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Sample records for acquired cancer phenotype

  1. Progeny from irradiated colorectal cancer cells acquire an EMT-like phenotype and activate Wnt/β-catenin pathway.

    PubMed

    Bastos, Lilian Gonçalves dos Reis; de Marcondes, Priscila Guimarães; de-Freitas-Junior, Julio Cesar Madureira; Leve, Fernanda; Mencalha, André Luiz; de Souza, Waldemir Fernandes; de Araujo, Wallace Martins; Tanaka, Marcelo Neves; Abdelhay, Eliana Saul Furquim Werneck; Morgado-Díaz, José Andrés

    2014-12-01

    Radiotherapy remains a major approach to adjuvant therapy for patients with advanced colorectal cancer, however, the fractionation schedules frequently allow for the repopulation of surviving tumors cells, neoplastic progression, and subsequent metastasis. The aim of the present study was to analyze the transgenerational effects induced by radiation and evaluate whether it could increase the malignant features on the progeny derived from irradiated parental colorectal cancer cells, Caco-2, HT-29, and HCT-116. The progeny of these cells displayed a differential radioresistance as seen by clonogenic and caspase activation assay and had a direct correlation with survivin expression as observed by immunoblotting. Immunofluorescence showed that the most radioresistant progenies had an aberrant morphology, disturbance of the cell-cell adhesion contacts, disorganization of the actin cytoskeleton, and vimentin filaments. Only the progeny derived from intermediary radioresistant cells, HT-29, reduced the E-cadherin expression and overexpressed β-catenin and vimentin with increased cell migration, invasion, and metalloprotease activation as seen by immunoblotting, wound healing, invasion, and metalloprotease activity assay. We also observed that this most aggressive progeny increased the Wnt/β-catenin-dependent TCF/LEF activity and underwent an upregulation of mesenchymal markers and downregulation of E-cadherin, as determined by qRT-PCR. Our results showed that the intermediate radioresistant cells can generate more aggressive cellular progeny with the EMT-like phenotype. The Wnt/β-catenin pathway may constitute an important target for new adjuvant treatment schedules with radiotherapy, with the goal of reducing the migratory and invasive potential of the remaining cells after treatment.

  2. ROBO1, a tumor suppressor and critical molecular barrier for localized tumor cells to acquire invasive phenotype: study in African-American and Caucasian prostate cancer models.

    PubMed

    Parray, Aijaz; Siddique, Hifzur R; Kuriger, Jacquelyn K; Mishra, Shrawan K; Rhim, Johng S; Nelson, Heather H; Aburatani, Hiroyuki; Konety, Badrinath R; Koochekpour, Shahriar; Saleem, Mohammad

    2014-12-01

    High-risk populations exhibit early transformation of localized prostate cancer (CaP) disease to metastasis which results in the mortality of such patients. The paucity of knowledge about the molecular mechanism involved in acquiring of metastatic behavior by primary tumor cells and non-availability of reliable phenotype-discriminating biomarkers are stumbling blocks in the management of CaP disease. Here, we determine the role and translational relevance of ROBO1 (an organogenesis-associated gene) in human CaP. Employing CaP-progression models and prostatic tissues of Caucasian and African-American patients, we show that ROBO1 expression is localized to cell-membrane and significantly lost in primary and metastatic tumors. While Caucasians exhibited similar ROBO1 levels in primary and metastatic phenotype, a significant difference was observed between tumor phenotypes in African-Americans. Epigenetic assays identified promoter methylation of ROBO1 specific to African-American metastatic CaP cells. Using African-American CaP models for further studies, we show that ROBO1 negatively regulates motility and invasiveness of primary CaP cells, and its loss causes these cells to acquire invasive trait. To understand the underlying mechanism, we employed ROBO1-expressing/ROBO1-C2C3-mutant constructs, immunoprecipitation, confocal-microscopy and luciferase-reporter techniques. We show that ROBO1 through its interaction with DOCK1 (at SH3-SH2-domain) controls the Rac-activation. However, loss of ROBO1 results in Rac1-activation which in turn causes E-Cadherin/β-catenin cytoskeleton destabilization and induction of cell migration. We suggest that ROBO1 is a predictive biomarker that has potential to discriminate among CaP types, and could be exploited as a molecular target to inhibit the progression of disease as well as treat metastasis in high-risk populations such as African-Americans.

  3. ROBO1, a tumor suppressor and critical molecular barrier for localized tumor cells to acquire invasive phenotype: Study in African-American and Caucasian prostate cancer models

    PubMed Central

    Parray, Aijaz; Siddique, Hifzur R.; Kuriger, Jacquelyn K.; Mishra, Shrawan K.; Rhim, Johng S.; Nelson, Heather H.; Aburatani, Hiroyuki; Konety, Badrinath R.; Koochekpour, Shahriar; Saleem, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    High-risk populations exhibit early transformation of localized prostate cancer (CaP) disease to metastasis which results in the mortality of such patients. The paucity of knowledge about the molecular mechanism involved in acquiring of metastatic behavior by primary tumor cells and non-availability of reliable phenotype-discriminating biomarkers are stumbling blocks in the management of CaP disease. Here, we determine the role and translational relevance of ROBO1 (an organogenesis-associated gene) in human CaP. Employing CaP-progression models and prostatic tissues of Caucasian and African-American patients, we show that ROBO1 expression is localized to cell-membrane and significantly lost in primary and metastatic tumors. While Caucasians exhibited similar ROBO1 levels in primary and metastatic phenotype, a significant difference was observed between tumor phenotypes in African-Americans. Epigenetic assays identified promoter methylation of ROBO1 specific to African-American metastatic CaP cells. Using African-American CaP models for further studies, we show that ROBO1 negatively regulates motility and invasiveness of primary CaP cells, and its loss causes these cells to acquire invasive trait. To understand the underlying mechanism, we employed ROBO1-expressing/ROBO1-C2C3-mutant constructs, immunoprecipitation, confocal-microscopy and luciferase-reporter techniques. We show that ROBO1 through its interaction with DOCK1 (at SH3-SH2-domain) controls the Rac-activation. However, loss of ROBO1 results in Rac1-activation which in turn causes E-Cadherin/β-catenin cytoskeleton destabilization and induction of cell migration. We suggest that ROBO1 is a predictive biomarker that has potential to discriminate among CaP types, and could be exploited as a molecular target to inhibit the progression of disease as well as treat metastasis in high-risk populations such as African-Americans. PMID:24752651

  4. REST is a crucial regulator for acquiring EMT-like and stemness phenotypes in hormone-refractory prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yi-Ting; Lin, Tzu-Ping; Campbell, Mel; Pan, Chin-Chen; Lee, Shu-Hui; Lee, Hsin-Chen; Yang, Muh-Hwa; Kung, Hsing-Jien; Chang, Pei-Ching

    2017-01-01

    Castration-resistance prostate cancer (CRPC), also known as hormone-refractory prostate cancer (HRPC), requires immediate attention since it is not only resistant to androgen ablation, chemo- and radiotherapy, but also highly metastatic. Increasing evidence suggests that enrichment of neuroendocrine (NE) cells is associated with CRPC. Here, combined RNA-seq and ChIP-seq analysis reveals that REST is involved in epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and stemness acquisition in NE differentiated prostate cancer (PCa) cells via direct transcriptional repression of Twist1 and CD44. Specifically we show that short-term knockdown of REST induces NE differentiation of LNCaP cells. Long-term REST knockdown enhanced the expression of Twist1 and CD44, cell migration and sphere formation. Overexpression of REST in hormone-refractory CWR22Rv1 PCa cells significantly reduces Twist1 and CD44 expression, cell migration and sphere formation. Collectively, our study uncovers REST in regulating EMT and stemness properties of NE PCa cells and suggests that REST is a potential therapeutic target for CRPC. PMID:28256535

  5. REST is a crucial regulator for acquiring EMT-like and stemness phenotypes in hormone-refractory prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yi-Ting; Lin, Tzu-Ping; Campbell, Mel; Pan, Chin-Chen; Lee, Shu-Hui; Lee, Hsin-Chen; Yang, Muh-Hwa; Kung, Hsing-Jien; Chang, Pei-Ching

    2017-03-03

    Castration-resistance prostate cancer (CRPC), also known as hormone-refractory prostate cancer (HRPC), requires immediate attention since it is not only resistant to androgen ablation, chemo- and radiotherapy, but also highly metastatic. Increasing evidence suggests that enrichment of neuroendocrine (NE) cells is associated with CRPC. Here, combined RNA-seq and ChIP-seq analysis reveals that REST is involved in epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and stemness acquisition in NE differentiated prostate cancer (PCa) cells via direct transcriptional repression of Twist1 and CD44. Specifically we show that short-term knockdown of REST induces NE differentiation of LNCaP cells. Long-term REST knockdown enhanced the expression of Twist1 and CD44, cell migration and sphere formation. Overexpression of REST in hormone-refractory CWR22Rv1 PCa cells significantly reduces Twist1 and CD44 expression, cell migration and sphere formation. Collectively, our study uncovers REST in regulating EMT and stemness properties of NE PCa cells and suggests that REST is a potential therapeutic target for CRPC.

  6. mRNA and methylation profiling of radioresistant esophageal cancer cells: the involvement of Sall2 in acquired aggressive phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Judong; Wang, Wenjie; Tang, Yiting; Zhou, Dandan; Gao, Yi; Zhang, Qi; Zhou, Xifa; Zhu, Hui; Xing, Ligang; Yu, Jinming

    2017-01-01

    Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) is one of the deadliest malignancies worldwide. Radiotherapy plays a critical role in the curative management of inoperable ESCC patients. However, radioresistance restricts the efficacy of radiotherapy for ESCC patients. The molecules involved in radioresistance remain largely unknown, and new approaches to sensitize cells to irradiation are in demand. Technical advances in analysis of mRNA and methylation have enabled the exploration of the etiology of diseases and have the potential to broaden our understanding of the molecular pathways of ESCC radioresistance. In this study, we constructed radioresistant TE-1 and Eca-109 cell lines (TE-1/R and Eca-109/R, respectively). The radioresistant cells showed an increased migration ability but reduced apoptosis and cisplatin sensitivity compared with their parent cells. mRNA and methylation profiling by microarray revealed 1192 preferentially expressed mRNAs and 8841 aberrantly methylated regions between TE-1/R and TE-1 cells. By integrating the mRNA and methylation profiles, we related the decreased expression of transcription factor Sall2 with a corresponding increase in its methylation in TE-1/R cells, indicating its involvement in radioresistance. Upregulation of Sall2 decreased the growth and migration advantage of radioresistant ESCC cells. Taken together, our present findings illustrate the mRNA and DNA methylation changes during the radioresistance of ESCC and the important role of Sall2 in esophageal cancer malignancy. PMID:28367244

  7. Macrophages are recruited to hypoxic tumor areas and acquire a Pro-Angiogenic M2-Polarized phenotype via hypoxic cancer cell derived cytokines Oncostatin M and Eotaxin

    PubMed Central

    Tripathi, Chakrapani; Tewari, Brij Nath; Kanchan, Ranjana Kumari; Baghel, Khemraj Singh; Nautiyal, Naveen; Shrivastava, Richa; Kaur, Harbeer; Bhatt, Madan Lal Bramha; Bhadauria, Smrati

    2014-01-01

    TAMs, a unique and distinct M2-skewed myeloid population of tumor stroma, exhibiting pro-tumor functions is fast emerging as a potential target for anti-cancer immunotherapy. Macrophage-recruitment and M2-polarization represent key TAMs-related phenomenon that are amenable to therapeutic intervention. However successful translation of these approaches into effective therapeutic regimen requires better characterization of tumor-microenvironment derived signals that regulate macrophage recruitment and their polarization. Owing to hypoxic milieu being a persistent feature of tumor-microenvironment and a major contributor to malignancy and treatment resistance, the current study was planned with an aim to decipher tumor cell responses to hypoxia vis-a-vis macrophage homing and phenotype switching. Here, we show that hypoxia-primed cancer cells chemoattract and polarize macrophages to pro-angiogenic M2-polarized subtype via Eotaxin and Oncostatin M. Concordantly, hypoxic regions of human breast-cancer specimen exhibited elevated Eotaxin and Oncostatin M levels with concurrently elevated M2-macrophage content. Blockade of Eotaxin/Oncostatin M not only prevented hypoxic breast-cancer cells from recruiting and polarizing macrophages towards an M2-polarized phenotype and retarded tumor progression in 4T1/BALB/c-syngenic-mice-model of breast-cancer but also enhanced the efficacy of anti-angiogenic Bevacizumab. The findings established these two cytokines as novel targets for devising effective anticancer therapy particularly for tumors that are refractory or develop resistance to anti-angiogenic therapeutics. PMID:25051364

  8. Human cytotrophoblasts acquire aneuploidies as they differentiateto an invasive phenotype

    SciTech Connect

    Weier, Jingly F.; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.; Jung, Christine J.; Gormley, Matthew; Zhou, Yuan; Chu, Lisa W.; Genbacev, Olga; Wright, AlexiA.; Fisher, Susan J.

    2004-12-15

    Through an unusual differentiation process, human trophoblast progenitors (cytotrophoblasts) give rise to tumor-like cells that invade the uterus. By an unknown mechanism, invasive cytotrophoblasts exhibit permanent cell cycle withdrawal. Here we report molecular cytogenetic data showing that {approx} 20 to 60 percent of these interphase cells had acquired aneusomies involving chromosomes X, Y, o r16. The incidence positively correlated with gestational age and differentiation to an invasive phenotype. Scoring 12 chromosomes in flow-sorted cytotrophoblasts showed that more than 95 percent of the cells were hyperdiploid. Thus, aneuploidy appears to be an important component of normal placentation, perhaps limiting the proliferative and invasive potential of cytotrophoblasts within the uterus.

  9. Lung cancer stem cells—characteristics, phenotype

    PubMed Central

    George, Rachel; Sethi, Tariq

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer remains a major cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide with unfavourable prognosis mainly due to the late stage of disease at presentation. High incidence and disease recurrence rates are a fact despite advances in treatment. Ongoing experimental and clinical observations suggest that the malignant phenotype in lung cancer is sustained by lung cancer stem cells (CSCs) which are putative stem cells situated throughout the airways that have the potential of initiating lung cancer formation. These cells share the common characteristic of increased proliferation and differentiation, long life span and resistance to chemotherapy and radiation therapy. This review summarises the current knowledge on their characteristics and phenotype. PMID:27413709

  10. Radiofrequency treatment alters cancer cell phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Ware, Matthew J.; Tinger, Sophia; Colbert, Kevin L.; Corr, Stuart J.; Rees, Paul; Koshkina, Nadezhda; Curley, Steven; Summers, H. D.; Godin, Biana

    2015-01-01

    The importance of evaluating physical cues in cancer research is gradually being realized. Assessment of cancer cell physical appearance, or phenotype, may provide information on changes in cellular behavior, including migratory or communicative changes. These characteristics are intrinsically different between malignant and non-malignant cells and change in response to therapy or in the progression of the disease. Here, we report that pancreatic cancer cell phenotype was altered in response to a physical method for cancer therapy, a non-invasive radiofrequency (RF) treatment, which is currently being developed for human trials. We provide a battery of tests to explore these phenotype characteristics. Our data show that cell topography, morphology, motility, adhesion and division change as a result of the treatment. These may have consequences for tissue architecture, for diffusion of anti-cancer therapeutics and cancer cell susceptibility within the tumor. Clear phenotypical differences were observed between cancerous and normal cells in both their untreated states and in their response to RF therapy. We also report, for the first time, a transfer of microsized particles through tunneling nanotubes, which were produced by cancer cells in response to RF therapy. Additionally, we provide evidence that various sub-populations of cancer cells heterogeneously respond to RF treatment. PMID:26165830

  11. Radiofrequency treatment alters cancer cell phenotype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ware, Matthew J.; Tinger, Sophia; Colbert, Kevin L.; Corr, Stuart J.; Rees, Paul; Koshkina, Nadezhda; Curley, Steven; Summers, H. D.; Godin, Biana

    2015-07-01

    The importance of evaluating physical cues in cancer research is gradually being realized. Assessment of cancer cell physical appearance, or phenotype, may provide information on changes in cellular behavior, including migratory or communicative changes. These characteristics are intrinsically different between malignant and non-malignant cells and change in response to therapy or in the progression of the disease. Here, we report that pancreatic cancer cell phenotype was altered in response to a physical method for cancer therapy, a non-invasive radiofrequency (RF) treatment, which is currently being developed for human trials. We provide a battery of tests to explore these phenotype characteristics. Our data show that cell topography, morphology, motility, adhesion and division change as a result of the treatment. These may have consequences for tissue architecture, for diffusion of anti-cancer therapeutics and cancer cell susceptibility within the tumor. Clear phenotypical differences were observed between cancerous and normal cells in both their untreated states and in their response to RF therapy. We also report, for the first time, a transfer of microsized particles through tunneling nanotubes, which were produced by cancer cells in response to RF therapy. Additionally, we provide evidence that various sub-populations of cancer cells heterogeneously respond to RF treatment.

  12. Restoration of normal phenotype in cancer cells

    DOEpatents

    Bissell, Mina J.; Weaver, Valerie M.

    1998-01-01

    A method for reversing expression of malignant phenotype in cancer cells is described. The method comprises applying .beta..sub.1 integrin function-blocking antibody to the cells. The method can be used to assess the progress of cancer therapy. Human breast epithelial cells were shown to be particularly responsive.

  13. Restoration of normal phenotype in cancer cells

    DOEpatents

    Bissell, M.J.; Weaver, V.M.

    1998-12-08

    A method for reversing expression of malignant phenotype in cancer cells is described. The method comprises applying {beta}{sub 1} integrin function-blocking antibody to the cells. The method can be used to assess the progress of cancer therapy. Human breast epithelial cells were shown to be particularly responsive. 14 figs.

  14. Imaging Prostate Cancer (PCa) Phenotype and Evolution

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    1 AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0386 TITLE: Imaging Prostate Cancer (PCa) Phenotype and Evolution PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Jason A. Koutcher...CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Sloan Kettering Institute for Cancer Research New York, NY 10065 REPORT DATE: October 2015 TYPE OF REPORT: Annual Report...time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and completing and reviewing this

  15. Aberrant Cytokeratin Expression During Arsenic-induced Acquired Malignant Phenotype in Human HaCaT Keratinocytes Consistent with Epidermal Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yang; Pi, Jingbo; Wang, Xueqian; Tokar, Erik J.; Liu, Jie; Waalkes, Michael P.

    2009-01-01

    Inorganic arsenic is a known human skin carcinogen. Chronic arsenic exposure results in various human skin lesions, including hyperkeratosis and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), both characterized by distorted cytokeratin (CK) production. Prior work shows the human skin keratinocyte HaCaT cell line, when exposed chronically for >25 weeks to a low level of inorganic arsenite (100 nM) results in cells able to produce aggressive SCC upon inoculation into nude mice. In the present study, CK expression analysis was performed in arsenic-exposed HaCaT cells during the progressive acquisition of this malignant phenotype (0 to 20 weeks) to further validate this model as relevant to epidermal carcinogenesis induced by arsenic in humans. Indeed, we observed clear evidence of acquired cancer phenotype by 20 weeks of arsenite exposure including the formation of giant cells, a >4-fold increase in colony formation in soft agar and a ∼2.5-fold increase in matrix metalloproteinase-9 secretion, an enzyme often secreted by cancer cells to help invade through the local extra-cellular matrix. During this acquired malignant phenotype, various CK genes showed markedly altered expression at the transcript and protein levels in a time-dependent manner. For example, CK1, a marker of hyperkeratosis, increased up to 34-fold during arsenic-induced transformation, while CK13, a marker for dermal cancer progression, increased up to 45-fold. The stem cell marker, CK15, increased up to 7-fold, particularly during the later stages of arsenic exposure, indicating a potential emergence of cancer stem-like cells with arsenic-induced acquired malignant phenotype. The expression of involucrin and loricrin, markers for keratinocyte differentiation, increased up to 9-fold. Thus, during arsenic-induced acquired cancer phenotype in human keratinocytes, dramatic and dynamic alterations in CK expression occur which are consistent with the process of epidermal carcinogenesis helping validate this as an

  16. Aberrant cytokeratin expression during arsenic-induced acquired malignant phenotype in human HaCaT keratinocytes consistent with epidermal carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yang; Pi, Jingbo; Wang, Xueqian; Tokar, Erik J; Liu, Jie; Waalkes, Michael P

    2009-08-03

    Inorganic arsenic is a known human skin carcinogen. Chronic arsenic exposure results in various human skin lesions, including hyperkeratosis and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), both characterized by distorted cytokeratin (CK) production. Prior work shows the human skin keratinocyte HaCaT cell line, when exposed chronically for >25 weeks to a low level of inorganic arsenite (100nM) results in cells able to produce aggressive SCC upon inoculation into nude mice. In the present study, CK expression analysis was performed in arsenic-exposed HaCaT cells during the progressive acquisition of this malignant phenotype (0-20 weeks) to further validate this model as relevant to epidermal carcinogenesis induced by arsenic in humans. Indeed, we observed clear evidence of acquired cancer phenotype by 20 weeks of arsenite exposure including the formation of giant cells, a >4-fold increase in colony formation in soft agar and a approximately 2.5-fold increase in matrix metalloproteinase-9 secretion, an enzyme often secreted by cancer cells to help invade through the local extra-cellular matrix. During this acquired malignant phenotype, various CK genes showed markedly altered expression at the transcript and protein levels in a time-dependent manner. For example, CK1, a marker of hyperkeratosis, increased up to 34-fold during arsenic-induced transformation, while CK13, a marker for dermal cancer progression, increased up to 45-fold. The stem cell marker, CK15, increased up to 7-fold, particularly during the later stages of arsenic exposure, indicating a potential emergence of cancer stem-like cells with arsenic-induced acquired malignant phenotype. The expression of involucrin and loricrin, markers for keratinocyte differentiation, increased up to 9-fold. Thus, during arsenic-induced acquired cancer phenotype in human keratinocytes, dramatic and dynamic alterations in CK expression occur which are consistent with the process of epidermal carcinogenesis helping validate this as an

  17. Phenotype heterogeneity in cancer cell populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almeida, Luis; Chisholm, Rebecca; Clairambault, Jean; Escargueil, Alexandre; Lorenzi, Tommaso; Lorz, Alexander; Trélat, Emmanuel

    2016-06-01

    Phenotype heterogeneity in cancer cell populations, be it of genetic, epigenetic or stochastic origin, has been identified as a main source of resistance to drug treatments and a major source of therapeutic failures in cancers. The molecular mechanisms of drug resistance are partly understood at the single cell level (e.g., overexpression of ABC transporters or of detoxication enzymes), but poorly predictable in tumours, where they are hypothesised to rely on heterogeneity at the cell population scale, which is thus the right level to describe cancer growth and optimise its control by therapeutic strategies in the clinic. We review a few results from the biological literature on the subject, and from mathematical models that have been published to predict and control evolution towards drug resistance in cancer cell populations. We propose, based on the latter, optimisation strategies of combined treatments to limit emergence of drug resistance to cytotoxic drugs in cancer cell populations, in the monoclonal situation, which limited as it is still retains consistent features of cell population heterogeneity. The polyclonal situation, that may be understood as "bet hedging" of the tumour, thus protecting itself from different sources of drug insults, may lie beyond such strategies and will need further developments. In the monoclonal situation, we have designed an optimised therapeutic strategy relying on a scheduled combination of cytotoxic and cytostatic treatments that can be adapted to different situations of cancer treatments. Finally, we review arguments for biological theoretical frameworks proposed at different time and development scales, the so-called atavistic model (diachronic view relying on Darwinian genotype selection in the coursof billions of years) and the Waddington-like epigenetic landscape endowed with evolutionary quasi-potential (synchronic view relying on Lamarckian phenotype instruction of a given genome by reversible mechanisms), to

  18. Acquire: an open-source comprehensive cancer biobanking system

    PubMed Central

    Dowst, Heidi; Pew, Benjamin; Watkins, Chris; McOwiti, Apollo; Barney, Jonathan; Qu, Shijing; Becnel, Lauren B.

    2015-01-01

    Motivation: The probability of effective treatment of cancer with a targeted therapeutic can be improved for patients with defined genotypes containing actionable mutations. To this end, many human cancer biobanks are integrating more tightly with genomic sequencing facilities and with those creating and maintaining patient-derived xenografts (PDX) and cell lines to provide renewable resources for translational research. Results: To support the complex data management needs and workflows of several such biobanks, we developed Acquire. It is a robust, secure, web-based, database-backed open-source system that supports all major needs of a modern cancer biobank. Its modules allow for i) up-to-the-minute ‘scoreboard’ and graphical reporting of collections; ii) end user roles and permissions; iii) specimen inventory through caTissue Suite; iv) shipping forms for distribution of specimens to pathology, genomic analysis and PDX/cell line creation facilities; v) robust ad hoc querying; vi) molecular and cellular quality control metrics to track specimens’ progress and quality; vii) public researcher request; viii) resource allocation committee distribution request review and oversight and ix) linkage to available derivatives of specimen. Availability and Implementation: Acquire implements standard controlled vocabularies, ontologies and objects from the NCI, CDISC and others. Here we describe the functionality of the system, its technological stack and the processes it supports. A test version Acquire is available at https://tcrbacquire-stg.research.bcm.edu; software is available in https://github.com/BCM-DLDCC/Acquire; and UML models, data and workflow diagrams, behavioral specifications and other documents are available at https://github.com/BCM-DLDCC/Acquire/tree/master/supplementaryMaterials. Contact: becnel@bcm.edu PMID:25573920

  19. Cell of Origin and Cancer Stem Cell Phenotype in Medulloblastomas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0115 TITLE: Cell of Origin and Cancer Stem Cell Phenotype in Medulloblastomas PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Kyuson Yun...of Origin and Cancer Stem Cell Phenotype in Medulloblastomas 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-14-1-0115 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6...some oncogene function in determining molecular phenotypes. To test this hypothesis, we proposed to transform neural stem cells (NSCs) and neural

  20. A multi-phenotypic cancer model with cell plasticity.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Da; Wang, Yue; Wu, Bin

    2014-09-21

    The conventional cancer stem cell (CSC) theory indicates a hierarchy of CSCs and non-stem cancer cells (NSCCs), that is, CSCs can differentiate into NSCCs but not vice versa. However, an alternative paradigm of CSC theory with reversible cell plasticity among cancer cells has received much attention very recently. Here we present a generalized multi-phenotypic cancer model by integrating cell plasticity with the conventional hierarchical structure of cancer cells. We prove that under very weak assumption, the nonlinear dynamics of multi-phenotypic proportions in our model has only one stable steady state and no stable limit cycle. This result theoretically explains the phenotypic equilibrium phenomena reported in various cancer cell lines. Furthermore, according to the transient analysis of our model, it is found that cancer cell plasticity plays an essential role in maintaining the phenotypic diversity in cancer especially during the transient dynamics. Two biological examples with experimental data show that the phenotypic conversions from NCSSs to CSCs greatly contribute to the transient growth of CSCs proportion shortly after the drastic reduction of it. In particular, an interesting overshooting phenomenon of CSCs proportion arises in three-phenotypic example. Our work may pave the way for modeling and analyzing the multi-phenotypic cell population dynamics with cell plasticity.

  1. Cancer cells exhibit clonal diversity in phenotypic plasticity

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Phenotypic heterogeneity in cancers is associated with invasive progression and drug resistance. This heterogeneity arises in part from the ability of cancer cells to switch between phenotypic states, but the dynamics of this cellular plasticity remain poorly understood. Here we apply DNA barcodes to quantify and track phenotypic plasticity across hundreds of clones in a population of cancer cells exhibiting epithelial or mesenchymal differentiation phenotypes. We find that the epithelial-to-mesenchymal cell ratio is highly variable across the different clones in cancer cell populations, but remains stable for many generations within the progeny of any single clone—with a heritability of 0.89. To estimate the effects of combination therapies on phenotypically heterogeneous tumours, we generated quantitative simulations incorporating empirical data from our barcoding experiments. These analyses indicated that combination therapies which alternate between epithelial- and mesenchymal-specific treatments eventually select for clones with increased phenotypic plasticity. However, this selection could be minimized by increasing the frequency of alternation between treatments, identifying designs that may minimize selection for increased phenotypic plasticity. These findings establish new insights into phenotypic plasticity in cancer, and suggest design principles for optimizing the effectiveness of combination therapies for phenotypically heterogeneous tumours. PMID:28202626

  2. Cancer cells exhibit clonal diversity in phenotypic plasticity.

    PubMed

    Mathis, Robert Austin; Sokol, Ethan S; Gupta, Piyush B

    2017-02-01

    Phenotypic heterogeneity in cancers is associated with invasive progression and drug resistance. This heterogeneity arises in part from the ability of cancer cells to switch between phenotypic states, but the dynamics of this cellular plasticity remain poorly understood. Here we apply DNA barcodes to quantify and track phenotypic plasticity across hundreds of clones in a population of cancer cells exhibiting epithelial or mesenchymal differentiation phenotypes. We find that the epithelial-to-mesenchymal cell ratio is highly variable across the different clones in cancer cell populations, but remains stable for many generations within the progeny of any single clone-with a heritability of 0.89. To estimate the effects of combination therapies on phenotypically heterogeneous tumours, we generated quantitative simulations incorporating empirical data from our barcoding experiments. These analyses indicated that combination therapies which alternate between epithelial- and mesenchymal-specific treatments eventually select for clones with increased phenotypic plasticity. However, this selection could be minimized by increasing the frequency of alternation between treatments, identifying designs that may minimize selection for increased phenotypic plasticity. These findings establish new insights into phenotypic plasticity in cancer, and suggest design principles for optimizing the effectiveness of combination therapies for phenotypically heterogeneous tumours.

  3. Long-term persistence of acquired resistance to 5-fluorouracil in the colon cancer cell line SW620

    SciTech Connect

    Tentes, I.K.; Schmidt, W.M.; Krupitza, G.; Steger, G.G.; Mikulits, W.; Kortsaris, A.; Mader, R.M.

    2010-11-15

    Treatment resistance to antineoplastic drugs represents a major clinical problem. Here, we investigated the long-term stability of acquired resistance to 5-fluorouracil (FU) in an in vitro colon cancer model, using four sub-clones characterised by increasing FU-resistance derived from the cell line SW620. The resistance phenotype was preserved after FU withdrawal for 15 weeks ({approx} 100 cell divisions) independent of the established level of drug resistance and of epigenetic silencing. Remarkably, resistant clones tolerated serum deprivation, adopted a CD133{sup +} CD44{sup -} phenotype, and further exhibited loss of membrane-bound E-cadherin together with predominant nuclear {beta}-catenin localisation. Thus, we provide evidence for a long-term memory of acquired drug resistance, driven by multiple cellular strategies (epithelial-mesenchymal transition and selective propagation of CD133{sup +} cells). These resistance phenomena, in turn, accentuate the malignant phenotype.

  4. The overshoot and phenotypic equilibrium in characterizing cancer dynamics of reversible phenotypic plasticity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiufang; Wang, Yue; Feng, Tianquan; Yi, Ming; Zhang, Xingan; Zhou, Da

    2016-02-07

    The paradigm of phenotypic plasticity indicates reversible relations of different cancer cell phenotypes, which extends the cellular hierarchy proposed by the classical cancer stem cell (CSC) theory. Since it is still questionable if the phenotypic plasticity is a crucial improvement to the hierarchical model or just a minor extension to it, it is worthwhile to explore the dynamic behavior characterizing the reversible phenotypic plasticity. In this study we compare the hierarchical model and the reversible model in predicting the cell-state dynamics observed in biological experiments. Our results show that the hierarchical model shows significant disadvantages over the reversible model in describing both long-term stability (phenotypic equilibrium) and short-term transient dynamics (overshoot) in cancer cell populations. In a very specific case in which the total growth of population due to each cell type is identical, the hierarchical model predicts neither phenotypic equilibrium nor overshoot, whereas the reversible model succeeds in predicting both of them. Even though the performance of the hierarchical model can be improved by relaxing the specific assumption, its prediction to the phenotypic equilibrium strongly depends on a precondition that may be unrealistic in biological experiments. Moreover, it still does not show as rich dynamics as the reversible model in capturing the overshoots of both CSCs and non-CSCs. By comparison, it is more likely for the reversible model to correctly predict the stability of the phenotypic mixture and various types of overshoot behavior.

  5. Phenotyping community-acquired pneumonia according to the presence of acute respiratory failure and severe sepsis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Acute respiratory failure (ARF) and severe sepsis (SS) are possible complications in patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). The aim of the study was to evaluate prevalence, characteristics, risk factors and impact on mortality of hospitalized patients with CAP according to the presence of ARF and SS on admission. Methods This was a multicenter, observational, prospective study of consecutive CAP patients admitted to three hospitals in Italy, Spain, and Scotland between 2008 and 2010. Three groups of patients were identified: those with neither ARF nor SS (Group A), those with only ARF (Group B) and those with both ARF and SS (Group C) on admission. Results Among the 2,145 patients enrolled, 45% belonged to Group A, 36% to Group B and 20% to Group C. Patients in Group C were more severe than patients in Group B. Isolated ARF was correlated with age (p < 0.001), COPD (p < 0.001) and multilobar infiltrates (p < 0.001). The contemporary occurrence of ARF and SS was associated with age (p = 0.002), residency in nursing home (p = 0.007), COPD (p < 0.001), multilobar involvement (p < 0.001) and renal disease (p < 0.001). 4.2% of patients in Group A died, 9.3% in Group B and 26% in Group C, p < 0.001. After adjustment, the presence of only ARF had an OR for in-hospital mortality of 1.85 (p = 0.011) and the presence of both ARF and SS had an OR of 6.32 (p < 0.001). Conclusions The identification of ARF and SS on hospital admission can help physicians in classifying CAP patients into three different clinical phenotypes. PMID:24593040

  6. Method for restoration of normal phenotype in cancer cells

    DOEpatents

    Bissell, Mina J.; Weaver, Valerie M.

    2000-01-01

    A method for reversing expression of malignant phenotype in cancer cells is described. The method comprises applying .beta..sub.1 integrin function-blocking antibody to the cells. The method can be used to assess the progress of cancer therapy. Human breast epithelial cells were shown to be particularly responsive.

  7. Phenotypic plasticity in prostate cancer: role of intrinsically disordered proteins

    PubMed Central

    Mooney, Steven M; Jolly, Mohit Kumar; Levine, Herbert; Kulkarni, Prakash

    2016-01-01

    A striking characteristic of cancer cells is their remarkable phenotypic plasticity, which is the ability to switch states or phenotypes in response to environmental fluctuations. Phenotypic changes such as a partial or complete epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) that play important roles in their survival and proliferation, and development of resistance to therapeutic treatments, are widely believed to arise due to somatic mutations in the genome. However, there is a growing concern that such a deterministic view is not entirely consistent with multiple lines of evidence, which indicate that stochasticity may also play an important role in driving phenotypic plasticity. Here, we discuss how stochasticity in protein interaction networks (PINs) may play a key role in determining phenotypic plasticity in prostate cancer (PCa). Specifically, we point out that the key players driving transitions among different phenotypes (epithelial, mesenchymal, and hybrid epithelial/mesenchymal), including ZEB1, SNAI1, OVOL1, and OVOL2, are intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) and discuss how plasticity at the molecular level may contribute to stochasticity in phenotypic switching by rewiring PINs. We conclude by suggesting that targeting IDPs implicated in EMT in PCa may be a new strategy to gain additional insights and develop novel treatments for this disease, which is the most common form of cancer in adult men. PMID:27427552

  8. Phenotypic plasticity in prostate cancer: role of intrinsically disordered proteins.

    PubMed

    Mooney, Steven M; Jolly, Mohit Kumar; Levine, Herbert; Kulkarni, Prakash

    2016-01-01

    A striking characteristic of cancer cells is their remarkable phenotypic plasticity, which is the ability to switch states or phenotypes in response to environmental fluctuations. Phenotypic changes such as a partial or complete epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) that play important roles in their survival and proliferation, and development of resistance to therapeutic treatments, are widely believed to arise due to somatic mutations in the genome. However, there is a growing concern that such a deterministic view is not entirely consistent with multiple lines of evidence, which indicate that stochasticity may also play an important role in driving phenotypic plasticity. Here, we discuss how stochasticity in protein interaction networks (PINs) may play a key role in determining phenotypic plasticity in prostate cancer (PCa). Specifically, we point out that the key players driving transitions among different phenotypes (epithelial, mesenchymal, and hybrid epithelial/mesenchymal), including ZEB1, SNAI1, OVOL1, and OVOL2, are intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) and discuss how plasticity at the molecular level may contribute to stochasticity in phenotypic switching by rewiring PINs. We conclude by suggesting that targeting IDPs implicated in EMT in PCa may be a new strategy to gain additional insights and develop novel treatments for this disease, which is the most common form of cancer in adult men.

  9. Imaging Prostate Cancer (Pca) Phenotype and Evolution

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    prostate cancer cells. To further investigate the effects of DFP on prostate cancer cells we carried out extracellular flux analysis experiments. Our...Extracellular flux analysis experiments with the Seahorse system showed a marked decrease in OCR after inhibition of ATP synthase by oligomycin...the means. Figure 5 – Extracellular flux analysis in TRAMP C2 cells incubated with different concentrations of DFP. Left: OCR measurements. Right

  10. Up-regulation of glycolysis promotes the stemness and EMT phenotypes in gemcitabine-resistant pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hengqiang; Duan, Qingke; Zhang, Zhengle; Li, Hehe; Wu, Heshui; Shen, Qiang; Wang, Chunyou; Yin, Tao

    2017-02-28

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT)-type cells are considered as underlying causes of chemoresistance, tumour recurrence and metastasis in pancreatic cancer. We aimed to describe the mechanisms - particularly glycolysis - involved in the regulation of the CSC and EMT phenotypes. We used a gemcitabine-resistant (GR) Patu8988 cell line, which exhibited clear CSC and EMT phenotypes and showed reliance on glycolysis. Inhibition of glycolysis using 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG) significantly enhanced the cytotoxicity of gemcitabine and inhibited the CSC and EMT phenotypes in GR cells both in vitro and in vivo. Intriguingly, the use of the reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger N-acetylcysteine (NAC) restored the CSC and EMT phenotypes. H2 O2 produced changes similar to those of 2-DG, indicating that ROS were involved in the acquired cancer stemness and EMT phenotypes of GR cells. Moreover, doublecortin-like kinase 1 (DCLK1), a pancreatic CSC marker, was highly expressed and regulated the stemness and EMT phenotypes in GR cell. Both 2-DG and H2 O2 treatment suppressed DCLK1 expression, which was also rescued by NAC. Together, these findings revealed that glycolysis promotes the expression of DCLK1 and maintains the CSC and EMT phenotypes via maintenance of low ROS levels in chemoresistant GR cells. The glycolysis-ROS-DCLK1 pathway may be potential targets for reversing the malignant behaviour of pancreatic cancer.

  11. Glucose metabolic phenotype of pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Anthony KC; Bruce, Jason IE; Siriwardena, Ajith K

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To construct a global “metabolic phenotype” of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) reflecting tumour-related metabolic enzyme expression. METHODS: A systematic review of the literature was performed using OvidSP and PubMed databases using keywords “pancreatic cancer” and individual glycolytic and mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (MOP) enzymes. Both human and animal studies investigating the oncological effect of enzyme expression changes and inhibitors in both an in vitro and in vivo setting were included in the review. Data reporting changes in enzyme expression and the effects on PDAC cells, such as survival and metastatic potential, were extracted to construct a metabolic phenotype. RESULTS: Seven hundred and ten papers were initially retrieved, and were screened to meet the review inclusion criteria. 107 unique articles were identified as reporting data involving glycolytic enzymes, and 28 articles involving MOP enzymes in PDAC. Data extraction followed a pre-defined protocol. There is consistent over-expression of glycolytic enzymes and lactate dehydrogenase in keeping with the Warburg effect to facilitate rapid adenosine-triphosphate production from glycolysis. Certain isoforms of these enzymes were over-expressed specifically in PDAC. Altering expression levels of HK, PGI, FBA, enolase, PK-M2 and LDA-A with metabolic inhibitors have shown a favourable effect on PDAC, thus identifying these as potential therapeutic targets. However, the Warburg effect on MOP enzymes is less clear, with different expression levels at different points in the Krebs cycle resulting in a fundamental change of metabolite levels, suggesting that other essential anabolic pathways are being stimulated. CONCLUSION: Further characterisation of the PDAC metabolic phenotype is necessary as currently there are few clinical studies and no successful clinical trials targeting metabolic enzymes. PMID:27022229

  12. Arsenic Exposure Transforms Human Epithelial Stem/Progenitor Cells into a Cancer Stem-like Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Tokar, Erik J.; Diwan, Bhalchandra A.; Waalkes, Michael P.

    2010-01-01

    Background Inorganic arsenic is a ubiquitous environmental carcinogen affecting millions of people worldwide. Evolving theory predicts that normal stem cells (NSCs) are transformed into cancer stem cells (CSCs) that then drive oncogenesis. In humans, arsenic is carcinogenic in the urogenital system (UGS), including the bladder and potentially the prostate, whereas in mice arsenic induces multiorgan UGS cancers, indicating that UGS NSCs may represent targets for carcinogenic initiation. However, proof of emergence of CSCs induced by arsenic in a stem cell population is not available. Methods We continuously exposed the human prostate epithelial stem/progenitor cell line WPE-stem to an environmentally relevant level of arsenic (5 μM) in vitro and determined the acquired cancer phenotype. Results WPE-stem cells rapidly acquired a malignant CSC-like phenotype by 18 weeks of exposure, becoming highly invasive, losing contact inhibition, and hypersecreting matrix metalloproteinase-9. When hetero-transplanted, these cells (designated As-CSC) formed highly pleomorphic, aggressive tumors with immature epithelial- and mesenchymal-like cells, suggesting a highly pluripotent cell of origin. Consistent with tumor-derived CSCs, As-CSCs formed abundant free-floating spheres enriched in CSC-like cells, as confirmed by molecular analysis and the fact that only these floating cells formed xenograft tumors. An early loss of NSC self-renewal gene expression (p63, ABCG2, BMI-1, SHH, OCT-4, NOTCH-1) during arsenite exposure was subsequently reversed as the tumor suppressor gene PTEN was progressively suppressed and the CSC-like phenotype acquired. Conclusions Arsenite transforms prostate epithelial stem/progenitor cells into CSC-like cells, indicating that it can produce CSCs from a model NSC population. PMID:20056578

  13. The molecular basis of breast cancer pathological phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Heng, Yujing J; Lester, Susan C; Tse, Gary Mk; Factor, Rachel E; Allison, Kimberly H; Collins, Laura C; Chen, Yunn-Yi; Jensen, Kristin C; Johnson, Nicole B; Jeong, Jong Cheol; Punjabi, Rahi; Shin, Sandra J; Singh, Kamaljeet; Krings, Gregor; Eberhard, David A; Tan, Puay Hoon; Korski, Konstanty; Waldman, Frederic M; Gutman, David A; Sanders, Melinda; Reis-Filho, Jorge S; Flanagan, Sydney R; Gendoo, Deena Ma; Chen, Gregory M; Haibe-Kains, Benjamin; Ciriello, Giovanni; Hoadley, Katherine A; Perou, Charles M; Beck, Andrew H

    2017-02-01

    The histopathological evaluation of morphological features in breast tumours provides prognostic information to guide therapy. Adjunct molecular analyses provide further diagnostic, prognostic and predictive information. However, there is limited knowledge of the molecular basis of morphological phenotypes in invasive breast cancer. This study integrated genomic, transcriptomic and protein data to provide a comprehensive molecular profiling of morphological features in breast cancer. Fifteen pathologists assessed 850 invasive breast cancer cases from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). Morphological features were significantly associated with genomic alteration, DNA methylation subtype, PAM50 and microRNA subtypes, proliferation scores, gene expression and/or reverse-phase protein assay subtype. Marked nuclear pleomorphism, necrosis, inflammation and a high mitotic count were associated with the basal-like subtype, and had a similar molecular basis. Omics-based signatures were constructed to predict morphological features. The association of morphology transcriptome signatures with overall survival in oestrogen receptor (ER)-positive and ER-negative breast cancer was first assessed by use of the Molecular Taxonomy of Breast Cancer International Consortium (METABRIC) dataset; signatures that remained prognostic in the METABRIC multivariate analysis were further evaluated in five additional datasets. The transcriptomic signature of poorly differentiated epithelial tubules was prognostic in ER-positive breast cancer. No signature was prognostic in ER-negative breast cancer. This study provided new insights into the molecular basis of breast cancer morphological phenotypes. The integration of morphological with molecular data has the potential to refine breast cancer classification, predict response to therapy, enhance our understanding of breast cancer biology, and improve clinical management. This work is publicly accessible at www.dx.ai/tcga_breast. Copyright © 2016

  14. Primary, Adaptive, and Acquired Resistance to Cancer Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Padmanee; Hu-Lieskovan, Siwen; Wargo, Jennifer A; Ribas, Antoni

    2017-02-09

    Cancer immunotherapy can induce long lasting responses in patients with metastatic cancers of a wide range of histologies. Broadening the clinical applicability of these treatments requires an improved understanding of the mechanisms limiting cancer immunotherapy. The interactions between the immune system and cancer cells are continuous, dynamic, and evolving from the initial establishment of a cancer cell to the development of metastatic disease, which is dependent on immune evasion. As the molecular mechanisms of resistance to immunotherapy are elucidated, actionable strategies to prevent or treat them may be derived to improve clinical outcomes for patients.

  15. Oncogenes induce the cancer-associated fibroblast phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Lisanti, Michael P; Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E; Sotgia, Federica

    2013-01-01

    Metabolic coupling, between mitochondria in cancer cells and catabolism in stromal fibroblasts, promotes tumor growth, recurrence, metastasis, and predicts anticancer drug resistance. Catabolic fibroblasts donate the necessary fuels (such as L-lactate, ketones, glutamine, other amino acids, and fatty acids) to anabolic cancer cells, to metabolize via their TCA cycle and oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS). This provides a simple mechanism by which metabolic energy and biomass are transferred from the host microenvironment to cancer cells. Recently, we showed that catabolic metabolism and “glycolytic reprogramming” in the tumor microenvironment are orchestrated by oncogene activation and inflammation, which originates in epithelial cancer cells. Oncogenes drive the onset of the cancer-associated fibroblast phenotype in adjacent normal fibroblasts via paracrine oxidative stress. This oncogene-induced transition to malignancy is “mirrored” by a loss of caveolin-1 (Cav-1) and an increase in MCT4 in adjacent stromal fibroblasts, functionally reflecting catabolic metabolism in the tumor microenvironment. Virtually identical findings were obtained using BRCA1-deficient breast and ovarian cancer cells. Thus, oncogene activation (RAS, NFkB, TGF-β) and/or tumor suppressor loss (BRCA1) have similar functional effects on adjacent stromal fibroblasts, initiating “metabolic symbiosis” and the cancer-associated fibroblast phenotype. New therapeutic strategies that metabolically uncouple oxidative cancer cells from their glycolytic stroma or modulate oxidative stress could be used to target this lethal subtype of cancers. Targeting “fibroblast addiction” in primary and metastatic tumor cells may expose a critical Achilles’ heel, leading to disease regression in both sporadic and familial cancers. PMID:23860382

  16. Fibroblasts that resist cigarette smoke-induced senescence acquire profibrotic phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Kanaji, Nobuhiro; Basma, Hesham; Nelson, Amy; Farid, Maha; Sato, Tadashi; Nakanishi, Masanori; Wang, Xingqi; Michalski, Joel; Li, YingJi; Gunji, Yoko; Feghali-Bostwick, Carol; Liu, Xiangde; Rennard, Stephen I

    2014-09-01

    This study assessed the effect of extended exposure to cigarette smoke extract (CSE) on tissue repair functions in lung fibroblasts. Human fetal (HFL-1) and adult lung fibroblasts were exposed to CSE for 14 days. Senescence-associated β-galactosidase (SA β-gal) expression, cell proliferation, and tissue repair functions including chemotaxis and gel contraction were assessed. HFL-1 proliferation was inhibited by CSE and nearly half of the CSE-exposed cells were SA β-gal positive after 14 days exposure, whereas 33% of adult lung fibroblasts were SA β-gal positive in response to 10% CSE exposure. The SA β-gal-positive cells did not proliferate as indicated by bromodeoxyuridine incorporation. In contrast, cells negative for SA β-gal after CSE exposure proliferated faster than cells never exposed to CSE. These nonsenescent cells migrated more and contracted collagen gels more than control cells. CSE exposure stimulated TGF-β1 production, and both inhibition of TGF-β receptor kinase and TGF-β1 siRNA blocked CSE modulation of fibroblast function. Extended exposure to CSE might induce two different fibroblast phenotypes, a senescent and a profibrotic phenotype. The fibroblasts that resist CSE-induced cellular senescence may contribute to the pathogenesis of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and could contribute to fibrotic lesions in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease acting through a TGF-β1-mediated pathway. In contrast, the senescent cells may contribute to the pathogenesis of emphysema.

  17. Hairy pinnae after orchiectomy and chemotherapy for testicular cancer: acquired localized hypertrichosis of the ears.

    PubMed

    Sänger, C F E; Dietrich, N; Pelivani, N; Borradori, L; de Viragh, P A

    2011-01-01

    Acquired localized hypertrichosis has rarely been reported. Here, we describe a patient with localized hypertrichosis of the pinnae that occurred 4 months after orchiectomy and chemotherapy for a testicular carcinoma. To our knowledge, this is the first case of an acquired hypertrichosis of the pinnae after cancer therapy. We propose that in our patient either hypogonadism or the hormonal imbalance caused by the cancer therapy led to the development of the hairy pinnae, perhaps alongside a genetic predisposition for hairy ears.

  18. The multiple personality disorder phenotype(s) of circulating endothelial cells in cancer.

    PubMed

    Bertolini, Francesco; Mancuso, Patrizia; Braidotti, Paola; Shaked, Yuval; Kerbel, Robert S

    2009-08-01

    Circulating endothelial cells (CECs) and circulating endothelial progenitors (CEPs) are currently being investigated in a variety of diseases as markers of vascular turnover or damage and, also in the case of CEPs, vasculogenesis. CEPs appear to have a "catalytic" role in different steps of cancer progression and recurrence after therapy, and there are preclinical and clinical data suggesting that CEC enumeration might be useful to select and stratify patients who are candidates for anti-angiogenic treatments. In some types of cancer, CECs and CEPs might be one of the possible hidden identities of cancer stem cells. The definition of CEC and CEP phenotype and the standardization of CEC and CEP enumeration strategies are highly desirable goals in order to exploit these cells as reliable biomarkers in oncology clinical trials.

  19. The significance of macrophage phenotype in cancer and biomaterials

    SciTech Connect

    Bygd, Hannah C.; Forsmark, Kiva D.; Bratlie, Kaitlin M.

    2014-11-25

    Macrophages have long been known to exhibit heterogeneous and plastic phenotypes. They show functional diversity with roles in homeostasis, tissue repair, immunity and disease. There exists a spectrum of macrophage phenotypes with varied effector functions, molecular determinants, cytokine and chemokine profiles, as well as receptor expression. In tumor microenvironments, the subset of macrophages known as tumor-associated macrophages generates byproducts that enhance tumor growth and angiogenesis, making them attractive targets for anti-cancer therapeutics. With respect to wound healing and the foreign body response, there is a necessity for balance between pro-inflammatory, wound healing, and regulatory macrophages in order to achieve successful implantation of a scaffold for tissue engineering. In this review, we discuss the multitude of ways macrophages are known to be important in cancer therapies and implanted biomaterials.

  20. The significance of macrophage phenotype in cancer and biomaterials

    DOE PAGES

    Bygd, Hannah C.; Forsmark, Kiva D.; Bratlie, Kaitlin M.

    2014-11-25

    Macrophages have long been known to exhibit heterogeneous and plastic phenotypes. They show functional diversity with roles in homeostasis, tissue repair, immunity and disease. There exists a spectrum of macrophage phenotypes with varied effector functions, molecular determinants, cytokine and chemokine profiles, as well as receptor expression. In tumor microenvironments, the subset of macrophages known as tumor-associated macrophages generates byproducts that enhance tumor growth and angiogenesis, making them attractive targets for anti-cancer therapeutics. With respect to wound healing and the foreign body response, there is a necessity for balance between pro-inflammatory, wound healing, and regulatory macrophages in order to achieve successfulmore » implantation of a scaffold for tissue engineering. In this review, we discuss the multitude of ways macrophages are known to be important in cancer therapies and implanted biomaterials.« less

  1. Therapy-induced developmental reprogramming of prostate cancer cells and acquired therapy resistance.

    PubMed

    Nouri, Mannan; Caradec, Josselin; Lubik, Amy Anne; Li, Na; Hollier, Brett G; Takhar, Mandeep; Altimirano-Dimas, Manuel; Chen, Mengqian; Roshan-Moniri, Mani; Butler, Miriam; Lehman, Melanie; Bishop, Jennifer; Truong, Sarah; Huang, Shih-Chieh; Cochrane, Dawn; Cox, Michael; Collins, Colin; Gleave, Martin; Erho, Nicholas; Alshalafa, Mohamed; Davicioni, Elai; Nelson, Colleen; Gregory-Evans, Sheryl; Karnes, R Jeffrey; Jenkins, Robert B; Klein, Eric A; Buttyan, Ralph

    2017-01-27

    Treatment-induced neuroendocrine transdifferentiation (NEtD) complicates therapies for metastatic prostate cancer (PCa). Based on evidence that PCa cells can transdifferentiate to other neuroectodermally-derived cell lineages in vitro, we proposed that NEtD requires first an intermediary reprogramming to metastable cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) of a neural class and we demonstrate that several different AR+/PSA+ PCa cell lines were efficiently reprogrammed to, maintained and propagated as CSCs by growth in androgen-free neural/neural crest (N/NC) stem medium. Such reprogrammed cells lost features of prostate differentiation; gained features of N/NC stem cells and tumor-initiating potential; were resistant to androgen signaling inhibition; and acquired an invasive phenotype in vitro and in vivo. When placed back into serum-containing mediums, reprogrammed cells could be re-differentiated to N-/NC-derived cell lineages or return back to an AR+ prostate-like state. Once returned, the AR+ cells were resistant to androgen signaling inhibition. Acute androgen deprivation or anti-androgen treatment in serum-containing medium led to the transient appearance of a sub-population of cells with similar characteristics. Finally, a 132 gene signature derived from reprogrammed PCa cell lines distinguished tumors from PCa patients with adverse outcomes. This model may explain neural manifestations of PCa associated with lethal disease. The metastable nature of the reprogrammed stem-like PCa cells suggests that cycles of PCa cell reprogramming followed by re-differentiation may support disease progression and therapeutic resistance. The ability of a gene signature from reprogrammed PCa cells to identify tumors from patients with metastasis or PCa-specific mortality implies that developmental reprogramming is linked to aggressive tumor behaviors.

  2. Consensus nomenclature for CD8(+) T cell phenotypes in cancer.

    PubMed

    Apetoh, Lionel; Smyth, Mark J; Drake, Charles G; Abastado, Jean-Pierre; Apte, Ron N; Ayyoub, Maha; Blay, Jean-Yves; Bonneville, Marc; Butterfield, Lisa H; Caignard, Anne; Castelli, Chiara; Cavallo, Federica; Celis, Esteban; Chen, Lieping; Colombo, Mario P; Comin-Anduix, Begoña; Coukos, Georges; Dhodapkar, Madhav V; Dranoff, Glenn; Frazer, Ian H; Fridman, Wolf-Hervé; Gabrilovich, Dmitry I; Gilboa, Eli; Gnjatic, Sacha; Jäger, Dirk; Kalinski, Pawel; Kaufman, Howard L; Kiessling, Rolf; Kirkwood, John; Knuth, Alexander; Liblau, Roland; Lotze, Michael T; Lugli, Enrico; Marincola, Francesco; Melero, Ignacio; Melief, Cornelis J; Mempel, Thorsten R; Mittendorf, Elizabeth A; Odun, Kunle; Overwijk, Willem W; Palucka, Anna Karolina; Parmiani, Giorgio; Ribas, Antoni; Romero, Pedro; Schreiber, Robert D; Schuler, Gerold; Srivastava, Pramod K; Tartour, Eric; Valmori, Danila; van der Burg, Sjoerd H; van der Bruggen, Pierre; van den Eynde, Benoît J; Wang, Ena; Zou, Weiping; Whiteside, Theresa L; Speiser, Daniel E; Pardoll, Drew M; Restifo, Nicholas P; Anderson, Ana C

    2015-04-01

    Whereas preclinical investigations and clinical studies have established that CD8(+) T cells can profoundly affect cancer progression, the underlying mechanisms are still elusive. Challenging the prevalent view that the beneficial effect of CD8(+) T cells in cancer is solely attributable to their cytotoxic activity, several reports have indicated that the ability of CD8(+) T cells to promote tumor regression is dependent on their cytokine secretion profile and their ability to self-renew. Evidence has also shown that the tumor microenvironment can disarm CD8(+) T cell immunity, leading to the emergence of dysfunctional CD8(+) T cells. The existence of different types of CD8(+) T cells in cancer calls for a more precise definition of the CD8(+) T cell immune phenotypes in cancer and the abandonment of the generic terms "pro-tumor" and "antitumor." Based on recent studies investigating the functions of CD8(+) T cells in cancer, we here propose some guidelines to precisely define the functional states of CD8(+) T cells in cancer.

  3. Consensus nomenclature for CD8+ T cell phenotypes in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Apetoh, Lionel; Smyth, Mark J.; Drake, Charles G.; Abastado, Jean-Pierre; Apte, Ron N.; Ayyoub, Maha; Blay, Jean-Yves; Bonneville, Marc; Butterfield, Lisa H.; Caignard, Anne; Castelli, Chiara; Cavallo, Federica; Celis, Esteban; Chen, Lieping; Colombo, Mario P.; Comin-Anduix, Begoña; Coukos, Georges; Dhodapkar, Madhav V.; Dranoff, Glenn; Frazer, Ian H.; Fridman, Wolf-Hervé; Gabrilovich, Dmitry I.; Gilboa, Eli; Gnjatic, Sacha; Jäger, Dirk; Kalinski, Pawel; Kaufman, Howard L.; Kiessling, Rolf; Kirkwood, John; Knuth, Alexander; Liblau, Roland; Lotze, Michael T.; Lugli, Enrico; Marincola, Francesco; Melero, Ignacio; Melief, Cornelis J.; Mempel, Thorsten R.; Mittendorf, Elizabeth A.; Odun, Kunle; Overwijk, Willem W.; Palucka, Anna Karolina; Parmiani, Giorgio; Ribas, Antoni; Romero, Pedro; Schreiber, Robert D.; Schuler, Gerold; Srivastava, Pramod K.; Tartour, Eric; Valmori, Danila; van der Burg, Sjoerd H.; van der Bruggen, Pierre; van den Eynde, Benoît J.; Wang, Ena; Zou, Weiping; Whiteside, Theresa L.; Speiser, Daniel E.; Pardoll, Drew M.; Restifo, Nicholas P.; Anderson, Ana C.

    2015-01-01

    Whereas preclinical investigations and clinical studies have established that CD8+ T cells can profoundly affect cancer progression, the underlying mechanisms are still elusive. Challenging the prevalent view that the beneficial effect of CD8+ T cells in cancer is solely attributable to their cytotoxic activity, several reports have indicated that the ability of CD8+ T cells to promote tumor regression is dependent on their cytokine secretion profile and their ability to self-renew. Evidence has also shown that the tumor microenvironment can disarm CD8+ T cell immunity, leading to the emergence of dysfunctional CD8+ T cells. The existence of different types of CD8+ T cells in cancer calls for a more precise definition of the CD8+ T cell immune phenotypes in cancer and the abandonment of the generic terms “pro-tumor” and “antitumor.” Based on recent studies investigating the functions of CD8+ T cells in cancer, we here propose some guidelines to precisely define the functional states of CD8+ T cells in cancer. PMID:26137416

  4. Targeting the latest hallmark of cancer: another attempt at 'magic bullet' drugs targeting cancers' metabolic phenotype.

    PubMed

    Cuperlovic-Culf, M; Culf, A S; Touaibia, M; Lefort, N

    2012-10-01

    The metabolism of tumors is remarkably different from the metabolism of corresponding normal cells and tissues. Metabolic alterations are initiated by oncogenes and are required for malignant transformation, allowing cancer cells to resist some cell death signals while producing energy and fulfilling their biosynthetic needs with limiting resources. The distinct metabolic phenotype of cancers provides an interesting avenue for treatment, potentially with minimal side effects. As many cancers show similar metabolic characteristics, drugs targeting the cancer metabolic phenotype are, perhaps optimistically, expected to be 'magic bullet' treatments. Over the last few years there have been a number of potential drugs developed to specifically target cancer metabolism. Several of these drugs are currently in clinical and preclinical trials. This review outlines examples of drugs developed for different targets of significance to cancer metabolism, with a focus on small molecule leads, chemical biology and clinical results for these drugs.

  5. Molecular subtypes and imaging phenotypes of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    During the last 15 years, traditional breast cancer classifications based on histopathology have been reorganized into the luminal A, luminal B, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), and basal-like subtypes based on gene expression profiling. Each molecular subtype has shown varying risk for progression, response to treatment, and survival outcomes. Research linking the imaging phenotype with the molecular subtype has revealed that non-calcified, relatively circumscribed masses with posterior acoustic enhancement are common in the basal-like subtype, spiculated masses with a poorly circumscribed margin and posterior acoustic shadowing in the luminal subtype, and pleomorphic calcifications in the HER2-enriched subtype. Understanding the clinical implications of the molecular subtypes and imaging phenotypes could help radiologists guide precision medicine, tailoring medical treatment to patients and their tumor characteristics. PMID:27599892

  6. Therapeutic targeting of Neu1 sialidase with oseltamivir phosphate (Tamiflu®) disables cancer cell survival in human pancreatic cancer with acquired chemoresistance

    PubMed Central

    O’Shea, Leah K; Abdulkhalek, Samar; Allison, Stephanie; Neufeld, Ronald J; Szewczuk, Myron R

    2014-01-01

    Background Resistance to drug therapy, along with high rates of metastasis, contributes to the low survival rate in patients diagnosed with pancreatic cancer. An alternate treatment for human pancreatic cancer involving targeting of Neu1 sialidase with oseltamivir phosphate (Tamiflu®) was investigated in human pancreatic cancer (PANC1) cells with acquired resistance to cisplatin and gemcitabine. Its efficacy in overcoming the intrinsic resistance of the cell to chemotherapeutics and metastasis was evaluated. Methods Microscopic imaging, immunocytochemistry, immunohistochemistry, and WST-1 cell viability assays were used to evaluate cell survival, morphologic changes, and expression levels of E-cadherin, N-cadherin, and VE-cadherin before and after treatment with oseltamivir phosphate in PANC1 cells with established resistance to cisplatin, gemcitabine, or a combination of the two agents, and in archived paraffin-embedded PANC1 tumors grown in RAGxCγ double mutant mice. Results Oseltamivir phosphate overcame the chemoresistance of PANC1 to cisplatin and gemcitabine alone or in combination in a dose-dependent manner, and disabled the cancer cell survival mechanism(s). Oseltamivir phosphate also reversed the epithelial-mesenchymal transition characteristic of the phenotypic E-cadherin to N-cadherin changes associated with resistance to drug therapy. Low-dose oseltamivir phosphate alone or in combination with gemcitabine in heterotopic xenografts of PANC1 tumors growing in RAGxCγ double mutant mice did not prevent metastatic spread to the liver and lung. Conclusion Therapeutic targeting of Neu1 sialidase with oseltamivir phosphate at the growth factor receptor level disables the intrinsic signaling platform for cancer cell survival in human pancreatic cancer with acquired chemoresistance. These findings provide evidence for oseltamivir phosphate (Tamiflu) as a potential therapeutic agent for pancreatic cancer resistant to drug therapy. PMID:24470763

  7. The Cohesive Metastasis Phenotype in Human Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Harryman, William L; Hinton, James P; Rubenstein, Cynthia P; Singh, Parminder; Nagle, Raymond B; Parker, Sarah J; Knudsen, Beatrice S; Cress, Anne E

    2016-12-01

    A critical barrier for the successful prevention and treatment of recurrent prostate cancer is detection and eradication of metastatic and therapy-resistant disease. Despite the fall in diagnoses and mortality, the reported incidence of metastatic disease has increased 72% since 2004. Prostate cancer arises in cohesive groups as intraepithelial neoplasia, migrates through muscle and leaves the gland via perineural invasion for hematogenous dissemination. Current technological advances have shown cohesive-clusters of tumor (also known as microemboli) within the circulation. Circulating tumor cell (CTC) profiles are indicative of disseminated prostate cancer, and disseminated tumor cells (DTC) are found in cohesive-clusters, a phenotypic characteristic of both radiation- and drug-resistant tumors. Recent reports in cell biology and informatics, coupled with mass spectrometry, indicate that the integrin adhesome network provides an explanation for the biophysical ability of cohesive-clusters of tumor cells to invade thorough muscle and nerve microenvironments while maintaining adhesion-dependent therapeutic resistance. Targeting cohesive-clusters takes advantage of the known ability of extracellular matrix (ECM) adhesion to promote tumor cell survival and represents an approach that has the potential to avoid the progression to drug- and radiotherapy-resistance. In the following review we will examine the evidence for development and dissemination of cohesive-clusters in metastatic prostate cancer.

  8. Hypodontia phenotype in patients with epithelial ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fekonja, Anita; Cretnik, Andrej; Zerdoner, Danijel; Takac, Iztok

    2015-01-01

    Background Ovarian cancer is usually diagnosed in an advanced stage and the present clinical and diagnostic molecular markers for early OC screening are insufficient. The aim of this study was to identify potential relationship between the hypodontia and epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). Patients and methods A retrospective study was conducted on 120 patients with EOC treated at the Department of Gynaecologic and Breast Oncology at the University Clinical Centre and 120 gynaecological healthy women (control group) of the same mean age. Women in both groups were reviewed for the presence of hypodontia and the patients with EOC also for clinicopathological characteristics of EOC according to hypodontia phenotype. Results Hypodontia was diagnosed in 23 (19.2%) of patients with EOC and 8 (6.7%) controls (p = 0.004; odds ratio [OR] = 3.32; confidence interval [CI], 1.42–7.76). There was no statistically significant difference in patients with EOC with or without hypodontia regarding histological subtype (p = 0.220); they differed in regard to FIGO stage (p = 0.014; OR =3.26; CI, 1.23–8.64) and tumour differentiation grade (p = 0.042; OR = 3.1; CI, 1.01–9.53). Also, bilateral occurrence of EOC was more common than unilateral occurrence in women with hypodontia (p = 0.021; OR = 2.9; CI, 1.15–7.36). We also found statistically significant difference between the ovarian cancer group and control group in presence of other malignant tumours in subjects (p < 0.001). Conclusions The results of the study suggest a statistical association between EOC and hypodontia phenotype. Hypodontia might serve as a risk factor for EOC detection. PMID:25810703

  9. Membranous CD24 drives the epithelial phenotype of pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lubeseder-Martellato, Clara; Hidalgo-Sastre, Ana; Hartmann, Carolin; Alexandrow, Katharina; Kamyabi-Moghaddam, Zahra; Sipos, Bence; Wirth, Matthias; Neff, Florian; Reichert, Maximilian; Heid, Irina; Schneider, Günter; Braren, Rickmer; Schmid, Roland M.; Siveke, Jens T.

    2016-01-01

    Surface CD24 has previously been described, together with CD44 and ESA, for the characterization of putative cancer stem cells in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), the most fatal of all solid tumors. CD24 has a variety of biological functions including the regulation of invasiveness and cell proliferation, depending on the tumor entity and subcellular localization. Genetically engineered mouse models (GEMM) expressing oncogenic KrasG12D recapitulate the human disease and develop PDAC. In this study we investigate the function of CD24 using GEMM of endogenous PDAC and a model of cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis. We found that (i) CD24 expression was upregulated in murine and human PDAC and during acute pancreatitis (ii) CD24 was expressed exclusively in differentiated PDAC, whereas CD24 absence was associated with undifferentiated tumors and (iii) membranous CD24 expression determines tumor subpopulations with an epithelial phenotype in grafted models. In addition, we show that CD24 protein is stabilized in response to WNT activation and that overexpression of CD24 in pancreatic cancer cells upregulated β-catenin expression augmenting an epithelial, non-metastatic signature. Our results support a positive feedback model according to which (i) WNT activation and subsequent β-catenin dephosphorylation stabilize CD24 protein expression, and (ii) sustained CD24 expression upregulates β-catenin expression. Eventually, membranous CD24 augments the epithelial phenotype of pancreatic tumors. Thus we link the WNT/β-catenin pathway with the regulation of CD24 in the context of PDAC differentiation. PMID:27203385

  10. Massive genomic rearrangement acquired in a single catastrophic event during cancer development.

    PubMed

    Stephens, Philip J; Greenman, Chris D; Fu, Beiyuan; Yang, Fengtang; Bignell, Graham R; Mudie, Laura J; Pleasance, Erin D; Lau, King Wai; Beare, David; Stebbings, Lucy A; McLaren, Stuart; Lin, Meng-Lay; McBride, David J; Varela, Ignacio; Nik-Zainal, Serena; Leroy, Catherine; Jia, Mingming; Menzies, Andrew; Butler, Adam P; Teague, Jon W; Quail, Michael A; Burton, John; Swerdlow, Harold; Carter, Nigel P; Morsberger, Laura A; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine; Follows, George A; Green, Anthony R; Flanagan, Adrienne M; Stratton, Michael R; Futreal, P Andrew; Campbell, Peter J

    2011-01-07

    Cancer is driven by somatically acquired point mutations and chromosomal rearrangements, conventionally thought to accumulate gradually over time. Using next-generation sequencing, we characterize a phenomenon, which we term chromothripsis, whereby tens to hundreds of genomic rearrangements occur in a one-off cellular crisis. Rearrangements involving one or a few chromosomes crisscross back and forth across involved regions, generating frequent oscillations between two copy number states. These genomic hallmarks are highly improbable if rearrangements accumulate over time and instead imply that nearly all occur during a single cellular catastrophe. The stamp of chromothripsis can be seen in at least 2%-3% of all cancers, across many subtypes, and is present in ∼25% of bone cancers. We find that one, or indeed more than one, cancer-causing lesion can emerge out of the genomic crisis. This phenomenon has important implications for the origins of genomic remodeling and temporal emergence of cancer.

  11. ZEB1 Mediates Acquired Resistance to the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor-Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Takeshi; Song, Lanxi; Bai, Yun; Kinose, Fumi; Li, Jiannong; Ohaegbulam, Kim C.; Muñoz-Antonia, Teresita; Qu, Xiaotao; Eschrich, Steven; Uramoto, Hidetaka; Tanaka, Fumihiro; Nasarre, Patrick; Gemmill, Robert M.; Roche, Joëlle; Drabkin, Harry A.; Haura, Eric B.

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is one mechanism of acquired resistance to inhibitors of the epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinases (EGFR-TKIs) in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The precise mechanisms of EMT-related acquired resistance to EGFR-TKIs in NSCLC remain unclear. We generated erlotinib-resistant HCC4006 cells (HCC4006ER) by chronic exposure of EGFR-mutant HCC4006 cells to increasing concentrations of erlotinib. HCC4006ER cells acquired an EMT phenotype and activation of the TGF-β/SMAD pathway, while lacking both T790M secondary EGFR mutation and MET gene amplification. We employed gene expression microarrays in HCC4006 and HCC4006ER cells to better understand the mechanism of acquired EGFR-TKI resistance with EMT. At the mRNA level, ZEB1 (TCF8), a known regulator of EMT, was >20-fold higher in HCC4006ER cells than in HCC4006 cells, and increased ZEB1 protein level was also detected. Furthermore, numerous ZEB1 responsive genes, such as CDH1 (E-cadherin), ST14, and vimentin, were coordinately regulated along with increased ZEB1 in HCC4006ER cells. We also identified ZEB1 overexpression and an EMT phenotype in several NSCLC cells and human NSCLC samples with acquired EGFR-TKI resistance. Short-interfering RNA against ZEB1 reversed the EMT phenotype and, importantly, restored erlotinib sensitivity in HCC4006ER cells. The level of micro-RNA-200c, which can negatively regulate ZEB1, was significantly reduced in HCC4006ER cells. Our results suggest that increased ZEB1 can drive EMT-related acquired resistance to EGFR-TKIs in NSCLC. Attempts should be made to explore targeting ZEB1 to resensitize TKI-resistant tumors. PMID:26789630

  12. Chronic inhibition of tumor cell-derived VEGF enhances the malignant phenotype of colorectal cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Vascular endothelial growth factor-a (VEGF)-targeted therapies have become an important treatment for a number of human malignancies. The VEGF inhibitors are actually effective in several types of cancers, however, the benefits are transiently, and the vast majority of patients who initially respond to the therapies will develop resistance. One of possible mechanisms for the acquired resistance may be the direct effect(s) of VEGF inhibitors on tumor cells expressing VEGF receptors (VEGFR). Thus, we investigated here the direct effect of chronic VEGF inhibition on phenotype changes in human colorectal cancer (CRC) cells. Methods To chronically inhibit cancer cell-derived VEGF, human CRC cell lines (HCT116 and RKO) were chronically exposed (2 months) to an anti-VEGF monoclonal antibody (mAb) or were disrupted the Vegf gene (VEGF-KO). Effects of VEGF family members were blocked by treatment with a VEGF receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor (VEGFR-TKI). Hypoxia-induced apoptosis under VEGF inhibited conditions was measured by TUNEL assay. Spheroid formation ability was assessed using a 3-D spheroid cell culture system. Results Chronic inhibition of secreted/extracellular VEGF by an anti-VEGF mAb redundantly increased VEGF family member (PlGF, VEGFR1 and VEGFR2), induced a resistance to hypoxia-induced apoptosis, and increased spheroid formation ability. This apoptotic resistance was partially abrogated by a VEGFR-TKI, which blocked the compensate pathway consisted of VEGF family members, or by knockdown of Vegf mRNA, which inhibited intracellular function(s) of all Vegf gene products. Interestingly, chronic and complete depletion of all Vegf gene products by Vegf gene knockout further augmented these phenotypes in the compensate pathway-independent manner. These accelerated phenotypes were significantly suppressed by knockdown of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α that was up-regulated in the VEGF-KO cell lines. Conclusions Our findings suggest that chronic

  13. Non-invasive analysis of acquired resistance to cancer therapy by sequencing of plasma DNA.

    PubMed

    Murtaza, Muhammed; Dawson, Sarah-Jane; Tsui, Dana W Y; Gale, Davina; Forshew, Tim; Piskorz, Anna M; Parkinson, Christine; Chin, Suet-Feung; Kingsbury, Zoya; Wong, Alvin S C; Marass, Francesco; Humphray, Sean; Hadfield, James; Bentley, David; Chin, Tan Min; Brenton, James D; Caldas, Carlos; Rosenfeld, Nitzan

    2013-05-02

    Cancers acquire resistance to systemic treatment as a result of clonal evolution and selection. Repeat biopsies to study genomic evolution as a result of therapy are difficult, invasive and may be confounded by intra-tumour heterogeneity. Recent studies have shown that genomic alterations in solid cancers can be characterized by massively parallel sequencing of circulating cell-free tumour DNA released from cancer cells into plasma, representing a non-invasive liquid biopsy. Here we report sequencing of cancer exomes in serial plasma samples to track genomic evolution of metastatic cancers in response to therapy. Six patients with advanced breast, ovarian and lung cancers were followed over 1-2 years. For each case, exome sequencing was performed on 2-5 plasma samples (19 in total) spanning multiple courses of treatment, at selected time points when the allele fraction of tumour mutations in plasma was high, allowing improved sensitivity. For two cases, synchronous biopsies were also analysed, confirming genome-wide representation of the tumour genome in plasma. Quantification of allele fractions in plasma identified increased representation of mutant alleles in association with emergence of therapy resistance. These included an activating mutation in PIK3CA (phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase, catalytic subunit alpha) following treatment with paclitaxel; a truncating mutation in RB1 (retinoblastoma 1) following treatment with cisplatin; a truncating mutation in MED1 (mediator complex subunit 1) following treatment with tamoxifen and trastuzumab, and following subsequent treatment with lapatinib, a splicing mutation in GAS6 (growth arrest-specific 6) in the same patient; and a resistance-conferring mutation in EGFR (epidermal growth factor receptor; T790M) following treatment with gefitinib. These results establish proof of principle that exome-wide analysis of circulating tumour DNA could complement current invasive biopsy approaches to identify

  14. A set of NF-κB-regulated microRNAs induces acquired TRAIL resistance in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Young-Jun; Middleton, Justin; Kim, Taewan; Laganà, Alessandro; Piovan, Claudia; Secchiero, Paola; Nuovo, Gerard J; Cui, Ri; Joshi, Pooja; Romano, Giulia; Di Leva, Gianpiero; Lee, Bum-Kyu; Sun, Hui-Lung; Kim, Yonghwan; Fadda, Paolo; Alder, Hansjuerg; Garofalo, Michela; Croce, Carlo M

    2015-06-30

    TRAIL (TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand) is a promising anticancer agent that can be potentially used as an alternative or complementary therapy because of its specific antitumor activity. However, TRAIL can also stimulate the proliferation of cancer cells through the activation of NF-κB, but the exact mechanism is still poorly understood. In this study, we show that chronic exposure to subtoxic concentrations of TRAIL results in acquired resistance. This resistance is associated with the increase in miR-21, miR-30c, and miR-100 expression, which target tumor-suppressor genes fundamental in the response to TRAIL. Importantly, down-regulation of caspase-8 by miR-21 blocks receptor interacting protein-1 cleavage and induces the activation of NF-κB, which regulates these miRNAs. Thus, TRAIL activates a positive feedback loop that sustains the acquired resistance and causes an aggressive phenotype. Finally, we prove that combinatory treatment of NF-κB inhibitors and TRAIL is able to revert resistance and reduce tumor growth, with important consequences for the clinical practice.

  15. Multiple sporadic colorectal cancers display a unique methylation phenotype.

    PubMed

    Gonzalo, Victoria; Lozano, Juan Jose; Alonso-Espinaco, Virginia; Moreira, Leticia; Muñoz, Jenifer; Pellisé, Maria; Castellví-Bel, Sergi; Bessa, Xavier; Andreu, Montserrat; Xicola, Rosa M; Llor, Xavier; Ruiz-Ponte, Clara; Carracedo, Angel; Jover, Rodrigo; Castells, Antoni; Balaguer, Francesc

    2014-01-01

    Epigenetics are thought to play a major role in the carcinogenesis of multiple sporadic colorectal cancers (CRC). Previous studies have suggested concordant DNA hypermethylation between tumor pairs. However, only a few methylation markers have been analyzed. This study was aimed at describing the epigenetic signature of multiple CRC using a genome-scale DNA methylation profiling. We analyzed 12 patients with synchronous CRC and 29 age-, sex-, and tumor location-paired patients with solitary tumors from the EPICOLON II cohort. DNA methylation profiling was performed using the Illumina Infinium HM27 DNA methylation assay. The most significant results were validated by Methylight. Tumors samples were also analyzed for the CpG Island Methylator Phenotype (CIMP); KRAS and BRAF mutations and mismatch repair deficiency status. Functional annotation clustering was performed. We identified 102 CpG sites that showed significant DNA hypermethylation in multiple tumors with respect to the solitary counterparts (difference in β value ≥0.1). Methylight assays validated the results for 4 selected genes (p = 0.0002). Eight out of 12(66.6%) multiple tumors were classified as CIMP-high, as compared to 5 out of 29(17.2%) solitary tumors (p = 0.004). Interestingly, 76 out of the 102 (74.5%) hypermethylated CpG sites found in multiple tumors were also seen in CIMP-high tumors. Functional analysis of hypermethylated genes found in multiple tumors showed enrichment of genes involved in different tumorigenic functions. In conclusion, multiple CRC are associated with a distinct methylation phenotype, with a close association between tumor multiplicity and CIMP-high. Our results may be important to unravel the underlying mechanism of tumor multiplicity.

