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Sample records for acquired functional magnetic

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging of acquired cardiac disease.

    PubMed Central

    Carrol, C L; Higgins, C B; Caputo, G R

    1996-01-01

    Over the last 15 years, advances in magnetic resonance imaging techniques have increased the accuracy and applicability of cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging. These advances have improved the utility of magnetic resonance imaging in evaluating cardiac morphology, blood flow, and myocardial contractility, all significant diagnostic features in the evaluation of the patient with acquired heart disease. Utilization of cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging has been limited, primarily due to clinical reliance upon nuclear scintigraphy and echocardiography. Recent developments in fast and ultrafast imaging should continue to enhance the significance of magnetic resonance imaging in this field. Widespread use of magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of the cardiovascular system will ultimately depend upon its maturation into a comprehensive, noninvasive imaging technique for the varying manifestations of acquired heart disease, including cardiomyopathy, ischemic heart disease, and acquired valvular disease. Images PMID:8792545

  2. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voos, Avery; Pelphrey, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), with its excellent spatial resolution and ability to visualize networks of neuroanatomical structures involved in complex information processing, has become the dominant technique for the study of brain function and its development. The accessibility of in-vivo pediatric brain-imaging techniques…

  3. Superconducting combined function magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, H.; Fernow, R.C.

    1983-01-01

    Superconducting accelerators and storage rings, presently under construction or in the design phase, are based on separate dipole and quadrupole magnets. It is here suggested that a hybrid lattice configuration consisting of dipoles and combined function gradient magnets would: (1) reduce the number of magnet units and their total cost; and (2) increase the filling factor and thus the energy at a given field. Coil cross sections are presented for the example of the Brookhaven Colliding Beam Accelerator. An asymmetric two-layer cable gradient magnet would have transfer functions of 10.42 G/A and 0.628 G cm/sup -1//A versus 15.77 G/A and 2.03 G cm/sup -1//A of the present separate dipoles and quadrupoles.

  4. Clinical predictors of functioning in persons with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wilson, I B; Cleary, P D

    1996-06-01

    To help clinicians better assess and treat functional disabilities in persons with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), the authors estimate empirical relations among biologic and physiologic variables, symptoms, and physical functioning in persons with AIDS. The sample of 305 persons with AIDS for this cross-sectional analysis came from three sites in Boston, Massachusetts: a hospital-based group practice, a human immunodeficiency virus clinic at a city hospital, and a staff-model health maintenance organization. Physical functioning, 10 AIDS-specific symptoms, and mental health were assessed by interview. Clinical diagnoses, comorbidities, health habits such as smoking, laboratory results, and selected medication use were assessed by chart review. Significant predictors of physical functioning P < 0.01, R2 = .58) in a multivariable regression model included energy/fatigue, neurologic symptoms, fever symptoms, a lower hemoglobin level, and current non-pneumonia bacterial infection. Ninety-six percent of the explained variance in physical functioning was accounted for by three symptom complexes: energy/fatigue, neurologic symptoms, and fever symptoms. Significant predictors of energy/fatigue in multivariable models included poorer mental health, lower white blood cell count, longer time since diagnosis, and weight loss (P < 0.01, R2 =.36). Significant predictors of neurologic symptoms included poorer mental health, weight loss, and no zidovudine use (P < 0.001, R2 = .30). Predictors of fever symptoms included poorer mental health, no zidovudine use, weight loss, and history of asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (P < 0.05, R2 = .25). In conclusion, symptom reports were strong predictors of physical functioning. Poorer mental health and weight loss were correlated consistently with worse symptoms, and not using zidovudine was correlated with worse neurologic and fever symptoms. These variables, and the others the authors identified, may represent

  5. Functional magnetic microspheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yen, Shiao-Ping S. (Inventor); Rembaum, Alan (Inventor); Landel, Robert F. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    Functional magnetic particles are formed by dissolving a mucopolysaccharide such as chitosan in acidified aqueous solution containing a mixture of ferrous chloride and ferric chloride. As the pH of the solution is raised magnetite is formed in situ in the solution by raising the pH. The dissolved chitosan is a polyelectrolyte and forms micelles surrounding the granules at pH of 8-9. The chitosan precipitates on the granules to form microspheres containing the magnetic granules. On addition of the microspheres to waste aqueous streams containing dissolved ions, the hydroxyl and amine functionality of the chitosan forms chelates binding heavy metal cations such as lead, copper, and mercury and the chelates in turn bind anions such as nitrate, fluoride, phosphate and borate.

  6. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Methods

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jingyuan E.; Glover, Gary H.

    2015-01-01

    Since its inception in 1992, Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) has become an indispensible tool for studying cognition in both the healthy and dysfunctional brain. FMRI monitors changes in the oxygenation of brain tissue resulting from altered metabolism consequent to a task-based evoked neural response or from spontaneous fluctuations in neural activity in the absence of conscious mentation (the “resting state”). Task-based studies have revealed neural correlates of a large number of important cognitive processes, while fMRI studies performed in the resting state have demonstrated brain-wide networks that result from brain regions with synchronized, apparently spontaneous activity. In this article, we review the methods used to acquire and analyze fMRI signals. PMID:26248581

  7. Fully magnetic sliding mode control for acquiring three-axis attitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovchinnikov, M. Yu.; Roldugin, D. S.; Penkov, V. I.; Tkachev, S. S.; Mashtakov, Y. V.

    2016-04-01

    Satellite equipped with purely magnetic attitude control system is considered. Sliding mode control is used to achieve three-axis satellite attitude. Underactuation problem is solved for transient motion. Necessary attitude is acquired by proper sliding manifold construction. Satellite motion on the manifold is executed with magnetic control system. One manifold construction approach is proposed and discussed. Numerical examples are provided.

  8. Functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Buchbinder, Bradley R

    2016-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) maps the spatiotemporal distribution of neural activity in the brain under varying cognitive conditions. Since its inception in 1991, blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) fMRI has rapidly become a vital methodology in basic and applied neuroscience research. In the clinical realm, it has become an established tool for presurgical functional brain mapping. This chapter has three principal aims. First, we review key physiologic, biophysical, and methodologic principles that underlie BOLD fMRI, regardless of its particular area of application. These principles inform a nuanced interpretation of the BOLD fMRI signal, along with its neurophysiologic significance and pitfalls. Second, we illustrate the clinical application of task-based fMRI to presurgical motor, language, and memory mapping in patients with lesions near eloquent brain areas. Integration of BOLD fMRI and diffusion tensor white-matter tractography provides a road map for presurgical planning and intraoperative navigation that helps to maximize the extent of lesion resection while minimizing the risk of postoperative neurologic deficits. Finally, we highlight several basic principles of resting-state fMRI and its emerging translational clinical applications. Resting-state fMRI represents an important paradigm shift, focusing attention on functional connectivity within intrinsic cognitive networks. PMID:27432660

  9. Lift outs: how to acquire a high-functioning team.

    PubMed

    Groysberg, Boris; Abrahams, Robin

    2006-12-01

    More and more, expanding companies are hiring high-functioning groups of people who have been working together effectively within one company and can rapidly come up to speed in a new environment. These lifted-out teams don't need to get acquainted with one another or to establish shared values, mutual accountability, or group norms; their long-standing relationships and trust help them make an impact very quickly. Of course, the process is not without risks: A failed lift out can lead to loss of money, opportunity, credibility, and even native talent. Boris Groysberg and Robin Abrahams studied more than 40 high-profile moves and interviewed team leaders in multiple industries and countries to examine the risks and opportunities that lift outs present. They concluded that, regardless of industry, nationality, or size of the team, a successful lift out unfolds over four consecutive, interdependent stages that must be meticulously managed. In the courtship stage, the hiring company and the leader of the targeted team determine whether the proposed move is, in fact, a good idea, and then define their business goals and discuss strategies. At the same time, the team leader discusses the potential move with the other members of his or her group to assess their level of interest and prepare them for the change. The second stage involves the integration of the team leader with the new company's top leadership. This part of the process ensures the team's access to senior executives-the most important factor in a lift out's success. Operational integration is the focus of the third stage. Ideally, teams will start out working with the same or similar clients, vendors, and industry standards. The fourth stage entails full cultural integration. To succeed, the lifted-out team members must be willing to re-earn credibility by proving their value and winning their new colleagues' trust. PMID:17183798

  10. Improving automatic analysis of the electrocardiogram acquired during magnetic resonance imaging using magnetic field gradient artefact suppression.

    PubMed

    Abächerli, Roger; Hornaff, Sven; Leber, Remo; Schmid, Hans-Jakob; Felblinger, Jacques

    2006-10-01

    The electrocardiogram (ECG) used for patient monitoring during magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) unfortunately suffers from severe artefacts. These artefacts are due to the special environment of the MRI. Modeling helped in finding solutions for the suppression of these artefacts superimposed on the ECG signal. After we validated the linear and time invariant model for the magnetic field gradient artefact generation, we applied offline and online filters for their suppression. Wiener filtering (offline) helped in generating reference annotations of the ECG beats. In online filtering, the least-mean-square filter suppressed the magnetic field gradient artefacts before the acquired ECG signal was input to the arrhythmia algorithm. Comparing the results of two runs (one run using online filtering and one run without) to our reference annotations, we found an eminent improvement in the arrhythmia module's performance, enabling reliable patient monitoring and MRI synchronization based on the ECG signal. PMID:17015063

  11. Memory functions of magnetic skyrmions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koshibae, Wataru; Kaneko, Yoshio; Iwasaki, Junichi; Kawasaki, Masashi; Tokura, Yoshinori; Nagaosa, Naoto

    2015-05-01

    We study, by microsimulation on the chiral magnets, the elementary functions of magnetic skyrmions and the design principles of skyrmionic memory devices. The external stimuli, such as local heating, magnetic field, electric field and electric current, trigger the creation and annihilation of the skyrmion. These procedures, corresponding to the writing and erasing operations, are achieved typically within of the order of nano or pico seconds. We also examine the current driven motion of the skyrmions and find that the gyro-dynamics, which is induced by the topological nature of the skyrmion, leads to the variety of useful functions including the remarkable enhancement of the spin-transfer-torque effect. These features are shown to be advantageous for (a) high-density data-storage, (b) nonvolatile memory, and (c) ultra-low current and energy cost manipulation.

  12. Magnetic Wood Achieving a Harmony between Magnetic and Woody Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oka, Hideo

    Magnetic wood, which was first introduced and developed by the Oka group in 1991, achieves a good balance of both woody and magnetic functions through the active addition of magnetic characteristics to the wood itself. In addition to showing magnetic characteristics, this magnetic wood also offers a woody texture, low specific gravity, humidity control, acoustic absorption and is very easy to process.

  13. Optimization of multiply acquired magnetic flux density Bz using ICNE-Multiecho train in MREIT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nam, Hyun Soo; In Kwon, Oh

    2010-05-01

    The aim of magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (MREIT) is to visualize the electrical properties, conductivity or current density of an object by injection of current. Recently, the prolonged data acquisition time when using the injected current nonlinear encoding (ICNE) method has been advantageous for measurement of magnetic flux density data, Bz, for MREIT in the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). However, the ICNE method results in undesirable side artifacts, such as blurring, chemical shift and phase artifacts, due to the long data acquisition under an inhomogeneous static field. In this paper, we apply the ICNE method to a gradient and spin echo (GRASE) multi-echo train pulse sequence in order to provide the multiple k-space lines during a single RF pulse period. We analyze the SNR of the measured multiple Bz data using the proposed ICNE-Multiecho MR pulse sequence. By determining a weighting factor for Bz data in each of the echoes, an optimized inversion formula for the magnetic flux density data is proposed for the ICNE-Multiecho MR sequence. Using the ICNE-Multiecho method, the quality of the measured magnetic flux density is considerably increased by the injection of a long current through the echo train length and by optimization of the voxel-by-voxel noise level of the Bz value. Agarose-gel phantom experiments have demonstrated fewer artifacts and a better SNR using the ICNE-Multiecho method. Experimenting with the brain of an anesthetized dog, we collected valuable echoes by taking into account the noise level of each of the echoes and determined Bz data by determining optimized weighting factors for the multiply acquired magnetic flux density data.

  14. Reorganization of Functional Connectivity as a Correlate of Cognitive Recovery in Acquired Brain Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castellanos, Nazareth P.; Paul, Nuria; Ordonez, Victoria E.; Demuynck, Olivier; Bajo, Ricardo; Campo, Pablo; Bilbao, Alvaro; Ortiz, Tomas; del-Pozo, Francisco; Maestu, Fernando

    2010-01-01

    Cognitive processes require a functional interaction between specialized multiple, local and remote brain regions. Although these interactions can be strongly altered by an acquired brain injury, brain plasticity allows network reorganization to be principally responsible for recovery. The present work evaluates the impact of brain injury on…

  15. Magnetic dipole moment of a spherical shell with TRM acquired in a field of internal origin. [Thermoremanent Magnetization implications for lunar magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srnka, L. J.

    1976-01-01

    The acquisition of thermoremanent magnetization (TRM) by a cooling spherical shell is studied for internal magnetizing dipole fields, using Runcorn's (1975) theorems on magnetostatics. If the shell cools progressively inward, inner regions acquire TRM in a net field composed of the dipole source term plus a uniform field due to the outer magnetized layers. In this case, the global dipole moment and external remanent field are nonzero when the whole shell has cooled below the Curie point and the source dipole has disappeared. The remanent field outside the shell is found to depend on the thickness, radii, and cooling rate of the shell, as well as the coefficient of TRM and the intensity of the magnetizing field. Some implications for the moon's remanent dipole moment are discussed.

  16. Functionalization of whole‐cell bacterial reporters with magnetic nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dayi; Fakhrullin, Rawil F.; Özmen, Mustafa; Wang, Hui; Wang, Jian; Paunov, Vesselin N.; Li, Guanghe; Huang, Wei E.

    2011-01-01

    Summary We developed a biocompatible and highly efficient approach for functionalization of bacterial cell wall with magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs). Three Acinetobacter baylyi ADP1 chromosomally based bioreporters, which were genetically engineered to express bioluminescence in response to salicylate, toluene/xylene and alkanes, were functionalized with 18 ± 3 nm iron oxide MNPs to acquire magnetic function. The efficiency of MNPs functionalization of Acinetobacter bioreporters was 99.96 ± 0.01%. The MNPs‐functionalized bioreporters (MFBs) can be remotely controlled and collected by an external magnetic field. The MFBs were all viable and functional as good as the native cells in terms of sensitivity, specificity and quantitative response. More importantly, we demonstrated that salicylate sensing MFBs can be applied to sediments and garden soils, and semi‐quantitatively detect salicylate in those samples by discriminably recovering MFBs with a permanent magnet. The magnetically functionalized cells are especially useful to complex environments in which the indigenous cells, particles and impurities may interfere with direct measurement of bioreporter cells and conventional filtration is not applicable to distinguish and harvest bioreporters. The approach described here provides a powerful tool to remotely control and selectively manipulate MNPs‐functionalized cells in water and soils. It would have a potential in the application of environmental microbiology, such as bioremediation enhancement and environment monitoring and assessment. PMID:21255376

  17. A cascade reaction network mimicking the basic functional steps of acquired immune response

    PubMed Central

    Han, Da; Wu, Cuichen; You, Mingxu; Zhang, Tao; Wan, Shuo; Chen, Tao; Qiu, Liping; Zheng, Zheng; Liang, Hao; Tan, Weihong

    2015-01-01

    Biological systems use complex ‘information processing cores’ composed of molecular networks to coordinate their external environment and internal states. An example of this is the acquired, or adaptive, immune system (AIS), which is composed of both humoral and cell-mediated components. Here we report the step-by-step construction of a prototype mimic of the AIS which we call Adaptive Immune Response Simulator (AIRS). DNA and enzymes are used as simple artificial analogues of the components of the AIS to create a system which responds to specific molecular stimuli in vitro. We show that this network of reactions can function in a manner which is superficially similar to the most basic responses of the vertebrate acquired immune system, including reaction sequences that mimic both humoral and cellular responses. As such, AIRS provides guidelines for the design and engineering of artificial reaction networks and molecular devices. PMID:26391084

  18. Capable of Suicide: A Functional Model of the Acquired Capability Component of the Interpersonal-Psychological Theory of Suicide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Phillip N.; Cukrowicz, Kelly C.

    2010-01-01

    A functional model of the acquired capability for suicide, a component of Joiner's (2005) Interpersonal-Psychological Theory of Suicide, is presented. A component of Joiner's (2005) Interpersonal-Psychological Theory of Suicide a functional model of the acquired capability for suicide is presented. The model integrates the points discussed by…

  19. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Pediatric Anxiety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pine, Daniel S.; Guyer, Amanda E.; Leibenluft, Ellen; Peterson, Bradley S.; Gerber, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    The use of functional magnetic resonance imaging in investigating pediatric anxiety disorders is studied. Functional magnetic resonance imaging can be utilized in demonstrating parallels between the neural architecture of difference in anxiety of humans and the neural architecture of attention-orienting behavior in nonhuman primates or rodents.…

  20. Acquired Phototrophy through Retention of Functional Chloroplasts Increases Growth Efficiency of the Sea Slug Elysia viridis

    PubMed Central

    Baumgartner, Finn A.; Pavia, Henrik; Toth, Gunilla B.

    2015-01-01

    Photosynthesis is a fundamental process sustaining heterotrophic organisms at all trophic levels. Some mixotrophs can retain functional chloroplasts from food (kleptoplasty), and it is hypothesized that carbon acquired through kleptoplasty may enhance trophic energy transfer through increased host growth efficiency. Sacoglossan sea slugs are the only known metazoans capable of kleptoplasty, but the relative fitness contributions of heterotrophy through grazing, and phototrophy via kleptoplasts, are not well understood. Fitness benefits (i.e. increased survival or growth) of kleptoplasty in sacoglossans are commonly studied in ecologically unrealistic conditions under extended periods of complete darkness and/or starvation. We compared the growth efficiency of the sacoglossan Elysia viridis with access to algal diets providing kleptoplasts of differing functionality under ecologically relevant light conditions. Individuals fed Codium fragile, which provide highly functional kleptoplasts, nearly doubled their growth efficiency under high compared to low light. In contrast, individuals fed Cladophora rupestris, which provided kleptoplasts of limited functionality, showed no difference in growth efficiency between light treatments. Slugs feeding on Codium, but not on Cladophora, showed higher relative electron transport rates (rETR) in high compared to low light. Furthermore, there were no differences in the consumption rates of the slugs between different light treatments, and only small differences in nutritional traits of algal diets, indicating that the increased growth efficiency of E. viridis feeding on Codium was due to retention of functional kleptoplasts. Our results show that functional kleptoplasts from Codium can provide sacoglossan sea slugs with fitness advantages through photosynthesis. PMID:25830355

  1. Intrinsic Functional Connectivity Patterns Predict Consciousness Level and Recovery Outcome in Acquired Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xuehai; Zou, Qihong; Hu, Jin; Tang, Weijun; Mao, Ying; Gao, Liang; Zhu, Jianhong; Jin, Yi; Wu, Xin; Lu, Lu; Zhang, Yaojun; Zhang, Yao; Dai, Zhengjia; Gao, Jia-Hong; Weng, Xuchu; Northoff, Georg; Giacino, Joseph T.; He, Yong

    2015-01-01

    For accurate diagnosis and prognostic prediction of acquired brain injury (ABI), it is crucial to understand the neurobiological mechanisms underlying loss of consciousness. However, there is no consensus on which regions and networks act as biomarkers for consciousness level and recovery outcome in ABI. Using resting-state fMRI, we assessed intrinsic functional connectivity strength (FCS) of whole-brain networks in a large sample of 99 ABI patients with varying degrees of consciousness loss (including fully preserved consciousness state, minimally conscious state, unresponsive wakefulness syndrome/vegetative state, and coma) and 34 healthy control subjects. Consciousness level was evaluated using the Glasgow Coma Scale and Coma Recovery Scale-Revised on the day of fMRI scanning; recovery outcome was assessed using the Glasgow Outcome Scale 3 months after the fMRI scanning. One-way ANOVA of FCS, Spearman correlation analyses between FCS and the consciousness level and recovery outcome, and FCS-based multivariate pattern analysis were performed. We found decreased FCS with loss of consciousness primarily distributed in the posterior cingulate cortex/precuneus (PCC/PCU), medial prefrontal cortex, and lateral parietal cortex. The FCS values of these regions were significantly correlated with consciousness level and recovery outcome. Multivariate support vector machine discrimination analysis revealed that the FCS patterns predicted whether patients with unresponsive wakefulness syndrome/vegetative state and coma would regain consciousness with an accuracy of 81.25%, and the most discriminative region was the PCC/PCU. These findings suggest that intrinsic functional connectivity patterns of the human posteromedial cortex could serve as a potential indicator for consciousness level and recovery outcome in individuals with ABI. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Varying degrees of consciousness loss and recovery are commonly observed in acquired brain injury patients, yet the

  2. A functional difference between native and horizontally acquired genes in bdelloid rotifers.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Elton G G; Crisp, Alastair; Broadbent, Sarah E; Carrillo, Martina; Boschetti, Chiara; Tunnacliffe, Alan

    2016-09-15

    The form of RNA processing known as SL trans-splicing involves the transfer of a short conserved sequence, the spliced leader (SL), from a noncoding SL RNA to the 5' ends of mRNA molecules. SL trans-splicing occurs in several animal taxa, including bdelloid rotifers (Rotifera, Bdelloidea). One striking feature of these aquatic microinvertebrates is the large proportion of foreign genes, i.e. those acquired by horizontal gene transfer from other organisms, in their genomes. However, whether such foreign genes behave similarly to native genes has not been tested in bdelloids or any other animal. We therefore used a combination of experimental and computational methods to examine whether transcripts of foreign genes in bdelloids were SL trans-spliced, like their native counterparts. We found that many foreign transcripts contain SLs, use similar splice acceptor sequences to native genes, and are able to undergo alternative trans-splicing. However, a significantly lower proportion of foreign mRNAs contains SL sequences than native transcripts. This demonstrates a novel functional difference between foreign and native genes in bdelloids and suggests that SL trans-splicing is not essential for the expression of foreign genes, but is acquired during their domestication. PMID:27312952

  3. Magnetic fields and density functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Salsbury Jr., Freddie

    1999-02-01

    A major focus of this dissertation is the development of functionals for the magnetic susceptibility and the chemical shielding within the context of magnetic field density functional theory (BDFT). These functionals depend on the electron density in the absence of the field, which is unlike any other treatment of these responses. There have been several advances made within this theory. The first of which is the development of local density functionals for chemical shieldings and magnetic susceptibilities. There are the first such functionals ever proposed. These parameters have been studied by constructing functionals for the current density and then using the Biot-Savart equations to obtain the responses. In order to examine the advantages and disadvantages of the local functionals, they were tested numerically on some small molecules.

  4. Increasing functional rehabilitation in acquired brain injury treatment: effective applications of behavioural principles.

    PubMed

    Guercio, John; Davis, Paula; Faw, Gerry; McMorrow, Martin; Ori, Lindsay; Berkowitz, Brooke; Nigra, Megan

    2002-10-01

    This paper investigated ways to increase the participation of direct care staff in the functional rehabilitation activities (FRAs) of adults with acquired brain injuries (ABIs). FRAs were rehabilitation agendas written by clinical staff for delivery by paraprofessionals. Increases in FRA completion were believed to be directly related to clinical success. These FRAs had been identified as key components in the rehabilitation programmes of the adults living within the residential facilities. Increases in FRAs were crucial in improving the quality of the rehabilitation programmes of the participants involved. The study observed four residential settings serving adults with ABIs using a multiple baseline design. The treatment approach consisted of public posting of weekly FRA documentation, incorporation of staff input, and reinforcement for documentation of FRAs. The results indicated a positive impact on the participation of staff in all of the residences in the study, consistent with implementation of the treatment package. PMID:12418998

  5. Esophageal epithelial cells acquire functional characteristics of activated myofibroblasts after undergoing an epithelial to mesenchymal transition

    PubMed Central

    Muir, Amanda B.; Dods, Kara; Noah, Yuli; Toltzis, Sarit; Chandramouleeswaran, Prasanna Modayur; Lee, Anna; Benitez, Alain; Bedenbaugh, Adam; Falk, Gary W.; Wells, Rebecca G.; Nakagawa, Hiroshi; Wang, Mei-Lun

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is an allergic inflammatory disease that leads to esophageal fibrosis and stricture. We have recently shown that in EoE, esophageal epithelial cells undergo an epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT), characterized by gain of mesenchymal markers and loss of epithelial gene expression. Whether epithelial cells exposed to profibrotic cytokines can also acquire the functional characteristics of activated myofibroblasts, including migration, contraction, and extracellular matrix deposition, is relevant to our understanding and treatment of EoE-associated fibrogenesis. In the current study, we characterize cell migration, contraction, and collagen production by esophageal epithelial cells that have undergone cytokine-induced EMT in vitro. Methods and Results Stimulation of human non-transformed immortalized esophageal epithelial cells (EPC2-hTERT) with profibrotic cytokines TNFα, TGFβ, and IL1β for three weeks led to acquisition of mesenchymal αSMA and vimentin, and loss of epithelial E-cadherin expression. Upon removal of the profibrotic stimulus, epithelial characteristics were partially rescued. TGFβ stimulation had a robust effect upon epithelial collagen production. Surprisingly, TNFα stimulation had the most potent effect upon cell migration and contraction, exceeding the effects of the prototypical profibrotic cytokine TGFβ. IL1β stimulation alone had minimal effect upon esophageal epithelial migration, contraction, and collagen production. Conclusions Esophageal epithelial cells that have undergone EMT acquire functional characteristics of activated myofibroblasts in vitro. Profibrotic cytokines exert differential effects upon esophageal epithelial cells, underscoring complexities of fibrogenesis in EoE, and implicating esophageal epithelial cells as effector cells in EoE-associated fibrogenesis. PMID:25183431

  6. Function and Regulation of Vibrio campbellii Proteorhodopsin: Acquired Phototrophy in a Classical Organoheterotroph

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zheng; O'Shaughnessy, Thomas J.; Soto, Carissa M.; Rahbar, Amir M.; Robertson, Kelly L.; Lebedev, Nikolai; Vora, Gary J.

    2012-01-01

    Proteorhodopsins (PRs) are retinal-binding photoproteins that mediate light-driven proton translocation across prokaryotic cell membranes. Despite their abundance, wide distribution and contribution to the bioenergy budget of the marine photic zone, an understanding of PR function and physiological significance in situ has been hampered as the vast majority of PRs studied to date are from unculturable bacteria or culturable species that lack the tools for genetic manipulation. In this study, we describe the presence and function of a horizontally acquired PR and retinal biosynthesis gene cluster in the culturable and genetically tractable bioluminescent marine bacterium Vibrio campbellii. Pigmentation analysis, absorption spectroscopy and photoinduction assays using a heterologous over-expression system established the V. campbellii PR as a functional green light absorbing proton pump. In situ analyses comparing PR expression and function in wild type (WT) V. campbellii with an isogenic ΔpR deletion mutant revealed a marked absence of PR membrane localization, pigmentation and light-induced proton pumping in the ΔpR mutant. Comparative photoinduction assays demonstrated the distinct upregulation of pR expression in the presence of light and PR-mediated photophosphorylation in WT cells that resulted in the enhancement of cellular survival during respiratory stress. In addition, we demonstrate that the master regulator of adaptive stress response and stationary phase, RpoS1, positively regulates pR expression and PR holoprotein pigmentation. Taken together, the results demonstrate facultative phototrophy in a classical marine organoheterotrophic Vibrio species and provide a salient example of how this organism has exploited lateral gene transfer to further its adaptation to the photic zone. PMID:22741028

  7. Regulatory and Functional Aspects of Indolic Metabolism in Plant Systemic Acquired Resistance.

    PubMed

    Stahl, Elia; Bellwon, Patricia; Huber, Stefan; Schlaeppi, Klaus; Bernsdorff, Friederike; Vallat-Michel, Armelle; Mauch, Felix; Zeier, Jürgen

    2016-05-01

    Tryptophan-derived, indolic metabolites possess diverse functions in Arabidopsis innate immunity to microbial pathogen infection. Here, we investigate the functional role and regulatory characteristics of indolic metabolism in Arabidopsis systemic acquired resistance (SAR) triggered by the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae. Indolic metabolism is broadly activated in both P. syringae-inoculated and distant, non-inoculated leaves. At inoculation sites, camalexin, indol-3-ylmethylamine (I3A), and indole-3-carboxylic acid (ICA) are the major accumulating compounds. Camalexin accumulation is positively affected by MYB122, and the cytochrome P450 genes CYP81F1 and CYP81F2. Local I3A production, by contrast, occurs via indole glucosinolate breakdown by PEN2- dependent and independent pathways. Moreover, exogenous application of the defense hormone salicylic acid stimulates I3A generation at the expense of its precursor indol-3-ylmethylglucosinolate (I3M), and the SAR regulator pipecolic acid primes plants for enhanced P. syringae-induced activation of distinct branches of indolic metabolism. In uninfected systemic tissue, the metabolic response is more specific and associated with enhanced levels of the indolics I3A, ICA, and indole-3-carbaldehyde (ICC). Systemic indole accumulation fully depends on functional CYP79B2/3, PEN2, and MYB34/51/122, and requires functional SAR signaling. Genetic analyses suggest that systemically elevated indoles are dispensable for SAR and associated systemic increases of salicylic acid. However, soil-grown but not hydroponically -cultivated cyp79b2/3 and pen2 plants, both defective in indolic secondary metabolism, exhibit pre-induced immunity, which abrogates their intrinsic ability to induce SAR. PMID:26802249

  8. Functionalized magnetic nanoparticle analyte sensor

    DOEpatents

    Yantasee, Wassana; Warner, Maryin G; Warner, Cynthia L; Addleman, Raymond S; Fryxell, Glen E; Timchalk, Charles; Toloczko, Mychailo B

    2014-03-25

    A method and system for simply and efficiently determining quantities of a preselected material in a particular solution by the placement of at least one superparamagnetic nanoparticle having a specified functionalized organic material connected thereto into a particular sample solution, wherein preselected analytes attach to the functionalized organic groups, these superparamagnetic nanoparticles are then collected at a collection site and analyzed for the presence of a particular analyte.

  9. Tutte polynomial in functional magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Castillón, Marlly V.

    2015-09-01

    Methods of graph theory are applied to the processing of functional magnetic resonance images. Specifically the Tutte polynomial is used to analyze such kind of images. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging provide us connectivity networks in the brain which are represented by graphs and the Tutte polynomial will be applied. The problem of computing the Tutte polynomial for a given graph is #P-hard even for planar graphs. For a practical application the maple packages "GraphTheory" and "SpecialGraphs" will be used. We will consider certain diagram which is depicting functional connectivity, specifically between frontal and posterior areas, in autism during an inferential text comprehension task. The Tutte polynomial for the resulting neural networks will be computed and some numerical invariants for such network will be obtained. Our results show that the Tutte polynomial is a powerful tool to analyze and characterize the networks obtained from functional magnetic resonance imaging.

  10. Functional Nanomaterials Useful for Magnetic Refrigeration Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aslani, Amir

    Magnetic refrigeration is an emerging energy efficient and environmentally friendly refrigeration technology. The principle of magnetic refrigeration is based on the effect of varying a magnetic field on the temperature change of a magnetocaloric material (refrigerant). By applying a magnetic field, the magnetic moments of a magnetic material tend to align parallel to it, and the thermal energy released in this process heats the material. Reversibly, the magnetic moments become randomly oriented when the magnetic field is removed, and the material cools down. The heating and the cooling of a refrigerant in response to a changing magnetic field is similar to the heating and the cooling of a gaseous medium in response to an adiabatic compression and expansion in a conventional refrigeration system. One requirement to make a practical magnetic refrigerator is to have a large temperature change per unit of applied magnetic field, with sufficiently wide operating temperature. So far, no commercially viable magnetic refrigerator has been built primarily due to the low temperature change of bulk refrigerants, the added burden of hysteresis, and the system's low cooling capacity. The purpose of this dissertation is to explore magnetic refrigeration system. First, the Active Magnetic Regenerator (AMR) system built by Shir et al at the GWU's Institute for Magnetics Research (IMR) is optimized by tuning the heat transfer medium parameters and system's operating conditions. Next, by reviewing literature and works done so far on refrigerants, a number of materials that may be suitable to be used in magnetic refrigeration technology were identified. Theoretical work by Bennett et al showed an enhancement in magnetocaloric effect of magnetic nanoparticles. Research was performed on functional magnetic nanoparticles and their use in magnetic refrigeration technology. Different aspects such as the size, shape, chemical composition, structure and interaction of the nanoparticle with

  11. Making Sense of Real-Time Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (rtfMRI) and rtfMRI Neurofeedback

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    This review explains the mechanism of functional magnetic resonance imaging in general and specifically introduces real-time functional magnetic resonance imaging as a method for training self-regulation of brain activity. Using real-time functional magnetic resonance imaging neurofeedback, participants can acquire control over their own brain activity. In patients with neuropsychiatric disorders, this control can potentially have therapeutic implications. In this review, the technical requirements are presented and potential applications and limitations are discussed. PMID:25716778

  12. Initial Sensorimotor and Cardiovascular Data Acquired from Soyuz Landings: Establishing a Functional Performance Recovery Time Constant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reschke, M. F.; Kozlovskaya, I. B.; Kofman, I. S.; Tomilovskaya, E. S.; Cerisano, J. M.; Bloomberg, J. J.; Stenger, M. B.; Platts, S. H.; Rukavishnikov, I. V.; Fomina, E. V.; Lee, S. M. C.; Wood, S. J.; Mulavara, A. P.; Feiveson, A. H.; Fisher, E. A.

    2015-01-01

    testing (quiet stance sway) as well as cardiovascular responses during sensorimotor testing on all of the above measures. We have also collected motion sickness data associated with each of the postflight tests. When possible rudimentary cerebellar assessment was undertaken. In addition to the immediate post-landing collection of data, postflight data has been acquired twice more within 24 hours after landing and measurements continue until sensorimotor and cardiovascular responses have returned to preflight normative values (approximately 60 days postflight). SUMMARY The level of functional deficit observed in the crew tested to date is more severe than expected, clearly triggered by the acquisition of gravity loads immediately after landing when the demands for crew intervention in response to emergency operations will be greatest. Measureable performance parameters such as ability to perform a seat egress, recover from a fall or the ability to see clearly when walking, and related physiologic data (orthostatic responses) are required to provide an evidence base for characterizing programmatic risks and the degree of variability among crewmembers for exploration missions where the crew will be unassisted after landing. Overall, these early functional and related physiologic measurements will allow the estimation of nonlinear sensorimotor and cardiovascular recovery trends that have not been previously captured.

  13. Association between muscle hydration measures acquired using bioelectrical impedance spectroscopy and magnetic resonance imaging in healthy and hemodialysis population

    PubMed Central

    Sawant, Anuradha; House, Andrew A.; Chesworth, Bert M.; Connelly, Denise M.; Lindsay, Robert; Gati, Joe; Bartha, Robert; Overend, Tom J.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Establishing the effect of fluctuating extracellular fluid (ECF) volume on muscle strength in people with end‐stage renal disease (ESRD) on hemodialysis (HD) is essential, as inadequate hydration of the skeletal muscles impacts its strength and endurance. Bioelectrical impedance spectroscopy (BIS) has been a widely used method for estimating ECF volume of a limb or calf segment. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)‐acquired transverse relaxation times (T2) has also been used for estimating ECF volumes of individual skeletal muscles. The purpose of this study was to determine the association between T2 (gold standard) of tibialis anterior (TA), medial (MG), and lateral gastrocnemius (LG), and soleus muscles and calf BIS ECF, in healthy and in people with ESRD/HD. Calf BIS and MRI measures were collected on two occasions before and after HD session in people with ESRD/HD and on a single occasion for the healthy participants. Linear regression analysis was used to establish the association between these measures. Thirty‐two healthy and 22 participants on HD were recruited. The association between T2 of TA, LG, MG, and soleus muscles and ratio of calf BIS‐acquired ECF and intracellular fluids (ICF) were: TA: β = 0.30, P > 0.05; LG: β = 0.37, P = 0.035; MG: β = 0.43, P = 0.014; soleus: β = 0.60, P < 0.001. For the HD group, calf ECF was significantly associated with T2 of TA (β = 0.44, P = 0.042), and medial gastrocnemius (β = 0.47, P = 0.027) following HD only. Hence BIS‐acquired measures cannot be used to measure ECF volumes of a single muscle in the ESRD/HD population; however, BIS could be utilized to estimate ratio of ECF: ICF in healthy population for the LG, MG, and soleus muscles. PMID:25626863

  14. Myocardial iron overload assessment by T2* magnetic resonance imaging in adult transfusion dependent patients with acquired anemias.

    PubMed

    Di Tucci, Anna Angela; Matta, Gildo; Deplano, Simona; Gabbas, Attilio; Depau, Cristina; Derudas, Daniele; Caocci, Giovanni; Agus, Annalisa; Angelucci, Emanuele

    2008-09-01

    Only limited data are available regarding myocardial iron overload in adult patients with transfusion dependent acquired anemias. To address this topic using MRI T2* we studied 27 consecutive chronic transfusion dependent patients with acquired anemias: (22 myelodysplastic syndrome, 5 primary myelofibrosis). Cardiac MRI T2* values obtained ranged from 5.6 to 58.7 (median value 39.8) milliseconds. Of the 24 analyzable patients, cardiac T2* correlated with transfusion burden (p=0.0002). No patient who had received less than 290 mL/kg of packed red blood cells (101 units=20 grams of iron) had a pathological cardiac T2* value (< 20 ms). All patients who had received at least 24 PRBC units showed MRI T2* detectable hepatic iron (liver T2* value magnetic resonance imaging provides a rapid and reproducible method for detecting myocardial iron overload which developed after a heavy transfusion burden equal to or greater than 290 mL/kg of packed red blood cell units. PMID:18603557

  15. Capable of Suicide: A Functional Model of the Acquired Capability Component of the Interpersonal-Psychological Theory of Suicide

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Phillip N.; Cukrowicz, Kelly C.

    2016-01-01

    The current review aims to present a functional model of the acquired capability for suicide; a component of Joiner’s (2005) Interpersonal-Psychological Theory of Suicide. This review is aimed at integrating the points discussed by Joiner into a unified and specific conceptualization of acquired capability. Additionally, we offer some points of elaboration; such as the interaction between specific diatheses with life events, the role of short-term bolstering of the capability for suicide, and how contextual factors moderate the experience of painful and provocative life events; thereby leading to fearlessness and pain insensitivity to the actions and ideas involved in suicide. PMID:20560748

  16. Magnetic spectroscopy and microscopy of functional materials

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, Catherine Ann

    2011-05-01

    Heusler intermetallics Mn2Y Ga and X2MnGa (X; Y =Fe, Co, Ni) undergo tetragonal magnetostructural transitions that can result in half metallicity, magnetic shape memory, or the magnetocaloric effect. Understanding the magnetism and magnetic behavior in functional materials is often the most direct route to being able to optimize current materials for todays applications and to design novel ones for tomorrow. Synchrotron soft x-ray magnetic spectromicroscopy techniques are well suited to explore the the competing effects from the magnetization and the lattice parameters in these materials as they provide detailed element-, valence-, and site-specifc information on the coupling of crystallographic ordering and electronic structure as well as external parameters like temperature and pressure on the bonding and exchange. Fundamental work preparing the model systems of spintronic, multiferroic, and energy-related compositions is presented for context. The methodology of synchrotron spectroscopy is presented and applied to not only magnetic characterization but also of developing a systematic screening method for future examples of materials exhibiting any of the above effects. The chapter progression is as follows: an introduction to the concepts and materials under consideration (Chapter 1); an overview of sample preparation techniques and results, and the kinds of characterization methods employed (Chapter 2); spectro- and microscopic explorations of X2MnGa/Ge (Chapter 3); spectroscopic investigations of the composition series Mn2Y Ga to the logical Mn3Ga endpoint (Chapter 4); and a summary and overview of upcoming work (Chapter 5). Appendices include the results of a Think Tank for the Graduate School of Excellence MAINZ (Appendix A) and details of an imaging project now in progress on magnetic reversal and domain wall observation in the classical Heusler material Co2FeSi (Appendix B).

  17. Linear constraint minimum variance beamformer functional magnetic resonance inverse imaging

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Fa-Hsuan; Witzel, Thomas; Zeffiro, Thomas A.; Belliveau, John W.

    2011-01-01

    Accurate estimation of the timing of neural activity is required to fully model the information flow among functionally specialized regions whose joint activity underlies perception, cognition and action. Attempts to detect the fine temporal structure of task-related activity would benefit from functional imaging methods allowing higher sampling rates. Spatial filtering techniques have been used in magnetoencephalography source imaging applications. In this work, we use the linear constraint minimal variance (LCMV) beamformer localization method to reconstruct single-shot volumetric functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data using signals acquired simultaneously from all channels of a high density radio-frequency (RF) coil array. The LCMV beamformer method generalizes the existing volumetric magnetic resonance inverse imaging (InI) technique, achieving higher detection sensitivity while maintaining whole-brain spatial coverage and 100 ms temporal resolution. In this paper, we begin by introducing the LCMV reconstruction formulation and then quantitatively assess its performance using both simulated and empirical data. To demonstrate the sensitivity and inter-subject reliability of volumetric LCMV InI, we employ an event-related design to probe the spatial and temporal properties of task-related hemodynamic signal modulations in primary visual cortex. Compared to minimum-norm estimate (MNE) reconstructions, LCMV offers better localization accuracy and superior detection sensitivity. Robust results from both single subject and group analyses demonstrate the excellent sensitivity and specificity of volumetric InI in detecting the spatial and temporal structure of task-related brain activity. PMID:18672071

  18. Functions of innate and acquired immune system are reduced in domestic pigeons (Columba livia domestica) given a low protein diet.

    PubMed

    Mabuchi, Yuko; Frankel, Theresa L

    2016-03-01

    Racing pigeons are exposed to and act as carriers of diseases. Dietary protein requirement for their maintenance has not been determined experimentally despite their being domesticated for over 7000 years. A maintenance nitrogen (protein) requirement (MNR) for pigeons was determined in a balance study using diets containing 6, 10 and 14% crude protein (CP). Then, the effects of feeding the diets were investigated to determine whether they were adequate to sustain innate and acquired immune functions. Nitrogen intake from the 6% CP diet was sufficient to maintain nitrogen balance and body weight in pigeons. However, the immune functions of phagocytosis, oxidative burst and lymphocyte proliferation in pigeons fed this diet were reduced compared with those fed 10 and 14% CP diets. Pigeons given the 6 and 10% CP diets had lower antibody titres following inoculation against Newcastle disease (ND) than those on the 14% CP diet. A confounding factor found on autopsy was the presence of intestinal parasites in some of the pigeons given the 6 and 10% CP diets; however, none of the pigeons used to measure MNR or acquired immunity to ND were infested with parasites. In conclusion, neither the 6 nor 10% CP diets adequately sustained acquired immune function of pigeons. PMID:27069640

  19. Functions of innate and acquired immune system are reduced in domestic pigeons (Columba livia domestica) given a low protein diet

    PubMed Central

    Mabuchi, Yuko; Frankel, Theresa L.

    2016-01-01

    Racing pigeons are exposed to and act as carriers of diseases. Dietary protein requirement for their maintenance has not been determined experimentally despite their being domesticated for over 7000 years. A maintenance nitrogen (protein) requirement (MNR) for pigeons was determined in a balance study using diets containing 6, 10 and 14% crude protein (CP). Then, the effects of feeding the diets were investigated to determine whether they were adequate to sustain innate and acquired immune functions. Nitrogen intake from the 6% CP diet was sufficient to maintain nitrogen balance and body weight in pigeons. However, the immune functions of phagocytosis, oxidative burst and lymphocyte proliferation in pigeons fed this diet were reduced compared with those fed 10 and 14% CP diets. Pigeons given the 6 and 10% CP diets had lower antibody titres following inoculation against Newcastle disease (ND) than those on the 14% CP diet. A confounding factor found on autopsy was the presence of intestinal parasites in some of the pigeons given the 6 and 10% CP diets; however, none of the pigeons used to measure MNR or acquired immunity to ND were infested with parasites. In conclusion, neither the 6 nor 10% CP diets adequately sustained acquired immune function of pigeons. PMID:27069640

  20. Clinicoepidemiological Observational Study of Acquired Alopecias in Females Correlating with Anemia and Thyroid Function

    PubMed Central

    Deo, Kirti; Sharma, Yugal K.; Wadhokar, Meenakshi; Tyagi, Neha

    2016-01-01

    Alopecia can either be inherited or acquired; the latter, more common, can be diffuse, patterned, and focal, each having cicatricial and noncicatricial forms. This observational study of 135 cases in a semiurban Indian population aimed to detect the prevalence of various forms of acquired alopecia in females and correlate the same with levels of hemoglobin, serum ferritin, triiodothyronine, thyroxin, and thyroid stimulating hormone. The majority (84, 62.2%) of our cases of alopecia had telogen effluvium followed by female pattern alopecia (32, 23.7%). Stress (86, 63.7%), topical application of chemicals (72, 53.3%), systemic medications for concurrent illnesses (62, 5%), and pregnancy (14, 10.3%) were the common exacerbating factors. Neither low hemoglobin (<12 gm%, 73.4%) nor low serum ferritin (<12 μg/L, 6.7%) was found to be statistically significant. A majority (90, 90.9%) of 99 cases with anemia (hemoglobin levels of <12 gm%) had serum ferritin levels >12 μg/L. Though lack of vitamin B12 testing was a limitation of our study, its deficiency could be the probable cause of iron deficiency as the majority (58, 64.4%) of these cases, as indeed majority (89, 65.4%) of our study population, were vegetarians. Thyroid disorders (23, 17%, including 9 newly diagnosed) were not of significance statistically. PMID:26904106

  1. Clinicoepidemiological Observational Study of Acquired Alopecias in Females Correlating with Anemia and Thyroid Function.

    PubMed

    Deo, Kirti; Sharma, Yugal K; Wadhokar, Meenakshi; Tyagi, Neha

    2016-01-01

    Alopecia can either be inherited or acquired; the latter, more common, can be diffuse, patterned, and focal, each having cicatricial and noncicatricial forms. This observational study of 135 cases in a semiurban Indian population aimed to detect the prevalence of various forms of acquired alopecia in females and correlate the same with levels of hemoglobin, serum ferritin, triiodothyronine, thyroxin, and thyroid stimulating hormone. The majority (84, 62.2%) of our cases of alopecia had telogen effluvium followed by female pattern alopecia (32, 23.7%). Stress (86, 63.7%), topical application of chemicals (72, 53.3%), systemic medications for concurrent illnesses (62, 5%), and pregnancy (14, 10.3%) were the common exacerbating factors. Neither low hemoglobin (<12 gm%, 73.4%) nor low serum ferritin (<12 μg/L, 6.7%) was found to be statistically significant. A majority (90, 90.9%) of 99 cases with anemia (hemoglobin levels of <12 gm%) had serum ferritin levels >12 μg/L. Though lack of vitamin B12 testing was a limitation of our study, its deficiency could be the probable cause of iron deficiency as the majority (58, 64.4%) of these cases, as indeed majority (89, 65.4%) of our study population, were vegetarians. Thyroid disorders (23, 17%, including 9 newly diagnosed) were not of significance statistically. PMID:26904106

  2. Simulating functional magnetic materials on supercomputers.

    PubMed

    Gruner, Markus Ernst; Entel, Peter

    2009-07-22

    The recent passing of the petaflop per second landmark by the Roadrunner project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory marks a preliminary peak of an impressive world-wide development in the high-performance scientific computing sector. Also, purely academic state-of-the-art supercomputers such as the IBM Blue Gene/P at Forschungszentrum Jülich allow us nowadays to investigate large systems of the order of 10(3) spin polarized transition metal atoms by means of density functional theory. Three applications will be presented where large-scale ab initio calculations contribute to the understanding of key properties emerging from a close interrelation between structure and magnetism. The first two examples discuss the size dependent evolution of equilibrium structural motifs in elementary iron and binary Fe-Pt and Co-Pt transition metal nanoparticles, which are currently discussed as promising candidates for ultra-high-density magnetic data storage media. However, the preference for multiply twinned morphologies at smaller cluster sizes counteracts the formation of a single-crystalline L1(0) phase, which alone provides the required hard magnetic properties. The third application is concerned with the magnetic shape memory effect in the Ni-Mn-Ga Heusler alloy, which is a technologically relevant candidate for magnetomechanical actuators and sensors. In this material strains of up to 10% can be induced by external magnetic fields due to the field induced shifting of martensitic twin boundaries, requiring an extremely high mobility of the martensitic twin boundaries, but also the selection of the appropriate martensitic structure from the rich phase diagram. PMID:21828528

  3. Acquired deficiency of tafazzin in the adult heart: Impact on mitochondrial function and response to cardiac injury.

    PubMed

    Szczepanek, Karol; Allegood, Jeremy; Aluri, Hema; Hu, Ying; Chen, Qun; Lesnefsky, Edward J

    2016-04-01

    The content and composition of cardiolipin (CL) is critical for preservation of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) and inner membrane integrity. Tafazzin (Taz) is an enzyme responsible for remodeling of immature CL containing mixed acyl groups into the mature tetralinoleyl form (C18:2)4-CL. We hypothesized that acquired defects in Taz in the mature heart would impact remodeling of CL and augment cardiac injury. The role of acquired Taz deficiency was studied using the inducible Taz knockdown (TazKD) mouse. Taz-specific shRNA is induced by doxycycline (DOX). One day of DOX intake decreased Taz mRNA in the heart to 20% vs. DOX-treated WT. Knockdown was initiated at an adult age and was stable during long term feeding. CL phenotype was assessed by (C18:2)4-CL content and was reduced 40% vs. WT at two months of DOX. TazKD showed increased production of reactive oxygen species and increased susceptibility to permeability transition pore opening at baseline. However, OXPHOS measured using the rate of oxygen consumption was unchanged in the setting of acquired Taz deficiency. Infarct size, measured in isolated buffer-perfused Langendorff hearts following 25min. Stop flow ischemia and 60min. Reperfusion was not altered in TazKD hearts. Thus, impaired Taz-function with onset at adult age does not enhance susceptibility to ischemia-reperfusion injury. PMID:26692032

  4. Social cognition and its relationship to functional outcomes in patients with sustained acquired brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Ubukata, Shiho; Tanemura, Rumi; Yoshizumi, Miho; Sugihara, Genichi; Murai, Toshiya; Ueda, Keita

    2014-01-01

    Deficits in social cognition are common after traumatic brain injury (TBI). However, little is known about how such deficits affect functional outcomes. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between social cognition and functional outcomes in patients with TBI. We studied this relationship in 20 patients with TBI over the course of 1 year post-injury. Patients completed neurocognitive assessments and social cognition tasks. The social cognition tasks included an emotion-perception task and three theory of mind tasks: the Faux Pas test, Reading the Mind in the Eyes (Eyes) test, and the Moving-Shapes paradigm. The Craig Handicap Assessment and Reporting Technique was used to assess functional outcomes. Compared with our database of normal subjects, patients showed impairments in all social cognition tasks. Multiple regression analysis revealed that theory of mind ability as measured by the Eyes test was the best predictor of the cognitive aspects of functional outcomes. The findings of this pilot study suggest that the degree to which a patient can predict what others are thinking is an important measure that can estimate functional outcomes over 1 year following TBI. PMID:25395854

  5. How Toddlers Acquire and Transfer Tool Knowledge: Developmental Changes and the Role of Executive Functions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pauen, Sabina; Bechtel-Kuehne, Sabrina

    2016-01-01

    This report investigates tool learning and its relations to executive functions (EFs) in toddlers. In Study 1 (N = 93), 18-, 20-, 22-, and 24-month-old children learned equally well to choose a correct tool from observation, whereas performance based on feedback improved with age. Knowledge transfer showed significant progress after 22 months of…

  6. Acoustic noise during functional magnetic resonance imaginga)

    PubMed Central

    Ravicz, Michael E.; Melcher, Jennifer R.; Kiang, Nelson Y.-S.

    2007-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) enables sites of brain activation to be localized in human subjects. For studies of the auditory system, acoustic noise generated during fMRI can interfere with assessments of this activation by introducing uncontrolled extraneous sounds. As a first step toward reducing the noise during fMRI, this paper describes the temporal and spectral characteristics of the noise present under typical fMRI study conditions for two imagers with different static magnetic field strengths. Peak noise levels were 123 and 138 dB re 20 μPa in a 1.5-tesla (T) and a 3-T imager, respectively. The noise spectrum (calculated over a 10-ms window coinciding with the highest-amplitude noise) showed a prominent maximum at 1 kHz for the 1.5-T imager (115 dB SPL) and at 1.4 kHz for the 3-T imager (131 dB SPL). The frequency content and timing of the most intense noise components indicated that the noise was primarily attributable to the readout gradients in the imaging pulse sequence. The noise persisted above background levels for 300-500 ms after gradient activity ceased, indicating that resonating structures in the imager or noise reverberating in the imager room were also factors. The gradient noise waveform was highly repeatable. In addition, the coolant pump for the imager’s permanent magnet and the room air handling system were sources of ongoing noise lower in both level and frequency than gradient coil noise. Knowledge of the sources and characteristics of the noise enabled the examination of general approaches to noise control that could be applied to reduce the unwanted noise during fMRI sessions. PMID:11051496

  7. Functionalized magnetic nanoparticles: A novel heterogeneous catalyst support

    EPA Science Inventory

    Functionalized magnetic nanoparticles have emerged as viable alternatives to conventional materials, as robust, high-surface-area heterogeneous catalyst supports. Post-synthetic surface modification protocol for magnetic nanoparticles has been developed that imparts desirable che...

  8. Nuclear AURKA acquires kinase-independent transactivating function to enhance breast cancer stem cell phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Feimeng; Yue, Caifeng; Li, Guohui; He, Bin; Cheng, Wei; Wang, Xi; Yan, Min; Long, Zijie; Qiu, Wanshou; Yuan, Zhongyu; Xu, Jie; Liu, Bing; Shi, Qian; Lam, Eric W.-F.; Hung, Mien-Chie; Liu, Quentin

    2016-01-01

    Centrosome-localized mitotic Aurora kinase A (AURKA) facilitates G2/M events. Here we show that AURKA translocates to the nucleus and causes distinct oncogenic properties in malignant cells by enhancing breast cancer stem cell (BCSC) phenotype. Unexpectedly, this function is independent of its kinase activity. Instead, AURKA preferentially interacts with heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K) in the nucleus and acts as a transcription factor in a complex that induces a shift in MYC promoter usage and activates the MYC promoter. Blocking AURKA nuclear localization inhibits this newly discovered transactivating function of AURKA, sensitizing resistant BCSC to kinase inhibition. These findings identify a previously unknown oncogenic property of the spatially deregulated AURKA in tumorigenesis and provide a potential therapeutic opportunity to overcome kinase inhibitor resistance. PMID:26782714

  9. Functional renormalization group approach to noncollinear magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delamotte, B.; Dudka, M.; Mouhanna, D.; Yabunaka, S.

    2016-02-01

    A functional renormalization group approach to d -dimensional, N -component, noncollinear magnets is performed using various truncations of the effective action relevant to study their long distance behavior. With help of these truncations we study the existence of a stable fixed point for dimensions between d =2.8 and d =4 for various values of N focusing on the critical value Nc(d ) that, for a given dimension d , separates a first-order region for N Nc(d ) . Our approach concludes to the absence of a stable fixed point in the physical—N =2 ,3 and d =3 —cases, in agreement with the ɛ =4 -d expansion and in contradiction with previous perturbative approaches performed at fixed dimension and with recent approaches based on the conformal bootstrap program.

  10. Production and function of cytokines in natural and acquired immunity to Candida albicans infection.

    PubMed Central

    Ashman, R B; Papadimitriou, J M

    1995-01-01

    Host resistance against infections caused by the yeast Candida albicans is mediated predominantly by polymorphonuclear leukocytes and macrophages. Antigens of Candida stimulate lymphocyte proliferation and cytokine synthesis, and in both humans and mice, these cytokines enhance the candidacidal functions of the phagocytic cells. In systemic candidiasis in mice, cytokine production has been found to be a function of the CD4+ T helper (Th) cells. The Th1 subset of these cells, characterized by the production of gamma interferon and interleukin-2, is associated with macrophage activation and enhanced resistance against reinfection, whereas the Th2 subset, which produces interleukins-4, -6, and -10, is linked to the development of chronic disease. However, other models have generated divergent data. Mucosal infection generally elicits Th1-type cytokine responses and protection from systemic challenge, and identification of cytokine mRNA present in infected tissues of mice that develop mild or severe lesions does not show pure Th1- or Th2-type responses. Furthermore, antigens of C. albicans, mannan in particular, can induce suppressor cells that modulate both specific and nonspecific cellular and humoral immune responses, and there is an emerging body of evidence that molecular mimicry may affect the efficiency of anti-Candida responses within defined genetic contexts. PMID:8531890

  11. Functional magnetic resonance imaging of the lung.

    PubMed

    Biederer, J; Heussel, C P; Puderbach, M; Wielpuetz, M O

    2014-02-01

    Beyond being a substitute for X-ray, computed tomography, and scintigraphy, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) inherently combines morphologic and functional information more than any other technology. Lung perfusion: The most established method is first-pass contrast-enhanced imaging with bolus injection of gadolinium chelates and time-resolved gradient-echo (GRE) sequences covering the whole lung (1 volume/s). Images are evaluated visually or semiquantitatively, while absolute quantification remains challenging due to the nonlinear relation of T1-shortening and contrast material concentration. Noncontrast-enhanced perfusion imaging is still experimental, either based on arterial spin labeling or Fourier decomposition. The latter is used to separate high- and low-frequency oscillations of lung signal related to the effects of pulsatile blood flow. Lung ventilation: Using contrast-enhanced first-pass perfusion, lung ventilation deficits are indirectly identified by hypoxic vasoconstriction. More direct but still experimental approaches use either inhalation of pure oxygen, an aerosolized contrast agent, or hyperpolarized noble gases. Fourier decomposition MRI based on the low-frequency lung signal oscillation allows for visualization of ventilation without any contrast agent. Respiratory mechanics: Time-resolved series with high background signal such as GRE or steady-state free precession visualize the movement of chest wall, diaphragm, mediastinum, lung tissue, tracheal wall, and tumor. The assessment of volume changes allows drawing conclusions on regional ventilation. With this arsenal of functional imaging capabilities at high spatial and temporal resolution but without radiation burden, MRI will find its role in regional functional lung analysis and will therefore overcome the sensitivity of global lung function analysis for repeated short-term treatment monitoring. PMID:24481761

  12. How Toddlers Acquire and Transfer Tool Knowledge: Developmental Changes and the Role of Executive Functions.

    PubMed

    Pauen, Sabina; Bechtel-Kuehne, Sabrina

    2016-07-01

    This report investigates tool learning and its relations to executive functions (EFs) in toddlers. In Study 1 (N = 93), 18-, 20-, 22-, and 24-month-old children learned equally well to choose a correct tool from observation, whereas performance based on feedback improved with age. Knowledge transfer showed significant progress after 22 months of age: Older children ignored irrelevant features more easily and adjusted their behavior more flexibly. Study 2 (N = 62) revealed that spontaneous transfer in 22- to 24-month-olds was related to set-shifting skills and response inhibition. Flexible adaptation to feedback correlated with working-memory capacity. These findings suggest that toddlerhood is a highly dynamic phase of tool learning and that EFs are related to transfer performance at this age. PMID:27138651

  13. An Inexpensive Biophysics Laboratory Apparatus for Acquiring Pulmonary Function Data with Clinical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harkay, Gregory

    2001-11-01

    Interest on the part of the Physics Department at KSC in developing a computer interfaced lab with appeal to biology majors and a need to perform a clinical pulmonological study to fulfill a biology requirement led to the author's undergraduate research project in which a recording spirometer (typical cost: $15K) was constructed from readily available materials and a typical undergraduate lab computer interface. Simple components, including a basic photogate circuit, CPU fan, and PVC couplings were used to construct an instrument for measuring flow rates as a function of time. Pasco software was used to build an experiment in which data was collected and integration performed such that one could obtain accurate values for FEV1 (forced expiratory volume for one second) and FVC (forced vital capacity) and their ratio for a large sample of subjects. Results were compared to published norms and subjects with impaired respiratory mechanisms identified. This laboratory exercise is one with which biology students can clearly identify and would be a robust addition to the repertoire for a HS or college physics or biology teaching laboratory.

  14. Surface functionalization and characterization of magnetic polystyrene microbeads.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chengli; Guan, Yueping; Xing, Jianmin; Liu, Huizhou

    2008-08-19

    A new approach to the surface functionalization of magnetic polystyrene microbeads with chloroacetyl chloride in the presence of aluminum chloride was reported. Composite microbeads consisting of polymer-coated iron oxide nanoparticles were prepared by spraying suspension polymerization. Functional chloride groups were introduced onto the surface of magnetic polystyrene microbeads by surface chemical reaction without destroying the magnetite nanoparticles within the microbeads. First, a complex was synthesized by a reaction between aluminum chloride and chloroacetyl chloride. Then, the complex was added dropwise to the solution of magnetic polystyrene microbeads, and a surface acylation reaction between complex and polystyrene microbeads was carried out. Subsequently, the amino groups were coupled to the magnetic microbeads via an ammonolysis reaction between ethylenediamine and chloride groups on the acylated magnetic polystyrene microbeads. The chemical composition, surface functional groups, and magnetism of the magnetic polystyrene microbeads before and after surface functionalization were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and vibrating sample magnetometry. The results showed that the surface functionalization reaction had little impact on the magnetism of the microbeads. The content of surface amino groups on the magnetic polystyrene microbeads was found to be 0.2 mmol/g. An affinity dye, Cibacron Blue F3G-A (CB), was then immobilized to prepare a magnetic affinity adsorbent. It was confirmed from X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy spectra that the CB molecules were covalently coupled on the magnetic microbeads. PMID:18624417

  15. Selecting for Function: Solution Synthesis of Magnetic Nanopropellers

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    We show that we can select magnetically steerable nanopropellers from a set of carbon coated aggregates of magnetic nanoparticles using weak homogeneous rotating magnetic fields. The carbon coating can be functionalized, enabling a wide range of applications. Despite their arbitrary shape, all nanostructures propel parallel to the vector of rotation of the magnetic field. We use a simple theoretical model to find experimental conditions to select nanopropellers which are predominantly smaller than previously published ones. PMID:24127909

  16. Synthesis and characterization of functionalized magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswal, Dipti; Peeples, Brianna N.; Spence, Destiny D.; Peeples, Caryn; Bell, Crystal N.; Pradhan, A. K.

    2012-04-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles have been used in a wide array of industrial and biomedical applications due to their unique properties at the nanoscale level. They are extensively used in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), magnetic hyperthermia treatment, drug delivery, and in assays for biological separations. Furthermore, superparamagnetic nanoparticles are of large interest for in vivo applications. However, these unmodified nanoparticles aggregate and consequently lose their superparamagnetic behaviors, due to high surface to volume ratio and strong dipole to dipole interaction. For these reasons, surface coating is necessary for the enhancement and effectiveness of magnetic nanoparticles to be used in various applications. In addition to providing increased stability to the nanoparticles in different solvents or media, stabilizers such as surfactants, organic/inorganic molecules, polymer and co-polymers are employed as surface coatings, which yield magnetically responsive systems. In this work we present the synthesis and magnetic characterization of Fe3O4 nanoparticles coated with 3-aminopropyltriethoxy silane (APS) and citric acid. The particles magnetic hysteresis was measured by a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer with an in-plane magnetic field. The uncoated and coated magnetic nanoparticles were characterized by using fourier transform infrared (FTIR), UV-vis, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and thermo-gravimetric analysis.

  17. Acquired platelet function defect

    MedlinePlus

    ... dark black, or tarry bowel movements ; or vomiting blood or material that looks like coffee grounds Nosebleeds ... Tests that may done include: Bleeding time Platelet aggregation test Platelet count PT and PTT

  18. Acquired platelet function defect

    MedlinePlus

    ... on the skin Gastrointestinal bleeding resulting in bloody, dark black, or tarry bowel movements ; or vomiting blood ... to the principles of the Health on the Net Foundation (www.hon.ch). The information provided herein ...

  19. Computerised cognitive training in acquired brain injury: A systematic review of outcomes using the International Classification of Functioning (ICF).

    PubMed

    Sigmundsdottir, Linda; Longley, Wendy A; Tate, Robyn L

    2016-10-01

    Computerised cognitive training (CCT) is an increasingly popular intervention for people experiencing cognitive symptoms. This systematic review evaluated the evidence for CCT in adults with acquired brain injury (ABI), focusing on how outcome measures used reflect efficacy across components of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health. Database searches were conducted of studies investigating CCT to treat cognitive symptoms in adult ABI. Scientific quality was rated using the PEDro-P and RoBiNT Scales. Ninety-six studies met the criteria. Most studies examined outcomes using measures of mental functions (93/96, 97%); fewer studies included measures of activities/participation (41/96, 43%) or body structures (8/96, 8%). Only 14 studies (15%) provided Level 1 evidence (randomised controlled trials with a PEDro-P score ≥ 6/10), with these studies suggesting strong evidence for CCT improving processing speed in multiple sclerosis (MS) and moderate evidence for improving memory in MS and brain tumour populations. There is a large body of research examining the efficacy of CCT, but relatively few Level 1 studies and evidence is largely limited to body function outcomes. The routine use of outcome measures of activities/participation would provide more meaningful evidence for the efficacy of CCT. The use of body structure outcome measures (e.g., neuroimaging) is a newly emerging area, with potential to increase understanding of mechanisms of action for CCT. PMID:26965034

  20. Delineating potential epileptogenic areas utilizing resting functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in epilepsy patients.

    PubMed

    Pizarro, Ricardo; Nair, Veena; Meier, Timothy; Holdsworth, Ryan; Tunnell, Evelyn; Rutecki, Paul; Sillay, Karl; Meyerand, Mary E; Prabhakaran, Vivek

    2016-08-01

    Seizure localization includes neuroimaging like electroencephalogram, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with limited ability to characterize the epileptogenic network. Temporal clustering analysis (TCA) characterizes epileptogenic network congruent with interictal epileptiform discharges by clustering together voxels with transient signals. We generated epileptogenic areas for 12 of 13 epilepsy patients with TCA, congruent with different areas of seizure onset. Resting functional MRI (fMRI) scans are noninvasive, and can be acquired quickly, in patients with different levels of severity and function. Analyzing resting fMRI data using TCA is quick and can complement clinical methods to characterize the epileptogenic network. PMID:27362339

  1. Cyclosporine restores hematopoietic function by compensating for decreased Tregs in patients with pure red cell aplasia and acquired aplastic anemia.

    PubMed

    Dao, An T T; Yamazaki, Hirohito; Takamatsu, Hiroyuki; Sugimori, Chiharu; Katagiri, Takamasa; Maruyama, Hiroyuki; Zaimoku, Yoshitaka; Maruyama, Kana; Ly, Trung Q; Espinoza, Luis; Nakao, Shinji

    2016-04-01

    Most patients with acquired pure red cell aplasia (PRCA) and some with acquired aplastic anemia (AA) respond well to cyclosporine (CsA), but thereafter often show CsA dependency. The mechanism underlying this dependency remains unknown. We established a reliable method for measuring the regulatory T cell (Treg) count using FoxP3 and Helios expression as markers and determined the balance between Tregs and other helper T cell subsets in 16 PRCA and 29 AA patients. The ratios of interferon-γ-producing CD4(+) (Th1) T cells to Tregs in untreated patients and CsA-dependent patients were significantly higher (PRCA 5.77 ± 1.47 and 7.38 ± 2.58; AA 6.18 ± 2.35 and 8.94 ± 4.06) than in healthy volunteers (HVs; 3.33 ± 0.90) due to the profound decrease in the percentage of Tregs. In contrast, the ratios were comparable to HVs in convalescent CsA-treated AA patients (4.74 ± 2.10) and AA patients in remission after the cessation of CsA treatment (4.24 ± 1.67). Low-dose CsA (100 ng/ml) inhibited the proliferation of conventional T cells (Tconv) to a similar degree to the inhibition by Tregs in a co-culture with a 1:1 Treg/Tconv ratio. The data suggest that CsA may reverse the hematopoietic suppression in PRCA and AA patients by compensating for the inadequate immune regulatory function that occurs due to a profound decrease in the Treg count. PMID:26968551

  2. Bilingual brain organization: a functional magnetic resonance adaptation study.

    PubMed

    Klein, Denise; Zatorre, Robert J; Chen, Jen-Kai; Milner, Brenda; Crane, Joelle; Belin, Pascal; Bouffard, Marc

    2006-05-15

    We used functional magnetic resonance adaptation (fMRA) to examine whether intra-voxel functional specificity may be present for first (L1)- and second (L2)-language processing. We examined within- and across-language adaptation for spoken words in English-French bilinguals who had acquired their L2 after the age of 4 years. Subjects listened to words presented binaurally through earphones. In two control conditions (one for each language), six identical words were presented to obtain maximal adaptation. The remaining six conditions each consisted of five words that were identical followed by a sixth word that differed. There were thus a total of eight experimental conditions: no-change (sixth word identical to first five); a change in meaning (different final word in L1); a change in language (final item translated into L2); a change in meaning and language (different final word in L2). The same four conditions were presented in L2. The study also included a silent baseline. At the neural level, within- and across-language word changes resulted in release from adaptation. This was true for separate analyses of L1 and L2. We saw no evidence for greater recovery from adaptation in across-language relative to within-language conditions. While many brain regions were common to L1 and L2, we did observe differences in adaptation for forward translation (L1 to L2) as compared to backward translation (L2 to L1). The results support the idea that, at the lexical level, the neural substrates for L1 and L2 in bilinguals are shared, but with some populations of neurons within these shared regions showing language-specific responses. PMID:16460968

  3. Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) -- Brain

    MedlinePlus

    ... powerful magnetic field, radio frequency pulses and a computer to produce detailed pictures of organs, soft tissues, ... The images can then be examined on a computer monitor, transmitted electronically, printed or copied to a ...

  4. Hybride magnetic nanostructure based on amino acids functionalized polypyrrole

    SciTech Connect

    Nan, Alexandrina Bunge, Alexander; Turcu, Rodica

    2015-12-23

    Conducting polypyrrole is especially promising for many commercial applications because of its unique optical, electric, thermal and mechanical properties. We report the synthesis and characterization of novel pyrrole functionalized monomers and core-shell hybrid nanostructures, consisting of a conjugated polymer layer (amino acids functionalized pyrrole copolymers) and a magnetic nanoparticle core. For functionalization of the pyrrole monomer we used several amino acids: tryptophan, leucine, phenylalanine, serine and tyrosine. These amino acids were linked via different types of hydrophobic linkers to the nitrogen atom of the pyrrole monomer. The magnetic core-shell hybrid nanostructures are characterized by various methods such as FTIR spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and magnetic measurements.

  5. Hybride magnetic nanostructure based on amino acids functionalized polypyrrole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nan, Alexandrina; Bunge, Alexander; Turcu, Rodica

    2015-12-01

    Conducting polypyrrole is especially promising for many commercial applications because of its unique optical, electric, thermal and mechanical properties. We report the synthesis and characterization of novel pyrrole functionalized monomers and core-shell hybrid nanostructures, consisting of a conjugated polymer layer (amino acids functionalized pyrrole copolymers) and a magnetic nanoparticle core. For functionalization of the pyrrole monomer we used several amino acids: tryptophan, leucine, phenylalanine, serine and tyrosine. These amino acids were linked via different types of hydrophobic linkers to the nitrogen atom of the pyrrole monomer. The magnetic core-shell hybrid nanostructures are characterized by various methods such as FTIR spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and magnetic measurements.

  6. Rationalisation of distribution functions for models of nanoparticle magnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Hilo, M.; Chantrell, R. W.

    2012-08-01

    A formalism is presented which reconciles the use of different distribution functions of particle diameter in analytical models of the magnetic properties of nanoparticle systems. For the lognormal distribution a transformation is derived which shows that a distribution of volume fraction transforms into a lognormal distribution of particle number albeit with a modified median diameter. This transformation resolves an apparent discrepancy reported in Tournus and Tamion [Journal of Magnetism and Magnetic Materials 323 (2011) 1118].

  7. Pre-Clinical Models of Acquired Neonatal Seizures: Differential Effects of Injury on Function of Chloride Co-Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Kang, SK; Kadam, SD

    2014-01-01

    Hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy [HIE] represents the most common acquired pathology associated with neonatal seizures. HIE-associated neonatal seizures are often difficult to control, due to their refractoriness to traditional anti-seizure agents. Developmentally regulated chloride gradients during early development make the neonatal brain more seizure-susceptible by depolarizing GABAAR-mediated currents, and therefore hindering inhibition by conventional anti-seizure drugs such as phenobarbital [PB] and benzodiazepines. Pharmaco-modulation of chloride co-transporters has become a current field of research in treating refractory neonatal seizures, and the basis of two clinical trials [NCT01434225; NCT00380531]. However, the recent termination of NEMO study [NCT01434225] on bumetanide, an NKCC1 antagonist, suggests that clinical utilization of bumetanide as an adjunct to treat neonatal seizures with PB may not be a viable option. Hence, re-evaluation of bumetanide as an adjunct through pre-clinical studies is warranted. Additionally, the model-specific variability in the efficacy of bumetanide in the pre-clinical models of neonatal seizures highlights the differential consequences of insults used to induce seizures in each pre-clinical model as worth exploration. Injury itself can significantly alter the function of chloride co-transporters, and therefore the efficacy of anti-seizure agents that follow. PMID:25590049

  8. Functional cliques in the amygdala and related brain networks driven by fear assessment acquired during movie viewing.

