National Laboratory e766 collaborations.

  8. Negative circular polarization as a universal property of quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Matthew W.; Spencer, Peter; Murray, Ray

    2015-03-23

    This paper shows that negative circular polarization, a spin flip of polarized carriers resulting in emission of opposite helicity, can be observed in undoped, n-doped, and p-doped InAs/GaAs quantum dots. These results contradict the usual interpretation of the effect. We show using power dependent and time resolved spectroscopy that the generation of negative circular polarization correlates with excited state emission. Furthermore, a longer spin lifetime of negatively polarized excitons is observed where emission is largely ground state in character.

  9. Polarization Sensitive Optical Coherence Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, B. Hyle; de Boer, Johannes F.

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an interferometric technique capable of noninvasive high-resolution cross-sectional imaging by measuring the intensity of light reflected from within tissue [1]. This results in a noncontact imaging modality that provides images similar in scale and geometry to histology. Just as different stains can be used to enhance the contrast in histology, various extensions of OCT allow for visualization of features not readily apparent in traditional OCT. For example, optical Doppler tomography [2] can enable depth-resolved imaging of flow by observing differences in phase between successive depth scans [3-5]. This chapter will focus on polarization-sensitive OCT (PS-OCT), which utilizes depth-dependent changes in the polarization state of detected light to determine the light-polarization changing properties of a sample [6-11]. These properties, including birefringence, dichroism, and optic axis orientation, can be determined directly by studying the depth evolution of Stokes parameters [7-10, 12-16] or indirectly by using the changing reflected polarization states to first determine Jones or Mueller matrices [11, 17-21]. PS-OCT has been used in a wide variety of applications, including correlating burn depth with a decrease in birefringence [14], measuring the birefringence of the retinal nerve fiber layer [22, 23], and monitoring the onset and progression of caries lesions [24]. In this chapter, a discussion of polarization theory and its application to PS-OCTwill be followed by clinical uses of the technology and will conclude with mentionof more recent work and future directions of PS-OCT.

  10. Perioperatively acquired disorders of coagulation

    PubMed Central

    Grottke, Oliver; Fries, Dietmar; Nascimento, Bartolomeu

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review To provide an overview of acquired coagulopathies that can occur in various perioperative clinical settings. Also described are coagulation disturbances linked to antithrombotic medications and currently available strategies to reverse their antithrombotic effects in situations of severe hemorrhage. Recent findings Recent studies highlight the link between low fibrinogen and decreased fibrin polymerization in the development of acquired coagulopathy. Particularly, fibrin(ogen) deficits are observable after cardiopulmonary bypass in cardiac surgery, on arrival at the emergency room in trauma patients, and with ongoing bleeding after child birth. Regarding antithrombotic therapy, although new oral anticoagulants offer the possibility of efficacy and relative safety compared with vitamin K antagonists, reversal of their anticoagulant effect with nonspecific agents, including prothrombin complex concentrate, has provided conflicting results. Specific antidotes, currently being developed, are not yet licensed for clinical use, but initial results are promising. Summary Targeted hemostatic therapy aims to correct coagulopathies in specific clinical settings, and reduce the need for allogeneic transfusions, thus preventing massive transfusion and its deleterious outcomes. Although there are specific guidelines for reversing anticoagulation in patients treated with antiplatelet agents or warfarin, there is currently little evidence to advocate comprehensive recommendations to treat drug-induced coagulopathy associated with new oral anticoagulants. PMID:25734869

  11. WAYS OF ACQUIRING FLYING PHOBIA.

    PubMed

    Schindler, Bettina; Vriends, Noortje; Margraf, Jürgen; Stieglitz, Rolf-Dieter

    2016-02-01

    The few studies that have explored how flying phobia is acquired have produced contradictory results. We hypothesized that classical conditioning plays a role in acquiring flying phobia and investigated if vicarious (model) learning, informational learning through media, and experiencing stressful life events at the time of onset of phobia also play a role. Thirty patients with flying phobia and thirty healthy controls matched on age, sex, and education were interviewed with the Mini-DIPS, the short German version of the Anxiety Disorders Interview Schedule (DSM-IV diagnostic criteria) and the Fear-of-Flying History Interview. Fifty Percent of patients with flying phobia and 53% of healthy controls reported frightening events in the air. There was no significant difference between the two samples. Thus there were not more classical conditioning events for patients with flying phobia. There also was no significant difference between the two samples for vicarious (model) learning: 37% of flying phobia patients and 23% of healthy controls felt influenced by model learning. The influence of informational learning through media was significantly higher for the clinical sample (70%) than for the control group (37%). Patients with flying phobia experienced significantly more stressful life events in the period of their frightening flight experience (60%) than healthy controls (19%). Frightening experiences while flying are quite common, but not everybody develops a flying phobia. Stressful life events and other factors might enhance conditionability. Informational learning through negative media reports probably reinforces the development of flying phobia. Clinical implications are discussed. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Foodborne listeriosis acquired in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Silk, Benjamin J; McCoy, Morgan H; Iwamoto, Martha; Griffin, Patricia M

    2014-08-15

    Listeriosis is characterized by bacteremia or meningitis. We searched for listeriosis case series and outbreak investigations published in English by 2013, and assessed the strength of evidence for foodborne acquisition among patients who ate hospital food. We identified 30 reports from 13 countries. Among the case series, the median proportion of cases considered to be hospital-acquired was 25% (range, 9%-67%). The median number of outbreak-related illnesses considered to be hospital-acquired was 4.0 (range, 2-16). All patients were immunosuppressed in 18 of 24 (75%) reports with available data. Eight outbreak reports with strong evidence for foodborne acquisition in a hospital implicated sandwiches (3 reports), butter, precut celery, Camembert cheese, sausage, and tuna salad (1 report each). Foodborne acquisition of listeriosis among hospitalized patients is well documented internationally. The number of listeriosis cases could be reduced substantially by establishing hospital policies for safe food preparation for immunocompromised patients and by not serving them higher-risk foods.

  13. Dynamic lossless polarization gate using a coherently prepared atomic medium.

    PubMed

    Wu, J X; Zhu, Chengjie; Yang, Y P

    2015-11-01

    We propose a dynamic lossless all-optical polarization gate using coherently prepared atomic media. We show that the loss/gain of two circularly polarized components of a linearly polarized probe field can be simultaneously eliminated by locking the power of the pump field and the external magnetic field intensity simultaneously. Using the polarization selective Kerr phase shift method, we can write π/2 (-π/2) phase shift to the right (left) circularly polarized component of the linearly polarized probe field with a choice of "magic" wavelength for the probe field. Consequently, the linear polarization state for the probe field acquires a 90° rotation at the exit of the medium. The scheme proposed in this Letter is helpful for applications in optical and quantum information processing and computation.

  14. Polarized Light in Astronomy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, D. J.

    1983-01-01

    The application of very sensitive electronic detecting devices during the last decade has revolutionized and revitalized the study of polarization in celestial objects. The nature of polarization, how polaroids work, interstellar polarization, dichroic filters, polarization by scattering, and modern polarimetry are among the topics discussed. (JN)

  15. Polarized maser growth

    SciTech Connect

    Melrose, D.B.; Judge, A.C.

    2004-11-01

    A polarized maser is assumed to operate in an anisotropic medium with natural modes polarized differently to the maser. It is shown that when the spatial growth rate and the generalized Faraday rotation rate are comparable, the polarization of the growing radiation is different from those of the maser and medium. In particular, for a lineary polarized maser operating in a medium with linearly polarized natural modes, the growing radiation is partially circularly polarized. This provides a previously unrecognized source of circular polarization that may be relevant to pulsar radio emission.

  16. Polarized electron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Prepost, R.

    1994-12-01

    The fundamentals of polarized electron sources are described with particular application to the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. The SLAC polarized electron source is based on the principle of polarized photoemission from Gallium Arsenide. Recent developments using epitaxially grown, strained Gallium Arsenide cathodes have made it possible to obtain electron polarization significantly in excess of the conventional 50% polarization limit. The basic principles for Gallium and Arsenide polarized photoemitters are reviewed, and the extension of the basic technique to strained cathode structures is described. Results from laboratory measurements of strained photocathodes as well as operational results from the SLAC polarized source are presented.

  17. [Acquired methemoglobinemia--case report].

    PubMed

    Paczek, Anna; Wawrzyńska, Liliana; Mendek-Czajkowska, Ewa; Kober, Jarosław; Torbicki, Adam

    2010-01-01

    Methemoglobinemia; an increased concentration of methemoglobin in the blood, is an altered state of hemoglobin whereby the ferrous form of iron is oxidized to the ferric state, rendering the heme moiety incapable of carrying oxygen. The authors present a case of 49-year-old man who was admitted to the department of chest medicine with dyspnea, weakness and cyanosis in whom differential diagnosis excluded acute and chronic pulmonary and cardiovascular disease. Clinical cyanosis and low measured oxygen saturation in the presence of normal arterial oxygen tension was highly suggestive of methemoglobinemia ("saturation gap"). Methemoglobin level, measured at the acute phase of disease was elevated at 16%. Episode resolved spontaneously. Causes of methemoglobinemia was not established.

  18. Polarization-balanced beamsplitter

    DOEpatents

    Decker, Derek E.

    1998-01-01

    A beamsplitter assembly that includes several beamsplitter cubes arranged to define a plurality of polarization-balanced light paths. Each polarization-balanced light path contains one or more balanced pairs of light paths, where each balanced pair of light paths includes either two transmission light paths with orthogonal polarization effects or two reflection light paths with orthogonal polarization effects. The orthogonal pairing of said transmission and reflection light paths cancels polarization effects otherwise caused by beamsplitting.

  19. Polarization-balanced beamsplitter

    DOEpatents

    Decker, D.E.

    1998-02-17

    A beamsplitter assembly is disclosed that includes several beamsplitter cubes arranged to define a plurality of polarization-balanced light paths. Each polarization-balanced light path contains one or more balanced pairs of light paths, where each balanced pair of light paths includes either two transmission light paths with orthogonal polarization effects or two reflection light paths with orthogonal polarization effects. The orthogonal pairing of said transmission and reflection light paths cancels polarization effects otherwise caused by beamsplitting. 10 figs.

  20. Crossed elliptical polarization undulator

    SciTech Connect

    Sasaki, Shigemi

    1997-05-01

    The first switching of polarization direction is possible by installing two identical helical undulators in series in a same straight section in a storage ring. By setting each undulator in a circular polarization mode in opposite handedness, one can obtain linearly polarized radiation with any required polarization direction depending on the modulator setting between two undulators. This scheme can be used without any major degradation of polarization degree in any low energy low emittance storage ring.

  1. Bejel: acquirable only in childhood?

    PubMed

    Rothschild, Bruce M; Rothschild, Christine; Naples, Virginia; Billard, Michel; Panero, Barbara

    2006-10-01

    Bejel clearly has a long history in the Middle East and the Sudan, but was it transmitted to Europe? As the major manifestation of bejel is presence of periosteal reaction in 20-40% of afflicted populations, absence of significant population frequency of periosteal reaction in Europe would exclude that diagnosis. Examination of skeletal populations from continental Europe revealed no significant periosteal reaction at the time of and immediately subsequent to the Crusades. Thus, there is no evidence for bejel in Europe, in spite of clear contact (the mechanism of bejel transmission in children) between warring groups, at least during the Crusades. This supports the hypothesis that bejel is a childhood-acquired disease and apparently cannot be contracted in adulthood.

  2. Acquired haemophilia in recipients of depot thioxanthenes.

    PubMed

    Stewart, A J; Manson, L M; Dasani, H; Beddall, A; Collins, P; Shima, M; Ludlam, C A

    2000-11-01

    We present two cases in which the occurrence of acquired haemophilia is associated with the use of depot preparations of the thioxanthenes zuclopenthixol and flupenthixol. These drugs have not previously been implicated in the aetiology of acquired haemophilia.

  3. 7 CFR 929.12 - Acquire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... ISLAND IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 929.12 Acquire. Acquire means to obtain cranberries by any means whatsoever for the purpose of handling such cranberries. ...

  4. 7 CFR 929.12 - Acquire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... ISLAND IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 929.12 Acquire. Acquire means to obtain cranberries by any means whatsoever for the purpose of handling such cranberries. ...

  5. 7 CFR 926.10 - Acquire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS APPLICABLE TO CRANBERRIES NOT SUBJECT TO THE CRANBERRY MARKETING ORDER § 926.10 Acquire. Acquire means to obtain cranberries by any means whatsoever for the purpose of handling cranberries. Effective...

  6. 7 CFR 926.10 - Acquire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS APPLICABLE TO CRANBERRIES NOT SUBJECT TO THE CRANBERRY MARKETING ORDER § 926.10 Acquire. Acquire means to obtain cranberries by any means whatsoever for the purpose of handling cranberries. Effective...

  7. 7 CFR 926.10 - Acquire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS APPLICABLE TO CRANBERRIES NOT SUBJECT TO THE CRANBERRY MARKETING ORDER § 926.10 Acquire. Acquire means to obtain cranberries by any means whatsoever for the purpose of handling cranberries. Effective...

  8. 7 CFR 926.10 - Acquire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS APPLICABLE TO CRANBERRIES NOT SUBJECT TO THE CRANBERRY MARKETING ORDER § 926.10 Acquire. Acquire means to obtain cranberries by any means whatsoever for the purpose of handling cranberries. Effective...

  9. 7 CFR 926.10 - Acquire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS APPLICABLE TO CRANBERRIES NOT SUBJECT TO THE CRANBERRY MARKETING ORDER § 926.10 Acquire. Acquire means to obtain cranberries by any means whatsoever for the purpose of handling cranberries. Effective...

  10. Semantic-enabled Spatiotemporal Web Portal for Polar Sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, K.

    2014-12-01

    It is essential for Intergovernmental and scientists to study, monitor and analyze the geographic data in polar regions. Polarregions are likely to respond rapidly and more severely to the climate changesthan any other area on the Earth.They also have significant importance for Global warming research. The ocean water around the Antarctic and Arctic is a crucial part of the ocean's thermohaline circulation. The Polar Cyberinfrastructure Program was built to acquire, share, access, analyze the polar data for Arctic and Antarctic communities. The polar data are becoming big and bring challenges for Polar Cyberinfrastructure Program including: 1) it is difficultfor polar data users to discover most relevant data based on the understanding the behavior; 2) the quality of polar data service is essential to use the polar data, however, it varies for users in different locations and different time. The semantic enabled discovery and volunteer computing are used in the Polar Cyberinfrastructurefor tackling these challenges: 1) semantic search and knowledge reasoning to improve the discovery recall and precision of polar data; 2) volunteer computing is used to gather volunteers computing resources around the world to improve the quality evaluationaccuracy of polar data service. Keywords: Polar Science, Cyberinfrastructure, Semantic, Volunteer Computing

  11. Acquiring Evolving Technologies: Web Services Standards

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-30

    2006 Carnegie Mellon University Acquiring Evolving Technologies : Web Services Standards Harry L. Levinson Software Engineering Institute Carnegie...Acquiring Evolving Technologies : Web Services Standards 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT...298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 2 Acquiring Evolving Technologies : Web Services Standards © 2006 Carnegie Mellon University Acquiring

  12. Polar cap precursor of nightside auroral oval intensifications using polar cap arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Ying; Nishimura, Yukitoshi; Lyons, Larry R.; Donovan, Eric F.; Shiokawa, Kazuo; Ruohoniemi, J. Michael; McWilliams, Kathryn A.; Nishitani, Nozomu

    2015-12-01

    Recent radar and optical observations suggested that localized fast flows in the polar cap precede disturbances within the nightside auroral oval. However, how commonly this connection occurs has been difficult to examine due to limited coverage of radar flow measurements and diffuse and dim nature of airglow patches. Polar cap arcs are also associated with fast flows in the polar cap and appear much brighter than patches, allowing evaluation of the interaction between polar cap structures and nightside aurora more definitively. We have surveyed data during six winter seasons and selected quasi-steady polar cap arcs lasting >1 h. Thirty-four arcs are found, and for the majority (~85%) of them, as they extend equatorward from high latitude, their contact with the nightside auroral poleward boundary is associated with new and substantial intensifications within the oval. These intensifications are localized (< ~1 h magnetic local time (MLT)) and statistically occur within 10 min and ±1 h MLT from the contact. They appear as poleward boundary intensifications in a thick auroral oval or an intensification of the only resolvable arc within a thin oval, and the latter can also exhibit substantial poleward expansion. When radar echoes are available, they corroborate the association of polar cap arcs with localized enhanced antisunward flows. That the observed oval intensifications are major disturbances that only occur after the impingement of polar cap arcs and near the contact longitude suggest that they are triggered by localized fast flows coming from deep in the polar cap.

  13. Parametric analysis of synthetic aperture radar data acquired over truck garden vegetation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, S. T.

    1984-01-01

    An airborne X-band SAR acquired multipolarization and multiflight pass SAR images over a truck garden vegetation area. Based on a variety of land cover and row crop direction variations, the vertical (VV) polarization data contain the highest contrast, while cross polarization contains the least. When the radar flight path is parallel to the row direction, both horizontal (HH) and VV polarization data contain very high return which masks out the specific land cover that forms the row structure. Cross polarization data are not that sensitive to row orientation. The inclusion of like and cross polarization data help delineate special surface features (e.g., row crop against non-row-oriented land cover, very-rough-surface against highly row-oriented surface).

  14. Numerical study of super-resolved optical microscopy with partly staggered beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jinping; Wang, Nan; Kobayashi, Takayoshi

    2016-12-01

    The resolving power of optical microscopy involving two or even more beams, such as pump-probe microscopy and nonlinear optical microscopy, can be enhanced both laterally and longitudinally with partly staggered beams. A numerical study of the new super-resolution imaging technology is performed with vector diffraction theory. The influence of polarization is discussed. A resolving power of sub-100 nm and sub-300 nm in the lateral and longitudinal directions, respectively, is achievable.

  15. Propagation of dynamic nuclear polarization across the xenon cluster boundaries: elucidation of the spin-diffusion bottleneck.

