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Sample records for acquired genetic disorders

  1. Update on iron metabolism and molecular perspective of common genetic and acquired disorder, hemochromatosis.

    PubMed

    Yun, Seongseok; Vincelette, Nicole D

    2015-07-01

    Iron is an essential component of erythropoiesis and its metabolism is tightly regulated by a variety of internal and external cues including iron storage, tissue hypoxia, inflammation and degree of erythropoiesis. There has been remarkable improvement in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of iron metabolism past decades. The classical model of iron metabolism with iron response element/iron response protein (IRE/IRP) is now extended to include hepcidin model. Endogenous and exogenous signals funnel down to hepcidin via wide range of signaling pathways including Janus Kinase/Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 3 (JAK/STAT3), Bone Morphogenetic Protein/Hemojuvelin/Mothers Against Decapentaplegic Homolog (BMP/HJV/SMAD), and Von Hippel Lindau/Hypoxia-inducible factor/Erythropoietin (VHL/HIF/EPO), then relay to ferroportin, which directly regulates intra- and extracellular iron levels. The successful molecular delineation of iron metabolism further enhanced our understanding of common genetic and acquired disorder, hemochromatosis. The majority of the hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) patients are now shown to have mutations in the genes coding either upstream or downstream proteins of hepcidin, resulting in iron overload. The update on hepcidin centered mechanisms of iron metabolism and their clinical perspective in hemochromatosis will be discussed in this review.

  2. Genetic Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... This can cause a medical condition called a genetic disorder. You can inherit a gene mutation from ... during your lifetime. There are three types of genetic disorders: Single-gene disorders, where a mutation affects ...

  3. Inherited or acquired metabolic disorders.

    PubMed

    Eichler, Florian; Ratai, Eva; Carroll, Jason J; Masdeu, Joseph C

    2016-01-01

    This chapter starts with a description of imaging of inherited metabolic disorders, followed by a discussion on imaging of acquired toxic-metabolic disorders of the adult brain. Neuroimaging is crucial for the diagnosis and management of a number of inherited metabolic disorders. Among these, inherited white-matter disorders commonly affect both the nervous system and endocrine organs. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has enabled new classifications of these disorders that have greatly enhanced both our diagnostic ability and our understanding of these complex disorders. Beyond the classic leukodystrophies, we are increasingly recognizing new hereditary leukoencephalopathies such as the hypomyelinating disorders. Conventional imaging can be unrevealing in some metabolic disorders, but proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) may be able to directly visualize the metabolic abnormality in certain disorders. Hence, neuroimaging can enhance our understanding of pathogenesis, even in the absence of a pathologic specimen. This review aims to present pathognomonic brain MRI lesion patterns, the diagnostic capacity of proton MRS, and information from clinical and laboratory testing that can aid diagnosis. We demonstrate that applying an advanced neuroimaging approach enhances current diagnostics and management. Additional information on inherited and metabolic disorders of the brain can be found in Chapter 63 in the second volume of this series. PMID:27432685

  4. Specific Genetic Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Genetic Terms Definitions for genetic terms Specific Genetic Disorders Many human diseases have a genetic component. ... Condition in an Adult The Undiagnosed Diseases Program Genetic Disorders Achondroplasia Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency Antiphospholipid Syndrome ...

  5. Genetic Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... of pregnancy loss. How do I know which tests to have? Your health care provider or a genetic counselor can discuss all of the testing options with you and help you decide based on your individual risk factors. Do I have to have these tests? Whether you want to be tested is a ...

  6. Postnatal toxic and acquired disorders.

    PubMed

    Saint-Amour, Dave; Dallaire, Renee; Dulac, Oliver

    2013-01-01

    To develop and function optimally, the brain requires a balanced environment of electrolytes, amino acids, neurotransmitters, and metabolic substrates. As a consequence, organ dysfunction has the potential to induce brain disorders and toxic-metabolic encephalopathies, particularly when occurring during early stages of cerebral maturation. Induced toxicity of three different organ systems that are commonly associated with brain complications are discussed. First, thyroid hormone deficiency caused by intrinsic or extrinsic factors (e.g., environmental toxins) may induce severe adverse effects on child neurological development from reversible impairments to permanent mental retardation. Second, inadequate removal of wastes due to chronic renal failure leads to the accumulation of endogenous toxins that are harmful to brain function. In uremic pediatric patients, the brain becomes more vulnerable to exogenous substances such as aluminum, which can induce aluminum encephalopathy. Following surgical procedures, neurological troubles including focal defects and severe epileptic seizures may result from hypertensive encephalopathy combined with toxicity of immunomodulating substances, or from the delayed consequences of cardiovascular defect. Taken together, this illustrates that organ disorders clearly have an impact on child brain function in various ways.

  7. Congenital and acquired bleeding disorders in infancy.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Sally Elizabeth; Bolton-Maggs, Paula H B

    2015-11-01

    The diagnosis of congenital and acquired bleeding disorders in infants requires an understanding of developmental haemostasis and the effect on laboratory testing. A systematic approach to bleeding in neonates will aid clinicians in the diagnosis and treatment, which may be caused by a wide variety of diseases. The clinical setting will help to direct the diagnostic pathway. This review will focus on the presentation and diagnosis of congenital and acquired bleeding disorders, including platelet disorders. Current research in this field is ongoing, including investigation into neonatal platelets and their different functionalities, platelet transfusion thresholds and how changes in coagulation factors may be linked to other homeostatic mechanisms.

  8. Genetic Brain Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    A genetic brain disorder is caused by a variation or a mutation in a gene. A variation is a different form ... mutation is a change in a gene. Genetic brain disorders affect the development and function of the ...

  9. Acquired bleeding disorders in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Kruse-Jarres, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    The hemostatic balance changes with advancing age which may be due to factors such as platelet activation, increase of certain clotting factor proteins, slowing of the fibrinolytic system, and modification of the endothelium and blood flow. Generally, this predisposes the elderly to thrombosis rather than bleeding. It often necessitates antiplatelet or anticoagulation therapy, which can cause significant bleeding problems in an aging population. Additionally, changing renal function, modification in immune regulation, and a multitude of other disease processes, can give rise to acquired bleeding disorders. Bleeding can prove difficult to treat in a dynamic environment and in a population that may have underlying thrombotic risk factors.This article discusses some specific challenges of acquired bleeding arising in the elderly. The use of anticoagulation and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medications is prevalent in the treatment of the elderly and predisposes them to increased bleeding risk as their physiology changes. When prescribing and monitoring these therapies, it is exceedingly important to weigh thrombotic versus bleeding risks. There are additional rare acquired bleeding disorders that predominantly affect the elderly. One of them is acquired hemophilia, which is an autoimmune disorder arising from antibodies against factor VIII. The treatment challenge rests in the use of hemostatic agents in a population that is already at increased risk for thrombotic complications. Another rare disorder of intensifying interest, acquired von Willebrand syndrome, has a multitude of etiologic mechanisms. Understanding the underlying pathophysiology is essential in making a treatment decision for this disorder.

  10. Genetic disorders of collagen.

    PubMed Central

    Tsipouras, P; Ramirez, F

    1987-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, and Marfan syndrome form a group of genetic disorders of connective tissue. These disorders exhibit remarkable clinical heterogeneity which reflects their underlying biochemical and molecular differences. Defects in collagen types I and III have been found in all three syndromes. PMID:3543367

  11. Stereotypic movement disorder after acquired brain injury.

    PubMed

    McGrath, Cynthia M; Kennedy, Richard E; Hoye, Wayne; Yablon, Stuart A

    2002-05-01

    Stereotypic movement disorder (SMD) consists of repetitive, non-functional motor behaviour that interferes with daily living or causes injury to the person. It is most often described in patients with mental retardation. However, recent evidence indicates that this condition is common among otherwise normal individuals. This case study describes a patient with new-onset SMD occurring after subdural haematoma and brain injury. SMD has rarely been reported after acquired brain injury, and none have documented successful treatment. The current psychiatric literature regarding neurochemistry, neuroanatomy, and treatment of SMD are reviewed with particular application to one patient. Treatment options include serotonin re-uptake inhibitors, opioid antagonists and dopamine antagonists. SMD has been under-appreciated in intellectually normal individuals, and may also be unrecognized after brain injury. Further investigation is needed in this area, which may benefit other individuals with SMD as well.

  12. Genetic autonomic disorders.

    PubMed

    Axelrod, Felicia B

    2013-03-01

    Genetic disorders affecting the autonomic nervous system can result in abnormal development of the nervous system or they can be caused by neurotransmitter imbalance, an ion-channel disturbance or by storage of deleterious material. The symptoms indicating autonomic dysfunction, however, will depend upon whether the genetic lesion has disrupted peripheral or central autonomic centers or both. Because the autonomic nervous system is pervasive and affects every organ system in the body, autonomic dysfunction will result in impaired homeostasis and symptoms will vary. The possibility of genetic confirmation by molecular testing for specific diagnosis is increasing but treatments tend to remain only supportive and directed toward particular symptoms. PMID:23465768

  13. Frequently Asked Questions about Genetic Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... used on this page Frequently Asked Questions About Genetic Disorders What are genetic disorders? A genetic disorder is a disease caused ... significant risk of developing the disease. . Geneticists group genetic disorders into three categories: Monogenetic disorders are caused ...

  14. Genetics of bipolar disorder

    PubMed Central

    Craddock, N.; Jones, I.

    1999-01-01

    Bipolar disorder (also known as manic depressive illness) is a complex genetic disorder in which the core feature is pathological disturbance in mood (affect) ranging from extreme elation, or mania, to severe depression usually accompanied by disturbances in thinking and behaviour. The lifetime prevalence of 1% is similar in males and females and family, twin, and adoption studies provide robust evidence for a major genetic contribution to risk. There are methodological impediments to precise quantification, but the approximate lifetime risk of bipolar disorder in relatives of a bipolar proband are: monozygotic co-twin 40-70%; first degree relative 5-10%; unrelated person 0.5-1.5%. Occasional families may exist in which a single gene plays the major role in determining susceptibility, but the majority of bipolar disorder involves the interaction of multiple genes (epistasis) or more complex genetic mechanisms (such as dynamic mutation or imprinting). Molecular genetic positional and candidate gene approaches are being used for the genetic dissection of bipolar disorder. No gene has yet been identified but promising findings are emerging. Regions of interest identified in linkage studies include 4p16, 12q23-q24, 16p13, 21q22, and Xq24-q26. Chromosome 18 is also of interest but the findings are confusing with up to three possible regions implicated. To date most candidate gene studies have focused on neurotransmitter systems influenced by medication used in clinical management of the disorder but no robust positive findings have yet emerged. It is, however, almost certain that over the next few years bipolar susceptibility genes will be identified. This will have a major impact on our understanding of disease pathophysiology and will provide important opportunities to investigate the interaction between genetic and environmental factors involved in pathogenesis. This is likely to lead to major improvements in treatment and patient care but will also raise important

  15. Pediatric genetic disorders of lens.

    PubMed

    Nihalani, Bharti R

    2014-12-01

    Pediatric genetic disorders of lens include various cataractous and non-cataractous anomalies. The purpose of this review is to help determine the genetic cause based on the lens appearance, ocular and systemic associations. Children with bilateral cataracts require a comprehensive history, ophthalmic and systemic examination to guide further genetic evaluation. With advancements in genetics, it is possible to determine the genetic mutations and assess phenotype genotype correlation in different lens disorders. The genetic diagnosis helps the families to better understand the disorder and develop realistic expectations as to the course of their child's disorder. PMID:27625879

  16. Pediatric genetic disorders of lens

    PubMed Central

    Nihalani, Bharti R.

    2014-01-01

    Pediatric genetic disorders of lens include various cataractous and non-cataractous anomalies. The purpose of this review is to help determine the genetic cause based on the lens appearance, ocular and systemic associations. Children with bilateral cataracts require a comprehensive history, ophthalmic and systemic examination to guide further genetic evaluation. With advancements in genetics, it is possible to determine the genetic mutations and assess phenotype genotype correlation in different lens disorders. The genetic diagnosis helps the families to better understand the disorder and develop realistic expectations as to the course of their child's disorder.

  17. Acquired disorders of elastic tissue: Part II. decreased elastic tissue.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Kevan G; Bercovitch, Lionel; Dill, Sara W; Robinson-Bostom, Leslie

    2004-08-01

    Elastic fibers in the extracellular matrix are integral components of dermal connective tissue. The resilience and elasticity required for normal structure and function of the skin are attributable to the network of elastic tissue. Advances in our understanding of elastic tissue physiology provide a foundation for studying the pathogenesis of elastic tissue disorders. Many acquired disorders are nevertheless poorly understood owing to the paucity of reported cases. Several acquired disorders in which loss of dermal elastic tissue produces prominent clinical and histopathologic features have recently been described, including middermal elastolysis, papular elastorrhexis, and pseudoxanthoma-like papillary dermal elastolysis, which must be differentiated from more well-known disorders such as anetoderma, acquired cutis laxa, and acrokeratoelastoidosis. Learning objective At the conclusion of this learning activity, participants should have an understanding of the similarities and differences between acquired disorders of elastic tissue that are characterized by a loss of elastic tissue.

  18. Acquired coagulation inhibitor-associated bleeding disorders: an update.

    PubMed

    Franchini, Massimo; Veneri, Dino

    2005-12-01

    Acquired blood coagulation inhibitors are circulating immunoglobulins that neutralize the activity of a specific coagulation protein or accelerate its clearance from the plasma, thus causing a bleeding tendency. In this review, we focus on the nonhemophilic inhibitors of coagulation, i.e. the autoantibodies occurring in individuals without a pre-existent coagulation defect, reporting the most recent advances in the pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment of these rare acquired bleeding disorders.

  19. Genetic disorders producing compressive radiculopathy.

    PubMed

    Corey, Joseph M

    2006-11-01

    Back pain is a frequent complaint seen in neurological practice. In evaluating back pain, neurologists are asked to evaluate patients for radiculopathy, determine whether they may benefit from surgery, and help guide management. Although disc herniation is the most common etiology of compressive radiculopathy, there are many other causes, including genetic disorders. This article is a discussion of genetic disorders that cause or contribute to radiculopathies. These genetic disorders include neurofibromatosis, Paget's disease of bone, and ankylosing spondylitis. Numerous genetic disorders can also lead to deformities of the spine, including spinal muscular atrophy, Friedreich's ataxia, Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, familial dysautonomia, idiopathic torsional dystonia, Marfan's syndrome, and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. However, the extent of radiculopathy caused by spine deformities is essentially absent from the literature. Finally, recent investigation into the heritability of disc degeneration and lumbar disc herniation suggests a significant genetic component in the etiology of lumbar disc disease. PMID:17048153

  20. Genetic disorders producing compressive radiculopathy.

    PubMed

    Corey, Joseph M

    2006-11-01

    Back pain is a frequent complaint seen in neurological practice. In evaluating back pain, neurologists are asked to evaluate patients for radiculopathy, determine whether they may benefit from surgery, and help guide management. Although disc herniation is the most common etiology of compressive radiculopathy, there are many other causes, including genetic disorders. This article is a discussion of genetic disorders that cause or contribute to radiculopathies. These genetic disorders include neurofibromatosis, Paget's disease of bone, and ankylosing spondylitis. Numerous genetic disorders can also lead to deformities of the spine, including spinal muscular atrophy, Friedreich's ataxia, Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, familial dysautonomia, idiopathic torsional dystonia, Marfan's syndrome, and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. However, the extent of radiculopathy caused by spine deformities is essentially absent from the literature. Finally, recent investigation into the heritability of disc degeneration and lumbar disc herniation suggests a significant genetic component in the etiology of lumbar disc disease.

  1. Genetic factors in anxiety disorders.

    PubMed

    Domschke, Katharina; Maron, Eduard

    2013-01-01

    Presently available clinical genetic studies point to a considerable heritability of anxiety disorders (30-67%), with multiple vulnerability genes such as 5-HT1A, 5-HTT, MAO-A, COMT, CCK-B, ADORA2A, CRHR1, FKBP5, ACE, RGS2/7 and NPSR1 suggested by molecular genetic association studies. These genes have been shown to partially interact with each other as well as with environmental factors to shape the overall disease risk in a complex genetic model. Additionally, recent studies have pointed out the crucial role of epigenetic signatures such as methylation patterns in modifying environmental influences as well as in driving the functional impact of anxiety disorder risk genes. On a systems level, vulnerability genes of anxiety disorders seem to confer some of the disease risk via intermediate phenotypes like behavioral inhibition, anxiety sensitivity or several neurobiological traits such as increased startle reactivity or dysfunctional corticolimbic activity during emotional processing. Finally, first pharmaco- and psychotherapy-genetic studies provide evidence for certain risk genes to confer interindividual variability in response to a pharmacological or psychotherapeutic intervention in anxiety disorders. Genetic research in anxiety disorders will be discussed regarding its potential to foster innovative and individually tailored therapeutic approaches for patients with anxiety disorders.

  2. Acquired cryptorchidism in a boy with disorder of sex development.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Fumi; Yamauchi, Katsuji; Matsui, Futoshi; Shimada, Kenji; Ida, Shinobu

    2012-01-01

    Recently, it has been reported that boys with severe hypospadias are at increased risk for acquired cryptorchidism. The reports suggested that prenatal and postnatal androgen disruption might be correlated with this condition. We experienced a case of ovotesticular disorder of sex development (DSD), which was ultimately diagnosed at surgery for acquired cryptorchidism. Ascent of the scrotal contents of the left side was detected in a 7-yr-old boy with the 46, XX karyotype, who had a history of perineal hypospadias repair. Intraoperative findings revealed the left gonad consisted of 2 segments, and this was histologically diagnosed as ovotestis by biopsy specimen. Resection of the ovarian segment was performed simultaneously. Exploration of the contralateral gonad showed the same findings. This is the first report of acquired cryptorchidism observed in a patient with DSD presenting with ambiguous genitalia.

  3. Osteonecrosis in genetic disorders

    PubMed Central

    Masi, Laura; Falchetti, Alberto; Brandi, Maria Luisa

    2007-01-01

    The avascular necrosis of bone is characterized by an abnormality of tissue that can occur whenever a disease process causes major cell stress. Some evidence supports a role for genetic factors in some avascular necrosis suggesting that gene mutations could play a role in the pathogenesis of osteonecrosis. These genetic studies provide hope that tools for identifying high risk patients will be available in the future. PMID:22460749

  4. Genetics of monoamine neurotransmitter disorders

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The monoamine neurotransmitter disorders are a heterogeneous group of inherited neurological disorders involving defects in the metabolism of dopamine, norepinephrine, epinephrine and serotonin. The inheritance of these disorders is mostly autosomal recessive. The neurological symptoms are primarily attributable to cerebral deficiency of dopamine, serotonin or both. The clinical presentations were highly variable and substantial overlaps exist. Evidently, laboratory investigations are crucial for accurate diagnosis. Measurement of neurotransmitter metabolites in cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) is the key to delineate the metabolic defects. Adjuvant investigations including plasma phenylalanine, urine pterins, urine 3-O-methyldopa (3-OMD) and serum prolactin are also helpful to establish the diagnosis. Genetic analyses are pivotally important to confirm the diagnosis which allows specific treatments, proper genetic counselling, prognosis prediction, assessment of recurrent risk in the family as well as prenatal diagnosis. Early diagnosis with appropriate treatment is associated with remarkable response and favourable clinical outcome in several disorders in this group. PMID:26835371

  5. Community-Acquired Pneumonia Hospitalization among Children with Neurologic Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Millman, Alexander J.; Finelli, Lyn; Bramley, Anna M.; Peacock, Georgina; Williams, Derek J.; Arnold, Sandra R.; Grijalva, Carlos G.; Anderson, Evan J.; McCullers, Jonathan A.; Ampofo, Krow; Pavia, Andrew T.; Edwards, Kathryn M.; Jain, Seema

    2016-01-01

    Objective To describe and compare the clinical characteristics, outcomes, and etiology of pneumonia among children hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) with neurologic disorders, non-neurologic underlying conditions, and no underlying conditions. Study design Children <18 years old hospitalized with clinical and radiographic CAP were enrolled at 3 US children’s hospitals. Neurologic disorders included cerebral palsy, developmental delay, Down syndrome, epilepsy, non-Down syndrome chromosomal abnormalities, and spinal cord abnormalities. We compared the epidemiology, etiology, and clinical outcomes of CAP in children with neurologic disorders with those with non-neurologic underlying conditions, and those with no underlying conditions using bivariate, age-stratified, and multivariate logistic regression analyses. Results From January 2010–June 2012, 2358 children with radiographically confirmed CAP were enrolled; 280 (11.9%) had a neurologic disorder (52.1% of these individuals also had non-neurologic underlying conditions), 934 (39.6%) had non-neurologic underlying conditions only, and 1144 (48.5%) had no underlying conditions. Children with neurologic disorders were older and more likely to require intensive care unit (ICU) admission than children with non-neurologic underlying conditions and children with no underlying conditions; similar proportions were mechanically ventilated. In age-stratified analysis, children with neurologic disorders were less likely to have a pathogen detected than children with non-neurologic underlying conditions. In multivariate analysis, having a neurologic disorder was associated with ICU admission for children ≥2 years of age. Conclusions Children with neurologic disorders hospitalized with CAP were less likely to have a pathogen detected and more likely to be admitted to the ICU than children without neurologic disorders. PMID:27017483

  6. Insights from Genetic Disorders of Phosphate Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Christov, Marta; Jüppner, Harald

    2013-01-01

    The molecular identification and characterization of genetic defects leading to a number of rare inherited or acquired disorders affecting phosphate homeostasis has added tremendous detail to our understanding of the regulation of phosphate balance. The identification of the key phosphate-regulating hormone, fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23), as well as other molecules that control its production, such as the glycosyltransferase GALNT3, the endopeptidase PHEX and the matrix protein DMP1, and molecules that function as downstream effectors of FGF23, such as the longevity factor Klotho and the phosphate transporters NPT2a and NPT2c, has permitted us to understand the elegant and complex interplay that exists between the kidneys, bone, parathyroid, and gut. Such insights from genetic disorders have allowed not only the design of potent targeted therapies for some of these rare genetic disorders, such as using anti-FGF23 antibodies for treatment of X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets, but also have led to clinically relevant observations related to the dysregulation of mineral ion homeostasis in chronic kidney disease. Thus, we are able to leverage our knowledge of rare human disorders affecting only few individuals, to understand and potentially treat disease processes that affect millions of patients. PMID:23465501

  7. Genetic disorders with heterotopic ossificans

    PubMed Central

    Sankar, Ruthiramurthy; Gowrishankar, Kalpana; Viswanathan, Saraswati

    2015-01-01

    Fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva (FOP) and progressive ossific heteroplasia (POH) are rare genetic disorders characterized by heterotopic bone formation leading to progressive loss of mobility and function. We report three cases of these rare disorders (two cases of FOP and one case of POH), which were clinically diagnosed and underwent genetic analysis. The aim of this report is to highlight the clinical features and the differences between these two conditions. We would also like to emphasize on the morbidity that can arise from unnecessary invasive investigations for diagnostic purposes. PMID:26015640

  8. The genetics of sleep disorders.

    PubMed

    Taheri, Shahrad; Mignot, Emmanuel

    2002-08-01

    The contribution of genetic components to the pathology of sleep disorders is increasingly recognised as important. Genetic studies have identified genes that may be important in the regulation of circadian rhythms, which in turn determine the time of sleep onset and waking. Recent studies have shown that mutations in hPER2 are associated with autosomal-dominant familial advanced-sleep-phase syndrome. Genetic studies in a canine model of narcolepsy and in knock-out mice have led to the identification of the hypothalamic hypocretin (orexin) neurotransmitter system as a key target for human narcolepsy. The contribution of genetic factors to obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS) has led to a better understanding of this complex disorder that may be part of a larger syndrome associated with respiratory, cardiovascular, and metabolic dysfunction. The aim of this review is to discuss the current knowledge on the role of genetic factors in sleep disorders, in particular circadian disorders, narcolepsy, restless-legs syndrome, and OSAS. PMID:12849457

  9. Imaging Genetics and Psychiatric Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, R; Ohi, K; Yamamori, H; Yasuda, Y; Fujimoto, M; Umeda-Yano, S; Watanabe, Y; Fukunaga, M; Takeda, M

    2015-01-01

    Imaging genetics is an integrated research method that uses neuroimaging and genetics to assess the impact of genetic variation on brain function and structure. Imaging genetics is both a tool for the discovery of risk genes for psychiatric disorders and a strategy for characterizing the neural systems affected by risk gene variants to elucidate quantitative and mechanistic aspects of brain function implicated in psychiatric disease. Early studies of imaging genetics included association analyses between brain morphology and single nucleotide polymorphisms whose function is well known, such as catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). GWAS of psychiatric disorders have identified genes with unknown functions, such as ZNF804A, and imaging genetics has been used to investigate clues of the biological function of these genes. The difficulty in replicating the findings of studies with small sample sizes has motivated the creation of large-scale collaborative consortiums, such as ENIGMA, CHARGE and IMAGEN, to collect thousands of images. In a genome-wide association study, the ENIGMA consortium successfully identified common variants in the genome associated with hippocampal volume at 12q24, and the CHARGE consortium replicated this finding. The new era of imaging genetics has just begun, and the next challenge we face is the discovery of small effect size signals from large data sets obtained from genetics and neuroimaging. New methods and technologies for data reduction with appropriate statistical thresholds, such as polygenic analysis and parallel independent component analysis (ICA), are warranted. Future advances in imaging genetics will aid in the discovery of genes and provide mechanistic insight into psychiatric disorders. PMID:25732148

  10. Imaging genetics and psychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, R; Ohi, K; Yamamori, H; Yasuda, Y; Fujimoto, M; Umeda-Yano, S; Watanabe, Y; Fukunaga, M; Takeda, M

    2015-01-01

    Imaging genetics is an integrated research method that uses neuroimaging and genetics to assess the impact of genetic variation on brain function and structure. Imaging genetics is both a tool for the discovery of risk genes for psychiatric disorders and a strategy for characterizing the neural systems affected by risk gene variants to elucidate quantitative and mechanistic aspects of brain function implicated in psychiatric disease. Early studies of imaging genetics included association analyses between brain morphology and single nucleotide polymorphisms whose function is well known, such as catechol-Omethyltransferase (COMT) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). GWAS of psychiatric disorders have identified genes with unknown functions, such as ZNF804A, and imaging genetics has been used to investigate clues of the biological function of these genes. The difficulty in replicating the findings of studies with small sample sizes has motivated the creation of largescale collaborative consortiums, such as ENIGMA, CHARGE and IMAGEN, to collect thousands of images. In a genome-wide association study, the ENIGMA consortium successfully identified common variants in the genome associated with hippocampal volume at 12q24, and the CHARGE consortium replicated this finding. The new era of imaging genetics has just begun, and the next challenge we face is the discovery of small effect size signals from large data sets obtained from genetics and neuroimaging. New methods and technologies for data reduction with appropriate statistical thresholds, such as polygenic analysis and parallel independent component analysis (ICA), are warranted. Future advances in imaging genetics will aid in the discovery of genes and provide mechanistic insight into psychiatric disorders.

  11. Telerehabilitation, Virtual Therapists, and Acquired Neurologic Speech and Language Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Cherney, Leora R.; van Vuuren, Sarel

    2013-01-01

    Telerehabilitation (telererehab) offers cost effective services that potentially can improve access to care for those with acquired neurologic communication disorders. However, regulatory issues including licensure, reimbursement, and threats to privacy and confidentiality hinder the routine implementation of telerehab services into the clinical setting. Despite these barriers, rapid technological advances and a growing body of research regarding the use of telerehab applications support its use. This article reviews the evidence related to acquired neurologic speech and language disorders in adults, focusing on studies that have been published since 2000. Research studies have used telerehab systems to assess and treat disorders including dysarthria, apraxia of speech, aphasia, and mild Alzheimer’s disease. They show that telerehab is a valid and reliable vehicle for delivering speech and language services. The studies represent a progression of technological advances in computing, Internet, and mobile technologies. They range on a continuum from working synchronously (in real-time) with a speech-language pathologist to working asynchronously (offline) with a stand-in virtual therapist. One such system that uses a virtual therapist for the treatment of aphasia, the Web-ORLA™ (Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago, Chicago, IL) system, is described in detail. Future directions for the advancement of telerehab for clinical practice are discussed. PMID:22851346

  12. Telerehabilitation, virtual therapists, and acquired neurologic speech and language disorders.

    PubMed

    Cherney, Leora R; van Vuuren, Sarel

    2012-08-01

    Telerehabilitation (telerehab) offers cost-effective services that potentially can improve access to care for those with acquired neurologic communication disorders. However, regulatory issues including licensure, reimbursement, and threats to privacy and confidentiality hinder the routine implementation of telerehab services into the clinical setting. Despite these barriers, rapid technological advances and a growing body of research regarding the use of telerehab applications support its use. This article reviews the evidence related to acquired neurologic speech and language disorders in adults, focusing on studies that have been published since 2000. Research studies have used telerehab systems to assess and treat disorders including dysarthria, apraxia of speech, aphasia, and mild Alzheimer disease. They show that telerehab is a valid and reliable vehicle for delivering speech and language services. The studies represent a progression of technological advances in computing, Internet, and mobile technologies. They range on a continuum from working synchronously (in real-time) with a speech-language pathologist to working asynchronously (offline) with a stand-in virtual therapist. One such system that uses a virtual therapist for the treatment of aphasia, the Web-ORLA™ (Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago, Chicago, IL) system, is described in detail. Future directions for the advancement of telerehab for clinical practice are discussed.

  13. Molecular Genetics of Mitochondrial Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Lee-Jun C.

    2010-01-01

    Mitochondrial respiratory chain (RC) disorders (RCDs) are a group of genetically and clinically heterogeneous diseases because of the fact that protein components of the RC are encoded by both mitochondrial and nuclear genomes and are essential in all cells. In addition, the biogenesis, structure, and function of mitochondria, including DNA…

  14. The genetics of sleep disorders.

    PubMed

    Taheri, S

    2004-06-01

    Most sleep disorders result from complex interactions between genes and the environment. Modern molecular techniques are increasingly applied to determine the contribution of genes to sleep and its disorders. The genetic basis of circadian rhythms has been explored using Drosophila and rodent models. This culminated in the identification of the molecular basis of one autosomal dominant form of familial advanced sleep phase syndrome: mutations in the human period 2 gene. Genetic studies in an autosomal recessive canine model of narcolepsy and in gene-targeted mice have identified the hypothalamic hypocretin (orexin) neuropeptide system as a key target for human narcolepsy. In this case, animal models have provided important clues to a human disorder with complex genetics. The study of the role of genes in the obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome is likely to provide important clues to a phenotype associated with respiratory, cardiovascular, and metabolic dysfunction. This brief review will present the role of genetic factors in the obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome, restless leg syndrome, narcolepsy, and circadian rhythm disorders. PMID:15289749

  15. The etiology of primary femoroacetabular impingement: genetics or acquired deformity?

    PubMed

    Packer, Jonathan D; Safran, Marc R

    2015-10-01

    The etiology of primary femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) remains controversial. Both genetic and acquired causes have been postulated and studied. While recent studies suggest that genetic factors may have a role in the development of FAI, there is no conclusive evidence that FAI is transmitted genetically. Currently, the most popular theory for the development of cam-type deformities is that a repetitive injury to the proximal femoral physis occurs during a critical period of development. There is a correlation between a high volume of impact activities during adolescence and the development of cam-type deformities. Multiple studies have found a high prevalence of FAI in elite football, ice hockey, basketball and soccer players. In this article, we review the current literature relating to the etiology of primary FAI.

  16. The etiology of primary femoroacetabular impingement: genetics or acquired deformity?

    PubMed

    Packer, Jonathan D; Safran, Marc R

    2015-10-01

    The etiology of primary femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) remains controversial. Both genetic and acquired causes have been postulated and studied. While recent studies suggest that genetic factors may have a role in the development of FAI, there is no conclusive evidence that FAI is transmitted genetically. Currently, the most popular theory for the development of cam-type deformities is that a repetitive injury to the proximal femoral physis occurs during a critical period of development. There is a correlation between a high volume of impact activities during adolescence and the development of cam-type deformities. Multiple studies have found a high prevalence of FAI in elite football, ice hockey, basketball and soccer players. In this article, we review the current literature relating to the etiology of primary FAI. PMID:27011846

  17. The etiology of primary femoroacetabular impingement: genetics or acquired deformity?

    PubMed Central

    Packer, Jonathan D.; Safran, Marc R.

    2015-01-01

    The etiology of primary femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) remains controversial. Both genetic and acquired causes have been postulated and studied. While recent studies suggest that genetic factors may have a role in the development of FAI, there is no conclusive evidence that FAI is transmitted genetically. Currently, the most popular theory for the development of cam-type deformities is that a repetitive injury to the proximal femoral physis occurs during a critical period of development. There is a correlation between a high volume of impact activities during adolescence and the development of cam-type deformities. Multiple studies have found a high prevalence of FAI in elite football, ice hockey, basketball and soccer players. In this article, we review the current literature relating to the etiology of primary FAI. PMID:27011846

  18. Genetic Determinism and the Innate-Acquired Distinction in Medicine

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    This article illustrates in which sense genetic determinism is still part of the contemporary interactionist consensus in medicine. Three dimensions of this consensus are discussed: kinds of causes, a continuum of traits ranging from monogenetic diseases to car accidents, and different kinds of determination due to different norms of reaction. On this basis, this article explicates in which sense the interactionist consensus presupposes the innate–acquired distinction. After a descriptive Part 1, Part 2 reviews why the innate–acquired distinction is under attack in contemporary philosophy of biology. Three arguments are then presented to provide a limited and pragmatic defense of the distinction: an epistemic, a conceptual, and a historical argument. If interpreted in a certain manner, and if the pragmatic goals of prevention and treatment (ideally specifying what medicine and health care is all about) are taken into account, then the innate–acquired distinction can be a useful epistemic tool. It can help, first, to understand that genetic determination does not mean fatalism, and, second, to maintain a system of checks and balances in the continuing nature–nurture debates. PMID:20234831

  19. Genetic disorders of thyroid metabolism and brain development

    PubMed Central

    Kurian, Manju A; Jungbluth, Heinz

    2014-01-01

    Normal thyroid metabolism is essential for human development, including the formation and functioning of the central and peripheral nervous system. Disorders of thyroid metabolism are increasingly recognized within the spectrum of paediatric neurological disorders. Both hypothyroid and hyperthyroid disease states (resulting from genetic and acquired aetiologies) can lead to characteristic neurological syndromes, with cognitive delay, extrapyramidal movement disorders, neuropsychiatric symptoms, and neuromuscular manifestations. In this review, the neurological manifestations of genetic disorders of thyroid metabolism are outlined, with particular focus on Allan-Herndon-Dudley syndrome and benign hereditary chorea. We report in detail the clinical features, major neurological and neuropsychiatric manifestations, molecular genetic findings, disease mechanisms, and therapeutic strategies for these emerging genetic ‘brain-thyroid’ disorders. PMID:24665922

  20. Gene Therapy for Diseases and Genetic Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... notable advancements are the following: Gene Therapy for Genetic Disorders Severe Combined Immune Deficiency (ADA-SCID) ADA- ... in preclinical animal models of this disease. Other genetic disorders After many years of laboratory and preclinical ...

  1. The Genetics of Tourette Disorder

    PubMed Central

    State, Matthew W.

    2011-01-01

    Tourette disorder (TD) is a childhood onset neuropsychiatric syndrome defined by persistent motor and vocal tics. Despite a long-standing consensus for a strong genetic contribution, the pace of discovery compared to other disorders of similar prevalence has been slow, due in part to a paucity of studies and both clinical heterogeneity and a complex genetic architecture. However, the potential for rapid progress is high. Recent rare variant findings have pointed to the importance of copy number variation, the overlap of risks among distinct diagnostic entities, the contribution of novel molecular mechanisms, and the value of family based studies. Finally, analysis of a cohort of sufficient size to identify common polymorphisms of plausible effect is underway, promising key information regarding the contribution of common alleles to TD. PMID:21277193

  2. [Genetic aspects of fertility disorders].

    PubMed

    Wieacker, P

    2013-12-01

    Genetic disorders of fertility can occur at the level of gonadal differentiation or function, germ cell production or function, and the genital ducts. In gonadal dysgenesis, the differentiation of testes or ovaries is impaired. Gonadal dysgenesis can be caused by chromosome aberrations or monogenetic defects in XY or XX gonadal dysgenesis. For the biosynthesis of sexual hormones, a normal development of the gonads and an intact hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis is necessary. Disorders of steroid hormone synthesis are associated with an increased or diminished production of sexual hormones. Clinical and genetic aspects of adrenogenital syndrome are discussed here. Mutations of the androgen receptor cause a spectrum of androgen insensitivity ranging from women with female external genitalia through patients with genital ambiguity to men with infertility. Disturbed spermatogenesis is heterogeneous and can be the result of chromosome aberrations such as Klinefelter syndrome or structural aberrations as translocations and microdeletions of the Y chromosome. Premature ovarian failure is characterized by amenorrhea and hypergonadotropic hypogonadism before 40 years of age. Beside nongenetic factors, premature ovarian failure can be caused by chromosome aberrations or monogenetic defects. Disorders of the genital ducts such as anomalies of the müllerian ducts in females and of the wolffian ducts in males can be associated with sterility or infertility.

  3. Genetic engineering and therapy for inherited and acquired cardiomyopathies.

    PubMed

    Day, Sharlene; Davis, Jennifer; Westfall, Margaret; Metzger, Joseph

    2006-10-01

    The cardiac myofilaments consist of a highly ordered assembly of proteins that collectively generate force in a calcium-dependent manner. Defects in myofilament function and its regulation have been implicated in various forms of acquired and inherited human heart disease. For example, during cardiac ischemia, cardiac myocyte contractile performance is dramatically downregulated due in part to a reduced sensitivity of the myofilaments to calcium under acidic pH conditions. Over the last several years, the thin filament regulatory protein, troponin I, has been identified as an important mediator of this response. Mutations in troponin I and other sarcomere genes are also linked to several distinct inherited cardiomyopathic phenotypes, including hypertrophic, dilated, and restrictive cardiomyopathies. With the cardiac sarcomere emerging as a central player for such a diverse array of human heart diseases, genetic-based strategies that target the myofilament will likely have broad therapeutic potential. The development of safe vector systems for efficient gene delivery will be a critical hurdle to overcome before these types of therapies can be successfully applied. Nonetheless, studies focusing on the principles of acute genetic engineering of the sarcomere hold value as they lay the essential foundation on which to build potential gene-based therapies for heart disease.

  4. Genetics Home Reference: paroxysmal extreme pain disorder

    MedlinePlus

    ... pain disorder is considered a form of peripheral neuropathy because it affects the peripheral nervous system, which ... MedlinePlus (3 links) Health Topic: Pain Health Topic: Peripheral Nerve Disorders Health Topic: Seizures Genetic and Rare Diseases Information ...

  5. Mouse models of neurological disorders--a comparison of heritable and acquired traits.

    PubMed

    Harper, Alex

    2010-10-01

    Human neurological disorders include a wide range of illnesses which have a disproportionately high prevalence in the increasingly populous geriatric community. Any research effort directed at discovering the aetiology of neurological disease is greatly enhanced with in vivo models of the disease of interest. Scientific research incorporating the use of mice has advanced rapidly in the last three decades. Relatively simple to breed, maintain and train, mice have many advantages over other species for use in research. More than a century of selective breeding has provided investigators with a rich gene pool and sub-strain diversity from which to choose for their research. Thus the dramatic increase in genetic screening and gene engineering that has occurred in research in recent decades has enabled the generation of a multitude of mouse models. This review discusses the relative utility of mouse models in which a heritable or non-heritable (acquired) manipulation has been used to model a specified trait of a human neurological disorder. The techniques used in deriving useful genetic alterations or modifications and in generating acquired mouse models are outlined with examples of each provided.

  6. Chicago Center for Jewish Genetic Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... Genome Centers Advocacy and Policy Cancers Educational Sites Ethics Gene Patenting General Genetics Information General News and Policy Jewish Genetic Disorders Jewish Medical and Ethical Information Local and State Resources National Disability Resources ...

  7. A causal model of post-traumatic stress disorder: disentangling predisposed from acquired neural abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Admon, Roee; Milad, Mohammed R; Hendler, Talma

    2013-07-01

    Discriminating neural abnormalities into the causes versus consequences of psychopathology would enhance the translation of neuroimaging findings into clinical practice. By regarding the traumatic encounter as a reference point for disease onset, neuroimaging studies of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) can potentially allocate PTSD neural abnormalities to either predisposing (pre-exposure) or acquired (post-exposure) factors. Based on novel research strategies in PTSD neuroimaging, including genetic, environmental, twin, and prospective studies, we provide a causal model that accounts for neural abnormalities in PTSD, and outline its clinical implications. Current data suggest that abnormalities within the amygdala and dorsal anterior cingulate cortex represent predisposing risk factors for developing PTSD, whereas dysfunctional hippocampal-ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) interactions may become evident only after having developed the disorder.

  8. Genetics of obsessive-compulsive disorder and related disorders.

    PubMed

    Browne, Heidi A; Gair, Shannon L; Scharf, Jeremiah M; Grice, Dorothy E

    2014-09-01

    Twin and family studies support a significant genetic contribution to obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and related disorders, such as chronic tic disorders, trichotillomania, skin-picking disorder, body dysmorphic disorder, and hoarding disorder. Recently, population-based studies and novel laboratory-based methods have confirmed substantial heritability in OCD. Genome-wide association studies and candidate gene association studies have provided information on specific gene variations that may be involved in the pathobiology of OCD, though a substantial portion of the genetic risk architecture remains unknown.

  9. Genetic relationships between schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and schizoaffective disorder.

    PubMed

    Cardno, Alastair G; Owen, Michael J

    2014-05-01

    There is substantial evidence for partial overlap of genetic influences on schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, with family, twin, and adoption studies showing a genetic correlation between the disorders of around 0.6. Results of genome-wide association studies are consistent with commonly occurring genetic risk variants, contributing to both the shared and nonshared aspects, while studies of large, rare chromosomal structural variants, particularly copy number variants, show a stronger influence on schizophrenia than bipolar disorder to date. Schizoaffective disorder has been less investigated but shows substantial familial overlap with both schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. A twin analysis is consistent with genetic influences on schizoaffective episodes being entirely shared with genetic influences on schizophrenic and manic episodes, while association studies suggest the possibility of some relatively specific genetic influences on broadly defined schizoaffective disorder, bipolar subtype. Further insights into genetic relationships between these disorders are expected as studies continue to increase in sample size and in technical and analytical sophistication, information on phenotypes beyond clinical diagnoses are increasingly incorporated, and approaches such as next-generation sequencing identify additional types of genetic risk variant.

  10. Genetic analysis of bleeding disorders.

    PubMed

    Edison, E; Konkle, B A; Goodeve, A C

    2016-07-01

    Molecular genetic analysis of inherited bleeding disorders has been practised for over 30 years. Technological changes have enabled advances, from analyses using extragenic linked markers to next-generation DNA sequencing and microarray analysis. Two approaches for genetic analysis are described, each suiting their environment. The Christian Medical Centre in Vellore, India, uses conformation-sensitive gel electrophoresis mutation screening of multiplexed PCR products to identify candidate mutations, followed by Sanger sequencing confirmation of variants identified. Specific analyses for F8 intron 1 and 22 inversions are also undertaken. The MyLifeOurFuture US project between the American Thrombosis and Hemostasis Network, the National Hemophilia Foundation, Bloodworks Northwest and Biogen uses molecular inversion probes (MIP) to capture target exons, splice sites plus 5' and 3' sequences and to detect F8 intron 1 and 22 inversions. This allows screening for all F8 and F9 variants in one sequencing run of multiple samples (196 or 392). Sequence variants identified are subsequently confirmed by a diagnostic laboratory. After having identified variants in genes of interest through these processes, a systematic procedure determining their likely pathogenicity should be applied. Several scientific societies have prepared guidelines. Systematic analysis of the available evidence facilitates reproducible scoring of likely pathogenicity. Documentation of frequency in population databases of variant prevalence and in locus-specific mutation databases can provide initial information on likely pathogenicity. Whereas null mutations are often pathogenic, missense and splice site variants often require in silico analyses to predict likely pathogenicity and using an accepted suite of tools can help standardize their documentation.

  11. Genetic analysis of bleeding disorders.

    PubMed

    Edison, E; Konkle, B A; Goodeve, A C

    2016-07-01

    Molecular genetic analysis of inherited bleeding disorders has been practised for over 30 years. Technological changes have enabled advances, from analyses using extragenic linked markers to next-generation DNA sequencing and microarray analysis. Two approaches for genetic analysis are described, each suiting their environment. The Christian Medical Centre in Vellore, India, uses conformation-sensitive gel electrophoresis mutation screening of multiplexed PCR products to identify candidate mutations, followed by Sanger sequencing confirmation of variants identified. Specific analyses for F8 intron 1 and 22 inversions are also undertaken. The MyLifeOurFuture US project between the American Thrombosis and Hemostasis Network, the National Hemophilia Foundation, Bloodworks Northwest and Biogen uses molecular inversion probes (MIP) to capture target exons, splice sites plus 5' and 3' sequences and to detect F8 intron 1 and 22 inversions. This allows screening for all F8 and F9 variants in one sequencing run of multiple samples (196 or 392). Sequence variants identified are subsequently confirmed by a diagnostic laboratory. After having identified variants in genes of interest through these processes, a systematic procedure determining their likely pathogenicity should be applied. Several scientific societies have prepared guidelines. Systematic analysis of the available evidence facilitates reproducible scoring of likely pathogenicity. Documentation of frequency in population databases of variant prevalence and in locus-specific mutation databases can provide initial information on likely pathogenicity. Whereas null mutations are often pathogenic, missense and splice site variants often require in silico analyses to predict likely pathogenicity and using an accepted suite of tools can help standardize their documentation. PMID:27405681

  12. Genetic disorders involving adrenal development.

    PubMed

    Lin, Lin; Ferraz-de-Souza, Bruno; Achermann, John C

    2007-01-01

    The past decade has seen significant advances in our understanding of the genetic aetiology of several forms of adrenal failure that present in infancy or childhood. Several of these disorders affect adrenal development and are termed 'adrenal hypoplasia'. These conditions can be broadly divided into: (1) secondary forms of adrenal hypoplasia due to panhypopituitarism (e.g. HESX1, LHX4, SOX3) or abnormalities in ACTH synthesis (TPIT) or processing (e.g. POMC or PC1); (2) adrenal hypoplasia as part of an ACTH resistance syndrome [MC2R/ACTH receptor, MRAP, AAAS (triple A syndrome)], and (3) primary defects in the development of the adrenal gland itself (primary adrenal hypoplasia). Primary adrenal hypoplasia most commonly occurs in an X-linked form due to mutations in the nuclear receptor DAX1 (NR0B1) but can occur in a poorly understood recessive form or as part of the IMAGe (intrauterine growth retardation, metaphyseal dysplasia, adrenal hypoplasia, genitourinary anomalies) syndrome. Defining the molecular basis of these conditions can have significant clinical implications for management, counselling and presymptomatic diagnosis, as well as providing fascinating insight into normal and abnormal mechanisms of adrenal development in humans.

  13. Surgical decision making for stage IV adult acquired flatfoot disorder.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Kyle S; Hyer, Christopher F

    2014-07-01

    Adult acquired flatfoot deformity is a debilitating musculoskeletal condition affecting the lower extremity. Posterior tibial tendon dysfunction (PTTD) is the primary etiology for the development of a flatfoot deformity in an adult. PTTD is classified into 4 stages (with stage IV subdivided into stage IV-A and IV-B). This classification is described in detail in this article.

  14. Surgical decision making for stage IV adult acquired flatfoot disorder.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Kyle S; Hyer, Christopher F

    2014-07-01

    Adult acquired flatfoot deformity is a debilitating musculoskeletal condition affecting the lower extremity. Posterior tibial tendon dysfunction (PTTD) is the primary etiology for the development of a flatfoot deformity in an adult. PTTD is classified into 4 stages (with stage IV subdivided into stage IV-A and IV-B). This classification is described in detail in this article. PMID:24980933

  15. Episodic disorders of behaviour and affect after acquired brain injury.

    PubMed

    Eames, Peter Eames; Wood, Rodger Ll

    2003-01-01

    Psychological disorders that follow traumatic brain injury are possibly more complex and diverse than those associated with other forms of "brain damage". These may include organic aggressive, or organic affective syndromes that are episodic in nature and therefore require a more specific diagnosis, a different classification, and a different approach to treatment. Consequently, it is necessary for clinicians to learn to distinguish between "primary" psychiatric illnesses and those disorders of behavioural control and mood that stem specifically from brain injury. There is relatively little in the clinical literature that explains the relationship between variable states of behaviour, mood or temperament, and clinical disorders that may have long-term implications for patient management. This concept paper therefore addresses abnormalities of mood and behaviour that are episodic in character and are not recognisably included in the DSM and ICD classifications of psychological or psychiatric disorders. PMID:21854336

  16. Mechanisms of Non-Genetic Inheritance and Psychiatric Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Toth, Miklos

    2015-01-01

    Inheritance is typically associated with the Mendelian transmission of information from parents to offspring by alleles (DNA sequence). However, empirical data clearly suggest that traits can be acquired from ancestors by mechanisms that do not involve genetic alleles, referred to as non-genetic inheritance. Information that is non-genetically transmitted across generations includes parental experience and exposure to certain environments, but also parental mutations and polymorphisms, because they can change the parental ‘intrinsic' environment. Non-genetic inheritance is not limited to the first generation of the progeny, but can involve the grandchildren and even further generations. Non-genetic inheritance has been observed for multiple traits including overall development, cardiovascular risk and metabolic symptoms, but this review will focus on the inheritance of behavioral abnormalities pertinent to psychiatric disorders. Multigenerational non-genetic inheritance is often interpreted as the transmission of epigenetic marks, such as DNA methylation and chromatin modifications, via the gametes (transgenerational epigenetic inheritance). However, information can be carried across generations by a large number of bioactive substances, including hormones, cytokines, and even microorganisms, without the involvement of the gametes. We reason that this broader definition of non-genetic inheritance is more appropriate, especially in the context of psychiatric disorders, because of the well-recognized role of parental and early life environmental factors in later life psychopathology. Here we discuss the various forms of non-genetic inheritance in humans and animals, as well as rodent models of psychiatric conditions to illustrate possible mechanisms. PMID:24889369

  17. The genetic basis of sleep disorders.

    PubMed

    Dauvilliers, Yves; Tafti, Mehdi

    2008-01-01

    The contribution of genes, environment and gene-environment interactions to sleep disorders is increasingly recognized. Well-documented familial and twin sleep disorder studies suggest an important influence of genetic factors. However, only few sleep disorders have an established genetic basis including four rare diseases that may result from a single gene mutation: fatal familial insomnia, familial advanced sleep-phase syndrome, chronic primary insomnia, and narcolepsy with cataplexy. However, most sleep disorders are complex in terms of their genetic susceptibility together with the variable expressivity of the phenotype even within a same family. Recent linkage, genome-wide and candidate gene association studies resulted in the identification of gene mutations, gene localizations, or evidence for susceptibility genes and/or loci in several sleep disorders. Molecular techniques including mainly genome-wide linkage and association studies are further required to identify the contribution of new genes. These identified susceptibility genetic determinants will provide clues to better understand pathogenesis of sleep disorders, to assess the risk for diseases and also to find new drug targets to treat and to prevent the underlying conditions. We reviewed here the role of genetic basis in most of key sleep disorders. PMID:19075715

  18. The complex genetics in autism spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Hua, Rui; Wei, MengPing; Zhang, Chen

    2015-10-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are a pervasive neurodevelopmental disease characterized by deficits in social interaction and nonverbal communication, as well as restricted interests and stereotypical behavior. Genetic changes/heritability is one of the major contributing factors, and hundreds to thousands of causative and susceptible genes, copy number variants (CNVs), linkage regions, and microRNAs have been associated with ASD which clearly indicates that ASD is a complex genetic disorder. Here, we will briefly summarize some of the high-confidence genetic changes in ASD and their possible roles in their pathogenesis. PMID:26335739

  19. Genetics of inherited primary arrhythmia disorders

    PubMed Central

    Spears, Danna A; Gollob, Michael H

    2015-01-01

    A sudden unexplained death is felt to be due to a primary arrhythmic disorder when no structural heart disease is found on autopsy, and there is no preceding documentation of heart disease. In these cases, death is presumed to be secondary to a lethal and potentially heritable abnormality of cardiac ion channel function. These channelopathies include congenital long QT syndrome, catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia, Brugada syndrome, and short QT syndrome. In certain cases, genetic testing may have an important role in supporting a diagnosis of a primary arrhythmia disorder, and can also provide prognostic information, but by far the greatest strength of genetic testing lies in the screening of family members, who may be at risk. The purpose of this review is to describe the basic genetic and molecular pathophysiology of the primary inherited arrhythmia disorders, and to outline a rational approach to genetic testing, management, and family screening. PMID:26425105

  20. Community acquired pneumonia: genetic variants influencing systemic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Ferrer Agüero, J M; Millán, S; Rodríguez de Castro, F; Martín-Loeches, I; Solé Violán, J

    2014-01-01

    The inflammatory response depends on several factors, including pathogenicity and duration of the stimulus, and also on the balance between inflammatory and antiinflammatory response. Several studies have presented evidence of the importance of genetic factors in severe infections. The innate immune response prevents the invasion and spread of pathogens during the first hours after infection. Each of the different processes involved in innate immunity may be affected by genetic polymorphisms, which can result in susceptibility or resistance to infection. The results obtained in the different studies do not irrefutably prove the role or function of a gene in the pathogenesis of respiratory infections. However, they can generate new hypotheses, suggest new candidate genes based on their role in the inflammatory response, and constitute a first step in understanding the underlying genetic factors.

  1. Community acquired pneumonia: genetic variants influencing systemic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Ferrer Agüero, J M; Millán, S; Rodríguez de Castro, F; Martín-Loeches, I; Solé Violán, J

    2014-01-01

    The inflammatory response depends on several factors, including pathogenicity and duration of the stimulus, and also on the balance between inflammatory and antiinflammatory response. Several studies have presented evidence of the importance of genetic factors in severe infections. The innate immune response prevents the invasion and spread of pathogens during the first hours after infection. Each of the different processes involved in innate immunity may be affected by genetic polymorphisms, which can result in susceptibility or resistance to infection. The results obtained in the different studies do not irrefutably prove the role or function of a gene in the pathogenesis of respiratory infections. However, they can generate new hypotheses, suggest new candidate genes based on their role in the inflammatory response, and constitute a first step in understanding the underlying genetic factors. PMID:24183496

  2. Genetics of human isolated hereditary nail disorders.

    PubMed

    Khan, S; Basit, S; Habib, R; Kamal, A; Muhammad, N; Ahmad, W

    2015-10-01

    Human hereditary nail disorders constitute a rare and heterogeneous group of ectodermal dysplasias. They occur as isolated and/or syndromic ectodermal conditions where other ectodermal appendages are also involved, and can occur associated with skeletal dysplasia. 'Nail disorder, nonsyndromic congenital' (OMIM; Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man) is subclassified into 10 different types. The underlying genes identified thus far are expressed in the nail bed and play important roles in nail development and morphogenesis. Here, we review the current literature on nail disorders and present a coherent review on the genetics of nail disorders. This review will pave the way to identifying putative genes and pathways involved in nail development and morphogenesis.

  3. [The genetic bases of neurodevelopmental disorders].

    PubMed

    Artigas-Pallarés, Josep; Guitart, Miriam; Gabau-Vila, Elisabeth

    2013-02-22

    In the last decade, progress made in genetics is questioning the current implicit nosological model in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fourth edition, text revision (DSM-IV-TR) and the International Classification of Diseases, tenth revision. Both the categorical nature and the comorbidity detected on applying diagnostic criteria become unsustainable in the light of the genetic architecture that is emerging from studies being conducted on the genetics of mental disorders. The classical paradigms -one gene for one disease- or even a specific distinctive genetic pattern for each condition, are concepts restricted to specific cases. In this review the objective is to describe the current scenario that has arisen following the latest advances in genetics. The lines of work being traced by research both in the present and in the near future include: the identification of variations in the number of copies (both frequent and rare), indiscriminately linked to different disorders; the concurrence of multiple variants for a single disorder; the double hit phenomenon; and epigenetic modulation. The new version of the DSM, fully aware of the deficiencies in the current model, will mark a turning point that, while somewhat timid, is decidedly oriented towards incorporating a dimensional conception of mental disorders.

  4. Fluency Disorders in Genetic Syndromes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Borsel, John; Tetnowski, John A.

    2007-01-01

    The characteristics of various genetic syndromes have included "stuttering" as a primary symptom associated with that syndrome. Specifically, Down syndrome, fragile X syndrome, Prader-Willi syndrome, Tourette syndrome, Neurofibromatosis type I, and Turner syndrome all list "stuttering" as a characteristic of that syndrome. An extensive review of…

  5. Acquired and congenital disorders of sung performance: A review.

    PubMed Central

    Berkowska, Magdalena; Dalla Bella, Simone

    2009-01-01

    Many believe that the majority of people are unable to carry a tune. Yet, this widespread idea underestimates the singing abilities of the layman. Most occasional singers can sing in tune and in time, provided that they perform at a slow tempo. Here we characterize proficient singing in the general population and identify its neuronal underpinnings by reviewing behavioral and neuroimaging studies. In addition, poor singing resulting from a brain injury or neurogenetic disorder (i.e., tone deafness or congenital amusia) is examined. Different lines of evidence converge in indicating that poor singing is not a monolithic deficit. A variety of poor-singing "phenotypes" are described, with or without concurrent perceptual deficits. In addition, particular attention is paid to the dissociations between specific abilities in poor singers (e.g., production of absolute vs. relative pitch, pitch vs. time accuracy). Such diversity of impairments in poor singers can be traced to different faulty mechanisms within the vocal sensorimotor loop, such as pitch perception and sensorimotor integration. PMID:20523851

  6. Genetically modified pig models for neurodegenerative disorders.

    PubMed

    Holm, Ida E; Alstrup, Aage Kristian Olsen; Luo, Yonglun

    2016-01-01

    Increasing incidence of neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease has become one of the most challenging health issues in ageing humans. One approach to combat this is to generate genetically modified animal models of neurodegenerative disorders for studying pathogenesis, prognosis, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention. Owing to the genetic, anatomic, physiologic, pathologic, and neurologic similarities between pigs and humans, genetically modified pig models of neurodegenerative disorders have been attractive large animal models to bridge the gap of preclinical investigations between rodents and humans. In this review, we provide a neuroanatomical overview in pigs and summarize and discuss the generation of genetically modified pig models of neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's diseases, Huntington's disease, Parkinson's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, spinal muscular atrophy, and ataxia-telangiectasia. We also highlight how non-invasive bioimaging technologies such as positron emission tomography (PET), computer tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and behavioural testing have been applied to characterize neurodegenerative pig models. We further propose a multiplex genome editing and preterm recloning (MAP) approach by using the rapid growth of the ground-breaking precision genome editing technology CRISPR/Cas9 and somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). With this approach, we hope to shorten the temporal requirement in generating multiple transgenic pigs, increase the survival rate of founder pigs, and generate genetically modified pigs that will more closely resemble the disease-causing mutations and recapitulate pathological features of human conditions. PMID:26446984

  7. Genetic and degenerative disorders primarily causing other movement disorders.

    PubMed

    Pavese, Nicola; Tai, Yen F

    2016-01-01

    In this chapter, we will discuss the contributions of structural and functional imaging to the diagnosis and management of genetic and degenerative diseases that lead to the occurrence of movement disorders. We will mainly focus on Huntington's disease, Wilson's disease, dystonia, and neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation, as they are the more commonly encountered clinical conditions within this group. PMID:27432681

  8. Motives for Acquiring and Saving in Hoarding Disorder, OCD, and Community Controls

    PubMed Central

    Frost, Randy O.; Steketee, Gail; Tolin, David F.; Sinopoli, Nicole; Ruby, Dylan

    2015-01-01

    Hoarding Disorder (HD) was classified as a separate disorder in DSM-5 (APA, 2013). However, only recently has research on hoarding begun in earnest, and as of yet, very little research exists on the motivation to acquire and save the excessive volume of possessions seen in patients with this disorder. This investigation examined the frequency of four motives for acquiring and saving possessions that are often reported anecdotally by people with HD (information, emotional reasons, avoid waste, and aesthetic reasons). Comparisons in a sample of 443 participants indicated that those with HD reported higher frequencies of each of these four motives for acquiring and saving compared to OCD participants and community controls. The intention to avoid waste emerged as the most prominent motive in people with HD. Understanding waste avoidance may be key to better understanding and treating HD. PMID:25729641

  9. The genetic basis of panic disorder.

    PubMed

    Na, Hae-Ran; Kang, Eun-Ho; Lee, Jae-Hon; Yu, Bum-Hee

    2011-06-01

    Panic disorder is one of the chronic and disabling anxiety disorders. There has been evidence for either genetic heterogeneity or complex inheritance, with environmental factor interactions and multiple single genes, in panic disorder's etiology. Linkage studies have implicated several chromosomal regions, but no research has replicated evidence for major genes involved in panic disorder. Researchers have suggested several neurotransmitter systems are related to panic disorder. However, to date no candidate gene association studies have established specific loci. Recently, researchers have emphasized genome-wide association studies. Results of two genome-wide association studies on panic disorder failed to show significant associations. Evidence exists for differences regarding gender and ethnicity in panic disorder. Increasing evidence suggests genes underlying panic disorder overlap, transcending current diagnostic boundaries. In addition, an anxious temperament and anxiety-related personality traits may represent intermediate phenotypes that predispose to panic disorder. Future research should focus on broad phenotypes, defined by comorbidity or intermediate phenotypes. Genome-wide association studies in large samples, studies of gene-gene and gene-environment interactions, and pharmacogenetic studies are needed.

  10. Genetic Variation in Cardiomyopathy and Cardiovascular Disorders.

    PubMed

    McNally, Elizabeth M; Puckelwartz, Megan J

    2015-01-01

    With the wider deployment of massively-parallel, next-generation sequencing, it is now possible to survey human genome data for research and clinical purposes. The reduced cost of producing short-read sequencing has now shifted the burden to data analysis. Analysis of genome sequencing remains challenged by the complexity of the human genome, including redundancy and the repetitive nature of genome elements and the large amount of variation in individual genomes. Public databases of human genome sequences greatly facilitate interpretation of common and rare genetic variation, although linking database sequence information to detailed clinical information is limited by privacy and practical issues. Genetic variation is a rich source of knowledge for cardiovascular disease because many, if not all, cardiovascular disorders are highly heritable. The role of rare genetic variation in predicting risk and complications of cardiovascular diseases has been well established for hypertrophic and dilated cardiomyopathy, where the number of genes that are linked to these disorders is growing. Bolstered by family data, where genetic variants segregate with disease, rare variation can be linked to specific genetic variation that offers profound diagnostic information. Understanding genetic variation in cardiomyopathy is likely to help stratify forms of heart failure and guide therapy. Ultimately, genetic variation may be amenable to gene correction and gene editing strategies.

  11. Genetics of affective and anxiety disorders.

    PubMed

    Leonardo, E D; Hen, René

    2006-01-01

    The study of the genetics of complex behaviors has evolved dramatically from the days of the nature versus nurture debates that dominated much of the past century. Here we discuss advances in our understanding of the genetics of affective and anxiety disorders. In particular, we highlight our growing understanding of specific gene-environment interactions that occur during critical periods in development, setting the stage for later behavioral phenotypes. We review the recent literature in the field, focusing on recent advances in our understanding of the role of the serotonin system in establishing normal anxiety levels during development. We emphasize the importance of understanding the effect of genetic variation at the level of functional circuits and provide examples from the literature of how such an approach has been exploited to study novel genetic endpoints, including genetically based variation in response to medication, a potentially valuable phenotype that has not received much attention to date. PMID:16318591

  12. Genetic Testing for Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bauer, Sarah C.; Msall, Michael E.

    2011-01-01

    Children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) have unique developmental and behavioral phenotypes, and they have specific challenges with communication, social skills, and repetitive behaviors. At this time, no single etiology for ASD has been identified. However, evidence from family studies and linkage analyses suggests that genetic factors play…

  13. Genetics of psychiatric disorders: Methods: Molecular approaches

    PubMed Central

    Avramopoulos, Dimitrios

    2010-01-01

    Summary The launch of the Human Genome Project in 1990 triggered unprecedented technological advances in DNA analysis technologies, followed by tremendous advances in our understanding of the human genome since the completion of the first draft in 2001. During the same time the interest shifted from the genetic causes of the Mendelian disorders, most of which were uncovered through linkage analyses and positional cloning, to the genetic causes of complex (including psychiatric) disorders that proved more of a challenge for linkage methods. The new technologies, together with our new knowledge of the properties of the genome, and significant efforts towards generating large patient and control sample collections, allowed for the success of genome-wide association studies. The result has been that reports currently appear in the literature every week identifying new genes for complex disorders. We are still far from completely explaining the heritable component of complex disorders, but we are certainly closer to being able to use the new information towards prevention and treatment of illness. Next-generation sequencing methods, combined with the results of association and perhaps linkage studies, will help us uncover the missing heritability and achieve a better understanding of the genetic aspects of psychiatric disease, as well as the best strategies for incorporating genetics in the service of patients. PMID:20159337

  14. Suppose It Were a Genetic Disorder?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krugman, Richard D.

    1997-01-01

    This editorial contemplates some of the implications of the possibility that child abuse and neglect might be a genetic disorder by describing a 1996 study (Brown, et al.) that seemed to identify a nurturing gene in mice and described the symptoms of its absence. Parallels between mouse and human displays of non-nurturing behavior are discussed.…

  15. Genetic disorders of neonatal respiratory function.

    PubMed

    Cole, F S; Hamvas, A; Nogee, L M

    2001-08-01

    Genetic risk for respiratory distress in infancy has been recognized with increasing frequency in neonatal intensive care units. Reports of family clusters of affected infants and of ethnic- and gender-based respiratory phenotypes point to the contribution of inheritance. Similarly, different outcomes among gestationally matched infants with comparable exposures to oxygen, mechanical ventilation, or nutritional deficiency also suggest a genetic risk for respiratory distress. Examples of inherited deficiency of surfactant protein B in both humans and genetically engineered murine lineages illustrate the importance of identifying markers of genetic risk. In contrast to developmental, inflammatory, or nutritional causes of respiratory distress that may resolve as infants mature, genetic causes result in both acute and chronic (and potentially irreversible) respiratory failure. The availability of clinically useful genetic markers of risk for respiratory distress in infancy will permit development of rational strategies for treatment of genetic lung disorders of infancy and more accurate counseling of families whose infants are at genetic risk for development of respiratory distress at birth or during early childhood. We review examples of genetic variations known to be associated with or cause respiratory distress in infancy. PMID:11477198

  16. Genetic assessment of safflower (Carthamus tinctorius L.) collection with microsatellite markers acquired via pyrosequencing method.

    PubMed

    Lee, Gi-An; Sung, Jung-Sook; Lee, Sok-Young; Chung, Jong-Wook; Yi, Jung-Yoon; Kim, Yeon-Gyu; Lee, Myung-Chul

    2014-01-01

    A genetic evaluation of safflower germplasm collections derived from different geographical regions and countries will provide useful information for sustainable conservation and the utilization of genetic diversity. However, the molecular marker information is limited for evaluation of genetic diversity of safflower germplasm. In this study, we acquired 509 putative genomic SSR markers for sufficient genome coverage using next-generation sequencing methods and characterized thirty polymorphic SSRs in safflower collection composed of 100 diverse accessions. The average allele number and expected heterozygosity were 2.8 and 0.386, respectively. Analysis of population structure and phylogeny based on thirty SSR profiles revealed genetic admixture between geographical regions contrary to genetic clustering. However, the accessions from Korea were genetically conserved in distinctive groups in contrast to other safflower gene pool. In conclusion, these new genomic SSRs will facilitate valuable studies to clarify genetic relationships as well as conduct population structure analyses, genetic map construction and association analysis for safflower.

  17. Acquired disorders of elastic tissue: part I. Increased elastic tissue and solar elastotic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Kevan G; Bercovitch, Lionel; Dill, Sara W; Robinson-Bostom, Leslie

    2004-07-01

    Elastic fibers in the extracellular matrix are an integral component of dermal connective tissue. The resilience and elasticity required for normal structure and function of the skin may be attributed to the network of elastic tissue. Advances in our understanding of elastic tissue physiology provide a foundation for studying the pathogenesis of elastic tissue disorders. Many acquired disorders are nevertheless poorly understood due to the paucity of reported cases. Several acquired disorders in which accumulation or elastotic degeneration of dermal elastic fibers produces prominent clinical and histopathologic features have recently been described. They include elastoderma, linear focal elastosis, and late-onset focal dermal elastosis and must be differentiated from better-known disorders, among them acquired pseudoxanthoma elasticum, elastosis perforans serpiginosa, and Favré-Racouchot syndrome. Learning objective At the conclusion of this learning activity, participants should understand the similarities and differences between acquired disorders of elastic tissue that are characterized by an increase in elastic tissue, as well as the spectrum of solar elastotic dermatoses.

  18. Optic nerve degeneration and mitochondrial dysfunction: genetic and acquired optic neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Carelli, Valerio; Ross-Cisneros, Fred N; Sadun, Alfredo A

    2002-05-01

    Selective degeneration of the smallest fibers (papillo-macular bundle) of the human optic nerve occurs in a large number of optic neuropathies characterized primarily by loss of central vision. The pathophysiology that underlies this peculiar pattern of cell involvement probably reflects different forms of genetic and acquired mitochondrial dysfunction. Maternally inherited Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON), dominant optic atrophy (Kjer disease), the optic atrophy of Leigh's syndrome, Friedreich ataxia and a variety of other conditions are examples of inherited mitochondrial disorders with different etiologies. Tobacco-alcohol amblyopia (TAA), the Cuban epidemic of optic neuropathy (CEON) and other dietary (Vitamins B, folate deficiencies) optic neuropathies, as well as toxic optic neuropathies such as due to chloramphenicol, ethambutol, or more rarely to carbon monoxide, methanol and cyanide are probably all related forms of acquired mitochondrial dysfunction. Biochemical and cellular studies in LHON point to a partial defect of respiratory chain function that may generate either an ATP synthesis defect and/or a chronic increase of oxidative stress. Histopathological studies in LHON cases and a rat model mimicking CEON revealed a selective loss of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) and the corresponding axons, particularly in the temporal-central part of the optic nerve. Anatomical peculiarities of optic nerve axons, such as the asymmetric pattern of myelination, may have functional implications on energy dependence and distribution of mitochondrial populations in the different sections of the nerve. Histological evidence suggests impaired axonal transport of mitochondria in LHON and in the CEON-like rat model, indicating a possible common pathophysiology for this category of optic neuropathies. Histological evidence of myelin pathology in LHON also suggests a role for oxidative stress, possibly affecting the oligodendrocytes of the optic nerves.

  19. The Genetics of Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders.

    PubMed

    Eberhart, Johann K; Parnell, Scott E

    2016-06-01

    The term "fetal alcohol spectrum disorders" (FASD) defines the full range of ethanol (EtOH)-induced birth defects. Numerous variables influence the phenotypic outcomes of embryonic EtOH exposure. Among these variables, genetics appears to play an important role, yet our understanding of the genetic predisposition to FASD is still in its infancy. We review the current literature that relates to the genetics of FASD susceptibility and gene-EtOH interactions. Where possible, we comment on potential mechanisms of reported gene-EtOH interactions. Early indications of genetic sensitivity to FASD came from human and animal studies using twins or inbred strains, respectively. These analyses prompted searches for susceptibility loci involved in EtOH metabolism and analyses of candidate loci, based on phenotypes observed in FASD. More recently, genetic screens in animal models have provided an additional insight into the genetics of FASD. Understanding FASD requires that we understand the many factors influencing phenotypic outcome following embryonic EtOH exposure. We are gaining ground on understanding some of the genetics behind FASD, yet much work remains to be carried out. Coordinated analyses using human patients and animal models are likely to be highly fruitful in uncovering the genetics behind FASD. PMID:27122355

  20. The Genetics of Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders.

    PubMed

    Eberhart, Johann K; Parnell, Scott E

    2016-06-01

    The term "fetal alcohol spectrum disorders" (FASD) defines the full range of ethanol (EtOH)-induced birth defects. Numerous variables influence the phenotypic outcomes of embryonic EtOH exposure. Among these variables, genetics appears to play an important role, yet our understanding of the genetic predisposition to FASD is still in its infancy. We review the current literature that relates to the genetics of FASD susceptibility and gene-EtOH interactions. Where possible, we comment on potential mechanisms of reported gene-EtOH interactions. Early indications of genetic sensitivity to FASD came from human and animal studies using twins or inbred strains, respectively. These analyses prompted searches for susceptibility loci involved in EtOH metabolism and analyses of candidate loci, based on phenotypes observed in FASD. More recently, genetic screens in animal models have provided an additional insight into the genetics of FASD. Understanding FASD requires that we understand the many factors influencing phenotypic outcome following embryonic EtOH exposure. We are gaining ground on understanding some of the genetics behind FASD, yet much work remains to be carried out. Coordinated analyses using human patients and animal models are likely to be highly fruitful in uncovering the genetics behind FASD.