    PubMed

    Kinreich, Sivan; Intrator, Nathan; Hendler, Talma

    2011-01-01

    One of the greatest challenges involved in studying the brain mechanisms of fear is capturing the individual's unique instantaneous experience. Brain imaging studies to date commonly sacrifice valuable information regarding the individual real-time conscious experience, especially when focusing on elucidating the amygdala's activity. Here, we assumed that by using a minimally intrusive cue along with applying a robust clustering approach to probe the amygdala, it would be possible to rate fear in real time and to derive the related network of activation. During functional magnetic resonance imaging scanning, healthy volunteers viewed two excerpts from horror movies and were periodically auditory cued to rate their instantaneous experience of "I'm scared." Using graph theory and community mathematical concepts, data-driven clustering of the fear-related functional cliques in the amygdala was performed guided by the individually marked periods of heightened fear. Individually tailored functions derived from these amygdala activation cliques were subsequently applied as general linear model predictors to a whole-brain analysis to reveal the correlated networks. Our results suggest that by using a localized robust clustering approach, it is possible to probe activation in the right dorsal amygdala that is directly related to individual real-time emotional experience. Moreover, this fear-evoked amygdala revealed two opposing networks of co-activation and co-deactivation, which correspond to vigilance and rest-related circuits, respectively. PMID:22432905

  9. Functional magnetic resonance imaging of internet addiction in young adults

    PubMed Central

    Sepede, Gianna; Tavino, Margherita; Santacroce, Rita; Fiori, Federica; Salerno, Rosa Maria; Di Giannantonio, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To report the results of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies pertaining internet addiction disorder (IAD) in young adults. METHODS: We conducted a systematic review on PubMed, focusing our attention on fMRI studies involving adult IAD patients, free from any comorbid psychiatric condition. The following search words were used, both alone and in combination: fMRI, internet addiction, internet dependence, functional neuroimaging. The search was conducted on April 20th, 2015 and yielded 58 records. Inclusion criteria were the following: Articles written in English, patients’ age ≥ 18 years, patients affected by IAD, studies providing fMRI results during resting state or cognitive/emotional paradigms. Structural MRI studies, functional imaging techniques other than fMRI, studies involving adolescents, patients with comorbid psychiatric, neurological or medical conditions were excluded. By reading titles and abstracts, we excluded 30 records. By reading the full texts of the 28 remaining articles, we identified 18 papers meeting our inclusion criteria and therefore included in the qualitative synthesis. RESULTS: We found 18 studies fulfilling our inclusion criteria, 17 of them conducted in Asia, and including a total number of 666 tested subjects. The included studies reported data acquired during resting state or different paradigms, such as cue-reactivity, guessing or cognitive control tasks. The enrolled patients were usually males (95.4%) and very young (21-25 years). The most represented IAD subtype, reported in more than 85% of patients, was the internet gaming disorder, or videogame addiction. In the resting state studies, the more relevant abnormalities were localized in the superior temporal gyrus, limbic, medial frontal and parietal regions. When analyzing the task related fmri studies, we found that less than half of the papers reported behavioral differences between patients and normal controls, but all of them found significant

  10. Renal relevant radiology: renal functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Ebrahimi, Behzad; Textor, Stephen C; Lerman, Lilach O

    2014-02-01

    Because of its noninvasive nature and provision of quantitative measures of a wide variety of physiologic parameters, functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) shows great potential for research and clinical applications. Over the past decade, application of functional MRI extended beyond detection of cerebral activity, and techniques for abdominal functional MRI evolved. Assessment of renal perfusion, glomerular filtration, interstitial diffusion, and parenchymal oxygenation turned this modality into an essential research and potentially diagnostic tool. Variations in many renal physiologic markers can be detected using functional MRI before morphologic changes become evident in anatomic magnetic resonance images. Moreover, the framework of functional MRI opened a window of opportunity to develop novel pathophysiologic markers. This article reviews applications of some well validated functional MRI techniques, including perfusion, diffusion-weighted imaging, and blood oxygen level-dependent MRI, as well as some emerging new techniques such as magnetic resonance elastography, which might evolve into clinically useful tools. PMID:24370767

  11. Brain magnetic resonance imaging in suspected extrapyramidal cerebral palsy: observations in distinguishing genetic-metabolic from acquired causes.

    PubMed

    Hoon, A H; Reinhardt, E M; Kelley, R I; Breiter, S N; Morton, D H; Naidu, S B; Johnston, M V

    1997-08-01

    Experienced clinicians recognize that some children who appear to have static cerebral palsy (CP) actually have underlying genetic-metabolic disorders. We report a series of patients with motor disorders seen in children with extrapyramidal CP in whom brain magnetic resonance imaging abnormalities provided important diagnostic clues in distinguishing genetic-metabolic disorders from other causes. One cause of static extrapyramidal CP, hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy at the end of a term gestation, produces a characteristic pattern of hyperintense signal and atrophy in the putamen and thalamus. Other signal abnormalities and atrophy in the putamen, globus pallidus, or caudate can point to genetic-metabolic diseases, including disorders of mitochondrial and organic acid metabolism. Progress in understanding and treating genetic diseases of the developing brain makes it essential to diagnose disorders that masquerade as static CP. Brain magnetic resonance imaging is a useful diagnostic tool in the initial evaluation of children who appear to have CP. PMID:9290610

  12. Arbitrary function generator for APS injector synchrotron correction magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Despe, O.D.

    1990-11-07

    The APS injector synchrotron ring measures about 368 m in circumference. In order to obtain the precision of the magnetic field required for the positron acceleration from 450 Mev to 7.7 Gev with low beam loss, eighty correction magnets are distributed around its circumference. These magnets provide the vernier field changes required for beam orbit correction during the acceleration phase of the injector synchrotron cycle. Because of mechanical imperfections in the construction, as well as installation of real dipole and multi-pole magnets, the exact field correction required at each correction magnet location is not known until a beam is actually accelerated. It is therefore essential that a means is provided to generate a correction field that is a function of the beam energy from injection until extraction for each correction magnet. The fairly large number of correction magnets in the system requires that the arbitrary function generator design be as simple as possible yet provide the required performance. An important, required performance feature is that the function can be changed or modified ``on the fly``, to provide the operator with a real-time feel during the tune up process. The arbitrary function generator described in this report satisfies these requirements.

  13. CD4 memory T cells develop and acquire functional competence by sequential cognate interactions and stepwise gene regulation.

    PubMed

    Kaji, Tomohiro; Hijikata, Atsushi; Ishige, Akiko; Kitami, Toshimori; Watanabe, Takashi; Ohara, Osamu; Yanaka, Noriyuki; Okada, Mariko; Shimoda, Michiko; Taniguchi, Masaru; Takemori, Toshitada

    2016-06-01

    Memory CD4(+) T cells promote protective humoral immunity; however, how memory T cells acquire this activity remains unclear. This study demonstrates that CD4(+) T cells develop into antigen-specific memory T cells that can promote the terminal differentiation of memory B cells far more effectively than their naive T-cell counterparts. Memory T cell development requires the transcription factor B-cell lymphoma 6 (Bcl6), which is known to direct T-follicular helper (Tfh) cell differentiation. However, unlike Tfh cells, memory T cell development did not require germinal center B cells. Curiously, memory T cells that develop in the absence of cognate B cells cannot promote memory B-cell recall responses and this defect was accompanied by down-regulation of genes associated with homeostasis and activation and up-regulation of genes inhibitory for T-cell responses. Although memory T cells display phenotypic and genetic signatures distinct from Tfh cells, both had in common the expression of a group of genes associated with metabolic pathways. This gene expression profile was not shared to any great extent with naive T cells and was not influenced by the absence of cognate B cells during memory T cell development. These results suggest that memory T cell development is programmed by stepwise expression of gatekeeper genes through serial interactions with different types of antigen-presenting cells, first licensing the memory lineage pathway and subsequently facilitating the functional development of memory T cells. Finally, we identified Gdpd3 as a candidate genetic marker for memory T cells. PMID:26714588

  14. Design and characterization of combined function multipole magnet for accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Sinha, Gautam; Singh, Gurnam

    2008-12-15

    This paper presents the design and analysis of a multipurpose combined function magnet for use in accelerators. This magnet consists of three corrector magnets: (i) skew quadrupole, (ii) horizontal dipole, and (iii) vertical dipole magnets, along with the main sextupole magnet. The strength of the corrector magnets is smaller than that of the main sextupole magnet. The strength of all the four magnets can be varied independently. The excitation strength required to produce skew quadrupole gradient and the presence of various multipole components in the magnet are estimated using first order perturbation theory. The experimental data for the variation of the sextupole strength and its higher order multipoles in the presence of skew quadrupole excitations are presented and compared to the theoretical predictions. Simulation using two-dimensional fine element code, Poisson, is also done. Results obtained from all the above three methods are found to be in good agreement with each other. The variations of skew quadrupole gradient for different sextupole excitations are also measured. The validity of this theory is also checked for various combinations of excitations including the case where magnet gets saturated. The excitation strengths required for producing the horizontal and vertical dipole fields are estimated analytically along with the presence of various multipoles. Theoretical predictions of permissible multipoles are compared to the results obtained from simulation.

  15. Acquired hyperpigmentations*

    PubMed Central

    Cestari, Tania Ferreira; Dantas, Lia Pinheiro; Boza, Juliana Catucci

    2014-01-01

    Cutaneous hyperpigmentations are frequent complaints, motivating around 8.5% of all dermatological consultations in our country. They can be congenital, with different patterns of inheritance, or acquired in consequence of skin problems, systemic diseases or secondary to environmental factors. The vast majority of them are linked to alterations on the pigment melanin, induced by different mechanisms. This review will focus on the major acquired hyperpigmentations associated with increased melanin, reviewing their mechanisms of action and possible preventive measures. Particularly prominent aspects of diagnosis and therapy will be emphasized, with focus on melasma, post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation, periorbital pigmentation, dermatosis papulosa nigra, phytophotodermatoses, flagellate dermatosis, erythema dyschromicum perstans, cervical poikiloderma (Poikiloderma of Civatte), acanthosis nigricans, cutaneous amyloidosis and reticulated confluent dermatitis PMID:24626644

  16. Magnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles: Synthesis and Surface Functionalization Strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Wei; He, Quanguo; Jiang, Changzhong

    2008-10-01

    Surface functionalized magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs) are a kind of novel functional materials, which have been widely used in the biotechnology and catalysis. This review focuses on the recent development and various strategies in preparation, structure, and magnetic properties of naked and surface functionalized iron oxide NPs and their corresponding application briefly. In order to implement the practical application, the particles must have combined properties of high magnetic saturation, stability, biocompatibility, and interactive functions at the surface. Moreover, the surface of iron oxide NPs could be modified by organic materials or inorganic materials, such as polymers, biomolecules, silica, metals, etc. The problems and major challenges, along with the directions for the synthesis and surface functionalization of iron oxide NPs, are considered. Finally, some future trends and prospective in these research areas are also discussed.

  17. Magnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles: Synthesis and Surface Functionalization Strategies

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Surface functionalized magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs) are a kind of novel functional materials, which have been widely used in the biotechnology and catalysis. This review focuses on the recent development and various strategies in preparation, structure, and magnetic properties of naked and surface functionalized iron oxide NPs and their corresponding application briefly. In order to implement the practical application, the particles must have combined properties of high magnetic saturation, stability, biocompatibility, and interactive functions at the surface. Moreover, the surface of iron oxide NPs could be modified by organic materials or inorganic materials, such as polymers, biomolecules, silica, metals, etc. The problems and major challenges, along with the directions for the synthesis and surface functionalization of iron oxide NPs, are considered. Finally, some future trends and prospective in these research areas are also discussed. PMID:21749733

  18. First results about recovery of walking function in patients with intensive care unit-acquired muscle weakness from the General Weakness Syndrome Therapy (GymNAST) cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Mehrholz, Jan; Mückel, Simone; Oehmichen, Frank; Pohl, Marcus

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To describe the time course of recovery of walking function and other activities of daily living in patients with intensive care unit (ICU)-acquired muscle weakness. Design This is a cohort study. Participants We included critically ill patients with ICU-acquired muscle weakness. Setting Post-acute ICU and rehabilitation units in Germany. Measures We measured walking function, muscle strength, activities in daily living, motor and cognitive function. Results We recruited 150 patients (30% female) who fulfilled our inclusion and exclusion criteria. The primary outcome recovery of walking function was achieved after a median of 28.5 days (IQR=45) after rehabilitation onset and after a median of 81.5 days (IQR=64) after onset of illness. Our final multivariate model for recovery of walking function included two clinical variables from baseline: the Functional Status Score ICU (adjusted HR=1.07 (95% CI 1.03 to 1.12) and the ability to reach forward in cm (adjusted HR=1.02 (95% CI 1.00 to 1.04). All secondary outcomes but not pain improved significantly in the first 8 weeks after study onset. Conclusions We found good recovery of walking function for most patients and described the recovery of walking function of people with ICU-acquired muscle weakness. Trials registrations number Sächsische Landesärztekammer EK-BR-32/13-1; DRKS00007181, German Register of Clinical Trials. PMID:26700274

  19. Functionalization of polydopamine coated magnetic nanoparticles with biological entities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mǎgeruşan, Lidia; Mrówczyński, Radosław; Turcu, Rodica

    2015-12-01

    New hybrid materials, obtained through introduction of cysteine, lysine and folic acid as biological entities into polydopamine-coated magnetite nanoparticles, are reported. The syntheses are straight forward and various methods were applied for structural and morphological characterization of the resulting nanoparticles. XPS proved a very powerful tool for surface chemical analysis and it evidences the functionalization of polydopamine coated magnetite nanoparticles. The superparamagnetic behavior and the high values of saturation magnetization recommend all products for further application where magnetism is important for targeting, separation, or heating by alternative magnetic fields.

  20. Functional magnetic resonance imaging in intact plants--quantitative observation of flow in plant vessels.

    PubMed

    Kuchenbrod, E; Kahler, E; Thürmer, F; Deichmann, R; Zimmermann, U; Haase, A

    1998-04-01

    Quantitative magnetic resonance (MR) images of flow velocities in intact corn plants were acquired using magnetization-prepared MR microscopy. A phase contrast flow imaging technique was used to quantitate water flow velocities and total volume flow rates in small xylem vessels. The simultaneous measurement of the transpiration of the whole plant was achieved by using a closed climate chamber within the MR magnet. The total volume flow rate and the transpiration values were in close correlation. Functional magnetic resonance imaging in intact plants was performed by light stimulation of the transpiration inside of the magnet. The change in the flow velocities in the xylem vessels of single vascular bundles was in correlation with the changes in the transpiration. Significant differences were observed between the xylem vessels in different vascular bundles. Furthermore, flow velocity measurements were performed on excised plant stems and visualized by the uptake of the MR contrast agent, gadolinium-diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA). A comparison between the phase contrast flow imaging and the contrast media uptake showed to be in good agreement with each other. PMID:9621974

  1. Cobalt silica magnetic nanoparticles with functional surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vadala, Michael L.; Zalich, Michael A.; Fulks, David B.; St. Pierre, Tim G.; Dailey, James P.; Riffle, Judy S.

    2005-05-01

    Cobalt nanoparticles encased in polysiloxane block copolymers have been heated at 600-700 °C to form protective shells around the particles, which contain crosslinked Si-O structures, and to anneal the cobalt. Methods to functionalize and modify the surfaces of the pyrolyzed/annealed silica-cobalt complexes with amines, isocyanates, poly(ethylene oxide), poly( L-lactide) and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) are presented.

  2. SEVEN TOPICS IN FUNCTIONAL MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING

    PubMed Central

    BANDETTINI, PETER A.

    2010-01-01

    Functional MRI (fMRI) is a non-invasive brain imaging methodology that started in 1991 and allows human brain activation to be imaged at high resolution within only a few minutes. Because it has extremely high sensitivity, is relatively easy to implement, and can be performed on most standard clinical MRI scanners. It continues to grow at an explosive rate throughout the world. Over the years, at any given time, fMRI has been defined by only a handful of major topics that have been the focus of researchers using and developing the methodology. In this review, I attempt to take a snapshot of the field of fMRI as it is in mid-2009 by discussing the seven topics that I feel are most on the minds of fMRI researchers. The topics are, in no particular order or grouping: (1) Clinical impact, (2) Utilization of individual functional maps, (3) fMRI signal interpretation, (4) Pattern effect mapping and decoding, (5) Endogenous oscillations, (6) MRI technology, and (7) Alternative functional contrast mechanisms. Most of these topics are highly interdependent, each advancing as the others advance. While most fMRI involves applications towards clinical or neuroscience questions, all applications are fundamentally dependent on advances in basic methodology as well as advances in our understanding of the relationship between neuronal activity and fMRI signal changes. This review neglects almost completely an in-depth discussion of applications. Rather the discussions are on the methods and interpretation. PMID:19938211

  3. Optimization of the bio-functionalized area of magnetic biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albisetti, Edoardo; Petti, Daniela; Damin, Francesco; Cretich, Marina; Bagnati, Marta; Sola, Laura; Chiari, Marcella; Bertacco, Riccardo

    2013-06-01

    In this work, calculations and preliminary experimental data for determining the optimal condition for the selective bio-functionalization of magnetic tunneling junction (MTJ)-based biosensors are presented. Results on the detection of biomolecular recognition events employing MTJ-based sensor and magnetic beads are presented and interpreted through calculations, taking into account the dependence of the signal on the distribution of the beads with respect to the sensor. Furthermore, it is demonstrated by calculations that a significant increase in the sensor sensitivity and quantification capability can be achieved by selectively bio-functionalizing an area which corresponds to the sensor active area.

  4. A generalized flux function for three-dimensional magnetic reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Yeates, A. R.; Hornig, G.

    2011-10-15

    The definition and measurement of magnetic reconnection in three-dimensional magnetic fields with multiple reconnection sites is a challenging problem, particularly in fields lacking null points. We propose a generalization of the familiar two-dimensional concept of a magnetic flux function to the case of a three-dimensional field connecting two planar boundaries. In this initial analysis, we require the normal magnetic field to have the same distribution on both boundaries. Using hyperbolic fixed points of the field line mapping, and their global stable and unstable manifolds, we define a unique flux partition of the magnetic field. This partition is more complicated than the corresponding (well-known) construction in a two-dimensional field, owing to the possibility of heteroclinic points and chaotic magnetic regions. Nevertheless, we show how the partition reconnection rate is readily measured with the generalized flux function. We relate our partition reconnection rate to the common definition of three-dimensional reconnection in terms of integrated parallel electric field. An analytical example demonstrates the theory and shows how the flux partition responds to an isolated reconnection event.

  5. Principles of functional magnetic resonance imaging: application to auditory neuroscience.

    PubMed

    Cacace, A T; Tasciyan, T; Cousins, J P

    2000-05-01

    Functional imaging based on magnetic resonance methods is a new research frontier for exploring a wide range of central nervous system (CNS) functions, including information processing in sensory, motor, cognitive, and linguistic systems. Being able to localize and study human brain function in vivo, in relatively high resolution and in a noninvasive manner, makes this a technique of unparalleled importance. In order to appreciate and fully understand this area of investigation, a tutorial covering basic aspects of this methodology is presented. We introduce functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) by providing an overview of the studies of different sensory systems in response to modality-specific stimuli, followed by an outline of other areas that have potential clinical relevance to the medical, cognitive, and communicative sciences. The discussion then focuses on the basic principles of magnetic resonance methods including magnetic resonance imaging, MR spectroscopy, fMRI, and the potential role that MR technology may play in understanding a wide range of auditory functions within the CNS, including tinnitus-related activity. Because the content of the material found herein might be unfamiliar to some, we provide a broad range of background and review articles to serve as a technical resource. PMID:10821504

  6. Effects of Hospital-Based Physical Therapy on Hospital Discharge Outcomes among Hospitalized Older Adults with Community-Acquired Pneumonia and Declining Physical Function

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sun Jung; Lee, Joo Hun; Han, Boram; Lam, Julia; Bukowy, Elizabeth; Rao, Avinash; Vulcano, Jordan; Andreeva, Anelia; Bertelson, Heather; Shin, Hyun Phil; Yoo, Ji Won

    2015-01-01

    To examine whether hospital-based physical therapy is associated with functional changes and early hospital readmission among hospitalized older adults with community-acquired pneumonia and declining physical function. Study design was a retrospective observation study. Participants were community-dwelling older adults admitted to medicine floor for community-acquired pneumonia (n = 1,058). Their physical function using Katz activities of daily living (ADL) Index declined between hospital admission and 48 hours since hospital admission (Katz ADL Index 6→5). The intervention group was those receiving physical therapy for ≥ 0.5 hour/day. Outcomes were Katz ADL Index at hospital discharge and all-cause 30-day hospital readmission rate. The intervention and control groups did not differ in the Katz ADL Index at hospital discharge (p = 0.11). All-cause 30-day hospital readmission rate was lower in the intervention than in control groups (OR = 0.65, p = 0.02). Hospital-based physical therapy has the benefits toward reducing 30-day hospital readmission rate of acutely ill older adults with community-acquired pneumonia and declining physical function. PMID:26029475

  7. Surface functionalized biocompatible magnetic nanospheres for cancer hyperthermia.

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, X.; Novosad, V.; Rozhkova, E. A.; Chen, H.; Yefremenko, V.; Pearson, J.; Torno, M.; Bader, S. D.; Rosengart, A. J.; Univ. Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine

    2007-06-01

    We report a simplified single emulsion (oil-in-water) solvent evaporation protocol to synthesize surface functionalized biocompatible magnetic nanospheres by using highly concentrated hydrophobic magnetite (gel) and a mixture of poly(D,L lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) and poly(lactic acid-block-polyethylene glycol-maleimide) (PLA-PEG-maleimide) (10:1 by mass) polymers. The as-synthesized particles are approximately spherical with an average diameter of 360-370 nm with polydispersity index of 0.12-0.18, are surface-functionalized with maleimide groups, and have saturation magnetization values of 25-40 emu/g. The efficiency of the heating induced by 400-kHz oscillating magnetic fields is compared for two samples with different magnetite loadings. Results show that these nanospheres have the potential to provide an efficient cancer-targeted hyperthermia.

  8. Peptide-functionalized magnetic nanoparticles for cancer therapy applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauser, Anastasia Kruse

    Lung cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer deaths in the United States. Radiation and chemotherapy are conventional treatments, but they result in serious side effects and the probability of tumor recurrence remains high. Therefore, there is an increasing need to enhance the efficacy of conventional treatments. Magnetic nanoparticles have been previously studied for a variety of applications such as magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents, anemia treatment, magnetic cell sorting and magnetically mediated hyperthermia (MMH). In this work, dextran coated iron oxide nanoparticles were developed and functionalized with peptides to target the nanoparticles to either the extracellular matrix (ECM) of tumor tissue or to localize the nanoparticles in subcellular regions after cell uptake. The magnetic nanoparticles were utilized for a variety of applications. First, heating properties of the nanoparticles were utilized to administer hyperthermia treatments combined with chemotherapy. The nanoparticles were functionalized with peptides to target fibrinogen in the ECM and extensively characterized for their physicochemical properties, and MMH combined with chemotherapy was able to enhance the toxicity of chemotherapy. The second application of the nanoparticles was magnetically mediated energy delivery. This treatment does not result in a bulk temperature rise upon actuation of the nanoparticles by an alternating magnetic field (AMF) but rather results in intracellular damage via friction from Brownian rotation or nanoscale heating effects from Neel relaxations. The nanoparticles were functionalized with a cell penetrating peptide to facilitate cell uptake and lysosomal escape. The intracellular effects of the internalized nanoparticles alone and with activation by an AMF were evaluated. Iron concentrations in vivo are highly regulated as excess iron can catalyze the formation of the hydroxyl radical through Fenton chemistry. Although often a concern of using iron

  9. Distinctions between manipulation and function knowledge of objects: evidence from functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Boronat, Consuelo B; Buxbaum, Laurel J; Coslett, H Branch; Tang, Kathy; Saffran, Eleanor M; Kimberg, Daniel Y; Detre, John A

    2005-05-01

    A prominent account of conceptual knowledge proposes that information is distributed over visual, tactile, auditory, motor and verbal-declarative attribute domains to the degree to which these features were activated when the knowledge was acquired [D.A. Allport, Distributed memory, modular subsystems and dysphagia, In: S.K. Newman, R. Epstein (Eds.), Current perspectives in dysphagia, Churchill Livingstone, Edinburgh, 1985, pp. 32-60]. A corollary is that when drawing upon this knowledge (e.g., to answer questions), particular aspects of this distributed information is re-activated as a function of the requirements of the task at hand [L.J. Buxbaum, E.M. Saffran, Knowledge of object manipulation and object function: dissociations in apraxic and non-apraxic subjects. Brain and Language, 82 (2002) 179-199; L.J. Buxbaum, T. Veramonti, M.F. Schwartz, Function and manipulation tool knowledge in apraxia: knowing 'what for' but not 'how', Neurocase, 6 (2000) 83-97; W. Simmons, L. Barsalou, The similarity-in-topography principle: Reconciling theories of conceptual deficits, Cognitive Neuropsychology, 20 (2003) 451-486]. This account predicts that answering questions about object manipulation should activate brain regions previously identified as components of the distributed sensory-motor system involved in object use, whereas answering questions about object function (that is, the purpose that it serves) should activate regions identified as components of the systems supporting verbal-declarative features. These predictions were tested in a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study in which 15 participants viewed picture or word pairs denoting manipulable objects and determined whether the objects are manipulated similarly (M condition) or serve the same function (F condition). Significantly greater and more extensive activations in the left inferior parietal lobe bordering the intraparietal sulcus were seen in the M condition with pictures and, to a lesser

  10. Functional Connectivity Magnetic Resonance Imaging Classification of Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Jeffrey S.; Nielsen, Jared A.; Froehlich, Alyson L.; DuBray, Molly B.; Druzgal, T. Jason; Cariello, Annahir N.; Cooperrider, Jason R.; Zielinski, Brandon A.; Ravichandran, Caitlin; Fletcher, P. Thomas; Alexander, Andrew L.; Bigler, Erin D.; Lange, Nicholas; Lainhart, Janet E.

    2011-01-01

    Group differences in resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging connectivity between individuals with autism and typically developing controls have been widely replicated for a small number of discrete brain regions, yet the whole-brain distribution of connectivity abnormalities in autism is not well characterized. It is also unclear…

  11. A thermal distribution function for relativistic magnetically insulated electron flows

    SciTech Connect

    Desjarlais, M.P.; Sudan, R.N.

    1986-05-01

    A distribution function is presented that may be used to study the effects of finite temperature on the equilibrium and stability properties of magnetically insulated electron flows. This distribution function has the useful property that it generates the thoroughly studied class of constant Q = ..omega../sup 2//sub p//..cap omega../sup 2/ equilibria in its zero-temperature limit. Analytic solutions are given for the general, constant Q, zero-temperature equilibria.

  12. Human brain somatic representation: a functional magnetic resonance mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero-Romo, Juan; Rojas, Rafael; Salgado, Perla; Sánchez-Cortázar, Julián; Vazquez-Vela, Arturo; Barrios, Fernando A.

    2001-10-01

    Central nervous system studies of injury and plasticity for the reorganization in the phantom limb sensation area presented. In particular functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) mapping of the somatic and motor cortex of amputee patients, in the case of referred sensations. Using fMRI we can show the correlation between structure and functional field and study the reorganization due to plasticity in the brain.

  13. Early functional magnetic resonance imaging activations predict language outcome after stroke.

    PubMed

    Saur, Dorothee; Ronneberger, Olaf; Kümmerer, Dorothee; Mader, Irina; Weiller, Cornelius; Klöppel, Stefan

    2010-04-01

    An accurate prediction of system-specific recovery after stroke is essential to provide rehabilitation therapy based on the individual needs. We explored the usefulness of functional magnetic resonance imaging scans from an auditory language comprehension experiment to predict individual language recovery in 21 aphasic stroke patients. Subjects with an at least moderate language impairment received extensive language testing 2 weeks and 6 months after left-hemispheric stroke. A multivariate machine learning technique was used to predict language outcome 6 months after stroke. In addition, we aimed to predict the degree of language improvement over 6 months. 76% of patients were correctly separated into those with good and bad language performance 6 months after stroke when based on functional magnetic resonance imaging data from language relevant areas. Accuracy further improved (86% correct assignments) when age and language score were entered alongside functional magnetic resonance imaging data into the fully automatic classifier. A similar accuracy was reached when predicting the degree of language improvement based on imaging, age and language performance. No prediction better than chance level was achieved when exploring the usefulness of diffusion weighted imaging as well as functional magnetic resonance imaging acquired two days after stroke. This study demonstrates the high potential of current machine learning techniques to predict system-specific clinical outcome even for a disease as heterogeneous as stroke. Best prediction of language recovery is achieved when the brain activation potential after system-specific stimulation is assessed in the second week post stroke. More intensive early rehabilitation could be provided for those with a predicted poor recovery and the extension to other systems, for example, motor and attention seems feasible. PMID:20299389

  14. Deriving a functional form of anhysteretic magnetization function for Jiles-Atherton theory of hysteresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiles, David; Raghunathan, Arun; Melikhov, Yevgen; Snyder, John

    2010-03-01

    The Jiles-Atherton (JA) theory explains the ferromagnetic hysteresis through contributions of irreversible and reversible magnetization components [1]. Anhysteretic magnetization function, a function of energy of the moments in a domain, forms a basic building block of this model. This function has known forms for specific cases of anisotropy: axially anisotropic (one-dimensional), planar anisotropic (two-dimensional), and isotropic (three-dimensional) [1, 2]. Hence there is a need to generalize anhysteretic magnetization function to extend JA theory to other forms of anisotropy. In this work, a functional form of anhysteretic magnetization function has been derived. It was shown that this functional form of anhysteretic magnetization with necessary boundary conditions can be reduced to the familiar specific model equations in the particular cases. This work extends the applicability of the JA model to systems with various anisotropy dependences. This research was supported by the UK EPSRC (EP/D057094) and the US NSF (DMR-0402716). [1] D. C. Jiles et. al., JMMM. 61, 48 (1986). [2] Y. M. Shi et. al., JMMM. 187, 75 (1998).

  15. Functional magnetic resonance imaging in medicine and physiology

    SciTech Connect

    Moonen, C.T.W.; van Zijl, P.C.M.; Frank, J.A.; Bihan, D.L.; Becker, E.D. )

    1990-10-05

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a well-established diagnostic tool that provides detailed information about macroscopic structure and anatomy. Recent advances in MRI allow the noninvasive spatial evaluation of various biophysical and biochemical processes in living systems. Specifically, the motion of water can be measured in processes such as vascular flow, capillary flow, diffusion, and exchange. In addition, the concentrations of various metabolites can be determined for the assessment of regional regulation of metabolism. Examples are given that demonstrate the use of functional MRI for clinical and research purposes. This development adds a new dimension to the application of magnetic resonance to medicine and physiology.

  16. Turbulent magnetic energy spectrum and the cancellation function of solar photospheric magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marschalkó, G.; Petrovay, K.; Petrovay, K.

    2013-11-01

    A simple analytical relation of form α=2κ-1 between the magnetic energy spectral exponent α of the turbulent magnetic field in the solar photosphere and its magnetic flux cancellation exponent κ, valid under certain restrictive assumptions, is tested and extended outside its range of validity in a series of Monte Carlo simulations. In these numerical tests artificial ``magnetograms'' are constructed in 1D and 2D by superposing a discrete set of Fourier modes of the magnetic field distribution with amplitudes following a power law spectrum and measuring the cancellation function on these simulated magnetograms. Our results confirm the validity of the analytical relation and extend it to the domain α<-1 where κ-> 0 as α-> -∞. The observationally derived upper limit of 0.38 on κ implies α<-0.24 in the granular size range, apparently at odds with a small scale dynamo driven in the inertial range.

  17. Anatomical, functional and molecular biomarker applications of magnetic resonance neuroimaging

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Christina H

    2015-01-01

    MRI and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) along with computed tomography and PET are the most common imaging modalities used in the clinics to detect structural abnormalities and pathological conditions in the brain. MRI generates superb image resolution/contrast without radiation exposure that is associated with computed tomography and PET; MRS and spectroscopic imaging technologies allow us to measure changes in brain biochemistry. Increasingly, neurobiologists and MRI scientists are collaborating to solve neuroscience problems across sub-cellular through anatomical levels. To achieve successful cross-disciplinary collaborations, neurobiologists must have sufficient knowledge of magnetic resonance principles and applications in order to effectively communicate with their MRI colleagues. This review provides an overview of magnetic resonance techniques and how they can be used to gain insight into the active brain at the anatomical, functional and molecular levels with the goal of encouraging neurobiologists to include MRI/MRS as a research tool in their endeavors. PMID:25774094

  18. Exponentially localized Wannier functions in periodic zero flux magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Nittis, G.; Lein, M.

    2011-11-01

    In this work, we investigate conditions which ensure the existence of an exponentially localized Wannier basis for a given periodic hamiltonian. We extend previous results [Panati, G., Ann. Henri Poincare 8, 995-1011 (2007), 10.1007/s00023-007-0326-8] to include periodic zero flux magnetic fields which is the setting also investigated by Kuchment [J. Phys. A: Math. Theor. 42, 025203 (2009), 10.1088/1751-8113/42/2/025203]. The new notion of magnetic symmetry plays a crucial rôle; to a large class of symmetries for a non-magnetic system, one can associate "magnetic" symmetries of the related magnetic system. Observing that the existence of an exponentially localized Wannier basis is equivalent to the triviality of the so-called Bloch bundle, a rank m hermitian vector bundle over the Brillouin zone, we prove that magnetic time-reversal symmetry is sufficient to ensure the triviality of the Bloch bundle in spatial dimension d = 1, 2, 3. For d = 4, an exponentially localized Wannier basis exists provided that the trace per unit volume of a suitable function of the Fermi projection vanishes. For d > 4 and d ⩽ 2m (stable rank regime) only the exponential localization of a subset of Wannier functions is shown; this improves part of the analysis of Kuchment [J. Phys. A: Math. Theor. 42, 025203 (2009), 10.1088/1751-8113/42/2/025203]. Finally, for d > 4 and d > 2m (unstable rank regime) we show that the mere analysis of Chern classes does not suffice in order to prove triviality and thus exponential localization.

  19. Green's function of compressible Petschek-type magnetic reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penz, Thomas; Semenov, V. S.; Ivanova, V. V.; Heyn, M. F.; Ivanov, I. B.; Biernat, H. K.

    2006-05-01

    We present a method to analyze the wave and shock structures arising from Petschek-type magnetic reconnection. Based on a time-dependent analytical approach developed by Heyn and Semenov [Phys. Plasmas 3, 2725 (1996)] and Semenov et al. [Phys. Plasmas 11, 62 (2004)], we calculate the perturbations caused by a delta function-shaped reconnection electric field, which allows us to achieve a representation of the plasma variables in the form of Green's functions. Different configurations for the initial conditions are considered. In the case of symmetric, antiparallel magnetic fields and symmetric plasma density, the well-known structure of an Alfvén discontinuity, a fast body wave, a slow shock, a slow wave, and a tube wave occurs. In the case of asymmetric, antiparallel magnetic fields, additionally surface waves are found. We also discuss the case of symmetric, antiparallel magnetic fields and asymmetric densities, which leads to a faster propagation in the lower half plane, causing side waves forming a Mach cone in the upper half plane. Complex effects like anisotropic propagation characteristics, intrinsic wave coupling, and the generation of different nonlinear and linear wave modes in a finite β plasma are retained. The temporal evolution of these wave and shock structures is shown.

  20. Magnetic anisotropy of metal functionalized phthalocyanine 2D networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Guojun; Zhang, Yun; Xiao, Huaping; Cao, Juexian

    2016-06-01

    The magnetic anisotropy of metal including Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Mo, Tc, Ru, Rh, W, Re, Os, Ir atoms functionalized phthalocyanine networks have been investigated with first-principles calculations. The magnetic moments can be expressed as 8-n μB with n the electronic number of outmost d shell in the transition metals. The huge magnetocrystalline anisotropy energy (MAE) is obtained by torque method. Especially, the MAE of Re functionalized phthalocyanine network is about 20 meV with an easy axis perpendicular to the plane of phthalocyanine network. The MAE is further manipulated by applying the external biaxial strain. It is found that the MAE is linear increasing with the external strain in the range of -2% to 2%. Our results indicate an effective approach to modulate the MAE for practical application.

  1. Acquired amusia.

    PubMed

    Clark, Camilla N; Golden, Hannah L; Warren, Jason D

    2015-01-01

    Recent developments in the cognitive neuroscience of music suggest that a further review of the topic of amusia is timely. In this chapter, we first consider previous taxonomies of amusia and propose a fresh framework for understanding the amusias, essentially as disorders of cognitive information processing. We critically review current cognitive and neuroanatomic findings in the published literature on amusia. We assess the extent to which the clinical and neuropsychologic evidence in amusia can be reconciled; both with the information-processing framework we propose, and with the picture of the brain organization of music and language processing emerging from cognitive neuroscience and functional neuroimaging studies. The balance of evidence suggests that the amusias can be understood as disorders of musical object cognition targeting separable levels of an information-processing hierarchy and underpinned by specific brain network dysfunction. The neuroanatomic associations of the amusias show substantial overlap with brain networks that process speech; however, this convergence leaves scope for separable brain mechanisms based on altered connectivity and dynamics across culprit networks. The study of the amusias contributes to an increasingly complex picture of the musical brain that transcends any simple dichotomy between music and speech or other complex sounds. PMID:25726293

  2. Toward functional magnetic stimulation (FMS) theory and experiment.

    PubMed

    Davey, K; Luo, L; Ross, D A

    1994-11-01

    This paper examines the use of magnetic fields to functionally stimulate peripheral nerves. All electric fields are induced via a changing magnetic field whose flux is entirely confined within a closed magnetic circuit. Induced electric fields are simulated using a nonlinear boundary element solver. The induced fields are solved using duality theory. The accuracy of these predictions is verified by saline bath experiments. Next, the theory is applied to the stimulation of nerves using small, partially occluded ferrite and laminated vanadium permendur cores. Experiments demonstrate the successful stimulation of peripheral nerves in the African bullfrog with 11 mA, 153 mV excitations. These results offer a new vista of possibilities in the area of functional nerve stimulation. Unlike functional electric stimulation (FES), FMS does not involve any half cell reactions, and thus would not have the commensurate FES restrictions regarding balanced biphasic stimulation, strength duration balances, and oxidation issues, always exercising care that the electrodes remain in the reversible operating regime. PMID:8001991

  3. Lanthanide-Functionalized Hydrophilic Magnetic Hybrid Nanoparticles: Assembly, Magnetic Behaviour, and Photophysical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Shuai; Tang, Yu; Guo, Haijun; Qin, Shenjun; Wu, Jiang

    2016-05-01

    The lanthanide-functionalized multifunctional hybrid nanoparticles combining the superparamagnetic core and the luminescent europium complex were successfully designed and assembled via layer-by-layer strategy in this work. It is noted that the hybrid nanoparticles were modified by a hydrophilic polymer polyethyleneimine (PEI) through hydrogen bonding which bestowed excellent hydrophilicity and biocompatibility on this material. A bright-red luminescence was observed by fluorescence microscopy, revealing that these magnetic-luminescent nanoparticles were both colloidally and chemically stable in PBS solution. Therefore, the nanocomposite with magnetic resonance response and fluorescence probe property is considered to be of great potential in multi-modal bioimaging and diagnostic applications.

  4. Lanthanide-Functionalized Hydrophilic Magnetic Hybrid Nanoparticles: Assembly, Magnetic Behaviour, and Photophysical Properties.

    PubMed

    Han, Shuai; Tang, Yu; Guo, Haijun; Qin, Shenjun; Wu, Jiang

    2016-12-01

    The lanthanide-functionalized multifunctional hybrid nanoparticles combining the superparamagnetic core and the luminescent europium complex were successfully designed and assembled via layer-by-layer strategy in this work. It is noted that the hybrid nanoparticles were modified by a hydrophilic polymer polyethyleneimine (PEI) through hydrogen bonding which bestowed excellent hydrophilicity and biocompatibility on this material. A bright-red luminescence was observed by fluorescence microscopy, revealing that these magnetic-luminescent nanoparticles were both colloidally and chemically stable in PBS solution. Therefore, the nanocomposite with magnetic resonance response and fluorescence probe property is considered to be of great potential in multi-modal bioimaging and diagnostic applications. PMID:27245169

  5. Principal and independent component analysis of concomitant functional near infrared spectroscopy and magnetic resonance imaging data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schelkanova, Irina; Toronov, Vladislav

    2011-07-01

    Although near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is now widely used both in emerging clinical techniques and in cognitive neuroscience, the development of the apparatuses and signal processing methods for these applications is still a hot research topic. The main unresolved problem in functional NIRS is the separation of functional signals from the contaminations by systemic and local physiological fluctuations. This problem was approached by using various signal processing methods, including blind signal separation techniques. In particular, principal component analysis (PCA) and independent component analysis (ICA) were applied to the data acquired at the same wavelength and at multiple sites on the human or animal heads during functional activation. These signal processing procedures resulted in a number of principal or independent components that could be attributed to functional activity but their physiological meaning remained unknown. On the other hand, the best physiological specificity is provided by broadband NIRS. Also, a comparison with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) allows determining the spatial origin of fNIRS signals. In this study we applied PCA and ICA to broadband NIRS data to distill the components correlating with the breath hold activation paradigm and compared them with the simultaneously acquired fMRI signals. Breath holding was used because it generates blood carbon dioxide (CO2) which increases the blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) signal as CO2 acts as a cerebral vasodilator. Vasodilation causes increased cerebral blood flow which washes deoxyhaemoglobin out of the cerebral capillary bed thus increasing both the cerebral blood volume and oxygenation. Although the original signals were quite diverse, we found very few different components which corresponded to fMRI signals at different locations in the brain and to different physiological chromophores.

  6. Intraoperative monitoring of motor function by magnetic motor evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    Lee, W Y; Hou, W Y; Yang, L H; Lin, S M

    1995-03-01

    Under etomidate anesthesia, motor evoked potentials produced by magnetic stimulation were successfully recorded from 10 thenar muscles and 10 anterior tibial muscles of eight patients who had undergone surgery on the medulla oblongata and the cervical and thoracic spinal cords. Recordings taken before placing the neural tissue at risk were assessed for variability in amplitude and latency. The lower limit in amplitude was approximately one-third (25-43%) of the baseline. The latencies were more difficult to monitor than were the amplitudes. The latency variations were 2.56 +/- 0.50 milliseconds for the hand and 6.84 +/- 1.37 milliseconds for the leg. During surgery, the unilateral recordings of two patients were transiently lost but partially recovered after a pause in the operation. No obvious postoperative weaknesses in the corresponding limbs occurred. One patient, who showed a permanent loss of unilateral recording, had transient monoplegia with a complete recovery. None of the remaining five patients who had amplitudes larger than one-third of the baseline at the end of the operation had additional motor deficits. Our conclusions are that under etomidate anesthesia, the magnetic motor evoked potentials can be convenient and reliable monitors of motor function, that changes in the amplitude may be superior to those in the latency for intraoperative warning, that the criterion for potential neural damage under magnetic motor evoked potential monitoring might be an amplitude reduction of two-thirds of the control value, and that the magnetic stimulation seems to be more sensitive than the electrical stimulation in the monitoring of motor function and also allows more time and opportunities for the motor function to recover. PMID:7753349

  7. Magnetic Alignment and Charge Transport Improvement in Functional Soft Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majewski, Pawel W.

    The realization of nanostructured functional materials by self-assembly in polymers and polymer nanocomposites is adversely affected by persisting structural defects which greatly diminish the performance of the material. The use of magnetic fields to impose long-range order is investigated in three distinct systems - ion-conducting block copolymers, semiconducting nanowire-polymer composites and lyotropic surfactant mesophases. The alignment process is quantitatively studied with X-ray scattering and microscopic methods. Time and temperature resolved data collected in situ during the magnetic experiments provide an insight into the thermodynamic and kinetic aspects of the process. These data together with simultaneous electrical conductivity measurements allow relating fundamental structural properties (e.g., morphology and long-range order) to transport properties (i.e., conductivity). In particular, it is demonstrated that magnetic fields offer a viable route for improvement of electric conductivity in these systems. More than an order of magnitude increase in conductivity is recorded in magnetically-annealed materials. The resulting aligned nanostructured systems are attractive for ordered solid polymer electrolyte membranes, heterojunction photovoltaic devices and generally help to understand charge transport mechanisms in anisotropic heterogeneous systems.

  8. Magnetic Helicity Spectrum of Solar Wind Fluctuations as a Function of the Angle with Respect to the Local Mean Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podesta, J. J.; Gary, S. P.

    2011-06-01

    Magnetic field data acquired by the Ulysses spacecraft in high-speed streams over the poles of the Sun are used to investigate the normalized magnetic helicity spectrum σ m as a function of the angle θ between the local mean magnetic field and the flow direction of the solar wind. This spectrum provides important information about the constituent modes at the transition to kinetic scales that occurs near the spectral break separating the inertial range from the dissipation range. The energetically dominant signal at scales near the thermal proton gyroradius k bottomρ i ~ 1 often covers a wide band of propagation angles centered about the perpendicular direction, θ ~= 90° ± 30°. This signal is consistent with a spectrum of obliquely propagating kinetic Alfvén waves with k bottom Gt k par in which there is more energy in waves propagating away from the Sun and along the direction of the local mean magnetic field than toward the Sun. Moreover, this signal is principally responsible for the reduced magnetic helicity spectrum measured using Fourier transform techniques. The observations also reveal a subdominant population of nearly parallel propagating electromagnetic waves near the proton inertial scale k par c/ωpi ~ 1 that often exhibit high magnetic helicity |σ m | ~= 1. These waves are believed to be caused by proton pressure anisotropy instabilities that regulate distribution functions in the collisionless solar wind. Because of the existence of a drift of alpha particles with respect to the protons, the proton temperature anisotropy instability that operates when T pbottom/T ppar > 1 preferentially generates outward propagating ion-cyclotron waves and the fire-hose instability that operates when T pbottom/T ppar < 1 preferentially generates inward propagating whistler waves. These kinetic processes provide a natural explanation for the magnetic field observations.

  9. MAGNETIC HELICITY SPECTRUM OF SOLAR WIND FLUCTUATIONS AS A FUNCTION OF THE ANGLE WITH RESPECT TO THE LOCAL MEAN MAGNETIC FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Podesta, J. J.; Gary, S. P.

    2011-06-10

    Magnetic field data acquired by the Ulysses spacecraft in high-speed streams over the poles of the Sun are used to investigate the normalized magnetic helicity spectrum {sigma}{sub m} as a function of the angle {theta} between the local mean magnetic field and the flow direction of the solar wind. This spectrum provides important information about the constituent modes at the transition to kinetic scales that occurs near the spectral break separating the inertial range from the dissipation range. The energetically dominant signal at scales near the thermal proton gyroradius k{sub perpendicular{rho}i} {approx} 1 often covers a wide band of propagation angles centered about the perpendicular direction, {theta} {approx_equal} 90{sup 0} {+-} 30{sup 0}. This signal is consistent with a spectrum of obliquely propagating kinetic Alfven waves with k{sub perpendicular} >> k{sub ||} in which there is more energy in waves propagating away from the Sun and along the direction of the local mean magnetic field than toward the Sun. Moreover, this signal is principally responsible for the reduced magnetic helicity spectrum measured using Fourier transform techniques. The observations also reveal a subdominant population of nearly parallel propagating electromagnetic waves near the proton inertial scale k{sub ||} c/{omega}{sub pi} {approx} 1 that often exhibit high magnetic helicity |{sigma}{sub m}| {approx_equal} 1. These waves are believed to be caused by proton pressure anisotropy instabilities that regulate distribution functions in the collisionless solar wind. Because of the existence of a drift of alpha particles with respect to the protons, the proton temperature anisotropy instability that operates when T{sub pperpendicular}/T{sub p||} > 1 preferentially generates outward propagating ion-cyclotron waves and the fire-hose instability that operates when T{sub pperpendicular}/T{sub p||} < 1 preferentially generates inward propagating whistler waves. These kinetic processes

  10. Elucidating the Function of Penetratin and a Static Magnetic Field in Cellular Uptake of Magnetic Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Suman; Smith, Carol Anne; del Pino, Pablo; de la Fuente, Jesus M.; Mullin, Margaret; Hursthouse, Andrew; Stirling, David; Berry, Catherine C.

    2013-01-01

    Nanotechnology plays an increasingly important role in the biomedical arena. In particular, magnetic nanoparticles (mNPs) have become important tools in molecular diagnostics, in vivo imaging and improved treatment of disease, with the ultimate aim of producing a more theranostic approach. Due to their small sizes, the nanoparticles can cross most of the biological barriers such as the blood vessels and the blood brain barrier, thus providing ubiquitous access to most tissues. In all biomedical applications maximum nanoparticle uptake into cells is required. Two promising methods employed to this end include functionalization of mNPs with cell-penetrating peptides to promote efficient translocation of cargo into the cell and the use of external magnetic fields for enhanced delivery. This study aimed to compare the effect of both penetratin and a static magnetic field with regards to the cellular uptake of 200 nm magnetic NPs and determine the route of uptake by both methods. Results demonstrated that both techniques increased particle uptake, with penetratin proving more cell specific. Clathrin- medicated endocytosis appeared to be responsible for uptake as shown via PCR and western blot, with Pitstop 2 (known to selectively block clathrin formation) blocking particle uptake. Interestingly, it was further shown that a magnetic field was able to reverse or overcome the blocking, suggesting an alternative route of uptake. PMID:24275948

  11. Perpendicular magnetization reversal mechanism of functional FePt films for magnetic storage medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Da-Hua; Chi, Po-Wei; Chao, Chung-Hua

    2014-11-01

    Magnetization reversal mechanism and related surface morphology of functional FePt(001) alloy films with large perpendicular magnetic anisotropy have been explored by alternate-atomic-layer deposition onto Pt/MgO(100) substrates via electron beam evaporation, and all evaporated films have been kept at in-situ substrate heating temperature of 400 °C. The FePt alloy film was composed of ultrathin [Fe (0.5 nm)/Pt (0.5 nm)]n Fe/Pt multilayer structures. The corresponding thickness of multilayer films was controlled by the periodic bilayer numbers (n) and varied in the range from 15 nm (n = 15) to 30 nm (n = 30). The surface topography was observed and varied from granular-like island to continuous microstructures with increasing the periodic numbers of Fe/Pt bilayer films. The measurement of angular dependent coercivity showed a tendency of the near rotation of reverse-domain type (n = 15) shift towards the domain-wall motion as a typical peak behavior (n = 30) with increasing the periodic bilayer numbers of Fe/Pt multilayers. On the basis of all magnetic measurements and corresponding magnetization analysis, indicating that the perpendicular magnetization reversal mechanism and related surface morphology of ordered FePt(001) alloy films could be systematically controlled by varying the periodic bilayer numbers accompanied with the thickness dependence.

  12. Nuclear chiral and magnetic rotation in covariant density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Jie; Zhao, Pengwei

    2016-05-01

    Excitations of chiral rotation observed in triaxial nuclei and magnetic and/or antimagnetic rotations (AMR) seen in near-spherical nuclei have attracted a lot of attention. Unlike conventional rotation in well-deformed or superdeformed nuclei, here the rotational axis is not necessary coinciding with any principal axis of the nuclear density distribution. Thus, tilted axis cranking (TAC) is mandatory to describe these excitations self-consistently in the framework of covariant density functional theory (CDFT). We will briefly introduce the formalism of TAC–CDFT and its application for magnetic and AMR phenomena. Configuration-fixed CDFT and its predictions for nuclear chiral configurations and for favorable triaxial deformation parameters are also presented, and the discoveries of the multiple chiral doublets in 133Ce and 103Rh are discussed.

  13. Cognitive Function Related to the Sirh11/Zcchc16 Gene Acquired from an LTR Retrotransposon in Eutherians

    PubMed Central

    Irie, Masahito; Yoshikawa, Masanobu; Ono, Ryuichi; Iwafune, Hirotaka; Furuse, Tamio; Yamada, Ikuko; Wakana, Shigeharu; Yamashita, Yui; Abe, Takaya; Ishino, Fumitoshi; Kaneko-Ishino, Tomoko

    2015-01-01

    Gene targeting of mouse S ushi- i chi-related r etrotransposon h omologue 11 / Z inc finger CCHC domain-containing 16 (Sirh11/Zcchc16) causes abnormal behaviors related to cognition, including attention, impulsivity and working memory. Sirh11/Zcchc16 encodes a CCHC type of zinc-finger protein that exhibits high homology to an LTR retrotransposon Gag protein. Upon microdialysis analysis of the prefrontal cortex region, the recovery rate of noradrenaline (NA) was reduced compared with dopamine (DA) after perfusion of high potassium-containing artificial cerebrospinal fluid in knockout (KO) mice. These data indicate that Sirh11/Zcchc16 is involved in cognitive function in the brain, possibly via the noradrenergic system, in the contemporary mouse developmental systems. Interestingly, it is highly conserved in three out of the four major groups of the eutherians, euarchontoglires, laurasiatheria and afrotheria, but is heavily mutated in xenarthran species such as the sloth and armadillo, suggesting that it has contributed to brain evolution in the three major eutherian lineages, including humans and mice. Sirh11/Zcchc16 is the first SIRH gene to be involved in brain function, instead of just the placenta, as seen in the case of Peg10, Peg11/Rtl1 and Sirh7/Ldoc1. PMID:26402067

  14. Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP): a regulator of the innate and acquired immune functions in juvenile fish.

    PubMed

    Lugo, Juana Maria; Carpio, Yamila; Oliva, Aymé; Morales, Antonio; Estrada, Mario Pablo

    2010-09-01

    To date, published in-vivo studies on the action of the PACAP in fish are few and these are concerned with reproduction, brain development and feeding behavior. Recently, we demonstrated for the first time that PACAP, apart from its neuroendocrine role, influences immune functions in fish larvae. In this work, we have evaluated the effects of recombinant Clarias gariepinus PACAP administration by intraperitoneal injection on important immune parameters in juvenile fish. We observed that a single injection of the recombinant peptide (0.1 microg per g of body weight) was able to increase the nitric oxide synthase-derived metabolites (NOS) and total immunoglobulin M (IgM) concentration in serum of juvenile catfish C. gariepinus and tilapia Orechromis niloticus respectively, after 24 h of its administration. In addition, our results showed that recombinant PACAP increases IgM, NOS and lysozyme in serum correlated with its ability to enhance growth performance in juvenile fish. Finally, the PACAP mRNA expression and PACAP immunoreactivity detected in peripheral blood leucocytes from juvenile catfish suggest a direct autocrine or/and paracrine mechanism of regulation of this peptide to mediate immune functions in fish. PMID:20510368

  15. Mammalian-specific genomic functions: Newly acquired traits generated by genomic imprinting and LTR retrotransposon-derived genes in mammals

    PubMed Central

    KANEKO-ISHINO, Tomoko; ISHINO, Fumitoshi

    2015-01-01

    Mammals, including human beings, have evolved a unique viviparous reproductive system and a highly developed central nervous system. How did these unique characteristics emerge in mammalian evolution, and what kinds of changes did occur in the mammalian genomes as evolution proceeded? A key conceptual term in approaching these issues is “mammalian-specific genomic functions”, a concept covering both mammalian-specific epigenetics and genetics. Genomic imprinting and LTR retrotransposon-derived genes are reviewed as the representative, mammalian-specific genomic functions that are essential not only for the current mammalian developmental system, but also mammalian evolution itself. First, the essential roles of genomic imprinting in mammalian development, especially related to viviparous reproduction via placental function, as well as the emergence of genomic imprinting in mammalian evolution, are discussed. Second, we introduce the novel concept of “mammalian-specific traits generated by mammalian-specific genes from LTR retrotransposons”, based on the finding that LTR retrotransposons served as a critical driving force in the mammalian evolution via generating mammalian-specific genes. PMID:26666304

  16. Cognitive Function Related to the Sirh11/Zcchc16 Gene Acquired from an LTR Retrotransposon in Eutherians.

    PubMed

    Irie, Masahito; Yoshikawa, Masanobu; Ono, Ryuichi; Iwafune, Hirotaka; Furuse, Tamio; Yamada, Ikuko; Wakana, Shigeharu; Yamashita, Yui; Abe, Takaya; Ishino, Fumitoshi; Kaneko-Ishino, Tomoko

    2015-09-01

    Gene targeting of mouse Sushi-ichi-related retrotransposon homologue 11/Zinc finger CCHC domain-containing 16 (Sirh11/Zcchc16) causes abnormal behaviors related to cognition, including attention, impulsivity and working memory. Sirh11/Zcchc16 encodes a CCHC type of zinc-finger protein that exhibits high homology to an LTR retrotransposon Gag protein. Upon microdialysis analysis of the prefrontal cortex region, the recovery rate of noradrenaline (NA) was reduced compared with dopamine (DA) after perfusion of high potassium-containing artificial cerebrospinal fluid in knockout (KO) mice. These data indicate that Sirh11/Zcchc16 is involved in cognitive function in the brain, possibly via the noradrenergic system, in the contemporary mouse developmental systems. Interestingly, it is highly conserved in three out of the four major groups of the eutherians, euarchontoglires, laurasiatheria and afrotheria, but is heavily mutated in xenarthran species such as the sloth and armadillo, suggesting that it has contributed to brain evolution in the three major eutherian lineages, including humans and mice. Sirh11/Zcchc16 is the first SIRH gene to be involved in brain function, instead of just the placenta, as seen in the case of Peg10, Peg11/Rtl1 and Sirh7/Ldoc1. PMID:26402067

  17. The WHO-DAS II: psychometric properties in the measurement of functional health status in adults with acquired hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Chisolm, Theresa H; Abrams, Harvey B; McArdle, Rachel; Wilson, Richard H; Doyle, Patrick J

    2005-01-01

    The World Health Organization's (WHO) Disability Assessment Scale II (WHO-DAS II) is a generic health-status instrument firmly grounded in the WHO's International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (WHO-ICF). As such, it assesses functioning for six domains: communication, mobility, self-care, interpersonal, life activities, and participation. Domain scores aggregate to a total score. Because the WHO-DAS II contains questions relevant to hearing and communication, it has good face validity for use as an outcome measure for audiologic intervention. The purpose of the present study was to determine the psychometric properties of the WHO-DAS II on a sample of individuals with adult-onset hearing loss, including convergent validity, internal consistency, and test-retest stability. Convergent validity was established by examining correlations between the WHO-DAS II (domain and total scores) and the Abbreviated Profile of Hearing Aid Benefit (APHAB) and the Hearing Aid Handicap for the Elderly (HHIE), two disease-specific measures, as well as with the Short Form-36 for veterans (SF-36V), a second generic measure. Data on all four measures were collected from 380 older individuals with adult-onset hearing loss who were not hearing aid users. The results of the convergent validity analysis revealed that the WHODAS II communication domain score was moderately and significantly correlated with scores on the APHAB and the HHIE. WHO-DAS II interpersonal and participation domain scores and the total scores were also moderately and significantly correlated with HHIE scores. These findings support the validity of using the WHO-DAS II for assessing activity limitations and participation restrictions of adult-onset hearing loss. Several WHO-DAS II domain scores and the total score were also significantly and moderately-markedly correlated with scores from the SF-36V. These findings support the validity of the WHO-DAS II as a generic health-status instrument

  18. Visualizing functional pathways in the human brain using correlation tensors and magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Ding, Zhaohua; Xu, Ran; Bailey, Stephen K; Wu, Tung-Lin; Morgan, Victoria L; Cutting, Laurie E; Anderson, Adam W; Gore, John C

    2016-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging usually detects changes in blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) signals from T2*-sensitive acquisitions, and is most effective in detecting activity in brain cortex which is irrigated by rich vasculature to meet high metabolic demands. We recently demonstrated that MRI signals from T2*-sensitive acquisitions in a resting state exhibit structure-specific temporal correlations along white matter tracts. In this report we validate our preliminary findings and introduce spatio-temporal functional correlation tensors to characterize the directional preferences of temporal correlations in MRI signals acquired at rest. The results bear a remarkable similarity to data obtained by diffusion tensor imaging but without any diffusion-encoding gradients. Just as in gray matter, temporal correlations in resting state signals may reflect intrinsic synchronizations of neural activity in white matter. Here we demonstrate that functional correlation tensors are able to visualize long range white matter tracts as well as short range sub-cortical fibers imaged at rest, and that evoked functional activities alter these structures and enhance the visualization of relevant neural circuitry. Furthermore, we explore the biophysical mechanisms underlying these phenomena by comparing pulse sequences, which suggest that white matter signal variations are consistent with hemodynamic (BOLD) changes associated with neural activity. These results suggest new ways to evaluate MRI signal changes within white matter. PMID:26477562

  19. Superparamagnetic And Paramagnetic MRI Contrast Agents: Application Of Rapid Magnetic Resonance Imaging To Assess Renal Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvlin, Mark J.; Renshaw, Perry F.; Arger, Peter; Kundel, Harold L.; Dougherty, Larry; Axel, Leon; Kassab, Eleanor; Moore, Bethanne

    1988-06-01

    The paramagnetic chelate complex, gadolinium-diethylene-triamine-pentaacetic acid, Gd-DTPA, and superparamagnetic particles, such as those composed of dextran coated magnetite, function as magnetic resonance contrast agents by changing the relaxation rates, 1/T1 and 1/T2. The effects that these agents have upon MR signal intensity are determined by: the inherent biophysical properties of the tissue being imaged, the concentration of the contrast agent and the data acquisition scheme (pulse sequence parameters) employed. Following the time course of MR signal change in the first minutes after the injection of contrast agent(s) allows a dynamic assessment of organ functions in a manner analogous to certain nuclear medicine studies. In order to study renal function, sequential MR fast scan images, gradient echo (TR=35/TE=7 msec, flip angle=25 degrees), were acquired, one every 12 seconds, after intravenous injection of Gd-DTPA and/or dextran-magnetite. Gd-DTPA, which is freely filtered at the glomerulus and is neither secreted nor reabsorbed, provides information concerning renal perfusion, glomerular filtration and tubular concentrating ability. Dextran-magnetite (200 A diameter), which is primarily contained within the intravascular space shortly after injection, provides information on blood flow to and distribution within the kidney. The MR signal change observed after administration of contrast agents varied dramatically depending upon the agents injected and the imaging parameters used. Hence a broad range of physiolgic processes may be described using these techniques, i.e. contrast agent enhanced functional MR examinations.

  20. Visualizing Functional Pathways in the Human Brain Using Correlation Tensors and Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Zhaohua; Xu, Ran; Bailey, Stephen K.; Wu, Tung-Lin; Morgan, Victoria L.; Cutting, Laurie E.; Anderson, Adam W.; Gore, John C.

    2016-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging usually detects changes in blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) signals from T2*-sensitive acquisitions, and is most effective in detecting activity in brain cortex which is irrigated by rich vasculature to meet high metabolic demands. We recently demonstrated that MRI signals from T2*-sensitive acquisitions in a resting state exhibit structure-specific temporal correlations along white matter tracts. In this report we validate our preliminary findings and introduce spatio-temporal functional correlation tensors to characterize the directional preferences of temporal correlations in MRI signals acquired at rest. The results bear a remarkable similarity to data obtained by diffusion tensor imaging but without any diffusion-encoding gradients. Just as in gray matter, temporal correlations in resting state signals may reflect intrinsic synchronizations of neural activity in white matter. Here we demonstrate that functional correlation tensors are able to visualize long range white matter tracts as well as short range sub-cortical fibers imaged at rest, and that evoked functional activities alter these structures and enhance the visualization of relevant neural circuitry. Furthermore, we explore the biophysical mechanisms underlying these phenomena by comparing pulse sequences, which suggest that white matter signal variations are consistent with hemodynamic (BOLD) changes associated with neural activity. These results suggest new ways to evaluate MRI signal changes within white matter. PMID:26477562

  1. Functional renormalization group - a new approach to frustrated quantum magnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reuther, Johannes

    The experimental and theoretical investigation of quantum spin systems has become one of the central disciplines of contemporary condensed matter physics. From an experimental viewpoint, the field has been significantly fueled by the recent synthesis of novel strongly correlated materials with exotic magnetic or quantum paramagnetic ground states. From a theoretical perspective, however, the numerical treatment of realistic models for quantum magnetism in two and three spatial dimensions still constitutes a serious challenge. This particularly applies to frustrated systems, which complicate the employment of established methods. This talk intends to propagate the pseudofermion functional renormalization group (PFFRG) as a novel approach to determine large size ground state correlations of a wide class of spin Hamiltonians. Using a diagrammatic pseudofermion representation for quantum spin models, the PFFRG performs systematic summations in all two-particle fermionic interaction channels, capturing the correct balance between classical magnetic ordering and quantum fluctuations. Numerical results for various frustrated spin models on different 2D and 3D lattices are reviewed, and benchmarked against other methods if available.

  2. Density Functional Theory applied to magnetic materials: Mn3O4 at different hybrid functionals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, R. A. P.; de Lazaro, S. R.; Pianaro, S. A.

    2015-10-01

    Antiferromagnetic Mn3O4 in spinel structure was investigated employing the Density Functional Theory at different hybrid functionals with default HF exchange percentage. Structural, electronic and magnetic properties were examined. Structural results were in agreement with experimental and Hartree-Fock results showing that the octahedral site was distorted by the Jahn-Teller effect, which changed the electron density distribution. Band-gap results for B3LYP and B3PW hybrid functionals were closer to the experimental when compared to PBE0. Mulliken Population Analysis revealed magnetic moments very close to ideal d4 and d5 electron configurations of Mn3+ and Mn2+, respectively. Electron density maps are useful to determine that oxygen atoms mediate the electron transfer between octahedral and tetrahedral clusters. Magnetic properties were investigated from theoretical results for exchange coupling constants. Intratetrahedral and tetra-octahedral interactions were observed to be antiferromagnetic, whereas, octahedral sites presented antiferromagnetic interactions in the same layer and ferromagnetic in adjacent layers. Results showed that only default B3LYP was successful to describe magnetic properties of antiferromagnetic materials in agreement with experimental results.

  3. Functional imaging of the human placenta with magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Siauve, Nathalie; Chalouhi, Gihad E; Deloison, Benjamin; Alison, Marianne; Clement, Olivier; Ville, Yves; Salomon, Laurent J

    2015-10-01

    Abnormal placentation is responsible for most failures in pregnancy; however, an understanding of placental functions remains largely concealed from noninvasive, in vivo investigations. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is safe in pregnancy for magnetic fields of up to 3 Tesla and is being used increasingly to improve the accuracy of prenatal imaging. Functional MRI (fMRI) of the placenta has not yet been validated in a clinical setting, and most data are derived from animal studies. FMRI could be used to further explore placental functions that are related to vascularization, oxygenation, and metabolism in human pregnancies by the use of various enhancement processes. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI is best able to quantify placental perfusion, permeability, and blood volume fractions. However, the transplacental passage of Gadolinium-based contrast agents represents a significant safety concern for this procedure in humans. There are alternative contrast agents that may be safer in pregnancy or that do not cross the placenta. Arterial spin labeling MRI relies on magnetically labeled water to quantify the blood flows within the placenta. A disadvantage of this technique is a poorer signal-to-noise ratio. Based on arterial spin labeling, placental perfusion in normal pregnancy is 176 ± 91 mL × min(-1) × 100 g(-1) and decreases in cases with intrauterine growth restriction. Blood oxygen level-dependent and oxygen-enhanced MRIs do not assess perfusion but measure the response of the placenta to changes in oxygen levels with the use of hemoglobin as an endogenous contrast agent. Diffusion-weighted imaging and intravoxel incoherent motion MRI do not require exogenous contrast agents, instead they use the movement of water molecules within tissues. The apparent diffusion coefficient and perfusion fraction are significantly lower in placentas of growth-restricted fetuses when compared with normal pregnancies. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy has the ability to extract

  4. Approach to combined-function magnets via symplectic slicing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titze, M.

    2016-05-01

    In this article we describe how to obtain symplectic "slice" maps for combined-function magnets, by using a method of generating functions. A feature of this method is that one can use an unexpanded and unsplit Hamiltonian. From such a slice map we obtain a first-order map which is symplectic at the closed orbit. We also obtain a symplectic kick map. Both results were implemented into the widely used program MAD-X to regain, in particular, the twiss parameters for the sliced model of the Proton Synchrotron at CERN. In addition, we obtain recursion equations for symplectic maps of general time-dependent Hamiltonians, which might be useful even beyond the scope of accelerator physics.

  5. [Functional magnetic resonance imaging in psychiatry and psychotherapy].

    PubMed

    Derntl, B; Habel, U; Schneider, F

    2010-01-01

    technical improvements, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has become the most popular and versatile imaging method in psychiatric research. The scope of this manuscript is to briefly introduce the basics of MR physics, the blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) contrast as well as the principles of MR study design and functional data analysis. The presentation of exemplary studies on emotion recognition and empathy in schizophrenia patients will highlight the importance of MR methods in psychiatry. Finally, we will demonstrate insights into new developments that will further boost MR techniques in clinical research and will help to gain more insight into dysfunctional neural networks underlying cognitive and emotional deficits in psychiatric patients. Moreover, some techniques such as neurofeedback seem promising for evaluation of therapy effects on a behavioral and neural level. PMID:20057981

  6. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Acute Kidney Injury: Present Status

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hai Ying; Chen, Tian Wu; Zhang, Xiao Ming

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common complication of hospitalization that is characterized by a sudden loss of renal excretory function and associated with the subsequent development of chronic kidney disease, poor prognosis, and increased mortality. Although the pathophysiology of renal functional impairment in the setting of AKI remains poorly understood, previous studies have identified changes in renal hemodynamics, perfusion, and oxygenation as key factors in the development and progression of AKI. The early assessment of these changes remains a challenge. Many established approaches are not applicable to humans because of their invasiveness. Functional renal magnetic resonance (MR) imaging offers an alternative assessment tool that could be used to evaluate renal morphology and function noninvasively and simultaneously. Thus, the purpose of this review is to illustrate the principle, application, and role of the techniques of functional renal MR imaging, including blood oxygen level-dependent imaging, arterial spin labeling, and diffusion-weighted MR imaging, in the management of AKI. The use of gadolinium in MR imaging may exacerbate renal impairment and cause nephrogenic systemic fibrosis. Therefore, dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging will not be discussed in this paper. PMID:26925411

  7. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Acute Kidney Injury: Present Status.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hai Ying; Chen, Tian Wu; Zhang, Xiao Ming

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common complication of hospitalization that is characterized by a sudden loss of renal excretory function and associated with the subsequent development of chronic kidney disease, poor prognosis, and increased mortality. Although the pathophysiology of renal functional impairment in the setting of AKI remains poorly understood, previous studies have identified changes in renal hemodynamics, perfusion, and oxygenation as key factors in the development and progression of AKI. The early assessment of these changes remains a challenge. Many established approaches are not applicable to humans because of their invasiveness. Functional renal magnetic resonance (MR) imaging offers an alternative assessment tool that could be used to evaluate renal morphology and function noninvasively and simultaneously. Thus, the purpose of this review is to illustrate the principle, application, and role of the techniques of functional renal MR imaging, including blood oxygen level-dependent imaging, arterial spin labeling, and diffusion-weighted MR imaging, in the management of AKI. The use of gadolinium in MR imaging may exacerbate renal impairment and cause nephrogenic systemic fibrosis. Therefore, dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging will not be discussed in this paper. PMID:26925411

  8. Evaluation of ventricular function with gated cardiac magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Osbakken, M; Yuschok, T

    1986-01-01

    To determine the feasibility of using planar images obtained with gated cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques to evaluate ventricular contractile function, cardiac chamber volume (V), and ejection fraction (EF) were calculated using MR images obtained in five previously catheterized patients. Patients were imaged with a .15-Tesla 55-cm bore magnet using the ECG to gate the images. Spin echo pulse sequences (30/500, TE/TR) were used to produce images in the transverse (T), coronal (C), and sagittal (S) planes at end diastole (ED) and end systole (ES). Slice thickness was 1.5 cm, with 2-mm resolution. A calibration grid was imaged in each plane to determine correction factors. Cardiac chamber areas were determined via planimetry. An area-length-volume algorithm was used to obtain EDV and ESV. Three combinations of biplane images in ES and ED were used (T/C, T/S, C/S). Volume data were used to calculate EF. Contrast ventriculogram volumes tended to be greater than MRI volumes, but EFs were similar with both techniques. In conclusion, gated cardiac MR images can be used to evaluate the ventricular function parameters of volume and ejection fraction. PMID:3731263

  9. Bridging the gap between theory and practice: dynamic systems theory as a framework for understanding and promoting recovery of function in children and youth with acquired brain injuries.

    PubMed

    Levac, Danielle; DeMatteo, Carol

    2009-11-01

    A theoretical framework can help physiotherapists understand and promote recovery of function in children and youth with acquired brain injuries (ABI). Physiotherapy interventions for this population have traditionally been based in hierarchical-maturational theories of motor development emphasizing the role of the central nervous system (CNS) in controlling motor behaviour. In contrast, Dynamic Systems Theory (DST) views movement as resulting from the interaction of many subsystems within the individual, features of the functional task to be accomplished, and the environmental context in which the movement takes place. DST is now a predominant theoretical framework in pediatric physiotherapy. The purpose of this article is to describe how DST can be used to understand and promote recovery of function after pediatric ABI. A DST-based approach for children and youth with ABI does not treat the impaired CNS in isolation but rather emphasizes the role of all subsystems, including the family and the environment, in influencing recovery. The emphasis is on exploration, problem solving, and practice of functional tasks. A case scenario provides practical recommendations for the use of DST to inform physiotherapy interventions and clinical decision making in the acute phase of recovery from ABI. Future research is required to evaluate the effectiveness of interventions based in this theoretical framework. PMID:19925262

  10. Effects of a multifaceted treatment program for executive dysfunction after acquired brain injury on indications of executive functioning in daily life.