    PubMed

    Pourfathi, M; Kuzma, N N; Kara, H; Ghosh, R K; Shaghaghi, H; Kadlecek, S J; Rizi, R R

    2013-10-01

    Earlier Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) experiments with frozen xenon/1-propanol/trityl mixtures have demonstrated spontaneous formation of pure xenon clusters above 120 K, enabling spectrally-resolved real-time measurements of (129)Xe nuclear magnetization in the clusters and in the surrounding radical-rich matrix. A spin-diffusion bottleneck was postulated to explain the peculiar time evolution of (129)Xe signals in the clusters as well as the apparent discontinuity of (129)Xe polarization across the cluster boundaries. A self-contained ab initio model of nuclear spin diffusion in heterogeneous systems is developed here, incorporating the intrinsic T1 relaxation towards the temperature-dependent equilibrium polarization and the spin-diffusion coefficients based on the measured NMR line widths and the known atomic densities in each compartment. This simple model provides the physical basis for the observed spin-diffusion bottleneck and is in a good quantitative agreement with the earlier measurements. A simultaneous fit of the model to the time-dependent NMR data at two different DNP frequencies provides excellent estimates of the cluster size, the intrinsic sample temperature, and (129)Xe T1 constants. The model was also applied to the NMR data acquired during relaxation towards the thermal equilibrium after the microwaves were turned off, to estimate T1 relaxation time constants inside and outside the clusters. Fitting the model to the data during and after DNP provides consistent estimates of the cluster size.

  16. Resolving boosted jets with XCone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thaler, Jesse; Wilkason, Thomas F.

    2015-12-01

    We show how the recently proposed XCone jet algorithm [1] smoothly interpolates between resolved and boosted kinematics. When using standard jet algorithms to reconstruct the decays of hadronic resonances like top quarks and Higgs bosons, one typically needs separate analysis strategies to handle the resolved regime of well-separated jets and the boosted regime of fat jets with substructure. XCone, by contrast, is an exclusive cone jet algorithm that always returns a fixed number of jets, so jet regions remain resolved even when (sub)jets are overlapping in the boosted regime. In this paper, we perform three LHC case studies — dijet resonances, Higgs decays to bottom quarks, and all-hadronic top pairs — that demonstrate the physics applications of XCone over a wide kinematic range.

  17. Resolvability of positron decay channels

    SciTech Connect

    Fluss, M.J.; Howell, R.H.; Rosenberg, I.J.; Meyer, P.

    1985-03-07

    Many data analysis treatments of positron experiments attempt to resolve two or more positron decay or exist channels which may be open simultaneously. Examples of the need to employ such treatments of the experimental results can be found in the resolution of the constituents of a defect ensemble, or in the analysis of the complex spectra which arise from the interaction of slow positrons at or near the surfaces of solids. Experimental one- and two-dimensional angular correlation of annihilation radiation experiments in Al single crystals have shown that two defect species (mono- and divacancies) can be resolved under suitable conditions. Recent experiments at LLNL indicate that there are a variety of complex exit channels open to positrons interacting at surfaces, and ultimely these decay channels must also be suitably resolved from one another. 6 refs., 4 figs.

  18. Metasurface polarization splitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slovick, Brian A.; Zhou, You; Yu, Zhi Gang; Kravchenko, Ivan I.; Briggs, Dayrl P.; Moitra, Parikshit; Krishnamurthy, Srini; Valentine, Jason

    2017-03-01

    Polarization beam splitters, devices that separate the two orthogonal polarizations of light into different propagation directions, are among the most ubiquitous optical elements. However, traditionally polarization splitters rely on bulky optical materials, while emerging optoelectronic and photonic circuits require compact, chip-scale polarization splitters. Here, we show that a rectangular lattice of cylindrical silicon Mie resonators functions as a polarization splitter, efficiently reflecting one polarization while transmitting the other. We show that the polarization splitting arises from the anisotropic permittivity and permeability of the metasurface due to the twofold rotational symmetry of the rectangular unit cell. The high polarization efficiency, low loss and low profile make these metasurface polarization splitters ideally suited for monolithic integration with optoelectronic and photonic circuits. This article is part of the themed issue 'New horizons for nanophotonics'.

  19. Metasurface polarization splitter.

    PubMed

    Slovick, Brian A; Zhou, You; Yu, Zhi Gang; Kravchenko, Ivan I; Briggs, Dayrl P; Moitra, Parikshit; Krishnamurthy, Srini; Valentine, Jason

    2017-03-28

    Polarization beam splitters, devices that separate the two orthogonal polarizations of light into different propagation directions, are among the most ubiquitous optical elements. However, traditionally polarization splitters rely on bulky optical materials, while emerging optoelectronic and photonic circuits require compact, chip-scale polarization splitters. Here, we show that a rectangular lattice of cylindrical silicon Mie resonators functions as a polarization splitter, efficiently reflecting one polarization while transmitting the other. We show that the polarization splitting arises from the anisotropic permittivity and permeability of the metasurface due to the twofold rotational symmetry of the rectangular unit cell. The high polarization efficiency, low loss and low profile make these metasurface polarization splitters ideally suited for monolithic integration with optoelectronic and photonic circuits.This article is part of the themed issue 'New horizons for nanophotonics'.

  20. Metasurface polarization splitter

    DOE PAGES

    Slovick, Brian A.; Zhou, You; Yu, Zhi Gang; ...

    2017-02-20

    Polarization beam splitters, devices that separate the two orthogonal polarizations of light into different propagation directions, are among the most ubiquitous optical elements. However, traditionally polarization splitters rely on bulky optical materials, while emerging optoelectronic and photonic circuits require compact, chip-scale polarization splitters. Here, we show that a rectangular lattice of cylindrical silicon Mie resonators functions as a polarization splitter, efficiently reflecting one polarization while transmitting the other. We show that the polarization splitting arises from the anisotropic permittivity and permeability of the metasurface due to the twofold rotational symmetry of the rectangular unit cell. Lastly, the high polarization efficiency,more » low loss and low profile make these metasurface polarization splitters ideally suited for monolithic integration with optoelectronic and photonic circuits.« less

  1. Corticomotoneuronal function and hyperexcitability in acquired neuromyotonia.

    PubMed

    Vucic, Steve; Cheah, Benjamin C; Yiannikas, Con; Vincent, Angela; Kiernan, Matthew C

    2010-09-01

    Acquired neuromyotonia encompasses a group of inflammatory disorders characterized by symptoms reflecting peripheral nerve hyperexcitability, which may be clinically confused in the early stages with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Despite a clear peripheral nerve focus, it remains unclear whether the ectopic activity in acquired neuromyotonia receives a central contribution. To clarify whether cortical hyperexcitability contributes to development of clinical features of acquired neuromyotonia, the present study investigated whether threshold tracking transcranial magnetic stimulation could detect cortical hyperexcitability in acquired neuromyotonia, and whether this technique could differentiate acquired neuromyotonia from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Cortical excitability studies were undertaken in 18 patients with acquired neuromyotonia and 104 patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, with results compared to 62 normal controls. Short-interval intracortical inhibition in patients with acquired neuromyotonia was significantly different when compared to patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (averaged short interval intracortical inhibition acquired neuromyotonia 11.3 +/- 1.9%; amyotrophic lateral sclerosis 2.6 +/- 0.9%, P < 0.001). In addition, the motor evoked potential amplitudes (acquired neuromyotonia 21.0 +/- 3.1%; amyotrophic lateral sclerosis 38.1 +/- 2.2%, P < 0.0001), intracortical facilitation (acquired neuromyotonia -0.9 +/- 1.3%; amyotrophic lateral sclerosis -2.3 +/- 0.6%, P < 0.0001), resting motor thresholds (acquired neuromyotonia 62.2 +/- 1.6%; amyotrophic lateral sclerosis 57.2 +/- 0.9%, P < 0.05) and cortical silent period durations (acquired neuromyotonia 212.8 +/- 6.9 ms; amyotrophic lateral sclerosis 181.1 +/- 4.3 ms, P < 0.0001) were significantly different between patients with acquired neuromyotonia and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Threshold tracking transcranial magnetic stimulation established corticomotoneuronal integrity

  2. The multiwavelength polarization of Cygnus X-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, David M.; Shahbaz, Tariq

    2014-03-01

    Polarization measurements of the microquasar Cygnus X-1 exist at γ-ray, X-ray, ultraviolet, optical and radio frequencies. The γ-ray emission has been shown to be highly linearly polarized. Here, we present new infrared polarimetric data of Cygnus X-1 taken with the 10.4 m Gran Telescopio Canarias and the 4.2 m William Herschel Telescope. We show that the broad-band, radio-to-γ-ray flux spectrum and polarization spectrum in the hard state are largely consistent with a simple phenomenological model of a strongly polarized synchrotron jet, an unpolarized Comptonized corona and a moderately polarized interstellar dust component. In this model, the origin of the γ-ray, X-ray and some of the infrared polarization is the optically thin synchrotron power law from the inner regions of the jet. The model requires the magnetic field in this region to be highly ordered and perpendicular to the axis of the resolved radio jet. This differs from studies of some other X-ray binaries, in which the magnetic field is turbulent, variable and aligned with the jet axis. The model is able to explain the approximate polarization strength and position angle at all wavelengths including the detected X-ray (3-5 keV) polarization, except the observed position angle of the γ-ray polarization, which differs from the model by ˜60°. Past numerical modelling has shown that a curved synchrotron spectrum can produce a shift in position angle by ˜60°, which may account for this.

  3. Polarized positrons and electrons at the linear collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moortgat-Pick, G.; Abe, T.; Alexander, G.; Ananthanarayan, B.; Babich, A. A.; Bharadwaj, V.; Barber, D.; Bartl, A.; Brachmann, A.; Chen, S.; Clarke, J.; Clendenin, J. E.; Dainton, J.; Desch, K.; Diehl, M.; Dobos, B.; Dorland, T.; Dreiner, H. K.; Eberl, H.; Ellis, J.; Flöttmann, K.; Fraas, H.; Franco-Sollova, F.; Franke, F.; Freitas, A.; Goodson, J.; Gray, J.; Han, A.; Heinemeyer, S.; Hesselbach, S.; Hirose, T.; Hohenwarter-Sodek, K.; Juste, A.; Kalinowski, J.; Kernreiter, T.; Kittel, O.; Kraml, S.; Langenfeld, U.; Majerotto, W.; Martinez, A.; Martyn, H.-U.; Mikhailichenko, A.; Milstene, C.; Menges, W.; Meyners, N.; Mönig, K.; Moffeit, K.; Moretti, S.; Nachtmann, O.; Nagel, F.; Nakanishi, T.; Nauenberg, U.; Nowak, H.; Omori, T.; Osland, P.; Pankov, A. A.; Paver, N.; Pitthan, R.; Pöschl, R.; Porod, W.; Proulx, J.; Richardson, P.; Riemann, S.; Rindani, S. D.; Rizzo, T. G.; Schälicke, A.; Schüler, P.; Schwanenberger, C.; Scott, D.; Sheppard, J.; Singh, R. K.; Sopczak, A.; Spiesberger, H.; Stahl, A.; Steiner, H.; Wagner, A.; Weber, A. M.; Weiglein, G.; Wilson, G. W.; Woods, M.; Zerwas, P.; Zhang, J.; Zomer, F.

    2008-05-01

    The proposed International Linear Collider (ILC) is well-suited for discovering physics beyond the Standard Model and for precisely unraveling the structure of the underlying physics. The physics return can be maximized by the use of polarized beams. This report shows the paramount role of polarized beams and summarizes the benefits obtained from polarizing the positron beam, as well as the electron beam. The physics case for this option is illustrated explicitly by analyzing reference reactions in different physics scenarios. The results show that positron polarization, combined with the clean experimental environment provided by the linear collider, allows to improve strongly the potential of searches for new particles and the identification of their dynamics, which opens the road to resolve shortcomings of the Standard Model. The report also presents an overview of possible designs for polarizing both beams at the ILC, as well as for measuring their polarization.

  4. Polarized reflectance and transmittance properties of windblown sea surfaces.

    PubMed

    Mobley, Curtis D

    2015-05-20

    Generation of random sea surfaces using wave variance spectra and Fourier transforms is formulated in a way that guarantees conservation of wave energy and fully resolves wave height and slope variances. Monte Carlo polarized ray tracing, which accounts for multiple scattering between light rays and wave facets, is used to compute effective Mueller matrices for reflection and transmission of air- or water-incident polarized radiance. Irradiance reflectances computed using a Rayleigh sky radiance distribution, sea surfaces generated with Cox-Munk statistics, and unpolarized ray tracing differ by 10%-18% compared with values computed using elevation- and slope-resolving surfaces and polarized ray tracing. Radiance reflectance factors, as used to estimate water-leaving radiance from measured upwelling and sky radiances, are shown to depend on sky polarization, and improved values are given.

  5. Spin polarization of Co(0001)/graphene junctions from first principles.

    PubMed

    Sipahi, G M; Žutić, Igor; Atodiresei, N; Kawakami, R K; Lazić, P

    2014-03-12

    Junctions comprised of ferromagnets and nonmagnetic materials are one of the key building blocks in spintronics. With the recent breakthroughs of spin injection in ferromagnet/graphene junctions it is possible to consider spin-based applications that are not limited to magnetoresistive effects. However, for critical studies of such structures it is crucial to establish accurate predictive methods that would yield atomically resolved information on interfacial properties. By focusing on Co(0001)/graphene junctions and their electronic structure, we illustrate the inequivalence of different spin polarizations. We show atomically resolved spin polarization maps as a useful approach to assess the relevance of Co(0001)/graphene for different spintronics applications.

  6. Time-resolved fluorescence study of all-trans-retinal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erez, Yuval; Presiado, Itay; Gepshtein, Rinat; Simkovitch, Ron; Huppert, Dan

    2014-11-01

    UV-vis steady-state and time-resolved emission techniques were employed to study the ultrafast relaxation path of all-trans-retinal. We found that the steady-state emission spectrum consists mainly of two bands that we assign to the allowed transition from the ? state and the forbidden transition from the ?(ππ*) state. The time-resolved emission signal is dependent on the excitation wavelength, and is composed of three decay components. The short-time component of less than 80 fs, irrespective of the solvent, is assigned to the transition from the ? state. The intermediate-time decay component is assigned to the transition from the ?(ππ*) state, depends on the solvent's polarity and not on the existence of hydrogen bonds between the solute and the solvent or the viscosity of the latter. It has a lifetime of ~1 ps in polar solvents, and of 0.6 and 0.4 ps in the non-polar solvents n-octane and cyclohexane, respectively.

  7. Mars polar volatiles: Topographic and geologic setting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murray, B.; Soderblom, L.; Herkenhoff, K.

    1984-01-01

    Progress on a project to elucidate the geological and topographic setting of the Martian polar volatiles is reported. The following accomplishments are enumerated: (1) all of the Mariner 9 imaging data sets available through JPL were acquired and copied; (2) Mariner 9 imagery was investigated in terms of the accuracy of the imaging footprints, dark current, and residual image; (3) the transfer functions of both vidicons were investigated; and (4) the magnitude of the atmospheric scattering was examined.

  8. Polarization Properties of Rotation Powered Pulsars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding Alice K.

    2009-01-01

    Polarization measurements of rotation-powered pulsars and their nebulae have unique diagnostic potential. The polarization position angle of the pulsar wind nebula, as is know for the Crab pulsar, can tell us the orientation of the spin axis. Phase-resolved polarimetry of pulsars has had enormous diagnostic capability at radio and optical wavelengths and could also be a powerful diagnostic in the X-ray range. Measurement of the polarization properties as a function of pulse phase can therefore provide a multidimensional mapping of the pulsar emission. In the 'rotating vector' model, radiation originating near a magnetic pole is expected to show a characteristic S-shaped swing of the position angle vs. pulse phase. In this case it is possible to determine the magnetic inclination and viewing angles. Radiation originating further from the poles or further above the neutron star surface will have a more complex polarization signature, as a result of relativistic effects of aberration and time-of-flight delays and may also cause depolarization of the signal. I will discuss predicted polarization properties of pulsed emission in polar cap models, where radiation originates near the neutron star surface at the magnetic poles, and in slot gap and outer gap models, where radiation originates over a range of altitudes out to the speed-of-light cylinder.

  9. Associative Learning Through Acquired Salience

    PubMed Central

    Treviño, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Most associative learning studies describe the salience of stimuli as a fixed learning-rate parameter. Presumptive saliency signals, however, have also been linked to motivational and attentional processes. An interesting possibility, therefore, is that discriminative stimuli could also acquire salience as they become powerful predictors of outcomes. To explore this idea, we first characterized and extracted the learning curves from mice trained with discriminative images offering varying degrees of structural similarity. Next, we fitted a linear model of associative learning coupled to a series of mathematical representations for stimulus salience. We found that the best prediction, from the set of tested models, was one in which the visual salience depended on stimulus similarity and a non-linear function of the associative strength. Therefore, these analytic results support the idea that the net salience of a stimulus depends both on the items' effective salience and the motivational state of the subject that learns about it. Moreover, this dual salience model can explain why learning about a stimulus not only depends on the effective salience during acquisition but also on the specific learning trajectory that was used to reach this state. Our mathematical description could be instrumental for understanding aberrant salience acquisition under stressful situations and in neuropsychiatric disorders like schizophrenia, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and addiction. PMID:26793078

  10. Associative Learning Through Acquired Salience.

    PubMed

    Treviño, Mario

    2015-01-01

    Most associative learning studies describe the salience of stimuli as a fixed learning-rate parameter. Presumptive saliency signals, however, have also been linked to motivational and attentional processes. An interesting possibility, therefore, is that discriminative stimuli could also acquire salience as they become powerful predictors of outcomes. To explore this idea, we first characterized and extracted the learning curves from mice trained with discriminative images offering varying degrees of structural similarity. Next, we fitted a linear model of associative learning coupled to a series of mathematical representations for stimulus salience. We found that the best prediction, from the set of tested models, was one in which the visual salience depended on stimulus similarity and a non-linear function of the associative strength. Therefore, these analytic results support the idea that the net salience of a stimulus depends both on the items' effective salience and the motivational state of the subject that learns about it. Moreover, this dual salience model can explain why learning about a stimulus not only depends on the effective salience during acquisition but also on the specific learning trajectory that was used to reach this state. Our mathematical description could be instrumental for understanding aberrant salience acquisition under stressful situations and in neuropsychiatric disorders like schizophrenia, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and addiction.