  1. Genetic research in autism spectrum disorders

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Elise B.; Neale, Benjamin M.; Hyman, Steven E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review The recent explosion of genetic findings in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) research has improved knowledge of the disorder's underlying biology and etiologic architecture. This review introduces concepts and results from recent genetic studies and discusses the manner in which those findings can influence the trajectory of ASD research. Recent findings Large consortium studies have associated ASDs with many types of genetic risk factors, including common polygenic risk, de novo single nucleotide variants, copy number variants, and rare inherited variants. In aggregate, these results confirm the heterogeneity and complexity of ASDs. The rare variant findings in particular point to genes and pathways that begin to bridge the gap between behavior and biology. Summary Genetic studies have the potential to identify the biological underpinnings of ASDs and other neuropsychiatric disorders. The data they generate are already being used to examine disease pathways and pathogenesis. The results also speak to ASD heterogeneity and, in the future, may be used to stratify research studies and treatment trials. PMID:26371945

  2. Unique acyl-carnitine profiles are potential biomarkers for acquired mitochondrial disease in autism spectrum disorder

    PubMed Central

    Frye, R E; Melnyk, S; MacFabe, D F

    2013-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) has been associated with mitochondrial disease (MD). Interestingly, most individuals with ASD and MD do not have a specific genetic mutation to explain the MD, raising the possibility of that MD may be acquired, at least in a subgroup of children with ASD. Acquired MD has been demonstrated in a rodent ASD model in which propionic acid (PPA), an enteric bacterial fermentation product of ASD-associated gut bacteria, is infused intracerebroventricularly. This animal model shows validity as it demonstrates many behavioral, metabolic, neuropathologic and neurophysiologic abnormalities associated with ASD. This animal model also demonstrates a unique pattern of elevations in short-chain and long-chain acyl-carnitines suggesting abnormalities in fatty-acid metabolism. To determine if the same pattern of biomarkers of abnormal fatty-acid metabolism are present in children with ASD, the laboratory results from a large cohort of children with ASD (n=213) who underwent screening for metabolic disorders, including mitochondrial and fatty-acid oxidation disorders, in a medically based autism clinic were reviewed. Acyl-carnitine panels were determined to be abnormal if three or more individual acyl-carnitine species were abnormal in the panel and these abnormalities were verified by repeated testing. Overall, 17% of individuals with ASD demonstrated consistently abnormal acyl-carnitine panels. Next, it was determined if specific acyl-carnitine species were consistently elevated across the individuals with consistently abnormal acyl-carnitine panels. Significant elevations in short-chain and long-chain, but not medium-chain, acyl-carnitines were found in the ASD individuals with consistently abnormal acyl-carnitine panels—a pattern consistent with the PPA rodent ASD model. Examination of electron transport chain function in muscle and fibroblast culture, histological and electron microscopy examination of muscle and other biomarkers of

  3. Unique acyl-carnitine profiles are potential biomarkers for acquired mitochondrial disease in autism spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Frye, R E; Melnyk, S; Macfabe, D F

    2013-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) has been associated with mitochondrial disease (MD). Interestingly, most individuals with ASD and MD do not have a specific genetic mutation to explain the MD, raising the possibility of that MD may be acquired, at least in a subgroup of children with ASD. Acquired MD has been demonstrated in a rodent ASD model in which propionic acid (PPA), an enteric bacterial fermentation product of ASD-associated gut bacteria, is infused intracerebroventricularly. This animal model shows validity as it demonstrates many behavioral, metabolic, neuropathologic and neurophysiologic abnormalities associated with ASD. This animal model also demonstrates a unique pattern of elevations in short-chain and long-chain acyl-carnitines suggesting abnormalities in fatty-acid metabolism. To determine if the same pattern of biomarkers of abnormal fatty-acid metabolism are present in children with ASD, the laboratory results from a large cohort of children with ASD (n=213) who underwent screening for metabolic disorders, including mitochondrial and fatty-acid oxidation disorders, in a medically based autism clinic were reviewed. Acyl-carnitine panels were determined to be abnormal if three or more individual acyl-carnitine species were abnormal in the panel and these abnormalities were verified by repeated testing. Overall, 17% of individuals with ASD demonstrated consistently abnormal acyl-carnitine panels. Next, it was determined if specific acyl-carnitine species were consistently elevated across the individuals with consistently abnormal acyl-carnitine panels. Significant elevations in short-chain and long-chain, but not medium-chain, acyl-carnitines were found in the ASD individuals with consistently abnormal acyl-carnitine panels-a pattern consistent with the PPA rodent ASD model. Examination of electron transport chain function in muscle and fibroblast culture, histological and electron microscopy examination of muscle and other biomarkers of mitochondrial

  4. Unique acyl-carnitine profiles are potential biomarkers for acquired mitochondrial disease in autism spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Frye, R E; Melnyk, S; Macfabe, D F

    2013-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) has been associated with mitochondrial disease (MD). Interestingly, most individuals with ASD and MD do not have a specific genetic mutation to explain the MD, raising the possibility of that MD may be acquired, at least in a subgroup of children with ASD. Acquired MD has been demonstrated in a rodent ASD model in which propionic acid (PPA), an enteric bacterial fermentation product of ASD-associated gut bacteria, is infused intracerebroventricularly. This animal model shows validity as it demonstrates many behavioral, metabolic, neuropathologic and neurophysiologic abnormalities associated with ASD. This animal model also demonstrates a unique pattern of elevations in short-chain and long-chain acyl-carnitines suggesting abnormalities in fatty-acid metabolism. To determine if the same pattern of biomarkers of abnormal fatty-acid metabolism are present in children with ASD, the laboratory results from a large cohort of children with ASD (n=213) who underwent screening for metabolic disorders, including mitochondrial and fatty-acid oxidation disorders, in a medically based autism clinic were reviewed. Acyl-carnitine panels were determined to be abnormal if three or more individual acyl-carnitine species were abnormal in the panel and these abnormalities were verified by repeated testing. Overall, 17% of individuals with ASD demonstrated consistently abnormal acyl-carnitine panels. Next, it was determined if specific acyl-carnitine species were consistently elevated across the individuals with consistently abnormal acyl-carnitine panels. Significant elevations in short-chain and long-chain, but not medium-chain, acyl-carnitines were found in the ASD individuals with consistently abnormal acyl-carnitine panels-a pattern consistent with the PPA rodent ASD model. Examination of electron transport chain function in muscle and fibroblast culture, histological and electron microscopy examination of muscle and other biomarkers of mitochondrial

  5. Genetic disorders associated with postnatal microcephaly.

    PubMed

    Seltzer, Laurie E; Paciorkowski, Alex R

    2014-06-01

    Several genetic disorders are characterized by normal head size at birth, followed by deceleration in head growth resulting in postnatal microcephaly. Among these are classic disorders such as Angelman syndrome and MECP2-related disorder (formerly Rett syndrome), as well as more recently described clinical entities associated with mutations in CASK, CDKL5, CREBBP, and EP300 (Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome), FOXG1, SLC9A6 (Christianson syndrome), and TCF4 (Pitt-Hopkins syndrome). These disorders can be identified clinically by phenotyping across multiple neurodevelopmental and neurobehavioral realms, and enough data are available to recognize these postnatal microcephaly disorders as separate diagnostic entities in their own right. A second diagnostic grouping, comprised of Warburg MICRO syndrome, Cockayne syndrome, and Cerebral-oculo-facial skeletal syndrome, share similar features of somatic growth failure, ophthalmologic, and dysmorphologic features. Many postnatal microcephaly syndromes are caused by mutations in genes important in the regulation of gene expression in the developing forebrain and hindbrain, although important synaptic structural genes also play a role. This is an emerging group of disorders with a fascinating combination of brain malformations, specific epilepsies, movement disorders, and other complex neurobehavioral abnormalities. PMID:24839169

  6. Mouse Genetic Models of Human Brain Disorders.

    PubMed

    Leung, Celeste; Jia, Zhengping

    2016-01-01

    Over the past three decades, genetic manipulations in mice have been used in neuroscience as a major approach to investigate the in vivo function of genes and their alterations. In particular, gene targeting techniques using embryonic stem cells have revolutionized the field of mammalian genetics and have been at the forefront in the generation of numerous mouse models of human brain disorders. In this review, we will first examine childhood developmental disorders such as autism, intellectual disability, Fragile X syndrome, and Williams-Beuren syndrome. We will then explore psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia and lastly, neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. We will outline the creation of these mouse models that range from single gene deletions, subtle point mutations to multi-gene manipulations, and discuss the key behavioral phenotypes of these mice. Ultimately, the analysis of the models outlined in this review will enhance our understanding of the in vivo role and underlying mechanisms of disease-related genes in both normal brain function and brain disorders, and provide potential therapeutic targets and strategies to prevent and treat these diseases. PMID:27047540

  7. Mouse Genetic Models of Human Brain Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Celeste; Jia, Zhengping

    2016-01-01

    Over the past three decades, genetic manipulations in mice have been used in neuroscience as a major approach to investigate the in vivo function of genes and their alterations. In particular, gene targeting techniques using embryonic stem cells have revolutionized the field of mammalian genetics and have been at the forefront in the generation of numerous mouse models of human brain disorders. In this review, we will first examine childhood developmental disorders such as autism, intellectual disability, Fragile X syndrome, and Williams-Beuren syndrome. We will then explore psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia and lastly, neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease. We will outline the creation of these mouse models that range from single gene deletions, subtle point mutations to multi-gene manipulations, and discuss the key behavioral phenotypes of these mice. Ultimately, the analysis of the models outlined in this review will enhance our understanding of the in vivo role and underlying mechanisms of disease-related genes in both normal brain function and brain disorders, and provide potential therapeutic targets and strategies to prevent and treat these diseases. PMID:27047540

  8. The Relationship between Body Dysmorphic Disorder Behaviors and the Acquired Capability for Suicide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Witte, Tracy K.; Didie, Elizabeth R.; Menard, William; Phillips, Katharine A.

    2012-01-01

    In a sample of 200 individuals diagnosed with body dysmorphic disorder (BDD), we utilized the interpersonal-psychological theory for suicide as a framework to examine BDD behaviors that might be associated with suicide risk, insofar as they might increase the acquired capability for suicide. We predicted that physically painful BDD behaviors…

  9. Genetics of Sleep and Sleep disorders

    PubMed Central

    Sehgal, Amita; Mignot, Emmanuel

    2011-01-01

    Sleep remains one of the least understood phenomena in biology – even its role in synaptic plasticity remains debatable. Since sleep was recognized to be regulated genetically, intense research has launched on two fronts: the development of model organisms for deciphering the molecular mechanisms of sleep and attempts to identify genetic underpinnings of human sleep disorders. In this Review, we describe how unbiased, high-throughput screens in model organisms are uncovering sleep regulatory mechanisms and how pathways, such as the circadian clock network and specific neurotransmitter signals, have conserved effects on sleep from Drosophila to humans. At the same time, genome-wide association (GWA) studies have uncovered ~14 loci increasing susceptibility to sleep disorders, such as narcolepsy and restless leg syndrome. To conclude, we discuss how these different strategies will be critical to unambiguously defining the function of sleep. PMID:21784243

  10. Genetics and Epigenetics of Eating Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, Zeynep; Hardaway, J. Andrew; Bulik, Cynthia M.

    2015-01-01

    Eating disorders (EDs) are serious psychiatric conditions influenced by biological, psychological, and sociocultural factors. A better understanding of the genetics of these complex traits and the development of more sophisticated molecular biology tools have advanced our understanding of the etiology of EDs. The aim of this review is to critically evaluate the literature on the genetic research conducted on three major EDs: anorexia nervosa (AN), bulimia nervosa (BN), and binge eating disorder (BED). We will first review the diagnostic criteria, clinical features, prevalence, and prognosis of AN, BN, and BED, followed by a review of family, twin, and adoption studies. We then review the history of genetic studies of EDs covering linkage analysis, candidate gene association studies, genome-wide association studies, and the study of rare variants in EDs. Our review also incorporates a translational perspective by covering animal models of ED-related phenotypes. Finally, we review the nascent field of epigenetics of EDs and a look forward to future directions for ED genetic research. PMID:27013903

  11. In Vivo NMR Studies of the Brain with Hereditary or Acquired Metabolic Disorders.

    PubMed

    Sherry, Erica B; Lee, Phil; Choi, In-Young

    2015-12-01

    Metabolic disorders, whether hereditary or acquired, affect the brain, and abnormalities of the brain are related to cellular integrity; particularly in regard to neurons and astrocytes as well as interactions between them. Metabolic disturbances lead to alterations in cellular function as well as microscopic and macroscopic structural changes in the brain with diabetes, the most typical example of metabolic disorders, and a number of hereditary metabolic disorders. Alternatively, cellular dysfunction and degeneration of the brain lead to metabolic disturbances in hereditary neurological disorders with neurodegeneration. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques allow us to assess a range of pathophysiological changes of the brain in vivo. For example, magnetic resonance spectroscopy detects alterations in brain metabolism and energetics. Physiological magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) detects accompanying changes in cerebral blood flow related to neurovascular coupling. Diffusion and T1/T2-weighted MRI detect microscopic and macroscopic changes of the brain structure. This review summarizes current NMR findings of functional, physiological and biochemical alterations within a number of hereditary and acquired metabolic disorders in both animal models and humans. The global view of the impact of these metabolic disorders on the brain may be useful in identifying the unique and/or general patterns of abnormalities in the living brain related to the pathophysiology of the diseases, and identifying future fields of inquiry.

  12. Genetic basis of human reproductive endocrine disorders.

    PubMed

    Fauser, B C; Hsueh, A J

    1995-04-01

    Disturbed human reproductive function may be caused by environmental and/or genetic factors. Much information related to single gene defects underlying reproductive failure has become available in recent years due to advances in molecular biology. In this review, techniques currently applied for deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) analysis are addressed. We also highlight underlying molecular mechanisms and the corresponding clinical presentation of single gene defects affecting (i) the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, resulting in disturbed gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neuron migration, or leading to defective gonadotrophins, gonadotrophin receptors and the Gs alpha protein; (ii) gonadal and adrenal steroid biosynthesis and (iii) steroid and insulin receptors. The potential genetic basis of polycystic ovary syndrome is also discussed. Although disease states caused by well-defined genetic abnormalities appear to represent only a small proportion of those found in the patient population, it should be considered that these affected individuals represent only the most severe cases in a wide spectrum of genetic abnormalities underlying disturbed fertility. Comprehension of these extreme cases will provide the basis for the elucidation of more common reproductive disorders as the result of subtle genetic changes or increased susceptibility to environmental factors.

  13. Molecular insights into transgenerational non-genetic inheritance of acquired behaviours.

    PubMed

    Bohacek, Johannes; Mansuy, Isabelle M

    2015-11-01

    Behavioural traits in mammals are influenced by environmental factors, which can interact with the genome and modulate its activity by complex molecular interplay. Environmental experiences can modify social, emotional and cognitive behaviours during an individual's lifetime, and result in acquired behavioural traits that can be transmitted to subsequent generations. This Review discusses the concept of, and experimental support for, non-genetic transgenerational inheritance of acquired traits involving the germ line in mammals. Possible mechanisms of induction and maintenance during development and adulthood are considered along with an interpretation of recent findings showing the involvement of epigenetic modifications and non-coding RNAs in male germ cells.

  14. A genetic study of affective disorders.

    PubMed

    Smeraldi, E; Negri, F; Melica, A M

    1977-11-01

    First and second degree relatives of 99 probands with affective disorders (49 unipolar and 50 bipolar subjects) were studied. The high risk values obtained for affective disorders were shown to be compatible with those found by other authors, although the prevalence of the illness in the population of Lombardy appears to be much lower than in other countries. Very low rates of suicide and alcoholism were found in our sample. Data obtained by analysis of the affected pairs of relatives rule out the hypothesis of a dominant X-linked gene if the bipolar and the unipolar forms are considered genetically separated entities. Results compatible with a polygenic condition, partially shared by bipolar patients, were found using Slater's and Smith & Falconer's methods. Our data, however, cannot rule out the dominant hypothesis. PMID:596231

  15. Genetic Basis of Human Circadian Rhythm Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Christopher R.; Huang, Angela L.; Ptáček, Louis J.; Fu, Ying-Hui

    2012-01-01

    Circadian rhythm disorders constitute a group of phenotypes that usually present as altered sleep-wake schedules. Until a human genetics approach was applied to investigate these traits, the genetic components regulating human circadian rhythm and sleep behaviors remained mysterious. Steady advances in the last decade have dramatically improved our understanding of the genes involved in circadian rhythmicity and sleep regulation. Finding these genes presents new opportunities to use a wide range of approaches, including in vitro molecular studies and in vivo animal modeling, to elevate our understanding of how sleep and circadian rhythms are regulated and maintained. Ultimately, this knowledge will reveal how circadian and sleep disruption contribute to various ailments and shed light on how best to maintain and recover good health. PMID:22849821

  16. An Overview of Mutation Detection Methods in Genetic Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Mahdieh, Nejat; Rabbani, Bahareh

    2013-01-01

    Genetic disorders are traditionally categorized into three main groups: single-gene, chromosomal, and multifactorial disorders. Single gene or Mendelian disorders result from errors in DNA sequence of a gene and include autosomal dominant (AD), autosomal recessive (AR), X-linked recessive (XR), X-linked dominant and Y-linked (holandric) disorders. Chromosomal disorders are due to chromosomal aberrations including numerical and structural damages. Molecular and cytogenetic techniques have been applied to identify genetic mutations leading to diseases. Accurate diagnosis of diseases is essential for appropriate treatment of patients, genetic counseling and prevention strategies. Characteristic features of patterns of inheritance are briefly reviewed and a short description of chromosomal disorders is also presented. In addition, applications of cytogenetic and molecular techniques and different types of mutations are discussed for genetic diagnosis of the pediatric genetic diseases. The purpose is to make pediatricians familiar with the applications of cytogenetic and molecular techniques and tools used for genetic diagnosis. PMID:24427490

  17. The genetic basis of addictive disorders.

    PubMed

    Ducci, Francesca; Goldman, David

    2012-06-01

    Addictions are common, chronic, and relapsing diseases that develop through a multistep process. The impact of addictions on morbidity and mortality is high worldwide. Twin studies have shown that the heritability of addictions ranges from 0.39 (hallucinogens) to 0.72 (cocaine). Twin studies indicate that genes influence each stage from initiation to addiction, although the genetic determinants may differ. Addictions are by definition the result of gene × environment interaction. These disorders, which are in part volitional, in part inborn, and in part determined by environmental experience, pose the full range of medical, genetic, policy, and moral challenges. Gene discovery is being facilitated by a variety of powerful approaches, but is in its infancy. It is not surprising that the genes discovered so far act in a variety of ways: via altered metabolism of drug (the alcohol and nicotine metabolic gene variants), via altered function of a drug receptor (the nicotinic receptor, which may alter affinity for nicotine but as discussed may also alter circuitry of reward), and via general mechanisms of addiction (genes such as monoamine oxidase A and the serotonin transporter that modulate stress response, emotion, and behavioral control). Addiction medicine today benefits from genetic studies that buttress the case for a neurobiologic origin of addictive behavior, and some general information on familially transmitted propensity that can be used to guide prevention. A few well-validated, specific predictors such as OPRM1, ADH1B, ALDH2, CHRNA5, and CYP26 have been identified and can provide some specific guidance, for example, to understand alcohol-related flushing and upper GI cancer risk (ADH1B and AKLDH2), variation in nicotine metabolism (CYP26), and, potentially, naltrexone treatment response (OPRM1). However, the genetic predictors available are few in number and account for only a small portion of the genetic variance in liability, and have not been integrated

  18. Prenatal testing for genetic disorders among Arabs.

    PubMed

    Zlotogora, J; Reshef, N

    1998-03-01

    Since, at least in the near future, prenatal testing and abortion of affected fetuses will remain the main way of the prevention of genetic diseases, knowledge about the way of its acceptance in different cultures is important. The Israeli population includes two major groups: Jewish and Arabs, but while there is wide experience about the Jewish population and its attitude towards prenatal testing, little is known about the Arab population. This knowledge is particularly important, since genetic disorders are relatively frequent in the Arab world (Teebi and Farag, 1997). From 1992 to 1996, 816 prenatal tests were performed in our department on Arab women [143 chorionic villus sampling (CVS) procedures and 673 amniocenteses]. The indication for an early prenatal test was a high risk for a monogenic disorder in 140 out of the 146 tests performed (143 CVS procedures and three early amniocenteses). In 26 cases, the fetus was found to be affected and early abortion was chosen by the couple in 25 cases (96 per cent). The 670 late prenatal tests were done for various reasons including monogenic disorders (13 per cent), increased risk because of a previous child affected with Down syndrome or a neural tube defect (4.8 per cent), and an increased risk for a chromosomal aberration (78 per cent). In 31 cases of a late prenatal test, the fetus was found to be affected and only 21 couples (70 per cent) opted for an abortion. The major reason for this observation is probably related to religious and cultural factors. Since Arab women do not wish to have prenatal testing for only knowledge or reassurance, these factors should be taken into consideration during pre-amniocentesis counselling. PMID:9556038

  19. The Genetics of Complex Cholestatic Disorders

    PubMed Central

    HIRSCHFIELD, GIDEON M.; CHAPMAN, ROGER W.; KARLSEN, TOM H.; LAMMERT, FRANK; LAZARIDIS, KONSTANTINOS N.; MASON, ANDREW L.

    2013-01-01

    Cholestatic liver diseases are caused by a range of hepatobiliary insults and involve complex interactions among environmental and genetic factors. Little is known about the pathogenic mechanisms of specific cholestatic diseases, which has limited our ability to manage patients with these disorders. However, recent genome-wide studies have provided insight into the pathogenesis of gallstones, primary biliary cirrhosis, and primary sclerosing cholangitis. A lithogenic variant in the gene that encodes the hepatobiliary transporter ABCG8 has been identified as a risk factor for gallstone disease; this variant has been associated with altered cholesterol excretion and metabolism. Other variants of genes encoding transporters that affect the composition of bile have been associated with cholestasis, namely ABCB11, which encodes the bile salt export pump, and ABCB4, which encodes hepatocanalicular phosphatidylcholine floppase. Many genes associated with gallstones have also been linked with vanishing bile duct syndromes and other cholestatic disorders. In contrast, studies have associated primary biliary cirrhosis and primary sclerosing cholangitis with genes encoding major histocompatibility complex proteins and identified loci associated with microbial sensing and immune regulatory pathways outside this region, such as genes encoding IL12, STAT4, IRF5, IL2 and its receptor (IL2R), CD28, and CD80. These discoveries have raised interest in the development of reagents that target these gene products. We review recent findings from genetic studies of patients with cholestatic liver disease. Future characterization of genetic variants in animal models, stratification of risk alleles by clinical course, and identification of interacting environmental factors will increase our understanding of these complex cholestatic diseases. PMID:23583734

  20. Molecular prevalence of multiple genetic disorders in Border collies in Japan and recommendations for genetic counselling.

    PubMed

    Mizukami, K; Yabuki, A; Kohyama, M; Kushida, K; Rahman, M M; Uddin, M M; Sawa, M; Yamato, O

    2016-08-01

    Reproductive management is necessary to prevent deleterious genetic disorders in purebred dogs, but comprehensive studies aimed at prevention of multiple underlying genetic disorders in a single breed have not been performed. The aims of this study were to examine mutant allele frequencies associated with multiple genetic disorders, using Border collies as a representative breed, and to make recommendations for prevention of the disorders. Genotyping of known mutations associated with seven recessive genetic disorders was performed using PCR assays. More than half (56%) of the Border collies had no mutant alleles associated with any of the seven disorders, suggesting that these disorders can be removed from the population over several generations. Since frequencies of each mutant allele differed among disorders, reproductive management should be performed after the establishment of prevention schemes that are appropriate for each disorder, the type and specificity of genetic test available, and the effective population size in each breeding colony.

  1. GENETICS OF HUMAN AGE RELATED DISORDERS.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, I; Thukral, N; Hasija, Y

    2015-01-01

    Aging is an inevitable biological phenomenon. The incidence of age related disorders (ARDs) such as cardiovascular diseases, cancer, arthritis, dementia, osteoporosis, diabetes, neurodegenerative diseases increase rapidly with aging. ARDs are becoming a key social and economic trouble for the world's elderly population (above 60 years), which is expected to reach 2 billion by 2050. Advancement in understanding of genetic associations, particularly through genome wide association studies (GWAS), has revealed a substantial contribution of genes to human aging and ARDs. In this review, we have focused on the recent understanding of the extent to which genetic predisposition may influence the aging process. Further analysis of the genetic association studies through pathway analysis several genes associated with multiple ARDs have been highlighted such as apolipoprotein E (APOE), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), cadherin 13 (CDH13), CDK5 regulatory subunit associated protein 1 (CDKAL-1), methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR), disrupted in schizophrenia 1 (DISC1), nitric oxide synthase 3 (NOS3), paraoxonase 1 (PON1), indicating that these genes could play a pivotal role in ARD causation. These genes were found to be significantly enriched in Jak-STAT signalling pathway, asthma and allograft rejection. Further, interleukin-6 (IL-6), insulin (INS), vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA), estrogen receptor1 (ESR1), transforming growth factor, beta 1(TGFB1) and calmodulin 1 (CALM1) were found to be highly interconnected in network analysis. We believe that extensive research on the presence of common genetic variants among various ARDs may facilitate scientists to understand the biology behind ARDs causation. PMID:26856084

  2. [Genetics applied to clinical practice in neurodevelopmental disorders].

    PubMed

    Fernández-Jaén, Alberto; Cigudosa, Juan C; Martín Fernández-Mayoralas, Daniel; Suela, Javier; Fernández-Perrone, Ana L; Calleja-Pérez, Beatriz; López-Martín, Sara

    2014-02-24

    The medical literature contains a wide body of evidence supporting genetic involvement in neurodevelopmental disorders. Advances made in genetics and technology have increased the diagnostic cost-effectiveness of current studies from 3-5% to 30-40% in patients with intellectual disability or autism spectrum disorders. In this regard, chromosomal microarray studies display greater diagnostic power than conventional techniques (karyotype, subtelomeric analyses, etc.). The latest protocols in the biomedical field of the genetic study of these disorders cite chromosomal microarrays as the first-line analysis, while also recommending other specific studies depending on the patient's clinical features (fragile X syndrome, PTEN mutation, etc.). In the evaluation of other neurodevelopmental disorders (attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, learning disorders, etc.), the number of genetic tests carried out is limited and conditioned by the clinical characteristics or the patient's familial or personal history. Even in these situations, there are no genetic referral or evaluation protocols.

  3. Comprehensive Neurocognitive Endophenotyping Strategies for Mouse Models of Genetic Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Hunsaker, Michael R.

    2012-01-01

    There is a need for refinement of the current behavioral phenotyping methods for mouse models of genetic disorders. The current approach is to perform a behavioral screen using standardized tasks to define a broad phenotype of the model. This phenotype is then compared to what is known concerning the disorder being modeled. The weakness inherent in this approach is twofold: First, the tasks that make up these standard behavioral screens do not model specific behaviors associated with a given genetic mutation but rather phenotypes affected in various genetic disorders; secondly, these behavioral tasks are insufficiently sensitive to identify subtle phenotypes. An alternate phenotyping strategy is to determine the core behavioral phenotypes of the genetic disorder being studied and develop behavioral tasks to evaluate specific hypotheses concerning the behavioral consequences of the genetic mutation. This approach emphasizes direct comparisons between the mouse and human that facilitate the development of neurobehavioral biomarkers or quantitative outcome measures for studies of genetic disorders across species. PMID:22266125

  4. Neural correlates of apathy in patients with neurodegenerative disorders, acquired brain injury, and psychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Kos, Claire; van Tol, Marie-José; Marsman, Jan-Bernard C; Knegtering, Henderikus; Aleman, André

    2016-10-01

    Apathy can be described as a loss of goal-directed purposeful behavior and is common in a variety of neurological and psychiatric disorders. Although previous studies investigated associations between abnormal brain functioning and apathy, it is unclear whether the neural basis of apathy is similar across different pathological conditions. The purpose of this systematic review was to provide an extensive overview of the neuroimaging literature on apathy including studies of various patient populations, and evaluate whether the current state of affairs suggest disorder specific or shared neural correlates of apathy. Results suggest that abnormalities within fronto-striatal circuits are most consistently associated with apathy across the different pathological conditions. Of note, abnormalities within the inferior parietal cortex were also linked to apathy, a region previously not included in neuroanatomical models of apathy. The variance in brain regions implicated in apathy may suggest that different routes towards apathy are possible. Future research should investigate possible alterations in different processes underlying goal-directed behavior, ranging from intention and goal-selection to action planning and execution. PMID:27527825

  5. The Genetics of Stress-Related Disorders: PTSD, Depression, and Anxiety Disorders.

    PubMed

    Smoller, Jordan W

    2016-01-01

    Research into the causes of psychopathology has largely focused on two broad etiologic factors: genetic vulnerability and environmental stressors. An important role for familial/heritable factors in the etiology of a broad range of psychiatric disorders was established well before the modern era of genomic research. This review focuses on the genetic basis of three disorder categories-posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), major depressive disorder (MDD), and the anxiety disorders-for which environmental stressors and stress responses are understood to be central to pathogenesis. Each of these disorders aggregates in families and is moderately heritable. More recently, molecular genetic approaches, including genome-wide studies of genetic variation, have been applied to identify specific risk variants. In this review, I summarize evidence for genetic contributions to PTSD, MDD, and the anxiety disorders including genetic epidemiology, the role of common genetic variation, the role of rare and structural variation, and the role of gene-environment interaction. Available data suggest that stress-related disorders are highly complex and polygenic and, despite substantial progress in other areas of psychiatric genetics, few risk loci have been identified for these disorders. Progress in this area will likely require analysis of much larger sample sizes than have been reported to date. The phenotypic complexity and genetic overlap among these disorders present further challenges. The review concludes with a discussion of prospects for clinical translation of genetic findings and future directions for research.

  6. Genetic disorders coupled to ROS deficiency

    PubMed Central

    O’Neill, Sharon; Brault, Julie; Stasia, Marie-Jose; Knaus, Ulla G.

    2015-01-01

    Maintaining the redox balance between generation and elimination of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is critical for health. Disturbances such as continuously elevated ROS levels will result in oxidative stress and development of disease, but likewise, insufficient ROS production will be detrimental to health. Reduced or even complete loss of ROS generation originates mainly from inactivating variants in genes encoding for NADPH oxidase complexes. In particular, deficiency in phagocyte Nox2 oxidase function due to genetic variants (CYBB, CYBA, NCF1, NCF2, NCF4) has been recognized as a direct cause of chronic granulomatous disease (CGD), an inherited immune disorder. More recently, additional diseases have been linked to functionally altered variants in genes encoding for other NADPH oxidases, such as for DUOX2/DUOXA2 in congenital hypothyroidism, or for the Nox2 complex, NOX1 and DUOX2 as risk factors for inflammatory bowel disease. A comprehensive overview of novel developments in terms of Nox/Duox-deficiency disorders is presented, combined with insights gained from structure–function studies that will aid in predicting functional defects of clinical variants. PMID:26210446

  7. Genetic disorders of palm skin and nail

    PubMed Central

    McLean, WH Irwin

    2003-01-01

    The outer part of the skin, the epidermis, is specialized to protect the human body from its environment. Because of the high levels of physical stress experienced by the human hand in everyday use, the epidermis of the hand is especially toughened. In particular, the epidermis of the palm is highly specialized to resist mechanical trauma. Like the epidermis, the nails are composed of specialized epithelial cells and are especially strong. In recent years it has become apparent that the physical strength of epithelial cells comes from the keratin cytoskeleton – a dense meshwork of filaments extending throughout the cytoplasm. Keratins are a large family of intermediate filament proteins encoded by more than 50 distinct genes in humans. These different keratin genes are expressed in well-defined combinations in specific epithelial tissues. Several keratin genes are expressed in palmoplantar epidermis and in the stratified epithelia of the nail bed. Genetic mutations in these genes lead to fragility of these tissues and result in a range of genetic disorders characterized by blistering and thickening of palm and sole skin and/or nails. Study of these diseases has shed new light on the vital structural role of keratins in maintaining the integrity of epithelial cells. PMID:12587928

  8. Iron-overload injury and cardiomyopathy in acquired and genetic models is attenuated by resveratrol therapy

    PubMed Central

    Das, Subhash K.; Wang, Wang; Zhabyeyev, Pavel; Basu, Ratnadeep; McLean, Brent; Fan, Dong; Parajuli, Nirmal; DesAulniers, Jessica; Patel, Vaibhav B.; Hajjar, Roger J.; Dyck, Jason R. B.; Kassiri, Zamaneh; Oudit, Gavin Y.

    2015-01-01

    Iron-overload cardiomyopathy is a prevalent cause of heart failure on a world-wide basis and is a major cause of mortality and morbidity in patients with secondary iron-overload and genetic hemochromatosis. We investigated the therapeutic effects of resveratrol in acquired and genetic models of iron-overload cardiomyopathy. Murine iron-overload models showed cardiac iron-overload, increased oxidative stress, altered Ca2+ homeostasis and myocardial fibrosis resulting in heart disease. Iron-overload increased nuclear and acetylated levels of FOXO1 with corresponding inverse changes in SIRT1 levels in the heart corrected by resveratrol therapy. Resveratrol, reduced the pathological remodeling and improved cardiac function in murine models of acquired and genetic iron-overload at varying stages of iron-overload. Echocardiography and hemodynamic analysis revealed a complete normalization of iron-overload mediated diastolic and systolic dysfunction in response to resveratrol therapy. Myocardial SERCA2a levels were reduced in iron-overloaded hearts and resveratrol therapy restored SERCA2a levels and corrected altered Ca2+ homeostasis. Iron-mediated pro-oxidant and pro-fibrotic effects in human and murine cardiomyocytes and cardiofibroblasts were suppressed by resveratrol which correlated with reduction in iron-induced myocardial oxidative stress and myocardial fibrosis. Resveratrol represents a clinically and economically feasible therapeutic intervention to reduce the global burden from iron-overload cardiomyopathy at early and chronic stages of iron-overload. PMID:26638758

  9. Iron-overload injury and cardiomyopathy in acquired and genetic models is attenuated by resveratrol therapy.

    PubMed

    Das, Subhash K; Wang, Wang; Zhabyeyev, Pavel; Basu, Ratnadeep; McLean, Brent; Fan, Dong; Parajuli, Nirmal; DesAulniers, Jessica; Patel, Vaibhav B; Hajjar, Roger J; Dyck, Jason R B; Kassiri, Zamaneh; Oudit, Gavin Y

    2015-12-07

    Iron-overload cardiomyopathy is a prevalent cause of heart failure on a world-wide basis and is a major cause of mortality and morbidity in patients with secondary iron-overload and genetic hemochromatosis. We investigated the therapeutic effects of resveratrol in acquired and genetic models of iron-overload cardiomyopathy. Murine iron-overload models showed cardiac iron-overload, increased oxidative stress, altered Ca(2+) homeostasis and myocardial fibrosis resulting in heart disease. Iron-overload increased nuclear and acetylated levels of FOXO1 with corresponding inverse changes in SIRT1 levels in the heart corrected by resveratrol therapy. Resveratrol, reduced the pathological remodeling and improved cardiac function in murine models of acquired and genetic iron-overload at varying stages of iron-overload. Echocardiography and hemodynamic analysis revealed a complete normalization of iron-overload mediated diastolic and systolic dysfunction in response to resveratrol therapy. Myocardial SERCA2a levels were reduced in iron-overloaded hearts and resveratrol therapy restored SERCA2a levels and corrected altered Ca(2+) homeostasis. Iron-mediated pro-oxidant and pro-fibrotic effects in human and murine cardiomyocytes and cardiofibroblasts were suppressed by resveratrol which correlated with reduction in iron-induced myocardial oxidative stress and myocardial fibrosis. Resveratrol represents a clinically and economically feasible therapeutic intervention to reduce the global burden from iron-overload cardiomyopathy at early and chronic stages of iron-overload.

  10. Glutamate receptors and transporters in genetic and acquired models of epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Meldrum, B S; Akbar, M T; Chapman, A G

    1999-09-01

    Glutamate, the principal excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain, acts on three families of ionotropic receptor--AMPA (alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-isoxazole-4-propionic acid), kainate and NMDA (N-methyl-D-aspartate) receptors and three families of metabotropic receptor (Group I: mGlu1 and mGlu5; Group II: mGlu2 and mGlu3; Group III: mGlu4, mGlu6, mGlu7 and mGlu8). Glutamate is removed from the synaptic cleft and the extracellular space by Na+-dependent transporters (GLAST/EAAT1, GLT/EAAT2, EAAC/EAAT3, EAAT4, EAAT5). In rodents, genetic manipulations relating to the expression or function of glutamate receptor proteins can induce epilepsy syndromes or raise seizure threshold. Decreased expression of glutamate transporters (EAAC knockdown, GLT knockout) can lead to seizures. In acquired epilepsy syndromes, a wide variety of changes in receptors and transporters have been described. Electrically-induced kindling in the rat is associated with functional potentiation of NMDA receptor-mediated responses at various limbic sites. Group I metabotropic responses are enhanced in the amygdala. To date, no genetic epilepsy in man has been identified in which the primary genetic defect involves glutamate receptors or transporters. Changes are found in some acquired syndromes, including enhanced NMDA receptor responses in dentate granule cells in patients with hippocampal sclerosis. PMID:10515165

  11. Specific Genetic Disorders and Autism: Clinical Contribution towards Their Identification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, David; Pichard, Nadege; Tordjman, Sylvie; Baumann, Clarisse; Burglen, Lydie; Excoffier, Elsa; Lazar, Gabriela; Mazet, Philippe; Pinquier, Clement; Verloes, Alian; Heron, Delphine

    2005-01-01

    Autism is a heterogeneous disorder that can reveal a specific genetic disease. This paper describes several genetic diseases consistently associated with autism (fragile X, tuberous sclerosis, Angelman syndrome, duplication of 15q11-q13, Down syndrome, San Filippo syndrome, MECP2 related disorders, phenylketonuria, Smith-Magenis syndrome, 22q13…

  12. Genetic basis of clinical catecholamine disorders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garland, Emily M.; Hahn, Maureen K.; Ketch, Terry P.; Keller, Nancy R.; Kim, Chun-Hyung; Kim, Kwang-Soo; Biaggioni, Italo; Shannon, John R.; Blakely, Randy D.; Robertson, David

    2002-01-01

    Norepinephrine and epinephrine are critical determinants of minute-to-minute regulation of blood pressure. Here we review the characterization of two syndromes associated with a genetic abnormality in the noradrenergic pathway. In 1986, we reported a congenital syndrome of undetectable tissue and circulating levels of norepinephrine and epinephrine, elevated levels of dopamine, and absence of dopamine-beta-hydroxylase (DBH). These patients appeared with ptosis and severe orthostatic hypotension and lacked sympathetic noradrenergic function. In two persons with DBH deficiency, we identified seven novel polymorphisms. Both patients are compound heterozygotes for a variant that affects expression of DBH protein via impairment of splicing. Patient 1 also has a missense mutation in DBH exon 2, and patient 2 carries missense mutations in exons 1 and 6. Orthostatic intolerance is a common syndrome affecting young women, presenting with orthostatic tachycardia and symptoms of cerebral hypoperfusion on standing. We tested the hypothesis that abnormal norepinephrine transporter (NET) function might contribute to its etiology. In our proband, we found an elevated plasma norepinephrine with standing that was disproportionate to the increase in levels of dihydroxphenylglycol, as well as impaired norepinephrine clearance and tyramine resistance. Studies of NET gene structure revealed a coding mutation converting a conserved alanine residue in transmembrane domain 9 to proline. Analysis of the protein produced by the mutant cDNA demonstrated greater than 98% reduction in activity relative to normal. The finding of genetic mutations responsible for DBH deficiency and orthostatic intolerance leads us to believe that genetic causes of other autonomic disorders will be found, enabling us to design more effective therapeutic interventions.

  13. Genetic and Environmental Influences on Disordered Eating: An Adoption Study

    PubMed Central

    Klump, Kelly L.; Suisman, Jessica L.; Burt, S. Alexandra; McGue, Matt; Iacono, William G.

    2009-01-01

    Twin studies indicate significant genetic, but little shared environmental, influences on eating disorders. However, critics argue that study limitations constrain the conclusions that can be drawn. Adoption studies avoid many of these limitations, but to date, no adoption studies of eating pathology have been conducted. The current study was the first adoption study to examine genetic/environmental effects for disordered eating. Participants included 123 adopted and 56 biological female sibling pairs. Disordered eating (i.e., overall eating pathology, body dissatisfaction, weight preoccupation, binge eating) was assessed using the Minnesota Eating Behaviors Survey. Biometric model-fitting indicated significant genetic influences (59–82%) on all forms of disordered eating, with nonshared environmental factors accounting for the remaining variance. Shared environmental factors did not contribute significantly to any disordered eating symptom. Our findings bolster those from twin studies and provide critical evidence of significant genetic effects on disordered eating symptoms. PMID:19899849

  14. Biology and genetics of oculocutaneous albinism and vitiligo - common pigmentation disorders in southern Africa.

    PubMed

    Manga, Prashiela; Kerr, Robyn; Ramsay, Michèle; Kromberg, Jennifer G R

    2013-07-29

    Pigmentation disorders span the genetic spectrum from single-gene autosomal recessive disorders such as oculocutaneous albinism (OCA), the autosomal dominant disorder piebaldism to X-linked ocular albinism and multifactorial vitiligo. OCA connotes a group of disorders that result in hypopigmented skin due to decreased melanin production in melanocytes and loss of visual acuity. There are four non-syndromic forms, OCA1-4, which are classified based on the gene that is mutated (tyrosinase, OCA2, tyrosinase-related protein 1 and SLC45A2, respectively). Despite the fact that multiple genes account for the various forms of OCA, the phenotypes of all four forms result from disruption in the maturation and trafficking of the enzyme tyrosinase. OCA2 is the most prevalent autosomal recessive disorder among southern African blacks, affecting 1/3 900 individuals; while OCA3, although rare, is most prevalent in southern Africa. Another common pigmentation disorder in southern Africa is vitiligo, which affects 1 - 2% of people worldwide. Vitiligo is a complex, acquired disorder in which melanocytes are destroyed due to an autoimmune response. The aetiology underlying this disorder is poorly understood, although recent genetic association studies have begun to shed light on the contributing factors. Pigmentation disorders have significant psychosocial implications and co-morbidities, yet therapies are still lacking. Recent progress in our understanding of the pathobiology of both albinism and vitiligo may herald novel treatment strategies for these disorders

  15. Biology and genetics of oculocutaneous albinism and vitiligo - common pigmentation disorders in southern Africa.

    PubMed

    Manga, Prashiela; Kerr, Robyn; Ramsay, Michèle; Kromberg, Jennifer G R

    2013-12-01

    Pigmentation disorders span the genetic spectrum from single-gene autosomal recessive disorders such as oculocutaneous albinism (OCA), the autosomal dominant disorder piebaldism to X-linked ocular albinism and multifactorial vitiligo. OCA connotes a group of disorders that result in hypopigmented skin due to decreased melanin production in melanocytes and loss of visual acuity. There are four non-syndromic forms, OCA1-4, which are classified based on the gene that is mutated (tyrosinase, OCA2, tyrosinase-related protein 1 and SLC45A2, respectively). Despite the fact that multiple genes account for the various forms of OCA, the phenotypes of all four forms result from disruption in the maturation and trafficking of the enzyme tyrosinase. OCA2 is the most prevalent autosomal recessive disorder among southern African blacks, affecting 1/3 900 individuals; while OCA3, although rare, is most prevalent in southern Africa. Another common pigmentation disorder in southern Africa is vitiligo, which affects 1 - 2% of people worldwide. Vitiligo is a complex, acquired disorder in which melanocytes are destroyed due to an autoimmune response. The aetiology underlying this disorder is poorly understood, although recent genetic association studies have begun to shed light on the contributing factors. Pigmentation disorders have significant psychosocial implications and co-morbidities, yet therapies are still lacking. Recent progress in our understanding of the pathobiology of both albinism and vitiligo may herald novel treatment strategies for these disorders.  PMID:24300644

  16. Etiology of Attention Disorders: A Neurological/Genetic Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grantham, Madeline Kay

    This paper explores the historical origins of attention deficit disorder/attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADD/ADHD) as a neurological disorder, current neurological and genetic research concerning the etiology of ADD/ADHD, and implications for diagnosis and treatment. First, ADD/ADHD is defined and then the origins of ADD/ADHD as a…

  17. A Primer on the Genetics of Comorbid Eating Disorders and Substance Use Disorders.

    PubMed

    Munn-Chernoff, Melissa A; Baker, Jessica H

    2016-03-01

    Eating disorders (EDs) and substance use disorders (SUDs) frequently co-occur; however, the reasons for this are unclear. We review the current literature on genetic risk for EDs and SUDs, as well as preliminary findings exploring whether these classes of disorders have overlapping genetic risk. Overall, genetic factors contribute to individual differences in liability to multiple EDs and SUDs. Although initial family studies concluded that no shared familial (which includes genetic) risk between EDs and SUDs exists, twin studies suggest a moderate proportion of shared variance is attributable to overlapping genetic factors, particularly for those EDs characterized by binge eating and/or inappropriate compensatory behaviours. No adoption or molecular genetic studies have examined shared genetic risk between these classes of disorders. Research investigating binge eating and inappropriate compensatory behaviours using emerging statistical genetic methods, as well as examining gene-environment interplay, will provide important clues into the aetiology of comorbid EDs and SUDs. PMID:26663753

  18. A Primer on the Genetics of Comorbid Eating Disorders and Substance Use Disorders.

    PubMed

    Munn-Chernoff, Melissa A; Baker, Jessica H

    2016-03-01

    Eating disorders (EDs) and substance use disorders (SUDs) frequently co-occur; however, the reasons for this are unclear. We review the current literature on genetic risk for EDs and SUDs, as well as preliminary findings exploring whether these classes of disorders have overlapping genetic risk. Overall, genetic factors contribute to individual differences in liability to multiple EDs and SUDs. Although initial family studies concluded that no shared familial (which includes genetic) risk between EDs and SUDs exists, twin studies suggest a moderate proportion of shared variance is attributable to overlapping genetic factors, particularly for those EDs characterized by binge eating and/or inappropriate compensatory behaviours. No adoption or molecular genetic studies have examined shared genetic risk between these classes of disorders. Research investigating binge eating and inappropriate compensatory behaviours using emerging statistical genetic methods, as well as examining gene-environment interplay, will provide important clues into the aetiology of comorbid EDs and SUDs.

  19. Genomics in pediatric endocrinology-genetic disorders and new techniques.

    PubMed

    Tenore, Alfred; Driul, Daniela

    2011-10-01

    In the last few years, there have been remarkable advances in the development of new and more sophisticated genetic techniques. These have allowed a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms of genetically determined pediatric endocrine disorders and are paving the way for a radical change in diagnosis and treatment. This article introduces some of these concepts and some of the genetic techniques being used.

  20. Shared Genetic Factors Influence Risk for Bipolar Disorder and Alcohol Use Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Carmiol, Nasdia; Peralta, Juan M; Almasy, Laura; Contreras, Javier; Pacheco, Adriana; Escamilla, Michael A; Knowles, Emma E; Raventós, Henriette; Glahn, David C

    2014-01-01

    Bipolar disorder and alcohol use disorder (AUD) have a high rate of comorbidity, more than 50% of individuals with bipolar disorder also receive a diagnosis of AUD in their lifetimes. Although both disorders are heritable, it is unclear if the same genetic factors mediate risk for bipolar disorder and AUD. We examined 733 Costa Rican individuals from 61 bipolar pedigrees. Based on a best-estimate process, 32% of the sample met criteria for bipolar disorder, 17% had a lifetime AUD diagnosis, 32% met criteria for lifetime nicotine dependence, and 21% had an anxiety disorder. AUD, nicotine dependence and anxiety disorders were relatively more common among individuals with bipolar disorder than in their non-bipolar relatives. All illnesses were shown to be heritable and bipolar disorder was genetically correlated with AUD, nicotine dependence and anxiety disorders. The genetic correlation between bipolar and AUD remained when controlling for anxiety, suggesting that unique genetic factors influence risk for comorbid bipolar and AUD independent of anxiety. Our findings provide evidence for shared genetic effects on bipolar disorder and AUD risk. Demonstrating that common genetic factors influence these independent diagnostic constructs could help to refine our diagnostic nosology. PMID:24321773

  1. Progeria: a rare genetic premature ageing disorder.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Jitendra Kumar; Ghosh, Shampa; Raghunath, Manchala

    2014-05-01

    Progeria is characterized by clinical features that mimic premature ageing. Although the mutation responsible for this syndrome has been deciphered, the mechanism of its action remains elusive. Progeria research has gained momentum particularly in the last two decades because of the possibility of revealing evidences about the ageing process in normal and other pathophysiological conditions. Various experimental models, both in vivo and in vitro, have been developed in an effort to understand the cellular and molecular basis of a number of clinically heterogeneous rare genetic disorders that come under the umbrella of progeroid syndromes (PSs). As per the latest clinical trial reports, Lonafarnib, a farnesyltranferase inhibitor, is a potent 'drug of hope' for Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) and has been successful in facilitating weight gain and improving cardiovascular and skeletal pathologies in progeroid children. This can be considered as the dawn of a new era in progeria research and thus, an apt time to review the research developments in this area highlighting the molecular aspects, experimental models, promising drugs in trial and their implications to gain a better understanding of PSs. PMID:25027075

  2. The genetic basis of myeloproliferative disorders.

    PubMed

    Skoda, Radek

    2007-01-01

    For many decades, myeloproliferative disorders (MPD) were largely neglected orphan diseases. The conceptual work of William Dameshek in 1951 provided the basis for understanding MPD as a continuum of related syndromes, possibly with a common pathogenetic cause. Recognition of the clonal origin of peripheral blood cells in MPD in 1976 and the ability to grow erythroid colonies in vitro in the absence of added growth factors in 1974 initiated the search for genetic alterations that might be responsible for myeloproliferation. Mutations in the genes for the erythropoietin receptor, thrombopoietin and the von Hippel-Lindau protein were found to cause familial syndromes resembling MPD, but despite their phenotypic similarities, none of these mutations were later found in patients with the sporadic form of MPD. The discovery of activating mutations in the Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) in most patients with MPD has fully transformed and energized the MPD field. Sensitive assays for detecting the JAK2-V617F mutation have become an essential part of the diagnostic work-up, and JAK2 now constitutes a prime target for developing specific inhibitors for the treatment of patients with MPD. Despite this progress, many questions remain unsolved, including how a single JAK2 mutation causes three different MPD phenotypes, what other genes might be involved in the pathogenesis, and what are the factors determining the progression to acute leukemia.

  3. Genetic bases of mitochondrial respiratory chain disorders.

    PubMed

    Rötig, Agnès

    2010-04-01

    Oxidative phosphorylation - ATP synthesis by the oxygen-consuming respiratory chain (RC) - supplies most organs and tissues with a readily usable energy source, and is already fully functioning at birth. This means that, in theory, RC deficiency can give rise to any symptom in any organ or tissue at any age and with any mode of inheritance, due to the two-fold genetic origin of RC components (nuclear DNA and mitochondrial DNA). It has long been erroneously believed that RC disorders originate from mutations of mtDNA as, for some time, only mutations or deletions of mtDNA could be identified. However, the number of disease-causing mutations in nuclear genes is now steadily growing. These genes not only encode the various subunits of each complex, but also the ancillary proteins involved in the different stages of holoenzyme biogenesis, including transcription, translation, chaperoning, addition of prosthetic groups and assembly of proteins, as well as the various enzymes involved in mtDNA metabolism.

  4. Transfer of newly acquired stimulus valence between identities in dissociative identity disorder (DID).

    PubMed

    Huntjens, Rafaële J C; Peters, Madelon L; Postma, Albert; Woertman, Liesbeth; Effting, Marieke; van der Hart, Onno

    2005-02-01

    Patients with Dissociative Identity Disorder (DID) frequently report episodes of interidentity amnesia, that is amnesia for events experienced by other identities. The goal of the present experiment was to test the implicit transfer of trauma-related information between identities in DID. We hypothesized that whereas declarative information may transfer from one identity to another, the emotional connotation of the memory may be dissociated, especially in the case of negative, trauma-related emotional valence. An evaluative conditioning procedure was combined with an affective priming procedure, both performed by different identities. In the evaluative conditioning procedure, previously neutral stimuli come to refer to a negative or positive connotation. The affective priming procedure was used to test the transfer of this acquired valence to an identity reporting interidentity amnesia. Results indicated activation of stimulus valence in the affective priming task, that is transfer of emotional material between identities.

  5. Genetics of Anxiety and Trauma-Related Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Norrholm, Seth D.; Ressler, Kerry J.

    2009-01-01

    Anxiety disorders are the most common psychiatric illnesses in the U.S. with approximately 30% of the population experiencing anxiety-related symptoms in their lifetime (Kessler et al., 2005). Notably, a variety of studies have demonstrated that 30−40% of the variance contributing to these disorders is heritable. In the present review, we discuss the latest findings regarding the genetic and environmental influences on the development and symptomatology of anxiety disorders. Specific emphasis is placed on posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) due to its uniqueness as an anxiety disorder; its diagnosis is dependent on a precipitating traumatic event and its development appears to be mediated by both genetic and environmental contributions. The co-morbidity of anxiety disorders and the potential reclassification of anxiety disorders as part of DSM-V are reviewed given the potential impact on the interpretation and design of genetic investigations. Lastly, several keys to future genetic studies are highlighted. Thorough analyses of the gene by environment (GxE) interactions that govern one's vulnerability to anxiety disorder(s), the effectiveness of individual treatment strategies, and the severity of symptoms may lead to more effective prophylactic (e.g., social support) and treatment strategies. PMID:19540311

  6. Chromosomal and Multifactorial Genetic Disorders with Oral Manifestations

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Shankargouda; Rao, Roopa S; Majumdar, Barnali

    2014-01-01

    The chromosomal disorders are individually rare, but collectively they are common whereas the multifactorial disorders are the most common form of genetic disorders. The chromosomal anomalies typically arise from alterations in the DNA containing chromosomal regions and can be reliably detected by karyotype analysis, whereas the multifactorial disorders demonstrate multi-gene as well as environmental interactions. Both the chromosomal and multifactorial disorders may manifest signs and symptoms such as a combination of birth defects, physical disabilities, challenging behavior and certain craniofacial defects as well, the knowledge of which can aid in a better patient management in everyday practice of dentistry. PMID:25395808

  7. Genetics of osteoarticular disorders, Florence, Italy, 22-23 February 2002.

    PubMed

    Falchetti, Alberto

    2002-01-01

    Osteoporosis (OP) and osteoarthritis (OA), the two most common age-related chronic disorders of articular joints and skeleton, represent a major public health problem in most developed countries. They are influenced by environmental factors and exhibit a strong genetic component. Large population studies clearly show their inverse relationship; therefore, an accurate analysis of the genetic bases of one of these two diseases may provide data of interest for the other disorder. The discovery of risk and protective genes for OP and OA promises to revolutionize strategies for diagnosing and treating these disorders. The primary goal of this symposium was to bring together scientists and clinicians working on OP and OA in order to identify the most promising and collaborative approaches for the coming decade. This meeting put into focus the importance of an adequate genetic approach to several areas of research: the search for the genetic determinants underlying new susceptibilities, the optimization of previously acquired data; the establishment of correlations between genetic polymorphism and functional variants, and gene-gene and gene-environment interactions (particularly those between genes and nutrients). An adequate genetic approach is also essential with regard to determining more selective criteria for phenotypic definition of familial OP, in order to obtain more homogeneous and statistically powerful family-based studies. The symposium concluded with an interesting overview of the future perspectives offered by DNA microarray technologies for identifying novel candidate genes, for developing proteomics and bioinformatics analyses and for designing low-cost clinical trials.

  8. Cross-Disorder Genetic Analysis of Tic Disorders, Obsessive-Compulsive, and Hoarding Symptoms.

    PubMed

    Zilhão, Nuno R; Smit, Dirk J; Boomsma, Dorret I; Cath, Danielle C

    2016-01-01

    Hoarding, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), and Tourette's disorder (TD) are psychiatric disorders that share symptom overlap, which might partly be the result of shared genetic variation. Population-based twin studies have found significant genetic correlations between hoarding and OCD symptoms, with genetic correlations varying between 0.1 and 0.45. For tic disorders, studies examining these correlations are lacking. Other lines of research, including clinical samples and GWAS or CNV data to explore genetic relationships between tic disorders and OCD, have only found very modest if any shared genetic variation. Our aim was to extend current knowledge on the genetic structure underlying hoarding, OC symptoms (OCS), and lifetime tic symptoms and, in a trivariate analysis, assess the degree of common and unique genetic factors contributing to the etiology of these disorders. Data have been gathered from participants in the Netherlands Twin Register comprising a total of 5293 individuals from a sample of adult monozygotic (n = 2460) and dizygotic (n = 2833) twin pairs (mean age 33.61 years). The data on Hoarding, OCS, and tic symptoms were simultaneously analyzed in Mplus. A liability threshold model was fitted to the twin data, analyzing heritability of phenotypes and of their comorbidity. Following the criteria for a probable clinical diagnosis in all phenotypes, 6.8% of participants had a diagnosis of probable hoarding disorder (HD), 6.3% of OCS, and 12.8% of any probable lifetime tic disorder. Genetic factors explained 50.4, 70.1, and 61.1% of the phenotypic covariance between hoarding-OCS, hoarding-tics, and OCS-tics, respectively. Substantial genetic correlations were observed between hoarding and OCS (0.41), hoarding and tics (0.35), and between OCS and tics (0.37). These results support the contribution of genetic factors in the development of these disorders and their comorbidity. Furthermore, tics were mostly influenced by specific

  9. Genetic Influences on Learning Disabilities and Speech and Language Disorders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennington, Bruce F.

    1983-01-01

    Comprehensively reviews known examples of genetically influenced learning disabilities and speech and language disorders, including familial dyslexia, stuttering, and other speech and language disorders, as well as sex-chromosome anomalies, treated PKU, and minor auto-somal anomalies. (Author/RH)

  10. A Genetic Study of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, Conduct Disorder, Oppositional Defiant Disorder and Reading Disability: Aetiological Overlaps and Implications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Neilson C.; Levy, Florence; Pieka, Jan; Hay, David A.

    2006-01-01

    Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) commonly co-occurs with Oppositional Defiant Disorder, Conduct Disorder and Reading Disability. Twin studies are an important approach to understanding and modelling potential causes of such comorbidity. Univariate and bivariate genetic models were fitted to maternal report data from 2040 families of…

  11. Genetic susceptibility for bipolar disorder and response to antidepressants in major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Tansey, Katherine E; Guipponi, Michel; Domenici, Enrico; Lewis, Glyn; Malafosse, Alain; O'Donovan, Michael; Wendland, Jens R; Lewis, Cathryn M; McGuffin, Peter; Uher, Rudolf

    2014-01-01

    The high heterogeneity of response to antidepressant treatment in major depressive disorder (MDD) makes individual treatment outcomes currently unpredictable. It has been suggested that resistance to antidepressant treatment might be due to undiagnosed bipolar disorder or bipolar spectrum features. Here, we investigate the relationship between genetic susceptibility for bipolar disorder and response to treatment with antidepressants in MDD. Polygenic scores indexing risk for bipolar disorder were derived from the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium Bipolar Disorder whole genome association study. Linear regressions tested the effect of polygenic risk scores for bipolar disorder on proportional reduction in depression severity in two large samples of individuals with MDD, treated with antidepressants, NEWMEDS (n=1,791) and STAR*D (n=1,107). There was no significant association between polygenic scores for bipolar disorder and response to treatment with antidepressants. Our data indicate that molecular measure of genetic susceptibility to bipolar disorder does not aid in understanding non-response to antidepressants.

  12. Ethical and Social Implications of Genetic Testing for Communication Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnos, Kathleen S.

    2008-01-01

    Advances in genetics and genomics have quickly led to clinical applications to human health which have far-reaching consequences at the individual and societal levels. These new technologies have allowed a better understanding of the genetic factors involved in a wide range of disorders. During the past decade, incredible progress has been made in…

  13. Genetic forms of epilepsies and other paroxysmal disorders.

    PubMed

    Olson, Heather E; Poduri, Annapurna; Pearl, Phillip L

    2014-07-01

    Genetic mechanisms explain the pathophysiology of many forms of epilepsy and other paroxysmal disorders, such as alternating hemiplegia of childhood, familial hemiplegic migraine, and paroxysmal dyskinesias. Epilepsy is a key feature of well-defined genetic syndromes including tuberous sclerosis complex, Rett syndrome, Angelman syndrome, and others. There is an increasing number of single-gene causes or susceptibility factors associated with several epilepsy syndromes, including the early-onset epileptic encephalopathies, benign neonatal/infantile seizures, progressive myoclonus epilepsies, genetic generalized and benign focal epilepsies, epileptic aphasias, and familial focal epilepsies. Molecular mechanisms are diverse, and a single gene can be associated with a broad range of phenotypes. Additional features, such as dysmorphisms, head size, movement disorders, and family history may provide clues to a genetic diagnosis. Genetic testing can impact medical care and counseling. We discuss genetic mechanisms of epilepsy and other paroxysmal disorders, tools and indications for genetic testing, known genotype-phenotype associations, the importance of genetic counseling, and a look toward the future of epilepsy genetics. PMID:25192505

  14. The Genetics of Soft Connective Tissue Disorders.

    PubMed

    Vanakker, Olivier; Callewaert, Bert; Malfait, Fransiska; Coucke, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Over the last few years, the field of hereditary connective tissue disorders has changed tremendously. This review highlights exciting insights into three prototypic disorders affecting the soft connective tissue: Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, pseudoxanthoma elasticum, and cutis laxa. For each of these disorders, the identification and characterization of several novel but related conditions or subtypes have widened the phenotypic spectrum. In parallel, the vast underlying molecular network connecting these phenotypes is progressively being uncovered. Identification and characterization (both clinical and molecular) of new phenotypes within the connective tissue disorder spectrum are often key to further unraveling the pathways involved in connective tissue biology and delineating the clinical spectrum and pathophysiology of the disorders. Although difficult challenges remain, recent findings have expanded our pathophysiological understanding and may lead to targeted therapies in the near future. PMID:26002060

  15. Nosology and Classification of Genetic Skeletal Disorders: 2010 Revision

    PubMed Central

    Warman, Matthew L; Cormier-Daire, Valerie; Hall, Christine; Krakow, Deborah; Lachman, Ralph; LeMerrer, Martine; Mortier, Geert; Mundlos, Stefan; Nishimura, Gen; Rimoin, David L; Robertson, Stephen; Savarirayan, Ravi; Sillence, David; Spranger, Juergen; Unger, Sheila; Zabel, Bernhard; Superti-Furga, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    Genetic disorders involving the skeletal system arise through disturbances in the complex processes of skeletal development, growth and homeostasis and remain a diagnostic challenge because of their variety. The Nosology and Classification of Genetic Skeletal Disorders provides an overview of recognized diagnostic entities and groups them by clinical and radiographic features and molecular pathogenesis. The aim is to provide the Genetics, Pediatrics and Radiology community with a list of recognized genetic skeletal disorders that can be of help in the diagnosis of individual cases, in the delineation of novel disorders, and in building bridges between clinicians and scientists interested in skeletal biology. In the 2010 revision, 456 conditions were included and placed in 40 groups defined by molecular, biochemical, and/or radiographic criteria. Of these conditions, 316 were associated with mutations in one or more of 226 different genes, ranging from common, recurrent mutations to “private” found in single families or individuals. Thus, the Nosology is a hybrid between a list of clinically defined disorders, waiting for molecular clarification, and an annotated database documenting the phenotypic spectrum produced by mutations in a given gene. The Nosology should be useful for the diagnosis of patients with genetic skeletal diseases, particularly in view of the information flood expected with the novel sequencing technologies; in the delineation of clinical entities and novel disorders, by providing an overview of established nosologic entities; and for scientists looking for the clinical correlates of genes, proteins and pathways involved in skeletal biology. © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc. PMID:21438135

  16. Genes, brains, and behavior: imaging genetics for neuropsychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Arslan, Ayla

    2015-01-01

    The majority of neuropsychiatric disorders show a strong degree of heritability, yet little is known about molecular factors involved in the pathophysiology of diseases like schizophrenia. After a brief historical introduction into the current understanding of neuropsychiatric disorders, the aim of this study is to discuss imaging genetics as a strategy to explore the pathophysiology of neuropsychiatric disorders. The candidate gene approach of imaging genetics is used for validation/replication studies of genes, whereas the hypothesis-free, noncandidate gene approach appears to be a tool for gene discovery. Besides, integration of environmental factors into neuroimaging begins to converge on neuroimaging studies of genetic variation. In the light of data from other avenues such as animal experimentation, these developments show a model of interdisciplinary research, which may lead to identifying markers for neuropsychiatric disorders.

  17. Practice Bulletin No. 162: Prenatal Diagnostic Testing for Genetic Disorders.

    PubMed

    2016-05-01

    Prenatal genetic diagnostic testing is intended to determine, with as much certainty as possible, whether a specific genetic disorder or condition is present in the fetus. In contrast, prenatal genetic screening is designed to assess whether a patient is at increased risk of having a fetus affected by a genetic disorder. Originally, prenatal genetic testing focused primarily on Down syndrome (trisomy 21), but now it is able to detect a broad range of genetic disorders. Although it is necessary to perform amniocentesis or chorionic villus sampling (CVS) to definitively diagnose most genetic disorders, in some circumstances, fetal imaging with ultrasonography, echocardiography, or magnetic resonance imaging may be diagnostic of a particular structural fetal abnormality that is suggestive of an underlying genetic condition.The objective of prenatal genetic testing is to detect health problems that could affect the woman, fetus, or newborn and provide the patient and her obstetrician-gynecologist or other obstetric care provider with enough information to allow a fully informed decision about pregnancy management. Prenatal genetic testing cannot identify all abnormalities or problems in a fetus, and any testing should be focused on the individual patient's risks, reproductive goals, and preferences. It is important that patients understand the benefits and limitations of all prenatal screening and diagnostic testing, including the conditions for which tests are available and the conditions that will not be detected by testing. It also is important that patients realize that there is a broad range of clinical presentations, or phenotypes, for many genetic disorders and that results of genetic testing cannot predict all outcomes. Prenatal genetic testing has many benefits, including reassuring patients when results are normal, identifying disorders for which prenatal treatment may provide benefit, optimizing neonatal outcomes by ensuring the appropriate location for

  18. Obesity--is it a genetic disorder?

    PubMed

    Loos, R J F; Bouchard, C

    2003-11-01

    Obesity is one of the most pressing problems in the industrialized world. Twin, adoption and family studies have shown that genetic factors play a significant role in the pathogenesis of obesity. Rare mutations in humans and model organisms have provided insights into the pathways involved in body weight regulation. Studies of candidate genes indicate that some of the genes involved in pathways regulating energy expenditure and food intake may play a role in the predisposition to obesity. Amongst these genes, sequence variations in the adrenergic receptors, uncoupling proteins, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor, and the leptin receptor genes are of particular relevance. Results that have been replicated in at least three genome-wide scans suggest that key genes are located on chromosomes 2p, 3q, 5p, 6p, 7q, 10p, 11q, 17p and 20q. We conclude that the currently available evidence suggests four levels of genetic determination of obesity: genetic obesity, strong genetic predisposition, slight genetic predisposition, and genetically resistant. This growing body of research may help in the development of anti-obesity agents and perhaps genetic tests to predict the risk for obesity.

  19. Genetic Models of Sensorimotor Gating: Relevance to Neuropsychiatric Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Martin; Geyer, Mark A.

    2012-01-01

    Sensorimotor gating, or the ability of a sensory event to suppress a motor response, can be measured operationally via prepulse inhibition (PPI) of the startle response. PPI is deficient in schizophrenia patients as well as other neuropsychiatric disorders, can be measured across species, and has been used widely as a translational tool in preclinical neuropharmacological and genetic research. First developed to assess drug effects in pharmacological and developmental models, PPI has become one of the standard behavioral measures in genetic models of schizophrenia and other neuropsychiatric disorders that exhibit PPI deficits. In this chapter we review the literature on genetic models of sensorimotor gating and discuss the utility of PPI as a tool in phenotyping mutant mouse models. We highlight the approaches to genetic mouse models of neuropsychiatric disease, discuss some of the important caveats to these approaches, and provide a comprehensive table covering the more recent genetic models that have evaluated PPI. PMID:22367921

  20. Evolving Roles for Physicians and Genetic Counselors in Managing Complex Genetic Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Shelton, Celeste A; Whitcomb, David C

    2015-01-01

    Proponents of personalized medicine predict that genetic information will provide pivotal perspectives for the prevention and management of complex disorders. Personalized medicine differs from traditional Western medicine, in that it focuses on more complex disorders that require mechanistic disease modeling and outcome simulation by integrating genomic risk, environmental stressors, and biomarkers as indicators of disease state. This information could be useful to guide targeted therapy and prevent pathologic outcomes. However, gaps exist in the process of linking the pieces together; currently, genetic data are seldom used to assist physicians in clinical decision making. With rapid growth in genetic data and the requirements for new paradigms for complex disorders comes the need to train professionals to understand and manage the impact of genetic information on patients within these clinical settings. Here we describe the challenges, controversies, and opportunities for genetics and genetic counselors in managing complex disorders and discuss the rationale for modifications in genetic counselor training and function. We conclude that a major paradigm shift is underway and a compelling functional, ethical, and financial argument can be made for employing properly trained genetic counselors to be strategically positioned within the health-care industries that are responsible for managing complex disorders. PMID:26561988

  1. Disentangling the heterogeneity of autism spectrum disorder through genetic findings.

    PubMed

    Jeste, Shafali S; Geschwind, Daniel H

    2014-02-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) represents a heterogeneous group of disorders, which presents a substantial challenge to diagnosis and treatment. Over the past decade, considerable progress has been made in the identification of genetic risk factors for ASD that define specific mechanisms and pathways underlying the associated behavioural deficits. In this Review, we discuss how some of the latest advances in the genetics of ASD have facilitated parsing of the phenotypic heterogeneity of this disorder. We argue that only through such advances will we begin to define endophenotypes that can benefit from targeted, hypothesis-driven treatments. We review the latest technologies used to identify and characterize the genetics underlying ASD and then consider three themes-single-gene disorders, the gender bias in ASD, and the genetics of neurological comorbidities-that highlight ways in which we can use genetics to define the many phenotypes within the autism spectrum. We also present current clinical guidelines for genetic testing in ASD and their implications for prognosis and treatment.

  2. Disentangling the heterogeneity of autism spectrum disorder through genetic findings

    PubMed Central

    Jeste, Shafali S.; Geschwind, Daniel H.