    PubMed

    Spikman, Jacoba M; Boelen, Danielle H E; Lamberts, Kirsten F; Brouwer, Wiebo H; Fasotti, Luciano

    2010-01-01

    A multicenter randomized control trial (RCT) was conducted to evaluate the effects of a treatment for dysexecutive problems after acquired brain injury (ABI) on daily life functioning. Seventy-five ABI patients were randomly allocated to either the experimental treatment, multifaceted strategy training for executive dysfunction, or a control treatment, computerized cognitive function training. Assessment took place before, directly after, and 6 months post-treatment. The primary outcome measure, the Role Resumption List (RRL), and two other follow-up measures, the Treatment Goal Attainment (TGA) and the Executive Secretarial Task (EST), were indications of daily life executive functioning. The experimental group improved significantly more over time than the controls on the RRL and attained significantly higher scores on the TGA and EST. We conclude that our treatment has resulted in significant improvements of executive functioning in daily life, lasting at least 6 months post-treatment. Although control patients' satisfaction and subjective well-being were at the same level, the experimental group had better abilities to set and accomplish realistic goals, to plan, initiate, and regulate a series of real-life tasks, and to resume previous roles with respect to work, social relations, leisure activities, and mobility. PMID:19900348

  11. A Resting State Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study of Concussion in Collegiate Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Czerniak, Suzanne M; Sikoglu, Elif M; Navarro, Ana A Liso; McCafferty, Joseph; Eisenstock, Jordan; Stevenson, J Herbert; King, Jean A; Moore, Constance M

    2015-01-01

    Sports-related concussions are currently diagnosed through multi-domain assessment by a medical professional and may utilize neurocognitive testing as an aide. However, these tests have only been able to detect differences in the days to week post-concussion. Here, we investigate a measure of brain function, namely resting state functional connectivity, which may detect residual brain differences in the weeks to months after concussion. Twenty-one student athletes (9 concussed within 6 months of enrollment; 12 non-concussed; between ages 18 to 22 years) were recruited for this study. All participants completed the Wisconsin Card Sort Task and the Color-Word Interference Test. Neuroimaging data, specifically resting state functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging data, were acquired to examine resting state functional connectivity. Two sample t-tests were used to compare the neurocognitive scores and resting state functional connectivity patterns among concussed and non-concussed participants. Correlations between neurocognitive scores and resting state functional connectivity measures were also determined across all subjects. There were no significant differences in neurocognitive performance between concussed and non-concussed groups. Concussed subjects had significantly increased connections between areas of the brain that underlie executive function. Across all subjects, better neurocognitive performance corresponded to stronger brain connectivity. Even at rest, brains of concussed athletes may have to ‘work harder’ than their healthy peers to achieve similar neurocognitive results. Resting state brain connectivity may be able to detect prolonged brain differences in concussed athletes in a more quantitative manner than neurocognitive test scores. PMID:25112544

  12. [Research of Left Ventricle Function Analysis Using Real-time Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging].

    PubMed

    Yang, Fan; He, Yan; Zhang, Jie; Wu, Yin

    2015-12-01

    Real-time free breathing cardiac cine imaging is a reproducible method with shorter acquisition time and without breath-hold for cardiac magnetic resonance imaging. However, the detection of end-diastole and end-systole frames of real-time free breathing cardiac cine imaging for left ventricle function analysis is commonly completed by visual identification, which is time-consuming and laborious. In order to save processing time, we propose a method for semi-automatic identification of end-diastole and end-systole frames. The method fits respiratory motion signal and acquires the expiration phase, end-diastole and end-systole frames by cross correlation coefficient. The procedure successfully worked on ten healthy volunteers and validated by the analysis of left ventricle function compared to the standard breath-hold steady-state free precession cardiac cine imaging without any significant statistical differences. The results demonstrated that the present method could correctly detect end-diastole and end-systole frames. In the future, this technique may be used for rapid left ventricle function analysis in clinic. PMID:27079101

  13. Probing Corticospinal Recruitment Patterns and Functional Synergies with Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, James; Kübler, Angelika; Bauer, Robert; Gharabaghi, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Background: On the one hand, stimulating the motor cortex at different spots may activate the same muscle and result in a muscle-specific cortical map. Maps of different muscles, which are functionally coupled, may present with a large overlap but may also show a relevant variability. On the other hand, stimulation of the motor cortex at one spot with different stimulation intensities results in a characteristic input–output (IO) curve for one specific muscle but may simultaneously also activate different, functionally coupled muscles. A comparison of the cortical map overlap of synergistic muscles and their IO curves has not yet been carried out. Objective: The aim of this study was to probe functional synergies of forearm muscles with transcranial magnetic stimulation by harnessing the convergence and divergence of the corticospinal output. Methods: We acquired bihemispheric cortical maps and IO curves of the extensor carpi ulnaris, extensor carpi radialis, and extensor digitorum communis muscles by subjecting 11 healthy subjects to both monophasic and biphasic pulse waveforms. Results: The degree of synergy between pairs of forearm muscles was captured by the overlap of the cortical motor maps and the respective IO curves which were influenced by the pulse waveform. Monophasic and biphasic stimulation were particularly suitable for disentangling synergistic muscles in the right and left hemisphere, respectively. Conclusion: Combining IO curves and different pulse waveforms may provide complementary information on neural circuit dynamics and corticospinal recruitment patterns of synergistic muscles and their neuroplastic modulation. PMID:27458344

  14. Hyperpolarized Xenon-129 Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Functional Lung Microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dregely, Isabel

    Hyperpolarized 129Xe (HXe) is a non-invasive contrast agent for lung magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which upon inhalation follows the functional pathway of oxygen in the lung by dissolving into lung tissue structures and entering the blood stream. HXe MRI therefore provides unique opportunities for functional lung imaging of gas exchange which occurs from alveolar air spaces across the air-blood boundary into parenchymal tissue. However challenges in acquisition speed and signal-to-noise ratio have limited the development of a HXe imaging biomarker to diagnose lung disease. This thesis addresses these challenges by introducing parallel imaging to HXe MRI. Parallel imaging requires dedicated hardware. This work describes design, implementation, and characterization of a 32-channel phased-array chest receive coil with an integrated asymmetric birdcage transmit coil tuned to the HXe resonance on a 3 Tesla MRI system. Using the newly developed human chest coil, a functional HXe imaging method, multiple exchange time xenon magnetization transfer contrast (MXTC) is implemented. MXTC dynamically encodes HXe gas exchange into the image contrast. This permits two parameters to be derived regionally which are related to gas-exchange functionality by characterizing tissue-to-alveolar-volume ratio and alveolar wall thickness in the lung parenchyma. Initial results in healthy subjects demonstrate the sensitivity of MXTC by quantifying the subtle changes in lung microstructure in response to orientation and lung inflation. Our results in subjects with lung disease show that the MXTC-derived functional tissue density parameter exhibits excellent agreement with established imaging techniques. The newly developed dynamic parameter, which characterizes the alveolar wall, was elevated in subjects with lung disease, most likely indicating parenchymal inflammation. In light of these observations we believe that MXTC has potential as a biomarker for the regional quantification of 1

  15. Acquired von Willebrand disease.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Shaji; Pruthi, Rajiv K; Nichols, William L

    2002-02-01

    Acquired von Willebrand disease (AvWD) is a relatively rare acquired bleeding disorder that usually occurs in elderly patients, in whom its recognition may be delayed. Patients usually present predominantly with mucocutaneous bleeding, with no previous history of bleeding abnormalities and no clinically meaningful family history. Various underlying diseases have been associated with AvWD, most commonly hematoproliferative disorders, including monoclonal gammopathies, lymphoproliferative disorders, and myeloproliferative disorders. The pathogenesis of AvWD remains incompletely understood but includes autoantibodies directed against the von Willebrand factor (vWF), leading to a more rapid clearance from the circulation or interference with its function, adsorption of vWF by tumor cells, and nonimmunologic mechanisms of destruction. Laboratory evaluation usually reveals a pattern of prolonged bleeding time and decreased levels of vWF antigen, ristocetin cofactor activity, and factor VIII coagulant activity consistent with a diagnosis of vWD. Acquired vWD is distinguished from the congenital form by age at presentation, absence of a personal and family history of bleeding disorders, and, often, presence of a hematoproliferative or autoimmune disorder. The severity of the bleeding varies considerably among patients. Therapeutic options include desmopressin and certain factor VIII concentrates that also contain vWF. Successful treatment of the associated illness can reverse the clinical and laboratory manifestations. Intravenous immunoglobulins have also shown some efficacy in the management of AvWD, especially cases associated with monoclonal gammopathies. Awareness of AvWD is essential for diagnosis and appropriate management. PMID:11838652

  16. Unusual Function of Modified Polyolefins for Manipulating Magnetic Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Qingliang; Yuan, Tingting; Wei, Suying; Guo, Zhanhu

    2014-04-01

    The unusual function of a long known plastic additive in industry, polypropylene- graft-maleic anhydride (PP- g-MA), is reviewed for serving as a polymeric surfactant to synthesize and stabilize magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) with tunable morphology and crystalline structure. The synthesis route employs a solution-based, one-pot, bottom-up method. Specifically, magnetic NPs were synthesized through thermo-decomposing organo-metallic precursors [i.e., Fe(CO)5 or Co2(CO)8] in the presence of PP- g-MA in solvent xylene. By simply changing the backbone length/concentration of PP- g-MA, different morphologies (monodispersed hollow vs. chain-like solid, or chain-like vs. monodispersed polyhedral-shaped NPs) and crystalline structures [α- vs. γ-phase for Fe2O3 NPs, or face-centered cubic (fcc)- vs. ɛ-phase for Co NPs] can be controlled simultaneously. In addition, for the chain-like Fe2O3 NPs, a different chain diameter and building block morphology can be controlled by only varying the molecular weight of PP- g-MA.

  17. Development of a Clinical Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Service

    PubMed Central

    Rigolo, Laura; Stern, Emily; Deaver, Pamela; Golby, Alexandra J.; Mukundan, Srinivasan

    2013-01-01

    One of the limitations of anatomical based imaging approaches is its relative inability to identify whether specific brain functions may be compromised by the location of brain lesions or contemplated brain surgeries. For this reason, methods for identifying the regions of eloquent brain that should not be disturbed are absolutely critical to the surgeon. By accurately identifying these regions preoperatively, virtually every pre-surgical decision from the surgical approach, operative goals (biopsy, sub-total vs. gross-total resection), and the potential need for awake craniotomy with intraoperative cortical-mapping is affected. Of the many techniques available to the surgeon, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has become the primary modality of choice due to the ability of MRI to serve as a “one-stop shop” for assessing both anatomy and functionality of the brain. Given their prevalence, brain tumors serve as the model pathology for the included discussion; however, a similar case can be made for the use of fMRI in other neurological conditions, most notably epilepsy. The value of fMRI was validated in 2007 when the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) established three new current procedural terminology (CPT) codes for clinical fMRI based upon its use for pre-therapeutic planning. In this article we will discuss the specific requirements for establishing an fMRI program, including specific software and hardware requirements. In addition, the nature of the fMRI CPT codes will be discussed. PMID:21435578

  18. Functional magnetic resonance imaging in chronic ischaemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Lake, Evelyn M R; Bazzigaluppi, Paolo; Stefanovic, Bojana

    2016-10-01

    Ischaemic stroke is the leading cause of adult disability worldwide. Effective rehabilitation is hindered by uncertainty surrounding the underlying mechanisms that govern long-term ischaemic injury progression. Despite its potential as a sensitive non-invasive in vivo marker of brain function that may aid in the development of new treatments, blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has found limited application in the clinical research on chronic stage stroke progression. Stroke affects each of the physiological parameters underlying the BOLD contrast, markedly complicating the interpretation of BOLD fMRI data. This review summarizes current progress on application of BOLD fMRI in the chronic stage of ischaemic injury progression and discusses means by which more information may be gained from such BOLD fMRI measurements. Concomitant measurements of vascular reactivity, neuronal activity and metabolism in preclinical models of stroke are reviewed along with illustrative examples of post-ischaemic evolution in neuronal, glial and vascular function. The realization of the BOLD fMRI potential to propel stroke research is predicated on the carefully designed preclinical research establishing an ischaemia-specific quantitative model of BOLD signal contrast to provide the framework for interpretation of fMRI findings in clinical populations.This article is part of the themed issue 'Interpreting BOLD: a dialogue between cognitive and cellular neuroscience'. PMID:27574307

  19. Wavelet smoothing of functional magnetic resonance images: a preliminary report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucier, Bradley J.

    2003-11-01

    Functional (time-dependent) Magnetic Resonance Imaging can be used to determine which parts of the brain are active during various limited activities; these parts of the brain are called activation regions. In this preliminary study we describe some experiments that are suggested from the following questions: Does one get improved results by analyzing the complex image data rather than just the real magnitude image data? Does wavelet shrinkage smoothing improve images? Should one smooth in time as well as within and between slices? If so, how should one model the relationship between time smoothness (or correlations) and spatial smoothness (or correlations). The measured data is really the Fourier coefficients of the complex image---should we remove noise in the Fourier domain before computing the complex images? In this preliminary study we describe some experiments related to these questions.

  20. A General Method for Calculating the External Magnetic Field from a Cylindrical Magnetic Source using Toroidal Functions

    SciTech Connect

    J Selvaggi; S Salon; O Kwon CVK Chari

    2006-02-14

    An alternative method is developed to compute the magnetic field from a circular cylindrical magnetic source. Specifically, a Fourier series expansion whose coefficients are toroidal functions is introduced which yields an alternative to the more familiar spherical harmonic solution or the Elliptic integral solution. This alternate formulation coupled with a method called charge simulation allows one to compute the external magnetic field from an arbitrary magnetic source in terms of a toroidal expansion. This expansion is valid on any finite hypothetical external observation cylinder. In other words, the magnetic scalar potential or the magnetic field intensity is computed on a exterior cylinder which encloses the magnetic source. This method can be used to accurately compute the far field where a finite element formulation is known to be inaccurate.

  1. Surface functionalized magnetic nanoparticles for cancer therapy applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wydra, Robert John

    Despite recent advances, cancer remains the second leading cause of deaths in the United States. Magnetic nanoparticles have found various applications in cancer research as drug delivery platforms, enhanced contrast agents for improved diagnostic imaging, and the delivery of thermal energy as standalone therapy. Iron oxide nanoparticles absorb the energy from an alternating magnetic field and convert it into heat through Brownian and Neel relaxations. To better utilize magnetic nanoparticles for cancer therapy, surface functionalization is essential for such factors as decreasing cytotoxicity of healthy tissue, extending circulation time, specific targeting of cancer cells, and manage the controlled delivery of therapeutics. In the first study, iron oxide nanoparticles were coated with a poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) based polymer shell. The PEG coating was selected to prevent protein adsorption and thus improve circulation time and minimize host response to the nanoparticles. Thermal therapy application feasibility was demonstrated in vitro with a thermoablation study on lung carcinoma cells. Building on the thermal therapy demonstration with iron oxide nanoparticles, the second area of work focused on intracellular delivery. Nanoparticles can be appropriately tailored to enter the cell and deliver energy on the nanoscale eliminating individual cancer cells. The underlying mechanism of action is still under study, and we were interested in determining the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) catalytically generated from the surface of iron oxide nanoparticles in this measured cytotoxicity. When exposed to an AMF, the nanoscale heating effects are capable of enhancing the Fenton-like generation of ROS determined through a methylene blue degradation assay. To deliver this enhanced ROS effect to cells, monosaccharide coated nanoparticles were developed and successfully internalized by colon cancer cell lines. Upon AMF exposure, there was a measured increase in

  2. Functional connectivity magnetic resonance imaging classification of autism.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Jeffrey S; Nielsen, Jared A; Froehlich, Alyson L; DuBray, Molly B; Druzgal, T Jason; Cariello, Annahir N; Cooperrider, Jason R; Zielinski, Brandon A; Ravichandran, Caitlin; Fletcher, P Thomas; Alexander, Andrew L; Bigler, Erin D; Lange, Nicholas; Lainhart, Janet E

    2011-12-01

    Group differences in resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging connectivity between individuals with autism and typically developing controls have been widely replicated for a small number of discrete brain regions, yet the whole-brain distribution of connectivity abnormalities in autism is not well characterized. It is also unclear whether functional connectivity is sufficiently robust to be used as a diagnostic or prognostic metric in individual patients with autism. We obtained pairwise functional connectivity measurements from a lattice of 7266 regions of interest covering the entire grey matter (26.4 million connections) in a well-characterized set of 40 male adolescents and young adults with autism and 40 age-, sex- and IQ-matched typically developing subjects. A single resting state blood oxygen level-dependent scan of 8 min was used for the classification in each subject. A leave-one-out classifier successfully distinguished autism from control subjects with 83% sensitivity and 75% specificity for a total accuracy of 79% (P = 1.1 × 10(-7)). In subjects <20 years of age, the classifier performed at 89% accuracy (P = 5.4 × 10(-7)). In a replication dataset consisting of 21 individuals from six families with both affected and unaffected siblings, the classifier performed at 71% accuracy (91% accuracy for subjects <20 years of age). Classification scores in subjects with autism were significantly correlated with the Social Responsiveness Scale (P = 0.05), verbal IQ (P = 0.02) and the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule-Generic's combined social and communication subscores (P = 0.05). An analysis of informative connections demonstrated that region of interest pairs with strongest correlation values were most abnormal in autism. Negatively correlated region of interest pairs showed higher correlation in autism (less anticorrelation), possibly representing weaker inhibitory connections, particularly for long connections (Euclidean distance >10 cm

  3. A design of novel type superconducting magnet for super-high field functional magnetic resonance imaging by using the harmonic analysis method of magnetic vector potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zu, Dong-Lin; Guo, Hua; Song, Xiao-Yu; Bao, Shang-Lian

    2002-10-01

    The approach of expanding the magnetic scalar potential in a series of Legendre polynomials is suitable for designing a conventional superconducting magnetic resonance imaging magnet of distributed solenoidal configuration. Whereas the approach of expanding the magnetic vector potential in associated Legendre harmonics is suitable for designing a single-solenoid magnet that has multiple tiers, in which each tier may have multiple layers with different winding lengths. A set of three equations to suppress some of the lowest higher-order harmonics is found. As an example, a 4T single-solenoid magnetic resonance imaging magnet with 4×6 layers of superconducting wires is designed. The degree of homogeneity in the 0.5m diameter sphere volume is better than 5.8 ppm. The same degree of homogeneity is retained after optimal integralization of turns in each correction layer. The ratio Bm/B0 in the single-solenoid magnet is 30% lower than that in the conventional six-solenoid magnet. This tolerates higher rated superconducting current in the coil. The Lorentz force of the coil in the single-solenoid system is also much lower than in the six-solenoid system. This novel type of magnet possesses significant advantage over conventional magnets, especially when used as a super-high field functional magnetic resonance imaging magnet.

  4. McMillan Magnet School: A Case History of a School Acquiring a Critical Mass of Computer Technology and Internet Connectivity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grandgenett, Neal; And Others

    McMillan Magnet Center is located in urban Omaha, Nebraska, and specializes in math, computers, and communications. Once a junior high school, it was converted to a magnet center for seventh and eighth graders in the 1983-84 school year as part of Omaha's voluntary desegregation plan. Now the ethnic makeup of the student population is about 50%…

  5. Exploiting temporal information in functional magnetic resonance imaging brain data.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Samaras, Dimitris; Tomasi, Dardo; Alia-Klein, Nelly; Cottone, Lisa; Leskovjan, Andreana; Volkow, Nora; Goldstein, Rita

    2005-01-01

    Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging(fMRI) has enabled scientists to look into the active human brain, leading to a flood of new data, thus encouraging the development of new data analysis methods. In this paper, we contribute a comprehensive framework for spatial and temporal exploration of fMRI data, and apply it to a challenging case study: separating drug addicted subjects from healthy non-drug-using controls. To our knowledge, this is the first time that learning on fMRI data is performed explicitly on temporal information for classification in such applications. Experimental results demonstrate that, by selecting discriminative features, group classification can be successfully performed on our case study although training data are exceptionally high dimensional, sparse and noisy fMRI sequences. The classification performance can be significantly improved by incorporating temporal information into machine learning. Both statistical and neuroscientific validation of the method's generalization ability are provided. We demonstrate that incorporation of computer science principles into functional neuroimaging clinical studies, facilitates deduction about the behavioral probes from the brain activation data, thus providing a valid tool that incorporates objective brain imaging data into clinical classification of psychopathologies and identification of genetic vulnerabilities. PMID:16685905

  6. Achromatic synesthesias - a functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Melero, H; Ríos-Lago, M; Peña-Melián, A; Álvarez-Linera, J

    2014-09-01

    Grapheme-color synesthetes experience consistent, automatic and idiosyncratic colors associated with specific letters and numbers. Frequently, these specific associations exhibit achromatic synesthetic qualities (e.g. white, black or gray). In this study, we have investigated for the first time the neural basis of achromatic synesthesias, their relationship to chromatic synesthesias and the achromatic congruency effect in order to understand not only synesthetic color but also other components of the synesthetic experience. To achieve this aim, functional magnetic resonance imaging experiments were performed in a group of associator grapheme-color synesthetes and matched controls who were stimulated with real chromatic and achromatic stimuli (Mondrians), and with letters and numbers that elicited different types of grapheme-color synesthesias (i.e. chromatic and achromatic inducers which elicited chromatic but also achromatic synesthesias, as well as congruent and incongruent ones). The information derived from the analysis of Mondrians and chromatic/achromatic synesthesias suggests that real and synesthetic colors/achromaticity do not fully share neural mechanisms. The whole-brain analysis of BOLD signals in response to the complete set of synesthetic inducers revealed that the functional peculiarities of the synesthetic brain are distributed, and reflect different components of the synesthetic experience: a perceptual component, an (attentional) feature binding component, and an emotional component. Additionally, the inclusion of achromatic experiences has provided new evidence in favor of the emotional binding theory, a line of interpretation which constitutes a bridge between grapheme-color synesthesia and other developmental modalities of the phenomenon. PMID:24845620

  7. Structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging of autism spectrum disorders

    PubMed Central

    Stigler, Kimberly A.; McDonald, Brenna C.; Anand, Amit; Saykin, Andrew J.; McDougle, Christopher J.

    2011-01-01

    The neurobiology of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) has become increasingly understood since the advent of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Initial observations of an above-average head circumference were supported by structural MRI studies that found evidence of increased total brain volume and early rapid brain overgrowth in affected individuals. Subsequent research revealed consistent abnormalities in cortical gray and white matter volume in ASDs. The structural integrity and orientation of white matter have been further elucidated via diffusion tensor imaging methods. The emergence of functional MRI techniques led to an enhanced understanding of the neural circuitry of ASDs, demonstrating areas of dysfunctional cortical activation and atypical cortical specialization. These studies have provided evidence of underconnectivity in distributed cortical networks integral to the core impairments associated with ASDs. Abnormalities in the default-mode network during the resting state have also been identified. Overall, structural and functional MRI research has generated important insights into the neurobiology of ASDs. Additional research is needed to further delineate the underlying brain basis of this constellation of disorders. PMID:21130750

  8. Methodological challenges and solutions in auditory functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Peelle, Jonathan E

    2014-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies involve substantial acoustic noise. This review covers the difficulties posed by such noise for auditory neuroscience, as well as a number of possible solutions that have emerged. Acoustic noise can affect the processing of auditory stimuli by making them inaudible or unintelligible, and can result in reduced sensitivity to auditory activation in auditory cortex. Equally importantly, acoustic noise may also lead to increased listening effort, meaning that even when auditory stimuli are perceived, neural processing may differ from when the same stimuli are presented in quiet. These and other challenges have motivated a number of approaches for collecting auditory fMRI data. Although using a continuous echoplanar imaging (EPI) sequence provides high quality imaging data, these data may also be contaminated by background acoustic noise. Traditional sparse imaging has the advantage of avoiding acoustic noise during stimulus presentation, but at a cost of reduced temporal resolution. Recently, three classes of techniques have been developed to circumvent these limitations. The first is Interleaved Silent Steady State (ISSS) imaging, a variation of sparse imaging that involves collecting multiple volumes following a silent period while maintaining steady-state longitudinal magnetization. The second involves active noise control to limit the impact of acoustic scanner noise. Finally, novel MRI sequences that reduce the amount of acoustic noise produced during fMRI make the use of continuous scanning a more practical option. Together these advances provide unprecedented opportunities for researchers to collect high-quality data of hemodynamic responses to auditory stimuli using fMRI. PMID:25191218

  9. Spontaneous physiological variability modulates dynamic functional connectivity in resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Nikolaou, F; Orphanidou, C; Papakyriakou, P; Murphy, K; Wise, R G; Mitsis, G D

    2016-05-13

    It is well known that the blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signal measured by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is influenced-in addition to neuronal activity-by fluctuations in physiological signals, including arterial CO2, respiration and heart rate/heart rate variability (HR/HRV). Even spontaneous fluctuations of the aforementioned physiological signals have been shown to influence the BOLD fMRI signal in a regionally specific manner. Related to this, estimates of functional connectivity between different brain regions, performed when the subject is at rest, may be confounded by the effects of physiological signal fluctuations. Moreover, resting functional connectivity has been shown to vary with respect to time (dynamic functional connectivity), with the sources of this variation not fully elucidated. In this context, we examine the relation between dynamic functional connectivity patterns and the time-varying properties of simultaneously recorded physiological signals (end-tidal CO2 and HR/HRV) using resting-state fMRI measurements from 12 healthy subjects. The results reveal a modulatory effect of the aforementioned physiological signals on the dynamic resting functional connectivity patterns for a number of resting-state networks (default mode network, somatosensory, visual). By using discrete wavelet decomposition, we also show that these modulation effects are more pronounced in specific frequency bands. PMID:27044987

  10. Hospital-acquired pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000146.htm Hospital-acquired pneumonia To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Hospital-acquired pneumonia is an infection of the lungs ...

  11. Multimodality evaluation of ventricular function: comparison of cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, echocardiography, and planar and SPECT blood pool imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feiglin, David H.; Krol, Andrzej; Tillapaugh-Fay, Gwen M.; Szeverenyi, Nikolaus M.; Thomas, Frank D.

    2001-05-01

    Fifteen patients underwent resting echocardiography (EC), ECG gated cardiac MR ventriculography (MRV) and blood pool planar and SPECT ventriculography (SPV) sequentially on the same day. In addition, 36 patients had sequential ECG gated blood pool and SPV and 20 normal volunteers, age > 18 years, had sequential ECG gated cardiac MRI performed on both Siemens closed, 1.5T, and open, 0.2T, magnets. Echocardiography was performed using a HP 5500 system equipped with an S4 transducer in 2D mode. MRV at 0.2T and 1.5T used a circular polarized body coil. Nuclear Medicine studies used 25 mCi Tc- 99m labeled red blood cells. Gated planar and SPV were acquired on a dual head Siemens E-Cam system. We have found that MRV affords the most accurate measurement of ventricular function. SPV and MRV provide similar estimations of left ventricular function (LVEF). Further, SPV consistently provides higher LVEF, as compared to the planar data simultaneously acquired. Observed significant differences in intermodality measurements indicate that follow up studies in patients, especially in patients whose management is critically dependent on functional measurement changes, should be monitored by one modality only.

  12. Low-pathogenicity Mycoplasma spp. alter human monocyte and macrophage function and are highly prevalent among patients with ventilator-acquired pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Nolan, T J; Gadsby, N J; Templeton, K E; McMullan, R; McKenna, J P; Rennie, J; Robb, C T; Walsh, T S; Rossi, A G; Conway Morris, A; Simpson, A J

    2016-01-01

    Background Ventilator-acquired pneumonia (VAP) remains a significant problem within intensive care units (ICUs). There is a growing recognition of the impact of critical-illness-induced immunoparesis on the pathogenesis of VAP, but the mechanisms remain incompletely understood. We hypothesised that, because of limitations in their routine detection, Mycoplasmataceae are more prevalent among patients with VAP than previously recognised, and that these organisms potentially impair immune cell function. Methods and setting 159 patients were recruited from 12 UK ICUs. All patients had suspected VAP and underwent bronchoscopy and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL). VAP was defined as growth of organisms at >104 colony forming units per ml of BAL fluid on conventional culture. Samples were tested for Mycoplasmataceae (Mycoplasma and Ureaplasma spp.) by PCR, and positive samples underwent sequencing for speciation. 36 healthy donors underwent BAL for comparison. Additionally, healthy donor monocytes and macrophages were exposed to Mycoplasma salivarium and their ability to respond to lipopolysaccharide and undertake phagocytosis was assessed. Results Mycoplasmataceae were found in 49% (95% CI 33% to 65%) of patients with VAP, compared with 14% (95% CI 9% to 25%) of patients without VAP. Patients with sterile BAL fluid had a similar prevalence to healthy donor BAL fluid (10% (95% CI 4% to 20%) vs 8% (95% CI 2% to 22%)). The most common organism identified was M. salivarium. Blood monocytes from healthy volunteers incubated with M. salivarium displayed an impaired TNF-α response to lipopolysaccharide (p=0.0003), as did monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs) (p=0.024). MDM exposed to M. salivarium demonstrated impaired phagocytosis (p=0.005). Discussion and conclusions This study demonstrates a high prevalence of Mycoplasmataceae among patients with VAP, with a markedly lower prevalence among patients with suspected VAP in whom subsequent cultures refuted the diagnosis. The most

  13. Mapping Depression in Schizophrenia: A Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study

    PubMed Central

    Kumari, Veena; Peters, Emmanuelle; Guinn, Ashley; Fannon, Dominic; Russell, Tamara; Sumich, Alexander; Kuipers, Elizabeth; Williams, Steven C. R.; ffytche, Dominic H.

    2016-01-01

    Depressive symptoms are common in schizophrenia, often left untreated, and associated with a high relapse rate, suicidal ideation, increased mortality, reduced social adjustment and poor quality of life. The neural mechanisms underlying depression in psychosis are poorly understood. Given reports of altered brain response to negative facial affect in depressive disorders, we examined brain response to emotive facial expressions in relation to levels of depression in people with psychosis. Seventy outpatients (final N = 63) and 20 healthy participants underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging during an implicit affect processing task involving presentation of facial expressions of fear, anger, happiness as well as neutral expressions and a (no face) control condition. All patients completed Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II) and had their symptoms assessed on the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS). In patients, depression (BDI-II) scores associated positively with activation of the left thalamus, extending to the putamen-globus pallidus, insula, inferior-middle frontal and para-post-pre-central gyri during fearful expressions. Furthermore, patients with moderate-to-severe depression had significantly higher activity in these brain regions during fearful expressions relative to patients with no, minimal, or mild depression and healthy participants. The study provides first evidence of enhanced brain response to fearful facial expressions, which signal an uncertain source of threat in the environment, in patients with psychosis and a high level of self-reported depression. PMID:26712855

  14. [Functional magnetic resonance imaging and dynamic neuroanatomy of addictive disorders].

    PubMed

    Mel'nikov, M E; Shtark, M B

    2014-01-01

    Research into the cerebral patterns that govern the formation and development of addictive behavior is one of the most interesting goals of neurophysiology. Authors of contemporary papers on the matter define a number of symptoms that are all part of substance or non-substance dependence, each one of them leading to abnormalities in the corresponding system of the brain. During the last twenty years the functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMR1) technology has been instrumental in locating such abnormalities, identifying specific parts of the brain that, when dysfunctional, may enhance addiction and cause its positive or negative symptoms. This article reviews fMRI studies aimed toward locating areas in the brain that are responsible for cognitive, emotional, and motivational dysfunction. Cerebral correlatives of impulsiveness, behavior control, and drug cravings are reviewed separately. The article also contains an overview of possibilities to further investigate the Selves of those dependent on substances, identify previously unknown diagnostic markers of substance dependence, and evaluate the effectiveness of therapy. The research under review in this article provides data that points to a special role of the nucleus caudatus as well as the nucleus accumbens, the thalamus, the insular cortex (IC), the anterior cingulate, prefrontal and orbitofrontal areas in psychological disorders that are part of substance dependence. General findings of the article are in accordance with contemporary models of addictive pattern. PMID:25729844

  15. Multi-function magnetic jack control drive mechanism

    DOEpatents

    Bollinger, Lawrence R.; Crawford, Donald C.

    1986-01-01

    A multi-function magnetic jack control drive mechanism for controlling a nuclear reactor is provided. The mechanism includes an elongate pressure housing in which a plurality of closely spaced drive rods are located. Each drive rod is connected to a rod which is insertable in the reactor core. An electromechanical stationary latch device is provided which is actuatable to hold each drive rod stationary with respect to the pressure housing. An electromechanical movable latch device is also provided for each one of the drive rods. Each movable latch device is provided with a base and is actuatable to hold a respective drive rod stationary with respect to the base. An electromechanical lift device is further provided for each base which is actuatable for moving a respective base longitudinally along the pressure housing. In this manner, one or more drive rods can be moved in the pressure housing by sequentially and repetitively operating the electromechanical devices. Preferably, each latch device includes a pair of opposed latches which grip teeth located on the respective drive rod. Two, three, or four drive rods can be located symmetrically about the longitudinal axis of the pressure housing.

  16. Multi-function magnetic jack control drive mechanism

    DOEpatents

    Bollinger, L.R.; Crawford, D.C.

    1983-10-06

    A multi-function magnetic jack control drive mechanism for controlling a nuclear reactor is provided. The mechanism includes an elongate pressure housing in which a plurality of closely spaced drive rods are located. Each drive rod is connected to a rod which is insertable in the reactor core. An electromechanical stationary latch device is provided which is actuatable to hold each drive rod stationary with respect to the pressure housing. An electromechanical movable latch device is also provided for each one of the drive rods. Each movable latch device is provided with a base and is actuatable to hold a respective drive rod stationary with respect to the base. An electromechanical lift device is further provided for each base which is actuatable for moving a respective base longitudinally along the pressure housing. In this manner, one or more drive rods can be moved in the pressure housing by sequentially and repetitively operating the electromechanical devices. Preferably, each latch device includes a pair of opposed latches which grip teeth located on the respective drive rod. Two, three, or four drive rods can be located symmetrically about the longitudinal axis of the pressure housing.

  17. Mapping Depression in Schizophrenia: A Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Veena; Peters, Emmanuelle; Guinn, Ashley; Fannon, Dominic; Russell, Tamara; Sumich, Alexander; Kuipers, Elizabeth; Williams, Steven C R; Ffytche, Dominic H

    2016-05-01

    Depressive symptoms are common in schizophrenia, often left untreated, and associated with a high relapse rate, suicidal ideation, increased mortality, reduced social adjustment and poor quality of life. The neural mechanisms underlying depression in psychosis are poorly understood. Given reports of altered brain response to negative facial affect in depressive disorders, we examined brain response to emotive facial expressions in relation to levels of depression in people with psychosis. Seventy outpatients (final N= 63) and 20 healthy participants underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging during an implicit affect processing task involving presentation of facial expressions of fear, anger, happiness as well as neutral expressions and a (no face) control condition. All patients completed Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II) and had their symptoms assessed on the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS). In patients, depression (BDI-II) scores associated positively with activation of the left thalamus, extending to the putamen-globus pallidus, insula, inferior-middle frontal and para-post-pre-central gyri during fearful expressions. Furthermore, patients with moderate-to-severe depression had significantly higher activity in these brain regions during fearful expressions relative to patients with no, minimal, or mild depression and healthy participants. The study provides first evidence of enhanced brain response to fearful facial expressions, which signal an uncertain source of threat in the environment, in patients with psychosis and a high level of self-reported depression. PMID:26712855

  18. Cerebellum and speech perception: a functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Mathiak, Klaus; Hertrich, Ingo; Grodd, Wolfgang; Ackermann, Hermann

    2002-08-15

    A variety of data indicate that the cerebellum participates in perceptual tasks requiring the precise representation of temporal information. Access to the word form of a lexical item requires, among other functions, the processing of durational parameters of verbal utterances. Therefore, cerebellar dysfunctions must be expected to impair word recognition. In order to specify the topography of the assumed cerebellar speech perception mechanism, a functional magnetic resonance imaging study was performed using the German lexical items "Boden" ([bodn], Engl. "floor") and "Boten" ([botn], "messengers") as test materials. The contrast in sound structure of these two lexical items can be signaled either by the length of the wordmedial pause (closure time, CLT; an exclusively temporal measure) or by the aspiration noise of wordmedial "d" or "t" (voice onset time, VOT; an intrasegmental cue). A previous study found bilateral cerebellar disorders to compromise word recognition based on CLT whereas the encoding of VOT remained unimpaired. In the present study, two series of "Boden - Boten" utterances were resynthesized, systematically varying either in CLT or VOT. Subjects had to identify both words "Boden" and "Boten" by analysis of either the durational parameter CLT or the VOT aspiration segment. In a subtraction design, CLT categorization as compared to VOT identification (CLT - VOT) yielded a significant hemodynamic response of the right cerebellar hemisphere (neocerebellum Crus I) and the frontal lobe (anterior to Broca's area). The reversed contrast ( VOT - CLT) resulted in a single activation cluster located at the level of the supratemporal plane of the dominant hemisphere. These findings provide first evidence for a distinct contribution of the right cerebellar hemisphere to speech perception in terms of encoding of durational parameters of verbal utterances. Verbal working memory tasks, lexical response selection, and auditory imagery of word strings have been

  19. Altered executive function in the welders: A functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Seo, Jeehye; Chang, Yongmin; Jang, Kyung Eun; Park, Jang Woo; Kim, Yang-Tae; Park, Sin-Jae; Jeong, Kyoung Sook; Kim, Ahro; Kim, Suk Hwan; Kim, Yangho

    2016-01-01

    Chronic exposure to manganese (Mn) can lead to impairments in motor and cognitive functions. Several recent studies reported Mn-induced executive dysfunction. The present study compared the neural correlates of ongoing executive function of welders and healthy controls. Fifty-three welders and 44 healthy controls were enrolled. Participants were given functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) scans and performed two modified versions of the Wisconsin Card Sorting Task (WCST) that differed in cognitive demand, and a task that established a high-level baseline (HLB) condition. Card Sorting Test and Word-Color Test were also used to assess executive performance. Neural activation of the bilateral superior-frontal cortex, right-inferior parietal cortex, and bilateral insula cortex were greater in healthy controls than in welders when contrasting the difficult version of the WCST with the HLB. There were also correlations between executive functions by the Card Sorting Test and Word-Color Test, and brain activation in the insula cortex using the WCST. Our results indicated that welders had altered neural processing related to executive function in the prefrontal cortex under conditions of high cognitive demand. Welders also had less activation of the insula cortex, a part of a larger network comprising the lateral prefrontal cortex and parietal cortex. PMID:27208889

  20. Effects of a 60 Hz Magnetic Field Exposure Up to 3000 μT on Human Brain Activation as Measured by Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Legros, Alexandre; Modolo, Julien; Brown, Samantha; Roberston, John; Thomas, Alex W.

    2015-01-01

    Several aspects of the human nervous system and associated motor and cognitive processes have been reported to be modulated by extremely low-frequency (ELF, < 300 Hz) time-varying Magnetic Fields (MF). Due do their worldwide prevalence; power-line frequencies (60 Hz in North America) are of particular interest. Despite intense research efforts over the last few decades, the potential effects of 60 Hz MF still need to be elucidated, and the underlying mechanisms to be understood. In this study, we have used functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) to characterize potential changes in functional brain activation following human exposure to a 60 Hz MF through motor and cognitive tasks. First, pilot results acquired in a first set of subjects (N=9) were used to demonstrate the technical feasibility of using fMRI to detect subtle changes in functional brain activation with 60 Hz MF exposure at 1800 μT. Second, a full study involving a larger cohort of subjects tested brain activation during 1) a finger tapping task (N=20), and 2) a mental rotation task (N=21); before and after a one-hour, 60 Hz, 3000 μT MF exposure. The results indicate significant changes in task-induced functional brain activation as a consequence of MF exposure. However, no impact on task performance was found. These results illustrate the potential of using fMRI to identify MF-induced changes in functional brain activation, suggesting that a one-hour 60 Hz, 3000 μT MF exposure can modulate activity in specific brain regions after the end of the exposure period (i.e., residual effects). We discuss the possibility that MF exposure at 60 Hz, 3000 μT may be capable of modulating cortical excitability via a modulation of synaptic plasticity processes. PMID:26214312

  1. Magnetically Actuated Soft Capsule With the Multimodal Drug Release Function.

    PubMed

    Yim, Sehyuk; Goyal, Kartik; Sitti, Metin

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we present a magnetically actuated multimodal drug release mechanism using a tetherless soft capsule endoscope for the treatment of gastric disease. Because the designed capsule has a drug chamber between both magnetic heads, if it is compressed by the external magnetic field, the capsule could release a drug in a specific position locally. The capsule is designed to release a drug in two modes according to the situation. In the first mode, a small amount of drug is continuously released by a series of pulse type magnetic field (0.01-0.03 T). The experimental results show that the drug release can be controlled by the frequency of the external magnetic pulse. In the second mode, about 800 mm(3) of drug is released by the external magnetic field of 0.07 T, which induces a stronger magnetic attraction than the critical force for capsule's collapsing. As a result, a polymeric coating is formed around the capsule. The coated area is dependent on the drug viscosity. This paper presents simulations and various experiments to evaluate the magnetically actuated multimodal drug release capability. The proposed soft capsules could be used as minimally invasive tetherless medical devices with therapeutic capability for the next generation capsule endoscopy. PMID:25378896

  2. Theory of multichannel magnetic stimulation: toward functional neuromuscular rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Ruohonen, J; Ravazzani, P; Grandori, F; Ilmoniemi, R J

    1999-06-01

    Human excitable cells can be stimulated noninvasively with externally applied time-varying electromagnetic fields. The stimulation can be achieved either by directly driving current into the tissue (electrical stimulation) or by means of electro-magnetic induction (magnetic stimulation). While the electrical stimulation of the peripheral neuromuscular system has many beneficial applications, peripheral magnetic stimulation has so far only a few. This paper analyzes theoretically the use of multiple magnetic stimulation coils to better control the excitation and also to eventually mimic electrical stimulation. Multiple coils allow electronic spatial adjustment of the shape and location of the stimulus without moving the coils. The new properties may enable unforeseen uses for peripheral magnetic stimulation, e.g., in rehabilitation of patients with neuromuscular impairment. PMID:10356871

  3. What is feasible with imaging human brain function and connectivity using functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Ugurbil, Kamil

    2016-10-01

    When we consider all of the methods we employ to detect brain function, from electrophysiology to optical techniques to functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we do not really have a 'golden technique' that meets all of the needs for studying the brain. We have methods, each of which has significant limitations but provide often complimentary information. Clearly, there are many questions that need to be answered about fMRI, which unlike other methods, allows us to study the human brain. However, there are also extraordinary accomplishments or demonstration of the feasibility of reaching new and previously unexpected scales of function in the human brain. This article reviews some of the work we have pursued, often with extensive collaborations with other co-workers, towards understanding the underlying mechanisms of the methodology, defining its limitations, and developing solutions to advance it. No doubt, our knowledge of human brain function has vastly expanded since the introduction of fMRI. However, methods and instrumentation in this dynamic field have evolved to a state that discoveries about the human brain based on fMRI principles, together with information garnered at a much finer spatial and temporal scale through other methods, are poised to significantly accelerate in the next decade.This article is part of the themed issue 'Interpreting BOLD: a dialogue between cognitive and cellular neuroscience'. PMID:27574313

  4. Experimental and first-principles characterization of functionalized magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Antipas, Georgios S E; Statharas, Eleftherios; Tserotas, Philippos; Papadopoulos, Nikolaos; Hristoforou, E

    2013-06-24

    Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles synthesized by coprecipitation and thermal decomposition yield largely monodisperse size distributions. The diameters of the coprecipitated particles measured by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy are between approximately 9 and 15 nm, whereas the diameters of thermally decomposed particles are in the range of 8 to 10 nm. Coprecipitated particles are indexed as magnetite-rich and thermally decomposed particles as maghemite-rich; however, both methods produce a mixture of magnetite and maghemite. Fourier transform IR spectra reveal that the nanoparticles are coated with at least two layers of oleic acid (OA) surfactant. The inner layer is postulated to be chemically adsorbed on the nanoparticle surface whereas the rest of the OA is physically adsorbed, as indicated by carboxyl O-H stretching modes above 3400 cm(-1). Differential thermal analysis (DTA) results indicate a double-stepped weight loss process, the lower-temperature step of which is assigned to condensation due to physically adsorbed or low-energy bonded OA moieties. Density functional calculations of Fe-O clusters, the inverse spinel cell, and isolated OA, as well as OA in bidentate linkage with ferrous and ferric atoms, suggest that the higher-temperature DTA stage could be further broken down into two regions: one in which condensation is due ferrous/ferrous- and/or ferrous/ferric-OA and the other due to condensation from ferrous/ferric- and ferric/ferric-OA complexes. The latter appear to form bonds with the OA carbonyl group of energy up to fivefold that of the bond formed by the ferrous/ferrous pairs. Molecular orbital populations indicate that such increased stability of the ferric/ferric pair is due to the contribution of the low-lying Fe(3+) t(2g) states into four bonding orbitals between -0.623 and -0.410 a.u. PMID:23649714

  5. The nuclear magnetic shielding as a function of internuclear separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jameson, Cynthia J.; de Dios, Angel C.

    1993-02-01

    Ab initio calculations of nuclear magnetic shielding surfaces for 23Na in the NaH molecule, 39Ar in ArNe, 21Ne in NeHe, and 39Ar in Ar...NaH are carried out over a wide range of internuclear separations, using a local origin method (LORG) which damps out the long-range errors due to incomplete basis sets. The R dependence of the intermolecular shielding in the attractive region of the potential in these systems and in Ar...Ar and Ar...Na+ are consistent with the long-range limiting forms associated with the shielding hyperpolarizability in conjunction with a mean square electric field approximation. The Cl and F shieldings over the range of nuclear displacements spanning the classical turning points of the ground vibrational states of ClF and F2 are found to be remarkably superposable upon scaling by the factors ṡRe. This holds as well for ClH compared with FH. The shielding of 23Na and 7Li in NaH and LiH molecules are almost superposable. These and the scaling of the intermolecular shielding in rare gas pairs indicate some general similarities of shielding surfaces. The systematic variation in the signs and magnitudes of the first derivative of X nuclear shielding at the equilibrium geometry in XHn molecules of the first and second row of the Periodic Table are shown to be consistent with a general shape for the shielding function σ(R), which we have found in rare gas pairs and for 23Na in NaH.

  6. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy of human brain function.

    PubMed Central

    Shulman, R G; Blamire, A M; Rothman, D L; McCarthy, G

    1993-01-01

    The techniques of in vivo magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and spectroscopy have been established over the past two decades. Recent applications of these methods to study human brain function have become a rapidly growing area of research. The development of methods using standard MR contrast agents within the cerebral vasculature has allowed measurements of regional cerebral blood volume (rCBV), which are activity dependent. Subsequent investigations linked the MR relaxation properties of brain tissue to blood oxygenation levels which are also modulated by consumption and blood flow (rCBF). These methods have allowed mapping of brain activity in human visual and motor cortex as well as in areas of the frontal lobe involved in language. The methods have high enough spatial and temporal sensitivity to be used in individual subjects. MR spectroscopy of proton and carbon-13 nuclei has been used to measure rates of glucose transport and metabolism in the human brain. The steady-state measurements of brain glucose concentrations can be used to monitor the glycolytic flux, whereas subsequent glucose metabolism--i.e., the flux into the cerebral glutamate pool--can be used to measure tricarboxylic acid cycle flux. Under visual stimulation the concentration of lactate in the visual cortex has been shown to increase by MR spectroscopy. This increase is compatible with an increase of anaerobic glycolysis under these conditions as earlier proposed from positron emission tomography studies. It is shown how MR spectroscopy can extend this understanding of brain metabolism. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:8475050

  7. Cavernosal nerve functionality evaluation after magnetic resonance imaging-guided transurethral ultrasound treatment of the prostate

    PubMed Central

    Sammet, Steffen; Partanen, Ari; Yousuf, Ambereen; Sammet, Christina L; Ward, Emily V; Wardrip, Craig; Niekrasz, Marek; Antic, Tatjana; Razmaria, Aria; Farahani, Keyvan; Sokka, Shunmugavelu; Karczmar, Gregory; Oto, Aytekin

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the feasibility of using therapeutic ultrasound as an alternative treatment option for organ-confined prostate cancer. METHODS: In this study, a trans-urethral therapeutic ultrasound applicator in combination with 3T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) guidance was used for real-time multi-planar MRI-based temperature monitoring and temperature feedback control of prostatic tissue thermal ablation in vivo. We evaluated the feasibility and safety of MRI-guided trans-urethral ultrasound to effectively and accurately ablate prostate tissue while minimizing the damage to surrounding tissues in eight canine prostates. MRI was used to plan sonications, monitor temperature changes during therapy, and to evaluate treatment outcome. Real-time temperature and thermal dose maps were calculated using the proton resonance frequency shift technique and were displayed as two-dimensional color-coded overlays on top of the anatomical images. After ultrasound treatment, an evaluation of the integrity of cavernosal nerves was performed during prostatectomy with a nerve stimulator that measured tumescence response quantitatively and indicated intact cavernous nerve functionality. Planned sonication volumes were visually correlated to MRI ablation volumes and corresponding histo-pathological sections after prostatectomy. RESULTS: A total of 16 sonications were performed in 8 canines. MR images acquired before ultrasound treatment were used to localize the prostate and to prescribe sonication targets in all canines. Temperature elevations corresponded within 1 degree of the targeted sonication angle, as well as with the width and length of the active transducer elements. The ultrasound treatment procedures were automatically interrupted when the temperature in the target zone reached 56 °C. In all canines erectile responses were evaluated with a cavernous nerve stimulator post-treatment and showed a tumescence response after stimulation with an electric current. These

  8. Investigating short-range magnetism in strongly correlated materials via magnetic pair distribution function analysis and ab initio theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frandsen, Benjamin; Page, Katharine; Brunelli, Michela; Staunton, Julie; Billinge, Simon

    Short-range magnetic correlations are known to exist in a variety of strongly correlated electron systems, but our understanding of the role they play is challenged by the difficulty of experimentally probing such correlations. Magnetic pair distribution function (mPDF) analysis is a newly developed neutron total scattering method that can reveal short-range magnetic correlations directly in real space, and may therefore help ameliorate this difficulty. We present temperature-dependent mPDF measurements of the short-range magnetic correlations in the paramagnetic phase of antiferromagnetic MnO, an archetypal strongly correlated transition-metal oxide. We observe significant correlations on a ~1 nm length scale that differ substantially from the low-temperature long-range-ordered spin arrangement. With no free parameters, ab initio calculations using the self-interaction-corrected local spin density approximation of density functional theory quantitatively reproduce the magnetic correlations to a high degree of accuracy. These results yield valuable insight into the magnetic exchange in MnO and showcase the utility of the mPDF technique for studying magnetic properties of strongly correlated electron systems.

  9. Functionalized polymeric magnetic nanoconstructs for selective capturing and sensitive detection of Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Chattopadhyay, Sruti; Kaur, Avneet; Jain, Swati; Sabharwal, Prabhjot K; Singh, Harpal

    2016-09-21

    Rapid detection and enumeration of pathogens is essential for monitoring contamination and spoilage of food products to ensure improved quality control management. Functionalized polymeric magnetic nanoconstructs (FPMNCs) were developed as an effective immunomagnetic separator and sensing platform for the selective capturing of Salmonella typhimurium. Novel FPMNCs were prepared in three stages involving synthesis of iron oxide (IO) dispersion, capping with sodium oleate and encapsulation of preformed IO nanoparticles by in-situ free radical emulsion polymerization of styrene (St), methyl methacrylate (MMA) and acetoacetoxy ethylmethacrylate (AAEM). PMMA improves the stability of FPMNCs by bridging extremely hydrophobic PS and hydrophilic PAAEM. Core-shell morphology of hydrophobic core of IO, PS & PMMA and hydrophilic shell of PAAEM was demonstrated by SEM, TEM and FTIR studies. FPMNCs with surface functionalized acetoacetoxy groups were covalently attached with polyclonal antibodies against Salmonella common structural antigen (CSA-1-Ab) without using any linker and catalyst. Colorimetric readout signal was acquired using CSA-1-Ab-HRP as secondary antibody after formation of sandwich immunocomplex with bacteria where the optical density of the samples were recorded using ELISA plate reader at 450 nm. The developed immunoassay was specific and selective which captures only targeted S. typhimurium with a detection limit of 10 cells/mL lower than infectious dose of salmonellosis infection. Minimal interference of food matrix with high signal to noise ratio was shown by various food samples. In addition, the performance of developed FPMNC based immunoassay was superior to commercially available immunomagnetic microbeads demonstrating undisputed advantage for capturing and detecting specific bacteria without any pre-enrichment of sample. PMID:27590554

  10. Lectin-functionalized magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for reproductive improvement

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Semen ejaculates contain heterogeneous sperm populations that can jeopardize male fertility. Recent development of nanotechnology in physiological systems may have applications in reproductive biology. Here, we used magnetic nanoparticles as a novel strategy for sperm purification to imp...

  11. Biomedical Applications of Magnetically Functionalized Organic/Inorganic Hybrid Nanofibers.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hwa-Jeong; Lee, Sang Joon; Uthaman, Saji; Thomas, Reju George; Hyun, Hoon; Jeong, Yong Yeon; Cho, Chong-Su; Park, In-Kyu

    2015-01-01

    Nanofibers are one-dimensional nanomaterial in fiber form with diameter less than 1 µm and an aspect ratio (length/diameter) larger than 100:1. Among the different types of nanoparticle-loaded nanofiber systems, nanofibers loaded with magnetic nanoparticles have gained much attention from biomedical scientists due to a synergistic effect obtained from the unique properties of both the nanofibers and magnetic nanoparticles. These magnetic nanoparticle-encapsulated or -embedded nanofiber systems can be used not only for imaging purposes but also for therapy. In this review, we focused on recent advances in nanofibers loaded with magnetic nanoparticles, their biomedical applications, and future trends in the application of these nanofibers. PMID:26084046

  12. Biomedical Applications of Magnetically Functionalized Organic/Inorganic Hybrid Nanofibers

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hwa-Jeong; Lee, Sang Joon; Uthaman, Saji; Thomas, Reju George; Hyun, Hoon; Jeong, Yong Yeon; Cho, Chong-Su; Park, In-Kyu

    2015-01-01

    Nanofibers are one-dimensional nanomaterial in fiber form with diameter less than 1 µm and an aspect ratio (length/diameter) larger than 100:1. Among the different types of nanoparticle-loaded nanofiber systems, nanofibers loaded with magnetic nanoparticles have gained much attention from biomedical scientists due to a synergistic effect obtained from the unique properties of both the nanofibers and magnetic nanoparticles. These magnetic nanoparticle-encapsulated or -embedded nanofiber systems can be used not only for imaging purposes but also for therapy. In this review, we focused on recent advances in nanofibers loaded with magnetic nanoparticles, their biomedical applications, and future trends in the application of these nanofibers. PMID:26084046

  13. Dual-function magnetic structure for toroidal plasma devices

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Robert L.

    1978-01-01

    This invention relates to a support system wherein the iron core and yoke of the plasma current system of a tokamak plasma containment device is redesigned to support the forces of the magnet coils. The containment rings, which occupy very valuable space around the magnet coils, are utilized to serve as yokes for the core such that the conventional yoke is eliminated. The overall result is an improved aspect ratio, reduction in structure, smaller overall size, and improved access to the plasma ring.

  14. Magnetic nanoparticles: synthesis, functionalization, and applications in bioimaging and magnetic energy storage

    PubMed Central

    Frey, Natalie A.; Peng, Sheng; Cheng, Kai; Sun, Shouheng

    2009-01-01

    This tutorial review summarizes the recent advances in the chemical synthesis and potential applications of monodisperse magnetic nanoparticles. After a brief introduction to nanomagnetism, the review focuses on recent developments in solution phase syntheses of monodisperse MFe2O4, Co, Fe, CoFe, FePt and SmCo5 nanoparticles. The review further outlines the surface, structural, and magnetic properties of these nanoparticles for biomedicine and magnetic energy storage applications. PMID:19690734

  15. Electron distribution function and recombination coefficient in ultracold plasma in a magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Bobrov, A. A.; Bronin, S. Ya.; Zelener, B. B.; Zelener, B. V.; Manykin, E. A.; Khikhlukha, D. R.

    2013-07-15

    The electron distribution function and diffusion coefficient in energy space have been calculated for the first time for a weakly coupled ultracold plasma in a magnetic field in the range of magnetic fields B = 100-50000 G for various temperatures. The dependence of these characteristics on the magnetic field is analyzed and the distribution function is shown to depend on the electron energy shift in a magnetic field. The position of the 'bottleneck' of the distribution function has been found to be shifted toward negative energies with increasing magnetic field. The electron velocity autocorrelators as a function of the magnetic field have been calculated; their behavior suggests that the frequency of collisions between charged particles decreases significantly with increasing magnetic field. The collisional recombination coefficient {alpha}{sub B} has been calculated in the diffusion approximation for a weakly coupled ultracold plasma in a magnetic field. An increase in magnetic field is shown to lead to a decrease in {alpha}{sub B} and this decrease can be several orders of magnitude.

  16. Activity of glucose oxidase functionalized onto magnetic nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Kouassi, Gilles K; Irudayaraj, Joseph; McCarty, Gregory

    2005-01-01

    Background Magnetic nanoparticles have been significantly used for coupling with biomolecules, due to their unique properties. Methods Magnetic nanoparticles were synthesized by thermal co-precipitation of ferric and ferrous chloride using two different base solutions. Glucose oxidase was bound to the particles by direct attachment via carbodiimide activation or by thiophene acetylation of magnetic nanoparticles. Transmission electron microscopy was used to characterize the size and structure of the particles while the binding of glucose oxidase to the particles was confirmed using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Results The direct binding of glucose oxidase via carbodiimide activity was found to be more effective, resulting in bound enzyme efficiencies between 94–100% while thiophene acetylation was 66–72% efficient. Kinetic and stability studies showed that the enzyme activity was more preserved upon binding onto the nanoparticles when subjected to thermal and various pH conditions. The overall activity of glucose oxidase was improved when bound to magnetic nanoparticles Conclusion Binding of enzyme onto magnetic nanoparticles via carbodiimide activation is a very efficient method for developing bioconjugates for biological applications PMID:15762994

  17. Functionalization and magnetization of carbon nanotubes using Co-60 gamma-ray irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C. Y.; Fu, M. J.; Tsai, C. Y.; Lin, F. H.; Chen, K. Y.

    2014-10-01

    Functionalized magnetic carbon nanotubes (CNTs) can be used in the biological and biomedical fields as biosensors, drug delivery systems, etc., which makes research into processes for manufacturing modified CNTs quite important. In this paper, Co-60 gamma irradiation is shown to be an effective tool for fabricating functionalized and magnetized CNTs. After the Co-60 gamma irradiation, the presence of carboxylic functional groups on the CNT walls was confirmed by their Fourier transform infrared spectra, and the presence of Fe3O4 was verified by the X-ray diffraction patterns. The functionalized and magnetized CNTs produced using Co-60 gamma irradiation have excellent dispersion properties. The techniques for functionalizing and magnetizing CNTs are introduced in this paper, and applications of the modified CNTs will be reported after more data are gathered.

  18. Force-free magnetic fields - Generating functions and footpoint displacements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfson, Richard; Verma, Ritu

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents analytic and numerical calculations that explore equilibrium sequences of bipolar force-free magnetic fields in relation to displacments of their magnetic footpoints. It is shown that the appearance of magnetic islands - sometimes interpreted as marking the loss of equilibrium in models of the solar atmosphere - is likely associated only with physically unrealistic footpoint displacements such as infinite separation or 'tearing' of the model photosphere. The work suggests that the loss of equilibrium in bipolar configurations, sometimes proposed as a mechanism for eruptive solar events, probably requires either fully three-dimensional field configurations or nonzero plasma pressure. The results apply only to fields that are strictly bipolar, and do not rule out equilibrium loss in more complex structures such as quadrupolar fields.

  19. Acquired reactive perforating collagenosis.

    PubMed

    Basak, P Y; Turkmen, C

    2001-01-01

    Acquired perforating disorder has been recognized as an uncommon distinct dermatosis in which altered collagen is eliminated through the epidermis. Several disorders accompanied by itching and scratching were reported to be associated with reactive perforating collagenosis. A 67-year-old white woman diagnosed as acquired reactive perforating collagenosis with poorly controlled diabetes mellitus and congestive cardiac failure is presented. PMID:11525959

  20. Effect of magnetic field on dynamic response function in Ising systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawlak, A.; Erdem, R.

    2013-11-01

    As a continuation of our previously published work, we use the Nelson's method to study the effect of the magnetic field on the temperature-, frequency-, and momentum-dependent response function and dynamic correlation function in the Ising-type systems with relaxational dynamics. The scaling function is given within the renormalization group formalism at one-loop order for nonzero field. We show how the typical two-peak structure of the real part of response function changes with magnetic field. We discuss the deviations of the correlation function from the Gaussian expression. The Fisher-Langer maximum is also considered.

  1. Implementation and evaluation of simultaneous video-electroencephalography and functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Umair J; Kokkinos, Vasileios; Carmichael, David W; Rodionov, Roman; Gasston, David; Duncan, John S; Lemieux, Louis

    2010-10-01

    The objective of this study was to demonstrate that the addition of simultaneous and synchronised video to electroencephalography (EEG)-correlated functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) could increase recorded information without data quality reduction. We investigated the effect of placing EEG, video equipment and their required power supplies inside the scanner room, on EEG, video and MRI data quality, and evaluated video-EEG-fMRI by modelling a hand motor task. Gradient-echo, echo-planner images (EPI) were acquired on a 3-T MRI scanner at variable camera positions in a test object [with and without radiofrequency (RF) excitation], and human subjects. EEG was recorded using a commercial MR-compatible 64-channel cap and amplifiers. Video recording was performed using a two-camera custom-made system with EEG synchronization. An in-house script was used to calculate signal to fluctuation noise ratio (SFNR) from EPI in test object with variable camera positions and in human subjects with and without concurrent video recording. Five subjects were investigated with video-EEG-fMRI while performing hand motor task. The fMRI time series data was analysed using statistical parametric mapping, by building block design general linear models which were paradigm prescribed and video based. Introduction of the cameras did not alter the SFNR significantly, nor did it show any signs of spike noise during RF off conditions. Video and EEG quality also did not show any significant artefact. The Statistical Parametric Mapping{T} maps from video based design revealed additional blood oxygen level-dependent responses in the expected locations for non-compliant subjects compared to the paradigm prescribed design. We conclude that video-EEG-fMRI set up can be implemented without affecting the data quality significantly and may provide valuable information on behaviour to enhance the analysis of fMRI data. PMID:20233646

  2. Wavelet-based approaches for multiple hypothesis testing in activation mapping of functional magnetic resonance images of the human brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fadili, Jalal M.; Bullmore, Edward T.

    2003-11-01

    Wavelet-based methods for multiple hypothesis testing are described and their potential for activation mapping of human functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data is investigated. In this approach, we emphasize convergence between methods of wavelet thresholding or shrinkage and the problem of multiple hypothesis testing in both classical and Bayesian contexts. Specifically, our interest will be focused on ensuring a trade off between type I probability error control and power dissipation. We describe a technique for controlling the false discovery rate at an arbitrary level of type 1 error in testing multiple wavelet coefficients generated by a 2D discrete wavelet transform (DWT) of spatial maps of {fMRI} time series statistics. We also describe and apply recursive testing methods that can be used to define a threshold unique to each level and orientation of the 2D-DWT. Bayesian methods, incorporating a formal model for the anticipated sparseness of wavelet coefficients representing the signal or true image, are also tractable. These methods are comparatively evaluated by analysis of "null" images (acquired with the subject at rest), in which case the number of positive tests should be exactly as predicted under the hull hypothesis, and an experimental dataset acquired from 5 normal volunteers during an event-related finger movement task. We show that all three wavelet-based methods of multiple hypothesis testing have good type 1 error control (the FDR method being most conservative) and generate plausible brain activation maps.

  3. Bilateral responses of prefrontal and motor cortices to repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation as measured by functional near infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Fenghua; Kozel, Frank Andrew; Dhamne, Sameer; McClintock, Shawn M.; Croarkin, Paul; Mapes, Kimberly; Husain, Mustafa M.; Liu, Hanli

    2009-02-01

    Simultaneously acquiring cortical functional Near Infrared Spectroscopy (fNIRS) during repeated Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS) offers the possibility of directly investigating the effects of rTMS on brain regions without quantifiable behavioral changes. In this study, the left motor cortex and subsequently the left prefrontal cortex were stimulated at 1 Hz while fNIRS data was simultaneously acquired. Changes in hemodynamic signals were measured on both ipsilateral and contralateral sides. In each cortex, a significantly larger decrease in the concentration of oxygenated hemoglobin and a smaller increase in the concentration of deoxygenated hemoglobin during the stimulation periods were observed in both the motor and prefrontal cortices. The ipsilateral and contralateral changes showed high temporal consistency. Same experiment was repeated for each subject 2 or 3 days later. The hemodynamic responses associated with the stimulation showed good reproducibility in two sessions. To our knowledge, this is the first report of simultaneous fNIRS measurement of ipsilateral and contralateral changes of either the motor or prefrontal cortex during rTMS stimulation.

  4. The continuum intensity as a function of magnetic field. II. Local magnetic flux and convective flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobel, P.; Solanki, S. K.; Borrero, J. M.

    2012-06-01

    Context. To deepen our understanding of the role of small-scale magnetic fields in active regions (ARs) and in the quiet Sun (QS) on the solar irradiance, it is fundamental to investigate the physical processes underlying their continuum brightness. Previous results showed that magnetic elements in the QS reach larger continuum intensities than in ARs at disk center, but left this difference unexplained. Aims: We use Hinode/SP disk center data to study the influence of the local amount of magnetic flux on the vigour of the convective flows and the continuum intensity contrasts. Methods: The apparent (i.e. averaged over a pixel) longitudinal field strength and line-of-sight (LOS) plasma velocity were retrieved by means of Milne-Eddington inversions (VFISV code). We analyzed a series of boxes taken over AR plages and the QS, to determine how the continuum intensity contrast of magnetic elements, the amplitude of the vertical flows and the box-averaged contrast were affected by the mean longitudinal field strength in the box (which scales with the total unsigned flux in the box). Results: Both the continuum brightness of the magnetic elements and the dispersion of the LOS velocities anti-correlate with the mean longitudinal field strength. This can be attributed to the "magnetic patches" (here defined as areas where the longitudinal field strength is above 100 G) carrying most of the flux in the boxes. There the velocity amplitude and the spatial scale of convection are reduced. Due to this hampered convective transport, these patches appear darker than their surroundings. Consequently, the average brightness of a box decreases as the the patches occupy a larger fraction of it and the amount of embedded flux thereby increases. Conclusions: Our results suggest that as the magnetic flux increases locally (e.g. from weak network to strong plage), the heating of the magnetic elements is reduced by the intermediate of a more suppressed convective energy transport within

  5. Irregular wave functions of a hydrogen atom in a uniform magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wintgen, D.; Hoenig, A.

    1989-01-01

    The highly excited irregular wave functions of a hydrogen atom in a uniform magnetic field are investigated analytically, with wave function scarring by periodic orbits considered quantitatively. The results obtained confirm that the contributions of closed classical orbits to the spatial wave functions vanish in the semiclassical limit. Their disappearance, however, is slow. This discussion is illustrated by numerical examples.

  6. Rapid eye movement-related brain activation in human sleep: a functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Wehrle, Renate; Czisch, Michael; Kaufmann, Christian; Wetter, Thomas C; Holsboer, Florian; Auer, Dorothee P; Pollmächer, Thomas

    2005-05-31

    In animal models, ponto-geniculo-occipital waves appear as an early sign of rapid eye movement sleep and may be functionally significant for brain plasticity processes. In this pilot study, we use a combined polysomnographic and functional magnetic resonance imaging approach, and show distinct magnetic resonance imaging signal increases in the posterior thalamus and occipital cortex in close temporal relationship to rapid eye movements during human rapid eye movement sleep. These findings are consistent with cell recordings in animal experiments and demonstrate that functional magnetic resonance imaging can be utilized to detect ponto-geniculo-occipital-like activity in humans. Studying intact neuronal networks underlying sleep regulation is no longer confined to animal models, but has been shown to be feasible in humans by a combined functional magnetic resonance imaging and electroencephalograph approach. PMID:15891584

  7. Brain functional magnetic resonance imaging response to glucose and fructose infusions in humans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objective: In animals, intracerebroventricular glucose and fructose have opposing effects on appetite and weight regulation. In humans, functional brain magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies during carbohydrate ingestion suggest that glucose may regulate HT signaling but are potentially confoun...

  8. Hyperpolarized Magnetic Resonance as a Sensitive Detector of Metabolic Function

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Hyperpolarized magnetic resonance allows for noninvasive measurements of biochemical reactions in vivo. Although this technique provides a unique tool for assaying enzymatic activities in intact organs, the scope of its application is still elusive for the wider scientific community. The purpose of this review is to provide key principles and parameters to guide the researcher interested in adopting this technology to address a biochemical, biomedical, or medical issue. It is presented in the form of a compendium containing the underlying essential physical concepts as well as suggestions to help assess the potential of the technique within the framework of specific research environments. Explicit examples are used to illustrate the power as well as the limitations of hyperpolarized magnetic resonance. PMID:25369537

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging and electromyography as indexes of muscle function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Gregory R.; Duvoisin, Marc R.; Dudley, Gary A.

    1992-01-01

    A hypothesis is tested that exercise-induced magnetic resonance (MR) contrast shifts would relate to electromyography (EMG) amplitude if both measures reflect muscle use during exercise. Both magnetic resonance images (MRI) and EMG data were obtained for separate eccentric (ECC) and cocentric (CON) exercise of increasing intensity for seven subjects 30-32 yr old. CON and ECC actions caused increased integrated EMG (IEMG) and T2 values which were strongly related with relative resistance. The rate of increase and absolute value of both T2 and IEMG were found to be greater for CON than for ECC actions. For both actions IEMG and T2 were correlated. Data obtained suggest that surface IEMG accurately reflects the contractile behavior of muscle and exercise-induced increases in MRI T2 values reflect certain processes that scale with muscle use.

  10. Small-angle neutron scattering correlation functions of bulk magnetic materials

    PubMed Central

    Mettus, Denis; Michels, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    On the basis of the continuum theory of micromagnetics, the correlation function of the spin-misalignment small-angle neutron scattering cross section of bulk ferromagnets (e.g. elemental polycrystalline ferromagnets, soft and hard magnetic nanocomposites, nanoporous ferromagnets, or magnetic steels) is computed. For such materials, the spin disorder which is related to spatial variations in the saturation magnetization and magnetic anisotropy field results in strong spin-misalignment scattering dΣM/dΩ along the forward direction. When the applied magnetic field is perpendicular to the incoming neutron beam, the characteristics of dΣM/dΩ (e.g. the angular anisotropy on a two-dimensional detector or the asymptotic power-law exponent) are determined by the ratio of magnetic anisotropy field strength H p to the jump ΔM in the saturation magnetization at internal interfaces. Here, the corresponding one- and two-dimensional real-space correlations are analyzed as a function of applied magnetic field, the ratio H p/ΔM, the single-particle form factor and the particle volume fraction. Finally, the theoretical results for the correlation function are compared with experimental data on nanocrystalline cobalt and nickel. PMID:26500464

  11. General protocol for the synthesis of functionalized magnetic nanoparticles for magnetic resonance imaging from protected metal-organic precursors.

    PubMed

    Hu, He; Zhang, Chongkun; An, Lu; Yu, Yanrong; Yang, Hong; Sun, Jin; Wu, Huixia; Yang, Shiping

    2014-06-01

    The development of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) with functional groups has been intensively pursued in recent years. Herein, a simple, versatile, and cost-effective strategy to synthesize water-soluble and amino-functionalized MNPs, based on the thermal decomposition of phthalimide-protected metal-organic precursors followed by deprotection, was developed. The resulting amino-functionalized Fe3O4, MnFe2O4, and Mn3O4 MNPs with particle sizes of about 14.3, 7.5, and 6.6 nm, respectively, had narrow size distributions and good dispersibility in water. These MNPs also exhibited high magnetism and relaxivities of r2 = 107.25 mM(-1)  s(-1) for Fe3O4, r2 = 245.75 mM(-1)  s(-1) for MnFe2O4, and r1 = 2.74 mM(-1)  s(-1) for Mn3O4. The amino-functionalized MNPs were further conjugated with a fluorescent dye (rhodamine B) and a targeting ligand (folic acid: FA) and used as multifunctional probes. Magnetic resonance imaging and flow-cytometric studies showed that these probes could specifically target cancer cells overexpressing FA receptors. This new protocol opens a new way for the synthesis and design of water-soluble and amino-functionalized MNPs by an easy and versatile route. PMID:24771671

  12. Single step synthesis, characterization and applications of curcumin functionalized iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Bhandari, Rohit; Gupta, Prachi; Dziubla, Thomas; Hilt, J Zach

    2016-10-01

    Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles have been well known for their applications in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), hyperthermia, targeted drug delivery, etc. The surface modification of these magnetic nanoparticles has been explored extensively to achieve functionalized materials with potential application in biomedical, environmental and catalysis field. Herein, we report a novel and versatile single step methodology for developing curcumin functionalized magnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles without any additional linkers, using a simple coprecipitation technique. The magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) were characterized using transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis. The developed MNPs were employed in a cellular application for protection against an inflammatory agent, a polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) molecule. PMID:27287099

  13. Phonon and magnetic structure in δ-plutonium from density-functional theory

    PubMed Central

    Söderlind, Per; Zhou, F.; Landa, A.; Klepeis, J. E.