  16. Multiple Sporadic Colorectal Cancers Display a Unique Methylation Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalo, Victoria; Lozano, Juan Jose; Alonso-Espinaco, Virginia; Moreira, Leticia; Muñoz, Jenifer; Pellisé, Maria; Castellví-Bel, Sergi; Bessa, Xavier; Andreu, Montserrat; Xicola, Rosa M.; Llor, Xavier; Ruiz-Ponte, Clara; Carracedo, Angel; Jover, Rodrigo; Castells, Antoni; Balaguer, Francesc

    2014-01-01

    Epigenetics are thought to play a major role in the carcinogenesis of multiple sporadic colorectal cancers (CRC). Previous studies have suggested concordant DNA hypermethylation between tumor pairs. However, only a few methylation markers have been analyzed. This study was aimed at describing the epigenetic signature of multiple CRC using a genome-scale DNA methylation profiling. We analyzed 12 patients with synchronous CRC and 29 age-, sex-, and tumor location-paired patients with solitary tumors from the EPICOLON II cohort. DNA methylation profiling was performed using the Illumina Infinium HM27 DNA methylation assay. The most significant results were validated by Methylight. Tumors samples were also analyzed for the CpG Island Methylator Phenotype (CIMP); KRAS and BRAF mutations and mismatch repair deficiency status. Functional annotation clustering was performed. We identified 102 CpG sites that showed significant DNA hypermethylation in multiple tumors with respect to the solitary counterparts (difference in β value ≥0.1). Methylight assays validated the results for 4 selected genes (p = 0.0002). Eight out of 12(66.6%) multiple tumors were classified as CIMP-high, as compared to 5 out of 29(17.2%) solitary tumors (p = 0.004). Interestingly, 76 out of the 102 (74.5%) hypermethylated CpG sites found in multiple tumors were also seen in CIMP-high tumors. Functional analysis of hypermethylated genes found in multiple tumors showed enrichment of genes involved in different tumorigenic functions. In conclusion, multiple CRC are associated with a distinct methylation phenotype, with a close association between tumor multiplicity and CIMP-high. Our results may be important to unravel the underlying mechanism of tumor multiplicity. PMID:24643221

  17. Notch1 induces epithelial-mesenchymal transition and the cancer stem cell phenotype in breast cancer cells and STAT3 plays a key role.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaojin; Zhao, Xiaoai; Shao, Shan; Zuo, Xiaoxiao; Ning, Qian; Luo, Minna; Gu, Shanzhi; Zhao, Xinhan

    2015-03-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignancy in women. The Notch signaling pathway has been shown to be associated with the development and progression of many human cancers, including breast cancer, but the precise mechanism remains unknown. Here, the influence of Notch1 signaling in mammary epithelial cells was studied. We showed that Notch1 promotes proliferation in MCF7 and MCF10A cells. Transwell assay indicated that Notch1 overexpression promotes cell migration and the invasion of breast cancer cells. We showed that MCF7 and MCF10A cells overexpressing Notch1 acquired features of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and displayed a cancer stem cell (CSC) phenotype. The expression levels of the epithelial markers E-cadherin and occludin were decreased, while the expression levels of the mesenchymal markers N-cadherin, vimentin and fibronectin were increased in cells overexpressing Notch1. We demonstrated that Notch1 induced phosphorylation of the signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) in breast cancer cells and increased the expression of p65 and interleukin (IL)-1β. Inhibition of STAT3 activity by JSI124 reduced the expression of p65 and IL-1. Treatment of MCF7-notch1 and MCF10A-notch1 cells with JSI124 also reduced the expression of N-cadherin, markers of epithelial mesenchymal transition and increased the expression of E-cadherin. Our results suggest that Notch1 promotes EMT and the CSC phenotype through induction of STAT3.

  18. Acquired resistance to gemcitabine and cross-resistance in human pancreatic cancer clones.

    PubMed

    Yoneyama, Hiroshi; Takizawa-Hashimoto, Asako; Takeuchi, Osamu; Watanabe, Yukiko; Atsuda, Koichiro; Asanuma, Fumiki; Yamada, Yoshinori; Suzuki, Yukio

    2015-01-01

    The efficacy of gemcitabine (GEM), a standard treatment agent for pancreatic cancer, is insufficient because of primary or acquired resistance to this drug. Patients with tumors intrinsically sensitive to GEM gradually acquire resistance and require a shift to second agents, which are associated with the risk of cross-resistance. However, whether cross-resistance is actually present has long been disputed. Using six GEM-resistant and four highly GEM-resistant clones derived from the pancreatic cancer cell line BxPC-3, we determined the resistance of each clone and parent cell line to GEM and four anticancer agents (5-FU, CDDP, CPT-11, and DTX). The GEM-resistant clones had different resistances to GEM and other agents, and did not develop a specific pattern of cross-resistance. This result shows that tumor cells are heterogeneous. However, all highly GEM-resistant clones presented overexpression of ribonucleotide reductase subunit M1 (RRM1), a target enzyme for metabolized GEM, and showed cross-resistance with 5-FU. The expression level of RRM1 was high; therefore, resistance to GEM was high. We showed that a tumor cell acquired resistance to GEM, and cross-resistance developed in one clone. These results suggest that only cells with certain mechanisms for high-level resistance to GEM survive against selective pressure applied by highly concentrated GEM. RRM1 may be one of the few factors that can induce high resistance to GEM and a suitable therapeutic target for GEM-resistant pancreatic cancer.

  19. On genetic information uncertainty and the mutator phenotype in cancer.

    PubMed

    Chan, Jason Yongsheng

    2012-01-01

    Recent evidence supports the existence of a mutator phenotype in cancer cells, although the mechanistic basis remains unknown. In this paper, it is shown that this enhanced genetic instability is generated by an amplified measurement uncertainty on genetic information during DNA replication. At baseline, an inherent measurement uncertainty implies an imprecision of the recognition, replication and transfer genetic information, and forms the basis for an intrinsic genetic instability in all biological cells. Genetic information is contained in the sequence of DNA bases, each existing due to proton tunnelling, as a coherent superposition of quantum states composed of both the canonical and rare tautomeric forms until decoherence by interaction with DNA polymerase. The result of such a quantum measurement process may be interpreted classically as akin to a Bernoulli trial, whose outcome X is random and can be either of two possibilities, depending on whether the proton is tunnelled (X=1) or not (X=0). This inherent quantum uncertainty is represented by a binary entropy function and quantified in terms of Shannon information entropy H(X)=-P(X=1)log(2)P(X=1)-P(X=0)log(2)P(X=0). Enhanced genetic instability may either be directly derived from amplified uncertainty induced by increases in quantum and thermodynamic fluctuation, or indirectly arise from the loss of natural uncertainty reduction mechanisms.

  20. Computational imaging reveals mitochondrial morphology as a biomarker of cancer phenotype and drug response

    PubMed Central

    Giedt, Randy J.; Fumene Feruglio, Paolo; Pathania, Divya; Yang, Katherine S.; Kilcoyne, Aoife; Vinegoni, Claudio; Mitchison, Timothy J.; Weissleder, Ralph

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria, which are essential organelles in resting and replicating cells, can vary in number, mass and shape. Past research has primarily focused on short-term molecular mechanisms underlying fission/fusion. Less is known about longer-term mitochondrial behavior such as the overall makeup of cell populations’ morphological patterns and whether these patterns can be used as biomarkers of drug response in human cells. We developed an image-based analytical technique to phenotype mitochondrial morphology in different cancers, including cancer cell lines and patient-derived cancer cells. We demonstrate that (i) cancer cells of different origins, including patient-derived xenografts, express highly diverse mitochondrial phenotypes; (ii) a given phenotype is characteristic of a cell population and fairly constant over time; (iii) mitochondrial patterns correlate with cell metabolic measurements and (iv) therapeutic interventions can alter mitochondrial phenotypes in drug-sensitive cancers as measured in pre- versus post-treatment fine needle aspirates in mice. These observations shed light on the role of mitochondrial dynamics in the biology and drug response of cancer cells. On the basis of these findings, we propose that image-based mitochondrial phenotyping can provide biomarkers for assessing cancer phenotype and drug response. PMID:27609668

  1. Phenotypic and genotypic evaluation of beta-lactamases (ESBL and KPC) among enterobacteria isolated from community-acquired monomicrobial urinary tract infections.

    PubMed

    Dias, Vanessa Cordeiro; da Silva, Vânia Lúcia; Barros, Renata; Bastos, André Netto; de Andrade Bastos, Lucas Quinnet; de Andrade Bastos, Victor Quinnet; Diniz, Cláudio Galuppo

    2014-12-01

    Beta-lactamases enzymes such as extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBL) and carbapenemase type beta-lactamases (KPC) confer resistance to beta-lactam drugs among Gram-negative rods, mainly Enterobacteriaceae, as those frequently related to urinary tract infections (UTI). The aim of this study was to evaluate ESBL and KPC among enterobacteria isolated from monomicrobial UTI and to establish correlations between the presence of genetic markers and the phenotypic resistance to beta-lactam antibiotics. Out of 12 304 urine samples collected during 2009, 93 enterobacteria showing an ESBL phenotype were recovered. Imipenem was used for KPC screening and modified disk approximation assay was used for detection of ESBL phenotype. Polymerase chain reaction was used for screening of bla(SHV), bla(TEM), bla(CTX-M), and bla(KPC). Considering the isolated bacteria showing ESBL phenotype 56% of the isolates were positive for two genes. The bla(TEM) was the most frequent (87·1%). Neither KPC phenotype nor bla(KPC)-harboring bacteria were observed. Monitoring the antimicrobial resistance is extremely important to sustain empirical therapy of community-acquired urinary tract infections (Co-UTI).

  2. Ciprofloxacin mediates cancer stem cell phenotypes in lung cancer cells through caveolin-1-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Phiboonchaiyanan, Preeyaporn Plaimee; Kiratipaiboon, Chayanin; Chanvorachote, Pithi

    2016-04-25

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs), a subpopulation of cancer cells with high aggressive behaviors, have been identified in many types of cancer including lung cancer as one of the key mediators driving cancer progression and metastasis. Here, we have reported for the first time that ciprofloxacin (CIP), a widely used anti-microbial drug, has a potentiating effect on CSC-like features in human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells. CIP treatment promoted CSC-like phenotypes, including enhanced anchorage-independent growth and spheroid formation. The known lung CSC markers: CD133, CD44, ABCG2 and ALDH1A1 were found to be significantly increased, while the factors involving in epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT): Slug and Snail, were depleted. Also, self-renewal transcription factors Oct-4 and Nanog were found to be up-regulated in CIP-treated cells. The treatment of CIP on CSC-rich populations obtained from secondary spheroids resulted in the further increase of CSC markers. In addition, we have proven that the mechanistic insight of the CIP induced stemness is through Caveolin-1 (Cav-1)-dependent mechanism. The specific suppression of Cav-1 by stably transfected Cav-1 shRNA plasmid dramatically reduced the effect of CIP on CSC markers as well as the CIP-induced spheroid formation ability. Cav-1 was shown to activate protein kinase B (Akt) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathways in CSC-rich population; however, such an effect was rarely found in the main lung cancer cells population. These findings reveal a novel effect of CIP in positively regulating CSCs in lung cancer cells via the activation of Cav-1, Akt and ERK, and may provoke the awareness of appropriate therapeutic strategy in cancer patients.

  3. Cancer RNA-Seq Nexus: a database of phenotype-specific transcriptome profiling in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Jian-Rong; Sun, Chuan-Hu; Li, Wenyuan; Chao, Rou-Fang; Huang, Chieh-Chen; Zhou, Xianghong Jasmine; Liu, Chun-Chi

    2016-01-04

    The genome-wide transcriptome profiling of cancerous and normal tissue samples can provide insights into the molecular mechanisms of cancer initiation and progression. RNA Sequencing (RNA-Seq) is a revolutionary tool that has been used extensively in cancer research. However, no existing RNA-Seq database provides all of the following features: (i) large-scale and comprehensive data archives and analyses, including coding-transcript profiling, long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) profiling and coexpression networks; (ii) phenotype-oriented data organization and searching and (iii) the visualization of expression profiles, differential expression and regulatory networks. We have constructed the first public database that meets these criteria, the Cancer RNA-Seq Nexus (CRN, http://syslab4.nchu.edu.tw/CRN). CRN has a user-friendly web interface designed to facilitate cancer research and personalized medicine. It is an open resource for intuitive data exploration, providing coding-transcript/lncRNA expression profiles to support researchers generating new hypotheses in cancer research and personalized medicine.

  4. The phenomenon of acquired resistance to metformin in breast cancer cells: The interaction of growth pathways and estrogen receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Scherbakov, Alexander M; Sorokin, Danila V; Tatarskiy, Victor V; Prokhorov, Nikolay S; Semina, Svetlana E; Berstein, Lev M; Krasil'nikov, Mikhail A

    2016-04-01

    Metformin, a biguanide antidiabetic drug, is used to decrease hyperglycemia in patients with type 2 diabetes. Recently, the epidemiological studies revealed the potential of metformin as an anti-tumor drug for several types of cancer, including breast cancer. Anti-tumor metformin action was found to be mediated, at least in part, via activation of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK)-intracellular energy sensor, which inhibits the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and some other signaling pathways. Nevertheless, some patients can be non-sensitive or resistant to metformin action. Here we analyzed the mechanism of the formation of metformin-resistant phenotype in breast cancer cells and its role in estrogen receptor (ER) regulation. The experiments were performed on the ER-positive MCF-7 breast cancer cells and metformin-resistant MCF-7 subline (MCF-7/M) developed due to long-term metformin treatment. The transcriptional activity of NF-κB and ER was measured by the luciferase reporter gene analysis. The protein expression was determined by immunoblotting (Snail1, (phospho)AMPK, (phospho)IκBα, (phospho)mTOR, cyclin D1, (phospho)Akt and ERα) and immunohistochemical analysis (E-cadherin). We have found that: 1) metformin treatment of MCF-7 cells is accompanied with the stimulation of AMPK and inhibition of growth-related proteins including IκBα, NF-κB, cyclin D1 and ERα; 2) long-term metformin treatment lead to the appearance and progression of cross-resistance to metformin and tamoxifen; the resistant cells are characterized with the unaffected AMPK activity, but the irreversible ER suppression and constitutive activation of Akt/Snail1 signaling; 3) Akt/Snail1 signaling is involved into progression of metformin resistance. The results presented may be considered as the first evidence of the progression of cross-resistance to metformin and tamoxifen in breast cancer cells. Importantly, the acquired resistance to both drugs is based on the

  5. A Multiplex Cancer/Testis Antigen-Based Biomarker Panel to Predict Aggressive Phenotype of Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-12-1-0535 TITLE: A Multiplex Cancer/Testis Antigen-Based Biomarker Panel to Predict Aggressive Phenotype of Prostate...30Sep2014 - 29Sep2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE: A Multiplex Cancer/Testis Antigen-Based Biomarker Panel to Predict Aggressive Phenotype of Prostate...different between aggressive and indolent tumors. For the third year of the grant, we evaluated the gene expression of these 8 CTAs in PCa and benign

  6. Acquired immune response to oncogenic human papillomavirus associated with prophylactic cervical cancer vaccines.

    PubMed

    Einstein, Mark H

    2008-04-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a common infection among women and a necessary cause of cervical cancer. Oncogenic HPV types infecting the anogenital tract have the potential to induce natural immunity, but at present we do not clearly understand the natural history of infection in humans and the mechanisms by which the virus can evade the host immune response. Natural acquired immune responses against HPV may be involved in the clearance of infection, but persistent infection with oncogenic virus types leads to the development of precancerous lesions and cancer. B cell responses are important for viral neutralization, but antibody responses in patients with cervical cancer are poor. Prophylactic vaccines targeting oncogenic virus types associated with cervical cancer have the potential to prevent up to 80% of cervical cancers by targeting HPV types 16 and 18. Clinical data show that prophylactic vaccines are effective in inducing antibody responses and in preventing persistent infection with HPV, as well as the subsequent development of high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia. This article reviews the known data regarding natural immune responses to HPV and those developed by prophylactic vaccination.

  7. The ETS family member GABPα modulates androgen receptor signalling and mediates an aggressive phenotype in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Naomi L.; Massie, Charlie E.; Butter, Falk; Mann, Matthias; Bon, Helene; Ramos-Montoya, Antonio; Menon, Suraj; Stark, Rory; Lamb, Alastair D.; Scott, Helen E.; Warren, Anne Y.; Neal, David E.; Mills, Ian G.

    2014-01-01

    In prostate cancer (PC), the androgen receptor (AR) is a key transcription factor at all disease stages, including the advanced stage of castrate-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). In the present study, we show that GABPα, an ETS factor that is up-regulated in PC, is an AR-interacting transcription factor. Expression of GABPα enables PC cell lines to acquire some of the molecular and cellular characteristics of CRPC tissues as well as more aggressive growth phenotypes. GABPα has a transcriptional role that dissects the overlapping cistromes of the two most common ETS gene fusions in PC: overlapping significantly with ETV1 but not with ERG target genes. GABPα bound predominantly to gene promoters, regulated the expression of one-third of AR target genes and modulated sensitivity to AR antagonists in hormone responsive and castrate resistant PC models. This study supports a critical role for GABPα in CRPC and reveals potential targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:24753418

  8. A continuous phenotype space model of cancer evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masip, David; Korobeinikiov, Andrei

    2017-02-01

    It was suggested that the ability of cancer to avoid immune response pressure (that should be expected to be capable to annihilate cancer at its early stage) can be attributed to the ability of the cancer cells to evolve. The goal of this notice is to illustrate this possibility by the means of mathematical modelling. In this notice, we construct a simple mechanistic model of cancer evolution, which is based upon a classical model of cancer-immune response interaction. Numerical simulations confirm the hypothesis that if cancer mutates fast enough and if immune response is not sufficiently strong, then cancer is able to avoid immune response pressure by evolution.

  9. Functional variomics and network perturbation: connecting genotype to phenotype in cancer.

    PubMed

    Yi, Song; Lin, Shengda; Li, Yongsheng; Zhao, Wei; Mills, Gordon B; Sahni, Nidhi

    2017-03-27

    Proteins interact with other macromolecules in complex cellular networks for signal transduction and biological function. In cancer, genetic aberrations have been traditionally thought to disrupt the entire gene function. It has been increasingly appreciated that each mutation of a gene could have a subtle but unique effect on protein function or network rewiring, contributing to diverse phenotypic consequences across cancer patient populations. In this Review, we discuss the current understanding of cancer genetic variants, including the broad spectrum of mutation classes and the wide range of mechanistic effects on gene function in the context of signalling networks. We highlight recent advances in computational and experimental strategies to study the diverse functional and phenotypic consequences of mutations at the base-pair resolution. Such information is crucial to understanding the complex pleiotropic effect of cancer genes and provides a possible link between genotype and phenotype in cancer.

  10. Phenotypic variation in colorectal adenoma/cancer expression in two families. Hereditary flat adenoma syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lynch, H T; Smyrk, T C; Lanspa, S J; Lynch, P M; Watson, P; Strayhorn, P C; Bronson, E K; Lynch, J F; Priluck, I A; Appelman, H D

    1990-09-01

    Clinical, pathologic, and genetic studies on two colorectal cancer-prone families have disclosed right-sided colonic flat adenomas and colorectal cancer. Adenomatous polyp counts exceeded those found in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) but were fewer than in familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP). Colon cancer occurred at a later age than in HNPCC or FAP and showed right-sided predominance. The older age of patients with colonic cancer, the right-sided predominance of colon cancer, and the paucity of rectal adenomas make FAP unlikely. Vertical transmission of polyps and colon cancer fit the pattern of autosomal dominant inheritance. A characteristic feature of this phenotype is the predominance of flat adenomas. Molecular genetic studies, with careful description of phenotype, should help clarify classification.

  11. Lung scintigraphy in differential diagnosis of peripheral lung cancer and community-acquired pneumonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krivonogov, Nikolay G.; Efimova, Nataliya Y.; Zavadovsky, Konstantin W.; Lishmanov, Yuri B.

    2016-08-01

    Ventilation/perfusion lung scintigraphy was performed in 39 patients with verified diagnosis of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) and in 14 patients with peripheral lung cancer. Ventilation/perfusion ratio, apical-basal gradients of ventilation (U/L(V)) and lung perfusion (U/L(P)), and alveolar capillary permeability of radionuclide aerosol were determined based on scintigraphy data. The study demonstrated that main signs of CAP were increases in ventilation/perfusion ratio, perfusion and ventilation gradient on a side of the diseased lung, and two-side increase in alveolar capillary permeability rate for radionuclide aerosol. Unlike this, scintigraphic signs of peripheral lung cancer comprise an increase in ventilation/perfusion ratio over 1.0 on a side of the diseased lung with its simultaneous decrease on a contralateral side, normal values of perfusion and ventilation gradients of both lungs, and delayed alveolar capillary clearance in the diseased lung compared with the intact lung.

  12. The phenotypic equilibrium of cancer cells: From average-level stability to path-wise convergence.

    PubMed

    Niu, Yuanling; Wang, Yue; Zhou, Da

    2015-12-07

    The phenotypic equilibrium, i.e. heterogeneous population of cancer cells tending to a fixed equilibrium of phenotypic proportions, has received much attention in cancer biology very recently. In the previous literature, some theoretical models were used to predict the experimental phenomena of the phenotypic equilibrium, which were often explained by different concepts of stabilities of the models. Here we present a stochastic multi-phenotype branching model by integrating conventional cellular hierarchy with phenotypic plasticity mechanisms of cancer cells. Based on our model, it is shown that: (i) our model can serve as a framework to unify the previous models for the phenotypic equilibrium, and then harmonizes the different kinds of average-level stabilities proposed in these models; and (ii) path-wise convergence of our model provides a deeper understanding to the phenotypic equilibrium from stochastic point of view. That is, the emergence of the phenotypic equilibrium is rooted in the stochastic nature of (almost) every sample path, the average-level stability just follows from it by averaging stochastic samples.

  13. Primary and acquired resistance to PD-1/PD-L1 blockade in cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiaohong; Wu, Xia

    2017-05-01

    PD-1/PD-L1 blockade appears to be a very promising immunotherapy with significant clinical benefits and durable responses in multiple tumor types. However, the effectual clinical benefits of PD-1/PD-L1 blockade are hampered by a high rate of primary resistance, where patients do not respond to PD-1/PD-L1 blockade initially. And more distressingly, most patients eventually develop acquired resistance after an initial response to PD-1/PD-L1 blockade. The mechanisms underlying primary and acquired resistance to PD-1/PD-L1 blockade have remained ambiguous. This review documents in detail the current understanding of the mechanisms through which resistance to anti-PD1/PD-L1 therapy occurs. The mechanisms underlying primary resistance to PD-1/PD-L1 blockade contain several immunoregulatory factors affecting tumor-specific immune responses within the immune microenvironment, co-enrichment of a group of 26 transcriptomic signatures (named innate anti-PD-1 resistance (IPRES) signatures) and cancer-cell-autonomous cues. The mechanism attributable to acquired resistance harbors evolution of neoantigen landscape, mutations of JAK and β-2-microglobulin, and epigenetic stability of exhausted T cells. At last, the promising therapeutic strategies to sensitize the resistant patients are also briefly discussed.

  14. Docetaxel-Resistance in Prostate Cancer: Evaluating Associated Phenotypic Changes and Potential for Resistance Transfer via Exosomes

    PubMed Central

    Corcoran, Claire; Rani, Sweta; O’Brien, Keith; O’Neill, Amanda; Prencipe, Maria; Sheikh, Rizwan; Webb, Glenn; McDermott, Ray; Watson, William; Crown, John; O’Driscoll, Lorraine

    2012-01-01

    Background Hormone-refractory prostate cancer remains hindered by inevitable progression of resistance to first-line treatment with docetaxel. Recent studies suggest that phenotypic changes associated with cancer may be transferred from cell-to-cell via microvesicles/exosomes. Here we aimed to investigate phenotypic changes associated with docetaxel-resistance in order to help determine the complexity of this problem and to assess the relevance of secreted exosomes in prostate cancer. Methodology/Principal Findings Docetaxel-resistant variants of DU145 and 22Rv1 were established and characterised in terms of cross-resistance, morphology, proliferation, motility, invasion, anoikis, colony formation, exosomes secretion their and functional relevance. Preliminary analysis of exosomes from relevant serum specimens was also performed. Acquired docetaxel-resistance conferred cross-resistance to doxorubicin and induced alterations in motility, invasion, proliferation and anchorage-independent growth. Exosomes expelled from DU145 and 22Rv1 docetaxel-resistant variants (DU145RD and 22Rv1RD) conferred docetaxel-resistance to DU145, 22Rv1 and LNCap cells, which may be partly due to exosomal MDR-1/P-gp transfer. Exosomes from prostate cancer patients’ sera induced increased cell proliferation and invasion, compared to exosomes from age-matched controls. Furthermore, exosomes from sera of patients undergoing a course of docetaxel treatment compared to matched exosomes from the same patients prior to commencing docetaxel treatment, when applied to both DU145 and 22Rv1 cells, showed a correlation between cellular response to docetaxel and patients’ response to treatment with docetaxel. Conclusions/Significance Our studies indicate the complex and multifaceted nature of docetaxel-resistance in prostate cancer. Furthermore, our in vitro observations and preliminary clinical studies indicate that exosomes may play an important role in prostate cancer, in cell-cell communication

  15. BRCA1-IRIS overexpression promotes and maintains the tumor initiating phenotype: implications for triple negative breast cancer early lesions.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Abhilasha; Paul, Bibbin T; Sullivan, Lisa M; Sims, Hillary; El Bastawisy, Ahmed; Yousef, Hend F; Zekri, Abdel-Rahman N; Bahnassy, Abeer A; ElShamy, Wael M

    2017-02-07

    Tumor-initiating cells (TICs) are cancer cells endowed with self-renewal, multi-lineage differentiation, increased chemo-resistance, and in breast cancers the CD44+/CD24-/ALDH1+ phenotype. Triple negative breast cancers show lack of BRCA1 expression in addition to enhanced basal, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), and TIC phenotypes. BRCA1-IRIS (hereafter IRIS) is an oncogene produced by the alternative usage of the BRCA1 locus. IRIS is involved in induction of replication, transcription of selected oncogenes, and promoting breast cancer cells aggressiveness. Here, we demonstrate that IRIS overexpression (IRISOE) promotes TNBCs through suppressing BRCA1 expression, enhancing basal-biomarkers, EMT-inducers, and stemness-enforcers expression. IRISOE also activates the TIC phenotype in TNBC cells through elevating CD44 and ALDH1 expression/activity and preventing CD24 surface presentation by activating the internalization pathway EGFR→c-Src→cortactin. We show that the intrinsic sensitivity to an anti-CD24 cross-linking antibody-induced cell death in membranous CD24 expressing/luminal A cells could be acquired in cytoplasmic CD24 expressing IRISOE TNBC/TIC cells through IRIS silencing or inactivation. We show that fewer IRISOE TNBC/TICs cells form large tumors composed of TICs, resembling TNBCs early lesions in patients that contain metastatic precursors capable of disseminating and metastasizing at an early stage of the disease. IRIS-inhibitory peptide killed these IRISOE TNBC/TICs, in vivo and prevented their dissemination and metastasis. We propose IRIS inactivation could be pursued to prevent dissemination and metastasis from early TNBC tumor lesions in patients.

  16. Canine Mammary Cancer Stem Cells are Radio- and Chemo- Resistant and Exhibit an Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition Phenotype.

    PubMed

    Pang, Lisa Y; Cervantes-Arias, Alejandro; Else, Rod W; Argyle, David J

    2011-03-30

    Canine mammary carcinoma is the most common cancer among female dogs and is often fatal due to the development of distant metastases. In humans, solid tumors are made up of heterogeneous cell populations, which perform different roles in the tumor economy. A small subset of tumor cells can hold or acquire stem cell characteristics, enabling them to drive tumor growth, recurrence and metastasis. In veterinary medicine, the molecular drivers of canine mammary carcinoma are as yet undefined. Here we report that putative cancer stem cells (CSCs) can be isolated form a canine mammary carcinoma cell line, REM134. We show that these cells have an increased ability to form tumorspheres, a characteristic of stem cells, and that they express embryonic stem cell markers associated with pluripotency. Moreover, canine CSCs are relatively resistant to the cytotoxic effects of common chemotherapeutic drugs and ionizing radiation, indicating that failure of clinical therapy to eradicate canine mammary cancer may be due to the survival of CSCs. The epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) has been associated with cancer invasion, metastasis, and the acquisition of stem cell characteristics. Our results show that canine CSCs predominantly express mesenchymal markers and are more invasive than parental cells, indicating that these cells have a mesenchymal phenotype. Furthermore, we show that canine mammary cancer cells can be induced to undergo EMT by TGFβ and that these cells have an increased ability to form tumorspheres. Our findings indicate that EMT induction can enrich for cells with CSC properties, and provide further insight into canine CSC biology.

  17. Matrix-dependent Plasticity of the Malignant Phenotype of Bladder Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hurst, Robert E.; Kyker, Kimberly D.; Bonner, Rebecca B.; Bowditch, Ron D.; Hemstreet, George P.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of cancer- and normal basement membrane-derived extracellular matrix to modulate the phenotype of bladder cancer cell lines. Five lines, varying in malignancy from papilloma to highly undifferentiated and invasive and immortalized human urothelial cells, were grown on two extracellular matrix preparations, Matrigel and SISgel. Matrigel represents matrix remodeled by malignancy while SISgel, obtained from small intestine submucosa (SIS), represents the normal matrix supporting differentiated cell growth. On Matrigel, regardless of the content of growth factors, the invasive lines displayed an invasive phenotype, while the low grade lines grew as papillary structures. In contrast, when the same cells were grown on SISgel, they grew as a layer of cells one to 5 cells thick, failed to invade, and expressed cell-surface E-cadherin. Unlike breast cancer cells, neutralization of β1, β4 and α6 integrins altered cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesiveness but did not alter the phenotype. When invasive cells were grown on mixtures of SISgel and Matrigel, the phenotype changed gradually, not abruptly, indicating that factors within the gel reversibly alter the phenotypic expression of invasion. In summary, the phenotype of bladder cancer cells growing in tissue-like 3-dimensional culture is highly plastic, and malignant properties such as invasion and papillary growth can be suppressed by the matrix. PMID:12926044

  18. Chronic inorganic arsenic exposure in vitro induces a cancer cell phenotype in human peripheral lung epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Person, Rachel J.; Olive Ngalame, Ntube N.; Makia, Ngome L.; Bell, Matthew W.; Waalkes, Michael P.; Tokar, Erik J.

    2015-07-01

    Inorganic arsenic is a human lung carcinogen. We studied the ability of chronic inorganic arsenic (2 μM; as sodium arsenite) exposure to induce a cancer phenotype in the immortalized, non-tumorigenic human lung peripheral epithelial cell line, HPL-1D. After 38 weeks of continuous arsenic exposure, secreted matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP2) activity increased to over 200% of control, levels linked to arsenic-induced cancer phenotypes in other cell lines. The invasive capacity of these chronic arsenic-treated lung epithelial (CATLE) cells increased to 320% of control and colony formation increased to 280% of control. CATLE cells showed enhanced proliferation in serum-free media indicative of autonomous growth. Compared to control cells, CATLE cells showed reduced protein expression of the tumor suppressor gene PTEN (decreased to 26% of control) and the putative tumor suppressor gene SLC38A3 (14% of control). Morphological evidence of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) occurred in CATLE cells together with appropriate changes in expression of the EMT markers vimentin (VIM; increased to 300% of control) and e-cadherin (CDH1; decreased to 16% of control). EMT is common in carcinogenic transformation of epithelial cells. CATLE cells showed increased KRAS (291%), ERK1/2 (274%), phosphorylated ERK (p-ERK; 152%), and phosphorylated AKT1 (p-AKT1; 170%) protein expression. Increased transcript expression of metallothioneins, MT1A and MT2A and the stress response genes HMOX1 (690%) and HIF1A (247%) occurred in CATLE cells possibly in adaptation to chronic arsenic exposure. Thus, arsenic induced multiple cancer cell characteristics in human peripheral lung epithelial cells. This model may be useful to assess mechanisms of arsenic-induced lung cancer. - Highlights: • Chronic arsenic exposure transforms a human peripheral lung epithelia cell line. • Cells acquire characteristics in common with human lung adenocarcinoma cells. • These transformed cells provide a

  19. Mechanical phenotype of cancer cells: cell softening and loss of stiffness sensing.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hsi-Hui; Lin, Hsiu-Kuan; Lin, I-Hsuan; Chiou, Yu-Wei; Chen, Horn-Wei; Liu, Ching-Yi; Harn, Hans I-Chen; Chiu, Wen-Tai; Wang, Yang-Kao; Shen, Meng-Ru; Tang, Ming-Jer

    2015-08-28

    The stiffness sensing ability is required to respond to the stiffness of the matrix. Here we determined whether normal cells and cancer cells display distinct mechanical phenotypes. Cancer cells were softer than their normal counterparts, regardless of the type of cancer (breast, bladder, cervix, pancreas, or Ha-RasV12-transformed cells). When cultured on matrices of varying stiffness, low stiffness decreased proliferation in normal cells, while cancer cells and transformed cells lost this response. Thus, cancer cells undergo a change in their mechanical phenotype that includes cell softening and loss of stiffness sensing. Caveolin-1, which is suppressed in many tumor cells and in oncogene-transformed cells, regulates the mechanical phenotype. Caveolin-1-upregulated RhoA activity and Y397FAK phosphorylation directed actin cap formation, which was positively correlated with cell elasticity and stiffness sensing in fibroblasts. Ha-RasV12-induced transformation and changes in the mechanical phenotypes were reversed by re-expression of caveolin-1 and mimicked by the suppression of caveolin-1 in normal fibroblasts. This is the first study to describe this novel role for caveolin-1, linking mechanical phenotype to cell transformation. Furthermore, mechanical characteristics may serve as biomarkers for cell transformation.

  20. Bridging scales in cancer progression: Mapping genotype to phenotype using neural networks

    PubMed Central

    Gerlee, Philip; Kim, Eunjung; Anderson, Alexander R.A.

    2015-01-01

    In this review we summarize our recent efforts in trying to understand the role of heterogeneity in cancer progression by using neural networks to characterise different aspects of the mapping from a cancer cells genotype and environment to its phenotype. Our central premise is that cancer is an evolving system subject to mutation and selection, and the primary conduit for these processes to occur is the cancer cell whose behaviour is regulated on multiple biological scales. The selection pressure is mainly driven by the microenvironment that the tumour is growing in and this acts directly upon the cell phenotype. In turn, the phenotype is driven by the intracellular pathways that are regulated by the genotype. Integrating all of these processes is a massive undertaking and requires bridging many biological scales (i.e. genotype, pathway, phenotype and environment) that we will only scratch the surface of in this review. We will focus on models that use neural networks as a means of connecting these different biological scales, since they allow us to easily create heterogeneity for selection to act upon and importantly this heterogeneity can be implemented at different biological scales. More specifically, we consider three different neural networks that bridge different aspects of these scales and the dialogue with the micro-environment, (i) the impact of the microenvironment on evolutionary dynamics, (ii) the mapping from genotype to phenotype under drug-induced perturbations and (iii) pathway activity in both normal and cancer cells under different micro-environmental conditions. PMID:24830623

  1. Pancreatic stellate cells enhance stem cell-like phenotypes in pancreatic cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hamada, Shin; Masamune, Atsushi; Takikawa, Tetsuya; Suzuki, Noriaki; Kikuta, Kazuhiro; Hirota, Morihisa; Hamada, Hirofumi; Kobune, Masayoshi; Satoh, Kennichi; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2012-05-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) promote the progression of pancreatic cancer. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pancreatic cancer cells co-cultured with PSCs showed enhanced spheroid formation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Expression of stem cell-related genes ABCG2, Nestin and LIN28 was increased. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Co-injection of PSCs enhanced tumorigenicity of pancreatic cancer cells in vivo. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This study suggested a novel role of PSCs as a part of the cancer stem cell niche. -- Abstract: The interaction between pancreatic cancer cells and pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs), a major profibrogenic cell type in the pancreas, is receiving increasing attention. There is accumulating evidence that PSCs promote the progression of pancreatic cancer by increasing cancer cell proliferation and invasion as well as by protecting them from radiation- and gemcitabine-induced apoptosis. Recent studies have identified that a portion of cancer cells, called 'cancer stem cells', within the entire cancer tissue harbor highly tumorigenic and chemo-resistant phenotypes, which lead to the recurrence after surgery or re-growth of the tumor. The mechanisms that maintain the 'stemness' of these cells remain largely unknown. We hypothesized that PSCs might enhance the cancer stem cell-like phenotypes in pancreatic cancer cells. Indirect co-culture of pancreatic cancer cells with PSCs enhanced the spheroid-forming ability of cancer cells and induced the expression of cancer stem cell-related genes ABCG2, Nestin and LIN28. In addition, co-injection of PSCs enhanced tumorigenicity of pancreatic cancer cells in vivo. These results suggested a novel role of PSCs as a part of the cancer stem cell niche.

  2. Identification of genetic determinants of breast cancer immune phenotypes by integrative genome-scale analysis

    PubMed Central

    Simeone, Ines; Anjum, Samreen; Mokrab, Younes; Bertucci, François; Finetti, Pascal; Curigliano, Giuseppe; Cerulo, Luigi; Tomei, Sara; Delogu, Lucia Gemma; Maccalli, Cristina; Miller, Lance D.; Ceccarelli, Michele

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cancer immunotherapy is revolutionizing the clinical management of several tumors, but has demonstrated limited activity in breast cancer. The development of more effective treatments is hindered by incomplete knowledge of the genetic determinant of immune responsiveness. To fill this gap, we mined copy number alteration, somatic mutation, and expression data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). By using RNA-sequencing data from 1,004 breast cancers, we defined distinct immune phenotypes characterized by progressive expression of transcripts previously associated with immune-mediated rejection. The T helper 1 (Th-1) phenotype (ICR4), which also displays upregulation of immune-regulatory transcripts such as PDL1, PD1, FOXP3, IDO1, and CTLA4, was associated with prolonged patients' survival. We validated these findings in an independent meta-cohort of 1,954 breast cancer gene expression data. Chromosome segment 4q21, which includes genes encoding for the Th-1 chemokines CXCL9-11, was significantly amplified only in the immune favorable phenotype (ICR4). The mutation and neoantigen load progressively decreased from ICR4 to ICR1 but could not fully explain immune phenotypic differences. Mutations of TP53 were enriched in the immune favorable phenotype (ICR4). Conversely, the presence of MAP3K1 and MAP2K4 mutations were tightly associated with an immune-unfavorable phenotype (ICR1). Using both the TCGA and the validation dataset, the degree of MAPK deregulation segregates breast tumors according to their immune disposition. These findings suggest that mutation-driven perturbations of MAPK pathways are linked to the negative regulation of intratumoral immune response in breast cancer. Modulations of MAPK pathways could be experimentally tested to enhance breast cancer immune sensitivity. PMID:28344865

  3. Identification of genetic determinants of breast cancer immune phenotypes by integrative genome-scale analysis.

    PubMed

    Hendrickx, Wouter; Simeone, Ines; Anjum, Samreen; Mokrab, Younes; Bertucci, François; Finetti, Pascal; Curigliano, Giuseppe; Seliger, Barbara; Cerulo, Luigi; Tomei, Sara; Delogu, Lucia Gemma; Maccalli, Cristina; Wang, Ena; Miller, Lance D; Marincola, Francesco M; Ceccarelli, Michele; Bedognetti, Davide

    2017-01-01

    Cancer immunotherapy is revolutionizing the clinical management of several tumors, but has demonstrated limited activity in breast cancer. The development of more effective treatments is hindered by incomplete knowledge of the genetic determinant of immune responsiveness. To fill this gap, we mined copy number alteration, somatic mutation, and expression data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). By using RNA-sequencing data from 1,004 breast cancers, we defined distinct immune phenotypes characterized by progressive expression of transcripts previously associated with immune-mediated rejection. The T helper 1 (Th-1) phenotype (ICR4), which also displays upregulation of immune-regulatory transcripts such as PDL1, PD1, FOXP3, IDO1, and CTLA4, was associated with prolonged patients' survival. We validated these findings in an independent meta-cohort of 1,954 breast cancer gene expression data. Chromosome segment 4q21, which includes genes encoding for the Th-1 chemokines CXCL9-11, was significantly amplified only in the immune favorable phenotype (ICR4). The mutation and neoantigen load progressively decreased from ICR4 to ICR1 but could not fully explain immune phenotypic differences. Mutations of TP53 were enriched in the immune favorable phenotype (ICR4). Conversely, the presence of MAP3K1 and MAP2K4 mutations were tightly associated with an immune-unfavorable phenotype (ICR1). Using both the TCGA and the validation dataset, the degree of MAPK deregulation segregates breast tumors according to their immune disposition. These findings suggest that mutation-driven perturbations of MAPK pathways are linked to the negative regulation of intratumoral immune response in breast cancer. Modulations of MAPK pathways could be experimentally tested to enhance breast cancer immune sensitivity.

  4. The marrow niche controls the cancer stem cell phenotype of disseminated prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shiozawa, Yusuke; Berry, Janice E.; Eber, Matthew R.; Jung, Younghun; Yumoto, Kenji; Cackowski, Frank C.; Yoon, Hyeun Joong; Parsana, Princy; Mehra, Rohit; Wang, Jingcheng; McGee, Samantha; Lee, Eunsohl; Nagrath, Sunitha; Pienta, Kenneth J.; Taichman, Russell S.

    2016-01-01

    Dissemination of cancer stem cells (CSCs) serves as the basis of metastasis. Recently, we demonstrated that circulating prostate cancer targets the hematopoietic stem cell (HSCs) ‘niche’ in marrow during dissemination. Once in the niche, disseminated tumor cells (DTCs) may remain dormant for extended periods. As the major function of the HSC niche is to maintain stem cell functions, we hypothesized that the niche regulates CSC activities of DTCs. Here we show that DTCs recovered from marrow were significantly enriched for a CSC phenotype. Critically, the conversion of DTCs to CSCs is regulated by niche-derived GAS6 through the Mer/mTOR; molecules previously shown to regulate dormancy. The data demonstrate that the niche plays a significant role in maintaining tumor-initiating prostate cancer in marrow and suggests a functional relationship between CSCs and dormancy. Understanding how the marrow niche regulates the conversion of DTCs to CSCs is critical for the development of therapeutics specifically targeting skeletal bone metastasis and dormancy. PMID:27172799

  5. Acquired RAS or EGFR mutations and duration of response to EGFR blockade in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Van Emburgh, Beth O.; Arena, Sabrina; Siravegna, Giulia; Lazzari, Luca; Crisafulli, Giovanni; Corti, Giorgio; Mussolin, Benedetta; Baldi, Federica; Buscarino, Michela; Bartolini, Alice; Valtorta, Emanuele; Vidal, Joana; Bellosillo, Beatriz; Germano, Giovanni; Pietrantonio, Filippo; Ponzetti, Agostino; Albanell, Joan; Siena, Salvatore; Sartore-Bianchi, Andrea; Di Nicolantonio, Federica; Montagut, Clara; Bardelli, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Blockade of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) with the monoclonal antibodies cetuximab or panitumumab is effective in a subset of colorectal cancers (CRCs), but the emergence of resistance limits the efficacy of these therapeutic agents. At relapse, the majority of patients develop RAS mutations, while a subset acquires EGFR extracellular domain (ECD) mutations. Here we find that patients who experience greater and longer responses to EGFR blockade preferentially develop EGFR ECD mutations, while RAS mutations emerge more frequently in patients with smaller tumour shrinkage and shorter progression-free survival. In circulating cell-free tumour DNA of patients treated with anti-EGFR antibodies, RAS mutations emerge earlier than EGFR ECD variants. Subclonal RAS but not EGFR ECD mutations are present in CRC samples obtained before exposure to EGFR blockade. These data indicate that clonal evolution of drug-resistant cells is associated with the clinical outcome of CRC patients treated with anti-EGFR antibodies. PMID:27929064

  6. Mechanisms of acquired resistance to androgen receptor targeting drugs in castration resistant prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chism, David D.; De Silva, Dinuka; Whang, Young E.

    2014-01-01

    After initial response to androgen receptor targeting drugs abiraterone or enzalutamide, most patients develop progressive disease and therefore, castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) remains a terminal disease. Multiple mechanisms underlying acquired resistance have been postulated. Intratumoral androgen synthesis may resume after abiraterone treatment. A point mutation in the ligand binding domain of androgen receptor may confer resistance to enzalutamide. Emergence of androgen receptor splice variants lacking the ligand binding domain may mediate resistance to abiraterone and enzalutamide. Steroid receptors such as glucocorticoid receptor may substitute for androgen receptor. Drugs with novel mechanisms of action or combination therapy, along with biomarkers for patient selection, may be needed to improve the therapy of CRPC. PMID:24927631

  7. Acquired von Willebrand disease and multiple myeloma: a case report of a breast cancer survivor.

    PubMed

    Jin, Ning; Salahuddin, Farah F; Nesbitt, John A

    2014-12-01

    Acquired von Willebrand disease (aVWD) is rare disease and is associated with a variety of underlying diseases. We report a case of aVWD in the setting of multiple myeloma. The patient was a 63-year-old female with breast cancer in remission who was admitted for symptomatic anemia. She was diagnosed with multiple myeloma. She also had subcutaneous bleeding before admission. Laboratory studies revealed isolated prolongation of the activated partial thromboplastin time, which corrected in a mixing study. Her factor VIII activity, von Willebrand factor (VWF) Ag, and VWF activity were low. VWF multimer study confirmed the patient had aVWD. The treatment of aVWD is discussed in this article, including the treatment of underlying diseases, and acute management in emergent situations. An intriguing question in this case is whether the patient's multiple myeloma is a chemotherapy-induced hematological malignancy or a second primary malignancy.

  8. Stochastic modeling and experimental analysis of phenotypic switching and survival of cancer cells under stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamani Dahaj, Seyed Alireza; Kumar, Niraj; Sundaram, Bala; Celli, Jonathan; Kulkarni, Rahul

    The phenotypic heterogeneity of cancer cells is critical to their survival under stress. A significant contribution to heterogeneity of cancer calls derives from the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), a conserved cellular program that is crucial for embryonic development. Several studies have investigated the role of EMT in growth of early stage tumors into invasive malignancies. Also, EMT has been closely associated with the acquisition of chemoresistance properties in cancer cells. Motivated by these studies, we analyze multi-phenotype stochastic models of the evolution of cancers cell populations under stress. We derive analytical results for time-dependent probability distributions that provide insights into the competing rates underlying phenotypic switching (e.g. during EMT) and the corresponding survival of cancer cells. Experimentally, we evaluate these model-based predictions by imaging human pancreatic cancer cell lines grown with and without cytotoxic agents and measure growth kinetics, survival, morphological changes and (terminal evaluation of) biomarkers with associated epithelial and mesenchymal phenotypes. The results derived suggest approaches for distinguishing between adaptation and selection scenarios for survival in the presence of external stresses.

  9. Predictive genomics: a cancer hallmark network framework for predicting tumor clinical phenotypes using genome sequencing data.

    PubMed

    Wang, Edwin; Zaman, Naif; Mcgee, Shauna; Milanese, Jean-Sébastien; Masoudi-Nejad, Ali; O'Connor-McCourt, Maureen

    2015-02-01

    Tumor genome sequencing leads to documenting thousands of DNA mutations and other genomic alterations. At present, these data cannot be analyzed adequately to aid in the understanding of tumorigenesis and its evolution. Moreover, we have little insight into how to use these data to predict clinical phenotypes and tumor progression to better design patient treatment. To meet these challenges, we discuss a cancer hallmark network framework for modeling genome sequencing data to predict cancer clonal evolution and associated clinical phenotypes. The framework includes: (1) cancer hallmarks that can be represented by a few molecular/signaling networks. 'Network operational signatures' which represent gene regulatory logics/strengths enable to quantify state transitions and measures of hallmark traits. Thus, sets of genomic alterations which are associated with network operational signatures could be linked to the state/measure of hallmark traits. The network operational signature transforms genotypic data (i.e., genomic alterations) to regulatory phenotypic profiles (i.e., regulatory logics/strengths), to cellular phenotypic profiles (i.e., hallmark traits) which lead to clinical phenotypic profiles (i.e., a collection of hallmark traits). Furthermore, the framework considers regulatory logics of the hallmark networks under tumor evolutionary dynamics and therefore also includes: (2) a self-promoting positive feedback loop that is dominated by a genomic instability network and a cell survival/proliferation network is the main driver of tumor clonal evolution. Surrounding tumor stroma and its host immune systems shape the evolutionary paths; (3) cell motility initiating metastasis is a byproduct of the above self-promoting loop activity during tumorigenesis; (4) an emerging hallmark network which triggers genome duplication dominates a feed-forward loop which in turn could act as a rate-limiting step for tumor formation; (5) mutations and other genomic alterations have

  10. Heterogeneity of Functional Properties of Clone 66 Murine Breast Cancer Cells Expressing Various Stem Cell Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Mukhopadhyay, Partha; Farrell, Tracy; Sharma, Gayatri; McGuire, Timothy R.; O’Kane, Barbara; Sharp, J. Graham

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Breast cancer grows, metastasizes and relapses from rare, therapy resistant cells with a stem cell phenotype (cancer stem cells/CSCs). However, there is a lack of studies comparing the functions of CSCs isolated using different phenotypes in order to determine if CSCs are homogeneous or heterogeneous. Methods Cells with various stem cell phenotypes were isolated by sorting from Clone 66 murine breast cancer cells that grow orthotopically in immune intact syngeneic mice. These populations were compared by in vitro functional assays for proliferation, growth, sphere and colony formation; and in vivo limiting dilution analysis of tumorigenesis. Results The proportion of cells expressing CD44highCD24low/neg, side population (SP) cells, ALDH1+, CD49fhigh, CD133high, and CD34high differed, suggesting heterogeneity. Differences in frequency and size of tumor spheres from these populations were observed. Higher rates of proliferation of non-SP, ALDH1+, CD34low, and CD49fhigh suggested properties of transit amplifying cells. Colony formation was higher from ALDH1− and non-SP cells than ALDH1+ and SP cells suggesting a progenitor phenotype. The frequency of clonal colonies that grew in agar varied and was differentially altered by the presence of Matrigel™. In vivo, fewer cells with a stem cell phenotype were needed for tumor formation than “non-stem” cells. Fewer SP cells were needed to form tumors than ALDH1+ cells suggesting further heterogeneities of cells with stem phenotypes. Different levels of cytokines/chemokines were produced by Clone 66 with RANTES being the highest. Whether the heterogeneity reflects soluble factor production remains to be determined. Conclusions These data demonstrate that Clone 66 murine breast cancer cells that express stem cell phenotypes are heterogeneous and exhibit different functional properties, and this may also be the case for human breast cancer stem cells. PMID:24265713

  11. Carbon Nanotubes Preserve Normal Phenotypes Under Cancer-Promoting Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wailes, Elizabeth; Levi-Polyachenko, Nicole

    2015-03-01

    Tumor-associated fibroblasts and cancer cells have long been known to create a feedback loop that further stimulates the cancer. While this has been explored from a molecular biology standpoint, little is known about the physical relationship of the cell types even though both sets of cells are known to be mechanosensitive. Indeed, for both fibroblasts and cancer, mechanical signals can make the difference between a normal or pathological cell. To evaluate this relationship and test if it can be manipulated to favor normal cells, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and confocal microscopy was performed on fibroblast and breast cancer cell co-cultures with a collagen gel matrix to simulate the extracellular matrix. Pathological behavior was encouraged through the addition of transforming growth factor beta (TGF- β) . In a separate group, this behavior was discouraged through the doping of the collagen gel with multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNT). Significant differences were observed both in the elastic moduli of each cell type and the cancer cells' propensity to migrate through the gel as a model for metastasis. These results shed new light on how cancer progresses and promote the further investigation of nano-mechanical solutions to cancer.

  12. Human macrophages chronically exposed to LPS can be reactivated by stimulation with MDP to acquire an antimicrobial phenotype.

    PubMed

    Guzmán-Beltrán, Silvia; Torres, Martha; Arellano, Monserrat; Juárez, Esmeralda

    2017-02-21

    Macrophages are important in host defense and can differentiate into functionally distinct subsets named classically (M1) or alternatively (M2) activated. In several inflammatory disorders, macrophages become tolerized to prevent deleterious consequences. This tolerization reduces the ability of macrophages to respond to bacterial components (e.g., LPS) maintaining a low level of inflammation but compromising the ability of macrophages to mount an effective immune response during subsequent pathogen encounters. In this study, we aimed to reactivate human monocyte-derived macrophages chronically exposed to LPS by re-stimulation with muramyl dipeptide (MDP). We observed an undefined profile of cell surface marker expression during endotoxin tolerance and absence of TNFα production. Stimulating macrophages chronically exposed to LPS with LPS+MDP restored TNFα, production together with an increased production of IL1, IL6, IFNγ, IL4, IL5 and IL10. These results suggest that macrophages chronically exposed to LPS possess a mixed M1-M2 phenotype with sufficient antimicrobial and homeostatic potential.

  13. Cancer risk and genotype-phenotype correlations in PTEN hamartoma tumor syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nieuwenhuis, Marry H; Kets, C Marleen; Murphy-Ryan, Maureen; Yntema, Helger G; Evans, D Gareth; Colas, Chrystelle; Møller, Pal; Hes, Frederik J; Hodgson, Shirley V; Olderode-Berends, Maran J W; Aretz, Stefan; Heinimann, Karl; Gómez García, Encarna B; Douglas, Fiona; Spigelman, Allan; Timshel, Susanne; Lindor, Noralane M; Vasen, Hans F A

    2014-03-01

    Patients with germline PTEN mutations are at high risk of developing benign and malignant tumours. We aimed to evaluate the cumulative risk of several types of cancer and of dysplastic cerebellar gangliocytoma (Lhermitte-Duclos disease, LDD). In addition, genotype-phenotype correlations in PTEN hamartoma tumour syndrome (PHTS) were assessed. Data on patients with PTEN mutations were collected from clinical genetic centres in Western Europe, Australia, and the USA. The cumulative risk of developing cancers of the breast, thyroid, endometrium, skin, kidneys, colorectum, and lungs, and also LDD was calculated by Kaplan-Meier methods. Associations between mutations and cancer were assessed by Chi square means. A total of 180 germline PTEN mutation carriers, 81 males (45%), from nine countries were included. The cumulative risk of developing any cancer and/or LDD at age 60 was 56% for males and 87% for females (p = 0.001). Females had significant higher risks of developing breast cancer, thyroid cancer, and LDD than males. The only genotype-phenotype correlation identified was a lower frequency of thyroid cancer in patients with missense mutations (p = 0.014). In conclusion, PHTS patients, particularly females, have a substantial risk of developing one or more tumours from a broad tumour spectrum. Major genotype-phenotype associations could not be identified.

  14. Melanoma-educated CD14+ cells acquire a myeloid-derived suppressor cell phenotype through COX-2-dependent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Mao, Yumeng; Poschke, Isabel; Wennerberg, Erik; Pico de Coaña, Yago; Egyhazi Brage, Suzanne; Schultz, Inkeri; Hansson, Johan; Masucci, Giuseppe; Lundqvist, Andreas; Kiessling, Rolf

    2013-07-01

    Tumors can suppress the host immune system by employing a variety of cellular immune modulators, such as regulatory T cells, tumor-associated macrophages, and myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC). In the peripheral blood of patients with advanced stage melanoma, there is an accumulation of CD14(+)HLA-DR(lo/-) MDSC that suppress autologous T cells ex vivo in a STAT-3-dependent manner. However, a precise mechanistic basis underlying this effect is unclear, particularly with regard to whether the MDSC induction mechanism relies on cell-cell contact of melanoma cells with CD14(+) cells. Here, we show that early-passage human melanoma cells induce phenotypic changes in CD14(+) monocytes, leading them to resemble MDSCs characterized in patients with advanced stage melanoma. These MDSC-like cells potently suppress autologous T-cell proliferation and IFN-γ production. Notably, induction of myeloid-suppressive functions requires contact or close proximity between monocytes and tumor cells. Further, this induction is largely dependent on production of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) because its inhibition in these MDSC-like cells limits their ability to suppress T-cell function. We confirmed our findings with CD14(+) cells isolated from patients with advanced stage melanoma, which inhibited autologous T cells in a manner relying up prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), STAT-3, and superoxide. Indeed, PGE2 was sufficient to confer to monocytes the ability to suppress proliferation and IFN-γ production by autologous T cells ex vivo. In summary, our results reveal how immune suppression by MDSC can be initiated in the tumor microenvironment of human melanoma.

  15. Dynamic Microenvironment Induces Phenotypic Plasticity of Esophageal Cancer Cells Under Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calibasi Kocal, Gizem; Güven, Sinan; Foygel, Kira; Goldman, Aaron; Chen, Pu; Sengupta, Shiladitya; Paulmurugan, Ramasamy; Baskin, Yasemin; Demirci, Utkan

    2016-12-01

    Cancer microenvironment is a remarkably heterogeneous composition of cellular and non-cellular components, regulated by both external and intrinsic physical and chemical stimuli. Physical alterations driven by increased proliferation of neoplastic cells and angiogenesis in the cancer microenvironment result in the exposure of the cancer cells to elevated levels of flow-based shear stress. We developed a dynamic microfluidic cell culture platform utilizing eshopagael cancer cells as model cells to investigate the phenotypic changes of cancer cells upon exposure to fluid shear stress. We report the epithelial to hybrid epithelial/mesenchymal transition as a result of decreasing E-Cadherin and increasing N-Cadherin and vimentin expressions, higher clonogenicity and ALDH positive expression of cancer cells cultured in a dynamic microfluidic chip under laminar flow compared to the static culture condition. We also sought regulation of chemotherapeutics in cancer microenvironment towards phenotypic control of cancer cells. Such in vitro microfluidic system could potentially be used to monitor how the interstitial fluid dynamics affect cancer microenvironment and plasticity on a simple, highly controllable and inexpensive bioengineered platform.

  16. Dynamic Microenvironment Induces Phenotypic Plasticity of Esophageal Cancer Cells Under Flow

    PubMed Central

    Calibasi Kocal, Gizem; Güven, Sinan; Foygel, Kira; Goldman, Aaron; Chen, Pu; Sengupta, Shiladitya; Paulmurugan, Ramasamy; Baskin, Yasemin; Demirci, Utkan

    2016-01-01

    Cancer microenvironment is a remarkably heterogeneous composition of cellular and non-cellular components, regulated by both external and intrinsic physical and chemical stimuli. Physical alterations driven by increased proliferation of neoplastic cells and angiogenesis in the cancer microenvironment result in the exposure of the cancer cells to elevated levels of flow-based shear stress. We developed a dynamic microfluidic cell culture platform utilizing eshopagael cancer cells as model cells to investigate the phenotypic changes of cancer cells upon exposure to fluid shear stress. We report the epithelial to hybrid epithelial/mesenchymal transition as a result of decreasing E-Cadherin and increasing N-Cadherin and vimentin expressions, higher clonogenicity and ALDH positive expression of cancer cells cultured in a dynamic microfluidic chip under laminar flow compared to the static culture condition. We also sought regulation of chemotherapeutics in cancer microenvironment towards phenotypic control of cancer cells. Such in vitro microfluidic system could potentially be used to monitor how the interstitial fluid dynamics affect cancer microenvironment and plasticity on a simple, highly controllable and inexpensive bioengineered platform. PMID:27910892

  17. Suppression of endogenous lipogenesis induces reversion of the malignant phenotype and normalized differentiation in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, Barbara; Park, Cheol Hong; Chandra Mohan, KVP; Khurana, Ashwani; Corominas-Faja, Bruna; Cuyàs, Elisabet; Alarcón, Tomás; Kleer, Celina; Menendez, Javier A.; Lupu, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    The correction of specific signaling defects can reverse the oncogenic phenotype of tumor cells by acting in a dominant manner over the cancer genome. Unfortunately, there have been very few successful attempts at identifying the primary cues that could redirect malignant tissues to a normal phenotype. Here we show that suppression of the lipogenic enzyme fatty acid synthase (FASN) leads to stable reversion of the malignant phenotype and normalizes differentiation in a model of breast cancer (BC) progression. FASN knockdown dramatically reduced tumorigenicity of BC cells and restored tissue architecture, which was reminiscent of normal ductal-like structures in the mammary gland. Loss of FASN signaling was sufficient to direct tumors to a reversed phenotype that was near normal when considering the development of polarized growth-arrested acinar-like structure similar to those formed by nonmalignant breast cells in a 3D reconstituted basement membrane in vitro. This process, in vivo, resulted in a low proliferation index, mesenchymal-epithelial transition, and shut-off of the angiogenic switch in FASN-depleted BC cells orthotopically implanted into mammary fat pads. The role of FASN as a negative regulator of correct breast tissue architecture and terminal epithelial cell differentiation was dominant over the malignant phenotype of tumor cells possessing multiple cancer-driving genetic lesions as it remained stable during the course of serial in vivo passage of orthotopic tumor-derived cells. Transient knockdown of FASN suppressed hallmark structural and cytosolic/secretive proteins (vimentin, N-cadherin, fibronectin) in a model of EMT-induced cancer stem cells (CSC). Indirect pharmacological inhibition of FASN promoted a phenotypic switch from basal- to luminal-like tumorsphere architectures with reduced intrasphere heterogeneity. The fact that sole correction of exacerbated lipogenesis can stably reprogram cancer cells back to normal-like tissue architectures

  18. The immune phenotype may relate to cancer development in kidney transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Hope, Christopher M; Grace, Blair S; Pilkington, Katherine R; Coates, Patrick T; Bergmann, Ivo P; Carroll, Robert P

    2014-07-01

    High regulatory T-cell (Treg) numbers predict recurrent cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma in kidney transplant recipients, and the Treg immune phenotype may identify kidney transplant recipients at risk of developing squamous cell carcinoma and/or solid-organ cancer. To investigate this, a total of 116 kidney transplant recipients, of whom 65 had current or past cancer, were immune-phenotyped and followed up prospectively for a median of 15 months. Higher Treg (CD3+CD4+FOXP3+CD25(Hi)CD127(Lo)) proportion and numbers significantly increased the odds of developing cancer (odds ratios (95% CI) 1.61 (1.17-2.20) and 1.03 (1.00-1.06), respectively) after adjusting for age, gender, and duration of immunosuppression. Class-switched memory B cells (CD19+CD27+IgD-) had a significant association to cancer, 1.04 (1.00-1.07). Receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curves for squamous cell carcinoma development within 100 days of immune phenotyping were significant for Tregs, memory B cells, and γδ T cells (AUC of 0.78, 0.68, and 0.65, respectively). After cancer resection, Treg, NK cell, and γδ T-cell numbers fell significantly. Immune-phenotype profiles associated with both squamous cell carcinoma and solid-organ cancer in kidney transplant recipients and depended on the presence of cancer tissue. Thus, immune profiling could be used to stratify kidney transplant recipients at risk of developing cancers to identify those who could qualify for prevention therapy.

  19. Prognostic value of acquired uniparental disomy (aUPD) in primary breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Tuna, Musaffe; Smid, Marcel; Martens, John W M; Foekens, John A

    2012-02-01

    Many studies have examined DNA copy number changes or gene expression profiling and their association with clinical outcomes in breast cancer. However, until now no study has investigated whether acquired uniparental disomy (aUPD), in which both chromosomes in a pair are derived from the same parent, may have an association with clinical outcome including initiation and recurrence of breast cancer. In this study, we used high-density SNP and expression microarrays data from primary tumors of 313 lymph node-negative breast cancer patients who had not received adjuvant systemic therapy to evaluate the association of aUPD with metastasis-free survival (MFS) and overall survival (OS). In 55.9% (175/313) of the tumors, we defined aUPD, which was most frequent in the regions at chr17q (30.3%) and chr13q (19.4%). In Cox univariate regression analysis including all patients, aUPD at four regions at chr17q, ranging in size from 2.9 to 4.0 Mb, were associated with a poor OS. Only aUPD at one region, region B, on chr17q was associated with a poor MFS. Similarly, aUPD at two regions, A and B, on chr13q, with sizes of 3.5 and 3.1 Mb, were associated with a poor OS, but not with MFS. In ER-subgroup analyses, regions B and D at 17q were associated with poor MFS and OS in ER-negative patients. Various differentially expressed genes within the identified aUPD regions at chr17q were associated with MFS and OS in all patients (PPM1D, C17orf71, and TRIM37) and/or in the ER-negative patients (PPM1D, PPM1E, and SLCA3R1). We thus conclude that aUPD is a frequent event in breast cancer and that aUPD at specific regions in the genome has implications in this disease.

  20. Activation of the Met kinase confers acquired drug resistance in FGFR-targeted lung cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Kim, S-M; Kim, H; Yun, M R; Kang, H N; Pyo, K-H; Park, H J; Lee, J M; Choi, H M; Ellinghaus, P; Ocker, M; Paik, S; Kim, H R; Cho, B C

    2016-07-18

    Aberrant fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) activation/expression is a common feature in lung cancer (LC). In this study, we evaluated the antitumor activity of and the mechanisms underlying acquired resistance to two potent selective FGFR inhibitors, AZD4547 and BAY116387, in LC cell lines. The antitumor activity of AZD4547 and BAY1163877 was screened in 24 LC cell lines, including 5 with FGFR1 amplification. Two cell lines containing FGFR1 amplifications, H1581 and DMS114, were sensitive to FGFR inhibitors (IC50<250 nm). Clones of FGFR1-amplified H1581 cells resistant to AZD4547 or BAY116387 (H1581AR and H1581BR cells, respectively) were established. Receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) array and immunoblotting analyses showed strong overexpression and activation of Met in H1581AR/BR cells, compared with that in the parental cells. Gene set enrichment analysis against the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) database showed that cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction pathways were significantly enriched in H1581AR/BR cells, with Met contributing significantly to the core enrichment. Genomic DNA quantitative PCR and fluorescent in situ hybridization analyses showed MET amplification in H1581AR, but not in H1581BR, cells. Met amplification drives acquired resistance to AZD4547 in H1581AR cells by activating ErbB3. Combination treatment with FGFR inhibitors and an anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)/Met inhibitor, crizotinib, or Met-specific short interfering RNA (siRNA) synergistically inhibited cell proliferation in both H1581AR and H1581BR cells. Conversely, ectopic expression of Met in H1581 cells conferred resistance to AZD4547 and BAY1163877. Acquired resistance to FGFR inhibitors not only altered cellular morphology, but also promoted migration and invasion of resistant clones, in part by inducing epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. Taken together, our data suggest that Met activation is sufficient to bypass dependency on FGFR signaling. Concurrent

  1. Tissue Metabonomic Phenotyping for Diagnosis and Prognosis of Human Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Yuan; Xu, Tangpeng; Huang, Jia; Zhang, Limin; Xu, Shan; Xiong, Bin; Wang, Yulan; Tang, Huiru

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the leading causes of cancer-related death worldwide and prognosis based on the conventional histological grading method for CRC remains poor. To better the situation, we analyzed the metabonomic signatures of 50 human CRC tissues and their adjacent non-involved tissues (ANIT) using high-resolution magic-angle spinning (HRMAS) 1H NMR spectroscopy together with the fatty acid compositions of these tissues using GC-FID/MS. We showed that tissue metabolic phenotypes not only discriminated CRC tissues from ANIT, but also distinguished low-grade tumor tissues (stages I-II) from the high-grade ones (stages III-IV) with high sensitivity and specificity in both cases. Metabonomic phenotypes of CRC tissues differed significantly from that of ANIT in energy metabolism, membrane biosynthesis and degradations, osmotic regulations together with the metabolism of proteins and nucleotides. Amongst all CRC tissues, the stage I tumors exhibited largest differentiations from ANIT. The combination of the differentiating metabolites showed outstanding collective power for differentiating cancer from ANIT and for distinguishing CRC tissues at different stages. These findings revealed details in the typical metabonomic phenotypes associated with CRC tissues nondestructively and demonstrated tissue metabonomic phenotyping as an important molecular pathology tool for diagnosis and prognosis of cancerous solid tumors. PMID:26876567

  2. Tissue Metabonomic Phenotyping for Diagnosis and Prognosis of Human Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yuan; Xu, Tangpeng; Huang, Jia; Zhang, Limin; Xu, Shan; Xiong, Bin; Wang, Yulan; Tang, Huiru

    2016-02-15

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the leading causes of cancer-related death worldwide and prognosis based on the conventional histological grading method for CRC remains poor. To better the situation, we analyzed the metabonomic signatures of 50 human CRC tissues and their adjacent non-involved tissues (ANIT) using high-resolution magic-angle spinning (HRMAS) (1)H NMR spectroscopy together with the fatty acid compositions of these tissues using GC-FID/MS. We showed that tissue metabolic phenotypes not only discriminated CRC tissues from ANIT, but also distinguished low-grade tumor tissues (stages I-II) from the high-grade ones (stages III-IV) with high sensitivity and specificity in both cases. Metabonomic phenotypes of CRC tissues differed significantly from that of ANIT in energy metabolism, membrane biosynthesis and degradations, osmotic regulations together with the metabolism of proteins and nucleotides. Amongst all CRC tissues, the stage I tumors exhibited largest differentiations from ANIT. The combination of the differentiating metabolites showed outstanding collective power for differentiating cancer from ANIT and for distinguishing CRC tissues at different stages. These findings revealed details in the typical metabonomic phenotypes associated with CRC tissues nondestructively and demonstrated tissue metabonomic phenotyping as an important molecular pathology tool for diagnosis and prognosis of cancerous solid tumors.

  3. Phenotype-Specific CpG Island Methylation Events in a Murine Model of Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Camoriano, Marta; Morey Kinney, Shannon R.; Moser, Michael T.; Foster, Barbara A.; Mohler, James L.; Trump, Donald L.; Karpf, Adam R.; Smiraglia, Dominic J.

    2010-01-01

    Aberrant DNA methylation plays a significant role in nearly all human cancers and may contribute to disease progression to advanced phenotypes. Study of advanced prostate cancer phenotypes in the human disease is hampered by limited availability of tissues. We therefore took advantage of the Transgenic Adenocarcinoma of Mouse Prostate (TRAMP) model to study whether three different phenotypes of TRAMP tumors (PRIM, late-stage primary tumors; AIP, androgen-independent primary tumors; and MET, metastases) displayed specific patterns of CpG island hypermethylation using Restriction Landmark Genomic Scanning. Each tumor phenotype displayed numerous hypermethylation events, with the most homogeneous methylation pattern in AIP and the most heterogeneous pattern in MET. Several loci displayed a phenotype-specific methylation pattern; the most striking pattern being loci methylated at high frequency in PRIM and AIP but rarely in MET. Examination of the mRNA expression of three genes, BC058385, Goosecoid, and Neurexin 2, which exhibited nonpromoter methylation, revealed increased expression associated with downstream methylation. Only methylated samples showed mRNA expression, in which tumor phenotype was a key factor determining the level of expression. The CpG island in the human orthologue of BC058385 was methylated in human AIP but not in primary androgen-stimulated prostate cancer or benign prostate. The clinical data show a proof-of-principle that the TRAMP model can be used to identify targets of aberrant CpG island methylation relevant to human disease. In conclusion, phenotype-specific hypermethylation events were associated with the overexpression of different genes and may provide new markers of prostate tumorigenesis. PMID:18519676

  4. Obesity and cancer phenotype: Is angiogenesis a missed link?

    PubMed

    Mendonça, Fernando; Soares, Raquel

    2015-10-15

    Obesity remains nowadays one of the main threats to human health, being a problem of worldwide proportions. It is characterized by augmented storage of fatty acids in an enlarged adipose tissue. This process is possible thanks to a rich capillary network, supported by a mechanism that has also a crucial role on cancer: angiogenesis. Given that several studies point obesity as a risk factor for cancer development, angiogenesis may be approached as the missed link between these two pathologies. Understanding the different pathways behind angiogenesis becomes essential to break this link by developing new anti-angiogenic therapies or improving the actual ones. In the first phase, this paper will focus the structural and cellular changes that adipose tissue suffers in obesity. Then, the main pro-angiogenic players will be reviewed, taking into account the pathways that explain their putative role in obesity-cancer link. Finally, the clinical implications of the presented mechanisms will also be regarded, being the main focus on the anti-angiogenic therapies.

  5. Ecology meets cancer biology: The cancer swamp promotes the lethal cancer phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Amend, Sarah R.; Pienta, Kenneth J.

    2015-01-01

    As they grow, tumors fundamentally alter their microenvironment, disrupting the homeostasis of the host organ and eventually the patient as a whole. Lethality is the ultimate result of deregulated cell signaling and regulatory mechanisms as well as inappropriate host cell recruitment and activity that lead to the death of the patient. These processes have striking parallels to the framework of ecological biology: multiple interacting ecosystems (organ systems) within a larger biosphere (body), alterations in species stoichiometry (host cell types), resource cycling (cellular metabolism and cell-cell signaling), and ecosystem collapse (organ failure and death). In particular, as cancer cells generate their own niche within the tumor ecosystem, ecological engineering and autoeutrophication displace normal cell function and result in the creation of a hypoxic, acidic, and nutrient-poor environment. This “cancer swamp” has genetic and epigenetic effects at the local ecosystem level to promote metastasis and at the systemic host level to induce cytokine-mediated lethal syndromes, a major cause of death of cancer patients. PMID:25895024

  6. Tissue Factor–Factor VII Complex As a Key Regulator of Ovarian Cancer Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Koizume, Shiro; Miyagi, Yohei

    2015-01-01

    Tissue factor (TF) is an integral membrane protein widely expressed in normal human cells. Blood coagulation factor VII (fVII) is a key enzyme in the extrinsic coagulation cascade that is predominantly secreted by hepatocytes and released into the bloodstream. The TF–fVII complex is aberrantly expressed on the surface of cancer cells, including ovarian cancer cells. This procoagulant complex can initiate intracellular signaling mechanisms, resulting in malignant phenotypes. Cancer tissues are chronically exposed to hypoxia. TF and fVII can be induced in response to hypoxia in ovarian cancer cells at the gene expression level, leading to the autonomous production of the TF–fVII complex. Here, we discuss the roles of the TF–fVII complex in the induction of malignant phenotypes in ovarian cancer cells. The hypoxic nature of ovarian cancer tissues and the roles of TF expression in endometriosis are discussed. Arguments will be extended to potential strategies to treat ovarian cancers based on our current knowledge of TF–fVII function. PMID:26396550

  7. Induction of KIAA1199/CEMIP is associated with colon cancer phenotype and poor patient survival.

    PubMed

    Fink, Stephen P; Myeroff, Lois L; Kariv, Revital; Platzer, Petra; Xin, Baozhong; Mikkola, Debra; Lawrence, Earl; Morris, Nathan; Nosrati, Arman; Willson, James K V; Willis, Joseph; Veigl, Martina; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill S; Wang, Zhenghe; Markowitz, Sanford D

    2015-10-13

    Genes induced in colon cancer provide novel candidate biomarkers of tumor phenotype and aggressiveness. We originally identified KIAA1199 (now officially called CEMIP) as a transcript highly induced in colon cancer: initially designating the transcript as Colon Cancer Secreted Protein 1. We molecularly characterized CEMIP expression both at the mRNA and protein level and found it is a secreted protein induced an average of 54-fold in colon cancer. Knockout of CEMIPreduced the ability of human colon cancer cells to form xenograft tumors in athymic mice. Tumors that did grow had increased deposition of hyaluronan, linking CEMIP participation in hyaluronan degradation to the modulation of tumor phenotype. We find CEMIP mRNA overexpression correlates with poorer patient survival. In stage III only (n = 31) or in combined stage II plus stage III colon cancer cases (n = 73), 5-year overall survival was significantly better (p = 0.004 and p = 0.0003, respectively) among patients with low CEMIP expressing tumors than those with high CEMIP expressing tumors. These results demonstrate that CEMIP directly facilitates colon tumor growth, and high CEMIP expression correlates with poor outcome in stage III and in stages II+III combined cohorts. We present CEMIP as a candidate prognostic marker for colon cancer and a potential therapeutic target.

  8. The role of NANOG transcriptional factor in the development of malignant phenotype of cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Gawlik-Rzemieniewska, Natalia; Bednarek, Ilona

    2016-01-01

    NANOG is a transcription factor that is involved in the self-renewal of embryonic stem cells (ES) and is a critical factor for the maintenance of the undifferentiated state of pluripotent cells. Extensive data in the literature show that the NANOG gene is aberrantly expressed during the development of malignancy in cancer cells. ES and cancer stem cells (CSCs), a subpopulation of cancer cells within the tumor, are thought to share common phenotypic properties. This review describes the role of NANOG in cancer cell proliferation, epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), apoptosis and metastasis. In addition, this paper illustrates a correlation between NANOG and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) in the maintenance of cancer stem cell properties and multidrug resistance. Together, the available data demonstrate that NANOG is strictly involved in the process of carcinogenesis and is a potential prognostic marker of malignant tumors.

  9. Notch-1 induces epithelial-mesenchymal transition consistent with cancer stem cell phenotype in pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Bao, Bin; Wang, Zhiwei; Ali, Shadan; Kong, Dejuan; Li, Yiwei; Ahmad, Aamir; Banerjee, Sanjeev; Azmi, Asfar S; Miele, Lucio; Sarkar, Fazlul H

    2011-08-01

    Activation of Notch-1 is known to be associated with the development and progression of human malignancies including pancreatic cancer. Emerging evidence suggest that the acquisition of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) phenotype and induction of cancer stem cell (CSC) or cancer stem-like cell phenotype are interrelated and contributes to tumor recurrence and drug resistance. The molecular mechanism(s) by which Notch-1 contributes to the acquisition of EMT phenotype and CSC self-renewal capacity has not been fully elucidated. Here we show that forced over-expression of Notch-1 leads to increased cell growth, clonogenicity, migration and invasion of AsPC-1 cells. Moreover, over-expression of Notch-1 led to the induction of EMT phenotype by activation of mesenchymal cell markers such as ZEB1, CD44, EpCAM, and Hes-1. Here we also report, for the first time, that over-expression of Notch-1 leads to increased expression of miR-21, and decreased expression of miR-200b, miR-200c, let-7a, let-7b, and let-7c. Re-expression of miR-200b led to decreased expression of ZEB1, and vimentin, and increased expression of E-cadherin. Over-expression of Notch-1 also increased the formation of pancreatospheres consistent with expression of CSC surface markers CD44 and EpCAM. Finally, we found that genistein, a known natural anti-tumor agent inhibited cell growth, clonogenicity, migration, invasion, EMT phenotype, formation of pancreatospheres and expression of CD44 and EpCAM. These results suggest that the activation of Notch-1 signaling contributes to the acquisition of EMT phenotype, which is in part mediated through the regulation of miR-200b and CSC self-renewal capacity, and these processes could be attenuated by genistein treatment.

  10. Acquired resistance to dasatinib in lung cancer cell lines conferred by DDR2 gatekeeper mutation and NF1 loss.

    PubMed

    Beauchamp, Ellen M; Woods, Brittany A; Dulak, Austin M; Tan, Li; Xu, Chunxiao; Gray, Nathanael S; Bass, Adam J; Wong, Kwok-kin; Meyerson, Matthew; Hammerman, Peter S

    2014-02-01

    The treatment of non-small cell lung cancer has evolved dramatically over the past decade with the adoption of widespread use of effective targeted therapies in patients with distinct molecular alterations. In lung squamous cell carcinoma (lung SqCC), recent studies have suggested that DDR2 mutations are a biomarker for therapeutic response to dasatinib and clinical trials are underway testing this hypothesis. Although targeted therapeutics are typically quite effective as initial therapy for patients with lung cancer, nearly all patients develop resistance with long-term exposure to targeted drugs. Here, we use DDR2-dependent lung cancer cell lines to model acquired resistance to dasatinib therapy. We perform targeted exome sequencing to identify two distinct mechanisms of acquired resistance: acquisition of the T654I gatekeeper mutation in DDR2 and loss of NF1. We show that NF1 loss activates a bypass pathway, which confers ERK dependency downstream of RAS activation. These results indicate that acquired resistance to dasatinib can occur via both second-site mutations in DDR2 and by activation of bypass pathways. These data may help to anticipate mechanisms of resistance that may be identified in upcoming clinical trials of anti-DDR2 therapy in lung cancer and suggest strategies to overcome resistance.