    2014-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) represents a heterogeneous group of disorders, which presents a substantial challenge to diagnosis and treatment. Over the past decade, considerable progress has been made in the identification of genetic risk factors for ASD that define specific mechanisms and pathways underlying the associated behavioural deficits. In this Review, we discuss how some of the latest advances in the genetics of ASD have facilitated parsing of the phenotypic heterogeneity of this disorder. We argue that only through such advances will we begin to define endophenotypes that can benefit from targeted, hypothesis-driven treatments. We review the latest technologies used to identify and characterize the genetics underlying ASD and then consider three themes—single-gene disorders, the gender bias in ASD, and the genetics of neurological comorbidities—that highlight ways in which we can use genetics to define the many phenotypes within the autism spectrum. We also present current clinical guidelines for genetic testing in ASD and their implications for prognosis and treatment. PMID:24468882

  3. Genetic aspects of autism spectrum disorders: insights from animal models.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Swati; Riordan, Maeveen; Bhat, Manzoor A

    2014-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are a complex neurodevelopmental disorder that display a triad of core behavioral deficits including restricted interests, often accompanied by repetitive behavior, deficits in language and communication, and an inability to engage in reciprocal social interactions. ASD is among the most heritable disorders but is not a simple disorder with a singular pathology and has a rather complex etiology. It is interesting to note that perturbations in synaptic growth, development, and stability underlie a variety of neuropsychiatric disorders, including ASD, schizophrenia, epilepsy, and intellectual disability. Biological characterization of an increasing repertoire of synaptic mutants in various model organisms indicates synaptic dysfunction as causal in the pathophysiology of ASD. Our understanding of the genes and genetic pathways that contribute toward the formation, stabilization, and maintenance of functional synapses coupled with an in-depth phenotypic analysis of the cellular and behavioral characteristics is therefore essential to unraveling the pathogenesis of these disorders. In this review, we discuss the genetic aspects of ASD emphasizing on the well conserved set of genes and genetic pathways implicated in this disorder, many of which contribute to synapse assembly and maintenance across species. We also review how fundamental research using animal models is providing key insights into the various facets of human ASD. PMID:24605088

  4. Targeted exome sequencing for mitochondrial disorders reveals high genetic heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mitochondrial disorders are difficult to diagnose due to extreme genetic and phenotypic heterogeneities. Methods We explored the utility of targeted next-generation sequencing for the diagnosis of mitochondrial disorders in 148 patients submitted for clinical testing. A panel of 447 nuclear genes encoding mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes, and other genes inducing secondary mitochondrial dysfunction or that cause diseases which mimic mitochondrial disorders were tested. Results We identified variants considered to be possibly disease-causing based on family segregation data and/or variants already known to cause disease in twelve genes in thirteen patients. Rare or novel variants of unknown significance were identified in 45 additional genes for various metabolic, genetic or neurogenetic disorders. Conclusions Primary mitochondrial defects were confirmed only in four patients indicating that majority of patients with suspected mitochondrial disorders are presumably not the result of direct impairment of energy production. Our results support that clinical and routine laboratory ascertainment for mitochondrial disorders are challenging due to significant overlapping non-specific clinical symptoms and lack of specific biomarkers. While next-generation sequencing shows promise for diagnosing suspected mitochondrial disorders, the challenges remain as the underlying genetic heterogeneity may be greater than suspected and it is further confounded by the similarity of symptoms with other conditions as we report here. PMID:24215330

  5. Guidelines for genetic testing of inherited cardiac disorders.

    PubMed

    Ingles, Jodie; Zodgekar, Poonam R; Yeates, Laura; Macciocca, Ivan; Semsarian, Christopher; Fatkin, Diane

    2011-11-01

    Inherited gene variants have been implicated increasingly in cardiac disorders but the clinical impact of these discoveries has been variable. For some disorders, such as familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, long QT syndrome, and familial hypercholesterolaemia, genetic testing has a high yield and has become an integral part of family management. For other disorders, including dilated cardiomyopathy, arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy, Brugada syndrome, catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia, and atrial fibrillation, relatively less is known about the genes involved and genetic testing has a lower yield. Recent advances in sequencing and array-based technologies promise to change the landscape of our understanding of the genetic basis of human disease and will dramatically increase the rate of detection of genomic variants. Since every individual is expected to harbour thousands of variants, many of which may be novel, interpretation of the functional significance of any single variant is critical, and should be undertaken by experienced personnel. Genotype results can have a wide range of medical and psychosocial implications for affected and unaffected individuals and hence, genetic testing should be performed in a specialised cardiac genetic clinic or clinical genetics service where appropriate family management and genetic counselling can be offered.

  6. Recent developments in certain X-linked genetic eye disorders.

    PubMed

    Shastry, B S

    1993-09-01

    Over the past few years, genetic diseases of the ocular system have become very active and fast-growing research areas in the vision field. The rapid development of the recombinant DNA techniques together with somatic cell genetics, during the last two decades has fueled this progress. As a result, many genetic disease genes have been localized in the human chromosome and several of them have been isolated and characterized. These and other studies have profoundly enriched our basic understanding of genetic eye disorders. Although gene replacement therapy, prenatal diagnosis and carrier detection have not been extensively tried for genetic eye diseases, such attempts will now be feasible. Molecular analyses made it clear that there are many challenging problems that need attention. This report highlights some of these initial developments, particularly on the X-linked major genetic eye diseases. In order to help the beginners and general audience, a brief description of the clinical pathology and the molecular probes used to locate the genetic defects of certain disorders are presented. Disorders are arranged according to their linkage from telomere to telomere on the chromosome to give a coherent structure. It is hoped that this information is useful and of general interest for the beginners, established investigators and ophthalmologists.

  7. Acquired prosopagnosia as a face-specific disorder: ruling out the general visual similarity account.

    PubMed

    Busigny, Thomas; Graf, Markus; Mayer, Eugène; Rossion, Bruno

    2010-06-01

    Prosopagnosia is classically defined as a disorder of visual recognition specific to faces, following brain damage. However, according to a long-standing alternative view, these patients would rather be generally impaired in recognizing objects belonging to visually homogenous categories, including faces. We tested this alternative hypothesis stringently with a well-documented brain-damaged prosopagnosic patient (PS) in three delayed forced-choice recognition experiments in which visual similarity between a target and its distractor was manipulated parametrically: novel 3D geometric shapes, morphed pictures of common objects, and morphed photographs of a highly homogenous familiar category (cars). In all experiments, PS showed normal performance and speed, and there was no evidence of a steeper increase of error rates and RTs with increasing levels of visual similarity, compared to controls. These data rule out an account of acquired prosopagnosia in terms of a more general impairment in recognizing objects from visually homogenous categories. An additional experiment with morphed faces confirmed that PS was specifically impaired at individual face recognition. However, in stark contrast to the alternative view of prosopagnosia, PS was relatively more impaired at the easiest levels of discrimination, i.e. when individual faces differ clearly in global shape rather than when faces were highly similar and had to be discriminated based on fine-grained details. Overall, these observations as well as a review of previous evidence, lead us to conclude that this alternative view of prosopagnosia does not hold. Rather, it seems that brain damage in adulthood may lead to selective recognition impairment for faces, perhaps the only category of visual stimuli for which holistic/configural perception is not only potentially at play, but is strictly necessary to individualize members of the category efficiently.

  8. Common Genetic and Environmental Influences on Major Depressive Disorder and Conduct Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Subbarao, Anjali; Rhee, Soo Hyun; Young, Susan E.; Ehringer, Marissa A.; Corley, Robin P.; Hewitt, John K.

    2008-01-01

    The evidence for common genetic and environmental influences on conduct disorder (CD) and major depressive disorder (MDD) in adolescents was examined. A sample of 570 monozygotic twin pairs, 592 dizygotic twin pairs, and 426 non-twin siblings, aged 12-18 years, was recruited from the Colorado Twin Registry. For the past year data, there was a…

  9. Genetic and Epigenetic Mechanisms Linking Pain and Psychiatric Disorders.

    PubMed

    Swiergiel, Artur H; Juszczak, Grzegorz R; Stankiewicz, Adrian M

    2015-01-01

    The neurophysiological link between neuropathic pain and depression remains unknown despite evident high comorbidity of these two disorders. However, there is convincing evidence that genotype plays a role in both pain and depression. Using various types of genetic analysis - population genetics, cytogenetics and molecular technologies - specific genes have been implicated in mediating almost all aspects of nociception and mood disorders. The current review attempts to identify specific genes and epigenetic mechanisms common to both disorders. It is concluded that external and internal factors (inflammation, stress, gender, etc.) that contribute to the pathologies may do so through epigenetic mechanisms that may affect expression of these particular genes. The possible involvement of epigenetic regulation in pain and psychiatric disorders suggests that treatments targeting epigenetic mechanisms that mediate adverse life events should be considered. PMID:26436761

  10. Genetic basis of human left-right asymmetry disorders.

    PubMed

    Deng, Hao; Xia, Hong; Deng, Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Humans and other vertebrates exhibit left-right (LR) asymmetric arrangement of the internal organs, and failure to establish normal LR asymmetry leads to internal laterality disorders, including situs inversus and heterotaxy. Situs inversus is complete mirror-imaged arrangement of the internal organs along LR axis, whereas heterotaxy is abnormal arrangement of the internal thoraco-abdominal organs across LR axis of the body, most of which are associated with complex cardiovascular malformations. Both disorders are genetically heterogeneous with reduced penetrance, presumably because of monogenic, polygenic or multifactorial causes. Research in genetics of LR asymmetry disorders has been extremely prolific over the past 17 years, and a series of loci and disease genes involved in situs inversus and heterotaxy have been described. The review highlights the classification, chromosomal abnormalities, pathogenic genes and the possible mechanism of human LR asymmetry disorders. PMID:26258520

  11. [Autism and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder: convergences and divergences. Genetics].

    PubMed

    Artigas-Pallarés, Josep

    2013-09-01

    According to the DSM-5, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are different conditions that earlier versions of the DSM stated could not be diagnosed together in the same individual. Yet, over the last few decades the debate on the limits between the two disorders has continued, even though ADHD and ASD are undoubtedly clinically and cognitively different phenotypes, as demonstrated by the simple fact that they have been defined in clearly different ways. Thus, from a perspective anchored in a purely phenomenological view, there would be no grounds whatsoever on which to question the independence between the two disorders. Since, at the present time, the discussion on the convergence between ADHD and ASD cannot be considered to have been solved, this study aims to take the data available from genetics as the basis on which to review the nosological position of the two disorders. The main studies that have addressed this issue are reviewed. The data collected agree on a genetic overlap between ADHD and ASD, which is influenced by common molecular mechanisms that affect the two disorders at the same time. The conclusions that can be drawn from the data collected suggest a new conceptual model not only for ADHD and ASD, but also for complex mental disorders in general. This line of research will transform the way of understanding the treatment of mental disorders and will almost certainly open up new perspectives in this area.

  12. Recent advances in the genetics of obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Samuels, Jack F

    2009-08-01

    This article reviews recent developments in understanding the genetic etiology of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Family studies provide further support for the familial aggregation of OCD. Genome-wide linkage studies indicate that specific chromosomal regions are linked to OCD. Moreover, results from recent molecular genetic studies suggest that several candidate genes are associated with OCD. However, specific genes causing OCD have not been conclusively identified, and the molecular pathogenesis of the disorder has not been elucidated. The search for genes is complicated by the clinical and etiologic heterogeneity of OCD, as well as the possibility of gene-gene and gene-environment interactions. Despite this complexity, further refinement of the phenotype and developments in molecular and statistical genetics hold promise for further deepening our genetic understanding of OCD in the future.

  13. Translational Genetics for Diagnosis of Human Disorders of Sex Development

    PubMed Central

    Baxter, Ruth M.; Vilain, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Disorders of sex development (DSDs) are congenital conditions with discrepancies between the chromosomal, gonadal, and phenotypic sex of the individual. Such disorders have historically been difficult to diagnose and cause great stress to patients and their families. Genetic analysis of human samples has been instrumental in elucidating the molecules and pathways involved in the development of the bipotential gonad into a functioning testis or ovary. However, many DSD patients still do not receive a genetic diagnosis. New genetic and genomic technologies are expanding our knowledge of the underlying mechanism of DSDs and opening new avenues for clinical diagnosis. We review the genetic technologies that have elucidated the genes that are well established in sex determination in humans, discuss findings from more recent genomic technologies, and propose a new paradigm for clinical diagnosis of DSDs. PMID:23875799

  14. Human embryonic stem cells carrying mutations for severe genetic disorders.

    PubMed

    Frumkin, Tsvia; Malcov, Mira; Telias, Michael; Gold, Veronica; Schwartz, Tamar; Azem, Foad; Amit, Ami; Yaron, Yuval; Ben-Yosef, Dalit

    2010-04-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (HESCs) carrying specific mutations potentially provide a valuable tool for studying genetic disorders in humans. One preferable approach for obtaining these cell lines is by deriving them from affected preimplantation genetically diagnosed embryos. These unique cells are especially important for modeling human genetic disorders for which there are no adequate research models. They can be further used to gain new insights into developmentally regulated events that occur during human embryo development and that are responsible for the manifestation of genetically inherited disorders. They also have great value for the exploration of new therapeutic protocols, including gene-therapy-based treatments and disease-oriented drug screening and discovery. Here, we report the establishment of 15 different mutant human embryonic stem cell lines derived from genetically affected embryos, all donated by couples undergoing preimplantation genetic diagnosis in our in vitro fertilization unit. For further information regarding access to HESC lines from our repository, for research purposes, please email dalitb@tasmc.health.gov.il. PMID:20186514

  15. Antibiotic Resistance, Virulence, and Genetic Background of Community-Acquired Uropathogenic Escherichia coli from Algeria.

    PubMed

    Yahiaoui, Merzouk; Robin, Frédéric; Bakour, Rabah; Hamidi, Moufida; Bonnet, Richard; Messai, Yamina

    2015-10-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate antibiotic resistance mechanisms, virulence traits, and genetic background of 150 nonrepetitive community-acquired uropathogenic Escherichia coli (CA-UPEC) from Algeria. A rate of 46.7% of isolates was multidrug resistant. bla genes detected were blaTEM (96.8% of amoxicillin-resistant isolates), blaCTX-M-15 (4%), overexpressed blaAmpC (4%), blaSHV-2a, blaTEM-4, blaTEM-31, and blaTEM-35 (0.7%). All tetracycline-resistant isolates (51.3%) had tetA and/or tetB genes. Sulfonamides and trimethoprim resistance genes were sul2 (60.8%), sul1 (45.9%), sul3 (6.7%), dfrA14 (25.4%), dfrA1 (18.2%), dfrA12 (16.3%), and dfrA25 (5.4%). High-level fluoroquinolone resistance (22.7%) was mediated by mutations in gyrA (S83L-D87N) and parC (S80I-E84G/V or S80I) genes. qnrB5, qnrS1, and aac(6')-Ib-cr were rare (5.3%). Class 1 and/or class 2 integrons were detected (40.7%). Isolates belonged to phylogroups B2+D (50%), A+B1 (36%), and F+C+Clade I (13%). Most of D (72.2%) and 38.6% of B2 isolates were multidrug resistant; they belong to 14 different sequence types, including international successful ST131, ST73, and ST69, reported for the first time in the community in Algeria and new ST4494 and ST4529 described in this study. Besides multidrug resistance, B2 and D isolates possessed virulence factors of colonization, invasion, and long-term persistence. The study highlighted multidrug-resistant CA-UPEC with high virulence traits and an epidemic genetic background.

  16. Problems in the control of genetic disorders.

    PubMed

    Kuliev, A M; Modell, B

    1990-01-01

    Preventive genetics services based on population screening are now an integral part of maternal and child health programmes. New developments in DNA technology, ultrasound scanning, and assay of factors in maternal blood are greatly increasing their potential to improve human health. If these services are to be delivered fairly to populations, there must be much more emphasis on community information, professional education, and service monitoring.

  17. Cross-Disorder Genetic Analysis of Tic Disorders, Obsessive–Compulsive, and Hoarding Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Zilhão, Nuno R.; Smit, Dirk J.; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Cath, Danielle C.

    2016-01-01

    Hoarding, obsessive–compulsive disorder (OCD), and Tourette’s disorder (TD) are psychiatric disorders that share symptom overlap, which might partly be the result of shared genetic variation. Population-based twin studies have found significant genetic correlations between hoarding and OCD symptoms, with genetic correlations varying between 0.1 and 0.45. For tic disorders, studies examining these correlations are lacking. Other lines of research, including clinical samples and GWAS or CNV data to explore genetic relationships between tic disorders and OCD, have only found very modest if any shared genetic variation. Our aim was to extend current knowledge on the genetic structure underlying hoarding, OC symptoms (OCS), and lifetime tic symptoms and, in a trivariate analysis, assess the degree of common and unique genetic factors contributing to the etiology of these disorders. Data have been gathered from participants in the Netherlands Twin Register comprising a total of 5293 individuals from a sample of adult monozygotic (n = 2460) and dizygotic (n = 2833) twin pairs (mean age 33.61 years). The data on Hoarding, OCS, and tic symptoms were simultaneously analyzed in Mplus. A liability threshold model was fitted to the twin data, analyzing heritability of phenotypes and of their comorbidity. Following the criteria for a probable clinical diagnosis in all phenotypes, 6.8% of participants had a diagnosis of probable hoarding disorder (HD), 6.3% of OCS, and 12.8% of any probable lifetime tic disorder. Genetic factors explained 50.4, 70.1, and 61.1% of the phenotypic covariance between hoarding-OCS, hoarding-tics, and OCS-tics, respectively. Substantial genetic correlations were observed between hoarding and OCS (0.41), hoarding and tics (0.35), and between OCS and tics (0.37). These results support the contribution of genetic factors in the development of these disorders and their comorbidity. Furthermore, tics were mostly influenced by specific

  18. Cross-Disorder Genetic Analysis of Tic Disorders, Obsessive-Compulsive, and Hoarding Symptoms.

    PubMed

    Zilhão, Nuno R; Smit, Dirk J; Boomsma, Dorret I; Cath, Danielle C

    2016-01-01

    Hoarding, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), and Tourette's disorder (TD) are psychiatric disorders that share symptom overlap, which might partly be the result of shared genetic variation. Population-based twin studies have found significant genetic correlations between hoarding and OCD symptoms, with genetic correlations varying between 0.1 and 0.45. For tic disorders, studies examining these correlations are lacking. Other lines of research, including clinical samples and GWAS or CNV data to explore genetic relationships between tic disorders and OCD, have only found very modest if any shared genetic variation. Our aim was to extend current knowledge on the genetic structure underlying hoarding, OC symptoms (OCS), and lifetime tic symptoms and, in a trivariate analysis, assess the degree of common and unique genetic factors contributing to the etiology of these disorders. Data have been gathered from participants in the Netherlands Twin Register comprising a total of 5293 individuals from a sample of adult monozygotic (n = 2460) and dizygotic (n = 2833) twin pairs (mean age 33.61 years). The data on Hoarding, OCS, and tic symptoms were simultaneously analyzed in Mplus. A liability threshold model was fitted to the twin data, analyzing heritability of phenotypes and of their comorbidity. Following the criteria for a probable clinical diagnosis in all phenotypes, 6.8% of participants had a diagnosis of probable hoarding disorder (HD), 6.3% of OCS, and 12.8% of any probable lifetime tic disorder. Genetic factors explained 50.4, 70.1, and 61.1% of the phenotypic covariance between hoarding-OCS, hoarding-tics, and OCS-tics, respectively. Substantial genetic correlations were observed between hoarding and OCS (0.41), hoarding and tics (0.35), and between OCS and tics (0.37). These results support the contribution of genetic factors in the development of these disorders and their comorbidity. Furthermore, tics were mostly influenced by specific

  19. Toward a Deeper Understanding of the Genetics of Bipolar Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Kerner, Berit

    2015-01-01

    Bipolar disorder is a common, complex psychiatric disorder characterized by mania and depression. The disease aggregates in families, but despite much effort, it has been difficult to delineate the basic genetic model or identify specific genetic risk factors. Not only single gene Mendelian transmission and common variant hypotheses but also multivariate threshold models and oligogenic quasi-Mendelian modes of inheritance have dominated the discussion at times. Almost complete sequence information of the human genome and falling sequencing costs now offer the opportunity to test these models in families in which the disorder is transmitted over several generations. Exome-wide sequencing studies have revealed an astonishing number of rare and potentially damaging mutations in brain-expressed genes that could have contributed to the disease manifestation. However, the statistical analysis of these data has been challenging, because genetic risk factors displayed a high degree of dissimilarity across families. This scenario is not unique to bipolar disorder, but similar results have also been found in schizophrenia, a potentially related psychiatric disorder. Recently, our group has published data which supported an oligogenic genetic model of transmission in a family with bipolar disorder. In this family, three affected siblings shared rare, damaging mutations in multiple genes, which were linked to stress response pathways. These pathways are also the target for drugs frequently used to treat bipolar disorder. This article discusses these findings in the context of previously proclaimed disease models and suggests future research directions, including biological confirmation and phenotype stratification as an approach to disease heterogeneity. PMID:26283973

  20. Toward a Deeper Understanding of the Genetics of Bipolar Disorder.

    PubMed

    Kerner, Berit

    2015-01-01

    Bipolar disorder is a common, complex psychiatric disorder characterized by mania and depression. The disease aggregates in families, but despite much effort, it has been difficult to delineate the basic genetic model or identify specific genetic risk factors. Not only single gene Mendelian transmission and common variant hypotheses but also multivariate threshold models and oligogenic quasi-Mendelian modes of inheritance have dominated the discussion at times. Almost complete sequence information of the human genome and falling sequencing costs now offer the opportunity to test these models in families in which the disorder is transmitted over several generations. Exome-wide sequencing studies have revealed an astonishing number of rare and potentially damaging mutations in brain-expressed genes that could have contributed to the disease manifestation. However, the statistical analysis of these data has been challenging, because genetic risk factors displayed a high degree of dissimilarity across families. This scenario is not unique to bipolar disorder, but similar results have also been found in schizophrenia, a potentially related psychiatric disorder. Recently, our group has published data which supported an oligogenic genetic model of transmission in a family with bipolar disorder. In this family, three affected siblings shared rare, damaging mutations in multiple genes, which were linked to stress response pathways. These pathways are also the target for drugs frequently used to treat bipolar disorder. This article discusses these findings in the context of previously proclaimed disease models and suggests future research directions, including biological confirmation and phenotype stratification as an approach to disease heterogeneity. PMID:26283973

  1. Behaviour Problems in Children with Genetic Disorders Causing Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Einfeld, Stewart L.

    2005-01-01

    This paper reviews several genetic syndromes that are associated with intellectual disability. The specific focus is on the behavioural patterns associated with the syndrome. Included in this review are the patterns of disruptive behaviour disorders associated with Fragile X, Prader-Willi, and Williams syndromes. Understanding and recognition of…

  2. Social and Psychological Aspects of Genetic Disorders: A Selected Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, Washington, DC.

    The scope of this bibliography encompasses the social and psychological aspects of genetic disorders. The bibliography lists selected English-language articles and books from the professional literature along with audiovisual materials produced by both voluntary organizations and professional filmmakers. The entries are organized by the following…

  3. Visual and Verbal Learning in a Genetic Metabolic Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spilkin, Amy M.; Ballantyne, Angela O.; Trauner, Doris A.

    2009-01-01

    Visual and verbal learning in a genetic metabolic disorder (cystinosis) were examined in the following three studies. The goal of Study I was to provide a normative database and establish the reliability and validity of a new test of visual learning and memory (Visual Learning and Memory Test; VLMT) that was modeled after a widely used test of…

  4. Clinical Genetic Aspects of ASD Spectrum Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Schaefer, G. Bradley

    2016-01-01

    Early presumptions opined that autism spectrum disorder (ASD) was related to the rearing of these children by emotionally-distant mothers. Advances in the 1960s and 1970s clearly demonstrated the biologic basis of autism with a high heritability. Recent advances have demonstrated that specific etiologic factors in autism spectrum disorders can be identified in 30%–40% of cases. Based on early reports newer, emerging genomic technologies are likely to increase this diagnostic yield to over 50%. To date these investigations have focused on etiologic factors that are largely mono-factorial. The currently undiagnosed causes of ASDs will likely be found to have causes that are more complex. Epigenetic, multiple interacting loci, and four dimensional causes (with timing as a variable) are likely to be associated with the currently unidentifiable cases. Today, the “Why” is more important than ever. Understanding the causes of ASDs help inform families of important issues such as recurrence risk, prognosis, natural history, and predicting associated co-morbid medical conditions. In the current era of emerging efforts in “personalized medicine”, identifying an etiology will be critical in identifying endo-phenotypic groups and individual variations that will allow for tailored treatment for persons with ASD. PMID:26840296

  5. Genetic basis for sleep regulation and sleep disorders.

    PubMed

    Raizen, David M; Mason, Thornton B A; Pack, Allan I

    2006-11-01

    Sleep disorders arise by an interaction between the environment and the genetic makeup of the individual but the relative contribution of nature and nurture varies with diseases. At one extreme are the disorders with simple Mendelian patterns of inheritance such as familial advanced sleep phase syndrome, and at the other extreme are diseases such as insomnia, which can be associated with a multitude of medical and psychiatric conditions. In this article, we review data on the relative contribution of genetic and environmental factors in the pathogenesis of various sleep disorders. The understanding of many of these disorders has been advanced by the study of sleep and circadian rhythms in model laboratory organisms. We summarize this model system research and how it relates to human sleep disorders. The current challenge in this field is the identification of susceptibility genetic loci for complex diseases such as obstructive sleep apnea. We anticipate such identification will increase our ability to assess risk for disease before symptom onset and by doing so will shift the focus from treatment to prevention of disease. PMID:17048148

  6. The molecular genetics of keratin disorders.

    PubMed

    Smith, Frances

    2003-01-01

    Keratins are the type I and II intermediate filament proteins which form a cytoskeletal network within all epithelial cells. They are expressed in pairs in a tissue- and differentiation-specific fashion. Epidermolysis bullosa simplex (EBS) was the first human disorder to be associated with keratin mutations. The abnormal keratin filament aggregates observed in basal cell keratinocytes of some EBS patients are composed of keratins K5 and K14. Dominant mutations in the genes encoding these proteins were shown to disrupt the keratin filament cytoskeleton resulting in cells that are less resilient and blister with mild physical trauma. Identification of mutations in other keratin genes soon followed with attention focussed on disorders showing abnormal clumping of keratin filaments in specific cells. For example, in bullous congenital ichthyosiform erythroderma, clumping of filaments in the suprabasal cells led to the identification of mutations in the suprabasal keratins, K1 and K10. Mutations have now been identified in 18 keratins, all of which produce a fragile cell phenotype. These include ichthyosis bullosa of Siemens (K2e), epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma (K1, K9), pachyonychia congenita (K6a, K6b, K16, K17), white sponge nevus (K4, K13), Meesmann's corneal dystrophy (K3, K12), cryptogenic cirrhosis (K8, K18) and monilethrix (hHb6, hHb1).In general, these disorders are inherited as autosomal dominant traits and the mutations act in a dominant-negative manner. Therefore, treatment in the form of gene therapy is difficult, as the mutant gene needs to be inactivated. Ways of achieving this are actively being studied. Reliable mutation detection methods from genomic DNA are now available. This enables rapid screening of patients for keratin mutations. For some of the more severe phenotypes, prenatal diagnosis may be requested and this can now be performed from chorionic villus samples at an early stage of the pregnancy. This review article describes the

  7. Retrotransposons and pediatric genetic disorders: Importance and implications.

    PubMed

    Akrami, Seyed Mohammad; Habibi, Laleh

    2014-03-01

    Pediatric disorders are generally observed to have a greater genetic load than diseases occurring during adulthood. Clinical manifestations of many genetic defects including chromosomal abnormalities and mutations in specific genes appear during childhood. One of the notable mutagens in human cells is mobile DNA element. They possess the ability to move and insert themselves in new genomic locations including critical disease-causing genes. Although our cells inhibit their transport by different mechanisms, factors such as aging and environmental heavy metals have effect on increasing their activities. In this article, we try to go over the features of active human retroelements and highlight their role in the pathology of pediatric genetic disorders. We also propose two mechanisms in which aged parental gametes and embryonic exposure to environmental stresses followed by mobile elements insertion may result in de novo pediatric diseases. PMID:27625862

  8. Genetic disorders on the island of St Helena.

    PubMed

    Eickhoff, S; Beighton, P

    1985-09-28

    The island of St Helena lies in the South Atlantic ocean and is isolated by distance from any land mass and by lack of a harbour or airfield. In these circumstances there could be an unusual pattern of inherited disease, and for this reason we have attempted to document the presence and frequency of genetic conditions in the population, which numbers approximately 5 500. Genetic disorders identified included autosomal dominant genu valgum, hereditary angioneurotic oedema, Christmas disease and pseudo-achondroplasia. The presence of the autosomal recessive form of retinitis pigmentosa provides a possible explanation for the occurrence of that condition in the islanders of Tristan da Cunha, since they have ancestral links with the St Helena community. The recognition of these genetic disorders in this isolated population has practical implications in terms of clinical management and the provision of medical services.

  9. Retrotransposons and pediatric genetic disorders: Importance and implications

    PubMed Central

    Akrami, Seyed Mohammad; Habibi, Laleh

    2014-01-01

    Pediatric disorders are generally observed to have a greater genetic load than diseases occurring during adulthood. Clinical manifestations of many genetic defects including chromosomal abnormalities and mutations in specific genes appear during childhood. One of the notable mutagens in human cells is mobile DNA element. They possess the ability to move and insert themselves in new genomic locations including critical disease-causing genes. Although our cells inhibit their transport by different mechanisms, factors such as aging and environmental heavy metals have effect on increasing their activities. In this article, we try to go over the features of active human retroelements and highlight their role in the pathology of pediatric genetic disorders. We also propose two mechanisms in which aged parental gametes and embryonic exposure to environmental stresses followed by mobile elements insertion may result in de novo pediatric diseases.

  10. Environmental Adversity Increases Genetic Risk for Externalizing Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Hicks, Brian M.; South, Susan C.; DiRago, Ana C.; Iacono, William G.; McGue, Matt

    2008-01-01

    Background Studies of gene-environment (G-E) interplay in the development of psychiatric and substance use disorders are rapidly accumulating. However, few attempts have been made to integrate findings and articulate general mechanisms of G-E influence in the emergence of psychopathology. Objective Identify patterns of G-E interplay between externalizing (EXT; antisocial behavior and substance use) disorders and several environmental risk factors. Design We used quantitative genetic models to examine how genetic and environmental risk for EXT disorders changes as a function of environmental context. Setting Participants were recruited from the community and took part in a day-long assessment at a university laboratory. Participants The sample consisted of 1315 male and female twin pairs participating in the age 17 assessment of the Minnesota Twin Family Study. Main Outcome Measures Multiple measures and informants were employed to construct a composite of EXT disorders and composite measures of 6 environmental risk factors including academic achievement and engagement, antisocial and prosocial peer affiliation, mother-child and father-child relationship problems, and stressful life events. Results A significant G × E interaction was detected between each environmental risk factor and EXT such that greater environmental adversity was associated with increased genetic risk in EXT. Conclusion Our findings demonstrate that in the context of environmental adversity, genetic factors become more important in the etiology of EXT disorders. The consistency of the results further suggests a general mechanism of environmental influence on EXT disorders regardless of the specific form of the environmental risk. PMID:19487629

  11. Genetics of human isolated hereditary hair loss disorders.

    PubMed

    Basit, S; Khan, S; Ahmad, W

    2015-09-01

    Hereditary hair loss in human is a group of clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorders. It is characterized by sparse to complete absence of hair on the scalp and other parts of the body. In few cases tightly curled twisted wooly hair (WH) on the scalp has been reported as well. The hair loss disorders, including both syndromic and non-syndromic (isolated) forms, segregate either in autosomal dominant or autosomal recessive pattern. To date, seven autosomal dominant and equal numbers of autosomal recessive isolated forms of hair loss disorders have been characterized. Genes responsible for causing most of these disorders have been identified. In this review, we have provided an update on clinical and genetic aspects of isolated hereditary hair loss disorders manifesting with hypotrichosis and/or WHs. Because most of the recessive genes have been mapped using consanguineous families of Pakistani origin, therefore emphasis is given to mutations identified in these families. OMIM nomenclature has been followed to indicate different forms of hair loss disorders.

  12. Case against Diagnosing Developmental Language Disorder by Default: A Single Case Study of Acquired Aphasia Associated with Convulsive Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marinac, Julie V.; Harper, Laura

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this article is to inform the diagnostic knowledge base for professionals working in the field of language disorders when classic symptoms, characteristics and sequences are not found. The information reveals the risk of diagnosis with a developmental language disorder (DLD) by default when no underlying cause can be readily identified.…

  13. Skeleton Genetics: a comprehensive database for genes and mutations related to genetic skeletal disorders.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chong; Jiang, Yi; Xu, Chenyang; Liu, Xinting; Hu, Lin; Xiang, Yanbao; Chen, Qingshuang; Chen, Denghui; Li, Huanzheng; Xu, Xueqin; Tang, Shaohua

    2016-01-01

    Genetic skeletal disorders (GSD) involving the skeletal system arises through disturbances in the complex processes of skeletal development, growth and homeostasis and remain a diagnostic challenge because of their clinical heterogeneity and genetic variety. Over the past decades, tremendous effort platforms have been made to explore the complex heterogeneity, and massive new genes and mutations have been identified in different GSD, but the information supplied by literature is still limited and it is hard to meet the further needs of scientists and clinicians. In this study, combined with Nosology and Classification of genetic skeletal disorders, we developed the first comprehensive and annotated genetic skeletal disorders database, named 'SkeletonGenetics', which contains information about all GSD-related knowledge including 8225 mutations in 357 genes, with detailed information associated with 481 clinical diseases (2260 clinical phenotype) classified in 42 groups defined by molecular, biochemical and/or radiographic criteria from 1698 publications. Further annotations were performed to each entry including Gene Ontology, pathways analysis, protein-protein interaction, mutation annotations, disease-disease clustering and gene-disease networking. Furthermore, using concise search methods, intuitive graphical displays, convenient browsing functions and constantly updatable features, 'SkeletonGenetics' could serve as a central and integrative database for unveiling the genetic and pathways pre-dispositions of GSD.Database URL: http://101.200.211.232/skeletongenetics/. PMID:27580923

  14. Identifying the genetic components underlying the pathophysiology of movement disorders

    PubMed Central

    Ezquerra, Mario; Compta, Yaroslau; Marti, Maria J

    2011-01-01

    Movement disorders are a heterogeneous group of neurological conditions, few of which have been classically described as bona fide hereditary illnesses (Huntington’s chorea, for instance). Most are considered to be either sporadic or to feature varying degrees of familial aggregation (parkinsonism and dystonia). In the late twentieth century, Mendelian monogenic mutations were found for movement disorders with a clear and consistent family history. Although important, these findings apply only to very rare forms of movement disorders. Already in the twenty-first century, and taking advantage of the modern developments in genetics and molecular biology, growing attention is being paid to the complex genetics of movement disorders. The search for risk genetic variants (polymorphisms) in large cohorts and the identification of different risk variants across different populations and ethnic groups are under way, with the most relevant findings to date corresponding to recent genome wide association studies in Parkinson’s disease. These new approaches focusing on risk variants may enable the design of screening tests for early or even preclinical disease, and the identification of likely therapeutic targets. PMID:23776369

  15. The Evolving Diagnostic and Genetic Landscapes of Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    PubMed

    Ziats, Mark N; Rennert, Owen M

    2016-01-01

    The autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are a heterogeneous set of neurodevelopmental syndromes defined by impairments in verbal and non-verbal communication, restricted social interaction, and the presence of stereotyped patterns of behavior. The prevalence of ASD is rising, and the diagnostic criteria and clinical perspectives on the disorder continue to evolve in parallel. Although the majority of individuals with ASD will not have an identifiable genetic cause, almost 25% of cases have identifiable causative DNA variants. The rapidly improving ability to identify genetic mutations because of advances in next generation sequencing, coupled with previous epidemiological studies demonstrating high heritability of ASD, have led to many recent attempts to identify causative genetic mutations underlying the ASD phenotype. However, although hundreds of mutations have been identified to date, they are either rare variants affecting only a handful of ASD patients, or are common variants in the general population conferring only a small risk for ASD. Furthermore, the genes implicated thus far are heterogeneous in their structure and function, hampering attempts to understand shared molecular mechanisms among all ASD patients; an understanding that is crucial for the development of targeted diagnostics and therapies. However, new work is beginning to suggest that the heterogeneous set of genes implicated in ASD may ultimately converge on a few common pathways. In this review, we discuss the parallel evolution of our diagnostic and genetic understanding of autism spectrum disorders, and highlight recent attempts to infer common biology underlying this complicated syndrome. PMID:27200076

  16. The Evolving Diagnostic and Genetic Landscapes of Autism Spectrum Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Ziats, Mark N.; Rennert, Owen M.

    2016-01-01

    The autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are a heterogeneous set of neurodevelopmental syndromes defined by impairments in verbal and non-verbal communication, restricted social interaction, and the presence of stereotyped patterns of behavior. The prevalence of ASD is rising, and the diagnostic criteria and clinical perspectives on the disorder continue to evolve in parallel. Although the majority of individuals with ASD will not have an identifiable genetic cause, almost 25% of cases have identifiable causative DNA variants. The rapidly improving ability to identify genetic mutations because of advances in next generation sequencing, coupled with previous epidemiological studies demonstrating high heritability of ASD, have led to many recent attempts to identify causative genetic mutations underlying the ASD phenotype. However, although hundreds of mutations have been identified to date, they are either rare variants affecting only a handful of ASD patients, or are common variants in the general population conferring only a small risk for ASD. Furthermore, the genes implicated thus far are heterogeneous in their structure and function, hampering attempts to understand shared molecular mechanisms among all ASD patients; an understanding that is crucial for the development of targeted diagnostics and therapies. However, new work is beginning to suggest that the heterogeneous set of genes implicated in ASD may ultimately converge on a few common pathways. In this review, we discuss the parallel evolution of our diagnostic and genetic understanding of autism spectrum disorders, and highlight recent attempts to infer common biology underlying this complicated syndrome. PMID:27200076

  17. The Evolving Diagnostic and Genetic Landscapes of Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    PubMed

    Ziats, Mark N; Rennert, Owen M

    2016-01-01

    The autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are a heterogeneous set of neurodevelopmental syndromes defined by impairments in verbal and non-verbal communication, restricted social interaction, and the presence of stereotyped patterns of behavior. The prevalence of ASD is rising, and the diagnostic criteria and clinical perspectives on the disorder continue to evolve in parallel. Although the majority of individuals with ASD will not have an identifiable genetic cause, almost 25% of cases have identifiable causative DNA variants. The rapidly improving ability to identify genetic mutations because of advances in next generation sequencing, coupled with previous epidemiological studies demonstrating high heritability of ASD, have led to many recent attempts to identify causative genetic mutations underlying the ASD phenotype. However, although hundreds of mutations have been identified to date, they are either rare variants affecting only a handful of ASD patients, or are common variants in the general population conferring only a small risk for ASD. Furthermore, the genes implicated thus far are heterogeneous in their structure and function, hampering attempts to understand shared molecular mechanisms among all ASD patients; an understanding that is crucial for the development of targeted diagnostics and therapies. However, new work is beginning to suggest that the heterogeneous set of genes implicated in ASD may ultimately converge on a few common pathways. In this review, we discuss the parallel evolution of our diagnostic and genetic understanding of autism spectrum disorders, and highlight recent attempts to infer common biology underlying this complicated syndrome.

  18. Brain structure-function associations in multi-generational families genetically enriched for bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Fears, Scott C; Schür, Remmelt; Sjouwerman, Rachel; Service, Susan K; Araya, Carmen; Araya, Xinia; Bejarano, Julio; Knowles, Emma; Gomez-Makhinson, Juliana; Lopez, Maria C; Aldana, Ileana; Teshiba, Terri M; Abaryan, Zvart; Al-Sharif, Noor B; Navarro, Linda; Tishler, Todd A; Altshuler, Lori; Bartzokis, George; Escobar, Javier I; Glahn, David C; Thompson, Paul M; Lopez-Jaramillo, Carlos; Macaya, Gabriel; Molina, Julio; Reus, Victor I; Sabatti, Chiara; Cantor, Rita M; Freimer, Nelson B; Bearden, Carrie E

    2015-07-01

    Recent theories regarding the pathophysiology of bipolar disorder suggest contributions of both neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative processes. While structural neuroimaging studies indicate disease-associated neuroanatomical alterations, the behavioural correlates of these alterations have not been well characterized. Here, we investigated multi-generational families genetically enriched for bipolar disorder to: (i) characterize neurobehavioural correlates of neuroanatomical measures implicated in the pathophysiology of bipolar disorder; (ii) identify brain-behaviour associations that differ between diagnostic groups; (iii) identify neurocognitive traits that show evidence of accelerated ageing specifically in subjects with bipolar disorder; and (iv) identify brain-behaviour correlations that differ across the age span. Structural neuroimages and multi-dimensional assessments of temperament and neurocognition were acquired from 527 (153 bipolar disorder and 374 non-bipolar disorder) adults aged 18-87 years in 26 families with heavy genetic loading for bipolar disorder. We used linear regression models to identify significant brain-behaviour associations and test whether brain-behaviour relationships differed: (i) between diagnostic groups; and (ii) as a function of age. We found that total cortical and ventricular volume had the greatest number of significant behavioural associations, and included correlations with measures from multiple cognitive domains, particularly declarative and working memory and executive function. Cortical thickness measures, in contrast, showed more specific associations with declarative memory, letter fluency and processing speed tasks. While the majority of brain-behaviour relationships were similar across diagnostic groups, increased cortical thickness in ventrolateral prefrontal and parietal cortical regions was associated with better declarative memory only in bipolar disorder subjects, and not in non-bipolar disorder family

  19. Brain structure–function associations in multi-generational families genetically enriched for bipolar disorder

    PubMed Central

    Schür, Remmelt; Sjouwerman, Rachel; Service, Susan K.; Araya, Carmen; Araya, Xinia; Bejarano, Julio; Knowles, Emma; Gomez-Makhinson, Juliana; Lopez, Maria C.; Aldana, Ileana; Teshiba, Terri M.; Abaryan, Zvart; Al-Sharif, Noor B.; Navarro, Linda; Tishler, Todd A.; Altshuler, Lori; Bartzokis, George; Escobar, Javier I.; Glahn, David C.; Thompson, Paul M.; Lopez-Jaramillo, Carlos; Macaya, Gabriel; Molina, Julio; Reus, Victor I.; Sabatti, Chiara; Cantor, Rita M.; Freimer, Nelson B.; Bearden, Carrie E.

    2015-01-01

    Recent theories regarding the pathophysiology of bipolar disorder suggest contributions of both neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative processes. While structural neuroimaging studies indicate disease-associated neuroanatomical alterations, the behavioural correlates of these alterations have not been well characterized. Here, we investigated multi-generational families genetically enriched for bipolar disorder to: (i) characterize neurobehavioural correlates of neuroanatomical measures implicated in the pathophysiology of bipolar disorder; (ii) identify brain–behaviour associations that differ between diagnostic groups; (iii) identify neurocognitive traits that show evidence of accelerated ageing specifically in subjects with bipolar disorder; and (iv) identify brain–behaviour correlations that differ across the age span. Structural neuroimages and multi-dimensional assessments of temperament and neurocognition were acquired from 527 (153 bipolar disorder and 374 non-bipolar disorder) adults aged 18–87 years in 26 families with heavy genetic loading for bipolar disorder. We used linear regression models to identify significant brain–behaviour associations and test whether brain–behaviour relationships differed: (i) between diagnostic groups; and (ii) as a function of age. We found that total cortical and ventricular volume had the greatest number of significant behavioural associations, and included correlations with measures from multiple cognitive domains, particularly declarative and working memory and executive function. Cortical thickness measures, in contrast, showed more specific associations with declarative memory, letter fluency and processing speed tasks. While the majority of brain–behaviour relationships were similar across diagnostic groups, increased cortical thickness in ventrolateral prefrontal and parietal cortical regions was associated with better declarative memory only in bipolar disorder subjects, and not in non

  20. Genetic association between NRG1 and schizophrenia, major depressive disorder, bipolar disorder in Han Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Wen, Zujia; Chen, Jianhua; Khan, Raja Amjad Waheed; Song, Zhijian; Wang, Meng; Li, Zhiqiang; Shen, Jiawei; Li, Wenjin; Shi, Yongyong

    2016-04-01

    Schizophrenia, major depressive disorder, and bipolar disorder are three major psychiatric disorders affecting around 0.66%, 3.3%, and 1.5% of the Han Chinese population respectively. Several genetic linkage analyses and genome wide association studies identified NRG1 as a susceptibility gene of schizophrenia, which was validated by its role in neurodevelopment, glutamate, and other neurotransmitter receptor expression regulation. To further investigate whether NRG1 is a shared risk gene for major depressive disorder, bipolar disorder as well as schizophrenia, we performed an association study among 1,248 schizophrenia cases, 1,056 major depression cases, 1,344 bipolar disorder cases, and 1,248 controls. Totally 15 tag SNPs were genotyped and analyzed, and no population stratification was found in our sample set. Among the sites, rs4236710 (corrected Pgenotye  = 0.015) and rs4512342 (Pallele  = 0.03, Pgenotye  = 0.045 after correction) were associated with schizophrenia, and rs2919375 (corrected Pgenotye  = 0.004) was associated with major depressive disorder. The haplotype rs4512342-rs6982890 showed association with schizophrenia (P = 0.03 for haplotype "TC" after correction), and haplotype rs4531002-rs11989919 proved to be a shared risk factor for both major depressive disorder ("CC": corrected P = 0.009) and bipolar disorder ("CT": corrected P = 0.003). Our results confirmed that NRG1 was a shared common susceptibility gene for major mental disorders in Han Chinese population.

  1. The epidemiology and genetics of binge eating disorder (BED).

    PubMed

    Davis, Caroline

    2015-12-01

    This narrative review provides an overview of the epidemiology of binge eating disorder (BED), highlighting the medical history of this disorder and its entry as an independent condition in the Feeding and Eating Disorders section of the recently published Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition. Estimates of prevalence are provided, as well as recognition that the female to male ratio is lower in BED than in other eating disorders. Evidence is also provided of the most common comorbidities of BED, including mood and anxiety disorders and a range of addiction disorders. In addition, discussion of the viewpoint that BED itself may be an addiction - at least in severe cases - is presented. Although the genetic study of BED is still in its infancy, current research is reviewed with a focus on certain neurotransmitter genes that regulate brain reward mechanisms. To date, a focal point of this research has been on the dopamine and the μ-opioid receptor genes. Preliminary evidence suggests that a predisposing risk factor for BED may be a heightened sensitivity to reward, which could manifest as a strong dopamine signal in the brain's striatal region. Caution is encouraged, however, in the interpretation of current findings, since samples are relatively small in much of the research. To date, no genome-wide association studies have focused exclusively on BED.

  2. Genetic risk score analysis indicates migraine with and without comorbid depression are genetically different disorders.

    PubMed

    Ligthart, Lannie; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Lewis, Cathryn M; Farmer, Anne E; Craig, Ian W; Breen, Gerome; Willemsen, Gonneke; Vink, Jacqueline M; Middeldorp, Christel M; Byrne, Enda M; Heath, Andrew C; Madden, Pamela A F; Pergadia, Michele L; Montgomery, Grant W; Martin, Nicholas G; Penninx, Brenda W J H; McGuffin, Peter; Boomsma, Dorret I; Nyholt, Dale R

    2014-02-01

    Migraine and major depressive disorder (MDD) are comorbid, moderately heritable and to some extent influenced by the same genes. In a previous paper, we suggested the possibility of causality (one trait causing the other) underlying this comorbidity. We present a new application of polygenic (genetic risk) score analysis to investigate the mechanisms underlying the genetic overlap of migraine and MDD. Genetic risk scores were constructed based on data from two discovery samples in which genome-wide association analyses (GWA) were performed for migraine and MDD, respectively. The Australian Twin Migraine GWA study (N = 6,350) included 2,825 migraine cases and 3,525 controls, 805 of whom met the diagnostic criteria for MDD. The RADIANT GWA study (N = 3,230) included 1,636 MDD cases and 1,594 controls. Genetic risk scores for migraine and for MDD were used to predict pure and comorbid forms of migraine and MDD in an independent Dutch target sample (NTR-NESDA, N = 2,966), which included 1,476 MDD cases and 1,058 migraine cases (723 of these individuals had both disorders concurrently). The observed patterns of prediction suggest that the 'pure' forms of migraine and MDD are genetically distinct disorders. The subgroup of individuals with comorbid MDD and migraine were genetically most similar to MDD patients. These results indicate that in at least a subset of migraine patients with MDD, migraine may be a symptom or consequence of MDD.

  3. Disorder-specific genetic factors in obsessive-compulsive disorder: A comprehensive meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Steven

    2016-04-01

    Much remains to be learned about the etiology of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Twin studies suggest that it arises from both disorder-specific and non-specific genetic factors. To understand the etiology of OCD per se, it is necessary to identify disorder-specific factors. Previous research shows that OCD is associated with serotonin-related polymorphisms (5-HTTLPR coded as triallelic and HTR2A rs6311/rs6313) and, in males, a polymorphism involved in catecholamine modulation; COMT (rs4680). The present study is the first comprehensive meta-analysis to investigate whether these polymorphisms are specific to OCD. A meta-analysis was conducted for genetic association studies of OCD or any other psychiatric disorder, published in any language, in any country. A total of 551 studies were examined, of which 290 were included, consisting of 47,358 cases and 68,942 controls from case control studies, and 2,443 trios from family based studies. The main meta-analysis was limited to those disorders in which there were at least five datasets (studies or sub-studies) per disorder. Results confirmed that OCD is associated with polymorphisms of 5-HTTLPR, HTR2A, and, in males only, COMT. These polymorphisms were not associated with almost all other forms of psychopathology, including unipolar mood disorders, bipolar disorder, panic disorder, schizophrenia, and alcohol dependence. OCD, compared to most other disorders, had a significantly stronger association with particular alleles of each of the polymorphisms. Results did not differ across ancestral groups (Asian vs. Caucasian), designs (case control vs. family based), or diagnostic systems. Results suggest that the polymorphisms investigated in this study are relatively specific to OCD.

  4. Network dysfunction of emotional and cognitive processes in those at genetic risk of bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Breakspear, Michael; Roberts, Gloria; Green, Melissa J; Nguyen, Vinh T; Frankland, Andrew; Levy, Florence; Lenroot, Rhoshel; Mitchell, Philip B

    2015-11-01

    The emotional and cognitive vulnerabilities that precede the development of bipolar disorder are poorly understood. The inferior frontal gyrus-a key cortical hub for the integration of cognitive and emotional processes-exhibits both structural and functional changes in bipolar disorder, and is also functionally impaired in unaffected first-degree relatives, showing diminished engagement during inhibition of threat-related emotional stimuli. We hypothesized that this functional impairment of the inferior frontal gyrus in those at genetic risk of bipolar disorder reflects the dysfunction of broader network dynamics underlying the coordination of emotion perception and cognitive control. To test this, we studied effective connectivity in functional magnetic resonance imaging data acquired from 41 first-degree relatives of patients with bipolar disorder, 45 matched healthy controls and 55 participants with established bipolar disorder. Dynamic causal modelling was used to model the neuronal interaction between key regions associated with fear perception (the anterior cingulate), inhibition (the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex) and the region upon which these influences converge, namely the inferior frontal gyrus. Network models that embodied non-linear, hierarchical relationships were the most strongly supported by data from our healthy control and bipolar participants. We observed a marked difference in the hierarchical influence of the anterior cingulate on the effective connectivity from the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex to the inferior frontal gyrus that is unique to the at-risk cohort. Non-specific, non-hierarchical mechanisms appear to compensate for this network disturbance. We thus establish a specific network disturbance suggesting dysfunction in the processes that support hierarchical relationships between emotion and cognitive control in those at high genetic risk for bipolar disorder. PMID:26373604

  5. Network dysfunction of emotional and cognitive processes in those at genetic risk of bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Breakspear, Michael; Roberts, Gloria; Green, Melissa J; Nguyen, Vinh T; Frankland, Andrew; Levy, Florence; Lenroot, Rhoshel; Mitchell, Philip B

    2015-11-01

    The emotional and cognitive vulnerabilities that precede the development of bipolar disorder are poorly understood. The inferior frontal gyrus-a key cortical hub for the integration of cognitive and emotional processes-exhibits both structural and functional changes in bipolar disorder, and is also functionally impaired in unaffected first-degree relatives, showing diminished engagement during inhibition of threat-related emotional stimuli. We hypothesized that this functional impairment of the inferior frontal gyrus in those at genetic risk of bipolar disorder reflects the dysfunction of broader network dynamics underlying the coordination of emotion perception and cognitive control. To test this, we studied effective connectivity in functional magnetic resonance imaging data acquired from 41 first-degree relatives of patients with bipolar disorder, 45 matched healthy controls and 55 participants with established bipolar disorder. Dynamic causal modelling was used to model the neuronal interaction between key regions associated with fear perception (the anterior cingulate), inhibition (the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex) and the region upon which these influences converge, namely the inferior frontal gyrus. Network models that embodied non-linear, hierarchical relationships were the most strongly supported by data from our healthy control and bipolar participants. We observed a marked difference in the hierarchical influence of the anterior cingulate on the effective connectivity from the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex to the inferior frontal gyrus that is unique to the at-risk cohort. Non-specific, non-hierarchical mechanisms appear to compensate for this network disturbance. We thus establish a specific network disturbance suggesting dysfunction in the processes that support hierarchical relationships between emotion and cognitive control in those at high genetic risk for bipolar disorder.

  6. Incidence and Long-term Outcomes of the HIV-Neuroretinal Disorder in Patients with the Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Jabs, Douglas A.; Drye, Lea; Van Natta, Mark L.; Thorne, Jennifer E.; Holland, Gary N.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Patients with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) have an abnormality of retina/optic nerve function, manifested as decreased contrast sensitivity (in the absence of ocular opportunistic infections or media opacity), abnormalities on automated perimetry, and loss of retinal nerve fiber layer, even among those with good visual acuity, termed the HIV-neuroretinal disorder. The objectives of this study were to determine the prevalence, incidence, risk factors for, and outcomes of HIV-neuroretinal disorder. Design Prospective cohort study Participants 1822 patients with AIDS without ocular infections or media opacities. Methods Patients with HIV-neuroretinal disorder were identified by a contrast sensitivity < 1.50 log units in either eye in the absence of ocular opportunistic infections or media opacity. Main outcome measures Incidence of HIV-neuroretinal disorder, mortality, visual impairment (visual acuity 20/50 or worse), and blindness (20/200 or worse) on logarithmic visual acuity charts. Results Sixteen percent of participants had HIV-neuroretinal disorder at enrollment. The estimated cumulative incidence by 20 years after AIDS diagnosis was 51% (95% confidence interval [CI] 46%–55%). HIV-neuroretinal disorder was more common in women and African American persons. Risk factors for it included hepatitis C infection, low CD4+ T cells, and detectable HIV RNA in the blood. Patients with HIV neuroretinal disorder had a 70% excess mortality vs. those without it, even after adjusting for CD4+ T cells and HIV load (hazard ratio=1.7, 95% CI= 1.3–2.1, P<0.0001). Patients with HIV-neuroretinal disorder had increased risks of bilateral visual impairment (hazard ratio=6.5, 95% CI=2.6–10.6, P<0.0001) and blindness (hazard ratio=5.9, 95% CI=2.8–13.7, P=0.01) vs. those without HIV neuroretinal disorder. Conclusions HIV-neuroretinal disorder is a common finding among patients with AIDS, and it is associated with an increased mortality and an increased

  7. Genetic approaches to understanding post-traumatic stress disorder.

    PubMed

    Almli, Lynn M; Fani, Negar; Smith, Alicia K; Ressler, Kerry J

    2014-02-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is increasingly recognized as both a disorder of enormous mental health and societal burden, but also as an anxiety disorder that may be particularly understandable from a scientific perspective. Specifically, PTSD can be conceptualized as a disorder of fear and stress dysregulation, and the neural circuitry underlying these pathways in both animals and humans are becoming increasingly well understood. Furthermore, PTSD is the only disorder in psychiatry in which the initiating factor, the trauma exposure, can be identified. Thus, the pathophysiology of the fear and stress response underlying PTSD can be examined and potentially interrupted. Twin studies have shown that the development of PTSD following a trauma is heritable, and that genetic risk factors may account for up to 30-40% of this heritability. A current goal is to understand the gene pathways that are associated with PTSD, and how those genes act on the fear/stress circuitry to mediate risk vs. resilience for PTSD. This review will examine gene pathways that have recently been analysed, primarily through candidate gene studies (including neuroimaging studies of candidate genes), in addition to genome-wide associations and the epigenetic regulation of PTSD. Future and on-going studies are utilizing larger and collaborative cohorts to identify novel gene candidates through genome-wide association and other powerful genomic approaches. Identification of PTSD biological pathways strengthens the hope of progress in the mechanistic understanding of a model psychiatric disorder and allows for the development of targeted treatments and interventions.

  8. Nosology and classification of genetic skeletal disorders: 2015 revision.

    PubMed

    Bonafe, Luisa; Cormier-Daire, Valerie; Hall, Christine; Lachman, Ralph; Mortier, Geert; Mundlos, Stefan; Nishimura, Gen; Sangiorgi, Luca; Savarirayan, Ravi; Sillence, David; Spranger, Jürgen; Superti-Furga, Andrea; Warman, Matthew; Unger, Sheila

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of the nosology is to serve as a "master" list of the genetic disorders of the skeleton to facilitate diagnosis and to help delineate variant or newly recognized conditions. This is the 9th edition of the nosology and in comparison with its predecessor there are fewer conditions but many new genes. In previous editions, diagnoses that were phenotypically indistinguishable but genetically heterogenous were listed separately but we felt this was an unnecessary distinction. Thus the overall number of disorders has decreased from 456 to 436 but the number of groups has increased to 42 and the number of genes to 364. The nosology may become increasingly important today and tomorrow in the era of big data when the question for the geneticist is often whether a mutation identified by next generation sequencing technology in a particular gene can explain the clinical and radiological phenotype of their patient. This can be particularly difficult to answer conclusively in the prenatal setting. Personalized medicine emphasizes the importance of tailoring diagnosis and therapy to the individual but for our patients with rare skeletal disorders, the importance of tapping into a resource where genetic data can be centralized and made available should not be forgotten or underestimated. The nosology can also serve as a reference for the creation of locus-specific databases that are expected to help in delineating genotype-phenotype correlations and to harbor the information that will be gained by combining clinical observations and next generation sequencing results.

  9. Genetic Disorders of the Skeleton: A Developmental Approach

    PubMed Central

    Kornak, Uwe; Mundlos, Stefan

    2003-01-01

    Although disorders of the skeleton are individually rare, they are of clinical relevance because of their overall frequency. Many attempts have been made in the past to identify disease groups in order to facilitate diagnosis and to draw conclusions about possible underlying pathomechanisms. Traditionally, skeletal disorders have been subdivided into dysostoses, defined as malformations of individual bones or groups of bones, and osteochondrodysplasias, defined as developmental disorders of chondro-osseous tissue. In light of the recent advances in molecular genetics, however, many phenotypically similar skeletal diseases comprising the classical categories turned out not to be based on defects in common genes or physiological pathways. In this article, we present a classification based on a combination of molecular pathology and embryology, taking into account the importance of development for the understanding of bone diseases. PMID:12900795

  10. Keratinization Disorders and Genetic Aspects in Palmar and Plantar Keratodermas.

    PubMed

    Stypczyńska, Ewa; Placek, Waldemar; Zegarska, Barbara; Czajkowski, Rafał

    2016-06-01

    Palmoplantar keratoderma (PPK) is a heterogeneous group of hereditary and acquired disorders characterized by abnormal thickening of the palms and soles. There are three clinical patterns: diffuse, focal, and punctuate. Palmoplantar keratodermas can be divided into the following functional subgroups: disturbed gene functions in structural proteins (keratins), cornified envelope (loricrin, transglutaminase), cohesion (plakophilin, desmoplakin, desmoglein 1), cell-to-cell communication (connexins) and transmembrane signal transduction (cathepsin C). Unna-Thost disease is the most common variety of hereditary PPK. Mutations in keratin 1 have been reported in Unna-Thost disease. We report 12 cases in which Unna-Thost disease was diagnosed. Genealogical study demonstrated that the genodermatosis was a familial disease inherited as an autosomal dominant disorder. Dermatological examination revealed yellowish hyperkeratosis on the palms and soles. Oral mucosa, teeth, and nails remained unchanged. Histopathological examination of the biopsy sample taken from the soles of the patients showed orthokeratotic keratosis, hypergranulosis, and acanthosis without epidermolysis. PMID:27477171

  11. Keratinization Disorders and Genetic Aspects in Palmar and Plantar Keratodermas.

    PubMed

    Stypczyńska, Ewa; Placek, Waldemar; Zegarska, Barbara; Czajkowski, Rafał

    2016-06-01

    Palmoplantar keratoderma (PPK) is a heterogeneous group of hereditary and acquired disorders characterized by abnormal thickening of the palms and soles. There are three clinical patterns: diffuse, focal, and punctuate. Palmoplantar keratodermas can be divided into the following functional subgroups: disturbed gene functions in structural proteins (keratins), cornified envelope (loricrin, transglutaminase), cohesion (plakophilin, desmoplakin, desmoglein 1), cell-to-cell communication (connexins) and transmembrane signal transduction (cathepsin C). Unna-Thost disease is the most common variety of hereditary PPK. Mutations in keratin 1 have been reported in Unna-Thost disease. We report 12 cases in which Unna-Thost disease was diagnosed. Genealogical study demonstrated that the genodermatosis was a familial disease inherited as an autosomal dominant disorder. Dermatological examination revealed yellowish hyperkeratosis on the palms and soles. Oral mucosa, teeth, and nails remained unchanged. Histopathological examination of the biopsy sample taken from the soles of the patients showed orthokeratotic keratosis, hypergranulosis, and acanthosis without epidermolysis.

  12. Genetic and immunologic aspects of sleep and sleep disorders.

    PubMed

    Parish, James M

    2013-05-01

    The study of genetics is providing new and exciting insights into the pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment of disease. Both normal sleep and several types of sleep disturbances have been found to have significant genetic influences, as have traits of normal sleep, such as those evident in EEG patterns and the circadian sleep-wake cycle. The circadian sleep-wake cycle is based on a complex feedback loop of genetic transcription over a 24-h cycle. Restless legs syndrome (RLS) and periodic limb movements in sleep (PLMS) have familial aggregation, and several genes have a strong association with them. Recent genome-wide association studies have identified single nucleotide polymorphisms linked to RLS/PLMS, although none has a definite functional correlation. Narcolepsy/cataplexy are associated with HLA DQB1*0602 and a T-cell receptor α locus, although functional correlations have not been evident. Obstructive sleep apnea is a complex disorder involving multiple traits, such as anatomy of the oropharynx, ventilatory control, and traits associated with obesity. Although there is clear evidence of familial aggregation in the obstructive sleep apnea syndrome, no specific gene or locus has been identified for it. Angiotensin-converting enzyme has been proposed as a risk variant, but evidence is weak. Fatal familial insomnia and advanced sleep phase syndrome are sleep disorders with a definite genetic basis. PMID:23648914

  13. Toward a genetically-informed model of borderline personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Livesley, John

    2008-02-01

    This article describes a conceptual framework for describing borderline personality disorder (BPD) based on empirical studies of the phenotypic structure and genetic architecture of personality. The proposed phenotype has 2 components: (1) a description of core self and interpersonal pathology-the defining features of personality disorder-as these features are expressed in the disorder; and (2) a set of traits based on the anxious-dependent or emotional dysregulation factor of the four-factor model of PD. Four kinds of traits are described: emotional (anxiousness, emotional reactivity, emotional intensity, and pessimistic-anhedonia), interpersonal (submissiveness, insecure attachment, social apprehensiveness, and need for approval), cognitive (cognitive dysregulation), and self-harm (behaviors and ideas). Formulation of the phenotype was guided by the conceptualization of personality as a system of interrelated sub-systems. The psychopathology associated with BPD involves most components of the system. The trait structure of the disorder is assumed to reflect the genetic architecture of personality and individual traits are assumed to be based on adaptive mechanisms. It is suggested that borderline traits are organized around the trait of anxiousness and that an important feature of BPD is dysregulation of the threat management system leading to pervasive fearfulness and unstable emotions. The interpersonal traits are assumed to be heritable characteristics that evolved to deal with interpersonal threats that arose as a result of social living. The potential for unstable and conflicted interpersonal relationships that is inherent to the disorder is assumed to result from the interplay between the adaptive structure of personality and psychosocial adversity. The etiology of the disorder is discussed in terms of biological and environmental factors associated with each component of the phenotype.

  14. Genetic evolution of nevus of Ota reveals clonal heterogeneity acquiring BAP1 and TP53 mutations.

    PubMed

    Vivancos, Ana; Caratú, Ginevra; Matito, Judit; Muñoz, Eva; Ferrer, Berta; Hernández-Losa, Javier; Bodet, Domingo; Pérez-Alea, Mileidys; Cortés, Javier; Garcia-Patos, Vicente; Recio, Juan A

    2016-03-01

    Melanoma presents molecular alterations based on its anatomical location and exposure to environmental factors. Due to its intrinsic genetic heterogeneity, a simple snapshot of a tumor's genetic alterations does not reflect the tumor clonal complexity or specific gene-gene cooperation. Here, we studied the genetic alterations and clonal evolution of a unique patient with a Nevus of Ota that developed into a recurring uveal-like dermal melanoma. The Nevus of Ota and ulterior lesions contained GNAQ mutations were c-KIT positive, and tumors showed an increased RAS pathway activity during progression. Whole-exome sequencing of these lesions revealed the acquisition of BAP1 and TP53 mutations during tumor evolution, thereby unmasking clonal heterogeneity and allowing the identification of cooperating genes within the same tumor. Our results highlight the importance of studying tumor genetic evolution to identify cooperating mechanisms and delineate effective therapies. PMID:26701415

  15. Sexual Orientation and Gender as Factors in Socioculturally Acquired Vulnerability to Body Dissatisfaction and Eating Disorders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siever, Michael D.

    1994-01-01

    Investigated hypothesis that gay men and heterosexual women are dissatisfied with their bodies and vulnerable to eating disorders because of shared emphasis on physical attractiveness and thinness based on desire to please men. Findings from 53 lesbian, 59 gay, 62 heterosexual female, and 63 heterosexual male college students generally confirmed…

  16. Sexual orientation and gender as factors in socioculturally acquired vulnerability to body dissatisfaction and eating disorders.

    PubMed

    Siever, M D

    1994-04-01

    This study investigated the hypothesis that gay men and heterosexual women are dissatisfied with their bodies and vulnerable to eating disorders because of a shared emphasis on physical attractiveness and thinness that is based on a desire to attract and please men. Although men place priority on physical attractiveness in evaluating potential partners, women place greater emphasis on other factors, such as personality, status, power, and income. Therefore, lesbians and heterosexual men are less concerned with their own physical attractiveness and, consequently, less dissatisfied with their bodies and less vulnerable to eating disorders. Several instruments measuring body satisfaction, the importance of physical attractiveness, and symptoms of eating disorders were administered to 250 college students. The sample included 53 lesbians, 59 gay men, 62 heterosexual women, and 63 heterosexual men. Multivariate and univariate analyses of variance were used to examine the differences among the scores of lesbians, gay men, heterosexual women, and heterosexual men on these various constructs. The results generally confirmed the research hypothesis. The implications and ramifications these findings have for the understanding of both the psychology of lesbians and gay men and the prevention and treatment of eating disorders are discussed.

  17. Prevalence of transfusion-acquired hepatitis C in an Australian bleeding disorders population.

    PubMed

    Northcott, M J; Ong, W L; Walsh, M; McCarthy, P; Belleli, D; Tran, H; Street, A; Kemp, W; Davis, A K

    2013-11-01

    In Australia prior to 1992, many patients with bleeding disorders were exposed to hepatitis C through blood products. However, the incidence, complications and response to treatment of chronic hepatitis C (CHC) in this population are poorly characterized. The aim of this study was to examine the prevalence of CHC and response to treatment in an Australian bleeding disorders population. Demographic data, virological data and liver disease status from these 700 patients with inherited bleeding disorders were analysed. Of these 700 patients, 424 (61%) had been tested for CHC infection and 219 (52%) were hepatitis C antibody positive, with the prevalence approaching 100% in patients with severe bleeding disorders. Of 219 patients, 73 (33%) had received treatment for their infection with a response rate of 33/73 (45%) across all genotypes. Of 219 patients, 34 (16%) had spontaneous viral clearance. When measured with transient elastography, 44/98 (45%) patients with CHC had significant liver fibrosis and 15/98 (15%) had liver cirrhosis. Of 130 patients, 38 (29%) with CHC infection had no evidence of follow-up with an appropriate clinician in the past 2 years. This study demonstrates that testing for CHC in this population is incomplete and treatment rates are low. Given the substantial morbidity and mortality associated with CHC and new therapeutic options becoming available, it seems important to reengage patients to diagnose, offer treatment and monitor this infection. PMID:23738855

  18. Skeleton Genetics: a comprehensive database for genes and mutations related to genetic skeletal disorders

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chong; Jiang, Yi; Xu, Chenyang; Liu, Xinting; Hu, Lin; Xiang, Yanbao; Chen, Qingshuang; Chen, Denghui; Li, Huanzheng; Xu, Xueqin; Tang, Shaohua

    2016-01-01

    Genetic skeletal disorders (GSD) involving the skeletal system arises through disturbances in the complex processes of skeletal development, growth and homeostasis and remain a diagnostic challenge because of their clinical heterogeneity and genetic variety. Over the past decades, tremendous effort platforms have been made to explore the complex heterogeneity, and massive new genes and mutations have been identified in different GSD, but the information supplied by literature is still limited and it is hard to meet the further needs of scientists and clinicians. In this study, combined with Nosology and Classification of genetic skeletal disorders, we developed the first comprehensive and annotated genetic skeletal disorders database, named ‘SkeletonGenetics’, which contains information about all GSD-related knowledge including 8225 mutations in 357 genes, with detailed information associated with 481 clinical diseases (2260 clinical phenotype) classified in 42 groups defined by molecular, biochemical and/or radiographic criteria from 1698 publications. Further annotations were performed to each entry including Gene Ontology, pathways analysis, protein–protein interaction, mutation annotations, disease–disease clustering and gene–disease networking. Furthermore, using concise search methods, intuitive graphical displays, convenient browsing functions and constantly updatable features, ‘SkeletonGenetics’ could serve as a central and integrative database for unveiling the genetic and pathways pre-dispositions of GSD. Database URL: http://101.200.211.232/skeletongenetics/ PMID:27580923

  19. Acquiring a Pet Dog Significantly Reduces Stress of Primary Carers for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Prospective Case Control Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, H. F.; Hall, S.; Hames, A.; Hardiman, J.; Mills, R.; Mills, D. S.

    2015-01-01

    This study describes the impact of pet dogs on stress of primary carers of children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). Stress levels of 38 primary carers acquiring a dog and 24 controls not acquiring a dog were sampled at: Pre-intervention (17 weeks before acquiring a dog), post-intervention (3-10 weeks after acquisition) and follow-up…

  20. Famous people and genetic disorders: from monarchs to geniuses--a portrait of their genetic illnesses.

    PubMed

    Ho, Nicola C; Park, Susan S; Maragh, Kevin D; Gutter, Emily M

    2003-04-15

    Famous people with genetic disorders have always been a subject of interest because such news feeds the curiosity the public has for celebrities. It gives further insight into their lives and provides a medical basis for any unexplained or idiosyncratic feature or behavior they exhibit. It draws admiration from society of those who excel in their specialized fields despite the impositions of their genetic illnesses and also elicits sympathy even in the most casual observer. Such news certainly catapults a rare genetic disorder into the realm of public awareness. We hereby present six famous figures: King George III, Toulouse-Lautrec, Queen Victoria, Nicolo Paganini, Abraham Lincoln, and Vincent van Gogh, all of whom made a huge indelible mark in either the history of politics or that of the arts. PMID:12655501

  1. Famous people and genetic disorders: from monarchs to geniuses--a portrait of their genetic illnesses.

    PubMed

    Ho, Nicola C; Park, Susan S; Maragh, Kevin D; Gutter, Emily M

    2003-04-15

    Famous people with genetic disorders have always been a subject of interest because such news feeds the curiosity the public has for celebrities. It gives further insight into their lives and provides a medical basis for any unexplained or idiosyncratic feature or behavior they exhibit. It draws admiration from society of those who excel in their specialized fields despite the impositions of their genetic illnesses and also elicits sympathy even in the most casual observer. Such news certainly catapults a rare genetic disorder into the realm of public awareness. We hereby present six famous figures: King George III, Toulouse-Lautrec, Queen Victoria, Nicolo Paganini, Abraham Lincoln, and Vincent van Gogh, all of whom made a huge indelible mark in either the history of politics or that of the arts.

  2. Management of developmental speech and language disorders. Part 2: acquired conditions.

    PubMed

    O'Hare, Anne

    2016-03-01

    Many children who present with these acquired impairments of communication have a clear preceding event such as an acquired brain injury from a road traffic accident. Children often respond differently in this situation to adult presentations. They may have a period of mutism when the prognosis might look poor and yet they subsequently make rapid progress and recover speech. They have greater potential for neural plasticity and language recovery, although they often have persisting difficulties in oral and written language. Alternatively, there may be a presentation with a paroxysmal event such as a seizure or a period of depressed consciousness, and the unusual behaviour that may accompany dysphasia and dysarthria may be misinterpreted in the child, whereas for the adult with the more common 'stroke-like' presentation, it would be immediately considered. Rarely the aphasia/dysphasia may itself be the paroxysmal event where actually recognising that the child's disrupted communication is the basis of any observed behaviours can be the greater challenge. PMID:25990500

  3. Management of developmental speech and language disorders. Part 2: acquired conditions.

    PubMed

    O'Hare, Anne

    2016-03-01

    Many children who present with these acquired impairments of communication have a clear preceding event such as an acquired brain injury from a road traffic accident. Children often respond differently in this situation to adult presentations. They may have a period of mutism when the prognosis might look poor and yet they subsequently make rapid progress and recover speech. They have greater potential for neural plasticity and language recovery, although they often have persisting difficulties in oral and written language. Alternatively, there may be a presentation with a paroxysmal event such as a seizure or a period of depressed consciousness, and the unusual behaviour that may accompany dysphasia and dysarthria may be misinterpreted in the child, whereas for the adult with the more common 'stroke-like' presentation, it would be immediately considered. Rarely the aphasia/dysphasia may itself be the paroxysmal event where actually recognising that the child's disrupted communication is the basis of any observed behaviours can be the greater challenge.