    2015-01-01

    We present phonon properties of plutonium metal obtained from a combination of density-functional-theory (DFT) electronic structure and the recently developed compressive sensing lattice dynamics (CSLD). The CSLD model is here trained on DFT total energies of several hundreds of quasi-random atomic configurations for best possible accuracy of the phonon properties. The calculated phonon dispersions compare better with experiment than earlier results obtained from dynamical mean-field theory. The density-functional model of the electronic structure consists of disordered magnetic moments with all relativistic effects and explicit orbital-orbital correlations. The magnetic disorder is approximated in two ways: (i) a special quasi-random structure and (ii) the disordered-local-moment method within the coherent potential approximation. Magnetism in plutonium has been debated intensely, but the present magnetic approach for plutonium is validated by the close agreement between the predicted magnetic form factor and that of recent neutron-scattering experiments. PMID:26514238

  14. Phonon and magnetic structure in δ-plutonium from density-functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Söderlind, Per; Zhou, F.; Landa, A.; Klepeis, J. E.

    2015-10-30

    We present phonon properties of plutonium metal obtained from a combination of density-functional-theory (DFT) electronic structure and the recently developed compressive sensing lattice dynamics (CSLD). The CSLD model is here trained on DFT total energies of several hundreds of quasi-random atomic configurations for best possible accuracy of the phonon properties. The calculated phonon dispersions compare better with experiment than earlier results obtained from dynamical mean-field theory. The density-functional model of the electronic structure consists of disordered magnetic moments with all relativistic effects and explicit orbital-orbital correlations. The magnetic disorder is approximated in two ways: (i) a special quasi-random structure and (ii) the disordered-local-moment (DLM) method within the coherent potential approximation. Magnetism in plutonium has been debated intensely, However, the present magnetic approach for plutonium is validated by the close agreement between the predicted magnetic form factor and that of recent neutron-scattering experiments.

  15. Phonon and magnetic structure in δ-plutonium from density-functional theory.

    PubMed

    Söderlind, Per; Zhou, F; Landa, A; Klepeis, J E

    2015-01-01

    We present phonon properties of plutonium metal obtained from a combination of density-functional-theory (DFT) electronic structure and the recently developed compressive sensing lattice dynamics (CSLD). The CSLD model is here trained on DFT total energies of several hundreds of quasi-random atomic configurations for best possible accuracy of the phonon properties. The calculated phonon dispersions compare better with experiment than earlier results obtained from dynamical mean-field theory. The density-functional model of the electronic structure consists of disordered magnetic moments with all relativistic effects and explicit orbital-orbital correlations. The magnetic disorder is approximated in two ways: (i) a special quasi-random structure and (ii) the disordered-local-moment method within the coherent potential approximation. Magnetism in plutonium has been debated intensely, but the present magnetic approach for plutonium is validated by the close agreement between the predicted magnetic form factor and that of recent neutron-scattering experiments. PMID:26514238

  16. Magnetic assembly of transparent and conducting graphene-based functional composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Ferrand, Hortense; Bolisetty, Sreenath; Demirörs, Ahmet F.; Libanori, Rafael; Studart, André R.; Mezzenga, Raffaele

    2016-06-01

    Innovative methods producing transparent and flexible electrodes are highly sought in modern optoelectronic applications to replace metal oxides, but available solutions suffer from drawbacks such as brittleness, unaffordability and inadequate processability. Here we propose a general, simple strategy to produce hierarchical composites of functionalized graphene in polymeric matrices, exhibiting transparency and electron conductivity. These are obtained through protein-assisted functionalization of graphene with magnetic nanoparticles, followed by magnetic-directed assembly of the graphene within polymeric matrices undergoing sol-gel transitions. By applying rotating magnetic fields or magnetic moulds, both graphene orientation and distribution can be controlled within the composite. Importantly, by using magnetic virtual moulds of predefined meshes, graphene assembly is directed into double-percolating networks, reducing the percolation threshold and enabling combined optical transparency and electrical conductivity not accessible in single-network materials. The resulting composites open new possibilities on the quest of transparent electrodes for photovoltaics, organic light-emitting diodes and stretchable optoelectronic devices.

  17. Synthesis and design of functionalized magnetic nanocolloids for water pollution remediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campos, A. F. C.; Ferreira, M. A.; Marinho, E. P.; Tourinho, F. A.; Depeyrot, J.

    This work focus on the potential applications of magnetic nanoparticles on pollution remediation. We draw attention to the chemical design of functionalized magnetic colloids based on tartrate ligands to be used in magnetic separation of heavy metals from wastewater. Coupling the speciation diagrams of nanoferrites particles surface with that of the tartaric acid, it was possible to provide a theoretical prediction of the optimal pH for particle surface-ligand complexation. Finally, from an electrochemical approach based on simultaneous potentiometric and conductimetric titrations it was possible to determine the saturation value of the surface charge density of the functionalized nanoparticles and its pH dependence.

  18. Acquired Cystic Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... a kidney transplant or blood-filtering treatments called dialysis. The cysts are more likely to develop in people who are on kidney dialysis. The chance of developing acquired cystic kidney disease ...

  19. Hospital-acquired pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    ... tends to be more serious than other lung infections because: People in the hospital are often very sick and cannot fight off ... prevent pneumonia. Most hospitals have programs to prevent hospital-acquired infections.

  20. Generalized form of anhysteretic magnetization function for Jiles-Atherton theory of hysteresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raghunathan, A.; Melikhov, Y.; Snyder, J. E.; Jiles, D. C.

    2009-10-01

    A generalized form of anhysteretic magnetization function to extend Jiles-Atherton theory to different forms of anisotropy has been derived. The general equation for the function has been compared with those of calculations made on the basis of known equations for specific cases: axially anisotropic (one-dimensional), planar anisotropic (two-dimensional), and isotropic (three-dimensional). The Jiles-Atherton model using the proposed functional form of generalized anhysteretic magnetization function for anisotropy dependence has been validated and the necessary equations derived. It has been shown in this work that this functional form of anhysteretic magnetization with necessary boundary conditions can be reduced to the familiar specific model equations in the particular cases.

  1. Longitudinal wave function control in single quantum dots with an applied magnetic field

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Shuo; Tang, Jing; Gao, Yunan; Sun, Yue; Qiu, Kangsheng; Zhao, Yanhui; He, Min; Shi, Jin-An; Gu, Lin; Williams, David A.; Sheng, Weidong; Jin, Kuijuan; Xu, Xiulai

    2015-01-01

    Controlling single-particle wave functions in single semiconductor quantum dots is in demand to implement solid-state quantum information processing and spintronics. Normally, particle wave functions can be tuned transversely by an perpendicular magnetic field. We report a longitudinal wave function control in single quantum dots with a magnetic field. For a pure InAs quantum dot with a shape of pyramid or truncated pyramid, the hole wave function always occupies the base because of the less confinement at base, which induces a permanent dipole oriented from base to apex. With applying magnetic field along the base-apex direction, the hole wave function shrinks in the base plane. Because of the linear changing of the confinement for hole wave function from base to apex, the center of effective mass moves up during shrinking process. Due to the uniform confine potential for electrons, the center of effective mass of electrons does not move much, which results in a permanent dipole moment change and an inverted electron-hole alignment along the magnetic field direction. Manipulating the wave function longitudinally not only provides an alternative way to control the charge distribution with magnetic field but also a new method to tune electron-hole interaction in single quantum dots. PMID:25624018

  2. Self-assembly with orthogonal-imposed stimuli to impart structure and confer magnetic function to electrodeposited hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying; Liu, Yi; Gao, Tieren; Zhang, Boce; Song, Yingying; Terrell, Jessica L; Barber, Nathan; Bentley, William E; Takeuchi, Ichiro; Payne, Gregory F; Wang, Qin

    2015-05-20

    A magnetic nanocomposite film with the capability of reversibly collecting functionalized magnetic particles was fabricated by simultaneously imposing two orthogonal stimuli (electrical and magnetic). We demonstrate that cathodic codeposition of chitosan and Fe3O4 nanoparticles while simultaneously applying a magnetic field during codeposition can (i) organize structure, (ii) confer magnetic properties, and (iii) yield magnetic films that can perform reversible collection/assembly functions. The magnetic field triggered the self-assembly of Fe3O4 nanoparticles into hierarchical "chains" and "fibers" in the chitosan film. For controlled magnetic properties, the Fe3O4-chitosan film was electrodeposited in the presence of various strength magnetic fields and different deposition times. The magnetic properties of the resulting films should enable broad applications in complex devices. As a proof of concept, we demonstrate the reversible capture and release of green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-conjugated magnetic microparticles by the magnetic chitosan film. Moreover, antibody-functionalized magnetic microparticles were applied to capture cells from a sample, and these cells were collected, analyzed, and released by the magnetic chitosan film, paving the way for applications such as reusable biosensor interfaces (e.g., for pathogen detection). To our knowledge, this is the first report to apply a magnetic field during the electrodeposition of a hydrogel to generate magnetic soft matter. Importantly, the simple, rapid, and reagentless fabrication methodologies demonstrated here are valuable features for creating a magnetic device interface. PMID:25923335

  3. Structure, function, and use of the magnetic sense in animals (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Michael M.; Diebel, Carol E.; Green, Colin R.

    2000-05-01

    The hypothesis that animals navigate magnetically is attractive because the earth's magnetic field provides consistent information about position and direction in all environments through which animals travel. However, the hypothesis has been difficult to test because (i) the structure and function of the sense could not readily be analyzed in the laboratory and (ii) the effects of experimental treatments on behavior in the laboratory and field could not be reliably predicted. Our research is focused on the structure and function of the sense in rainbow trout and on applying the understanding gained in the laboratory to studies of navigation by homing pigeons. We have found iron-rich crystals (most likely single-domain magnetite) in candidate magnetoreceptor cells located within a discrete layer of sensory tissue in the nose of rainbow trout. The candidate receptor cells are closely associated with a branch of the trigeminal nerve that responds to changes in intensity but not direction of magnetic fields. In parallel work, we have developed a model of magnetic position determination in which pigeons derive magnetic analogues of geographic latitude and longitude from (i) the total intensity and (ii) the direction of the intensity slope of the earth's magnetic field. Taken together with our other results, the model gives us confidence that a coherent understanding of the structure, function, and use of the magnetic sense in animals is now developing.

  4. High-permeability functionalized silicone magnetic microspheres with low autofluorescence for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Evans, Benjamin A; Ronecker, Julia C; Han, David T; Glass, Daniel R; Train, Tonya L; Deatsch, Alison E

    2016-05-01

    Functionalized magnetic microspheres are widely used for cell separations, isolation of proteins and other biomolecules, in vitro diagnostics, tissue engineering, and microscale force spectroscopy. We present here the synthesis and characterization of a silicone magnetic microsphere which can be produced in diameters ranging from 0.5 to 50μm via emulsion polymerization of a silicone ferrofluid precursor. This bottom-up approach to synthesis ensures a uniform magnetic concentration across all sizes, leading to significant advances in magnetic force generation. We demonstrate that in a size range of 5-20μm, these spheres supply a full order of magnitude greater magnetic force than leading commercial products. In addition, the unique silicone matrix exhibits autofluorescence two orders of magnitude lower than polystyrene microspheres. Finally, we demonstrate the ability to chemically functionalize our silicone microspheres using a standard EDC reaction, and show that our folate-functionalized silicone microspheres specifically bind to targeted HeLa and Jurkat cells. These spheres show tremendous potential for replacing magnetic polystyrene spheres in applications which require either large magnetic forces or minimal autofluorescence, since they represent order-of-magnitude improvements in each. In addition, the unique silicone matrix and proven biocompatibility suggest that they may be useful for encapsulation and targeted delivery of lipophilic pharmaceuticals. PMID:26952493

  5. Evaluating Swallowing Muscles Essential for Hyolaryngeal Elevation by Using Muscle Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Pearson, William G.; Hindson, David F.; Langmore, Susan E.; Zumwalt, Ann C.

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: Reduced hyolaryngeal elevation, a critical event in swallowing, is associated with radiation therapy. Two muscle groups that suspend the hyoid, larynx, and pharynx have been proposed to elevate the hyolaryngeal complex: the suprahyoid and longitudinal pharyngeal muscles. Thought to assist both groups is the thyrohyoid, a muscle intrinsic to the hyolaryngeal complex. Intensity modulated radiation therapy guidelines designed to preserve structures important to swallowing currently exclude the suprahyoid and thyrohyoid muscles. This study used muscle functional magnetic resonance imaging (mfMRI) in normal healthy adults to determine whether both muscle groups are active in swallowing and to test therapeutic exercises thought to be specific to hyolaryngeal elevation. Methods and Materials: mfMRI data were acquired from 11 healthy subjects before and after normal swallowing and after swallowing exercise regimens (the Mendelsohn maneuver and effortful pitch glide). Whole-muscle transverse relaxation time (T2 signal, measured in milliseconds) profiles of 7 test muscles were used to evaluate the physiologic response of each muscle to each condition. Changes in effect size (using the Cohen d measure) of whole-muscle T2 profiles were used to determine which muscles underlie swallowing and swallowing exercises. Results: Post-swallowing effect size changes (where a d value of >0.20 indicates significant activity during swallowing) for the T2 signal profile of the thyrohyoid was a d value of 0.09; a d value of 0.40 for the mylohyoid, 0.80 for the geniohyoid, 0.04 for the anterior digastric, and 0.25 for the posterior digastric-stylohyoid in the suprahyoid muscle group; and d values of 0.47 for the palatopharyngeus and 0.28 for the stylopharyngeus muscles in the longitudinal pharyngeal muscle group. The Mendelsohn maneuver and effortful pitch glide swallowing exercises showed significant effect size changes for all muscles tested, except for the thyrohyoid. Conclusions

  6. Brain Activation during Semantic Processing in Autism Spectrum Disorders via Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Gordon J.; Chabris, Christopher F.; Clark, Jill; Urban, Trinity; Aharon, Itzhak; Steele, Shelley; McGrath, Lauren; Condouris, Karen; Tager-Flusberg, Helen

    2006-01-01

    Language and communication deficits are core features of autism spectrum disorders (ASD), even in high-functioning adults with ASD. This study investigated brain activation patterns using functional magnetic resonance imaging in right-handed adult males with ASD and a control group, matched on age, handedness, and verbal IQ. Semantic processing in…

  7. Irregular wave functions of a hydrogen atom in a uniform magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Wintgen, D. Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Postfach 103980, D-6900 Heidelberg, ); Honig, A. )

    1989-10-02

    We study the irregular wave functions of a highly excited hydrogen atom in a uniform magnetic field. The scarring of wave functions by periodic orbits is quantitatively investigated. The shape of unperturbed scars is in good agreement with recent semiclassical predictions.

  8. Wide-band complex magnetic susceptibility measurements of magnetic fluids as a function of temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fannin, P. C.; Kinsella, L.; Charles, S. W.

    1999-07-01

    Measurements of the complex magnetic susceptibility over the frequency and temperature ranges of 2 MHz-6 GHz and 20 to -100°C, respectively, are reported for the first time for a magnetic fluid. The fluid used was a colloidal suspension of magnetite particles of median diameter 9 nm in a hydrocarbon oil (isopar m). Resonance was observed and found to increase from approx 1.5 GHz to 3.3 GHz in the temperature range 20 to -50°C. The increase in resonant frequency is attributed to a decrease in thermal fluctuations with decrease in temperature. At frequencies below approximately 19 MHz, a significant drop in χ'( ω) with decrease in temperature over the temperature range 20 to -100°C, is observed and is attributed to the changes in the Néel and Brownian relaxation processes. Below -60°C, the temperature at which the suspension becomes solid, Brownian relaxation ceases to exist.

  9. Equation of state and spin-correlation functions of ultrasmall classical Heisenberg magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Ciftja, O.; Luban, M.; Auslender, M.; Luscombe, J.H.

    1999-10-01

    We obtain analytical expressions for the total magnetic moment and the static spin-correlation functions of the classical Heisenberg model for ultrasmall systems of spins (unit vectors), that interact via isotropic, nearest-neighbor (n-n) exchange and that are subject to a uniform dc magnetic field of arbitrary strength. Explicit results are presented for the dimer, equilateral triangle, square, and regular tetrahedron arrays of spins. These systems provide a useful theoretical framework for calculating the magnetic properties of several recently synthesized molecular magnets. The tetrahedron as well as the equilateral triangle systems, each considered for n-n antiferromagnetic exchange, are of particular interest since they exhibit frustrated spin ordering for sufficiently low temperatures and weak magnetic fields. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  10. Effects of the substrate on graphone magnetism: A density functional theory study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buonocore, Francesco; Mosca Conte, Adriano; Lisi, Nicola

    2016-04-01

    The magnetism of graphone, a single-side-hydrogenated graphene derivative, has been related to the localized and unpaired p-electrons associated with the unhydrogenated carbon atoms. In the present density functional theory study, the effects the adhesion to either Cu(111) or α-quartz (0001) surface on the magnetic properties of graphone have been investigated. The total magnetization of the graphone adsorbed to copper and quartz surface is reduced by four and two times, respectively, with respect to the isolated graphone. We have shown there is electronic charge transfer from surface towards three-fold coordinated C atoms of graphone, but the main role in the partial magnetism quenching is played by bond formation and the consequent electron pairing of p-electrons. The critical temperature has been investigated on the basis of the mean field theory to evaluate the stability of the magnetism at ordinary temperature.

  11. Multi-functional Magnetic Nanoparticles for Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Yallapu, Murali M.; Othman, Shadi F.; Curtis, Evan T.; Gupta, Brij K.; Jaggi, Meena; Chauhan, Subhash C.

    2010-01-01

    We have developed a multi-layer approach for the synthesis of water-dispersible superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for hyperthermia, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and drug delivery applications. In this approach, iron oxide core nanoparticles were obtained by precipitation of iron salts in the presence of ammonia and provided β-cyclodextrin and pluronic polymer (F127) coatings. This formulation (F127250) was highly water dispersible which allowed encapsulation of the anti-cancer drug(s) in β-cyclodextrin and pluronic polymer for sustained drug release. The F127250 formulation has exhibited superior hyperthermia effects over time under alternating magnetic field compared to pure magnetic nanoparticles (MNP) and β-cyclodextrin coated nanoparticles (CD200). Additionally, the improved MRI characteristics were also observed for the F127250 formulation in agar gel and in cisplatin resistant ovarian cancer cells (A12780CP) compared to MNP and CD200 formulations. Furthermore, the drug loaded formulation of F127250 exhibited many folds of imaging contrast properties. Due to the internalization capacity of the F127250 formulation, its curcumin loaded formulation (F127250-CUR) exhibited almost equivalent inhibition effects on A2780CP (ovarian), MDA-MB-231 (breast), and PC3 (prostate) cancer cells even though curcumin release was only 40%. The improved therapeutic effects were verified by examining molecular effects using Western blotting and transmission electron microscopic (TEM) studies. F127250-CUR also exhibited haemocompatibility, suggesting a nanochemo-therapuetic agent for cancer therapy. PMID:21167595

  12. Functionalization of magnetic nanoparticles with 3-aminopropyl silane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Čampelj, Stanislav; Makovec, Darko; Drofenik, Miha

    2009-05-01

    Superparamagnetic maghemite nanoparticles were functionalized with 3-aminopropyl triethoxy silane (APS). The influence of the different experimental parameters (temperature, pH, and reactant concentration) on the efficiency of the APS bonding directly to the maghemite nanoparticles or after their coating with a thin layer of silica was systematically studied. The functionalization was followed with measurements of the ζ-potential and direct measurements of the surface APS concentration on the nanoparticles. The surface concentration of the APS was much higher in the case when the APS was bonded to the silica-coated nanoparticles compared to bonding directly to the surfaces of the iron-oxide nanoparticles.

  13. Community-acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Falguera, M; Ramírez, M F

    2015-11-01

    This article not only reviews the essential aspects of community-acquired pneumonia for daily clinical practice, but also highlights the controversial issues and provides the newest available information. Community-acquired pneumonia is considered in a broad sense, without excluding certain variants that, in recent years, a number of authors have managed to delineate, such as healthcare-associated pneumonia. The latter form is nothing more than the same disease that affects more frail patients, with a greater number of risk factors, both sharing an overall common approach. PMID:26186969

  14. Magnetic probe response function calibrations for plasma equilibrium reconstructions of CDX-U

    SciTech Connect

    Spaleta, J.; Zakharov, L.; Kaita, R.; Majeski, R.; Gray, T.

    2006-10-15

    A novel response function calibration technique has been developed to account for time-dependent nonaxisymmetric eddy currents near magnetic sensors in toroidal magnetic confinement devices. The response function technique provides a means to cross calibrate against all available external field coil systems to calculate the absolute sensitivity of each magnetic field sensor, even when induced eddy currents are present in the vacuum vessel wall. The response function information derived in the calibration process can be used in equilibrium reconstructions to separate plasma signals from signals due to externally produced eddy currents at magnetic field sensor locations, without invoking localized wall current distribution details. The response function technique was used for the first ever equilibrium reconstructions of spherical torus plasmas, when applied to the Current Drive Experiment-Upgrade (CDX-U) device. In conjunction with the equilibrium and stability code (ESC), equilibria were obtained for recent CDX-U experiments with lithium plasma-facing components. A description of the CDX-U magnetic sensor configuration and the response function calibration technique will be presented along with examples of resulting plasma equilibrium for CDX-U lithium wall operations.

  15. A comparison of spectral quality in magnetic resonance spectroscopy data acquired with and without a novel EPI-navigated PRESS sequence in school-aged children with fetal alcohol spectrum disorders

    PubMed Central

    Hess, Aaron T.; Jacobson, Sandra W.; Jacobson, Joseph L.; Molteno, Christopher D.; van der Kouwe, André J.W.; Meintjes, Ernesta M.

    2014-01-01

    Single voxel spectroscopy (SVS) can generate useful information regarding metabolite concentrations provided that the MR signal can be averaged over several minutes during which the subject remains stationary. This requirement can be particularly challenging for children who cannot otherwise be scanned without sedation. To address this problem we developed an EPI volume navigated (vNav) SVS PRESS sequence, which applies real-time head pose (location and orientation), frequency, and first-order B0 shim adjustments. A water-independent preprocessing algorithm removes residual frequency and phase shifts resulting from within-TR movements. We compare results and performance of the standard and vNav PRESS sequences in a sample of 9- to 10-year-olds from a South African cohort of children with fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD) and healthy controls. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) data in the deep cerebellar nuclei were initially acquired with the standard PRESS sequence. The children were re-scanned 1 year later with the vNav PRESS sequence. Good quality data were acquired in 73% using the vNav PRESS sequence, compared to only 50% for the standard PRESS sequence. Additionally, tighter linewidths and smaller variances in the measured concentrations were observed. These findings confirm previous reports demonstrating the efficacy of our innovative vNav sequence with healthy volunteers and young children with HIV and expand its application to a school-aged population with FASD—disorders often associated with attention problems and hyperactivity. This study provides the most direct evidence to date regarding degree to which these new methods can improve data quality in research studies employing MRS. PMID:24488204

  16. A comprehensive neuropsychological mapping battery for functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Karakas, Sirel; Baran, Zeynel; Ceylan, Arzu Ozkan; Tileylioglu, Emre; Tali, Turgut; Karakas, Hakki Muammer

    2013-11-01

    Existing batteries for FMRI do not precisely meet the criteria for comprehensive mapping of cognitive functions within minimum data acquisition times using standard scanners and head coils. The goal was to develop a battery of neuropsychological paradigms for FMRI that can also be used in other brain imaging techniques and behavioural research. Participants were 61 healthy, young adult volunteers (48 females and 13 males, mean age: 22.25 ± 3.39 years) from the university community. The battery included 8 paradigms for basic (visual, auditory, sensory-motor, emotional arousal) and complex (language, working memory, inhibition/interference control, learning) cognitive functions. Imaging was performed using standard functional imaging capabilities (1.5-T MR scanner, standard head coil). Structural and functional data series were analysed using Brain Voyager QX2.9 and Statistical Parametric Mapping-8. For basic processes, activation centres for individuals were within a distance of 3-11 mm of the group centres of the target regions and for complex cognitive processes, between 7 mm and 15 mm. Based on fixed-effect and random-effects analyses, the distance between the activation centres was 0-4 mm. There was spatial variability between individual cases; however, as shown by the distances between the centres found with fixed-effect and random-effects analyses, the coordinates for individual cases can be used to represent those of the group. The findings show that the neuropsychological brain mapping battery described here can be used in basic science studies that investigate the relationship of the brain to the mind and also as functional localiser in clinical studies for diagnosis, follow-up and pre-surgical mapping. PMID:23892066

  17. Nanometric resolution magnetic resonance imaging methods for mapping functional activity in neuronal networks

    PubMed Central

    Boretti, Albert; Castelletto, Stefania

    2016-01-01

    This contribution highlights and compares some recent achievements in the use of k-space and real space imaging (scanning probe and wide-filed microscope techniques), when applied to a luminescent color center in diamond, known as nitrogen vacancy (NV) center. These techniques combined with the optically detected magnetic resonance of NV, provide a unique platform to achieve nanometric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) resolution of nearby nuclear spins (known as nanoMRI), and nanometric NV real space localization. • Atomic size optically detectable spin probe. • High magnetic field sensitivity and nanometric resolution. • Non-invasive mapping of functional activity in neuronal networks. PMID:27144128

  18. Nanometric resolution magnetic resonance imaging methods for mapping functional activity in neuronal networks.

    PubMed

    Boretti, Albert; Castelletto, Stefania

    2016-01-01

    This contribution highlights and compares some recent achievements in the use of k-space and real space imaging (scanning probe and wide-filed microscope techniques), when applied to a luminescent color center in diamond, known as nitrogen vacancy (NV) center. These techniques combined with the optically detected magnetic resonance of NV, provide a unique platform to achieve nanometric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) resolution of nearby nuclear spins (known as nanoMRI), and nanometric NV real space localization. •Atomic size optically detectable spin probe.•High magnetic field sensitivity and nanometric resolution.•Non-invasive mapping of functional activity in neuronal networks. PMID:27144128

  19. Physiological Noise Reduction Using Volumetric Functional Magnetic Resonance Inverse Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Fa-Hsuan; Nummenmaa, Aapo; Witzel, Thomas; Polimeni, Jonathan R.; Zeffiro, Thomas A.; Wang, Fu-Nien; Belliveau, John W.

    2013-01-01

    Physiological noise arising from a variety of sources can significantly degrade the detection of task-related activity in BOLD-contrast fMRI experiments. If whole head spatial coverage is desired, effective suppression of oscillatory physiological noise from cardiac and respiratory fluctuations is quite difficult without external monitoring, since traditional EPI acquisition methods cannot sample the signal rapidly enough to satisfy the Nyquist sampling theorem, leading to temporal aliasing of noise. Using a combination of high speed magnetic resonance inverse imaging (InI) and digital filtering, we demonstrate that it is possible to suppress cardiac and respiratory noise without auxiliary monitoring, while achieving whole head spatial coverage and reasonable spatial resolution. Our systematic study of the effects of different moving average (MA) digital filters demonstrates that a MA filter with a 2 s window can effectively reduce the variance in the hemodynamic baseline signal, thereby achieving 57-58% improvements in peak z-statistic values compared to unfiltered InI or spatially smoothed EPI data (FWHM =8.6 mm). In conclusion, the high temporal sampling rates achievable with InI permit significant reductions in physiological noise using standard temporal filtering techniques that result in significant improvements in hemodynamic response estimation. PMID:21954026

  20. Long-Circulating Heparin-Functionalized Magnetic Nanoparticles for Potential Application as a Protein Drug Delivery Platform

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jian; Shin, Meong Cheol; David, Allan E.; Zhou, Jie; Lee, Kyuri; He, Huining; Yang, Victor C.

    2013-01-01

    Starch-coated, PEGylated and heparin-functionalized iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles (DNPH) were successfully synthesized and characterized in detail. The PEGylation (20 kDa) process resulted in an average coating of 430 PEG molecules per nanoparticle. After that, heparin conjugation was carried out to attain the final DNPH platform with 35.4 μg of heparin/mg Fe. Commercially acquired heparin-coated magnetic nanoparticles were also PEGylated (HP) and characterized for comparison. Protamine was selected as a model protein to demonstrate the strong binding affinity and high loading content of DNPH for therapeutically relevant cationic proteins. DNPH showed a maximum loading of 22.9 μg protamine/mg Fe. In the pharmacokinetic study, DNPH displayed a long-circulating half-life of 9.37 h, 37.5-fold longer than that (0.15 h) of H P. This improved plasma stability enabled extended exposure of DNPH to the tumor lesions, as was visually confirmed in a flank 9L-glioma mouse model using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Quantitative analysis of the Fe content in excised tumor lesions further demonstrated the superior tumor targeting ability of DNPH, with up to 31.36 μg Fe/g tissue (13.07% injected dose (I.D.)/g tissue) and 7.5-fold improvement over that (4.27 μg Fe/g tissue; 1.78% I.D./g tissue) of HP. Overall, DNPH shed light of the potential to be used as a protein drug delivery platform. PMID:24024964

  1. Electron Velocity Distribution Function in Magnetic Clouds in the Solar Wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nieves-Chinchil, Teresa; Vinas, Adolfo F.; Bale, Stuart D.

    2006-01-01

    We present a study of the kinetic properties of the electron velocity distribution functions within magnetic clouds, since they are the dominant thermal component. The study is based on high time resolution data from the GSFC WIND/SWE electron spectrometer and the Berkeley 3DP electron plasma instruments. Recent studies on magnetic clouds have shown observational evidence of anti-correlation between the total electron density and electron temperature, which suggest a polytrope law P(sub e) = alpha(Nu(sub e) (sup gamma)) for electrons with the constant gamma approximates 0.5 < 1. This anti-correlation and small polytropic gamma-values is interpreted in the context of the presence of highly non-Maxwellian electron distributions (i.e. non-thermal) within magnetic clouds. These works suggested that the non-thermal electrons can contribute as much as 50% of the total electron pressure within magnetic clouds. We have revisited some of the magnetic cloud events previously studied and attempted to quantify the nature of the non-thermal electrons by modeling the electron velocity distribution function using a kappa distribution function to characterize the kinetic non-thermal effects. If non-thermal tail effects are the source for the anti-correlation between the moment electron temperature and density and if the kappa distribution is a reasonable representative model of non-thermal effects, then the electron velocity distribution within magnetic clouds should show indication for small K-values when gamma < 1.

  2. Fabrication and functionalization of dendritic poly(amidoamine)-immobilized magnetic polymer composite microspheres.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongbo; Guo, Jia; Jin, Lan; Yang, Wuli; Wang, Changchun

    2008-03-20

    The synthesis of functionalized magnetic polymer microspheres was described by a process involving (1) preparation of the monodisperse magnetic seeds according to a two-step procedure including the preparation of bilayer-oleic acid-coated Fe3O4 nanoparticles followed by soap-free emulsion polymerization with methyl methacrylate (MMA) and divinyl benzene (a cross-linking agent, DVB); (2) seeded emulsion polymerization proceeding under the continuous addition of glycidyl methacrylate (GMA) monomers in the presence of the magnetic PMMA seeds; and (3) chemical modification of the PGMA shells with ethylenediamine (EDA) to yield amino groups. As such, the magnetic poly(MMA-DVB-GMA) microspheres were prepared possessing monodispersity, uniform magnetic properties, and abundant surface amino groups. Then, the dendritic poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) shells were coated on the magnetic particles on the basis of the Michael addition of methyl acrylate and the amidation of the resulting ester with a large excess of EDA, which could achieve generational growth under such uniform stepwise reactions. For improving the luminescence properties of the composite particles, fluorescein isothiocyanate, which is a popular organic dye, was reacted with the terminal -NH2 groups from the dendritic PAMAM shells, resulting in the formation of multifunctional microspheres with excellent photoluminescence, superparamagnetic, and pH-sensitive properties. In this case, it can be expected that an extension of the functionalization of these microspheres is to immobilize other target molecules onto the PAMAM shells to introduce other desired functions for potential chemical and biological applications. PMID:18281972

  3. Tailored functionalization of iron oxide nanoparticles for MRI, drug delivery, magnetic separation and immobilization of biosubstances.

    PubMed

    Hola, Katerina; Markova, Zdenka; Zoppellaro, Giorgio; Tucek, Jiri; Zboril, Radek

    2015-11-01

    In this critical review, we outline various covalent and non-covalent approaches for the functionalization of iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs). Tuning the surface chemistry and design of magnetic nanoparticles are described in relation to their applicability in advanced medical technologies and biotechnologies including magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents, targeted drug delivery, magnetic separations and immobilizations of proteins, enzymes, antibodies, targeting agents and other biosubstances. We review synthetic strategies for the controlled preparation of IONPs modified with frequently used functional groups including amine, carboxyl and hydroxyl groups as well as the preparation of IONPs functionalized with other species, e.g., epoxy, thiol, alkane, azide, and alkyne groups. Three main coupling strategies for linking IONPs with active agents are presented: (i) chemical modification of amine groups on the surface of IONPs, (ii) chemical modification of bioactive substances (e.g. with fluorescent dyes), and (iii) the activation of carboxyl groups mainly for enzyme immobilization. Applications for drug delivery using click chemistry linking or biodegradable bonds are compared to non-covalent methods based on polymer modified condensed magnetic nanoclusters. Among many challenges, we highlight the specific surface engineering allowing both therapeutic and diagnostic applications (theranostics) of IONPs and magnetic/metallic hybrid nanostructures possessing a huge potential in biocatalysis, green chemistry, magnetic bioseparations and bioimaging. PMID:25689073

  4. Advances in functional magnetic resonance imaging of the human brainstem.

    PubMed

    Beissner, Florian; Schumann, Andy; Brunn, Franziska; Eisenträger, Daniela; Bär, Karl-Jürgen

    2014-02-01

    The brainstem is of tremendous importance for our daily survival, and yet the functional relationships between various nuclei, their projection targets, and afferent regulatory areas remain poorly characterized. The main reason for this lies in the sub-optimal performance of standard neuroimaging methods in this area. In particular, fMRI signals are much harder to detect in the brainstem region compared to cortical areas. Here we describe and validate a new approach to measure activation of brainstem nuclei in humans using standard fMRI sequences and widely available tools for statistical image processing. By spatially restricting an independent component analysis to an anatomically defined brainstem mask, we excluded those areas from the analysis that were strongly affected by physiological noise. This allowed us to identify for the first time intrinsic connectivity networks in the human brainstem and to map brainstem-cortical connectivity purely based on functionally defined regions of interest. PMID:23933038

  5. Acquired Brain Injury Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Stacey Hunter

    This paper reviews the Acquired Brain Injury (ABI) Program at Coastline Community College (California). The ABI Program is a two-year, for-credit educational curriculum designed to provide structured cognitive retraining for adults who have sustained an ABI due to traumatic (such as motor vehicle accident or fall) or non-traumatic(such as…

  6. Acquired von Willebrand disease.

    PubMed

    Petrini, P

    1999-05-01

    Acquired von Willebrand disease (AvWD) is a syndrome that has clinical and laboratory features similar to hereditary vWD. In contrast to the latter it occurs in patients without a family history of previous bleeding tendency. PMID:23401904

  7. The quiet Sun magnetic field observed with ZIMPOL on THEMIS. I. The probability density function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bommier, V.; Martínez González, M.; Bianda, M.; Frisch, H.; Asensio Ramos, A.; Gelly, B.; Landi Degl'Innocenti, E.

    2009-11-01

    Context: The quiet Sun magnetic field probability density function (PDF) remains poorly known. Modeling this field also introduces a magnetic filling factor that is also poorly known. With these two quantities, PDF and filling factor, the statistical description of the quiet Sun magnetic field is complex and needs to be clarified. Aims: In the present paper, we propose a procedure that combines direct determinations and inversion results to derive the magnetic field vector and filling factor, and their PDFs. Methods: We used spectro-polarimetric observations taken with the ZIMPOL polarimeter mounted on the THEMIS telescope. The target was a quiet region at disk center. We analyzed the data by means of the UNNOFIT inversion code, with which we inferred the distribution of the mean magnetic field α B, α being the magnetic filling factor. The distribution of α was derived by an independent method, directly from the spectro-polarimetric data. The magnetic field PDF p(B) could then be inferred. By introducing a joint PDF for the filling factor and the magnetic field strength, we have clarified the definition of the PDF of the quiet Sun magnetic field when the latter is assumed not to be volume-filling. Results: The most frequent local average magnetic field strength is found to be 13 G. We find that the magnetic filling factor is related to the magnetic field strength by the simple law α = B_1/B with B1 = 15 G. This result is compatible with the Hanle weak-field determinations, as well as with the stronger field determinations from the Zeeman effect (kGauss field filling 1-2% of space). From linear fits, we obtain the analytical dependence of the magnetic field PDF. Our analysis has also revealed that the magnetic field in the quiet Sun is isotropically distributed in direction. Conclusions: We conclude that the quiet Sun is a complex medium where magnetic fields having different field strengths and filling factors coexist. Further observations with a better

  8. ``Green'' functionalization of magnetic nanoparticles via tea polyphenol for magnetic resonance/fluorescent dual-imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Wen; Lai, Kuilin; Liu, Kexia; Xia, Rui; Gao, Fabao; Wu, Yao; Gu, Zhongwei

    2014-01-01

    Tea polyphenol serves as an environmentally friendly ligand-exchange molecule to synthesize multifunctional metal-doped superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles via a catechol-metal coordination interaction. The resultant particles not only exhibit excellent hydrophilicity and protein adsorption resistance, but also are applicable as magnetic resonance/fluorescent dual-imaging probes due to their high T2 relaxivity, autofluorescence and large cellular uptake.Tea polyphenol serves as an environmentally friendly ligand-exchange molecule to synthesize multifunctional metal-doped superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles via a catechol-metal coordination interaction. The resultant particles not only exhibit excellent hydrophilicity and protein adsorption resistance, but also are applicable as magnetic resonance/fluorescent dual-imaging probes due to their high T2 relaxivity, autofluorescence and large cellular uptake. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Additional information and figures (Fig. S1-S7), including experimental sections, characterization of the products, protein corona analysis, cytotoxicity and cellular uptake quantification. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr05003c

  9. Special Considerations for Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Pediatric Populations

    PubMed Central

    Kotsoni, Eleni; Byrd, Dana; Casey, BJ

    2010-01-01

    Functional MRI (fMRI) provides a non-invasive means of studying both typical and atypical brain development in vivo. However, the developmental and clinical status of the populations of interest impact how neuroimaging data should be collected, analyzed, and interpreted. In the present paper, we review methodological and theoretical issues relevant to developmental and clinical neuroimaging research and provide possible approaches for addressing each. These issues include accounting for differences in biological noise, neuroanatomy, motion, and task performance. Finally, we emphasize the importance of a converging methods approach in constraining and supporting interpretations of pediatric imaging results. PMID:16649204

  10. Functional magnetic resonance imaging for defining the biological target volume

    PubMed Central

    Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Zechmann, Christian; Stieltjes, Bram; Weber, Marc-Andre

    2006-01-01

    Morphology as demonstrated by CT is the basis for radiotherapy planning. Intensity-modulated and adaptive radiotherapy techniques would greatly benefit from additional functional information allowing for definition of the biological target volume. MRI techniques include several which can characterize and quantify different tissue properties and their tumour-related changes. Results of perfusion MRI represent microvascular density and permeability; MR spectroscopy depicts particular metabolites; diffusion weighted imaging shows tissue at risk and tumour cellularity; while dynamic 3D acquisition (4D MRI) shows organ motion and the mobility of tumours within them. PMID:16766269

  11. Vortex fluidic entrapment of functional microalgal cells in a magnetic polymer matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eroglu, Ela; D'Alonzo, Nicholas J.; Smith, Steven M.; Raston, Colin L.

    2013-03-01

    Composite materials based on superparamagnetic magnetite nanoparticles embedded in polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) are generated in a continuous flow vortex fluidic device (VFD). The same device is effective in entrapping microalgal cells within this material, such that the functional cells can be retrieved from aqueous dispersions using an external magnet.Composite materials based on superparamagnetic magnetite nanoparticles embedded in polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) are generated in a continuous flow vortex fluidic device (VFD). The same device is effective in entrapping microalgal cells within this material, such that the functional cells can be retrieved from aqueous dispersions using an external magnet. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr33813d

  12. Ab initio studies of mechanical, electric, and magnetic properties of functionalized carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milowska, Karolina; Birowska, Magdalena; Majewski, Jacek A.

    2012-02-01

    We present results of extensive theoretical studies of mechanical, electric, and magnetic properties of functionalized carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Our studies are based on the ab initio calculations in the framework of the density functional theory. We have performed calculations for various metallic and semiconductor single wall CNTs, functionalized with simple organic molecules such as OH, COOH, NHn, CHn and metals, Al, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, and Pd. We have determined the stability of the functionalized CNTs, their elastic moduli, conductance, and magnetic moments (in the case of CNTs decorated with magnetic ions). These studies shed light on physical mechanisms governing the binding of the adsorbed molecules and also provide valuable quantitative predictions that are of importance for design of novel composite materials and functional devices. In particular, we find out that the Young's modulus of functionalized CNTs is smaller than in the case of bare CNTs, however it is large enough to provide a strong enforcement of composites. The functionalization with molecules leads also to the metallization of semiconducting CNTs, being relevant in the context of CNT interconnects, whereas the functionalization with metals might be used to cut CNTs into ribbons.

  13. Surface functionalization for tailoring the aggregation and magnetic behaviour of silica-coated iron oxide nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roca, A. G.; Carmona, D.; Miguel-Sancho, N.; Bomatí-Miguel, O.; Balas, F.; Piquer, C.; Santamaría, J.

    2012-04-01

    We report here a detailed structural and magnetic study of different silica nanocapsules containing uniform and highly crystalline maghemite nanoparticles. The magnetic phase consists of 5 nm triethylene glycol (TREG)- or dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA)-coated maghemite particles. TREG-coated nanoparticles were synthesized by thermal decomposition. In a second step, TREG ligands were exchanged by DMSA. After the ligand exchange, the ζ potential of the particles changed from - 10 to - 40 mV, whereas the hydrodynamic size remained constant at around 15 nm. Particles coated by TREG and DMSA were encapsulated in silica following a sol-gel procedure. The encapsulation of TREG-coated nanoparticles led to large magnetic aggregates, which were embedded in coalesced silica structures. However, DMSA-coated nanoparticles led to small magnetic clusters inserted in silica spheres of around 100 nm. The final nanostructures can be described as the result of several competing factors at play. Magnetic measurements indicate that in the TREG-coated nanoparticles the interparticle magnetic interaction scenario has not dramatically changed after the silica encapsulation, whereas in the DMSA-coated nanoparticles, the magnetic interactions were screened due to the function of the silica template. Moreover, the analysis of the AC susceptibility suggests that our systems essentially behave as cluster spin glass systems.

  14. Interfacial adsorption and surfactant release characteristics of magnetically functionalized halloysite nanotubes for responsive emulsions.

    PubMed

    Owoseni, Olasehinde; Nyankson, Emmanuel; Zhang, Yueheng; Adams, Daniel J; He, Jibao; Spinu, Leonard; McPherson, Gary L; Bose, Arijit; Gupta, Ram B; John, Vijay T

    2016-02-01

    Magnetically responsive oil-in-water emulsions are effectively stabilized by a halloysite nanotube supported superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle system. The attachment of the magnetically functionalized halloysite nanotubes at the oil-water interface imparts magnetic responsiveness to the emulsion and provides a steric barrier to droplet coalescence leading to emulsions that are stabilized for extended periods. Interfacial structure characterization by cryogenic scanning electron microscopy reveals that the nanotubes attach at the oil-water interface in a side on-orientation. The tubular structure of the nanotubes is exploited for the encapsulation and release of surfactant species that are typical of oil spill dispersants such as dioctyl sulfosuccinate sodium salt and polyoxyethylene (20) sorbitan monooleate. The magnetically responsive halloysite nanotubes anchor to the oil-water interface stabilizing the interface and releasing the surfactants resulting in reduction in the oil-water interfacial tension. The synergistic adsorption of the nanotubes and the released surfactants at the oil-water interface results in oil emulsification into very small droplets (less than 20μm). The synergy of the unique nanotubular morphology and interfacial activity of halloysite with the magnetic properties of iron oxide nanoparticles has potential applications in oil spill dispersion, magnetic mobilization and detection using magnetic fields. PMID:26555959

  15. Functional magnetic resonance spectroscopy of glutamate in schizophrenia and major depressive disorder: anterior cingulate activity during a color-word Stroop task

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Reggie; Neufeld, Richard W J; Schaefer, Betsy; Densmore, Maria; Rajakumar, Nagalingam; Osuch, Elizabeth A; Williamson, Peter C; Théberge, Jean

    2015-01-01

    Background: Glutamate abnormalities have been suggested to be associated with symptoms of schizophrenia. Using functional magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-fMRS), it is possible to monitor glutamate dynamically in the activated brain areas, which has yet to be reported in schizophrenia. It was hypothesized that subjects with schizophrenia would have weaker glutamatergic responses in the anterior cingulate to a color-word Stroop Task. AIMS: The aim of this study was to gain insight into the health of GLU neurotransmission and the GLU-GLN cycle in SZ using a 1H-fMRS protocol. Methods: Spectra were acquired from the anterior cingulate of 16 participants with schizophrenia, 16 healthy controls and 16 participants with major depressive disorder (MDD) while performing the Stroop task in a 7T magnetic resonance imaging scanner. 1H-fMRS spectra were acquired for 20 min in which there were three 4-min blocks of cross fixation interleaved with two 4-min blocks of the Stroop paradigm. Results: A repeated-measures analysis of variance revealed a main effect of time for glutamate concentrations of all groups (P<0.001). The healthy control group increased glutamate concentrations in the first run of the Stroop task (P=0.006) followed by a decrease in the recovery period (P=0.007). Neither the schizophrenia (P=0.107) nor MDD (P=0.081) groups had significant glutamate changes in the first run of the task, while the schizophrenia group had a significant increase in glutamine (P=0.005). The MDD group decreased glutamate concentrations in the second run of the task (P=0.003), as did all the groups combined (P=0.003). Conclusions: 1H-fMRS data were successfully acquired from psychiatric subjects with schizophrenia and mood disorder using a cognitive paradigm for the first time. Future study designs should further elucidate the glutamatergic response to functional activation in schizophrenia. PMID:27336037

  16. Electronic Structure Calculation of Permanent Magnets using the KKR Green's Function Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doi, Shotaro; Akai, Hisazumi

    2014-03-01

    Electronic structure and magnetic properties of permanent magnetic materials, especially Nd2Fe14B, are investigated theoretically using the KKR Green's function method. Important physical quantities in magnetism, such as magnetic moment, Curie temperature, and anisotropy constant, which are obtained from electronics structure calculations in both cases of atomic-sphere-approximation and full-potential treatment, are compared with past band structure calculations and experiments. The site preference of heavy rare-earth impurities are also evaluated through the calculation of formation energy with the use of coherent potential approximations. Further, the development of electronic structure calculation code using the screened KKR for large super-cells, which is aimed at studying the electronic structure of realistic microstructures (e.g. grain boundary phase), is introduced with some test calculations.

  17. Stability of a pinned magnetic domain wall as a function of its internal configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Montaigne, F.; Duluard, A.; Briones, J.; Lacour, D.; Hehn, M.; Childress, J. R.

    2015-01-14

    It is shown that there are many stable configurations for a domain wall pinned by a notch along a magnetic stripe. The stability of several of these configurations is investigated numerically as a function of the thickness of the magnetic film. The depinning mechanism depends on the structure of the domain wall and on the thickness of the magnetic film. In the case of a spin-valve structure, it appears that the stray fields emerging from the hard layer at the notch location influence the stability of the micromagnetic configuration. Different depinning mechanisms are thus observed for the same film thickness depending on the magnetization orientation of the propagating domain. This conclusion qualitatively explains experimental magnetoresistance measurements.

  18. Functionalization of monodisperse iron oxide NPs and their properties as magnetically recoverable catalysts.

    PubMed

    Gage, Samuel H; Stein, Barry D; Nikoshvili, Linda Zh; Matveeva, Valentina G; Sulman, Mikhail G; Sulman, Esther M; Morgan, David Gene; Yuzik-Klimova, Ekaterina Yu; Mahmoud, Waleed E; Bronstein, Lyudmila M

    2013-01-01

    Here we report the functionalization of monodisperse iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs) with commercially available functional acids containing multiple double bonds such as linolenic (LLA) and linoleic (LEA) acids or pyridine moieties such as 6-methylpyridine-2-carboxylic acid, isonicotinic acid, 3-hydroxypicolinic acid, and 6-(1-piperidinyl)pyridine-3-carboxlic acid (PPCA). Both double bonds and pyridine groups can be reacted with noble metal compounds to form catalytically active species in the exterior of magnetic NPs, thus making them promising magnetically recoverable catalysts. We determined that both LLA and LEA stabilize magnetic iron oxide NPs, allowing the formation of π-complexes with bis(acetonitrile)dichloropalladium(II) in the NP shells. In both cases, this leads to the formation of NP aggregates because of interparticle complexation. In the case of pyridine-containing ligands, only PPCA with two N-containing rings is able to provide NP stabilization and functionalization whereas other pyridine-containing acids did now allow sufficient steric stabilization. The interaction of PPCA-based particles with Pd acetate also leads to aggregation because of interparticle interactions, but the aggregates that are formed are much smaller. Nevertheless, the catalytic properties in the selective hydrogenation of dimethylethynylcarbinol (DMEC) to dimethylvinylcarbinol were the best for the catalyst based on LLA, demonstrating that the NP aggregates in all cases are penetrable for DMEC. Easy magnetic separation of this catalyst from the reaction solution makes it promising as a magnetically recoverable catalyst. PMID:23234434

  19. Advanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging techniques to probe muscle structure and function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malis, Vadim

    Structural and functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) studies of skeletal muscle allow the elucidation of muscle physiology under normal and pathological conditions. Continuing on the efforts of the Muscle Imaging and Modeling laboratory, the focus of the thesis is to (i) extend and refine two challenging imaging modalities: structural imaging using Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) and functional imaging based on Velocity Encoded Phase Contrast Imaging (VE-PC) and (ii) apply these methods to explore age related structure and functional differences of the gastrocnemius muscle. Diffusion Tensor Imaging allows the study of tissue microstructure as well as muscle fiber architecture. The images, based on an ultrafast single shot Echo Planar Imaging (EPI) sequence, suffer from geometric distortions and low signal to noise ratio. A processing pipeline was developed to correct for distortions and to improve image Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR). DTI acquired on a senior and young cohort of subjects were processed through the pipeline and differences in DTI derived indices and fiber architecture between the two cohorts were explored. The DTI indices indicated that at the microstructural level, fiber atrophy was accompanied with a reduction in fiber volume fraction. At the fiber architecture level, fiber length and pennation angles decreased with age that potentially contribute to the loss of muscle force with age. Velocity Encoded Phase Contrast imaging provides tissue (e.g. muscle) velocity at each voxel which allows the study of strain and Strain Rate (SR) under dynamic conditions. The focus of the thesis was to extract 2D strain rate tensor maps from the velocity images and apply the method to study age related differences. The tensor mapping can potentially provide unique information on the extracellular matrix and lateral transmission the role of these two elements has recently emerged as important determinants of force loss with age. In the cross sectional study on

  20. Abnormal degree centrality in Alzheimer's disease patients with depression: A resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhongwei; Liu, Xiaozheng; Hou, Hongtao; Wei, Fuquan; Liu, Jian; Chen, Xingli

    2016-06-15

    Depression is common in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and occurs in AD patients with a prevalence of up to 40%. It reduces cognitive function and increases the burden on caregivers. Currently, there are very few medications that are useful for treating depression in AD patients. Therefore, understanding the brain abnormalities in AD patients with depression (D-AD) is crucial for developing effective interventions. The aim of this study was to investigate the intrinsic dysconnectivity pattern of whole-brain functional networks at the voxel level in D-AD patients based on degree centrality (DC) as measured by resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (R-fMRI). Our study included 32 AD patients. All patients were evaluated using the Neuropsychiatric Inventory and Hamilton Depression Rating Scale and further divided into two groups: 15 D-AD patients and 17 non-depressed AD (nD-AD) patients. R-fMRI datasets were acquired from these D-AD and nD-AD patients. First, we performed a DC analysis to identify voxels that showed altered whole brain functional connectivity (FC) with other voxels. We then further investigated FC using the abnormal DC regions to examine in more detail the connectivity patterns of the identified DC changes. D-AD patients had lower DC values in the right middle frontal, precentral, and postcentral gyrus than nD-AD patients. Seed-based analysis revealed decreased connectivity between the precentral and postcentral gyrus to the supplementary motor area and middle cingulum. FC also decreased in the right middle frontal, precentral, and postcentral gyrus. Thus, AD patients with depression fit a 'network dysfunction model' distinct from major depressive disorder and AD. PMID:27079332

  1. Magnetic two-photon scattering and two-photon emission - Cross sections and redistribution functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, S. G.; Meszaros, P.

    1991-01-01

    The magnetic two-photon scattering cross section is discussed within the framework of QED, and the corresponding scattering redistribution function for this process and its inverse, as well as the scattering source function are calculated explicitly. In a similar way, the magnetic two-photon emission process which follows the radiative excitation of Landau levels above ground is calculated. The two-photon scattering and two-photon emission are of the same order as the single-photon magnetic scattering. All three of these processes, and in optically thick cases also their inverses, are included in radiative transport calculations modeling accreting pulsars and gamma-ray bursters. These processes play a prominent role in determining the relative strength of the first two cyclotron harmonics, and their effects extend also to the higher harmonics.

  2. Optimizing the function of upstanding activities in adult patients with acquired lesions of the central nervous system by using the Bobath concept approach - A case report.

    PubMed

    Jelica, Stjepan; Seper, Vesna; Davidović, Erna; Bujisić, Gordana

    2011-01-01

    Nonspecific medical gymnastic therapy may help patients after stroke achieve certain results in terms of efficiency but not in terms of quality of movement. The goal of treatment by Bobath concept is development of movement (effectiveness) and optimization of movement (efficiency). This article presents the case of a 62-year old patient who had experienced a stroke and has difficulties with standing up activities. It underscores the importance of not only recovery of function but also optimization of the function in such patients. PMID:21648353

  3. Written Discourse and Acquired Brain Impairment: Evaluation of Structural and Semantic Features of Personal Letters from a Systemic Functional Linguistic Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mortensen, Lynne

    2005-01-01

    This qualitative study investigated written discourse in the form of personal letters written by ten people with aphasia following stroke and ten people with cognitive-language disorder as a consequence of traumatic brain injury, and compared their performance with 15 non brain-damaged writers. Personal letters perform the dual function of…

  4. Abnormal fusiform activation during emotional-face encoding assessed with functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Adleman, Nancy E; Kayser, Reilly R; Olsavsky, Aviva K; Bones, Brian L; Muhrer, Eli J; Fromm, Stephen J; Pine, Daniel S; Zarate, Carlos; Leibenluft, Ellen; Brotman, Melissa A

    2013-05-30

    This functional magnetic resonance imaging study shows that children and adults with bipolar disorder (BD), compared with healthy subjects, exhibit impaired memory for emotional faces and abnormal fusiform activation during encoding. Fusiform activation abnormalities in BD were correlated with mania severity and may therefore represent a trait and state BD biomarker. PMID:23541333

  5. The synthesis and rheological characteristics of colloidal systems containing functional magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaichenko, Alexander; Bolshakova, Inessa; Mitina, Nanalia; Shevchuk, Oleh; Bily, Alexander; Lobaz, Vladimir

    2005-03-01

    Functional magnetic nanoparticles were synthesized by homogeneous nucleation from the solution of metal salts in the presence of functional oligoperoxide surfactants (FOS). FOS addition causes the decrease of the quantity of large particles and agglomerates. The presence of radical forming sites on the magnetic colloid surface provides the possibility of carrying out of grafted polymerization in a wide temperature range in the media of various polarities. As a result of homogeneous nucleation of the particles in the presence of oligomer surfactants the extremes of the particle size, dynamic viscosity and maximal value of FOS sorption are observed at the same FOS concentration in the solution. The dependences of dynamic viscosity of magnetic colloid suspensions modified by various amount of FOS on shear stress witness the formation of multi-layer functional shell with different orientation of polar functional groups and their different remoteness from the surface. The formation of new polymeric chains tethered to the colloid surface leads to breaking particle assemblies and provides both the aggregative and sedimentation stabilization of the magnetic fluids formed and targeted affinity to biological substrates.

  6. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Cognitive Processing in Young Adults with Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacola, Lisa M.; Byars, Anna W.; Chalfonte-Evans, Melinda; Schmithorst, Vincent J.; Hickey, Fran; Patterson, Bonnie; Hotze, Stephanie; Vannest, Jennifer; Chiu, Chung-Yiu; Holland, Scott K.; Schapiro, Mark B.

    2011-01-01

    The authors used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate neural activation during a semantic-classification/object-recognition task in 13 persons with Down syndrome and 12 typically developing control participants (age range = 12-26 years). A comparison between groups suggested atypical patterns of brain activation for the…

  7. A Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Investigation of Verbal Working Memory in Adolescents with Specific Language Impairment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weismer, Susan Ellis; Plante, Elena; Jones, Maura; Tomblin, Bruce J.

    2005-01-01

    This study used neuroimaging and behavioral techniques to examine the claim that processing capacity limitations underlie specific language impairment (SLI). Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was used to investigate verbal working memory in adolescents with SLI and normal language (NL) controls. The experimental task involved a modified…

  8. Hyperpolarized functional magnetic resonance of murine skeletal muscle enabled by multiple tracer-paradigm synchronizations.

    PubMed

    Leftin, Avigdor; Roussel, Tangi; Frydman, Lucio

    2014-01-01

    Measuring metabolism's time- and space-dependent responses upon stimulation lies at the core of functional magnetic resonance imaging. While focusing on water's sole resonance, further insight could arise from monitoring the temporal responses arising from the metabolites themselves, in what is known as functional magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Performing these measurements in real time, however, is severely challenged by the short functional timescales and low concentrations of natural metabolites. Dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization is an emerging technique that can potentially alleviate this, as it provides a massive sensitivity enhancement allowing one to probe low-concentration tracers and products in a single-scan. Still, conventional implementations of this hyperpolarization approach are not immediately amenable to the repeated acquisitions needed in real-time functional settings. This work proposes a strategy for functional magnetic resonance of hyperpolarized metabolites that bypasses this limitation, and enables the observation of real-time metabolic changes through the synchronization of stimuli-triggered, multiple-bolus injections of the metabolic tracer 13C1-pyruvate. This new approach is demonstrated with paradigms tailored to reveal in vivo thresholds of murine hind-limb skeletal muscle activation, involving the conversion of 13C1-pyruvate to 13C1-lactate and 13C1-alanine. These functional hind-limb studies revealed that graded skeletal muscle stimulation causes commensurate increases in glycolytic metabolism in a frequency- and amplitude-dependent fashion, that can be monitored on the seconds/minutes timescale using dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization. Spectroscopic imaging further allowed the in vivo visualization of uptake, transformation and distribution of the tracer and products, in fast-twitch glycolytic and in slow-twitch oxidative muscle fiber groups. While these studies open vistas in time and sensitivity for metabolic

  9. Hyperpolarized Functional Magnetic Resonance of Murine Skeletal Muscle Enabled by Multiple Tracer-Paradigm Synchronizations

    PubMed Central

    Leftin, Avigdor; Roussel, Tangi; Frydman, Lucio

    2014-01-01

    Measuring metabolism's time- and space-dependent responses upon stimulation lies at the core of functional magnetic resonance imaging. While focusing on water's sole resonance, further insight could arise from monitoring the temporal responses arising from the metabolites themselves, in what is known as functional magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Performing these measurements in real time, however, is severely challenged by the short functional timescales and low concentrations of natural metabolites. Dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization is an emerging technique that can potentially alleviate this, as it provides a massive sensitivity enhancement allowing one to probe low-concentration tracers and products in a single-scan. Still, conventional implementations of this hyperpolarization approach are not immediately amenable to the repeated acquisitions needed in real-time functional settings. This work proposes a strategy for functional magnetic resonance of hyperpolarized metabolites that bypasses this limitation, and enables the observation of real-time metabolic changes through the synchronization of stimuli-triggered, multiple-bolus injections of the metabolic tracer 13C1-pyruvate. This new approach is demonstrated with paradigms tailored to reveal in vivo thresholds of murine hind-limb skeletal muscle activation, involving the conversion of 13C1-pyruvate to 13C1-lactate and 13C1-alanine. These functional hind-limb studies revealed that graded skeletal muscle stimulation causes commensurate increases in glycolytic metabolism in a frequency- and amplitude-dependent fashion, that can be monitored on the seconds/minutes timescale using dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization. Spectroscopic imaging further allowed the in vivo visualization of uptake, transformation and distribution of the tracer and products, in fast-twitch glycolytic and in slow-twitch oxidative muscle fiber groups. While these studies open vistas in time and sensitivity for metabolic

  10. Modelling of heat assisted magnetic recording with the Landau-Lifshitz-Bloch equation and Brillouin functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greaves, Simon John; Muraoka, Hiroaki; Kanai, Yasushi

    2015-05-01

    Brillouin functions were used to model the temperature dependence of magnetisation in media for heat assisted magnetic recording. Although dHk/dT was higher when Brillouin functions with J = 0.5 or J = 1 were used, an earlier onset of the linear reversal mode led to a drop in dHc/dT near to Tc, resulting in wider written bits. Tracks written with a higher thermal gradient were also wider when J was small and had lower SNR.

  11. Resting state functional connectivity magnetic resonance imaging integrated with intraoperative neuronavigation for functional mapping after aborted awake craniotomy

    PubMed Central

    Batra, Prag; Bandt, S. Kathleen; Leuthardt, Eric C.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Awake craniotomy is currently the gold standard for aggressive tumor resections in eloquent cortex. However, a significant subset of patients is unable to tolerate this procedure, particularly the very young or old or those with psychiatric comorbidities, cardiopulmonary comorbidities, or obesity, among other conditions. In these cases, typical alternative procedures include biopsy alone or subtotal resection, both of which are associated with diminished surgical outcomes. Case Description: Here, we report the successful use of a preoperatively obtained resting state functional connectivity magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) integrated with intraoperative neuronavigation software in order to perform functional cortical mapping in the setting of an aborted awake craniotomy due to loss of airway. Conclusion: Resting state functional connectivity MRI integrated with intraoperative neuronavigation software can provide an alternative option for functional cortical mapping in the setting of an aborted awake craniotomy. PMID:26958419

  12. Stationary electron velocity distribution function in crossed electric and magnetic fields with collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Shagayda, Andrey

    2012-08-15

    Analytical studies and numerical simulations show that the electron velocity distribution function in a Hall thruster discharge with crossed electric and magnetic fields is not Maxwellian. This is due to the fact that the mean free path between collisions is greater than both the Larmor radius and the characteristic dimensions of the discharge channel. However in numerical models of Hall thrusters, a hydrodynamic approach is often used to describe the electron dynamics, because discharge simulation in a fully kinetic approach requires large computing resources and is time consuming. A more accurate modeling of the electron flow in the hydrodynamic approximation requires taking into account the non-Maxwellian character of the distribution function and finding its moments, an approach that reflects the properties of electrons drifting in crossed electric and magnetic fields better than the commonly used Euler or Navier-Stokes approximations. In the present paper, an expression for the electron velocity distribution function in rarefied spatially homogeneous stationary plasma with crossed electric and magnetic fields and predominance of collisions with heavy particles is derived in the relaxation approximation. The main moments of the distribution function including longitudinal and transversal temperatures, the components of the viscous stress tensor, and of the heat flux vector are calculated. Distinctive features of the hydrodynamic description of electrons with a strongly non-equilibrium distribution function and the prospects for further development of the proposed approach for calculating the distribution function in spatially inhomogeneous plasma are discussed.

  13. [Acquired von Willebrand syndrome].

    PubMed

    Franchini, Massimo

    2006-01-01

    Acquired von Willebrand syndrome (aVWS) is a rare, but probably underestimated, bleeding disorder that mimics the congenital form of von Willebrand disease (VWD) in terms of laboratory findings and clinical presentation. However, unlike congenital VWD, it arises in individuals with no personal or family history of bleeding. AVWS occurs in association with a variety of underlying disorders, including lymphoproliferative disorders, myeloproliferative disorders and cardiovascular diseases. The main pathogenic, clinical, laboratory and therapeutic aspects of this syndrome are concisely reported in this review. PMID:16913181

  14. A multi-functional testing instrument for heat assisted magnetic recording media

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, H. Z. Chen, Y. J.; Leong, S. H.; An, C. W.; Ye, K. D.; Hu, J. F.; Yin, M. J.

    2014-05-07

    With recent developments in heat assisted magnetic recording (HAMR), characterization of HAMR media is becoming very important. We present a multi-functional instrument for testing HAMR media, which integrates HAMR writing, reading, and a micro-magneto-optic Kerr effect (μ-MOKE) testing function. A potential application of the present instrument is to make temperature dependent magnetic property measurement using a pump-probe configuration. In the measurement, the media is heated up by a heating (intense) beam while a testing (weak) beam is overlapped with the heating beam for MOKE measurement. By heating the media with different heating beam power, magnetic measurements by MOKE at different temperatures can be performed. Compared to traditional existing tools such as the vibrating sample magnetometer, the present instrument provides localized and efficient heating at the measurement spot. The integration of HAMR writing and μ-MOKE system can also facilitate a localized full investigation of the magnetic media by potential correlation of HAMR head independent write/read performance to localized magnetic properties.

  15. Magnetic assembly of transparent and conducting graphene-based functional composites.

    PubMed

    Le Ferrand, Hortense; Bolisetty, Sreenath; Demirörs, Ahmet F; Libanori, Rafael; Studart, André R; Mezzenga, Raffaele

    2016-01-01

    Innovative methods producing transparent and flexible electrodes are highly sought in modern optoelectronic applications to replace metal oxides, but available solutions suffer from drawbacks such as brittleness, unaffordability and inadequate processability. Here we propose a general, simple strategy to produce hierarchical composites of functionalized graphene in polymeric matrices, exhibiting transparency and electron conductivity. These are obtained through protein-assisted functionalization of graphene with magnetic nanoparticles, followed by magnetic-directed assembly of the graphene within polymeric matrices undergoing sol-gel transitions. By applying rotating magnetic fields or magnetic moulds, both graphene orientation and distribution can be controlled within the composite. Importantly, by using magnetic virtual moulds of predefined meshes, graphene assembly is directed into double-percolating networks, reducing the percolation threshold and enabling combined optical transparency and electrical conductivity not accessible in single-network materials. The resulting composites open new possibilities on the quest of transparent electrodes for photovoltaics, organic light-emitting diodes and stretchable optoelectronic devices. PMID:27354243

  16. Phonon and magnetic structure in δ-plutonium from density-functional theory

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Söderlind, Per; Zhou, F.; Landa, A.; Klepeis, J. E.

    2015-10-30

    We present phonon properties of plutonium metal obtained from a combination of density-functional-theory (DFT) electronic structure and the recently developed compressive sensing lattice dynamics (CSLD). The CSLD model is here trained on DFT total energies of several hundreds of quasi-random atomic configurations for best possible accuracy of the phonon properties. The calculated phonon dispersions compare better with experiment than earlier results obtained from dynamical mean-field theory. The density-functional model of the electronic structure consists of disordered magnetic moments with all relativistic effects and explicit orbital-orbital correlations. The magnetic disorder is approximated in two ways: (i) a special quasi-random structure andmore » (ii) the disordered-local-moment (DLM) method within the coherent potential approximation. Magnetism in plutonium has been debated intensely, However, the present magnetic approach for plutonium is validated by the close agreement between the predicted magnetic form factor and that of recent neutron-scattering experiments.« less

  17. Magnetic assembly of transparent and conducting graphene-based functional composites

    PubMed Central

    Le Ferrand, Hortense; Bolisetty, Sreenath; Demirörs, Ahmet F.; Libanori, Rafael; Studart, André R.; Mezzenga, Raffaele

    2016-01-01

    Innovative methods producing transparent and flexible electrodes are highly sought in modern optoelectronic applications to replace metal oxides, but available solutions suffer from drawbacks such as brittleness, unaffordability and inadequate processability. Here we propose a general, simple strategy to produce hierarchical composites of functionalized graphene in polymeric matrices, exhibiting transparency and electron conductivity. These are obtained through protein-assisted functionalization of graphene with magnetic nanoparticles, followed by magnetic-directed assembly of the graphene within polymeric matrices undergoing sol–gel transitions. By applying rotating magnetic fields or magnetic moulds, both graphene orientation and distribution can be controlled within the composite. Importantly, by using magnetic virtual moulds of predefined meshes, graphene assembly is directed into double-percolating networks, reducing the percolation threshold and enabling combined optical transparency and electrical conductivity not accessible in single-network materials. The resulting composites open new possibilities on the quest of transparent electrodes for photovoltaics, organic light-emitting diodes and stretchable optoelectronic devices. PMID:27354243

  18. Investigation of the Magnetic Behavior in Fe3O4 Ferrofluid Functionalized by Carapa Guianensis Oil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López, Jorge Luis; Rodriguez, Anselmo Fortunato Ruiz; de Jesus Nascimento Pontes, Maria; de Morais, Paulo Cesar; de Azevedo, Ricardo Bentes; Pfannes, Hans Dieter; Dias Filho, José Higino

    2010-12-01

    A ferrofluid based on Fe3O4 has been synthesized using the condensation method by coprecipitating aqueous solutions of FeSO4 and FeCl3 mixtures in NH4OH and treated further in order to obtain colloidal sols by creating a charge density on their surface and functionalized by carapa guianensis (andiroba oil). Aqueous sample with an average particle diameter ˜7 nm were studied by Mössbauer spectroscopy and dc magnetization measurements in the range of 4.2-250 K. The saturation magnetization (Ms) at 4.2 K was determined from M vs 1/H plots by extrapolating the value of magnetizations to infinite fields, to 5.6 emu/g and coercivity to 344 Oe. The low saturation magnetization value was attributed to spin noncollinearity predominantly at the surface. From the magnetization measurements a magnetic anisotropy energy constant (K) of 1×104 J/m3 was calculated. Fe3O4 spectra at room temperature showed a singlet due to superparamagnetic relaxation and a sextet at low temperature.

  19. SUPERCONDUCTING COMBINED FUNCTION MAGNET SYSTEM FOR J-PARC NEUTRINO EXPERIMENT.

    SciTech Connect

    OGITSU, T.; AJIMA, Y.; ANERELLA, M.; ESCALLIER, J.; GANETIS, G.; GUPTA, R.; HAGEDOM, D.; HARRISON, M.; HIGASHI, N.; IWAMOTO, Y.; ICHIKAWA, A.; JAIN, A.; KIMURA, N.; KOBAYASHI, T.; MAKIDA, Y.; MURATORE, J.; NAKAMOTO, T.; OHHATA, H.; TAKASAKI, N.; TANAKA, K.; TERASHIMA, A.; YAMOMOTO, A.; OBANA, T.; PARKER, B.; WANDERER, P.

    2004-10-03

    The J-PARC Neutrino Experiment, the construction of which starts in JFY 2004, will use a superconducting magnet system for its primary proton beam line. The system, which bends the 50 GeV 0.75 MW proton beam by about 80 degrees, consists of 28 superconducting combined function magnets. The magnets utilize single layer left/right asymmetric coils that generate a dipole field of 2.6 T and a quadrupole field of 18.6 T/m with the operation current of about 7.35 kA. The system also contains a few conduction cooled superconducting corrector magnets that serve as vertical and horizontal steering magnets. All the magnets are designed to provide a physical beam aperture of 130 mm in order to achieve a large beam acceptance. Extensive care is also required to achieve safe operation with the high power proton beam. The paper summarizes the system design as well as some safety analysis results.