  11. Resistance and gain-of-resistance phenotypes in cancers harboring wild-type p53.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Rivera, Michelle; Siddik, Zahid H

    2012-04-15

    Chemotherapy is the bedrock for the clinical management of cancer, and the tumor suppressor p53 has a central role in this therapeutic modality. This protein facilitates favorable antitumor drug response through a variety of key cellular functions, including cell cycle arrest, senescence, and apoptosis. These functions essentially cease once p53 becomes mutated, as occurs in ∼50% of cancers, and some p53 mutants even exhibit gain-of-function effects, which lead to greater drug resistance. However, it is becoming increasingly evident that resistance is also seen in cancers harboring wild-type p53. In this review, we discuss how wild-type p53 is inactivated to render cells resistant to antitumor drugs. This may occur through various mechanisms, including an increase in proteasomal degradation, defects in post-translational modification, and downstream defects in p53 target genes. We also consider evidence that the resistance seen in wild-type p53 cancers can be substantially greater than that seen in mutant p53 cancers, and this poses a far greater challenge for efforts to design strategies that increase drug response in resistant cancers already primed with wild-type p53. Because the mechanisms contributing to this wild-type p53 "gain-of-resistance" phenotype are largely unknown, a concerted research effort is needed to identify the underlying basis for the occurrence of this phenotype and, in parallel, to explore the possibility that the phenotype may be a product of wild-type p53 gain-of-function effects. Such studies are essential to lay the foundation for a rational therapeutic approach in the treatment of resistant wild-type p53 cancers.

  12. Resistance and gain-of-resistance phenotypes in cancers harboring wild-type p53

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Rivera, Michelle; Siddik, Zahid H.

    2012-01-01

    Chemotherapy is the bedrock for the clinical management of cancer, and the tumor suppressor p53 has a central role in this therapeutic modality. This protein facilitates favorable antitumor drug response through a variety of key cellular functions, including cell cycle arrest, senescence, and apoptosis. These functions essentially cease once p53 becomes mutated, as occurs in ~50% of cancers, and some p53 mutants even exhibit gain-of-function effects, which lead to greater drug resistance. However, it is becoming increasingly evident that resistance is also seen in cancers harboring wild-type p53. In this review, we discuss how wild-type p53 is inactivated to render cells resistant to antitumor drugs. This may occur through various mechanisms, including an increase in proteasomal degradation, defects in post-translational modification, and downstream defects in p53 target genes. We also consider evidence that the resistance seen in wild-type p53 cancers can be substantially greater than that seen in mutant p53 cancers, and this poses a far greater challenge for efforts to design strategies that increase drug response in resistant cancers already primed with wild-type p53. Because the mechanisms contributing to this wild-type p53 “gain-of-resistance” phenotype are largely unknown, a concerted research effort is needed to identify the underlying basis for the occurrence of this phenotype and, in parallel, to explore the possibility that the phenotype may be a product of wild-type p53 gain-of-function effects. Such studies are essential to lay the foundation for a rational therapeutic approach in the treatment of resistant wild-type p53 cancers. PMID:22227014

  13. NF-kappaΒ-inducing kinase regulates stem cell phenotype in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Vazquez-Santillan, Karla; Melendez-Zajgla, Jorge; Jimenez-Hernandez, Luis Enrique; Gaytan-Cervantes, Javier; Muñoz-Galindo, Laura; Piña-Sanchez, Patricia; Martinez-Ruiz, Gustavo; Torres, Javier; Garcia-Lopez, Patricia; Gonzalez-Torres, Carolina; Ruiz, Victor; Avila-Moreno, Federico; Velasco-Velazquez, Marco; Perez-Tapia, Mayra; Maldonado, Vilma

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs) overexpress components of the Nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) signaling cascade and consequently display high NF-κB activity levels. Breast cancer cell lines with high proportion of CSCs exhibit high NF-κB-inducing kinase (NIK) expression. The role of NIK in the phenotype of cancer stem cell regulation is poorly understood. Expression of NIK was analyzed by quantitative RT-PCR in BCSCs. NIK levels were manipulated through transfection of specific shRNAs or an expression vector. The effect of NIK in the cancer stem cell properties was assessed by mammosphere formation, mice xenografts and stem markers expression. BCSCs expressed higher levels of NIK and its inhibition through small hairpin (shRNA), reduced the expression of CSC markers and impaired clonogenicity and tumorigenesis. Genome-wide expression analyses suggested that NIK acts on ERK1/2 pathway to exert its activity. In addition, forced expression of NIK increased the BCSC population and enhanced breast cancer cell tumorigenicity. The in vivo relevance of these results is further supported by a tissue microarray of breast cancer samples in which we observed correlated expression of Aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) and NIK protein. Our results support the essential involvement of NIK in BCSC phenotypic regulation via ERK1/2 and NF-κB. PMID:27876836

  14. Genomic and phenotypic profiles of two Brazilian breast cancer cell lines derived from primary human tumors

    PubMed Central

    CORRÊA, NATÁSSIA C.R.; KUASNE, HELLEN; FARIA, JERUSA A.Q.A.; SEIXAS, CIÇA C.S.; SANTOS, IRIA G.D.; ABREU, FRANCINE B.; NONOGAKI, SUELY; ROCHA, RAFAEL M.; SILVA, GERLUZA APARECIDA BORGES; GOBBI, HELENICE; ROGATTO, SILVIA R.; GOES, ALFREDO M.; GOMES, DAWIDSON A.

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common type of cancer among women worldwide. Research using breast cancer cell lines derived from primary tumors may provide valuable additional knowledge regarding this type of cancer. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the phenotypic profiles of MACL-1 and MGSO-3, the only Brazilian breast cancer cell lines available for comparative studies. We evaluated the presence of hormone receptors, proliferation, differentiation and stem cell markers, using immunohistochemical staining of the primary tumor, cultured cells and xenografts implanted in immunodeficient mice. We also investigated the ability of the cell lines to form colonies and copy number alterations by array comparative genomic hybridization. Histopathological analysis showed that the invasive primary tumor from which the MACL-1 cell line was derived, was a luminal A subtype carcinoma, while the ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) that gave rise to the MGSO-3 cell line was a HER2 subtype tumor, both showing different proliferation levels. The cell lines and the tumor xenografts in mice preserved their high proliferative potential, but did not maintain the expression of the other markers assessed. This shift in expression may be due to the selection of an ‘establishment’ phenotype in vitro. Whole-genome DNA evaluation showed a large amount of copy number alterations (CNAs) in the two cell lines. These findings render MACL-1 and MGSO-3 the first characterized Brazilian breast cancer cell lines to be potentially used for comparative research. PMID:23404580

  15. Impact of Triple-Negative Phenotype on Prognosis of Patients With Breast Cancer Brain Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Zhiyuan; Schlesinger, David; Toulmin, Sushila; Rich, Tyvin; Sheehan, Jason

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: To elucidate survival times and identify potential prognostic factors in patients with triple-negative (TN) phenotype who harbored brain metastases arising from breast cancer and who underwent stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Methods and Materials: A total of 103 breast cancer patients with brain metastases were treated with SRS and then studied retrospectively. Twenty-four patients (23.3%) were TN. Survival times were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method, with a log-rank test computing the survival time difference between groups. Univariate and multivariate analyses to predict potential prognostic factors were performed using a Cox proportional hazard regression model. Results: The presence of TN phenotype was associated with worse survival times, including overall survival after the diagnosis of primary breast cancer (43 months vs. 82 months), neurologic survival after the diagnosis of intracranial metastases, and radiosurgical survival after SRS, with median survival times being 13 months vs. 25 months and 6 months vs. 16 months, respectively (p < 0.002 in all three comparisons). On multivariate analysis, radiosurgical survival benefit was associated with non-TN status and lower recursive partitioning analysis class at the initial SRS. Conclusion: The TN phenotype represents a significant adverse prognostic factor with respect to overall survival, neurologic survival, and radiosurgical survival in breast cancer patients with intracranial metastasis. Recursive partitioning analysis class also served as an important and independent prognostic factor.

  16. Integrating Enzymatic Self-Assembly and Mitochondria Targeting for Selectively Killing Cancer Cells without Acquired Drug Resistance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huaimin; Feng, Zhaoqianqi; Wang, Youzhi; Zhou, Rong; Yang, Zhimou; Xu, Bing

    2016-12-14

    Targeting organelles by modulating the redox potential of mitochondria is a promising approach to kill cancer cells that minimizes acquired drug resistance. However, it lacks selectivity because mitochondria perform essential functions for (almost) all cells. We show that enzyme-instructed self-assembly (EISA), a bioinspired molecular process, selectively generates the assemblies of redox modulators (e.g., triphenyl phosphinium (TPP)) in the pericellular space of cancer cells for uptake, which allows selectively targeting the mitochondria of cancer cells. The attachment of TPP to a pair of enantiomeric, phosphorylated tetrapeptides produces the precursors (L-1P or D-1P) that form oligomers. Upon dephosphorylation catalyzed by ectophosphatases (e.g., alkaline phosphatase (ALP)) overexpressed on cancer cells (e.g., Saos2), the oligomers self-assemble to form nanoscale assemblies only on the surface of the cancer cells. The cancer cells thus uptake these assemblies of TPP via endocytosis, mainly via a caveolae/raft-dependent pathway. Inside the cells, the assemblies of TPP-peptide conjugates escape from the lysosome, induce dysfunction of mitochondria to release cytochrome c, and result in cell death, while the controls (i.e., omitting TPP motif, inhibiting ALP, or removing phosphate trigger) hardly kill the Saos2 cells. Most importantly, the repeated stimulation of the cancers by the precursors, unexpectedly, sensitizes the cancer cells to the precursors. As the first example of the integration of subcellular targeting with cell targeting, this study validates the spatial control of the assemblies of nonspecific cytotoxic agents by EISA as a promising molecular process for selectively killing cancer cells without inducing acquired drug resistance.

  17. Breast cancer phenotypes regulated by tissue factor-factor VII pathway: Possible therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Koizume, Shiro; Miyagi, Yohei

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is a leading cause of cancer death in women, worldwide. Fortunately, breast cancer is relatively chemosensitive, with recent advances leading to the development of effective therapeutic strategies, significantly increasing disease cure rate. However, disease recurrence and treatment of cases lacking therapeutic molecular targets, such as epidermal growth factor receptor 2 and hormone receptors, referred to as triple-negative breast cancers, still pose major hurdles in the treatment of breast cancer. Thus, novel therapeutic approaches to treat aggressive breast cancers are essential. Blood coagulation factor VII (fVII) is produced in the liver and secreted into the blood stream. Tissue factor (TF), the cellular receptor for fVII, is an integral membrane protein that plays key roles in the extrinsic coagulation cascade. TF is overexpressed in breast cancer tissues. The TF-fVII complex may be formed in the absence of injury, because fVII potentially exists in the tissue fluid within cancer tissues. The active form of this complex (TF-fVIIa) may stimulate the expression of numerous malignant phenotypes in breast cancer cells. Thus, the TF-fVII pathway is a potentially attractive target for breast cancer treatment. To date, a number of studies investigating the mechanisms by which TF-fVII signaling contributes to breast cancer progression, have been conducted. In this review, we summarize the mechanisms controlling TF and fVII synthesis and regulation in breast cancer cells. Our current understanding of the TF-fVII pathway as a mediator of breast cancer progression will be also described. Finally, we will discuss how this knowledge can be applied to the design of future therapeutic strategies. PMID:25493229

  18. Knowledge acquired, satisfaction attained and attitudes towards shared decision making in colorectal cancer screening

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Alonso, Francisco J.; Tejero, María Hernández; Cambrodón, Daniel Bonillo; Bermejo, Fernando

    2017-01-01

    Background Introducing shared decision making (SDM) in colorectal cancer (CRC) screening requires patients to acquire appropriate knowledge. We aimed to describe the knowledge attained by subjects with a family history of CRC. Methods Consecutive patients attending the gastroenterology clinic for a CRC family history were invited to take part in a cross-sectional survey. Attitudes towards SDM, satisfaction with the information received, knowledge currently achieved, and relevant influencing factors were evaluated. Satisfaction and attitudes towards SDM were evaluated with Likert scale questions. Knowledge was surveyed with closed (80%) and open (20%) questions. Results Of the 160 patients, 42.7% were male and the median age was 51.8 years (interquartile range: 43.9-58.5). Most subjects favored SDM; only 12.8% (8.4-19.1%) favored passive attitudes. Satisfaction with the information received about what a colonoscopy is and why it is recommended was adequate in 83.1% (76.4-88.2%). Information about risks satisfied 62.9% (55-70.1%) and about alternatives to colonoscopy only 30.6% (23.8-38.3%). The benefits of screening were better known than its risks and alternatives. The CRC decrease associated with screening was known to 71.3% (63.7-77.8%), but only 38.5% (31.1-46.4%) knew that a reduced risk still exists. Just 21.2% (15.5-26.9%) could mention an alternative screening method to colonoscopy and only 42.5% (35-50.4%) were aware of any associated harm. On multivariate analysis, higher educational level and younger age of the attending physician were associated with higher knowledge scores. Conclusion SDM is considered favorably by most patients. Although information about the benefits of CRC screening is transmitted adequately, risks and alternatives should be better addressed. PMID:28042241

  19. MicroRNAs Induce Epigenetic Reprogramming and Suppress Malignant Phenotypes of Human Colon Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ogawa, Hisataka; Wu, Xin; Kawamoto, Koichi; Nishida, Naohiro; Konno, Masamitsu; Koseki, Jun; Matsui, Hidetoshi; Noguchi, Kozou; Gotoh, Noriko; Yamamoto, Tsuyoshi; Miyata, Kanjiro; Nishiyama, Nobuhiro; Nagano, Hiroaki; Yamamoto, Hirofumi; Obika, Satoshi; Kataoka, Kazunori; Doki, Yuichiro; Mori, Masaki; Ishii, Hideshi

    2015-01-01

    Although cancer is a genetic disease, epigenetic alterations are involved in its initiation and progression. Previous studies have shown that reprogramming of colon cancer cells using Oct3/4, Sox2, Klf4, and cMyc reduces cancer malignancy. Therefore, cancer reprogramming may be a useful treatment for chemo- or radiotherapy-resistant cancer cells. It was also reported that the introduction of endogenous small-sized, non-coding ribonucleotides such as microRNA (miR) 302s and miR-369-3p or -5p resulted in the induction of cellular reprogramming. miRs are smaller than the genes of transcription factors, making them possibly suitable for use in clinical strategies. Therefore, we reprogrammed colon cancer cells using miR-302s and miR-369-3p or -5p. This resulted in inhibition of cell proliferation and invasion and the stimulation of the mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition phenotype in colon cancer cells. Importantly, the introduction of the ribonucleotides resulted in epigenetic reprogramming of DNA demethylation and histone modification events. Furthermore, in vivo administration of the ribonucleotides in mice elicited the induction of cancer cell apoptosis, which involves the mitochondrial Bcl2 protein family. The present study shows that the introduction of miR-302s and miR-369s could induce cellular reprogramming and modulate malignant phenotypes of human colorectal cancer, suggesting that the appropriate delivery of functional small-sized ribonucleotides may open a new avenue for therapy against human malignant tumors. PMID:25970424

  20. Curcumin mediates oxaliplatin-acquired resistance reversion in colorectal cancer cell lines through modulation of CXC-Chemokine/NF-κB signalling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz de Porras, Vicenç; Bystrup, Sara; Martínez-Cardús, Anna; Pluvinet, Raquel; Sumoy, Lauro; Howells, Lynne; James, Mark I.; Iwuji, Chinenye; Manzano, José Luis; Layos, Laura; Bugés, Cristina; Abad, Albert; Martínez-Balibrea, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Resistance to oxaliplatin (OXA) is a complex process affecting the outcomes of metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC) patients treated with this drug. De-regulation of the NF-κB signalling pathway has been proposed as an important mechanism involved in this phenomenon. Here, we show that NF-κB was hyperactivated in in vitro models of OXA-acquired resistance but was attenuated by the addition of Curcumin, a non-toxic NF-κB inhibitor. The concomitant combination of Curcumin + OXA was more effective and synergistic in cell lines with acquired resistance to OXA, leading to the reversion of their resistant phenotype, through the inhibition of the NF-κB signalling cascade. Transcriptomic profiling revealed the up-regulation of three NF-κB-regulated CXC-chemokines, CXCL8, CXCL1 and CXCL2, in the resistant cells that were more efficiently down-regulated after OXA + Curcumin treatment as compared to the sensitive cells. Moreover, CXCL8 and CXCL1 gene silencing made resistant cells more sensitive to OXA through the inhibition of the Akt/NF-κB pathway. High expression of CXCL1 in FFPE samples from explant cultures of CRC patients-derived liver metastases was associated with response to OXA + Curcumin. In conclusion, we suggest that combination of OXA + Curcumin could be an effective treatment, for which CXCL1 could be used as a predictive marker, in CRC patients. PMID:27091625

  1. ERK5 signalling in prostate cancer promotes an invasive phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Ramsay, A K; McCracken, S R C; Soofi, M; Fleming, J; Yu, A X; Ahmad, I; Morland, R; Machesky, L; Nixon, C; Edwards, D R; Nuttall, R K; Seywright, M; Marquez, R; Keller, E; Leung, H Y

    2011-01-01

    Background: Aberrant mitogen/extracellular signal-regulated kinase 5 (MEK5)–extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase 5 (ERK5)-mediated signalling has been implicated in a number of tumour types including prostate cancer (PCa). The molecular basis of ERK5-driven carcinogenesis and its clinical relevance remain to be fully characterised. Methods: Modulation of ERK5 expression or function in human PCa PC3 and PC3–ERK5 (stably transfected with ERK5) cells was performed using siRNA-mediated knockdown or the MEK inhibitor PD18435 respectively. In vitro significance of ERK5 signalling was assessed by assays for proliferation, motility, invasion and invadopodia. Expression of matrix metalloproteinases/tissue inhibitors of metalloproteases was determined by Q-RT–PCR. Extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase 5 expression in primary and metastatic PCa was examined using immunohistochemistry. Results: Reduction of ERK5 expression or signalling significantly inhibited the motility and invasive capability of PC3 cells. Extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase 5-mediated signalling significantly promoted formation of in vivo metastasis in an orthotopic PCa model (P<0.05). Invadopodia formation was also enhanced by forced ERK5 expression in PC3 cells. Furthermore, in metastatic PCa, nuclear ERK5 immunoreactivity was significantly upregulated when compared with benign prostatic hyperplasia and primary PCa (P=0.013 and P<0.0001, respectively). Conclusion: Our in vitro, in vivo and clinical data support an important role for the MEK5–ERK5 signalling pathway in invasive PCa, which represents a potential target for therapy in primary and metastatic PCa. PMID:21266977

  2. Blood classical monocytes phenotype is not altered in primary non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Almatroodi, Saleh A; McDonald, Christine F; Collins, Allison L; Darby, Ian A; Pouniotis, Dodie S

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the M1 and M2 monocyte phenotype in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) compared to controls. Also, to examine the expression of Th1 and Th2 cytokines in plasma of NSCLC vs controls. METHODS: Freshly prepared peripheral blood mononuclear cells samples were obtained from patients with NSCLC (lung adenocarcinoma and squamous cell lung carcinoma) and from non-cancer controls. Flow cytometry was performed to investigate M1 and M2 phenotypes in peripheral monocytes (classical monocytes CD14+, CD45+ and CD16-) using conventional surface markers. Th1 and Th2 cytokine production was also analysed in the plasma using cytometric bead array technique. RESULTS: There were no significant difference in expression of M1 (HLA-DR) and/or M2 markers (CD163 and CD36) markers on classical monocytes in patients with NSCLC compared to non-cancer controls. Expression of CD11b, CD11c, CD71 and CD44 was also shown to be similar in patients with NSCLC compared to non-cancer controls. Th1 and Th2 cytokines [interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12 (p70), tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, TNF-β, and interferon-γ] analysis revealed no significant difference between patients with NSCLC and non-cancer controls. CONCLUSION: This study shows no alteration in peripheral monocyte phenotype in circulating classical monocytes in patients with NSCLC compared to non-cancer controls. No difference in Th1 and Th2 cytokine levels were noted in the plasma of these patients. PMID:25493244

  3. Wnt-beta-catenin pathway signals metastasis-associated tumor cell phenotypes in triple negative breast cancers

    PubMed Central

    De, Pradip; Carlson, Jennifer H.; Wu, Hui; Marcus, Adam; Leyland-Jones, Brian; Dey, Nandini

    2016-01-01

    Tumor cells acquire metastasis-associated (MA) phenotypes following genetic alterations in them which cause deregulation of different signaling pathways. Earlier, we reported that an upregulation of the Wnt-beta-catenin pathway (WP) is one of the genetic salient features of triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC), and WP signaling is associated with metastasis in TNBC. Using cBioPortal, here we found that collective % of alteration(s) in WP genes, CTNNB1, APC and DVL1 among breast-invasive-carcinomas was 21% as compared to 56% in PAM50 Basal. To understand the functional relevance of WP in the biology of heterogeneous/metastasizing TNBC cells, we undertook this comprehensive study using 15 cell lines in which we examined the role of WP in the context of integrin-dependent MA-phenotypes. Directional movement of tumor cells was observed by confocal immunofluorescence microscopy and quantitative confocal-video-microscopy while matrigel-invasion was studied by MMP7-specific casein-zymography. WntC59, XAV939, sulindac sulfide and beta-catenin siRNA (1) inhibited fibronectin-directed migration, (2) decreased podia-parameters and motility-descriptors, (3) altered filamentous-actin, (4) decreased matrigel-invasion and (5) inhibited cell proliferation as well as 3D clonogenic growth. Sulindac sulfide and beta-catenin siRNA decreased beta-catenin/active-beta-catenin and MMP7. LWnt3ACM-stimulated proliferation, clonogenicity, fibronection-directed migration and matrigel-invasion were perturbed by WP-modulators, sulindac sulfide and GDC-0941. We studied a direct involvement of WP in metastasis by stimulating brain-metastasis-specific MDA-MB231BR cells to demonstrate that LWnt3ACM-stimulated proliferation, clonogenicity and migration were blocked following sulindac sulfide, GDC-0941 and beta-catenin knockdown. We present the first evidence showing a direct functional relationship between WP activation and integrin-dependent MA-phenotypes. By proving the functional relationship

  4. Induction of LIFR confers a dormancy phenotype in breast cancer cells disseminated to the bone marrow

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Rachelle W.; Finger, Elizabeth C.; Olcina, Monica M.; Vilalta, Marta; Aguilera, Todd; Miao, Yu; Merkel, Alyssa R.; Johnson, Joshua R.; Sterling, Julie A.; Wu, Joy Y.; Giaccia, Amato J.

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer cells frequently home to the bone marrow, where they may enter a dormant state before forming a bone metastasis. Several members of the interleukin-6 (IL-6) cytokine family are implicated in breast cancer bone colonization, but the role for the IL-6 cytokine leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) in this process is unknown. We tested the hypothesis that LIF provides a pro-dormancy signal to breast cancer cells in the bone. In breast cancer patients, LIF receptor (LIFR) levels are lower with bone metastases and are significantly and inversely correlated with patient outcome and hypoxia gene activity. Hypoxia also reduces the LIFR:STAT3:SOCS3 signaling pathway in breast cancer cells. Loss of the LIFR or STAT3 enables otherwise dormant breast cancer cells to down-regulate dormancy, quiescence, and cancer stem cell-associated genes, and to proliferate in and specifically colonize the bone, suggesting LIFR:STAT3 signaling confers a dormancy phenotype in breast cancer cells disseminated to bone. PMID:27642788

  5. From Genotype to Functional Phenotype: Unraveling the Metabolomic Features of Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bathe, Oliver F.; Farshidfar, Farshad

    2014-01-01

    Much effort in recent years has been expended in defining the genomic and epigenetic alterations that characterize colorectal adenocarcinoma and its subtypes. However, little is known about the functional ramifications related to various subtypes. Metabolomics, the study of small molecule intermediates in disease, provides a snapshot of the functional phenotype of colorectal cancer. Data, thus far, have characterized some of the metabolic perturbations that accompany colorectal cancer. However, further studies will be required to identify biologically meaningful metabolic subsets, including those corresponding to specific genetic aberrations. Moreover, further studies are necessary to distinguish changes due to tumor and the host response to tumor. PMID:25055199

  6. Induction of autophagy counteracts the anticancer effect of cisplatin in human esophageal cancer cells with acquired drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Yu, Le; Gu, Chunping; Zhong, Desheng; Shi, Lili; Kong, Yi; Zhou, Zhitao; Liu, Shuwen

    2014-12-01

    Cisplatin-based chemotherapy frequently resulted in acquired resistance. The underpinning mechanism of such resistance remains obscure especially in relation to autophagic response. This study thus investigated the role of autophagy in the anticancer activity of cisplatin in human esophageal cancer cells with acquired cisplatin resistance. In response to cisplatin treatment, EC109 cells exhibited substantial apoptosis and senescence whereas cisplatin-resistant EC109/CDDP cells exhibited resistance. In this respect, cisplatin increased ERK phosphorylation whose inhibition by MEK inhibitor significantly attenuated the cytotoxic and cytostatic effect of cisplatin. Notably, cisplatin preferentially induces autophagy in EC109/CDDP cells but not in EC109 cells. Moreover, the induction of autophagy was accompanied by the suppression of mTORC1 activity. Abolition of autophagy by pharmacological inhibitors or knockdown of ATG5/7 re-sensitized EC109/CDDP cells. Co-administration of an autophagy inhibitor chloroquine and cisplatin significantly suppressed tumor growth whereas cisplatin monotherapy failed to elicit anticancer activity in nude mice xenografted with EC109/CDDP cells. To conclude, our data implicate autophagic response as a key mechanism of acquired resistance to cisplatin, suggesting that autophagy is a novel target to improve therapy efficiency of cisplatin toward human esophageal cancers with acquired resistance.

  7. Highly expressed NRSN2 is related to malignant phenotype in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Tang, Wenbin; Ren, Aimin; Xiao, Hongyang; Sun, Huizhen; Li, Bin

    2017-01-01

    Neurensin-2 (NRSN2) is a 24KD protein, which is reported located in the membrane, while its biological functions remain unknown, not to mention in the field of tumor biology. In current study, we aimed to analyze the functions of NRSN2 in ovarian cancer. We screened TCGA database and surprisingly found that its copy number and mRNA level are gained and heightened respectively in parts of serous ovarian cancer patients. In current study, both loss- and gain- function assays found that NRSN2 is associated with the malignant phenotype in ovarian cancer cells, because NRSN2 plays a remarkable role in anchorage-independent colony formation, subcutaneous tumor formation, cell invasion, and chemoresistance. Furthermore, we found that the level of NRSN2 was positively correlated with the expression of stem cell marker CD133. In addition, Wnt canonical signaling and Twist/Akt/Erk axis were also regulated by NRSN2. In conclusion, we found that a poorly studied protein, NRSN2, which is associated with the malignant phenotype of serous ovarian cancer and as a membrane protein; it could be a target for serous ovarian cancer treatment.

  8. Colorectal cancer stem cell and chemoresistant colorectal cancer cell phenotypes and increased sensitivity to Notch pathway inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Huang, Rui; Wang, Guiyu; Song, Yanni; Tang, Qingchao; You, Qi; Liu, Zheng; Chen, Yinggang; Zhang, Qian; Li, Jiaying; Muhammand, Shan; Wang, Xishan

    2015-08-01

    Colorectal cancer stem cells (Co-CSCs) are a small subpopulation of tumor cells which have been proposed to be tumor-initiating cells in colorectal cancer (CRC) and to be implicated in resistance to standard chemotherapy. Chemoresistance is a common problem in the clinic. However, the interrelation between Co-CSCs and chemoresistant cells has yet to be elucidated. The present study investigated the Co-CSC phenotype in colonospheres and chemoresistant CRC cell lines and aimed to identify targets for therapy. Colonospheres and chemoresistant CRC cells were found to be enriched with the CSC markers CD133 and CD44, and exhibited similar phenotypes. Furthermore, it was found that Notch signaling may simultaneously regulate Co-CSCs and chemoresistant cells and may represent a novel strategy for targeting this pathway in CRC.

  9. Decreased Expression of the Early Mitotic Gene, CHFR, Contributes to the Acquisition of Breast Cancer Phenotypes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-06-1-0332 TITLE: Decreased Expression of the Early... Decreased Expression of the Early Mitotic Gene, CHFR, Contributes to the Acquisition of Breast Cancer Phenotypes 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-06-1-0332 5c... decreased CHFR expression compared to normal cells and tissues and the loss of CHFR expression by RNAi in cell culture models leads to the acquisition of

  10. Modeling the Transitions between Collective and Solitary Migration Phenotypes in Cancer Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Bin; Jolly, Mohit Kumar; Lu, Mingyang; Tsarfaty, Ilan; Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Onuchic, Jose’ N

    2015-01-01

    Cellular plasticity during cancer metastasis is a major clinical challenge. Two key cellular plasticity mechanisms —Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition (EMT) and Mesenchymal-to-Amoeboid Transition (MAT) – have been carefully investigated individually, yet a comprehensive understanding of their interconnections remains elusive. Previously, we have modeled the dynamics of the core regulatory circuits for both EMT (miR-200/ZEB/miR-34/SNAIL) and MAT (Rac1/RhoA). We now extend our previous work to study the coupling between these two core circuits by considering the two microRNAs (miR-200 and miR-34) as external signals to the core MAT circuit. We show that this coupled circuit enables four different stable steady states (phenotypes) that correspond to hybrid epithelial/mesenchymal (E/M), mesenchymal (M), amoeboid (A) and hybrid amoeboid/mesenchymal (A/M) phenotypes. Our model recapitulates the metastasis-suppressing role of the microRNAs even in the presence of EMT-inducing signals like Hepatocyte Growth Factor (HGF). It also enables mapping the microRNA levels to the transitions among various cell migration phenotypes. Finally, it offers a mechanistic understanding for the observed phenotypic transitions among different cell migration phenotypes, specifically the Collective-to-Amoeboid Transition (CAT). PMID:26627083

  11. Modeling the Transitions between Collective and Solitary Migration Phenotypes in Cancer Metastasis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Bin; Jolly, Mohit Kumar; Lu, Mingyang; Tsarfaty, Ilan; Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Onuchic, Jose' N.

    2015-12-01

    Cellular plasticity during cancer metastasis is a major clinical challenge. Two key cellular plasticity mechanisms —Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition (EMT) and Mesenchymal-to-Amoeboid Transition (MAT) - have been carefully investigated individually, yet a comprehensive understanding of their interconnections remains elusive. Previously, we have modeled the dynamics of the core regulatory circuits for both EMT (miR-200/ZEB/miR-34/SNAIL) and MAT (Rac1/RhoA). We now extend our previous work to study the coupling between these two core circuits by considering the two microRNAs (miR-200 and miR-34) as external signals to the core MAT circuit. We show that this coupled circuit enables four different stable steady states (phenotypes) that correspond to hybrid epithelial/mesenchymal (E/M), mesenchymal (M), amoeboid (A) and hybrid amoeboid/mesenchymal (A/M) phenotypes. Our model recapitulates the metastasis-suppressing role of the microRNAs even in the presence of EMT-inducing signals like Hepatocyte Growth Factor (HGF). It also enables mapping the microRNA levels to the transitions among various cell migration phenotypes. Finally, it offers a mechanistic understanding for the observed phenotypic transitions among different cell migration phenotypes, specifically the Collective-to-Amoeboid Transition (CAT).

  12. Isolation of circulating epithelial and tumor progenitor cells with an invasive phenotype from breast cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Janice; Fan, Tina; Zhao, Qiang; Zeng, Wei; Zaslavsky, Eva; Chen, John J.; Frohman, Michael A.; Golightly, Marc G.; Madajewicz, Stefan; Chen, Wen-Tien

    2009-01-01

    Recent research advances show that tumor cell intravasation (entry into the circulation) and metastasis occur very early in breast cancer progression. Clinical studies also illustrate the potential importance of detection of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in outcomes of patients with metastatic breast cancer. Whether these cells exhibit the invasiveness and express tumor stem or progenitor markers, hallmark of the metastatic phenotype, is less well characterized. To detect CTCs with the invasive phenotype and to explore their molecular features, we applied a functional cell separation method, called collagen adhesion matrix (CAM) assay, as enrichment and identification steps. The CAM-coated device successfully recovered tumor cells spiked in one mL of blood with a 54%±9% (n=18) recovery rate and 0.5-35% purity, and detected invasive tumor cells in 10/10 blood samples (100% yield) from patients with metastatic breast cancer with a range of 18 to 256 CTCs/mL and average of 126±25 (mean±SD) CTCs/mL. CTCs were detected in blood samples of 28/54 (52%) stage I-III breast cancer patients with a mean count of 61 CTCs/mL. Furthermore, the relative frequency of these cells correlated to the staging, lymph node-status and survival of patients with early stage breast cancer. CAM-captured cells were capable of propagation in culture. Gene expression and multiplex flow cytometric analyses on CAM-captured cells demonstrated the existence of distinct populations of CTCs including these of epithelial lineage and stem or progenitor cells. Thus, CAM-initiated CTC detection provides advantages for examining invasiveness and tumor progenitor phenotypes. PMID:19662651

  13. Cross-Phenotype Polygenic Risk Score Analysis of Persistent Post-Concussive Symptoms in U.S. Army Soldiers with Deployment-Acquired Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Polimanti, Renato; Chen, Chia-Yen; Ursano, Robert J; Heeringa, Steven G; Jain, Sonia; Kessler, Ronald C; Nock, Matthew K; Smoller, Jordan W; Sun, Xiaoying; Gelernter, Joel; Stein, Murray B

    2017-02-15

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) contributes to the increased rates of suicide and post-traumatic stress disorder in military personnel and veterans, and it is also associated with the risk for neurodegenerative and psychiatric disorders. A cross-phenotype high-resolution polygenic risk score (PRS) analysis of persistent post-concussive symptoms (PCS) was conducted in 845 U.S. Army soldiers who sustained TBI during their deployment. We used a prospective longitudinal survey of three brigade combat teams to assess deployment-acquired TBI and persistent physical, cognitive, and emotional PCS. PRS was derived from summary statistics of large genome-wide association studies of Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and major depressive disorder (MDD); and for years of schooling, college completion, childhood intelligence, infant head circumference (IHC), and adult intracranial volume. Although our study had more than 95% of statistical power to detect moderate-to-large effect sizes, no association was observed with neurodegenerative and psychiatric disorders, suggesting that persistent PCS does not share genetic components with these traits to a moderate-to-large degree. We observed a significant finding: subjects with high IHC PRS recovered better from cognitive/emotional persistent PCS than the other individuals (R(2) = 1.11%; p = 3.37 × 10(-3)). Enrichment analysis identified two significant Gene Ontology (GO) terms related to this result: GO:0050839∼Cell adhesion molecule binding (p = 8.9 × 10(-6)) and GO:0050905∼Neuromuscular process (p = 9.8 × 10(-5)). In summary, our study indicated that the genetic predisposition to persistent PCS after TBI does not have substantial overlap with neurodegenerative and psychiatric diseases, but mechanisms related to early brain growth may be involved.

  14. Clinical definition of acquired resistance to epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors in non-small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Jackman, David; Pao, William; Riely, Gregory J; Engelman, Jeffrey A; Kris, Mark G; Jänne, Pasi A; Lynch, Thomas; Johnson, Bruce E; Miller, Vincent A

    2010-01-10

    Ten percent of North American patients with non-small-cell lung cancer have tumors with somatic mutations in the gene for the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Approximately 70% of patients whose lung cancers harbor somatic mutations in exons encoding the tyrosine kinase domain of EGFR experience significant tumor regressions when treated with the EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) gefitinib or erlotinib. However, the overwhelming majority of these patients inevitably acquire resistance to either drug. Currently, the clinical definition of such secondary or acquired resistance is not clear. We propose the following criteria be used to define more precisely acquired resistance to EGFR TKIs. All patients should have the following criteria: previous treatment with a single-agent EGFR TKI (eg, gefitinib or erlotinib); either or both of the following: a tumor that harbors an EGFR mutation known to be associated with drug sensitivity or objective clinical benefit from treatment with an EGFR TKI; systemic progression of disease (Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors [RECIST] or WHO) while on continuous treatment with gefitinib or erlotinib within the last 30 days; and no intervening systemic therapy between cessation of gefitinib or erlotinib and initiation of new therapy. The relatively simple definition proposed here will lead to a more uniform approach to investigating the problem of acquired resistance to EGFR TKIs in this unique patient population. These guidelines should minimize reporting of false-positive and false-negative activity in these clinical trials and would facilitate the identification of agents that truly overcome acquired resistance to gefitinib and erlotinib.

  15. Cancer abolishes the tissue type-specific differences in the phenotype of energetic metabolism.

    PubMed

    Acebo, Paloma; Giner, Daniel; Calvo, Piedad; Blanco-Rivero, Amaya; Ortega, Alvaro D; Fernández, Pedro L; Roncador, Giovanna; Fernández-Malavé, Edgar; Chamorro, Margarita; Cuezva, José M

    2009-08-18

    Nowadays, cellular bioenergetics has become a central issue of investigation in cancer biology. Recently, the metabolic activity of the cancer cell has been shown to correlate with a proteomic index that informs of the relative mitochondrial activity of the cell. Within this new field of investigation, we report herein the production and characterization of high-affinity monoclonal antibodies against proteins of the "bioenergetic signature" of the cell. The use of recombinant proteins and antibodies against the mitochondrial beta-F1-ATPase and Hsp60 proteins and the enzymes of the glycolytic pathway glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and pyruvate kinase M2 in quantitative assays provide, for the first time, the actual amount of these proteins in normal and tumor surgical specimens of breast, lung, and esophagus. The application of this methodology affords a straightforward proteomic signature that quantifies the variable energetic demand of human tissues. Furthermore, the results show an unanticipated finding: tumors from different tissues and/or histological types have the same proteomic signature of energetic metabolism. Therefore, the results indicate that cancer abolishes the tissue-specific differences in the bioenergetic phenotype of mitochondria. Overall, the results support that energetic metabolism represents an additional hallmark of the phenotype of the cancer cell and a promising target for the treatment of diverse neoplasias.

  16. CYP2D6 Genetic Polymorphisms and Phenotypes in Different Ethnicities of Malaysian Breast Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Chin, Fee Wai; Chan, Soon Choy; Abdul Rahman, Sabariah; Noor Akmal, Sharifah; Rosli, Rozita

    2016-01-01

    The cytochrome P450, family 2, subfamily D, polypeptide 6 (CYP2D6) is an enzyme that is predominantly involved in the metabolism of tamoxifen. Genetic polymorphisms of the CYP2D6 gene may contribute to inter-individual variability in tamoxifen metabolism, which leads to the differences in clinical response to tamoxifen among breast cancer patients. In Malaysia, the knowledge on CYP2D6 genetic polymorphisms as well as metabolizer status in Malaysian breast cancer patients remains unknown. Hence, this study aimed to comprehensively identify CYP2D6 genetic polymorphisms among 80 Malaysian breast cancer patients. The genetic polymorphisms of all the 9 exons of CYP2D6 gene were identified using high-resolution melting analysis and confirmed by DNA sequencing. Seven CYP2D6 alleles consisting of CYP2D6*1, CYP2D6*2, CYP2D6*4, CYP2D6*10, CYP2D6*39, CYP2D6*49, and CYP2D6*75 were identified in this study. Among these alleles, CYP2D6*10 is the most common allele in both Malaysian Malay (54.8%) and Chinese (71.4%) breast cancer patients, whereas CYP2D6*4 in Malaysian Indian (28.6%) breast cancer patients. In relation to CYP2D6 genotype, CYP2D6*10/*10 is more frequently observed in both Malaysian Malay (28.9%) and Chinese (57.1%) breast cancer patients, whereas CYP2D6*4/*10 is more frequently observed in Malaysian Indian (42.8%) breast cancer patients. In terms of CYP2D6 phenotype, 61.5% of Malaysian Malay breast cancer patients are predicted as extensive metabolizers in which they are most likely to respond well to tamoxifen therapy. However, 57.1% of Chinese as well as Indian breast cancer patients are predicted as intermediate metabolizers and they are less likely to gain optimal benefit from the tamoxifen therapy. This is the first report of CYP2D6 genetic polymorphisms and phenotypes in Malaysian breast cancer patients for different ethnicities. These data may aid clinicians in selecting an optimal drug therapy for Malaysian breast cancer patients, hence improve the

  17. Acquired long QT syndrome and monomorphic ventricular tachycardia after alternative treatment with cesium chloride for brain cancer.

    PubMed

    Dalal, Anuj K; Harding, John D; Verdino, Ralph J

    2004-08-01

    Individuals searching for symptomatic relief or a potential cure are increasingly seeking and using nontraditional therapies for their various diseases. Little is known about the potential adverse effects that patients may encounter while undergoing these alternative treatments. Cesium chloride is an unregulated agent that has been reported to have antineoplastic properties. Cesium chloride is advertised as an alternative agent for many different types of cancers and can be purchased easily on the Internet. Recently, QT prolongation and polymorphic ventricular tachycardia were reported in several patients taking cesium chloride as alternative treatment for cancer. We report acquired QT prolongation and sustained monomorphic ventricular tachycardia in a patient who self-initiated and completed a course of cesium chloride as adjunctive treatment for brain cancer.

  18. CD133+CD24lo defines a 5-Fluorouracil-resistant colon cancer stem cell-like phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Paschall, Amy V.; Yang, Dafeng; Lu, Chunwan; Redd, Priscilla S.; Choi, Jeong-Hyeon; Heaton, Christopher M.; Lee, Jeffrey R.; Nayak-Kapoor, Asha; Liu, Kebin

    2016-01-01

    The chemotherapeutic agent 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) is the most commonly used drug for patients with advanced colon cancer. However, development of resistance to 5-FU is inevitable in almost all patients. The mechanism by which colon cancer develops 5-FU resistance is still unclear. One recently proposed theory is that cancer stem-like cells underlie colon cancer 5-FU resistance, but the phenotypes of 5-FU-resistant colon cancer stem cells are still controversial. We report here that 5-FU treatment selectively enriches a subset of CD133+ colon cancer cells in vitro. 5-FU chemotherapy also increases CD133+ tumor cells in human colon cancer patients. However, sorted CD133+ colon cancer cells exhibit no increased resistance to 5-FU, and CD133 levels exhibit no correlation with colon cancer patient survival or cancer recurrence. Genome-wide analysis of gene expression between sorted CD133+ colon cancer cells and 5-FU-selected colon cancer cells identifies 207 differentially expressed genes. CD24 is one of the genes whose expression level is lower in the CD133+ and 5-FU-resistant colon cancer cells as compared to CD133+ and 5-FU-sensitive colon cancer cells. Consequently, CD133+CD24lo cells exhibit decreased sensitivity to 5-FU. Therefore, we determine that CD133+CD24lo phenotype defines 5-FU-resistant human colon cancer stem cell-like cells. PMID:27659530

  19. Bayesian model of signal rewiring reveals mechanisms of gene dysregulation in acquired drug resistance in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Azad, A. K. M.; Keith, Jonathan M.

    2017-01-01

    Small molecule inhibitors, such as lapatinib, are effective against breast cancer in clinical trials, but tumor cells ultimately acquire resistance to the drug. Maintaining sensitization to drug action is essential for durable growth inhibition. Recently, adaptive reprogramming of signaling circuitry has been identified as a major cause of acquired resistance. We developed a computational framework using a Bayesian statistical approach to model signal rewiring in acquired resistance. We used the p1-model to infer potential aberrant gene-pairs with differential posterior probabilities of appearing in resistant-vs-parental networks. Results were obtained using matched gene expression profiles under resistant and parental conditions. Using two lapatinib-treated ErbB2-positive breast cancer cell-lines: SKBR3 and BT474, our method identified similar dysregulated signaling pathways including EGFR-related pathways as well as other receptor-related pathways, many of which were reported previously as compensatory pathways of EGFR-inhibition via signaling cross-talk. A manual literature survey provided strong evidence that aberrant signaling activities in dysregulated pathways are closely related to acquired resistance in EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Our approach predicted literature-supported dysregulated pathways complementary to both node-centric (SPIA, DAVID, and GATHER) and edge-centric (ESEA and PAGI) methods. Moreover, by proposing a novel pattern of aberrant signaling called V-structures, we observed that genes were dysregulated in resistant-vs-sensitive conditions when they were involved in the switch of dependencies from targeted to bypass signaling events. A literature survey of some important V-structures suggested they play a role in breast cancer metastasis and/or acquired resistance to EGFR-TKIs, where the mRNA changes of TGFBR2, LEF1 and TP53 in resistant-vs-sensitive conditions were related to the dependency switch from targeted to bypass signaling links

  20. Bayesian model of signal rewiring reveals mechanisms of gene dysregulation in acquired drug resistance in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Azad, A K M; Lawen, Alfons; Keith, Jonathan M

    2017-01-01

    Small molecule inhibitors, such as lapatinib, are effective against breast cancer in clinical trials, but tumor cells ultimately acquire resistance to the drug. Maintaining sensitization to drug action is essential for durable growth inhibition. Recently, adaptive reprogramming of signaling circuitry has been identified as a major cause of acquired resistance. We developed a computational framework using a Bayesian statistical approach to model signal rewiring in acquired resistance. We used the p1-model to infer potential aberrant gene-pairs with differential posterior probabilities of appearing in resistant-vs-parental networks. Results were obtained using matched gene expression profiles under resistant and parental conditions. Using two lapatinib-treated ErbB2-positive breast cancer cell-lines: SKBR3 and BT474, our method identified similar dysregulated signaling pathways including EGFR-related pathways as well as other receptor-related pathways, many of which were reported previously as compensatory pathways of EGFR-inhibition via signaling cross-talk. A manual literature survey provided strong evidence that aberrant signaling activities in dysregulated pathways are closely related to acquired resistance in EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Our approach predicted literature-supported dysregulated pathways complementary to both node-centric (SPIA, DAVID, and GATHER) and edge-centric (ESEA and PAGI) methods. Moreover, by proposing a novel pattern of aberrant signaling called V-structures, we observed that genes were dysregulated in resistant-vs-sensitive conditions when they were involved in the switch of dependencies from targeted to bypass signaling events. A literature survey of some important V-structures suggested they play a role in breast cancer metastasis and/or acquired resistance to EGFR-TKIs, where the mRNA changes of TGFBR2, LEF1 and TP53 in resistant-vs-sensitive conditions were related to the dependency switch from targeted to bypass signaling links

  1. Let-7b Inhibits Human Cancer Phenotype by Targeting Cytochrome P450 Epoxygenase 2J2

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shenglan; Gong, Wei; Wang, Yan; Cianflone, Katherine; Tang, Jiarong; Wang, Dao Wen

    2012-01-01

    Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, noncoding RNA molecules of 20 to 22 nucleotides that regulate gene expression by binding to their 3′ untranslated region (3′UTR). Increasing data implicate altered miRNA participation in the progress of cancer. We previously reported that CYP2J2 epoxygenase promotes human cancer phenotypes. But whether and how CYP2J2 is regulated by miRNA is not understood. Methods and Results Using bioinformatics analysis, we found potential target sites for miRNA let-7b in 3′UTR of human CYP2J2. Luciferase and western blot assays revealed that CYP2J2 was regulated by let-7b. In addition, let-7b decreased the enzymatic activity of endogenous CYP2J2. Furthermore, let-7b may diminish cell proliferation and promote cell apoptosis of tumor cells via posttranscriptional repression of CYP2J2. Tumor xenografts were induced in nude mice by subcutaneous injection of MDA-MB-435 cells. The let-7b expression vector, pSilencer-let-7b, was injected through tail vein every 3 weeks. Let-7b significantly inhibited the tumor phenotype by targeting CYP2J2. Moreover, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and western blotting were used to determine the expression levels of let-7b and CYP2J2 protein from 18 matched lung squamous cell cancer and adjacent normal lung tissues; the expression level of CYP2J2 was inversely proportional to that of let-7b. Conclusions Our results demonstrated that the decreased expression of let-7b could lead to the high expression of CYP2J2 protein in cancerous tissues. These findings suggest that miRNA let-7b reduces CYP2J2 expression, which may contribute to inhibiting tumor phenotypes. PMID:22761738

  2. Intratumoral heterogeneity: Role of differentiation in a potentially lethal phenotype of testicular cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bilen, Mehmet Asim; Hess, Kenneth R.; Broaddus, Russell R.; Kopetz, Scott; Wei, Chongjuan; Pagliaro, Lance C.; Karam, Jose A.; Ward, John F.; Wood, Christopher G.; Rao, Priya; Tu, Zachary H.; General, Rosale; Chen, Adrienne H.; Nieto, Yago L.; Yeung, Sai‐ching J.; Lin, Sue‐Hwa; Logothetis, Christopher J.; Pisters, Louis L.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Intratumoral heterogeneity presents a major obstacle to the widespread implementation of precision medicine. The authors assessed the origin of intratumoral heterogeneity in nonseminomatous germ cell tumor of the testis (NSGCT) and identified distinct tumor subtypes and a potentially lethal phenotype. METHODS In this retrospective study, all consecutive patients who had been diagnosed with an NSGCT between January 2000 and December 2010 were evaluated. The histologic makeup of primary tumors and the clinical course of disease were determined for each patient. A Fine and Gray proportional hazards regression analysis was used to determine the prognostic risk factors, and the Gray test was used to detect differences in the cumulative incidence of cancer death. In a separate prospective study, next‐generation sequencing was performed on tumor samples from 9 patients to identify any actionable mutations. RESULTS Six hundred fifteen patients were included in this study. Multivariate analysis revealed that the presence of yolk sac tumor in the primary tumor (P = .0003) was associated with an unfavorable prognosis. NSGCT could be divided into 5 subgroups. Patients in the yolk sac‐seminoma subgroup had the poorest clinical outcome (P = .0015). These tumors tended to undergo somatic transformation (P < .0001). Among the 9 NSGCTs that had a yolk sac tumor phenotype, no consistent gene mutation was detected. CONCLUSIONS The current data suggest that intratumoral heterogeneity is caused in part by differentiation of pluripotent progenitor cells. Integrated or multimodal therapy may be effective at addressing intratumoral heterogeneity and treating distinct subtypes as well as a potentially lethal phenotype of NSGCT. Cancer 2016;122:1836–43. © 2016 The Authors. Cancer published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Cancer Society. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution‐NonCommercial License

  3. NK Cells Preferentially Target Tumor Cells with a Cancer Stem Cell Phenotype.

    PubMed

    Ames, Erik; Canter, Robert J; Grossenbacher, Steven K; Mac, Stephanie; Chen, Mingyi; Smith, Rachel C; Hagino, Takeshi; Perez-Cunningham, Jessica; Sckisel, Gail D; Urayama, Shiro; Monjazeb, Arta M; Fragoso, Ruben C; Sayers, Thomas J; Murphy, William J

    2015-10-15

    Increasing evidence supports the hypothesis that cancer stem cells (CSCs) are resistant to antiproliferative therapies, able to repopulate tumor bulk, and seed metastasis. NK cells are able to target stem cells as shown by their ability to reject allogeneic hematopoietic stem cells but not solid tissue grafts. Using multiple preclinical models, including NK coculture (autologous and allogeneic) with multiple human cancer cell lines and dissociated primary cancer specimens and NK transfer in NSG mice harboring orthotopic pancreatic cancer xenografts, we assessed CSC viability, CSC frequency, expression of death receptor ligands, and tumor burden. We demonstrate that activated NK cells are capable of preferentially killing CSCs identified by multiple CSC markers (CD24(+)/CD44(+), CD133(+), and aldehyde dehydrogenase(bright)) from a wide variety of human cancer cell lines in vitro and dissociated primary cancer specimens ex vivo. We observed comparable effector function of allogeneic and autologous NK cells. We also observed preferential upregulation of NK activation ligands MICA/B, Fas, and DR5 on CSCs. Blocking studies further implicated an NKG2D-dependent mechanism for NK killing of CSCs. Treatment of orthotopic human pancreatic cancer tumor-bearing NSG mice with activated NK cells led to significant reductions in both intratumoral CSCs and tumor burden. Taken together, these data from multiple preclinical models, including a strong reliance on primary human cancer specimens, provide compelling preclinical evidence that activated NK cells preferentially target cancer cells with a CSC phenotype, highlighting the translational potential of NK immunotherapy as part of a combined modality approach for refractory solid malignancies.

  4. Probing the metabolic phenotype of breast cancer cells by multiple tracer stable isotope resolved metabolomics.

    PubMed

    Lane, Andrew N; Tan, Julie; Wang, Yali; Yan, Jun; Higashi, Richard M; Fan, Teresa W-M

    2017-02-02

    Breast cancers vary by their origin and specific set of genetic lesions, which gives rise to distinct phenotypes and differential response to targeted and untargeted chemotherapies. To explore the functional differences of different breast cell types, we performed Stable Isotope Resolved Metabolomics (SIRM) studies of one primary breast (HMEC) and three breast cancer cells (MCF-7, MDAMB-231, and ZR75-1) having distinct genotypes and growth characteristics, using (13)C6-glucose, (13)C-1+2-glucose, (13)C5,(15)N2-Gln, (13)C3-glycerol, and (13)C8-octanoate as tracers. These tracers were designed to probe the central energy producing and anabolic pathways (glycolysis, pentose phosphate pathway, Krebs Cycle, glutaminolysis, nucleotide synthesis and lipid turnover). We found that glycolysis was not associated with the rate of breast cancer cell proliferation, glutaminolysis did not support lipid synthesis in primary breast or breast cancer cells, but was a major contributor to pyrimidine ring synthesis in all cell types; anaplerotic pyruvate carboxylation was activated in breast cancer versus primary cells. We also found that glucose metabolism in individual breast cancer cell lines differed between in vitro cultures and tumor xenografts, but not the metabolic distinctions between cell lines, which may reflect the influence of tumor architecture/microenvironment.

  5. The tandem duplicator phenotype as a distinct genomic configuration in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Menghi, Francesca; Inaki, Koichiro; Woo, XingYi; Kumar, Pooja A.; Grzeda, Krzysztof R.; Malhotra, Ankit; Yadav, Vinod; Kim, Hyunsoo; Marquez, Eladio J.; Ucar, Duygu; Shreckengast, Phung T.; Wagner, Joel P.; MacIntyre, George; Murthy Karuturi, Krishna R.; Scully, Ralph; Keck, James; Chuang, Jeffrey H.; Liu, Edison T.

    2016-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing studies have revealed genome-wide structural variation patterns in cancer, such as chromothripsis and chromoplexy, that do not engage a single discernable driver mutation, and whose clinical relevance is unclear. We devised a robust genomic metric able to identify cancers with a chromotype called tandem duplicator phenotype (TDP) characterized by frequent and distributed tandem duplications (TDs). Enriched only in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) and in ovarian, endometrial, and liver cancers, TDP tumors conjointly exhibit tumor protein p53 (TP53) mutations, disruption of breast cancer 1 (BRCA1), and increased expression of DNA replication genes pointing at rereplication in a defective checkpoint environment as a plausible causal mechanism. The resultant TDs in TDP augment global oncogene expression and disrupt tumor suppressor genes. Importantly, the TDP strongly correlates with cisplatin sensitivity in both TNBC cell lines and primary patient-derived xenografts. We conclude that the TDP is a common cancer chromotype that coordinately alters oncogene/tumor suppressor expression with potential as a marker for chemotherapeutic response. PMID:27071093

  6. Evolution of pre-existing versus acquired resistance to platinum drugs and PARP inhibitors in BRCA-associated cancers.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Kimiyo N; Hirota, Kouji; Takeda, Shunichi; Haeno, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Platinum drugs and PARP inhibitors ("PARPis") are considered to be effective in BRCA-associated cancers with impaired DNA repair. These agents cause stalled and collapsed replication forks and create double-strand breaks effectively in the absence of repair mechanisms, resulting in arrest of the cell cycle and induction of cell death. However, recent studies have shown failure of these chemotherapeutic agents due to emerging drug resistance. In this study, we developed a stochastic model of BRCA-associated cancer progression in which there are four cancer populations: those with (i) functional BRCA, (ii) dysfunctional BRCA, (iii) functional BRCA and a growth advantage, and (iv) dysfunctional BRCA and a growth advantage. These four cancer populations expand from one cancer cell with normal repair function until the total cell number reaches a detectable amount. We derived formulas for the probability and expected numbers of each population at the time of detection. Furthermore, we extended the model to consider the tumor dynamics during treatment. Results from the model were validated and showed good agreement with clinical and experimental evidence in BRCA-associated cancers. Based on the model, we investigated conditions in which drug resistance during the treatment course originated from either a pre-existing drug-resistant population or a de novo population, due to secondary mutations. Finally, we found that platinum drugs and PARPis were effective if (i) BRCA inactivation is present, (ii) the cancer was diagnosed early, and (iii) tumor growth is rapid. Our results indicate that different types of cancers have a preferential way of acquiring resistance to platinum drugs and PARPis according to their growth and mutational characteristics.

  7. Clinical phenotype and prevalence of hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer syndrome in Chinese population

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuan-Zhi; Sheng, Jian-Qiu; Li, Shi-Rong; Zhang, Hong

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To describe systematically the clinical characteristics and phenotype of HNPCC families and the prevalence of HNPCC in the general population of CRC patients in China. METHODS: HNPCC kindreds and CRC patients were from two sources. One was that we consecutively investigated kindreds and patients by ourselves. And the other was the published Chinese and foreign literature related to Chinese HNPCC syndrome. There were 142 HNPCC families fulfilling AC I and/or AC II including 57 families with detailed data, and 3874 general primary CRC patients in all. All statistical tests were two-sided. RESULTS: In AC I families, the number of Lynch syndrome I and II families were 25 (47.2%) and 28 (52.8%) respectively. There were 215 patients (82.4%) with CRC, 67 patients (25.7%) with extracolonic cancer and 50 patients (19.2%) with multiple primary cancers. In all CRC patients, multiple primary CRC were in 41 patients (19.1%), and the first-CRC was right-sided colorectal cancer in 143 patients (66.5%) and rectal cancer in 44 patients (20.5%). 8.8% and 19.2% of the first cancer were CRC and extracolonic cancers. Among those patients whose first cancer was CRC, 66.8% and 19.9% were right-sided colorectal cancer and rectal cancer, respectively. The similar results were found in AC II families. Normal distribution was only found in the distribution of the age of diagnosis of the first cancer in both AC I families (coefficient of skewness: u = 0.81, 0.20<0.400.5>0.20; coefficient of kurtosis: u = 0.84, 0.20<0.40cancer suffered from the first malignant tumor in HNPCC families diagnosed by AC I and AC II, the mean age and median age were 45.1±12.7 years and 44.0 years, 45.2±12.7 years and 44.5 years, respectively. The median

  8. Metastatic Breast Cancer Cells Enter into Dormant State and Express Cancer Stem Cells Phenotype Under Chronic Hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Carcereri de Prati, Alessandra; Butturini, Elena; Rigo, Antonella; Oppici, Elisa; Rossin, Michele; Boriero, Diana; Mariotto, Sofia

    2017-03-06

    Tumor dormancy is a poorly understood stage in cancer progression characterized by mitotic cycle arrest in G0/G1 phase and low metabolism. The cells survive in a quiescent state and wait for appropriate environmental conditions to begin proliferation again giving rise to metastasis. Despite their key role in cancer development and metastasis, the knowledge about their biology and origin is still very limited due to the poorness of established in vitro models that faithfully recapitulated tumor dormancy. Using at least three cycles of 1%O2 hypoxia and reoxygenation, we establish and characterize the hypoxia-resistant human breast cancer cell line chMDA-MB-231 that can stably survive under 1% O2 condition by entering into dormant state characterized by arrest in G0/G1 phase and low metabolism. This dormant state is reversible since once replaced in normoxia the cells recover the proliferation rate in two weeks.. We show that chronic hypoxia induces autophagy that may be the survival mechanism of chMDA-MB-231 cells. Furthermore, the data in this work demonstrate that cycling hypoxic/reoxygenation stress selects MDA-MB-231 population that presents the cancer stem-like phenotype characterized by CD24(-) /CD44(+) /ESA(+) expression and spheroid forming capacity. We believe that our study presents a promising approach to select dormant breast cancer cells with stem-like phenotype using the hypoxia/reoxygenation regimen that may represent an area with profound implications for therapeutic developments in oncology. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  9. Skin-Based DNA Repair Phenotype for Cancer Risk from GCR in Genetically Diverse Populations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guiet, Elodie; Viger, Louise; Snijders, Antoine; Costes, Sylvian V.

    2017-01-01

    Predicting cancer risk associated with cosmic radiation remains a mission-critical challenge for NASA radiation health scientists and mission planners. Epidemiological data are lacking and risk methods do not take individual radiation sensitivity into account. In our approach we hypothesize that genetic factors strongly influence risk of cancer from space radiation and that biomarkers reflecting DNA damage and cell death are ideal tools to predict risk and monitor potential health effects post-flight. At this workshop, we will be reporting the work we have done over the first 9 months of this proposal. Skin cells from 15 different strains of mice already characterized for radiation-induced cancer sensitivity (B6C3F; BALB/cByJ, C57BL/6J, CBA/CaJ, C3H/HeMsNrsf), and 10 strains from the DOE collaborative cross-mouse model were expanded from ear biopsy and cultivated until Passage 3. On average, 3 males and 3 females for each strain were expanded and frozen for further characterization at the NSRL beam line during the NSRL16C run for three LET (350 MeV/n Si, 350 MeV/n Ar and 600 MeV/n Fe) and two ion fluences (1 and 3 particles per cell). The mice work has established new metrics for the usage of Radiation Induced Foci as a marker for various aspect of DNA repair deficiencies. In year 2, we propose to continue characterization of the mouse lines with low LET to identify loci specific to high- versus low- LET and establish genetic linkage for the various DNA repair biomarkers. Correlation with cancer risk from each animals strain and gender will also be investigated. On the human side, we will start characterizing the DNA damage response induced ex-vivo in 200 human's blood donors for radiation sensitivity with a tentative 500 donors by the end of this project. All ex-vivo phenotypic data will be correlated to genetic characterization of each individual human donors using SNP arrays characterization as done for mice. Similarly, ex-vivo phenotypic features from mice will

  10. Target Acquired: Progress and Promise of Targeted Therapeutics in the Treatment of Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Stuchbery, Ryan; Kurganovs, Natalie J; McCoy, Patrick J; Nelson, Colleen C; Hayes, Vanessa M; Corcoran, Niall M; Hovens, Christopher M

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is fundamentally a genomic disease caused by mutations or rearrangements in the DNA or epigenetic machinery of a patient. An emerging field in cancer treatment targets key aberrations arising from the mutational landscape of an individual patient's disease rather than employing a cancer-wide cytotoxic therapy approach. In prostate cancer in particular, where there is an observed variation in response to standard treatments between patients with disease of a similar pathological stage and grade, mutationdirected treatment may grow to be a viable tool for clinicians to tailor more effective treatments. This review will describe a number of mutations across multiple forms of cancer that have been successfully antagonised by targeted therapeutics including their identification, the development of targeted compounds to combat them and the development of resistance to these therapies. This review will continue to examine these same mutations in the treatment and management of prostate cancer; the prevalence of targetable mutations in prostate cancer, recent clinical trials of targeted-agents and the potential or limitations for their use.

  11. Moesin-dependent cytoskeleton remodelling is associated with an anaplastic phenotype of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Abiatari, Ivane; Esposito, Irene; Oliveira, Tiago De; Felix, Klaus; Xin, Hong; Penzel, Roland; Giese, Thomas; Friess, Helmut; Kleeff, Jörg

    2010-05-01

    Cell motility is controlled by the dynamic cytoskeleton and its related proteins, such as members of the ezrin/radixin/moesin (ERM) family, which act as signalling molecules inducing cytoskeleton remodelling. Although ERM proteins have been identified as important factors in various malignancies, functional redundancy between these proteins has hindered the dissection of their individual contribution. The aim of the present study was to analyse the functional role of moesin in pancreatic malignancies. Cancer cells of different malignant lesions of human and transgenic mice pancreata were evaluated by immunohistochemistry. For functional analysis, cell growth, adhesion and invasion assays were carried out after transient and stable knock-down of moesin expression in pancreatic cancer cells. In vivo tumourigenicity was determined using orthotopic and metastatic mouse tumour models. We now show that moesin knock-down increases migration, invasion and metastasis and influences extracellular matrix organization of pancreatic cancer. Moesin-regulated migratory activities of pancreatic cancer cells were in part promoted through cellular translocation of beta-catenin, and re-distribution and organization of the cytoskeleton. Analysis of human and different transgenic mouse pancreatic cancers demonstrated that moesin is a phenotypic marker for anaplastic carcinoma, suggesting that this ERM protein plays a specific role in pancreatic carcinogenesis.

  12. Galectin-7 Expression Potentiates HER-2-Positive Phenotype in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Grosset, Andrée-Anne; Poirier, Françoise; Gaboury, Louis; St-Pierre, Yves

    2016-01-01

    HER-2 positive tumors are among the most aggressive subtypes of breast cancer and are frequently associated with metastasis and poor outcome. As with other aggressive subtypes of breast cancer, these tumors are associated with abnormally high expression of galectin-7 (gal-7), which confers metastatic breast tumor cells with increased invasive behavior. Although previous studies in the rat model of breast tumorigenesis have shown that gal-7 is also increased in primary breast tumor, its contribution to the development of the primary breast tumors remains unclear. In the present work, we have used genetically-engineered gal-7-deficient mice to examine the role of gal-7 in the development of the mammary gland and of breast cancer. Using histological and immunohistological analysis of whole mammary glands at different stages of development, we detected no significant changes between normal and gal-7-deficient mice. To test the involvement of gal-7 in breast cancer, we next examined the effects of loss of gal-7 on mammary tumor development by crossing gal-7-deficient mice with the mammary tumor transgenic mouse strain FVB-Tg(MMTV-Erbb2)NK1Mul/J. Finally, assessment of mice survival and tumor volume showed a delay of mammary tumor growth in the absence of systemic gal-7. These data suggest that gal-7 could potentiate the phenotype of HER-2 positive primary breast cancer. PMID:27902734

  13. miR in melanoma development: miRNAs and acquired hallmarks of cancer in melanoma.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Paige E; Bemis, Lynne; Norris, David A; Shellman, Yiqun G

    2013-11-15

    Melanoma is a very aggressive skin cancer with increasing incidence worldwide. MicroRNAs are small, noncoding RNAs that regulate gene expression of targeted gene(s). The hallmark of cancer model outlined by Hanahan and Weinberg offers a meaningful framework to consider the roles of microRNAs in melanoma development and progression. In this systematic review of the literature, we associate what is known about deregulation of microRNAs and their targeted genes in melanoma development with the hallmarks and characteristics of cancer. The diagnostic and therapeutic potential of microRNAs for future melanoma management will also be discussed.

  14. Biomarker and Phenotypic Risk Factors for Breast Cancer Lymphedema | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): Lymphedema (LE) following treatment for breast cancer is the most common form of secondary LE in the industrialized world. It occurs in 20% to 87% of patients following treatment for breast cancer and results in significant disability. At the |

  15. Myeloid suppressor cells in cancer: recruitment, phenotype, properties, and mechanisms of immune suppression.

    PubMed

    Serafini, Paolo; Borrello, Ivan; Bronte, Vincenzo

    2006-02-01

    Growing tumors acquire the ability to resist immune recognition and immune-mediated injury. Among several mechanisms, mouse and human tumors share the ability to alter the normal hematopoiesis, leading to accumulation of cells of the myelo-monoctytic lineage at the tumor site and in different primary and secondary lymphoid organs. These cells aid tumor development by providing molecules and factors essential for tumor growth and neovascularization but also exert a profound inhibitory activity on both tumor-specific and nonspecific T lymphocytes. The present article summarizes recent findings on the interaction between developing cancers and these recently described "myeloid suppressor cells".

  16. Arctigenin Inhibits Lung Metastasis of Colorectal Cancer by Regulating Cell Viability and Metastatic Phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Han, Yo-Han; Kee, Ji-Ye; Kim, Dae-Seung; Mun, Jeong-Geon; Jeong, Mi-Young; Park, Sang-Hyun; Choi, Byung-Min; Park, Sung-Joo; Kim, Hyun-Jung; Um, Jae-Young; Hong, Seung-Heon

    2016-08-27

    Arctigenin (ARC) has been shown to have an anti-cancer effect in various cell types and tissues. However, there have been no studies concerning metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC). In this study, we investigated the anti-metastatic properties of ARC on colorectal metastasis and present a potential candidate drug. ARC induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in CT26 cells through the intrinsic apoptotic pathway via MAPKs signaling. In several metastatic phenotypes, ARC controlled epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) through increasing the expression of epithelial marker E-cadherin and decreasing the expressions of mesenchymal markers; N-cadherin, vimentin, β-catenin, and Snail. Moreover, ARC inhibited migration and invasion through reducing of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and MMP-9 expressions. In an experimental metastasis model, ARC significantly inhibited lung metastasis of CT26 cells. Taken together, our study demonstrates the inhibitory effects of ARC on colorectal metastasis.

  17. Comparative study of the immunohistochemical phenotype in breast cancer and its lymph node metastatic location.

    PubMed

    De la Haba-Rodríguez, Juan R; Ruiz Borrego, Manuel; Gómez España, Auxiliadora; Villar Pastor, Carlos; Japón, Miguel A; Travado, Paulino; Moreno Nogueira, José Andrés; López Rubio, Fernando; Aranda Aguilar, Enrique

    2004-01-01

    At present, an important part of prognostic information, together with particular treatment strategies in breast cancer, take into account the immunohistochemical phenotype of the primary tumor location. However, the changing heterogeneity intrinsic to neoplastic cells in general leads us to consider the possibility that the expression of these proteins is modified during tumoral development and dissemination. With this hypothesis as a starting point, 60 patients with breast cancer were studied with immunohistochemistry, the expression of estrogen and progestagenic receptors, proliferation through the Ki-67 expression, and the overexpression of HER-2 and p53 in both the primary location and the lymph node metastases. If we consider significant change to be loss (from positive to negative) or gain (negative to positive) of expression in some of the studied determinations, we find that this is produced in 60% of the tumors studied. These results demonstrate the modification of immunohistochemical expression of the proteins studied between the primary tumor location and the lymph node metastases.

  18. Radiomic Phenotyping in Brain Cancer to Unravel Hidden Information in Medical Images.

    PubMed

    Abrol, Srishti; Kotrotsou, Aikaterini; Salem, Ahmed; Zinn, Pascal O; Colen, Rivka R

    2017-02-01

    Radiomics is a new area of research in the field of imaging with tremendous potential to unravel the hidden information in digital images. The scope of radiology has grown exponentially over the last two decades; since the advent of radiomics, many quantitative imaging features can now be extracted from medical images through high-throughput computing, and these can be converted into mineable data that can help in linking imaging phenotypes with clinical data, genomics, proteomics, and other "omics" information. In cancer, radiomic imaging analysis aims at extracting imaging features embedded in the imaging data, which can act as a guide in the disease or cancer diagnosis, staging and planning interventions for treating patients, monitor patients on therapy, predict treatment response, and determine patient outcomes.

  19. MECHANISMS OF ACQUIRED RESISTANCE TO ENDOCRINE THERAPY IN HORMONE-DEPENDENT BREAST CANCER CELLS1

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Wei; Fan, Ping; Wang, Jiping; Li, Yuebai; Santen, Richard J.

    2007-01-01

    Acquired resistance is a major problem limiting the clinical benefit of endocrine therapy. To investigate the mechanisms involved, two in vitro models were developed from MCF-7 cells. Long-term culture of MCF-7 cells in estrogen deprived medium (LTED) mimics aromatase inhibition in patients. Continued exposure of MCF-7 to tamoxifen represents a model of acquired resistance to antiestrogens (TAM-R). Long-term estrogen deprivation results in sustained activation of the ERK MAP kinase and the PI3 kinase/mTOR pathways. Using a novel Ras inhibitor, farnesylthiosalicylic acid (FTS), to achieve dual inhibition of the pathways, we found that the mTOR pathway plays the primary role in mediation of proliferation of LTED cells. In contrast to the LTED model, there is no sustained activation of ERK MAPK but enhanced responsiveness to rapid stimulation induced by E2 and TAM in TAM-R cells. An increased amount of ERα formed complexes with EGFR and c-Src in TAM-R cells, which apparently resulted from extra-nuclear redistribution of ERα. Blockade of c-Src activity drove ERα back to the nucleus and reduced ERα-EGFR interaction. Prolonged blockade of c-Src activity restored sensitivity of TAM-R cells to tamoxifen. Our results suggest that different mechanisms are involved in acquired endocrine resistance and the necessity for individualized treatment of recurrent diseases. PMID:17616457

  20. Afatinib increases sensitivity to radiation in non-small cell lung cancer cells with acquired EGFR T790M mutation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shirong; Zheng, Xiaoliang; Huang, Haixiu; Wu, Kan; Wang, Bing; Chen, Xufeng; Ma, Shenglin

    2015-03-20

    Afatinib is a second-generation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitor and has shown a significant clinical benefit in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with EGFR-activating mutations. However, the potential therapeutic effects of afatinib combining with other modalities, including ionizing radiation (IR), are not well understood. In this study, we developed a gefitinib-resistant cell subline (PC-9-GR) with a secondary EGFR mutation (T790M) from NSCLC PC-9 cells after chronic exposures to increasing doses of gefitinib. The presence of afatinib significantly increases the cell killing effect of radiation in PC-9-GR cells harboring acquired T790M, but not in H1975 cells with de novo T790M or in H460 cells that express wild-type EGFR. In PC-9-GR cells, afatinib remarkable blocks baseline of EGFR and ERK phosphorylations, and causes delay of IR-induced AKT phosphorylation. Afatinib treatment also leads to increased apoptosis and suppressed DNA damage repair in irradiated PC-9-GR cells, and enhanced tumor growth inhibition when combined with IR in PC-9-GR xenografts. Our findings suggest a potential therapeutic impact of afatinib as a radiation sensitizer in lung cancer cells harboring acquired T790M mutation, providing a rationale for a clinical trial with combination of afatinib and radiation in NSCLCs with EGFR T790M mutation.

  1. Phenotypic Switch Induced by Simulated Microgravity on MDA-MB-231 Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Masiello, Maria Grazia; Cucina, Alessandra; Proietti, Sara; Palombo, Alessandro; Coluccia, Pierpaolo; D'Anselmi, Fabrizio; Dinicola, Simona; Pasqualato, Alessia; Morini, Veronica; Bizzarri, Mariano

    2014-01-01

    Microgravity exerts dramatic effects on cell morphology and functions, by disrupting cytoskeleton and adhesion structures, as well as by interfering with biochemical pathways and gene expression. Impairment of cells behavior has both practical and theoretical significance, given that investigations of mechanisms involved in microgravity-mediated effects may shed light on how biophysical constraints cooperate in shaping complex living systems. By exposing breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells to simulated microgravity (~0.001 g), we observed the emergence of two morphological phenotypes, characterized by distinct membrane fractal values, surface area, and roundness. Moreover, the two phenotypes display different aggregation profiles and adherent behavior on the substrate. These morphological differences are mirrored by the concomitant dramatic functional changes in cell processes (proliferation and apoptosis) and signaling pathways (ERK, AKT, and Survivin). Furthermore, cytoskeleton undergoes a dramatic reorganization, eventually leading to a very different configuration between the two populations. These findings could be considered adaptive and reversible features, given that, by culturing microgravity-exposed cells into a normal gravity field, cells are enabled to recover their original phenotype. Overall these data outline the fundamental role gravity plays in shaping form and function in living systems. PMID:25215287

  2. Phenotypic screening reveals TNFR2 as a promising target for cancer immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Geoffrey S.; Mistry, Bina; Guillard, Sandrine; Ulrichsen, Jane Coates; Sandercock, Alan M.; Wang, Jun; González-Muñoz, Andrea; Parmentier, Julie; Black, Chelsea; Soden, Jo; Freeth, Jim; Jovanović, Jelena; Leyland, Rebecca; Al-Lamki, Rafia S.; Leishman, Andrew J.; Rust, Steven J.; Stewart, Ross; Jermutus, Lutz; Bradley, John R.; Bedian, Vahe; Valge-Archer, Viia; Minter, Ralph; Wilkinson, Robert W.

    2016-01-01

    Antibodies that target cell-surface molecules on T cells can enhance anti-tumor immune responses, resulting in sustained immune-mediated control of cancer. We set out to find new cancer immunotherapy targets by phenotypic screening on human regulatory T (Treg) cells and report the discovery of novel activators of tumor necrosis factor receptor 2 (TNFR2) and a potential role for this target in immunotherapy. A diverse phage display library was screened to find antibody mimetics with preferential binding to Treg cells, the most Treg-selective of which were all, without exception, found to bind specifically to TNFR2. A subset of these TNFR2 binders were found to agonise the receptor, inducing iκ-B degradation and NF-κB pathway signalling in vitro. TNFR2 was found to be expressed by tumor-infiltrating Treg cells, and to a lesser extent Teff cells, from three lung cancer patients, and a similar pattern was also observed in mice implanted with CT26 syngeneic tumors. In such animals, TNFR2-specific agonists inhibited tumor growth, enhanced tumor infiltration by CD8+ T cells and increased CD8+ T cell IFN-γ synthesis. Together, these data indicate a novel mechanism for TNF-α-independent TNFR2 agonism in cancer immunotherapy, and demonstrate the utility of target-agnostic screening in highlighting important targets during drug discovery. PMID:27626702

  3. Involvement of potassium channels in the progression of cancer to a more malignant phenotype.

    PubMed

    Comes, Nuria; Serrano-Albarrás, Antonio; Capera, Jesusa; Serrano-Novillo, Clara; Condom, Enric; Ramón Y Cajal, Santiago; Ferreres, Joan Carles; Felipe, Antonio

    2015-10-01

    Potassium channels are a diverse group of pore-forming transmembrane proteins that selectively facilitate potassium flow through an electrochemical gradient. They participate in the control of the membrane potential and cell excitability in addition to different cell functions such as cell volume regulation, proliferation, cell migration, angiogenesis as well as apoptosis. Because these physiological processes are essential for the correct cell function, K+ channels have been associated with a growing number of diseases including cancer. In fact, different K+ channel families such as the voltage-gated K+ channels, the ether à-go-go K+ channels, the two pore domain K+ channels and the Ca2+-activated K+ channels have been associated to tumor biology. Potassium channels have a role in neoplastic cell-cycle progression and their expression has been found abnormal in many types of tumors and cancer cells. In addition, the expression and activity of specific K+ channels have shown a significant correlation with the tumor malignancy grade. The aim of this overview is to summarize published data on K+ channels that exhibit oncogenic properties and have been linked to a more malignant cancer phenotype. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane channels and transporters in cancers.

  4. Induction of an altered lipid phenotype by two cancer promoting treatments in rat liver.

    PubMed

    Riedel, S; Abel, S; Swanevelder, S; Gelderblom, W C A

    2015-04-01

    Changes in lipid metabolism have been associated with tumor promotion in rat liver. Similarities and differences of lipid parameters were investigated using the mycotoxin fumonisin B1 (FB1) and the 2-acetylaminofluorene/partial hepatectomy (AAF/PH) treatments as cancer promoters in rat liver. A typical lipid phenotype was observed, including increased membranal phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) and cholesterol content, increased levels of C16:0 and monounsaturated fatty acids in PE and phosphatidylcholine (PC), as well as a decrease in C18:0 and long-chained polyunsaturated fatty acids in the PC fraction. The observed lipid changes, which likely resulted in changes in membrane structure and fluidity, may represent a growth stimulus exerted by the cancer promoters that could provide initiated cells with a selective growth advantage. This study provided insight into complex lipid profiles induced by two different cancer promoting treatments and their potential role in the development of hepatocyte nodules, which can be used to identify targets for the development of chemopreventive strategies against cancer promotion in the liver.