  11. Seagull to acquire arkla exploration

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-11-23

    Seagull Energy Corp., Houston, has agreed to acquire Arkla Exploration Inc. from Arkla Inc., Shreveport, La., for about $402 million. The transaction-expected to net Seagull reserves totaling about 578 bcf of gas and 7.3 million bbl of oil and condensate-would more than double Seagull's proved reserves and nearly double its total assets. According to Seagull's 1991 annual report, the company's reserves at yearend 1991 were estimated at 401.2 bcf of gas equivalent (bcfe), including 335.1 bcf of gas and 11 million bbl of oil. Independent engineers at yearend 1991 estimated Arkla's proved reserves at 635 bcf of gas and 9 million bbl of liquids. Seagull Chairman Barry J. Galt said the company plans to keep many of Arkla Exploration's employees and to establish a meaningful presence in Shreveport. Arkla's already got good people in Shreveport and an operating base, a Seagull official said. We want to move in, put our name on the door, and continue the good operations Arkla already has. Seagull has lined up financing for the acquisition from a group of major U.S. banks. A new credit facility-consisting of a $475 million line of revolving credit and a $150 million 3 year term loan-will replace an exiting $225 million line of revolving credit. Boards of both companies have approved the deal, which Seagull and Arkla hope to close before yearend, subject to regulatory approvals and purchase price adjustments.

  12. Infections Acquired in the Garden.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Cheston B; Cunha, Burke A

    2015-10-01

    Gardening is a wonderful pastime, and the garden is a very peaceful place to enjoy one's vacation. However, the garden may be a treacherous place for very young or compromised hosts when one takes into account the infectious potential residing in the soil, as well as the insect vectors on plants and animals. Even normal hosts may acquire a variety of infections from the soil, animals, or animal-related insect bites. The location of the garden, its natural animal and insect inhabitants, and the characteristics of the soil play a part in determining its infectious potential. The most important factor making the garden an infectious and dangerous place is the number and interaction of animals, whether they are pets or wild, that temporarily use the garden for part of their daily activities. The clinician should always ask about garden exposure, which will help in eliminating the diagnostic possibilities for the patient. The diagnostic approach is to use epidemiological principles in concert with clinical clues, which together should suggest a reasonable list of diagnostic possibilities. Organ involvement and specific laboratory tests help further narrow the differential diagnosis and determine the specific tests necessary to make a definitive diagnosis.

  13. Inherited or acquired metabolic disorders.

    PubMed

    Eichler, Florian; Ratai, Eva; Carroll, Jason J; Masdeu, Joseph C

    2016-01-01

    This chapter starts with a description of imaging of inherited metabolic disorders, followed by a discussion on imaging of acquired toxic-metabolic disorders of the adult brain. Neuroimaging is crucial for the diagnosis and management of a number of inherited metabolic disorders. Among these, inherited white-matter disorders commonly affect both the nervous system and endocrine organs. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has enabled new classifications of these disorders that have greatly enhanced both our diagnostic ability and our understanding of these complex disorders. Beyond the classic leukodystrophies, we are increasingly recognizing new hereditary leukoencephalopathies such as the hypomyelinating disorders. Conventional imaging can be unrevealing in some metabolic disorders, but proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) may be able to directly visualize the metabolic abnormality in certain disorders. Hence, neuroimaging can enhance our understanding of pathogenesis, even in the absence of a pathologic specimen. This review aims to present pathognomonic brain MRI lesion patterns, the diagnostic capacity of proton MRS, and information from clinical and laboratory testing that can aid diagnosis. We demonstrate that applying an advanced neuroimaging approach enhances current diagnostics and management. Additional information on inherited and metabolic disorders of the brain can be found in Chapter 63 in the second volume of this series.

  14. [A review on polarization information in the remote sensing detection].

    PubMed

    Gong, Jie-Qiong; Zhan, Hai-Gang; Liu, Da-Zhao

    2010-04-01

    Polarization is one of the inherent characteristics. Because the surface of the target structure, internal structure, and the angle of incident light are different, the earth's surface and any target in atmosphere under optical interaction process will have their own characteristic nature of polarization. Polarimetric characteristics of radiation energy from the targets are used in polarization remote sensing detection as detective information. Polarization remote sensing detection can get the seven-dimensional information of targets in complicated backgrounds, detect well-resolved outline of targets and low-reflectance region of objectives, and resolve the problems of atmospheric detection and identification camouflage detection which the traditional remote sensing detection can not solve, having good foreground in applications. This paper introduces the development of polarization information in the remote sensing detection from the following four aspects. The rationale of polarization remote sensing detection is the base of polarization remote sensing detection, so it is firstly introduced. Secondly, the present researches on equipments that are used in polarization remote sensing detection are particularly and completely expatiated. Thirdly, the present exploration of theoretical simulation of polarization remote sensing detection is well detailed. Finally, the authors present the applications research home and abroad of the polarization remote sensing detection technique in the fields of remote sensing, atmospheric sounding, sea surface and underwater detection, biology and medical diagnosis, astronomical observation and military, summing up the current problems in polarization remote sensing detection. The development trend of polarization remote sensing detection technology in the future is pointed out in order to provide a reference for similar studies.

  15. Detecting Exomoons Around Self-Luminous Giant Exoplanets Through Polarization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sengupta, Sujan; Marley, Mark Scott

    2016-01-01

    Many of the directly imaged self-luminous gas giant exoplanets have been found to have cloudy atmo- spheres. Scattering of the emergent thermal radiation from these planets by the dust grains in their atmospheres should locally give rise to significant linear polarization of the emitted radiation. However, the observable disk averaged polarization should be zero if the planet is spherically symmetric. Rotation-induced oblateness may yield a net non-zero disk averaged polarization if the planets have sufficiently high spin rotation velocity. On the other hand, when a large natural satellite or exomoon transits a planet with cloudy atmosphere along the line of sight, the asymmetry induced during the transit should give rise to a net non-zero, time resolved linear polarization signal. The peak amplitude of such time dependent polarization may be detectable even for slowly rotating exoplanets. Therefore, we suggest that large exomoons around directly imaged self-luminous exoplanets may be detectable through time resolved imaging polarimetry. Adopting detailed atmospheric models for several values of effective temperature and surface gravity which are appropriate for self-luminous exoplanets, we present the polarization profiles of these objects in the infrared during transit phase and estimate the peak amplitude of polarization that occurs during the the inner contacts of the transit ingress/egress phase. The peak polarization is predicted to range between 0.1 and 0.3 % in the infrared.

  16. Resolving Ethical Issues at School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benninga, Jacques S.

    2013-01-01

    Although ethical dilemmas are a constant in teachers' lives, the profession has offered little in the way of training to help teachers address such issues. This paper presents a framework, based on developmental theory, for resolving professional ethical dilemmas. The Four-Component Model of Moral Maturity, when used in conjunction with a…

  17. Resolving Ethical Issues at School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benninga, Jacques S.

    2013-01-01

    Although ethical dilemmas are a constant in teachers' lives, the profession has offered little in the way of training to help teachers address such issues. This paper presents a framework, based on developmental theory, for resolving professional ethical dilemmas. The Four-Component Model of Moral Maturity, when used in conjunction with a…

  18. Virginia Resolves, 1993-1994.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrow, S. Rex, Ed.

    1994-01-01

    These two issues of "Virginia Resolves" provide articles of interest to the social studies reader and provides ideas for social studies instruction and curriculum. The fall issue features seven articles: (1) "Death and the Young Child" (Rosanne J. Marek); (2) "Simulations: Bibliography for the Middle and Elementary…

  19. Time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Tokmakoff, Andrei; Champion, Paul; Heilweil, Edwin J.; Nelson, Keith A.; Ziegler, Larry

    2009-05-14

    This document contains the Proceedings from the 14th International Conference on Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy, which was held in Meredith, NH from May 9-14, 2009. The study of molecular dynamics in chemical reaction and biological processes using time-resolved spectroscopy plays an important role in our understanding of energy conversion, storage, and utilization problems. Fundamental studies of chemical reactivity, molecular rearrangements, and charge transport are broadly supported by the DOE's Office of Science because of their role in the development of alternative energy sources, the understanding of biological energy conversion processes, the efficient utilization of existing energy resources, and the mitigation of reactive intermediates in radiation chemistry. In addition, time-resolved spectroscopy is central to all fiveof DOE's grand challenges for fundamental energy science. The Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy conference is organized biennially to bring the leaders in this field from around the globe together with young scientists to discuss the most recent scientific and technological advances. The latest technology in ultrafast infrared, Raman, and terahertz spectroscopy and the scientific advances that these methods enable were covered. Particular emphasis was placed on new experimental methods used to probe molecular dynamics in liquids, solids, interfaces, nanostructured materials, and biomolecules.

  20. 17 CFR 210.8-06 - Real estate operations acquired or to be acquired.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Real estate operations acquired or to be acquired. 210.8-06 Section 210.8-06 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND... Statements of Smaller Reporting Companies § 210.8-06 Real estate operations acquired or to be acquired....

  1. Polarization maintaining fiber based ultra-high resolution spectral domain polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    We present a new ultra high resolution spectral domain polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) system based on polarization maintaining (PM) fibers. The method transfers the principles of our previous bulk optic PS-OCT systems to a fiberized setup. The phase shift between the orthogonal polarization states travelling in the two orthogonal modes of the PM fiber is compensated by software in post processing. Thereby, the main advantage of our bulk optics setups, i.e. the use of only a single input polarization state to simultaneously acquire reflectivity, retardation, optic axis orientation, and Stokes vector, is maintained. The use of a broadband light source of 110 nm bandwidth provides improved depth resolution and smaller speckle size. The latter is important for improved resolution of depolarization imaging. We demonstrate our instrument for high-resolution PS-OCT imaging of the healthy human retina. PMID:20052196

  2. Polarized Light Corridor Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davies, G. R.

    1990-01-01

    Eleven demonstrations of light polarization are presented. Each includes a brief description of the apparatus and the effect demonstrated. Illustrated are strain patterns, reflection, scattering, the Faraday Effect, interference, double refraction, the polarizing microscope, and optical activity. (CW)

  3. A Translational Polarization Rotator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chuss, David T.; Wollack, Edward J.; Pisano, Giampaolo; Ackiss, Sheridan; U-Yen, Kongpop; Ng, Ming wah

    2012-01-01

    We explore a free-space polarization modulator in which a variable phase introduction between right- and left-handed circular polarization components is used to rotate the linear polarization of the outgoing beam relative to that of the incoming beam. In this device, the polarization states are separated by a circular polarizer that consists of a quarter-wave plate in combination with a wire grid. A movable mirror is positioned behind and parallel to the circular polarizer. As the polarizer-mirror distance is separated, an incident liear polarization will be rotated through an angle that is proportional to the introduced phase delay. We demonstrate a prototype device that modulates Stokes Q and U over a 20% bandwidth.

  4. Polarized Light Corridor Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davies, G. R.

    1990-01-01

    Eleven demonstrations of light polarization are presented. Each includes a brief description of the apparatus and the effect demonstrated. Illustrated are strain patterns, reflection, scattering, the Faraday Effect, interference, double refraction, the polarizing microscope, and optical activity. (CW)

  5. North Polar Scarp

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-05-09

    This image from NASA 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft shows the scarp face of the north polar cap near Abalos Mensa. The top part of the image is the polar cap. This image was collected during northern hemisphere summer.

  6. Polarization at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Woods, M.

    1995-01-01

    A highly polarized electron beam is a key feature. for the Current physics program at SLAC. An electron beam polarization of 80% can now be routinely achieved for typically 5000 hours of machine operation per year. Two main Physics programs utilize the polarized beam. Fixed target experiments in End Station A study the collision of polarized electrons with polarized nuclear targets to elucidate the spin structure of the nucleon and to provide an important test of QCD. Using the SLAC Linear Collider, collisions of polarized electrons with unpolarized positrons allow precise measurements of parity violation in the Z-fermion couplings and provide a very precise measurement of tile weak mixing angle. This paper discusses polarized beam operation at SLAC, and gives an overview of the polarized physics program.

  7. Long Term Changes in the Polar Vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braathen, Geir O.

    2016-04-01

    As the amount of halogens in the stratosphere is slowly declining and the ozone layer slowly recovers it is of interest to see how the meteorological conditions in the vortex develop over the long term since such changes might alter the foreseen ozone recovery. In conjunction with the publication of the WMO Antarctic and Arctic Ozone Bulletins, WMO has acquired the ERA Interim global reanalysis data set for several meteorological parameters. This data set goes from 1979 - present. These long time series of data can be used for several useful studies of the long term development of the polar vortices. Several "environmental indicators" for vortex change have been calculated, and a climatology, as well as trends, for these parameters will be presented. These indicators can act as yardsticks and will be useful for understanding past and future changes in the polar vortices and how these changes affect polar ozone depletion. Examples of indicators are: vortex mean temperature, vortex minimum temperature, vortex mean PV, vortex "importance" (PV*area), vortex break-up time, mean and maximum wind speed. Data for both the north and south polar vortices have been analysed at several isentropic levels from 350 to 850 K. A possible link between changes in PV and sudden stratospheric warmings will be investigated, and the results presented. The unusual meteorological conditions of the 2015 south polar vortex and the 2010/11 and 2015/16 north polar vortices will be compared to other recent years.

  8. Acquired immune deficiency syndrome: review.

    PubMed

    Scully, C; Cawson, R A; Porter, S R

    1986-07-19

    Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) is reviewed for dental practitioners, with an emphasis on oral findings; the clinical course, diagnosis, reporting, treatment, prognosis, transmission, and epidemiology are also covered. HIV infection has an incubation period that may be associated with glandular fever, a prodrome called AIDS-Related Complex (ARC) characterized by lymphadenopathy, low fever, weight loss, night sweats, diarrhea, oral candidosis, nonproductive cough and recurrent infections. AIDS is characterized by opportunistic infections. Over 50% present with pneumocystis carinii pneumonia, 21% with Kaposi's sarcoma, and 6% have both. The AIDS virus causes direct neurological symptoms in some cases. Oral candidosis (thrush) in a young male without a local cause such as xerostomia or immune suppression is strongly suggestive of AIDS. Other oral manifestations are severe herpes simplex, varicella-zoster, Epstein-Barr virus, cytomegalovirus, venereal warts, aphthous ulceration, mycobacterial oral ulcers, oral histoplasmosis, sinusitis and osteomyelitis of the jaw. Hairy leukoplakia, usually seen on the lateral border of the tongue, is probably caused by Epstein-Barr virus. Kaposi's sarcoma, an endothelial cell tumor, is characteristic of AIDS, and in 50% of patients is oral or perioral. Cervical lymph node enlargement will be seen in those with ARC as well as AIDS. No guidelines have been issued by the Department of Health and Social Security for dental surgeons in the UK for reporting AIDS cases. Although HIV virions have been isolated from saliva, there are no known incidents of transmission via saliva. HIV is less likely to be transmitted by needle stick injuries than, for example hepatitis B (25% risk), especially if the blood is from a carrier rather than a full blown AIDS case.

  9. Clinicopathological associations of acquired erythroblastopenia

    PubMed Central

    Gunes, Gursel; Malkan, Umit Yavuz; Yasar, Hatime Arzu; Eliacik, Eylem; Haznedaroglu, Ibrahim Celalettin; Demiroglu, Haluk; Sayinalp, Nilgun; Aksu, Salih; Etgul, Sezgin; Aslan, Tuncay; Goker, Hakan; Ozcebe, Osman Ilhami; Buyukasik, Yahya

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Acquired erythroblastopenia (AE) is a rare clinical situation. It is characterized by the reduction of erythroid precursors in the bone marrow together with the low reticulocyte counts in the peripheral blood. Background: Main secondary causes of AE are drugs, Parvovirus B19 and other infectious reasons, lymphoid and myeloid neoplasia, autoimmune diseases, thymoma and pregnancy. The aim of this study is to assess the frequencies and clinical associations of AE via analyzing 12340 bone marrow samples in a retrospective manner. Material and method: Bone marrow aspirations which were obtained from patients who applied to Hacettepe University Hematology Clinic between 2002 and 2013, were analyzed retrospectively. Results: Thirty four erythroblastopenia cases were found. Patients ranged in age from 16 to 80 years with a median of 38 years. Fifteen patients were men (44%) and nineteen were women (56%). In these patients, detected causes of erythroblastopenia were MDS, idiopathic pure red cell aplasia (PRCA), parvovirus infection, post chemotherapy aplasia, plasma proliferative diseases, copper deficiency due to secondary amyloidosis, fever of unknown origin, hemophagocytic syndrome, enteric fever and legionella pneumonia. We found that between those reasons the most common causes of erythroblastopenia are MDS (17.7%) and idiopathic PRCA (17.7%). Discussion: As a result, erythroblastopenia in the bone marrow may be an early sign of MDS. In those AE cases possibility of being MDS must be kept in mind as it can be mistaken for PRCA. Conclusion: To conclude, in adults MDS without excess blast is one of the most common causes of erythroblastopenia in clinical practice and in case of erythroblastopenia the presence of MDS should be investigated. PMID:26885236

  10. Clinicopathological associations of acquired erythroblastopenia.

    PubMed

    Gunes, Gursel; Malkan, Umit Yavuz; Yasar, Hatime Arzu; Eliacik, Eylem; Haznedaroglu, Ibrahim Celalettin; Demiroglu, Haluk; Sayinalp, Nilgun; Aksu, Salih; Etgul, Sezgin; Aslan, Tuncay; Goker, Hakan; Ozcebe, Osman Ilhami; Buyukasik, Yahya

    2015-01-01

    Acquired erythroblastopenia (AE) is a rare clinical situation. It is characterized by the reduction of erythroid precursors in the bone marrow together with the low reticulocyte counts in the peripheral blood. Main secondary causes of AE are drugs, Parvovirus B19 and other infectious reasons, lymphoid and myeloid neoplasia, autoimmune diseases, thymoma and pregnancy. The aim of this study is to assess the frequencies and clinical associations of AE via analyzing 12340 bone marrow samples in a retrospective manner. Bone marrow aspirations which were obtained from patients who applied to Hacettepe University Hematology Clinic between 2002 and 2013, were analyzed retrospectively. Thirty four erythroblastopenia cases were found. Patients ranged in age from 16 to 80 years with a median of 38 years. Fifteen patients were men (44%) and nineteen were women (56%). In these patients, detected causes of erythroblastopenia were MDS, idiopathic pure red cell aplasia (PRCA), parvovirus infection, post chemotherapy aplasia, plasma proliferative diseases, copper deficiency due to secondary amyloidosis, fever of unknown origin, hemophagocytic syndrome, enteric fever and legionella pneumonia. We found that between those reasons the most common causes of erythroblastopenia are MDS (17.7%) and idiopathic PRCA (17.7%). As a result, erythroblastopenia in the bone marrow may be an early sign of MDS. In those AE cases possibility of being MDS must be kept in mind as it can be mistaken for PRCA. To conclude, in adults MDS without excess blast is one of the most common causes of erythroblastopenia in clinical practice and in case of erythroblastopenia the presence of MDS should be investigated.