  20. Unconventional electronic and magnetic functions of nanographene-based host-guest systems.

    PubMed

    Enoki, Toshiaki; Takai, Kazuyuki

    2008-08-01

    Nanographene has a unique electronic structure which critically depends on the shape of its edge. A zigzag-edged nanographene sheet has a non-bonding pi-electron state (edge state), yielding a strong spin magnetism for edge-state localized spins, in spite of the absence of such a state in an armchair-edged nanographene sheet. Nanographite (stacked nanographene sheets)-network-based nanoporous carbon is employed as the host material to build unconventional magnetic systems based on the host-guest interaction. The physisorption of various guest materials can cause a reversible low-spin/high-spin magnetic switching phenomenon, whose feature varies depending on the type of guest species. The edge-state spins are utilized as a probe to detect a huge condensation of helium atoms in the nanopores. The giant magnetoresistance of the nanographite network is controlled by the physisorption of magnetic oxygen molecules. The confinement of potassium clusters in the nanopores surrounded by nanographite domains yields an interesting nanomagnetic state. Nanographene/nanographite is an intriguing pi-electron-based nanocarbon material with the potential of producing unconventional magnetic structures that cannot be obtained using bulk graphite. The processability of nanographene/nanographite is expected to give a variety of magnetic functions for spintronic applications. PMID:18629396

  1. Capsaicin-evoked brain activation and central sensitization in anaesthetised rats: a functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Moylan Governo, Ricardo Jose; Morris, Peter Gordon; Prior, Malcolm John William; Marsden, Charles Alexander; Chapman, Victoria

    2006-12-15

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) of blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) haemodynamic responses was used to study the effects of the noxious substance capsaicin on whole brain activation in isofluorane anaesthetised rats. Rats (n=8) received intradermal injection of capsaicin (30 microg/5 microl), or topical cream (0.1%) capsaicin and BOLD responses were acquired for up to 120 min. Effects of capsaicin versus placebo cream treatment on the BOLD response to a 15 g mechanical stimulus applied adjacent to the site of cream application were also studied. Both injection and cream application of capsaicin activated brain areas involved in pain processing, including the thalamus and periaqueductal grey (PAG) (p<0.05, corrected for multiple comparisons). Capsaicin also produced increases in BOLD signal intensity in other regions that contribute to pain processing, such as the parabrachial nucleus and superior colliculus. Mechanical stimulation in capsaicin-treated rats, but not placebo-treated rats, induced a significant decrease in BOLD signal intensity in the PAG (p<0.001). These data demonstrate that the noxious substance capsaicin produces brain activation in the midbrain regions and reveals the importance of the PAG in central sensitization. PMID:16843597

  2. Bioinformatics and functional magnetic resonance imaging in clinical populations: practical aspects of data collection, analysis, interpretation, and management.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Diana J; Hurd, Mark W

    2005-10-15

    In this paper the authors review the issues associated with bioinformatics and functional magnetic resonance (fMR) imaging in the context of neurosurgery. They discuss the practical aspects of data collection, analysis, interpretation, and the management of large data sets, and they consider the challenges involved in the adoption of fMR imaging into clinical neurosurgical practice. Their goal is to provide neurosurgeons and other clinicians with a better understanding of some of the current issues associated with bioinformatics or neuroinformatics and fMR imaging. Thousands to tens of thousands of images are typically acquired during an fMR imaging session. It is essential to follow an activation task paradigm exactly to obtain an accurate representation of cortical activation. These images are then interactively postprocessed offline to produce an activation map, or in some cases a series of maps. The maps may then be viewed and interpreted in consultation with a neurosurgeon and/or other clinicians. After this consultation, long-term archiving of the processed fMR activation maps along with the standard structural MR images is a complex but necessary final step in this process. The fMR modality represents a valuable tool in the neurosurgical planning process that is still in the developmental stages for routine clinical use, but holds exceptional promise for patient care. PMID:16241106

  3. Lateralization of cervical spinal cord activity during an isometric upper extremity motor task with functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Weber, Kenneth A; Chen, Yufen; Wang, Xue; Kahnt, Thorsten; Parrish, Todd B

    2016-01-15

    The purpose of this study was to use an isometric upper extremity motor task to detect activity induced blood oxygen level dependent signal changes in the cervical spinal cord with functional magnetic resonance imaging. Eleven healthy volunteers performed six 5minute runs of an alternating left- and right-sided isometric wrist flexion task, during which images of the cervical spinal cord were acquired with a reduced field-of-view T2*-weighted gradient-echo echo-planar-imaging sequence. Spatial normalization to a standard spinal cord template was performed, and group average activation maps were generated in a mixed-effects analysis. The task activity significantly exceeded that of the control analyses. The activity was lateralized to the hemicord ipsilateral to the task and reliable across the runs at the group and subject level. Finally, a multi-voxel pattern analysis was able to successfully decode the left and right tasks at the C6 and C7 vertebral levels. PMID:26488256

  4. Investigation of high-resolution functional magnetic resonance imaging by means of surface and array radiofrequency coils at 7 T.

    PubMed

    van der Zwaag, Wietske; Marques, José P; Hergt, Martin; Gruetter, Rolf

    2009-10-01

    In this investigation, high-resolution, 1x1x1-mm(3) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) at 7 T is performed using a multichannel array head coil and a surface coil approach. Scan geometry was optimized for each coil separately to exploit the strengths of both coils. Acquisitions with the surface coil focused on partial brain coverage, while whole-brain coverage fMRI experiments were performed with the array head coil. BOLD sensitivity in the occipital lobe was found to be higher with the surface coil than with the head array, suggesting that restriction of signal detection to the area of interest may be beneficial for localized activation studies. Performing independent component analysis (ICA) decomposition of the fMRI data, we consistently detected BOLD signal changes and resting state networks. In the surface coil data, a small negative BOLD response could be detected in these resting state network areas. Also in the data acquired with the surface coil, two distinct components of the positive BOLD signal were consistently observed. These two components were tentatively assigned to tissue and venous signal changes. PMID:19261421

  5. Development of Small-sized Fluid Control Valve with Self-holding Function Using Permanent Magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akagi, Tetsuya; Dohta, Shujiro; Ueda, Hirofumi

    Recently, force feedback devices in virtual reality and power assisted nursing care systems have received much attention and active research. In such a control system, an actuator and a driving device such as a control valve are mounted on the human body. In this condition, the size and weight of the control valve become serious problems. At the same time, the valve should be operated with lower energy consumption because of using a limited electrical power. The typical electro magnetic solenoid valve drives its spool using a larger solenoid to open the valve. The complex construction of the valve for sealing makes its miniaturization and the fabrication of a low cost valve more difficult. In addition, the solenoid in the valve consumes more electrical power while the valve is kept opening. The purpose of our study is to develop a small-sized, lightweight, lower energy consumption and flexible control valve that can be safe enough to mount on the human body at a lower cost. In our pervious study, we proposed and tested the control valve that can open using a vibration motor. In this study, we propose and test a new type of fluid control valve with a self-holding function. The new valve uses a permanent magnet ball. It has a cylindrical magnet and two solenoids. The self-holding function of the valve is done as follows. When one side of the solenoid is stimulated by the current momentarily, the solenoid gives a repulsive force to the cylindrical magnet. The magnet moves toward the opposite side of the solenoid and is attracted to the iron core. Then, the magnet ball moves toward the cylindrical magnet and opens the orifice. The valve can keep open without electrical energy. As a result, the valve with the extremely lower energy consumption can be developed.

  6. Evolution of the Red Sea Continental Margin from Integrated Analyses of Gravity, Magnetic, and Receiver Function Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, C. A.; Mohamed, A. A.; Gao, S. S.; Mickus, K. L.; Liu, K. H.; Yu, Y.; Elsheikh, A. A.

    2014-12-01

    The development of evolutionary models and constraints for the extensional mechanisms which govern continental rifting is of fundamental significance toward understanding the breakup of continents and the role of volcanism in achieving successful rifting. To analyze the transitional nature of the Red Sea rift (RSR) passive margins and to quantify the mechanism through which extension has been accommodated, we examined a total of 3531 high-quality radial receiver functions from multiple temporary deployments in Saudi Arabia and the Levant as well as data recently acquired by the Egyptian National Seismic Network. Egypt is characterized by a relatively constant crustal thickness of approximately 37 km, while the southern Arabian Shield is roughly 35 km on average. The crust beneath the Eastern Desert of Egypt is significantly thinned with an average thickness of about 26 km. Observations of Vp/Vs across the Arabian-Nubian Shield indicate highly similar intermediate to mafic compositions, supporting well-accepted theories for juvenile arc accretion of relatively uniform makeup. Thinned crust as far as 130 km inland on the Egyptian margin indicates a highly asymmetric crustal structure across the Red Sea, supporting a model invoking simple shear extensional mechanisms. Joint modeling using satellite gravity and magnetic data with RF Moho depth constraints reveals the presence of high-density high-magnetic susceptibility mafic complexes which we interpret as volcanic margins in the northern RSR at ~25.5°N and the southern RSR at ~19.5°N. We believe the development of the northern RSR margin is accompanied by isolated volcanism associated with slow spreading rates since the Oligocene.

  7. A pilot study of functional magnetic resonance imaging brain correlates of deception in healthy young men.

    PubMed

    Kozel, F Andrew; Revell, Letty J; Lorberbaum, Jeffrey P; Shastri, Ananda; Elhai, Jon D; Horner, Michael David; Smith, Adam; Nahas, Ziad; Bohning, Daryl E; George, Mark S

    2004-01-01

    We hypothesized that specific brain regions would activate during deception, and these areas would correlate with changes in electrodermal activity (EDA). Eight men were asked to find money hidden under various objects. While functional MRI images were acquired and EDA was recorded, the subjects gave both truthful and deceptive answers regarding the money's location. The group analysis revealed significant activation during deception in the orbitofrontal cortex (OFCx) and anterior cingulate (AC), but individual results were not consistent. Individually and as a group, EDA correlated with blood flow changes in the OFCx and AC. Specific brain regions were activated during deception, but the present technique lacks good predictive power for individuals. PMID:15377736

  8. Fabrication and hyperthermia effect of magnetic functional fluids based on amorphous particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chuncheng; Bian, Xiufang; Qin, Jingyu; Guo, Tongxiao; Zhao, Shuchun

    2015-03-01

    An experimental study conducted on the preparation and hyperthermia effect of magnetic functional fluids based on Fe73.5Nb3Cu1Si13.5B9 amorphous particles, CoFe2O4 nanoparticles and Fe3O4 nanoparticles dispersed in water is presented. Scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, differential scanning calorimetry and vibrating sample magnetometer methods have been used to characterize the morphology, structure and magnetic property of the amorphous particles. It is disclosed that the Fe73.5Nb3Cu1Si13.5B9 particles are still amorphous after being milled for 48 h. Moreover, the saturation magnetization of metallic glass particles is approximately 75% and 50% larger than that of CoFe2O4 nanoparticles and Fe3O4 nanoparticles, respectively. The hyperthermia experiment results show that when alternating electrical current is 150 A, the temperature of the functional fluids based on amorphous particles could rise to 33 °C in 1500 s. When the current is 300 A, the final stable temperature could reach to 60 °C. This study demonstrates that the Fe73.5Nb3Cu1Si13.5B9 magnetic functional fluids may have potential on biomedical applications.

  9. Magnetism of C adatoms on BN nanostructures: implications for functional nanodevices.

    PubMed

    Li, Jia; Zhou, Gang; Chen, Ying; Gu, Bing-Lin; Duan, Wenhui

    2009-02-11

    Spin-polarized density functional calculations reveal that magnetism can be induced by carbon adatoms on boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) and BN hexagonal sheets. As a result of the localization of impurity states, these hybrid sp-electron systems are spin-polarized, with a local magnetic moment of 2.0 mu(B) per C adatom regardless of the tube diameter and the bonding between the C atom and the BNNTs/BN sheets. An analysis of orbital hybridization indicates that two valence electrons participate in the bonding and the remaining two electrons of the C adatom are confined at the adsorption site and contribute to the magnetism accordingly. The effective interaction distance between the C-induced magnetic moments is evaluated. In terms of the diffusion barrier and the adsorption energy of C adatoms on the BN nanotubes/sheets, a fabrication method for BN-C-based functional nanodevices is proposed, and a series of virtual building blocks for functional devices are illustrated. PMID:19154109

  10. Pre-clinical functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Part II: The heart.

    PubMed

    Meßner, Nadja M; Zöllner, Frank G; Kalayciyan, Raffi; Schad, Lothar R

    2014-12-01

    One third of all deaths worldwide in 2008 were caused by cardiovascular diseases (CVD), and the incidence of CVD related deaths rises ever more. Thus, improved imaging techniques and modalities are needed for the evaluation of cardiac morphology and function. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI) is a minimally invasive technique that is increasingly important due to its high spatial and temporal resolution, its high soft tissue contrast and its ability of functional and quantitative imaging. It is widely accepted as the gold standard of cardiac functional analysis. In the short period of small animal MRI, remarkable progress has been achieved concerning new, fast imaging schemes as well as purpose-built equipment. Dedicated small animal scanners allow for tapping the full potential of recently developed animal models of cardiac disease. In this paper, we review state-of-the-art cardiac magnetic resonance imaging techniques and applications in small animals at ultra-high fields (UHF). PMID:25023418

  11. Iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles with versatile surface functions based on dopamine anchors.

    PubMed

    Mazur, Mykola; Barras, Alexandre; Kuncser, Victor; Galatanu, Andrei; Zaitzev, Vladimir; Turcheniuk, Kostiantyn V; Woisel, Patrice; Lyskawa, Joel; Laure, William; Siriwardena, Aloysius; Boukherroub, Rabah; Szunerits, Sabine

    2013-04-01

    The synthesis of multifunctional magnetic nanoparticles (MF-MPs) is one of the most active research areas in advanced materials as their multifunctional surfaces allow conjugation of biological and chemical molecules, thus making it possible to achieve target-specific diagnostic in parallel to therapeutics. We report here a simple strategy to integrate in a one-step reaction several reactive sites onto the particles. The preparation of MF-MPs is based on their simultaneous modification with differently functionalized dopamine derivatives using simple solution chemistry. The formed MF-MPs show comparable magnetic properties to those of naked nanoparticles with almost unaltered particle size of around 25 nm. The different termini, amine, azide and maleimide functions, enable further functionalization of MF-MPs by the grafting-on approach. Michael addition, Cu(i) catalyzed « click » chemistry and amidation reactions are performed on the MF-MPs integrating subsequently 6-(ferrocenyl)-hexanethiol, horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and mannose. PMID:23420060

  12. Iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles with versatile surface functions based on dopamine anchors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazur, Mykola; Barras, Alexandre; Kuncser, Victor; Galatanu, Andrei; Zaitzev, Vladimir; Turcheniuk, Kostiantyn V.; Woisel, Patrice; Lyskawa, Joel; Laure, William; Siriwardena, Aloysius; Boukherroub, Rabah; Szunerits, Sabine

    2013-03-01

    The synthesis of multifunctional magnetic nanoparticles (MF-MPs) is one of the most active research areas in advanced materials as their multifunctional surfaces allow conjugation of biological and chemical molecules, thus making it possible to achieve target-specific diagnostic in parallel to therapeutics. We report here a simple strategy to integrate in a one-step reaction several reactive sites onto the particles. The preparation of MF-MPs is based on their simultaneous modification with differently functionalized dopamine derivatives using simple solution chemistry. The formed MF-MPs show comparable magnetic properties to those of naked nanoparticles with almost unaltered particle size of around 25 nm. The different termini, amine, azide and maleimide functions, enable further functionalization of MF-MPs by the grafting-on approach. Michael addition, Cu(i) catalyzed « click » chemistry and amidation reactions are performed on the MF-MPs integrating subsequently 6-(ferrocenyl)-hexanethiol, horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and mannose.

  13. Disrupted Brain Functional Network in Internet Addiction Disorder: A Resting-State Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study

    PubMed Central

    Yap, Pew-Thian; Wu, Guorong; Shi, Feng; Price, True; Du, Yasong; Xu, Jianrong; Zhou, Yan; Shen, Dinggang

    2014-01-01

    Internet addiction disorder (IAD) is increasingly recognized as a mental health disorder, particularly among adolescents. The pathogenesis associated with IAD, however, remains unclear. In this study, we aim to explore the encephalic functional characteristics of IAD adolescents at rest using functional magnetic resonance imaging data. We adopted a graph-theoretic approach to investigate possible disruptions of functional connectivity in terms of network properties including small-worldness, efficiency, and nodal centrality on 17 adolescents with IAD and 16 socio-demographically matched healthy controls. False discovery rate-corrected parametric tests were performed to evaluate the statistical significance of group-level network topological differences. In addition, a correlation analysis was performed to assess the relationships between functional connectivity and clinical measures in the IAD group. Our results demonstrate that there is significant disruption in the functional connectome of IAD patients, particularly between regions located in the frontal, occipital, and parietal lobes. The affected connections are long-range and inter-hemispheric connections. Although significant alterations are observed for regional nodal metrics, there is no difference in global network topology between IAD and healthy groups. In addition, correlation analysis demonstrates that the observed regional abnormalities are correlated with the IAD severity and behavioral clinical assessments. Our findings, which are relatively consistent between anatomically and functionally defined atlases, suggest that IAD causes disruptions of functional connectivity and, importantly, that such disruptions might link to behavioral impairments. PMID:25226035

  14. On the spectral expansion of the electric and magnetic dyadic Green's functions in cylindrical harmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, L. W.

    1983-04-01

    The expansions of the electric and magnetic dyadic Green's functions are constructed in terms of the solenoidal Hansen vector wave functions in cylindrical coordinates. A static term is shown to arise in the course of conducting the radial spectral integral. This pole term has apparently not been identified in previously published expansions and is similar to recently identified static terms in Cartesian and spherical wave function expansions. The integration in the longitudinal spectral variable is considered, too, and forms which offer two alternative integration paths are constructed.

  15. Green's function theory of orbital magnetic moment of interacting electrons in solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aryasetiawan, F.; Karlsson, K.; Miyake, T.

    2016-04-01

    A general formula for the orbital magnetic moment of interacting electrons in solids is derived using the many-electron Green's function method. The formula factorizes into two parts, a part that contains the information about the one-particle band structure of the system and a part that contains the effects of exchange and correlations carried by the Green's function. The derived formula provides a convenient yet rigorous means of including the effects of exchange and correlations beyond the commonly used local density approximation of density functional theory.

  16. Direct coprecipitation route to monodisperse dual-functionalized magnetic iron oxide nanocrystals without size selection.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhen; Tan, Bien; Allix, Mathieu; Cooper, Andrew I; Rosseinsky, Matthew J

    2008-02-01

    Water-soluble monodisperse superparamagnetic Fe3O4 nanocrystals decorated with two distinct functional groups are prepared in a single-step procedure by injecting iron precursors into a refluxing aqueous solution of a polymer ligand, trithiol-terminated poly(methacrylic acid) (PMAA-PTTM), bearing both carboxylate and thiol functionalities. The ratio of carboxylic acid groups in the polymer-protecting ligand to the iron precursors plays a key role in determining the particle size and particle size distribution. The surface functionalities of the ligands allow post-synthesis modification of the materials to produce water-soluble fluorescent magnetic nanocrystals. PMID:18213671

  17. A Novel Data-Driven Approach to Preoperative Mapping of Functional Cortex Using Resting-State Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Timothy J.; Hacker, Carl D.; Breshears, Jonathan D.; Szrama, Nick P.; Sharma, Mohit; Bundy, David T.; Pahwa, Mrinal; Corbetta, Maurizio; Snyder, Abraham Z.; Shimony, Joshua S.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Recent findings associated with resting-state cortical networks have provided insight into the brain's organizational structure. In addition to their neuroscientific implications, the networks identified by resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) may prove useful for clinical brain mapping. OBJECTIVE: To demonstrate that a data-driven approach to analyze resting-state networks (RSNs) is useful in identifying regions classically understood to be eloquent cortex as well as other functional networks. METHODS: This study included 6 patients undergoing surgical treatment for intractable epilepsy and 7 patients undergoing tumor resection. rs-fMRI data were obtained before surgery and 7 canonical RSNs were identified by an artificial neural network algorithm. Of these 7, the motor and language networks were then compared with electrocortical stimulation (ECS) as the gold standard in the epilepsy patients. The sensitivity and specificity for identifying these eloquent sites were calculated at varying thresholds, which yielded receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curves and their associated area under the curve (AUC). RSNs were plotted in the tumor patients to observe RSN distortions in altered anatomy. RESULTS: The algorithm robustly identified all networks in all patients, including those with distorted anatomy. When all ECS-positive sites were considered for motor and language, rs-fMRI had AUCs of 0.80 and 0.64, respectively. When the ECS-positive sites were analyzed pairwise, rs-fMRI had AUCs of 0.89 and 0.76 for motor and language, respectively. CONCLUSION: A data-driven approach to rs-fMRI may be a new and efficient method for preoperative localization of numerous functional brain regions. ABBREVIATIONS: AUC, area under the curve BA, Brodmann area BOLD, blood oxygen level dependent ECS, electrocortical stimulation fMRI, functional magnetic resonance imaging ICA, independent component analysis MLP, multilayer perceptron MP

  18. Interhemispheric neuroplasticity following limb deafferentation detected by resting-state functional connectivity magnetic resonance imaging (fcMRI) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI)

    PubMed Central

    Pawela, Christopher P.; Biswal, Bharat B.; Hudetz, Anthony G.; Li, Rupeng; Jones, Seth R.; Cho, Younghoon R.; Matloub, Hani S.; Hyde, James S.

    2009-01-01

    Functional connectivity magnetic resonance imaging (fcMRI) studies in rat brain show brain reorganization following peripheral nerve injury. Subacute neuroplasticity was observed two weeks following transection of the four major nerves of the brachial plexus. Direct functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) stimulation of the intact radial nerve reveals an activation pattern in the forelimb regions of the sensory and motor cortices that is significantly different from that observed in normal rats. Results of this fMRI experiment were used to determine seed voxel regions for fcMRI analysis. Intrahemispheric connectivities in the sensorimotor forelimb representations in both hemispheres are largely unaffected by deafferentation, whereas substantial disruption of interhemispheric sensorimotor cortical connectivity occurs. In addition, significant intra- and interhemispheric changes in connectivities of thalamic nuclei were found. These are the central findings of the study. They could not have been obtained from fMRI studies alone—both fMRI and fcMRI are needed. The combination provides a general marker for brain plasticity. The rat visual system was studied in the same animals as a control. No neuroplastic changes in connectivities were found in the primary visual cortex upon forelimb deafferentation. Differences were noted in regions responsible for processing multisensory visual-motor information. This incidental discovery is considered to be significant. It may provide insight into phantom limb epiphenomena. PMID:19796693

  19. The odyssey of a young gene: structure-function studies in human glutamate dehydrogenases reveal evolutionary-acquired complex allosteric regulation mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Zaganas, Ioannis V; Kanavouras, Konstantinos; Borompokas, Nikolas; Arianoglou, Giovanna; Dimovasili, Christina; Latsoudis, Helen; Vlassi, Metaxia; Mastorodemos, Vasileios

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) catalyzes the reversible inter-conversion of glutamate to α-ketoglutarate and ammonia, interconnecting carbon skeleton and nitrogen metabolism. In addition, it functions as an energy switch by its ability to fuel the Krebs cycle depending on the energy status of the cell. As GDH lies at the intersection of several metabolic pathways, its activity is tightly regulated by several allosteric compounds that are metabolic intermediates. In contrast to other mammals that have a single GDH-encoding gene, humans and great apes possess two isoforms of GDH (hGDH1 and hGDH2, encoded by the GLUD1 and GLUD2 genes, respectively) with distinct regulation pattern, but remarkable sequence similarity (they differ, in their mature form, in only 15 of their 505 amino-acids). The GLUD2 gene is considered a very young gene, emerging from the GLUD1 gene through retro-position only recently (<23 million years ago). The new hGDH2 iso-enzyme, through random mutations and natural selection, is thought to have conferred an evolutionary advantage that helped its persistence through primate evolution. The properties of the two highly homologous human GDHs have been studied using purified recombinant hGDH1 and hGDH2 proteins obtained by expression of the corresponding cDNAs in Sf21 cells. According to these studies, in contrast to hGDH1 that maintains basal activity at 35-40 % of its maximal, hGDH2 displays low basal activity that is highly responsive to activation by rising levels of ADP and/or L-leucine which can also act synergistically. While hGDH1 is inhibited potently by GTP, hGDH2 shows remarkable GTP resistance. Furthermore, the two iso-enzymes are differentially inhibited by estrogens, polyamines and neuroleptics, and also differ in heat-lability. To elucidate the molecular mechanisms that underlie these different regulation patterns of the two iso-enzymes (and consequently the evolutionary adaptation of hGDH2 to a new functional role), we have

  20. AIDS: acquired immunodeficiency syndrome *

    PubMed Central

    Gilmore, N.J.; Beaulieu, R.; Steben, M.; Laverdière, M.

    1992-01-01

    Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, or AIDS, is a new illness that occurs in previously healthy individuals. It is characterized by immunodeficiency, opportunistic infections and unusual malignant diseases. Life-threatening single or multiple infections with viruses, mycobacteria, fungi or protozoa are common. A rare neoplasm, Kaposi's sarcoma, has developed in approximately one third of patients with AIDS. More than 800 cases of AIDS have been reported in North America, over 24 of them in Canada. The majority of patients are male homosexuals, although AIDS has also developed in abusers of intravenously administered drugs, Haitian immigrants, individuals with hemophilia, recipients of blood transfusions, prostitutes, and infants, spouses and partners of patients with AIDS. The cause of AIDS is unknown, but the features are consistent with an infectious process. Early diagnosis can be difficult owing to the nonspecific symptoms and signs of the infections and malignant diseases. Therefore, vigilance by physicians is of the utmost importance. PMID:1544049

  1. Community-acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Polverino, E; Torres Marti, A

    2011-02-01

    Despite the remarkable advances in antibiotic therapies, diagnostic tools, prevention campaigns and intensive care, community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is still among the primary causes of death worldwide, and there have been no significant changes in mortality in the last decades. The clinical and economic burden of CAP makes it a major public health problem, particularly for children and the elderly. This issue provides a clinical overview of CAP, focusing on epidemiology, economic burden, diagnosis, risk stratification, treatment, clinical management, and prevention. Particular attention is given to some aspects related to the clinical management of CAP, such as the microbial etiology and the available tools to achieve it, the usefulness of new and old biomarkers, and antimicrobial and other non-antibiotic adjunctive therapies. Possible scenarios in which pneumonia does not respond to treatment are also analyzed to improve clinical outcomes of CAP. PMID:21242952

  2. Acquired Porphyria Cutanea Tarda

    PubMed Central

    Koval, Andrew; Danby, C. W. E.; Petermann, H.

    1965-01-01

    Currently, the porphyrias are classified in four main groups: congenital porphyria, acute intermittent porphyria, porphyria cutanea tarda hereditaria, and porphyria cutanea tarda symptomatica. The acquired form of porphyria (porphyria cutanea tarda symptomatica) occurs in older males and is nearly always associated with chronic alcoholism and hepatic cirrhosis. The main clinical changes are dermatological, with excessive skin fragility and photosensitivity resulting in erosions and bullae. Biochemically, high levels of uroporphyrin are found in the urine and stools. Treatment to date has been symptomatic and usually unsuccessful. A case of porphyria cutanea tarda symptomatica is presented showing dramatic improvement of both the skin lesions and porphyrin levels in urine and blood following repeated phlebotomy. Possible mechanisms of action of phlebotomy on porphyria cutanea tarda symptomatica are discussed. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2 PMID:14341652

  3. [ICU acquired neuromyopathy].

    PubMed

    Gueret, G; Guillouet, M; Vermeersch, V; Guillard, E; Talarmin, H; Nguyen, B-V; Rannou, F; Giroux-Metges, M-A; Pennec, J-P; Ozier, Y

    2013-09-01

    ICU acquired neuromyopathy (IANM) is the most frequent neurological pathology observed in ICU. Nerve and muscle defects are merged with neuromuscular junction abnormalities. Its physiopathology is complex. The aim is probably the redistribution of nutriments and metabolism towards defense against sepsis. The main risk factors are sepsis, its severity and its duration of evolution. IANM is usually diagnosed in view of difficulties in weaning from mechanical ventilation, but electrophysiology may allow an earlier diagnosis. There is no curative therapy, but early treatment of sepsis, glycemic control as well as early physiotherapy may decrease its incidence. The outcomes of IANM are an increase in morbi-mortality and possibly long-lasting neuromuscular abnormalities as far as tetraplegia. PMID:23958176

  4. Feasibility Study of Large Combined Function Magnets for the Jefferson Lab 12 GeV Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Brindza P. D.; LeRose J. J.; Leung E. M.

    2005-05-01

    The 12 GeV upgrade at Jefferson Lab has identified two new large spectrometers as Physics detectors for the project. The first is a 7.5 Gev/c 35 m-sr. spectrometer that requires a pair of identical Combined Function Superconducting Magnets (CFSM) that can simultaneously produce 1.5 T dipole fields and 4.5 T/m quadrupole fields inside a warm bore of 120 cm. The second is an 11 GeV/c 2 m-sr. spectrometer that requires a CFSM that simultaneously produces a dipole field of 4.0 T and a quadruple field of 3.0 T/m in a 60 cm warm bore. Magnetic designs using TOSCA 3D have been performed to realize the magnetic requirements, provide 3d fields for optics analysis and produce field and force information for the engineering feasibility of the magnets. A two-sector cos(theta)/cos(2theta) design with a low nominal current density, warm bore and warm iron design has been selected and analyzed. These low current densities are consistent with the limits for a cryostable winding. The current paper will summarize the requirement definition of these two magnets. The conceptual design arrived at during the feasibility study involving the choice of conductors, thermal and structural analyses will be presented. A discussion of the manufacturing approach and challenges will be provided.

  5. Electronic and magnetic properties of silicon supported organometallic molecular wires: a density functional theory (DFT) study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xia; Tan, Yingzi; Li, Xiuling; Wu, Xiaojun; Pei, Yong

    2015-08-28

    The electronic and magnetic properties of transition metal (TM = Sc, Ti, V, Cr and Mn) atom incorporated single and double one-dimensional (1D) styrene molecular wires confined on the hydrogen-terminated Si(100) surface are explored for the first time by means of spin-polarized density functional theory, denoted as Si-[TM(styrene)]. It is unveiled that TM atoms bind asymmetrically to the adjacent phenyl rings, which leads to novel electronic and magnetic properties in stark contrast to the well-studied gas phase TM-benzene molecular wires. Si-[Mn(styrene)]∞ and Si-[Cr(styrene)]∞ single molecular wires (SMWs) are a ferromagnetic semiconductor and half metal, respectively. Creation of H-atom defects on the silicon surface can introduce an impurity metallic band, which leads to novel half-metallic magnetism of a Si-[Mn(styrene)]∞ system. Moreover, double molecular wires (DMWs) containing two identical or hetero SMWs are theoretically designed. The [Mn(styrene)]∞-[Cr(styrene)]∞ DMW exhibits half-metallic magnetism where the spin-up and spin-down channels are contributed by two single molecular wires. Finally, we demonstrate that introducing a TM-defect may significantly affect the electronic structure and magnetic properties of molecular wires. These studies provide new insights into the structure and properties of surface supported 1-D sandwiched molecular wires and may inspire the future experimental synthesis of substrate confined organometallic sandwiched molecular wires. PMID:26219748

  6. Geometric and magnetic properties of Pt clusters supported on graphene: Relativistic density-functional calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Błoński, Piotr; Hafner, Jürgen

    2011-04-01

    The geometric and magnetic structures of small Ptn clusters (n = 1 - 5) supported on a graphene layer have been investigated using ab initio density functional calculations including spin-orbit coupling. Pt-Pt interactions were found to be much stronger than the Pt-C interactions promoting the binding to the support. As a consequence, the equilibrium structure of the gas-phase clusters is preserved if they are deposited on graphene. However, the clusters bind to graphene only via at most two Pt-C bonds: A Pt2 dumbbell prefers an upright position, the larger clusters are bound to graphene only via one edge of the planar cluster (Pt3 and Pt5) or via two terminal Pt atoms of a bent Pt4 rhombus. Evidently, the strong buckling of the graphene layer induced by the Pt-C bonds prevents the formation of a larger number of cluster-support bonds. As the local spin and orbital magnetic moments are quenched on the Pt atoms forming Pt-C bonds, the magnetic structure of the supported clusters is much more inhomogeneous as in the gas-phase. This leads to noncollinear magnetic structures and a strongly reduced magnetic anisotropy energy.

  7. Ion energy-angle distribution functions at the plasma-material interface in oblique magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Khaziev, Rinat; Curreli, Davide

    2015-04-15

    The ion energy-angle distribution (IEAD) at the wall of a magnetized plasma is of fundamental importance for the determination of the material processes occurring at the plasma-material interface, comprising secondary emissions and material sputtering. Here, we present a numerical characterization of the IEAD at the wall of a weakly collisional magnetized plasma with the magnetic field inclined at an arbitrary angle with respect to the wall. The analysis has been done using two different techniques: (1) a fluid-Monte Carlo method, and (2) particle-in-cell simulations, the former offering a fast but approximate method for the determination of the IEADs, the latter giving a computationally intensive but self-consistent treatment of the plasma behavior from the quasi-neutral region to the material boundary. The two models predict similar IEADs, whose similarities and differences are discussed. Data are presented for magnetic fields inclined at angles from normal to grazing incidence (0°–85°). We show the scaling factors of the average and peak ion energy and trends of the pitch angle at the wall as a function of the magnetic angle, for use in the correlation of fluid plasma models to material models.

  8. Comparison and functionalization study of microemulsion-prepared magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Okoli, Chuka; Sanchez-Dominguez, Margarita; Boutonnet, Magali; Järås, Sven; Civera, Concepción; Solans, Conxita; Kuttuva, Gunaratna Rajarao

    2012-06-01

    Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (MION) for protein binding and separation were obtained from water-in-oil (w/o) and oil-in-water (o/w) microemulsions. Characterization of the prepared nanoparticles have been performed by TEM, XRD, SQUID magnetometry, and BET. Microemulsion-prepared magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (ME-MION) with sizes ranging from 2 to 10 nm were obtained. Study on the magnetic properties at 300 K shows a large increase of the magnetization ~35 emu/g for w/o-ME-MION with superparamagnetic behavior and nanoscale dimensions in comparison with o/w-ME-MION (10 emu/g) due to larger particle size and anisotropic property. Moringa oleifera coagulation protein (MOCP) bound w/o- and o/w-ME-MION showed an enhanced performance in terms of coagulation activity. A significant interaction between the magnetic nanoparticles and the protein can be described by changes in fluorescence emission spectra. Adsorbed protein from MOCP is still retaining its functionality even after binding to the nanoparticles, thus implying the extension of this technique for various applications. PMID:22578053

  9. Magnetic structure determination from the magnetic pair distribution function (mPDF): ground state of MnO.

    PubMed

    Frandsen, Benjamin A; Billinge, Simon J L

    2015-05-01

    An experimental determination of the magnetic pair distribution function (mPDF) defined in an earlier paper [Frandsen et al. (2014). Acta Cryst. A70, 3-11] is presented for the first time. The mPDF was determined from neutron powder diffraction data from a reactor and a neutron time-of-flight total scattering source on a powder sample of the antiferromagnetic oxide MnO. A description of the data treatment that allowed the measured mPDF to be extracted and then modelled is provided and utilized to investigate the low-temperature structure of MnO. Atomic and magnetic co-refinements support the scenario of a locally monoclinic ground-state atomic structure, despite the average structure being rhombohedral, with the mPDF analysis successfully recovering the known antiferromagnetic spin configuration. The total scattering data suggest a preference for the spin axis to lie along the pseudocubic [10{\\overline 1}] direction. Finally, r-dependent PDF refinements indicate that the local monoclinic structure tends toward the average rhombohedral R{\\overline 3}m symmetry over a length scale of approximately 100 Å. PMID:25921501

  10. Itinerant Electron Magnets: Curie Temperature and Susceptibility in Density-Functional Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohn, Peter; Khmelevskyi, Sergei

    Groundstate properties of solids are astonishingly well described by the local density functional approximation (LDA) [1]. This is also true of metallic magnets for which the situation was recently described by this author [2]. Excited-state properties of magnets (and other systems), however, are still a great challenge and it was believed until recently that the band-picture, based in the LDA, fails entirely in describing magnetism at elevated temperatures. We emphasize here that this is not so, attempting first to expose the reason why it was thought that the band-picture fails. Since historically the underlying physical picture was developed by Stoner and Wohlfarth, we begin with a discussion of their theory using, however, an approach that reveals the essential assumptions. This is Mermin's [3] finite-temperature density functional theory. Two points emerge: one is the essential noncollinearity of the magnetic moments at finite temperatures, the other is the form of the exchange-corr elation contribution to the thermodynamic potential. We know how to deal with noncollinear order in the LDA and we explain how we might use this knowledge to advance the issue. Exchange and correlation at finite temperatures are, however, at the present state not well understood. This statement not only applies to density functional theory but also to many-body treatments addressed at this workshop. We will show in particular that the theory of magnons in the band-LDA-picture at low temperatures is in good shape. At high temperatures we opt for a theory involving spin fluctuations and argue that, although broad features of the magnetic phase transition are described satisfactorily, many details await further improvements.

  11. Hydrazide functionalized core-shell magnetic nanocomposites for highly specific enrichment of N-glycopeptides.

    PubMed

    Liu, Liting; Yu, Meng; Zhang, Ying; Wang, Changchun; Lu, Haojie

    2014-05-28

    In view of the biological significance of glycosylation for human health, profiling of glycoproteome from complex biological samples is highly inclined toward the discovery of disease biomarkers and clinical diagnosis. Nevertheless, because of the existence of glycopeptides at relatively low abundances compared with nonglycosylated peptides and glycan microheterogeneity, glycopeptides need to be highly selectively enriched from complex biological samples for mass spectrometry analysis. Herein, a new type of hydrazide functionalized core-shell magnetic nanocomposite has been synthesized for highly specific enrichment of N-glycopeptides. The nanocomposites with both the magnetic core and the polymer shell hanging high density of hydrazide groups were prepared by first functionalization of the magnetic core with polymethacrylic acid by reflux precipitation polymerization to obtain the Fe3O4@poly(methacrylic acid) (Fe3O4@PMAA) and then modification of the surface of Fe3O4@PMAA with adipic acid dihydrazide (ADH) to obtain Fe3O4@poly(methacrylic hydrazide) (Fe3O4@PMAH). The abundant hydrazide groups toward highly specific enrichment of glycopeptides and the magnetic core make it suitable for large-scale, high-throughput, and automated sample processing. In addition, the hydrophilic polymer surface can provide low nonspecific adsorption of other peptides. Compared to commercially available hydrazide resin, Fe3O4@PMAH improved more than 5 times the signal-to-noise ratio of standard glycopeptides. Finally, this nanocomposite was applied in the profiling of N-glycoproteome from the colorectal cancer patient serum. In total, 175 unique glycopeptides and 181 glycosylation sites corresponding to 63 unique glycoproteins were identified in three repeated experiments, with the specificities of the enriched glycopeptides and corresponding glycoproteins of 69.6% and 80.9%, respectively. Because of all these attractive features, we believe that this novel hydrazide functionalized

  12. Configuration-dependent electronic and magnetic properties of graphene monolayers and nanoribbons functionalized with aryl groups

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Xiaoqing Gu, Juan; Xu, Jian-bin

    2014-01-28

    Graphene monolayers functionalized with aryl groups exhibit configuration-dependent electronic and magnetic properties. The aryl groups were adsorbed in pairs of neighboring atoms in the same sublattice A (different sublattices) of graphene monolayers, denoted as the M{sub 2}{sup AA} (M{sub 2}{sup AB}) configuration. The M{sub 2}{sup AA} configuration behaved as a ferromagnetic semiconductor. The band gaps for the majority and minority bands were 1.1 eV and 1.2 eV, respectively. The M{sub 2}{sup AB} configuration behaved as a nonmagnetic semiconductor with a band gap of 0.8 eV. Each aryl group could induce 1 Bohr magneton (μ{sub B}) into the molecule-graphene system. Armchair graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) exhibited the same configuration-dependent magnetic properties as the graphene monolayers. The net spin of the functionalized zigzag GNRs was mainly localized on the edges demonstrating an adsorption site-dependent magnetism. For the zigzag GNRs, both the M{sub 2}{sup AA} and M{sub 2}{sup AB} configurations possibly had a magnetic moment. Each aryl group could induce 1.5–3.5 μ{sub B} into the molecule-graphene system. There was a metal-to-insulator transition after adsorption of the aryl groups for the zigzag GNRs.

  13. Surface functionalization of silica-coated magnetic nanoparticles for covalent attachment of cholesterol oxidase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šulek, Franja; Drofenik, Miha; Habulin, Maja; Knez, Željko

    2010-01-01

    A systematic approach towards the fabrication of highly functionalized silica shell magnetic nanoparticles, presently used for enzyme immobilization, is herein fully presented. The synthesis of bare maghemite (γ-Fe 2O 3) nanoparticles was accomplished by thermal co-precipitation of iron ions in ammonia alkaline solution at harsh reaction conditions, respectively. Primary surface engineering of maghemite nanoparticles was successfully performed by the proper deposition of silica onto nanoparticles surface under strictly regulated reaction conditions. Next, the secondary surface functionalization of the particles was achieved by coating the particles with organosilane followed by glutaraldehyde activation in order to enhance protein immobilization. Covalent immobilization of cholesterol oxidase was attempted afterwards. The structural and magnetic properties of magnetic silica nanocomposites were characterized by TEM and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) instruments. X-ray diffraction measurements confirmed the spinel structure and average size of uncoated maghemite nanoparticles to be around 20 nm in diameter. SEM-EDS spectra indicated a strong signal for Si, implying the coating procedure of silica onto the particles surface to be successfully accomplished. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectra analysis confirmed the binding of amino silane molecules onto the surface of the maghemite nanoparticles mediated Si-O-Si chemical bonds. Compared to the free enzyme, the covalently bound cholesterol oxidase retained 50% of its activity. Binding of enzyme onto chemically modified magnetic nanoparticles via glutaraldehyde activation is a promising method for developing biosensing components in biomedicine.

  14. Isolation of N-linked glycopeptides by hydrazine-functionalized magnetic particles.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shisheng; Yang, Ganglong; Wang, Ting; Wang, Qinzhe; Chen, Chao; Li, Zheng

    2010-04-01

    We introduce a novel combination of magnetic particles with hydrazine chemistry, dubbed as hydrazine-functionalized magnetic particles (HFMP) for isolation of glycopeptides. Four methods have been developed and compared for the production of HFMP by hydrazine modification of the surface of the carboxyl and epoxy-silanized magnetic particles, respectively. The evaluation of the capability and specificity of HFMP as well as the optimization of the coupling condition for capturing of glycoproteins were systematically investigated. The results showed that HFMP prepared by adipic dihydrazide functionalization from carboxyl-silanized magnetic particles (HFCA) displayed the maximum capture capacity and isolated efficiency for glycoprotein. When measured with glycoproteins, the capacity of the HFCA (1 g) for coupling bovine fetuin was 130 +/- 5.3 mg. The capability of this method was also confirmed by successful isolation of all formerly glycosylated peptides from standard glycoproteins and identification of their glycosylation sites, which demonstrated the feasibility of the HFCA as an alternative solid support for isolation of glycoproteins/glycopeptides. PMID:20169334

  15. Functional expression of an scFv on bacterial magnetic particles by in vitro docking

    SciTech Connect

    Sugamata, Yasuhiro; Tanaka, Tsuyoshi; Matsunaga, Tadashi; Yoshino, Tomoko

    2014-02-28

    Highlights: • We present a novel expression system called “in vitro docking” on bacterial magnetic particles. • An scFv–Fc was functionally expressed on bacterial magnetic particles of magnetotactic bacteria. • Our novel expression system on BacMPs will be effective for disulfide-bonded proteins. - Abstract: A Gram-negative, magnetotactic bacterium, Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1 produces nano-sized magnetic particles (BacMPs) in the cytoplasm. Although various applications of genetically engineered BacMPs have been demonstrated, such as immunoassay, ligand–receptor interaction or cell separation, by expressing a target protein on BacMPs, it has been difficult to express disulfide-bonded proteins on BacMPs due to lack of disulfide-bond formation in the cytoplasm. Here, we propose a novel dual expression system, called in vitro docking, of a disulfide-bonded protein on BacMPs by directing an immunoglobulin Fc-fused target protein to the periplasm and its docking protein ZZ on BacMPs. By in vitro docking, an scFv–Fc fusion protein was functionally expressed on BacMPs in the dimeric or trimeric form. Our novel disulfide-bonded protein expression system on BacMPs will be useful for efficient screening of potential ligands or drugs, analyzing ligand–receptor interactions or as a magnetic carrier for affinity purification.

  16. Nature versus nurture: functional assessment of restoration effects on wetland services using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sundareshwar, P.V.; Richardson, C.J.; Gleason, R.A.; Pellechia, P.J.; Honomichl, S.

    2009-01-01

    Land-use change has altered the ability of wetlands to provide vital services such as nutrient retention. While compensatory practices attempt to restore degraded wetlands and their functions, it is difficult to evaluate the recovery of soil biogeochemical functions that are critical for restoration of ecosystem services. Using solution 31P Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy, we examined the chemical forms of phosphorus (P) in soils from wetlands located across a land-use gradient. We report that soil P diversity, a functional attribute, was lowest in farmland, and greatest in native wetlands. Soil P diversity increased with age of restoration, indicating restoration of biogeochemical function. The trend in soil P diversity was similar to documented trends in soil bacterial taxonomic composition but opposite that of soil bacterial diversity at our study sites. These findings provide insights into links between ecosystem structure and function and provide a tool for evaluating the success of ecosystem restoration efforts. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  17. Development of magnetic resonance imaging based detection methods for beta amyloids via sialic acid-functionalized magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouyoumdjian, Hovig

    The development of a non-invasive method for the detection of Alzheimer's disease is of high current interest, which can be critical in early diagnosis and in guiding preventive treatment of the disease. The aggregates of beta amyloids are a pathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease. Carbohydrates such as sialic acid terminated gangliosides have been shown to play significant roles in initiation of amyloid aggregation. Herein, we report a biomimetic approach using sialic acid coated iron oxide superparamagnetic nanoparticles for in vitro detection in addition to the assessment of the in vivo mouse-BBB (Blood brain barrier) crossing of the BSA (bovine serum albumin)-modified ones. The sialic acid functionalized dextran nanoparticles were shown to bind with beta amyloids through several techniques including ELISA (enzyme linked immunosorbent assay), MRI (magnetic resonance imaging), TEM (transmission electron microscopy), gel electrophoresis and tyrosine fluorescence assay. The superparamagnetic nature of the nanoparticles allowed easy detection of the beta amyloids in mouse brains in both in vitro and ex vivo model by magnetic resonance imaging. Furthermore, the sialic acid nanoparticles greatly reduced beta amyloid induced cytotoxicity to SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells, highlighting the potential of the glyconanoparticles for detection and imaging of beta amyloids. Sialic acid functionalized BSA (bovine serum albumin) nanoparticles also showed significant binding to beta amyloids, through ELISA and ex vivo mouse brain MRI experiments. Alternatively, the BBB crossing was demonstrated by several techniques such as confocal microscopy, endocytosis, exocytosis assays and were affirmed by nanoparticles transcytosis assays through bEnd.3 endothelial cells. Finally, the BBB crossing was confirmed by analyzing the MRI signal of nanoparticle-injected CD-1 mice.

  18. Waiguan Stimulation May Kindle Anticorrelated Brain Networks: Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Data Revisited.

    PubMed

    Wik, Gustav; Huang, Yong; Zeng, Tongjun; Qu, Shanshan; Zheng, Yu; Zhang, Jiping; Lai, Xinsheng; Tang, Chunzhi; Shan, Baoci

    2016-02-01

    Subtraction of functional magnetic resonance imaging activity data results in a loss of information regarding possible general patterns of brain activation under experimental conditions. We, hence, reanalyzed previous Waiguan acupuncture data to qualitatively elucidate patterns of cerebral correlations to acupuncture and placebo conditions. Healthy individuals (n=24) were randomly allocated to true and sham Waiguan acupuncture and to true and sham needling of a nonacupuncture point (nonacupoint), and functional magnetic resonance imaging scans were performed during stimulation. Statistical parametric mapping group comparisons revealed clearly different patterns of activation between Waiguan stimulation and the corresponding stimulation of a nonacupoint. The former condition produced less neocortical activation than the nonacupoint stimulation. Cerebellar activation was typically seen only during true Waiguan acupuncture. The reduced neocortical activity during both true and sham Waiguan acupuncture may indicate that this point activates anticorrelated networks, with possible intrinsic healing properties. Cerebellar activation during true Waiguan acupuncture implies the region's influence on healing networks. PMID:26896073

  19. Functional mapping of the human visual cortex by magnetic resonance imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Belliveau, J.W.; Kennedy, D.N.; McKinstry, R.C.; Buchbinder, B.R.; Weisskoff, R.M.; Cohen, M.S.; Vevea, J.M.; Brady, T.J.; Rosen, B.R. Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA )

    1991-11-01

    Knowledge of regional cerebral hemodynamics has widespread application for both physiological research and clinical assessment because of the well-established interrelation between physiological function, energy metabolism, and localized blood supply. A magnetic resonance technique was developed for quantitative imaging of cerebral hemodynamics, allowing for measurement of regional cerebral blood volume during resting and activated cognitive states. This technique was used to generate the first functional magnetic resonance amps of human task activation, by using a visual stimulus paradigm. During photic stimulation, localized increases in blood volume (32 {plus minus} 10%, n = 7 subjects) were detected in the primary visual cortex. Center-of-mass coordinates and linear extends of brain activation within the plane of the calcarine fissure are reported.

  20. THE EFFECT OF MAGNETIC FIELDS AND AMBIPOLAR DIFFUSION ON CORE MASS FUNCTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, Nicole D.; Basu, Shantanu E-mail: basu@uwo.ca

    2013-03-20

    Linear analysis of the formation of protostellar cores in planar magnetic interstellar clouds yields information about length scales involved in star formation. Combining these length scales with various distributions of other environmental variables (i.e., column density and mass-to-flux ratio) and applying Monte Carlo methods allow us to produce synthetic core mass functions (CMFs) for different environmental conditions. Our analysis shows that the shape of the CMF is directly dependent on the physical conditions of the cloud. Specifically, magnetic fields act to broaden the mass function and develop a high-mass tail while ambipolar diffusion will truncate this high-mass tail. In addition, we analyze the effect of small number statistics on the shape and high-mass slope of the synthetic CMFs. We find that observed CMFs are severely statistically limited, which has a profound effect on the derived slope for the high-mass tail.

  1. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging: definitive imaging of placental function?

    PubMed

    Chalouhi, G E; Deloison, B; Siauve, N; Aimot, S; Balvay, D; Cuenod, C A; Ville, Y; Clément, O; Salomon, L J

    2011-02-01

    The placenta constitutes a complex circulatory interface between the mother and fetus, but the relationship between the maternal and fetal circulation is still very difficult to study in vivo. There is growing evidence that magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is useful and safe during pregnancy, and MRI is increasingly used for fetal and placental anatomical imaging. MRI functional imaging is now a modern obstetric tool and has the potential to provide new insights into the physiology of the human placenta. Placental perfusion has been studied during the first pass of an MR contrast agent, by arterial spin labeling, diffusion imaging, T1 and T2 relaxation time measurement using echo-planar imaging, and by a combination of magnetization transfer with established stereological methods. The BOLD (blood oxygen level-dependent) effect offers new perspectives for functional MRI evaluation of the placenta. PMID:20851065

  2. Low-energy ion distribution functions on a magnetically quiet day at geostationary altitude /L = 7/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, N.; Raitt, W. J.; Yasuhara, F.

    1982-01-01

    Ion energy and pitch angle distribution functions are examined for a magnetically quiet day using averaged data from ATS 6. For both field-aligned and perpendicular fluxes, the populations have a mixture of characteristic energies, and the distribution functions can be fairly well approximated by Maxwellian distributions over three different energy bands in the range 3-600 eV. Pitch angle distributions varying with local time, and energy distributions are used to compute total ion density. Pitch angle scattering mechanisms responsible for the observed transformation of pitch angle distribution are examined, and it is found that a magnetic noise of a certain power spectral density belonging to the electromagnetic ion cyclotron mode near the ion cyclotron frequency can be effective in trapping the field aligned fluxes by pitch angle scattering.

  3. Functional magnetic resonance microscopy at single-cell resolution in Aplysia californica

    PubMed Central

    Radecki, Guillaume; Nargeot, Romuald; Jelescu, Ileana Ozana; Le Bihan, Denis; Ciobanu, Luisa

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we show the feasibility of performing functional MRI studies with single-cell resolution. At ultrahigh magnetic field, manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance microscopy allows the identification of most motor neurons in the buccal network of Aplysia at low, nontoxic Mn2+ concentrations. We establish that Mn2+ accumulates intracellularly on injection into the living Aplysia and that its concentration increases when the animals are presented with a sensory stimulus. We also show that we can distinguish between neuronal activities elicited by different types of stimuli. This method opens up a new avenue into probing the functional organization and plasticity of neuronal networks involved in goal-directed behaviors with single-cell resolution. PMID:24872449

  4. Copper Ferrocyanide-Functionalized Magnetic Nanoparticles for the Selective Removal of Radioactive Cesium.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hee-Man; Lee, Kune-Woo; Seo, Bum-Kyoung; Moon, Jei-Kwon

    2015-02-01

    Copper ferrocyanide-functionalized magnetite nanoparticles (Cu-FC-MNPs) were successfully synthesized by immobilizing copper and ferrocyanide on the surfaces of [1-(2 amino-ethyl)-3-aminopropyl] trimethoxysilane-modified magnetite nanoparticles. Radioactive cesium (Cs) adsorption tests were conducted to investigate the effectiveness of the Cu-FC-MNPS toward the removal of radioactive Cs. The Cu-FC-MNPs showed excellent separation properties using an external magnet in an aqueous solution. PMID:26353716

  5. Multimodal imaging guided photothermal therapy using functionalized graphene nanosheets anchored with magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Yang, Kai; Hu, Lilei; Ma, Xingxing; Ye, Shuoqi; Cheng, Liang; Shi, Xiaoze; Li, Changhui; Li, Yonggang; Liu, Zhuang

    2012-04-10

    In this work, a nanoscale reduced graphene oxide-iron oxide nanoparticle (RGO-IONP) complex is noncovalently functionalized with polyethylene glycol (PEG), obtaining a RGO-IONP-PEG nanocomposite with excellent physiological stability, strong NIR optical absorbance, and superparamagnetic properties. Using this theranostic nanoprobe, in-vivo triple modal fluorescence, photoacoustic, and magnetic resonance imaging are carried out, uncovering high passive tumor targeting, which is further used for effective photothermal ablation of tumors in mice. PMID:22378564

  6. Acquired Language Disorders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raymer, Anastasia M.

    2001-01-01

    This article discusses advances in structural and functional neuroimaging that indicate that, in general, nonfluent aphasias are associated with left pre-rolandic lesions and fluent aphasias occur with left post-rolandic lesions that spare pre-rolandic areas. However, functional neuroimaging studies have also shown that neural dysfunction often…

  7. Aberrant regional neural fluctuations and functional connectivity in generalized anxiety disorder revealed by resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Hou, Jingming; Qian, Shaowen; Liu, Kai; Li, Bo; Li, Min; Peng, Zhaohui; Xin, Kuolin; Sun, Gang

    2016-06-15

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the neural activity and functional connectivity in generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) during resting state, and how these alterations correlate to patients' symptoms. Twenty-eight GAD patients and 28 matched healthy controls underwent resting-state functional magnetic resonance (fMRI) scans. Amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (ALFF) and seed-based resting-state functional connectivity (RSFC) were computed to explore regional activity and functional integration, and were compared between the two groups using the voxel-based two-sample t test. Pearson's correlation analyses were performed to examine the neural relationships with demographics and clinical symptoms scores. Compared to controls, GAD patients showed functional abnormalities: higher ALFF in the bilateral dorsomedial prefrontal cortex, bilateral dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and left precuneus/posterior cingulate cortex; lower connectivity in prefrontal gyrus; lower in prefrontal-limbic and cingulate RSFC and higher prefrontal-hippocampus RSFC were correlated with clinical symptoms severity, but these associations were unable to withstand correction for multiple testing. These findings may help facilitate further understanding of the potential neural substrate of GAD. PMID:27163197

  8. Solar Magnetic Flux as a Function of Disk Position over the Solar Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, T.

    2005-05-01

    A novel analysis of a SOHO/MDI full-disk magnetogram time series from March 1996 to November 2004 is presented. Each of the 26,052 magnetograms in the series are segmented into sectors of constant μ = cos θ, each sector having a width of Δμ = 0.05. Within each sector, a histogram of signed magnetic flux density, corrected for the line-of-sight angle θ, is compiled. For each magnetogram we thus obtain a distribution of signed magnetic flux density as a function of μ. Summing the signed flux in each μ bin gives the total signed flux as a function of μ. Plotting these totals for each μ-sector as a function of time over the course of Solar Cycle 22 reveals that cycle minimum and maximum are differentiated only by the magnitude of the flux distributions. In other words, in contrast to analogous plots of flux versus heliocentric latitude, there is no discernible pattern, or "Butterfly Diagram", of flux seen on the solar disk from Earth. The finding is relevant to investigations of total solar irradiance (TSI) since it is known that the primary cause of the ~ 0.1% TSI variation over the solar cycle is the distribution of non-sunspot magnetic flux at smaller μ-values (so-called "faculae").

  9. Magnetically labelled gold and epoxy bi-functional microcarriers for suspension based bioassay technologies.

    PubMed

    Vyas, Kunal N; Palfreyman, Justin J; Love, David M; Mitrelias, Thanos; Barnes, Crispin H W

    2012-12-21

    Microarrays and suspension-based assay technologies have attracted significant interest over the past decade with applications ranging from medical diagnostics to high throughput molecular biology. The throughput and sensitivity of a microarray will always be limited by the array density and slow reaction kinetics. Suspension (or bead) based technologies offer a conceptually different approach, improving detection by substituting a fixed plane of operation with many individually distinguishable microcarriers. In addition to all the features of a suspension based assay technology, our technology offers a rewritable label. This has the potential to be truly revolutionary by opening up the possibility of generating, on chip, extensive labelled molecular libraries. We unveil our latest SU-8 microcarrier design with embedded magnetic films that can be utilized for both magnetic and optical labelling. The novel design significantly simplifies fabrication and additionally incorporates a gold cap to provide a dual surface, bi-functional architecture. The microcarriers are fabricated using deep-ultraviolet lithography techniques and metallic thin film growth by evaporation. The bi-functional properties of the microcarriers will allow us to use each microcarrier as its own positive control thereby increasing the reliability of our technology. Here we present details of the design, fabrication, magnetic detection and functionalization of these microcarriers. PMID:23128508

  10. Magnetic properties of f-electron systems in spin-polarized relativistic density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamagami, H.; Mavromaras, A.; Kübler, J.

    1997-12-01

    The magnetic ground state of the series of lanthanide and actinide trivalent ions is investigated by means of spin-polarized relativistic spin-density functional theory. In the local density functional approximation (LDA) an internal effective magnetic field due to exchange and correlation couples to the spin degrees of freedom. The resulting set of coupled Dirac equations yields ground-state multiplets that obey the well-known Hund's rules. This remarkable result comes about by the coupling of the j = l + 1/2 with the j = l - 1/2 states due to the exchange - correlation potential that is, as usual, the functional derivative of the exchange - correlation energy with respect to the spin magnetic moment. The effect of the coupling is shown to depend on the varying relative strengths of spin - orbit coupling and exchange splitting within the f series. Since in the f levels the internal exchange splitting dominates rather than the spin - orbit splitting, the energy level scheme is that of the Paschen - Back effect, and thus features of the Russell - Saunders coupling persist in spite of relativistic effects.

  11. Advanced magnetic resonance neuroimaging of language function recovery after aphasic stroke: a technical review.

    PubMed

    Smits, Marion; Visch-Brink, Evy G; van de Sandt-Koenderman, Mieke E; van der Lugt, Aad

    2012-01-01

    Two advanced magnetic resonance neuroimaging techniques, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), have recently made their way into clinically oriented research and hold great promise to study the brain's adaptive changes of function and structure after aphasic stroke, respectively. Such functional and structural neuroplasticity is thought to underlie the recovery of language function, occurring spontaneously and/or in the context of therapeutic intervention. With fMRI, brain activity can be visualized. Spontaneous brain activity, present in multiple brain networks, is measured with resting-state fMRI and language-related brain activity by having the subject perform a language task during scanning (task-based fMRI). With DTI the major white matter tracts, such as the dorsal and ventral language pathways and the commissural fibers, can be visualized and quantified. Both techniques are entirely noninvasive and thus offer the unique opportunity to perform multiple assessments within the same subject. To gain more insight in functional and structural neuroplasticity after aphasic stroke, advanced magnetic resonance neuroimaging studies in specific patient populations, at several stages after stroke and in the course of language recovery, are needed. Such studies will help to clarify the influence of the many factors that play a role in the recovery of language function and are thus vital to further the development of aphasia therapy. Application of these techniques in aphasic stroke patients, however, is not without challenge. The purpose of this article is to discuss the methodologic challenges of fMRI and DTI in the assessment of language recovery after aphasic stroke. PMID:22202190

  12. Perpendicularly propagating electromagnetic modes in a strongly magnetized hot plasma with non-Maxwellian distribution function

    SciTech Connect

    Zaheer, S.; Murtaza, G.; Shah, H.A.

    2006-06-15

    Electromagnetic modes (ordinary and extraordinary) for strongly magnetized plasma are studied and their damping factors {gamma}{sub or} and {gamma}{sub ex} are calculated using non-Maxwellian velocity distribution function. It is observed that for moderate values of the spectral indices r and q [used in (r, q) distribution functions], both the damping decrements show substantial change. As the value of the spectral index r increases for a fixed value of q, the damping increases for the O mode but decreases for the X mode. In the limiting case of r=0, q{yields}{infinity}, the damping factors reduce to the standard Maxwellian values.

  13. Voice perception in blind persons: a functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Gougoux, Frédéric; Belin, Pascal; Voss, Patrice; Lepore, Franco; Lassonde, Maryse; Zatorre, Robert J

    2009-11-01

    Early blind persons have often been shown to be superior to sighted ones across a wide range of non-visual perceptual abilities, which in turn are often explained by the functionally relevant recruitment of occipital areas. While voice stimuli are known to involve voice-selective areas of the superior temporal sulcus (STS) in sighted persons, it remains unknown if the processing of vocal stimuli involves similar brain regions in blind persons, or whether it benefits from cross-modal processing. To address these questions, we used fMRI to measure cerebral responses to voice and non-voice stimuli in blind (congenital and acquired) and sighted subjects. The global comparison of all sounds vs. silence showed a different pattern of activation between blind (pooled congenital and acquired) and sighted groups, with blind subjects showing stronger activation of occipital areas but weaker activation of temporal areas centered around Heschl's gyrus. In contrast, the specific comparison of vocal vs. non-vocal sounds did not isolate activations in the occipital areas in either of the blind groups. In the congenitally blind group, however, it led to a stronger activation in the left STS, and to a lesser extent in the fusiform cortex, compared to both sighted participants and those with acquired blindness. Moreover, STS activity in congenital blind participants significantly correlated with performance in a voice discrimination task. This increased recruitment of STS areas in the blind for voice processing is in marked contrast with the usual cross-modal recruitment of occipital cortex. PMID:19576235

  14. Magnetism in undoped ZnS studied from density functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Wen-Zhi E-mail: llwang@hun.edu.cn; Rong, Qing-Yan; Xiao, Gang; Wang, Ling-ling E-mail: llwang@hun.edu.cn; Meng, Bo

    2014-06-07

    The magnetic property induced by the native defects in ZnS bulk, thin film, and quantum dots are investigated comprehensively based on density functional theory within the generalized gradient approximation + Hubbard U (GGA + U) approach. We find the origin of magnetism is closely related to the introduction of hole into ZnS systems. The relative localization of S-3p orbitals is another key to resulting in unpaired p-electron, due to Hund's rule. For almost all the ZnS systems under study, the magnetic moment arises from the S-dangling bonds generated by Zn vacancies. The charge-neutral Zn vacancy, Zn vacancy in 1− charge sate, and S vacancy in the 1+ charge sate produce a local magnetic moment of 2.0, 1.0, and 1.0 μ{sub B}, respectively. The Zn vacancy in the neutral and 1− charge sates are the important cause for the ferromagnetism in ZnS bulk, with a Curie temperature (T{sub C}) above room temperature. For ZnS thin film with clean (111) surfaces, the spins on each surface are ferromagnetically coupled but antiferromagnetically coupled between two surfaces, which is attributable to the internal electric field between the two polar (111) surfaces of the thin film. Only surface Zn vacancies can yield local magnetic moment for ZnS thin film and quantum dot, which is ascribed to the surface effect. Interactions between magnetic moments on S-3p states induced by hole-doping are responsible for the ferromagnetism observed experimentally in various ZnS samples.

  15. Model of controlled drug release from functionalized magnetic nanoparticles by a nonheating alternating-current magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golovin, Yu. I.; Klyachko, N. L.; Gribanovskii, S. L.; Golovin, D. Yu.; Majouga, A. G.

    2016-03-01

    A magnetohydrodynamic model of controlled drug macromolecule release from transport magnetic nanoparticles covered by a polymer shell under the influence of a low-frequency (<1 kHz) nonheating magnetic field is described.

  16. Impact of a High Magnetic Field on the Orientation of Gravitactic Unicellular Organisms—A Critical Consideration about the Application of Magnetic Fields to Mimic Functional Weightlessness

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Anja; Waßer, Kai; Hauslage, Jens; Christianen, Peter C.M.; Albers, Peter W.; Lebert, Michael; Richter, Peter; Alt, Wolfgang; Anken, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The gravity-dependent behavior of Paramecium biaurelia and Euglena gracilis have previously been studied on ground and in real microgravity. To validate whether high magnetic field exposure indeed provides a ground-based facility to mimic functional weightlessness, as has been suggested earlier, both cell types were observed during exposure in a strong homogeneous magnetic field (up to 30 T) and a strong magnetic field gradient. While swimming, Paramecium cells were aligned along the magnetic field lines; orientation of Euglena was perpendicular, demonstrating that the magnetic field determines the orientation and thus prevents the organisms from the random swimming known to occur in real microgravity. Exposing Astasia longa, a flagellate that is closely related to Euglena but lacks chloroplasts and the photoreceptor, as well as the chloroplast-free mutant E. gracilis 1F, to a high magnetic field revealed no reorientation to the perpendicular direction as in the case of wild-type E. gracilis, indicating the existence of an anisotropic structure (chloroplasts) that determines the direction of passive orientation. Immobilized Euglena and Paramecium cells could not be levitated even in the highest available magnetic field gradient as sedimentation persisted with little impact of the field on the sedimentation velocities. We conclude that magnetic fields are not suited as a microgravity simulation for gravitactic unicellular organisms due to the strong effect of the magnetic field itself, which masks the effects known from experiments in real microgravity. Key Words: Levitation—Microgravity—Gravitaxis—Gravikinesis—Gravity. Astrobiology 14, 205–215. PMID:24621307

  17. Impact of a high magnetic field on the orientation of gravitactic unicellular organisms--a critical consideration about the application of magnetic fields to mimic functional weightlessness.

    PubMed

    Hemmersbach, Ruth; Simon, Anja; Waßer, Kai; Hauslage, Jens; Christianen, Peter C M; Albers, Peter W; Lebert, Michael; Richter, Peter; Alt, Wolfgang; Anken, Ralf

    2014-03-01

    The gravity-dependent behavior of Paramecium biaurelia and Euglena gracilis have previously been studied on ground and in real microgravity. To validate whether high magnetic field exposure indeed provides a ground-based facility to mimic functional weightlessness, as has been suggested earlier, both cell types were observed during exposure in a strong homogeneous magnetic field (up to 30 T) and a strong magnetic field gradient. While swimming, Paramecium cells were aligned along the magnetic field lines; orientation of Euglena was perpendicular, demonstrating that the magnetic field determines the orientation and thus prevents the organisms from the random swimming known to occur in real microgravity. Exposing Astasia longa, a flagellate that is closely related to Euglena but lacks chloroplasts and the photoreceptor, as well as the chloroplast-free mutant E. gracilis 1F, to a high magnetic field revealed no reorientation to the perpendicular direction as in the case of wild-type E. gracilis, indicating the existence of an anisotropic structure (chloroplasts) that determines the direction of passive orientation. Immobilized Euglena and Paramecium cells could not be levitated even in the highest available magnetic field gradient as sedimentation persisted with little impact of the field on the sedimentation velocities. We conclude that magnetic fields are not suited as a microgravity simulation for gravitactic unicellular organisms due to the strong effect of the magnetic field itself, which masks the effects known from experiments in real microgravity. PMID:24621307

  18. A New Adaptive Diffusive Function for Magnetic Resonance Imaging Denoising Based on Pixel Similarity

    PubMed Central

    Heydari, Mostafa; Karami, Mohammad Reza

    2015-01-01

    Although there are many methods for image denoising, but partial differential equation (PDE) based denoising attracted much attention in the field of medical image processing such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The main advantage of PDE-based denoising approach is laid in its ability to smooth image in a nonlinear way, which effectively removes the noise, as well as preserving edge through anisotropic diffusion controlled by the diffusive function. This function was first introduced by Perona and Malik (P-M) in their model. They proposed two functions that are most frequently used in PDE-based methods. Since these functions consider only the gradient information of a diffused pixel, they cannot remove noise in noisy images with low signal-to-noise (SNR). In this paper we propose a modified diffusive function with fractional power that is based on pixel similarity to improve P-M model for low SNR. We also will show that our proposed function will stabilize the P-M method. As experimental results show, our proposed function that is modified version of P-M function effectively improves the SNR and preserves edges more than P-M functions in low SNR. PMID:26955563

  19. Prediction of d^0 magnetism in self-interaction corrected density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das Pemmaraju, Chaitanya

    2010-03-01

    Over the past couple of years, the phenomenon of ``d^0 magnetism'' has greatly intrigued the magnetism community [1]. Unlike conventional magnetic materials, ``d^0 magnets'' lack any magnetic ions with open d or f shells but surprisingly, exhibit signatures of ferromagnetism often with a Curie temperature exceeding 300 K. Current research in the field is geared towards trying to understand the mechanism underlying this observed ferromagnetism which is difficult to explain within the conventional m-J paradigm [1]. The most widely studied class of d^0 materials are un-doped and light element doped wide gap Oxides such as HfO2, MgO, ZnO, TiO2 all of which have been put forward as possible d0 ferromagnets. General experimental trends suggest that the magnetism is a feature of highly defective samples leading to the expectation that the phenomenon must be defect related. In particular, based on density functional theory (DFT) calculations acceptor defects formed from the O-2p states in these Oxides have been proposed as being responsible for the ferromagnetism [2,3]. However. predicting magnetism originating from 2p orbitals is a delicate problem, which depends on the subtle interplay between covalency and Hund's coupling. DFT calculations based on semi-local functionals such as the local spin-density approximation (LSDA) can lead to qualitative failures on several fronts. On one hand the excessive delocalization of spin-polarized holes leads to half-metallic ground states and the expectation of room-temperature ferromagnetism. On the other hand, in some cases a magnetic ground state may not be predicted at all as the Hund's coupling might be under estimated. Furthermore, polaronic distortions which are often a feature of acceptor defects in Oxides are not predicted [4,5]. In this presentation, we argue that the self interaction error (SIE) inherent to semi-local functionals is responsible for the failures of LSDA and demonstrate through various examples that beyond

  20. Acute Acquired Concomitant Esotropia

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jingchang; Deng, Daming; Sun, Yuan; Shen, Tao; Cao, Guobin; Yan, Jianhua; Chen, Qiwen; Ye, Xuelian

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Acute acquired concomitant esotropia (AACE) is a rare, distinct subtype of esotropia. The purpose of this retrospective study was to describe the clinical characteristics and discuss the classification and etiology of AACE. Charts from 47 patients with AACE referred to our institute between October 2010 and November 2014 were reviewed. All participants underwent a complete medical history, ophthalmologic and orthoptic examinations, and brain and orbital imaging. Mean age at onset was 26.6 ± 12.2 years. Of the 18 cases with deviations ≤ 20 PD, 16 presented with diplopia at distance and fusion at near vision at the onset of deviation; differences between distance and near deviations were < 8 PD; all cases except one were treated with prism and diplopia resolved. Of the 29 cases with deviations > 20 PD, 5 were mild hypermetropic with age at onset between 5 and 19 years, 16 were myopic, and 8 were emmetropic with age at onset > 12 years; 24 were surgically treated and 5 cases remained under observation; all 24 cases achieved normal retinal correspondence or fusion or stereopsis on postoperative day 1 in synoptophore; in 23 cases diplopia or visual confusion resolved postoperatively. Of the 47 cases, brain and orbital imaging in 2 cases revealed a tumor in the cerebellopontine angle and 1 case involved spinocerebellar ataxia as revealed by genetic testing. AACE in this study was characterized by a sudden onset of concomitant nonaccommodative esotropia with diplopia or visual confusion at 5 years of age or older and the potential for normal binocular vision. We suggest that AACE can be divided into 2 subgroups consisting of patients with relatively small versus large angle deviations. Coexisting or underlying neurological diseases were infrequent in AACE. PMID:26705210

  1. Functionalized magnetic mesoporous silica nanoparticles for U removal from low and high pH groundwater.

    PubMed

    Li, Dien; Egodawatte, Shani; Kaplan, Daniel I; Larsen, Sarah C; Serkiz, Steven M; Seaman, John C

    2016-11-01

    U(VI) species display limited adsorption onto sediment minerals and synthetic sorbents in pH <4 or pH >8 groundwater. In this work, magnetic mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MMSNs) with magnetite nanoparticle cores were functionalized with various organic molecules using post-synthetic methods. The functionalized MMSNs were characterized using N2 adsorption-desorption isotherms, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), (13)C cross polarization and magic angle spinning (CPMAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, and powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), which indicated that mesoporous silica (MCM-41) particles of 100-200nm formed around a core of magnetic iron oxide, and the functional groups were primarily grafted into the mesopores of ∼3.0nm in size. The functionalized MMSNs were effective for U removal from pH 3.5 and 9.6 artificial groundwater (AGW). Functionalized MMSNs removed U from the pH 3.5 AGW by as much as 6 orders of magnitude more than unfunctionalized nanoparticles or silica and had adsorption capacities as high as 38mg/g. They removed U from the pH 9.6 AGW as much as 4 orders of magnitude greater than silica and 2 orders of magnitude greater than the unfunctionalized nanoparticles with adsorption capacities as high as 133mg/g. These results provide an applied solution for treating U contamination that occurs at extreme pH environments and a scientific foundation for solving critical industrial issues related to environmental stewardship and nuclear power production. PMID:27341378

  2. Removal of total organic carbon from sewage wastewater using poly(ethylenimine)-functionalized magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Lakshmanan, Ramnath; Sanchez-Dominguez, Margarita; Matutes-Aquino, Jose A; Wennmalm, Stefan; Kuttuva Rajarao, Gunaratna

    2014-02-01

    The increased levels of organic carbon in sewage wastewater during recent years impose a great challenge to the existing wastewater treatment process (WWTP). Technological innovations are therefore sought that can reduce the release of organic carbon into lakes and seas. In the present study, magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) were synthesized, functionalized with poly(ethylenimine) (PEI), and characterized using TEM (transmission electron microscopy), X-ray diffraction (XRD), FTIR (Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy), CCS (confocal correlation spectroscopy), SICS (scattering interference correlation spectroscopy), magnetism studies, and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The removal of total organic carbon (TOC) and other contaminants using PEI-coated magnetic nanoparticles (PEI-NPs) was tested in wastewater obtained from the Hammarby Sjöstadsverk sewage plant, Sweden. The synthesized NPs were about 12 nm in diameter and showed a homogeneous particle size distribution in dispersion by TEM and CCS analyses, respectively. The magnetization curve reveals superparamagnetic behavior, and the NPs do not reach saturation because of surface anisotropy effects. A 50% reduction in TOC was obtained in 60 min when using 20 mg/L PEI-NPs in 0.5 L of wastewater. Along with TOC, other contaminants such as turbidity (89%), color (86%), total nitrogen (24%), and microbial content (90%) were also removed without significant changes in the mineral ion composition of wastewater. We conclude that the application of PEI-NPs has the potential to reduce the processing time, complexity, sludge production, and use of additional chemicals in the WWTP. PMID:24428551

  3. Functionalized magnetic carbonaceous microspheres for trypsin immobilization and the application to fast proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Yao, Guoping; Qi, Dawei; Deng, Chunhui; Zhang, Xiangmin

    2008-12-26

    In this study, magnetic carbonaceous (MC) microspheres prepared with a large-scale synthesis approach were developed as the novel substrate for enzyme immobilization, and the trypsin-immobilized MC microspheres were successfully applied to protein fast digestion. Firstly, MC microspheres with small size, strong magnetism, and biological compatibility were prepared through two-step solvothermal reactions. Secondly, MC microsphere surface was modified by 3-glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane (GLYMO). Finally, the enzyme was immobilized on the GLYMO-functionalized MC microspheres. The enzyme-immobilized magnetic microspheres were applied for fast protein digestion with microwave-assistance. Bovine serum albumin, myoglobin and cytochrome c, were used as model proteins to verify the digestion efficiency, and the digestion products were then characterized using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) with sequence coverage of 43%, 90% and 77%, respectively. The enzyme-immobilized magnetic particles were also successfully applied to the analysis of human pituitary extract. After database search, 485 proteins (p<0.01) were identified when the extract was digested by the microspheres. This opens a route for its future application in bottom-up proteomic analysis. PMID:19026420

  4. Localized crustal magnetic field inversion using inner- and outer-source altitude vector Slepian functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plattner, A.; Simons, F. J.