  5. Genetic predisposition directs breast cancer phenotype by dictating progenitor cell fate

    PubMed Central

    Proia, Theresa A.; Keller, Patricia J.; Gupta, Piyush B.; Klebba, Ina; Jones, Ainsley D.; Sedic, Maja; Gilmore, Hannah; Tung, Nadine; Naber, Stephen P.; Schnitt, Stuart; Lander, Eric S.; Kuperwasser, Charlotte

    2011-01-01

    Women with inherited mutations in the BRCA1 gene have increased risk of developing breast cancer, but also exhibit a predisposition for the development of aggressive basal-like breast tumors. We report here that breast epithelial cells derived from patients harboring deleterious mutations in BRCA1 (BRCA1mut/+) give rise to tumors with increased basal differentiation relative to cells from BRCA1+/+ patients. Molecular analysis of disease-free breast tissues from BRCA1mut/+ patients revealed defects in progenitor cell lineage commitment even before cancer incidence. Moreover, we discovered that the transcriptional repressor Slug is an important functional regulator of human breast progenitor cell lineage commitment and differentiation and that it is aberrantly expressed in BRCA1mut/+ tissues. Slug expression is necessary for increased basal-like phenotypes prior to and following neoplastic transformation. These findings demonstrate that the genetic background of patient populations, in addition to affecting incidence rates, significantly impacts progenitor cell fate commitment and, therefore, tumor phenotype. PMID:21295272

  6. Targeted Nanodiamonds as Phenotype Specific Photoacoustic Contrast Agents for Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ti; Cui, Huizhong; Fang, Chia-Yi; Cheng, Kun; Yang, Xinmai; Chang, Huan-Cheng; Forrest, M. Laird

    2015-01-01

    Aim The aim is to develop irradiated nanodiamonds (INDs) as a molecularly-targeted contrast agent for high resolution and phenotype-specific detection of breast cancer with photoacoustic (PA) imaging. Materials & Methods The surface of acid treated radiation-damaged nanodiamonds was grafted with polyethylene glycol (PEG) to improve its stability and circulation time in blood, followed by conjugation to an anti-Human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2) peptide (KCCYSL) with a final nanoparticle size of ca. 92 nm. Immunocompetent mice bearing orthotopic HER2 positive or negative tumors were administered INDs and PA imaged using an 820-nm near infrared laser. Results PA images demonstrated that INDs accumulate in tumors and completely delineated the entire tumor within 10 hours. HER2 targeting significantly enhanced imaging of HER2-positive tumors. Pathological examination demonstrated INDs are non-toxic. Conclusions PA technology is adaptable to low-cost bedside medicine, and with new contrast agents described herein, PA can achieve high resolution (sub-mm) and phenotype specific monitoring of cancer growth. PMID:25723091

  7. Genomic agonism and phenotypic antagonism between estrogen and progesterone receptors in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Singhal, Hari; Greene, Marianne E.; Tarulli, Gerard; Zarnke, Allison L.; Bourgo, Ryan J.; Laine, Muriel; Chang, Ya-Fang; Ma, Shihong; Dembo, Anna G.; Raj, Ganesh V.; Hickey, Theresa E.; Tilley, Wayne D.; Greene, Geoffrey L.

    2016-01-01

    The functional role of progesterone receptor (PR) and its impact on estrogen signaling in breast cancer remain controversial. In primary ER+ (estrogen receptor–positive)/PR+ human tumors, we report that PR reprograms estrogen signaling as a genomic agonist and a phenotypic antagonist. In isolation, estrogen and progestin act as genomic agonists by regulating the expression of common target genes in similar directions, but at different levels. Similarly, in isolation, progestin is also a weak phenotypic agonist of estrogen action. However, in the presence of both hormones, progestin behaves as a phenotypic estrogen antagonist. PR remodels nucleosomes to noncompetitively redirect ER genomic binding to distal enhancers enriched for BRCA1 binding motifs and sites that link PR and ER/PR complexes. When both hormones are present, progestin modulates estrogen action, such that responsive transcriptomes, cellular processes, and ER/PR recruitment to genomic sites correlate with those observed with PR alone, but not ER alone. Despite this overall correlation, the transcriptome patterns modulated by dual treatment are sufficiently different from individual treatments, such that antagonism of oncogenic processes is both predicted and observed. Combination therapies using the selective PR modulator/antagonist (SPRM) CDB4124 in combination with tamoxifen elicited 70% cytotoxic tumor regression of T47D tumor xenografts, whereas individual therapies inhibited tumor growth without net regression. Our findings demonstrate that PR redirects ER chromatin binding to antagonize estrogen signaling and that SPRMs can potentiate responses to antiestrogens, suggesting that cotargeting of ER and PR in ER+/PR+ breast cancers should be explored. PMID:27386569

  8. Mutant p53 regulates ovarian cancer transformed phenotypes through autocrine matrix deposition

    PubMed Central

    Iwanicki, Marcin P.; Chen, Hsing-Yu; Iavarone, Claudia; Zervantonakis, Ioannis K.; Muranen, Taru; Novak, Marián; Ince, Tan A.; Brugge, Joan S.

    2016-01-01

    High-grade serous ovarian carcinoma (HGS-OvCa) harbors p53 mutations and can originate from the epithelial cell compartment of the fallopian tube fimbriae. From this site, neoplastic cells detach, survive in the peritoneal cavity, and form cellular clusters that intercalate into the mesothelium to form ovarian and peritoneal masses. To examine the contribution of mutant p53 to phenotypic alterations associated with HGS-OvCA, we developed live-cell microscopy assays that recapitulate these early events in cultured fallopian tube nonciliated epithelial (FNE) cells. Expression of stabilizing mutant variants of p53, but not depletion of endogenous wild-type p53, in FNE cells promoted survival and cell-cell aggregation under conditions of cell detachment, leading to the formation of cell clusters with mesothelium-intercalation capacity. Mutant p53R175H-induced phenotypes were dependent on fibronectin production, α5β1 fibronectin receptor engagement, and TWIST1 expression. These results indicate that FNE cells expressing stabilizing p53 mutants acquire anchorage independence and subsequent mesothelial intercalation capacity through a mechanism involving mesenchymal transition and matrix production. These findings provide important new insights into activities of mutant p53 in the cells of origin of HGS-OvCa. PMID:27482544

  9. Inherent phenotypic plasticity facilitates progression of head and neck cancer: Endotheliod characteristics enable angiogenesis and invasion

    SciTech Connect

    Tong, Meng; Han, Byungdo B.; Holpuch, Andrew S.; Pei, Ping; He, Lingli; Mallery, Susan R.

    2013-04-15

    The presence of the EMT (epithelial-mesenchymal transition), EndMT (endothelial-mesenchymal transition) and VM (vasculogenic mimicry) demonstrates the multidirectional extent of phenotypic plasticity in cancers. Previous findings demonstrating the crosstalk between head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) imply that HNSCC cells share some functional commonalities with endothelial cells. Our current results reveal that cultured HNSCC cells not only possess endothelial-specific markers, but also display endotheliod functional features including low density lipoprotein uptake, formation of tube-like structures on Matrigel and growth state responsiveness to VEGF and endostatin. HNSCC cell subpopulations are also highly responsive to transforming growth factor-β1 and express its auxiliary receptor, endoglin. Furthermore, the endotheliod characteristics observed in vitro recapitulate phenotypic features observed in human HNSCC tumors. Conversely, cultured normal human oral keratinocytes and intact or ulcerated human oral epithelia do not express comparable endotheliod characteristics, which imply that assumption of endotheliod features is restricted to transformed keratinocytes. In addition, this phenotypic state reciprocity facilitates HNSCC progression by increasing production of factors that are concurrently pro-proliferative and pro-angiogenic, conserving cell energy stores by LDL internalization and enhancing cell mobility. Finally, recognition of this endotheliod phenotypic transition provides a solid rationale to evaluate the antitumorigenic potential of therapeutic agents formerly regarded as exclusively angiostatic in scope. - Highlights: ► HNSCC tumor cells express endothelial specific markers VE-cadherin, CD31 and vimentin. ► Similarly, cultured HNSCC cells retain expression of these markers. ► HNSCC cells demonstrate functional endotheliod characteristics i.e. AcLDL uptake. ► HNSCC cell

  10. Deficient BIM Expression as a Mechanism of Intrinsic and Acquired Resistance to Targeted Therapies in EGFR-Mutant and ALK-Positive Lung Cancers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-01

    EGFR- Mutant and ALK-Positive Lung Cancers PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Lecia Sequist MD. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Massachusetts General Hospital Boston...and Acquired Resistance to Targeted Therapies in EGFR- Mutant and ALK-Positive Lung Cancers 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-13-1-0227 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT...to a specific kinase, inhibition of that kinase often leads to cell growth arrest and apoptosis. For example, EGFR mutant and EML4-ALK lung cancers

  11. Deficient BIM Expression as a Mechanism of Intrinsic and Acquired Resistance to Targeted Therapies in EGFR-Mutant and ALK-Positive Lung Cancers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-01

    EGFR- Mutant and ALK-Positive Lung Cancers PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Jeffrey Engelman MD PhD. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Massachusetts General Hospital...Intrinsic and Acquired Resistance to Targeted Therapies in EGFR- Mutant and ALK-Positive Lung Cancers 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-13-1-0226 5c. PROGRAM...to a specific kinase, inhibition of that kinase often leads to cell growth arrest and apoptosis. For example, EGFR mutant and EML4-ALK lung cancers

  12. Increased sensitivity to platinum drugs of cancer cells with acquired resistance to trabectedin

    PubMed Central

    Colmegna, B; Uboldi, S; Frapolli, R; Licandro, S A; Panini, N; Galmarini, C M; Badri, Nadia; Spanswick, V J; Bingham, J P; Kiakos, Konstantinos; Erba, E; Hartley, J A; D'Incalci, M

    2015-01-01

    Background: In order to investigate the mechanisms of acquired resistance to trabectedin, trabectedin-resistant human myxoid liposarcoma (402-91/T) and ovarian carcinoma (A2780/T) cell lines were derived and characterised in vitro and in vivo. Methods: Resistant cell lines were obtained by repeated exposures to trabectedin. Characterisation was performed by evaluating drug sensitivity, cell cycle perturbations, DNA damage and DNA repair protein expression. In vivo experiments were performed on A2780 and A2780/T xenografts. Results: 402-91/T and A2780/T cells were six-fold resistant to trabectedin compared with parental cells. Resistant cells were found to be hypersensitive to UV light and did not express specific proteins involved in the nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway: XPF and ERCC1 in 402-91/T and XPG in A2780/T. NER deficiency in trabectedin-resistant cells was associated with the absence of a G2/M arrest induced by trabectedin and with enhanced sensitivity (two-fold) to platinum drugs. In A2780/T, this collateral sensitivity, confirmed in vivo, was associated with an increased formation of DNA interstrand crosslinks. Conclusions: Our finding that resistance to trabectedin is associated with the loss of NER function, with a consequent increased sensitivity to platinum drugs, provides the rational for sequential use of these drugs in patients who have acquired resistance to trabectedin. PMID:26633559

  13. Human antimicrobial protein hCAP18/LL-37 promotes a metastatic phenotype in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Günther; Chamorro, Clara Ibel; Granath, Fredrik; Liljegren, Annelie; Zreika, Sami; Saidak, Zuzana; Sandstedt, Bengt; Rotstein, Samuel; Mentaverri, Romuald; Sánchez, Fabio; Pivarcsi, Andor; Ståhle, Mona

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Human cathelicidin antimicrobial protein, hCAP18, and its C-terminal peptide LL-37 is a multifunctional protein. In addition to being important in antimicrobial defense, it induces chemotaxis, stimulates angiogenesis and promotes tissue repair. We previously showed that human breast cancer cells express high amounts of hCAP18, and hypothesised that hCAP18/LL-37 may be involved in tumour progression. Methods hCAP18 mRNA was quantified in 109 primary breast cancers and compared with clinical findings and ERBB2 mRNA expression. Effects of exogenous LL-37 and transgenic overexpression of hCAP18 on ErbB2 signalling were investigated by immunoblotting using extracts from breast cancer cell lines ZR75-1 and derivatives of MCF7. We further analysed the impact of hCAP18/LL-37 on the morphology of breast cancer cells grown in soft agar, on cell migration and on tumour development in severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice. Results The expression of hCAP18 correlated closely with that of ERBB2 and with the presence of lymph node metastases in oestrogen receptor-positive tumours. hCAP18/LL-37 amplified Heregulin-induced mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signalling through ErbB2, identifying a functional association between hCAP18/LL-37 and ErbB2 in breast cancer. Treatment with LL-37 peptide significantly stimulated the migration of breast cancer cells and their colonies acquired a dispersed morphology indicative of increased metastatic potential. A truncated version of LL-37 competitively inhibited LL-37 induced MAPK phosphorylation and significantly reduced the number of altered cancer cell colonies induced by LL-37 as well as suppressed their migration. Transgenic overexpression of hCAP18 in a low malignant breast cancer cell line promoted the development of metastases in SCID mice, and analysis of hCAP18 transgenic tumours showed enhanced activation of MAPK signalling. Conclusions Our results provide evidence that hCAP18/LL-37 contributes to breast

  14. Circulating tumor cells with a putative stem cell phenotype in peripheral blood of patients with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Theodoropoulos, Panayiotis A; Polioudaki, Hara; Agelaki, Sofia; Kallergi, Galatea; Saridaki, Zacharenia; Mavroudis, Dimitris; Georgoulias, Vassilis

    2010-02-01

    The CD44(+)/CD24(-/low) and ALDH1(+) cell phenotypes are associated with stemness and enhanced tumorigenic potential in breast cancer. We assessed the expression of CD44, CD24 and ALDH1 on tumor cells circulating in the peripheral blood (CTCs) of patients with metastatic breast cancer using triple-marker immunofluorescence microscopy. Among a total of 1439 CTCs identified in 20 (66.7%) out of 30 patients, 35.2% had the stem-like/tumorigenic phenotype CD44(+)/CD24(-/low), whereas 17.7% of the CTCs analyzed in seven patients, were ALDH1(high)/CD24(-/low). In conclusion, we report the existence of a subpopulation of CTCs with putative stem cell progenitor phenotypes in patients with metastatic breast cancer.

  15. Analysis of the interaction of extracellular matrix and phenotype of bladder cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Dozmorov, Mikhail G; Kyker, Kimberly D; Saban, Ricardo; Knowlton, Nicholas; Dozmorov, Igor; Centola, Michael B; Hurst, Robert E

    2006-01-01

    Background The extracellular matrix has a major effect upon the malignant properties of bladder cancer cells both in vitro in 3-dimensional culture and in vivo. Comparing gene expression of several bladder cancer cells lines grown under permissive and suppressive conditions in 3-dimensional growth on cancer-derived and normal-derived basement membrane gels respectively and on plastic in conventional tissue culture provides a model system for investigating the interaction of malignancy and extracellular matrix. Understanding how the extracellular matrix affects the phenotype of bladder cancer cells may provide important clues to identify new markers or targets for therapy. Methods Five bladder cancer cell lines and one immortalized, but non-tumorigenic, urothelial line were grown on Matrigel, a cancer-derived ECM, on SISgel, a normal-derived ECM, and on plastic, where the only ECM is derived from the cells themselves. The transcriptomes were analyzed on an array of 1186 well-annotated cancer derived cDNAs containing most of the major pathways for malignancy. Hypervariable genes expressing more variability across cell lines than a set expressing technical variability were analyzed further. Expression values were clustered, and to identify genes most likely to represent biological factors, statistically over-represented ontologies and transcriptional regulatory elements were identified. Results Approximately 400 of the 1186 total genes were expressed 2 SD above background. Approximately 100 genes were hypervariable in cells grown on each ECM, but the pattern was different in each case. A core of 20 were identified as hypervariable under all 3 growth conditions, and 33 were hypervariable on both SISgel and Matrigel, but not on plastic. Clustering of the hypervariable genes showed very different patterns for the same 6 cell types on the different ECM. Even when loss of cell cycle regulation was identified, different genes were involved, depending on the ECM. Under the

  16. Reprogramming Malignant Cancer Cells toward a Benign Phenotype following Exposure to Human Embryonic Stem Cell Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Arena, Vincenzo; Arena, Manuel; Arena, Goffredo Orazio

    2017-01-01

    The embryonic microenvironment is well known to be non-permissive for tumor development because early developmental signals naturally suppress the expression of proto-oncogenes. In an analogous manner, mimicking an early embryonic environment during embryonic stem cell culture has been shown to suppress oncogenic phenotypes of cancer cells. Exosomes derived from human embryonic stem cells harbor substances that mirror the content of the cells of origin and have been reported to reprogram hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells via horizontal transfer of mRNA and proteins. However, the possibility that these embryonic stem cells-derived exosomes might be the main effectors of the anti-tumor effect mediated by the embryonic stem cells has not been explored yet. The present study aims to investigate whether exosomes derived from human embryonic stem cells can reprogram malignant cancer cells to a benign stage and reduce their tumorigenicity. We show that the embryonic stem cell-conditioned medium contains factors that inhibit cancer cell growth and tumorigenicity in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, we demonstrate that exosomes derived from human embryonic stem cells display anti-proliferation and pro-apoptotic effects, and decrease tumor size in a xenograft model. These exosomes are also able to transfer their cargo into target cancer cells, inducing a dose-dependent increase in SOX2, OCT4 and Nanog proteins, leading to a dose-dependent decrease of cancer cell growth and tumorigenicity. This study shows for the first time that human embryonic stem cell-derived exosomes play an important role in the tumor suppressive activity displayed by human embryonic stem cells. PMID:28068409

  17. Spatially resolved metabolic phenotyping of breast cancer by desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Guenther, Sabine; Muirhead, Laura J; Speller, Abigail V M; Golf, Ottmar; Strittmatter, Nicole; Ramakrishnan, Rathi; Goldin, Robert D; Jones, Emrys; Veselkov, Kirill; Nicholson, Jeremy; Darzi, Ara; Takats, Zoltan

    2015-05-01

    Breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease characterized by varying responses to therapeutic agents and significant differences in long-term survival. Thus, there remains an unmet need for early diagnostic and prognostic tools and improved histologic characterization for more accurate disease stratification and personalized therapeutic intervention. This study evaluated a comprehensive metabolic phenotyping method in breast cancer tissue that uses desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry imaging (DESI MSI), both as a novel diagnostic tool and as a method to further characterize metabolic changes in breast cancer tissue and the tumor microenvironment. In this prospective single-center study, 126 intraoperative tissue biopsies from tumor and tumor bed from 50 patients undergoing surgical resections were subject to DESI MSI. Global DESI MSI models were able to distinguish adipose, stromal, and glandular tissue based on their metabolomic fingerprint. Tumor tissue and tumor-associated stroma showed evident changes in their fatty acid and phospholipid composition compared with normal glandular and stromal tissue. Diagnosis of breast cancer was achieved with an accuracy of 98.2% based on DESI MSI data (PPV 0.96, NVP 1, specificity 0.96, sensitivity 1). In the tumor group, correlation between metabolomic profile and tumor grade/hormone receptor status was found. Overall classification accuracy was 87.7% (PPV 0.92, NPV 0.9, specificity 0.9, sensitivity 0.92). These results demonstrate that DESI MSI may be a valuable tool in the improved diagnosis of breast cancer in the future. The identified tumor-associated metabolic changes support theories of de novo lipogenesis in tumor tissue and the role of stroma tissue in tumor growth and development and overall disease prognosis.

  18. Assessment of elasticity of colorectal cancer tissue, clinical utility, pathological and phenotypical relevance

    PubMed Central

    Kawano, Shingo; Kojima, Motohiro; Higuchi, Yoichi; Sugimoto, Motokazu; Ikeda, Koji; Sakuyama, Naoki; Takahashi, Shinichiro; Hayashi, Ryuichi; Ochiai, Atsushi; Saito, Norio

    2015-01-01

    Generally, cancer tissue is palpated as a hard mass. However, the elastic nature of cancer tissue is not well understood. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the clinical utility of measuring the elastic modulus (EM) in colorectal cancer tissue. Using a tactile sensor, we measured the EM of 106 surgically resected colorectal cancer tissues. Data on the EM were compared with clinicopathological findings, including stromal features represented by Azan staining and the α-SMA positive area ratio of the tumor area. Finally, a cDNA microarray profile of the tumors with high EM were compared with the findings of tumors with low EM. A higher EM in tumors was associated with pathological T, N, and M-stage tumors (P < 0.001, P = 0.001 and P = 0.011, respectively). Patients with high EM tumors had shorter disease-free survival than had patients with low EM. The EM showed strongly positive correlation with the Azan staining positive area ratio (r = 0.908) and the α-SMA positive area ratio (r = 0.921). Finally, the cDNA microarray data of the tumors with high EM revealed a distinct gene expression profile compared with data from those tumors with low EM. The assessment of the elasticity of colorectal cancer tissue may allow a more accurate clinical stage and prognosis estimation. The distinct phenotypical features of the high EM tumors and their strong association with stromal features suggest the existence of a biological mechanism involved in this phenomenon that may contribute to future therapy. PMID:26083008

  19. Reprogramming Malignant Cancer Cells toward a Benign Phenotype following Exposure to Human Embryonic Stem Cell Microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shufeng; Abdouh, Mohamed; Arena, Vincenzo; Arena, Manuel; Arena, Goffredo Orazio

    2017-01-01

    The embryonic microenvironment is well known to be non-permissive for tumor development because early developmental signals naturally suppress the expression of proto-oncogenes. In an analogous manner, mimicking an early embryonic environment during embryonic stem cell culture has been shown to suppress oncogenic phenotypes of cancer cells. Exosomes derived from human embryonic stem cells harbor substances that mirror the content of the cells of origin and have been reported to reprogram hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells via horizontal transfer of mRNA and proteins. However, the possibility that these embryonic stem cells-derived exosomes might be the main effectors of the anti-tumor effect mediated by the embryonic stem cells has not been explored yet. The present study aims to investigate whether exosomes derived from human embryonic stem cells can reprogram malignant cancer cells to a benign stage and reduce their tumorigenicity. We show that the embryonic stem cell-conditioned medium contains factors that inhibit cancer cell growth and tumorigenicity in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, we demonstrate that exosomes derived from human embryonic stem cells display anti-proliferation and pro-apoptotic effects, and decrease tumor size in a xenograft model. These exosomes are also able to transfer their cargo into target cancer cells, inducing a dose-dependent increase in SOX2, OCT4 and Nanog proteins, leading to a dose-dependent decrease of cancer cell growth and tumorigenicity. This study shows for the first time that human embryonic stem cell-derived exosomes play an important role in the tumor suppressive activity displayed by human embryonic stem cells.

  20. Isolation and phenotypic characterization of cancer stem-like side population cells in colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Feng, Long; Wu, Jian-Bing; Yi, Feng-Ming

    2015-09-01

    Previous studies in cancer biology suggest that chemotherapeutic drug resistance and tumor relapse are driven by cells within a tumor termed 'cancer stem cells'. In the present study, a Hoechst 33342 dye exclusion technique was used to identify cancer stem‑like side population (SP) cells in colon carcinoma, which accounted for 3.4% of the total cell population. Following treatment with verapamil, the population of SP cells was reduced to 0.6%. In addition, the sorted SP cells exhibited marked multidrug resistance and enhanced cell survival rates compared with non‑SP cells. The SP cells were able to generate more tumor spheres and were CD133 positive. Subsequent biochemical analysis revealed that the levels of the adenosine triphosphate‑binding cassette sub‑family G member 2 transporter protein, B‑cell lymphoma anti‑apoptotic factor and autocrine production of interleukin‑4 were significantly enhanced in the colon cancer SP cells, which contributed to drug resistance, protection of the cells from apoptosis and tumor recurrence. Therefore, the findings suggested that treatment failure and colon tumorigenesis is dictated by a small population of SP cells, which indicate a potential target in future therapies.

  1. Towards a transcriptome-based theranostic platform for unfavorable breast cancer phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Dobroff, Andrey S.; D’Angelo, Sara; Eckhardt, Bedrich L.; Ferrara, Fortunato; Staquicini, Daniela I.; Cardó-Vila, Marina; Staquicini, Fernanda I.; Nunes, Diana N.; Kim, Kisu; Driessen, Wouter H. P.; Hajitou, Amin; Lomo, Lesley C.; Barry, Marc; Krishnamurthy, Savitri; Sahin, Aysegul; Woodward, Wendy A.; Prossnitz, Eric R.; Dias-Neto, Emmanuel; Brown-Glaberman, Ursa A.; Royce, Melanie E.; Ueno, Naoto T.; Cristofanilli, Massimo; Hortobagyi, Gabriel N.; Marchiò, Serena; Gelovani, Juri G.; Sidman, Richard L.; Arap, Wadih; Pasqualini, Renata

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory breast carcinoma (IBC) is one of the most lethal forms of human breast cancer, and effective treatment for IBC is an unmet clinical need in contemporary oncology. Tumor-targeted theranostic approaches are emerging in precision medicine, but only a few specific biomarkers are available. Here we report up-regulation of the 78-kDa glucose-regulated protein (GRP78) in two independent discovery and validation sets of specimens derived from IBC patients, suggesting translational promise for clinical applications. We show that a GRP78-binding motif displayed on either bacteriophage or adeno-associated virus/phage (AAVP) particles or loop-grafted onto a human antibody fragment specifically targets orthotopic IBC and other aggressive breast cancer models in vivo. To evaluate the theranostic value, we used GRP78-targeting AAVP particles to deliver the human Herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase type-1 (HSVtk) transgene, obtaining simultaneous in vivo diagnosis through PET imaging and tumor treatment by selective activation of the prodrug ganciclovir at tumor sites. Translation of this AAVP system is expected simultaneously to image, monitor, and treat the IBC phenotype and possibly other aggressive (e.g., invasive and/or metastatic) subtypes of breast cancer, based on the inducible cell-surface expression of the stress-response chaperone GRP78, and possibily other cell-surface receptors in human tumors. PMID:27791177

  2. Decreased HoxD10 expression promotes a proliferative and aggressive phenotype in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Mo, R-J; Lu, J-M; Wan, Y-P; Hua, W; Liang, Y-X; Zhuo, Y-J; Kuang, Q-W; Liu, Y-L; He, H-C; Zhong, W-D

    2017-02-19

    HoxD10 gene plays a critical role in cell proliferation in the process of tumor development. However, the protein expression level and the function of HoxD10 in prostate cancer remain unknown. Using tissue microarray, we demonstrate that the protein expression of HoxD10 is commonly decreased in prostate cancer tissues (n = 92) compared to adjacent benign prostate tissues (n = 77). Functionally, knockdown of HoxD10 resulted in significant promotion of prostate cancer cell proliferation. Moreover, knockdown of HoxD10 strikingly stimulated prostate tumor growth in a mouse xenograft model. We also found a significant association between decreased immunohistochemical staining of HoxD10 expression and higher Gleason score (P = 0.031) and advanced clinical pathological stage (P = 0.011). An analysis of the Taylor database revealed that decreased HoxD10 expression predicted worse biochemical recurrence (BCR)-free survival of PCa patients (P = 0.005) and the multivariate analyses further supported that HoxD10 might be an independent predictor for BCR-free survival (P = 0.027). Collectively, our data suggest that the loss of HoxD10 function is common and may thus result in a progressive phenotype in PCa. HoxD10 may function as a biomarker that differentiates patients with BCR disease from the ones that are not after radical prostatectomy, implicating its potential as a therapeutic target.

  3. Inhibition of ABCB1 Overcomes Cancer Stem Cell-like Properties and Acquired Resistance to MET Inhibitors in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Sugano, Teppei; Seike, Masahiro; Noro, Rintaro; Soeno, Chie; Chiba, Mika; Zou, Fenfei; Nakamichi, Shinji; Nishijima, Nobuhiko; Matsumoto, Masaru; Miyanaga, Akihiko; Kubota, Kaoru; Gemma, Akihiko

    2015-11-01

    Patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) EGFR mutations have shown a dramatic response to EGFR inhibitors (EGFR-TKI). EGFR T790M mutation and MET amplification have been recognized as major mechanisms of acquired resistance to EGFR-TKI. Therefore, MET inhibitors have recently been used in NSCLC patients in clinical trials. In this study, we tried to identify the mechanism of acquired resistance to MET inhibitors. We analyzed the antitumor effects of two MET inhibitors, PHA-665752 and crizotinib, in 10 NSCLC cell lines. EBC-1 cells with MET amplification were the only cells that were sensitive to both MET inhibitors. We established PHA-665752-resistant EBC-1 cells, namely EBC-1R cells. Activation of KRAS, EGFR, and FGFR2 signaling was observed in EBC-1R cells by FISH and receptor tyrosine kinase phosphorylation antibody arrays. EBC-1R cells also showed overexpression of ATP-binding cassette subfamily B member 1 (ABCB1) as well as phosphorylation of MET. EBC-1R cells grew as cell spheres that exhibited cancer stem cell-like (CSC) properties and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). The level of miR-138 that targeted ABCB1 was decreased in EBC-1R cells. ABCB1 siRNA and the ABCB1 inhibitor elacridar could reduce sphere numbers and suppress EMT. Elacridar could also reverse resistance to PHA-665752 in EBC-1R cells. Our study demonstrated that ABCB1 overexpression, which was associated with CSC properties and EMT, was involved in the acquired resistance to MET inhibitors. Inhibition of ABCB1 might be a novel therapeutic strategy for NSCLC patients with acquired resistance to MET inhibitors.

  4. Inhibition of focal adhesion kinase suppresses the adverse phenotype of endocrine-resistant breast cancer cells and improves endocrine response in endocrine-sensitive cells.

    PubMed

    Hiscox, Stephen; Barnfather, Peter; Hayes, Edd; Bramble, Pamela; Christensen, James; Nicholson, Robert I; Barrett-Lee, Peter

    2011-02-01

    Acquired resistance to endocrine therapy in breast cancer is a major clinical problem. Previous reports have demonstrated that cell models of acquired endocrine resistance have altered cell-matrix adhesion and a highly migratory phenotype, features which may impact on tumour spread in vivo. Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is an intracellular kinase that regulates signalling pathways central to cell adhesion, migration and survival and its expression is frequently deregulated in breast cancer. In this study, we have used the novel FAK inhibitor PF573228 to address the role of FAK in the development of endocrine resistance. Whilst total-FAK expression was similar between endocrine-sensitive and endocrine-resistant MCF7 cells, FAK phosphorylation status (Y397 or Y861) was altered in resistance. PF573228 promoted a dose-dependent inhibition of FAK phosphorylation at Y397 but did not affect other FAK activation sites (pY407, pY576 and pY861). Endocrine-resistant cells were more sensitive to these inhibitory effects versus MCF7 (mean IC(50) for FAK pY397 inhibition: 0.43 μM, 0.05 μM and 0.13 μM for MCF7, TamR and FasR cells, respectively). Inhibition of FAK pY397 was associated with a reduction in TamR and FasR adhesion to, and migration over, matrix components. PF573228 as a single agent (0-1 μM) did not affect the growth of MCF7 cells or their endocrine-resistant counterparts. However, treatment of endocrine-sensitive cells with PF573228 and tamoxifen combined resulted in greater suppression of proliferation versus single agent treatment. Together these data suggest the importance of FAK in the process of endocrine resistance, particularly in the development of an aggressive, migratory cell phenotype and demonstrate the potential to improve endocrine response through combination treatment.

  5. Ligand-associated ERBB2/3 activation confers acquired resistance to FGFR inhibition in FGFR3-dependent cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, J; Mikse, O; Liao, R G; Li, Y; Tan, L; Janne, P A; Gray, N S; Wong, K-k; Hammerman, P S

    2015-04-23

    Somatic alterations of fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFRs) have been described in a wide range of malignancies. A number of anti-FGFR therapies are currently under investigation in clinical trials for subjects with FGFR gene amplifications, mutations and translocations. Here, we develop cell line models of acquired resistance to FGFR inhibition by exposure of cell lines harboring FGFR3 gene amplification and translocation to the selective FGFR inhibitor BGJ398 and multitargeted FGFR inhibitor ponatinib. We show that the acquisition of resistance is rapid, reversible and characterized by an epithelial to mesenchymal transition and a switch from dependency on FGFR3 to ERBB family members. Acquired resistance was associated with demonstrable changes in gene expression including increased production of ERBB2/3 ligands, which were sufficient to drive resistance in the setting of FGFR3 dependency but not dependency on other FGFR family members. These data support the concept that activation of ERBB family members is sufficient to bypass dependency on FGFR3 and suggest that concurrent inhibition of these two pathways may be desirable when targeting FGFR3-dependent cancers.

  6. An innovative method to acquire the location of point A for cervical cancer treatment by HDR brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Chang, Liyun; Ho, Sheng-Yow; Yeh, Shyh-An; Lee, Tsair-Fwu; Chen, Pang-Yu

    2016-11-08

    Brachytherapy of local cervical cancer is generally accomplished through film-based treatment planning with the prescription directed to point A, which is invisible on images and is located at a high-dose gradient area. Through a standard reconstruction method by digitizing film points, the location error for point A would be 3mm with a condition of 30° curvature tandem, which is 10° away from the gantry rotation axis of a simulator, and has an 8.7 cm interval between the flange and the isocenter. To reduce the location error of the reconstructed point A, this paper proposes a method and demonstrates its accuracy. The Cartesian coordinates of point A were derived by acquiring the locations of the cervical os (tandem flange) and a dummy seed located in the tandem above the flange. To verify this analytical method, ball marks in a commercial "Isocentric Beam Checker" were selected to simulate the two points A, the os, and the dummies. The Checker was placed on the simulator couch with its center ball coincident with the simulator isocenter and its rotation axis perpendicular to the gantry rotation axis. With different combinations of the Checker and couch rotation angles, the orthogonal films were shot and all coor-dinates of the selected points were reconstructed through the treatment planning system and compared with that calculated through the analytical method. The position uncertainty and the deviation prediction of point A were also evaluated. With a good choice of the reference dummy point, the position deviations of point A obtained through this analytical method were found to be generally within 1 mm, with the standard uncertainty less than 0.5 mm. In summary, this new method is a practical and accurate tool for clinical usage to acquire the accurate location of point A for the treatment of cervical cancer patient.

  7. An innovative method to acquire the location of point A for cervical cancer treatment by HDR brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Chang, Liyun; Ho, Sheng-Yow; Yeh, Shyh-An; Lee, Tsair-Fwu; Chen, Pang-Yu

    2016-11-01

    Brachytherapy of local cervical cancer is generally accomplished through film-based treatment planning with the prescription directed to point A, which is invisible on images and is located at a high-dose gradient area. Through a standard reconstruction method by digitizing film points, the location error for point A would be 3 mm with a condition of 30° curvature tandem, which is 10° away from the gantry rotation axis of a simulator, and has an 8.7 cm interval between the flange and the isocenter. To reduce the location error of the reconstructed point A, this paper proposes a method and demonstrates its accuracy. The Cartesian coordinates of point A were derived by acquiring the locations of the cervical os (tandem flange) and a dummy seed located in the tandem above the flange. To verify this analytical method, ball marks in a commercial "Isocentric Beam Checker" were selected to simulate the two points A, the os, and the dummies. The Checker was placed on the simulator couch with its center ball coincident with the simulator isocenter and its rotation axis perpendicular to the gantry rotation axis. With different combinations of the Checker and couch rotation angles, the orthogonal films were shot and all coordinates of the selected points were reconstructed through the treatment planning system and compared with that calculated through the analytical method. The position uncertainty and the deviation prediction of point A were also evaluated. With a good choice of the reference dummy point, the position deviations of point A obtained through this analytical method were found to be generally within 1 mm, with the standard uncertainty less than 0.5 mm. In summary, this new method is a practical and accurate tool for clinical usage to acquire the accurate location of point A for the treatment of cervical cancer patient. PACS number(s): 87.55.km.

  8. Phenotypic analysis of T cells infiltrating colon cancers: Correlations with oncogenetic status

    PubMed Central

    Chirica, Mircea; Le Bourhis, Lionel; Lehmann-Che, Jacqueline; Chardiny, Victor; Bouhidel, Fatiha; Foulboeuf, Laure; Gornet, Jean Marc; Lourenco, Nelson; Dulphy, Nicolas; Toubert, Antoine; Allez, Matthieu

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancers (CRC) develop in the face of an important immune system associated with the intestinal mucosal tissue. The immune response against the tumor has been proposed to affect the prognosis of patients undergoing treatment for CRC. In this study T cells infiltrating the tumor were compared with T cells populating the unaffected neighboring mucosal tissue and cells from the peripheral blood. We observed that T cells from the tumor harbor an activated phenotype, with engagement of the NKG2D pathway in CD8 T cells. We show that mucosal and tumor-infiltrating T cells are enriched in NKG2D CD4 T cells, which exhibit cytotoxic functions. Finally, T cell populations in the tumor were modified according to its oncogenetic status, with higher percentages of CD8 T cells isolated from patients with microsatellite instable tumor status. PMID:26405567

  9. Mast cell phenotype, TNFα expression and degranulation status in non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shikotra, A.; Ohri, C. M.; Green, R. H.; Waller, D. A.; Bradding, P.

    2016-01-01

    Mast cell infiltration of tumour islets represents a survival advantage in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The phenotype and activation status of these mast cells is unknown. We investigated the mast cell phenotype in terms of protease content (tryptase-only [MCT], tryptase + chymase [MCTC]) and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα) expression, and extent of degranulation, in NSCLC tumour stroma and islets. Surgically resected tumours from 24 patients with extended survival (ES; mean survival 86.5 months) were compared with 25 patients with poor survival (PS; mean survival 8.0 months) by immunohistochemistry. Both MCT and MCTC in tumour islets were higher in ES (20.0 and 5.6 cells/mm2 respectively) compared to PS patients (0.0 cells/mm2) (p < 0.0001). Both phenotypes expressed TNFα in the islets and stroma. In ES 44% of MCT and 37% of MCTC expressed TNFα in the tumour islets. MCT in the ES stroma were more degranulated than in those with PS (median degranulation index = 2.24 versus 1.73 respectively) (p = 0.0022), and ES islet mast cells (2.24 compared to 1.71, p < 0.0001). Since both MCT and MCTC infiltrating tumour islets in ES NSCLC patients express TNFα, the cytotoxic activity of this cytokine may confer improved survival in these patients. Manipulating mast cell microlocalisation and functional responses in NSCLC may offer a novel approach to the treatment of this disease. PMID:27922077

  10. Phenotypic differentiation does not affect tumorigenicity of primary human colon cancer initiating cells.

    PubMed

    Dubash, Taronish D; Hoffmann, Christopher M; Oppel, Felix; Giessler, Klara M; Weber, Sarah; Dieter, Sebastian M; Hüllein, Jennifer; Zenz, Thorsten; Herbst, Friederike; Scholl, Claudia; Weichert, Wilko; Werft, Wiebke; Benner, Axel; Schmidt, Manfred; Schneider, Martin; Glimm, Hanno; Ball, Claudia R

    2016-02-28

    Within primary colorectal cancer (CRC) a subfraction of all tumor-initiating cells (TIC) drives long-term progression in serial xenotransplantation. It has been postulated that efficient maintenance of TIC activity in vitro requires serum-free spheroid culture conditions that support a stem-like state of CRC cells. To address whether tumorigenicity is indeed tightly linked to such a stem-like state in spheroids, we transferred TIC-enriched spheroid cultures to serum-containing adherent conditions that should favor their differentiation. Under these conditions, primary CRC cells did no longer grow as spheroids but formed an adherent cell layer, up-regulated colon epithelial differentiation markers, and down-regulated TIC-associated markers. Strikingly, upon xenotransplantation cells cultured under either condition equally efficient formed serially transplantable tumors. Clonal analyses of individual lentivirally marked TIC clones cultured under either culture condition revealed no systematic differences in contributing clone numbers, indicating that phenotypic differentiation does not select for few individual clones adapted to unfavorable culture conditions. Our results reveal that CRC TIC can be propagated under conditions previously thought to induce their elimination. This phenotypic plasticity allows addressing primary human CRC TIC properties in experimental settings based on adherent cell growth.

  11. CXCL12-CXCR7 axis contributes to the invasive phenotype of pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jian-Yu; Zhang, Zhi-Gang; Liang, Zhi-Yong; Zhou, Wei-Xun; You, Lei; Zhang, Tai-Ping; Zhao, Yu-Pei

    2016-01-01

    Chemokine (C-X-C motif) receptor 7 (CXCR7) and its ligand, chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 12 (CXCL12), were established to be involved in biological behaviors and associated with prognosis in many cancers. However, effects, underlying mechanisms of CXCL12-CXCR7 axis in invasive phenotype of pancreatic cancer (PC) and its clinicopathologic significances have not been comprehensively explored. In the present study, it was first found by tissue microarray-based immunohistochemistry that CXCL12 and CXCR7 staining scores were significantly associated with vessel invasion and overall survival in two independent cohorts of PC. Besides, co-expression of these proteins was an independent prognosticator in multivariate analysis in both cohorts. Then, migration and invasion, but not proliferation, were decreased in CXCR7-stably silenced PC cells, whereas opposite changes were observed in CXCR7-stably overexpressed cells, accompanied by alterations of mTOR and Rho/ROCK pathways. CXCL12 stimulated migration, invasion, CXCR7 expression and phosphorylation of key mTOR proteins. AMD3100 did not influence effects of CXCL12. Two mTOR inhibitors, rapamycin and Torin1, reversed enhanced invasive phenotypes and mTOR phosphorylation in CXCR7-overexpressed cells. Moreover, CXCR7 directly interacts with mTOR. Finally, liver metastasis, but not growth, was affected by CXCR7 status in orthotopically-implanted PC models in nude mice. Collectively, CXCL12-CXCR7 axis accelerates migration and invasion of PC cells through mTOR and Rho/ROCK pathways, and predicts poor prognosis of PC. PMID:27542220

  12. Cancer intelligence acquired (CIA): tumor glycosylation and sialylation codes dismantling antitumor defense.

    PubMed

    Boligan, Kayluz Frias; Mesa, Circe; Fernandez, Luis Enrique; von Gunten, Stephan

    2015-04-01

    Aberrant glycosylation is a key feature of malignant transformation and reflects epigenetic and genetic anomalies among the multitude of molecules involved in glycan biosynthesis. Although glycan biosynthesis is not template bound, altered tumor glycosylation is not random, but associated with common glycosylation patterns. Evidence suggests that acquisition of distinct glycosylation patterns evolves from a 'microevolutionary' process conferring advantages in terms of tumor growth, tumor dissemination, and immune escape. Such glycosylation modifications also involve xeno- and hypersialylation. Xeno-autoantigens such as Neu5Gc-gangliosides provide potential targets for immunotherapy. Hypersialylation may display 'enhanced self' to escape immunosurveillance and involves several not mutually exclusive inhibitory pathways that all rely on protein-glycan interactions. A better understanding of tumor 'glycan codes' as deciphered by lectins, such as siglecs, selectins, C-type lectins and galectins, may lead to novel treatment strategies, not only in cancer, but also in autoimmune disease or transplantation.

  13. Acquired METD1228V Mutation and Resistance to MET Inhibition in Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Bahcall, Magda; Sim, Taebo; Paweletz, Cloud P; Patel, Jyoti D; Alden, Ryan S; Kuang, Yanan; Sacher, Adrian G; Kim, Nam Doo; Lydon, Christine A; Awad, Mark M; Jaklitsch, Michael T; Sholl, Lynette M; Jänne, Pasi A; Oxnard, Geoffrey R

    2016-12-01

    Amplified and/or mutated MET can act as both a primary oncogenic driver and as a promoter of tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) resistance in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, the landscape of MET-specific targeting agents remains underdeveloped, and understanding of mechanisms of resistance to MET TKIs is limited. Here, we present a case of a patient with lung adenocarcinoma harboring both a mutation in EGFR and an amplification of MET, who after progression on erlotinib responded dramatically to combined MET and EGFR inhibition with savolitinib and osimertinib. When resistance developed to this combination, a new MET kinase domain mutation, D1228V, was detected. Our in vitro findings demonstrate that MET(D1228V) induces resistance to type I MET TKIs through impaired drug binding, while sensitivity to type II MET TKIs is maintained. Based on these findings, the patient was treated with erlotinib combined with cabozantinib, a type II MET inhibitor, and exhibited a response.

  14. Phenotypic changes of acid adapted cancer cells push them toward aggressiveness in their evolution in the tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Damaghi, Mehdi; Gillies, Robert

    2016-09-16

    The inter- and intra-tumoral metabolic phenotypes of tumors are heterogeneous, and this is related to microenvironments that select for increased glycolysis. Increased glycolysis leads to decreased pH, and these local microenvironment effects lead to further selection. Hence, heterogeneity of phenotypes is an indirect consequence of altering microenvironments during carcinogenesis. In early stages of growth, tumors are stratified, with the most aggressive cells developing within the acidic interior of the tumor. However, these cells eventually find themselves at the tumor edge, where they invade into the normal tissue via acid-mediated invasion. We believe acid adaptation during the evolution of cancer cells in their niche is a Rubicon that, once crossed, allows cells to invade into and outcompete normal stromal tissue. In this study, we illustrate some acid-induced phenotypic changes due to acidosis resulting in more aggressiveness and invasiveness of cancer cells.

  15. Prevalence of the Rhesus-negative phenotype in Caucasian patients with small-cell lung cancer (SCLC).

    PubMed

    Cerny, T; Fey, M F; Oppliger, R; Castiglione, M; Nachbur, B; Gertsch, M; Gasser, A; Joss, R A; Thatcher, N; Lind, M

    1992-09-30

    We report that the Rhesus (Rh)-negative phenotype is more prevalent in patients with small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) than in the normal Caucasian population (SCLC: 25% Rh-negative vs. 15% expected, p less than 0.0001). This finding has been validated for a Central and a Northern European population (Switzerland and UK). In contrast, the Rh-negative phenotype is no more frequent in non-small-cell lung cancer patients or in heavy smokers with coronary heart disease than in the general population. There was a normal distribution of the ABO blood group phenotype in all patients studied. Whilst the significance of this observation is unclear, we hypothesize that a genetic predisposition to the development of SCLC may be linked to a hitherto unidentified gene on chromosome 1p near the Rh locus. Our observation may perhaps allow further progress to be made in understanding genetic mechanisms of SCLC carcinogenesis.

  16. Androgen receptor expression in breast cancer in relation to molecular phenotype: results from the Nurses' Health Study.

    PubMed

    Collins, Laura C; Cole, Kimberly S; Marotti, Jonathan D; Hu, Rong; Schnitt, Stuart J; Tamimi, Rulla M

    2011-07-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that androgen receptor is expressed in many breast cancers, but its expression in relation to the various breast cancer subtypes as defined by molecular profiling has not been studied in detail. We constructed tissue microarrays from 3093 breast cancers that developed in women enrolled in the Nurses' Health Study. Tissue microarray sections were immunostained for estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), cytokeratin 5/6, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and androgen receptor (ER). Immunostain results were used to categorize each cancer as luminal A or B, HER2 and basal like. The relationships between androgen receptor expression and molecular subtype were analyzed. Overall, 77% of the invasive breast carcinomas were androgen receptor positive. Among 2171 invasive cancers, 64% were luminal A, 15% luminal B, 6% HER2 and 11% basal like. The frequency of androgen receptor expression varied significantly across the molecular phenotypes (P<0.0001). In particular, androgen receptor expression was commonly observed in luminal A (91%) and B (68%) cancers, but was less frequently seen in HER2 cancers (59%). Despite being defined by the absence of ER and PR expression and being considered hormonally unresponsive, 32% of basal-like cancers expressed androgen receptor. Among 246 cases of ductal carcinoma in situ, 86% were androgen receptor positive, but the frequency of androgen receptor expression differed significantly across the molecular phenotypes (P=0.001), and high nuclear grade lesions were less likely to be androgen receptor positive compared with lower-grade lesions. Androgen receptor expression is most commonly seen in luminal A and B invasive breast cancers. However, expression of androgen receptor is also seen in approximately one-third of basal-like cancers, providing further evidence that basal-like cancers represent a heterogeneous group. Our findings raise the

  17. Uncovering cancer cell behavioral phenotype in 3-D in vitro metastatic landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Liyu; Sun, Bo; Duclos, Guillaume; Kam, Yoonseok; Gatenby, Robert; Stone, Howard; Austin, Robert

    2012-02-01

    One well-known fact is that cancer cell genetics determines cell metastatic potentials. However, from a physics point of view, genetics as cell properties cannot directly act on metastasis. An agent is needed to unscramble the genetics first before generating dynamics for metastasis. Exactly this agent is cell behavioral phenotype, which is rarely studied due to the difficulties of real-time cell tracking in in vivo tissue. Here we have successfully constructed a micro in vitro environment with collagen based Extracellular Matrix (ECM) structures for cell 3-D metastasis. With stable nutrition (glucose) gradient inside, breast cancer cell MDA-MB-231 is able to invade inside the collagen from the nutrition poor site towards the nutrition rich site. Continuous confocal microscopy captures images of the cells every 12 hours and tracks their positions in 3-D space. The micro fluorescent beads pre-mixed inside the ECM demonstrate that invasive cells have altered the structures through mechanics. With the observation and the analysis of cell collective behaviors, we argue that game theory may exist between the pioneering cells and their followers in the metastatic cell group. The cell collaboration may explain the high efficiency of metastasis.

  18. Osteopontin is involved in the development of acquired chemo-resistance of cisplatin in small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Gu, Tao; Ohashi, Rina; Cui, Ri; Tajima, Ken; Yoshioka, Masakata; Iwakami, Shinichiro; Sasaki, Shinichi; Shinohara, Atsuko; Matsukawa, Takehisa; Kobayashi, Jun; Inaba, Yutaka; Takahashi, Kazuhisa

    2009-11-01

    Osteopontin (OPN) is a multi-functional cytokine involved in cell survival, migration and adhesion which is associated with tumorigenesis, progression and metastasis. However, the role of OPN in chemo-sensitivity of human lung cancer has not yet been elucidated. The purpose of this study is to investigate the role of OPN in chemo-sensitivity of lung cancer cells. We developed a stable OPN transfectant (SBC-3/OPN) and a control transfectant (SBC-3/NEO) from human small cell lung cancer cell line, SBC-3. SBC-3/OPN cells were more resistant to cisplatin than SBC-3/NEO cells. Multi-drug resistance-associated protein (MRP) does not appear to be involved in the development of acquired chemo-resistance, since MRP inhibitor did not alter chemo-sensitivity. After exposure to cisplatin, the apoptotic SBC-3/OPN cells were reduced in number compared to SBC-3/NEO cells. Treatment with cisplatin revealed that the expression of anti-apoptotic protein, bcl-2, was down-regulated in SBC-3/NEO cells, while that of SBC-3/OPN cells was not altered. In contrast, pro-apoptotic protein, bax, was not altered in both SBC-3/OPN and SBC-3/NEO cells, thus bcl-2/bax ratio was decreased in SBC-3/NEO but not altered in SBC-3/OPN cells. Activation of caspase-3 and caspase-9 was increased in SBC-3/NEO cells, but not in SBC-3/OPN cells. Our results suggest that OPN enhances chemo-resistance of cisplatin in SBC-3 cells by suppressing bcl-2 protein down-regulation, thereby blocking the caspase-9- and caspase-3-dependent cell apoptosis.

  19. Acquired Mitochondrial Abnormalities, Including Epigenetic Inhibition of Superoxide Dismutase 2, in Pulmonary Hypertension and Cancer: Therapeutic Implications.

    PubMed

    Archer, Stephen L

    2016-01-01

    PASMC and therapy with the SOD mimetic, MnTBAP, regresses experimental PAH. In conclusion, cancer and PAH share acquired mitochondrial abnormalities that increase proliferation and inhibit apoptosis, suggesting new therapeutic targets.

  20. Suppression of cancer stem-like phenotypes in NCI-H460 lung cancer cells by vanillin through an Akt-dependent pathway.

    PubMed

    Srinual, Songpol; Chanvorachote, Pithi; Pongrakhananon, Varisa

    2017-02-17

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) have been reported as a major cause of cancer metastasis and the failure of cancer treatment. Cumulative studies have indicated that protein kinase B (Akt) and its downstream signaling pathway, including CSC markers, play a critical role in the aggressive behavior of this cancer. In this study, we investigated whether vanillin, a major component in Vanilla planifolia seed, could suppress cancer stemness phenotypes and related proteins in the human non-small cell lung cancer NCI‑H460 cell line. A non-toxic concentration of vanillin suppressed spheroid and colony formation, two hallmarks of the cancer stemness phenotype, in vitro in NCI‑H460 cells. Western blot analysis revealed that the CSC markers CD133 and ALDH1A1 and the associated transcription factors, Oct4 and Nanog, were extensively downregulated by vanillin. Vanillin also attenuated the expression and activity of Akt, a transcription regulator upstream of CSCs, an action that was confirmed by treatment with the Akt inhibitor perifosine. Furthermore, the ubiquitination of Akt was elevated in response to vanillin treatment prior to proteasomal degradation. This finding indicates that vanillin can inhibit cancer stem cell-like behavior in NCI‑H460 cells through the induction of Akt-proteasomal degradation and reduction of downstream CSC transcription factors. This inhibitory effect of vanillin may be an alternative approach in the treatment against lung cancer metastasis and its resistance to chemotherapy.

  1. Trastuzumab (herceptin) targets gastric cancer stem cells characterized by CD90 phenotype.

    PubMed

    Jiang, J; Zhang, Y; Chuai, S; Wang, Z; Zheng, D; Xu, F; Zhang, Y; Li, C; Liang, Y; Chen, Z

    2012-02-09

    Identification and characterization of cancer stem cells (CSCs) in gastric cancer are difficult owing to the lack of specific markers and consensus methods. In this study, we show that cells with the CD90 surface marker in gastric tumors could be enriched under non-adherent, serum-free and sphere-forming conditions. These CD90(+) cells possess a higher ability to initiate tumor in vivo and could re-establish the cellular hierarchy of tumors from single-cell implantation, demonstrating their self-renewal properties. Interestingly, higher proportion of CD90(+) cells correlates with higher in vivo tumorigenicity of gastric primary tumor models. In addition, it was found that ERBB2 was overexpressed in about 25% of the gastric primary tumor models, which correlates with the higher level of CD90 expression in these tumors. Trastuzumab (humanized anti-ERBB2 antibody) treatment of high-tumorigenic gastric primary tumor models could reduce the CD90(+) population in tumor mass and suppress tumor growth when combined with traditional chemotherapy. Moreover, tumorigenicity of tumor cells could also be suppressed when trastuzumab treatment starts at the same time as cell implantation. Therefore, we have identified a CSC population in gastric primary tumors characterized by their CD90 phenotype. The finding that trastuzumab targets the CSC population in gastric tumors suggests that ERBB2 signaling has a role in maintaining CSC populations, thus contributing to carcinogenesis and tumor invasion. In conclusion, the results from this study provide new insights into the gastric tumorigenic process and offer potential implications for the development of anticancer drugs as well as therapeutic treatment of gastric cancers.

  2. Unique DNA methylome profiles in CpG island methylator phenotype colon cancers

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yaomin; Hu, Bo; Choi, Ae-Jin; Gopalan, Banu; Lee, Byron H.; Kalady, Matthew F.; Church, James M.; Ting, Angela H.

    2012-01-01

    A subset of colorectal cancers was postulated to have the CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP), a higher propensity for CpG island DNA methylation. The validity of CIMP, its molecular basis, and its prognostic value remain highly controversial. Using MBD-isolated genome sequencing, we mapped and compared genome-wide DNA methylation profiles of normal, non-CIMP, and CIMP colon specimens. Multidimensional scaling analysis revealed that each specimen could be clearly classified as normal, non-CIMP, and CIMP, thus signifying that these three groups have distinctly different global methylation patterns. We discovered 3780 sites in various genomic contexts that were hypermethylated in both non-CIMP and CIMP colon cancers when compared with normal colon. An additional 2026 sites were found to be hypermethylated in CIMP tumors only; and importantly, 80% of these sites were located in CpG islands. These data demonstrate on a genome-wide level that the additional hypermethylation seen in CIMP tumors occurs almost exclusively at CpG islands and support definitively that these tumors were appropriately named. When these sites were examined more closely, we found that 25% were adjacent to sites that were also hypermethylated in non-CIMP tumors. Thus, CIMP is also characterized by more extensive methylation of sites that are already prone to be hypermethylated in colon cancer. These observations indicate that CIMP tumors have specific defects in controlling both DNA methylation seeding and spreading and serve as an important first step in delineating molecular mechanisms that control these processes. PMID:21990380

  3. Mammographic Density Phenotypes and Risk of Breast Cancer: A Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Graff, Rebecca E.; Ursin, Giske; dos Santos Silva, Isabel; McCormack, Valerie; Baglietto, Laura; Vachon, Celine; Bakker, Marije F.; Giles, Graham G.; Chia, Kee Seng; Czene, Kamila; Eriksson, Louise; Hall, Per; Hartman, Mikael; Warren, Ruth M. L.; Hislop, Greg; Chiarelli, Anna M.; Hopper, John L.; Krishnan, Kavitha; Li, Jingmei; Li, Qing; Pagano, Ian; Rosner, Bernard A.; Wong, Chia Siong; Scott, Christopher; Stone, Jennifer; Maskarinec, Gertraud; Boyd, Norman F.; van Gils, Carla H.

    2014-01-01

    Background Fibroglandular breast tissue appears dense on mammogram, whereas fat appears nondense. It is unclear whether absolute or percentage dense area more strongly predicts breast cancer risk and whether absolute nondense area is independently associated with risk. Methods We conducted a meta-analysis of 13 case–control studies providing results from logistic regressions for associations between one standard deviation (SD) increments in mammographic density phenotypes and breast cancer risk. We used random-effects models to calculate pooled odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). All tests were two-sided with P less than .05 considered to be statistically significant. Results Among premenopausal women (n = 1776 case patients; n = 2834 control subjects), summary odds ratios were 1.37 (95% CI = 1.29 to 1.47) for absolute dense area, 0.78 (95% CI = 0.71 to 0.86) for absolute nondense area, and 1.52 (95% CI = 1.39 to 1.66) for percentage dense area when pooling estimates adjusted for age, body mass index, and parity. Corresponding odds ratios among postmenopausal women (n = 6643 case patients; n = 11187 control subjects) were 1.38 (95% CI = 1.31 to 1.44), 0.79 (95% CI = 0.73 to 0.85), and 1.53 (95% CI = 1.44 to 1.64). After additional adjustment for absolute dense area, associations between absolute nondense area and breast cancer became attenuated or null in several studies and summary odds ratios became 0.82 (95% CI = 0.71 to 0.94; P heterogeneity = .02) for premenopausal and 0.85 (95% CI = 0.75 to 0.96; P heterogeneity < .01) for postmenopausal women. Conclusions The results suggest that percentage dense area is a stronger breast cancer risk factor than absolute dense area. Absolute nondense area was inversely associated with breast cancer risk, but it is unclear whether the association is independent of absolute dense area. PMID:24816206

  4. ‘Normalizing' the malignant phenotype of luminal breast cancer cells via alpha(v)beta(3)-integrin

    PubMed Central

    Abu-Tayeh, Hanan; Weidenfeld, Keren; Zhilin-Roth, Alisa; Schif-Zuck, Sagi; Thaler, Sonja; Cotarelo, Cristina; Tan, Tuan Z; Thiery, Jean P; Green, Jeffrey E; Klorin, Geula; Sabo, Edmond; Sleeman, Jonathan P; Tzukerman, Maty; Barkan, Dalit

    2016-01-01

    Reestablishing tissue organization of breast cancer cells into acini was previously shown to override their malignant phenotype. In our study, we demonstrate that alpha(v)beta(3) integrin (Int-αvβ3), previously shown to play a role in cancer progression, promoted differentiation and growth arrest of organoids derived from luminal A breast cancer cells grown in their relevant three-dimensional microenvironment. These organoids differentiated into normal-like acini resembling a benign stage of breast tissue. Likewise, we demonstrate that Int-αvβ3 is selectively expressed in the epithelium of the benign stage of breast tissues, and is lost during the early stages of luminal A breast cancer progression. Notably, the organoids' reversion into normal-like acini was mediated by cancer luminal progenitor-like cells expressing both EpCAMhighCD49flowCD24+ and Int-αvβ3. Furthermore, downregulation of Notch4 expression and downstream signaling was shown to mediate Int-αvβ3-induced reversion. Intriguingly, when luminal A breast cancer cells expressing Int-αvβ3 were injected into a humanized mouse model, differentiated tumors developed when compared with that generated by control cells. Hence, our data suggest that promoting differentiation of luminal A breast cancer cells by signaling emanating from Int-αvβ3 can potentially promote ‘normalization' of their malignant phenotype and may prevent the malignant cells from progressing. PMID:27906177

  5. RWCFusion: identifying phenotype-specific cancer driver gene fusions based on fusion pair random walk scoring method

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jianmei; Li, Xuecang; Yao, Qianlan; Li, Meng; Zhang, Jian; Ai, Bo; Liu, Wei; Wang, Qiuyu; Feng, Chenchen; Liu, Yuejuan; Bai, Xuefeng; Song, Chao; Li, Shang; Li, Enmin; Xu, Liyan; Li, Chunquan

    2016-01-01

    While gene fusions have been increasingly detected by next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies based methods in human cancers, these methods have limitations in identifying driver fusions. In addition, the existing methods to identify driver gene fusions ignored the specificity among different cancers or only considered their local rather than global topology features in networks. Here, we proposed a novel network-based method, called RWCFusion, to identify phenotype-specific cancer driver gene fusions. To evaluate its performance, we used leave-one-out cross-validation in 35 cancers and achieved a high AUC value 0.925 for overall cancers and an average 0.929 for signal cancer. Furthermore, we classified 35 cancers into two classes: haematological and solid, of which the haematological got a highly AUC which is up to 0.968. Finally, we applied RWCFusion to breast cancer and found that top 13 gene fusions, such as BCAS3-BCAS4, NOTCH-NUP214, MED13-BCAS3 and CARM-SMARCA4, have been previously proved to be drivers for breast cancer. Additionally, 8 among the top 10 of the remaining candidate gene fusions, such as SULF2-ZNF217, MED1-ACSF2, and ACACA-STAC2, were inferred to be potential driver gene fusions of breast cancer by us. PMID:27506935

  6. RWCFusion: identifying phenotype-specific cancer driver gene fusions based on fusion pair random walk scoring method.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jianmei; Li, Xuecang; Yao, Qianlan; Li, Meng; Zhang, Jian; Ai, Bo; Liu, Wei; Wang, Qiuyu; Feng, Chenchen; Liu, Yuejuan; Bai, Xuefeng; Song, Chao; Li, Shang; Li, Enmin; Xu, Liyan; Li, Chunquan

    2016-09-20

    While gene fusions have been increasingly detected by next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies based methods in human cancers, these methods have limitations in identifying driver fusions. In addition, the existing methods to identify driver gene fusions ignored the specificity among different cancers or only considered their local rather than global topology features in networks. Here, we proposed a novel network-based method, called RWCFusion, to identify phenotype-specific cancer driver gene fusions. To evaluate its performance, we used leave-one-out cross-validation in 35 cancers and achieved a high AUC value 0.925 for overall cancers and an average 0.929 for signal cancer. Furthermore, we classified 35 cancers into two classes: haematological and solid, of which the haematological got a highly AUC which is up to 0.968. Finally, we applied RWCFusion to breast cancer and found that top 13 gene fusions, such as BCAS3-BCAS4, NOTCH-NUP214, MED13-BCAS3 and CARM-SMARCA4, have been previously proved to be drivers for breast cancer. Additionally, 8 among the top 10 of the remaining candidate gene fusions, such as SULF2-ZNF217, MED1-ACSF2, and ACACA-STAC2, were inferred to be potential driver gene fusions of breast cancer by us.

  7. Acquired BRAF inhibitor resistance: a multicenter meta-analysis of the spectrum and frequencies, clinical behavior, and phenotypic associations of resistance mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Douglas B.; Menzies, Alexander M.; Zimmer, Lisa; Eroglu, Zeynep; Ye, Fei; Zhao, Shilin; Rizos, Helen; Sucker, Antje; Scolyer, Richard A.; Gutzmer, Ralf; Gogas, Helen; Kefford, Richard F.; Thompson, John F.; Becker, Jürgen C.; Berking, Carola; Egberts, Friederike; Loquai, Carmen; Goldinger, Simone M.; Pupo, Gulietta M.; Hugo, Willy; Kong, Xiangju; Garraway, Levi A.; Sosman, Jeffrey A.; Ribas, Antoni; Lo, Roger S.; Long, Georgina V.; Schadendorf, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Background Acquired resistance to BRAF inhibitors (BRAFi) is a near-universal phenomenon caused by numerous genetic and non-genetic alterations. In this study, we evaluated the spectrum, onset, pattern of progression, and subsequent clinical outcomes associated with specific mechanisms of resistance. Methods We compiled clinical and genetic data from 100 patients with 132 tissue samples obtained at progression on BRAFi therapy from 3 large, previously published studies of BRAFi resistance. These samples were subjected to whole exome sequencing and/or PCR-based genetic testing. Results Among 132 samples, putative resistance mechanisms were identified in 58%, including NRAS or KRAS mutations (20%), BRAF splice variants (16%), BRAFV600E/K amplifications (13%), MEK1/2 mutations (7%), and non-MAPK pathway alterations (11%). Marked heterogeneity was observed within tumors and patients; 18 of 19 patients (95%) with >1 progression biopsy had distinct/unknown drivers of resistance between samples. NRAS mutations were associated with vemurafenib use (p=0.045) and intracranial metastases (p=0.036), and MEK1/2 mutations correlated with hepatic progression (p=0.011). Progression-free survival and overall survival were similar across resistance mechanisms. The median survival after disease progression was 6.9 months, and responses to subsequent BRAF and MEK inhibition were uncommon (2 of 15; 13%). Post-progression outcomes did not correlate with specific acquired BRAFi resistance mechanisms. Conclusions This is the first study to systematically characterize the clinical implications of particular acquired BRAFi resistance mechanisms in patients with BRAF-mutant melanoma largest study to compile the landscape of resistance. Despite marked heterogeneity of resistance mechanisms within patients, NRAS mutations correlated with vemurafenib use and intracranial disease involvement. PMID:26608120

  8. Cell type of origin as well as genetic alterations contribute to breast cancer phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    West, William W.; Qiu, Fang; Band, Hamid; Band, Vimla

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is classified into different subtypes that are associated with different patient survival outcomes, underscoring the importance of understanding the role of precursor cell and genetic alterations in determining tumor subtypes. In this study, we evaluated the oncogenic phenotype of two distinct mammary stem/progenitor cell types designated as K5+/K19− or K5+/K19+ upon introduction of identical combinations of oncogenes-mutant H-Ras (mRas) and mutant p53 (mp53), together with either wild-type ErbB2(wtErbB2) or wild-type EGFR (wtEGFR). We examined their tumor forming and metastasis potential, using both in-vitro and in-vivo assays. Both the combinations efficiently transformed K5+/K19− or K5+/K19+ cells. Xenograft tumors formed by these cells were histologically heterogeneous, with variable proportions of luminal, basal-like and claudin-low type components depending on the cell types and oncogene combinations. Notably, K5+/K19− cells transformed with mRas/mp53/wtEGFR combination had a significantly longer latency for primary tumor development than other cell lines but more lung metastasis incidence than same cells expressing mRas/mp53/wtErbB2. K5+/K19+ cells exhibit shorter overall tumor latency, and high metastatic potential than K5+/K19− cells, suggesting that these K19+ progenitors are more susceptible to oncogenesis and metastasis. Our results suggest that both genetic alterations and cell type of origin contribute to oncogenic phenotype of breast tumors. PMID:25940703

  9. Cell type of origin as well as genetic alterations contribute to breast cancer phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Bhagirath, Divya; Zhao, Xiangshan; West, William W; Qiu, Fang; Band, Hamid; Band, Vimla

    2015-04-20

    Breast cancer is classified into different subtypes that are associated with different patient survival outcomes, underscoring the importance of understanding the role of precursor cell and genetic alterations in determining tumor subtypes. In this study, we evaluated the oncogenic phenotype of two distinct mammary stem/progenitor cell types designated as K5+/K19- or K5+/K19+ upon introduction of identical combinations of oncogenes-mutant H-Ras (mRas) and mutant p53 (mp53), together with either wild-type ErbB2(wtErbB2) or wild-type EGFR (wtEGFR). We examined their tumor forming and metastasis potential, using both in-vitro and in-vivo assays. Both the combinations efficiently transformed K5+/K19- or K5+/K19+ cells. Xenograft tumors formed by these cells were histologically heterogeneous, with variable proportions of luminal, basal-like and claudin-low type components depending on the cell types and oncogene combinations. Notably, K5+/K19- cells transformed with mRas/mp53/wtEGFR combination had a significantly longer latency for primary tumor development than other cell lines but more lung metastasis incidence than same cells expressing mRas/mp53/wtErbB2. K5+/K19+ cells exhibit shorter overall tumor latency, and high metastatic potential than K5+/K19- cells, suggesting that these K19+ progenitors are more susceptible to oncogenesis and metastasis. Our results suggest that both genetic alterations and cell type of origin contribute to oncogenic phenotype of breast tumors.

  10. TNFα enhances cancer stem cell-like phenotype via Notch-Hes1 activation in oral squamous cell carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung Hee; Hong, Hannah S; Liu, Zi Xiao; Kim, Reuben H; Kang, Mo K; Park, No-Hee; Shin, Ki-Hyuk

    2012-07-20

    Cancer stem-like cell (CSC; also known as tumor initiating cell) is defined as a small subpopulation of cancer cells within a tumor and isolated from various primary tumors and cancer cell lines. CSCs are highly tumorigenic and resistant to anticancer treatments. In this study, we found that prolonged exposure to tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα), a major proinflammatory cytokine, enhances CSC phenotype of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) cells, such as an increase in tumor sphere-forming ability, stem cell-associated genes expression, chemo-radioresistance, and tumorigenicity. Moreover, activation of Notch1 signaling was detected in the TNFα-exposed cells, and suppression of Notch1 signaling inhibited CSC phenotype. Furthermore, we demonstrated that inhibition of a Notch downstream target, Hes1, led to suppression of CSC phenotype in the TNFα-exposed cells. We also found that Hes1 expression is commonly upregulated in OSCC lesions compared to precancerous dysplastic lesions, suggesting the possible involvement of Hes1 in OSCC progression and CSC in vivo. In conclusion, inflammatory cytokine exposure may enhance CSC phenotype of OSCC, in part by activating the Notch-Hes1 pathway.

  11. Oncogenes induce the cancer-associated fibroblast phenotype: metabolic symbiosis and "fibroblast addiction" are new therapeutic targets for drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Lisanti, Michael P; Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E; Sotgia, Federica

    2013-09-01

    Metabolic coupling, between mitochondria in cancer cells and catabolism in stromal fibroblasts, promotes tumor growth, recurrence, metastasis, and predicts anticancer drug resistance. Catabolic fibroblasts donate the necessary fuels (such as L-lactate, ketones, glutamine, other amino acids, and fatty acids) to anabolic cancer cells, to metabolize via their TCA cycle and oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS). This provides a simple mechanism by which metabolic energy and biomass are transferred from the host microenvironment to cancer cells. Recently, we showed that catabolic metabolism and "glycolytic reprogramming" in the tumor microenvironment are orchestrated by oncogene activation and inflammation, which originates in epithelial cancer cells. Oncogenes drive the onset of the cancer-associated fibroblast phenotype in adjacent normal fibroblasts via paracrine oxidative stress. This oncogene-induced transition to malignancy is "mirrored" by a loss of caveolin-1 (Cav-1) and an increase in MCT4 in adjacent stromal fibroblasts, functionally reflecting catabolic metabolism in the tumor microenvironment. Virtually identical findings were obtained using BRCA1-deficient breast and ovarian cancer cells. Thus, oncogene activation (RAS, NFkB, TGF-β) and/or tumor suppressor loss (BRCA1) have similar functional effects on adjacent stromal fibroblasts, initiating "metabolic symbiosis" and the cancer-associated fibroblast phenotype. New therapeutic strategies that metabolically uncouple oxidative cancer cells from their glycolytic stroma or modulate oxidative stress could be used to target this lethal subtype of cancers. Targeting "fibroblast addiction" in primary and metastatic tumor cells may expose a critical Achilles' heel, leading to disease regression in both sporadic and familial cancers.

  12. Aldehyde dehydrogenase activity selects for the holoclone phenotype in prostate cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Doherty, R.E.; Haywood-Small, S.L.; Sisley, K.; Cross, N.A.

    2011-11-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Isolated ALDH{sup Hi} PC3 cells preferentially form primitive holoclone-type colonies. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Primitive holoclone colonies are predominantly ALDH{sup Lo} but contain rare ALDH{sup Hi} cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Holoclone-forming cells are not restricted to the ALDH{sup Hi} population. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ALDH phenotypic plasticity occurs in PC3 cells (ALDH{sup Lo} to ALDH{sup Hi} and vice versa). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ALDH{sup Hi} cells are observed but very rare in PC3 spheroids grown in stem cell medium. -- Abstract: Aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH) activity is considered to be a marker of cancer stem cells (CSCs) in many tumour models, since these cells are more proliferative and tumourigenic than ALDH{sup Lo} cells in experimental models. However it is unclear whether all CSC-like cells are within the ALDH{sup Hi} population, or whether all ALDH{sup Hi} cells are highly proliferative and tumourigenic. The ability to establish a stem cell hierarchy in vitro, whereby sub-populations of cells have differing proliferative and differentiation capacities, is an alternate indication of the presence of stem cell-like populations within cell lines. In this study, we have examined the interaction between ALDH status and the ability to establish a stem cell hierarchy in PC3 prostate cancer cells. We demonstrate that PC3 cells contain a stem cell hierarchy, and isolation of ALDH{sup Hi} cells enriches for the most primitive holoclone population, however holoclone formation is not restricted to ALDH{sup Hi} cells. In addition, we show that ALDH activity undergoes phenotypic plasticity, since the ALDH{sup Lo} population can develop ALDH{sup Hi} populations comparable to parental cells within 2 weeks in culture. Furthermore, we show that the majority of ALDH{sup Hi} cells are found within the least primitive paraclone population, which is circumvented by culturing PC3 cells as spheroids in

  13. Phenotypic Reversion or Death of Cancer Cells by Altering Signaling Pathways in Three-Dimensional Contexts

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fei; Hansen, Rhonda K.; Radisky, Derek; Yoneda, Toshiyuki; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen; Petersen, Ole W.; Turley, Eva A.; Bissell, Mina J.

    2010-01-01

    Background We previously used a three-dimensional (3D) reconstituted basement membrane (rBM) assay to demonstrate that tumorigenic HMT-3522 T4–2 human breast cells can be induced to form morphologically normal structures (“reversion”) by treatment with inhibitors of β1 integrin, the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), or mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). We have now used this assay to identify reversion and/or death requirements of several more aggressive human breast cancer cell lines. Methods Breast tumor cell lines MCF7, Hs578T, and MDA-MB-231 were cultured in 3D rBM and treated with inhibitors of β1 integrin, MAPK, or phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K). MDA-MB-231 cells, which lack E-cadherin, were transfected with an E-cadherin cDNA. The extent of reversion was assessed by changes in morphology and polarity, growth in 3D rBM or soft agar, level of invasiveness, and tumor formation in nude mice. Results All three cell lines showed partial reversion (MCF7 the greatest and Hs578T the least) of tumorigenic properties treated with a single β1 integrin, MAPK, or PI3K inhibitor. Combined inhibition of β1 integrin and either PI3K or MAPK resulted in nearly complete phenotypic reversion (MDA-MB-231, MCF7) or in cell death (Hs578T). E-cadherin-transfected MDA-MB-231 cells showed partial reversion, but exposure of the transfectants to an inhibitor of β1 integrin, PI3K, or MAPK led to nearly complete reversion. Conclusion The 3D rBM assay can be used to identify signaling pathways that, when manipulated in concert, can lead to the restoration of morphologically normal breast structures or to death of the tumor cells, even highly metastatic cells. This approach may be useful to design therapeutic intervention strategies for aggressive breast cancers. PMID:12359858

  14. FOXP3+ Tregs: heterogeneous phenotypes and conflicting impacts on survival outcomes in patients with colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhuo, Changhua; Xu, Ye; Ying, Mingang; Li, Qingguo; Huang, Liyong; Li, Dawei; Cai, Sanjun; Li, Bin

    2015-03-01

    The tumor microenvironment composites a mixture of immune lymphoid cells, myeloid cells, stromal cells with complex cytokines, as well as numerous lymphovascular vessels. Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a common malignancy and one of the leading causes of tumor-related death in the United States and worldwide. The immune status in the tumor microenvironment contributes to the survival of a patient with CRC. Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are considered a key factor in immune escape and immunotherapy failure among cancer patients. The transcription factor forkhead box P3 (FOXP3) is a crucial intracellular marker and also a key developmental and functional factor for CD4+CD25+ Tregs. Tregs are correlated with survival in various human neoplasms, and elevated proportions of Tregs are usually associated with unfavorable clinical outcomes. However, the role of Tregs in CRC remains controversial. High densities of tumor-infiltrating Tregs in CRC patients are reported to be correlated with worse or better outcomes. And Tregs may not be predictive of prognosis after resection of the primary tumor. The exact explanations for these discordant results remain unclear. The heterogeneous instincts of cell phenotype, gene expression, and functional activities of Tregs may partly contribute this contrasting result. Furthermore, the lack of a robust marker for identifying Tregs or due to the different techniques applied is also account. The Treg-specific demethylated region (TSDR) was recently reported to be a specific epigenetic marker for natural Tregs (nTregs), which can stably express FOXP3. The FOXP3-TSDR demethylation assay may be an promising technique for CRC-related nTregs studies.

  15. BRCA1 transcriptionally regulates genes associated with the basal-like phenotype in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Gorski, Julia J; James, Colin R; Quinn, Jennifer E; Stewart, Gail E; Staunton, Kieran Crosbie; Buckley, Niamh E; McDyer, Fionnuala A; Kennedy, Richard D; Wilson, Richard H; Mullan, Paul B; Harkin, D Paul

    2010-08-01

    Expression profiling of BRCA1-deficient tumours has identified a pattern of gene expression similar to basal-like breast tumours. In this study, we examine whether a BRCA1-dependent transcriptional mechanism may underpin the link between BRCA1 and basal-like phenotype. In methods section, the mRNA and protein were harvested from a number of BRCA1 mutant and wild-type breast cancer cell lines and from matched isogenic controls. Microarray-based expression profiling was used to identify potential BRCA1-regulated transcripts. These gene targets were then validated (by in silico analysis of tumour samples) by real-time PCR and Western blot analysis. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays were used to confirm recruitment of BRCA1 to specific promoters. In results, we demonstrate that functional BRCA1 represses the expression of cytokeratins 5(KRT5) and 17(KRT17) and p-Cadherin (CDH3) in HCC1937 and T47D breast cancer cell lines at both mRNA and protein level. ChIP assays demonstrate that BRCA1 is recruited to the promoters of KRT5, KRT17 and CDH3, and re-ChIP assays confirm that BRCA1 is recruited independently to form c-Myc and Sp1 complexes on the CDH3 promoter. We show that siRNA-mediated inhibition of endogenous c-Myc (and not Sp1) results in a marked increase in CDH3 expression analogous to that observed following the inhibition of endogenous BRCA1. The data provided suggest a model whereby BRCA1 and c-Myc form a repressor complex on the promoters of specific basal genes and represent a potential mechanism to explain the observed overexpression of key basal markers in BRCA1-deficient tumours.

  16. CXCR4-targeted lipid-coated PLGA nanoparticles deliver sorafenib and overcome acquired drug resistance in liver cancer.

    PubMed

    Gao, Dong-Yu; Lin, Ts-Ting; Sung, Yun-Chieh; Liu, Ya Chi; Chiang, Wen-Hsuan; Chang, Chih-Chun; Liu, Jia-Yu; Chen, Yunching

    2015-10-01

    Sorafenib, a multikinase inhibitor, has been used as an anti-angiogenic agent against highly vascular hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) - yet associated with only moderate therapeutic effect and the high incidence of HCC recurrence. We have shown intratumoral hypoxia induced by sorafenib activated C-X-C receptor type 4 (CXCR4)/stromal-derived factor 1α (SDF1α) axis, resulting in polarization toward a tumor-promoting microenvironment and resistance to anti-angiogenic therapy in HCC. Herein, we formulated sorafenib in CXCR4-targeted lipid-coated poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles (NPs) modified with a CXCR4 antagonist, AMD3100 to systemically deliver sorafenib into HCC and sensitize HCC to sorafenib treatment. We demonstrated that CXCR4-targeted NPs efficiently delivered sorafenib into HCCs and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) to achieve cytotoxicity and anti-angiogenic effect in vitro and in vivo. Despite the increased expression of SDF1α upon the persistent hypoxia induced by sorafenib-loaded CXCR4-targeted NPs, AMD3100 attached to the NPs can block CXCR4/SDF1α, leading to the reduced infiltration of tumor-associated macrophages, enhanced anti-angiogenic effect, a delay in tumor progression and increased overall survival in the orthotopic HCC model compared with other control groups. In conclusion, our results highlight the clinical potential of CXCR4-targeted NPs for delivering sorafenib and overcoming acquired drug resistance in liver cancer.