  11. Perspectives for Polarized Antiprotons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenisa, Paolo

    In the framework of the FAIR project the PAX Collaboration has suggested new experiments using polarized protons and antiprotons. In order to provide polarized antiprotons, the proposed mechanisms for the production of a polarized stored have to be investigated. To this aim a series of experiments have already been started with protons at the COSY ring. Additional experiment have to be foreseen at AD ring with antiprotons to define to working parameters of a dedicated Antiproton Polarizer Ring.

  12. RESOLVE's Field Demonstration on Mauna Kea, Hawaii 2010

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Captain, Janine; Quinn, Jacqueline; Moss, Thomas; Weis, Kyle

    2010-01-01

    In cooperation with the Canadian Space Agency, and the Northern Centre for Advanced Technology, Inc., NASA has undertaken the In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) project called RESOLVE (Regolith and Environment Science & Oxygen and Lunar Volatile Extraction). This project is an Earth-based lunar precursor demonstration of a system that could be sent to explore permanently shadowed polar lunar craters, where it would drill into regolith, quantify the volatiles that are present, and extract oxygen by hydrogen reduction of iron oxides. The resulting water could be electrolyzed into oxygen to support exploration and hydrogen, which would be recycled through the process. The RESOLVE chemical processing system was mounted on a Canadian Space Agency mobility chasis and successfully demonstrated on Hawaii's Mauna Kea volcano in February 2010. The RESOLVE unit is the initial prototype of a robotic prospecting mission to the Moon. RESOLVE is designed to go to the poles of the Moon to "ground truth" the form and concentration of the hydrogen/water/hydroxyl that has been seen from orbit (M3, Lunar Prospector and LRO) and to test technologies to extract oxygen from the lunar regolith. RESOLVE has the ability to capture a one-meter core sample of lunar regolith and heat it to determine the volatiles that may be released and then demonstrate the production of oxygen from minerals found in the regolith. The RESOLVE project, which is led by KSC, is a multi-center and multi-organizational effort that includes representatives from KSC, JSC, GRC, the Canadian Space Agency, and the Northern Center for Advanced Technology (NORCAT). This paper details the results obtained from four days of lunar analog testing that included gas chromatograph analysis for volatile components, remote control of chemistry and drilling operations via satalite communications, and real-time water quantification using a novel capacitance measurement technique.

  13. Polar Pits: Are They Active?

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-02-27

    This 2008 image shows a portion of the North Polar layered deposits with lines of very small pits, only about 1 meter in diameter. Such small pits should be quickly filled in by seasonal ice and dust, so their existence suggests active processes such as faults pulling apart the icy layers. The map is projected here at a scale of 25 centimeters (9.8 inches) per pixel. [The original image scale is 33.3 centimeters (13.1 inches) per pixel (with 1 x 1 binning); objects on the order of 100 centimeters (39.3 inches) across are resolved.] North is up. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21464

  14. Playing with Polarizers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hecht, Jeff

    1991-01-01

    Discussed is how polarized sunglasses block glare, help spot subtle differences in surfaces, and give a clearer view under water. Information on unpolarized and polarized light is provided. The reasons causing glare to occur and how polarizers decrease glare are discussed. (KR)

  15. Polarization feedback laser stabilization

    DOEpatents

    Esherick, Peter; Owyoung, Adelbert

    1988-01-01

    A system for locking two Nd:YAG laser oscillators includes an optical path for feeding the output of one laser into the other with different polarizations. Elliptical polarization is incorporated into the optical path so that the change in polarization that occurs when the frequencies coincide may be detected to provide a feedback signal to control one laser relative to the other.

  16. Enhanced Polar System (EPS)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    0603432F Project Name 644052 Polar Satellite Communications (Sunk) Air Force 3600 05 0605432F Project Name 657105 Polar Satellite ...provides continuous protected communication (low probability of interception and detection) over the north polar region using two communications ...payloads on classified host satellites in highly elliptical Molniya orbits. EPS is composed of four segments: the eXtended Data Rate (XDR) Payload

  17. Polarity at Many Levels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flannery, Maura C.

    2004-01-01

    An attempt is made to find how polarity arises and is maintained, which is a central issue in development. It is a fundamental attribute of living things and cellular polarity is also important in the development of multicellular organisms and controversial new work indicates that polarization in mammals may occur much earlier than previously…

  18. Graphing Polar Curves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawes, Jonathan F.

    2013-01-01

    Graphing polar curves typically involves a combination of three traditional techniques, all of which can be time-consuming and tedious. However, an alternative method--graphing the polar function on a rectangular plane--simplifies graphing, increases student understanding of the polar coordinate system, and reinforces graphing techniques learned…

  19. Physics with Polarized Nuclei.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, William J.; Clegg, Thomas B.

    1979-01-01

    Discusses recent advances in polarization techniques, specifically those dealing with polarization of atomic nuclei, and how polarized beams and targets are produced. These techniques have greatly increased the scope of possible studies, and provided the tools for testing fundamental symmetries and the spin dependence of nuclear forces. (GA)

  20. Polar Ozone Workshop. Abstracts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aikin, Arthur C.

    1988-01-01

    Results of the proceedings of the Polar Ozone Workshop held in Snowmass, CO, on May 9 to 13, 1988 are given. Topics covered include ozone depletion, ozonometry, polar meteorology, polar stratospheric clouds, remote sensing of trace gases, atmospheric chemistry and dynamical simulations.

  1. Partial polarizer filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Title, A. M. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A birefringent filter module comprises, in seriatum. (1) an entrance polarizer, (2) a first birefringent crystal responsive to optical energy exiting the entrance polarizer, (3) a partial polarizer responsive to optical energy exiting the first polarizer, (4) a second birefringent crystal responsive to optical energy exiting the partial polarizer, and (5) an exit polarizer. The first and second birefringent crystals have fast axes disposed + or -45 deg from the high transmitivity direction of the partial polarizer. Preferably, the second crystal has a length 1/2 that of the first crystal and the high transmitivity direction of the partial polarizer is nine times as great as the low transmitivity direction. To provide tuning, the polarizations of the energy entering the first crystal and leaving the second crystal are varied by either rotating the entrance and exit polarizers, or by sandwiching the entrance and exit polarizers between pairs of half wave plates that are rotated relative to the polarizers. A plurality of the filter modules may be cascaded.

  2. Playing with Polarizers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hecht, Jeff

    1991-01-01

    Discussed is how polarized sunglasses block glare, help spot subtle differences in surfaces, and give a clearer view under water. Information on unpolarized and polarized light is provided. The reasons causing glare to occur and how polarizers decrease glare are discussed. (KR)

  3. Silicon Raman polarizer.

    PubMed

    Kozlov, Victor V; Wabnitz, Stefan

    2012-02-15

    We theoretically investigate the polarization properties of Raman amplifiers based on silicon-on-insulator waveguides, and show that it is possible to realize a waveguide Raman polarizer. The Raman polarizer is a special type of Raman amplifier with the property of producing an amplified and highly repolarized beam when it is fed by a relatively weak and unpolarized signal.

  4. Calculation of polarization effects

    SciTech Connect

    Chao, A.W.

    1983-09-01

    Basically there are two areas of accelerator applications that involve beam polarization. One is the acceleration of a polarized beam (most likely a proton beam) in a synchrotron. Another concerns polarized beams in an electron storage ring. In both areas, numerical techniques have been very useful.

  5. Polarity at Many Levels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flannery, Maura C.

    2004-01-01

    An attempt is made to find how polarity arises and is maintained, which is a central issue in development. It is a fundamental attribute of living things and cellular polarity is also important in the development of multicellular organisms and controversial new work indicates that polarization in mammals may occur much earlier than previously…

  6. Citizen CATE Experiment and Polar Plume Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Adriana; Penn, Matt; Baer, Robert; Bosh, Robert; Garrison, David; Gelderman, Richard; Hare, Honor; Isberner, Fred; Jensen, Logan; Kovac, Sarah; McKay, Myles; Pierce, Michael; Thompson, Patricia; Ursache, Andrei; Varsik, John R.; Walter, Donald; Watson, Zachary; Young, David; Citizen CATE Team

    2017-01-01

    During the summer of 2017, a total solar eclipse will pass over the continental United States, allowing millions of citizens the opportunity to experience a beautiful celestial event. The Citizen Continental-America Telescopic Eclipse (CATE) Experiment plans to harness the power of these many viewers by using volunteers from sites across the US to observe and record the total solar eclipse. The data acquired from each of these sites will be composed into a continuous 90-minute video, allowing the inner solar corona to be studied for an unprecedented length of time.Observations in Indonesia of the March 2016 total solar eclipse allowed initial testing and analysis of the inner corona polar plume dynamics. Using MATLAB, a routine was developed to identify the polar coronal threads and their angle relative to the radial direction to analyze the field line behavior at the boundary of the polar coronal holes.

  7. Time resolved optical tomography of the human forearm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillman, Elizabeth M. C.; Hebden, Jeremy C.; Schweiger, Martin; Dehghani, Hamid; Schmidt, Florian E. W.; Delpy, David T.; Arridge, Simon R.

    2001-04-01

    A 32-channel time-resolved optical imaging instrument has been developed principally to study functional parameters of the new-born infant brain. As a prelude to studies on infants, the device and image reconstruction methodology have been evaluated on the adult human forearm. Cross-sectional images were generated using time-resolved measurements of transmitted light at two wavelengths. All data were acquired using a fully automated computer-controlled protocol. Images representing the internal scattering and absorbing properties of the arm are presented, as well as images that reveal physiological changes during a simple finger flexion exercise. The results presented in this paper represent the first simultaneous tomographic reconstruction of the internal scattering and absorbing properties of a clinical subject using purely temporal data, with additional co-registered difference images showing repeatable absorption changes at two wavelengths in response to exercise.

  8. Time resolved optical tomography of the human forearm.

    PubMed

    Hillman, E M; Hebden, J C; Schweiger, M; Dehghani, H; Schmidt, F E; Delpy, D T; Arridge, S R

    2001-04-01

    A 32-channel time-resolved optical imaging instrument has been developed principally to study functional parameters of the new-born infant brain. As a prelude to studies on infants, the device and image reconstruction methodology have been evaluated on the adult human forearm. Cross-sectional images were generated using time-resolved measurements of transmitted light at two wavelengths. All data were acquired using a fully automated computer-controlled protocol. Images representing the internal scattering and absorbing properties of the arm are presented, as well as images that reveal physiological changes during a simple finger flexion exercise. The results presented in this paper represent the first simultaneous tomographic reconstruction of the internal scattering and absorbing properties of a clinical subject using purely temporal data, with additional co-registered difference images showing repeatable absorption changes at two wavelengths in response to exercise.

  9. EMCCD-based spectrally resolved fluorescence correlation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Bestvater, Felix; Seghiri, Zahir; Kang, Moon Sik; Gröner, Nadine; Lee, Ji Young; Im, Kang-Bin; Wachsmuth, Malte

    2010-11-08

    We present an implementation of fluorescence correlation spectroscopy with spectrally resolved detection based on a combined commercial confocal laser scanning/fluorescence correlation spectroscopy microscope. We have replaced the conventional detection scheme by a prism-based spectrometer and an electron-multiplying charge-coupled device camera used to record the photons. This allows us to read out more than 80,000 full spectra per second with a signal-to-noise ratio and a quantum efficiency high enough to allow single photon counting. We can identify up to four spectrally different quantum dots in vitro and demonstrate that spectrally resolved detection can be used to characterize photophysical properties of fluorophores by measuring the spectral dependence of quantum dot fluorescence emission intermittence. Moreover, we can confirm intracellular cross-correlation results as acquired with a conventional setup and show that spectral flexibility can help to optimize the choice of the detection windows.

  10. Structural kinetics of myosin by transient time-resolved FRET

    PubMed Central

    Nesmelov, Yuri E.; Agafonov, Roman V.; Negrashov, Igor V.; Blakely, Sarah E.; Titus, Margaret A.; Thomas, David D.

    2011-01-01

    For many proteins, especially for molecular motors and other enzymes, the functional mechanisms remain unsolved due to a gap between static structural data and kinetics. We have filled this gap by detecting structure and kinetics simultaneously. This structural kinetics experiment is made possible by a new technique, (TR)2FRET (transient time-resolved FRET), which resolves protein structural states on the submillisecond timescale during the transient phase of a biochemical reaction. (TR)2FRET is accomplished with a fluorescence instrument that uses a pulsed laser and direct waveform recording to acquire an accurate subnanosecond time-resolved fluorescence decay every 0.1 ms after stopped flow. To apply this method to myosin, we labeled the force-generating region site specifically with two probes, mixed rapidly with ATP to initiate the recovery stroke, and measured the interprobe distance by (TR)2FRET with high resolution in both space and time. We found that the relay helix bends during the recovery stroke, most of which occurs before ATP is hydrolyzed, and two structural states (relay helix straight and bent) are resolved in each nucleotide-bound biochemical state. Thus the structural transition of the force-generating region of myosin is only loosely coupled to the ATPase reaction, with conformational selection driving the motor mechanism. PMID:21245357

  11. Resolving fundamental limits of adhesive bonding in microfabrication.

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, Jessica S.; Frischknecht, Amalie Lucile; Emerson, John Allen; Adkins, Douglas Ray; Kent, Michael Stuart; Read, Douglas H.; Giunta, Rachel Knudsen; Lamppa, Kerry P.; Kawaguchi, Stacie; Holmes, Melissa A.

    2004-04-01

    As electronic and optical components reach the micro- and nanoscales, efficient assembly and packaging require the use of adhesive bonds. This work focuses on resolving several fundamental issues in the transition from macro- to micro- to nanobonding. A primary issue is that, as bondline thicknesses decrease, knowledge of the stability and dewetting dynamics of thin adhesive films is important to obtain robust, void-free adhesive bonds. While researchers have studied dewetting dynamics of thin films of model, non-polar polymers, little experimental work has been done regarding dewetting dynamics of thin adhesive films, which exhibit much more complex behaviors. In this work, the areas of dispensing small volumes of viscous materials, capillary fluid flow, surface energetics, and wetting have all been investigated. By resolving these adhesive-bonding issues, we are allowing significantly smaller devices to be designed and fabricated. Simultaneously, we are increasing the manufacturability and reliability of these devices.

  12. Benchtop time-resolved magneto-optical Kerr magnetometer.

    PubMed

    Barman, Anjan; Kimura, T; Otani, Y; Fukuma, Y; Akahane, K; Meguro, S

    2008-12-01

    We present here the construction and application of a compact benchtop time-resolved Kerr magnetometer to measure the magnetization precession in magnetic thin films and lithographically patterned elements. As opposed to very expensive femtosecond lasers this system is built upon a picosecond pulsed injection diode laser and electronic pulse and delay generators. The precession is triggered by the electronic pulses of controlled duration and shape, which is launched onto the sample by a microstrip line. We used polarized optical pulses synchronous to the electronic pulses to measure the magneto-optical Kerr rotation. The system is integrated in a conventional upright microscope configuration with separate illumination, imaging, and magneto-optical probe paths. The system offers high stability, relative ease of alignment, sample changing, and a long range of time delay. We demonstrate the measurements of time-resolved dynamics of a Permalloy microwire and microdot using this system, which showed dynamics at two different time scales.

  13. Linear Polarization Measurements of Chromospheric Emission Lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheeley, N. R., Jr.; Keller, C. U.

    2003-01-01

    We have used the Zurich Imaging Stokes Polarimeter (ZIMPOL I) with the McMath-Pierce 1.5 m main telescope on Kitt Peak to obtain linear polarization measurements of the off-limb chromosphere with a sensitivity better than 1 x 10(exp -5). We found that the off-disk observations require a combination of good seeing (to show the emission lines) and a clean heliostat (to avoid contamination by scattered light from the Sun's disk). When these conditions were met, we obtained the following principal results: 1. Sometimes self-reversed emission lines of neutral and singly ionized metals showed linear polarization caused by the transverse Zeeman effect or by instrumental cross talk from the longitudinal Zeeman effect in chromospheric magnetic fields. Otherwise, these lines tended to depolarize the scattered continuum radiation by amounts that ranged up to 0.2%. 2. Lines previously known to show scattering polarization just inside the limb (such as the Na I lambda5889 D2 and the He I lambda5876 D3 lines) showed even more polarization above the Sun's limb, with values approaching 0.7%. 3. The O I triplet at lambda7772, lambda7774, and lambda7775 showed a range of polarizations. The lambda7775 line, whose maximum intrinsic polarizability, P(sub max), is less than 1%, revealed mainly Zeeman contributions from chromospheric magnetic fields. However, the more sensitive lambda7772 (P(sub max) = 19%) and lambda7774 (P(sub max) = 29%) lines had relatively strong scattering polarizations of approximately 0.3% in addition to their Zeeman polarizations. At times of good seeing, the polarization spectra resolve into fine structures that seem to be chromospheric spicules.

  14. Linear Polarization Measurements of Chromospheric Emission Lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheeley, N. R., Jr.; Keller, C. U.

    2003-01-01

    We have used the Zurich Imaging Stokes Polarimeter (ZIMPOL I) with the McMath-Pierce 1.5 m main telescope on Kitt Peak to obtain linear polarization measurements of the off-limb chromosphere with a sensitivity better than 1 x 10(exp -5). We found that the off-disk observations require a combination of good seeing (to show the emission lines) and a clean heliostat (to avoid contamination by scattered light from the Sun's disk). When these conditions were met, we obtained the following principal results: 1. Sometimes self-reversed emission lines of neutral and singly ionized metals showed linear polarization caused by the transverse Zeeman effect or by instrumental cross talk from the longitudinal Zeeman effect in chromospheric magnetic fields. Otherwise, these lines tended to depolarize the scattered continuum radiation by amounts that ranged up to 0.2%. 2. Lines previously known to show scattering polarization just inside the limb (such as the Na I lambda5889 D2 and the He I lambda5876 D3 lines) showed even more polarization above the Sun's limb, with values approaching 0.7%. 3. The O I triplet at lambda7772, lambda7774, and lambda7775 showed a range of polarizations. The lambda7775 line, whose maximum intrinsic polarizability, P(sub max), is less than 1%, revealed mainly Zeeman contributions from chromospheric magnetic fields. However, the more sensitive lambda7772 (P(sub max) = 19%) and lambda7774 (P(sub max) = 29%) lines had relatively strong scattering polarizations of approximately 0.3% in addition to their Zeeman polarizations. At times of good seeing, the polarization spectra resolve into fine structures that seem to be chromospheric spicules.