  4. Acquired Fanconi syndrome is an indolent disorder in the absence of overt multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Ma, Cynthia X; Lacy, Martha Q; Rompala, John F; Dispenzieri, Angela; Rajkumar, S Vincent; Greipp, Philip R; Fonseca, Rafael; Kyle, Robert A; Gertz, Morie A

    2004-07-01

    Adult-acquired Fanconi syndrome (FS) is a rare complication of monoclonal gammopathy. We retrospectively reviewed 32 patients diagnosed with adult-acquired FS between April 1968 and June 2002 at Mayo Clinic (Rochester, MN). At diagnosis, most patients had monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) or smoldering multiple myeloma (SMM), with a median creatinine level of 176.8 microM (2.0 mg/dL; range, 79.56-327.08 microM [0.9-3.7 mg/dL]) and evidence of osteomalacia. During the average 65 months (range, 2-238 months) of follow-up, 5 patients developed end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and only 1 of 14 patients with MGUS transformed to multiple myeloma (MM). Also, 14 deaths occurred, with only 1 from ESRD but 4 from alkylator-related leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome. Chemotherapy offered little benefit on renal functions of MGUS or SMM patients. In conclusion, FS associated with monoclonal gammopathy does not appear to confer an additional risk of subsequent evolution to MM. ESRD occurs late in the disease process. PMID:15010372

  5. The anatomical foundations of acquired reading disorders: a neuropsychological verification of the dual-route model of reading.

    PubMed

    Ripamonti, E; Aggujaro, S; Molteni, F; Zonca, G; Frustaci, M; Luzzatti, C

    2014-07-01

    In this study we investigated the neural correlates of acquired reading disorders through an anatomo-correlative procedure of the lesions of 59 focal brain damaged patients suffering from acquired surface, phonological, deep, undifferentiated dyslexia and pure alexia. Two reading tasks, one of words and nonwords and one of words with unpredictable stress position, were used for this study. We found that surface dyslexia was predominantly associated with left temporal lesions, while in phonological dyslexia the lesions overlapped in the left insula and the left inferior frontal gyrus (pars opercularis) and that pure alexia was associated with lesions in the left fusiform gyrus. A number of areas and white matter tracts, which seemed to involve processing along both the lexical and the sublexical routes, were identified for undifferentiated dyslexia. Two cases of deep dyslexia with relatively dissimilar anatomical correlates were studied, one compatible with Coltheart's right-hemisphere hypothesis (1980) whereas the other could be interpreted in the context of Morton and Patterson's (1980), multiply-damaged left-hemisphere hypothesis. In brief, the results of this study are only partially consistent with the current state of the art, and propose new and stimulating challenges; indeed, based on these results we suggest that different types of acquired dyslexia may ensue after different cortical damage, but white matter disconnection may play a crucial role in some cases.

  6. Early-onset acquired epileptic aphasia (Landau-Kleffner syndrome, LKS) and regressive autistic disorders with epileptic EEG abnormalities: the continuing debate.

    PubMed

    Deonna, Thierry; Roulet-Perez, Eliane

    2010-10-01

    Early-onset acquired epileptic aphasia (Landau-Kleffner syndrome) may present as a developmental language disturbance and the affected child may also exhibit autistic features. Landau-Kleffner is now seen as the rare and severe end of a spectrum of cognitive-behavioural symptoms that can be seen in idiopathic (genetic) focal epilepsies of childhood, the benign end being the more frequent typical rolandic epilepsy. Several recent studies show that many children with rolandic epilepsy have minor developmental cognitive and behavioural problems and that some undergo a deterioration (usually temporary) in these domains, the so-called "atypical" forms of the syndrome. The severity and type of deterioration correlate with the site and spread of the epileptic spikes recorded on the electroencephalogram within the perisylvian region, and continuous spike-waves during sleep (CSWS) frequently occur during this period of the epileptic disorder. Some of these children have more severe preexisting communicative and language developmental disorders. If early stagnation or regression occurs in these domains, it presumably reflects epileptic activity in networks outside the perisylvian area, i.e. those involved in social cognition and emotions. Longitudinal studies will be necessary to find out if and how much the bioelectrical abnormalities play a causal role in these subgroup of children with both various degrees of language and autistic regression and features of idiopathic focal epilepsy. One has to remember that it took nearly 40 years to fully acknowledge the epileptic origin of aphasia in Landau-Kleffner syndrome and the milder acquired cognitive problems in rolandic epilepsies.

  7. Uncovering cortico-striatal correlates of cognitive fatigue in pediatric acquired brain disorder: Evidence from traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Nicholas P; Beauchamp, Miriam H; Beare, Richard; Coleman, Lee; Ditchfield, Michael; Kean, Michael; Silk, Timothy J; Genc, Sila; Catroppa, Cathy; Anderson, Vicki A

    2016-10-01

    Cognitive fatigue is among the most profound and disabling sequelae of pediatric acquired brain disorders, however the neural correlates of these symptoms in children remains unexplored. One hypothesis suggests that cognitive fatigue may arise from dysfunction of cortico-striatal networks (CSNs) implicated in effort output and outcome valuation. Using pediatric traumatic brain injury (TBI) as a model, this study investigated (i) the sub-acute effect of brain injury on CSN volume; and (ii) potential relationships between cognitive fatigue and sub-acute volumetric abnormalities of the CSN. 3D T1 weighted magnetic resonance imaging sequences were acquired sub-acutely in 137 children (TBI: n = 103; typically developing - TD children: n = 34). 67 of the original 137 participants (49%) completed measures of cognitive fatigue and psychological functioning at 24-months post-injury. Results showed that compared to TD controls and children with milder injuries, children with severe TBI showed volumetric reductions in the overall CSN package, as well as regional gray matter volumetric change in cortical and subcortical regions of the CSN. Significantly greater cognitive fatigue in the TBI patients was associated with volumetric reductions in the CSN and its putative hub regions, even after adjusting for injury severity, socioeconomic status (SES) and depression. In the first study to evaluate prospective neuroanatomical correlates of cognitive fatigue in pediatric acquired brain disorder, these findings suggest that post-injury cognitive fatigue is related to structural abnormalities of cortico-striatal brain networks implicated in effort output and outcome valuation. Morphometric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may have potential to unlock early prognostic markers that may assist to identify children at elevated risk for cognitive fatigue post-TBI.

  8. Genetic relationship between five psychiatric disorders estimated from genome-wide SNPs

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Most psychiatric disorders are moderately to highly heritable. The degree to which genetic variation is unique to individual disorders or shared across disorders is unclear. To examine shared genetic etiology, we use genome-wide genotype data from the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium (PGC) for cases and controls in schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, major depressive disorder, autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). We apply univariate and bivariate methods for the estimation of genetic variation within and covariation between disorders. SNPs explained 17–29% of the variance in liability. The genetic correlation calculated using common SNPs was high between schizophrenia and bipolar disorder (0.68 ± 0.04 s.e.), moderate between schizophrenia and major depressive disorder (0.43 ± 0.06 s.e.), bipolar disorder and major depressive disorder (0.47 ± 0.06 s.e.), and ADHD and major depressive disorder (0.32 ± 0.07 s.e.), low between schizophrenia and ASD (0.16 ± 0.06 s.e.) and non-significant for other pairs of disorders as well as between psychiatric disorders and the negative control of Crohn’s disease. This empirical evidence of shared genetic etiology for psychiatric disorders can inform nosology and encourages the investigation of common pathophysiologies for related disorders. PMID:23933821

  9. Genetic relationship between five psychiatric disorders estimated from genome-wide SNPs.

    PubMed

    Lee, S Hong; Ripke, Stephan; Neale, Benjamin M; Faraone, Stephen V; Purcell, Shaun M; Perlis, Roy H; Mowry, Bryan J; Thapar, Anita; Goddard, Michael E; Witte, John S; Absher, Devin; Agartz, Ingrid; Akil, Huda; Amin, Farooq; Andreassen, Ole A; Anjorin, Adebayo; Anney, Richard; Anttila, Verneri; Arking, Dan E; Asherson, Philip; Azevedo, Maria H; Backlund, Lena; Badner, Judith A; Bailey, Anthony J; Banaschewski, Tobias; Barchas, Jack D; Barnes, Michael R; Barrett, Thomas B; Bass, Nicholas; Battaglia, Agatino; Bauer, Michael; Bayés, Mònica; Bellivier, Frank; Bergen, Sarah E; Berrettini, Wade; Betancur, Catalina; Bettecken, Thomas; Biederman, Joseph; Binder, Elisabeth B; Black, Donald W; Blackwood, Douglas H R; Bloss, Cinnamon S; Boehnke, Michael; Boomsma, Dorret I; Breen, Gerome; Breuer, René; Bruggeman, Richard; Cormican, Paul; Buccola, Nancy G; Buitelaar, Jan K; Bunney, William E; Buxbaum, Joseph D; Byerley, William F; Byrne, Enda M; Caesar, Sian; Cahn, Wiepke; Cantor, Rita M; Casas, Miguel; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Chambert, Kimberly; Choudhury, Khalid; Cichon, Sven; Cloninger, C Robert; Collier, David A; Cook, Edwin H; Coon, Hilary; Cormand, Bru; Corvin, Aiden; Coryell, William H; Craig, David W; Craig, Ian W; Crosbie, Jennifer; Cuccaro, Michael L; Curtis, David; Czamara, Darina; Datta, Susmita; Dawson, Geraldine; Day, Richard; De Geus, Eco J; Degenhardt, Franziska; Djurovic, Srdjan; Donohoe, Gary J; Doyle, Alysa E; Duan, Jubao; Dudbridge, Frank; Duketis, Eftichia; Ebstein, Richard P; Edenberg, Howard J; Elia, Josephine; Ennis, Sean; Etain, Bruno; Fanous, Ayman; Farmer, Anne E; Ferrier, I Nicol; Flickinger, Matthew; Fombonne, Eric; Foroud, Tatiana; Frank, Josef; Franke, Barbara; Fraser, Christine; Freedman, Robert; Freimer, Nelson B; Freitag, Christine M; Friedl, Marion; Frisén, Louise; Gallagher, Louise; Gejman, Pablo V; Georgieva, Lyudmila; Gershon, Elliot S; Geschwind, Daniel H; Giegling, Ina; Gill, Michael; Gordon, Scott D; Gordon-Smith, Katherine; Green, Elaine K; Greenwood, Tiffany A; Grice, Dorothy E; Gross, Magdalena; Grozeva, Detelina; Guan, Weihua; Gurling, Hugh; De Haan, Lieuwe; Haines, Jonathan L; Hakonarson, Hakon; Hallmayer, Joachim; Hamilton, Steven P; Hamshere, Marian L; Hansen, Thomas F; Hartmann, Annette M; Hautzinger, Martin; Heath, Andrew C; Henders, Anjali K; Herms, Stefan; Hickie, Ian B; Hipolito, Maria; Hoefels, Susanne; Holmans, Peter A; Holsboer, Florian; Hoogendijk, Witte J; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Hultman, Christina M; Hus, Vanessa; Ingason, Andrés; Ising, Marcus; Jamain, Stéphane; Jones, Edward G; Jones, Ian; Jones, Lisa; Tzeng, Jung-Ying; Kähler, Anna K; Kahn, René S; Kandaswamy, Radhika; Keller, Matthew C; Kennedy, James L; Kenny, Elaine; Kent, Lindsey; Kim, Yunjung; Kirov, George K; Klauck, Sabine M; Klei, Lambertus; Knowles, James A; Kohli, Martin A; Koller, Daniel L; Konte, Bettina; Korszun, Ania; Krabbendam, Lydia; Krasucki, Robert; Kuntsi, Jonna; Kwan, Phoenix; Landén, Mikael; Långström, Niklas; Lathrop, Mark; Lawrence, Jacob; Lawson, William B; Leboyer, Marion; Ledbetter, David H; Lee, Phil H; Lencz, Todd; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Levinson, Douglas F; Lewis, Cathryn M; Li, Jun; Lichtenstein, Paul; Lieberman, Jeffrey A; Lin, Dan-Yu; Linszen, Don H; Liu, Chunyu; Lohoff, Falk W; Loo, Sandra K; Lord, Catherine; Lowe, Jennifer K; Lucae, Susanne; MacIntyre, Donald J; Madden, Pamela A F; Maestrini, Elena; Magnusson, Patrik K E; Mahon, Pamela B; Maier, Wolfgang; Malhotra, Anil K; Mane, Shrikant M; Martin, Christa L; Martin, Nicholas G; Mattheisen, Manuel; Matthews, Keith; Mattingsdal, Morten; McCarroll, Steven A; McGhee, Kevin A; McGough, James J; McGrath, Patrick J; McGuffin, Peter; McInnis, Melvin G; McIntosh, Andrew; McKinney, Rebecca; McLean, Alan W; McMahon, Francis J; McMahon, William M; McQuillin, Andrew; Medeiros, Helena; Medland, Sarah E; Meier, Sandra; Melle, Ingrid; Meng, Fan; Meyer, Jobst; Middeldorp, Christel M; Middleton, Lefkos; Milanova, Vihra; Miranda, Ana; Monaco, Anthony P; Montgomery, Grant W; Moran, Jennifer L; Moreno-De-Luca, Daniel; Morken, Gunnar; Morris, Derek W; Morrow, Eric M; Moskvina, Valentina; Muglia, Pierandrea; Mühleisen, Thomas W; Muir, Walter J; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Murtha, Michael; Myers, Richard M; Myin-Germeys, Inez; Neale, Michael C; Nelson, Stan F; Nievergelt, Caroline M; Nikolov, Ivan; Nimgaonkar, Vishwajit; Nolen, Willem A; Nöthen, Markus M; Nurnberger, John I; Nwulia, Evaristus A; Nyholt, Dale R; O'Dushlaine, Colm; Oades, Robert D; Olincy, Ann; Oliveira, Guiomar; Olsen, Line; Ophoff, Roel A; Osby, Urban; Owen, Michael J; Palotie, Aarno; Parr, Jeremy R; Paterson, Andrew D; Pato, Carlos N; Pato, Michele T; Penninx, Brenda W; Pergadia, Michele L; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A; Pickard, Benjamin S; Pimm, Jonathan; Piven, Joseph; Posthuma, Danielle; Potash, James B; Poustka, Fritz; Propping, Peter; Puri, Vinay; Quested, Digby J; Quinn, Emma M; Ramos-Quiroga, Josep Antoni; Rasmussen, Henrik B; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Rehnström, Karola; Reif, Andreas; Ribasés, Marta; Rice, John P; Rietschel, Marcella; Roeder, Kathryn; Roeyers, Herbert; Rossin, Lizzy; Rothenberger, Aribert; Rouleau, Guy; Ruderfer, Douglas; Rujescu, Dan; Sanders, Alan R; Sanders, Stephan J; Santangelo, Susan L; Sergeant, Joseph A; Schachar, Russell; Schalling, Martin; Schatzberg, Alan F; Scheftner, William A; Schellenberg, Gerard D; Scherer, Stephen W; Schork, Nicholas J; Schulze, Thomas G; Schumacher, Johannes; Schwarz, Markus; Scolnick, Edward; Scott, Laura J; Shi, Jianxin; Shilling, Paul D; Shyn, Stanley I; Silverman, Jeremy M; Slager, Susan L; Smalley, Susan L; Smit, Johannes H; Smith, Erin N; Sonuga-Barke, Edmund J S; St Clair, David; State, Matthew; Steffens, Michael; Steinhausen, Hans-Christoph; Strauss, John S; Strohmaier, Jana; Stroup, T Scott; Sutcliffe, James S; Szatmari, Peter; Szelinger, Szabocls; Thirumalai, Srinivasa; Thompson, Robert C; Todorov, Alexandre A; Tozzi, Federica; Treutlein, Jens; Uhr, Manfred; van den Oord, Edwin J C G; Van Grootheest, Gerard; Van Os, Jim; Vicente, Astrid M; Vieland, Veronica J; Vincent, John B; Visscher, Peter M; Walsh, Christopher A; Wassink, Thomas H; Watson, Stanley J; Weissman, Myrna M; Werge, Thomas; Wienker, Thomas F; Wijsman, Ellen M; Willemsen, Gonneke; Williams, Nigel; Willsey, A Jeremy; Witt, Stephanie H; Xu, Wei; Young, Allan H; Yu, Timothy W; Zammit, Stanley; Zandi, Peter P; Zhang, Peng; Zitman, Frans G; Zöllner, Sebastian; Devlin, Bernie; Kelsoe, John R; Sklar, Pamela; Daly, Mark J; O'Donovan, Michael C; Craddock, Nicholas; Sullivan, Patrick F; Smoller, Jordan W; Kendler, Kenneth S; Wray, Naomi R

    2013-09-01

    Most psychiatric disorders are moderately to highly heritable. The degree to which genetic variation is unique to individual disorders or shared across disorders is unclear. To examine shared genetic etiology, we use genome-wide genotype data from the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium (PGC) for cases and controls in schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, major depressive disorder, autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). We apply univariate and bivariate methods for the estimation of genetic variation within and covariation between disorders. SNPs explained 17-29% of the variance in liability. The genetic correlation calculated using common SNPs was high between schizophrenia and bipolar disorder (0.68 ± 0.04 s.e.), moderate between schizophrenia and major depressive disorder (0.43 ± 0.06 s.e.), bipolar disorder and major depressive disorder (0.47 ± 0.06 s.e.), and ADHD and major depressive disorder (0.32 ± 0.07 s.e.), low between schizophrenia and ASD (0.16 ± 0.06 s.e.) and non-significant for other pairs of disorders as well as between psychiatric disorders and the negative control of Crohn's disease. This empirical evidence of shared genetic etiology for psychiatric disorders can inform nosology and encourages the investigation of common pathophysiologies for related disorders. PMID:23933821

  10. Technological applications in the assessment of acquired neurogenic communication and swallowing disorders in adults.

    PubMed

    Hallowell, B; Katz, R C

    1999-01-01

    The role of technology is expanding rapidly in many aspects of the diagnostic process with patients who have neurogenic communication and swallowing disorders. In this article we discuss a broad selection of technological tools that enhance a wide range of diagnostic tasks, such as taking case histories, administering and scoring tests, performing acoustic, physiologic, cognitive, and linguistic analyses, making normative comparisons, profiling diagnostic results, and making diagnostic decisions. Clinicians are encouraged to scrutinize the relative value of all diagnostic tools to maintaining the quality of service. An appendix includes information for contacting vendors and manufacturers of the products discussed.

  11. Ethical and legal issues arising from complex genetic disorders. DOE final report

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, Lori

    2002-10-09

    The project analyzed the challenges raised by complex genetic disorders in genetic counselling, for clinical practice, for public health, for quality assurance, and for protection against discrimination. The research found that, in some settings, solutions created in the context of single gene disorders are more difficult to apply to complex disorders. In other settings, the single gene solutions actually backfired and created additional problems when applied to complex genetic disorders. The literature of five common, complex genetic disorders--Alzheimer's, asthma, coronary heart disease, diabetes, and psychiatric illnesses--was evaluated in depth.

  12. Neurocognitive-genetic and neuroimaging-genetic research paradigms in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Kurnianingsih, Yoanna Arlina; Kuswanto, Carissa Nadia; McIntyre, Roger S; Qiu, Anqi; Ho, Beng Choon; Sim, Kang

    2011-11-01

    Studies examining intermediate phenotypes such as neurocognitive and neuroanatomical measures along with susceptibility genes are important for improving our understanding of the neural basis of schizophrenia (SZ) and bipolar disorder (BD). In this paper, we review extant studies involving neurocognitive-genetic and neuroimaging-genetic perspectives and particularly related to catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and neuregulin-1 (NRG1) genes in SZ and BD. In terms of neurocognitive-genetic investigations, COMT and BDNF are the two most studied candidate genes especially in patients with SZ. Whereas BDNF Met carriers perform worse on verbal working memory, problem solving and visuo-spatial abilities, COMT Met carriers perform better in working memory, attention, executive functioning with evidence of genotype by diagnosis interactions including high-risk individuals. In terms of genetic-structural MRI studies, patients with SZ are found to have reductions in the frontal, temporal, parietal cortices, and limbic regions, which are associated with BDNF, COMT, and NRGI genes. Genetic-functional MRI studies in psychotic disorders are sparse, especially with regard to BD. These neurocognitive and neuroimaging findings are associated with genes which are implicated in functional pathways related to neuronal signaling, inter-neuronal communication and neuroplasticity. PMID:21688113

  13. Curiouser and curiouser: genetic disorders of cortical specialization.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Kevin J

    2011-06-01

    The processes by which cortical areas become specialized for high-level cognitive functions may be revealed by the study of familial developmental disorders such as dyslexia, dyscalculia, prosopagnosia, color agnosia and amusia. These disorders are characterised by the inability to integrate information across multiple areas and the consequent failure to develop representations of the knowledge of some category based on its associated attributes. In contrast, synesthesia may be seen as a hyper-associative condition, possibly due to a failure to properly segregate areas into distinct networks. Here, I consider recent advances in our understanding of the genetic and neurobiological bases of these conditions and the developmental mechanisms underlying the specialization of cortical areas and networks. PMID:21296568

  14. Genetic disorders involving molecular-chaperone genes: a perspective.

    PubMed

    Macario, Alberto J L; Grippo, Tomas M; Conway de Macario, Everly

    2005-01-01

    Molecular chaperones are important for maintaining a functional set of proteins in all cellular compartments. Together with protein degradation machineries (e.g., the ubiquitin-proteasome system), chaperones form the core of the cellular protein-quality control mechanism. Chaperones are proteins, and as such, they can be affected by mutations. At least 15 disorders have been identified that are associated with mutations in genes encoding chaperones, or molecules with features suggesting that they function as chaperones. These chaperonopathies and a few other candidates are presented in this article. In most cases, the mechanisms by which the defective genes contribute to the observed phenotypes are still uncharacterized. However, the reported observations definitely point to the possibility that abnormal chaperones participate in pathogenesis. The available data open novel perspectives and should encourage searches for new genetic chaperonopathies, as well as further analyses of the disorders discussed in this article, including detection of new cases.

  15. Human Genetic Disorders and Knockout Mice Deficient in Glycosaminoglycan

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) are constructed through the stepwise addition of respective monosaccharides by various glycosyltransferases and maturated by epimerases and sulfotransferases. The structural diversity of GAG polysaccharides, including their sulfation patterns and sequential arrangements, is essential for a wide range of biological activities such as cell signaling, cell proliferation, tissue morphogenesis, and interactions with various growth factors. Studies using knockout mice of enzymes responsible for the biosynthesis of the GAG side chains of proteoglycans have revealed their physiological functions. Furthermore, mutations in the human genes encoding glycosyltransferases, sulfotransferases, and related enzymes responsible for the biosynthesis of GAGs cause a number of genetic disorders including chondrodysplasia, spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia, and Ehlers-Danlos syndromes. This review focused on the increasing number of glycobiological studies on knockout mice and genetic diseases caused by disturbances in the biosynthetic enzymes for GAGs. PMID:25126564

  16. Down syndrome--genetic and nutritional aspects of accompanying disorders.

    PubMed

    Mazurek, Dominika; Wyka, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is one of the more commonly occurring genetic disorders, where mental retardation is combined with nutritional diseases. It is caused by having a third copy of chromosome 21, and there exist 3 forms; Simple Trisomy 21, Translocation Trisomy and Mosaic Trisomy. Symptoms include intellectual disability/mental retardation, early onset of Alzheimer's disease and the appearance of various phenotypic features such as narrow slanted eyes, flat nose and short stature. In addition, there are other health problems throughout the body, consisting in part of cardiac defects and thyroid function abnormalities along with nutritional disorders (ie. overweight, obesity, hypercholesterolemia and deficiencies of vitamins and minerals). Those suffering DS have widespread body frame abnormalities and impaired brain development and function; the latter leading to impaired intellectual development. Many studies indicate excessive or deficient nutrient uptakes associated with making inappropriate foodstuff choices, food intolerance, (eg. celiac disease) or malabsorption. DS persons with overweight or obesity are linked with a slow metabolic rate, abnormal blood leptin concentrations and exhibit low levels of physical activity. Vitamin B group deficiencies and abnormal blood homocysteine levels decrease the rate of intellectual development in DS cases. Zinc deficiencies result in short stature, thyroid function disorders and an increased appetite caused by excessive supplementation. Scientific advances in the research and diagnosis of DS, as well as preventing any associated conditions, have significantly increased life expectancies of those with this genetic disorder. Early dietary interventions by parents or guardians of DS children afford an opportunity for decreasing the risk or delaying some of the DS associated conditions from appearing, thus beneficially impacting on their quality of life.

  17. Down syndrome--genetic and nutritional aspects of accompanying disorders.

    PubMed

    Mazurek, Dominika; Wyka, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is one of the more commonly occurring genetic disorders, where mental retardation is combined with nutritional diseases. It is caused by having a third copy of chromosome 21, and there exist 3 forms; Simple Trisomy 21, Translocation Trisomy and Mosaic Trisomy. Symptoms include intellectual disability/mental retardation, early onset of Alzheimer's disease and the appearance of various phenotypic features such as narrow slanted eyes, flat nose and short stature. In addition, there are other health problems throughout the body, consisting in part of cardiac defects and thyroid function abnormalities along with nutritional disorders (ie. overweight, obesity, hypercholesterolemia and deficiencies of vitamins and minerals). Those suffering DS have widespread body frame abnormalities and impaired brain development and function; the latter leading to impaired intellectual development. Many studies indicate excessive or deficient nutrient uptakes associated with making inappropriate foodstuff choices, food intolerance, (eg. celiac disease) or malabsorption. DS persons with overweight or obesity are linked with a slow metabolic rate, abnormal blood leptin concentrations and exhibit low levels of physical activity. Vitamin B group deficiencies and abnormal blood homocysteine levels decrease the rate of intellectual development in DS cases. Zinc deficiencies result in short stature, thyroid function disorders and an increased appetite caused by excessive supplementation. Scientific advances in the research and diagnosis of DS, as well as preventing any associated conditions, have significantly increased life expectancies of those with this genetic disorder. Early dietary interventions by parents or guardians of DS children afford an opportunity for decreasing the risk or delaying some of the DS associated conditions from appearing, thus beneficially impacting on their quality of life. PMID:26400113

  18. Application of Genetic/Genomic Approaches to Allergic Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Baye, Tesfaye M.; Martin, Lisa J.; Khurana Hershey, Gurjit K.

    2010-01-01

    Completion of the human genome project and rapid progress in genetics and bioinformatics have enabled the development of large public databases, which include genetic and genomic data linked to clinical health data. With the massive amount of information available, clinicians and researchers have the unique opportunity to complement and integrate their daily practice with the existing resources to clarify the underlying etiology of complex phenotypes such as allergic diseases. The genome itself is now often utilized as a starting point for many studies and multiple innovative approaches have emerged applying genetic/genomic strategies to key questions in the field of allergy and immunology. There have been several successes, which have uncovered new insights into the biologic underpinnings of allergic disorders. Herein, we will provide an in depth review of genomic approaches to identifying genes and biologic networks involved in allergic diseases. We will discuss genetic and phenotypic variation, statistical approaches for gene discovery, public databases, functional genomics, clinical implications, and the challenges that remain. PMID:20638111

  19. Neuromuscular disorders: genes, genetic counseling and therapeutic trials

    PubMed Central

    Zatz, Mayana; Passos-Bueno, Maria Rita; Vainzof, Mariz

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Neuromuscular disorders (NMD) are a heterogeneous group of genetic conditions, with autosomal dominant, recessive, or X-linked inheritance. They are characterized by progressive muscle degeneration and weakness. Here, we are presenting our major contributions to the field during the past 30 years. We have mapped and identified several novel genes responsible for NMD. Genotype-phenotype correlations studies enhanced our comprehension on the effect of gene mutations on related proteins and their impact on clinical findings. The search for modifier factors allowed the identification of a novel "protective"; variant which may have important implication on therapeutic developments. Molecular diagnosis was introduced in the 1980s and new technologies have been incorporated since then. Next generation sequencing greatly improved our capacity to identify disease-causing mutations with important benefits for research and prevention through genetic counseling of patients' families. Stem cells researches, from and for patients, have been used as tools to study human genetic diseases mechanisms and for therapies development. The clinical effect of preclinical trials in mice and canine models for muscular dystrophies are under investigation. Finally, the integration of our researches and genetic services with our post-graduation program resulted in a significant output of new geneticists, spreading out this expertise to our large country. PMID:27575431

  20. Neuromuscular disorders: genes, genetic counseling and therapeutic trials.

    PubMed

    Zatz, Mayana; Passos-Bueno, Maria Rita; Vainzof, Mariz

    2016-01-01

    Neuromuscular disorders (NMD) are a heterogeneous group of genetic conditions, with autosomal dominant, recessive, or X-linked inheritance. They are characterized by progressive muscle degeneration and weakness. Here, we are presenting our major contributions to the field during the past 30 years. We have mapped and identified several novel genes responsible for NMD. Genotype-phenotype correlations studies enhanced our comprehension on the effect of gene mutations on related proteins and their impact on clinical findings. The search for modifier factors allowed the identification of a novel "protective"; variant which may have important implication on therapeutic developments. Molecular diagnosis was introduced in the 1980s and new technologies have been incorporated since then. Next generation sequencing greatly improved our capacity to identify disease-causing mutations with important benefits for research and prevention through genetic counseling of patients' families. Stem cells researches, from and for patients, have been used as tools to study human genetic diseases mechanisms and for therapies development. The clinical effect of preclinical trials in mice and canine models for muscular dystrophies are under investigation. Finally, the integration of our researches and genetic services with our post-graduation program resulted in a significant output of new geneticists, spreading out this expertise to our large country. PMID:27575431

  1. New developments in the genetics of bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Shinozaki, Gen; Potash, James B

    2014-11-01

    The last several years have been breakthrough ones in bipolar disorder (BPD) genetics, as the field has identified robust risk variants for the first time. Leading the way have been genome-wide association studies (GWAS) that have assessed common genetic markers across very large groups of patients and controls. These have resulted in findings in genes including ANK3, CACNA1C, SYNE1, ODZ4, and TRANK1. Additional studies have begun to examine the biology of these genes and how risk variants influence aspects of brain and behavior that underlie BPD. For example, carriers of the CACNA1C risk variant have been found to exhibit hippocampal and anterior cingulate dysfunction during episodic memory recall. This work has shed additional light on the relationship of bipolar susceptibility variants to other disorders, particularly schizophrenia. Even larger BPD GWAS are expected with samples now amassed of 21,035 cases and 28,758 controls. Studies have examined the pharmacogenomics of BPD with studies of lithium response, yielding high profile results that remain to be confirmed. The next frontier in the field is the identification of rare bipolar susceptibility variants through large-scale DNA sequencing. While only a couple of papers have been published to date, many studies are underway. The Bipolar Sequencing Consortium has been formed to bring together all of the groups working in this area, and to perform meta-analyses of the data generated. The consortium, with 13 member groups, now has exome data on ~3,500 cases and ~5,000 controls, and on ~162 families. The focus will likely shift within several years from exome data to whole genome data as costs of obtaining such data continue to drop. Gene-mapping studies are now providing clear results that provide insights into the pathophysiology of the disorder. Sequencing studies should extend this process further. Findings could eventually set the stage for rational therapeutic development. PMID:25194313

  2. Molecular genetics and animal models in autistic disorder.

    PubMed

    Andres, Christian

    2002-01-01

    Autistic disorder is a behavioural syndrome beginning before the age of 3 years and lasting over the whole lifetime. It is characterised by impaired communication, impaired social interactions, and repetitive interests and behaviour. The prevalence is about 7/10,000 taking a restrictive definition and more than 1/500 with a broader definition, including all the pervasive developmental disorders. The importance of genetic factors has been highlighted by epidemiological studies showing that autistic disorder is one of the most genetic neuropsychiatric diseases. The relative risk of first relatives is about 100-fold higher than the risk in the normal population and the concordance in monozygotic twin is about 60%. Different strategies have been applied on the track of susceptibility genes. The systematic search of linked loci led to contradictory results, in part due to the heterogeneity of the clinical definitions, to the differences in the DNA markers, and to the different methods of analysis used. An oversimplification of the inferred model is probably also cause of our disappointment. More work is necessary to give a clearer picture. One region emerges more frequently: the long arm of chromosome 7. Several candidate genes have been studied and some gave indications of association: the Reelin gene and the Wnt2 gene. Cytogenetical abnormalities are frequent at 15q11-13, the region of the Angelman and Prader-Willi syndrome. Imprinting plays an important role in this region, no candidate gene has been identified in autism. Biochemical abnormalities have been found in the serotonin system. Association and linkage studies gave no consistent results with some serotonin receptors and in the transporter, although it seems interesting to go further in the biochemical characterisation of the serotonin transporter activity, particularly in platelets, easily accessible. Two monogenic diseases have been associated with autistic disorder: tuberous sclerosis and fragile X. A

  3. Genetic linkage study of bipolar disorder and the serotonin transporter

    SciTech Connect

    Kelsoe, J.R.; Morison, M.; Mroczkowski-Parker, Z.; Bergesch, P.; Rapaport, M.H.; Mirow, A.L.

    1996-04-09

    The serotonin transporter (HTT) is an important candidate gene for the genetic transmission of bipolar disorder. It is the site of action of many antidepressants, and plays a key role in the regulation of serotonin neurotransmission. Many studies of affectively ill patients have found abnormalities in serotonin metabolism, and dysregulation of the transporter itself. The human serotonin transporter has been recently cloned and mapped to chromosome 17. We have identified a PstI RFLP at the HTT locus, and here report our examination of this polymorphism for possible linkage to bipolar disorder. Eighteen families were examined from three populations: the Old Order Amish, Iceland, and the general North American population. In addition to HTT, three other microsatellite markers were examined, which span an interval known to contain HTT. Linkage analyses were conducted under both dominant and recessive models, as well as both narrow (bipolar only) and broad (bipolar + recurrent unipolar) diagnostic models. Linkage could be excluded to HTT under all models examined. Linkage to the interval spanned by the microsatellites was similarly excluded under the dominant models. In two individual families, maximum lod scores of 1.02 and 0.84 were obtained at D17S798 and HTT, respectively. However, these data overall do not support the presence of a susceptibility locus for bipolar disorder near the serotonin transporter. 20 refs., 2 tabs.

  4. Inherited, congenital and acquired disorders by hemostasis (vascular, platelet & plasmatic phases) with repercussions in the therapeutic oral sphere

    PubMed Central

    Arrieta-Blanco, Juan J.; Martínez-López, Federico; Oñate-Cabrerizo, Daniel; Cabrerizo-Merino, Maria C.

    2014-01-01

    The hemostasis alterations, either congenital or hereditary origin, and acquired, are circumstances that hinder oral care to patients who suffer them and also generates in the professional who has to attend, high stress. Bleeding control once established and dental treatment planning, both in the aspect of preparation, as the realization of the odonto-stomatological therapeutic, has suffered updates that do need to remember certain aspects of the care of these patients. But we must not forget that the hematologist or internist who controls the patient’s medical condition, is a cornerstone for the planning and implementation of treatment plans. We must also remember that, in certain circumstances, treatment should be performed in a hospital setting. In this review, we aim to provide the odonto-stomatologist guidance on how to address the problem and provide simple and updated guidelines to apply in the treatment of these people. Key words:Hemostasis disorder, oral care protocols, haemorrhagic and thrombotic disorders, haemophilia, von willebrand disease, desmopressin, purple, thrombocytopenia, thrombocytopathies. PMID:24121923

  5. Genetics of neurocutaneous disorders: basic principles of inheritance as they apply to neurocutaneous syndromes.

    PubMed

    Dies, Kira A; Sahin, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    Neurocutaneous disorders vary widely in clinical presentation as well as genetic cause and inheritance pattern. Recent advancements in genetic research have identified many of the causal genes for neurocutaneous disorders, allowing families to receive genetic testing and genetic counseling to better understand carrier risks, recurrence risks for future generations, and reproductive options such as prenatal testing and preimplantation diagnosis. Examples of specific neurocutaneous disorders are utilized to illustrate the various inheritance patterns seen in this heterogeneous group of disorders, including autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, X-linked dominant, X-linked recessive, de novo, and somatic and germline mosaicism.

  6. Genetics of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder: A Current Review and Future Prospects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy, Florence; Hay, David A.; Bennett, Kellie S.

    2006-01-01

    While there have been significant advances in both the behaviour genetics and molecular genetics of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), researchers are now beginning to develop hypotheses about relationships between phenotypes and genetic mechanisms. Twin studies are able to model genetic, shared environmental and non-shared…

  7. Not all my fault”: Genetics, stigma, and personal responsibility for women with eating disorders

    PubMed Central

    Easter, Michele M.

    2012-01-01

    Medical researchers and clinicians increasingly understand and present eating disorders (anorexia and bulimia nervosa) as biologically-based psychiatric disorders, with genetic risk factors established by high heritability estimates in twin studies. But there has been no research on interpretation of genetic involvement by people with eating disorders, who may hold other views. Their interpretations are particularly important given the frequent presumption that biogenetic framing will reduce stigma, and recent findings that it exacerbates stigma for other mental illnesses. To identify implications of genetic framing in eating disorders, I conducted semi-structured interviews with 50 US women with a history of eating disorders (half recovered, half in treatment; interviewed 2008–9 in the USA). Interviews introduced the topic of genetics, but not stigma per se. Analysis followed the general principles of grounded theory to identify perceived implications of genetic involvement; those relevant to stigma are reported here. Most anticipated that genetic reframing would help reduce stigma from personal responsibility (i.e., blame and guilt for eating disorder as ongoing choice). A third articulated ways it could add stigma, including novel forms of stigma related to genetic essentialist effacing of social factors. Despite welcoming reductions in blame and guilt, half also worried genetic framing could hamper recovery, by encouraging fatalistic self-fulfilling prophecies and genetic excuses. This study is the first to elicit perceptions of genetic involvement by those with eating disorders, and contributes to an emerging literature on perceptions of psychiatric genetics by people with mental illness. PMID:22819736

  8. "Not all my fault": genetics, stigma, and personal responsibility for women with eating disorders.

    PubMed

    Easter, Michele M

    2012-10-01

    Medical researchers and clinicians increasingly understand and present eating disorders (anorexia and bulimia nervosa) as biologically-based psychiatric disorders, with genetic risk factors established by high heritability estimates in twin studies. But there has been no research on interpretation of genetic involvement by people with eating disorders, who may hold other views. Their interpretations are particularly important given the frequent presumption that biogenetic framing will reduce stigma, and recent findings that it exacerbates stigma for other mental illnesses. To identify implications of genetic framing in eating disorders, I conducted semi-structured interviews with 50 US women with a history of eating disorders (half recovered, half in treatment; interviewed 2008-9 in the USA). Interviews introduced the topic of genetics, but not stigma per se. Analysis followed the general principles of grounded theory to identify perceived implications of genetic involvement; those relevant to stigma are reported here. Most anticipated that genetic reframing would help reduce stigma from personal responsibility (i.e., blame and guilt for eating disorder as ongoing choice). A third articulated ways it could add stigma, including novel forms of stigma related to genetic-essentialist effacing of social factors. Despite welcoming reductions in blame and guilt, half also worried genetic framing could hamper recovery, by encouraging fatalistic self-fulfilling prophecies and genetic excuses. This study is the first to elicit perceptions of genetic involvement by those with eating disorders, and contributes to an emerging literature on perceptions of psychiatric genetics by people with mental illness.

  9. Response to lithium in bipolar disorder: clinical and genetic findings.

    PubMed

    Rybakowski, Janusz K

    2014-06-18

    The use of lithium is a cornerstone for preventing recurrences in bipolar disorder (BD). The response of patients with bipolar disorder to lithium has different levels of magnitude. About one-third of lithium-treated patients are excellent lithium responders (ELR), showing total prevention of the episodes. A number of clinical characteristics were delineated in patients with favorable response to lithium as regards to clinical course, family history of mood disorders, and psychiatric comorbidity. We have also demonstrated that temperamental features of hypomania (a hyperthymic temperament) and a lack of cognitive disorganization predict the best results of lithium prophylaxis. A degree of prevention against manic and depressive episodes has been regarded as an endophenotype for pharmacogenetic studies. The majority of data have been gathered from so-called "candidate" gene studies. The candidates were selected on the basis of neurobiology of bipolar disorder and mechanisms of lithium action including, among others, neurotransmission, intracellular signaling, neuroprotection or circadian rhythms. We demonstrated that response to lithium has been connected with the genotype of BDNF gene and serum BDNF levels and have shown that ELR have normal cognitive functions and serum BDNF levels, even after long-term duration of the illness. A number of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of BD have been also performed in recent years, some of which also focused on lithium response. The Consortium on Lithium Genetics (ConLiGen) has established the large sample for performing the genome-wide association study (GWAS) of lithium response in BD, and the first results have already been published.

  10. Host genetic factors predisposing to HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder.

    PubMed

    Kallianpur, Asha R; Levine, Andrew J

    2014-09-01

    The success of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) in transforming the lives of HIV-infected individuals with access to these drugs is tempered by the increasing threat of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) to their overall health and quality of life. Intensive investigations over the past two decades have underscored the role of host immune responses, inflammation, and monocyte-derived macrophages in HAND, but the precise pathogenic mechanisms underlying HAND remain only partially delineated. Complicating research efforts and therapeutic drug development are the sheer complexity of HAND phenotypes, diagnostic imprecision, and the growing intersection of chronic immune activation with aging-related comorbidities. Yet, genetic studies still offer a powerful means of advancing individualized care for HIV-infected individuals at risk. There is an urgent need for 1) longitudinal studies using consistent phenotypic definitions of HAND in HIV-infected subpopulations at very high risk of being adversely impacted, such as children, 2) tissue studies that correlate neuropathological changes in multiple brain regions with genomic markers in affected individuals and with changes at the RNA, epigenomic, and/or protein levels, and 3) genetic association studies using more sensitive subphenotypes of HAND. The NIH Brain Initiative and Human Connectome Project, coupled with rapidly evolving systems biology and machine learning approaches for analyzing high-throughput genetic, transcriptomic and epigenetic data, hold promise for identifying actionable biological processes and gene networks that underlie HAND. This review summarizes the current state of understanding of host genetic factors predisposing to HAND in light of past challenges and suggests some priorities for future research to advance the understanding and clinical management of HAND in the cART era. PMID:24996618

  11. Genetic and non-genetic animal models for autism spectrum disorders (ASD).

    PubMed

    Ergaz, Zivanit; Weinstein-Fudim, Liza; Ornoy, Asher

    2016-09-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is associated, in addition to complex genetic factors, with a variety of prenatal, perinatal and postnatal etiologies. We discuss the known animal models, mostly in mice and rats, of ASD that helps us to understand the etiology, pathogenesis and treatment of human ASD. We describe only models where behavioral testing has shown autistic like behaviors. Some genetic models mimic known human syndromes like fragile X where ASD is part of the clinical picture, and others are without defined human syndromes. Among the environmentally induced ASD models in rodents, the most common model is the one induced by valproic acid (VPA) either prenatally or early postnatally. VPA induces autism-like behaviors following single exposure during different phases of brain development, implying that the mechanism of action is via a general biological mechanism like epigenetic changes. Maternal infection and inflammation are also associated with ASD in man and animal models.

  12. Tooth dentin defects reflect genetic disorders affecting bone mineralization

    PubMed Central

    Vital, S. Opsahl; Gaucher, C.; Bardet, C.; Rowe, P.S.; George, A.; Linglart, A.; Chaussain, C.

    2012-01-01

    Several genetic disorders affecting bone mineralization may manifest during dentin mineralization. Dentin and bone are similar in several aspects, especially pertaining to the composition of the extracellular matrix (ECM) which is secreted by well-differentiated odontoblasts and osteoblasts, respectively. However, unlike bone, dentin is not remodelled and is not involved in the regulation of calcium and phosphate metabolism. In contrast to bone, teeth are accessible tissues with the shedding of deciduous teeth and the extractions of premolars and third molars for orthodontic treatment. The feasibility of obtaining dentin makes this a good model to study biomineralization in physiological and pathological conditions. In this review, we focus on two genetic diseases that disrupt both bone and dentin mineralization. Hypophosphatemic rickets is related to abnormal secretory proteins involved in the ECM organization of both bone and dentin, as well as in the calcium and phosphate metabolism. Osteogenesis imperfecta affects proteins involved in the local organization of the ECM. In addition, dentin examination permits evaluation of the effects of the systemic treatment prescribed to hypophosphatemic patients during growth. In conclusion, dentin constitutes a valuable tool for better understanding of the pathological processes affecting biomineralization. PMID:22296718

  13. Shared Genetic Influences on Negative Emotionality and Major Depression/Conduct Disorder Comorbidity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tackett, Jennifer L.; Waldman, Irwin D.; Van Hulle, Carol A.; Lahey, Benjamin B.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate whether genetic contributions to major depressive disorder and conduct disorder comorbidity are shared with genetic influences on negative emotionality. Method: Primary caregivers of 2,022 same- and opposite-sex twin pairs 6 to 18 years of age comprised a population-based sample. Participants were randomly selected across…

  14. The Genetics of Child Psychiatric Disorders: Focus on autism and Tourette syndrome

    PubMed Central

    State, Matthew W.

    2012-01-01

    Investigations into the genetics of child psychiatric disorders have begun to shed light on molecular and cellular mechanisms of psychopathology. The first strains of success are the result of an increasingly sophisticated appreciation of the allelic architecture of common neuropsychiatric disorders; the consolidation of large patient cohorts; the emergence of genomic tools enabling comprehensive studies of rare as well as common genetic variation; and advances in developmental neuroscience that are fueling the rapid translation of genetic findings. These issues, as well as the opportunities and challenges that now confront gene discovery efforts in genetically complex conditions, are addressed with regard to two paradigmatic childhood disorders: autism and Tourette syndrome. PMID:20955933

  15. Predictors of Outcome following Acquired Brain Injury in Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Abigail R.; DeMatt, Ellen; Salorio, Cynthia F.

    2009-01-01

    Acquired brain injury (ABI) in children and adolescents can result from multiple causes, including trauma, central nervous system infections, noninfectious disorders (epilepsy, hypoxia/ischemia, genetic/metabolic disorders), tumors, and vascular abnormalities. Prediction of outcomes is important, to target interventions, allocate resources,…

  16. Additional Evidence Is Needed to Recommend Acquiring a Dog to Families of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Response to Wright and Colleagues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crossman, Molly K.; Kazdin, Alan E.

    2016-01-01

    Caregivers of children with autism spectrum disorder are vulnerable to overstated benefits of interventions, and such overstatements are common with interventions involving animals. This response to Wright, Hall, Hames, Hardmin, Mills, the Paws Team, and Mills' (2015) article, "Acquiring a Pet Dog Significantly Reduces Stress of Primary…

  17. Tourette's Disorder: Genetic Update, Neurological Correlates, and Evidence-Based Interventions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phelps, LeAdelle

    2008-01-01

    This article provides an update of the search for genetic markers related to Tourette's Disorder. The probable neurophysiology of the disorder is reviewed. Frequently prescribed medications are related to the probable biological bases of the disorder. Behavioral interventions and assessment tools are examined. It is concluded that evidence based…

  18. Behavioral Genetics: Concepts for Research and Practice in Language Development and Disorders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilger, Jeffrey W.

    1995-01-01

    This paper is an introduction to behavioral genetics for researchers and practitioners in language development and disorders. It identifies essential concepts and applies behavioral genetic research to the language sciences. It suggests that more complex questions may be successfully addressed through behavioral genetic paradigms. Research needs…

  19. Reward deficiency syndrome: genetic aspects of behavioral disorders.

    PubMed

    Comings, D E; Blum, K

    2000-01-01

    added to the list. Like other behavioral disorders, these are polygenically inherited and each gene accounts for only a small per cent of the variance. Techniques such as the Multivariate Analysis of Associations, which simultaneously examine the contribution of multiple genes, hold promise for understanding the genetic make up of polygenic disorders.

  20. Genetic Markers in Biological Fluids for Aging-Related Major Neurocognitive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Castro-Chavira, S.A.; Fernández, T.; Nicolini, H.; Diaz-Cintra, S.; Prado-Alcalá, R.A.

    2015-01-01

    Aging-related major neurocognitive disorder (NCD), formerly named dementia, comprises of the different acquired diseases whose primary deficit is impairment in cognitive functions such as complex attention, executive function, learning and memory, language, perceptual/motor skills, and social cognition, and that are related to specific brain regions and/or networks. According to its etiology, the most common subtypes of major NCDs are due to Alzheimer’s disease (AD), vascular disease (VaD), Lewy body disease (LBD), and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). These pathologies are frequently present in mixed forms, i.e., AD plus VaD or AD plus LBD, thus diagnosed as due to multiple etiologies. In this paper, the definitions, criteria, pathologies, subtypes and genetic markers for the most common age-related major NCD subtypes are summarized. The current diagnostic criteria consider cognitive decline leading to major NCD or dementia as a progressive degenerative process with an underlying neuropathology that begins before the manifestation of symptoms. Biomarkers associated with this asymptomatic phase are being developed as accurate risk factor and biomarker assessments are fundamental to provide timely treatment since no treatments to prevent or cure NCD yet exist. Biological fluid assessment represents a safer, cheaper and less invasive method compared to contrast imaging studies to predict NCD appearance. Genetic factors particularly have a key role not only in predicting development of the disease but also the age of onset as well as the presentation of comorbidities that may contribute to the disease pathology and trigger synergistic mechanisms which may, in turn, accelerate the neurodegenerative process and its resultant behavioral and functional disorders. PMID:25731625

  1. Genetic markers in biological fluids for aging-related major neurocognitive disorder.

    PubMed

    Castro-Chavira, S A; Fernandez, T; Nicolini, H; Diaz-Cintra, S; Prado-Alcala, R A

    2015-01-01

    Aging-related major neurocognitive disorder (NCD), formerly named dementia, comprises of the different acquired diseases whose primary deficit is impairment in cognitive functions such as complex attention, executive function, learning and memory, language, perceptual/motor skills, and social cognition, and that are related to specific brain regions and/or networks. According to its etiology, the most common subtypes of major NCDs are due to Alzheimer' s disease (AD), vascular disease (VaD), Lewy body disease (LBD), and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). These pathologies are frequently present in mixed forms, i.e., AD plus VaD or AD plus LBD, thus diagnosed as due to multiple etiologies. In this paper, the definitions, criteria, pathologies, subtypes and genetic markers for the most common age-related major NCD subtypes are summarized. The current diagnostic criteria consider cognitive decline leading to major NCD or dementia as a progressive degenerative process with an underlying neuropathology that begins before the manifestation of symptoms. Biomarkers associated with this asymptomatic phase are being developed as accurate risk factor and biomarker assessments are fundamental to provide timely treatment since no treatments to prevent or cure NCD yet exist. Biological fluid assessment represents a safer, cheaper and less invasive method compared to contrast imaging studies to predict NCD appearance. Genetic factors particularly have a key role not only in predicting development of the disease but also the age of onset as well as the presentation of comorbidities that may contribute to the disease pathology and trigger synergistic mechanisms which may, in turn, accelerate the neurodegenerative process and its resultant behavioral and functional disorders. PMID:25731625

  2. Genetic findings are challenging the symptom-based diagnostic classification system of mental disorders

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, Chen

    2016-01-01

    The present diagnostic classification of mental illnesses is primarily based on symptomatology. A recent cross-disorder genome-wide association study revealed that there were genetic similarities between multiple clinically defined diagnoses (including schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, depression, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, and autism spectrum disorder) on regions of chromosomes 3p21 and 10q24 and single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within two L-type voltage-gated calcium channel subunits of CACNA1C and CACNB2. These findings suggest that the pathogenesis of these five independent disorders are related. Such cross-disorder genetic studies challenge the current symptom-based diagnostic classification of mental disorders. Researchers need to identify creative ways to bridge the gap between these two approaches to understanding and labelling mental disorders. PMID:27688643

  3. Genetic findings are challenging the symptom-based diagnostic classification system of mental disorders.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chen

    2016-02-25

    The present diagnostic classification of mental illnesses is primarily based on symptomatology. A recent cross-disorder genome-wide association study revealed that there were genetic similarities between multiple clinically defined diagnoses (including schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, depression, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, and autism spectrum disorder) on regions of chromosomes 3p21 and 10q24 and single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within two L-type voltage-gated calcium channel subunits of CACNA1C and CACNB2. These findings suggest that the pathogenesis of these five independent disorders are related. Such cross-disorder genetic studies challenge the current symptom-based diagnostic classification of mental disorders. Researchers need to identify creative ways to bridge the gap between these two approaches to understanding and labelling mental disorders. PMID:27688643

  4. Expanding the Genetic and Phenotypic Spectrum of Popliteal Pterygium Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Leslie, Elizabeth J.; O'Sullivan, James; Cunningham, Michael L.; Singh, Ankur; Goudy, Steven L.; Ababneh, Faroug; Alsubaie, Lamia; Ch'ng, Gaik-Siew; van der Laar, Ingrid M.B.H.; Hoogeboom, A. Jeannette M.; Dunnwald, Martine; Kapoor, Seema; Jiramongkolchai, Pawina; Standley, Jennifer; Manak, J. Robert; Murray, Jeffrey C.; Dixon, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    The popliteal pterygia syndromes are a distinct subset of the hundreds of Mendelian orofacial clefting syndromes. Popliteal pterygia syndromes have considerable variability in severity and in the associated phenotypic features but are all characterized by cutaneous webbing across one or more major joints, cleft lip and/or palate, syndactyly, and genital malformations. Heterozygous mutations in IRF6 cause popliteal pterygium syndrome (PPS) while homozygous mutations in RIPK4 or CHUK (IKKA) cause the more severe Bartsocas-Papas syndrome (BPS) and Cocoon syndrome, respectively. In this study we report mutations in six pedigrees with children affected with PPS or BPS. Using a combination of Sanger and exome sequencing, we report the first case of an autosomal recessive popliteal pterygium syndrome caused by homozygous mutation of IRF6 and the first case of uniparental disomy of chromosome 21 leading to a recessive disorder. We also demonstrate that mutations in RIPK4 can cause features with a range of severity along the PPS-BPS spectrum and that mutations in IKKA can cause a range of features along the BPS-Cocoon spectrum. Our findings have clinical implications for genetic counseling of families with pterygia syndromes and further implicate IRF6, RIPK4, and CHUK (IKKA) in potentially interconnected pathways governing epidermal and craniofacial development. PMID:25691407

  5. Interpreting genetics in the context of eating disorders: evidence of disease, not diversity.

    PubMed

    Easter, Michele

    2014-07-01

    How is genetic involvement interpreted for disorders whose medicalisation is contested? Framing psychiatric and behavioural disorders in terms of genetics is expected to make them seem more medical. Yet a genetic aetiology can also be used to frame behaviour as acceptable human variation, rather than a medical problem (for example, sexual orientation). I analyse responses to the idea that there is a genetic component in anorexia and bulimia nervosa (AN or BN) via semi-structured interviews with a sample of 50 women diagnosed with an eating disorder (25 had recovered). All but three volunteered that genetics would medicalise AN or BN by (i) making eating disorders seem more like 'real diseases'; implying that these disorders need (ii) professional treatment or (iii) a biologically based treatment. The results also indicate there are several counter-logics by which genetic framing could support non-medical definitions of AN or BN. I argue that genetic framing reduces perceived individual responsibility, which can support definitions of behaviour as either a reflection of disease (which entails intervention) or a reflection of normal human diversity (which does not). In the context of public scepticism as to the 'reality' of AN or BN, genetic involvement was taken as evidence of disease in ongoing negotiations about the medical and moral status of people with eating disorders.

  6. An ontology for the integration of multiple genetic disorder data sources.

    PubMed

    Gong, P; Qu, W; Feng, D D

    2005-01-01

    As a huge amount of gene disorder information is available on the Internet, there is an increasing requirement to integrate these data sources. The integration of gene disorder data sources provides an important tool in the research of life science, therapeutics, and genetic disease prevention and inhibition. The key challenge of such integration is how to deal with semantic heterogeneity of multiple information resources. The paper proposes an ontology-based approach to describe and extract the semantics of genetic disorder terminologies and provides a mechanism for sharing and reusing genetic disorder knowledge. According to this unified meta model, heterogeneous gene disorder data sources can be integrated, and a semantic middleware has the ability to do reasoning on the knowledge base of gene disorder for users and applications' various queries.

  7. Association of adoptive child's thought disorders and schizophrenia spectrum disorders with their genetic liability for schizophrenia spectrum disorders, season of birth and parental Communication Deviance.

    PubMed

    Roisko, Riikka; Wahlberg, Karl-Erik; Hakko, Helinä; Tienari, Pekka

    2015-04-30

    Joint effects of genotype and the environment have turned out to be significant in the development of psychotic disorders. The purpose of the present study was to assess the association of an adoptive child׳s thought and schizophrenia spectrum disorders with genetic and environmental risk indicators and their interactions. A subgroup of the total sample used in the Finnish Adoptive Family Study was considered in the present study. The subjects were 125 adoptees at a high (n=53) or low (n=72) genetic risk of schizophrenia spectrum disorders and their adoptive parents. The risk factors evaluated were the adoptive child's genetic risk for schizophrenia spectrum disorders, winter or spring birth and parental Communication Deviance (CD). Thought disorders in the adoptees were assessed using the Thought Disorder Index and diagnoses were made according to DSM-III-R criteria. The adoptive child׳s Thought Disorder Index was only associated with parental Communication Deviance. The adoptive child's heightened genetic risk or winter or spring birth or parental CD or their interactions did not predict the adoptee's schizophrenia spectrum disorder. The results suggest that studies taking several risk indicators and their interactions into account may change views on the mutual significance of well-known risk factors.

  8. Association of adoptive child's thought disorders and schizophrenia spectrum disorders with their genetic liability for schizophrenia spectrum disorders, season of birth and parental Communication Deviance.

    PubMed

    Roisko, Riikka; Wahlberg, Karl-Erik; Hakko, Helinä; Tienari, Pekka

    2015-04-30

    Joint effects of genotype and the environment have turned out to be significant in the development of psychotic disorders. The purpose of the present study was to assess the association of an adoptive child׳s thought and schizophrenia spectrum disorders with genetic and environmental risk indicators and their interactions. A subgroup of the total sample used in the Finnish Adoptive Family Study was considered in the present study. The subjects were 125 adoptees at a high (n=53) or low (n=72) genetic risk of schizophrenia spectrum disorders and their adoptive parents. The risk factors evaluated were the adoptive child's genetic risk for schizophrenia spectrum disorders, winter or spring birth and parental Communication Deviance (CD). Thought disorders in the adoptees were assessed using the Thought Disorder Index and diagnoses were made according to DSM-III-R criteria. The adoptive child׳s Thought Disorder Index was only associated with parental Communication Deviance. The adoptive child's heightened genetic risk or winter or spring birth or parental CD or their interactions did not predict the adoptee's schizophrenia spectrum disorder. The results suggest that studies taking several risk indicators and their interactions into account may change views on the mutual significance of well-known risk factors. PMID:25746170

  9. Genetics of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder: Informing Clinical Conceptualizations and Promoting Future Research

    PubMed Central

    Nugent, Nicole R.; Amstadter, Ananda B.; Koenen, Karestan C.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of genetic research involving post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). First, we summarize evidence for genetic influences on PTSD from family investigations. Second, we discuss the distinct contributions to our understanding of the genetics of PTSD permitted by twin studies. Finally, we summarize findings from molecular genetic studies, which have the potential to inform our understanding of underlying biological mechanisms for the development of PTSD. PMID:18412098

  10. Reward circuitry dysfunction in psychiatric and neurodevelopmental disorders and genetic syndromes: animal models and clinical findings

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    This review summarizes evidence of dysregulated reward circuitry function in a range of neurodevelopmental and psychiatric disorders and genetic syndromes. First, the contribution of identifying a core mechanistic process across disparate disorders to disease classification is discussed, followed by a review of the neurobiology of reward circuitry. We next consider preclinical animal models and clinical evidence of reward-pathway dysfunction in a range of disorders, including psychiatric disorders (i.e., substance-use disorders, affective disorders, eating disorders, and obsessive compulsive disorders), neurodevelopmental disorders (i.e., schizophrenia, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, autism spectrum disorders, Tourette’s syndrome, conduct disorder/oppositional defiant disorder), and genetic syndromes (i.e., Fragile X syndrome, Prader–Willi syndrome, Williams syndrome, Angelman syndrome, and Rett syndrome). We also provide brief overviews of effective psychopharmacologic agents that have an effect on the dopamine system in these disorders. This review concludes with methodological considerations for future research designed to more clearly probe reward-circuitry dysfunction, with the ultimate goal of improved intervention strategies. PMID:22958744

  11. Genetic Networks of Complex Disorders: from a Novel Search Engine for PubMed Article Database.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jae-Yoon; Wall, Dennis Paul

    2013-01-01

    Finding genetic risk factors of complex disorders may involve reviewing hundreds of genes or thousands of research articles iteratively, but few tools have been available to facilitate this procedure. In this work, we built a novel publication search engine that can identify target-disorder specific, genetics-oriented research articles and extract the genes with significant results. Preliminary test results showed that the output of this engine has better coverage in terms of genes or publications, than other existing applications. We consider it as an essential tool for understanding genetic networks of complex disorders.

  12. Human Genetic Disorders Caused by Mutations in Genes Encoding Biosynthetic Enzymes for Sulfated Glycosaminoglycans*

    PubMed Central

    Mizumoto, Shuji; Ikegawa, Shiro; Sugahara, Kazuyuki

    2013-01-01

    A number of genetic disorders are caused by mutations in the genes encoding glycosyltransferases and sulfotransferases, enzymes responsible for the synthesis of sulfated glycosaminoglycan (GAG) side chains of proteoglycans, including chondroitin sulfate, dermatan sulfate, and heparan sulfate. The phenotypes of these genetic disorders reflect disturbances in crucial biological functions of GAGs in human. Recent studies have revealed that mutations in genes encoding chondroitin sulfate and dermatan sulfate biosynthetic enzymes cause various disorders of connective tissues. This minireview focuses on growing glycobiological studies of recently described genetic diseases caused by disturbances in biosynthetic enzymes for sulfated GAGs. PMID:23457301

  13. The potential of genetic and gene expression analysis in the diagnosis of neuropsychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    van de Leemput, Joyce; Glatt, Stephen J; Tsuang, Ming T

    2016-06-01

    Neuropsychiatric disorders are difficult to diagnose because of phenotypic heterogeneity within and symptomatic overlap between disorders. This review describes how genomics and blood-based gene expression have shown potential as biomarkers for neuropsychiatric disorders (schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and major depressive disorder) yet also discusses how a complex genetic landscape has limited sole genetic diagnostic tools for these disorders. In addition to their potential use as classifiers for neuropsychiatric disorders, genomic and blood-based biomarkers have revealed clues to the molecular pathways contributing to etiology. A comprehensive overview of studies to date has been given, and the authors provide suggestions for steps to be taken to ultimately move the laboratory-based classifiers towards application in a clinical setting. Furthermore, they share their vision for the future of these classifiers, both in clinical application and in opening up new ways to gain insights into the underlying biology.

  14. Genetics of Autism Spectrum Disorder: Current Status and Possible Clinical Applications

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is one of the most complex behavioral disorders with a strong genetic influence. The objectives of this article are to review the current status of genetic research in ASD, and to provide information regarding the potential candidate genes, mutations, and genetic loci possibly related to pathogenesis in ASD. Investigations on monogenic causes of ASD, candidate genes among common variants, rare de novo mutations, and copy number variations are reviewed. The current possible clinical applications of the genetic knowledge and their future possibilities are highlighted. PMID:26713075

  15. Mothers' postcounseling beliefs about the causes of their children's genetic disorders.

    PubMed Central

    Weil, J

    1991-01-01

    Mothers' postcounseling beliefs about the causes of their children's genetic disorders were investigated by means of a Q-sort consisting of 54 statements of possible beliefs that were sorted into nine groups of six items each on the basis of congruence with the subject's beliefs. The subjects were well educated, knowledgeable about the genetics of their child's disorder, and indicated a high level of belief in genetic causes. Differences in beliefs were associated with differences in genetic etiology, indicating that beliefs were affected by the specific information provided in genetic counseling. Factor analysis identified a cluster of Q-sort items characterized by a highly personal relationship to the cause of the disorder (e.g., personal attributes, being selected and blessed, and God's actions). Subjects who rated these items low had a belief pattern, designated impersonal, that was consistent with a scientific worldview and that indicated psychological distancing from the cause of the child's disorder. Subjects who rated these items high, the personal belief pattern, had a mixture of scientific and nonscientific beliefs that indicated a sense of personal involvement in the cause of the child's disorder. Subjects with the two belief patterns were equally knowledgeable about the genetics of the disorder. Thus, the personal belief pattern did not appear to interfere with acceptance or understanding of the information provided in genetic counseling. PMID:1985455

  16. Genetics Home Reference: 46,XX testicular disorder of sex development

    MedlinePlus

    ... of sex development 46,XX testicular disorder of sex development Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse ... Close All Description 46,XX testicular disorder of sex development is a condition in which individuals with ...

  17. Neuroinformatic analyses of common and distinct genetic components associated with major neuropsychiatric disorders

    PubMed Central

    Lotan, Amit; Fenckova, Michaela; Bralten, Janita; Alttoa, Aet; Dixson, Luanna; Williams, Robert W.; van der Voet, Monique

    2014-01-01

    Major neuropsychiatric disorders are highly heritable, with mounting evidence suggesting that these disorders share overlapping sets of molecular and cellular underpinnings. In the current article we systematically test the degree of genetic commonality across six major neuropsychiatric disorders—attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), anxiety disorders (Anx), autistic spectrum disorders (ASD), bipolar disorder (BD), major depressive disorder (MDD), and schizophrenia (SCZ). We curated a well-vetted list of genes based on large-scale human genetic studies based on the NHGRI catalog of published genome-wide association studies (GWAS). A total of 180 genes were accepted into the analysis on the basis of low but liberal GWAS p-values (<10−5). 22% of genes overlapped two or more disorders. The most widely shared subset of genes—common to five of six disorders–included ANK3, AS3MT, CACNA1C, CACNB2, CNNM2, CSMD1, DPCR1, ITIH3, NT5C2, PPP1R11, SYNE1, TCF4, TENM4, TRIM26, and ZNRD1. Using a suite of neuroinformatic resources, we showed that many of the shared genes are implicated in the postsynaptic density (PSD), expressed in immune tissues and co-expressed in developing human brain. Using a translational cross-species approach, we detected two distinct genetic components that were both shared by each of the six disorders; the 1st component is involved in CNS development, neural projections and synaptic transmission, while the 2nd is implicated in various cytoplasmic organelles and cellular processes. Combined, these genetic components account for 20–30% of the genetic load. The remaining risk is conferred by distinct, disorder-specific variants. Our systematic comparative analysis of shared and unique genetic factors highlights key gene sets and molecular processes that may ultimately translate into improved diagnosis and treatment of these debilitating disorders. PMID:25414627

  18. Disorders of sex development: a genetic study of patients in a multidisciplinary clinic.

    PubMed

    Laino, Luigi; Majore, Silvia; Preziosi, Nicoletta; Grammatico, Barbara; De Bernardo, Carmelilia; Scommegna, Salvatore; Rapone, Anna Maria; Marrocco, Giacinto; Bottillo, Irene; Grammatico, Paola

    2014-12-01

    Sex development is a process under genetic control directing both the bi-potential gonads to become either a testis or an ovary, and the consequent differentiation of internal ducts and external genitalia. This complex series of events can be altered by a large number of genetic and non-genetic factors. Disorders of sex development (DSD) are all the medical conditions characterized by an atypical chromosomal, gonadal, or phenotypical sex. Incomplete knowledge of the genetic mechanisms involved in sex development results in a low probability of determining the molecular definition of the genetic defect in many of the patients. In this study, we describe the clinical, cytogenetic, and molecular study of 88 cases with DSD, including 29 patients with 46,XY and disorders in androgen synthesis or action, 18 with 46,XX and disorders in androgen excess, 17 with 46,XY and disorders of gonadal (testicular) development, 11 classified as 46,XX other, eight with 46,XX and disorders of gonadal (ovarian) development, and five with sex chromosome anomalies. In total, we found a genetic variant in 56 out of 88 of them, leading to the clinical classification of every patient, and we outline the different steps required for a coherent genetic testing approach. In conclusion, our results highlight the fact that each category of DSD is related to a large number of different DNA alterations, thus requiring multiple genetic studies to achieve a precise etiological diagnosis for each patient.

  19. Disorders of sex development: a genetic study of patients in a multidisciplinary clinic

    PubMed Central

    Laino, Luigi; Majore, Silvia; Preziosi, Nicoletta; Grammatico, Barbara; De Bernardo, Carmelilia; Scommegna, Salvatore; Rapone, Anna Maria; Marrocco, Giacinto; Bottillo, Irene; Grammatico, Paola

    2014-01-01

    Sex development is a process under genetic control directing both the bi-potential gonads to become either a testis or an ovary, and the consequent differentiation of internal ducts and external genitalia. This complex series of events can be altered by a large number of genetic and non-genetic factors. Disorders of sex development (DSD) are all the medical conditions characterized by an atypical chromosomal, gonadal, or phenotypical sex. Incomplete knowledge of the genetic mechanisms involved in sex development results in a low probability of determining the molecular definition of the genetic defect in many of the patients. In this study, we describe the clinical, cytogenetic, and molecular study of 88 cases with DSD, including 29 patients with 46,XY and disorders in androgen synthesis or action, 18 with 46,XX and disorders in androgen excess, 17 with 46,XY and disorders of gonadal (testicular) development, 11 classified as 46,XX other, eight with 46,XX and disorders of gonadal (ovarian) development, and five with sex chromosome anomalies. In total, we found a genetic variant in 56 out of 88 of them, leading to the clinical classification of every patient, and we outline the different steps required for a coherent genetic testing approach. In conclusion, our results highlight the fact that each category of DSD is related to a large number of different DNA alterations, thus requiring multiple genetic studies to achieve a precise etiological diagnosis for each patient. PMID:25248670

  20. Interpreting genetics in the context of eating disorders: Evidence of disease, not diversity

    PubMed Central

    Easter, Michele

    2013-01-01

    How is genetic involvement interpreted for disorders whose medicalisation is contested? Framing psychiatric and behavioral disorders in terms of genetics is expected to make them seem “more medical.” Yet, genetic etiology can also be used to frame behavior as acceptable human variation, rather than a medical problem (e.g., sexual orientation). I analyze responses to the idea of a genetic component in anorexia and bulimia nervosa (AN/BN) via semi-structured interviews with a sample of 50 women diagnosed with an eating disorder (25 recovered). All but three volunteered that genetics would medicalise AN/BN, by (1) making eating disorders seem more like “real” diseases; (2) implying a need for professional treatment; or (3) for biologically-based treatment. Results also indicate several “counter-logics,” by which genetic framing could support non-medical definitions of AN/BN. I argue that genetic framing reduces perceived individual responsibility, which can support definitions of behavior as either a reflection of disease (which entails intervention) or a reflection of normal human diversity (which does not). In the context of public skepticism as to the “reality” of AN/BN, genetic involvement was taken as evidence of disease in ongoing negotiations about the medical and moral status of people with eating disorders. PMID:24286479

  1. Genetics of the sleep-wake cycle and its disorders.

    PubMed

    Hamet, Pavel; Tremblay, Johanne

    2006-10-01

    The sleep-wake cycle is under the control of the circadian clock. Recent advances in rhythm biology have identified molecular clocks and their key regulating genes. Circadian clock genes (Clock, Per) were first isolated in Drosophila, and their homologous counterparts have been found in mammals. Some of the circadian master genes have been shown to influence sleeping behavior. For instance, a point mutation in a human clock gene (Per2) was shown to produce the rare advanced sleep phase syndrome, whereas a functional polymorphism in Per3 is associated with the more frequent delayed sleep phase syndrome. Furthermore, a study examining the association between Clock gene polymorphisms and insomnia revealed a higher recurrence of initial, middle, and terminal insomnia in patients homozygous for the Clock genotype. Other genes have been shown to contribute to sleep pathologies. A point mutation in the prion protein gene appears to be the cause of fatal familial insomnia. A missense mutation has been found in the gene encoding the GABA-A beta 3 subunit in a patient with chronic insomnia. In both animal models and humans, a deficiency in the hypocretin/orexin system was proposed to be responsible for narcolepsy. Selective destruction of hypocretin neurons is the most probable culprit in humans. These findings suggest that the genetic contribution to sleep disorders and wake determinants is more important than originally thought. Beyond sleep, light/dark cycles and sleep deprivation appear also to be associated with eating habits, and epidemics of obesity have to be evaluated in the context of shortened sleep duration. PMID:16979429

  2. Translational genetic approaches to substance use disorders: bridging the gap between mice and humans

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Abraham A.; de Wit, Harriet

    2012-01-01

    While substance abuse disorders only occur in humans, mice and other model organisms can make valuable contributions to genetic studies of these disorders. In this review, we consider a few specific examples of how model organisms have been used in conjunction with studies in humans to study the role of genetic factors in substance use disorders. In some examples genes that were first discovered in mice were subsequently studied in humans. In other examples genes or specific polymorphisms in genes were first studied in humans and then modeled in mice. Using anatomically and temporally specific genetic, pharmacological and other environmental manipulations in conjunction with histological analyses, mechanistic insights that would be difficult to obtain in humans have been obtained in mice. We hope these examples illustrate how novel biological insights about the effect of genes on substance use disorders can be obtained when mouse and human genetic studies are successfully integrated. PMID:22170288

  3. Acquiring a Pet Dog Significantly Reduces Stress of Primary Carers for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Prospective Case Control Study.