  17. Understanding and overcoming the mechanisms of primary and acquired resistance to abiraterone and enzalutamide in castration resistant prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Buttigliero, Consuelo; Tucci, Marcello; Bertaglia, Valentina; Vignani, Francesca; Bironzo, Paolo; Di Maio, Massimo; Scagliotti, Giorgio Vittorio

    2015-12-01

    In recent years, in castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), several new drugs have been approved that prolong overall survival, including enzalutamide and abiraterone, two new-generation hormonal therapies. Despite the demonstrated benefit of these agents, not all patients with CRPC are responsive to treatment, the gain in median progression-free survival with these therapies compared to standard of care is, rather disappointingly, still less than six months and the appearance of acquired resistance is almost universal. Approximately one third of patients treated with abiraterone and 25% of those treated with enzalutamide show primary resistance to these agents. Even if the mechanisms of resistance to these agents are not fully defined, many hypotheses are emerging, including systemic and intratumoral androgen biosynthesis up-regulation, androgen receptor (AR) gene mutations and amplifications, alteration of pathways involved in cross-talk with AR signaling, glucocorticoid receptor overexpression, neuroendocrine differentiation, immune system deregulation and others. The aim of this paper is to review currently available data about mechanisms of resistance to abiraterone and enzalutamide, and to discuss how these mechanisms could be potentially overcome through novel therapeutic agents.

  18. Molecular differences in the microsatellite stable phenotype between left‐sided and right‐sided colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Yayoi; Habano, Wataru; Ishida, Kazuyuki; Eizuka, Makoto; Otsuka, Koki; Sasaki, Akira; Takayuki Matsumoto; Morikawa, Takanori; Unno, Michiaki; Suzuki, Hiromu

    2016-01-01

    Differences in the pathogenesis of microsatellite stable (MSS) sporadic colorectal cancers (CRCs) between left‐sided CRC (LC) and right‐sided CRC (RC) have not been clarified. To identify pathogenesis‐related genomic differences between MSS CRCs within the two locations, we performed a comprehensive molecular analysis using crypt isolation with samples from 92 sporadic CRCs. Microsatellite instability (MSI; high and low/negative) and DNA methylation status (low methylation epigenome; intermediate methylation epigenome [IME] or high methylation epigenome [HME]) were determined using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) microsatellite analysis and PCR‐bisulfite pyrosequencing, respectively. Additionally, mutations in the TP53, KRAS, BRAF and PIK3CA genes were examined using PCR‐bisulfite pyrosequencing (for KRAS and BRAF mutations) or PCR‐single conformation polymorphism (for TP53 and PIK3CA mutations), followed by sequencing of aberrant bands. Finally, a genome‐wide study using a copy number alteration (CNA)‐targeted single nucleotide polymorphism array was performed. Ninety‐two CRCs were classified into 71 MSS and 21 MSI phenotypes. We examined 71 CRCs with the MSS phenotype (LC, 56; RC, 15). Mutations in KRAS were associated with RC with the MSS phenotype, whereas mutations in TP53 were more frequently found in LC with the MSS phenotype. There were significant differences in the frequencies of KRAS and TP53 mutations in the IME between LC and RC with the MSS phenotype. Although CNA gains were associated with LC with the MSS phenotype, CNA losses were not major alterations associated with the MSS phenotype. These findings suggested that the molecular pathogenesis of the MSS phenotype in LC was different from that in RC. PMID:27509333

  19. XPD Helicase Structures And Activities: Insights Into the Cancer And Aging Phenotypes From XPD Mutations

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, L.; Fuss, J.O.; Cheng, Q.J.; Arvai, A.S.; Hammel, M.; Roberts, V.A.; Cooper, P.K.; Tainer, J.A.

    2009-05-18

    Mutations in XPD helicase, required for nucleotide excision repair (NER) as part of the transcription/repair complex TFIIH, cause three distinct phenotypes: cancer-prone xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), or aging disorders Cockayne syndrome (CS), and trichothiodystrophy (TTD). To clarify molecular differences underlying these diseases, we determined crystal structures of the XPD catalytic core from Sulfolobus acidocaldarius and measured mutant enzyme activities. Substrate-binding grooves separate adjacent Rad51/RecA-like helicase domains (HD1, HD2) and an arch formed by 4FeS and Arch domains. XP mutations map along the HD1 ATP-binding edge and HD2 DNA-binding channel and impair helicase activity essential for NER. XP/CS mutations both impair helicase activity and likely affect HD2 functional movement. TTD mutants lose or retain helicase activity but map to sites in all four domains expected to cause framework defects impacting TFIIH integrity. These results provide a foundation for understanding disease consequences of mutations in XPD and related 4Fe-4S helicases including FancJ.

  20. Phenotype-genotype correlation in multiple primary lung cancer patients in China

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yang; Yin, Wei; He, Wenxin; Jiang, Chao; Zhou, Xiao; Song, Xiao; Zhu, Junjie; Fei, Ke; Cao, Weijun; Jiang, Gening

    2016-01-01

    Due to recent advances in high-resolution detection technology, multiple primary lung cancer (MPLC) is becoming an increasingly common diagnosis. However, the genotype-phenotype correlations in MPLC patients have not yet been assessed. In this study, we analyzed the clinical and pathological data for 129 consecutive MPLC patients who received curative surgery at the Tongji University Shanghai Pulmonary Hospital, China. We have screened 129 patients in the present study and found mutations in EGFR, BRAF, ROS1 and KRAS genes, as well as the rearrangement of the EML4-ALK gene in 113 patients. The mean patient age was 59.9 (25–78) years old and 41 patients were males (31.8%). Among the total patients, 123 (95.4%) had two primary lesions, 5 (3.9%) had three primary lesions, and 1 (0.8%) had four primary lesions. In 38.8% of the patients, all lesions were located on only one side of the body. Most of the detected mutations (98 patients) were in the EGFR gene. The patients exhibited significant differences in the EGFR mutation, age at diagnosis, and foci location. PMID:27796337

  1. Quantitative molecular phenotyping with topically applied SERS nanoparticles for intraoperative guidance of breast cancer lumpectomy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yu; Kang, Soyoung; Khan, Altaz; Ruttner, Gabriel; Leigh, Steven Y.; Murray, Melissa; Abeytunge, Sanjee; Peterson, Gary; Rajadhyaksha, Milind; Dintzis, Suzanne; Javid, Sara; Liu, Jonathan T.C.

    2016-01-01

    There is a need to image excised tissues during tumor-resection procedures in order to identify residual tumors at the margins and to guide their complete removal. The imaging of dysregulated cell-surface receptors is a potential means of identifying the presence of diseases with high sensitivity and specificity. However, due to heterogeneities in the expression of protein biomarkers in tumors, molecular-imaging technologies should ideally be capable of visualizing a multiplexed panel of cancer biomarkers. Here, we demonstrate that the topical application and quantification of a multiplexed cocktail of receptor-targeted surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) nanoparticles (NPs) enables rapid quantitative molecular phenotyping (QMP) of the surface of freshly excised tissues to determine the presence of disease. In order to mitigate the ambiguity due to nonspecific sources of contrast such as off-target binding or uneven delivery, a ratiometric method is employed to quantify the specific vs. nonspecific binding of the multiplexed NPs. Validation experiments with human tumor cell lines, fresh human tumor xenografts in mice, and fresh human breast specimens demonstrate that QMP imaging of excised tissues agrees with flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry, and that this technique may be achieved in less than 15 minutes for potential intraoperative use in guiding breast-conserving surgeries. PMID:26878888

  2. XPD Helicase Structures and Activities: Insights into the Cancer and Aging Phenotypes from XPD Mutations

    SciTech Connect

    Tainer, John; Fan, Li; Fuss, Jill O.; Cheng, Quen J.; Arvai, Andrew S.; Hammel, Michal; Roberts, Victoria A.; Cooper, Priscilla K.; Tainer, John A.

    2008-06-02

    Mutations in XPD helicase, required for nucleotide excision repair (NER) as part of the transcription/repair complex TFIIH, cause three distinct phenotypes: cancer-prone xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), or aging disorders Cockayne syndrome (CS), and trichothiodystrophy (TTD). To clarify molecular differences underlying these diseases, we determined crystal structures of the XPD catalytic core from Sulfolobus acidocaldarius and measured mutant enzyme activities. Substrate-binding grooves separate adjacent Rad51/RecA-like helicase domains (HD1, HD2) and an arch formed by 4FeS and Arch domains. XP mutations map along the HD1 ATP-binding edge and HD2 DNA-binding channel and impair helicase activity essential for NER. XP/CS mutations both impair helicase activity and likely affect HD2 functional movement. TTD mutants lose or retain helicase activity but map to sites in all four domains expected to cause framework defects impacting TFIIH integrity. These results provide a foundation for understanding disease consequences of mutations in XPD and related 4Fe-4S helicases including FancJ.

  3. Quantitative molecular phenotyping with topically applied SERS nanoparticles for intraoperative guidance of breast cancer lumpectomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yu; Kang, Soyoung; Khan, Altaz; Ruttner, Gabriel; Leigh, Steven Y.; Murray, Melissa; Abeytunge, Sanjee; Peterson, Gary; Rajadhyaksha, Milind; Dintzis, Suzanne; Javid, Sara; Liu, Jonathan T. C.

    2016-02-01

    There is a need to image excised tissues during tumor-resection procedures in order to identify residual tumors at the margins and to guide their complete removal. The imaging of dysregulated cell-surface receptors is a potential means of identifying the presence of diseases with high sensitivity and specificity. However, due to heterogeneities in the expression of protein biomarkers in tumors, molecular-imaging technologies should ideally be capable of visualizing a multiplexed panel of cancer biomarkers. Here, we demonstrate that the topical application and quantification of a multiplexed cocktail of receptor-targeted surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) nanoparticles (NPs) enables rapid quantitative molecular phenotyping (QMP) of the surface of freshly excised tissues to determine the presence of disease. In order to mitigate the ambiguity due to nonspecific sources of contrast such as off-target binding or uneven delivery, a ratiometric method is employed to quantify the specific vs. nonspecific binding of the multiplexed NPs. Validation experiments with human tumor cell lines, fresh human tumor xenografts in mice, and fresh human breast specimens demonstrate that QMP imaging of excised tissues agrees with flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry, and that this technique may be achieved in less than 15 minutes for potential intraoperative use in guiding breast-conserving surgeries.

  4. Discovery of a novel unfolded protein response phenotype of cancer stem/progenitor cells from the bone marrow of breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Bartkowiak, Kai; Effenberger, Katharina E; Harder, Sönke; Andreas, Antje; Buck, Friedrich; Peter-Katalinic, Jasna; Pantel, Klaus; Brandt, Burkhard H

    2010-06-04

    Metastases arise from disseminated tumor cells (DTC) that colonize secondary organs. However, DTC survival strategies to start metastatic outgrowth are unclear. The hostile (hypoxic, hypoglycemic) microenvironmental conditions of the bone marrow serve as an ideal model environment for investigation of DTC survival strategies under environmental stress. We investigated the breast cancer DTC cell line BC-M1 established from the bone marrow of a cancer patient by 2-D DIGE and MS analysis. We observed specific overexpression of the unfolded protein response (UPR) proteins Grp78, Grp94, and protein disulfide-isomerase in breast, lung, and prostate cancer DTC cell lines from the bone marrow. The UPR contributes to survival under adverse environmental conditions including chemotherapy. We show in cellular models that Grp78 expression of the UPR is regulated by tyrosine 1248 of ErbB-2. The breast cancer DTC cell lines shared stem/progenitor cell cancer phenotypes (CD44(high)/CD24(low)). Immunocytochemical staining of bone marrow samples from breast cancer patients confirmed in situ high expression of Grp78 and Grp94 in DTC of breast cancer patients, indicating the potential of both proteins as novel markers for DTC detection. Our results suggest the presence of a previously not recognized stress resistant DTC population that combines stem/progenitor attributes with an UPR phenotype.

  5. Clinical Classification of Cancer Cachexia: Phenotypic Correlates in Human Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Johns, Neil; Hatakeyama, Shinji; Stephens, Nathan A.; Degen, Martin; Degen, Simone; Frieauff, Wilfried; Lambert, Christian; Ross, James A.; Roubenoff, Ronenn; Glass, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Cachexia affects the majority of patients with advanced cancer and is associated with a reduction in treatment tolerance, response to therapy, and duration of survival. One impediment towards the effective treatment of cachexia is a validated classification system. Methods 41 patients with resectable upper gastrointestinal (GI) or pancreatic cancer underwent characterisation for cachexia based on weight-loss (WL) and/or low muscularity (LM). Four diagnostic criteria were used >5%WL, >10%WL, LM, and LM+>2%WL. All patients underwent biopsy of the rectus muscle. Analysis included immunohistochemistry for fibre size and type, protein and nucleic acid concentration, Western blots for markers of autophagy, SMAD signalling, and inflammation. Findings Compared with non-cachectic cancer patients, patients with LM or LM+>2%WL, mean muscle fibre diameter was reduced by about 25% (p = 0.02 and p = 0.001 respectively). No significant difference in fibre diameter was observed if patients had WL alone. Regardless of classification, there was no difference in fibre number or proportion of fibre type across all myosin heavy chain isoforms. Mean muscle protein content was reduced and the ratio of RNA/DNA decreased in patients with either >5%WL or LM+>2%WL. Compared with non-cachectic patients, SMAD3 protein levels were increased in patients with >5%WL (p = 0.022) and with >10%WL, beclin (p = 0.05) and ATG5 (p = 0.01) protein levels were increased. There were no differences in phospho-NFkB or phospho-STAT3 levels across any of the groups. Conclusion Muscle fibre size, biochemical composition and pathway phenotype can vary according to whether the diagnostic criteria for cachexia are based on weight loss alone, a measure of low muscularity alone or a combination of the two. For intervention trials where the primary end-point is a change in muscle mass or function, use of combined diagnostic criteria may allow identification of a more homogeneous patient

  6. Shorter telomeres and high telomerase activity correlate with a highly aggressive phenotype in breast cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Ceja-Rangel, Hugo A; Sánchez-Suárez, Patricia; Castellanos-Juárez, Emilio; Peñaroja-Flores, Rubicelia; Arenas-Aranda, Diego J; Gariglio, Patricio; Benítez-Bribiesca, Luis

    2016-09-01

    Maintenance of telomere length is one function of human telomerase that is crucial for the survival of cancer cells and cancer progression. Both telomeres and telomerase have been proposed as possible biomarkers of cancer risk and cancer invasiveness; however, their clinical relevance is still under discussion. In order to improve our understanding of the relationship between telomere length and telomerase activity with cancer invasiveness, we studied telomere length as well as telomerase levels, activity, and intracellular localization in breast cancer cell lines with diverse invasive phenotypes. We found an apparently paradoxical coincidence of short telomeres and enhanced telomerase activity in the most invasive breast cancer cell lines. We also observed that hTERT intracellular localization could be correlated with its level of activity. There was no association between human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) protein expression levels and invasiveness. We propose that simultaneous evaluation of these two biomarkers-telomere length and telomerase activity-could be useful for the assessment of the invasive capacity and aggressiveness of tumor cells from breast cancer patients.

  7. Using Computer-extracted Image Phenotypes from Tumors on Breast MRI to Predict Breast Cancer Pathologic Stage

    PubMed Central

    Burnside, Elizabeth S.; Drukker, Karen; Li, Hui; Bonaccio, Ermelinda; Zuley, Margarita; Ganott, Marie; Net, Jose M.; Sutton, Elizabeth; Brandt, Kathleen R.; Whitman, Gary; Conzen, Suzanne; Lan, Li; Ji, Yuan; Zhu, Yitan; Jaffe, Carl; Huang, Erich; Freymann, John; Kirby, Justin; Morris, Elizabeth; Giger, Maryellen

    2015-01-01

    Background To demonstrate that computer-extracted image phenotypes (CEIPs) of biopsy-proven breast cancer on MRI can accurately predict pathologic stage. Methods We used a dataset of de-identified breast MRIs organized by the National Cancer Institute in The Cancer Imaging Archive. We analyzed 91 biopsy-proven breast cancer cases with pathologic stage (stage I = 22; stage II = 58; stage III = 11) and surgically proven nodal status (negative nodes = 46, ≥ 1 positive node = 44, no nodes examined = 1). We characterized tumors by (a) radiologist measured size, and (b) CEIP. We built models combining two CEIPs to predict tumor pathologic stage and lymph node involvement, evaluated them in leave-one-out cross-validation with area under the ROC curve (AUC) as figure of merit. Results Tumor size was the most powerful predictor of pathologic stage but CEIPs capturing biologic behavior also emerged as predictive (e.g. stage I+II vs. III demonstrated AUC = 0.83). No size measure was successful in the prediction of positive lymph nodes but adding a CEIP describing tumor “homogeneity,” significantly improved this discrimination (AUC = 0.62, p=.003) over chance. Conclusions Our results indicate that MRI phenotypes show promise for predicting breast cancer pathologic stage and lymph node status. PMID:26619259

  8. c-Myc and Her2 cooperate to drive a stem-like phenotype with poor prognosis in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Nair, R; Roden, D L; Teo, W S; McFarland, A; Junankar, S; Ye, S; Nguyen, A; Yang, J; Nikolic, I; Hui, M; Morey, A; Shah, J; Pfefferle, A D; Usary, J; Selinger, C; Baker, L A; Armstrong, N; Cowley, M J; Naylor, M J; Ormandy, C J; Lakhani, S R; Herschkowitz, J I; Perou, C M; Kaplan, W; O'Toole, S A; Swarbrick, A

    2014-07-24

    The HER2 (ERBB2) and MYC genes are commonly amplified in breast cancer, yet little is known about their molecular and clinical interaction. Using a novel chimeric mammary transgenic approach and in vitro models, we demonstrate markedly increased self-renewal and tumour-propagating capability of cells transformed with Her2 and c-Myc. Coexpression of both oncoproteins in cultured cells led to the activation of a c-Myc transcriptional signature and acquisition of a self-renewing phenotype independent of an epithelial-mesenchymal transition programme or regulation of conventional cancer stem cell markers. Instead, Her2 and c-Myc cooperated to induce the expression of lipoprotein lipase, which was required for proliferation and self-renewal in vitro. HER2 and MYC were frequently coamplified in breast cancer, associated with aggressive clinical behaviour and poor outcome. Lastly, we show that in HER2(+) breast cancer patients receiving adjuvant chemotherapy (but not targeted anti-Her2 therapy), MYC amplification is associated with a poor outcome. These findings demonstrate the importance of molecular and cellular context in oncogenic transformation and acquisition of a malignant stem-like phenotype and have diagnostic and therapeutic consequences for the clinical management of HER2(+) breast cancer.

  9. BZL101, a phytochemical extract from the Scutellaria barbata plant, disrupts proliferation of human breast and prostate cancer cells through distinct mechanisms dependent on the cancer cell phenotype.

    PubMed

    Marconett, Crystal N; Morgenstern, Travis J; San Roman, Adrianna K; Sundar, Shyam N; Singhal, Ankur K; Firestone, Gary L

    2010-08-15

    BZL101 is an aqueous extract from the Scutellaria barbata plant shown to have anticancer properties in a variety of human cancers. In order to determine its efficacy on human reproductive cancers, we assessed the responses of two human breast cancer cell lines, estrogen sensitive MCF7 and estrogen insensitive MDA-MB-231, and of two human prostate cancer cell lines, androgen sensitive LNCaP and androgen insensitive PC3 which are human cell lines that represent early and late stage reproductive cancers. BZL101 inhibited reproductive cancer growth in all cell lines by regulating expression levels of key cell cycle components that differ with respect to the cancer cell phenotypes. In early stage estrogen sensitive MCF7 cells, BZL101 induced a G₁ cell cycle arrest and ablated expression of key G₁ cell cycle regulators Cyclin D1, CDK2 and CDK4, as well as growth factor stimulatory pathways and estrogen receptor-α expression. Transfection of luciferase reporter plasmids revealed that the loss of CDK2, CDK4 and estrogen receptor-α transcript expression resulted from the BZL-dependent ablation of promoter activities. BZL101 growth arrests early stage androgen sensitive LNCaP cells in the G₂/M phase with corresponding decreases in Cyclin B1, CDK1 and androgen receptor expression. In late stage hormone insensitive breast (MDA-MB-231) and prostate (PC3) cancer cells, BZL101 induced an S phase arrest with corresponding ablations in Cyclin A2 and CDK2 expression. Our results demonstrate that BZL101 exerts phenotype specific anti-proliferative gene expression responses in human breast and prostate cancer cells, which will be valuable in the potential development of BZL-based therapeutic strategies for human reproductive cancers.

  10. Phenotypic malignant changes and untargeted lipidomic analysis of long-term exposed prostate cancer cells to endocrine disruptors

    SciTech Connect

    Bedia, Carmen Dalmau, Núria Jaumot, Joaquim Tauler, Romà

    2015-07-15

    Endocrine disruptors (EDs) are a class of environmental toxic molecules able to interfere with the normal hormone metabolism. Numerous studies involve EDs exposure to initiation and development of cancers, including prostate cancer. In this work, three different EDs (aldrin, aroclor 1254 and chlorpyrifos (CPF)) were investigated as potential inducers of a malignant phenotype in DU145 prostate cancer cells after a chronic exposure. Epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) induction, proliferation, migration, colony formation and release of metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2) were analyzed in 50-day exposed cells to the selected EDs. As a result, aldrin and CPF exposure led to an EMT induction (loss of 16% and 14% of E-cadherin levels, respectively, compared to the unexposed cells). Aroclor and CPF presented an increased migration (134% and 126%, respectively), colony formation (204% and 144%, respectively) and MMP-2 release (137% in both cases) compared to the unexposed cells. An untargeted lipidomic analysis was performed to decipher the lipids involved in the observed transformations. As general results, aldrin exposure showed a global decrease in phospholipids and sphingolipids, and aroclor and CPF showed an increase of certain phospholipids, glycosphingolipids as well as a remarkable increase of some cardiolipin species. Furthermore, the three exposures resulted in an increase of some triglyceride species. In conclusion, some significant changes in lipids were identified and thus we postulate that some lipid compounds and lipid metabolic pathways could be involved in the acquisition of the malignant phenotype in exposed prostate cancer cells to the selected EDs. - Highlights: • Aldrin, aroclor and chlorpyrifos induced an aggressive phenotype in DU145 cells. • An untargeted lipidomic analysis has been performed on chronic exposed cells. • Lipidomic results showed changes in specific lipid species under chronic exposure. • These lipids may have a role in the

  11. Natural product extracts of the Canadian prairie plant, Thermopsis rhombifolia, have anti-cancer activity in phenotypic cell-based assays.

    PubMed

    Kernéis, Sophie; Swift, Lucy H; Lewis, Cody W; Bruyère, Céline; Oumata, Nassima; Colas, Pierre; Ruchaud, Sandrine; Bain, John; Golsteyn, Roy M

    2015-01-01

    Many plant species within the terrestrial ecological zones of Canada have not yet been investigated for anti-cancer activity. We examined the scientific literature describing the endemic flora from the prairie ecological zone and selected the species, Thermopsis rhombifolia, locally known as the buffalo bean, for investigation of its anti-cancer potential. We tested it in cell-based assays using phenotypic screens that feature some of the hallmarks of cancer. An ethanolic extract prepared from T. rhombifolia was cytotoxic to HT-29 (colon) and SH-SY5Y (brain) cancer cell lines, and showed little cytotoxicity to a normal human cell line (WI-38). In phenotypic assays, we identified activities in the extracts that target cell death, cell cycle and cell adhesion. These data highlight the anti-cancer potential of previously untested plants found in northern ecological zones and the feasibility of using pertinent phenotypic assays to examine the anti-cancer potential of natural product extracts.

  12. Mycobacterium tuberculosis uses host triacylglycerol to accumulate lipid droplets and acquires a dormancy-like phenotype in lipid-loaded macrophages.

    PubMed

    Daniel, Jaiyanth; Maamar, Hédia; Deb, Chirajyoti; Sirakova, Tatiana D; Kolattukudy, Pappachan E

    2011-06-01

    Two billion people are latently infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). Mtb-infected macrophages are likely to be sequestered inside the hypoxic environments of the granuloma and differentiate into lipid-loaded macrophages that contain triacylglycerol (TAG)-filled lipid droplets which may provide a fatty acid-rich host environment for Mtb. We report here that human peripheral blood monocyte-derived macrophages and THP-1 derived macrophages incubated under hypoxia accumulate Oil Red O-staining lipid droplets containing TAG. Inside such hypoxic, lipid-loaded macrophages, nearly half the Mtb population developed phenotypic tolerance to isoniazid, lost acid-fast staining and accumulated intracellular lipid droplets. Dual-isotope labeling of macrophage TAG revealed that Mtb inside the lipid-loaded macrophages imports fatty acids derived from host TAG and incorporates them intact into Mtb TAG. The fatty acid composition of host and Mtb TAG were nearly identical suggesting that Mtb utilizes host TAG to accumulate intracellular TAG. Utilization of host TAG by Mtb for lipid droplet synthesis was confirmed when fluorescent fatty acid-labeled host TAG was utilized to accumulate fluorescent lipid droplets inside the pathogen. Deletion of the Mtb triacylglycerol synthase 1 (tgs1) gene resulted in a drastic decrease but not a complete loss in both radiolabeled and fluorescent TAG accumulation by Mtb suggesting that the TAG that accumulates within Mtb is generated mainly by the incorporation of fatty acids released from host TAG. We show direct evidence for the utilization of the fatty acids from host TAG for lipid metabolism inside Mtb. Taqman real-time PCR measurements revealed that the mycobacterial genes dosR, hspX, icl1, tgs1 and lipY were up-regulated in Mtb within hypoxic lipid loaded macrophages along with other Mtb genes known to be associated with dormancy and lipid metabolism.

  13. siRNA Knockdown of Ribosomal Protein Gene RPL19 Abrogates the Aggressive Phenotype of Human Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bee, Alix; Brewer, Daniel; Beesley, Carol; Dodson, Andrew; Forootan, Shiva; Dickinson, Timothy; Gerard, Patricia; Lane, Brian; Yao, Sheng; Cooper, Colin S.; Djamgoz, Mustafa B. A.; Gosden, Christine M.; Ke, Youqiang; Foster, Christopher S.

    2011-01-01

    We provide novel functional data that posttranscriptional silencing of gene RPL19 using RNAi not only abrogates the malignant phenotype of PC-3M prostate cancer cells but is selective with respect to transcription and translation of other genes. Reducing RPL19 transcription modulates a subset of genes, evidenced by gene expression array analysis and Western blotting, but does not compromise cell proliferation or apoptosis in-vitro. However, growth of xenografted tumors containing the knocked-down RPL19 in-vivo is significantly reduced. Analysis of the modulated genes reveals induction of the non-malignant phenotype principally to involve perturbation of networks of transcription factors and cellular adhesion genes. The data provide evidence that extra-ribosomal regulatory functions of RPL19, beyond protein synthesis, are critical regulators of cellular phenotype. Targeting key members of affected networks identified by gene expression analysis raises the possibility of therapeutically stabilizing a benign phenotype generated by modulating the expression of an individual gene and thereafter constraining a malignant phenotype while leaving non-malignant tissues unaffected. PMID:21799931

  14. Overcoming acquired drug resistance in colorectal cancer cells by targeted delivery of 5-FU with EGF grafted hollow mesoporous silica nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lijue; She, Xiaodong; Wang, Tao; He, Li; Shigdar, Sarah; Duan, Wei; Kong, Lingxue

    2015-08-01

    Acquired drug resistance (ADR) can be developed in colorectal cancer cells after 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) treatment and diminish the effectiveness of chemotherapy. In this work, acquired 5-FU resistance in the colorectal cancer cell line SW480 was obtained with the up-regulation of dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPYD) gene expression which can convert 5-FU to its inactive metabolite. To overcome ADR in colorectal cancer, hollow mesoporous silica nanoparticles (HMSNs) grafted with epidermal growth factor (EGF) were used as nanocarriers to deliver 5-FU to colorectal cancer cells with acquired drug resistance. The effect and mechanism of 5-FU loaded EGF grafted HMSNs (EGF-HMSNs-5-FU) in overcoming acquired drug resistance in SW480/ADR cells were studied. The EGF-HMSNs were demonstrated to be specifically internalized in EGFR overexpressed SW480/ADR cells via a receptor-mediated endocytosis and can escape from endo-lysosomes. The EGF-HMSNs-5-FU exhibited much higher cytotoxicity on SW480/ADR cells than HMSNs-5-FU and free 5-FU while the plain HMSNs did not show significant cytotoxicity. The mechanism of EGF-HMSNs-5-FU in overcoming drug resistance in SW480/ADR cells could be attributed to the specific internalization of EGF-HMSNs-5-FU in EGFR overexpressed cells which can lead to high intracellular drug accumulation and cause cell death through S phase arrest.Acquired drug resistance (ADR) can be developed in colorectal cancer cells after 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) treatment and diminish the effectiveness of chemotherapy. In this work, acquired 5-FU resistance in the colorectal cancer cell line SW480 was obtained with the up-regulation of dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPYD) gene expression which can convert 5-FU to its inactive metabolite. To overcome ADR in colorectal cancer, hollow mesoporous silica nanoparticles (HMSNs) grafted with epidermal growth factor (EGF) were used as nanocarriers to deliver 5-FU to colorectal cancer cells with acquired drug resistance. The

  15. P4H9-detected molecule expression on spindle-shaped fibroblasts indicates malignant phenotype of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yokoyama, Shozo; Ieda, Junji; Yamamoto, Naoyuki; Yamaguchi, Shunsuke; Mitani, Yasuyuki; Takeuchi, Akihiro; Takifuji, Katsunari; Hotta, Tsukasa; Matsuda, Kenji; Watanabe, Takashi; Shively, John E; Yamaue, Hiroki

    2015-01-01

    Background: Our previous study using a mammary fat pad mouse model showed that P4H9, produced by the β2 integrin epitope, detected a molecule on fibroblasts in response to carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 1 (CEACAM1)-expressing cancer cells. P4H9-detected molecule (PDM) expression appeared to be associated with myofibroblast differentiation. In this study, we investigated whether PDM is expressed on fibroblasts and cancer cells in clinical tissue samples, and whether the presence of PDM-expressing colorectal cancer cells is correlated with clinicopathological features of patients. Methods: Immunohistochemistry was conducted to detect P4H9 on clinical tissue samples from 156 patients with colorectal cancer. Risk factors for metastases and survival were calculated for clinical implication of PDM-expressing spindle-shaped fibroblasts. Results: Multivariate analysis showed that PDM-expressing spindle-shaped fibroblasts were an independent risk factor for lymph node metastasis, hematogenous metastasis, and poor survival. A Kaplan–Meier survival curve indicated that PDM-expressing spindle-shaped fibroblasts were associated with shorter survival time (P<0.0001). Immunofluorescence showed PDM expression on CCD-18Co fibroblasts and two colorectal cancer cell lines (HCT116 and HCT-15). Conclusions: PDM-expressing spindle-shaped fibroblasts are associated with metastasis and shorter survival in colorectal cancer patients. PDM-expressing spindle-shaped fibroblasts may have a role in eliciting the malignant phenotype of colorectal cancer. PMID:26469833

  16. Mouse models for xeroderma pigmentosum group A and group C show divergent cancer phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Melis, Joost P M; Wijnhoven, Susan W P; Beems, Rudolf B; Roodbergen, Marianne; van den Berg, Jolanda; Moon, Hojin; Friedberg, Errol; van der Horst, Gijsbertus T J; Hoeijmakers, Jan H J; Vijg, Jan; van Steeg, Harry

    2008-03-01

    The accumulation of DNA damage is a slow but hazardous phenomenon that may lead to cell death, accelerated aging, and cancer. One of the most versatile defense mechanisms against the accumulation of DNA damage is nucleotide excision repair, in which, among others, the Xeroderma pigmentosum group C (XPC) and group A (XPA) proteins are involved. To elucidate differences in the functions of these two proteins, comprehensive survival studies with Xpa(-/-), Xpc(-/-) and wild-type control female mice in a pure C57BL/6J background were done. The median survival of Xpc(-/-) mice showed a significant decrease, whereas the median survival of Xpa(-/-) mice did not. Strikingly, Xpa(-/-) and Xpc(-/-) mice also showed a phenotypical difference in terms of tumor spectrum. Xpc(-/-) mice displayed a significant increase in lung tumors and a trend toward increased liver tumors compared with Xpa-deficient or wild-type mice. Xpa(-/-) mice showed a significant elevation in liver tumors. Additionally, Xpc-deficient mice exhibited a strong increase in mutant frequency in lung compared with Xpa(-/-) mice, whereas in both models mutant frequency is increased in liver. Our in vitro data displayed an elevated sensitivity to oxygen in Xpc(-/-) in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEF) when compared with Xpa(-/-) and wild-type fibroblasts. We believe that XPC plays a role in the removal of oxidative DNA damage and that, therefore, Xpc(-/-) mice display a significant increase in lung tumors and a significant elevation in mutant frequency in lung, and Xpc-deficient MEFs show greater sensitivity to oxygen when compared with Xpa(-/-) and wild-type mice.

  17. Atypical Cell Populations Associated with Acquired Resistance to Cytostatics and Cancer Stem Cell Features: The Role of Mitochondria in Nuclear Encapsulation

    PubMed Central

    Gustmann, Sebastian; Jastrow, Holger; Acikelli, Ali Haydar; Dammann, Philip; Klein, Jacqueline; Dembinski, Ulrike; Bardenheuer, Walter; Malak, Sascha; Araúzo-Bravo, Marcos J.; Schultheis, Beate; Aldinger, Constanze; Strumberg, Dirk

    2014-01-01

    Until recently, acquired resistance to cytostatics had mostly been attributed to biochemical mechanisms such as decreased intake and/or increased efflux of therapeutics, enhanced DNA repair, and altered activity or deregulation of target proteins. Although these mechanisms have been widely investigated, little is known about membrane barriers responsible for the chemical imperviousness of cell compartments and cellular segregation in cytostatic-treated tumors. In highly heterogeneous cross-resistant and radiorefractory cell populations selected by exposure to anticancer agents, we found a number of atypical recurrent cell types in (1) tumor cell cultures of different embryonic origins, (2) mouse xenografts, and (3) paraffin sections from patient tumors. Alongside morphologic peculiarities, these populations presented cancer stem cell markers, aberrant signaling pathways, and a set of deregulated miRNAs known to confer both stem-cell phenotypes and highly aggressive tumor behavior. The first type, named spiral cells, is marked by a spiral arrangement of nuclei. The second type, monastery cells, is characterized by prominent walls inside which daughter cells can be seen maturing amid a rich mitochondrial environment. The third type, called pregnant cells, is a giant cell with a syncytium-like morphology, a main nucleus, and many endoreplicative functional progeny cells. A rare fourth cell type identified in leukemia was christened shepherd cells, as it was always associated with clusters of smaller cells. Furthermore, a portion of resistant tumor cells displayed nuclear encapsulation via mitochondrial aggregation in the nuclear perimeter in response to cytostatic insults, probably conferring imperviousness to drugs and long periods of dormancy until nuclear eclosion takes place. This phenomenon was correlated with an increase in both intracellular and intercellular mitochondrial traffic as well as with the uptake of free extracellular mitochondria. All these cellular

  18. Atypical cell populations associated with acquired resistance to cytostatics and cancer stem cell features: the role of mitochondria in nuclear encapsulation.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Carballo, David; Gustmann, Sebastian; Jastrow, Holger; Acikelli, Ali Haydar; Dammann, Philip; Klein, Jacqueline; Dembinski, Ulrike; Bardenheuer, Walter; Malak, Sascha; Araúzo-Bravo, Marcos J; Schultheis, Beate; Aldinger, Constanze; Strumberg, Dirk

    2014-11-01

    Until recently, acquired resistance to cytostatics had mostly been attributed to biochemical mechanisms such as decreased intake and/or increased efflux of therapeutics, enhanced DNA repair, and altered activity or deregulation of target proteins. Although these mechanisms have been widely investigated, little is known about membrane barriers responsible for the chemical imperviousness of cell compartments and cellular segregation in cytostatic-treated tumors. In highly heterogeneous cross-resistant and radiorefractory cell populations selected by exposure to anticancer agents, we found a number of atypical recurrent cell types in (1) tumor cell cultures of different embryonic origins, (2) mouse xenografts, and (3) paraffin sections from patient tumors. Alongside morphologic peculiarities, these populations presented cancer stem cell markers, aberrant signaling pathways, and a set of deregulated miRNAs known to confer both stem-cell phenotypes and highly aggressive tumor behavior. The first type, named spiral cells, is marked by a spiral arrangement of nuclei. The second type, monastery cells, is characterized by prominent walls inside which daughter cells can be seen maturing amid a rich mitochondrial environment. The third type, called pregnant cells, is a giant cell with a syncytium-like morphology, a main nucleus, and many endoreplicative functional progeny cells. A rare fourth cell type identified in leukemia was christened shepherd cells, as it was always associated with clusters of smaller cells. Furthermore, a portion of resistant tumor cells displayed nuclear encapsulation via mitochondrial aggregation in the nuclear perimeter in response to cytostatic insults, probably conferring imperviousness to drugs and long periods of dormancy until nuclear eclosion takes place. This phenomenon was correlated with an increase in both intracellular and intercellular mitochondrial traffic as well as with the uptake of free extracellular mitochondria. All these cellular

  19. The "HER2-PI3K/Akt-FASN Axis" regulated malignant phenotype of colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Nan; Bu, Xiaodong; Wu, Peng; Wu, Pingping; Huang, Peilin

    2012-04-01

    Recent evidence suggests that HER2 (ErbB2; Her-2/neu) and the related PI3K/Akt signaling pathway substantially affect the malignant phenotype of colorectal cancer cells. Moreover, fatty acid synthase (FASN), which mediates de-novo fatty acid synthesis, is crucially important in the carcinogenesis process of a variety of cancers, including colorectal cancer. The purpose of this study was to investigate the malignant phenotype regulation of colorectal cancer cells via the "HER2-PI3K/Akt-FASN axis". Caco-2 cells with high expression of HER2 and FASN and high transfection efficiency were selected for functional characterization. The cells were transfected with either HER2-specific RNAi plasmid or negative control RNAi plasmid, followed by Q-RT-PCR and western blot assays to examine expression of HER2, PI3K, Akt, and FASN. MTT and colony-formation assays were used to assess proliferation. Migration was investigated by use of the transwell assay, and apoptosis and cell cycle were assayed by use of flow cytometry. Expression of HER2, PI3K, Akt, and FASN were downregulated when HER2 was silenced. Proliferation decreased after downregulation of HER2, which was consistent with increased apoptosis. Migration of HER2-silenced cells was also impaired. Loss of HER2 inhibits the activity of the "HER2-PI3K/Akt-FASN axis" of Caco-2 cells, and reduced activity of this axis alters the malignant behavior of Caco-2 cells.

  20. Serum depletion induced cancer stem cell-like phenotype due to nitric oxide synthesis in oncogenic HRas transformed cells

    PubMed Central

    Monji, Keisuke; Uchiumi, Takeshi; Hoshizawa, Saki; Yagi, Mikako; Matsumoto, Takashi; Setoyama, Daiki; Matsushima, Yuichi; Gotoh, Kazuhito; Amamoto, Rie; Kang, Donchon

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells rewire their metabolism and mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) to promote proliferation and maintenance. Cancer cells use multiple adaptive mechanisms in response to a hypo-nutrient environment. However, little is known about how cancer mitochondria are involved in the ability of these cells to adapt to a hypo-nutrient environment. Oncogenic HRas leads to suppression of the mitochondrial oxygen consumption rate (OCR), but oxygen consumption is essential for tumorigenesis. We found that in oncogenic HRas transformed cells, serum depletion reversibly increased the OCR and membrane potential. Serum depletion promoted a cancer stem cell (CSC)-like phenotype, indicated by an increase in CSC markers expression and resistance to anticancer agents. We also found that nitric oxide (NO) synthesis was significantly induced after serum depletion and that NO donors modified the OCR. An NOS inhibitor, SEITU, inhibited the OCR and CSC gene expression. It also reduced anchorage-independent growth by promoting apoptosis. In summary, our data provide new molecular findings that serum depletion induces NO synthesis and promotes mitochondrial OXPHOS, leading to tumor progression and a CSC phenotype. These results suggest that mitochondrial OCR inhibitors can be used as therapy against CSC. PMID:27655692

  1. Serum depletion induced cancer stem cell-like phenotype due to nitric oxide synthesis in oncogenic HRas transformed cells.

    PubMed

    Monji, Keisuke; Uchiumi, Takeshi; Hoshizawa, Saki; Yagi, Mikako; Matsumoto, Takashi; Setoyama, Daiki; Matsushima, Yuichi; Gotoh, Kazuhito; Amamoto, Rie; Kang, Donchon

    2016-11-15

    Cancer cells rewire their metabolism and mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) to promote proliferation and maintenance. Cancer cells use multiple adaptive mechanisms in response to a hypo-nutrient environment. However, little is known about how cancer mitochondria are involved in the ability of these cells to adapt to a hypo-nutrient environment. Oncogenic HRas leads to suppression of the mitochondrial oxygen consumption rate (OCR), but oxygen consumption is essential for tumorigenesis. We found that in oncogenic HRas transformed cells, serum depletion reversibly increased the OCR and membrane potential. Serum depletion promoted a cancer stem cell (CSC)-like phenotype, indicated by an increase in CSC markers expression and resistance to anticancer agents. We also found that nitric oxide (NO) synthesis was significantly induced after serum depletion and that NO donors modified the OCR. An NOS inhibitor, SEITU, inhibited the OCR and CSC gene expression. It also reduced anchorage-independent growth by promoting apoptosis. In summary, our data provide new molecular findings that serum depletion induces NO synthesis and promotes mitochondrial OXPHOS, leading to tumor progression and a CSC phenotype. These results suggest that mitochondrial OCR inhibitors can be used as therapy against CSC.

  2. Decreased Expression of the Early Mitotic Gene CHFR Contributes to the Acquisition of Breast Cancer Phenotypes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-01

    human model system. To characterize the role of CHFR in breast cancer , we used both cultured breast cell lines... epithelial cells became elongated and showed more variability in cell size, which is suggestive of the epithelial -to- mesenchymal transition that is...was to characterize the role of CHFR in breast cancer tumorigenesis using both cultured breast cancer cell lines and primary breast cancers

  3. Community-acquired diarrhea associated with Clostridium difficile in an HIV-positive cancer patient: first case report in Latin America.

    PubMed

    Costa, Cecília L; Quesada-Gómez, Carlos; de Carvalho, Cibele B Mano; González, Rafael H; Gifoni, Markus A; Ribeiro, Ronaldo A; de Castro Brito, Gerly Anne

    2014-09-01

    Clostridium difficile is the most important cause of nosocomial diarrhea, mainly associated with antibiotic use and immunodeficiency. Although, an increased incidence of community-acquired C. difficile infection (CA-CDI) has been reported worldwide, this infection has been under-diagnosed in Latin America. This is the first report of a CA-CDI case in Latin America, in an HIV-positive patient with cancer.

  4. miR-15b inhibits cancer-initiating cell phenotypes and chemoresistance of cisplatin by targeting TRIM14 in oral tongue squamous cell cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xijun; Guo, Hongmei; Yao, Banjamin; Helms, Julia

    2017-03-27

    Oral tongue squamous cell carcinoma (TSCC) is one of the most lethal cancers within the oral cavity and its prognosis remains dismal due to the paucity of effective therapeutic targets. The formation of cancer-initiating cells (CICs) and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) are pivotal events involved in the dismal prognosis. They have been shown to be related to the resistance to cisplatin treatment. In the present study, we showed that TRIM14 induced formation of cancer-initiating cells and EMT in TSCC SCC25 cells. Its overexpression promoted cisplatin resistance in the SCC25 cells. We found that overexpression of miR-15b suppressed TRIM14 and inhibited CIC phenotypes in the SCC25 cells. Moreover, overexpression of miR-15b promoted mesenchymal-epithelial transition (MET) in the SCC25 cells and sensitized cisplatin-resistant SCC25 (SCC25-res) cells to cisplatin. Thus, we conclude that miR-15b inhibited cancer stem cell phenotypes and its restoration reversed the chemoresistance of cisplatin by targeting TRIM14 in TSCC. Elucidating the molecular mechanism of EMT and cancer stem cells in TSCC may further aid in the understanding of the pathogenesis and progression of the disease, and offer novel targets for the discovery of new drugs.

  5. Acquired pericentric inversion of chromosome 9 in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Udayakumar, A M; Pathare, A V; Dennison, D; Raeburn, J A

    2009-01-01

    Pericentric inversion of chromosome 9 involving the qh region is relatively common as a constitutional genetic aberration without any apparent phenotypic consequences. However, it has not been established as an acquired abnormality in cancer. Among the three patients reported so far in the literature with acquired inv(9), only one had acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Here we describe an unique case where both chromosomes 9 presented with an acquired pericentric inversion with breakpoints at 9p13 and 9q12 respectively, in a AML patient with aberrant CD7 and CD9 positivity. Additionally, one der(9) also showed short arm deletion at 9p21 to the centromeric region and including the p16 gene. The constitutional karyotype was normal. This is probably the first report describing an acquired inv(9) involving both chromosomes 9 in AML. The possible significance of this inversion is discussed.

  6. CD44v6 expression is related to mesenchymal phenotype and poor prognosis in patients with colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Saito, Seiya; Okabe, Hirohisa; Watanabe, Masayuki; Ishimoto, Takatsugu; Iwatsuki, Masaaki; Baba, Yoshifumi; Tanaka, Youhei; Kurashige, Junji; Miyamoto, Yuji; Baba, Hideo

    2013-04-01

    CD44 standard isoform (CD44s) is a cancer stem cell marker in many tumors, and is one of the CD44 isoforms.CD44v6 has been reported to correlate with tumor progression and poor prognosis in colorectal cancer. However, the relevance of CD44s and CD44v6 to epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) remains unclear. Immunohistochemistry was performed to investigate the clinical importance of CD44s and CD44v6 and their relevance to EMT in 113 patients with stage II/III colorectal cancer treated by curative resection. The relevance of CD44v6 knockdown to the phenotype of colon cancer cells was examined using small interfering RNA (siRNA) specific for CD44v6 in vitro. CD44v6 expression showed a significant inverse correlation with E-cadherin expression (P=0.0007) and a positive correlation with vimentin expression (P=0.0096). A multivariate analysis showed that high CD44v6 expression was an independent poor prognostic factor for disease-free survival (P=0.01, HR=3.05) and overall survival (P=0.025, HR=3.16). The clinical significance and the relevance of CD44s expression to EMT markers was noted to a lesser extent compared to CD44v6 expression. The knockdown of CD44v6 decreased vimentin expression, cell invasion and HGF-induced cell migration, but conferred only a slight effect on E-cadherin expression in colon cancer cells (HCT116 and LoVo). CD44v6 is related to poor outcome of patients with colorectal cancer via upregulation of the mesenchymal phenotype.

  7. p16 overexpression and 9p21 deletion are linked to unfavorable tumor phenotype in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Lebok, Patrick; Roming, Magdalena; Kluth, Martina; Koop, Christina; Özden, Cansu; Taskin, Berivan; Hussein, Khakan; Lebeau, Annette; Witzel, Isabell; Wölber, Linn; Geist, Stefan; Paluchowski, Peter; Wilke, Christian; Heilenkötter, Uwe; Müller, Volkmar; Schmalfeldt, Barbara; Simon, Ronald; Sauter, Guido; Terracciano, Luigi; Krech, Rainer Horst; von der Assen, Albert; Burandt, Eike

    2016-12-06

    Overexpression of the p16 tumor suppressor, but also deletion of its gene locus 9p21, is linked to unfavorable tumor phenotype and poor prognosis in breast cancer. To better understand these contradictory observations, and to clarify the prognostic impact of p16 expression and 9p21 deletion, a tissue microarray (TMA) with 2,197 breast cancers was analyzed by fluorescence in-situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry (FISH) for 9p21 deletion and p16 expression. p16 immunostaining was weak in 25.6%, moderate in 7.1%, and strong in 12.7% of 1,684 evaluable cancers. Strong p16 staining was linked to advanced tumor stage (p = 0.0003), high-grade (p < 0.0001), high tumor cell proliferation (p < 0.0001), negative hormone receptor (ER/PR) status (p < 0.0001 each), and shorter overall survival (p = 0.0038). 9p21 deletion was found in 15.3% of 1,089 analyzable breast cancers, including 1.7% homozygous and 13.6% heterozygous deletions. 9p21 deletion was linked to adverse tumor features, including high-grade (p < 0.0001) and nodal positive cancers (p = 0.0063), high cell proliferation (p < 0.0001), negative hormone receptor (ER/PR) status (p ≤ 0.0006), and HER2 amplification (p = 0.0078). Patient outcome was worse in 9p21 deleted than in undeleted cancers (p = 0.0720). p16 expression was absent in cancers harboring homozygous 9p21 deletions, but no difference in p16 expression was found between cancers with (59.2% p16 positive) and without heterozygous 9p21 deletion (51.3% p16 positive, p = 0.0256). In summary, p16 expression is unrelated to partial 9p21 deletion, but both alterations are linked to aggressive breast cancer phenotype. High-level p16 expression is a strong predictor of unfavorable disease course in breast cancer.

  8. Lentivirus-mediated RASSF1A expression suppresses aggressive phenotypes of gastric cancer cells in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, P-H; Zheng, J-B; Wei, G-B; Wang, X-L; Wang, W; Chen, N-Z; Yu, J-H; Yao, J-F; Wang, H; Lu, S-Y; Sun, X-J

    2015-01-01

    Loss of Ras association domain family protein 1 isoform A (RASSF1A) expression is associated with the development of a variety of human cancers and the expression of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) frequently occurs in gastric cancer. This study investigated the effects of RASSF1A expression restoration using a hypoxia-inducible CEA promoter-driven vector on xenograft tumor growth in nude mice and on the in-vitro regulation of gastric cancer cell viability, cell cycle distribution, apoptosis, colony formation and invasion capacity. The data showed that the level of CEA mRNA and protein was much higher in gastric cancer SGC7901 cells than in a second gastric cancer cell line, MKN28, or in the MCF-10A normal epithelial breast cell line. RASSF1A expression was restored in SGC7901 cells compared with the negative control virus-infected SGC7910 cells. RASSF1A expression restoration significantly inhibited gastric cancer cell viability, colony formation and invasion capacity, but induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in vitro, especially under hypoxic culture conditions. At the gene level, restoration of RASSF1A expression under hypoxic culture conditions significantly suppressed matrix metalloproteinase-2 expression and prevented cyclinD1 expression. A nude mouse xenograft assay showed that the restoration of RASSF1A expression reduced gastric cancer xenograft formation and growth. In conclusion, the restoration of RASSF1A expression using a hypoxia-inducible and CEA promoter-driven vector suppressed aggressive phenotypes of gastric cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. These results suggest that LV-5HRE-CEAp-RASSF1A gene therapy may be a promising novel approach to treat advanced gastric cancer. PMID:26005859

  9. A discordance of the cytochrome P450 2C19 genotype and phenotype in patients with advanced cancer

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Marion L; Bhargava, Pankaj; Cherrouk, Ilham; Marshall, John L; Flockhart, David A; Wainer, Irving W

    2000-01-01

    Aims To examine the relationship between cytochrome P450 2C19 (CYP2C19) genotype and expressed metabolic activity in 16 patients with advanced metastatic cancer. Methods Individual CYP2C19 genotypes were determined by PCR-based amplification, followed by restriction fragment length analysis, and compared with observed CYP2C19 metabolic activity, as determined using the log hydroxylation index of omeprazole. Results All 16 patients had an extensive metabolizer genotype. However, based on the antimode in a distribution of log omeprazole hydroxylation indices from healthy volunteers, four of the patients had a poor metabolizer phenotype and there was a general shift of the remaining 12 patients towards a slower metabolic phenotype. This suggests a reduction in metabolic activity for all patients relative to healthy volunteers. A careful analysis of patient medical records failed to reveal any drug interactions or other source for the observed discordance between genotype and phenotype. Conclusions There are no previous reports of a ‘discordance’ between genotype and expressed enzyme activity in cancer patients. Such a decrease in enzyme activity could have an impact on the efficacy and toxicity of chemotherapeutic agents and other drugs, used in standard oncology practice. PMID:10792207

  10. Resistance to anticancer vaccination effect is controlled by a cancer cell-autonomous phenotype that disrupts immunogenic phagocytic removal.

    PubMed

    Garg, Abhishek D; Elsen, Sanne; Krysko, Dmitri V; Vandenabeele, Peter; de Witte, Peter; Agostinis, Patrizia

    2015-09-29

    Immunogenic cell death (ICD) is a well-established instigator of 'anti-cancer vaccination-effect (AVE)'. ICD has shown considerable preclinical promise, yet there remain subset of cancer patients that fail to respond to clinically-applied ICD inducers. Non-responsiveness to ICD inducers could be explained by the existence of cancer cell-autonomous, anti-AVE resistance mechanisms. However such resistance mechanisms remain poorly investigated. In this study, we have characterized for the first time, a naturally-occurring preclinical cancer model (AY27) that exhibits intrinsic anti-AVE resistance despite treatment with ICD inducers like mitoxantrone or hypericin-photodynamic therapy. Further mechanistic analysis revealed that this anti-AVE resistance was associated with a defect in exposing the important 'eat me' danger signal, surface-calreticulin (ecto-CRT/CALR). In an ICD setting, this defective ecto-CRT further correlated with severely reduced phagocytic clearance of AY27 cells as well as the failure of these cells to activate AVE. Defective ecto-CRT in response to ICD induction was a result of low endogenous CRT protein levels (i.e. CRTlow-phenotype) in AY27 cells. Exogenous reconstitution of ecto-rCRT (recombinant-CRT) improved the phagocytic removal of ICD inducer-treated AY27 cells, and importantly, significantly increased their AVE-activating ability. Moreover, we found that a subset of cancer patients of various cancer-types indeed possessed CALRlow or CRTlow-tumours. Remarkably, we found that tumoural CALRhigh-phenotype was predictive of positive clinical responses to therapy with ICD inducers (radiotherapy and paclitaxel) in lung and ovarian cancer patients, respectively. Furthermore, only in the ICD clinical setting, tumoural CALR levels positively correlated with the levels of various phagocytosis-associated genes relevant for phagosome maturation or processing. Thus, we reveal the existence of a cancer cell-autonomous, anti-AVE or anti-ICD resistance

  11. Acquired resistance to BRAF inhibition induces epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition in BRAF (V600E) mutant thyroid cancer by c-Met-mediated AKT activation

    PubMed Central

    Byeon, Hyung Kwon; Na, Hwi Jung; Yang, Yeon Ju; Ko, Sooah; Yoon, Sun Och; Ku, Minhee; Yang, Jaemoon; Kim, Jae Wook; Ban, Myung Jin; Kim, Ji-Hoon; Kim, Da Hee; Kim, Jung Min; Choi, Eun Chang; Kim, Chang-Hoon; Yoon, Joo-Heon; Koh, Yoon Woo

    2017-01-01

    Previously, the authors have identified that c-Met mediates reactivation of the PI3K/AKT pathway following BRAF inhibitor treatment in BRAF (V600E) mutant anaplastic thyroid cancer, thereby contributing to the acquired drug resistance. Therefore dual inhibition of BRAF and c-Met led to sustained treatment response, thereby maximizing the specific anti-tumor effect of targeted therapy. The present study goes one step further and aims to investigate the effect of acquired resistance of BRAF inhibitor on epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in BRAF mutant thyroid cancer cells and the effect of dual inhibition from combinatorial therapy. Two thyroid cancer cell lines, 8505C and BCPAP were selected and treated with BRAF inhibitor, PLX4032 and its effect on EMT were examined and compared. Further investigation was carried out in orthotopic xenograft mouse models. Unlike BCPAP cells, the BRAF inhibitor resistant 8505C cells showed increased expressions of EMT related markers such as vimentin, β-catenin, and CD44. The combinatorial treatment of PLX4032 and PHA665752, a c-Met inhibitor reversed EMT. Similar results were confirmed in vivo. c-Met-mediated reactivation of the PI3K/AKT pathway contributes to the drug resistance to PLX4032 in BRAF (V600E) mutant anaplastic thyroid cancer cells and further promotes tumor cell migration and invasion by upregulated EMT mechanism. Dual inhibition of BRAF and c-Met leads to reversal of EMT, suggesting a maximal therapeutic response. PMID:27880942

  12. A Nested Case–Control Study of Metabolically Defined Body Size Phenotypes and Risk of Colorectal Cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC)

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Neil; Cross, Amanda J.; Abubakar, Mustapha; Jenab, Mazda; Aleksandrova, Krasimira; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Dossus, Laure; Racine, Antoine; Kühn, Tilman; Katzke, Verena A.; Tjønneland, Anne; Petersen, Kristina E. N.; Overvad, Kim; Quirós, J. Ramón; Jakszyn, Paula; Molina-Montes, Esther; Dorronsoro, Miren; Huerta, José-María; Barricarte, Aurelio; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Wareham, Nick; Travis, Ruth C.; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Lagiou, Pagona; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Masala, Giovanna; Krogh, Vittorio; Tumino, Rosario; Vineis, Paolo; Panico, Salvatore; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas; Siersema, Peter D.; Peeters, Petra H.; Ohlsson, Bodil; Ericson, Ulrika; Palmqvist, Richard; Nyström, Hanna; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Skeie, Guri; Freisling, Heinz; Kong, So Yeon; Tsilidis, Kostas; Muller, David C.; Riboli, Elio; Gunter, Marc J

    2016-01-01

    Background Obesity is positively associated with colorectal cancer. Recently, body size subtypes categorised by the prevalence of hyperinsulinaemia have been defined, and metabolically healthy overweight/obese individuals (without hyperinsulinaemia) have been suggested to be at lower risk of cardiovascular disease than their metabolically unhealthy (hyperinsulinaemic) overweight/obese counterparts. Whether similarly variable relationships exist for metabolically defined body size phenotypes and colorectal cancer risk is unknown. Methods and Findings The association of metabolically defined body size phenotypes with colorectal cancer was investigated in a case–control study nested within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study. Metabolic health/body size phenotypes were defined according to hyperinsulinaemia status using serum concentrations of C-peptide, a marker of insulin secretion. A total of 737 incident colorectal cancer cases and 737 matched controls were divided into tertiles based on the distribution of C-peptide concentration amongst the control population, and participants were classified as metabolically healthy if below the first tertile of C-peptide and metabolically unhealthy if above the first tertile. These metabolic health definitions were then combined with body mass index (BMI) measurements to create four metabolic health/body size phenotype categories: (1) metabolically healthy/normal weight (BMI < 25 kg/m2), (2) metabolically healthy/overweight (BMI ≥ 25 kg/m2), (3) metabolically unhealthy/normal weight (BMI < 25 kg/m2), and (4) metabolically unhealthy/overweight (BMI ≥ 25 kg/m2). Additionally, in separate models, waist circumference measurements (using the International Diabetes Federation cut-points [≥80 cm for women and ≥94 cm for men]) were used (instead of BMI) to create the four metabolic health/body size phenotype categories. Statistical tests used in the analysis were all two-sided, and a

  13. Endogenously Expressed IL-4Rα Promotes the Malignant Phenotype of Human Pancreatic Cancer In Vitro and In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Traub, Benno; Sun, Lie; Ma, Yongsu; Xu, Pengfei; Lemke, Johannes; Paschke, Stephan; Henne-Bruns, Doris; Knippschild, Uwe; Kornmann, Marko

    2017-03-28

    Exogenous interleukin-4 (IL-4) has been demonstrated to affect the growth of different human malignancies including pancreatic cancer cells. The aim of our study was to determine the role of endogenously expressed IL-4-receptor-α-chain (IL-4Rα) in pancreatic cancer cells. IL-4Rα-suppression was achieved by generating Capan-1 cells stably expressing shRNA targeting IL-4Rα. The malignant phenotype was characterized by assessing growth properties, directional and non-directional cell movement in vitro and tumor growth in vivo. Signaling pathways were analyzed upon IL-4 and IL-13 stimulation of wildtype (WT) and control-transfected cells compared to IL-4Rα-knockdown cells. Silencing of IL-4Rα resulted in reduced anchorage-dependent cell growth (p < 0.05) and reduced anchorage-independent colony size (p < 0.001) in vitro. Moreover, cell movement and migration was inhibited. IL-4 and IL-13 stimulation of Capan-1-WT cells induced activation of similar pathways like stimulation with Insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I. This activation was reduced after IL-4Rα downregulation while IGF-I signaling seemed to be enhanced in knockdown-clones. Importantly, IL-4Rα silencing also significantly suppressed tumor growth in vivo. The present study indicates that endogenously expressed IL-4 and IL-4Rα contribute to the malignant phenotype of pancreatic cancer cells by activating diverse pro-oncogenic signaling pathways. Addressing these pathways may contribute to the treatment of the disease.

  14. Phenotype and function of tumor-associated neutrophils and their subsets in early-stage human lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Eruslanov, Evgeniy B

    2017-03-10

    Neutrophils accumulate in many types of human and murine tumors and represent a significant portion of tumor-infiltrating myeloid cells. Our current understanding of the role of neutrophils in tumor development has depended primarily on murine models of cancer. However, there are crucial species differences in the evolution of tumors, genetic diversity, immune and inflammatory responses, and intrinsic biology of neutrophils that might have a profound impact on the tumor development and function of neutrophils in mouse versus human tumors. To date, the majority of experimental approaches to study neutrophils in cancer patients have been limited to the examination of circulating blood neutrophils. The phenotype and function of tumor-associated neutrophils (TANs) in humans, particularly in the early stages of tumor development, have not been extensively investigated. Thus, the long-term goal of our work has been to characterize human TANs and determine their specific role in tumor development. Here, we summarize our findings on human TANs obtained from human early stage lung cancer patients. We will describe the phenotypes of different TAN subsets identified in early stage lung tumors, as well as their functional dialog with T cells.

  15. Targeting the miR-200c/LIN28B axis in acquired EGFR-TKI resistance non-small cell lung cancer cells harboring EMT features

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Hiroki; Shien, Kazuhiko; Tomida, Shuta; Okayasu, Kazuhiro; Suzawa, Ken; Hashida, Shinsuke; Torigoe, Hidejiro; Watanabe, Mototsugu; Yamamoto, Hiromasa; Soh, Junichi; Asano, Hiroaki; Tsukuda, Kazunori; Miyoshi, Shinichiro; Toyooka, Shinichi

    2017-01-01

    MicroRNA (miR)-200 family members (miR-200s) are frequently silenced in advanced cancer and have been implicated in the process of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). We previously reported that miR-200s were silenced through promoter methylation in acquired EGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) resistant non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells harboring EMT features. In this study, we examined the functional role of miR-200s in NSCLC cells and investigated a novel approach to overcoming acquired EGFR-TKI resistance. In the analysis of NSCLC cell lines, each of the miR-200s expression-silenced cell lines showed promoter methylation. Significant correlations between miR-200c silencing and several oncogenic pathway alterations, including EMT-changes and LIN28B overexpression, were observed in the database analysis. In addition, EGFR-wild type cell lines had lower miR-200s expression levels than EGFR-mutant cell lines. The introduction of miR-200c using pre-miR-200c caused LIN28B suppression in cells with acquired EGFR-TKI resistance that harbored EMT features. Interestingly, both the introduction of miR-200c and the knockdown of LIN28B produced an antitumor effect in acquired EGFR-TKI resistance cells, whereas these manipulations were not effective in parental cells. The miR-200c/LIN28B axis plays an important role in cells with acquired resistance to EGFR-TKI that harbor EMT features and might be a useful therapeutic target for overcoming resistance. PMID:28084458

  16. Usefulness of plasma HGF level for monitoring acquired resistance to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors in non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Umeguchi, Hitomi; Sueoka-Aragane, Naoko; Kobayashi, Naomi; Nakamura, Tomomi; Sato, Akemi; Takeda, Yuji; Hayashi, Shinichiro; Sueoka, Eisaburo; Kimura, Shinya

    2015-01-01

    Monitoring of molecular markers is indispensable for deciding subsequent treatment after acquired resistance to molecular-targeted therapy. According to results using re-biopsy, EGFR T790M mutation and overexpression of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) are major mechanisms of acquired resistance to epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors (EGFR-TKIs). The aim of the present study was to assess whether quantification of HGF using peripheral blood in addition to detection of T790M with plasma DNA is useful for monitoring as an alternative to invasive re-biopsy. HGF levels in plasma were determined using ELISA and T790M mutation was detected using mutation-biased PCR and quenched probe system (MBP-QP). The median level of HGF in plasma at baseline was 140 pg/ml and was significantly higher in the advanced stage of cancer and in smokers and predicted poor survival as determined using 315 plasma samples from 225 lung cancer patients. T790M was detected with plasma DNA in 9 of 16 patients who acquired resistance to EGFR-TKIs and a greater than 1.5-fold elevation compared with pretreatment HGF levels was observed in 6 patients after acquired resistance. Eleven of 16 patients (69%) showed either HGF elevation or T790M in plasma samples, with both outcomes observed in 25% of patients; this is consistent with results based on re-biopsy reported from other laboratories. Considering these results, assessing HGF and T790M using peripheral blood could be useful for monitoring mechanisms of acquired resistance to EGFR-TKIs.

  17. Curcumin-treated cancer cells show mitotic disturbances leading to growth arrest and induction of senescence phenotype.

    PubMed

    Mosieniak, Grażyna; Sliwinska, Małgorzata A; Przybylska, Dorota; Grabowska, Wioleta; Sunderland, Piotr; Bielak-Zmijewska, Anna; Sikora, Ewa

    2016-05-01

    Cellular senescence is recognized as a potent anticancer mechanism that inhibits carcinogenesis. Cancer cells can also undergo senescence upon chemo- or radiotherapy. Curcumin, a natural polyphenol derived from the rhizome of Curcuma longa, shows anticancer properties both in vitro and in vivo. Previously, we have shown that treatment with curcumin leads to senescence of human cancer cells. Now we identified the molecular mechanism underlying this phenomenon. We observed a time-dependent accumulation of mitotic cells upon curcumin treatment. The time-lapse analysis proved that those cells progressed through mitosis for a significantly longer period of time. A fraction of cells managed to divide or undergo mitotic slippage and then enter the next phase of the cell cycle. Cells arrested in mitosis had an improperly formed mitotic spindle and were positive for γH2AX, which shows that they acquired DNA damage during prolonged mitosis. Moreover, the DNA damage response pathway was activated upon curcumin treatment and the components of this pathway remained upregulated while cells were undergoing senescence. Inhibition of the DNA damage response decreased the number of senescent cells. Thus, our studies revealed that the induction of cell senescence upon curcumin treatment resulted from aberrant progression through the cell cycle. Moreover, the DNA damage acquired by cancer cells, due to mitotic disturbances, activates an important molecular mechanism that determines the potential anticancer activity of curcumin.

  18. The impact of adhesion peptides within hydrogels on the phenotype and signaling of normal and cancerous mammary epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Michael S.; Bernabé, Beatriz Peñalver; Shikanov, Ariella; Bluver, Dennis A.; Mui, Michael D.; Shin, Seungjin; Broadbelt, Linda J.; Shea, Lonnie D.

    2012-01-01

    The microenviroment contributes to directing mammary epithelial cell (MEC) development and the progression of breast cancer. Three-dimensional culture models have been used to support formation of structures that display varying degrees of disorganization that parallel the degree of cancer. Synthetic hydrogels were employed to investigate the mechanisms by which specific adhesion signals in the microenvironment directed development. Polyethylene glycol-based hydrogels supported 3D growth of MECs and directed formation of a range of phenotypes that were functions of genotype, and identity and concentration of adhesion peptides RGD and YIGSR. Non-cancerous and cancerous MECs responded differentially to the same adhesion cues and produced variable structural organizations. An analysis of dynamic signaling pathways revealed differential activities of transcription factors within the MAPK and JAK/STAT pathways in response to genotype and adhesion. These results directly implicate adhesion in cancer development and demonstrate that AP1, CREB, STAT1, and STAT3 all contribute to the genotype dependence of cellular response to adhesion peptides. The tools presented in this work could be applied to other systems and connect extracellular cues with intracellular signaling to molecularly dissect tissue development and further biomaterials development. PMID:22341213

  19. Gallic acid inhibition of Src-Stat3 signaling overcomes acquired resistance to EGF receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors in advanced non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Phan, Ai N.H.; Hua, Tuyen N.M.; Kim, Min-Kyu; Vo, Vu T.A.; Choi, Jong-Whan; Kim, Hyun-Won; Rho, Jin Kyung; Kim, Ki Woo; Jeong, Yangsik

    2016-01-01

    Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) targeting epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) have clinically benefited to lung cancer patients harboring a subset of activating EGFR mutations. However, even with the remarkable therapeutic response at the initial TKI treatment, most lung cancer patients eventually have relapsed aggressive tumors due to acquired resistance to the TKIs. Here, we report that 3, 4, 5-trihydroxybenzoic acid or gallic acid (GA), a natural polyphenolic compound, shows anti-tumorigenic effects in TKI-resistant non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Using both in vitro growth assay and in vivo xenograft animal model, we demonstrated tumor suppressive effect of GA was more selective for the TKI-resistant cancer compared to the TKI-sensitive one. Mechanistically, GA treatment inhibited Src-Stat3-mediated signaling and decreased the expression of Stat3-regulated tumor promoting genes, subsequently inducing apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in the TKI-resistant lung cancer but not in the TKI-sensitive one. Consistent with the in vitro results, in vivo xenograft experiments showed the TKI-resistant tumor-selective growth inhibition and suppression of Src-Stat3-dependent signaling in the GA-treated tumors isolated from the xenograft model. This finding identified an importance of Src-Stat3 signaling cascade in GA-mediated tumor-suppression activity and, more importantly, provides a novel therapeutic insight of GA for advanced TKI-resistant lung cancer. PMID:27419630

  20. Acquired resistance of pancreatic cancer cells to cisplatin is multifactorial with cell context-dependent involvement of resistance genes

    PubMed Central

    Mezencev, R; Matyunina, L V; Wagner, G T; McDonald, J F

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is one of the most lethal of malignancies, in large measure, due to the propensity of PDAC cells to acquire resistance to chemotherapeutic agents. A better understanding of the molecular basis of acquired resistance is a major focus of contemporary PDAC research. We report here the results of a study to independently develop cisplatin resistance in two distinct parental PDAC cell lines, AsPC1 and BxPC3, and to subsequently examine the molecular mechanisms associated with the acquired resistance. Cisplatin resistance in both resistant cell lines was found to be multifactorial and to be associated with mechanisms related to drug transport, drug inactivation, DNA damage response, DNA repair and the modulation of apoptosis. Our results demonstrate that the two resistant cell lines employed alternative molecular strategies in acquiring resistance dictated, in part, by pre-existing molecular differences between the parental cell lines. Collectively, our findings indicate that strategies to inhibit or reverse acquired resistance of PDAC cells to cisplatin, and perhaps other chemotherapeutic agents, may not be generalized but will require individual molecular profiling and analysis to be effective. PMID:27910856

  1. Acquired EGFR C797S mutation mediates resistance to AZD9291 in non-small cell lung cancer harboring EGFR T790M.

    PubMed

    Thress, Kenneth S; Paweletz, Cloud P; Felip, Enriqueta; Cho, Byoung Chul; Stetson, Daniel; Dougherty, Brian; Lai, Zhongwu; Markovets, Aleksandra; Vivancos, Ana; Kuang, Yanan; Ercan, Dalia; Matthews, Sarah E; Cantarini, Mireille; Barrett, J Carl; Jänne, Pasi A; Oxnard, Geoffrey R

    2015-06-01

    Here we studied cell-free plasma DNA (cfDNA) collected from subjects with advanced lung cancer whose tumors had developed resistance to the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) AZD9291. We first performed next-generation sequencing of cfDNA from seven subjects and detected an acquired EGFR C797S mutation in one; expression of this mutant EGFR construct in a cell line rendered it resistant to AZD9291. We then performed droplet digital PCR on serial cfDNA specimens collected from 15 AZD9291-treated subjects. All were positive for the T790M mutation before treatment, but upon developing AZD9291 resistance three molecular subtypes emerged: six cases acquired the C797S mutation, five cases maintained the T790M mutation but did not acquire the C797S mutation and four cases lost the T790M mutation despite the presence of the underlying EGFR activating mutation. Our findings provide insight into the diversity of mechanisms through which tumors acquire resistance to AZD9291 and highlight the need for therapies that are able to overcome resistance mediated by the EGFR C797S mutation.

  2. An Acquired HER2 T798I Gatekeeper Mutation Induces Resistance to Neratinib in a Patient with HER2 Mutant-Driven Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Hanker, Ariella B; Red Brewer, Monica; Sheehan, Jonathan H; Koch, James P; Sliwoski, Gregory R; Nagy, Rebecca; Lanman, Richard; Berger, Michael F; Hyman, David M; Solit, David B; He, Jie; Miller, Vincent; Cutler, Richard E; Lalani, Alshad S; Cross, Darren; Lovly, Christine M; Meiler, Jens; Arteaga, Carlos L

    2017-03-08

    We report a HER2T798I gatekeeper mutation in a patient with HER2L869R-mutant breast cancer with acquired resistance to neratinib. Laboratory studies suggested that HER2L869R is a neratinib-sensitive, gain-of-function mutation that upon dimerization with mutant HER3E928G, also present in the breast cancer, amplifies HER2 signaling. The patient was treated with neratinib and exhibited a sustained partial response. Upon clinical progression, HER2T798I was detected in plasma tumor cell-free DNA. Structural modeling of this acquired mutation suggested that the increased bulk of isoleucine in HER2T798I reduces neratinib binding. Neratinib blocked HER2-mediated signaling and growth in cells expressing HER2L869R but not HER2L869R/T798I. In contrast, afatinib and the osimertinib metabolite AZ5104 strongly suppressed HER2L869R/T798I-induced signaling and cell growth. Acquisition of HER2T798I upon development of resistance to neratinib in a breast cancer with an initial activating HER2 mutation suggests HER2L869R is a driver mutation. HER2T798I-mediated neratinib resistance may be overcome by other irreversible HER2 inhibitors like afatinib.

  3. Aquaporin 5 expression is frequent in prostate cancer and shows a dichotomous correlation with tumor phenotype and PSA recurrence.

    PubMed

    Pust, Alexandra; Kylies, Dominik; Hube-Magg, Claudia; Kluth, Martina; Minner, Sarah; Koop, Christina; Grob, Tobias; Graefen, Markus; Salomon, Georg; Tsourlakis, Maria Christina; Izbicki, Jakob; Wittmer, Corinna; Huland, Hartwig; Simon, Ronald; Wilczak, Waldemar; Sauter, Guido; Steurer, Stefan; Krech, Till; Schlomm, Thorsten; Melling, Nathaniel

    2016-02-01

    Aquaporin 5 (AQP5) is an androgen-regulated member of a family of small hydrophobic integral transmembrane water channel proteins regulating cellular water homeostasis and growth signaling. To evaluate its clinical impact and relationship with key genomic alterations in prostate cancer, AQP5 expression was analyzed by immunohistochemistry on a tissue microarray containing 12427 prostate cancers. The analysis revealed weak to moderate immunostaining in normal prostate epithelium. In prostate cancers AQP5 staining levels were more variable and also included completely negative and highly overexpressing cases. Negative, weak, moderate, and strong AQP5 staining was found in 25.0%, 32.5%, 32.5%, and 10.0% of 10239 interpretable tumors. Comparison of AQP5 expression levels with tumor characteristics showed a dichotomous pattern with both high and low staining levels being linked to unfavorable tumor phenotype. AQP5 was negative in 28%, 23%, 24%, and 35% of tumors with Gleason score ≤3 + 3, 3 + 4, 4 + 3 and ≥4 + 4, while the rate of strongly positive cases continuously increased from 7.0% over 10.0% and 12.0% to 13.0% in cancers with Gleason score ≤3 + 3, 3 + 4, 4 + 3 and ≥4 + 4. AQP5 expression was also related to ERG positivity and phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) deletion (P < .0001 each). Strong AQP5 positivity was seen in 15.5% of ERG-positive and 5.8% of ERG-negative cancers (P < .0001) as well as in 14.7% of cancers with PTEN deletion and 9.4% of cancers without PTEN deletion. Remarkably, both negativity and strong positivity of AQP5 were linked to unfavorable disease outcome. This was however only seen in subgroups defined by TMPRSS2-ERG fusion and/or PTEN deletion. In summary, AQP5 can be both overexpressed and lost in subgroups of prostate cancers. Both alterations are linked to unfavorable outcome in molecularly defined cancer subgroups. It is hypothesized that this dichotomous role of AQP5 is due to two highly different mechanisms as to how the

  4. Non-small cell lung cancer: quantitative phenotypic analysis of CT images as a potential marker of prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jiangdian; Liu, Zaiyi; Zhong, Wenzhao; Huang, Yanqi; Ma, Zelan; Dong, Di; Liang, Changhong; Tian, Jie

    2016-01-01

    This was a retrospective study to investigate the predictive and prognostic ability of quantitative computed tomography phenotypic features in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). 661 patients with pathological confirmed as NSCLC were enrolled between 2007 and 2014. 592 phenotypic descriptors was automatically extracted on the pre-therapy CT images. Firstly, support vector machine (SVM) was used to evaluate the predictive value of each feature for pathology and TNM clinical stage. Secondly, Cox proportional hazards model was used to evaluate the prognostic value of these imaging signatures selected by SVM which subjected to a primary cohort of 138 patients, and an external independent validation of 61 patients. The results indicated that predictive accuracy for histopathology, N staging, and overall clinical stage was 75.16%, 79.40% and 80.33%, respectively. Besides, Cox models indicated the signatures selected by SVM: “correlation of co-occurrence after wavelet transform” was significantly associated with overall survival in the two datasets (hazard ratio [HR]: 1.65, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.41–2.75, p = 0.010; and HR: 2.74, 95%CI: 1.10–6.85, p = 0.027, respectively). Our study indicates that the phenotypic features might provide some insight in metastatic potential or aggressiveness for NSCLC, which potentially offer clinical value in directing personalized therapeutic regimen selection for NSCLC. PMID:27922113

  5. Phenotypic and Molecular Characterization of MCF10DCIS and SUM Breast Cancer Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Barnabas, Nandita; Cohen, Dalia

    2013-01-01

    We reviewed the phenotypic and molecular characteristics of MCF10DCIS.com and the SUM cell lines based on numerous studies performed over the years. The major signaling pathways that give rise to the phenotype of these cells may serve as a good resource of information when researchers in drug discovery and development use these cells to identify novel targets and biomarkers. Major signaling pathways and mutations affecting the coding sequence are also described providing important information when using these cells as a model in a variety of studies. PMID:23401782

  6. The mitotic checkpoint regulator RAE1 induces aggressive breast cancer cell phenotypes by mediating epithelial-mesenchymal transition

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Ji Hoon; Hur, Ho; Lee, Ji-Yeon; Kim, Yeejeong; Seo, Younsoo; Kim, Myoung Hee

    2017-01-01

    The gene RAE1 encodes ribonucleic acid export 1 (RAE1), which is involved in mRNA export and is known to serve as a mitotic checkpoint regulator. In addition, RAE1 haplo-insufficiency leads to chromosome missegregation and early aging-associated phenotypes. In humans, a positive correlation has been found between RAE1 copy number abnormalities and gene amplification in breast cancer cells. However, the precise functional role of RAE1 in breast cancer remains to be determined. An in silico analysis of data retrieved from GENT and cBio-Portal identified RAE1 upregulation in breast cancer tissues relative to normal breast cells. Functional studies of various cell lines showed that RAE1 induced invasive and migratory abilities by regulating epithelial-mesenchymal transition signals. A tissue microarray was constructed to demonstrate the interrelationship between clinicopathological features and RAE1 expression. Immunohistochemistry revealed a positive correlation between RAE1 expression and a high histologic grade. Furthermore, RAE1 overexpression was associated with considerably poorer disease-free survival and distant metastasis-free survival, especially in patients with oestrogen receptor-positive tumours. In summary, RAE1 may be a prognostic marker and therapeutic intervention target in malignant breast cancers. PMID:28181567

  7. Phenotypic consequences of somatic mutations in the ataxia-telangiectasia mutated gene in non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Anika Maria; Drobnitzky, Neele; Devery, Aoife Maire; Bokobza, Sivan Mili; Adams, Richard A.; Maughan, Timothy S.; Ryan, Anderson Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) gene are frequently found in human cancers, including non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Loss of ATM function confers sensitivity to ionising radiation (IR) and topoisomerase inhibitors and may thus define a subset of cancer patients that could get increased benefit from these therapies. In this study, we evaluated the phenotypic consequences of ATM missense changes reported in seven NSCLC cell lines with regard to radiosensitivity and functionality of ATM signalling. Our data demonstrate that only 2/7 NSCLC cell lines (H1395 and H23) harbouring ATM missense mutations show a functional impairment of ATM signalling following IR-exposure. In these two cell lines, the missense mutations caused a significant reduction in ATM protein levels, impairment of ATM signalling and marked radiosensitivity. Of note, only cell lines with homozygous mutations in the ATM gene showed significant impairment of ATM function. Based on these observations, we developed an immunohistochemistry-based assay to identify patients with loss or reduction of ATM protein expression in a clinical setting. In a set of 137 NSCLC and 154 colorectal cancer specimens we identified tumoral loss of ATM protein expression in 9.5% and 3.9% of cases, respectively, demonstrating the potential utility of this method. PMID:27602502

  8. Effect of Dietary ω-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid DHA on Glycolytic Enzymes and Warburg Phenotypes in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Manzi, Laura; Costantini, Lara; Molinari, Romina; Merendino, Nicolò

    2015-01-01

    The omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω-3 PUFAs) are a class of lipids that has been shown to have beneficial effects on some chronic degenerative diseases such as cardiovascular diseases, rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory disorders, diabetes, and cancer. Among ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) has received particular attention for its antiproliferative, proapoptotic, antiangiogenetic, anti-invasion, and antimetastatic properties, even though the involved molecular mechanisms are not well understood. Recently, some in vitro studies showed that DHA promotes the inhibition of glycolytic enzymes and the Warburg phenotype. For example, it was shown that in breast cancer cell lines the modulation of bioenergetic functions is due to the capacity of DHA to activate the AMPK signalling and negatively regulate the HIF-1α functions. Taking into account these considerations, this review is focused on current knowledge concerning the role of DHA in interfering with cancer cell metabolism; this could be considered a further mechanism by which DHA inhibits cancer cell survival and progression. PMID:26339588

  9. Effect of Dietary ω-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid DHA on Glycolytic Enzymes and Warburg Phenotypes in Cancer.