  15. Spin-Resolved Photoemission of Surface States of W(110)-(1×1)H

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hochstrasser, M.; Tobin, J. G.; Rotenberg, Eli; Kevan, S. D.

    2002-11-01

    The surface electronic states of W(110)-(1×1)H have been measured using spin- and angle-resolved photoemission. We directly demonstrate that the surface bands are both split and spin-polarized by the spin-orbit interaction in association with the loss of inversion symmetry near a surface. We observe 100% spin polarization of the surface states, with the spins aligned in the plane of the surface and oriented in a circular fashion relative to the S¯ symmetry point. In contrast, no measurable polarization of nearby bulk states is observed.

  16. The relationship of storm severity to directionally resolved radio emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. O.; Bushman, M. L.; Sherrill, W. M.

    1980-01-01

    Directionally resolved atmospheric radio frequency emission data were acquired from thunderstorms occurring in the central and southwestern United States. In addition, RF sferic tracking data were obtained from hurricanes and tropical depressions occurring in the Gulf of Mexico. The data were acquired using a crossed baseline phase interferometer operating at a frequency of 2.001 MHz. The received atmospherics were tested for phase linearity across the array, and azimuth/elevation angles of arrival were computed in real time. A histogram analysis of sferic burst count versus azimuth provided lines of bearing to centers of intense electrical activity. Analysis indicates a consistent capability of the phase linear direction finder to detect severe meteorological activity to distances of 2000 km from the receiving site. The technique evidences the ability to discriminate severe storms from nonsevere storms coexistent in large regional scale thunderstorm activity.

  17. Activation Layer Stabilization of High Polarization Photocathodes in Sub-Optimal RF Gun Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory A. Mulhollan

    2010-11-16

    Specific activation recipes for bulk, 100 nm thick MBE grown and high polarization III-V photocathode material have been developed which mitigate the effects of exposure to background gasses. Lifetime data using four representative gasses were acquired for bulk GaAs, 100 nm unstrained GaAs and strained superlattice GaAs/GaAsP, all activated both with Cs and then Cs and Li (bi-alkali). Each photoemitter showed marked resilience improvement when activated using the bi-alkali recipe compared to the standard single alkali recipe. A dual alkali activation system at SLAC was constructed, baked and commissioned with the purpose of performing spin-polarization measurements on electrons emitted from the bi-alkali activated surfaces. An end station at SSRL was configured with the required sources for energy resolved photoemission measurements on the bi-alkali activated and CO2 dosed surfaces. The bi-alkali recipes were successfully implemented at SLAC/SSRL. Measurements at SLAC of the photoelectron spin-polarization from the modified activation surface showed no sign of a change in value compared to the standard activated material, i.e., no ill effects. Analysis of photoemission data indicates that the addition of Li to the activation layer results in a multi-layer structure. The presence of Li in the activation layer also acts as an inhibitor to CO2 absorption, hence better lifetimes in worse vacuum were achieved. The bi-alkali activation has been tested on O2 activated GaAs for comparison with NF3 activated surfaces. Comparable resilience to CO2 exposure was achieved for the O2 activated surface. An RF PECVD amorphous silicon growth system was modified to allow high temperature heat cleaning of GaAs substrates prior to film deposition. Growth versus thickness data were collected. Very thin amorphous silicon germanium layers were optimized to exhibit good behavior as an electron emitter. Growth of the amorphous silicon germanium films on the above substrates was fine tuned

  18. Targeting Cell Polarity Machinery to Exhaust Breast Cancer Stem Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0644 TITLE: Targeting Cell Polarity Machinery to Exhaust Breast Cancer Stem Cells PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Chun-Ju...Targeting Cell Polarity Machinery to Exhaust Breast Cancer Stem Cells 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-15-1-0644 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT...Distribution Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Cancer stem cells (CSCs), a cell population with acquired perpetuating self-renewal properties

  19. PALOMA: A Magnetic CV between Polars and Intermediate Polars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Arti; Pandey, J. C.; Singh, K. P.; Agrawal, P. C.

    2016-10-01

    We present analyses of archival X-ray data obtained from the XMM-Newton satellite and optical photometric data obtained from 1 m class telescopes of ARIES, Nainital of a magnetic cataclysmic variable (MCV) Paloma. Two persistent periods at 156 ± 1 minutes and 130 ± 1 minutes are present in the X-ray data, which we interpret as the orbital and spin periods, respectively. These periods are similar to those obtained from the previous as well as new optical photometric observations. The soft-X-ray excess seen in the X-ray spectrum of Paloma and the averaged X-ray spectra are well fitted by two-temperature plasma models with temperatures of {0.10}-0.01+0.02 and {13.0}-0.5+0.5 keV with an Fe Kα line and an absorbing column density of 4.6 × 1022 cm-2. This material partially covers 60 ± 2% of the X-ray source. We also present the orbital and spin-phase-resolved spectroscopy of Paloma in the 0.3{--}10.0 {keV} energy band and find that the X-ray spectral parameters show orbital and spin-phase dependencies. New results obtained from optical and X-ray studies of Paloma indicate that it belongs to a class of a few magnetic CVs that seem to have the characteristics of both the polars and the intermediate polars.

  20. Characterization of optical surface degradation: Angular resolved scatterometer

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, D.F.; Gillespie, C.H.; Wirtenson, G.R.

    1987-02-26

    The Angular Resolved Scatterometer (ARS) is a sensitive diagnostic instrument for quantitatively specifying the degree of degradation for optical surfaces. ARS test results are reported for coatings undergoing aboveground (AGT) prompt x-ray irradiation. With the ARS, the light scattered from an optical surface is measured as a function of scattering angle, wavelength, and polarization. From these data the power spectral density (PSD) is calculated and contains the bandwidth-limited spatial information about the surface. Subtle changes in surface properties (e.g., radiation-induced absorption, polarization changes, or localized incipient melting) that would not be detected by surface roughness or reflectance measurements appear as a significant PSD change. The ARS data are an integration over all spatial frequencies and thus accurately and uniquely characterize each surface.

  1. HST observations of the limb polarization of Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazzon, A.; Schmid, H. M.; Buenzli, E.

    2014-12-01

    Context. Titan is an excellent test case for detailed studies of the scattering polarization from thick hazy atmospheres. Accurate scattering and polarization parameters have been provided by the in situ measurements of the Cassini-Huygens landing probe. For Earth-bound observations Titan can only be observed at a backscattering situation, where the disk-integrated polarization is close to zero. However, with resolved imaging polarimetry a second order polarization signal along the entire limb of Titan can be measured. Aims: We present the first limb polarization measurements of Titan, which are compared as a test to our limb polarization models. Methods: Previously unpublished imaging polarimetry from the HST archive is presented, which resolves the disk of Titan. We determine flux-weighted averages of the limb polarization and radial limb polarization profiles, and investigate the degradation and cancelation effects in the polarization signal due to the limited spatial resolution of our observations. Taking this into account we derive corrected values for the limb polarization in Titan. The results are compared with limb polarization models, using atmosphere and haze scattering parameters from the literature. Results: In the wavelength bands between 250 nm and 2 μm a strong limb polarization of about 2 - 7% is detected with a position angle perpendicular to the limb. The fractional polarization is highest around 1 μm. As a first approximation, the polarization seems to be equally strong along the entire limb. The comparison of our data with model calculations and the literature shows that the detected polarization is compatible with expectations from previous polarimetric observations taken with Voyager 2, Pioneer 11, and the Huygens probe. Conclusions: Our results indicate that ground-based monitoring measurements of the limb-polarization of Titan could be useful for investigating local haze properties and the impact of short-term and seasonal variations of

  2. Cryptosporidiosis in the acquired immune deficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cooper, D A; Wodak, A; Marriot, D J; Harkness, J L; Ralston, M; Hill, A; Penny, R

    1984-10-01

    Cryptosporidiosis was found in a patient with the acquired immune deficiency syndrome. The microbiological and morphological features of this newly recognized opportunistic infection are distinctive and diagnostic.

  3. Approaches to resolving trade disputes.

    PubMed

    Wilson, D W; Thiermann, A B

    2003-08-01

    The authors discuss the various approaches to resolving trade disputes available to Member Countries of the OIE (World organisation for animal health). The paper first describes the rights and obligations of Member Countries in setting health measures for the importation of animals and animal products, according to the provisions of the World Trade Organization (WTO) Agreement on the Application of Sanitary and Phytosanitary Measures (the SPS Agreement). The authors indicate how OIE standards may be used to set import measures and introduce issues such as equivalence and the use of provisional measures, which are both areas of potential conflict. The authors then describe the options available for resolving disputes--bilateral discussions, mediation through the OIE, the use of the WTO SPS Committee and the formal WTO dispute settlement process, discussing the advantages and disadvantages of each.

  4. Peach maturity/quality assessment using hyperspectral imaging-based spatially-resolved technique

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The objective of this research was to measure the absorption and reduced scattering coefficients of peaches, using a hyperspectral imaging-based spatially-resolved method, for their maturity/quality assessment. A newly developed optical property measuring instrument was used for acquiring hyperspect...

  5. Resolving Phase Ambiguities In OQPSK

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Tien M.

    1991-01-01

    Improved design for modulator and demodulator in offset-quaternary-phase-key-shifting (OQPSK) communication system enables receiver to resolve ambiguity in estimated phase of received signal. Features include unique-code-word modulation and detection and digital implementation of Costas loop in carrier-recovery subsystem. Enchances performance of carrier-recovery subsystem, reduces complexity of receiver by removing redundant circuits from previous design, and eliminates dependence of timing in receiver upon parallel-to-serial-conversion clock.

  6. Extended Deterrence and Communicating Resolve

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    being interpreted as bluffs indicating a lack of U.S. resolve. The U.S. President should, therefore, eschew the use of TLAM/N for signaling. The...example, Earl C. Ravenal , "Counterforce and Alliance: The Ultimate Connection," International Security 6, No. 4 (Spring 1982): 26-43. 2. William J...policy/dod/npr.htm. 13. Ravenal , "Counterforce and Alliance: The Ultimate Connection." 14. Moreover, damage limitation capabilities are not cost

  7. Resolved conifolds in supergravity solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Ghezelbash, A. M.

    2008-01-15

    We construct generalized 11D supergravity solutions of fully localized intersecting D2/D4 brane systems. These solutions are obtained by embedding six-dimensional resolved Eguchi-Hanson conifolds lifted to M-theory. We reduce these solutions to ten dimensions, obtaining new D-brane systems in type IIA supergravity. We discuss the limits in which the dynamics of the D2 brane decouples from the bulk for these solutions.

  8. Polarization-coupled polariton pairs in a birefringent microcavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yinglei; Hu, Tao; Xie, Wei; Sun, Liaoxin; Zhang, Long; Wang, Jian; Gu, Jie; Wu, Lin; Wang, Jun; Shen, Xuechu; Chen, Zhanghai

    2015-03-01

    We demonstrate a clear anticrossing between two polarization-orthogonal exciton-polariton modes in ZnO microwires. The strong coupling between exciton polaritons with orthogonal polarization is evidenced by using angle-resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy. The evolution of the coupling strength with the detuning between the two coupled polariton modes is studied by scanning the excitation spot on a tapered ZnO microwire. Steady oscillations are established between the two differently polarized polariton modes with resonant wave vectors and frequencies, which is well described by the plane wave coupling model.

  9. Optical Control of Spin Polarization in Monolayer Transition Metal Dichalcogenides.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi; Yan, Tengfei; Zhu, Bairen; Yang, Siyuan; Cui, Xiaodong

    2017-02-28

    Optical excitation could generate electrons' spin polarization in some semiconductors with the control of the field polarization. In this article, we report a series of spin-resolved photocurrent experiments on monolayer tungsten disulfide. The experiments demonstrate that the optical excitations with the same helicity could generate opposite spin polarization around the Fermi level by tuning the excitation energy. The mechanism lies in the valley-dependent optical selection rules, the giant spin-orbit coupling, and spin-valley locking in monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs). These exotic features make monolayer TMDs promising candidates for conceptual semiconductor-based spintronics.

  10. Polarization effects. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Courant, E.

    1981-01-01

    The use of polarized proton beams in ISABELLE is important for several general reasons: (1) With a single longitudinally polarized proton beam, effects involving parity violation can be identified and hence processes involving weak interactions can be separated from those involving strong and electromagnetic interactions. (2) Spin effects are important in the strong interactions and can be useful for testing QCD. The technique for obtaining polarized proton beams in ISABELLE appears promising, particularly in view of the present development of a polarized proton beam for the AGS. Projections for the luminosity in ISABELLE for collisions of polarized protons - one or both beams polarized with longitudinal or transverse polarization - range from 1/100 to 1 times the luminosity for unpolarized protons.

  11. The Physics of Polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landi Degl'Innocenti, Egidio

    2015-10-01

    The introductory lecture that has been delivered at this Symposium is a condensed version of an extended course held by the author at the XII Canary Island Winter School from November 13 to November 21, 2000. The full series of lectures can be found in Landi Degl'Innocenti (2002). The original reference is organized in 20 Sections that are here itemized: 1. Introduction, 2. Description of polarized radiation, 3. Polarization and optical devices: Jones calculus and Muller matrices, 4. The Fresnel equations, 5. Dichroism and anomalous dispersion, 6. Polarization in everyday life, 7. Polarization due to radiating charges, 8. The linear antenna, 9. Thomson scattering, 10. Rayleigh scattering, 11. A digression on Mie scattering, 12. Bremsstrahlung radiation, 13. Cyclotron radiation, 14. Synchrotron radiation, 15. Polarization in spectral lines, 16. Density matrix and atomic polarization, 17. Radiative transfer and statistical equilibrium equations, 18. The amplification condition in polarized radiative transfer, and 19. Coupling radiative transfer and statistical equilibrium equations.

  12. Circular Polarization in AGNs: Polarity and Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aller, M. F.; Aller, H. D.; Plotkin, R. M.

    2005-12-01

    Circular polarization (Stokes V) observations potentially provide information on the nature and origin of the underlying magnetic fields in AGNs. We have been systematically monitoring a group of sources with detectable circular polarization (V>0.1 percent, a level set by the instrumental polarization of our system) in all 4 Stokes parameters at 8.0 and 4.8 GHz since 2000, and also at 14.5 GHz since November 2003, with the University of Michigan prime focus paraboloid antenna. These data are compared with historical observations obtained with the same instrument at 8.0 and 4.8 GHz extending back to 1978. Specific goals are to study the temporal spectral behavior of Stokes V and its relation to variability in total flux and linear polarization, and to investigate the question of polarity stability on decade-long time scales using data obtained with the same instrumentation and at the same frequencies. The data are consistent with linear-to-circular mode conversion in partially opaque regions of the source. We find examples of polarity changes with time at one or more frequencies associated with outbursts in total flux and linear polarization, and polarity differences within the 3 frequencies at a single epoch in one case, 3C 279. Such behavior argues against the notion that the sign of Stokes V is a simple tracer of the net flow of magnetic energy from the central engine to the jet or an indicator of the direction of rotation of the spinning central black hole/accretion disk via the winding up of the initial seed magnetic field. This work was supported in part by NSF grant AST-0307629 and by funds from the University of Michigan.

  13. [Research on New Type of Spectral Modulation Polarization Measurement Technology].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jia; Zhou, Feng; Li, Huan; Zhao, Hai-bo

    2015-10-01

    Spectral Modulation Polarization Measurement technology (SMPM) is a new type of polarization modulation technology, with an achromatic /4 retarder, a multiple-order retarder and a polarizer the polarization information of incident light can be encoded into the spectral dimension, sinusoidal which amplitude scales with the degree of the linear polarization and phase scales with the angle of the linear polarization can be acquired directly. With a dedicated algorithm for the modulated spectrum, we can get degree and angle of the linear polarization, spectral information and radiation information of the target. This paper expounds the basic principle of SMPM and concrete implementation scheme is proposed. Demodulation algorithm is designed before experimental platform are set up. Experiment which verified the correctness on the SMPM has carried on. The experimental results show the correctness and feasibility of SMPM. Compared with traditional polarization modulate techniques no moving parts and electronic components are including in this scheme. It's also has the advantages of compact and low mass. We can get all the polarization information through one single measurement rather than get Stokes parameters for further calculations. This study provides a new kind of technological approaches for the development of new space polarization detecting sensor.

  14. Polarimetric imaging and retrieval of target polarization characteristics in underwater environment.

    PubMed

    Gu, Yalong; Carrizo, Carlos; Gilerson, Alexander A; Brady, Parrish C; Cummings, Molly E; Twardowski, Michael S; Sullivan, James M; Ibrahim, Amir I; Kattawar, George W

    2016-01-20

    Polarized light fields contain more information than simple irradiance and such capabilities provide an advanced tool for underwater imaging. The concept of the beam spread function (BSF) for analysis of scalar underwater imaging was extended to a polarized BSF which considers polarization. The following studies of the polarized BSF in an underwater environment through Monte Carlo simulations and experiments led to a simplified underwater polarimetric imaging model. With the knowledge acquired in the analysis of the polarimetric imaging formation process of a manmade underwater target with known polarization properties, a method to extract the inherent optical properties of the water and to retrieve polarization characteristics of the target was explored. The proposed method for retrieval of underwater target polarization characteristics should contribute to future efforts to reveal the underlying mechanism of polarization camouflage possessed by marine animals and finally to generalize guidelines for creating engineered surfaces capable of similar polarization camouflage abilities in an underwater environment.

  15. Device For Viewing Polarized Light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noever, David A.

    1995-01-01

    Technique for detection of polarized light based on observation of scene through two stacked polarizing disks. No need to rotate polarizers to create flicker indicative of polarization. Implemented by relatively simple, lightweight apparatus. Polarization seen as bow-tie rainbow pattern. Advantageous for detecting polarization in variety of meteorological, geological, astronomical, and related applications.