    2015-12-01

    When inverting for a planetary magnetic potential from vector-valued satellite magnetic field data we need to take into account that the recorded data also contain fields not stemming from the planet but from outer sources in space. In classical global spherical-harmonic analysis this is done by fitting, in addition to the inner sources potential field, a linear combination of outer-source spherical harmonics to the data. This approach has been successfully applied to data with global homogeneous coverage and quality but is not suited for purely regional data. In many situations a local method would be beneficial to take full advantage of data with regionally varying quality or coverage, or to avoid ringing artifacts from sharp intensity contrasts. Here we present a local method that allows such a magnetic source separation. We simultaneously create inner-source and outer-source altitude vector Slepian functions by solving an optimization problem that considers the satellite altitude, the upper radial limit of the satellite trajectory, and the maximum spherical-harmonic degree we want to resolve. This new dual-source altitude vector Slepian system allows to invert for both inner-source and outer-source magnetic potential fields from regional data in a computationally efficient manner, as we show with a series of examples for Earth, the Moon, and terrestrial planets.

  5. 16 CFR 801.2 - Acquiring and acquired persons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... confer control of X and therefore will file as an acquiring person. Because A held the plant prior to the... within two persons, “A” and “B.” Under this section, if V is to acquire corporation X, both “A” and “B... person. Examples: 1. Assume that person “Q” will acquire voting securities of corporation X held by...

  6. 16 CFR 801.2 - Acquiring and acquired persons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... confer control of X and therefore will file as an acquiring person. Because A held the plant prior to the... within two persons, “A” and “B.” Under this section, if V is to acquire corporation X, both “A” and “B... person. Examples: 1. Assume that person “Q” will acquire voting securities of corporation X held by...

  7. Arrangement for measuring the field angle of a magnetic field as a function of axial position within a magnet bore tube

    DOEpatents

    Pidcoe, Stephen V.; Zink, Roger A.; Boroski, William N.; McCaw, William R.

    1993-01-01

    An arrangement for measuring the field angle of a magnetic field as a function of axial position within a magnet bore tube of a magnet such as is used with the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC). The arrangement includes a magnetic field alignment gauge that is carried through the magnet bore tube by a positioning shuttle in predetermined increments. The positioning shuttle includes an extensible body assembly which is actuated by an internal piston arrangement. A pair of spaced inflatable cuffs are carried by the body assembly and are selectively actuated in cooperation with pressurizing of the piston to selectively drive the positioning shuttle in an axial direction. Control of the shuttle is provided by programmed electronic computer means located exteriorly of the bore tube and which controls valves provided pressurized fluid to the inflatable cuss and the piston arrangement.

  8. Exact transfer functions for the PEP storage ring magnets and some general characteristics and techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, J.E.

    1982-05-01

    The exact, ion-optical transfer functions for the dipoles, quadrupoles and sextupoles of the PEP standard PODC cell are calculated for any single particle with initial coordinates (r, p, s). Modifications resulting from radiative energy loss are also calculated and discussed. These functions allow one to characterize individual magnets or classes of magnets by their aberrations and thereby simplify their study and correction. In contrast to high-energy spectrometers where aberrations are often analyzed away, those in storage rings drive series of high order resonances, even for perfect magnets (2), that can produce stop bands and other effects which can seriously limit performance. Thus, one would like to eliminate them altogether or failing this to develop local and global correction schemes. Even then, one should expect higher order effects to influence injection, extraction or single-pass systems either because of orbit distortions or overly large phase spece distortions such as may occur in low-beta insertions or any final-focus optics. The term exact means that the results here are based on solving the relativistic Lorentz force equation with accurate representations of measured magnetostatic fields. Such fields satisfy Maxwell's equations and are the actual fields seen by a particle as it propagates around a real storage ring. This is discussed in detail and illustrated with examples that show that this is possible, practical and may even be useful.

  9. An engineered glove for investigating the neural correlates of finger movements using functional magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Bonzano, Laura; Tacchino, Andrea; Roccatagliata, Luca; Inglese, Matilde; Mancardi, Giovanni Luigi; Novellino, Antonio; Bove, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Objective measurement of concomitant finger motor performance is recommended for functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies investigating brain activity during finger tapping tasks, because performance modality and ability can influence the selection of different neural networks. In this study, we present a novel glove system for quantitative evaluation of finger opposition movements during fMRI (called Glove Analyzer for fMRI, GAF). Several tests for magnetic resonance (MR) compatibility were performed concerning magnet forces, image artifacts and right functioning of the system. Then, pilot fMRI of finger opposition tasks were conducted at 1.5T and 3T to investigate the neural correlates of sequences of finger opposition movements with the right hand, with simultaneous behavioral recording by means of GAF. All the MR compatibility tests succeeded, and the fMRI analysis revealed mainly the activation of the left sensorimotor areas and right cerebellum, regions that are known to be involved in finger movements. No artifactual clusters were detected in the activation maps. At the same time, through the parameters calculated by GAF it was possible to describe the sensorimotor strategy adopted by the subjects during the required task. Thus, the proposed device resulted to be MR compatible and can be useful for future fMRI studies investigating the neural correlates of finger opposition movements, allowing follow-up studies and comparisons among different groups of patients. PMID:26441600

  10. Recent advances in surface chemistry strategies for the fabrication of functional iron oxide based magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turcheniuk, Kostiantyn; Tarasevych, Arkadii V.; Kukhar, Valeriy P.; Boukherroub, Rabah; Szunerits, Sabine

    2013-10-01

    The synthesis of superparamagnetic nanostructures, especially iron-oxide based nanoparticles (IONPs), with appropriate surface functional groups has been intensively researched for many high-technological applications, including high density data storage, biosensing and biomedicine. In medicine, IONPs are nowadays widely used as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), in hyperthermia therapy, but are also exploited for drug and gene delivery, detoxification of biological fluids or immunoassays, as they are relatively non-toxic. The use of magnetic particles in vivo requires IONPs to have high magnetization values, diameters below 100 nm with overall narrow size distribution and long time stability in biological fluids. Due to the high surface energies of IONPs agglomeration over time is often encountered. It is thus of prime importance to modify their surface to prevent aggregation and to limit non-specific adsorption of biomolecules onto their surface. Such chemical modifications result in IONPs being well-dispersed and biocompatible, and allow for targeted delivery and specific interactions. The chemical nature of IONPs thus determines not only the overall size of the colloid, but also plays a significant role for in vivo and in vitro applications. This review discusses the different concepts currently used for the surface functionalization and coating of iron oxide nanoparticles. The diverse strategies for the covalent linking of drugs, proteins, enzymes, antibodies, and nucleotides will be discussed and the chemically relevant steps will be explained in detail.

  11. Succinate Functionalization of Hyperbranched Polyglycerol-Coated Magnetic Nanoparticles as a Draw Solute During Forward Osmosis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hee-Man; Choi, Hye Min; Jang, Sung-Chan; Han, Myeong Jin; Seo, Bum-Kyoung; Moon, Jei-Kwon; Lee, Kune-Woo

    2015-10-01

    Hyperbranched polyglycerol-coated magnetic nanoparticles (SHPG-MNPs) were functionalized with succinate groups to form a draw solute for use in a forward osmosis (FO). After the one-step synthesis of hyperbranched polyglycerol-coated magnetic nanoparticles (HPG-MNPs), the polyglycerol groups on the surfaces of the HPG-MNPs were functionalized with succinic anhydride moieties. The resulting SHPG-MNPs showed no change of size and magnetic property compared with HPG-MNPs and displayed excellent dispersibility in water up to the concentration of 400 g/L. SHPG-MNPs solution showed higher osmotic pressure than that of HPG-MNPs solution due to the presence of surface carboxyl groups in SHPG-MNPs and could draw water from a feed solution across an FO membrane without any reverse draw solute leakage during FO process. Moreover, the water flux remained nearly constant over several SHPG-MNP darw solute regeneration cycles applied to the ultrafiltration (UF) process. The SHPG-MNPs demonstrate strong potential for use as a draw solute in FO processes. PMID:26726503

  12. MULTIPASS MUON RLA RETURN ARCS BASED ON LINEAR COMBINED-FUNCTION MAGNETS

    SciTech Connect

    Vasiliy Morozov, Alex Bogacz, Yves Roblin, Kevin Beard

    2011-09-01

    Recirculating Linear Accelerators (RLA) are an efficient way of accelerating short-lived muons to the multi-GeV energies required for Neutrino Factories and TeV energies required for Muon Colliders. In this paper we present a design of a two-pass RLA return arc based on linear combined function magnets, in which both charge muons with momenta different by a factor of two are transported through the same string of magnets. The arc is composed of 60{sup o}-bending symmetric super cells allowing for a simple arc geometry closing. By adjusting the dipole and quadrupole components of the combined-function magnets, each super cell is designed to be achromatic and to have zero initial and final periodic orbit offsets for both muon momenta. Such a design provides a greater compactness than, for instance, an FFAG lattice with its regular alternating bends and is expected to possess a large dynamic aperture characteristic of linear-field lattices.

  13. Highly Stable Amine Functionalized Iron Oxide Nanoparticles Designed for Magnetic Particle Imaging (MPI)

    PubMed Central

    Arami, Hamed; Krishnan, Kannan M.

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic particle imaging (MPI) is a promising medical imaging technology that uses iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs) as clinically safe tracers. The core and hydrodynamic size of these NPs determine the signal intensity and spatial resolution in MPI, whilst their monodispersity when preserved during the biomedical applications, generates a consistently high quality MPI image. Using an effective process to coat the synthesized NPs with amine terminated PEG molecules, we show by dynamic light scattering (DLS) that they are water-soluble with long-term stability in biological media such as phosphate buffered saline (PBS) and sodium bicarbonate buffers and Dulbecco’s modified Eagle medium (DMEM) enriched with 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS). Further, using magnetic particle spectroscopy (MPS), to measure the particle response function (PRF), defined as the derivative of the magnetization of the nanoparticles, we predict the MPI performance of these nanoparticles at a driving field frequency of 25 kHz. The MPS efficacy of the functionalized nanoparticles was also monitored over time, and both signal intensity and resolution remained unchanged even after seven days of incubation. This is attributed to the dominant contribution of the Néel relaxation mechanism of the monodisperse and highly stable nanoparticles, which was preserved through the incubation period. PMID:25554710

  14. An engineered glove for investigating the neural correlates of finger movements using functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Bonzano, Laura; Tacchino, Andrea; Roccatagliata, Luca; Inglese, Matilde; Mancardi, Giovanni Luigi; Novellino, Antonio; Bove, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Objective measurement of concomitant finger motor performance is recommended for functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies investigating brain activity during finger tapping tasks, because performance modality and ability can influence the selection of different neural networks. In this study, we present a novel glove system for quantitative evaluation of finger opposition movements during fMRI (called Glove Analyzer for fMRI, GAF). Several tests for magnetic resonance (MR) compatibility were performed concerning magnet forces, image artifacts and right functioning of the system. Then, pilot fMRI of finger opposition tasks were conducted at 1.5T and 3T to investigate the neural correlates of sequences of finger opposition movements with the right hand, with simultaneous behavioral recording by means of GAF. All the MR compatibility tests succeeded, and the fMRI analysis revealed mainly the activation of the left sensorimotor areas and right cerebellum, regions that are known to be involved in finger movements. No artifactual clusters were detected in the activation maps. At the same time, through the parameters calculated by GAF it was possible to describe the sensorimotor strategy adopted by the subjects during the required task. Thus, the proposed device resulted to be MR compatible and can be useful for future fMRI studies investigating the neural correlates of finger opposition movements, allowing follow-up studies and comparisons among different groups of patients. PMID:26441600

  15. Density-functional-theory calculations of matter in strong magnetic fields. I. Atoms and molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Medin, Zach; Lai Dong

    2006-12-15

    We present calculations of the electronic structure of various atoms and molecules in strong magnetic fields ranging from B=10{sup 12} G to 2x10{sup 15} G, appropriate for radio pulsars and magnetars. For these field strengths, the magnetic forces on the electrons dominate over the Coulomb forces, and to a good approximation the electrons are confined to the ground Landau level. Our calculations are based on the density functional theory, and use a local magnetic exchange-correlation function which is tested to be reliable in the strong field regime. Numerical results of the ground-state energies are given for H{sub N} (up to N=10), He{sub N} (up to N=8), C{sub N} (up to N=5), and Fe{sub N} (up to N=3), as well as for various ionized atoms. Fitting formulae for the B dependence of the energies are also given. In general, as N increases, the binding energy per atom in a molecule, vertical bar E{sub N}|/N, increases and approaches a constant value. For all the field strengths considered in this paper, hydrogen, helium, and carbon molecules are found to be bound relative to individual atoms (although for B less than a few x10{sup 12} G, carbon molecules are very weakly bound relative to individual atoms). Iron molecules are not bound at B < or approx. 10{sup 13} G, but become energetically more favorable than individual atoms at larger field strengths.

  16. SiN-SiC nanofilm: A nano-functional ceramic with bipolar magnetic semiconducting character

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jiahui; Li, Xingxing; Yang, Jinlong

    2014-04-28

    Nowadays, functional ceramics have been largely explored for application in various fields. However, magnetic functional ceramics for spintronics remain little studied. Here, we propose a nano-functional ceramic of sphalerite SiN-SiC nanofilm with intrinsic ferromagnetic order. Based on first principles calculations, the SiN-SiC nanofilm is found to be a ferromagnetic semiconductor with an indirect band gap of 1.71 eV. By mean field theory, the Curie temperature is estimated to be 304 K, close to room temperature. Furthermore, the valence band and conduction band states of the nanofilm exhibit inverse spin-polarization around the Fermi level. Thus, the SiN-SiC nanofilm is a typical bipolar magnetic semiconductor in which completely spin-polarized currents with reversible spin polarization can be created and controlled by applying a gate voltage. Such a nano-functional ceramic provides a possible route for electrical manipulation of carrier's spin orientation.

  17. Group Treatment in Acquired Brain Injury Rehabilitation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bertisch, Hilary; Rath, Joseph F.; Langenbahn, Donna M.; Sherr, Rose Lynn; Diller, Leonard

    2011-01-01

    The current article describes critical issues in adapting traditional group-treatment methods for working with individuals with reduced cognitive capacity secondary to acquired brain injury. Using the classification system based on functional ability developed at the NYU Rusk Institute of Rehabilitation Medicine (RIRM), we delineate the cognitive…

  18. Electronic and magnetic properties of silicon supported organometallic molecular wires: a density functional theory (DFT) study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xia; Tan, Yingzi; Li, Xiuling; Wu, Xiaojun; Pei, Yong

    2015-08-01

    The electronic and magnetic properties of transition metal (TM = Sc, Ti, V, Cr and Mn) atom incorporated single and double one-dimensional (1D) styrene molecular wires confined on the hydrogen-terminated Si(100) surface are explored for the first time by means of spin-polarized density functional theory, denoted as Si-[TM(styrene)]. It is unveiled that TM atoms bind asymmetrically to the adjacent phenyl rings, which leads to novel electronic and magnetic properties in stark contrast to the well-studied gas phase TM-benzene molecular wires. Si-[Mn(styrene)]∞ and Si-[Cr(styrene)]∞ single molecular wires (SMWs) are a ferromagnetic semiconductor and half metal, respectively. Creation of H-atom defects on the silicon surface can introduce an impurity metallic band, which leads to novel half-metallic magnetism of a Si-[Mn(styrene)]∞ system. Moreover, double molecular wires (DMWs) containing two identical or hetero SMWs are theoretically designed. The [Mn(styrene)]∞-[Cr(styrene)]∞ DMW exhibits half-metallic magnetism where the spin-up and spin-down channels are contributed by two single molecular wires. Finally, we demonstrate that introducing a TM-defect may significantly affect the electronic structure and magnetic properties of molecular wires. These studies provide new insights into the structure and properties of surface supported 1-D sandwiched molecular wires and may inspire the future experimental synthesis of substrate confined organometallic sandwiched molecular wires.The electronic and magnetic properties of transition metal (TM = Sc, Ti, V, Cr and Mn) atom incorporated single and double one-dimensional (1D) styrene molecular wires confined on the hydrogen-terminated Si(100) surface are explored for the first time by means of spin-polarized density functional theory, denoted as Si-[TM(styrene)]. It is unveiled that TM atoms bind asymmetrically to the adjacent phenyl rings, which leads to novel electronic and magnetic properties in stark contrast to

  19. Electronic and magnetic properties of yttrium-doped silicon carbide nanotubes: Density functional theory investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Khaira, Jobanpreet S.; Jain, Richa N.; Chakraborty, Brahmananda; Ramaniah, Lavanya M.

    2015-06-24

    The electronic structure of yttrium-doped Silicon Carbide Nanotubes has been theoretically investigated using first principles density functional theory (DFT). Yttrium atom is bonded strongly on the surface of the nanotube with a binding energy of 2.37 eV and prefers to stay on the hollow site at a distance of around 2.25 Å from the tube. The semi-conducting nanotube with chirality (4, 4) becomes half mettalic with a magnetic moment of 1.0 µ{sub B} due to influence of Y atom on the surface. There is strong hybridization between d orbital of Y with p orbital of Si and C causing a charge transfer from d orbital of the Y atom to the tube. The Fermi level is shifted towards higher energy with finite Density of States for only upspin channel making the system half metallic and magnetic which may have application in spintronic devices.

  20. Collective magnetic behavior of biocompatible systems of maghemite particles coated with functional polymer shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demchenko, P.; Nedelko, N.; Mitina, N.; Lewińska, S.; Dłużewski, P.; Greneche, J. M.; Ubizskii, S.; Navrotskyi, S.; Zaichenko, A.; Ślawska-Waniewska, A.

    2015-04-01

    Three series of core-shell maghemite nanoparticles were prepared by a template synthesis using surface active oligoperoxides and further surface initiated grafting functional polymers, forming shell suitable for biomedical applications. Because the polymer shells prevent exchange coupling between maghemite particles, the overall magnetic properties of the samples studied are dominated by dipolar interparticle interactions. Only the sample with the highest polymer fraction displays superparamagnetic relaxation phenomena close to the room temperature. On cooling, the magnetostatic interactions lead to a disordered collective magnetic state that should be described in terms of a spin-glass phenomenology. This collective freezing cannot however be considered as a generic spin-glass phase transition at a well-defined temperature but rather as freezing to a metastable glass-like state of locally correlated structural domains (clusters) without a long-range order. A quasi static spin ordering is only achieved at temperatures much below the freezing temperature.

  1. Electronic and magnetic properties of substituted BN sheets: A density functional theory study

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Yungang; Yang, Ping; Wang, Zhiguo; Zu, Xiaotao T.; Xiao, Hai Yan; Sun, Xin; Khaleel, Mohammad A.; Gao, Fei

    2011-04-15

    Using density functional calculations, we investigate the geometries, electronic structures and magnetic properties of hexagonal BN sheets with 3d transition metal (TM) and nonmetal atoms embedded in three types of vacancies: VB, VN, and VB+N. We show that some embedded configurations, except TM atoms in VN vacancy, are stable in BN sheet and yield interesting phenomena. For instance, the band gaps and magnetic moments of BN sheet can be tuned depending on the embedded dopant species and vacancy type. In particular, embedment such as Cr in VB+N, Co in VB, and Ni in VB leads to half-metallic BN sheets interesting for spin filter applications. From the investigation of Mn-chain (CMn) embedments, a regular 1D structure can be formed in BN sheet as an electron waveguide, a metal nanometer wire with a single atom thickness.

  2. Physiological basis and image processing in functional magnetic resonance imaging: Neuronal and motor activity in brain

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Rakesh; Sharma, Avdhesh

    2004-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is recently developing as imaging modality used for mapping hemodynamics of neuronal and motor event related tissue blood oxygen level dependence (BOLD) in terms of brain activation. Image processing is performed by segmentation and registration methods. Segmentation algorithms provide brain surface-based analysis, automated anatomical labeling of cortical fields in magnetic resonance data sets based on oxygen metabolic state. Registration algorithms provide geometric features using two or more imaging modalities to assure clinically useful neuronal and motor information of brain activation. This review article summarizes the physiological basis of fMRI signal, its origin, contrast enhancement, physical factors, anatomical labeling by segmentation, registration approaches with examples of visual and motor activity in brain. Latest developments are reviewed for clinical applications of fMRI along with other different neurophysiological and imaging modalities. PMID:15125779

  3. Removal of aqueous uranyl ions by magnetic functionalized carboxymethylcellulose and adsorption property investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yangyang; Yuan, Yali; Ma, Dandan; Li, Le; Li, Yuhui; Xu, Wenhui; Tao, Wei

    2014-10-01

    Magnetic carboxymethylcellulose (CMC/Fe3O4) was used as a framework adsorption material to remove uranium ions from aqueous solutions. Carboxyl functional groups were grafted onto the CMC/Fe3O4. The maximum adsorption capacity of the magnetic composite toward U(VI) was 122.48 mg/g. Kinetic and thermodynamic parameters of the adsorption process were estimated. The pseudo-second-order model was more suitable and it proved to be an endothermic and spontaneous process. The Langmuir and Freundlich models were applied to evaluate the adsorption isotherm. The data matched well with Langmuir model after equilibrium was reached and with Freundlich model before equilibrium was reached.

  4. Rapid and selective separation for mixed proteins with thiol functionalized magnetic nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Thiol group functionalized silica-coated magnetic nanoparticles (Si-MNPs@SH) were synthesized for rapid and selective magnetic field-based separation of mixed proteins. The highest adsorption efficiencies of binary proteins, bovine serum albumin (BSA; 66 kDa; pI = 4.65) and lysozyme (LYZ; 14.3 kDa; pI = 11) were shown at the pH values corresponding to their own pI in the single-component protein. In the mixed protein, however, the adsorption performance of BSA and LYZ by Si-MNPs@SH was governed not only by pH but also by the molecular weight of each protein in the mixed protein. PMID:22650609

  5. Development of Magnetic Resonance-based Functional Imaging: The Past, the Present, and the Future.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Ken-Ichiro

    2016-01-01

    The term "theranostics" is a compound word combining "therapeutics" and "diagnostics". Discovery of the X-ray made an extraordinary contribution to the field of medical science. Development of computer science after World War II has been absolutely imperative for the development of medical imaging technology to date. The invention of X-ray computed tomography (CT) has revolutionized medical image diagnostic systems. Several functional imaging modalities emerged not only in the radiological field but also in magnetic resonance and ultrasonic fields. The fusion of three digital imaging techniques, MR Redox imaging, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) oxygen mapping, and hyperpolarized (13)C MRI techniques in the magnetic resonance field, contribute to the newly-termed theranostics. Future development of a suitable contrast agent for each imaging modality will be a key for the success of theranositics. PMID:27477720

  6. Electronic and magnetic properties of yttrium-doped silicon carbide nanotubes: Density functional theory investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaira, Jobanpreet S.; Jain, Richa N.; Chakraborty, Brahmananda; Ramaniah, Lavanya M.

    2015-06-01

    The electronic structure of yttrium-doped Silicon Carbide Nanotubes has been theoretically investigated using first principles density functional theory (DFT). Yttrium atom is bonded strongly on the surface of the nanotube with a binding energy of 2.37 eV and prefers to stay on the hollow site at a distance of around 2.25 Å from the tube. The semi-conducting nanotube with chirality (4, 4) becomes half mettalic with a magnetic moment of 1.0 µB due to influence of Y atom on the surface. There is strong hybridization between d orbital of Y with p orbital of Si and C causing a charge transfer from d orbital of the Y atom to the tube. The Fermi level is shifted towards higher energy with finite Density of States for only upspin channel making the system half metallic and magnetic which may have application in spintronic devices.

  7. Effect of propofol on the medial temporal lobe emotional memory system: a functional magnetic resonance imaging study in human subjects

    PubMed Central

    Pryor, K. O.; Root, J. C.; Mehta, M.; Stern, E.; Pan, H.; Veselis, R. A.; Silbersweig, D. A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Subclinical doses of propofol produce anterograde amnesia, characterized by an early failure of memory consolidation. It is unknown how propofol affects the amygdala-dependent emotional memory system, which modulates consolidation in the hippocampus in response to emotional arousal and neurohumoral stress. We present an event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging study of the effects of propofol on the emotional memory system in human subjects. Methods Thirty-five healthy subjects were randomized to receive propofol, at an estimated brain concentration of 0.90 μg ml−1, or placebo. During drug infusion, emotionally arousing and neutral images were presented in a continuous recognition task, while blood-oxygen-level-dependent activation responses were acquired. After a drug-free interval of 2 h, subsequent memory for successfully encoded items was assessed. Imaging analysis was performed using statistical parametric mapping and behavioural analysis using signal detection models. Results Propofol had no effect on the stereotypical amygdalar response to emotional arousal, but caused marked suppression of the hippocampal response. Propofol caused memory performance to become uncoupled from amygdalar activation, but it remained correlated with activation in the posterior hippocampus, which decreased in proportion to amnesia. Conclusions Propofol is relatively ineffective at suppressing amygdalar activation at sedative doses, but abolishes emotional modulation and causes amnesia via mechanisms that commonly involve hyporesponsiveness of the hippocampus. These findings raise the possibility that amygdala-dependent fear systems may remain intact even when a patient has diminished memory of events. This may be of clinical importance in the perioperative development of fear-based psychopathologies, such as post-traumatic stress disorder. Clinical trial registration NCT00504894. PMID:26174294

  8. A multi-nuclear magnetic resonance and density functional theory investigation of epitaxially grown InGaP2.

    PubMed

    Knijn, P J; van Bentum, P J M; Fang, C M; Bauhuis, G J; de Wijs, G A; Kentgens, A P M

    2016-08-01

    In this paper the short and long range order in In0.483Ga0.517P thin films is investigated by solid-state Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. To this end two samples were grown on a GaAs substrate by metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy at two different growth-pressures. From band gap energy measurements, CuPt long range order parameters of SCuPt = 0.22 and 0.39 were deduced, respectively. In the (31)P spectrum five resonances are observed corresponding to the five possible P(GanIn4-n), n = 0-4, coordinations whose relative intensities correspond to the order in the material, but the intensity variations for order parameters between 0 and 0.5 are minimal. (69)Ga, (71)Ga and (115)In (MQ)MAS spectra were acquired to analyze the quadrupolar and chemical shift distributions related to the (dis)order in these materials in more detail. All these spectra clearly reflect the disorder in the sample and do not show the presence of highly ordered domains. The difference in the order parameter in the sample is not clearly reflected in the spectra. (31)P chemical shifts were calculated using Density Functional Theory. The experimentally observed shifts are well reproduced with a simple random model of the disorder, thus confirming the assignment of the resonances. The (31)P chemical shifts are very sensitive to changes in the lattice parameter and chemical surroundings. These effects nearly compensate and explain why the (31)P chemical shifts in pure InP and GaP are nearly identical whereas a large difference would be expected based on the observed shift difference for the P[In4] and P[Ga4] coordinations in In0.483Ga0.517P. PMID:27424548

  9. Rapid and specific influenza virus detection by functionalized magnetic nanoparticles and mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The timely and accurate diagnosis of specific influenza virus strains is crucial to effective prophylaxis, vaccine preparation and early antiviral therapy. The detection of influenza A viruses is mainly accomplished using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) techniques or antibody-based assays. In conjugation with the immunoassay utilizing monoclonal antibody, mass spectrometry is an alternative to identify proteins derived from a target influenza virus. Taking advantage of the large surface area-to-volume ratio, antibody-conjugated magnetic nanoparticles can act as an effective probe to extract influenza virus for sodium dodecylsulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and on-bead mass spectrometric analysis. Results Iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles (MNP) were functionalized with H5N2 viral antibodies targeting the hemagglutinin protein and capped with methoxy-terminated ethylene glycol to suppress nonspecific binding. The antibody-conjugated MNPs possessed a high specificity to H5N2 virus without cross-reactivity with recombinant H5N1 viruses. The unambiguous identification of the captured hemagglutinin on magnetic nanoparticles was realized by SDS-PAGE visualization and peptide sequence identification using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Conclusions The assay combining efficient magnetic separation and MALDI-MS readout offers a rapid and sensitive method for virus screening. Direct on-MNP detection by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) provided high sensitivity (~103 EID50 per mL) and a timely diagnosis within one hour. The magnetic nanoparticles encapsulated with monoclonal antibodies could be used as a specific probe to distinguish different subtypes of influenza. PMID:22088100

  10. A portable single-sided magnet system for remote NMR measurements of pulmonary function.

    PubMed

    Dabaghyan, Mikayel; Muradyan, Iga; Hrovat, Alan; Butler, James; Frederick, Eric; Zhou, Feng; Kyriazis, Angelos; Hardin, Charles; Patz, Samuel; Hrovat, Mirko

    2014-12-01

    In this work, we report initial results from a light-weight, low field magnetic resonance device designed to make relative pulmonary density measurements at the bedside. The development of this device necessarily involves special considerations for the magnet, RF and data acquisition schemes as well as a careful analysis of what is needed to provide useful information in the ICU. A homogeneous field region is created remotely from the surface of the magnet such that when the magnet is placed against the chest, an NMR signal is measured from a small volume in the lung. In order to achieve portability, one must trade off field strength and therefore spatial resolution. We report initial measurements from a ping-pong ball size region in the lung as a function of lung volume. As expected, we measured decreased signal at larger lung volumes since lung density decreases with increasing lung volume. Using a CPMG sequence with ΔTE=3.5 ms and a 20 echo train, a signal to noise ratio ~1100 was obtained from an 8.8mT planar magnet after signal averaging for 43 s. This is the first demonstration of NMR measurements made on a human lung with a light-weight planar NMR device. We argue that very low spatial resolution measurements of different lobar lung regions will provide useful diagnostic information for clinicians treating Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome as clinicians want to avoid ventilator pressures that cause either lung over distension (too much pressure) or lung collapse (too little pressure). PMID:24953556

  11. A portable single-sided magnet system for remote NMR measurements of pulmonary function

    PubMed Central

    Mikayel, Dabaghyan; Iga, Muradyan; James, Butler; Eric, Frederick; Feng, Zhou; Angelos, Kyriazis; Charles, Hardin; Samuel, Patz; Mirko, Hrovat

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we report initial results from a light-weight, low field magnetic resonance device designed to make relative pulmonary density measurements at the bedside. The development of this device necessarily involves special considerations for the magnet, RF and data acquisition schemes as well as a careful analysis of what is needed to provide useful information in the ICU. A homogeneous field region is created remotely from the surface of the magnet such that when the magnet is placed against the chest, an NMR signal is measured from a small volume in the lung. In order to achieve portability, one must trade off field strength and therefore spatial resolution. We report initial measurements from a ping-pong ball size region in the lung as a function of lung volume. As expected, we measured decreased signal at larger lung volumes since lung density decreases with increasing lung volume. Using a CPMG sequence with ΔTE=3.5 ms and a 20 echo train, a signal to noise ratio ~1100 was obtained from an 8.8mT planar magnet after signal averaging for 43 s. This is the first demonstration of NMR measurements made on a human lung with a light-weight planar NMR device. We argue that very low spatial resolution measurements of different lobar lung regions will provide useful diagnostic information for clinicians treating Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome as clinicians want to avoid ventilator pressures that cause either lung over distension (too much pressure) or lung collapse (too little pressure). PMID:24953556

  12. Phase transitions, magnetism and surface adsorptions assessed by meta-GGA functionals and random phase approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Bing

    investigated the electronic structures and magnetism of R-VO2 using exchange-correlation functionals of all five rungs on Jacob's ladder. Our calculations show that all semilocal functionals (LSDA, GGAs and meta-GGAs) and hybrid functionals (HSE06) stabilize the spin-polarized states (ferromagnetic and anti-ferromagnetic states) over non-magentic state, which are completely opposite to experimental observation. Suprisingly, LSDA gives the best energetic descriptions for magnetic and non-magnetic phases of R-VO2 among semilocal functionals and HSE06. Othwerwise, RPA calculations are highly dependent on the inputs in the spin polarized case. With PBE inputs, RPA also fails, giving lower energies for spin-polarized states than for the non-magnetic phase. Meawhile, the results are reversed using LSDA inputs. From the computed equilibrium cell volume, we observe the error cancellation in the exchange-correlation hole of most semilocal functionals in the spin-polarized calculations. LSDA and RPA do not fit to this picture. By analyzing the local magnetic moments of vanadium atoms, it is found that the magnetic property predicted from meta-GGA can be related to its exchange enhancement factor. The physisorption of a molecule on a transition metal surface is also another difficult problem in DFT because of the long-range van der Waals interactions. The recently developed MGGA_MS family of density functionals is able to capture a portion of intermediate range dispersion interactions. Therefore, we employed MGGA_MS2 to study the physisorption of CO2 on Pt (111) surface, and the results are compared to those of PBE, PBE+D2 and optB88-vdW methods. The computed binding curves comfirm that that MGGA_MS2 indeed captures the van der Waals interactions near the equilibrium binding distance, and the obtained binding distance is also in good agreement with PBE+D2 and optB88-vdW calculations. By computing the electron density difference map (EDDM), we find that the electron densities of CO2 and

  13. Musical training-induced functional reorganization of the adult brain: functional magnetic resonance imaging and transcranial magnetic stimulation study on amateur string players.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Eog; Shin, Min-Jung; Lee, Kyoung-Min; Chu, Kon; Woo, Sung Ho; Kim, Young Ro; Song, Eun-Cheol; Lee, Jun-Won; Park, Seong-Ho; Roh, Jae-Kyu

    2004-12-01

    We used the combined technique of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to observe changes that occur in adult brains after the practice of stringed musical instruments. We carried out fMRI on eight volunteers (aged 20-22 years): five novices and three individuals who had discontinued practice for more than 5 years. The motor paradigm contained a repetitive lift-abduction/fall-adduction movement of the left/right little finger, carried out with maximum efforts without pacing. The sensory paradigm was to stimulate the same little finger using a string. In parallel to the fMRI acquisition, TMS motor maps for the little finger were obtained using a frameless stereotactic neuronavigation system. After the baseline study, each participant began to learn a stringed instrument. Newly developed fMRI activations for the left little finger were observed 6 months after practice at multiple brain regions including inferior parietal lobule, premotor area (PMA), left precuneus, right anterior superior temporal gyrus, and posterior middle temporal gyrus. In contrast, new activations were rarely observed for the right little finger. The TMS study revealed new motor representation sites for the left little finger in the PMA or supplementary motor area (SMA). Unexpectedly, TMS motor maps for the right little finger were reduced significantly. Among new fMRI activations for sensory stimuli of the left little finger, the cluster of highest activation was located in the SMA. Collectively, these data provide insight into orchestrated reorganization of the sensorimotor and temporal association cortices contributing to the skillful fingering and musical processing after the practice of playing stringed instruments. PMID:15449354

  14. An integrated framework for targeting functional networks via transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Opitz, Alexander; Fox, Michael D; Craddock, R Cameron; Colcombe, Stan; Milham, Michael P

    2016-02-15

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a powerful investigational tool for in vivo manipulation of regional or network activity, with a growing number of potential clinical applications. Unfortunately, the vast majority of targeting strategies remain limited by their reliance on non-realistic brain models and assumptions that anatomo-functional relationships are 1:1. Here, we present an integrated framework that combines anatomically realistic finite element models of the human head with resting functional MRI to predict functional networks targeted via TMS at a given coil location and orientation. Using data from the Human Connectome Project, we provide an example implementation focused on dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). Three distinct DLPFC stimulation zones were identified, differing with respect to the network to be affected (default, frontoparietal) and sensitivity to coil orientation. Network profiles generated for DLPFC targets previously published for treating depression revealed substantial variability across studies, highlighting a potentially critical technical issue. PMID:26608241

  15. Neural Correlates of Symptom Dimensions in Pediatric Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: A Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, Andrew R.; Akkal, Dalila; Almeida, Jorge R. C.; Mataix-Cols, David; Kalas, Catherine; Devlin, Bernie; Birmaher, Boris; Phillips, Mary L.

    2009-01-01

    The use of functional magnetic resonance imaging on a group of pediatric subjects with obsessive compulsive disorder reveals that this group has reduced activity in neural regions underlying emotional processing, cognitive processing, and motor performance as compared to control subjects.

  16. 16 CFR 801.2 - Acquiring and acquired persons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... acquired person is the pre-acquisition ultimate parent entity of the entity. (ii) The value of an... directors of B. A is deemed to be acquiring all of the assets of B as a result. (g) Transfers of patent... transfer of patent rights covered by this paragraph constitutes an asset acquisition; and (3) Patent...

  17. Vectorial Slepian functions and the estimation of the crustal magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plattner, Alain; Simons, Frederik

    2013-04-01

    Within the past two decades increasingly sophisticated magnetometry satellite missions have brought us data of ever improving quality and will reach a new pinnacle with the Swarm satellite mission to be launched in 2013. In order to make optimal use of this rich source of information for the lithospheric structure of Earth, and other planets, the computational algorithms used to obtain the crustal magnetic field from satellite data should be designed to take the specific properties of the data into account (e.g. their bandlimitation, their noise properties, the satellite altitude, their vectorial character). Ideally, the method should also be able to focus on chosen regions, be it as a means of regularization in a specifically targeted investigation or in order to discern between areas of intrinsically different properties of the field, such as for example crustal versus oceanic field. Such a merging of properties can be achieved using Slepian functions, a basis of bandlimited and spatially concentrated functions. The scalar version of Slepian functions has proven to be useful in a wide range of fields including geodesy, gravimetry, geomagnetism, and geodynamics. In order to make use of all three components of the vectorial data set we recently developed vectorial Slepian functions. In this presentation we combine the vectorial Slepian functions with the up- and downward continuation of vector fields to construct a fully vectorial estimation scheme for the regional crustal magnetic field from data at satellite altitude. We test our method with artificial data for different regions and bandlimits and compare different implementations of the method including regional concentration at satellite altitude, regional concentration on Earth's surface, and an estimation scheme employing vectorial Slepian functions that are constructed to ideally incorporate the defocusing effect due to altitude continuation.

  18. Copper Ferrocyanide-Functionalized Magnetic Adsorbents Using Polyethyleneimine Coated Fe3O4 Nanoparticles for the Removal of Radioactive Cesium.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hee-Man; Hong, Sang Bum; Cho, Yong Suk; Lee, Kune-Woo; Seo, Bum-Kyoung; Moon, Jei-Kwon

    2016-03-01

    Copper ferrocyanide-functionalized magnetic nano-adsorbents were successfully synthesized by electrostatic coating of citric acid coated Fe3O4 nanoparticles with polyethyleneimine, and immobilizing copper and ferrocyanide on the surfaces of polyethyleneimine-coated nanoparticles. Radioactive cesium (Cs) adsorption tests were conducted to investigate the effectiveness of the copper ferrocyanide-functionalized magnetic nano-adsorbents toward the removal of radioactive Cs. PMID:27455762

  19. Quantitative comparison of functional magnetic resonance imaging with positron emission tomography using a force-related paradigm.

    PubMed

    Dettmers, C; Connelly, A; Stephan, K M; Turner, R; Friston, K J; Frackowiak, R S; Gadian, D G

    1996-12-01

    The intention of our study was to compare functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) with positron emission tomography (PET). We used the same force-related motor paradigm for both techniques, which allows for quantification of stimulus intensity. Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was determined with PET in six male subjects (age 30 +/- 3) using the slow bolus injection technique and oxygen-15-labeled water. Scans were collected during six different conditions: at rest and during repetitive Morse key press at 1 Hz, with the right index finger at a range of different forces. In a second series of experiments fMRI data were acquired under similar conditions in six volunteers in a single slice parallel to and 51 +/- 3 mm dorsal to the anterior and posterior commissure (AC-PC). A conventional 1.5-T clinical magnetic resonance (MR) system and the FLASH technique were used. The data obtained in both series of experiments were subjected to the same statistical analyses. Statistical parametric maps (SPM) were generated by two different approaches: a correlation between peak force and rCBF or fMRI signal and using a categorical comparison of force exerted with rest. SPMs were coregistered with anatomical MR images. PET and fMRI measurements demonstrated activation in the primary motor cortex (M1) and posterior supplementary motor cortex in all subjects. Correlation analysis demonstrated foci in the M1 in four subjects with PET and in only one subject with fMRI. Locations of activation peaks differed by 2 to 8 mm between imaging methods. The relationship between fMRI signal or rCBF and peak force was logarithmic. The maximum increase in fMRI signal was 5.0% +/- 0.9 at 60% of the maximum voluntary contraction while the corresponding increase in rCBF was 13.7% +/- 1.2. The ratio of percentage rCBF change to percentage fMRI signal change was very similar across all force levels. The high degree of correspondence between PET and fMRI data provides good cross-validation for

  20. Pre-clinical functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Part I: The kidney.

    PubMed

    Zöllner, Frank G; Kalayciyan, Raffi; Chacón-Caldera, Jorge; Zimmer, Fabian; Schad, Lothar R

    2014-12-01

    The prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) is increasing worldwide. In Europe alone, at least 8% of the population currently has some degree of CKD. CKD is associated with serious comorbidity, reduced life expectancy, and high economic costs; hence, the early detection and adequate treatment of kidney disease is important. Pre-clinical research can not only give insights into the mechanisms of the various kidney diseases but it also allows for investigating the outcome of new drugs developed to treat kidney disease. Functional magnetic resonance imaging provides non-invasive access to tissue and organ function in animal models. Advantages over classical animal research approaches are numerous: the same animal might be repeatedly imaged to investigate a progress or a treatment of disease over time. This has also a direct impact on animal welfare and the refinement of classical animal experiments as the number of animals in the studies might be reduced. In this paper, we review current state of the art in functional magnetic resonance imaging with a focus on pre-clinical kidney imaging. PMID:24931712

  1. Affinity capture using peptide-functionalized magnetic nanoparticles to target Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Fang-Yin; Lin, Wei-Lien; Chen, Yu-Chie

    2016-04-28

    Staphylococcus aureus, a commonly found pathogen, can cause food poisoning and infections. Thus, it is necessary to develop analytical methods for the rapid screening of S. aureus in suspicious samples. Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) are widely used as affinity probes to selectively enrich target species from complex samples because of their high specific surface area and magnetic properties. The MNP surface should be functionalized to have the capability to target specific species. We herein propose a straightforward method to functionalize aluminum oxide-coated iron oxide (Fe3O4@Al2O3) MNPs with the peptide HHHHHHDEEGLFVD (D). The peptide D was comprised of three domains: polyhistidine (H6) used as the linker, DEE added as the spacer, and GLFVD used for targeting S. aureus. D was immobilized on the surface of Fe3O4@Al2O3 MNPs through H6-Al chelation. Our results showed that the D-functionalized Fe3O4@Al2O3 MNPs (D-Fe3O4 MNPs) possess the capability to target S. aureus. The selective trapping experiments were conducted under microwave-heating for only 60 s, and sufficient bacterial cells were trapped by the MNPs to be identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS). We demonstrated that the D-Fe3O4@Al2O3 MNPs combined with MALDI-MS can be used to rapidly characterize trace amounts of S. aureus in complex juice and egg samples. PMID:27087258

  2. Effect of weak, interrupted sinusoidal low frequency magnetic field on neural regeneration in rats: functional evaluation.

    PubMed

    Bervar, Marijan

    2005-07-01

    A study of the effect of weak, interrupted sinusoidal low frequency magnetic field (ISMF) stimulation on regeneration of the rat sciatic nerve was carried out. In the experiment, 60 Wistar rats were used: 24 rats underwent unilateral sciatic nerve transection injury and immediate surgical nerve repair, 24 rats underwent unilateral sciatic nerve crush injury, and the remaining 12 rats underwent a sham surgery. Half of the animals (n = 12) with either sciatic nerve lesion were randomly chosen and exposed between a pair of Helmholtz coils for 3 weeks post-injury, 4 h/day, to an interrupted (active period to pause ratio = 1.4 s/0.8 s) sinusoidal 50 Hz magnetic field of 0.5 mT. The other half of the animals (n = 12) and six rats with sham surgery were used for two separate controls. Functional recovery was followed for 6 weeks for the crush injuries and 7(1/2) months for the transection injuries by video assisted footprint analysis in static conditions and quantified using a recently revised static sciatic index (SSI) formula. We ascertained that the magnetic field influence was weak, but certainly detectable in both injury models. The accuracy of ISMF influence detection, determined by the one-way repeated measures ANOVA test, was better for the crush injury model: F(1, 198) = 9.0144, P = .003, than for the transection injury model: F(1, 198) = 6.4826, P = .012. The Student-Newman-Keuls range test for each response day yielded significant differences (P < .05) between the exposed and control groups early in the beginning of functional recovery and later on from the points adjacent to the beginning of the plateau, or 95% of functional recovery, and the end of observation. These differences probably reflect the ISMF systemic effect on the neuron cell bodies and increased and more efficient reinnervation of the periphery. PMID:15887258

  3. Design of covalently functionalized carbon nanotubes filled with metal oxide nanoparticles for imaging, therapy, and magnetic manipulation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaojie; Marangon, Iris; Melinte, Georgian; Wilhelm, Claire; Ménard-Moyon, Cécilia; Pichon, Benoit P; Ersen, Ovidiu; Aubertin, Kelly; Baaziz, Walid; Pham-Huu, Cuong; Bégin-Colin, Sylvie; Bianco, Alberto; Gazeau, Florence; Bégin, Dominique

    2014-11-25

    Nanocomposites combining multiple functionalities in one single nano-object hold great promise for biomedical applications. In this work, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were filled with ferrite nanoparticles (NPs) to develop the magnetic manipulation of the nanotubes and their theranostic applications. The challenges were both the filling of CNTs with a high amount of magnetic NPs and their functionalization to form biocompatible water suspensions. We propose here a filling process using CNTs as nanoreactors for high-yield in situ growth of ferrite NPs into the inner carbon cavity. At first, NPs were formed inside the nanotubes by thermal decomposition of an iron stearate precursor. A second filling step was then performed with iron or cobalt stearate precursors to enhance the encapsulation yield and block the formed NPs inside the tubes. Water suspensions were then obtained by addition of amino groups via the covalent functionalization of the external surface of the nanotubes. Microstructural and magnetic characterizations confirmed the confinement of NPs into the anisotropic structure of CNTs making them suitable for magnetic manipulations and MRI detection. Interactions of highly water-dispersible CNTs with tumor cells could be modulated by magnetic fields without toxicity, allowing control of their orientation within the cell and inducing submicron magnetic stirring. The magnetic properties were also used to quantify CNTs cellular uptake by measuring the cell magnetophoretic mobility. Finally, the photothermal ablation of tumor cells could be enhanced by magnetic stimulus, harnessing the hybrid properties of NP loaded-CNTs. PMID:25343751

  4. Investigating the emotional response to room acoustics: A functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Lawless, M S; Vigeant, M C

    2015-10-01

    While previous research has demonstrated the powerful influence of pleasant and unpleasant music on emotions, the present study utilizes functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to assess the positive and negative emotional responses as demonstrated in the brain when listening to music convolved with varying room acoustic conditions. During fMRI scans, subjects rated auralizations created in a simulated concert hall with varying reverberation times. The analysis detected activations in the dorsal striatum, a region associated with anticipation of reward, for two individuals for the highest rated stimulus, though no activations were found for regions associated with negative emotions in any subject. PMID:26520354

  5. Cerebral activation focusing on strong tasting food: a functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Senichiro; Kubota, Fumio; Nisijima, Koichi; Washiya, Sumio; Kato, Satoshi

    2005-02-28

    Very little research has been conducted on taste imagery because of the difficulty of doing so. We conducted a functional magnetic resonance imaging study to observe cerebral activation patterns produced in volunteers concentrating on pickled plums (umeboshi), a traditional Japanese food with a strong and sour taste. Activation was observed in the right insula, the bilateral opercula, the bilateral orbitofrontal cortices and the left Broca's area. Activation in the insula (primary gustatory area) was very weak and limited to one side. The activation pattern was similar to that of taste perception. Our results showed that it is possible for humans to imagine tastes. PMID:15706236

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging biomarkers of gastrointestinal motor function and fluid distribution

    PubMed Central

    Khalaf, Asseel; Hoad, Caroline L; Spiller, Robin C; Gowland, Penny A; Moran, Gordon W; Marciani, Luca

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a well established technique that has revolutionized diagnostic radiology. Until recently, the impact that MRI has had in the assessment of gastrointestinal motor function and bowel fluid distribution in health and in disease has been more limited, despite the novel insights that MRI can provide along the entire gastrointestinal tract. MRI biomarkers include intestinal motility indices, small bowel water content and whole gut transit time. The present review discusses new developments and applications of MRI in the upper gastrointestinal tract, the small bowel and the colon reported in the literature in the last 5 years. PMID:26600972

  7. Vital functions of organisms in infra-low frequency magnetic fields 3. The embryogeny of mammals

    SciTech Connect

    Khizhenkov, P.K.; Bilobrov, V.M.; Zinkevich, I.I.; Zyablitsev, S.V.

    1994-10-01

    Results are presented of the experimental studies of the effect of variable (rotary) magnetic fields H at f = 6.5 Hz on the reproduction function of rats. It is shown that a pregnancy does not occur when mating takes place under the action of the field H. In the second quarter of pregnancy, the effect of the field is characterized by an increase of the mass of the body and of the internal organs of the new-born rats, among which, the growth of gemmae, spleen and of the thymus gland are particularly significant. The relative composition of the white blood cells changes as well.

  8. Magnetically responsive ordered mesoporous materials: A burgeoning family of functional composite nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Yonghui; Cai, Yue; Sun, Zhenkun; Zhao, Dongyuan

    2011-06-01

    Magnetic mesoporous materials, as a family of novel functional nanomaterials, have attracted increasing attention due to their unique properties. Much work has been done to synthesize these materials and to explore applications in various fields, such as catalysis, separation, hyperthermia, drug delivery, and MR imaging. This Letter reviews the synthesis approaches, which can be grouped into three categories, i.e. sol-gel coating, post-loading, and nanocasting approaches. Emphasis is placed on the elucidation of the design principles, synthesis strategies and the properties-applications relationship of the mesoporous materials.

  9. Combining Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy and Density Functional Theory Calculations to Characterize Carvedilol Polymorphs.

    PubMed

    Rezende, Carlos A; San Gil, Rosane A S; Borré, Leandro B; Pires, José Ricardo; Vaiss, Viviane S; Resende, Jackson A L C; Leitão, Alexandre A; De Alencastro, Ricardo B; Leal, Katia Z

    2016-09-01

    The experiments of carvedilol form II, form III, and hydrate by (13)C and (15)N cross-polarization magic-angle spinning (CP MAS) are reported. The GIPAW (gauge-including projector-augmented wave) method from DFT (density functional theory) calculations was used to simulate (13)C and (15)N chemical shifts. A very good agreement was found for the comparison between the global results of experimental and calculated nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shifts for carvedilol polymorphs. This work aims a comprehensive understanding of carvedilol crystalline forms employing solution and solid-state NMR as well as DFT calculations. PMID:26372719

  10. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Motor Cortex: Hemispheric Asymmetry and Handedness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seong-Gi; Ashe, James; Hendrich, Kristy; Ellermann, Jutta M.; Merkle, Hellmut; Ugurbil, Kamil; Georgopoulos, Apostolos P.

    1993-07-01

    A hemispheric asymmetry in the functional activation of the human motor cortex during contralateral (C) and ipsilateral (I) finger movements, especially in right-handed subjects, was documented with nuclear magnetic resonance imaging at high field strength (4 tesla). Whereas the right motor cortex was activated mostly during contralateral finger movements in both right-handed (C/I mean area of activation = 36.8) and left-handed (C/I = 29.9) subjects, the left motor cortex was activated substantially during ipsilateral movements in left-handed subjects (C/I = 5.4) and even more so in right-handed subjects (C/I = 1.3).

  11. H-1 Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Metabolomics Analysis Identifies Novel Urinary Biomarkers for Lung Function

    SciTech Connect

    MCClay, Joseph L.; Adkins, Daniel E.; Isern, Nancy G.; O'Connell, Thomas M.; Wooten, Jan B.; Zedler, Barbara K.; Dasika, Madhukar S.; Webb, B. T.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Pounds, Joel G.; Murrelle, Edward L.; Leppert, Mark F.; van den Oord, Edwin J.

    2010-06-04

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), characterized by chronic airflow limitation, is a serious and growing public health concern. The major environmental risk factor for COPD is tobacco smoking, but the biological mechanisms underlying COPD are not well understood. In this study, we used proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR) spectroscopy to identify and quantify metabolites associated with lung function in COPD. Plasma and urine were collected from 197 adults with COPD and from 195 adults without COPD. Samples were assayed using a 600 MHz NMR spectrometer, and the resulting spectra were analyzed against quantitative spirometric measures of lung function. After correcting for false discoveries and adjusting for covariates (sex, age, smoking) several spectral regions in urine were found to be significantly associated with baseline lung function. These regions correspond to the metabolites trigonelline, hippurate and formate. Concentrations of each metabolite, standardized to urinary creatinine, were associated with baseline lung function (minimum p-value = 0.0002 for trigonelline). No significant associations were found with plasma metabolites. Two of the three urinary metabolites positively associated with baseline lung function, i.e. hippurate and formate, are often related to gut microflora. This suggests that the microbiome composition is variable between individuals with different lung function. Alternatively, the nature and origins of all three associated metabolites may reflect lifestyle differences affecting overall health. Our results will require replication and validation, but demonstrate the utility of NMR metabolomics as a screening tool for identifying novel biomarkers of lung disease or disease risk.

  12. The presupplementary area within the language network: a resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging functional connectivity analysis.

    PubMed

    Ter Minassian, Aram; Ricalens, Emmanuel; Nguyen The Tich, Sylvie; Dinomais, Mickaël; Aubé, Christophe; Beydon, Laurent

    2014-08-01

    The presupplementary motor area (pre-SMA) is involved in volitional selection. Despite the lateralization of the language network and different functions for both pre-SMA, few studies have reported the lateralization of pre-SMA activity and very little is known about the possible lateralization of pre-SMA connectivity. Via functional connectivity analysis, we sought to understand how the language network may be connected to other intrinsic connectivity networks (ICNs) through the pre-SMA. We performed a spatial independent component analysis of resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging in 30 volunteers to identify the language network. Subsequently, we applied seed-to-voxel functional connectivity analyses centered on peaks detected in the pre-SMA. Three signal peaks were detected in the pre-SMA. The left rostral pre-SMA intrinsic connectivity network (LR ICN) was left lateralized in contrast to bilateral ICNs associated to right pre-SMA peaks. The LR ICN was anticorrelated with the dorsal attention network and the right caudal pre-SMA ICN (RC ICN) anticorrelated with the default mode network. These two ICNs overlapped minimally. In contrast, the right rostral ICN overlapped the LR ICN. Both right ICNs overlapped in the ventral attention network (vATT). The bilateral connectivity of the right rostral pre-SMA may allow right hemispheric recruitment to process semantic ambiguities. Overlap between the right pre-SMA ICNs in vATT may contribute to internal thought to external environment reorientation. Distinct ICNs connected to areas involved in lexico-syntactic selection and phonology converge in the pre-SMA, which may constitute the resolution space of competing condition-action associations for speech production. PMID:24939724

  13. Neural Alterations in Acquired Age-Related Hearing Loss

    PubMed Central

    Mudar, Raksha A.; Husain, Fatima T.

    2016-01-01

    Hearing loss is one of the most prevalent chronic health conditions in older adults. Growing evidence suggests that hearing loss is associated with reduced cognitive functioning and incident dementia. In this mini-review, we briefly examine literature on anatomical and functional alterations in the brains of adults with acquired age-associated hearing loss, which may underlie the cognitive consequences observed in this population, focusing on studies that have used structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging, diffusion tensor imaging, and event-related electroencephalography. We discuss structural and functional alterations observed in the temporal and frontal cortices and the limbic system. These neural alterations are discussed in the context of common cause, information-degradation, and sensory-deprivation hypotheses, and we suggest possible rehabilitation strategies. Although, we are beginning to learn more about changes in neural architecture and functionality related to age-associated hearing loss, much work remains to be done. Understanding the neural alterations will provide objective markers for early identification of neural consequences of age-associated hearing loss and for evaluating benefits of intervention approaches. PMID:27313556

  14. Testing the Jacob's ladder of density functionals for electronic structure and magnetism of rutile VO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Bing; Sun, Jianwei; Ruzsinszky, Adrienn; Perdew, John P.

    2014-08-01

    We employ semilocal density functionals [local spin-density approximation (LSDA), Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof (PBE) generalized gradient approximation (GGA), and meta-GGAs)], LSDA plus Hubbard U (LSDA+U) theory, a nonlocal range-separated Heyd-Scuseria-Ernzerhof hybrid functional (HSE06), and the random-phase approximation (RPA) to assess their performances for the ground-state magnetism and electronic structure of a strongly correlated metal, rutile VO2. Using recent quantum Monte Carlo results as the benchmark, all tested semilocal and hybrid functionals as well as the RPA (with PBE inputs) predict the correct magnetic ground states for rutile VO2. The observed paramagnetism could arise from temperature-disordered local spin moments or from the thermal destruction of these moments. All semilocal functionals also give the correct ground-state metallicity for rutile VO2. However, in the ferromagnetic (FM) and antiferromagnetic (AFM) phases, LSDA+U and HSE06 incorrectly predict rutile VO2 to be a Mott-Hubbard insulator. For the computed electronic structures of FM and AFM phases, we find that the Tao-Perdew-Staroverov-Scuseria (TPSS) and revised TPSS (revTPSS) meta-GGAs give strong 2p-3d hybridizations, resulting in a depopulation of the 2p bands of O atoms, in comparison with other tested meta-GGAs. The regularized TPSS (regTPSS) and meta-GGAs made simple, i.e., MGGA_MS0 and MGGA_MS2, which are free of the spurious order-of-limits problem of TPSS and revTPSS, give electronic states close to those of the PBE GGA and LSDA. In comparison to experiment, semilocal functionals predict better equilibrium cell volumes for rutile VO2 in FM and AFM states than in the spin-unpolarized state. For meta-GGAs, a monotonic decrease of the exchange enhancement factor Fx(s,α) with α for small s, as in the MGGA_MS functionals, leads to large (probably too large) local magnetic moments in spin-polarized states.

  15. pH-responsive deoxyribonucleic acid capture/release by polydopamine functionalized magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Ma, Xiangdong; Ding, Chun; Jia, Li

    2015-03-01

    Polydopamine functionalized magnetic nanoparticles (PDA@Fe3O4) were prepared and characterized by transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, zeta potential and vibrating sample magnetometry. They were found to enable highly efficient capture of genomic deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA). The adsorption capacity of PDA@Fe3O4 for genomic DNA can reach 161 mg g(-1). The extraction protocol used aqueous solutions for DNA binding to and releasing from the surface of the magnetic particles based on the pH inducing the charge switch of amino and phenolic hydroxyl groups on PDA@Fe3O4. The extracted DNA with high quality (A260/A280=1.80) can be directly used as templates for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) followed by capillary electrophoresis (CE) analysis. None of the toxic chemical reagents and PCR inhibitors was used throughout the whole procedure. PDA@Fe3O4 based magnetic solid phase extraction (MSPE) method was superior to those using commercial kit and traditional phenol-chloroform extraction methods in yield of DNA. The developed PDA@Fe3O4 based MSPE-PCR-CE method was applied for simultaneous and fast detection of Listeria monocytogenes and Escherichia coli O157:H7 in milk. PMID:25682426

  16. One-step fabrication of amino functionalized magnetic graphene oxide composite for uranium(VI) removal.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lili; Zhao, Donglin; Chen, Shaohua; Wang, Xianbiao; Chen, Changlun

    2016-06-15

    Amino functionalized magnetic graphene oxide composite (AMGO), a good sorbent for U(VI), was fabricated and characterized. The AMGO was applied as a magnetic sorbent for the U(VI) removal from aqueous solutions. The AMGO can be easily recovered from the solution with the magnetic separation within one minute. The kinetic data were well-described by the pseudo-second-order equation. The Langmuir model fitted the sorption isotherm data better than the Freundlich model. The maximum sorption capacity of the AMGO for U(VI) was 141.2mg/g, displaying a high efficiency for the removal of U(VI). It was found that the U(VI) sorption was accomplished mainly via chelation or ion exchange. The thermodynamic parameters illustrated that the sorption process was spontaneous and endothermic in nature. In addition, the excellent reproducibility indicate that the AMGO can be used as a potential sorbent for removal of U(VI) from large volumes of aqueous solution. PMID:27016915

  17. High-capacity adsorption of dissolved hexavalent chromium using amine-functionalized magnetic corn stalk composites.

    PubMed

    Song, Wen; Gao, Baoyu; Zhang, Tengge; Xu, Xing; Huang, Xin; Yu, Huan; Yue, Qinyan

    2015-08-01

    Easily separable amine-functionalized magnetic corn stalk composites (AF-MCS) were employed for effective adsorption and reduction of toxic hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] to nontoxic Cr(III). The saturated magnetization of AF-MCS reached 6.2emu/g, and as a result, it could be separated from aqueous solution by a magnetic process for its superparamagnetism. The studies of various factors influencing the sorption behavior indicated that the optimum AF-MCS dosage for Cr(VI) adsorption was 1g/L, and the maximum adsorption capacity was observed at pH 3.0. The chromium adsorption perfectly fitted the Langmuir isotherm model and pseudo second order kinetic model. Furthermore, characterization of AF-MCS was investigated by means of XRD, SEM, TEM, FT-IR, BET, VSM and XPS analysis to discuss the uptake mechanism. Basically, these results demonstrated that AF-MCS prepared in this work has shown its merit in effective removal of Cr(VI) and rapid separation from effluents simultaneously. PMID:25690680

  18. Children Acquire Emotion Categories Gradually

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Widen, Sherri C.; Russell, James A.

    2008-01-01

    Some accounts imply that basic-level emotion categories are acquired early and quickly, whereas others imply that they are acquired later and more gradually. Our study examined this question for fear, happiness, sadness, and anger in the context of children's categorization of emotional facial expressions. Children (N=168, 2-5 years) first labeled…

  19. Pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic analysis to evaluate ceftaroline fosamil dosing regimens for the treatment of community-acquired bacterial pneumonia and complicated skin and skin-structure infections in patients with normal and impaired renal function.

    PubMed

    Canut, A; Isla, A; Rodríguez-Gascón, A

    2015-04-01

    In this study, the probability of pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic target attainment (PTA) of ceftaroline against clinical isolates causing community-acquired bacterial pneumonia (CABP) and complicated skin and skin-structure infection (cSSSI) in Europe was evaluated. Three dosing regimens were assessed: 600 mg every 12 h (q12 h) as a 1-h infusion (standard dose) or 600 mg every 8 h (q8 h) as a 2-h infusion in virtual patients with normal renal function; and 400 mg q12 h as a 1-h infusion in patients with moderate renal impairment. Pharmacokinetic and microbiological data were obtained from the literature. The PTA and the cumulative fraction of response (CFR) were calculated by Monte Carlo simulation. In patients with normal renal function, the ceftaroline standard dose (600 mg q12 h as a 1-h infusion) can be sufficient to treat CABP due to ceftazidime-susceptible (CAZ-S) Escherichia coli, CAZ-S Klebsiella pneumoniae, meticillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae and Moraxella catarrhalis (CFR>90%). However, against meticillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), the CFR was 72%. In cSSSI, the CFR was also <80% for MRSA. Administration of ceftaroline 600 mg q8 h as a 2-h infusion or 400 mg q12 h as a 1-h infusion in patients with moderate renal insufficiency provided a high probability of treatment success (CFR ca. 100%) for most micro-organisms causing CABP and cSSSI, including MRSA and penicillin-non-susceptible S. pneumoniae. These results suggest that in patients with normal renal function, ceftaroline 600 mg q8 h as a 2-h infusion may be a better option than the standard dose, especially if the MRSA rate is high. PMID:25700566

  20. Assessing Late Cardiopulmonary Function in Patients with Repaired Tetralogy of Fallot Using Exercise Cardiopulmonary Function Test and Cardiac Magnetic Resonance

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ming-Chun; Chen, Chun-An; Chiu, Hsin-Hui; Chen, Ssu-Yuan; Wang, Jou-Kou; Lin, Ming-Tai; Chiu, Shuenn-Nan; Lu, Chun-Wei; Huang, Shu-Chien; Wu, Mei-Hwan

    2015-01-01

    Background Patients with repaired tetralogy of Fallot (TOF) usually experience progressive right ventricle (RV) dysfunction due to pulmonary regurgitation (PR). This could further worsen the cardiopulmonary function. This study aimed to compare the changes in patient exercise cardiopulmonary test and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, and consider the implication of these changes. Methods Our study examined repaired TOF patients who underwent cardiopulmonary exercise test (CPET) to obtain maximal (peak oxygen consumption, peak VO2) and submaximal parameters (oxygen uptake efficiency plateau, oxygen uptake efficiency plateau (OUEP), and ratio of minute ventilation to carbon dioxide production, VE/VCO2 slope). Additionally, the hemodynamic status was assessed by using cardiac magnetic resonance. Criteria for exclusion included TOF patients with pulmonary atresia, atrioventricular septal defect, or absence of pulmonary valve syndrome. Results We enrolled 158 patients whose mean age at repair was 7.8 ± 9.1 years (range 0.1-49.2 years) and the mean patient age at CPET was 29.5 ± 12.2 years (range 7.0-57.0 years). Severe PR (PR fraction ≥ 40%) in 53 patients, moderate in 55, and mild (PR fraction < 20%) in 50 patients were noted. The mean RV end-diastolic volume index (RVEDVi) was 113 ± 35 ml/m2, with 7 patients observed to have a RVEDVi > 163 ml/m2. The mean left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) was 63 ± 8%, left ventricular end-diastolic volume index (LVEDVi) was 65 ± 12 ml/m2, and LVESVi was 25 ± 14 ml/m2. CPET revealed significantly decreased peak VO2 (68.5 ± 14.4% of predicted), and fair OUEP (90.3 ± 14.1% of predicted) and VE/VCO2 slope (27.1 ± 5.3). PR fraction and age at repair were negatively correlated with maximal and submaximal exercise indicators (peak VO2 and OUEP). Left ventricular (LV) function and size were positively correlated with peak VO2 and OUEP. Conclusions The results of CPET showed that patients with repaired TOF had a low

  1. Naturally acquired microchimerism

    PubMed Central

    Eikmans, Michael; van Halteren, Astrid GS; van Besien, Koen; van Rood, Jon J; Drabbels, Jos JM; Claas, Frans HJ

    2014-01-01

    Microchimerism represents a condition where one individual harbors genetically distinct cell populations, and the chimeric population constitutes <1% of the total number of cells. The most common natural source of microchimerism is pregnancy. The reciprocal cell exchange between a mother and her child often leads to the stable engraftment of hematopoietic and non-hematopoietic stem cells in both parties. Interaction between cells from the mother and those from the child may result in maternal immune cells becoming sensitized to inherited paternal alloantigens of the child, which are not expressed by the mother herself. Vice versa, immune cells of the child may become sensitized toward the non-inherited maternal alloantigens of the mother. The extent of microchimerism, its anatomical location, and the sensitivity of the techniques used for detecting its presence collectively determine whether microchimerism can be detected in an individual. In this review, we focus on the clinical consequences of microchimerism in solid organ and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and propose concepts derived from data of epidemiologic studies. Next, we elaborate on the latest molecular methodology, including digital PCR, for determining in a reliable and sensitive way the extent of microchimerism. For the first time, tools have become available to isolate viable chimeric cells from a host background, so that the challenges of establishing the biologic mechanisms and function of these cells may finally be tackled. PMID:24762743

  2. Associative Learning Through Acquired Salience

    PubMed Central

    Treviño, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Most associative learning studies describe the salience of stimuli as a fixed learning-rate parameter. Presumptive saliency signals, however, have also been linked to motivational and attentional processes. An interesting possibility, therefore, is that discriminative stimuli could also acquire salience as they become powerful predictors of outcomes. To explore this idea, we first characterized and extracted the learning curves from mice trained with discriminative images offering varying degrees of structural similarity. Next, we fitted a linear model of associative learning coupled to a series of mathematical representations for stimulus salience. We found that the best prediction, from the set of tested models, was one in which the visual salience depended on stimulus similarity and a non-linear function of the associative strength. Therefore, these analytic results support the idea that the net salience of a stimulus depends both on the items' effective salience and the motivational state of the subject that learns about it. Moreover, this dual salience model can explain why learning about a stimulus not only depends on the effective salience during acquisition but also on the specific learning trajectory that was used to reach this state. Our mathematical description could be instrumental for understanding aberrant salience acquisition under stressful situations and in neuropsychiatric disorders like schizophrenia, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and addiction. PMID:26793078

  3. Associative Learning Through Acquired Salience.

    PubMed

    Treviño, Mario

    2015-01-01

    Most associative learning studies describe the salience of stimuli as a fixed learning-rate parameter. Presumptive saliency signals, however, have also been linked to motivational and attentional processes. An interesting possibility, therefore, is that discriminative stimuli could also acquire salience as they become powerful predictors of outcomes. To explore this idea, we first characterized and extracted the learning curves from mice trained with discriminative images offering varying degrees of structural similarity. Next, we fitted a linear model of associative learning coupled to a series of mathematical representations for stimulus salience. We found that the best prediction, from the set of tested models, was one in which the visual salience depended on stimulus similarity and a non-linear function of the associative strength. Therefore, these analytic results support the idea that the net salience of a stimulus depends both on the items' effective salience and the motivational state of the subject that learns about it. Moreover, this dual salience model can explain why learning about a stimulus not only depends on the effective salience during acquisition but also on the specific learning trajectory that was used to reach this state. Our mathematical description could be instrumental for understanding aberrant salience acquisition under stressful situations and in neuropsychiatric disorders like schizophrenia, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and addiction. PMID:26793078

  4. Low-Functioning Autism and Nonsyndromic Intellectual Disability: Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Findings.