    PubMed

    Manzi, Laura; Costantini, Lara; Molinari, Romina; Merendino, Nicolò

    2015-01-01

    The omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω-3 PUFAs) are a class of lipids that has been shown to have beneficial effects on some chronic degenerative diseases such as cardiovascular diseases, rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory disorders, diabetes, and cancer. Among ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) has received particular attention for its antiproliferative, proapoptotic, antiangiogenetic, anti-invasion, and antimetastatic properties, even though the involved molecular mechanisms are not well understood. Recently, some in vitro studies showed that DHA promotes the inhibition of glycolytic enzymes and the Warburg phenotype. For example, it was shown that in breast cancer cell lines the modulation of bioenergetic functions is due to the capacity of DHA to activate the AMPK signalling and negatively regulate the HIF-1α functions. Taking into account these considerations, this review is focused on current knowledge concerning the role of DHA in interfering with cancer cell metabolism; this could be considered a further mechanism by which DHA inhibits cancer cell survival and progression.

  10. The mitotic checkpoint regulator RAE1 induces aggressive breast cancer cell phenotypes by mediating epithelial-mesenchymal transition.

    PubMed

    Oh, Ji Hoon; Hur, Ho; Lee, Ji-Yeon; Kim, Yeejeong; Seo, Younsoo; Kim, Myoung Hee

    2017-02-09

    The gene RAE1 encodes ribonucleic acid export 1 (RAE1), which is involved in mRNA export and is known to serve as a mitotic checkpoint regulator. In addition, RAE1 haplo-insufficiency leads to chromosome missegregation and early aging-associated phenotypes. In humans, a positive correlation has been found between RAE1 copy number abnormalities and gene amplification in breast cancer cells. However, the precise functional role of RAE1 in breast cancer remains to be determined. An in silico analysis of data retrieved from GENT and cBio-Portal identified RAE1 upregulation in breast cancer tissues relative to normal breast cells. Functional studies of various cell lines showed that RAE1 induced invasive and migratory abilities by regulating epithelial-mesenchymal transition signals. A tissue microarray was constructed to demonstrate the interrelationship between clinicopathological features and RAE1 expression. Immunohistochemistry revealed a positive correlation between RAE1 expression and a high histologic grade. Furthermore, RAE1 overexpression was associated with considerably poorer disease-free survival and distant metastasis-free survival, especially in patients with oestrogen receptor-positive tumours. In summary, RAE1 may be a prognostic marker and therapeutic intervention target in malignant breast cancers.

  11. Differences among college women for breast cancer prevention acquired information-seeking, desired apps and texts, and daughter-initiated information to mothers.

    PubMed

    Kratzke, Cynthia; Amatya, Anup; Vilchis, Hugo

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine among college women acquired breast cancer prevention information-seeking, desired apps and texts, and information given to mothers. Using a cross-sectional study, a survey was administered to college women at a southwestern university. College women (n = 546) used the Internet (44 %) for active breast cancer prevention information-seeking and used the Internet (74 %), magazines (69 %), and television (59 %) for passive information receipt. Over half of the participants desired breast cancer prevention apps (54 %) and texts (51 %). Logistic regression analyses revealed predictors for interest to receive apps were ethnicity (Hispanic), lower self-efficacy, actively seeking online information, and older age and predictors for interest to receive texts were lower self-efficacy and higher university level. Eighteen percent of college women (n = 99) reported giving information to mothers and reported in an open-ended item the types of information given to mothers. Predictors for giving information to mothers were actively and passively seeking online information, breast self-exam practice, and higher university level. Screenings were the most frequent types of information given to mothers. Breast cancer prevention information using apps, texts, or Internet and daughter-initiated information for mothers should be considered in health promotion targeting college students or young women in communities. Future research is needed to examine the quality of apps, texts, and online information and cultural differences for breast cancer prevention sources.

  12. Characterization of cervical cancer stem cell-like cells: phenotyping, stemness, and human papilloma virus co-receptor expression.

    PubMed

    Ortiz-Sánchez, Elizabeth; Santiago-López, Luz; Cruz-Domínguez, Verónica B; Toledo-Guzmán, Mariel E; Hernández-Cueto, Daniel; Muñiz-Hernández, Saé; Garrido, Efraín; Cantú De León, David; García-Carrancá, Alejandro

    2016-05-31

    Cancer stem cells (CSC) exhibit high tumorigenic capacity in several tumor models. We have now determined an extended phenotype for cervical cancer stem cells. Our results showed increased CK-17, p63+, AII+, CD49f+ expression in these cells, together with higher Aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDHbright)activity in Cervical CSC (CCSC) enriched in cervospheres. An increase in stem cell markers, represented by OCT-4, Nanog, and β-catenin proteins, was also observed, indicating that under our culture conditions, CCSC are enriched in cervospheres, as compared to monolayer cultures. In addition, we were able to show that an increased ALDHbright activity correlated with higher tumorigenic activity. Flow cytometry and immunflorescence assays demonstrated that CCSC in cervosphere cultures contain a sub-population of cells that contain Annexin II, a Human papillomavirus (HPV) co-receptor. Taken together, under our conditions there is an increase in the number of CCSC in cervosphere cultures which exhibit the following phenotype: CK-17, p63+, AII+, CD49f+ and high ALDH activity, which in turn correlates with higher tumorigenicity. The presence of Annexin II and CD49f in CCSC opens the possibility that normal cervical stem cells could be the initial target of infection by high risk HPV.

  13. Characterization of cervical cancer stem cell-like cells: phenotyping, stemness, and human papilloma virus co-receptor expression

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz-Sánchez, Elizabeth; Santiago-López, Luz; Cruz-Domínguez, Verónica B.; Toledo-Guzmán, Mariel E.; Hernández-Cueto, Daniel; Muñiz-Hernández, Saé; Garrido, Efraín; De León, David Cantú; García-Carrancá, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSC) exhibit high tumorigenic capacity in several tumor models. We have now determined an extended phenotype for cervical cancer stem cells. Our results showed increased CK-17, p63+, AII+, CD49f+ expression in these cells, together with higher Aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDHbright)activity in Cervical CSC (CCSC) enriched in cervospheres. An increase in stem cell markers, represented by OCT-4, Nanog, and β-catenin proteins, was also observed, indicating that under our culture conditions, CCSC are enriched in cervospheres, as compared to monolayer cultures. In addition, we were able to show that an increased ALDHbright activity correlated with higher tumorigenic activity. Flow cytometry and immunflorescence assays demonstrated that CCSC in cervosphere cultures contain a sub-population of cells that contain Annexin II, a Human papillomavirus (HPV) co-receptor. Taken together, under our conditions there is an increase in the number of CCSC in cervosphere cultures which exhibit the following phenotype: CK-17, p63+, AII+, CD49f+ and high ALDH activity, which in turn correlates with higher tumorigenicity. The presence of Annexin II and CD49f in CCSC opens the possibility that normal cervical stem cells could be the initial target of infection by high risk HPV. PMID:27008711

  14. Inhibition of long non-coding RNA UCA1 by CRISPR/Cas9 attenuated malignant phenotypes of bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhen, Shuai; Hua, Ling; Liu, Yun-Hui; Sun, Xiao-Min; Jiang, Meng-Meng; Chen, Wei; Zhao, Le; Li, Xu

    2017-02-07

    CRISPR/Cas9 is a novel and effective genome editing technique, but its application is not widely expanded to manipulate long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) expression. The lncRNA urothelial carcinoma-associated 1 (UCA1) is upregulated in bladder cancer and promotes the progression of bladder cancer. Here, we design gRNAs specific to UCA1 and construct CRISPR/Cas9 systems targeting UCA1. Single CRISPR/Cas9-UCA1 can effectively inhibit UCA1 expression when transfected into 5637 and T24 bladder cancer cells, while the combined transfection of the two most effective CRISPR/Cas9-UCA1s can generate more satisfied inhibitory effect. CRISPR/Cas9-UCA1s attenuate UCA1 expression via targeted genome-specific DNA cleavage, resulting in the significant inhibition of cell proliferation, migration and invasion in vitro and in vivo. The mechanisms associated with the inhibitory effect of CRISPR/Cas9-UCA1 on malignant phenotypes of bladder cancer are attributed to the induction of cell cycle arrest at G1 phase, a substantial increase of apoptosis, and an enhanced activity of MMPs. Additionally, urinary UCA1 can be used as a non-invasive diagnostic marker for bladder cancer as revealed by a meta-analysis. Collectively, our data suggest that CRISPR/Cas9 technique can be used to down-modulate lncRNA expression, and urinary UCA1 may be used as a non-invasive marker for diagnosis of bladder cancer.

  15. Phenotype and function of T cells infiltrating visceral metastases from gastrointestinal cancers and melanoma: implications for adoptive cell transfer therapy.

    PubMed

    Turcotte, Simon; Gros, Alena; Hogan, Katherine; Tran, Eric; Hinrichs, Christian S; Wunderlich, John R; Dudley, Mark E; Rosenberg, Steven A

    2013-09-01

    Adoptive cell transfer of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) can mediate cancer regression in patients with metastatic melanoma, but whether this approach can be applied to common epithelial malignancies remains unclear. In this study, we compared the phenotype and function of TILs derived from liver and lung metastases from patients with gastrointestinal (GI) cancers (n = 14) or melanoma (n = 42). Fewer CD3(+) T cells were found to infiltrate GI compared with melanoma metastases, but the proportions of CD8(+) cells, T cell differentiation stage, and expression of costimulatory molecules were similar for both tumor types. Clinical-scale expansion up to ~50 × 10(9) T cells on average was obtained for all patients with GI cancer and melanoma. From GI tumors, however, TIL outgrowth in high-dose IL-2 yielded 22 ± 1.4% CD3(+)CD8(+) cells compared with 63 ± 2.4% from melanoma (p < 0.001). IFN-γ ELISA demonstrated MHC class I-mediated reactivity of TIL against autologous tumor in 5 of 7 GI cancer patients tested (9% of 188 distinct TIL cultures) and in 9 of 10 melanoma patients (43% of 246 distinct TIL cultures). In these assays, MHC class I-mediated up-regulation of CD137 (4-1BB) expression on CD8(+) cells suggested that 0-3% of TILs expanded from GI cancer metastases were tumor-reactive. This study implies that the main challenge to the development of TIL adoptive cell transfer for metastatic GI cancers may not be the in vitro expansion of bulk TILs, but the ability to select and enrich for tumor-reactive T cells.

  16. Acquired hyperpigmentations*

    PubMed Central

    Cestari, Tania Ferreira; Dantas, Lia Pinheiro; Boza, Juliana Catucci

    2014-01-01

    Cutaneous hyperpigmentations are frequent complaints, motivating around 8.5% of all dermatological consultations in our country. They can be congenital, with different patterns of inheritance, or acquired in consequence of skin problems, systemic diseases or secondary to environmental factors. The vast majority of them are linked to alterations on the pigment melanin, induced by different mechanisms. This review will focus on the major acquired hyperpigmentations associated with increased melanin, reviewing their mechanisms of action and possible preventive measures. Particularly prominent aspects of diagnosis and therapy will be emphasized, with focus on melasma, post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation, periorbital pigmentation, dermatosis papulosa nigra, phytophotodermatoses, flagellate dermatosis, erythema dyschromicum perstans, cervical poikiloderma (Poikiloderma of Civatte), acanthosis nigricans, cutaneous amyloidosis and reticulated confluent dermatitis PMID:24626644

  17. Intersection of Smoking, Human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and Cancer: Proceedings of the 8(th) Annual Texas Conference on Health Disparities.

    PubMed

    Rajendiran, Smrithi; Kashyap, Meghana V; Vishwanatha, Jamboor K

    2013-10-05

    The Texas Center for Health Disparities, a National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities Center of Excellence, presents an annual conference to discuss prevention, awareness education and ongoing research about health disparities both in Texas and among the national population. The 2013 Texas Conference on Health Disparities brought together experts, in research, patient care and community outreach, on the "Intersection of Smoking, Human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) and Cancer". Smoking, HIV/AIDS and cancer are three individual areas of public health concern, each with its own set of disparities and risk factors based on race, ethnicity, gender, geography and socio-economic status. Disparities among patient populations, in which these issues are found to be comorbid, provide valuable information on goals for patient care. The conference consisted of three sessions addressing "Comorbidities and Treatment", "Public Health Perspectives", and "Best Practices". This article summarizes the basic science, clinical correlates and public health data presented by the speakers.

  18. Role of Parp Activity in Lung Cancer-induced Cachexia: Effects on Muscle Oxidative Stress, Proteolysis, Anabolic Markers and Phenotype.

    PubMed

    Chacon-Cabrera, Alba; Mateu-Jimenez, Mercè; Langohr, Klaus; Fermoselle, Clara; García-Arumí, Elena; Andreu, Antoni L; Yelamos, Jose; Barreiro, Esther

    2017-02-08

    Strategies to treat cachexia are still at its infancy. Enhanced muscle protein breakdown and ubiquitin-proteasome system are common features of cachexia associated with chronic conditions including lung cancer (LC). Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARP), which play a major role in chromatin structure regulation, also underlie maintenance of muscle metabolism and body composition. We hypothesized that protein catabolism, proteolytic markers, muscle fiber phenotype, and muscle anabolism may improve in respiratory and limb muscles of LC-cachectic Parp-1-deficient (Parp-1(-/-) ) and Parp-2(-/-) mice. In diaphragm and gastrocnemius of LC (LP07 adenocarcinoma) bearing mice (wild type, Parp-1(-/-) and Parp-2(-/-) ), PARP activity (ADP-ribose polymers, pADPr), redox balance, muscle fiber phenotype, apoptotic nuclei, tyrosine release, protein ubiquitination, muscle-specific E3 ligases, NFkB signaling pathway, markers of muscle anabolism (Akt, mTOR, p70S6K, and mitochondrial DNA) were evaluated along with body and muscle weights and limb muscle force. Compared to wild type cachectic animals, in both respiratory and limb muscles of Parp-1(-/-) and Parp-2(-/-) cachectic mice: cancer induced-muscle wasting characterized by increased PARP activity, protein oxidation, tyrosine release, and ubiquitin-proteasome system (total protein ubiquitination, atrogin-1, and 20S proteasome C8 subunit) were blunted, the reduction in contractile myosin and atrophy of the fibers was attenuated, while no effects were seen in other structural features (inflammatory cells, internal or apoptotic nuclei), and markers of muscle anabolism partly improved. Activation of either PARP-1 or -2 is likely to play a role in muscle protein catabolism via oxidative stress, NF-kB signaling, and enhanced proteasomal degradation in cancer-induced cachexia. Therapeutic potential of PARP activity inhibition deserves attention. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  19. The mannose receptor LY75 (DEC205/CD205) modulates cellular phenotype and metastatic potential of ovarian cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Faddaoui, Adnen; Bachvarova, Magdalena; Plante, Marie; Gregoire, Jean; Renaud, Marie-Claude; Sebastianelli, Alexandra; Gobeil, Stephane; Morin, Chantale; Macdonald, Elizabeth; Vanderhyden, Barbara; Bachvarov, Dimcho

    2016-01-01

    The molecular basis of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) dissemination is still poorly understood. Previously, we identified the mannose receptor LY75 gene as hypomethylated in high-grade (HG) serous EOC tumors, compared to normal ovarian tissues. LY75 represents endocytic receptor expressed on dendritic cells and so far, has been primarily studied for its role in antigen processing and presentation. Here we demonstrate that LY75 is overexpressed in advanced EOC and that LY75 suppression induces mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition (MET) in EOC cell lines with mesenchymal morphology (SKOV3 and TOV112), accompanied by reduction of their migratory and invasive capacity in vitro and enhanced tumor cell colonization and metastatic growth in vivo. LY75 knockdown in SKOV3 cells also resulted in predominant upregulation of functional pathways implicated in cell proliferation and metabolism, while pathways associated with cell signaling and adhesion, complement activation and immune response were mostly suppressed. Moreover, LY75 suppression had an opposite effect on EOC cell lines with epithelial phenotype (A2780s and OV2008), by directing epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) associated with reduced capacity for in vivo EOC cell colonization, as similar/identical signaling pathways were reversely regulated, when compared to mesenchymal LY75 knockdown EOC cells. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a gene displaying such pleiotropic effects in sustaining the cellular phenotype of EOC cells and points to novel functions of this receptor in modulating EOC dissemination. Our data also support previous findings regarding the superior capacity of epithelial cancer cells in metastatic colonization of distant sites, compared to cancer cells with mesenchymal-like morphology. PMID:26871602

  20. ST6Gal-I expression in ovarian cancer cells promotes an invasive phenotype by altering integrin glycosylation and function

    PubMed Central

    Christie, Daniel R; Shaikh, Faheem M; Lucas, John A; Lucas, John A; Bellis, Susan L

    2008-01-01

    Background Ovarian adenocarcinoma is not generally discovered in patients until there has been widespread intraperitoneal dissemination, which is why ovarian cancer is the deadliest gynecologic malignancy. Though incompletely understood, the mechanism of peritoneal metastasis relies on primary tumor cells being able to detach themselves from the tumor, escape normal apoptotic pathways while free floating, and adhere to, and eventually invade through, the peritoneal surface. Our laboratory has previously shown that the Golgi glycosyltransferase, ST6Gal-I, mediates the hypersialylation of β1 integrins in colon adenocarcinoma, which leads to a more metastatic tumor cell phenotype. Interestingly, ST6Gal-I mRNA is known to be upregulated in metastatic ovarian cancer, therefore the goal of the present study was to determine whether ST6Gal-I confers a similarly aggressive phenotype to ovarian tumor cells. Methods Three ovarian carcinoma cell lines were screened for ST6Gal-I expression, and two of these, PA-1 and SKOV3, were found to produce ST6Gal-I protein. The third cell line, OV4, lacked endogenous ST6Gal-I. In order to understand the effects of ST6Gal-I on cell behavior, OV4 cells were stably-transduced with ST6Gal-I using a lentiviral vector, and integrin-mediated responses were compared in parental and ST6Gal-I-expressing cells. Results Forced expression of ST6Gal-I in OV4 cells, resulting in sialylation of β1 integrins, induced greater cell adhesion to, and migration toward, collagen I. Similarly, ST6Gal-I expressing cells were more invasive through Matrigel. Conclusion ST6Gal-I mediated sialylation of β1 integrins in ovarian cancer cells may contribute to peritoneal metastasis by altering tumor cell adhesion and migration through extracellular matrix. PMID:19014651

  1. Retraction: "Over-expression of FoxM1 leads to epithelial-mesenchymal transition and cancer stem cell phenotype in pancreatic cancer cells" by Bao et al.

    PubMed

    2016-08-01

    The above article, published online on April 18, 2011 in Wiley Online Library (wileyonlinelibrary.com), has been retracted by agreement between the journal Editor in Chief, Gary S. Stein, and Wiley Periodicals, Inc. The retraction has been agreed following an investigation from Wayne State University involving the second author that found Figures 1C and 4C to be inappropriately re-used and re-labeled. REFERENCE Bao B, Wang Z, Ali S, Kong D, Banerjee S, Ahmad A, Li Y, Azmi AS, Miele L, Sarkar FH. 2011. Over-expression of FoxM1 leads to epithelial-mesenchymal transition and cancer stem cell phenotype in pancreatic cancer cells. J Cell Biochem 112:2296-2306; doi: 10.1002/jcb.23150.

  2. Differential association for N-acetyltransferase 2 genotype and phenotype with bladder cancer risk in Chinese population

    PubMed Central

    Quan, Lei; Chattopadhyay, Koushik; Nelson, Heather H.; Chan, Kenneth K.; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Renwei; Gao, Yu-Tang; Yuan, Jian-Min

    2016-01-01

    Background N-acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2) is involved in both carcinogen detoxification through hepatic N-acetylation and carcinogen activation through local O-acetylation. NAT2 slow acetylation status is significantly associated with increased bladder cancer risk among European populations, but its association in Asian populations is inconclusive. Methods NAT2 acetylation status was determined by both single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and caffeine metabolic ratio (CMR), in a population-based study of 494 bladder cancer patients and 507 control subjects in Shanghai, China. Results The CMR, a functional measure of hepatic N-acetylation, was significantly reduced in a dose-dependent manner among both cases and controls possessing the SNP-inferred NAT2 slow acetylation status (all P-values<5.0×10−10). The CMR-determined slow N-acetylation status (CMR<0.34) was significantly associated with a 50% increased risk of bladder cancer (odds ratio = 1.50, 95% confidence interval = 1.10-2.06) whereas the SNP-inferred slow acetylation statuses were significantly associated with an approximately 50% decreased risk of bladder cancer. The genotype-disease association was strengthened after the adjustment for CMR and was primarily observed among never smokers. Conclusions The apparent differential associations for phenotypic and genetic measures of acetylation statuses with bladder cancer risk may reflect dual functions of NAT2 in bladder carcinogenesis because the former only measures the capacity of carcinogen detoxification pathway while the latter represents both carcinogen activation and detoxification pathways. Future studies are warranted to ascertain the specific role of N- and O-acetylation in bladder carcinogenesis, particularly in populations exposed to different types of bladder carcinogens. PMID:27223070

  3. G-CSF regulates macrophage phenotype and associates with poor overall survival in human triple-negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hollmén, Maija; Karaman, Sinem; Schwager, Simon; Lisibach, Angela; Christiansen, Ailsa J.; Maksimow, Mikael; Varga, Zsuzsanna; Jalkanen, Sirpa; Detmar, Michael

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) have been implicated in the promotion of breast cancer growth and metastasis, and a strong infiltration by TAMs has been associated with estrogen receptor (ER)-negative tumors and poor prognosis. However, the molecular mechanisms behind these observations are unclear. We investigated macrophage activation in response to co-culture with several breast cancer cell lines (T47D, MCF-7, BT-474, SKBR-3, Cal-51 and MDA-MB-231) and found that high granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) secretion by the triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) cell line MDA-MB-231 gave rise to immunosuppressive HLA-DRlo macrophages that promoted migration of breast cancer cells via secretion of TGF-α. In human breast cancer samples (n = 548), G-CSF was highly expressed in TNBC (p < 0.001) and associated with CD163+ macrophages (p < 0.0001), poorer overall survival (OS) (p = 0.021) and significantly increased numbers of TGF-α+ cells. While G-CSF blockade in the 4T1 mammary tumor model promoted maturation of MHCIIhi blood monocytes and TAMs and significantly reduced lung metastasis, anti-CSF-1R treatment promoted MHCIIloF4/80hiMRhi anti-inflammatory TAMs and enhanced lung metastasis in the presence of high G-CSF levels. Combined anti-G-CSF and anti-CSF-1R therapy significantly increased lymph node metastases, possibly via depletion of the so-called “gate-keeper” subcapsular sinus macrophages. These results indicate that G-CSF promotes the anti-inflammatory phenotype of tumor-induced macrophages when CSF-1R is inhibited and therefore caution against the use of M-CSF/CSF-1R targeting agents in tumors with high G-CSF expression. PMID:27141367

  4. Phenotype characterization of embryoid body structures generated by a crystal comet effect tail in an intercellular cancer collision scenario

    PubMed Central

    Diaz, Jairo A; Murillo, Mauricio F

    2012-01-01

    Cancer is, by definition, the uncontrolled growth of autonomous cells that eventually destroy adjacent tissues and generate architectural disorder. However, this concept cannot be totally true. In three well documented studies, we have demonstrated that cancer tissues produce order zones that evolve over time and generate embryoid body structures in a space-time interval. The authors decided to revise the macroscopic and microscopic material in well-developed malignant tumors in which embryoid bodies were identified to determine the phenotype characterization that serves as a guideline for easy recognition. The factors responsible for this morphogenesis are physical, bioelectric, and magnetic susceptibilities produced by crystals that act as molecular designers for the topographic gradients that guide the surrounding silhouette and establish tissue head-tail positional identities. The structures are located in amniotic-like cavities and show characteristic somite-like embryologic segmentation. Immunophenotypic study has demonstrated exclusion factor positional identity in relation to enolase-immunopositive expression of embryoid body and human chorionic gonadotropin immunopositivity exclusion factor expression in the surrounding tissues. The significance of these observations is that they can also be predicted by experimental image data collected by the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) accelerator at the European Organization for Nuclear Research, in which two-beam subatomic collision particles in the resulting debris show hyperorder domains similar to those identified by us in intercellular cancer collisions. Our findings suggest that we are dealing with true reverse biologic system information in an activated collective cancer stem cell memory, in which physics participates in the elaboration of geometric complexes and chiral biomolecules that serve to build bodies with embryoid print as it develops during gestation. Reversal mechanisms in biology are intimately

  5. Ethanol exposure induces the cancer-associated fibroblast phenotype and lethal tumor metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez-Alvarez, Rosa; Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E.; Lin, Zhao; Lamb, Rebecca; Hulit, James; Howell, Anthony; Sotgia, Federica; Rubin, Emanuel; Lisanti, Michael P.

    2013-01-01

    Little is known about how alcohol consumption promotes the onset of human breast cancer(s). One hypothesis is that ethanol induces metabolic changes in the tumor microenvironment, which then enhances epithelial tumor growth. To experimentally test this hypothesis, we used a co-culture system consisting of human breast cancer cells (MCF7) and hTERT-immortalized fibroblasts. Here, we show that ethanol treatment (100 mM) promotes ROS production and oxidative stress in cancer-associated fibroblasts, which is sufficient to induce myofibroblastic differentiation. Oxidative stress in stromal fibroblasts also results in the onset of autophagy/mitophagy, driving the induction of ketone body production in the tumor microenvironment. Interestingly, ethanol has just the opposite effect in epithelial cancer cells, where it confers autophagy resistance, elevates mitochondrial biogenesis and induces key enzymes associated with ketone re-utilization (ACAT1/OXCT1). During co-culture, ethanol treatment also converts MCF7 cells from an ER(+) to an ER(-) status, which is thought to be associated with “stemness,” more aggressive behavior and a worse prognosis. Thus, ethanol treatment induces ketone production in cancer-associated fibroblasts and ketone re-utilization in epithelial cancer cells, fueling tumor cell growth via oxidative mitochondrial metabolism (OXPHOS). This “two-compartment” metabolic model is consistent with previous historical observations that ethanol is first converted to acetaldehyde (which induces oxidative stress) and then ultimately to acetyl-CoA (a high-energy mitochondrial fuel), or can be used to synthesize ketone bodies. As such, our results provide a novel mechanism by which alcohol consumption could metabolically convert “low-risk” breast cancer patients to “high-risk” status, explaining tumor recurrence or disease progression. Hence, our findings have clear implications for both breast cancer prevention and therapy. Remarkably, our results

  6. The Role of DNA Methyltransferase in the Progression of Breast Cancer of a Hormone Independent Phenotype

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-09-01

    suggesting that overexpression of DMT may be necessary for maintenance of aberrant methylation patterns. In examining primary breast tumor tissue , we found...unmethylated except for genes on the inactive X chromosome and some imprinted genes (Li, et al, 1993). In contrast, cancer cells often display anomalous...cell lines and primary tumors, but remains unmethylated in normal tissues and ER-positive breast cancer cell lines. Furthermore, treatment of the ER

  7. Acquired savolitinib resistance in non-small cell lung cancer arises via multiple mechanisms that converge on MET-independent mTOR and MYC activation

    PubMed Central

    Castriotta, Lillian; Ladd, Brendon; Markovets, Aleksandra; Beran, Garry; Ren, Yongxin; Zhou, Feng; Adam, Ammar; Zinda, Michael; Reimer, Corinne; Qing, Weiguo; Su, Weiguo; Clark, Edwin; D'Cruz, Celina M.; Schuller, Alwin G.

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer death globally with a significant, unmet need for more efficacious treatments. The receptor tyrosine kinase MET has been implicated as an oncogene in numerous cancer subtypes, including non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Here we explore the therapeutic potential of savolitinib (volitinib, AZD6094, HMPL-504), a potent and selective MET inhibitor, in NSCLC. In vitro, savolitinib inhibits MET phosphorylation with nanomolar potency, which correlates with blockade of PI3K/AKT and MAPK signaling as well as MYC down-regulation. In vivo, savolitinib causes inhibition of these pathways and significantly decreases growth of MET-dependent xenografts. To understand resistance mechanisms, we generated savolitinib resistance in MET-amplified NSCLC cell lines and analyzed individual clones. We found that upregulation of MYC and constitutive mTOR pathway activation is a conserved feature of resistant clones that can be overcome by knockdown of MYC or dual mTORC1/2 inhibition. Lastly, we demonstrate that mechanisms of resistance are heterogeneous, arising via a switch to EGFR dependence or by a requirement for PIM signaling. This work demonstrates the efficacy of savolitinib in NSCLC and characterizes acquired resistance, identifying both known and novel mechanisms that may inform combination strategies in the clinic. PMID:27472392

  8. Epigenetic Regulation of MicroRNA Expression: Targeting the Triple-Negative Breast Cancer Phenotype

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-10-01

    SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT The primary long-term objective of this research is to identify HDAC inhibitor ( HDACi ) regulated microRNAs which...profiles of two TNBC cell lines following treatment with HDACi identifying a number of up- and down- regulated microRNAs. The overall microRNA profile...after HDACi treatment was indicative of a less aggressive phenotype. Treatment with HDACi also resulted in increased expression of E- cadherin as well as

  9. HER2 amplification: a potential mechanism of acquired resistance to EGFR inhibition in EGFR-mutant lung cancers that lack the second-site EGFRT790M mutation.

    PubMed

    Takezawa, Ken; Pirazzoli, Valentina; Arcila, Maria E; Nebhan, Caroline A; Song, Xiaoling; de Stanchina, Elisa; Ohashi, Kadoaki; Janjigian, Yelena Y; Spitzler, Paula J; Melnick, Mary Ann; Riely, Greg J; Kris, Mark G; Miller, Vincent A; Ladanyi, Marc; Politi, Katerina; Pao, William

    2012-10-01

    EGF receptor (EGFR)-mutant lung cancers eventually become resistant to treatment with EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI). The combination of EGFR-TKI afatinib and anti-EGFR antibody cetuximab can overcome acquired resistance in mouse models and human patients. Because afatinib is also a potent HER2 inhibitor, we investigated the role of HER2 in EGFR-mutant tumor cells. We show in vitro and in vivo that afatinib plus cetuximab significantly inhibits HER2 phosphorylation. HER2 overexpression or knockdown confers resistance or sensitivity, respectively, in all studied cell line models. FISH analysis revealed that HER2 was amplified in 12% of tumors with acquired resistance versus only 1% of untreated lung adenocarcinomas. Notably, HER2 amplification and EGFR(T790M) were mutually exclusive. Collectively, these results reveal a previously unrecognized mechanism of resistance to EGFR-TKIs and provide a rationale to assess the status and possibly target HER2 in EGFR-mutant tumors with acquired resistance to EGFR-TKIs.

  10. Cancer Cells Acquire Mitotic Drug Resistance Properties Through Beta I-Tubulin Mutations and Alterations in the Expression of Beta-Tubulin Isotypes

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Chun Hei Antonio; Wu, Su-Ying; Lee, Tian-Ren; Chang, Chi-Yen; Wu, Jian-Sung; Hsieh, Hsing-Pang; Chang, Jang-Yang

    2010-01-01

    Background Anti-mitotic compounds (microtubule de-stabilizers) such as vincristine and vinblastine have been shown clinically successful in treating various cancers. However, development of drug-resistance cells limits their efficacies in clinical situations. Therefore, experiments were performed to determine possible drug resistance mechanisms related to the application of anti-mitotic cancer therapy. Principal Findings A KB-derived microtubule de-stabilizer-resistant KB-L30 cancer cell line was generated for this study. KB-L30 cells showed cross-resistance to various microtubule de-stabilizers including BPR0L075, vincristine and colchicine through multiple-drug resistant (MDR)-independent mechanisms. Surprisingly, KB-L30 cells showed hyper-sensitivity to the microtubule-stabilizer, paclitaxel. Results of the RT-PCR analysis revealed that expression of both class II and III β-tubulin was down-regulated in KB-L30 cells as compared to its parental KB cancer cells. In addition, DNA sequencing analysis revealed six novel mutation sites present in exon four of the βI-tubulin gene. Computational modeling indicated that a direct relationship exists between βI-tubulin mutations and alteration in the microtubule assembly and dynamic instability in KB-L30 cells and this predicted model was supported by an increased microtubule assembly and reduced microtubule dynamic instability in KB-L30 cells, as shown by Western blot analysis. Conclusions and Significance Our study demonstrated that these novel mutations in exon four of the βI-tubulin induced resistance to microtubule de-stabilizers and hyper-sensitivity to microtubule stabilizer through an alteration in the microtubule assembly and dynamics in cancer cells. Importantly, the current study reveals that cancer cells may acquire drug resistance ability to anti-mitotic compounds through multiple changes in the microtubule networks. This study further provided molecular information in drug selection for patients with

  11. Progesterone and Src Family Inhibitor PP1 Synergistically Inhibit Cell Migration and Invasion of Human Basal Phenotype Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Li; Chen, Xi; Gainey, Lindsey O.; Xiao, Jian; Nanes, Mark S.; Hou, Anji; You, Shaojin; Chen, Qiong

    2015-01-01

    Basal phenotype breast cancer is one of the most aggressive breast cancers that frequently metastasize to brain. The role of sex hormones and their receptors in development of this disease is largely unclear. We demonstrated that mPRα was expressed at a moderate level in a brain metastatic BPBC cell line MB231Br, which was derived from the parent mPRα undetectable MB231 cells. It functioned as an essential mediator for progesterone induced inhibitory effects on cell migration of MB231Br and, when coincubated with PP1, synergistically enhanced the progesterone's inhibitory effect on cell migration and invasion in vitro. Progesterone and PP1 cotreatment induced a cascade of molecular signaling events, such as dephosphorylation of FAK, downregulation of MMP9, VEGF, and KCNMA1 expressions. Our in vitro study demonstrated that mPRα was expressed and functioned as an essential mediator for progesterone induced inhibitory effects on cell migration and invasion in BPBC cells. This inhibitory effect was enhanced by PP1 via FAK dephosphorylation, MMP9, VEGF, and KCNMA1 downregulation mechanisms. Our study provides a new clue toward the development of novel promising agents and pathways for inhibiting nuclear hormonal receptor-negative and endocrine-resistant breast cancers. PMID:26075237

  12. Inhibitors of Rho kinase (ROCK) signaling revert the malignant phenotype of breast cancer cells in 3D context.

    PubMed

    Matsubara, Masahiro; Bissell, Mina J

    2016-05-31

    Loss of polarity and quiescence along with increased cellular invasiveness are associated with breast tumor progression. ROCK plays a central role in actin-cytoskeletal rearrangement. We used physiologically relevant 3D cultures of nonmalignant and cancer cells in gels made of laminin-rich extracellular matrix, to investigate ROCK function. Whereas expression levels of ROCK1 and ROCK2 were elevated in cancer cells compared to nonmalignant cells, this was not observed in 2D cultures. Malignant cells showed increased phosphorylation of MLC, corresponding to disorganized F-actin. Inhibition of ROCK signaling restored polarity, decreased disorganization of F-actin, and led to reduction of proliferation. Inhibition of ROCK also decreased EGFR and Integrinβ1 levels, and consequently suppressed activation of Akt, MAPK and FAK as well as GLUT3 and LDHA levels. Again, ROCK inhibition did not inhibit these molecules in 2D. A triple negative breast cancer cell line, which lacks E-cadherin, had high levels of ROCK but was less sensitive to ROCK inhibitors. Exogenous overexpression of E-cadherin, however, rendered these cells strikingly sensitive to ROCK inhibition. Our results add to the growing literature that demonstrate the importance of context and tissue architecture in determining not only regulation of normal and malignant phenotypes but also drug response.

  13. Ursolic acid-mediated changes in glycolytic pathway promote cytotoxic autophagy and apoptosis in phenotypically different breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lewinska, Anna; Adamczyk-Grochala, Jagoda; Kwasniewicz, Ewa; Deregowska, Anna; Wnuk, Maciej

    2017-02-17

    Plant-derived pentacyclic triterpenotids with multiple biological activities are considered as promising candidates for cancer therapy and prevention. However, their mechanisms of action are not fully understood. In the present study, we have analyzed the effects of low dose treatment (5-20 µM) of ursolic acid (UA) and betulinic acid (BA) on breast cancer cells of different receptor status, namely MCF-7 (ER(+), PR(+/-), HER2(-)), MDA-MB-231 (ER(-), PR(-), HER2(-)) and SK-BR-3 (ER(-), PR(-), HER2(+)). UA-mediated response was more potent than BA-mediated response. Triterpenotids (5-10 µM) caused G0/G1 cell cycle arrest, an increase in p21 levels and SA-beta-galactosidase staining that was accompanied by oxidative stress and DNA damage. UA (20 µM) also diminished AKT signaling that affected glycolysis as judged by decreased levels of HK2, PKM2, ATP and lactate. UA-induced energy stress activated AMPK that resulted in cytotoxic autophagy and apoptosis. UA-mediated elevation in nitric oxide levels and ATM activation may also account for AMPK activation-mediated cytotoxic response. Moreover, UA-promoted apoptosis was associated with decreased pERK1/2 signals and the depolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential. Taken together, we have shown for the first time that UA at low micromolar range may promote its anticancer action by targeting glycolysis in phenotypically distinct breast cancer cells.

  14. A miR-335/COX-2/PTEN axis regulates the secretory phenotype of senescent cancer-associated fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Kabir, Tasnuva D.; Leigh, Ross J.; Tasena, Hataitip; Mellone, Massimiliano; Coletta, Ricardo D.; Parkinson, Eric K.; Prime, Stephen S.; Thomas, Gareth J.; Paterson, Ian C.; Zhou, Donghui; McCall, John; Speight, Paul M.; Lambert, Daniel W.

    2016-01-01

    Senescent cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAF) develop a senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP) that is believed to contribute to cancer progression. The mechanisms underlying SASP development are, however, poorly understood. Here we examined the functional role of microRNA in the development of the SASP in normal fibroblasts and CAF. We identified a microRNA, miR-335, up-regulated in the senescent normal fibroblasts and CAF and able to modulate the secretion of SASP factors and induce cancer cell motility in co-cultures, at least in part by suppressing the expression of phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN). Additionally, elevated levels of cyclo-oxygenase 2 (PTGS2; COX-2) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) secretion were observed in senescent fibroblasts, and inhibition of COX-2 by celecoxib reduced the expression of miR-335, restored PTEN expression and decreased the pro-tumourigenic effects of the SASP. Collectively these data demonstrate the existence of a novel miRNA/PTEN-regulated pathway modulating the inflammasome in senescent fibroblasts. PMID:27385366

  15. Inhibitors of Rho kinase (ROCK) signaling revert the malignant phenotype of breast cancer cells in 3D context

    PubMed Central

    Matsubara, Masahiro; Bissell, Mina J.

    2016-01-01

    Loss of polarity and quiescence along with increased cellular invasiveness are associated with breast tumor progression. ROCK plays a central role in actin-cytoskeletal rearrangement. We used physiologically relevant 3D cultures of nonmalignant and cancer cells in gels made of laminin-rich extracellular matrix, to investigate ROCK function. Whereas expression levels of ROCK1 and ROCK2 were elevated in cancer cells compared to nonmalignant cells, this was not observed in 2D cultures. Malignant cells showed increased phosphorylation of MLC, corresponding to disorganized F-actin. Inhibition of ROCK signaling restored polarity, decreased disorganization of F-actin, and led to reduction of proliferation. Inhibition of ROCK also decreased EGFR and Integrinβ1 levels, and consequently suppressed activation of Akt, MAPK and FAK as well as GLUT3 and LDHA levels. Again, ROCK inhibition did not inhibit these molecules in 2D. A triple negative breast cancer cell line, which lacks E-cadherin, had high levels of ROCK but was less sensitive to ROCK inhibitors. Exogenous overexpression of E-cadherin, however, rendered these cells strikingly sensitive to ROCK inhibition. Our results add to the growing literature that demonstrate the importance of context and tissue architecture in determining not only regulation of normal and malignant phenotypes but also drug response. PMID:27203208

  16. Overexpression of SDF-1 activates the NF-κB pathway to induce epithelial to mesenchymal transition and cancer stem cell-like phenotypes of breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kong, Lingxin; Guo, Sufen; Liu, Chunfeng; Zhao, Yiling; Feng, Chong; Liu, Yunshuang; Wang, Tao; Li, Caijuan

    2016-03-01

    The formation of EMT and EMT-induced CSC-like phenotype is crucial for the metastasis of tumor cells. The stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) is upregulated in various human carcinomas, which is closely associated with proliferation, migration, invasion and prognosis of malignancies. However, limited attention has been directed towards the effect of SDF-1 on epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) or cancer stem cell (CSC)-like phenotype formation in breast cancer cells and the related mechanism. In the present study, we screened MCF-7 cells with low SDF-1 expression level for the purpose of evaluating whether SDF-1 is involved in EMT and CSC-like phenotype formation in MCF-7 cells. The pEGFP-N1-SDF-1 plasmid was transfected into MCF-7 cells, and the stably overexpressed SDF-1 in MCF-7 cells was confirmed by real-time PCR and western blot analysis. Colony formation assay, MTT, wound healing assay and Transwell invasion assay demonstrated that overexpression of SDF-1 significantly boosted the proliferation, migration and invasion of MCF-7 cells compared with parental (P<0.05). Flow cytometry analysis revealed a notable increase of CD44+/CD24- subpopulation in SDF-1 overexpressing MCF-7 cells (P<0.001), accompanied by the apparently elevated ALDH activity and the upregulation of the stem cell markers OCT-4, Nanog, and SOX2 compared with parental (P<0.01). Besides, western blot analysis and immunofluorescence assay observed the significant decreased expression of E-cadherin and enhanced expression of slug, fibronectin and vimentin in SDF-1 overexpressed MCF-7 cells in comparison with parental (P<0.01). Further study found that overexpression of SDF-1 induced the activation of NF-κB pathway in MCF-7 cells. Conversely, suppressing or silencing p65 expression by antagonist or RNA interference could remarkably increase the expression of E-cadherin in SDF-1 overexpressed MCF-7 cells (P<0.001). Overall, the above results indicated that overexpression of SDF-1 enhanced

  17. Cross-platform analysis of cancer microarray data improves gene expression based classification of phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Warnat, Patrick; Eils, Roland; Brors, Benedikt

    2005-01-01

    Background The extensive use of DNA microarray technology in the characterization of the cell transcriptome is leading to an ever increasing amount of microarray data from cancer studies. Although similar questions for the same type of cancer are addressed in these different studies, a comparative analysis of their results is hampered by the use of heterogeneous microarray platforms and analysis methods. Results In contrast to a meta-analysis approach where results of different studies are combined on an interpretative level, we investigate here how to directly integrate raw microarray data from different studies for the purpose of supervised classification analysis. We use median rank scores and quantile discretization to derive numerically comparable measures of gene expression from different platforms. These transformed data are then used for training of classifiers based on support vector machines. We apply this approach to six publicly available cancer microarray gene expression data sets, which consist of three pairs of studies, each examining the same type of cancer, i.e. breast cancer, prostate cancer or acute myeloid leukemia. For each pair, one study was performed by means of cDNA microarrays and the other by means of oligonucleotide microarrays. In each pair, high classification accuracies (> 85%) were achieved with training and testing on data instances randomly chosen from both data sets in a cross-validation analysis. To exemplify the potential of this cross-platform classification analysis, we use two leukemia microarray data sets to show that important genes with regard to the biology of leukemia are selected in an integrated analysis, which are missed in either single-set analysis. Conclusion Cross-platform classification of multiple cancer microarray data sets yields discriminative gene expression signatures that are found and validated on a large number of microarray samples, generated by different laboratories and microarray technologies

  18. Chemotherapy induces adaptive drug resistance and metastatic potentials via phenotypic CXCR4-expressing cell state transition in ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyun Hee; Bellat, Vanessa

    2017-01-01

    Ovarian cancer (OVC) patients who receive chemotherapy often acquire drug resistance within one year. This can lead to tumor reoccurrence and metastasis, the major causes of mortality. We report a transient increase of a small distinctive CXCR4High/CD24Low cancer stem cell population (CXCR4High) in A2780 and SKOV-3 OVC cell lines in response to cisplatin, doxorubicin, and paclitaxel, treatments. The withdrawal of the drug challenges reversed this cell-state transition. CXCR4High exhibits dormancy in drug resistance and mesenchymal-like invasion, migration, colonization, and tumor formation properties. The removal of this cell population from a doxorubicin-resistant A2780 lineage (A2780/ADR) recovered the sensitivity to drug treatments. A cytotoxic peptide (CXCR4-KLA) that can selectively target cell-surface CXCR4 receptor was further synthesized to investigate the therapeutic merits of targeting CXCR4High. This peptide was more potent than the conventional CXCR4 antagonists (AMD3100 and CTCE-9908) in eradicating the cancer stem cells. When used together with cytotoxic agents such as doxorubicin and cisplatin, the combined drug-peptide regimens exhibited a synergistic cell-killing effect on A2780, A2780/ADR, and SKOV-3. Our data suggested that chemotherapy could establish drug-resistant and tumor-initiating properties of OVC via reversible CXCR4 cell state transition. Therapeutic strategies designed to eradicate rather than antagonize CXCR4High might offer a far-reaching potential as supportive chemotherapy. PMID:28196146

  19. Altered Death Receptor Signaling Promotes Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition and Acquired Chemoresistance

    PubMed Central

    Antoon, James W.; Lai, Rongye; Struckhoff, Amanda P.; Nitschke, Ashley M.; Elliott, Steven; Martin, Elizabeth C.; Rhodes, Lyndsay V.; Yoon, Nam Seung; Salvo, Virgilio A.; Shan, Bin; Beckman, Barbara S.; Nephew, Kenneth P.; Burow, Matthew E.

    2012-01-01

    Altered death receptor signaling and resistance to subsequent apoptosis is an important clinical resistance mechanism. Here, we investigated the role of death receptor resistance in breast cancer progression. Resistance of the estrogen receptor alpha (ER)-positive, chemosensitive MCF7 breast cancer cell line to tumor necrosis factor (TNF) was associated with loss of ER expression and a multi-drug resistant phenotype. Changes in three major pathways were involved in this transition to a multidrug resistance phenotype: ER, Death Receptor and epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT). Resistant cells exhibited altered ER signaling, resulting in decreased ER target gene expression. The death receptor pathway was significantly altered, blocking extrinsic apoptosis and increasing NF-kappaB survival signaling. TNF resistance promoted EMT changes, resulting in a more aggressive phenotype. This first report identifying specific mechanisms underlying acquired resistance to TNF could lead to a better understanding of the progression of breast cancer in response to chemotherapy treatment. PMID:22844580

  20. GALNT6 expression enhances aggressive phenotypes of ovarian cancer cells by regulating EGFR activity.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tzu-Chi; Chen, Syue-Ting; Huang, Min-Chuan; Huang, John; Hsu, Chia-Lang; Juan, Hsueh-Fen; Lin, Ho-Hsiung; Chen, Chi-Hau

    2017-03-28

    Ovarian cancer is the most lethal of the gynecologic malignancies. N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase 6 (GALNT6), an enzyme that mediates the initial step of mucin type-O glycosylation, has been reported to regulate mammary carcinogenesis. However, the expression and role of GALNT6 in ovarian cancer are still unclear. Here we showed that high GALNT6 expression correlates with increased recurrence, lymph node metastasis, and chemoresistance in ovarian endometrioid and clear cell carcinomas; and higher GALNT6 levels are significantly associated with poorer patient survivals. GALNT6 knockdown with two independent siRNAs significantly suppressed viability, migration, and invasion of ovarian cancer cells. Using phospho-RTK array and Western blot analyses, we identified EGFR as a critical target of GALNT6. GALNT6 knockdown decreased phosphorylation of EGFR, whereas GALNT6 overexpression increased the phosphorylation. Lectin pull-down assays with Vicia villosa agglutinin (VVA) indicated that GALNT6 was able to modify O-glycans on EGFR. Moreover, the GALNT6-enhanced invasive behavior was significantly reversed by erlotinib, an EGFR inhibitor. Our results suggest that GALNT6 expression is associated with poor prognosis of ovarian cancer and enhances the aggressive behavior of ovarian cancer cells by regulating EGFR activity.

  1. Fucosylation is a common glycosylation type in pancreatic cancer stem cell-like phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Terao, Naoko; Takamatsu, Shinji; Minehira, Tomomi; Sobajima, Tomoaki; Nakayama, Kotarosumitomo; Kamada, Yoshihiro; Miyoshi, Eiji

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate/isolate cancer stem cells (CSCs) from tissue or cell lines according to various definitions and cell surface markers. METHODS: Lectin microarray analysis was conducted on CSC-like fractions of the human pancreatic cancer cell line Panc1 by establishing anti-cancer drug-resistant cells. Changes in glycan structure of CSC-like cells were also investigated in sphere-forming cells as well as in CSC fractions obtained from overexpression of CD24 and CD44. RESULTS: Several types of fucosylation were increased under these conditions, and the expression of fucosylation regulatory genes such as fucosyltransferases, GDP-fucose synthetic enzymes, and GDP-fucose transporters were dramatically enhanced in CSC-like cells. These changes were significant in gemcitabine-resistant cells and sphere cells of a human pancreatic cancer cell line, Panc1. However, downregulation of cellular fucosylation by knockdown of the GDP-fucose transporter did not alter gemcitabine resistance, indicating that increased cellular fucosylation is a result of CSC-like transformation. CONCLUSION: Fucosylation might be a biomarker of CSC-like cells in pancreatic cancer. PMID:25852272

  2. Simultaneous MEMS-based electro-mechanical phenotyping of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pandya, Hardik J.; Park, Kihan; Chen, Wenjin; Chekmareva, Marina A.; Foran, David J.; Desai, Jaydev P.

    2015-01-01

    Carcinomas are the most commonly diagnosed cancers originating in the skin, lungs, breasts, pancreas, and other organs and glands. In most of the cases, the microenvironment within the tissue changes with the progression of disease. A key challenge is to develop a device capable of providing quantitative indicators in diagnosing cancer by measuring alteration in electrical and mechanical property of the tissues from the onset of malignancy. We demonstrate micro-electro-mechanical-systems (MEMS) based flexible polymer microsensor array capable of simultaneously measuring electro-mechanical properties of the breast tissues cores (1mm in diameter and 10μm in thickness) from onset through progression of the cancer. The electrical and mechanical signatures obtained from the tissue cores shows the capability of the device to clearly demarcate the specific stages of cancer in epithelial and stromal regions providing quantitative indicators facilitating the diagnosis of breast cancer. The present study shows that electro-mechanical properties of the breast tissue core at the micro-level are different than those at the macro-level. PMID:26224116

  3. A nuclear-directed human pancreatic ribonuclease (PE5) targets the metabolic phenotype of cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Vert, Anna; Castro, Jessica; Ribó, Marc; Benito, Antoni; Vilanova, Maria

    2016-04-05

    Ribonucleases represent a new class of antitumor RNA-damaging drugs. However, many wild-type members of the vertebrate secreted ribonuclease family are not cytotoxic because they are not able to evade the cytosolic ribonuclease inhibitor. We previously engineered the human pancreatic ribonuclease to direct it to the cell nucleus where the inhibitor is not present. The best characterized variant is PE5 that kills cancer cells through apoptosis mediated by the p21(WAF1/CIP1) induction and the inactivation of JNK. Here, we have used microarray-derived transcriptional profiling to identify PE5 regulated genes on the NCI/ADR-RES ovarian cancer cell line. RT-qPCR analyses have confirmed the expression microarray findings. The results show that PE5 cause pleiotropic effects. Among them, it is remarkable the down-regulation of multiple genes that code for enzymes involved in deregulated metabolic pathways in cancer cells.

  4. Phenotypic diversity of breast cancer-related mutations in metalloproteinase-disintegrin ADAM12.

    PubMed

    Qi, Yue; Duhachek-Muggy, Sara; Li, Hui; Zolkiewska, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Six different somatic missense mutations in the human ADAM12 gene have been identified so far in breast cancer. Five of these mutations involve highly conserved residues in the extracellular domain of the transmembrane ADAM12-L protein. Two of these extracellular mutations, D301H and G479E, have been previously characterized in the context of mouse ADAM12. Three other mutations, T596A, R612Q, and G668A, have been reported more recently, and their effects on ADAM12-L protein structure/function are not known. Here, we show that ADAM12-L bearing the G668A mutation is largely retained in the endoplasmic reticulum in its nascent, full-length form, with an intact N-terminal pro-domain. The T596A and R612Q mutants are efficiently trafficked to the cell surface and proteolytically processed to remove their pro-domains. However, the T596A mutant shows decreased catalytic activity at the cell surface, while the R612Q mutant is fully active and comparable to the wild-type ADAM12-L. The D301H and G479E mutants, consistent with the corresponding D299H and G477E mutants of mouse ADAM12 described earlier, are not proteolytically processed and do not exhibit catalytic activity at the cell surface. Among all six breast cancer-associated mutations in ADAM12-L, mutations that preserve the activity--R612Q and L792F--occur in triple-negative breast cancers, while loss-of-function mutations--D301H, G479E, T596A, and G668A--are found in non-triple negative cancers. This apparent association between the catalytic activity of the mutants and the type of breast cancer supports a previously postulated role of an active ADAM12-L in the triple negative breast cancer disease.

  5. APC gene methylation is inversely correlated with features of the CpG island methylator phenotype in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Iacopetta, Barry; Grieu, Fabienne; Li, Wei; Ruszkiewicz, Andrew; Caruso, Maria; Moore, James; Watanabe, Goh; Kawakami, Kazuyuki

    2006-11-15

    The notion of a CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP) was proposed to describe a subset of colorectal cancers (CRC) displaying frequent and concordant methylation of CpG islands located within gene promoter regions. Some workers have failed to observe associations between CIMP and specific clinicopathological features of CRC, possibly because of the choice of genes used to define this phenotype. The aim of the current study was to determine whether the aberrant methylation of 6 genes implicated in CRC development was associated with the same phenotypic features of this tumour type. The MethyLight assay was used to provide quantitative estimates of MLH1, P16, TIMP3, P14, DAPK and APC methylation levels in 199 unselected colorectal tumours. The methylation of MLH1, P16, TIMP3 and P14 was highly concordant (p < 0.0001 for each pair) but that of DAPK and APC was not. An inverse association was observed between the methylation of APC and TIMP3 (p = 0.004). Methylation of the MLH1, P16, TIMP3 and P14 genes was associated with tumour infiltrating lymphocytes (p < 0.05), microsatellite instability (p < 0.001), BRAF mutation (p < 0.0001) and elevated concentrations of the methyl group carriers tetrahydrofolate (THF) and 5,10-methylene THF (p < 0.05). In contrast, APC methylation was associated with wildtype BRAF (p = 0.003) and with lower concentrations of methyl group carriers (p < 0.05). These findings highlight the importance of gene selection in studies that aim to characterize the biological features and clinical behaviour of CIMP+ tumours.

  6. Annexin A1 contributes to pancreatic cancer cell phenotype, behaviour and metastatic potential independently of Formyl Peptide Receptor pathway

    PubMed Central

    Belvedere, Raffaella; Bizzarro, Valentina; Forte, Giovanni; Dal Piaz, Fabrizio; Parente, Luca; Petrella, Antonello

    2016-01-01

    Annexin A1 (ANXA1) is a Ca2+-binding protein over-expressed in pancreatic cancer (PC). We recently reported that extracellular ANXA1 mediates PC cell motility acting on Formyl Peptide Receptors (FPRs). Here, we describe other mechanisms by which intracellular ANXA1 could mediate PC progression. We obtained ANXA1 Knock-Out (KO) MIA PaCa-2 cells using the CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing technology. LC-MS/MS analysis showed altered expression of several proteins involved in cytoskeletal organization. As a result, ANXA1 KO MIA PaCa-2 partially lost their migratory and invasive capabilities with a mechanism that appeared independent of FPRs. The acquisition of a less aggressive phenotype has been further investigated in vivo. Wild type (WT), PGS (scrambled) and ANXA1 KO MIA PaCa-2 cells were engrafted orthotopically in SCID mice. No differences were found about PC primary mass, conversely liver metastatization appeared particularly reduced in ANXA1 KO MIA PaCa-2 engrafted mice. In summary, we show that intracellular ANXA1 is able to preserve the cytoskeleton integrity and to maintain a malignant phenotype in vitro. The protein has a relevant role in the metastatization process in vivo, as such it appears attractive and suitable as prognostic and therapeutic marker in PC progression. PMID:27412958

  7. Isolation and characterization of calcium sensing receptor null cells: a highly malignant and drug resistant phenotype of colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Singh, Navneet; Liu, Guangming; Chakrabarty, Subhas

    2013-05-01

    The expression of calcium sensing receptor (CaSR) in the human colonic crypt epithelium is linked to cellular differentiation while its lack of expression is associated with undifferentiated and invasive colon carcinoma. Human colon carcinoma cell lines contain small subpopulations (10-20%) that do not express CaSR (termed CaSR null cells). Here, we report on the isolation, propagation, maintenance and characterization of CaSR null cells from the CBS and HCT116 human colon carcinoma cell lines. CaSR null cells grew as three-dimensional non-adherent spherical clusters with increased propensity for anchorage independent growth, cellular proliferation and invasion of matrigels. CaSR null cells were highly resistant to fluorouracil and expressed abundant amount of thymidylate synthase and survivin. Molecular profiling by real time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blots showed a high level of expression of the previously reported cancer stem cell markers CD133, CD44 and Nanog in CaSR null cells. A significant increase in the expression of epithelial-mesenchymal transitional molecules and transcription factors was also observed. These include N-cadherin, β-catenin, vimentin, fibronectin, Snail1, Snail2, Twist and FOXC2. The expression of the tumor suppressive E-cadherin and miR145, on the other hand, was greatly reduced while expression of the oncogenic microRNAs: miR21, miR135a and miR135b was significantly up-regulated. CaSR null cells possess a myriad of cellular and molecular features that drive and sustain the malignant phenotype. We conclude that CaSR null constitutes a highly malignant and drug resistant phenotype of colon cancer.

  8. Ovatodiolide sensitizes aggressive breast cancer cells to doxorubicin, eliminates their cancer stem cell-like phenotype, and reduces doxorubicin-associated toxicity.

    PubMed

    Bamodu, Oluwaseun Adebayo; Huang, Wen-Chien; Tzeng, David T W; Wu, Alexander; Wang, Liang Shun; Yeh, Chi-Tai; Chao, Tsu-Yi

    2015-08-10

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is chemotherapy-refractory and associated with poor clinical prognosis. Doxorubicin (Doxo), a class I anthracycline and first-line anticancer agent, effective against a wide spectrum of neoplasms including breast carcinoma, is associated with several cumulative dose-dependent adverse effects, including cardiomyopathy, typhilitis, and acute myelotoxicity. This study evaluated the usability of Ovatodiolide (Ova) in sensitizing TNBC cells to Doxo cytotoxicity, so as to reduce Doxo effective dose and consequently its adverse effects. TNBC cell lines MDA-MB-231 and HS578T were used. Pre-treatment of the TNBC cells with 10 µM Ova 24 h before Doxo administration increased the Doxo anticancer effect (IC50 1.4 µM) compared to simultaneous treatment with Doxo ( IC50 1.8 µM), or Doxo alone (IC50 9.2 µM). Intracellular accumulation of Doxo was lowest in Ova pre-treated cells at all Doxo concentrations, when compared with Doxo or simultaneously treated cells. In comparison to the Doxo-only group, cell cycle analysis of MDA-MB-231 cells treated concurrently with 2.5 µM Ova and 1.25 µM Doxo showed increased percentage of cells arrested at G0/G1; however, pre-treatment with the same concentration of Ova 24 h before Doxo showed greater tumor growth inhibition, with a 2.4-fold increased percentage of cells in G0/G1 arrest, greater Doxo-induced apoptosis, and significantly reduced intracellular Doxo accumulation. Additionally, Ova-sensitized TNBC cells also lost their cancer stem cell-like phenotype evidenced by significant dissolution, necrosis of formed mammospheres. Taken together, these findings indicate that Ova sensitizes TNBC cells to Doxo and potentiates doxorubicin-induced elimination of the TNBC cancer stem cell-like phenotype.

  9. Association of aberrations in one-carbon metabolism with molecular phenotype and grade of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Naushad, Shaik Mohammad; Pavani, Addepalli; Rupasree, Yedluri; Divyya, Shree; Deepti, Sripurna; Digumarti, Raghunadha Rao; Gottumukkala, Suryanarayana Raju; Prayaga, Aruna; Kutala, Vijay Kumar

    2012-10-01

    We have earlier demonstrated the role of aberrant one-carbon metabolism in the etiology of breast cancer. In the current study, we examine the clinical utility of these factors in predicting the subtype of breast cancer and as indicators of disease progression. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) and PCR-amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) approaches were used for genetic analysis. Plasma folate and homocysteine were measured using Axsym folate kit and reverse phase HPLC, respectively. Multiple linear regression models were used to test the predictability of disease progression. Luminal A subtype was associated with late age of onset, higher body mass index and lack of family history of breast cancer. Thymidylate synthase (TYMS) 5'-UTR 28 bp tandem repeat (OR: 2.09, 95% CI: 1.05-4.16) and methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T (OR: 4.10, 95% CI: 1.40-11.95) were strongly associated with Luminal B. Reduced folate carrier (RFC1) G80A (OR: 2.92, 95% CI: 1.22-6.97) and methionine synthase (MTR) A2756G (OR: 4.71, 95% CI: 1.66-13.31) polymorphisms were associated with LuminA-HH subtype while MTHFR C677T showed association with HER-enriched (OR: 30.41, 95% CI: 6.47-142.91). Cytosolic serine hydroxymethyltransferase (cSHMT) conferred protection against basal-like breast cancer (OR: 0.47, 95% CI: 0.22-0.98). HER-enriched and basal-like subtypes showed positive association with familial breast cancer and inverse association with plasma folate. Hyperhomocysteinemia was observed in Luminal B and basal-like subtypes. Multiple linear regression models of aberrant one-carbon metabolism were found to be moderate predictors of breast cancer grade (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, C = 0.72, 95% CI: 0.58-0.87, P = 0.008). To conclude, aberrations in one-carbon metabolism predict the subtype of breast cancer and disease progression.

  10. Acquired resistance to the second-generation androgen receptor antagonist enzalutamide in castration-resistant prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kregel, Steven; Chen, James L.; Tom, Westin; Krishnan, Venkatesh; Kach, Jacob; Brechka, Hannah; Fessenden, Tim B.; Isikbay, Masis; Paner, Gladell P.

    2016-01-01

    Enzalutamide (MDV3100) is a second generation Androgen Receptor (AR) antagonist with proven efficacy in the treatment of castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). The majority of treated patients, however, develop resistance and disease progression and there is a critical need to identify novel targetable pathways mediating resistance. The purpose of this study was to develop and extensively characterize a series of enzalutamide-resistant prostate cancer cell lines. Four genetically distinct AR-positive and AR-pathway dependent prostate cancer cell lines (CWR-R1, LAPC-4, LNCaP, VCaP) were made resistant to enzalutamide by long-term culture (> 6 months) in enzalutamide. Extensive characterization of these lines documented divergent in vitro growth characteristics and AR pathway modulation. Enzalutamide-resistant LNCaP and CWR-R1 cells, but not LAPC-4 and VCAP cells, demonstrated increased castration-resistant and metastatic growth in vivo. Global gene expression analyses between short-term enzalutamide treated vs. enzalutamide-resistant cells identified both AR pathway and non-AR pathway associated changes that were restored upon acquisition of enzalutamide resistance. Further analyses revealed very few common gene expression changes between the four resistant cell lines. Thus, while AR-mediated pathways contribute in part to enzalutamide resistance, an unbiased approach across several cell lines demonstrates a greater contribution toward resistance via pleiotropic, non-AR mediated mechanisms. PMID:27036029

  11. Detection of architectural distortion in mammograms acquired prior to the detection of breast cancer using texture and fractal analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prajna, Shormistha; Rangayyan, Rangaraj M.; Ayres, Fábio J.; Desautels, J. E. Leo

    2008-03-01

    Mammography is a widely used screening tool for the early detection of breast cancer. One of the commonly missed signs of breast cancer is architectural distortion. The purpose of this study is to explore the application of fractal analysis and texture measures for the detection of architectural distortion in screening mammograms taken prior to the detection of breast cancer. A method based on Gabor filters and phase portrait analysis was used to detect initial candidates of sites of architectural distortion. A total of 386 regions of interest (ROIs) were automatically obtained from 14 "prior mammograms", including 21 ROIs related to architectural distortion. The fractal dimension of the ROIs was calculated using the circular average power spectrum technique. The average fractal dimension of the normal (false-positive) ROIs was higher than that of the ROIs with architectural distortion. For the "prior mammograms", the best receiver operating characteristics (ROC) performance achieved was 0.74 with the fractal dimension and 0.70 with fourteen texture features, in terms of the area under the ROC curve.

  12. The DBP Phenotype Gc-1f/Gc-1f Is Associated with Reduced Risk of Cancer. The Tromsø Study

    PubMed Central

    Jorde, Rolf; Schirmer, Henrik; Wilsgaard, Tom; Bøgeberg Mathiesen, Ellisiv; Njølstad, Inger; Løchen, Maja-Lisa; Joakimsen, Ragnar Martin; Grimnes, Guri

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objective In addition to its role as a transport protein, the vitamin D binding protein (DBP) may also affect lipid metabolism, inflammation and carcinogenesis. There are three common variants of the DBP, Gc1s (1s), Gc1f (1f), Gc2 (2) that result in six common phenotypes (1s/1s, 1s/1f, 1s/2, 1f/1f, 1f/2, and 2/2). These phenotypes can be identified by genotyping for the two single nucleotide polymorphisms rs7041 and rs4588 in the GC gene. The DBP variants have different binding coefficients for the vitamin D metabolites, and accordingly there may be important relations between DBP phenotypes and health. Methods DNA was prepared from subjects who participated in the fourth survey of the Tromsø Study in 1994-1995 and who were registered with the endpoints myocardial infarction (MI), type 2 diabetes (T2DM), cancer or death as well as a randomly selected control group. The endpoint registers were complete up to 2010- 2013. Genotyping was performed for rs7041 and rs4588 and serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) was measured. Results Genotyping for rs7041 and rs4588 was performed successfully in 11 704 subjects. Among these, 1660 were registered with incident MI, 958 with T2DM, 2410 with cancer and 4318 had died. Subjects with the DBP phenotype 1f/1f had 23 – 26 % reduced risk of incident cancer compared to the 1s/1s and 2/2 phenotypes (P < 0.02, Cox regression with gender as covariate). Differences in serum 25(OH)D levels could not explain the apparent cancer protective effect of the DBP variant 1f. In addition to cancer and 25(OH)D, there were significant associations between DBP phenotype and body height, hip circumference and serum calcium. Conclusion There are important biological differences between the common DBP phenotypes. If the relation between the DBP variant 1f and cancer is confirmed in other studies, determination of DBP phenotype may have clinical importance. PMID:25993554

  13. Accurate IMRT fluence verification for prostate cancer patients using ‘in-vivo’ measured EPID images and in-room acquired kilovoltage cone-beam CT scans

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background To investigate for prostate cancer patients the comparison of ‘in-vivo’ measured portal dose images (PDIs) with predictions based on a kilovoltage cone-beam CT scan (CBCT), acquired during the same treatment fraction, as an alternative for pre-treatment verification. For evaluation purposes, predictions were also performed using the patients’ planning CTs (pCT). Methods To get reliable CBCT electron densities for PDI predictions, Hounsfield units from the pCT were mapped onto the CBCT, while accounting for non-rigidity in patient anatomy in an approximate way. PDI prediction accuracy was first validated for an anatomical phantom, using IMRT treatment plans of ten prostate cancer patients. Clinical performance was studied using data acquired for 50 prostate cancer patients. For each patient, 4–5 CBCTs were available, resulting in a total of 1413 evaluated images. Measured and predicted PDIs were compared using γ-analyses with 3% global dose difference and 3 mm distance to agreement as reference criteria. Moreover, the pass rate for automated PDI comparison was assessed. To quantify improvements in IMRT fluence verification accuracy results from multiple fractions were combined by generating a γ-image with values halfway the minimum and median γ values, pixel by pixel. Results For patients, CBCT-based PDI predictions showed a high agreement with measurements, with an average percentage of rejected pixels of 1.41% only. In spite of possible intra-fraction motion and anatomy changes, this was only slightly larger than for phantom measurements (0.86%). For pCT-based predictions, the agreement deteriorated (average percentage of rejected pixels 2.98%), due to an enhanced impact of anatomy variations. For predictions based on CBCT, combination of the first 2 fractions yielded gamma results in close agreement with pre-treatment analyses (average percentage of rejected pixels 0.63% versus 0.35%, percentage of rejected beams 0.6% versus 0%). For the p

  14. Effect of surgical wound fluids after intraoperative electron radiotherapy on the cancer stem cell phenotype in a panel of human breast cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Zaleska, Karolina; Suchorska, Wiktoria Maria; Przybyła, Anna; Murawa, Dawid

    2016-01-01

    The wound healing process after surgery alters the area surrounding the original tumor and around the scar, and the modified microenvironment is more favorable for tumor recurrence. Intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) is one of the more novel strategies in breast cancer (BC) treatment. Irradiation during surgery has effects on the tumor microenvironment, abrogating the proliferative cascade induced by surgical wound healing. The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of surgical wound fluids from IOERT treatment (RT-WF) compared with wound fluids from conservative-breast surgery only (WF) on the cancer stem cell phenotype in a panel of BC cell lines. Post-operative wound fluids were derived from patients with BC who underwent a tumor resection (quadrantectomy) plus intraoperative electron radiotherapy using a single dose of ≤10 Gy on the tumor bed and surrounding tissues, or from those who underwent a tumor resection without IOERT. Cell lines were incubated with 10% wound fluids, and after 4 days, the cluster of differentiation (CD)44+/CD24−/low phenotype and aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1) activity were determined by flow cytometry. The two types of fluid each affected the CD44+/CD24−/low phenotype. The results varied markedly between each cell line, even for the same histological subtypes. RT-WF decreased the CD44+/CD24−/low populations in the basal-like BT-549 and MDA-MB-468 cell lines, whereas in the luminal type MCF7 cell line, the two fluids inhibited these populations. The HER-OE subtypes harbored a minimal CD44+/CD24−/low population, but the growth of SK-BR-3 was stimulated by the two post-operative fluids. WF exhibited a stronger effect on ALDH1 activity compared with RT-WF. The stimulatory effect was dependent on the histological subtype of the cell line and the strongest dependence was observed in luminal subtypes characterized by low dehydrogenase activity in the control group. The present results enable a better understanding of

  15. Induced cancer stem-like cells as a model for biological screening and discovery of agents targeting phenotypic traits of cancer stem cell.

    PubMed

    Nishi, Mayuko; Akutsu, Hidenori; Kudoh, Ayumi; Kimura, Hirokazu; Yamamoto, Naoki; Umezawa, Akihiro; Lee, Sam W; Ryo, Akihide

    2014-09-30

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) retain the capacity to propagate themselves through self-renewal and to produce heterogeneous lineages of cancer cells constituting the tumor. Novel drugs that target CSCs can potentially eliminate the tumor initiating cell population therefore resulting in complete cure of the cancer. We recently established a CSC-like model using induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology to reprogram and partially differentiate human mammary epithelial MCF-10A cells. Using the induced CSC-like (iCSCL) model, we developed a phenotypic drug assay system to identify agents that inhibit the stemness and self-renewal properties of CSCs. The selectivity of the agents was assessed using three distinct assays characterized by cell viability, cellular stemness and tumor sphere formation. Using this approach, we found that withaferin A (WA), an Ayurvedic medicine constituent, was a potent inhibitor of CSC stemness leading to cellular senescence primarily via the induction of p21Cip1 expression. Moreover, WA exhibited strong anti-tumorigenic activity against the iCSCL. These results indicate that our iCSCL model provides an innovative high throughput platform for a simple, easy, and cost-effective method to search for novel CSC-targeting drugs. Furthermore, our current study identified WA as a putative drug candidate for abrogating the stemness and tumor initiating ability of CSCs.

  16. In vivo relevant mixed urolithins and ellagic acid inhibit phenotypic and molecular colon cancer stem cell features: A new potentiality for ellagitannin metabolites against cancer.

    PubMed

    Núñez-Sánchez, María Ángeles; Karmokar, Ankur; González-Sarrías, Antonio; García-Villalba, Rocío; Tomás-Barberán, Francisco A; García-Conesa, María Teresa; Brown, Karen; Espín, Juan Carlos

    2016-06-01

    Colon cancer stem cells (CSCs) offer a novel paradigm for colorectal cancer (CRC) treatment and dietary polyphenols may contribute to battle these cells. Specifically, polyphenol-derived colon metabolites have the potential to interact with and affect colon CSCs. We herein report the effects against colon CSCs of two mixtures of ellagitannin (ET) metabolites, ellagic acid (EA) and the gut microbiota-derived urolithins (Uro) at concentrations detected in the human colon tissues following the intake of ET-containing products (pomegranate, walnuts). These mixtures reduce phenotypic and molecular features in two models of colon CSCs: Caco-2 cells and primary tumour cells from a patient with CRC. The mixture containing mostly Uro-A (85% Uro-A, 10% Uro-C, 5% EA) was most effective at inhibiting the number and size of colonospheres and aldehyde dehydrogenase activity (ALDH, a marker of chemoresistance) whereas the mixture containing less Uro-A but IsoUro-A and Uro-B (30% Uro-A, 50% IsoUro-A, 10% Uro-B, 5% Uro-C, 5% EA) had some effects on the number and size of colonospheres but not on ALDH. These data support a role for polyphenols metabolites in the control of colon cancer chemoresistance and relapse and encourage the research on the effects of polyphenols against CSCs.