  16. The Mars Polar Vortex: 2003-2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McConnochie, T. H.; Conrath, B. J.; Banfield, D.; Gierasch, P. J.; Smith, M. D.

    2005-05-01

    The winter season, westerly circumpolar flow of the martian atmosphere, like that of the terrestrial stratosphere, is concentrated into a jet which lies near 60 degrees latitude. This jet is known as the polar vortex. Polar vortices are of interest because they act as a barrier, inhibiting energy transport and potentially preventing the mixing of aerosols and chemical species. Thus, they control the response of winter polar processes to climatic forcings, both short term and long term. We have used the Mars Global Surveyor Thermal Emission Spectrometer nadir-pointed data set to generate a gridded time series of vertically resolved temperatures, and from this time series we estimate the horizontal wind field using an adaption of the "balance winds" methodology suggested by Randel (1987, J. Atmos. Sci, 44). From the wind field we calculate Ertel potential vorticity (PV), which is a conserved quantity for adiabatic flow and therefore acts as a dynamical tracer for evaluating the extent of mixing into the winter polar region. Animations of these PV maps are an important tool for visualizing the polar vortex's behaviors. The Mars polar vortex in the northern winter of 2003 shows a variety of interesting structures and behaviors, some of which appear to be characteristic of the martian polar vortices, and some of which are unique to that year and season. Characteristic features of the martian polar vortex include: 1) Rossby number of order 1, and often exceeding 1 in northern winter, in the core of the circumpolar jet; 2) a local maximum in PV on the poleward flanks of the jet, giving the potential vorticity field an annular shape and suggesting the possibility of barotropic instability; 3) a well organized northern hemisphere polar vortex that persists past Ls 330 into early 2004, and which we expect acts as an effective barrier to mixing over time scales less than the PV conservation time scale of 10 days. One notable event unique to the 2003 northern winter is a major

  17. Spatio-Temporal Dynamics of Cross Polarized Wave Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Daniel; Squier, Jeff; Durfee, Charles

    2009-10-01

    We use time-domain Spatially and Spectrally Resolved Interferometry (SSRI) to investigate cross-polarized wave (XPW) generation in barium fluoride. We find that the XPW pulse is √3 smaller than the input in the spatiotemporal domain regardless of the input chirp. Additionally, we calculate a temporally dependent focal length resulting from the nonlinear interaction, and discuss its implications.

  18. Acquired Surface Dyslexia: The Evidence from Hebrew.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birnboim, Smadar

    1995-01-01

    Investigates the symptoms of acquired surface dyslexia in Hebrew. Four acquired surface dyslexic adults were compared with eight normal second graders in terms of reading strategy. Homophones and homographs were a major source of difficulty for native Hebrew surface dyslexic readers; the normal second graders used a non-lexical strategy. (45…

  19. Acquired idiopathic generalized anhidrosis: case report.

    PubMed

    Brantley, Elise I; Mutasim, Diya F; Heaton, Charles

    2011-01-01

    We report a case of acquired idiopathic generalized anhidrosis (AIGA) in a 56-year-old white woman. Acquired idiopathic generalized anhidrosis is an exceedingly rare group of heterogeneous disorders that has been almost exclusively reported in young Japanese males. Our case is unique in that AlGA may be underrecognized in this patient population.

  20. Acquiring and Managing Electronic Journals. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curtis, Donnelyn; Yue, Paoshan

    Electronic journals are both a blessing and a curse for libraries. To be meaningful in the current information environment--to meet users' ever-increasing demands--libraries must acquire as many appropriate full text resources as possible, as quickly as possible, and make them easy to use. This Digest provides tips for acquiring and providing…

  1. Experimental demonstration of negative-valued polarization quasiprobability distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spasibko, K. Yu.; Chekhova, M. V.; Khalili, F. Ya.

    2017-08-01

    Polarization quasiprobability distribution defined in the Stokes space shares many important properties with the Wigner function for position and momentum. Most notably, they both give correct one-dimensional marginal probability distributions and therefore represent the natural choice for the probability distributions in classical hidden-variable models. In this context, negativity of the Wigner function is considered as proof of nonclassicality for a quantum state. On the contrary, the polarization quasiprobability distribution demonstrates negativity for all quantum states. This feature comes from the discrete nature of Stokes variables; however, it was not observed in previous experiments, because they were performed with photon-number averaging detectors. Here we reconstruct the polarization quasiprobability distribution of a coherent state with photon-number resolving detectors, which allows us to directly observe for the first time its negativity. Furthermore we derive a theoretical polarization quasiprobability distribution for any linearly polarized quantum state.

  2. Circular polarization in a non-magnetic resonant tunneling device

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    We have investigated the polarization-resolved photoluminescence (PL) in an asymmetric n-type GaAs/AlAs/GaAlAs resonant tunneling diode under magnetic field parallel to the tunnel current. The quantum well (QW) PL presents strong circular polarization (values up to -70% at 19 T). The optical emission from GaAs contact layers shows evidence of highly spin-polarized two-dimensional electron and hole gases which affects the spin polarization of carriers in the QW. However, the circular polarization degree in the QW also depends on various other parameters, including the g-factors of the different layers, the density of carriers along the structure, and the Zeeman and Rashba effects. PMID:21711613

  3. Circular polarization in a non-magnetic resonant tunneling device.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos, Lara F; Gobato, Yara Galvão; Teodoro, Márcio D; Lopez-Richard, Victor; Marques, Gilmar E; Brasil, Maria Jsp; Orlita, Milan; Kunc, Jan; Maude, Duncan K; Henini, Mohamed; Airey, Robert J

    2011-01-25

    We have investigated the polarization-resolved photoluminescence (PL) in an asymmetric n-type GaAs/AlAs/GaAlAs resonant tunneling diode under magnetic field parallel to the tunnel current. The quantum well (QW) PL presents strong circular polarization (values up to -70% at 19 T). The optical emission from GaAs contact layers shows evidence of highly spin-polarized two-dimensional electron and hole gases which affects the spin polarization of carriers in the QW. However, the circular polarization degree in the QW also depends on various other parameters, including the g-factors of the different layers, the density of carriers along the structure, and the Zeeman and Rashba effects.

  4. Polarized Solid State Target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutz, Hartmut; Goertz, Stefan; Meyer, Werner

    2017-01-01

    The polarized solid state target is an indispensable experimental tool to study single and double polarization observables at low intensity particle beams like tagged photons. It was one of the major components of the Crystal-Barrel experiment at ELSA. Besides the operation of the 'CB frozen spin target' within the experimental program of the Crystal-Barrel collaboration both collaborative groups of the D1 project, the polarized target group of the Ruhr Universität Bochum and the Bonn polarized target group, have made significant developments in the field of polarized targets within the CRC16. The Bonn polarized target group has focused its work on the development of technically challenging polarized solid target systems towards the so called '4π continuous mode polarized target' to operate them in combination with 4π-particle detection systems. In parallel, the Bochum group has developed various highly polarized deuterated target materials and high precision NMR-systems, in the meantime used for polarization experiments at CERN, JLAB and MAMI, too.

  5. Specular, diffuse and polarized imagery of an oat canopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanderbilt, Vern C.; De Venecia, Kurt J.

    1988-01-01

    Light, polarized by specular reflection, has been found to be an important part of the light scattered by several measured plant canopies. The authors investigate for one canopy the relative importance of specularly reflected sunlight, specularly reflected light from other sources including skylight, and diffusely upwelling light. Polarization images are used to gain increased understanding of the radiation transfer process in a plant canopy. Analysis of the results suggests that properly analyzed polarized remotely sensed data, acquired under specific atmospheric conditions by a specially designed sensor, potentially provide measures of physiological and morphological states of plants in a canopy.

  6. Statistical Polarization Mode Dispersion/Polarization Dependent Loss Emulator for Polarization Division Multiplexing Transmission Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perlicki, Krzysztof

    2010-03-01

    A low-cost statistical polarization mode dispersion/polarization dependent loss emulator is presented in this article. The emulator was constructed by concatenating 15 highly birefringence optical-fiber segments and randomly varying the mode coupling between them by rotating the polarization state. The impact of polarization effects on polarization division multiplexing transmission quality was measured. The designed polarization mode dispersion/polarization dependent loss emulator was applied to mimic the polarization effects of real optical-fiber links.

  7. Multiwavelength Polarization of Rotation-powered Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harding, Alice K.; Kalapotharakos, Constantinos

    2017-05-01

    Polarization measurements provide strong constraints on models for emission from rotation-powered pulsars. We present multiwavelength polarization predictions showing that measurements over a range of frequencies can be particularly important for constraining the emission location, radiation mechanisms, and system geometry. The results assume a generic model for emission from the outer magnetosphere and current sheet in which optical to hard X-ray emission is produced by synchrotron radiation (SR) from electron-positron pairs and γ-ray emission is produced by curvature radiation (CR) or SR from accelerating primary electrons. The magnetic field structure of a force-free magnetosphere is assumed and the phase-resolved and phase-averaged polarization is calculated in the frame of an inertial observer. We find that large position angle (PA) swings and deep depolarization dips occur during the light-curve peaks in all energy bands. For synchrotron emission, the polarization characteristics are strongly dependent on photon emission radius with larger, nearly 180°, PA swings for emission outside the light cylinder (LC) as the line of sight crosses the current sheet. The phase-averaged polarization degree for SR is less that 10% and around 20% for emission starting inside and outside the LC, respectively, while the polarization degree for CR is much larger, up to 40%-60%. Observing a sharp increase in polarization degree and a change in PA at the transition between X-ray and γ-ray spectral components would indicate that CR is the γ-ray emission mechanism.

  8. [Review] Polarization and Polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trippe, Sascha

    2014-02-01

    Polarization is a basic property of light and is fundamentally linked to the internal geometry of a source of radiation. Polarimetry complements photometric, spectroscopic, and imaging analyses of sources of radiation and has made possible multiple astrophysical discoveries. In this article I review (i) the physical basics of polarization: electromagnetic waves, photons, and parameterizations; (ii) astrophysical sources of polarization: scattering, synchrotron radiation, active media, and the Zeeman, Goldreich-Kylafis, and Hanle effects, as well as interactions between polarization and matter (like birefringence, Faraday rotation, or the Chandrasekhar-Fermi effect); (iii) observational methodology: on-sky geometry, influence of atmosphere and instrumental polarization, polarization statistics, and observational techniques for radio, optical, and X/γ wavelengths; and (iv) science cases for astronomical polarimetry: solar and stellar physics, planetary system bodies, interstellar matter, astrobiology, astronomical masers, pulsars, galactic magnetic fields, gamma-ray bursts, active galactic nuclei, and cosmic microwave background radiation.

  9. Automatic Bayesian polarity determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pugh, D. J.; White, R. S.; Christie, P. A. F.

    2016-07-01

    The polarity of the first motion of a seismic signal from an earthquake is an important constraint in earthquake source inversion. Microseismic events often have low signal-to-noise ratios, which may lead to difficulties estimating the correct first-motion polarities of the arrivals. This paper describes a probabilistic approach to polarity picking that can be both automated and combined with manual picking. This approach includes a quantitative estimate of the uncertainty of the polarity, improving calculation of the polarity probability density function for source inversion. It is sufficiently fast to be incorporated into an automatic processing workflow. When used in source inversion, the results are consistent with those from manual observations. In some cases, they produce a clearer constraint on the range of high-probability source mechanisms, and are better constrained than source mechanisms determined using a uniform probability of an incorrect polarity pick.

  10. A dual polarized antenna system using a meanderline polarizer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burger, H. A.

    1978-01-01

    Certain applications of synthetic aperture radars (e.g., aerial crop surveying) require transmission on one linear polarization and reception on two orthogonal linear polarizations for adequate characterization of the surface. To meet this requirement at minimum cost, it was desirable to use two identically polarized shaped beam antennas and to change the polarization of one of them by a polarization conversion plate. The plate was realized as a four-layer meanderline polarizer designed to convert horizontal polarization to vertical.

  11. A dual polarized antenna system using a meanderline polarizer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burger, H. A.

    1978-01-01

    Certain applications of synthetic aperture radars require transmitting on one linear polarization and receiving on two orthogonal linear polarizations for adequate characterization of the surface. To meet the current need at minimum cost, it was desirable to use two identical horizontally polarized shaped beam antennas and to change the polarization of one of them by a polarization conversion plate. The plate was realized as a four-layer meanderline polarizer designed to convert horizontal polarization to vertical.

  12. Detection of North Atlantic Polar Lows in Climate Mode Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahn, M.; von Storch, H.; Bakan, S.

    2007-12-01

    Polar lows are not properly resolved in global re-analyses. Atmospheric limited area models (LAMs), which post- process re-analysis data, may be an appropriate tool for describing the year-to-year variability and decadal trends in the formation of Polar Lows. The merits and potential of this approach are examined in case studies of reproducing polar low occurrences with a LAM. A series of three week long ensemble simulations of weather situations over the NE Atlantic with a RCM/LAM (CLM) was conducted and its capability to reproduce polar lows was investigated. To keep the influence of the initial field low, the simulations were begun approximately two weeks prior to the polar low formation. It is shown that polar lows can be reproduced with the LAM. When "spectral nudging" is applied a polar low develops in all ensemble members and the simulations are very insensitive to the initial conditions. However there are differences in detail compared to observational data, e.g extent of pressure decline and polar low's location. In a scond step towards our goal of determining trends in changing frequencies and characteristics, an algorithm for automatical detection polar lows has been designed and tested. This algorithm was applied to the output fields of a long-term simulation and first results are shown.

  13. Polarization feedback laser stabilization

    DOEpatents

    Esherick, P.; Owyoung, A.

    1987-09-28

    A system for locking two Nd:YAG laser oscillators includes an optical path for feeding the output of one laser into the other with different polarizations. Elliptical polarization is incorporated into the optical path so that the change in polarization that occurs when the frequencies coincide may be detected to provide a feedback signal to control one laser relative to the other. 4 figs.

  14. Polar Cap Patch Dynamics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-25

    illustrate the concept with a sample model -run incorporating representative data. Title 12: Space weather challenges of the polar cap ionosphere ...located at Oslo and Ny-Ålesund. The primary objective has been to obtain a better understanding solar wind impacts on the polar ionosphere which are of...made no inventions, and Section 8 lists the core UiO personnel during this project. 15. SUBJECT TERMS EOARD, ionosphere (polar

  15. Near Real Time Prospecting for Lunar Volatiles: Demonstrating RESOLVE Science in the Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elphic, Richard; Colaprete, Anthony; Heldmann, Jennifer; Mattes, Gregory W.; Ennico, Kimberly; Sanders, Gerald; Quinn, Jacqueline; Tegnerud, Erin Leigh; Marinova, Margarita; Larson, William E.; Picard, Martin; Morse, Stephanie

    2012-01-01

    The Regolith and Environment Science and Oxygen & Lunar Volatile Extraction (RESOLVE) project aims to demonstrate the utility of "in situ resource utilization". In situ resource utilization (ISRU) is a way to rebalance the economics of spaceflight by reducing or eliminating materials that must be brought up from Earth and placed on the surface of the Moon for human use. RESOLVE is developing a rover-borne payload that (1) can locate near subsurface volatiles, (2) excavate and analyze samples of the volatile-bearing regolith, and (3) demonstrate the form, extractability and usefulness of the materials. Such investigations are important not only for ISRU but are also critically important for understanding the scientific nature of these intriguing lunar polar volatile deposits. Temperature models and orbital data suggest near surface volatile concentrations may exist at briefly lit lunar polar locations outside persistently shadowed regions. A lunar rover could be remotely operated at some of these locations for the 4-7 days of expected sunlight at relatively low cost. In July 2012 the RESOLVE project conducted a full-scale field demonstration. In particular, the ability to perform the real-time measurement analysis necessary to search for volatiles and the ability to combine the various measurement techniques to meet the mission measurement and science goals. With help from the Pacific International Space Center for Exploration Systems (PISCES), a lunar rover prototype (provided by the Canadian Space Agency) was equipped with prospecting instruments (neutron spectrometer and near-infrared spectrometer), subsurface access and sampling tools, including both an auger and coring drill (provided by CSA) and subsurface sample analysis instrumentation, including a sample oven system, the Oxygen and Volatile Extraction Node (OVEN), and Gas Chromatograph / Mass Spectrometer system, the Lunar Advanced Volatile Analysis (LAVA) system. Given the relatively short time period this

  16. Near Real-Time Prospecting for Lunar Volatiles: Demonstrating RESOLVE Science in the Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elphic, R. C.; Colaprete, A.; Heldmann, J. L.; Mattes, G.; Ennico, K.; Sanders, G. B.; Quinn, J.; Fritzler, E.; Marinova, M.; Roush, T. L.; Stoker, C.; Larson, W.; Picard, M.; McMurray, R.; Morse, S.

    2012-12-01

    The Regolith and Environment Science and Oxygen & Lunar Volatile Extraction (RESOLVE) project aims to demonstrate the utility of "in situ resource utilization". In situ resource utilization (ISRU) is a way to rebalance the economics of spaceflight by reducing or eliminating materials that must be brought up from Earth and placed on the surface of the Moon for human use. RESOLVE is developing a rover-borne payload that (1) can locate near subsurface volatiles, (2) excavate and analyze samples of the volatile-bearing regolith, and (3) demonstrate the form, extractability and usefulness of the materials. Such investigations are important not only for ISRU but are also critically important for understanding the scientific nature of these intriguing lunar polar volatile deposits. Temperature models and orbital data suggest near surface volatile concentrations may exist at briefly lit lunar polar locations outside persistently shadowed regions. A lunar rover could be remotely operated at some of these locations for the 4-7 days of expected sunlight at relatively low cost. In July 2012 the RESOLVE project conducted a full-scale field demonstration. In particular, the ability to perform the real-time measurement analysis necessary to search for volatiles and the ability to combine the various measurement techniques to meet the mission measurement and science goals. With help from the Pacific International Space Center for Exploration Systems (PISCES), a lunar rover prototype (provided by the Canadian Space Agency) was equipped with prospecting instruments (neutron spectrometer and near-infrared spectrometer), subsurface access and sampling tools, including both an auger and coring drill (provided by CSA) and subsurface sample analysis instrumentation, including a sample oven system, the Oxygen and Volatile Extraction Node (OVEN), and Gas Chromatograph / Mass Spectrometer system, the Lunar Advanced Volatile Analysis (LAVA) system. Given the relatively short time period this

  17. Enhanced polarization of (11–22) semi-polar InGaN nanorod array structure

    SciTech Connect

    Athanasiou, M.; Smith, R. M.; Hou, Y.; Zhang, Y.; Gong, Y.; Wang, T.