    PubMed

    Wright, H F; Hall, S; Hames, A; Hardiman, J; Mills, R; Mills, D S

    2015-08-01

    This study describes the impact of pet dogs on stress of primary carers of children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). Stress levels of 38 primary carers acquiring a dog and 24 controls not acquiring a dog were sampled at: Pre-intervention (17 weeks before acquiring a dog), post-intervention (3-10 weeks after acquisition) and follow-up (25-40 weeks after acquisition), using the Parenting Stress Index. Analysis revealed significant improvements in the intervention compared to the control group for Total Stress, Parental Distress and Difficult Child. A significant number of parents in the intervention group moved from clinically high to normal levels of Parental Distress. The results highlight the potential of pet dogs to reduce stress in primary carers of children with an ASD. PMID:25832799

  4. Intelligence: shared genetic basis between Mendelian disorders and a polygenic trait.

    PubMed

    Franić, Sanja; Groen-Blokhuis, Maria M; Dolan, Conor V; Kattenberg, Mathijs V; Pool, René; Xiao, Xiangjun; Scheet, Paul A; Ehli, Erik A; Davies, Gareth E; van der Sluis, Sophie; Abdellaoui, Abdel; Hansell, Narelle K; Martin, Nicholas G; Hudziak, James J; van Beijsterveldt, Catherina E M; Swagerman, Suzanne C; Hulshoff Pol, Hilleke E; de Geus, Eco J C; Bartels, Meike; Ropers, H Hilger; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Boomsma, Dorret I

    2015-10-01

    Multiple inquiries into the genetic etiology of human traits indicated an overlap between genes underlying monogenic disorders (eg, skeletal growth defects) and those affecting continuous variability of related quantitative traits (eg, height). Extending the idea of a shared genetic basis between a Mendelian disorder and a classic polygenic trait, we performed an association study to examine the effect of 43 genes implicated in autosomal recessive cognitive disorders on intelligence in an unselected Dutch population (N=1316). Using both single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)- and gene-based association testing, we detected an association between intelligence and the genes of interest, with genes ELP2, TMEM135, PRMT10, and RGS7 showing the strongest associations. This is a demonstration of the relevance of genes implicated in monogenic disorders of intelligence to normal-range intelligence, and a corroboration of the utility of employing knowledge on monogenic disorders in identifying the genetic variability underlying complex traits.

  5. The genetic architecture of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) and the potential importance of common regulatory genetic variants.

    PubMed

    Saffen, David

    2015-10-01

    Currently, there is great interest in identifying genetic variants that contribute to the risk of developing autism spectrum disorders (ASDs), due in part to recent increases in the frequency of diagnosis of these disorders worldwide. While there is nearly universal agreement that ASDs are complex diseases, with multiple genetic and environmental contributing factors, there is less agreement concerning the relative importance of common vs rare genetic variants in ASD liability. Recent observations that rare mutations and copy number variants (CNVs) are frequently associated with ASDs, combined with reduced fecundity of individuals with these disorders, has led to the hypothesis that ASDs are caused primarily by de novo or rare genetic mutations. Based on this model, large-scale whole-genome DNA sequencing has been proposed as the most appropriate method for discovering ASD liability genes. While this approach will undoubtedly identify many novel candidate genes and produce important new insights concerning the genetic causes of these disorders, a full accounting of the genetics of ASDs will be incomplete absent an understanding of the contributions of common regulatory variants, which are likely to influence ASD liability by modifying the effects of rare variants or, by assuming unfavorable combinations, directly produce these disorders. Because it is not yet possible to identify regulatory genetic variants by examination of DNA sequences alone, their identification will require experimentation. In this essay, I discuss these issues and describe the advantages of measurements of allelic expression imbalance (AEI) of mRNA expression for identifying cis-acting regulatory variants that contribute to ASDs. PMID:26335735

  6. [Screening for hereditary neuromuscular disorders with molecular genetic methods in the Roma population of Hungary].

    PubMed

    Herczegfalvi, Agnes; Pikó, Henriett; Karcagi, Veronika

    2008-11-30

    Recent medical genetic research has identified a number of novel, or previously known, but rare conditions, caused by private founder mutations. The Finnish and Ashkenazi Jew populations provide the best examples for identifying genes in unique genetic disorders. In these populations, research efforts and high-level medical services resulted in intense improvements of medical care and in organization of population-based screening programs. Hereditary disorders of the Roma populations are known for a long time. The genetic background of these diseases has been established by extensive molecular genetic studies. The Romas represent 6% of the Hungarian population and live under extremely bad health conditions. Therefore, our aim was to map the incidence of the hereditary neuromuscular disorders among the Hungarian Roma population. Moreover, we intended to provide proper information, genetic counseling and possible prevention strategies for the families at risk, which should represent a primer task in public health. Because of our experience in neuromuscular disorders, we choose six, frequent, autosomal recessive disorders for these clinical and genetic studies: hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy type Lom (HMSNL), hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy type Russe (HMSNR), congenital cataracts facial dysmorphism syndrome (CCFDN), limb-girdle muscular dystrophy 2C (LGMD2C), congenital myasthenic syndrome (CMS) and spinal muscular atrophy (SMA). Following identification of the founder mutations, the possibility of prenatal diagnosis and carrier screening for family members will contribute to the decrease of the recurrence risk for these severe, mostly untreatable disorders. PMID:19070320

  7. Ethical considerations in the prevention and management of genetic disorders with special emphasis on religious considerations.

    PubMed

    Albar, Mohammed A

    2002-06-01

    Genetic diseases include not only single gene disorders, but multifactorial, somatic cell genetic disorders, mitochondrial and even chromosomal. One in 4 adults will suffer from a multifactorial or a somatic cell genetic disease. The common diseases in the community have a hereditary component namely diabetes mellitus, hypertension, ischemic heart diseases and many types of cancer. Even monogenic diseases which affect a small number of the newborns (2%-3%), have a greater impact on childhood diseases up to age 15 years. Therefore, it is imperative to scrutinize the available methods of prevention and management of genetic disorders, their ethical implications, and since east Mediterranean region is mainly occupied by Arabs and muslims, religious considerations become of paramount importance. Islam differs from many other religions in providing a complete code of life, which encompasses the secular with spiritual, the mundane with the celestial and hence forms the basis of the ethical, moral and even juridical attitudes and laws towards any problem or situation. Islamic teachings carry a great deal of instructions for health promotion and disease prevention including hereditary and genetic disorders. This review discusses how the Islamic teachings play an important role in the prevention and management of genetic disorders and the type of ethical implications involved in such management namely premarital medical examination, the question of consanguinity, the genetic counseling, the question of preimplantation diagnosis, the question of abortion and the offering of alternative ways of reproduction.

  8. Large-scale discovery of novel genetic causes of developmental disorders.

    PubMed

    2015-03-12

    Despite three decades of successful, predominantly phenotype-driven discovery of the genetic causes of monogenic disorders, up to half of children with severe developmental disorders of probable genetic origin remain without a genetic diagnosis. Particularly challenging are those disorders rare enough to have eluded recognition as a discrete clinical entity, those with highly variable clinical manifestations, and those that are difficult to distinguish from other, very similar, disorders. Here we demonstrate the power of using an unbiased genotype-driven approach to identify subsets of patients with similar disorders. By studying 1,133 children with severe, undiagnosed developmental disorders, and their parents, using a combination of exome sequencing and array-based detection of chromosomal rearrangements, we discovered 12 novel genes associated with developmental disorders. These newly implicated genes increase by 10% (from 28% to 31%) the proportion of children that could be diagnosed. Clustering of missense mutations in six of these newly implicated genes suggests that normal development is being perturbed by an activating or dominant-negative mechanism. Our findings demonstrate the value of adopting a comprehensive strategy, both genome-wide and nationwide, to elucidate the underlying causes of rare genetic disorders.

  9. Studying Interactions, Reactions, and Perceptions: Can Genetic Disorders Serve as Behavioral Proxies?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodapp, Robert M.

    2004-01-01

    Different genetic disorders predispose individuals to display specific, etiology-related profiles, personalities, and maladaptive behaviors. Using groups with genetic etiologies as stand-ins or proxies for a specific behavior or set of behaviors, one can then examine how others in the child's environment react and whether such reactions are…

  10. InterRett, a Model for International Data Collection in a Rare Genetic Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Louise, Sandra; Fyfe, Sue; Bebbington, Ami; Bahi-Buisson, Nadia; Anderson, Alison; Pineda, Merce; Percy, Alan; Zeev, Bruria Ben; Wu, Xi Ru; Bao, Xinhua; MacLeod, Patrick; Armstrong, Judith; Leonard, Helen

    2009-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a rare genetic disorder within the autistic spectrum. This study compared socio-demographic, clinical and genetic characteristics of the international database, InterRett, and the population-based Australian Rett syndrome database (ARSD). It also explored the strengths and limitations of InterRett in comparison with other…

  11. Genetic and environmental contributions to the co-occurrence of depressive personality disorder and DSM-IV personality disorders.

    PubMed

    Ørstavik, Ragnhild E; Kendler, Kenneth S; Røysamb, Espen; Czajkowski, Nikolai; Tambs, Kristian; Reichborn-Kjennerud, Ted

    2012-06-01

    One of the main controversies with regard to depressive personality disorder (DPD) concerns the co-occurrence with the established DSM-IV personality disorders (PDs). The main aim of this study was to examine to what extent DPD and the DSM-IV PDs share genetic and environmental risk factors, using multivariate twin modeling. The DSM-IV Structured Interview for Personality was applied to 2,794 young adult twins. Paranoid PD from Cluster A, borderline PD from Cluster B, and all three PDs from Cluster C were independently and significantly associated with DPD in multiple regression analysis. The genetic correlations between DPD and the other PDs were strong (.53-.83), while the environmental correlations were moderate (.36-.40). Close to 50% of the total variance in DPD was disorder specific. However, only 5% was due to disorder-specific genetic factors, indicating that a substantial part of the genetic vulnerability to DPD also increases the vulnerability to other PDs.

  12. Autism Spectrum Disorders in Genetic Syndromes: Implications for Diagnosis, Intervention and Understanding the Wider Autism Spectrum Disorder Population

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moss, J.; Howlin, P.

    2009-01-01

    Background: An emerging literature on behavioural phenotypes has highlighted apparent associations between autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) or ASD-related phenomenology and a number of different genetically determined syndromes. Method: A systematic review of the current literature regarding the association with ASD and ASD characteristics was…

  13. SEROLOGICAL AND BIOCHEMICAL GENETIC MARKERS AND THEIR ASSOCIATIONS WITH PSYCHIATRIC DISORDERS : A REVIEW

    PubMed Central

    Balgir, R.S.

    1983-01-01

    SUMMARY The studies pertaining to associations of serological and biochemical genetic markers (blood groups in particular and scrum proteins and enzymes in general) with the psychiatric disorders such as psychoses in general, Schizophrenia, manic-depressive psychosis including unipolar and bipolar affective disorders and neuroses have been critically examined. The reasons for inconsistent findings of various investigators have been pointed out to assist the future researchers to overcome the previous drawbacks. Implications of associations of genetic markers with the psychiatric disorders have been discussed and future areas of research suggested. PMID:21847304

  14. The Fourth International Symposium on Genetic Disorders of the Ras/MAPK Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Stevenson, David A.; Schill, Lisa; Schoyer, Lisa; Andresen, Brage S.; Bakker, Annette; Bayrak-Toydemir, Pinar; Burkitt-Wright, Emma; Chatfield, Kathryn; Elefteriou, Florent; Elgersma, Ype; Fisher, Michael J.; Franz, David; Gelb, Bruce D.; Goriely, Anne; Gripp, Karen W.; Hardan, Antonio Y.; Keppler-Noreuil, Kim M.; Kerr, Bronwyn; Korf, Bruce; Leoni, Chiara; McCormick, Frank; Plotkin, Scott R.; Rauen, Katherine A.; Reilly, Karlyne; Roberts, Amy; Sandler, Abby; Siegel, Dawn; Walsh, Karin; Widemann, Brigitte C.

    2016-01-01

    The RASopathies are a group of disorders due to variations of genes associated with the Ras/MAPK pathway. Some of the RASopathies include neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), Noonan syndrome, Noonan syndrome with multiple lentigines, cardiofaciocutaneous (CFC) syndrome, Costello syndrome, Legius syndrome, and capillary malformation–arteriovenous malformation (CM-AVM) syndrome. In combination, the RASopathies are a frequent group of genetic disorders. This report summarizes the proceedings of the 4th International Symposium on Genetic Disorders of the Ras/MAPK pathway and highlights gaps in the field. PMID:27155140

  15. Serological and biochemical genetic markers and their associations with psychiatric disorders : a review.

    PubMed

    Balgir, R S

    1983-10-01

    The studies pertaining to associations of serological and biochemical genetic markers (blood groups in particular and scrum proteins and enzymes in general) with the psychiatric disorders such as psychoses in general, Schizophrenia, manic-depressive psychosis including unipolar and bipolar affective disorders and neuroses have been critically examined. The reasons for inconsistent findings of various investigators have been pointed out to assist the future researchers to overcome the previous drawbacks. Implications of associations of genetic markers with the psychiatric disorders have been discussed and future areas of research suggested. PMID:21847304

  16. [Genetic and brain structure anomalies in autism spectrum disorders. Towards an understanding of the aetiopathogenesis?].

    PubMed

    Nickl-Jockschat, T; Michel, T M

    2011-05-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are pervasive development disorders with high heritability and an as yet unclear aetiology. So far molecular genetic research was able to identify several candidate genes for the disorder which are functionally linked to neurotransmission and neuronal migration, cortical organisation and synaptic plasticity. MRI studies repeatedly showed a higher total brain volume for ASD patients. The volume increase was most pronounced for the frontal and the temporal lobes and peaked in early childhood. A combination of molecular genetic and structural imaging research appears promising for a further characterization of ASD aetiology.

  17. The Fourth International Symposium on Genetic Disorders of the Ras/MAPK pathway.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, David A; Schill, Lisa; Schoyer, Lisa; Andresen, Brage S; Bakker, Annette; Bayrak-Toydemir, Pinar; Burkitt-Wright, Emma; Chatfield, Kathryn; Elefteriou, Florent; Elgersma, Ype; Fisher, Michael J; Franz, David; Gelb, Bruce D; Goriely, Anne; Gripp, Karen W; Hardan, Antonio Y; Keppler-Noreuil, Kim M; Kerr, Bronwyn; Korf, Bruce; Leoni, Chiara; McCormick, Frank; Plotkin, Scott R; Rauen, Katherine A; Reilly, Karlyne; Roberts, Amy; Sandler, Abby; Siegel, Dawn; Walsh, Karin; Widemann, Brigitte C

    2016-08-01

    The RASopathies are a group of disorders due to variations of genes associated with the Ras/MAPK pathway. Some of the RASopathies include neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), Noonan syndrome, Noonan syndrome with multiple lentigines, cardiofaciocutaneous (CFC) syndrome, Costello syndrome, Legius syndrome, and capillary malformation-arteriovenous malformation (CM-AVM) syndrome. In combination, the RASopathies are a frequent group of genetic disorders. This report summarizes the proceedings of the 4th International Symposium on Genetic Disorders of the Ras/MAPK pathway and highlights gaps in the field. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27155140

  18. Association between genetic risk scoring for schizophrenia and bipolar disorder with regional subcortical volumes.

    PubMed

    Caseras, X; Tansey, K E; Foley, S; Linden, D

    2015-01-01

    Previous research has shown coincident abnormal regional brain volume in patients with schizophrenia (SCZ) and bipolar disorder (BD) compared with controls. Whether these abnormalities are genetically driven or explained by secondary effects of the disorder or environmental factors is unknown. We aimed to investigate the association between genetic risk scoring (GRS) for SCZ and BD with volume of brain areas previously shown to be different between these clinical groups and healthy controls. We obtained subcortical brain volume measures and GRS for SCZ and BD from a sample of 274 healthy volunteers (71.4% females, mean age 24.7 (s.d. 6.9)). Volume of the globus pallidus was associated with the shared GRS between SCZ and BD, and also with the independent GRS for each of these disorders. Volume of the amygdala was associated with the non-shared GRS between SCZ and BD, and with the independent GRS for BD. Our results for volume of the globus pallidus support the idea of SCZ and BD sharing a common underlying neurobiological abnormality associated with a common genetic risk for both these disorders. Results for volume of the amygdala, though, would suggest the existence of a distinct mechanism only associated with genetic risk for BD. Finally, the lack of association between genetic risk and volume of most subcortical structures suggests that the volumetric differences reported in patient-control comparisons may not be genetically driven, but a consequence of the disorder or co-occurring environmental factors. PMID:26645627

  19. Association between genetic risk scoring for schizophrenia and bipolar disorder with regional subcortical volumes

    PubMed Central

    Caseras, X; Tansey, K E; Foley, S; Linden, D

    2015-01-01

    Previous research has shown coincident abnormal regional brain volume in patients with schizophrenia (SCZ) and bipolar disorder (BD) compared with controls. Whether these abnormalities are genetically driven or explained by secondary effects of the disorder or environmental factors is unknown. We aimed to investigate the association between genetic risk scoring (GRS) for SCZ and BD with volume of brain areas previously shown to be different between these clinical groups and healthy controls. We obtained subcortical brain volume measures and GRS for SCZ and BD from a sample of 274 healthy volunteers (71.4% females, mean age 24.7 (s.d. 6.9)). Volume of the globus pallidus was associated with the shared GRS between SCZ and BD, and also with the independent GRS for each of these disorders. Volume of the amygdala was associated with the non-shared GRS between SCZ and BD, and with the independent GRS for BD. Our results for volume of the globus pallidus support the idea of SCZ and BD sharing a common underlying neurobiological abnormality associated with a common genetic risk for both these disorders. Results for volume of the amygdala, though, would suggest the existence of a distinct mechanism only associated with genetic risk for BD. Finally, the lack of association between genetic risk and volume of most subcortical structures suggests that the volumetric differences reported in patient–control comparisons may not be genetically driven, but a consequence of the disorder or co-occurring environmental factors. PMID:26645627

  20. Acquired cutis laxa associated with cutaneous mastocytosis.

    PubMed

    Hoang, Minh Van; Dang, Phuoc Van; Bui, Duc Van; Mejbel, Haider; Mani, Divya Thomas; Smoller, Bruce Robert; Phung, Thuy Linh

    2015-07-01

    Cutis laxa is characterized by dramatic wrinkling of skin that is lacking in elasticity due to inherent defects in dermal elastic fibers. Cutis laxa can be caused by genetic and metabolic disorders. It can also be acquired, possibly resulting from inflammatory processes with destruction of elastic fibers. This report describes a 26-year old woman who developed acquired cutis laxa and cutaneous mastocytosis leading to premature aging. She represents a unique co-occurrence of these two separate disease entities. To our knowledge, there has been only one published case report of acquired cutis laxa occurring in association with urticaria pigmentosa in a 4-year old girl. Our case would be a second case that exhibits the coexistence of these two disorders in an adult female. PMID:26436968

  1. Shared Genetic Contributions to Anxiety Disorders and Pathological Gambling in a Male Population

    PubMed Central

    Giddens, Justine L.; Xian, Hong; Scherrer, Jeffrey F.; Eisen, Seth A.; Potenza, Marc N.

    2013-01-01

    Background Pathological gambling (PG) frequently co-occurs with anxiety disorders. However, the extent to which the co-occurrence is related to genetic or environmental factors across PG and anxiety disorders is not known. Method Data from the Vietnam Twin Registry (n=7869, male twins) were examined in bivariate models to estimate genetic and shared and unique environmental contributions to PG and generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) and PG and panic disorder (PD). Results While both genetic and unique environmental factors contributed individually to PG, GAD, and PD, the best fitting model indicated that the relationship between PG and GAD was attributable predominantly to shared genetic contributions (ra =0.53). In contrast, substantial correlations were observed between both the genetic (ra=0.34) and unique environmental (re =0.31) contributions to PG and PD. Limitations Results may be limited to middle aged males. Conclusions The existence of shared genetic contributions between PG and both GAD and PD suggest that specific genes, perhaps those involved in affect regulation or stress responsiveness, contribute to PG and anxiety disorders. Overlapping environmental contributions to the co-occurrence of PG and PD suggest that common life experiences (e.g., early life trauma) contribute to both PG and PD. Conversely, the data suggest that distinct environmental factors contribute to PG and GAD (e.g., early onset of gambling in PG). Future studies should examine the relationship between PG and anxiety disorders amongst other populations (women, adolescents) to identify specific genetic and environmental influences that account for the manifestation of these disorders and their co-occurrences. PMID:21481943

  2. Practice Bulletin No. 162 Summary: Prenatal Diagnostic Testing for Genetic Disorders.

    PubMed

    2016-05-01

    Prenatal genetic diagnostic testing is intended to determine, with as much certainty as possible, whether a specific genetic disorder or condition is present in the fetus. In contrast, prenatal genetic screening is designed to assess whether a patient is at increased risk of having a fetus affected by a genetic disorder. Originally, prenatal genetic testing focused primarily on Down syndrome (trisomy 21), but now it is able to detect a broad range of genetic disorders. Although it is necessary to perform amniocentesis or chorionic villus sampling (CVS) to definitively diagnose most genetic disorders, in some circumstances, fetal imaging with ultrasonography, echocardiography, or magnetic resonance imaging may be diagnostic of a particular structural fetal abnormality that is suggestive of an underlying genetic condition.The objective of prenatal genetic testing is to detect health problems that could affect the woman, fetus, or newborn and provide the patient and her obstetrician-gynecologist or other obstetric care provider with enough information to allow a fully informed decision about pregnancy management. Prenatal genetic testing cannot identify all abnormalities or problems in a fetus, and any testing should be focused on the individual patient's risks, reproductive goals, and preferences. It is important that patients understand the benefits and limitations of all prenatal screening and diagnostic testing, including the conditions for which tests are available and the conditions that will not be detected by testing. It also is important that patients realize that there is a broad range of clinical presentations, or phenotypes, for many genetic disorders and that results of genetic testing cannot predict all outcomes. Prenatal genetic testing has many benefits, including reassuring patients when results are normal, identifying disorders for which prenatal treatment may provide benefit, optimizing neonatal outcomes by ensuring the appropriate location for

  3. The Genetic Basis of Thought Disorder and Language and Communication Disturbances in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Deborah L.; Coleman, Michael J.; Sung, Heejong; Ji, Fei; Matthysse, Steven; Mendell, Nancy R.; Titone, Debra

    2009-01-01

    Thought disorder as well as language and communication disturbances are associated with schizophrenia and are over-represented in clinically unaffected relatives of schizophrenics. All three kinds of dysfunction involve some element of deviant verbalizations, most notably, semantic anomalies. Of particular importance, thought disorder characterized primarily by deviant verbalizations has a higher recurrence in relatives of schizophrenic patients than schizophrenia itself. These findings suggest that deviant verbalizations may be more penetrant expressions of schizophrenia susceptibility genes than schizophrenia. This paper reviews the evidence documenting the presence of thought, language and communication disorders in schizophrenic patients and in their first-degree relatives. This familial aggregation potentially implicates genetic factors in the etiology of thought disorder, language anomalies, and communication disturbances in schizophrenia families. We also present two examples of ways in which thought, language and communication disorders can enrich genetic studies, including those involving schizophrenia. PMID:20161689

  4. Promoting Adaptive Behavior in Persons with Acquired Brain Injury, Extensive Motor and Communication Disabilities, and Consciousness Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lancioni, Giulio E.; Singh, Nirbhay N.; O'Reilly, Mark F.; Sigafoos, Jeff; Belardinelli, Marta Olivetti; Buonocunto, Francesca; Sacco, Valentina; Navarro, Jorge; Lanzilotti, Crocifissa; De Tommaso, Marina; Megna, Marisa; Badagliacca, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    These two studies extended the evidence on the use of technology-based intervention packages to promote adaptive behavior in persons with acquired brain injury and multiple disabilities. Study I involved five participants in a minimally conscious state who were provided with intervention packages based on specific arrangements of optic, tilt, or…

  5. The molecular genetics of Marfan syndrome and related disorders

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, P N; Arteaga‐Solis, E; Baldock, C; Collod‐Béroud, G; Booms, P; De Paepe, A; Dietz, H C; Guo, G; Handford, P A; Judge, D P; Kielty, C M; Loeys, B; Milewicz, D M; Ney, A; Ramirez, F; Reinhardt, D P; Tiedemann, K; Whiteman, P; Godfrey, M

    2006-01-01

    Marfan syndrome (MFS), a relatively common autosomal dominant hereditary disorder of connective tissue with prominent manifestations in the skeletal, ocular, and cardiovascular systems, is caused by mutations in the gene for fibrillin‐1 (FBN1). The leading cause of premature death in untreated individuals with MFS is acute aortic dissection, which often follows a period of progressive dilatation of the ascending aorta. Recent research on the molecular physiology of fibrillin and the pathophysiology of MFS and related disorders has changed our understanding of this disorder by demonstrating changes in growth factor signalling and in matrix‐cell interactions. The purpose of this review is to provide a comprehensive overview of recent advances in the molecular biology of fibrillin and fibrillin‐rich microfibrils. Mutations in FBN1 and other genes found in MFS and related disorders will be discussed, and novel concepts concerning the complex and multiple mechanisms of the pathogenesis of MFS will be explained. PMID:16571647

  6. Connection between Genetic and Clinical Data in Bipolar Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Mellerup, Erling; Andreassen, Ole; Bennike, Bente; Dam, Henrik; Durovic, Srdjan; Hansen, Thomas; Melle, Ingrid; Møller, Gert Lykke; Mors, Ole; Koefoed, Pernille

    2012-01-01

    Complex diseases may be associated with combinations of changes in DNA, where the single change has little impact alone. In a previous study of patients with bipolar disorder and controls combinations of SNP genotypes were analyzed, and four large clusters of combinations were found to be significantly associated with bipolar disorder. It has now been found that these clusters may be connected to clinical data. PMID:23028568

  7. Familial Resemblance of Borderline Personality Disorder Features: Genetic or Cultural Transmission?

    PubMed Central

    Distel, Marijn A.; Rebollo-Mesa, Irene; Willemsen, Gonneke; Derom, Catherine A.; Trull, Timothy J.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Boomsma, Dorret I.

    2009-01-01

    Borderline personality disorder is a severe personality disorder for which genetic research has been limited to family studies and classical twin studies. These studies indicate that genetic effects explain 35 to 45% of the variance in borderline personality disorder and borderline personality features. However, effects of non-additive (dominance) genetic factors, non-random mating and cultural transmission have generally not been explored. In the present study an extended twin-family design was applied to self-report data of twins (N = 5,017) and their siblings (N = 1,266), parents (N = 3,064) and spouses (N = 939) from 4,015 families, to estimate the effects of additive and non-additive genetic and environmental factors, cultural transmission and non-random mating on individual differences in borderline personality features. Results showed that resemblance among biological relatives could completely be attributed to genetic effects. Variation in borderline personality features was explained by additive genetic (21%; 95% CI 17–26%) and dominant genetic (24%; 95% CI 17–31%) factors. Environmental influences (55%; 95% CI 51–60%) explained the remaining variance. Significant resemblance between spouses was observed, which was best explained by phenotypic assortative mating, but it had only a small effect on the genetic variance (1% of the total variance). There was no effect of cultural transmission from parents to offspring. PMID:19390632

  8. Cross-Disorder Genome-Wide Analyses Suggest a Complex Genetic Relationship Between Tourette Syndrome and Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Dongmei; Mathews, Carol A.; Scharf, Jeremiah M.; Neale, Benjamin M.; Davis, Lea K.; Gamazon, Eric R.; Derks, Eske M.; Evans, Patrick; Edlund, Christopher K.; Crane, Jacquelyn; Fagerness, Jesen A.; Osiecki, Lisa; Gallagher, Patience; Gerber, Gloria; Haddad, Stephen; Illmann, Cornelia; McGrath, Lauren M.; Mayerfeld, Catherine; Arepalli, Sampath; Barlassina, Cristina; Barr, Cathy L.; Bellodi, Laura; Benarroch, Fortu; Berrió, Gabriel Bedoya; Bienvenu, O. Joseph; Black, Donald; Bloch, Michael H.; Brentani, Helena; Bruun, Ruth D.; Budman, Cathy L.; Camarena, Beatriz; Campbell, Desmond D.; Cappi, Carolina; Cardona Silgado, Julio C.; Cavallini, Maria C.; Chavira, Denise A.; Chouinard, Sylvain; Cook, Edwin H.; Cookson, M. R.; Coric, Vladimir; Cullen, Bernadette; Cusi, Daniele; Delorme, Richard; Denys, Damiaan; Dion, Yves; Eapen, Valsama; Egberts, Karin; Falkai, Peter; Fernandez, Thomas; Fournier, Eduardo; Garrido, Helena; Geller, Daniel; Gilbert, Donald; Girard, Simon L.; Grabe, Hans J.; Grados, Marco A.; Greenberg, Benjamin D.; Gross-Tsur, Varda; Grünblatt, Edna; Hardy, John; Heiman, Gary A.; Hemmings, Sian M.J.; Herrera, Luis D.; Hezel, Dianne M.; Hoekstra, Pieter J.; Jankovic, Joseph; Kennedy, James L.; King, Robert A.; Konkashbaev, Anuar I.; Kremeyer, Barbara; Kurlan, Roger; Lanzagorta, Nuria; Leboyer, Marion; Leckman, James F.; Lennertz, Leonhard; Liu, Chunyu; Lochner, Christine; Lowe, Thomas L.; Lupoli, Sara; Macciardi, Fabio; Maier, Wolfgang; Manunta, Paolo; Marconi, Maurizio; McCracken, James T.; Mesa Restrepo, Sandra C.; Moessner, Rainald; Moorjani, Priya; Morgan, Jubel; Muller, Heike; Murphy, Dennis L.; Naarden, Allan L.; Ochoa, William Cornejo; Ophoff, Roel A.; Pakstis, Andrew J.; Pato, Michele T.; Pato, Carlos N.; Piacentini, John; Pittenger, Christopher; Pollak, Yehuda; Rauch, Scott L.; Renner, Tobias; Reus, Victor I.; Richter, Margaret A.; Riddle, Mark A.; Robertson, Mary M.; Romero, Roxana; Rosário, Maria C.; Rosenberg, David; Ruhrmann, Stephan; Sabatti, Chiara; Salvi, Erika; Sampaio, Aline S.; Samuels, Jack; Sandor, Paul; Service, Susan K.; Sheppard, Brooke; Singer, Harvey S.; Smit, Jan H.; Stein, Dan J.; Strengman, Eric; Tischfield, Jay A.; Turiel, Maurizio; Valencia Duarte, Ana V.; Vallada, Homero; Veenstra-VanderWeele, Jeremy; Walitza, Susanne; Walkup, John; Wang, Ying; Weale, Mike; Weiss, Robert; Wendland, Jens R.; Westenberg, Herman G.M.; Yao, Yin; Hounie, Ana G.; Miguel, Euripedes C.; Nicolini, Humberto; Wagner, Michael; Ruiz-Linares, Andres; Cath, Danielle C.; McMahon, William; Posthuma, Danielle; Oostra, Ben A.; Nestadt, Gerald; Rouleau, Guy A.; Purcell, Shaun; Jenike, Michael A.; Heutink, Peter; Hanna, Gregory L.; Conti, David V.; Arnold, Paul D.; Freimer, Nelson; Stewart, S. Evelyn; Knowles, James A.; Cox, Nancy J.; Pauls, David L.

    2014-01-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and Tourette Syndrome (TS) are highly heritable neurodevelopmental disorders that are thought to share genetic risk factors. However, the identification of definitive susceptibility genes for these etiologically complex disorders remains elusive. Here, we report a combined genome-wide association study (GWAS) of TS and OCD in 2723 cases (1310 with OCD, 834 with TS, 579 with OCD plus TS/chronic tics (CT)), 5667 ancestry-matched controls, and 290 OCD parent-child trios. Although no individual single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) achieved genome-wide significance, the GWAS signals were enriched for SNPs strongly associated with variations in brain gene expression levels, i.e. expression quantitative loci (eQTLs), suggesting the presence of true functional variants that contribute to risk of these disorders. Polygenic score analyses identified a significant polygenic component for OCD (p=2×10−4), predicting 3.2% of the phenotypic variance in an independent data set. In contrast, TS had a smaller, non-significant polygenic component, predicting only 0.6% of the phenotypic variance (p=0.06). No significant polygenic signal was detected across the two disorders, although the sample is likely underpowered to detect a modest shared signal. Furthermore, the OCD polygenic signal was significantly attenuated when cases with both OCD and TS/CT were included in the analysis (p=0.01). Previous work has shown that TS and OCD have some degree of shared genetic variation. However, the data from this study suggest that there are also distinct components to the genetic architectures of TS and OCD. Furthermore, OCD with co-occurring TS/CT may have different underlying genetic susceptibility compared to OCD alone. PMID:25158072

  9. [The genetic approaches of the disorders of the child].

    PubMed

    Sznajer, Y

    2006-01-01

    Genetics, which encompasses cytogenetic, molecular genetics, genetic of populations, pharmacogenetics and gene therapy, become as numerous and almost independent applications (fields). Deriving from the original questions on the origin and mechanisms of diseases, these represent essential tools to better understand physiopathogenesis. Cytogenetics (Chromosomes study, aberrations and their impact on the apparition of diseases) and genomics (the understand of the structure, organisation and DNA expression) are dedicated to clinical genetics as diagnostic and basic science improvements. The identification of new mechanisms of diseases were responsible for the creation of new tools which allow in turn to precise the intimate and underlying processes of diseases or syndromes. Due to the explosion of findings and research programs on fetal, embryologic and pediatric fields, laboratory and reference centers were build. Any child identified as carrier and/or affected from a pathogenic mutation became the primary step for the development of fetal, prenatal and preimplantatory medicines. Ethics came into play since responsibilities for 'do not harm', 'eugenism' temptations and 'individual life' with respect to medical laws should be guaranteed. These are part of the geneticist tasks and the reasons for professionalisation as for teaching genetics as part of medical traineeships that Paediatrics, among others, represents. The present review will systematically describe the principles of these different genetic fields.

  10. Cross-species genetics converge to TLL2 for mouse avoidance behavior and human bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    de Mooij-van Malsen, J G; van Lith, H A; Laarakker, M C; Brandys, M K; Oppelaar, H; Collier, D A; Olivier, B; Breen, G; Kas, M J

    2013-08-01

    Interspecies genetic analysis of neurobehavioral traits is critical for identifying neurobiological mechanisms underlying psychiatric disorders, and for developing models for translational research. Recently, after screening a chromosome substitution strain panel in an automated home cage environment, chromosomes 15 and 19 were identified in female mice for carrying genetic loci that contribute to increased avoidance behavior (sheltering preference). Furthermore, we showed that the quantitative trait locus (QTL) for baseline avoidance behavior on chromosome 15 is homologous with a human linkage region for bipolar disorder (8q24). Similarly, we now performed comparative analysis on the QTL for avoidance behavior found on chromosome 19 and correspondingly revealed an overlap of the mouse interval and human homologous region 10q23-24, which has been previously linked to bipolar disorders. By means of a comparative genetic strategy within the human homologous region, we describe an association for TLL2 with bipolar disorder using the genome-wide association study (GWAS) data set generated by the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium (WTCCC). On the basis of genetic homology and mood stabilizer sensitivity, our data indicate the intriguing possibility that mouse home cage avoidance behavior may translate to a common biochemical mechanisms underlying bipolar disorder susceptibility. These findings pave new roads for the identification of the molecular mechanisms and novel treatment possibilities for this psychiatric disorder, as well as for the validity of translational research of associated psychiatric endophenotypes.

  11. Genetics and Epigenetics of Circadian Rhythms and Their Potential Roles in Neuropsychiatric Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chunyu; Chung, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Circadian rhythms alterations have been implicated in multiple neuropsychiatric disorders, particularly sleep-wake disorders, addiction, and anxiety and mood disorders. Circadian rhythms are known to be maintained by a set of classic clock genes that form complex mutual and self regulatory loops. While many other genes showing rhythmic expression have been identified through genome-wide studies, their roles in the circadian regulation remain largely unknown. In attempts to directly connect circadian rhythms and neuropsychiatric disorders, genetic studies have identified genes with mutations associated with several rare forms of sleep disorders or sleep-related traits. Other than that, genetic studies of circadian genes in psychiatric disorders have yielded limited success. As important mediator of environmental factors and regulators of circadian rhythms, the epigenetic system may hold the key to the etiology or pathology of psychiatric disorders, their subtypes or endophenotypes. Epigenomic regulations of the circadian system and its related changes have not been thoroughly explored in the context of neuropsychiatric disorders. We argue for systematic investigation of the circadian system, particularly epigenetic regulation, and its involvement in neuropsychiatric disorders, to improve our understanding of human behavior and disease etiology. PMID:25652815

  12. Mucolipidosis II and III. The genetic relationships between two disorders of lysosomal enzyme biosynthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, O T; Honey, N K; Little, L E; Miller, A L; Shows, T B

    1983-01-01

    The genetic relationships between the multiple variants of mucolipidosis II (I-cell disease) and mucolipidosis III (pseudo-Hurler polydystrophy) were investigated with a sensitive genetic complementation analysis procedure. These clinically distinct disorders have defects in the synthesis of a recognition marker necessary for the intracellular transport of acid hydrolases into lysosomes. Both disorders are associated with an inherited deficiency of a uridine diphosphate-N-acetyl-glucosamine: lysosomal enzyme precursor N-acetyl-glucosamine-phosphate transferase activity. We had previously shown that both disorders are genetically heterogeneous. Complementation analysis between mucolipidosis II and III fibroblasts indicated an identity of mucolipidosis II with one of the three mucolipidosis III complementation groups (ML IIIA), suggesting a close genetic relationship between these groups. The presence of several instances of complementation within this group suggested an intragenic complementation mechanism. Genetic complementation in heterokaryons resulted in increases in N-acetyl-glucosamine-phosphate transferase activity, as well as in the correction of lysosomal enzyme transport. This resulted in increases in the intracellular levels of several lysosomal enzymes and in the correction of the abnormal electrophoretic mobility pattern of intracellular beta-hexosaminidase. The findings demonstrate that a high degree of genetic heterogeneity exists within these disorders. N-acetyl-glucosamine-phosphate transferase is apparently a multicomponent enzyme with a key role in the biosynthesis and targeting of lysosomal enzymes. Images FIGURE 2 PMID:6309902

  13. Emerging Genetic Counselor Roles within the Biotechnology and Pharmaceutical Industries: as Industry Interest Grows in Rare Genetic Disorders, How are Genetic Counselors Joining the Discussion?

    PubMed

    Field, Tessa; Brewster, Stephanie Jo; Towne, Meghan; Campion, MaryAnn W

    2016-08-01

    Traditionally, the biotechnology and pharmaceutical industry (BPI) has focused drug development at the mass-market level targeting common medical issues. However, a recent trend is the development of therapies for orphan or rare disorders, including many genetic disorders. Developing treatments for genetic disorders requires an understanding of the needs of the community and translating genomic information to clinical and non-clinical audiences. The core skills of genetic counselors (GCs) include a deep knowledge of genetics and ability to communicate complex information to a broad audience, making GCs a choice fit for this shift in drug development. To date there is limited data defining the roles GCs hold within this industry. This exploratory study aimed to define the roles and motivation of GCs working in BPI, assess job satisfaction, and identify translatable skills and current gaps in GC training programs. The authors surveyed 26 GCs working in BPI in the United States; 79 % work for companies focused on rare disorders. GC positions in BPI are growing, with 57 % of respondents being the first GC in their role. GCs in BPI continue to utilize core genetic counseling competencies, though 72 % felt their training did not fully prepare them for BPI. These data suggest opportunities for exposure to BPI in GC training to better prepare future generations of GCs for these career opportunities. GC satisfaction was high in BPI, notably in areas traditionally reported as less satisfying on the National Society for Genetic Counselors Professional Status Survey: salary and advancement opportunities. BPI's growing interest in rare disorders represents a career opportunity for GCs, addressing both historic areas of dissatisfaction for GCs and BPI's genomic communication needs.

  14. Emerging Genetic Counselor Roles within the Biotechnology and Pharmaceutical Industries: as Industry Interest Grows in Rare Genetic Disorders, How are Genetic Counselors Joining the Discussion?

    PubMed

    Field, Tessa; Brewster, Stephanie Jo; Towne, Meghan; Campion, MaryAnn W

    2016-08-01

    Traditionally, the biotechnology and pharmaceutical industry (BPI) has focused drug development at the mass-market level targeting common medical issues. However, a recent trend is the development of therapies for orphan or rare disorders, including many genetic disorders. Developing treatments for genetic disorders requires an understanding of the needs of the community and translating genomic information to clinical and non-clinical audiences. The core skills of genetic counselors (GCs) include a deep knowledge of genetics and ability to communicate complex information to a broad audience, making GCs a choice fit for this shift in drug development. To date there is limited data defining the roles GCs hold within this industry. This exploratory study aimed to define the roles and motivation of GCs working in BPI, assess job satisfaction, and identify translatable skills and current gaps in GC training programs. The authors surveyed 26 GCs working in BPI in the United States; 79 % work for companies focused on rare disorders. GC positions in BPI are growing, with 57 % of respondents being the first GC in their role. GCs in BPI continue to utilize core genetic counseling competencies, though 72 % felt their training did not fully prepare them for BPI. These data suggest opportunities for exposure to BPI in GC training to better prepare future generations of GCs for these career opportunities. GC satisfaction was high in BPI, notably in areas traditionally reported as less satisfying on the National Society for Genetic Counselors Professional Status Survey: salary and advancement opportunities. BPI's growing interest in rare disorders represents a career opportunity for GCs, addressing both historic areas of dissatisfaction for GCs and BPI's genomic communication needs. PMID:27017827

  15. Additional Evidence is Needed to Recommend Acquiring a Dog to Families of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Response to Wright and Colleagues.

    PubMed

    Crossman, Molly K; Kazdin, Alan E

    2016-01-01

    Caregivers of children with autism spectrum disorder are vulnerable to overstated benefits of interventions, and such overstatements are common with interventions involving animals. This response to Wright, Hall, Hames, Hardmin, Mills, the Paws Team, and Mills' (2015) article, "Acquiring a Pet Dog Significantly Reduces Stress of Primary Careers for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Prospective Case Control Study," details why that study's conclusions are premature. Specific limitations of the study are detailed, including overstatements of the supportive literature, problems with the design, and mismatch between the findings and conclusions. The purpose is not to challenge the benefits of pet ownership, but to point out that those benefits have not yet been established. PMID:26231204

  16. Neuroimaging and Genetic Risk for Alzheimer’s Disease and Addiction-Related Degenerative Brain Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Jahanshad, Neda; Leonardo, Cassandra D.; Thompson, Paul M.

    2014-01-01

    Neuroimaging offers a powerful means to assess the trajectory of brain degeneration in a variety of disorders, including Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Here we describe how multimodal imaging can be used to study the changing brain during the different stages of AD. We integrate findings from a range of studies using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), positron emission tomography (PET), functional MRI (fMRI) and diffusion weighted imaging (DWI). Neuroimaging reveals how risk genes for degenerative disorders affect the brain, including several recently discovered genetic variants that may disrupt brain connectivity. We review some recent neuroimaging studies of genetic polymorphisms associated with increased risk for late-onset Alzheimer’s disease (LOAD). Some genetic variants that increase risk for drug addiction may overlap with those associated with degenerative brain disorders. These common associations offer new insight into mechanisms underlying neurodegeneration and addictive behaviors, and may offer new leads for treating them before severe and irreversible neurological symptoms appear. PMID:24142306

  17. Neuroimaging and genetic risk for Alzheimer's disease and addiction-related degenerative brain disorders.

    PubMed

    Roussotte, Florence F; Daianu, Madelaine; Jahanshad, Neda; Leonardo, Cassandra D; Thompson, Paul M

    2014-06-01

    Neuroimaging offers a powerful means to assess the trajectory of brain degeneration in a variety of disorders, including Alzheimer's disease (AD). Here we describe how multi-modal imaging can be used to study the changing brain during the different stages of AD. We integrate findings from a range of studies using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), positron emission tomography (PET), functional MRI (fMRI) and diffusion weighted imaging (DWI). Neuroimaging reveals how risk genes for degenerative disorders affect the brain, including several recently discovered genetic variants that may disrupt brain connectivity. We review some recent neuroimaging studies of genetic polymorphisms associated with increased risk for late-onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD). Some genetic variants that increase risk for drug addiction may overlap with those associated with degenerative brain disorders. These common associations offer new insight into mechanisms underlying neurodegeneration and addictive behaviors, and may offer new leads for treating them before severe and irreversible neurological symptoms appear.

  18. Environmental, Physiological, and Cultural Injuries and Genetic Disorders

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There are some disorders of citrus that are not currently known to be caused by a pathogenic agent, but appears to be inherited, physiologically based, or caused by environmental conditions. Environmental injuries include heat injury and sunburn; wind injury; smog; flooding; hail damage; lightning; ...

  19. Genetics Home Reference: PMM2-congenital disorder of glycosylation

    MedlinePlus

    ... CDG (CDG-Ia) Genetic Testing Registry: Carbohydrate-deficient glycoprotein syndrome type I These resources from MedlinePlus offer ... area? Other Names for This Condition carbohydrate-deficient glycoprotein syndrome type Ia CDG Ia CDG1a CDGS1a congenital ...

  20. Genetic Counseling in Autism and Pervasive Developmental Disorders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simonoff, Emily

    1998-01-01

    Provides a protocol for counseling families with an autistic member concerning the risk of having an autistic child. Reports data regarding empirical recurrence risks and identifies the key elements that influence recurrence risks for individual couples. Counseling expertise in both diagnosis and treatment of autism and in the genetics of complex…

  1. Insights from a Rare Genetic Disorder of Extra-Skeletal Bone Formation, Fibrodysplasia Ossificans Progressiva (FOP)

    PubMed Central

    Shore, Eileen M.; Kaplan, Frederick S.

    2008-01-01

    Fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva (FOP) is a rare human genetic disorder of extensive and debilitating extra-skeletal bone formation. While the challenges of investigating a rare condition are many, the potential benefits are also great – not only for the specific disease under investigation, but also for the unique perspective on how cells normally function and the mechanisms that underlie more common disorders. This review will illustrate some of the many insights that we have gained by studying FOP. PMID:18590993

  2. Genetic Regulation of Acquired Immune Responses to Antigens of Mycobacterium tuberculosis: a Study of Twins in West Africa

    PubMed Central

    Jepson, Annette; Fowler, Amanda; Banya, Winston; Singh, Mahavir; Bennett, Steve; Whittle, Hilton; Hill, Adrian V. S.

    2001-01-01

    The role of genetic factors in clinical tuberculosis is increasingly recognized; how such factors regulate the immune response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis in healthy individuals is unclear. In this study of 255 adult twin pairs residing in The Gambia, West Africa, it is apparent that memory T-cell responses to secreted mycobacterial antigens (85-kDa antigen complex, “short-term culture filtrate,” and peptides from the ESAT-6 protein), as well as to the 65-kDa heat shock protein, are subject to effective genetic regulation. The delayed hypersensitivity response to intradermal tuberculin also demonstrates significant genetic variance, while quantitative T-cell and antibody responses to the 38-kDa cell membrane protein appear to be determined largely by environmental factors. Such findings have implications for vaccine development. PMID:11349068

  3. A behavioral-genetic investigation of bulimia nervosa and its relationship with alcohol use disorder.

    PubMed

    Trace, Sara E; Thornton, Laura M; Baker, Jessica H; Root, Tammy L; Janson, Lauren E; Lichtenstein, Paul; Pedersen, Nancy L; Bulik, Cynthia M

    2013-08-15

    Bulimia nervosa (BN) and alcohol use disorder (AUD) frequently co-occur and may share genetic factors; however, the nature of their association is not fully understood. We assessed the extent to which the same genetic and environmental factors contribute to liability to BN and AUD. A bivariate structural equation model using a Cholesky decomposition was fit to data from 7241 women who participated in the Swedish Twin study of Adults: Genes and Environment. The proportion of variance accounted for by genetic and environmental factors for BN and AUD and the genetic and environmental correlations between these disorders were estimated. In the best-fitting model, the heritability estimates were 0.55 (95% CI: 0.37; 0.70) for BN and 0.62 (95% CI: 0.54; 0.70) for AUD. Unique environmental factors accounted for the remainder of variance for BN. The genetic correlation between BN and AUD was 0.23 (95% CI: 0.01; 0.44), and the correlation between the unique environmental factors for the two disorders was 0.35 (95% CI: 0.08; 0.61), suggesting moderate overlap in these factors. The findings from this investigation provide additional support that some of the same genetic factors may influence liability to both BN and AUD.

  4. Review. Genetics of addictions: strategies for addressing heterogeneity and polygenicity of substance use disorders.

    PubMed

    Wong, Chloe C Y; Schumann, Gunter

    2008-10-12

    Addictions are common psychiatric disorders that exert high cost to the individual and to society. Addictions are a result of the interplay of multiple genetic and environmental factors. They are characterized by phenotypic and genetic heterogeneity as well as polygenicity, implying a contribution of different neurobiological mechanisms to the clinical diagnosis. Therefore, treatments for most substance use disorders are often only partially effective, with a substantial proportion of patients failing to respond. To address heterogeneity and polygenicity, strategies have been developed to identify more homogeneous subgroups of patients and to characterize genes contributing to their phenotype. These include genetic linkage and association studies as well as functional genetic analysis using endophenotypes and animal behavioural experimentation. Applying these strategies in a translational context aims at improving therapeutic response by the identification of subgroups of addiction patients for individualized, targeted treatment strategies. This article aims to discuss strategies addressing heterogeneity and polygenicity of substance use disorders by presenting results of recent research on genetic and environmental components of addiction. It will also introduce the European IMAGEN study that aims to integrate methodical approaches discussed in order to identify the genetic and neurobiological basis of behavioural traits relevant to the development of addictions.

  5. Strabismus genetics across a spectrum of eye misalignment disorders

    PubMed Central

    Ye, XC; Pegado, V; Patel, MS; Wasserman, WW

    2014-01-01

    Eye misalignment, called strabismus, is amongst the most common phenotypes observed, occurring in up to 5% of individuals in a studied population. While misalignment is frequently observed in rare complex syndromes, the majority of strabismus cases are non-syndromic. Over the past decade, genes and pathways associated with syndromic forms of strabismus have emerged, but the genes contributing to non-syndromic strabismus remain elusive. Genetic testing for strabismus risk may allow for earlier diagnosis and treatment, as well as decreased frequency of surgery. We review human and model organism literature describing non-syndromic strabismus, including family, twin, linkage, and gene expression studies. Recent advances in the genetics of Duane retraction syndrome are considered, as relatives of those impacted show elevated familial rates of non-syndromic strabismus. As whole genome sequencing efforts are advancing for the discovery of the elusive strabismus genes, this overview is intended to support the interpretation of the new findings. PMID:24579652

  6. Techniques and Approaches to Genetic Analyses in Nephrological Disorders.

    PubMed

    Willig, Laurel K

    2016-03-01

    Inherited renal disease is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in pediatric nephrology. High throughput advancements in genomics have led to greater understanding of the biologic underpinnings of these diseases. However, the underlying genetic changes explain only part of the molecular biology that contributes to disease manifestation and progression. Other omics technologies will provide a more complete picture of these cellular processes. This review discusses these omics technologies in the context of pediatric renal disease. PMID:27617137

  7. Imaging of genetic and degenerative disorders primarily causing Parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Brooks, David J

    2016-01-01

    In this chapter the structural and functional imaging changes associated with both genetic causes of Parkinson's disease and the sporadic condition are reviewed. The role of imaging for supporting diagnosis and detecting subclinical disease is discussed and the potential use and drawbacks of using imaging biomarkers for monitoring disease progression are debated. Additionally, the use of imaging for differentiating atypical parkinsonian syndromes from Parkinson's disease is presented. PMID:27432680

  8. RDoC and Translational Perspectives on the Genetics of Trauma-Related Psychiatric Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Montalvo-Ortiz, Janitza L.; Gelernter, Joel; Hudziak, James; Kaufman, Joan

    2016-01-01

    Individuals with a history of child abuse are at high risk for depression, anxiety disorders, aggressive behavior, and substance use problems. The goal of this paper is to review studies of the genetics of these stress-related psychiatric disorders. An informative subset of studies that examined candidate gene by environment (GxE) predictors of these psychiatric problems in individuals maltreated as children is reviewed, together with extant genome wide association studies (GWAS). Emerging findings on epigenetic changes associated with adverse early experiences are also reviewed. Meta-analytic support and replicated findings are evident for several genetic risk factors; however, extant research suggests the effects are pleiotropic. Genetic factors are not associated with distinct psychiatric disorders, but rather diverse clinical phenotypes. Research also suggests adverse early life experiences are associated with changes in gene expression of multiple known candidate genes, genes involved in DNA transcription and translation, and genes necessary for brain circuitry development, with changes in gene expression reported in key brain structures implicated in the pathophysiology of psychiatric and substance use disorders. The finding of pleiotropy highlights the value of using the Research Domain Criteria (RDoC) framework in future studies of the genetics of stress-related psychiatric disorders, and not trying simply to link genes to multifaceted clinical syndromes, but to more limited phenotypes that map onto distinct neural circuits. Emerging work in the field of epigenetics also suggests that translational studies that integrate numerous unbiased genome-wide approaches will help to further unravel the genetics of stress-related psychiatric disorders. PMID:26592203

  9. Inherited, congenital and acquired disorders by hemostasis (vascular, platelet & plasmatic phases) with repercussions in the therapeutic oral sphere.

    PubMed

    Arrieta-Blanco, Juan-José; Oñate-Sánchez, Ricardo; Martínez-López, Federico; Oñate-Cabrerizo, Daniel; Cabrerizo-Merino, Maria-del Carmen

    2014-05-01

    The hemostasis alterations, either congenital or hereditary origin, and acquired, are circumstances that hinder oral care to patients who suffer them and also generates in the professional who has to attend, high stress. Bleeding control once established and dental treatment planning, both in the aspect of preparation, as the realization of the odonto-stomatological therapeutic, has suffered updates that do need to remember certain aspects of the care of these patients. But we must not forget that the hematologist or internist who controls the patient's medical condition, is a cornerstone for the planning and implementation of treatment plans. We must also remember that, in certain circumstances, treatment should be performed in a hospital setting. In this review, we aim to provide the odonto-stomatologist guidance on how to address the problem and provide simple and updated guidelines to apply in the treatment of these people.

  10. Association between Hypoalbuminaemia and Mortality in Patients with Community-Acquired Bacteraemia Is Primarily Related to Acute Disorders.

    PubMed

    Magnussen, Bjarne; Oren Gradel, Kim; Gorm Jensen, Thøger; Kolmos, Hans Jørn; Pedersen, Court; Just Vinholt, Pernille; Touborg Lassen, Annmarie

    2016-01-01

    We sought to investigate whether hypoalbuminaemia was mainly caused by acute or chronic factors in patients with community-acquired bacteraemia. In this population-based study, we considered 1844 adult cases of community-acquired bacteraemia that occurred in Funen, Denmark between 2000 and 2008. We used a stepwise prognostic predisposition-insult-response-organ dysfunction (PIRO) logistic regression model by initially including age and comorbidity, then added bacterial species, and finally sepsis severity. The models were furthermore analysed using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. Outcomes comprised mortality incidence on days 0-30 and 31-365 after the bacteraemia episode. Each step was performed with and without baseline albumin level measured on the date of bacteraemia. In 422 patients, their latest albumin measurement taken 8-30 days before the date of bacteraemia was also used in the analysis together with the baseline albumin level. For each decrease of 1g/L in plasma albumin level, the odds ratios (95% confidence intervals) of mortality in the period of 0-30 days after bacteraemia were 0.86 (0.84-0.88) in both predisposition (P) and predisposition-insult (PI) models and 0.87 (0.85-0.89) in the full PIRO-model. The AUC values were 0.78 and 0.66 for mortality in the period of 0-30 days in the model comprising only predisposition factors with and without albumin levels added as a factor, respectively. The AUC values in the full PIRO-model were 0.81 and 0.73 with and without consideration of albumin levels, respectively. A higher proportion of patients died within 30 days if there was a decrease in the albumin level between days 8 and 30 before bacteraemia and the actual bacteraemia date. A single plasma albumin measurement on the bacteraemia date was a better prognostic predictor of short-term mortality than the sepsis severity score. PMID:27611431

  11. Mouse genetic models for temporomandibular joint development and disorders

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, A; Iwata, J

    2016-01-01

    The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a synovial joint essential for hinge and sliding movements of the mammalian jaw. Temporomandibular joint disorders (TMD) are dysregulations of the muscles or the TMJ in structure, function, and physiology, and result in pain, limited mandibular mobility, and TMJ noise and clicking. Although approximately 40–70% adults in the USA have at least one sign of TMD, the etiology of TMD remains largely unknown. Here, we highlight recent advances in our understanding of TMD in mouse models. PMID:26096083

  12. Acquired genetic mechanisms of a multiresistant bacterium isolated from a treatment plant receiving wastewater from antibiotic production.

    PubMed

    Johnning, Anna; Moore, Edward R B; Svensson-Stadler, Liselott; Shouche, Yogesh S; Larsson, D G Joakim; Kristiansson, Erik

    2013-12-01

    The external environment, particularly wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), where environmental bacteria meet human commensals and pathogens in large numbers, has been highlighted as a potential breeding ground for antibiotic resistance. We have isolated the extensively drug-resistant Ochrobactrum intermedium CCUG 57381 from an Indian WWTP receiving industrial wastewater from pharmaceutical production contaminated with high levels of quinolones. Antibiotic susceptibility testing against 47 antibiotics showed that the strain was 4 to >500 times more resistant to sulfonamides, quinolones, tetracyclines, macrolides, and the aminoglycoside streptomycin than the type strain O. intermedium LMG 3301T. Whole-genome sequencing identified mutations in the Indian strain causing amino acid substitutions in the target enzymes of quinolones. We also characterized three acquired regions containing resistance genes to sulfonamides (sul1), tetracyclines [tet(G) and tetR], and chloramphenicol/florfenicol (floR). Furthermore, the Indian strain harbored acquired mechanisms for horizontal gene transfer, including a type I mating pair-forming system (MPFI), a MOBP relaxase, and insertion sequence transposons. Our results highlight that WWTPs serving antibiotic manufacturing may provide nearly ideal conditions for the recruitment of resistance genes into human commensal and pathogenic bacteria.

  13. Screening for genetic disorders: therapeutic abortion and IVF.

    PubMed

    Michael, M; Buckle, S

    1990-03-01

    This paper examines a proposal to make use of IVF techniques to provide an alternative to therapeutic abortion of fetuses with genetic abnormalities. We begin by describing the proposed procedure, and then show that, considered in itself, it is morally on a par with therapeutic abortion. However, once the wider practical implications are brought into view, the proposed new procedure loses its initial appeal. The pros and cons are not sufficiently clear-cut entirely to rule out the IVF procedure, so the paper concludes by indicating some further complications which may follow, should the procedure come to be adopted. PMID:2319572

  14. Identification of Genetic Loci Underlying the Phenotypic Constructs of Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Xiao-Qing; Georgiades, Stelios; Duku, Eric; Thompson, Ann; Devlin, Bernie; Cook, Edwin H.; Wijsman, Ellen M.; Paterson, Andrew D.; Szatmari, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the underlying phenotypic constructs in autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and to identify genetic loci that are linked to these empirically derived factors. Method: Exploratory factor analysis was applied to two datasets with 28 selected Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised (ADI-R) algorithm items. The first dataset was from…

  15. Personality Mediation of Genetic Effects on Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martel, Michelle M.; Nikolas, Molly; Jernigan, Katherine; Friderici, Karen; Nigg, Joel T.

    2010-01-01

    Personality traits may be viable candidates for mediators of the relationship between genetic risk and ADHD. Participants were 578 children (331 boys; 320 children with ADHD) between the ages of six and 18. Parents and teachers completed a comprehensive, multi-stage diagnostic procedure to assess ADHD and comorbid disorders. Mother completed the…

  16. Common and Specific Genetic Influences on Aggressive and Nonaggressive Conduct Disorder Domains

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gelhorn, Heather; Stallings, Michael; Young, Susan; Corley, Robin; Rhee, Soo Hyun; Hopfer, Christian; Hewitt, John

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To explore the genetic and environmental influences on DSM-IV conduct disorder (CD) aggressive and nonaggressive subscales, taking into account age and sex differences. Method: A community sample of 1,100 twin pairs (ages 11-18) was interviewed using the Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children. Bivariate analyses, using variable…

  17. Delineation of Behavioral Phenotypes in Genetic Syndromes: Characteristics of Autism Spectrum Disorder, Affect and Hyperactivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliver, Chris; Berg, Katy; Moss, Jo; Arron, Kate; Burbidge, Cheryl

    2011-01-01

    We investigated autism spectrum disorder (ASD) symptomatology, hyperactivity and affect in seven genetic syndromes; Angelman (AS; n = 104), Cri du Chat (CdCS; 58), Cornelia de Lange (CdLS; 101), Fragile X (FXS; 191), Prader-Willi (PWS; 189), Smith-Magenis (SMS; 42) and Lowe (LS; 56) syndromes (age range 4-51). ASD symptomatology was heightened in…

  18. Autism and 15q11-q13 Disorders: Behavioral, Genetic, and Pathophysiological Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dykens, Elisabeth M.; Sutcliffe, James S.; Levitt, Pat

    2004-01-01

    New insights into biological factors that underlie autism may be gained by comparing autism to other neurodevelopmental disorders that have autistic features and relatively well-delineated genetic etiologies or neurobiological findings. This review moves beyond global diagnoses of autism and instead uses an endophenotypic approach to compare…

  19. Resolving the etiology of atopic disorders by using genetic analysis of racial ancestry.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Jayanta; Johansson, Elisabet; Bernstein, Jonathan A; Chakraborty, Ranajit; Khurana Hershey, Gurjit K; Rothenberg, Marc E; Mersha, Tesfaye B

    2016-09-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD), food allergy, allergic rhinitis, and asthma are common atopic disorders of complex etiology. The frequently observed atopic march from early AD to asthma, allergic rhinitis, or both later in life and the extensive comorbidity of atopic disorders suggest common causal mechanisms in addition to distinct ones. Indeed, both disease-specific and shared genomic regions exist for atopic disorders. Their prevalence also varies among races; for example, AD and asthma have a higher prevalence in African Americans when compared with European Americans. Whether this disparity stems from true genetic or race-specific environmental risk factors or both is unknown. Thus far, the majority of the genetic studies on atopic diseases have used populations of European ancestry, limiting their generalizability. Large-cohort initiatives and new analytic methods, such as admixture mapping, are currently being used to address this knowledge gap. Here we discuss the unique and shared genetic risk factors for atopic disorders in the context of ancestry variations and the promise of high-throughput "-omics"-based systems biology approach in providing greater insight to deconstruct their genetic and nongenetic etiologies. Future research will also focus on deep phenotyping and genotyping of diverse racial ancestry, gene-environment, and gene-gene interactions. PMID:27297995

  20. Featural versus Configural Face Processing in a Rare Genetic Disorder: Williams Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isaac, L.; Lincoln, A.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Williams syndrome (WMS) is a rare genetic disorder with an estimated prevalence of 1 in 20,000 live births. Among other characteristics, WMS has a distinctive cognitive profile with spared face processing and language skills that contrasts with impairment in the cognitive domains of spatial cognition, problem solving and planning. It…

  1. Spermatogonial Stem Cells: Implications for Genetic Disorders and Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Makiko; De Chiara, Letizia

    2016-01-01

    Spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) propagate mammalian spermatogenesis throughout male reproductive life by continuously self-renewing and differentiating, ultimately, into sperm. SSCs can be cultured for long periods and restore spermatogenesis upon transplantation back into the native microenvironment in vivo. Conventionally, SSC research has been focused mainly on male infertility and, to a lesser extent, on cell reprogramming. With the advent of genome-wide sequencing technology, however, human studies have uncovered a wide range of pathogenic alleles that arise in the male germ line. A subset of de novo point mutations was shown to originate in SSCs and cause congenital disorders in children. This review describes both monogenic diseases (eg, Apert syndrome) and complex disorders that are either known or suspected to be driven by mutations in SSCs. We propose that SSC culture is a suitable model for studying the origin and mechanisms of these diseases. Lastly, we discuss strategies for future clinical implementation of SSC-based technology, from detecting mutation burden by sperm screening to gene correction in vitro. PMID:27596369

  2. Behavioral and molecular genetic contributions to a dimensional classification of personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Livesley, W John

    2005-04-01

    This article examines the possible contribution of behavioral and molecular genetic research to the development of a dimensional classification of personality disorder. It is argued that the results of molecular studies are too preliminary to have immediate nosological significance. However, behavioral genetic methods could play a useful role in constructing a classification that reflects the genetic architecture of personality disorder. It is also argued that the best approach to constructing a valid classification would be to integrate behavioral genetic methods with the construct validation framework used in test construction. An integrative approach is proposed that seeks to combine constructs from alternative dimensional models. It is suggested that strong evidence of a four-dimensional structure to personality disorder provides a way to organize a preliminary model. An initial set of primary traits to define these secondary domains would then be compiled from existing models and refined using a combination of traditional psychometric analyses and behavioral genetic methods. It is concluded that an etiologically based classification is feasible for the DSM-V.

  3. Association between Hypoalbuminaemia and Mortality in Patients with Community-Acquired Bacteraemia Is Primarily Related to Acute Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Magnussen, Bjarne; Oren Gradel, Kim; Gorm Jensen, Thøger; Kolmos, Hans Jørn; Pedersen, Court; Just Vinholt, Pernille; Touborg Lassen, Annmarie

    2016-01-01

    We sought to investigate whether hypoalbuminaemia was mainly caused by acute or chronic factors in patients with community-acquired bacteraemia. In this population-based study, we considered 1844 adult cases of community-acquired bacteraemia that occurred in Funen, Denmark between 2000 and 2008. We used a stepwise prognostic predisposition-insult-response-organ dysfunction (PIRO) logistic regression model by initially including age and comorbidity, then added bacterial species, and finally sepsis severity. The models were furthermore analysed using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. Outcomes comprised mortality incidence on days 0–30 and 31–365 after the bacteraemia episode. Each step was performed with and without baseline albumin level measured on the date of bacteraemia. In 422 patients, their latest albumin measurement taken 8–30 days before the date of bacteraemia was also used in the analysis together with the baseline albumin level. For each decrease of 1g/L in plasma albumin level, the odds ratios (95% confidence intervals) of mortality in the period of 0–30 days after bacteraemia were 0.86 (0.84–0.88) in both predisposition (P) and predisposition-insult (PI) models and 0.87 (0.85–0.89) in the full PIRO-model. The AUC values were 0.78 and 0.66 for mortality in the period of 0–30 days in the model comprising only predisposition factors with and without albumin levels added as a factor, respectively. The AUC values in the full PIRO-model were 0.81 and 0.73 with and without consideration of albumin levels, respectively. A higher proportion of patients died within 30 days if there was a decrease in the albumin level between days 8 and 30 before bacteraemia and the actual bacteraemia date. A single plasma albumin measurement on the bacteraemia date was a better prognostic predictor of short-term mortality than the sepsis severity score. PMID:27611431

  4. Predictive Medicine: Recombinant DNA Technology and Adult-Onset Genetic Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Hayden, Michael

    1988-01-01

    Genetic factors are of great importance in common adult-onset disorders such as atherosclerosis, cancer, and neuro-degenerative diseases. Advances in DNA technology now allow identification of persons at high-risk of developing some of these diseases. This advance is leading to predictive medicine. In some genetic disorders, such as those leading to atherosclerosis and cancer, identification of high-risk individuals allows intervention which alters the natural history of the disorder. In other diseases, for which there is no treatment, such as Huntington's disease, the application of this technology provides information that relieves uncertainty and may affect quality of life, but does not alter the course of the illness. General implementation of predictive testing programs awaits the results of pilot projects, which will demonstrate the needs, appropriate levels of support, and guidelines for delivery of such testing. PMID:21253100

  5. Therapygenetics: Using genetic markers to predict response to psychological treatment for mood and anxiety disorders

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Considerable variation is evident in response to psychological therapies for mood and anxiety disorders. Genetic factors alongside environmental variables and gene-environment interactions are implicated in the etiology of these disorders and it is plausible that these same factors may also be important in predicting individual differences in response to psychological treatment. In this article, we review the evidence that genetic variation influences psychological treatment outcomes with a primary focus on mood and anxiety disorders. Unlike most past work, which has considered prediction of response to pharmacotherapy, this article reviews recent work in the field of therapygenetics, namely the role of genes in predicting psychological treatment response. As this is a field in its infancy, methodological recommendations are made and opportunities for future research are identified. PMID:23388219

  6. Genetic disruption of voltage-gated calcium channels in psychiatric and neurological disorders

    PubMed Central

    Heyes, Samuel; Pratt, Wendy S.; Rees, Elliott; Dahimene, Shehrazade; Ferron, Laurent; Owen, Michael J.; Dolphin, Annette C.