    PubMed

    Erbetta, Alessandra; Bulgheroni, Sara; Contarino, Valeria Elisa; Chiapparini, Luisa; Esposito, Silvia; Annunziata, Silvia; Riva, Daria

    2015-10-01

    Previous neuroradiologic studies reported a high incidence of abnormalities in low-functioning autistic children. In this population, it is difficult to know which abnormality depends on autism itself and which is related to intellectual disability associated with autism. The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency of neuroradiologic abnormalities in low-functioning autistic children compared to Intellectual Quotient and age-matched nonsyndromic children, using the same set of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences. MRI was rated as abnormal in 44% of autistic and 54% of children with intellectual disability. The main results were mega cisterna magna in autism and hypoplastic corpus callosum in intellectual disability. These abnormalities are morphologically visible signs of altered brain development. These findings, more frequent than expected, are not specific to the 2 conditions. Although MRI cannot be considered mandatory, it allows an in-depth clinical assessment in nonsyndromic intellectual-disabled and autistic children. PMID:25895913

  5. Recent developments in optimal experimental designs for functional magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Ming-Hung; Temkit, M'hamed; Wong, Weng Kee

    2014-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is one of the leading brain mapping technologies for studying brain activity in response to mental stimuli. For neuroimaging studies utilizing this pioneering technology, there is a great demand of high-quality experimental designs that help to collect informative data to make precise and valid inference about brain functions. This paper provides a survey on recent developments in experimental designs for fMRI studies. We briefly introduce some analytical and computational tools for obtaining good designs based on a specified design selection criterion. Research results about some commonly considered designs such as blocked designs, and m-sequences are also discussed. Moreover, we present a recently proposed new type of fMRI designs that can be constructed using a certain type of Hadamard matrices. Under certain assumptions, these designs can be shown to be statistically optimal. Some future research directions in design of fMRI experiments are also discussed. PMID:25071884

  6. Facile synthesis of boronic acid-functionalized magnetic carbon nanotubes for highly specific enrichment of glycopeptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Rongna; Hu, Junjie; Cai, Zongwei; Ju, Huangxian

    2014-02-01

    A stepwise strategy was developed to synthesize boronic acid functionalized magnetic carbon nanotubes (MCNTs) for highly specific enrichment of glycopeptides. The MCNTs were synthesized by a solvothermal reaction of Fe3+ loaded on the acid-treated CNTs and modified with 1-pyrenebutanoic acid N-hydroxysuccinimidyl ester (PASE) to bind aminophenylboronic acid (APBA) via an amide reaction. The introduction of PASE could bridge the MCNT and APBA, suppress the nonspecific adsorption and reduce the steric hindrance among the bound molecules. Due to the excellent structure of the MCNTs, the functionalization of PASE and then APBA on MCNTs was quite simple, specific and effective. The glycopeptides enrichment and separation with a magnetic field could be achieved by their reversible covalent binding with the boronic group of APBA-MCNTs. The exceptionally large specific surface area and the high density of boronic acid groups of APBA-MCNTs resulted in rapid and highly efficient enrichment of glycopeptides, even in the presence of large amounts of interfering nonglycopeptides. The functional MCNTs possessed high selectivity for enrichment of 21 glycopeptides from the digest of horseradish peroxidase demonstrated by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometric analysis showing more glycopeptides detected than the usual 9 glycopeptides with commercially available APBA-agarose. The proposed system showed better specificity for glycopeptides even in the presence of non-glycopeptides with 50 times higher concentration. The boronic acid functionalized MCNTs provide a promising selective enrichment platform for precise glycoproteomic analysis.A stepwise strategy was developed to synthesize boronic acid functionalized magnetic carbon nanotubes (MCNTs) for highly specific enrichment of glycopeptides. The MCNTs were synthesized by a solvothermal reaction of Fe3+ loaded on the acid-treated CNTs and modified with 1-pyrenebutanoic acid N-hydroxysuccinimidyl ester (PASE) to bind aminophenylboronic acid

  7. Functional magnetic resonance imaging of category-specific cortical activation: evidence for semantic maps.

    PubMed

    Spitzer, M; Kischka, U; Gückel, F; Bellemann, M E; Kammer, T; Seyyedi, S; Weisbrod, M; Schwartz, A; Brix, G

    1998-04-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was used to examine the pattern of cortical activity during a picture naming task. Subjects (n=12) had to covertly name either animals or furniture items. Functional scanning was performed using a conventional 1.5-Tesla whole-body MRI system. Images obtained during naming the two categories were compared using a non-parametric test. The study revealed evidence for domain-specific lexical regions in left middle, right middle and inferior frontal areas, as well as in superior and middle temporal areas. The results corroborate neuropsychological data and demonstrate directly and non-invasively in human volunteers that semantic representations in frontal and temporal areas are, to some degree, localized and possibly implemented as multiple maps. A completely distributed storage of semantic information is rendered unlikely. PMID:9593960

  8. Liquid Crystalline Block Copolymers with Brush Type Architecture: Toward Functional Membranes by Magnetic Field Alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choo, Youngwoo; Gopinadhan, Manesh; Mahajan, Lalit; Kasi, Rajeswari; Osuji, Chinedum

    2015-03-01

    We introduce a novel liquid crystalline block copolymer with brush type architecture for membrane applications by magnetic field directed self-assembly. Ring-opening metathesis of n-alkyloxy cyanobiphenyl and polylactide (PLA) functionalized norbornene monomers provides efficient polymerization yielding low polydispersity block copolymers. The molecular weight of the PLA side chains, spacer length of the cyanobiphenyl mesogens are systematically varied to form well-ordered BCP morphologies at varying volume fractions. Interestingly, the system features morphology dependent anchoring condition where mesogens adopt planar anchoring on cylindrical interface while homeotropic anchoring was preferred on a planar block interface. The minority PLA domains from highly aligned materials can be readily degraded by hydrolysis to produce vertically aligned nanoporous polymer films which exhibit reversible thermal switching behavior. The polymers introduced here provide a versatile platform for scalable fabrication of aligned membranes and further functional materials based on such templates. This work was supported by NSF(CCMI-1246804).

  9. Magnetically induced behaviour of ferritin corpuscles in avian ears: can cuticulosomes function as magnetosomes?

    PubMed Central

    Jandacka, Petr; Burda, Hynek; Pistora, Jaromir

    2015-01-01

    Magnetoreception is an enigmatic, poorly understood sensory ability, described mainly on the basis of behavioural studies in animals of diverse taxa. Recently, corpuscles containing superparamagnetic iron-storage protein ferritin were found in the inner ear hair cells of birds, a predominantly single ferritin corpuscle per cell. It was suggested that these corpuscles might represent magnetosomes and function as magnetosensors. Here we determine ferritin low-field paramagnetic susceptibility to estimate its magnetically induced intracellular behaviour. Physical simulations show that ferritin corpuscles cannot be deformed or rotate in weak geomagnetic fields, and thus cannot provide magnetoreception via deformation of the cuticular plate. Furthermore, we reached an alternative hypothesis that ferritin corpuscle in avian ears may function as an intracellular electromagnetic oscillator. Such an oscillator would generate additional cellular electric potential related to normal cell conditions. Though the phenomenon seems to be weak, this effect deserves further analyses. PMID:25551148

  10. Controlled surface functionality of magnetic nanoparticles by layer-by-layer assembled nano-films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Daheui; Son, Boram; Park, Tai Hyun; Hong, Jinkee

    2015-04-01

    Over the past several years, the preparation of functionalized nanoparticles has been aggressively pursued in order to develop desired structures, compositions, and structural order. Among the various nanoparticles, iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) have shown great promise because the material generated using these MNPs can be used in a variety of biomedical applications and possible bioactive functionalities. In this study, we report the development of various functionalized MNPs (F-MNPs) generated using the layer-by-layer (LbL) self-assembly method. To provide broad functional opportunities, we fabricated F-MNP bio-toolbox by using three different materials: synthetic polymers, natural polymers, and carbon materials. Each of these F-MNPs displays distinct properties, such as enhanced thickness or unique morphologies. In an effort to explore their biomedical applications, we generated basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF)-loaded F-MNPs. The bFGF-loaded F-MNPs exhibited different release mechanisms and loading amounts, depending on the film material and composition order. Moreover, bFGF-loaded F-MNPs displayed higher biocompatibility and possessed superior proliferation properties than the bare MNPs and pure bFGF, respectively. We conclude that by simply optimizing the building materials and the nanoparticle's film composition, MNPs exhibiting various bioactive properties can be generated.Over the past several years, the preparation of functionalized nanoparticles has been aggressively pursued in order to develop desired structures, compositions, and structural order. Among the various nanoparticles, iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) have shown great promise because the material generated using these MNPs can be used in a variety of biomedical applications and possible bioactive functionalities. In this study, we report the development of various functionalized MNPs (F-MNPs) generated using the layer-by-layer (LbL) self-assembly method. To provide

  11. Biocompatible polyurethane/thiacalix[4]arenes functionalized Fe3O4 magnetic nanocomposites: Synthesis and properties.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Abbas; Barikani, Mehdi; Lakouraj, Moslem Mansour

    2016-09-01

    In this study, a series of magnetic polyurethane/Fe3O4 elastomer nanocomposites were prepared by covalently embedding novel thiacalix[4]arenes (TC4As) functionalized Fe3O4 nanoparticles (TC4As-Fe3O4) which contain macrocycles with reactive hydroxyl groups. Surface functionalization of Fe3O4 nanoparticles with TC4As macrocycles as unique reactive surface modifier not only gives specific characteristics to Fe3O4 nanoparticles but also improves the interphase interaction between nanoparticles and the polyurethane matrices through covalent attachment of polymer chains to nanoparticle surfaces. The novel synthesized TC4As-Fe3O4 nanoparticles were characterized by FTIR, XRD, TGA, VSM and SEM analysis. Furthermore, the effect of functionalization of Fe3O4 nanoparticles on the various properties of resulting nanocomposites was studied by XRD, TGA, DMTA, SEM, and a universal tensile tester. It was found that the functionalization of nanoparticles with TC4As affords better mechanical and thermal properties to polyurethane nanocomposites in comparison with unmodified nanoparticles. The SEM analysis showed finer dispersion of TC4As-Fe3O4 nanoparticles than unmodified Fe3O4 nanoparticles within the polyurethane matrices, which arising from formation of covalent bonding between TC4As functionalized Fe3O4 nanoparticles and polyurethane matrices. Moreover, the investigation of in vitro biocompatibility of novel nanocomposites showed that these samples are excellent candidate for biomedical use. PMID:27207044

  12. Repetitive magnetic stimulation improves retinal function in a rat model of retinal dystrophy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotenstreich, Ygal; Tzameret, Adi; Levi, Nir; Kalish, Sapir; Sher, Ifat; Zangen, Avraham; Belkin, Michael

    2014-02-01

    Vision incapacitation and blindness associated with retinal dystrophies affect millions of people worldwide. Retinal degeneration is characterized by photoreceptor cell death and concomitant remodeling of remaining retinal cells. Repetitive Magnetic Stimulation (RMS) is a non-invasive technique that creates alternating magnetic fields by brief electric currents transmitted through an insulated coil. These magnetic field generate action potentials in neurons, and modulate the expression of neurotransmitter receptors, growth factors and transcription factors which mediate plasticity. This technology has been proven effective and safe in various psychiatric disorders. Here we determined the effect of RMS on retinal function in Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) rats, a model for retinal dystrophy. Four week-old RCS and control Spargue Dawley (SD) rats received sham or RMS treatment over the right eye (12 sessions on 4 weeks). RMS treatment at intensity of at 40% of the maximal output of a Rapid2 stimulator significantly increased the electroretinogram (ERG) b-wave responses by up to 6- or 10-fold in the left and right eye respectively, 3-5 weeks following end of treatment. RMS treatment at intensity of 25% of the maximal output did not significant effect b-wave responses following end of treatment with no adverse effect on ERG response or retinal structure of SD rats. Our findings suggest that RMS treatment induces delayed improvement of retinal functions and may induce plasticity in the retinal tissue. Furthermore, this non-invasive treatment may possibly be used in the future as a primary or adjuvant treatment for retinal dystrophy.

  13. Lateral flow biosensor for multiplex detection of nitrofuran metabolites based on functionalized magnetic beads.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xuewen; Liang, Xiaoling; Dong, Jianghong; Fang, Zhiyuan; Zeng, Lingwen

    2016-09-01

    The use of potential mutagenic nitrofuran antibiotic in food animal production has been banned world-wide. Common methods for nitrofuran detection involve complex extraction procedures. In the present study, magnetic beads functionalized with antibody against nitrofuran derivative were used as both the extraction and color developing media in lateral flow biosensor. Derivatization reagent carboxybenzaldehyde is firstly modified with ractopamine. After reaction with nitrofuran metabolites, the resultant molecule has two functional groups: the metabolite moiety and the ractopamine moiety. Metabolite moiety is captured by the antibody that is coated on magnetic beads. This duplex is then loaded onto biosensor and ractopamine moiety is further captured by the antibody immobilized on the test zone of nitrocellulose membrane. Without tedious organic reagent-based extraction procedure, this biosensor was capable of visually detecting four metabolites simultaneously with a detection limit of 0.1 μg/L. No cross-reactivity was observed in the presence of 50 μg/L interferential components. Graphical abstract Derivatization of nitrofuran metabolites (AHD, AOZ, SEM, or AMOZ) and LFA detection of the derivative products. PMID:27438720

  14. Magnetic Hydrogels from Alkyne/Cobalt Carbonyl-Functionalized ABA Triblock Copolymers.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Bingyin; Hom, Wendy L; Chen, Xianyin; Yu, Pengqing; Pavelka, Laura C; Kisslinger, Kim; Parise, John B; Bhatia, Surita R; Grubbs, Robert B

    2016-04-01

    A series of alkyne-functionalized poly(4-(phenylethynyl)styrene)-block-poly(ethylene oxide)-block-poly(4-(phenylethynyl)styrene) (PPES-b-PEO-b-PPES) ABA triblock copolymers was synthesized by reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization. PESn[Co2(CO)6]x-EO800-PESn[Co2(CO)6]x ABA triblock copolymer/cobalt adducts (10-67 wt % PEO) were subsequently prepared by reaction of the alkyne-functionalized PPES block with Co2(CO)8 and their phase behavior was studied by TEM. Heating triblock copolymer/cobalt carbonyl adducts at 120 °C led to cross-linking of the PPES/Co domains and the formation of magnetic cobalt nanoparticles within the PPES/Co domains. Magnetic hydrogels could be prepared by swelling the PEO domains of the cross-linked materials with water. Swelling tests, rheological studies and actuation tests demonstrated that the water capacity and modulus of the hydrogels were dependent upon the composition of the block copolymer precursors. PMID:26958699

  15. Magnetic nanoparticles coated with maltose-functionalized polyethyleneimine for highly efficient enrichment of N-glycopeptides.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinan; Wang, Fangjun; Wan, Hao; Liu, Jing; Liu, Zheyi; Cheng, Kai; Zou, Hanfa

    2015-12-18

    Hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC) adsorbents have drawn increasing attention in recent years due to their high efficiency in N-glycopeptides enrichment. The hydrophilicity and binding capacity of HILIC adsorbents are crucial to the enrichment efficiency and mass spectrometry (MS) detection sensitivity of N-glycopeptides. Herein, magnetic nanoparticles coated with maltose-functionalized polyethyleneimine (Fe3O4-PEI-Maltose MNPs) were prepared by one-pot solvothermal reaction coupled with "click chemistry" and utilized for N-glycopeptides enrichment. Owing to the presence of hydrophilic and branched polyethyleneimine, the amount of immobilized disaccharide units was improved about four times. The N-glycopeptides capturing capacity was about 150mg/g (IgG/MNPs) and the MS detection limitation as low as 0.5fmol for IgG and 85% average enrichment recovery were feasibly achieved by using this hybrid magnetic adsorbent. Finally, 1237 unique N-glycosylation sites and 1567 unique N-glycopeptides from 684 N-glycoproteins were reliably characterized from 60μg protein sample extracted from mouse liver. Therefore, this maltose-functionalized polyethyleneimine coated adsorbent can play a promising role in highly efficient N-glycopeptides enrichment for glycoproteomic analyses of complex protein samples. PMID:26607318

  16. Comprehensive language mapping in children, using functional magnetic resonance imaging: what's missing counts.

    PubMed

    Wilke, Marko; Lidzba, Karen; Staudt, Martin; Buchenau, Karin; Grodd, Wolfgang; Krägeloh-Mann, Ingeborg

    2005-06-21

    Noninvasive language mapping is a frequently used application of functional magnetic resonance imaging. The examination of children, however, poses both practical and technical challenges. To this effect, we have developed two new paradigms mainly requiring passive listening to stories from which several key words were removed. Results were compared with a standard active verb-generation task, particularly with regard to hemispheric dominance in frontal brain areas. Fifteen healthy children (seven boys, eight girls, 6-14 years) were scanned. Distinct frontal activation was seen in our new tasks, which was stronger when the tasks were analyzed specifically with regard to the missing words. This confirms the hypothesis that the removal of these words is the key in inducing frontal activation. Frontal lateralization was consistent and strong in all three paradigms. Additionally, receptive language areas are also mapped by our new tasks. We conclude that our two new, child-friendly functional magnetic resonance imaging paradigms are useful in determining hemispheric dominance for language in children too young or too impaired to execute an active task. They also allow robust mapping of receptive language areas. PMID:15931061

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging of the congenital clubfoot treated with the French functional (physical therapy) method.

    PubMed

    Richards, B Stephens; Dempsey, Molly

    2007-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) changes that occur in clubfeet after nonoperative treatment with the French functional method, specifically pertaining to the chondro-osseous anatomy and the joint relationships. The magnetic resonance images were obtained in 6 infants before treatment and 3 months later. The MRI protocol described previously for clubfeet which were treated by the Ponseti method (J Pediatr Orthop. 2001;21:719) was closely adhered to, except that no sedation was allowed by our institutional review board. The severity of the clubfoot deformities before treatment made assessment of the tibiotalar, talonavicular, and talocalcaneal joint relationships difficult in some feet. Despite this, improvements were noted after treatment in tibiotalar plantarflexion, the talonavicular relationship, the calcaneocuboid relationship, and the varus position of the calcaneus. The wedge shape of both the navicular and distal end of the calcaneus that occasionally was noted on the MRI before treatment improved after therapy. Although improved clinically, persistent equinus of the calcaneus on MRI was significant in 2 feet and was associated with slight dorsal displacement of the cuboid on the calcaneus (MRI evidence of rocker bottom). As noted with use of the Ponseti nonoperative treatment method, the chondro-osseous abnormalities seen on MRI studies in congenital clubfoot improve after treatment with the French functional (physical therapy) method, with the exception of equinus. PMID:17314649

  18. Functionalized magnetic nanoparticles for the decontamination of water polluted with cesium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helal, Ahmed S.; Decorse, Philippe; Perruchot, Christian; Novak, Sophie; Lion, Claude; Ammar, Souad; El Hage Chahine, Jean-Michel; Hémadi, Miryana

    2016-05-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles are attracting considerable interest because of their potential applications in practically all fields of science and technology, including the removal of heavy metals from contaminated waters. It is, therefore, of great importance to adapt the surfaces of these nanoparticles according to the application. In this work advanced nanoparticles (NPs) with well-tailored surface functionalities were synthesized using the polyol method. The efficiency of a chelating agent, succinyl-β-cyclodextrin (SBCD), was first investigated spectrophotometrically and by Isothermal Titration Calorimetry (ITC). SBCD was then grafted onto nanoparticles previously functionalized with 3-aminopropyl triethoxsilane (NP-APTES). The resulting NP-SBCD system was then incubated with a solution of cesium. After magnetic separation, the solid residue was removed from the supernatant and characterized by X-Ray Photoelectron spectrometry (XPS), X-Ray Fluorescence spectrometry (XRF) and Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID) magnetometry. These characterizations show the presence of cesium in the solid residue, which indicates Cs uptake by the NP-SBCD system. This nanohybrid system constitutes a promising model for heavy metal decontamination.

  19. Comparison of three magnetic bead surface functionalities for RNA extraction and detection.

    PubMed

    Adams, Nicholas M; Bordelon, Hali; Wang, Kwo-Kwang A; Albert, Laura E; Wright, David W; Haselton, Frederick R

    2015-03-25

    Magnetic beads are convenient for extracting nucleic acid biomarkers from biological samples prior to molecular detection. These beads are available with a variety of surface functionalities designed to capture particular subsets of RNA. We hypothesized that bead surface functionality affects binding kinetics, processing simplicity, and compatibility with molecular detection strategies. In this report, three magnetic bead surface chemistries designed to bind nucleic acids, silica, oligo (dT), and a specific oligonucleotide sequence were evaluated. Commercially available silica-coated and oligo (dT) beads, as well as beads functionalized with oligonucleotides complementary to respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) nucleocapsid gene, respectively recovered ∼75, ∼71, and ∼7% target RSV mRNA after a 1 min of incubation time in a surrogate patient sample spiked with the target. RSV-specific beads required much longer incubation times to recover amounts of the target comparable to the other beads (∼77% at 180 min). As expected, silica-coated beads extracted total RNA, oligo (dT) beads selectively extracted total mRNA, and RSV-specific beads selectively extracted RSV N gene mRNA. The choice of bead functionality is generally dependent on the target detection strategy. The silica-coated beads are most suitable for applications that require nucleic acids other than mRNA, especially with detection strategies that are tolerant of a high concentration of nontarget background nucleic acids, such as RT-PCR. On the other hand, oligo (dT) beads are best-suited for mRNA targets, as they bind biomarkers rapidly, have relatively high recovery, and enable detection strategies to be performed directly on the bead surface. Sequence-specific beads may be best for applications that are not tolerant of a high concentration of nontarget nucleic acids that require short RNA sequences without poly(A) tails, such as microRNAs, or that perform RNA detection directly on the bead surface. PMID

  20. Effect of the double-counting functional on the electronic and magnetic properties of half-metallic magnets using the GGA+U method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsirogiannis, Christos; Galanakis, Iosif

    2015-11-01

    Methods based on the combination of the usual density functional theory (DFT) codes with the Hubbard models are widely used to investigate the properties of strongly correlated materials. Using first-principle calculations we study the electronic and magnetic properties of 20 half-metallic magnets performing self-consistent GGA+U calculations using both the atomic-limit (AL) and around-mean-field (AMF) functionals for the double counting term, used to subtract the correlation part from the DFT total energy, and compare these results to the usual generalized-gradient-approximation (GGA) calculations. Overall the use of AMF produces results similar to the GGA calculations. On the other hand the effect of AL is diversified depending on the studied material. In general the AL functional produces a stronger tendency towards magnetism leading in some cases to unphysical electronic and magnetic properties. Thus the choice of the adequate double-counting functional is crucial for the results obtained using the GGA+U method.

  1. Effects function analysis of ELF magnetic field exposure in the electric utility work environment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J; Nair, I; Sahl, J

    1997-01-01

    The incomplete understanding of the relation between power-frequency fields and biological responses raises problems in defining an appropriate metric for exposure assessment and epidemiological studies. Based on evidence from biological experiments, one can define alternative metrics or effects functions that embody the relationship between field exposure patterns and hypothetical health effects. In this paper, we explore the application of the "effects function" approach to occupational exposure data. Our analysis provides examples of exposure assessments based on a range of plausible effects functions. An EMDEX time series data set of ELF frequency (40-800 Hz) magnetic field exposure measurements for electric utility workers was analyzed with several statistical measures and effects functions: average field strength, combination of threshold and exposure duration, and field strength changes. Results were compared for eight job categories: electrician, substation operator, machinist, welder, plant operator, lineman/splicer, meter reader, and clerical. Average field strength yields a different ranking for these job categories than the ranks obtained using other biologically plausible effects functions. Whereas the group of electricians has the highest exposure by average field strength, the group of substation operators has the highest ranking for most of the other effects functions. Plant operators rank highest in the total number of field strength changes greater than 1 microT per hour. The clerical group remains at the lowest end for all of these effects functions. Our analysis suggests that, although average field strength could be used as a surrogate of field exposure for simply classifying exposure into "low" and "high," this summary measure may be misleading in the relative ranking of job categories in which workers are in "high" fields. These results indicate the relevance of metrics other than average field strength in occupational exposure assessment and

  2. Magnetic capture from blood rescues molecular motor function in diagnostic nanodevices

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Introduction of effective point-of-care devices for use in medical diagnostics is part of strategies to combat accelerating health-care costs. Molecular motor driven nanodevices have unique potentials in this regard due to unprecedented level of miniaturization and independence of external pumps. However motor function has been found to be inhibited by body fluids. Results We report here that a unique procedure, combining separation steps that rely on antibody-antigen interactions, magnetic forces applied to magnetic nanoparticles (MPs) and the specificity of the actomyosin bond, can circumvent the deleterious effects of body fluids (e.g. blood serum). The procedure encompasses the following steps: (i) capture of analyte molecules from serum by MP-antibody conjugates, (ii) pelleting of MP-antibody-analyte complexes, using a magnetic field, followed by exchange of serum for optimized biological buffer, (iii) mixing of MP-antibody-analyte complexes with actin filaments conjugated with same polyclonal antibodies as the magnetic nanoparticles. This causes complex formation: MP-antibody-analyte-antibody-actin, and magnetic separation is used to enrich the complexes. Finally (iv) the complexes are introduced into a nanodevice for specific binding via actin filaments to surface adsorbed molecular motors (heavy meromyosin). The number of actin filaments bound to the motors in the latter step was significantly increased above the control value if protein analyte (50–60 nM) was present in serum (in step i) suggesting appreciable formation and enrichment of the MP-antibody-analyte-antibody-actin complexes. Furthermore, addition of ATP demonstrated maintained heavy meromyosin driven propulsion of actin filaments showing that the serum induced inhibition was alleviated. Detailed analysis of the procedure i-iv, using fluorescence microscopy and spectroscopy identified main targets for future optimization. Conclusion The results demonstrate a promising approach for

  3. Origins of Highly Structured Distribution Functions in Magnetic Reconnection Exhausts: Understanding Electron Acceleration and Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuster, J. R.; Wang, S.; Chen, L. J.; Bessho, N.; Guo, R.; Torbert, R. B.; Daughton, W. S.

    2014-12-01

    Electron velocity distribution functions (VDFs) during reconnection with negligible guide field from particle in cell (PIC) simulations and Cluster observations are studied to further understand electron acceleration and heating. Until recently, electrons in the exhaust of reconnection with negligible guide field were thought to be isotropic. PIC simulation results with zero guide field reveal that near the time of peak reconnection, VDFs become highly structured in magnetic islands and open exhausts. Ring, arc, and counterstreaming populations are generic and lasting constituents of exhaust electron VDFs. Analyses of particle trajectories indicate that a number of mechanisms including Fermi acceleration, the parallel potential, and adiabatic heating contribute to the energization of exhaust electrons. Near the electron diffusion region (EDR), exhaust electrons exhibit large Te⊥ due to ring and arc populations of electrons accelerated in the EDR. Farther away from the EDR, the VDFs show a mixture of electrons from the EDR and those crossing the separatrix from the inflow. Pitch angle scattering is effective near the exhaust midplane, away from the EDR and before reaching the magnetic pileup region, producing isotropic, high-energy electrons, while the low energy exhaust electrons exhibit the anisotropy Te// > Te⊥ characteristic of the inflow. The work done on the electrons by the perpendicular electric field between the end of EDR and the magnetic pileup region is due to Fermi acceleration which leads to a net increase in the electron's parallel velocity. For the net increase of electrons' v⊥ beyond the EDR, pitch angle scattering effectively converts v// gained by acceleration from the parallel potential into v⊥. Electron's v⊥ further increases downstream through adiabatic heating from the increasing magnetic field in addition to less efficient pitch angle scattering. The parallel potential and the magnetic bottle together determine the trapped

  4. Affinity capture using peptide-functionalized magnetic nanoparticles to target Staphylococcus aureus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Fang-Yin; Lin, Wei-Lien; Chen, Yu-Chie

    2016-04-01

    Staphylococcus aureus, a commonly found pathogen, can cause food poisoning and infections. Thus, it is necessary to develop analytical methods for the rapid screening of S. aureus in suspicious samples. Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) are widely used as affinity probes to selectively enrich target species from complex samples because of their high specific surface area and magnetic properties. The MNP surface should be functionalized to have the capability to target specific species. We herein propose a straightforward method to functionalize aluminum oxide-coated iron oxide (Fe3O4@Al2O3) MNPs with the peptide HHHHHHDEEGLFVD (D). The peptide D was comprised of three domains: polyhistidine (H6) used as the linker, DEE added as the spacer, and GLFVD used for targeting S. aureus. D was immobilized on the surface of Fe3O4@Al2O3 MNPs through H6-Al chelation. Our results showed that the D-functionalized Fe3O4@Al2O3 MNPs (D-Fe3O4 MNPs) possess the capability to target S. aureus. The selective trapping experiments were conducted under microwave-heating for only 60 s, and sufficient bacterial cells were trapped by the MNPs to be identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS). We demonstrated that the D-Fe3O4@Al2O3 MNPs combined with MALDI-MS can be used to rapidly characterize trace amounts of S. aureus in complex juice and egg samples.Staphylococcus aureus, a commonly found pathogen, can cause food poisoning and infections. Thus, it is necessary to develop analytical methods for the rapid screening of S. aureus in suspicious samples. Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) are widely used as affinity probes to selectively enrich target species from complex samples because of their high specific surface area and magnetic properties. The MNP surface should be functionalized to have the capability to target specific species. We herein propose a straightforward method to functionalize aluminum oxide-coated iron oxide (Fe3O4@Al2O3) MNPs with the

  5. L-cysteine functionalized magnetic nanoparticles (LCMNP): a novel magnetically separable organocatalyst for one-pot synthesis of 2-amino-4H-chromene-3-carbonitriles in water.

    PubMed

    Khalafi-Nezhad, Ali; Nourisefat, Maryam; Panahi, Farhad

    2015-07-28

    In this study, L-cysteine was chemically grafted to magnetic nanoparticles in order to prepare a reusable magnetic material incorporating an amino acid moiety. For this purpose, silica-coated magnetic nanoparticles (Fe3O4@SiO2) were reacted with trimethoxy(vinyl)silane to produce vinyl-functionalized magnetic nanoparticles (VMNP). Reaction of a VMNP substrate with L-cysteine in the presence of azobisisobutyronitrile (AIBN) resulted in the production of L-cysteine-functionalized magnetic nanoparticles (LCMNP). The LCMNP material was characterized using different microscopy and spectroscopy techniques such as FT-IR, XRD, TEM, SEM, EDX, VSM, and elemental analysis. Also, LCMNP was analyzed by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) in order to determine its thermal behavior. The applicability of the LCMNP material was evaluated in a three-component coupling reaction between a nucleophile, salicylaldehyde and malononitrile as the catalyst for one-pot synthesis of 2-amino-4H-chromene-3-carbonitrile derivatives. The catalyst system showed high catalytic activity in this process and target products were obtained in high isolated yields in water as a green solvent. The LCMNP catalyst was reusable in this reaction at least 7 times with no significant decrease in its catalytic activity. PMID:26098281

  6. Cardiac Structure and Function in Cushing's Syndrome: A Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study

    PubMed Central

    Roux, Charles; Salenave, Sylvie; Kachenoura, Nadjia; Raissouni, Zainab; Macron, Laurent; Guignat, Laurence; Jublanc, Christel; Azarine, Arshid; Brailly, Sylvie; Young, Jacques; Mousseaux, Elie; Chanson, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Background: Patients with Cushing's syndrome have left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy and dysfunction on echocardiography, but echo-based measurements may have limited accuracy in obese patients. No data are available on right ventricular (RV) and left atrial (LA) size and function in these patients. Objectives: The objective of the study was to evaluate LV, RV, and LA structure and function in patients with Cushing's syndrome by means of cardiac magnetic resonance, currently the reference modality in assessment of cardiac geometry and function. Methods: Eighteen patients with active Cushing's syndrome and 18 volunteers matched for age, sex, and body mass index were studied by cardiac magnetic resonance. The imaging was repeated in the patients 6 months (range 2–12 mo) after the treatment of hypercortisolism. Results: Compared with controls, patients with Cushing's syndrome had lower LV, RV, and LA ejection fractions (P < .001 for all) and increased end-diastolic LV segmental thickness (P < .001). Treatment of hypercortisolism was associated with an improvement in ventricular and atrial systolic performance, as reflected by a 15% increase in the LV ejection fraction (P = .029), a 45% increase in the LA ejection fraction (P < .001), and an 11% increase in the RV ejection fraction (P = NS). After treatment, the LV mass index and end-diastolic LV mass to volume ratio decreased by 17% (P < .001) and 10% (P = .002), respectively. None of the patients had late gadolinium myocardial enhancement. Conclusion: Cushing's syndrome is associated with subclinical biventricular and LA systolic dysfunctions that are reversible after treatment. Despite skeletal muscle atrophy, Cushing's syndrome patients have an increased LV mass, reversible upon correction of hypercortisolism. PMID:25093618

  7. Influence of intermittency on the anisotropy of magnetic structure functions of solar wind turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, Zhongtian; He, Jiansen; Wang, Xin; Tu, Chuanyi; Marsch, Eckart; Wang, Linghua; Yan, Limei

    2016-02-01

    Intermittency appears to be connected with the spectral anisotropy of solar wind turbulence. We use the Local Intermittency Measure to identify and remove intermittency from the magnetic field data measured by the Ulysses spacecraft in fast solar wind. Structure functions are calculated based on the time sequences as obtained before and after removing intermittency and arranged by time scale (τ) and ΘRB (the angle between local mean magnetic field B0 and radial direction R). Thus, the scaling exponent (ξ(p, ΘRB)) of every structure function of order (p) is obtained for different angles. Before removing intermittency, ξ(p, ΘRB) shows a distinctive dependence on ΘRB: from monofractal scaling law at ΘRB ~0° to multifractal scaling law at ΘRB ~90°. In contrast after eliminating the intermittency, ξ(p, ΘRB) is found to be more monofractal for all ΘRB. The extended structure-function model is applied to ξ(p, ΘRB), revealing differences of its fitting parameters α (a proxy of the power spectral index) and P1 (fragmentation fraction) for the cases with and without intermittency. Parameter α shows an evident angular trend falling from 1.9 to 1.6 for the case with intermittency but has a relatively flat profile around 1.8 for the case without intermittency. Parameter P1 rises from around 0.5 to above 0.8 with increasing ΘRB for the intermittency case and is located between 0.5 and 0.8 for the case lacking intermittency. Therefore, we may infer that it is the anisotropy of intermittency that causes the scaling anisotropy of energy spectra and the unequal fragmentation of energy cascading.

  8. Magnetism, structures and stabilities of cluster assembled TM@Si nanotubes (TM = Cr, Mn and Fe): a density functional study.

    PubMed

    Dhaka, Kapil; Bandyopadhyay, Debashis

    2016-08-01

    The present study reports transition metal (TM = Cr, Mn and Fe) doped silicon nanotubes with tunable band structures and magnetic properties by careful selection of cluster assemblies as building blocks using the first-principles density functional theory. We found that the transition metal doping and in addition, the hydrogen termination process can stabilize the pure silicon nanoclusters or cluster assemblies and then it could be extended as magnetic nanotubes with finite magnetic moments. Study of the band structures and density of states (DOS) of different empty and TM doped nanotubes (Type 1 to Type 4) show that these nanotubes are useful as metals, semiconductors, semi-metals and half-metals. These designer magnetic materials could be useful in spintronics and magnetic devices of nanoscale order. PMID:27430742

  9. A density functional study of strong local magnetism creation on MoS2 nanoribbon by sulfur vacancy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shidpour, Reza; Manteghian, Merhrdad

    2010-08-01

    In this study a low-width MoS2 ribbon has been used for probing the electronic structure and local magnetic moment near vacancies. A theoretical study with the full-potential Density Functional Theory (DFT) approach (Wien2K code) have shown that when the dimension of MoS2 is reduced from 2-D to 1-D the nonmagnetic semi-conductor MoS2 becomes a magnetic conductor. Our study has shown that a vacancy on the S-edge with 50% coverage intensifies the magnetization of the edge of the MoS2 nanoribbon but such a vacancy on S-edge with 100% coverage causes this magnetic property to disappear. It is concluded that in both of them, there are positive or negative strong gradients of local magnetic moment near the vacancy. This may explain why lattice defects are essential for catalysis processes.

  10. A density functional study of strong local magnetism creation on MoS2 nanoribbon by sulfur vacancy.

    PubMed

    Shidpour, Reza; Manteghian, Merhrdad

    2010-08-01

    In this study a low-width MoS(2) ribbon has been used for probing the electronic structure and local magnetic moment near vacancies. A theoretical study with the full-potential Density Functional Theory (DFT) approach (Wien2K code) have shown that when the dimension of MoS(2) is reduced from 2-D to 1-D the nonmagnetic semi-conductor MoS(2) becomes a magnetic conductor. Our study has shown that a vacancy on the S-edge with 50% coverage intensifies the magnetization of the edge of the MoS(2) nanoribbon but such a vacancy on S-edge with 100% coverage causes this magnetic property to disappear. It is concluded that in both of them, there are positive or negative strong gradients of local magnetic moment near the vacancy. This may explain why lattice defects are essential for catalysis processes. PMID:20820730

  11. MAGNETS

    DOEpatents

    Hofacker, H.B.

    1958-09-23

    This patent relates to nmgnets used in a calutron and more particularly to means fur clamping an assembly of magnet coils and coil spacers into tightly assembled relation in a fluid-tight vessel. The magnet comprises windings made up of an assembly of alternate pan-cake type coils and spacers disposed in a fluid-tight vessel. At one end of the tank a plurality of clamping strips are held firmly against the assembly by adjustable bolts extending through the adjacent wall. The foregoing arrangement permits taking up any looseness which may develop in the assembly of coils and spacers.

  12. Towards an automated selection of spontaneous co-activity maps in functional magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sourty, Marion; Thoraval, Laurent; Roquet, Daniel; Armspach, Jean-Paul; Foucher, Jack

    2015-03-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging allows to assess large scale functional integration of the brain. One of the leading techniques to extract functionally relevant networks is spatial independent component analysis (ICA). Spatial ICA separates independent spatial sources, many of whom are noise or imaging artifacts, whereas some do correspond to functionally relevant Spontaneous co-Activity Maps (SAMs). For research purposes, ICA is generally performed on group data. This strategy is well adapted to uncover commonly shared networks, e.g. resting-state networks, but fails to capture idiosyncratic functional networks which may be related to pathological activity, e.g. epilepsy, hallucinations. To capture these subject specific networks, ICA has to be applied to single subjects using a large number of components, from which a tenth are SAMs. Up to now, SAMs have to be selected manually by an expert based on predefined criteria. We aim to semi-automate the selection process in order to save time. To this end, some approaches have been proposed but none with the near 100 % sensitivity required for clinical purposes. In this paper, we propose a computerized version of the SAM's criteria used by experts, based on frequential and spatial characteristics of functional networks. Here we present a pre-selection method and its results at different resolutions, with different scanners or imaging sequences. While preserving a near 100 % sensitivity, it allows an average of 70 % reduction of components to be classified which save 55% of experts' time. In comparison, group ICA fails to detect about 25% of the SAMs.

  13. Prediction of Liver Function by Using Magnetic Resonance-based Portal Venous Perfusion Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Cao Yue; Wang Hesheng; Johnson, Timothy D.; Pan, Charlie; Hussain, Hero; Balter, James M.; Normolle, Daniel; Ben-Josef, Edgar; Ten Haken, Randall K.; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Feng, Mary

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate whether liver function can be assessed globally and spatially by using volumetric dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging MRI (DCE-MRI) to potentially aid in adaptive treatment planning. Methods and Materials: Seventeen patients with intrahepatic cancer undergoing focal radiation therapy (RT) were enrolled in institution review board-approved prospective studies to obtain DCE-MRI (to measure regional perfusion) and indocyanine green (ICG) clearance rates (to measure overall liver function) prior to, during, and at 1 and 2 months after treatment. The volumetric distribution of portal venous perfusion in the whole liver was estimated for each scan. We assessed the correlation between mean portal venous perfusion in the nontumor volume of the liver and overall liver function measured by ICG before, during, and after RT. The dose response for regional portal venous perfusion to RT was determined using a linear mixed effects model. Results: There was a significant correlation between the ICG clearance rate and mean portal venous perfusion in the functioning liver parenchyma, suggesting that portal venous perfusion could be used as a surrogate for function. Reduction in regional venous perfusion 1 month after RT was predicted by the locally accumulated biologically corrected dose at the end of RT (P<.0007). Regional portal venous perfusion measured during RT was a significant predictor for regional venous perfusion assessed 1 month after RT (P<.00001). Global hypovenous perfusion pre-RT was observed in 4 patients (3 patients with hepatocellular carcinoma and cirrhosis), 3 of whom had recovered from hypoperfusion, except in the highest dose regions, post-RT. In addition, 3 patients who had normal perfusion pre-RT had marked hypervenous perfusion or reperfusion in low-dose regions post-RT. Conclusions: This study suggests that MR-based volumetric hepatic perfusion imaging may be a biomarker for spatial distribution of liver function, which

  14. Prediction of Liver Function by Using Magnetic Resonance-based Portal Venous Perfusion Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Yue; Wang, Hesheng; Johnson, Timothy D.; Pan, Charlie; Hussain, Hero; Balter, James M.; Normolle, Daniel; Ben-Josef, Edgar; Ten Haken, Randall K.; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Feng, Mary

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate whether liver function can be assessed globally and spatially by using volumetric dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging MRI (DCE-MRI) to potentially aid in adaptive treatment planning. Methods and Materials Seventeen patients with intrahepatic cancer undergoing focal radiation therapy (RT) were enrolled in institution review board-approved prospective studies to obtain DCE-MRI (to measure regional perfusion) and indocyanine green (ICG) clearance rates (to measure overall liver function) prior to, during, and at 1 and 2 months after treatment. The volumetric distribution of portal venous perfusion in the whole liver was estimated for each scan. We assessed the correlation between mean portal venous perfusion in the nontumor volume of the liver and overall liver function measured by ICG before, during, and after RT. The dose response for regional portal venous perfusion to RT was determined using a linear mixed effects model. Results There was a significant correlation between the ICG clearance rate and mean portal venous perfusion in the functioning liver parenchyma, suggesting that portal venous perfusion could be used as a surrogate for function. Reduction in regional venous perfusion 1 month after RT was predicted by the locally accumulated biologically corrected dose at the end of RT (P<.0007). Regional portal venous perfusion measured during RT was a significant predictor for regional venous perfusion assessed 1 month after RT (P<.00001). Global hypovenous perfusion pre-RT was observed in 4 patients (3 patients with hepatocellular carcinoma and cirrhosis), 3 of whom had recovered from hypoperfusion, except in the highest dose regions, post-RT. In addition, 3 patients who had normal perfusion pre-RT had marked hypervenous perfusion or reperfusion in low-dose regions post-RT. Conclusions This study suggests that MR-based volumetric hepatic perfusion imaging may be a biomarker for spatial distribution of liver function, which

  15. Acquired Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Cho, Do-Yeon; Woodworth, Bradford A

    2016-01-01

    In the genetic airway disease cystic fibrosis (CF), deficiency or dysfunction of the cystic fibrosis membrane conductance regulator (CFTR) alters anion transport in respiratory epithelium and consequently disrupts mucociliary clearance. An enriched understanding of the role of CFTR in the maintenance of normal epithelial function has revealed that mild and variable CFTR mutations play a causative role in a number of diseases not classically associated with CF. Furthermore, recent evidence indicates that acquired defects in wild-type CFTR protein processing, endocytic recycling and function can contribute to the pathogenesis of airway diseases, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. In this chapter, we discuss emerging findings implicating acquired CFTR dysfunction in the pathogenesis of chronic rhinosinusitis and propose a new and leading edge approach to future CRS therapy using CFTR potentiators. PMID:27466849

  16. Design of an active-passive device for human ankle movement during functional magnetic resonance imaging analysis.

    PubMed

    Belforte, Guido; Eula, Gabriella

    2012-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging analysis has made major strides in recent years, both because of the development of new scanners and owing to magnetic resonance compatible systems that make it possible to stimulate parts of the human body during analysis. The significant gains in our knowledge of the brain that can thus be achieved justify efforts to construct machines with control circuits suitable for this purpose. This paper presents a magnetic resonance compatible mechatronic device with electropneumatic control that can be used to move one or both feet during functional magnetic resonance imaging analysis of the cerebral motor zones. The system is innovative and original. The results obtained at the end of the investigation were good, and demonstrated that the design is feasible. PMID:22888581

  17. Magnetic properties and paleointensities as function of depth in a Hawai'ian lava flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekkers, M. J.; de Groot, L. V.; ter Maat, G. W.

    2013-12-01

    The outcome of paleointensity experiments largely depends on the rock-magnetic properties of the samples. To assess the relation between volcanic emplacement processes and rock-magnetic properties we sampled a vertical transect in a ~6 m thick inflated lava flow at Hawai'i, with an age of 588 (558 - 640) AD (Rubin et al., 1987, recalibrated with INTCAL.09). This profile was sampled at sixteen levels in the flow; at six of these levels up to twelve samples were taken horizontally to have sufficient sample material for paleointensity experiments. Samples from all levels were rock magnetically characterized by determining hysteresis loops and FORC (first-order-reversal-curve) diagrams, and the low-field susceptibility, all at room temperature. To test for thermochemical alteration the temperature dependence of the low-field susceptibility and magnetization was determined. Overall, rock magnetic properties appear to vary as function of distance from the top; the observations can be correlated to the typical cooling rate profile for such a flow. The solidified crust under which the flow continued to flow during emplacement is ~1.8 m thick. Its rock-magnetic properties - notably the low-field susceptibility and the coercivity ratio - are more variable than those of the inflated part underneath. FORC diagrams indicate a fair portion of very small superparamagnetic particles in the top and to a lesser extent the bottom parts of the flow. In line with their faster cooling the dominant titanomagnetite composition is ~TM60 with associated low Curie and unblocking temperatures. The titanomagnetite in the slower cooled central part of the flow is unmixed into the magnetite (~TM0) and ülvospinel end-members; the remanence has therefore high Curie and unblocking temperatures. FORC diagrams and hysteresis parameters indicate larger pseudo-single-domain particles. We performed both IZZI-Thellier and calibrated pseudo-Thellier (AGU Fall 2012 contribution GP43A-1122, submitted

  18. Surface Functionalization of Magnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles for MRI Applications – Effect of Anchoring Group and Ligand Exchange Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Smolensky, Eric D.; Park, Hee-Yun E.; Berquó, Thelma S.; Pierre, Valérie C.

    2011-01-01

    Hydrophobic magnetite nanoparticles synthesized from thermal decomposition of iron salts must be rendered hydrophilic for their application as MRI contrast agents. This process requires refunctionalizing the surface of the nanoparticles with a hydrophilic organic coating such as polyethylene glycol. Two parameters were found to influence the magnetic behavior and relaxivity of the resulting hydrophilic iron oxide nanoparticles: the functionality of the anchoring group and the protocol followed for the functionalization. Nanoparticles coated with PEGs via a catecholate-type anchoring moiety maintain the saturation magnetization and relaxivity of the hydrophobic magnetite precursor. Other anchoring functionalities, such as phosphonate, carboxylate, and dopamine decrease the magnetization and relaxivity of the contrast agent. The protocol for functionalizing the nanoparticles also influences the magnetic behavior of the material. Nanoparticles refunctionalized according to a direct biphasic protocol exhibit higher relaxivity than those refunctionalized according to a two-step procedure which first involves stripping the nanoparticles. This research presents the first systematic study of both the binding moiety and the functionalization protocol on the relaxivity and magnetization of water-soluble coated iron oxide nanoparticles used as MRI contrast agents. PMID:21861279

  19. Functional magnetic resonance imaging of awake monkeys: some approaches for improving imaging quality

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Gang; Wang, Feng; Dillenburger, Barbara C.; Friedman, Robert M.; Chen, Li M.; Gore, John C.; Avison, Malcolm J.; Roe, Anna W.

    2011-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), at high magnetic field strength can suffer from serious degradation of image quality because of motion and physiological noise, as well as spatial distortions and signal losses due to susceptibility effects. Overcoming such limitations is essential for sensitive detection and reliable interpretation of fMRI data. These issues are particularly problematic in studies of awake animals. As part of our initial efforts to study functional brain activations in awake, behaving monkeys using fMRI at 4.7T, we have developed acquisition and analysis procedures to improve image quality with encouraging results. We evaluated the influence of two main variables on image quality. First, we show how important the level of behavioral training is for obtaining good data stability and high temporal signal-to-noise ratios. In initial sessions, our typical scan session lasted 1.5 hours, partitioned into short (<10 minutes) runs. During reward periods and breaks between runs, the monkey exhibited movements resulting in considerable image misregistrations. After a few months of extensive behavioral training, we were able to increase the length of individual runs and the total length of each session. The monkey learned to wait until the end of a block for fluid reward, resulting in longer periods of continuous acquisition. Each additional 60 training sessions extended the duration of each session by 60 minutes, culminating, after about 140 training sessions, in sessions that last about four hours. As a result, the average translational movement decreased from over 500 μm to less than 80 μm, a displacement close to that observed in anesthetized monkeys scanned in a 7 T horizontal scanner. Another major source of distortion at high fields arises from susceptibility variations. To reduce such artifacts, we used segmented gradient-echo echo-planar imaging (EPI) sequences. Increasing the number of segments significantly decreased susceptibility

  20. Love-related changes in the brain: a resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Song, Hongwen; Zou, Zhiling; Kou, Juan; Liu, Yang; Yang, Lizhuang; Zilverstand, Anna; d'Oleire Uquillas, Federico; Zhang, Xiaochu

    2015-01-01

    Romantic love is a motivational state associated with a desire to enter or maintain a close relationship with a specific other person. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies have found activation increases in brain regions involved in the processing of reward, motivation and emotion regulation, when romantic lovers view photographs of their partners. However, not much is known about whether romantic love affects the brain's functional architecture during rest. In the present study, resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rsfMRI) data was collected to compare the regional homogeneity (ReHo) and functional connectivity (FC) across an "in-love" group (LG, N = 34, currently intensely in love), an "ended-love" group (ELG, N = 34, ended romantic relationship recently), and a "single" group (SG, N = 32, never fallen in love). Results show that: (1) ReHo of the left dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) was significantly increased in the LG (in comparison to the ELG and the SG); (2) ReHo of the left dACC was positively correlated with length of time in love in the LG, and negatively correlated with the lovelorn duration since breakup in the ELG; (3) FC within the reward, motivation, and emotion regulation network (dACC, insula, caudate, amygdala, and nucleus accumbens) as well as FC in the social cognition network [temporo-parietal junction (TPJ), posterior cingulate cortex (PCC), medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC), inferior parietal, precuneus, and temporal lobe] was significantly increased in the LG (in comparison to the ELG and SG); (4) in most regions within both networks FC was positively correlated with the duration of love in the LG but negatively correlated with the lovelorn duration of time since breakup in the ELG. This study provides first empirical evidence of love-related alterations in brain functional architecture. Furthermore, the results shed light on the underlying neural mechanisms of romantic love, and demonstrate the

  1. Love-related changes in the brain: a resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging study

    PubMed Central

    Song, Hongwen; Zou, Zhiling; Kou, Juan; Liu, Yang; Yang, Lizhuang; Zilverstand, Anna; d’Oleire Uquillas, Federico; Zhang, Xiaochu

    2015-01-01

    Romantic love is a motivational state associated with a desire to enter or maintain a close relationship with a specific other person. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies have found activation increases in brain regions involved in the processing of reward, motivation and emotion regulation, when romantic lovers view photographs of their partners. However, not much is known about whether romantic love affects the brain’s functional architecture during rest. In the present study, resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rsfMRI) data was collected to compare the regional homogeneity (ReHo) and functional connectivity (FC) across an “in-love” group (LG, N = 34, currently intensely in love), an “ended-love” group (ELG, N = 34, ended romantic relationship recently), and a “single” group (SG, N = 32, never fallen in love). Results show that: (1) ReHo of the left dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) was significantly increased in the LG (in comparison to the ELG and the SG); (2) ReHo of the left dACC was positively correlated with length of time in love in the LG, and negatively correlated with the lovelorn duration since breakup in the ELG; (3) FC within the reward, motivation, and emotion regulation network (dACC, insula, caudate, amygdala, and nucleus accumbens) as well as FC in the social cognition network [temporo-parietal junction (TPJ), posterior cingulate cortex (PCC), medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC), inferior parietal, precuneus, and temporal lobe] was significantly increased in the LG (in comparison to the ELG and SG); (4) in most regions within both networks FC was positively correlated with the duration of love in the LG but negatively correlated with the lovelorn duration of time since breakup in the ELG. This study provides first empirical evidence of love-related alterations in brain functional architecture. Furthermore, the results shed light on the underlying neural mechanisms of romantic love, and demonstrate

  2. Rapid three-dimensional functional magnetic resonance imaging of the initial negative BOLD response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindquist, Martin A.; Zhang, Cun-Hui; Glover, Gary; Shepp, Lawrence

    2008-03-01

    Functional MRI is most commonly used to study the local changes in blood flow that accompanies neuronal activity. In this work we introduce a new approach towards acquiring and analyzing fMRI data that instead provides the potential to study the initial oxygen consumption in the brain that accompanies activation. As the oxygen consumption is closer in timing to the underlying neuronal activity than the subsequent blood flow, this approach promises to provide more precise information about the location and timing of activity. Our approach is based on using a new single shot 3D echo-volumar imaging sequence which samples a small central region of 3D k-space every 100 ms, thereby giving a low spatial resolution snapshot of the brain with extremely high temporal resolution. Explicit and simple rules for implementing the trajectory are provided, together with a straightforward reconstruction algorithm. Using our approach allows us to effectively study the behavior of the brain in the time immediately following activation through the initial negative BOLD response, and we discuss new techniques for detecting the presence of the negative response across the brain. The feasibility and efficiency of the approach is confirmed using data from a visual-motor task and an auditory-motor-visual task. The results of these experiments provide a proof of concept of our methodology, and indicate that rapid imaging of the initial negative BOLD response can serve an important role in studying cognition tasks involving rapid mental processing in more than one region.

  3. MSi₂₀H₂₀ aggregates: from simple building blocks to highly magnetic functionalized materials.

    PubMed

    Palagin, Dennis; Reuter, Karsten

    2013-02-26

    Density-functional theory based global geometry optimization is used to scrutinize the possibility of using endohedrally doped hydrogenated Si clusters as building blocks for constructing highly magnetic materials. In contrast to the known clathrate-type facet-sharing, the clusters exhibit a predisposition to aggregation through double Si-Si bridge bonds. For the prototypical CrSi₂₀H₂₀ cluster we show that reducing the degree of hydrogenation may be used to control the number of reactive sites to which other cages can be attached, while still preserving the structural integrity of the building block itself. This leads to a toolbox of CrSi₂₀H(20-2n) monomers with different number of double "docking sites", that allows building network architectures of any morphology. For (CrSi₂₀H₁₈)₂ dimer and [CrSi₂₀H₁₆](CrSi₂₀H₁₈)₂ trimer structures we illustrate that such aggregates conserve the high spin moments of the dopant atoms and are therefore most attractive candidates for cluster-assembled materials with unique magnetic properties. The study suggests that the structural completion of the individual endohedral cages within the doubly bridge bonded structures and the high thermodynamic stability of the obtained aggregates are crucial for potential synthetic polimerization routes via controlled dehydrogenation. PMID:23339372

  4. PAMAM Dendrimer/pDNA Functionalized-Magnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles for Gene Delivery.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Shili; Castro, Rita; Rodrigues, João; Shi, Xiangyang; Tomás, Helena

    2015-08-01

    Herein, we report an easy and ingenious method to functionalize magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (MNPs) with plasmid DNA (pDNA) to obtain nanohybrid systems suitable for nucleic acid therapy. The nanohybrids were prepared by combining complexes of dendrimers and pDNA (dendriplexes) and poly(styrene) sulfonate-coated MNPs through electrostatic interactions. The effects of the dendrimer generation (generations 2, 4 and 6) and the amine to phosphate group (N/P) ratio on the hydrodynamic diameter, zeta potential, cell viability, cellular internalization and transfection efficiency of the nanohybrids were systematically investigated at different transfection conditions (including incubation time, pDNA concentration, presence or absence of an external magnetic field, and presence or absence of fetal bovine serum). The results confirmed that the nanohybrids were able to transfect NIH 3T3 cells, and that the level of gene expression (the luciferase protein reporter gene was used) was strongly dependent on the dendrimer generation, the N/P ratio, and the pDNA concentration. The best system was based on dendriplex-coated MNPs formed by generation 6 dendrimers at an N/P ratio of 10 that, at optimized conditions, led to a gene expression level which was not significantly different from that obtained only using dendriplexes. In summary, a coherent set of results was reached indicating the potential of the developed nanohybrids as effective gene delivery nanomaterials. PMID:26295139

  5. Development of a simple pressure and heat stimulator for intra- and interdigit functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyung-Sik; Choi, Mi-Hyun; Kim, Hyun-Joo; Hong, Sang-Pyo; Park, Jang-Yeon; Jun, Jae-Hoon; Yi, Jeong-Han; Chung, Yoon-Gi; Kim, Sung-Phil; Park, Jong-Rak; Lim, Dae-Woon; Chung, Soon-Cheol

    2014-06-01

    For this study, we developed a simple pressure and heat stimulator that can quantitatively control pressure and provide heat stimulation to intra- and interdigit areas. The developed stimulator consists of a control unit, drive units, and tactors. The control unit controls the stimulation parameters, such as stimulation types, intensity, time, and channel, and transmits a created signal of stimulation to the drive units. The drive units operate pressure and heat tactors in response to commands from the control unit. The pressure and heat tactors can display various stimulation intensities quantitatively, apply stimulation continuously, and adjust the stimulation areas. Additionally, they can easily be attached to and detached from the digits. The developed pressure and heat stimulator is small in total size, easy to install, and inexpensive to manufacture. The new stimulator operated stably in a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) environment without affecting the obtained images. A preliminary functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) experiment confirmed that differences in activation of somatosensory areas were induced from the pressure and heat stimulation. The developed pressure and heat stimulator is expected to be utilized for future intra- and interdigit fMRI studies on pressure and heat stimulation. PMID:23861087

  6. Statistical maps of geomagnetic perturbations as a function of the interplanetary magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weimer, D. R.; Clauer, C. R.; Engebretson, M. J.; Hansen, T. L.; Gleisner, H.; Mann, I.; Yumoto, K.

    2010-10-01

    Mappings of geomagnetic perturbations are shown for different combinations of the solar wind velocity, interplanetary magnetic field (IMF), and dipole tilt angle (season). Average maps were derived separately for the northward, eastward, and vertical (downward) components of the geomagnetic disturbances, using spherical cap harmonics in least error fits of sorted measurements. The source data are obtained from 104 ground-based magnetometer stations in the Northern Hemisphere at geomagnetic latitudes over 40° during the years 1998 through 2001. Contour maps of statistical fits are shown along-side scatter plots of individual measurements in corrected geomagnetic apex coordinates. The patterns are consistent with previous mappings of ionospheric electric potential. Interestingly, the vertical component of the magnetic perturbations closely resembles maps of the overhead, field-aligned currents, including the Northward IMF configuration. The maximum and minimum values from the statistical mappings are graphed to show their changes as a function of southward IMF magnitude, solar wind velocity, and seasons. It is expected that this work will lead to better advance predictions of the geomagnetic perturbations that are based on real-time IMF measurements.

  7. The influence of surface functionalization on the enhanced internalization of magnetic nanoparticles in cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villanueva, Angeles; Cañete, Magdalena; Roca, Alejandro G; Calero, Macarena; Veintemillas-Verdaguer, Sabino; Serna, Carlos J; del Puerto Morales, María; Miranda, Rodolfo

    2009-03-01

    The internalization and biocompatibility of iron oxide nanoparticles surface functionalized with four differently charged carbohydrates have been tested in the human cervical carcinoma cell line (HeLa). Neutral, positive, and negative iron oxide nanoparticles were obtained by coating with dextran, aminodextran, heparin, and dimercaptosuccinic acid, resulting in colloidal suspensions stable at pH 7 with similar aggregate size. No intracellular uptake was detected in cells incubated with neutral charged nanoparticles, while negative particles showed different behaviour depending on the nature of the coating. Thus, dimercaptosuccinic-coated nanoparticles showed low cellular uptake with non-toxic effects, while heparin-coated particles showed cellular uptake only at high nanoparticle concentrations and induced abnormal mitotic spindle configurations. Finally, cationic magnetic nanoparticles show excellent properties for possible in vivo biomedical applications such as cell tracking by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and cancer treatment by hyperthermia: (i) they enter into cells with high effectiveness, and are localized in endosomes; (ii) they can be easily detected inside cells by optical microscopy, (iii) they are retained for relatively long periods of time, and (iv) they do not induce any cytotoxicity.

  8. Electronic and magnetic properties of N-N split substitution in GaAs: A hybrid density functional study

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Ruiqi; Wang, Qingxia; Cai, Xiaolin; Li, Chong; Jia, Yu; Wang, Fei; Wang, Sanjun

    2015-07-15

    Employing the first-principles combined with hybrid functional calculations, the electronic and magnetic properties of GaAs doped with a N{sub 2} molecule are investigated in this work. We find that in Ga{sub 32}As{sub 31}(N{sub 2}){sub As} the N-N split is able to saturate the dangling bond of Ga atom ,form sp{sup 3}-like hybridization, and simultaneously supply an extra localized electron, leading to a magnetic ground state with a magnetic moment of ∼1μ{sub B}. This magnetic ground state is different from previously nonmagnetic results predicted by PBE functional, which results from the self-interaction error inherent in semi-local density functional theory. Moreover, the band gap of magnetic ground state of Ga{sub 32}As{sub 31}(N{sub 2}){sub As} alloy decreases, which is relative to GaAs . Finally we discuss and explain why the magnetism is not discovered in previous experiments and theories.

  9. In Vivo NMR Studies of the Brain with Hereditary or Acquired Metabolic Disorders.

    PubMed

    Sherry, Erica B; Lee, Phil; Choi, In-Young

    2015-12-01

    Metabolic disorders, whether hereditary or acquired, affect the brain, and abnormalities of the brain are related to cellular integrity; particularly in regard to neurons and astrocytes as well as interactions between them. Metabolic disturbances lead to alterations in cellular function as well as microscopic and macroscopic structural changes in the brain with diabetes, the most typical example of metabolic disorders, and a number of hereditary metabolic disorders. Alternatively, cellular dysfunction and degeneration of the brain lead to metabolic disturbances in hereditary neurological disorders with neurodegeneration. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques allow us to assess a range of pathophysiological changes of the brain in vivo. For example, magnetic resonance spectroscopy detects alterations in brain metabolism and energetics. Physiological magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) detects accompanying changes in cerebral blood flow related to neurovascular coupling. Diffusion and T1/T2-weighted MRI detect microscopic and macroscopic changes of the brain structure. This review summarizes current NMR findings of functional, physiological and biochemical alterations within a number of hereditary and acquired metabolic disorders in both animal models and humans. The global view of the impact of these metabolic disorders on the brain may be useful in identifying the unique and/or general patterns of abnormalities in the living brain related to the pathophysiology of the diseases, and identifying future fields of inquiry. PMID:26610379

  10. Alterations in vascular function in primary aldosteronism: a cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Mark, P B; Boyle, S; Zimmerli, L U; McQuarrie, E P; Delles, C; Freel, E M

    2014-02-01

    Excess aldosterone is associated with increased cardiovascular risk. Aldosterone has a permissive effect on vascular fibrosis. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) allows study of vascular function by measuring aortic distensibility. We compared aortic distensibility in primary aldosteronism (PA), essential hypertension (EH) and normal controls and explored the relationship between aortic distensibility and pulse wave velocity (PWV). We studied PA (n=14) and EH (n=33) subjects and age-matched healthy controls (n=17) with CMR, including measurement of aortic distensibility, and measured PWV using applanation tonometry. At recruitment, PA and EH patients had similar blood pressure and left ventricular mass. Subjects with PA had significantly lower aortic distensibility and higher PWV compared with EH and healthy controls. These changes were independent of other factors associated with reduced aortic distensibility, including ageing. There was a significant relationship between increasing aortic stiffness and age in keeping with physical and vascular ageing. As expected, aortic distensibility and PWV were closely correlated. These results demonstrate that PA patients display increased arterial stiffness compared with EH, independent of vascular ageing. The implication is that aldosterone invokes functional impairment of arterial function. The long-term implications of arterial stiffening in aldosterone excess require further study. PMID:23884211

  11. A computerized tablet with visual feedback of hand position for functional magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Karimpoor, Mahta; Tam, Fred; Strother, Stephen C.; Fischer, Corinne E.; Schweizer, Tom A.; Graham, Simon J.

    2015-01-01

    Neuropsychological tests behavioral tasks that very commonly involve handwriting and drawing are widely used in the clinic to detect abnormal brain function. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) may be useful in increasing the specificity of such tests. However, performing complex pen-and-paper tests during fMRI involves engineering challenges. Previously, we developed an fMRI-compatible, computerized tablet system to address this issue. However, the tablet did not include visual feedback of hand position (VFHP), a human factors component that may be important for fMRI of certain patient populations. A real-time system was thus developed to provide VFHP and integrated with the tablet in an augmented reality display. The effectiveness of the system was initially tested in young healthy adults who performed various handwriting tasks in front of a computer display with and without VFHP. Pilot fMRI of writing tasks were performed by two representative individuals with and without VFHP. Quantitative analysis of the behavioral results indicated improved writing performance with VFHP. The pilot fMRI results suggest that writing with VFHP requires less neural resources compared to the without VFHP condition, to maintain similar behavior. Thus, the tablet system with VFHP is recommended for future fMRI studies involving patients with impaired brain function and where ecologically valid behavior is important. PMID:25859201

  12. Neural correlates of attachment trauma in borderline personality disorder: a functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Buchheim, Anna; Erk, Susanne; George, Carol; Kächele, Horst; Kircher, Tilo; Martius, Philipp; Pokorny, Dan; Ruchsow, Martin; Spitzer, Manfred; Walter, Henrik

    2008-08-30

    Functional imaging studies have shown that individuals with borderline personality disorder (BPD) display prefrontal and amygdala dysfunction while viewing or listening to emotional or traumatic stimuli. The study examined for the first time the functional neuroanatomy of attachment trauma in BPD patients using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during the telling of individual stories. A group of 11 female BPD patients and 17 healthy female controls, matched for age and education, told stories in response to a validated set of seven attachment pictures while being scanned. Group differences in narrative and neural responses to "monadic" pictures (characters facing attachment threats alone) and "dyadic" pictures (interaction between characters in an attachment context) were analyzed. Behavioral narrative data showed that monadic pictures were significantly more traumatic for BPD patients than for controls. As hypothesized BPD patients showed significantly more anterior midcingulate cortex activation in response to monadic pictures than controls. In response to dyadic pictures patients showed more activation of the right superior temporal sulcus and less activation of the right parahippocampal gyrus compared to controls. Our results suggest evidence for potential neural mechanisms of attachment trauma underlying interpersonal symptoms of BPD, i.e. fearful and painful intolerance of aloneness, hypersensitivity to social environment, and reduced positive memories of dyadic interactions. PMID:18635342

  13. The effect of magnetic resonance imaging noise on cochlear function in dogs.

    PubMed

    Venn, R E; McBrearty, A R; McKeegan, D; Penderis, J

    2014-10-01

    Noise produced by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanners (which can peak at a sound pressure level of 131 dB) has been shown to cause noise-induced cochlear dysfunction in people. The aim of this study was to investigate whether noise produced during MRI had a deleterious effect on cochlear function in dogs, using distortion product otoacoustic emission (DPOAE) testing, which allows frequency specific, non-invasive assessment of cochlear function. DPOAE testing was performed before and after MRI in one or both ears under general anaesthesia at 14 frequency pairs (f2 frequency ranging from 0.84 kHz to 8.0 kHz). A control group comprised dogs undergoing anaesthesia of a similar duration for quiet procedures. Thirty-six dogs (66 ears) and 17 dogs (28 ears) were included in the MRI and control groups respectively. There was a reduction in DPOAE at all frequencies tested in the MRI group; a similar effect was not evident in the control group. This reduction in the MRI group was statistically significant in five of the 14 frequencies assessed (P < 0.05). These results demonstrate that exposure to MRI noise results in a significant reduction in frequency-specific cochlear function in dogs, although it is not known whether this is reversible or permanent. This suggests that all dogs undergoing MRI studies should be provided with ear protection as a routine precautionary measure. PMID:25155216

  14. American Clinical Magnetoencephalography Society Clinical Practice Guideline 2: Presurgical Functional Brain Mapping Using Magnetic Evoked Fields*

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, Richard C.; Funke, Michael E.; Bowyer, Susan M.; Lewine, Jeffrey D.; Kirsch, Heidi E.; Bagić, Anto I.

    2012-01-01

    The following are “minimum standards” for the routine clinical recording of magnetic evoked fields (MEFs) in all age-groups. Practicing at minimum standards should not be the goal of a magnetoencephalography (MEG) center but rather a starting level for continued improvement. Minimum standards meet only the most basic responsibilities to the patient and the referring physician. These minimum standards have been put forth to improve standardization of procedures, to facilitate interchange of recordings and reports among laboratories in the United States, and to confirm the expectations of referring physicians. Recommendations regarding Laboratory (Center) Environment and Preparation for MEG Recordings are detailed in the American Clinical Magnetoencephalography Society Clinical Practice Guideline (CPG) 1 : Recording and Analysis of Spontaneous Cerebral Activity, except for its EEG aspect that is not considered necessary (although may be helpful in trained hands) for MEFs (presurgical functional brain mapping). PMID:21811122

  15. Mapping quantal touch using 7 Tesla functional magnetic resonance imaging and single-unit intraneural microstimulation.

    PubMed

    Sanchez Panchuelo, Rosa Maria; Ackerley, Rochelle; Glover, Paul M; Bowtell, Richard W; Wessberg, Johan; Francis, Susan T; McGlone, Francis

    2016-01-01

    Using ultra-high field 7 Tesla (7T) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we map the cortical and perceptual responses elicited by intraneural microstimulation (INMS) of single mechanoreceptive afferent units in the median nerve, in humans. Activations are compared to those produced by applying vibrotactile stimulation to the unit's receptive field, and unit-type perceptual reports are analyzed. We show that INMS and vibrotactile stimulation engage overlapping areas within the topographically appropriate digit representation in the primary somatosensory cortex. Additional brain regions in bilateral secondary somatosensory cortex, premotor cortex, primary motor cortex, insula and posterior parietal cortex, as well as in contralateral prefrontal cortex are also shown to be activated in response to INMS. The combination of INMS and 7T fMRI opens up an unprecedented opportunity to bridge the gap between first-order mechanoreceptive afferent input codes and their spatial, dynamic and perceptual representations in human cortex. PMID:27154626

  16. Quantification of cardiovascular disease biomarkers via functionalized magnetic beads and on-demand detachable quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Park, Hoyoung; Lee, Jong-Wook; Hwang, Mintai P; Lee, Kwan Hyi

    2013-09-21

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a potent cause of mortality in both advanced and developing countries. While soluble CD40L (sCD40L) has been implicated as a correlative factor among CVD patients, methods to quantify sCD40L are not yet well-established. In this paper, we present an ability to separate and quantify sCD40L via a simple immunomagnetic assay. Composed of functionalized magnetic beads conferred with directionality and on-demand detachable quantum dots for subsequent optical analysis, our system utilizes the competitive nature of imidazole and nickel ions for histidine. In essence, we demonstrate the capacity to effectively separate and detect sCD40L within a clinically relevant range that contains the cut-off value for acute coronary disease. While sCD40L was used to conduct this study, we envision the use of our system for the separation and quantification of other biomarkers. PMID:23893124

  17. "More is different" in functional magnetic resonance imaging: a review of recent data analysis techniques.

    PubMed

    Lohmann, Gabriele; Stelzer, Johannes; Neumann, Jane; Ay, Nihat; Turner, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Two aspects play a key role in recently developed strategies for functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data analysis: first, it is now recognized that the human brain is a complex adaptive system and exhibits the hallmarks of complexity such as emergence of patterns arising out of a multitude of interactions between its many constituents. Second, the field of fMRI has evolved into a data-intensive, big data endeavor with large databases and masses of data being shared around the world. At the same time, ultra-high field MRI scanners are now available producing data at previously unobtainable quality and quantity. Both aspects have led to shifts in the way in which we view fMRI data. Here, we review recent developments in fMRI data analysis methodology that resulted from these shifts in paradigm. PMID:23402339

  18. Mapping brain region activity during chewing: a functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Onozuka, M; Fujita, M; Watanabe, K; Hirano, Y; Niwa, M; Nishiyama, K; Saito, S

    2002-11-01

    Mastication has been suggested to increase neuronal activities in various regions of the human brain. However, because of technical difficulties, the fine anatomical and physiological regions linked to mastication have not been fully elucidated. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging during cycles of rhythmic gum-chewing and no chewing, we therefore examined the interaction between chewing and brain regional activity in 17 subjects (aged 20-31 years). In all subjects, chewing resulted in a bilateral increase in blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signals in the sensorimotor cortex, supplementary motor area, insula, thalamus, and cerebellum. In addition, in the first three regions, chewing of moderately hard gum produced stronger BOLD signals than the chewing of hard gum. However, the signal was higher in the cerebellum and not significant in the thalamus, respectively. These results suggest that chewing causes regional increases in brain neuronal activities which are related to biting force. PMID:12407087

  19. Quantification of cardiovascular disease biomarkers via functionalized magnetic beads and on-demand detachable quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hoyoung; Lee, Jong-Wook; Hwang, Mintai P.; Lee, Kwan Hyi

    2013-08-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a potent cause of mortality in both advanced and developing countries. While soluble CD40L (sCD40L) has been implicated as a correlative factor among CVD patients, methods to quantify sCD40L are not yet well-established. In this paper, we present an ability to separate and quantify sCD40L via a simple immunomagnetic assay. Composed of functionalized magnetic beads conferred with directionality and on-demand detachable quantum dots for subsequent optical analysis, our system utilizes the competitive nature of imidazole and nickel ions for histidine. In essence, we demonstrate the capacity to effectively separate and detect sCD40L within a clinically relevant range that contains the cut-off value for acute coronary disease. While sCD40L was used to conduct this study, we envision the use of our system for the separation and quantification of other biomarkers.