    2015-10-05

    By means of a cost effective nanosphere lithography technique, an InGaN/GaN multiple quantum well structure grown on (11–22) semipolar GaN has been fabricated into two dimensional nanorod arrays which form a photonic crystal (PhC) structure. Such a PhC structure demonstrates not only significantly increased emission intensity, but also an enhanced polarization ratio of the emission. This is due to an effective inhibition of the emission in slab modes and then redistribution to the vertical direction, thus minimizing the light scattering processes that lead to randomizing of the optical polarization. The PhC structure is designed based on a standard finite-difference-time-domain simulation, and then optically confirmed by detailed time-resolved photoluminescence measurements. The results presented pave the way for the fabrication of semipolar InGaN/GaN based emitters with both high efficiency and highly polarized emission.

  18. A Bionic Polarization Navigation Sensor and Its Calibration Method

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Huijie; Xu, Wujian

    2016-01-01

    The polarization patterns of skylight which arise due to the scattering of sunlight in the atmosphere can be used by many insects for deriving compass information. Inspired by insects’ polarized light compass, scientists have developed a new kind of navigation method. One of the key techniques in this method is the polarimetric sensor which is used to acquire direction information from skylight. In this paper, a polarization navigation sensor is proposed which imitates the working principles of the polarization vision systems of insects. We introduce the optical design and mathematical model of the sensor. In addition, a calibration method based on variable substitution and non-linear curve fitting is proposed. The results obtained from the outdoor experiments provide support for the feasibility and precision of the sensor. The sensor’s signal processing can be well described using our mathematical model. A relatively high degree of accuracy in polarization measurement can be obtained without any error compensation. PMID:27527171

  19. Widespread spin polarization effects in photoemission from topological insulators

    SciTech Connect

    Jozwiak, C.; Chen, Y. L.; Fedorov, A. V.; Analytis, J. G.; Rotundu, C. R.; Schmid, A. K.; Denlinger, J. D.; Chuang, Y.-D.; Lee, D.-H.; Fisher, I. R.; Birgeneau, R. J.; Shen, Z.-X.; Hussain, Z.; Lanzara, A.

    2011-06-22

    High-resolution spin- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (spin-ARPES) was performed on the three-dimensional topological insulator Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} using a recently developed high-efficiency spectrometer. The topological surface state's helical spin structure is observed, in agreement with theoretical prediction. Spin textures of both chiralities, at energies above and below the Dirac point, are observed, and the spin structure is found to persist at room temperature. The measurements reveal additional unexpected spin polarization effects, which also originate from the spin-orbit interaction, but are well differentiated from topological physics by contrasting momentum and photon energy and polarization dependencies. These observations demonstrate significant deviations of photoelectron and quasiparticle spin polarizations. Our findings illustrate the inherent complexity of spin-resolved ARPES and demonstrate key considerations for interpreting experimental results.

  20. Long-Lived Hole Spin/Valley Polarization Probed by Kerr Rotation in Monolayer WSe2.

    PubMed

    Song, Xinlin; Xie, Saien; Kang, Kibum; Park, Jiwoong; Sih, Vanessa

    2016-08-10

    Time-resolved Kerr rotation and photoluminescence measurements are performed on MOCVD-grown monolayer tungsten diselenide (WSe2). We observe a surprisingly long-lived Kerr rotation signal (∼80 ns) at 10 K, which is attributed to spin/valley polarization of the resident holes. This polarization is robust to transverse magnetic field (up to 0.3 T). Wavelength-dependent measurements reveal that only excitation near the free exciton energy generates this long-lived spin/valley polarization.

  1. Optical probing of the spin polarization of the ν=5/2 quantum Hall state.

    PubMed

    Stern, M; Plochocka, P; Umansky, V; Maude, D K; Potemski, M; Bar-Joseph, I

    2010-08-27

    We apply polarization resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy to measure the spin polarization of a two dimensional electron gas in perpendicular magnetic field. We find that the splitting between the σ+ and σ- polarizations exhibits a sharp drop at ν=5/2 and is equal to the bare Zeeman energy, which resembles the behavior at even filling factors. We show that this behavior is consistent with filling factor ν=5/2 being unpolarized.

  2. A new method for acquiring the complex hologram in optical scanning holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Meijuan; Dai, Enwen; Liu, Liren; Sun, Jianfeng; Wu, Yapeng; Zhou, Yu; Yan, Aimin; Zhi, Yanan

    2011-09-01

    In this paper, we propose a new method that can acquire the complex hologram of a 3D object for optical scanning holography (OSH) by using polarized optical elements and a 90 degrees 2×4 optical hybrid. The 3D object is scanned by a wave front combined by a plane and spherical wave with orthogonal polarization. The transmitted/reflected signal light is divided into two beams by a polarized beamsplitter (PBS). Then after the polarization control, the two separated beams are heterodyne detected by a 90 degrees 2×4 optical hybrid with two balanced detectors. The 3D object can be reconstructed from the complex hologram acquired from the balanced detectors. Compared with the conventional OSH, the acousto-optic modulator and complex electronic system are not needed in this method. Another advantage of this method lies in its high efficiency since there is almost no energy loss in the generation of the scanning beam by using the polarized optical elements. This method should be used for 3D holographic microscopy and 3D holographic television.

  3. RESOLVE Projects: Lunar Water Resource Demonstration and Regolith Volatile Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    To sustain affordable human and robotic space exploration, the ability to live off the land at the exploration site will be essential. NASA calls this ability in situ resource utilization (ISRU) and is focusing on finding ways to sustain missions first on the Moon and then on Mars. The ISRU project aims to develop capabilities to technology readiness level 6 for the Robotic Lunar Exploration Program and early human missions returning to the Moon. NASA is concentrating on three primary areas of ISRU: (1) excavating, handling, and moving lunar regolith, (2) extracting oxygen from lunar regolith, and (3) finding, characterizing, extracting, separating, and storing volatile lunar resources, especially in the permanently shadowed polar craters. To meet the challenges related to technology development for these three primary focus areas, the Regolith and Environment Science and Oxygen and Lunar Volatile Extraction (RESOLVE) project was initiated in February 2005, through funding by the Exploration Systems Mission Directorate. RESOLVE's objectives are to develop requirements and conceptual designs and to perform breadboard concept verification testing of each experiment module. The final goal is to deliver a flight prototype unit that has been tested in a relevant lunar polar environment. Here we report progress toward the third primary area creating ways to find, characterize, extract, separate, and store volatile lunar resources. The tasks include studying thermal, chemical, and electrical ways to collect such volatile resources as hydrogen, water, nitrogen, methane, and ammonia. We approached this effort through two subtasks: lunar water resource demonstration (LWRD) and regolith volatile characterization (RVC).

  4. Polarization at SLC

    SciTech Connect

    Swartz, M.L.

    1988-07-01

    The SLAC Linear Collider has been designed to readily accommodate polarized electron beams. Considerable effort has been made to implement a polarized source, a spin rotation system, and a system to monitor the beam polarization. Nearly all major components have been fabricated. At the current time, several source and polarimeter components have been installed. The installation and commissioning of the entire system will take place during available machine shutdown periods as the commissioning of SLC progresses. It is expected that a beam polarization of 45% will be achieved with no loss in luminosity. 13 refs., 15 figs.

  5. Polarized negative ions

    SciTech Connect

    Haeberli, W.

    1981-04-01

    This paper presents a survey of methods, commonly in use or under development, to produce beams of polarized negative ions for injection into accelerators. A short summary recalls how the hyperfine interaction is used to obtain nuclear polarization in beams of atoms. Atomic-beam sources for light ions are discussed. If the best presently known techniques are incorporated in all stages of the source, polarized H/sup -/ and D/sup -/ beams in excess of 10 ..mu..A can probably be achieved. Production of polarized ions from fast (keV) beams of polarized atoms is treated separately for atoms in the H(25) excited state (Lamb-Shift source) and atoms in the H(1S) ground state. The negative ion beam from Lamb-Shift sources has reached a plateau just above 1 ..mu..A, but this beam current is adequate for many applications and the somewhat lower beam current is compensated by other desirable characteristics. Sources using fast polarized ground state atoms are in a stage of intense development. The next sections summarize production of polarized heavy ions by the atomic beam method, which is well established, and by optical pumping, which has recently been demonstrated to yield very large nuclear polarization. A short discussion of proposed ion sources for polarized /sup 3/He/sup -/ ions is followed by some concluding remarks.

  6. Acquired Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura in a Patient with Pernicious Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Bhagat, Shambhu

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. Acquired thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) has been associated with different autoimmune disorders. However, its association with pernicious anemia is rarely reported. Case Report. A 46-year-old male presented with blood in sputum and urine for one day. The vitals were stable. The physical examination was significant for icterus. Lab tests' results revealed leukocytosis, macrocytic anemia, severe thrombocytopenia, renal dysfunction, and unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia. He had an elevated LDH, low haptoglobin levels with many schistocytes, nucleated RBCs, and reticulocytes on peripheral smear. Low ADAMTS13 activity (<10%) with elevated ADAMTS13 antibody clinched the diagnosis of severe acquired TTP, and plasmapheresis was started. There was an initial improvement in his hematological markers, which were however not sustained on discontinuation of plasmapheresis. For his refractory TTP, he was resumed on daily plasmapheresis and Rituximab was started. Furthermore, the initial serum Vitamin B12 and reticulocyte index were low in the presence of anti-intrinsic factor antibody. So with the concomitant diagnosis of pernicious anemia, Vitamin B12 was supplemented. The rest of the immunological workups were negative. Subsequently, his symptoms resolved and his hematological parameters improved. Discussion. While pernicious anemia can masquerade as TTP, an actual association between the two can also occur and needs further evaluation and characterization. PMID:28473932

  7. Attosecond control of spin polarization in electron-ion recollision driven by intense tailored fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayuso, David; Jiménez-Galán, Alvaro; Morales, Felipe; Ivanov, Misha; Smirnova, Olga

    2017-07-01

    Tunnel ionization of noble gas atoms driven by a strong circularly polarized laser field in combination with a counter-rotating second harmonic generates spin-polarized electrons correlated to the spin-polarized ionic core. Crucially, such two-color field can bring the spin-polarized electrons back to the parent ion, enabling the scattering of the spin-polarized electron on the spin-polarized parent ion. Here we show how one can control the degree of spin polarization as a function of electron energy and recollision time by tuning the laser parameters, such as the relative intensities of the counter-rotating fields. The attosecond precision of the control over the degree of spin polarization opens the door for attosecond control and spectroscopy of spin-resolved dynamics.

  8. Dirac cones, Floquet side bands, and theory of time-resolved angle-resolved photoemission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrell, Aaron; Arsenault, A.; Pereg-Barnea, T.

    2016-10-01

    Pump-probe techniques with high temporal resolution allow one to drive a system of interest out of equilibrium and at the same time probe its properties. Recent advances in these techniques open the door to studying new, nonequilibrium phenomena such as Floquet topological insulators and superconductors. These advances also necessitate the development of theoretical tools for understanding the experimental findings and predicting new ones. In the present paper, we provide a theoretical foundation to understand the nonequilibrium behavior of a Dirac system. We present detailed numerical calculations and simple analytic results for the time evolution of a Dirac system irradiated by light. These results are framed by appealing to the recently revitalized notion of side bands [A. Farrell and T. Pereg-Barnea, Phys. Rev. Lett. 115, 106403 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.115.106403; Phys. Rev. B 93, 045121 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevB.93.045121], extended to the case of nonperiodic drive where the fast oscillations are modified by an envelope function. We apply this formalism to the case of photocurrent generated by a second probe pulse. We find that, under the application of circularly polarized light, a Dirac point only ever splits into two copies of side bands. Meanwhile, the application of linearly polarized light leaves the Dirac point intact while producing side bands. In both cases the population of the side bands are time dependent through their nonlinear dependence on the envelope of the pump pulse. Our immediate interest in this work is in connection to time- and angle-resolved photoemission experiments, where we find excellent qualitative agreement between our results and those in the literature [Wang et al., Science 342, 453 (2013), 10.1126/science.1239834]. However, our results are general and may prove useful beyond this particular application and should be relevant to other pump-probe experiments.

  9. RHIC Polarized proton operation

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, H.; Ahrens, L.; Alekseev, I.G.; Aschenauer, E.; Atoian, G.; Bai, M.; Bazilevsky, A.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brennan, J.M.; Brown, K.A.; Bruno, D.; Connolly, R.; Dion, A.; D'Ottavio, T.; Drees, K.A.; Fischer, W.; Gardner, C.; Glenn, J.W.; Gu, X.; Harvey, M.; Hayes, T.; Hoff, L.; Hulsart, R.L.; Laster, J.; Liu, C.; Luo, Y.; MacKay, W.W.; Makdisi, Y.; Marr, G.J.; Marusic, A.; Meot, F.; Mernick, K.; Michnoff, R,; Minty, M.; Montag, C.; Morris, J.; Nemesure, S.; Poblaguev, A.; Ptitsyn, V.; Ranjibar, V.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Roser, T.; J.; Severino, F.; Schmidke, B.; Schoefer, V.; Severino, F.; Smirnov, D.; Smith, K.; Steski, D.; Svirida, D.; Tepikian, S.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuozzolo, J. Wang, G.; Wilinski, M.; Yip, K.; Zaltsman, A.; Zelenski, A.; Zeno, K.; Zhang, S.Y.

    2011-03-28

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) operation as the polarized proton collider presents unique challenges since both luminosity(L) and spin polarization(P) are important. With longitudinally polarized beams at the experiments, the figure of merit is LP{sup 4}. A lot of upgrades and modifications have been made since last polarized proton operation. A 9 MHz rf system is installed to improve longitudinal match at injection and to increase luminosity. The beam dump was upgraded to increase bunch intensity. A vertical survey of RHIC was performed before the run to get better magnet alignment. The orbit control is also improved this year. Additional efforts are put in to improve source polarization and AGS polarization transfer efficiency. To preserve polarization on the ramp, a new working point is chosen such that the vertical tune is near a third order resonance. The overview of the changes and the operation results are presented in this paper. Siberian snakes are essential tools to preserve polarization when accelerating polarized beams to higher energy. At the same time, the higher order resonances still can cause polarization loss. As seen in RHIC, the betatron tune has to be carefully set and maintained on the ramp and during the store to avoid polarization loss. In addition, the orbit control is also critical to preserve polarization. The higher polarization during this run comes from several improvements over last run. First we have a much better orbit on the ramp. The orbit feedback brings down the vertical rms orbit error to 0.1mm, much better than the 0.5mm last run. With correct BPM offset and vertical realignment, this rms orbit error is indeed small. Second, the jump quads in the AGS improved input polarization for RHIC. Third, the vertical tune was pushed further away from 7/10 snake resonance. The tune feedback maintained the tune at the desired value through the ramp. To calibrate the analyzing power of RHIC polarimeters at any energy above

  10. Detection of spin-resolved electronic structures from a buried ferromagnetic layer utilizing forward Mott scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Ueda, S.; Mizuguchi, M.; Kojima, T.; Takanashi, K.; Ishimaru, S.; Tsujikawa, M.; Shirai, M.

    2014-03-31

    We report ultrahigh-resolution spin-resolved hard X-ray photoemission (HAXPES) for a buried FeNi alloy film. By utilizing the forward Mott scattering in a Au layer on FeNi, our spin-resolved HAXPES method does not require a standard spin detector and allows us to use the multi-channel electron detection system for the high-efficient electron detection as used in conventional photoemission spectroscopy. A combination of the forward Mott scattering and multi-channel detection leads us to measure a clear spin polarization as well as spin-resolved majority and minority states in the Fe 2p core-level spectra without using the standard spin detector. This method enables us to measure spin-resolved core-level spectra for buried ferromagnetic materials.

  11. Propagation of Dynamic Nuclear Polarization across the Xenon Cluster Boundaries: Elucidation of the Spin-Diffusion Bottleneck

    PubMed Central

    Pourfathi, M.; Kuzma, N. N.; Kara, H.; Ghosh, R. K.; Shaghaghi, H.; Kadlecek, S. J.; Rizi, R. R.

    2013-01-01

    Earlier dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) experiments with frozen xenon/1-propanol/trityl mixtures have demonstrated spontaneous formation of pure xenon clusters above 120 K, enabling spectrally-resolved real-time measurements of 129Xe nuclear magnetization in the clusters and in the surrounding radical-rich matrix. A spin-diffusion bottleneck was postulated to explain the peculiar time evolution of 129Xe signals in the clusters as well as the apparent discontinuity of 129Xe polarization across the cluster boundaries. A self-contained ab initio model of nuclear spin diffusion in heterogeneous systems is developed here, incorporating the intrinsic T1 relaxation towards the temperature-dependent equilibrium along with the spin-diffusion coefficients based on the measured NMR line widths and the known atomic densities in each compartment. This simple model provides the physical basis for the observed spin-diffusion bottleneck and is in a good quantitative agreement with the earlier measurements. A simultaneous fit of the model to the time-dependent NMR data at two different DNP frequencies provides excellent estimates of the cluster size, the intrinsic sample temperature, and 129Xe T1 constants. The model was also applied to the NMR data acquired during relaxation towards thermal equilibrium after microwaves were turned off to estimate T1 relaxation time constants inside and outside the clusters. Fitting the model to data during and after DNP provides estimates of cluster size that are in complete agreement. PMID:23981341

  12. Diffuse hyperpigmentation associated with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Peter, S. A.; Brignol, Y. F.; Razavi, M. H.; Greeley, N.

    1992-01-01

    This article reports a case of diffuse hyperpigmentation in a 56-year-old Latino male after he was diagnosed with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). The possible causes of this hyperpigmentation are discussed. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:1334155

  13. Acquired Brown's syndrome: an unusual cause.

    PubMed

    Booth-Mason, S; Kyle, G M; Rossor, M; Bradbury, P

    1985-10-01

    A 62-year-old man with acquired Brown's syndrome is presented. This was due to an orbital metastatic deposit, a cause not previously reported. Other causes of this disorder and its treatment are discussed.