    2015-01-01

    This review summarises genetic studies in which calcium channel genes have been connected to the spectrum of neuropsychiatric syndromes, from bipolar disorder and schizophrenia to autism spectrum disorders and intellectual impairment. Among many other genes, striking numbers of the calcium channel gene superfamily have been implicated in the aetiology of these diseases by various DNA analysis techniques. We will discuss how these relate to the known monogenic disorders associated with point mutations in calcium channels. We will then examine the functional evidence for a causative link between these mutations or single nucleotide polymorphisms and the disease processes. A major challenge for the future will be to translate the expanding psychiatric genetic findings into altered physiological function, involvement in the wider pathology of the diseases, and what potential that provides for personalised and stratified treatment options for patients. PMID:26386135

  7. Carrier testing for Ashkenazi Jewish disorders in the prenatal setting: navigating the genetic maze.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Jose Carlos P; Schreiber-Agus, Nicole; Carter, Suzanne M; Klugman, Susan; Gregg, Anthony R; Gross, Susan J

    2014-09-01

    Exciting developments in the fields of genetics and genomics have facilitated the identification of the etiological basis of many Mendelian disorders. Several of the methods used in gene discovery have focused initially on homogeneous populations, including the Ashkenazi Jewish population. The founder effect is well recognized in this community, in which historical events and cultural behaviors have resulted in a limited number of mutations underlying genetic disorders with substantial health impact. New technologies have made it possible to rapidly expand the test panels, changing testing paradigms, and thereby creating challenges for the physician in deciphering the appropriate approach to genetic screening in this population. The goal of this review is to help primary obstetric health care providers navigate through this quickly moving field so as to better counsel and support their patients of Ashkenazi Jewish heritage. PMID:24508465

  8. The Role of Host Genetics in the Susceptibility for HIV-associated Neurocognitive Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Singer, Elyse J.; Shapshak, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Despite progress in the treatment of the Human Immunodeficiency virus (HIV), there continues to be a high prevalence of infected individuals who develop neurocognitive deficits and disorders. Our understanding of the potential cause of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) continues to develop on many fronts. Among them is the study of host genetics. Here, we review the most current information regarding the association between host genetics and risk for HIV infection, AIDS, and HAND. We focus on the role of dopamine dysfunction in the etiology of HAND, and propose a number of genetic polymorphisms within genes related to dopaminergic functioning and other neurobiological factors that may confer vulnerability or protection against HAND. PMID:18264751

  9. Familial clustering of epilepsy and behavioral disorders: Evidence for a shared genetic basis

    PubMed Central

    Hesdorffer, Dale C.; Caplan, Rochelle; Berg, Anne T.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To examine whether family history of unprovoked seizures is associated with behavioral disorders in epilepsy probands, thereby supporting the hypothesis of shared underlying genetic susceptibility to these disorders. Methods We conducted an analysis of the 308 probands with childhood onset epilepsy from the Connecticut Study of Epilepsy with information on first degree family history of unprovoked seizures and of febrile seizures whose parents completed the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) at the 9-year follow-up. Clinical cut-offs for CBCL problem and DSM-Oriented scales were examined. The association between first degree family history of unprovoked seizure and behavioral disorders was assessed separately in uncomplicated and complicated epilepsy and separately for first degree family history of febrile seizures. A subanalysis, accounting for the tendency for behavioral disorders to run in families, adjusted for siblings with the same disorder as the proband. Prevalence ratios were used to describe the associations. Key findings In probands with uncomplicated epilepsy, first degree family history of unprovoked seizure was significantly associated with clinical cut-offs for Total Problems and Internalizing Disorders. Among Internalizing Disorders, clinical cut-offs for Withdrawn/Depressed, and DSM-Oriented scales for Affective Disorder and Anxiety Disorder were significantly associated with family history of unprovoked seizures. Clinical cut-offs for Aggressive Behavior and Delinquent Behavior, and DSM-Oriented scales for Conduct Disorder and Oppositional Defiant Disorder were significantly associated with family history of unprovoked seizure. Adjustment for siblings with the same disorder revealed significant associations for the relationship between first degree family history of unprovoked seizure and Total Problems and Agressive Behavior in probands with uncomplicated epilepsy; marginally significant results were seen for Internalizing Disorder

  10. The vascular phenotype in Pseudoxanthoma elasticum and related disorders: contribution of a genetic disease to the understanding of vascular calcification

    PubMed Central

    Lefthériotis, Georges; Omarjee, Loukman; Saux, Olivier Le; Henrion, Daniel; Abraham, Pierre; Prunier, Fabrice; Willoteaux, Serge; Martin, Ludovic

    2013-01-01

    Vascular calcification is a complex and dynamic process occurring in various physiological conditions such as aging and exercise or in acquired metabolic disorders like diabetes or chronic renal insufficiency. Arterial calcifications are also observed in several genetic diseases revealing the important role of unbalanced or defective anti- or pro-calcifying factors. Pseudoxanthoma elasticum (PXE) is an inherited disease (OMIM 264800) characterized by elastic fiber fragmentation and calcification in various soft conjunctive tissues including the skin, eyes, and arterial media. The PXE disease results from mutations in the ABCC6 gene, encoding an ATP-binding cassette transporter primarily expressed in the liver, kidneys suggesting that it is a prototypic metabolic soft-tissue calcifying disease of genetic origin. The clinical expression of the PXE arterial disease is characterized by an increased risk for coronary (myocardial infarction), cerebral (aneurysm and stroke), and lower limb peripheral artery disease. However, the structural and functional changes in the arterial wall induced by PXE are still unexplained. The use of a recombinant mouse model inactivated for the Abcc6 gene is an important tool for the understanding of the PXE pathophysiology although the vascular impact in this model remains limited to date. Overlapping of the PXE phenotype with other inherited calcifying diseases could bring important informations to our comprehension of the PXE disease. PMID:23408347

  11. Genetics Underlying Atypical Parkinsonism and Related Neurodegenerative Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Scholz, Sonja W.; Bras, Jose

    2015-01-01

    Atypical parkinsonism syndromes, such as dementia with Lewy bodies, multiple system atrophy, progressive supranuclear palsy and corticobasal degeneration, are neurodegenerative diseases with complex clinical and pathological features. Heterogeneity in clinical presentations, possible secondary determinants as well as mimic syndromes pose a major challenge to accurately diagnose patients suffering from these devastating conditions. Over the last two decades, significant advancements in genomic technologies have provided us with increasing insights into the molecular pathogenesis of atypical parkinsonism and their intriguing relationships to related neurodegenerative diseases, fueling new hopes to incorporate molecular knowledge into our diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic approaches towards managing these conditions. In this review article, we summarize the current understanding of genetic mechanisms implicated in atypical parkinsonism syndromes. We further highlight mimic syndromes relevant to differential considerations and possible future directions. PMID:26501269

  12. Genetic and environmental modulation of neurodevelopmental disorders: Translational insights from labs to beds.

    PubMed

    Homberg, Judith R; Kyzar, Evan J; Scattoni, Maria Luisa; Norton, William H; Pittman, Julian; Gaikwad, Siddharth; Nguyen, Michael; Poudel, Manoj K; Ullmann, Jeremy F P; Diamond, David M; Kaluyeva, Aleksandra A; Parker, Matthew O; Brown, Richard E; Song, Cai; Gainetdinov, Raul R; Gottesman, Irving I; Kalueff, Allan V

    2016-07-01

    Neurodevelopmental disorders (NDDs) are a heterogeneous group of prevalent neuropsychiatric illnesses with various degrees of social, cognitive, motor, language and affective deficits. NDDs are caused by aberrant brain development due to genetic and environmental perturbations. Common NDDs include autism spectrum disorder (ASD), intellectual disability, communication/speech disorders, motor/tic disorders and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Genetic and epigenetic/environmental factors play a key role in these NDDs with significant societal impact. Given the lack of their efficient therapies, it is important to gain further translational insights into the pathobiology of NDDs. To address these challenges, the International Stress and Behavior Society (ISBS) has established the Strategic Task Force on NDDs. Summarizing the Panel's findings, here we discuss the neurobiological mechanisms of selected common NDDs and a wider NDD+ spectrum of associated neuropsychiatric disorders with developmental trajectories. We also outline the utility of existing preclinical (animal) models for building translational and cross-diagnostic bridges to improve our understanding of various NDDs. PMID:27113433

  13. Definitions of Normal Liver Fat and the Association of Insulin Sensitivity with Acquired and Genetic NAFLD—A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Petäjä, Elina M.; Yki-Järvinen, Hannele

    2016-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) covers a spectrum of disease ranging from simple steatosis (NAFL) to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and fibrosis. “Obese/Metabolic NAFLD” is closely associated with obesity and insulin resistance and therefore predisposes to type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. NAFLD can also be caused by common genetic variants, the patatin-like phospholipase domain-containing 3 (PNPLA3) or the transmembrane 6 superfamily member 2 (TM6SF2). Since NAFL, irrespective of its cause, can progress to NASH and liver fibrosis, its definition is of interest. We reviewed the literature to identify data on definition of normal liver fat using liver histology and different imaging tools, and analyzed whether NAFLD caused by the gene variants is associated with insulin resistance. Histologically, normal liver fat content in liver biopsies is most commonly defined as macroscopic steatosis in less than 5% of hepatocytes. In the population-based Dallas Heart Study, the upper 95th percentile of liver fat measured by proton magnetic spectroscopy (1H-MRS) in healthy subjects was 5.6%, which corresponds to approximately 15% histological liver fat. When measured by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based techniques such as the proton density fat fraction (PDFF), 5% macroscopic steatosis corresponds to a PDFF of 6% to 6.4%. In contrast to “Obese/metabolic NAFLD”, NAFLD caused by genetic variants is not associated with insulin resistance. This implies that NAFLD is heterogeneous and that “Obese/Metabolic NAFLD” but not NAFLD due to the PNPLA3 or TM6SF2 genetic variants predisposes to type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. PMID:27128911

  14. Structural, Genetic, and Functional Signatures of Disordered Neuro-Immunological Development in Autism Spectrum Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Vishal; Ramdas, Shweta; Ochoa, Courtney Rothrock; Wallace, David; Bhide, Pradeep; Kohane, Isaac

    2012-01-01

    Background Numerous linkage studies have been performed in pedigrees of Autism Spectrum Disorders, and these studies point to diverse loci and etiologies of autism in different pedigrees. The underlying pattern may be identified by an integrative approach, especially since ASD is a complex disorder manifested through many loci. Method Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) was studied through two different and independent genome-scale measurement modalities. We analyzed the results of copy number variation in autism and triangulated these with linkage studies. Results Consistently across both genome-scale measurements, the same two molecular themes emerged: immune/chemokine pathways and developmental pathways. Conclusion Linkage studies in aggregate do indeed share a thematic consistency, one which structural analyses recapitulate with high significance. These results also show for the first time that genomic profiling of pathways using a recombination distance metric can capture pathways that are consistent with those obtained from copy number variations (CNV). PMID:23239965

  15. Social Engagement with Parents in 11-Month-Old Siblings at High and Low Genetic Risk for Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Susan B.; Leezenbaum, Nina B.; Mahoney, Amanda S.; Day, Taylor N.; Schmidt, Emily N.

    2015-01-01

    Infant siblings of children with an autism spectrum disorder are at heightened genetic risk to develop autism spectrum disorder. We observed high risk (n?=?35) and low risk (n?=?27) infants at 11?months during free play with a parent. Children were assessed for autism spectrum disorder in toddlerhood. High-risk infants with a later diagnosis…

  16. Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder with Reading Disabilities: Preliminary Genetic Findings on the Involvement of the ADRA2A Gene

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevenson, J.; Langley, K.; Pay, H.; Payton, A.; Worthington, J.; Ollier, W.; Thapar, A.

    2005-01-01

    Background: Attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and reading disability (RD) tend to co-occur and quantitative genetic studies have shown this to arise primarily through shared genetic influences. However, molecular genetic studies have shown different genes to be associated with each of these conditions. Neurobiological studies have…

  17. Widespread Macromolecular Interaction Perturbations in Human Genetic Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Sahni, Nidhi; Yi, Song; Taipale, Mikko; Fuxman Bass, Juan I.; Coulombe-Huntington, Jasmin; Yang, Fan; Peng, Jian; Weile, Jochen; Karras, Georgios I.; Wang, Yang; Kovács, István A.; Kamburov, Atanas; Krykbaeva, Irina; Lam, Mandy H.; Tucker, George; Khurana, Vikram; Sharma, Amitabh; Liu, Yang-Yu; Yachie, Nozomu; Zhong, Quan; Shen, Yun; Palagi, Alexandre; San-Miguel, Adriana; Fan, Changyu; Balcha, Dawit; Dricot, Amelie; Jordan, Daniel M.; Walsh, Jennifer M.; Shah, Akash A.; Yang, Xinping; Stoyanova, Ani; Leighton, Alex; Calderwood, Michael A.; Jacob, Yves; Cusick, Michael E.; Salehi-Ashtiani, Kourosh; Whitesell, Luke J.; Sunyaev, Shamil; Berger, Bonnie; Barabási, Albert-László; Charloteaux, Benoit; Hill, David E.; Hao, Tong; Roth, Frederick P.; Xia, Yu; Walhout, Albertha J.M.; Lindquist, Susan; Vidal, Marc

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY How disease-associated mutations impair protein activities in the context of biological networks remains mostly undetermined. Although a few renowned alleles are well characterized, functional information is missing for over 100,000 disease-associated variants. Here we functionally profile several thousand missense mutations across a spectrum of Mendelian disorders using various interaction assays. The majority of disease-associated alleles exhibit wild-type chaperone binding profiles, suggesting they preserve protein folding or stability. While common variants from healthy individuals rarely affect interactions, two-thirds of disease-associated alleles perturb protein-protein interactions, with half corresponding to “edgetic” alleles affecting only a subset of interactions while leaving most other interactions unperturbed. With transcription factors, many alleles that leave protein-protein interactions intact affect DNA binding. Different mutations in the same gene leading to different interaction profiles often result in distinct disease phenotypes. Thus disease-associated alleles that perturb distinct protein activities rather than grossly affecting folding and stability are relatively widespread. PMID:25910212

  18. The genetics of disorders of sex development in humans.

    PubMed

    Ohnesorg, Thomas; Vilain, Eric; Sinclair, Andrew H

    2014-01-01

    One of the defining events during human embryonic development with the most far-reaching effects for the individual is whether the embryo develops as male or female. The crucial step in this process is the differentiation of the bipotential embryonic gonads into either testes or ovaries. If the embryo inherits X and Y sex chromosomes, the Y-linked SRY (sex determining region in Y) gene initiates a network of genes that results in a functional testis and ultimately a male phenotype. By contrast, in an embryo with 2 X chromosomes, the undifferentiated gonad develops as an ovary resulting in a female phenotype. Perturbation of any of the genes in either the testicular or ovarian developmental pathway can result in individuals with disorders of sex development. In this review, we provide a summary of known components of testicular or ovarian pathways and their antagonistic actions and give a brief overview of new technologies currently used to identify the missing pieces of the sex development network.

  19. Genetic and Disorder-Specific Aspects of Resting State EEG Abnormalities in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Venables, Noah C.; Bernat, Edward M.; Sponheim, Scott R.

    2009-01-01

    We evaluated whether abnormal frequency composition of the resting state electroencephalogram (EEG) in schizophrenia was associated with genetic liability for the disorder by studying first-degree biological relatives of schizophrenia patients. The study included a data-driven method for defining EEG frequency components and determined the specificity of resting state EEG frequency abnormalities by assessing schizophrenia patients, bipolar disorder patients, and relatives of both patient groups. Schizophrenia patients and their relatives, but not bipolar patients or their relatives, exhibited increased high-frequency activity (beta) providing evidence for disturbances in resting state brain activity being specific to genetic liability for schizophrenia. Schizophrenia patients exhibited augmented low-frequency EEG activity (delta, theta), while bipolar disorder patients and the 2 groups of relatives generally failed to manifest similar low-frequency EEG abnormalities. The Val158Met polymorphism for the catechol-O-methyl transferase (COMT) gene was most strongly associated with delta and theta activity in schizophrenia patients. Met homozygote schizophrenia patients exhibited augmented activity for the 2 low-frequency bands compared with control subjects. Excessive high-frequency EEG activity over frontal brain regions may serve as an endophenotype that reflects cortical expression of genetic vulnerability for schizophrenia. Low-frequency resting state EEG anomalies in schizophrenia may relate to disorder-specific pathophysiology in schizophrenia and the influence of the COMT gene on tonic dopamanergic function. PMID:18381357

  20. Genomic View of Bipolar Disorder Revealed by Whole Genome Sequencing in a Genetic Isolate

    PubMed Central

    Georgi, Benjamin; Craig, David; Kember, Rachel L.; Liu, Wencheng; Lindquist, Ingrid; Nasser, Sara; Brown, Christopher; Egeland, Janice A.; Paul, Steven M.; Bućan, Maja

    2014-01-01

    Bipolar disorder is a common, heritable mental illness characterized by recurrent episodes of mania and depression. Despite considerable effort to elucidate the genetic underpinnings of bipolar disorder, causative genetic risk factors remain elusive. We conducted a comprehensive genomic analysis of bipolar disorder in a large Old Order Amish pedigree. Microsatellite genotypes and high-density SNP-array genotypes of 388 family members were combined with whole genome sequence data for 50 of these subjects, comprising 18 parent-child trios. This study design permitted evaluation of candidate variants within the context of haplotype structure by resolving the phase in sequenced parent-child trios and by imputation of variants into multiple unsequenced siblings. Non-parametric and parametric linkage analysis of the entire pedigree as well as on smaller clusters of families identified several nominally significant linkage peaks, each of which included dozens of predicted deleterious variants. Close inspection of exonic and regulatory variants in genes under the linkage peaks using family-based association tests revealed additional credible candidate genes for functional studies and further replication in population-based cohorts. However, despite the in-depth genomic characterization of this unique, large and multigenerational pedigree from a genetic isolate, there was no convergence of evidence implicating a particular set of risk loci or common pathways. The striking haplotype and locus heterogeneity we observed has profound implications for the design of studies of bipolar and other related disorders. PMID:24625924

  1. Map of autosomal recessive genetic disorders in Saudi Arabia: concepts and future directions.

    PubMed

    Al-Owain, Mohammed; Al-Zaidan, Hamad; Al-Hassnan, Zuhair

    2012-10-01

    Saudi Arabia has a population of 27.1 million. Prevalence of many autosomal recessive disorders is higher than in other known populations. This is attributable to the high rate of consanguineous marriages (56%), the tribal structure, and large family size. Founder mutations have been recognized in many autosomal recessive disorders, many of which are overrepresented within certain tribes. On the other hand, allelic heterogeneity is also observed among common and rare autosomal recessive conditions. With the adoption of more advanced molecular techniques in the country in recent years in conjunction with international collaboration, the mapping of various autosomal recessive disorders has increased dramatically. Different genetic concepts pertinent to this highly inbred population are discussed here. Addressing such genetic disorders at the national level will become a cornerstone of strategic health care initiatives in the 21st century. Current efforts are hampered by many socio-cultural and health care related factors. Education about genetic diseases, establishment of a "national registry" and mutational database, and enhanced healthcare access are crucial for success of any preventative campaign. PMID:22903695

  2. [Diagnostics of the genetic causes of autism spectrum disorders - a clinical geneticist's view].

    PubMed

    Szczaluba, Krzysztof

    2014-01-01

    Explanation of the genetic basis of autism spectrum disorders has, for many decades, been a part of interest of researchers and clinicians. In recent years, thanks to modern molecular and cytogenetic techniques, a significant progress has been achieved in the diagnosis of genetic causes of autism. This applies particularly, but not exclusively, to those cases of autism that are accompanied by other clinical signs (i. e. complex phenotypes). The important clinical markers belong to different categories, and include congenital defects/anomalies, dysmorphism and macro-/microcephaly, to name the few. Thus, the choice of the diagnostic strategy depends on the clinical and pedigree information and, under Polish circumstances, the availability of specific diagnostic techniques and the amount of reimbursement under the National Health Service. Overall, the identification of the genetic causes of autism spectrum disorders is possible in about 10-30% of patients. In this paper the practical aspects of the use of different diagnostic techniques are briefly described. Some clinical examples and current recommendations for the diagnosis of patients with autism spectrum disorders are also presented. The point of view of a specialist in clinical genetics, increasingly involved, as part of the multidisciplinary care team, in the diagnostics of an autistic child has been demonstrated.

  3. Human Urine-Derived Renal Progenitors for Personalized Modeling of Genetic Kidney Disorders.

    PubMed

    Lazzeri, Elena; Ronconi, Elisa; Angelotti, Maria Lucia; Peired, Anna; Mazzinghi, Benedetta; Becherucci, Francesca; Conti, Sara; Sansavini, Giulia; Sisti, Alessandro; Ravaglia, Fiammetta; Lombardi, Duccio; Provenzano, Aldesia; Manonelles, Anna; Cruzado, Josep M; Giglio, Sabrina; Roperto, Rosa Maria; Materassi, Marco; Lasagni, Laura; Romagnani, Paola

    2015-08-01

    The critical role of genetic and epigenetic factors in the pathogenesis of kidney disorders is gradually becoming clear, and the need for disease models that recapitulate human kidney disorders in a personalized manner is paramount. In this study, we describe a method to select and amplify renal progenitor cultures from the urine of patients with kidney disorders. Urine-derived human renal progenitors exhibited phenotype and functional properties identical to those purified from kidney tissue, including the capacity to differentiate into tubular cells and podocytes, as demonstrated by confocal microscopy, Western blot analysis of podocyte-specific proteins, and scanning electron microscopy. Lineage tracing studies performed with conditional transgenic mice, in which podocytes are irreversibly tagged upon tamoxifen treatment (NPHS2.iCreER;mT/mG), that were subjected to doxorubicin nephropathy demonstrated that renal progenitors are the only urinary cell population that can be amplified in long-term culture. To validate the use of these cells for personalized modeling of kidney disorders, renal progenitors were obtained from (1) the urine of children with nephrotic syndrome and carrying potentially pathogenic mutations in genes encoding for podocyte proteins and (2) the urine of children without genetic alterations, as validated by next-generation sequencing. Renal progenitors obtained from patients carrying pathogenic mutations generated podocytes that exhibited an abnormal cytoskeleton structure and functional abnormalities compared with those obtained from patients with proteinuria but without genetic mutations. The results of this study demonstrate that urine-derived patient-specific renal progenitor cultures may be an innovative research tool for modeling of genetic kidney disorders.

  4. [Genetic defects and disorders at the neuromuscular junction].

    PubMed

    Ohno, Kinji

    2011-07-01

    Genetic defects in molecules expressed at the neuromuscular junction (NMJ) cause congenital myasthenic syndromes (CMSs), which are characterized by muscle weakness, abnormal fatigability, amyotrophy, and minor facial anomalies. Muscle weakness mostly develops under 2 years but is also sometimes seen in adults. Mutations identified to date include (i) muscle nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR) subunits, (ii) rapsyn that anchors and clusters AChRs at the neuromuscular junction, (iii) agrin that is released from the nerve terminal and induces AChR clustering by stimulating the downstream LRP4/MuSK/Dok-7/rapsyn/AChR pathway, (iv) muscle-specific kinase (MuSK) that transmits the AChR-clustering signal from agrin/LRP4 to rapsyn/AChR, (v) Dok-7 that transmits the AChR-clustering signal from agrin/LRP4/MuSK to rapsyn/AChR, (vi) skeletal muscle sodium channel type 1.4 (Nav1.4) that spreads the depolarization potential from the endplate throughout muscle fibers, (vii) collagen Q that anchors acetylcholinesterase to the synaptic basal lamina, and (viii) choline acetyltransferase that resynthesizes acetylcholine from recycled choline at the nerve terminal. In addition, mutations in the heparin sulfate proteoglycan perlecan, which binds to many molecules including collagen Q and dystroglycan, causes Schwartz-Jampel syndrome. Interestingly, mutations in LRP4 cause Cenani-Lenz syndactyly syndrome but not CMS. AChR, MuSK, and LRP4 are also targets of auto-antibodies in myasthenia gravis. In addition, molecules at the NMJ are targets of many other disease states AChRs are blocked by the snake toxin alpha-bungarotoxin and the plant poison curare. The presynaptic SNARE complex is attacked by botulinum toxin. Acetylcholinesterase is inhibited by the nerve gas sarin and by organophosphate pesticides. This review focuses on the molecular bases underlying defects of AChR, rapsyn, Nav1.4, collagen Q, and choline acetyltransferase. PMID:21747136

  5. Molecular, Phenotypic Aspects and Therapeutic Horizons of Rare Genetic Bone Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Dhawan, Naveen; Vohra, Shivani; Tu, Khin; Abdelmagid, Samir M.

    2014-01-01

    A rare disease afflicts less than 200,000 individuals, according to the National Organization for Rare Diseases (NORD) of the United States. Over 6,000 rare disorders affect approximately 1 in 10 Americans. Rare genetic bone disorders remain the major causes of disability in US patients. These rare bone disorders also represent a therapeutic challenge for clinicians, due to lack of understanding of underlying mechanisms. This systematic review explored current literature on therapeutic directions for the following rare genetic bone disorders: fibrous dysplasia, Gorham-Stout syndrome, fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva, melorheostosis, multiple hereditary exostosis, osteogenesis imperfecta, craniometaphyseal dysplasia, achondroplasia, and hypophosphatasia. The disease mechanisms of Gorham-Stout disease, melorheostosis, and multiple hereditary exostosis are not fully elucidated. Inhibitors of the ACVR1/ALK2 pathway may serve as possible therapeutic intervention for FOP. The use of bisphosphonates and IL-6 inhibitors has been explored to be useful in the treatment of fibrous dysplasia, but more research is warranted. Cell therapy, bisphosphonate polytherapy, and human growth hormone may avert the pathology in osteogenesis imperfecta, but further studies are needed. There are still no current effective treatments for these bone disorders; however, significant promising advances in therapeutic modalities were developed that will limit patient suffering and treat their skeletal disabilities. PMID:25530967

  6. Genetic testing of children for predisposition to mood disorders: anticipating the clinical issues.

    PubMed

    Erickson, Jessica A; Kuzmich, Lili; Ormond, Kelly E; Gordon, Erynn; Christman, Michael F; Cho, Mildred K; Levinson, Douglas F

    2014-08-01

    Large-scale sequencing information may provide a basis for genetic tests for predisposition to common disorders. In this study, participants in the Coriell Personalized Medicine Collaborative (N = 53) with a personal and/or family history of Major Depressive Disorder or Bipolar Disorder were interviewed based on the Health Belief Model around hypothetical intention to test one's children for probability of developing a mood disorder. Most participants (87 %) were interested in a hypothetical test for children that had high ("90 %") positive predictive value, while 51 % of participants remained interested in a modestly predictive test ("20 %"). Interest was driven by beliefs about effects of test results on parenting behaviors and on discrimination. Most participants favored testing before adolescence (64 %), and were reluctant to share results with asymptomatic children before adulthood. Participants anticipated both positive and negative effects of testing on parental treatment and on children's self-esteem. Further investigation will determine whether these findings will generalize to other complex disorders for which early intervention is possible but not clearly demonstrated to improve outcomes. More information is also needed about the effects of childhood genetic testing and sharing of results on parent-child relationships, and about the role of the child in the decision-making process. PMID:24651919

  7. The value of the study of natural history in genetic disorders and congenital anomaly syndromes.

    PubMed Central

    Hall, J G

    1988-01-01

    The study of the natural history of genetic disorders and syndromes with congenital anomalies and dysmorphic features is a challenging and often neglected area. There are many reasons to pursue this type of research but it requires special clinical skills and a considerable amount of hard work. Setting up protocols and collecting data is complex and time consuming. Frequently, helpful clues for a particular disorder come from the study of the natural history of other disorders. Older affected subjects and unique cases with unusual features are often most important in unravelling the 'normal' course of a disease or recognising the basic defect. The study of natural history from individual patients and their records is complementary to population or registry based studies because it identifies individual variations and clinical heterogeneity. The understanding of the natural history of a particular disorder is of importance both to the affected person and their family and to the physicians caring for them. It is also useful to the basic researcher trying to determine the pathogenetic mechanism causing the disorder. In many ways, clinical geneticists have learned the art of caring for patients, as well as the challenges of clinical genetics, by becoming apprentices to and studying in depth specific disease entities. PMID:3050091

  8. Imaging Phenotypes of Major Depressive Disorder: Genetic Correlates

    PubMed Central

    Savitz, Jonathan B; Drevets, Wayne C

    2009-01-01

    Imaging techniques are a potentially powerful method of identifying phenotypes that are associated with, or are indicative of a vulnerability to developing major depressive disorder (MDD). Here we identify seven promising MDD-associated traits identified by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or positron emission tomography (PET). We evaluate whether these traits are state-independent, heritable endophenotypes, or state-dependent phenotypes that may be useful markers of treatment efficacy. In MDD, increased activity of the amygdala in response to negative stimuli appears to be a mood-congruent phenomenon, and is likely moderated by the serotonin transporter gene (SLC6A4) promoter polymorphism (5-HTTLPR). Hippocampal volume loss is characteristic of elderly or chronically-ill samples and may be impacted by the val66met brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene variant and the 5-HTTLPR SLC6A4 polymorphism. White matter pathology is salient in elderly MDD cohorts but is associated with cerebrovascular disease, and is unlikely to be a useful marker of a latent MDD diathesis. Increased blood flow or metabolism of the subgenual anterior cingulate cortex (sgACC), together with gray matter volume loss in this region, is a well-replicated finding in MDD. An attenuation of the usual pattern of fronto-limbic connectivity, particularly a decreased temporal correlation in amygdala-anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) activity, is another MDD-associated trait. Concerning neuroreceptor PET imaging, decreased 5-HT1A binding potential in the raphe, medial temporal lobe, and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) has been strongly associated with MDD, and may be impacted by a functional single nucleotide polymorphism in the promoter region of the 5-HT1A gene (HTR1A: –1019C/G; rs6295). Potentially indicative of inter-study variation in MDD etiology or mood state, both increased and decreased binding potential of the serotonin transporter has been reported. Challenges facing the field include

  9. Bilateral cataract and high serum ferritin: a new dominant genetic disorder?

    PubMed Central

    Bonneau, Dominique; Winter-Fuseau, Isabelle; Loiseau, Marie-Noëlle; Amati, Patrizia; Berthier, Michel; Oriot, Denis; Beaumont, Carole

    1995-01-01

    This paper reports the cosegregation in a three generation pedigree of dominantly inherited cataract with an abnormally high level of serum ferritin. In this family, circulating L ferritin was raised in all subjects affected by cataract independently of iron overload. We suggest that a disorder of ferritin metabolism could be a new genetic disorder leading to lens opacity. Cataract-hyperferritaemia syndrome could also be a new contiguous gene syndrome involving the L ferritin gene and the gene coding for the lens membrane protein (MP19), which both map to the same region of chromosome 19q. PMID:8558554

  10. Molecular genetics and clinical aspects of inherited disorders of nerve and muscle.

    PubMed

    Harding, A E

    1992-10-01

    Rapid progress has been made in elucidating the molecular genetic basis of several neuromuscular disorders in the past year. Candidate genes have been identified or analysed in hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy (HMSN) type I, X-linked bulbospinal neuronopathy and non-dystrophic myotonic disorders, and further mutations causing amyloidosis have been identified. A familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) locus maps to chromosome 21 in some families, and the chronic childhood spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) and malignant hyperthermia loci have been localized more precisely. PMID:1392132

  11. Dissociative experiences in obsessive-compulsive disorder and trichotillomania: clinical and genetic findings.

    PubMed

    Lochner, Christine; Seedat, Soraya; Hemmings, Sian M J; Kinnear, Craig J; Corfield, Valerie A; Niehaus, Dana J H; Moolman-Smook, Johanna C; Stein, Dan J

    2004-01-01

    A link between dissociation proneness in adulthood and self-reports of childhood traumatic events (including familial loss in childhood, sexual/physical abuse and neglect) has been documented. Several studies have also provided evidence for an association between dissociative experiences and trauma in patients with various psychiatric disorders, including post-traumatic stress disorder, borderline personality, dissociative identity and eating disorders. Based on the relative paucity of data on dissociation and trauma in obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and trichotillomania (TTM), the primary objective of this study was to examine the relationship between trauma and dissociative experiences (DE) in these two diagnostic groups. Furthermore, the availability of clinical and genetic data on this sample allowed us to explore clinical and genetic factors relevant to this association. A total of 110 OCD and 32 TTM patients were compared with respect to the degree of dissociation (using the Dissociative Experiences Scale [DES]) and childhood trauma (using the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire [CTQ]). Patients were classified on the DES as either "high" (mean DES score >/= 30) or "low" (mean DES score < 30) dissociators. Additional clinical and genetic factors were also explored with chi-square and t tests as appropriate. A total of 15.8% of OCD patients and 18.8% of TTM patients were high dissociators. OCD and TTM groups were comparable on DES and CTQ total scores, and in both OCD and TTM groups, significant positive correlations were found between mean DES scores and mean CTQ subscores of emotional abuse, physical abuse, sexual abuse, and physical neglect. In the OCD group, high dissociators were significantly younger than low dissociators, and significantly more high dissociators than low dissociators reported a lifetime (current and past) history of tics (P <.001), Tourette's syndrome (P =.019), bulimia nervosa (P =.003), and borderline personality disorder (P =.027

  12. Integrating Genetic, Neuropsychological and Neuroimaging Data to Model Early-Onset Obsessive Compulsive Disorder Severity.

    PubMed

    Mas, Sergi; Gassó, Patricia; Morer, Astrid; Calvo, Anna; Bargalló, Nuria; Lafuente, Amalia; Lázaro, Luisa

    2016-01-01

    We propose an integrative approach that combines structural magnetic resonance imaging data (MRI), diffusion tensor imaging data (DTI), neuropsychological data, and genetic data to predict early-onset obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) severity. From a cohort of 87 patients, 56 with complete information were used in the present analysis. First, we performed a multivariate genetic association analysis of OCD severity with 266 genetic polymorphisms. This association analysis was used to select and prioritize the SNPs that would be included in the model. Second, we split the sample into a training set (N = 38) and a validation set (N = 18). Third, entropy-based measures of information gain were used for feature selection with the training subset. Fourth, the selected features were fed into two supervised methods of class prediction based on machine learning, using the leave-one-out procedure with the training set. Finally, the resulting model was validated with the validation set. Nine variables were used for the creation of the OCD severity predictor, including six genetic polymorphisms and three variables from the neuropsychological data. The developed model classified child and adolescent patients with OCD by disease severity with an accuracy of 0.90 in the testing set and 0.70 in the validation sample. Above its clinical applicability, the combination of particular neuropsychological, neuroimaging, and genetic characteristics could enhance our understanding of the neurobiological basis of the disorder. PMID:27093171

  13. Integrating Genetic, Neuropsychological and Neuroimaging Data to Model Early-Onset Obsessive Compulsive Disorder Severity

    PubMed Central

    Mas, Sergi; Gassó, Patricia; Morer, Astrid; Calvo, Anna; Bargalló, Nuria; Lafuente, Amalia; Lázaro, Luisa

    2016-01-01

    We propose an integrative approach that combines structural magnetic resonance imaging data (MRI), diffusion tensor imaging data (DTI), neuropsychological data, and genetic data to predict early-onset obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) severity. From a cohort of 87 patients, 56 with complete information were used in the present analysis. First, we performed a multivariate genetic association analysis of OCD severity with 266 genetic polymorphisms. This association analysis was used to select and prioritize the SNPs that would be included in the model. Second, we split the sample into a training set (N = 38) and a validation set (N = 18). Third, entropy-based measures of information gain were used for feature selection with the training subset. Fourth, the selected features were fed into two supervised methods of class prediction based on machine learning, using the leave-one-out procedure with the training set. Finally, the resulting model was validated with the validation set. Nine variables were used for the creation of the OCD severity predictor, including six genetic polymorphisms and three variables from the neuropsychological data. The developed model classified child and adolescent patients with OCD by disease severity with an accuracy of 0.90 in the testing set and 0.70 in the validation sample. Above its clinical applicability, the combination of particular neuropsychological, neuroimaging, and genetic characteristics could enhance our understanding of the neurobiological basis of the disorder. PMID:27093171

  14. Exploiting the unique regenerative capacity of the liver to underpin cell and gene therapy strategies for genetic and acquired liver disease.

    PubMed

    Logan, Grant J; de Alencastro, Gustavo; Alexander, Ian E; Yeoh, George C

    2014-11-01

    The number of genetic or acquired diseases of the liver treatable by organ transplantation is ever-increasing as transplantation techniques improve placing additional demands on an already limited organ supply. While cell and gene therapies are distinctly different modalities, they offer a synergistic alternative to organ transplant due to distinct architectural and physiological properties of the liver. The hepatic blood supply and fenestrated endothelial system affords relatively facile accessibility for cell and/or gene delivery. More importantly, however, the remarkable capacity of hepatocytes to proliferate and repopulate the liver creates opportunities for new treatments based on emerging technologies. This review will summarise current understanding of liver regeneration, describe clinical and experimental cell and gene therapeutic modalities and discuss critical challenges to translate these new technologies to wider clinical utility. This article is part of a Directed Issue entitled: "Regenerative Medicine: the challenge of translation".

  15. A Comprehensive Review of Progressive Familial Intrahepatic Cholestasis (PFIC): Genetic Disorders of Hepatocanalicular Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Amer, Syed; Hajira, Amtul

    2014-01-01

    Progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis or PFIC is a general term used to describe a group of genetic disorders involving the hepatocanalicular transporters. These diseases are characterized by persistent cholestasis, pruritus and jaundice. Type I PFIC is characterized by defect in the gene that codes for aminophospholipid translocase protein and maintains canalicular membrane stability. Types 2 and 3 are caused by defect in genes that code for bile acid transporter and a phospholipid translocase, respectively. This review summarizes the genetics, clinical features, diagnosis and treatment of the three types of PFIC.

  16. Familial clustering of Taenia solium cysticercosis in the rural pigs of Mexico: hints of genetic determinants in innate and acquired resistance to infection.

    PubMed

    Sciutto, E; Martínez, J J; Huerta, M; Avila, R; Fragoso, G; Villalobos, N; de Aluja, A; Larralde, C

    2003-10-20

    In two rural villages of the state of Puebla, Mexico, where Taenia solium pig cysticercosis is highly endemic, 120 pairs of young out-bred piglets were used to assay what proved to be an effective synthetic peptide vaccine against naturally acquired cysticercosis. Because the piglets used were all sired by one of three distinct studs in many different out-bred sows, the prevalence and intensity of infection, as well as degree of protection conferred by the vaccine, could be related to each of the three stud families (A-C). The highest prevalence was found in the C family (25%), whilst the prevalence of B and A families were 21.6 and 4.4%, respectively. Familial clustering of cases was even more conspicuous in vaccinated pigs than in not-vaccinated ones: seven of the nine cysticercosis cases that occurred in the vaccinated group belonged to the C family (7/26) and two to the B family (2/23), whilst the vaccine rendered the A family totally resistant (0/71). Parasite numbers were also higher in the C family in both nai;ve and vaccinated pigs. Familial clustering of cases and of large parasite numbers in naive and vaccinated pigs hint to the relevance of their genetic background in their innate and acquired resistance to cysticercosis.

  17. Relationship of genetically transmitted alpha EEG traits to anxiety disorders and alcoholism

    SciTech Connect

    Enoch, M.A.; Rohrbaugh, W.; Harris, C.R.

    1995-10-09

    We tested the hypothesis that a heritable EEG trait, the low voltage alpha (LV), is associated with psychiatric disorders. Modest to moderate evidence for genetic linkage of both panic disorder and the low voltage alpha trait to the same region of chromosome 20q has recently been reported, raising the issue of whether there is a phenotypic correlation between these traits. A total of 124 subjects including 50 unrelated index subjects and 74 relatives were studied. Alpha EEG power was measured and EEG phenotypes were impressionistically classified. Subjects were psychiatrically interviewed using the SADS-L and blind-rated by RDC criteria. Alcoholics were four times more likely to be LV (including so-called borderline low voltage alpha) than were nonalcoholic, nonanxious subjects. Alcoholics with anxiety disorder are 10 times more likely to be LV. However, alcoholics without anxiety disorder were similar to nonalcoholics in alpha power. An anxiety disorder (panic disorder, phobia, or generalized anxiety) was found in 14/17 LV subjects as compared to 34/101 of the rest of the sample (P < 0.01). Support for these observations was found in the unrelated index subjects in whom no traits would be shared by familial clustering. Lower alpha power in anxiety disorders was not state-dependent, as indicated by the Spielberger Anxiety Scale. Familial covariance of alpha power was 0.25 (P < 0.01). These findings indicate there may be a shared factor underlying the transmissible low voltage alpha EEG variant and vulnerability to anxiety disorders with associated alcoholism. This factor is apparently not rare, because LV was found in approximately 10% of unrelated index subjects and 5% of subjects free of alcoholism and anxiety disorders. 43 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  18. Genetic disorders and the ethical status of germ-line gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Berger, E M; Gert, B M

    1991-12-01

    Recombinant DNA technology will soon allow physicians an opportunity to carry out both somatic cell- and germ-line gene therapy. While somatic cell gene therapy raises no new ethical problems, gene therapy of gametes, fertilized eggs or early embryos does raise several novel concerns. The first issue discussed here relates to making a distinction between negative and positive eugenics; the second issue deals with the evolutionary consequences of lost genetic diversity. In distinguishing between positive and negative eugenics, the concept of malady is applied as a definitional criterion for identifying genetic disorders that could qualify for germ-line therapy. Because gene replacement techniques are currently unavailable for humans, and because even if they were possible the number of people involved would be quite small, the loss of diversity concern seems moot. Finally, we discuss the issue of iatrogenic disorders associated with gene therapy and discuss several 'real world considerations.'

  19. Addressing the Genetics of Human Mental Health Disorders in Model Organisms.

    PubMed

    McCammon, Jasmine M; Sive, Hazel

    2015-01-01

    Mental health disorders are notoriously difficult to diagnose and treat for a variety of reasons, including genetic heterogeneity, comorbidities, and qualitative diagnostic criteria. Discovery of the molecular pathology underlying these disorders is crucial to the development of quantitative biomarkers and novel therapeutics. In this review, we discuss contributions to the mental health field of different cellular and whole-animal approaches in characterizing psychiatric genetics and molecular pathology. These approaches include mammalian cell and neuronal culture, cerebral organoids, induced pluripotent stem cells, and the whole-animal models of nematodes, flies, mollusks, frogs, mice, and zebrafish, on the last of which we place extra emphasis. Integrative use of these cellular and animal systems in a complementary and informative fashion maximizes the potential contributions to the mental health field as a whole. PMID:26002061

  20. Large animal models of rare genetic disorders: sheep as phenotypically relevant models of human genetic disease.

    PubMed

    Pinnapureddy, Ashish R; Stayner, Cherie; McEwan, John; Baddeley, Olivia; Forman, John; Eccles, Michael R

    2015-09-02

    Animals that accurately model human disease are invaluable in medical research, allowing a critical understanding of disease mechanisms, and the opportunity to evaluate the effect of therapeutic compounds in pre-clinical studies. Many types of animal models are used world-wide, with the most common being small laboratory animals, such as mice. However, rodents often do not faithfully replicate human disease, despite their predominant use in research. This discordancy is due in part to physiological differences, such as body size and longevity. In contrast, large animal models, including sheep, provide an alternative to mice for biomedical research due to their greater physiological parallels with humans. Completion of the full genome sequences of many species, and the advent of Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) technologies, means it is now feasible to screen large populations of domesticated animals for genetic variants that resemble human genetic diseases, and generate models that more accurately model rare human pathologies. In this review, we discuss the notion of using sheep as large animal models, and their advantages in modelling human genetic disease. We exemplify several existing naturally occurring ovine variants in genes that are orthologous to human disease genes, such as the Cln6 sheep model for Batten disease. These, and other sheep models, have contributed significantly to our understanding of the relevant human disease process, in addition to providing opportunities to trial new therapies in animals with similar body and organ size to humans. Therefore sheep are a significant species with respect to the modelling of rare genetic human disease, which we summarize in this review.

  1. [Acquired haemophilia (acquired factor VIII inhibitor)].

    PubMed

    Ceresetto, José M; Duboscq, Cristina; Fondevila, Carlos; Tezanos Pinto, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Acquired haemophilia is a rare disorder. The clinical picture ranges from mild ecchymosis and anaemia to life threatening bleeding in up to 20% of patients. The disease is produced by an antibody against Factor VIII and it usually occurs in the elderly, with no previous history of a bleeding disorder. It can be associated to an underlying condition such as cancer, autoimmune disorders, drugs or pregnancy. It has a typical laboratory pattern with isolated prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) that fails to correct upon mixing tests with normal plasma and low levels of factor VIII. Treatment recommendations are based on controlling the acute bleeding episodes with either bypassing agent, recombinant activated factor VII or activated prothrombin complex concentrate, and eradication of the antibody with immunosuppressive therapy.

  2. The Possible Role of Transplacentally-Acquired Antibodies to Infectious Agents, With Molecular Mimicry to Nervous System Sialic Acid Epitopes, as Causes of Neuromental Disorders: Prevention and Vaccine Implications

    PubMed Central

    Nahmias, André J.; Nahmias, Susanne Beckman; Danielsson, Dan

    2006-01-01

    Proof of causality of most neuromental disorders (NMD's) is largely unavailable. Lessons from four-decade investigations of the epidemiology, immunology, pathogenesis, prevention and therapy of perinatal infectious agents, which invade directly the nervous system, have led us to propose a new indirect effect hypothesis: maternal transplacentally-acquired antibodies, to agents with epitope molecular mimicry with the developing nervous system, can cross the fetus/infant's blood–nervous system barriers to cause NMD's, clinically manifest years later.Further rationale is provided by relevant evolutionary/developmental (EVO–DEVO) considerations—applicable also to some vaccines. The hypothesis is being tested in: (a) older pregnancy studies with available maternal and newborn sera, and follow-up of the progeny for NMD's; and (b) NMD registry individuals linked to their stored newborn blood spots. Preliminary results support a possible role for schizophrenia of high-tittered antibodies to some agents (toxoplasma, influenza and herpes simplex type 2 virus).A model that includes likely genetic and postnatal influences is schematized and a list of putative agents and factors, based on varying rationales, is tabulated. In case pilot studies are confirmed, the identified agent(s) and antibodies would need to be tested in new prospectively enrolled pregnant women, so as to establish further risk factors leading to possible preventive modalities. PMID:17162360

  3. Genetic and environmental determinants of violence risk in psychotic disorders: a multivariate quantitative genetic study of 1.8 million Swedish twins and siblings.

    PubMed

    Sariaslan, A; Larsson, H; Fazel, S

    2016-09-01

    Patients diagnosed with psychotic disorders (for example, schizophrenia and bipolar disorder) have elevated risks of committing violent acts, particularly if they are comorbid with substance misuse. Despite recent insights from quantitative and molecular genetic studies demonstrating considerable pleiotropy in the genetic architecture of these phenotypes, there is currently a lack of large-scale studies that have specifically examined the aetiological links between psychotic disorders and violence. Using a sample of all Swedish individuals born between 1958 and 1989 (n=3 332 101), we identified a total of 923 259 twin-sibling pairs. Patients were identified using the National Patient Register using validated algorithms based on International Classification of Diseases (ICD) 8-10. Univariate quantitative genetic models revealed that all phenotypes (schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, substance misuse, and violent crime) were highly heritable (h(2)=53-71%). Multivariate models further revealed that schizophrenia was a stronger predictor of violence (r=0.32; 95% confidence interval: 0.30-0.33) than bipolar disorder (r=0.23; 0.21-0.25), and large proportions (51-67%) of these phenotypic correlations were explained by genetic factors shared between each disorder, substance misuse, and violence. Importantly, we found that genetic influences that were unrelated to substance misuse explained approximately a fifth (21%; 20-22%) of the correlation with violent criminality in bipolar disorder but none of the same correlation in schizophrenia (Pbipolar disorder<0.001; Pschizophrenia=0.55). These findings highlight the problems of not disentangling common and unique sources of covariance across genetically similar phenotypes as the latter sources may include aetiologically important clues. Clinically, these findings underline the importance of assessing risk of different phenotypes together and integrating interventions for psychiatric disorders, substance misuse, and violence.

  4. Genetic and environmental determinants of violence risk in psychotic disorders: a multivariate quantitative genetic study of 1.8 million Swedish twins and siblings.

    PubMed

    Sariaslan, A; Larsson, H; Fazel, S

    2016-09-01

    Patients diagnosed with psychotic disorders (for example, schizophrenia and bipolar disorder) have elevated risks of committing violent acts, particularly if they are comorbid with substance misuse. Despite recent insights from quantitative and molecular genetic studies demonstrating considerable pleiotropy in the genetic architecture of these phenotypes, there is currently a lack of large-scale studies that have specifically examined the aetiological links between psychotic disorders and violence. Using a sample of all Swedish individuals born between 1958 and 1989 (n=3 332 101), we identified a total of 923 259 twin-sibling pairs. Patients were identified using the National Patient Register using validated algorithms based on International Classification of Diseases (ICD) 8-10. Univariate quantitative genetic models revealed that all phenotypes (schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, substance misuse, and violent crime) were highly heritable (h(2)=53-71%). Multivariate models further revealed that schizophrenia was a stronger predictor of violence (r=0.32; 95% confidence interval: 0.30-0.33) than bipolar disorder (r=0.23; 0.21-0.25), and large proportions (51-67%) of these phenotypic correlations were explained by genetic factors shared between each disorder, substance misuse, and violence. Importantly, we found that genetic influences that were unrelated to substance misuse explained approximately a fifth (21%; 20-22%) of the correlation with violent criminality in bipolar disorder but none of the same correlation in schizophrenia (Pbipolar disorder<0.001; Pschizophrenia=0.55). These findings highlight the problems of not disentangling common and unique sources of covariance across genetically similar phenotypes as the latter sources may include aetiologically important clues. Clinically, these findings underline the importance of assessing risk of different phenotypes together and integrating interventions for psychiatric disorders, substance misuse, and violence

  5. Genetic and environmental determinants of violence risk in psychotic disorders: a multivariate quantitative genetic study of 1.8 million Swedish twins and siblings

    PubMed Central

    Sariaslan, A; Larsson, H; Fazel, S

    2016-01-01

    Patients diagnosed with psychotic disorders (for example, schizophrenia and bipolar disorder) have elevated risks of committing violent acts, particularly if they are comorbid with substance misuse. Despite recent insights from quantitative and molecular genetic studies demonstrating considerable pleiotropy in the genetic architecture of these phenotypes, there is currently a lack of large-scale studies that have specifically examined the aetiological links between psychotic disorders and violence. Using a sample of all Swedish individuals born between 1958 and 1989 (n=3 332 101), we identified a total of 923 259 twin-sibling pairs. Patients were identified using the National Patient Register using validated algorithms based on International Classification of Diseases (ICD) 8–10. Univariate quantitative genetic models revealed that all phenotypes (schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, substance misuse, and violent crime) were highly heritable (h2=53–71%). Multivariate models further revealed that schizophrenia was a stronger predictor of violence (r=0.32; 95% confidence interval: 0.30–0.33) than bipolar disorder (r=0.23; 0.21–0.25), and large proportions (51–67%) of these phenotypic correlations were explained by genetic factors shared between each disorder, substance misuse, and violence. Importantly, we found that genetic influences that were unrelated to substance misuse explained approximately a fifth (21% 20–22%) of the correlation with violent criminality in bipolar disorder but none of the same correlation in schizophrenia (Pbipolar disorder<0.001; Pschizophrenia=0.55). These findings highlight the problems of not disentangling common and unique sources of covariance across genetically similar phenotypes as the latter sources may include aetiologically important clues. Clinically, these findings underline the importance of assessing risk of different phenotypes together and integrating interventions for psychiatric disorders, substance misuse, and

  6. Partitioning the Heritability of Tourette Syndrome and Obsessive Compulsive Disorder Reveals Differences in Genetic Architecture

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Lea K.; Yu, Dongmei; Keenan, Clare L.; Gamazon, Eric R.; Konkashbaev, Anuar I.; Derks, Eske M.; Neale, Benjamin M.; Yang, Jian; Lee, S. Hong; Evans, Patrick; Barr, Cathy L.; Bellodi, Laura; Benarroch, Fortu; Berrio, Gabriel Bedoya; Bienvenu, Oscar J.; Bloch, Michael H.; Blom, Rianne M.; Bruun, Ruth D.; Budman, Cathy L.; Camarena, Beatriz; Campbell, Desmond; Cappi, Carolina; Cardona Silgado, Julio C.; Cath, Danielle C.; Cavallini, Maria C.; Chavira, Denise A.; Chouinard, Sylvain; Conti, David V.; Cook, Edwin H.; Coric, Vladimir; Cullen, Bernadette A.; Deforce, Dieter; Delorme, Richard; Dion, Yves; Edlund, Christopher K.; Egberts, Karin; Falkai, Peter; Fernandez, Thomas V.; Gallagher, Patience J.; Garrido, Helena; Geller, Daniel; Girard, Simon L.; Grabe, Hans J.; Grados, Marco A.; Greenberg, Benjamin D.; Gross-Tsur, Varda; Haddad, Stephen; Heiman, Gary A.; Hemmings, Sian M. J.; Hounie, Ana G.; Illmann, Cornelia; Jankovic, Joseph; Jenike, Michael A.; Kennedy, James L.; King, Robert A.; Kremeyer, Barbara; Kurlan, Roger; Lanzagorta, Nuria; Leboyer, Marion; Leckman, James F.; Lennertz, Leonhard; Liu, Chunyu; Lochner, Christine; Lowe, Thomas L.; Macciardi, Fabio; McCracken, James T.; McGrath, Lauren M.; Mesa Restrepo, Sandra C.; Moessner, Rainald; Morgan, Jubel; Muller, Heike; Murphy, Dennis L.; Naarden, Allan L.; Ochoa, William Cornejo; Ophoff, Roel A.; Osiecki, Lisa; Pakstis, Andrew J.; Pato, Michele T.; Pato, Carlos N.; Piacentini, John; Pittenger, Christopher; Pollak, Yehuda; Rauch, Scott L.; Renner, Tobias J.; Reus, Victor I.; Richter, Margaret A.; Riddle, Mark A.; Robertson, Mary M.; Romero, Roxana; Rosàrio, Maria C.; Rosenberg, David; Rouleau, Guy A.; Ruhrmann, Stephan; Ruiz-Linares, Andres; Sampaio, Aline S.; Samuels, Jack; Sandor, Paul; Sheppard, Brooke; Singer, Harvey S.; Smit, Jan H.; Stein, Dan J.; Strengman, E.; Tischfield, Jay A.; Valencia Duarte, Ana V.; Vallada, Homero; Van Nieuwerburgh, Filip; Veenstra-VanderWeele, Jeremy; Walitza, Susanne; Wang, Ying; Wendland, Jens R.; Westenberg, Herman G. M.; Shugart, Yin Yao; Miguel, Euripedes C.; McMahon, William; Wagner, Michael; Nicolini, Humberto; Posthuma, Danielle; Hanna, Gregory L.; Heutink, Peter; Denys, Damiaan; Arnold, Paul D.; Oostra, Ben A.; Nestadt, Gerald; Freimer, Nelson B.; Pauls, David L.; Wray, Naomi R.

    2013-01-01

    The direct estimation of heritability from genome-wide common variant data as implemented in the program Genome-wide Complex Trait Analysis (GCTA) has provided a means to quantify heritability attributable to all interrogated variants. We have quantified the variance in liability to disease explained by all SNPs for two phenotypically-related neurobehavioral disorders, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and Tourette Syndrome (TS), using GCTA. Our analysis yielded a heritability point estimate of 0.58 (se = 0.09, p = 5.64e-12) for TS, and 0.37 (se = 0.07, p = 1.5e-07) for OCD. In addition, we conducted multiple genomic partitioning analyses to identify genomic elements that concentrate this heritability. We examined genomic architectures of TS and OCD by chromosome, MAF bin, and functional annotations. In addition, we assessed heritability for early onset and adult onset OCD. Among other notable results, we found that SNPs with a minor allele frequency of less than 5% accounted for 21% of the TS heritability and 0% of the OCD heritability. Additionally, we identified a significant contribution to TS and OCD heritability by variants significantly associated with gene expression in two regions of the brain (parietal cortex and cerebellum) for which we had available expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs). Finally we analyzed the genetic correlation between TS and OCD, revealing a genetic correlation of 0.41 (se = 0.15, p = 0.002). These results are very close to previous heritability estimates for TS and OCD based on twin and family studies, suggesting that very little, if any, heritability is truly missing (i.e., unassayed) from TS and OCD GWAS studies of common variation. The results also indicate that there is some genetic overlap between these two phenotypically-related neuropsychiatric disorders, but suggest that the two disorders have distinct genetic architectures. PMID:24204291

  7. A cross-species genetic analysis identifies candidate genes for mouse anxiety and human bipolar disorder

    PubMed Central

    Ashbrook, David G.; Williams, Robert W.; Lu, Lu; Hager, Reinmar

    2015-01-01

    Bipolar disorder (BD) is a significant neuropsychiatric disorder with a lifetime prevalence of ~1%. To identify genetic variants underlying BD genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been carried out. While many variants of small effect associated with BD have been identified few have yet been confirmed, partly because of the low power of GWAS due to multiple comparisons being made. Complementary mapping studies using murine models have identified genetic variants for behavioral traits linked to BD, often with high power, but these identified regions often contain too many genes for clear identification of candidate genes. In the current study we have aligned human BD GWAS results and mouse linkage studies to help define and evaluate candidate genes linked to BD, seeking to use the power of the mouse mapping with the precision of GWAS. We use quantitative trait mapping for open field test and elevated zero maze data in the largest mammalian model system, the BXD recombinant inbred mouse population, to identify genomic regions associated with these BD-like phenotypes. We then investigate these regions in whole genome data from the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium's bipolar disorder GWAS to identify candidate genes associated with BD. Finally we establish the biological relevance and pathways of these genes in a comprehensive systems genetics analysis. We identify four genes associated with both mouse anxiety and human BD. While TNR is a novel candidate for BD, we can confirm previously suggested associations with CMYA5, MCTP1, and RXRG. A cross-species, systems genetics analysis shows that MCTP1, RXRG, and TNR coexpress with genes linked to psychiatric disorders and identify the striatum as a potential site of action. CMYA5, MCTP1, RXRG, and TNR are associated with mouse anxiety and human BD. We hypothesize that MCTP1, RXRG, and TNR influence intercellular signaling in the striatum. PMID:26190982

  8. Brush and Spray: A High-Throughput Systemic Acquired Resistance Assay Suitable for Large-Scale Genetic Screening1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Beibei; Xu, Shaohua; Xu, Mo; Li, Yan; Li, Shuxin; Ding, Jinmei; Zhang, Yuelin

    2011-01-01

    Systemic acquired resistance (SAR) is a defense mechanism induced in the distal parts of plants after primary infection. It confers long-lasting protection against a broad spectrum of microbial pathogens. Lack of high-throughput assays has hampered the forward genetic analysis of SAR. Here, we report the development of an easy and efficient assay for SAR and its application in a forward genetic screen for SAR-deficient mutants in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Using the new assay for SAR, we identified six flavin-dependent monooxygenase1, four AGD2-like defense response protein1, three salicylic acid induction-deficient2, one phytoalexin deficient4, and one avrPphB-susceptible3 alleles as well as a gain-of-function mutant of CALMODULIN-BINDING TRANSCRIPTION ACTIVATOR3 designated camta3-3D. Like transgenic plants overexpressing CAMTA3, camta3-3D mutant plants exhibit compromised SAR and enhanced susceptibility to virulent pathogens, suggesting that CAMTA3 is a critical regulator of both basal resistance and SAR. PMID:21900483

  9. Comparing targeted exome and whole exome approaches for genetic diagnosis of neuromuscular disorders

    PubMed Central

    Gorokhova, Svetlana; Cerino, Mathieu; Mathieu, Yves; Courrier, Sébastien; Desvignes, Jean-Pierre; Salgado, David; Béroud, Christophe; Krahn, Martin; Bartoli, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Massively parallel sequencing is rapidly becoming a widely used method in genetic diagnostics. However, there is still no clear consensus as to which approach can most efficiently identify the pathogenic mutations carried by a given patient, while avoiding false negative and false positive results. We developed a targeted exome approach (MyoPanel2) in order to optimize genetic diagnosis of neuromuscular disorders. Using this approach, we were able to analyse 306 genes known to be mutated in myopathies as well as in related disorders, obtaining 98.8% target sequence coverage at 20 ×. Moreover, MyoPanel2 was able to detect 99.7% of 11,467 known mutations responsible for neuromuscular disorders. We have then used several quality control parameters to compare performance of the targeted exome approach with that of whole exome sequencing. The results of this pilot study of 140 DNA samples suggest that targeted exome sequencing approach is an efficient genetic diagnostic test for most neuromuscular diseases. PMID:27054082

  10. Accuracy of preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) of single gene and chromosomal disorders

    SciTech Connect

    Verlinsky, Y.; Strom, C.; Rechitsky, S.

    1994-09-01

    We have developed a polar body inferred approach for preconception diagnosis of single gene and chromosomal disorders. Preconception PCR or FISH analysis was performed in a total of 310 first polar bodies for the following genetic conditions: cystic fibrosis, hemophilia A, alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency, Tay Sachs disease, retinitis pigmentosa and common chromosomal trisomies. An important advantage of this approach is the avoidance of sperm (DNA) contamination, which is the major problem of PGD. We are currently applying FISH analysis of biopsied blastomeres, in combination with PCR or separately, and have demonstrated a significant improvement of the accuracy of PGD of X-linked disorders at this stage. Our data have also demonstrated feasibility of the application of FISH technique for PGD of chromosomal disorders. It was possible to detect chromosomal non-disjunctions and chromatid malsegregations in the first meiotic division, as well as to evaluate chromosomal mutations originating from the second meiotic nondisjunction.

  11. Estimating the genetic variance of major depressive disorder due to all single nucleotide polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Lubke, Gitta H; Hottenga, Jouke Jan; Walters, Raymond; Laurin, Charles; de Geus, Eco J C; Willemsen, Gonneke; Smit, Jan H; Middeldorp, Christel M; Penninx, Brenda W J H; Vink, Jacqueline M; Boomsma, Dorret I

    2012-10-15

    Genome-wide association studies of psychiatric disorders have been criticized for their lack of explaining a considerable proportion of the heritability established in twin and family studies. Genome-wide association studies of major depressive disorder in particular have so far been unsuccessful in detecting genome-wide significant single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Using two recently proposed methods designed to estimate the heritability of a phenotype that is attributable to genome-wide SNPs, we show that SNPs on current platforms contain substantial information concerning the additive genetic variance of major depressive disorder. To assess the consistency of these two methods, we analyzed four other complex phenotypes from different domains. The pattern of results is consistent with estimates of heritability obtained in twin studies carried out in the same population.

  12. Narcolepsy and familial advanced sleep-phase syndrome: molecular genetics of sleep disorders.

    PubMed

    Tafti, Mehdi; Dauvilliers, Yves; Overeem, Sebastiaan

    2007-06-01

    Sleep disorders are very prevalent and represent an emerging worldwide epidemic. However, research into the molecular genetics of sleep disorders remains surprisingly one of the least active fields. Nevertheless, rapid progress is being made in several prototypical disorders, leading recently to the identification of the molecular pathways underlying narcolepsy and familial advanced sleep-phase syndrome. Since the first reports of spontaneous and induced loss-of-function mutations leading to hypocretin deficiency in human and animal models of narcolepsy, the role of this novel neurotransmission pathway in sleep and several other behaviors has gained extensive interest. Also, very recent studies using an animal model of familial advanced sleep-phase syndrome shed new light on the regulation of circadian rhythms. PMID:17467264

  13. Extrahepatic portal vein thrombosis in children and adolescents: Influence of genetic thrombophilic disorders

    PubMed Central

    Pietrobattista, Andrea; Luciani, Matteo; Abraldes, Juan G; Candusso, Manila; Pancotti, Simona; Soldati, Massimo; Monti, Lidia; Torre, Giuliano; Nobili, Valerio

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To explore the prevalence of local and genetic thrombophilic disorders as risk factors for portal vein thrombosis (PVT) in our series, the largest ever published in pediatric literature. METHODS: We conducted a case-control study enrolling 31 children with PVT and 26 age-matched controls. All were screened for thrombophilia, including genetic disorders, protein C, protein S and homocysteine deficiencies. All coagulation parameters were studied at least 3 mo after the diagnosis of portal vein obstruction. RESULTS: In our study we showed that most pediatric patients with PVT have local prothrombotic risk factors, which are probably the most important factors leading to PVT. However, there is a clear association between the presence of prothrombotic disorders and PVT, suggesting that these increase the risk of thrombosis in patients with local factors such as perinatal umbilical vein catheterization or sepsis. CONCLUSION: Patients with PVT should be screened for inherited prothrombotic disorders regardless of a history of an obvious local risk factor. PMID:21182228

  14. FINDbase: a relational database recording frequencies of genetic defects leading to inherited disorders worldwide.

    PubMed

    van Baal, Sjozef; Kaimakis, Polynikis; Phommarinh, Manyphong; Koumbi, Daphne; Cuppens, Harry; Riccardino, Francesca; Macek, Milan; Scriver, Charles R; Patrinos, George P

    2007-01-01

    Frequency of INherited Disorders database (FINDbase) (http://www.findbase.org) is a relational database, derived from the ETHNOS software, recording frequencies of causative mutations leading to inherited disorders worldwide. Database records include the population and ethnic group, the disorder name and the related gene, accompanied by links to any corresponding locus-specific mutation database, to the respective Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man entries and the mutation together with its frequency in that population. The initial information is derived from the published literature, locus-specific databases and genetic disease consortia. FINDbase offers a user-friendly query interface, providing instant access to the list and frequencies of the different mutations. Query outputs can be either in a table or graphical format, accompanied by reference(s) on the data source. Registered users from three different groups, namely administrator, national coordinator and curator, are responsible for database curation and/or data entry/correction online via a password-protected interface. Databaseaccess is free of charge and there are no registration requirements for data querying. FINDbase provides a simple, web-based system for population-based mutation data collection and retrieval and can serve not only as a valuable online tool for molecular genetic testing of inherited disorders but also as a non-profit model for sustainable database funding, in the form of a 'database-journal'.

  15. The variation game: Cracking complex genetic disorders with NGS and omics data.

    PubMed

    Cui, Hongzhu; Dhroso, Andi; Johnson, Nathan; Korkin, Dmitry

    2015-06-01

    Tremendous advances in Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) and high-throughput omics methods have brought us one step closer towards mechanistic understanding of the complex disease at the molecular level. In this review, we discuss four basic regulatory mechanisms implicated in complex genetic diseases, such as cancer, neurological disorders, heart disease, diabetes, and many others. The mechanisms, including genetic variations, copy-number variations, posttranscriptional variations, and epigenetic variations, can be detected using a variety of NGS methods. We propose that malfunctions detected in these mechanisms are not necessarily independent, since these malfunctions are often found associated with the same disease and targeting the same gene, group of genes, or functional pathway. As an example, we discuss possible rewiring effects of the cancer-associated genetic, structural, and posttranscriptional variations on the protein-protein interaction (PPI) network centered around P53 protein. The review highlights multi-layered complexity of common genetic disorders and suggests that integration of NGS and omics data is a critical step in developing new computational methods capable of deciphering this complexity.

  16. Acquired color vision deficiency.

    PubMed

    Simunovic, Matthew P

    2016-01-01

    Acquired color vision deficiency occurs as the result of ocular, neurologic, or systemic disease. A wide array of conditions may affect color vision, ranging from diseases of the ocular media through to pathology of the visual cortex. Traditionally, acquired color vision deficiency is considered a separate entity from congenital color vision deficiency, although emerging clinical and molecular genetic data would suggest a degree of overlap. We review the pathophysiology of acquired color vision deficiency, the data on its prevalence, theories for the preponderance of acquired S-mechanism (or tritan) deficiency, and discuss tests of color vision. We also briefly review the types of color vision deficiencies encountered in ocular disease, with an emphasis placed on larger or more detailed clinical investigations.

  17. The Revolution in Migraine Genetics: From Aching Channels Disorders to a Next-Generation Medicine.

    PubMed

    Pellacani, Simona; Sicca, Federico; Di Lorenzo, Cherubino; Grieco, Gaetano S; Valvo, Giulia; Cereda, Cristina; Rubegni, Anna; Santorelli, Filippo M

    2016-01-01

    Channelopathies are a heterogeneous group of neurological disorders resulting from dysfunction of ion channels located in cell membranes and organelles. The clinical scenario is broad and symptoms such as generalized epilepsy (with or without fever), migraine (with or without aura), episodic ataxia and periodic muscle paralysis are some of the best known consequences of gain- or loss-of-function mutations in ion channels. We review the main clinical effects of ion channel mutations associated with a significant impact on migraine headache. Given the increasing and evolving use of genetic analysis in migraine research-greater emphasis is now placed on genetic markers of dysfunctional biological systems-we also show how novel information in rare monogenic forms of migraine might help to clarify the disease mechanisms in the general population of migraineurs. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) and more accurate and precise phenotyping strategies are expected to further increase understanding of migraine pathophysiology and genetics. PMID:27378853

  18. The Revolution in Migraine Genetics: From Aching Channels Disorders to a Next-Generation Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Pellacani, Simona; Sicca, Federico; Di Lorenzo, Cherubino; Grieco, Gaetano S.; Valvo, Giulia; Cereda, Cristina; Rubegni, Anna; Santorelli, Filippo M.

    2016-01-01

    Channelopathies are a heterogeneous group of neurological disorders resulting from dysfunction of ion channels located in cell membranes and organelles. The clinical scenario is broad and symptoms such as generalized epilepsy (with or without fever), migraine (with or without aura), episodic ataxia and periodic muscle paralysis are some of the best known consequences of gain- or loss-of-function mutations in ion channels. We review the main clinical effects of ion channel mutations associated with a significant impact on migraine headache. Given the increasing and evolving use of genetic analysis in migraine research—greater emphasis is now placed on genetic markers of dysfunctional biological systems—we also show how novel information in rare monogenic forms of migraine might help to clarify the disease mechanisms in the general population of migraineurs. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) and more accurate and precise phenotyping strategies are expected to further increase understanding of migraine pathophysiology and genetics. PMID:27378853

  19. Familial Influences on Conduct Disorder Reflect 2 Genetic Factors and 1 Shared Environmental Factor

    PubMed Central

    Kendler, Kenneth S.; Aggen, Steven H.; Patrick, Christopher J.

    2013-01-01

    Context Prior studies suggest that antisocial behavior in childhood and adolescence reflects multiple symptomatic dimensions. However, to our knowledge, no prior study has evaluated the underlying nature of the etiologic influences contributing to conduct disorder (CD) symptoms as defined in the DSM. Objective To determine the structure of genetic and environmental risk factors for CD. Design Population-based twin registry. Setting Virginia. Participants Two thousand seven hundred sixty-nine members of male-male twin pairs from the Virginia Adult Twin Study of Psychiatric and Substance Use Disorders. Main Outcome Measure Retrospective self-reported symptoms of CD. Results The best-fitting multivariate twin model included 2 genetic factors, 1 shared environmental common factor, and 1 nonshared environmental common factor, along with criterion-specific genetic and nonshared environmental effects. The CD criteria with the strongest loadings on the 2 genetic factors were, respectively, those reflecting rule breaking (eg, playing hooky) and overt aggressive acts (eg, hurting people). The shared environ mental common factor had salient loadings on a distinct set of criteria reflecting covert delinquent acts (eg, stealing and hurting animals). Loadings on the single non-shared environmental common factor were more uniform and less selective. Scores on the 3 familial CD factors were differentially associated with a range of personality, psychopathology, and demographic factors. Conclusions From a genetic perspective, the DSM criteria for CD do not reflect a single dimension of liability. The familial risk to CD is composed of 2 discrete dimensions of genetic risk, reflecting rule breaking and overt aggression, and 1 dimension of shared environmental risk, reflecting covert delinquency. These 3 familial factors differ meaningfully in their association with a range of relevant validators. PMID:23117573

  20. Acquired lymphangiectasis.

    PubMed

    Celis, A V; Gaughf, C N; Sangueza, O P; Gourdin, F W

    1999-01-01

    Acquired lymphangiectasis is a dilatation of lymphatic vessels that can result as a complication of surgical intervention and radiation therapy for malignancy. Acquired lymphangiectasis shares clinical and histologic features with the congenital lesion, lymphangioma circumscriptum. Diagnosis and treatment of these vesiculo-bullous lesions is important because they may be associated with pain, chronic drainage, and cellulitis. We describe two patients who had these lesions after treatment for cancer and review the pertinent literature. Although a number of treatment options are available, we have found CO2 laser ablation particularly effective. PMID:9932832

  1. Simons Variation in Individuals Project (Simons VIP): a genetics-first approach to studying autism spectrum and related neurodevelopmental disorders.

    PubMed

    2012-03-22

    We describe a project aimed at studying a large number of individuals (>200) with specific recurrent genetic variations (deletion or duplication of segment 16p11.2) that increase the risk of developing autism spectrum (ASD) and other developmental disorders. The genetics-first approach augmented by web-based recruitment, multisite collaboration and calibration, and robust data-sharing policies could be adopted by other groups studying neuropsychiatric disorders to accelerate the pace of research. PMID:22445335

  2. Common genetic influences for schizophrenia and bipolar disorder: A population-based study of 2 million nuclear families

    PubMed Central

    Lichtenstein, Paul; Yip, Benjamin H.; Björk, Camilla; Pawitan, Yudi; Cannon, Tyrone D.; Sullivan, Patrick F.; Hultman, Christina M.

    2013-01-01

    Background A persistent debate in psychiatry concerns whether schizophrenia and bipolar disorder are the clinical realizations of discrete versus shared etiological processes. Methods We linked the Multi-Generation Register, containing information about children and their parents of all Swedes, and the Hospital Discharge Register, covering all public psychiatric inpatient hospitalizations in Sweden. We identified 9,009,202 unique individuals in more than 2 million nuclear families. Risks for schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and their co-morbidity were calculated for biological and adoptive parents, offspring, full siblings and half-siblings of probands with the diseases. A multivariate generalized linear mixed model was used to estimate genetic and environmental contributions to liability for schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and their co-morbidity. Findings There were increased risks of both schizophrenia and bipolar disorder to first degree relatives of probands with either disorder. Half-sibs had a significantly increased risk, albeit substantially lower than the full-siblings. When relatives of probands with bipolar disorder were analysed, increased risks for schizophrenia were present for all relationships, including offspring adopted away. Heritability for schizophrenia was 64% and for bipolar disorder 59%. Shared environmental effects were small but significant for both disorders. The co-morbidity between the disorders was primarily (63%) due to additive genetic effects common to both disorders. Interpretation Similar to molecular genetic studies, we found compelling evidence that schizophrenia and bipolar disorder partially share a common genetic etiology. These results challenge the current nosological dichotomy between schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, and are consistent with a reappraisal of these disorders as distinct diagnostic entities. PMID:19150704

  3. Disordered models of acquired dyslexia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virasoro, M. A.

    We show that certain specific correlations in the probability of errors observed in dyslexic patients that are normally explained by introducing additional complexity in the model for the reading process are typical of any Neural Network system that has learned to deal with a quasiregular environment. On the other hand we show that in Neural Networks the more regular behavior does not become naturally the default behavior.