  20. Spatial Bayesian Variable Selection Models on Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Time-Series Data

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kuo-Jung; Jones, Galin L.; Caffo, Brian S.; Bassett, Susan Spear

    2014-01-01

    A common objective of fMRI (functional magnetic resonance imaging) studies is to determine subject-specific areas of increased blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) signal contrast in response to a stimulus or task, and hence to infer regional neuronal activity. We posit and investigate a Bayesian approach that incorporates spatial and temporal dependence and allows for the task-related change in the BOLD signal to change dynamically over the scanning session. In this way, our model accounts for potential learning effects in addition to other mechanisms of temporal drift in task-related signals. We study the properties of the model through its performance on simulated and real data sets. PMID:25530824

  1. Prevention of Serum Albumin Glycation/Fibrillation by β-Cyclodextrin Functionalized Magnetic Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Ansari, Mojtaba; Habibi-Rezaei, Mehran; Salahshour-Kordestani, Soheila; Movahedi, Ali A Moosavi; Poursasan, Najmeh

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays, glycation induced protein aggregation and related opposing strategies have received much attention. We present the effect of functionalized magnetic core-shell nanoparticles of Fe3O4 (MNPs) with β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) on the aggregation/fibrillation of bovine serum albumin (BSA) under diabetic condition known as amyloidogenesis. To confirm the β-CD conjugation on MNP, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) methods were applied. Moreover, spectrofluorimetry and spectropolarimetry were utilized to analyze the effect of β-CD/Fe3O4 MNPs on the aggregation and amyloidogenesis of BSA through glycation. The BSA amyloidogenesis was significantly inhibited by interfering β-CD-MNPs that may present the possible diagnostic and preventive applications against the degenerative effects of protein glycation/fibrillation under diabetes. PMID:26100685

  2. Functional Neurosurgery in the Human Thalamus by Transcranial Magnetic Resonance Guided Focused Ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, Beat; Morel, Anne; Jeanmonod, Daniel; Martin, Ernst

    2009-04-01

    Potential applications of Transcranial Magnetic Resonance guided Focused Ultrasound (TcMRgFUS) include treatment of functional brain disorders, such as Parkinson's disease, dystonia and tremor, neurogenic pain and tinnitus, neuropsychiatric disorders and epilepsy. In this study we demonstrate the feasibility of non-invasive TcMRgFUS ablation of clinically well established targets in the human thalamus that are currently accessed stereotactically by interventional strategies based on the concept of the thalamocortical dysrhythmia (TCD). Thermal hotspots suitable for clinical intervention were created successfully in anatomical preparations of human ex-vivo heads under pseudo clinical conditions. The hotspots could be positioned at the target locations as needed and local energy deposition was sufficient to create tissue ablation. Numerical simulations based on these experimental data predict that the acoustic energy needed to create ablative lesions in-vivo will be within limits that can safely applied.

  3. Application of carboxyphenylboronic acid-functionalized magnetic nanoparticles for extracting nucleic acid from seeds.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ning; Deng, Congliang; Ge, Guanglu; Xia, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles functionalized with 4-carboxyphenylboronic acid (CPBA-MNPs) were developed for extracting genomic DNA, total RNA and nucleic acids from seeds. The seed samples were genetically-modified maize seeds and unmodified soybean seeds infected by bean pod mottle virus and tobacco ringspot virus. The total nucleic acids, genomic DNA, and RNA could be separately extracted from these seeds with high qualities using CPBA-MNPs under different conditions. Furthermore, the results of real-time quantitative qPCR and real-time reverse transcription (RT)-PCR indicated that the nucleic acids extracted from these seeds using CPBA-MNPs were suitable for the detection of genetically-modified seeds and seed-borne viruses. PMID:25214223

  4. Improving the Description of Nonmagnetic and Magnetic Molecular Crystals via the van der Waals Density Functional

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obata, Masao; Nakamura, Makoto; Hamada, Ikutaro; Oda, Tatsuki

    2015-02-01

    We have derived and implemented a stress tensor formulation for the van der Waals density functional (vdW-DF) with spin-polarization-dependent gradient correction (GC) recently proposed by the authors [J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 82, 093701 (2013)] and applied it to nonmagnetic and magnetic molecular crystals under ambient condition. We found that the cell parameters of the molecular crystals obtained with vdW-DF show an overall improvement compared with those obtained using local density and generalized gradient approximations. In particular, the original vdW-DF with GC gives the equilibrium structural parameters of solid oxygen in the α-phase, which are in good agreement with the experiment.

  5. Real-time magnetic resonance imaging of cardiac function and flow—recent progress

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shuo; Joseph, Arun A.; Voit, Dirk; Schaetz, Sebastian; Merboldt, Klaus-Dietmar; Unterberg-Buchwald, Christina; Hennemuth, Anja; Lotz, Joachim

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac structure, function and flow are most commonly studied by ultrasound, X-ray and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques. However, cardiovascular MRI is hitherto limited to electrocardiogram (ECG)-synchronized acquisitions and therefore often results in compromised quality for patients with arrhythmias or inabilities to comply with requested protocols—especially with breath-holding. Recent advances in the development of novel real-time MRI techniques now offer dynamic imaging of the heart and major vessels with high spatial and temporal resolution, so that examinations may be performed without the need for ECG synchronization and during free breathing. This article provides an overview of technical achievements, physiological validations, preliminary patient studies and translational aspects for a future clinical scenario of cardiovascular MRI in real time. PMID:25392819

  6. Nonuniqueness of magnetic fields and energy derivatives in spin-polarized density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gál, T.; Ayers, P. W.; De Proft, F.; Geerlings, P.

    2009-10-01

    The effect of the recently uncovered nonuniqueness of the external magnetic field B(r⃑) corresponding to a given pair of density n(r⃑) and spin density ns(r⃑) on the derivative of the energy functional of spin-polarized density functional theory, and its implications for the definition of chemical reactivity descriptors, is examined. For ground states, the nonuniqueness of B(r⃑) implies the nondifferentiability of the energy functional Ev,B[n,ns] with respect to ns(r⃑). It is shown, on the other hand, that this nonuniqueness allows the existence of the one-sided derivatives of Ev,B[n,ns] with respect to ns(r⃑). Although the N-electron ground state can always be obtained from the minimization of Ev,B[n,ns] without any constraint on the spin number Ns=∫ns(r⃑)dr⃑, the Lagrange multiplier μs associated with the fixation of Ns does not vanish even for ground states. μs is identified as the left- or right-side derivative of the total energy with respect to Ns, which justifies the interpretation of μs as a (spin) chemical potential. This is relevant not only for the spin-polarized generalization of conceptual density functional theory, the spin chemical potential being one of the elementary reactivity descriptors, but also for the extension of the thermodynamical analogy of density functional theory for the spin-polarized case. For higher-order reactivity indices, B(r⃑)'s nonuniqueness has similar implications as for μs, leading to a split of the indices with respect to Ns into one-sided reactivity descriptors.

  7. The neural basis of the blood-oxygen-level-dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging signal.

    PubMed Central

    Logothetis, Nikos K

    2002-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has rapidly become an important tool in clinical medicine and biological research. Its functional variant (functional magnetic resonance imaging; fMRI) is currently the most widely used method for brain mapping and studying the neural basis of human cognition. While the method is widespread, there is insufficient knowledge of the physiological basis of the fMRI signal to interpret the data confidently with respect to neural activity. This paper reviews the basic principles of MRI and fMRI, and subsequently discusses in some detail the relationship between the blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) fMRI signal and the neural activity elicited during sensory stimulation. To examine this relationship, we conducted the first simultaneous intracortical recordings of neural signals and BOLD responses. Depending on the temporal characteristics of the stimulus, a moderate to strong correlation was found between the neural activity measured with microelectrodes and the BOLD signal averaged over a small area around the microelectrode tips. However, the BOLD signal had significantly higher variability than the neural activity, indicating that human fMRI combined with traditional statistical methods underestimates the reliability of the neuronal activity. To understand the relative contribution of several types of neuronal signals to the haemodynamic response, we compared local field potentials (LFPs), single- and multi-unit activity (MUA) with high spatio-temporal fMRI responses recorded simultaneously in monkey visual cortex. At recording sites characterized by transient responses, only the LFP signal was significantly correlated with the haemodynamic response. Furthermore, the LFPs had the largest magnitude signal and linear systems analysis showed that the LFPs were better than the MUAs at predicting the fMRI responses. These findings, together with an analysis of the neural signals, indicate that the BOLD signal primarily measures the input

  8. Magnetic resonance techniques to quantify tissue damage, tissue repair, and functional cortical reorganization in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Filippi, M; Agosta, F

    2009-01-01

    A dramatic paradigm shift is taking place in our understanding of the pathophysiology of multiple sclerosis (MS). An important contribution to such a shift has been made possible by the advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technology, which allows structural damage to be quantified in the brains of patients with MS and to be followed over the course of the disease. Modern quantitative MR techniques have reshaped the picture of MS, leading to the definition of the so- called "axonal hypothesis" (i.e., changes in axonal metabolism, morphology, or density are important determinants of functional impairment in MS). Metrics derived from magnetization transfer and diffusion-weighted MRI enable us to quantify the extent of structural changes occurring within T2-visible lesions and normal-appearing tissues (including gray matter), with increased pathological specificity over conventional MRI to irreversible tissue damage; proton MR spectroscopy adds valuable pieces of information on the biochemical nature of such changes. Finally, functional MRI can provide new insights into the role of cortical adaptive changes in limiting the clinical consequences of MS-related irreversible structural damage. Our current understanding of the pathophysiology of MS is that this is not only a disease of the white matter, characterized by focal inflammatory lesions, but also a disease involving more subtle and diffuse damage throughout the white and gray matter. The inflammatory and neurodegenerative components of the disease process are present from the earliest observable phases of the disease, but appear to be, at least partially, dissociated. In addition, recovery and repair play an important role in the genesis of the clinical manifestations of the disease, involving both structural changes and plastic reorganization of the cortex. This new picture of MS has important implications in the context of treatment options, since it suggests that agents that protect against

  9. Hypothalamus, sexual arousal and psychosexual identity in human males: a functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Brunetti, M; Babiloni, C; Ferretti, A; Del Gratta, C; Merla, A; Olivetti Belardinelli, M; Romani, G L

    2008-06-01

    In a recent functional magnetic resonance imaging study, a complex neural circuit was shown to be involved in human males during sexual arousal [A. Ferretti et al. (2005) Neuroimage, 26, 1086]. At group level, there was a specific correlation between penile erection and activations in anterior cingulate, insula, amygdala, hypothalamus and secondary somatosensory regions. However, it is well known that there are remarkable inter-individual differences in the psychological view and attitude to sex of human males. Therefore, a crucial issue is the relationship among cerebral responses, sexual arousal and psychosexual identity at individual level. To address this issue, 18 healthy male subjects were recruited. Their deep sexual identity (DSI) was assessed following the construct revalidation by M. Olivetti Belardinelli [(1994) Sci. Contrib. Gen. Psychol., 11, 131] of the Franck drawing completion test, a projective test providing, according to this revalidation, quantitative scores on 'accordance/non-accordance' between self-reported and psychological sexual identity. Cerebral activity was evaluated by means of functional magnetic resonance imaging during hard-core erotic movies and sport movies. Results showed a statistically significant positive correlation between the blood oxygen level-dependent signal in bilateral hypothalamus and the Franck drawing completion test score during erotic movies. The higher the blood oxygen level-dependent activation in bilateral hypothalamus, the higher the male DSI profile. These results suggest that, in male subjects, inter-individual differences in the DSI are strongly correlated with blood flow to the bilateral hypothalamus, a dimorphic brain region deeply implicated in instinctual drives including reproduction. PMID:18588532

  10. Diverse Ligand-Functionalized Mixed-Valent Hexamanganese Sandwiched Silicotungstates with Single-Molecule Magnet Behavior.

    PubMed

    Xue, Han; Zhao, Jun-Wei; Pan, Rui; Yang, Bai-Feng; Yang, Guo-Yu; Liu, Hong-Sheng

    2016-08-22

    Under hydrothermal conditions, replacement of the water molecules in the [Mn(III) 4 Mn(II) 2 O4 (H2 O)4 ](8+) cluster of mixed-valent Mn6 sandwiched silicotungstate [(B-α-SiW9 O34 )2 Mn(III) 4 Mn(II) 2 O4 (H2 O)4 ](12-) (1 a) with organic N ligands led to the isolation of five organic-inorganic hybrid, Mn6 -substituted polyoxometalates (POMs) 2-6. They were all structurally characterized by IR spectroscopy, elemental analysis, thermogravimetric analysis, diffuse-reflectance spectroscopy, and powder and single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Compounds 2-6 represent the first series of mixed-valent {Mn(III) 4 Mn(II) 2 O4 (H2 O)4-n (L)n } sandwiched POMs covalently functionalized by organic ligands. The preparation of 1-6 not only indicates that the double-cubane {Mn(III) 4 Mn(II) 2 O4 (H2 O)4-n (L)n } clusters are very stable fragments in both conventional aqueous solution and hydrothermal systems and that organic functionalization of the [Mn(III) 4 Mn(II) 2 O4 (H2 O)4 ](8+) cluster by substitution reactions is feasible, but also demonstrates that hydrothermal environments can promote and facilitate the occurrence of this substitution reaction. This work confirms that hydrothermal synthesis is effective for making novel mixed-valent POMs substituted with transition-metal (TM) clusters by combining lacunary Keggin precursors with TM cations and tunable organic ligands. Furthermore, magnetic measurements reveal that 3 and 6 exhibit single-molecule magnet behavior. PMID:27373550

  11. HIV-specific CD8+ T cell function in children with vertically acquired HIV-1 infection is critically influenced by age and the state of the CD4+ T cell compartment.

    PubMed

    Sandberg, Johan K; Fast, Noam M; Jordan, Kimberly A; Furlan, Scott N; Barbour, Jason D; Fennelly, Glenn; Dobroszycki, Joanna; Spiegel, Hans M L; Wiznia, Andrew; Rosenberg, Michael G; Nixon, Douglas F

    2003-04-15

    The immunology of vertical HIV transmission differs from that of adult infection in that the immune system of the infant is not fully matured, and the factors that influence the functionality of CD8(+) T cell responses against HIV in children remain largely undefined. We have investigated CD8(+) T cell responses in 65 pediatric subjects with vertically acquired HIV-1 infection. Vigorous, broad, and Ag dose-driven CD8(+) T cell responses against HIV Ags were frequently observed in children who were older than 3 years of age and maintained CD4(+) T cell counts >400 cells/ micro l. In contrast, younger age or a CD4(+) T cell count <400 cells/ micro l was associated with poor CD8(+) T cell responses and high HIV loads. Furthermore, subjects with a severely depleted and phenotypically altered CD4(+) T cell compartment had circulating Gag-specific CD8(+) T cells with impaired IFN-gamma production. When viral load was not suppressed by antiviral treatment, subjects that fell below the putative age and CD4(+) T cell count thresholds had significantly reduced CD8(+) T cell responses and significantly higher viral loads. Thus, the data suggest that fully effective HIV-specific CD8(+) T cell responses take years to develop despite an abundance of Ag in early life, and responses are further severely impaired, independent of age, in children who have a depleted or skewed CD4(+) T cell compartment. The results are discussed in relation to differences between the neonatal and adult immune systems in the ability to respond to HIV infection. PMID:12682278

  12. 2-Deoxy-D-Glucose Modified Magnetic Nanoparticles with Dual Functional Properties: Nanothermotherapy and Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lingyun; Zheng, Yajing; Yan, Hao; Xie, WenSheng; Sun, Xiaodan; Li, Ning; Tang, Jintian

    2016-03-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) with appropriate surface chemistry have attracted wild attention in medical and biological application because of their current and potential usefulness such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast enhancement, magnetic mediated hyperthermia (MMH), immunoassay, and in drug delivery, etc. In this study, we investigated the MRI contrast agents and MMH mediators properties of the novel 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG) modified SPIONs. As a non-metabolizable glucose analogue, 2-DG can block glycolysis and inhibits protein glycosylation. Moreover, SPIONs coated with 2-DG molecules can be particularly attractive to resource-hungry cancer cells, therefore to realize the targeting strategy for the SPIONs. SPIONs with amino silane as the capping agent for amino-group surface modification were synthesized by the chemical co-precipitation method with modification. Glutaraldehyde was further applied as an activation agent through which 2-DG was conjugated to the amino-coated SPIONs. Physicochemical characterizations of the 2-DG-SPIONs, such as surface morphology, surface charge and magnetic properties were investigated by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), ζ-Potential and Vibrating Sample Magnetometer (VSM), etc. Magnetic inductive heating characteristics of the 2-DG-SPIONs were analyzed by exposing the SPIONs suspension (magnetic fluid) under alternative magnetic field (AMF). U-251 human glioma cells with expression of glucose transport proteins type 1 and 3 (GLUT1 and GLUT 3), and L929 murine fibroblast cell as negative control, were employed to study the effect of 2-DG modification on the cell uptake for SPIONs. TEM images for ultra-thin sections as well as ICP-MS were applied to evaluate the SPIONs internalization within the cells. In vitro MRI was performed after cells were co-incubated with SPIONs and the T2 relaxation time was measured and compared. The results demonstrate that 2-DG-SPIONs were supermagnetic and in

  13. Evaluation of outliers in acquired brain MR images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moldovanu, S.; (Vişan Pungǎ, M.; Moraru, L.

    2015-01-01

    Pre-processing is an important stage in the analysis of magnetic resonance images (MRI), because the effect of specific image artefacts, such as intensity inhomogeneity, noise and low contrast can adversely affect the quantitative image analysis. The image histogram is a useful tool in the analysis of MR images given that it allows a close relationship with important image features such as contrast and noise. The noise and variable contrast are elements that locally modify the quality of images. The key issue of this study derives from the fact that the spatial histogram can contain outliers indicating corrupted image information through the disorder of the bins. These aberrant errors should be excluded from the studied data sets. Here, the outliers are evaluated by using rigorous methods based on the probability theory and Chauvenet (CC), Grubbs (GC) and Peirce's (PC) criteria. In order to check the quality of the MR images, the Minkowsky (MD), Euclidean (ED) and cosine (CD) distance functions were used. They act as similarity scores between the histogram of the acquired MRI and the processed image. This analysis is necessary because, sometimes, the distance function exceeds the co-domain because of the outliers. In this paper, 32 MRIs are tested and the outliers are removed so that the distance functions generate uncorrupted and real values.

  14. Energy distribution functions of kilovolt ions parallel and perpendicular to the magnetic field of a modified Penning discharge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, R. J.

    1973-01-01

    The distribution function of ion energy parallel to the magnetic field of a modified Penning discharge has been measured with a retarding potential energy analyzer. These ions escaped through one of the throats of the magnetic mirror geometry. Simultaneous measurements of the ion energy distribution function perpendicular to the magnetic field have been made with a charge exchange neutral detector. The ion energy distribution functions are approximately Maxwellian, and the parallel and perpendicular kinetic temperatures are equal within experimental error. These results suggest that turbulent processes previously observed in this discharge Maxwellianize the velocity distribution along a radius in velocity space and cause an isotropic energy distribution. When the distributions depart from Maxwellian, they are enhanced above the Maxwellian tail.

  15. A comparative physicochemical, morphological and magnetic study of silane-functionalized superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles prepared by alkaline coprecipitation.

    PubMed

    Mireles, Laura-Karina; Sacher, Edward; Yahia, L'Hocine; Laurent, Sophie; Stanicki, Dimitri

    2016-06-01

    The characterization of synthetic superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle (SPION) surfaces prior to functionalization is an essential step in the prediction of their successful functionalization, and in uncovering issues that may influence their selection as magnetically targeted drug delivery vehicles (prodrugs). Here, three differently functionalized magnetite (Fe3O4) SPIONs are considered. All were identically prepared by the alkaline coprecipitation of Fe(2+) and Fe(3+) salts. We use X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, electron microscopy, time-of-flight SIMS, FTIR spectroscopy and magnetic measurements to characterize their chemical, morphological and magnetic properties, in order to aid in determining how their surfaces differ from those prepared by Fe(CO)5 decomposition, which we have already studied, and in assessing their potential use as drug delivery carriers. PMID:26667269

  16. The magnetic and electronic structure of vanadyl pyrophosphate from density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Mu-Jeng; Nielsen, Robert J; Tahir-Kheli, Jamil; Goddard, William A

    2011-05-28

    We have studied the magnetic structure of the high symmetry vanadyl pyrophosphate ((VO)(2)P(2)O(7), VOPO), focusing on the spin exchange couplings, using density functional theory (B3LYP) with the full three-dimensional periodicity. VOPO involves four distinct spin couplings: two larger couplings exist along the chain direction (a-axis), which we predict to be antiferromagnetic, J(OPO) = -156.8 K and J(O) = -68.6 K, and two weaker couplings appear along the c (between two layers) and b directions (between two chains in the same layer), which we calculate to be ferromagnetic, J(layer) = 19.2 K and J(chain) = 2.8 K. Based on the local density of states and the response of spin couplings to varying the cell parameter a, we found that J(OPO) originates from a super-exchange interaction through the bridging -O-P-O- unit. In contrast, J(O) results from a direct overlap of 3d(x(2)-y(2)) orbitals on two vanadium atoms in the same V(2)O(8) motif, making it very sensitive to structural fluctuations. Based on the variations in V-O bond length as a function of strain along a, we found that the V-O bonds of V-(OPO)(2)-V are covalent and rigid, whereas the bonds of V-(O)(2)-V are fragile and dative. These distinctions suggest that compression along the a-axis would have a dramatic impact on J(O), changing the magnetic structure and spin gap of VOPO. This result also suggests that assuming J(O) to be a constant over the range of 2-300 K whilst fitting couplings to the experimental magnetic susceptibility is an invalid method. Regarding its role as a catalyst, the bonding pattern suggests that O(2) can penetrate beyond the top layers of the VOPO surface, converting multiple V atoms from the +4 to +5 oxidation state, which seems crucial to explain the deep oxidation of n-butane to maleic anhydride. PMID:21503330

  17. The Effect of Disruption of Prefrontal Cortical Function with Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation on Visual Working Memory

    PubMed Central

    Lorenc, Elizabeth S.; Lee, Taraz G.; Chen, Anthony J.-W.; D’Esposito, Mark

    2015-01-01

    It is proposed that feedback signals from the prefrontal cortex (PFC) to extrastriate cortex are essential for goal-directed processing, maintenance, and selection of information in visual working memory (VWM). In a previous study, we found that disruption of PFC function with transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) in healthy individuals impaired behavioral performance on a face/scene matching task and decreased category-specific tuning in extrastriate cortex as measured with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). In this study, we investigated the effect of disruption of left inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) function on the fidelity of neural representations of two distinct information codes: (1) the stimulus category and (2) the goal-relevance of viewed stimuli. During fMRI scanning, subjects were presented face and scene images in pseudo-random order and instructed to remember either faces or scenes. Within both anatomical and functional regions of interest (ROIs), a multi-voxel pattern classifier was used to quantitatively assess the fidelity of activity patterns representing stimulus category: whether a face or a scene was presented on each trial, and goal relevance, whether the presented image was task relevant (i.e., a face is relevant in a “Remember Faces” block, but irrelevant in a “Remember Scenes” block). We found a reduction in the fidelity of the stimulus category code in visual cortex after left IFG disruption, providing causal evidence that lateral PFC modulates object category codes in visual cortex during VWM. In addition, we found that IFG disruption caused a reduction in the fidelity of the goal relevance code in a distributed set of brain regions. These results suggest that the IFG is involved in determining the task-relevance of visual input and communicating that information to a network of regions involved in further processing during VWM. Finally, we found that participants who exhibited greater fidelity of the goal relevance

  18. Multi-functional liposomes showing radiofrequency-triggered release and magnetic resonance imaging for tumor multi-mechanism therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Bin; Han, Shuping; Li, Hongyan; Zhao, Feifei; Su, Xiangjie; Cao, Xiaohui; Zhang, Zhenzhong

    2015-03-01

    Recently, nanoplatforms with multiple functions, such as tumor-targeting drug carriers, MRI, optical imaging, thermal therapy etc., have become popular in the field of cancer research. The present study reports a novel multi-functional liposome for cancer theranostics. A dual targeted drug delivery with radiofrequency-triggered drug release and imaging based on the magnetic field influence was used advantageously for tumor multi-mechanism therapy. In this system, the surface of fullerene (C60) was decorated with iron oxide nanoparticles, and PEGylation formed a hybrid nanosystem (C60-Fe3O4-PEG2000). Thermosensitive liposomes (dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine, DPPC) with DSPE-PEG2000-folate wrapped up the hybrid nanosystem and docetaxel (DTX), which were designed to combine features of biological and physical (magnetic) drug targeting for fullerene radiofrequency-triggered drug release. The magnetic liposomes not only served as powerful tumor diagnostic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents, but also as powerful agents for photothermal ablation of tumors. Furthermore, a remarkable thermal therapy combined chemotherapy multi-functional liposome nanoplatform converted radiofrequency energy into thermal energy to release drugs from thermosensitive liposomes, which was also observed during both in vitro and in vivo treatment. The multi-functional liposomes also could selectively kill cancer cells in highly localized regions via their excellent active tumor targeting and magnetic targeted abilities.

  19. Magnetic property variation in carbon steel and chrome-molybdenum steel as a function of uniaxial stress noncoaxial with the magnetic field (abstract)

    SciTech Connect

    Sablik, M.J. ); Kaminski, D.A.; Jiles, D.C.; Biner, S.B. )

    1993-05-15

    Magnescope[sup 1] magnetic measurements were made on carbon steel specimens ranging from 0.1--0.8 wt %C and on chrome-molybdenum steel specimens cut from electric power plant pipes previously in service. The carbon steel specimens were heat-treated using three procedures: (1) spheroidization, (2) quenching, and (3) quench and tempering. The specimens were subjected to uniaxial tension up to 40 ksi. The inspection head was aligned so that the magnetic field was oriented at different angles with respect to the stress axis. Magnetic properties (such as coercivity and maximum differential permeability) were extracted from digitized magnetic hysteresis loop measurements. Magnetic properties were studied as a function of stress at each angle of stress-field orientation. To our knowledge, such a comprehensive study of noncoaxial stress and field effects has never been accomplished before for such a wide variety of steel specimens. Results for the various materials are presented for different orientation angles and compared to numerical results from the noncoaxial magnetomechanical hysteresis model of Sablik [ital et] [ital al].[sup 2

  20. Three-dimensional functional magnetic resonance imaging of human brain on a clinical 1.5-T scanner.

    PubMed

    van Gelderen, P; Ramsey, N F; Liu, G; Duyn, J H; Frank, J A; Weinberger, D R; Moonen, C T

    1995-07-18

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is a tool for mapping brain function that utilizes neuronal activity-induced changes in blood oxygenation. An efficient three-dimensional fMRI method is presented for imaging brain activity on conventional, widely available, 1.5-T scanners, without additional hardware. This approach uses large magnetic susceptibility weighting based on the echo-shifting principle combined with multiple gradient echoes per excitation. Motor stimulation, induced by self-paced finger tapping, reliably produced significant signal increase in the hand region of the contralateral primary motor cortex in every subject tested. PMID:7624341

  1. Three-dimensional functional magnetic resonance imaging of human brain on a clinical 1.5-T scanner.

    PubMed Central

    van Gelderen, P; Ramsey, N F; Liu, G; Duyn, J H; Frank, J A; Weinberger, D R; Moonen, C T

    1995-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is a tool for mapping brain function that utilizes neuronal activity-induced changes in blood oxygenation. An efficient three-dimensional fMRI method is presented for imaging brain activity on conventional, widely available, 1.5-T scanners, without additional hardware. This approach uses large magnetic susceptibility weighting based on the echo-shifting principle combined with multiple gradient echoes per excitation. Motor stimulation, induced by self-paced finger tapping, reliably produced significant signal increase in the hand region of the contralateral primary motor cortex in every subject tested. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:7624341

  2. Generation of Internal-Image Functional Aptamers of Okadaic Acid via Magnetic-Bead SELEX

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chao; Liu, Zeng-Shan; Wang, Dong-Xu; Li, Lin; Hu, Pan; Gong, Sheng; Li, Yan-Song; Cui, Cheng; Wu, Zong-Cheng; Gao, Yang; Zhou, Yu; Ren, Hong-Lin; Lu, Shi-Ying

    2015-01-01

    Okadaic acid (OA) is produced by Dinophysis and Prorocentrum dinoflagellates and primarily accumulates in bivalves, and this toxin has harmful effects on consumers and operators. In this work, we first report the use of aptamers as novel non-toxic probes capable of binding to a monoclonal antibody against OA (OA-mAb). Aptamers that mimic the OA toxin with high affinity and selectivity were generated by the magnetic bead-assisted systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX) strategy. After 12 selection rounds, cloning, sequencing and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) analysis, four candidate aptamers (O24, O31, O39, O40) were selected that showed high affinity and specificity for OA-mAb. The affinity constants of O24, O31, O39 and O40 were 8.3 × 108 M−1, 1.47 × 109 M−1, 1.23 × 109 M−1 and 1.05 × 109 M−1, respectively. Indirect competitive ELISA was employed to determine the internal-image function of the aptamers. The results reveal that O31 has a similar competitive function as free OA toxin, whereas the other three aptamers did not bear the necessary internal-image function. Based on the derivation of the curvilinear equation for OA/O31, the equation that defined the relationship between the OA toxin content and O31 was Y = 2.185X − 1.78. The IC50 of O31 was 3.39 ng·mL−1, which was close to the value predicted by the OA ELISA (IC50 = 4.4 ng·mL−1); the IC10 was 0.33 ng·mL−1. The above data provides strong evidence that internal-image functional aptamers could be applicable as novel probes in a non-toxic assay. PMID:26694424

  3. Perfusion MRI Indexes Variability in the Functional Brain Effects of Theta-Burst Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Gratton, Caterina; Lee, Taraz G.; Nomura, Emi M.; D’Esposito, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) is an important tool for testing causal relationships in cognitive neuroscience research. However, the efficacy of TMS can be variable across individuals and difficult to measure. This variability is especially a challenge when TMS is applied to regions without well-characterized behavioral effects, such as in studies using TMS on multi-modal areas in intrinsic networks. Here, we examined whether perfusion fMRI recordings of Cerebral Blood Flow (CBF), a quantitative measure sensitive to slow functional changes, reliably index variability in the effects of stimulation. Twenty-seven participants each completed four combined TMS-fMRI sessions during which both resting state Blood Oxygen Level Dependent (BOLD) and perfusion Arterial Spin Labeling (ASL) scans were recorded. In each session after the first baseline day, continuous theta-burst TMS (TBS) was applied to one of three locations: left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (L dlPFC), left anterior insula/frontal operculum (L aI/fO), or left primary somatosensory cortex (L S1). The two frontal targets are components of intrinsic networks and L S1 was used as an experimental control. CBF changes were measured both before and after TMS on each day from a series of interleaved resting state and perfusion scans. Although TBS led to weak selective increases under the coil in CBF measurements across the group, individual subjects showed wide variability in their responses. TBS-induced changes in rCBF were related to TBS-induced changes in functional connectivity of the relevant intrinsic networks measured during separate resting-state BOLD scans. This relationship was selective: CBF and functional connectivity of these networks were not related before TBS or after TBS to the experimental control region (S1). Furthermore, subject groups with different directions of CBF change after TBS showed distinct modulations in the functional interactions of targeted networks. These results suggest

  4. Robust image registration for functional magnetic resonance imaging of the brain.

    PubMed

    Hsu, C C; Wu, M T; Lee, C

    2001-09-01

    Motion-related artifacts are still a major problem in data analysis of functional magnetic resonance imaging (FMRI) studies of brain activation. However, the traditional image registration algorithm is prone to inaccuracy when there are residual variations owing to counting statistics, partial volume effects or biological variation. In particular, susceptibility artifacts usually result in remarkable signal intensity variance, and they can mislead the estimation of motion parameters. In this study, Two robust estimation algorithms for the registration of FMRI images are described. The first estimation algorithm was based on the Newton method and used Tukey's biweight objective function. The second estimation algorithm was based on the Levenberg-Marquardt technique and used a skipped mean objective function. The robust M-estimators can suppress the effects of the outliers by scaling down their error magnitudes or completely rejecting outliers using a weighting function. The proposed registration methods consisted of the following steps: fast segmentation of the brain region from noisy background as a preprocessing step; pre-registration of the volume centroids to provide a good initial estimation; and two robust estimation algorithms and a voxel sampling technique to find the affine transformation parameters. The accuracy of the algorithms was within 0.5 mm in translation and within 0.5 degrees in rotation. For the FMRI data sets, the performance of the algorithms was visually compared with the AIR 2.0 software, which is a software for image registration, using colour-coded statistical mapping by the Kolmogorov-Smirov method. Experimental results showed, that the algorithms provided significant improvement in correcting motion-related artifacts and can enhance the detection of real brain activation. PMID:11712647

  5. Neural Correlates of Emotional Personality: A Structural and Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study

    PubMed Central

    Koelsch, Stefan; Skouras, Stavros; Jentschke, Sebastian

    2013-01-01

    Studies addressing brain correlates of emotional personality have remained sparse, despite the involvement of emotional personality in health and well-being. This study investigates structural and functional brain correlates of psychological and physiological measures related to emotional personality. Psychological measures included neuroticism, extraversion, and agreeableness scores, as assessed using a standard personality questionnaire. As a physiological measure we used a cardiac amplitude signature, the so-called Eκ value (computed from the electrocardiogram) which has previously been related to tender emotionality. Questionnaire scores and Eκ values were related to both functional (eigenvector centrality mapping, ECM) and structural (voxel-based morphometry, VBM) neuroimaging data. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data were obtained from 22 individuals (12 females) while listening to music (joy, fear, or neutral music). ECM results showed that agreeableness scores correlated with centrality values in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, the anterior cingulate cortex, and the ventral striatum (nucleus accumbens). Individuals with higher Eκ values (indexing higher tender emotionality) showed higher centrality values in the subiculum of the right hippocampal formation. Structural MRI data from an independent sample of 59 individuals (34 females) showed that neuroticism scores correlated with volume of the left amygdaloid complex. In addition, individuals with higher Eκ showed larger gray matter volume in the same portion of the subiculum in which individuals with higher Eκ showed higher centrality values. Our results highlight a role of the amygdala in neuroticism. Moreover, they indicate that a cardiac signature related to emotionality (Eκ) correlates with both function (increased network centrality) and structure (grey matter volume) of the subiculum of the hippocampal formation, suggesting a role of the hippocampal formation for emotional

  6. Functional investigations on human mesenchymal stem cells exposed to magnetic fields and labeled with clinically approved iron nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background For clinical applications of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), labeling and tracking is crucial to evaluate cell distribution and homing. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been successfully established detecting MSCs labeled with superparamagnetic particles of iron oxide (SPIO). Despite initial reports that labeling of MSCs with SPIO is safe without affecting the MSC's biology, recent studies report on influences of SPIO-labeling on metabolism and function of MSCs. Exposition of cells and tissues to high magnetic fields is the functional principle of MRI. In this study we established innovative labeling protocols for human MSCs using clinically established SPIO in combination with magnetic fields and investigated on functional effects (migration assays, quantification of colony forming units, analyses of gene and protein expression and analyses on the proliferation capacity, the viability and the differentiation potential) of magnetic fields on unlabeled and labeled human MSCs. To evaluate the imaging properties, quantification of the total iron load per cell (TIL), electron microscopy, and MRI at 3.0 T were performed. Results Human MSCs labeled with SPIO permanently exposed to magnetic fields arranged and grew according to the magnetic flux lines. Exposure of MSCs to magnetic fields after labeling with SPIO significantly enhanced the TIL compared to SPIO labeled MSCs without exposure to magnetic fields resulting in optimized imaging properties (detection limit: 1,000 MSCs). Concerning the TIL and the imaging properties, immediate exposition to magnetic fields after labeling was superior to exposition after 24 h. On functional level, exposition to magnetic fields inhibited the ability of colony formation of labeled MSCs and led to an enhanced expression of lipoprotein lipase and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ in labeled MSCs under adipogenic differentiation, and to a reduced expression of alkaline phosphatase in unlabeled MSCs under

  7. On the analytical form of the Earth's magnetic attraction expressed as a function of time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlheim-Gyllenskold, V.

    1983-01-01

    An attempt is made to express the Earth's magnetic attraction in simple analytical form using observations during the 16th to 19th centuries. Observations of the magnetic inclination in the 16th and 17th centuries are discussed.

  8. The Solar Wind - Magnetosphere Energy Coupling Function and Open Magnetic Flux Estimation: Two Science Aspects of the SMILE Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C.; Dai, L.; Sun, T.; Han, J.

    2015-12-01

    The Solar wind Magnetosphere Ionosphere Link Explorer (SMILE) is a novel self-standing mission to observe solar wind - magnetosphere coupling via simultaneous in situ solar wind /magnetosheath plasma and magnetic field measurements, X-ray images of the magnetosphere, and UV images of global auroral distribution defining system - level consequences. The SMILE mission is jointly supported by ESA and CSA, and the launch date is expected to be in 2021. SMILE will address several key outstanding questions concerning how the solar wind interacts with the magnetospheres on a global level. Quantitatively estimating the energy input from the solar wind into the magnetosphere on a global scale is still an observational challenge. Using global MHD simulations, we derive a new solar wind - magnetosphere energy coupling function. The X-ray images of the magnetosphere from the SMILE mission will help estimate the energy transfer from the solar wind into the magnetosphere. A second aspect SMILE can address is the open magnetic flux, which is closely related to magnetic reconnections in the dayside magnetopause and magnetotail. In a similar way, we find that the open magnetic flux can be estimated through a combined parameter f, which is a function of the solar wind velocity, number density, the southern interplanetary magnetic field strength, and the ionospheric Pederson conductance. The UV auroral images from SMILE will be used to determine the open magnetic flux, which may serve as a key space weather forecast element in the future.

  9. A review of heart chamber segmentation for structural and functional analysis using cardiac magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Peng, Peng; Lekadir, Karim; Gooya, Ali; Shao, Ling; Petersen, Steffen E; Frangi, Alejandro F

    2016-04-01

    Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) has become a key imaging modality in clinical cardiology practice due to its unique capabilities for non-invasive imaging of the cardiac chambers and great vessels. A wide range of CMR sequences have been developed to assess various aspects of cardiac structure and function, and significant advances have also been made in terms of imaging quality and acquisition times. A lot of research has been dedicated to the development of global and regional quantitative CMR indices that help the distinction between health and pathology. The goal of this review paper is to discuss the structural and functional CMR indices that have been proposed thus far for clinical assessment of the cardiac chambers. We include indices definitions, the requirements for the calculations, exemplar applications in cardiovascular diseases, and the corresponding normal ranges. Furthermore, we review the most recent state-of-the art techniques for the automatic segmentation of the cardiac boundaries, which are necessary for the calculation of the CMR indices. Finally, we provide a detailed discussion of the existing literature and of the future challenges that need to be addressed to enable a more robust and comprehensive assessment of the cardiac chambers in clinical practice. PMID:26811173

  10. Optimized multimodal functional magnetic resonance imaging/near-infrared spectroscopy probe for ultrahigh-resolution mapping.

    PubMed

    Hocke, Lia Maria; Cayetano, Kenroy; Tong, Yunjie; Frederick, Blaise

    2015-10-01

    Functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) is an increasingly important noninvasive method in neuroscience due to its high temporal resolution and ability to independently measure oxy- and deoxy-hemoglobin. However, the relatively low spatial resolution of fNIRS makes it difficult to relate this signal to underlying anatomy. Simultaneous functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) can complement fNIRS with superior spatial resolution and the ability to image the entire brain, providing additional information to improve fNIRS localization. However, current simultaneous fMRI/fNIRS acquisition methods are not optimal, due to the poor physical compatibility of existing MR coils and fNIRS optodes. Here, we present a technique to manufacture a true multimodal fMRI/fNIRS probe in which both modalities can be used with maximal sensitivity. To achieve this, we designed custom MR coils with integral fNIRS optodes using three-dimensional printing. This multimodal probe can be used to optimize spatial ([Formula: see text]) and temporal resolution (2.5 Hz) of fMRI, and it provides maximal MRI sensitivity, while allowing for high flexibility in the location and density of fNIRS optodes within the area of interest. Phantom and human data are shown to confirm the improvement in sensitivity in both modalities. This probe shows promise for addressing fundamental questions of the relation of fNIRS to physiology. PMID:26668816

  11. Density functional calculations for structural, electronic, and magnetic properties of gadolinium-oxide clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, H. K.; Chen, H. Tian, C. L.; Kuang, A. L.; Wang, J. Z.

    2014-04-21

    Gadolinium-oxide clusters in various sizes and stoichiometries have been systematically studied by employing the density functional theory with the generalized gradient approximation. The clusters in bulk stoichiometry are relatively more stable and their binding energies increase with the increasing size. Stoichiometric (Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}){sub n} clusters of n = 1–3 prefer cage-like structures, whereas the clusters of n = 4–30 prefer compact structures layered by wedge-like units and exhibit a rough feature toward the bulk-like arrangement with small disorders of atomic positions. The polyhedral-cages analogous to carbon-fullerenes are stable isomers yet not the minimum energy configurations. Their stabilities can be improved by embedding one oxygen atom or a suitable cage to form core-shell configurations. The mostly favored antiferromagnetic couplings between adjacent Gd atoms are nearly degenerated in energy with their ferromagnetic couplings, resulting in super-paramagnetic characters of gadolinium-oxide clusters. The Ruderman-Kittel-Kasuya-Yosida (RKKY)-type mechanism together with the superexchange-type mechanism plays cooperation role for the magnetic interactions in clusters. We present, as a function of n, calculated binding energies, ionization potential, electron affinity, and electronic dipole moment.

  12. Surface-based analysis methods for high-resolution functional magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Rez; Zhang, Qin; Darayan, Shayan; Dhandapani, Sankari; Katyal, Sucharit; Greene, Clint; Bajaj, Chandra; Ress, David

    2011-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has become a popular technique for studies of human brain activity. Typically, fMRI is performed with >3-mm sampling, so that the imaging data can be regarded as two-dimensional samples that average through the 1.5—4-mm thickness of cerebral cortex. The increasing use of higher spatial resolutions, <1.5-mm sampling, complicates the analysis of fMRI, as one must now consider activity variations within the depth of the brain tissue. We present a set of surface-based methods to exploit the use of high-resolution fMRI for depth analysis. These methods utilize white-matter segmentations coupled with deformable-surface algorithms to create a smooth surface representation at the gray-white interface and pial membrane. These surfaces provide vertex positions and normals for depth calculations, enabling averaging schemes that can increase contrast-to-noise ratio, as well as permitting the direct analysis of depth profiles of functional activity in the human brain. PMID:22125419

  13. Measurement of single-kidney glomerular filtration function from magnetic resonance perfusion renography.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Meiying; Cheng, Yingsheng; Zhao, Binghui

    2015-08-01

    Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) describes the flow rate of filtered fluid through the kidney, and is considered to be the reference standard in the evaluation of renal function. There are many ways to test the GFR clinically, such as serum creatinine concentration, blood urea nitrogen and SPECT renography, however, they're all not a good standard to evaluate the early damage of renal function. In recent years, the improvement of MRI hardware and software makes it possible to reveal physiological characteristics such as renal blood flow or GFR by dynamic contrast enhancement magnetic resonance perfusion renography (DEC MRPR). MRPR is a method used to monitor the transit of contrast material, typically a gadolinium chelate, through the renal cortex, the medulla, and the collecting system. This review outlines the basics of DCE MRPR included acquisition of dynamic MR perfusion imaging, calculation of the contrast concentration from signal intensity and compartment models, and some challenges of MRPR method faced in prospective clinical application. PMID:26032130

  14. Physiological recordings: Basic concepts and implementation during functional magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Marcus A.; Minati, Ludovico; Harrison, Neil A.; Gianaros, Peter J.; Napadow, Vitaly; Critchley, Hugo D.

    2009-01-01

    Combining human functional neuroimaging with other forms of psychophysiological measurement, including autonomic monitoring, provides an empirical basis for understanding brain–body interactions. This approach can be applied to characterize unwanted physiological noise, examine the neural control and representation of bodily processes relevant to health and morbidity, and index covert expression of affective and cognitive processes to enhance the interpretation of task-evoked regional brain activity. In recent years, human neuroimaging has been dominated by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies. The spatiotemporal information of fMRI regarding central neural activity is valuably complemented by parallel physiological monitoring, yet such studies still remain in the minority. This review article highlights fMRI studies that employed cardiac, vascular, respiratory, electrodermal, gastrointestinal and pupillary psychophysiological indices to address specific questions regarding interaction between brain and bodily state in the context of experience, cognition, emotion and behaviour. Physiological monitoring within the fMRI environment presents specific technical issues, most importantly related to safety. Mechanical and electrical hazards may present dangers to scanned subjects, operator and/or equipment. Furthermore, physiological monitoring may interfere with the quality of neuroimaging data, or itself be compromised by artefacts induced by the operation of the scanner. We review the sources of these potential problems and the current approaches and advice to enable the combination of fMRI and physiological monitoring in a safe and effective manner. PMID:19460445

  15. How pain empathy depends on ingroup/outgroup decisions: A functional magnet resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Ruckmann, Judith; Bodden, Maren; Jansen, Andreas; Kircher, Tilo; Dodel, Richard; Rief, Winfried

    2015-10-30

    Showing empathy is crucial for social functioning and empathy is related to group membership. The aim of the current study was to investigate the influence of experimentally generated groups on empathy for pain in a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) paradigm. Thirty healthy participants underwent a minimal group paradigm to create two groups. While BOLD contrast was measured using fMRI, subjects were instructed to empathize with ingroup and outgroup members, who were depicted in a picture paradigm of painful and neutral situations. Behavioral measure of state empathy was measured using a visual analog scale. Furthermore, self-reported trait empathy measures were obtained. Repeated-measures ANOVAs were conducted for fMRI and behavioral data. In addition to a main effect of pain in pain-related areas, a main effect of group in areas belonging to the visual cortex was found. Although there was no ingroup bias for empathy ratings, subjects showed altered neural activation in regions of the right fusiform gyrus, the cerebellum, the hippocampal and amygdala region during the pain×group interaction. Activation in the preceding structures, revealed by the interaction of pain by group, suggests that activation in the pallidum might reflect specific empathy for pain-related regulation processes. PMID:26323252

  16. Suggestion-Induced Modulation of Semantic Priming during Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ulrich, Martin; Kiefer, Markus; Bongartz, Walter; Grön, Georg; Hoenig, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Using functional magnetic resonance imaging during a primed visual lexical decision task, we investigated the neural and functional mechanisms underlying modulations of semantic word processing through hypnotic suggestions aimed at altering lexical processing of primes. The priming task was to discriminate between target words and pseudowords presented 200 ms after the prime word which was semantically related or unrelated to the target. In a counterbalanced study design, each participant performed the task once at normal wakefulness and once after the administration of hypnotic suggestions to perceive the prime as a meaningless symbol of a foreign language. Neural correlates of priming were defined as significantly lower activations upon semantically related compared to unrelated trials. We found significant suggestive treatment-induced reductions in neural priming, albeit irrespective of the degree of suggestibility. Neural priming was attenuated upon suggestive treatment compared with normal wakefulness in brain regions supporting automatic (fusiform gyrus) and controlled semantic processing (superior and middle temporal gyri, pre- and postcentral gyri, and supplementary motor area). Hence, suggestions reduced semantic word processing by conjointly dampening both automatic and strategic semantic processes. PMID:25923740

  17. Density functional calculations for structural, electronic, and magnetic properties of gadolinium-oxide clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, H. K.; Chen, H.; Tian, C. L.; Kuang, A. L.; Wang, J. Z.

    2014-04-01

    Gadolinium-oxide clusters in various sizes and stoichiometries have been systematically studied by employing the density functional theory with the generalized gradient approximation. The clusters in bulk stoichiometry are relatively more stable and their binding energies increase with the increasing size. Stoichiometric (Gd2O3)n clusters of n = 1-3 prefer cage-like structures, whereas the clusters of n = 4-30 prefer compact structures layered by wedge-like units and exhibit a rough feature toward the bulk-like arrangement with small disorders of atomic positions. The polyhedral-cages analogous to carbon-fullerenes are stable isomers yet not the minimum energy configurations. Their stabilities can be improved by embedding one oxygen atom or a suitable cage to form core-shell configurations. The mostly favored antiferromagnetic couplings between adjacent Gd atoms are nearly degenerated in energy with their ferromagnetic couplings, resulting in super-paramagnetic characters of gadolinium-oxide clusters. The Ruderman-Kittel-Kasuya-Yosida (RKKY)-type mechanism together with the superexchange-type mechanism plays cooperation role for the magnetic interactions in clusters. We present, as a function of n, calculated binding energies, ionization potential, electron affinity, and electronic dipole moment.

  18. Functional magnetic resonance imaging in conscious rats using a chronically implanted surface coil

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Chris J.; Kennerley, Aneurin J.; Berwick, Jason; Port, Michael; Mayhew, John E.W.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To establish procedures for functional magnetic resonance imaging in rats without the need for anaesthetic agents. Materials and Methods Rats were trained to habituate to restraint in a harness and scanner noise. Under anaesthesia, rats were then prepared with a cranial implant that permitted stabilization of the head during subsequent imaging experiments. The cranial implant included an RF coil that was used to transmit and receive radiofrequency signals during imaging. Further training was then conducted to habituate the animals to head fixation whilst in the MR scanner. Results Using this method, we were able to successfully and repeatedly record BOLD fMRI responses to hypercapnia and whisker stimulation in awake rats. Electrical stimulation of the whisker pad produced a ~7% increase in BOLD signal in the corresponding barrel cortex as well as adjacent negative BOLD responses, whilst hypercapnia produced larger increases in BOLD signal amplitude. Conclusion This methodology leaves the face and limbs free from obstruction, making possible a range of behavioural or sensory stimulation protocols. Further development of this animal model could enable traditional behavioural neuroscience techniques to be combined with modern functional neuroimaging. PMID:23677870

  19. Acupuncture effects on cardiac functions measured by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging in a feline model.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jen-Hsou; Shih, Chen-Haw; Kaphle, Krishna; Wu, Leang-Shin; Tseng, Weng-Yih; Chiu, Jen-Hwey; Lee, Tzu-Chi; Wu, Ying-Ling

    2010-06-01

    The usefulness of acupuncture (AP) as a complementary and/or alternative therapy in animals is well established but more research is needed on its clinical efficacy relative to conventional therapy, and on the underlying mechanisms of the effects of AP. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI), an important tool in monitoring cardiovascular diseases, provides a reliable method to monitor the effects of AP on the cardiovascular system. This controlled experiment monitored the effect electro-acupuncture (EA) at bilateral acupoint Neiguan (PC6) on recovery time after ketamine/xylazine cocktail anesthesia in healthy cats. The CMRI data established the basic feline cardiac function index (CFI), including cardiac output and major vessel velocity. To evaluate the effect of EA on the functions of the autonomic nervous and cardiovascular systems, heart rate, respiration rate, electrocardiogram and pulse rate were also measured. Ketamine/xylazine cocktail anesthesia caused a transient hypertension in the cats; EA inhibited this anesthetic-induced hypertension and shortened the post-anesthesia recovery time. Our data support existing knowledge on the cardiovascular benefits of EA at PC6, and also provide strong evidence for the combination of anesthesia and EA to shorten post-anesthesia recovery time and counter the negative effects of anesthetics on cardiac physiology. PMID:18955311

  20. Current treatment options of acquired flatfoot.

    PubMed

    Lesić, Aleksandar R; Atkinson, Henry Dushan E; Zagorac, Slavisa G; Bumbasirević, Marko

    2013-01-01

    Symptomatic acquired flatfoot is an important orthopaedic problem, due to progressive loss of whole foot function and the increasing problem of patient disability. It is a complex entity, involving the tibialis posterior tendon, ankle joint, hindfoot and midfoot. In most cases the posterior tibial tendon (PTT) is the root cause of acquired flat foot, but there are other contributors and many different factors have an influence. The clinical picture varies depending on the stage of the deformity, as well as the treatment approach. Initially soft tissue procedures, synoviectomy and augmentation of the PTT are advised. In stage 2, lateral column lengthening and calcaneal osteotomy, with soft tissue - tendon transfers (TA, FHL, FDL) are recommended. In stage 3 subtalar, double or triplearthodesis is preferable, while in stage 4 pantalar fusion is indicated. This article elaborates on the etiology, the clinical picture, diagnosis and treatment modalities. PMID:24669559

  1. Detection of electron energy distribution function anisotropy in a magnetized electron cyclotron resonance plasma by using a directional Langmuir probe

    SciTech Connect

    Shikama, T. Hasuo, M.; Kitaoka, H.

    2014-07-15

    Anisotropy in the electron energy distribution function (EEDF) in an electron cyclotron resonance plasma with magnetized electrons and weakly magnetized ions is experimentally investigated using a directional Langmuir probe. Under an assumption of independent EEDFs in the directions parallel and perpendicular to the magnetic field, the directional variation of the EEDF is evaluated. In the measured EEDFs, a significantly large population density of electrons with energies larger than 30 eV is found in one of the cross-field directions depending on the magnetic field direction. With the aid of an electron trajectory calculation, it is suggested that the observed anisotropic electrons originate from the EEDF anisotropy and the cross-field electron drift.

  2. Designed synthesis of fluorous-functionalized magnetic mesoporous microspheres for specific enrichment of phosphopeptides with fluorous derivatization.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Man; Deng, Chunhui

    2016-04-01

    In this work, for the first time, perfluorinated magnetic mesoporous microspheres were designed and synthesized for the highly specific enrichment of fluorous-derivatized phosphopeptides through the unique fluorine-fluorine interactions. The perfluorinated magnetic mesoporous microspheres were prepared through a surfactant-mediated one-pot approach and successfully applied to the selective extraction of fluorous-derivatized phosphopeptides from β-casein tryptic digest, protein mixtures, and human serum. Thanks to the hydrophilic silanol groups exposed on the surface, perfluorinated groups modified in the pore channels and the magnetic cores, the flourous-functionalized magnetic microspheres exhibited excellent dispersibility, specificity toward fluorous-derivatized phosphopeptides while facilitated separation procedures. The novel composites achieved a high selectivity of 1:1000 toward nonphosphorylated peptides and proved to be practicable in the enrichment of endogenous phosphopeptides in the human serum sample. PMID:26800430

  3. A comparison of calculations and measurements of the field harmonics as a function of current in the SSC dipole magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, R.C.; Cottingham, J.G.; Kahn, S.A.; Morgan, G.H.; Wanderer, P.

    1991-01-01

    A large number of short and long superconducting dipole magnets for the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) have been constructed and measured for their magnetic field properties at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). In this paper we compare the calculations and measurements for the variation of field harmonics as a function of current in 40 mm aperture and 50 mm aperture dipole magnets. The primary purpose of this paper is to examine the iron saturation effects on the field harmonics. The field harmonics also change due to the persistent current in the superconducting wires and due to the deformation of the coil shape because of Lorentz forces. We discuss the variation in the sextupole harmonics (b{sub 2}) with current and explain the differences between the calculations and measurements. We also discuss the skew quadrupole harmonic at high field in the long dipole magnets. 3 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Structure, magnetism, and dissociation energy of small bimetallic cobalt-chromium oxide cluster cations: A density-functional-theory study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Hung Tan; Cuong, Ngo Tuan; Tam, Nguyen Minh; Lam, Vu Dinh; Tung, Nguyen Thanh

    2016-01-01

    We study CoxCryOm+ (x + y = 2, 3 and 1 ≤ m ≤ 4) clusters by means of density-functional-theory calculations. It is found that the clusters grow preferentially through maximizing the number of metal-oxygen bonds with a favor on Cr sites. The size- and composition-dependent magnetic behavior is discussed in relation with the local atomic magnetic moments. While doped species show an oscillatory magnetic behavior, the total magnetic moment of pure cobalt and chromium oxide clusters tends to enhance or reduce as increasing the oxygen content, respectively. The dissociation energies for different evaporation channels are also calculated to suggest the stable patterns, as fingerprints for future photofragmentation experiments.

  5. Wave Function Mixing and g-Factors in Narrow Gap Ferromagnetic III-V Dilute Magnetic Semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Y.; Sanders, G. D.; Stanton, C. J.

    2002-03-01

    We present a theory for wave-function mixing and g-factors in ferromagnetic p-doped narrow gap In_1-xMn_xAs dilute magnetic semiconductor alloys in an ultrahigh external magnetic field, B. We generalize an 8 band Pidgeon-Brown model to include (i) the wavevector, k, dependence of the electronic states along B, (ii) s-d and p-d exchange interactions with localized Mn d-electrons, and (iii) finite magnetic moment in the ferromagnetic state. The complex valence band structure at finite k plays an important role in the cyclotron resonance spectra. We look at the band-mixing and spin-dependence of the wave functions as a function of the wavevector, magnetic field (0-100T), temperature (4 K to 290 K), and Mn concentration (0 to 12 %). From this, we can extract magnetic field dependent g-factors. The sensitivity of the band mixing and g-factors to the s-d and p-d exchange interactions is also investigated. Finally, we look at the effect of band-mixing on optical properties such as the polarization dependence of the absorption and luminescence.

  6. The continuum intensity as a function of magnetic field. I. Active region and quiet Sun magnetic elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobel, P.; Solanki, S. K.; Borrero, J. M.

    2011-07-01

    Context. Small-scale magnetic fields are major contributors to the solar irradiance variations. Hence, the continuum intensity contrast of magnetic elements in the quiet Sun (QS) network and in active region (AR) plage is an essential quantity that needs to be measured reliably. Aims: By using Hinode/SP disk center data at a constant, high spatial resolution, we aim at updating results of earlier ground-based studies of contrast vs. magnetogram signal, and to look for systematic differences between AR plages and QS network. Methods: The field strength, filling factor and inclination of the field was retrieved by means of a Milne-Eddington inversion (VFISV code). As in earlier studies, we then performed a pixel-by-pixel study of 630.2 nm continuum contrast vs. apparent (i.e. averaged over a pixel) longitudinal magnetic field over large fields of view in ARs and in the QS. Results: The continuum contrast of magnetic elements reaches larger values in the QS (on average 3.7%) than in ARs (on average 1.3%). This could not be attributed to any systematic difference in the chosen contrast references, so that it mainly reflects an intrinsic brightness difference. The larger contrasts in the QS are in agreement with earlier, lower resolution results, although our values are larger due to our better spatial resolution. At Hinode's spatial resolution, moreover, the relationship between contrast and apparent longitudinal field strength exhibits a peak at around 700 G in both the QS and ARs, whereas earlier lower resolution studies only found a peak in the QS and a monotonic decrease in ARs. We attribute this discrepancy both to our careful removal of the pores and their close surroundings affected by the telescope diffraction, as well as to the enhanced spatial resolution and very low scattered light of the Hinode Solar Optical Telescope. We verified that the magnetic elements producing the peak in the contrast curve are rather vertical in the AR and in the QS, so that the

  7. Magnetic impurities in nanotubes: From density functional theory to Kondo many-body effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baruselli, P. P.; Fabrizio, M.; Smogunov, A.; Requist, R.; Tosatti, E.

    2013-12-01

    Low-temperature electronic conductance in nanocontacts, scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), and metal break junctions involving magnetic atoms or molecules is a growing area with important unsolved theoretical problems. While the detailed relationship between contact geometry and electronic structure requires a quantitative ab initio approach such as density functional theory (DFT), the Kondo many-body effects ensuing from the coupling of the impurity spin with metal electrons are most properly addressed by formulating a generalized Anderson impurity model to be solved with, for example, the numerical renormalization group (NRG) method. Since there is at present no seamless scheme that can accurately carry out that program, we have in recent years designed a systematic method for semiquantitatively joining DFT and NRG. We apply this DFT-NRG scheme to the ideal conductance of single wall (4,4) and (8,8) nanotubes with magnetic adatoms (Co and Fe), both inside and outside the nanotube, and with a single carbon atom vacancy. A rich scenario emerges, with Kondo temperatures generally in the Kelvin range, and conductance anomalies ranging from a single channel maximum to destructive Fano interference with cancellation of two channels out of the total four. The configuration yielding the highest Kondo temperature (tens of Kelvins) and a measurable zero-bias anomaly is that of a Co or Fe impurity inside the narrowest nanotube. The single atom vacancy has a spin, but a very low Kondo temperature is predicted. The geometric, electronic, and symmetry factors influencing this variability are all accessible, which makes this approach methodologically instructive and highlights many delicate and difficult points in the first-principles modeling of the Kondo effect in nanocontacts.

  8. Repeatability of functional anisotropy in navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation--coil-orientation versus response.

    PubMed

    Kallioniemi, Elisa; Könönen, Mervi; Julkunen, Petro

    2015-06-17

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) can be used for evaluating the function of motor pathways. According to the principles of electromagnetism and electrophysiology, TMS activates those neurons that are suitably oriented with respect to the TMS-induced electric field. We hypothesized that TMS could potentially be able to evaluate the neuronal structure, although until now, this putative application has not been exploited. We have developed a TMS-based method to evaluate the function and structure of the motor cortex concurrently in a quantitative manner. This method produced a measure, the anisotropy index (AI), which is based on the motor-evoked potentials induced at different coil orientations. The AI was demonstrated to exhibit an association with both motor cortex excitability and neuronal structure. In the present study, we evaluated the repeatability (intrasession and intersession) of AI in three consecutive measurements. In addition, we studied the repeatability of the optimal coil angle in inducing motor-evoked potentials. Two of the measurements were conducted on the same stimulation target and the third on a remapped target. The coefficient of repeatability of the AI was 0.022 for intrasession and 0.040 for intersession assessments. For the optimal stimulation angle, the coefficients of repeatability were 3.7° and 5.1°, respectively. Both the AI and the optimal stimulation angle demonstrated good repeatability (Cronbach's α>0.760). In conclusion, the results indicate that the AI can provide a reliable estimation of local functional anisotropy changes under conditions affecting the cortex, such as during stroke or focal dysplasia. PMID:26011386

  9. Resting-State Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Language Preoperative Planning

    PubMed Central

    Branco, Paulo; Seixas, Daniela; Deprez, Sabine; Kovacs, Silvia; Peeters, Ronald; Castro, São L.; Sunaert, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is a well-known non-invasive technique for the study of brain function. One of its most common clinical applications is preoperative language mapping, essential for the preservation of function in neurosurgical patients. Typically, fMRI is used to track task-related activity, but poor task performance and movement artifacts can be critical limitations in clinical settings. Recent advances in resting-state protocols open new possibilities for pre-surgical mapping of language potentially overcoming these limitations. To test the feasibility of using resting-state fMRI instead of conventional active task-based protocols, we compared results from fifteen patients with brain lesions while performing a verb-to-noun generation task and while at rest. Task-activity was measured using a general linear model analysis and independent component analysis (ICA). Resting-state networks were extracted using ICA and further classified in two ways: manually by an expert and by using an automated template matching procedure. The results revealed that the automated classification procedure correctly identified language networks as compared to the expert manual classification. We found a good overlay between task-related activity and resting-state language maps, particularly within the language regions of interest. Furthermore, resting-state language maps were as sensitive as task-related maps, and had higher specificity. Our findings suggest that resting-state protocols may be suitable to map language networks in a quick and clinically efficient way. PMID:26869899

  10. Vision Therapy in Adults with Convergence Insufficiency: Clinical and Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Measures

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, Tara L.; Vicci, Vincent R.; Alkan, Yelda; Kim, Eun H.; Gohel, Suril; Barrett, Anna M.; Chiaravalloti, Nancy; Biswal, Bharat B.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose This research quantified clinical measurements and functional neural changes associated with vision therapy in subjects with convergence insufficiency (CI). Methods Convergence and divergence 4° step responses were compared between 13 control adult subjects with normal binocular vision and four CI adult subjects. All CI subjects participated in 18 h of vision therapy. Clinical parameters quantified throughout the therapy included: nearpoint of convergence, recovery point of convergence, positive fusional vergence at near, near dissociated phoria, and eye movements that were quantified using peak velocity. Neural correlates of the CI subjects were quantified with functional magnetic resonance imaging scans comparing random vs. predictable vergence movements using a block design before and after vision therapy. Images were quantified by measuring the spatial extent of activation and the average correlation within five regions of interests (ROI). The ROIs were the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, a portion of the frontal lobe, part of the parietal lobe, the cerebellum, and the brain stem. All measurements were repeated 4 months to 1 year post-therapy in three of the CI subjects. Results Convergence average peak velocities to step stimuli were significantly slower (p = 0.016) in CI subjects compared with controls; however, significant differences in average peak velocities were not observed for divergence step responses (p = 0.30). The investigation of CI subjects participating in vision therapy showed that the nearpoint of convergence, recovery point of convergence, and near dissociated phoria significantly decreased. Furthermore, the positive fusional vergence, average peak velocity from 4° convergence steps, and the amount of functional activity within the frontal areas, cerebellum, and brain stem significantly increased. Several clinical and cortical parameters were significantly correlated. Conclusions Convergence peak velocity was significantly slower in

  11. Altered Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Responses to Nonpainful Sensory Stimulation in Fibromyalgia Patients

    PubMed Central

    López-Solá, Marina; Pujol, Jesus; Wager, Tor D.; Garcia-Fontanals, Alba; Blanco-Hinojo, Laura; Garcia-Blanco, Susana; Poca-Dias, Violant; Harrison, Ben J.; Contreras-Rodríguez, Oren; Monfort, Jordi; Garcia-Fructuoso, Ferran; Deus, Joan

    2015-01-01

    Objective Fibromyalgia (FM) is a disorder characterized by chronic pain and enhanced responses to acute noxious events. However, the sensory systems affected in FM may extend beyond pain itself, as FM patients show reduced tolerance to non-nociceptive sensory stimulation. Characterizing the neural substrates of multisensory hypersensitivity in FM may thus provide important clues about the underlying pathophysiology of the disorder. The aim of this study was to characterize brain responses to non-nociceptive sensory stimulation in FM patients and their relationship to subjective sensory sensitivity and clinical pain severity. Methods Functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to assess brain response to auditory, visual, and tactile motor stimulation in 35 women with FM and 25 matched controls. Correlation and mediation analyses were performed to establish the relationship between brain responses and 3 types of outcomes: subjective hypersensitivity to daily sensory stimulation, spontaneous pain, and functional disability. Results Patients reported increased subjective sensitivity (increased unpleasantness) in response to multisensory stimulation in daily life. Functional MRI revealed that patients showed reduced task-evoked activation in primary/secondary visual and auditory areas and augmented responses in the insula and anterior lingual gyrus. Reduced responses in visual and auditory areas were correlated with subjective sensory hypersensitivity and clinical severity measures. Conclusion FM patients showed strong attenuation of brain responses to nonpainful events in early sensory cortices, accompanied by an amplified response at later stages of sensory integration in the insula. These abnormalities are associated with core FM symptoms, suggesting that they may be part of the pathophysiology of the disease. PMID:25220783

  12. Resting-State Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Language Preoperative Planning.

    PubMed

    Branco, Paulo; Seixas, Daniela; Deprez, Sabine; Kovacs, Silvia; Peeters, Ronald; Castro, São L; Sunaert, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is a well-known non-invasive technique for the study of brain function. One of its most common clinical applications is preoperative language mapping, essential for the preservation of function in neurosurgical patients. Typically, fMRI is used to track task-related activity, but poor task performance and movement artifacts can be critical limitations in clinical settings. Recent advances in resting-state protocols open new possibilities for pre-surgical mapping of language potentially overcoming these limitations. To test the feasibility of using resting-state fMRI instead of conventional active task-based protocols, we compared results from fifteen patients with brain lesions while performing a verb-to-noun generation task and while at rest. Task-activity was measured using a general linear model analysis and independent component analysis (ICA). Resting-state networks were extracted using ICA and further classified in two ways: manually by an expert and by using an automated template matching procedure. The results revealed that the automated classification procedure correctly identified language networks as compared to the expert manual classification. We found a good overlay between task-related activity and resting-state language maps, particularly within the language regions of interest. Furthermore, resting-state language maps were as sensitive as task-related maps, and had higher specificity. Our findings suggest that resting-state protocols may be suitable to map language networks in a quick and clinically efficient way. PMID:26869899

  13. Acquired Equivalence Changes Stimulus Representations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meeter, M.; Shohamy, D.; Myers, C. E.

    2009-01-01

    Acquired equivalence is a paradigm in which generalization is increased between two superficially dissimilar stimuli (or antecedents) that have previously been associated with similar outcomes (or consequents). Several possible mechanisms have been proposed, including changes in stimulus representations, either in the form of added associations or…

  14. Aminodextran polymer-functionalized reactive magnetic emulsions for potential theranostic applications.

    PubMed

    Lima-Tenório, Michele K; Pineda, Edgardo A Gómez; Ahmad, Nasir M; Agusti, Geraldine; Manzoor, Sadia; Kabbaj, Dounia; Fessi, Hatem; Elaissari, Abdelhamid

    2016-09-01

    Aminodextran (AMD) polymer was prepared via chemical grafting of hexamethylenediamine on oxidized dextran. Magnetic latex particles were successfully obtained by adsorption of positively charged AMD on negatively charged submicron magnetic emulsion. The adsorbed amount was found to be ranged from 20 to 1280mg of AMD per gram of dried magnetic dispersion. The AMD-coated magnetic emulsions were characterized by positive zeta potential in the pH range from 3 to 9 compared to bare seed magnetic emulsion. All the samples showed to be superparamagnetic property, even after the adsorption of the polymer. The developed magnetic submicron particles exhibited good potential for in vivo biomedical diagnosis applications as demonstrated by their higher T2 contrast-ability compared to Gd in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and hyperthermia. PMID:27214787

  15. Influence of maturation on infant diaphragm function assessed by magnetic stimulation of phrenic nerves.

    PubMed

    Dimitriou, Gabriel; Greenough, Anne; Moxham, John; Rafferty, Gerrard F

    2003-01-01

    Infant diaphragm function may be adversely affected in a variety of disorders and conditions. Key to establishing an accurate diagnosis are appropriate control data. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of maturation on diaphragm function, using a nonvolitional test. Diaphragm function was assessed by measuring the transdiaphragmatic pressure (Pdi) generated by magnetic stimulation of the phrenic nerves. Ballon catheters were positioned in the lower third of the esophagus and stomach. Esophageal (Pes) and gastric (Pgas) pressure changes were measured using differential pressure transducers. The pressure signals were amplified and displayed in real time on a computer (running Labview trade mark software) and Pdi derived by online subtraction of Pes from Pgas. Twenty-nine infants (14 born preterm), at a median gestational age of 37 (range, 25-42) weeks, were studied at a median postconceptional age (PCA) of 39 (range, 32-44) weeks. At time of measurement, none had respiratory problems or were hyperinflated (functional residual capacity ranged from 23-35 mL/kg). The preterm infants had significantly lower transdiaphragmatic pressures responses following median left (4.0, range 2.5-6.8 cmH(2)O vs. 4.8, range 2.8-7.2 cmH(2)O) and median right phrenic nerve stimulation (3.6, range 2.6-4.8 cmH(2)O vs. 4.3, range 2.7-6.8 cmH(2)O) (P < 0.05) than term infants. Following left and right phrenic nerve stimulation, Pdi correlated significantly with gestational age (r = 0.4, P < 0.05, and r = 0.4, P < 0.05, respectively) and PCA (r = 0.37, P = 0.05, and r = 0.56, P < 0.01, respectively). We conclude that gestational age at birth and postconceptional age at time of measurements must be taken into account when interpreting the results of infant diaphragm function tests. PMID:12461734

  16. Kinetic corrections from analytic non-Maxwellian distribution functions in magnetized plasmas

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Izacard, Olivier

    2016-08-02

    In magnetized plasma physics, almost all developed analytic theories assume a Maxwellian distribution function (MDF) and in some cases small deviations are described using the perturbation theory. The deviations with respect to the Maxwellian equilibrium, called kinetic effects, are required to be taken into account especially for fusion reactor plasmas. Generally, because the perturbation theory is not consistent with observed steady-state non-Maxwellians, these kinetic effects are numerically evaluated by very central processing unit (CPU)-expensive codes, avoiding the analytic complexity of velocity phase space integrals. We develop here a new method based on analytic non-Maxwellian distribution functions constructed from non-orthogonal basismore » sets in order to (i) use as few parameters as possible, (ii) increase the efficiency to model numerical and experimental non-Maxwellians, (iii) help to understand unsolved problems such as diagnostics discrepancies from the physical interpretation of the parameters, and (iv) obtain analytic corrections due to kinetic effects given by a small number of terms and removing the numerical error of the evaluation of velocity phase space integrals. This work does not attempt to derive new physical effects even i