  14. Polarized Light: Three Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goehmann, Ruth; Welty, Scott

    1984-01-01

    Describes three demonstrations used in the Chicago Museum of Science and Industry polarized light show. The procedures employed are suitable for the classroom by using smaller polarizers and an overhead projector. Topic areas include properties of cellophane tape, nondisappearing arrows, and rope through a picket fence. (JN)

  15. The Polar Insulation Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Urban-Rich, Juanita

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author developed an activity called "The Polar Insulation Investigation." This activity builds on students' natural interest in "things polar" and introduces them to animal adaptations in a unique way. The aim of the exploration is to determine the role of animal coverings (e.g., blubber, fur, and feathers) and to see which is…

  16. Polar Science Is Cool!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weeks, Sophie

    2012-01-01

    Children are fascinated by the fact that polar scientists do research in extremely cold and dangerous places. In the Arctic they might be viewed as lunch by a polar bear. In the Antarctic, they could lose toes and fingers to frostbite and the wind is so fast it can rip skin off. They camp on ice in continuous daylight, weeks from any form of…

  17. The Polar Insulation Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Urban-Rich, Juanita

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author developed an activity called "The Polar Insulation Investigation." This activity builds on students' natural interest in "things polar" and introduces them to animal adaptations in a unique way. The aim of the exploration is to determine the role of animal coverings (e.g., blubber, fur, and feathers) and to see which is…

  18. Our Polar Past

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clary, Renee; Wandersee, James

    2009-01-01

    The study of polar exploration is fascinating and offers students insights into the history, culture, and politics that affect the developing sciences at the farthest ends of Earth. Therefore, the authors think there is value in incorporating polar exploration accounts within modern science classrooms, and so they conducted research to test their…

  19. Polarization Radar Processing Technology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-10-01

    Oi"C FILE ( J qII RADC-TR-89-144 In-House Report October 1989 AD-A215 242 POLARIZATION RADAR PROCESSING TECHNOLOGY Kenneth C. Stiefvater, Russell D...NO. NO. NO. ACCESSION NO. 62702F 4506 11 58 11. TITLE (Include Security Classification) POLARIZATION RADAR PROCESSING TECHNOLOGY 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S

  20. Polarization of barcode readers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiley, Daniel J.

    1998-02-01

    In high-quality barcode readers, specular reflection from shiny barcodes is blocked by using a polarized scan laser and a crossed polarizer in front of the detector. When complex scanning geometries are required, the polarization properties of the mirrors in the system can become a limiting factor in system performance. Polarization raytracing allows systems such as barcode readers, LIDAR systems, and other polarization-critical system to be accurately characterized. Polarization raytracing often requires the use of local, ray-based coordinate system for expressing rays' polarization states, yet the choice of coordinate system can have important implications on system analysis. An example is presented in which specular reflection is controlled in a barcode reader by using reflection-enhanced coatings on only one of the four set of the mirrors in the system. The coordinate system used to express rays' polarization states in the example system provides useful lessons for other systems. The other analytical methods used in this example can be applied to a variety of scanning systems.

  1. Polar Science Is Cool!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weeks, Sophie

    2012-01-01

    Children are fascinated by the fact that polar scientists do research in extremely cold and dangerous places. In the Arctic they might be viewed as lunch by a polar bear. In the Antarctic, they could lose toes and fingers to frostbite and the wind is so fast it can rip skin off. They camp on ice in continuous daylight, weeks from any form of…

  2. Our Polar Past

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clary, Renee; Wandersee, James

    2009-01-01

    The study of polar exploration is fascinating and offers students insights into the history, culture, and politics that affect the developing sciences at the farthest ends of Earth. Therefore, the authors think there is value in incorporating polar exploration accounts within modern science classrooms, and so they conducted research to test their…

  3. Circularly polarized Hankel vortices.

    PubMed

    Kotlyar, Victor V; Kovalev, Alexey A

    2017-04-03

    We discuss vector Hankel beams with circular polarization. These beams appear as a generalization of a spherical wave with an embedded optical vortex with topological charge n. Explicit analytical relations to describe all six projections of the E- and H-field are derived. The relations are shown to satisfy Maxwell's equations. Hankel beams with clockwise and anticlockwise circular polarization are shown to have peculiar features while propagating in free space. Relations for the Poynting vector projections and the angular momentum in the far field are also obtained. It is shown that a Hankel beam with clockwise circular polarization has radial divergence (ratio between the radial and longitudinal projections of the Poynting vector) similar to that of the spherical wave, while the beam with the anticlockwise circular polarization has greater radial dependence. At n = 0, the circularly polarized Hankel beam has non-zero spin angular momentum. At n = 1, power flow of the Hankel beam with anticlockwise polarization consists of two parts: right-handed helical flow near the optical axis and left-handed helical flow in periphery. At n ≥2, power flow is directed along the right-handed helix regardless of the direction of the circular polarization. Power flow along the optical axis is the same for the Hankel beams of both circular polarizations, if they have the same topological charge.

  4. Fusion of Polarized Deuterons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, H. M.; Fick, D.

    1984-06-01

    The nuclear physics aspects of the d-d reactions initiated by low-energy polarized deuterons are discussed. It is shown that the use of polarized deuterons does not suppress the fusion of deuterons with deuterons and hence does not suppress neutron production. Therefore a recently proposed "neutron-free" d-3He fusion reactor is unlikely to work.

  5. Polarized Light: Three Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goehmann, Ruth; Welty, Scott

    1984-01-01

    Describes three demonstrations used in the Chicago Museum of Science and Industry polarized light show. The procedures employed are suitable for the classroom by using smaller polarizers and an overhead projector. Topic areas include properties of cellophane tape, nondisappearing arrows, and rope through a picket fence. (JN)

  6. Solid polarized targets

    SciTech Connect

    Crabb, D.G.

    1994-10-26

    Polarized targets using the method of dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) are in use in many laboratories. The method of DNP is reviewed briefly and the technical developments presented at recent meetings are discussed. The operation of target systems at SLAC and CERN are presented as examples. The emergence of frozen HD as a possible target is discussed.

  7. Nomenclature of polarized light - Elliptical polarization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, D.

    1974-01-01

    Alternative handedness and sign conventions for relating the orientation of elliptical polarization are discussed. The discussion proceeds under two headings: (1) snapshot picture, where the emphasis for the convention is contained in the concept of handedness; and (2) angular momentum consideration, where the emphasis for the convention is strongly associated with mathematical convention and the sign of the fourth Stokes parameter.

  8. Nomenclature of polarized light - Elliptical polarization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, D.

    1974-01-01

    Alternative handedness and sign conventions for relating the orientation of elliptical polarization are discussed. The discussion proceeds under two headings: (1) snapshot picture, where the emphasis for the convention is contained in the concept of handedness; and (2) angular momentum consideration, where the emphasis for the convention is strongly associated with mathematical convention and the sign of the fourth Stokes parameter.

  9. Polar Atmospheric Dynamics of Jupiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayanagi, Kunio M.; Mitchell, J. L.; Heavens, N. G.

    2012-10-01

    We investigate the transition in Jupiter's atmospheric dynamic regime between mid-latitudes to polar regions. Spacecraft observations of Jupiter have identified three distinct dynamical regimes in the cloud-top winds. In the equatorial region, a fast, broad jetstream blows eastward where no vortices are found. In the mid-latitudes, many vortices exist between the numerous jetstreams that alternate in wind direction between eastward and westward. On Jupiter, vortices become increasingly prevalent with latitude; poleward of 65 degree N/S latitudes, the banded structure that characterizes the lower latitudes becomes indiscernible, and the flow acquires an increasingly turbulent appearance with little zonal organization - we identify this regime as polar turbulence. Saturn also has a very similarly organized atmosphere, except that it maintains zonally organized cloud bands up to the poles and lacks polar turbulence. The zonal structure of Saturn culminates in the southern hemisphere with a hurricane-like cyclonic vortex residing precisely at south pole. Here, we focus on the transition from the mixed jet-vortex regime in the mid-latitudes to the vortex-dominated polar-regime of Jupiter. Using an idealized shallow-water model in a beta-plane channel, we test the stability of various scenarios that range between a jet-dominated flow and vortical turbulence. Since we are simulating a zone on the sphere rather than the full circulation, we test the sensitivity of the dynamics to latitude by varying the model’s beta-plane parameters, namely, the background Coriolis parameter f0 and its gradient beta. In addition, as we employ a 1 1/2-layer shallow-water model, we also vary the layer thickness and the bottom-layer topography to mimic a steeply varying thermal stratification (i.e., a potential vorticity front) by exploiting the topographic beta effects. We use the EPIC model (Dowling et al. 1998) to perform our numerical experiments. Our study is supported by a NASA Outer

  10. Spin polarization of the split Kondo state.

    PubMed

    von Bergmann, Kirsten; Ternes, Markus; Loth, Sebastian; Lutz, Christopher P; Heinrich, Andreas J

    2015-02-20

    Spin-resolved scanning tunneling microscopy is employed to quantitatively determine the spin polarization of the magnetic field-split Kondo state. Tunneling conductance spectra of a Kondo-screened magnetic atom are evaluated within a simple model taking into account inelastic tunneling due to spin excitations and two Kondo peaks positioned symmetrically around the Fermi energy. We fit the spin state of the Kondo-screened atom with a spin Hamiltonian independent of the Kondo effect and account for Zeeman splitting of the Kondo peak in the magnetic field. We find that the width and the height of the Kondo peaks scales with the Zeeman energy. Our observations are consistent with full spin polarization of the Kondo peaks, i.e., a majority spin peak below the Fermi energy and a minority spin peak above.

  11. MgII Linear Polarization Measurements Using the MSFC Solar Ultraviolet Magnetograph Sounding Rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, Edward; Cirtain, Jonathan; Kobayashi, Ken; Davis, John; Gary, Allen

    2011-01-01

    This paper will describe the Marshall Space Flight Center's Solar Ultraviolet Magnetograph Investigation (SUMI) sounding rocket program, with emphasis on the polarization characteristics of the VUV optics and their spectral, spatial and polarization resolution. SUMI's first flight (7/30/2010) met all of its mission success criteria and this paper will describe the data that was acquired with emphasis on the MgII linear polarization measurements.

  12. MgII Linear Polarization Measurements Using the MSFC Solar Ultraviolet Magnetograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, Edward; Cirtain, Jonathan; Kobayahsi, Ken; Davis, John; Gary, Allen; Adams, Mitzi

    2011-01-01

    This paper will describe the Marshall Space Flight Center's Solar Ultraviolet Magnetograph (SUMI) sounding rocket program, with emphasis on the polarization characteristics of the VUV optics and their spectral, spatial and polarization resolution. SUMI's first flight (7/30/2010) met all of its mission success criteria and this paper will describe the data that was acquired with emphasis on the MgII linear polarization measurements.

  13. [Design of full-polarized and multi-spectral imaging system based on LCVR].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Zhao, Hui-jie; Cheng, Xuan; Xiong, Sheng-jun

    2011-05-01

    A new full-polarized multi-spectral imaging system is described, which uses electronically controlled LCVR (liquid crystal variable retarder) to modulate the full-polarized state of light in the visible to IR range. The system consisted of optical lenses, LCVRs, filters and CCD. Firstly, the system structure, working theory and optical design are introduced in the present paper. A polarization calibration method is provided and the calibration system was set up, which realized high-precision polarization calibration using a small polarized source. Then, a field experiment with the imaging system was carried out. Polarized spectral images with higher spectral and spatial resolution were collected. Finally, the data acquired were rough processed to get polarization degree image of the targets. It is concluded that the experiment has proved that the imaging system is effective in obtaining full-polarized and multi- spectral data. The image captured by the system can be applied to object identification and object classification.

  14. Parallel Polarization State Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    She, Alan; Capasso, Federico

    2016-05-01

    The control of polarization, an essential property of light, is of wide scientific and technological interest. The general problem of generating arbitrary time-varying states of polarization (SOP) has always been mathematically formulated by a series of linear transformations, i.e. a product of matrices, imposing a serial architecture. Here we show a parallel architecture described by a sum of matrices. The theory is experimentally demonstrated by modulating spatially-separated polarization components of a laser using a digital micromirror device that are subsequently beam combined. This method greatly expands the parameter space for engineering devices that control polarization. Consequently, performance characteristics, such as speed, stability, and spectral range, are entirely dictated by the technologies of optical intensity modulation, including absorption, reflection, emission, and scattering. This opens up important prospects for polarization state generation (PSG) with unique performance characteristics with applications in spectroscopic ellipsometry, spectropolarimetry, communications, imaging, and security.

  15. Parallel Polarization State Generation.

    PubMed

    She, Alan; Capasso, Federico

    2016-05-17

    The control of polarization, an essential property of light, is of wide scientific and technological interest. The general problem of generating arbitrary time-varying states of polarization (SOP) has always been mathematically formulated by a series of linear transformations, i.e. a product of matrices, imposing a serial architecture. Here we show a parallel architecture described by a sum of matrices. The theory is experimentally demonstrated by modulating spatially-separated polarization components of a laser using a digital micromirror device that are subsequently beam combined. This method greatly expands the parameter space for engineering devices that control polarization. Consequently, performance characteristics, such as speed, stability, and spectral range, are entirely dictated by the technologies of optical intensity modulation, including absorption, reflection, emission, and scattering. This opens up important prospects for polarization state generation (PSG) with unique performance characteristics with applications in spectroscopic ellipsometry, spectropolarimetry, communications, imaging, and security.

  16. Polarization of clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goloub, Philippe; Herman, Maurice; Parol, Frederic

    1995-12-01

    This paper reports the main results concerning polarization by clouds derived from POLDER (polarization and directionality of earth's reflectances) airborne version. These results tend to confirm the high information content in the polarization (phase, altimetry). The preliminary results of EUCREX'94 (European Cloud Radiation Experiment) evidenced the drastically different polarized signatures for ice crystals and water droplets. Here we report systematic and statistically significative observations over the whole EUCREX data set. The results show that the cirrus exhibit their own signature. Preliminary observations performed during CLEOPATRA'91 (Cloud Experiment Ober Pfaffenhofen And Transport) and EUCREX'94 campaigns have shown the feasibility of cloud altimetry using spectral information (443 nm and 865 nm) of the polarized light over liquid water droplets clouds. Altimetry technique has been generalized on ASTEX-SOFIA'92 and EUCREX'94 data sets. All these results are presented and discussed in this paper.

  17. Parallel Polarization State Generation

    PubMed Central

    She, Alan; Capasso, Federico

    2016-01-01

    The control of polarization, an essential property of light, is of wide scientific and technological interest. The general problem of generating arbitrary time-varying states of polarization (SOP) has always been mathematically formulated by a series of linear transformations, i.e. a product of matrices, imposing a serial architecture. Here we show a parallel architecture described by a sum of matrices. The theory is experimentally demonstrated by modulating spatially-separated polarization components of a laser using a digital micromirror device that are subsequently beam combined. This method greatly expands the parameter space for engineering devices that control polarization. Consequently, performance characteristics, such as speed, stability, and spectral range, are entirely dictated by the technologies of optical intensity modulation, including absorption, reflection, emission, and scattering. This opens up important prospects for polarization state generation (PSG) with unique performance characteristics with applications in spectroscopic ellipsometry, spectropolarimetry, communications, imaging, and security. PMID:27184813

  18. Cell polarity: mechanochemical patterning.

    PubMed

    Goehring, Nathan W; Grill, Stephan W

    2013-02-01

    Nearly every cell type exhibits some form of polarity, yet the molecular mechanisms vary widely. Here we examine what we term 'chemical systems' where cell polarization arises through biochemical interactions in signaling pathways, 'mechanical systems' where cells polarize due to forces, stresses and transport, and 'mechanochemical systems' where polarization results from interplay between mechanics and chemical signaling. To reveal potentially unifying principles, we discuss mathematical conceptualizations of several prototypical examples. We suggest that the concept of local activation and global inhibition - originally developed to explain spatial patterning in reaction-diffusion systems - provides a framework for understanding many cases of cell polarity. Importantly, we find that the core ingredients in this framework - symmetry breaking, self-amplifying feedback, and long-range inhibition - involve processes that can be chemical, mechanical, or even mechanochemical in nature.

  19. Lash ptosis in congenital and acquired blepharoptosis.

    PubMed

    Malik, Khurram J; Lee, Michael S; Park, D J John; Harrison, Andrew R

    2007-12-01

    To determine the prevalence of lash ptosis (LP) in eyes with congenital and acquired blepharoptosis. We retrospectively graded photographs of 228 eyes from 174 patients with congenital or acquired blepharoptosis for LP. We used a 4-point rating scale for LP, in which 0 indicates no LP; 1, minimal; 2, moderate; and 3, severe. A prospective evaluation of LP in 30 eyes from 15 patients without blepharoptosis (control eyes) was also performed. A total of 107 eyes (in 87 patients) demonstrated congenital blepharoptosis and 121 eyes (in 87 patients) had acquired blepharoptosis. A moderate to severe rating of LP (rating, >/= 2) occurred in 60.7% of eyes with congenital blepharoptosis, 28.9% of eyes with acquired blepharoptosis, and 6.7% of control eyes. Lash ptosis (rating, >/= 1) was present in 91.6% of eyes with congenital blepharoptosis, 83.5% of eyes with acquired blepharoptosis, and 33.3% of control eyes. The mean LP rating was 2.1 for eyes with congenital blepharoptosis, 1.3 for eyes with acquired blepharoptosis, and 0.6 for control eyes. Lash ptosis was common in the patients with blepharoptosis. Moderate to severe LP occurred more commonly in all forms of blepharoptosis compared with normal eyes, with more frequent and more severe LP demonstrated in eyes with congenital blepharoptosis.

  20. Resolving conflicts: principles and practice.

    PubMed

    Gill, S L

    1995-04-01

    Physicians and other medical professionals undergo extensive professional training for the privilege of obtaining their professional licenses. For most physicians, clinical training is conducted in extremely competitive circumstances. Many physicians endorse competition as an appropriate method for producing greater individual and collective competence within the profession. Competition, however, is a very limited way to resolve conflicts. And, in the current environment of greater resource restrictions and reform, the competitive model, at best, seems short-sighted. Many of the current relationships involving physicians and others are transitional, involving various partners in numerous practice and professional relationships. For example, medical practices are merging; hospitals are engaging physicians in numerous business structures, even employment. However, longer term relationships are enhanced by mutual respect and collaboration, rather than chronic competition to "win" one's rights over another. Thus, the need among physicians to enhance their conflict resolution skills is expanded in today's environment.