  4. Methemoglobinemia - acquired

    MedlinePlus

    ... blood disorder in which the body cannot reuse hemoglobin because it is damaged. Hemoglobin is the oxygen-carrying molecule found in red blood cells. In some cases of methemoglobinemia, the hemoglobin is unable to carry enough oxygen to body ...

  5. Tracheomalacia - acquired

    MedlinePlus

    ... After having a breathing tube or trachea tube (tracheostomy) for a long time Symptoms Symptoms of tracheomalacia ... Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Breathing Problems Tracheal Disorders Uncommon Infant and Newborn Problems Browse the Encyclopedia ...

  6. A screening on Specific Learning Disorders in an Italian speaking high genetic homogeneity area.

    PubMed

    Cappa, Claudia; Giulivi, Sara; Schilirò, Antonino; Bastiani, Luca; Muzio, Carlo; Meloni, Fabrizio

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present research is to investigate the prevalence of Specific Learning Disorders (SLD) in Ogliastra, an area of the island of Sardinia, Italy. Having experienced centuries of isolation, Ogliastra has become a high genetic homogeneity area, and is considered particularly interesting for studies on different kinds of pathologies. Here we are going to describe the results of a screening carried out throughout 2 consecutive years in 49 second grade classes (24 considered in the first year and 25 in the second year of the study) of the Ogliastra region. A total of 610 pupils (average age 7.54 years; 293 female, 317 male) corresponding to 68.69% of all pupils who were attending second grade in the area, took part in the study. The tool used for the screening was "RSR-DSA. Questionnaire for the detection of learning difficulties and disorders", which allowed the identification of 83 subjects at risk (13.61% of the whole sample involved in the study). These subjects took part in an enhancement training program of about 6 months. After the program, pupils underwent assessment for reading, writing and calculation abilities, as well as cognitive assessment. According to the results of the assessment, the prevalence of SLDs is 6.06%. For what concerns dyslexia, 4.75% of the total sample manifested this disorder either in isolation or in comorbidity with other disorders. According to the first national epidemiological investigation carried out in Italy, the prevalence of dyslexia is 3.1-3.2%, which is lower than the prevalence obtained in the present study. Given the genetic basis of SLDs, this result, together with the presence of several cases of SLD in isolation (17.14%) and with a 3:1 ratio of males to females diagnosed with a SLD, was to be expected in a sample coming from a high genetic homogeneity area. PMID:26296080

  7. Genetic and Environmental Influences on Disordered Gambling in Men and Women

    PubMed Central

    Slutske, Wendy S.; Zhu, Gu; Meier, Madeline H.; Martin, Nicholas G.

    2013-01-01

    Context Women now represent nearly half of all individuals in treatment for pathological gambling (PG), but relatively little is known about the causes of PG among women or potential sex differences in the causes of PG. Objectives To (1) investigate the role of genetic and environmental risk factors in the development of disordered gambling (DG) among women and (2) determine the extent to which the genetic and environmental risk of DG among women differs quantitatively or qualitatively from the risk of DG among men. (Disordered gambling refers to the full continuum of gambling-related problems that includes PG disorder.) Design Twin study. Setting The national community-based Australian Twin Registry. Participants Four thousand seven hundred sixty-four individuals from 2889 twin pairs; twins were aged 32 to 43 years and 57% were women. Main Outcome Measure Disordered gambling was defined based on lifetime DSM-IV PG symptom counts. Results The estimate of the proportion of variation in liability forDGdue to genetic influences was 49.2% (95% confidence interval, 26.7–60.9). There was no evidence for shared environmental influences contributing to variation in DG liability. There was no evidence for quantitative or qualitative sex differences in the causes of variation in DG liability. Conclusions This study establishes for the first time that genes are as important in the etiology of DG in women as they are in men and that the susceptibility genes contributing to variation in liability for DG are likely to overlap considerably in men and women. PMID:20530012

  8. The Prevalence of Nine Genetic Disorders in a Dog Population from Belgium, the Netherlands and Germany

    PubMed Central

    Broeckx, Bart J. G.; Coopman, Frank; Verhoeven, Geert E. C.; Van Haeringen, Wim; van de Goor, Leanne; Bosmans, Tim; Gielen, Ingrid; Saunders, Jimmy H.; Soetaert, Sandra S. A.; Van Bree, Henri; Van Neste, Christophe; Van Nieuwerburgh, Filip; Van Ryssen, Bernadette; Verelst, Elien; Van Steendam, Katleen; Deforce, Dieter

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to screen a dog population from Belgium, the Netherlands and Germany for the presence of mutant alleles associated with hip dysplasia (HD), degenerative myelopathy (DM), exercise-induced collapse (EIC), neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis 4A (NCL), centronuclear myopathy (HMLR), mucopolysaccharidosis VII (MPS VII), myotonia congenita (MG), gangliosidosis (GM1) and muscular dystrophy (Duchenne type) (GRMD). Blood samples (K3EDTA) were collected for genotyping with Kompetitive Allele Specific PCR (n = 476). Allele and genotype frequencies were calculated in those breeds with at least 12 samples (n = 8). Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium was tested. Genetic variation was identified for 4 out of 9 disorders: mutant alleles were found in 49, 15, 3 and 2 breeds for HD, DM, EIC and NCL respectively. Additionally, mutant alleles were identified in crossbreeds for both HD and EIC. For HD, DM, EIC and NCL mutant alleles were newly discovered in 43, 13, 2 and 1 breed(s), respectively. In 9, 2 and 1 breed(s) for DM, EIC and NCL respectively, the mutant allele was detected, but the respective disorder has not been reported in those breeds. For 5 disorders (HMLR, MPS VII, MG, GM1, GRMD), the mutant allele could not be identified in our population. For the other 4 disorders (HD, DM, EIC, NCL), prevalence of associated mutant alleles seems strongly breed dependent. Surprisingly, mutant alleles were found in many breeds where the disorder has not been reported to date. PMID:24069350

  9. Genetic Risk for Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder Contributes to Neurodevelopmental Traits in the General Population

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Joanna; Hamshere, Marian L.; Stergiakouli, Evangelia; O’Donovan, Michael C.; Thapar, Anita

    2014-01-01

    Background Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) can be viewed as the extreme end of traits in the general population. Epidemiological and twin studies suggest that ADHD frequently co-occurs with and shares genetic susceptibility with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and ASD-related traits. The aims of this study were to determine whether a composite of common molecular genetic variants, previously found to be associated with clinically diagnosed ADHD, predicts ADHD and ASD-related traits in the general population. Methods Polygenic risk scores were calculated in the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC) population sample (N = 8229) based on a discovery case-control genome-wide association study of childhood ADHD. Regression analyses were used to assess whether polygenic scores predicted ADHD traits and ASD-related measures (pragmatic language abilities and social cognition) in the ALSPAC sample. Polygenic scores were also compared in boys and girls endorsing any (rating ≥1) ADHD item (n = 3623). Results Polygenic risk for ADHD showed a positive association with ADHD traits (hyperactive-impulsive, p = .0039; inattentive, p = .037). Polygenic risk for ADHD was also negatively associated with pragmatic language abilities (p = .037) but not with social cognition (p = .43). In children with a rating ≥1 for ADHD traits, girls had a higher polygenic score than boys (p = .003). Conclusions These findings provide molecular genetic evidence that risk alleles for the categorical disorder of ADHD influence hyperactive-impulsive and attentional traits in the general population. The results further suggest that common genetic variation that contributes to ADHD diagnosis may also influence ASD-related traits, which at their extreme are a characteristic feature of ASD. PMID:24673882

  10. Genome-wide Association Study of Dermatomyositis Reveals Genetic Overlap with other Autoimmune Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Frederick W.; Cooper, Robert G.; Vencovsky, Jiri; Rider, Lisa G.; Danko, Katalin; Wedderburn, Lucy R.; Lundberg, Ingrid E.; Pachman, Lauren M.; Reed, Ann M.; Ytterberg, Steven R.; Padyukov, Leonid; Selva-O’Callaghan, Albert; Radstake, Timothy; Isenberg, David A.; Chinoy, Hector; Ollier, William E. R.; O’Hanlon, Terrance P.; Peng, Bo; Lee, Annette; Lamb, Janine A.; Chen, Wei; Amos, Christopher I.; Gregersen, Peter K.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To identify new genetic associations with juvenile and adult dermatomyositis (DM). Methods We performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of adult and juvenile DM patients of European ancestry (n = 1178) and controls (n = 4724). To assess genetic overlap with other autoimmune disorders, we examined whether 141 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) outside the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) locus, and previously associated with autoimmune diseases, predispose to DM. Results Compared to controls, patients with DM had a strong signal in the MHC region consisting of GWAS-level significance (P < 5x10−8) at 80 genotyped SNPs. An analysis of 141 non-MHC SNPs previously associated with autoimmune diseases showed that three SNPs linked with three genes were associated with DM, with a false discovery rate (FDR) < 0.05. These genes were phospholipase C like 1 (PLCL1, rs6738825, FDR=0.00089), B lymphoid tyrosine kinase (BLK, rs2736340, FDR=0.00031), and chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 21 (CCL21, rs951005, FDR=0.0076). None of these genes was previously reported to be associated with DM. Conclusion Our findings confirm the MHC as the major genetic region associated with DM and indicate that DM shares non-MHC genetic features with other autoimmune diseases, suggesting the presence of additional novel risk loci. This first identification of autoimmune disease genetic predispositions shared with DM may lead to enhanced understanding of pathogenesis and novel diagnostic and therapeutic approaches. PMID:23983088

  11. Genetics of psychiatric disorders in the GWAS era: an update on schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Schwab, Sibylle G; Wildenauer, Dieter B

    2013-11-01

    The influence of genetic factors in the development of schizophrenia has been convincingly demonstrated by family, twin, and adoption studies. The statistical construct of heritability is generally used for estimating the liability due to genetic factors. Heritability estimates for schizophrenia are reported to be between 60 and 80 %. Due to the technical achievements in whole genome-wide association studies, dissection of the underlying genetic factors was intensified recently, resulting in the conclusion that schizophrenia is essentially a polygenic, complex disorder. Most likely more than 100 genes, each with small effect size, contribute to disease risk. A most recent multi-stage genome-wide association study (Ripke et al. in Nat Genet 2013) identified 22 risk loci and estimated that 8,300 independent single-nucleotide polymorphisms contributed to the risk accounting collectively for 32 % in liability. In addition to this polygenic, complex inheritance, there is also strong indication that in some patients a deletion or insertion of a larger chromosomal region [so-called copy number variation (CNV)] might play a crucial role in pathogenesis. This could be specifically important in sporadic cases with schizophrenia, since a higher frequency of de novo mutations has been associated with these CNVs. Further studies, combining much larger sample sizes as well as application of newer technology, such as deep sequencing technologies will be necessary in order to obtain a more comprehensive understanding of the genetic foundations of schizophrenia. PMID:24071914

  12. Genetics of psychiatric disorders in the GWAS era: an update on schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Schwab, Sibylle G; Wildenauer, Dieter B

    2013-11-01

    The influence of genetic factors in the development of schizophrenia has been convincingly demonstrated by family, twin, and adoption studies. The statistical construct of heritability is generally used for estimating the liability due to genetic factors. Heritability estimates for schizophrenia are reported to be between 60 and 80 %. Due to the technical achievements in whole genome-wide association studies, dissection of the underlying genetic factors was intensified recently, resulting in the conclusion that schizophrenia is essentially a polygenic, complex disorder. Most likely more than 100 genes, each with small effect size, contribute to disease risk. A most recent multi-stage genome-wide association study (Ripke et al. in Nat Genet 2013) identified 22 risk loci and estimated that 8,300 independent single-nucleotide polymorphisms contributed to the risk accounting collectively for 32 % in liability. In addition to this polygenic, complex inheritance, there is also strong indication that in some patients a deletion or insertion of a larger chromosomal region [so-called copy number variation (CNV)] might play a crucial role in pathogenesis. This could be specifically important in sporadic cases with schizophrenia, since a higher frequency of de novo mutations has been associated with these CNVs. Further studies, combining much larger sample sizes as well as application of newer technology, such as deep sequencing technologies will be necessary in order to obtain a more comprehensive understanding of the genetic foundations of schizophrenia.

  13. Inbreeding levels in Northeast Brazil: Strategies for the prospecting of new genetic disorders

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    A new autosomal recessive genetic condition, the SPOAN syndrome (an acronym for spastic paraplegia, optic atrophy and neuropathy syndrome), was recently discovered in an isolated region of the State of Rio Grande do Norte in Northeast Brazil, in a population that was identified by the IBGE (Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics) as belonging to the Brazilian communities with the highest rates of “deficiencies” (Neri, 2003), a term used to describe diseases, malformations, and handicaps in general. This prompted us to conduct a study of consanguinity levels in five of its municipal districts by directly interviewing their inhabitants. Information on 7,639 couples (corresponding to about 40% of the whole population of the studied districts) was obtained. The research disclosed the existence of very high frequencies of consanguineous marriages, which varied from about 9% to 32%, suggesting the presence of a direct association between genetic diseases such as the SPOAN syndrome, genetic drift and inbreeding levels. This fact calls for the introduction of educational programs for the local populations, as well as for further studies aiming to identify and characterize other genetic conditions. Epidemiological strategies developed to collect inbreeding data, with the collaboration of health systems available in the region, might be very successful in the prospecting of genetic disorders. PMID:21637472

  14. Inbreeding levels in Northeast Brazil: Strategies for the prospecting of new genetic disorders.

    PubMed

    Santos, Silvana; Kok, Fernando; Weller, Mathias; de Paiva, Francisco Rennan Lopes; Otto, Paulo A

    2010-04-01

    A new autosomal recessive genetic condition, the SPOAN syndrome (an acronym for spastic paraplegia, optic atrophy and neuropathy syndrome), was recently discovered in an isolated region of the State of Rio Grande do Norte in Northeast Brazil, in a population that was identified by the IBGE (Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics) as belonging to the Brazilian communities with the highest rates of "deficiencies" (Neri, 2003), a term used to describe diseases, malformations, and handicaps in general. This prompted us to conduct a study of consanguinity levels in five of its municipal districts by directly interviewing their inhabitants. Information on 7,639 couples (corresponding to about 40% of the whole population of the studied districts) was obtained. The research disclosed the existence of very high frequencies of consanguineous marriages, which varied from about 9% to 32%, suggesting the presence of a direct association between genetic diseases such as the SPOAN syndrome, genetic drift and inbreeding levels. This fact calls for the introduction of educational programs for the local populations, as well as for further studies aiming to identify and characterize other genetic conditions. Epidemiological strategies developed to collect inbreeding data, with the collaboration of health systems available in the region, might be very successful in the prospecting of genetic disorders.

  15. Current Issues in the Neurology and Genetics of Learning-Related Traits and Disorders: Introduction to the Special Issue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilger, Jeffrey W.

    2001-01-01

    This introductory article briefly describes each of the following eight articles in this special issue on the neurology and genetics of learning related disorders. It notes the greater appreciation of learning disability as a set of complex disorders with broad and intricate neurological bases and of the large individual differences in how these…

  16. Genetic Variation in Melatonin Pathway Enzymes in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder and Comorbid Sleep Onset Delay

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veatch, Olivia J.; Pendergast, Julie S.; Allen, Melissa J.; Leu, Roberta M.; Johnson, Carl Hirschie; Elsea, Sarah H.; Malow, Beth A.

    2015-01-01

    Sleep disruption is common in individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Genes whose products regulate endogenous melatonin modify sleep patterns and have been implicated in ASD. Genetic factors likely contribute to comorbid expression of sleep disorders in ASD. We studied a clinically unique ASD subgroup, consisting solely of children with…

  17. Association between genetic polymorphisms in the serotonergic system and comorbid personality disorders among patients with first-episode depression.

    PubMed

    Bukh, Jens D; Bock, Camilla; Kessing, Lars V

    2014-06-01

    Studies on the association between genetic polymorphisms and personality disorders have provided inconsistent results. Using the "enriched sample method," the authors of the present study aimed to assess the association between polymorphisms in the serotonergic transmitter system and comorbid personality disorders in patients recently diagnosed with first-episode depression. A total of 290 participants were systematically recruited via the Danish Psychiatric Central Research Register. Diagnoses of personality disorders were assessed by a SCID-II interview, and polymorphisms in the genes encoding the serotonin transporter, serotonin receptors 1A, 2A, 2C, and tryptophan hydroxylase 1 were genotyped. The authors found a significant effect of the length polymorphism in the serotonin transporter gene (5-HTTLPR) on cluster B personality disorder (mainly borderline disorder), but no influence on cluster C personality disorder, and no associations between other polymorphisms and personality disorders. The study adds evidence to the effect of the serotonin transporter gene specifically on cluster B personality disorders.

  18. The Genetics of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder and Tourette Syndrome: An Epidemiological and Pathway-Based Approach for Gene Discovery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grados, Marco A.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To provide a contemporary perspective on genetic discovery methods applied to obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and Tourette syndrome (TS). Method: A review of research trends in genetics research in OCD and TS is conducted, with emphasis on novel approaches. Results: Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) are now in progress in OCD…

  19. The genetic basis of female reproductive disorders: Etiology and clinical testing ☆

    PubMed Central

    Layman, Lawrence C.

    2013-01-01

    With the advent of improved molecular biology techniques, the genetic basis of an increasing number of reproductive disorders has been elucidated. Mutations in at least 20 genes cause hypogonadotropic hypogonadism including Kallmann syndrome in about 35–40% of patients. The two most commonly involved genes are FGFR1 and CHD7. When combined pituitary hormone deficiency includes hypogonadotropic hypogonadism as a feature, PROP1 mutations are the most common of the six genes involved. For hypergonadotropic hypogonadism, mutations in 14 genes cause gonadal failure in 15% of affected females, most commonly in FMR1. In eugonadal disorders, activating FSHR mutations have been identified for spontaneous ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome; and WNT4 mutations have been described in mullerian aplasia. For other eugonadal disorders, such as endometriosis, polycystic ovary syndrome, and leiomyomata, specific germline gene mutations have not been identified, but some chromosomal regions are associated with the corresponding phenotype. Practical genetic testing is possible to perform in both hypogonadotropic and hypergonadotropic hypogonadism and spontaneous ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome. However, clinical testing for endometriosis, polycystic ovary syndrome, and leiomyomata is not currently practical for the clinician. PMID:23499866

  20. Genetics of borderline personality disorder: systematic review and proposal of an integrative model.

    PubMed

    Amad, Ali; Ramoz, Nicolas; Thomas, Pierre; Jardri, Renaud; Gorwood, Philip

    2014-03-01

    Borderline personality disorder (BPD) is one of the most common mental disorders and is characterized by a pervasive pattern of emotional lability, impulsivity, interpersonal difficulties, identity disturbances, and disturbed cognition. Here, we performed a systematic review of the literature concerning the genetics of BPD, including familial and twin studies, association studies, and gene-environment interaction studies. Moreover, meta-analyses were performed when at least two case-control studies testing the same polymorphism were available. For each gene variant, a pooled odds ratio (OR) was calculated using fixed or random effects models. Familial and twin studies largely support the potential role of a genetic vulnerability at the root of BPD, with an estimated heritability of approximately 40%. Moreover, there is evidence for both gene-environment interactions and correlations. However, association studies for BPD are sparse, making it difficult to draw clear conclusions. According to our meta-analysis, no significant associations were found for the serotonin transporter gene, the tryptophan hydroxylase 1 gene, or the serotonin 1B receptor gene. We hypothesize that such a discrepancy (negative association studies but high heritability of the disorder) could be understandable through a paradigm shift, in which "plasticity" genes (rather than "vulnerability" genes) would be involved. Such a framework postulates a balance between positive and negative events, which interact with plasticity genes in the genesis of BPD.

  1. Clinical practice and genetic counseling for cystic fibrosis and CFTR-related disorders

    PubMed Central

    Moskowitz, Samuel M.; Chmiel, James F.; Sternen, Darci L.; Cheng, Edith; Gibson, Ronald L; Marshall, Susan G.; Cutting, Garry R.

    2009-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator-related disorders encompass a disease spectrum from focal male reproductive tract involvement in congenital absence of the vas deferens to multiorgan involvement in classic cystic fibrosis. The reproductive, gastrointestinal, and exocrine manifestations of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator deficiency are correlated with CFTR genotype, whereas the respiratory manifestations that are the main cause of morbidity and mortality in cystic fibrosis are less predictable. Molecular genetic testing of CFTR has led to new diagnostic strategies and will enable targeting of molecular therapies now in development. Older diagnostic methods that measure sweat chloride and nasal potential difference nonetheless remain important because of their sensitivity and specificity. In addition, the measurement of immunoreactive trypsinogen and the genotyping of CFTR alleles are key to newborn screening programs because of low cost. The multiorgan nature of cystic fibrosis leads to a heavy burden of care, thus therapeutic regimens are tailored to the specific manifestations present in each patient. The variability of cystic fibrosis lung disease and the variable expressivity of mild CFTR alleles complicate genetic counseling for this autosomal recessive disorder. Widespread implementation of newborn screening programs among populations with significant cystic fibrosis mutation carrier frequencies is expected to result in increasing demands on genetic counseling resources. PMID:19092437

  2. Genetics of glucocorticoid regulation and posttraumatic stress disorder--What do we know?

    PubMed

    Castro-Vale, Ivone; van Rossum, Elisabeth F C; Machado, José Carlos; Mota-Cardoso, Rui; Carvalho, Davide

    2016-04-01

    CASTRO-VALE, I., E.F.C. van Rossum, J.C. Machado, R. Mota-Cardoso and D. Carvalho. Genetics of glucocorticoid regulation and posttraumatic stress disorder-What do we know? NEUROSCI. BIOBEHAV. REV. 43 (1) XXX-XXX, 2014 - Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) develops in a small proportion of those who have been exposed to a traumatic event. Genetic factors are estimated to be responsible for 30% of the variance in PTSD risk. Dysfunction of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA)-axis in PTSD has been found, particularly hypersensitivity of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). In this review we aim to understand the genetic factors that influence glucocorticoid function in PTSD. Glucocorticoid action is regulated by a corticotrophin-releasing hormone, arginine vasopressin (AVP)/oxytocin pathway, GR, and regulators such as co-chaperone FKBP5. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the GR gene, CRHR1 gene and FKBP5 gene affect HPA-axis sensitivity. The GR gene SNP BclI has been associated with hypersensitivity to glucocorticoids and PTSD symptoms. FKBP5 gene SNPs interacted with childhood adversity to moderate PTSD risk and in particular, the rs9470080 SNP was independently associated with lifetime PTSD. SNPs in the CRHR1 gene were also associated with PTSD risk. Gene-environment interaction studies have highlighted the importance of multifactorial vulnerability in PTSD, with epigenetic mechanisms contributing to the equation. PMID:26872620

  3. Ethics, policy, and rare genetic disorders: the case of Gaucher disease in Israel.

    PubMed

    Gross, Michael L

    2002-01-01

    Gaucher disease is a rare, chronic, ethnic-specific genetic disorder affecting Jews of Eastern European descent. It is extremely expensive to treat and presents difficult dilemmas for officials and patients in Israel where many patients live. First, high-cost, high-benefit, but low volume treatment for Gaucher creates severe allocation dilemmas for policy makers. Allocation policies driven by cost effectiveness, age, opportunity or need make it difficult to justify funding. Process oriented decision making based on terms of fair cooperation or decisions invoking the "rule of rescue" risk discriminating against minorities who may already suffer from inequitable distribution of heath care resources. Apart from cost, Gaucher disease prompts questions about abortion. Unlike severe genetic disorders, Gaucher offers no grounds for abortion and, in many ways, is analogous to gender based abortions that are prohibited regardless of fetal age. Finally, Gaucher raises concerns about the disclosure of genetic information. These affect potential carriers asked to participate in population studies and carriers and patients who must consider disclosure to others. These concerns weigh the right to privacy against communal interests and bilateral commitments. PMID:12400900

  4. Good laboratory practices for biochemical genetic testing and newborn screening for inherited metabolic disorders.

    PubMed

    2012-04-01

    Biochemical genetic testing and newborn screening are essential laboratory services for the screening, detection, diagnosis, and monitoring of inborn errors of metabolism or inherited metabolic disorders. Under the Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments of 1988 (CLIA) regulations, laboratory testing is categorized on the basis of the level of testing complexity as either waived (i.e., from routine regulatory oversight) or nonwaived testing (which includes tests of moderate and high complexity). Laboratories that perform biochemical genetic testing are required by CLIA regulations to meet the general quality systems requirements for nonwaived testing and the personnel requirements for high-complexity testing. Laboratories that perform public health newborn screening are subject to the same CLIA regulations and applicable state requirements. As the number of inherited metabolic diseases that are included in state-based newborn screening programs continues to increase, ensuring the quality of performance and delivery of testing services remains a continuous challenge not only for public health laboratories and other newborn screening facilities but also for biochemical genetic testing laboratories. To help ensure the quality of laboratory testing, CDC collaborated with the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, the Food and Drug Administration, the Health Resources and Services Administration, and the National Institutes of Health to develop guidelines for laboratories to meet CLIA requirements and apply additional quality assurance measures for these areas of genetic testing. This report provides recommendations for good laboratory practices that were developed based on recommendations from the Clinical Laboratory Improvement Advisory Committee, with additional input from the Secretary's Advisory Committee on Genetics, Health, and Society; the Secretary's Advisory Committee on Heritable Disorders in Newborns and Children; and representatives of newborn

  5. Acquired hyperpigmentations*

    PubMed Central

    Cestari, Tania Ferreira; Dantas, Lia Pinheiro; Boza, Juliana Catucci

    2014-01-01

    Cutaneous hyperpigmentations are frequent complaints, motivating around 8.5% of all dermatological consultations in our country. They can be congenital, with different patterns of inheritance, or acquired in consequence of skin problems, systemic diseases or secondary to environmental factors. The vast majority of them are linked to alterations on the pigment melanin, induced by different mechanisms. This review will focus on the major acquired hyperpigmentations associated with increased melanin, reviewing their mechanisms of action and possible preventive measures. Particularly prominent aspects of diagnosis and therapy will be emphasized, with focus on melasma, post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation, periorbital pigmentation, dermatosis papulosa nigra, phytophotodermatoses, flagellate dermatosis, erythema dyschromicum perstans, cervical poikiloderma (Poikiloderma of Civatte), acanthosis nigricans, cutaneous amyloidosis and reticulated confluent dermatitis PMID:24626644

  6. Incidences of and genetic parameters for mastitis, claw disorders, and common health traits recorded in dairy cattle contract herds.

    PubMed

    Gernand, E; Rehbein, P; von Borstel, U U; König, S

    2012-04-01

    Test-day records for protein yield, protein percent, fat percent and somatic cell score combined with diagnoses for health traits from 19,870 Holstein cows kept in 9 large-scale contract herds in the region of Thuringia, Germany, were used to infer genetic parameters. From an electronic database system for recording diagnoses, 15 health disorders with highest incidences were extracted and grouped into the following 5 disease categories: claw disorders, mastitis, female fertility, metabolism, and ectoparasites. In a bayesian approach, threshold methodology was applied for binary distributed health disorders and linear models were used for gaussian test-day observations. Variances and variance ratios for health disorders were from univariate and covariance components among health disorders and between health disorders, and test-day production traits were from bivariate repeatability models. Incidences of health disorders increased with increasing parity and were substantially higher at the beginning of lactation. Only incidences for ectoparasites slightly increased with increasing stage of lactation. Heritabilities ranged from 0.00 for ectoparasites to 0.22 for interdigital hyperplasia. Heritabilities of remaining health disorders were in a narrow range between 0.04 (corpus luteum persistent) and 0.09 (dermatitis digitalis). Clustering diseases into categories did not result in higher heritabilities. The variance ratio of the permanent environmental component was higher than the heritability for the same trait, pointing to the conclusion that non-genetic factors influence repeated occurrence of health problems during lactation. Repeatabilities were relatively high with values up to 0.49 for interdigital hyperplasia. Genetic correlations among selected health disorders were low and close to zero, disproving the assumption that a cow being susceptible for a specific disease is also susceptible for other types of health disorders. Antagonistic genetic relationships

  7. Acquired methemoglobinemia revisited.

    PubMed

    Trapp, Larry; Will, John

    2010-10-01

    Dentistry has two medications in its pain management armamentarium that may cause the potentially life-threatening disorder methemoglobinemia. The first medications are the topical local anesthetics benzocaine and prilocaine. The second medication is the injectable local anesthetic prilocaine. Acquired methemoglobinemia remains a source of morbidity and mortality in dental and medical patients despite the fact that it is better understood now than it was even a decade ago. It is in the interest of all dental patients that their treating dentists review this disorder. The safety of dental patients mandates professional awareness.

  8. Behavior genetics of personality disorders: informing classification and conceptualization in DSM-5.

    PubMed

    South, Susan C; DeYoung, Nathaniel J

    2013-07-01

    Personality pathology is currently captured in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual through 10 categorical personality disorder (PD) diagnoses grouped into three descriptive clusters. This classification system has been criticized by many for using discrete categories and arbitrary thresholds when making clinical decisions. To address these critiques, the DSM-5 Personality and Personality Disorders Work Group has put forth a proposal that significantly alters the structure and content of the DSM-IV PD section. If this DSM-5 Work Group has conducted its own systematic review of the empirical literature, this review has not been released or made widely available. As such, it is up to the psychology community at large to determine how well the suggested changes align with findings from extant PD research. The current article joins this effort by addressing the contribution of behavior genetic findings to the revision process for classification of PDs in DSM-5. First, we provide a brief review of the history of PD classification in the DSM. Next, we present an overview and rationale for each of the five major suggested changes to PD diagnoses. For each suggested change, we outline the available evidence from behavior genetics and interpretations of these findings. Finally, we offer a summary of considerations for PD classification as the DSM-5 moves forward. Review of the behavior genetics literature suggests that several features of the DSM-5 proposal, including the elimination of 4 PDs, merging clinical disorders and PDs on a single axis, and the implementation of a trait rating system, require significantly greater explication before a product is finalized.

  9. Velo-cardio-facial syndrome and psychotic disorders: Implications for psychiatric genetics

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, W.C.; Bassett, A.S.; Weksberg, R.

    1994-06-15

    Psychiatric disorders have been reported in over 10% of patients with velo-cardio-facial syndrome (VCFS) in long-term follow-up. To further explore the behavioral and psychiatric findings associated with VCFS in adulthood, detailed clinical histories of two patients - one with VCFS who developed a psychotic illness, and one with schizophrenia who was found to have dysmorphological features associated with VCFS - are described in the current report. The observed overlap of physical and psychiatric symptoms in these two patients suggests that VCFS and psychotic disorders may share a pathogenetic mechanism. This could be consistent with a contiguous gene model for VCFS and psychosis, suggesting chromosome 22q11 as a possible candidate region for genetic studies of schizophrenia. 26 refs., 2 tabs.

  10. A genetic model of substrate deprivation therapy for a glycosphingolipid storage disorder

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yujing; Wada, Ryuichi; Kawai, Hiromichi; Sango, Kazunori; Deng, Chuxia; Tai, Tadashi; McDonald, Michael P.; Araujo, Kristlyn; Crawley, Jacqueline N.; Bierfreund, Uwe; Sandhoff, Konrad; Suzuki, Kinuko; Proia, Richard L.

    1999-01-01

    Inherited defects in the degradation of glycosphingolipids (GSLs) cause a group of severe diseases known as GSL storage disorders. There are currently no effective treatments for the majority of these disorders. We have explored a new treatment paradigm, substrate deprivation therapy, by constructing a genetic model in mice. Sandhoff's disease mice, which abnormally accumulate GSLs, were bred with mice that were blocked in their synthesis of GSLs. The mice with simultaneous defects in GSL synthesis and degradation no longer accumulated GSLs, had improved neurologic function, and had a much longer life span. However, these mice eventually developed a late-onset neurologic disease because of accumulation of another class of substrate, oligosaccharides. The results support the validity of the substrate deprivation therapy and also highlight some limitations. PMID:10021458

  11. Clinical and Molecular Features of Laron Syndrome, A Genetic Disorder Protecting from Cancer.

    PubMed

    Janecka, Anna; Kołodziej-Rzepa, Marta; Biesaga, Beata

    2016-01-01

    Laron syndrome (LS) is a rare, genetic disorder inherited in an autosomal recessive manner. The disease is caused by mutations of the growth hormone (GH) gene, leading to GH/insulin-like growth factor type 1 (IGF1) signalling pathway defect. Patients with LS have characteristic biochemical features, such as a high serum level of GH and low IGF1 concentration. Laron syndrome was first described by the Israeli physician Zvi Laron in 1966. Globally, around 350 people are affected by this syndrome and there are two large groups living in separate geographic regions: Israel (69 individuals) and Ecuador (90 individuals). They are all characterized by typical appearance such as dwarfism, facial phenotype, obesity and hypogenitalism. Additionally, they suffer from hypoglycemia, hypercholesterolemia and sleep disorders, but surprisingly have a very low cancer risk. Therefore, studies on LS offer a unique opportunity to better understand carcinogenesis and develop new strategies of cancer treatment. PMID:27381597

  12. Evidence for a genetic association between alleles of monoamine oxidase A gene and bipolar affective disorder

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, L.C.C.; Sham, P.; Castle, D.

    1995-08-14

    We present evidence of a genetic association between bipolar disorder and alleles at 3 monoamine oxidase A (MAOA) markers, but not with alleles of a monoamine oxidase B (MAOB) polymorphism. The 3 MAOA markers, including one associated with low MAOA activity, show strong allelic association with each other but surprisingly not with MAOB. Our results are significantly only for females, though the number of males in our sample is too small to draw any definite conclusions. Our data is consistent with recent reports of reduced MAOA activity in patients with abnormal behavioral phenotypes. The strength of the association is weak, but significant, which suggests that alleles at the MAOA locus contribute to susceptibility to bipolar disorder rather than being a major determinant. 58 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  13. Moving towards causality in attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder: overview of neural and genetic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Gallo, Eduardo F; Posner, Jonathan

    2016-06-01

    Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterised by developmentally inappropriate levels of inattention and hyperactivity or impulsivity. The heterogeneity of its clinical manifestations and the differential responses to treatment and varied prognoses have long suggested myriad underlying causes. Over the past decade, clinical and basic research efforts have uncovered many behavioural and neurobiological alterations associated with ADHD, from genes to higher order neural networks. Here, we review the neurobiology of ADHD by focusing on neural circuits implicated in the disorder and discuss how abnormalities in circuitry relate to symptom presentation and treatment. We summarise the literature on genetic variants that are potentially related to the development of ADHD, and how these, in turn, might affect circuit function and relevant behaviours. Whether these underlying neurobiological factors are causally related to symptom presentation remains unresolved. Therefore, we assess efforts aimed at disentangling issues of causality, and showcase the shifting research landscape towards endophenotype refinement in clinical and preclinical settings. Furthermore, we review approaches being developed to understand the neurobiological underpinnings of this complex disorder, including the use of animal models, neuromodulation, and pharmacoimaging studies.

  14. Moving towards causality in attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder: overview of neural and genetic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Gallo, Eduardo F; Posner, Jonathan

    2016-06-01

    Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterised by developmentally inappropriate levels of inattention and hyperactivity or impulsivity. The heterogeneity of its clinical manifestations and the differential responses to treatment and varied prognoses have long suggested myriad underlying causes. Over the past decade, clinical and basic research efforts have uncovered many behavioural and neurobiological alterations associated with ADHD, from genes to higher order neural networks. Here, we review the neurobiology of ADHD by focusing on neural circuits implicated in the disorder and discuss how abnormalities in circuitry relate to symptom presentation and treatment. We summarise the literature on genetic variants that are potentially related to the development of ADHD, and how these, in turn, might affect circuit function and relevant behaviours. Whether these underlying neurobiological factors are causally related to symptom presentation remains unresolved. Therefore, we assess efforts aimed at disentangling issues of causality, and showcase the shifting research landscape towards endophenotype refinement in clinical and preclinical settings. Furthermore, we review approaches being developed to understand the neurobiological underpinnings of this complex disorder, including the use of animal models, neuromodulation, and pharmacoimaging studies. PMID:27183902

  15. Mathematical limits of multilocus models: The genetic transmission of bipolar disorder

    SciTech Connect

    Craddock, N.; Khodel, V.; Van Eerdewegh, P.; Reich, T.

    1995-09-01

    We describe a simple, graphical method for determining plausible modes of inheritance for complex traits and apply this to bipolar disorder. The constraints that allele frequencies and penetrances lie in the interval 0-1 impose limits on recurrence risks, K{sub R}, in relatives of an affected proband for a given population prevalence, K{sub p}. We have investigated these limits for K{sub R} in three classes of relatives (MZ co-twin, sibling, and parent/offspring) for the general single-locus model and for two types of multilocus models: heterogeneity and multiplicative. In our models we have assumed Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, an all-or-none trait, absence of nongenetic resemblance between relatives, and negligible mutation at the disease loci. Although the true values of K{sub p} and the K{sub R}`s are only approximately known, observed population and family data for bipolar disorder are inconsistent with a single-locus model or with any heterogeneity model. In contrast, multiplicative models involving three or more loci are consistent with observed data and, thus, represent plausible models for the inheritance of bipolar disorder. Studies to determine the genetic basis of most bipolar disorder should use methods capable of detecting interacting oligogenes. 32 refs., 5 figs.

  16. Moving towards causality in attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder: overview of neural and genetic mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Gallo, Eduardo F; Posner, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterised by developmentally inappropriate levels of inattention and hyperactivity or impulsivity. The heterogeneity of its clinical manifestations and the differential responses to treatment and varied prognoses have long suggested myriad underlying causes. Over the past decade, clinical and basic research efforts have uncovered many behavioural and neurobiological alterations associated with ADHD, from genes to higher order neural networks. Here, we review the neurobiology of ADHD by focusing on neural circuits implicated in the disorder and discuss how abnormalities in circuitry relate to symptom presentation and treatment. We summarise the literature on genetic variants that are potentially related to the development of ADHD, and how these, in turn, might affect circuit function and relevant behaviours. Whether these underlying neurobiological factors are causally related to symptom presentation remains unresolved. Therefore, we assess efforts aimed at disentangling issues of causality, and showcase the shifting research landscape towards endophenotype refinement in clinical and preclinical settings. Furthermore, we review approaches being developed to understand the neurobiological underpinnings of this complex disorder including the use of animal models, neuromodulation, and pharmaco-imaging studies. PMID:27183902

  17. Laboratory and Genetic Investigation of Mutations Accounting for Congenital Fibrinogen Disorders.

    PubMed

    Neerman-Arbez, Marguerite; de Moerloose, Philippe; Casini, Alessandro

    2016-06-01

    Congenital fibrinogen disorders are classified into two types of plasma fibrinogen defects: type I (quantitative fibrinogen deficiencies), that is, hypofibrinogenemia or afibrinogenemia, in which there are low or absent plasma fibrinogen antigen levels, respectively, and type II (qualitative fibrinogen deficiencies), that is, dysfibrinogenemia or hypodysfibrinogenemia, in which there are normal or reduced antigen levels associated with disproportionately low functional activity. These disorders are caused by mutations in the three fibrinogen-encoding genes FGA, FGB, and FGG. Afibrinogenemia is associated with mild to severe bleeding, whereas hypofibrinogenemia is often asymptomatic. For these quantitative disorders, the majority of mutations prevent protein production. However, in some cases, missense or late-truncating nonsense mutations allow synthesis of the mutant fibrinogen chain, but intracellular fibrinogen assembly and/or secretion are impaired. Qualitative fibrinogen disorders are associated with bleeding, thrombosis, or both thrombosis and bleeding, but many dysfibrinogenemias are asymptomatic. The majority of cases are caused by heterozygous missense mutations. Here, we review the laboratory and genetic diagnosis of fibrinogen gene anomalies with an updated discussion of causative mutations identified.

  18. Genetics and pharmacogenetics of aminergic transmitter pathways in functional gastrointestinal disorders.

    PubMed

    Martinucci, Irene; Blandizzi, Corrado; de Bortoli, Nicola; Bellini, Massimo; Antonioli, Luca; Tuccori, Marco; Fornai, Matteo; Marchi, Santino; Colucci, Rocchina

    2015-01-01

    Functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs) are highly prevalent syndromes, without evident underlying organic causes. Their pathogenesis is multifactorial in nature, with a combination of environmental and genetic factors contributing to their clinical manifestations, for which most of current treatments are not satisfactory. It is acknowledged that amine mediators (noradrenaline, dopamine and serotonin) play pivotal regulatory actions on gut functions and visceral sensation. In addition, drugs of therapeutic interest for FGIDs act on these transmitter pathways. The present article reviews current knowledge on the impact of genetics and pharmacogenetics of aminergic pathways on FGID pathophysiology, clinical presentations, symptom severity and medical management, in an attempt of highlighting the most relevant evidence and point out issues that should be addressed in future investigations.

  19. Psychological impact of genetic testing for adult-onset disorders. An update for clinicians.

    PubMed

    Meiser, B; Gleeson, M A; Tucker, K M

    2000-02-01

    Testing for gene mutations that confer susceptibility to adult-onset disorders has potential benefits, but these must be balanced against the psychological harms, if any. We review published findings on the psychological effects of such testing, focusing on Huntington's disease, which has the most available data, and the hereditary cancer syndromes. Most of the evidence suggests that non-carriers and carriers differ significantly in terms of short-term, but not long-term, psychological adjustment to test results. The psychological impact of genetic testing depends more on pretest psychological distress than the test result itself. PMID:10735024

  20. Genetic red cell disorders and severity of falciparum malaria in Myanmar.

    PubMed Central

    Oo, M.; Tin-Shwe; Marlar-Than; O'Sullivan, W. J.

    1995-01-01

    A hospital-based survey was undertaken to investigate the relationship between the incidence and severity of malaria infection and various red cell disorders in Myanmar. The mean parasitaemia levels of patients with alpha- or beta-thalassaemia trait or with severe glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency were lower than those of individuals with normal haemoglobin AA or with heterozygous haemoglobin E. The double genetic defect of thalassaemia trait and severe G6PD deficiency appeared to confer some degree of protection against malaria. PMID:8846492

  1. Expanding the clinical and genetic heterogeneity of hereditary disorders of connective tissue.

    PubMed

    Alazami, Anas M; Al-Qattan, Sarah M; Faqeih, Eissa; Alhashem, Amal; Alshammari, Muneera; Alzahrani, Fatema; Al-Dosari, Mohammed S; Patel, Nisha; Alsagheir, Afaf; Binabbas, Bassam; Alzaidan, Hamad; Alsiddiky, Abdulmonem; Alharbi, Nasser; Alfadhel, Majid; Kentab, Amal; Daza, Riza M; Kircher, Martin; Shendure, Jay; Hashem, Mais; Alshahrani, Saif; Rahbeeni, Zuhair; Khalifa, Ola; Shaheen, Ranad; Alkuraya, Fowzan S

    2016-05-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) describes a group of clinical entities in which the connective tissue, primarily that of the skin, joint and vessels, is abnormal, although the resulting clinical manifestations can vary widely between the different historical subtypes. Many cases of hereditary disorders of connective tissue that do not seem to fit these historical subtypes exist. The aim of this study is to describe a large series of patients with inherited connective tissue disorders evaluated by our clinical genetics service and for whom a likely causal variant was identified. In addition to clinical phenotyping, patients underwent various genetic tests including molecular karyotyping, candidate gene analysis, autozygome analysis, and whole-exome and whole-genome sequencing as appropriate. We describe a cohort of 69 individuals representing 40 families, all referred because of suspicion of an inherited connective tissue disorder by their primary physician. Molecular lesions included variants in the previously published disease genes B3GALT6, GORAB, ZNF469, B3GAT3, ALDH18A1, FKBP14, PYCR1, CHST14 and SPARC with interesting variations on the published clinical phenotypes. We also describe the first recessive EDS-like condition to be caused by a recessive COL1A1 variant. In addition, exome capture in a familial case identified a homozygous truncating variant in a novel and compelling candidate gene, AEBP1. Finally, we also describe a distinct novel clinical syndrome of cutis laxa and marked facial features and propose ATP6V1E1 and ATP6V0D2 (two subunits of vacuolar ATPase) as likely candidate genes based on whole-genome and whole-exome sequencing of the two families with this new clinical entity. Our study expands the clinical spectrum of hereditary disorders of connective tissue and adds three novel candidate genes including two that are associated with a highly distinct syndrome.

  2. Expanding the clinical and genetic heterogeneity of hereditary disorders of connective tissue.

    PubMed

    Alazami, Anas M; Al-Qattan, Sarah M; Faqeih, Eissa; Alhashem, Amal; Alshammari, Muneera; Alzahrani, Fatema; Al-Dosari, Mohammed S; Patel, Nisha; Alsagheir, Afaf; Binabbas, Bassam; Alzaidan, Hamad; Alsiddiky, Abdulmonem; Alharbi, Nasser; Alfadhel, Majid; Kentab, Amal; Daza, Riza M; Kircher, Martin; Shendure, Jay; Hashem, Mais; Alshahrani, Saif; Rahbeeni, Zuhair; Khalifa, Ola; Shaheen, Ranad; Alkuraya, Fowzan S

    2016-05-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) describes a group of clinical entities in which the connective tissue, primarily that of the skin, joint and vessels, is abnormal, although the resulting clinical manifestations can vary widely between the different historical subtypes. Many cases of hereditary disorders of connective tissue that do not seem to fit these historical subtypes exist. The aim of this study is to describe a large series of patients with inherited connective tissue disorders evaluated by our clinical genetics service and for whom a likely causal variant was identified. In addition to clinical phenotyping, patients underwent various genetic tests including molecular karyotyping, candidate gene analysis, autozygome analysis, and whole-exome and whole-genome sequencing as appropriate. We describe a cohort of 69 individuals representing 40 families, all referred because of suspicion of an inherited connective tissue disorder by their primary physician. Molecular lesions included variants in the previously published disease genes B3GALT6, GORAB, ZNF469, B3GAT3, ALDH18A1, FKBP14, PYCR1, CHST14 and SPARC with interesting variations on the published clinical phenotypes. We also describe the first recessive EDS-like condition to be caused by a recessive COL1A1 variant. In addition, exome capture in a familial case identified a homozygous truncating variant in a novel and compelling candidate gene, AEBP1. Finally, we also describe a distinct novel clinical syndrome of cutis laxa and marked facial features and propose ATP6V1E1 and ATP6V0D2 (two subunits of vacuolar ATPase) as likely candidate genes based on whole-genome and whole-exome sequencing of the two families with this new clinical entity. Our study expands the clinical spectrum of hereditary disorders of connective tissue and adds three novel candidate genes including two that are associated with a highly distinct syndrome. PMID:27023906

  3. Connectomic markers of disease expression, genetic risk and resilience in bipolar disorder

    PubMed Central

    Dima, D; Roberts, R E; Frangou, S

    2016-01-01

    Bipolar disorder (BD) is characterized by emotional dysregulation and cognitive deficits associated with abnormal connectivity between subcortical—primarily emotional processing regions—and prefrontal regulatory areas. Given the significant contribution of genetic factors to BD, studies in unaffected first-degree relatives can identify neural mechanisms of genetic risk but also resilience, thus paving the way for preventive interventions. Dynamic causal modeling (DCM) and random-effects Bayesian model selection were used to define and assess connectomic phenotypes linked to facial affect processing and working memory in a demographically matched sample of first-degree relatives carefully selected for resilience (n=25), euthymic patients with BD (n=41) and unrelated healthy controls (n=46). During facial affect processing, patients and relatives showed similarly increased frontolimbic connectivity; resilient relatives, however, evidenced additional adaptive hyperconnectivity within the ventral visual stream. During working memory processing, patients displayed widespread hypoconnectivity within the corresponding network. In contrast, working memory network connectivity in resilient relatives was comparable to that of controls. Our results indicate that frontolimbic dysfunction during affect processing could represent a marker of genetic risk to BD, and diffuse hypoconnectivity within the working memory network a marker of disease expression. The association of hyperconnectivity within the affect-processing network with resilience to BD suggests adaptive plasticity that allows for compensatory changes and encourages further investigation of this phenotype in genetic and early intervention studies. PMID:26731443

  4. Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: The Process of Parental Adaptation and Implications for Genetic Counseling.

    PubMed

    Andrighetti, Heather; Semaka, Alicia; Stewart, S Evelyn; Shuman, Cheryl; Hayeems, Robin; Austin, Jehannine

    2016-10-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) has primarily pediatric onset and well-documented unique impacts on family functioning. Limited research has assessed the understanding that parents of children with OCD have of the etiology of the condition, and there are no data regarding potential applications of genetic counseling for this population. We recruited 13 parents of 13 children diagnosed with OCD from the OCD Registry at British Columbia Children's Hospital, and conducted qualitative semi-structured telephone interviews to explore participants' experiences with their child's OCD, causal attributions of OCD, and perceptions of two genetic counseling vignettes. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed, and analyzed using elements of grounded theory qualitative methodology. Analysis revealed key components and contextual elements of the process through which parents adapt to their child's OCD. This adaptation process involved conceptualizing the meaning of OCD, navigating its impact on family dynamics, and developing effective illness management strategies. Adaptation took place against a backdrop of stigmatization and was shaped by participants' family history of mental illness and their child's specific manifestations of OCD. Parents perceived genetic counseling, as described in the vignettes, as being empowering, alleviating guilt and blame, and positively impacting treatment orientation. These data provide insight into the process of parental adaptation to pediatric OCD, and suggest that genetic counseling services for families affected by OCD may help facilitate adaptation to this illness.

  5. Psychometric precision in phenotype definition is a useful step in molecular genetic investigation of psychiatric disorders

    PubMed Central

    Xu, M K; Gaysina, D; Barnett, J H; Scoriels, L; van de Lagemaat, L N; Wong, A; Richards, M; Croudace, T J; Jones, P B

    2015-01-01

    Affective disorders are highly heritable, but few genetic risk variants have been consistently replicated in molecular genetic association studies. The common method of defining psychiatric phenotypes in molecular genetic research is either a summation of symptom scores or binary threshold score representing the risk of diagnosis. Psychometric latent variable methods can improve the precision of psychiatric phenotypes, especially when the data structure is not straightforward. Using data from the British 1946 birth cohort, we compared summary scores with psychometric modeling based on the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-28) scale for affective symptoms in an association analysis of 27 candidate genes (249 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs)). The psychometric method utilized a bi-factor model that partitioned the phenotype variances into five orthogonal latent variable factors, in accordance with the multidimensional data structure of the GHQ-28 involving somatic, social, anxiety and depression domains. Results showed that, compared with the summation approach, the affective symptoms defined by the bi-factor psychometric model had a higher number of associated SNPs of larger effect sizes. These results suggest that psychometrically defined mental health phenotypes can reflect the dimensions of complex phenotypes better than summation scores, and therefore offer a useful approach in genetic association investigations. PMID:26125156

  6. Differences in quality between privately and publicly banked umbilical cord blood units: a pilot study of autologous cord blood infusion in children with acquired neurologic disorders

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jessica; Allison, June; McLaughlin, Colleen; Sledge, Linda; Waters-Pick, Barbara; Wease, Stephen; Kurtzberg, Joanne

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND A pilot study was conducted to determine the safety and feasibility of intravenous administration of autologous umbilical cord blood (CB) in young children with acquired neurologic disorders. Most CB units (CBUs) were electively stored in private CB banks. Unlike public banks, which utilize specific criteria and thresholds for banking, private banks generally store all collected CBUs. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS CBUs of eligible patients containing more than 1 × 107 cells/kg were shipped to Duke from the banks of origin after confirming identity by HLA typing. On the day of infusion, CBUs were thawed and washed in dextran-albumin and infused intravenously. Patients were medicated with acetaminophen, diphenhydramine, and methylprednisolone before transfusion. Data regarding patients, infusions, and CBUs were collected retrospectively. Characteristics of CBUs were compared to existing data from CBUs publicly banked at the Carolinas Cord Blood Bank. RESULTS From March 2004 to December 2009, 184 children received 198 CB infusions. Three patients had infusion reactions, all responsive to medical therapy and stopping the infusion. Median precryopreservation volume (60 mL vs. 89 mL, p < 0.0001), total nucleated cell count (4.7 × 108 vs. 10.8 × 108, p < 0.0001), and CD34 count (1.8 × 106 vs. 3.0 × 106, p < 0.0001) were significantly lower than publicly stored CBUs. Postthaw sterility cultures were positive in 7.6% of infused CBUs. CONCLUSION IV infusion of autologous CB is safe and feasible in young children with neurologic injuries. Quality parameters of privately banked CBUs are inferior to those stored in public banks. If efficacy of autologous CB is established clinically, the quality of autologous units should be held to the same standards as those stored in public banks. PMID:20546200

  7. Why is genetic screening for autosomal dominant disorders underutilized in families? The case of hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT)

    PubMed Central

    Bernhardt, Barbara A.; Zayac, Cara; Pyeritz, Reed E.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Appropriate management of autosomal dominant disorders reduces morbidity and mortality, but relies on identifying which family members are affected. Genetic testing may identify relatives needing follow-up, but is underutilized. We conducted this study to identify barriers to genetic testing for one disorder, hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT). Methods Surveys and on-line discussion groups with people from HHT families. Results Multiple barriers to HHT genetic testing were identified including lack of knowledge about genetic testing, problems with access, and emotional barriers. Many participants: did not understand the rationale for HHT testing or benefits of early detection; believed that genetic testing is expensive and not covered by insurance; believed that primary care providers don’t know how to order genetic testing. Access to HHT testing is limited by distance from an HHT Center or a genetics clinic. Emotional barriers include fear of insurance discrimination; denial of having HHT or being at risk; guilt and stigma. Conclusion Voluntary disease organizations should develop and disseminate brief educational materials that describe the rationale for genetic testing, and emphasize the benefits of early detection and treatment. In addition, laboratories offering genetic testing should provide support for primary care physicians to order and interpret genetic tests. PMID:21637104

  8. The genetic and molecular bases of monogenic disorders affecting proteolytic systems

    PubMed Central

    Richard, I

    2005-01-01

    Complete and limited proteolysis represents key events that regulate many biological processes. At least 5% of the human genome codes for components of proteolytic processes if proteases, inhibitors, and cofactors are taken into account. Accordingly, disruption of proteolysis is involved in numerous pathological conditions. In particular, molecular genetic studies have identified a growing number of monogenic disorders caused by mutations in protease coding genes, highlighting the importance of this class of enzymes in development, organogenesis, immunity, and brain function. This review provides insights into the current knowledge about the molecular genetic causes of these disorders. It should be noted that most are due to loss of function mutations, indicating absolute requirement of proteolytic activities for normal cellular functions. Recent progress in understanding the function of the implicated proteins and the disease pathogenesis is detailed. In addition to providing important clues to the diagnosis, treatment, and pathophysiology of disease, functional characterisation of mutations in proteolytic systems emphasises the pleiotropic functions of proteases in the body homeostasis. PMID:15994873

  9. Genetic models of schizophrenia and related psychotic disorders: progress and pitfalls across the methodological "minefield".

    PubMed

    O'Tuathaigh, Colm M P; Moran, Paula M; Waddington, John L

    2013-10-01

    The challenge of modelling a complex and multifaceted disorder such as schizophrenia is epitomised by the considerable degree of phenotypic variability described in patients and by the absence of specific and consistent neuropathological biomarkers. The pattern and severity of a range of clinical features, including florid psychotic symptoms such as hallucinations and delusions, negative symptoms and cognitive dysfunction, together with age at onset, course of illness and other indices, can vary greatly between individual patients. The undefined nature of the relationship between diagnosis and underlying aetiology has complicated research in the field of clinical and preclinical neuroscience, thereby making it difficult to generate or evaluate appropriate disease models of schizophrenia. In the present review, we explore those conceptual and practical issues that relate specifically to the genetic modelling of schizophrenia and related disorders in rodents. Practical issues that impact on the robustness of endophenotypic findings and their translational relevance are discussed with reference to evidence from selective genetic models of candidate risk genes and copy number variants implicated in schizophrenia.

  10. The genetics and pathogenesis of thoracic aortic aneurysm disorder and dissections.

    PubMed

    Zhang, L; Wang, H-H

    2016-06-01

    Major advances have been made over the last 20 years to better elucidate the molecular basis of aortic aneurysmal diseases. Thoracic aortic aneurysm disorder and dissections (TAADs) have a high mortality rate, and one-fifth of TAADs patients have a high familial prevalence of the disease. Clinical presentations of TAADs are different, from no symptom to aortic insufficiency that may result in sudden death. The identification of the genetic factors associated with familial TAADs is beneficial for screening and early intervention of TAADs and provides a paradigm for the study of inherited blood vessel disorders. Defects in multiple genes have been identified as causing TAADs. Many genes/alleles are associated with clinical presentations of TAADs; however, the roles of these gene defects in the pathogenesis of TAADs remain unclear. Genetic studies are now beginning to shed light on the key molecules that regulate the extracellular matrix and cytoskeleton in smooth muscle cells and transforming growth factor-beta signaling pathways involved in TAADs pathogenesis. Deciphering the molecular basis of TAADs will improve our understanding of the basic physiology of aortic function and will provide knowledge of the causative genes/alleles and typical manifestations, which will benefit clinical decision-making going forward.

  11. Characterization of Movement Disorder Phenomenology in Genetically Proven, Familial Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Gasca-Salas, Carmen; Masellis, Mario; Khoo, Edwin; Shah, Binit B.; Fisman, David; Lang, Anthony E.; Kleiner-Fisman, Galit

    2016-01-01

    Background Mutations in granulin (PGRN) and tau (MAPT), and hexanucleotide repeat expansions near the C9orf72 genes are the most prevalent genetic causes of frontotemporal lobar degeneration. Although behavior, language and movement presentations are common, the relationship between genetic subgroup and movement disorder phenomenology is unclear. Objective We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of the literature characterizing the spectrum and prevalence of movement disorders in genetic frontotemporal lobar degeneration. Methods Electronic databases were searched using terms related to frontotemporal lobar degeneration and movement disorders. Articles were included when cases had a proven genetic cause. Study-specific prevalence estimates for clinical features were transformed using Freeman-Tukey arcsine transformation, allowing for pooled estimates of prevalence to be generated using random-effects models. Results The mean age at onset was earlier in those with MAPT mutations compared to PGRN (p<0.001) and C9orf72 (p = 0.024). 66.5% of subjects had an initial non-movement presentation that was most likely a behavioral syndrome (35.7%). At any point during the disease, parkinsonism was the most common movement syndrome reported in 79.8% followed by progressive supranuclear palsy (PSPS) and corticobasal (CBS) syndromes in 12.2% and 10.7%, respectively. The prevalence of movement disorder as initial presentation was higher in MAPT subjects (35.8%) compared to PGRN subjects (10.1). In those with a non-movement presentation, language disorder was more common in PGRN subjects (18.7%) compared to MAPT subjects (5.4%). Summary This represents the first systematic review and meta-analysis of the occurrence of movement disorder phenomenology in genetic frontotemporal lobar degeneration. Standardized prospective collection of clinical information in conjunction with genetic characterization will be crucial for accurate clinico-genetic correlation. PMID:27100392

  12. EMQN best practice guidelines for the molecular genetic testing and reporting of chromosome 11p15 imprinting disorders: Silver-Russell and Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome.

    PubMed

    Eggermann, Katja; Bliek, Jet; Brioude, Frédéric; Algar, Elizabeth; Buiting, Karin; Russo, Silvia; Tümer, Zeynep; Monk, David; Moore, Gudrun; Antoniadi, Thalia; Macdonald, Fiona; Netchine, Irène; Lombardi, Paolo; Soellner, Lukas; Begemann, Matthias; Prawitt, Dirk; Maher, Eamonn R; Mannens, Marcel; Riccio, Andrea; Weksberg, Rosanna; Lapunzina, Pablo; Grønskov, Karen; Mackay, Deborah Jg; Eggermann, Thomas

    2016-10-01

    Molecular genetic testing for the 11p15-associated imprinting disorders Silver-Russell and Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (SRS, BWS) is challenging because of the molecular heterogeneity and complexity of the affected imprinted regions. With the growing knowledge on the molecular basis of these disorders and the demand for molecular testing, it turned out that there is an urgent need for a standardized molecular diagnostic testing and reporting strategy. Based on the results from the first external pilot quality assessment schemes organized by the European Molecular Quality Network (EMQN) in 2014 and in context with activities of the European Network of Imprinting Disorders (EUCID.net) towards a consensus in diagnostics and management of SRS and BWS, best practice guidelines have now been developed. Members of institutions working in the field of SRS and BWS diagnostics were invited to comment, and in the light of their feedback amendments were made. The final document was ratified in the course of an EMQN best practice guideline meeting and is in accordance with the general SRS and BWS consensus guidelines, which are in preparation. These guidelines are based on the knowledge acquired from peer-reviewed and published data, as well as observations of the authors in their practice. However, these guidelines can only provide a snapshot of current knowledge at the time of manuscript submission and readers are advised to keep up with the literature.

  13. EMQN best practice guidelines for the molecular genetic testing and reporting of chromosome 11p15 imprinting disorders: Silver–Russell and Beckwith–Wiedemann syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Eggermann, Katja; Bliek, Jet; Brioude, Frédéric; Algar, Elizabeth; Buiting, Karin; Russo, Silvia; Tümer, Zeynep; Monk, David; Moore, Gudrun; Antoniadi, Thalia; Macdonald, Fiona; Netchine, Irène; Lombardi, Paolo; Soellner, Lukas; Begemann, Matthias; Prawitt, Dirk; Maher, Eamonn R; Mannens, Marcel; Riccio, Andrea; Weksberg, Rosanna; Lapunzina, Pablo; Grønskov, Karen; Mackay, Deborah JG; Eggermann, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Molecular genetic testing for the 11p15-associated imprinting disorders Silver–Russell and Beckwith–Wiedemann syndrome (SRS, BWS) is challenging because of the molecular heterogeneity and complexity of the affected imprinted regions. With the growing knowledge on the molecular basis of these disorders and the demand for molecular testing, it turned out that there is an urgent need for a standardized molecular diagnostic testing and reporting strategy. Based on the results from the first external pilot quality assessment schemes organized by the European Molecular Quality Network (EMQN) in 2014 and in context with activities of the European Network of Imprinting Disorders (EUCID.net) towards a consensus in diagnostics and management of SRS and BWS, best practice guidelines have now been developed. Members of institutions working in the field of SRS and BWS diagnostics were invited to comment, and in the light of their feedback amendments were made. The final document was ratified in the course of an EMQN best practice guideline meeting and is in accordance with the general SRS and BWS consensus guidelines, which are in preparation. These guidelines are based on the knowledge acquired from peer-reviewed and published data, as well as observations of the authors in their practice. However, these guidelines can only provide a snapshot of current knowledge at the time of manuscript submission and readers are advised to keep up with the literature. PMID:27165005

  14. Distinct Muscle Biopsy Findings in Genetically Defined Adult-Onset Motor Neuron Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Jokela, Manu; Huovinen, Sanna; Raheem, Olayinka; Lindfors, Mikaela; Palmio, Johanna; Penttilä, Sini; Udd, Bjarne

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize and compare muscle histopathological findings in 3 different genetic motor neuron disorders. We retrospectively re-assessed muscle biopsy findings in 23 patients with autosomal dominant lower motor neuron disease caused by p.G66V mutation in CHCHD10 (SMAJ), 10 X-linked spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) and 11 autosomal dominant c9orf72-mutated amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (c9ALS) patients. Distinct large fiber type grouping consisting of non-atrophic type IIA muscle fibers were 100% specific for the late-onset spinal muscular atrophies (SMAJ and SBMA) and were never observed in c9ALS. Common, but less specific findings included small groups of highly atrophic rounded type IIA fibers in SMAJ/SBMA, whereas in c9ALS, small group atrophies consisting of small-caliber angular fibers involving both fiber types were more characteristic. We also show that in the 2 slowly progressive motor neuron disorders (SMAJ and SBMA) the initial neurogenic features are often confused with considerable secondary “myopathic” changes at later disease stages, such as rimmed vacuoles, myofibrillar aggregates and numerous fibers reactive for fetal myosin heavy chain (dMyHC) antibodies. Based on our findings, muscle biopsy may be valuable in the diagnostic work-up of suspected motor neuron disorders in order to avoid a false ALS diagnosis in patients without clear findings of upper motor neuron lesions. PMID:26999347

  15. Transitions in genetic toggle switches driven by dynamic disorder in rate coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hang; Thill, Peter; Cao, Jianshu

    2016-05-01

    In biochemical systems, intrinsic noise may drive the system switch from one stable state to another. We investigate how kinetic switching between stable states in a bistable network is influenced by dynamic disorder, i.e., fluctuations in the rate coefficients. Using the geometric minimum action method, we first investigate the optimal transition paths and the corresponding minimum actions based on a genetic toggle switch model in which reaction coefficients draw from a discrete probability distribution. For the continuous probability distribution of the rate coefficient, we then consider two models of dynamic disorder in which reaction coefficients undergo different stochastic processes with the same stationary distribution. In one, the kinetic parameters follow a discrete Markov process and in the other they follow continuous Langevin dynamics. We find that regulation of the parameters modulating the dynamic disorder, as has been demonstrated to occur through allosteric control in bistable networks in the immune system, can be crucial in shaping the statistics of optimal transition paths, transition probabilities, and the stationary probability distribution of the network.

  16. The genetics of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder in adults, a review.

    PubMed

    Franke, B; Faraone, S V; Asherson, P; Buitelaar, J; Bau, C H D; Ramos-Quiroga, J A; Mick, E; Grevet, E H; Johansson, S; Haavik, J; Lesch, K-P; Cormand, B; Reif, A

    2012-10-01

    The adult form of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (aADHD) has a prevalence of up to 5% and is the most severe long-term outcome of this common neurodevelopmental disorder. Family studies in clinical samples suggest an increased familial liability for aADHD compared with childhood ADHD (cADHD), whereas twin studies based on self-rated symptoms in adult population samples show moderate heritability estimates of 30-40%. However, using multiple sources of information, the heritability of clinically diagnosed aADHD and cADHD is very similar. Results of candidate gene as well as genome-wide molecular genetic studies in aADHD samples implicate some of the same genes involved in ADHD in children, although in some cases different alleles and different genes may be responsible for adult versus childhood ADHD. Linkage studies have been successful in identifying loci for aADHD and led to the identification of LPHN3 and CDH13 as novel genes associated with ADHD across the lifespan. In addition, studies of rare genetic variants have identified probable causative mutations for aADHD. Use of endophenotypes based on neuropsychology and neuroimaging, as well as next-generation genome analysis and improved statistical and bioinformatic analysis methods hold the promise of identifying additional genetic variants involved in disease etiology. Large, international collaborations have paved the way for well-powered studies. Progress in identifying aADHD risk genes may provide us with tools for the prediction of disease progression in the clinic and better treatment, and ultimately may help to prevent persistence of ADHD into adulthood.

  17. Genetic polymorphisms in folate pathway enzymes, DRD4 and GSTM1 are related to temporomandibular disorder

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Temporomandibular disorder (TMD) is a multifactorial syndrome related to a critical period of human life. TMD has been associated with psychological dysfunctions, oxidative state and sexual dimorphism with coincidental occurrence along the pubertal development. In this work we study the association between TMD and genetic polymorphisms of folate metabolism, neurotransmission, oxidative and hormonal metabolism. Folate metabolism, which depends on genes variations and diet, is directly involved in genetic and epigenetic variations that can influence the changes of last growing period of development in human and the appearance of the TMD. Methods A case-control study was designed to evaluate the impact of genetic polymorphisms above described on TMD. A total of 229 individuals (69% women) were included at the study; 86 were patients with TMD and 143 were healthy control subjects. Subjects underwent to a clinical examination following the guidelines by the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD). Genotyping of 20 Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs), divided in two groups, was performed by multiplex minisequencing preceded by multiplex PCR. Other seven genetic polymorphisms different from SNPs (deletions, insertions, tandem repeat, null genotype) were achieved by a multiplex-PCR. A chi-square test was performed to determine the differences in genotype and allelic frequencies between TMD patients and healthy subjects. To estimate TMD risk, in those polymorphisms that shown significant differences, odds ratio (OR) with a 95% of confidence interval were calculated. Results Six of the polymorphisms showed statistical associations with TMD. Four of them are related to enzymes of folates metabolism: Allele G of Serine Hydoxymethyltransferase 1 (SHMT1) rs1979277 (OR = 3.99; 95%CI 1.72, 9.25; p = 0.002), allele G of SHMT1 rs638416 (OR = 2.80; 95%CI 1.51, 5.21; p = 0.013), allele T of Methylentetrahydrofolate Dehydrogenase (MTHFD) rs

  18. Current molecular genetics strategies for the diagnosis of lysosomal storage disorders.

    PubMed

    Giugliani, Roberto; Brusius-Facchin, Ana-Carolina; Pasqualim, Gabriela; Leistner-Segal, Sandra; Riegel, Mariluce; Matte, Ursula

    2016-01-01

    Lysosomal storage disorders (LSDs) are a group of almost 50 monogenic diseases characterized by mutations causing deficiency of lysosomal enzymes or non-enzyme proteins involved in transport across the lysosomal membrane, protein maturation or lysosomal biogenesis. Usually, affected patients are normal at birth and have a progressive and severe disease with high morbidity and reduced life expectancy. The overall incidence of LSDs is usually estimated as 1:5000, but newborn screening studies are indicating that it could be much higher. Specific therapies were already developed for selected LSDs, making the timely and correct diagnosis very important for successful treatment and also for genetic counseling. In most LSD cases the biochemical techniques provide a reliable diagnosis. However, the identification of pathogenic mutations by genetic analysis is being increasingly recommended to provide additional information. In this paper we discuss the conventional methods for genetic analysis used in the LSDs [restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP), amplification-refractory mutation system (ARMS), single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP), denaturing high performance liquid chromatography (dHPLC), real-time polymerase chain reaction, high resolution melting (HRM), multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA), Sanger sequencing] and also the newer approaches [massive parallel sequencing, array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH)]. PMID:26567866

  19. Integrating behavioral economics and behavioral genetics: delayed reward discounting as an endophenotype for addictive disorders.

    PubMed

    MacKillop, James

    2013-01-01

    Delayed reward discounting is a behavioral economic index of impulsivity, referring to how much an individual devalues a reward based on its delay in time. As a behavioral process that varies considerably across individuals, delay discounting has been studied extensively as a model for self-control, both in the general population and in clinical samples. There is growing interest in genetic influences on discounting and, in particular, the prospect of discounting as an endophenotype for addictive disorders (i.e., a heritable mechanism partially responsible for conferring genetic risk). This review assembles and critiques the evidence supporting this hypothesis. Via numerous cross-sectional studies and a small number of longitudinal studies, there is considerable evidence that impulsive discounting is associated with addictive behavior and appears to play an etiological role. Moreover, there is increasing evidence from diverse methodologies that impulsive delay discounting is temporally stable, heritable, and that elevated levels are present in nonaffected family members. These findings suggest that impulsive discounting meets the criteria for being considered an endophenotype. In addition, recent findings suggest that genetic variation related to dopamine neurotransmission is significantly associated with variability in discounting preferences. A significant caveat, however, is that the literature is modest in some domains and, in others, not all the findings have been supportive or consistent. In addition, important methodological considerations are necessary in future studies. Taken together, although not definitive, there is accumulating support for the hypothesis of impulsive discounting as an endophenotype for addictive behavior and a need for further systematic investigation.