  17. Targeting glucosylceramide synthase induction of cell surface globotriaosylceramide (Gb3) in acquired cisplatin-resistance of lung cancer and malignant pleural mesothelioma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tyler, Andreas; Johansson, Anders; Karlsson, Terese; Gudey, Shyam Kumar; Brännström, Thomas; Grankvist, Kjell; Behnam-Motlagh, Parviz

    2015-08-01

    Background: Acquired resistance to cisplatin treatment is a caveat when treating patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM). Ceramide increases in response to chemotherapy, leading to proliferation arrest and apoptosis. However, a tumour stress activation of glucosylceramide synthase (GCS) follows to eliminate ceramide by formation of glycosphingolipids (GSLs) such as globotriaosylceramide (Gb3), the functional receptor of verotoxin-1. Ceramide elimination enhances cell proliferation and apoptosis blockade, thus stimulating tumor progression. GSLs transactivate multidrug resistance 1/P-glycoprotein (MDR1) and multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP1) expression which further prevents ceramide accumulation and stimulates drug efflux. We investigated the expression of Gb3, MDR1 and MRP1 in NSCLC and MPM cells with acquired cisplatin resistance, and if GCS activity or MDR1 pump inhibitors would reduce their expression and reverse cisplatin-resistance. Methods: Cell surface expression of Gb3, MDR1 and MRP1 and intracellular expression of MDR1 and MRP1 was analyzed by flow cytometry and confocal microscopy on P31 MPM and H1299 NSCLC cells and subline cells with acquired cisplatin resistance. The effect of GCS inhibitor PPMP and MDR1 pump inhibitor cyclosporin A for 72 h on expression and cisplatin cytotoxicity was tested. Results: The cisplatin-resistant cells expressed increased cell surface Gb3. Cell surface Gb3 expression of resistant cells was annihilated by PPMP whereas cyclosporin A decreased Gb3 and MDR1 expression in H1299 cells. No decrease of MDR1 by PPMP was noted in using flow cytometry, whereas a decrease of MDR1 in H1299 and H1299res was indicated with confocal microscopy. No certain co-localization of Gb3 and MDR1 was noted. PPMP, but not cyclosporin A, potentiated cisplatin cytotoxicity in all cells. Conclusions: Cell surface Gb3 expression is a likely tumour biomarker for acquired cisplatin

  18. Decreased Expression of the Early Mitotic Gene, CHFR, Contributes to the Acquisition of Breast Cancer Phenotypes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-01

    cell line information, including origins and hormone receptor status, has been compiled by Neve et al. (27). Please see Supplementary Table S1 for a...from primary and metastatic sites using selective media. Cancer Res 1993; 53:627–35. 27. Neve RM, Chin K, Fridlyand J, et al. A collection of breast...amplified kinase STK15/BTAK induces centrosome amplification, aneuploidy and transformation. Nat Genet. 1998; 20: 189-193. [25] McGhee, EM, Cotter, PD

  19. Epithelial Plasticity in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer: Biology of the Lethal Phenotype

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-07-01

    male Y - chromosomes ) with amplification and compared with non-amplified control DNA, in order to ascertain the potential biases in copy number...direct evidence to date for the existence of EMT in human cancer. In year 1, we have also begun to analyze EMT marker expression in a tissue...on these results, we have develo ped a novel CTC capture method based on th is EMT biology to identif y non-epithelial CTCs whic h are previously

  20. Epithelial Plasticity in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer: Biology of the Lethal Phenotype

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-01

    little overexpression of this marker , despite its expression in stroma. In scored epithelial tumor cells for example, we only found overexpression of N...found these markers to be over-expressed in the circulating tumor cells from men with mCRPC and women with metastatic breast cancer (see below), and...outcomes. We have already developed and validated several EMT markers that will then be applied in the following order to the TMA in order to study the

  1. Targeting ceramide synthase 6–dependent metastasis-prone phenotype in lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Motoshi; Cao, Ke; Kato, Seiichi; Komizu, Yuji; Mizutani, Naoki; Tanaka, Kouji; Arima, Chinatsu; Tai, Mei Chee; Yanagisawa, Kiyoshi; Togawa, Norie; Shiraishi, Takahiro; Usami, Noriyasu; Taniguchi, Tetsuo; Fukui, Takayuki; Yokoi, Kohei; Wakahara, Keiko; Hasegawa, Yoshinori; Mizutani, Yukiko; Igarashi, Yasuyuki; Inokuchi, Jin-ichi; Iwaki, Soichiro; Fujii, Satoshi; Satou, Akira; Matsumoto, Yoko; Ueoka, Ryuichi; Tamiya-Koizumi, Keiko; Murate, Takashi; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Kyogashima, Mamoru; Takahashi, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Sphingolipids make up a family of molecules associated with an array of biological functions, including cell death and migration. Sphingolipids are often altered in cancer, though how these alterations lead to tumor formation and progression is largely unknown. Here, we analyzed non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) specimens and cell lines and determined that ceramide synthase 6 (CERS6) is markedly overexpressed compared with controls. Elevated CERS6 expression was due in part to reduction of microRNA-101 (miR-101) and was associated with increased invasion and poor prognosis. CERS6 knockdown in NSCLC cells altered the ceramide profile, resulting in decreased cell migration and invasion in vitro, and decreased the frequency of RAC1-positive lamellipodia formation while CERS6 overexpression promoted it. In murine models, CERS6 knockdown in transplanted NSCLC cells attenuated lung metastasis. Furthermore, combined treatment with l-α-dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine liposome and the glucosylceramide synthase inhibitor D-PDMP induced cell death in association with ceramide accumulation and promoted cancer cell apoptosis and tumor regression in murine models. Together, these results indicate that CERS6-dependent ceramide synthesis and maintenance of ceramide in the cellular membrane are essential for lamellipodia formation and metastasis. Moreover, these results suggest that targeting this homeostasis has potential as a therapeutic strategy for CERS6-overexpressing NSCLC. PMID:26650179

  2. Cyclooxygenase-2 is associated with malignant phenotypes in human lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Weiying; Yue, Wentao; Wang, Hui; Lai, Baitang; Yang, Xuehui; Zhang, Chunyan; Wang, Yue; Gu, Meng

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate whether cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is associated with malignancy, and to investigate its molecular mechanisms in human lung cancer tumor malignancy. The present study used RNA interference (RNAi) methodology and celecoxib, a COX-2 inhibitor, to investigate the effect of COX-2 knockdown on the proliferation and invasion abilities of lung cancer cells and the molecular mechanisms involved. Human lung adenocarcinoma A549-si10 and LTEP-A2 cells transfected with a specific small interfering RNA (A549-si10 and LTEP-A2-si10, respectively) grew more slowly compared with parental cell lines and cells transfected with pU6. The colony formation of A549-si10 and LTEP-A2-si10 cells was also reduced. In addition, A549-si10 and LTEP-A2-si10 cells were characterized by decreased metastatic and invasive abilities. The proliferation and invasive potential of parental A549 and LTEP-A2 cells was inhibited following treatment with celecoxib. In vivo, a COX-2 knockdown resulted in a decrease of proliferation and reduction of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and endothelial growth factor receptor (EGFR) expression in A549 xenografts. In conclusion, the present study revealed that COX-2 plays a extremely important role in tumor growth, infiltration and metastasis via the regulation of VEGF, MMP-2 and EGRF expression. Therefore, COX-2 is a potential therapeutic target for lung cancer. PMID:27895738

  3. More favorable progesterone receptor phenotype of breast cancer in diabetics treated with metformin.

    PubMed

    Berstein, Lev M; Boyarkina, Marina P; Tsyrlina, Evgenia V; Turkevich, Elena A; Semiglazov, Vladimir F

    2011-12-01

    The coexistence of type 2 diabetes with breast cancer may result in poorer cancer-related survival due to a number of mediating factors including an alteration of tumor tissue hormonal sensitivity. Previous studies have shown that receptor status of breast tumors in diabetics may be changed; however, the mode of therapy for diabetes was usually ignored. This work presents the results of an analysis of the receptor status of breast carcinomas in 90 postmenopausal women suffering with diabetes mellitus type 2 who had been cured, for not less that 1 year prior to surgery, with different modes of antidiabetic therapy, including a dietary treatment only, sulfonylurea preparations, insulin therapy, and metformin as a monotherapy or in combination with sulfonylurea derivatives. No differences in estrogen receptors occurrence in tumor tissue were found in different treatment groups. The frequency of progesterone receptor-positive mammary carcinomas in women who were treated with metformin, irrespective of whether it was combined with sulfonylurea preparations, was significantly higher than in the sulfonylurea only group (P=0.043) and in the combined group of patients treated with either sulfonylurea or insulin (P=0.041). The exclusion of the patients who received neoadjuvant chemotherapy (24 persons) did not significantly affect the above results. The data may be used as an explanation of the distinctions in cancer characteristics and course between diabetic patients treated with either metformin or sulfonylurea derivatives and insulin.

  4. Targeting ceramide synthase 6-dependent metastasis-prone phenotype in lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Motoshi; Cao, Ke; Kato, Seiichi; Komizu, Yuji; Mizutani, Naoki; Tanaka, Kouji; Arima, Chinatsu; Tai, Mei Chee; Yanagisawa, Kiyoshi; Togawa, Norie; Shiraishi, Takahiro; Usami, Noriyasu; Taniguchi, Tetsuo; Fukui, Takayuki; Yokoi, Kohei; Wakahara, Keiko; Hasegawa, Yoshinori; Mizutani, Yukiko; Igarashi, Yasuyuki; Inokuchi, Jin-ichi; Iwaki, Soichiro; Fujii, Satoshi; Satou, Akira; Matsumoto, Yoko; Ueoka, Ryuichi; Tamiya-Koizumi, Keiko; Murate, Takashi; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Kyogashima, Mamoru; Takahashi, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Sphingolipids make up a family of molecules associated with an array of biological functions, including cell death and migration. Sphingolipids are often altered in cancer, though how these alterations lead to tumor formation and progression is largely unknown. Here, we analyzed non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) specimens and cell lines and determined that ceramide synthase 6 (CERS6) is markedly overexpressed compared with controls. Elevated CERS6 expression was due in part to reduction of microRNA-101 (miR-101) and was associated with increased invasion and poor prognosis. CERS6 knockdown in NSCLC cells altered the ceramide profile, resulting in decreased cell migration and invasion in vitro, and decreased the frequency of RAC1-positive lamellipodia formation while CERS6 overexpression promoted it. In murine models, CERS6 knockdown in transplanted NSCLC cells attenuated lung metastasis. Furthermore, combined treatment with l-α-dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine liposome and the glucosylceramide synthase inhibitor D-PDMP induced cell death in association with ceramide accumulation and promoted cancer cell apoptosis and tumor regression in murine models. Together, these results indicate that CERS6-dependent ceramide synthesis and maintenance of ceramide in the cellular membrane are essential for lamellipodia formation and metastasis. Moreover, these results suggest that targeting this homeostasis has potential as a therapeutic strategy for CERS6-overexpressing NSCLC.

  5. Coexpression analysis of large cancer datasets provides insight into the cellular phenotypes of the tumour microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Biopsies taken from individual tumours exhibit extensive differences in their cellular composition due to the inherent heterogeneity of cancers and vagaries of sample collection. As a result genes expressed in specific cell types, or associated with certain biological processes are detected at widely variable levels across samples in transcriptomic analyses. This heterogeneity also means that the level of expression of genes expressed specifically in a given cell type or process, will vary in line with the number of those cells within samples or activity of the pathway, and will therefore be correlated in their expression. Results Using a novel 3D network-based approach we have analysed six large human cancer microarray datasets derived from more than 1,000 individuals. Based upon this analysis, and without needing to isolate the individual cells, we have defined a broad spectrum of cell-type and pathway-specific gene signatures present in cancer expression data which were also found to be largely conserved in a number of independent datasets. Conclusions The conserved signature of the tumour-associated macrophage is shown to be largely-independent of tumour cell type. All stromal cell signatures have some degree of correlation with each other, since they must all be inversely correlated with the tumour component. However, viewed in the context of established tumours, the interactions between stromal components appear to be multifactorial given the level of one component e.g. vasculature, does not correlate tightly with another, such as the macrophage. PMID:23845084

  6. Narrowing the focus: a toolkit to systematically connect oncogenic signaling pathways with cancer phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Singleton, Katherine R.; Wood, Kris C.

    2016-01-01

    Functional genomics approaches such as gain- and loss-of-function screening can efficiently reveal genes that control cancer cell growth, survival, signal transduction, and drug resistance, but distilling the results of large-scale screens into actionable therapeutic strategies is challenging given our incomplete understanding of the functions of many genes. Research over several decades, including the results of large-scale cancer sequencing projects, has made it clear that many oncogenic properties are controlled by a common set of core oncogenic signaling pathways. By directly screening this core set of pathways, rather than much larger numbers of individual genes, it may be possible to more directly and efficiently connect functional genomic screening results with therapeutic targets. Here, we describe the recent development of methods to directly screen oncogenic pathways in high-throughput. We summarize the results of studies that have used pathway-centric screening to map the pathways of resistance to targeted therapies in diverse cancer types, then conclude by expanding on potential future applications of this approach. PMID:27738492

  7. Interstitial flows promote an amoeboid cell phenotype and motility of breast cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tung, Chih-Kuan; Huang, Yu Ling; Zheng, Angela; Wu, Mingming

    2015-03-01

    Lymph nodes, the drainage systems for interstitial flows, are clinically known to be the first metastatic sites of many cancer types including breast and prostate cancers. Here, we demonstrate that breast cancer cell morphology and motility is modulated by interstitial flows in a cell-ECM adhesion dependent manner. The average aspect ratios of the cells are significantly lower (or are more amoeboid like) in the presence of the flow in comparison to the case when the flow is absent. The addition of exogenous adhesion molecules within the extracellular matrix (type I collagen) enhances the overall aspect ratio (or are more mesenchymal like) of the cell population. Using measured cell trajectories, we find that the persistence of the amoeboid cells (aspect ratio less than 2.0) is shorter than that of mesenchymal cells. However, the maximum speed of the amoeboid cells is larger than that of mesenchymal cells. Together these findings provide the novel insight that interstitial flows promote amoeboid cell morphology and motility and highlight the plasticity of tumor cell motility in response to its biophysical environment. Supported by NIH Grant R21CA138366.

  8. Phenotype of NK-Like CD8(+) T Cells with Innate Features in Humans and Their Relevance in Cancer Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Barbarin, Alice; Cayssials, Emilie; Jacomet, Florence; Nunez, Nicolas Gonzalo; Basbous, Sara; Lefèvre, Lucie; Abdallah, Myriam; Piccirilli, Nathalie; Morin, Benjamin; Lavoue, Vincent; Catros, Véronique; Piaggio, Eliane; Herbelin, André; Gombert, Jean-Marc

    2017-01-01

    Unconventional T cells are defined by their capacity to respond to signals other than the well-known complex of peptides and major histocompatibility complex proteins. Among the burgeoning family of unconventional T cells, innate-like CD8(+) T cells in the mouse were discovered in the early 2000s. This subset of CD8(+) T cells bears a memory phenotype without having encountered a foreign antigen and can respond to innate-like IL-12 + IL-18 stimulation. Although the concept of innate memory CD8(+) T cells is now well established in mice, whether an equivalent memory NK-like T-cell population exists in humans remains under debate. We recently reported that CD8(+) T cells responding to innate-like IL-12 + IL-18 stimulation and co-expressing the transcription factor Eomesodermin (Eomes) and KIR/NKG2A membrane receptors with a memory/EMRA phenotype may represent a new, functionally distinct innate T cell subset in humans. In this review, after a summary on the known innate CD8(+) T-cell features in the mouse, we propose Eomes together with KIR/NKG2A and CD49d as a signature to standardize the identification of this innate CD8(+) T-cell subset in humans. Next, we discuss IL-4 and IL-15 involvement in the generation of innate CD8(+) T cells and particularly its possible dependency on the promyelocytic leukemia zinc-finger factor expressing iNKT cells, an innate T cell subset well documented for its susceptibility to tumor immune subversion. After that, focusing on cancer diseases, we provide new insights into the potential role of these innate CD8(+) T cells in a physiopathological context in humans. Based on empirical data obtained in cases of chronic myeloid leukemia, a myeloproliferative syndrome controlled by the immune system, and in solid tumors, we observe both the possible contribution of innate CD8(+) T cells to cancer disease control and their susceptibility to tumor immune subversion. Finally, we note that during tumor progression, innate CD8(+) T

  9. New findings on primary and acquired resistance to anti-EGFR therapy in metastatic colorectal cancer: do all roads lead to RAS?

    PubMed

    Bronte, Giuseppe; Silvestris, Nicola; Castiglia, Marta; Galvano, Antonio; Passiglia, Francesco; Sortino, Giovanni; Cicero, Giuseppe; Rolfo, Christian; Peeters, Marc; Bazan, Viviana; Fanale, Daniele; Giordano, Antonio; Russo, Antonio

    2015-09-22

    Anti-epidermal growth factor receptor therapy with the monoclonal antibodies cetuximab and panitumumab is the main targeted treatment to combine with standard chemotherapy for metastatic colorectal cancer. Many clinical studies have shown the benefit of the addition of these agents for patients without mutations in the EGFR pathway. Many biomarkers, including KRAS and NRAS mutations, BRAF mutations, PIK3CA mutations, PTEN loss, AREG and EREG expression, and HER-2 amplification have already been identified to select responders to anti-EGFR agents. Among these alterations KRAS and NRAS mutations are currently recognized as the best predictive factors for primary resistance. Liquid biopsy, which helps to isolate circulating tumor DNA, is an innovative method to study both primary and acquired resistance to anti-EGFR monoclonal antibodies. However, high-sensitivity techniques should be used to enable the identification of a wide set of gene mutations related to resistance.

  10. New findings on primary and acquired resistance to anti-EGFR therapy in metastatic colorectal cancer: do all roads lead to RAS?

    PubMed Central

    Castiglia, Marta; Galvano, Antonio; Passiglia, Francesco; Sortino, Giovanni; Cicero, Giuseppe; Rolfo, Christian; Peeters, Marc; Bazan, Viviana; Fanale, Daniele; Giordano, Antonio; Russo, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Anti-epidermal growth factor receptor therapy with the monoclonal antibodies cetuximab and panitumumab is the main targeted treatment to combine with standard chemotherapy for metastatic colorectal cancer. Many clinical studies have shown the benefit of the addition of these agents for patients without mutations in the EGFR pathway. Many biomarkers, including KRAS and NRAS mutations, BRAF mutations, PIK3CA mutations, PTEN loss, AREG and EREG expression, and HER-2 amplification have already been identified to select responders to anti-EGFR agents. Among these alterations KRAS and NRAS mutations are currently recognized as the best predictive factors for primary resistance. Liquid biopsy, which helps to isolate circulating tumor DNA, is an innovative method to study both primary and acquired resistance to anti-EGFR monoclonal antibodies. However, high-sensitivity techniques should be used to enable the identification of a wide set of gene mutations related to resistance. PMID:26318427

  11. A phenotype from tumor stroma based on the expression of metalloproteases and their inhibitors, associated with prognosis in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Eiró, Noemí; Fernandez-Garcia, Belen; Vázquez, Julio; del Casar, José M; González, Luis O; Vizoso, Francisco J

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present work was to evaluate the impact of the phenotype of both mononuclear inflammatory cells (MICs) and cancer-associated fibroblast (CAFs) in early breast cancer patients, specifically assessed as to their expression of MMP/TIMP relative to their position within the tumor (i.e., localization at the tumor center or invasive front) and the occurrence of distant metastases.. An immunohistochemical study was performed using tissue arrays and specific antibodies against matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)−1, −2, −7, −9, −11, −13 and −14, tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinase (TIMP)−1, −2 and −3, both at tumor center and at invasive front, in 107 patients with primary ductal invasive breast tumors. Data were analyzed by unsupervised hierarchical clustering analysis. Our results indicated that MMP-11 expression by MICs, and TIMP-2 expression by CAFs at either the tumor center or the invasive front, were the most potent independent prognostic factors for predicting the clinical outcome of patients. Using the unsupervised hierarchical clustering analysis, we found well-defined clusters of cases identifying subgroups of tumors showing a high molecular profile of MMPs/TIMPs expression by stromal cells (CAFs and MICs), both at the tumor center and at the invasive front, which were strongly associated with a higher prevalence of distant metastasis. In addition, we found combinations of these clusters defining subpopulations of breast carcinomas differing widely in their clinical outcome. The results presented here identify biologic markers useful to categorize patients into different subgroups based on their tumor stroma, which may contribute to improved understanding of the prognosis of breast cancer patients. PMID:26140253

  12. IKK phosphorylation of NF-κB at serine 536 contributes to acquired cisplatin resistance in head and neck squamous cell cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhipeng; Yang, Zejia; Lapidus, Rena G; Liu, Xuefeng; Cullen, Kevin J; Dan, Han C

    2015-01-01

    Current treatment methods for advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) include surgery, radiation therapy and chemotherapy. For recurrent and metastatic HNSCC, cisplatin is the most common treatment option, but most of patients will eventually develop cisplatin resistance. Therefore, it is imperative to define the mechanisms involved in cisplatin resistance and find novel therapeutic strategies to overcome this deadly disease. In order to determine the role of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) in contributing to acquired cisplatin resistance in HNSCC, the expression and activity of NF-κB and its upstream kinases, IKKα and IKKβ, were evaluated and compared in three pairs of cisplatin sensitive and resistant HNSCC cell lines, including a pair of patient derived HNSCC cell line. The experiments revealed that NF-κB p65 activity was elevated in cisplatin resistant HNSCC cells compared to that in their parent cells. Importantly, the phosphorylation of NF-κB p65 at serine 536 and the phosphorylation of IKKα and IKKβ at their activation loops were dramatically elevated in the resistant cell lines. Furthermore, knockdown of NF-κB or overexpression of p65-S536 alanine (p65-S536A) mutant sensitizes resistant cells to cisplatin. Additionally, the novel IKKβ inhibitor CmpdA has been shown to consistently block the phosphorylation of NF-κB at serine 536 while also dramatically improving the efficacy of cisplatin in inhibition of cell proliferation and induction of apoptosis in the cisplatin resistant cancer cells. These results indicated that IKK/NF-κB plays a pivotal role in controlling acquired cisplatin resistance and that targeting the IKK/NF-κB signaling pathway may provide a possible therapeutic method to overcome the acquired resistance to cisplatin in HNSCC. PMID:26693062

  13. Polo-like kinase 1 inhibition diminishes acquired resistance to epidermal growth factor receptor inhibition in non-small cell lung cancer with T790M mutations

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Liguang; Nilsson, Monique; Goonatilake, Ruchitha; Tong, Pan; Li, Lerong; Giri, Uma; Villalobos, Pamela; Mino, Barbara; Rodriguez-Canales, Jaime; Wistuba, Ignacio; Wang, Jing; Heymach, John V.; Johnson, Faye M.

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) are effective against non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with activating EGFR mutations, but resistance is inevitable. Mechanisms of acquired resistance include T790M mutations and epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT). One potential strategy for overcoming this resistance is the inhibition of polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) based on our previous studies showing that mesenchymal NSCLC cell lines are more sensitive to PLK1 inhibition than epithelial cell lines. To determine the extent to which PLK1 inhibition overcomes EGFR TKI resistance we measured the effects of the PLK1 inhibitor volasertib alone and in combination with the EGFR inhibitor erlotinib in vitro and in vivo in EGFR mutant NSCLC cell lines with acquired resistance to erlotinib. Two erlotinib-resistant cell lines that underwent EMT had higher sensitivity to volasertib, which caused G2/M arrest and apoptosis, than their parental cells. In all NSCLC cell lines with T790M mutations, volasertib markedly reduced erlotinib resistance. All erlotinib-resistant NSCLC cell lines with T790M mutations had higher sensitivity to erlotinib plus volasertib than to erlotinib alone, and the combination treatment caused G2/M arrest and apoptosis. Compared with either agent alone, the combination treatment also caused significantly more DNA damage and greater reductions in tumor size. Our results suggest that PLK1 inhibition is clinically effective against NSCLC that becomes resistant to EGFR inhibition through EMT or the acquisition of a T790M mutation. These results uncover new functions of PLK1 inhibition in the treatment of NSCLC with acquired resistance to EGFR TKIs. PMID:27384992

  14. SU-E-J-241: Creation of Ventilation CT From Daily 4D CTs Or 4D Conebeam CTs Acquired During IGRT for Thoracic Cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Tai, A; Ahunbay, E; Li, X

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To develop a method to create ventilation CTs from daily 4D CTs or 4D KV conebeam CTs (4DCBCT) acquired during image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) for thoracic tumors, and to explore the potential for using the ventilation CTs as a means for early detection of lung injury during radiation treatment. Methods: 4DCT acquired using an in-room CT (CTVision, Siemens) and 4DCBCT acquired using the X-ray Volume Imaging (XVI) system (Infinity, Elekta) for representative lung cancer patients were analyzed. These 4D data sets were sorted into 10 phase images. A newly-available deformable image registration tool (ADMIRE, Elekta) is used to deform the phase images at the end of exhale (EE) to the phase images at the end of inhale (EI). The lung volumes at EI and EE were carefully contoured using an intensity-based auto-contour tool and then manually edited. The ventilation images were calculated from the variations of CT numbers of those voxels masked by the lung contour at EI between the registered phase images. The deformable image registration is also performed between the daily 4D images and planning 4DCT, and the resulting deformable field vector (DFV) is used to deform the planning doses to the daily images by an in-house Matlab program. Results: The ventilation images were successfully created. The tide volumes calculated using the ventilation images agree with those measured through volume difference of contours at EE and EI, indicating the accuracy of ventilation images. The association between the delivered doses and the change of lung ventilation from the daily ventilation CTs is identified. Conclusions: A method to create the ventilation CT using daily 4DCTs or 4D KV conebeam CTs was developed and demonstrated.

  15. The joint contribution of tumor phenotype and education to breast cancer survival disparity between Hispanic and non-Hispanic white women.

    PubMed

    Boone, S D; Baumgartner, K B; Joste, N E; Pinkston, C M; Yang, D; Baumgartner, R N

    2014-03-01

    Some studies suggest that Hispanic women are more likely to have ER- and triple-negative (ER-/PR-/HER2-) tumors and subsequently poorer prognosis than non-Hispanic white (NHW) women. In addition, only a handful of studies have examined period-specific effects of tumor phenotype and ethnicity on breast cancer survival, leaving the time-varying effects of hormonal status and ethnicity on breast cancer survival poorly defined. This study describes short and long-term breast cancer survival by ethnicity at 0-5 years and 5+ years post-diagnosis using data from the New Mexico Health, Eating, Activity, and Lifestyle cohort of Hispanic and NHW women ages 29-88 years newly diagnosed with stages I-IIIA breast cancer. The survival rate for Hispanics at 0-5 years was 82.2 % versus 94.3 % for NHW. Hispanics were more likely to have larger tumors, more advanced stage, and ER- phenotypes compared to NHW women. There was a significantly higher risk of breast cancer mortality in Hispanics over 5 years of follow-up compared to NHW (HR = 2.78, 95 % CI 1.39-5.56), adjusting for age, tumor phenotype, stage, and tumor size. This ethnic difference in survival, however, was attenuated and no longer statistically significant when additional adjustment was made for education, although a >1.5-fold increase in mortality was observed. In contrast, there was no difference between ethnic groups for survival after 5 years (HR = 1.08, 95 % CI 0.36-3.24). Our results indicate that the difference in survival between Hispanic and NHW women with breast cancer occurs in the first few years following diagnosis and is jointly associated with tumor phenotype and socio-demographic factors related to education.

  16. Desmosomes in acquired disease

    PubMed Central

    Stahley, Sara N.; Kowalczyk, Andrew P.

    2015-01-01

    Desmosomes are cell-cell junctions that mediate adhesion and couple the intermediate filament cytoskeleton to sites of cell-cell contact. This architectural arrangement functions to integrate adhesion and cytoskeletal elements of adjacent cells. The importance of this robust adhesion system is evident in numerous human diseases, both inherited and acquired, that occur when desmosome function is compromised. This review focuses on autoimmune and infectious diseases that impair desmosome function. In addition, we discuss emerging evidence that desmosomal genes are often misregulated in cancer. The emphasis of our discussion is placed on how human diseases inform our understanding of basic desmosome biology, and in turn, how fundamental advances in the cell biology of desmosomes may lead to new treatments for acquired diseases of the desmosome. PMID:25795143

  17. Desmosomes in acquired disease.

    PubMed

    Stahley, Sara N; Kowalczyk, Andrew P

    2015-06-01

    Desmosomes are cell-cell junctions that mediate adhesion and couple the intermediate filament cytoskeleton to sites of cell-cell contact. This architectural arrangement integrates adhesion and cytoskeletal elements of adjacent cells. The importance of this robust adhesion system is evident in numerous human diseases, both inherited and acquired, which occur when desmosome function is compromised. This review focuses on autoimmune and infectious diseases that impair desmosome function. In addition, we discuss emerging evidence that desmosomal genes are often misregulated in cancer. The emphasis of our discussion is placed on the way in which human diseases can inform our understanding of basic desmosome biology and in turn, the means by which fundamental advances in the cell biology of desmosomes might lead to new treatments for acquired diseases of the desmosome.

  18. SRC family kinase FYN promotes the neuroendocrine phenotype and visceral metastasis in advanced prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sievert, Margarit; Duan, Peng; Lichterman, Jake; Huang, Jen-Ming; Smith, Bethany; You, Sungyong; Nandana, Srinivas; Chu, Gina Chia-Yi; Mink, Sheldon; Josson, Sajni; Liu, Chunyan; Morello, Matteo; Jones, Lawrence W. M.; Kim, Jayoung; Freeman, Michael R.; Bhowmick, Neil; Zhau, Haiyen E.; Chung, Leland W.K.; Posadas, Edwin M.

    2015-01-01

    FYN is a SRC family kinase (SFK) that has been shown to be up-regulated in human prostate cancer (PCa) tissues and cell lines. In this study, we observed that FYN is strongly up-regulated in human neuroendocrine PCa (NEPC) tissues and xenografts, as well as cells derived from a NEPC transgenic mouse model. In silico analysis of FYN expression in prostate cancer cell line databases revealed an association with the expression of neuroendocrine (NE) markers such as CHGA, CD44, CD56, and SYP. The loss of FYN abrogated the invasion of PC3 and ARCaPM cells in response to MET receptor ligand HGF. FYN also contributed to the metastatic potential of NEPC cells in two mouse models of visceral metastasis with two different cell lines (PC3 and TRAMPC2-RANKL). The activation of MET appeared to regulate neuroendocrine (NE) features as evidenced by increased expression of NE markers in PC3 cells with HGF. Importantly, the overexpression of FYN protein in DU145 cells was directly correlated with the increase of CHGA. Thus, our data demonstrated that the neuroendocrine differentiation that occurs in PCa cells is, at least in part, regulated by FYN kinase. Understanding the role of FYN in the regulation of NE markers will provide further support for ongoing clinical trials of SFK and MET inhibitors in castration-resistant PCa patients. PMID:26624980

  19. Promising Noninvasive Cellular Phenotype in Prostate Cancer Cells Knockdown of Matrix Metalloproteinase 9

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Aditi; Cao, Wei; Sadashivaiah, Kavitha; Chen, Wantao; Schneider, Abraham; Chellaiah, Meenakshi A.

    2013-01-01

    Cell surface interaction of CD44 and MMP9 increases migration and invasion of PC3 cells. We show here that stable knockdown of MMP9 in PC3 cells switches CD44 isoform expression from CD44s to CD44v6 which is more glycosylated. These cells showed highly adhesive morphology with extensive cell spreading which is due to the formation of focal adhesions and well organized actin-stress fibers. MMP9 knockdown blocks invadopodia formation and matrix degradation activity as well. However, CD44 knockdown PC3 cells failed to develop focal adhesions and stress fibers; hence these cells make unstable adhesions. A part of the reason for these changes could be caused by silencing of CD44v6 as well. Immunostaining of prostate tissue microarray sections illustrated significantly lower levels of CD44v6 in adenocarcinoma than normal tissue. Our results suggest that interaction between CD44 and MMP9 is a potential mechanism of invadopodia formation. CD44v6 expression may be essential for the protection of non-invasive cellular phenotype. CD44v6 decrease may be a potential marker for prognosis and therapeutics. PMID:23476138

  20. Robot-Guided Atomic Force Microscopy for Mechano-Visual Phenotyping of Cancer Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wenjin; Brandes, Zachary; Roy, Rajarshi; Chekmareva, Marina; Pandya, Hardik J.; Desai, Jaydev P.; Foran, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and other forms of scanning probe microscopy have been successfully used to assess biomechanical and bioelectrical characteristics of individual cells. When extending such approaches to heterogeneous tissue, there exists the added challenge of traversing the tissue while directing the probe to the exact location of the targeted biological components under study. Such maneuvers are extremely challenging owing to the relatively small field of view, limited availability of reliable visual cues, and lack of context. In this study we designed a system that leverages the visual topology of the serial tissue sections of interest to help guide robotic control of the AFM stage to provide the requisite navigational support. The process begins by mapping the whole-slide image of a stained specimen with a well-matched, consecutive section of unstained section of tissue in a piecewise fashion. The morphological characteristics and localization of any biomarkers in the stained section can be used to position the AFM probe in the unstained tissue at regions of interest where the AFM measurements are acquired. This general approach can be utilized in various forms of microscopy for navigation assistance in tissue specimens. PMID:26343283

  1. Potential of L-Buthionine Sulfoximine to Enhance the Apoptotic Action of Estradiol to Reverse Acquired Antihormonal Resistance in Metastatic Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lewis-Wambi, Joan S; Swaby, Ramona; Kim, Helen; Jordan, V. Craig

    2010-01-01

    L-buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) is a potent inhibitor of glutathione biosynthesis and studies have shown that it is capable of enhancing the apoptotic effects of several chemotherapeutic agents. Previous studies have shown that long term antihormonal therapy leads to acquired drug resistance and that estrogen, which is normally a survival signal, is a potent apoptotic agent in these resistant cells. Interestingly, we have developed an antihormone resistant breast cancer cell line, MCF-7:2A, which is resistant to estrogen-induced apoptosis but has elevated levels of glutathione. In the present study, we examined whether BSO is capable of sensitizing antihormone resistant MCF-7:2A cells to estrogen-induced apoptosis. Our results showed that treatment of MCF-7:2A cells with 1 nM E2 plus 100 μM BSO combination for 1 week reduced the growth of these cells by almost 80-90% whereas the individual treatments had no significant effect on growth. TUNEL and DAPI staining showed that the inhibitory effect of the combination treatment was due to apoptosis. Our data indicates that glutathione participates in retarding apoptosis in antihormone-resistant human breast cancer cells and that depletion of this molecule by BSO may be critical in predisposing resistant cells to estrogen-induced apoptosis. PMID:19167492

  2. C. elegans and mutants with chronic nicotine exposure as a novel model of cancer phenotype.

    PubMed

    Kanteti, Rajani; Dhanasingh, Immanuel; El-Hashani, Essam; Riehm, Jacob J; Stricker, Thomas; Nagy, Stanislav; Zaborin, Alexander; Zaborina, Olga; Biron, David; Alverdy, John C; Im, Hae Kyung; Siddiqui, Shahid; Padilla, Pamela A; Salgia, Ravi

    2016-01-01

    We previously investigated MET and its oncogenic mutants relevant to lung cancer in C. elegans. The inactive orthlogues of the receptor tyrosine kinase Eph and MET, namely vab-1 and RB2088 respectively, the temperature sensitive constitutively active form of KRAS, SD551 (let-60; GA89) and the inactive c-CBL equivalent mutants in sli-1 (PS2728, PS1258, and MT13032) when subjected to chronic exposure of nicotine resulted in a significant loss in egg-laying capacity and fertility. While the vab-1 mutant revealed increased circular motion in response to nicotine, the other mutant strains failed to show any effect. Overall locomotion speed increased with increasing nicotine concentration in all tested mutant strains except in the vab-1 mutants. Moreover, chronic nicotine exposure, in general, upregulated kinases and phosphatases. Taken together, these studies provide evidence in support of C. elegans as initial in vivo model to study nicotine and its effects on oncogenic mutations identified in humans.

  3. RB loss contributes to aggressive tumor phenotypes in MYC-driven triple negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Knudsen, Erik S; McClendon, A Kathleen; Franco, Jorge; Ertel, Adam; Fortina, Paolo; Witkiewicz, Agnieszka K

    2015-01-01

    Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) is characterized by multiple genetic events occurring in concert to drive pathogenic features of the disease. Here we interrogated the coordinate impact of p53, RB, and MYC in a genetic model of TNBC, in parallel with the analysis of clinical specimens. Primary mouse mammary epithelial cells (mMEC) with defined genetic features were used to delineate the combined action of RB and/or p53 in the genesis of TNBC. In this context, the deletion of either RB or p53 alone and in combination increased the proliferation of mMEC; however, the cells did not have the capacity to invade in matrigel. Gene expression profiling revealed that loss of each tumor suppressor has effects related to proliferation, but RB loss in particular leads to alterations in gene expression associated with the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. The overexpression of MYC in combination with p53 loss or combined RB/p53 loss drove rapid cell growth. While the effects of MYC overexpression had a dominant impact on gene expression, loss of RB further enhanced the deregulation of a gene expression signature associated with invasion. Specific RB loss lead to enhanced invasion in boyden chambers assays and gave rise to tumors with minimal epithelial characteristics relative to RB-proficient models. Therapeutic screening revealed that RB-deficient cells were particularly resistant to agents targeting PI3K and MEK pathway. Consistent with the aggressive behavior of the preclinical models of MYC overexpression and RB loss, human TNBC tumors that express high levels of MYC and are devoid of RB have a particularly poor outcome. Together these results underscore the potency of tumor suppressor pathways in specifying the biology of breast cancer. Further, they demonstrate that MYC overexpression in concert with RB can promote a particularly aggressive form of TNBC.

  4. Plexin A1 signaling confers malignant phenotypes in lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Daisuke; Watanabe, Satoshi; Kawahara, Kohichi; Maeda, Takehiko

    2016-11-04

    Aberrant changes to several signaling pathways because of genetic mutations or increased cytokine production are critical for tumor cells to become malignant. Semaphorin 3A (SEMA3A) acts as a bivalent factor that suppresses or promotes tumor development in different pathological backgrounds. Previously, we showed that SEMA3A positively regulated the proliferative and glycolytic activities of mouse-derived Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) cells. Plexins A1-A4 (PLXNA1-PLXNA4) are SEMA3A receptors; however, it is not known which subtype is critical for oncogenic SEMA3A signaling. We used LLC cells to investigate the role of PLXNA1 in oncogenic SEMA3A signaling. Using short hairpin RNA-mediated knockdown, we investigated the effects of constitutive inhibition of Plxna1 on cell proliferation, metabolic dependency, and epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitor (EGFR-TKI) sensitivity. We found that Plxna1 knockdown did not affect apoptosis but resulted in decreased cell proliferation and reductions in mRNA expression levels of proliferation-marker genes, such as Ccnd1, Pcna, and Myc. In addition, we found decreased mRNA expression levels of glycolysis-associated genes, such as Pkm2 and Ldha, and decreased lactate production. In contrast, we found no changes in the mRNA expression levels of oxidative phosphorylation-associated genes, such as Cycs, Cox5a, and Atp5g1. We found that Plxna1 knockdown conferred resistance to glucose starvation but increased cytotoxicity to oligomycin. Plxna1 or Sema3a knockdown caused an increased sensitivity to the EGFR-TKIs gefitinib and erlotinib, in Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) cells. These findings demonstrate that PLXNA1 mediates the acquisition of malignant phenotypes induced by autocrine SEMA3A signaling.

  5. Loss of AXIN1 drives acquired resistance to WNT pathway blockade in colorectal cancer cells carrying RSPO3 fusions.

    PubMed

    Picco, Gabriele; Petti, Consalvo; Centonze, Alessia; Torchiaro, Erica; Crisafulli, Giovanni; Novara, Luca; Acquaviva, Andrea; Bardelli, Alberto; Medico, Enzo

    2017-03-01

    In colorectal cancer (CRC), WNT pathway activation by genetic rearrangements of RSPO3 is emerging as a promising target. However, its low prevalence severely limits availability of preclinical models for in-depth characterization. Using a pipeline designed to suppress stroma-derived signal, we find that RSPO3 "outlier" expression in CRC samples highlights translocation and fusion transcript expression. Outlier search in 151 CRC cell lines identified VACO6 and SNU1411 cells as carriers of, respectively, a canonical PTPRK(e1)-RSPO3(e2) fusion and a novel PTPRK(e13)-RSPO3(e2) fusion. Both lines displayed marked in vitro and in vivo sensitivity to WNT blockade by the porcupine inhibitor LGK974, associated with transcriptional and morphological evidence of WNT pathway suppression. Long-term treatment of VACO6 cells with LGK974 led to the emergence of a resistant population carrying two frameshift deletions of the WNT pathway inhibitor AXIN1, with consequent protein loss. Suppression of AXIN1 in parental VACO6 cells by RNA interference conferred marked resistance to LGK974. These results provide the first mechanism of secondary resistance to WNT pathway inhibition.

  6. Continuous administration of bevacizumab plus capecitabine, even after acquired resistance to bevacizumab, restored anti-angiogenic and antitumor effect in a human colorectal cancer xenograft model

    PubMed Central

    Iwai, Toshiki; Sugimoto, Masamichi; Harada, Suguru; Yorozu, Keigo; Kurasawa, Mitsue; Yamamoto, Kaname

    2016-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-neutralizing therapy with bevacizumab has become increasingly important for treating colorectal cancer. It was demonstrated that second-line chemotherapy together with bevacizumab after disease progression (PD) on first-line therapy including bevacizumab showed clinical benefits in metastatic colorectal and breast cancers (ML18147 trial, TANIA trial). One of the rationales for these trials was that the refractoriness to first-line therapy is caused by resistance to not so much bevacizumab as to the chemotherapeutic agents. Nevertheless, resistance to bevacizumab cannot be ruled out because VEGF-independent angiogenesis has been reported to be a mechanism of resistance to anti-VEGF therapy. In this study, we used a xenograft model with the human colon cancer HT-29 cells to investigate the mechanisms underlying the effect of continued administration of bevacizumab plus capecitabine even after resistance to bevacizumab was acquired. The combination of capecitabine plus bevacizumab exhibited significantly stronger antitumor and anti-angiogenic activities than did monotherapy with either agent. Capecitabine treatment significantly increased the intratumoral VEGF level compared with the control group; however, the combination with bevacizumab neutralized the VEGF. Among angiogenic factors other than VEGF, intratumoral galectin-3, which reportedly promotes angiogenesis both dependent on, and independently of VEGF, was significantly decreased in the capecitabine group and the combination group compared with the control group. In an in vitro experiment, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), an active metabolite of capecitabine, inhibited galectin-3 production by HT-29 cells. These results suggested that capecitabine has a dual mode of action: namely, inhibition of tumor cell growth and inhibition of galectin-3 production by tumor cells. Thus, capecitabine and bevacizumab may work in a mutually complementary manner in tumor angiogenesis inhibition

  7. Treatment to sustain a Th17-type phenotype to prevent skewing toward Treg and to limit premalignant lesion progression to cancer.

    PubMed

    Young, M Rita I; Levingston, Corinne A; Johnson, Sara D

    2016-05-15

    While immune suppression is a hallmark of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HSNCC), the immunological impact of premalignant oral lesions, which often precedes development of HNSCC, is unknown. The present study assessed the changes in splenic and draining lymph node CD4(+) cell populations and their production of select cytokines that occur in mice with carcinogen-induced premalignant oral lesions and the changes that occur as lesions progress to oral cancer. These studies found skewing toward Th1 and Th17-type phenotypes in the spleen and lymph nodes of mice with premalignant oral lesions and a shift to Treg as lesions progress to cancer. Since the role of Th17 cells in the progression from premalignant lesions to cancer is not clear, studies determined the immunological and clinical effect of treating mice bearing premalignant oral lesions with a TGF-β type 1 receptor inhibitor plus IL-23 as an approach to sustain the Th17 phenotype. These studies showed that the treatment approach not only sustained the Th17 phenotype, but also increased distal spleen cell and regional lymph node cell production of other stimulatory/inflammatory mediators and slowed premalignant lesion progression to cancer.

  8. Systems Medicine for Lung Diseases: Phenotypes and Precision Medicine in Cancer, Infection, and Allergy.

    PubMed

    Schmeck, Bernd; Bertrams, Wilhelm; Lai, Xin; Vera, Julio

    2016-01-01

    Lung diseases cause an enormous socioeconomic burden. Four of them are among the ten most important causes of deaths worldwide: Pneumonia has the highest death toll of all infectious diseases, lung cancer kills the most people of all malignant proliferative disorders, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) ranks third in mortality among the chronic noncommunicable diseases, and tuberculosis is still one of the most important chronic infectious diseases. Despite all efforts, for example, by the World Health Organization and clinical and experimental researchers, these diseases are still highly prevalent and harmful. This is in part due to the specific organization of tissue homeostasis, architecture, and immunity of the lung. Recently, several consortia have formed and aim to bring together clinical and molecular data from big cohorts of patients with lung diseases with novel experimental setups, biostatistics, bioinformatics, and mathematical modeling. This "systems medicine" concept will help to match the different disease modalities with adequate therapeutic and possibly preventive strategies for individual patients in the sense of precision medicine.

  9. Vitamin D3 suppresses morphological evolution of the cribriform cancerous phenotype.

    PubMed

    Deevi, Ravi K; McClements, Jane; McCloskey, Karen D; Fatehullah, Aliya; Tkocz, Dorota; Javadi, Arman; Higginson, Robyn; Marsh Durban, Victoria; Jansen, Marnix; Clarke, Alan; Loughrey, Maurice B; Campbell, Frederick C

    2016-08-02

    Development of cribriform morphology (CM) heralds malignant change in human colon but lack of mechanistic understanding hampers preventive therapy. This study investigated CM pathobiology in three-dimensional (3D) Caco-2 culture models of colorectal glandular architecture, assessed translational relevance and tested effects of 1,25(OH)2D3,theactive form of vitamin D. CM evolution was driven by oncogenic perturbation of the apical polarity (AP) complex comprising PTEN, CDC42 and PRKCZ (phosphatase and tensin homolog, cell division cycle 42 and protein kinase C zeta). Suppression of AP genes initiated a spatiotemporal cascade of mitotic spindle misorientation, apical membrane misalignment and aberrant epithelial configuration. Collectively, these events promoted "Swiss cheese-like" cribriform morphology (CM) comprising multiple abnormal "back to back" lumens surrounded by atypical stratified epithelium, in 3D colorectal gland models. Intestinal cancer driven purely by PTEN-deficiency in transgenic mice developed CM and in human CRC, CM associated with PTEN and PRKCZ readouts. Treatment of PTEN-deficient 3D cultures with 1,25(OH)2D3 upregulated PTEN, rapidly activated CDC42 and PRKCZ, corrected mitotic spindle alignment and suppressed CM development. Conversely, mutationally-activated KRAS blocked1,25(OH)2D3 rescue of glandular architecture. We conclude that 1,25(OH)2D3 upregulates AP signalling to reverse CM in a KRAS wild type (wt), clinically predictive CRC model system. Vitamin D could be developed as therapy to suppress inception or progression of a subset of colorectal tumors.

  10. Epigenetic regulation of ID4 in the determination of the BRCAness phenotype in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Branham, M T; Campoy, E; Laurito, S; Branham, R; Urrutia, G; Orozco, J; Gago, F; Urrutia, R; Roqué, M

    2016-01-01

    BRCAness breast tumors represent a group of sporadic tumors characterized by a reduction in BRCA1 gene expression. As BRCA1 is involved in double-strand breaks (DSBs) repair, dysfunctional BRCA pathway could make a tumor sensitive to DNA damaging drugs (e.g., platinum agents). Thus, accurately identifying BRCAness could contribute to therapeutic decision making in patients harboring these tumors. The purpose of this study was to identify if BRCAness tumors present a characteristic methylation profile and/or were related to specific clinico-pathological features. BRCAness was measured by MLPA in 63 breast tumors; methylation status of 98 CpG sites within 84 cancer-related genes was analyzed by MS-MLPA. Protein and mRNA expressions of the selected genes were measured by quantitative real-time PCR and Western Blot. BRCAness was associated with younger age, higher nuclear pleomorphism, and triple-negative (TN) status. Epigenetically, we found that the strongest predictors for BRCAness tumors were the methylations of MLH1 and PAX5 plus the unmethylations of CCND2 and ID4. We determined that ID4 unmethylation correlated with the expression levels of both its mRNA and protein. We observed an inverse relation between the expressions of ID4 and BRCA1. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report suggesting an epigenetic regulation of ID4 in BRCAness tumors. Our findings give new information of BRCAness etiology and encourage future studies on potential drug targets for BRCAness breast tumors.

  11. Ovine intestinal adenocarcinomas: histologic and phenotypic comparison with human colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Munday, John S; Brennan, Moira M; Jaber, Azhar M; Kiupel, Matti

    2006-04-01

    Approximately 7% of old, unthrifty sheep (Ovis aries) in New Zealand have intestinal adenocarcinomas. To investigate whether these sheep might be used as a model of human colonic neoplasia, the biologic behavior and histologic appearance of ovine intestinal adenocarcinomas were compared with those reported for human colonic adenocarcinomas. We collected 50 intestinal tracts with grossly visible intestinal neoplasia from slaughtered sheep. Neoplasms were assessed using World Health Organization guidelines for assessment of human colonic adenocarcinomas. All ovine adenocarcinomas developed in the small intestine. In contrast, only 4% of human intestinal tumors develop at this location, whereas the majority develop in the colon. A visible polyp is present within 89% of human colonic adenocarcinomas, whereas polyps were present in only 46% of the ovine neoplasms. Intestinal wall infiltration by the neoplastic cells and rates of lymph node (84% in sheep; 61% in humans) and distant (52% in sheep; 17% in humans) metastases were comparable between ovine and human adenocarcinomas. However, ovine adenocarcinomas developed more peritoneal and fewer hepatic metastases than human adenocarcinomas. Histologic grading of ovine tumors revealed cell differentiation similar to that reported within human colonic adenocarcinomas. In conclusion, ovine intestinal adenocarcinomas, like human colonic adenocarcinomas, typically arise spontaneously and consistently develop widespread metastases. In addition, tumors appear histologically similar between these species. Therefore, sheep may provide a model of advanced human colonic cancer, possibly allowing evaluation of novel therapeutics and surgical procedures.

  12. Phenotypic changes of p53, HER2, and FAS system in multiple normal tissues surrounding breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Mottolese, Marcella; Nádasi, Edit A; Botti, Claudio; Cianciulli, Anna M; Merola, Roberta; Buglioni, Simonetta; Benevolo, Maria; Giannarelli, Diana; Marandino, Ferdinando; Donnorso, Raffaele Perrone; Venturo, Irene; Natali, Pier Giorgio

    2005-07-01

    To determine whether phenotypic field changes occur in tissues adjacent to carcinoma, we assayed, by immunohistochemistry, the expression of HER-2, p53, Fas, and FasL in 72 breast cancers (BC) and multiple autologous peritumoral tissues (PTTs) sampled up to 5 cm distance and in 44 benign breast tumors (BBTs). About 5% and 3% of the PTTs and 4.5% and 6.8% of BBTs showed alterations in HER2 and p53 expression, respectively. Of interest, gene amplification was observed in 50% of HER2 positive PTTs, but not in any HER2 positive BBTs. Fas, highly expressed in BBTs and downregulated in BC, maintained its expression in PTTs, whereas FasL, usually negative in BBTs, was upregulated in BC as well as in the PTTs closest (1 cm) to the invasive lesion. Our data suggest that FasL could be a potential novel biomarker of transformation, which may identify, along with HER2 and p53, precursor lesions in a genetically altered breast tissue.

  13. Interactions between interleukin-6 and myeloid-derived suppressor cells drive the chemoresistant phenotype of hepatocellular cancer.

    PubMed

    Xu, Min; Zhao, Zhongwei; Song, Jingjing; Lan, Xilin; Lu, Siming; Chen, Minjiang; Wang, Zufei; Chen, Weiqian; Fan, Xiaoxi; Wu, Fazong; Chen, Li; Tu, Jianfei; Ji, Jiansong

    2017-02-15

    Emerging evidence implicates an important role for myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) in tumor growth, angiogenesis and metastasis. However, limited knowledge is known about the function of MDSCs in response to chemotherapies. In this study, we find that drug-resistant hepatocellular cancer (HCC) cells-derived conditioned medium significantly enhances the expansion and immunosuppressive function of MDSCs compared to their parental sensitive cells, which is demonstrated by increased level of arginase, nitric oxide (NO), and reactive oxygen species (ROS). Next, we reveal that drug-resistant HCC cells-derived IL-6 activated MDSCs, which is demonstrated by using an anti-IL-6 neutralizing antibody that caused a reduced MDSC immunosuppressive activity. More importantly, the depletion of MDSC via the administration of anti-Gr-1 antibody or the blockade of IL-6 signaling sensitized 5-FU-resistant H22 hepatoma to chemotherapy in the immunocompetent C57BL/6N mice. In primary human HCC, IL-6 expression levels strongly correlate with an MDSC phenotype and chemotherapy response in HCC patients. In conclusion, these results describe a role of IL-6 in the drug resistance in HCC chemotherapy and suggest that MDSC-targeting treatments may be potential therapeutic strategy for HCC chemoresistance.

  14. A Renewable Tissue Resource of Phenotypically Stable, Biologically and Ethnically Diverse, Patient-derived Human Breast Cancer Xenograft (PDX) Models

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaomei; Claerhout, Sofie; Pratt, Aleix; Dobrolecki, Lacey E.; Petrovic, Ivana; Lai, Qing; Landis, Melissa D.; Wiechmann, Lisa; Schiff, Rachel; Giuliano, Mario; Wong, Helen; Fuqua, Suzanne W.; Contreras, Alejandro; Gutierrez, Carolina; Huang, Jian; Mao, Sufeng; Pavlick, Anne C.; Froehlich, Amber M.; Wu, Meng-Fen; Tsimelzon, Anna; Hilsenbeck, Susan G.; Chen, Edward S.; Zuloaga, Pavel; Shaw, Chad A.; Rimawi, Mothaffar F.; Perou, Charles M.; Mills, Gordon B.; Chang, Jenny C.; Lewis, Michael T.

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer research is hampered by difficulties in obtaining and studying primary human breast tissue, and by the lack of in vivo preclinical models that reflect patient tumor biology accurately. To overcome these limitations, we propagated a cohort of human breast tumors grown in the epithelium-free mammary fat pad of SCID/Beige and NOD/SCID/IL2γ-receptor null (NSG) mice, under a series of transplant conditions. Both models yielded stably transplantable xenografts at comparably high rates (~21% and ~19%, respectively). Of the conditions tested, xenograft take rate was highest in the presence of a low-dose estradiol pellet. Overall, 32 stably transplantable xenograft lines were established, representing 25 unique patients. Most tumors yielding xenografts were “triple-negative” (ER-PR-HER2+) (n=19). However, we established lines from three ER-PR-HER2+ tumors, one ER+PR-HER2−, one ER+PR+HER2− and one “triple-positive” (ER+PR+HER2+) tumor. Serially passaged xenografts show biological consistency with the tumor of origin, are phenotypically stable across multiple transplant generations at the histologic, transcriptomic, proteomic, and genomic levels, and show comparable treatment responses as those observed clinically. Xenografts representing 12 patients, including two ER+ lines, showed metastasis to the mouse lung. These models thus serve as a renewable, quality-controlled tissue resource for preclinical studies investigating treatment response and metastasis. PMID:23737486

  15. PME-1 modulates protein phosphatase 2A activity to promote the malignant phenotype of endometrial cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wandzioch, Ewa; Pusey, Michelle; Werda, Amy; Bail, Sophie; Bhaskar, Aishwarya; Nestor, Mariya; Yang, Jing-Jing; Rice, Lyndi M

    2014-08-15

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) negatively regulates tumorigenic signaling pathways, in part, by supporting the function of tumor suppressors like p53. The PP2A methylesterase PME-1 limits the activity of PP2A by demethylating its catalytic subunit. Here, we report the finding that PME-1 overexpression correlates with increased cell proliferation and invasive phenotypes in endometrial adenocarcinoma cells, where it helps maintain activated ERK and Akt by inhibiting PP2A. We obtained evidence that PME-1 could bind and regulate protein phosphatase 4 (PP4), a tumor-promoting protein, but not the related protein phosphatase 6 (PP6). When the PP2A, PP4, or PP6 catalytic subunits were overexpressed, inhibiting PME-1 was sufficient to limit cell proliferation. In clinical specimens of endometrial adenocarcinoma, PME-1 levels were increased and we found that PME-1 overexpression was sufficient to drive tumor growth in a xenograft model of the disease. Our findings identify PME-1 as a modifier of malignant development and suggest its candidacy as a diagnostic marker and as a therapeutic target in endometrial cancer.

  16. Vitamin D3 suppresses morphological evolution of the cribriform cancerous phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Deevi, Ravi K.; McClements, Jane; McCloskey, Karen D.; Fatehullah, Aliya; Tkocz, Dorota; Javadi, Arman; Higginson, Robyn; Durban, Victoria Marsh; Jansen, Marnix; Loughrey, Maurice B.; Campbell, Frederick C.

    2016-01-01

    Development of cribriform morphology (CM) heralds malignant change in human colon but lack of mechanistic understanding hampers preventive therapy. This study investigated CM pathobiology in three-dimensional (3D) Caco-2 culture models of colorectal glandular architecture, assessed translational relevance and tested effects of 1,25(OH)2D3, the active form of vitamin D. CM evolution was driven by oncogenic perturbation of the apical polarity (AP) complex comprising PTEN, CDC42 and PRKCZ (phosphatase and tensin homolog, cell division cycle 42 and protein kinase C zeta). Suppression of AP genes initiated a spatiotemporal cascade of mitotic spindle misorientation, apical membrane misalignment and aberrant epithelial configuration. Collectively, these events promoted “Swiss cheese-like” cribriform morphology (CM) comprising multiple abnormal “back to back” lumens surrounded by atypical stratified epithelium, in 3D colorectal gland models. Intestinal cancer driven purely by PTEN-deficiency in transgenic mice developed CM and in human CRC, CM associated with PTEN and PRKCZ readouts. Treatment of PTEN-deficient 3D cultures with 1,25(OH)2D3 upregulated PTEN, rapidly activated CDC42 and PRKCZ, corrected mitotic spindle alignment and suppressed CM development. Conversely, mutationally-activated KRAS blocked 1,25(OH)2D3 rescue of glandular architecture. We conclude that 1,25(OH)2D3 upregulates AP signalling to reverse CM in a KRAS wild type (wt), clinically predictive CRC model system. Vitamin D could be developed as therapy to suppress inception or progression of a subset of colorectal tumors. PMID:27119498

  17. VGLL1 expression is associated with a triple-negative basal-like phenotype in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Castilla, María Ángeles; López-García, María Ángeles; Atienza, María Reina; Rosa-Rosa, Juan Manuel; Díaz-Martín, Juan; Pecero, María Luisa; Vieites, Begoña; Romero-Pérez, Laura; Benítez, Javier; Calcabrini, Annarica; Palacios, José

    2014-08-01

    Vestigial-like 1 (VGLL1) is a poorly characterized gene encoding a transcriptional co-activator structurally homologous to TAZ and YAP that modulates the Hippo pathway in Drosophila. In this study, we examined the expression of VGLL1 and its intronic miRNA, miR-934, in breast cancer. VGLL1 and miR-934 expression miRNA profiling was carried out on frozen samples of grade 3 invasive ductal carcinomas. VGLL1 protein was also examined in 433 sporadic and BRCA1-associated breast carcinomas on tissue microarrays. RNA-seq data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) was used to confirm differences in VGLL1 and miR-934 expression in different breast cancer subtypes, and to correlate their expression with that of other genes and miRNAs. Of 28 miRNAs differentially expressed in estrogen receptor (ER)-positive and ER-negative grade 3 breast carcinomas, miR-934 was most strongly upregulated in ER-negative carcinomas, and its expression was correlated with that of VGLL1. Nuclear VGLL1 expression was observed in 13% of sporadic breast carcinomas, and while VGLL1 was only occasionally found in luminal A (0.70%) and B (5.60%) carcinomas, it was often expressed in HER2-positive (17%), triple-negative (TN) breast carcinomas (>40%) and BRCA1-associated TN carcinomas (>50%). These findings were confirmed in the TCGA dataset, which revealed positive associations with luminal progenitor genes (GABRP, SLC6A14, FOXC1, PROM1, and BBOX1) and strong negative correlations with ER-associated genes (ESR1, C6ORF211, GATA3, and FOXA1). Moreover, VGLL1 expression was associated with reduced overall survival. In conclusion, VGLL1 and miR-934 are mainly expressed in sporadic and BRCA1-associated TN basal-like breast carcinomas, and their coordinated expression, at least partially mediated by the direct modulation of ESR1, might be involved in the maintenance of a luminal progenitor phenotype.

  18. Association between body mass index and mortality for colorectal cancer survivors: overall and by tumor molecular phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Peter T.; Newton, Christina C.; Newcomb, Polly A.; Phipps, Amanda I.; Ahnen, Dennis J.; Baron, John A.; Buchanan, Daniel D.; Casey, Graham; Cleary, Sean P.; Cotterchio, Michelle; Farris, Alton B.; Figueiredo, Jane C.; Gallinger, Steven; Green, Roger C.; Haile, Robert W.; Hopper, John L.; Jenkins, Mark A.; Le Marchand, Loïc; Makar, Karen W.; McLaughlin, John R.; Potter, John D.; Renehan, Andrew G.; Sinicrope, Frank A.; Thibodeau, Stephen N.; Ulrich, Cornelia M.; Win, Aung Ko; Lindor, Noralane M.; Limburg, Paul J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Microsatellite instability (MSI) and BRAF-mutation status are associated with colorectal cancer survival whereas the role of body mass index (BMI) is less clear. We evaluated the association between BMI and colorectal cancer survival, overall and by strata of MSI, BRAF-mutation, sex, and other factors. Methods This study included 5,615 men and women diagnosed with invasive colorectal cancer who were followed for mortality (maximum: 14.7 years; mean: 5.9 years). Pre-diagnosis BMI was derived from self-reported weight approximately 1-year before diagnosis and height. Tumor MSI and BRAF-mutation status were available for 4,131 and 4,414 persons, respectively. Multivariable hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated from delayed-entry Cox proportional hazards models. Results In multivariable models, high pre-diagnosis BMI was associated with higher risk of all-cause mortality in both sexes (per 5-kg/m2, HR = 1.10; 95% CI = 1.06 to 1.15), with similar associations stratified by sex (p-interaction: 0.41), colon vs rectum (p-interaction: 0.86), MSI status (p-interaction: 0.84), and BRAF-mutation status (p-interaction: 0.28). In joint models, with MS-stable/MSI-low and normal BMI as the reference group, risk of death was higher for MS-stable/MSI-low and obese BMI (HR: 1.32; p-value: 0.0002), not statistically significantly lower for MSI-high and normal BMI (HR: 0.86; p-value: 0.29), and approximately the same for MSI-high and obese BMI (HR: 1.00; p-value: 0.98). Conclusions High pre-diagnosis BMI was associated with increased mortality; this association was consistent across participant subgroups, including strata of tumor molecular phenotype. Impact High BMI may attenuate the survival benefit otherwise observed with MSI-high tumors. PMID:26038390

  19. Elevated lung cancer risk is associated with deficiencies in cell cycle checkpoints: Genotype and phenotype analyses from a case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yun-Ling; Kosti, Ourania; Loffredo, Christopher; Bowman, Elise; Mechanic, Leah; Perlmutter, Donna; Jones, Raymond; Shields, Peter G.; Harris, Curtis

    2010-01-01

    Cell cycle checkpoints play critical roles in the maintenance of genomic integrity and inactivation of checkpoint genes, and are frequently perturbed in most cancers. In a case-control study of 299 non-small cell lung cancer cases and 550 controls in Maryland, we investigated the association between γ-radiation-induced G2/M arrest in cultured blood lymphocytes and lung cancer risk, and examined genotype-phenotype correlations between genetic polymorphisms of 20 genes involving in DNA repair and cell cycle control and γ-radiation-induced G2/M arrest. The study was specifically designed to examine race and gender differences in risk factors. Our data indicated that a less efficient DNA damage-induced G2/M checkpoint was associated with an increased risk of lung cancer in African American women with an adjusted odds ratio (OR) of 2.63 (95% CI = 1.01 – 7.26); there were no statistically significant associations for Caucasians, or African American men. When the African American women were categorized into quartiles, a significant reverse trend of decreased G2/M checkpoint function and increased lung cancer risk was present, with lowest-vs-highest quartile OR of 13.72 (95% CI = 2.30 – 81.92, Ptrend < 0.01). Genotype-phenotype correlation analysis indicated that polymorphisms in ATM, CDC25C, CDKN1A, BRCA2, ERCC6, TP53, and TP53BP1 genes were significantly associated with the γ-radiation-induced G2/M arrest phenotype. This study provides evidence that a less efficient G2/M checkpoint is significantly associated with lung cancer risk in African American women. The data also suggested that the function of G2/M checkpoint is modulated by genetic polymorphisms in genes involved in DNA repair and cell cycle control. PMID:19626602

  20. Mouse breast cancer model-dependent changes in metabolic syndrome-associated phenotypes caused by maternal dioxin exposure and dietary fat.

    PubMed

    La Merrill, Michele; Baston, David S; Denison, Michael S; Birnbaum, Linda S; Pomp, Daniel; Threadgill, David W

    2009-01-01

    Diets high in fat are associated with increased susceptibility to obesity and metabolic syndrome. Increased adipose tissue that is caused by high-fat diets (HFD) results in altered storage of lipophilic toxicants like 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), which may further increase susceptibility to metabolic syndrome. Because both TCDD and HFD are associated with increased breast cancer risk, we examined their effects on metabolic syndrome-associated phenotypes in three mouse models of breast cancer: 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA), Tg(MMTV-Neu)202Mul/J (HER2), and TgN(MMTV-PyMT)634Mul/J (PyMT), all on an FVB/N genetic background. Pregnant mice dosed with 1 microg/kg of TCDD or vehicle on gestational day 12.5 were placed on a HFD or low-fat diet (LFD) at parturition. Body weights, percent body fat, and fasting blood glucose were measured longitudinally, and triglycerides were measured at study termination. On HFD, all cancer models reached the pubertal growth spurt ahead of FVB controls. Among mice fed HFD, the HER2 model had a greater increase in body weight and adipose tissue from puberty through adulthood compared with the PyMT and DMBA models. However, the DMBA model consistently had higher fasting blood glucose levels than the PyMT and HER2 models. TCDD only impacted serum triglycerides in the PyMT model maintained on HFD. Because the estrogenic activity of the HFD was three times lower than that of the LFD, differential dietary estrogenic activities did not drive the observed phenotypic differences. Rather, the HFD-dependent changes were cancer model dependent. These results show that cancer models can have differential effects on metabolic syndrome-associated phenotypes even before cancers arise.

  1. Phenotypic and functional analysis of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes compared with tumor-associated lymphocytes from ascitic fluid and peripheral blood lymphocytes in patients with advanced ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Santin, A D; Hermonat, P L; Ravaggi, A; Bellone, S; Roman, J J; Smith, C V; Pecorelli, S; Radominska-Pandya, A; Cannon, M J; Parham, G P

    2001-01-01

    To investigate and compare the phenotype and function of lymphocytes collected from patients harboring advanced ovarian cancer, leukocytes from peripheral blood (n = 18), ascitic fluid (n = 13) and tumor tissues (n = 13) were evaluated for the relative proportions of lymphocyte subsets, including CD3+, CD4+, CD8+, CD19+, CD56 and the early (CD25) and late (HLA-DR) activation markers on CD3+ T cells. The ability to synthesize type 1 cytokines (IFN-gamma and IL-2) and a type 2 cytokine (IL-4) was assessed by flow cytometry. In all patients, T cells (CD3+) were the major leukocyte population detected in each tissue, with CD4+ T cells being dominant in peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) and tumor-associated lymphocytes (TAL) but not in tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) (CD4:CD8 ratios: 3.0 vs. 2.0 vs. 1.0, respectively). CD19+ lymphocytes (B cells) and CD56+ lymphocytes (NK cells) were significantly higher in PBL compared to TAL and TIL (p < 0.05). TAL and TIL had a higher proportion of T cells expressing the late activation marker HLA-DR compared to PBL. In contrast, no significant differences were detected in PBL, TAL and TIL in the expression of the early activation marker CD25. Type 1 cytokines were the dominant type produced by in vitro stimulated T cells for each population, with a greater proportion of IFN-gamma+ T cells in TAL and TIL compared to PBL (p < 0.01), and a higher proportion of IL-2+ T cells in PBL compared with TAL and TIL (p < 0.05). Low percentages of IL-4+ T cells (i.e. Th2) were detected in each tissue. Taken together, these data demonstrate the recruitment and accumulation of high concentrations of antigen-experienced T lymphocytes in TAL and TIL compared to PBL. However, low surface expression of IL-2 receptor (i.e. CD25), as well as depressed intracellular IL-2 production in chronically stimulated TAL and TIL suggests that the impaired antitumor function commonly detected in these lymphocyte populations may be secondary to an acquired

  2. Melanocortin-1 receptor, skin cancer and phenotypic characteristics (M-SKIP) project: study design and methods for pooling results of genetic epidemiological studies

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background For complex diseases like cancer, pooled-analysis of individual data represents a powerful tool to investigate the joint contribution of genetic, phenotypic and environmental factors to the development of a disease. Pooled-analysis of epidemiological studies has many advantages over meta-analysis, and preliminary results may be obtained faster and with lower costs than with prospective consortia. Design and methods Based on our experience with the study design of the Melanocortin-1 receptor (MC1R) gene, SKin cancer and Phenotypic characteristics (M-SKIP) project, we describe the most important steps in planning and conducting a pooled-analysis of genetic epidemiological studies. We then present the statistical analysis plan that we are going to apply, giving particular attention to methods of analysis recently proposed to account for between-study heterogeneity and to explore the joint contribution of genetic, phenotypic and environmental factors in the development of a disease. Within the M-SKIP project, data on 10,959 skin cancer cases and 14,785 controls from 31 international investigators were checked for quality and recoded for standardization. We first proposed to fit the aggregated data with random-effects logistic regression models. However, for the M-SKIP project, a two-stage analysis will be preferred to overcome the problem regarding the availability of different study covariates. The joint contribution of MC1R variants and phenotypic characteristics to skin cancer development will be studied via logic regression modeling. Discussion Methodological guidelines to correctly design and conduct pooled-analyses are needed to facilitate application of such methods, thus providing a better summary of the actual findings on specific fields. PMID:22862891

  3. A Prostate Cancer Model Build by a Novel SVM-ID3 Hybrid Feature Selection Method Using Both Genotyping and Phenotype Data from dbGaP

    PubMed Central

    Yücebaş, Sait Can; Aydın Son, Yeşim

    2014-01-01

    Through Genome Wide Association Studies (GWAS) many Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP)-complex disease relations can be investigated. The output of GWAS can be high in amount and high dimensional, also relations between SNPs, phenotypes and diseases are most likely to be nonlinear. In order to handle high volume-high dimensional data and to be able to find the nonlinear relations we have utilized data mining approaches and a hybrid feature selection model of support vector machine and decision tree has been designed. The designed model is tested on prostate cancer data and for the first time combined genotype and phenotype information is used to increase the diagnostic performance. We were able to select phenotypic features such as ethnicity and body mass index, and SNPs those map to specific genes such as CRR9, TERT. The performance results of the proposed hybrid model, on prostate cancer dataset, with 90.92% of sensitivity and 0.91 of area under ROC curve, shows the potential of the approach for prediction and early detection of the prostate cancer. PMID:24651484

  4. Intersection of Smoking, Human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and Cancer: Proceedings of the 8th Annual Texas Conference on Health Disparities

    PubMed Central

    Rajendiran, Smrithi; Kashyap, Meghana V.; Vishwanatha, Jamboor K.

    2013-01-01

    The Texas Center for Health Disparities, a National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities Center of Excellence, presents an annual conference to discuss prevention, awareness education and ongoing research about health disparities both in Texas and among the national population. The 2013 Texas Conference on Health Disparities brought together experts, in research, patient care and community outreach, on the “Intersection of Smoking, Human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) and Cancer”. Smoking, HIV/AIDS and cancer are three individual areas of public health concern, each with its own set of disparities and risk factors based on race, ethnicity, gender, geography and socio-economic status. Disparities among patient populations, in which these issues are found to be comorbid, provide valuable information on goals for patient care. The conference consisted of three sessions addressing “Comorbidities and Treatment”, “Public Health Perspectives”, and “Best Practices”. This article summarizes the basic science, clinical correlates and public health data presented by the speakers. PMID:24227993

  5. Androgen receptors are acquired by healthy postmenopausal endometrial epithelium and their subsequent loss in endometrial cancer is associated with poor survival

    PubMed Central

    Kamal, A M; Bulmer, J N; DeCruze, S B; Stringfellow, H F; Martin-Hirsch, P; Hapangama, D K

    2016-01-01

    Background: Endometrial cancer (EC) is a hormone-driven disease, and androgen receptor (AR) expression in high-grade EC (HGEC) and metastatic EC has not yet been described. Methods: The expression pattern and prognostic value of AR in relation to oestrogen (ERα and ERβ) and progesterone (PR) receptors, and the proliferation marker Ki67 in all EC subtypes (n=85) were compared with that of healthy and hyperplastic endometrium, using immunohistochemisty and qPCR. Results: Compared with proliferative endometrium, postmenopausal endometrtial epithelium showed significantly higher expression of AR (P<0.001) and ERα (P=0.035), which persisted in hyperplastic epithelium and in low-grade EC (LGEC). High-grade EC showed a significant loss of AR (P<0.0001), PR (P<0.0001) and ERβ (P<0.035) compared with LGEC, whilst maintaining weak to moderate ERα. Unlike PR, AR expression in metastatic lesions was significantly (P=0.039) higher than that in primary tumours. Androgen receptor expression correlated with favourable clinicopathological features and a lower proliferation index. Loss of AR, with/without the loss of PR was associated with a significantly lower disease-free survival (P<0.0001, P<0.0001, respectively). Conclusions: Postmenopausal endometrial epithelium acquires AR whilst preserving other steroid hormone receptors. Loss of AR, PR with retention of ERα and ERβ may promote the unrestrained growth of HGEC. Androgen receptor may therefore be a clinically relevant prognostic indicator and a potential therapeutic target in EC. PMID:26930451

  6. Genetic polymorphisms in one-carbon metabolism: associations with CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP) in colon cancer and the modifying effects of diet

    PubMed Central

    Curtin, Karen; Slattery, Martha L.; Ulrich, Cornelia M.; Bigler, Jeannette; Levin, Theodore R.; Wolff, Roger K.; Albertsen, Hans; Potter, John D.; Samowitz, Wade S.

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated associations between CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP) colon cancer and genetic polymorphisms relevant to one-carbon metabolism and thus, potentially the provision of methyl groups and risk of colon cancer. Data from a large, population-based case–control study (916 incident colon cancer cases and 1972 matched controls) were used. Candidate polymorphisms in methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR), thymidylate synthase (TS), transcobalamin II (TCNII), methionine synthase (MTR), reduced folate carrier (RFC), methylene-tetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase 1 (MTHFD1), dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) and alcohol dehydrogenase 3 (ADH3) were evaluated. CIMP− or CIMP+ phenotype was based on five CpG island markers: MINT1, MINT2, MINT31, p16 and MLH1. The influence of specific dietary factors (folate, methionine, vitamin B12 and alcohol) on these associations was also analyzed. We hypothesized that polymorphisms involved in the provision of methyl groups would be associated with CIMP+ tumors (two or more of five markers methylated), potentially modified by diet. Few associations specific to CIMP+ tumors were observed overall, which does not support the hypothesis that the provision of methyl groups is important in defining a methylator phenotype. However, our data suggest that genetic polymorphisms in MTHFR 1298A > C, interacting with diet, may be involved in the development of highly CpG-methylated colon cancers. AC and CC genotypes in conjunction with a high-risk dietary pattern (low folate and methionine intake and high alcohol use) were associated with CIMP+ (OR = 2.1, 95% CI = 1.3–3.4 versus AA/high risk; P-interaction = 0.03). These results provide only limited support for a role of polymorphisms in one-carbon metabolism in the etiology of CIMP colon cancer. PMID:17449906

  7. Changes in the phenotype of human small cell lung cancer cell lines after transfection and expression of the c-myc proto-oncogene.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, B E; Battey, J; Linnoila, I; Becker, K L; Makuch, R W; Snider, R H; Carney, D N; Minna, J D

    1986-01-01

    Small cell lung cancer growing in cell culture possesses biologic properties that allow classification into two categories: classic and variant. Compared with classic small cell lung cancer cell lines, variant lines have altered large cell morphology, shorter doubling times, higher cloning efficiencies in soft agarose, and very low levels of L dopa decarboxylase production and bombesin-like immunoreactivity. C-myc is amplified and expressed in some small cell lung cancer cell lines and all c-myc amplified lines studied to date display the variant phenotype. To investigate if c-myc amplification and expression is responsible for the variant phenotype, a normal human c-myc gene was transfected into a cloned classic small cell lung cancer cell line not amplified for or expressing detectable c-myc messenger RNA (mRNA). Clones were isolated with one to six copies of c-myc stably integrated into DNA that expressed c-myc mRNA. In addition, one clone with an integrated neo gene but a deleted c-myc gene was isolated and in this case c-myc was not expressed. C-myc expression in transfected clones was associated with altered large cell morphology, a shorter doubling time, and increased cloning efficiency, but no difference in L dopa decarboxylase levels and bombesin-like immunoreactivity. We conclude increased c-myc expression observed here in transfected clones correlates with some of the phenotypic properties distinguishing c-myc amplified variants from unamplified classic small cell lung cancer lines. Images PMID:3016030

  8. PET/CT imaging: The incremental value of assessing the glucose metabolic phenotype and the structure of cancers in a single examination.

    PubMed

    Czernin, Johannes; Benz, Matthias R; Allen-Auerbach, Martin S

    2010-03-01

    PET/CT with the glucose analogue FDG is emerging as the most important diagnostic imaging tool in oncology. More than 2000 PET/CT scanners are operational worldwide and its unique role for diagnosing, staging, restaging and therapeutic monitoring in cancer is undisputed. Studies conducted in thousands of cancer patients have clearly indicated that the combination of molecular PET with anatomical CT imaging provides incremental diagnostic value over PET or CT alone. State of the art imaging protocols combine fully diagnostic CT scans with quality whole body PET surveys. The current review briefly describes the biological alterations of cancer cells that result in their switch to a strongly glycolytic phenotype. Different whole body imaging protocols are discussed. We summarize the evidence for the incremental value of PET/CT over CT and PET alone using imaging of sarcoma as an example. Following this section we discuss the performance of FDG-PET/CT imaging for staging, restaging and monitoring of head and neck cancer, solitary lung nodules and lung cancer, breast cancer, colorectal cancer, lymphoma and unknown primary tumors. Finally, the recently emerging evidence of a substantial impact of PET/CT imaging on patient management is presented.

  9. Nuclear maspin expression correlates with the CpG island methylator phenotype and tumor aggressiveness in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung Ho; Cho, Nam-Yun; Bae, Jeong Mo; Kim, Kyung-Ju; Rhee, Ye-Young; Lee, Hye Seung; Kang, Gyeong Hoon

    2015-01-01

    It has been suggested that nuclear expression of maspin (mammary serine protease inhibitor; also known as SERPINB5) in colorectal cancer (CRC) is associated with proximal colonic tumor location, mucinous and poorly differentiated histology, microsatellite instability-high (MSI-H), and poor prognosis. Based on these findings, there may be a potential association between nuclear maspin expression and the CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP) in CRC, but no study has elucidated this issue. Here, we evaluated maspin protein expression status by immunohistochemistry in 216 MSI-H CRCs. CIMP status was also determined by methylation-specific quantitative PCR method (MethyLight) using eight CIMP markers (MLH1, NEUROG1, CRABP1, CACNA1G, CDKN2A (p16), IGF2, SOCS1, and RUNX3) in 216 MSI-H CRCs. Associations between maspin expression status and various pathological, molecular, and survival data were statistically analyzed. Among the 216 MSI-H CRCs, 111 (51%) cases presented nuclear maspin-positive tumors. Nuclear maspin-positive MSI-H CRCs were significantly associated with proximal tumor location (P = 0.003), tumor budding (P < 0.001), lymphovascular invasion (P = 0.001), perineural invasion (P = 0.008), absence of peritumoral lymphoid reaction (P = 0.045), lymph node metastasis (P = 0.003), distant metastasis (P = 0.005), advanced AJCC/UICC stage (stage III/IV) (P = 0.001), and CIMP-high (CIMP-H) status (P < 0.001). Patients with nuclear maspin-positive tumors showed worse disease-free survival than patients with nuclear maspin-negative tumors (log-rank P = 0.025). In conclusion, nuclear maspin expression is molecularly associated with CIMP-H rather than MSI-H, and clinicopathologically correlates with tumor aggressiveness in CRC.

  10. SET-mediated NDRG1 inhibition is involved in acquisition of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition phenotype and cisplatin resistance in human lung cancer cell.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hao; Gu, Yixue; Yin, Jiang; Zheng, Guopei; Wang, Chenkun; Zhang, Zhijie; Deng, Min; Liu, Jifang; Jia, Xiaoting; He, Zhimin

    2014-12-01

    Development of resistance to therapy continues to be a serious clinical problem in lung cancer management. Cancer cells undergoing epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) have been shown to play roles in resistance to chemotherapy. Here, we utilized a proteomics-based method and identified a significant downregulation of the metastasis suppressor NDRG1 in drug resistant lung cancer cells. We showed that downregulation of DNRG1 constitutes a mechanism for acquisition of EMT phenotype and endows lung cancer cells with an increased resistance to cisplatin. We also identified a signal cascade, namely, SET--| PP2A--| c-myc--| NDRG1, in which upregulation of SET is critical for inhibition of NDRG1. We also found that blockade of SET (or reactivation of PP2A) by FTY720 reverted EMT, restored drug sensitivity, and inhibited invasiveness and growth of lung tumor xenografts. Together, our results indicated a functional link between SET-mediated NDRG1 regulation and acquisition of EMT phenotype and drug resistance, and provided an evidence that blockade of SET-driven EMT can overcome drug resistance and inhibit tumor progression.

  11. Promotion of a cancer-like phenotype, through chronic exposure to inflammatory cytokines and hypoxia in a bronchial epithelial cell line model

    PubMed Central

    Baird, Anne-Marie; Gray, Steven G.; Richard, Derek J.; O’Byrne, Kenneth J.