  20. The analysis of genetic aberrations in children with inherited neurometabolic and neurodevelopmental disorders.

    PubMed

    Szymańska, Krystyna; Szczałuba, Krzysztof; Lugowska, Agnieszka; Obersztyn, Ewa; Radkowski, Marek; Nowakowska, Beata A; Kuśmierska, Katarzyna; Tryfon, Jolanta; Demkow, Urszula

    2014-01-01

    Inherited encephalopathies include a broad spectrum of heterogeneous disorders. To provide a correct diagnosis, an integrated approach including genetic testing is warranted. We report seven patients with difficult to diagnose inborn paediatric encephalopathies. The diagnosis could not be attained only by means of clinical and laboratory investigations and MRI. Additional genetic testing was required. Cytogenetics, PCR based tests, and array-based comparative genome hybridization were performed. In 4 patients with impaired language abilities we found the presence of microduplication in the region 16q23.1 affecting two dose-sensitive genes: WWOX (OMIM 605131) and MAF (OMIM 177075) (1 case), an interstitial deletion of the 17p11.2 region (2 patients further diagnosed as Smith-Magenis syndrome), and deletion encompassing first three exons of Myocyte Enhancer Factor gene 2MEF2C (1 case). The two other cases represented progressing dystonia. Characteristic GAG deletion in DYT1 consistently with the diagnosis of torsion dystonia was confirmed in 1 case. Last enrolled patient presented with clinical picture consistent with Krabbe disease confirmed by finding of two pathogenic variants of GALC gene and the absence of mutations in PSAP. The integrated diagnostic approach including genetic testing in selected examples of complicated hereditary diseases of the brain is largely discussed in this paper. PMID:24949445

  1. Using next-generation sequencing as a genetic diagnostic tool in rare autosomal recessive neurologic Mendelian disorders.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhao; Wang, Jun-Ling; Tang, Bei-Sha; Sun, Zhan-Fang; Shi, Yu-Ting; Shen, Lu; Lei, Li-Fang; Wei, Xiao-Ming; Xiao, Jing-Jing; Hu, Zheng-Mao; Pan, Qian; Xia, Kun; Zhang, Qing-Yan; Dai, Mei-Zhi; Liu, Yu; Ashizawa, Tetsuo; Jiang, Hong

    2013-10-01

    Next-generation sequencing was used to investigate 9 rare Chinese pedigrees with rare autosomal recessive neurologic Mendelian disorders. Five probands with ataxia-telangectasia and 1 proband with chorea-acanthocytosis were analyzed by targeted gene sequencing. Whole-exome sequencing was used to investigate 3 affected individuals with Joubert syndrome, nemaline myopathy, or spastic ataxia Charlevoix-Saguenay type. A list of known and novel candidate variants was identified for each causative gene. All variants were genetically verified by Sanger sequencing or quantitative polymerase chain reaction with the strategy of disease segregation in related pedigrees and healthy controls. The advantages of using next-generation sequencing to diagnose rare autosomal recessive neurologic Mendelian disorders characterized by genetic and phenotypic heterogeneity are demonstrated. A genetic diagnostic strategy combining the use of targeted gene sequencing and whole-exome sequencing with the aid of next-generation sequencing platforms has shown great promise for improving the diagnosis of neurologic Mendelian disorders. PMID:23726790

  2. Genetic and environmental factors underlying comorbid bulimic behaviours and alcohol use disorders: a moderating role for the dysregulated personality cluster?

    PubMed

    Slane, Jennifer D; Klump, Kelly L; McGue, Matthew; Iacono, G

    2014-05-01

    Women with bulimia nervosa (BN) frequently have co-occurring alcohol use disorders (AUDs). Studies of shared genetic transmission of these disorders have been mixed. Personality heterogeneity among individuals with BN may explain discrepant findings. Cluster analysis has characterized women with BN in groups on the basis of personality profiles. One group, the Dysregulated cluster, characterized largely by behavioural disinhibition and emotional dysregulation may be more closely linked etiologically to AUDs. This study examined whether genetic associations between BN and AUDs are the strongest among the Dysregulated cluster. Symptoms of BN and AUDs were assessed in female twins at ages 17 and 25 years from the Minnesota Twin Family Study. Personality clusters were defined using the Multidimensional Personality Questionnaire. Twin moderation models suggested small-to-moderate common genetic transmission between BN and AUDs. However, shared genetic effects did not differ by personality cluster. Findings suggest that personality clusters are unlikely to account for inconsistent findings regarding their shared aetiology.

  3. Genetic Differences in the Immediate Transcriptome Response to Stress Predict Risk-Related Brain Function and Psychiatric Disorders.

    PubMed

    Arloth, Janine; Bogdan, Ryan; Weber, Peter; Frishman, Goar; Menke, Andreas; Wagner, Klaus V; Balsevich, Georgia; Schmidt, Mathias V; Karbalai, Nazanin; Czamara, Darina; Altmann, Andre; Trümbach, Dietrich; Wurst, Wolfgang; Mehta, Divya; Uhr, Manfred; Klengel, Torsten; Erhardt, Angelika; Carey, Caitlin E; Conley, Emily Drabant; Ruepp, Andreas; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Hariri, Ahmad R; Binder, Elisabeth B

    2015-06-01

    Depression risk is exacerbated by genetic factors and stress exposure; however, the biological mechanisms through which these factors interact to confer depression risk are poorly understood. One putative biological mechanism implicates variability in the ability of cortisol, released in response to stress, to trigger a cascade of adaptive genomic and non-genomic processes through glucocorticoid receptor (GR) activation. Here, we demonstrate that common genetic variants in long-range enhancer elements modulate the immediate transcriptional response to GR activation in human blood cells. These functional genetic variants increase risk for depression and co-heritable psychiatric disorders. Moreover, these risk variants are associated with inappropriate amygdala reactivity, a transdiagnostic psychiatric endophenotype and an important stress hormone response trigger. Network modeling and animal experiments suggest that these genetic differences in GR-induced transcriptional activation may mediate the risk for depression and other psychiatric disorders by altering a network of functionally related stress-sensitive genes in blood and brain. PMID:26050039

  4. The cognitive genetics of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD): sustained attention as a candidate phenotype.

    PubMed

    Bellgrove, Mark A; Hawi, Ziarih; Gill, Michael; Robertson, Ian H

    2006-08-01

    Here we describe the application of cognitive genetics to the study of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Cognitive genetics owes much to the pioneering work of cognitive neuropsychologists such as John Marshall, whose careful observations of cognitive dissociations between brain-lesioned patients greatly advanced the theoretical understanding of normal cognitive function. These theories have in turn helped to constrain linkages between candidate genes and cognitive processes and thus help to drive the relatively new field of cognitive genetics in a hypothesis-driven fashion. We examined the relationship between sustained attention deficits in ADHD and genetic variation in a catecholamine-related gene, dopamine beta hydroxylase (DbetaH). DBH encodes the enzyme that converts dopamine to noradrenaline and is crucial to catecholamine regulation. A polymorphism with the DBH gene has been associated with ADHD. In fifty-two children with ADHD, we examined whether variation in the Taq I DBH gene polymorphism was related to sustained attention performance. Participants performed the Sustained Attention to Response Test (SART). Performance on the SART discriminates ADHD from control children, and in imaging work, is associated with right frontoparietal activation. A significant effect of DBH genotype was found on SART performance measures. Children possessing two copies of the ADHD-associated risk allele (A2) had significantly poorer sustained attention than those ADHD children who did not possess this allele or a non-genotyped control group. The DBH gene may contribute to the susceptibility for ADHD, in part because of its varying effects on the development of brain mechanisms mediating sustained attention.

  5. Joubert syndrome: A model for untangling recessive disorders with extreme genetic heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    R, Bachmann-Gagescu; JC, Dempsey; IG, Phelps; BJ, O’Roak; DM, Knutzen; TC, Rue; GE, Ishak; CR, Isabella; N, Gorden; J, Adkins; EA, Boyle; N, de Lacy; D, O’Day; A, Alswaid; AR, Devi; L, Lingappa; C, Lourenço; L, Martorell; À, Garcia-Cazorla; H, Ozyürek; G, Haliloğlu; B, Tuysuz; M, Topçu; P, Chance; MA, Parisi; I, Glass; J, Shendure; D, Doherty

    2016-01-01

    Background Joubert syndrome (JS) is a recessive neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by hypotonia, ataxia, cognitive impairment, abnormal eye movements, respiratory control disturbances, and a distinctive mid-hindbrain malformation. JS demonstrates substantial phenotypic variability and genetic heterogeneity. This study provides a comprehensive view of the current genetic basis, phenotypic range and gene-phenotype associations in JS. Methods We sequenced 27 JS-associated genes in 440 affected individuals (375 families) from a cohort of 532 individuals (440 families) with JS, using molecular inversion probe-based targeted capture and next generation sequencing. Variant pathogenicity was defined using the Combined Annotation Dependent Depletion (CADD) algorithm with an optimized score cut-off. Results We identified presumed causal variants in 62% of pedigrees, including the first B9D2 mutations associated with JS. 253 different mutations in 23 genes highlight the extreme genetic heterogeneity of JS. Phenotypic analysis revealed that only 34% of individuals have a “pure JS” phenotype. Retinal disease is present in 30% of individuals, renal disease in 25%, coloboma in 17%, polydactyly in 15%, liver fibrosis in 14% and encephalocele in 8%. Loss of CEP290 function is associated with retinal dystrophy, while loss of TMEM67 function is associated with liver fibrosis and coloboma, but we observe no clear-cut distinction between JS-subtypes. Conclusion This work illustrates how combining advanced sequencing techniques with phenotypic data addresses extreme genetic heterogeneity to provide diagnostic and carrier testing, guide medical monitoring for progressive complications, facilitate interpretation of genome-wide sequencing results in individuals with a variety of phenotypes, and enable gene-specific treatments in the future. PMID:26092869

  6. Dopamine and serotonin genetic risk scores predicting substance and nicotine use in attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

    PubMed

    Groenman, Annabeth P; Greven, Corina U; van Donkelaar, Marjolein M J; Schellekens, Arnt; van Hulzen, Kimm J E; Rommelse, Nanda; Hartman, Catharina A; Hoekstra, Pieter J; Luman, Marjolein; Franke, Barbara; Faraone, Stephen V; Oosterlaan, Jaap; Buitelaar, Jan K

    2016-07-01

    Individuals with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are at increased risk of developing substance use disorders (SUDs) and nicotine dependence. The co-occurrence of ADHD and SUDs/nicotine dependence may in part be mediated by shared genetic liability. Several neurobiological pathways have been implicated in both ADHD and SUDs, including dopamine and serotonin pathways. We hypothesized that variations in dopamine and serotonin neurotransmission genes were involved in the genetic liability to develop SUDs/nicotine dependence in ADHD. The current study included participants with ADHD (n = 280) who were originally part of the Dutch International Multicenter ADHD Genetics study. Participants were aged 5-15 years and attending outpatient clinics at enrollment in the study. Diagnoses of ADHD, SUDs, nicotine dependence, age of first nicotine and substance use, and alcohol use severity were based on semi-structured interviews and questionnaires. Genetic risk scores were created for both serotonergic and dopaminergic risk genes previously shown to be associated with ADHD and SUDs and/or nicotine dependence. The serotonin genetic risk score significantly predicted alcohol use severity. No significant serotonin × dopamine risk score or effect of stimulant medication was found. The current study adds to the literature by providing insight into genetic underpinnings of the co-morbidity of ADHD and SUDs. While the focus of the literature so far has been mostly on dopamine, our study suggests that serotonin may also play a role in the relationship between these disorders. PMID:25752199

  7. Using zebrafish to uncover the genetic and neural basis of aggression, a frequent comorbid symptom of psychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Jones, Lauren J; Norton, William H J

    2015-01-01

    Aggression is an important adaptive behavior that can be used to monopolize resources such as mates or food, acquire and defend territory and establish dominant hierarchies in social groups. It is also a symptom of several psychiatric disorders including attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and schizophrenia. The frequent comorbidity of aggression and psychiatric diseases suggests that common genes and neural circuits may link these disorders. Research using animal models has the potential to uncover these genes and neural circuits despite the difficulty of fully modeling human behavioral disorders. In this review we propose that zebrafish may be a suitable model organism for aggression research with the potential to shed light upon the aggressive symptoms of human diseases.

  8. Keith R. Porter Lecture, 1996. Of mice and men: genetic disorders of the cytoskeleton.

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, E

    1997-01-01

    Since the time when I was a postdoctoral fellow under the supervision of Dr. Howard Green, then at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, I have been interested in understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying growth, differentiation, and development in the mammalian ectoderm. The ectoderm gives rise to epidermal keratinocytes and to neurons, which are the only two cell types of the body that devote most of their protein-synthesizing machinery to developing an elaborate cytoskeletal architecture composed of 10-nm intermediate filaments (IFs). Our interest is in understanding the architecture of the cytoskeleton in keratinocytes and in neurons, and in elucidating how perturbations in this architecture can lead to degenerative diseases of the skin and the nervous system. I will concentrate on the intermediate filament network of the skin and its associated genetic disorders, since this has been a long-standing interest of my laboratory at the University of Chicago. Images PMID:9190201

  9. Genetic treatment of a molecular disorder: gene therapy approaches to sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Hoban, Megan D; Orkin, Stuart H; Bauer, Daniel E

    2016-02-18

    Effective medical management for sickle cell disease (SCD) remains elusive. As a prevalent and severe monogenic disorder, SCD has been long considered a logical candidate for gene therapy. Significant progress has been made in moving toward this goal. These efforts have provided substantial insight into the natural regulation of the globin genes and illuminated challenges for genetic manipulation of the hematopoietic system. The initial γ-retroviral vectors, next-generation lentiviral vectors, and novel genome engineering and gene regulation approaches each share the goal of preventing erythrocyte sickling. After years of preclinical studies, several clinical trials for SCD gene therapies are now open. This review focuses on progress made toward achieving gene therapy, the current state of the field, consideration of factors that may determine clinical success, and prospects for future development.

  10. Genetic Disorders with Dyshidrosis: Ectodermal Dysplasia, Incontinentia Pigmenti, Fabry Disease, and Congenital Insensitivity to Pain with Anhidrosis.

    PubMed

    Wataya-Kaneda, Mari

    2016-01-01

    Sweating is regulated by various neurohormonal mechanisms. A disorder in any part of the sweating regulatory pathways, such as the thermal center, neurotransmitters in the central to peripheral nerve, innervation of periglandular neurotransmission, and sweat secretion in the sweat gland itself, induces dyshidrosis. Therefore, hereditary disorders with dyshidrosis result from a variety of causes. These diseases have characteristic symptoms derived from each pathogenesis besides dyshidrosis. The information in this chapter is useful for the differential diagnosis of representative genetic disorders with dyshidrosis. PMID:27584961

  11. Genetic Controls Balancing Excitatory and Inhibitory Synaptogenesis in Neurodevelopmental Disorder Models

    PubMed Central

    Gatto, Cheryl L.; Broadie, Kendal

    2010-01-01

    Proper brain function requires stringent balance of excitatory and inhibitory synapse formation during neural circuit assembly. Mutation of genes that normally sculpt and maintain this balance results in severe dysfunction, causing neurodevelopmental disorders including autism, epilepsy and Rett syndrome. Such mutations may result in defective architectural structuring of synaptic connections, molecular assembly of synapses and/or functional synaptogenesis. The affected genes often encode synaptic components directly, but also include regulators that secondarily mediate the synthesis or assembly of synaptic proteins. The prime example is Fragile X syndrome (FXS), the leading heritable cause of both intellectual disability and autism spectrum disorders. FXS results from loss of mRNA-binding FMRP, which regulates synaptic transcript trafficking, stability and translation in activity-dependent synaptogenesis and plasticity mechanisms. Genetic models of FXS exhibit striking excitatory and inhibitory synapse imbalance, associated with impaired cognitive and social interaction behaviors. Downstream of translation control, a number of specific synaptic proteins regulate excitatory versus inhibitory synaptogenesis, independently or combinatorially, and loss of these proteins is also linked to disrupted neurodevelopment. The current effort is to define the cascade of events linking transcription, translation and the role of specific synaptic proteins in the maintenance of excitatory versus inhibitory synapses during neural circuit formation. This focus includes mechanisms that fine-tune excitation and inhibition during the refinement of functional synaptic circuits, and later modulate this balance throughout life. The use of powerful new genetic models has begun to shed light on the mechanistic bases of excitation/inhibition imbalance for a range of neurodevelopmental disease states. PMID:21423490

  12. Fetal alcohol spectrum disorders and their transmission through genetic and epigenetic mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Mead, Edward A.; Sarkar, Dipak K.

    2014-01-01

    Fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD) are a group of related conditions that arise from prenatal exposure to maternal consumption of the teratogen, ethanol. It has been estimated that roughly 1% of children in the US suffer from FASD (Sampson etal., 1997), though in some world populations, such as inhabitants of some poorer regions of South Africa, the rate can climb to as high as 20% (May etal., 2013). FASD are the largest cause of mental retardation in U.S. neonates, and ironically, are entirely preventable. FASD have been linked to major changes in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, resulting in lifelong impairments through mental disorders, retardation, and sensitivity to stress. FASD are linked to an impaired immune system which consequently leads to an elevated risk of cancer and other diseases. FASD arise from a complex interplay of genetic and epigenetic factors. Here, we review current literature on the topic to tease apart what is known in these areas particularly emphasizing HPA axis dysfunction and how this ties into new studies of transgenerational inheritance in FASD. PMID:24917878

  13. Common genetic variants on 5p14.1 associate with autism spectrum disorders

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kai; Zhang, Haitao; Ma, Deqiong; Bucan, Maja; Glessner, Joseph T.; Abrahams, Brett S.; Salyakina, Daria; Imielinski, Marcin; Bradfield, Jonathan P.; Sleiman, Patrick M. A.; Kim, Cecilia E.; Hou, Cuiping; Frackelton, Edward; Chiavacci, Rosetta; Takahashi, Nagahide; Sakurai, Takeshi; Rappaport, Eric; Lajonchere, Clara M.; Munson, Jeffrey; Estes, Annette; Korvatska, Olena; Piven, Joseph; Sonnenblick, Lisa I.; Retuerto, Ana I. Alvarez; Herman, Edward I.; Dong, Hongmei; Hutman, Ted; Sigman, Marian; Ozonoff, Sally; Klin, Ami; Owley, Thomas; Sweeney, John A.; Brune, Camille W.; Cantor, Rita M.; Bernier, Raphael; Gilbert, John R.; Cuccaro, Michael L.; McMahon, William M.; Miller, Judith; State, Matthew W.; Wassink, Thomas H.; Coon, Hilary; Levy, Susan E.; Schultz, Robert T.; Nurnberger, John I.; Haines, Jonathan L.; Sutcliffe, James S.; Cook, Edwin H.; Minshew, Nancy J.; Buxbaum, Joseph D.; Dawson, Geraldine; Grant, Struan F. A.; Geschwind, Daniel H.; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A.; Schellenberg, Gerard D.; Hakonarson, Hakon

    2009-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) represent a group of childhood neurodevelopmental and neuropsychiatric disorders characterized by deficits in verbal communication, impairment of social interaction, and restricted and repetitive patterns of interests and behaviour. To identify common genetic risk factors underlying ASDs, here we present the results of genome-wide association studies on a cohort of 780 families (3,101 subjects) with affected children, and a second cohort of 1,204 affected subjects and 6,491 control subjects, all of whom were of European ancestry. Six single nucleotide polymorphisms between cadherin 10 (CDH10) and cadherin 9 (CDH9)—two genes encoding neuronal cell-adhesion molecules—revealed strong association signals, with the most significant SNP being rs4307059 (P = 3.4 × 10−8, odds ratio = 1.19). These signals were replicated in two independent cohorts, with combined P values ranging from 7.4 × 10−8 to 2.1 × 10−10. Our results implicate neuronal cell-adhesion molecules in the pathogenesis of ASDs, and represent, to our knowledge, the first demonstration of genome-wide significant association of common variants with susceptibility to ASDs. PMID:19404256

  14. Autism and 15q11-q13 disorders: behavioral, genetic, and pathophysiological issues.

    PubMed

    Dykens, Elisabeth M; Sutcliffe, James S; Levitt, Pat

    2004-01-01

    New insights into biological factors that underlie autism may be gained by comparing autism to other neurodevelopmental disorders that have autistic features and relatively well-delineated genetic etiologies or neurobiological findings. This review moves beyond global diagnoses of autism and instead uses an endophenotypic approach to compare specific clusters of autistic symptomatology to features of chromosome 15q11-q13 disorders. Paternally or maternally derived deficiencies of 15q11-q13 result in Prader-Willi or Angelman syndromes, and we first use a global approach to review potential autism susceptibility genes in the 15q11-q13 region. We then use a more trait-based approach to suggest possible ties between specific phenotypic characteristics of autism and Prader-Willi syndrome, namely savant-like skills. We conclude with insights from pathophysiological studies that implicate altered development of specific neuron types and circuits in the cerebral cortex as part of the pathophysiological processes associated with autism and mental retardation.

  15. Dysfunction of mitochondrial respiratory chain complex I in neurological disorders: genetics and pathogenetic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Petruzzella, Vittoria; Sardanelli, Anna Maria; Scacco, Salvatore; Panelli, Damiano; Papa, Francesco; Trentadue, Raffaella; Papa, Sergio

    2012-01-01

    This chapter covers genetic and biochemical aspects of mitochondrial bioenergetics dysfunction in neurological disorders associated with complex I defects. Complex I formation and functionality in mammalian cells depends on coordinated expression of nuclear and mitochondrial genes, post-translational subunit modifications, mitochondrial import/maturation of nuclear encoded subunits, subunits interaction and stepwise assembly, and on proteolytic processing. Examples of complex I dysfunction are herein presented: homozygous mutations in the nuclear NDUFS1 and NDUFS4 genes for structural components of complex I; an autosomic recessive form of encephalopathy associated with enhanced proteolytic degradation of complex I; familial cases of Parkinson associated to mutations in the PINK1 and Parkin genes, in particular, homoplasmic mutations in the ND5 and ND6 mitochondrial genes of the complex I, coexistent with mutation in the PINK1 gene. This knowledge, besides clarifying molecular aspects of the pathogenesis of hereditary diseases, can also provide hints for understanding the involvement of complex I in neurological disorders, as well as for developing therapeutical strategies. PMID:22399432

  16. Understanding the Covariation among Childhood Externalizing Symptoms: Genetic and Environmental Influences on Conduct Disorder, Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, and Oppositional Defiant Disorder Symptoms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dick, Danielle M.; Viken, Richard J.; Kaprio, Jaakko; Pulkkinen, Lea; Rose, Richard J.

    2005-01-01

    Conduct disorder (CD), attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) are common childhood externalizing disorders that frequently co-occur. However, the causes of their comorbidity are not well understood. To address that question, we analyzed data from >600 Finnish twin pairs, who completed standardized…

  17. Approaches to Managing Autoimmune Cytopenias in Novel Immunological Disorders with Genetic Underpinnings Like Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Rao, V. Koneti

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is a rare disorder of apoptosis. It is frequently caused by mutations in FAS (TNFRSF6) gene. Unlike most of the self-limiting autoimmune cytopenias sporadically seen in childhood, multi lineage cytopenias due to ALPS are often refractory, as their inherited genetic defect is not going to go away. Historically, more ALPS patients have died due to overwhelming sepsis following splenectomy to manage their chronic cytopenias than due to any other cause, including malignancies. Hence, current recommendations underscore the importance of avoiding splenectomy in ALPS, by long-term use of corticosteroid-sparing immunosuppressive agents like mycophenolate mofetil and sirolimus. Paradigms learnt from managing ALPS patients in recent years is highlighted here and can be extrapolated to manage refractory cytopenias in patients with as yet undetermined genetic bases for their ailments. It is also desirable to develop international registries for children with rare and complex immune problems associated with chronic multilineage cytopenias in order to elucidate their natural history and long-term comorbidities due to the disease and its treatments. PMID:26258116

  18. Genetics of movement disorders in the next-generation sequencing era.

    PubMed

    Olgiati, Simone; Quadri, Marialuisa; Bonifati, Vincenzo

    2016-04-01

    Several innovative and extremely powerful methods for sequencing nucleic acids (DNA and RNA), collectively known as next-generation sequencing technologies, have become available in the past few years. The application of these technologies is rapidly changing the landscape of both medical genetic research and clinical practice: the pace of discovery of novel disease-causing or disease-predisposing genes is markedly accelerating; the phenotypic spectra associated with previously known genes is expanding; and novel tools for rapid, cheap, and comprehensive genetic testing are entering the clinical practice. As with every technological revolution, next-generation sequencing also comes with new challenges concerning the storage, the analysis, and crucially, the interpretation of the large amounts of generated data. The current possibility to sequence entire human exomes (the coding part of the genome) or entire genomes at affordable costs has brought the era of personalized medicine closer than ever, also raising new legal and ethical issues. In this article, we summarize the essential technological aspects of next-generation sequencing and discuss their applications in the field of movement disorders. We review the different strategies for gene finding enabled by these technologies (including project designs, filtering approaches, and bioinformatic tools) and we then discuss their applications in clinical practice. PMID:26899883

  19. Behavioral phenotyping of Nestin-Cre mice: implications for genetic mouse models of psychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Giusti, Sebastian A; Vercelli, Claudia A; Vogl, Annette M; Kolarz, Adam W; Pino, Natalia S; Deussing, Jan M; Refojo, Damian

    2014-08-01

    Genetic mouse models based on the Cre-loxP system have been extensively used to explore the influence of specific gene deletions on different aspects of behavioral neurobiology. However, the interpretation of the effects attributed to the gene deletion might be obscured by potential side effects secondary to the Cre recombinase transgene insertion or Cre activity, usually neither controlled nor reported. Here, we performed a comprehensive behavioral analysis of endophenotypes of neuropsychiatric disorders in the extensively used Nestin(Cre) mouse line, commonly employed to restrict genetic modifications to the CNS. We observed no alterations in locomotion, general exploratory activity, learning and memory, sociability, startle response and sensorimotor gating. Although the overall response to stimuli triggering anxiety-like behaviors remained unaltered in Nestin(Cre) mice, a strong impairment in the acquisition of both contextual- and cued-conditioned fear was observed. These results underline the importance of adequately controlling the behavioral performance of the employed Cre-lines per-se in pre-clinical neurobehavioral research.

  20. Contributions of endocannabinoid signaling to psychiatric disorders in humans: Genetic and biochemical evidence

    PubMed Central

    Hillard, Cecilia J.; Weinlander, Kenneth M.; Stuhr, Kara L.

    2011-01-01

    The endocannabinoid signaling system is a widespread, neuromodulatory system in brain and is also widely utilized in the periphery to modulate metabolic functions and the immune system. Preclinical data demonstrate that endocannabinoid signaling is an important stress buffer and modulates emotional and cognitive functions. These data suggest the hypothesis that endocannabinoid signaling could be dysfunctional in a number of mental disorders. Genetic polymorphisms in the human genes for two important proteins of the endocannabinoid signaling system, the CB1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1R) and fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), have been explored in the context of normal and pathological conditions. In the case the gene for FAAH, the mechanistic relationships among the common genetic polymorphism, the expression of the FAAH protein and its likely impact on endocannabinoid signaling are understood. However, multiple polymorphisms in the gene for the CB1R occur and are associated with human phenotypic differences without an understanding of the functional relationships among the gene, mRNA, protein and protein function. The endocannabinoid ligands are found in the circulation and several studies have identified changes in their concentrations under various conditions. These data are reviewed for the purpose of generating hypotheses and to encourage further studies in this very interesting and important area. PMID:22123166

  1. A recessive genetic model and runs of homozygosity in major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Power, Robert A; Keller, Matthew C; Ripke, Stephan; Abdellaoui, Abdel; Wray, Naomi R; Sullivan, Patrick F; Breen, Gerome

    2014-03-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) of major depressive disorder (MDD) have yet to identify variants that surpass the threshold for genome-wide significance. A recent study reported that runs of homozygosity (ROH) are associated with schizophrenia, reflecting a novel genetic risk factor resulting from increased parental relatedness and recessive genetic effects. Here, we explore the possibility of such a recessive model in MDD. In a sample of 9,238 cases and 9,521 controls reported in a recent mega-analysis of 9 GWAS we perform an analysis of ROH and common variants under a recessive model. Since evidence for association with ROH could reflect a recessive mode of action at loci, we also conducted a genome-wide association analyses under a recessive model. The genome-wide association analysis using a recessive model found no significant associations. Our analysis of ROH suggested that there was significant heterogeneity of effect across studies in effect (P = 0.001), and it was associated with genotyping platform and country of origin. The results of the ROH analysis show that differences across studies can lead to conflicting systematic genome-wide differences between cases and controls that are unaccounted for by traditional covariates. They highlight the sensitivity of the ROH method to spurious associations, and the need to carefully control for potential confounds in such analyses. We found no strong evidence for a recessive model underlying MDD. PMID:24482242

  2. Genetic, transcriptomic, and epigenetic studies of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder

    PubMed Central

    Levine, Andrew J.; Panos, Stella E.; Horvath, Steve

    2014-01-01

    The Human Genome Project, coupled with rapidly evolving high throughput technologies, has opened the possibility of identifying heretofore unknown biological processes underlying human disease. Due to the opaque nature of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder (HAND) neuropathogenesis, the utility of such methods has gained notice among NeuroAIDS researchers. Further, the merging of genetics with other research areas has also allowed for application of relatively nascent fields, such as neuroimaging genomics and pharmacogenetics, to the context of HAND. In this review, we detail the development of genetic, transcriptomic, and epigenetic studies of HAND, beginning with early candidate gene association studies and culminating in current “omics” approaches that incorporate methods from systems biology to interpret data from multiple levels of biological functioning. Challenges with this line of investigation are discussed; including the difficulty of defining a valid phenotype for HAND. We propose that leveraging known associations between biology and pathology across multiple levels will lead to a more reliable and valid phenotype. We also discuss the difficulties of interpreting the massive and multi-tiered mountains of data produced by current high-throughput omics assays, and explore the utility of systems biology approaches in this regard. PMID:24583618

  3. Facilitating Collaboration in Rare Genetic Disorders Through Effective Matchmaking in DECIPHER

    PubMed Central

    Chatzimichali, Eleni A.; Brent, Simon; Hutton, Benjamin; Perrett, Daniel; Wright, Caroline F.; Bevan, Andrew P.; Hurles, Matthew E.; Firth, Helen V.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT DECIPHER (https://decipher.sanger.ac.uk) is a web‐based platform for secure deposition, analysis, and sharing of plausibly pathogenic genomic variants from well‐phenotyped patients suffering from genetic disorders. DECIPHER aids clinical interpretation of these rare sequence and copy‐number variants by providing tools for variant analysis and identification of other patients exhibiting similar genotype–phenotype characteristics. DECIPHER also provides mechanisms to encourage collaboration among a global community of clinical centers and researchers, as well as exchange of information between clinicians and researchers within a consortium, to accelerate discovery and diagnosis. DECIPHER has contributed to matchmaking efforts by enabling the global clinical genetics community to identify many previously undiagnosed syndromes and new disease genes, and has facilitated the publication of over 700 peer‐reviewed scientific publications since 2004. At the time of writing, DECIPHER contains anonymized data from ∼250 registered centers on more than 51,500 patients (∼18000 patients with consent for data sharing and ∼25000 anonymized records shared privately). In this paper, we describe salient features of the platform, with special emphasis on the tools and processes that aid interpretation, sharing, and effective matchmaking with other data held in the database and that make DECIPHER an invaluable clinical and research resource. PMID:26220709

  4. Genetics of movement disorders in the next-generation sequencing era.

    PubMed

    Olgiati, Simone; Quadri, Marialuisa; Bonifati, Vincenzo

    2016-04-01

    Several innovative and extremely powerful methods for sequencing nucleic acids (DNA and RNA), collectively known as next-generation sequencing technologies, have become available in the past few years. The application of these technologies is rapidly changing the landscape of both medical genetic research and clinical practice: the pace of discovery of novel disease-causing or disease-predisposing genes is markedly accelerating; the phenotypic spectra associated with previously known genes is expanding; and novel tools for rapid, cheap, and comprehensive genetic testing are entering the clinical practice. As with every technological revolution, next-generation sequencing also comes with new challenges concerning the storage, the analysis, and crucially, the interpretation of the large amounts of generated data. The current possibility to sequence entire human exomes (the coding part of the genome) or entire genomes at affordable costs has brought the era of personalized medicine closer than ever, also raising new legal and ethical issues. In this article, we summarize the essential technological aspects of next-generation sequencing and discuss their applications in the field of movement disorders. We review the different strategies for gene finding enabled by these technologies (including project designs, filtering approaches, and bioinformatic tools) and we then discuss their applications in clinical practice.

  5. Translational research in bipolar disorder: emerging insights from genetically based models

    PubMed Central

    Chen, G; Henter, ID; Manji, HK

    2010-01-01

    Bipolar disorder (BPD) is characterized by vulnerability to episodic depression and mania and spontaneous cycling. Because of marked advances in candidate-gene and genome-wide association studies, the list of risk genes for BPD is growing rapidly, creating an unprecedented opportunity to understand the pathophysiology of BPD and to develop novel therapeutics for its treatment. However, genetic findings are associated with major unresolved issues, including whether and how risk variance leads to behavioral abnormalities. Although animal studies are key to resolving these issues, consensus is needed regarding how to define and monitor phenotypes related to mania, depression and mood swing vulnerability in genetically manipulated rodents. In this study we discuss multiple facets of this challenging area, including theoretical considerations, available tests, limitations associated with rodent behavioral modeling and promising molecular–behavioral findings. These include CLOCK, glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK-3β), glutamate receptor 6 (GluR6), extracellular signal-regulated kinase-1 (ERK1), p11 (or S100A10), vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2 or SLC18A2), glucocorticoid receptors (GRs), Bcl-2-associated athanogene-1 (BAG1) and mitochondrial DNA polymerase-γ (POLG). Some mutant rodent strains show behavioral clusters or activity patterns that cross-species phenocopy objective/observable facets of mood syndromes, and changes in these clustered behaviors can be used as outcome measures in genetic–behavioral research in BPD. PMID:20142820

  6. Genetic Evidence for Elevated Pathogenicity of Mitochondrial DNA Heteroplasmy in Autism Spectrum Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yiqin; Picard, Martin; Gu, Zhenglong

    2016-01-01

    Increasing clinical and biochemical evidence implicate mitochondrial dysfunction in the pathophysiology of Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), but little is known about the biological basis for this connection. A possible cause of ASD is the genetic variation in the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequence, which has yet to be thoroughly investigated in large genomic studies of ASD. Here we evaluated mtDNA variation, including the mixture of different mtDNA molecules in the same individual (i.e., heteroplasmy), using whole-exome sequencing data from mother-proband-sibling trios from simplex families (n = 903) where only one child is affected by ASD. We found that heteroplasmic mutations in autistic probands were enriched at non-polymorphic mtDNA sites (P = 0.0015), which were more likely to confer deleterious effects than heteroplasmies at polymorphic mtDNA sites. Accordingly, we observed a ~1.5-fold enrichment of nonsynonymous mutations (P = 0.0028) as well as a ~2.2-fold enrichment of predicted pathogenic mutations (P = 0.0016) in autistic probands compared to their non-autistic siblings. Both nonsynonymous and predicted pathogenic mutations private to probands conferred increased risk of ASD (Odds Ratio, OR[95% CI] = 1.87[1.14–3.11] and 2.55[1.26–5.51], respectively), and their influence on ASD was most pronounced in families with probands showing diminished IQ and/or impaired social behavior compared to their non-autistic siblings. We also showed that the genetic transmission pattern of mtDNA heteroplasmies with high pathogenic potential differed between mother-autistic proband pairs and mother-sibling pairs, implicating developmental and possibly in utero contributions. Taken together, our genetic findings substantiate pathogenic mtDNA mutations as a potential cause for ASD and synergize with recent work calling attention to their unique metabolic phenotypes for diagnosis and treatment of children with ASD. PMID:27792786

  7. Detection of Clinically Relevant Genetic Variants in Autism Spectrum Disorder by Whole-Genome Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yong-hui; Yuen, Ryan K.C.; Jin, Xin; Wang, Mingbang; Chen, Nong; Wu, Xueli; Ju, Jia; Mei, Junpu; Shi, Yujian; He, Mingze; Wang, Guangbiao; Liang, Jieqin; Wang, Zhe; Cao, Dandan; Carter, Melissa T.; Chrysler, Christina; Drmic, Irene E.; Howe, Jennifer L.; Lau, Lynette; Marshall, Christian R.; Merico, Daniele; Nalpathamkalam, Thomas; Thiruvahindrapuram, Bhooma; Thompson, Ann; Uddin, Mohammed; Walker, Susan; Luo, Jun; Anagnostou, Evdokia; Zwaigenbaum, Lonnie; Ring, Robert H.; Wang, Jian; Lajonchere, Clara; Wang, Jun; Shih, Andy; Szatmari, Peter; Yang, Huanming; Dawson, Geraldine; Li, Yingrui; Scherer, Stephen W.

    2013-01-01

    Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) demonstrates high heritability and familial clustering, yet the genetic causes remain only partially understood as a result of extensive clinical and genomic heterogeneity. Whole-genome sequencing (WGS) shows promise as a tool for identifying ASD risk genes as well as unreported mutations in known loci, but an assessment of its full utility in an ASD group has not been performed. We used WGS to examine 32 families with ASD to detect de novo or rare inherited genetic variants predicted to be deleterious (loss-of-function and damaging missense mutations). Among ASD probands, we identified deleterious de novo mutations in six of 32 (19%) families and X-linked or autosomal inherited alterations in ten of 32 (31%) families (some had combinations of mutations). The proportion of families identified with such putative mutations was larger than has been previously reported; this yield was in part due to the comprehensive and uniform coverage afforded by WGS. Deleterious variants were found in four unrecognized, nine known, and eight candidate ASD risk genes. Examples include CAPRIN1 and AFF2 (both linked to FMR1, which is involved in fragile X syndrome), VIP (involved in social-cognitive deficits), and other genes such as SCN2A and KCNQ2 (linked to epilepsy), NRXN1, and CHD7, which causes ASD-associated CHARGE syndrome. Taken together, these results suggest that WGS and thorough bioinformatic analyses for de novo and rare inherited mutations will improve the detection of genetic variants likely to be associated with ASD or its accompanying clinical symptoms. PMID:23849776

  8. Male Reproductive Disorders and Fertility Trends: Influences of Environment and Genetic Susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Skakkebaek, Niels E; Rajpert-De Meyts, Ewa; Buck Louis, Germaine M; Toppari, Jorma; Andersson, Anna-Maria; Eisenberg, Michael L; Jensen, Tina Kold; Jørgensen, Niels; Swan, Shanna H; Sapra, Katherine J; Ziebe, Søren; Priskorn, Lærke; Juul, Anders

    2016-01-01

    It is predicted that Japan and European Union will soon experience appreciable decreases in their populations due to persistently low total fertility rates (TFR) below replacement level (2.1 child per woman). In the United States, where TFR has also declined, there are ethnic differences. Caucasians have rates below replacement, while TFRs among African-Americans and Hispanics are higher. We review possible links between TFR and trends in a range of male reproductive problems, including testicular cancer, disorders of sex development, cryptorchidism, hypospadias, low testosterone levels, poor semen quality, childlessness, changed sex ratio, and increasing demand for assisted reproductive techniques. We present evidence that several adult male reproductive problems arise in utero and are signs of testicular dysgenesis syndrome (TDS). Although TDS might result from genetic mutations, recent evidence suggests that it most often is related to environmental exposures of the fetal testis. However, environmental factors can also affect the adult endocrine system. Based on our review of genetic and environmental factors, we conclude that environmental exposures arising from modern lifestyle, rather than genetics, are the most important factors in the observed trends. These environmental factors might act either directly or via epigenetic mechanisms. In the latter case, the effects of exposures might have an impact for several generations post-exposure. In conclusion, there is an urgent need to prioritize research in reproductive physiology and pathophysiology, particularly in highly industrialized countries facing decreasing populations. We highlight a number of topics that need attention by researchers in human physiology, pathophysiology, environmental health sciences, and demography. PMID:26582516

  9. Whole Brain Expression of Bipolar Disorder Associated Genes: Structural and Genetic Analyses

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, Michael J.; Liang, Sherri; Spadoni, Andrea D.; Kelsoe, John R.; Simmons, Alan N.

    2014-01-01

    Studies of bipolar disorder (BD) suggest a genetic basis of the illness that alters brain function and morphology. In recent years, a number of genetic variants associated with BD have been identified. However, little is known about the associated genes, or brain circuits that rely upon their function. Using an anatomically comprehensive survey of the human transcriptome (The Allen Brain Atlas), we mapped the expression of 58 genes with suspected involvement in BD based upon their relationship to SNPs identified in genome wide association studies (GWAS). We then conducted a meta-analysis of structural MRI studies to identify brain regions that are abnormal in BD. Of 58 BD associated genes, 22 had anatomically distinct expression patterns that could be categorized into one of three clusters (C1–C3). Brain regions with the highest and lowest expression of these genes did not overlap strongly with anatomical sites identified as abnormal by structural MRI except in the parahippocampal gyrus, the inferior/superior temporal gyrus and the cerebellar vermis, regions where overlap was significant. Using the 22 genes in C1–C3 as reference points, additional genes with correlated expression patterns were identified and organized into sets based on similarity. Further analysis revealed that five of these gene sets were significantly associated with BD, suggesting that anatomical expression profile is correlated with genetic susceptibility to BD, particularly for genes in C2. Our data suggest that expression profiles of BD-associated genes do not explain the majority of structural abnormalities observed in BD, but may be useful in identifying new candidate genes. Our results highlight the complex neuroanatomical basis of BD, and reinforce illness models that emphasize impaired brain connectivity. PMID:24941232

  10. Male Reproductive Disorders and Fertility Trends: Influences of Environment and Genetic Susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Skakkebaek, Niels E; Rajpert-De Meyts, Ewa; Buck Louis, Germaine M; Toppari, Jorma; Andersson, Anna-Maria; Eisenberg, Michael L; Jensen, Tina Kold; Jørgensen, Niels; Swan, Shanna H; Sapra, Katherine J; Ziebe, Søren; Priskorn, Lærke; Juul, Anders

    2016-01-01

    It is predicted that Japan and European Union will soon experience appreciable decreases in their populations due to persistently low total fertility rates (TFR) below replacement level (2.1 child per woman). In the United States, where TFR has also declined, there are ethnic differences. Caucasians have rates below replacement, while TFRs among African-Americans and Hispanics are higher. We review possible links between TFR and trends in a range of male reproductive problems, including testicular cancer, disorders of sex development, cryptorchidism, hypospadias, low testosterone levels, poor semen quality, childlessness, changed sex ratio, and increasing demand for assisted reproductive techniques. We present evidence that several adult male reproductive problems arise in utero and are signs of testicular dysgenesis syndrome (TDS). Although TDS might result from genetic mutations, recent evidence suggests that it most often is related to environmental exposures of the fetal testis. However, environmental factors can also affect the adult endocrine system. Based on our review of genetic and environmental factors, we conclude that environmental exposures arising from modern lifestyle, rather than genetics, are the most important factors in the observed trends. These environmental factors might act either directly or via epigenetic mechanisms. In the latter case, the effects of exposures might have an impact for several generations post-exposure. In conclusion, there is an urgent need to prioritize research in reproductive physiology and pathophysiology, particularly in highly industrialized countries facing decreasing populations. We highlight a number of topics that need attention by researchers in human physiology, pathophysiology, environmental health sciences, and demography.

  11. Psychological Factors Associated with Genetic Test Decision-Making among Parents of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xu, Lei; Richman, Alice R.

    2015-01-01

    Making decisions to undergo Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) genetic testing can be challenging. It is important to understand how the perceptions of affected individuals might influence testing decision-making. Although evidence has shown that psychological factors are important in predicting testing decisions, affect-type variables have been…

  12. Genetic Syndromes, Maternal Diseases and Antenatal Factors Associated with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD)

    PubMed Central

    Ornoy, Asher; Weinstein- Fudim, Liza; Ergaz, Zivanit

    2016-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) affecting about 1% of all children is associated, in addition to complex genetic factors, with a variety of prenatal, perinatal, and postnatal etiologies. In addition, ASD is often an important clinical presentation of some well-known genetic syndromes in human. We discuss these syndromes as well as the role of the more important prenatal factors affecting the fetus throughout pregnancy which may also be associated with ASD. Among the genetic disorders we find Fragile X, Rett syndrome, tuberous sclerosis, Timothy syndrome, Phelan–McDermid syndrome, Hamartoma tumor syndrome, Prader-Willi and Angelman syndromes, and a few others. Among the maternal diseases in pregnancy associated with ASD are diabetes mellitus (PGDM and/or GDM), some maternal autoimmune diseases like antiphospholipid syndrome (APLS) with anti-β2GP1 IgG antibodies and thyroid disease with anti-thyroid peroxidase (TPO) antibodies, preeclampsia and some other autoimmune diseases with IgG antibodies that might affect fetal brain development. Other related factors are maternal infections (rubella and CMV with fetal brain injuries, and possibly Influenza with fever), prolonged fever and maternal inflammation, especially with changes in a variety of inflammatory cytokines and antibodies that cross the placenta and affect the fetal brain. Among the drugs are valproic acid, thalidomide, misoprostol, and possibly SSRIs. β2-adrenergic receptor agonists and paracetamol have also lately been associated with increased rate of ASD but the data is too preliminary and inconclusive. Associations were also described with ethanol, cocaine, and possibly heavy metals, heavy smoking, and folic acid deficiency. Recent studies show that heavy exposure to pesticides and air pollution, especially particulate matter < 2.5 and 10 μm in diameter (PM2.5 and PM10) during pregnancy is also associated with ASD. Finally, we have to remember that many of the associations mentioned in this review are

  13. A tale worth telling: The impact of the diagnosis experience on disclosure of genetic disorders

    PubMed Central

    Goodwin, Jane; Schoch, Kelly; Shashi, Vandana; Hooper, Stephen R.; Gothelf, Doron; Zalevsky, Moran; Morad, Ola; Campbell, Linda E.

    2014-01-01

    Background Research suggests children with genetic disorders exhibit greater coping skills when they are aware of their condition and its heritability. While the experiences parents have at diagnosis may influence their decision to disclose the diagnosis to their children, there is little research into this communication. The aim of the current study was to examine the relationship between the diagnosis experience and the disclosure experience for parents of children with intellectual disabilities; with a child affected by 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS) compared to a group of parents with children affected with other genetic diagnoses, with a similar age of diagnosis (e.g., Fragile X syndrome) and a group where diagnosis generally occurs early (i.e., Down syndrome). Method The sample comprised 559 parents and caregivers of children with genetic developmental disorders, and an online survey was utilised. Items from the questionnaire were combined to create variables for diagnosis experience, parental disclosure experience, child’s disclosure experience, and parental coping and self-efficacy. Results Across all groups parents reported that the diagnosis experience was negative and often accompanied by lack of support and appropriate information. Sixty-eight percent of those in the 22q11DS and 58.3% in the Similar Conditions groups had disclosed the diagnosis to their child, whereas only 32.7% of the Down syndrome group had. Eighty-six percent of the Down syndrome group felt they had sufficient information to talk to their child compared to 44.1% of the Similar Conditions group and 32.6% of the 22q11DS group. Parents reported disclosing the diagnosis to their child because they did not want to create secrets; and that they considered the child’s age when disclosing. In the 22q11DS and Similar Conditions groups, a poor diagnosis experience was significantly associated with negative parental disclosure experiences. In the Similar Conditions group, a poor

  14. Genetic Syndromes, Maternal Diseases and Antenatal Factors Associated with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD).

    PubMed

    Ornoy, Asher; Weinstein-Fudim, Liza; Ergaz, Zivanit

    2016-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) affecting about 1% of all children is associated, in addition to complex genetic factors, with a variety of prenatal, perinatal, and postnatal etiologies. In addition, ASD is often an important clinical presentation of some well-known genetic syndromes in human. We discuss these syndromes as well as the role of the more important prenatal factors affecting the fetus throughout pregnancy which may also be associated with ASD. Among the genetic disorders we find Fragile X, Rett syndrome, tuberous sclerosis, Timothy syndrome, Phelan-McDermid syndrome, Hamartoma tumor syndrome, Prader-Willi and Angelman syndromes, and a few others. Among the maternal diseases in pregnancy associated with ASD are diabetes mellitus (PGDM and/or GDM), some maternal autoimmune diseases like antiphospholipid syndrome (APLS) with anti-β2GP1 IgG antibodies and thyroid disease with anti-thyroid peroxidase (TPO) antibodies, preeclampsia and some other autoimmune diseases with IgG antibodies that might affect fetal brain development. Other related factors are maternal infections (rubella and CMV with fetal brain injuries, and possibly Influenza with fever), prolonged fever and maternal inflammation, especially with changes in a variety of inflammatory cytokines and antibodies that cross the placenta and affect the fetal brain. Among the drugs are valproic acid, thalidomide, misoprostol, and possibly SSRIs. β2-adrenergic receptor agonists and paracetamol have also lately been associated with increased rate of ASD but the data is too preliminary and inconclusive. Associations were also described with ethanol, cocaine, and possibly heavy metals, heavy smoking, and folic acid deficiency. Recent studies show that heavy exposure to pesticides and air pollution, especially particulate matter < 2.5 and 10 μm in diameter (PM2.5 and PM10) during pregnancy is also associated with ASD. Finally, we have to remember that many of the associations mentioned in this review are

  15. The Association Between Genetic Variants in the Dopaminergic System and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lizhuo; Bao, Yijun; He, Songbai; Wang, Gang; Guan, Yanlei; Ma, Dexuan; Wang, Pengfei; Huang, Xiaolong; Tao, Shanwei; Zhang, Dewei; Liu, Qiwen; Wang, Yunjie; Yang, Jingyun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a complex mental disorder and can severely interfere with the normal life of the affected people. Previous studies have examined the association of PTSD with genetic variants in multiple dopaminergic genes with inconsistent results. To perform a systematic literature search and conduct meta-analysis to examine whether genetic variants in the dopaminergic system is associated with PTSD. PubMed, Cochrane Library, Embase, Google Scholar, and HuGE. The studies included subjects who had been screened for the presence of PTSD; the studies provided data for genetic variants of genes involved in the dopaminergic system; the outcomes of interest included diagnosis status of PTSD; and the studies were case–control studies. Odds ratio was used as a measure of association. We used random-effects model in all the meta-analyses. Between-study heterogeneity was assessed using I2, and publication bias was evaluated using Egger test. Findings from meta-analyses were confirmed using random-effects meta-analyses under the framework of generalized linear model (GLM). A total of 19 studies met the eligibility criteria and were included in our analyses. We found that rs1800497 in DRD2 was significantly associated with PTSD (OR = 1.96, 95% CI: 1.15–3.33; P = 0.014). The 3′-UTR variable number tandem repeat (VNTR) in SLC6A3 also showed significant association with PTSD (OR = 1.62, 95% CI: 1.12–2.35; P = 0.010), but there was no association of rs4680 in COMT with PTSD (P = 0.595). Sample size is limited for some studies; type and severity of traumatic events varied across studies; we could not control for potential confounding factors, such as age at traumatic events and gender; and we could not examine gene–environment interaction due to lack of data. We found that rs1800497 in DRD2 and the VNTR in SLC6A3 showed significant association with PTSD. Future studies controlling for confounding factors, with large

  16. Genetic Syndromes, Maternal Diseases and Antenatal Factors Associated with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD).

    PubMed

    Ornoy, Asher; Weinstein-Fudim, Liza; Ergaz, Zivanit

    2016-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) affecting about 1% of all children is associated, in addition to complex genetic factors, with a variety of prenatal, perinatal, and postnatal etiologies. In addition, ASD is often an important clinical presentation of some well-known genetic syndromes in human. We discuss these syndromes as well as the role of the more important prenatal factors affecting the fetus throughout pregnancy which may also be associated with ASD. Among the genetic disorders we find Fragile X, Rett syndrome, tuberous sclerosis, Timothy syndrome, Phelan-McDermid syndrome, Hamartoma tumor syndrome, Prader-Willi and Angelman syndromes, and a few others. Among the maternal diseases in pregnancy associated with ASD are diabetes mellitus (PGDM and/or GDM), some maternal autoimmune diseases like antiphospholipid syndrome (APLS) with anti-β2GP1 IgG antibodies and thyroid disease with anti-thyroid peroxidase (TPO) antibodies, preeclampsia and some other autoimmune diseases with IgG antibodies that might affect fetal brain development. Other related factors are maternal infections (rubella and CMV with fetal brain injuries, and possibly Influenza with fever), prolonged fever and maternal inflammation, especially with changes in a variety of inflammatory cytokines and antibodies that cross the placenta and affect the fetal brain. Among the drugs are valproic acid, thalidomide, misoprostol, and possibly SSRIs. β2-adrenergic receptor agonists and paracetamol have also lately been associated with increased rate of ASD but the data is too preliminary and inconclusive. Associations were also described with ethanol, cocaine, and possibly heavy metals, heavy smoking, and folic acid deficiency. Recent studies show that heavy exposure to pesticides and air pollution, especially particulate matter < 2.5 and 10 μm in diameter (PM2.5 and PM10) during pregnancy is also associated with ASD. Finally, we have to remember that many of the associations mentioned in this review are

  17. The Genetic Intersection of Neurodevelopmental Disorders and Shared Medical Comorbidities – Relations that Translate from Bench to Bedside

    PubMed Central

    Plummer, Jasmine T.; Gordon, Alexis J.; Levitt, Pat

    2016-01-01

    Most psychiatric disorders are considered neurodevelopmental, and the associated genes often are expressed in tissues outside of the brain. This suggests a biological relatedness with medical co-occurrences that could have broad clinical implications for diagnosis and patient management over a lifetime. A qualitative integration of public data from genetic consortia of psychiatric disorders and medical comorbidities explores the question of whether genetically associated psychiatric illnesses present with co-occurring disturbances can be used to define specific mental–physical health relations. Novel patterns of gene-disorder relations appear with approximately one-third of conservatively defined, consortia-generated candidate risk genes with multiple psychiatric diagnoses. Moreover, nearly as many genes overlap with non-psychiatric phenotypes, including cardiovascular, renal, respiratory, and metabolic disturbances. While the landscape of genetic risk will change as study populations are expanded and biological confirmations accrue, the current relationships suggest that a mostly siloed perspective of gene relatedness to one categorical psychiatric diagnosis is not clinically useful. The future holds the promise that once candidates are fully validated, genome screening and mutation identification will bring more precision for predicting the risk for complex health conditions. Our view is that as genetic data are refined, continuing to decipher a shared pattern of genetic risk for brain and peripheral organ pathophysiology is not simply an academic exercise. Rather, determining relatedness will impact predictions of multifaceted health risks, patient treatment, and management.

  18. The Genetic Intersection of Neurodevelopmental Disorders and Shared Medical Comorbidities – Relations that Translate from Bench to Bedside

    PubMed Central

    Plummer, Jasmine T.; Gordon, Alexis J.; Levitt, Pat

    2016-01-01

    Most psychiatric disorders are considered neurodevelopmental, and the associated genes often are expressed in tissues outside of the brain. This suggests a biological relatedness with medical co-occurrences that could have broad clinical implications for diagnosis and patient management over a lifetime. A qualitative integration of public data from genetic consortia of psychiatric disorders and medical comorbidities explores the question of whether genetically associated psychiatric illnesses present with co-occurring disturbances can be used to define specific mental–physical health relations. Novel patterns of gene-disorder relations appear with approximately one-third of conservatively defined, consortia-generated candidate risk genes with multiple psychiatric diagnoses. Moreover, nearly as many genes overlap with non-psychiatric phenotypes, including cardiovascular, renal, respiratory, and metabolic disturbances. While the landscape of genetic risk will change as study populations are expanded and biological confirmations accrue, the current relationships suggest that a mostly siloed perspective of gene relatedness to one categorical psychiatric diagnosis is not clinically useful. The future holds the promise that once candidates are fully validated, genome screening and mutation identification will bring more precision for predicting the risk for complex health conditions. Our view is that as genetic data are refined, continuing to decipher a shared pattern of genetic risk for brain and peripheral organ pathophysiology is not simply an academic exercise. Rather, determining relatedness will impact predictions of multifaceted health risks, patient treatment, and management. PMID:27597832

  19. The Genetic Intersection of Neurodevelopmental Disorders and Shared Medical Comorbidities - Relations that Translate from Bench to Bedside.

    PubMed

    Plummer, Jasmine T; Gordon, Alexis J; Levitt, Pat

    2016-01-01

    Most psychiatric disorders are considered neurodevelopmental, and the associated genes often are expressed in tissues outside of the brain. This suggests a biological relatedness with medical co-occurrences that could have broad clinical implications for diagnosis and patient management over a lifetime. A qualitative integration of public data from genetic consortia of psychiatric disorders and medical comorbidities explores the question of whether genetically associated psychiatric illnesses present with co-occurring disturbances can be used to define specific mental-physical health relations. Novel patterns of gene-disorder relations appear with approximately one-third of conservatively defined, consortia-generated candidate risk genes with multiple psychiatric diagnoses. Moreover, nearly as many genes overlap with non-psychiatric phenotypes, including cardiovascular, renal, respiratory, and metabolic disturbances. While the landscape of genetic risk will change as study populations are expanded and biological confirmations accrue, the current relationships suggest that a mostly siloed perspective of gene relatedness to one categorical psychiatric diagnosis is not clinically useful. The future holds the promise that once candidates are fully validated, genome screening and mutation identification will bring more precision for predicting the risk for complex health conditions. Our view is that as genetic data are refined, continuing to decipher a shared pattern of genetic risk for brain and peripheral organ pathophysiology is not simply an academic exercise. Rather, determining relatedness will impact predictions of multifaceted health risks, patient treatment, and management. PMID:27597832

  20. Can the classification of personality disorders be based on behavior genetics? A comment on South and DeYoung (2013).

    PubMed

    Skodol, Andrew E; Krueger, Robert F

    2013-07-01

    Comments on the article by S. C. South and N. J. DeYoung (see record 2012-01744-001). This commentary examines how behavior genetic research can be used to inform the revision of personality disorders (PDs) during the transition from DSM-IV to DSM-5. Although supportive of the proposal put forth by the work group that extreme personality traits need to be distinguished from personality disorder by the presence of disorganization in personality structure and function, South and DeYoung note the absence of behavior genetics data on the levels of personality functioning and the new general criteria for personality disorder that incorporate impairment in personality functioning as the "A criterion." They also note, however, that literature supporting this type of definition with its focus on aspects of self-concept and interpersonal relations is rapidly growing.

  1. Diagnosis of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder and Its Behavioral, Neurological, and Genetic Roots

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mueller, Kathryn L.; Tomblin, J. Bruce

    2012-01-01

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a common developmental disorder often associated with other developmental disorders including speech, language, and reading disorders. Here, we review the principal features of ADHD and current diagnostic standards for the disorder. We outline the ADHD subtypes, which are based upon the dimensions…

  2. Prenatal testing: A method for early detection of genetic disorders among fetuses in Thailand, a data between the year 1990 and 2010

    PubMed Central

    Wiwanitkit, Viroj

    2012-01-01

    Prenatal screening is an effective way to prevent genetic disease in pediatric populations. The prenatal amniocentesis and chromosome study is a widely used screening test. Here, the author reports the data on this screening from Thailand as a national reference. The rate of detected disorders is equal to 3.88 percent and the most common disorder is Down syndrome. It can be seen that the implementation of screening can help successfully prevent a number of genetic disorders in Thai pediatric population.

  3. The role of genetic factors and pre- and perinatal influences in the etiology of autism spectrum disorders - indications for genetic referral.

    PubMed

    Rybakowski, Filip; Chojnicka, Izabela; Dziechciarz, Piotr; Horvath, Andrea; Janas-Kozik, Małgorzata; Jeziorek, Anetta; Pisula, Ewa; Piwowarczyk, Anna; Słopień, Agnieszka; Sykut-Cegielska, Joanna; Szajewska, Hanna; Szczałuba, Krzysztof; Szymańska, Krystyna; Waligórska, Anna; Wojciechowska, Aneta; Wroniszewski, Michał; Dunajska, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are caused by disruptions in early stages of central nervous system development and are usually diagnosed in first years of life. Despite common features such as impairment of socio-communicative development and stereotypical behaviours, ASD are characterised by heterogeneous course and clinical picture. The most important aetiological factors comprise genetic and environmental influences acting at prenatal, perinatal and neonatal period. The role of rare variants with large effect i.e. copy number variants in genes regulating synapse formation and intrasynaptic connections is emphasised. Common variants with small effect may also be involved, i.e. polymorphisms in genes encoding prosocial peptides system - oxytocin and vasopressin. The environmental factors may include harmful effects acting during pregnancy and labour, however their specificity until now is not confirmed, and in some of them a primary genetic origin cannot be excluded. In several instances, especially with comorbid disorders - intellectual disability, epilepsy and dysmorphias - a detailed molecular diagnostics is warranted, which currently may elucidate the genetic background of disorder in about 20% of cases. PMID:27556113

  4. Social engagement with parents in 11-month-old siblings at high and low genetic risk for autism spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Susan B; Leezenbaum, Nina B; Mahoney, Amanda S; Day, Taylor N; Schmidt, Emily N

    2015-11-01

    Infant siblings of children with an autism spectrum disorder are at heightened genetic risk to develop autism spectrum disorder. We observed high risk (n = 35) and low risk (n = 27) infants at 11 months during free play with a parent. Children were assessed for autism spectrum disorder in toddlerhood. High-risk infants with a later diagnosis (n = 10) were less socially engaged with their parents than were low-risk infants. Parent behavior during play did not vary by group. Within the high-risk group, ratings of social reciprocity at 11 months predicted Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule severity scores at follow-up, suggesting that systematic observations of parent-infant play may be a useful addition to early assessments of emerging autism spectrum disorder.

  5. Mitochondrial genetic variants identified to be associated with posttraumatic stress disorder

    PubMed Central

    Flaquer, A; Baumbach, C; Ladwig, K-H; Kriebel, J; Waldenberger, M; Grallert, H; Baumert, J; Meitinger, T; Kruse, J; Peters, A; Emeny, R; Strauch, K

    2015-01-01

    Despite the fact that mitochondrial dysfunctions are increasingly recognized as key components in stress-related mental disorders, very little is known about the association between posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and mitochondrial variants. To identify susceptibility mitochondrial genes for PTSD, we analyzed a total number of 978 mitochondrial single-nucleotide polymorphisms (mtSNPs) in a sample of 1238 individuals participating in the KORA (Cooperative Health Research in the Region of Augsburg) study. Participants were classified with ‘no PTSD', ‘partial PTSD' or ‘full PTSD' by applying the Posttraumatic Diagnostic Scale and the Impact of Event Scale. To assess PTSD–mtSNP association while taking heteroplasmy into account, we used the raw signal intensity values measured on the microarray and applied linear regression. Significant associations were obtained between full versus no PTSD and two mtSNPs; mt8414C→T (β=−0.954±0.06, Padjusted=0.037) located in adenosine triphosphate (ATP) synthase subunit 8 (MT-ATP8) and mt12501G→A (β=−1.782±0.40, Padjusted=0.015) located in the NADH dehydrogenase subunits 5 (MT-ND5). Heteroplasmy for the two variants towards a larger number of the respective minor alleles increases the risk of having PTSD. NADH dehydrogenase and ATP synthase are both linked to the regulation of reactive oxygen species. Our results highlight the important role of the mitochondrial genome among the factors that contribute to the risk of PTSD. Mitochondrial genetic variants may be more important than has previously been assumed, leading to further insights regarding effects of existing medications, or even to the development of innovative treatments. As this is the first mitochondrial genome-wide association study for PTSDs, further analyses are needed to follow up on the present findings. PMID:25756807

  6. Genetic Background, Adipocytokines, and Metabolic Disorders in Postmenopausal Overweight and Obese Women.

    PubMed

    Grygiel-Górniak, Bogna; Kaczmarek, Elżbieta; Mosor, Maria; Przysławski, Juliusz; Bogacz, Anna

    2016-10-01

    The relationship between the genetic background, adipocytokines, and metabolic state in postmenopausal women has not yet been fully described. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between PPAR gamma-2 (Pro12Ala, C1431T) and ADRB3 (Trp64Arg) polymorphisms and serum adipocytokines (adiponectin, visfatin, and resistin) and metabolic disorders in 176 postmenopausal women with increased body mass (BMI ≥ 25 kg m(-2)). The distributions of selected alleles and genotype frequencies were determined with the PCR-RFLP method. The bioimpedance method was used to determine nutritional status, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays were applied to determine serum concentrations of adipocytokines. Viscerally obese postmenopausal women had higher body mass, body fat content, serum glucose, insulin, total cholesterol, LDL, triglycerides, uric acid, and HOMA-IR and a higher prevalence of the Ala12 allele. In models based on cytokine concentration, higher body mass and glucose concentration (visfatin model, p = 0.008) and higher insulin and triglyceride levels (resistin model, p = 0.002) were observed in visceral fat deposition and this was potentiated by the presence of the T1431 allele. In resistin models, co-existence of Ala12/X polymorphisms with the T1431 allele was associated with higher resistin and triglyceride concentrations (p = 0.045). In postmenopausal women, metabolic parameters are mainly determined by the distribution of body fat, but Ala12/X polymorphism may increase the metabolic disorders and this effect can be enhanced by the T1431 allele. PMID:27246401

  7. Oxytocin and Vasopressin Are Dysregulated in Williams Syndrome, a Genetic Disorder Affecting Social Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Li; Carter, C. Sue; Ying, Jian; Bellugi, Ursula; Pournajafi-Nazarloo, Hossein; Korenberg, Julie R.

    2012-01-01

    The molecular and neural mechanisms regulating human social-emotional behaviors are fundamentally important but largely unknown; unraveling these requires a genetic systems neuroscience analysis of human models. Williams Syndrome (WS), a condition caused by deletion of ∼28 genes, is associated with a gregarious personality, strong drive to approach strangers, difficult peer interactions, and attraction to music. WS provides a unique opportunity to identify endogenous human gene-behavior mechanisms. Social neuropeptides including oxytocin (OT) and arginine vasopressin (AVP) regulate reproductive and social behaviors in mammals, and we reasoned that these might mediate the features of WS. Here we established blood levels of OT and AVP in WS and controls at baseline, and at multiple timepoints following a positive emotional intervention (music), and a negative physical stressor (cold). We also related these levels to standardized indices of social behavior. Results revealed significantly higher median levels of OT in WS versus controls at baseline, with a less marked increase in AVP. Further, in WS, OT and AVP increased in response to music and to cold, with greater variability and an amplified peak release compared to controls. In WS, baseline OT but not AVP, was correlated positively with approach, but negatively with adaptive social behaviors. These results indicate that WS deleted genes perturb hypothalamic-pituitary release not only of OT but also of AVP, implicating more complex neuropeptide circuitry for WS features and providing evidence for their roles in endogenous regulation of human social behavior. The data suggest a possible biological basis for amygdalar involvement, for increased anxiety, and for the paradox of increased approach but poor social relationships in WS. They also offer insight for translating genetic and neuroendocrine knowledge into treatments for disorders of social behavior. PMID:22719898

  8. Impaired activity-dependent neural circuit assembly and refinement in autism spectrum disorder genetic models

    PubMed Central

    Doll, Caleb A.; Broadie, Kendal

    2014-01-01

    Early-use activity during circuit-specific critical periods refines brain circuitry by the coupled processes of eliminating inappropriate synapses and strengthening maintained synapses. We theorize these activity-dependent (A-D) developmental processes are specifically impaired in autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). ASD genetic models in both mouse and Drosophila have pioneered our insights into normal A-D neural circuit assembly and consolidation, and how these developmental mechanisms go awry in specific genetic conditions. The monogenic fragile X syndrome (FXS), a common cause of heritable ASD and intellectual disability, has been particularly well linked to defects in A-D critical period processes. The fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) is positively activity-regulated in expression and function, in turn regulates excitability and activity in a negative feedback loop, and appears to be required for the A-D remodeling of synaptic connectivity during early-use critical periods. The Drosophila FXS model has been shown to functionally conserve the roles of human FMRP in synaptogenesis, and has been centrally important in generating our current mechanistic understanding of the FXS disease state. Recent advances in Drosophila optogenetics, transgenic calcium reporters, highly-targeted transgenic drivers for individually-identified neurons, and a vastly improved connectome of the brain are now being combined to provide unparalleled opportunities to both manipulate and monitor A-D processes during critical period brain development in defined neural circuits. The field is now poised to exploit this new Drosophila transgenic toolbox for the systematic dissection of A-D mechanisms in normal versus ASD brain development, particularly utilizing the well-established Drosophila FXS disease model. PMID:24570656

  9. ABCA3, a key player in neonatal respiratory transition and genetic disorders of the surfactant system.

    PubMed

    Peca, Donatella; Cutrera, Renato; Masotti, Andrea; Boldrini, Renata; Danhaive, Olivier

    2015-10-01

    Genetic disorders of the surfactant system are rare diseases with a broad range of clinical manifestations, from fatal respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) in neonates to chronic interstitial lung disease (ILD) in children and adults. ABCA3 [ATP-binding cassette (ABC), subfamily A, member 3] is a lung-specific phospholipid transporter critical for intracellular surfactant synthesis and storage in lamellar bodies (LBs). Its expression is developmentally regulated, peaking prior to birth under the influence of steroids and transcription factors. Bi-allelic mutations of the ABCA3 gene represent the most frequent cause of congenital surfactant deficiency, indicating its critical role in lung function. Mutations affect surfactant lipid and protein processing and LBs' morphology, leading to partial or total surfactant deficiency. Approximately 200 mutations have been reported, most of which are unique to individuals and families, which makes diagnosis and prognosis challenging. Various types of mutations, affecting different domains of the protein, account in part for phenotype diversity. Disease-causing mutations have been reported in most coding and some non-coding regions of the gene, but tend to cluster in the first extracellular loop and the second nucleotide-binding domain (NBD), leading to defective glycosylation and trafficking defects and interfering with ATP binding and hydrolysis respectively. Mono-allelic damaging and benign variants are often subclinical but may act as disease modifiers in lung diseases such as RDS of prematurity or associate with mutations in other surfactant-related genes. Diagnosis is complex but essential and should combine pathology and ultrastructure studies on lung biopsy with broad-spectrum genetic testing of surfactant-related genes, made possible by recent technology advances in the massive parallel sequencing technology.

  10. Cerebellar Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... balance. Problems with the cerebellum include Cancer Genetic disorders Ataxias - failure of muscle control in the arms and legs that result in movement disorders Degeneration - disorders caused by brain cells decreasing in ...

  11. Dubowitz syndrome is a complex comprised of multiple, genetically distinct and phenotypically overlapping disorders.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Douglas R; Pemov, Alexander; Johnston, Jennifer J; Sapp, Julie C; Yeager, Meredith; He, Ji; Boland, Joseph F; Burdett, Laurie; Brown, Christina; Gatti, Richard A; Alter, Blanche P; Biesecker, Leslie G; Savage, Sharon A

    2014-01-01

    Dubowitz syndrome is a rare disorder characterized by multiple congenital anomalies, cognitive delay, growth failure, an immune defect, and an increased risk of blood dyscrasia and malignancy. There is considerable phenotypic variability, suggesting genetic heterogeneity. We clinically characterized and performed exome sequencing and high-density array SNP genotyping on three individuals with Dubowitz syndrome, including a pair of previously-described siblings (Patients 1 and 2, brother and sister) and an unpublished patient (Patient 3). Given the siblings' history of bone marrow abnormalities, we also evaluated telomere length and performed radiosensitivity assays. In the siblings, exome sequencing identified compound heterozygosity for a known rare nonsense substitution in the nuclear ligase gene LIG4 (rs104894419, NM_002312.3:c.2440C>T) that predicts p.Arg814X (MAF:0.0002) and an NM_002312.3:c.613delT variant that predicts a p.Ser205Leufs*29 frameshift. The frameshift mutation has not been reported in 1000 Genomes, ESP, or ClinSeq. These LIG4 mutations were previously reported in the sibling sister; her brother had not been previously tested. Western blotting showed an absence of a ligase IV band in both siblings. In the third patient, array SNP genotyping revealed a de novo ∼ 3.89 Mb interstitial deletion at chromosome 17q24.2 (chr 17:62,068,463-65,963,102, hg18), which spanned the known Carney complex gene PRKAR1A. In all three patients, a median lymphocyte telomere length of ≤ 1st centile was observed and radiosensitivity assays showed increased sensitivity to ionizing radiation. Our work suggests that, in addition to dyskeratosis congenita, LIG4 and 17q24.2 syndromes also feature shortened telomeres; to confirm this, telomere length testing should be considered in both disorders. Taken together, our work and other reports on Dubowitz syndrome, as currently recognized, suggest that it is not a unitary entity but instead a collection of phenotypically

  12. Dubowitz Syndrome Is a Complex Comprised of Multiple, Genetically Distinct and Phenotypically Overlapping Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Douglas R.; Pemov, Alexander; Johnston, Jennifer J.; Sapp, Julie C.; Yeager, Meredith; He, Ji; Boland, Joseph F.; Burdett, Laurie; Brown, Christina; Gatti, Richard A.; Alter, Blanche P.; Biesecker, Leslie G.; Savage, Sharon A.

    2014-01-01

    Dubowitz syndrome is a rare disorder characterized by multiple congenital anomalies, cognitive delay, growth failure, an immune defect, and an increased risk of blood dyscrasia and malignancy. There is considerable phenotypic variability, suggesting genetic heterogeneity. We clinically characterized and performed exome sequencing and high-density array SNP genotyping on three individuals with Dubowitz syndrome, including a pair of previously-described siblings (Patients 1 and 2, brother and sister) and an unpublished patient (Patient 3). Given the siblings' history of bone marrow abnormalities, we also evaluated telomere length and performed radiosensitivity assays. In the siblings, exome sequencing identified compound heterozygosity for a known rare nonsense substitution in the nuclear ligase gene LIG4 (rs104894419, NM_002312.3:c.2440C>T) that predicts p.Arg814X (MAF:0.0002) and an NM_002312.3:c.613delT variant that predicts a p.Ser205Leufs*29 frameshift. The frameshift mutation has not been reported in 1000 Genomes, ESP, or ClinSeq. These LIG4 mutations were previously reported in the sibling sister; her brother had not been previously tested. Wester