    2016-01-01

    Globally, lung cancer accounts for approximately 20% of all cancer related deaths. Five-year survival is poor and rates have remained unchanged for the past four decades. There is an urgent need to identify markers of lung carcinogenesis and new targets for therapy. Given the recent successes of immune modulators in cancer therapy and the improved understanding of immune evasion by tumours, we sought to determine the carcinogenic impact of chronic TNF-α and IL-1β exposure in a normal bronchial epithelial cell line model. Following three months of culture in a chronic inflammatory environment under conditions of normoxia and hypoxia (0.5% oxygen), normal cells developed a number of key genotypic and phenotypic alterations. Important cellular features such as the proliferative, adhesive and invasive capacity of the normal cells were significantly amplified. In addition, gene expression profiles were altered in pathways associated with apoptosis, angiogenesis and invasion. The data generated in this study provides support that TNF-α, IL-1β and hypoxia promotes a neoplastic phenotype in normal bronchial epithelial cells. In turn these mediators may be of benefit for biomarker and/or immune-therapy target studies. This project provides an important inflammatory in vitro model for further immuno-oncology studies in the lung cancer setting. PMID:26759080

  12. SRRM4 Expression and the Loss of REST Activity May Promote the Emergence of the Neuroendocrine Phenotype in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaotun; Coleman, Ilsa M.; Brown, Lisha G.; True, Lawrence D.; Kollath, Lori; Lucas, Jared M.; Lam, Hung-Ming; Dumpit, Ruth; Corey, Eva; Chéry, Lisly; Lakely, Bryce; Higano, Celestia S.; Montgomery, Bruce; Roudier, Martine; Lange, Paul H.; Nelson, Peter S.; Vessella, Robert L.; Morrissey, Colm

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The neuroendocrine (NE) phenotype is associated with the development of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Our objective was to characterize the molecular features of the NE phenotype in CRPC. Experimental Design Expression of chromogranin A (CHGA), synaptophysin (SYP), androgen receptor (AR), and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) was analyzed by immunohistochemistry (IHC) in 155 CRPC metastases from 50 patients and in 24 LuCaP prostate cancer patient-derived xenografts (PDX). Seventy-one of 155 metastases and the 24 LuCaP xenograft lines were analyzed by whole genome microarrays. REST splicing was verified by PCR. Results Co-expression of CHGA and SYP in >30% of cells was observed in 22 of 155 metastases (9 patients); 11 of the 22 metastases were AR+/PSA+ (6 patients), 11/22 were AR−/PSA− (4 patients), and 4/24 LuCaP PDXs were AR−/PSA−. By IHC, of the 71 metastases analyzed by whole genome microarrays, 5 metastases were CHGA+/SYP+/AR− and 5 were CHGA+/SYP+/AR+. Only CHGA+/SYP+ metastases had a NE transcript signature. The neuronal transcriptional regulator SRRM4 transcript was associated with the NE signature in CHGA+/SYP+ metastases and all CHGA+/SYP+ LuCaP xenografts. Additionally, expression of SRRM4 in LuCaP NE xenografts correlated with a splice variant of REST that lacks the transcriptional repressor domain. Conclusions (a) metastatic NE status can be heterogeneous in the same patient, (b) the CRPC NE molecular phenotype can be defined by CHGA+/SYP+ dual positivity, (c) the NE phenotype is not necessarily associated with the loss of AR activity, and (d) the splicing of REST by SRRM4 could promote the NE phenotype in CRPC. PMID:26071481

  13. Acquired Cystic Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... They Work Kidney Disease A-Z Acquired Cystic Kidney Disease What is acquired cystic kidney disease? Acquired cystic kidney disease happens when a ... cysts. What are the differences between acquired cystic kidney disease and polycystic kidney disease? Acquired cystic kidney ...

  14. Alteration of cancer stem cell-like phenotype by histone deacetylase inhibitors in squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck.

    PubMed

    Chikamatsu, Kazuaki; Ishii, Hiroki; Murata, Takaaki; Sakakura, Koichi; Shino, Masato; Toyoda, Minoru; Takahashi, Katsumasa; Masuyama, Keisuke

    2013-11-01

    Recent progression in the understanding of stem cell biology has greatly facilitated the identification and characterization of cancer stem cells (CSCs). Moreover, evidence has accumulated indicating that conventional cancer treatments are potentially ineffective against CSCs. Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) have multiple biologic effects consequent to alterations in the patterns of acetylation of histones and are a promising new group of anticancer agents. In this study, we investigated the effects of two HDACi, suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) and trichostatin A (TSA), on two CD44+ cancer stem-like cell lines from squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) cultured in serum-free medium containing epidermal growth factor and basic fibroblast growth factor. Histone deacetylase inhibitors inhibited the growth of SCCHN cell lines in a dose-dependent manner as measured by MTS assays. Moreover, HDACi induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in these SCCHN cell lines. Interestingly, the expression of cancer stem cell markers, CD44 and ABCG2, on SCCHN cell lines was decreased by HDACi treatment. In addition, HDACi decreased mRNA expression levels of stemness-related genes and suppressed the epithelial-mesencymal transition phenotype of CSCs. As expected, the combination of HDACi and chemotherapeutic agents, including cisplatin and docetaxel, had a synergistic effect on SCCHN cell lines. Taken together, our data indicate that HDACi not only inhibit the growth of SCCHN cell lines by inducing apoptosis and cell cycle arrest, but also alter the cancer stem cell phenotype in SCCHN, raising the possibility that HDACi may have therapeutic potential for cancer stem cells of SCCHN.

  15. Antiproliferative effects of phenylaminonaphthoquinones are increased by ascorbate and associated with the appearance of a senescent phenotype in human bladder cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Felipe, K.B.; Benites, J.; Glorieux, C.; Sid, B.; Valenzuela, M.; Kviecinski, M.R.; Pedrosa, R.C.; Valderrama, J.A.; Levêque, Ph.; Gallez, B.; Verrax, J.; Buc Calderon, P.

    2013-04-19

    Highlights: •Phenylaminonaphthoquinones are redox cyclers able to form ROS. •Phenylaminonaphthoquinones plus ascorbate inhibit T24 cell growth. •Phenylaminonaphthoquinones plus ascorbate lead to necrotic-like cell death. •Phenylaminonaphthoquinones plus ascorbate impair cell cycle and affect MAPKs. •Phenylaminonaphthoquinones plus ascorbate induce a senescent cancer cell phenotype. -- Abstract: Quinone-containing molecules have been developed against cancer mainly for their redox cycling ability leading to reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation. We have previously shown that donor-acceptor phenylaminonaphthoquinones are biologically active against a panel of cancer cells. In this report, we explored the mechanisms involved in cancer cell growth inhibition caused by two phenylaminonaphthoquinones, namely Q7 and Q9, with or without ascorbate (ASC). The results show that Q7 and Q9 are both redox cyclers able to form ROS, which strongly inhibit the proliferation of T24 cells. Q9 was a better redox cycler than Q7 because of marked stabilization of the semiquinone radical species arising from its reduction by ascorbate. Indeed, ASC dramatically enhances the inhibitory effect of Q9 on cell proliferation. Q9 plus ASC impairs the cell cycle, causing a decrease in the number of cells in the G2/M phase without involving other cell cycle regulating key proteins. Moreover, Q9 plus ASC influences the MAPK signaling pathways, provoking the appearance of a senescent cancer cell phenotype and ultimately leading to necrotic-like cell death. Because cellular senescence limits the replicative capacity of cells, our results suggest that induction of senescence may be exploited as a basis for new approaches to cancer therapy.

  16. Phenotypic Knockout of CXCR4 Expression by a Novel Intrakine Mutant hSDF-1α/54/KDEL Inhibits Breast Cancer Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Clayman, Eric S.; Ma, Wei-Feng

    2015-01-01

    Many malignant tumors express high levels of the chemokine receptor CXCR4, and the interaction between CXCR4 and its ligand, SDF-1, promotes migration, invasion, and metastasis of breast cancer cells. Therefore, blocking the interaction between CXCR4 and SDF-1 could alter the tumor's metastatic phenotype and control the development and progression of cancers. We used a cellular phenotypic knockout strategy and developed a novel recombinant gene, AdSDF-1α/54/KDEL, which contains an adenovirus vector, a mutant form of SDF-1 that lacks a C-terminal α-helix, and a KDEL tetrapeptide sequence that promotes retention at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). We hypothesized that SDF-1α/54/KDEL could efficiently block metastasis of breast cancer cells with less inflammatory side effects than SDF-1α/KDEL. Using the MCF-7 cell line, which expresses a stable, high level of CXCR4, we found that SDF-1α/54/KDEL efficiently becomes localized at the ER of tumor cells, where it specifically binds to newly synthesized CXCR4 and prevents it from reaching the cell surface. Chemotaxis and invasion assays revealed that the cells treated with SDF-1α/54/KDEL failed to migrate toward SDF-1. We also found that SDF-1α/54/KDEL impaired lung metastasis of metastatic breast cancer by decreasing CXCR4 on the cell surface. The novel recombinant gene, SDF-1α/54/KDEL, played an instrumental role in blocking SDF-1/CXCR4-mediated cell migration, and we found that this gene-based strategy for targeting the SDF-1/CXCR4 axis offers a very effective alternative method for preventing metastasis of breast cancer and other cancers expressing high levels of CXCR4. PMID:25978539

  17. Autophagy is involved in TGF-β1-induced protective mechanisms and formation of cancer-associated fibroblasts phenotype in tumor microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fang-Lan; Mo, En-Pan; Yang, Liu; Du, Jun; Wang, Hong-Sheng; Zhang, Huan; Kurihara, Hiroshi; Xu, Jun; Cai, Shao-Hui

    2016-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) present in tumor microenvironment acts in a coordinated fashion to either suppress or promote tumor development. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the effects of TGF-β1 on tumor microenvironment are not well understood. Our clinical data showed a positive association between TGF-β1 expression and cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) in tumor microenvironment of breast cancer patients. Thus we employed starved NIH3T3 fibroblasts in vitro and 4T1 cells mixed with NIH3T3 fibroblasts xenograft model in vivo to simulate nutritional deprivation of tumor microenvironment to explore the effects of TGF-β1. We demonstrated that TGF-β1 protected NIH3T3 fibroblasts from Star-induced growth inhibition, mitochondrial damage and cell apoptosis. Interestingly, TGF-β1 induced the formation of CAFs phenotype in starvation (Star)-treated NIH3T3 fibroblasts and xenografted Balb/c mice, which promoted breast cancer tumor growth. In both models, autophagy agonist rapamycin increased TGF-β1-induced protective effects and formation of CAFs phenotypes, while autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine, Atg5 knockdown or TGF-β type I receptor kinase inhibitor LY-2157299 blocked TGF-β1 induced these effects. Taken together, our results indicated that TGF-β/Smad autophagy was involved in TGF-β1-induced protective effects and formation of CAFs phenotype in tumor microenvironment, which may be used as therapy targets in breast cancer. PMID:26716641

  18. The metastasis inducer CCN1 (CYR61) activates the fatty acid synthase (FASN)-driven lipogenic phenotype in breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Menendez, Javier A.; Vellon, Luciano; Espinoza, Ingrid; Lupu, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    The angiogenic inducer CCN1 (Cysteine-rich 61, CYR61) is differentially activated in metastatic breast carcinomas. However, little is known about the precise mechanisms that underlie the pro-metastatic actions of CCN1. Here, we investigated the impact of CCN1 expression on fatty acid synthase (FASN), a metabolic oncogene thought to provide cancer cells with proliferative and survival advantages. Forced expression of CCN1 in MCF-7 cells robustly up-regulated FASN protein expression and also significantly increased FASN gene promoter activity 2- to 3-fold, whereas deletion of the sterol response element-binding protein (SREBP) binding site in the FASN promoter completely abrogated CCN1-driven transcriptional activation. Pharmacological blockade of MAPK or PI-3'K activation similarly prevented the ability of CCN1 to induce FASN gene activation. Pharmacological inhibition of FASN activity with the mycotoxin cerulenin or the small compound C75 reversed CCN1-induced acquisition of estrogen independence and resistance to hormone therapies such as tamoxifen and fulvestrant in anchorage-independent growth assays. This study uncovers FASNdependent endogenous lipogenesis as a new mechanism controlling the metastatic phenotype promoted by CCN1. Because estrogen independence and progression to a metastatic phenotype are hallmarks of therapeutic resistance and mortality in breast cancer, this previously unrecognized CCN1-driven lipogenic phenotype represents a novel metabolic target to clinically manage metastatic disease progression. PMID:27713913

  19. The metastasis inducer CCN1 (CYR61) activates the fatty acid synthase (FASN)-driven lipogenic phenotype in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Menendez, Javier A; Vellon, Luciano; Espinoza, Ingrid; Lupu, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    The angiogenic inducer CCN1 (Cysteine-rich 61, CYR61) is differentially activated in metastatic breast carcinomas. However, little is known about the precise mechanisms that underlie the pro-metastatic actions of CCN1. Here, we investigated the impact of CCN1 expression on fatty acid synthase (FASN), a metabolic oncogene thought to provide cancer cells with proliferative and survival advantages. Forced expression of CCN1 in MCF-7 cells robustly up-regulated FASN protein expression and also significantly increased FASN gene promoter activity 2- to 3-fold, whereas deletion of the sterol response element-binding protein (SREBP) binding site in the FASN promoter completely abrogated CCN1-driven transcriptional activation. Pharmacological blockade of MAPK or PI-3'K activation similarly prevented the ability of CCN1 to induce FASN gene activation. Pharmacological inhibition of FASN activity with the mycotoxin cerulenin or the small compound C75 reversed CCN1-induced acquisition of estrogen independence and resistance to hormone therapies such as tamoxifen and fulvestrant in anchorage-independent growth assays. This study uncovers FASNdependent endogenous lipogenesis as a new mechanism controlling the metastatic phenotype promoted by CCN1. Because estrogen independence and progression to a metastatic phenotype are hallmarks of therapeutic resistance and mortality in breast cancer, this previously unrecognized CCN1-driven lipogenic phenotype represents a novel metabolic target to clinically manage metastatic disease progression.

  20. Upregulation of CD44v6 contributes to acquired chemoresistance via the modulation of autophagy in colon cancer SW480 cells.

    PubMed

    Lv, Lin; Liu, Hai-Guang; Dong, Si-Yang; Yang, Fan; Wang, Qing-Xuan; Guo, Gui-Long; Pan, Yi-Fei; Zhang, Xiao-Hua

    2016-07-01

    The CD44 isoform containing variant exon v6 (CD44v6) plays an important role in the progression, metastasis, and prognosis of colorectal cancer (CRC). Recently, it was found that CD44v6 is involved in acquired drug resistance. This study aimed to investigate the molecular mechanism of CD44v6 in the resistance of CRC cells to chemotherapy. A stable CD44v6 overexpression model in SW480 cells was established via lentiviral transduction. The chemosensitivity of cells to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and oxaliplatin (L-OHP) was determined by cell counting kit (CCK)-8, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release, and colony formation assays. Immunohistochemical staining of CD44v6 was performed in human CRC tissues. The key components in cell apoptosis, drug efflux and metabolism, mismatch repair, autophagy, epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), and the PI3K-Akt and MAPK-Ras-Erk1/2 pathways were assessed using flow cytometry, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and western blot assays. The CD44v6 overexpression cells showed a higher viability, a lower LDH release rate, and an increased clonogenicity than the control cells under drug treatment. Moreover, overexpression of CD44v6 resulted in enhanced autophagy flux, EMT, and phosphorylation of Akt and Erk in the presence of drugs. Furthermore, high CD44v6 expression in the primary tumor was closely associated with an early recurrence in CRC patients who underwent curative surgery and adjuvant chemotherapy. In conclusion, overexpression of CD44v6 contributes to chemoresistance in SW480 cells under cytotoxic stress via the modulation of autophagy, EMT, and activation of the PI3K-Akt and MAPK-Ras-Erk pathways.

  1. 5-Fluorouracil Adjuvant Chemotherapy Does Not Increase Survival in Patients with CpG Island Methylator Phenotype Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jover, Rodrigo; Nguyen, Thuy-Phuong; Pérez-Carbonell, Lucía; Zapater, Pedro; Payá, Artemio; Alenda, Cristina; Rojas, Estefanía; Cubiella, Joaquín; Balaguer, Francesc; Morillas, Juan D.; Clofent, Juan; Bujanda, Luis; Reñé, Josep M; Bessa, Xavier; Xicola, Rosa M.; Nicolás-Pérez, David; Castells, Antoni; Andreu, Montserrat; Llor, Xavier; Boland, C. Richard; Goel, Ajay

    2011-01-01

    Background & Aims 5-FU-based adjuvant chemotherapy does not increase survival times of patients with colorectal tumors with microsatellite instability. We determined the response of patients with colorectal tumors with the CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP) to 5-FU-based therapy. Methods We analyzed a population-based cohort of 302 patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) for a median follow-up time of 50.7 months. CIMP status was determined by analysis of the CACNAG1, SOCS1, RUNX3, NEUROG1, and MLH1 promoters; tumors were considered to be CIMP-positive (CIMP+) if at least 3 promoters were methylated. Results Tumors from 29.5% (89/302) of patients were CIMP+; this did not influence disease-free survival (log rank=.26). Of tumors of TNM stages II–III (n=196), 32.7% were CIMP+. Among patients with CRC stages II–III who did not receive adjuvant 5-FU chemotherapy, those with CIMP+ tumors had longest times of disease-free survival (log rank=.04); patients with CIMP+ tumors who received chemotherapy had shorter times of disease-free survival (log rank=0.02). In patients with CIMP-negative tumors, adjuvant 5-FU chemotherapy significantly increased time of disease-free survival (log-rank=.00001). However, in patients with CIMP+ tumors, adjuvant 5-FU chemotherapy did not affect time of disease-free survival (log rank=.7). Multivariate analysis showed a significant, independent interaction between 5-FU treatment and CIMP status (hazard ratio [HR]=0.6; 95% confidence interval [CI], .5–.8). Among patients with CIMP+ tumors, adjuvant chemotherapy was not an independent predictor of outcome (HR=0.8; 95% CI, 0.3–2.0). In patients who did not receive adjuvant 5-FU chemotherapy, CIMP status was the only independent predictor of survival (HR=2.0; 95% CI, 1.1–3.8) Conclusion Patients with CIMP+ colorectal tumors do not benefit from 5-FU–based adjuvant chemotherapy. PMID:21185836

  2. Tumor growth affects the metabonomic phenotypes of multiple mouse non-involved organs in an A549 lung cancer xenograft model

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Shan; Tian, Yuan; Hu, Yili; Zhang, Nijia; Hu, Sheng; Song, Dandan; Wu, Zhengshun; Wang, Yulan; Cui, Yanfang; Tang, Huiru

    2016-01-01

    The effects of tumorigenesis and tumor growth on the non-involved organs remain poorly understood although many research efforts have already been made for understanding the metabolic phenotypes of various tumors. To better the situation, we systematically analyzed the metabolic phenotypes of multiple non-involved mouse organ tissues (heart, liver, spleen, lung and kidney) in an A549 lung cancer xenograft model at two different tumor-growth stages using the NMR-based metabonomics approaches. We found that tumor growth caused significant metabonomic changes in multiple non-involved organ tissues involving numerous metabolic pathways, including glycolysis, TCA cycle and metabolisms of amino acids, fatty acids, choline and nucleic acids. Amongst these, the common effects are enhanced glycolysis and nucleoside/nucleotide metabolisms. These findings provided essential biochemistry information about the effects of tumor growth on the non-involved organs. PMID:27329570

  3. Synthetic Tet-inducible small hairpin RNAs targeting hTERT or Bcl-2 inhibit malignant phenotypes of bladder cancer T24 and 5637 cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Junhao; Liu, Yuchen; Zhan, Yonghao; Zhuang, Chengle; Liu, Li; Fu, Xing; Xu, Wen; Li, Jianfa; Chen, Mingwei; Cai, Zhiming; Huang, Weiren

    2016-03-01

    Small hairpin RNA (shRNA) can inhibit the malignant phenotypes of tumor cell through ribonucleic acid interference (RNAi). However, it is hardly to be regulated and it may induce few phenotypic changes. Here, we build a type of tetracycline (Tet)-inducible vectors which can achieve regulatable expression of shRNA in a time-dependent manner by using synthetic biology approach. In order to prove the effectiveness of this device, we chose hTERT and Bcl-2 as target genes and test the utility of the device on 5637 and T24 cell lines. The experiments show that the Tet-inducible small hairpin RNA can effectively suppress their target genes and generate anti-cancer effects on both 5637 and T24 cell lines. The device we build not only can inhibit proliferation but also can induce apoptosis and suppress migration of the bladder cancer cell lines 5637 and T24. The Tet-inducible small hairpin RNAs may provide a novel strategy for the treatment of human bladder cancer in the future.

  4. Development of a three-dimensional multiscale agent-based tumor model: simulating gene-protein interaction profiles, cell phenotypes and multicellular patterns in brain cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Le; Athale, Chaitanya A; Deisboeck, Thomas S

    2007-01-07

    Experimental evidence suggests that epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-mediated activation of the signaling protein phospholipase Cgamma plays a critical role in a cancer cell's phenotypic decision to either proliferate or to migrate at a given point in time. Here, we present a novel three-dimensional multiscale agent-based model to simulate this cellular decision process in the context of a virtual brain tumor. Each tumor cell is equipped with an EGFR gene-protein interaction network module that also connects to a simplified cell cycle description. The simulation results show that over time proliferative and migratory cell populations not only oscillate but also directly impact the spatio-temporal expansion patterns of the entire cancer system. The percentage change in the concentration of the sub-cellular interaction network's molecular components fluctuates, and, for the 'proliferation-to-migration' switch we find that the phenotype triggering molecular profile to some degree varies as the tumor system grows and the microenvironment changes. We discuss potential implications of these findings for experimental and clinical cancer research.

  5. An aberrant nuclear localization of E-cadherin is a potent inhibitor of Wnt/β-catenin-elicited promotion of the cancer stem cell phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Su, Y-J; Chang, Y-W; Lin, W-H; Liang, C-L; Lee, J-L

    2015-01-01

    Several studies suggest that Wnt signaling contributes to reprogramming and maintenance of cancer stem cell (CSC) states activated by loss of membranous E-cadherin expression. However, E-cadherin's exact role in Wnt/β-catenin-mediated promotion of the CSC phenotype remains unclear. Recently, a significant positive correlation has been observed between the expression of nuclear (an aberrant nuclear localization) E-cadherin and β-catenin in gastric and colorectal carcinomas. Here we conducted a series of in-vitro and in-vivo studies to show that the β-catenin/TCF4 interaction was abolished by E-cadherin and was correlated with its nuclear localization, and consequently decreased β-catenin/TCF4 transcriptional activity. Nuclear E-cadherin was a negative regulator of Wnt/β-Catenin-elicited promotion of the CSC phenotype. Using immunohistochemistry on lung cancer tissue microarrays, we found that changes in subcellular location of E-cadherin may be described by tumor grade and stage, suggesting cellular redistribution during lung tumorigenesis. Furthermore, nuclear E-cadherin expression was more significantly inversely correlated with CD133 (a lung CSC marker) expression (P<0.005) than total E-cadherin expression (P<0.05), suggesting that lung cancer as defined by nuclear E-cadherinLow/nuclear β-cateninHigh/CD133High biomarkers has superior prognostic value over total E-cadherinLow/nuclear β-cateninHigh/CD133High. PMID:26075748

  6. Identification of Variant-Specific Functions of PIK3CA by Rapid Phenotyping of Rare Mutations | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    Large-scale sequencing efforts are uncovering the complexity of cancer genomes, which are composed of causal "driver" mutations that promote tumor progression along with many more pathologically neutral "passenger" events. The majority of mutations, both in known cancer drivers and uncharacterized genes, are generally of low occurrence, highlighting the need to functionally annotate the long tail of infrequent mutations present in heterogeneous cancers.

  7. 15-LOX-1 suppression of hypoxia-induced metastatic phenotype and HIF-1α expression in human colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yuanqing; Mao, Fei; Zuo, Xiangsheng; Moussalli, Micheline J; Elias, Elias; Xu, Weiguo; Shureiqi, Imad

    2014-06-01

    The expression of 15-lipoxygenase-1 (15-LOX-1) is downregulated in colon cancer and other major cancers, and 15-LOX-1 reexpression in cancer cells suppresses colonic tumorigenesis. Various lines of evidence indicate that 15-LOX-1 expression suppresses premetastatic stages of colonic tumorigenesis; nevertheless, the role of 15-LOX-1 loss of expression in cancer epithelial cells in metastases continues to be debated. Hypoxia, a common feature of the cancer microenvironment, promotes prometastatic mechanisms such as the upregulation of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α, a transcriptional master regulator that enhances cancer cell metastatic potential, angiogenesis, and tumor cell invasion and migration. We have, therefore, tested whether restoring 15-LOX-1 in colon cancer cells affects cancer cells' hypoxia response that promotes metastasis. We found that 15-LOX-1 reexpression in HCT116, HT29LMM, and LoVo colon cancer cells inhibited survival, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression, angiogenesis, cancer cell migration and invasion, and HIF-1α protein expression and stability under hypoxia. These findings demonstrate that 15-LOX-1 expression loss in cancer cells promotes metastasis and that therapeutically targeting ubiquitous 15-LOX-1 loss in cancer cells has the potential to suppress metastasis.

  8. 15-LOX-1 suppression of hypoxia-induced metastatic phenotype and HIF-1α expression in human colon cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yuanqing; Mao, Fei; Zuo, Xiangsheng; Moussalli, Micheline J; Elias, Elias; Xu, Weiguo; Shureiqi, Imad

    2014-01-01

    The expression of 15-lipoxygenase-1 (15-LOX-1) is downregulated in colon cancer and other major cancers, and 15-LOX-1 reexpression in cancer cells suppresses colonic tumorigenesis. Various lines of evidence indicate that 15-LOX-1 expression suppresses premetastatic stages of colonic tumorigenesis; nevertheless, the role of 15-LOX-1 loss of expression in cancer epithelial cells in metastases continues to be debated. Hypoxia, a common feature of the cancer microenvironment, promotes prometastatic mechanisms such as the upregulation of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α, a transcriptional master regulator that enhances cancer cell metastatic potential, angiogenesis, and tumor cell invasion and migration. We have, therefore, tested whether restoring 15-LOX-1 in colon cancer cells affects cancer cells' hypoxia response that promotes metastasis. We found that 15-LOX-1 reexpression in HCT116, HT29LMM, and LoVo colon cancer cells inhibited survival, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression, angiogenesis, cancer cell migration and invasion, and HIF-1α protein expression and stability under hypoxia. These findings demonstrate that 15-LOX-1 expression loss in cancer cells promotes metastasis and that therapeutically targeting ubiquitous 15-LOX-1 loss in cancer cells has the potential to suppress metastasis. PMID:24634093

  9. The tumor suppressor TERE1 (UBIAD1) prenyltransferase regulates the elevated cholesterol phenotype in castration resistant prostate cancer by controlling a program of ligand dependent SXR target genes

    PubMed Central

    Fredericks, William J.; Sepulveda, Jorge; Lal, Priti; Tomaszewski, John E.; Lin, Ming-Fong; McGarvey, Terry; Rauscher, Frank J; Malkowicz, S. Bruce

    2013-01-01

    Castrate-Resistant Prostate Cancer (CRPC) is characterized by persistent androgen receptor-driven tumor growth in the apparent absence of systemic androgens. Current evidence suggests that CRPC cells can produce their own androgens from endogenous sterol precursors that act in an intracrine manner to stimulate tumor growth. The mechanisms by which CRPC cells become steroidogenic during tumor progression are not well defined. Herein we describe a novel link between the elevated cholesterol phenotype of CRPC and the TERE1 tumor suppressor protein, a prenyltransferase that synthesizes vitamin K-2, which is a potent endogenous ligand for the SXR nuclear hormone receptor. We show that 50% of primary and metastatic prostate cancer specimens exhibit a loss of TERE1 expression and we establish a correlation between TERE1 expression and cholesterol in the LnCaP-C81 steroidogenic cell model of the CRPC. LnCaP-C81 cells also lack TERE1 protein, and show elevated cholesterol synthetic rates, higher steady state levels of cholesterol, and increased expression of enzymes in the de novo cholesterol biosynthetic pathways than the non-steroidogenic prostate cancer cells. C81 cells also show decreased expression of the SXR nuclear hormone receptor and a panel of directly regulated SXR target genes that govern cholesterol efflux and steroid catabolism. Thus, a combination of increased synthesis, along with decreased efflux and catabolism likely underlies the CRPC phenotype: SXR might coordinately regulate this phenotype. Moreover, TERE1 controls synthesis of vitamin K-2, which is a potent endogenous ligand for SXR activation, strongly suggesting a link between TERE1 levels, K-2 synthesis and SXR target gene regulation. We demonstrate that following ectopic TERE1 expression or induction of endogenous TERE1, the elevated cholesterol levels in C81 cells are reduced. Moreover, reconstitution of TERE1 expression in C81 cells reactivates SXR and switches on a suite of SXR target genes that

  10. Protein-bound Polysaccharide-K Inhibits Hedgehog Signaling Through Down-regulation of MAML3 and RBPJ Transcription Under Hypoxia, Suppressing the Malignant Phenotype in Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Yamasaki, Akio; Onishi, Hideya; Imaizumi, Akira; Kawamoto, Makoto; Fujimura, Akiko; Oyama, Yasuhiro; Katano, Mitsuo

    2016-08-01

    Hedgehog signaling is activated in pancreatic cancer and could be a therapeutic target. We previously demonstrated that recombination signal binding protein for immunoglobulin-kappa-J region (RBPJ) and mastermind-like 3 (MAML3) contribute to the hypoxia-induced up-regulation of Smoothened (SMO) transcription. We have also shown that protein-bound polysaccharide-K (PSK) could be effective for refractory pancreatic cancer that down-regulates SMO transcription under hypoxia. In this study, we evaluated whether the anticancer mechanism of PSK involves inhibiting RBPJ and MAML3 expression under hypoxia. PSK reduced SMO, MAML3 and RBPJ expression in pancreatic cancer cells under hypoxia. PSK also blocked RBPJ-induced invasiveness under hypoxia by inhibiting matrix metalloproteinase expression. Lastly, we showed that PSK attenuated RBPJ-induced proliferation both in vitro and in vivo. These results suggest that PSK suppresses Hedgehog signaling through down-regulation of MAML3 and RBPJ transcription under hypoxia, inhibiting the induction of a malignant phenotype in pancreatic cancer. Our results may lead to development of new treatments for refractory pancreatic cancer using PSK as a Hedgehog inhibitor.

  11. Synthetic Tet-inducible artificial microRNAs targeting β-catenin or HIF-1α inhibit malignant phenotypes of bladder cancer cells T24 and 5637.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Yonghao; Liu, Yuchen; Lin, Junhao; Fu, Xing; Zhuang, Chengle; Liu, Li; Xu, Wen; Li, Jianfa; Chen, Mingwei; Zhao, Guoping; Huang, Weiren; Cai, Zhiming

    2015-11-06

    Ribonucleic acid interference (RNAi) based on microRNA (miRNA) may provide efficient and safe therapeutic opportunities. However, natural microRNAs can not easily be regulated and usually cause few phenotypic changes. Using the engineering principles of synthetic biology, we provided a novel and standard platform for the generation of tetracycline (Tet)-inducible vectors that express artificial microRNAs in a dosage-dependent manner. The vector generates a Pol II promoter-mediated artificial microRNA which was flanked by ribozyme sequences. In order to prove the utility of this platform, we chose β-catenin and HIF-1α as the functional targets and used the bladder cancer cell lines 5637 and T24 as the test models. We found that the Tet-inducible artificial microRNAs can effectively silence the target genes and their downstream genes, and induce anti-cancer effects in the two bladder cancer cell lines. These devices can inhibit proliferation, induce apoptosis, and suppress migration of the bladder cancer cell lines 5637 and T24. The Tet-inducible synthetic artificial microRNAs may represent a kind of novel therapeutic strategies for treating human bladder cancer.

  12. Experimental co-expression of vimentin and keratin intermediate filaments in human breast cancer cells results in phenotypic interconversion and increased invasive behavior.

    PubMed Central

    Hendrix, M. J.; Seftor, E. A.; Seftor, R. E.; Trevor, K. T.

    1997-01-01

    The expression of intermediate filament proteins is remarkably tissue specific, which suggests that the intermediate filament type(s) present in cells is somehow related to their biological function. However, in some cancers, particularly malignant breast carcinoma, there is a strong indication that vimentin is co-expressed with keratins, thus presenting as a dedifferentiated or interconverted (between epithelial and mesenchymal) phenotype. In the present study, we recapitulated the interconverted phenotype by developing stable transfectants of MCF-7 human breast cancer cells, termed MoVi clones, to express both vimentin and keratins. Overexpression of vimentin in these cells led to augmentation of motility and invasiveness in vitra. These activities could be transiently down-regulated by vimentin antisense oligonucleotides in MoVi clones and MDA-MB-231 cells (which constitutively co-express keratins and vimentin). Furthermore, in the MoVi experimental transfectants expressing the highest percentage of vimentin-positive cells, their proliferative capacity, clonogenic potential, and tumorigenicity increased. However, the metastatic ability of the MoVi transfectants remained unchanged compared with MCF-7neo controls. The MDA-MB-231 cells metastasized to axillary lymph nodes in a SCID mouse model. Finally, we explored the possibility that potential changes could occur with respect to cell surface integrins. These studies revealed a decrease in the alpha 2- and alpha 3-containing promiscuous integrins, in addition to beta 1 containing integrins, concomitant with an increase in the alpha 6-containing laminin receptor integrin. Further functional analysis of the alpha 6 observation showed an increase in the baptotactic migration of MoVi transfectants toward a laminin substrate. From these data, it is postulated that the ability to co-express vimentin and keratins confers a selective advantage to breast cancer cells in their interpretation of signaling cues from the

  13. Human thyroid cancer cells as a source of iso-genic, iso-phenotypic cell lines with or without functional p53

    PubMed Central

    Wyllie, F S; Haughton, M F; Rowson, J M; Wynford-Thomas, D

    1999-01-01

    Differentiated thyroid carcinomas (in contrast to the rarer anaplastic form) are unusual among human cancers in displaying a remarkably low frequency of p53 mutation and appear to retain wild-type (wt) p53 function as assessed by the response of derived cell lines to DNA damage. Using one such cell line, K1, we have tested the effect of experimental abrogation of p53 function by generating matched sub-clones stably expressing either a neo control gene, a dominant-negative mutant p53 (143ala) or human papilloma virus protein HPV16 E6. Loss of p53 function in the latter two groups was confirmed by abolition of p53-dependent ‘stress’ responses including induction of the cyclin/CDK inhibitor p21WAF1 and G1/S arrest following DNA-damage. In contrast, no change was detected in the phenotype of ‘unstressed’ clones, with respect to any of the following parameters: proliferation rate in monolayer, serum-dependence for proliferation or survival, tumorigenicity, cellular morphology, or tissue-specific differentiation markers. The K1 line therefore represents a ‘neutral’ background with respect to p53 function, permitting the derivation of functionally p53 + or − clones which are not only iso-genic but also iso-phenotypic. Such a panel should be an ideal tool with which to test the p53-dependence of cellular stress responses, particularly the sensitivity to potential therapeutic agents, free from the confounding additional phenotypic differences which usually accompany loss of p53 function. The results also further support the hypothesis that p53 mutation alone is not sufficient to drive progression of thyroid cancer to the aggressive anaplastic form. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10098744

  14. Colorectal cancer risk variants at 8q23.3 and 11q23.1 are associated with disease phenotype in APC mutation carriers.

    PubMed

    Ghorbanoghli, Z; Nieuwenhuis, M H; Houwing-Duistermaat, J J; Jagmohan-Changur, S; Hes, F J; Tops, C M; Wagner, A; Aalfs, C M; Verhoef, S; Gómez García, E B; Sijmons, R H; Menko, F H; Letteboer, T G; Hoogerbrugge, N; van Wezel, T; Vasen, H F A; Wijnen, J T

    2016-10-01

    Familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) is a dominantly inherited syndrome caused by germline mutations in the APC gene and characterized by the development of multiple colorectal adenomas and a high risk of developing colorectal cancer (CRC). The severity of polyposis is correlated with the site of the APC mutation. However, there is also phenotypic variability within families with the same underlying APC mutation, suggesting that additional factors influence the severity of polyposis. Genome-wide association studies identified several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that are associated with CRC. We assessed whether these SNPs are associated with polyp multiplicity in proven APC mutation carriers. Sixteen CRC-associated SNPs were analysed in a cohort of 419 APC germline mutation carriers from 182 families. Clinical data were retrieved from the Dutch Polyposis Registry. Allele frequencies of the SNPs were compared for patients with <100 colorectal adenomas versus patients with ≥100 adenomas, using generalized estimating equations with the APC genotype as a covariate. We found a trend of association of two of the tested SNPs with the ≥100 adenoma phenotype: the C alleles of rs16892766 at 8q23.3 (OR 1.71, 95 % CI 1.05-2.76, p = 0.03, dominant model) and rs3802842 at 11q23.1 (OR 1.51, 95 % CI 1.03-2.22, p = 0.04, dominant model). We identified two risk variants that are associated with a more severe phenotype in APC mutation carriers. These risk variants may partly explain the phenotypic variability in families with the same APC gene defect. Further studies with a larger sample size are recommended to evaluate and confirm the phenotypic effect of these SNPs in FAP.

  15. CD44+/CD24− breast cancer cells exhibit phenotypic reversion in three-dimensional self-assembling peptide RADA16 nanofiber scaffold

    PubMed Central

    Mi, Kun; Xing, Zhihua

    2015-01-01

    Background Self-assembling peptide nanofiber scaffolds have been shown to be a permissive biological material for tissue repair, cell proliferation, differentiation, etc. Recently, a subpopulation (CD44+/CD24−) of breast cancer cells has been reported to have stem/progenitor cell properties. The aim of this study was to investigate whether this subpopulation of cancer cells have different phenotypes in self-assembling COCH3-RADARADARADARADA-CONH2 (RADA16) peptide nanofiber scaffold compared with Matrigel® (BD Biosciences, Two Oak Park, Bedford, MA, USA) and collagen I. Methods CD44 and CD24 expression was determined by flow cytometry. Cell proliferation was measured by 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine assay and DNA content measurement. Immunostaining was used to indicate the morphologies of cells in three-dimensional (3D) cultures of different scaffolds and the localization of β-catenin in the colonies. Western blot was used to determine the expression of signaling proteins. In vitro migration assay and inoculation into nude mice were used to evaluate invasion and tumorigenesis in vivo. Results The breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-435S contained a high percentage (>99%) of CD44+/CD24− cells, which exhibited phenotypic reversion in 3D RADA16 nanofiber scaffold compared with collagen I and Matrigel. The newly formed reverted acini-like colonies reassembled a basement membrane and reorganized their cytoskeletons. At the same time, cells cultured and embedded in RADA16 peptide scaffold exhibited growth arrest. Also, they exhibited different migration potential, which links their migration ability with their cellular morphology. Consistent with studies in vitro, the in vivo tumor formation assay further supported of the functional changes caused by the reversion in 3D RADA16 culture. Expression levels of intercellular surface adhesion molecule-1 were upregulated in cells cultured in RADA16 scaffolds, and the NF-kappa B inhibitor pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate could inhibit

  16. CD133+, CD166+CD44+, and CD24+CD44+ phenotypes fail to reliably identify cell populations with cancer stem cell functional features in established human colorectal cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Muraro, Manuele Giuseppe; Mele, Valentina; Däster, Silvio; Han, Junyi; Heberer, Michael; Cesare Spagnoli, Giulio; Iezzi, Giandomenica

    2012-08-01

    Increasing evidence that cancers originate from small populations of so-called cancer stem cells (CSCs), capable of surviving conventional chemotherapies and regenerating the original tumor, urges the development of novel CSC-targeted treatments. Screening of new anticancer compounds is conventionally conducted on established tumor cell lines, providing sufficient material for high-throughput studies. Whether tumor cell lines might comprise CSC populations resembling those of primary tumors, however, remains highly debated. We have analyzed the expression of defined phenotypic profiles, including CD133+, CD166+CD44+, and CD24+CD44+, reported as CSC-specific in human primary colorectal cancer (CRC), on a panel of 10 established CRC cell lines and evaluated their correlation with CSC properties. None of the putative CSC phenotypes consistently correlated with stem cell-like features, including spheroid formation ability, clonogenicity, aldehyde dehydrogenase-1 activity, and side population phenotype. Importantly, CRC cells expressing putative CSC markers did not exhibit increased survival when treated with chemotherapeutic drugs in vitro or display higher tumorigenicity in vivo. Thus, the expression of CD133 or the coexpression of CD166/CD44 or CD24/CD44 did not appear to reliably identify CSC populations in established CRC cell lines. Our findings question the suitability of cell lines for the screening of CSC-specific therapies and underline the urgency of developing novel platforms for anticancer drug discovery.

  17. Cervical Cancer Cell Supernatants Induce a Phenotypic Switch from U937-Derived Macrophage-Activated M1 State into M2-Like Suppressor Phenotype with Change in Toll-Like Receptor Profile

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Reyes, Karina; Bravo-Cuellar, Alejandro; Hernández-Flores, Georgina; Lerma-Díaz, José Manuel; Jave-Suárez, Luis Felipe; Gómez-Lomelí, Paulina; de Celis, Ruth; Aguilar-Lemarroy, Adriana; Domínguez-Rodríguez, Jorge Ramiro; Ortiz-Lazareno, Pablo Cesar

    2014-01-01

    Cervical cancer (CC) is the second most common cancer among women worldwide. Infection with human papillomavirus (HPV) is the main risk factor for developing CC. Macrophages are important immune effector cells; they can be differentiated into two phenotypes, identified as M1 (classically activated) and M2 (alternatively activated). Macrophage polarization exerts profound effects on the Toll-like receptor (TLR) profile. In this study, we evaluated whether the supernatant of human CC cells HeLa, SiHa, and C-33A induces a shift of M1 macrophage toward M2 macrophage in U937-derived macrophages. Results. The results showed that soluble factors secreted by CC cells induce a change in the immunophenotype of macrophages from macrophage M1 into macrophage M2. U937-derived macrophages M1 released proinflammatory cytokines and nitric oxide; however, when these cells were treated with the supernatant of CC cell lines, we observed a turnover of M1 toward M2. These cells increased CD163 and IL-10 expression. The expression of TLR-3, -7, and -9 is increased when the macrophages were treated with the supernatant of CC cells. Conclusions. Our result strongly suggests that CC cells may, through the secretion of soluble factors, induce a change of immunophenotype M1 into M2 macrophages. PMID:25309919

  18. The clinical impact of breast scintigraphy acquired with a breast specific γ-camera (BSGC) in the diagnosis of breast cancer: incremental value versus mammography.

    PubMed

    Spanu, Angela; Sanna, Daniela; Chessa, Francesca; Manca, Alessandra; Cottu, Pierina; Fancellu, Alessandro; Nuvoli, Susanna; Madeddu, Giuseppe

    2012-08-01

    We investigated the clinical impact of breast scintigraphy acquired with a breast specific γ-camera (BSGC) in the diagnosis of breast cancer (BC) and assessed its incremental value over mammography (Mx). A consecutive series of 467 patients underwent BSGC scintigraphy for different indications: suspicious lesions on physical examination and/or on US/MRI negative at Mx (BI-RADS 1 or 3), characterization of lesions suspicious at Mx (BI-RADS 4), preoperative staging in lesions highly suggestive of malignancy at Mx (BI-RADS 5). Definitive histopathological findings were obtained in all cases after scintigraphy: 420/467 patients had BC, while 47/467 patients had benign lesions. The scintigraphic data were correlated to Mx BI-RADS category findings and to histology. The incremental value of scintigraphy over Mx was calculated. Scintigraphy was true-positive in 97.1% BC patients, detecting 96.2% of overall tumor foci, including 91.5% of carcinomas ≤10 mm, and it was true-negative in 85.1% of patients with benign lesions. Scintigraphy gave an additional value over Mx in 141/467 cases (30.2%). In particular, scintigraphy ascertained BC missed at Mx in 31 patients with BI-RADS 1 or 3, including 26 patients with heterogeneously/high dense breast (19/26 with tumors ≤10 mm) and detected additional clinically occult ipsilateral or controlateral tumor foci (all <10 mm) or the in situ component sited around invasive tumors in 77 BC patients with BI-RADS 4 or 5, changing surgical management in 18.2% of these cases; moreover, scintigraphy ruled out malignancy in 33 patients with BI-RADS 4. BSGC scintigraphy proved a highly sensitive diagnostic tool, even in small size carcinoma detection, while maintaining a high specificity. The procedure increased both the sensitivity of Mx, especially in dense breast and in multifocal/multicentric disease, and the specificity as well as it better defined local tumor extension, thus guiding the surgeon to a more appropriate surgical treatment.

  19. Kinome-wide RNA interference screen reveals a role for PDK1 in acquired resistance to CDK4/6 inhibition in ER-positive breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Valerie M; Bhola, Neil E; Bauer, Joshua A; Formisano, Luigi; Lee, Kyung-Min; Hutchinson, Katherine E; Witkiewicz, Agnieszka K; Moore, Preston D; Estrada, Monica Valeria; Sanchez, Violeta; Ericsson, Paula G; Sanders, Melinda; Pohlmann, Paula R; Pishvaian, Michael J; Riddle, David A; Wei, Wenyi; Dugger, Teresa C; Knudsen, Erik; Arteaga, Carlos L

    2017-03-01

    To discover mechanisms of resistance to CDK4/6 inhibitors, we used a kinome-wide siRNA screen to identify kinases that, when downregulated, promote sensitivity to ribociclib. We identified 3-phosphoinositide dependent protein kinase 1 (PDK1) as the top siRNA that sensitized ER+ MCF-7 cells to ribociclib. Pharmacological inhibition of PDK1 with GSK2334470 in combination with ribociclib or palbociclib, synergistically inhibited proliferation and increased apoptosis in a panel of ER+ breast cancer cell lines. Ribociclib-resistant MCF-7, T47D and HCC1428 cells, selected after chronic drug exposure, displayed increased levels of PDK1, P-RSK2, P-AKT and P-S6 compared to parental drug-sensitive cells. Cell cycle analysis revealed that CDK4/6 inhibition failed to induce G1 arrest, a reduction in S phase, and senescence in ribociclib-resistant cells, suggesting an upregulation of S-phase cyclins/CDKs. The resistant cells exhibited significantly higher levels of P-CDK2, cyclin A, cyclin D1, cyclin E and S477/T479 P-AKT, a CDK2-dependent phosphorylation site within AKT required for full kinase activity and limited to the S-phase of the cell cycle. Treatment with GSK2334470 or the CDK2 inhibitor dinaciclib re-sensitized ribociclib-resistant cells to CDK4/6 inhibitors; however, ribociclib/GSK2334470 inhibited the ribociclib-resistant cells more potently than ribociclib/dinaciclib. Ribociclib/GSK2334470 but not ribociclib/dinaciclib completely abrogated P-Rb, P-S6, P-RSK2, P-CDK2, cyclin A, cyclin D1 and cyclin E expression. Further, ribociclib in combination with GSK2334470 or the PI3Kα inhibitor alpelisib induced regression of MCF-7 xenografts. Finally, primary ER+ tumors displayed increased PDK1, P-S6 and cyclin D1 levels after short treatment with palbociclib. These data support a role for PI3K/PDK1 in mediating acquired resistance to CDK4/6 inhibitors.

  20. Individualized Nonadaptive and Online-Adaptive Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Treatment Strategies for Cervical Cancer Patients Based on Pretreatment Acquired Variable Bladder Filling Computed Tomography Scans

    SciTech Connect

    Bondar, M.L.; Hoogeman, M.S.; Mens, J.W.; Quint, S.; Ahmad, R.; Dhawtal, G.; Heijmen, B.J.

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To design and evaluate individualized nonadaptive and online-adaptive strategies based on a pretreatment established motion model for the highly deformable target volume in cervical cancer patients. Methods and Materials: For 14 patients, nine to ten variable bladder filling computed tomography (CT) scans were acquired at pretreatment and after 40 Gy. Individualized model-based internal target volumes (mbITVs) accounting for the cervix and uterus motion due to bladder volume changes were generated by using a motion-model constructed from two pretreatment CT scans (full and empty bladder). Two individualized strategies were designed: a nonadaptive strategy, using an mbITV accounting for the full-range of bladder volume changes throughout the treatment; and an online-adaptive strategy, using mbITVs of bladder volume subranges to construct a library of plans. The latter adapts the treatment online by selecting the plan-of-the-day from the library based on the measured bladder volume. The individualized strategies were evaluated by the seven to eight CT scans not used for mbITVs construction, and compared with a population-based approach. Geometric uniform margins around planning cervix-uterus and mbITVs were determined to ensure adequate coverage. For each strategy, the percentage of the cervix-uterus, bladder, and rectum volumes inside the planning target volume (PTV), and the clinical target volume (CTV)-to-PTV volume (volume difference between PTV and CTV) were calculated. Results: The margin for the population-based approach was 38 mm and for the individualized strategies was 7 to 10 mm. Compared with the population-based approach, the individualized nonadaptive strategy decreased the CTV-to-PTV volume by 48% {+-} 6% and the percentage of bladder and rectum inside the PTV by 5% to 45% and 26% to 74% (p < 0.001), respectively. Replacing the individualized nonadaptive strategy by an online-adaptive, two-plan library further decreased the percentage of

  1. Immunostimulatory early phenotype of tumor-associated macrophages does not predict tumor growth outcome in an HLA-DR mouse model of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Riabov, Vladimir; Kim, David; Chhina, Surmeet; Alexander, Richard B; Klyushnenkova, Elena N

    2015-07-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAM) were shown to support the progression of many solid tumors. However, anti-tumor properties of TAM were also reported in several types of cancer. Here, we investigated the phenotype and functions of TAM in two transgenic mouse models of prostate cancer that display striking differences in tumor growth outcome. Mice expressing prostate-specific antigen (PSA) as a self-antigen specifically in prostate (PSAtg mice) rejected PSA-expressing transgenic adenocarcinoma of mouse prostate (TRAMP) tumors. However, the introduction of HLA-DRB1*1501 (DR2b) transgene presenting PSA-derived peptides in a MHC class II-restricted manner exacerbated the growth of TRAMP-PSA tumors in DR2bxPSA F 1 mice. Despite the difference in tumor growth outcome, tumors in both strains were equally and intensively infiltrated by macrophages on the first week after tumor challenge. TAM exhibited mixed M1/M2 polarization and simultaneously produced pro-inflammatory (TNFα, IL1β) and anti-inflammatory (IL10) cytokines. TAM from both mouse strains demonstrated antigen-presenting potential and pronounced immunostimulatory activity. Moreover, they equally induced apoptosis of tumor cells. In vivo depletion of macrophages in DR2bxPSA F 1 but not PSAtg mice aggravated tumor growth suggesting that macrophages more strongly contribute to anti-tumor immunity when specific presentation of PSA to CD4+ T cells is possible. In summary, we conclude that in the early stages of tumor progression, the phenotype and functional properties of TAM did not predict tumor growth outcome in two transgenic prostate cancer models. Furthermore, we demonstrated that during the initial stage of prostate cancer development, TAM have the potential to activate T cell immunity and mediate anti-tumor effects.

  2. High-throughput mouse phenotyping.

    PubMed

    Gates, Hilary; Mallon, Ann-Marie; Brown, Steve D M

    2011-04-01

    Comprehensive phenotyping will be required to reveal the pleiotropic functions of a gene and to uncover the wider role of genetic loci within diverse biological systems. The challenge will be to devise phenotyping approaches to characterise the thousands of mutants that are being generated as part of international efforts to acquire a mutant for every gene in the mouse genome. In order to acquire robust datasets of broad based phenotypes from mouse mutants it is necessary to design and implement pipelines that incorporate standardised phenotyping platforms that are validated across diverse mouse genetics centres or mouse clinics. We describe here the rationale and methodology behind one phenotyping pipeline, EMPReSSslim, that was designed as part of the work of the EUMORPHIA and EUMODIC consortia, and which exemplifies some of the challenges facing large-scale phenotyping. EMPReSSslim captures a broad range of data on diverse biological systems, from biochemical to physiological amongst others. Data capture and dissemination is pivotal to the operation of large-scale phenotyping pipelines, including the definition of parameters integral to each phenotyping test and the associated ontological descriptions. EMPReSSslim data is displayed within the EuroPhenome database, where a variety of tools are available to allow the user to search for interesting biological or clinical phenotypes.

  3. Aberrant PGE₂ metabolism in bladder tumor microenvironment promotes immunosuppressive phenotype of tumor-infiltrating myeloid cells.

    PubMed

    Eruslanov, Evgeniy; Daurkin, Irina; Vieweg, Johannes; Daaka, Yehia; Kusmartsev, Sergei

    2011-07-01

    Bladder cancer is associated with enhanced inflammation and characterized by deregulated prostanoid metabolism. Here we examined prostaglandin E₂ (PGE₂) metabolism and myeloid cell subsets that infiltrate tumor tissue using two xenograft models of human bladder cancer. Human bladder tumor xenografts implanted into athymic nude mice become highly infiltrated with host CD11b myeloid cells of bone marrow origin. Fast growing SW780 bladder tumor xenografts were infiltrated with heterogeneous CD11b myeloid cell subsets including tumor-associated macrophages and myeloid-derived suppressor cells. In contrast, majority of myeloid cells in tumor tissue from slow growing bladder cancer Urothel 11 displayed more immature, homogenous phenotype and comprised mostly MHC II class-negative myeloid-derived suppressor cells. We demonstrate that human bladder tumors secrete substantial amounts of PGE₂. Normal bone marrow myeloid cell progenitors cultured in the presence of a bladder tumor-conditioned medium, which is enriched for PGE₂, failed to differentiate into mature APCs and acquired phenotype of the myeloid-derived suppressor cells or inflammatory macrophages with up-regulated chemokine receptor CXCR4. Collectively our data demonstrate that enhanced cancer-related inflammation and deregulated PGE₂ metabolism in tumor microenvironment promote immunosuppressive pro-tumoral phenotype of myeloid cells in bladder cancer. These data also suggest that not only local tumor microenvironment but other factors such as stage of cancer disease and pace of tumor growth could markedly influence the phenotype, differentiation and immune function of myeloid cells in tumor tissue.

  4. PET Imaging-Based Phenotyping as a Predictive Biomarker of Response to Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor Therapy in Non-small Cell Lung Cancer: Are We There Yet?

    PubMed

    Gerbaudo, Victor H; Kim, Chun K

    2017-03-01

    The increased understanding of the molecular pathology of different malignancies, especially lung cancer, has directed investigational efforts to center on the identification of different molecular targets and on the development of targeted therapies against these targets. A good representative is the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR); a major driver of non-small cell lung cancer tumorigenesis. Today, tumor growth inhibition is possible after treating lung tumors expressing somatic mutations of the EGFR gene with tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI). This opened the doors to biomarker-directed precision or personalized treatments for lung cancer patients. The success of these targeted anticancer therapies depends in part on being able to identify biomarkers and their patho-molecular make-up in order to select patients that could respond to specific therapeutic agents. While the identification of reliable biomarkers is crucial to predict response to treatment before it begins, it is also essential to be able to monitor treatment early during therapy to avoid the toxicity and morbidity of futile treatment in non-responding patients. In this context, we share our perspective on the role of PET imaging-based phenotyping in the personalized care of lung cancer patients to non-invasively direct and monitor the treatment efficacy of TKIs in clinical practice.

  5. The in vitro and vivo effects of nuclear and cytosolic parafibromin expression on the aggressive phenotypes of colorectal cancer cells: a search of potential gene therapy target.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Hua-Chuan; Liu, Jia-Jie; Li, Jing; Wu, Ji-Cheng; Yang, Lei; Zhao, Gui-Feng; Zhao, Xin; Jiang, Hua-Mao; Huang, Ke-Qiang; Li, Zhi-Jie

    2017-02-16

    Down-regulated parafibromin is positively linked to the pathogenesis of parathyroid, lung, breast, ovarian, gastric and colorectal cancers. Here, we found that wild-type (WT) parafibromin overexpression suppressed proliferation, tumor growth, induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in colorectal cancer cells (p<0.05), but it was the converse for mutant-type (MT, mutation in nucleus localization sequence) parafibromin (p<0.05). Both WT and MT transfectants inhibited migration and invasion, and caused better differentiation (p<0.05) of cancer cells. WT parafibromin transfectants showed the overexpression of Cyclin B1, Cyclin D1, Cyclin E, p38, p53, and AIF in HCT-15 and HCT-116 cells, while MT parafibromin only up-regulated p38 expression. There was lower mRNA expression of bcl-2 in parafibromin transfectants than the control and mock, while higher expression of c-myc, Cyclin D1, mTOR, and Raptor. According to transcriptomic analysis, WT parafibromin suppressed PI3K-Akt and FoxO signaling pathways, while MT one promoted PI3K-Akt pathway, focal adhesion, and regulation of actin cytoskeleton. Parafibromin was less expressed in colorectal cancer than paired mucosa (p<0.05), and inversely correlated with its differentiation at both mRNA and protein levels (p<0.05). These findings indicated that WT parafibromin might reverse the aggressive phenotypes of colorectal cancer cells and be employed as a target for gene therapy. Down-regulated parafibromin expression might be closely linked to colorectal carcinogenesis and cancer differentiation.

  6. Targeting colon cancer cell NF-κB promotes an anti-tumour M1-like macrophage phenotype and inhibits peritoneal metastasis.

    PubMed

    Ryan, A E; Colleran, A; O'Gorman, A; O'Flynn, L; Pindjacova, J; Lohan, P; O'Malley, G; Nosov, M; Mureau, C; Egan, L J

    2015-03-19

    In a model of peritoneal metastasis in immune-competent mice, we show that nuclear factor (NF)-κB inhibition in CT26 colon cancer cells prevents metastasis. NF-κB inhibition, by stable overexpression of IκB-α super-repressor, induced differential polarization of co-cultured macrophages to an M1-like anti-tumour phenotype in vitro. NF-κB-deficient cancer cell-conditioned media (CT26/IκB-α SR) induced interleukin (IL)-12 and nitric oxide (NO) synthase (inducible NO synthase (iNOS)) expression in macrophages. Control cell (CT26/EV) conditioned media induced high levels of IL-10 and arginase in macrophages. In vivo, this effect translated to reduction in metastasis in mice injected with CT26/ IκB-α SR cells and was positively associated with increased CD8(+)CD44(+)CD62L(-) and CD4(+)CD44(+)CD62L(-) effector T cells. Furthermore, inhibition of NF-κB activity induced high levels of NO in infiltrating immune cells and decreases in matrix metalloproteinase-9 expression, simultaneous with increases in tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases 1 and 2 within tumours. CT26/IκB-α SR tumours displayed increased pro-inflammatory gene expression, low levels of angiogenesis and extensive intratumoral apoptosis, consistent with the presence of an anti-tumour macrophage phenotype. Macrophage depletion reduced tumour size in CT26/EV-injected animals and increased tumour size in CT26/IκB-α SR cells compared with untreated tumours. Our data demonstrate, for the first time, that an important implication of targeting tumour cell NF-κB is skewing of macrophage polarization to an anti-tumour phenotype. This knowledge offers novel therapeutic opportunities for anticancer treatment.

  7. Expression of human endogenous retrovirus-K is strongly associated with the basal-like breast cancer phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Johanning, Gary L.; Malouf, Gabriel G.; Zheng, Xiaofeng; Esteva, Francisco J.; Weinstein, John N.; Wang-Johanning, Feng; Su, Xiaoping

    2017-01-01

    Human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs), which make up approximately 8% of the human genome, are overexpressed in some breast cancer cells and tissues but without regard to cancer subtype. We, therefore, analyzed TCGA RNA-Seq data to evaluate differences in expression of the HERV-K family in breast cancers of the various subtypes. Four HERV-K loci on different chromosomes were analyzed in basal, Her2E, LumA, and LumB breast cancer subtypes of 512 breast cancer patients with invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC). The results for all four loci showed higher HERV-K expression in the basal subtype, suggesting similar mechanisms of regulation regardless of locus. Expression of the HERV-K envelope gene (env) was highly significantly increased in basal tumors in comparison with the also-upregulated expression of other HERV-K genes. Analysis of reverse-phase protein array data indicated that increased expression of HERV-K is associated with decreased mutation of H-Ras (wild-type). Our results show elevation of HERV-K expression exclusively in the basal subtype of IDC breast cancer (as opposed to the other subtypes) and suggest HERV-K as a possible target for cancer vaccines or immunotherapy against this highly aggressive form of breast cancer. PMID:28165048

  8. Fusion-derived epithelial cancer cells express hematopoietic markers and contribute to stem cell and migratory phenotype in ovarian carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishnan, Mallika; Mathur, Sandeep R; Mukhopadhyay, Asok

    2013-09-01

    For a long time, the external milieu of cancer cells was considered to be of secondary importance when compared with its intrinsic properties. That has changed now as the microenvironment is considered to be a major contributing factor toward the progression of tumor. In this study, we show that in human and mouse epithelial ovarian carcinoma and mouse lung carcinoma, the interaction between tumor-infiltrating hematopoietic cells and epithelial cancer cells results in their fusion. Intriguingly, even after the fusion event, cancer cells retain the expression of the pan-hematopoietic marker (CD45) and various markers of hematopoietic lineage, including those of hematopoietic stem cells, indicating that the hematopoietic genome is not completely reprogrammed. This observation may have implications on the bone marrow contribution to the cancer stem cell population. Interestingly, it was seen that in both cancer models, the expression of chemokine receptor CXCR4 was largely contributed to by the fused compartment of cancer cells. We hypothesize that the superior migratory potential gained by the cancer cells due to the fusion helps in its dissemination to various secondary organs upon activation of the CXCR4/CXCL12 axis. We are the first to report the presence of a hemato-epithelial cancer compartment, which contributes to stem cell markers and CXCR4 in epithelial carcinoma. This finding has repercussions on CXCR4-based therapeutics and opens new avenues in discovering novel molecular targets against fusion and metastasis.

  9. MicroRNA-200c: A Novel Way to Attack Breast Cancer Metastases by Restoring the Epithelial Phenotype

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-12-01

    cancer stem cells with normal stem cells. Cell 138(3):592–603 59. Thomson JM, Newman M, Parker JS, Morin-Kensicki EM, Wright T, Hammond SM (2006...endometrial cancers are a heterogeneous group of poorly differentiated tumors (International Federation of Gynecology and Obstet- rics grade 3 endometrioid

  10. c-Met Overexpression Contributes to the Acquired Apoptotic Resistance of Nonadherent Ovarian Cancer Cells through a Cross Talk Mediated by Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase and Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase 1/212

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Maggie K S; Zhou, Hong Y; Yam, Judy W P; Wong, Alice S T

    2010-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the most lethal gynecologic cancer mainly because of widespread peritoneal dissemination and malignant ascites. Key to this is the capacity of tumor cells to escape suspension-induced apoptosis (anoikis), which also underlies their resistance to chemotherapy. Here, we used a nonadherent cell culture model to investigate the molecular mechanisms of apoptotic resistance of ovarian cancer cells that may mimic the chemoresistance found in solid tumors. We found that ovarian cancer cells acquired a remarkable resistance to anoikis and apoptosis induced by exposure to clinically relevant doses of two front-line chemotherapeutic drugs cisplatin and paclitaxel when grown in three-dimensional than monolayer cultures. Inhibition of the hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) receptor c-Met, which is frequently overexpressed in ovarian cancer, by a specific inhibitor or small interfering RNA blocked the acquired anoikis resistance and restored chemosensitivity in three-dimensional not in two-dimensional cultures. These effects were found to be dependent on both phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 signaling pathways. Inhibitors of PI3K/Akt abrogated ERK1/2 activation and its associated anoikis resistance in response to HGF, suggesting a signaling relay between these two pathways. Furthermore, we identified a central role of Ras as a mechanism of this cross talk. Interestingly, Ras did not lie upstream of PI3K/Akt, whereas PI3K/Akt signaling to ERK1/2 involved Ras. These findings shed new light on the apoptotic resistance mechanism of nonadherent ovarian cancer ascites cells and may have important clinical implications. PMID:20126471

  11. A CD44high/EGFRlow subpopulation within head and neck cancer cell lines shows an epithelial-mesenchymal transition phenotype and resistance to treatment.

    PubMed

    La Fleur, Linnea; Johansson, Ann-Charlotte; Roberg, Karin

    2012-01-01

    Mortality in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is high due to emergence of therapy resistance which results in local and regional recurrences that may have their origin in resistant cancer stem cells (CSCs) or cells with an epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) phenotype. In the present study, we investigate the possibility of using the cell surface expression of CD44 and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), both of which have been used as stem cell markers, to identify subpopulations within HNSCC cell lines that differ with respect to phenotype and treatment sensitivity. Three subpopulations, consisting of CD44(high)/EGFR(low), CD44(high)/EGFR(high) and CD44(low) cells, respectively, were collected by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. The CD44(high)/EGFR(low) population showed a spindle-shaped EMT-like morphology, while the CD44(low) population was dominated by cobblestone-shaped cells. The CD44(high)/EGFR(low) population was enriched with cells in G0/G1 and showed a relatively low proliferation rate and a high plating efficiency. Using a real time PCR array, 27 genes, of which 14 were related to an EMT phenotype and two with stemness, were found to be differentially expressed in CD44(high)/EGFR(low) cells in comparison to CD44(low) cells. Moreover, CD44(high)/EGFR(low) cells showed a low sensitivity to radiation, cisplatin, cetuximab and gefitinib, and a high sensitivity to dasatinib relative to its CD44(high)/EGFR(high) and CD44(low) counterparts. In conclusion, our results show that the combination of CD44 (high) and EGFR (low) cell surface expression can be used to identify a treatment resistant subpopulation with an EMT phenotype in HNSCC cell lines.

  12. v-rasH induces non-small cell phenotype, with associated growth factors and receptors, in a small cell lung cancer cell line.

    PubMed Central

    Falco, J P; Baylin, S B; Lupu, R; Borges, M; Nelkin, B D; Jasti, R K; Davidson, N E; Mabry, M

    1990-01-01

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) tumor progression can involve partial or complete conversion to a more treatment-resistant non-small cell (NSCLC) phenotype. In a cell culture model of this phenomenon, we have previously demonstrated that insertion of the viral Harvey ras gene (v-Ha-ras) into SCLC cell lines with amplification and overexpression of the c-myc gene induced many NSCLC phenotypic features. We now report that the v-Ha-ras gene can also induce morphologic, biochemical, and growth characteristics consistent with the NSCLC phenotype in an N-myc amplified SCLC cell line, NCI-H249. We show that v-Ha-ras has novel effects on these cells, abrogating an SCLC-specific growth requirement for gastrin-releasing peptide, and inducing mRNA expression of three NSCLC-associated growth factors and receptors, platelet-derived growth factor B chain, transforming growth factor-alpha (TGF-alpha), and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGF-R). TGF-alpha secretion and EGF-R also appear, consistent with the induction of an autocrine loop previously shown to be growth stimulatory for NSCLC in culture. These data suggest that N-myc and v-Ha-ras represent functional classes of genes that may complement each other in bringing about the phenotypic alterations seen during SCLC tumor progression, and suggest that such alterations might include the appearance of growth factors and receptors of potential importance for the growth of the tumor and its surrounding stroma. Images PMID:2161428

  13. Integrative analysis reveals clinical phenotypes and oncogenic potentials of long non-coding RNAs across 15 cancer types

    PubMed Central

    Piccolo, Stephen R.; Zhang, Xiao-Qin; Li, Jun-Hao; Zhou, Hui; Yang, Jian-Hua; Qu, Liang-Hu

    2016-01-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been shown to contribute to tumorigenesis. However, surprisingly little is known about the comprehensive clinical and genomic characterization of lncRNAs across human cancer. In this study, we conducted comprehensive analyses for the expression profile, clinical outcomes, somatic copy number alterations (SCNAs) profile of lncRNAs in ~7000 clinical samples from 15 different cancer types. We identified significantly differentially expressed lncRNAs between tumor and normal tissues from each cancer. Notably, we characterized 47 lncRNAs which were extensively dysregulated in at least 10 cancer types, suggesting a conserved function in cancer development. We also analyzed the associations between lncRNA expressions and patient survival, and identified sets of lncRNAs that possessed significant prognostic values in specific cancer types. Our combined analysis of SCNA data and expression data uncovered 116 dysregulated lncRNAs are strikingly genomic altered across 15 cancer types, indicating their oncogenic potentials. Our study may lay the groundwork for future functional studies of lncRNAs and help facilitate the discovery of novel clinical biomarkers. PMID:27147563

  14. Enriched CD44(+)/CD24(-) population drives the aggressive phenotypes presented in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC).

    PubMed

    Ma, Fei; Li, Huihui; Wang, Haijuan; Shi, Xiuqing; Fan, Ying; Ding, Xiaoyan; Lin, Chen; Zhan, Qimin; Qian, Haili; Xu, Binghe

    2014-10-28

    The mechanism underlying the aggressive behaviors of triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) is not well characterized yet. The association between cancer stem cell (CSC) population and the aggressive behaviors of TNBC has not been established. We found the CD44(+)/CD24(-) cell population was enriched in TNBC tissues and cell lines, with a higher capacity of proliferation, migration, invasion and tumorigenicity as well as lower adhesion ability. The CD44(+)/CD24(-) cell population with cancer stem cell-like properties may play an important role in the aggressive behaviors of TNBC. This discovery may lead to new therapeutic strategies targeting CD44(+)/CD24(-) cell population in TNBC.

  15. Loss of androgen receptor expression promotes a stem-like cell phenotype in prostate cancer through STAT3 signaling.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Anne; Herrmann, Andreas; Cherryholmes, Gregory; Kowolik, Claudia; Buettner, Ralf; Pal, Sumanta; Yu, Hua; Müller-Newen, Gerhard; Jove, Richard

    2014-02-15

    Androgen receptor (AR) signaling is important for prostate cancer progression. However, androgen-deprivation and/or AR targeting-based therapies often lead to resistance. Here, we demonstrate that loss of AR expression results in STAT3 activation in prostate cancer cells. AR downregulation further leads to development of prostate cancer stem-like cells (CSC), which requires STAT3. In human prostate tumor tissues, elevated cancer stem-like cell markers coincide with those cells exhibiting high STAT3 activity and low AR expression. AR downregulation-induced STAT3 activation is mediated through increased interleukin (IL)-6 expression. Treating mice with soluble IL-6 receptor fusion protein or silencing STAT3 in tumor cells significantly reduced prostate tumor growth and CSCs. Together, these findings indicate an opposing role of AR and STAT3 in prostate CSC development.

  16. Genomic Landscape of Experimental Bladder Cancer in Rodents and Its Application to Human Bladder Cancer: Gene Amplification and Potential Overexpression of Cyp2a5/CYP2A6 Are Associated with the Invasive Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Kanemoto, Kazuhiro; Fukuta, Katsuhiro; Kawai, Noriyasu; Tozawa, Keiichi; Ochiai, Masako; Okamoto, Koji; Ohnami, Sumiko; Sakamoto, Hiromi; Yoshida, Teruhiko; Kanai, Yae; Katoh, Masaru; Yasui, Takahiro; Kohri, Kenjiro; Kakizoe, Tadao; Nakagama, Hitoshi

    2016-01-01

    Non-muscle invasive (superficial) bladder cancer is a low-grade malignancy with good prognosis, while muscle invasive (invasive) bladder cancer is a high-grade malignancy with poor prognosis. N-butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl)nitrosamine (BBN) induces superficial bladder cancers with papillary morphology in rats and invasive bladder cancers with infiltrating phenotype in mice. In this study, we analyzed genomic landscapes of rodent BBN-induced bladder cancers using array-based comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH). While no significant copy number alterations were detected in superficial bladder tumors in rats, copy number gains in chromosomal regions 2D-E1, 7qA3, 9F2, and 11C-D were detected in invasive bladder tumors in mice. Amplification of representative genes located on 2D-E1 and 7qA3 chromosomal regions was confirmed by quantitative PCR. Cyp2a22 and Cyp2a5 genes but not Cyp2g1, Cyp2a12, and Rab4b genes on mouse chromosome 7qA3 were amplified in invasive bladder cancers. Although the human ortholog gene of Cyp2a22 has not been confirmed, the mouse Cyp2a5 gene is the ortholog of the human CYP2A6 gene located in chromosomal region 19q13.2, and CYP2A6 was identified by database search as one of the closest human homolog to mouse Cyp2a22. Considering a possibility that this region may be related to mouse 7qA3, we analyzed CYP2A6 copy number and expression in human bladder cancer using cell lines and resected tumor specimens. Although only one of eight cell lines showed more than one copy increase of the CYP2A6 gene, CYP2A6 amplification was detected in six out of 18 primary bladder tumors where it was associated with the invasive phenotype. Immunohistochemical analyses of 118 primary bladder tumors revealed that CYP2A6 protein expression was also higher in invasive tumors, especially in those of the scattered type. Together, these findings indicate that the amplification and overexpression of the CYP2A6 gene are characteristic of human bladder cancers with

  17. Self-Styled ZnO Nanostructures Promotes the Cancer Cell Damage and Supresses the Epithelial Phenotype of Glioblastoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahab, Rizwan; Kaushik, Neha; Khan, Farheen; Kaushik, Nagendra Kumar; Choi, Eun Ha; Musarrat, Javed; Al-Khedhairy, Abdulaziz A.

    2016-01-01

    Extensive researches have been done on the applications of zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO-NPs) for the biological purposes. However, the role and toxicity mechanisms of ZnO nanostructures (ZnO-NSts) such as nanoplates (NPls), nanorods (NRs), nanosheets (NSs), nanoflowers (NFs) on cancer cells are not largely known. Present study was focused to investigate the possible mechanisms of apoptosis induced by self-designed ZnO-NSts, prepared at fix pH via solution process and exposed against human T98G gliomas including various cancers and non-malignant embryonic kidney HEK293, MRC5 fibroblast cells. NSts were used for the induction of cell death in malignant human T98G gliomas including various cancers and compared with the non-malignant cells. Notably, NRs were found to induce higher cytotoxicity, inhibitory effects on cancer and normal cells in a dose dependent manner. We also showed that NRs induced cancer cell death through oxidative stress and caspase-dependent pathways. Furthermore, quantitative and qualitative analysis of ZnO-NSts have also been confirmed by statistical analytical parameters such as precision, accuracy, linearity, limits of detection and limit of quantitation. These self-styled NSts could provide new perception in the research of targeted cancer nanotechnology and have potentiality to improve new therapeutic outcomes with poor diagnosis.

  18. Self-Styled ZnO Nanostructures Promotes the Cancer Cell Damage and Supresses the Epithelial Phenotype of Glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Wahab, Rizwan; Kaushik, Neha; Khan, Farheen; Kaushik, Nagendra Kumar; Choi, Eun Ha; Musarrat, Javed; Al-Khedhairy, Abdulaziz A.

    2016-01-01

    Extensive researches have been done on the applications of zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO-NPs) for the biological purposes. However, the role and toxicity mechanisms of ZnO nanostructures (ZnO-NSts) such as nanoplates (NPls), nanorods (NRs), nanosheets (NSs), nanoflowers (NFs) on cancer cells are not largely known. Present study was focused to investigate the possible mechanisms of apoptosis induced by self-designed ZnO-NSts, prepared at fix pH via solution process and exposed against human T98G gliomas including various cancers and non-malignant embryonic kidney HEK293, MRC5 fibroblast cells. NSts were used for the induction of cell death in malignant human T98G gliomas including various cancers and compared with the non-malignant cells. Notably, NRs were found to induce higher cytotoxicity, inhibitory effects on cancer and normal cells in a dose dependent manner. We also showed that NRs induced cancer cell death through oxidative stress and caspase-dependent pathways. Furthermore, quantitative and qualitative analysis of ZnO-NSts have also been confirmed by statistical analytical parameters such as precision, accuracy, linearity, limits of detection and limit of quantitation. These self-styled NSts could provide new perception in the research of targeted cancer nanotechnology and have potentiality to improve new therapeutic outcomes with poor diagnosis. PMID:26818603

  19. Opposing function of the proprotein convertases furin and PACE4 on breast cancer cells' malignant phenotypes: role of tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinase-1.

    PubMed

    Lapierre, Marion; Siegfried, Geraldine; Scamuffa, Nathalie; Bontemps, Yannick; Calvo, Fabien; Seidah, Nabil G; Khatib, Abdel-Majid

    2007-10-01

    Proteolytic cleavage of various cancer-related substrates by the proprotein convertases (PC) was reported to be important in the processes of neoplasia. These enzymes are inhibited by their naturally occurring inhibitors, the prosegments (ppPC), and by the engineered general PC inhibitor, the serpin variant alpha1-PDX. In the present study, we sought to compare the effect of these PC inhibitors on malignant phenotypes of breast cancer cells. Overexpression in a stable manner of alpha1-PDX and the prosegment ppPACE4 in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells resulted in increased matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 (but not MMP-2) activity and a reduced secretion of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP-1). This was associated with significant enhancement in cell motility, migration, and invasion of collagen in vitro. In contrast, ppFurin expression in these cells decreased MMP-9 activity and diminished these biological functions, but had no significant effect on TIMP-1 secretion. Taken together, these data showed the specific and opposing roles of Furin and PACE4 in the regulation of MMP-9/TIMP-1-mediated cell motility and invasion.

  20. Identification of the metabolic alterations associated with the multidrug resistant phenotype in cancer and their intercellular transfer mediated by extracellular vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Lopes-Rodrigues, Vanessa; Di Luca, Alessio; Mleczko, Justyna; Meleady, Paula; Henry, Michael; Pesic, Milica; Cabrera, Diana; van Liempd, Sebastiaan; Lima, Raquel T.; O’Connor, Robert; Falcon-Perez, Juan M.; Vasconcelos, M. Helena

    2017-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a serious obstacle to efficient cancer treatment. Overexpression of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) plays a significant role in MDR. Recent studies proved that targeting cellular metabolism could sensitize MDR cells. In addition, metabolic alterations could affect the extracellular vesicles (EVs) cargo and release. This study aimed to: i) identify metabolic alterations in P-gp overexpressing cells that could be involved in the development of MDR and, ii) identify a potential role for the EVs in the acquisition of the MDR. Two different pairs of MDR and their drug-sensitive counterpart cancer cell lines were used. Our results showed that MDR (P-gp overexpressing) cells have a different metabolic profile from their drug-sensitive counterparts, demonstrating decreases in the pentose phosphate pathway and oxidative phosphorylation rate; increases in glutathione metabolism and glycolysis; and alterations in the methionine/S-adenosylmethionine pathway. Remarkably, EVs from MDR cells were capable of stimulating a metabolic switch in the drug-sensitive cancer cells, towards a MDR phenotype. In conclusion, obtained results contribute to the growing knowledge about metabolic alterations in MDR cells and the role of EVs in the intercellular transfer of MDR. The specific metabolic alterations identified in this study may be further developed as targets for overcoming MDR. PMID:28303926

  1. Identification of the metabolic alterations associated with the multidrug resistant phenotype in cancer and their intercellular transfer mediated by extracellular vesicles.

    PubMed

    Lopes-Rodrigues, Vanessa; Di Luca, Alessio; Mleczko, Justyna; Meleady, Paula; Henry, Michael; Pesic, Milica; Cabrera, Diana; van Liempd, Sebastiaan; Lima, Raquel T; O'Connor, Robert; Falcon-Perez, Juan M; Vasconcelos, M Helena

    2017-03-17

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a serious obstacle to efficient cancer treatment. Overexpression of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) plays a significant role in MDR. Recent studies proved that targeting cellular metabolism could sensitize MDR cells. In addition, metabolic alterations could affect the extracellular vesicles (EVs) cargo and release. This study aimed to: i) identify metabolic alterations in P-gp overexpressing cells that could be involved in the development of MDR and, ii) identify a potential role for the EVs in the acquisition of the MDR. Two different pairs of MDR and their drug-sensitive counterpart cancer cell lines were used. Our results showed that MDR (P-gp overexpressing) cells have a different metabolic profile from their drug-sensitive counterparts, demonstrating decreases in the pentose phosphate pathway and oxidative phosphorylation rate; increases in glutathione metabolism and glycolysis; and alterations in the methionine/S-adenosylmethionine pathway. Remarkably, EVs from MDR cells were capable of stimulating a metabolic switch in the drug-sensitive cancer cells, towards a MDR phenotype. In conclusion, obtained results contribute to the growing knowledge about metabolic alterations in MDR cells and the role of EVs in the intercellular transfer of MDR. The specific metabolic alterations identified in this study may be further developed as targets for overcoming MDR.

  2. Non-homologous end-joining protein expression screen from radiosensitive cancer patients yields a novel DNA double strand break repair phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Goh, Su Kak; McKay, Jeremy N.; Chao, Michael; McKay, Timothy M.

    2017-01-01

    Background Clinical radiosensitivity is a significant impediment to tumour control and cure, in that it restricts the total doses which can safely be delivered to the whole radiotherapy population, within the tissue tolerance of potentially radiosensitive (RS) individuals. Understanding its causes could lead to personalization of radiotherapy. Methods We screened tissues from a unique bank of RS cancer patients for expression defects in major DNA double-strand break repair proteins, using Western blot analysis and subsequently reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Results We hypothesized that abnormalities in expression of these proteins may explain the radiosensitivity of some of our cancer patients. The cells from one patient showed a reproducibly consistent expression reduction in two complex-forming DNA double-strand break repair protein components (DNA Ligase IV and XRCC4). We also showed a corresponding reduction in both gene products at the mRNA level. Additionally, the mRNA inducibility by ionizing radiation was increased for one of the proteins in the patient’s cells. We confirmed the likely functional significance of the non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) expression abnormalities with a DNA double strand break (DNA DSB) repair assay. Conclusions We have identified a novel biologica